Administrative Reports - 1929



ADMINISTRATIVE REPORTS FOR THE YEAR 1929

Table of Contents

0 History and Geography

1 General

2 Finance

3 Production

4 Trade and Economics

5 Communications

6 Justice, Police and Prisons

7 Public Works

8 Public Health

9 Education

10 Lands and Surveys

11 Labour

12 Legislation

13 Miscellaneous

A Financial Returns

A(1) Finances

A(2) Audit office

B Assessment

C Secretariat for Chinese affairs

D Harbour office

E Imports and Exports office

F Royal Observatory

G Supreme Court

G(1) Registrar of Trade Marks

H Police Magistrates' Courts

I Land office

J New Territories

K Police and Fire Brigade

L Prisons

M Medical and Sanitary

M(1) Sanitary

N Botanical and forestry

O Education

P Volunteer Corps (Not Published)

Q Public Works

R Post office

S Railway

 








CONTENTS.

HISTORY AND GEOGRAPHY

1. GENERAL

II. FINANCE

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III. PRODUCTION

IV. TRADE AND ECONOMICS

V. COMMUNICATIONS

VI. JUSTICE, POLICE AND PRISONS

VII. PUBLIC WORKS

VIII. PUBLIC HEALTH

IX. EDUCATION

X. LANDS AND SURVEY

XI. LABOUR

XII. LEGISLATION

XIII. MISCELLANEOUS

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History and Geography.

The Colony of Hong Kong is situated off the south-eastern coast of China between latitude 22° 9′ and 22° 17′ N. and longitude 114° 5′ and 114° 18′ E. The island is about 11 miles long and 2 to 5 miles in breadth, its circumference being about 27 miles and its area 283 square miles. It consists of an irregular ridge of lofty hills rising to a height of nearly 2,000 feet above sea level, stretching nearly east and west, with few valleys of any extent and little ground available for cultivation.

The island, then desolate and sparsely inhabited by fishermen, was ceded to Great Britain in January, 1841, the cession being confirmed by the Treaty of Nanking in August, 1842, and the charter bears the date of 5th April, 1843. All that part of Kowloon penin- sula lying South of Kowloon Fort to the northernmost point of Stonecutter's Island together with that island was ceded to Great Britain under the Convention signed at Peking in October, 1860, and under the Convention signed at Peking in June, 1898, the area

known as the New Territories including Mirs Bay and Deep Bay was leased to Great Britain by the Government of China for 99 years. The area of the New Territories and Islands is about 345 square miles.

Trade gradually developed as China became accustomed to foreign intercourse and it increased greatly owing to the opening of the Suez Canal. It now stands at about 200 million pounds sterling per annum.

Large local banking, dock, steamboat, and insurance companies were established between 1865 and 1872, and their numbers are being continually added to.

The Colony is the centre of an incessant flow of Chinese emigra- tion and immigration (see XIII Miscellaneous).

در

The Rainfall for 1928 was 71.15 inches and for 1929 it was 69.82 inches, against an average of 85.73 inches for the past 45 years. A serious shortage of rain from the end of February to the middle of June caused a water famine. Disaster was averted by a rainfall of 3.8 inches between June 14th and 25th, followed by frequent heavy rain in July to the extent of 22.7 inches, and in August to the extent of 20 inches.

In 1929 the mean temperature of the air was 72°.6 as against 72°.4 in 1928 and 71°.8 for the past 45 years.

The typhoon season may be said to last from June to October, though typhoons occasionally occur before and after this period. On August 22nd, 1929, a severe typhoon passed between Hong Kong and Gap Rock, on a WNW track, gausing a violent gale at Hong Kong, the maximum gust velocity being at the rate of 117 m.p.h. from E. b. S. 1.39 p.m.

The currency of Hong Kong consists of the following coins (vide Order in Council, 2nd February, 1895):-

1. The silver dollar of Mexico.

2. British dollar.

3. The Hong Kong dollar, half-dollar, and 20 cent, 10 cent, and 5 cent pieces, issued from the Hong Kong Mint. (1866-68).

4. Half-dollars, 20, 10, and 5 cent pieces, imported from England, and coined at the Royal Mint and Birmingham

Mint.

5. Copper coins representing one-hundredth part of the dollar (called one cent), and one-thousandth part of the dollar (mil or cash), imported from England.

Local weights and measures are the following:

1 tael=13 0%.;

1 picul=1333rd lbs. (avoirdupois)

7 catties-1 imperial gallon;

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I.-General.

At the close of the year 1928 the accounts of the Colony showed a surplus balance of $8,091,634, and the balance at the end of 1929 was, subject to the final examination of the Crown Agents Accounts estimated to be $9,577,038. Thus, in spite of continued trade de- pression, the general position of the Colony remains sound, but increasing expenditure on normal recurrent charges and demands for new public works are more than overtaking the normal growth of revenue so that fresh sources will have to be explored in search of increased income.

On January 2nd, Marshal Li Chai Sum left Canton for Nanking to take part in the Disarmament Conference. He returned a month later and spent the month of February in an endeavour to reorganize the military establishments of Kwangtung and Kwangsi in conformity with the decisions reached. On March 5th he again left to attend the assembly of the National Party at Nanking. General Chan Ming Shü Chairman of the Kwangtung Provincial Government was follow- ing him a few days later but while in Hong Kong he sustained serious injuries in escaping from the fire which destroyed the King Edward Hotel necessitating his removal to hospital.

Meanwhile the friction which had been growing between the Central Government and the Kwangsi group since the expulsion of Lo Tik Ping from Hunan in February, developed into open warfare and Marshal Li Chai Sum was arrested and detained in Nanking on March 20th on a charge of complicity in the rebellion. His followers in Canton at once prepared to take the field but on March 30th they were expelled and Canton took the side of the Central Government under the leadership of Generals Chang Ming Shü and Chan Tsai Tong and Admiral Chan Chak.

Hostilities then broke out between Kwangtung and Kwangsi. A mutiny of the Cantonese Navy and an attempt to seize Canton by a coup de main on May 7th were frustrated by the use of aeroplanes and subsequently, after severe fighting which continued from May 10th to May 19th, a determined attack by the Kwangsi forces was completely defeated. By the end of June with the help of reinforcements from Nanking the province of Kwangsi was brought under the control of the Central Government. The rebellion of Cheung Fat Fui in September was the signal for a renewed rising in Kwangsi which culminated in a combined attack on Canton in the months of November and December. By December 18th the Cantonese armies had succeeded once more in routing their adversaries and the end of the year saw them in occupation of Wuchow preparing again for the invasion of Kwangsi.

Mr. Chu Chao Hsin resigned his post as Commissioner of Foreign Affairs at the end of May and was succeeded by Mr. Yee Shing L. C. Tao who held this office until the end of the year.

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The office of Chairman of the Provincial Government was held throughout the year by General Chan Ming Shü.

The year showed a gratifying decrease in the number of piracies, the record though was somewhat marred by the piracy of the "Hai- ching" in December. The attack was however frustrated by the gallant efforts of the ship's officers and the co-operation of His Majesty's Navy.

The list of piracies which took place in 1929 is as follows:-

Date 18th Date

Piracy of fishing junk off Cheung Chau Island.

August, 1929. Piracy of the S.S. "Haiching".

8th December, 1929.

The year was rendered memorable by a slight change in the Constitution resulting in an increase in the numbers of the Legislative Council of the Colony. His Excellency the Governor on his return in January was able to announce the appointment of four additional members to the Council, two official and two unofficial. These seats were taken by the Harbour Master and the Director of Medical and Sanitary Services, and by two unofficial members, the Honourable Mr. J. P. Braga, and the Honourable Dr. S. W. Ts'o, O.B.E., LL.D., who made the third Chinese representative.

His Royal Highness the Duke of Gloucester, K.G., G.C.V.O., who had been entrusted with the mission to present the Order of the Garter to His Imperial Majesty the Emperor of Japan, passed through. the Colony in April, arriving on the 25th, and leaving on the after- noon of the 27th in H.M.S. "Suffolk." Special arrangements were made for his reception and entertainment by the European and Chinese Communities, including the presentation of addresses on arrival at the City Hall, a dinner given by the General Chamber of Commerce, and a luncheon given by the Chinese Community. A reception and Garden Party on the Hong Kong Cricket Club ground took place on the afternoon of the 26th April. The Colony greatly enjoyed the honour of His Royal Highness' visit and all classes availed themselves of the opportunity of giving concrete evidence of their loyalty to the throne.

The honours conferred on residents of Hong Kong by His Majesty the King included the appointments of the following:-

Mr. Li Yau-tsun

Lieutenant Colonel L. G.

..C.B.E.

Bird, D.S.O..........O.B.E. (Military Division)

Mr. Cheng Cheuk-hin ....I.S.O.

Mr. P. Julyan

.I.S.O.

The Colony experienced a serious water shortage in the first half of the year which lasted until July 13th when a heavy fall of rain helped to remove further anxiety. The drought had lasted since the

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previous September, the year 1928 having a rainfall of only 71.16 inches as compared with 107.87 in 1927 and an average annual rain- fall of 85.73. Pactically no rain had fallen since August 1928 and the position became increasingly serious until on July 11th only 41,000,000 gallons remained in the island reservoirs. It is calculated that under normal conditions the average daily consumption in the Island is 12,000,000 gallons, but restrictions on the supply had been gradually imposed with increasing severity so that by the end of the drought the actual consumption from the reservoirs had been reduced to 3,000,000 gallons a day. These restrictions were more acutely felt by the inhabitants of the more densely populated lower levels. Conditions in Kowloon were also serious, but of shorter duration, and on June 8th the total storage in the mainland was only 76 Mill. Gall. In order to alleviate their sufferings as far as possible a Water Emergency Committee was appointed at the beginning of June, to assist the Government in devising and carrying out schemes for augmenting the reservoir supplies.

To this end water was brought from out-ports in ships and from the Canton River in a specially chartered Tanker and H.M.S. "Cherub"; in addition various small streams in the New Territories were tapped and their yield brought in by lighters and water boats. These supplies were placed in large tanks situated along the water- front from which the population of the lower levels, mainly Chinese, were permitted to draw. A special Water Shipping Committee was in charge of the transport of such supplies and had evolved schemes for further augmentation when the long expected rainfall in July removed the necessity for these emergency measures.

The unprecedented drought had, however, the effect of emphasis- ing the urgency of increasing the normal supply, and the prepara- tions already begun for the cross-harbour pipe line were hurried on with the utmost speed and it was anticipated that by April 1930, the Island would be in a position to draw extra supplies, if required, from the mainland reservoirs. The construction of the new Aberdeen reservoir was also expedited.

One of the most serious fires recorded in the history of the Colony occurred on March 11th when the King Edward Hotel was almost completely destroyed by fire. The disaster was the more serious owing to the loss of life. Altogether ten persons were killed, including six Europeans, and five persons were injured. Amongst the latter were General Chan Ming Shü, Chairman of the Kwangtung Provincial Government, and his wife who were in the Colony on a short stay on their way to Nanking.

His Excellency the Governor Sir Cecil Clementi, K.C.M.G., was absent from the Colony on short leave in the Philippine Islands from October 1st until October 28th. During his absence the Honourable Mr. W. T. Southorn, C.M.G., acted as Officer Administering the Government. The Honourable Mr. W. T. Southorn, Colonial Secretary, was absent on short leave from the 29th May to June 22nd, 1929.

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On the 21st November it was announced that His Majesty had been pleased to approve the appointment of His Excellency Sir Cecil Clementi, K.C.M.G., as Governor of the Straits Settlements and High Commissioner of the Federated Malay States.

His Excellency Major-General C. C. Luard, C.B., C.M.G., General Officer Commanding the South China Command, left the Colony on the 7th March, 1929, on completion of his term of duty and was succeeded by His Excellency Major-General J. W. Sandi- lands, C.B., C.M.G., D.S.O., whose command was enlarged to include all the military forces in China.

Admiral Sir R. Y. Tyrwhitt, G.C.B., D.S.O., Commander-in- Chief of the China Station was succeeded by Vice-Admiral Sir A. K. Waistell, K.C.B., who hoisted his flag on February 1st, 1929.

II.-Finance.

The total revenue of the year amounted to $23,554,475.16 which sum exceeded the Estimate by $1,275,875.16 but fell short of the revenue for 1928 by $1,413,924.

It should be noted however, that included in the revenue for 1928 was a sum of $1,963,359 which was recovered from the funds of the Public Works Loan (1927) on account of expenditure on Loan Works during the years 1923-1926.

There were increases under all heads with the exception of Licences and Internal Revenue and Fees of Court etc., which showed decreases of $498,585 and $65,595 respectively. The most notable feature was the increase in Land Sales of $936,171 and another large increase of $458,477 was shown under Miscellaneous Receipts, mainly due to exchange.

A considerable increase in Radio and Postal Traffic was reflected in the Post Office Revenue which exceeded the Estimate by $73,665 while improved conditions enabling the Kowloon-Canton Railway through service to Canton to be maintained resulted in an increase of $82,445 in the Railway revenue.

The expenditure for the year amounted to $21,983,257`which was $2,816,393 less than the estimate and $753,015 more than the expenditure in 1928.

Substantial savings were effected in the votes of the Public Works Recurrent and P. W. Extraordinary and the Kowloon-Canton Railway and to a smaller extent in many other departments.

The serious shortage of water during part of the year involved the Colony in an expenditure of $357,993 in emergency measures,

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On the 21st November it was announced that His Majesty had been pleased to approve the appointment of His Excellency Sir Cecil Clementi, K.C.M.G., as Governor of the Straits Settlements and High Commissioner of the Federated Malay States.

His Excellency Major-General C. C. Luard, C.B., C.M.G., General Officer Commanding the South China Command, left the Colony on the 7th March, 1929, on completion of his term of duty and was succeeded by His Excellency Major-General J. W. Sandi- lands, C.B., C.M.G., D.S.O., whose command was enlarged to include all the military forces in China.

Admiral Sir R. Y. Tyrwhitt, G.C.B., D.S.O., Commander-in- Chief of the China Station was succeeded by Vice-Admiral Sir A. K. Waistell, K.C.B., who hoisted his flag on February 1st, 1929.

II.-Finance.

The total revenue of the year amounted to $23,554,475.16 which sum exceeded the Estimate by $1,275,875.16 but fell short of the revenue for 1928 by $1,413,924.

It should be noted however, that included in the revenue for 1928 was a sum of $1,963,359 which was recovered from the funds of the Public Works Loan (1927) on account of expenditure on Loan Works during the years 1923-1926.

There were increases under all heads with the exception of Licences and Internal Revenue and Fees of Court etc., which showed decreases of $498,585 and $65,595 respectively. The most notable feature was the increase in Land Sales of $936,171 and another large increase of $458,477 was shown under Miscellaneous Receipts, mainly due to exchange.

A considerable increase in Radio and Postal Traffic was reflected in the Post Office Revenue which exceeded the Estimate by $73,665 while improved conditions enabling the Kowloon-Canton Railway through service to Canton to be maintained resulted in an increase of $82,445 in the Railway revenue.

The expenditure for the year amounted to $21,983,257`which was $2,816,393 less than the estimate and $753,015 more than the expenditure in 1928.

Substantial savings were effected in the votes of the Public Works Recurrent and P. W. Extraordinary and the Kowloon-Canton Railway and to a smaller extent in many other departments.

The serious shortage of water during part of the year involved the Colony in an expenditure of $357,993 in emergency measures,

The following is a statement of Revenue and Expenditure for

the last five years.

Year.

Revenue.

Expenditure.

1925

$23,244,365

$28,266,817

1926

21,131,582

23,524,716

1927

21,344,536

20,845,065

1928

24,968,399

21,220,242

1929

23,554,475

21,983,257

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Public Debt:-The amount of the Public Works Loan (1927) which is repayable in 1932. is $4,927,000. The Sinking Fund amounted to £51,320.

The Inscribed Stock Loans of 1893 and 1908 due for repayment in 1943 stood at £1,485,733 and Sinking Fund at £674,622.

Trade Loan-A further 29 loans amounting to $1,356,536.86 were redeemed during the year thus reducing the number of the loans outstanding on 31st December, 1929, to 60 representing a sum of $3,340,022.22.

III.-Production.

FORESTRY, AGRICULTURE & BOTANY.

Formation of Plantations.-Planting of Pinus Massoniana and other trees was carried on chiefly in the areas which have been definitely allocated as permanent forestry reserves. 61,000 more trees were planted than in the previous year.

Insect Pests.Pine Tree Caterpillars (Dendrolimus punctatus) made their appearance in very small numbers only, and the amount of damage done by them was negligible.

Protection of Plantations.-A large number of serious fires occurred in plantations, where not less than 10,000 mature Pine trees were destroyed. The major portion of the damage was done at the time of the Chung Yeung Festival, when the weather was exception- ally hot and dry.

Inspection of Nursery Stock.-Thirteen consignments, totalling 127,940 bulbs, of Narcissus Tazetta were inspected and certified as fit for export to Britain, United States of America and Hawaii.

One hundred and thirty-four consignments of dried vegetable products were inspected and certified as fit for export to the Philippine Islands.

Cultivation of Foreign Vegetables.-Increased interest is being shown by residents of the New Territories villages in the cultivation of this crop during the winter months; formerly the major portion of the Padi fields were kept empty for at least three months during the year.

Typhoon Damage.-Numerous large trees in the Botanical Gardens, streets and roads on the Island and in the New Territories were destroyed by the gale which passed close to the Colony on August 22nd.

FISHERIES.

A considerable proportion of the boat population of Hong Kong supports itself by deep-sea fishing, in which pursuit a large number of junks are engaged. The villages of Aberdeen, Stanley, Shaukiwan, and also many in the New Territories, are largely dependent upon. this industry for their prosperity. Fresh water fish is imported from Canton and the West River. There are oyster beds of consider- able value in Deep Bay.

MINING.

The mineral resources of the Colony are small and little mining was done in 1929.

MANUFACTURES.

Sugar.-Hong Kong sugars were more in demand during 1929 than in the previous year, but markets were difficult and results disappointing. The continuation of the anti-Japanese boycott in China induced cautious buying for the first half of the year, and later, on its removal, stocks of sugar at abnormally low prices were forced on the market. Political unrest in China considerably curtail- ed business throughout the year.

Hosiery. There are established in the Colony over a score of Chinese-owned factories for the knitting of cotton hosiery and singlets. The factories use, except for the higher grades, Japanese yarn and find an ever-increasing demand for their products in South Africa, the Persian Gulf, and in many parts of the near East, wherever there is a large native population. Business in hosiery manufactured at local knitting factories compares unfavourably with the volume in 1928. Low Japanese grades were less affected than manufactures of better class British yarns. Prospects appeared to be good during the early months of 1929, but an unexpected lack of enquiry set in about March, which left the trade considerably overstocked with both yarn and hosiery. The position at the end of the year showed signs of improvement, but was far from normal.

Ginger. A dozen ginger-preserving establishments deal with the raw product which is imported from South China and supplied principally to Great Britain, Holland, the U.S.A. and Australia,

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to the extent of about £300,000 annually. Owing to the drought in South China in the early part of 1929, the price of raw ginger was higher than for many years. The high cost affected the demand in the buying markets, and the year on the whole was an unsatisfactory one for local manufacturers and merchants dealing in the product.

Rope Making-The demand for Manila Cordage was not good during 1929, and the year's turnover showed a decrease on that of the previous year.

SHIPBUILDING.

Five coasting steamers, six passenger and cargo motor vessels, three other ocean going vessels, and fifteen smaller craft were built in local dockyards during 1929.

IV. Trade and Economics.

In anticipation of the increased Chinese Customs Import Duties as from 1st February, the year opened with greater activity in import trade and in the clearance of stocks in Hong Kong. China New Year having passed off more or less satisfactorily, internal strife in China and depreciation of Central Bank of China notes proved а serious deterrent to trade for several months. Accentuated depression of the market marked the second half of 1929, autumn trading being handicapped by the fact that heavy shipments of piece goods and other commodities prior to the increase in the Tariff had not moved into consumption. The premium on the local dollar (as a result of its temporary divorce from silver value) aggravated already unfavourable conditions. The adjustment of exchange in October led to considerable improvement in offtake of piecegoods, and to an increase of activity in regard to exports. The recrudescence of internecine strife in adjoining provinces of China in November and December, in conjunction with general political unrest in Nanking and the North, brought about a most depressed state of affairs for the remainder of the year as regards imports and clearances, and greatly restricted export business in view of the holding-up of supplies.

V.-Communications.

SHIPPING.

The total Shipping entering and clearing Ports in the Colony during the year 1929 amounted to 300,557 vessels of 47,186,181 tons which compared with the figures of 1928 shows an increase of 241 vessels and an increase of 2,302,416 tons.

Of the above, 52,574 vessels of 39,871,149 tons were engaged in Foreign Trade as compared with 52,278 vessels of 37,640,694 tons in 1928.

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to the extent of about £300,000 annually. Owing to the drought in South China in the early part of 1929, the price of raw ginger was higher than for many years. The high cost affected the demand in the buying markets, and the year on the whole was an unsatisfactory one for local manufacturers and merchants dealing in the product.

Rope Making-The demand for Manila Cordage was not good during 1929, and the year's turnover showed a decrease on that of the previous year.

SHIPBUILDING.

Five coasting steamers, six passenger and cargo motor vessels, three other ocean going vessels, and fifteen smaller craft were built in local dockyards during 1929.

IV. Trade and Economics.

In anticipation of the increased Chinese Customs Import Duties as from 1st February, the year opened with greater activity in import trade and in the clearance of stocks in Hong Kong. China New Year having passed off more or less satisfactorily, internal strife in China and depreciation of Central Bank of China notes proved а serious deterrent to trade for several months. Accentuated depression of the market marked the second half of 1929, autumn trading being handicapped by the fact that heavy shipments of piece goods and other commodities prior to the increase in the Tariff had not moved into consumption. The premium on the local dollar (as a result of its temporary divorce from silver value) aggravated already unfavourable conditions. The adjustment of exchange in October led to considerable improvement in offtake of piecegoods, and to an increase of activity in regard to exports. The recrudescence of internecine strife in adjoining provinces of China in November and December, in conjunction with general political unrest in Nanking and the North, brought about a most depressed state of affairs for the remainder of the year as regards imports and clearances, and greatly restricted export business in view of the holding-up of supplies.

V.-Communications.

SHIPPING.

The total Shipping entering and clearing Ports in the Colony during the year 1929 amounted to 300,557 vessels of 47,186,181 tons which compared with the figures of 1928 shows an increase of 241 vessels and an increase of 2,302,416 tons.

Of the above, 52,574 vessels of 39,871,149 tons were engaged in Foreign Trade as compared with 52,278 vessels of 37,640,694 tons in 1928.

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There was an increase in British Ocean-going shipping of 221 vessels of 358,451 tons.

Foreign Ocean-going vessels showed an increase of 439 vessels and an increase of 1,032,895 tons.

British River Steamers showed an increase of 857 vessels and an increase of 1,040,135 tons.

Foreign River Steamers showed an increase of 366 vessels and an increase of 18,761 tons.

In Steamships not exceeding 60 tons employed in Foreign Trade there was a decrease of 1,110 vessels with a decrease in tonnage of 29,976 tons.

Junks in Foreign trade showed a decrease of 477 vessels and a decrease of 189,811 tons.

In Local Trade (i.e. between places within the waters of the Colony) there was a decrease in Steam Launches of 1,099 Vessels and a decrease in Tonnage of 106,785.

Junks in Local Trade showed an increase of 1,044 Vessels and an increase of 178,746 tons.

Of vessels of European construction, 6,274 Ocean-going vessels, 4,532 River Steamers, and 3,688 Steamships not exceeding 60 tons entered during the year giving a daily average of 39.7 vessels as compared with 38.5 vessels in 1928 and 37.3 vessels in 1927.

HONG KONG SHIPPING STATISTICS.

Total Shipping Entered and Cleared.

Number & Tonnage of Vessels in Foreign Trade entered &

cleared.

Year

1918 1919 1920

1921

Total Percentage Number Tonnage of British Tonnage

43,436 16,955,332 41.7 41,985 21,072,129 43.0 43,364 24,194,022 43.8 52,222 27,852,616

British Total Tonnage Tonnage

7,072,021 29,518,189

9,095,805 35,615,169

11,608,069 40,122,527

44.3

12,766,492, 43,420,970

1922

50,427 29,543,564

45.4

13,420,118 46,566,764

1923

49.900 35,947,534

47.0

1924

57.765

38,770,499 47.3

16,920,491 53,402,239 18,369,413 56,731,077

1925

41,336

1926

30,231

1927

32,179,053 47.6 28,371,104 51.5 51,289 36,834,014 45.7

15,321,935 49,520,523

14,730,846 43,796,436

1928

1929

!

52,278 37,640,694 46.6 52,574 39,871,149 47.5

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16,960,522 (44,127,161 17,562,442 44,883,765 18,961,028 47,186,181

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A comparison between the years 1928 to 1929 is given in the following table:

1928.

1929.

Decrease.

Increase.

Class of Vessels

No. Tonnage. No. Tonnage.

No.

Tonnage. No. Tonnage.

British Ocean-|

going, Foreign Ocean

going,

British River

4,513 10.792,701 4,734 11,151,152

7,370 | 16,101,694|| 7,809 17,134,589

Steamers, 6,617

6,769,741 7,474 7,809,876

:

:

221

358,451

439 1,032,895

Foreign River

Steamers. 1,235 542,300 1,601

561,061

857 1,040,135

366

18,761

Steamships

under 60

tons For.

eign Trade... 8.514 241,043 7,434

211,067 1,110

29,976

Junks, Foreign

Trade,

23,999 3,193,245 23,522 3,003,404 477

189,811

Total, Foreign

Trade, |52,278 37,640,694 |52,574 39,871,149 1,587

219,787 1,883 | 2.450,242

Steam Laun-

ches, Local

Trade..... ||215,974 5,666,901 214,875 5,560,116 1,099

Junks. Local

Trade, |†32,064 †1,576,170 *33,108 *1,754,916

106,785

1,044 178,746

Grand Total.. 300,316 41,883,765 300,557 47,186,181

2,686

326,572 2,927 | 2,628,988

Net,

241

2,302,416

† Including 15,966 Conservancy and Dust Boats of 903,674 tons.

*

19

18,012

""

of 1,109,384

7.

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Of vessels of European construction 6,274 Ocean Steamers, 4,532 River Steamers and 3,688 Steamships not exceeding 60 Tons entered durinne year, giving a daily average of 39.7 ships. Thus:-

Steamers.

No. of times entered.

Total Tonnage.

Flag.

1928. 1929. 1928. 1929.

1928.

1929.

British,

371

395 5,562

6,100

Japanese, U.S.A.,

250

2631,016

263 1,016

1,074

1,074

8,786,202 9,462,545 2,829,121 | 2,969,284

|

83

87 251

343

1,471,424 1,681,683

Chinese,

75 71 1,670

1,620

812,037

610,239

German,

60. 48

163

187

564,429

594,325

Danish,

14

13

70

80

196.780

214,977

Dutch,

36

38

245

290

823,506

1,013,048

French,

33

26

312

293

724.176

669,354

Italian,

5

14

26

53

143,918

250,532

Panamanian,

1

1

388

Norwegian,

74

83

419

468

613,765

656,395

Portuguese,

15

81

271

14,380

95,855

Swedish,

11

10

43

22

128,955

83,261

Mexican,

Siamese,

1

(new ship)

Belgian,

4

4

14,787

Finnish,

1

entered under Br. flag)

Greek,

1

3,437

Total..... 1,018 1,071 9,859 10,806 17,109,051 18,319,722

|

KOWLOON-CANTON RAILWAY.

All the through express trains between Kowloon and Canton continued to be hauled by the British

British Section engines daily throughout the year with the exception of two periods in May and December, totalling 37 days.

Monthly general revenues showed a steady and healthy increase, and by the end of the year General Revenues had amounted to $890,744.54 against $820,994.90 for the previous year,

General Revenues exceeded Working Expenses by the very satisfactory sum of $138,767.19.

Liabilities under Capital decreased by $82,824.53 under Main

Line..

13

The Fanling Branch Line equipment unsold was written down to market value, the land handed back to the Government and the value written off the Capital, Account. Other ite.. were also written off and debited to Loss on Property Retired.

Additions to Capital were light as there were no heavy engineer- ing works. The principal items were-New Siding at Fanling $4,902.55; New Painting Shop $5,289.40; new machines for Work- shops $1,914.96, and other small items, the total Special Expenditure chargeable to Capital being $16,154.09.

Revenues from Rents, which in 1928 amounted to $7,728.57, declined to $5,651.75.

The typhoon of August 22nd did considerable damage to roofs and fencing, but no special vote was required for repairs.

Permanent Way and Structures, Rolling Stock and Plant were maintained as usual.

An unfortunate collision at Shek Tan on the Chinese Section, resulted in considerable damage to a British Section engine, but no serious injury was caused to passengers.

The total train mileage amounted to 288,056 miles, being 4,289 less than last year. This includes trains run over the Chinese Section to and from Canton.

8.280 reinforced concrete

sleepers were manufactured and In addition, 735 bridge

4,192 were laid in the track as renewals.

and other timbers were renewed.

POST OFFICE.

Mails. The number of mail receptacles of Hong Kong origin despatched during the year was 43,725 as compared with 35,517 in 1928 an increase of 8,208; the number received was 48,579 as compared with 45,202-an increase of 3,377.

Receptacles in transit, including those to and from British and Foreign Men-of-War, numbered 180,579 as against 175,492 in 1928

an increase of 5,087.

Registered Articles and Parcels.-The number of registered articles handled amounted to 848,135 as compared with 806,980 in 1928 an increase of 41,155.

The figures for insured letters were 19,050 and 17,430 respectively an increase of 1.620.

Parcels, ordinary and insured, which were dealt with reached total of 411,165 as against 423,880 in 1928-a decrease of 12,715.

.

14

WIRELESS.

The year 1929 saw further considerable advances made in the reorganisation and establishment on a sound basis of the wireless services of the Colony.

The Kowloon Royal Observatory station is now used as the receiving station for the ship services and as a distant reception station for the Radio Telegraph Office. The Observatory Station operates by remote control the transmitters installed

at Cape D'Aguilar which are used for the ship services. The station is also used for the reception of time signals, and long distance weather reports.

Cape D'Aguilar is now a grouped transmitter station for ship services and for point to point transmitters. Reception is not carried on at this station, operation and control of transmitters being done by remote control from the Radio Telegraph Office and the Observatory Station.

Early in the year a new site for a wireless station, to be built and organised on the most up to date lines, was chosen at Victoria Peak. A considerable amount of progress has already been made in the erection of station buildings, masts etc., and two transmitters are already installed there, one working on 350 metres for broadcasting musical programmes, weather reports, news bulletins etc. and the other one working on 49 metres for communication with points in South China and French Indo-China. The station which is still in course, of erection will, when completed, accommodate high power short wave long distance transmitters for commercial working with practically all parts of the world. The call signal of Victoria Peak Wireless Station is ZBW and its position is Lat. 22°16′ 38′′.56 N., Long. 114°08′ 31′′.95 E.

The Radio Telegraph Office on the Ground Floor of the new P. & O. Building is the controlling station for all services. R.T.O. operates by remote control the transmitters installed at Cape D'Aguilar and Victoria Peak which are used for fixed point services, carries on direct and indirect reception, and accepts and distributes radiotelegraphic traffic. Commercial wireless telegraph services are maintained between numerous points in South China, North China, French Indo-China, Siam, British North Borneo, Yunnanfu, Philippines, Dutch East Indies, Dutch Borneo, American Continents, Europe, etc.

The revenue collected by the Post Office during the year from radiotelegrams amounted to $162,517.66 an increase of $20,639.21 on the amount collected in 1928.

Advices of vessels signalled at the Lighthouses yielded $1,021.00. Semaphore messages, $3.60 and Wireless Receiving Station Licences $482.31. The total Revenue from the Telegraph Service amounted to $162,999.97.

15

The number of paid radio-telegrams forwarded during the year was 72,153 consisting of 708,282 words against 38,422 consisting of 322,041 words in 1928, and 85,571 were received consisting of 817,571 words against 51,951 consisting of 478,109 words, represent- ing a total increase in the number of messages of 74% and words 91%.

In addition to the paid traffic figures given above the wireless service is responsible for the reception of time signals daily from Bordeaux, Rugby, Malabar and Nauen, for the transmission of time signals to ships in the China Sea, the reception of press messages amounting to 396 messages 222,088 words from Rugby, the collection and distribution of meteorological traffic, having forwarded 4,297 messages 272,985 words, and received 10,915 messages 219,441 words, the reception of Saigon Health Bulletins once weekly, the reception and dissemination of distress, piracy and navigation messages, the transmission and reception of Government messages etc., etc.

CABLES.

The Eastern Extension Telegraph Company (British) by means of three cables to Singapore, one direct and one each via Labuan and Cape St. James respectively, provide good connections with Europe via India, with Australasia, and with the other British Colonies and possessions. By their cable to Manila connection is made with the direct American cable, thence to San Francisco. Two cables to Shanghai, belonging respectively to the Eastern Ex- tension and to the Great Northern (Danish) Companies, via Foochow and Amoy respectively, give a good connection with Shanghai, North China, Japan and Russia; and the system of the Great Northern Telegraph Co. gives a good service to Europe via Asiatic Russia.

TELEPHONES.

Telephonic communication, provided by the Hong Kong Tele- phone Co., is available to most parts of the Colony..

VI.-Justice, Police and Prisons.

Serious crime in 1929 shewed a slight increase over 1928-5349 cases against 5201. Minor crime showed an increase 15792 cases against 14409 cases in 1928. There was an increase in House and Godown Breaking, Larcenies and Robberies, but a decrease in Larceny in Dwelling, Larceny on Ships and Wharves and Burglaries. In the minor offences there was an increase of 1383.

There was an increase of 1 murder and 15 robberies. There was an increase of 7 robberies in the New Territories.

Arms. There were 6 arms seizures of note during the year, the largest of which was on board S.S. Haiching where 111 Automatic pistols and over 11000 rounds ammunition were found.

16.

The Arms Embargo was lifted on the 19th April.

Communism.-Communists were less active during the year than in 1928. There were no demonstrations but there was one murder which was the work of communists.

Labour Associations.-No Labour Guilds or Unions were pro- scribed during the year.

Piracy. One piracy and one attempted piracy were recorded on steamships, the piracy being on the Japanese S.S. Deli Maru in September. Three Indian guards were shot and 4 passengers were kidnapped. Officers and guards were overpowered and were not able to put up any resistance. Of the 4 kidnapped persons 2 have been released.

The attempted piracy on the S.S. Hai Ching, in December, was frustrated by the action of the officers and guards on the ship. The pirates set fire to the ship. The 2nd officer was killed, and the 1st officer was wounded, 1 Indian guard was killed and 1 wounded, 9 passengers were known to have been killed by bullet wounds and 23 of the crew and passengers were wounded.

Three of the pirates were arrested and charged with piracy and murder. 3 others were detained for banishment. It is believed that none of the pirates, who numbered about 14, escaped; 5 or 6 were killed by the defenders and others jumped overboard.

There was a considerable decrease of piracies on junks during the year in waters adjoining the Colony. Piracy in the Canton River Delta also showed a decrease.

Gaols. The total number of persons committed to Vienoma Gaol was 5,779 as compared with 5,756 in 1928. Of these 1,117 were com- mitted for criminal offences against 1,117 in 1928. Of committals for non-criminal offences there were 220 more for hawking without a licence, and 23 less for unlawfully cutting trees, than in 1928.

The daily average of prisoners confined in the Gaols was 1,075 the average. for 1928 being 1,071 and the highest previous average being 1,116 in 1925. The percentage of prisoners to population, accord- ing to the daily average of the former and the estimated number of the latter was 0.100: The average percentage for the last ten years was 0.123. Owing, however, to the large floating population, which is constantly moving between the Colony and Chinese Territory, the percentage of crime to population does not convey an accurate idea of the comparative criminality of the residents of the Colony. The Victoria Gaol has accommodation for 700 prisoners including patients in Hospital. The Branch Prison at Laichikok has accommodation for 475 prisoners.

The prison discipline was satisfactory, the average of punish- ments per prisoner being 0.46 as compared with 0.49 in 1928 and 0.52 in 1927.

!.

17

Prisoners are employed at printing, book-binding, tinsmithing, mat-making, tailoring, carpentering, soap-making, gardening, etc. The bulk of the Government printing and book-binding is done in Victoria Gaol.

VII.-Public Works.

BUILDINGS.

During the year progress as stated was made on the following buildings:

Hong Kong.-The extension of the Ball Room and other alterations at Government House, the erection of a Wireless Station at Victoria Peak, certain alterations to the Central Police Station and extensions to the Police Club at Happy Valley were completed. The Work of erecting new Water Works Workshops on the Praya East Reclamation was commenced in October and was well advanced at the end of the year.

The 2 Public Trough Closets at Wilmer Street and Water Street and the addition of 6 pens to the Sai Wan Ho Pig Lairage were completed. The Public Latrine at the junction of Spring Garden Lane and Cross Street was nearing completion.

A number of minor works were also executed.

Kowloon. The erection of a Lock-up Store at Yaumati Slipway, additional Latrine accommodation at the Police Training School, and the conversion of "Parkside" for use as a School were completed, and the formation of a Childrens Playground was commenced.

The Public Latrine and Bathhouse at Hung Hom was nearing completion and work on the site for the Maternity Block, Kowloon Hospital, was in progress.

New Kowloon.-The extension to Shamshuipo Market and the Public Latrine and Bathhouse at Shamshuipo were completed. The extension to Kowloon City Market was nearing completion and the Public Latrine and Bathhouse at Kowloon City was in course of erection.

COMMUNICATIONS.

Hong Kong-The site formation and road construction for Village Houses at Wongneichong was completed. Road

Road from Causeway Bay to Quarry Bay, section opposite M.L.'s. 430 and 431; Road Construction at Tai Hang; Barker Road Improvements, from Stubbs Road to Victoria Hospital, and Path to Cape D'Aguilar Wireless Station, 1st Section, were continued.

18

Two Bridle Tracks 9 miles in length were constructed during the year:-

(1) on the South side of the Island, between Wanchai Gap and

the road from Wongneichong Gap-Little Hong Kong.

(2) on the North side of the Island, between Wongneichong

Gap and Mount Parker Road.

completed.

Kowloon.-Argyle Street Extension to a width of 60 feet was Chatham Road Extension and Boundary Street, (section from Nathan Road to No. 8 Railway Bridge) were in course of construction.

Portions of new roads, an aggregate of 1 mile, were macadamized, kerbed and channeled adjoining new buildings erected during the course of the year.

New Kowloon.-In the widening of Castle Peak Road, half width of the roadway was completed. Extension of Roads in Kowloon Tong Development Area was in progress.

Kerbing, channelling and macadamising roads on the Kowloon Tong Estate was completed, the total length of new roads being 3 miles.

New Territories.-Patrol Path from Lin Ma Hang to Sha Tau Kok, Widening Path from Sheung Shui to Ta Ku Ling, Access and Patrol Path to Lo Wu Railway Station Block House, Widening road between Fanling and Sha Tau Kok were in progress.

DRAINAGE.

Hong Kong. The reconstruction of Wongneichong Nullah, Section No. 4 (in front of Jockey Club Stands) was completed in October.

New sewers and storm water drains, including sewers on the Praya East Reclamation, were constructed to a length of 18,064 feet. Existing drains in the Wanchai district were reconstructed to a length of 2,786 feet.

Stream-courses were trained to a length of 1,897 feet.

Kowloon.-New sewers and storm water drains were constructed to a length of 22,261 feet.

Trenches were cut in connection with the anti-malarial campaign.

New Kowloon.-New sewers and storm water drains were con- structed to a length of 7,202 feet.

Anti-malarial work was continued.

19

The construction of the nullah to connect streams North of hill area at Kowloon Tong was completed.

New Territories.-Various anti-malarial works were carried out at Taipo, and 329 feet of sewers were constructed at Taipo Market.

WATER WORKS.

Hong Kong.-A division wall inside the Albany Service Reservoir was constructed. Turbine and pump for Bowen Road Filters were ordered in England. Extension to Motor House was com- pleted.

1,400 feet 12′′ main were laid in Whitfield. 3,460 feet 6′′ main were laid through University grounds and along Lyttelton Road and Breezy Path (East). 2,000 feet 6" main were laid to new Tung Wah Eastern Hospital. Contract was let for North Point Service Reservoir and work begun.

Praya East Reclamation.—18,308 feet 6′′, 408 feet 8′′ and 2,756 feet of 15′′ main were laid and the work completed as far as roads permitted.

Aberdeen Valley Scheme.-Contract was let for Upper Dam etc. and work commenced. Pipes, pumps and filtration plant were ordered in England. Surveys continued for other portions of the scheme.

Kowloon.-590 feet 3′′, 230 feet 5′′ and 2120 feet 6′′ main were laid to keep up with development. 420 feet 10′′ main were relaid in Pakhoi Street.

New Kowloon.-A new 6′′ supply main 5,700 feet in length was laid from Wong Uk to Shamshuipo. 1,224 feet of 6" main were laid elsewhere to keep up with development. Supply main consisting of 1,900 feet 4′′ and 2,000 feet 3" was laid to Diamond Hill. Kowloon Tong Estate supply completed, 740 feet 5′′ and 780 feet 6" laid. Special repairs to Kowloon Catchwater continued.

New Territories.-Lower intake was constructed across Shing Mun River for pumping.

Shing Mun Valley Scheme.-1st Section.-The laying of the 1st 24" diameter Steel Main was continued. 11,800 lin: feet being laid during the year, bringing the total laid to date to 24,130 lin: feet.

Good progress was made with the Service Reservoir in the Sheklaipui Valley and the Eastern half was well forward by the end of the year.

20

A Contract was let for the Byewash Reservoir situated im- mediately below the existing Kowloon Dam and fair progress was male during the year.

Orders for a 12′′ diameter Steel Main were placed in England in June for a pipe line across the Harbour and pipes commenced to arrive in September. Actual laying commenced on 17th December.

2nd Section.-Surveys and investigations were continued.

RECLAMATIONS.

Hong Kong. Praya East, about 90 acres, was completed.

A further reclamation of about 2 acres was commenced at Shaukiwan.

New Kowloon.-Construction was continued on the sea wall to protect the Shamshuipo Reclamation. A length of about 1,400 lineal feet was completed.

The dumping of refuse at Cheung Sha Wan resulted in the reclamation of a total area of approximately 3 acres.

The work of bringing the Kai Tak Reclamation to finished levels was continued.

New Territories.-The Standard Oil Co. continued with the formation of a site at Lai Chi Kok. Progress with this work has been delayed owing to the failure of the sea wall.

PIERS.

Kowloon.-At Mong Kok Tsui, construction was commenced on a reinforced concrete ferry pier, 150 feet in length by 50 feet in width.

New Kowloon. At Shamshuipo, the construction of а ferry pier, 150 feet in length by 50 feet in width, was commenced.

SLIPWAYS.

New Kowloon.-The construction of the slipway at the Kai Tak Reclamation was completed. The slipway is 380 feet in length at a grade of 1 in 20 and provides a depth of 6 feet at L.W.O.S.Ť.

21

VIII. Public Health.

The estimated population of the Colony is as follows:--

(1) Non Chinese

(2) Chinese:

City of Victoria,

Villages of Hong Kong

577,500

46,080

Kowloon (and New Kowloon)... 296,480

Population afloat (Junks &

Sampans)

109,050

New Territories

96,250

18,150

Total Chinese population

Total Civil poulation

1,125,360

1,143,510

The population of Hong Kong is a very variable one and, owing to the large unstable, floating population, and to partial birth registration, no reliable means are available for estimation.

For pur- poses of statistics, the estimated population of the New Territories has been subtracted.

The Crude Birth Rate for the year 1929 was 9.76 per 1,000; 9.56 per 1,000 among the Chinese Community and 19.3 per 1,000 among the non-Chinese.

These figures are very inaccurate and unreliable owing to incom- plete registration of Chinese births (especially females) and im- migration. There are signs, however, that registration is increasing among the Chinese Community. The non-Chinese rate is more trustworthy.

The Crude Death Rate was 16.77 per 1,000; 16.95 per 1,000 among the Chinese Community and 12.06 per 1,000 among the non- Chinese. As registration is essential before burial can take place the figures for deaths are much more accurate and reliable than those for births.

The ratio of Infantile Deaths (under 1 vear) to total deaths for the year 1929 was 38.74%, the figures for 1928 and 1927 being 29.5% and 31.6% respectively.

The Zymotic Death rate was 1.36 per mille population.

22

The deaths from Notifiable Infectious Diseases in order of incidence were as follows:

Disease.

1 Small Pox

(Typhoid

2

Chinese

Non- Chinese

Total

852

2

854

54

7

61

Paratyphoid

3 Diphtheria

61

3

64

4 Cerebro Spinal Fever

18

2

20

5 Puerperal Fever

9

1

10

6 Plague

2

2

Totals

1,411

15

1,426

There was an epidemic of Smallpox in the last quarter of the year which is still in progress (February 1930); up to 31st December, 1929, there were 149 cases notified of which 119 or 79% have died.

The deaths from special Diseases and locally important causes were as follows:

Disease.

Chinese

Non- Chinese

Total

Malaria

Beri-beri

408

12

564

22

420 (1) 566 (2)

Respiratory Diseases :-

Tuberculosis (pulmonary)

and Phthisis

2,137

21

2,158)

Non-tubercular

5.221

27

5,248f

(3)

Other forms of Tuberculosis

743

6

749

Venereal disease (Syphilis)

227

227

Dysentery

188

4

Heart disease & Heart failure...

425

15

16

189

440

Infantile enteritis and Gastro-

enteritis (under 1 year)

1,238

7

1,245

23

(1) Further antimalarial work is needed in the Colony but many of the cases are likely to have been imported from China.

(2) There is considerable doubt as to the accuracy of these figures as the disease is by no means easy to diagnose or differentiate.

(3) The total figure for Respiratory Diseases and Pulmonary Tuberculosis is 7,406. The climate and conditions of the Colony are most inimical to cure.

The deaths reported in the Coroners' Returns (Chinese only) are as follows, classified according to age and sex:-

Age Periods.

Males

Females

1 Under 2 years

2,329

2,613

2 Over 2 years

1,047

493

Totals

3,376

3,106

Suicides and Deaths from Accidents or Violence amounted to

312:-

(i) Chinese

(ii) Non-Chinese

289

23

These figures include a very large proportion of dumped bodies, especially heavy among infants. This dangerous and revolting practice is hard to eradicate amongst an ignorant population.

There were 2 cases of human plague reported in 1929; one on 18th August and one on 2nd September, both being fatal.

Systematic rat catching was carried out throughout the year, the total number of rats and mice destroyed being 135,417, (Hong Kong 87,786, Kowloon 47,631). Of these 4 were reported from the mortuaries as Plague infected.

The routine work authorised under the by-laws for the Prevention of epidemic endemic and contagious or infectious disease was carried- out throughout the year; 97,692 floors were cleansed in Hong Kong and 55,070 floors in Kowloon. Practically all premises were cleansed twice in the year, many were cleansed three times and a few four times. Systematic limewashing of all domestic premises within the areas specified which are occupied by the members of more than one family was similarly supervised, 29,785 floors being limewashed in Hong Kong and 19,202 in Kowloon,

24

These two measures ensure a fair standard of cleanliness among the poorer classes of the community,

There were 3 cases of hydrophobia (1 human and 2 canine) throughout the year; 109 dogs were placed under observation and 14 dog brains were examined by the Government Bacteriologist for evidence of rabies.

GOVERNMENT HOSPITALS.

Civil Hospital. This hospital consists of three blocks and contains 212 beds in 23 wards. At times of pressure this number has been increased to 230 beds. 100 beds are allotted to the University Clinic. 5,108 In-patients were treated (4,995 in 1928). Of these 1,385 were under the Staff of the University (1,286 in 1928). The daily average number of patients was 178. Attendances at the Out-patient Depart- ment numbered 52,127. (56,947 in 1928). The greater part of the work of this Department is done by the Staff of the University.

Attached to the hospital is an isolated Maternity Hospital con- taining 21 beds. 807 patients were treated during the year (776 in 1928). All the patients, except a few treated by the Government Medical Officers, were under the care of the University Professor of Obstetrics and his assistants. Of those treated, 9 were Europeans and 798 Asiatics.

Mental Hospital.-The Hospital is situated close to the Civil Hospital and is under the direction of the Medical Officer in charge of that hospital. European and Chinese patients are separated, the European portion containing 14 beds in separate wards and the Chinese portion 18 beds.

290 patients of all races were treated during 1929 and there were 20 deaths.

The Infectious Diseases Hospital is situated on the western out- skirts of the city-it is used mainly for the treatment of Small-pox. The Hospital contains 26 beds to which 40 patients were admitted (11 in 1928).

Victoria Hospital.-This hospital is situated on the Peak and con- sists of a Main Block and a Maternity Block.

There are 42 beds in the main block in which 506 patients were treated, and 22 beds in the Maternity Block in which 92 were treated.

Kowloon Hospital.-Situated on the mainland has 57 beds. 1,277 patients were treated in 1929 as compared with 1,204 in 1928.

TUNG WAH HOSPITAL (Government aided).

Number of beds

Number of patients treated in 1929

Number of patients treated in 1928

460

12.806

11.486

Number of beds

INFECTIOUS DISEASES BRANCH.

Number of patients treated in 1929

63

186

Number of patients treated in 1928

126

KWONG WAH HOSPITAL, KOWLOON, (Government aided).

Number of beds

292

Number of patients treated in 1929

9,065

Number of patients treated in 1928

8,822

The Hospitals are under the supervision of a Visiting Medical Officer who is a member of the Medical Department.

TUNG WAH EASTERN HOSPITAL (Government aided).

Number of beds

Number of patients treated in 1929

(Hospital opened November, 1929).

IX.-Education.

120

223

The total numbers of pupils at schools in the Colony, excluding the Police School, are:-

Number of Pupils

Total

English Vernacular Schools Schools

Government Schools

4,020

380

4,400

Military Schools

210

***

210

Excluded Private School

152



152

Grant Schools

4,620

987

5,607

Vernacular Schools, Urban

District

·

36,407

36,407

Vernacular Schools, Rural

District

5,747

5,747

Private English Schools

6,361

6,361

Technical Institute

598

598

Total

15,961

43,521

59,482

1

26

The chief Government Schools are Queen's College, King's Col- lege, and three District Schools for Chinese boys, the Belilios Public School for Chinese girls, the Vernacular Middle School and two Ver- nacular Normal Schools, and the Ellis Kadoorie School for Indians.

The Central British School and Kowloon Junior, Victoria, and Quarry Bay Schools for children of British parentage have an average attendance of 295. There is also a school for children of the Peak District with an average attendance of 57.

There are 6 Grant-in-Aid Anglo-Chinese Schools for boys and 6 for girls, and 4 Grant-in-Aid Vernacular Schools for girls.

The Hong Kong Technical Institute affords an opportunity for high education of students who have left school. Instruction was given in 1929 in Building Construction, Chemistry (Practical), Metal- lurgy, Physics, Electricity, English, Shorthand, Physical Instruction and Seamanship. Classes for men and women teachers, both "English" and "Vernacular" are a feature of the Institute. .

,

The lecturers are recruited from members of the medical and educational professions in the Colony, and from the Department of Public Works, and receive fees for their services. The Institute is furnished with a well equipped chemical laboratory and excellent physical apparatus.

The expenditure of the Education Department in 1929 was $1,152,375.00 and the revenue collected from Government School fees was $185,659.90.

THE UNIVERSITY OF HONG KONG.

The University of Hong Kong was incorporated under a local University Ordinance, 1911, and opened in 1912. It is a residential University and open to students of both sexes.

The late Sir Hormusjee Mody bore the entire expense of the erection of the main building and additions have been made through the liberality of benefactors of varied nationality and domicile. The latest addition to the buildings is a workshop built out of a con- tribution from Sir Robert Ho Tung.

The annual income of the University now amounts to about $603,000 of which about $290,000 comes from endowments and $90,000 from Government. Messrs. Butterfield and Swire gave £40,000 to the original endowment fund and subsequently $100,000 for engineering equipment. The Rockfeller Institution has endowed the University with three chairs in surgery, medicine and obstetrics, the endowment being in each case $250,000.

The annual expenditure now amounts to about $666,000.



27

The University includes the three Faculties, of Medicine, Engineering and Arts. Admission to all faculties is conditional upon passing the matriculation examination of the University or some examination recognised as equivalent thereto.

The Faculty of Medicine provides a six year course of study in the usual pre-medical and medical sciences, leading to the degree of M.B. and B.S. The degrees of M.D., and M.S., may be obtained for postgraduate work. The degrees above mentioned are recognised by the General Medical Council for registration in Great Britain.

in

The Faculty of Engineering provides a four year course practical and theoretical engineering, leading to the degree of B.Sc., (Eng.). Fourth year students specialize in civil, mechanical or electrical engineering. The degree for post-graduate work is that of M.Sc., (Eng.).

The Faculty of Arts includes departments of pure arts and science, social science, commerce and a department for training teachers. The course is in all cases one of four years and leads to the degree of B.A. The degree for post-graduate work is that of M.A.

With a view to securing the maintenance of the desired standard -which is in all three faculties that of a British University degree- external examiners are, in all faculties, associated with the internal examiners in all annual final examinations. In the Faculty of Engineering, but not in other faculties, degrees with honours granted, the standard being assessed by special examiners chosen from amongst the external examiners in the University of London.

The degree of LL.D., is granted, honoris causa.

are

Government of grants and by 709,789 sq. ft.

The site of the University was given by the Hong Kong. As subsequently enlarged by minor purchase, the University estate covers an area of The view from the grounds over the harbour is magnificent and the grounds are naturally beautiful.

In the main buildings are housed the chemical and physical laboratories, the University library and portions of the engineering laboratories. They further include the Great Hall, a Senate room and the lecture and class rooms used by the Faculty of Arts and for general purposes.

Special medical buildings include schools of anatomy, physiology, pathology and tropical medicine, erected at the cost of Chinese gentlemen resident in the Colony. Clinical instruction is given at the Government Civil Hospital.

Special engineering buildings include:-

(a) a power station, with internal combustion engines of varied types which are maintained for instructional purposes;

(b) a primemovers (steam) and hydraulics laboratory, at present housed in a converted pumping station, formerly the property of the Government; and

(c) A workshop, for practical instruction of students.

Electrical machinery, electrical technology, the testing of materials and experimental mechanics are dealt with in the main building.

The larger part of the engineering equipment was the gift of British engineering firms.

Other buildings upon the estate include:-

(a) the Vice-Chancellor's Lodge

(b) Staff-quarters

(c) the resident hostels, and

(d) the University Union Building.

Unless exempted from residence (such exemption being ordinarily granted on the ground that the student's "manner of life" is not such as is catered for in the hostels), every matriculated student is required to reside either in a University or recognised hostel.

The University hostels are three in number-Lugard Hall, Eliot Hall and May Hall.

- Recognised hostels are at present three in number-Morrison Hall, situated immediately above the University grounds and conducted by the London Missionary Society, St. John's Hall, im- mediately opposite the front of the University, conducted by the Church Missionary Society and Ricci Hall. This hostel, situated in the Pokfulam Road, will be conducted by the Irish Jesuits. It is to be opened in the first month of 1930.

Each student occupies a separate room or cubicle, and there are the usual common rooms. Each University hostel is in charge of a member of the staff, as resident warden.

No University hostel at present exists for women students-- whose right to admission to the University was first recognised in 1921: but some arrangements for the accommodation of a few women students in a rented building have been made by the authorities of St. Stephen's Girls' College, a Church of England girls' school which is near the University. The nuns of a neighbouring Italian convent are also prepared to house a few women students.

medical

The tuition fee is $300-the hostel fee which includes board and lodging is $300. A student who is allowed to live in a hostel during

vacation-some have to because of their work, students, and others because their homes are too far away-pay at the rate of $8 a week. When a student joins he is required to

a

e.g.

29

deposit caution money to the extent of $25, and to pay a registration fee of $5. The annual subscription to the University Union is $20 and this covers the annual subscription to practically all the athletic clubs. The graduation fee is $25. Probably about $1,200 repre- sents the minimum amount which at present prices would cover a student's annual expenses including vacations. It would cost a Chinese student who goes abroad $2,500 a year at the very least and this would not cover travelling expenses.

Numerous scholarships are available, including the King Edward VII Scholarships founded by His Majesty's Government. There are also scholarships provided by the Governments of Hong Kong, of the Straits Settlements and Federated Malay States.

The Union is the centre of the social life of the students. It is at once a Club and a centre of athletics. The Union Committee contains certain members of the University teaching staff, but its President and Secretary are undergraduates elected by the under- graduates. The undergraduate members of the Committee are also elected by their fellow students. There is a Union magazine with English and Chinese sections. The editors are students, a member of the teaching staff acting as assistant editor. There are thirty-eight women students; these women students are all members of the Union.

Students of the University come from Kwangtung, Ho Pe, Hankow, Hupeh, Yunnan, Hunan, Shanghai, Pekin, Fukien, Singapore, Penang, Kuala Lumpur, Kedah, Jahore, Java, Manila, Burma, Siam, Japan, India and Macao. The present enrolment is 315 of whom 266 are Chinese and 49 non-Chinese.

X.-Lands and Surveys.

LAND GRANTS AND GENERAL VALUE OF LAND.

(1). The amount of premium received from Sales of Crown Land and Pier Rights, exclusive of the New Territories, during the year 1929 was $1,378,301.74 an increase of $186,624.38 on the preceding year, and $662,890.74 more than the average of the previous five years. The principal items were $136,000.00 for Kowloon Inland Lot No. 2175 and $102,000.00 for Kowloon Inland Lot No. 2205.

(2). The amount of premium received from Sales of Crown Land and Pier Rights in the New Territories during the year under review was $548,312.25 being an increase of $110,561.71 on the preceding year, and $360,712.57 more than the average of the preceding five years. The principal items were $30,010.00 for New Kowloon Inland Lot No. 1274 and $25,708.00 for New Kowloon Inland Lot No. 1285.

(3). The foregoing increases indicate a further gradual and welcome return to normal conditions.

30

The total area of land leased during the year was 455 acres 1 rood and 13-1/5 poles which is a slight decrease on the preceding year.

The total area resumed re-entered and surrendered was 279 acres 3 roods and 32-2/5 poles.

In Hong Kong and Kowloon there was a steadily growing demand for building sites whilst in the Northern District of the New Territories there was little demand for house sites in the develop- ment areas but in the villages construction of new houses goes on steadily and there was a fair demand for agricultural land..

There is little to report with regard to the Southern District of the New Territories beyond an increase in the demand for house sites at Cheung Chau which cannot be met until the Reclamation is made, and an increase in the building of new houses at Tai O.

XI.-Labour.

Trade in general remained very dull during the year and with the factories still working much below their full capacity, there was no increase in the number of women and children employed.

The knitting factories in Kowloon and the cigarette and perfumery factories in Hong Kong are the largest employers of women and girls, such work being peculiarly suitable for female labour. Several glass factories closed down during the year owing to lack of trade and the high price of coal.

The Industrial Employment of Children Ordinance No. 22 of 1922 was amended by ordinance No. 24 of 1929, and its scope extended to include women and young persons as well as children. The most important regulations made under the amended ordinance are those prohibiting the employment, of women in certain dangerous trades and also in any factory between the hours of 10 p.m. and 6 a.m.

The year 1929 was remarkably uneventful as regards labour troubles, not a single strike in which more than very few workers were engaged having taken place. A strike threatened amongst the lightermen at the Kowloon Godowns in July, but the trouble came to an end when the masters granted a slight concession in the matter of night-work pay.

There are known to exist in the Colony 150 labour Guilds, with a total membership of over 100,000, but one-third of this figure. would probably represent the number of active members. With one or two exceptions Guild activities seem to be at a low ebb, and the interest taken in their Guilds by so-called members is very slight. The supply of labour in the Colony is good, possibly as a result of trouble in the adjacent provinces, and the Guilds are still financially crippled as a result of the 1925 strike. Guilds in Canton are kept under close surveillance by the Government, and this has probably also had a beneficial effect on those in Hong Kong.

30

The total area of land leased during the year was 455 acres 1 rood and 13-1/5 poles which is a slight decrease on the preceding year.

The total area resumed re-entered and surrendered was 279 acres 3 roods and 32-2/5 poles.

In Hong Kong and Kowloon there was a steadily growing demand for building sites whilst in the Northern District of the New Territories there was little demand for house sites in the develop- ment areas but in the villages construction of new houses goes on steadily and there was a fair demand for agricultural land..

There is little to report with regard to the Southern District of the New Territories beyond an increase in the demand for house sites at Cheung Chau which cannot be met until the Reclamation is made, and an increase in the building of new houses at Tai O.

XI.-Labour.

Trade in general remained very dull during the year and with the factories still working much below their full capacity, there was no increase in the number of women and children employed.

The knitting factories in Kowloon and the cigarette and perfumery factories in Hong Kong are the largest employers of women and girls, such work being peculiarly suitable for female labour. Several glass factories closed down during the year owing to lack of trade and the high price of coal.

The Industrial Employment of Children Ordinance No. 22 of 1922 was amended by ordinance No. 24 of 1929, and its scope extended to include women and young persons as well as children. The most important regulations made under the amended ordinance are those prohibiting the employment, of women in certain dangerous trades and also in any factory between the hours of 10 p.m. and 6 a.m.

The year 1929 was remarkably uneventful as regards labour troubles, not a single strike in which more than very few workers were engaged having taken place. A strike threatened amongst the lightermen at the Kowloon Godowns in July, but the trouble came to an end when the masters granted a slight concession in the matter of night-work pay.

There are known to exist in the Colony 150 labour Guilds, with a total membership of over 100,000, but one-third of this figure. would probably represent the number of active members. With one or two exceptions Guild activities seem to be at a low ebb, and the interest taken in their Guilds by so-called members is very slight. The supply of labour in the Colony is good, possibly as a result of trouble in the adjacent provinces, and the Guilds are still financially crippled as a result of the 1925 strike. Guilds in Canton are kept under close surveillance by the Government, and this has probably also had a beneficial effect on those in Hong Kong.

31

a

In August, 1929, there appeared evidence of the existence of a communistic organisation known as the Hong Kong Kung Toi Wui (Hong Kong Labour Representatives' Union), which made systematic attempt to stir up trouble among various bodies of workers, though most of the Guilds remained impervious to its influence. It was eventually located on the 29th September, and of 50 persons then arrested 19 were finally banished. Documents seized proved that it aimed to revive the Hong Kong General Labour Union as an organisation on communist lines carrying on a political agitation against the Government of China.

The Tobacco Workers' Union closed down during the year following the discovery of communist propaganda on its premises and an attempt to injure the manager of a cigar factory by throwing vitriol on him from behind.

XII.-Legislation.

during 1929. The most

Thirty-four Ordinances were passed during 1929. important were the following.

The Tobacco Ordinance, No. 3, abolished the system of manu- facture of tobacco in bond and introduced the principle of taxation on the raw material on importation.

The Hongkong and Shanghai Bank Ordinance, No. 6, consolidat- ed and amended the provisions of two Ordinances and of the deed of settlement of 1867. The principal changes are that the powers of the Bank have been increased in accordance with modern develop- ments, and that the Bank is now incorporated for an indefinite period instead of for a limited time.

The Offences Against the Person Amendment Ordinance, No. 13, attempts to legislate for a matter which has been discussed on and off for five years.

Section 3 of the Ordinance makes it an offence to take any part in any transaction the object of which is to transfer the possession or control of any minor under eighteen for any valuable consideration, unless the accused can prove that the transaction was bona fide and solely for the purpose of a proposed marriage or adoption in accordance with Chinese custom. This is an endeavour to strike at the traffic in children. The cases of bond fide marriage and adoption according to Chinese custom are excepted because money does pass on those occasions, and though the payment of money confers no rights over the minor in Hong Kong law yet it is obviously undesirable to make criminal regular and unobjection- able customs observed by a large part of the population of the Colony.

The British Mercantile Marine Uniform Ordinance, No. 19, prohibits the improper use within the Colony of the British Mercantile Marine uniform prescribed by Order of His Majesty in Council. It is based on the British Mercantile Marine Uniform Act, 1919, 9 and 10 Geo. 5, c. 62.

32

The Protection of Women and Girls Amendment Ordinance, No. 21, made various minor alterations in the principal Ordinance, some with a view to strengthening the hands of the authorities in dealing with the traffic in women and girls, and some in order to get rid of certain difficulties and inconsistencies which then existed in the legislation of the Colony.

The Female Domestic Service Amendment Ordinance, No. 22, made various detailed amendments in the principal Ordinance in order to increase its efficiency. Perhaps the most important provision of the Ordinance is one which provides that in every prosecution under the principal Ordinance it shall, until the contrary is proved, be presumed that the girl in question was a mui tsai in the employment of the accused at the time of the alleged offence. This may appear

to be drastic, but the difficulties of proof are enormous. In order to prove that a girl was a mui tsai it might be necessary to prove a payment made years ago, outside the Colony, to persons of whom all trace has been lost, and in the absence of the girl herself. On the other hand, the accused should find it com- paratively easy to prove the real status of any girl in his household, and the burden is therefore less heavy than it might appear.

It must also be remembered that the consent of the Secretary for Chinese Affairs is required for any prosecution under the Ordinance.

The Industrial Employment of Women, Young Persons and Children Amendment Ordinance, No. 24, is intended as a further step in the improvement of factory conditions in the Colony. Such improvement must be slow and gradual, and it is very difficult in such matters to travel far ahead of neighbouring countries. The principal effect of the Ordinance is to include women and young persons within the scope of the principal Ordinance so that their employment in

in factories,

as that of children, can be regulated.

as

well

XIII.-Miscellaneous.

EMIGRATION AND IMMIGRATION.

Two hundred and twenty seven thousand five hundred and twenty-three (227,523) Emigrants left Hong Kong for various places during the year 1929; of these 114,323 were carried in British ships and 113,200 in Foreign vessels.

One hundred and eighty five thousand three hundred and ninety (185,390) returning emigrants were reported to have been brought to Hong Kong from the several places to which they had emigrated either from this Colony or from Coast ports as against 187,847 in 1928. Of these 103,261 were brought in British vessels and 82,129 in Foreign vessels.

32

The Protection of Women and Girls Amendment Ordinance, No. 21, made various minor alterations in the principal Ordinance, some with a view to strengthening the hands of the authorities in dealing with the traffic in women and girls, and some in order to get rid of certain difficulties and inconsistencies which then existed in the legislation of the Colony.

The Female Domestic Service Amendment Ordinance, No. 22, made various detailed amendments in the principal Ordinance in order to increase its efficiency. Perhaps the most important provision of the Ordinance is one which provides that in every prosecution under the principal Ordinance it shall, until the contrary is proved, be presumed that the girl in question was a mui tsai in the employment of the accused at the time of the alleged offence. This may appear

to be drastic, but the difficulties of proof are enormous. In order to prove that a girl was a mui tsai it might be necessary to prove a payment made years ago, outside the Colony, to persons of whom all trace has been lost, and in the absence of the girl herself. On the other hand, the accused should find it com- paratively easy to prove the real status of any girl in his household, and the burden is therefore less heavy than it might appear.

It must also be remembered that the consent of the Secretary for Chinese Affairs is required for any prosecution under the Ordinance.

The Industrial Employment of Women, Young Persons and Children Amendment Ordinance, No. 24, is intended as a further step in the improvement of factory conditions in the Colony. Such improvement must be slow and gradual, and it is very difficult in such matters to travel far ahead of neighbouring countries. The principal effect of the Ordinance is to include women and young persons within the scope of the principal Ordinance so that their employment in

in factories,

as that of children, can be regulated.

as

well

XIII.-Miscellaneous.

EMIGRATION AND IMMIGRATION.

Two hundred and twenty seven thousand five hundred and twenty-three (227,523) Emigrants left Hong Kong for various places during the year 1929; of these 114,323 were carried in British ships and 113,200 in Foreign vessels.

One hundred and eighty five thousand three hundred and ninety (185,390) returning emigrants were reported to have been brought to Hong Kong from the several places to which they had emigrated either from this Colony or from Coast ports as against 187,847 in 1928. Of these 103,261 were brought in British vessels and 82,129 in Foreign vessels.

-

Appendix A.

FINANCIAL RETURNS FOR THE YEAR

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF THE REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE FOR T

Estimates,

Actual Revenue

Revenue for

Heads of Revenue.

1929.

to 31st December,

same period

year.

Increase.

Decrease.

of preceding

Heads of Expen

Light Dues

*

1929.

C.

141,000 144,961.48

c.

138,550.02

C.

6,411.46

Do.,

Special Assess-

ment

173,000

174,165.18

165,292.04

8,873.14

Licences and Internal Re-

venue not otherwise specified -

15,399,150

¡4,900,565.03 15,081,429.56

Fees of Court or Office, Payments for specific purposes, and Reim- bursements in Aid

1,930,550

1,864,955.18 1,945,215.33

Post Office

930,000 1,003,664.99 966,918.40

36,746.59

Kowloon-Canton Railway -

808,300

890,744.54 820,994.90

69,749.64

Rent of Government Pro-

perty, Land and Houses -

1,310,200

1,411,532.69 1,331,138.98

80,393. I

Interest

200,000 382,837.87 235,764.68

147,073.19

Miscellaneous Receipts -

386,400 844,876.91 2,647,859.32

$

C.

H. E. the Govern

Cadet Service Senior Clerical a counting Staff Junior Clerical Se Colonial Secretary and Legislatur Secretariat for (

Affairs

Treasury -

180,864.53

Audit Departmen

District Office, No

80,260.15

1,802,982.41

Do.,

Post Office

So

Imports & Exports Harbour Departm Royal Observator Fire Brigade Supreme Court - Attorney General Crown Solicitor's ( Offical Receiver- Land Office Magistracy, Hong Do., Kowk Police Force- Prisons Departme Medical Departme

Sanitary Departm Botanical and F

Department - Education Depart Public Works I

ment Public Works, Re

Do., Extrao Kowloon-Canton Volunteer Defence Military Contribut Miscellaneous Ser Charitable Service Charge on Acco

Public Debt- Pensions

Total (exclusive of Land

Sales)-

21,278,600

21,618,303.87 23,333,163.23 349.247-73

2,064,107.09

Land Sales, (Premia on

New Leases)

1,000,000 1,936,171.29 1,635,235.65

300,935.64

TOTAL

22,278,600 23,554,475.16 24,968,398.88

650,183.37

2,064,107.09

TOTAL

Deduct

+

Net

$ 650,183.37

$1,413,923.72

Appendix A.

!CIAL RETURNS FOR THE YEAR 1929.

UE AND EXPENDITURE FOR THE PERIOD ENDED 31ST DECEMBER, 1929.

Estimates,

Decrease.

Heads of Expenditure.

1929.

Actual Expenditure to 31st December,

1929.

Expenditure for same period of preceding

year.

Increase.

Decrease.

C.

$

C.

C.

C.

C.

16

H. E. the Governor

103,363

102,148.09

107,569.13

Cadet Service

305,565

316,806.95

323,865.05

5,421.04 7,058.10

Senior Clerical and Ac-

counting Staff -

220,103

205,582.45

159,402.76

46,179.69

Junior Clerical Service

726,021

669,822.54

631,561.83

38,260.71

14

Colonial Secretary's Office

and Legislature

41,198

40,665.04

56,993.19

16.328.15

Secretariat for Chinese

Affairs

13,180

11,482.94

11,592.73

109.79

Treasury

16,160

15,069.12

8,419.35

6,649.77

180,864.53

Audit Department

46,781

47.193.29

47,160.12

33.17

District Office, North

22,299

20,625.34

22,666.14

Do.,

South -

13,252

8,668.90

9,247.27

Post Office

-

307,140

289,516.20

243,570.08

45,946.12

Imports & Exports Office -

753.746

688,566.03

748,806.99

2 040.80 578.37

60,240.96

80,260.15

Harbour Department

782,132

757,198.07

748,057.57

9,140.50

Royal Observatory-

38,306

35,141.07

35,434.52

293.45

Fire Brigade

250,286

232,826.21

198,222.37

34,603.84

Supreme Court -

143,043

133,286.54

136,123.55

2,837.01

59

Attorney General

22.713

34,689.99

35,264.50

Crown Solicitor's Office

33,988

43,640.30

51,144.17

574-5 I 7,503.87

Offical Receiver -

10,175

10,116.83

9,846.95

269.88

Land Office

24,976

26,118.20

28,866.99

64

Magistracy, Hong Kong

-

2,264

1,813.86

1,857.71

2,748.79 43.85

Medical Department

Do., Kowloon

Police Force -

Prisons Department

Sanitary Department

A

2,132

1,970.90

1,899.17

7173

1,967,352

1,956,798.33

1,986,105.12

29,306.79

548,364

512,591.65

485,147.89

27,443.76

-

979,350

867,292.50

786,638.21

80,654.29

J

821,501

713.184.49

578,991.11

134,193.38

Botanical and Forestry

Department -

100,884

98,412.87

96,597.70

1,815.17

Education Department

1,259,827

1,152,375.18

1,103,540.35

48,834.83

.19

Public Works Depart-

ment

1,549,897

1,873,280.18

1,362,633.59 510,646.59

Public Works, Recurrent-

1,689,050

1,464.558.35

1,482,915.36

18,357.01

Do., Extraordinary-

3,419.605

2,125.974 96

2,108,515.82

17,459.14

1,802,982.41

Kowloon-Canton Railway

811,644

656,696.58

747,743-71

91,047.13

Volunteer Defence Corps-

103,358

83,757.67

96,303.79

12,546.12

Military Contribution -

3,988,388

3,259,337.65

3,748,960.40

489,622.75

Miscellaneous Services

1,246,743

1,304,714.87

1,141,430.22

163,284.65

Charitable Services

103,566

100,079.50

100,574-93

495.43

Charge on Account of

Public Debt-

1,332,298

1,324,498.97

1,046,602.31

3 2,064,107.09

Pensions

847,000

796,754.06

739,969.59

277,896.66 56,784.47

,.64

3.37

2,064,107.09

TOTAL

$650,183.37

$1,413,923.72

*

24.799,650 | 21,983,256.67 21,230,242.24

Deduct

Net

1,500,168.35

747,153.92

7+7,153.92

$753,014.43 •

Statement of Assets and Liabilities on the 31st December, 1929.

LIABILITIES.

C.

ASSETS.

$

ᎦᎵ .

C.

Deposits not Available

1,286,152.42

Subsidiary Coins

Postal Agencies

5,972.14

Advances

Suspense Account

Suspense Trade Loan

602,383.96

Building Loans....

1,815,287.09

679,145.35

1,399,759.30

807,553.58 Imprest

9,682.00

Overdraft Bank Trade Loan

2,532,468.64† Joint Colonial Fund......

4,604,444.44

Public Works (1927) Loan Account.

Adjustment of Exchange Account...

430,001,81

House Service Account

18,447.82

948,537.35

Unallocated Stores, (P.W.D.).....

408,843.64

Unallocated Stores, (Railway).

151,752.98

Coal Account

4,844.80

* Investment Account

1,240,712.28

Fixed Deposit Account

1,000,000.00

Balance at Banks General Account

1,134,577.63

Total Liabilities

6,613,069.90

Balance Public Works (1927) Loan A/c.

430,001.81

Balance...

9,662,852.36

Trade Loan Outstanding..

3,340,022.22

Crown Agents' Current Account .

38,400.84

Total

16,275,922.26

Total

$

16,275,922.26

† Joint Colonial Fund £388,500. Os. Od.

* Invested as follows:-

AMOUNT OF STOCK, &c.

NOMINAL VALUE.

COST PRICE.

MARKET VALUE.

STERLING INVESTMENT.

Natal, (1929-49)

..........

..3 % Stock.

Newcastle Corporation, (1945-55)......4%

}}

Queensland, (1940-60)

.........

.......5 %

£ 7,600. 0. 0

20,000. 0. 0

29,009.16.10

£ 5,646. 7. 0 (75)

19,200. 0 0 ̊ (92)

£ 5,700. 0. 0

18,400. 0. 0

28,719.14.11

""

(91)

26,398.19. 1

Treasury Bond, (1930)

............. 5 1 2 %

50,000. 0. 0

51,119. 0. 1 (100g) 50,187.10. 0

RECEIPT.

£106,609.16.10 £ 104,685. 2. 0

£ 100,686 9. 1

PAYMENT.

Loan including Interest, &c. .........$ 5,053,337.86 Contribution from Imperial Govern-

ment

692,783.50

Total............$ 5,746,121.36

Shing Mun Valley Scheme

Harbour Development Aerodrome Site....... Balance at Bank

$ 2,790,227.88 416,729.68 2,109,161.99 430,001.81

Total......

.$

5,746,121.36

*

Appendix A (1)

REPORT ON THE FINANCE FOR THE YEAR 1929.

REVENUE,

The total revenue for the year amounted to $23,554,475 being $1,275,875 more than the estimate and $1,413,924 less than the revenue in 1928. The Revenue for 1928 included however a sum of $1,963,358.77 which represented the recovery of previous Expenditure chargeable to loan account.

Compared with 1928 there were increases under all heads except Licences and Internal Revenue, Fees of Courts &c. and Miscellaneous Receipts.

2. The principal heads showing excess over the estimates were as follows:-

(a) Post Office

(b) Kowloon Canton Railway

(c) Rent of Government Properties etc.

(d) Interest

(†) Land Sales

(e) Miscellaneous Receipts

$ 73,665.

82,445

101,333

182,838

458,477

936,171

The increases Interest (d) and Miscellaneous Receipts (e) are mainly due to the fall in exchange. Sterling investments and deposits realised during the year have shewn a considerable dollar appreciation on that account. The other increases in- dicate that the improvement in local conditions referred to in the 1928 report have been maintained,

3. The principal heads showing deficit compared with the estimates were as follows:

(a) Licences and Internal Revenue

(b) Fees of Courts &c.

$498,585 65,595

The revenue derived from the Opium Monopoly and Stamp Duties fell considerably short of the amount estimated.

EXPENDITURE.

4. The total expenditure brought to account amounted to $21,983,257 being $2,816,393 less than the estimate and $753,015 more than the expenditure in 1928.

- A (1) 2

2-

The principal heads showing savings were as follows:-

SAVINGS.

Cadet Service

$

48,758

Junior Clerical Service

56,198

Imports and Exports Office

65,180

Harbour Master's Department

24,934

Prisons Department

35,772

Medical

103,058

Sanitary

108,317

Education

107,452

Public Works Recurrent

224,492

""

Extraordinary

1,293,630

*

Kowloon Canton Railway

154,947

Military Contribution

729,050

Pensions

50,246

These savings in so far as they relate to personal emolu- ments are accounted for by lapsing salaries due to vacant posts and officers on leave.

Other important items were :

Imports and Exports Office.-The amount of opium sold was considerably less than anticipated and there was a cor- responding reduction in the expenses attendant upon the pre- paration of raw opium for sale.

Harbour Master's Department.-One new launch was not completed during the year as expected and there was a conse- quent saving in fuel, equipment, stores.

Prisons Department.-A considerable saving was effected in Rent of Quarters for European Warders and Subsistence of Prisoners.

Medical Department.-Savings resulted on practically all sub-heads particularly Bedding and Clothing, Field Works, Fuel and Light, Maintenance of Lunatics at Canton and Medicines and Surgical Instruments.

- A (1) 3

Sanitary Department.-Notable savings were effected under Exhumation Recurrent, Running Expenses for Motor Lorries and Vans. Under special expenditure the substitution of a cheaper type of barge and the purchase of 6 Motor Lorries at a lower price than estimated occasioned further savings.

Education Department.-Capitation Grants. Subsidies to Schools and Building Grants were the sub-heads under which large savings resulted.

Public Works Recurrent.-Savings were shewn on practical- lv all sub-heads, the exceptions being Typhoon and Rainstorm Damages and Water Works.

Public Works Extraordinary.-Savings were shewn on prac- tically all heads and were mainly due to the non-completion or complete postponement of works provided for in the estimates.

Kowloon Canton Railway.-The principal items shewing large savings were Coal for Locomotives-due to lower price and the suspension of through traffic for 37 days-and Locomotive Repairs due to the fact that the overhaul of two engines was not undertaken.

Military Contribution.—A large amount due for recoverv in respect of previous overpayments was deducted from the 1929 payment.

Pensions. It is not possible to forecast the amount required with any degree of complete accuracy and the sum provided proved to be somewhat more than that actually required.

The principal heads showing excess were as follows:

EXCESS.

Public Works Department

Miscellaneous Services

$223,383 57.972

In the case of the Public Works Department the excess was entirely due to expenditure occasioned by the Water Shortage.

Under Miscellaneous Services, Rent Allowances and Ex- change Compensation were the contributory causes.

5. The Revenue for the year exceeded the expenditure by the sum of $1,571,218.

- A (1) 4 -

6. The following statement shows the Liabilities and Assets on the 31st December, 1929:

LIABILITIES.

Deposits not Available Postal Agencies ..... Suspense Account Suspense Trade Loan Overdraft Trade Loan Public Works (1927)

Loan Account Adjustment of Ex-

change Account

C.

ASSETS.

5,972.14 Advances

C.

1,286,152.42 Subsidiary Coins

1,815,287.09

679,145.35

1,399,759.30

9,682.00

18,447.82

602,383.96 Building Loans 807,553.58 Imprest

2,532,468.64 House Service Acct.

tJoint Colonial A/c... 4,604,444.44

430,001.81 Unallocated Stores,

(P. W. D.),.................

408,843.64

948,537.35 Unallocated Stores,

(Railway)

151,752.98

Coal Account

4,844.86

*Investment A/c.

1,240,712.28

Fixed Deposit A/e...

1,000,000.00

Total Liabilities ... 6,613,069.90

Balance at Banks

General A/cs

Balance at Banks P. W. (1927) Loan Account

Trade Loan Out-

1,134,577.63

430,001.81

standing

Crown Agents'

9,662,852.36

3,340,022.22

38,400.84

Balance

Total......$16,275,922.26

Current Account...

† Joint Colonial Fund £388,500 Os. Od.

* Invested as follows:

AMOUNT OF STOCK, &C.

STERLING INVESTMENT.

Natal. (1929-49).3 % Stock. Newcastle Corporation.

CATEGOR

Total.....$16,275,922.26

NOMINAL VALUE.

COST PRICE, MARKET VALUE.

£ 7.600. 0. 0 £ 5,647. 7.0 (75) £5,700. 0. 0

(1945-55)..

.41%

20.000. 0.0

19,200. 0. 0(92)

Queensland, (1940-60) ...5 %

29,009.16 10

Treasury Bond, (1930) ...5%

50,000. 0. 0

28,719.14.11 (91)

18,400. 0. 0

26,398.19. 1

51,119. 0. 1(1003) 50,187.10. 0

£106,609.16.10 £101,685. 2. 0 £ 100,686. 9. 1

A (1) 5-

7. The following table shows the Revenue and Expenditure during the last five years:-

1925

$

1926

$

1927

1928

1929

$

$

Revenue...23,244,365 21,131,582 21,344,536 24,968,399 23,554,475

Expendi-

ture......28.266,817 23,524,716 20,845,065 21,230,242 21,983,257 499,471 3,738,157 1,571,218

Surplus....

Deficit 5,022,452 2,393,134

PUBLIC DEBT.

8. The Inscribed Stock Loans of 1893 and 1906 amounted to £1,485,733 and the Sinking Fund stood at £674,622 being £43,571 more than the amount at credit of that fund at the end of 1928.

The Public Works Loan (Ordinance No. 14 of 1927) amount- ed to $4,927,000. The first part of this Loan was issued locally at par on November 1st, 1927, and Bonds were allotted to the value of $3,000,000. The second part was issued on November 1st, 1928, at a premium of 3 per cent-Bonds to the nominal value of $1,927,000 being allotted. The Sinking Fund amounted to £51,320 being £30,654 more than the amount at credit of the fund at the end of 1928.

GENERAL REMARKS.

9. The total receipts and payments in the Treasury Books during the year were $49,993,832 and $50,195,191 respectively. The figures not accounted for under revenue and expenditure relate to transactions under various heads such as Deposits, Advance, Subsidiary Coin, Unallocated Stores, etc.

10. Subsidiary Coins in stock on 31st December, were as follows:

20 cents

10

5

Copper

$

83,272

1,677,837

35,168

19,010

Total

$1,815,287

-c

A (1) 6

The nominal amount of coins in circulation was $17,914,370 and the market value stood practically at par.

11. The local circulation of notes and Specie in Reserve of the three banks having authorised issues were as follows on 31st December:

Hong Kong and Shanghai

Banking Corporation

Chartered Bank of India,

Australia and China

Note in Circulation.

Specie in Reserve.

$59,636,538 $37,600,000

17,166,328 7,000,000

Mercantile Bank of India,

Ltd.

1,928,465

750,000

Total

$78,731,331

$45,350,000

12. The rate of exchange for the Estimates was taken at 18. 10d. whereas the average rate for purpose of conversion in the Treasury books was 1s. 1ld.

C. McI. MESSER,

Colonial Treasurer.

2nd May, 1930.

A (1) 7

REPORT ON THE TRADE LOAN ACCOUNT FOR THE YEAR 1929.

During the course of the year, the Sterling Loan was für- ther reduced by £145,000, and on 31st December the liability in London with the Hongkong and Shanghai Banking Corpora- tion stood at £270,000. £1,530,000 of the original loan of £1,800,000 has now been refunded.

Redemptions of mortgages effected during 1929 amounted to $1,356,536.86, as against $2,604,930.00 in 1926; $4,845,879.76 in 1927; and $3,403,560.02 in 1928.

Twenty nine loans were repaid during the year.

Power of Sale was exercised in one instance. The principal was fully recovered, but a small loss was sustained in respect of interest.

sum

It was found necessary in two cases to enter into possession of certain properties. In one instance, it was considered ad- visable to purchase the equity of redemption from the Official Trustee, the borrower having been adjudicated bankrupt.

The Overdraft at Bank at the close of the year was $2,532,468.64.

The following table shews the financial position of the Loan on 31st December, 1929:~~

Total of Loans issued from 16th November, 1925,

on the security of Mortgages ....

Less redemptions effected during the years :-

$15,629,818.69

1926

1927

1928

1929

$ 2,604,930.00

4,845,879.76

3,403,560.02

1,356,536.86

12,210,906.64

$8,418,912.05

78,889.83

Less amount written off as irrecoverable

Total of Loans outstanding on 31st Dec., 1929... $ 3,340,022.22

- A (1) 8

Overdraft with the Hong Kong and Shanghai

Banking Corporation on 31st Dec., 1929...... $ 2,532,468.64

Interest in arrears on 31st December, 1926...... $

117,369.42

11

17

""

31st December, 1927...... $

206,818.64

1

"}

""

دو

31st December, 1928...... $

321,121.10

1

""

22

31st December, 1929...... $

416,237.93

Total number of Loans issued

Less number redeemed in:-

295

1926

1927

1928

1929

34

85

87

29

235

Number of Loans outstanding on 31st December, 1929...... 60

Loans obtained in London by the Hong Kong

Government

Less repaid in 1926

1927

22

17

""

1928

1929

22

22

£1,800,000

£400,000

£550,000

£435,000

£145,000

£1,530,000

Total outstanding on 31st December, 1929

£ 270,000

2nd May, 1930,

C. McI. MESSER,

Colonial Treasurer.

Appendix A (2)

REPORT OF THE ACTING AUDITOR, HONG KONG

ON THE AUDIT OFFICE,

and the examination of the various accounts in connection with Revenue, Expenditure, and Stores Accounts of the Colony of Hong Kong, and Kowloon-Canton Railway (British Section) for the financial year 1929.

OUTSTANDING QUESTIONS.

1. With reference to the opening paragraph of the Auditor's report on the Accounts for the financial year 1928, in connection with the defalcations by the Treasury Water Account Clerk, Carvalho Yeo, I have to report that the amount involved, viz. $15,329.95 has been written off, the authority of the Secretary of State having been conveyed in his Confidential despatch of the 22nd of October 1929.

2. With reference to paragraph 2 of the above-mentioned report, dealing with the question of the Exchange Account, I am still uninformed whether any decision has been arrived at as to the proposed adjustment of the balance standing to the credit of "Suspense Account Military Contribution", which on the 31st of December, 1929, was $556,129.30, being an increase of $52,024.60 on the previous year's balance.

REVENUE.

3. The Revenue Accounts of the Colony were examined in accordance with procedure adopted in the previous year, and as submitted to His Excellency the Governor and approved by yourself in the official programme of work. One hundred and ninety-two (192) queries were issued during the year 1929, all of which have been satisfactorily settled.

4. The total Revenue collected during the year, including proceeds from Land Sales, amounted to $23,554,475.16 being a decrease of $1,413,923.72 as compared with $24,968,398.88 in 1928, and an increase of $1,275,875.16 in comparison with the Estimated Revenue of $22,278,600.00. There was, in addition, an opening balance of $1,374,337.41 which brings the total re- venue receipts available for the financial year to $24,928,812.57.

5. The various items of Revenue which show an increase or decrease as compared with the Estimates are set forth in the detailed statement of Revenue, and I submit that the explana- tions tendered by the Colonial Treasurer may be accepted as correct. The Revenue for the year exceeded the Expenditure by $2,945,555.90.

A (2) 2

REVENUE INCREASES.

6. The following sub-heads of Revenue show the most noticeable increases as compared with the Estimates:

are:

Assessed Taxes

Carriage, Chair etc. Licences

Hawkers Licences

Tobacco Duties

China Companies Fees

Survey of Steamships

Message Fees

Postage

Railway-Passenger Service Foreign Line.

Home Line

Railway-Goods Service Home Line

Other Miscellaneous Receipts

Land Sales, Premia on New Leases

REVENUE DECREASES.

$97,112.60

36,747.33

29,256.00

272,814.07

38,331.81

15,415.10

17,690.92

55.774.07

83,077.22

25,197.69

10,586.94

448,225.39

936,171.29

7. The principal decreases as compared with the Estimates

Liquor Duties

$301,005.76

Opium Monopoly

348,508.28

Stamp Duties

283,221.17

Water Excess Supply and Meter Rents

104,541.70

ARREARS OF REVENUE.

8. A statement showing the arrears of Revenue at the termination of the financial year 1929 is enclosed showing a total sum of $353,213.70 outstanding on the 31st of December, 1929, since which date, and on the 31st of July, 1930, the position is as follows:

Collected since 1.1.1930 Written off

Outstanding on 31.7.1930

Total

$290,805.79

54,485.36

7,922.55

$353,213.70

On reviewing the statement it will be seen that the amount of $4,991.63 outstanding on the 31st July, 1930, in connection with Premia on New Leases, compares very favourably with the amount of $150,383.28 outstanding on the 31st of July, 1929, in respect of arrears of revenue for the year 1928. It will also be observed that a sum of $50,289.00 appears as having been written off, this involved no actual loss on the part of the Government, being in the nature of unrealized premia on account of cancellations and re-entries by Government.

Á (2) 3

EXPENDITURE.

9. The Expenditure Accounts of the Colony have been examined in accordance with the general procedure. Two hundred and eighteen (218) queries were raised in the course of the examination of the general expenditure accounts included in which are one hundred and five (105) queries on the Store Accounts, all of which have been satisfactorily settled.

The total expenditure for the financial year 1929 amounted to $21,983,256.67 being an apparent decrease of $2,816,393.33 on the total estimated expenditure, and an increase of $753,014.43 as compared with the total actual expenditure for the previous financial year.

SUPPLEMENTARY VOTES.

10. During the financial year it was found necessary to obtain supplementary votes amounting to $1,729,664.00. Further sums amounting to $17,551.00 were voted in 1930 to supplement the 1929 Estimates. The total amount provision- ally voted being $1,747,215.00. In comparing these totals with the Appropriation Account for 1929 it will be observed that, under Head 31-Public Works Extraordinary-Supplementary Voted, Miscellaneous-Pipe Line from Tytam to Stanley Village, a sum of $15,000.00 only appears, whereas the amount actually voted was $15,500.00. This was due to a clerical error.

Of the total of $17,551.00 found necessary to be voted in 1930 to authorize expenditure incurred during 1929 in excess of the Estimates, the principal items, with the explanations of the Colonial Treasurer are appended hereunder.

$9,027.00 Further cost of proceedings instituted by Government against the Hong Kong and Shanghai Banking Corporation for recredit- ing of sums paid out by them on forged cheques.

1,000.00 Due to the price of Drill ordered through the Crown Agents by the Superintendent of Prisons being higher than anticipated, and to the fall in exchange.

1,168.00 Owing to the payment of Exchange Com- pensation Allowances to officers returning from leave not having been fully estimated for.

1,290.00 Owing to Private Letter Boxes, obtained in 1924 and charged to Public Works Depart- ment, being transferred to a new item under Post Office.

1

A (2) 4

EXPENDITURE SAVINGS.

11. In comparing the expenditure with the Estimates it will be observed that there were savings on 30 heads, explanations of which are set out in the Draft Appropriation Account for the year, and which may be accepted as correct.

EXPENDITURE INCREASES.

12. The following heads of expenditure show the most. noticeable increases:

(a) Crown Solicitor

(b) Public Works Department Special Ex-

penditure...

(c) Miscellaneous Services

$ 9,652.30

223,383.18 57,971.87

The increase under A above was on account of the protracted proceedings taken by the Government against the Hong Kong and Shanghai Banking Corporation for re-crediting of sums paid out by the defendant Corporation on forged cheques uttered by Carvalho Yeo. The increase under B was on account of the

special expenditure, on emergency measures, taken by the Government to provide a sufficiently adequate supply of water during the drought experienced in the year 1929. I enclose a statement of the expenditure incurred, with explanatory re- marks. The increase under C was due to the fall in exchange which necessitated additional exchange compensation.

EXCESSES ON SUB-HEADS.

13. The excesses on sub-heads of expenditure as recorded in the Appropriation Account have been authorized in accord- ance with the provisions of Colonial Regulation No. 281.

ANNUAL STATEMENT OF REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE,

14. The Annual Statement of Revenue and Expenditure has been examined in detail with the various books of account, and is duly certified and submitted in triplicate.

STORE ACCOUNTS.

15. All departmental Store Accounts have been examined during the year and call for no special comment.

SURPRISE SURVEYS.

16. Four hundred and seventy-seven (477) surprise surveys of Cash, Stamps, Railway Tickets, Stores, Bonded Warehouses, Opium etc., were undertaken during the year, details of which have been submitted to you in the monthly returns for the year 1929. All observations raised in the course of the surveys have been satisfactorily settled.

----

A (2) 5

STAMP VAULT.

17. The main Stock of Stamps (Postage and Revenue), Post- cards, Watermarked Paper, Imperial and Local Postal Notes, have been examined and were found to agree with the respec- tive balances shown in the various stock books.

SECURITY BONDS.

18. As in previous years the Security Bonds given by officers for the due discharge of their duties, were examined by a Board consisting of the Crown Solicitor and the Second Assistant Audi- tor, and were found to be satisfactory.

STATEMENT OF ADVANCES AND REPAYMENT OF ADVANCES.

19. The Statement of Advances and Repayment of Ad- vances has been examined with the Treasury Books of Account and found to agree.

STATEMENT OF DEPOSITS AND REPAYMENT OF DEPOSITS.

20. This Statement has been examined with the Treasury Accounts and found to be in agreement.

SECRET SERVICE REWARD FUND.

21. The total receipts of the Imports and Exports Reward Fund, which are derived from fines forfeitures and sale of con- fiscated articles, amounted to $60,132.00. This figure includes the balance of $34,149.83 carried forward from the 1928 Ac- ount. This procedure was adopted on account of the decrease in receipts under this Head in 1928, when the payments would have exceeded the receipts had not the latter been considerably augmented by the sale of a quantity of confiscated drugs through the Crown Agents. The payments of rewards to informers during the year 1929 amounted to $39,647.71, the balance of $20,484.29 being carried forward to the 1930 Account.

STATEMENT OF SUBSIDIARY COINS.

22. The enclosed Statement has been examined with the Treasury Accounts and found to agree.

NEW TERRITORIES.

23. All the Accounts have been regularly examined and were found in order. In connection with the examination of the accounts of the District Officer, Northern District, the sys- tem of accounting was revised by this Department at the request of the District Officer; the revised system came into operation on the 1st January, 1930.

HARBOUR OUTSTATIONS.

24. The Accounts have been regularly examined and call for no comment.

The following outstations were visited during the year: Aberdeen. Stanley, Shaukiwan, Yaumati, Cheung Chau, Sai Kung and Tai O.

(2) 6

WEIHAIWEI BRITISH POSTAL AGENCY.

25. The monthly account of the Agency has been regularly examined in this office. During the Auditor's annual tour of inspection to Weihaiwei, a complete survey of all cash and postal matter was made with satisfactory results.

REGISTRAR OF COMPANIES.

26. This Account was examined in detail at Shanghai, vide the Auditor's report submitted under covering letter No. 46/99 of the 12th of September, 1929.

CUSTODIAN OF ENEMY PROPERTY,

27. A final supplementary audited statement as at the 30th June, 1929, embodying the transactions subsequent to the pre- vious statement dated the 31st December, 1927, was submitted to the Secretary of State under cover of Hong Kong Despatch No. 411 of the 19th September, 1929. As there were no further transactions in the interval between the 30th June 1929 and the 31st of August 1929, the accounts were closed and the final balances of the two accounts with the Hong Kong and Shanghai Banking Corporation, namely the Local Custodian's Account $49,478.89 = £4,883.9.3, and the Local Clearing Office Account $8,067.86= £796.5.6 were remitted to the Secretary of State for transmission to the Crown Agents for the Colonies with the supplementary statement before mentioned.

There are, I understand, certain outstanding questions, re- garding liquidated property in Hong Kong on which the Ad- ministrator of Enemy Property requires information. These questions are receiving the attention of the Local Custodian.

STATEMENT OF ASSETS AND LIABILITIES.

28. The Statement has been examined and may be accepted.

The balances of the various suspense accounts amounting to $602,383.96 are shown in the "Suspense Account Summary of Receipts and Payments" enclosed, and include the sum of $556,129.30 being the total amount held in suspense in respect of the liability for Military Contribution on Exchange transac- tions.

RAILWAY REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE.

29. A copy of the Annual Report of the Kowloon-Canton Railway for the year 1929 is submitted. The various statements contained therein have been examined and found correct. Dur- ing the year repeated surprise surveys were made at all stations. and the stock of tickets and cash earnings checked.

A (2) 7-

RAILWAY EARNINGS.

30. A statement showing the gross receipts for the past five years is shown on page 11 of the report; and it will be observed that the gross receipts for the year were $890,744.54, being an increase of $69,749.64 as compared with $820,994.90 for the year 1928. The Revenue shows the very satisfactory excess over Expenditure for the year of $138,767.19.

The foreign passenger receipts show an increase of 23.15% on the previous year in spite of the fact that the through pas- senger service to Canton was suspended for 37 days.

SUSPENSION OF TRAFFIC CLAIMS.

31. The claims against the Chinese Section on account of suspension of Through and Joint Sectional Traffic, hire of Rolling Stock, and Demurrage, which stood at $997,596.21 at the end of 1928, have increased by $23,966.40 in respect of suspension of traffic during 1929, making a total of $1,021,562.61 outstand- ing at the end of 1929. The Debits in respect of Demurrage and Hire of Rolling Stock for the year 1929 were accepted by the Administration of the Chinese Section and the accounts adjusted. The claims for Suspension of Traffic for 1923-1929 and Demurrage of Wagons for 1924 and 1925 were however not accepted, and the question of the adjustment of the claim of $1,021,562.61 has been referred to the Secretary of State.

RAILWAY EXPENDITURE.

32. The working expenses for the year 1929 amounted to $751,977.35 being a decrease of $48,976.82 on the amount ex- pended in 1928.

FARES ALLOCATION.

33. The final division sheets of Through and Joint Sectional traffic receipts have been agreed between the two Administra- tions to the end of 1929.

RAILWAY STORES.

34. Test surveys of the Main and Workshop Stores were carried out during the year and call for no comment.

PRAYA EAST ACCOUNT.

35. The account has been examined monthly and all obser- vations made have been satisfactorily settled.

The Reclamation Scheme is rapidly nearing completion. Many new Leases have been granted to Subscribers on the understanding that they will have to bear a proportionate part of the excess cost over the estimate when the amount is finally known.

.

A (2) 8

PUBLIC WORKS LOAN ACCOUNT.

36. The allocation of expenditure on the works authorized in the Schedule of Public Works Loan Ordinance No. 14 of 1927 is as follows:

Head 1.

Waterworks Development

Head 2.

$3,500,000

Aerodrome and Harbour Development. 1,500,000

Since the inception of the Loan, the expenditure incurred up to the 31st December, 1929, is as follows:-

Head 1.

Head 2.

$2,790,227.88 2,525,891.67

The sum of £70,000 received from the Imperial Government as part of the total contribution of £100,000, was expended during the year on the development of the Aerodrome site, and is included in the figure of $2,109,161.99 appearing against Head 2, sub-head 2, as the total expenditure on this sub-head up to the 31st December, 1929.

A Statement showing the expenditure from Loan Funds at the termination of the financial year 1929 is enclosed, and from which it will be observed that the total expenditure on Head 2 exceeded the approved appropriation from Loan Funds by $1,025,891.67. After the contribution of £70,000 ($692,783.50) has been deducted there remains an excess of $333,108.17 over the allocation. This amount was met during the financial year from the unexpended balance on Head 1 pending an Advance from the surplus balances of the Colony. I would, however, inform you that the excess expenditure, together with amount which was estimated to be expended during the finan- cial year 1930, was covered by an Advance Warrant authorizing the sum to be advanced from the surplus balances of the Colony during the present financial year. The amount advanced from the surplus balances of the Colony will be reimbursed from a future loan. Legislative authority for the procedure I have men- tioned was duly asked for and obtained.

the

The accounts for the year 1929 have been examined and found to be well kept.

TRADE LOAN ACCOUNT.

37. The Accounts for 1929 have been examined and found

to be in order,

- A (2) 9-

The following statements are submitted which show the financial position of the Account as at the 31st of December, 1929:

(a) Trial Balance

(b) Working Account

(c) Balance Sheet

(d) Statement of Outstanding Loans

(e) Statement of Outstanding Interest.

The Sterling Loan has been reduced to the amount of £270,000.

It was found necessary in one instance only for the Govern- ment to exercise the power of sale, the mortgaged property being disposed of by private treaty. The amount realized, covered the original loan and a portion of the outstanding in- terest thereon, the balance of interest due, $2,382.90 having to be written off.

AUDIT STAFF.

38. A Statement is submitted showing changes in the Audit Staff during 1929.

Mr. Phelips made his annual tour of inspection to Weihaiwei and Shanghai during the period from the 14th June to the 5th August, 1929; Capt. A. F. B. Howard M.c. acted as Auditor during the period of Mr. Phelips' absence.

Mr. T. Dallin, First Assistant Auditor, proceeded on home leave on the 16th of March, returning to the Colony and re- suming duty on the 21st November, 1929.

During the year European Probationers for the Senior Clerical and Accounting Staff were temporarily attached to this. department for instruction in accordance with the request of the Colonial Secretariat.

The standard and progress of the work has been well main- tained.

T. DALLIN,

Acting Auditor.

25th August, 1930.

B 1-

REPORT ON THE ASSESSMENT FOR THE YEAR 1930-1931.

1. By Order of His Excellency the Governor in Council a new valuation of the whole Colony has been made and the Rateable Value has thereby been increased from $31,617,566 to $33,069,602 an addition of $1,452,036 or 4.59 per cent.

2. The following Table gives a comparison of the Assessments for the years 1929-1930 and 1930-1931 :-

DISTRICT.

VALUATION 1920-1930.

VALUATION 1930-1931.

INCREASE.

PER

CENT.

$

The City of Victoria,

22,741,241 22,741,244 23,316,978 23,316,978

575,734

2.53

Hill District,...

529,405

555,375

Shaukiwan, Saiwanho, and

Quarry Bay,

597,670

624,345

Hong Kong Villages,.

1,331.753 | 2,458,828 1.455,616

2,635,336 176,508 7.18

Kowloon Point,

1.566,890

1,750.345

Yaumati,

1,802,620

1,868,604

Mongkoktsui,

1,231,426

1,417,806

**

Hunghom & Hok Un,.......

628,015

652,120

Kowloon Villages,

224,242

289,822

New Territories,

964,301 6,417,194 1,138,791 | 7,117,288

699,794 | 10-90

Total..........

31,617,566

33,069,602 1,452,036

4.59

3. The number of tenements reported to be vacant averaged about 144 monthly, as compared with 192 last year.

4. During the year ending 28th May, 1930, 1168 Interim Valuations were made as follows:-

and

New or rebuilt tenements

tenements structurally altered .......

Assessments cancelled, tenements; resumed, pulled down or being in other respects not rateable....

Number and increase

CITY OF VICTORIA.

REST OF COLONY.

No.

Rateable Value.

No.

Rateable Value.

247

489,210

773

630,495

62

150,810

86

60,805

309

338,400

859

569,690

B 2

5. The following comparative statement shows the Rateable Value of the Colony of Hong Kong in each of the ten years from 1921-1922 to 1930-1931 inclusive :

Rateable

Year.

Value.

Increase as compared with previous

year.

Percentage of In-

crease in Rateable Value as compared with previous year.

$

$

%

1921-22

18,696,660

1,287,701

7.40

1922-23

19,805,929

1,109,269

5.91

1923-24

21,059,700

1,253,771

6.33

1924-25

22,147,951

1,088,251

5.16

1925-26

27,287,862

5,139,911

23.20

1926-27 27,998,237

710,375

2.60

1927-28

29,016,439

1,018,202

3.64

1928-29

30,395,447

1,379,008

4.75

1929-30

31,617,566

1,222,119

4.02

1930-31

33,069,602

1,452,036

4.59

J

6. In the years 1921-1922 to 1930-1931 the rateable Value of the Colony has increased by $14,372,942 or 76.87 per cent.

THE TREASURY,

28th May, 1930.

C. McI. MESSER,

Colonial Treasurer & Assessor.

Appendix C.

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY FOR CHINESE AFFAIRS FOR THE YEAR 1929.

REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE.

(Tables I & II).

1. The Revenue derived from all sources during the year was $16.828.36 and the expenditure was $93,140.47.

PROTECTION OF WOMEN AND GIRLS.

(Table III).

Ordinance No. 4 of 1897.

Ordinance No. 21 of 1929.

Ordinance No. 6 of 1893.

Ordinance No. 1 of 1923.

Ordinance No. 22 of 1929.

2. The number of persons reported to the Po Leung Kuk as missing during the year was 58 of whom 7 were found as compared with 44 and 10 in 1928.

3. Fifteen names were added to the list of girls under bond. The number of names on the list on December 31st was 26.

4. Part III of the Female Domestic Service Ordinance was brought into force by proclamation on December 1st, 1930. The number of muitsai registered under the ordinance on December 31st was 31.

The number of prosecutions undertaken by the Department under Ordinance 4 of 1897 was 7 with 7 convictions: under Ordinance 1 of 1923, 11 with 12 convictions.

5. Under the Offences against the Person Ordinance No. 13 of 1929 the sale or purchase of a minor child is now a criminal offence. As a result of investigations by police officers of the department two persons were charged and convicted of taking. part in the sale of a child. Previous to the passing of this ordinance, proceedings under the Deportation Ordinance were taken against a number of persons suspected of being engaged in the Traffic in Children and 23 males and 34 females were after enquiry banished for life from the Colony.

C 2

6. For a fuller report on the work of the Po Leung Kuk see Annexe A of this report.

EMIGRATION.

(Ordinance 30 of 1915).

(i)-Emigration of Women and Children.

(Table IV).

7. The number of female and minor passengers examined and allowed to proceed shows a decrease of 27.3% over the figures for 1928. Of the female emigrants 76.6% went with or to join relatives, 21% were maid servants and the remainder consisted of tailoresses, farmers and hairdressers. 131 women were detained for enquiries as compared with 75 in 1928. The number repatriated during the year was 36.

(ii)-Assisted Emigration. (Table V).

8. The figures for the year show a decrease of 7% as com- pared with 1928.

CHINESE BOARDING HOUSES.

(Ordinance 23 of 1917). (Table VI).

9. During the year 12 convictions were obtained under the ordinance as compared with 37 in 1928.

PERMITS.

(Ordinance 3 of 1888).

10. 1,544 permits to fire crackers were issued of which 1,274 were for weddings and the remainder for birthdays, shop openings, etc. 122 permits were issued for theatrical per- formances.

Other permits issued were 23 for religious ceremonies and 6 for processions.

REGISTRATION OF BOOKS.

(Ordinance 2 of 1888).

11. 59 books were registered during the year as compared with 47 in 1928.

REGISTRATION OF NEWSPAPERS.

(Ordinance 25 of 1927).

12. From the coming into force of the printers and publishers ordinance 1927 to December 31st. 1929, 161 verna- cular papers have been registered; of these 102 were registered during the year.

C 3

DISTRICT WATCH.

(Ordinance 3 of 1888).

(Table VII).

18. The District Watch Committee met on 12 occasions at the Secretariat for Chinese Affairs. In addition 4 meetings at which His Excellency the Governor presided were held

held at Government House. The following gentlemen served on the committee throughout the year:

Mr. Wong Kam-fuk, Mr. Lei Yau-tsun, Hon. Sir Shouson Chow, Kt.,

Mr. Tong Yat-chun, Mr. Fung Ping-shan, Mr. Lo Cheung-shiu,

Mr. Wong Iu tung,

Mr. To Sz-tun,

Hon. Dr. R. H. Kotewali,

C.M.G.,

Mr. Li Po-kwai,

Hon. Dr. S. W. Tso,

Mr. Li Yik-mui.

Messrs. Wong Ping Suen and Lo Chung Kui retired on the expiration of their year of office and were succeeded by Messrs. TANG SHIC KIN and MA CHUK CHỊU.

14. At the end of the year the District Watch force was at its full strength of 125 men. 7 members of the force retired on pension, 6 were dismissed, 3 resigned, 1 deserted and 1 died; 18 new recruits were engaged during the year.

Sub-Inspector Carey remained in charge of the force throughout the year. The post is an arduous and responsible one involving as it does the control almost single handed of a considerable body of men, the duties of liaison officer between the police and District Watch, and the detailed supervision of the activities of the detective branch. Sub-Inspector Carey worthily maintained the high standard set by his predecessors in this office.

15. The total number of police court cases secured by members of the force was 737 including over 500 cases of larceny as compared with 848 in 1928. The record in this respect is very satisfactory seeing that for three months from May to July every man who could be spared was fully occupied in maintaining order amongst the queues waiting at street fountains. These men performed a monotonous and often difficult task in a satisfactory and tactful manner and credit is due to them as well as to the public for the patience with which the long period of water restriction was endured.

C 4

comm

TUNG WA HOSPITAL AND MAN MO TEMPLE,

(Table VIII to Table X(E)).

Ordinances 1 of 1870, 9 of 1904 and 10 of 1908.

16. The following gentlemen served on the Committee for 1929:

Mr. M. K. Lo, Mr. Ho Yi Cheong, Mr. Leung Yau Shang, Mr. Leung Yuk Ki, Mr. Yu Cheuk Shang, Mr. Lo Chuk Chai, Mr. Chan Tsz Hang, Mr. Ma Si Chuen,

Mr. Ma Wai Nun,

Mr. Ho Sai Ki,

Mr. Mok Tat Huen, Mr. Kwok Sheung Ngo, Mr. Lam Kau Mau, Mr. Chan Ping, Mr. Kwok Lam Shong, Mr. Kwan Wan Pak.

17. The number of in-patients treated during 1929 was 12,826 of whom 7,107 came under Western treatment and 5,219 under native treatment. The number of out-patients was 207,487 of whom 186,178 attended the herbal clinic and 21,259 the Western clinic.

The number of destitutes temporarily housed and then sent to their homes at the expense of the Hospital was 1,571,

18. The Tung Wa Hospital Committee rendered signal service during the acute water shortage of the spring and early summer months by erecting a number of water tanks on the sea front and generally by bringing to the notice of the author- ities suggestions and complaints and by explaining the position to the public.

19. The outstanding event of the year was the opening by His Excellency the Governor on November 27th of the Eastern Branch of the Tung Wah Hospital. The building situated at the head of the So Kon Po Valley was erected at а cost of $315,400.00 and is designed to form part of a large scheme. This fine building with its up-to-date equipment is in every way a credit to the successive Boards of Directors and their helpers who for the past 10 years have spared no pains to raise the funds necessary for its construction and maintenance.

During the year a new school building was erected at the back of the Man Mo Temple at a cost of $15,000.00 to house the six vernacular free schools maintained by the committee in the Central District.

This year also saw the completion of the Wing Pit Ting or Farewell Pavilion for use in connection with funerals which was erected on a site granted by Government on the Pokfulam Road at a cost of $13,000.00.

5

KWONG WA HOSPITAL,

(Table XII).

20. The following gentlemen served on the Committec for 1929:

Li Keng Po,

Ho Sing Chau,

Leung Shau Yu,

Wu Foon,

Wong Iu Nam,

Kwok Tam Wan,

Wong Tat Wing,

Hung Iu To,

Tsang Yung,

Ng Keng Yu, Chan Kam Chuen, Lui Wai Shun.

20. (a) The number of in-patients admitted during the year was 8,810 of whom 6,915 elected to receive Western treatinent and 1,895 Native treatment. The number of out-patients was 135,528, 94,067 under Native and 41,191 under Western treat-

ment.

21. The new maternity block with accommodation for 55 patients was completed during the year at a cost of $56,305 30 and was formally opened on September 28, 1929.

22. Statement of accounts and other reports furnished by the Committee of the Tung Wa Hospital are published for general information (Tables VIII to X(E)).. Full details of the income and expenditure of the Tung Wa Hospital and Kwong Wa Hospital are to be found in the annual volumes published in Chinese by the two committees. Further information regarding the work of the hospitals will be found in the report of the Medical Department.

23. The resignation of Dr. E. W. Kirk from the post of Visiting Medical Officer took place at the end of the year. Dr. Kirk accepted this appointment in June 1927 and his tenure of office covered a period of considerable expansion and progress in the work of the two hospitals. In matters of administration and especially in connection with the equipment and organisation of the new branch hospital his advice and assistance has proved of inestimable value to successive Boards of Directors and the news of his resignation was received with general regret.

TSAN YUK MATERNITY HOSPITAL.

(Table XIII).

WAN TSAI MATERNITY HOSPITAL.

24. An account of the working of these hospitals will be found in the report of the Medical Department,

- C 6 -

CHINESE PUBLIC DISPENSARIES.

(Tables XIV to XVII).

25. In outlying districts where there are no hospitals the dispensaries fill a most important place in providing free medical attention to thousands of people. At all the dispensaries a weekly gynaecological clinic is held and at some of the bigger ones a women's clinic is held twice a week. The dispensaries are also free vaccination centres. The number of cases treated in 1929 was 209,359 as against 192,152 in 1928. Vaccinations numbered 27,658 as against 49,941 in 1928.

A permanent building to house the Shaukiwan Public Dis- pensary was erected during the year at a cost of $19,500.00 and opened on August 31st, 1929.

CHINESE PERMANENT CEMETERY.

(Table XVIII).

26. An extension to this cemetery measuring 89,000 square feet was granted by Government in 1928 and the work of pre- paring new terraces is well in hand.

CHINESE RECREATION Ground,

(Table XIX).

PASSAGE MONEY FUND.

(Table XX). TRANSLATIONS.

27. The total number of translations made in the depart- ment during 1929 was 1,606 as compared with 1,572 in 1928. 824 of these were from Chinese into English and 782 from English into Chinese. In addition a large number of translations made in other Government departments were sent to this office for revision,

FACTORIES. (Table XXIII).

28. Trade in general remained very dull during the year and with the factories still working much below their full capacity, there was no increase in the number of women and children employed. The knitting factories in Kowloon and the cigarette and perfumery factories in Hong Kong are the largest employers of women and girls, such work being peculiarly suit- able for female labour. Several glass factories closed down during the year owing to lack of trade and the high price of coal.

As a result of enquiries made during the previous year into the conditions prevailing in white lead and vermillion factories, the Industrial Employment of Children Ordinance was amended by the passing of the Industrial Employment of Women, Young

2

- C 7

Persons and Children Amendment Ordinance, No. 24 of 1929. This marks a further step forward in factory legislation in this Colony. Under this Ordinance the list of Dangerous Trades is extended to include the manufacture of vermillion and lead processes (white lead). This Ordinance also prohibits the em- ployment of women and young persons in any factory or industrial undertaking at night between 10 p.m. and 6 a.m.

The total number of accidents in factories reported during the year was 86 (8 fatal) as against 59 (7 fatal) for the preceed- ing year.

LABOUR.

29. The year was marked by an almost complete absence of trouble in the labour world. Records kept during the past two years show that except in the case of beef and mutton the cost of the bare necessities of life has not appreciably risen during that period. At the same time trade generally has been dull and the competition for employment keen while the labour unions are still suffering from the depression which followed the com- munist coup at Canton in December 1927. Most of the unions reached the height of their power while communism was on the ascendancy in the province and adopted the new creed with fervour: when disillusionment came they were left with dis- credited leaders and empty purses. In very few instances indeed were the integrity and ability of the union officials equal to their task and the decline of their influence seems to have come about unregretted.

An attempt made during August and September by dele- gales of a communist group in Shanghai to establish in the Colony a federation of labour unions failed signally to secure the support of the local association and when after some two months subterranean activity the organisers were rounded up while holding a secret meeting with some fifty of their followers, it was found that apart from the ringleaders themselves no one of the smallest consequence was present. Many indeed were un- employed persons who had received small sums of money to secure their attendance.

TEMPLES.

(Table XXII).

30. The following gentlemen served on the Chinese Temples Committee during the year:

(a) Hon. Sir Shouson Chow, Kt., Hon. Dr. R. H. Kote- wall, C.M.G.. Hon. Dr. S. W. Tso, O.B.E.,-- Chinese members of the Legislative Council.

(b) Mr. Lei Yau Tsun, C.B.E.,-Representative of the

District Watch Committee.

}

C 8

(c) Mr. Wong Kwong Tin, Mr. T. N. Chau,--Chinese

members of the Sanitary Board.

(d) Mr. M. K. Lo,-Chairman of the Tung Wa Hospital

Committee.

(e) Mr. Ma Chui Chiu,-Senior member of the Po

Leung Kuk Committee.

(f) Mr. Ho Sing Chau,-Chairman of the Kwong Wa

Hospital Committee.

(g) The Secretary for Chinese Affairs (Chairman).

Mr. Chan Tin Shan succeeded Mr. Ma Chui Chiu in April as the representative of the Po Leung Kuk Committee.

31. The Committee met on 10 occassions at the Secretariat for Chinese Affairs. Mr. Wong Kwong Tin acted as honorary secretary with the assistance of Mr. R. R. Todd of the Secre- tariat for Chinese Affairs.

32. During the year contributions amounting to $8,000.00 from the surplus funds of the Tin Hau and Tam Kung Temples at Shaukiwan were made towards the cost of the new Shau- kiwan public dispensary, and a sum of $28,000.00 from the balance to the credit of the Tin Hau Temple at Yaumati was granted to the Kwong Wa Hospital for the new Maternity Block. The committee also advanced from the general fund a sum of $3,000.00 towards the reconstruction on a new site of the Pak Tai Temple at Hok Un, the original temple having been demolished in the course of improvements in the locality.

33. Temples taken over and let by tender by the Committee during the year included the following:-

Pak Tai Temple, Cheung Chau Island,

Ngai Yee Pak Kung Temple, Quarry Bay, Tam Kung Temple, Wong Nei Chung, Tin Hau Temple, Aberdeen,

Pak Tai Temple, Hok Un,

Tin Hau Temple, Ping Chau Island,

Hung Shing Temple, Aplichau,

Kun Yam Temple, Hung Hom.

THE WATER SHORTAGE.

34. Figures and facts concerning the water famine of 1929 will be found in the report of the department concerned but some recognition seems appropriate here of the exemplary pati- ence shown by the Chinese Community in the face of great discomfort and often of actual hardship. For some six months wide areas of the City were entirely dependent on water carried from street fountains. Those who could afford to hire carriers did so, though many found the cost a serious burden. Others

C 9

were forced to dispense with the services of a member of the family for hours daily in order to obtain two buckets of water, and this loss of working hours must have pressed hardly on many. The golden opportunity offered to the enemies of order was not overlooked, but attempts from time to time to excite popular feeling by the distribution of leaflets met with no success. Great credit is due to the general public but even more to the leaders of the Chinese Community who gave up much valuable time to hearing complaints and suggestions and passing these on to the authorities. In this task every assistance was given them by the officials concerned. The District Watch Committee, the Committees of the Chinese Hospitals, the Chinese Chamber of Commerce and many other bodies rendered valuable assist- ance as did the Chinese Sub-Committee of the Water Emergency Committee. An organisation of Street Committees to ensure the equitable distribution of water was set on foot and had already begun to function in certain localities when the fall of rain made it possible to relax the restriction.

STAFF.

Secretary for Chinese Affairs.

35. The Hon. Mr. E. R. Hallifax acted as Colonial Secre- tary from 1st to 23rd January, went on leave from 24th January to 7th November, and resumed duties as Secretary for Chinese Affairs from 8th November to 31st December. The Hon. Mr.

R. A. C. North acted as Secretary for Chinese Affairs from 1st January to 7th November.

March 20th, 1930.

"

A. E. WOOD,

Secretary for Chinese Affairs.

Heads of Revenue.

Table I.

Revenue for the years 1928 and 1929.

Details of Revenue

Licences and Internal Revenue not other-- wise specified,

Fees of Court

or

Office, Payments for Specific l'urposes, and Reimburse-

ments-in-aid,.

Interest,

Chinese Boarding House Licences, Emigration Passage Brokers' Licences, Forfeitures,

Certificates to Chinese proceeding to foreign countries

Bond by Non-resident Householders, Official Signatures,

Interest accrued on official account,

Other Miscellaneous Receipts,

Permits for Firework Displays,

...

Ordinance under which received.

Revenue in

1928.

Revenue in

1929.

Increase.

Decrease.

c.

No. 1 of 1889 & No. 4 of 1908.

18,072.00

15.052.00

No. 30 of 1915,

1,200.00

1,200,00

75.00

20.00

..

3,020.00

55.00

No. 6 of 1923.

250.00

100.00

150.00

No. 3 of 1888.

No. 14 of 1913.

138.00

80.00

58.00

205.53

62.01

143.52

Total,.

100.00

314.35

214.35

20,040,53

16,828.36

214.35

3 426.52

Deduct Increase,

Total Decrease,

214.35

3,212.17

A. E. WOOD,

Secretary for Chinese Affairs.

--

、་

Table II.

Revenue and Expenditure of the Secretariat for Chinese Affairs since 1920.

Revenue.

Expenditure.

Year.

Total.

Decrease.

Increase.

Total.

Decrease.

Increase.

Percent-

age of

Expen

diture to

Revenue.

C 11

*A

c.

C.

C.

3

$

C.

%

1920,

18,007.65

3,423.07

57,716,27

5,081.70

320.51

1921,

15,659.34

2,348.31

18,705.03

39,011.24

102.25

1922,

15,514.50

144.50

21,115.67

2,410.64

136.10

1923,

16,777.69

1,263.19

28,795.63

7,679.96

171.63

1924,

18,716.08

1,938.39

27,512.96

1,282.67

147.00

1925,

15,741.94

2,974.14

29,225.63

1,712.67

185.66

1926,

19,740.62

3,998.68

8,147.42 21,078.21

41.19

1927,

22,318.25

2,577.63

11,533.80

3,386.38

51.68

1928,

20,040.53

2,277.72

78,913.32

67,379.52

393.78

1929,

16,828.36

3,212.17

93,140.47

14,227.15

553.48

-

Table III.

Number of Women and Girls detained in a Place of Refuge by the Secretary for Chinese Affairs under Sections 34 and 35 of Ordinance No. 4 of 1897, and arrangements made regarding them.

Permitted to leave,

Permitted to leave under bond,

Restored to husband,

Restored to relatives,

Sent to native place,

Married,..

Adopted,

Sent to Refuge or Convent,. Died,

Under Detention on 1st January, 1929.

Detained during 1929.

Total.

Prostitutes. Emigrants.

Total. Prostitutes. | Emigrants.

Total.

(A MARTY SEVERE SEVERNA

...

...

...

Awaiting marriage,

Cases under consideration,

Total,

Cases brought forward, 4.

Cases dealt with during the year, 61.

4

...

...

...

...

4

4

...

...

1

1

1

...

10

5

Cases carried forward, 4.

...

C 12 -

1

C 13

Table IV.

Number of Female Passengers and Boys examined and passed before the Secretary for Chinese Affairs under “The

Asiatic Emigration Ordinance, 1915",

during the year 1929.

Women and Children, 1929.

Total Women

and

Women.

Girls,

Boys. Total.

Children

1928.

Macassar

440

91

352

883

1,096

Straits Settlements and

F.M.S.

...

29,444

4,027

5,833

30,304

38,465

Dutch Indies

9

2

3

14

Belawan Deli

714

189

302

1,205

2,490

British North Borneo

1,070

286

380

1,736

1,983

Honolulu

82

17

36

135

102

...

Central America

25

28

36

Canada

9

United States of America.

128

32

189

349

537

South America

49

58

112

56

Mauritius and Re-Union

189

20

148

357

331

Australia

11

3

21

35

27

India

86

14

34

134

578

South Africa

37

2

19

58

Vancouver

32

5

56

98

107

Batavia

1,920

315

1,191

3,426

3,818

West Indies (Jamaica)

7

12

Sourabaya

1

Balikpapan

30

Rangoon

65

14

43

122

33

Port Elizabeth

1

11

16

23

Delagoa Bay

1

2

6

6

Callao

28

4

47

79

49

Billiton

2

9

19

28

Victoria

20

12

34

66

22

Seattle

35

12

84

131

220

Manila

6

3

1

10

1

25,384

5,057

8,885

39,326

50,067

C 14

Table V.

Number of Assisted Emigrants.

Rejected.

Year.

Examined Passed.

Un- willing.

Rejected Rejected

at S.C.A.

by Doctor.

Total rejected.

Percentage

of rejection.

1928,

23,433 19,952

49

42

21

112

.48

1929, .

17,079 16,988

19

*56

16

91

+53

*This number includes those who failed to appear for the final

examination.

Treatment of Rejected Emigrants for 1929.

Sent home through Tung Wah Hospital at expense of

Boarding Houses

1.

Rejected by doctor and sent back to boarding houses to

be cured

16

Total

17

Native districts of Assisted Emigrants passed.

West River,

East River,

North River,

Canton,

Delta,

Kwong Sai

Southern Districts,

Mandarin, (Hunan, Kwong Sai and Kiangsi)

Total,

1,447

10,246

167

1,342

1,005

1,388

1,291

102

16,988

- C 15

Table V,-Continued.

Destinations of Assisted Emigrants.

Whither bound.

Male Assisted Emigrants.

1928

1929

Straits Settlements and F.M.S.,

185

British North Borneo,

Dutch Indies :·

613

147

Banca,

5,425

Muntoh,

8.141

Samarinda,

441

Billiton,

2.895

2,564

Balikpapan,

466

Macassar,

63

Belawan Deli,

9,242

5,119

India,

5

Samoa,

478

Ocean Island,

230

250

Nauru,

297

243

Solomon Island,

22

Tihiti,

88

Sydney,

11

11

Kilindini,

4

Total,

19,952

16,988

5042 passenger's, passes were issued for 1st and 2nd class Straits Settlements passengers during the year.

1085 passenger's passes were issued to passengers proceed- ing to India and Burma during the year.

Classification of the Assisted Emigrants examined, accord- ing to the language spoken gives the following figures:-

Cantonese,

Hakka,

Hoklo,

Southern Mandarin (mostly from

Kwong Sai and Hunan),

Hainanese,

Total,

Table VI.

9,092

2,515

4,993

137

251

16,988

Chinese Boarding House Licence Returns under Boarding House Ordinance No. 23 of 1919.

Class

..I II IV

V

VI VII No. in existence at beginning of 1929...2 68 16 299 213 98 No. in existence at end of 1929 .2 67 16 308 290 94



C 16

Table VII.

Statement of the Receipts and Expenditure relative to the Hong Kong District Watchmen's Fund for the year 1929.

Receipts.

Expenditure.

C.

$ c.

$

C.

To Balance,

78,230,00

By Wages and Salaries :-

"

Contributions, (Victoria $56,635.09

Chief District Watchmen, Assistant Chief District Watch-

8,281 00

and Kowloon $10,202.23)...

66,837.32

men, Detectives,

1,801.00

6.864.00

1st Class District Watchmen.... 8,164 02

"}

Grant by Hong Kong Goverument,...

2,000.00

2nd

22

3rd

11,209,66

1,063.66

17

99

לי

Payment for District Watchmen for

Special Services,

32,383.34

1.497.00

Miscellaneous :--

Cooks......

1,008.00

House Rents,

996.00

Coolies,

Messengers,

812.33 96.00

1,946.33

""

Fines,

31.00

Office Staff:

40

""

Condemned Store,.......

20.00

Manager,

180.00

Writer,

132.00

"

Rents for an iron gate on Inland

Lot No. 680,

2.00

Interpreter, Clerk, Collectors,

Interest on Hong Kong Government

6% P. W. Loan,

2,280,00

Total....

996.00

1,308.00

35,637.67

Other Charges :—

"

Interest on Fixed Deposits

1,250.00

Allowance to Detectives,

1.660.99

Medal Allowance,

1,282.00

17

Interest on Current Account,

172,22

Rent allowance,

2.447,35

*

Good Conduct Allowance,

865.00

Electric charges,

676.42

Conservancy Allowance...

64.40

Coolie Hire and Conveyance

Allowance,

970.21

Stationery and Printing,

452.29

Uniform and Equipments,

3,418.67

Ammunition, ..

173.95

Repairs and Fittings,

1.003.06

Reut of Telephone.

468.00

(rown Rent.

7.00

Premium on Fire Policies.

426.$4

Gratuities and Rewards,

1,551.00

Sundries.

869.42

15,836.60

Pensions:

Ex. C.D.W. Fung Fong and others,

8,777.15

Total Expenditure,...................

60,251.42

Balance,

93,064.12

Total,

$ 153,315.54

Balance in Colonial Treasury :-

Hong Kong P. W. Loan,.. Cash,...

Fixed Deposits......

Advance to C.D.W.s.

A. E. WOOD,

Secretary for Chinese Affairs.

R. A. D. FORREST,

Asst. Secretary for Chinese.

KO CHUNG WOON,

Manager, D.W.F.

Hong Kong, 31st December, 1929.

Total,........

Total, ............$

153,315.54

.$38,000.00

14,904.12

40,000.00

160.00

$93,064.12

Examined and found correct.

WONG KAM FUK, LI YAU TSun,

Members of

District Watchmen Committee.

1

Patients.

Table VIII.

Number of Patients under treatment and other statistics concerning the Tung Wah Hospital during the year 1929.

Admitted.

Out-patients.

1

Male,

Female,

3294,120 | 4,047 8,167 8,496 6,539 | 1,536 1511,099 3,060 | 4,159 4,3103,430

421 97,113 7,498 104,611 11,345 1,044 1,571

752

128

89,065 13,761 102,826

527

...

ī

Total,..

480 5,219 7,107 12,326 12,806 9,969 | 2,288

549 186,178 21,259 207,437 11,345 1,5711,571

Total for 1928,

480 4,587 6,419 11,006|11,4868,845 2,161

198,59 480 176,788 21,810 198,598 8,339 1,4244,273

C 17 —

Table IX.

Number of Patients under treatment and other statistics concerning the Tung Wah Eastern Hospital during the period from the date of opening i.e. the 28th November up to the 31st December, 1929

Patients.

Male,

Female,

Total,

Admitted.

Out-patients.

European Treatment.

Total.

Vaccinations.

Dead bodies brought to Hospital Mortuary

for burial.

:

70

76 146

146

67

20

58

770

134

904

35

42

77

77

44

11

23

628

76

704

...

...

105

118 223 223

111

31

811,398

2101,608

:

1

1

C 18-

Summary of Receipts and Payments of the Tung Wah Hospital for the year 1929.

Receipts.

Amount.

Payments.

Amount.

C 19

C.

C.

By Balance brought forward from 1928:-|

To Kwong Wah Hospital

57,961.27

Cung Wah Easteru Hospital

Man Mo Temple Emergency account

Tsan Yuk Hospital

Tung Wah account

Kwong Wah Hospital

Tu

$ 140,153.64

Tung Wah Eastern Hospital...

269,057.19

12,954.38

Man Mo Temple

46,255.55

Emergency account

1,625.26

159,149.47

Tsan Yuk Hospital

3,769.33

69,057.56

...

92,358.42

Provisions.

2,658.09

Employees

476,331.55

Wards

$ 17,628.84

32,868.91

Tuug Wah Eastern Hospital

193,805.68

50,497.75

Man Mo Temple

27,568.85

Medicine.

Kwong Wah Hospital

58,778.54

Chinese

$ 37,825.09

Emergency account

2,216.60

European

14,584.18

Tsan Yuk Hospital

4,258.79

52,409.27

Donations and subscriptions (a)

35,255.39

Employees remuneration

55,121.98

Government grants (6)

23,000.00

Annual Expenditures (†)

53,544.18

Special subscriptions (e)

15,392.16

Donations (4) .........

3,418.46

Rents and Interests (d).

177,737.37

Miscellaneous Expenses (h)

41,417.01

Miscellaneous Receipts (e) X-Ray Apparatus

17,510.37

X-Ray Apparatus

1,776.00

1,776.00

To Balance :—

Tung Wah account

$152,610,28

Tung Wah Eastern Ilospital

83,897.96

Kwong Wah Hospital

13,771.65

Man Mo Temple...................

50,370.86)

Emergency account Tsan Yuk Hospital

92,949.76

3,147.54

396,748.05

Grand Total..

$ 1,033,631.30

Grand Total.

$1,033,631.30

C 20

Schedule (A): Donations and subscriptions.

Subscription from Firms,

10,263.50

Subscription from Steamers,

3,371.31

Donations,

6.796.93

Annual subscription from persons,

7,200.00

Collections made by directors and ex-directors &c.

7,623.65

35.255.39

Schedule (B): Government Grants &c.

Annual Grant,

Grant for Coffins,

Grant for Medicine,

Donation from Man Mo Temple a/c.

8,000.00

10,000.00

2,500.00

2,500.00

23,000.00

Schedule (C): Special Subscriptions.

Special Donation for "Yee Chong",

4,500.00

Subscription from Theatres,

1,750.00

Donation for coffins, medicines, cotton coats &c.,

2,746.70

Collections from theatrical performance,

6,395.46

15,392.16

Schedule (D): Rents and Interests.

Rents from properties,

103,036.17

Rents from "Yee Chong",

22,408.50

Rents from Yat Pit Ting,

1,660.00

Rents from Iron Stoves,

1,476.00

Bank and Mortgage interests,

49,156.70

177,737.37

Schedule (E): Miscellaneous Receipts.

Discount or goods and currency premiums,

2,376.62

Rent for private wards and for medicine used,

5,471.75

Sale of Medicine, removal of coffin by junks, and rent

of Ambulance &c.

9,662.00

17,510.37

C 21

-

Schedule (F): Annual Expenditures.

Electric Lights,

8,540.39

Insurance,

2,092.12

Repairs to Furniture and Fittings, .........

8,431.12

Miscellaneous expenses for Wards,

17,501.28

Expenses for Small Pox Hospital,

2,232.97

Miscellaneous Expenses "Yee Chong" and Cemetery.

815.33

Crown rent, rates and taxes,

12,820.81

Repairs to Properties, ....

1,110.16

53,544.18

Schedule (G): Donations.

Passage for sick and destitute persons,

248.46

Donation to Kwong Wa Hospital,

2,000.00

Ditto. Old Men's Home, Kowloon,

200.00

Ditto. Fong Pin Hospital, Canton,

1,000.00

3,448.46

Schedule (H): Miscellaneous Expenses.

Stationery and advertisement,

5,981.21

Miscellaneous Expenses,

7,236.67

Interest on Deposits,

6,191.08

Burial Expenses (East Hospital),

4,042.87

Coffins (East Hospital),

8,512.94

Burial Expenses (West Hospital),

2,487.11

Coffins (West Hospital),

6,965.13

41.417.01

Table X (A).

Summary of Receipts and Payments of the Kwong Wah Hospital for 1929.

22

Receipts.

Expenditure.



C.

$

C.

By Balance brought forward from 1928

12,954.38

To Payments for February

2,000.00

Government Grants.

Ditto.

Ditto. for coffins

Donations:

19

8,500.00

March

8,000.00

77

25,000.00

""

7,000.00

""

April

May

3,000.00

8,000.00

40,500 00

Shadowless operating lamp (May).

449.77

Payments for June....

7,500.00

Wa Fong Studio..........

500.00

July

7,000.00

Po Hing Theatre

2,232.00

Repairs (July)

Lee Theatre

1,000.00

Payments for August....

Tai Ping Theatre

2,000.00

November

Ko Shing Theatre

600.00

December

11.50

7,500.00

7,000.00

7,500,00

""

Yu Hon Chau (theatrical per- formance at Shamshuipo)

Balance

13,771.65

500.00

Mr. To Sze Tun donation for Ki Chi year

Mr. Fung Ping Shan donation for Mo Shan year..

6,832.00

300.00

50.00

Donation from Tung Wah Hospital

2,000.00

Amount transferred from interest of "Free

the

Medicine

Account"

Miscellaneous

9,088.04

8.50

Total,.

71,782.92

Total,....

71,732.92

.......

t

Table X (B).

Summary of Receipts and Payments of Tung Wah Eastern Hospital, 1929.



Receipts.

Amount.

C.

Expenditure.

Amount.

$ .C

By Balance brought forward from 1928 Subscriptions and donations

159,149.47

To Contracts

159,045.00

Furnishings.

124,214.33

68,620.38

Interest

8,485.04

Furniture

19,342.14

Repayment of loan by Lau Wa Ton

12,000.00

Palmer and Turner's Fees.

7,269.96

Ditto by Lau Hee Sing

12,000.00

Chap Sin Hospital...

11,563.14

Cash

2,000.00

Telegram and stationery &c....$ 567.29

Miscellaneous

275.64

Crown Rent

1.50

Advertisements

1,002.12

Water rates....

33.53

Insurance

26.15

1.630.59

Salaries

1,049.00

Total.

352,955.15

Photos for Donors

Marbles for photos

Miscellaneous

Cash..

Balance

1.531.25

2,500.00

×26.65

30.509.75

83,897.96

Total.

352,955.15

.

C 23

Table X (C).

Summary of Receipts and Payments of the Man Mo Temple for 1929.

Receipts.

A mount.

Payments.

C.

By Balance brought forward from 1928,. Rent of properties

69,057.56

11,306.50

Deposits from Caretakers

2,196.66

Rent from Caretakers

6,040.76

Government Grant to Schools

6,320.00

Water Rates

Interest on deposits

1,657.38

Return of Deposits..

Crown rent (repaid by other section

holders)

14.40

To Donation to Tung Wah Hospital Expenses of Free School ..... Repairs to properties and Schools Crown rent, taxes and Insurance

.....

Costs of building free schools near Man Mo Temple and at Shaukiwan and

Miscellaneous receipts

33.15

architects' fees

Advertisements,

Miscellaneous

Total,.....

96,626.41

To Balance

Amount.

C.

2,500.00

21,540.10

3,253.88

1,880.88

312.75

250.00

16,038.61

4.73

474.60

50,870.86

Total,.

.$

96,626.41

C 24

1

Table X (D).

Summary of Receipts and Payments of Emergency Account for 1929.

Receipts.

Amount.

C.

By Balance brought forward from 1928

92,358.42

To Payments

Interest on deposits

2,216.60

Balance

Payments.

Amount.

1,625.26

92,949.76

Total,...........

94,575.02

Total,.

94,575.02

25

Table X (E).

Summary of Receipts and Payments of Tsan Yuk Hospital for 1929.

Receipts.

Amount.

Expenditure.

Amount.

$

C.

By Balance brought forward from 1928.

2,658.08

To Repairs

30.05

Rent

""

* 4,195.00

Crown rent, taxes and Insurance

539.28

>>

Interest

33

63.79

""

Secretariat for Chinese Affairs, rent for the four quarters 1928

3,200.00

Balance,

3,147.54

Total,

6,916.87

The above accounts (Tables X to X (E) ) have been audited and found correct by me.

LAU YUK WAN,

Auditor.

Total,

M. K. LO.

HO I. CHEUNG.

6,916.87

Revenue.

C 27

Table XI.

Revenue and Expenditure of the Brewin Charity during the year 1929.

Amount.

Expenditure.

Amount.

To Balance from 1928

$179,919.34

Subscriptions from Directors, Tung

Wah Hospital

1,200.00

29

Subscriptions

from Committee, Po

By Charity for widows and orphans

Subscription to Old Men's Home Salary for Accountant Mr. Chan Yik

Wan

10,070.90 2,400.00

100.00

Leung Kuk

300.00

??

Subscriptions from Directors, Kwong

Salary for Clerk Mr. Wong Shut Wing Stamps

60.00

5.10

Wah Hospital

135.00

"}

Subscriptions from the German Mis-

Conveyance expenses for collecting

interest etc.

10.80

sions Trustees

2,000.00

Interest from Mr. Lau Kwai Nam for

Printed matters by the Hing Shing.. Balance

20.00

186,661.03

mortgage

1,620.00

Interest from Mr. Chan Tsat $780 and

from Mr. Li Sze Ngai $780 for

mortgage

1,560.00

Interest from Mr. Lo Wun Ching and

others for mortgage

2,340.00

Interest from Mr. Tsoi Man Sui for

mortgage

2,112.50

Interest from Mr. Kan Iu Cho for

""

mortgage

1,344.00

Interest from Mr. U Nga Ping for

mortgage

3,420.00

17

Interest from Mr. Lo Luk for mortgage

545.38

"

"}

Interest on War Bonds of Singapore Premium on $5,200 War Bonds of

Singapore

343.95

1,560.21

Interest on War Bonds of Hong Kong. Interest on Current Account with

600.00

Shanghai Bank

187.10

Cash from Secretariat for Chinese

Affairs for Shiu Siu Sze

84.00

""

Interest on fixed deposit of Wong Fung Sze with Shanghai Bank

56.35

Total

$199,327.83

Total

$199,327.83

By fixed deposit with Mr. Lau Kwai Nam on mort-

gage of two houses in Temple Street fixed deposit with Messrs. Chan Tsat and Li Sze

Ngai on mortgage of two houses in Temple St. 16,000.00 fixed deposit with Mr. Lo Wun Ching on mort-

$16,000.00

gage of house No. 11 Temple Street

6,000.00

fixed deposit with Mr. Lau Yung Sze on mortgage

of two houses in Temple Street

12,000.00

21

fixed deposit with Mr. Tsoi Yung Chun on mort-

gage of house No. 17 Temple Street

6,000.00

""

fixed deposit, with Mr. Kan Iu Cho on mortgage

of house property in Wanchai Road

16,000.00

fixed deposit with Mr. Tsoi Man Shui on mort-

gage of house No. 102 Wing Lok Street

25,000.00

fixed deposit with Mr. U Nga Ping on mortgage

of house property in Bonham Strand

60,000.00

fixed deposit with Mr. Lo Luk on mortgage of

house property in Whitfield

8,500.00

War Bonds of Hong Kong

10,000.00

fixed deposit and interest of Wong Fung Sze with

Shanghai Bank

1.308.50

deposit of Sat A Li with Wing Hing Bank (after

deducting three dividends amounting $83.70)

19

17

current account deposits with Shanghai Bank deposit with Tung Wah Hospital

236.40 8,885.80

730.33

Total

$186,661.03

M. K. LO

HO I CHEUNG

Directors, Tung Wah Hospital.

Patients.

Remaining in Hospital

on 31st December, 1928.

Chinese

Treatment.

European Treatment.

Total.

Total Number of pa-

tients under treatment.

Discharged.

Deaths.

Table XII.

Number of Patients under treatment and other statistics concerning the Kwong Wah Hospital during the year 1929.

Admitted.

Õut-patients.

Remaining in Hospital

on 31st December, 1929.|

Chinese

Treatment.

European Treatment.

Total.

Vaccinations.

Dead bodies brought to Hospital Mortuary for burial.

Destitutes sent home.

Male,

Female,

143

1,376 2,598 3,974 4,117 2,604 1,379 | 134

55,073 20,168| 75,241| 1,252 434

104

519 4,317 4,836 4,940 3,880 955 105

38,994 21,023 60,017 1,418 | 264

Total,..

247

1,895 6,915 8,810 9,057 6,484 2,334

239

94,067 41,191 135,258 2,670 698

Total for 1928,| 259

1,948 6,6159,563 8,822 6,476 2,099 247

83,685 45,257|| 128,942||

575

:

:

C 28

1

Receipts.

Table XIII.

WESTERN MATERNITY HOSPITAL. Statement of Accounts for the year ending 31st December, 1929.

$

C 29

Expenditure



$

To Balance

762.38 | By Salary

Subscriptions

Donations :-

702.62

Drugs

5,925.00

2,018.85

Instruments

306.00

Chinese Public Dispensaries

Furniture

235.25

Fund

5,000.00

Bedding

223.10

Chinese Recreation Ground Fund

1,200.00

Food for Patients, pupils and

Rent of houses purchased with Tung Wah Hospital Jubilee Donation

midwives in the Hospital.....

4,571.02

Stationery and Printing

96.15

3,200.00

Gas and Electricity

1,332.29

10,102.62

Repairs and Fitting

215.25

Fees paid by patients in the Hospital

Water Account

205.00

8,527.10

Telephone (Sub. Exchange).

10.00

Money paid by pupils etc. in the

Washing

1,555.50

Hospital for their foods & rents

1,022.00

Coarse Paper

1,410,00

Fees paid by patients who had venereal diseases

Crown Rent

1.00

195.40

Miscellaneous

1,284.30

....

.....

Interest

19.13

19,488.71

Balance with Colonial Treasury

1,139.92

Total..

20,628.63

Total.

20,628.63

A. E. WOOD,

Secretary for Chinese Affairs.

C 30

Table XIV.

Summary of work done by the Chinese Public Dispensaries: Victoria, Harbour, Shaukiwan, and Kowloon Peninsula.

New Cases,....

Return Cases,

Description.

Total,.....

Grand Total. Total Total

1929. 1928.

Grand

114,630

94,729

209,559 192,152

42

4

340

367

294

:

:

:

:

:

246

1,033

961

137

146

453

421

957

1,029

Certificates of nature of disease issued,

"J

cause of death,.

Patients removed to hospital by ambulance, ..

Corpses removed to hospital or mortuary,...

Attendances at cleansing of infected premises,

Compensation claims sent in,

Applications received for coffins,

for midwives,

"

Confinement cases in Maternity Hospital.......

Infauts brought to Dispensaries, (alive),

:

"

""

(dead),................

1,282

Total,..

:

1,282

1,322

Vaccinations at private houses,

4

""

""

Dispensaries,

27,654

Total,.

27,658

49,941

Receipts.

· CHINESE PUBLIC DISPENSARIES.

Statement of Accounts for the year ending 31st December, 1929.

**

C.



c.

Expenditure.

3

C.



C.

31.

To Balance

Grant by Government.

Donation from :-

>>

Tai Ping Theatre Lee Theatre

3,300.00

400.00

Ko Shing Theatre

""

""

>>

150.00

Subscription, Land....

18,770.03

Harbour...

Shaukiwan

Kowloon City

10,629.20

72,806.27 By Maintenance of Dispensaries:- 9,500.00

Victoria

Harbour and Yaumati

29,205.67

7,117.51

Shaukiwan

8,140.14

Kowloon City.

4,341.86

48,805.18

""

Subscription in aid of the Fund of Maternity Hospital, Western...

5,000.00

866.15

887.00

35,002.38

4

""

}}

Donation towards the Fund for, erection of Shaukiwan Dispens- ary from Kai Fong of Shaukiwan.] Refund from Yaumati Public Square.

""

8,544.86

"

4,000.00

Interest

3,930.07

""

99

Fees from Maternity Hospital in

"

Balance due to Contractor Kin Sang for erection of Shauki- wan Dispensary

Fee for Architect for repairing the plan of Shauki wan Dispensary.

Balance:

On Fixed Deposit in Hong Kong

and Shanghai Bank Corp....... 40,000.00 On Fixed Deposit in Colonial

8,645.56

350.00

Chinese Public Dispensary at Wanchai

Treasury

15,000,00

1,701.00

On Hong Kong Government 6%

Public Works Loan

11,000.00

In Cash

6,563.84

Advance to Dispensaries Clerks.

120.00

72,693.84

Total.

$ 135,484,58

Total.....

135,484.58

A. E. WOOD,

Secretary for Chinese Affairs,

Table XVI.

HUNGHOM DISPENSARY,

Statement of Accounts for the year ending 31st December, 1929.

Receipts.

Expenditure.

c.

C.

Balance,

Subscription etc..

305.33

Through Secretariat for Chinese Affairs,

2,142.00

915.25

Through Local Committee,

3,257.71

Donations from :-

Po Hing Theatre,

1,167.00

Scavenging Contractor,

1,920.00

Refund of Electricity from Kai Fong,

38.00

Balance:-

At Secretariat for Chinese Affairs With Local Committee

654.23

354.90

Total,.

5,399.71

Total,..

5,399.71

CHUNG IU SHAN, Chairman.

LI KIT CHUEN,

Accountant.

A. E. WOOD,

Secretary for Chinese Affairs.

C 32

To Balance

Receipts.

Table XVII.

SHAMSIUIPO DISPENSARY.

Statement of Accounts for the year ending 31st December, 1929.

C.

Expenditure.

2,637.60 By Payment through Secretariat for Chinese

Affairs.

Payment through Local Committee,

Balance :-

At Colonial Treasury,

With Local Committee,

""

Grant by Government.

2,500.00

""

Donation from Kai Fong for holding theatrical

""

performance

1,200.00

Rents from Temple Keepers of Sam Tai Tsz,

""

Pak Tai and Tin Hau Temples

877.30

>>

Rents from the eight houses at Shamshuipo,...

2,400.00

Total,

9,614.90

C.

2,700.00

2,036.23

1,025.00

3,853.67

Total,

9.614.90

WONG IU TUNG,

Vice-Chairman.

AU TO NAM,

Accountant.

A. E. WOOD,

Secretary for Chinese Affairs.

Receipts.

Table XVIII.

Statement of Receipts and Payments of the Chinese Permanent Cemetery for 1929.

Amount.

$

C.

Payments,

Amount.

$

C.

To Balance,

""

Interest from Hong Kong and

Shanghai Bank, ................

52,843.28 | By Rent of telephone,

189.00

"}

Interest from Tai San Bank,

516.35

420.00

Repairs to embankment, roads and the Ti Chong Wong Temple and supply of 100 pieces of number stones by Yeung Tam Kee,,...

10,202.68

""

""

Interest from Mr. Ngan Kit Hing,

""

Printed matters by the Shing Fat,.

3.00

1,800.00

""

Wages for Ma Shu-hoi & gardeners,...

1,571.00

>>

Wages from Họn. Dr. S. W.

Wages for Pun Yau Chin and Chau Wan Kok,,

480.00

Tso for refilling vaults,

284,00

"

Printed matters by the Tung Nga & Co.,................

7.50

Sale of 193 lots,

10,325.00

24 joss paper jars by Hop Cheung,

84.00

"}

""

Stone Embankment,.

2,895.00

""

دو

Sale of vacant ground in front

Preparing title deed of the Chinese Permanent Cemetery includ- ing stamp duty by Solicitors Tso and Hodgson,...

54.40

of graves,

3,943.00

""

Preparing plan of the wharf of the Chinese Permanent Cemetery

by Architect F. Munford,.....

150.00

Flower pots, manure, bamboo wares, scythes, brooms etc.,. Account book by Nam Wah,

265.22

Q

.70

Stamps,.

Rates for getting water from river,

Rent of wharf,

13.00

34

2.00

1.00

Crown Rent,.

"1

1.00

Balance,

60,002.13

Total,

.$ 73,026.63

Total,..

73,026.63

S. W. TSO, Secretary,

T. N. CHAU, Treasurer.

By deposits with Hong Kong & Shanghai Bank,.........$ 39,774.12 Fixed deposit on mortgage of house No. 237 Nath ..n

י

Road,

99

Cash,

20,000.00

228.01

$ 60,002.13

Examined and found correct,

LI PO KWAI,

To Balance,........

""

Rent of Stalls,

"}

Receipts.

Table XIX.

CHINESE RECREATION GROUND.

Receipts and Expenditure, 1929.

Interest on money deposited in Treasury,......

C.

Payments.

C.

4,995.75 By Wages of Watchmen, etc.,

920.00

Water Account,

207.25

3,496.21

,, Consumption of Gas,

247.50

Subscription to Western Maternity Hospital,

1,200.00

80.45

Lime Washing,

90.00

"}

""

Repairs,

231.00

Miscellaneous,

3.84

""

Balance,

5,672.82

""

Total,.

8,572.41

Total,...

A. E. WOOD,

Secretary for Chinese Affairs.

8,372.41

35

Table XX.

Statement of Accounts of Passage Money Fund, 1929.

Receipts.

Payments.

To Balance on Fixed Deposit,.

"}

55

in Colonial Treasury,

$6,250.00

949.56

By Gifts to 1 woman on being married, Gratuities to destitutes,

2.00

59.50

59

7,199.56

""

Subscription to Alice Memorial Hospital,

50.00

"

""

Passage Money received,

45.00

"

""

Eyre Diocesan Refuge,

Hawker's Licences to destitute persons, Gifts in aid of repatriation of emigrants,......| Balance on Fixed Deposit, ......$6,250.00

170.00

16.00

60 84

>>

55

Miscellaneous Receipts,

50.00

in Colonial Treasury,

962.46

>>

Interest on Fixed Deposit,

250.00

7,212.46

19

""

""

on money deposited in Treasury,

26.24

276.24

Total,

7,570.80

Total,

A. E. WOOD,

$ 7,570.80

Secretary for Chinese Affairs,

36

Receipts.

C 37

Table XXI.

GENERAL CHINESE CHARITIES FUND.

Statement of Accounts for the year ending 31st December, 1929.



C.

$

*A

C.

Expenditure.

$

40

C.



c.

To Balance,

25

Rent from Temple Keepers of :-

Hau Wong Temple, Kowloon City. Tin Hau l'emple, Yanmati

Kwun Yam Temple, Chi Wan Shan, Pak 'Tai Temple, Wanchai

Tin Hau Temple, Shaukiwan

Tam Kung Temple, Shaukiwan

Fook Tak Chi Temple, Shaukiwan

To Ti Temple, Shaukiwan Sheung Tai Temple, Ma Tau Chung Tam Kung Temple, Sung Wong Toi Tin Hau Temple, To Kwa Wan Pak Tai Temple, Cheung Chau

Island

20,880.00 10,000.00

588.00

1,681.26

Hospital

693.55

130,644.46

By Maintenance of Free Schools,

Kowloon City......

Grants to:-

>>

Kwong Wah Ho-pital towards the

28,000.00

Kwong Wah Hospital for expenses | 25,000.00

5,214,28

fund for building the Maternity

1,630,00

Chinese Public Dispensaries Fund

475.50

for expenses

7,500.00

30.00

Chinese Public Dispensary (Shum-

297.75

shuipo)....

2,500.00

457.37

The Kai Fong of Hunghom for the

112.50

Kwun Yum Temple, Hunghom ... Yi Pak Kung Temple, Quarry Bay Tin Hau Temple, Ping Chau Island' Tam Kung Temple, Wongneichong Tin Hau Temple, Aberdeen .... Pak Tai Temple, Hok Un, Hung-

hom....

3,200.00 4,610.00

595.00

expenses of free school at Kwun Yum Temple, Hunghom Ngai Lo Shi (ex-temple keeper of

Yi Pak Kung Temple, Quarry Bay)

1,100.00

116.50

652.50

491.00

230.00

46,740.93

71.25

Lok Shin Tong, Kowloon City for

1929....

400.00

64,571.25

27

Expenses for holding theatrical

performance at Kowloon City Ma Tau Chung

600.00

50.00

Cheung Chau Island

1,000.00

1,650.00

""

""

"J

House Rents:-

Property of lau Wong Temple,

Kowloon City....

775.50

Property of Tin Hau Temple,

Shaukiwan

555.77

"}

Annual Subscription to Confucian Society for expenses of the Free school at Yuk Hu Kung, Wanchui,....

1,331.27

3'9

Repairs to:-

Pak Tai Temple, Wanchai

Pak Tai Temple. Hunghom

Property of Pak Tai Temple, Cheung Chau (shares of the Cheung Chau Kai Fong Ferry Co.).....

Grant from Education Department

for Free Schools in Kowloon City.

Subscriptions from Kai Fong of Wanchai for repairs to Pak Tai Temple, Wanchai

Grant by Hong Kong Government....

Interest:

""

Fixed Deposit......

Current Account...

:

5,200.00

Hau Wong Temple, Kowloon City. Yi Pak Kung Temple, Quarry Bay.

:

Crown Rents

""

"2

Fee for boundary stones for Chinese

2,040.00

150.00

""

35,000.00

2,950.00

804.41

3,754.41

""

Public Dispensary, Kowloon City Stamp Duty for Crown Leases for Chinese Public Dispensary, Kowloon City..............

Water Account

Advertisements

for

tender of

Temple Keepers..

Furniture and Fittings for Pak Tai Temple, Hok Un

Balance in Treasury :—

Fixed Deposit......

Cash Account..............

Total......

224,861.07

Total......

***

520.00

1,500.00 2,600.00 250.00

200.00

4,550.00 19.00

26.00

:

:

:

30.00 22.50

182.39

621.00

110,000.00

37,454.65

147,454.65

A. E. WOOD,

224,861.07

Secretary for Chinese Affairs.

=

Table XXII.

Prosecutions under Ordinances No. 3 of 1888, No. 30 of 1915, and No. 4 of 1897.

. Offence.

Convicted.

Discharged.

No. of

ICases.

Male.

Female.

Male.

Female.

:

2

I

Ordinance No. 3 e2 1888.

Bills,-Posting without bermis-iou,

Fireworks, Discharged withonermission,.

3

132

128

Drums and G ngs,- 8,-Night noi by beating,

12

11

theatrical per-

formance permit, .....

1

Permits,--Broach of Condition

Ordinance No. 30 of 1915.

Decoying men or boys into or out of the Colony,...

Ordinance No. 4 of 1897.

Co

5

1

:

...

:

Remarks.

Abduction of girls under 21,

1

2

Defilement of girls under 12 years of age,.

1

1

Indecent assault upon female,.

4

3

Using premises as a brothel (Sec. 14),

26

2

223

25

2

1

Procuring defilement of women,.

1

Detaining, harbouring, or receiving women or girls,..

16

ลง

2

5

3

7

Living on earnings of prostitution........................

]

2

:

:..

Deriving profits from prostitution and trading in

women,

61

5

55

تك

Carnal knowledge of female,

1

Rape,.....

1

1

Failing to produce documents relating to girls when so required by S.C.A.,

:

بد

:

T



C 38 --

Industry.

Shipbuilding, Oil Installations, Cement Works,

Sugar Refineries,

Rope Works,

Soap Boiling,

C 39

Table XXIII.

Analysis of Accidents in Factories during 1929.

Accidents due to

Printing,

Cigarette Making,

Total...

Fatalities.

Total No.

of Accidents.

Machin-

cry.

Ex- plosions.

Falls etc. Scalds and

Burns.

20 (1)

4



(1)

: ܗ: ܗ

2

2

41 (4)

1

5

65

...

4 (2)

2

4

]

10 10 6 4 2

5

5

1

10

223

28

2

51

5

The figures in parenthesis denote fatalities and are included in the total.

15th January, 1930.

F. MEADE, Inspector of Factories.

ANNEXE A.

Report on the work of the Po Leung Kuk for the year 1929.

The Po Leung Kuk Society was founded in 1878 to aid in the detection and suppression of kidnapping, especially of girls and women, and to shelter such girls or women as had been kidnapped in the interior and brought to Hong Kong for sale or emigration. Its name means "institution for the protection of good women”. The initiative in its formation came from the Chinese themselves, and ever since by subscription and personal service, they have continued to support it.

There is a paid Chinese staff-matron, amahs and nurses, and two clerks who are secretaries to the managing committee. This Committee meets every evening from Monday to Friday at 7 p.m. the principal meeting of the week being held at 12 noon on Sunday. It not only manages the Po Leung Kuk, but

1

1

1

86

C 40

acts as an advisory committee to the Secretary for Chinese Affairs, in all cases affecting women and children, and Chinese family life generally, which are often extremely difficult and tedious. It corresponds when necessary with charitable institu- tions and private persons in various parts of China, traces parents of lost children or ill-treated mui tsai, and shelters for the night any Chinese woman or girl who chooses to go. When parents and relations cannot be traced, the Committee arranges for the girls in its care to be given in marriage (never as con- cubines) or in adoption, always under bond and always with the consent of this office; and in every case this office ascertains the girl's willingness before giving consent to either adoption or marriage.

1

In addition to the annual Committee appointed by co-option there is a Permanent Committee, which serves to maintain con- tinuity of policy, and of which the Secretary for Chinese Affairs is the ex-officio chairman.

The following gentlemen were elected in March to serve as Managing Committee for the year:

Chan Tin Son,

Chan Shu Ming,

Chan Man Chung,

Ko Leung Wo,

Chan Yee Wan,

Mak Sui Cho,

Li Sheung Ming,

Yu Sz Wing,

Li Iu Tseung,

Au Kun Ue,

Wong Hoi Kat,

Sum Chung Hing.

The number of inmates of the Po Leung Kuk on 1st January, 1929, was 61 and during the year 636 persons were admitted as against 622 in 1928. The circumstances of admission and the action taken in regard to them are set out in Table A.

28 women and girls were admitted under warrant and 608 were admitted without warrant. Of the remainder 46 were lost children 12 were accompanied by parents or guardians, and 52 were maid-servants or "mui-tsai" who had left their masters or mistresses.

On leaving the Kuk 376 women and girls were restored to husbands or other relatives, 71 were sent to charitable institutions in China, 8 were given in adoption, 1 married, 191 released (10 released under bond), 2 sent to Convent or Refuge and 5 died. The number of inmates remaining in the Kuk on December 31st was 53.

The institution was visited monthly by Justices of the Peace, Mr. A. G. Coppin and the Hon. Dr. S. W. Tso, O.B.E., who on no occasion found cause for adverse comment. The average monthly number of inmates was 69.

- C 41

The matron reports favourably on the conduct, health and industry of the inmates during the year. There were 72 cases of sickness of which 59 were sent to the Tung Wa Hospital for treatment and of these 5 died.

Lady Chow and Mrs. R. H. Kotewall, continued to under- take the duty of regular monthly visits of inspection during the year.

March 20th, 1930.

A. E. WOOD, Secretary for Chinese Affairs. President.

We, Wong Pak San and Chan Yee Wan, members of the Board of Direction of the Po Leung Kuk Incorporated Society do solemnly and sincerely declare that the attached statements of Assets and Liabilities of above Society on the 31st December, 1929, marked "A" and signed with our names on the 17th January 1930 is a true statement, and we make this solemn declaration conscientiously believing the same to be true and by virtue of the provisions of "The Statutory Declaration Act 1835'.

黃伯臣

陳倚雲

Declared by the declarants Wong Pak San and Chan Yee Wan at Victoria, Hong Kong the 17th January 1930 through the interpretation of Luk Yam Ko of Hong Kong the said Luk Yam Ko having also first declared that he had truly, distinctly and audibly interpreted the contents of this document of the said declarants and that he would faithfully interpret the contents of this document to the said declarants and that he would faithfully interpret the declaration about to be administered unto them.

Before me,

R. A. C. NORTH, Justice of Peace.

You do solemnly and sincerely declare that you understand the English and Chinese language, and that you have truly and audibly interpreted the contents of this document to the declar- ants Wong Pak San and Chan Yee Wan and that you will truly and faithfully interpret the declaration about to be administered to them. Declared at the Secretariat for Chinese Affairs, Hong Kong this 17th January, 1930.

Luk Yam Ko.

Before me,

E. R. HALLIFAX,

Secretary for Chinese Affairs

and Justice of Peace.

C 42

Statement "A" of Assets and Liabilities of the Po Leung Kuk Incorporated Society on the 31st December, 1929.

Assets. Liabilities

Fixed deposit with Mrs. Lei Ho Shi

on mortgage

$20,000.00

Nil.

At current account with the Yik On and

Fuk Wa Banks

5,952.12

$25,952.12

This is the statement “A” referred to in the Declaration of

Wong Pak San and Chan Yee Wan declared before me this 17th

day of January, 1930.

R. A. C. NORTH,

Justice of Peace.

黃伯臣

陳倚雲

January, 1929. In the Po Leung Kuk on 1st Į

Admitted during the year, ...

Total,

Remaining in the Po Leung

28

Kuk on the 31st Decem-

4

3

ber, 1929,

Table A.

Number of Women and Girls admitted to the Po Leung Kuk during the year 1929 and the

arrangements made regarding them.

Committed under Warrant from the Secretariat for Chinese Affairs

Committed under Warrant from

the Emigration Office. Pending the opening of the Secretariat for Chinese Affairs. Sent with their own consent by the Secretary for Chinese Affairs. Sent with their own consent from

Singapore and Bangkok.

Sent with their own consent by the Police.

Lost Children.

Accompanying parents or

guardians.

Runaway maid-servants.

4

6 14

6

18]

=

11

F

2

61

Total.

N

27

:

00

ww

:

Released after enquiry.

Released under bond.

Placed in charge of husband.

Placed in charge of parents and relatives.

Sent to Charitable Institutions

in China.

Sent to School, Convent, or Refuge.

Adopted.

Married.

Died.

Cases under consideration.

Total.

53 178

31236 46

12

52

636

101 !1

10 376 63

8

8

1

5

53

636

N

1

33

32

59 (192

37251| 53

54

697

103 15

16403 65

14

16

10 | 53

697

21

7

3

شاه

2

53

61

C 43

Table B.

PO LEUNG KUK,

Statement of Receipts and Expenditure from 1st January to 31st December, 1929.

- °C 44 ---

RECEIPTS.

Balance from previous year,

C.

6,512.68

EXPENDITURE.

#A

S



Subscriptions :-

Elected Committee,

600.00

Yue Lan Celebrations, West Point,.

1,265.53

By the Elected Committee :-

(see Table C),

Balance :-

14,862.68

Guilds,

3,764.42

Man Mo Temple,

1,300.23

On Deposit,

2,000.00

Theatres,

700.00

14,142.86

At Current Account,

5,952.12

Interest :-

7,952.12

On Mortgage,

1,800.00

On Current Account,

359.26

2,159.26

Total,.....

22,814.80

Total,...

22,814.80

Certified by the Statutory Declaration of Wong Pat San and Chan Yee Wan, Members of the Board of Direction.

Table C.

Statement showing particulars of Expenditure by the Elected Committee from 1st January to 31st December, 1929.

RECEIPTS.

$

C.

Balance from previous year,

Received from Permanent Board,

...

18.13

14,862,68

Miscellaneous Receipts,...

21.50

Premium on bank notes,

EXPENDITURE.

$

Decorations,

Food,

Light and Fire,

Miscellaneous,

Passage Money, Petty Expenditure,

115.72

5,496.78

2,167.64

247.53

256.75

864.25

267.88

· 356,40

Printing,

Repairs,..........

Stationery,

Telephone,

148.30

108.00

Insurance,

128.56

Wages,

4,720.00

14,877.81

24.50

Balance,

Total,...$ 14,902.31

Total,..

$ 14,902.31

- C 45 --

{

1

!

Appendix D.

REPORT OF THE HARBOUR MASTER

FOR THE YEAR 1929.

CONTENTS.

Bunker Coal shipped

Buoy Plan

PAGE.

:

:

:

46

5

10

12

12

18

6

10

14

16

11

11

16

15

13

7

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

Crews, Nationality of

Emigration and Immigration

Examination of Pilots

Examination of Masters, Mates, and Engineers ..

Gunpowder Depôt...

Junks

Launches...

Lighthouses and Signal Stations...

Mercantile Marine Office

Marine Magistrate's Court

Marine Courts of Enquiry

Marine Surveyors' Office

Moorings

Outstations

Passenger Trade

Port Facilities...

Registry of Shipping

Revenue and Expenditure

Shipping Report

Sunday Cargo Working

Trade

...

:

:

:

:

:

:

...

Yaumati Slipway and Coaling Depôt ..

aa

...

44

10

4:

:

:

:

:.

:

:..

:

:



:

12

MA

...

...

5

19

D 2

TABLES.

Arrivals and Departures all Vessels Summary

Boat Licences etc. issued ...

TABLE.

IX

XII

:

Emigration to Destinations other than China

XIV

Do.

in quinquennial periods

XV

Do.

in annual periods

XVI

Immigration from countries other than China

XVII

Do.

in quinquennial periods ...

XVIII

Do.

in annual periods

XIX

Junks entered

VII

Do. cleared

VIII

Launches entered

Do.

cleared

:

X

XI

Revenue

Revenue and Expenditure comparison

Shipping Total 1910 to 1929

XIII

XXIII

XXIV

Do. Graph all classes 1910 to 1929

XXV

Do.

do. Ocean Going British and Foreign Vessels

1910 to 1929

XXVI

Do.

do. Ocean Going British Vessels 1910 to 1929

XXVII

Do. cleared

Vessels entered showing Number Tonnage and Crews

Do. entered at each port

I

do.

II

III

Do. cleared

do.

IV

Do. of each nation entered.......

V

Do.

do.

cleared...

VI

Do. in Foreign Trade comparison of Tonnage 1920 to 1929 XXII

Do. Registered

Do. Struck off the Register...

XX

XXI

D 3

1.-Shipping.

A comparison between the years 1928 and 1929 of all shipping entering and clearing Ports in the Colony is given in the following

table :-

1928.

1929.

Decrease.

Increase.

Class of Vessels

No. Tonnage.

No. Tonnage.

No. Tonnage. No. Tonnage.

British Ocean-

going,

4,513 10.792,701

4.73411,151,152

221 358.451

Foreign Ocean

going.

7,370 16,101,694 7,809 17,134,589

439

1,032,895

British River]

Steamers,.. 6,617

6,769,741 | 7,474 | 7,809,876 |

857

1,040,135

Foreign River

Steamers, . 1,235

542,300 1,601

561,061

366

18.761

Steamships

under 60

tons For-

eign Trade... 8,544

241,043 7,434

211,067

1,110

29,976

Junks, Foreign

Trade,

23,999

3.193,215 23,522 | 3,003,401 477

189,811

Total, Foreign

Trade,

52,278 37,640,694 |52,574 | 39,871,149 1,587

219,787 1,883 | 2,450,242

Steam Laun-

ches, Local

Trade........ 215,974 5,666,901 214,875 5,560,116 1,099

106,785

Junks. Local

Trade,

|†32,064 †1,576,170 *33,108 *1,754,916

1,044 178,746

Grand Total.. (300,316 44,883,765 300,557, 47,186,181 2,686

326,572 2,927 2,628,988

Net,

241

2,302,416

+ Including 15,966 Conservancy and Dust Boats of 903,674 tons.

>>

18,012

19

"}

??

of 1,109,384

It will be seen from the above table that the total Shipping entering and clearing Ports in the Colony during the year 1929 amounted to 300,557 vessels of 47,186,181 tons, which compared with the figures of 1928 show an increase of 241 vessels and an increase of 2,302,416 tons.

Of the above 52,574 vessels of 39,871,149 tons were engaged in Foreign Trade as compared with 52,278 vessels of 37,640,694 tons, in 1928.

There was an increase in British ocean-going shipping of 221 ships of 358,451 tons.

Foreign ocean-going vessels show an increase of 439 ships and an increase of 1,032,895 tons.

D 4

British river steamers show an increase of 857 ships and an increase of 1,040,135 tons.

Foreign river steamers show an increase of 366 ships and an. increase of 18,761 tons.

In steamships not exceeding 60 tons employed in foreign trade there is a decrease of 1,110 ships with a decrease in tonnage of 29,976 tons.

Junks in foreign trade show a decrease of 477 vessels, and a decrease of 189,811 tons.

In local trade (i.e. between places within the waters of the Colony) there is a decrease in steam-launches of 1,099 vessels and a decrease in tonnage of 106,785 tons.

Junks in Local trade show an increase of 1,044 vessels and an increase of 178,746 tons.

Of vessels of European construction 6,274 Ocean Steamers, 4,532 River Steamers and 8,688 Steamships not exceeding 60 Tons entered during the year, giving a daily average of 39.7 ships. Thus:-

Steamers.

No. of times entered.

Total Tonnage.

Flag.

1928. 1929. 1928. 1929.

1928.

1929.

British,

Japanese, U.S.A.,

371 395 5,562 6,100 8,786,202 9,462,545 250 263 1,016 1,074 | 2,829,121 | 2,969,284 83 87 251 343 1,471,424 | 1,681,683

Chinese,

75 71

1,670

1,620

812,037

610,239

German,

60

48

163

187

564,429

594,325

Danish,

14

13

70

80

196.780

214,977

Dutch,

36

38 245

290

823,506

1,013,048

French,

33

26

312

293

724,176

669,354

Italian,

5

14

26

53

143,918

250,532

Panamanian,

1

388

Norwegian,

74

83

.....

Portuguese,.

5

15

Swedish,

11

10

340

419

468

613,765

656,395

81

271

14,380

95,855

43

22

128,955

83,261

Mexican,

Siamese,

1

(new ship)

Belgian,

4

14,787

Finnish,

1

(entered under Br. flag)

Greek,

1

3,437

Total..... 1,018 1,071 9,859 10,806 17,109,051 18,319,722

- D5 -

The Nationalities of the Crews in British and in Foreign Ships were as follows:

VESSELS.

BRITISH

OTHER EURO-

PEANS AND AMERICANS.

ASIATICS.

1928. 1929. 1928. 1929. 1928. 1929. 1928. 1929.

British,

371 395 41,014,46,399 1,372 1,838 411,717 423,334

Foreign, 647 676 765 577 47,001 51,920 |236,150 245,662

Total,

1,018 1,071 41,779 46,976 48,373 53,758 647,867,668,996

Hence in British ships :-

and in Foreign ships: -

1928. 1929.

1928.

1929.

09.03 %

09.08 % of the crews were British.

00:26 %

00-19 % of the crews

were British.

00:30 %

00.29 % of the crews

16.55 %

17:41 % of the crews

were other Europeans &

were other

Europeans &

Americans.

Americans.

90.67 %

90'63 % of the crews

were Asiatics.

83.19 % 82.40 % of the crews

were Asiatics.

100·00% 100·00 %

100·00 % 100·00 %

2.-Trade.

Details of vessels of European type of construction, shipping bunker coal and oil fuel are as follows:-

EXPORTS.

1928.

1929.

No.

Coal Tons. No.

Oil Tons. No.

Coal Tons. No. Oil Tons.

Steamers,.

5,951 327,761 5,951

River Steamers, 3.925 85,407 3,925

117,380 6,269

453 4.543

312,708 6,269 101,174

128,366 4.513 223

Total,

9,876

413,168 9,876

117,833 10,812

411,074 10,812 101,397

- D 6

The River Trade compared with 1928 is shown in the

following Table :-

1928..

1929...

Year.

Imports. Tons.

Exports.

Passengers.

Tons.

322,058

475,689

2,211,904

324,127.36

451,698.30

2,530,671

The following Tables show the Junk Trade of the Colony for the year 1928 and 1929 :-

IMPORTS.

1928.

1929.

Junks.

Tonnage.

Junks. Tonnage.

Foreign Trade,...... 11,931 I.ocal Trade,............... 7,910

1,577,103

11,767

1,496,561

326,549

7,385

316,628

Total,

19,841

1,903,652

19,152

1,813,189

Cargo 1929.

Tons.

Cattle, 977 head,

115

Swine, 12,910 bead,

General,.....

760

.470,736

Total,...

471,611

EXPORTS.

1928.

1929.

Junks.

Tonnage.

Junks.

Tonnage.

Foreign Trade,...... 12,068 Local Trade,......... 8,188

1,616,112

11,755

1,506,843

345,947

7,711

328,904

Total,..... 20,256

1,962,059

19,466

1,835,747

Cargo 1929.

Tons.

Kerosine, 1,404,522 Cases,

Rice and Paddy,

Coal,

General,

50,162

..170,877

96,411 .718,783

Total,......

..1,036,233

-

D 7

Passenger Trade of the Port for the year 1929:-

Passengers.

Emigrants.

No. of Ships.

Arrived.

Departed. Returned. Departed.

British Ocean-going,

4,73+

319,119 202,855 103.261

114.323

Foreign Ocean-going,

7,809

317,229

196,342

82,129

113,200

British River Steamers,

7.474

1,160,715

1,222,169

Foreign River Steamers,

1.601

69,280

78,507

Total,

21,618

1,66 343 1,699.873

185,390

227,523

Steam-launches, Foreign Trade.

7,434

Junks, Foreign Trade,.....

23,522

55,368

4 62,339*

Total, Foreign Trade,

Steam-launches. Local Trade,.

Junks, Local Trade,..

Total, Local Trade,

52.574 1,921,711 1,762,216

214.875 | 1,492,537 15,096 4.100

229,971 1,496,637 | 1,493,077

Grand Total,

282,5453,418.348

185,390 227,523

1,487 666 5,411

3,255,293

185,390

185,390 272,523

227,523

3.-Revenue and Expenditure.

The total Revenue during the year was $1,010,061.97 as against $973,283.46 collected in the previous year showing an increase of $36,778.51 or 3.64%.

Light Dues,

Light Dues, Special Assessments,..

Licences and Internal Revenue,..

Fees of Court or Offices,.......

Miscellaneous Receipts,

1928

1929. Increase. Decrease.

$138,550.02 $144,961.48 $ 6,411.46

165,292.04 174,165.18 8.873.14

190,178.25 195,271.52 5,093.27

477,320.51 489,710.01 12,389,50

1,942.64 5,953,78 4.011.14

$973,283.46 $1,010,061.97 $36,778.51

D 8

3.-Revenue and Expenditure,—Continued.

The principal individual increases are :—

Light Dues,

$ 6,411.46

Light Dues, Special Assessments,

8,873.14

Boat Licences,

1,106.35

Fines,

3,217.67

Junk Licences from New Territory,

1,212.25

Steam Launch Licences,

1,164.50

Survey of Steam Launches,

1,880.00

Survey of Steamships,

22,099.10

....

Sunday Cargo Working Permits,

7,475.00

Sale of Condemned Stores,

2.701.35

The principal individual decreases are:-

Junk Licences, Old Territory, Engagement and Discharge of Seamen, Fees for use of Government Buoys,........ Medical Examination of Emigrants,

The

Expenditure

$1,437.50

2,802.60

3,832.29

12,006.10

excluding Special Expenditure

was

$688,938,40 as against $648,324.33 expended in 1928 showing an increase of $40,614.07. This increase is principally due to additional staff and stipulated increments.

Special Expenditure included:-

Special Repairs to Yaumati Slipway,

1 New Engine for Motor Boat of Stanley,

Cust Rock Beacon,

$ 234.44

915.70

3,116,90

2 Reversible Mooring Buoys A Class,

3,735.00

1 New Launch for Government Marine

Surveyor,

23,100.00*

Training Expenses of Government Marine

Surveyors in England,

21,994.81

Filing Cabinets for Registration Records, 1 New Launch (Lila) to replace "H. D. 5"

(last instalment),

$ 68,259.67

1,412.82

13,750.00

* Excluding last instalment of $7,700 paid in 1930.

..

Light Dues were collected during the year 1929 as follows:-

Special Assessment.

Class of Vessels.

No. of

Trips.

Tonnage.

Rate

per tou.

Fees

Collected.

Rate

per ton.

Fees

Collected.

Total Fees

Collected.

Ocean Vessels,...........

6,344

14,142,714

F 1 cent.

Steam-launches,

2,691

90,342 1

River Steamers, (Night),

1,296

789,584

>>

Do.,

(Day),

· 3,125

3,346,273 Nil.

$

C.

C.

$

..

141,427.14

1 cent.

141,427.14

282,854 28

903.42

1

903.42

1,806.84

2.631.96

3,947.97

6,579.93

xoko

??

27,885.61

27,885.61

Total,.

13,456

18,368,913

...

$144,962.52

D 9

$174,164.14

$319,125.66

D 10

4.- Steam-launches.

On the 31st December, 1929, there were 305 Steam-launches and 170 Motor Boats employed in the Harbour. Of these 410 were licensed for the conveyance of passengers, 29 steam-launches and 13 motor boats belonged to the Colonial Government, 3 steam launches belonged to the Imperial Government, and 15 steam launches and 5 motor boats to the Naval Authorities. In addition there were 43 motor boats privately owned for pleasure and private purposes.

New licence books for Steam Launches and Motor Boats were issued as follows in three classes during the year 1929, under Regulations, Section 37 of the Merchant Shipping Ordinance, No. 10 of 1899.

Class I......... 38 licences

Class II .... 18

Class III ...... 84

3

For incompetence or negligence in performing their duties :-

5 coxswains' certificates were cancelled.

655 engagements and 658 discharges of masters and engineers were recorded during the year.

5.--Emigration and Immigration.

227,523 emigrants left Hong Kong for various places during the year 1929 (257,162 in 1928). Of these 114,323 were carried in British ships and 113,200 in Foreign ships.

185,390 returning emigrants were reported to have been brought to Hong Kong from the several places to which they had emigrated either from this Colony or from Coast Ports, as against 187,847 in 1928. Of these, 103,261 arrived in British ships and 82,129 in Foreign ships.

6.-Registry, etc., of Shipping.

During the year,

year, 20 ships were registered under the provisions of the Merchant Shipping Acts, and 24 Certificates of Registry cancelled. 284 documents, etc., were dealt with in con- nection with the Act, the fees on which amounted to $2,142.00 as compared with $2,440,00 in 1928,

D 11

7. Marine Magistrate's Court.

Four hundred and Seventy-seven (477) cases were heard in the Marine Magistrate's Court during 1929 (as compared with 380 in 1928).

The principal offences were :-

Carrying excess passengers.

Mooring within 100 yards from low water mark in pro-

hibited hours.

Mooring in Causeway Bay Harbour of Refuge without a

permit.

Making fast to steamers whilst underway without permis-

sion of the Master or Officer in charge.

Boarding ships without permission.

Mooring outside 5 other boats alongside steamer.

Failing to carry the regulation lights.

Anchoring in the Fairways.

Breach of condition of Passenger boat licence by carrying

cargo.

Leaving Port without a Clearance.

Failing to stop when called upon to do so by Police.

Failing to take out licence.

Failing to produce licence.

Using bright lights for purpose of attracting fish in pro-

hibited areas.

Failing to observe the Rule of the Road.

Hawking in Harbour without a Hawker's (Native Craft)-

or (Steamship) licence.

8. Marine Courts of Enquiry.

(Under Section 19 of Ordinance 10 of 1899),

During the year 1929 four courts were held, riz:-

(1) On the 9th and 10th August, 1929, to enquire into circumstances attending the stranding of the British S.S. "Lok Sun" Official No. 153555 of Hong Kong. (2) On the 21st August, 1929, to enquire into a charge of misconduct against Mr. W. C. C. Becks, 1st Mate of the British S.S. "Kwong Fook Cheong".

(3) On the 11th September, 1929, re-hearing of the case taken on 21st August, 1929, on a charge of miscon- duct against Mr. W. C. C. Becks, ex 1st Mate of the British S.S. "Kwong Fook Cheong ".

(4) On the 11th December, 1929, to enquire into a charge of misconduct against Mr. A. J. Cordiner, 2nd Engineer of the British S.S "Porteurna",

D 12

9.-Examination of Masters, Mates, and Engineers. (Under Board of Trade Regulations.)

The following Tables show the number of Candidates examined under Ordinance No. 10 of 1899 for Certificates of Compe-

tency.

Grade.

Passed.

Failed.

Master,

First Mate,

21

22

11

16

Second Mate,

* Total,

32

29:18

38

First Class Engineer, ...

Second Class Engineer,

10

7

† Total,

17

47

285

19

28

* Passed 45-7 per cent. † Passed 26-5 per cent.

Failed 54.3 per cent. Failed 73.5 per cent.

For Steamships not exceeding 60 tons, under Section 37 of Ordinance 10 of 1899 :-

Master,... Engineer,

Candidates.

Total,...

Passed.

Failed.

81

49

69

18

150

67

10. Examination of Pilots.

(Under Ordinance No. 3 of 1904.)

Twenty-four licences were renewed during the year. No examination of Pilots was held in 1929.

11.-Sunday Cargo-Working.

Under Ordinance No. 7 of 1929, 1,159 permits were issued during the year as compared with 1,168 in 1928.

The Revenue collected under this head amounted to $129,750 as against $122.275 in 1928 showing an increase of $7,475.

D 13

12.-Harbour Master's Out-Stations.

The Out-stations attached to the Harbour Department issued

Licences, etc., as follows:-

1928.

19.29.

Shaukiwan,..

5,629

4,865

Aberdeen,

6,581

6,827

Stanley,

629

681

Yaumati,

4,254

3,634

Cheung Chau,

4,343

4,013

Tai O.....

2,136

2,542

Tai Po,

1,724

2,326

Saikung,

1,015

1,009

Longket,

388

839

Deep Bay,

698

771

Lantao.

448

709

27.845

28,216

The following is a comparative statement showing the amount of fees collected at out-Stations during the years 1928 and 1929.

Station.

1928.

1929. Increase.

Decrease.

$

Shaukiwan,

Aberdeen,

+

C.

22,053.25* 19,750.45

-CA

$

C.

$

C.

$

c.

2,302.80

17,153.00

17,657,60

504.60

Stanley,

1,069.30

1,357.30

288.00

Yaumati,

37,271.75

35,417.50

1,854.25

Cheung Chow,

12,584.60

13,273.00

688.40

Tai 0,

4,623.05

5,176.00

552.95

Tai Po,

5,163.15

6,105.70

942.55

Saikung,

2,311.75

2,586 25

274.50

Longket,

1,500.65

2,389,00

888.35

Deep Bay,

2,279.90 2,191.00

88.90

Lantao,

Total,

1,498.20 1,935.00 436.80

107,508.60 107,838.80 4,576.15 4,245.95

Nett Increase,

330.20

* Excluding Dispensary Fees $1,794.30

t

"

""

$3,430.30

D.14

13.-Lighthouses and Signal Stations.

GAP ROCK LIGHTHOUSE.

During 1929 a total number of 1,166 vessels were signalled and reported including 144 by Flash lamp.

4,125 messages, including meteorological observations for the Observatory, were sent by telegraph, 854 messages were received (26 by wireless) including weather reports.

Telegraphic communication was interrupted for 16 days 13

hours.

There were 78 hours and 30 minutes of fog, and fog signals were fired 490 times.

The fortnightly reliefs were delayed 6 times owing to bad

weather.

WAGLAN LIGHTHOUSE.

During 1929, 4,131 vessels were signalled and reported in- cluding 1,165 by Flash lamp.

4,018 messages including meteorological observations for the Royal Observatory were sent by telegraph and 10 by wireless.

915 messages were received by telegraph and 18 by wireless including weather reports.

year.

Telegraphic communication was maintained throughout the

There were 363 hours 40 minutes fog.

The Diaphone fog signal was sounded for 380 hours.

The relief was delayed owing to bad weather on 2 occasions.

GREEN ISLAND LIGHTHOUSE AND SIGNAL STATION.

During 1929, 1,564 vessels were signalled and reported.

366 messages were sent and 46 were received.

Aga lights (including Green Island) are now 17 in number and have worked accurately and continuously throughout the year.

The Beckwith Bell fog signal has worked satisfactorily throughout the year.

KAP SING LIGHTHOUSE.

This station has been regularly inspected and has worked satisfactorily throughout the year.

D 15

KOWLOON SIGNAL STATION.

At the Signal Hill Station, Kowloon, 3,691 vessels were signalled and reported as entering and 2,600 as leaving the harbour. 104 Typhoon and non-local signals were hoisted.

14. Harbour Moorings.

GOVERNMENT MOORINGS.

Government Moorings as detailed below are available for the use of vessels frequenting the Port --

Daily Rental. Number Available.

1928. 1929.

A Class for Vessels 450/600

feet long

$8.00

17

17

B Class for Vessels 300/450

feet long

6.00

20

20

C Class for Vessels less than

300 feet long...

4.00

19

19

Total...

56

56

Of the above 56 Moorings there are 16 special Typhoon Moorings viz., 14 A Class and 2 B Class.

(i) In the aggregate these moorings were in use throughout the year as follows:-

A Class 4,328 days.

B Class 4,248

C Class 5,128

""

(ii) In addition they were used by Naval Vessels and Transports, for which no charge was made, as follows:-

A Class 99 days.

B Class 12

REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE,

The gross revenue for the year, including $1,393.71 from Private Buoys, was $82,017.71. The loss of revenue due to (ii) above amounted to $840 and the expenditure for upkeep was $19,469.24. In addition to this $11,023.36 was expended in providing chain for new moorings, and $3,735.00 for two reversible A Class mooring buoys.

PRIVATE BUoys.

Permission was granted to various industrial concerns to maintain private buoys and moorings to the number of 28, and the total revenue derived from that source was $1,393.71.

D 16

15. Mercantile Marine Office.

36,657 seamen were shipped and 34,604 discharged at the Mercantile Marine Office and on board ships during the year, com- pared with 38,773 shipped and 38,221 discharged during 1928.

52 distressed seamen were received and admitted to Sailors' Home and Boarding Houses; of these 17 were sent Home, 2 to Bombay, 6 to Calcutta, 1 to Foochow, 1 to Melbourne, 2 to Singapore, 1 disappeared, I died in hospital, 2 remained in Sailors' home, 1 in hospital, 1 remained in Gaol, and 10 obtained employment.

$1,136.75 was expended by the Harbour Master on behalf of the Board of Trade in the relief of these distressed seamen,

16. Marine Surveyor's Office.

PASSENGER CERTIFICATES.

126 vessels of 363,960 tons, gross, were surveyed for Passenger Certificates during the year, as compared with 134 vessels of 389,967 tons, gross, in 1928:29 being surveyed at Kowloon Docks, 67 at Taikoo Dockyard, 9 at Cosmopolitan Docks, 1 at Aberdeen, 19 at Chinese Slipways, and one on a Bottom Certificate issued by the Australian Government. The following is a comparison of tonnages and nationalities of the various vessels granted Hong Kong Passen- ger Certificates during 1929 :-

103 vessels of 322,918 tons (gross)

British, Norwegian,

14

...

Chinese,

7

31,566 5;185

""

J

Danish,

2

4,291

""

>"

""

3 vessels of a total of 10,916 tons, gross, were surveyed and granted Bottom Certificates during the year.

EMIGRATION SURVEYS.

107 vessels, of which 49 were British, and 58 foreign, were surveyed for Emigration Licences during the year, as compared with 119 vessels in 1928.

LOADLINE CERTIFICATES,

32 vessels were surveyed for Loadline Certificates during the year, as compared with 50 in 1928. Of this number 14 were British vessels registered in Hong Kong, the remainder being Chinese.

LIFESAVING APPLIANCES.

56 new Lifeboats and 101 units of Standard Buoyant Apparatus were surveyed during construction, at the makers' works, during the year. 20,363 new lifejackets were inspected and stamped during the year as compared with 12,793 in 1928. In addition, some 2,000 new lifejackets were examined, and rejected due to defects in materials, failure to pass buoyancy tests, etc.

SURVEYS OF HARBOUR LAUNCHES.

During the year 727 surveys were carried out on steam and motor launches for plying licences, as compared with 763 in 1928.

Year.

Comparative Return of Work performed by the Government Marine Surveyor's Department for 3 years ending 31.12.29.

1927

128

27

8

137

12

24

Surveys for

Passenger Certificate Surveys for Load- line Certificate.

Surveyors for Bottom Certificate.

Surveys for

Emigration Licence.

Measurement of Tonnage for British

Registry.

Measurement of Tonnage, not for British Registry.

Inspection & Certific- ation of Light & Sound Signals.

Examination of Boiler Designs.

Surveys of Boilers during Construction.

Surveys of Govern- ment Land Boilers.

Surveys of Licensed Launches.

Surveys of Govt.

Launches & Harbour Buoys, etc.

Ships' Plans Exam-

ined.

Inclining Experi- ments carried out.

New Lifeboats Surveyed

New Buoyant Appar- atus Surveyed.

Life jackets Inspect- ed and Stamped..

Engineers Examined B. O. T. Certificates.

Engineers Examined Local Certificates.

Estimated Total

24

16

10

-759

1928

134

50

3

119

11

12

12

18

10

763

1,100

1929

126

32

3

107

20

34

22

20

12

10

727

1,242

260

34

56

101 20,363

64

87

6,560

-

73

96

Number of Visits in connection with

4,488

12,793

73

101

5,215

Surveys.

LI C

D 18

17.-Government Gunpowder Depôt.

During the year 1929 there has been stored in Government Gunpowder Depôt, Green Island:-

No.

Approx-

imate

of Cases.

Weight,

lb.

Gunpowder, privately owned,

Do.. Government owned,..

Cartridges, privately owned,.

Do., Government owned,.

Explosive Compounds, privately owned,

1,132

40,362

17

940

89

8,324

19

1,833

8,063

498,888

Do.,

Government owned,

44

1,440

Non-explosives, privately owned,..

122

22.724

Do.,

Government owned,

34

1,370

Total,

9,520 565,881

During the same period there has been delivered out of the Depôt :-

No.

Approxi-

of Cases.

mate Weight.

jk.

For Sale in the Colony :-

Gunpowder, privately owned,

52

1,750

Cartridges, privately owned,.

Non-explosives, privately owned,

32

2,820

Explosive Compounds, privately owned,..

1,208

70,352

6

587

For Export :-

Gunpowder, privately owned,

Cartridges,

510

15,250

6

5,527

1,337 243,642

Explosive Compounds, privately owned,..

Non-explosives, privately owned,

Government owned :-

Gunpowder,

Cartridges,

Explosive Compounds,

230

Delivered to be destroyed :-

Cartridges,

2

300

Explosive Compounds,

Gunpowder,

Non-explosives,

15

2,089

Total,..

7,361

338,357

D 19

On the 31st December, 1929, there remained as follows:

No. of Cases.

Approxi-

mate

Weight.

Ib.

Gunpowder, privately owned,.

570

23,362

Do,

Government owned,

17

940

Cartridges, privately owned,

49

3,867

Do. Government owned,

19

1,833

Explosive Compounds, privately owned,

1,328 174,894

Do.,

Government owned,

41 1,210

Non-explosives, privately owned,

101

20,048

Do.,

Government owned,

34

1,370

Total,...

2,159 | 227,524

18.-Government Coaling Depôt, Yaumati.

Government Launches received coal or oil fuel as required during the year. 8,7454 tons of coal was received into the Depôt and 8,5134 tons issued to launches. 36,083 gallons of Kerosene and 14,570 gallons of Petrol were received and 35,530 gallons Kerosene and 14,539 gallons Petrol were issued to motor launches. 2,302.38 tons of fuel oil were received and bunkered.

GOVERNMENT SLIPWAY, YAUMATI.

Government launches were slipped, aggregating 67 times at regular intervals during the year and the slip, was occupied 239 days.

G. F. HOLE, Harbour Master.

( D 20)

SHIPPING, 1929.

Table I.-NUMBER, TONNAGE, AND CREWS, OF VESSELS ENTERED AT PORTS IN THE COLONY OF HONG KONG FROM EACH COUNTRY IN THE YEAR 1929.

BRITISH.

FOREIGN.

GRAND TOTAL.

COUNTRIES WHENCE ARRIVED.

Vessels.

Tons.

Crews. Vessels. Tons.

Crews. Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Australia & Pacific Islands including New Zealand,.

34

97,893 3,467

17

51,051

1,613

51

148,944 5,080

British North Borneo.........

47

115,089 3,713

16

34,938

819

63

150.027 4,532

Canada.

27

246,121 11,254

6

25,571

273

33

271,692 14,527

Ceylon,

1

5,228

40

1

India, including Mauritius,

119

412,159 16,196

98

333,366

5,764

217

5,228

745,525 21,960

40

South Africa,

3

9,492

338

3

Straits Settlements & F.M.S.,

110

211,896

10,779

39

79,243

3,522

149

9.492

291,139

338

14.301

United Kingdom,.....

170

843,058 17,934

40 214.730 5.255

210

1.057,788 23,189

China,

1,311 1,895.545113.762

River Steamers,

3.363.707190,892

2,783 2,934.010|183,374 478 236.088 25,147 3,261 3.170,098 208,521

1,304 1,468,162 77,130 2,615

11

1

Steamships under 60 tons,..

Junks,

:

:

3,579 102,688 42.760

11,151 | 1,408,047 |185,648

3,579

11,151

Denmark,

17

84,261

699

17

Europe (not specially mentioned),

11

43,121

817

31

115,329 1.513

12

102,688 12,760

1,108,047 185,618

84,261 699

158,453 2,330

France,

15

59,009 1,222

38

248.741 7.550

53

307,750 8,772

Formosa,

11,064

220

140

164,982

7,189

144

176,046 7,109

Germany,

25,659

422

90

402,404

6,983

95

428,063 7,405

Holland,........

1

5,680

210

10

44,639

508

11

50,319

718

Italy,

1

347

26

30

(French) Indo-China, ..... ..

148

192,221 10,130

433

Japan,

135

Macao,

1

591,233 20,706

50

River Steamers,

951

666

961,92+ 50,934

320

479 1,701,130

399 57,722 10,032

42,590 10,050

144,532

471,037 26,466

35,752

1,912

31

144,879 1,938

""

Steamships under 60 tons,

Junks,

Netherland East Indies,

Philippine Islands,

109

616

:

2,767 1,110

88,514 9.771

581 663,258 36,596

614 2,292,363 56,458

400 58.388 10,082

1,271 1,004,514 60,984

109

616

2,767

1,110

$8,514

9.771

16

53,067

662

175

539,216 15,242

191 :

592,283

15.904

24 144,999 6,556

75

472,114 10.953

65

99

617,113

17,509

Russia in Asia, .

Siam,

South America,

Sweden,

United States of America, «

··

12

72.700 1,053

20

20

89 137.165

7,749

146

92 207

160,874

926

32 164.907 1,979

...

:

:

20 91,666

12

83 398,424

6,997

272

45,926

1,529.430 30.454

9,929

2,037

401

235

20 91.666 2,037

12 45,926

355 1,927,854 37,451

298,039 17,678

401

TOTAL,

6,100 | 9,462,545 | 471,571

20,161

10,459,193 537,448

26,261 19.921,738 1,009,019

}

( D 21 )

Table II.-NUMBER, TONNAGE, AND CREWS OF VESSELS CLEARED IN THE COLONY (

COUNTRY IN THE YEAR 1929.

BRITISH.

FOREIGN.

COUNTRIES TO WHICH DEPARTED.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Fuel Bunker

Oil.

Coal.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Fuel

Bun

Oil.

Co:

Australia & Pacific Islands including New Zealand

British North Boinco..

29

83.547 3,195 2.346 2,25

31

88.903

2,401

3.

57

147,184 4.242

1.945

3,730

17

46 119

729

775

...

:

Canada,

22

195,907 10,315

Ceylon.

India including Mauritius,...............

$2

296,994 10,979

:

:

1

3,169

39

+

7.305

114

298,316

6,980

South Africa.

3

9,492

354

CCO

13

46, 33

991

:

Straits Settlements & F'. M. S,.....

129

244,342

United Kingdom,......

89

China,.........

River Steamers, .

521,774 14,396

1,347 2,016,805 | 119,346

2,791 | 2,953,805 | 183,991

12,597 11.918 *7.603

5,245

5,060

10,657 56,937

215 108.744

75

219.732

4,816

39 209,928

5,138

1,477 1,852,949 79,164

483 239,793 25,104

1.014 14

б

10.



Steamships under 60 ions,

:

Junks.

Deumark,

:..

:

3,631

102,814 42.856

16,

11,333

1.444,115 190,585

:

34,526

275

Europe, fnct specially mentioned),.

6

25,220

254

Fiance,

:

26

200.165 6,460

200

1.

Formosa,

3

6,456

130

65

40

92

128,871 5.813

170

Germany.

14

63,187 1,174

1,000

40

178.235 2.917

Holland.

1

2,337

57

1:0

2

Italy.

...

11.037

24 120,918 1,535

81

(French) Indo-China,.............

165

Japan,

204

Macao,

2

229,225 11,251 200.

858,390 24,119 9,412

1,332

103

27,061

490 647,059 32,473

26,589 374 1,485,886 30,774

782 49.

1,110 7.

401

55,642 9,969

66

1.

River Steamers,

949

960,137 50,813

:

8,086

320

42,590 10,050

1

"

"

Steamships under 60 tons,

115

2,798 1,157

"

Junks,

...

422

62,728 6,679

Netherlands East Indies,

18

63,566 791

60

2,900

110

387,616 11,706

:

Philippine Islands,

37

230,716 11,448 3,180

2,195

157

Russia in Asia.

32

174,560 2,608

:

1,870

12

749,042

54,407

16 344

4,700

442

}

Siam,

64 97,078

5,575

7,240 || 4,605

129

140,901 8,825

South America,

30

200

880 34.

143.158 3.135 1,500

Sweden,..

United States of America,........................

70

341,649 6,218 4,503 2,356



231

101

10,374

400

1,317,204 27,417 32,606 5.

Total,

6,108 9,498,483 | 473,702 56,986 269,659

20.205 10,450,928 | 536,140

44,411 188.

( D 21 )

TONNAGE, AND CREWS OF VESSELS CLEARED IN THE COLONY OF HONG KONG TO EACH

COUNTRY IN THE YEAR 1929.

BRITISH.

FOREIGN.

GRAND TOTAL.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Fuel Bunker

Oil. Coal.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Fuel Bunker Oil. Coal,

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Fuel Bunker Oil. Coal.

29

57

147,184

83,547 3,195 2.346 2,25

4.242

1,945

31

88.908 2,401

3,110

60

172,450 5,596 2,346 5,935

3,730

17

46 119

729

775

:

74

193,303 4,971 2,720

3,730

22

195,907

10,315

1

3,169

39

23

199,076

10,354

...

:

122

:

:

$2

296.994

10,979

4.305

114

298,316

6,980

960

196

965,310 17.959

8,265

3

9,492

354

CCO

13

46, 33

991

16

56,225 1,315

600

129

244,342

12,597

11.918

*7.603

75

219.732

4,816

4,750

204

464,074

11.918 17,413

12.353

89

521,774

14,396

5,245

5,060

39 209,928

5,138

128

1,347 2,016,805 | 119,346

10,657

56,937

1,477 1,852,949 79,164

1,014

14.453

2,791 2,953,605 | 183,991

215168.744

473

259,793 25,104

10.239

:

:

:

:

3,631

102,814

42.856

+

:

:

:

:

:

11,333

1.444,115190,585

:

:

16,931

3,631

11.333

731,702

2,243 869,754 | 198,510

3,274 3,193,598 | 209,395

12.856 102,814

1.444,115 190,585

19.534

5,245 5,060

11,671 101,390

223,118,983

16,931

7

34,526

275

7

34.526

275

:

6

26,220

254

6

25.220

254

:

26

200,165 6,460

200

1,775

26

200,165

0,160

200

1,775

3

6,456

130

65

10

92

128,871

5,813

170

130

95

135,327

5.943

235

470

14

63,187 1,174

1

2,337

57

:

1,000

40

178.235

2.917

54

241,422

4,121

1.000

1:0

2

11,037

81

:

:

:

3

13,374

138

150

24

120,918 1,535

60

24 120,918 1,535

60

165

229,225 11,251

200.

27,061

490

204

858,390 24,119

26,589 9,412

2

1,332

103

949

960,137

50,813

:

:

8,086

647,059 32,473

374 1,485,886 30,774

401

55,642 9,969

320 42,590 10,030

782

49,719

655

1,110

7,521

578

876,264 43,724

2,314,276 54,893

982

76,738

10,522

34,110

66

1,427

203

1,297

115

2,798 1,157

339

56,974 10,072

60,863 1,269 1,002,727

115

2.798

66

1,427

9,383

1,157

339

422

:

62.728 6,679

422 62,728 6,679

18

63,566

791

60

2,900

110

387,616

11,706

4,012

128

...

451,182

12,497

60

6,912

37

230,716 11,448

3,180

2,195

157

749,042

16.344

4,700

762

194

979,758

28,392

7,880

2,957

32

174,560 2,608

1,870

12

54,407

442

200

41

228,967

3.050

200

1,870

64 97,078

5,575

7,2404,605

129

140,901 8,825

880

34,965

193

237,979

:

30 143.158 3,135

1,500

160

30

3

::.

:

70

341,649

6,218

4,503

2,356

231

10,374

1,317,204

101

27,417

400

32,606 5,775

143,158

3 10,374

301 1,658,853

14,400

*1,500 3,135

8,120 39,570

160

101

33,635

400

37,109

D

8,131

6,108 9,498,483 473,702

56,986 269,659

20.205 10,450,928 | 536,140 44,411 188,685

26,31319,949,411 1,009.842 101,397 458,344

D 22-

Table III.-Total Number and Tonnage of Vessel Entered at each Port in the Colony of Hong Kong during the Year 1929.

BRITISHI.

FOREIGN.

TOTAL.

STATION.

Vessels.

Tonnage.

Vessels.

Tonnage. Vessels.

Tonnage.

Aberdeen, Cheung Chau,

Saikung,

Stanley,

44

Tai O,........

Tai Po,

314

13,018

314

13,018

489

28,051

489

28,051

13

468

13

468

!

177

5,583

177

5,583

63

1,854

63

1,854

Deep Bay,

44

Junk Bay, Victoria,

6,100 9,462,545

22.802 10,621,392

28,902 20,093,937

Totals....

6,100 9,462,545

23,858 10 670,366

30,018 20,132,911

Table IV.-Total Number and Tonnage of Vessels Cleared at each Port in the Colony of Hong Kong during the Year, 1929.

BRITISH.

FOREIGN.

TOTAL.

STATION.

Vessels. Tonnage.

Vessels. Tonnage. Vessels.

Tonnage.

Aberdeen,

...

Cheung Chau,

814

13,017

314

13,017

488

29,930

488

29,930

...

Saikung,

Stanley,

£13

469

13

468

177

5,547

177

5.547

Tai Po,

62

1,830

62

1,830

Deep Bay,

Junk Bay, Victoria,

6,109 9,498,483

23,116 10,623,428

29,224 20,121,911

Total,...

6,108 9,498,483

24170 10,674,220

30,278 20,172,703

D 23

Table V.

NUMBER, TONNAGE, and CREWS of VESSELS of EACH NATION ENTERED at PORTS in the COLONY of

HONG KONG in the YEAR 1929.

ENTERED.

NATIONALITY,

Vessels.

Tons.

Crews.

British,

2,366

5,566,611

237,263

River Steamers, ..

3,734

3,895,934

234,308

""

American,

343

1,681,683

33,596

Chinese,

976

370,699

39,372

22

River Steamers,

644

239,540

30,263

Junks,

11,767

1,496,561

195,419

"

Danish,

80

214,977

4,962

Dutch,

290

1,013,048

27,680

French,..

293

669,354

29,836

Italian,

53

250,532

3,175

Japanese,

1,074

2,969,284

76,356

Norwegian,

468

656,395

24,613

Portuguese,

117

56,717

8,481

River Steamers,

154

39,138

4,934

""

German,

187

594,325

13,900

Swedish,

22

83,261

741

Belgian,

4

14,787

211

Greek,

3,437

39

Steamships

under

under 60

tons trading to Ports

3,688

105,455

43,870

outside the Colony, ...

TOTAL,

26,261

19,921,738 1,009,019

- D 24

Table VI.

NUMBER, TONNAGE, and CREWS of VESSELS of EACH NATION CLEARED at PORTS in the COLONY of HONG KONG in the YEAR 1929.

CLEARED.

NATIONALITY.

Vessels.

Tons.

Crews.

British,

2,368 5,584,541

238,898

River Steamers, ...

3,740

3,913,942

234,804

American,........

348

1,683,002

33,771

Chinese,

971

368,355

39,369

River Steamers,

650

242,820

30,442

Junks,

11,755

1,506,843

197,264

Danish,

79

213,253

4,787

Dutch,

291

1,014,522

26,815

French,

291

667,325

28,087

Italian,

52

247,450

3,067

Japanese,

1,073

2,954,226

. 73,949

Norwegian,

465

654,967

25,312

Portuguese,

117

56,471

8,737

River Steamers,

153

39,563

5,012

""

German,

185

592,597

14,458

Swedish,

22

83,261

740

Belgian,

1

14,787

211

Finnish,

1

1,987

46

Siamese.

1

450

21

Greek,

1

3,437

39

Steamships under 60

tons trading to Ports outside the Colony,...

3,746

105,612

44,013

TOTAL,......

26,313

19,949,411

1,009,842

-

Table VII.

Total Number, Tonnage, Crows, Passengers, and Cargoes of Junks ENTERED in the Colony of Hong Kong, from Ports on the Coast of China and Macao, in the Year 1929.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels. Tons.

Crew.

Passen- Cargo, Ves- gers Tons. sels.

Tons.

Crew.

Passen-

gers.

Passen-

Vessels

Tous. Crew.

gers.

Cargo.

Tons.

Canton,

501 95,747 9,888

51,519 1,283 280.026

24,407

1,784

375,773 34,295

51,519

West River,

Macao,

4,118 522,481 79,800 52,124 142 25,056 1,457

192,713 | 2,219 | 262,006

35,055

470

6,337

784,487 115,355

52 594

192,713

East Coast,

West Coast,

1,989 148,223 19,433 2,774

81

9,115 1,416

1,648 616 $2,237

14.309 174 63,458 94,719 314 8,212 2,252

12.897

8,314

616

88,514 9,771

14,309

2,303

156,435 21,685

2,774

94,719

727

91.352 14,313

1,648

Total, 1929,

6,831

800,622,111,994 | 54,898

354.908 4,936 695,939

83,425

470

11,767 1,496,561 |195,419

55,368

354,908

Total, 1928,

5,941

717,138 101,821 72,328

і 839,965 291,139 5,990 839,965 103,021

28

11,931 | 1,577,103 | 204,842 72,356

291,139

D 25

Table VIII.

Total Number, Tonnage, Crews, Passengers, and Cargoes of Junks CLEARED in the Colony of Hong Kong, for Ports on the Coast of China and Macao, iu the Year 1929.

- D 26

Cargo.

Ballast.

Total.

Vessels.

Tons. Crew.

Passen- Cargo, Ves- gers. tons. sels.

Tons. Crew.

Passen-

gers.

Vessels.

Tons.

('rew,

Passen-

geis.

Cargo,

tous.

1

Canton,

2,314

West River,

143,462 43,699 1,857 624,593 93,054 57,004

Macao,

355

51,751 6,028

East Coast...

1,385

55,966 11,999

5,335

West Coast,

729

97.549 14,557

450,480 32 5,641 571 324,5971,185 129,350 17,315 33,335 64 10,977 16,764 815 $5.625 9.169 85,825 16 1,926

2,346

449,106 44 270

450,480

6,042

753,943 | 110,399

57,001

324,597

651

122

62 728 6,679

33,335

2.200

111,591 21,168

5 335

16,764

191

745

99.475 14,748

85,825

...

Total 1929.

9,643 | 1,273,321 | 169,337

62,339

911,001 2,112|233,522 27.927

11,755

1,506,843 | 197,261

62,339

911,001

Total 1928,

10,397 | 1,429,102.| 185,055

72,507

1,035,609 1,671 | 187,010 22,389

12,068

1,616,112 | 207,444 72,507 1,035,609

FOREIGN TRADE.

Table IX.

Summary of Arrivals and Departures of all Vessels.

1928.

1929.

D 27 -

NO. OF

VESSELS.

TONS.

CREW.

NO. OF

VESSELS.

TONS.

CREW.

British Ships entered,

5,562

8,786,202

442,289

6,100

9.462,545

471,571

British Ships cleared,

5,568

8,776,240

470,280

6,108

9,498,483

473,702

Foreign Ships entered,

4,297

8,322,849

295,730

4,706

8,857.177

298,159

Foreign Ships cleared,

4,308

8,321,145

293,552

4,704

8,838,473

294,863

Steamships under 60 tous entered,

4,249

119,824

49,288

3,688

105,455

43,870

Steamships under 60 tons cleared,..

4,295

121,219

49,717

3,746

105,612

44,013

Junks entered,

11,931

1,577,103

204,842

11,767

1,496,561

193,419

Junks cleared,

12,068

1,616,112

207,444

11,755

1,506,843

197,264

Total of all Vessels entered,..

26,039

18,805,978

992,149

26,261

Total of all Vessels cleared,.

26.239

18,834,716

1,020,993

19,921,738 26,313 19,949,411 1,009,842

1,009,019

Total of all Vessels entered and cleared, in Foreign Trade,

52,278

37,640,694

2,013,142

52,574 39,871,149

2,018,861

LOCAL TRADE.

Total Junks entered,

Do.

cleared,

Total Local Trade entered and cleared,

7,910

326,549

77,283

7,385

316,628

75,491

8,188

345,947

80,920

7,711

328,904

76,932

16,098

672,496

158,203

15,096

645,532

152,443

Total Foreign Trade entered and cleared, Total Local Trade entered and cleared,

52,278

37,640,694

2,013,142

52,574

39,871,149

2,018,861

16,098

672,496

158,203

15,096

645,532

152,443

Grand Total,

68,376

38,313,190

2.171,345

67,670 40,516,681

2,171,304

Table X.

Statement of Licensed Steam-launches Entered in the Colony of Hong Kong during the year 1929.

TOWING.

NOT TOWING.

PLACES.

1929, .

Within the Waters of the Colony, 1928,

Do.,

Outside the Waters of the Colony

*------

Canton,

West River,

Macao,

East Coast,

Other places,

Total,.

Tonnage.

Crew.

Passengers.

Tons.

Cargo,

Vessels.

Tonnage.

Crew.

Passengers.

Tons.

Cargo,

Vessels.

TOTAL.

Tonnage.

Crew.

Passengers.

Cargo,

Tons.

405,240 | 1,563,637

11 289

13,522

108,048 2,834,521 | 1,151,889 | 1,563,637 107,038 | 2,623,641 | 1,148,736 | 1,492,537

11,289

13,522

75,181 | 1,609,196

746,649

863 23,090 9,896 150

$2,857 1,225,825

106,1752,799,651 | 1,138,840 | 1,492,387

Vessels.

:

F:

281 7,620 3,530

252| 7,038 3,734

39 1,007

401

152 6,598 | 1,717

1,046 30,447 12,725

1,770 (52,710 22,107

:.

:

:

:

:

198|6,876|2,438

126| 5,898| 1,866

:

:

70❘ 1,760 718

149 5,809 1,640

1,375 32,402 15,110

1,918 152,745 21,772

F:

479 14,496 5,968

378 12,936 5,600

109|2,767 | 1,119

301|12,407 | 3,357

2,421 62,849 27,835

3,688 105.455 43,879

:

:

:

:

:

...

:

:

:

...

D 28

:

:

PLACES.

Table XI.

Statement of Licensed Steam-launches Cleared in the Colony of Hong Kong during the year 1928.

TOWING.

NOT TOWING.

TOTAL.

Vessels. Ton-

Crew. Bunker Cargo Vessels.

nage.

Coal.

Tons.

Ton-

nage.

Crew.

gers. Tons. Passen- Cargo, Bunker Vessels. Coal

Ton-

nage.

Crew.

Passen- Cargo, Bunker gers. Tons.

Coal.

1929,

75,054 1,605,601

1,180

748,279

13,556

30,492

13,400

1,093

...

32,872 1,226,779 403,767 1,652,728 106,657 2,705,983 1,124,755 1,487,666

8,777

12,524

107,926 2,832,380

8,122

15,053

107,837 2,736,475

1,149,046 1,552,728 1,138,155 | 1,487,666

8,777

26,079

8,122

16,146

Within the Waters of theColony, 1928,

Do.,

Outside the Waters of the Colony :-

Canton,.....

West River,

Macao,

East Coast,

Other places,

Total,

- D

29 -

365 8,796 4,001

1,913 352

160 5,701 1,964

...

2,814

584

525 14,497 5,965

256 7,195 3,820 4,552

249

121 5,759 1,800

2,559

230

377 12,954 5,620

59 1,405 620

223

176 7,481 2,009 1,198 1,753 45,190 0,294 6,157

2,609 70,067 30,744 14,043

:

:

56 1,393

537

:.

97

116

115 2,798 1,157

:

:..

3,166 2,497

2,808 4,782

97

339

126 4,852 1,327

40

767

30212,333 3,336

...

40 1,965

674 17,840 7,641

4

2,814 1,530 2,427 63,030 27,935

4

2,814 7,687

601 1,137 35,545 13,269

4

3,824

8,324 3,227 3,746 105,612 44,013

4

8,925 17,270

.

Table XII.

Number of Boat Licences, Permits, etc., issued and Fees collected during the year 1929.

(Under Table U, Section 40, of Ordinance No. 10 of 1899.)

DESCRIPTION.

Licence Books,

Boat Repainting,

$ 3,559.00

LICENCE.

LICENCE DUPLICATE BOAT RE- SPECIAL Books. LICENCE. PAINTING

FEES.

PERMITS.

Special Permits,

Passenger Boat, Classes A & B,......

Lighter, Cargo and Water Boats,

Other Boats,

:

3,541

2,594

2,083

:

:.

:

13,126

:

:

:

3,872

...

...

...

:

968.00

1,429

357.25

:

13,899.25

:

...

30

53,196.50

44,074.25

Fish Drying Hulks,

59

...

Duplicate Licence,

00

8

506,50

...

8.00

***

...

TOTAL,

17,862

3,541

8

3,872

1,429 $116,568.75

D 31

Table XIII.

Comparative Statement of Revenue collected in the Harbour

Department during the years 1928 and 1929.

Sub-head of Revenue.

Amount

1928.

Amount 1929.

1. Light Dues, Ordinance 10 of 1899,

$

C.

138,550.02

$

C.

144,961.48

Special Assessment, Ord, 10 of 1899, 165,292.04 174,165.18

2. Licences & Internal Revenue not otherwise

specified :-

...

Boat Licences, Ordinance 10 of 1899, 115,497.65 116,604.00 Chinese Passenger Ship Licences, Or-

dinance 1 of 1889,

Fines,

Forfeitures,

1,740.00

9,631.55

1,545.00 12,849.22

135.00

275.00

Fishing Stake and Station Licences,

Ordinance 10 of 1899,.

62.80

64.40

Fishing Stake and Station Licences, from

the New Territories, Ord. 10 of 1899, Junk Licences, &c., Ord. 10 of 1899, Junk Licences, &c., from the New Ter-

ritories, Ord. 10 of 1899,

1,120.30

1,028.70

40,025.75

38,588.25

9,928.00

11,140.25

145.00

120.00

11,892.20

13,056.70

Pilots Licences, Ordinance 3 of 1904, Steam-launch Licences, &c.. Ordinance

10 of 1899,

3. Fees of Court or Office, Payments for specific purposes, and Reimbursements- in-Aid:

Court Fees,

Engagement and Discharge of Seamen,

Ordinance 10 of 1899,....

Engagement of Masters and Engineers of Steam-launches, Ord. 10 of 1899, Examination of Masters, &c., Ordinance

10 of 1899,

Fees for use of Government Buoys,

Ordinance 10 of 1899,.....

Gunpowder, Storage of, Ord. 10 of 1899, Medical Examination of Emigrants, Ord.

1 of 1889,.

Official Signatures, Ordinance 1 of 1889, Printed Forms, Sale of, Ord. I of 1889, Registry Fees (Merchant Shipping Act),

Ordinance 10 of 1899....

Steam-launches, Surveyor's Certificates,

Ordinance 10 of 1899,.....

*

9.00

35,698.80

32,896.20

383.00

327.50

2,732.50

2.985.00

85,850.00

82,017.71

9,381.71 9,674.60

*164,516.00 †152,509.90

7,304.00 953.50

6,966.00

667.00

2,440.00

2,142.00

11,470.00 13,350,00

Survey of Steamships, Ordinance 10 of

1899...

34,316.00 56,115.10

Sunday Cargo Working Permits, Ord.

Interest,

7 of 1929,

4. Miscellaneous Receipts :—

Rent of Government Property, Building,

Sale of condemned stores,

Other Miscellaneous Receipts,

Royalty Wireless Telegraphy,

122,275.00 129,750.00

11.32

1,728.65

4,430.00

86.19 116.48

2.78

71.00

1,450.00

Total,....

$973,284.46 1,010,061.97

† See next page,

D 32

* Statement of Emigration Fees, 1928 :-

Revenue collected by.

Expenditure incurred by.

$ 13,300.00 (Estimated.)

4,047.00

Harbour Department,...... $164,516.00

Office of Secretary for

16,400.00

11,088.00

$ 192,004.00

$ 47,788.73

Chinese Affairs,

Stamp Office, on account

of Bill of Health,

Medical Department,.....

30,441.73

Net Revenue.................................. $144,215.27

Statement of Emigration Fees, 1929 :-

Revenue collected by.

Expenditure

incurred by,

Harbour Department,...... $152,509.90

Office of Secretary for

Chinese Affairs,

Stamp Office, on account

of Bill of Health, Medical Department,................

14,500.00

$ 13,300.00 (Estimated.)

3,880.00

12,108.00

33,119.81

$179,117.90

$ 50,299.81

Net Revenue........

$128,818.09

Summary of Chinese Emigrants from Hong Kong to Ports other than in China, during the year 1929.

BRITISH SHIPS.

FOREIGN SHIPS.

GRAND TOTAL.

Adults

Children.

Adults.

Children.

Adults.

Children.

PORTS.

Total.

Total.

Total.

M.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

- D 33

Australia,

Africa,

1,428

10

1,438

50

S

58

1 478

10

1,496

:

365

49

21

438

79

28

9

117

444

77

30

555

Bermuda Island (near America),

1

1

1

1

British N. Borneo,

Canada,

Calcutta,

3,323 1,080 375

259

5.037

::

3,323 | 1,080

375

259

5,037

.....

6,903 43

80

11

7,037

230

19

19

273 7,133 62

99

16

7,310

658 125

46

26 855

658

125

46

26

855

New Zealand (Dunedin).

13

18

::

18

18

Chile,

5

5

:

Dutch Indies,

|29,965 | 3,165| 1,856

602 35 588 29.965 3.165

1,856

602

35,588



...

Fiji,

120

16

126

120

6

126

Honolulu,

7,515 273

93

32| 7,913| 7,515¦

273

Mexico,

1,313

35

14

2| 1,394| 1,313

35

14

Mauritius,

608

146

113

13

880

608

146

113

གྲྭ ལཆ

93: 32 7,913

1,394

880

New Caledonia (Noumea),

10

9

F:..

1

10

New Guinea (Raboul),

10

14

10

2

14

Nauru Island,

228

228

228

228

Ocean island,

233

233

233

233

Portuguese East Africa,

80

14

:

Panama,

Rangoon,

South America,

296

12

42

7

2

103

80

14

7

103

10

2

320

296

12

10

320

572

79

55

10

716

572

79

55

10

716

22

Sumatra (Belawan Deli),

322

37

13

22 397 260 176 132 965 419 260 9 381 4.838 621 237 163 5.8595,160 658

176

132

987

250

172 6,240

Straits Settlements,

Tahiti,

67,108 19,859 6,445 3,403 96,845 35,571 8,654 3,912 1,531 49,671 102,679 28,543 110,357

4,937 | 146,516

17

13

3

34

17

13

3

31

Timoi.

United States of America, West Indies,

11

6

18

11

6

1

18

6|10,433

246 174 46 10,899 |10,439

246

173

47 10.905

Zanzibar Island

16

1

17

16

17

Total 1929,

Total 1928.

|81,955 |21,463 | 7,170 | 3,735|114,323 |90,799 |13,342| 6,538| 2,521 |88,318|23,740 | 9,144 | 4,136|125,838 | 100,187 |18,470| 9,255| 3,912

Total Passengers by Foreign Ships, Total Passengers by British Ships,.

Excess of Passengers by Foreign Ships,

113,200 172,754 34,805 13,708 6,256 227,523 131,824 |188,505 42,210 |18,399

8,048 257,162

81.955 21,463 7,170 3,735 | 114,323 90,799 |13,342| 6,538| 2,521| 113,200

1,128

Table XV.

Statement of Average Number of Emigrants from Hong Kong to Ports other than in China, for Quinquennial Periods from 1890 to 1925 inclusive.

1890.

66,706

1895. 1900. 1905. 1910. 1915. 60,360 66,961 73,105 88,452 109,110

1920.

84,602

1925.

129,004

- D 34 —

Table XVI.

Number of Male and Female Emigrants from Hong Kong to Ports other than in China, for Ten Years, from 1920 to 1929 inclusive.

Whither bound.

1920.

1921.

1922. 1923. 1924.

Straits Settlements, Males. Straits Settlements, Females,

Total,

Other Ports, Males, Other Ports, Females,

30.330 67,032 39,616 52,011 58,051 13,605 20,292 10,740 13,573 17,631 43,935 87,321 50,356 65,584 75,682

1925. 1926. 1927. 1928, 1929.

78,505 | 127,863|158,788 |129.089 | 113,036 19,047 29,422 43,620 40.652 33,480 97,552157,285 202,408 169,741 | 146,516

59,128 64,293 44,109 48,773 49,427 40,198 54,506 75,003 77,815 73,426 2,195 4,394 3,928 5,867 4.750 2,784 4,736 8,182 9,606 7,581

Total.

61,323

Grand Total,

68,687

105,258 | 156,011

48,037 54,640 54,177 42,982 59,242 83,185 87,421 81.007 98,393120,224 129,859 | 140,534 216,527 285,593 257,162 | 227,523

Table XVII.

Summary of Chinese Emigrants Returned to Hong Kong from Ports other than in China, during the year 1929.

BRITISH SHIPS.

FOREIGN SHIPS.

GRAND TOTAL.

Adults.

Children.

Adults.

Children.

Adults.

Children.

PORTS.

Total.

Total.

Total.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

- D 35 -

Australia,

1,742

142

107

70

2,061

230

17

17

14

278

1.972

159

124

84

2,339

Africa,

40

3

I

1

45

40

1

1

45

Bangkok,

2,232

479

BIS

202

3,231

1,538

383

201

164

2,286

3,770

862

519

366

5,517

British N. Borneo,

245

74

59

34

412

59

14

+

80

304

88

63

37

492

Canada,

6,132

501

271

J21

7,025

762

60

28

13

863

6.894

561

299

134

7,888

Continent of Europe,

386

46

38

B

183

386

46

38

13

483

Dutch Indies,

19,051

1.977

1,807

817

23.652

19,051

1.977 | 1,807

817

23,652

Honolulu.

1.162

$7

44

30

1,328

1,162

87

44

30

1,323

Mexico,

19

3

6

33

19

3

6

33

Nauru Island,

147

147

147

147

Ocean Island,

148

148

148

148

South America,

95

22

16

10

143

95

22

16

10

143

Straits Settlements,

64.447

13,983 7,587 | 4,124

90,14)

24,216

4.035 1,710

30.936

975

88,663

18,018 |9,275,099 121,077

Sumatra (Belawan Deli),

...

13,832

2,546|1 059

622

18.059

13,832

2,546 | 1,059

622

United States of America,

51

51

3,381

309 184

119

3,993

3,432

309

181

119

18,059

4,044

Total 1929,

75,184

15,182 | 8,343 | 4,552

103.261

64,731

9,499 |5,114 | 2,785

82,129

139,915

24,681 13,457 7.337 185,390

Total 1928,

78,611

13,780 6,9323,804 103,127

67,342

8,903 | 5,746 | 2,729

84,720

145,953

22,683 12.678|6,533 | 187,847

Total Passengers by British Ships,

75,184

15,1828,343 | 4,552 | 103,261

12

*

Foreign

64.731

9,499 | 5,114 | 2,785

82,129

Excess of

British

10,453

5,683 |3,229 | 1,767 21,132

"}

"

Table XVIII.

Statement of Average Number of Emigrants Returned to Hong Kong from Ports other than in China, for Quinquennial Periods from 1890 to 1925 inclusive.

1890.

96,068

1895. 1900. 1905. 1910. 104,118 109,534 137,814 146,585

1915.

151,728

1920.

100,641

1925.

129,106

Table XIX.

Number of Male and Female Emigrants Returned to Hong Kong from Ports other than in China, for Ten Years, from 1920 to 1929 inclusive.

Where from.

Straits Settlements, Males, Straits Settlements, Females,

Total,..

Other Ports. Males..

Other Ports, Females,

Total,

Grand Total.

D 36

1920.

1921. 1922.

1923. 1924. 1925. 1926. 1927. 1928. 1929,

68,316 91,203

4,610 9,490

74,694 58,800 10,950

7,186

72,926 | 100,693

46,776

85,644

52,429 52,596 2,736 5,912

307

4,742

57,903

55,116

55,931

49,512 58,371

122,438 |159,064 | 143,547 | 121,102 | 130,194 91,622 | 128.661181,100 187,847 | 185,390

30,731

65,047 52.220 72,194 113,507 | 100,116 97,960 9,216 8,671 14,761 23,189 20,577 23,117 65,986 74,263 60,891 | 86,955 | 136,696 | 120,693 | 121,077 50,374 51,031 27,888 36,886 38.360 58,515 55,412 4,900 2,843 4,820 6,044 8,639 8,901 41,706 64,313

44,104 67,151

Table XX.

Return of Vessels Registered at the Port of Hong Kong during the year 1929.

Official

Name of Vessel.

Number.

Registered

Tonnage.

Horse

Power.

Rig.

Build.

Where and when built.

Remarks.

1. Leung Kwong,

154,023

109

In & Out Hong Kong ......1928 | First Registry (New Vessel).

2. Kien Yu,

151,024

102

N.H.P. 114

Schooner.

}}

3. Pangkor,

154,025

687

104.8

Clinker.

***

.1929

..1929

"}

31

77

4. Norseman,

154,026

5

4.0

Yawl.

Carvel.

"}

"}

.1912

""

5. Cabarita ex Chronos

132,455

2,612

421

Schooner. Clinker.

19

6. Tai Luk 6,

154,027

92

16.6

Nil.

"7

}}

Glasgow

Hong Kong.

.1915

1906

Formerly unregistered vessel as "Norseman”. Registry transferred from Melbourne. First Registry (formerly unregistered vessel as "Tai Luk 6").

7. Helikon,

139,573

1,214

148

Schooner.

"}

71

8. Age,

151,805

2,864

317

>>

""

77

9. Tai Ng 5,.

154,028

98

15.8

Nil.

}}

19

10. Tai Kau 9,

154.029

106

15.8

""

"}

"

11. Fu Ping,.

154,030

62

75.68

Schooner.

12. Petreux 1,

154,031

19

35.28

Nil.

In & Out

Clinker.

*

""

13. Sun Chau,

154,032

48

87.12

.1929

.1929

*

""

9

"}

11

14. Tin Yat,

154,033

579

88

In & Out

??

lò. Hai Tung,

154,034

20

10.5

16. Tug 5,

154,035

37

55

Schooner.

>>

17. Tai Yee Ho 2,.

154,036 129

43

Nil.

""

18. Tai Tsat Ho 7,

154,037

103

15.8

Carvel.

Clinker.

In & Out

Clinker.

".

""

"

19. Taiyuan,

154,038 2,109

203

Schooner.

}}

20. Wah Sing Ton,

154,039

14

14

"!

Not rigged. Carvel.

Canton

Sunderland

.1917 | Formerly Norwegian flag as "Helikon 1922 | Registry transferred frow Melbourne.

Hong Kong.....1920 | First Registry (formerly unregistered vessel

as Tai Ng 5").

...1925 First Registry (formerly unregistered vessel

as "Tai Kau 9").

..1929 First Registry (New Vessel).

Unknown. Recon- structed in Hong Kong .1929

Hong Kong .1929

1929

1929

Formerly under Chinese flag as ex" Wo Ping

First Registry (New Vessel).

71

.1922 | Formerly unregistered vessel as "Tai Tsat ". 1929 First Registry (New Vessel).

"

.1920 Formerly unregistered vessel as Washingtou ex "Hoi Lee ".

+

1

Tin Yat

"}

"

- D 37 -

Table XXI.

Return of Registers of Vessels Cancelled at the Port of Hong Kong during the year 1929.

Official

Name of Vessel.

Number.

Registered

Tonnage.

Date of

Registry.

Rig.

Build.

When and where built.

Reason of Cancellation.

1. Chung Yuen.

154,021

86

29. 12. 1928.

Schooner. In & Out. Hong Kong

2. Chung Kai.

154,022

86

29. 12. 1928.

*

19

3. Peari River,

154,017

21

18. 9. 1928.

4. Chief Maquilla,

140,336 6,919

21. 2. 1928.

5. Kien Yu,

154,024 102

31. 1. 1929.

Carvel.

Clinker.

In & Out.

1

6. Wing Hung,

152,089

528

6. 9. 1922.

7. Kin Lee,

153,5:0

57

8. Fook Sang...

120,586

1,987

2. 2. 1924. 13. 11. 1924.

Nil.

None.

Schooner.

Carvel.

"}

1923

>>

Clinker.

9. Wing Hong,

152,103

2,672

23. 4. 1923.

10. Luen Yi,

127,230 1,735

30.

4. 1913.

None.

""

,

Germany

Dunkerque...{

11. Lok Sun.

153,555

1,045

28. 6. 1924.

12. Hang Tung,

152,443

51

22. 11. 1923.

Schooner.

None.

""

Carvel.

Wuchow

13. Ilha de Dom João,....

126.990

48

16. 6. 1908.

Hong Kong



14. Cassum,

154 020

148

14 12. 1928.

15. Tug 3.

154,035

37

16.

9. 1929.

16. Ying Ying,

153,565

16

25.

9. 1924.

Nil.

Schooner.

Nonc.

Clinker.

London

"

Hong Kong

17. Tai Ye.......

116,042

366

9.

9. 1904.

Carvel.

Clinker.

Canton

18. Chenyang,

152,085

31. 5. 1922.

Nil.

"

19. Kwong Ying,

152,431

424

12.

9. 1923.

??

"?

20. Taiyuan,

154 038

2,109

18. 11. 1929.

Schooner.

"

21. Englestan ex Intaba

129,345

3.039

2.

7. 1927.

Aberdeen

??

22. Chief Skidegate,.

120.414 4,848

21.

2. 1928.

"

23. Kwong Foon,.

24. Planet Pilgrim,

152,432 |

487

19.

9. 1923.

109,868

47

None. 5. 3. 1902. Schooner.

Clinker.

Carvel.

Glasgow

Hong Kong

"

Kobe

Hong Kong

Canton

New Castle on

.1928 | Sold to Foreigner (Chinese Canton Govern-

1928

ment).

Do.

1910 Sold to Foreigner (Chinese Subject.)

1917 Ship totally lost off the Aleutian Islands. 1929 Sold to Foreigner (Chinese Canton Govern-

1919

Tyne......... 1905

1898

J 1905

# 1906

ment).

Sold to Foreigners (Portuguese Subjects). Sold to Foreigner (Chinese Subject).

Do.

Sold to Foreigners (Japanese Subjects).

Sold to Foreigners (Chinese Subjects).

Bremerhaven ...1902: Ship totally lost. 1923

..1897!

1897

Hong Kong

...

1929| Registry transferred to Shanghai. 1924 Sold to Foreigner (Chinese Subject). ..1892 Do.

1929

1910

.1922 Registry transferred to Shanghai. .1914 Sold to Foreigner (Chinese Subject). Registry transferred to London. Registry transferred to Rangoon. Sold to Foreigner (Japanese Subject). 1922 Sold to Foreigner (Chinese Subject). 1902] Ship totally lost.

1899

Sold to Foreigner (Chinese Subject). Do.

Do.

- D 38

- D 39

Table XXII.

Number and Tonnage of Vessels in Foreign Trade Entered and

Cleared since 1920.

YEAR.

No. of

VESSELS.

TONNAGE.

1920

43,364

24,194,022

1921

52,222

27,852,616

1922

50,127

29,543,564

1923

49,300

35,947,534

1924

57,765

38,770,499

1925

41,336

32,179,053

1926

30,231

28,371,104

1927

51,289

36,834,014

1928

52,278

37,610,694

1929

52,574

39,871,149

Table XXIII.

Revenue and Expenditure of the Harbour Department.

Year.

Total Revenue of Department.

Total Expenditure of Department Excluding Special Expenditure.

Percentage of Expenditure to Revenue.

$

C.

C.

%

1920,

701,493.26

230,033.12

32.79

1921,

800,798.13

246,295.53

30.76

1922,

857,576.04

280,625.57

32.72

1923,

925,643.02

300,484.95

32.46

1924,

997,530.74

318,412.04

31.92

1925,

878,118,83

452,106.42

51.48

1926.

820,888.39

534,675.91

65.13

1927,

1,000,229.80

610,480.26

61.03

1928,

973,283.46

648,324.33

66.61

1929,

1,010,061,97

688,938.40

68.21

D 40

Table XXIV.

Table showing total Shipping at the Port of Hong Kong during the years 1910 to 1929.

TOTAL TONNAGE

TOTAL TONNAGE TOTAL TONNAGE

YEAR.

OCEAN GOING

ALL CLASSES.

OCEAN GOING.

BRITISHI,

1910

36,534,361

16,215,915

8,111,946

1911

36,179,152

15,507.635

7,589,995

1912

36,735,149

16,372,290

7,779,970

1913

37,742,982

17,722,168

8,449,533

1914

36,756,951

16.913,914

8,321,692

1915

33,884,919

14,381,808

7,358,586

1916

36,381,457

13,728,092

6,868,743

1917

33,827,325

12,289,548

5,168,058

1918

29,518,189

9,745,469

3,627,576

1919

35,615,169

14,467,847

6,842,024

1920

40,122,527

17,574,636

8,351,084

1921

43,420,970

20,064,611

9,247,198

1922

46,566.764

21,971,162

9,688,891

1923

53,402,239

25.89 1,058

11,222,141

1924

56,731,077

27,874,830

11,844,752

1925

49,520,523

23,653,774

9,866,820

1926

43,796,436

21,314,696

9,257,417

1927

41,127,161

25,700,164

9,660,440

1928

44,883,765

26,894,395

10,792,701

1929

47,136,181

28,285,741

11,151,152

7

Tous.

D 41

Table XXV.

DIAGRAM SHEWING TOTAL SHIPPING ALL CLASSES

1910-1929.

57,000,000

56,000,000

55,000,000

54,000,000

53,000,000

52,000,000

51,000,000

50,000,000

49,000,000

+8,000,000

1919

1911

2161

1913

1914

1915

9161

1917

8161

6161

1920

1921

1922

1923

1924

1925

1926

1927

1928

1929

47,000,000 $6,000,000

· 45,000,000 44,000,000

47,186,181

+3,000,000

42,000,000

41,000,000

40,000,000

39,000,000

38,000,000

37,000,000

36,000,000

35,000,000

34,000,000

33,000,000

32,000,000

31,000,000

30,000,000

29,000,000

D 42

Table XXVI.

DIAGRAM SHEWING OCEAN GOING SHIPPING BRITISH AND FOREIGN ENTERED AND CLEARED 1910-1929.

Tous.

28,000,000

27,500,000

27,000,000

26,500,000

26,000,000

25,500,000

25,000,000

24,500,000

24,000,000

23,500,000

23,000,000

22,500,000

22,000,000

21,500,000

21,000,000

20,500,000

20,000,000

19,500,000

19,000,000

18,500,000

18,000,000

17,500,000

17,000,000

16,500,000

16,000,000

15,500,000

15,000,000

14,500,000

£4,000,000

13,500,000

13,000,000

12,500,000

12,000,000

11,500,000

11,000,000

10,500,000

10,000,000

9,500,000

9,000,000

8,500,000

8,000,000

7,500,000

0161

1911

1912

1913

1914

1915

1916

1917

1918

6161

1920

1921

1922

1923

1924

1925

1926

1927

1928

1929

28,285,741

$,000,000

7,500,000

7,000,000

6,500,000

6,000,000

5,500,000

5,000,000

4,500,000

1,000,000

3.500.000

D 43

Table XXVII.

DIAGRAM SHEWING OCEAN GOING SHIPPING BRITISH

ONLY, ENTERED AND CLEARED.

Tons.

24,500,000

24,000,000

23,500,000

23,000,000

22,500,000

22,000,000

21,500,000

21,000,000

20,500,000

20,000,000

19,500,000

19,000,000

18,500,000

18,000,000

17,500,000

17,000,000

16,500,000

16,000,000

15,500,000

15,000,000

14,500,000

14,000,000

13,500,000

13,000,000

12,500,000

1910

1911

1912

12,000,000

11,500,000

11,000,000

10,500,000

10,000,000

9,500,000

9,000,000 8,500,000

11,15 1,152

1913

1914

1915

1915

1917

1918

1919

1920

1921

1922

1923

1924

1925

1926

1927

1928

1929

Appendix E.

REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF IMPORTS AND EXPORTS FOR THE YEAR 1929.

I.--LIQUOR.

1. The net Revenue collected was $1,740,350.42 including licence fees. Chinese spirit showed a decrease of $123,400.81, this decrease occurred chiefly in the last half of the year. European liquor showed an increase of $18,087.64.

Collections on Chinese liquor remained very unsatisfactory, although larger seizures of Chinese spirit and spirits of wine were made.

In the course of investigations made into various cases it was proved that a large amount of spirit consumed by Chinese never paid duty, and that the general evasion of duty was far greater than was realised before.

2. Distilleries.--Collections from local Chinese distilleries

showed a decrease of 14 per cent. This decrease was partly due to bad trade, partly to water shortage, and partly to the competition of spirits of wine smuggled in from Macau. The competition caused by smuggled spirits of wine caused some distilleries to take a hand in this illicit trade themselves.

(b) The Distillery Regulations continued to work satisfac- torily, and all distilleries are now being worked in a systematic manner, and the old, careless, haphazard, and confused me- thods have been entirely abandoned. All fermenting vessels are arranged in systematic order and are emptied for the purpose of distillation in strict rotation.

(c) Two distilleries were detected in possession of smuggled spirits of wine and convictions were obtained. These distilleries were practically bankrupt at the time and closed at once when detected. The spirits of wine were generally used for the pur- pose of blending with their own output.

(d) Five distilleries were found to be engaged in extensive frauds on the Revenue by means of the concealment of about half of their production of rice spirit. They actually reduced by a half the time they claimed necessary for proper fermenta- tion, distilling at half time and not accounting at all for the spirit so produced. Fresh rice was then put to ferment and distilled at the stated time, the spirit so produced being duly accounted for. The records kept in the distillery, of course, failed to show the distillation at half-time and the putting on of fresh rice to ferment. These frauds had probably been going

E 2

on for a considerable period, if not for years, for the time formerly claimed as necessary for the fermentation of rice, ranging up to 60 days, allowed sufficient time for 4 to 5 com- plete fermentations and distillations to be carried out for every one reported. The frauds were detected in various indirect ways, but the real reason became manifest why distilleries as a body objected to Revenue Officers opening jars of fermenting rice for inspection. Had jars been opened the fraud would have at once become apparent to any experienced officer. Ex- periments are in hand to discover the effect on fermentation of a sudden drop in temperature. It should be possible to prevent this type of fraud during the warm months of the year by reducing considerably the time allowed for the fermentation of rice. But during the winter months when the indoor tem- perature falls below 60° F. fermentation is retarded for longer and shorter periods, and it becomes a matter of some difficulty to fix such a period as shall be sufficient, but leave no loop-hole for this type of fraud. In three cases convictions were obtained, and in the other two the licensees admitted the fraud and paid up considerable arrears of duty.

(e) In all 9 distilleries were detected in extensive frauds on the Revenue, six were convicted out of seven prosecuted, and two paid up arrears of duty.

It cannot unfortunately yet be said that distillery con- trol is easy. Very few distilleries yet realise that fraud in the long run must be detected, and that detection is every year becoming more certain as the technical knowledge and practical experience of this Department increase as the result of continued experiment and observation. In some cases the businesses were on the verge of bankruptcy when the frauds came to light. In others the fraud was probably for the benefit of the managing partner, not of the firm as a whole. In one case it appeared probable that the employees only were concerned. But while the capital invested in any distillery is so small, a successful fraud carried on for a short time only may enable the capital to be doubled. For in many cases neither the site, building nor most of the utensils belong to the firm. Yet, in the case of the smallest fraud discovered, the illicit gains made by the evasion of duty were over $100 per week. It is estimated that the evasions of duty detected during the year were at the rate of over $200,000 per annum in the case of distilleries alone.

(g) Distillery control is now as thorough as the amount of duty collected justifies. In 1923 one Revenue Officer only was inspecting distilleries, which were three times as numerous; five days a week were spent in Hong Kong Island and the Kowloon Peninsula, and only a half day in paying a flying visit to the New Territories. All the small distilleries in the New Territories were controlled by the nearest Police station, whose European Officer had little time to spare and no technical training, and was liable to frequent transfers. At the present time one

E 3

Revenue Officer is in charge of Hong Kong Island, one tours the New Territories North in a departmental motor-car every day, one visits the distilleries on the coast in the Southern District in the seagoing launch every day, and another visits those in New Kowloon in addition to other duties. Thus, every distillery is liable to be visited any day. Owing to the time spent in travelling, every distillery cannot be actually visited every day, and it is possible for distilleries to get warning long before the officer actually arrives.

(h) The transfer of all distilleries to the adequate control of specially trained officers, and their systematic regulation, has enabled some idea to be formed of the enormous extent of the evasion of liquor duty which prevailed prior to 1925, when distilleries in practice were left to pay such duty as they felt disposed to pay.

(i) The number of distilleries decreased from 65 to 44, the main decrease being in the Northern District of the New Territories. Many of the smaller ones, who had been carrying on in a very spasmodic way for years, found it not worth while to continue the business of distiller just to supply the petty trade. of their own liquor shops. Such shops now obtain their supplies quite easily elsewhere, and probably make more profit from the retailing alone than they did from manufacture and retailing combined.

(j) The company which has established a molasses tank at Sham Ching, supplies a molasses of good and constant quality, and has succeeded in capturing practically all the trade in molasses. But, unfortunately for the distilleries, this company's prices have been practically doubled since they started and many distilleries are now hesitating as to whether it is pro- fitable to carry on business any longer. If the high prices are maintained it is probable that many of the larger distilleries will close.

3. Imported Chinese spirit decreased by 9 per cent, the decrease being in respect of the cheapest kind of spirit imported from Macau and neighbouring places. Attention is, however, drawn to the increased amounts seized, 2,625 gallons by Revenue Officers alone, apart from 721 gallons seized by the Police. In many cases the amount seized formed only the smaller portion of the original consignment. The origin of most of this spirit was Macau, whence it was conveyed in small fishing boats.

One ingenious method of concealment discovered is worthy of mention. Near the shore of Kowloon Bay a large deep pit was dug and covered over with boards fastened together, on the top of which good earth and turf were placed. Whenever the contents of the pit were required the whole of the cover, turf and all, was lifted up and replaced. Care had been taken to water the turf frequently so that there was a luxuriant covering of grass, over which the search party walked without suspecting until they received precise indications of the position

f the cache.

E 4

4. There was a large increase in the smuggling of spirits of wine: 2,726 gallons were seized by Revenue Officers, and 16 gallons by the Police. The source of all was Macau.

The use was continued of glass and stone-ware demijohns sunk in pairs on the bottom of the harbour, especially near Yaumati break- water, but no evidence could be obtained as to who was respon- sible. This spirits of wine is chiefly used for blending purposes, and the purchaser of inferior spirit does not seem to care about the flavour provided the cost is low. A large proportion of the spirit legally imported from Macau is a blend of spirits of wine. There is undoubtedly a demand for inferior spirit at a cheap price and to meet such demand various devices have been re- sorted to by the trade. The coolie class, the chief consumers of such spirit, appear to be able to assimilate with impunity spirit which would seriously upset less strong stomachs. The question is under consideration as to how this demand can best be met, without detriment to the more discriminating drinker. One gallon of Java arrack costing wholesale about 70 cents makes on dilution about 4 gallons of spirit which can be readily sold, especially after a process of sophistication with cut lemons. Formosa arrack of rather inferior quality is sold at a considerably lower price. It is indeed competition with mixtures made from such contraband that drives many of the distilleries to commit frauds on the Revenue.

5. The number of Chinese wine and spirit licences issued showed a decrease of 25. Part of the decrease was due to the refusal to renew the licences of shops which had been proved to be trading in smuggled spirit, and part was due to the general state of stagnation of business during the year. An officer was detailed during part of the year specially for the inspection of licensed spirit shops. He found that many shops were selling far more than they admitted or could satisfactorily account for, and that these suspect shops pretended to keep no books what- ever. It became quite clear that until shops can be made to keep official books by regulation, as in fact they all do in prac- tice though they refuse to produce them, no control can be exercised over the extensive trade in smuggled spirit. Common Chinese spirit is a kind of commodity both bulky and cheap, and therefore cannot stand heavy transport expenses. Yet it has been found that spirit will be sent from a retail shop in Cheung Sha Wan to a retail shop in Sai Ying Pun, or from Shaukiwan to Sham Shui Po. Spirit has been traced from shop to shop all over the Colony, where the cost of transport must have been nearly equal to the intrinsic value of the spirit, and the price quoted to the last receiver of a long chain remained the same.

The conclusion formed is that much of this aimless transfer which goes on is simply for the purpose of making the spirit lose its identity. The actual smuggling shop gets rid of its contraband at once to another allied shop which can, of course, plead purchase in good faith if questioned.

E 5-

Several liquor shops which were closely investigated could not prove how they made enough profit by the sale of spirit which they admitted even to pay for their licence fee. All these shops must have been selling more than twice as much as they stated, and must have had a secret source from which to draw spirit which had never paid duty.

6. European Liquor.-European Liquor unexpectedly show- ed an increase of $18,000, divided evenly over all categories except beer.

(b) Very little bogus Hennessy brandy was met with.

7. Legislation.-A partial amendment of the Liquors Con- solidation Ordinance of 1911 became law in December, but it was not found possible to proceed with the complete revision which was drafted early in 1925.

The chief points dealt with were:—

(a) The method of assessing duty on the output of Distil- leries. The Imperial Spirits Act of 1880 was adopted as closely as local conditions permitted, while the actual method of pay- ment of duty by distilleries was not altered.

(b) The penalties, which had been adequate only for technical offences against the original Licensing Ordinance, were raised to a scale similar to that laid down in other Revenue Ordinances.

II. TOBACCO.

1. The net duty collected showed an increase of $319,986.07 which must be accounted very satisfactory in a year notable for general trade depression. The reason must be ascribed in the main to the alteration in the methods of collecting duty on local manufactures, as mentioned below. This new method was put into force when the local factories opened after the Chinese New Year holidays, thus the new system was in force for about 10 months only.

(b) The introduction of the new method of taxation caused some apprehension amongst those local factories which manu- factured for export, and threats were made that factories would move to Macau. All have now found that the new system is perfectly fair and workable, and does not affect exports adver sely. The only factory which actually transferred its export business to its Macau branch has now found that it is quite feasible to manufacture for export here, and has recommenced manufacture for export on a large scale. The introduction of the new system after the New Year holidays conduced greatly to the smooth introduction of the innovation, as factories were cleared of all manufactured goods before the holidays.

E 6

The new system has worked well after the officers concerned had got accustomed to it and certain practical adjustments in the methods of assessment of raw leaf had been made after experiment.

2. Legislation.--By an amendment of the Tobacco Ordi- nance duty became payable on raw leaf as soon as it was im- ported or drawn from bonded warehouse for removal to any factory. This system is in force in most other countries where Tobacco is taxed, including the United Kingdom. To facilitate manufacture for export a system of drawbacks was introduced, based on the amount of duty-paid tobacco which had been used in each case.

3. Licences. The fees for importers and retail licences were raised on the 1st January, and an unexpectedly large number of retailers renewed their licences at the enhanced fee which was graded according to locality.

4. Tariff.--As a sequence to the transfer of taxation on to the raw leaf instead of the manufactured product in the case of local factories, a flat rate was adopted for all imported manu- factured tobacco, instead of the former classified ad valorem tariff. It had in fact proved increasingly difficult to assess at their true value the numerous and often ephemeral brands of imported cigarettes and cigars, and the only assessment which found ready acceptance was that in the importer's favour. The manufacturer abroad now knows in advance exactly what the duty will be on any new brand which he may wish to introduce. Formerly every manufacturer had to consider carefully how to adjust his price and quality so as to bring his goods just within the lowest possible tariff class.

III. OPIUM.

The Revenue collected was $2,705,853.20, a decrease of $670,262.75 on the figures for 1928.

2. Sources of illicit opium.-(a) Prepared Opium.

(i) Wuchow, in spite of the West River being closed to trade twice by the invasions of the Kwong Sai forces, supplied the largest quantity of prepared opium.

(ii) Macau supplied the second largest quantity, this was in one-tael brass tins bearing an impressed device of a Lion and a globe, and is commonly known to Chinese as the Red Lion brand. This brand has been sent to Malaya in large quantities and has been discovered frequently in the Netherlands Indies and elsewhere. Whether this brand is actually prepared in Macau itself is unknown, but it is very frequently found on ships which are known to have come direct from Macau and to have been to no other port. The tin differs from those sold in Macau itself on behalf of the official Monopoly. Smokers report that this opium is a blend of Persian and Chinese raw opium with a considerable admixture of some adulterant.

-E 7

(iii) Kwong Chow Wan took third place, and it is probable that very little would have been seen of opium from this source had not the West River route been blocked by hostilities for two periods during the year.

(iv) Shanghai appears in the list for the first time; this opium was packed in five-tael tins and was intended for U.S.A. The labels on the tins were copies of marks used by Kwong Chow Wan and originally by Macau. The labels purported to show Macau manufacture, and were similar to those found on seizures made in U.S.A. This seizure confirms the information received that Shanghai had become a centre for the preparation and export of opium across the Pacific to U.S.A. The trans- ference of the trade will account for the fact that unusually little was heard during the year of smuggling to U.S.A.

(b) Raw Opium.

(i) Most of the Chinese raw opium seized was Yunnan bamboo cake opium. It mostly reached the Colony viâ the West River, but a considerable quantity was brought down by train, some by women carriers, some by the railway staff. While the West River was closed by inter-provincial hostilities raw opium tended to revert to the old route viâ Pakhoi and neighbouring ports.

(ii) Seizures of Persian opium were more numerous and in most cases it was possible from the circumstances of the seizure to be certain that it had come from Macau direct. Occasionally bogus Persian opium which had come from Macau was encoun- tered, which was somewhat similar to a sample sent to this Government by the Macau Authorities.

(iii) A large seizure of Indian opium was made inside the anchor davit of S.S. "Kut Sang" on her arrival from Cal- cutta. A sample submitted to the Authorities in India proved on examination to be excise opium of the type only sold locally in India, and never lawfully exported. The real destination of this lot was Shanghai, where fantastic prices were being quoted for Indian opium, as high as $1,920 per ball containing about 26 to 28 taels of actual opium. Prices such as this, which is quoted from a letter from a Shanghai opium dealer to a smuggler in Hong Kong, show the general effectiveness of the measures taken to prevent Indian opium entering China, and the difference made by the abolition in 1928 of the unrestricted sale of raw Indian opium at Kwong Chow Wan. For the period previous to 1928 prices in Shanghai ranged from about $6,000 to $8,000 per chest of 40 balls.

3. General. Supplies of illicit opium of all kinds continued to be both plentiful and cheap and sales of Government opium decreased as a result. It should be remarked that the seizures of prepared opium destined for other places greatly decreased, while seizures of that destined for local consumption increased

somewhat.

IV.

E 8~

DANGEROUS DRUGS.

1. No seizures of Dangerous Drugs were made.

2. The use of Heroin pills in divans appears to be becoming more common, and some premises were discovered where the clients were offered the choice of illicit opium or heroin pills.

Experiments were conducted in the Laboratory to ascertain whether any heroin passed over in the smoke drawn into the lungs of the smoker, but a negative result was obtained. Ar- rangements were made with the Medical Department for a special study to be made of any case of addiction due to the use of these pills. So far no such case has been encountered.

V.-ARMS.

Only one important seizure of arms was made, i.e. on S.S. “HAI CHING", a vessel which was fated to suffer so severely at the hands of the Bias Bay pirates, for whom probably the automatics seized were intended.

With the withdrawal of the Arms Embargo by the Great Powers it is probable that the smuggling of arms will greatly decrease. This may be expected to affect the smuggling of opium, as the sale of opium provided the funds for the purchase of arms and vice versa. Both in Hong Kong and U.S.A. the proceeds of the sale of illicit opium used to be commonly in- vested in the purchase of arms, the sale of these in turn at immense profits provided greatly enhanced capital for the pur- chase of opium. The capital in use was thus earning handsome profits all the time, and it so happened that the demand for arms was strongest just in those places from which opium was exported.

VI. TRADE STATISTICS.

Funds are provided in the 1930 Estimates for the reopening of the Statistical Branch of the Imports and Exports Depart- ment. Efforts were made to commence the collection of the statistics on January 1st, 1930, but much preliminary work was required, and the Hong Kong General Chamber of Com- merce requested time to consider the whole matter and depre- cated undue haste in the interests of a firm and satisfactory foundation. The exact form of the statistics was still under discussion with the Chamber at the end of the year.

E 9

The Department was severely handicapped at the time, because the Assistant Superintendent of Imports and Exports had shortly before proceeded on long leave, and the League of Nations Opium Commission was due to arrive early in January. To afford relief, Mr. W. Schofield was transferred from the Kowloon Magistracy as Assistant Superintendent of Imports and Exports and the part time services of Mr. Roe, of the Harbour Department, who had former experience on trade statistics, were requisitioned.

The provision of adequate permanent accommodation for the Statistical Branch is a pressing question. Temporary ac- commodation has been provided on the top floor of Beacons- field Arcade, but this building is in a dilapidated condition and will probably have to be rebuilt in the near future. The large amount of floor space required in one building cannot easily be obtained except in a building specially constructed for the pur- pose.

VII. STAFF.

The conduct of the European and Chinese Clerical Staff was excellent, but the year saw a larger number of dismissals of Chinese Revenue Officers. Four of these were due to an illegal early morning raid carried out at Shaukiwan, the exact reasons of which could not be discovered, except that they were known to be connected with a quarrel between two rival gangs of illicit opium dealers.

The Department suffered a severe loss due to the invalid- ing of Senior Revenue Officer G. Watt while on leave. With the exception of the Chief Preventive Officer, all European Revenue Officers now in the department have joined since 1919. Steps have therefore been taken to strengthen the personnel by obtaining the services of an experienced officer from the United Kingdom Customs and Excise Department.

J. D. LLOYD,

27th March, 1930,

Superintendent.

E 10

Table I.

g

Return of Liquor duty collected during the year 1929.

European Type Liquor.

Class of liquor.

Gallons.

Amount of duty collected.

$

C.

Ale, Beer, Cider and Stout

366,806

146,722.40

Brandy

10,060

60,360.00

Whisky

15,515

93,090.00

Gin and Cocktail

8,631

51,786.00

Rum

1,320

7,920.00

Champagne and Sparkling wine.]

2,290

22,900.00

Claret

4,279

12,837.00

Port wine

5,166

20,664.00

Sherry and Madeira

2,382

9,528.00

Vermouth

5,902

17,706.00

Liqueur

1,347

13,470.00

Spirits of wine

68

680.00

Miscellaneous

7,362

22,086.00

Difference on over-proof and

fractions

TOTAL

92.95

$479,842.35

Note :-Fractions of a gallon are not shown in this Table.

-

E 11

Table II.

Return of Liquor duty collected during the year 1929.

Chinese and Japanese Liquor.

Native

Spirits

not more than

25% of alcohol

by weight.

Native Spirits

over 25% of

alcohol by

weight

Northern spirits

over 25% of

alcohol weight...

Sake

by

Liquor

distilled

locally.

Amount of duty collected.

Amount of

Imported liquor.

duty collected.

Total amount of duty collected.

Gallons.

C. Gallons.

C.

C.

490,970

540,067.14

205,227 216,272.19 786,339.63

29,713

40,058.31 67,117

198,956.75 239,015.06

48,826

4,389 5,266.80

5,266.80

Difference

on

over-proof,

fractions and

ariears of duty

400.29

Total

873.79

774.08

1,031,395.57

Not :-Fractions of a gallon are not shown in this Table.

Table III.

Summary of Revenue collected from liquor during

the year 1929.

Duties on European Liquor

Duties on Chinese and Japanese Liquor

Licensed Warehouse Fees

$ 479,842.35

1,031,395,57

6,000.00 29,000.00

Liquor Dealer's Licence Fees

Distillery Licence Fees

6,050.00

Chinese Spirits Shop Licence Fees

188,062.50

TOTAL

$1,740,350.42

Refund of Liquor Duties

12,243.68

NET TOTAL

$1,728,106.74

E 12

Table IV.

Return of Duty Paid Tobacco for the

year

1929.

CLASS OF TOBACCO.

lbs.

M

DITY.

Cigars

37,906

$

C.

38,454.53

Cigarettes

1,788,465

1,315,220.82

European Tobacco

13,957

11,238.00

Chinese Prepared Tobacco

142,648

66,134.58

Clean Tobacco Leaf.......

105,044

63,026.40

Raw Tobacco Leaf

1,979,313

975,793.95

Snuff

9

10.88

Total

4,067,342

2,469.879.16

(1) Duty on Tobacco for the year

.$ 2,469,879.16

Miscellaneous fees

1,949.76

Total

Less Drawbacks

2,471,828.92

197,065.09

Net Revenue...

.$ 2,274,763.83

(2) Licence Fees.

Retailer's

Licensed Warehouse

Manufacturer's

$ 42,398.50

300.00

Importer's.

Total.....

-

680,00

5,458.34

$

48,836.84

NOTE:-Fractions of a pound are not shown in this Table

-

-

[

E 13

Table V.

Total Amount of Prepared Opium sold during

the year 1929.

Hong Kong Bengal Opium

Kamshan Bengal Opium

TOTAL

156,763:6 Taels

23,220.0

179,983.6 Taels

Table VI.

Statement of Opium Transhipped during the year 1929.

From Bombay

Persian

Total

chests.

chests.

1,784

1,784

Total

1,784

1,784

To Keelung..

Dairen

Macao..

""

Persian

Total

chests.

chests.

450

450

934

934

400

400

Total.......

1,784

1,784

E 14

Table VIA.

Statement of Opium in Transit during the year 1929.

From Port Said

London

To Yokohama

(1) OPIUM.

Prepared Raw

(2) ARMS.

Turkish

Total

chests.

chests.

40

40

25

25

Total......

65

65

Turkish

Total

chests.

chests.

65

65

Total.....

65

65

Table VII,

CONTRABAND SEIZED.

Seizures.

10,172 taels

371

17,331 taels

150

Revolvers

Rifles Air Guns Sword

Ammunition

(3) TOBACCO.

Cigarettes

Chinese Tobacco

(4) LIQUOR.

Brandy

Spirits of Wine Chinese Spirits

122

1

4

1

11,918 rounds J

796,511

13

17

1,162 lbs.

74

1

6 gallons 2,726 gallons 16

2,625 gallons

108

E 15

(5) DANGEROUS DRUGS.

Heroin pills

Forged Government opium labels

(6) MISCELLANEOUS.

Die for printing opium labels

Seditious literature

Dogs illegally imported

Small craft confiscated

Seizures.

340,853

4

2,231

9

1

1

1

225

24

3

20

20

(1) OPIUM.

Possession

Boiling

Dealing

False Labels

Table VIII.

Arrests. Convictions.

456

403

26

23

1

1

9

5

(2) ARMS.

Illegal possession

11

8

(3) TOBACCO.

Possession, Cigarettes

10

6

Chinese Tobacco

53

51

Illegal manufacture

4

4

Unlicensed selling

9.

9

(4) LIQUOR.

Brandy

1

1

Spirits of wine

19

13

Chinese Spirits

82

68

Distillery Offences

9

9

(5) DANGEROUS DRUGS.

Heroin pills

3

3

(6) MISCELLANEOUS.

Forged Government opium labels ..

9

5

Printing Government opium labels.

1

1

Seditious literature

1

1

Importing dogs

1

1

Larceny from person

1

1

Lottery tickets

3

Total

709

616

E 16

Table IX.

Classified List of Opium Seizures, 1929.

Number of

Taels

Seizures.

Seized.

Prepared Opium, Wuchow*

244

5,652.80

Doubtful

227

608.75

19

Macao

65

3,992.83

""

""

92

29

Shanghai

1

515.00

وو

33

Kwong Chow Wan

13

1,241.00

Amoy

3

781.00

French

1

3.00

12

11

Canton

19

79.75

39

Hong Kong

3

7.55

Total Prepared Opium

12,881.68

Opium Dross, all kinds

4

8.70



Dross Opium, all kinds

1

.40

Total Dross, all kinds

9.10

Raw Opium, Chinese

270

17,100.05

Indian

1

**

19

2,328.00

Persian

7

22

1,799.00

Total Raw Opium

21,227.05

Raw Opium Mixture

6

292.50

Opium Solution

Pints Seized.

25

36.00

* Wuchow, a port on the West River. Port of entry for Kwong Sai

Province.

E 17

Table X.

Fines and Forfeitures collected by the Courts under Opium, Liquor and Tobacco Ordinances.

Hong Kong Magistracy

Kowloon Magistracy

District Office, North

District Office, South

Total

Table XI.

$12,064.26

4,949.40

621.00

680.89

$18,315.55

Rewards Paid.

For Opium, Drugs, Liquor and Tobacco

$34,048.39

Table XII.

Importation of Dangerous Drugs during the year 1929.

lbs. OZ.

grs.

Preparations containing Ethyl Morphine

Hydrochloride

1

154

Preparations containing Morphine

213.

Morphine Salts

Cocaine Salts

Heroin Hydrochloride

5

3

NOTE :-Included in these amounts are supplies issued to Government in-

stitutions and registered chemists from confiscated stock.

Clerks

European Revenue Officers

Chinese Revenue Officers

Tallyman

Opium-Shroff

Opium-Chinese Clerk

Opium-Packers

E 18

Table XIII.

Staff Changes.

1

Discharged due to Reduction of Staff.

Resigned.

Dismissed.

2

Died

1

1

5

7 1

1

1

1

-

Pensioned.

-

-

-

PLACE OF SEIZURE.

Table XIV.

Chief Seizures of Opium, 1929.

Kind of ()PIUM,

'S. S. Kut Sang

Sampan in Yaumati Typhoon Shelter

Do.

"}

Motor Boat" Simplex'

S. S. Limehow

Do.

Sampan ex S. S. Sui Tai

་་.་...་་་་་་

Raw Opium (Indian)

Do. (Persian)

Prepared Opium (Macao)

Do. (Macao).

Raw Opium (Chinese)

Do. (Chinese)

Do.

(Persian)

Manganese Ore Junk from Kwong Sai

Do.

(Chinese)

Prepared Opium (Amoy)

Unoccupied Sampan ex S. S. Menado Maru

---

Raw Opium (Chinese)

S. S. Mantauk concealed in Mast

Prepared Opium (Shanghai)

S. S. Michael Jebsen

TAELS.

2.328

960

610

1,250

1.000

975

672

2,250

659

1,500

515

Table XV.

Return of Seizures under Dangerous Drugs Ordinance No. 22 of 1923 for the year 1929.

DATE.

QUANTITY AND SUBSTANCE.

ORIGIN.

18th February, 1929 21st April, 1929.

26th November, 1929 4th December, 1929 14th December, 1929

PLACE OF SEIZURE.

PROBABLE DESTINATION.

Shanghai.

Local consumption.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Brought back from Singapore. Local consumption.

U. S. A.

DESTINATION.

RESULT.

153 Heroin Pills

Unknown.

612

Do.

Do.

124 Connaught Road Central, (2nd floor)........ Yaumati

Lucal consumption.

Do.

1 Conviction.

Do.

500

Do.

Do.

291 Queen's Road Central, (3rd floor)

Do.

2 Convictions.

***

340,000

Do

Do

Cargo Boat 44×V

200,000

Do.

Do.

Junk 390v

Local Sale.

Do.

I Conviction,

1

Do.



-E 19

E 20

Table XVI.

Licences issued during the year 1929.

Dealer's Licence

Licensed Warehouse

LIQUOR.

Chinese Wine and Spirit Shop (excluding New Territories)

29

24

341

Distillery Licence:---

(a) Hong Kong and Aplichau

6

(b) Kowloon, South of Kowloon Hills.

(c) N.T. North including Chun Wan and

Hang Hau

28

(d) Islands of N.T. South

7

44

TOBACCO.

Importer's Licence

Retailer's Licence:-

(a) $20.00

(b) $10.00

Licensed Warehouse

Manufacturer's Licence

Retailer's Licence

112

1,472

1,333

2.805

4

29

OPIUM.

71

E

Åppendix F.

REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR

OF THE ROYAL OBSERVATORY, HONG KONG, FOR THE YEAR 1929.

I.-GROUNDS AND BUILDINGS.

and

The grounds were kept in order by the Botanical Forestry Department with the assistance of the Observatory coolies.

A stone for the zero triangulation station was set up by the Public Works Department, 38.5 ieet due south of the Observatory transit instrument, on February 2.

The Main Building and the Assistants Quarters were re- painted in the Spring.

The tubular steel storm signal mast on Kowloon Signal Hill having been blown down during the typhoon of August 22 was replaced by a lattice steel mast on November 20.

Magnetic Station at Au Tau.-In view of the large range of temperature in the magnetograph house, during the months of June-August the walls of the inner chamber were covered with sheet asbestos, inch thick, on both inner and outer surfaces. The ceiling and floor were covered on the outer surface only.

only. Interior vestibules were constructed at the entrances of the outer and inner chambers, and it is now necessary to pass through five doors in order to reach the recording room from the outer air. The range of temperature has been sensibly reduced by these alterations, but is still too great. To keep it within the necessary limits, thermostatic control will probably be necessary.

Underground Chamber for Seismographs and Clocks.-The range of temperature in the underground chamber was 9°.7 (F) in 1929 as against 10°.7 (F) in 1928 and 11°.6 (F) in 1927. The relative humidity was never less than 95% between June 6 and September 4. The absolute range during the year was 45% in 1929 as against 45% in 1928 and 61% in 1927.

In the following table the mean monthly temperature and humidity in the Underground Chamber are compared with the temperature and humidity in the open air.

F 2

Mean Monthly Temperature and Relative Humidity in the Underground Chamber and in the Open Air

during the year 1929.

Excess of Under-

Chamber.

In Underground In the Open Air.

Month 1929.

ground Chamber over Open Air.

Temper- Relative Temper- Relative Temper- Relative

ature Humidity ature Humidity ature

Humidity

%

January,..

72.4

go

62.5

76

February,. ΤΟΙ

89.

58-9

79

March,.....

70*7

79

64'9

73

April,

.....

72'4

86

71.2

75

May,

75°0

93

78.1

84

June,..

774

96

82.5

79

July....... 78-8

96

81.6

84

| | | ++++

+ 99

% + 14

+ 11'2

+ 10

+ 5·8

I'2

3.1

5'1

2.8

+ 12

August,...

79'5

96

81.1

1.6

September 79.8

93

81.2

*9

14

+14

October, 78.9

86

76.5

69

+ 24

+ 17

November, 76.3

92

67.7

64

+ 8.6

+ 28

December, 74.4

87

647

78

+ 9*7

+ 9

Range,....

97

23.6

II.—METEOROLOGICAL INSTRUMENTS.

All the meteorological instruments were maintained in good order throughout the year.

The thermometers in use were compared with Kew Standard No. 647 in summer and winter.

The working of the electric hammer on the Nakamura Pluviograph was tested daily at 11h.

The Beckley and Dines Baxendell Anemographs were oiled and the orientation of the vanes checked once a month. The Dines Baxendell instrument continues to work satisfactorily, except at very low velocities when its action is uncertain.

F 3

The mean monthly results of comparisons with the records of the Beckley Anemograph from 1910-1928 are given in the following table, together with the results for 1929:-

Factor for converting the actual run of the Beckley Anemograph cups to velocities recorded by the Dines Pressure

Tube Anemograph.

Factor (Dines Beckley).

3

Month.

Mean 1910-1928.

1929.

January,

I'94

2.13

February,

I'99

2.II

March,

2:06

2.13

April,..

2°08

2.19

May,

2*19

2.25

June,

2.I!

2°29

July,

2.23

2.38

August,.

2'21

2:55

September, ......

2.20

2:36

October,.

2'12

2.25

November,

2'02

2.20

December,

1'94

2'14

Year...

2:09

2.25

III.-METEOROLOGICAL OBSERVATIONS AT THE OBSERVATORY.

as

Automatic records of the temperature of the air and evaporation were obtained with a Richard dry and wet-bulb thermograph, and the direction and velocity of the wind with a Beckley and a Dines-Baxendell anemograph, modified described in the report for 1912. The amount of rain is recorded automatically by a Nakamura Pluviograph and the amount of sunshine by two Campbell-Stokes universal sunshine recorders. Eye observations of barometric pressure, temperature of the air and of evaporation and the amount of cloud are made at each hour of Hong Kong Standard Time. The character and direc- tion of motion of the clouds are observed every three hours. Daily readings are taken of self-registering maximum and minimum thermometers. Observations of pilot balloons are made in clear weather with a Watts 14 inch "Coudé" theodolite. It is proposed to send up a small balloon daily, when the balloons arrive, in order to study the winds in the lower strata of the atmosphere.

Principal features of the Weather in 1929: The principal features of the weather in 1929 were:-

(a) A severe typhoon on August 22.

(b) Continuation of the serious shortage of rain (which

began in July, 1928) until the middle of June. (c) Temperature of the air considerably above normal in January and moderately above from March to June.

F 4

Barometric pressure was considerably below normal in July and December and moderately below in January and August. It was considerably above in March, April, September and November. The mean pressure for the year at station level (109 feet above sea level) was 29.845 ins. as against 29.828 ins. in 1928 and 29.842 ins. for the past 46 years. The highest pressure was 30.282 ins. at 9h. 30m. a.m. on December 23 as against 30.312 ins. in 1928 and 30.509 ins. for the past 46 years. The lowest pressure was 28.912 ins. at 1.43 p.m. on August 22 as against 29.227 ins. in 1928 and 28.590 ins, for the past 46 years,

The temperature of the air was considerably above normal in January, and moderately above from March to June and in December. It was moderately below normal in November. The mean temperature for the year was 72°.6 as against 72°.4 in 1928 and 71.9 for the past 46 years. The highest tempera- ture was 92.2 at 3h. Om. p.m. on July 8 as against 92°.6 in 1928 and 97°.0 for the past 46 years.

The lowest tempera- ture was 44°.4 at 6h. 55m. a.m. on December 23 as against 45°.0 in 1928 and 32°.0 for the past 46 years.

The total rainfall for the year was 69.82 inches as against 71.15 inches in 1928 and 85.380 ins. for the past 46 years. A water famine resulted from a serious shortage of rain from the middle of July 1928 to the middle of June 1929, when only 27 inches of rain fell against an average of 71 inches. Disaster was averted by a rainfall of 3.8 inches between June 14 and 25, 1929, followed by frequent heavy rain in July, to the extent of 22.7 inches, and in August to the extent of 20 inches. The greatest fall in one civil day was 7.155 inches on August 16 as against 4.100 inches in 1928 and 21.025 inches for the past 46 years. The greatest fall in one hour was 2.730 inches between 31. and 4h. a.m. on August 16, as against 1.700 inch in 1928 and 3.965 inches for the past 46 years.

The wind velocity was very considerably below normal in March, considerably below in February and April, and slightly below in June, July and December. It was slightly above in January and September. The mean velocity for the year was 11.6 m.p.h. as against 11.2 m.p.h. in 1928 and 12.5 m.p.h. for the past 46 years. The maximum velocity for one hour, as recorded by the Beckley anemograph was 89 m.p.h. at 14h. on August 22, as against 59 miles in 1928 and 108 miles for the past 46 years. The maximum gust velocity, as recorded by the Dines-Baxendell anemograph, was at the rate of 117 m.p.h. from E. by S. at 13h. 39m. on August 22, as against 76 m.p.h. in 1928 and 130 m.

1.p.h. for the past 20 years.

The relative humidity was considerably above normal in December and slightly above in January, February, July. August, and September. It was considerably below in March and April and slightly below in October and November.

The

F 5

mean for the year was 77% as against 79% in 1928 and 77% for the past 46 years. It frequently exceeded 95% in Spring and Summer. The lowest for the year was 26% at 1h. Om. p.m. on April 20 and at 4h. Om. p.m. on November 18, as against 25% in 1928 and 12% for the past 46 years.

Rainfall at five Stations.--In the following table the monthly rainfall for the year 1929 at the Observatory is com- pared with the fall at the Police Station, (Tai Po), the Botanical Gardens, (Hong Kong), the Matilda Hospital, (Mount Kellet), and Fanling:

Month.

Obser- Police vatory Station Gardens (Kowloon). (Taipo). (Hong Kong).

Botanical

Matilda Hospital (Mount Kellet,' Hong Kong).

Fanling.

inches, inches. inches.

inches.

inches.

January,

0'930

1*48

1'30

0*90

February,

0'585

0°77

0'70

0.66

March,

0*505

0.08

C'91

C'97

April,

1*540

0*9***

1*22

105

1.68

May,

6.620

3'97

7:00

5:48

3'53

June,

4 195

4:07

5.31

3.64

4.1!

July,

22.700

20.87

23°23

18.43

24.64

August,

20*020

12.58

20'07

15.12

1567

September,... 10795

9'55

9'41

7:07

3.68

October,...... 0'140

0'00

O'II

0*03

November,... 1375

1.82

1'31

1-52

1*78

December,... 0°420 0.63

0*59

0°57

0*2/2

Year.... 69.825

56.79

7116

5562

55*34*

*From April 1.

Floods.-Little or no damage was caused by floods during the year 1929. The heaviest rainfall occurred at the Observatory as follows:

*

Period 1929.

Amount.

Duration.

Greatest fall in 1 hour.

Time.

d. h.

0.900 July 12 9

d. b.

d. h. inches.

hours.

Amount. inches.

July...II 0 to July 15 15

948

47

July

...20 22 to July 24

3

6.39

28

July...26 10

10 July 28

14

1.65

17

...29

Aug....15 2 to Ang. 19 Sept.

0.870 July 28 12

19

10.96

1:010 July 22 16

12 to Oct. 1 2

4.87

33 2.730 Aug 16 4 15 * 0:580 Sept. 29 20

Typhoons.-The tracks of 15 typhoons in the Far East are given in the Monthly Meteorological Bulletin for December. On August 22 a typhoon passed between Hong Kong and Gap Rock on a WNW track. The lowest barometer reading, reduced to sea level and standard gravity, was 28.912 inches at 1.43 p.m. The greatest wind velocity (gust) was at the rate of 117 m.p.h. from E by S at 1.39 p.m.

F 6

IV. PUBLICATIONS.

Daily Weather Report and Map.-A weather map of the Far East, for 6 a.m. of the 120 meridian time, is constructed daily and lithographed at the Observatory. On the verso is printed the morning weather report, from 40 to 50 stations in China, Indo-China, Japan, Korea, Borneo and the Philippines, and a weather forecast for the following districts :-

1. Formosa Channel.

2. S. E. Coast of China between Hong Kong and

Lamocks.

3. Hong Kong to Gap Rock.

4.

S. Coast of China between Hong Kong and Hainan.

This publication is exhibited on notice boards at the Hong Kong and Kowloon Ferry Piers, the Harbour Office, at the offices of the Cable Companies and at the General Post Office. It may be purchased by the general public at a subscription rate of $10 per annum. During the year 45 companies etc, sub- scribed for 55 copies. The Weather Report and Forecast, and all Storm Warnings, are telephoned to Stone-cutters Wireless Station for transmission to H. M. Ships on the China Station.

A weather map for 2 p.m. of the 120th. meridian time is also constructed daily. It is not published, but an evening weather report and forecast based thereon, is sent to the morn- ing papers and exhibited on the notice boards.

Meteorological observations from 26 stations in the Far East, followed by a Weather Report and Forecast, are broadcast by Cape d'Aguilar (VPS) on a 600 metre spark at 0400 and 1200 G.M.T. A repetition of the 0400 message is made by VPS on 2913 (2800 until May 31) meters I.C.W. at 0500 and the 1200 message on 2913 (2000 until May 31) meters I.C.W. immediately following the 1300 time-signal.

The Weather Reports and Forecasts are also broadcast by the Peak Wireless Station (ZBW.) on 355 (300 until November 22) metres telephony at 0548 and 1148 G.M.T.

Hong Kong Storm Warnings are broadcast by VPS on a 600 metre spark on receipt, and at 18 minutes past every hour until 1600 G.M.T.

ZBW normally broadcasts these warnings on 355 (300 until November 22) metre telephony immediately following the 0548 and 1148 weather reports, but when Hong Kong local typhoon signals are displayed they are broadcast by telephony on receipt, and at 48 minutes past every hour until the signals are lowered.

F 7

Shanghai and Manila warnings are broadcast by VPS on a 600 metre spark on receipt, and repeated after an interval of 10 minutes. They are similarly broadcast by ZBW on 355 metres telephony when the Hong Kong Local typhoon signals are displayed.

V.-WEATHER TELEGRAMS, FORECASTS AND STORM WARNINGS.

Daily Weather Telegrams.-In addition to the ordinary 6h. and 14h. observations, which the Cable Companies transmit free of charge, the 11h. and 17h. observations were received at half rates from the following stations:

Shanghai Gutzlaff

Amoy Macao

The 2300 and 0700 G.M.T. observations from Fort Bayard, Phu-lien, Tourane, Cape Padaran and Capt St. James, and the 0300 and 0900 G.M.T. observations from the above, and about 12 other stations in Indo-China, are received from Phu-lien on short wave. This service is very valuable and ensures the early receipt of the observations, and at regular hours, namely at 0115, 0400, 0830 and 1015 G.M.T. It also saves the expense of obtaining the 0300 and 0900 G.M.T. observations by cable.

Other valuable services are the 2200 G.M.T. observations on 23 metres S.W. from Yangtze Ports, and several stations in N.E. China and Korea sent personally by Father Gherzi S.J. of the Zi Ka Wei Observatory, and the 2100 G.M.T. observations from Pelew, Yan. Saipan and Ponape, sent on 1050 metres from the Pelew Observatory at 0200 G.M.T.

The 0600 and 2200 G.M.T. observations from Hoihow are received by wireless telegraphy occasionally.

The Meteorological Authorities at Pratas continue to send, daily, with commendable regularity and promptitude. their 6h., 11h.. 14h. and 17h. observations and the 6h.observations from some some Philippine stations. They also send hourly observa- tions during the passage of a typhoon.

Though the number of observations received for construct- ing daily weather maps has increased of late vears, owing to the advent of wireless telegraphy, far more observations are still required before even approximately accurate maps can be drawn, showing kinks in the isobars, lines of discontinuity, cold fronts, warm fronts etc.

Nothing further has been heard of the projected synoptic weather message from a high power wireless station at Hankow, mentioned in last year's report. Nor have any such messages been received from Naha.

At the request of the Director, National Institute of Meteorology, Nankin. watch was kept at 0010 G.M.T. on 1930 January 22 and 23, for the Tokio synontic weather message, on 4800 metres, but no signals were heard.

-F8

-

Extra Weather Telegrams.-The following stations send extra weather telegrams at half rates during typhoons, on receipt of certain code words from Hong Kong:-Amoy, Canton, Macao, Phu-lien, Sharp Peak and Taihoku. The Director of the Philippine Weather Bureau also sends extra telegrams, at his discretion, from Aparri or some other station nearer the typhoon centre. The 9 p.m. observations from Swatow, kindly sanctioned by the Chinese Telegraph Administration, were received only occasionally; sometimes on the following day. The Director of the Taihoku Observatory sends extra weather telegrams from the two stations in Formosa nearest to the centre during the passage of a typhoon.

Weather Telegrams from Ships by Radio.-The following table gives the monthly number of ships from which radio meteorological messages have been received, and the number of messages received (each arrival and departure is counted separately):-

British (including H.M. Ships).

H.M.S.

in Port

Other National-

Total,

ities.

Mouth.

No. of ships.

No. of

messages.

No. of ships.

No. of

messages,

No. of ships.

No. of

messages.

No. of ships.

No. of

messages.

January, .....

66

272 19 147 71 107

156

February,

61

343 18

103 49

172

526 128 520

March,...

59

163

26 100 66

191

151 454

April,

74

200 13

73

бо

140

147

413

May,

49

140 16 103 55

113

120

356

June,

66

173 12 118

197

152 488

July,

Angust,

September,

October,

216 8 72

189 283

12

323 32

222

163 $10

November,

December,

65

211 34 136

N 00

87

12

99 146

бо

157 147 433

224 143 606

141 58 187

8 94 55 101 128 331

171

168 640

149 539

[ 1929, ......

794

2549 210 1285 748 1982

1752 816

1928,

789

2645 203 1202 588 1893 1580 5740

Totals {

1927,

544

1802 154 1838 435 1386

1133 5026

1926, ......1058

5216

831 2376 1889 8883

F 9

It will be seen that the number of British ships sending these messages increased from 992 in 1928 to 1004 in 1929. The number of ships of other nationalities increased from 588 to 748.

Results of Weather Forecasts.-The results of comparison of the daily weather forecasts with the weather subsequently ex- perienced are given below, together with the results of the previous five years:

Year.

Complete Partial Success. Success.

Partial

Total

Failure. Failure.

%

%

%

alo

%

1924

71

24

1925

62

34

1926

72

26

1927

.70

26

1928

66

31

1929

70

28

54 2 432

do оооооо

The forecast comprises wind direction, wind force, and weather. Complete success means correct in three elements. Partial success means correct in only two elements. Partial failure means correct in only one element. Total failure means correct in no element.

The method of analysis is described in the 1918 Report.

Storm Warnings.-The symbols of the China Seas Non- local Storm Signal Code are displayed on Kowloon Signal Hill and on the roof of No. 49 Godown of the Hong Kong & Kow- loon Wharf and Godown Co.

The following Ports are warned by a telegraphic adaptation of the code:-Shanghai, Sharp Peak, Swatow, Amoy, Santuao, Macao, Canton, Wuchow, Phu-lien, Taihoku, Manila, Labuan and Singapore. 108 storm warnings were sent in 1929. 178 were received from Manila, and 261 from Zikawei. The corres- ponding numbers in 1928 were 103, 187 and 144 respectively.

The Central Weather Bureau, Poona, was warned on September 6 and 20 and December 11, of the passage of typhoons across Indo-China in a westerly direction.

No alterations in the arrangements for the display and dis- semination of local Storm Signals were made during the year.

F 10

In the following table are given the number of times and number of hours the local signals were hoisted in each of the years 1925-1929 : —

Red Signals.

Black Signals.

Bombs.

Year.

Number

Number

Number of

times

of hours displayed.

Number of times.

of hours

displayed.

Number of times fired.

1925

1926

1927 1928

IO

1929

3

28

In 2000

128

50 169

3442

4

103

ུ༦

57

I

61

I

58

46

The figures in the above table include the number of hours that night signals, corresponding to the day signals, were hoisted.

The red signal indicates that a depression or typhoon exists which may possibly cause a gale at Hong Kong within 24 hours. The black signals indicate that a gale is expected at Hong Kong,

Three bombs fired at intervals of 10 seconds indicate that wind of typhoon force is anticipated.

VI. METEOROLOGICAL OBSERVATIONS FROM SHIPS, TREATY PORTS, &c.

Logs received. In addition to meteorological registers kept at about 40 stations in China, meteorological logs were received from 197 ships operating in the Far East. These logs, represent- ing 10,153 days' observations have been utilised for amplifying the weather maps and verifying typhoon tracks. The corres- ponding figures for the year 1928 were 186 and 9425.

Comparison of Barometers.-The corrections to ships baro- meters are usually obtained by comparing their readings while at Hong Kong with those of the Observatory Standard. Oc- casionally ship captains bring their barometers to the Observatory to be compared with the Observatory Standard.

VII.-MAGNETIC OBSERVATIONS.

From the beginning of 1928 Magnetic horizontal force, de- clination and dip have been determined at the Au Tau Station weekly, when possible. The instruments used are a magneto- meter by Cook, Troughton and Simms, No. 31, and an Earth Inductor by the Cambridge Instrument Co. C65818. In the

F 11

following table are given the annual values of the magnetic elements in 1929 as derived from 41 determinations:-

Q

Declination (West)

0.43.5

Dip (North)

30.38.7

Horizontal Force (C.G.S. unit)

0.37481

0.22206

0.43565

Vertical Force (C.G.S. unit)

Total Force (C.G.S. unit)

Photographic registration of the variation of magnetic Declination, Horizontal Force, and Vertical Force was main- tained at Au Tau throughout the year, except from May 30th to August 30th, during which period alterations were made in the magnetograph house, with a view to securing greater tem- perature insulation. During the progress of these alterations the disposition of the registration apparatus and lights of the Declination variometer was rearranged, in order to obtain a greater scale value: It is now 5.53 inches for 1°, in place of 2.80 inches.

The measurement and tabulation of the magnetograms has not been commenced, as the records are not yet satisfactory. The trace of the H.F. variometer has shown a persistent creep throughout the year, in a direction signifying increased moment of the magnet, or decreased torsion couple. As it was thought that the shellac joints of the suspension had possibly become soft and yielding, on account of the high temperature experienced during the summer months, they were replaced by solder. The creep continues however, and further investigation as to its origin is necessary.

The frequent adjustments of the V.F. thermograph on the V.F. variometer, necessary on account of its very open scale value, produced disturbances of the V.F. scale value, and the suspension was eventually broken during one such adjustment, in May, prior to the commencement of the alterations to the building. The suspension was repaired and registration resumed in August, after an arrangement had been fitted whereby adjust- ments could be effected to the thermograph without opening the instrument case. The V.F. record is not yet satisfactory how- ever, and at the end of the year, experiments were again in progress to determine what scale value should be adopted.

Much difficulty has been experienced in obtaining suitable and sufficiently economical registering lights, which could be fixed with the necessary rigidity; but satisfactory registration is now being obtained with a frosted strip-light lamp in a firmly fixed brass cylindrical cover in which a fine vertical slit is cut. No condenser is necessary with this method.

The Chinese attendant at Au Tau is changing the photo- graphic sheets satisfactorily and keeping the batteries charged, but he cannot cope with emergencies when they arise. It is necessary to send an officer from the Observatory, a distance of 27 miles. This occasionally causes delay in rectifying faults and consequent loss of register.

S

F 12

VIII.-TIME SERVICE.

Time Ball. The time ball on Kowloon Signal Hill is dropped at 10h. and 16h. daily, except on Saturdays when it is dropped at 10h. and 13h. and on Sundays and Holidays when it is dropped at 10h. only (120th Meridian Time).

The ball is hoisted half mast at the 55th minute and full mast at the 57th minute. If the ball fails to drop at the cor- rect time it is lowered at 5 minutes past the hour and the ordinary routine repeated at the following hour, if possible.

Time signals are also given at night by means of three white lamps mounted vertically on the Observatory radio mast. The lights are extinguished momentarily every second from 20h. 55m. to 21h, except at the 28th, 29th, 54th, 56th, 57th, 58th and 59th seconds, of each minute. The 21h. signals were repeated at midnight on December 31, the last signal indicating the close of the year 1929. The hours refer to Hong Kong Standard Time (8 hours East of Greenwich).

The Timeball was dropped successfully 658 times. There were two failures, on August 2nd and 4th at 10h. a.m. when it fell 12 seconds and 30 seconds early, respectively. The failures. were due to electrical defects in the connections within the observatory. The ball was not raised on August 22nd at 4h. p.m. owing to a typhoon gale, and on August 24th and 25th at 4h. p.m. owing to faults in the exterior lines.

The error of the time ball due to accumulated error of the standard clock never exceeded Os.3 throughout the year.

The probable error of the time ball in each month of the past five years is given in the following table.

Probable Error of the Time Ball.

Month.

1925

1926

1927

1928

1929

January,

±0.38

February,

*22

+0*13 *18

±0.14 ±0.13

+0*10

12

*IO

*10

March,

*22

*I I

'I I

•10

*10

April.....

•16

*13

'10

*10

*10

May,

'I I

'10

14

*10

*10

June,

'IO

10

13

*20

10

July,

10

'10

ΙΟ

'I I

*10

August,.

'I 2

*12

*12

*20

*12

September,

'10

*10

*10

*I I

*IO

October,

*Iz

II

*I I

*I I

'IO

November,

'10

·10

'10

*10

'I I

December,..

'10

13

*13

'12

*14

Means,

±0.15 +0.12 ±0.12

±0.12

±0.11

A

F 13

Time Signals by Radio Telegraphy.-In addition to the time signals given by the time ball, and on the radio mast, signals are broadcast at 10h. and 21h. by radio-telegraphy, via Cape D'aguilar. Particulars of the programme are given in Govern- ment Notification No. 322 of the 1st June, 1928.

Observations of the rhythmic radio time signals emitted by Nauen at 8h. a.m., Hong Kong Standard Time, have been made daily, whenever possible, during the year. The observations have been utilized for clock regulation during cloudy weather.

Longitude Determination.-During the period Jan. 1st, 1927-December 31st, 1929, 285 observations of the Bordeaux time signal were observed, giving a longitude of Hong Kong of 7h. 36m. 41.28s. East of Greenwich. During the same period, 916 observations of the Nauen time signal were made, giving a longitude of 7h. 36m. 41.21s. east of Greenwich. The mean result from observations of both stations is therefore 7h. 36m. 41.25s. This result is identical with that obtained by means of 13 simultaneous observations of the Bordeaux time signal observed by Hong Kong and Greenwich in September- November, 1925. Both results need a correction of-0.03s. for time of transit of the signal, and as a result of all observations made at the Roval Observatory, Hong Kong, the longitude may be taken as 7h. 36m. 41.22s. east of Greenwich. The 35 observa- tions of the Bordeaux time signal made during October and November 1926 were sent to the "Commission Internationale des Longitudes par T.S.F." and in “La Revision des Longitudes Mondiales" the resulting longitude of Hong Kong is given as 7h. 36m. 41.19s. east of Greenwich. It is not proposed at present to alter the adopted longitude of the observatory, name- ly, 7h. 36m. 41.25s. east of Greenwich.

Transit Instrument.-Routine transit and level observations were made by the Chinese computers throughout the year. The Collimation and Azimuth determinations and occasional transit observations were made by the Chief and First Assistants.

The number of observations in the years 1928 and 1929 was as follows:

Transits

Level determinations

Azimuth determinations (mark)

Azimuth determinations (transit of

circumpolar stars)

Collimation determinations (mark)

1928 1929

1200 1111

620

562

31

32

276

271

41

35

Clocks. Sidereal Clock Cottingham and Mercer, No. 507, has been in use as the Observatory Standard throughout the year. Its performance was again marked by a steady increase of

- F 14-

-

losing rate (with superposed fluctuations corresponding to varia- tions of pressure in the clock case due to temperature changes) until the end of October, since when the losing rate has shown a distinct tendency to decrease. No increase of pressure due to leakage in the case has been detected. The losing rate varied from-08.25 on February 12 to--0s.20 on October 5. Pressure in the clock case was reduced by about 15 m.m. on July 6.

The Leroy Mean Time Clock, No. 1350, was used for drop- ping the time ball, maintaining the electric time service in the Observatory, and sending hourly signals to the Railway, the Post Office, the Telephone Co. and the Eastern Extension Tele- graph Co. The clock is corrected daily before 10h. and 16h. by the electric regulating apparatus. The daily rate of the pen- dulum is kept below 0.5s. by the addition or withdrawal of weights. The Dent Mean Time Clock, No. 39740, is held in readiness as a substitute for Leroy No. 1350. It was not required for this purpose in 1929.

IX. MISCELLANEOUS.

Seismograph.-No alterations were made to the seismograph during the year. New needle points were fitted as required. As against 183 in 1928, 252 earthquakes were recorded during the year 1929.

The seismograms have been forwarded to the President of the International Seismological Committee, Oxford, to be dealt with.

Upper Air Research.-82 balloon ascents were made during the year, 6 of which were observed with a second theodolite, 6469 feet to the north of the Observatory. 4 temperature flights were made by Officers of the R.A.F. from the Kai Tak base.

The result of the pilot balloon observations have been for- warded monthly to the Secretary of the International Commis- sion for the exploration of the upper air.

The following days were selected by the International Com- mission as days for international ascents:-April 15-20, August 12-17, and December 17-19. December was chosen as the "In- ternational month". Balloon ascents were made on April 15-16. On the other International days the weather was too cloudy.

Rain-making Experiments.-The water shortage having be- come very serious, on June 18, R.A.F. planes from the R.A.F. base, Kai Tak, dropped 64 cwt. of powdered kaolin on cumulus cloud, with a view to producing rain.

The experiments were suggested by a Hong Kong resident and were sanctioned by the Naval authorities at the request of the Hong Kong Government, not with any hope of producing rain, but to satisfy the public. The result of the experiments was as anticipated.

F 15

Conferences.-The Director attended the Conference of Empire Meteorologists held at London in August, and the Inter- national Conference of Directors of Meteorological Services held at Copenhagen in September.

At the conference of Empire Meteorologists it was suggested that a Conference of Directors of Far Eastern Weather Services should be held at an early date to discuss the possibility of adopting

(a) Uniform codes for local and non-local visual storm

warning signals for the Far East.

(b) a uniform code for the transmission in the Far East

of daily weather reports by cable.

The suggestion was agreed to and approved by the Inter- national Conference of Directors. The Director of the Royal Observatory, Hong Kong, was asked to act as Convener.

New symbols for Local Storm warnings.-Towards the close of the year, the rattan symbols of the Hong Kong Local Storm Signal Code were replaced by others of expanded metal on steel frames, which, though of different design, have the same appearance as the old symbols, at a distance.

Lithographic Work.-Plans of the various schemes for an improved water supply were lithographed at the Observatory in January and special temperature charts for the Kowloon Hospital in February.

Visitors. Professor Kiyofusa Sotome, Director of the Astronomical Observatory, Tokio, and Professor Gerhard Schott, of the Deutsche Seewarte, visited the Observatory on April 5, Professor R. C. de Ward, of the Blue Hill Observatory, on April 6th. Fathers C. Repetti, from Manila, and E. Gherzi, from Zikawei, on April 30. Professor Pingjan Tsiang, Director of the Tsingtau Observatory, and Professor Coching Chu, Director of the National Institute of Meteorology, Nankin, on May 4. Dr. Wilhelm Credner, of the Sun Yat Sen University, on July 16.

Dr. Sekiguti and Dr. Kunitona, delegates from Japan to the International Meteorological Conference, Copenhagen, on Decem- ber 9th.

Staff.--No change occurred in the European Staff during the year. The Clerical Assistant, Mr. Chan Tin Fuk, was transferred to Volunteer Head Quarters on December 13 and was replaced by Mr. R. P. Ghilote, from the Harbour Department.

The Director was on leave of absence from March 30 to December 4,

C

F 16

Expenditure.-The annual expenditure on the Observatory

for the past ten years is as follows:

Year.

Total Expenditure.

Increase.

Decrease.

C.

$

c.

$

C.

1920

25,965.66

2,515.09

1921

32,700.51

6,734.85

1922

38,350.10

5.649.59

1923

38,522.58

172.48

1924

52,638.49

14,115.91

1925

41,955-51

10,682.98

1926

45,158.87

3,203.36

1927

36,664.99

8,493.88

1928

35,434.52

1,230.47

1929

35,141.07

293.45

Acknowledgements.-Acknowledgements are here made to the Naval Authorities for their co-operation in securing daily observations from H. M. ships and upper air temperatures in aeroplanes, to the Directors of Weather Services in the Far East, and the Chinese Maritime Customs Authorities, for daily observations by cable and radio-telegraphy, and extra observa- tions during typhoon weather, to the Telegraph Companies for transmitting the majority of the observations free of charge, to the Commanders of vessels who have furnished meteorological observations by post and by radio-telegraphy, to the Directors of the various Observatories and Institutions, and private per- sons, who have presented their publications to the Library, and to the Observatory staff for the efficient manner in which they have carried out their respective duties, particularly to Mr. Jef- fries, who had charge of the Observatory in my absence, and to Mr. Evans who acted as Chief Assistant. A considerable amount of extra work was thrown on both.

19th February, 1930.

T. F. CLAXTON,

Director.

Appendix G.

REPORT OF THE REGISTRAR OF THE SUPREME COURT FOR THE YEAR 1929.

1.-ORIGINAL JURISDICTION.

Three hundred and twenty four (324) actions were instituted in this division of the Court during the year 1929, as against 320 in 1928. One hundred and sixty nine (169) were disposed of during the year and 67 were settled or withdrawn before trial, as against 136 and 81 respectively in 1928.

The claims amounted to $2,377,380.92, as against $2,994,331.20 in 1928.

The debts and damages recovered amounted to $997,151.27, as against $1,200,768.02 in 1928.

The fees collected amounted to $15,407.25, as against $14,924.50 in 1928.

Tables setting out in detail the figures contained in this and the following paragraphs are printed on pages 01, 02, Y2 and Y3 of the Blue Book for the year 1929.

2. SUMMARY JURISDICTION.

One thousand nine hundred and seventy nine (1,979) actions were instituted during the year, as against 2,010 in 1928.

The cases were disposed of as follows:-Settled or with- drawn 459: Judgment for the Plaintiff 1,032: Judgment for the Defendant 63; Nonsuit 2: Struck off, Dismissed or Lapsed 70; and Pending 353; as against 531, 945, 48, 8, 44 and 434 respectively in 1928.

The claims amounted to $578,413.05, as against $589,941.93 in 1928, and the amounts recovered were $318,921.29, as against $284,808.69 in 1928.

The number of Rent Distress Warrants issued was 1,739, representing unpaid rents amounting to $367,696.86, of which $53,551.76 was recovered by enforced sales in 651 Warrants; as against 1,447, $261,853.11 and $58,930.39 respectively in 1928.

One thousand and twenty eight (1,028) Warrants were with- drawn on settlement between the parties, as against 909 in 1928, and the remaining Warrants were cancelled or otherwise dis- Caused of.

G 2

The fees collected amounted to $24,507.10, as against $22,577.20 in 1928.

3. CRIMINAL JURISDICTION.

There were 99 cases and 140 persons committed for trial at the Criminal Sessions, as against 91 and 118 respectively

in 1928.

Of the 140 persons indicted, 82 were convicted, 39 were acquitted and 19 were discharged (case abandoned). In 1928 the figures were respectively 118; 73, 41, 3 and one person's trial postponed.

4.-APPELLATE JURISDICTION.

Four appeals were lodged during the year.

Of the four two were dismissed and the remaining two are pending.

5.-ADMIRALTY JURISDICTION.

Thirteen actions were instituted during the year.

In five cases judgment was given for the Plaintiff, in one case for the Defendent, four were settled or withdrawn and the others are pending.

The fees collected amounted to $600.50, as against $1,378.65 in 1928.

6. PROBATE AND ADMINISTRATION.

Three hundred and eight (308) grants were made by the Court, being-

Probate,

Letters of Administration,

..120

.188

308

The figures in 1928 were respectively 104 and 144.

Court fees amounted to $21,531.80 and Official Administra- tor's Commission to $3,447.65. The figures in 1928 were $21,- 247.20 and $1,989.30 respectively.

During the year there were 212 Deceased Estates Accounts on the Court Books. The cash balance was $9,746.41.

142 Accounts were closed during the year and 39 new Accounts were opened. One Estate was transferred to Trusts Account.

-

G 3

7.-OFFICAL TRUSTS.

The number of Trust Estates in the hands of the Official Trustee at the end of the year was 23. The invested funds totalled $197,345.99 and the cash balance $10,037.46. One trust was wound up during the year and one new trust was opened.

The amount of commission collected was $247.56, as against $753.67 in 1928.

8. REGISTRAR OF COMPANIES.

On the 31st December there were 560 companies on the Hong Kong Register, of which 58 were in course of liquidation.

During the year 56 new companies were put on the Register and 37 struck off. One company was transferred from the Shanghai to the Hong Kong Register and no company from the Hong Kong to the Shanghai Register.

The fees collected in respect of "China" companies amounted to $138,331.81, and those in respect of other com- panies to $13,651.70.

Two firms were registered under the Chinese Partnerships Ordinance, 1911, and no firm was registered under the Limited Partnerships Ordinance, 1912.

Deposits to the total value of $3,905,000 have been made by Insurance Companies under the Fire and Marine Insurance Companies Deposit Ordinance, 1917.

9.-FEES AND COMMISSION.

The total sum collected during the year by way of fees and commission amounted to $102,876.25, as against $101,624.20 in the previous year.

10. STAFF.

Mr. T. M. Hazlerigg ceased to act as Deputy Registrar from 15th February.

Mr. W. R. N. Andrews, Accountant, was absent on long leave from 10th April to 31st December, and Mr. S. Randle acted as Accountant from 10th April to 26th December, and Mr. H. A. Mills acted from 27th to 31st December (in addition to his other duties).

Mr. J. V. Dodd, Interpreter, retired on 31st July.

Table showing total number of Cases dealt with and Expenditure and Revenue of the Supreme Court.

(From 1919 to 1929).

- G 4

Total

Expenditure

Revenue

Number

Year.

of cases

dealt with

Total

Increase Decrease

Total

Increase

Decrease

Percentage

of Revenue

to

Expenditure

$

$

$

CA

$

C.

%

1919.

982

98,844.23

562.83

*61,305.87

6,726.85

62

1920.

872 113,082.79

14,238.56

*55,957.81

5,348.56

49

1921

851 118,782.72

5,699.93

*58,830.97

2,873.66

49

1922

827 126,424.34

7,641.62

*60,448.59

1,617.62

47

1923.

962 128,838.62

2,414.28

*69,955.20

9,506.61

54

1924.

1,549 136,136.69

7,298.07

*89,624.99

19,669.79

65

1925

1,908 150,698.14

14,561,45

*121,606.20

31,981.21

80

1926.

3,416 133,680.40

17,017.74*117,252.61

4,353.59

87

1927

2,267

141,493.29

7,812.89

*96,254.96

20,997.65

68

1928.

2,330 | 165,114.93

23,621.64

*101,624.20

5,369.24

62

1929

2,303

167,632.95

6,518.02

*102,876.25

1,252.05

61

*Not including amounts paid direct to Treasury for fees in respect of Licences to keep Local Registers and China Companies Fees by the Registrar of Companies under the Companies Ordinances, 1911 and 1925.

15TH MARCH, 1930.

C. D. MELBOURNE, Registrar, Supreme Court.

G (1) 1-

Appendix G (1)

REPORT OF THE OFFICIAL RECEIVER AND

REGISTRAR OF TRADE MARKS AND LETTERS

PATENT FOR THE YEAR 1929.

BANKRUPTCY.

New Business.

1. The number of petitions filed during the year was smaller than in 1928, but the assets collected amounted to more than three times as much, while the estimated liabilities were slightly in excess of those for last year. The assets for distribution among creditors, in bankruptcy, and in companies winding-up, amounted to approximately $70,000.00, while the liabilities were estimated at $245,000.00.

Fees.

2. The fees received for Official Receiver's commission amounted approximately to $9,500.00. In addition, a sum of approximately $66,000.00 was transferred from the Companies Liquidation Account to general revenue, under the provisions of the Unclaimed Balances Ordinance, No. 5 of 1929.

Bankruptcy Discharges.

one

8. Two discharges were granted during the year, conditionally, and one application for discharge was absolutely refused. In the last case, two facts under Section 24 of the Bankruptcy Ordinance were established against the debtor, on proof of either of which he was liable to be sentenced to summary imprisonment for any term not exceeding one year. This power was not, however, exercised by the Court in this case, as it was considered reasonable that, as the provision had become to all intents and purposes a dead letter, warning of intention to exercise it should be given,

Companies Winding-up.

4. One compulsory winding-up order was made during the course of the year. The case is noteworthy by reason of the fact that an order for public examination of a Director of the company was made. It is believed that this is the first in- stance in which such an order has been made, at any rate for some very considerable time.

G (1) 2-

5. Comparative figures for the years 1928 and 1929 are given below:-

COMPANIES LIQUIDATION.

BANKRUPTCY,

Year.

1929

1

1

15 12

GO

3

11

9

14

1

7

1928

27 19

8 13

10 6

2

2

10

2

--

:

Granted.

Discharges

Receiving Orders rescinded.

Adjudications annulled.

1

10

5

Assets for dis- tribution.

:

Estimated liabilities.

Fees in Stamps.

Official Receiver's

('om-

mission.

Unclaimed balances transferred to General

Revenue.

$

C.

c.

C.

71,C67.15 | 254,725,41

4,073.25

C.

9.498.27

26,819.28 207,887.22 5.562.75 20,080.40

C.

65,968,39

TRADE MARKS AND LETTERS PATENT.

Revenue.

6. The revenue derived from the registration of trade marks was slightly larger than last year, namely, $11,105.00.

Opposed Registration and Appeals.

7. Only three applications for registration of trade marks were opposed during the year. In one case the application to register was withdrawn, in another, the opposition was abandoned, and the third case is still pending. There were no appeals to the Court from the Registrar's decision.

G (1) 3-

Patents Registration.

8. The revenue under this heading was, as usual, very smal} although it amounted to more than double the total for 1928. Comparative tables follow:-

Year.

Total No. of applications for

Total No. of

Total

registration

amount of

registration of trade marks.

certificates

fees.

granted.

1929

492

477

$11,105.00

1928

497

375

10,310.55

Year.

Total Number of Patents registered.

Total amount of fees.

1929

1928

40

$218.00

90.00

Total Revenue and Expenditure.

9. The following are tables of revenue and expenditure for the department for the years 1929 and 1928 respectively. (including salaries of officers met from the Junior Clerical Service vote) :—

Total Revenue. Total Expenditure. Excess of Revenue.

1929

$20,821.27.

1928 $30,480.95.

$18,190.67.

$17,788.28.

$2,630.60. $12,692.67.

E. L. AGASSIZ,

Official Receiver and Registrar

of Trade Marlis and Letters Patent.

Hong Kong, 6th February, 1930.

Appendix H.

REPORT OF THE POLICE MAGISTRATES' COURTS

FOR THE YEAR 1929.

(Victoria)

Mr. R. E. Lindsell acted as First Police Magistrate and Coroner from the 1st January to 15th February.

Mr. E. W. Hamilton acted as First Police Magistrate and Coroner from the 16th February to 15th May and from 25th May to the end of the year.

Mr. N. L. Smith acted as First Police Magistrate and Coroner from the 16th May to 24th May during the absence of Mr. E. W. Hamilton (on sick leave).

Major C. Willson, O.B.E., acted as Second Police Magistrate from the 1st January to 7th July in addition to his duties as First Clerk, and resumed duty as First Clerk and Magistrate from 8th July to the end of the year.

Mr. T. M. Hazlerigg, M.C. acted as Second Police Magistrate from the 8th July to 8th September.

Mr. A. W. G. H. Grantham acted as Second Police Magistrate from the 9th September to the end of the year.

(Kowloon)

Mr. E. W. Hamilton acted as Police Magistrate from the 1st January to 15th February.

Mr. T. S. Whyte-Smith acted as Police Magistrate from 16th February to 19th November.

Mr. W. Schofield acted as Police Magistrate from the 20th November to 15th December.

Mr. T. S. Whyte-Smith acted as Police Magistrate from 16th to the 31st December.

Mr. D. Ogilvie acted as First Clerk during the year.

H 2

The number of cases was 31,588 as compared with 28,468 in 1928 and the Revenue was $140,810.13 as compared with $163,216.82 in 1928.

Table I shows the total number of cases tried and the Revenue and Expenditure of the Magistracy for the years 1920-1929. Since 1921 the salaries of Cadet Officers acting as Police Magistrates have been paid out of the Cadet Service vote, since 1926 the Junior Clerks' salaries from the Junior Clerical Service Vote, and since 1927 the First Clerks' salaries from the Senior Clerical and Accounting Staff Vote; the figures given in the expenditure column of the table include these salaries.

Table II gives a return of Punishments awarded in respect of different classes of offences during the year.

Table III gives an abstract of cases under cognizance of the Police Magistrates' Courts during the year.

Table IV shows the number of offences under various Ordinances tried during the year.

Table V gives an abstract of cases brought under cognizance of the Police Magistrates' Courts during the last ten years.

E. W. HAMILTON,

First Police Magistrate.

28th February, 1930.

- H 3-

EXPENDITURE.

YEAR.

Total.

Increase. Decrease.

Total.

Table I.

Table showing total Number of Cases tried in, and Expenditure and Revenue of the Magistracies for the years 1920 to 1929, exclusive of New Territories Courts.

REVENUE.

Total

Number

of Cases

tried.

Percentage

of Ex-

penditure to Revenue.

Increase. Decrease.

$ C.

$

ਹਰੇ

C.

C.

%

1920.

45,539.94

4,765.71

103,132,51

12,281.15

15,304

44.15

1921.

48,664,59

3,124.65

149,195.72 46,063.21

17,374

32.62

1922.

51,880.03

3,215.44

159,928.50 | 10,832.68

18,221

32.50

1923.

50,158.91

1,721.12 184,926.15 24,998.65

21,811

27.12

1924..

61,364.58 | 11,205.67

261,372.23

76,446.08

27,877

23.47

1925..

68,548,55

7,183.97

211,227.43

50,144.80

25,989

32.45

1926..

60,794.21

7,754.34 233,529.18 | 22,301,75

30,516

26.03

1927.

64,605.92 3,811.71

223,811.97

9,717.21

32,122

28.86

1928.

65,094.10

488.18

163,216.82

60,595.15

28,468

39.88

1929.

60,153.85

4,940.25 140,810.13

22,406.69

...

31,558

42.72

Table II.

HONG KONG, KOWLOON AND NEW TERRITORIES.

RETURN of PUNISHMENTS awarded in respect of CERTAIN CLASSES of OFFENCES, during the Year.

:

PUNISHMENTS.

Assaults

and other

Offences against

Revenue Acts,

Offences against Offences against

Masters and

Malicious

property other

Highway Acts,

offences

Gam-

than malicious

Health Acts, and

Servants Acts,

Other

injuries to

against

bling.

Number of

the

property.

Description.

each kind

person.

inflicted.

injuries to pro- perty or predial larceny.

social economy of the colony.

2,206

including Acts

offen-

other Acts

relating to the

relating to

ces.

indentured

coolies.

19,532

:

:

23,364

115

12

1,426

73

88

38

26

...

4,700

167

185

1,802

872

449

6

2

6

180

59

Fines,

Imprisonment in lieu

of fine or security,

Peremptory Imprison- ment,

Whipping,

Juvenile Prison.

Expelled from the

Colony,

:

Sentenced to House of

Detention,

26

:

:

:

...

Bound over with or



without Sureties,

515

182

1

5

TOTAL,...

29,146

470

20

1,631

:

:

15

H 4-

1,669

196

:

:

:

:

43

2,136

3,163

26

284

21,726

1:



1

CLASSIFICATION OF OFFENCES.

*

H 5

Table III.

ABSTRACT of CASES under COGNIZANCE of the POLICE MAGISTRATES' COURTS during the Year 1929.

CASES, HOW DISPOSED OF, AND THE NUMBER OF MALE AND FEMALE PRISONERS UNDER EACH HEAD.

Ordered to find Security.

WRITS ISSUED BY THE POLICE MAGISTRATES

DURING THE YEAR.

Warrants.

Total Number of

Prisoners.

Summons for Defendants.

Summons for Witnesses.

Notices of Re-hearing.

Arrest.

Distress.

Search.

For entering

Gambling Houses.

Magistrates Orders.

TOTAL.

M.

F.

M.

F. M. F. M. F.

M. F. M. F. M. F. M. P. M. F. M.

F.

Assaults and

other offences against the person, Malicious injuries to property, Gambling,

Offences against property other

than malicious injuries to property or predial larceny. Offences against Revenue Acts.' Highway Acts, Health Acts. and other Acts, relating to the social economy of the Colony,

Offences against Opium Ordin- ances Nos. 30 of 1923, and 7 of 1924

Offences against Masters and ServantsActs, including Acts, relating to indentured coo- lies,...

Other offences.

2,654 2,855 | 2,025| 67

2.653 2,887 2,274 | 157

760 839 643 89

101

18

541

501 617 263 25

23 19 1,757 | 1,604

129 4 14

22

2

122

621 29 70

12

:

433 23

:.

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:..

:

:

:

:

:

:

:.



9 125

6

:

1

574

44 13,739 102 1298 80 874 422

50 | 15,566

bo

:

:-

22

1,730

27

17

19

3

24,428 25,387 (20,480|963

3,461 | 137

51

97

...

18 146

16

6

1

Total.

31,558 34,368 27,308|1323| 4,872 203 | 135

146 27 290

23 25

-

:

:

:..

:

:

:

:

:

2,757

99

24

2,731

180

744

95

30

18

|24,265 | 1,135

44

|32,826|1,580 |13,739 102

1298 80 | 874 422

50 15,566

* TOTAL MALES AND FEMALES,

34,406

* Consisting of Offenders not sentenced to Imprisonment.

OFFENCES.

Table IV.

POLICE COURTS.

LIST of OFFENCES TRIED during the year 1929.

No. of CASES.

No. of PRL- SONERS.

OFFENCES.

No. of CASES.

No. OF

Put-

BONERS.

Brought forward,..............

122

134

Accessories and Abettors Ordinance-3 of 1865

Arms and Ammunition Ordinance-2 of 1900.-

Contraventions of

6 Coinage Offences Ordinance-7 of 1865,—

Offences relating to the King's gold and silver coin.

(Sections 3-12).

12

19

72

70

(

"

21-32)

4

Asiatic Emigration Ordinance-30 of 1915

Bankruptcy Ordinance—7 of 1891

1

Common Law Offences

103

145

8

15

Copyright Ordinance-11 of 1918

1

Births and Deaths Ordinance-7 of 1896

10

12

Criminal Intimidation Ordinance—13 of 1920............

11

13

Boarding House Ordinance-23 of 1917.

14

14

Dangerous Goods Ordinance-1 of 1873.—

Chinese Extradition Ordinance-7 of 1889

6

7

Contraventions of Regulations made thereunder.....

39

40

Chinese Marriage Preservation Ordinance-42 of 1912

3

Dangerous Drugs Ordinance-22 of 1923

Chinese Publication Ordinance-15 of 1907 ....

2

4

Defence (Sketching Prevention) Orainance-1 of 1895 ....

Chinese Temples Ordinance-7 of 1928

2 Deportation Ordinance- 25 of 1917

220 220

Carried forward,

122

134

1

www.

H6-

Carried forward..........

524 589

OFFENCES.

Table IV,-Continued.

LIST of OFFENCES, ETC.,-Continued.

No, or

CASES.

No OF

PRI-

SONERS.

OFFENCES.

No. of

No. of

CASES.

SONERS.

PRI-

ON

+

Brought forward,

524

589

Brought forward,

1,808 3,109

645

656

Gunpowder and Fireworks Ordinance-14 of 1901,- Contraventions of and Offences under

46

65

Dogs Ordinance-21 of 1927,-

Contraventions of

Education Ordinance-26 of 1913

Emergency Regulations Ordinance-5 of 1922

Employers and Servants Ordinance-45 of 1902,- Proceedings under

Ferry Ordinance-28 of 1917

Female Domestic Service Ordinance-1 of 1923

~

~

3 Importation and Exportation Ordinance-32 of 1915

Indecent Exhibition Ordinance-3 of 1918

Interpretation Ordinance-31 of 1911

Larceny Ordinance-5 of 1865,- Larceny by Bailee (Section 4) Simple Larceny

1

+

- H 7-

1Q

4

23

23

គន

5

....

1,501 1,553

20

18

29

Forgery Ordinance-11 of 1922-(Sections 4-8).

23

23

Larceny of cattle and other animals, (Sections 9-17)..] of written instruments, (Sections 19-21) of things attached to or growing on laud, (Sections 22-28)

12

13

1

81

125

Uttering forged bank notes, (Section

9)..

11

11

Larceny from the person and similar Offences, (^ections 29-37)

336

386

(

10-15).

23

34

"

Sacrilege. Burglary and house breaking, (Sections 38-47)

78

Forts Protection Ordinance -3 of 1891 Fugitive Offenders Act., 1881

Gambling Ordinance-2 of 1891,-

Contraventions of and Offences under

2

N

N

Larceny in dwelling houses. (Sections 48-49),

73

"}

31

541 1,757

Carried foru ard........

1,808 |3,109

in ships, Wharves, &c., (Sections 50-53) or embezzlement by clerks, servants, &c., (Sections 54-60)

Frauds by bankers. agents, &c., (Sections 62–74) Obtaining property by false pretences, (Sec. 75—78)... Keceiving stolen property, (Sections 79-87)

Carried forward

14

82

36

*** 88

85

78

14

88

35

63

73

354 381

4,518 | 6,039

OFFENCES.

Brought forward,..

Table IV,-Continued.

LIST of OFFENCES, ETC.,-Continued.

NUMBER No. of

OF

PRI-

CASES. SONERS.

Licensing Ordinance--8 of 1887,-

Contraventions of and Offences under

of Regulations made thereunder

Liquor Licence Ordinance-9 of 1911,—

Contraventions of and Offences under Part I,

(Sections 3-40)

Part II, (Sections 41-73)

III, (

".

71-96)

OFFENCES.

NUMBER No. of

OF

PRI-

CASES. SONERS,

4,518 | 6,039

Brought forward,..

12,695 | 14,253

3.430 [3,402

Marrried Women (Maintenance in case of desertion) Ordinance-10 of 1905,—

3,379 13,380

Proceedings under

Merchant Shipping Ordinance-10 of 1899,-

97

99

Contraventions of and Offences under Part VI,

(Sections 21-30).

63

96

***

54

Contraventions of Regulations made thereunder

3

31

***

83

9

111

Merchandise Marks Ordinance-4 of 1890.- Contraventions of and Offences under

41

42

5

Misdemeanour Punishment Ordinance-1 of 1898,- Offences under

70

74

New Territories (Regulations) Ordinance – 34 of 1910

14

14

1,070 | 1,121

Obscene Publication Ordinance-15 of 1911

1

Offences against the person Ordinance-2 of 1865,— Homicide, (Sections 2-9)

19

23

Acts causing or tending to cause danger to life, &c, (Sections 16-31)

17

19

Assaults, (Sections 32-43)

383

488

Forcible taking or detention of persons, (Sections

5

44-45)

A

Attempt to procure abortion (Sections 47-48)



21

31

3

|12,695 |14,253

Carried forward,

13,304 | 15,038

Liquor Amendment Ordinance-16 of 1927

Live Stock Import and Export Regulation Ordinance-

15 of 1903

...

.

Magistrates Ordinance-3 of 1890,-

Offences under

Maintenance Order Ordinance-9 of 1921

Malicious Damage Ordinance-6 of 1865.-

Injuries by fire to buildings and goods therein,

(Sections 2-9).

Miscellaneous injuries, (Sections 42-44)

Marine Store Protection Ordinance-13 of 1919

Carried forward,

H 8-

OFFENCES.

Table IV,-Continued.

LIST of OFFENCES, ETC.,--Continued.

NUMBER No. CF

PRI-

OF

CASES. SONERS.

OFFENCES.

:

NUMBER No. of

OF

PRI-

CASES. SONERS.

Brought forward

13,304 15,038

Brought forward.

14,185 15,992

44

Opium Ordinance-30 of 1923.-

Contraventions of, Part III, (Sections 9-20)

Ordinance-7 of 1924 (Raw Opium)

529

588

Protection of Women and Girls Ordinance-1 of 1897,- Offences under

133

135

IV, (

"}

21-43).

4

4

227

247

Public Health and Buildings Ordinance-1 of 1903,— Contraventions of Part I, (Sections 1-7)

10

,

""

Pawn Brokers Ordinance-1 of 1860,—

II, (

III.

8-95)

593

775

}}

"

96-250)

65

"

Contraventions of

57

48

་་

VI. (

""

255-264)

10

Failure to comply with B. A. Notice

36

Peak Tramway Ordinance-2 of 1883

1

2

S. B.

305 305

មឹងផង

74

12

37

"

""

Perjury Ordinance-21 of 1922.

4

2

Plant Ordinance-11 of 1920

1

Public Places Regulation Ordinance-2 of 1870,- Contraventions of Regulations made thereunder Railway Ordinance--21 of 1909

9

10

10 10

Pharmacy Ordinance - 9 of 1916

}

CYD

3

Registration of Persons Ordinance-35 of 1923...

8

00

Police Force Ordinance-11 of 1900,- Offences under

28

29 Regulation of Chinese Ordinance-3 of 1888,- Offences under Part I, (Sections 1-17)

Post Office Ordinance-6 of 1900,- Contraventions of and Offences under

"}

Prison Ordinance-15 of 1923,—

12

12

Printers and Publishers Ordinance-4 of 1886

14

Offences under

"}

""

22-28).

50-51)

145

1

15 Rogue and Vagabond 5 Geo. IV, c. 83

15

46 46 61 10

10 10 —

145

2

15

Sale of Food and Drugs Ordinance-8 of 1696

I

1

3

3

Carried forward

|14,185 (15,992

Carried forward,

|15,531 | 17,537

·

— H 9 —

OFFENCES.

Table IV,-Continued.

LIST of OFFEnces, etc.,—Continued.

No. of

CASES.

NO. OF

PRI-

SONERS.

OFFENCES.

No. of

CASES.

NO. OF

PRI-

SONERS

H 10

Brought forward,...

Seditious Publication Ordinance-6 of 1914

15,531|17,537

Brought forward,

22.556 | 25,286

20

18 Tobacco Ordinance-10 of 1916

181

190

Servant Quarters Ordinance-11 of 1903,~

Tramways Ordinance-10 of 1902,-

Offences under

2

Contraventions of and Offences under...

2

2

Small Tenements Recovery Ordinance--10 of 1897

I

1

Travellers Restriction Ordinance-19 of 1915

1

1

·

Societies Ordinance-8 of 1920

9

Vagrancy Ordinance-9 of 1897,—

Proceedings under

37

41

+

Stamp Ordinance-8 of 1921,—

Offences under

42

"Star" Ferry Co. Ordinance-46 of 1902

1

1

42 Vehicles and Traffic Regulation Ordinance-40 of 1912,- Contraventions of Regulations made thereunder and Offences

7,7767,820

806

818

""

""

Stowaways Ordinance-5 of 1903.-

Watchman Ordinance-6 of 1928

15

15

Offences under

24

35

Summary Offences Ordinance-1 of 1845,-

Water Works Ordinance—16 of 1903,- Offences under

171

185

Nuisances, Trespasses

and Similar Offences,

(Sections 3-21)

Offences against good order, (Sections 22-35)

384 733

6,085 | 6,427 | We'ghts and Measures Ordinance-2 of 1885,- Contraventions of and Offences under

Possession of stolen goods, (Sections 36-41) Proceedings under Miscellaneous Provisions, (Sections)

456

476

Wild Birds and Game preservation Ord.—6 of 1885

42-51)

Offences under No. 7 of 1905 an Ordinance to amend

Wireless Telegraphy Ordinance-11 of 1926

the above

2

2

Undecided Cases

Carried forward,..

|22,556 25,286

TOTAL,

4

1

5

41

44

81,602 | 34,412

H 11

Table V.

4.- ABSTRACT of CASES brought under COGNIZANCE of the POLICE MAGISTRATES' COURTS

during a period of ten years 1920-1929.

CASES, HOW DISPOSED OF, AND THE NUMBER OF MALE AND FEMALE PRISONERS UNDER EACH HEAD.

Escaped

before

being

absconded.

Did not appear and

Coinmit- ted for trial at

Supreme

Court.

Committed to prison or

detained pending or- der of His

Excellency

the Governor.

Ordered to find security

To keep the

peace, to be of

good beha viour, and to

answer any

charge.

Punished for prefer ring

false charge

Undecided.

Total number

or giving false testimony.

of defendants.

Escaped.

brought

for trial at

the Ma- gistracy."

2

B

4

5

6 7

8

G.

9

10 11 12 13 14 15

16

17

18

19

20

21

M.

F.

F.

M

F. M. F.

M.

F. M. M.

F. M.

M.

F.

M. F.

M.

F.

Year

Total numbe

of

cases

Convicted and punished.

Discharged.

102

1920,

15,267

15,520

517

1,511

119136

1922, ... 18,535

1921,... 17.374 18,726 695 2,247

18,338 614 2018

1923, ... 21,720 22,975 356 3.190

1924....

27.724 28,708 859 5,154

151 85

Co

w?

76 198

72246

172 171 6

Total,.. 100,620 104.2678,041 14,150

590 836 19

:

143 19

173

10

5

246

30

264 17

376

38

:

:

1,202 109

:

:

Average per

Year.

20,121,20,853-4 | 608′2; 2,530

118 1672 3.8

1.8

240-4 218

1

1

:

1925.

1926,

25.790 25,896 | 1,595

30,516 31,360 1,379

4,099

3,540

242 178 2

149 83

323 23

:

:

403 64

1927.

32.122 | 38,114 | 1,306

3,501 160 93

1928.

28 468

26,191,005

3157 222

1929.

31.558 27,808 1,323

4,872 203 135

38

521

49

:

$4

1



073 35!

:

:

Co

:

461

54 6

Total,. 148.454 143,869 6.60S

19,169

976 | 578

12

2,283 225

:

Average

per 23,690-8 28,778.8 1,321-6 3,833.8 1952 1416

00

2'4'

456-6 45

Year,

Grand Total for the

|219,074 | 248,136 | 9,649 33,319 1,566 1,409 23 21

3.485 334 6

10

Years,

Average

per Year,

1

24,9074 24.8'3-6, 964-93,331-9156.6 (140,9 2·3 2-1

:

348-533-4 6

35

ON

17,380

€65

אן:

LO

21,275 864



20,835 722

98

5

26,773 450

176

15

34,585 1.090

:

+4

-1

:

382

29

120,848 | 3,791

76-1

5.8

24,169.6 | 758-2

:

:

200

30, 696 1,364

123

35,509 1,592

100

37,330 1,516

30,148 1,263

-

41

32,832 1,580

:

:

:

~

602

166,515 7,815

:

120-4

•1

33,303 1,56 3

984

31

287,363 |11,606

98.4 3.1

28,736-3 1,160-6

SUPREME COURT AND MAGISTRACY.

COMPARATIVE TABLE showing the Number of Offences, Apprehensions, Convictions, and Acquittals for the last Four Years.

1926.

1927.

1928.

1929.

· H 12

The number of persons apprehended by the Police or summoned before the Police Magistrates ....

36,978

38,746

31,276

34,368

The number of summary convictions

1. For Offences against the person

313

398

249

288

2. Gambling

1,504

2,140

1,685

1,626

3. For Offences against the property other than predial larceny

1,552

1,713

2,067

2,111

4. For other Offences

22,881

23,409

22,651

23,874

5. For Opium Offences

6,489

6,760

544

732

The number of persons acquitted in the Inferior Courts

3,689

3,661

3,379

5,075

Appendix I.

REPORT OF THE LAND OFFICER FOR THE YEAR 1929.

REGISTRATION.

1. (1) During the year four thousand two hundred and fifty (4,250) instruments were registered under the provisions of Ordinance No. 1 of 1844,-a decrease of 548 on the preceding year.

(2) The total number of instruments registered under the provisions of the above mentioned Ordinance (since 1844) to the end of the year 1929 was 117376.

(3) The number of instruments registered each year during the last ten years is shewn in Table I.

2. The total consideration on sales, mortgages, surrenders and miscellaneous land transactions amounted to $93,361,005.83 particulars of which are shewn in Table II.

GRANTS OF LAND.

1. The total area of land leased during the year under review was 455 Acres 1 Rood and 13-1/5 poles, of which 387 Acres and 2 Roods were dealt with by the District Officers.

2. Particulars of grants surrenders and resumptions during the year are shewn on pages W 1 and 2 of the Blue Book for 1929.

SURRENDERS.

Eighty seven (87) Surrenders of land required for public purposes (including Surrenders under Contracts of Exchange) were prepared and registered in the Land Office, the total con- sideration for those required for public purposes amounting to $625,255.00.

CROWN LEASES.

1. Two hundred and forty two (242) Crown Leases were issued during the year, as against 235 in the previous year-an increase of 7, particulars are set out in Table III.

2. The number of leases issued each year during the last ten years is shewn in Table I.

- I 2

FEES.

1. The total amount of fees collected (exclusive of the New Territories) amounted to $76,076.50 being a decrease of $10,008.50 on the preceding year. Table IV shews the Monthly Revenue.

2. Land Registration Fees in the New Territories amounted to $5,901.40 and Crown Lease Fees to $30.00.

3. The total fees collected during the past ten years is shewn in Table V.

STAMP DUTIES.

to

1. Stamp Duties paid on registered documents (exclusive of Probates and Letters of Administration) amounted $408,691.40.

2. Stamp Duties on Probates and Letters of Administration: registered amounted to $212,698.65.

CROWN RENTS.

1.-(1) The number of lots entered on the Hong Kong an Kowloon Crown Rent Roll-as shewn in Table VI-was 6,126 an increase of 610 on the preceding year.

(2) The Crown Rents on this Roll amounted to $604,543.62 -an increase on the preceding year of $29,116.03.

2.-(1) The number of lots entered on the Village Crown Rent Roll--as shewn in Table VII-was 3,241-a decrease of 48 on the preceding year.

(2) The Crown Rents on this Roll amounted to $1,753.55 as compared with $1,787.05 in the preceding year, a decrease of $33.50.

3. (1) The total Crown Rents amounted to $606,297.17 -an increase of $29,082.53 on the year 1928.

(2) The increase was occasioned by the sale of new lots and revision of Crown Rents.

I 3

DOCUMENTS.

Seven hundred and eighty seven (787) miscellaneous docu- ments were prepared in the Land Office during the year, viz:

(a) Two hundred and forty two (242) Crown Leases

(with Counterparts).

(b) One hundred and eighty eight (188) Memorials for the registration of Undertakings relating to Veran- dahs and Balconies over Crown Land.

(c) Eighty seven (87) Surrenders of land required for public purposes street improvements and private Exchanges.

(d) Two (2) Deeds of Covenant relating to Scavenging

Lanes.

(e) Two hundred and forty three (243) Agreements for

leases exchanges surrenders and Permits.

(f) Twenty five (25) Memorials of Re-entry.

MILITARY LANDS.

During the year Memoranda for giving effect to the last four outstanding items set out in Col. Lewis' Memorandum were drawn up and submitted to the War Department for approval it is hoped to complete these in the course of 1930.

17th March, 1930.

PHILIP JACKS,

Land Officer.

I 4

Table I.

NUMBER OF INSTRUMENTS REGISTERED AND CROWN LEASES

GRANTED DURING THE YEARS 1920 TO 1929.

Year. Instruments registered

Crown Leases granted.

1920

3,045

74

1921

4,466

84

1922

4,146

207

1923

6,837

209

1924

6,000

90

1925

4,226

178

1926

4,360

250

1927

4,628

196

1928

4,798

235

1929

4,250

242

Table II.

CONSIDERATION ON INSTRUMENTS REGISTERED IN THE LAND OFFICE DURING THE YEAR 1929.

No. of Lots

Description of Instruments.

Number registered.

or portions

of Lots affected.

Total Consideration.

$

C.

Assignments

1,227

1,358

29,381,944.21

Mortgages and Transfer of

Mortgages

1,207

1,506

34,515,596.33

Reassignments and Certi-

ficates of Satisfaction

970

1,209

27,959,786.18

Surrenders

87

105

625,255.00

Judgments and Orders of

Court

41

64

Miscellaneous Documents

597

747

73,858.86 804,565.25

Probates and Letters of

Administration, (Stamp

121

179

Duties $212,698.65) ...)

Total

4,250

5,168

93,361,005.83

10

Marine

Hong Kong.

62

со

Inland

1

Rural Building

Shaukiwan Inland

Inland

-I 5

Table III.

CROWN LEASES GRANTED During the Year 1929.

Hung Hom Inland

Inland

Kowloon.

New Kowloon Total.

Dairy Farm

5

56

2

102

2

242

Table IV.

RETURN OF MONTHLY REVENUE PAID IN STAMPS TO THE LAND OFFICE DURING THE YEAR 1929.

Registration

Month.

of Deeds.

Searches Copy Documents and Certi-

fications.

Crown

Lease

Total.

Fees.

$

C.

$

C.

$

C.

$

C.

January February

6,289.00

672.00

290.00

7,251.00

4,752.00

297.00

510.00

5,559.00

March

5,642.00

428.00

1,050.00

7,120.00

April

4,933.00

544.50

580.00

6,057.50

May

5,374.00

355.00

850.00

6,579.00

June

4,187.00

409.50

470.00

5,066.50

July

4,653.00

462.00 330.00

5,445.00

August

5,989.00

465.25

360.00

6,$14.25

September

5,545.00

472.00

630.00

6,647.00

October

4,993.00

532.25

280.00

5,805.25

November

4,615.00

407.00

780.00

5,802.00

December

6,506.00

454.00

970.00

7,930.00

Totals:-

63,478.00

5,498.50 7,100.00

76,076.50

$86,085.00

1928 Total.

76,076.50

1929 Total.

$10,008.50

Decrease.

Total

I 6

ww

Table V.

FEES COLLECTED DURING THE YEARS 1920 TO 1929.

Searches

Year.

Registration

of Deeds.

of Docu-

and Copies Grants of

Leases.

ments.

Total.

C.

$ c.

$ c.

$

1920

52,569.00

3,849.75

2,870.00

59,288.75

1921

70,617.00.

4,235.00 2,685.00

77,537.00

1922

65,407.00

4,683.50 5,550.00

75,640.00

1923

109,671.00 7,280.00 6,680.00

123,631.00

1924

93,304.00

5,824.25 2,470.00

101,598.25

1925

65,068.00

4,778.75

5,210.00

75,056.75

1926

65,843.00

4,443.00

7,635 00

77,921.00

1927

67,115.00

5,050.50

5,442.(

77,607.50

1928

72,815.00

6,640.00 6,630.00

86,085.00

1929

63,478.00

5,498.50 7,100.00

76,076.50

I 7

Table VI.

HONG KONG AND KOWLOON RENT ROLL.

Locality and Description.

No. of Lots.

Total Crown Rent.

$

C.

"J

Victoria Marine Lot

Praya Reclamation Marine

367

81,778.26

Lot

Inland Lot

Quarry Bay Marine Lot

Inland Lot

Victoria Farm Lot

Garden Lot

Aberdeen Marine Lot

68

2,340

6,653.91 232,531.52

2

13

18.458.00 4,166.00

8

401.55

· 44

Rural Building Lot

218

5

Inland Lot

Aplichau Marine Lot

Inland Lot

80

24

1,483.00 38.061.58

579.16 1,091.16 152.84

40

263.48

72

Shaukiwan Marine Lot

10

1,928.00

Inland Lot

221

4,485.43

Stanley Inland Lot

4

4.00

Kowloon Marine Lot

56

47,367.00

Inland Lot

1.380

88,851.23

Garden Lot

1

1.00

>>

Hung Hom Marine Lot

་་

Sheko Inland Lot

Tai Tam Inland Lot

Tong Po Inland Lot

New Kowloon Marine Lot

2

6,140.00

Inland Lot

154

9,068.00

3

9.00

1.00

1

1.00

5

18,608.00

,,

Inland Lot

Farm Lot

1,031

33,903.00

4

135.50

""

Rural Building Lot

1

42.00

Tai Po Inland Lot

7

436.00

Fan Ling Lot

2

1.192.00

Sheung Shui Lot

5

910.00

Ping Chau Farm Lot

1

225.00

Mining Lot

1

302.00

Tsun Wan Marine Lot

3

2,808.00

"

Inland Lot

9

1.786.00

New Kowloon Dairy Farm Lot

14

638.00

Tsing I Marine Lot

1

82.00

Total

6,126

604,543.62

I 8

Table VII.

VILLAGE RENT ROLL.

Locality and Description.

No. of Lots.

Total Crown Rent.

$ c.

Wongneichung

1

1.00

Aberdeen

18

70.50

Pokfulam

24

28.25

Tai Hang

157

633.50

Ah Kung Ngam

25

18.25

Shaukiwan

27

15.00

Ma Tau Wei

81

150.00

Hau Pui Loong

13

49.50

Wong Tsuk Hang

2

34.50

Tai Hang Stream

16

67.00

Little Hong Kong

2.00

Tong Po

1

2.50

Stanley

9

18.00

Tvtam

3.50

Tytam Tuk

2.50

Shek O

8

23.00

Chung Hom Bay

3.00

Chinese Joss House, Bowen Road

-

Victoria

1

3.00

Aplichau

42

75.00

Telegraph Bay

13

43.50

Little Hong Kong

1,577

280.25

Shek O

315

68.00

Hok Tsui

182

36.00

Chai Wan

723

125.80

Total

3,241

1,753.55

I 9

REPORT OF THE REGISTRAR OF MARRIAGES FOR THE YEAR 1929.

MARRIAGES.

1. The number of Marriages celebrated in the Colony during the year was 225 (of which 94 were between Chinese persons) as compared with 236 (and 105) respectively in 1928-a decrease of 11. Particulars are given in Table I.

FEES.

2. The total amount of Fees received under the Second Schedule of the Marriage Ordinance 1875 was $2,440.75 as compared with $2,558.00 in 1928-a decrease of $117.25. Particulars are shewn in Table II.

PHILIP JACKS,

Registrar of Marriages.

15th March, 1930.

Table I.

(1). Marriages by SPECIAL LICENCE, 29.

(a) At Licenced Places of

Public Worship.

10.

(b). At the Office of the

Registrar of Marriages.

19.

(2). Marriages by REGISTRAR'S CERTIFICATE. 196.

(a) At Licenced Places of

Public Worship.

150.

(b) At the Office of the

Registrar of Marriages.

46.

I 10

Table II.

FEES RECEIVED DURING 1929.

Fee.

Total Fees.

204 Certificates of Notice

(Registrar's Certificates).

@ $1.00

204.00

3 Searches

@ $1.00

3.00

40 Certified Copies

@

$1.00

40.00*

3 Licences to Registrar of)

Marriages

to

issue his

@ $10.00

30.00

Certificates

30 Special Licences

@ $50.00

1,500.00

66 Marriages at the Office of

the Registrar

@ $10.00

660.00

Excess Receipts over Statutory

Fees

3.75*

*Excess Receipts due to Exchange.

Total

$2.440.75

Appendix J.

REPORT ON THE NEW TERRITORIES FOR THE

YEAR 1929.

A. NORTHERN DISTRICT.

I. STAFF.

Mr. J. A. Fraser continued in charge throughout the year. Mr. E. H. Williams, A.D.O. went on leave on 23.3.29, and Mr. J. S. MacLaren was appointed A.D.O. on 23.3.29.

On the transfer of Mr. F. Brett to P.W.D. on 31.5.29, Mr. J. D. Bickerstaff was appointed Land Bailiff at Ping Shan on 1.7.29 and Mr. W. G. Routley continued to act as Land Bailiff at Tai Po.

II. MAGISTRACY.

Table A shows the number of cases heard by the District Officer sitting as Police Magistrate and as Judge of the Small Debts Court.

The District had practically a clean record as regards serious crime, only one case being committed to Sessions, and there dismissed.

The number of police cases showed a corresponding de- crease, 477 against 484 in 1928. The total number of persons brought before the P.M. was 633 against 802 in 1928.

Among these cases again, there was an increased number of traffic summonses 203 against 188, so that these figures pro- bably constitute a record in the annals of the District.

Opium cases numbered only 17, against 23 in 1928, but no valuable inference can be drawn from this decrease.

There was only one case under the Arms ordinance. Lar- ceny cases dropped from 81 in 1928 to 55 in 1929.

There was an increase in the number of liquor and tobacco cases due to stricter supervision.

Undoubtedly for this excellent record credit is due not only to the local police, but also to the Chinese authorities in the neighbouring district, who during the year succeeded in keeping down the number of thieves and other bad characters along the border.

J 2

The number of small debts cases again increased.

Conditions in the district were difficult owing to the pro- longed drought and to this cause may be attributed a large number of actions brought by shopkeepers for goods supplied, and an unusually large number of unstable money loan associa- tions, which accounted for the bulk of the Small debts court work.

There were besides 56 miscellaneous cases, 36 "Women and girls cases" and 166 cases of all kinds at Ping Shan, or 55 above the average for the last five years.

The general tendency is for the work to increase.

Thirty one dead bodies were sent to the Mortuary and six formal enquiries were held.

III.-LAND OFFICE.

The number of sales and other transactions affecting land during the year is set out in Table B.

The number of memorials registered was 3,176 against 2,830, and fees received as stamp duty, $3,708.40 against $3,347.70 in 1928.

Although the year compares unfavourably with 1928 in village development, again a reflection of the hardships suffered by the farmers during the drought, there were compensating features in the large number of local improvements undertaken by Government, which by giving employment to the people in a period of enforced idleness, alleviated to no small extent the distress of the agricultural population.

Six of the eight sites to accommodate the villagers to be removed from the Southern District in connection with the Shing Mun waterworks scheme were completed, or practically com- pleted during the year. One of the greatest difficulties encoun- tered in reconciling these people to these new houses has been the question of 'fung shui a pseudo-science which trivial as it may seem to Western eyes, has an all-important bearing in the question of selecting or forming a site for Chinese dwellings. Great credit is due to those officers in charge of the actual construction who, by constantly meeting as far as possible the fungshui objections raised, succeeded in making completely satis- factory sites for so many villages in so short a time.

At one site, unfortunately, rock has been encountered in the process of levelling, and in this case a further delay in moving the vill- agers may be expected.

Access paths were constructed to several of those sites, and sample houses were erected on the most important, by Govern- ment. The villagers are in the process of building for themselves new houses on four sites.

-

-

J 3

The most important feature of road construction was the completion of a path connecting Sheung Shui with Lo Wu, on the border. A large bridge, now nearing completion, will com- plete this link. Good progress was made on the continuation of this path to Shataukok.

Two important additions were made to the lay-out of the villages of Taipo Market and

Market and Yuen Long,

Yuen Long, ensuring their development along modern lines, and in the latter, a number of houses and shops were built along the new streets.

Following up the survey of matsheds undertaken in the pre- vious year, photographs and finger-prints of matshed dwellers were obtained for record. It is hoped by this means to supervise more closely this important section of the population. In- directly, the close attention lately given to these people may have a bearing on the low incidence of crime.

A small market electrically lighted has arisen at Sheung Shui, in the premises of an old knitting factory, and greatly adds to the importance of this neighbourhood.

IV.

REVENUE.

The Revenue collected in this office is set out under the appropriate heads in Table C. to which should be added the fol- lowing amounts collected in the district by other Depart- ments:

Crown Rent paid in Land Office

Mining Licence fees paid in Treasury Harbour Dues, Sai Kung

11

"

No. 1 Launch

2

>>

4

TOTAL

$ 2,940.00

502.00

2,585.75

6,300.00

2,191.00

2,389.00

$16,907.75

The money collected by No. 1 Launch increased by over $1,000.00 this year.

Liquor and tobacco duties collected by Imports and Exports Department are not included.

V. GENERAL.

Afforestation.-Planting appeared to be a failure, on account of the drought, but during the later rains it was seen that quite a good proportion of the seeds sown had taken root. There. were curiously enough fewer hill fires than in the preceding year.

3

J 4

The drought. The year was one of the driest in human memory. A slight rain about the season for planting the first crop enabled the nursery padi to be laid down, and on it the drought that followed took immediate effect. In spite of all efforts to conserve water, 'planting out' was impossible in the western portion of the district, and there, practically the whole crop was entirely lost. The effects of this failure will extend to the coming rice season, for the seed planted for the second crop will not grow successfully for the first, and in addition to losing an entire crop, the farmers will have to buy seed for next year.

In regions where water was available however, like the Lam Ts-uen valley, a good first crop was obtained, and in some cases where it was impossible to grow rice, a dry crop of vege- tables was successfully reaped.

At Ha Tsuen, rain making ceremonies were held from 18th April, and some days later a little rain fell. Many parts of these ceremonies make an interesting analogy with those des- cribed in the works of authorities on native magic.

Happily rice did not rise to famine-prices, and there was no shortage of food. The population was, however, driven to forage for wood on the hillsides, in order to eke out a scanty living by carrying it to market for sale, and in two extreme cases, one at Shatin, and the other at Sheung Nam Long, on the shores of Deep Bay, fines were imposed for tree cutting by H.E. the Governor in Council.

On the planting of the second rice-crop, weather conditions returned to normal, and a good harvest was reaped, without accident from typhoon although soon afterwards a typhoon uprooted hundreds of trees on the western coast-line.

severe

Trade conditions were difficult, and there was general busi- ness depression.

Agricultural Show.-On 4.1.30, the third Agricultural Show was held on land adjoining Sheung Shui police station, and opened by H.E. the Governor Sir Cecil Clementi K.C.M.G. who was also patron of the Show. The quality of the exhibits showed a great advance on previous years. The competition was keener, and the districts were more fully represented than hitherto. Again, the success of the show was largely due to the efforts of the Rev. R. H. Wells (the Chairman) Sir Robert and Lady Ho Tung, and prominent elders of the Territories who served on the Committee.

A draft constitution of the proposed Agricultural Associa- tion has now been submitted to Government for consideration.

J. A. FRASER,

Dated 14th March, 1930.

District Officer, North.

J 5

Table A.

POLICE COURT.

1929.

Average from

1924-1928.

Cases heard

477

360

Persons brought before the P.M.

633

589

Persons convicted and punished

487

363

Persons bound over

17

67

Persons discharged

128

149

Persons committed

1

9

Persons imprisoned

134

101

Fines inflected

$8,225.00 $11,735.14

Warrants executed

48

38

Cases heard

Writs of Execution

SMALL DEBTS COURT.

1929.

Average from 1924-1928.

289

164

78

56

Table B.

No. of

Increase

Decrease

Amount

Sales,

No.

Area

in

Headings.

Permits,

of

in

Licences, Lots.

Acres,

Annual

Rent.

in

Annual

of

Rent.

Premia,

Fees, &c.

Amount

paid for

Resump-

Term

of

tion of

Land.

years.

&c.

- J 6 -



C.

C.

Sales of Land for Agriculture

90

19:31

62,81

>>

}}

>>

Building

134

7:03

633,50

2,968.56

3,182.82

75

75

Kerosene store

5

*05

3.50

25.00

75

31

"}

99

Lime Kiln

1

'03

.10

9.00

75

31

""

>>

208

"}

19

"}

Brick-storing ground

1.67

8.40

364.00

75

"}

>>

Fish' pond

5.34

5.40

583.00

75

Orchard

18.46

18.80

1,666.00

75

""

""

>>

19

""

"}

Threshing Floor

11

*33

1.50

140.50

75

Conversions

98

2.85

165.50

27.83

75

Permits to occupy land for Agriculture..

*45

1.00

10

22

41

14:54

34.04

5

"

293

487

247-33

681.35

1

}}

""

"}

**

for other purposes.

2

2

26.11

57.00

1

Extensions

Re-entries

8

9

'07

7.00

55.50

75

149

12:44

86.46

Surrenders

58

10:37

401.11

Resumptions

300

11.88

28.52

3,930.47

Stone Quarry Permits

9]

388.00

Permits to cut Earth, etc.

207

875.00

Matshed Permits

654

8:15

1,838.00

Ferry Licences

5

Forestry Licences

609

609

36042*10

Pine-apple Land Leases

102

102

54:31

Grave Certificates

21

Deeds Registered and Stamp Fees

3,176

9.00

3,604.21

162.93

10.00

3,7. 8.40

1

10

J 7

Table C.

REVENUE.

1929.

Crown Rent (Leased Land),

$ 88,883.27

Average for 1924-1928. $88,629.13

Kerosene Oil Licences,

528.00

457.20

Chinese Wine and Spirit Licences,

3,887.50

4,687.90

Pawnbroker's Licences,

Moneychanger's Licences,

Fines,

Fines (Land Sales),

1,200.00

1,240.00

250.00

376.00

2,686.00

2,225.80

31.00

396.20

Fines Reward Fund,

621.00

991.54

Forfeiture,

57.00

259.40

Forfeitures (Land Sales),

67.00

631.00

Distress Warrants,

101.00

74.00

Distress Warrants (Crown Rent),

112.00.

23.60

Arrears of Revenue,

96.45

209.65

Other Micellaneous Receipts,

498.66

72.56

Forestry Licences,

3,604.21

2,351.07

Permits to cut Earth &c.,

875.00

645.80

Grave Certificates,

10.00

49.14

Pineapple Licences,

162.93

52.28

Matshed Permits,

1,838.00

1,169.00

Permits to occupy land,

1,244.34

997.36

Stone Quarry Permits,

388.00

396.00

Stone Quarry Leases,

375.00

381.91

Ferry Licences,

9.00

9.00

Certified Extracts,

130.00

200.20

Sunprints,

95.00

78.00

Premia on Crown Land,

9,022.21

23,408.30

Stamps for Deeds,

3,708.40

3,478.50

Boundary Stones,

100.00

165.50

Deposits not Available,

1,321.56

1,793.99

TOTAL,

$121,902.53 $135,449.83.

Table D.

REVENUE COLLECTED FROM 1920-1929.

1920

$115,865.45

1925

$141,862.65

1921

121,680.38

1926

139,773.95

1922

159,191.56

1927

127,251.02

1923

280,848.64

1928

118,826.48

1924

209,105.18

1929

121,902.53

J 8

Table E.

LOCAL PUBLIC WORKS, 1929.

New Works.

Making of survey pickets in connection with the lay-

out at Yun Long Market

Making a well and a path at Tai Po

$

20.00

135.00

Repairs.

Road between Fung Yuen and Sha Lo Tung

100.00

Road from Lin Au to Siu Om Shan

50.00

Road from Chung Pui to Wang Shan Keuk

100.00

Pier near Island House, Tai Po

440.00

Bridge at Yau Tin

90.00

Bridge near Kwan Ti

400.00

Matsheds for the Agricultural Show at Sheungshui

1,000.00

Road near the pier at Castle Peak

100.00

Path to the summit of Castle Peak

800.00

Un-expended

1,765.00

TOTAL

$5,000.00

Table F.

RAINFALL AT TAIPO POLICE STATION.

1929.

Average 1924-1928.

Inches.

Inches.

January,

February,

March,

April,

1.48

1.07

.66

3.43

.08

4.02

.97

8.00

May,

June, July,

3.39

10.45

4.07

15.97

21.37

19.69

August,

12.58

8.95

September,

9.55

6.35

October,

Nil

5.04

November,

1.82

2.41

December,

.63

.35

TOTAL,

56.60

85.73

J 9

Table G.

SERIOUS CRIMES REPORTED.

On Land,

Murder

Suspected Murder

Armed Robbery and Murder

Armed Robbery, Murder and Kidnapping

Attempted Armed Robbery and Murder

Armed Robbery, Wounding and Kidnapping

Attempted Armed Robbery and Wounding

Armed Robbery

Robbery

Highway Robbery

Attempted Highway Robbery (armed)

Kidnapping

1

1929

1928

1

1

1

1

1

1

9

4

5

1

1

1

1.

Armed Robbery and Kidnapping

1

Armed Robbery and Wounding

1

Robbery with violence.

1

Abduction of a Married Woman

1

TOTAL

21

12

On Water.

Armed Robbery

Attempted Armed Robbery and Wounding

TOTAL

1929

1928

1

....

1

J 10

REPORT ON THE NEW TERRITORIES FOR THE

THE YEAR 1929.

B. SOUTHERN DISTRICT.

1. STAFF.

Mr. J. A. Fraser continued in charge. Mr. E. H. Williams went on leave on 23rd March when Mr. J. S. MacLaren was appointed Assistant District Officer in both Districts.

2. MAGISTRACY.

Table A shows the number of cases heard by the District Officer sitting as Police Magistrate and as Judge of the Small Debts Court.

There was an increase in the number of police and Small Debts cases in 1929 as compared with 1928, but the combined figures for 1929 are still less than those for 1927.

3.-LAND OFFICE.

The demand for land for building purposes remained about the same as in 1928 but there was a slight increase in the number of sales of agricultural land.

Permits to occupy land and matshed permits on Crown land increased in number by some 20%. There was a marked decrease in the number of earth, sand, and stone permits. Beaches are becoming rapidly denuded of sand and restriction of permits has had to be enforced.

The number of memorials registered was 1,536 as compared with 993 in 1928 but few transactions of any size were con- cluded.

The fees received as stamp duty amounted to $2,193.00 against $1,907.60 in 1928.

Resumptions in connection with the Shing Mun Water Scheme were the largest item in land work during the year. All the agricultural lots in Tsun Wan Demarcation Districts Nos. 452, 457, 458, 459, 460 and 466 were resumed.

4.

REVENUE.

The revenue collected by the office is set out under the appropriate heads in Table C totalling $40,870.41. Tables D and E respectively show the revenue collected in the District by Police and other Departments, and Table F gives for purposes of comparison the total revenue from all sources for the past three years. The figures for 1929 show a satisfactory increase.

5.

J 11

GENERAL.

The abnormal drought in the Spring and Summer of 1929 had an adverse effect on the rice and vegetable crops in Cheung Chau, Lantao, and Lamma, but Tsuen Wan being well-watered did not suffer to the same extent.

Tai O had a successful fishing season but fish were less plentiful in the Cheung Chau and Lamma waters and prices remained high.

The following estimate shows roughly the state of the fisheries near Tai 0:-

Fish.

Weight in piculs. Average price

Wong Fa

Ma Yau

Herring

Shrimps

per picul.

5116.

$17.00

500

$19.00

1776

$17.00

400

$15.00

Salt pans did not do so well as in 1928 and the output of salt in Tai O is estimated at 10,200 piculs against 18,000 piculs in 1928.

Distilleries in Tai O and Cheung Chau fared rather bettter and there was an increase in the amount of spirit produced in 1929.

Lime kiln owners had a poor year.

As 1928 was a lean year for livestock generally prices re- mained high in 1929. Good sales are reported from all parts of the District. Most of the livestock reared in the Southern Dis- trict is sold for local consumption but Lamma is exporting an increasing number of cattle for sale in the Aberdeen market.

The health of the District was on the whole good. Malaria is unavoidably prevalent in Tsuen Wan the more so that build- ing development in this neighbourhood continues and the sani- tary condition of this village leaves much to be desired. Six fatal cases of beri-beri were reported from Cheung Chau.

The consolidation of the ferry services between Hong Kong, Aberdeen, Cheung Chau, Tai O, Castle Peak and Tsuen Wan (the "Western Ferry Services") under the Hong Kong and New Territories Ferry Company has been only a qualified success, owing partly to the temporary disorganization from a change of management, and partly to competition in goods traffic, which is the more valuable part of the trade. There were, however, certain notable improvements. A new launch, the "Sun Chau" was put on the Cheung Chau run, and other vessels of similar

J 12

type are projected for the services to Tai O and Tsuen Wan. The timetables have been satisfactorily reorganized, except at Tai O, where the lack of a good anchorage and remoteness from Hong Kong make it difficult to arrange a schedule that will meet all needs. Serious efforts are now being made in this direction, and there is hope that a successful solution will soon be evolved.

There were no serious outbreaks of fire in the District during the past year. Cheung Chau, Tai O, and Tsuen Wan, however, are very inadequately supplied with fire-appliances and the possibility of a conflagration in one of these places is a constant menace. The elders of Cheung Chau which is a prosperous and progressive township have lately shown great interest in the ques- tion of fire-appliances and tentative negotiations have been en- tered into for the purchase of an up-to-date portable fire-engine out of funds collected locally. Tai O and Tsuen Wan are, un- fortunately, relatively poor communities and show little sign of raising sufficient funds for this purpose. Tsuen Wan is not entirely unprotected as a fire-engine from Kowloon can reach it in twenty-five minutes. Tai O, however, presents a very difficult proposition as the fire-float takes over two hours to reach this outlying station. An endeavour is being made to get the inhabitants to contribute half the cost of a small fire-engine on the same lines as an older appliance was purchased some years ago for Cheung Chau.

There has been a keen demand for bathing-matshed sites on the Castle Peak Road and the beaches there may now be said to be very fully occupied. Parking-places near most of the beaches have been provided-an improvement which is greatly appreciated by car-owners,

Tai 0.-Business was slightly better than during the pre- vious year.

The fishing population had a successful season and the "Wong Fa" catch was particularly good. There are two distilleries in Tai O which do business on a small scale and an increase in output is reported. The demand for salt was smaller than usual-a decrease which is probably due to the famine conditions prevailing in parts of China during the drought. There was one outbreak of fire only.

Cheung Chau. The development along modern lines of this rising township is greatly hampered by the shortage of land available for building. The demand for house-sites continues to increase, and it may be necessary in the interests of the com- munity to put in hand a fresh section of the projected reclama- tion on the foreshore.

Lack of water and lower prices again combined to affect the prosperity of the market-gardens.

Thirty-four stalls were occupied in the market and business. generally was fair.

-J13

All the European houses were occupied during the Summer months and Cheung Chau continues to be a popular Summer resort.

A new company was entrusted with the lighting of Cheung Chau in 1928 and new plant installed, but continued interrup- tions in the supply of current have made further improvements necessary, and fresh plant has been ordered.

Ping Chau. Two of the ten lime-kilns on this Island have closed down owing to the temporary check in building develop- ment during the drought, and a number of the kilns there were damaged by typhoon.

Tsuen Wan.-Rice-growers in Tsuen Wan were able to plant two crops despite the long period of drought. Prices were high. The crop of pineapples was good and the demand for areas for planting has increased considerably. Pineapple cultivation pro- mises to increase still further in this locality.

Fish were scarce

and supplies had to be obtained from Hong Kong.

Lamma.-The first crop of rice was very poor. Poultry, pigs and cattle from this island continued to fetch good prices in the Aberdeen market.

15th March, 1930.

J. A. FRASER,

District Officer South.

}

J 14

Table A.

POLICE COURT.

1927.

1928.

1929.

Cases heard,

196

89

133

Persons brought before the

Police Magistrate,

306

185

230

Persons convicted and punished,

140

120

122

Persons bound over,

11

7

7

Persons committed,

8

1

Persons imprisoned,

88

50

64

Persons discharged,

50

21

37

Fines,

$2,273.57 $879.46 $3,078.87

Arms Fines,

524.95

20.00

240.16

Forfeitures,

57.00

42.37

411.00

Revenue Reward Fund,

1,433.60

803.43

680.89

Cases heard,

Writs of Execution,

SMALL DEBTS COURT.

1927.

1928.

1929.

100

49

60

16

10

11

Headings.

No. of Sales,

Permits, Li- cences, etc.

No. of Lots.

Area in Acres.

Table B.

Increase of Crown Rent.

Land Sales for Buildings

Agriculture

71

10

...

Lease for Buildings ... Permit for Agriculture

12

...

...

...

...

29

& poultry farming

20233

71

1.32

$

109.50

S

10

2.51

5.53/

$

C.

817.50

109.50



S

75

75

12

1.13

16.50

3

7.83

17.00

1.11

2.35

1

Conversions

.35

32.82

Stone Quarry Leases...

52.60

292.00

1

Permits to occupy Land

78

751.32

Matshed Permits on Crown Land

671

1,321.00

Private Land

72

365.50

,,

Earth Permits

395

1,261,00

Forestry Licences

123

1,629.72

Pineapple Licences Deeds Registered Resumptions Surrenders

373

616.99

...

1,536

2,193.00

198*

204.20

689.29

170,488.13

9

.27

6.04

...

Re-entries

92

4.23

31.88

...

Reversion

14

1.31

5.92

* Plus all agricultural lots in Tsun Wan D. Ds. Nos. 452, 457, 458, 459, 460 and 466.

€0

Decrease of Crown Rent.

Amount of

Premia, Fees, etc.

Amount paid for Resump- tion of Land.

- Ĵ 15 -

Term of Years.

J:16-

Table C.

REVENUE COLLECTED BY THE DISTRICT OFFICER, SOUTHERN DISTRICT, NEW TERRITORIES.

1928.

1929.

Land Sales,

$ 1.122.20 $ 909.00

Boundary Stones,

473.00

132.00

Permits to obtain Earth and Stone, ...

1,008.00

1,261.00

Forestry Licences,

1,825.57 1,629.72

Forfeitures,

42.37

411.00

Fines,

879.46

3,078.87

Deeds Registration Fees,

1,907.60

2,193.00

Crown Leases,

30.00

30.00

Legal Costs,

92.00

91.00

Crown Rent,

26,110.86

24,955.65

Matshed Permits on Crown Land,

1,184.50

1,321.00

Matshed Permits on Private Land,

541.50

365.50

Permits to occupy land,

355.40

751.32

Pineapple Land Leases,

679.40

616.99

Market Fees,

1,706.05

1,585.12

Leases of Stone Quarries,

295.00

292.00

Interest on Deposit Account,

27.15

66.60

Miscellaneous Receipts,

175.98

259.59

Revenue Reward Fund,

803.43

680.89

Arms Fines,

20.00

240.16

Total,

$39,279.47 $40,870.41

Pawn-

Wine and

Spirit.

Kerosene.

Dogs.

brokers.

Money

Changers.

Total.

Table D.

LICENCE FEES COLLECTED BY THE POLICE DEPARTMENT.

Station.

J

17





C.

$

C.

$

$

C.

927.00

4,000.00

4,927.00

600.00

6,000.00

250.00

6,850,00

575.00

64.00

400.00

40.00

1,079.00

750.00

66.00

800. 00

80.00

1,696.00

375.00

28.00

403.00

100.00

100.00

:

:

:

:

:

÷

:

:

:

:

:

:

:.

:

:

:

:

Kowloon City

Sham Shui Po

Tai O

Cheung Chau

Tsun Wan

Lamma Island

Total

1,800.00

158.00

1,527.00

11,200.00

370.00

15,055.00

J 18

Table E.

REVENUE COLLECTED THROUGH OTHER DEPARTMENTS FROM THE SOUTHERN DISTRICT, NEW TERRITORIES.

1928.

1929.

Treasury, (Village Rates)

$ 92,602.16 $105,333.07

11

(Crown Rent for Inland

Lots)

54,620.86

57,662.68

(Quarries in New Kow-

loon)

6,321.88

6,683.15

""

(Eating House

Licence

Fees)

250.00

285.00

Police, (Licence Fees)

14,416.00

15,055.00*

Harbour Office (Harbour Dues,

Stakenets)

18,705.85 20,384.00

Total,

$186,916.75 $205,402.90

*See Table D.

Table F'.

TOTAL REVENUE COLLECTED FROM SOUTHERN DISTRICT, NEW

TERRITORIES

DURING THE LAST THREE YEARS.

By District Office,

By Other Departments,

Total,

1927.

1928.

i

1929.

$ 42,046.73 $ 39,279.47 $ 40,870.41+ 172,379.29 186,916.75* 205,402.90*

$214,426.02 $226,196.22 $246,273.31

See Table C.

*See Table E.

Table G

LOCAL PUBLIC WORKS, 1929.

Repairs.

Road in Cheung Chau

Chau European Reservation,

Cheung Chau,

Pier at Hang Hau,

Total,

Un-expended,

$ 150.00

287.50 3,562.50

$4,000.00

Appendix K.

REPORT OF THE INSPECTOR GENERAL OF POLICE

FOR THE YEAR 1929.

SUMMARY OF CRIME FOR 1929.

The total number of cases reported to the Police during the year 1929 was 21,140 as against 19,610 in 1928, being an increase of 1,980 or 9.3%. The average for the last 5 years is 20,405.

In the division of these cases into serious and minor offences there were 5,348 serious cases in 1929 as against 5,201 in 1928, an increase of 147 or 2.7%. There were 15,792 minor cases in 1929 as against 14,409 minor cases in 1928, an increase of 1,383 or 8.1%. Please see Table I.

CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION DEPARTMENT.

1. The Strength of the Department on December 31st

was:

Europeans Chinese

Total

1929

1928

38

37

129

125

167

162

2. The number of searchers employed on Steamers, Laun- ches and ferries on December 31st was:--

Europeans

Chinese

Female Searchers

Total

1929

1928

7

7

124

124

31

31

162

162

These figures include both Hong Kong and Kowloon.

No piracies occurred or were attempted on steamers outward

bound from Hong Kong during the year.

K 2

PIRACY.

1 piracy and 1 attempted piracy were recorded on steam- ships, the piracy being on the Japanese S.S. "Deli Maru" in September. Three Indian Guards were shot and four passengers were kidnapped. Officers and Guards were overpowered and were not able to put up any resistance. Of the four kidnapped persons two have been released.

The attempted piracy on the S.S. "Haiching" in December, was frustrated by the action of the Officers and Guards on the ship. The pirates set fire to the ship. The 2nd Officer was killed, and the 1st Officer was wounded, one Indian guard was killed and one wounded, nine passengers were known to have been killed by bullet wounds and twenty three of the crew and passengers were wounded. Two of the pirates were arrested, charged with piracy and murder and sentenced to death. Three others have been banished for life. It is believed that none of the pirates, who numbered about fourteen, escaped; five or six were killed by the defenders and others jumped over- board.

There was a considerable decrease in the number of reports of piracies on junks during the year in waters adjoining the Colony.

Piracy in the Canton River Delta also showed a decrease.

ARMS.

There were six arms seizures of note during the year, the largest of which was on 16.8.1929 on board the S.S. "Haiching" where 111 Automatic pistols and over 11,000 rounds of ammuni- tion were found.

The Arms Embargo was lifted on 19.4.29.

COMMUNISM.

Communists were less active during the year than in 1928. There were no demonstrations but there was one murder which was the work of communists.

3. Serious crime in 1929 showed a slight increase over 1928-5,349 cases against 5,201. Minor crimes showed an in- crease 15,792 cases against 14,409 cases in 1928. There was an increase in House and Godown Breaking, Larcenies and Rob- beries, but a decrease in Larceny in Dwelling, Larceny on ships and wharves and Burglaries. In the minor offences there was an increase of 1,883 cases.

There was an increase of 1 murder and 15 robberies. There was an increase of 7 robberies in the New Territories.

K 3

4. The offices of the C.I.D. were moved on 6.11.29 to the 1st floor of Police Headquarters. This floor has been partitioned off to provide accommodation for the various sub-departments. The new arrangement is much more convenient and efficient than the old, though at busy times considerable noise cannot be avoided.

5. Table II shows the number of piracies committed in adjacent waters during the year 1929 Compared with 1928 there is a decrease of 13 in the number of piracies other than Bias Bay piracies.

The number of Bias Bay piracies remains the same.

6. Table III gives the number of Discharged Prisoners, Deportees and Vagrants dealt with by the Records Office during the year 1929.

FINGER PRINT DEPARTMENT.

A summary of work executed in this Department for the year 1929 is as follows:

Number of Number of Number of convictions

Number of

finger prints

examined.

persons

identified.

records

filed.

under Deportation

Number of convictions under Market

Ordinance.

Ordinance.

1929 1928

12.138

2.786

10,731

222

620

12,646

2.916

13,221

216

937

Increase Decrease

6

508

...

130

2,490

317

Overhaul of Finger Print Bureau: No. of old records

destroyed 298.

No. of records on file 116,549.

PHOTOGRAPHIC SUB-DEPARTMENT.

The total number of photographs taken of scenes of serious crime and accidents throughout the year was 55. The total number of photographs issued was 1,813.

PROPERTY REPORTED STOLEN AND PROPERTY RECOVERED.

The estimated value of property stolen during the year was $566,485.55 as against $478,020.98 in 1928, an increase of $88,464.57 or 12.8%.

The average for the last 5 years is $545,152.20.

- K 4

The value of property recovered during the year was $67,617.32 or 11% of the value of the property stolen, as against $74,702.63 or 15% of the property stolen in 1928 a decrease of 4% in ratio between the property stolen and pro- perty recovered.

The following is recovered:-

LOST PROPERTY.

а return showing property lost or

Articles

Year.

reported lost.

Value lost.

Articles re- covered and found but not

Value of

articles

found.

reported lost.

1929

338

$31,760.00

145

1928

357

33,829.85

129

$1,597.80 1,470.38

GAMBLING.

There were 109 successful gambling cases for the year end- ing December, 1929 as against 165 successful cases in 1928.

There were two cases in which no conviction was obtained.

There were 71 lottery cases, compared with 74 in 1928.

PASS OFFICE.

During the year 42 persons of various nationalities, other than Chinese, Indians, and Japanese were put before the Courts for the following offences:-

Vagrancy

Stowaways

Passport Ordinance

20

17

5

The number of foreign destitutes dealt with during the year was 55.

MENDICANTS.

During the year, eleven hundred and sixty six mendicants were arrested and dealt with as follows:-

11 mendicants charged before the Magistrate.

80

2

16

sent to Tung Wah Hospital.

released.

sent to Nam Tau.

sent to Canton.

232

""

796

31

"

sent to Deep Bay.

K 5

Of the above mendicants sent away, a considerable percen tage were sent out of the Colony more than once.

DEAD BODIES.

The following table shows the number of unknown dead bodies found by Police in the Streets and elsewhere during the last 5 years:

1925

1926

1927

1928

1929

Victoria,.

285

268

367

358

706

Kowloon,....

674

637

801

1,077

1,072

Harbour,.

124

110

37

139

164

Elsewhere, .....................

98

99

112

106

91

Total.......

1,181

1,114

1,317

1,680

2,033

1925

1926

1927

1928

1929

Males,

670

644

791

992

1,164

Females....

472

430

479

670

840

Unknown,

39

40

47

18

29

Children,

1,136

1,020

1,185

1,516

1.851

Adults,

45

94

132

164

182

DOGS ORDINANCE.

Owing to the prevalence of rabies in the Colony the muzzling order continued in force throughout the year.

868 dogs were destroyed in 1929 as compared with 1025 in 1928.

1929

1928

Dogs Licensed

3,533

3,945

Dogs Licensed (free)

37

33

Dogs Impounded

156

288

Dogs Destroyed

868

1,025

- K 6 -

WEIGHTS AND MEASURES,

Weights and Measures

examined.

Correct. Incorrect.

Total.

Foreign Scales

117

Chinese Scales

1,033

18

Yard Measures

421

Chinese Foot Measures

600

:: co

3

120

1,051

421

600

Total......

2,171

21

2,192

The following prosecutions were instituted under the Weights and Measures Ordinance.

Number of Cases.

Convictions.

10

Fines.

10

$195

DANGEROUS GOODS.

The following prosecutions were instituted under the Dangerous Goods Ordinance.

Number of Cases,

Convictions.

82

Fines.

80

$1,831

ARMS ORDINANCE.

Table IV (a) shows Arms and Ammunition seized and con- fiscated during the year.

Table IV (b) shows seizures classified according to places of origin.

K 7

TRAFFIC REGULATIONS.

The following prosecutions were instituted under the Traffic Regulations (Notification No. 377: Government Gazette of 26th June, 1924):-For the purpose of comparison 1928 figures are also inserted.

Year.

Prosecu- Convic- With-

tions. tions.

drawn.

Dis- charged.

Remanded. Result.

1929.

7,567

6,527

779

200

61 $27,562.00

1928......

6,711

6,321

116

155

119 $27,614.00

1929..

2

1928..

1

Manslaughter

1

1

1

The total number of persons examined as Motor Drivers during the year was 834 as against 1,665 in 1928.

The total number of persons passed as Motor Drivers during the year was 707 as against 1,218 in 1928.

The total number of accidents reported during the year was 948 as against 888 in 1928.

The total number of fatal accidents was 36 as against 39 in 1928.

The total number of public motor vehicles examined and found unfit for public use during the year was 794 as against 358 in 1928.

The total number of Public motor vehicles examined and passed fit for public use during the year was 1,838 as against 1,408 in 1928.

The total number of Motor driver's licences suspended dur- ing the year was 150 as against 69 in 1928.

The total number of Motor driver's licences cancelled during the year was 10 as against 4 in 1928.

- K 8 -

LICENCES.

The following licences were issued during the year:-

1929

1928

Public Jinrikshas

1,630

1,649

Private Jinrikshas

831

865

Public Chairs

570

610

Private Chairs

77

106

Drivers and Bearers

15,672

16,834

Truck licences

800

937

Motor cars (Livery)

457

491

Motor cars (Private)

1,462

1,148

Motor cars (Drivers)

3,027

2,970

Motor cycle (Licences)

531

538

Motor cycle (Drivers)

404

362

Money changers

199

195

Pawnbrokers

125

121

Auctioneer Licences

3

5

Billiard Tables and Bowling

Alleys....

4

3

Marine Stores

38

35

Game Licences

350

355

Hawkers

13,748

11,907

Dangerous Goods

872

905

Poisons

19

17

REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE.

Table showing the Total Strength, Expenditure and Revenue of the Police Department for the years 1919 to 1929:

Year

Total Strength

Expenditure

Revenue

1919......

1,228

$ 840,977

$ 225,031

1920.

1,281

1,165,084

229,122

1921...

1,341

1,443,627

259,876

1922.

1,381

1,533,772

376,347

1923.

1,589

1,633,847

349,443

1924..

1,774

1,877,948

389,176

· 1925..

1,965

1,898,823

375,832

1926...

1,994

1,745,085

374,549

1927.

2,026

1,759,132

393,557

1928.

2,042

1,986,105

448,772

1929..

2,054

1,956,798

463,148

-

K 9

ESTABLISHMENT RETURN.

Return showing the Establishment and Casualties in the Force during the year 1929: —

Nationality.

Establishment of the Force.

Enlistments.

Deaths.

Resignations

through

sickness.

Resignations through expiry of terms of service | or otherwise.

Dismissals or Desertions.

Total Number

of Casualties.

Europeans,

253

Indians,

739

Chinese,

774

88858

15

2

2

52

JI

10

10

89

LO

6

8

16

406

4

32

49

79

Water Police..

241

41

1

13

16

2823

12

63

34

2007

...

Total, 2,207 197

20

24

43 101

188

This number includes the Police paid by other Depart- ments, also the Engineers, Coxswains, Stokers, and Seamen, but it is exclusive of:-

9 Superintendents.

2 Accountants.

2 Storekeepers.

1 Police Secretary.

23 Clerks.

11 Telephone Clerks.

70 Interpreters

128 Messengers and coolies.

2 Indians and 2 Chinese Constables who are employed

by Private Firms.

2 Shroffs.

Actual Strength on the 10th December, 1929.

Europeans.

Indians.

Chinese.

Total.

Present,

221

696

764

1,681

Sick or Absent on

leave,

32

43

10

Excess over Estimates

8

15

96

85

29

Vacancies,

Total,

261

754

780

1,795

K 10

CONDUCT.

"A" Contingent.

The conduct of the European Contingent was good. The total number of reports against them was 120 as against 121 in 1928. There were 5 reports for being drunk or under the influence of drink, as against 5 in 1928. There were 30 reports for neglect of duty as against 25 in 1928; for misconduct there were 14 reports as against 11 in 1928. One L.S. was convicted by the Police Magistrate for larceny of sampans and money.

"B" Contingent.

The conduct of the Indian Contingent was fair. There were 1276 reports as against 1189 for the preceding year. For drunken- ness there were 24 as against 12 in 1928. For neglect of duty 263 as against 217; for misconduct there were 215 as against 341 in 1928. Minor offences totalled 874 as against 619 in 1928. 3 men were convicted by the Police Magistrate (Dismissed from the Force) 1 for being absent from duty and 2 for mis- conduct as a Police Constable. 239 men had no report as against 240 in 1928.

"C" Contingent.

The behaviour of the Chinese (Cantonese) was fairly good. There were 1,045 reports as against 1,347 in 1928. For drunken- ness there were none. For neglect of duty there were 200 as against 219 in 1928, and for misconduct there were 198 as against 297 in 1928. There were 647 minor offences. 2 men were convicted by the Police Magistrate (Dismissed from the Force) 1 for demanding money and 1 for receiving bribes and larceny. 244 men had no reports as against 226 in 1928.

"D" Contingent.

The behaviour of the Chinese Contingent (Wei Hai Wei) was fair. There were 553 reports as against 339 in 1928. For drunkenness there were 2 as against 1 in 1928. There were 94 for misconduct as against 84 in 1928; and 90 for neglect of duty as against 59 in 1928. For minor offences there were 367 as against 196 in 1928. 2 men were convicted by the Police Magistrate (Dismissed from the Force), 1 for Attempting to obtain a bribe and 1 for Bribery, and Misconduct as a Police Constable. 39 men had no reports as against 44 in 1928.

HEALTH.

Admissions to Hospital during the last three years are as

follows:

1927.

1928.

1929.

ment.

Admis- Fstablish- Admis- sions. ment. sions.

Nationality. Establish- Admis-Fstablish-

ment.

sions.

Europeans,...

246

118

253

176

253

114

Indians...

753

405

754

479

739

582

Chinese...

816

442

756

311

774

357

-

K 11

M

MEDALS AND COMMENDATIONS.

His Excellency the Governor was pleased to grant Medals for long and efficient service and Commendation to the following Police Officers:

Inspector A.N. Reynolds:

3rd Class Medal,

Inspector R. Lanigan:

4th

""

4th

""

12

P.S. B44 Inder Singh:

Principal Chinese Detective Lai Sui: 4th

"}

Sergeant Major Tang Kai:

4th

Chief Engineer C1.2 Mok Kam:

4th

C1.2 Engineer No. 20 Iu Shing:

4th

P.S. A63 O'Donovan :

Commended

for

efficient, zealous work in the in- vestigation of ac- tivities of Com- munists.

MUSKETRY AND REVOLVER COURSES, 1929.

173 Officers fired their annual musketry course at Taikoo Rifle Range, Quarry Bay, during January, 1930, and are classi- find as under :-

Insp. Booker obtained the highest score with 211 out

of a possible 220.

Sub. Insp. Dorling was second with 183.

Advanced Course.

Classification Part II.

Marksmen

84

1st Class Shots

14

1st Class Shots

37

2nd

16

""

"

2nd

21

3rd

1

19

"}

3rd

Nil.

Failures

Total

142

Total

31

142

Total Fired

173

K 12

A-Revolver: Europeans.

Each officer fired three quarterly revolver courses at the Police Range Bowen Road during 1929 as under:

Possible score: 110.

Points required to qualify: 55 i.e. 50%.

Fired in May.

Superintendents

9

Other ranks

214

Total Passed

223

Fired in August.

Superintendents

Other ranks

9

216

Total Passed

225

Fired in November.

Superintendents

8

Other ranks

213

Total Passed

221

B.--Musketry: Indians.

657 Indians fired their annual musketry course at Taikoo Rifle Range, Quarry Bay, during December, 1929, and are classified as under:-

Corporals B321 and B71 obtained the highest score with

105 out of a possible 110.

Marksmen

1st Class Shots

2nd

11

68

285

201

99

""

3rd

17

Failures

Total

657

7

:

K 13

B.-Revolver.

Each officer fired three quarterly revolver courses at Kennedy Road Revolver Range during 1929 as under:-

Possible score: 120.

Points required to qualify: 60 i.e. 50%.

April

697 Passed

4 Failed

701 Total fired.

July

684 Passed

2 Failed

686 Total fired.

October

658 Passed

Nil. Failed

658 Total fired.

D.-Musketry W.H.W.

160 men of the Northern Contingent fired their annual musketry course at Taikoo Rifle Range, Quarry Bay, during January, 1930, and are classified as under:

Marksmen

30

1st Class Shots

92

2nd

35

3rd

1

Failures

2

Total fired

160

D.--Revolver, W.H.W.

Each officer fired three quarterly revolver courses at Kennedy Road Revolver Range during 1929 as under:—

Possible score: 120.

Points to qualify: 60.

March

.... 148

June

162

Failures

.....

. Nil.

Failures

Nil.

September. 163

Failures

Nil.

K 14

C.-Musketry Course: Cantonese.

Cantonese Police are not armed with rifles.

C.-Revolver Course.

Each officer fired three quarterly revolver

Kennedy Road Revolver Range during 1929 as under:-

Possible score: 120.

Points required to qualify: 60.

at

March

556 June

534

Failures

2

Failures

1

September 550

Failures



Nil.

Total fired.. 558

Total fired.. 535

Total fired.. 550

WATER POLICE SEAMEN (Chinese).

Each seaman fired three quarterly revolver courses at Kennedy Road Revolver Range during 1929 and are classified as under:

Possible score: 120.

Points required to qualify: 60.

March

39

June

45

September 35

Failed

23

Failed

18

Failed

26

Total fired.. 62

Total fired.. 63

Total fired..

61

DISTRICT WATCHMEN.

The District Watchmen fired their annual revolver course at Kennedy Road Revolver Range during October, 1929.

Possible score: 120.

Points to qualify: 60.

Passed

75

Failed

39

Total fired

114

K 15

SPECIAL EVENTS.

}

GENERAL.

1929 may be classed as a quiet year from a Police stand- point. Despite the water-shortage and dull trade, the year was not marked by any conspicuous crime wave or by industrial unrest. The increase of 147 cases in the figure for serious crime gives no cause for alarm. The population of the Colony cer- tainly did not diminish during the year. Building and other development operations in various parts of the Colony attracted a large body of casual labour.

The suppression of the activities of Communists continued to be an important branch of Police work throughout the year. Communists have failed to obtain any serious hold in Hong Kong, but frequent raids by Police reveal that the Communist Party still maintains, or seeks to maintain, cells in Hong Kong. Their Agents are forced to conduct their activities with great secrecy, and there is evidence that the personnel of the Party's Representatives in the Colony is frequently changed. It is signi- ficant that most of the Party's Agents who have passed through the hands of the Police have been of the young student type, and appear to have been controlled from Shanghai. Their efforts had been directed to cause trouble among the labouring classes of the Colony. On September 29th, Police and District Watch- men succeeded in "capturing" a Communist Meeting in full swing at a Chinese Temple on the outskirts of Kowloon City. Over fifty persons were arrested. The principals were subse- quently banished.

WATER SHORTAGE.

Owing to prolonged drought, the severe water shortage con- tinued throughout the Colony until July. It became necessary to construct many large tanks along the sea-front in the City of Victoria. These were filled with water imported by steamer and lighter from neighbouring places on the mainland. Service from the street fountains was restricted to three hours in the morning and three hours in the evening. The construction of the water-side tanks provided the emergency water service avail- able throughout the day and night.. Special Police were required for duty to control the queues at each street fountain and tank. To meet the demand, the Emergency Unit, District Watch- men and Police Special Guards, had to be detailed for this duty. It is largely due to the co-operation of the Chinese public as a whole that no serious disorders occurred throughout the shortage.

K 16

KING EDWARD HOTEL FIRE.

A disastrous fire occurred in these premises on March 11th. The fire started shortly before 03.00 hours, and had obtained a strong hold on the main staircase and lift-shaft before the general alarm was raised. Nine persons (five Europeans and four Chinese) lost their lives, and five persons were injured whilst escaping from the burning building. A Coroner's enquiry, with Jury, was subsequently held.

VISIT OF H.R.H. THE DUKE OF GLOUCESTER.

H.R.H. The Duke of Gloucester arrived on the morning of April 25th and remained in the Colony until the evening of April 27th. Good weather favoured the visit. Various functions included a Reception at Blake Pier by H.E. Governor, followed by a Reception at the City Hall; & Polo Match at Causeway Bay; an Official Dinner at Government House; motor drive round the New Territories; Reception on Hong Kong Cricket Ground; dinner given by the Hong Kong Chamber of Commerce at the Peninsula Hotel; Chinese luncheon at the Kam Ling Restaurant, and an extra Race Meeting on the afternoon of April 27th.

The various functions entailed extra duty on most branches of the Force. Regular Police were indebted to the Police Reserve for thir help and co-operation. Before his departure, His Royal Highness was pleased to express his appreciation of the Police arrangements during his visit.

LIFE-SAVING CLASSES.

Through the kindness of Mr. Ewart (Education Department) a series of instructional classes was held during the summer. At the conclusion of the courses, 16 Europeans and five Indians obtained Certificates of proficiency.

BELILIOS MEDALS,

On June 27th, at Police Headquarters, the Honourable Sir Shou Son Chow presented Belilios Medals to six Chinese; five Civilians and a Sub-Officer of the Fire Brigade. The Honourable Dr. R. H. Kotewall, c.M.G., L.L.D., the Hon: Dr. S. W. Tso, O.B.E., L.L.D., Mr. Li Yu Tsun, 0.B.E., Mr. M. K. Lo, President of the Tung Wah Hospital Committee, and other members of the Chinese Community were present.

TYPHOON.

A severe typhoon visited the Colony on August 22nd. There had been ample warning and no loss of life occurred. Considerable damage was done to trees, especially in Victoria. In the Typhoon Shelter at Yaumati, the "Meridian Star" Ferry

{

2

K 17

Launch broke adrift and caused damage to Police Launches Nos. 7, 8, 9 and 14, but, fortunately, there were no casualties among the crews. Three private launches were sunk in the same shelter; the s.s. "Cassum" was driven ashore at Kap Sui Mun. Much damage was done to matsheds at the various bathing beaches.

MURDER AND KIDNAPPING IN SHEUNG SHUI DISTRICT.

On September 3rd occurred the most serious outrage of the year. A gang of between twenty and thirty men crossed the border and made their way to On Lok Tsun village, near Fanling shortly before 01.00 hours. The gang attacked the house of Tang Kwan Leung, fatally shot his younger brother, kidnapped his son, and made off with considerable loot. An Indian Police Patrol of three men, attracted by the sound of

firing, hastened to the scene and opened fire on the gang, who returned the fire. The gang thereupon retreated, but, aided by the darkness, avoided arrest, although subsequent enquiries indicated that two of the gang had been wounded.

The boy was eventually recovered in Chinese Territory in January, 1930.

MUITSAI.

On November 7th, new Regulations were made under Sec- tion 12 of the female Domestic Service Ordinance, 1923. All Muitsai have now to be registered. Facilities for registration und Blentification have been provided at all Police Stations.

Police forward particulars of all registrations to the Sec- retary for Chinese Affairs.

K 18

ANNEXES.

WATER POLICE.

Annexe A.-Details concerning the Water Police.

1

21

B.-Details concerning Recruiting, and the Police Train-

ing School.

NEW TERRITORIES (NORTH).

C-A report on the New Territories (North).

GUARDS.

D.-Details concerning the Anti-piracy and Shore

Guards.

STREET BOYS CLUB.

E. A report on the working of the Street Boys' Club.

HONG KONG POLICE RESERVE.

F.-A report on the Hong Kong Police Reserve.

E. D. C. WOLFE, Inspector General of Police.

Hong Kong, 15th April, 1930.

SERIOUS OFFENCES.

K 19

Table I.

YEARLY RETURN OF CRIME FOR THE WHOLE COLONY FOR THE YEAR 1929.

Charge cases.

Cases without

charge.

Total cases.

Charge cases.

Cases without

charge.

Total cases.

1928.

1929.

% Charge cases to total.

Europeans.

Indians,

Chinese.

Europeans.

Indians.

Chinese.

CONVICTED.

PERSONS

PERSONS DISCHARGED.

Arms,

73

10

83

48

Assault (Serious),

17

17

21

7 55 87%

21 100%

12

1

2

Assault with intent to rob,

4

4

4

4 100%

Burglary,

20

85

105

24

54

78 30%

Coinage Offences,

32

32

14

14 100%

:

Deportation,

211

211

222

222 100%

221



Embezzlement,

24

57

81

21

66

87 24%

House and Godown Breaking,.

27

63

90

37

89

126 70%

2

ཝཱཧྨསྶསྶཋཚེ

Intimidation and Extortion,.

11

11

9

9 100%

7

Kidnapping,

20

3

23

28

1

29

96%

1

27

...

Larceny, ...

Larceny from Dwelling Houses,

Manslaughter,

Larceny on Ships and Wharf, ...

Murder,

Murder, Attempted,

1,652 1,519 3,171 1,784 1,602 3,386

|

52%

15

59 562

621

62 555 617

10%

1 2

4 1,733

67

77

77

154

64

53

117 53%

66

3

6

6 100%

O

...

13

21

10

12

22 45%

15

2

2

2

2 100%

Obtaining by False Pretences,

64

18

82

65

25

90 72%

56

Receiving,

153

153

158

158 100%

150

Robbery,....

27

72

99

29

84

113 25%

351

Women and Girls,...

26

26

1.5

15 100%

16

Other Serious Offences,

205

212

170

7 177

92%

10

:

138

Total,..

2,715 2,486 5,201 2,791 2,557 5,348 52%

34

5 2,688

4

3

11

4

6

1

6

VALUE OF VALUE OF PROPERTY PROPERTY

STOLEN RECOVERED.

$

c.

10,200.73 5,572.10

15

5186,563.63

16,840.51

6,574.70

151 157,177.24 36,354.05 9 93,641.37 | 13,112.84 2 5,087,32 1,083.50

244

12 16,894.19 1,969.51

38

28 68,372.82 2,700.62

7

86 11,707.74 250.00

397566,485.55| 67,617.32

MINOR OFFENCES.

܂

- K 20-

Table I.-Continued.

YEARLY RETURN OF CRIME FOR THE WHOLE COLONY FOR THE YEAR 1929.

1928.

Charge cases.

Cases without

98.1tfo

Total cases.

Charge cases.

Cases without

charge.

Total cases.

1929.

% Charge cases to total.

Europeans.

Indians.

PERSONS

CONVICTED.

PERSONS DISCHARGED

Chinese.

Europeans.

Indians.

Chivesc.

VALUE OF PROPERTY STOLEN.

VALUE OF PROPERTY RECOVERED

Co

C.

*-

$

c

Assault,

291

291

299

:

Damage to Property,

28

28

17

299 100% 17 100%

4

307

1

50

18

1

Dangerous Goods,

31

31

36

36 100%

41

3

Drunkenness,

20

20

22

22 100%

18

2

3

1

1

Forestry Offences,

335

335

211

211 100%

306

14

Gambling,

364

364

327

327 100%

1,745

72

Hawking Offences,.

8,988

8,988 9,764

9,764 100%

9,580

270

Eottery Offences,

245

245

205

205 100%

251

35

Mendicants,

74

74 19

19 100%

19

1

ر

Merchant Shipping Ordinance,

349

349

461

461

2

870

23

Morphine,

17

17

2

2 100%

2

Nuisances,

239

239

321

321 100%

333

5

Opium,

624

624

787

787 100%

1

836

111

Revenue,

228

228

329

329 100%

339

40

:

Rogue and Vagabond,

20

20

36

36 100%

32

7

Stowaways,

27

27

24

24 100%

20

15

3

Unlawful Possession,

332

332

322

322 100%

294

50

Vagrants,

47

47

27

27

19

10

Vehicles and Traffic,

1,078

1,078 1,042

1,042

4

1,024

110

5

41

Women and Girls,

144

144

137

137

1

131

14

Other Miscellaneous Offences,.

928

928 1,404

1,404

10

18 1,926

2

118

Total,.

14,409

14,409 15,792

15,792

76

37 18,185

со

2

862

Grand Total,...

17,124 2,486 19,610 18,583 2,557 21,140

110

42 20,760

12

5 1,259 566,485.55 67,617.32

K 21

Table II.

PIRACIES REPORTED TO HONG KONG POLICE DURING 1929 OTHER THAN BIAS BAY.

Date.

Ship, Name and address of Complainant.

Place of Occurrence.

Estimated No. of Pirates. Dialect spoken.

Estimated Value of Pro- perty Stolen.

No. of Persons Kidnapped.

Remarks.

6. 3. 29.

Cheung Fat, residing at Ping Shan Tsai, Tai Po, fishing boat No. 5383.

Near Hit Ngam, Ma Liu River, Tai Pong, C.T.

5 Hakka.

$331.80

Nil.

Boat taken.

14. 4. 29.

Chung Wah Tim, fishing boat No. 10 miles from Peng Hoi 4272 H.A.

6 Hakka and

Hoklo..

$565.00

Nil.

2. 7. 29.

Tsang Yung Lee, residing at Hing Lung St., Sai Heung, C.T., Junk No. 3818.

Sau Chau Island just outside British Waters.

About 6?

Punti?

$300 00

1

Boat not recovered.

28. 7. 29.

Leung Chiu Ip, residing on board Heung Chau, W. of Macao

fishing Junk No. 1317 H.C.

10. 9. 29.

Tang Yum, fishing boat No. 5409P Near Mirs Bay

15

$6,710.00

Nil.

5 female pirates.

4 Hakka.

$12.00

1

of Tam Shui.

ז

K 22

Table II,-Continued.

PIRACIES REPORTED TO HONG KONG POLICE DURING 1929 IN BIAS BAY.

Estimated

Date.

Ship, Name and address of Complainant.

Place of Occurrence.

No. of Pirates. Dialect spoken.

Estimated Value of Pro- perty Stolen.

No. of Persons Kidnapped.

Remarks.

16. 11. 29. ...

Chan Fat, trading Junk No. un- known, Shaukiwan.

Ping Hoi Bay, off Tai Sin Moun- tain.

13 Hakka.

$195.00

Nil.

21. 9. 29. ....

Capt. Yamamoto, Osaka Shosen Hong Hoi Bay (Bias Bay) Kaisha, H.K. S/S Deli Maru.

13, Hakka, Hoklo & Punti.

$3,320.00

4 persons.

8. 12. 29....... S/S Hai Ching, Douglas S.S. Co., Bias Bay

Hongkong. (Attempted piracy. Pirates failed to obtain control of the steamer which they set on fire).

12 to 14 Hakka.

Nil.

Nil.

Rather a doubtful report.

1 female pirate.

1 European killed, 1 Indian killed, 9 Chinese killed, (2 females), Wounded 24, (1E., 1 I. and 19C.) (3 banished, 2 sentenced death).

to

}

1928

1929

Decrease

Increase

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

Year.

K 23 —

Table III.

DISCHARGED PRISONERS, DEPORTEES AND VAGRANTS 1929.

Number of persons Banished from Hong Kong.

No. of persons discharged from Gaol of whom Descriptions are on Record.

Persons deported from Singapore and Re-Banished.

Singapore Vagrants Repatriated.

Rangoon Deportees.

Repatriation of Undesirables. Dutch East Indies.

Repatriation of Undesirables. Deli Planters Association.

1,286

1,357

1,013

675

292

1,176

1,304

809

936

643

3

6

Total number of men handled by Records Office. 1929=6,774

Increase..

1928-6,645

129

110

53

204

12

261

351

3

6

Repatriation of Sarawak Deportees.

Repatriation of Asiatic Petroleum Company's men.

K 24

Table IV (A).

ARMS AND AMMUNITION SEIZED AND CONFISCATED DURING THE YEAR, 1929.

In Store on Dec. 31st, 1929.

Description of Arms.

Arms Seized.

Ammunition Seized.

Arms.

Ammunition.

Winchester Rifles

349

N

349

Rifles Various

12

443

12

443

German Rifles

Mauser Pistols

431

4

431

Auto Pistols

137

12,685

137

12,685

Revolvers

33

796

33

796

Luger Pistols

12

1,835

12

1,835

Rifles Winchester

Ammunition

""

21

Various

""

Ammunition

12

71

Mauser

""

Ammunition

K 25

Table IV (B).

ARMS AND AMMUNITION.

Classification of Seizures of Arms and Ammunition according to place of origin.

Spanish. U.S.A.

French

and Austrian. British. Canadian. German. Unknown. Total. Belgian.

2

349

2

334

76

Pistols Mauser

Ammunition

211

""

Automatic

3

22

Ammunition

293

116 12,262

"

} }

Luger

-Ammunition

835

*

Revolvers

Shot Guns

Ammunition

Ammunition

"

""

.45 Thompson Machine Gun

J7

Primers

Amtn.

N

| |

2

349

10

12

33

443

1

3

4

220

431

13

3

137

130

12,685

12

12

1,000

1,835

16

2

2

13

33

701

13

82

796

1

1

1

| |

1

K 26

Annexe A.

REPORT ON THE WATER POLICE.

Return of Changes in the Establishment in 1929:

Resigned

Dismissed

Struck off

7

16

4

Retired

1

Invalided

4

Died

1

Transferred to Land Police

1

Total

Enlistments

(including:

5 enlistments to cover vacancies on 31.12.28 and 3 enlistments -additional posts in 1929 Es- timates).

Vacancy on 31.12.29

34

41

1

Total

42

K 27

CONDUCT.

The conduct of the Chinese (Average Strength 241) was poor. compared with 323 in 1928.

Staff of the Water Police There were 552 reports as

List of offences:



Class A Class B.

Sleeping on duty

12

Absent from station or launch

and duty

127

Absent from station or launch

without leave

103

Careless navigation and Damage

to Launches

8

1

Damage to Govt. property

1

Discreditable conduct

9

Disobedience of orders

11

12

Misconduct

3

Improperly dressed

38

Neglect of duty

10

10

Insolence

1

Disorderly conduct

3

2

Minor offences

201

Total

184

368

GRAND TOTal 552.

There were 90 men against whom no defaulter reports were made during 1929:

1. Seaman W.93 U YING was charged on 23.3.29 for Living in part on the earnings of Prostitution and was sentenced to 2 months. H.L. by P.M. (K).

He was dismissed from Water Police.

2. Seaman W.99 WONG SZE was charged before the P.M. (K) on 28.8.29. with (a) Larceny of 1 pair of trousers (b) Attempting to pawn and (c) Illegal pawn- ing and was sentenced to (a) 2 months, (c) 2 months (Consec.) and (b) Withdrawn.

He was dismissed from Water Police.

The large increase in the number of reports may, to some extent, be ascribed to greater and better supervision of Chinese Staff of Water Police by European Police Officers.

K 28

CRUISING LAUNCHES.

During the year 1929 Nos. 1, 2 and 4 Launches have under- gone their annual survey and overhaul besides being slipped quarterly when minor repairs were effected.

No. 1 Launch is 27 years old and is no longer fit for the duties she is expected to perform. She is to be replaced by a new Launch, in 1930, provision having been made for a new launch in Estimates 1930.

During 1929 a new No 3 Launch was constructed by W.S. Bailey & Co. She is equipped with wireless and a three pounder gun. Her maximum speed is only 10 knots per hour which is insufficient for a Police Cruising Launch.

MOTOR BOATS.

Motor boats Nos. 10, 11 and 12 have been overhauled and are in good condition,

SEARCHLIGHTS.

Searchlights on Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8 and 14 Launches have been overhauled and exercised and are in good working order.

PULLING BOATS.

Pulling boats and gear are in good condition except the boat Application for a motor

at Tai O which has been condemned. boat for Tai O is being made in 1931 Estimates.

WIRELESS.

Nos. 2 3 and 4 Cruising Launches are fitted with wireless each launch having accommodation for 2 wireless operators.

The wireless has worked satisfactorily and has been of very great service.

MUSKETRY.

All Cruising Launches are equipped with Vickers. Guns and quarterly courses have been fired.

The Chinese Deck Staff of Cruising Launches are regularly exercised in the use of Winchester Rifles and Revolvers and fire a quarterly course with revolver and annual course with Winchester Rifle.

Nos. 2, 3 and 4 Cruising Launches are equipped with 3 pounder guns. The European and Chinese gun layers of each of these launches have been through a course of training and fire a half yearly course.

7

- K 29-

Annexe B.

POLICE TRAINING SCHOOL.

I.-RECRUITING TABLE FROM 1.1.29 TO 31.12.29.

Continuing instruction

from 1929

Recruited

Passed out

Struck off

Dismissed

Invalided

Resigned

...

Continuing Instruction

1930

Euro-

pean.

Indian.

Canton-

ese.

W.H.W.

District-

Watch

men.

Seamen.

23

37

2

25

5

...

11

55

84

20

19

18

24

34

43

22

19

13

14

13

...

6

3

...

1

3

::

...

...

10

44

20

20

5

10

5

II. EXAMINATIONS.

A.-During the year twenty-three examinations were held for Promotion. The following table shews the number of officers who qualified for the various ranks.

European

Indian

Cantonese ("C"

Contingent)

W.H.W. ("D"

Contingent)

In- Sub In- Sergeant spector. spector. Major.

Sergeant.

Lance Sergeant.

2

19

21

24

: 53

3

11

14

...

4

4

All

B.-During the year 32 members of the Chinese Company, and 8 members of the Indian Company, Hong Kong Police Reserve were re-examined in knowledge of Police duties. passed (4 members of the Chinese Co. with Great Credit, and 10 members of the Chinese Co. and 3 members of the Indian Co. with Credit).



III.

K 30

SPECIAL TUITION.

4.--During the year 20 Indian and 20 Chinese (Northern Contingent) Police were specially trained in Traffic Duties: 15 Indians and 20 Chinese qualified and were appointed to the Traffic Staff: 5 Indians failed to qualify and were returned to regular duty.

B.-During the year 14 Chinese Probationary Detectives underwent a Special Course in Police duties: 13 qualified and were appointed to C.I.D. Staff: 1 continues his training in 1930.

C.-The following list shews the number of inefficient Indian and Chinese regular Police, who were sent back to P.T.S. for Special instruction during 1929.

Indian.

Cantonese.

W. H. W.

Seut back for instruction 1929...

5

2

Passed Out

3

2

2

Continuing instruction in 1930.

D.-First Aid.-The following table shews the number of regular Police Officers and recruits who were trained, and passed or failed in First Aid to the Injured.

Trained.

Qualified.

Failed.

Continning training in

1930.

European

Indian

60

57

3

243

121

62

Cantonese

171

135

36

W.H W.

160

86

14

60

8: 8:

60

IV.--DISCIPLINE.

Two Cantonese recruits were on 16.2.29 sentenced to 3 and 4 months imprisonment with H.L. respectively for (a) Miscon- duct as constables by improperly entering a gaming house at Un Long, (b) Larceny in a gaming house: both were subse- quently dismissed. Four other Cantonese and three W.H.W. recruits were dismissed for misconduct. Fourteen Indian and thirteen Cantonese recruits were struck off as unsuitable.

Discipline was otherwise satisfactory.

K 31

Annexe C.

REPORT ON NEW TERRITORIES (NORTH) FOR 1929.

1.-ADMINISTRATIVE,

Mr. W. R. Scott resumed charge of N.T.N. on 3rd March.

2.—ESTABLISHMENT.

The following changes occurred in the Police Establishment during the year:-

was

(a) Sheung Shui :-The Lewis Gun Instructor

transferred in March from Sha Tau Kok to Sheung Shui to act as Lewis gun instructor and assistant to O.I.C. Sheung Shui. In September, consequent upon a raid on On Lok Tsun carried out by a large party of armed bandits from Chinese Territory, one extra E.L.S. and one extra I.P.C. were sent to Sheung Shui temporarily.

(b) Ta Ku Ling:-Two extra I.P.C.s were sent here

because of the raid mentioned above.

(c) Lin Ma Hang: -This new station was opened in January in Sheung Shui District, and accommodates 1 Sikh N.C.O. and 6 Sikh P.C.s.

(d) Sha Tau Kok :-The European strength of this sta- tion was below establishment between March and September, having only one European instead of two there.

3.—CONDUCT AND DISCIPLINE.

The conduct of the men of all contingents was very good. There were 3 European defaulters, 100 Indian, and 6 Chinese.

4.-COMMENDATIONS.

The following police officers were commended by the Hon : I. G. P.:

(a) A.P.S. A165 T. Collins. (b) P.S. B451 Kaku Singh.

(c) P.S. B44 Indar Singh. (d) P.S. B366 Thima Singh.

K 32

The following officers were commended by the District Officer (North):-

(a) L.S. A177 C. Baysting.

(b) L.S. B241 Wassan Singh.

I.P.C. B384 Sant Singh.

• I.P.C. B255 Bakhtawa Singh.

5. SICKNESS.

The health of the police in the New Territory was good. There was slightly less malaria than last year. The figures for malaria cases (hospital and sick in station) are:-

1927

1928

1929

333 cases.

193

186

71

L.S. A196 Probert fell ill whilst in charge of Lok Ma Chau Station and died on 14.11.29.

6.-BUILDINGS.

The new sub-station or blockhouse at Lin Ma Hang in Sheung Shui District was completed and occupied in January. It has proved to be a healthy station.

7.-ACCIDENTS.

(a) Traffic.-There were 4 fatal traffic accidents and 25 minor traffic accidents.

(b) Other Fatal Accidents.--Total 7, caused by shooting, burning, suffocation, railway and falling from scaffolding.

8.--FIRES.

There were seven fires during 1929. In each case the damage done was little except one at Kau Lung Hang on 9th Sepetember when one man died as a result of burns received, and damage to the extent of $600.00 was done.

9.-CRIME.

There was more serious crime in 1929 than in 1928, there being 22 cases of serious crime, exclusive of larcenies, in 1929 compared with 12 in 1928. Of these 22 cases, 3 were murder

K 33

combined with armed robbery. Sheung Shui District suffered from four raids by armed bands from Chinese territory. In three of these raids the above mentioned murders were com- mitted and on one occasion the raiders were driven off by the village scouts before any harm was done. In the last raid on On Lok Tsun a small police patrol came into contact with them. Shots were exchanged and two of the robbers were wounded, one fatally.

10. THE FRONTIER.

Throughout the year the police were on friendly terms with the Chinese authorities and at times received useful help from them, and from the authorities in Sha Tau Kok in particular.

Annexe D.

REPORT ON THE GUARDS 1929.

Jan. 1st.

Dec. 31st.

Steamer Guards (Indian)

203

194

Steam Launches (Chinese)

6

2

Shore Guards (Indian)

254

261

Shore Guards (Chinese)

33

34

Special Lewis Gun Guards

(Indian)

44

50

Guards on strength (Casual-

duty)

14

22

Guards on Casual duty (Un-

employed)

54

43

Totál

608

606

STRENGTH.

The strength on the 1st January stood at 608 and on the 31st December 606 as compared with 717 on the 1st January, 1928 and 614 on the 31st December, 1928: —

Resignations

Dismissals

Taken on strength

Desertions

Died

87

26

102

Nil.

4

The latter includes 2 Guards killed by pirates during piracy of s.s. Deli Maru 21.9.29. and s.s. Hai Ching 8.12.29. 2 Guards died in G.C.H. 4 Guards are also presumed to have lost their lives in the foundering of S.L. Lee Cheong on or about 23.12.29. The majority of Guards who resigned returned to India on leave. The remainder are men who left to seek work as private watchmen. Throughout the year there has been

K 34

an increased demand for Guards, employers realizing their use- fulness. During the water shortage 55 Police Guards were em- ployed guarding water tanks in various parts of the city.

CONDUCT.

Discipline throughout the year was fair. There were 395 defaulters and 26 dismissals for misconduct.

During the year 1 Guard was commended by the I.G.P. and granted $25.00 for the arrest of 2 Chinese males who com- mitted an armed Robbery at Kowloon City.

MUSKETRY.

All Guards throughout the year were exercised with the revolver and instructed in the use of the Winchester Rifle and Greener Gun. They also attended at Kennedy Town Range and fired their Quarterly course. Special Guards have been instructed throughout the year in the Lewis Gun and revolver.

PRIVATE WATCHMEN.

The total number of Registered private watchmen for the year is 750.

A number of men (to the total of 19) were proceeded against for offences committed against the Watchmen Ordinance.

One hundred and fifty Private Watchmen who resigned dur- ing the year have either returned to India or obtained employ- ment in Canton or Macao.

Annexe E.

STREET BOY'S CLUB.

The membership of the Club is now 27 boys as against 29 in January, 1929

During the year 4 boys absconded from the Club and one boy was sent back to the country by order of the Hon: I.G.P.

During the year six boys joined the Club.

During the year 2 boys found employment, one as a car- penters apprentice at the Wing Yick Co. and one as an assistant cook at the Royal Naval Yard.

During the year 3 boys were arrested for minor offences and

fined $2 each.

Nine boys are employed as messengers and eleven boys are employed selling goods on the streets and are given free Itine- rant Hawkers Licences for that purpose.

K 35

7 Boys are at St. Louis Industrial School.

The funds of the Club on December 31st amounted to $3,026.83.

The boys employed as messengers are encouraged to save $2 a month from their pay. Other boys save at the rate of 5 cts. per day or more as their funds permit. They have saved $333.00 during the year.

During the summer months the boys attended bathing once each week at Kau Pak Hang Bathing Beach. 12 Boys took part in the Police Aquatic Sports held at the V.R.C. Baths in September and all displayed great keenness. A polo ball has been provided which makes the bathing parties more interesting.

During the winter months hot baths have been provided at Police Headquarters.

From September all available boys attended the C.Y.M.C.A. twice weekly and have taken part in Games, Drill and Gymnas- ties under instructors. All appear very keen.

A ping pong table has been installed in the Club premises and the boys enjoy the games.

On February 1st, thanks to the enterprise of Mrs. Southorn, a school was started at the Club for English and Chinese Classes 3 nights a week, one hour Chinese and one hour English. The average attendance at each Chinese and English Class was 16 and 17 boys respectively. Progress in Chinese has been good and the boys are now learning the 4th book of the Hong Kong Vernacular Reader. Progress in English is fair.

During the year each boy employed selling goods on the streets has been supplied with 2 winter and 3 summer suits, one pair of boots, one pair of long knitted stockings and 2 singlets. Kit inspection is held on the last Saturday of each month. The boys look after their clothing and appreciate the kindness of the donors.

During the year the following have visited the Club premises and taken a great interest in the welfare of the boys, Inspector General of Police, Mr. King, Mrs. Southorn, Mrs. Creasy, Colonel Christian, Mr. Tang Shui Kin, Mr. Perdue, Mrs. Kotewall and Mr. Kwok Chui.

The Club premises remain at No. 40 Hollywood Road 3rd floor not far from Police Headquarters. Police Sergeant Fung Kam resides on the premises and attends to the welfare of the boys.

Discipline and conduct of the boys are good.

K 36

STREET BOYS CLUB.

Statement of Accounts for the year ending December 31st, 1929.

GENERAL ACCOUNT.

Income.

Expenditure.

To Balance Jan. 1st,

1929

$4,022.23 By St. Louis School. $1,000.00

M.C.L. Donation. 600.00

Rent of Club

780.00

Mr. Tang Shui

Light

39.36

Kin per Mrs.

Teachers Salary

385.00



Southorn (Tea-

Cheque Book .....

2.50

cher)

420.00

School Stationery.

25.38

Rent (refund)

7.00

Colour Washing

Mr. Tang Shui

Club

26.02

Kin (Boots)

96.00

Clothing & Boots.

127.00

Mr. Julia Chan

Small Stores

7.50

Pui

100.00

Balance December

Mr. Kwok Chui

100.00

31st

3,026.83

Interest

74.86

Income.

$5,419.59

BOYS SAVINGS ACCOUNT.

Expenditure.

$5,419.59

To Balance Jan. 1st,

By Withdrawals

$ 165.00

1929

$ 263.91

Balance December

Savings

year Interest

during

31st

439.42

333.02 7.49

$ 604.42

$ 604.42

A. J. C. TAYLOR,

Accountant.

Inspector General of Police.

E. D. C. WOLFE,

January 20th, 1930.

I

K 37

Annexe F.

HONG KONG POLICE RESERVE,

ANNUAL REPORT.

The Hong Kong Police Reserve has been maintained throughout the year on the same lines as before.

Strength. The strength of the Force has shown but slight decrease, the few resignations having been caused through lack of time and transfer of members to other places.

The strength of the Contingent is as follows:-

1930

1929

Chinese Company

72

78

Indian Company

49

53

Flying Squad

42

34

Sharpshooters' Company

31

34

Total

194

199

Leave. Mr. D. L. King, Deputy Superintendent of Police (Reserve) was granted 8 months' leave of absence from the Colony, from March 19th, 1929, and Mr. W. Kent, A. S. P. took over the duties as Adjutant, Hong Kong Police Reserve from that date.

Commendations.-During the year, no commendations were awarded to the Police Reserve, but that by no means indicates lack of interest by members of the Force.

Training. Training has been continued at both the Police Training School and at Central Police Station, attendance at both places having been satisfactory.

Special Training.-Signalling, Life Saving and "First Aid to the Injured" were started in the Force. The Chinese Com- pany only have proved successful so far.

- K 38

Special Voluntary Police Duty.--All contingents of the Police Reserve have rendered valuable assistance to the Regular Police upon special occasions, especially during the Royal Visit of H. R. H. The Duke of Gloucester in April 1929.

Annual Inspection.-A general inspection of the Hong Kong Police Reserve was held on Thursday, January 31st, 1929 and the attendance was satisfactory.

Special Constabulary.-This force is divided into thirteen different Contingents (according to their different nationalities) and the strength on 31.12.29 was 177.

Flying Squad.-Strength. Nine recruits joined during the year thus bringing the total strength up to 42-Hong Kong 29 and Kowloon 13.

Patrols.-Weekly Instructional Patrols have been held reg- ularly in Hong Kong and Kowloon, except during the summer months (June/October) when each Section did only two patrols a month. The attendance at the various patrols has been satis- factory.

Promotion.---Constables

R336 A. Gascon and R330 J. Kotwall were both promoted to the rank of Crown Sergeant.

General. From time to time members of the Flying Squad have assisted the Regular Traffic Police in escort duties, in addition to traffic duties on special ceremonial occasions, and especially during the period of Communist activity in August last, when 17 men assisted the C.I.D. Department in suppressing the distribution of seditious literature. During this period they were required to do 5 hours duty a day.

Members have again displayed great keenness ir their work, and have certainly gained a lot of useful experienc as well as a good knowledge of Police duties in general.

D. L. KING,

Deputy Superintendent of Police (R).

K 39

REPORT BY THE CHIEF OFFICER

HONG KONG FIRE BRIGADE.

1. Cost of Fire Brigade.-The cost of the Fire Brigade for the year 1929 was $232,826.21 as compared with $197,222.37 in 1928 and $190,350.27 in 1927. Special Expenditure amount- ing to $46,940.28 is included.

2. Stations and Equipment.-It was not found possible to proceed with any new stations during the year; the preparation of plans during 1930 of the new Central Fire Station for Kow- loon has however been approved.

Government approval was given for the provision of a new motor Fire Float in 1930 and the work of compiling specifications is in hand.

The question of the provision of a new, additional, Turn- table Water Tower and Fire Escape was considered during the year but has had to stand over for a time.

3. Special Occurrences.

(a) Fires. Loss of Life.--The year 1929 was marked by a most disastrous and fatal fire at the King Edward Hotel on the 11th March, when two persons were burned to death and nine were killed or died from injuries received in their endeav- ours to escape by jumping from the burning building. Twelve persons were rescued from the building by means of the Fire Brigade's appliances; of this number three were injured but have since recovered.

At the Inquest held in connection with this fire, the Jury found that the internal design and construction of the premises was such that, without adequate external means of escape, the building was unsuitable for occupation as an hotel.

The Jury commended the Fire Brigade for "their speedy arrival on the scene and their handling of the situation", and they attached "no blame whatever to the Brigade in connection with the deplorable loss of life".

Recommendations were made for legislation empowering the Building Authority to insist on obvious safeguards against fire in old buildings such as the King Edward Hotel.

(b) General. The Annual Drill Display of the Brigade which included the final heats of the motor escape, motor pump and despatch box competitions, took place on the compound of the Police Headquarters on the 27th November and was witnessed by a large number of the public.

4. The report of the Superintendent giving full details of the work of the Brigade during the year 1929, is attached.

E. D. C. WOLFE, Chief Officer Fire Brigade.

25th February, 1930.

K 40

REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT OF THE HONG KONG

FIRE BRIGADE FOR THE YEAR 1929.

Calls:-The number of calls received during the year totalled 237. Actual fires 182, Chimney fires 14, Collapses 5 and false alarms 36.

Compared with the previous year (1928) there is an increase of 25 calls.

II.

There were 10 serious fires, details of which appear in Table

Of the false alarms; 6 were maliciously given, 19 were given with good intent, and 11 were due to electrical faults of Fire Alarms.

How received:-By Street fire alarm 67; by Telephone 136; from Police 14; from Messengers 20.

LIVES LOST; PERSONS INJURED; PERSONS RESCUED.

Fourteen persons lost their lives or received such injuries that they subsequently succumbed.

Nine persons received minor injuries from which they re- covered.

Twelve persons were rescued by means of the Fire Brigade appliances.

Five persons were extricated alive by the Brigade from Collapses.

STAFF INJURED IN THE EXECUTION OF DUTY.

Injured

11

HEALTH OF STAFF.

During the year there were 290 cases of illness, viz., European officers 7, Chinese members 283.

AWARD.

Asst: Engineer and Station Officer G.C. Moss was invested by the Chief Officer Hon: Mr. E. D. C. Wolfe, C.M.G. with th, Long Service medal of the Professional Fire Brigades As- Rociation.

K 41

STRENGTH OF STAFF.

The authorized strength of the Staff for the year 1929 was as follows:-

Chief Officer (Hon: I.G.P.).

1 Superintendent.

2 Station Officers.

1 Consulting Engineer (Asst: G.M.S.).

4 Asst: Station Officers.

1 Mechanical Engineer.

1 Asst: Mechanical Engineer.

14

(Chinese).

Sub-Officers.

5 Foremen.

120 Firemen,

32 Motor Drivers.

16 Ambulance Attendants.

3 Clerks.

10 Telephone Clerks.

70 Other ranks.

Total

281

THEATRE AND OTHER DUTIES.

Duties performed by members of the Brigade at public and private entertainments during the year totalled 361 comprising altogether 3,655 hours.

MOTOR AMBULANCE SERVICE.

The number of cases attended during the year by the respec- tive Ambulances is shewn in the following summary:

Cases.

Total

Police Private

Distance run. (miles)

No. I Ambulance (Kowloon)

251

300 551

4,387

No. 4

611

""

وو

730 1,341

10,060

No. 2

(Hong Kong) 258

434

692

4,046

No. 3

634

""

683 1,317

9,868

Totals

1,434

1,8553,289

23,802

K 42

The yearly increase in cases attended by the Motor Am- bulances is shewn in the following summary:

Previous years

Last year 1929

1928 1927 1926 1925 1924

Cases attended

3,289 3,282 3,187 |2,637 |2,265 | 2,129

REVENUE.

Theatre and Other duties

Motor Ambulance Service

Total

$1,600.00

3,753.00

$5,353.00

WATER SUPPLY.

The number of Pedestal Hydrants was increased by 27 during the year while the number of Ball Hydrants was reduced by 98; total number of hydrants now being 1,252 viz. :—

Hong Kong (pedestal hydrants)

Kowloon (pedestal hydrants)

112

75

Hong Kong (ball hydrants) (including Peak) Kowloon (ball hydrants)

690

354

Total

1,231

The above hydrants were regulary inspected every quarter.

GENERAL.

Staff:-The Chief Officer, the Hon. Mr. E. D. C. Wolfe, C.M.G., proceeded on long leave on the 2/3/29 and returned to the Colony on the 7/11/29.

During the year 39 Chinese members resigned, 10 were dismissed and 20 absconded. 56 recruits were enrolled and trained as firemen and passed out of the Drill Class into the Brigade while 18 men were engaged and appointed to fill vacancies in other ranks of the Department.

K 43

As a result of the Brigade Motor driving classes 7 Firemen qualified as drivers during the year and were appointed to fill vacancies as Motor Drivers in the Brigade.

Resulting from the number of collisions with motor fire appliances the question was considered during the year of trying White Russian drivers. Three such drivers were engaged in June, 1929, and so far the experiment has proved satisfactory.

With the much appreciated assistance of the St. John's Ambulance Brigade, first aid classes for Sub-officers and Fire- men were continued during the year.

Equipment:-(Additions and deductions). The following appliances were supplied during the year and added to the equipment of Brigade:-

1 Rolls Royce Dennis Motor Fire Engine, equipped with a 250/300 g.p.m. turbine pump, and 1st aid ap- pliance;

"Davy" fire escapes;

3 Sets of Peroxide Rescue apparatus.

(Overhauls and tests).--All brigade motor vehicles, fire floats and apparatus were satisfactorily overhauled and tested during the year.

Fire Inspection Work.-The following number of inspections were made by the Brigade and reported upon during the year: —

Theatres and Cinemas

Hotels and Restaurants

372

229

Garages

241

Petrol Storages

51

Inflammable Structures

138

Premises used for offensive trades

18

Miscellaneous Storages

26

Premises installed with hydrant services.

(other than those mentioned above).

36

Schools

26

Factories

16

Total

1,153

K 44

In addition 209 Chemical Fire Extinguishers located to various Government Buildings were tested and recharged by the Brigade during the year.

The thanks of the Brigade are due to the Public, the Police, the members of the St. John's Ambulance Brigade, Boy Scouts, Naval and Military Forces for the much appreciated assistance they have rendered the Brigade from time to time during the year.

25th February, 1930.

H. T. BROOKS, Superintendent, Fire Brigade.

K 46

Table II.

Short Report of Serious Fires.

Date

1929

Time of Call (Hours)

Fire Extinguished by

Address

Business

Hyd-

Eng-

rants

ines

Fire Floats

Feb. 5 08.43

224 Hollywood Road, Central.

Tailor.

Mar. 9

06.13

78 Jervois Street,

Central,

Piece Good Merchant.

19

Mar. 10 03.43

93 Wing Lok Street, Central.

Provision dealers.

1

Mar. 11 03.06

3 & 5 Des Vœux

Road, Central-

King Edward Hotel.

w

June 15

22.23

Aug. 7 03.03

Nov. 8 01.33

Nov. 26 06.30

18 Cockrane Street, Central.

15 Des Voeux Road West & Connaught Road West.

Nos. 107, 109 & 111

Belchers Street, Kennedy Town, West.

No. 74 Jervois Street.

Paper furniture and Doll makers.

Medicine Herb dealer and Banker.

Yan Tak Medicine Shop and Leung King Po Confectioner's Shop. Piece Goods Merchant.

Dec. 8 09.53

Kowloon Bay (after entering Hong Kong).

Steamship "Hai Ching".

Dec. 22 08.06

252 Queen's Road, East.

Provision Dealer.

1

10

Damage

1

A building of 4 floors about 45 x 17 ft. (used as work- rooms and dwelling) 3 upper floors severely damaged by fire and roof off. Shop and contents under damaged by water and breakage.

A building of 3 floors about 60 x 15 ft. ground floor used as shop two upper floors used as stores & dwellings, severely damaged by fire and roof off.

A building of 3 floors about 45 x 15 ft. ground floor used as provision shop and two upper floors as godowns and dwellings severely damaged by fire and collapse.

A building of 7 floors, about 108 x 85 ft., (used as residential hotel) contents severely damaged by fire, heat, water and collapse, and roof off.

A building of 4 floors about 45 x 20 ft. (used as shop, store and dwellings) and contents severely damaged by fire, heat, smoke and water and most part of roof off.

A building of 4 floors about 160 x 15 ft. (used as godown and offices) and contents severely damaged by fire, heat, smoke and water; most part of roof off and floors collapsed.

A range of buildings, each of 4 floors, covering an area of about 50 x 45 ft. (used as shops and dwellings) gutted by fire (adjoining & communicating).

A building of 3 floors about 40 x 15 ft. (used as piece goods shop, store and dwelling).

Two upper

floors and contents severely damaged by fire, heat, smoke and water, and part of roof off, ground floor and contents by water and breakage, (adicining and communicating at rear, with No. 249 Queen's Road, Central).

Fore bridge and superstructure beneath gutted, fore part of upper deck and fore hold and contents severely damaged by fire and water during piracy on the high seas.

A range of buildings of 4 floors covering an area of about 50 x 30 ft. (used shops and dwellings No. 252 & 250 whole house and three upper floors of No. 248 gutted, ground floor of No. 248 and contents damaged by water and breakage.

1

3

1

K 45

Table I

Summary of Estimated Monetary Loss by Fire for the year 1929.

Not Exceeding

Exceed-

Month

Under $500

ing $5,000

Total

$750 $1,000 $2,500 $5,000,

$

January...

290

2,900

25,580

28,770

February... 624

March

286

7,125 6,000 13,749

160,000 160,286

April

616

..

:

1,000 2,500

7,800

11,916

May

315

:

:

7,000! 7,315

June

276

18,000 18,276

July.

493

2,000

35,000

37,493

August

301

2,000

50,000

52,301

September..

807

807

October

360

1,800 1,500 5,000

49,000

57,660

November..! 653

December.. 559

1,000 3,500 5,000

70,200 80,353

207,000 207,559

Total

5,580

3,800 11,500 20,025 635,580 676,485

Appendix L.

REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF PRISONS

FOR THE YEAR 1929.

1. The number of prisoners received into prison during the year and the corresponding number for 1928 were as follows:

1928.

1929.

Convicted by Ordinary Courts Convicted by High Court Wei-hai-wei... Debtors

4,895

4,773

3

7

80

66

On remand or in default of finding surety

778

933

Total

5,756

5,779

There was an increase in the number of prisoners convicted for larceny during the year under review the number being 1,410 against 1,061 for the previous year.

2. The number of Revenue Grade prisoners admitted to prisons was 2.717 made up as follows:-

Convicted under the Opium Ordinance

Gambling Ordinance

566

158

Arms & Ammunition Ord.

8

"

"

Vehicle Ordinance

184

1

12

">

29

29

Harbour Regulations

25

Water Works Ordinance

24

39

Dangerous Goods Ord.

8

"

? 1

23

Chinese Wine & Spirit Ord.

66

Societies Ordinance

1

""

71

Public Health & Buildings

40

Truck Ordinance

12

A

17

Ordinance

Women & Girls (Protection)

Ordinance..

Importation & Exportation

Ordinance

Tobacco Ordinance

17

""

17

Stowaway Ordinance

Seditious Publication Ord..

Offences against the Person

Ordinance

Police Regulations

Carried forward

33

17

1

3

2

1

64

20

4

1,179

L 2

Brought forward

Convicted of removing dead body without

17

"

committing nuisance in the street

unlawfully boarding steamers

1,179

permission

3

17

23

73

hawking without a licence

463

"

cruelty to animals

keeping house for prostitution

35

drunkenness

92

"

trespass

86

>>

disorderly conduct

21

assault

56

""

obstruction

64

""

17

cutting trees

20

""

"

removing sand without permission. mendicancy

7

11

*

unlawful possession of lottery tickets unlawful possession

39

208

**

stealing

302

"

"

offering bribe

་་

: :

travelling on tram car without

"

"Y

damaging Government property. uttering cries

31



possession of implement fit for

unlawful purpose

obtaining money by false pretences. soliciting in a public throughfare

for the purpose of prostitution unlawful receiving

paying legal fare

demanding money with menaces obeying a call of nature in a

public place

1

10

8

3

31

1

3

25

1

15

49

fighting

:)

firing crackers without

་,

permission

converting property to own use................

being rogue and vagabond

felonious intent

$

1

3

1

unlawfully picking flowers

keeping a dog without licence

impersonating police

4

aiding and abetting to commit an

offence

?

:

leaving the Colony without

clearance

exposing his person in a public place distributing indecent newspaper...

Total

1

1

1

2.717

I

– L 3

3. The above figures show that 77 per cent of the total admissions to prison were Revenue Grade prisoners.

The following table shows the number of prisoners com- mitted to prison without the option of fine and in default of payment of fine:

In default of payment of fine.

Without

Served the

Year. option of

Paid full

fine.

imprison-

Paid part

Total.

fine.

fine.

ment.

1928

1,117

3,413

162

203

4,895

1929

2,056

2,357

159

201

4,773

4. 78 boys were admitted as Juveniles i.e. under 16 years of age, during the year, with sentences varying from 48 hours detention to 9 months hard labour, but only 33 were treated as Juvenile Offenders; the others in the opinions of the Super- intendent and Medical Officer being over 16 years of age.

In

5 cases corporal punishment was awarded by courts in addition to sentences of imprisonment.

5. The percentage of convicted prisoners admitted to prison with previous convictions recorded against them, was 23.8 as compared with 19. for 1928.

6. 126 prisoners were convicted by Police Courts in the New Territories, against 145 for the previous year.

7. The following table shows the number of convicts in custody on the 31st December for the past 10 years, and the percentage of the total number of prisoners in custody to the estimated population of Hong Kong:-

Year.

Estimated Number of population. convicts.

Percentage

of

Daily average number of

Precentage

to

population.

prisoners.

population.

1920

648,150

275

*043

755

•117

1921 665,350

231

⚫035

764

*115

1922

662,200

259

*039

787

*119

1923 681,800

294

*043

861

*126

1924 799,550

345

*043

1,066

•133

1925

874,420

394

⚫045

1,116

•128

1926

786,920

409

·052

1,054

•134

1927 890,400

.392

*044

1,189

*136

1928 1,075,690

352

*033

1,071

*100

1929 1,075,690

331

·031

1,075

•100

L 4

VICTORIA GAOL.

8. 15,611,413 forms were printed and issued to various Government Departments and 101,884 books bound or repaired, as compared with 14,503,195 forms and 99,947 books in 1928. During the year type to the value of $4,124.00 was cast.

9. Other work done in the Prison included, matmaking, tailoring, carpentering, tinsmithing, painting, laundering, shoemaking, soapmaking, netmaking and basketmaking, in addition to the necessary upkeep work of cooking, cleaning and minor building repairs.

10. The Gaol was again overcrowded.

Until a new prison

is built this state of affairs is likely to continue. The estimated population of the Colony for 1929 was nearly double that of 1919.

VICTORIA GAOL. FEMALE PRISON.

11. This prison was also overcrowded and proposals were made to remove the female prisoners elsewhere. These pro- posals are under consideration.

12. During the year the working party of English and Chinese resident ladies continued to visit the Prison on Tuesdays and Fridays to instruct the women in sewing raffiawork &c. and to give them elementary education and singing lessons. The prisoners are attentive and appreciative. The results, except perhaps from the singing class, were highly gratifying. I would again like to record my appreciation of the work done by these ladies often under trying conditions of climate and accommoda- tion.

LAI CHI KOK PRISON.

13. Progress continues with the land resumed in 1926 which is now mostly under cultivation. This garden work gives useful employment to prisoners. Other work done at Lai Chi Kok apart from the necessary upkeep duties of cooking cleaning etc are string and net making, basket and broom making and grass matmaking.

14. Prisoner No. 11989 escaped from the Garden Party on 21.12.1929. He was recaptured by the Police on 30.12.29.

GENERAL.

15. 493 punishments were awarded for breach of prison discipline as compared with 524 for the preceding year. Corporal punishment was inflicted in twelve cases for prison offences.

L 5

16. Two hundred and twenty two (222) prisoners were whipped by order of courts.

17. There were 18 deaths (14 natural causes and 4 executions).

18. The conduct of the Staff, with a few exceptions, was very good.

19. The general health of the Staff was good.

20. Existing fire appliances are in good condition. Improved fire fighting apparatus was supplied to each prison in 1928. The installation was completed at Lai Chi Kok in 1929 but the necessary pumps have not yet been supplied to Victoria Gaol.

21. The rules laid down for the Government of prisons were complied with.

22. Mr. J. W. Franks, Superintendent of Prisons proceeded on long leave on the 23rd March and returned to the Colony on 23rd November.

Captain H. F. Bloxham acted as Superintendent of Prisons from 23rd March to 4th June. He proceeded on special leave on the 5th June and returned to the Colony on the 12th December.

Major C. Willson acted as Superintendent of Prisons from the 5th June to the 22nd November.

23. The usual returns are appended.

J. W. FRANKS,

Superintendent of Prisons.

9th April, 1930.

Table I.

Return showing the Expenditure and Income for the year 1929.

EXPENDITURE.

c.

INCOME.

*A

L

Pay and allowance of officers including Uni-

Earning of prisoners

171,355.24

form, etc.

339,539.14

Debtors' subsistence

508.25

Victualling of prisoners

89,336.91

Naval

do.

27.00

Fuel, light, soap, and dry earth

42,375.26

Consulate, Amoy

938.00

Clothing of prisoners, bedding, and furniture

41,340.34

Wei-hai-wei Government subsistence

556.85

Vagrants' subsistence

19.60

Total

$512,591.65

To Balance

339,186.71

1928

$485,147.89

Total.

$512,591.65

Average annual cost per prisoner $317.43, in 1928 $303.34, and in 1927 $284.67.

- L 7 —

Table II.

Return showing Expenditure and Income for the past 10 years.

Actual cost

Average

cost per

Year. Expenditure. Income.

of prisoners' maintenance.

prisoner.

C.

$

c.

$

C.

$

C.

1920..... 258,609.17

66,547.61

192,061,56

254.37

1921...... 297.970.56

79.635.73

218,334 83

286.78

1922...... 291.175.12 126,124.62

165,050.50

209.72

1923...... 324,698.26 117,302.22

207,396.04

240.88

1924...... 375,158.14

121,664.03

253,137.11

237.56

1925

462,827.14

122,221,20

340,605 84

305.20

1926...... 472,337.42 148,667.08

322.640.12

306 11

1927...... 493,398.88

154,929.44

338,469.44

284.67

1928...... 485,147.89 160,272 50

324.975.39

303.34

1929......

512,591.65

171,355.24

341,236.41

317.43

Table III.

Return showing value of Industrial Labour for the year 1929.

1

2

Value of

Nature of Industry.

stock on

Value of

hand

materials

Total Dr.

January 1st purchased.

1929.

4

5

6

7

8

Value of

Value of

Value of

Value of

articles

manufactur- ed or work

articles

manufactur.

stock on

earnings.

ed or work

hand

Total Cr.

(Difference

done for

December

done for

payment.

Gaol or other 31st, 1929.

between

columns

3 and 7.)

Departments.

L 8

C.

..

$

C.

C.

Oakum,

Coir,

83.79

4,178.93

83.79

269.40

269.40

185.61

6,127.94 | 10,306.87

2,431.02

5,303,37

4,425.94

12,160.33

1,853.46

Netmaking,

4.60

492.16

196.76

553,66

6.95

155.00

715.61

218.85

Tailoring,

18,382.34

17,530.96

35,913.30

113.91

28,147.08

10,426.83

38,687.82

2,774.52

Rattan,

3.95

765.80

769.75

38.57

708.66

210.90

958.13

188.38

Tinsmithing,

176.63

1,609.19

1,785,82

95.94

3,622.10

116.39

3,834.43

2,048.6!

Carpentering,

230.51

5,357.46

5,587.97

536.24

4,526.10

2,298.49

7,420,83

1,832.86

Grass-matting,

1.85

176.00

177.85

Shoemaking,

3,167,88

5,090.54

8,258.42

Laundry,

4.80

1,184.42

1,189.22

Printing and Bookbinding,

Photography,

38,762,50

34.60

68,482.53 107,155,03

Total,. ......$

1,050.58 1,085.18 64,942.38 107,867.58 172,809.96

5.10 12,533.66 11,344.44 41,086.90 256,175.43 149,020.40 318.50 1,284.84 199.66 4,494.74 280,121.50 59,548.96 344,165.20 171,355.24

Paid into Bank during 1929, which sum includes $73.97 for work executed in 1928, $3,902,60. Value of work executed during 1929 for which payment was deferred to 1930, $216.90.

473.10 126.85 9,019.86 12,528.56 256.80 214,831.73 12.35 953.99

1.30

474.40

296.55

503.61

9,650.32

1,391.90

CONTENTS.

1. Report of the Head of the Sanitary Department :-

Sanitary Board Members

Legislation

Staff

Administration

...

:

8

6

10

11

Vaccination

Scavenging

Refuse Removal

Nightsoil Removal...

...

:

...

:

:

...

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

Work done at Disinfecting Stations Ambulance and Dead Box Service

Public Bath Houses

...

Water Closets and Public Conveniences

Markets and Special Food Licences Offensive Trades

Cemeteries, Mortuaries, Crematoria Births and Deaths Registration

Revenue and Expenditure

2. Report of the Medical Officer of Health:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

Work done under the Public Health & Buildings

Ordinance

...

Work done under the Food and Drugs Ordinance and

Sec. 83, P. H. & B. O....

...

3. Report of the Colonial Veterinary Surgeon

Staff

General Statistics ...

...

Slaughter houses Revenue Lard Factories

Crematorium ..... Disease in Depots

Grass growing Quarantine Live Stock"

...

...

...

Infectious Disease in the Colony...



...

...

:

:

:.

:

:

:

:

:

...

:

...

...

...

...

:.

:

12

14

43

43

44

45

45

46

47

47

47

48

Page

4

4

6

6

7

7

7

7

CONTENTS,- Continued.

4. Appendices (H. S. D.'s Report) :

Appendix A. Children vaccinated

""

"

Page

16

B. (i) Cost of Refuse Collection, Hong Kong 17

C.

(ia) (ii)

""

""

Kowloon...

""

Removal



(iii) Comparative cost for 2 years..... Work done at Disinfecting Stations D. (i) List of Ambulance Stations

(ii) Calls made for Ambulance and Dead

Boxes

...

E.

Public Bath-houses

****

F.

Markets

""

H. (i) Interments

G. Burial space in Cemeteries

...

(ii) General Exhumation

(iii) Private Exhumation

(iv) Cremations

I. Certified and Uncertified deaths

18

...

19

19

...

20

21

21



22

...

23

...

24

25

26

26

...

26

...

27

""

J. Revenue...

"

"5

K. Expenditure

::

23

30

5. Tables (M. O. H.'s Report):-

A

L. Nuisances reported...

classified

...

by Health Districts

M.

""

N. (i) »

0. House Cleansing

""

6. Maps :--

(ii) Prosecutions

...

32

...

33

35

36

37

38

39

40

P. (i) Number of Chinese Houses, Hong Kong

(ii)

""

Q. Houses limewashed

Hong Kong Health Districts Kowloon

29

Kowloon...

...

::

::

...

41

42

REPORT OF

THE HEAD OF THE SANITARY DEPARTMENT.

1. SANITARY BOARD.

The following were members of the Sanitary Board during the year:

President, the Head of the Sanitary Department, Mr.

G. R. Sayer from 1st January to 1st March, Mr. N. L. Smith from 22nd April to 12th May, from 23rd May to 7th June and from 18th July to 31st August and Mr. W. J. Carrie from 2nd March to 21st April, from 13th to 22nd May, from 8th June to 17th July and from 1st September to 31st December.

Vice-President, the Director of Public Works, the

Honourable Mr. H. T. Creasy, C.B.E.

The Secretary for Chinese Affairs, the Honourable Mr. R. A. C. North from 1st January to 7th November and the Honourable Mr. E. R. Hallifax, C.M.G. C.B.E., from 8th November to 31st December.

The Medical Officer of Health, Mr. G. W. Pope, L.R.C.P. & S., D.P.H. from 1st January to 19th December, for whom Mr. H. A. Fawcett, M.R.C.S., L.R.C.P., D.P.H., D.T.M. & H. acted from 19th January to 3rd November and Mr. B. H. Mellon, M.R.C.S., L.R.C.P., D.P.H., F.R.C.v.s., acted from 4th to 7th November.

The Director of Medical and Sanitary Services, the Honourable Mr. A. R. Wellington, M.R.C.S., L.R.C.P.. D.T.M. & H., D.P.H., took the place of the Medical Officer of Health from 20th to 31st December.

Major D. G. Cheyne, o.B.E., M.C., R.A.M.C., appointed on 2nd December vice Lieutenent-Colonel and Brevet-Colonel J. S. Bostock, C.B.E., R.A.M.C. re- signed on leaving the Colony.

Dr. W. V. M. Koch.

Mr. Chau Tsun Nin appointed on 25th March vice the Honourable Mr. S. W. Tso, o.B.E., LL.D., resigned.

Mr. Wong Kwong Tin.

The Honourable Mr. J. P. Braga.

Mr. M. K. Lo appointed on 22nd May vice Dr. S. C.

Ho resigned on expiry of term of office.

M (1) 4-

2.- LEGISLATION.

The following by-laws were made by the Board:

The Offensive Trade By-laws were amended so as to include the trade of fat-boiling within the meaning of Offensive Trades.

The Cemeteries By-law No. 8 was amended by the deletion of the words "and the written consent of the next of kin of the person buried".

3.-DEPARTMENTAL STAFF.

Inspectors:-

The Establishment was increased by one Senior Inspec- tor. The numbers of Inspectors on duty on 1st January, 1st July and 31st December were 40, 42 and 45 respectively.

Clerical Staff.

The Establishment was increased by five Interpreters.

4.-ADMINISTRATION.

General Sanitary Work:-The functions and control of the Sanitary Board, as determined by the Public Health and Build- ings Ordinance No. 1 of 1903, are limited to the Island of Hong Kong, Kowloon and New Kowloon.

The Island of Hong Kong is divided into the City of Victoria; its extension eastwards as far as and including Shauki- wan; the Hill District; and the outlying villages of Aberdeen, Aplichau, Stanley, and Taitam.

The City proper is divided into eastern, central, western- central and western districts each with a sanitary office, and sub-divided into 12 Health Districts each with a Sanitary Inspector in charge, (see map A). The Hill District is worked in conjunction with Health District 3. The Shaukiwan exten- sion has a Sanitary Inspector in charge. The Sanitary Inspector posted in Aberdeen is in charge of Pokfulam, Aberdeen, Aplichau, Stanley and Taitam districts.

Kowloon is divided into Kowloon Peninsula, Shamshuipo and Kowloon City each with a sanitary office, and sub-divided into seven Health Districts each with a Sanitary Inspector in charge (see map B.)

Scavenging and Nightsoil Removal:-For the purpose of Refuse Collection the City and Hill District is divided into three main districts east, central and west, each with an Inspec- tor in charge. There are two Inspectors in charge of Kowloon

- M (1) 5-

Peninsula and the District Inspector of Health District 15 com- bines supervision of refuse collection with district work. The Inspector in charge of Shaukiwan Health District also supervises refuse collection in that district. The scavenging and refuse col- lection in the Villages of Pokfulam, Aberdeen, Aplichau, Stanley and Taitam was done departmentally under the supervision of the Sanitary Inspector in charge. Inspectors in charge of refuse collection also supervise the removal of nightsoil in this area; the removal itself is carried out by contractors.

The disposal of refuse from the City of Victoria and Kow- loon is supervised by a Sanitary Inspector who is also in charge of street-watering in Victoria. Kowloon street-watering is under the direction of the Inspector in charge of scavenging (Kowloon).

Disinfection:-For the purpose of disinfection of infected clothing there are Disinfecting Stations in Victoria and in Kow- loon each under the control of an Inspector. Transport is made by means of an infected clothing motor van on either side. Use is also made of portable "Sack" Disinfectors.

Cemeteries:-Public cemeteries are under the charge of special Inspectors.

Markets-The Central and Western Markets are under an Other markets are supervised by the local district

Overseer. Inspectors.

Veterinary Work:-There is a Government depot at Ken- nedy Town (Hong Kong) for the reception of all cattle, sheep, swine, and goats brought into the Colony for slaughter. There are also Government Slaughter Houses at Kennedy Town and Ma Tau Kok (Kowloon) and controlled slaughter houses at Aberdeen and Sai Wan Ho at one of which all animals for food must be slaughtered. The Government depot and slaughter houses are under the direct charge of the Colonial Veterinary Surgeon and Assistant Colonial Veterinary Surgeon and a staff of five Inspectors. All beef in Hong Kong and Kowloon is conveyed from slaughter house to Market in specially constructed

motor vans.

Depot fees are 50 cents for cattle, 10 cents for sheep, 10 cents for swine. Slaughter fees (which are not additional to depot fees) are 40 cents for cattle, 20 cents for sheep and 30 cents for swine. There is a crematorium at Kennedy Town Slaughter House at which carcases can be destroyed on payment of a prescribed fee. A certain number of private factories are established in the immediate vicinity of the Government Slaugh- ter Houses (Kennedy Town and Ma Tau Kok) at which lard and meat products derived solely from these slaughter houses are prepared for export under the direct supervision of the Colonial Veterinary Surgeon and his staff.

M (1) 6-

5.-WORK DONE UNDER THE PUBLIC HEALTH AND

BUILDINGS ORDINANCE.

An account of work done under the Public Health and Buildings Ordinance will be found in the Annexe by the Medical Officer of Health.

6.-WORK DONE UNDER THE FOOD AND DRUGS ORDINANCE AND SECTION 83 OF THE PUBLIC HEALTH

AND BUILDINGS ORDINANCE,

An account of work done under the Food and Drugs Ordin- ance and section 83 of the Public Health and Buildings Ordin- ance will be found in the annexe by the Medical Officer of Health.

7.-VACCINATION.

Under the Vaccination Ordinance, No. 12 of 1923, all Public Vaccinators are under the control of the Director of Medical and Sanitary Services, who is the Superintendent of Vaccina- tion. As Registrar of Births, the Head of the Sanitary Depart- ment is responsible for ensuring the vaccination of all children whose births are registered, and Appendix A shows the results of action so taken.

8.-SCAVENGING.

268.26 tons of refuse were collected daily from the City of Victoria, Hill Districts, Quarry Bay, Shaukiwan, Stanley, Repulse Bay, Pokfulam and Kowloon Peninsula including Kow- loon City and Kowloon Tong, and removed to the various refuse depots.

The cost of the service in Hong Kong (including Stanley and Repulse Bay) and Kowloon is shown in Appendix B (i) and B (ia) attached. Table (iii) shows a comparison with last year.

There are now 16 refuse-lorries in use, 11 being used in Hong Kong and 5 in Kowloon.

Aberdeen, Pokfulam, Stanley and Aplichau are now 'scavenged departmentally (cost included in Appendix B (i)), incinerators having been built for the disposal of refuse from this area.

Refuse from Stanley, Repulse Bay and Pokfulam is conveyed to the refuse depot at Kennedy Town by lorry.

It should be noted that the difference in the amount of refuse received at the depots (432 tons per day) and the amount collected by lorry, is due to a large quantity of refuse taken to the depots by private firms and individuals; also the quantity shown as having been removed by barge is approximate only.

M (1) 7

G

9.-REFUSE REMOVAL.

The bulk of the refuse from the City of Victoria and Kow- loon was, as hitherto, taken by barges and dumped at sea. Some 27,147 tons were dumped at Cheung Sha Wan where a reclama- tion is being gradually formed.

Appendix B, Table (ii) shows cost of removal from Victoria the Hill District and Kowloon Peninsula. Figures for the last two years will be found in Table (iii). Barges were delayed on two occasions by weather conditions.

10.-NIGHTSOIL REMOVAL.

During the year the monthly payment due from the con- tractor was reduced by $1,560.00 in respect of flushed closets opened in Kowloon.

The contracts for the removal of nightsoil from Aberdeen, Pokfulam and Aplichau, and Stanley and Taitam for 3 years from 1st January were signed. For the former contract a sum of $60 per annum goes to revenue and for the latter an annual payment of $600 was paid by the Government for the service.

The contracts for the removal of nightsoil from Victoria and the Kowloon Peninsula; Shaukiwan; Aberdeen, Pokfulam and Aplichau; and Stanley and Taitam respectively were carried out satisfactorily.

11.--WORK DONE AT DISINFECTING STATIONS.

Appendix C shows the number of articles and vehicles dis- infected and washed after disinfection during the year 1929. The figures for 1928 are given for comparison. The use of por table "Sack" disinfectors has been continued.

Miscellaneous repairs and new construction of various articles were done at the Hong Kong and Kowloon Disinfecting Stations to the value of $3,999.24 and $1,372.61 respectively. At the Central Garage miscellaneous repairs to the value of $4,823.18 were also carried out.

12. AMBULANCE AND DEAD BOX SERVICE.

Ambulances and Dead Boxes are obtainable at any hour of the day or night at the two Disinfecting Stations and also by day at the Eastern and Western District Sanitary Offices at which a staff of bearers is kept. This service is now supple- mentary to that of the Motor Ambulances which are controlled by the Police Department.

Appendix D (i) shows the stations at which Sanitary Depart- ment ambulances are obtainable in emergencies. At these stations there are no bearers attached and volunteer bearers must be obtained when required. Appendix D (ii) shows the number of times manpower ambulances and dead boxes were used.

M (1) S

13.-PUBLIC BATH-HOUSES.

The Boundary Street Bath-House was opened during the year.

Appendix E shows the number of men, women and children who used the Bath-Houses during the years 1928 and 1929.

14.-WATER CLOSETS AND PUBLIC CONVENIENCES.

During the year public conveniences were completed as follows:

One flush closet at Wong Nei Chong.

One

??

One

1

One

27

One

at Wilmer Street.

at Water Street.

at Sham Shui Po Market.

at Boundary Street.

One dry latrine in Pokfulam Village.

One

39

One

71

at Wong Nei Chong was demolished.

at On Ning Lane was demolished.

The Board approved the installation of 1,240 water closets, 4 trough closets and 165 urinals on private premises.

15.--MARKETS AND SPECIAL FOOD LICENCES.

No new market was opened during the year.

60 additional food licences were issued under section 78 of the Public Health and Buildings Ordinance.

Appendix F gives details of rentals of the stalls in the various markets. On 1st January the rents were readjusted.

16.-OFFENSIVE TRADES.

Offensive Trades are controlled by the Board under section 42 of the Public Health and Buildings Ordinance. No. 1 of 1903.

Specific areas for these trades are set aside in Hong Kong and are situated at the extreme west and east of the town, well removed from the thickly populated areas.

Several areas are also set aside in Kowloon and Offensive trades are confined within the limits of these areas.

M (1) 9

The following is a list of offensive trades showing the num- ber of licences issued in Hong Kong and Kowloon:-

Trade.

Bone-boiling

Bone-storing

Hong Kong. Kowloon.

2

2

Bone and fat-boiling

Drying fish guts, scales and

scraping

Fat-boiling

Feather cleansing and sorting

Feather-drying

Na N

5

2

1

17

4

1

2

Feather-sorting

Feather-cleansing

Feather-storing

1

1

5

2

Feather-sorting and storing

1

Feather-cleansing and packing.

1

Feather and bone-storing

1

Hair-drying

1

Hair-sorting

1

Lard-boiling

4

Pig-roasting

20

17

Rag-picking and storing

1.

1

Rag-picking

1

Rag-sorting and storing

2

Rag-storing

1

Soap-boiling

7

Scales-drying

1

Tannery

5

Tallow and bone-boiling

1

65

62

17.-CEMETERIES, MORTUARIES, CREMATORIA.

The following cemetery was opened during the year:-

Kowloon Inland Lot No. 2,148, Ho Man Tin.

Appendix G shows the approximate burial space in the main cemeteries and the net available space on 31st December 1929.

Appendix H (i) shows the number of interments at the various cemeteries during the year 1929.

M (1) 10

Appendix H (ii) shows the number of general exhumations carried out at the Public expense, and Appendix H (iii) shows the number of exhumations carried out by relatives of the de- ceased.

Appendix H (iv) gives particulars of cremations, bodies de- posited in the Tung Wah Hospital Mortuary, and removals from the Colony before burial.

18. BIRTHS AND DEATHS REGISTRATION.

The General Registration Office established by Ordinance No. 7 of 1896, as amended by Ordinance No. 26 of 1923, for registration of both births and deaths is situated at the Sanitary Department Head Office, Post Office Building.

At this office all non-Chinese births and deaths must be registered. Chinese are required to register in the district within which the birth or death occurred. A list of such district re- gistries for births and deaths respectively is appended. Yaumati, Nos. 2 and 7 Police Stations are available for registration of deaths on Sundays and Public Holidays only, when the General Registration Office is closed. The Head of the Sanitary Depart- ment is ex officio Registrar and has appointed the Police officers in charge of stations, the Inspector in charge of Kowloon Dis- infecting Station and the Principal clerks in charge of Dispen- saries on the appended list as assistant registrars.

Death registration, being a necessary preliminary to burial is almost universal but there is considerable ignorance of the law among Chinese as regards registering of births. As a proof of this it may be pointed out that the records of registered mid-wives show a total of 11,781 births, whereas only 10,223 births were actually registered during the year. Female births in particular are frequently not registered. This is no doubt due to the presence of a large fluctuating population wholly unaccustomed to the systern.

Appendix I shows the ratio of Certified and Uncertified

deaths

Death Registration Offices.

Sanitary Department, Head Office.

Kowloon Disinfecting Station.

Shaukiwan Police Station.

Aberdeen Police Station.

No. 7 Police Station.

No. 2 Police Station.

Kowloon City Police Station.

Sham Shui Po Police Station,

Stanley Police Station.

Yaumati Police Station.

M (1) 11-

Birth Registration Offices.

Sanitary Department, Head Office.

Yaumati Chinese Public Dispensary.

Hunghom Chinese Public Dispensary.

Sham Shui Po Chinese Public Dispensary

Kowloon City Chinese Public Dispensary.

Eastern Chinese Public Dispensary.

Western Chinese Public Dispensary.

Central Chinese Public Dispensary.

Shaukiwan Chinese Public Dispensary.

Aberdeen Police Station.

Stanley Police Station.

19. REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE.

Appendix J shows under the various heads the revenue col- lected by the Department during 1929 and also the revenue paid into the Treasury in respect of the Department's contracts. As regards the former, markets show an increase. This to some extent is due to readjustment of market-stall rents.

Revenue from contracts again shows a decrease on account of the reductions allowed to the Conservancy Contractors.

Appendix K shows the Department's expenditure for the year 1929.

Other details of the working of the Department will be found in the reports of the Medical Officer of Health and the Colonial Veterinary Surgeon.

29th March, 1930.

G. R. SAYER,

Head of the Sanitary Department.

:

M (1) 12 -

ANNEXE BY THE MEDICAL OFFICER OF HEALTH.

i

1.-(1) WORK DONE UNDER THE PUBLIC HEALTH AND BUILD- INGS ORDINANCE.

Sanitary Nuisances and Contraventions of Sanitary By- laws:-Appendix L shows the total number of nuisances report- ed and the action taken to obtain compliance and amount of fines. Of the total number of nuisances reported in which action was taken 58% were abated after receipt of a letter. In 237 cases a legal notice failed to produce compliance. Of the summonses which followed 210 secured convictions, 11 were discharged and 16 withdrawn.

It is a matter for regret that these figures for legal notices and summonses show an increase over 1928, in that they are an index of the number of failures to get works carried out by peaceful persuasion rather than resort to law.

It should be remembered that each inspector has for super- vision a district, with approximately 25,000 inhabitants, most of whom are ignorant of the rudiments of sanitation.

Appendix M shows the nuisances in respect of which action has been taken.

Appendix N (i) shows the Health Districts from which these nuisances were reported and Appendix N (ii) gives details of all prosecutions and amount of fines inflicted.

(ii) Building Nuisances:-Appendix N (i) line 1 shows by districts the number of nuisances under Part III of the Public Health and Buildings Ordinance reported by the Department to the Building Authority for action. These are additional to those referred to in paragraph (i) above.

(iii) Although Appendix N shows a considerable balance in favour of new domestic premises over similar premises demo- lished, there is no evidence of any decrease in overcrowding. This is especially true of the central districts in the City of Victoria.

It has, up to the present, been found quite impractical to enforce strictly Sections 153 and 154 of the Public Health ani Buildings Ordinance. Much time is therefore taken up in the consideration of applications for modifications of these sections.

The attached diagram shows the approved layout of ten houses,

M (1) 13

(iv) Miscellaneous improvements:-Appendix N (i) lines 3, 4, 5 shows miscellaneous improvements effected by District Inspectors in their districts. Lines 7, 8, 9, 10 show the number of houses demolished and erected. The great majority of these are tenement houses.

(v) House Cleansing :-The routine work under the by-laws for the Prevention and Mitigation of Epidemic Disease was. carried out during the year. Appendix O shows the number of floors cleansed in the various districts and as compared with the last two years.

House cleansing was carried on continously on five mornings a week throughout the year by the staff. The privilege of per- mitting certain occupants of premises to carry out house cleans- ing at their own convenience was continued and further extended during the year. The terms and conditions under which this concession was granted were, generally, complied with.

Appendix P shows approximately the total number of Chinese houses liable for cleansing.

(vi) Limewashing:-The usual limewashing required by the Domestic Cleanliness and Ventilation By-laws was carried out during the year. Appendix Q shows the number of floors lime-

washed. The difference between this total and the total in Appendix P is due partly to exemptions, some floors being new and not requiring limewashing. A certain number has also been carried over into 1930.

Departmental limewashing at the request of owner and where necessary under By-law 4 was carried out throughout the year. No complaints as to the quality of the work done or of injury to property were received.

(vii) Rat Catching :-Twenty-eight members of the cleans- ing staff were employed during the year setting traps, bird-lime boards and rat poison; also collecting rats from street rat-bins, private premises, etc., and taking them to the Public Mortuary for examination. Special campaigns in March and April were undertaken when rat-poison was distributed throughout urban districts. The total number of rats caught was:-

Hong Kong

Kowloon

87,786

47,631

Of these 4 were found plague infected.

The infected rats came from Nos. 8 and 9 Health Districts

and were found in property adjoining the water front.

M (1) 14



2. WORK DONE UNDER THE FOOD AND DRUGS ORDINANCE AND SECTION 82 OF THE PUBLIC HEALTH AND BUILDINGS ORDINANCE.

Samples of fresh milk were submitted for analysis under section 12 of the Food and Drugs Ordinance, of which 48 were found to pass the standard and 1 to be below standard,

In addition the following samples of Food and Drugs were taken:

Bean curd 4, sugar 36, coffee 10, tea 27, lard 6, cheese 13, bread 27, skimmed milk 2, tinned condensed milk 7, tinned milk 23, flour 31, tinned butter 8 and fresh butter 21.

Prosecutions were undertaken in 2 cases where the samples failed to satisfy the legal requirements.

Under section 82 of the Public Health and Buildings Ordinance the following foodstuffs were seized and destroyed by Order of the Head of the Sanitary Department:-

Condensed milk 574 tins, crabmeat 5 tins, salmon 160 tins, Dutch butter 16 tins, sardines 155 tins, milk 530 tins, tongue 94 tins, oddments 160 tins, syrup 70 tips, shad fish 11 tins and salt fish 8 tins.

G. W. POPE,

Medical Officer of Health.

8

B

M (1) 15.--..

·17-02

PLAN OF A FLOOR IN A NEW HOUSE

WITH CUBICLES

SCALE =8FT.

Registry.

Appendix¡A.

"

VACCINATION RETURN FOR 1929.1

B. F.

Unvac-

New Total Vaccin- births.. ated.

liable.

Left

Cannot Had

Insus-

Dead.

Colony.

be Small-

found.

Unfit.

ceptible.

Total

C. F.

Total.

pox.

cinated.

Births and Deaths (Non-Chinese) Births and Deaths (Chinese) Kowloon Chinese Public Dispensary Shaukiwan Chinese Public Dispensary Yaumati Chinese Public Dispensary Central Chinese Public Dispensary....... Hunghom Chinese Public Dispensary Western Chinese Public Dispensary Eastern Chinese Public Dispensary Shamshuipo Chinese Public Dispensary.

M

16

213 1,799 1,063 2,862

350 563 305

20

19

1

217

563

428

3

148

143

32,137

2,862

128

298 426

106

25

14

111

170

426

233 441 1,646 3,971 5,617

674

109

13

5

300

245

674

3,202

48

48

700

223,597

5,617

307

7091,016

438

67

204

207

1,016

9 79 1,6611,1052,766

88

14

6

16

50

88

619 35

2

614

1,496

2,766

1,006 1,572 | 2,578 350 605

566

125

466

955

641

ཚུལ

549

872

2,578

2

54

255

955

Total..

7,352 10,193 |17,545 | 6,428

259

774 | 2,710

287,346 | 17,545

་ ་ ་

M (1) 17

Three 60 cwt.

Eight 30 cwt. f

}

Refuse Lorries

1

STATEMENT OF COST.

MOTOR TRANSPORT.

Monthly Running Cost of Motors.

Appendix B (i).

HONG KONG,

Mainten-

Repairs

Miscel-

plus

Total.

Tyres.

Petrol.

lancous.

10 %

Supervision

Claims for

Damages

paid.

*

auce of

Hand Carts.

Total.

X

$

C.

C.

C.

$

C.

Total

Monthly

Charge.

Total monthly

Mileage.

Cost per mile.

Refuse collected by lorry.

Cost per ton.

Petrol used.

Miles per

Gallon.

Refuse collected.

at Shaukiwan. |

Refuse collected by Hand Carts.

Total Refuse

collected.

No.

Cents.

Tous.

Gallous.

No.

Tous.

Tons

..

C.

10,301.97

11,060.77

37.91

173.73

617.77

235.03

95.48

557.85

125.56

85.48

1,006.94

942.62

...

100.29

11.176.25

7.18

387.25

100.67

584.44

1,279.54

11,508.16 10,735 12,103.68 68.04 12,523.83

25.26

10,078 25.54

5,099

200.1 1,8728

7.81

1651

5,750

5,189.5

209.4 1.2392

8.13

588

5,777.5

10,697

27.21 5,425

206.1

1,305

8.19

651

6,076

11,071.92

260,83

530.77 1

216.13

63.97

50.00

1,121.70

31.27 12,227.89

10,056

27.93 4,928

220

1,1791

8.05

630

5,558

1,010,62

167.01

534.38

193.17

101.16

108.94

1,104,56

60.84 12,176.02

9,896

26.85 5,153

2:09.7

1,187

8.46

651

5,804

1.541.29

159.60

510.42

73.73

316.75

1,060.50

10,872.31

566.88

446.49

229.67

383.14

1,625,88

10,873.27

50.73

460.78

276.20

361.66

98.00

1,247.37

11,211.07

64.58

390.39

73.26

91.78

620.01

11.106.40

100.69

403.45

164.32

6.45

674.91

11.093.95

50.33

395.26

162.38

370.66

68.88

1,047.51

11,248.59

308.52

469.17

229.86

393.67

1,401,22

81.72 12,683.51 9,430 62.64 12,560.83 9,241 34.50 25.07 12,145.71 9,164 30.71 47.87 11,881,95 8,479 25.73 5,00 11,876.31 8,955 7.37 12,148.83 8,457 5.17 12,654.17 9,509

27.80 4,857

225.3

1.134

8.31

111660

5,628

5,057.5

210,6

1,115

8.28

59/682

5,798.5

5,690.5 | 187.4

187.4

1.143

8.02

661725

6,481.5

4,804.5 216.3

1 001

8.17

731660

5,537,5

24.46 4,914

208.2

1,034)

8.65

65682

5,661

30.70 4,393

236.8 1,013

8.31

76/660

5,129

30.36

| 4,799.5 2127.5 1,203

7.90

80682

5,561,5

132,770.90 1,967.69 5,903.98 2,079.98

2,854.54

325.82 13,132.01

498.28 146,401.19 114,697

60,310 28.08 60,310.5 0,310,5 | 243.1|13,929

8.21

5307,922 [68,762.5

!

M (1) 17

M

1

REFUSE COLLECTION ONLY. SANITARY DEPARTMENT.

Standing Charges.

Three 60 cwt.

Eight 30 cwt.

Refuse Lorries

STATEMENT OF COST.

MOTOR TRANSPORT,

Monthly Running Cost of Motors.

Appendix B

Mainten-

*

Į

Year 1929.

Estimated

Wages.

Scavenging!

Gear.

Miscel-

Depreci- iation of

Total.

Tyres.

Petrol.

Repairs

plus

Drivers.

'Scavenging]

Staff.

laneous.

10%

Supervision

Claims for

Damages

paid.

*

ance of

Hand Carts.

Total

Monthly

Charge.

Total.

Total monthly

Mileage.

Cost per mile.

No.

Cents.

Vehicles.

('.

C,

C.

$

C.

C.

C.

C.

C.

Jamary,

281.23

793.28

912.93

February,

398.72

793.28

838.62

March,

183,77

793.28

837.94 9,061.26

„April,

371.83

793.28

8,514.63 8,514.53 | 10,501.97 11,060.77 9,030.15

11.176.25 893.95 9,012.86 11,071.92

57.91

617,77

235.03

95.48

173.73

557.85

125.56

85.48

1,006.94

942.62

11,508.16

10,735

25.21

7.18

587.25

100.67

584.44

1,279.54

260,83

530.77

216.13

63.97

50.00

1,121.70

12,103.68 100.29 68.04 12,523,83 12.227,89 31.27

10.078 25.5

10,697

27.2

10.056

27.9:

May,

388.07

723.63

828.58

9,013.74

11,010.62

167.01

584.38

193.17

101.16

108.94

1,104.56

60.84 12,176.02

9,896

26.8.

June,

1,005.93

723.83

837.72

8,973,81 11,541.29

159.60

510.42

73.73

316.75

1,060.50

81.72 12,683.51

9,430

27.8

July.

576.94

723,83

838.89

8,732.65

10,872.31

566.88

446.49

229.67

383.14

1,625.88

62.64 12,560.83

9.241

34.50

Angust,

391.91

723.83

843.64

8,910.89

10,873.27

50.73

460.78

276.20

361.66

98.00

1,247.37

25.07

12,145.71

9.164

30.7

September,

525.24

728.93

838.09

9,126.91

11,214.07

64.58

390.39

73.26

91.78

620,01

47.87

11,881,95

8.479

25.7.

October,

435.88

723.83

792.23

9,154.46 | 11,106.40

100.69

403.45

164,32

6.45

674.91

5.00

11,876.31

8,955

24.40

November,

117.64

694.30

854.75

9,127.26

December,

633,15

655.68

830.66

9,128.59

11,093.95

11,248.59

50.33

395.26

162.38

370.66

68.88

1,047.51

7.37

12,1 18.83

8,157

30.70

308.52

469.17 |

229.86

393.67

1,401.22

5.17

12,654.47

9,509

30.3

Total,......

5,908 31

8,866 08

10,148.00 107,848.51,132,770.90

1,967,69

5,903,98 2,079.98

2,854.54

325.82

13,132.01

198.28

|1 46,40

146,401.19 114,697

28.0

NLY.

.T.

M (1) 18

Four 50 cwt Refuse Lorries One 30 cwt Refuse Lorry

STATEMENT OF COST:

MOTOR TRANSPORT

Appendix B (ia).

KOWLOON.

Monthly Running Cost of Motors.

Mainten-

Total.

Tyres.

Petrol.

Repairs Miscel- plus laneous. 10%



Supervision.

Claims for

Damages !

paid.

*

Total.

ance of

Hand Carts.

Total

Monthly

Charge.

Total monthly Mileage.

Cost per mile.

No.

Cents.

Tons.

Total Refuse collected by Lorry.

Cost per ton.

Petrol used.

Gallon.

Miles per

Refuse collected by Hand Carts.

Total Refuse

collected

Gallons.

No.

ons.

Tous.

C.

C.

C.

C.

C.

196

*

C.

('.

32 4,692,81

404.89

226.95

235.08

13.54

880.46

.64

4,907.21

241.71

35.38

14.75

291.84

50.14

.71

+,965,17

251,34

31.13

14.19

296.66

34.01

.22

4,940.48

183.37

458.50

182.64

819.51

17.13

15

4,926.13

234.71

31.20

3.84

57.00

326.75

30.42

5,573.27 5,243,25 2,685 33.37 5,295.84 3,770 23.90 5,777,12 2,093 68.12 5,283.30 2,913 33.09

2,526 60.69

1,897.5 285.8

1,823

2,027.5 | 212.4

5043

5.00

465

2,862,5

238.7

537

1

5.33

420 2,243

558

6.78

465 2,492,5

1,857 250.2 4073

5.01

450 | 2,807

2,018,5

2,018,5 212.7

.35

466 2,483,5

.69

5.213.32

251.88

27.59

21.36

300.83

40.85

5,555,00 2,982

29.96

2,019 224.9

6592

5.32

460

2.469

.66

5,009.46

181.57

182.92

14,69

379,18

31.32

5,419.96

2,861 33,84

2,012.5 202.1

6425

6.27

465

2,477.5

.24

4,952.02

239,26

34.32

8.37

281.95

12.53

5,246,50 3,291 26.80

2,071.5 203,6

613!

5.36

505

2,576,5

.43

5,232.51

236,82

645.36

26.78

908.96

28.93

83

5.161,65

223.27

311.43

52.40

587.10

.02

5,303,60

203.38

50.24

135.81

389.43

98 5,484.64

242,38

102.78

79.98

425.14

6,165.40 3,188 48.88 2.49 5,751.24 3,015 3.68 5,696,71 2,884 2.58 5,912.36

2,009 250.7

607

5.26

450

2,469

39.55

1,993.5 | 238.9

572

5.25 465

2,458,5

40.81

1,832,5

249,5 |

5213

5.5% 450 2,282.5

3,373

38,60 2,074

232.8

6214

5.42 465 2,539

.42

60,783,06

404.89 2,716.64 2,140.93

568.35 1

57.00

5,887.81

249.08

66,919,95

35,581

39.80 23,635.5

23,635,5

228.5 6,589

6.40 [5,515 29,150,5

::

REFUSE COLLECTION ONLY. SANITARY DEPARTMENT.

M (1) 18

Four 50 cwt Refuse Lorries One 30 cwt Refuse Lorry

STATEMENT OF COST:

MOTOR TRANSPORT

Appendix B (ia).

Standing Charges.

Monthly Running Cost of Motors,

Mainten-

*

Year, 1929.

Estimated

Wages.

Scavenging

Depreci-

Total.

Gear.

*

ation of

Vehicles.

Drivers.

Scaveng-

ing Staff.

Tyres.

Petrol.

Miscel-

laneous.

Repairs

plus

10%

Supervision.

Claims for

Damages

paid.

ance of

Hand Carts.

Total

Monthly

Charge.

Total.

Total monthly

Mileage.

*

C.

C.

..

..

C.

C.

C.

C.

January,

140.61

227.26

425.62

3,899.32

4,692,81

404.89

226.95

235.08

13.51

880.46

5,578,27

2,526

February,

i

195.85

227.26

March...

241.88

227.26

377.29

377.02 4,097,64 4,907,21 4,118,74 4,965,17

241.71

35.38

14.75

291.84

50.14

5,243,25

2,685

251,34

31.13

14.19

296.66

34.01 5,295.84

3,770

April,

185.92

227.26

382.08

4,145,22 4,940.48

183.37

453.50

182.64

819.51

17.13

5,777,12

2,093

May,

191.53

208.07

429.38 4,097.15

4,926.13

234.71

31.20

3.84 | $7.00

326.75

30.42

5,283,30 2.913

June,

502.96

208.07

384.60 4,117.69

5,213.32

251,88

27.59

21.36

300.83

10.85

5,555,00 2,982

July,

288.47

208.07

381.26 4,131,66

5,009,46

181,57

182.92

14.69

379.18

81.82

5,419,96 2,861

August,

197.45

208.07

392.26 4.154.24 4,952.02

239,26

34.32

8.37

281.95

...

12.53 5,246,50 8,291

September,...

262.62

208.07

451.39

4,310.43 5,232,51

236.82

645.36

26.78

908.96

23.93

6,165,40

3,188

October,

217.93

208.07

397.32

4,338,33 5,161,65

223.27

311.43

62.40

587.10

2.49

5,751,24

3,015

November,

December,

208.82

337.60

816.57

376.32

450.16 4,307.02 5,303.60 500.77 4,290.98 5,484,64

203.38

50.24

135.81

389.43

- 8.68

242.38

102.78

79.98

425.14

5,696,71 2.58 5,912,36 3,373

2,884

4

3

Total

2,954.11 2,871,38 4,949.15 50,008.42 60,783.06

404.89

2,716.64 2,140.93 568,35

57,00

5,887.81

249.08 66,919,95 35,581

M (1) 19-

Appendix B (ii).

Cost of Refuse Removal.

Salary of Bargemen,...

Hong Kong Kowloon. Total.

$24,252.79 $577.72 $24,830.51

Salary of Crews,..

5,797.12

Repairs, Stores and Coal for

Launches and Barges,

47,027.39

Total...$24,252.79

$577 72 $77,655.02

Appendix B (iii).

Comparative Table for 2 years.

1928.

1929.

City Scavenging,

$142,755.21 $146,401.19

Kowloon Scavenging,

64,626.19 66,919.95

Removal,

64,117.24 77,655.02

Appendix C.

WORK DONE AT DISINFECTING STATIONS.

·M (1) 20

1928.

1929.

Eastern

Western

Eastern

Western

Hong Kong Kowloon

District Disinfect- Disinfect- Office.

District Hong Kong Kowloon Office.

District

District

Disinfeet- Disinfect-1 Office.

Office.

ing

ing

ing

ing

Station.

Station.

Portable Sack

Station.

Station.

Portable Sack

Disinfectors.

Disinfectors.

Number of articles disinfected...

27,428

11,604

2,266

712

14,802

10,324

1,860

831

Number of Public Vehicles disinfected

102

317

136

354

Number of Days Disinfecting

Apparatus in use

159

190

85

44

106

317

58

41

*47

*30

Number of Articles washed after disinfecting

154

121

1

*Portable Sack Disinfector.

.

M (1) 21

Appendix D (i).

AMBULANCE AND DEAD BOX SERVICE.

LIST OF AMBULANCE STATIONS.

Race Course, Wong Nei Chong Road. Belcher's Street, Scavenging Coolies' Quarters. Government Civil Hospital.

Western Market, North Block.

No. 6 Police Station. Central Police Station. Post Office Building. Pokfulam Police Station. Bay View Police Station. Aberdeen Police Station. Stanley Police Station. Shaukiwan Police Station. Mount Gough Police Station. Tsim Sha Tsui Police Station. Shamshuipo Police Station. Kowloon City Police Station. Sha Tau Kok Police Station. Au Tau Police Station.

Tai Po Police Station.

Appendix D (ii).

CALLS MADE FOR AMBULANCES AND DEAD BOXES.

Hong Kong Kowloon

Eastern Western

Disinfect- Disinfect-

ing

District

District

ing

Office.

Office.

Station. Station.

Ambulances,

European

2

Ambulances,

Chinese

136

127

37

80

Dead Boxes

308

2,173

446

651

Appendix E.

PUBLIC BATH-HOUSES.

1928.

1929.

Men. Women. Children. Men. Women.

Children.

Wanchai, Cross Lane Bath-House

191,796 95,629 89,816 187,014 112,515

84,344

Second Street Bath-House

811,920 210,717 177,082 256,520

181,006

158,450

Pakhoi Street Bath-House

54,642

19,962

Pound Lane Bath-House

166,193

61,275 |

28,867 52,917

25,378

18,275 27,528

129,053

61,888 35,588

Boundary Street Bath-House

24,783 13,334 34,174

M (1) 22

M (1) 23

Appendix F.

MARKETS.

WE ARE Mama kapag

The following statement shows the Revenue derived from Markets :-

Markets.

1916-1925 (average for

10 years).

1926.

1927.

1928.

1929.

..

C.

C.

Central

61,588.78

62,614.80

62,614.80

62,794.80

75,656,00

Hung Hom

4,463.24

4,450.80

7,930,00

6,780.40

6,771.40

Mong Kok Tsui

2,103.26

12,592.00

11,118.20

11,073.60

16,175.00

Sai Wan Ho

1,956.48

2,854.80

2,854.80

2,854.80

4,053.50

Sai Ying Pun......

16,459.12

16,525.20

16,525,20

16,525,20

20,787.20

Shaukiwan

2,109.00

2,132.40

2,132.40

2,132.40

2,512.80

Shek Tong Tsui

943.70

942.00

964.00

1,008.00

1,411.50

So Kon Po

1,751.85

2,202.00

2,911.50

3,025.50

2,859.10

Tai Kok Tsui.

764.14

872.40

872.40

872.40

872.40

Tsim Sha Tsui

4,586.22

5,409.50

5,408.00

5,546.90

6,928.50

Wan Tsai

3,882.88

4,910.40

4,910.40

4,910.40

3,979.60

Western (North Block)

20,651.81

25,314.70

25,626.80

25,478.30

32,078.20

Western (South Block)

32,197.34

32,906.40

32,906.40

32,921.40 40,530.60

Yaumati

13,574.99

19,765,10

19,272.40

* 21,258.20

28,347.60

Aberdeen

491.57

852.00

852.00

1,011.60

1,422.00

Canal Road

516.00

516.00

516.00

516.00

516.00

Praya East (closed down)

478.70

904.80

Reclamation Street

2,896.23

3,315,00

3,289.50

3.295.20

4,155.20

Staunton Street

964.07

952.80

951.50

963.60

963.60

Tai Hang

642.19

565.20

565.20

846.00

891.50

Sham Shui Po

3,253.80

2,956.80

2,974.80

3,409 30

4,888.40

Kowloon City opened on 1/1/22 & 1/4/28

289.80

271.80

254.40

2,476.70

3,092.40

Reclamation Street, (Poultry) opened on 1/6/22

1,385.13

1.454.40

1,454.40

1,454.40

1,978.80

Monmouth Path opened on 1/1/24

2,020.20

2,001.20

1,765.20

1,749.00

1,725.90

Wong Nei Chong opened on 1/1/24

2,322.00

2,322.00

2,322.00

2,322.00

2,322.00

Quarry Bay opened on 1/7/24

2,386.60

1,948.60

1,861.90

1,104.10

913.10

Whitfield opened on 1/10/24

9,552.50

5,494.50

5,524.70

5,652.60

5,669.30

Waterloo Road opened on 1/10/24 Kun Chung opened on 1/2/25..... Cheung Sha Wan opened on 1/4/28 To Kwa Wan opened on 1/4/28

1,002.00

984.00

16,300.90

18,575.50

984.00

13,839.90

984.00

13,861.80

1,436.40

912.30

984.00

14,040.60

1,706.60

959.20

Total,.

2!1,534.03

231,607.10 233.206.80 239,177.30

291,191,50

- M (1) 24

Appendix G. 1929.

(1)

(2)

(3)

(4)

(5)

(6)

(7)

(8).

Approxi-

A vailable

Subsequent Exhumation.

Net

Cemetery.

mate

space as on

Gross available

Burial

burial space. 31/12/28.

Private. Public.

space.

since 31/12/28.

available

space on 31/12/29.

Average burials for last 10 years.

(9) Average private exhumation for last 10 years.

Year

Colonial

10,200

1,161

I

Roman Catholic

8,000

1,479

20

Mohammedan

3,500

244

Parsec

200

99

::

(10)

Last previous General Exhumation.

No. Year No.

1,162

1,499

147

24

72

1,090

69



2

1,352

148

34

1917

288 1923 765

214

58

186

63

99

99

:

1913 1,669

1916 338

1918 864

1920 1,921

Mount Caroline

8,653

1,408

313

58t

2,305

1,018

1,287

943

238

1923

920 1924 641 1925 650 1926 468

1927 490

1928 500

Chinese Protestant...

1,800

316

316

***

78

238

72

Eurasian (Ho Tung)

200

176

176

1

172

3

X

Kai Lung Wan East

14,000

4,700

167

1,052

5,919

1,469

4,450

1,360

182

1920 | 1,952 1924 | 1,504 1926

1923 | 1,631 19251,542

992

1927 1,369

Tung Wah (K.L.W. West)

53,486

4,254

87

1,700

6,041

5,711

300

5,105

59

1928 1,247 19196,000 19241,406

1923 | 2,753

1925 1,605

1926 2,862

1927 2,501

19281,288

Mohammedan, Ho Mun Tin

300

295

295

294

2

Sai Yu Shek

5,400

4,548

165

4,713

169

4,544

164

156

1911 1,276

1920 1,197

Shaukiwan (Chai Wan)

6,700

1,635

1-

7

1,642

247

1,395

249

25

1924

548 1927 1,046

1928

169

Shaukiwan (Christian)

185

67

:

67

10

57

5

Stanley (Tung Tau Chau)

1,090

850

So Kon Po (Roman Catholic)

20,000

8,757

6

3

:

356

19

337

24

3

100

8,860

1,649

7,211

1,448

1927

100

1923 560 1924

785

Aberdeen (Shum Wan)

2,000

1,003

5

1,008

158

850

198

34

1927 200

Jewish

250

108

108

1

107

2

Shek (

Malay

Ho Mun Tin

Chinese Permanent.

Cheung Sha Wan

1,000

+

1,000

1

996

+

100 53,400

98 15,400

98

98

1

56

**

15,456

5,389

10,067

4,676

44

118

81

5

...

...

5,200

4,800

9

4,193

9,002

172

8,830

5

1

M (1) 25

Appendix H (i).

INTERMENTS.

The following tables shows the number of interments at the various cemeteries during the year 1929.

Public.

Private.

Colonial

Mount Caroline

72

Roman Catholic, Happy

Valley

147

1,018

Mohamedan,

Happy

Kai Lung Wan East ... 1,469

Valley

58

Kai Lung Wan Chiu

Jewish, Happy Valley.

1

Chow

37

Parsee, Happy Valley.

Chai Wan

247

Malay, Happy Valley.

Chai Wan Christian

10

Chinese Roman Catho-

lic, Sokonpo

1,649

Shum Wan

158

Tung Wah Hospital,

Tung Tau Chau

19

Kai Lung Wan

5,741

Shek O

4

Tung Wah Hospital,

Eastern Extension

16

Sai Yu Shek

169

Chinese Permanent

118

Ho Mun Tin

5,389

Chinese Protestant

78

Ho Mun Tin Indian

1

Kowloon Christian

64

Cheung Sha Wan

172

Eurasian (Ho Tung)

4

`8,765

Kowloon Cemetery, No.

2

1

7,877

2

M (1) 26

Appendix H (ii).

General Exhumations.

Kai Lung Wan West

Kai Lung Wan East

Mount Caroline

Cheung Sha Wan

Appendix H (iii).

Exhumations were carried out by relatives as follows:

Aberdeen

Cheung Sha Wan

Chinese Permanent

5

9

11

Chai Wan

Colonial

Hau Pui Lung

Ho Mun Tin

Kai Lung Wan Kowloon Tong Mount Caroline

7

1

119

56

167

27

313

Ma Tau Wai

20

Roman Catholic

20

Roman Catholic Sokonpo

103

Sai Yu Shek

165

Stanley

6

Tung Wah Hospital

87

Mount Davis

Kowloon Tong Christian

22

Unauthorised cemeteries

Appendix H (iv).

1,154

1,700

1,052

584

4,193

7,529

3 Cremations.

23 bodies were cremated at the Japanese Crematorium

and 29 at the Sikh Temple.

4. Mortuaries.

5.

80 bodies were awaiting burial at the Tung Wah Hos-

pital Mortuary in 1929.

Removals.

403 bodies were removed from the Colony for burial.

!

NON-CHINESE.

- M (1) 27 -

Appendix I.

RETURN OF CERTIFIED AND UNCERTIFIED DEATHS.

CHINESE.

1

2

3

4

LO

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

Uncertified Deaths.

Certified Deaths.

Uncertified Deaths.

Year.

Non-

Number

By

Chinese certified.

Medical

Medical

Reference.

Coroner.

Percentage certified.

Percentage uncertified.

Chinese HongKong. Kowloon. deaths.

Total.

T.W.H.

K.W.H.

Medical Medical Practi- Reference.

Coroner. Percentage

Percentage

certified.

uncertified.

tioners.

deaths.

Practi-

tioners.

1929

219

206

13

94

5.9

17,346

5,628

3,423

9,051

1,571

80

152

5

6,487

52.7

47.8

26

87.2

12.7

14,553

4,416

3,164

7,680

910

128

6

5,829

52.7

47.9

signifies a death the cause of which has been certified on Form 16 of Ordinance No. 7 of 1896 by a registered Medical Practitioner or Licentiate who has attended the case before death.

1928

204

178

...

N.B.—ʻ

"Certified

L

M (1) 29

Appendix J.

REVENUE FROM JANUARY TO DECEMBER, 1929.

$

C.

Chinese Undertakers' Licences

1,020.00

Forfeitures

2.74

Special Food Licences:

13,725.41

Ambulance and Cremation Fees

412.00

Births and Deaths Registration

3,146.60

Chinese Cemetery Fees

5,369.50

Official Certificates

2,848.50

Use of Motor Vans

7,871.55

Lands Not Leased

180.00

Laundries

3,000.00

Markets

291,127.00

Slaughter House, Kennedy Town

97,177.50

Slaughter House, Ma Tau Kok

38,010.00

Interest

17.63

Condemned Stores, &c.

188.50

Other Miscellaneous Receipts

2,813.75

Scavenging City, Villages and Hill District

2,707.24

TOTAL

1928

$469,617.92

$422,958.55

Revenue from Contracts.

Conservancy Contract, Victoria

Conservancy Contract, Kowloon Conservancy Contract, Shaukiwan.... Conservancy Contract,

Contract, Aberdeen, Pokfulam and Aplichau

Blood and Hair Kennedy Town

Blood and Hair, Ma Tau Kok

Slaughtering Contract, Sai Wan Ho

Slaughtering Contract, Aberde

TOTAL

Deduction.

$6,600

5,520 $1,560

$ 6,600 3,960

198

198

60

60

8,544

3,540

4,500

2,100

$29,502

-

M (1) 30

Appendix K.

EXPENDITURE FROM JANUARY TO DECEMBER, 1929.

S.H.

1.

Personal Emoluments

2.

Advertisements

$

C.

459,730.20

1,053.10

3. Ambulances, Coffins, Dead Vans, and Dead

Boxes

1,250.16

4.

Bath-houses, Fuel, Light etc.

1,732.96

5.

Bonuses to Dispensary Licentiates and

Clerks for vaccination of Children and

Registration of Births

2,400.80

6.

7.

9.

Burial of Infected Bodies

2,204.50

Coal for Official Quarters

1,380.75

Conveyance and Motor Allowances

9,440.15

10.

Disinfectants

10,620.62

11. Disinfecting and Cleansing Apparatus

2,662.62

12.

Disinfectors

1,006.99

13. Dust and Water Carts

747.36

14. Exhumation, Recurrent

9,152.46

15.

Fuel for Blacksmith's Forges

216.00

16.

General Cleansing, Chinese New Year

580.50

17. Head Stones

1,835.41

18. Incidental Expenses

2,364.84

20. Light

10,899.92

21. Motor Lorries, Vans and Cars, Running

Expenses

20,807.20

22. Nightsoil Receptacles

670.75

23. Paint, Turpentine, &c.

970.62

25. Rat Poison, Rat Traps, &c.

1,507.62

26.

Rent of Quarters for Inspectors and Sanitary

Officers

988.00

28.

29.

27. Rent of Quarters for Scavenging Coolies

Scavenging City, Villages, and Hill District Scavenging Gear

3,216.00

994.00

8,862.42

30. Transport

2,416.55

31. Uniforms for Staff

10,509.57

32. Workshop Apparatus

144.60

33. Animal Depots and Slaughter Houses, Fuel

4,936.30

34. Animal Depots and Slaughter Houses, In-

cidental Expenses

1,040.44

36

35. Animal Depots and Slaughter Houses, Light Animal Depots and Slaughter Houses, Motor

Meat Vans Running Expenses

37. Cattle Crematorium and Refuse Destructor

760.63

3,263.29

231.60

TOTAL

1928

$580,598.93

$567,686.50

Crown Agents' a/c for November and December are excluded

as they have not yet arrived.

}

- M (1) 31

Special Expenditure.

$ c.

38.

39.

40.

41.

42.

1 Towing Launch

6 Motor Lorries

Exhumation Special

11,419.49

2 Refuse Barges (Replacements)

19,520.00

48,700.00

34,271.45

2 Light Refuse Barges

11,680.00

TOTAL

$125,590.94

1928

$ 11,304.61

Crown Agents' a/c for November and December are excluded.

as they have not yet arrived.

:

M (1) 32

Appendix L.

RETURN FOR THE YEAR, 1929.

Outstanding (31st December, 1928)

No. of nuisances reported

No. of nuisances reported in which no

action taken

No. of first letters sent

12,131

Compliance on first letters

9,936

No. of first letters withdrawn

25

No. of legal notices sent sections 29

and 30

7,271

No. of legal notices withdrawn section.

31

23

No. of legal notices modified section 31

No. of legal notices time extended sec-

tion 31

Compliance on legal notices

6,844

No. of summonses applied for section

32

No. of summonses refused

237

No. of summonses withdrawn

No. of Magistrate's order section 33

1191

16

107

Compliance after Magistrate's order (including compliance after sum- monses) Fines $1,839

No. of cases discharged

No. of cases abandoned through defen-

dant absconding

.

No. of re-summonses for failure to

comply section 35

Compliance after re-summonses.

$215

Nuisances abated by the Sanitary

Department section 35

Expenses of abating $

Outstanding

TOTAL

202

11

Fines

8

247

17,047

229

17,294 17,294

1

**

1

.-

-

M (1) 33

Appendix M.

CLASSIFICATION OF NUISANCES REPORTED, 1929.

1. Defective wastepipes, rain water pipes, eaves gut-

ters, etc.

2,675

2.

Defective gratings

2,521

3.

Illegal cubicles

1,854

4. Choked wastepipes, rain water pipes, eaves gutters,

etc.

1,320

5. No dust bins

1,005

6. Obstructions of windows, doors, ventilating openings,

etc.

940

Defective cement rendering

788

8.

Missing gratings

786

9.

Defective floor surfaces

782

10.

Accumulation of refuse

683

11.

Rat runs filled in

654

12.

Obstructions of verandahs

406

13.

Dirty condition of premises

385

14. Breeding of mosquitoes

330

15. Use of basements for habitation, as workshops etc. 16. Gratings not properly fixed

324

254

17.

No receptacles to latrines

169

18.

Obstructions of yards

133

19. Illegal wooden bunks

128

20. Use of rooms without windows opening into external

air for sleeping purposes

106

21. Illegal height of cubicles

103

22. No cement rendering

66

23. Water closets not maintained in thoroughly efficient

and cleanly condition

66

24. Accumulation of stagnant water

65

25. Use of yards for cooking purposes

56

26. Use of kitchens for sleeping purposes

55

27.

Illegal wooden partitions in kitchens and verandahs.

48

244.

28. Dark and ill-ventilated premises for sleeping pur-

30

poses

Illegal showcases

Use of verandahs for cooking and sleeping purposes. 31. Offensive trades (Rag and feather-storing, Soap-

boiling, etc.)

32 Keeping of cattle and swine without licence

33. Discharge of suilage water, urine and excreta

Use of latrine for cooking purposes

34.

35. No fly-proof covers to receptacles of latrines

Insufficient glazed area to window openings

36.

37. Absence of signboards in front of market stall 38. No urinal accommodation

39. Illegal urinals

40. Water closets or urinals having been maintained in

breach of conditions

44

38

38

35

25

22

22

21

16

9

6

6

6

M (1) 34

41. Illegal partitions extending across the width of the

42.

ground floors

Accumulation of undergrowth

43. Depositing of excreta and urine, etc.

44. Illegal wooden covers over cubicles

45. Keeping of pigs within six feet of dwelling houses.

Obstructions of thoroughfare of market

46.

47. Common lodging houses without licence

48.

49.

50.

Exposing of fruit, vegetables etc. for sale without

licence

Bake-houses without licence

Goods being allowed to project beyond the market

stalls

51. No covers to water tank and well etc.

52. Exposing of articles for sale in a part of the market

not appropriated for the sale of such article

53. Use of staircases for sleeping purposes 54. Black smoke issuing from chimney and funnel

Laundries without licence

55.

56.



Urinals or water closets constructed without permis-

sion of the Board and the consent of C. S.

57. Insanitary and defective water closets and urinals. 58. Storage of pigwash in receptacles outside the kitchen.

59.

Keeping of poultry in premises

60. Use of roof as a kitchen

61. Illegal wooden riding floor

TOTAL

1

1

1

1

1

17,047

2

1

N W

2

3

w w

3

5

4

6

M (1) 35

Appendix N (i):

K DONE IN THE SEVERAL HEALTH DISTRICTS 1929.

36

16

96

21

16

9

6a & 7a

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

Shaukiwan Aberdeen

Total

63

346

ོ- ། སྶ > -

26

248

156

228

151

77

191

57

96

43

78

73

64

12

1,017

2,081

1,579

551

· 1,231

. 812

760

370

511

731

601

189

2888

15

1

1

}

:.

2,125

17,047

137

...

...

12

126

324

143

23

42

61

45

17

26

11

37

1,346

3

65

70

95

29.

27

25

10

80

418

87

32

2

ة

...

9

12

34

47

727

10

18

8

18

18

60

61

2 x x x 8 &

37

34

49.

3

654

39

52

7

39

22

1,240

91

17

147

...

102

37

240

25

87

83 198

87

264

249

749

161

28

53

2

13

658

1,817

...

...

1

:

1

2

4

1

5

I

1

24

8

12

15

...

31

1

-M (1), 35.-

Appendix N. (i).,

PROSPECTUS OF WORK DONE IN THE SEVERAL HEALTH 1

1

2

1a & 2a

3

4

5

6

7

6a & 7a

8

9

Applications for B.A. Notices,

...

...

Applications for S.B. Notices,

...

...

Obstructions removed from open space, Obstructions removed to light and ventilation, Rat runs filled in,

...

...

76

584

620

986

26

73

32

346

191

66

63

26

998

280

1,742

1,280

516

346

248

156

1,017

221

}

2,081

4

27

1

59

28

1

1

24

71

122

4

119

96

21

22

26

12

4

6

12

1

85

78

16

9

20 2

126

65

324

70

Water closets installed in private Buildings,

Houses demolished and No. of floors (Domestic { Houses

222

60

33

120

9

9

1

10

2

19

1

2

Floors

52

2

-1

Houses erected and No. of floors (Domestic

Houses

90

Buildings),



Floors

175

པ =

11

67

51

182

I

1

9

34

Houses demolished and No. of floors (Non

Houses

1

...

Domestic Buildings),...

Floors

6

2

Houses erected and

No. of floors (Non Houses

4

A

1

Domestic Buildings),...

Floors

12

~TH

...

...

';

-M (1) 36-

4

H

; 1

Total amount

of Fines.

69

$266.00

1

10.00

1

5.00

16

55.00

26

188.00

Shau-Aber-

kiwan. deen.

Total No. Total No.

of cases.

13

...

...

1

6

6A &

7 A

7

8

10

11

12

13 14

15

16

17

Appendix N (ii).

OSECUTIONS CLASSIFIED BY HEALTH DISTRICTS 1929.

:

1

::

...

4

14

1

:

:

:

:

.:.

:

,

N

:

:

:

...

1

:

30

:

t

:

6

:.

:

:

:

1

:

...

::

24

...

17

...

1

:..

1

:

...

:

:.

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

::

Co

::

.:..

:

:

1

་་

D:

::

:

:.

:

:.

2

...

...

2

.:..

:

...

:

:

:

::

:

:

:

:

::

:

:

:

3

...

1

1

:ཀ

3

:.

10

N

...

:.

:

:

:

...

:

:

2

:

24

325

...

...

1

1

1

:

...

4

:

:

:

:

:.

N

:

...

:

:

...

:

50

372.00

...

2

50.00

4

127.00

:

...

:..

2

13.00

1

5.00

:

1

25.00

10

60.00

1

...

:

:.

2

N

...

...

...

:

...

:

***

1

1

...

27

co:

3

...

:

...

1

...

1

:.

Co

:

2

...

...

22

9.00

30.00

...

N

2

6

75.00

:

1

10.00

:::

...

15

570.00

...

...

1

10.00

1

10.00

6

2

245

2,054.00

...

...

2

1

...

...

2

ܗ:

...

:

2

8

...

1::∞

9

Nature of Offence.

10

11

12

13

M (1) 38

Appendix N (ii).

PROSECUTIONS CLASSIFIED BY HEALTH DISTRICTS 1929.

1A &

1

2

2A

1

:

00

t-

...

4

10

5

5

6

6A &

7A

7

...

:..

4:

X

:

1

**

1

Co

4:

:

:.

:

2

...

1

:

:

:

:.

:

:

:..

:

:

:

...

:

F:..

:

...

4

14

1

30

:

~

:

6

1

7

:

:

:

T:.

...

:

:

:

...

:

:

i

...

:

I

24

:

:.

~

:

:

:

:

17

...

:

:

:

1

:

:

:

N

...

:.

:

:

:

1

...

:

:

:

:

:.

...

...

:

:

:

:..

::

...

1

...

:

...

::.

:

མཁ

:

:.

:

:

::

:

:

:

:

:

...

:.

...

4:

...

2

10

:.

...

:..

1

3

...

2

2

1

1

...

...

::

1

1

24

27

1

1

3

...

22

28

10

~:::

...

2

68

688

1

11

3

5

::

:.

::

:

Dumping Rubbish, Nightsoil etc. Dumping a dead body

Assaulting a Scavenging Coolie

whilst he was on duty Committing a nuisance in public place

Obstruction of avenue in markets, etc.

Using and permitting basements to be used for habitation, work- shop preparation and storage of food etc

Selling adulterated milk

Using premises for Offensive Trade without S.B. Licence.

Keeping Goats without

Licence

S.B.

Maintaining illegal Cubicles in con- travention of Sec. 154

Using premises as Bake-House without being registered by the Board

Exposing vegetables etc. for sale without S.B. Licence... Carrying Night-soil during pro- hibited hours

Failing to abate smoke nuisances....

Dirty condition

condition of Bakehouse, market stalls etc.

Failing to comply with the Magis- trate's Order

Failing to notify a case of Small-

pox

Trespass on Government Property Obstructions of Verandah

Prosecution on S.B. Nuisance Notices

:

:

Totol

:.



20

24

7

MR

1

C

M (1) 37

Appendix 0.

HOUSE CLEANSING RETURN,

Floors Cleansed.

1927

1928

1929

Eastern Districts (Shaukiwan

1. la and 2a and 2)

23,771

26,026

28,768

Central Districts (3, 4 and 5)

21,826

22,966

21,633

Western Central Districts (6,

6a and 7a, 7)

18,505

20,168 20,714

Western Districts (8, 9 and 10). 20,438

25,115 24,005

Aberdeen

3,072

2,600

2,572

TOTAL

87,612

96,875

97,692

Kowloon (11, 12, 13, 14, 15,

16 and 17)

48,754

55,710

55,070

Nos. 1a and 2a, 5, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 14, 15, 16 and 17 were cleansed twice, Shaukiwan, Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4, 6a and 7a, 7 and 13 were cleansed three times, Nos. 6 and Aberdeen were cleansed four times.

Health Districts.

1 storey.

2 storeys.

3 storeys.

4 storeys.

Appendix P (i). Table Showing Number of Chinese Houses and Floors, Victoria, 1929.

Shaukiwan

Aberdeen and Aplichau

1

la & 2a

101

530

414

59

126

112

...

105

...

350 265

327

21

57 328

482

***

262

...

...

269 580

150

...

...

64 176

87

15

;

61

...

498 627

95

4

5

6

6a & 7a

...

7

19

127

476 321

42

59

34

292

328

σε

16

175

206

16

9

223

382

37

3

34 69

456

423

54

10

128

431 508

76

10

91

525 595

98

Total...

5841,502 5,067 4,850 509

|

C

Co

...

9

...

Co

3

5 storeys.

1

6 storeys.

7 storeys.

8 storeys

9 storeys.

10 storeys

12 storeys.

Houses.

Floors.

1,056

3,491

3:30

297

647

2.18

1,047

2,908

2:08

888

3,047

3:43

1,261

3,140

2.49

342

1,079

3.15

1

I

1,297

4,663

3.59

987

3,207

3.24

781

2,655

3.3

416

1,464

3.51

666

2,505

3.76

1,036

3,502

3.38

1,153

3,971

3.43

1,309

4,627

3.53

1

12,536

40,906

3.27

M (1) 38

Average.

Appendix N.

HONG KONG.

REPORT ON THE BOTANICAL AND FORESTRY

DEPARTMENT FOR THE YEAR 1929.

GENERAL REMARKS.

The weather during the early part of the year was most unfavourable for both gardening and forestry operations; owing to the lack of rain, all tree planting was much delayed. In the latter part of the year many forest fires occurred during the frequent exceptionally dry periods.

The rainfall for the year was 71.16 inches in 128 days as against 80.89 inches on 138 days in 1928.

Typhoon signals were hoisted on three occasions during the year. The typhoon which passed to the south of the Colony on August 22nd caused extensive damage to trees on roadsides, in plantations and in the Botanical Gardens.

GARDENS, PARKS AND GROUNDS.

Botanic Gardens.-A further area of the Old Garden was made available for planting by the terracing of the steep banks on the south side; owing to the difficult nature of the ground in this area, no cultivation had been attempted there since the Gardens were first formed.

The stages in the plant houses were reduced in size, thus opening up much more walking space for the numerous visitors.

Thirteen of the largest trees in the Gardens were blown down by the gale on August 22nd, the largest of them being a Grevillea robusta, which had stood in the New Garden for over 40 years; many other smaller specimen trees and ornamental shrubs were blown down, but the majority of them were saved by being promptly raised and supported.

Work in connection with the removal of large tree stumps, damaged portions of trees, and shrubs was still proceeding`at the end of the year.

The bamboo roofing of the plant houses was blown away by the gale, but the damage among the pot plants was com- paratively light.

N 2

The reconditioning of the Aviary was completed by the Public Works Department and the whole structure is now rat proof.

The damage done to lawns by Grass Caterpillars (Thialleta signifera) during the autumn was negligible.

An avenue of young trees of Grevillea robusta was planted on the grass banks bordering the path immediately adjoining the Fountain Terrace.

The total number of trees, shrubs and pot plants sold dur- ing the year was 1,896.

Government House Grounds.-A very large Banian (Ficus retusa) which stood on the lawn immediately in front of the main entrance to the house was blown down on August 22nd; many other trees, particularly Flame of the Forest, were almost entirely stripped of their largest limbs.

Tennis lawns, bowling greens, flower beds and shrubberies were given such attention as they required.

The interior of the house was decorated on several occasions during the year.

Mountain Lodge Grounds.-An additional flower bed was made and planted with Hydrangea hortensia on the spare ground at the base of flagstaff hill.

Young trees of Cupressus macrocarpa and Casuarina equisc- tifolia were planted in various parts of the grounds.

The valley and outer portions of the grounds were cleared of undesirable undergrowth; tennis lawns and other turfed areas were given such attention as they required.

Colonial Cemetery.-A number of indigenous and other trees which were becoming a danger to headstones and graves were removed.

Several very large specimens of Araucaria excelsa were destroyed by the gale on August 22nd and many other trees were severely damaged. Felling of dangerous trees and branches was still proceeding at the end of the year.

The turfed areas were given such attention as they required; outer areas were regularly cleared of undergrowth.

Kowloon Hospital Grounds.-The exposed position of these grounds makes the work of establishing trees or shrubs very difficult, numbers of such hardy plants as Azalea (Rhododendron indicum) and Archontophoenix Alexandrae have been killed by the prevailing winds. In order to provide shelter for less hardy plants, 755 one year old Pinus Massoniana were planted.

N 3

A large number of Hibiscus Lambertianus and Livistona chinensis were planted in various parts of the grounds, where the majority made slow progress up to the end of the year.

Two additional Bamboo hedges were planted in rear of the hospital buildings.

Undergrowth was regularly cleared from banks, tennis lawns and the extensive turfed areas were given such attention as they required.

Blake Garden, West End Park, King's Park, Civil Hospital, Mental Hospital, Senior Officers' Quarters, Leighton Hill, Indian School, Volunteer Headquarters, Statue Square Plots, Victoria Hospital, Homestead Quarters, Government Pavilions and Vil- las, Royal Observatory, Kowloon Magistracy, Colonial Secretary's Residence, The Eyrie, Government Offices and Queen's Gardens. The grounds or such portions of them as are under the control of this Department were kept in good order during the year, additional planting of trees and flowering shrubs was carried on, and grass lawns, banks, trees and shrubs were given such attention as they required.

Decoration. The City Hall, Queen's Pier and the Hong Kong Cricket Club grounds were decorated on the occasion of the visit of H.R.H. the Duke of Gloucester.

Queen's Pier was decorated on several other occasions, dur- ing the year.

HERBARIUM AND LIBRARY.

During the year 10 new books were added to the library and 518 bulletins, pamplets and other publications were received.

Fifty-eight plant specimens were added to the herbarium.

FORESTRY.

Formation of Pine Tree Plantations.-The number of sow- ings in situ of Pinus Massoniana during the year amounted to 250,480, the areas reafforested were Mount Collinson, West Bay, Pokfulum Valley, Kowloon Bay, Shek Li Pui Catchment Area, Kowloon Tsai, Taipo Kau Forestry Reserve and ground adjoining Ping Shan Land Office; on a number of the areas seeds of Leucacna glauca were mixed and sown with the Pine seeds.

On grassy areas, seeds of Pinus Massoniana and Leucaena glauca were sown by the broadcast method; the total weight of seeds used for all sowings during the year were Pinus Mas- soniana 1,725 pounds and Leucaena glauca 250 pounds.

- N 4

Broad-leaved Trees Planted.-Plantations of varying sizes composed of the following trees were formed in Taipo Kau Forestry Reserve, Mount Collinson Prohibited Area, low hills at Fan Ling and sheltered areas in various parts of the Colony:- Acacia pennata, Acacia confusa, Bischofia javanica, Aleurites montana, Aleurites Fordii, Sterculia lanceolata, Melia Azedarach, Quercus Edithae, Tristania conferta, Crataeva religiosa, Spath- odea nilotica, Achrus sapota, Cinnamomum Camphora, Cup- ressus macrocarpa, Casuarina equisetifolia, Celtis sinensis, Adenanthera intermedia, the total number of trees so planted was 26,000.

Shade and decorative trees were planted in the vicinity of all outlying roads in Hong Kong and the New Territories, but this work was much delayed owing to the lack of rain during the planting season.

#

Miscellaneous Planting.--Groups of flowering trees and shrubs were planted on open spaces in the vicinity of public roads.

The Indian Cemetery in Kowloon was planted with shade and flowering trees.

Trees Felled. In connection with road widening due to the increase of motor traffic, large roadside trees were removed from the following places, Bowen Road, Magazine Gap, Bowrington Canal Road, Garden Road and Morrison Hill Road.

Fellings of large numbers of Pine and wild trees were neces- sitated by the extension of Aberdeen and Kowloon Reservoirs, extensions of public roads and the development of building sites.

Storm Damage. The whole of the forestry staff was engag- ed for over one month in clearing away numerous large trees which were killed or severely damaged by the gale on August. 22nd; the work of dealing with the lesser damage was still proceeding at the end of the year.

Undergrowth Clearing.-The total area cleared in Hong Kong and the New Territories in connection with anti-malarial measures was 2,920,440 square feet. For other purposes, such as clearing of cemeteries, cutting of survey traces, road making, nullah training and other public improvements the area cleared. amounted to 4,413,315 square feet.

Protection of Plantations.-The fire barriers in Taipo Kau Forestry Reserve and Mount Collinson Prohibited Area were extended during the year, and all old fire barriers were cleared before the commencement of the dry season.

N 5

The total number of fires during the year was 116 as against 68 in 1928 and 30 in 1927. This was very largely due to the lack of rain, and extensive damage was done to Pine and other plantations. The most serious damage occurred on the day of the Ching Ming Festival, which was most unfortunately hot and dry, and 27 fires broke out in cemeteries and in the vicinity of graves. The total number of mature Pine trees killed by these fires was not less than 10,000; the whole of the damage was directly due to the careless handling of sacrificial papers, candles and fire-crackers. The Chung Yeung Festival was res ponsible for only two fires. The remainder were apparently caused by the dropping of lighted matches or tobacco.

Insect Pests.-Pine Tree Caterpillars (Dendrolimus punc- tutus) made their appearance in very small numbers and the amount of damage done by them was negligible.

Forest Guards Service.-The total number of persons arrest- ed and charged with forestry offences by Forest Guards during the year was 156, of these 129 were fined or imprisoned, 18 cautioned, 4 had their bail estreated, cases against 2 were dis- missed, 1 was bound over and cases against 2 were withdrawn

The Police Department arrested and charged 98 persons with forestry offences, of these 90 were fined or imprisoned, 1 had bail estreated and 7 were discharged.

Full particulars of these cases are given in Tables I, II and IIA.

Organised raids on plantations were less frequent than usual. This was undoubtedly largely due to exemplary punishment inflicted by Police Magistrates and District Officers and to the absence of old offenders with one or more previous convictions, of whom 8 were banished during the year.

Courts of Inquiry under Ordinance No. 6 of 1917 were held at the villages of Lung Kwu Tan and Mu Tze Lam, where extensive illicit felling of wild trees had occurred. In both cases the villages were fined.

One contractor paid $50 compensation for damage done to roadside trees.

Forest Service Paths.-The service path at Taipo Kau Forestry Reserve was extended and other paths in all parts of the Colony were given such attention as they required.

AGRICULTURE, ETC.

The Ground Nut crop in all parts of the Colony was very poor, owing to the damage done by a fungoid disease.

An exhibit of foreign vegetables was staged at the New Territories Agricultural Show, which was held for the second time at Fan Ling.

N 6

The cultivation of foreign vegetables, during the winter sea- son, is still on the increase in all parts of the Colony.

Inspection of Nursery Stock and Vegetable Products.- Thirteen consignments containing in all 127,940 bulbs of Narcissus Tazetta were inspected and certified as fit for export to Britain and the United States of America.

One hundred and thirty-four consignments of fresh and pre- served vegetable products were inspected and certified as fit for export to the Philippine Islands.

SEED COLLECTION.

Seeds of the following were collected for local use and for the purpose of exchange:-Artocarpus hypargyrea, Liquidambar chinensis, Strychnos angustifolia, Eucalyptus tereticornis, Melaleuca leucadendron, Albizzia Lebbek, Bischofia javanica, Celtis sinensis, Castanospermum australe, Ardisia crispa, Atal- antia Hinds, Garcinia oblongifolia, Acacia pennata, Leucaena glauca, Cassia fistula, Sapium sebifera, Sapium discolor, Melia Azedarach, Callistemon rigidus, Cinnamomum Camphora, Aleu- rites montana, Aleurites triloba, Aleurites Fordii, Pinus Mas- soniana, Casuarina equisetifolia, Cunninghamia sinensis, Glypto- strobus heterophyllus, Bauhinia variegata, Tristania conferta, Sterculia lanceolata, Ficus retusa and Callistemon lanceolata.

EXCHANGE OF SEEDS, &c.

The Department is indebted to the following donors of seeds, plants etc. --Director, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew; Director of Forests, Manila; Director of Agriculture, Bermuda; Conser- vator of Forests, British North Borneo; Professor W. Y. Chun; Messrs. H. Campbell (Cyprus); H. Humphreys; G. H. Potts, J. F. Grose; P. J. Wester (Manila) and R. C. Ching.

The following were the principal recipients:-Director, Botanical Gardens, Leningrad; Director of Agriculture, Ber- muda; Sir Murchison Fletcher; Professor W. Y. Chun; Consult- ing Forest Engineer, Sydney; Conservator of Forests, British North Borneo; Director, Department of Agriculture, Giza, Egypt; Messrs. H. Humphreys; G. Grossman; J. F. Grose; Knowles A. Ryerson (U.S.A.); C. Woodrow; P. J. Wester (Manila); R. C. Pickering (U.S.A.) and W. Dixson (Australia).

REVENCE AND EXPENDITURE.

Statements of Revenue collected by the Department and comparison of Revenue and Expenditure are given in Tables III and IV.

H. GREEN,

Superintendent.

28th March, 1930.

N 7

Table I.

FOREST GUARDS, SERVICE: OFFENCE.

REPORT OF:

Village or

District.

Pine tree

Brush-

Block

Compartment.

Pine tree

stealing.

Pine cone

Grass

branch

stealing.

stealing.

wood

stealing.

cutting.

Wild

flower

stealing.

Tree root

stealing.

Cattle

grazing in

upon

Trespassing

plantation. plantation. plantation.

Setting

fire on

Victoria Wongneichung

Shaukiwan

Tytam

Stanley

Aberdeen

Pokfulam

Kowloon

123

A.B.C.E.G.

4

A.

2

42

18

B.C.D.E.

A.

A.B.D.F.

2

1

3

7

B.C.E.F.G.

2

6

8

1

9

A.B.C.

8

10

·

11

12

20117

6

2

Harbour Belt

Cheungshawan

Kang Hau

New Territories.

Total for 1929.

Total for 1928

1

2

12

7

4

2

31

6

19

10

43

1

2

4

77

47

16

1

97

4

10

2

3

98

3

- N 8

Table II.

POLICE COURT RESULTS,

Case.

1929

1928

$1 to $5 fine

25

52

$ 6,, $10

14

63

$11

$25

15

13

""

$26 $50

1

3

اوو

>"

1 to

7 days' imprisonment

10

23

8 14

38

53

>>

27

13

29

""

3 weeks'

4

6

"?

"}

""

1 month's

2 4 2

3

10

"}

2 months'

1

1

""

3

""

""

6

"}

""

Discharges

Cautions

2

6

18

25

Forfeiture of Bail

4

Cases withdrawn

2

Bound over

2

Detained for 24 hours

1

TOTAL

156

281

Table IIA.

FORESTRY OFFENCES, POLICE DEPARTMENT.

Number of Cases

Number of Offenders

Convicted Bail estreated Discharged

TOTAL

1929

1928

-X-

81

128

90

135

1

7

10



98

145

* Including 1 by District Watchmen as against 11 in 1928

Revenue.

N 9

Table III.

REVENUE.

1929

1928

$

Timber Sales

4,102 25

$ 3,084.32

Plant Sales

797.35

724.20

Loan of Plants

346.18

216.36

Forestry Licences

* 5,232.93

3,734.92

Sale of Condemned Stores .....

15.65

Other Miscellaneous Receipts....

+ 1,383.48

1,044.37

Interest on Current Account...

23.78

29.53

Total

* Collected by District Officer.

11,885.97

8,849.35

+ Including $1,360 for Inspection of Nursery Stock as against $985

in 1928.

Table IV.

Comparative Statement of Revenue and Expenditure for

the Year 1920-1929.

Year

Total Expenditure. Total Revenue.

of Revenue to Expenditure.

1920

$ 55,975.49

$

8,547.76

15.27

1921

61,428.11

10,657.86

17.35

1922

71,223.47

12,464.32

17.50

1923

77,157.40

15,848.76

20.54

1924

86,516.80

13,038.79

15.07

1925

96,371.63

9.806.95

10.18

1926

87,642.19

10,798.95

12.32

1927

93,289.09

7,861.76

8.43

1928

96,597.70

8,849.35

9.16

1929

98,412.87

11,885.97

12.78

Appendix 0.

REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF EDUCATION

FOR THE YEAR 1929.

Preface.

Summary of Contents.

Chapter 1.-Review of Year.

Chapter 2.-Expenditure, Revenue, Scholarships.

Chapter 3.-Report by the Inspectors of English Schools. Chapter 4.-Report by the Inspector of Vernacular Schools. Chapter 5.-Report by the Director of the Technical Institute. Tables I & II.-General tables of Schools and Scholars.

Table III.-Government Schools.

Table IV.-Controlled Schools in receipt of a Grant under the

Grant Code.

Table V-Amount of Fees remitted in Government Schools

during 1929.

Table VI.-Graph showing numbers of Scholars between 1913

and 1929.

Preface.

1.-CLASSIFICATION OF SCHOOLS.

Those schools in England and Wales which are, wholly or partly, dependent on assistance from public funds lie within the control of the Local Education Authority, the Board of Education and, in the case of non-provided schools, of their own managers.

In Hong Kong Government doubles the parts of Local Education Authority and Ministry of Education. Consequently there is no distinction with regard to financial assistance from rates and taxes.

Of the 1007 schools controlled by the Education Depart- ment in 1929 twenty are directly managed by Government. The cost of their equipment and maintenance is a charge on the colonial revenues and, except for a few temporary appoint- ments, the teachers are civil servants on the permanent establishment of the Government of the Colony.

328 schools under private management are partly dependent on assistance from public funds.

0 2

There are also 659 other private schools subject to registra- tion and inspection but receiving no financial assistance from funds at the disposal of the Director of Education. A "school" is defined in the Education Ordinance as "a place where ten or more persons are habitually taught." All such institutions fall within the control of the Education Department.

2.-GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS

These are either schools where the medium of instruction is English or for the most part English, or schools where the medium of instruction is Chinese.

Of four Government English Schools, usually classed as secondary schools, three have primary departments and eight classes take the pupils from the first steps in English to the Matriculation and Senior Local Examinations of the University of Hong Kong either of which constitutes the leaving certificate of these schools.

The twelve primary schools fall into two groups-four mixed schools being preparatory for the Central British School, which has no primary department, and eight "District" and Lower Grade schools, one of which is a school for Indians where Urdu takes the place of Chinese.

In those English schools which are attended by Chinese. usually known as Anglo-Chinese schools, the study of English and Chinese is carried on side by side, the pari passu system requiring that promotion shall depend on proficiency in both languages.

The Technical Institute, an evening school for adults. which is classed in Tables 1 and 2 as "vocational", is attended by persons desirous of receiving instruction in subjects for the most part germane to their daytime occupations.

Of the remaining Government schools the

the Vernacular Middle School, which has a Normal department for the training of Vernacular Teachers, is classed as a secondary school. There is also a Normal School for the training of Vernacular Women Teachers and a Normal School on the mainland which aims at providing Vernacular teachers for rural schools.

3.-GRANT IN AID AND SUBSIDIZED SCHOOLS.

(i) The control of and assistance given to Grant in Aid Schools is regulated by the Grant Code. Of these schools six are English schools for Boys, six are English schools for Girls and four are Vernacular schools for Girls.

Of the above one English school for boys and one English school for girls are lower grade schools, the further education of the children being provided at parent institutions. The remaining ten English schools, usually classed as secondary schools have primary departments.

0 3

(ii) The Subsidized Schools are all Vernacular Schools and differ from the Vernacular Grant in Aid Schools only in the method by which financial assistance is afforded. The Subsidy system is found to be the most suitable way of implementing financial assistance to Vernacular schools and it is not proposed to add to the number of Vernacular schools under Code regulations.

4.-UNAIDED SCHOOLS.

The pupils in the Unaided Schools constitute about half of the children under instruction in Hong Kong. The relations between them and the Director of Education are governed by the Education Ordinance of 1913.

(i) As will be seen from Table 2 the great majority of these schools are Vernacular schools and among them there is con- siderable difference as to quality. At one end are schools nearly good enough to be eligible for subsidy at the other end are ephemeral schools which come and go each year. Thus in 1929 193 new schools were granted registration and 164 closed.

:

(ii) The unaided English schools are either day schools or night schools, the former being on the whole of better quality. In 1929 16 new days schools and 42 new night schools were registered: 22 day schools and 45 night schools were closed.

Very few of these schools approach the standard of the Grant in Aid schools, nor are they able to provide such staff, premises or equipment as would enable them to do so.

Educationally there is little need for these schools and the demand for instruction in English which calls them into existence · would be more satisfactorily met by additional "District" or Lower Grade Government schools.

The great majority of the pupils in the three different classes of English schools are to be found in the junior schools and the junior departments of "secondary" schools, and of these most leave before they reach Class 2 where in Government and Grant in Aid Schools they are required to sit for the Junior Local Examination of the University of Hong Kong.

Up to 1913, the date of the Education Ordinance, the policy or trend, as described by the then Director of Education, was "to encourage Upper Grade schools, both Government and Grant rather than Lower Grade schools"

Though this tendency has been somewhat modified since pre-Ordinance days, the improvement is mostly in the field of Vernacular education and the existence of 135 English schools in which the teaching and the English are for the most part of an inferior quality shows that the demand for English is only partially satisfied by the more efficient Government and Grant in Aid schools.

0 4

Chapter I.

REVIEW OF THE YEAR, 1929,

STAFF.

Of the English Masters usually appointed from England one resigned, one was invalided and four new appointments were made.

At the end of the year there were 25 of these masters on the establishment out of the 33 appearing on the estimates.

Four new posts were added, successful candidates being re- quired, after graduation, to take an Education Diploma Course in England before coming out to the Colony. Two of these posts were filled during the year.

Twenty Government Students in various "years" were in residence at the University of Hong Kong of whom three failed at the end of the year. Two graduated and received appoint- ments as University Trained Teachers.

Of English Mistresses usually appointed from England the year began with 31.

Four new mistresses arrived during the

year and one resigned.

It is with great regret that I have to record the death of Mr. Lai Pui Yan, assistant master at Queen's College. Mr. Lai, a very efficient member of a valuable class of teacher, had spent over twenty-five years in the service of Government..

BOARD OF EDUCATION.

The Board of Education met six times during the year.

Chev. J. M. Alves, Rev. Fr. Byrne, Mr. B. Wylie and Mr. A. el Arculli were re-appointed in January, February, May and July respectively.

Capt. E. R. Deakin was appointed to the Board on March 22 vice Captain Charnock, A.E.C.

During the absence of Mr. Dowbiggin from the Colony from February 1 to November 7 Mr. C. L. C. Sandes acted as a Member of the Board.

-

0 5

Members of the Board of Education. Director of Education (Chairman).

Senior Inspector of English Schools.

Senior Inspector of Vernacular Schools.

Rev. A. D. Stewart.

Hon. Mr. S. W. Tso, O.B.E., LL.D.

Chev. J. M. Alves.

Mr. A. el Arculli.

Rev. G. Byrne, S J., D Ph.

Mr. B. Wylie.

Rev. F. Short.

Mr. H. K. Woo.

Capt. E. R. Deakin, D.S.O., M.C., A.E.C.

Mr. A. R. Sutherland (Secretary).

GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS.

British Schools. I mentioned in my report for 1928 that Gun Club Hill School leased since 1921 from the Military Au- thorities for the use of Kowloon Junior School would not be available in 1929. "Parkside" was adapted for the purpose and has, on the whole proved satisfactory, but a large room for physical drill is needed. This would also be useful as an assembly hall.

The total number of pupils enrolled at the five schools in 1929 was 466 as against 436 in 1928 and 409 in 1927. The in- crease during the last ten years of the number of children in the British Schools seems to indicate that more families are settling down here and regarding the Colony as their home, though the closing of the Sugar Refinery at Quarry Bay will affect the attendance at the school in that district.

A number of children, however, still proceed to Europe to continue their education and it is satisfactory to find that they usually do well and more often than not are found to be up to or beyond the standard expected from children of their age.

0 6

At present the pupils of Class 1 at the Central British School sit each year for the Matriculation Examination of the University of Hong Kong and a few lor the London University Matriculation.

An annexe of five classrooms was opened in this school in 1924. Four extra rooms were added in 1928 and it is agam Jound necessary to provide additional room of a temporary nature which will serve till a new school building becomes available.

Anglo-Chinese Schools.-The total number of pupils on roll was 3,554 as against 3,238 in 1928. At Queen's College, King's College and Belhos Public School for Girls the pupils of Classes 1 and 2 are required to sit for the Matriculation or Senior Local and Junior Local Examinations of the University of Hong Kong. This year the entrants numbered 214 and 102 passed.

The age limit for admission to Class 8 has been raised to twelve plus. These entrants are, it should be understood, not making their first venture into school life, as the entrance ex- amination postulates three or four, years education in the ver- nacular.

During the year Un Long school building was found to be unsafe and rented premises have been occupied pending the erection of a new building.

Vernacular Schools.-The Vernacular Middle School was again unable to accommodate all the applicants for admission. At the final examination in the normal department seven quali- fied as Vernacular teachers. The Inspector of Vernacular Schools reports that these teachers are sought for by heads of schools and easily find employment.

The Vernacular Normal School for Women continues its satisfactory career and again shows a small increase in numbers: holders of the final certificates from this school also have no difficulty in finding posts and are doing useful work.

Technical Institute.-The number on the roll was 598. This institution which represents the only provision in the Colony for adult education continues to supply an obvious need. Very useful are the English and Vernacular teachers' classes, which have been effective in improving the quality of the instruction in the schools of the Colony.

- 07

GRANT IN AID SCHOOLS.

The number of these schools is again sixteen, the Wah Yan branch school at Kowloon having been added to the list. It may not be necessary to place any more schools on the Grant List in the near future and I do not see any pressing need for an increase in the secondary departments of English Schools for the next few years.

As the late Governor said at one of his last public functions there is room for more schools which cater for that majority of our pupils who do not stay at school beyond class 3 or 4.

The pupils at the English Schools numbered 4,639 as against 4,257 last year while the numbers at Vernacular Schools dropped from 1,011 to 987.

PRIVATE SCHOOLS.

It was found necessary at the beginning of the year to appoint one new Inspector of Vernacular Schools and an in- crease in subsidy expenditure of $3,000 was incurred. This would have to be further, but at present not considerably, increased if aid were given to all schools which merit and need it The receipt of a subsidy is a sort of hall mark and has the merit of attracting pupils to institutions which have met with the comparative approval of the inspectors.

In the preface to this report I have referred to the private English schools of which in 1929 there were 135 with 6,361 pupils of whom only 270 were girls.

EXAMINATIONS.

(1) A table showing the results of the Matriculation and Local Examinations conducted in 1929 by the University of Hong Kong is given below. A fair standard has been reached in Government and Grant in Aid schools, of the latter three girls schools being well above the average and one boys' school considerably below. This year for the first time there were candidates from a Vernacular Grant school for girls.

The Local Examinations are conducted by the University at the request of the Government. All boys and girls in the two senior classes of Government and Grant in Aid English schools are required to sit for these examinations.

HONG KONG UNIVERSITY MATRICULATION & LOCAL EXAMINATION RESULTS 1929.

MATRICULATION AND

JUNIOR

LOCAL

SENIOR LOCAL

School.

Passed

Matric

Passed

Sen. Local

Presented

Passed

Queen's College

21

53

26

57

King's College

21

15

Belilios Public School

10

10

Central British School

St. Joseph's College

17

5

32

Italian Convent School..

4

10

1 t

****

31

13

SEE TE

36

18

11

97

14

French Convent School

3

11

14

Diocesan Girls' School

10

10

11

Diocesan Boys' School

6

4

18

31

St. Mary's School

9

10

10

Wah Yan College

10

7

46

25

56

St. Stephen's Girls' College.

6

16

12

15

Wah Yan Branch School

9

St. Paul's College

1

17

24

Ying Wah Girls' School

10

:

Ying Wa College

Tutorial Institute St. Peter's College......

St. George's College...

Sacred Heart School

Munsang College

Docksin School

Kowloon College

1

18

23

1

1

20

17

1

9

16

10

1

To Man Wai School

Tai Tung College

3

St. Stephen's College

4

34

10

Private Study...........

13

37

Shanghai Centre...

29

Semarang Centre

13

18

909*

19

6

79

19

46

35

Batavia Centre

1

1

6

Penang Centre

5

1

10

1

4

Singapore Centre

Total,

108

87

453

268

690

Presented

It is a common practice among writers and speakers on educational subjects to depreciate examinations. But there is ut present nothing to take their place and they are likely to form part of educational machinery for some time to come. Nor do I think there is anything intrinsically vicious about them but they are liable to abuse. The results of the examina- tions among the private unaided schools reveal a serious misuse of the Local Examinations and especially of the Junior Local.

It will be seen that ten of these schools have secured 21 passes out of 151 candidates who sat for the examinations. But though this represents a pitiful waste of energy, I am not so concerned about the high percentage of failures as about the low numbers entering from individual schools. The selection of a few candidates who are optimistically supposed to have a chance of passing is contrary to the object of the examinations, which are only of value if every boy or girl from the appropriate class is entered for them.

(ii) Every year all the boys in Class 4 at Queen's College, King's College and the Government "District Schools", viz. Ellis Kadoorie School, Yaumati School, Wantsai School and the Indian School, sit for an examination conducted jointly by the head masters of these institutions, and boys from this class in these schools do not gain admission to the three senior classes of Queen's College and King's College by any other means.

This year, of 324 Class 4 boys, 274 or 80% passed. Four schools were above the average and two below.

A constant

This examination has been found very useful. standard is attained and the senior classes are not flooded with entrants who have procured promotion by examinations of vary- ing quality. It may be found advisable to throw this examina- tion open so that boys attending schools which do not maintain secondary departments or schools which endeavour to do so with inadequate staffs may have an opportunity of continuing their education.

(iii) From time to time, as application is made, examina- tions of the University of London are held at the Education Office. In 1929 there were two Matriculation examinations, one in January and one in June.

These examinations do not form anv part of the educational system of the Colony but are arranged for the convenience of the public.

(iv). Two examinations of the Royal Sanitary Institute were held during the year.

(v) One teacher sat for the Teachers' Certificate examina- tion of the National Froebel Union.

O 10

Chapter II.

EXPENDITURE: REVENUE: SCHOLARSHIPS.

1.-SUMMARY OF EXPENDITURE & REVENUE.

(c) Subsidies to Vernacular Schools

(d) Direction and Inspection.

(a) Government

Schools-salaries, equip-

ment, rent

$ 807,935

(b) Assistance to Grant Schools etc.

144,131

108,388

60,904

24,795

6,222

$1,152,375

(e) University Students in Training (f) Miscellaneous

TOTAL

The figures in this chapter refer only to expenditure under the Estimates of the Education Department.

2.-EXPENDITURE

Under (a) teachers' salaries amounted to $770,897, rent of school buildings $5,544 and equipment and general expenses to $31,494.

Under (a) are not included furniture and maintenance of buildings (Public Works Department). Under (a) and (d) arè not included cost of the clerical staff (Junior Clerical Staff), cost of pensions (Pensions), cost of leave passages (Miscellaneous Services, Transport of Government Servants).

Details of financial assistance (b) to Grant in Aid Schools etc. during 1929 are as under :

English Schools.

Capitation Grant. Higher Classes

$ 25.200

Capitation Grant, Remove Classes

53,220

Capitation Grant, Lower Classes

29,100

Matriculation & Local Examinations Grant.

14,450

Entrance Fees to Local Examinations

7,715

Rent Grant

3,120

Vernacular Schools.

Capitation Grant

10.626

Miscellaneous.

Maternity Hospital, Salary of teacher Alice Memorial

600

IIospital-teacher,

two

months

TOTAL

100

$144,131

Table TV shows the financial assistance accorded this year

in respect of 1929.

O 11

Under (d) is included the amount expended under convey- ance of heads of schools as well as of the office staff, salaries of inspectors and sub-inspectors and Education office servants but not those of the Director of Education (Cadet Service), Medical Officer of Schools and School Nurse (Medical Depart- ment) nor the cost of electric light and fans at the Education Office.

The sum of $24,795 under University Students in Training (e) is made up of Tuition Fees ($8,395), Maintenance ($9,200) and Personal Emolument ($7,200).

The subhead Miscellaneous (f) includes an annual grant of $1,500 to the Hok Hoi Library, a sum of $2,531 paid to the Kowloon Canton Railway as compensation for loss on school- children's tickets and a contribution of $2,191 towards the cost of the London Advisory Committee on Education in the Colonies.

Details as to School fees will be found in Table 3.

3.-SCHOLARSHIPS IN GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS.

These may be either Internal Scholarships implemented through remission of fees by Government or External Scholar- ships provided by individual benefactors or groups of benefac- tors. Internal Scholarships may be:-

(i) Scholarships from Vernacular Schools to Govern- ment English Schools-free education for five years:

(ii)

Scholarships from each class in Government Schools to the one above-free education for one year:

(iii) Scholarships from Lower Grade Schools to Dis- trict Schools-free education for two years:

(iv) Scholarships from Class 4 in District Schools, Queen's College and King's College to the upper classes at Queen's College and King's College- free education for three years:

(v)

Scholarships from the Garrison School (classed in Table 1 as "uncontrolled") to Central British School.

(vi) to which may be added a number of "free places" which are not strictly speaking scholarships but granted for eleemosynary reasons.

During 1929 the fees remitted by Government as above amounted to $20,371.

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-

The External Scholarships tenable in Government Schools are as follows:

(i)

"Lugard Scholarships" tenable at Queen's College. (Some of these are tenable at the Diocesan Girls' School, Italian Convent School, St. Mary's School, French Convent School and St. Joseph's College).

(ii) "Ho Tung Outlying Schools Scholarships" ten

able at Tai Po, Un Long and Cheung Chan Schools.

(iii) "Wu Hay Tong Scholarships" tenable at Queen -

College, King's College, Ellis Kadoorie Schoen Belilios Public School, Yaumati School, Wants.. School, Gap Road School, and others from the three outlying schools to higher grade schools.

(iv) "Tsoi Kung Po Scholarships" awarded at disere-

tion of the Director of Education.

(v)

"Fung Ping Shan Scholarships" tenable at the Vernacular Middle School.

(vi) "Ellis Kadoorie Scholarships" from the Indian

School to Queen's College.

(vii) "Ellis Kadoorie Scholarships" tenable at the

Indian School.

(viii) "Belilios Trust Scholarships" tenable at Belilios

Public School.

(ix) "Kotewall Scholarships" tenable at Gap Road

School.

(x)

The following scholarships are tenable at Queen's College only:-

Senior, Junior and Intermediate "Morrison",

Senior and Junior "Belilios", "Ho Tung' (Queen's College), "Ho Kom Tong" (Queen's College), "Ralphs" (Queen's College), Wright", Alfred May”, "Grant" "Dealy", "Ng In", "Tsang Chung", "Kong Ki Fai", "Ho Fook", "Ho Wing", "Ho lu", "Ho Kwong", "Lee Hy San", "Tai Yau", "Lau Chu Pak", "Sheung Hing" and an anony- mous scholarships for boys from the Pun Yu District.

Details of these scholarships are given in the

Queen's College prospectus.

O 13

(xi) The following scholarships are tenable at King's

College only:-

"Chan Pek Chuen", "Belilios", "Ho Tung",

(King's College), "Hu Cheong”, “Alan Morris", "Chan Shek Shan", "Ho Kom

Tong" (King's College), "Ralphs"

(King's College), "Mok Kon Sang", "Alfred Morris", "Kwok Siu Lau".

2

Details of these scholarships are given in the

King's College prospectus.

(xii) The following scholarships are tenable at Ellis

Kadoorie School:

"Chan Kai Ming", "Mrs. Lau Chu Pak", "Ho Kom Tong" (Ellis Kadoorie

School).

(xiii) "Tai Po" Scholarships tenable at Tai Po School.

(xiv) The following scholarships are tenable at the

Central British School only :

"J. R. M. Smith", "Hong Kong & Whampoa Dock Company", "Ezra Abraham". Details of these scholarships are given in the

Central British School prospectus.

External Scholarships are approximately of

an annual value of $8,000.

HEALTH.

That the health of children in Government Schools is good is evidenced by the high average attendance as compared with total enrolment.

I attach extracts from the Report of the Medical Officer of Schools.

During the year, 2,552 children were examined, entrants and re-inspections. The percentage of defect, which remains steady year by year, being 37 in British and 44 in Chinese schools. Improvements recorded were rather more than 50%.

A very large proportion of the defect among Chinese children is vision defect which is treated more or less successfully, though most children, not being by any means entrants to school life when first medically inspected, are not seen early enough in their school career.

O 14

Cases of spinal curvature, deformity, mouth-breathing etc. were reported to Physical Instructor or Physical training teachers. and by this means improvement has been effected. Visiting in homes by the School Nurses is also beginning to show results.

Chickenpox affected all the British schools, there being 34 cases in two small epidemics in March and December.

Cases of diphtheria (6), mumps (6), typhoid (7) and measles (4) were notified in Government or Grant in Aid schools.

E. RALPHS,

17th March, 1930.

Director of Education.

O 15

-

Chapter III.

REPORT BY INSPECTORS OF ENGLISH SCHOOLS.

1.-GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS.

Queen's College. The maximum enrolment was 691 and the average attendance 619. At the beginning of the year 451 applicants for admission were refused. The health of the pupils, as the high percentage of attendance indicates, was good but there was an unusual amount of sickness on the staff and the college suffered a great loss by the death of Mr. Lai Pui Yan whose name will long be remembered by the boys and old boys who were fortunate enough to be taught by him.

At the external examinations held at the end of the year by the University of Hong Kong, for which 110 boys were presented, 49 passed with 17 distinctions. At the internal ex- amination for the rest of the school 328 passed out of 500.

Mr. Reeves, Map Curator and Cartographer of the Royal Geographical Society was good enough to examine the best specimens sent in for the annual competition in map produc- tion. He found that these were "creditable productions" and indicated the possibility of the competitors becoming with train- ing "really good geographical draughtsmen".

The inclusion of the Head Master, Mr. A. H. Crook, M.A., O.B.E. in the New Year Honours was a great pleasure to the old boys whose interest in their old school iş illustrated by the generosity of the Association to which the Head Master alluded in his speech at the annual prize-giving.

King's College.-The maximum enrolment was 856 and the average attendance 782. It was not possible to consider the admission of a large number of applicants at the beginning of the year. As will be seen from the foregoing figures this school is approaching its limits as regards numbers.

At the external examinations held at the end of the year by the University of Hong Kong, for which 57 boys were pre- sented, 26 passed with 11 distinctions.

We regret to have to record the death. of Mr. Wong Wo Ting a member of the Vernacular Staff.

The equipment of the gymnasium is now complete and a full time gymnasium instructor has been appointed.

O 16

The signal success of the woodwork class, in which 120 boys, all volunteers, work after school hours with excellent results, seems to contradict the opinion we have often heard that hand work of this nature is not popular with Chinese. schoolboys.

The school hours, 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., facilitate the out of school activities which are a feature of this institution. These, in addition to games, swimming and woodwork include a success- ful ambulance division, a troop of boy scouts and a photography class.

Ellis Kadoorie School.-The maximum enrolment was 439 and the average attendance 381. 150 boys were refused admis- sion.

For most of the year Mr. J. Ralston, M.A., acted as Head Master, owing to the absence on leave of Mr. F. J. de Rome, B.Sc.

The New Method Readers have now passed the experiment- al stage and are to be introduced throughout the school as they have been found superior to any previously used. The Head Master is to be congratulated on the success of the innovation.

The outdoor activities of the school have, as usual, included several enjoyable and profitable excursions to places of interest.

41 boys were successful out of 48 who sat for the annual examination of Class 4 and of the rest of the school 95% gained promotion to higher classes.

Yaumati School. The maximum enrolment was 272 and the average attendance 255. A considerable proportion of the boys come from rural schools in the New Territory.

The results at the annual examination of class 4 were dis- appointing.

Wantsai School. The maximum enrolment was 212 and the average attendance 198. This school receives boys from Gap Road School and in 1929 found itself with only two classes in seven divisions and no lower classes.

Of

At the annual examination of Class 4, 69 boys passed and all are now attending Government higher grade schools. the boys in the three divisions of Class 5 83% gained promotion to Class 4.

Gap Road School.--The maximum enrolment was 152 and the average attendance 145—a creditable figure which also shows that the health of the boys was satisfactory. Boys from this school continue to be successful at Wantsai School and after- wards at Queen's College.

O 17

Of the three outlying schools Tai Po had a maximum en- rolment of 92 with an average attendance of 77. The figures at Un Long were 64 and 47.

The Head Master of the latter school complains that malaria had affected the summer attend-

ance.

It is hoped that before very long these two schools will have a District School accessible from both localities.

Owing to its insularity Cheung Chau boys will have to seek promotion to higher classes in Hong Kong schools. This school, once the architectural Cinderella of Government Schools is re- joicing in its new building. It is a sorry typhoon that does not benefit somebody. The maximum enrolment was 74 with an average attendance of 65.

Ellis Kadoorie School for Indians.-The maximum enrol- ment was 131 with an average attendance of 119. This school is in the proverbial state which calls for no particular comment. Numbers were slightly higher and nobody was ill; they were all vaccinated in October. Games were as usual good. Of the 16 boys in Class 4 thirteen succeeded in getting out of it and of the remaining 104 bors in the school only two failed to achieve promotion.

Belilios Public School. The maximum enrolment was 571 with an average attendance of 505. In spite of the unhappy lack of space outside the classrooms the extraneous activities of the school are many.

The policy of increasing the amount and standard of English has been continued with good results. The school is approaching the end of a transition period. The old institution has gone and the day has long passed when young women of 18 or 19 left what was once a purely vernacular department to waste eighteen months over a smattering of elementary English which was soon forgotten in the interests of married life.

The maximum enrolment at the five British Schools was 466 against 436 the previous year but the increase in numbers was confined to the two Kowloon schools, the figures at the island schools being slightly lower than in 1928.

At the Central British School, where the maximum enrol- ment and average attendance were 194 and 141, one pupil passed the London Matriculation and three the Matriculation of the University of Hong Kong.

At the end of the year examinations, 71% were successful,

Promotion from the junior schools is effected by the heads in co-operation with the Head Master of the Central British School, which continues to do excellent work and in the main, as in the case of any school, this must be attributed to the Head Master and his Staff.

O 18

They are, however assisted by certain material factors. The school lies within the number limits which permit each pupil to be more than a name to the head of the school so that individual consideration is possible. It is also fortunate in the absence of the lower forms which are confined to the junior schools. This permits of concentration of staff. We hope some day to see a similarly restricted Anglo-Chinese school.

The largest of the junior schools. now housed in "Park- side', is Kowloon Junior School which in 1929 had a maximum enrolment of 116 with an average attendance of 88. One larger room or hall for gymnastics is required, but on the whole this school has benefitted by the move from Gun Club Hill. Miss Cooper, B. A. was absent for most of the year. Miss Hendry

acted as Head Mistress.

Miss Newsholme acted as Head Mistress at the Peak School during Mrs. Stark's absence on leave. The maximum enrolment was 70 and the average attendance 57.

Victoria British School and Quarry Bay School had respec- tively maximum enrolments of 51 and 37 with average attendance of 38 and 29

2.-GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS-GAMES.

Every year sees an increase in the numbers of Chinese boys taking part in games in spite of the restricted space available.

Full use is made of school compounds and in all the Anglo- Chinese schools volley ball or basket ball is played, interest being stimulated by inter-class and inter-school competitions.

Only two schools, Queen's College and Yaumati School have grounds for their exclusive use. Both these schools play foot- ball as do also Central British, the Indian School, Ellis Kadoorie, Gap Road and Tai Po.

The schools which have no fields of their own share grounds under the auspices of the Recreation Grounds Committee.

Queen's College, the Central British and Indian schools play cricket and lawn tennis, which game is also popular at King's College.

King's College is the happy possessor of a bath for swim- ming which very useful form of recreation is enjoyed by most schools either on approved beaches or by means of launch pic- nics.

At the Indian School and Quarry Bay are flourishing gardens.

O 19

3. GRANT IN AID SCHOOLS.

The Grant in Aid schools, statistics as to which will be found in Table 4, were visited at least twice during the year, the annual inspections being held as usual in October and Novem- ber. There were 4,158 pupils present at inspection.

Discipline can be reported as good in all schools.

With the exception of one point, but it is an important exception, the general work of these schools can be characterised as good, in some cases very good.

Reading and Recitation were good throughout.

Pronunciation and Conversation are improving but are not equally good in all schools. This cannot be hoped for where the Chinese language is used as the medium of instruction in English lessons.

There are Chinese classes in Anglo-Chinese schools and Chinese pupils are expected to be proficient in both languages. The English classes, however, should be conducted entirely in English. It is the particular character of "English" schools that the medium of instruction in other than vernacular lessons is the English language.

If teachers do not teach in English it must be either be- cause they cannot or are not required to do so by the head of the school or because they do not carry out his instructions. Either the school is not efficiently directed or the teachers are not "adequate according to Code requirements the natural consequence of which is reduction of grant.

Written work, Drawing and Map production were on the whole good.

In the girls' schools they were very good as were Painting and Needle-work.

We were glad to notice the freer use of wall maps, atlases and sketch maps in connection with history lessons.

4.-PRIVATE ENGLISH SCHOOLS.

Day Schools-Of the 60 schools existing at the end of 1928, 16 closed and 6 disappeared without giving notice; while 16 new schools were opened during the year, thus making the number at the end of the year 54. The total number of students enrolled was 4,119 including 270 girls (4,059 in 1928); and the average attendance was 3,754 (3,484 in 1928).

1

O 20

Eight of the existing schools were girls' schools, two of which attempt to teach Chinese ladies a practical knowledge of the English language, and one teaches type-writing only. Amongst the boys' schools, eight sent students to sit for the Hong Kong Matriculation, and the Senior and Junior Locals.

Night Schools.-During the year, 42 new schools were re- gistered, and 45 closed-the number existing at the end of December was 81 as against 84 in the previous year. The num- ber of students enrolled was 2,242 (2,030 in 1928) and the average attendance was 1,768 (1,577 in 1928).

All schools have been visited at least once during the year.

G. P. DE MARTIN,

A. R. SUTHERLAND,

Inspectors of English Schools.

I. S. WAN,

Inspector of Private English Schools.

!

1

O 21

Chapter IV.

REPORT ON VERNACULAR SCHOOLS, 1929.

I.. -GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS.

(i) Vernacular Middle School-Head Teacher, Mr. Li King Hong, B.A.

The Maximum Enrolment was 191 (208 in 1928).

The Average Attendance was 176 (186 in 1928).

In

There were only 2 students in the highest class, who were, as in previous years, entered for the Special Final Examination conducted by the Hong Kong University, and one passed. the Normal Division, 12 "Final" students were examined by external examiners, and 7 passed, each receiving a Vernacular Teacher's Certificate. Such Certificate holders have little diffi- culty in finding employment in schools in the Colony, and practically all those who have passed out from this school are now engaged in teaching in either Government or Private Schools.

A considerable number of applicants for admission had again. to be turned away at the beginning of the year, only 49 out of 269 applicants being admitted.

By the generosity of Messrs. Fung Ping Shan, Kwok Fu Ting and Kwok Yau Ting, the school library has been increased by some 400 volumes of Chinese books.

Mr. Fung Ping Shan has generously made a further donation of $3,000 to the school for the purpose of establishing 6 scholar- ships for the Middle School Division.

Chinese Painting has been taught with some success.

Volley Ball, Football and Ping Pong were the most popular games played. In Volley Ball, the school did well in the Hong Kong School League: both the Senior and the Junior Teams were runners-up.

The health of the school was satisfactory on the whole.

(ii) Vernacular Normal School for Women.-Head Mistress, Miss Chan Yat Hing.

The Maximum Enrolment was 152 (143 in 1928).

The Average Attendance was 141 (128 in 1928).

O 22

The entrance examination held at the beginning of the year was attended by 98 candidates, of whom only 4 were found fit for, and subsequently admitted, to the 1st year Normal Class, but 43 others were admitted to the lower standards.

There was only one 4th year student who passed her "Final” very creditably.

The school continued to do excellent work. It was visited and much admired by an educationalist from Japan.

During the Summer Vacation, an Algebra class was con- ducted by myself and attended by all the 3rd and 4th year Normal Students. This was an experiment to work through the Senior Local" Algebra Syllabus taught through the medium of Chinese in a course of 16 lessons, and the result of the experi- ment was that 15 out of 22 students attending were able to pass the test examination held at the end of the session, the standard reached being somewhere between the Senior and the Junior.

(iii) Taipo Vernacular Normal School.-Head Teacher, Mr. Chan Pun Chiu.

The Maximum Enrolment was 37 (34 in 1928).

The Average Attendance was 31 (27 in 1928).

16 Final students were examined by external examiners, and 5 were successful. Practically all the Passed Students are being engaged in teaching, in the New Territories and have proved themselves quite useful.

The school has made steady progress, though Chinese Com- position is still weak.

There were less cases of Malaria than in the previous year, but 2 cases of Tuberculosis occurred. The general health was satisfactory however.

Discipline and tone are very good.

II. GRANT SCHOOLS.

The Maximum Enrolment in the 4 Vernacular Grant Schools was 987, and the Average Attendance was 874.

The Ying Wa Girls' School presented for the 1st time 4 students for the Senior Local Examination and 2 passed. Both the Fairlea Girls' School and the Kowloon Victoria Home have started a Middle School Division-a sign showing the tendency of Chinese girls to remain in school longer than they used to.

Very satisfactory work is being done in all these schools, and their discipline and tone are excellent.

The Maximum Grant was recommended for each school.

O 23

III. PRIVATE SCHOOLS, URBAN DISTRICTS.

Subsidized Schools. Of the 218 subsidized schools on the list at the end of 1928, one was removed to the non-subsidy list and 10 closed during the year. With 8 schools newly subsidized, the total number at the end of the year was 215. The maximum enrolment in these schools was 14,364 (14,247 in 1928) and the average attendance was 12,852 (13,016 in 1928). The amount of subsidies expended totalled $94,750, working out on the average to be $440.69 per school, ($423.3 in 1928 and $436.14 in 1927) and $6.65 per pupil ($6.47 in 1928 and $7.01 in 1927).

Non-subsidized Schools.-137 new Day Schools were regis- tered and 112 closed during the year. With 8 schools transferred to, and one transferred from the subsidy list, the total number of non-subsidized schools at the end of the year was 452 (as against 434 in 1928). The maximum enrolment in these schools was 21,981 (21,384 in 1928) and the average attendance was 19,678 (19,102 in 1928).

The total number of Vernacular Day Schools now existing is 673 (658 in 1928), consisting of 2 Exempted, 4 Grant, 215 Subsidized and 452 Non-subsidized schools. The maximum en- rolment was 37,332 (36,642 in 1928) and the average attendance was 33,404 (33,043 in 1928), the former number including 12,940 girls.

During the last few years there has been a growing tendency to open so-called Middle Schools, and in order to make the standard uniform, a Committee was appointed by the Director of Education to draw up a Model Syllabus which all Private Middle Schools must follow. Indiscriminate admission and pre- mature promotion to these schools are an evil which it has not been easy to suppress.

Free Scholarships-30 boys from subsidized schools were admitted to the various Government English Schools, but of the 18 Free Places for girls at the Belilios Public School, it was only possible to fill two; great difficulty was experienced in find- ing students who, on entering the Belilios School, would be of the same standard in both English and Chinese as the other girls in the class. 19 candidates representing 11 schools com- peted for the 4 scholarships tenable at the Vernacular Middle School.

Night Schools.-During the year, 12 Night Schools were registered and 10 closed. The number at the end of the year was 22, with a maximum enrolment of 526 (423 in 1928) and an average attendance of 371 (338 in 1928).

✪ 24

IV. PRIVATE SCHOOLS, RURAL DISTRICTS.

Subsidized Schools.-There were 96 Subsidized Schools on the register at the end of December as against 101 in 1928. During the year 14 schools were newly subsidized whilst 3 were removed to the Non-Subsidized List and 16 closed.

Of these 96 schools, 12 enjoyed the privilege of receiving special subsidies, while the rest were awarded subsidies ranging from $5 to $15 per month according to their merits. The total subsidies paid out amounted to $13,637.50 ($12,985 in 1928). In comparison with the previous year, the number of Subsidized Schools has decreased by 5 and the amount of subsidies in- creased by $651.50; but as there was an increase in the number of pupils, it worked out to be not more than $3.21 per pupil-- that is about $0.48 less than what was spent on each pupil in the previous four years.

Non-Subsidized Schools. The number of Non-Subsidized Schools was 72 at the end of the year (81 in 1928). During the last twelve months, 44 new schools came into being, while 42 closed, 14 were transferred to and 3 transferred from the Sub- sidized List.

Night Schools. It was the first time in the history of the New Territories that a Night School for girls was opened. This school occupied the premises of a girls' Day School at Un Long.

Illegal Schools.-Three non-registered schools were found and their teachers were prosecuted in the District Officer's Court at Ping Shan. After a conviction was registered, they were let

off with a caution.

Attendance.—The Maximum Enrolment in Subsidized Schools was 4,247 including 352 girls (3.538, with 358 girls in 1928) and the average attendance was 3,643 (2,886 in 1928). The number in Non-subsidized schools was 1,498 including 145 girls (1,752 with 158 girls in 1928) and the average attendance was 1,155 (1,363 in 1928).

Free Scholarships.-3 Free Scholars from Vernacular Sub- sidized Schools were admitted to Taipo School, 2 to Cheung Chau, and one to Un Long. Yaumati School received 3 Free Scholars from the Shatin District, and King's College, 1 from Tsuen Wan.

All schools have been inspected during the year.

{

;

Y. P. LAW,

Inspector of Vernacular Schoois.

– Ó 25

Chapter V.

REPORT BY THE DIRECTOR OF THE TECHNICAL. INSTITUTE, 1929.

The Institute was open as usual during eight months of the year.

The number of students in attendance during the Session ending June 30th was 598, against 574 in 1928.

In June-and for certain Classes in December-Examina- tions were conducted as in previous years by independent ex- aminers. 360 students were examined (373 in 1928); of these a total of 196 students, or 54%, passed (236, or 63% in 1928). As remarked in my last Report a high standard is required throughout, but particularly in the Teachers' Classes, where it has again been raised. At the December examination, of 52 Teachers (43 in 1928) examined in the "English" Teachers' Classes, 32 passed, 5 with "Distinction"; in the "Vernacular” Classes 174 Teachers (144 in 1928) were examined and 48 passed (41 in 1928). Final Teachers' Certificates' were gained by 2 men and 2 women in the "English" Teachers Classes and, by 5 men and 3 women in the "Vernacular" Teachers' Classes. Hygiene is now a compulsory subject in the "English" Teachers' Course. Gratifying reports continue to be received of the good work done in various schools of the Colony by Teachers-Men and Women, English and Vernacular-who have been trained in these Classes. The Nautical Class opened last year, by arrangement with the Harbour Master, was well attended; 59 inen were examined and of these 50 passed the examination held by the Harbour Authorities.

A Physical Training Class for Teachers was opened and has proved very successful; the object is to qualify Teachers to carry out approved physical training courses in schools.

1st March, 1930.

E. RALPHS.

Director of Technical Institute

:

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Table I.

ABSTRACT STATEMENTS OF SCHOOLS AND SCHOLARS

FOR THE YEAR 1929.

POIULATION (1921)

PARTICULARS OF INSTITUTIONS.

Non-European, ...620,166

European,.. ... 5,000

Urban, 76%

470,849

Rural, 13

83,163

Floating, 11., ................

71,154

CONTROLLED INSTITUTIONS.

Secondary. Primary. Vocational. Total.

INSTITUTIONS NOT CONTROLLED.

INSTITUTIONS.

Mixed,

1

Mixed, European,

1

5

1

:

Males, Non-Europe n...................

8

760

2

770

1.

Females, Non-European,...

10

220

1

231

Total,......

19

984

4

1.007

2

PUPILS ENROLLED.

Mixed,

598

598

Mixed, European,

192

274

466

210

Males, Non-European,...... 4,398 37,220

99

41,717

152

Females, Non-European,... 3,150-

13,037

152

16,339

Total,...

7,740

50,531

819

59,120

362

3

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Table II.

SCHOOLS AND SCHOLARS FOR THE YEAR 1929.

CLASS OF INSTITUTION.

ENGLISH.

Secondary,

Primary,.

Vocational,

GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS.

GRANT IN AID AND SUBSIDIZED SCHOOLS,

UNAIDED SCHOOLS.

No. of Institutions.

On Roll.

No. of Institutions.

On Roll.

No. of Institutions.

On Roll.

2,310

10

4,252

12

1,710

2

368

135

6,361

1

598

Total,......

17

4,618

12

4,620

135

6,361

VERNACULAR.

Secondary,...

Primary,.

Vocational,

1

191

987

...

:

311

18,613

524

23,479

2

189

62

Total,......

3

380

316

19,662

521

23,479

Grand Total,

20

.....

4,998

328

24,282

659

29,810

O 28

Table III:

GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS.

STAFF.

Maximum Average

Rate of

NAME AND NATURE. (1)

Certificated Anglo-

Teachers. Chinese.

Veruacular.

Monthly At- Enrolment. tendance. per mensem

Fees

Fees Collected.

or Term.

*

ENGLISH SCHOOLS.

Central British, Kowloon Junior, Victoria, Quarry Bay and Peakt Schools-for children of European British Parentage. Primary and Secondary

Queen's College and King's College--mainly for Chinese and Indians. Prepare for Hong Kong University Matriculation and for Commercial Examinations.....

Ellis Kadoorie, Wantsai, and Yaumati Schools-

for Chinese. Prepare for Upper School at Queen's College and King's College

C.

$15 a term(2)

12

(3)

11

10

(4)

10

(2)

35

I

438

352

7

:

(3) 16,547.40

7

(4)

|†40 & 30(2)

30 & 20(3)(4)

30

32

19

1,532

! 1,400

$8 & $6

91,474.00

per mensem

11

30

11

923

835

$5

45,340.00

per mensem

Belilios Public School for Girls-mainly for Chinese.

Primary and Secondary..

12

15

549

504

$3

17,469.00

per mensem

Gap Road School-for Chinese. Primary

6

2

152

145

$2

2,996.00

per mensem

*

Ellis Kadoorie School for Indians--prepares for Upper

School, Queen's College

1

Tai Po, Un Long, and Cheung Chau Schools-Elemen-

tary English for Chinese. Primary

131

118

$2

2,832.00

per mensem

*$1.00

10

3

230

189

50 cents

1,359.50

per mensem

*

Vern. Middle School, Vern. Normal School at Taipo,†

and Vern. Normal for Women

2

2

22

380

350

*$2 p.m.

7,642.00

† Free.

(1) For boys unless otherwise stated.

(2) For First child of one family.

88

100

73

4,335

3,893

(3) For Second of two or more children of the same family. (4) For Third of three or more children of the same family.

185,649.90

CONTROLLED SCHOOLS IN

No.

Name of School.

Denomina- tion.

IN RECEIF

ENG

Higher Classes.

Average Attend-

Rate.

ance.

CAPITATION

Remove (

1 Average Total. Attend-

ance.

Rat



$

BA

1

St. Joseph's College,

R. C.

8

/393

-752

681

133

2

Italian Convent,

'8 & Inf.

/376

480

427

28

>>

188

50

6,650

397

30

50 1,400

135 30

3

French Convent,

8 & Inf.

وو

/352

262

231

29

50 1,450 67 30

77

Diocesan Girls' School,

C. of E. & Inf.

375

269

234

23

50

118 1,150

30

8

9

13

Diocesan Boys' School,

St. Mary's School,

St. Francis' School,

8

"

/370

314

252

33

50

2,650

132

30

R. C.

9 & Inf.

/385

372

315 20

4 & Inf.

201

190

162

"

14

St. Joseph's Branch,

4

22

/394

178

162

16

St. Paul's College,

C. M. S.

8

***

1/365

475

389

43

17

Wah Yan College,

Private.

8

371

827

770

115

18

St. Stephen's Girls' College,

C. M. S. 9 & Inf.

/372 209

187

28

19

Wah Yan Branch,

Private.

7

/372

292

253

12

영양영향:: 잉

50

1,000

99

31

42

30

92

3

50

2,150

234

30

50

5,750

452

31

50

1,400

69

30

600 50

131

3

No.

Name and Nature of School.

Mission.

Number of Classes.

4,620

4,063

484

24,200 | 1,963

VERNA (

Number Maximum

Average

Rate.

of School Monthly Attendance.

Days.

Enrolment.

$

18

Fairlea, (Girls)

C. M. S.

19

Victoria Home (Girls)

77

20

Ying Wah (Girls)

L. M. S,

12

21

St. Paul's (Girls)

C. M. S.

T720

221

262

237

11

229

154

137

11

235

287

268

11

10

241

278

240

11

981

882

5,601

4,945

NOTE.-R. C.

J

Roman Catholic.

C. of E.

=hurch of England.

¡

-

O 29

TABLE ĮV.

OLS IN RECEIPT OF A GRANT UNDER THE

THE GRAN

Average Attendance.

ENGLISH SCHOOLS.

CAPITATION GRANT.

A

Total

Capitation

UNIVERSITY EXAMINATION GRAI

Higher Classes.

Remove Classes.

Lower Classes.

Senior.

Average Attend.

ance.

1

Rate.

Total.

Average Attend-

Rate.

2

Average! Total. Attend-

Rate.

3 Total.

Grants

of Columns

Junior.

Ho

4

5

1,

2 & 3.

ance.

ance.

No. of Rate. Pupils.

Total.

No. of Rate. Pupils.

No. of I

Total.

Pupils.

.€

$

$

$

SA

$

$



€9

$

681

133

50

6,650 397 30

11,910 151

20

3,020

21,580

32

30

960 103

15

1,545

3

427 28

50

1,400 135 30

4,050 264 201

5,280

10,730 14

30

420 14

15

210

1

231

29

50

1,450

234 23

50

1,150

67 118 30

30

2,010

135 20:

2,700

6,160

I

30

330 14

15

210

3,540

93

20

1,860

6,550

252

53

50

2,650

132 30

3,960

67

20

1,340

7,950 18

315 20

50

1,000

99 30

2,970

196

20

· 3,920

7,890

162

42

30

1,260

120 20

2,400

3,660

162

...

92 30

2,760

70

20

1,400

4,160

389 43

50

2,150

234 30

770 115

50

5,750

187 28

50

1,400

253

12

50

7,020 112 452 30

13,560 203 20 69 30 2,070 90 20 600 131

30

3,930 110 20

20

2,240

11,410

4,060 23,370 38

1,800 5,270 13 2,200 6,730

: 585:: 828

10

30

300

11

15

165

30

540

32

15

10

30

300

10

15

17

30

510

28

15

30

1,140

56

15

30

390

15

15

9

15

12 12 12 12 112

480

150

...

...

420

840

225

135

4,063

484

|24,200 | 1,968

59,040 | 1,611

32,220 115,460 163

4,890 292

4,380

VERNACULAR

num

hly nent.

Average Attendance.

Rate.

SCHOO

SCHOOLS.

OLS

(Upper Grade.)

Principal Grant.

$

237

11

137

11

268

11

240

11

----

2,607

1,507

2,948

2,640

882

9,702

4,945

olic.

f England.

125,162

C. M. S.

Church Missionary Society. L. M. S. =London Missionary Society.

10

5

! UNDER THE GRANT

CODE.

ƆLS.

UNIVERSITY EXAMINATION GRANT.

B

C

D

Graud

7

Total

Total

Local

on

Senior.

Junior.

Jurs.

Hono

Refund

Grants

Special Rent

of

>

Science

of

of Fees.

Grant

6

Columns

Grant

Columns

IS

4

3.

No. of Rate. Pupils.

No. of Rate.

Total.

5 Total.

No. of Rate

Total.

4, 5, 6, & 7.

A,B,C&D.

Pupils.

Pupils.

49

$

€0.

$

$

$

$

@HERE ::~32 :

:

32

30

960

103

15 1,545

14

30

420

14

15

210

11

30

330

14

15

210

10

30

300

11

15

165

18

30

540 32

15

480

10

30

300

10

15

150

)

Co mal

300

3

100

1,732

4,537

860

100

448

100

1,178

...

438

978

...

461

926

...

844

1,864

1,000

320

770

26,977

11,908

:

7,138

7,476

10,814

8,660

...

3,660

***

...

4,160

...

738

17

30

510

28

15

420

1,668

320

13,398

100

38

30

1,140

1,676

56

15

840

1

100

3,756

1,820

28,946

416

13

30

1,031

390

15

15

225

6,301

9

15

135

::

120

255

60

7.015

)

163

4,890 292

4,380

500 7,193

5

16,963

4,060

OOLS.

ch Missionary Society. on Missionary Society.

:

136,483

Grant

in aid of Rent.

Total

14

$



2,607

1,507

...

2,948

2,640

...

:

9,702

146,185

O 30

Table V.

Amount of Fees Remitted to Free Scholars in Government Schools during, 1929.

Queen's College

King's College

Belilios Public School

Ellis Kadoorie School

Yaumati School

Wantsai School

Gap Road School

Tai Po School

$ 7,456.00

4,565.00

1,345.00

1,160.00

3,190.00

420.00

582.00

120.00

Un Long School

22.00

Cheung Chau School

38.50

Vernacular Middle School

336.00

Women Vernacular Normal School

168.00

Tai Po Normal School

Nil.

Ellis Kadoorie Indian School

144.00

Central British School

825.00

Victoria British School

Nil.

Quarry Bay School

Nil.

Peak School

Nil.

Kowloon Junior School

Nil.

TOTAL

$20,371.50

46,000

45,000

44,000

43,000

42,000

41,000

40,000

39,000

38,000

O 31

Table VI.

Average Attendance in all Government and Grant Schools, and total enrolment at Private Schools and the

Technical Institute.

The University and Police School are not included.

English Schools:-Red.

Vernacular Schools :-Black.

1913. 1914. 1915. 1916. 1917. 1918. | 1919. 1920.] 1921. | 1922. 1923.| 1924. 1925.| 1926,| 1927.| 1928.| 1929.

37,244

42,610

43,322

Appendix Q.

REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC WORKS

FOR THE YEAR 1929.

1. This Report for the year 1929 records the works carried out by the fourteen sub-departments known as the Public Works Department viz:-Construction. of Waterworks, Drainage, Architectural and Maintenance of Buildings, Maintenance of Waterworks, Buildings Ordinance, Electrical and

and Wireless Telegraphy, Port Works, General Works, Roads and Transport, Valuation and Resumptions, Crown Lands, Surveys, Accounts and Stores, Administrative Staff and Correspondence.

The European Staff comprises 156 Officers as follows: -44 Engineers, 14 Survey Officers, 2 Accountants and Storekeepers, 1 Secretary, 5 Senior Clerks, 2 Stenographers, 11 Telegraph Engineers, W/T Inspectors and Operators, 77 Inspectors, Over- seers, Land Bailiffs, Chief Draughtsman and Storekeepers.

The non-European Staff comprises Clerks, Draughtsmen, Surveyors, Foremen, Firemen, Messengers, Office Attendants, coolies etc. numbering 535.

HAROLD T. CREASY,

M.I.C.E., A.M.I.M.E., Director of Public Works.

Public Works Office,

Hong Kong, 31st March, 1930.

Expenditure.

Q 2

Expenditure.

2. The amounts voted, as compared with those actually expended by the Department under the various headings, were as follows:-

Amount voted.

In Estimates.

Supplement- ary Votes.

Actual Expendi-

Total.

ture.

(i) Personal Emoluments *1,433,152.00

1,433,152.00 1,358,196.24

(ia) Other Charges,.

(IB) Special Expenditure,

256,890.00

104,200.00

3,000.00 259,890.00 220,173.20

409,773.00 513,973.00 130,218.28

(ii) Annually Recurrent

Works,

1,689,050.00

(iii) Extraordinary Works, 3,419,605.00

48,750.00 1,737,800.00 1,464,558.35

899,949.00 4,319,554.00 2,125,974.96

6,902,897.00 1,361,472.00 8,264,369.00 5,599,121.03

Less amount met out of savings, under Heads as per Financial Messages for the year 1929,...

417,230.00

417,230.00



6,902,897.00

944,242,007,847,139.00 | 5,599,121,03

(iv) Works undertaken on

P.W. Loan Account,...] 5,000,000.00

5,000,000.00

839,387.54

(v) Works undertaken on Advance Account from Surplus Balance of the Colony,

(vi) Works undertaken

on behalf of Parti- cipants P.E.R.

(vii) Works

undertaken

on behalf of War Memorial Nursing Home Trustees and

other private lots

owners etc.,

596,188,32

579,396.64

33,500.32

944,242.00 12,847,139.00 | 7,647,593.85

Total,.. .$ 11,902,897.00

*Includes Personal Emoluments of Senior and Junior Clerical Services

Amounting to $135,307.54.

Detailed Statements of (ii) and (iii) are given in Annexes A and B with reference to:-

(i) Savings are due partly to higher rate of exchange than the one at which the sterling salaries in the Estimates were converted and also on account of vacant posts provided for in the Estimates not having been filled during the year under review.

- Q 3

Expenditure.

(iv) Vote taken to reimburse Revenue for previous

expenditure chargeable to Loan Funds.

The sum of $839,387.54 was expended on works undertaken during the year.

(v) A sum of $596,188.32 was expended on works of Aberdeen Water Scheme, which are estimated at $2,702,000.00 in all. This sum was charged to Advance Account from Surplus Balance of the Colony and is recoverable from future loan.

(vi) In addition to other expenditure a sum of $579.396.64 was expended on work undertaken on behalf of participants in the Praya East Reclamation Scheme. This amount does not include the expenditure on Government's participation in the Praya East Reclamation. The amount of $83,259.80 expended on those works has been included in Extraordinary Works expenditure.

(vii) A sum of $25,064.93 was expended on works under- taken on behalf of Trustees of War Memorial Nursing Home for construction of motor approach road and a sum of $8.435.39 on behalf of the owners of I.Ls. 1889 and 2479 also for construction of motor road to their property.

(iA), (iB) and (ii) Savings were effected on the following

subheads:

Sub-head:-

HEAD 29.-P.W.D.

1. Personal Emoluments,

$65,918.30

OTHER CHARGES.

2. Conveyance and Motor Allowances,

$ 9.386.70

3. Drawing Material and Mounting Plans,

177.48

4. Electric Fans and Lights,

4,492.59

6. Lifts Maintenance Government Buildings,

1,153.63

7. Maintenance of Furniture,

1,545.55

8. Surveying Instruments and Contingencies,

1,555.18

9. Transport and Travelling Expenses,

801.48

10. Uniforms,

2,449.74

11. Upkeep of Government Garage Plant,

2.47

12. Upkeep and running expenses of Motor Lorries

and Cars,

20.64

13. Upkeep of Motor and Steam Rollers,

5,107.68

14. Upkeep of Quarry Plants,

8,130.82

15. Upkeep of Triangulation Monuments,

385 60

Expenditure.

4

RADIO TELEGRAPH BRANCH.

Sub-heads:

16. Incidental Expenses,

17. Repairs, Stores and Current,

18. Transport,

$

167.47

777.38

611.84

SPECIAL EXPENDITURE.

20. Harbour Surveying,

1,146.40

22. 1 Motor Car,

592.46

23. 2 Safes,

88.90

24. Additional 5 K.W. Short Wave Transmitter..

49.999.25

25. Additional receiving gear,

408.49

28. 1 5 K.W. Transmitter for Ship Traffic,

44.89

30. Dehumidifying Plant,

3.136.30

HEAD 30.--P.W.R.

HONG KONG.

1. Buildings,

$16,745.88

2. Communications,

27.343.79

3. Drainage,

434.14

5. Typhoon and Rainstorm Damages,

41.344.08

6. Water Works,

38,911.02

7. Miscellaneous,

9,292.10

8. Buildings,

9. Communications,

10. Drainage,

11. Lighting,

14. Miscellaneous,

KOWLOON.

$ 8.219.19

9.355.93

2.493.58

4,221.58

16,780.97

NEW KOWLOON.

15. Buildings,

$ 4.337.81

16. Communications.

2.644.97

17. Drainage,

649.50

18. Lighting,

225.52

19. Typhoon and Rainstorm Damages,

21.566.14

20. Water Works,

280.3.5

21. Miscellaneous,

4.962.68

Q 5

NEW TERRITORIES.

Expenditure.

Sub-heads:

22. Buildings,

23. Communications,

$ 4,215.57

3,827.49

24. Drainage,

228.94

25. Typhoon and Rainstorm Damages,

32,623.41

26. Water Works,

755.70

27. Miscellaneous,

155.36

The savings were

far more than counterbalanced by

excesses on Other sub-heads as set forth below:-

HEAD 29.-P.W.D.

5. Incidental Expenses



49.45

SPECIAL EXPENDITURE.

26. Provision of High Speed Transmitting gear,

29.79

27. Duplication of Storage Battery,

205.93

29. 11 K.W. Transmitter for Close Range,

729.37

4. Lighting,

HEAD 30.- -P.W.R.

HONG KONG.

KOWLOON.

$ 3,478.02

12. Typhoon and Rainstorm Damages,

13. Water Works,

$11,245.74

13,726.42

(iii) Savings under this Head were largely due to some works, for which substantial sums were allocated, not being proceeded with during the year on account of the necessity for economy.

Comparison of Expenditure, 1928 and 1929.

Expenditure.

Q 6

3. The following is a Statement of the Expenditure of 1929 as compared with that of the previous year:-

1928.

1929.

Increase.

Decrease.

$ 6.

$ 0.

$ C.

C.

(i) Personal Emoluments *1,277,964.20 †1,358,196.24

80,232.04

(IA) Other Charges,

177,566.93 220,173.20

42,606.27

(IB) Special Expenditure,

27,636.66 430,218.28

402,581.62

(ii) Annually Recurrent

Works,

1,482,915.36 1,464,558.35

18,357.01

(iii) Extraordinary Works, 2,108,515.82 2,125,974.96

*5,074,598.97 †5,599,121.03

17,459.14

542,879.07 18,357.01

(iv) Works on

undertaken P.W. Loan Ac- count,

976,112.08 839,387.54

136,724.54

(v) Works undertaken on Advance Account from Surplus Balance of the Colony,

(vi) Works

undertaken

on behalf of Parti- cipants P.E.R.

(vii) Works undertaken on behalf of War Memorial Nursing Home Trustees and other private lots owners etc.,

(viii) Works undertaken on behalf of Mili- tary and Naval Authorities,

596,188.32

596,188.32

547,227.11 579,396.64 32,169.53

.

33,500.32

33,500.32

23,883.64

Total, .$ | *6,621,821.80†7,647,593.85 | 1,204,737.24

23,883.64

178,965.19

*Includes Personal Emoluments of Senior and Junior Clerical Services

amounting to $120,534.20.

+Includes Personal Emoluments of Senior. and Junior Clerical Services

amounting to $135,307.54.

In reference to:-

(i) The increase is due to increments on salaries and some of the vacancies being filled during the year. (IA) The increase is due to the heavy commitments for advertisements through Crown Agents, and the main- tenance of Furniture which in previous years was carried under. head (ii).

(iB) The actual increase is due on account of additional Wireless Apparatus and Emergency Works for Water Shortage which prevailed in the Colony during the year.

>

Q 7

Expenditure.

(ii) The actual decrease is due to the absence of heavy commitments on account of Typhoon and Rainstorm Damage which were necessary in 1928.

(iii) The increase is due to laying of new Roads and Drainage on rapid progress of buildings on the Mainland and the Island etc.

(iv) The decrease is on account of larger resumptions in 1928 than during the year and the expenditure represents mostly actual work done.

(v) Works commenced during the year.

(vi) The increase is due to the laying of Roads and Drainage and Water Mains on rapid progress of buildings on the Praya East Reclamation by the participants.

(vii) Works commenced during the year.

(viii) The actual decrease is due to works being completed in 1928 and no further request for work from the Military Authorities.

COMPARISON OF EXPENDITURE OF PUBLIC WORKS

DURING 1919-1929.

Personal Emoluments

Year.

and Other

Special Expendi-

ture.

Recurrent Works.

Annually Extraordinary

Total

Works. Expenditure.

Charges.

c.

$

C.

1919

390,006.29

1,376.35

$ 822,509.87

C.

C.

0.

2,235,002.95

3,448,895.46

1920

468,371.82

615.96

825,493.70

2,555,877.69

3,850,359.17

1921

650,900.00

699.00

938,582.38

3,053,525.11

4,643,706,49

1922

820,529.49

3,575,635.19

5,471,956,38

1923

900,573.35

4,716,602.94 7,042,918.45

1924

1,184,482.27

1925

1,316,091.10

1926

$1,339,359.94

1927

§1,408,932.15

1928

$1,455,531,13|

1929

$1,578,369,44

1,145.40 1,074,646.30 1,209.36 | 1,424,532,80 285.631,793,968.69 78,919.111,574,431.75

946.00 1,822,816.80 1,542,494.98 1,482,915.36

14,681.13

27,636.66

430,218.28 | 1,464,558.35

8,112,785.4911,091,522.08 8,638,930.87|11,638,372,83

4,720,000,19 7,863,122,93 2,966,390.69 5,932,498.95

2,108,515.82*6,621,821.80

2,125,974.96 *7,647,593,85,

Total... 11,543,146 9 557,732.88 14,766,950,98 | 44,809,241.90 75,272,768.39

*These expenditures include amounts expended on works charged to Loan Funds, Praya East Reclamation Scheme, Aberdeen Valley Water Scheme, Military Authorities, Trustees to War Memorial Nursing Home and other Private Lots owners etc., and Personal Emoluments of Senior and Junior Clerical Services of the Department.

+Includes only Junior Clerical Service.

§Includes Senior and Junior Clerical Services.

Expenditure under these Heads has not been included in the comparison of Expenditure Statement in previous years.

Expenditure.

4. Statement of Revenue from Water Works, 1929.

1929

Locality.

Excess Con- sumption.

Rate 2%.

Total.

C.

1928 Total.

C.

C.

Chong Village

City including Wong Nei

properties bordering

and

Shau Ki Wan Road,..

211,821.82

435,109.86

646,931.68

Hill District,

10.442.58

10,596.10

21,038,68

Pokfulam District,

9,207.57

9,207.57

745,061.83 26 955.23 10,778.13

Kowloon including Sham-

shui Po and Kowloon

City,

304.527.68

121,413.71

425.941.39

356,998.14

Aberdeen,

4,582.88

1,506.37

6,089.25

6,390.17

Kepulse Bay.

Shaukiwan.

3,014.58

3.014.58

2,859.40

7,642.54

10,264.71

17,907.25

18,519.51

Stanley,

Laichikok,

Fanling,

Taipo

Total,

130,05

130.05

59,997.25

59,997.25

166,116.70

3,271.25

3.271.25

2,805.99

$20.10

$20.10

586.53

615,458.30

578,890.751,194,349.05 | 1,336.571 63

COMPARISON OF WATER WORKS REVENUE 1928 & 1929.

1928.

City (as above stated)

$745,061.83

1929. $646,931.68

Hill District

26,955.23

21,038.68

Pokfulam District

10,778.13

9,207.57

Kowloon

356,998.14

425,941.39

Aberdeen

6,390.17

6,089.25

Repulse Bay

2,859.40

3,014.58

Shaukiwan

18,519.51

17,907.25

Stanley

130.05

Laichikok

Fanling

166,116.70

59,997.25

2,305.99

3,271.25

Taipo

586.53

820.10

$1,336,571.63 $1,194,349.05

Land Sales, etc.

Land Sales.

5. Land Sales, Extensions, Grants, etc.-The total amount of premia paid

paid into the Treasury during the year was $1,940,300.35 of which $6,509.00 was derived from fees for boundary stones. The estimate for the year was $1,000,000.00.

The following is a comparative statement of the Revenue derived from Land Sales, &c. for the years 1927-1929:-

1927.

1928.

1929.

c.

C.

C.

Sales by Auction.

39.840.50 1.369,356.00 1,252,933.36

Sales without Auction,

50,038.31

299,146.23

640,007.32

Extensions granted.

22,334,87

91,948.56

21,846.48

Giants on Nominal Terms,

1.00

Grants on Short Leases.

3,321.00

Premia derived from sale of rights to

erect piers,

564.20

903,96

1,292.50

Fees for Boundary Stones to define Lots,

3,575.25

5,961.75

7,705.75

Conversions and Exchanges,

44,425.70

57,855.31

149,329.72

Total,

..$

164,099.83 1,825,172.81 |2,073,115.13

Actual amount of premia paid into

the Treasury,...

$ 146,242.24 | 1,642,106.87 1,940,300.35

The difference between the above totals is accounted for by the payment of premium and interest in 1929, and also failure to pay premium on transactions during 1929, refunds and re-adjust- ments.

6. Sales by Auction.-Ten lots in Hong Kong, 36 lots in Kowloon and 32 lots in the New Territories were sold during the year realizing the sums of $178,130.00, $744,611.86 and $323,218.00 respectively.

The District Officer (South) sold 14 lots which realized $426.00 and the District Officer (North) 214 lots for $6,547.50.

7. Sales without Auction.-Seventy two lots in Hong Kong (including 68 lots on the Praya East Reclamation), 2 lots in Kowloon and 221 lots in the New Territories, (including 219 lots on the Kowloon Tong Estate) were sold during the year realizing the sums of $355,407.75 for Hong Kong and $281,768.69 for New Territories. There was no premium on the 2 lots in Kowloon,

Land Sales, etc.

Q 10

The District Officer (South) sold 58 lots which realized $439.50 and the District Officer (North) 39 lots for $2,391.38.

8. Extensions Granted.-Sixteen lots in Hong Kong 10 lots in Kowloon, and 3 lots in the New Territories were granted extensions during the year realizing the sums of $14,150.59, $6,643.64 and $932.25 respectively.

The District Officer (South) granted extensions to 8 lots realizing $64.50, and the District Officer (North) extensions to 9 lots realizing $55.50.

9. Conversions & Exchanges.-Fifty five lots in Hong Kong, 17 lots in Kowloon and 36 lots in the New Territories were ex- changed during the year at premia amounting to $1,013.00, $25,792.55 and $98,033.84 respectively.

In Hong Kong, portions of Garden Lot No. 76 were con- verted into 5 Rural Building Lots without premium, and one lot (I.L. 2461) was converted from a 40 years lease to a 75 years renewable lease at a premium of $24,462.50.

The District Officer (South) arranged the conversions of 3 lots and exchange of one lot without premium and the District Officer (North) the conversions of 98 lots at a total premium of $27.83.

10. Grants on Nominal Terms. The following grants were made during the year:-in Hong Kong an area (R.B.L. 317) of 83,090 square feet to the Trustees of the War Memorial Nursing Home.

In Kowloon an area (K.I.L. 2174) of 14,755 square feet to the Trustees of the Union Church in Hong Kong. There were no grants in the New Territories.

11. Grants on Short Leases.--There were no grants in Hong Kong or Kowloon.

The District Officer (South) granted fifteen lots for terms of five years each and three lots for one year.

12. Permits to occupy land for short periods &c.—These were of a very miscellaneous character and too numerous to admit of individual mention.

The total number of permits issued during the year for Hong Kong, Kowloon and New Kowloon was 3,111 (including 533 new permits), the fees for which amounted to $158,088.51.

The District Officer (South) issued 81 permits at a total fee of $663.12 and the District Officer (North) 295 yearly per- mits, 21 permits for 5 years and 2 permits for 10 years at a total fee of $773.39.

-

---

Q 11

Land Sales, etc.

13. Extension of Leases.-There were no extensions granted during the year.

14. Prospecting & Mining Licences.-Two mining licences for areas at Taipo and Ma On Shan were issued during the year and Mining Licence No. 5 was renewed for a period of one year.

15. Plans &c.-Plans and particulars in duplicate of 768 lots were prepared and forwarded to the Land Officer in con- nection with the issue of Crown Leases. In addition to these 77 sale plans, 149 Tracings and 8,509 Sunprints were prepared and issued during the year (including 53 plans sold to the public at sums amounting to $1,454.00).

16. Naval and Military Lands.-Inland Lot 2268, Bowen Road was acquired by the Military Authorities, and the Crown Rent has been capitalized.

The Kowloon Peak Barrack sites were transferred to the Colonial Government.

17. Piers.

(a.) Permanent Picrs.-There is nothing to report in Hong Kong and Kowloon. In the New Territories, permission was granted to erect two piers-New Kowloon Permanent Pier No. 8 opposite New Kowloon Marine Lot No. 3 and Tsun Wan Permanent Pier No. 2 opposite Tsun Wan Marine Lot No. 5 at a total premium of $1,292.50.

(b.) Temporary Piers.-Licences to erect 3 temporary piers were issued during the year-1 in Kowloon and 2 in New Kow- loon the total fees amounting to $473.11. The premia on renewal of licences for temporary piers amounted to $898.96.

18. Cemeteries.-There is nothing to report in Hong Kong and the New Territories.

In Kowloon an area of about 14 acres at Ho Mun Tin (K.I.L. 2148) was granted as a Roman Catholic Cemetery.

19. Re-entries.-Fourteen lots in Hong Kong, 7 lots in Kowloon, 2 lots in the New Territories, 92 lots in the Southern District (New Territories) and 149 lots in the Northern District (New Territories) were re-entered during the year.

Surveys.

Q 12

..

SURVEYS.

20. The following is an abbreviated report of the work car- ried out during the year.

SURVEY OF THE COLONY.

City of Victoria.-(Revision) 26.21 acres have been surveyed with a chainage of 2.7 miles and 25.17 acres have been plotted.

The Peak.--(Revision) The area surveyed and plotted was 35.5 acres and the chainage 9 miles..

Wongneichong.-Area surveyed and plotted was 22 acres, chainage 44 miles.

Pokfulam.-An area 45.14 acres has been surveyed and 41.28 acres plotted, the chainage being 8.9 miles.

Aberdeen & Aplichau.-Area surveyed and plotted was 7 acres, chainage 2 miles.

Deep Water Bay.-Arca surveyed and plotted 38 acres, chainage 2 miles.

Tytam.-Area surveyed was 20 acres, and 15.5 acres have been plotted. Chinage 81 miles,

Sai Wan Area surveyed and plotted 8.3 acres, chainage 4,100 feet.

Shaukiwan. (Revision) Area surveyed and plotted 1.61 acres, chainage 4,487 feet.

Quarry Bay-Area surveyed 2 acres. Plotted 12 acres.

Kowloon.-During the year 358 acres were surveyed and 314 acres were plotted, the chainage being 38.5 miles.

21. Traverses.-The following main traverses were run dur- ing the year—

Wongneichong Gap to Little Hong

Kong

Whitty Street triangulation station

to end of Mt. Davis Road via Victoria Road

Whitty Street triangulation station

to Pokfulam triangulation station

via Pokfulam Road

Pokfulam triangulation station

Chainage in miles.

1.3

1.7

2.38

to

1.42

station outside Peak Tram

Station

Surveys.

Chainage in miles.

to

1.02

3.41

Q 13

Hill 800 triangulation station

Wongneichong Gap

Shek O Gap triangulation station to Boa Vista triangulation station. Station outside Peak Tram Station to Pokfulam Road near Pumping Station via Harlech Road and Hatton Road

2.00

Kowloon.-

Diamond Hill triangulation station to Victoria Orphanage triangulation

station

3.66

Diamond Hill triangulation station to Beacon Hill tunnel entrance

2.49

....

Traverse connecting main traverses

No. 13 & 17

.83

2.00

From Stone 15 to Stone 6 in Sharn-

shuipo-Lai Chi Kok traverse

22. Triangulation.-Observations to determine the value of a new station fixed at the Observatory were taken from Vic- toria Peak, Mount Nicholson, Jardines Look Out, Channel Rocks, Tates Cairn and Patridge Hill. new triangulation

station was erected at Whitty Street and valued.

Survey beacons were erected at the following places and observations were taken from same and the whole connected with the main triangulation of the Colony:-

Lan Tau Peak, Lan Tau East, East Brother, Chu Lu Kok, Tree Island, Tai O. South Soko Island, Nam Tim, Yee O and the rectangular Co-ordinates of each station were computed.

The following triangulation stations were inspected:

Tai Mo Shan, Beacon Hill, Tsing I (North), Tsing I (South), Tai Lam, Hai Wan, Junk Island, Channel Rocks, Tung Lung Island, Kau I Chau, Cheung Chau, Whitehead, Cloudy Hill, Cloudy Hill (2), Lantau (East) Mount Parker, Partridge Hill, Kowloon Peak, Castle Peak Pier, Castle Peak, Mong Tsing, Sui Hang, Ha Tsia, She Kong, Fan- ling, Diamond Hill, Quarry Hill, Hill 359, Victoria Orphanage, Danger Flag Hill, Jordan Road, East Battery, Tidal Cove, Tai Po, and cairns were re- built at Tai Mo Shan, Junk Island, Lantau East, Mount Parker, Castle Peak, Mong Tsing and Sui Hang and repairs carried out where necessary in other cases,

Surveys.

Q 14

23. Revenue Surveys & General.-Surveys were made for plans to be attached to Crown Leases of 768 lots. Boundaries of numerous lots and street alignments were set out for the Drainage, General Works & Roads Offices. In Hong Kong 46 frontage lines to streets were checked and 217 in Kowloon and New Kowloon. Bounderies of 79 lots in Hong Kong and 187 in Kowloon and New Kowloon were defined and in addition in the latter neighbourhoods 18 areas of various sizes which were to be let on permit were defined. An area of 63 acres North of Kowloon Tong Estate was surveyed and contoured and an area of 42 acres at Ho Mun Tin was also surveyed and con- toured.

An area of 8 acres above Stubbs Road (I.L. 2354) which had been split up into numerous sections was surveyed in antici- pation of the preparation of lease plans for each section.

A survey of the urning ground at Aplichau which has an area of 17 acres was prepared. A Contoured Survey of the area occupied by the Wireless Station at the Peak was made.

The City boundary East of Magazine Gap Road along the 700 ft. contour was defined and Boundary Stones fixed or re- fixed.

A cultivated area of 17 acres at Pokfulam was surveyed.

The following surveys were made for plans to be attached to transfer deeds in connection with Military Lands:

Wellington Barracks (War Department Lot No. 5). Murray Parade Ground (War Department Lot No. 4). Tai Lam Gun Road (War Department Lot No. 28)

Chainage 1.74 miles.

Tai Lam Branch Road (War Department Lot No. 27)

Chainage 2.08 miles.

Tai Lam Military Camp (War Department Lot No. 26)

Area 27.98 acres.

Lo Wu Military Camp (War Department Lot No. 29)

Area 15.7 acres.

Sun Wei Military Camp (War Department Lot No. 24)

Area 19.67 acres.

Approach Road to Lo Wu Camp (War Department Lot

No. 30) Chainage 5632 feet.

Approach Road to Sun Wei Camp (War Department

Lot No. 25) Chainage 1197 feet.

--

Q 15

--

Surveys.

24. Levelling.-Preliminary work was commenced in Kow- loon in August. This consisted in running a line of levels across nowloon reninsula from Kowloon Dock at Hung Hom το Cosmopolitan Dock at Tai Kok Tsui connecting up various existing Bench Marks on the way which had been fixed and valued by the Drainage Office previously at various periods. From the records of tidal observations kept by the Hong Kong and Whampoa Dock Company at Hung Hom and the Cosmopoii- tan Dock tnose taken at the latter place were accepted as being more accurate. The tidal readings over a short period of one month were analyzed and an approximate Mean Sea Level was found and the value of the existing Bench Marks as given by the Drainage Department were approximately checked. No great error was found. As the tides in Hong Kong vary considerably according to the season a Mean Sea Level to be in any degree accurate must be taken over a long period. The mean tidal readings for a period of one year will shortly be completed and a datum established. These readings will continue to be col- lected annually and a M.S.L. eventually adopted. Bench Marks, each consisting of a brass rod sunk in-rock and cement and covered by an iron picket box, have been fixed at Cosmo- politan Dock, Taipo Road at the crest of the Hill near Kowloon Reservoir, Shatin Railway crossing, Tai Po, and Fanling Station and one Staple Bench Mark driven into the wall on the latrine at Taipo Market. A total distance of 304 miles has been double levelled and approximate heights fixed for 5 Bench Marks 25 Staple Bench Marks and 15 Milestones along the Kowloon Fan- ling Road via Shatin and Taipo and 5 Milestones along the Castle Peak Road. This work is being continued.

25. Boundary Stones.-Stones were fixed to define the boundaries of 80 lots in Hong Kong and 178 lots in Kowloon and New Kowloon.

26. New Territories.-Several centre lines of proposed new roads and an area of about 4 acres for proposed building lots at Un Loong was set out.

Lots 4543 & 4544 D.D. 51 containing about 3 acres were set out and Boundary Stones fixed.

Lots 730, 755, 756 & 757 D.D. 131 were surveyed, the area being 2 acres and the chainage 3400 feet. Boundary Stones were fixed to lots 730 & 755.

The Kwanti Race Course was surveyed, the total area of the survey being about 80 acres and the chainage which in- cluded that necessary for the Sun Wei Military Camp survey was 29,200 feet.

The following surveys were also carried out:

An extensive survey of about 44 acres was carried out at Ku Tung near Sheung Shui for a proposed new layout scheme.

B. O. O. Work.

Q 16

27. Faniing.—An area of 130 acres with a chainage of 13,000 feet.

28. Tai Po Market.-An area of 12 acres with a chainage of 3,320 feet.

29. Sheung Shui.-An area of 23 acres with a chainage of 5,100 feet.

feet.

30. Tai Po.-An area of 19 acres with a chainage of 17,100

A main traverse of 3.35 miles was run from Lam Ti triangulation station to Castle Peak triangulation station.

Works under the Buildings Ordinance

31. As forecasted in the 1928 Report, a considerable in- crease has taken place in the number of new works dealt with in 1929.

Plans approved for new houses on the Praya East Reclama- tion approximately account for the increased number of Chinese houses in course of erection at the end of 1929. The small decrease recorded in the number of "non-domestic" buildings completed during 1929 is accounted for by the fact that certain buildings commenced during 1928 were still in progress at the end of 1929. A comparison of these figures, with actual work in hand at the end of the year, indicates a probable further decrease in the number of buildings of the "non-domestic" type which should be completed during 1930.

Attention is drawn to the graph embodied in this Report which is of interest as showing the number of plans approved and houses completed during the period from 1905 to 1929.

32. Plans. The following is a tabulated statement showing the number and type of buildings, in connection with which plans were deposited during the year, the figures for 1928 being given in a parallel column for purposes of comparison:-

Buildings, &c.

1928.

1929.

Increase.

Decrease.

New European houses.

170

217

17

New Chinese houses,

633

844

2:1

New Buildings and Structures

other than the above,

350

282

68

Alterations and additions to

existing buildings,

2,045

1,960

85

Verandahs,

574

790

216

Balconies,

129

154

25

Sunshades,

6

2

Canopies,

2:

...

Piers,

Wells,

8885

86

189

103

Total,.........

3,998

4,447

601

155

190325

190

500

07

140

08

[145]

160

148

1000

1910 86

Iscili i

| 500

3000

3500

14000

1571)

1263

9111

946

1208

(1191)

"T

BLACK CURVE Indicates No. of Plans Approved

RED CURVE

Indicates No. of Houses Completed

1477

1644

1886

1609)

1426

1712

1818

2049

(1965)

2016

(2700)

|2500]

2000

12000

YEAR

12220

13334

14312

5331

1632

20 17 335

18406

161

457

1920415

211379

22726

23 985

241955

25771

26814

27459

2850

2994

502

11000.

1993

(388)

2498

|3000

2155

[2481}

2929

2903

13500

4000

17

J

B. 0. 0. Work.

The number of plans (covering the buildings in the tabulated statement above) deposited during the year was 2,362, as com- pared with 2,385 in 1928.

The number of plans approved during the year was 2,903 as compared with 2,929 in 1928.

33. Occupation Permits.-The following permits to occupy new buildings were issued:

-

278 under Section 204 of Ordinance No. 1 of 1903, covering 694 domestic buildings, of which 122 were European and 572 Chinese dwellings, and 83 cover- ing 102 non-domestic buildings.

These figures show an increase of 188 in the case of "domes- tic" and a decrease of 5 in that of "non-domestic" buildings. Of the 122 European houses completed, 22 are on the Kowloon Tong Estate.

34. Notices and Permits.-The following is a tabulated statement of the number of notices served and permits issued during the year, the figures for 1928 being given in a parallel column for purposes of comparison:

1928.

1929.

Increase Decrease

Dangerous Structure Notices,

141

129

12

Miscellaneous Notices.......

281

509

225

Private Street Improvement

Notices, including footpaths under verandahs and balconies,

196

478

282

...

Notices in respect of Nuisances

reported by Officers of the Sanitary Department,

4,236

3,255

981

New Permits issued,.........

935

878

57

Permits renewed,....................

372

371

1

B. 0. 0. Work.

Q 18

35. Charges, Fees, Securities, etc.-The following is a state- ment of amounts payable for various Private Works, including Securities required in connection with Matshed and Hoarding Permits, Drainage Works, Private Street Improvements, etc:--

1928

1929

Increase Decrease

Securities required in connection

with the issue of permits

11,475.00

9,475.00

2,000.00

Fees charged for the issue of new

permits,

14.00

32.00

18.00

Fees charged for the issue of plans

for Theatrical Sheds,

10.00

10.00

Fees charged for additional Drain-

age Inspections,

Fees Charged for Disconnecting

Traps on Crown Land.

Charges made for permission to obtain Sand and Stone from Crown Land,

not

included

130.00

not

included

340.00



.:.

15.00

15.00

30.00

(Turf)

Charges made for damage to Trees...

250.00

250,00

Charges made for damage to Road

Surface,

150.00

709.90

559.90

Charges made for damage to Foot-

ways during building oper- ations,

Charges made for diverting Storm

Water Channel,

Charges made for removing Debris

not included

46.28

not

included

239.54

not

included

153.24

Charges made for paving Footways and Approach Roads (Private Work only),

not

included

515.34

Accounts for Drainage Works,

not included

7,226.67

Accounts for paving Footways under Verandahs and Bal- conies. Payments credited to D. N. A. Account.....

Accounts for Private Street Im- provements. Work carried out under Sec. 134 of the P. H. & B. Ordinance.

Accounts for Private Street Im-

provements. Work carried out under Sec. 186 of the P. H. & B. O.

not included 41,036,07

not included

1,586.10

not

included 12,902.71

74,117.85

:

:

36. Typhoon and Rainstorm Damage.-During the Typhoon on 22nd. August 1929 a certain amount of damage to private property was caused, although it was not so serious as might have been expected. A, few roofs collapsed and in several cases minor damage was caused to roofs. A number of temporary structures on the Praya East Reclamation were either destroyed or seriously damaged. A small landslip occurred on private property at Broadwood Road.

Q 19

B. O. O. Work.

37. Prosecutions.--The following is a tabulated statement of the cases in which legal proceedings were taken with regard to illegal works and other nuisances, the number of convictions obtained, and the amount of fines imposed: -

Nature of Offence.

No. of Cases.

No. of Convictions.

Amount of Fines.

Depositing on Crown Land without per-

mission,

Obtaining stone, etc., without permission, Matsheds without permission,

Defective Mortar,

Defective Building Works,.

Illegal works (ie., divergence from approv ed plans, non-submission of plans before commencing building opera- tions, construction of illegal works, and occupation of matsheds, &c., without permission),

Other cases (ie, non-compliance with

notices issued under the Public Health) & Buildings Ordinance),

5

00:110

150 80

100

355

17

12

445

45

35

$24

38. Cemeteries.-In connection with the provision of addi- tional grave spaces, the work of forming new terraces and paths, and repairing paths and channels proceeded as usual at the Chinese Cemeteries at Mount Caroline, Kai Lung Wan, Chai Wan, and Shum Wan, in Hong Kong.

New paths and steps to the East and West slopes of Mount Caroline Cemetery were formed. A small R.C.C. Bridge was

also constructed.

Extensions to Section A of Kai Lung Wan East Cemetery were formed and terraced. A new extension to Section C was made. Paths were surfaced and exhumed areas were re-formed.

Exhumed areas in Kai Lung Wan West Cemetery were re-

formed.

A new landing stage was erected and approach path formed at Aplichau Urning Ground.

At the Chinese Cemeteries in Kowloon the following works were carried out:

Kowloon Central Cemeteries-New areas, paths and channels were formed. New Section A was formed, and terraces and trenches were formed. Paths were surfaced. Steps to Indian Cemetery were re- formed. Two small R.C.C. Bridges in Ho Mun Tin Cemetery were constructed.

B. O. 0. Work.

Q 20

Sai Yu Shek Cemetery-Areas which had been washed out were repaired, paths surfaced and channels. formed.

Cheung Sha Wan Cemetery-Exhumed areas were levelled, and terraces re-formed. Paths, steps, and channels were formed. Undergrowth was cleared. A R.C.C. Bridge was constructed.

39. Reclamations.-The following is a statement of the private reclamations which were completed or in progress during the year:

M.L.'s 430 and 43, North Point, (nearing com-

pletion)

Area in

sq. ft.

833.975

S.I.L. 510, Shaukiwan, (completed)

8,530

S.I.L. 511, Shaukiwan, (completed)

6,960

S.I.L. 512, Shaukiwan, (completed)

5,130

S.I.L. 524, Shaukiwan, (completed)

7,626

S.I.L. 526, Shaukiwan, (in progress)

12,650

K.M.L. 93, Tai Wan, (in progress)

72,350

K.I.L.'s 1558 to 1561, Ma Tau Kok, (progress-

ing early in the year, but work was sus- pended during the year)

407,985

N.K.M.L. 3, Lai Chi Kok, (in progress)

140,250

N.K.M.L. 6, Lai Chi Kok, (in progress)

374,400

N.K.M.L. 7, Lai Chi Kok, (in progress)

630,000

N.K.I.L. 520, Castle Peak Road, (work was

suspended early in the year)

27,000

N.K.I.L. 521, Castle Peak Road, (work was

suspended early in the year)

24,750

N.K.I.L. 971, Castle Peak Road, (work was

suspended early in the year)

24,750

Tsun Wan M.L. 2, (completed)

874,400

Tsun Wan M.L. 4, (in progress)

74,900

Tsun Wan M.L. 5, (in progress)

273,600

21

B. O. 0. Work.

40. Principal Works of a Private Nature, completed or in progress.

Works completed:-

Shops, and Office Block, on I.L. 619 R.P., Queen's

Road Central.

Departmental Store for The Sun Co. Ltd., on P.R.M.L. 63, Des Voeux Road Central and Connaught Road Central.

School, on I.L. 338, at rear of No. 130, Hollywood

Road

New Building for the Wesleyan Sailors' and Soldiers'

Home, on I.L. 2616, Hennessy Road.

R. C. C. Building to be used as a Chapel, (St. Paul's

Hospital) on I.L. 1018, Causeway Bay.

Hospital for the Tung Wah Hospital Authorities, in

I.L. 2686, Soo Kun Poo.

Block of Stables, on R.B.L. 33, Wongneichong Road. Building to be used as a Public Dispensary, on S.I.L.

430, Main Street, Shaukiwan.

Rubber Factory, on S.I.L. 104, Main Street, Shaukiwan. Glass Factory, on S.I.L. 525, Shaukiwan East. New wing as an extension to St. Stephen's Girls' College on I.L. 2440, Lyttelton Road and Park Road.

Students' Hostel, to be known as "Ricci Hall", on I.L.

2610, Section A, Pokfulam Road.

Godown, on I.L. 954 Section A, s.s. 2 and Section C,

R.P., Belchers Street.

Chinese family mansion, on R.B.L. 28, The Peak. Distillery, on Crown Land adjoining Aberdeen I.L. 72. 10 European houses (10 shops and 30 flats,) on K.I.L.

407, Nathan Road.

10 European houses, on K.I.L. 2097, Prince Edward

Road.

11 Chinese houses, on K.I.L. 1618, Reclamation Street. Telephone Exchange and Staff Quarters, on K.I.L. 754

Nathan Road.

"Po Hing" Theatre on K.I.L. 2101, Nathan Road. Hostel and Hall for the Chinese Y.M.C.A., on K.I.L.

1483, Waterloo Road and Pitt Street

Maternity Ward, Kwong Wah Hospital, on K.I.L. 1213,

Kwong Wah Street.

Workshop on K.M.L. 39, Public Square Street.

Offices, on K.I.L. 1218, Portland Street,

B. O. 0. Work.

Q 22

Chapel and School, on N.K.I.L. 579, Yen Chow Street. School, on N.K.I.L. 1114, Un Chau Street.

Factory, on K.I.L. 1768, Tai Kok Tsui.

Pill Factory and Quarters, on N.K.I.L. 1140 Section

B., Ki Lung Street.

Sugar Factory, on N.K.I.L.'s 995, 996, 997 and 975,

Hai Tan Street.

Sub-station and Quarters, for The China Light & Power Co. (1918) Ltd., on K.I.L. 1900, Prince Edward Road.

Workshed, on N.K.I.L. 500, Po Kong Road.

Chinese Temple, on K.I.L. 2004, Ma Tau Wei Road.

In course of erection

7

Building for Banking premises, on I.L.'s 57 and 339 Sections A and B, Queen's Road Central, was in progress.

Building for Banking premises and Offices, on I.L. 295,

Queen's Road Central, was nearing completion. Block of Shops and Offices, to be known as "Gloucester Building" on M.L. 7 Section B and R. P., Pedder Street and Des Voeux Road Central. Piling for foundations was in progress.

1 Godown and 4 European Houses, on M.L. 197, Nos. 153 and 155 Praya East, (now Hennessy Road), were in progress.

Cold Store and Quarters on I.L. 563, Great George

Street, was in progress.

Grand Stands on R.B.L. 33, Wongneichong Road, were

nearing completion.

A Chinese family mansion, on I.L. 1946, Broadwood

Road was almost completed.

Liquid Fuel Tank, No. 4, on I.L. 2273, North Point,

was in progress.

Piano Factory, with Quarters on upper floor, on I.L.

2845, Shaukiwan Road, was nearing completion, Cinema Theatre, one Crown Land, opposite S.I.L. 446,

Shaukiwan East, was nearing completion.

10 European Houses, on I.L. 2980, Shaukiwan Road

and Lau Sin Street, were in progress.

A large European house, on I.L. 591, Sections A, B, C,

and D, Bonham Road, was in progress.

Theatre, to be known as "Central Theatre", on I.L.'s 48 R.P. and 601 R.P., Queen's Road Central and Circular Pathway, was nearing completion.

Q 23

B. O. O. Work.

Lard Factory, on I.L. 2415, Kennedy Town, was in

progress.

2 Godowns, on I.L. 1298 Section A, Cadogan and Bel-

chers Streets, were in progress.

Site formation for War Memorial Nursing Home, on R.B.L. 317, Mount Kellett, was nearing completion. Regional Seminary, on R.B.L. 315, Aberdeen, was in

progress.

5 European houses (5 shops and 15 flats), on K.I.L.

413, Nathan Road, were in progress.

13 Chinese houses, on K.I.L. 216, Canton Road, were

in progress.

Site formation for a Church and Manse, on K.I.L.

2174, Jordan Road, was in progress.

Building consisting of Showrooms, Offices, Quarters, etc. on K.I.L. 2111, Nathan Road, was in progress.

Chinese Theatre, Actors' Quarters and 2 Shops, on

K.I.L. 1726, Nathan Road, were in progress.

32 Chinese houses, on K.I.L. 1578, Argyle, Tung Choi,

and Fa Yuen Streets, were in progress.

10 Chinese houses, on K.I.L. 1796, Larch Street and

Bedford Road, were in progress.

Steel Factory, on N.K.I.L. 521 Section A., new road

near Castle Peak Road, was in progress.

Knitting Factory, on K.I.L. 1749 Section F., Fuk Tsun

Street, was in progress.

School, on N.K.I.L. 1127, Boundary Street, was in

progress.

12 European houses, on K.I.L. 2135, Prince Edward

Road, were in progress.

10 Chinese houses, on K.I.L. 2175, Lai Chi Kok Road,

were in progress.

13 Chinese houses, on K.I.L. 2175, Lai Chi Kok Road,

were in progress,

11 Chinese houses, on K.I.L. 2175, Prince Edward Road,

were in progress.

B. O. O. Work.

24

18 Chinese houses, on K.I.L. 2210, Prince Edward Road,

were in progress.

10 Chinese houses, on K.I.L. 2239, Tai Nan Street,

were in progress.

10 Chinese houses, on K.I.L. 2271, Tai Nan Street,

were in progress.

12 Chinese houses, on N.K.I.L. 1248, Cheungshawan

Road were in progress.

14 Chinese houses, on N.K.I.L. 1285, Cheungshawan

Road were in progress.

12 Chinese houses, on K.I.L. 2208, Sai Yeung Choi

Street, were in progress.

17 Chinese houses, on N.K.I.L. 1274, Ki Lung Street,

were in progress.

41. Special reference is made_to_the_following Principal Works of a Private Nature.-Regarding the development of Praya East Reclamation, started in 1928, when a large R.C.C. Godown on I.L. 2755 was commenced, and completed in 1929, the following is a brief resume of further works carried out during 1929:

21 plans for 196 Chinese houses were approved. Of these, 33 houses were completed and 159 were in course of erection. In the case of only 4 houses work had not commenced at the end of the year.

2 plans for a Saw Mill and a Gasoline Service Station were approved. Both these buildings were com- pleted during the year.

Site formation for 28 European houses on R.B.L. 245, Deep Water Bay, referred to in last year's Report, was completed. One house on Site No. 22 was completed and two houses on Sites Nos. 17 and 18 were almost complete. Plans for fifteen houses on other sites were approved during the year, and ten of these houses were in course of erection.

The main buildings to house St. Stephen's Boys' College, referred to in last year's Report, were occupied during the second half of the year. The premises comprise College, Hostel, 2 Bungalows, Servants Quarters, Laundry, Garage, and Chauf- feurs Quarters, and are situated on R.B.L.'s 314, 318, 319, 320, 321 and 322, Stanley.

Q 25

B. 0. 0. Work.

On the Kowloon Tong Estate, 17 European houses, for for which plans were approved prior to 1929, were still in course of erection, and work was in progress one Bungalow for which plan was approved during 1929.

on

42. Valuation and Resumption.-The total valuations made during the year 1929 comprised 1,266 properties with a total estimated value of $22,246,789.83.

Valuations were made for the purpose of resumption for street widening and the development of areas in accordance with the approved Town Planning Scheme.

Resumptions shown in Schedule A below were actually effected:--

SCHEDULE A.

Resumptions in connection with Street Widening, New Roads, Improvement Schemes, etc., etc.

Number of

Purpose of Resumption. Vote debited.

properties dealt with

Amount paid.

Total area in

sq. ft.

HONG KONG.

Head 31,

(a) Street Widenings

Sub-head 66

1

2,000.00

1,054

(b) Development Schemes.

dc.

1 village lot

1,275.08

$3,275.08

KOWLOON.

Development in accord-

Head 31,

ance with the Town Plan- ning Scheme.

Sub-head 97

10

38,238.00

Do.

do.

8 village lots

3,761.45

41,999.45

NEW KOWLOON.

(a) Kowloon Tsai Resump-

tion

Head 31,

Sub-head 124 75 village lots

22,674.60

(b) Town Planning and

Development Scheme

Head 31,

Sub-head 135 57 village lots

38,171.85

(c) Kai Tak Aerodrome

Loan Account 58 village lots

17,866.91

N.K.I.L. 115 Sec. A

do.

1

55,000.00

$72,866.91

B. O. O. Work.

26

were submitted to

Included in Schedule A certain cases Arbitration with results as detailed in Schedule B below.

Lots resumed.

SCHEDULE B.

Government's offer based on Valuation and Resumption Officer's valuations.

Amount

of claim submitted.

Result of proceedings.

Wong Nei Chong Lot 5..

790.00

No claim submitted.

*K. I. L. 1278

2,700.00

do.

Board awarded.

$1,204.75

2,700.00

Tong Mi Village Lots

S.D. IV 730, 771, 773,

777, 778, 779, 780, 781, 782 and 783

1,851.25

do.

1,851.25

Kowloon Tong Village

Lot S.D. IV No. 2082.

2,190.50

do.

1,307.00

Kowloon Tong Village

Lots S.D. IV.

No. 15

65.35

65.35

No. 16

435.60

435.60

No.

18

130.70

130.70

No.

20

130.68

130.68

No. 28

152.45

152.45

No. 151

36.13

36.13

do.

No. 187

435.60

435.60

No. 188

104.56

104.56

No. 205

104.56

104.56

No. 215

52.28

52.28

No. 217

296.20

296.20

S.D. 11 Lot 1563 R.P.

184.24

do.

174.20

*Paid in 1928. Not included in Schedule A.

27

P.W.R. Hong Kong.

In addition to the valuations shown in Schedule A the undermentioned valuations for other purposes were made :—

1. For Resumptions not effected 289 properties totalling

$847,228.49.

2. Valuations required by Government of sundry pro-

perties-65 properties totalling $2,625,388.40.

3. Confidential Valuations required by Government-20

properties totalling $8,435,565.00.

4. For Resumption of areas required for Kai Tak Aero-

drome-176 properties totalling $89,144.12.

5. For Estate Duty Commissioner-490 properties total-

ling $8,682,817.93.

6. For Registrar of Supreme Court-4 properties totall-

ing $242,020.00.

7. For Registrar of Companies-1 property totalling

$301,300.00.

8. For Official Trustee for Security-7 properties total-

ling $46,580.00.

9. For Superintendent of Imports and Exports-3 pro-

perties totalling $797,758.00.

PUBLIC WORKS RECURRENT.

HONG KONG.

43. Maintenance of Buildings.-Government Buildings were kept in a good state of repair and general renovation work was carried out in accordance with the recurring programme.

The electrical installations were maintained in good order. Fourteen hundred and eighty three fans and one hundred and thirteen radiators were cleaned and overhauled. One hundred and fourteen fans were re-wound and repaired. Seven buildings were rewired throughout, total points 211.

Estimates Expenditure

$180,000.00 $169,697.29

P.W.R. Hong Kong.

Q 28

44. Improvements to Buildings.-The principal improve- ments carried out under this heading were the following:-

Botanical Gardens-Alterations to Aviary providing reinforced concrete roof and partitions to replace wooden structures. Victoria British School-Rein- forced concrete stairway to replace a temporary wooden one. Chair Coolie Quarters, Peak-Instal- lation of a watercarriage system to replace existing dry latrines. 152 Peak-Installing additional W.C.'s in bathrooms. Fire Station Building- Erecting partition in the Inspector of Vernacular Schools Office to form an additional office. Belilios Public School-Erecting external staircase as an emergency fire escape. New Government Office- Erecting louvred screen on verandah of the Sup- erintendent of Mails Quarters to secure privacy from adjoining property.

property. Colonial Secretariat- Installing a fire service circuit on all floors. "Tan- deragee" Removing existing partition wall to in- crease the area of a bathroom. Government Civil Hospital-Erecting small wooden shed to accom- modate X-ray apparatus.

Police Club Happy Valley-This work was referred to in paragraph 210 of last year's Report. A Con- tract was let to Messrs. Tat Lee & Co. on the 28th May and the work was satisfactorily completed in September.

Estimates

$26,000.00

Expenditure

$21,365.50

45. Maintenance of Lighthouses.-Lighthouses were main- tained in a good state of repair and renovations were carried out under the usual recurring programme.

Estimates

Expenditure

$8,000.00

$6,191.33

}

46. Maintenance of Roads and Bridges in City. Approxi-

Improvements to Roads and Bridges in City.

mately 64 miles of roads.-The road surfaces were maintained in a satisfactory condition. The asphaltum treatment of the carriageways was further extended throughout the City.

The following figures show the extent of the operations carried out at the Government Quarry, Tsat Tse Mui, during the year:

Stone-Various grades passed through crushers :—

Q 29

P.W.R. Hong Kong.

A total quantity of 12,023 cubic yards of which 6,434 cubic yards were made into tar macadam, 1365 cubic yards into Sand Carpeting and 4224 cubic yards were delivered to various works as the material came from the crushers. Further 21,274 grano- lithic paving slabs were provided for use on footways; 36 rein- forced concrete standards for railings and 52 rubber squeegees were made.

The following are particulars of the additional areas laid with improved surfacing during the year:

1. Tarring and sanding

2. 21" granolithic paving slabs laid on

footways

3. Substitution of 2" asphaltum laid on

cement concrete bed for macadam

4. Substitution of tar macadam for ordin-

ary macadam

Estimates

Expenditure

$105,000.001

20,000.00

$100,725.741

Square Yards.

60,747

5,512

15,833

500

=

$125,000.00

19,077.62 $119,803.36

47. Maintenance of Roads and Bridges Outside City. Improvements to Roads and Bridges Outside City. Approximately 78 miles of roads.—The road surfaces were main- tained in a satisfactory condition.

Additional parapet walls were erected at dangerous points on the road around the Island and the hair-pin bend at the junction of Island Road and road to Stanley Beach was widened.

A large amount of concrete channelling and surfacing of lanes etc. was carried out at Tai Hang, Shaukiwan, Stanley, Aberdeen and Aplichau.

The following are particulars of the improved surfacing in- troduced on a number of roads in addition of those mentioned in previous reports:-

1. Tarring and sanding

2. Substitution of tar macadam for ord-

inary macadam

Estimates

Expenditure

Square yards.

58,050

32,590

$130,000.00

6,000.00ƒ

= $136,000.00

$111,432.061

3,513.54

$114,945.60

P.W.R. Hong Kong.

Q 30

48. Maintenance of Telephones, including all cables.-The lines and instruments were maintained in good order. Altera- tions and improvements were effected to various existing lines.

Fifteen additional direct telephones and four extensions were installed.

Estimates, Expenditure,

$10,000.00 $ 8,907.25

49. Maintenance of Sewers, Nullahs, &c.-The sewers, stormwater drains, and trained nullahs generally were cleansed, repaired and maintained in good condition, the open nullahs and channels in the City of Victoria and in the Shaukiwan district being cleansed by the Sanitary Department. The automatic flushing tanks were operated during periods of low tide. deposits were cleared as they occurred.

Sand

The Septic Tanks at Lugard Road, Repulse Bay, Deep Water Bay, near R.B.L. 137, Pokfulam Road, and at F.L.'s 29 and 30, Pokfulam, were periodically sludged. Several Septic Tanks at Repulse Bay, were covered in with galvanized iron sheets.

All metal work in connection with the various drainage systems was inspected, and, where found necessary, repaired and tarred.

Repairs were also effected to sewers, stormwater drains, nullahs and channels, the most important being to those situated as shewn below:

Sewers.

Below Bowen Road east of No. 16 Macdonnell Road; from North View Bungalow, Shaukiwan Road; in front of No. 3 Tung On Street; in Mui Fong Street, junction of Des Voeux Road West; at rear of No. 17 Wing Fung Street; in Peak Road be- tween Lamp-posts Nos. 1450 and 1452; west of I.L. 1384 Macdonnell Road; at University, Bonham Road near Gate Lodge.

7

Storm Water Drains. At Kellett Bay outfall; oppo- site No. 23 Hillier Street; on footpath leading to Re- servoir east of S.I.L. 525 Shaukiwan.

Nullahs. Invert of nullah on east side of No. 15 Bowen Road; coping on Tai Hang nullah near R. Corney & Co.: culvert at side of I.L. 2620 between new road and Conduit Road.

Channels.

On Crown land below No. 50 The Peak; at side of No. 2 Gordon Road.

Q 31

P.W.R. Hong Kong.

Many defective traps, gullies, gratings, etc. were renewed, and a number of old disused drains of various sizes and types destroyed and filled in.

Estimates, Expenditure,

$22,000.00 $21,565.86

50. Gas Lighting, City and Suburb and Hill District.-The total number of lamps in use at the end of the year in the City and its precincts was 1,679, an increase of 45 over the figures for the previous year, and in the Hill District 225, the same as last year.

Estimates, Expenditure,

$98,000.00 $95,536.86

51. Electric Lighting, City, Hill District and Shaukiwan.- The old agreement with the Hong Kong Electric Co. for electric street lighting expired in 1928 and a new agreement was entered upon in November 1929 for a period of seven years from 1st January 1929; the new rates for street lighting being charged from 1.1.1929.

The numbers and positions of incandescent lamps in the principal roads of the City are as under:-

Along tramway route

Do.

Chater Road, Junction of Mur-

1 300 watts.

49

200

ray Road

1

300

Chater Road, Junction of Jack-

City of Victoria.

son Road

1

300

Chater Road (suspended lantern) 3 Connaught Road Central near

500

**

the Star Ferry Wharf

1

150

Icehouse Street, junction of

Queen's Road Central

1

500

35

Icehouse Street, (suspended lan-

tern)

3

500

Pedder

Street (suspended lan-

tern)

2

500

"

Various Roads

52

500

Do.

2

300

Do.

4

150

}

Aberdeen

19

100

11

Do.

6

75

**

Aberdeen Village -

2

75

25

Aplichau Village

7 100

"

Do.

5

75

"

Ah Kung Ngam Village

6

60

"

Do.

1

75

Barker Road Tram Station

2

40

93

*

Bowen Road

25

60

31

P.W.R. Hong Kong.

Q 32

Breezy Point Government Quarters.. 1

100 watts.

Brewin Path

6

60

Caroline Hill Road

6

60

Do.

1

75

Excelsior Terrace

60

Do.

2

75

Harlech Road

18

60

Homestead Path

00

8

100

Kennedy Town Cattle Pier

1 -

60

Lugard Road

26

60

Latrine Lights

84

15

Magazine Gap Road

25

60

-

Morrison Hill Road

10

5

Mount Cameron Road

11

c

100

75

Mount Davis Road

22

100

Pokfulam Road

26

100

Queen's Pier

00

8

300

Do.

10

5

150

Do.

2

40

Quarry Bay Road

9



100

Sai Wan Ho

16

60

21

Do.

9



100

}

Sassoon Road

1

100

11

Do.

10

60

Shaukiwan Road

Do.

Do.

18

-

3

8 100

60

75

,

Shaukiwan Village

Stanley Road

5

100

Do.

2

60

12

40

Stubbs Road

Tregunter Path

102



100

Do. (Sentry Box)

Wanchai Gap to Bowen Road

Wongneichong Recreation Grounds

1

15

18



60

"

20

100

5

60.

33

P.W.R. Hong Kong.

52. Traffic Control Lights.

Bottom of Seymour Road

Ditto.

1

15 watts. (1 not to exceed 75 watts.)

Junction of Stubbs Road

and Gap Road

(

Do.

}

Corner of Arsenal Street &

Queen's Road East ( Queen's Road West and

Do.

)

Pokfulam Road

(

Do.

53. Lights-Control by meters.

Traffic Light

-Junction of Garden Road and Lower

Albert Road

One

Do.

-Corner Caine Road and Arbuthnot

Road

One

Do.

-Junction of Bonham Road and Pok-

fulam Road

One

Refuse Pier

-Praya East Reclamation Refuse Pier One

Do.

-Whitfield Refuse Pier

One

Public Latrine

Wellington

Street, junction of

Queen's Road Central

Three

Do.

Three

Pier head light

-Wongneicheong

and cable light Queen Victoria Street Ferry Pier... Two

In addition to these, the Taikoo Dockyard & Engineering Co. of Hong Kong provide 10 lamps, each having a cluster of three-100 C.P. incandescent lamps for lighting the road adja- cent to their property, and the Taikoo Sugar Refinery Co. also provide and light seven 2,000 C.P. incandescent lamps for road adjacent to their property.

Estimates,

Supplementary Vote,

Total,

$45,000.00

7,000.00

$52,000.00

$51,661.16

Expenditure,

54. Extensions of Lighting.-45 gas lamps were installed

during the year.

Estimates, Expenditure,

$3,000.00 2,280.00

P.W.R. Hong Kong.

Q 34

55. Typhoon and Rainstorm Damages.-Following the ty phoon more or less extensive repairs were made under this head to the following buildings. These repairs were chiefly confined to roofs and external joinery :

Victoria Gaol, Central Police Station, Beaconsfield Arcade, 410 The Peak, Homestead Site Houses and Flats, Chair Coolie Shelter-The Peak, 160 The Peak, Government Civil Hospital, Pokfulam Sani- tary Office, Lyemun Signal Station, Morrison Hill Market, Botanical Gardens, Colonial Cemetery Church, Magazine Gap Sub-Station, Fire Station Building.

Slight damage was also caused to the following Roads:-

Road to War Memorial Nursing Home Site, Mt. Kellett, Barker Road, Improvements from Stubbs Road to Victoria Hospital, and in the Tai Hang Valley Development.

Sand &c. were cleared from :-Wongneichong nullah; Soo- kunpo nullah; stormwater drain, Beach Street; stormwater drain, Cadogan Street; stormwater drain, Hill Road. Repairs were made to:-outfall of Shing On Street nullah, Saiwanho; outfall of stormwater drain near S.I.L. 482 Saiwanho; invert. of nullah at No. 12 Bridge, Shaukiwan; sewer and connexions west of "Thorpe Manor" May Road; invert of nullah at No. 8 Bridge, Pokfulam; culvert in Stubbs Road near I.L. 2383. General works were carried out as follows:-A temporary matshed was reinstated at Government expense for the Royal Hong Kong Golf Club near the Monument; rock was removed from "Inver- druie" nullah between Magazine Gap Road and Bowen Road.

Estimates,

Expenditure,

$100,000.00

$ 58.655.92

56. Maintenance of City and Hill District Water Works. The year opened with a constant supply by street fountains only and until the rains commenced on July 12th, the Colony under- went one of the most severe periods of water shortage in its history.

The rainfall recorded at the Royal Observatory during the 12 months ending 30th June was 37.27 inches which is 8.56 inches less than the lowest previously recorded in any 12 co›› secutive months.

""

**

""

""

35

P.W.R. Hong Kong.

The following Table shews the restrictions which were in operation during the year:

Districts.

Remarks.

Period.

Whole City

Jan. 1st.-30th.

April

Constant Supply by

Street Fountain Supply.

street fountains only. (Night pres- sures reduced from 25th March-30th.

April).

1st. May-27th. May 12 hours supply (6

28th May-17th.

June

18th. June-24th

June

25th, June-1st.

July

2nd. July-22nd.

July 23rd. July-7th.

August

8th. Aug.-18th.

August

19th. Aug.-8th.

September

9th. Sept.--12th.

November

13th. Nov.-31st

December

A.M.-6 P.M.).

Principal

Mains

closed 6 P.M.-6 A.M.

7 hours supply 6-10 A.M. & 3-6 P.M.

5

hours supply 6-9 A.M. & 3.30-6 P.M.

5 hours supply 5-8 A.M. & 6-8.30 P.M.

4 hours supply 6-8 A.M. & 6-8 P.M. 12 hours fountains supply 6 A.M.-6 P.M.

2 hours house supply in all Rider Main Districts (Principal Mains closed from 7 P.M.-6 A.M.) 12 hours house sup- ply in all Rider Main Districts (Principal mains closed at night. 15 hours supply in all Rider Main Dis-

tricts 6 A.M.-9

P.M.

Principal

Mains closed at

night.

12 hours supply in all

Rider Main Dis-

House Supply.

tricts

6 A.M.-6

P.M.

Principal

mains

closed

at

night.

P.W.R. Hong Kong.

36

From the above table it will be seen that an unrestricted 24 hours supply was not turned on during the whole year and that the Rider Mains were closed during 219 days of the year.

Numerous emergency measures to augment the regular sup- plies were taken and the following are worthy of record:--

Total

Average

Source.

Period in operation.

Quantity

Daily

obtained

in M. G.

Quantity M. G.

Tai Koo Refinery Supply,

2nd February to 17th August.

19.12

0.10

Lai Chi Kok Water Boat Dock,

21st March to 29th July.

40.00

0.30

Remarks.

Connection made to Govt. Main at North Point.

to

Transported

Tanks on Praya by Water Boat.

Tsun Wan Stream,

9th June to

13.98

0.27

Do.

29th July.

Imported Supplies, ...

8th June to

13.44

0.25

From outports and

30th July.

Canton River Delta by W. E. Committee.

36.54

0.92

Altogether 21 tanks of a total capacity of 1.05 million gal- lons were erected on the Praya between Douglas Street and Kennedy Town and on the Praya East Reclamation. Approxi- mately half of the tanks were supplied with water from Lai Chi Kok and Tsun Wan and remainder with imported supplies. Fountains north of Queen's Road were generally closed whilst tank supplies were available.

With a 4 hours per day supply and the above supplies in operation the draw-off from the permanent supply fell below 3 million gallons per day.

In addition to the above supplies several streams were diverted into the Bowen Road and Pokfulum Conduits and yielded approximately 100 million gallons after the rains had set in. A further 45 million gallons was likewise obtained by the construction of a channel approximately 4,500 feet in length at Tytam Tuk. This channel which was completed on 22nd July, diverts the run off from 150 acres into Tytam Tuk Reservoir and as that reservoir did not overflow during the year the full benefit of these additional supplies was obtained. This channel will be available until superseded by the permanent Tytam Tuk East Catchwater.

37

P.W.R. Hong Kong.

The total quantity of water stored in the impounding reser- voirs on the 1st of January amounted to 998.53 million gallons, of which 292.63 million gallons were in the gravitation reservoirs and 705.90 million gallons in the low-level reservoirs requiring pumping. Storage reached a minimum on the 11th July when the total was 141.36 million gallons, 124.65 million gallons being in the gravitation reservoirs.

On June 18th Tytam Tuk Reservoir stood at 107 feet below overflow level, when pumping had to be discontinued owing to the muddy state of the water.

The reservoirs were at or over their permanent overflow levels for the following periods:-

Reservoirs.

Capacity to per- manent overflow

Periods.

level

Tai Tam,

Tai Tam Bywash,

....

Tai Tam Interme-

diate.

Tai Tam Tuk,

(Million Gallons.)

384.80

45

22.37

195.90

1,419.00

Wong Nei Chong,

30.34

Pokfulam,

days

between

30th July and 12th September.

40 days between 1st August and 9th September.

94 days between 7th August and 11th November.

Nil. Reached 5'-11′′ below overflow le- vel on 1st. Oct.

8 days between 2nd August and 23rd August.

66.00

30

days between 29th July and 3rd. September.

The rainfall for the year amounted to 69.83 inches (Obser- vatory) or 1.33 inches less than last year and was 15.54 inches below the average for the last forty-six years.

P.W.R. Hong Kong.

Q 38

There were only light rains during May and June and the wet season did not set in until the middle of July. The first heavy rain fell on the 12th July when the reservoirs commented to rise, but the dry season set in early, the last considerable rain falling on the 30th September.

The maximum quantity of water impounded in all reservoirs during the year amounted to 1,905.06 million gallons on the 10th September.

The total quantity of water remaining at the. end of the year was 1,308.83 million gallons.

The total quantity of water pumped from Tai Tam Tuk Reservoir during the vear amounted to 1,306.01 million gallons of which 1,287.06 million gallons were pumped by the Simpson Engines and 18.95 million gallons by the Tangye Engines. This total is less than that of last year by 407.09 million gallons.

No. 1 Engine (Tangye) ran

No. 2

No. 3

19

No. 4

"

No. 5

6 days.

16

27

"1

(Simpson) 35

>"

192

29

222

""

"

21

The following is a statement of the cost of pumping during 1928 and 1929:

TAI TAM TUK PUMPING STATION.

Coal,

Wages,

Miscellaneous, including repairs

and stores other than coal,

Total,

1928.

1929.

$ 72,038.40

C.

$ 60,097.10 *

15,668.37

16,501.56

7,653.33

9,764.23

$95,360.10

$86,362.89

*This is the value of coal consumed during the year.

Coal to the value

of $16,466.60 was carried forward from 1928 to 1929, and coal to the value

of $17,269.50 was carried forward from 1929 to 1930. was $14.50 per ton during the whole year in 1929.

The price of coal

39

P.W.R. Hong Kong.

The total quantity of water supplied during the year amount- ed to 2,148.48 million gallons filtered, and 52.99 million gallons unfiltered, making a grand total of 2,201.47 million gallons or 814.96 million gallons less than during 1928.

The average consumption of filtered water per head per day for all purposes throughout the year was about 13.6 gallons. In arriving at this figure the population has been estimated at 433,420. Full details of consumption etc., will be found in Annexes C and D.

The analyses made by the Government Analyst show that the water was of good quality throughout the year, whilst the results obtained by bacteriological examination were satisfactory.

The quantity of water pumped to the High Level Districts of the City was 127.68 million gallons, equal to an average daily consumption of about 350,000 gallons whilst 54.71 million gal- lons were pumped to the Hill District, giving an average daily consumption of 150,000 gallons.

As compared with 1928 there was a decrease of 38.25 million gallons to the High Level District and a decrease of 21.29 million gallons to the Hill District.

The grand total pumped during the year to the High Level and Peak Districts amounted to 182.39 million gallons as com- pared with 246.89 million gallons in 1928, a decrease of 64.50 million gallons. Tabulated statements containing particulars of the quantities of water pumped to the High Levels of the City and to the Hill District respectively will be found in Annexe E.

All engines, motors and station buildings have been kept in good order throughout the year. The work of overhauling the valves on the principal mains in the City was continued during the year, 169 being thoroughly repaired.

The number of meters in use at the end of the year aggre- gated 3,748 in the City and 265 in the Hill District making a grand total of 4,013 as compared with 3,532 and 251 or a total of 3,783 at the end of 1928. These figures do not include 64 meters in use at Pokfulum,

P.W.R. Hong Kong.

40 -

The quantity of water supplied by meters was as follows:

Filtered:

Government Buildings, for all

purposes, free of charge, ... 100.42 million gallons.

Trade,

311.50

""

Domestic,

203.64

(High Level District) 87.46

91

(Peak District),

44.53

19

52.99

"

TOTAL,

800.54

Unfiltered,

These figures show a decrease of 178.71 million gallons in the quantity supplied by meters as compared with 1928.

New services were constructed or old ones altered, improved, repaired, or connected to the mains to the number of 6,287 and 73 supplies were laid on for building purposes.

The number of inspections of services carried out was 34,473. Defective services were found in 738 cases all of which were put in, proper repair after the usual notices had been served.

Estimates,

Expenditure,

$270,000.00

$231,385.26

7

Q 41

A comparative statement of the local rainfall for the year at various points is given in the following table:-

P.W.R. Hong Kong.

Month.

Royal

Observa-

tory.

Public Tai Tam Gardens. Reservoir.

Tai Tam

Tuk

Reservoir.

Pokfulam

Reservoir.

Wong Nei Shing Mun Shing Mun Shing Mun Reservoir Reservoir Reservoir Chong

No. 1.

Reservoir.

Shek Lai

No. 2.

No. 3.

Kowloon

Reservoir

No. 4.

Pui Tai Po Reservoir Quarters. No. 5.

Fanling.

January,

.930

1.30

.73

.77

.70

.57

.45

.47

.38

1.41

1.02

1.48

February,

.585

.70

.36

.45

.33

.42

.98

.95

.85

.74

.57

.77

*

*

March,

.505

.91

.81

.88

.70

.60

.13

.10

.05

.28

.25

.08

*

April,

1.540

1.22

.83

.86

.90

.79

3.03

3.17

2.94

1.48

1.29

.97

1.68

May,

June,

6.620

7.00

6.53

6.33

5.37

5.68

3.38

3.72

3.16

3.25

2.83

3.97

3.53

4.195

5.31

3.51

4.94

3.69

4.90

6.70

7.44

6.47

6.36

5.74

4.07

4.11

July,

22.700

23.23

25.00

25.83

18.78

29.61

21.12

21.20

21.29

23.87

20.14

20.87

24.64

August,

20.020

20.07

19.20

15.78

18.56

22.64

15.82

16.61

16.06

15.40

11.56

12.58

15.67

September,

10.795

9.41

6.87

7.15

7.72

7.53

11.42

11.42

11.14

10.59

8.39

9.55

3.68

October,

.140

.03

.28

.17

1.13

.32

.36

.22

.03

November,

1.375

1.31

.57

.57

1.24

.31

.80

.86

December,

.420

.59

.34

41

.36

.35

.18

.20

328

.75

1.50

1.17

1.82

1.78

.14

.86

.64

.63

.22

Total 1929,

69.825

71.08

65.03

64.14

59.48

73.72

64.01

66.14

63.23

66.10

53.82

56.79

55.34

Total 1928,

71.155

80.29

79.67

74.69

64.09

69.41

72.37

75.11

70.21

75.64

'61.17

61.83

Increase or Decrease. 1.330 -9.21

--14.64

-10.55

-4.61

+4.31

-8.36 ~~8.97

-6.98

--9.54

-7.35

-5.04

55.34

*No gauge.

P.W.R. Hong Kong.

42

-

57. Maintenance of Water Works, Shaukiwan.--A satisfac- tory supply of water was maintained by fountains throughout the year. This was rendered possible by the temporary connec- tion to the Taikoo Refinery Supply, the total quantity of water drawn therefrom amounting to 7.41 million gallons.

Prior to the rains in July the supply was restricted during various periods by shutting off at night as circumstances neces- sitated.

From 27th November to 8th December the supply was shut off from 8 p.m. to 6 a.m. and from the 9th to 31st December the supply was shut off from 6 p.m. to 6 a.m.

The total consumption of filtered water for the year was 58.52 million gallons which includes 4.01 million gallons supplied to the boat population giving an average of 160,000 gallons per day. An unfiltered supply of 2.15 million gallons was given to the Barracks at Sai Wan, which with the total of the filtered. supply stated amounted to 60.67 million gallons or 166,000 gal- lons per day. The details of the consumption are given in Annexe F.

There were 66 meters in use at the close of the year.

Estimates, Expenditure,

$1,200.00 $1,199.08

58. Maintenance of Water Works, Aberdeen. -A constant supply of water was maintained throughout the year, the total consumption being 36.61 million gallons. This includes 3.97 million gallons supplied through the water boat station and 2.48 million gallons supplied by the new 2′′ main to Aplichau.

The average consumption throughout the year was 100,000 gallons per day, the details of which are given in Annexe G.

There were 25 meters in use at the close of the year includ- ing two at Aplichau.

Estimates, Expenditure,

$1,200.00 $1,188.59

59. Maintenance of Water Works, Repulse Bay. The tota! quantity of water supplied during the year amounted to 9.67 million gallons or an average consumption of 26,000 gallons per day against a total supply of 7.85 million gallons and an average consumption of 21.000 gallons per day during 1928.

P.W.R. Hong Kong.

Owing to the drought the supply almost failed owing to the low level of the Wong Nei Chong Reservoir. A 6,000 gallon Iron Tank was erected on the beach at Repulse Bay and arrange- ments were made to deliver a supply to it by water boats and thence pumping it into the Hotel Company's Tanks by their salt water Pumps. Fortunately it was not necessary to operate this scheme.

There were 24 meters in use at the close of the year.

Estimates,

Expenditure,

$1,000.00

$ 764.00

60. Water Account (Meters etc.).—The number of meters examined and repaired during the year was 1,832. A systematic overhaul of all meters is being carried out.

The total expenditure for the year was.

Estimates,

Expenditure,

$24,000.00

$23,952.05

61. Maintenance of Praya Walls and Piers. To maintain the above works in a satisfactory condition during the year in- volved repairs to the following piers:

Davis Street Refuse Boat, Harbour Department, King Shan, Murray, Queen Victoria Street, Sai Wan Ho, Shaukiwan, Western Market and Whitfield Refuse Boat.

Minor repairs and painting was carried out to the super- structure of the following piers:-

Blake and Queen's.

The tide gauge houses at Shaukiwan and Kennedy Town were repaired and painted.

The Police Searching Sheds on the undermentioned wharves were repaired and painted:-

Chiu On, Hing Kee, Hoi On, Hong Kong and Macao Steamboat, Kwong Wing, Luen Cheong, Osaka Shosen Kaisha, Ping On, Po Tak, Sai Kong, Tai Hing, Tung On and Yuen On.

Estimates,

Expenditure,

$30,000.00

$26,705.73

P.W.R. Hong Kong

Q 44

62. Maintenance of Public Cemetery.The Cemeteries generally were maintained in a satisfactory condition. More of the paths in the Colonial Cemetery were paved with 24" granolithic paving.

Estimates, Expenditure,

$2,500.00 $2,231.49

63. Maintenance of Chinese Cemeteries.—Work carried out under this head has already been alluded to in paragraph 38 of this report.

Estimates Expenditure

$3,500.00 $3,498.54

64. Maintenance of Public Recreation Grounds.-The various grounds were maintained in a good order. The use of departmental labour for the purpose of mowing grass, cleansing ditches etc., was continued.

Estimates, Expenditure,

$4,000.00

$2,899.47

65. Dredging Foreshores.-During the year, No. 1 Grab Dredger worked 236 days and was 7 weeks under repair (24th May to 15th July).

The cost of repairs amounted to $6,774.60. This dredger removed 27,477 cubic yards of silt at a cost of 23.77 cents per cube yard, excluding depreciation and repair charges.

The No. 2 Grab Dredger worked 326 days throughout the year.

This dredger removed 33,624 cube yards of silt at a cost of 13.43 cents per cube yard, excluding depreciation.

The greater portion of the dredged material was dumped at Cheung Sha Wan, the remainder at Shaukiwan.

The silt removed in dredging foreshores, i.e. in maintaining the depth of water alongside Public Piers, Refuse Boat Piers and within the Causeway Bay Typhoon Shelter amounted to 40,315 cube yards. The remainder of the dredging was in connection with the following works:-Protective works at Cheung Sha Wan, Cross Harbour Pipe Line and Nullah founda- tions at Shaukiwan.

Estimates, Expenditure,

$28,000.00

$23,726.13

Q 45

P.W.R. Hong Kong.

66. Store Depreciation.-The adjustment of store values and reconditioning of old stores have been met from this vote, amounting to $6,438.61.

The following sums were credited to this vote:-$6,182.83 being rebate on Freight Charges in connection with stores pur- chased in England through the Crown Agents: $161.84 being the value of stores returned which had been issued prior to 1929.

The result showed a net expenditure on this vote of $93.94.

Estimates,

Expenditure,

$100.00

$ 93.94

67. Boundary Stones.-A statement of the boundary stones fixed is given in paragraph 25 of this Report.

Estimates,

Expenditure,

$5,000.00

$2,603.76

68. Survey of Colony.—An account of the principal survey work executed during the year is given in paragraphs 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, and 26 of this Report.

Estimates,

Expenditure,

$5,000.00

$4,921.20

69. Bathing Places:-The provision of these facilities was. referred to in paragraph 60 of last year's Report.

Facilities as last year were provided at Kennedy Town, North Point, Repulse Bay and Tai Wan, whilst provision was also made at Lai Chi Kok for men and women.

The attendance for the beaches showed a falling off; this may be attributed to the formation of several bathing Clubs, the members of which apparently utilised the accommodation provided by them.

Estimates,

Supplementary Vote,

Expenditure,

$15,000.00

$ 4,150.00

$19,150.00 $17,127.64

P.W.R. Kowloon.

-

46

P. W. R. KOWLOON.

70. Maintenance of Buildings.-Government Buildings were repaired and maintained in accordance with the usual recurring programme of works.

Estimates, Expenditure,

$35,000.00

$31,844.84

71. Improvements to Buildings.-Under this head the following are the more important of the works executed:

Tsim Sha Tsui Police Station-Concrete surface to the surrounding compound. Children's Playground-Increasing the height of the surrounding fence. Royal Observatory Alterations to bathrooms. Kowloon British School- Roughening the surface of the playground to prevent slipping.

Estimates,

Expenditure,

72. Maintenance of Roads & Bridges.

Improvements to Roads & Bridges.f

$10,000.00 $ 4,935.97

Approximately 37

miles of Roads.-The road surfaces were generally maintained

in a satisfactory manner.

The following are particulars of the additional areas laid with improved surfacing during the year:-

Square yards.

1. Tarring and sanding,

95,193

2. 21′′ granolithic paving slabs laid

on footways,

19,453

3. Substitution of 7" reinforced concrete surfacing for ordinary macadam, tarpainted,

14,740

$80,000.00

$82,500.00

Estimates,

$ 2,500.00ƒ

$70,963.991

$73.192.08

Expenditure,

$ 2,228.09(

73. Maintenance of Telephones.-The lines and instruments were maintained in good order. The lines and instruments in the Kowloon-Canton Railway were also maintained in a satis- factory manner. Six additional instruments were installed.

Estimates, Expenditure,

$2,500.00

$2,451.99

47

P.W.R. Kowloon.

74. Maintenance of Sewers, Nullahs, &c.-The sewers, stormwater drains, and trained nullahs were cleansed, repaired and maintained in good condition, the open channels and nullahs being cleansed by the Sanitary Department. The automatic flushing tanks were kept working continuously and sand deposits as they accumulated were removed.

Repairs were made to the sewers, stormwater drains and nullahs, the most important being to those situated as shewn below:

Sewers.

Near Aimai Villas between Kimberley Road and Austin Road; at Kau Pui Shek; at outfall, Ma Tau Kok.

Storm Water Drains. At Outfall, Kau Pui Shek; at north-east corner of Kow- loon Cricket Club Ground.

Nullahs.

Railings, Lo Lung Hang nul- lah between Nos. 40 and 42, Bulkeley Street; at nullah extension, Ma Tau Wai Rd. under K.I.L. 1714,

1714, Shek Shan; railings, Nelson Street nullah; invert and walling, Waterloo Road nullah below Railway Bridge.

Many defective traps, gullies, gratings etc., were removed, and a number of old disused drains destroyed and filled in.

All metal work in connection with the drainage systems was inspected, and, where found necessary repaired and tarred.

Estimates, Expenditure,

$10,000.00

$ 7,506.42

75. Gas Lighting.-The total number of lamps in use at the end of the year was 541, an increase of 7 over the previous year.

Estimates, Expenditure,

$32,000.00

$29,838.48

76. Electric Lighting.-The total number of lamps in use at the end of the year, all of which are incandescent, was 389, an increase of 37 over the previous year.

Estimates, Expenditure,

$22,000.00

$20,449.89

77. Extensions of Lighting.-Forty four additional lamps were installed during the year, 37 being electric and 7 gas.

Estimates, Expenditure,

$1,500.00

$ 990.05

P.W.R. Kowloon.

Q 48

78. Typhoon and Rainstorm Damage.-The following is a list of the Buildings which suffered the most damage during the typhoon rains in July and August. Repairs, which were chiefly to roofs and external joinery, were carried out under this head:

Kowloon Post Office, Blackhead Signal Station and Typhoon Symbols, Tsim Sha Tsui Police Station, Yaumati Pig Market, Police Training School, Kowloon Hospital, Children's Playground, Royal Observatory.

Sand was removed from:-Waterloo Road nullah; Mongkok nullah; King's Park nullah; Lo Lung Hang nullah.

Several public street lamps were damaged by falling trees and branches.

Estimates,

Sup: Vote,

Expenditure,

$10,000.00

$22,000.00

$32,000.00

$21,245.74

79. Maintenance of Water Works.-The year opened with a constant supply in all districts, but owing to the prolonged dry season, restrictive measures had to be adopted as follows:

· ---

District.

Period of Restriction

Hours of supply.

All districts

Do.

1st May-4th June ...6 A.M.-6 P.M.

5th June-23rd June. 6-10 A.M. & 2 hours

in afternoon.

Do.

24th June-16th July. 6 A.M.-6 P.M.

With the exception of the above periods, totalling 77 days, a constant supply was maintained throughout the year.

Several emergency measures were taken in June to tem- porarily increase the daily supply, including the following:-

(1). An 8" pipe line 1,600 feet in length was laid to divert the flow of the Shek Lai Pui stream to the Kowloon Filter Beds. The minimum daily delivery was approximately 40,000 gallons (This pipe line is still in use).

Q 49

P.W.R. Kowloon.

(2). Two small pumps were erected in the Shing Mun Valley below Pineapple Pass to deliver additional water to the Conduit when the main intake was below overflow level. During the year, approxi- mately 10 million gallons were pumped.

(3). On 22nd. June a portable fire pump was hired and used to pump water from the Lai Chi Kok stream to the Kowloon Filter Beds. Pumping continued at intervals until 21st. July when a total approximately of 2 million gallons had been delivered.

(4). Arrangements were under consideration to trans- port additional supplies by water boat from the temporary Tsun Wan Supply, but fortunately it was not necessary to do so. A quantity of 1.32 million gallons was actually transported to Kowloon by the Hong Kong & Godown Company for their own use.

Particulars of further measures taken to cope with the water shortage will be found in the Sessional Paper to be published in 1930.

The Paterson Fast Gravity Filtration Plant was put into operation on 10th. June and has been in daily use up to the end of the year. This plant supplies Lai Chi Kok Water Boat Dock, Cheung Sha Wan and Sham Shui Po and has greatly relieved the work of the slow sand filters.

The total quantity of water filtered by this plant during the year was 170.63 million gallons or an average of 0.835 million gallons per day.

Despite the restrictions referred to above the total consump- tion for the year is only 14.19 less than that of the previous year when there were no restrictions.

During the year 1,420.62 million gallons from the Shing Mun River were delivered through the Tunnels into the Reception Reservoir. A large percentage of this quantity however was not required and had to be allowed to run to waste.

The total yield of the Shing Mun River for the year, as measured by the recorder at the unner Intake, was 2,517 million gallons compared with 2,962 million gallons in 1928 and 4,576 million gallons in 1927.

The total quantity supplied was 1,232.36 million gallons giving an average daily consumption of 3.38 million gallons or 19.8 gallons per head per day, based on an estimated population of 170,740, The details are given in Annexe H

P.W.R. Kowloon.

Q 50

The quantity of water stored in the impounding reservoirs on 1st. of January amounted to 393.59 million gallons and it reached a minimum of 76.00 million gallons on the 8th June. The Main reservoir was at or above its permanent overflow level from 2nd. August to 31st. December. Shek Lai Pui Reservoir did not overflow during the year, the highest point reached being 5′ 7′′ below overflow level on 7th. November. The Reception Reservoir overflowed on 114 days between 26th. June and 10th November. The quantity of water remaining in the reservoirs at the end of the year amounted to 463.58 million gallons.

The analyses made by the Government Analyst and the examinations by the Bacteriologist were satisfactory.

The various buildings were kept in a good state of repair during the year. There were 3,555 meters in use at the close of the year, an increase of 778 as compared with 1928.

House services were constructed, altered or repaired in 855 instances and 54 supplies were laid on for building purposes.

The quantity of water supplied by meters was as follows:

Government Buildings, for all

purposes, free of charge,

48.39 millions gallons

Trade,

208.38

19

39

Domestic,

350.41

""

Total,

607.18

Estimates,

$40,000.00

Sup. Vote,

Expenditure,

$ 5,000.00

$45,000.00

$43,892.48

80. Water Account (Meters &c.).—The number of meters examined and repaired during the year was 902.

Estimates,

Sup. Vote,

$20,000.00

$10,000.00

$30,000.00

Expenditure,

$29,833.94

Q 51

P.W.R. New Kowloon.

81. Maintenance of Praya Walls and Piers.-The Praya Walls and Public Piers were maintained in a satisfactory con- dition. The maintenance work included repairs to the following piers-Fire Station, Hung Hom, Kowloon, Public Square Street, Saigon Street Refuse, Shang Tung Street and Waterloo Road.

The rails and rail-bearers were taken up and renewed in the underwater portion of the Yaumati Slipway.

Estimates, Expenditure,

$27,000.00 $10,434.52

82. Maintenance of Chinese Cemeteries.-Work carried out under this head has already been alluded to in paragraph 38 of this report.

Estimates, Expenditure,

$2,500.00 $2,489.92

83. Maintenance of Recreation Grounds. The various grounds were maintained in good condition. Departmental gangs were employed for the purpose of mowing grass, cleansing ditches etc.

Estimates, Expenditure,

$2,500.00 $2,294.59

P. W. R. NEW KOWLOON.

84. Maintenance of Buildings.-Government Buildings were maintained in a good state of repair and general renovations were executed under the usual recurring programme.

Estimates, Expenditure,

$8,000.00 $4,874.08

85. Improvements to Buildings.-The more important items executed under this head were as follows:

Kowloon City Police Station--Fixing grilles to certain windows. Sham Shui Po Police Station-Fixing grilles to cer- tain doors and windows.

Estimates, Expenditure,

$2,000.00 $ 788.11

86. Maintenance of Roads & Bridges. 1 Approximately

Improvements to Roads & Bridges.

82 miles of Roads.—The road surfaces were generally maintained in a satisfactory manner. The following are particulars of the additional areas laid with improved surfacing during the year.

P.W.R. New Kowloon.

Q 52

1. Tarring and sanding,

2. 24" granolithic paving slabs

laid on footways,

Square Yards.

41,406

Estimates,

Expenditure,

13,404

$25,000.001

$27,000.00

$ 2,000.00ƒ

$22,504.14 $24,468.09

$1,963.95

Maintenance of Telephones.—The lines and instruments

were maintained in good order.

Estimates,

Expenditure,

$500.00

$386.94

87. Maintenance of Sewers, Nullahs, &c.-The sewers, stormwater drains, and trained nullahs were cleansed, repaired, and maintained in good condition, the open channels and nullahs being cleansed by the Sanitary Department. Sand deposits, as they accumulated were removed.

All metal work in connection with the drainage systems was inspected, and, where found necessary, repaired and tarred.

Estimates, Expenditure,

$3,000.00 $2,350.50

88. Gas and Electric Lighting.-The number of electric lamps in use at the end of the year, all of which are incandes- cent, was 378, an increase of 70 over the previous year.

Estimates,

Supplementary Vote,

TOTAL,

Expenditure,

$15,000.00

600.00

$15,600.00

$15,024.48

89. Extensions of Lighting.-Seventy electric lamps were installed during the year.

Estimates, Expenditure,

$250.00

Nil.

90. Typhoon and Rainstorm Damages.--A number of minor repairs to roofs were carried out under this head following the typhoon in August. The more extensive damage was caused to the following buildings--.

Q 53

P.W.R. New Kowloon.

Lai Chi Kok Prison, Green Island Gunpowder Depot,

Ma Tau Kok Cattle Depot, To Kwa Wan Market.

Slight damage to the temporary storm water connection of the nullah in Cornwall Road, Kowloon Tong Estate, was made good by the end of September.

There were also several small washouts and scours in road- ways not surfaced with asphaltum or concrete.

Estimates, Expenditure,

$30,000.00.

$ 8,433.86

91. Maintenance of Water Works, Lai Chi Kok.—The total quantity of water supplied during the year was 92.91 million gallons which is a decrease of 50.29 million gallons over 1928 or an average consumption of 254,000 gallons per day.

In addition to the above, 40.00 million gallons were tran- sported to Hong Kong between 21st March and 29th July. From 12th June to 1st August supplies to shipping were suspended owing to the drought.

Details of consumption are given in Annexe J.

There were 15 meters in use at the close of the year.

Estimates,

Expenditure,

$4,000.00

$3,849.99

92. Water Account (Meters &c.).-The number of meters examined and repaired during the year was 19.

Estimates, Expenditure.

$1,200.00 $1,069.66

93. Maintenance of Praya Walls and Piers.-The Praya Walls and Piers were maintained in a satisfactory condition and necessitated repairs to the piers at Kowloon City and Sham- shuipo, also to the Refuse Boat Station at Shamshuipo, together with the reconstruction of lengths of sea wall at Hung Hom, Kowloon City, Tai Wan and To Kwa Wan.

Estimates, Expenditure,

$10,000.00 $ 5,041.08

94. Maintenance of Chinese Cemeteries.-Work carried out. under this head has already been alluded to in paragraph 38 of this report.

Estimates, Expenditure,

$1,000.00 $ 996.24

P.W.R. New Territories.

Q 54

P. W. R. NEW TERRITORIES.

95. Maintenance of Buildings.-Repairs and renovations necessary to maintain Government Buildings in a good state of repair were carried out under the usual recurring programme.

Estimates, Expenditure,

$20,000.00 $17,913.06

96. Improvements to Buildings.-The following are the more important items carried out under this head:

Tai Po Land Office-Removal of partition wall to in- crease the area of the Court Room. Tai Po Rest House-Tiling bathrooms. Tai Ku Ling Police Station-Ceiling to underside of rafters.

Estimates,

Expenditure,

97. Maintenance of Roads and Bridges.

Improvements to Roads and Bridges.

$5,000.00

$2,871.37

Approximately

75 miles of roads.—The road surfaces were generally maintained in a satisfactory manner.

The strengthening and improvement of the road surfaces was commenced, an additional layer of 4" macadam being laid over the present surface and tar painted from a point near Castie Peak to the Molasses Factory.

year:

The following are particulars of the areas laid during the

1. Tarring and sanding

2. 21" granolithic paving slabs laid

on footways

Estimates,

Expenditure,

Square yards. 104,574

785

$70,000.00

2,000.00

$72,000.00

$66,426.82

1,898.14

$68,324.96

98. Maintenance of Telephones.-The lines and instruments were maintained in good order. Two additional instruments were installed.

Estimates, Expenditure,

$4,000.00

$3,847.55

Q., 55 P.W.R. New Territories.

99. Maintenance of Sewers, Nullahs, &c.-The sewers, stormwater drains, trained nullahs and concrete channels were cleansed, repaired, and maintained in good condition. Repairs were effected to the channels, and pools were cemented up in bed of streamcourse on Crown land in the vicinity of "The Flywheel" Tai Po.

Estimates, Expenditure,

$500.00

$271.06

100. Typhoon and Rainstorm Damage.-Repairs, chiefly to roofs and external joinery, were carried out to a number of buildings, of which the following are the more important- Waglan Lighthouse, Tai O Police Station, Cheung Chau Police Station, Ping Shan Land Office.

Minor repairs were also necessary to the following roads:

Access Road to Lo Wu Railway Station, Road from Sheung Shui to Ta Ku Ling, Road from Fanling to Sha Tau Kok, Fencing at Au Tau Magnetic Huts.

Estimates, Expenditure,

$40,000.00 $ 7,376.59

101. Maintenance of Water Works at Fanling.-The total quantity of water supplied during the year was 6.77 million gallons equal to an average consumption of 18,000 gallons per day.

There were 19 meters in use at the close of the year.

Estimates, Expenditure,

$700.00

$587.25

102. Maintenance of Water Works at Taipo.-The total quantity of water supplied during the year was 14.99 million gallons equal to an average consumption of 41,000 gallons per day.

There were 43 meters in use at the close of the year.

Estimates, Expenditure,

$700.00

$609.01

103. Water Account (meters &c.).- -11 meters were examin-

ed and repaired during the year.

Estimates, Expenditure,

$600.00 $ 48.04

P.W.E. Hong Kong.

Q 56

104. Maintenance of Chinese Cemeteries.-No work was carried out under this head during the year.

Estimates,

Expenditure,

$100.00

Nil.

105. Maintenance of Praya Walls and Piers.-The Praya Walls and Piers were maintained in a satisfactory condition. Repairs were carried out to the following Piers:-

Castle Peak, Cheung Chau Island, Hang Hau and Tai ().

Estimates,

Expenditure,

$2,500.00

$2,444.64

PUBLIC WORKS EXTRAORDINARY. HONG KONG.

106. Wongneichona Village Development-Removing exist- ing School and latrine and re-erecting on new site.—This work was referred to in paragraph 107 of last year's report.

The construction of the new school was completed early in the year.

The completion of the latrine was recorded in last year's report. The only charge against this year's vote was that for Retention Money.

Estimates,

Expenditure,

$2,000.00

$1,285.87

107. Victoria Gaol-Reception Block.-The work was re- ported as completed in paragraph 105 of last year's report.

The only charge against this year's vote was the payment of Retention Money.

Estimates,

$5,000.00 Total Estimate

$35,000.00

Expenditure up

Expenditure,

$2,000.00 to 31.12.29

$27,586.33

Q 57

P.W.E. Hong Kong.

108. Government Offices. Additional Storey.-The work carried out under the main Contract was reported as completed in paragraph 203 of last year's Report. The construction of the Porch to the Main Entrance was completed in January and the Lift and Gear on arrival from England was installed in April.

Estimates,

$35,000.00 Total Estimates, . $126,500.00

Expenditure,

Expenditure up

$20,372.69 to 31.12.29,

..

$119,625.25

109. Peak Wireless Station, Block "B".--This work was not proceeded with during the year and consequently there was no expenditure under this heading.

Estimates, Expenditure,

$33,000.00

'Nil.

110. Peak Wireless Station, Block

'C'.-This work was

not proceeded with during the vear and consequently there was no expenditure under this heading.

Estimates, Expenditure,

$18,000.00

Nil.

111. Latrine on Praya East (Temporary): No expenditure was incurred on this work during the year.

Estimates, Expenditure,

$4,000.00

Nil.

112. Government House, Alterations and Improvements. Owing to the difficulty of carrying out extensive alterations to this old building and in order to proceed with and complete the work as early in the year as possible, it was decided that Messrs. Sang Lee & Co. should carry out the work under the Maintenance Contract.

The work consisted of the addition of a new bay and pro- scenium to the East end of the Ball Room thus increasing the length by about 15′ 0′′.

The space occupied by the Governor's previous office was thrown into the Crush Hall and a new office erected over the area adjoining the old site and next to the Drawing Room. This was fitted with teak book cases and panelling.

P.W.E. Hong Kong

Q 58

S

The old lavatory which was inadequate was increased in size

The area situated between the lavatory and Crush Hall was roofed over with patent glazing and transformed into a con- servatory. The floor and walls were laid with green and white Italian marble. On the East wall a marble niche was formed having a white marble fauns head from which water plays into a basin below.

A new office was erected for the Custodian at the South West corner of the building.

An improvement was made in the serving facilities of the supper room in the basement and a gas hot plate and additional sinks were installed.

When work to the Ball Room was commenced it was dis- covered that the old wooden trusses and roof timbers were in an advanced state of decay owing to white ants and dry rot and the roof was therefore replaced by a flat one of steel and con- crete. To enable the new flat roof to be used as a place for sitting out, a teak stair was constructed from the Crush Hall to a panelled mezzanine floor and a white cast concrete stair led from there to the roof which was decorated with ornamental bronze lamps.

At the same time it was decided to include the South verandah in the Ball Room by removing the dividing wall and substituting reinforced concrete columns. New decorative plaster was fixed throughout to the walls and ceiling of the Ball Room.

Small alterations to the Guard House and the formation of lavatories, etc. for the guard necessitated additional accommoda- tion being provided to the Servants Quarters. This work formed a separate Contract, and was carried out by Messrs. Kien. On & Co. at a total cost of $3,250.00.

Work was commenced in February and completed by the end of November.

Estimate, Sup. Vote,

Expenditure,

$ 48,500.00

$104,000.00

$152,500.00

$152,430.17

Q 59

P.W.E. Hong Kong.

113. New No. 2 Police Station.-This work was referred to in paragraph 211 of last year's Report.

The sketch plans were approved but it was not found possible to commence the preparation of working drawings until Decem-

There was no expenditure under this heading.

Estimates, Expenditure,

$150,000.00

Nil.

114. New Fire Station Building, Alterations to Tower.—The work consisted of the addition of four concrete Balconies to the Tower to facilitate the training of the members of the Fire Brigade.

Estimates, Expenditure,

$1,500.00 $1,435.55

115. Junction of Ladder Street and Hollywood Road- Underground Latrine (60 seats):—This work was not undertaken as the selection of a site was still under consideration at the end of the year.

Estimates, Expenditure,

$13,000.00

Nil.

116. Jardine's Corner, Peak-—Latrine and Urinal (4 seats):Plans were prepared and tenders invited for the above work but owing to objections received from the Peak Residents' Association in regard to the site (under the retaining wall sup porting Mt. Kellett Road, with the entrance on Stubb's Road) the matter was in abeyance at the end of the year.

Estimates, Expenditure,

$5,000.00

Nil.

117. Spring Garden Lane and Cross Street-Latrine and Urinal (16 seats):—The seating accommodation of this latrine was increased to 54 seats by adding a second storey. The ground floor contained accommodation of 32 seats and 4 urinals for men, whilst on the 1st floor 22 seats for women were provided.

A Contract for the work was let to Messrs. Tat Lee & Co. for a sum of $13,239.70 on 28th May, 1929.

Good progress was made and by the end of the year the work was nearing completion.

Estimates, Supplementary Vote,

Expenditure,

$ 6,000.00

8,000.00

$14,000.00

$12,184.06

P.W.E. Hong Kong.

Q 60

118. Trough Closet and Urinal at Connaught Road West:- (a) Wilmer Street (2 seats) (b) Water Street (2 seats):-Both conveniences contained 2 seats and a urinal trough.

A contract for these two conveniences was let to Mr. Johnley Ching for a sum of $1,040.80 on 13th August, 1929. Work was completed by the end of the year.

Estimates,

Expenditure,

$2,000.00

$1,184.32

119. Sai Wan Ho increase of Pig Lairage.-Pig Lairage accommodation was increased at the Sai Wan Ho Slaughter House by the extension of the building to provide an additional 6 pens.

A Contract for this work was let to Messrs. Hop Hing and Son for a sum of $2,603.25 on 21st May, 1929, which was satis- factorily completed by the end of July.

Estimates,

Expenditure,

$3,000.00

$2,414.30

120. Sai Ying Pun, New Market. The third revised sketch scheme was prepared during the month of November. No ex- penditure was incurred under this heading.

Estimates,

Expenditure,

$200,000.00

Nil.

121. Swine Slaughter House, Kennedy Town, Roofing_in open space. The work, which was executed under the Main- tenance of Buildings Contract by Messrs. Sang Lee & Co. con- sisted of the erection of a re-inforced concrete flat roof over the open space behind the Slaughter House.

Estimates,

Expenditure,

$2,900.00

$1,712.17

122. Victoria Gaol, New Printing Shop including New Motors, wiring and switch gear.-Sketch Plans were prepared for two alternative schemes. The first providing for an extension to the existing Printing Shop and the second scheme for the demolition of the existing Printing Shop and the erection of a new building of larger size. The work was deferred and conse- quently no expenditure was incurred under this heading.

Estimates,

Expenditure,

$41,000.00

Nil.

Q 61

P.W.E. Hong Kong.

General Works:

123. Road:-The following is a brief description of the principal works carried out under this heading:-

Consequent upon the erection of new buildings, kerbing & channelling operations were executed on the following roads, the footpaths being paved and any necessary alterations in levels or alignment being affected:-

Anton Street,

Belchers Street,

Bowrington Road,

Cross Street,

High Street,

Jervois Street,

Sand Street,

School Street,

Sing Woo Road,

Star Street,

Third Street,

Ventris Road,

Jockey Club Stable,

Wanchai Road,

Morrison Hill Road,

Whitfield Road,

Queen's Road,

Wongneicheong.

Sai Wan Ho,

The Road leading from the Island Road into Stanley Village as far as the Police Station was widened to 20 feet.

Carriageway of Arbuthnot Road was widened & improved by substitution of flat channels for large round ones.

A parking ground was formed at the north-east of the Public Works Department Garage, Lower Albert Road.

Estimates,

Expenditure,

$60,000.00

$50,886.63

P.W.E. Hong Kong.

62

124. Training Nullahs.-The following are the most impor- tant stream courses dealt with during the year:-

STREAM COUrses.

Length

Re-

Locality.

Position of stream course.

trained

marks.

(in feet).

Com-

Peak.

Below Upper Tram Station.

70' pleted.

Peak.

Below Peak School...

212'

Peak,

Below Peak Church.

294'

Peak,

Chatham Path below Victoria

Hospital.

Pokfulam Road.... West of University Playing

Fields.

Conduit Road

I. L. 2425 Conduit Road.

Po Shan Road.

East of I. L. 2447 Po Shan

Road

Kennedy Town.... West of Slaughter Houses,

Tsat Tze Mui

Tsat Tze Mui.

Kennedy Road

Wong Nei Chong.

at head of Cadogan Street.

West of Braemar Terrace.

...

To laying of pipes and half- round channels to combat mosquito breeding south of Colfix Ltd. Shaukiwan Road.....

North-west of I. L. 2495 Ken-

nedy Road.

South-west corner of Jews'

Cemetery.....

Estimates,

Expenditure,

48'

""

182'

""

25'

2+

308'

""

266'

";

200'

100'

""

162'

19

30'

"7

$25,000.00

$14,997.04

Q 63

P.W.E. Hong Kong.

125. Sewage and Stormwater Drains.-The undermentioned are the most important stormwater drains and sewers which were laid during the year:

Size. Description. Length.

Locality.

Position

Remarks.

36"

Stormwater drain

64

Tai Hang

North of 1.L. 2461. Tai

Hang Village.

Completed.

21"

B34'

Kennedy

Cadogan Street.

29

Town

21"

77

Central

21" & 18"

4

561 Sookipoo

15" & 12"

18 &

15"

In Zetland Stree', in con- nection with realignment South of Queen's Road Central.

From Caroline Hill Road West to Broadwood Road.

208 Wong Nei Chong In Colonial Cemetery op-

19/

Sewer

1391'

9"

JS

97

Central

9"

posite Jockey Club pre-

mises.

From Monument to the

south end of Jockey Club Stands, Wong Nei Chong Road.

In Zetland Street in con-

nection with realignment south of Queen's Road Central.

763' Wong Nei Chong South-ea-t of I.L. 2559

Sing Wo Road,

9"

9/

""

9"

Stormwater

drain

!

"

""

100' Shaukiwan

Outfall near S.I L. 147

Shaukiwan East.

19

234 Wardley Street East of Hong Kong and

Shanghai Bauk, Ward- ley Street.

95'

P.W.D.

P.W.D. Car Park.

6"

Sewer

464'

Kennedy

Town

6"

From Beach Street, Ken- nedy Town, to Rieci Hall, Pokfulam Road,

233' Sassoon Road

R.B.L. 217 Sassoon Road.

146'

99

C.S.O. Building

East of C.S.O. Building.

P.W.E. Hong Kong.

Size. Description. Length.

Locality.

64

Position.

Remarks.

6"

Sewer

6"

262 Wong Nei Chong From I.L. 2660 to I.L's Completed

598'

""

6"

""

6"

22

6"

+

"

6"

6"

6"

6"

25

530'

""

106'

""

138'

""

549'

325'

99

19

54'

Sai Wan Ho

19

174

6"

159'

6"

""

Shaukiwan

114'

22

6"

199'

""

>>

6"

162'

North Point

93

6'

120'

Star Street

""

6" & 4′′

701'

Conduit Road

99

2715 and 2724.

1.L's. 2344 & 2551 Wong

Nei Chong Village Rd.

To 1.L. 2478 New Road

above Tai Hang.

In scavenging lane to rear of I.L's. 2541 and 2527 Wong Nei Chong.

In scavenging laue to rear I.L. 2503 rear of Man Chung Terrace, Wong Nei Chong.

I.L's. 1569 & 1577 Wong

Nei Chong Road.

In scavenging lane

>>

""

"

""

to

""

rear of I.L, 2853 Wong Nei Chong Village Rd,

In scavenging lane.

of

S.I.L's. 420 & 502 Sai Wan Ho near Shing On Street.

In scavenging lane to rear of S.I.L. 420 Shing On Street, Sai Wan Ho.

From S.I.L. 447 to rear of S.I.L. 449 Shaukiwan.

In pathway at side of S. of I.L. 525 Shaukiwau East.

In scavenging lane to rear

S.I.L. 525 Shankiwan,

Sewer outfall at I.L. 2845 Shaukiwan Road, North Point.

To I.L. 1910, Star Street.

From University Grounds to Filter Bed Quarters, West Point.

>>

>>

39

"

*

Q 65

P.W.E. Hong Kong.

The number of drain connections made was 184.

Many new gullies with flat gully gratings were constructed and connected to the stormwater drainage system.

Estimates, Supplementary Vote,

Expenditure,

$30,000.00

$24,000.00

$54,000.00

$50,652.71

126. Miscellaneous.-The following is a brief description of the principal works carried out under this heading:

Central Police Station-The top floor rooms of the Bar- rack Block were ceiled and the tarred dado's re- moved.

A covered way was erected outside the Police Store to facilitate the unpacking of stores during wet wea- ther.

King's College--A number of new Scholarship Boards

were supplied and fixed.

Colonial Secretariat-A small Pay Office was erected

at the rear of the Annexe.

Fire Extincteurs were supplied to the following Build- ings, Colonial Secretariat, Morrison Gap Road School, Quarry Bay School, Sai Ying Pun School, Ellis Kadoorie School, Government Civil Hospital, "Lyemun" 463 The Peak.

Fire Station Building-Construction of a concrete tank

in the Drill Tower.

Erection of two incinerators, Holy Cross Path, Shauki- wan-The two incinerators were provided to deal with Refuse from Shaukiwan which could not be efficiently dealt with by the usual means of convey- ing to sea in barges. Erection of a latrine at Shek O Village.--A semi-permanent latrine was con- structed with accommodation for 4 Men's Seats and 2 Women's.

Estimates,

Expenditure,

$30,000.00 $24,606.11

127. Water Works. The following is a statement of the works carried out under this heading

7

P.W.E. Hong Kong.

:

66

(a) An additional Peebles Sand Washing Machine was obtained from England and has been installed at the Eastern Filter Beds.

(b) A cement concrete division wall 10 feet in height was constructed inside the Albany Service Reservoir to facilitate future cleansing and repair work. Re- pairs to the invert and side walls were also carried out and the reservoir after test, was found to be water tight.

(c) The sewer connection from West Point Filter Beds Quarters referred to in Para. 112 (c) of last Year's Report, was completed.

(d) The 6" Wrot Iron Main between Magazine Gap Road Tank and Bowen Road has been replaced by an 8" Cast Iron Main. The work was not quite completed by the end of the year.

Estimates,

Supt. Vote,

Expenditure,

$15,000.00

1,534.00

$16,534.00

$13,904.76

128. Port Works.-Ticket Offices, a shelter and barriers were erected on the Eastern Street Pier, borings were taken at Wilmer Street in connection with the proposal to construct a new pier and minor works of a miscellaneous nature were carried out during the year.

Estimates, Expenditure,

Communications :——

$5,000.00 $4,436.06

129. Wongneichong Development-Site formation and road construction. This work was referred to in paragraph 110 (b) of the Report for 1927 and in paragraph 114 of last year's Report.

This work was reported as completed in last year's Report. During the early part of the year, work of surfacing footpaths adjacent to the Chinese type houses west of the nullah was undertaken; this work having been delayed to allow the drainage work to be completed.

Estimates,

$2,000.00 Total Estimates,. $130,000.00

Expenditure,

877.83

Expenditure up

to 31.12.29,

$ 22,775.17

Q 67.

P.W.E. Hong Kong.

130. Approach road to new Tung Wah Hospital site at Soo Kun Poo. This work was referred to in paragraph 116 of last year's Report.

The road was completed in 1928 and the retention money paid. No expenditure was therefore incurred on this vote.

Estimates,

Expenditure,

$1,000.00

Nil.

131. Road from Causeway Bay to Quarry Bay (Section 70 feet wide) opposite M.Ls. 430 and 431.—The old road to Sau Ki Wan traversed an area, which, after negotiation, was included in M.Ls. 430 and 431 it therefore became necessary to undertake the construction of this new road so as to make the whole of the lots available to the owner.

It is not considered necessary to proceed with construction to full width in the first instance and the Contract let to Mr. Un Ng Tsung for a sum of $27,870 on 30th May, 1929 was for the construction of a road 1,000 feet long and 70 feet wide.

Estimates, Expenditure,

$30,000.00 $ 6,630.00

132. Tai Hang Development Road Construction.-This work was referred to in paragraph 114 (ƒ) of the Report for 1926 where- in the work was reported as in abeyance and Contract closed.

A new Contract was let to the Lam Construction Co. for a sum of $64,369, on 28th February; 1929 for the completion. of a length of 4,500 lineal fect of the 25 foot road above Tai Hang Valley.

Fair progress was made and by the end of the year work was well advanced on most of the walling.

Estimates, Expenditure,

$75,000.00 $52,780.40

133. Barker Road Improvements from Stubbs Road to Victoria Hospital. The widening of Barker Road from its junc- tion with Stubbs Road to the Victoria Hospital was undertaken to provide access to the Hospital for motor traffic.

A contract for this work was let to Messrs. Yun Tai and Co. on 4th April, 1929 for a sum of $38,934.00 but slow progress was made with the work.

Estimates, Expenditure,

$30,000.00

$ 9,720.96

P.W.E. Hong Kong.

Q 68

134. 10-foot Path to Cape D'Aguilar Wireless Station 1st Section. The construction of a path to give access to the Wire- less Station at Cape D'Aguilar was undertaken, the 1st section of which was 2,700 feet long. A contract for this work was let to Mr. Johnley Ching for a sum of $16,381.50 on 7th March, 1929.

Good progress was made and by the end of the year the work was nearing completion. An amendment made to the alignment of the road enabled the cost to be somewhat reduced.

Estimates, Expenditure,

$15,000.00 $ 9,933.04

135. Improvements to Garden Road at junction with Queen's Road (East corner).-The contract for this work was only let at the end of November consequently there was no ex- penditure on this vote.

Estimates, Expenditure,

$6,000.00 Nil.

136. Road to Mountain Lodge, Peak.-No expenditure was incurred under this heading during the year but various suggested amendments to the original alignment were surveyed.

Estimates,

$57,000.00

Drainage :-

Training Nullahs:-

137. Reconstruction of Wong Nei Chong Nullah, Section No. 4, in front of Jockey Club Stand.—This work, which was referred to in paragraph 119 of last year's Report, was com- pleted towards the end of October.

Estimates,

Expenditure,

$70,000.00 Total Estimates,

$200,000.00

Expenditure up

$31,927.87 to 31.12.29,

$116,850.70

138. Wongneichong Village Development (Houses).-This work was referred to in paragraph 102 of the Report for 1927 and in paragraph 104 of last year's Report.

The sewers were completed early in the year and the 20 houses on the West side of the nullah were handed over to the Secretary for Chinese Affairs.

Estimates,

$3,000.00 Total Estimates,

$62,000.00

Expenditure up

Expenditure,

$2,566.00

to 31.12.29,

$56,939.01

69

P.W.E. Hong Kong.

139. Revolver Range for Police.-This work, referred to in paragraph 124 of last year's Report was completed in February.

Estimates,

Expenditure,

$2,000.00 Total Estimates, ... $20,000.00

Expenditure up

$1,743.41 to 31.12.29,

$12,516.64

140. I.L. 2058-Surrendered in connection with the con- struction of new road from Tai Hang to Bowen Road—Recon- structing servants Quarters.—The Demolition of the house ́ on I.L. 2059 and the servants quarters of the above lot was under- taken and the end wall of the house on I.L. 2058 supported by buttresses.

The work which was carried out under the Contract for the Construction of Tai Hang Valley Road for which The Lam Construction Co. are the Contractors was completed before the end of the year.

Estimates,

Expenditure,

$3,500.00 $ 331.68

141. Chinese Cemeteries, Laying out new areas.—Work car- ried out under this head has already been alluded to in paragraph 38 of this report.

Estimates, Expenditure,

$6,000.00 $5,999.35

142. Reinstatement of Government Retaining Walls.-This work was referred to in paragraph 120 of last year's report. Periodical inspections of various Government Retaining walls were made.

A retaining wall at the toe of the embankment below the old No. 8 Police Station Site (Po Hing Fong) was constructed to protect the new houses recently erected on inland lots Nos. 1646-1648. Sundry minor works were carried out during the year.

Estimates,

Expenditure,

$20,000.00

$ 5,932.82

143. Renewing electrical wiring at Government Buildings.— The following nine buildings were rewired throughout for lights and fans, the total number of points being 627:-Maternity Block, G.C.H. Harbour Office. Victoria Gaol (Single European and Indian Warder Quarters). Kennedy Town Slaughter House. Western District Sanitary Offices. Sai Wan Ho Market. Shau- kiwan Market. No. 6 Police Station. Gough Hill Police Station.

P.W.E. Hong Kong.

Q 70

Estimates,

Sup. Vote,

Expenditure,

$10,000,00

$ 2,200.00

$12,200.00

$ 9.147.04

144. Laying telephone cable between Wong Nei Chong Police Station and the Cable Hut in Wong Nei Chong Road.- A 25 pair lead covered and steel tape armoured telephone cable was laid between the points mentioned.

Estimates,

Expenditure,

$11,000.00 $10,582.51

145. Queen's College, Trough Closets. This work consisted of the conversion of the existing dry latrines at Queen's College

into a water carriage trough system.

in February and completed in June.

Estimates,

Expenditure,

The work was commenced

$3,800.00 $3,182.87

146. Laying telephone cable between Victoria Gap and a point just beyond Victoria Hospital.-A 15 pair telephone cable, lead covered and steel tape armoured was laid between the points mentioned.

Estimates,

Expenditure,

$4,250.00 $3,222.60

147. Two 200 ft. Steel Masts at Peak W/T Station.-No work was carried out under this heading during the year.

Estimates, Expenditure,

$22,000.00

Nil.

148. New Garage-P.W.D. Store-Wood Road. This work was nearing completion at the end of the year.

Estimates, Expenditure,

$16,000.00 $15,815,54

149. Transfer of P.W.D. Workshops to Wood Road.-It was decided to transfer the workshops of the Water Work's Office to a site at Lockhart Road,

The work consists of the erection of a large Machine Shop. Mains and House Service Offices, Stores, and Quarters, etc, for a portion of the Chinese Staff.

Q 71

P.W.E. Hong Kong.

The work was commenced in October and good progress was made by the end of the year.

Estimates, Expenditure,

$70,000.00

$30,381.70

150. Provision of traffic protection by means of white lines and/or studs.—A considerable number of white lines were painted and aluminium studs were also fixed at various points in the City and Outside City Districts.

Estimates, Expenditure,

$6,000.00 $5,044.00

151. Government Pavilions, Peak (Water carriage system). -The work consisted of the installation of a water carriage system to these two houses in place of the existing dry latrines. Commenced in July the installation was completed in September.

Estimates, Expenditure,

152. Mountain Lodge-Improvements.

$1,400.00 $1,367.31

This work, which

consisted of the erection of a Tennis Pavilion and a Laundry, was deferred. No expenditure was incurred under this heading.

Estimates, Expenditure,

$5,500.00

Nil.

153. Waglan Lighthouse New Electrical Installation.-A 3 K.W. 110V. kerosine electric set together with a suitable 120 A.H. secondary battery was installed.

Estimates, Expenditure,

$6,850.00 $5,587.65

154. Central Police Station, Chief Detective Inspector's Office, Alterations to Building and constructing Offices.—The work consisted of minor alterations and the conversion of three large barrack rooms on the first floor of the Main Building into offices by the erection of glazed partitions to provide accommoda- tion for the Criminal Investigation Department in a more con- 、centrated manner.

The offices vacated by the transfer were fitted up for use as barrack rooms.

P.W.E. Hong Kong.

Q 72

The work was commenced in July and satisfactorily com- pleted in December.

Estimates, Expenditure,

$10,000.00 $ 7,530.32

155. Traffic Lights and Danger Signs.-Minor repair work only was incurred under this heading.

Estimates, Expenditure,

$2,000.00

$ 34.29

156. Pedestal Fire Hydrants.--During the year 34 addition- al Pedestal Hydrants were fixed and charged. fixed in Hong Kong and thirteen in Kowloon.

Estimates, Expenditure,

Twenty-one were

$10,000.00 $ 9,924.54

ime

157. Government Quarters-Gas Cookers and Geysers. Several minor items were executed under this head from the time but the major question of taking over from tenants -under certain conditions-private Gas fittings in Government Buildings was still under consideration at the close of the year.

Estimates, Expenditure,

$10,000.00 $ 212.00

158. Victoria Gaol, New Floor to "F" Hall.-The work, which was executed under the Maintenances of Buildings Con- tract by Messrs. Sang Lee & Co., consisted of the removal of the present wood floor and the construction of a new floor in reinforced concrete.

The work was commenced in April and completed in July.

Estimates, Expenditure,

$2,800.00

$2,631.47

159. Additional Storey to quarters cookhouse-Victoria Gaol. On the préparation of working drawings it was found uneconomical to utilize the walls of the old cookhouse building and therefore a scheme of rebuilding was prepared.

A Contract was let to Messrs. Yeung Fat & Co. on the 28th September and at the end of the year about half the work was completed.

Estimates, Sup. Vote,

Expenditure,

$2,500.00

$1,500.00

$4,000.00

$1,418.58

Q 73

P.W.E. Hong Kong.

160. Furniture.-During the year 6 complete sets of fur- niture were supplied to Senior Officers and 5 sets to Subordinate Officers. In addition 131 single articles were supplied to quar- ters where necessary and 501 articles were provided for Police Stations, Offices and Schools in Hong Kong, Kowloon, New Kow- loon and New Territories.

Estimates,

Supplementary Vote,

Expenditure,

$20,000.00

4,500.00

$24,500.00

$22,144.50

161. Upkeep of Government undeveloped Sites:-It was found unnecessary to undertake any work during the year and consequently no charge was made against this vote.

Estimates,

Expenditure,

Water Works:

$5,000.00

Nil.

162. Installation of Turbines and Pump at Bowen Road Filter Beds. The necessary alterations to, and extensions of, the existing motor house to accommodate the two new Turbines were started in February and completed in August. The Tur- bines had not arrived from England by the end of the year.

Estimates, Expenditure,

$20,000.00 $ 8,855.23

163. New Principal Mains in City.-The 6" main from Lau Sin Street to Bay View Police Station, a distance of 1,400 feet, was replaced by a 12" main.

A new 6" main 3,460 feet in length was laid through the University grounds, along Lyttelton Road & Breezy Path, join- ing the Caine Road main at the Nethersole Hospital. This new main had become necessary to improve pressures in the Caine Road district.

Estimates,

Expenditure,

$20,000.00

$19,971.70

New Supply main from Peak Tank to Victoria Gap.- No work was done under this heading and consequently no ex- penditure was incurred.

Estimates,

Expenditure,

$8,000.00

Nil.

P.W.E. Hong Kong.

Q74

164. Water Supply to New Tung Wah Hospital Site (East- ern).—This work was completed in March & consists of a 6′′ main 2,000 feet in length from Causeway Bay Tram Terminus to the Hospital Site.

Estimates, Expenditure,

$5,500.00 $4,387.89

165. North Point Balance Tank.-A Contract for this work amounting to $50,202.50 was awarded to Mr. Ng Wah in Novem- ber and by the end of the year matsheds had been erected and excavation commenced.

Estimates,

Expenditure,

166. Praya East Reclamation :

$50,000.00

Nil.

(a) Contribution by Government towards funds for Re-

clamation.

(b) Morrison Hill Development, Retaining Walls and

Drains.

This work was referred to in paragraph 130 of last year's Report.

(a) Filling.-The filling in of the reclamation was completed on the 31st May. The quantity of filling material deposited in the reclamation during the year amounted to 17,939 cube yards, making a total of 3,111,099 cube yards, of this total 2,906,120 cube yards was paid as filling from Morrison Hill, the balance (204,979 cube yards) was from other sources, the greater portion coming from East Point Hill. The total area of land formed was approximately 90 acres, of which, about 3 acres was formed during the year.

Sea Wall. The total length of the sea wall amounts to about 4,995 lineal feet and was completed on the 31st May. The construction was not undertaken of the wet dock at the north-east corner of the reclamation referred to in last year's Report.

Quay Wall. The construction was completed of reinforced concrete wharf 23 feet in length connecting the quay wall to the adjacent Admiralty wharf.

Public Pier 'A'.-This pier is situated at the end of Fenwick Street. The decking, landing steps and fendering were con- structed during the year, thus completing the pier.

Public Pier 'B'.-The decking of this pier was completed. and the pier opened to traffic.

Q 75

P.W.E. Hong Kong.

Sewers. The following length of sewers were completed at

the end of the year.

21" diameter sewers

3,790.4 lineal feet.

27"

600.5

""

,,

In addition a contract was let on the 29th May for the laying of subsidiary sewers but work was not commenced until the beginning of September owing to pressure of work caused by the Water Emergency and need for ordering special material from home. The following sewers had been constructed by the end of the year:-

Size. Description. Length. Locality.

Position.

Remarks.

6"

Sewer.

460'

Gloucester Road.

From Percival Street to Completed.

Canal Road East.

6"

460'

""

.

6"

19

509'

6"

287

""

6'

""

658'

""

to

""

From Canal Road West to

Marsh Road.

From Marsh Road

Tonnochy Road,

From Tonuochy Road to

Stewart Road.

From Stewart Road to

Fleming Road.

6"

480'

"9

From O'Brien Road to

Luard Road.

""

6"

430'

From Luard Road to Fen-

wick Street.

"

6"

"

460' Hennessy

Road.

From Percival Street to

Canal Road East.

""

6"

138/

32

95

From Canal Road West to

Marsh Road.

""

6"

29

555'

6"

431'

"

to

""

From Marsh Road

Tonnochy Road.

From Tonnochy Road to

Stewart Road.

>>

""

P.W.E. Hong Kong.

76

Size. Description. Length.

Locality.

Position.

Remarks.

6′ & 9′′ Sewer.

6"

729' Hennessy Road

480

"

6"

600

>>

6"

430'

6"

278'

Bowrington

9"

160

Canal Road

West.

From Stewart Road to Completed.

Fleming Road.

From Fleming Road to

O'Brien Road.

From O'Brien

Luard Road.

From Luard Road to Fen-

wick Street.

Bowrington Caual Road

Road to

""

13

12"

586'

West

6"

205/

Tonnochy

Tonnochy Road East.

9#

"



323

Road East

12"

65'

202'

Tonnochy

9" 12"

Tonnochy Road West.

319

Road West

61

Storm Water Drains and Nullahs.-The construction of the storm water drains was completed. The diameter of the drains varied from 9 inches to 11 feet 6 inches, their total length being 15,690 lineal feet, of which 350 lineal feet of 24′′ and 30" diam. drains was constructed during the year.

The contractor completed the construction of the three road bridges spanning the 36 feet wide nullah which extends from the old sea front to the new sea front.

The work was completed of reconstructing the drainage in the back areas affected by the Reclamation Scheme.

The fol-

Due to the Praya East Reclamation Scheme certain altera- tions of Existing Sewers in Wanchai was necessary. lowing were carried out during the year:

Size, Description. Length.

Locality.

Position

15")

Sewer

1213′ | Causeway Bay.

12"

15"

914

19

Wong Nei

Choug.

9"

75'

Morrison Hill

Road.

Remarks.

In Yee Woo Street and Completed.

Caroline Hill Road.

Morrison Hill Road from

Leighton Hill Road to Monument.

Across Morrison Hill Road

junction Hong Kong Hotel Garage entrance.

34

Q 77

P.W.E. Hong Kong.

Alterations of existing Storm Water Drains in Wanchai

:

Size. Description. Leugth.

Locality.

Position.

Remarks.

30′′

Storinwater drain.

37′ Praya East.

27"

""

24"

Stormwater drain between Completed.

Tin Lok Lane and Heard

Street

Track.

across Tram

177 Causeway Bay, Extension in Yee Woo

Street across Tram Track.

Through Jardine's pro- perty, East Point, M.L.

220'

East Point.

52.

""

18"

15′′

12"

15"

12"

114'

39

36' Morrison Hill Road. Praya East.

Across Morrison Hill Road.

**

Along Hennessy Road east

of Percival Strect.

"

Removal of Proserpine Rocks.-These rocks formed a dangerous obstruction to craft navigating in the vicinity of Ton- nochy Pier,

The removal of the rocks to a depth of 9.5 feet below low water was undertaken during March and completed in Septem- ber

The blasting operations under water were conducted by divers; low tension electric detonators were used for shot-firing.

Roads. This work which has been in progress since 1928 consists of kerbing, channelling and laying 6′′ cement con- crete road foundations to receive 2′′ sand carpeting in Hennessy and Gloucester Roads and the laying of macadam tarpainted in other roads.

Water Mains.-All water mains on the Reclamation have been laid with the exception of a few short lengths where the roadway has not yet been formed.

P. V. E. Hong Kong.

Q, 78

The following is a statement of the mains laid:

15" Cast Iron Pipes

8"

ސ

2,756 lineal feet,

780

18.308

6"

""

Branches have been provided for an ample number of pedestal fire hydrants.

The following table is an analysis of the total expenditure during the year.

During the

Head of Expenditme.

year ended 31st Decem- ber, 1929.

Previously.

Total to 31st December,

1929.

Contract No. 12 of 1921.

217,376.992,388,351.95 2,605,728.94

Dredging,

778.06

70,980.68 71,753.74

Alteration of Existing

Sewers,

75,410.71

126,957.91 202,368.65

Alteration of Existing

Stormwater Drains,

7.270.58

185,840.84 193,111.42

Water Mains,.

5,570.43

79,686.03

85,256.46

Roads,

244,558.10

76,615.01

321,173.11

Salaries and Supervision,

28,197.70

203.175.36

231,378.06

Advance Account,

Items subsidiary to but

not included in Contract No. 12 of 1921,

Bonus payment on Con-

tract No. 12 of 1921,

Total,......

105,541.84 105,541.84

239.04

6,000.79

6,239,83

924,070.86 924,070.86

579,3 6.64 4,167,221.27 4,746,617.91

-

The account in respect of the Contribution by Government towards funds for Reclamation is as follows:

1929 Estimates, $129,000.00 Expenditure 1929 Expenditure, $ 83,259.80 to 31.12.29,

$848,702.65

(b) Morrison Hill Development,-Roads, Retaining walls and drains.—Under this head, the drainage works alone remain- ed to be carried out and these were completed early in the year.

Estimates,

Expenditure,

$15,000.00 Expenditure

$ 6,465.06 to 31.12.29, $128,482.33

Q.79

P. W. E. Hong Kong.

167. Construction of Nullah through Bowrington Canal from South of Praya to Leighton Hill Road.-The works under this head were completed in July. The portion carried out during the year included the reconstruction in reinforced concrete of the Leighton Hill Road Bridge (44 feet span), the regrading and surfacing of the Road on each side of this Bridge.

1929 Estimates, .... $25,000.00 Total Estimates,

$200,000.00

Total Expenditure

1929 Expenditure, . $24,116.31 to 31.12.29,

$157,807.58

168. Dust Pier at (a) Centre Street. It was decided not to construct the pier at Centre Street. Another location will be selected. No expenditure was incurred during the year.

Estimate,

Expenditure,

$7,000.00

Nil.

169. Dust Pier: (b) Widening chutes.-The chute at Davis Street Pier was taken down and improved.

Two new chutes were constructed and fitted to the pier at Whitfield.

Estimates,

Expenditure,

$2,500.00

$1,611.56

170. P.H. & B.O. Various-Resumption for road widening Schemes approved by Government as rebuilding occurs.—

-This vote provided for the Resumption of areas required in connec- tion with Street Widening and Improvement Schemes, New Roads, the development of village areas in accordance with the provisions of the Public Health and Buildings Ordinance 1903 and for Resumptions for all other purposes. In addition to the Resumptions referred to in Schedule A on page 25 of this report and payments made by the Government in connection with the conversions and exchanges referred to at page 9 the final pay- ment of $18,000.00 was debited to this vote in connection with the Reprovisioning of Dairy Farm lots.

Estimates,

Expenditure (approved),

$75,000.00

$28,561.79

Less Amounts refunded, etc.,

$ 6,720.04

Nett Expenditure,

$21.841.75

.

P. W. E. Kowloon.

80

P. W. E. KOWLOON.

171. Yaumati Slipway--Lock up Store.-This work, referred to in paragraph 139 of last year's Report was completed in

January.

$2,500.00 Total Estimates,

Estimates,

Expenditure,

$15,000.00

$2,278.87

Expenditure up to 31.12.29,

$10,646.77

172. Raising of Time Ball Tower.-This work was reported as completed in paragraph 140 of last year's report.

The only charge against this year's vote was the payment of Retention Money.

Estimates,

Expenditure,

$705.00 Total Estimates,

$5,405.00

Expenditure up

$705.00 to 31.12.29,

$5,400.00

173. Hung Hom, New Government Store.--The work was not proceeded with during the year. There was no expenditure under this heading.

Estimates,

Expenditure,

$50,000.00

Nil.

174. Public Latrine and Bathhouse at Dock Lane, Hung Hom. The structure consisted of a two storey building, which on the Ground Floor provided latrine accommodation of 24 Seats and 2 Urinals for Men and 8 Seats for Women.

The Bathhouse facilities on the first floor comprised 14 Cubicles for Men and 7 for Women.

A Contract (No. 30 of 1929) totalling $50,714.90 was let to Messrs. Yun Tai & Co. on 21st May, 1929. The Contract com- prised two sections of which Part A refers to the above work which amounted to $26,052.95 and Part B for a Public Con- venience at Kowloon City which is referred to hereafter.

Progress was fair and towards the end of the year the build- ing was nearing completion.

Estimates,

Expenditure,

$27,000.00

$14,509.48

81

P. W. E. Kowloon.

175. Tsim Sha Tsui Fire Station, Extension to Quarters.- Sketch plans were prepared showing alterations and additions providing two small flats for European Officers in place of the one flat at present. The work was deferred and consequently no expenditure was incurred.

Estimates,

Expenditure,

$9,500.00

Nil.

176. Kowloon Hospital-Maternity Block, Site Formation. This work comprised the preparation of a site 250 feet long by 130 feet wide at a formation level of 115 feet above Ordnance Datum which is 15 feet above that of the original hospital blocks.

A Contract was let to Mr. Man Gang on 2nd October, 1929 for a sum of $35,936.00.

Progress during the year was fair.

Estimates,

Expenditure,

$60,000.00

$ 1,436.30

177. Children's Playground.-The work consisted of the levelling and turning of an area of land under Signal Hill and the erection of a shelter and swings, see-saws, etc. Commenced in November the work of levelling had been completed before the end of the year.

Estimates,

Expenditure,

$30,000.00 $ 1,250.74

178. Temporary Native Latrine (additional) at Police Train- ing School. The work consisted of the erection of additional latrine accommodation on the water-carriage trough system for native police. Commenced in September the work was com- pleted in December.

Estimates, Sup. Votë,

Expenditure,

$1,500.00

$ 500.00

$2,000.00

$1.792.38

179. Public Latrine and Bathhouse, Argyle Street, Mong Kok.-Plans were prepared but the erection of this convenience was not proceeded with during the year. No expenditure was incurred.

Estimates, Expenditure,

$12,000.00

Nil.

P. W. E. Kowloon.

General Works:-

82

180. Roads. The following is a brief statement of the principal works carried out under this heading :-

The undermentioned roads were macadamized, kerbed, channelled and laid to new levels, the footpaths being paved with granolithic and slab paving and the necessary improvements made in front of the new buildings erected during the year.

Argyle Street,

Ash Street,

Ma Hang Chung Street & Pak

Tai Street,

Mody & Chatham Roads,

Arran & Reclamation Streets, Mong Kok Road,

Battery Road,

Nathan Road,

Bowring Street,

Chatham Road Extension,

Cook & Barker Streets,

Fuk Tsun Street,

Gascoigne Road,

Po Hing Theatre,

Portland Street,

Prince Edward Road,

Reclamation Street,

Sai Yeung Choi Street,

Gillies Avenue & Cook Street, Shanghai Street,

Hak Po & Soy Streets,

Ho Mun Tin,

Shantung & Sai Yee Streets,

Shek Lung Street,

King's Park,

Kowloon City Road,

Kwong Wah & Pitt Street,

Laichikok Road,

Larch Street,

Ma Tau Wei Road,

Estimates,

Supplementary Vote,

TOTAL,

Expenditure,

Tam Kung Road,

Temple Street,

Tong Mi Road & Larch Street,

To Kwa Wan Road,

Tung Kun Street,

Waterloo Road.

$ 80,000.00 114,200.00

$194,200.00

$155,277.75

181. Training Nullahs.-Reinforced concrete decking and parapet walling were constructed at the junction of Waterloo Road nullah with the Homuntin Cemetery branch.

Estimates, Expenditure,

$1,000.00 $ 920.51

Q 83

P. W. E. Kowloon.

182. Miscellaneous Drainage Works.-The following are the most important stormwater drains and sewers which were laid during the year.

Size.

Description.

Length (in feet.)

Locality.

Position.

Remarks.

39"

Stormwater

108

Taikoktsui

30"

drains

370

27"

231

24"

400

21"

347

15"

289

36"

""

In Fuk Tsun Street from Completed

Tong Mi Road, and branch stormwater drains in Fir Street and Lime Street (portion only).

200 Waterloo Road At Waterloo Road exten-

39

33"

200

sion.

30"

200

27"

200

24′′

200

18"

200

12'

200

33"

"

474

Tong Mi

In Canton

Road

from

27"

184

18"

327

15′′

202

30"

25

19

Ho Mun Tin

27"

200

24"

400

Prince Edward Road, and along Lai Chi Kok Road, and up Cedar Street with side branches off (portion only).

In new road between K.I. L's 1736 and 1737 from Waterloo Road.

"

21"

102

27"

303

Tong Mi

24"

177

21"

209

18"

199

15′′

In Nathan Road from Prince Edward Road in a northerly direction (port- ion only).

""

199

27"

24"

180

220 Kowloon Tong In Boundary Street from

Kowloon Tong.

39

21"

200

18"

145

27"

355

>>

24"

110

In Prince Edward Road,

Kowloon Tong.

""

21"

213

18"

200

P. W. E. Kowloon.

Size.

Description.

Length (in feet.)

Locality.

27"

Stormwater

309

Taikoktsm

21"

drains.

200

18"

200

21*

188

11

Mongkok

18"

199

15"

183

18"

400

Hung Hom

15"

200

12"

650

9"

562

18"

Sewers

186

Taikokt ui

84

Position.

Remarks.

In Tung Chau Street from Completed.

Tong Mi Road up to Poplar Street (portion only).

lu Mongkok Road from Sai Yeung Choi Street to Yim Po Fong Street.

In Tai Wan Road, Hung

Hom.

15"

Stormwater

193

Tong Mi

12"

drains

192

9"

80

15" 12"

266

19

136

12"

234

9"

ào

Sewers

111

6"

740

315

In Maple Street from op- posite scavenging lane K.I.L. 1634 to Boundary Street.

In Tai Nan Street, fron Maple Street to main stormwater drain in Pop- lar Street.

In Ki Lung Street, from Boundary Street, to main stormwater drain in Pop- lar Street.

In Laichikok Road, from

Portland Street.

Waterloo Road In New Road,"south of Waterloo Road between K.I.L. 1736 and K.I.L.

2139 up to approach

paths to K.I.L.'s. 1627 and 1629, (portion only). "

Kowloon Tong In Prince Edward Road,

Kowloon Tong.

1

""

""

"

""

9"

$2

600

"

6"

400

9"

6"

So

$3

66

Yaumati

261

In Pakhoi Street

Theatre on K.I.L. 2101.

to

5.20

9"

100

*

Mongkok

6"

93

In Nelson Street and Fa Yuen Street to opposite T-scavenging lane K.I. L. 1570.

Size. Description.

Length (in feet.)

Locality.

6"

50

9"

Sewers

132 107

Mongkok

9"

""

5"

78 185

85

P. W. E. Kowloon.

Position.

Remarks.

Alongside Mongkok Nullah Completed.

as far as K.I.L. 2111.

In

Portland street from Prince Edward Road up to and opposite K.I.L. 2146 and in scavenging lane behind K.I.L. 214j.

""

9"

Sewer

258

Shek Shan

In scavenging lane in rear of K.I.L. 2152 up to K.I.L. 1800.

""

9"

474

"

6"

6"

6"

6"

6"

6"

6"

1

Kowloon Toug In un-named street north of Prince Edward Road and west of K I.L's. 2171 and 2176.

94

12

Hung Hom

330

Mataukok

י

300

Waterloo Road.

1273

To Kwa Wan.

In scavenging lane H.H.

I.L's. 263 and 264.

In scavenging lane K.I.L.

1914.

In scavenging lane K.I.L.

1736 (part only).

In unnamed streets, east of Kowloon City Road and in Kowloon City Road and up scaveng- ing lane of K.I.L. 1752 also up scavenging lane K.1.Ls. 2091 and 1692

etc.

79 Kan Pui Shek. In scavenging lane K.J.L.

1200 Kowloon Tong. In

190

Shek Shan.

>>

*

1577 (portion only) Ching Lung Street.

Boundary Street, Kowloon Tong.

In front of K.I.L. 1574 Chatham Road opposite Shek Tong Street.

""

""

""

""

P. W. E. Kowloon.

Q 86

Size.

Description.

Length (in feet.)

Locality.

Position.

Remarks.

6"

Sewer.

6"

6"

A



51

Mongkok.

92

In scavenging lane K.I.L. Completed.

2141 Sai Yeung Choi Street.

In T-scavenging lane K.I.L. 1570, Mongkok.

110 Tong Mi Road. In scavenging lane, K.I.L.

6"

119

Shantung Street.

6"

69

Yaumati.

6"

وو

6"

27



6"

6"

6"

6"

25

155

Shantung Street.

250 Taikoktsni.

97

294

Mongkok.

""

139

"2

241

6"

257

*

"

Yaumati.

1644, Tong Mi Road, Bedford Road.

In scavenging lane K.I.L. 1570 Section E., Shan- tung Street.

In scavenging lane K.I.L. 2009, Nos. 29 and 31 Battery Street.

In scavenging lane K.I L. 1568 Shantung Street.

In scavenging lane in rear

of K.I.L. 1747.

In T-lane in rear of

K.I.L. 2162.

In Mongkok Road from Tung Choi Street to Fa Yuen Street and up Fa Yuen Street to opposite scavenging lane K.I.L. 2147.

In scavenging lane K.I.L. 2147 Mongkok Road.

In Sai Yeung Choi Street from Prince Edward Road to opposite sca、- enging lane, K.I.L. 1727 and up scavenging lane K.I.L. 1727.

In Nathan Road and up new 10' wide scaveng- ing lane north of Po Hing Theatre.

1

"

"

*>

""

97

22

"7

"

Size. Description.

Length {(in feet).]

Locality.

6"

Sewer

381

Taikoktsui.

6"

131

Mongkok.

6"

348 Taikoktsui.

6"

156

6"

154

Mongkok.

87

P. W. E. Kowloon.

Position.

Remarks.

In Tung Chan Street from Completed.

Prince Edward Road to opposite scavenging lane K.I.L. 1724 and in scavenging lane of KI.L. 1724.

In scavenging lane

of

17

K.I.L. 1725 from Prince Edward Road.

In scavenging lane behind

K.J.L. 1749.

"}

In Prince Edward Roal and up scavenging lane of K.I.L. 1928.

In scavenging lane behind K.I.LS. 2159 and 2160 Fife Street.

The number of drain connections was 317.

Many new gullies with flat gully gratings were constructed and connected to the stormwater drainage system.

Estimates, Supplementary Vote,

$ 75,000.00

87,640.00

Expenditure,

$162,640.00

$145,958.55

183. Miscellaneous.-The following is a brief description of the principal works carried out under this heading:-

Police Training School-Supplying and fixing geysers. Royal Observatory-Provision of an auxiliary water tank. Tsim Sha Tsui Police Station-Reconstruc- tion of an existing footpath. Fire Extincteurs were supplied to the following buildings:-Kowloon Junior School and Kowloon British School.

A reinforced concrete bridge, for pedestrians and rickshas, was constructed over Argyle Street nullah opposite Fa Yuen Street.

>>

"

P. W. E. Kowloon.

88

The old decking was removed from Public Square Street nullah at the site of the ricksha shelter near the Ferry, and the nullah was arched over, in connexion with road improvements.

Estimates, Expenditure,

$10,000.00 $ 6,078.37

184. Water Works.-The following works were carried out under this heading :-

(a.) Repairs to Clear water channel of Catchwater were

continued.

(b.) 300 lineal feet of 6′′ main laid in Mong Kok Road

eastwards from Nathan Road.

150 lineal feet of 6′′ main laid in Shum Chum Street,

Mong Kok Tsui.

230 lineal feet of 5′′ main laid in Nelson Street east-

wards from Nathan Road.

Estimates,

Expenditure,

$8,000.00

$4,737.59

185. Port Works.-Only minor works were carried out during the year under this head, these included investigations as to the nature of the harbour bottom in the vicinity of the Cust Rocks.

Estimates, Expenditure,

Communications :

$2,000.00 $ 178.08

186. Waterloo Road Extension to Boundary, 100 feet wide. -This work was referred to in paragraph 139 (b) of the Report for 1927 and in paragraph 147 of last year's Report.

No further work was carried out during the year.

Estimates, Expenditure,

$10,000.00

Nil.

$

187. To Kwa Wan Road and Site Formation.-This work was referred to in paragraph 139 (c) of the Report for 1927 and in paragraph 148 of last year's Report.

A stormwater drain, consisting of 213 feet of 36′′ and 130 feet of 27′′, was constructed across Ma Tau Wei Road, extending from the summit of the nullah to the centre of Shek Shan Road.

Estimates, Expenditure,

$12,000.00 $ 1,843.28

89

P. W. E: Kowloon.

188. Argyle Street Extension to Waterloo Road. This work was referred to in paragraph 139 (d) of the Report for 1927 and in paragraph 149 of last year's Report.

This work was completed early in February but the road was not surfaced as the cutting face on the west side was let for quarry purposes.

Estimates,

Expenditure,

$22,000.00

$ 5,062.80

189. Improving existing main roads for motor traffic— portion of Salisbury and Nathan Roads. This work, which is part of a yearly programme for improving existing main roads. was commenced in August. It consists of the laying of a 7′′ reinforced cement concrete surface, asphaltum painted & covered with granite chippings.

Estimates,

Supplementary vote-savings from vote "Improving existing main roads for motor traffic from Prince Edward & Argyle Street Extension, (Eastwards)

Total,

Expenditure,

$50,000.00

20,000.00

$70,000.00

$64,741.05

190. Chatham Road Extension.--This work was referred to in paragraph 139 (a) of the Report for 1927, wherein the Contract was recorded as closed.

A Contract for the completion of the construction of Chatham Road was let to Messrs. Li Sang & Co. on 18th November, 1929 for a sum of $124,450.00,

The work comprised a 100-foot road linking up the existing Chatham Road at Hung Hom with Ma Tau Wei Road at Shek Shan. The length being roughly mile.

Little progress was made since the Contract was not signed till late in the year.

Estimates,

Expenditure,

$50,000.00

608.90

191. Boundary Street, Forming Road by Covering Nullah West of No. 8 Railway Bridge.—This work comprised the cover- ing of 104 lineal feet of the nullah on the West of No. 8 Railway Bridge and the surfacing of a 30-foot strip of Boundary Street to its junction with Nathan Road.

P. W. E. Kowloon.

90

A Contract for this work was let to Mr. Man Gang on 20th September, 1929 for a sum of $10,738.50.

Good progress was made and by the end of the year the work was nearing completion.

Estimates,

Expenditure,

Drainage:-

Training Nullahs:-

$15,000.00

$ 8,081.33

192. Tong Mi-Extension of Storm Water Drain from Old Taipo Road to Kowloon Tong Village area.—This work, for which a Contract was let in March, was commenced in the middle of April, but had to be discontinued in September on account of the state of progress of reclamation work controlled by another Con- tract.

Estimates,

Expenditure,

$15,000.00

$ 7,891.29

193. Chinese Cemeteries, Laying out new areas. -Work carried out under this head has already been alluded to in paragraph 38 of this report.

Estimates,

Expenditure,

$10,000.00

$ 9,996.27

194. Renewing electrical wiring in Government Buildings. -The electrical wiring in the following six buildings was renew- ed, the total number of points being 594:-Disinfecting Station, Hung Hom Police Station, Tsim Tsa Tsui Police Station, Central British School (Main Block), Yaumati Market, Tsim Tsa Tsui Market.

Estimates,

Expenditure,

$4,200.00

$4,174.04

195. Upkeep of Government undeveloped sites.-It was found unnecessary to undertake any work under this head.

Estimates,

Expenditure,

$5,000.00

Nil.

}

Q 91

P. W. E. Kowloon.

196. Filling in and draining land west of Yaumati Railway Station and North of Argyle Street.-No work was undertaken during the year; consequently no expenditure was incurred.

Estimates,

Expenditure,

$2,000.00

Nil.

197. Laying telephone cable between Kowloon Railway Station and Chatham Road Bridge.-A lead covered, steel tape armoured telephone cable was laid between the points mentioned.

Estimates,

$8,000.00

$7.970.14

Expenditure,

Waterworks :

198. Distributing

Water Mains.-The undermentioned

mains were laid during the year:-

Size of Main. Length in feet.

Locality.

10"

420

Pakhoi Street between Nathan Road

and Gascoigne Road,

1,200

Argyle Street East of Nathan Road.

6"

6"

470

34

590

Ho Mun Tin Street southwards from

Waterloo Road.

Ho Mun Tin Street.

Estimates,

Expenditure,

Port Works:

$15,000.00

$12,933.04

199. Police Pier.-This work was referred to in paragraph 158 of last year's Report.

The repairs carried out to this pier were completed in August, 1928. The only expenditure under this head was on account of the payment of retention money.

Estimates, Expenditure,

$1,000.00

$1,000.00

P. W. E. Kowloon,

Q 92

200. Mong Kok Tsui and Shamshuipo Ferry Piers.-Work- ing drawings of wrought iron piers were prepared and forwarded to the Crown Agents for the Colonies, who invited tenders for the supply of the Structural ironwork of the piers. Tenderers submitted prices for the supply of structural steel and copper steel alloys. No tender was received for wrought iron materials, and the proposal to build the piers in wrought iron was abandoned.

A contract was let on 6th June for the construction of the above piers in reinforced concrete. The contract provides for two piers each 150 feet in length and 50 feet in width with approaches. The approaches are formed by a reclamation ex- tending 100 seaward of the sea wall by about 60′ in width, protected by pitched slopes on a rubble foundation. Electric hoists and ramps fixed on the pier will provide facilities for the embarkation and disembarkation of passengers.

The whole of the piles, 108 in number, were manufactured at a blockyard at Taikoktsui. At the end of the year, 50 piles had been driven, also the rubble foundations and plinth course were completed.

A

In November, a contract for the supply of the electric hoists was placed with Messrs. John M. Henderson of Aberdeen.

Estimates,

Expenditure,

$150,000.00

$ 35,986.77

201. Compensation and Resumptions.-This vote provided for the Resumption of properties required for Street Widening and Improvement Schemes and in connection with the develop- ment of the district in accordance with the approved Town Planning Scheme. The Resumptions referred to in Schedule A on page 25 of this Report and the payments made by the Government in connection with the conversions and exchanges referred to at page 9 were debited to this vote.

Estimates,

$100,000.00

Expenditure (approved),

$41,999.45

Less Amounts refunded, etc.,

$

980.30

Nett Expenditure,

$ 41,019.15

93

P.W.E. New Kowloon.

P. W. E. NEW KOWLOON.

202. Shamshuipo Market Extension (20 stalls).—This work was referred to in paragraph 161 of last year's Report.

The work was satisfactorily completed by the end of the year.

Estimates, Supplementary Vote, $16,000.00

-$3,000.00

Total Estimates, Total Estimates, . $28,000.00

Total, Expenditure,

$19,000.00 Expenditure up

$14,662.82 to 31.12.29,

$20,659.35

203. Sai Yu Shek Cemetery, quarters for two sextons.- This work was referred in paragraph 163 of last year's Report.

The work was recorded as completed in 1928 and no ex- penditure was incurred during the current year.

Estimates, Expenditure,

$

$500.00 Nil.'

204. Latrine and Bathhouse, Boundary Street, Shamshui- po.-This work was referred to in paragraph 162 of last year's Report.

The work was completed at the end of April but owing to the long drought, it was considered inadvisable to open the bath- house facilities to the Public until the latter part of the year.

Estimates, Expenditure,

$5,000.00

$3,965.15

205. Kowloon City Market Extension.-It was found neces- sary to erect a second block of Market to meet the requirements of the increased population in this district

The building is similar to that built in 1928 with the ex- ception that no quarters are provided. The accommodation con- sisted of 21 stalls for fish, poultry and vegetables.

The progress was fair and by the end of the year the work was nearing completion.

Estimates,

Expenditure,

$15,000.00

$10,901.27

P.W.E. New Kowloon.

94

206. Kowloon Tong Market (Temporary) (4 stalls).-It was ultimately decided that a permanent and larger market should be built to meet the requirements of the population in this dis- trict; consequently no work was carried out under this head other than preparing plans.

Estimates,

Expenditure,

$1.500.00

Nil.

207. Latrine and Bathhouse at Kowloon City, North of New Police Station.-This building is identical to the convenience at Dock Lane, Hung Hom and is being carried out as Part B under Contract No. 30 of 1929 as described in the Kowloon section of this Report.

Fair progress was made so that towards the end of the year the construction of the building was well advanced.

Estimates, Expenditure,

$20,000.00 $16,316.04

208. Married Quarters, Lai Chi Kok Prison. The work con- sists of the erection of a block of six flats for married (warder) officers. Each flat comprises a Living Room, Two bedrooms, Bathroom, Scullery, Kitchen and the usual Servants Quarters. Sketch plans were prepared and approved and working drawings were in course of preparation at the end of the year. No expen- diture was incurred under this heading.

Estimates, Expenditure,

General Works:

$67,000.00 Nil.

209. Roads. The following is a brief statement of the principal works carried out under this heading :--

The undermentioned roads were macadamized, kerbed, channelled and laid to approved levels, the footpaths being paved with granolithic and slab paving and the necessary im- provements made in front of the new buildings erected during the year:

Boundary Street & Tai Nam

Street,

Castle Peak Road,

Cheung Sha Wan & Nam

Chang Street,

Haitan & Boundary Streets, Nam Chang & Om Yau Streets,

Ngai Tsin Wai Road,

Prince Edward Road, Road to Po Kong Village,

Estimates, Expenditure,

Sa Po Road,

Shek Kip Mei & Yu Chow

Street,

Tai Nam, Shek Kip Mei and

Ki Lung Streets,

Tak Ku Ling Road,

Wong Chuk & Ki Lung

Streets,

Yen Chow Street & Newchang & Castle Peak Road,

Yen Chow Street.

$50,000.00 $36,701.01

95

P.W.E. New Kowloon.

Drainage:-

210. Training Nullahs.-The cutting of trenches to prevent the formation of mosquito breeding pools was continued during the year.

Large catchwater channels, with concrete inverts, were formed for site protection above N.K.I.L.'s. 362 and 420, Cheung Sha Wan. The channel was extended, with side feeders, in the valley north west of Laichikok Prison.

A reinforced concrete bridge was erected over Nanchang Street nullah at Un Chau Street, Shamshuipo.

Estimates,

Expenditure,

$10,000.00

$ 3,901.35

211. Miscellaneous Drainage Works.-The following are the most important stormwater drains and sewers laid during the

year:

Size.

Description.

Length (in feet).

Locality.

Position.

Remarks.

48" 42′′

Stormwater drains

217 Shamshuipo

231

36"

211

30"

210

18"

210

In Yen Chow Street and Completed.

off same in Apliu Street, Cheung Sha Wan Road, Om Yau Street and Tin Liu Street (portion only)

15"

926

12"

933

"

30"

320

"

147

15"

395

Kowloon City In Prince Edward Road from Kowloon City Road to Tak Ku Ling Road,

""

12"

214

18"

Sewers

445

Shamshuipo

6"

1215

15"

Sewer

90

14

In Sak Kip Mi Street from manhole opposite N.K.I. L. 1168 to opposite scav- | enging lane N.K.I.L. 1078 Om Yau Street and in scavenging lanes, N.K. I.L's. 1168, 511, 1078

etc.

In

from

Maple Street Boundary Street to Ki

Lung Street.

P.W.E. New Kowloon,

Q 96

Size.

Description.

Length (in feet).

Locality.

6"

Sewer

56

Shamshuipo

6"

>>

296

6"

27

255

6"

A

27

6"

27

6"

99

6'

6"

6"

""

299

A

"

Position.

Remarks.

In T-lane, N.K.I.L. 1151, Completed.

Wong Chuk Street.

In scavenging lane, N.K.

I.L's. 1140 and 1141.

In Un Chau Street to

N.K.I.L. 1114.

In scavenging lane N.K.I.

L. 1082, Cheung Sha Wan Road.

In scavenging lane N.K. 1.L. 520, Un Chan Street.

scavenging

T-lane

N.K.I.L. 1150 Cheung

Sha Wan Road.

In scavenging lane N.K. I.L. 574 Tak Ku Ling Road.

In scavenging lane in rear of N.K.I.L's. 1090 and

1029.

In scavenging lane in rear

of N.K.I.L. 1105.

""

""

22

135

25

14

150

Cheung Sha Wan

59

Shamshnipo

In

200

"

Kowloon City

وو

87

>>

36

""

"3

The number of drain connections made was 231.

Many new gullies were constructed and connected to the stormwater drainage system.

Estimates,

$30,000.00

Supplementary Vote,

$29,000.00

$59,000.00

Expenditure,

$55,196.23

Q 97

P.W.E. New Kowloon.

212. Miscellaneous.-The following is a brief description of the principal works executed under this head:-

Sham Shui Po Police Station-Concreting surfacing to

compound. Lai Chi Kok Gaol-Renewal of part of the surrounding fence. Nullah east of Lai Chi Kok Prison-Demolition of Dams. Christian Chin-

ese Cemetery-Diversion of Path. Ngau Shi Wan -Removal of truck line.

Estimates,

Expenditure,

$10,000.00

$ 5,093.00

213. Water Works.-Only minor extensions necessitated by the installing of street fountains in developing districts, were carried out under this vote.

Estimates,

Expenditure,

$4,000.00 $ 773.04

214. Port Works.-Only minor works of a miscellaneous nature were carried out by daily labour under the above head during the year.

Estimates, Expenditure,

Communications :·

$1,000.00 43.60

215. Waterloo Road Extension to foothills (100 feet) (sur- facing chiefty).—This work was referred to in paragraph 153 (a) of the Report for 1927 and in paragraph 170 of last year's Re- port.

No further work was undertaken, consequently no expendi- ture was incurred.

Estimates, Expenditure,

$8,000.00 Nil.

216. Kowloon Tong Development Area at Kowloon Tsai- Extension of roads (no surfacing).-This work was referred to in paragraph 172 of last year's Report.

Contract No. 24 of 1922 was closed on 17th September, 1929 owing to the dilatoriness of the Contractor Messrs. Li Hing & Bros. in finishing this work. The work of completion was let to Mr. Keng Tak Cheong on 4th November, 1929, under Contract No. 62 of 1929. This Contract totalling $14,907.00 comprised 3 sections, "A", "B" and "C". The above work being carried out as Part "A" for a sum of $11,910.00. Part "B" deals with "Kowloon Tong Development Scheme-Excavation and filling' and Part "C" with "Kowloon Tong Development Area- Connection of Stream North of Hill Area to main nullah" men- tioned hereafter.

*

P.W.E. New Kowloon,

Q 98

Little progress was made since the Contract was not signed

till late in the year.

Estimates,

Expenditure,

$20,000.00 Total Estimates,

$

$40,200.00

Expenditure up

$ 9,569.63

901.25 to 31.12.29,

217. Widening_of_Nathan_Koad Extension Northward to Nancheong Street (junction of New Taipo & Castle Peak Roads).

This road was widened, kerbed, channelled, macadamized and tar painted with the exception of a portion in the vicinity of Nathan Square which at the end of the year had not been filled

in.

The work of widening Nathan Road northwards from its junction with Prince Edward Road to Nan Cheong Street was embodied in the Contract for "Filling in areas at Tong Mi and Kowloon Tong", mentioned hereafter.

Good

Channelling, kerbing and surfacing were undertaken. progress was made and by the end of the year the work was nearing completion.

Estimates,

Expenditure,

$20,000.00 $18,669.70

218. Access Road (15 feet wide) to Christian Chinese Ceme- tery, Kowloon City.It was found not possible to proceed with the construction of this road during the year owing to prolonged negotiations for resumptions of lots. Preliminary survey work was, however, carried out.

Estimates, Expenditure,

$9,700.00 $ 6.80

219. Improving existing main roads for motor traffic from Prince Edward and Argyle Street Extension (Eastwards).—This work was not proceeded with, the vote being used to supplement. that for "Improving existing main roads for motor traffic- portion of Salisbury and Nathan Roads".

Estimates, Expenditure,

Drainage :--

Training Nullahs :-

$20,000.00 Nil.

220. Kowloon Tong Development Area-Connection of Stream North of Hill Area to Main Nullah.-This work was re- ferred in paragraph 154 (b) of the report for 1927 and in para- graph 174 of last year's Report.

99

P.WE. New Kowloon.

Contract No. 24 of 1922 was closed on 17th September, 1929 owing to the dilatoriness of the Contractor, Messrs. Li Hing & Bros. in finishing the work.

The work of completion was let to Mr. Keng Tak Cheong on 4th November, 1929 under Contract No. 62 of 1929. This Contract totalling $14,901.00 comprised 3 sections "A", "B" and "C"; the above work being carried out as Part "B" for a sum of $1,900.00 of which mention is made in paragraph 216 of this Report.

Little progress was made since the Contract was not signed till late in the year.

Estimates,

Expenditure,

$21,000.00 Total Estimates,

Expenditure up to

31.12.29

$16,424.74



$72,000.00

$67,368.39

221. Kowloon Tong Development-Connection of Streams East side of Estate to Main Nullah (Central).—It was not pos- sible to undertake the construction of a culvert to connect the streams on the East side of Kowloon Tong Estate to the main nullah but plans are in course of preparation; no expenditure was incurred during the year.

Estimates, Expenditure,

Miscellaneous:-

$16,000.00

Nil.

222. Kowloon Tong-Surfacing_Roads_and_Scavenging Lanes.-This work was referred to in paragraph 177 of last year's Report.

The work of kerbing, channelling, laying macadam to car- riageways, tarpainting and granolithic paving to footways and scavenging lanes was practically completed.

Estimates, Expenditure,

$30,000.00 $25,581,22

223. Refuse Dump at Cheung_Sha_Wan.~This work was referred to in paragraph 161 of the report for 1927 and in para- graph 180 of last year's Report.

Fresh tenders were called for and in April Mr. Man Gang was given the Contract for the current year.

Good progress was made and a further area of .72 acre was formed

$

P.W.E. New Kowloon.

Q 100

The Requirements of the Sanitary Department as regards provision of spoil for covering of refuse were met throughout the year.

Estimates, Sup. Vote,

Expenditure,

$5,000.00

$1,800.00

$6,800.00

$6,241.64

224. Chinese Cemeteries, Laying out new areas.-Work carried out under this head has already been alluded to in para- graph 38 of this report.

Estimates, Expenditure,

$6,000.00 $5,995.48

225. Kowloon Tong Development Scheme-Excavation and filling. This work was referred to in paragraph 157 of the Report for 1927 and in paragraph 178 of last year's Report.

Contract No. 24 of 1922 was closed on 17th September, 1929 owing to the dilatoriness of the Contractor, Messrs. Li Hing & Bros. in finishing the work.

The work of completion was let to Mr. Keng Tak Cheong on 4th November, 1929 under Contract No. 62 of 1929. This Contract totalling $14,901.00 comprised 3 sections "A", "B" and "C"; the above work being carried out as Part "C" for a sum of $1,091.00 of which mention is made in paragraph 216 of this Report.

Little progress was made since the Contract was not signed till late in the year.

Estimates,

Expenditure,

$4,000.00 Total Estimates, . $375,400.00

$1,995.09

Expenditure up to 31.12.29,



$373,051.37

226. Filling in Areas at Tong Mi and Kowloon Tong.-This work was referred to in paragraph 162 of the Report for 1927 and in paragraph 181 of last year's Report.

The work comprised the filling in of the remaining low lying areas on the east side of Nathan Road to approved Forma- tion Levels in accordance with the Town Planning Layout.

A contract was let to Messrs. Tak Hing & Co. for a sum of $34,500 on 15th June, 1929.

Q 101

P.W.E. New Kowloon.

Good progress was made during the year and 8.94 acres of land were reclaimed by the end of the year.

Estimates,

Expenditure,

$35,000.00 Total Estimates, . $201,000.00

Expenditure up to

$ 6,685.25

31.12.29

$ 39,870.66

227. Pier at Lai Chi Kok for use of Prison Department Launches. This work was not undertaken during the year.

Estimates,

$400.00

Expenditure,

Nil.

228. Kowloon Tsai Resumptions.-This vote provided for the Resumption of properties in the village of Kowloon Tsai required in connection for development purposes.

Estimates,

Expenditure (approved),

$46,000.00

$23,826.80

Less Amounts refunded, etc.,

$ 1,152.20

$22,674.60

Nett Expenditure,

229. Filling in large area Kowloon City.-This work was referred to in paragraph 158 of the Report for 1927 and in paragraph 179 of last year's Report.

It was considered inadvisable at the present time to fill and bring to approved Formation Level the area now occupied by Ma Tau Wei Village since this district did not warrant develop- ment on the lines of the Town Planning Layout.

Estimates,

$30,000.00 Total Estimate,

...

$366,000.00

Expenditure up to 31.12.29,

$ 72,406.46

230. Repairs to Kowloon City Wall.-The work comprised the rebuilding of the North East Corner of the Old Wall, en- circling the 'Walled City", diversion of the stream course at this point and the general improvement to drainage system.

66

A Contract was let to Mr. Man Gang for a sum of $2,042.40 on 3rd July, 1929.

The work was satisfactorily completed at the end of the year.

Estimates, Expenditure,

$2,000.00

$1,980.19

P.W E. New Kowloon. Q 102

231. Cheung Sha Wan-Forming site for exchanges.-It was considered inadvisable to undertake this work since the locality of this district did not warrant development on the lines of the Town Planning Layout, consequently no expenditure was incurred during the year.

Estimates, Expenditure,

$4,500.00

Nil.

232. Filling in Areas North West of Nan Cheong Street and West of Taipo Road.—This work was undertaken to bring the low lying areas West of Nan Cheong Street and South of Castle Peak Road to approved Formation Levels in accordance with the Town Planning Layout.

A Contract was let to Messrs. Fu On & Co. for a sum of $92,315.00 on 18th October, 1929 for the above work together with the continuation of the nullah wall and invert West of Shamshuipo Camp.

Little progress was made, however, since the Contract was not signed till late in the year.

Estimates, Expenditure,

Waterworks:

$30,000.00

74.00

233. Kowloon Tong Estate-Mains.-This work was com- pleted by the laying of:-

780 lineal feet of 6" Cast Iron main and 740 lineal feet of 5" Cast Iron main in Cornwall Street, at the Northern end of the Estate.

Estimates,

Expenditure,

$5,000.00

$3,663.32

234. Distributing Water Mains.-The following works were carried out under this vote:

(a) A connecting main 5,700 lineal feet in length was. laid along Tin Liu and Un Chau Streets connecting up the Sham Shui Po system to Piper's Hill Service Reservoir. The main is mostly 6′′ Cast Iron but a small portion temporarily is of 7" Cast Iron.

(b) 600 lineal feet of 6" main laid along Shek Kip Mei Street, Shamshuipo, northwards from Lai Chi Kok Road.

(c) 264 lineal feet of 6" main laid along Maple Street,

Shamshuipo, northwards from Lai Chi Kok Road.

Q 103

P.W.E. New Kowloon.

(d) 360 lineal feet of 6" main laid in Fir Street, Sham-

shuipo.

Estimates,

Expenditure,

$10,000.00

$ 9,629.48

235. Fillered water supply to Dairy Farm Lots at Diamond Hill.-A Galvanised Wrot Iron Pipe was laid from Sai Kung Road, Kowloon City to these lots, the total length of pipe being about 3,900 lineal feet. A start was made with the erection of a 30,000 gallons Mild Steel Plate Tank.

The main consists of about 1,900 feet of 4" Wrot Iron Pipe from Sai Kung Road to Shek Ku Lung Village and from there to the lots the main is of 3" pipe about 2,000 feet in length.

Estimates,

Expenditure,

Port Works :—

$20,000.00

$ 9.394.27

236. Further Reclamation at Shamshuipo.-This work was referred to in paragraph 186 of last year's Report.

The dredging of materials overlying the rubble mound foun- dations were completed, the deposit removed amounted to a total of about 12,500 cube yards. About 6,560 cube yards of rubble were deposited to bring the foundations to correct levels. The sea wall was completed for a distance of about 1,575 feet out of a total distance of 1,600 feet.

A slipway was constructed for the use of the Military Au- thorities, this slipway takes up a distance of 25 feet frontage on the Western extremity of the reclamation.

33,860 cube yards of filling materials were deposited during the year, making a total of 46,860 cube yards of filling deposited under the present Contract.

The foundations of the sea wall settled vertically for a distance of about 180 lineal feet, the maximum settlement amounted to about 6 feet. The settlement was apparently due to the displacement of a thick strata of mud beneath the foun- dations. The building of the settled portion of the sea wall to proper level was well advanced at the end of the year.

Estimates,

Expenditure,

$60,000.00 Total Estimates, . $783,662.00

Total Expenditure $53,817.21 to 31.12.29.

$745,981.11

1

P.W.E. New Territories. Q 104

237. Cheung Sha Wan-Construction of mound to retain materials dumped.—A contract was let for the construction of protective works to retain silt dumped in Cheung Sha Wan Bay. The protective works extend from the South-west corner of the existing reclamation for a distance of 1,500 feet westwards and in line with the existing frontage. This work was commenced in June. At the end of the year, about 22,800 cube yards of silt had been removed to prepare a trench for the rubble mound foundations. Approximately 13,800 cube yards of rubble had been deposited pell-mell in the dredged trench to form portion of the foundations of the protective works.

Estimates, Expenditure,

$50,000.00 $27,895.78

238. Lai Chi Kok.-Water Boat Dock, surfacing to East wall. The 20 feet wide roadway on the east side of the dock was surfaced throughout its length with a 6′′ lime concrete slab tar painted two coats. The total area of surfacing amounted to 1,051 square yards. Estimates,

Expenditure,

$2,400.00 Total Estimates, . $530,000.00

Expenditure up

$1,549.57 to 31.12.29.

$521,995.54

239. Compensation and Resumptions.-This vote provided for the resumption of properties required for Street Widening and Improvement Schemes, and in connection with the develop- ment of the district in accordance with the approved Town Planning Scheme.

The resumption referred to in Schedule A on page 25 of this report and the payments made by the Government in con- nection with the conversions and exchanges referred to at page 9 were debited to this vote.

Estimates,

Expenditure (approved),



$100,000.00

$ 36,983.45

Less Amounts refunded, etc., $ 2,031.68 Nett Expenditure,

$ 34,951.77

P. W. E. NEW TERRITORIES.

240. Cheung Chau, Anglo Chinese School. This work was reported as completed in paragraph 188 of last year's Report.

The only charge against this year's vote was the payment of Retention Money. Estimates,

$10,000.00 Total Estimates,

$45,000.00

Expenditure up

Expenditure,

$ 5,794.47

to 31.12.29,

......

$40,898.59

Q 105

P.W.E. New Territories.

General Works:

241. Roads,Taipo Market Lots 777, 811 and 826.—The streets fronting these lots were kerbed, channelled, macadamized and tarpainted, granolithic paving being laid on footways.

Estimates, Expenditure,

$2,500.00 $2,309.83

242. Training Nullahs.-Channelling and sub-soil drains were laid, dams were erected, and swamp was filled in west of railway between "The Flywheel" and "Island House", Taipo.

Estimates, Expenditure,

$1,500.00

$1,355.62

243. Miscellaneous Drainage Works.-The following are the most important sewers which were laid during the year.

Size. Description.

Length (in feet).

Locality.

일을

9"

Sewers

6"

70 169

Taipo Market

Position.

Remarks.

From main outfall sewer to opposite scavenging lanes behind T.M.L's. 847, 840, 839 and up scavenging lanes behind T.M.L's. 847, 840, 839 (portion only).

Completed

6'

Sewer

90

In scavenging lane behind

T.M.L. 828.

"

The number of drain connections was 30.

Estimates, Expenditure,

$5,000.00

$3,249.41

244. Miscellaneous.--The following is a brief description of the principal works carried out under this head:

Sheung Shui Police Station-Concrete surfacing to the compound and erection of a fence to enclose the Indian constables quarters.

Tsun Wan Police Station--Fix arms grille.

Tai O Police Station-Fix arms grille and form a

parade ground.

Trace from Kowloon City to Sai Kung, Eastern Circular

Road-Clearing undergrowth.

P.W.E. New Territories.

Q 106

Ping Shan Land Bailiff's Office-Improvements to path.

Ta Ku Ling Police Station-Enlarging loopholes and

providing steel plates.

Castle Peak Bathing Beach-Improvements to Water

Supply.

Estimates,

Expenditure,

245. Water Works

$7,500.00

$6,378.90

A lower intake, to facilitate pumping

to the Conduit, was erected across the Shing Mun River below Pineapple Pass. A small Gauge Basin to measure the Needle Hill Stream Supply was constructed beside the Temporary Conduit.

Estimates,

Expenditure,

Communications :~

$1,000.00

$ 783.02

246. Patrol Path from Lin Ma Hang to Sha Tau Kok.- This path which is being constructed for Police Patrol purposes is a continuation of the Path from Ta Ku Ling to Lin Ma Hang, reference to which was made in paragraph 197 of last year s Report, on to Sha Tau Kok Village. Its width is six feet and the length approximately three and a half miles.

The work was let on 22nd June, 1929 in two parts "A" and "B" of Contract No. 43 of 1929. Part "A" which covered that section between "Lin Ma Hang Village and No. 11 Boundary Stone" was let to Mr. Ah Cheong for a sum of $35,820.00; whilst Part "B" referred to that Section for "No. 11 Boundary Stone to Sha Tau Kok" and was let to Mr. Pang Loong for $40,186.50.

Such poor progress was made with Part "A", owing to the Contractor, Mr. Ah Cheong, carrying out the work in a dilatory manner, that by the end of the year it was considered advisable to close his Contract and award it to Mr. Pang Loong, the Con- tractor for Section "B".

The progress on the latter was good and by the end of the year all earthworks were practically completed.

Estimates,

$50,000.00 Total Estimate,

$60,000.00

Expenditure up

Expenditure,

$ 9,943.60

to 31.12.29,

$23,746.12

Q 107

P.W.E. New Territories.

247. Reconditioning Roads.-The following works. were carried out under this heading :-

Kam Tin Road from Au Tau Police Station to Kam Tin Village was macadamized and tarpainted. Necessary passing places were provided. The reconditioning of Castle Peak Road near Castle Peak was continued.

Estimates, Expenditure,

$30,000.00 $27,660.97

248. Widening_Patrol Path—Sheung Shui to Ta Ku Ling to 10-feet. The 4-feet and 6-feet path between Sheung Shui Police Station and Ta Ku Ling Block House was widened to 10 feet to provide quicker means of transport for Police Patrol work.

The Construction work was let as Part 'A" of Contract No. 19 of 1929 to Mr. Ah Cheong on 14th March, 1929 for a sum of $8,100. Part "B" referred to "Access and Patrol Path to Block House at Lo Wu Railway Station" which is men- tioned hereafter.

The work suffered from inattention by the Contractor and was not completed by the end of the year.

Estimates, Expenditure,

$8,500.00 $5,082.35

249. Access and Patrol Path to Lo Wu Railway Station Block House. A path 10 feet wide and approximately 3,200 feet long was constructed to give access to the Block House at Lo Wu Railway Station also for Police Patrol purposes.

The work was let to Mr. Ah Cheong under Part B of Con- tract No. 19 of 1929 for a sum of $3,698.00.

The progress during the year was poor owing to the dilatori- ness of the Contractor.

Estimates, Expenditure,

$4,500.00 $2,477.53

250. Widening existing road between Fan Ling and Sha Tau Kok upon removal of Railway.-The Branch Line of the Kowloon Canton Railway to Sha Tau Kok traversed a section of the road between Fan Ling and Sha Tau Kok, and upon its removal this portion was straightened and widened.

The work was let to Mr. Johnley Ching on 9th March, 1929 for a sum of $5,730 as Part A of Contract No. 17 of 1929 (Part "B" referred to "Levelling strip of land now occupied by the Railway, Sha Tau Kok" mentioned hereafter).

P.W.E. New Territories.

108

The work was satisfactorily, completed by the end of the year.

Estimates,

Expenditure,

$10,000.00

$ 7,078.84

251. Tai Po Road Improvements-Bridge at 133 miles.-In view of improvements to the existing bridge the work of con- structing the new bridge was not proceeded with.

Estimates,

Expenditure,

$30,000.00

Nil.

252. Levelling strip of land formerly occupied by the Rail- way, Sha Tau Kok.—When the section of the roadway occupied by the branch line of the Kowloon-Canton Railway to Sha Tau Kok was vacated, the terminal area at Sha Tau Kok was levelled to provide parking places for motor buses and other vehicles.

The work was let to Mr. Pang Loong, on 13th May, 1929 as Part B of Contract No. 17 of 1929 for a sum of $1,132.00.

The work was satisfactorily completed by the end of the year.

Estimates,

Expenditure,

$5,000.00

$1,195.18

253. Forming and surfacing street in front of D.D.C. Lot 827 C. and D. and 828 C.—This work was completed.

Estimates,

Expenditure,

$2,000.00

$1,432.88

254. Fencing of Magnetic Huts, Au Tau.-The area on which the Magnetograph House and Magnetic Hut at Au Tau were built, reference of which is made in paragraph 193 of the Report for 1927, was enclosed in a wooden fence in the construc- tion of which no iron work was permitted.

A Contract for this work was let to Mr. Keng Tack Cheong on 17th May, 1929 for a sum of $1,046.60.

year.

The work was satisfactorily completed by the end of the

Estimates,

Expenditure,

$1,600.00

$ 988.95

Q 109 Works not Appearing in

Estimates,-- Hong Kong.

255. Compensation and Resumptions.-This vote provided for the Resumption of properties required for sundry purposes in the New Territories other than the area known as New Kowloon.

Estimates,

$5,000.00

Expenditure (approved),

$

Less Amounts refunded, etc.,

$

Nett Expenditure,

$2,223.10

WORKS NOT APPEARING IN ESTIMATES.

HONG KONG.

256. Wireless Telegraph Station at Victoria Peak. This work, referred to in paragraph 205 of last year's report was com- pleted in March.

Special Vote,..... $52,510.00 Total Estimates,

Expenditure,

Expenditure up

$25,399.32 to 31.12.29,

$91,440.00

....

$61,079.46

257. Widening of the existing Forestry_Tracks.—This work consisted of the widening of two tracks:

(1) on the south side of the Island, between Wanchai Gap and the road from Wongneicheong Gap-Little Hong Kong Road.

(2) on the north side of the Island, between Wongnei-

cheong Gap and Mount Parker Road.

The work was completed by end of November.

Special Vote,

Expenditure,

$25,000.00

$24,756.93

258. Construction of new motor road from Garden Road to May Road. This work was commenced in the Autumn and satisfactory progress was made to the end of the year.

Special Vote, Expenditure,

$20,000.00 $ 9,006.72

259. Continuation of Reclamation at Shaukiwan.-A con- tract was let to Mr. Ip Lam Shang for the construction of a reclamation about 2.2 acres in extent protected on the north side by a mound of building debris and on the west and south-west sides by a nullah wall. Work was commenced in September, At the end of the year, about 8,000 cube yards of filling materials had been deposited in the reclamation, 200 feet of nullah wall had been completed and 1,400 cube yards of building debris. deposited to form the protective mound.

Special Vote, Expenditure,

$20,000.00 $ 4,207.52

Works not appearing in Estimates,-Kowloon,

-

Q 110

260. Telephone Instruments and Plant.-Seventy tele- phone instruments and certain plant were obtained in connection with the intercommunication of the Government and Public tele- phone systems.

Special Vote, Expenditure,

$20,000.00 $14,476.92

261. Broadcasting Studio.-Accommodation was provided (on the first floor of the General Post Office Building) for a Studio where programmes are broadcasted daily.

Special Vote, Sup. Vote,

Expenditure,

...

$5,000.00 Total Estimates, $12,365.00 $1,365.00 Expenditure

$6,226.92 to 31.12.29,

$10,862.31

262. Water Supply to Stanley_Village.-This work was started in January with the primary object of supplying the new St. Stephen's College and was completed in September. A 3" Wrot Irou main about 13,600 lineal feet in length was laid from the Tytam Tuk Rising Mains. A Service Reservoir of 9,000 gallons capacity is situated above the main Island Road near the Stanley Road.

Special Vote, Expenditure,

$15,500.00 $

Nil.

KOWLOON.

263. Kowloon Junior School, Removal to “Parkside" This work referred to in paragraph 215 of last year's Report was satisfactorily completed and furnished in February.

Special Vote,

Expenditure,

$9,000.00 Total Estimates,

Expenditure up

$8,057.86 to 31.12.29,

...

$13,000.00

$12,061.32

264. Filling in Tidal Flat and Cutting down Hill between Tai Kok Tsui and Fuk Tsun Heung.-This work was referred to in paragraph 157 of last year's Report.

This work was completed at the end of 1928, and main- tained satisfactorily until June, 1929. The expenditure under this head was on account of the payment of retention money of $10,000 which became due to the Contractor on expiration of the maintenance period.

Special Vote,

$10,000.00 Total Estimates, . $880,000.00

Expenditure,

Expenditure

$10,000.00 to 31.12.29,

$634,600.10

111

Q 111

Works & charges defray- ed from funds not provided.

for under P.W..E Votes.

265. Widening Castle Peak Road to 60 feet wide and filling in areas at Cheung Sha Wan.-This work was referred to in paragraph 218 of last year's Report.

Under the Contract for this work which was closed at the end of the year the following progress was made:-

(a) Castle Peak Road, section from its junction with Nan Chang Street to old Castle Peak Road was widened to 60 feet.

(b) Castle Peak Road, section from old Castle Peak Road to Wong Uk Village was formed to new levels for a width of 30 feet.

(c) Certain low lying areas at Cheung Sha Wan were

brought up to approved Formation Level.

Special Vote, Expenditure,

*

$30,000.00 Expenditure up $27,901.00 to 31.12.29,

$30,127.14

NEW TERRITORIES.

266. Block Houses on frontier at Lin Ma Hang.—This work was referred to in paragraph 190 of last year's Report.

The work was satisfactorily completed.

Special Vote,

Expenditure,

$3,000.00 Expenditure up $2,839.34 to 31.12.29.

$10,302.34

WORKS & CHARGES DEFRAYED FROM FUNDS NOT PROVIDED FOR UNDER

P.W.E. VOTES.

267. Upkeep of Government Garage Plant.—The plant was maintained in a good state of repair.

Estimates, Expenditure,

$1,000.00

$ 997.53

268. Upkeep and running expenses of Motor Lorries and Cars. All motor lorries and cars were subject to re-current in- spection and maintained in good running condition.

Estimates, Expenditure,

$30,000.00 $29,979.36

269. Upkeep of Motor and Steam Rollers.---All motor and steam rollers were subject to recurrent inspection and main-

tained in good running condition.

Estimates, Expenditure,

$10,000.00 $ 4,892.32

Works & charges defrayed from funds not provided for under P.W.E. Votes.

112

270. Upkeep of Quarry Plants.-The plant was maintained. in a good state of repair and running order.

Estimates, Expenditure,

$18,000.00 $ 9.869.18

271. Harbour Surveying. This work was referred to in paragraph 224 of last year's Report.

Surveys were made during the year to ascertain the effect of dumping in various portions of the harbour particularly at Kennedy Town, North Point and Cheung Sha Wan. The mea- surement of silt dredged in the harbour by the two Government Grab dredgers was made from surveys before and after dredging in cases where the job was in excess of 2,000 cube yards. Various surveys of the under water portion of structures were undertaken by diver. The information obtained from the two self-recording tide gauges was plotted together with thermal and wind pressure diagrams.

Estimates, Expenditure,

$7,000.00 $5.853.60

272. 1 Motor Car.—A Morris Oxford Touring Car was order- ed from England and delivered in the Colony during the year.

Estimates, Expenditure,

$3,000.00 $2,407.54

273. Lifts Maintenance, Government Buildinas.—All lifts were maintained in good order.

Estimates, Expenditure,

$6,000.00 $4,846.37

274. Construction of Cust Rocks Beacon Light.-A contract was let to Mr. Lam Woo in April for the construction of a Beacon Light consisting of a concrete round tower founded on a pell-mell rubble foundation, surmounted on the round tower is a reinforced concrete house for housing the carbide cylinders and light.

The work was completed and handed over to the Harbour Department in September.

Estimates, Expenditure,

$4,000.00 $3.126.90

275. Morris Truck for New Territories.—A Morris Commer- cial 30 cwt. Truck was ordered from England and delivered in the Colony during the year.

Estimates, Expenditure,

$4,000.00

$4,000.00

Q 113

Works & charges defray- ed from funds not provided

for under P.W.E. Votes.

276. Replacing aerial line from the Sub-Station to "A" and “B” Blocks Officers' Quarters K.C.R.—The old aerial line which was too small was replaced by a buried cable, paper insulated, lead covered and armoured.

The cost of the work was met from a K.C.R. Vote, H. 32.

Estimates, Expenditure,

$3,950.00 $3,018.50

277. Additional Receiving Gear. The instruments were ob- tained from England and arrived in September. They were in- stalled at the Royal Observatory and the Government Radio Telegraph Office.

Estimates,

Expenditure,

$2,500.00 $2,091.51

278. Provision of high speed transmitting gear. This gear was obtained from England. It arrived in the Colony in Novem- ber and will be used in the Government Radio Service.

Estimates, Sup. Vote,

$2,640.00

$

30.00

$2,670.00

$2,669.79

Expenditure,

279. Duplication of Storage Battery.-This battery arrived in the Colony in 1929 and was sent to Cape D'Aguilar W/T Station for erection.

Estimates, Sup. Vote,

$5,160.00

$ 210.00

$5,370.00 $5,365.93

Expenditure,

280. Onc 5 K.W. Transmitter for ship traffic.-The trans- mitter was obtained from England and is installed at Cape D'Aguilar W/T Station.

Estimates, Expenditure,

$14,400.00

$14,355.11

281. One K.W. Transmitter for close range.-The trans- mitter was obtained from England and is installed at Cape D'Aguilar W/T Station.

Estimates, Sup. Vote,

Expenditure,

$5,000.00 $ 750.00

$5,750.00 $5,729.37

Works carried out and

chargeable to Loan Funds.

Q 114

282. Dehumidifying plant.-The plant was ordered from England but had not arrived in the Colony by the end of the year. It will be installed in the Peak W/T Station.

Estimates,

Expenditure,

$10,000.00

$ 6,863.70

WORKS CARRIED OUT AND CHARGEABLE TO LOAN FUNDS.

283. Shing Mun Valley Waterworks Scheme:

(a) Preparation of sites for the inhabitants of resumed area in connection with the above.—This work was referred to in paragraph 229 of last year's Report. Preparation of further Sites at Nam She Po, Wo Hop Shek and Ping Kong were under- taken during the year under a Contract let to Messrs. Hop Hing and Son on 15th May, 1929 for a sum of $6,244.00.

The Nam She Po area which covered 9,800 square feet provided sites for 8 houses, the area at Wo Hop Shek of 45,420 square feet for 32 houses and the Ping Kong area of 42,300 square feet for 32 houses.

By the end of the year these sites were completed.

Plans for the site formation at Fung Yuen, Pang Chung and Mui Sha Ha were prepared and tenders called for at the end of the year.

(b) Construction of Large and Small Type Houses for in- habitants of resumed area in connection with the above.—The work consisted of erecting 3 Large Type Houses and 3 Small Type Houses at Kam Tin.

A Contract was let to Messrs. Lee Fat & Co. on 25th September, 1929 for a sum of $6,870. The cost of a large type house being $1,400.00 and for the small type $890.00.

The work was satisfactorily completed by the end of the year.

Total Estimates,

$520,957.48

Expenditure up to 31.12.29,

$182,132.39

Q 115 Works carried out and chargeable to Loan Funds.

1.0

(c) Filtering Plant and Erection.-This plant was brought into operation on June 10th., being run for 8 hours per day in order to supply Piper's Hill Service Reservoir with approx. million gallons per day. The results of Bacteriological and chemical tests have been satisfactory. A Paterson type Fluxograph to record the quantity of water passing through the plant was installed in February.

Total Estimates,

Expenditure up to 31.12.29,

$199,694.35

$200,048.14

(d) Service Reservoir, Shek Lai Pui.-Steady progress was made with the execavation of the Eastern half of the reservoir resulting in a commencement of the concrete invert by the middle of June. Early in August concrete work in the main walls and piers was commenced and continued steadily to the end of the year.

Towards the end of November the timbering & placing of reinforcement for the roof was commenced.

During the year the following concrete work was com- pleted :-

Invert

Piers

Main Walls

Division Wall

195 bays 15′0′′ x 12′0′′ 165 No.

553 lineal feet.

116

As the excavations were proceeding it was found economical to enlarge the size of the service reservoir to give a capacity of 11.5 million gallons.

Total Estimates,

Expenditure up to 31.12.29,

$400,000.00 $127,155.27

(e) Pipe Line.The laying of the 24′′ steel main in Nathan Road was continued and by the end of May it had been laid to Prince Edward Road. The section above Cheung Sha Wan was completed in May by the laying of 560 lineal feet of 24′′ main to the site of Shek Lai Pui Service Reservoir. From this point a temporary 12′′ C. I. main 360 lineal feet in length was laid to the Shing Mun Rapid Gravity Filters.

A 24" x 11" Self Closing valve with recording apparatus was installed at a point approx. 560 lineal feet below the Shek Lai Pui Service Reservoir and a valve house built.

The pipe line was brought into operation on June 10th., to feed the Piper's Hill Service Reservoir from the Shing Mun Rapid Gravity Filters.

Works carried out and chargeable to Loan Funds.

M

116

As the re-alignment of the Castle Peak Road was completed the laying of the main in this section was proceeded with and by the end of the year this had been completed except for a length of about 700 lineal feet.

At the south end of the main a length of 300 lineal feet of 24′′ main with welded joints was laid under the Kowloon Canton Railway to the sea wall where it will join the Cross Harbour Pipes.

Towards the end of the year a length of 800 lineal feet of 24′′ steel main was laid from Queen's Pier, the Hong Kong end of the Cross Harbour pipe, to Queen's Road, connecting with the existing 15′′ main at the corner of Wardley Street.

During the year a total of 11,800 lineal feet of main was laid bringing the total laid to date to 24,130 lineal feet.

Total Estimates,

Expenditure up to 31.12.29,

$700,650.67 $410,122.80

(f) Harbour Pipes-In January Government decided to proceed with a Cross Harbour Pipe and Mr. R. M. Henderson, Assistant Director of Public Works was deputed to proceed to England to place his scheme before The Colonial Office & Con- sulting Engineers. Mr. Henderson arrived in England on 27th.. April and sanction for his scheme was obtained in May.

On 28th. June a Contract for the necessary Steel Pipes and Specials was let to Messrs. Stewarts & Lloyds delivery to commence in England in six weeks and complete in two and a half months.

During this period preparation of the Harbour Bed was pro- ceeded with and special Concrete Anchor Blocks were cast.

Mr. Henderson returned to the Colony on 16th. September and the first consignment of pipes arrived on 18th. September.

A Pipe Yard was constructed on the Praya East opposite Arsenal Street and fabrication of the pipe sections by oxygen & acetylene welding was commenced on 13th. October.

All was ready for pipe laying by 23rd. Ultimo, but owing to the non arrival of the necessary Ball and Socket Joints, Bolts & other materials it was not possible to proceed.

On 12th. December the necessary Specials arrived and on 17th. December pipe laying in the centre of the Harbour was commenced.

By the end of the year 4800 lineal feet of pipe had been fabricated into sections and 800 lineal feet had been laid on the Harbour Bed and tested.

Total Estimates,

Expenditure to 31.12.29,

$301,244.41

$177,032.20

Q 117

Works carried out and chargeable to Loan Funds.

(g) Hong Kong Service Reservoir.-Preliminary prickings were taken on the proposed site and the indications are that little rock will be encountered.

Total Estimates,

Expenditure to 31.12.29,

$400,000.00 211.50

(h) 2nd Section.-Surveys in the Shing Mun Valley were continued and trenches were cut on the sites of two proposed dam's exposing the rock foundations.

year.

Investigations had not been completed by the end of the

Total Estimates,

Expenditure to 31.12.29,

$30,000.00

$ 9,118.68

284. Dredging within Harbour Limits and Formation of Reclamation at Kowloon City.-This work was referred to in paragraph 230 of last year's Report.

285. Dredging. This work was completed in 1928. The ex- penditure during the year was in payment of retention money.

Total Estimates,

Expenditure up to 31.12.29,

1929 Estimate,

Dredging,

$1,260,000.00

$ 975,679.69

$ 13,000.00

$ 229.285.26

286. Aberdeen Valley Water Scheme.-Authority to proceed with this work was obtained in the Spring and on 30th. October a Contract amounting to $604,066.25 was let to The Hong Kong Excavation and Pile Driving Company for the construction of the Upper Dam and Contingent Works.

Work commenced at once and by the end of the year ex- cavation of the Access Road, Catchwater and Dam Foundations was in progress,

Total Estimates,

Expenditure to 31.12.29,

$2,702,000.00 $ 596,188.32

287. Byewash Reservoir, Kowloon.-The preparation of the drawings and Contract was put in hand early in the year and on June 11th a contract was let to Messrs. The Hong Kong Excavation Pile Driving and Construction Company amounting to $499,344.44 for the construction of this work.

The 10 feet wide access road 1,310 feet long from the Taipo Road to the site of the dam was completed in September. The excavation of the foundations of the dam proceeded slowly but by the end of the year better progress was being made.

P

Works carried out and chargeable to Loan Funds.

Q 118

A block yard site at the West end of the dam was levelled off and a concrete floor laid and block-making commenced in November. By the end of the year 2,000 blocks had been made. The erection of the contractor's plant for handling materials and chuting concrete was well in hand by the end of the year.

Total Estimates,

Expenditure to 31.12.29,

$600,000.00

$ 30,829.09

288. Hong Kong Air Port:-This work was referred to in paragraph 232 of last year's Report.

During the year progress was made on the following sub- heads:

(a) Resumplions.-The cutting face was abandoned owing to excess of rock and the land temporarily resumed for the rail track thereto was returned to the owners. The material for reclamation work is now being obtained trom the hills of Tai Shek Ku Valley and the hill upon which stands the Victoria Home.

A

(b) Forming reclamation including completion of sca_walls, nullahs, surjacing and drainage.-Under this head all work on Nos. 2 and a nullahs in connection with strengthening of walls, pouting and construction of centre piers was completed.

It was found necessary to divert a stream on the North Last side of the aerodrome and 900 lineal yards of 30 inch diameter concrete storm water drain were constructed for this purpose. Approximately 35,000. cubic yards of earth surfacing was deposited during the year.

(c) Covering of Nullahs.-The decking of Nos. 2 and 3 nullahs was completed by the end of the year.

(d) Seaplane Slipway and Reclamation of Camber Area to the East of No. 4 Nullah.-The Slipway was completed on 7th June. 6,044 cube yards of pell-mell rubble were deposited during the year, making a total of 21,344 cube yards of rubble to form the foundations of the slipway and nullah diversion. The under water portion of the slipway, about 130 feet in length, was paved with concrete block 2 feet in thickness set by divers. The surfacing of the slipway above low water was formed of cement concrete in situ, 15" in thickness. The sides of the slipway were pitched with granite set in cement. The granite pitching on the west side of the slipway was carried round to the end of the wall constructed to divert the nullah.

All work on No. 4 nullah in connection with reconstruction and strengthening of walls was completed by the end of the year. With the exception of about 300 lineal feet, the decking of No. 4 nullah was completed, approximately 92,000 cubic yards of earth surfacing was deposited on this area during the year.

Q 119

Wireless Telegraphy.

(e) Roads.-The surfacing of the road along the North East Boundary of the reclamation was taken up and relaid.

(a) Resumption :-

Total Estimates,

$1,186,250.00

Expenditure up to 31.12.29, ... $1,158,698.62

(b) Formation of Reclamation including completion of Sea

Walls &c.:

Total Estimates,

$738,000.00

Expenditure up to 31.12.29,

$635,331.63

(c) Covering of Nullahs:

Total Estimates,

$275,000.00

Expenditure up to 31.12.29,

$168,901.48

(d) Resumptions:-

Total Estimates,

$275,000.00

Expenditure up to 31.12.29,

$141,688.11

$ 55,000.00

$ 4,542.15

(e) Roads:

Total Estimates,

Expenditure, up to 31.12.29,

WIRELESS TELEGRAPHY.

A summary of the work done under this heading is given below.

289.-1. Cape D'Aguilar Wireless Telegraph Station VPS. -The gear was maintained in a satisfactory manner.

A new 200′ 0′′ mast was partially completed.

2. Government School for training Asiatic Operators.-The school was re-opened in 1929 with 20 pupils.

3. The Meteorological Wireless Telegraph Station at the Royal Observatory. This station was maintained in satisfactory

manner.

4. Victoria Peak Wireless Telegraph Station ZBW.-A number of W/T transmitters, motor-generators etc. were install- ed during the year.

5. Service Wireless Stations.-These stations at Police Stations, Lighthouses and Government Vessels were maintained in a satisfactory manner.

6. Broadcasting Service.-This was maintained in a satis- factory manner..

1

120

Annexe A.

ANNUALLY RECURRENT EXPENDITURE, 1929.

HEADS AND SUB-HEADS.

PROVISION-

BALANCE. EXCESS.

ESTIMATED. ACTUAL. INCREASE. DECREASE. ALLY

$

*A



C.

ESTABLISHMENT.

Personal Emoluments,

Other Charges,

1,288,8071.222.888,70

256,890

$

C.

20

c.

VOTED.

$

$ c.

65,918.30

65,918.30

220,173.20

36,716.80 3,000.00 39,716.80

3,000.00 105,635.10 *3,000.00 | *3,000.00

1,545,697 1.443,061.90

102,635.10

102,635.10

SPECIAL EXPENDITURE.

20. Harbour Surveying,

21. Morris Truck for New Territories,

7,000 5,853,60 4,000 4,000.00

1,146.40

1,146.40

4

22. 1 Motor Car,

3,000

2,407.54

23. 2 Safes....

500

411.10

592.46 88.90

ì

592.46 $8.90



24. Additional 5 K. W. Short Wave

Transmitter,

50,000

25. Additional receiving gear,

2,500

.75 2,091.51

49,999.25 408.49

49,999.25 408.49

...

+4

26. Provision of high speed transmitting

gear,..

27. Duplication of storage Battery,

2,640 2,669.79 5,160 5,365.93

29.79 205.93

30.00 210.00

.21

4.07

::

28. 1 5 K. W. Transmitter for ship

Traffic,...

14,400

14,355.11

44.89

44.89

29. 14K. W. Transmitter for close Range, 30. Dehumidifying Plant,..

Telephone Instruments and plant, Generators for Rescue Tug and

Police Launches,

Apparatus required in connection

with proposed Wireless Broadcast- ing,

Short Wave Transmitter,

Additional receiving gear for short

wave transmitter,

Water supply, Expenditure incurred on emergency works aud importing water

on account of the drought,1929 Purchase of six Typewriters for

W/T. Office,

Cost of Motor Car ordered in 1928,... Rent for areas on Praya East Re-

clamation, ....

5,000

5,729.37

729.37

750.00

20.63

...

10,000

6,863,70 14,476.92 14,476.92

3,136.30

3,136.30

20,000.00

5,523.08

1,580.63

1,580.63

2,000.00

419.37

1,278.51 545.78

1,278.51

545.78

1,365.00 1,760.00

86.49

1,214.22

...

:

282.00

282.00

357,992.86 357.992.86

1,500.00 1,500.00 3,095.18 3,095.18

:

375,000.00

17,007.14

1,500.00

3,096.00

.82

:

::

:

::

:

3,780.00

3,780.00

409,773.00

83,754.72

990.00

Total,...

† 990.00

82,764.72

104,200 430,218.28 381,434.97

55,416.69 408,783.00

* Less amount met out from-Saving under the Heads vide :-

Message No. 19 Item 132-$3.000.00

Less amounts met out from Savings under the Head vide:-

1930 Message No. 1 Item 137... $

་ད

"

"

158...

30.00 210 09

་.

139...

750.00

$ 990.00

HEADS AND SUB-HEADS.

121

ANNEXE A,—Continued.

*

ESTIMATED. ACTUAL. INCREASE. DECREASE.

PROVISION-

ALLY BALANCE. Excess. VOTED.

€A

$

$3

C.

$



c.

..



ن

$

*A

10,302.71 4,634.50 1,808.67

...

C.

10,302.71 4,634.50 1,808.67

...

4,274.26

4,274.26

922.38

922.38

18,567.94

...

18,567.94

2,486.46

2,486.46

1,092.75

1,092.75

:

:.

:

:

PUBLIC WORKS DEPT.

HONG KONG.

1.- Buildings.

1. Maintenance of Buildings,..

2. Improvements to Buildings,

3. Maintenance of Lighthouses,

2.--Communications.

1. Maintenance of Roads and Bridges in

City,

2. Improvements to Roads and Bridges

in City,

3. Maintenance of Roads and Bridges

outside City,

4. Improvements to Roads and Bridges

outside City,

}

180,000 169,697,29 26,000 21,365.50 $,000 6,191,33

105,000 100,725.74

20,000 19,077.62

130,000 111,432.06

6,000 3,513.54

:

5. Maintenance of Telephones, including

all Cables,

10.000 8,907.25

3.- Drainage.

1. Maintenance of Sewers, Nullahs, &c.,...

22,000 | 21,565.86

...

434.14

434.14

4.- Lighting.

1. Gas Lighting, City and Suburbs and

Hill District,

2. Electric Lighting, City, Hill District

and Shankiwan,

3. Extensions of Lighting,......

5.-Typhoon and Rainstorm Damages.

1. Typhoon and Rainstorm Damages,

6.- Waterworks.

1. Maintenance of City and Hill District, .

Shaukiwan,

Aberdeen,

2.

3.

"

""

4.

,, Repulse Bay,

5. Water Account, (Meters),

98,000 95,536.86

45,000 | 51,661.16 3,000 2.280.00

2,463.14

...

2,463.14

6,661.16

7,000.00

335.84

720.00

720.00

100,000 58,655.92

270,000 231,385.26

1,200

1,199.08

1,200

1,188.59

1,000

24,000

764.00 23,952.05

:..

41,344.08

41,344.08

38,614.74

. .92 11.41 236 00 47.95

...

38,614.74

.92

11.41

236.00

47.95

:::

:

...

7.- Miscellaneous.

1. Maintenance of Praya Walls and Piers, 2. Maintenance of Public Cemetery,

30,000

26.705.73

2,500

2,231.49

3. Maintenance of Chinese Cemeteries,.. 4. Maintenance of Public Recreation

3,500

3,498.54

Grounds,

4,000

2,899.47

5. Dredging Foreshores,

28,000

23,726,13

...

6. Stores Depreciation,

100

93.94

7. Boundary Stones,

8. Survey of Colony,

.5,000 2,603.76

9. Bathing places,

Carried forward, .....$

5,000 4,921.20 15,000

17,127.64

2,127.64

3,294.27 268.51 1.46

1,100.53

3,294.27 268.51 1.46

1,100.53 4,273,87 6.06 2,396.24 78.80 4,150.00 2,022.36

1,143,500 1,012,907.01 8,788.80 139,381.79 11,150.00 141,742.99

4,273.87

6.06 2,396.2+

78.80

...

Q 122

ANNEXE A,—Continued.

VOTED.

HEADS AND SUB-HEADS.

ESTIMATED. ACTUAL. INCREASE. | DECREASE.

PROVISION-

ALLY

BALANCE. EXCESS.

C.

C.



C.

11,150.00 141,742.99

$ C.

C.

$

:

Brought forward,

1,143,500

1.012,907,01

8,788.80 139,381.79

KOWLOON.

8.- Buildings.

1. Maintenance of Buildings,

2. Improvements to Buildings,

9.- Communications.

35,000 31,844.84 10,000 4,935.97

3,155.16 5,064.03

...

3,155.16 3,064.03



C.

...

9,036.01 271.91 48.01

...

:::

2,493.58

...

2,493.58

...

1. Maintenance of Roads and Bridges, 2. Improvements to Roads and Bridges,.. 3. Maintenance of Telephones,

80,000 | 70,963.99

2,500

2,500

2,228.09 2,451.99

:::

9.036.01

271.91 48.01

10.- Drainage.

1. Maintenance of Sewers, Nullahs, &c.,.

10,000

7,506.42

11.- Lighting.

1. Gas Lighting,

2. Electric Lighting.

32,000

29,838.48

22,000

20,449.89

...

1,500

990.05

2,161,52 1,550.11 509.95

3. Extensions of Lighting,

12.- Typhoon and Rainstorm Damages.

1. Typhoon and Rainstorm Damages,

13.-Waterworks.

I. Maintenance of Waterworks,... 2. Water Account, (Meters, &c.),

10,000 | 21,245.74 11,245.74

40,000 43,892.48 3,892.48 20,000 29,833.94 9,833.94

2,161.52 1,550,11 509.95

22,000.00

10,754.26

5,000.00 10,000.00

1,107.52

166 06

...

::

-ai

14.-Miscellaneous.

1. Maintenance of Praya Walls and Piers, Chinese Cemeteries, ... Recreation Grounds,.......

2.

3.

NEW KOWLOON.

15.—Buildings,

1. Maintenance of Buildings, 2. Improvements to Buildings,

16.-Communications.

1. Maintenance of Roads and Bridges, 2. Improvements to Roads and Bridges,... 3. Maintenance of Telephones,

17.-Drainage,

1. Maintenance of Sewers, Nullahs, &c.,...

18.-Lighting.

27,000 10,434.52 2,500 2,489.92 2,500 2,294.59

16,565.48

10.08 205.41

...

16,565.48 10.08 205.41

**8,000 2,000

'4,874.08

788.11

3,125.92 1,211.89

3,125,92 1,211.89

25,000 22,504.14 2,000 1,963.95

500

386.94

3,000 2,350.50

:::

2,495.86 36.05 113.06

2,495.86

36.05

113.06

649.50

649,50

...

1. Gas and Electric Lighting, 2. Extensions of Lighting,...

....

15,000 15,024.48

250

24.48

600.00

575.52

250.00

250.00

Carried forward,.........

1,496,750 1,342,200,12 33,785.44 188,335.32 48,750.00 203,299.88

:

HEADS AND SUB-HEADS.

123

ANNEXE A—Continued.

PROVISION-

ESTIMATED.] ACTUAL. INCREASE. DECREASE. ALLY BALANCE. EXCESS.

VOTED.

$

Brought forward,........

1,496.750

New Kowloon,-Continned.

19.— Typhoon and Rainstorm Damages,

1. Typhoon and Rainstorm Damages,

20.-Waterworks.

1. Maintenance of Lai Chi Kok Water-

works,

2. Water Account, (Meters, &c.)

21.- Miscellaneous.

€A

C.

C.



C.

$

$ C.

C.

$

C.

1,342,200.12 33,785.44 188,335.32 | 48,750.00 203,299.88

30,000

8,433.86

:

21,566.14

21,566.14

4,000

3.849.99

1,200 1,069.66

150.01 130.34

150.01 130.34

1. Maintenance of Praya Walls and Pier, 2. Maintenance of Chinese Cemeteries,

10,000

1,000

5,041.08 996.24

4,958.92 3.76

4,958.92 3.76

NEW TERRITORIES.

22.-Buildings.

1. Maintenance of Buildings,

2. Improvements to Buildings,

23.- Communications.

20,000 5,000

17,918.06

2,871.37

2,086.94 2,128.63

2,086.91 2,128.63

...

1. Maintenance of Roads and Bridges, 2. Improvements to Roads and Bridges, 3. Maintenance of Telephones,

70,000

66,426.82

3,573.18

3,573.18

2,000

1,898.14

101.86

101,86

4,000

3,547.55

152.45

152.45

24.-Drainage.

228.94

228.94

...

32,623.41

32,623.41

***

1. Maintenance of Sewers, Nullahs, &c.,...)

25.- Typhoon and Rainstorm Damages.

500

271.06

1. Typhoon and Rainstorm Damages, ...

26.- Waterworks.

40,000 7.376.59

:

1. Maintenance of Fanling Waterworks,

700

587.25

2.

Taipo Waterworks, ...

700

609.01

112.75 90.99

3. Water Account, (Meters, &c.),

600

4.804

551.96

27.-Miscellaneous.

1. Maintenance of Chinese Cemeteries, 2. Maintenance of Praya Wall and Piers.

Recovery of 1928 Expenditure...

100 2,500

2,444.64 Cr.1,326.13

100.00 55.36 1,326.13

112.75 90.99 551.96

100.00

55.36

...

1,326.13

Total, Public Works, Recurrent,. $ 1,689,050

1,464,558.35

48,750.00 273,241,65 t12,600.00 †12,600.00

38,785.44 258,277.09 | 36,150.00 260,641.65

+ Less amounts met out from Savings under the Heads vide :—

Message No. 7 Item 39......... $ 600.00

19

да

>>

19

ور

124

128......

7,000.00 5.000.00

$ 12,600.00



...

124

Annexe B.

EXTRAORDINARY EXPENDITURE, 1929.

C.

SA

C.

*

HEADS AND SUB-HEADS.

ESTIMATED. ACTUAL.

PROVISION- INCREASE. DECREASE. ALLY

BALANCE. EXCESS.

VOTED.

HEAD 31, PUBLIC WORKS EXTRAOR- DINARY, 1929.

HONG KONG.

Sub-heads:

Buildings.



C.

C.

*A

C.

*A

C.



...

...

***

:

1. Wong Nei Chong Village Develop- meut, Removing existing school & latrine & re-erecting on new site,... 2. Victoria Gaol, Reception Block, 3. Government Offices, Additional Storey, 4. Peak Wireless Station, Block.“ B" 5. Peak Wireless Station, Block “C” 6. Latrine on Praya East (Temporary),.. 7. Government House Alterations and

Improvements,

8. New No. 2 Police Station,....

""

9. New Fire Station Building, Alter-

ations, to Tower,

2,000

5,000

35,000

1,285.87 2,000.00 20,372.69

......

714.13 3,000.00

14,627,31

33,000

33,000.00

18,000

18,000,00

4,000

4,000.00

48.500 150,000

152,430.17

103,930.17

1104,000.00

150,000.00

1,500

1,435.55

64.45

714.13 3,000.00 14,627.31 33,000.00 18,000.00 4,000.00

69.83 150,000.00

64.45

10. Junction of Ladder Street and Holly- wood Road Underground latrine (60 seats).

?

13,000

13,000.00

13,000.00

11. Jardine's Corner, Peak, Latrine and

Urinal (4 seats),.....

5,000

5,000.00



5,000.00

12. Spring Garden Lane and Cross Street

Latrine and Urinal (16 seats),

6,000

12,184.06

6,184 06

8,000.00

1,815.94

13. Trough Closet and Crinal at Con-

naught Road West :-

(a) Wilmer Street (2 seats)

14. Sai Wan Ho. increase of Pig Lairage,. 15. Sai Ying Pun, New Market,.. 16. Swine Slaughter House, Kennedy

Town, Roofing in Open Space, ..... 17. Victoria Gaol New Printing Shop,

including New Motors, wiring and switch gear,

(b) Water Street (2 seats)

2,000

1,184.32

3,000

2.414.30

200,000

815,68

585.70 200,000.00

815.68

2,900

1,712.17

1,187.83

:

41,000

41,000.00

585.70 200,000.00

1,187.83

41,000.00

General Works.

18. Roa ls,

60,000

50,386.63

9,613.37

9,613.37

Drainage :-

19. Training Nullahs,

25,000 14,997.04



10,002.96

: 10,002.96

20. Sewage and Stormwater Drains,

30,000

50,652.71

20,652.71

24,000.00

3,347.29

21. Miscellaneous,

30,000

24,606.11

5,393.89

5.395.89

22. Waterworks,

15,000

13,904.76

1,095.24 1,534.00

2,629.24

23. Port Works,.....

5,000

4,436.06

563.94

563.94

Communications.

24. Wong Nei Chong Development,-Site

formation and Road construction.............

2,000

877.83

1,122.17

1,122.17

25. Approach Road to New Tung Wah

Hospital Site at Soo Kun Poo,......

1,000

1,000.00

1,000.00

26. Road from Causeway Bay to Quarry Bay, (Section 70′ wide) opposite M.L's. 430 and 431,

30,000

6,630.00

23,370.00

23.370.00

27. Tai Hang Development Road con- struction including Strengthening conduit,

75,000

52,780.40

22,219.60

22,219.60

28. Barker Road Improvements from

Stubbs Road to Victoria Hospital,.

30,000

9,720.96

20,279.04

20,279.04

Carried forward

..$

872,900 424,011.63

130,766.94 579,655.31 137,534.00 586,422.37

M

Q 125

ANNEXE B,-Continued.

$ C.

HEADS AND SUB-HEADS.

ESTIMATED.

ACTUAL. INCREASE.

PROVISION- DECREASE. ! ALLY

BALANCE.

EXCESS.

VOTED.

C.



C.

130,766.94 579,655.31 137,534.00 (586,422.37

C.

$ C.

Brought forward

872,900

424,011.63

Hong Kong,-Continued.

Sub-heads :-

Communications.

i

15,000

9,933.04

...

5.066.96

.....

6,000 57,000

2.16

5,997.84 57,000.00



29. 10' 0" Path to Cape D'Aguilar

Wireless Station (1st Section),...... 30. Improvements to Garden Road at junction with Queen's Road (East Corner),

31. Road to Mountain Lodge, Peak,

Drainage.

32. Reconstruction of Wong Nei Chong Nullah, Section No. 4, in front of Jockey Club Stand,

Miscellaneous.

33. Wong Nei Chong Village Develop-

ment (Houses),

70,000

31,927.87

:

5,066.96

5.997.84 57,000.00

38,072,13



38,072.13

:

:

3,000

34. Revolver Range for Police,

2,000

2,566.00 1,743.41

.

434.00 256.59

434.00 256.59

35. I.L. 2058, Surrendered in connection with the construction of new road from Tai Hang to Bowen Road, Reconstructing servants quarters....

3,500

331,68

3,168.32

36. Chinese Cemeteries, Laying out new

3,168.52

areas,

6,000

5,999.35

.65

37. Reinstatement of Government Re-

taining Walls....................

.65

20,000

5,932.82

14.067.18:

38. Renewing electrical wiring at Govern-

ment Buildings,

14,067.18

10,000

9,147.04

852.96

¡ 2,200.00

3,052.96

Miscellaneous.

39. Laying telephone cable

between

Wong Nei Chong Police Station

:

:

and the Cable Hut in Wong Nei Cheong Road,

11,000

10,582.51

417,49

40. Queen's College, Trough Closets,

3,800

3,182.87

617,13

41. Laying telephone cable

between

Victoria Gap and a point just hevond Victoria Hospital,...

4,250

3,222.60

1,027.40

42. Two 200 ft. Steel Masts at Peak

W/T. Station,...

22.000

22,000.00

43. New Garage F.W.D. Store-Wood

Road,

16,000

15,815.54

184.46

44. Transfer of P.W.D. workshops to Wood Road (on account)..........

70,000

30,381.70

39,618.30

45. Provision of Traffic Protection by

means of white Imes and/or studs, . 46. Government Pavilions, Peak (Water

6,000

5,044.00

956.00

carriage system),

1,400

1,367.31

32.69

47. Mountain Lodge. Improvements, 48. Waglan Lighthouse, New Electrical

Installation,

5,500

5,500 00

6,350

5,587.65

1,262,35

49. Central Police Station, Chief Detec- tive Inspector's Office-Alterations to Building and constructing offices.

10,000

7,530.32

50. Traffic Lights and Danger Signs,

2,000

34.29

Carried forward

:

:

417.49 617.13

...

1,027.40

22,000.00

184.46

39,618.30

956.00

:

32.69



5,500.00

1,262.35

...

2,469.68 1,965.71

...

2,469.68 1,965.71

...

1,224,200

574,343.79 130,766.94 780,623.15 139,734.00 789,590.21

:

{

Q 126

ANNEXE B,-Continued.

PROVISION-

HEADS AND SUB-HEADS.

ESTIMATED.

ACTUAL. INCREASE. DECREASE. ALLY

BALANCE. EXCESS.

VOTED.

$

c.

Brought forward........

1,224,200

574,3 13.79

Hong Kong,-Continued.

Sub-heads *-

51. Central Fire Station, Pedestal Fire

Hydrants,

$

C.

$

Ĉ.

$

C.

$ C.

C.

130,766.94 780,623.15 139,734.00 789,590.21

:

10,000

9,924,54

75.46

:

75.46

52. Government Quarters, Gas Cookers

and Geysers,

10,000

212.00

9,788.00

...

9,788.00

53. Victoria Gaol, New Floor to "F"

Hall,

2,800

2,631.47

168.53

168.53

54. Additional storey to quarters, cook-

house, Victoria Goal,.

2,500

1,418,58

1,081.42

1,500.00

2,581.42

55. Furniture,

20,000

22,144,50

2,144.50

4,500 00

2,355.50

56. Upkeep of Government undeveloped

sites,

5,000

*

5,000.00

5,000.00

Water Works.

57. Installation of Turbines and Pump at Bower Road Filter Beds,

20,000

58. New Principal Mains in City,

20,000

8,855.23 19,971,70

11,144.77 28.30

11,144.77

28,30

"ater Works.

59. New Supply main from Peak Tank to

Victoria Gap,...

8,000

4T4

8,000.00

:

8,000.00

60. Water Supply to New Tung Wah Hospital Site (Eastern):-6" C.I.

Pipe.

5,500

4,387.89

61. North Point, Balance Tanks,..

50,000

1,112,11 50,000.00

...

1,112.11 50.000.00

Port Works.

Praya Fast Reclamation :-

62. Contribution by Government towards

fund for Reclamation,....

129,000

83,259,80

45,740.20

:

45,740,20

63. Morrison Hill Development, Roads, Retaining walls and drains,

15,000

6,465,06

8,534.94

61. Construction of Nullah through Bow- rington Canal from South Praya to Leighton Hill Road,

25,000

24,116.31

65. Dust Pier at (a) Centre Street (b)

Widening shoots,

7,000

883.69 7,000.00

2,500

1,611.56

888.41

8,534.94

883.69 7,000 00 888.44

Public Health and Buildings Ordinance,

66. Various-Resumption for road widening. Schemes approved by Government as rebuilding occurs,

75,000

21,841.75

53,158,25

53,158.25

KOWLOON.

Buildings.

::

004

67. Yaumati Slipway, Lock up Store,...... 68. Raising of Time Ball Tower,

2,500 705

2,278.87 705.00

221.13

221.13

69. Hung Hom, New Government Store,... 70. Public latrine at:-

50,000

50,000.00

50,000.00

Dock Lane, Latrine and Bathhouse.

27,000

14,509.48

12,490.52

12,490.52

71. Tsim Sha Tsui Fire Station, Exten-

sion to Quarters,

9,500

9,500.00

:

9,500.00

...

72. Kowloon Hospital, Maternity Block,

Site Formation and Building,

60,000

1,436.30

73. Children's Playground, ....

30,000

1,250.74

58,563.70 28,749.26

58,563.70 28,749.26

74. Temporary Native Latrine (addition-

al) at Police Training School,

1,500

1,792.38

292.38

500.00

207.62

...

75. Public Latrine and Bathhouse, Argyle

Street, Mongkok,

12,000

12,000.00

12,000.00

Carried forward,$ 1,824,705 803,156.95

133.203.82 1,154.751.87 146,234.00

1.167,782.05

...

!

HEADS AND SUB-HEADS.

Brought forward

Kowloon,-Continued.

*

127

ANNEXE B,-Continued.

PROVISION-

ESTIMATED. ACTUAL. INCREASE. DECREASE. ALLY BALANCE. EXCESS.

C.

1,824,705

803,156.95

VOTED.

C.

C.

C.

133,203.82 1,154,751.87 146,234.00

¤A



C.

1,167.782.05

$

C.

Sub-Heads.-

General Works.

76. Roads,

80,000

155,277.75

75,277.75

|114,200.00 | 38,922,25

:

Drainage :-

77. Training Nullahs,

1,000

78. Miscellaneous Drainage Works,.

75,000

920 51 145,958.55

79.49

...

70,958.55

79.49 87,640.00 16,681.45

79. Miscellaneous,



10,000

6,078.37

80. Water Works,

8,000

4,737.59

81. Port Works,..

2.000

178.08

3,921.63 3,262.41 1,821,92

3,921.63



3,262.41

...

1,821.92

...

Communications.

82. Waterloo Road Extension to Bound-

ary, 100 feet wide,.....

10,000

D



10,000.00

83. Tokwawan Road & site formation, 84. Argyle Street Extension to Waterloo

Road (60 feet),

12,000

1,843.28

10,156.72

22,000

5,062.80

16,937.20

:

...

10,000.00 10,156.72

...

16,937.20

...

Improving existing main road: for motor

traffic:

85. Portion of Salisbury and Nathan Roads,

50,000

86. Chatham Road, Excension

50,000

64,741.05 608.90

14,741.05

20,000.00

49,391.10

5,258.95 49,391.10

::

87. Boun lary Street, Forming road by covering nullah west of No. 8, Rulway Bridge,........

15,000

8,081.33

6,918.67

...

6,918.67

...

Drainage.

88. Training Nullah :-

Tong Mi, Extension of Storm

Water Drain from old Taipo Road

to Kowloon Tong Village area (on account),...

15,000

7.891.29

7,108.71

7,108.71

...

Miscellaneous.

89. Chinese Cemeteries, Laying out new

areas,

10.000

9,996.27

3.73

90. Kowloon, Renewing electrical wiring

to Government Buildings,...................

4,200

4,174.04

25.96

91. Upkeep of Government undeveloped

+

sites,

5,000

5,000.00

:

:

3.73

:

25.96

...

5,000.00

92. Filling in and draining land west of Yaumati Railway Station and North of Argyle Street,

2,000

.

: ...

2,000.00

2,000.00

93. Laying telephone cable between Kow- loon Railway Station and the test hut beyond Chatham Road Rail- way Bridge,

8,000

7,970.14

29.86

...

29.86

...

Water Works.

Sub-heads:

!

94. Distributing Water mains

Port Works.

95. Kowloon Police Pier,

15,000

12,933.04

2,066.96

...

:

1,000 1,000.00

150,000 35,986.77

...

114,013.23

... s

100,000 41,019.15

58,980.85

96. Mong Kok Tsui and shamshuipo, Western Ferry Piers (on account),

Public Ilealth and Buildings Ordinance. 97. Compensation and Resumptions,

2,066.96

114,013.23

58,980.85

Carried forward,.........$ 2,469,905 1,317,615.86 294,181.17 1,446,470.31 368,074.00 1,320,363.14

:

1

-

Q 128

ANNEXE B.-Continued.

HEADS AND SUB-HEADS,

ESTIMATED

ACTUAL

PROVISION-

INCREASE. DECREASE. ALLY BALANCE. EXCESS.

c.

VOTED.

C. $ C.

C.

1,520,363.14

294,181,171,446,470.31 |368,074.00

$ C.

$

Brought forward,

2,469,905 | 1,317,615.86

New Kowloon.

Sub-heads —

Buildings.

98. Shamshuipo Market Extension, (20

Stalls,)............

99. Sai Yu Shek Cemetery, Quarters for

2 Sextons,

100. Boundary Street, Shamshuipo, Latrine]

and Bath-house,

3,000 14,662.82

11,662.82

16,000.00 1,337.18

:

500

500.00

:.

500.00

5,000

101. Kowloon City Market Extension, 102. Kowloon Tong Market (Temporary)

(4 stalls),.....

15,000

3,965.15 10,901,27

1,034.85

1,034.85

4,098.73

4,098.73

1,500

1,500.00

1,500.00

103. Latrine at Kowloon City, North of

New Police Station,

20,000

16,316.04

3.683.96

3,683.96

104. Married Quarters, Lai Chi Kok

Prison,....

67,000

67,000.00

67,000.00

General Works.

105. Roads,............

50,000

36,701.01

13,298.99

13,298.99

Drainage :-

106. Training Nullahs,

10,000

3,901.35

6,098.65

6,098.65

107. Miscellaneous Drainage Works,

30,000

55,196.23

25,196.23

29,000.00

3,803.77

108. Miscellaneous,

10,000

5,093.00

4,907.00

4,907.00

...

109. Water Works,

4,000

110. Port Works,

1,000'

773.04 43.60

3,226.96

3,226.96

...

...

956.40

956.40

...

Communications.

111. Waterloo Road Extension to foothills (100 ft) (surfacing chiefly),

at Kowloon Tsai, Extension of roads, (No surfacing),

8,000

.....

......

8,000.00

112. Kowloon Tong Development Area

20,000

901,25

19,098.75

8,000.00

19,098.75

:

113. Widening of Nathan Road Extension

Northward to Nancheong Street, (Junction of New Taipo and Castle Peak Roads),

20,000

18,669.70

1,330.30

114. Access Road (15 ft. wide) to Christian Chinese Cemetery, Kowloon City,

:

9,700

6.80

9,693.20

1,330.30

9,693.20

115. Improving existing Main Roads for

Motor Traffic from Prince Edward Road and Argyle Street Exten- sion, (Eastwards),

20,000

......

20,000.00

20,000.00

Drainage.

116. Kowloon Tong Development area, Connection of stream North of Hill

area to Main Nullah,

21,000

16,424.74

4,575.26

4,575.26

117. Kowloon Tong Development:-Con-

nection Streams East side of Estate to main nullah (Central 600 F. L.),

16,000

16,000.00

16,000.00

Miscellaneous.

118. Kowloon Tong, Surfacing Roads and

scavenging Lanes,

30,000

25,581.22

4,418.78

119. Cheung Sha Wan Refuse Dump,.......

5,000

6,241.64

1,241.64

1.800.00

4,418.78 558.36

...

120. Chinese Cemeteries, laying out new

areas,

6,000

5,995.48

4.52

4.52

121. Kowloon Tong Development Scheme,

Excavation and filling,

4,000

1,995.09

2,004.91

2,004.91

122. Tong Mi and Kowloon Tong, Filling

in areas,

35,000

6,685.25

28,314,75

28,314.75

:

123, Pier at Laichikok for use of Prison

Department Launches,

4,000

......

124. Kau Lung Tsai Resumptions &c.,

Carried forward,

46,000 22,674.60

...$2,931,6051,570,345.14 332,281.86

1,693.541 72

4,000.00 23,325.40

4,000.00 23,325.40



...

414,874.00

4.00

1,776,133.86

...

HEADS AND SUB-HEADS.

Q 129

ANNEXE B,-Continued.

PROVISION-

ESTIMATED. ACTUAL. INCREASE. DECREASE. ALLY BALANCE. EXCESS.

VOTED.

Brought forward..

$ 2,931,605

New Kowloon,—Continued.

Miscel a eous.

125. Kowloon City, Filling in of large

areas,

$

C.

1,670,345.14

C.

$

C. $ C. 332,281.86 1,693,541.72 414,874.00

$

C.

C.

1 776,133.86

30,000

126. Repairs to Kowloon City wall, 127. Cheung Sha Wan, Forming site for

Exchanges,

2,000

1,980.19

30,000.00 19.81

30,000,00 19.81

4,500

4,500.00

4,500.00

128. Filling in areas North West of Nan Cheong Street and West of Taipo Road,

30,000

74.00

****

29,926 00

...

29,926.00

Waterworks.

129. Kowloon Tong Estate Mains,

5,000

3,663.32

......

130. Distributing Water Mains,

10,000

9,629.48

1,336.68 370.52

131. Filtered water supply to Dairy Farm

Lots at Diamond Hill,

20,000

9,394.27

10,605.73

Port Works.

132. Further Reclamation at Shamshuipo,. 133. Cheung Sha Wan, Construction of mound to retain materials dumped,. 134. Lai Chi Kok, Water Boat Dock, sur-

facing to East wall,

60,000

53,817.21

6,182.79

50,000

27,895.98

22,104.02

2,400

1,549.57

850.43

1,336.68 370.52

10,605.73

6,182.79

22,104.02

850.43

...

Public Health and Buildings Ordinance.

135. Compensation and Resumptions,..

100,000

34,951.77 |

65,048.23

New Territories.

Buildings.

136. Cheung Chau, Anglo Chinese School,

:

:

65,048.23

...

10,000

5,794.47

4,205.53

4,205.53

:

General Works.

137. Roads

2,500

2,309.83

190.17

190.17

Drainage.

138. Training Nullahs, .

1,500

1,355.62

139. Miscellaneous Drainage Works,



5,000

3,249.41

140. Miscellaneous,

7,500

6,378.90

144 38 1,750.59 1,121.10

144.38

...

1,750.59

2,200.00

3,321.10

141. Waterworks,

1,000

783.02

216.98

216.98

Communications.

142. Patrol Path from Lin Ma Hang to

Sha Tau Kok..........

50,000

143. Reconditioning Roads,

30,000

9,943.60 27,660.97

40,056.40

2,339.03

144. Widening Patrol Path, Sheung Shui

to Ta Ku Ling to 10 ft, (Bridge $2,500),

8,500

5,082.35

3,417.65

145. Access and Patrol Path to Lo Wu

Railway Station Block House,

4,500

2,477.53



2,022.47

146. Widening existing road between

Fanling and Sha Tau Kok upon removal of Railway,

10,000

7,078.84

6

2,921.16

147. Tai Po Road Improvement, Bridge

at 133 miles,

30,000

4

30,000.00

Miscellaneous.

148. Levelling strip of land now occupied

by the Railway, Sha Tau Kok,...... 149. Forming and surfacing street in front of D. D. C. Lot 827 C. and D. and 828 C,

5,000

1,195.18

3,804.82

::

:

:

:

40,056.40 2,339,03

3,417.65

2,022.47

:

2,921.16

30,000.00

3,804.82

2,000

1,432.88

150. Magentic Huts, Au Tau, fencing, ... Public Health and Buildings Ordinance. 151. Compensation and Resumptions, ......

1,600

988.95

5,000

2,223.10

Carried forward....$ 3,419,605 1,791,255.58

567.12 611.05

2,776.90

332,281.861.960.631.28 417,074.00

567.12 611.05

2,776.90

2,045,423 42

...

Q 130

ANNEXE B, -Continued.

HEADS AND SUB-HEADS.

ESTIMATED. ACTUAL.

PROVISION-

INCREASE. DECREASE. ALLY BALANCE. EXCESS.

VOTED.

$ C.

C. $ C.

$

ย.

C.

3,419,6051,791,255.58

332,281.86

1,960,631.28 417,074.00 2,045,423.42

Brought forward,

SUPPLEMENTARY VOTES.

Sub-heads :---

Hong Kong.

Buildings.

New Porch to C. S. O. Building,...

Wireless Broadcasting Studio: to meet the

cost of Furniture, Piano, Carpet, etc., New Building and mast at Cape D'Aguilar

for W/T traffic,

New Latrine in Water Street,

Communications.

Forming two Forestry Tracks into Bridle

Paths,

Proposed Road connecting Garden Road

& Bowen Road with May Road,

Miscellaneous.

Wireless Telegraphy, Expenditure on Buildings and plant to effect neces- sary improvements,

Continuation of Reclamation at Shaukiwan, Victoria Gaol, Fire Fighting Appliances,... Rent Allowance to old inhabitants of

Wong Nei Cheung Village, .. Purchase of M.L. 187A and payment in

reference to Kowloon site,......................

Waterworks.

Expenditure on Storage Tanks, &c. due

...

:

...

to drought,

Pipe Line from Tytam and Stanley Village,

Kowloon.

Buildings.

.998.14

4,948.41

1,582.30

$

1.86 1,000.00

1.86

51.59 5,000.00

51.59

.

13,417.70 15,000.00 13,417.70 10,000.00 | 10,000.00 | 10,000.00

24,756.93

243.07 25,000.00

243.07

9,006.72

47,993.28 57,000.00 | 47,993.28

...

43,339.94

9,170.06 52,510.00 9,170.06

4,207.52 450.00

15,792.48

20,000.00

15,792.48

3,330.00

3,780.00

3,330.00

1.212.00

1,212.00

180,000.00

180,000.00 |

:

:

...

!

15,915.79

9,084.21 15,500.00

25,000.00 9,084.21 15,500.00 15,500.00

...

Conversion of Park Side for School pur-

pose and furnishing,

8,057.86

942,14 9,000.00

942.14

Port Works.

Filling in Tidal flats, cutting down Hill between Tai Kok Tsui and Fuk

Tsun Heung,

10,000.00

10,000.00

New Kowloon.

Communications.

Widening Castle Peak Road to 60 feet

width and filling in

Cheung Sha Wan,

Miscellaneous.

areas at

Laichikok Gaol Fire Fighting Appliances,

New Territories.

Buildings.

Block House on Frontier at Lin Ma Hang

and telephone Connection,....

Communications.

Circular Road, Ngan Tau Kok to Shatin

via Sai Kung, Preliminary Works,.....

Miscellaneous.

Resumption of Privately owned lots at

Kwanti,

Recovery of 1928 Expenditure,

:

:

27,901.14

2,098.86 30,000.00 2,098.86

1,628.20

2,971.80 4,600.00 2,971.80

:

:

2,839.34

160.66 3,000.00

160.66

+++

5,000.00 5,000.00

5,000.00

625.09

Cr. 2,750.00

9,617.91 2,750.00

10,273 00

9.647.91

2,750.00

899.949.00

2.193,579.04

* 400,640.00 * 400.640.00

*

499,309.00 1,792,939.04

...

Total, Public Works, Extraordinary, ...$ 3,419,505.00 2,125,974.96

332,281.862,108,786.90

* Less amounts met out of savings,...

$ 400,640.00.

}

Annexe C.

CITY AND HILL DISTRICT WATERWORKS, 1929. Monthly Consumption and Contents of Reservoirs (Millions of Gallons).

BALANCE

DUE TO CHONG 10"| STREAMS,

WONG NEI CHONG.

TOTAL CON-

In Tai Tam Tuk Reservoir 1st of month.

Delivered

Over

ganges.

In Reser-

voir 1st of

month.

Delivered

over

TENTS OF WONG NEI IMPOUNDING RESERVOIR

1ST OF

INTAKE.

gauge.

MONTH.

*

TOTAL CON-

OBSER-

SUMPTION

UN-

FILTERED

GRAND

LEAKAGE,

(Filtered).

ETC.

TOTAL.

VATORY

RAINFALL.

REMARKS.

SUPPLIES.

522.00

192.24

7.03

:

998.53

3.15

10.83

187.48

1.69

189.17

.930

334.84

176.51

4.79

:

803.89

2.36

2.08

179.40

1.94

181.34

•58