Administrative Reports - 1927


ADMINISTRATIVE REPORTS FOR THE YEAR 1927
Table of Contents
0 History and Geography
1 General
2 Finance
3 Production
4 Trade and Economics
5 Communications
6 Justice, Police and Prisons
7 Public Works
8 Public Health
9 Education
10 Lands and Surveys
11 Labour
12 Legislation
13 Miscellaneous
A Financial Returns
A(1) Finances
B Assessment
C Secretariat for Chinese affairs
D Harbour office
E Imports and Exports office
F Royal Observatory
G Supreme Court
H Police Magistrates' Courts
I Land office
J New Territories
K Police and Fire Brigade
L Prisons
M Sanitary
M(1) Medical
N Botanical and forestry
O Education
P Volunteer Corps (Not Published)
Q Public Works
R Post office
S Railway

 





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HISTORY AND GEOGRAPHY
1. GENERAL
II. FINANCE
III.
PRODUCTION
IV.
TRADE AND ECONOMICS
V.
COMMUNICATIONS
VI. JUSTICE, POLICE AND PRISONS
VII. PUBLIC WORKS
VIII. PUBLIC HEALTH
IX.
X.
EDUCATION
LANDS AND SURVEY
XI. LABOUR
XII.
LEGISLATION
XIII. MISCELLANEOUS
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History and Geography.
The Colony of Hong Kong is situated off the south-eastern coast China between latitude 22° 9′ and 22° 17′ N. and longitude 114° and 114° 18′ E. The island is about 11 miles long and 2 to 5 miles in breadth, its circumference being about 27 miles and its area 281 square miles. It consists of an irregular ridge of lofty hills rising to a height of nearly 2,000 feet above sea level, stretching nearly east and west, with few valleys of any extent and little ground available for cultivation.
The island, then desolate and sparsely inhabited by fishermen, was ceded to Great Britain in January, 1841, the cession being confirmed by the Treaty of Nankin in August, 1842, and the charter bears the date of 5th April, 1843 All that part of Kowloon penin- sula lying South of Kowloon Fort to the northernmost point of Stonecutter's Island together with that island was ceded to Great Britain under the Convention signed at Peking in October, 1860, and under the Convention signed at Peking in June, 1898, the area known as the New Territories including Mirs Bay and Deep Bay was leased to Great Britain by the Government of China for 99 years. The area of the New Territories and Islands is about 345 square miles.
Trade gradually developed as China became accustomed to foreign intercourse and it increased greatly owing to the opening of the Suez Canal. It now stands at about 200 million pounds sterling per annum.
2
Large local banking, dock, steamboat, and insurance companies were established between 1865 and 1872, and their numbers are being continually added to.
The Colony is the centre of an incessant flow of Chinese emigra tion and immigration (see XIII Miscellaneous).
The estimated population is as follows:
Non-Chinese
Chinese
TOTAL
16,500
961,400
977,900
Of the Non-Chinese population it was estimated at the census of 1921 that the number of British nationals of European origin was about 4,300. There has probably been a slight increase in this num- ber in the intervening period.
The rainfall for 1926 was 100.78 inches, and for 1927, 107.86 inches. In 1926 the mean temperature was 71° 6′ and in 1927, 71° 4′, the mean minimum temperature during the latter year rang- ing from 78° 7′ in June to 55° 2′ in February and the mean maximum temperature from 87° 5′ in August to 62° 2' in February. Typhoons are prevalent during the months July to October.
The currency of Hong Kong consists of the following coins (vide Order in Council, 2nd February, 1895):-
1. The silver dollar of Mexico.
2. British dollar.
3. The Hong Kong dollar, half-dollar, and 20 cent, 10 cent, and 5 cent pieces, issued from the Hong Kong Mint. (1866-68).
4. Half-dollars, 20, 10, and 5 cent pieces, imported from England, and coined at the Royal Mint and Birmingham Mint.
5. Copper coins representing one-hundredth part of the dollar (called one cent), and one-thousandth part of the dollar (mil or cash), imported from England.
Local weights and measures are the following:
1 tael=1.1
1 picul
oz.;
133.1/3rd lbs. (avoirdupois)
7 catties 1 imperial gallon;
#
3
I.-General.
The year 1927 was one of slow but steady recovery in the finan- cial and commercial position of the Colony, though the volume of business still remained below the level of 1925. In introducing the Budget in September His Excellency the Governor stated that careful scrutiny of expenditure was still absolutely necessary, and that in financial matters the "Coat must be cut according to the cloth”. His Excellency took this opportunity to review the developments of the Colony during the past 30 years, and stated that "the achievement of Hong Kong in financing its amazing developments during the past 30 years by means of its annual revenue and without recourse to borrowing is unequalled in any part of the British Empire". In order to assist future development. His Excellency announced the forth- coming issue of a public works loan at 6% at par.
2. One of the most striking events of the year was the arrival of the units of the Shanghai Defence Force, and of the naval rein- forcements, especially the First Cruiser Squadron. Many of these additional forces were stationed in Hong Kong. The local accommoda- tion was taxed to the uttermost. A number of buildings had to be commandeered for billeting and for hospitals. Among these buildings were the Peninsula Hotel, King's College and the Diocesan Boys School. In addition a large hutment camp was erected on the reclamation at Shamshuipo. Strenuous efforts, partly under the auspices of the Y.M.C.A., and partly by individuals, were made to provide for the recreation and entertainment of the troops. A number of canteens was opened, and concert parties arranged. Special recognition should be accorded to the hard work done by the voluntary helpers during the trying weather of the summer months.
t
3. Piracies during the year were a source of continual trouble. The execution of 8 pirates who had been captured on the s.s. Sunning" at the end of 1926, appeared to have little deterrent effect on the Bias Bay pirates. After the piracy of the British steamer "Hop Sang", at the end of March, a naval raid was con- ducted on the pirate stronghold in Bias Bay. Two villages where pirates were known to live were destroved, and the whole operations were carried out without loss of life, either to the inhabitants or to the raiding parties. These operations caused a lull in piracies for a period of four months, when the piracies of the Norwegian steamer "Solviken", and of the British steamer "Yat Shing". led to a fur- ther naval raid on Bias Bay. Simultaneously the British steamer "Kochow" was pirated on the West River, and naval operations were carried out at the town of Tai Ping-hui, where pirates were known to live. Since that date there has been a marked diminution in piratical attacks on British vessels. However, in November the Chinese steamer "Trene" was intercepted in Bias Bay, when in the possession of pirates, by the British Submarine L.4. The vessel was only brought to after a shot had been fired into its engine room, and although a few persons some of who were presumed to he nirates inst their lives the passengers and crew were almost all saved. Seven men were brought to trial in connection with this niracy and executed New piracy regulations. designed to abolish the system of locked grilles, are under consideration.
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4. The uncertain situation in Canton caused anxiety in the Colony early in the year. For a time there was some possibility of a recurrence of the strike and boycott of 1925, but by the proscription of the Seamen's Union and by the prevention of seditious meetings this danger was averted. A more settled Government in Canton led to a gradual improvement in its relations with this Colony. There was however a continual influx of refugees and other persons into the Colony, and the disbanding in Canton of the Hong Kong strikers caused many bad characters to make their way to Hong Kong. A series of armed robberies occurred during the autumn, culminating in December in a street battle between the police and a gang of armed robbers, in which two Chinese constables were shot and three robbers either killed or wounded.
5. On August 20th, the Colony was visited by a severe typhoon, which lasted for the unusually long period of 12 hours. Much damage was caused on shore, especially in the Peak district, where one block of flats collapsed and a number of flats and houses were severely damaged. The P. & O. steamer."Rawalpindi" dragged her moorings, and for a time was in danger of being dashed on the Praya Wall. This catastrophe was happily averted.
6. The honours conferred on residents of Hong Kong by H.M. the King during the year included the appointment of Sir Joseph Kemp as Knight Bachelor and of Mr. W. T. Southorn and Dr. R. H. Kotewall as Campanions of the Order of St. Michael and St. George. Among the visitors to the Colony during the year mention should be made of the Bishop of London, who was present at the New Year and whose addresses were received with much enthusiasm by the local religious community. In September the two American aviator Messrs. Brock and Schee and their aeroplane "Pride of Detroit visited Hong Kong and made a short stay on their flight round the world.
II.-Finance.
The total revenue of the year amounted to $21,344,536 which sum exceeded the estimate by $337,139, and the revenue for 1926 by $212,954. This increase was chiefly under the headings Licences and Internal Revenue and it more than set off the deficit in stamp and liquor duties and in the revenue from land sales. A noteworthy item was the increase of $107,184 in the passenger service (foreign line) of the Kowloon-Canton Railway due to the reopening of through traffic with Canton. This increase more than counterbalances the decrease in passenger receipts on the home line. Two unusual items contributed to the excess of revenue over expenditure. The first was the transfer of accumulated interest to the amount of $146,450 ɔn the money deposited in London towards the cost of the Singapore. base. The second was the transfer to revenue of the surplus of the local War Loan Sinking Fund amounting to $158,134 following on the repayment of the loan at the end of the year.
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4. The uncertain situation in Canton caused anxiety in the Colony early in the year. For a time there was some possibility of a recurrence of the strike and boycott of 1925, but by the proscription of the Seamen's Union and by the prevention of seditious meetings this danger was averted. A more settled Government in Canton led to a gradual improvement in its relations with this Colony. There was however a continual influx of refugees and other persons into the Colony, and the disbanding in Canton of the Hong Kong strikers caused many bad characters to make their way to Hong Kong. A series of armed robberies occurred during the autumn, culminating in December in a street battle between the police and a gang of armed robbers, in which two Chinese constables were shot and three robbers either killed or wounded.
5. On August 20th, the Colony was visited by a severe typhoon, which lasted for the unusually long period of 12 hours. Much damage was caused on shore, especially in the Peak district, where one block of flats collapsed and a number of flats and houses were severely damaged. The P. & O. steamer."Rawalpindi" dragged her moorings, and for a time was in danger of being dashed on the Praya Wall. This catastrophe was happily averted.
6. The honours conferred on residents of Hong Kong by H.M. the King during the year included the appointment of Sir Joseph Kemp as Knight Bachelor and of Mr. W. T. Southorn and Dr. R. H. Kotewall as Campanions of the Order of St. Michael and St. George. Among the visitors to the Colony during the year mention should be made of the Bishop of London, who was present at the New Year and whose addresses were received with much enthusiasm by the local religious community. In September the two American aviator Messrs. Brock and Schee and their aeroplane "Pride of Detroit visited Hong Kong and made a short stay on their flight round the world.
II.-Finance.
The total revenue of the year amounted to $21,344,536 which sum exceeded the estimate by $337,139, and the revenue for 1926 by $212,954. This increase was chiefly under the headings Licences and Internal Revenue and it more than set off the deficit in stamp and liquor duties and in the revenue from land sales. A noteworthy item was the increase of $107,184 in the passenger service (foreign line) of the Kowloon-Canton Railway due to the reopening of through traffic with Canton. This increase more than counterbalances the decrease in passenger receipts on the home line. Two unusual items contributed to the excess of revenue over expenditure. The first was the transfer of accumulated interest to the amount of $146,450 ɔn the money deposited in London towards the cost of the Singapore. base. The second was the transfer to revenue of the surplus of the local War Loan Sinking Fund amounting to $158,134 following on the repayment of the loan at the end of the year.

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III.-Production.
FORESTRY, AGRICULTURE AND BOTANY.
Formation of Pine Tree plantations.-Increased areas were dealt with during the year. Pinus Massoniana sowings in situ amounted to 197,476. Suitable areas were broadcasted with 995 pounds of Pinus Massoniana and 129 pounds of Leucaena glauca, the latter being tried for the first time. Other experimental sowings were made with Pinus insularis, Cunninghamia sinensis, Acacia pennata and Acacia confusa.
Insect Pests.-Pine Tree Caterpillars (Eutricha punctata) ap- peared in the pine plantations in many parts of the Colony. June was a particularly bad month, weather conditions being ideal for the pests. The total amount collected and destroyed in all parts of the Colony was 14,637 pounds.
Protection from Fire.-Fires were again numerous but fortunately no serious damage was done to Government plantations. Little or no assistance in dealing with fires was given by village people living within short distances of the burnt areas. The usual clearing of fire barriers was carried out.
Agriculture.-A general exhibit of foreign vegetables was staged at the first New Territories Agricultural Show which was held at Sheung Shui on November 7th and 8th.
More interest is now displayed in the cultivation of both foreign and native vegetables for local consumption, this is chiefly due to increased motor transport and the communication between the Hong Kong markets and the New Territories villages, which was established during the labour troubles and consequent shortage of fresh vegetables during 1925.
Inspection of Nursery Stock.-Eleven consignments of bulbs of Narcissus Tazetta were inspected during the vear. of these four con- signments totalling 57.106 bulbs were exported to the United States of America and Honolulu: seven consignments totalling 177,840 bulbs were exported to Britain and British Colonies.
Small consignments of fruits, dried legumes and vegetables were inspected before being exported to the Philippine Islands by local firms.
Seed Collection.-Seeds of the following were collected for local use and for the purpose of exchange:-Casuarina equisetifolia, Cuninghamia sinensis, Glyptostrobus heterophullus, Leucaena glauca. Bauhinia variegata, Cassia fistula, Tristania conferta, Sterculia lanceolata, Ficus retusa. Callistemon lanceolata. Garcinia oblongifolia. Melia Azedarach, Callistemon rigidus, Cinnamomum Camphora. Poinciana regia, Aleurites Fordii, Aleurites montana, Aleurites triloba, Acacia pennata and Pinus Massoniana.
Y
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FISHERIES.
A considerable proportion of the boat population of Hong Kong supports itself by deep-sea fishing, in which pursuit a large number Gi junks are engaged. The villages of Aberdeen, Stanley, Shaukiwan, and also many in the New Territories, are largely dependent upon this industry for their prosperity. Fresh water fish is imported from Canton and the West River. There are oyster beds of considerable
value in Deep Bay.
MINING.
The mineral resources of the Colony are small and little mining was done in 1927.
MANUFACTURES.
Sugar. The higher prices of Raw and Refined that prevailed towards the close of 1926 were not maintained. A break commenced early in 1927 and prices continued to fall practically throughout the year closing at the end of December about the lowest. The reason for this market weakness was principally disappointing consumption both in United States of America and United Kingdom and invisible supplies of sugars in excess of expectations while the reduction in Cuban output t: 4,000,000 tons against 4,500,000 tons for 1926 was offset by a European Beet Crop of 8,100,000 tons for 1927-28 against 6,860,000 tions for 1926-27.
Rope Making.-The demand for Manila cordage for 1927 was restricted owing to the depression in Shipping and the political trouble in China.
SHIPBUILDING.
Six ocean-going vessels were built in 1927, the largest being of 562 gross tons; one river vessel of 1,068 gross tons and some twenty launches, motor boats and lighters were also built.
IV. Trade and Economics.
Trade suffered throughout the year from the disturbed condition of China but the establishment in Canton of a more settled Govern- ment and the restoration of friendly relations between Canton and Hong Kong brought about a marked improvement at the close of 1927 warranting confidence in the speedy disappearance of the effects of the strike and boycott of 1925.
The following figures, taken from returns for 1924 (the last avail- able), show the principal countries with which trade is carried on:-
Imported from Exported to
£
£
United Kingdom Germany
9,450,000
744,000
1,835,000
132,000
Belgium
Holland
France
696,000
19,000
326,000
107,000
319,000
79,000
Italy
Sweden
259,000
6,000
173,000
2,000
Other European Countries
189,000
16,000
United States of America
5,915,000
2,489,000
Cuba, Central & S. America
169,000
933,000
Japan, Korea & Formosa
9,127,000
3,523,000
Australia
1,042,000
428,000
Canada
733,000
410,000
New Zealand
54,000
62,000
Foreign Countries Miscellane-
ous
195,000
38,000
£30,482,000
£8,988,000
The Scale of Hong Kong's trade with neighbouring countries is indicated by the following figures, also taken from the statistics for
1924:-
India Ceylon
Burmah
Straits Settlements & F.M.S.
British North Borneo
China
Netherlands East Indies
French Indo-China
Siam
Philippine Islands
Total
Imported from Exported to
£
1,998,000
£
805,000
21,000
133,000
1
· 1,051,000
1,692,000
277,000
224,000 2,893,000
129,000 39,738,000
K
:
*25,974,000
9,457,000
1,054,000
10.994,000
5,135,000
6,262,000
2,530,000
654,000
1,719,000
58,380,000
54,360,000
:
Hong Kong's own consumption and production of commodities is comparatively small; one of its main functions is to act as an entrepot and clearing house for the products of South China and r the world's manufactured goods passing into South China.
*This figure is obtained from the Chinese Maritime Customs Returns.
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T
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However, owing to the fact that no duties are levied upon com- modities, except liquors and tobacco, whereas China levies import and export duties upon all commodities, the tendency has been for a number of manufacturing processes to be established in the Colony, e.g., sugar and tin refining, cement making and ginger preserving; there are also several factories weaving cotton manufactured goods, and hundreds of native workshops manufacturing rattan ware and similar products.
Much of the voluminous trade with neighbouring countries com- prises purely Chinese commodities and is carried on by Chinese firms in Hong Kong with branches elsewhere. Trade with Europe, the Americas and Australasia is principally in the hands of British and foreign import and export firms who do business with the Chinese mercantile community established in Hong Kong, purchasing from them the products of China which have been assembled from the interior, and selling manufactured goods which pass on from wholesale to retail dealers and so to the small shopkeepers in the interior of of China. The lack of modern means of communication in China necessarily makes the process slow and difficult.
The Chinese written language is a great hindrance to direct deal- ings between Chinese traders and merchants and manufacturers in foreign countries; another obstacle is lack of confidence by shippers overseas the product of many regrettable experiences. The sub- stantial British and foreign firms in Hong Kong, with their branches in the Treaty Ports of China, serve a definitely useful purpose in acting as intermediaries between Chinese and overseas traders. Owing to the hindrances to commerce resulting from the language. difficulty and the lack of education of the proprietors of native manufactories it would be impossible for firms abroad to do business direct. As a rule letters would not be answered, and, even if contact were established, there would be no means of ensuring deliveries in accordance with sample. It is in this matter, especially, that the foreign exporters protect the interests of buyers abroad. Enquiries as to the South China market should be addressed to the General Chamber of Commerce, Hong Kong.
V.-Communications.
SHIPPING.
The total Shipping entering and clearing Ports in the Colony during the year 1927 amounted to 298,707 vessels of 44,127,161 tons which, compared with the figures for 1926, shows a decrease of 261,566 vessels entered and cleared and an increase of 330,725 tons.
Of the above 51,289 vessels of 36,834,014 tons were engaged in Foreign Trade as compared with 30,231 vessels of 28,371,104 tons in 1926.
There was an increase in British Ocean-going shipping of 460 ships of 403,023 tons entered and cleared.
Foreign Ocean-going vessels show an increase of 2,299 ships entered and cleared giving an increase of 3,982,445 tons.
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These figures are affected by the stoppage due to vessels of the China Navigation Co. being laid up from 1st July 1927 to 7th Septem- ber 1927.
British River Steamers show an increase of 3,273 ships and an increase of 1,826,653 tons.
Foreign River Steamers show an increase of 935 ships and an increase of 453,420 tons.
In steamships not exceeding 60 tons employed in Foreign Trade there is an increase of 5,064 ships entered and cleared giving an in- crease in tonnage of 146,044 tons.
Junks in Foreign Trade show an increase of 9,027 vessels entered and cleared giving an increase of 1,651,325 tons.
In the Local Trade a decrease is shown in the number and tonnage of steam launches due to the extension of the Harbour limits, which now include places for which statistics were formerly required.
A comparison between the years 1926 and 1927 is given in the following table :-
1926.
1927.
Increase.
Decrease.
Class of Vessels
No.
Tonnage. No.
Tonnage. No. Tonnage.
No.
Tonnage.
British Ocean-
going,
3,401
9.257,417 3.861
Foreign Ocean
going,
4,468
British River
Steamers,.
4,276
9,660,440 460 403,023
12,057,279 6,767 16,039,724 2,299 3,982,445
5,473,429 7,549
7,300,082 3,273 | 1,826,653
Foreign River
Steamers,..
230
107,735 1,165
561,155 935
453,420
Steamships
under 60!
tons For-
eign Trade... 2,829
$7,330 7,893
Junks, Foreign)
Trade,
15,027
1,387,914 24,054
233,374 5,064
3,039,239 9,027 | 1,651,325
146,044
:
:
***
:
Total, Foreign
Trade,
30,231 28,371,104 51.289 36,834,014 21,058 | 8,462,910
Steam Laun-
ches. Local
Trade......... 499,824 13,950,144 219,555 5,771,970;
Junks, Local
Trade,
*30,218 *1,475,188 +27,863 †1,521,177|
280,869 8,178,174
45,989
2,355
Grand Total.. 560,273 43,796,436 298,707 44,127,161 21.058 8,508,899 | 282,624 8,178,174
*
Net,
330,725 261,566
Including 16,294 Conservancy and Dust Boats of 736,688 tons.
"
15,358
71
"3
19
22
of 993,280
1
f
Z
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In Local Trade (i.e. between places within the waters of the Colony) there is a decrease in entrances and clearances of steam launches of 280,269 which gives a decrease in tonnage of 8,178,174 tons.
Junks in Local Trade show a decrease of 2,355 vessels entered and cleared and an increase of 45,989 tons.
Of vessels of European construction, 5,316 ocean-going, 4,353 river steamers and 3,936 steamships not exceeding 60 tons entered during the year, giving a daily average of 37.3 ships as compared with 20.8 ships in 1926 and 28.9 ships in 1925.
Ocean-going steamers entered as follows:-
Steamers.
No. of times entered.
Total Tonnage.
Flag.
1926. 1927. 1926. 1927. 1926.
1927.
British, Japanese,
339
346 1,686 5,702 | 4,597,357 | 8,466,960
207
264
755
1,109
2,236,359 2,927,207
U.S.A.,
69
79
236
245
1,510,383 | 1,495,775
....
Chinese,
61
81
606 1,315
245,697
847,073
German,
34
43
90
151
373,318
487,160
Danish,
14
11
23
48
78,025
153,341
Dutch,
40
41
232
251
785,696
849,766
French,
31
108
246
445,567
629,144
Italian,
9
27
26
127,870
141,566
Panaman,
1
1
9,953
Norwegian,
47
61
111
472
152,641
657,005
Portuguese,
5
5
33 73
23,856
15,526
Russian,
1
1
241
Swedish,
7
12
30
46,180
103,182
Spanish,
3
8
19,236
Belgian,
1
3,181
Mexican,
1
1,183
*
*
Total.
869
997 3,930 9,669 10,619,560 16,774,788
*(River Steamers included.)
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HONG KONG SHIPPING STATISTICS.
Ships engaged in foreign trade cleared and entered.
Total shipping
entered and cleared,
Year
Number
Total Tonnage
Percentage of British Tonnage
British Tonnage
Total Tonnage
1897
9,944
12,124,599
1898
11,058
13,252,733 66
82
67
1899
10,905
13,437,147 65
1900
10,940
14,022,167 65
1901
10,807
14,599,141 53
1902
12,461
16,275,998
59
9,571,787 21,333,566
1903
14.489
19,018,411
59
1904
16,976
19,333,096
70
11,250,296 23,853,384 13,406,094 24,648,258
1905
18,103
19,778,176
67
34,185,091
1906
16,397 19,833,666
61
32,747,268
1907
18,096
20,381,421
51.5 11,846,533 36,028,310
1908
19,604
20,104,795
58.6
14,903,106 34,615,241
1909
18,714
20,171,755
56.7
11,437,678 34,830,845
1910
17,557
20,966,504
57.8
12,112,019 36,534,361
1911
19,644
20,490,520
57.1
11,706,731 36,179,152
1912
21,010
21,614,995
56.1
11,977,714 36,735,149
1913
21,867
22,939,134
55.4
12,528,168 37,742,982
1914
23,740
22,069,879
56.9
12,312,404 36,756,951
1915
23,051 19,561,318
58.1
11,381,439 33,884,919
1916
23,303
19,106,690
50.3
10,995,794 36,381,457
1917
21,959 17,329,841
52.9
9,167,595 33,827,325
1918
19,997
13,982,966
51.9
7,072,021 29,518,189
1919
21,275 18,474,996
54.6
10,095,805 35,615,169
1920
21,498 21,576,139
53.8
11,608,069 40,122,527
1921
24,697 24,360,880
52.4
12,766,492 43,420,970
1922
24,272 26,635,467
50.3
13,420,118 46,566,764
1923
25,347 32,382,530
50.2
16,920,491 53,402,239
1924
57,765 38,770,499
47.4
18,369,413 56,731,077
1925
40,705
31,941,703
48.5
15,321,935 49,520,523
1926
1927
15,204 27,235
26,983,190 54.2 33,794,775 50.2
14,730,846| 43,796,436 16,960,522| 44,127,161
KOWLOON-CANTON RAILWAY.
1. The principal item of interest was the introduction in June of an arrangement entered into with the Administration of the Chinese Section whereby British Section engines hauled the two express trains daily each way for the whole distance between Kowloon and Canton, 111 miles of which 89 are through Chinese Territory.
+
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Maka
2. This arrangement proved very satisfactory to both Sections of the Railway as well as to the travelling public. Strict attention was paid to punctuality, comfort and the safety of the trains and passengers through the disturbed areas traversed by the line in Chinese Territory, with very gratifying results.
3. General revenues showed a distinct and steady increase from July onwards, and in November reached nearly $75,000, the highest monthly figure by far since February 1922 during the period of the Seamen's Strike.
4. Working expenses exceeded revenues by the narrow margin of $2,344.56, a very striking improvement on the working of previous years.
5. Liabilities under Capital increased by $27,599.96, as against $237,993.40, in 1926 making a total of $20,540,037.40, and the deficit increased by $483,159.32 as against $544,931.93 in 1926. The ac- cumulated deficit stood at $6,510,538.95 on December 31st.
6. The chief addition chargeable to Capital account, involving $24,739.46 was in connection with the building of new offices for the Chief Mechanical Engineer, at the locomotive yard at Hung Hom.
7. The Improvements at Taipo Market Station, estimated to cost $25,000, were delayed and only $2,860.50 spent on account.
8. New Works chargeable to Revenue were of a minor nature.
9. Typhoon and Rainstorm Damages amounted to $4,343.81.
10. Permanent Way and Structures were maintained to the usual standard of efficiency, likewise all locomotives, motor coaches and rolling stock.
11. The Workshops were kept exceptionally busy, owing to extra work in connection with the train haulage to Canton, in addition to a heavy round of overhauls and painting.
12. Arrangements having been made with the Chinese Section for the British Section to recondition a large number of their goods stock, extra gangs were engaged at the Workshops and started on this work in October.
13. The transport of troops and equipment in connection with units of the Shanghai Defence Force in the early part of the year, added to that for an abnormal camping season later, resulted in ex- ceptional use of rolling stock and increased revenue from military
sources.
14. A heavier train service generally, was run during most of the year, the train mileage amounting to 224,764 or 79,843 miles more than in 1926, which however includes the trains running over Chinese Territory to Canton.
14
15. A new Railway Ordinance No. 28 of 1927 revising the Ordin- ance No. 21 of 1909, came into force in December.
INTERNAL COMMUNICATIONS.
As the life of Hong Kong centres round the harbour its in- ternal communications are largely by water. Regular ferry services cross the harbour in various directions, and in addition there is a large fleet of launches owned by commercial firms, and numerous motor-boats, sampans, etc. plying for hire between the shore and vessels in the stream.
On the island there is an electric tram service, the lines running along the south side of the harbour for practically the whole length of the island; the steepness and proximity of the hills renders any lateral development of this system impossible.
There is also a funicular tramway running from the lower levels up to the residential area on the Peak, the upper terminus being at a level of 1,300 feet.
There is a plentiful supply of rickshaws and sedan-chairs, and a large number of motor cars which ply for public hire. Taxicabs have recently been reintroduced.
There are excellent motor roads round the island and to the Peak, and also round the New Territories. No large extensions were
made in 1927. (See Public Works).
POST OFFICE.
Mails. The number of mail receptacles of Hong Kong origin dispatched during the year was 35,159 as compared with 31,863 in 1926 an increase of 3,296; the number received was 43,638 as com- pared with 38,262-an increase of 5,376.
Receptacles in transit, including those to and from British and Foreign Men-of-War, numbered 194,200 as against 186,806 in 1926- an increase of 7,394.
Registered Articles and Parcels.-The number of registered articles handled amounted to 883,177 as compared with 880,721 in 1926-a decrease of 47,544.
The figures for insured letters were 17,648 and 20,236 respec- tively a decrease of 2,588.
The decrease in the number of insured letters was due to the fact that some countries are now forwarding insured letters direct to China in closed sacks.
Parcels, ordinary and insured, which were dealt with reached a total of 424,047 as against 555,345 in 1926-a decrease of 131,307..
15
WIRELESS.
A radio-telegraph station established at Cape D'Aguilar provides communication with vessels inter ports. The Kowloon Royal Obser- vatory W/T Station, longitude 114° 10" 18.7 E., latitude 22° 18′′ 13.2 N., opened for meteorological traffic on 1st April, 1927. Call sign "G.O.W."
The revenue collected by the Post Office during the year from radiotelegrams amounted to $122,798.02, an increase of $55,596.63 on the amount collected in 1926.
The number of radiotelegrams forwarded during the year was 22,793 consisting of 209,171 words against 7,836 consisting of 81,000 words in 1926, and 26,326 were received consisting of 276,078 words as against 13,725 consisting of 156,128 words in 1926.
CABLES.
The Eastern Extension Telegraph Company (British) by means of three cables to Singapore, one direct and one each via Labuan & Cape St. James respectively, provide good connections with Europe via India, with Australasia, and with the other British Colonies and possessions. By their cable to Manila connection is made with the direct American cable, thence to San Francisco. Two cables to Shanghai, belonging respectively to the Eastern Extension and to the Great Northern (Danish) Companies, via Foochow and Amoy respec- tively, give a good connection with Shanghai, North China, Japan and Russia; and the system of the Great Northern Telegraph Co. gives a good service to Europe via Asiatic Russia.
TELEPHONES.
Telephonic communication, provided by the Hong Kong Tele- phone Co., is available to most parts of the Colony.
VI.-Justice, Police and Prisons.
Serious crime in 1927 showed an increase over that in 1926— 4,553 cases against 3,713 in 1926. Minor crime also showed an increase-19,891 cases against 16,335 cases in 1926.
The increase in serious crime is accounted for almost entirely by increases under burglary and larceny. Throughout the year there was a large number of unemployed in the Colony, while the Police Force, owing to difficulty in obtaining recruits, was appreciably below establishment strength.
There were decreases of 10 and 9 cases in murder and robbery respectively.
16
There has been a very considerable increase in the population of the Colony during the year, due to a gradual steady return of people and interests that left Hong Kong in 1926. This flow was increased to a flood at two periods-one during the political upheaval in Canton In April, the other in November and December when political disturbances culminated in a Communist rising and burning of part of that city. During the latter phase it is estimated that at least 50,000 refugees came to Hong Kong. The Police countered the internal effect of these movements by diverting temporarily certain sections of Police from normal duty to search and surveillance of incoming passengers in which work the newly formed Police Reserve also participated. Special patrols have also assisted in keeping Hong Kong immune from abnormal crime waves which have been experienced in other ports. The Colony is also indebted to cordial co-operation throughout the year from the Police Authorities in Canton and Macao.
Piracy-Two Naval expeditions, accompanied by a party of Hong Kong Police, were undertaker on March 23rd and September 1st each following the piracy of a British ship. Operations were confined to destroying the dwellings of pirates. No injury to persons occurred. Intelligence work became more successful The result was seen in the capture of the pirated vessel S.S "Irene" with the pirates on board on October 19th by H. M. Submarine L.4. 15 pirates from Bias Bay were executed in Hong Kong during 1927. There has been no piracy emanating from Bias Bay since the case of the s.s. "Irene".
A number of piracies on junks occurred during the year, in waters near Hong Kong. Piracy in the Canton River delta has increased.
The year was free from serious strikes or industrial trouble. Two events of importance took place :-
(1) Proscription of the Hong Kong General Labour Union
on 31st March.
(2) Proscription of the Chinese Seamen's Union on 26th
May.
The closing of these two centres of sedition evoked no opposition; on the contrary the workers seem content to be rid of their domina- tion. Small bands of agitators have attempted to cause mischief on ¿ few occasions but they met with no success.
Constant touch has been maintained with the Shanghai Defence
Force.
The only serious outrage occurred on the 7th December when a party of 4 Armed Robbers who had committed an armed robbery in the Western District were intercepted in the Central District by a Police Search Party. One of the robbers opened fire on the Police seriously wounding the European Sergeant in charge and a Chinese

·
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Detective. One robber was shot dead and two were arrested, one of the latter, however, not until he had seriously wounded one Indian Constable, and one Chinese Constable who subsequently died of his wounds. He also shot dead another Chinese Constable who attempted to intercept him. The Court cases were still pending at the end of the year.
The year 1927 witnessed the formation of the Police Reserve on lines similar to the Police Reserve organised during the War. It consists of four Contingents, one European, one Indian, one Chinese and a mixed Motor Cycle Squad.
The District Watchmen Force, to which the Government contributes $2,000 per annum, was well supported by the Chinese during the year. These watchmen patrol the streets in the Chinese quarter of the City. They are placed on police beats and are supervised by the European police on section patrol. A detective branch of the force has done useful work under the supervision of a European Inspector.
At the end of the year the District Watch Force reached full strength consisting of 122 members. The number of convictions secured by members of the force was 606, a number far above any previous record, as compared with 467 in 1926. Particular attention was given to the activities of pick-pockets with gratifying results; 17% of convictions were of this class. Larceny cases made up 34% and unlawful possession added another 17%
The total number of persons committed to Victoria Gaol was 7.740 as compared with 6,511 in 1926. Of these 1,740 were com- mitted for criminal offences against 1,454 in 1926. Of committals for non-criminal offences there were 165 less for hawking without a licence, and 2 more for unlawfully cutting trees, than in 1926.
The daily average of prisoners confined in the Gaol was 1,189 the average for 1926 being 1,054 and the highest previous average being 1,116 in 1925. The percentage of prisoners to population. according to the daily average of the former and the estimated number of the latter, was 0.136. The average percentage for the last ten years was 0.12. Owing, however, to the large floating population. which is constantly moving between the Colony and Chinese Territory, the percentage of crime to population does not convey an accurate idea of the comparative criminality of the residents of the Colony. The Victoria Gaol has accommodation for 700 prisoners including patients in Hospital. The Branch Prison at Laichikok has accommodation for 450 prisoners.
The prison discipline was satisfactory, the average of punish- ments per prisoner being 0.52 as compared with 0.49 in 1926 and 0.71 in 1925.
Prisoners are employed at printing, book-binding, tinsmithing, mat-making, tailoring, carpentering, soap-making, gardening. etc. Fractically all the Government printing and bookbinding is done in Victoria Gaol.
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VII.-Public Works.
BUILDINGS.
During the year progress as stated was made on the following
works:
Hong Kong. Work on the Ventris Road Quarters proceeded satisfactorily and the buildings were completed in August. A large garage at the Central Police Station was also erected during the year and work was commenced in July on a new Hospital for the Victoria Gaol.
Kowloon. Minor works only were carried out during the year.
New Kowloon.-The principai work executed in this district was the erection and equipment of a large camp of wooden huts for the Military Authority. About 140 huts of varying sizes were built.
This work, which was of the greatest urgency was commenced on the first of March and the whole of the camp was completed and fully equipped with furniture, light, water, etc., in less than two months from its commencement.
New Territories.-Minor works only were carried out in this District.
The work of erection of Quarters for Cadets in Canton proceeded satisfactorily and the building was completed in the month of March.
COMMUNICATIONS.
Hong Kong.The Contract for the road contouring Tai Hang Valley was closed owing to conditions prevailing in the Colony.
Road construction work in the Wongneichong Development area made slow progress owing to the non-fulfillment of building covenants by various lessees.
Kowloon. The Formation of To Kwa Wan Road was completed but Argyle Street Extension was delayed owing to the contractor becoming financially embarrassed. Waterloo Road Extension made fair progress.
New Kowloon.-Waterloo Road Extension to the foothills made far progress, the southern portion being prepared for surfacing.
Road to Dairy Farm Lots at Diamond Hill was practically completed by the end of the year.
New Territories. The approaches and New Bridge at Tai Po were completed and opened to traffic before the end of the year.
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DRAINAGE.
Hong Kong.-Considerable progress was made with the re- construction of Wong Nei Chong nullah, sections 1 and 2 being completed, and a start being made on section 3 (from Bowringtou Canal to Chinese Race Stand) which was about half finished by the end of the year.
New sewers and storm water drains were laid to a length of 2,500 feet; and stream courses were trained to a length of 2,450 feet.
Good progress was made with the re-drainage of the area between the Praya and Queen's Road East, in connexion with the Iraya East Reclamation scheme.
Kowloon. The section of the large stormwater culvert in Tong Mi Road necessary for present requirements was completed.
A start was made after the rains with the large nullah in the New Cemeteries Area, Homuntin, and good progress made.
New sewers and storm water drains were constructed to the length of 9,030 feet.
Trenches were cut and swamps filled-in, in connexion with the anti-malaria campaign.
New Kowloon.-New sewers and storm water drains were constructed over the area generally to the length of 3,930 feet, and in the Kowloon Tong Estate to the length of 13,346 feet.
Anti-malarial work was continued, and nullah training carried out on the hillsides north of N.K.I.L's 420 and 362, Cheung Sha Wan.
New Territories.-Various works were carried out, of an anti- malaria nature, at Taipo and Taipo Market. Some small extension. were made to sewers, and additional gully connexions given.
WATER Works
Hong Kong.-The Western half of the Service Reservoir at the Eastern Filter Beds was completed and put into use while the covering of the Eastern half was nearly completed. Considerable work was done also in approach roads, sandwashing sites, banks etc.
The change from slow sand beds to fast gravity filter beds at Bowen Road was completed, and the new Paterson Rapid Gravity Filters were put into use in June and proved very satisfactory.
21
Kai Tack Reclamation.-Originally a private enterprise, was resumed by Government early in the year. Approximate area 205 acres, about 40 acres were filled in during the year, making a totai of about 160 acres of reclaimed land.
Kowloon Bay West Reclamation. This work remained abeyance practically throughout the year.
Kowloon Bay East Reclamation.-Practically during the year.
in
no work done
New Territories.-Further Reclamation work was undertaken by the Standard Oil Co. and about 75% completed.
PIERS.
Hong Kong. The extensive repair work on Blake Pier was satisfactorily completed.
Kowloon.-The Police Pier at Tsim Sha Tsui suffered consider - able damage from typhoon seas during July. Repair work was well 11. hand by end of the year.
MISCELLANEous.
The total amount expended on Public Works Extraordinary was
0.69 and on annually recurrent works $1,542,494.98.
VIII.-Public Health.
The Birth rate for the year was 8.2 per 1000 among the Chinese community and 19.6 per 1000 among the Non-Chinese as compared with 4.18 and 19.21 in 1926. This is the highest Chinese birth rate ever recorded in the Colony. Birth statistics in Hong Kong are most misleading as registration is largely evaded by the Chinese especially as regards female children. Registration of Chinese births in 1927 shows increases of 104% as regards males and 153% as regards females over the figures for 1926; the population is estimated to have increased meanwhile by about 10% and it appears, therefore, that registration of births, especially of females, is being carried out to a greater degree than formerly.
The death rate for the year was 16.6 per 1000 among the Chinese community and 13.2 per 1000 among the Non-Chinese civil com- munity, as compared with 16.01 and 10.9 in 1926. The ratio of deaths of infants to the total deaths registered was 31.6% (27.3% in 1926.
There were 4,239 deaths from respiratory diseases other than Tuberculosis as compared with 3,566 in 1926. Of these 34 were Non-Chinese (27 in 1926). Tubercular infections of the respiratory system caused 1,595 deaths in 1927 (1,517 in 1926) of which 31 were
Non-Chinese (28 in 1926). tions amounted to 14.38% tered.
22
The total deaths from tubercular infec- (15.27 in 1926) of the total deaths regis-
The deaths from Malaria numbered 635 (587 m 1926). The deaths of Chinese from this cause in the City of Victoria numbered 260 (172 in 1926) in an estimated population of 500,000 giving a death rate of 0.52 per 1000 (0.38 in 1926).
The deaths from Beriberi, which were high in 1925 again showed a decrease, being 744 (1,192 in 1926 and 1,744 in 1925), or 5.04 of the total deaths recorded (9.5 in 1926 and 11.6 in 1925).
The incidence of notifiable infectious diseases was slight, the total number being 612 of which 72 were imported. Of the local cases 266 were Typhoid and Paratyphoid.
For the fourth year in succession there were no cases of Plague. The last notification of plague was on 27th September 1923 while the last case of a plague infected rat was found on 17th September 1923. Systematic rat catching is carried out; 155,515 rats were sent to the Public mortuary for examination during 1927. None were plague infected. The routine work authorised under the bylaws for the Prevention of epidemic, endemic and contagious or infectious disease was carried out throughout the year. 87,612 floors were cleansed in Hong Kong and 48,754 in Kowloon; all premises were cleansed twice, some three times and a few four times. Systematic limewashing of all domestic premises within the areas prescribed, which are occupied by the members of more than one family, was similarly supervised as required by the bylaws on Domestic Cleanliness and Ventilation: 26,585 floors were limewashed in Hong Kong and 17,788 in Kowloon. To these two methods of ensuring a fair standard of cleanliness among the poorer classes of the community is largely owed the comparative immunity of Hong Kong from epidemic disease.
No cases of locally acquired cholera have been reported in the Colony since September 1922. There were 3 cases in 1927 all being imported.
There was a minor epidemic of smallpox during the early part of the year; the total number of cases notified being 149, of which 18 were imported. There were 126 deaths, all Chinese.
The incidence of Cerobro Spinal Fever during 1927 continued to be slight, there being 32 cases of which 2 were imported.
The total number of cases of Enteric and Paratyphoid Fevers during 1927 was 314 of which 7 were Paratyphoid. The cases of local origin amounted to 204 of Enteric and 4 of Paratyphoid among the Chinese community and 57 cases of Enteric and 1 of Paratyphoid among the Non-Chinese population. There were 28 Chinese and 12 Non-Chinese imported cases of Enteric and 5 Chinese and 1 Non- Chinese cases from the New Territory. There were 2 cases of Paratyphoid, 1 being imported and 1 from the New Territory.
1
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The number of cases of Diphtheria was 87 of which 65 were Chinese and 22 Non-Chinese. Of these 2 Non-Chinese and 4 Chinese
cases were imported.
There was one case of Hydrophobia, the victim being Non- Chinese. During the year 312 dogs were placed under observation on suspicion of being rabid and 11 carcases were sent direct to the Bacteriologist for examination. 34 dog brains were examined during the year; in 5 Negri bodies were present. These 5 cases were :n Kowloon and New Territories; in Hong Kong Island it would appear a. if the last outbreak was now over, as no positive case has been detected since December 1926.
GOVERNMENT HOSPITALS.
Civil Hospital.-This hospital consists of three blocks and con- tains 198 beds in 23 wards.
4,894 in-patients and 35,962 out patients were treated during 1927 as against 5,381 and 16,969 respectively in 1926.
Attached to the hospital is an isolated Maternity Hospital con- taining 20 beds. 686 patients were admitted during the year (626 in 1926). Since the opening of the Maternity Block at Victoria Hospital, this hospital has been mainly used for Asiatics.
Victoria Hospital.-This hospital is situated on the Peak and consists of a Main Block and a Maternity Block. The hospital was originally reserved for women and children but since the opening of the Maternity Block the accommodation in the main building was more than was required and in December it was decided to admit male patients also.
There are 38 beds in the main building to which 323 patients were admitted, and 33 in the Maternity Block to which 63 were admitted.
The Infectious Diseases Hospital is situated on the western out- skirts of the city-it is used mainly for the treatment of Small-pox. The Hospital contains 26 beds to which 9 patients were admitted (13 in 1926).
Kowloon Hospital.-Situated on the mainland has 48 beds. 980 patients were treated in 1927 as compared with 894 in 1926,
)
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TUNG WAH HOSPITAL (Government aided).
Number of beds
Number of patients treated in 1927
Number of patients treated in 1926
INFECTIOUS DISEASES BRANCH.
Number of beds
Number of patients treated in 1927
Number of patients treated in 1926
480
9,726
7,951
70
31
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KWONG WAH HOSPITAL, KOWLOON, (Government aided).
Number of beds
Number of patients treated in 1927
Number of patients treated in 1926
226
7.593
6,336
The Hospitals are under the supervision of a Visiting Medical Officer who is a member of the Medical Department.
LUNATIC ASYLUM.
The Asylum is situated close to the Civil Hospital and is under the direction of the Medical Officer in charge of that hospital. European and Chinese patients are separated, the European portion containing 14 beds in separate wards and the Chinese portion 16 beds.
267 patients of all races were treated during 1927 and there were 18 deaths.
IX.-Education.
The total numbers of pupils at schools in the Colony, excluding the Police School, are:---
Number of Pupils
Total
English Vernacular
Schools
Schools
Government Schools
3,529
369
3,897
Military School
135
135
Excluded Private School
158
158
Grant Schools
3,911
1,051
4,962
Vernacular Schools, Urban District...
30,622
30,622
Vernacular Schools, Rural District....
5,375
5,375
Private English Schools
4,721
4,721
Technical Institute
620
620
Total
13,073
37,417
50,490
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TUNG WAH HOSPITAL (Government aided).
Number of beds
Number of patients treated in 1927
Number of patients treated in 1926
INFECTIOUS DISEASES BRANCH.
Number of beds
Number of patients treated in 1927
Number of patients treated in 1926
480
9,726
7,951
70
31
23
KWONG WAH HOSPITAL, KOWLOON, (Government aided).
Number of beds
Number of patients treated in 1927
Number of patients treated in 1926
226
7.593
6,336
The Hospitals are under the supervision of a Visiting Medical Officer who is a member of the Medical Department.
LUNATIC ASYLUM.
The Asylum is situated close to the Civil Hospital and is under the direction of the Medical Officer in charge of that hospital. European and Chinese patients are separated, the European portion containing 14 beds in separate wards and the Chinese portion 16 beds.
267 patients of all races were treated during 1927 and there were 18 deaths.
IX.-Education.
The total numbers of pupils at schools in the Colony, excluding the Police School, are:---
Number of Pupils
Total
English Vernacular
Schools
Schools
Government Schools
3,529
369
3,897
Military School
135
135
Excluded Private School
158
158
Grant Schools
3,911
1,051
4,962
Vernacular Schools, Urban District...
30,622
30,622
Vernacular Schools, Rural District....
5,375
5,375
Private English Schools
4,721
4,721
Technical Institute
620
620
Total
13,073
37,417
50,490
3
25
The chief Government Schools are Queen's College, King's College, and three District Schools for Chinese boys, the Belillos Public School for Chinese girls, the Vernacular Middle School and two Vernacular Normal Schools, and the Ellis Kadoorie School for Indians.
The Central British School and Kowloon Junior, Victoria, and Quarry Bay Schools for children of British parentage have an average attendance of 286. There is also a school for children of the Peak District with an average attendance of 49.
There are 5 Grant-in-Aid Anglo-Chinese Schools for boys and 6 for girls, and 4 Grant-in-Aid Vernacular School for girls.
The Hong Kong Technical Institute affords an opportunity for higher education of students who have left school. Instruction was given in 1927 in Building Construction, Field Surveying, Mathematics, Chemistry (Practical and Theoretical), Metallurgy, Physics, Electricity, French, Shorthand, Sanitation and Cookery. Classes for men and women teachers, both "English" and "Vernacular" are a feature of the Institute.
The lecturers are recruited from members of the medical and educational professions in the Colony, and from the Department of Public Works, and receive fees for their services. The Institute is furnished with a well equipped chemical laboratory and excellent physical apparatus.
The expenditure of the Education Department in 1927 was $1,091,423.21 and the revenue collected from Government School fees was $121,981.75.
THE UNIVERSITY OF HONG KONG.
The University of Hong Kong was incorporated under a local University Ordinance, 1911, and opened in 1912. It is a residential University and open to students of both sexes.
The late Sir Hormusjee Mody bore the entire expense of the erection of the main building and additions have been made through the liberality of benefactors of varied nationality and domicile. The latest addition to the buildings is a workshop built out of a con- tribution from Sir Robert Ho Tung.
The annual income of the University now amounts to about $514,000 of which about $315,000 comes from endowments and $50,000 from Government. Messrs. Butterfield and Swire gave £40,000 to the original endowment fund and subsequently $100,000 for engineering equipment. The Rockefeller Institution has endowed the University with three chairs in surgery, medicine and obstetrics, the endowment being in each case $250,000.
**
The expenditure for the year 1927 amounted to $507,887.
26
The University includes the three Faculties of Medicine, Engineering and Arts. Admission to all faculties is conditional upon passing the matriculation examination of the University or some examination recognised as equivalent thereto.
The Faculty of Medicine provides a six year course of study in the usual pre-medical and medical sciences, leading to the degree ot M.B. and B.S. The degrees of M.D., and M.S., may be obtained for postgraduate work. The degrees above mentioned are recognised by the General Medical Council for registration in Great Britain.
The Faculty of Engineering provides a four year course in practical and theoretical engineering, leading to the degree of B.Sc., (Eng.). Fourth year students specialize in civil, in mechanical or in electrical engineering. The degree for post-graduate work is that of M.Sc., (Eng.).
The Faculty of Arts includes departments of pure arts and science, social science, commerce and a department for training teachers. The course is in all cases one of four years and leads to the degree of B.A. The degree for post-graduate work is that of M.A.
With a view to securing the maintenance of the desired standard --which is in all three faculties that of a British University degree- external examiners are, in all faculties, associated with the internal examiners in all annual final examinations. In the Faculty of Engineering, but not in other faculties, degrees with honours are granted, the standard being assessed by special examiners chosen from amongst the external examiners in the University of London.
The degree of LL.D., is granted, honoris causa.
The site of the University was given by the Government of Hong Kong. As subsequently enlarged by minor grants and by purchase, the University estate covers an area of 709,789 sq. ft. The view from the grounds over the harbour is magnificent and the grounds are naturally beautiful,
In the main buildings are housed the chemical and physical laboratories, the University library and portions of the engineering laboratories. They further include the Great Hall, a Senate room and the lecture and class rooms used by the Faculty of Arts and for general purposes.
Special medical buildings include schools of anatomy, physiology, pathology and tropical medicine, erected at the cost of Chinese gentlemen resident in the Colony. Clinical instruction is given at the Government Civil Hospital.
Special engineering buildings include:-
(a) a power station, with internal combustion engines of varied types which are maintained for instructional purposes;
28
clubs. The graduation fee is $25.
Probably about $1,200 repre- sents the minimum amount which at present prices would cover a student's annual expenses including vacations. It would cost a Chinese student who goes abroad $2,500 a year at the very least end this would not cover travelling expenses.
Numerous scholarships are available, including the King Edward VII Scholarships founded by His Majesty's Government. There are also scholarships provided by the Governments of Hong Kong, of the Straits Settlements and Federated Malay States, of Kedah and Siam.
The Union is the centre of the social life of the students. It is at once a Club and a centre of athletics. The Union Committee contains certain memebrs of the University teaching staff, but its President and Secretary are undergraduates elected by the under- graduates. The undergraduate members of the Committee are also elected by their fellow students. There is a Union magazine with English and Chinese sections. The editors are students, a member of the teaching staff acting as assistant editor. There are twenty- one women students; these women students are all members of the Union.
Students of the University come from Kwangtung, Chihli, Hankow, Hupeh, Yunnan, Hunan, Shanghai. Pekin, Fukien, Singapore, Penang, Kuala Lumpur, Kedah. Jahore, Java, Manila, Burma, Siam, Japan, India and Macao. The present enrolment is 300 of whom 251 are Chinese and 49 non-Chinese.
X.-Lands and Surveys.
LAND GRANTS AND GENERAL VALUE OF LAND.
1. (1) Sales of Crown Land and Pier rights (exclusive of the New Territories) during 1927 produced $107,633.63 a decrease of $144,897.32 on the preceding year, and $1,397,985.80 less than the average of the previous five years.
(2). Sales of Crown Land and Pier rights in the New Territories produced $32,741.21 an increase of $6,649.42 on the preceding year, and $213,330.91 less than the average of the previous five years.
(3). The average decrease is explained by the fact that the years 1922, 1923, and 1924 were boom years followed by a severe slump from which the Colony has not yet fully recovered.
2. The total area of land leased during the year was 454 Acres 3 Roods and 26-1/5 Poles being 931 Acres 3 Roods and 15 Poles less than in 1926.
3. (1). The total area resumed (including Re-entries and Surrenders) was 584 Acres and 2-4/5 Poles a decrease of 1481 Acres 2 Roods and 31-3/5 Poles on 1926.
1
29
(2). Non-fulfilment of Building Covenants (owing to financial depression) necessitated Re-entry on over 90 Acres in the Colony.
4. The Village development continues in the Northern District of the New Territories but there was little or no fresh development in semi-urban areas.
SURVEYS.
An Aerial Survey of the Colony was undertaken in 1924 and the ground work necessary to enable new maps of the Colony to be published was completed in 1927.

The Geological Survey of the Colony was continued by Dr. Brock, Dean of the Faculty of Geology, University of British. Columbia.
XI.-Labour.
The Illegal Strikes and Lock-outs Ordinance, No. 10, was based on the English Trades Disputes and Trade Union bill, which became law in England on the 29th July, 1927. The Hong Kong Ordinance became law on the 8th July, 1927.
FACTORIES.
The ordinance regulating the employment of children in factories has now been in force for five years and it may not be out of place to survey briefly the results attained. This ordinance (No. 22 of 1922) was the first piece of constructive factory legislation introduced into this Colony and to the Chinese factory owners was an entirely new departure. In the earlier stages a large number of the younger children were dismissed from the factories, the owners finding it' easier to dispense with child labour than to comply with the requirements of the ordinance as to hours of work, overtime and holidays. The children so dismissed have not been replaced and it now admitted that the absence of child labour need not affect output. In factories where children have been retained the conditions of the ordinance have been accepted without serious objection. No European firms in the Colony employ children under the age of 15 years and the total number of children employed has been reduced until at present there are not more that one hundred and fifty children under that age regularly at work in factories. This large reduction is partly accounted for by the depression in the knitting trade and cigarette factories. No new beginners have been taken on during the year and many of these who have hitherto been registered under the ordinance have now outgrown the age of registration. The cigarette factories which formerly employed a large number of young girls were closed for a considerable part of the year: production has now been resumed but on a limited scale and where formerly 160 children were engaged in packing cigarettes there are now but 15 at work. Apart from the cigarette trade the knitting factories of Kowloon are the principal employers of women and girls. Some of these have closed down during the year: others have found
30
markets elsewhere to replace those lost and have built up a consider- able export trade with Singapore and the Dutch East Indies. The 'trade outlook appears brighter and some firms are installing new machinery and plant in anticipation of improved trade in the near future.
Dangerous Trades.-Glass making, boiler chipping and firework making. Visits of inspection have been made to all places where these trades are carried on. No breach of the ordinance has been discovered.
Building material etc.-The practice of engaging children to carry coal, bricks and sand up the Peak, once so common and the subject of so much comment has almost entirely ceased. Isolated cases still occur where children are found helping their mothers but they are not now regularly employed and engaged by contractors for this work.
XII. Legislation.
Twenty-eight ordinances were passed during 1927. The most important were the following.
The Factory (Accidents) Ordinance, No. 3, gives power to make regulations for the purpose of preventing accidents. The regulations which have been made are short and simple. In this matter it is necessary to proceed here by easy stages until Chinese public opinion has been more fully educated on the subject. In any case, the proximity of China makes it impossible to proceed too far on European lines while China lags so far behind.
The Basel Evangelical Missionary Socitey Incorporation Ordin- ance, No. 7, restores this mission to it pre-war status and position.
The Public Revenue Protection Ordinance, No. 9, provides a method of imposing or altering taxation rapidly and secretly, with the object of defeating attempts to take advantage of the old rate of taxation, or freedom from taxation, by means of accelerated clearances from bond or otherwise. It gives the Governor power to impose or alter taxation provisionally, and it provides that the taxation so imposed or altered is to be operative from the actual making of the order by the Governor. The Governor's order remains in force for only four months at most, and it ceases to be in force before that time if the proposals embodied in it are rejected by the Legislative Council. If the Governor's order is not ratified by Legislative Council any excess taxation paid has to be refunded.
The Suppression of Piracy Amendment Ordinance, No. 15. provides for the abolition of the present system by which ship cwners have to give bonds binding them to provide grilles and to make certain other structural alterations of their ships, to employ guards, and to carry out certain other anti-piracy measures within certain portions of their voyages from and to Hong Kong. system was probably necessarv originally, but it has now been decided to leave the question of anti-piracy measures on board to the ship- owners themselves, and to confine the Government anti-piracy
This

30
markets elsewhere to replace those lost and have built up a consider- able export trade with Singapore and the Dutch East Indies. The 'trade outlook appears brighter and some firms are installing new machinery and plant in anticipation of improved trade in the near future.
Dangerous Trades.-Glass making, boiler chipping and firework making. Visits of inspection have been made to all places where these trades are carried on. No breach of the ordinance has been discovered.
Building material etc.-The practice of engaging children to carry coal, bricks and sand up the Peak, once so common and the subject of so much comment has almost entirely ceased. Isolated cases still occur where children are found helping their mothers but they are not now regularly employed and engaged by contractors for this work.
XII. Legislation.
Twenty-eight ordinances were passed during 1927. The most important were the following.
The Factory (Accidents) Ordinance, No. 3, gives power to make regulations for the purpose of preventing accidents. The regulations which have been made are short and simple. In this matter it is necessary to proceed here by easy stages until Chinese public opinion has been more fully educated on the subject. In any case, the proximity of China makes it impossible to proceed too far on European lines while China lags so far behind.
The Basel Evangelical Missionary Socitey Incorporation Ordin- ance, No. 7, restores this mission to it pre-war status and position.
The Public Revenue Protection Ordinance, No. 9, provides a method of imposing or altering taxation rapidly and secretly, with the object of defeating attempts to take advantage of the old rate of taxation, or freedom from taxation, by means of accelerated clearances from bond or otherwise. It gives the Governor power to impose or alter taxation provisionally, and it provides that the taxation so imposed or altered is to be operative from the actual making of the order by the Governor. The Governor's order remains in force for only four months at most, and it ceases to be in force before that time if the proposals embodied in it are rejected by the Legislative Council. If the Governor's order is not ratified by Legislative Council any excess taxation paid has to be refunded.
The Suppression of Piracy Amendment Ordinance, No. 15. provides for the abolition of the present system by which ship cwners have to give bonds binding them to provide grilles and to make certain other structural alterations of their ships, to employ guards, and to carry out certain other anti-piracy measures within certain portions of their voyages from and to Hong Kong. system was probably necessarv originally, but it has now been decided to leave the question of anti-piracy measures on board to the ship- owners themselves, and to confine the Government anti-piracy
This

}
31
measures to searching the ships and their passengers so far as may be practical, before they sail from Hong Kong. The Ordinance contains a suspending clause and was not put into operation in 1927.
The Chinese Extradition Amendment Ordinance, No. 17, is an attempt to make possible again extradition from Hong Kong to China which had been rendered impossible by the abnormal constitutional condition of China. It enables the Governor to act on a request received from any person which he may declare to be or to represent the person or persons actually exercising authority in any province or other territory which has at any time formed part of the Republic of China.
XIII.-Miscellaneous.
EMIGRATION AND IMMIGRATION.
કે હું
Two hundred and eighty five thousand, five hundred and ninety three emigrants (285,593) left Hong Kong for various places during the year 1927. Of these, 138,263 were carried in British ships and 147,300 in Foreign ships.
One hundred and eighty one thousand, and one hundred (181,100) returning emigrants were reported to have been brought to Hong Kong from the several places to which they had emigrated either from this colony or from coast ports, as against 128,661 in 1926. On these, 100,889 arrived in British ships and 80,211 in Foreign ships.
Statement of number of emigrants to Straits Settlement 1915 to 1927 compared with total Chinese emigration.
No. of Emigrants to
Straits Settlement.
Total No. of Emigrants.
*
1915
41,278
68,275
1916
82,797
117,653
1917
63,292
96,298
1918
8,019
43,830
1919
11,638
59,969
1920 ....
43,935
105,258
1921
87,324
156,011
1922
50,356
98,393
1923
65,584
120,224
1924
75,682
129,859
1925
97,552
140,534
1926
157,285
216,527
1927
202,408
285,593

32
INSTITUTIONS.
Among institutions recognised and encouraged, but not to any considerable extent supported by Government may be mentioned the Pó Leung Kuk, the Eyre Refuge, the City Hall, and the Chinese Fublic Dispensaries.
The Pó Leung Kuk is a Chinese Society founded in 1878 for the suppression of kidnapping and traffic in human beings. It was incorporated in 1893 and is presided over by the Secretary for Chinese Affairs and not more than twelve directors nominated by the Governor. The actual inanagement is entrusted to a committee elected annually by the members of the Society. The Society's buildings have been declared a Refuge under the Women and Girls Protection Ordinance, and almost all women and girls detained by the Secretary for Chinese Affairs under that Ordinance are sent to the Pó Leung Kuk. During 1926 the number of persons admitted was 299 and at the close of the year 45 remained under the care of the Society. The inmates are under the immediate charge of a Chinese matron, and instruction is given them by the matron and A Chinese teacher in elementary subjects and in needlework.
The Chinese Public Dispensaries are institutions maintained in order to provide the Chinese with the services of doctors, whose certificates will be accepted by the Registrar of Deaths, and with the services of interpreters, who can assist the inmates of houses, where a case of infectious disease has occurred. Coolies are engaged and ambulances and dead vans provided in order to remove cases of infectious disease to the Infectious Diseases Hospital and dead bodies to the Mortuary. The Dispensaries receive sick infants and send them to one or other of the Convents and arrange for the burial of dead infants. Free advice and medicine are given and patients are attended at their houses. There are eight Dispensaries in existence. The Government makes an annual grant of $2,000, and the rest of the cost is defrayed by voluntary subscription. The Dis- pensaries are conducted by committees under the chairmanship of the Secretary for Chinese Affairs.
The Tung Wa Hospital, opened in 1872, is mainly supported by the voluntary subscriptions of Chinese, but receives an annual grant of $8,000 from the Government. Only Chinese are treated in this institution. Various other services not appertaining to a hospital are performed by the institution, such as the free burial of the poor, the repatriation of destitutes, the maintenance of free vernacular schools, and the organisation of charitable relief in emergencies: Chinese as well as European methods of treatment are employed in accordance with the wishes expressed by the patients or their friends. Over half the number are now treated by Western methods. The hospital is managed by a committee of Chinese gentlemen annually elected, their appointment being submitted to the Governor for confirmation.
Appendix A.
FINANCIAL RETURNS FOR THE YEAR 192'
COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF THE REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE FOR THE P
Estimates,
Heads of Revenue.
1927.
Light Dues
Do., Special Assess-
ment

Actual Revenue
to 31st December,
1927.
C.
150,000
132,379.31
Revenue for same period of
Increase.
Decrease.
Heads of Expenditure.
preceding year.
c .
110,543.80
C.
$
C.
21,835.50
165,000 158,762.56
127,655.26
31,107.30
Licences and Internal Re- venue not otherwise specified -
15,548,500
15,248,634.64 14,020,850.58
1,227,784.06
Fees of Court or Office, Payments for specific
purposes, and Reim- bursements in Aid
1,801,525
1,789,799.18 1,488,587.15
301,212.03
Post Office
790,000 890,946.79 766,539.87 124,406.92
Kowloon-Canton Railway
609,100
713,424.85
538,044.73
175,380.12
Rent of Gr
:nment Pro-
Td
perty, and Houses
1,267,172
1,283,234.68 1,264,799.24
18,435.44
Interest
65,000 328,086.83 237,443.67
90,643.16
Miscellaneous Receipts -
311,100 655,583-54 2,290,775-73
H. E. the Governor Cadet Service
-
Senior Clerical & Accoun
ing Staff -
Junior Clerical Service Colonial Secretary's Offic
and Legislature
Secretariat for Chines
Affairs
Treasury -
Audit Department
District Office North
Do.
Post Office
South

Imports & Exports Offic Harbour Master's De
partment -
Royal Observatory- Fire Brigade
-
Supreme Court - Attorney General - Crown Solicitor's Office Offical Receiver -
Land Office -
Magistracy Hong Kong
Kowloon
Do Police Force -
·
-
Prisons Department Medical Department Sanitary Department Botanical and Foresti Department - Education Department Public Works Depar
ment
-
Public Works, Recurre
Do., Extraordina Kowloon-Canton Railw Volunteer Defence Cor
1,635,192.19 Hong Kong Royal Nav
Volunteer Reserve-
Military Contribution- Miscellaneous Services Charitable Services Charge on Account
Public Debt-
Pensions
-
Port Works Departmen Port Works Extraor
nary
Total (exclusive of Land
Sales)-
20,707,397
21,200,852.38 20,845,240.03
1,990,804.53
1,635,192.19
Land Sales, (Premia on
New Leases)
300,000 143,683.34 286,341.61
142,658.27
TOTAL
-
21,007,397 21,344,535.72 21,131,581.64
1,990,804.53
1,777,850.46
TOTAL
Deduct
$1,777,850.46
Net
212,954.07
Appendix A.
NCIAL RETURNS FOR THE YEAR 1927.
UE AND EXPENDITURE FOR THE PERIOD ENDED 31ST DECEMBER, 1927.
Estimates,
Decrease.
Heads of Expenditure.
1927.
Actual Expenditure to 31st December,
1927.
Expenditure
for
same period of Increase.
preceding year.
Decrease.
C.

C.
C.
C.
.50
H. E. the Governor
101,319
103,096.25
Cadet Service
319,200
316,639.96
115,162.79 292,521.59
C.
12,066.54
C.
24,118.37
Senior Clerical & Account-
ing Staff -
155,248
152,432.89
Junior Clerical Service
733,116
705,809.19
669,125.82
152,432.89 36,683.37
·30
Colonial Secretary's Office
and Legislature
46,275
43,021.40
55,136.12
12,114.72
Secretariat for Chinese
Affairs
11,729
11,533.80
8,147.42
3.386.38
Treasury -
15,264
6,107.57
25,405.41
Audit Department
44,092
41,257.03
45.609.05
19,297.84 4,352.02
..06
District Office North
20,905
20,537.68
Do.
South

10,181
25,886.61
10,150.84
4,801.91
Post Office
155,321
134,583.48
120,848.45
13,735.03
Imports & Exports Office
855,767
849,296.91
667,665.32
181,631.59
Harbour Master's De-
partment -
737,146
632,121.36
619,442.78
12,678,58
Royal Observatory-
35,275
36,664.99
45,158.87
8.493.88
.03
Fire Brigade
230,799
190,350.27
Supreme Court -
206,232.50
15,882,23
149,777
141,493.29
133,680.40
Attorney General
7,812.89
22,538
24,369.40
23,986.97
382.43
Crown Solicitor's Office
38,704
36,608.03
.92
Offical Receiver -
9,546
9,545.89
67,386.52
3,076.82
Land Office
23,633
24,309.42
Magistracy Hong Kong
2,206
1,917.80
Do Kowloon
2,248
16,230.95
12,282.13
2,031.02
.12
Police Force-
1,826,592
1,759,131.57
1,745,084.97
Prisons Department
14,046.60
512,167
493,379-33
472,337.42
21,041.91
Medical Department
781,991
717,531.96
723,228,38
5,696.92
Sanitary Department -
695,363
588,154.71
Botanical and Forestry
569,392.24
18,762.47
.44
Department - -
98,320
93,289.09
87,541.09
Education Department
5,748.00
1,153,943
1,091,423.21
.16
1,635,192.19
Public Works Depart-
ment
-
Public Works, Recurrent-
Do., Extraordinary- Kowloon-Canton Railway Volunteer Defence Corps- Hong Kong Royal Naval
910,063.09
181,360.12
1,492,2811
1,309,117.34 1,248,864.89
60,252.45
1,540,400
3,706,264
1,542,494.98 1,822,816.80 2.966,390.69
4,720.000.19
280,321.82 1,753,609.50
650,033
632,380.39
766.402.88
134,022.49
64,299
62,562.92
48,980.22
13,582.70
Volunteer Reserve-
40,000
Military Contribution-
3,523,006
3,491,894.33
4,198,057.87
706,163.54
Miscellaneous Services
677,223
1,034,917.88
990,467.63
44,450.25
Charitable Services
96,475
118,609.41
115,842.01
Charge on Account of
2,767.40
Public Debt-
1,050,153
790,595.90
803,272 29
-53
1,635,192.19
Pensions
12,676.39
Port Works Department
Port Works Extraordi-
nary
675,903 659.312.51
578.765.67
80,546.84
59,299.30
59,299.30
526,670.93
528,670.93
142,658.27
4.53
1,777,850.46
TOTAL
22,314,702
20,845,064.69 23,524,715.94
883,299.00
850.46
Deduct
954.07
Net
$
3,562,950.25
883,299.00
2,679,651.25
Appendix A (1)
REPORT ON THE FINANCES FOR THE YEAR 1927.
REVENUE.
The total revenue for the year amounted to $21,344,536- being $337,139 more than the estimate and $212,954 more than the revenue in 1926.
Compared with that year there were increases under all heads except Miscellaneous Receipts and Land Sales, the most notable being an increase of $1,227,784 in Licences and Internal Revenue.
2. The principal sub-heads showing excess over the
estimates were as follows:-
EXCESS.
(b) Forfeitures
*
(a) Assessed Taxes
(c) Hawkers Licences.
(d) Liquor Licences
(e) Opium Monopoly
$ 47,159
25,943
20,483
41,445
344,371
(f) Medical Examination
of
Emigrants
60,109
(g) Post Office Message Fees
53,838
(h) Post Office Postage
47,109
(i) K.C.R. Passenger
Service,
Passenger, Foreign Line
107,184
(K.C.R. Goods Service, Goods,
Foreign Line
26,580
(k) K.C.R. Auxiliary Operations
Foreign Haulage
(1) Leased Lands (Crown Rent) (m) Interest
(n) Compensation in lieu of Rates
(0) Other Miscellaneous Receipts ...
The above increases may be attributed generally to the great improvement in local trading conditions. Items (i), (i) & (k) are due to the resumption of the through service to Canton and the large increase in (m) was brought about by the transfer of accumulated interest on the money deposited in London towards the cost of the Singapore Base.
The transfer to revenue of profit on exchange and the surplus of the Local War Loan Sinking Fund resulted in (0) and increased sales of opium accounted for (e).
67,819
...
36,691
263,087
27,052
308,712
-A (1) 2-
3. The principal sub-heads showing deficits compared with the estimates were as follows:
DEFICITS.
(a) Liquor Duties
$ 310,195
(b) Stamp Duties
383,088
(c) Tobacco Duties
73,988
(d) K.C.R. Passengers Service,
Passengers, Home Line
97,982
(e) Buildings, Rent of
20,478
(f) Land Sales
156,317
The new liquor duties failed to bring in the revenue anticipated and stamp duties proved to be overestimated. The deficit in (d) is more than off-set by the increases in other sub- heads of railway revenue. Land Sales proved to be considerably less than was expected.
EXPENDITURE.
4. The total expenditure brought to account amounted to $20,845,065 being $1,469,637 less than the estimate and $2,679,651 less than the expenditure in 1926.
The principal heads showing savings were as follows:-
SAVINGS.
Junior Clerical Service
Post Office
Harbour Department
$ 27,307
20,738
105,025
Fire Brigade
Police Force
Medical Department
Sanitary Department
40,449
67,460
64,459
107,208
Education Department
72,520
Public Works Department
183,164
Public Works Extraordinary
739,873
Military Contribution
31,112
Hong Kong Royal Naval Volunteer
Reserve
40,000
Charge On Account of Public Debt..
259,557
The savings in the Harbour Department were chiefly due to overstimating the coal and oil fuel requirements, the actual expenditure on this item being over $61,000 below the estimate. Only one instalment was paid on the new launch to replace the "Victoria" and in consequence a sum of $23,350 lapsed on this item.
17
-A (1) 3-
Savings in the Fire Brigade vote were mainly owing to personnel being below the authorised establishment and to the non-arrival of one of the light motor pumps provided for in the Estimates.
Under the head of Police Force savings were due to vacancies in the establishment and officers being on leave.
Lapsing salaries and overestimating the sum required for medicines and surgical appliances were chiefly responsible for the savings in the Medical Department.
The savings in the Sanitary Department vote are accounted for by lapsing salaries and deferring the purchase of a new refuse barge for which provision was made in the Estimates.
The Education Department showed savings as a result of lapsing salaries and a reduction in capitation and building grants.
The Public Works Department showed a saving mainly due to lapsing salaries and a tendency to overestimate requirements for "other charges".
The considerable saving under Public Works Extraordinary was brought about by the general policy of retrenchment pursued by the Government. Public works not of an urgent character were postponed and work was delayed on such schemes as were already in progress wherever this could be done without dis- advantage.
The saving shown under the head Charge On Account of Public Debt was due to repayment of the greater part of the Local War Loan being effected in the first half of the year with a consequent saving of interest. The Sinking Fund investments realised sufficient to make any further contribution unnecessary and the provision for this was therefore allowed to lapse.
The scheme for the formation of a Naval Volunteer Reserve
in Hong Kong was not proceeded with.
The principal heads showing excess were as follows:
EXCESS.
Miscellaneous Services
Charitable Services
$357,695 22,134
The vote for Miscellaneous Services was exceeded largely on account of services of a special nature necessitated by the political situation and for which no provision was made in the Estimates. The cost of transport of Government Servants was greatly underestimated and to a smaller degree this fault was apparent in several other items.
-A (1) 4-
Several charitable grants which could not be foreseen caused an excess on the Charitable Services vote.
5. The Revenue for the year exceeded the Expenditure by the sum of $499,471.
6. The following statement shows the Liabilities and Assets on the 31st December, 1927:
LIABILITIES.
G.
ASSETS.
C.
Deposits not Available
1,179,775.88 | Subsidiary Coins
1,956,414.29
Postal Agencies
Suspense Account
18,037.34 | Advances 493,931.37 Building Loans
125,982.71
1,620,573.61
Suspense Trade Loan ..
461,318.35
Imprest
5,439,71
Overdraft, Bank Trade
House Service A/c...
198.10
Loan
7,638,676.65
Crown Agents'
Adjustment of Ex-
Deposit Account...
9,896.91
change Account
**
455,895.39
Unallocated Stores,
(P. W. D.),..........
325,536.05
Unallocated Stores,
*Investment A c.
(Railway)
Coal Account
Balance at Bank........
164,455.91
12,369.66
1,279,861.69
611,169.17
Trade Loan Out-
standing
8,102,995.00
Crown Agents'
Current Account...]
21,504,74
Total Liabilities 10,250,634.98
Balance
3,985,761.57
Total......$14,236,396.55
† Cash on deposit £1,000 Os. Od.
* Invested as follows :-
AMOUNT OF STOCK, &C.
STERLING INVESMENT.
Natal, (1929-49)..............
.3 % Stock.
Newcastle Corporation,
(1945-55)
.41%
22
Queensland, (1940-60) ...5 %
National War Bonds,
(Feb. 1929) .....
.5 %
11
Total.....$14,236,396.55
NOMINAL VALUE.
COST PRICE. MARKET VALUE.
£ 7,600. 0. 0
20,000. 0. 0 29,009.16.10
70,980.16. 3
£5,646. 7.0 (75) £5,700. 0. 0
19,200. 0. 0(94) 18,800. 0.0 28,719.14.11 (100) 29,009.16.10
75,753. 5. 3 (1054) 74.707. 6. 1
£ 127,590.13. 1 £129,319. 7. 2 £ 128,217. 2.11
-A (1) 5
7. The following table shows the Revenue and Expenditure during the last five years :-
1923
$
1924 $
1925
1926
1927
$
$
Revenue..24,783,763 24,209,640 23,244,365 21,131,582 21,344,536
Expendi-
ture 21,571,905 26,726,428 28,266,817 23,524,716 20,845,065 Surplus... 3,211,858
Deficit.....
2,516,788 5,022,452 2,393,134
PUBLIC DEBT.
499,471
8. The inscribed Stock Loans of 1893 and 1906 amounted to £1,485,733 and the Sinking Fund stood at £587,205 being £53,418 more than the amount at credit of that fund at the end of 1926.
The Local 6% War Loan (Ord. No. 12 of 1916) of $5,000,000 was fully repaid during the year, $2,100,000 on May 1st and $900,000 on November 1st, and there remained a surplus in the Sinking Fund of $158,134 which was transferred to Revenue.
The first part of the 6% Public Works Loan 1927 (Ord. No. 14 of 1927) was issued locally at par on November 1st, 1927. Applications, which were invited from the public, amounted to $11,711,000 and Bonds were allotted to the value of $3,000,000.
The first contribution to the Sinking Fund becomes due on October 31st, 1928.
GENERAL REMARKS.
9. The total receipts and payments in the Treasury books during the year were $52,331,639 and $51,511,012 respectively. The figures not accounted for under revenue and expenditure relate to transactions under various heads such as Deposits, Advances, Subsidiary Coin, Unallocated Stores, etc.
10. Subsidiary coins in stock on 31st December were as follows:-
50 cents
20
10
5
""
Copper
$
10,200
3,960
1,667,676
248,424
26,153
$1,956,413
-A (1) 6-
The nominal amount of coins in circulation was $17,914,370 and the market value stood practically at par.
11. The local circulation of notes and Specie in Reserve of the three Banks having authorised issues were as follows on 31st December:
Hong Kong & Shanghai
Banking Corporation
Chartered Bank of India,
Australia and China
Mercantile Bank of India
Notes in Circulation.
Specie in Reserve.
$47,195,645 $34,000,000
1,855,310
15,755,477 5,800,000
660,000
$64,806,432 $40,460,000
12. The rate of exchange for the Estimates was taken at 2/--and this proved to be the average rate for purpose of con- version in the Treasury books.
21st April, 1928.
C. McI. MESSER.
Treasurer.
-A (1) 7
REPORT ON THE TRADE LOAN.
=
The purpose of this Loan was to assist local merchants and others during a period of exceptional financial stringency. The necessary funds were obtained by borrowing in London from the Straits Settlements Government, the West African Commis- sioners and the Hong Kong and Shanghai Banking Corporation sums totalling £1,800,000, security being afforded to the lenders by Ordinance No. 13 of 1926 which made the Loan a charge against the Colony's Revenue.
Loans were issued locally on the security of mortgages on lands or shares with two or three exceptions. A Committee appointed for the purpose received applications and made their recommendations as a result of which 278 loans were issued, the first being made on 16th November, 1925.
All loans were limited to a period of two years and a number fell due for repayment in the latter part of the year under review. It was decided however, to refrain from applying any undue pressure to borrowers in view of the fact that although the financial situation had improved considerably there still existed a stringency which warranted the renewal of many loans on a month to month basis.
On the other hand a number of mortgagors found it con- venient to effect repayment before the expiry of two years and the extent to which this was done is shown in the following tables.
Foreclosure was resorted to in only one instance and no loss was sustained in this connection.
Total of Loans issued in Hong Kong from 16th
November, 1925 on the security of Mortgages $15,624,588.46
Less redemption effected during the year:-
FA
1926
1927
$2,604,930.00
4,845,879.76
7,450,809.76
Total
8,173,778.70
70,883.70
Less amount written off as Irrecoverable
Total of Loans outstanding on 31st Dec. 1927 $ 8,102,895.00
Overdraft with Hong Kong & Shanghai Bank
on 31st Dec. 1927
$7,638,676.65
—A (1) 8
Interest in arrears on 31st Dec. 1926
""
31st Dec. 1927
$117,369.42
206,818.45
Total number of Loans issued
Less number redeemed in:
278
1926
1927
32
82
114
Number of Loans outstanding
164
Loans obtained in London by the Hong Kong
Government
Less repaid in 1926.....
1927......
""
""
£1,800,000
£400,000
550,000
950,000
Total outstanding on 31st Dec. 1927
£ 850,000
21st April, 1928.
C. McI. MESSER,
Treasurer.
*
1
Appendix B.
REPORT ON THE ASSESSMENT FOR THE YEAR 1928-1929.
1. By Order of His Excellency the Governor in Council a new valuation of the whole Colony has been made and the Rateable Value has thereby been increased from $29,016,439 to $30,395,447 an addition of $1,379,008 or 4.75 per cent.
2. The following Table gives a comparison of the Assessinents for the years 1927-1928 and 1928-1929 :=
DISTRICT.
VALUATION 1927-1928.
VALUATION 1928-1929.
INCREASE.
PER
CENT.
The City of Victoria, ...................... Hill District,...
............
Shaukiwan, Saiwanbo, and
Quarry Bay. 210.16 Hong Kong Villages,...................... Kowloon Point,
21,338,342 21,338,342 22,136,417 22,116,417
778,075 8.64
502,085
.....
488,745
577,408 ......
614,744
1,110,266 2,189,751 1.208.421 2,311,910
122,156 5:58
1:366,230
1.450,880
Yaumati,
1:563,172
......
1,691,350
:.....
Mongkoktsui,
......tit.1:
1,062,815
1,144,090
......
Hunghom & Hok Un,.......................
557,810 *....
614,690
...
Kowloon Villages,
187,842
210,147
New Territories,
750,674 5,488,343
855.963 | 5,967,120 478,777 8.72
Total;......
29,016,439
|30,895,147 | 1,379,008 4.75
3. The number of tenements reported to be vacant averaged about 324 monthly, as compared with 445 last year.
4. During the year ending 25th May, 1928, 1,047 Interim Valuations were made as follows:
New or rebuilt tenements and tenements structurally altered
CITY OF VICTORIA.
REST OF COLONY.
No.
Rateable Value.
Rateable
No.
Value.
$
$
295
458,967
524
301,044
Assessments cancelled, tenements resumed, pulled down or being in other respects not rateable......
89
193,080
139
57,440
Number and increase
384
266,887
663
243,604
B 2
5. The following comparative statement shows the Rateable Value of the Colony of Hong Kong in each of the ten years from 1919-1920 to 1928-1929 inclusive:
Year.
Rateable Value.
Increase as compared with previous
year.
Percentage of In- crease in Rateable Value as compared with previous year.
$
%
1919-20
16,304,801
666,065
4.25
1920-21
17,408,959
1,104,185
6.77
1921-22 18,696,660
1,287,701.
7.40
1922-23 19,805,929
1,109,269
5.91 *
1923-24 21,059,700
1,253,771
6.33
1924-25
22,147,951
1,088,251
5.16
1925-26
27,287,862
5,139,911
23.20
1926-27
27,998,237
710,375
2.60
1927-28 29,016,439.
1,018,202
3.64
1928-29 30,395,447
1,379,008
4.75
6. In the ten years 1919-1920 to 1928-1929 the Rateable Value of the Colony has increased by $14,090,646 or 86.42 per cent.
THE TREASURY,
25th May, 1928.
C. McI. MESSER,
Treasurer & Assessor.
:.
*
Appendix C.
REPORT OF THE SECRETARY FOR CHINESE AFFAIRS
FOR THE YEAR 1927.
REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE.
(Tables I and II).
1. The revenue derived from all sources during the year was $22,318 and the expenditure was $11,534.
PROTECTION OF WOMEN AND GIRLS.
Women and Girls Protection Ordinance, No. 4 of 1897. Po Leung Kuk Incorporation Ordinance, No. 6 of 1893.
(Table III).
2. The number of persons reported by Hong Kong residents to the Po Leung Kuk ás missing during the year was 45 of whom 8 were found, as compared with 36 and 8 in 1926: The total number of persons reported missing including reports from China and Macao was 50 of whom 8 were found, as compared with 8 out of 36 in 1926.
3. Four names were added to the list of girls under bond to report themselves periodically to the Secretary for Chinese Affairs. The number of names on the list on December 31st was 12. The names of 3 girls of whom 1 ran away were struck off the list.
EMIGRATION.
Asiatic Emigration Ordinance, No. 30 of 1915.
(i)-Emigration of Women and Children, (Free). ·
(Table IV).
4. The number of female and minor passengers examined and allowed to proceed shows an increase of 66% over the number for 1926.
5. The record of the occupations of the female emigrants over 16 years of age shows that 66% went either with or to join relatives, 25% went as maid servants and the remainder con- sisted of tailoresses, farmers and hairdressers."
6. 66 women were detained for enquiries; none were detain- ed in 1926.
:
C 2
7. The number of women and girls repatriated during the year was 92.
8. 5 prosecutions were undertaken by this office under the Women and Girls Protection Ordinance, and four convictions were obtained.
(ii)-Male Emigration, (Assisted).
(Table V).
9. The figures for the year show an increase of over 31% over the number for 1926.

CHINESE BOARDING HOUSES.
The Boarding House Ordinance, No. 23 of 1917.
(Table VI).
10. 'Under, this Ordinance Chinese Boarding Houses are divided into six classes for the purposes.
11. During the year 16 convictions were obtained for breaches of the Ordinance as compared with 7 in 1926.
Ordinance No. 3 of 1888.
(i)-District Watch.
(Table VII).
12. The District Watch Committee met on 12 occasions; the average attendance being 14. The loyal advice and assist- ance of the Committee (which deals with every kind of question affecting the Chinese Community) continue to be, of the greatest value to the Government.
13. The Hon: Sir Shouson Chow, Messrs. Lo Cheung Shiu, Wong Iu Tung and To Sz Tun's terms of 5 years expired and they were re-appointed by His Excellency the Governor for a further period of 5 years.
14. During the year the two members selected from the retiring Committees of the Tung Wa Hospital and the Po Leung Kuk who hold their appointments for one year, were Mr. Tam Woon Tong and Mr. Chau Tsun Nin vice Mr. Ma Chui Chiu and Mr. Li Yik Mui whose terms had expired.
15. At the end of the year the District Watch Force reached full strength consisting of 122 members. S.I. Shaftain continued in charge of the Force until November when he went on leave and his place was taken by S.I. Andrew. The number of con- victions secured by members of the force was 606, a number
C 3
far above any previous record, as compared with 467 in 1926 Particular attention was given to the activities of pick-pockets with gratifying results; 17% of convictions were of this class. Larceny cases made up 34% and unlawful possession added another 17%..
(ii)-Permits.
16. Permits to issue fire-crackers were given in 1,197 cases of which 871 were for weddings, 150 for theatricals, and the remainder were for religious ceremonies and processions.
REGISTRATION OF BOOKS.
Ordinance No. 2 of 1888.
17. 26 books were registered during the year as compared with 27 in 1926.
TUNG WA HOSPITAL AND MAN MO TEMPLE,
Ordinance No. 1 of 1870, No. 9 of 1904 and No. 10 of 1908.
(Table VIII to Table XII),
18. The following is a list of the Directors for 1927:-
Li Hoi-tung,.
San Shing-sam,
Ng Yu-hon,
Tong Shun,
Chau Pok-hing,
Au Kung-ue,
Uen Lan-suen,-
To Chak-man, Lui Ka On, Tsang lu-ting, Yung Kung-man, Cho Shuk-kon, Luk Kung-luk, Lam Shin-po.
19. The following gentlemen were elected to form the Com-
mittee for 1928:-
Tang Shiu Kin, Lo Yin Nin,
Ng Wa,
Li Chi Tseung,
Siu Shuk Lim,
Fung Kang Ue,
Mak Sui Cho
Lo Leung Wo, Lau Sing Chong, Wong Chung To, Ng Yiu Ting, Tsang Hiu Man, Li Chak Man, Li Yiu Tseung.
20. The number of out patients was 195,203 and that of in- patients was 9,293. 25% of the out-patients and 53% of the in-patients elected to be treated by European methods.
21. The number of destitutes temporarily housed and then sent to their homes was 499; most of whom were sent to the Hospital from this office.
22. Substantial progress was made during the year in preparing for the erection of the Eastern Branch of the Tung Wa Hospital. Funds in hand amounted to over $250,000 and plans are now ready for a beginning of actual building during 1928.
C 4-
KWONG WA HOSPITAL.
(Table XV to Table XVIB).
23. The number of out-patients was 124,337 and that of in- patients was 7,466. 33% of the out-patients elected to receive European treatment. 15% of the in-patients were brought to Hospital in a dying condition and died shortly after arrival. Of the remainder 77% elected to receive European treatment.
TSAN YUK MATERNITY HOSPITAL (WEST POINT).
(Table XIII and Table XIIIA).

24. The Matron, Miss Leung, returned from her course at Rotunda Hospital in March.
The work in the in-patient department has increased con- siderably during the year, and new sisters had to be engaged to cope with this increase.
WAN TSAI MATERNITY HOSPITAL.

25. The work of this hospital has steadily increased since it, was established in 1919. 1,003 cases were admitted as against 773 in 1926.
CHINESE PUBLIC DISPENSARIES AND PLAGUE HOSPITAL.
(Table XVII to Table XXII).
26. The number of cases treated show an increase of 11% over that of 1926, whilst the number of vaccinations increased by 200%.
The number of these vaccinations was 31,077.
CHINESE PERMANENT CEMETERY.
(Table XXIII).
27. The balance at the end of the year was $40,755 as against $43,556 in 1926.
28. The total number of translations done by the Translators was 1,145 as against 737 in 1926. In addition a large number of translations made in other Government Departments are sent to this office for revision.
CHINESE RECREATION GROUND.
(Table XXIV).
29. The Ground continued its contribution of $100 p.m. to the funds of the Tsan Yuk Hospital.
7
C 5
PASSAGE MONEY FUND.
(Table. XXV).
30. The net income shows a considerable increase.
FACTORIES.
31. Mr. Meade continued to act as inspector of factories under the Industrial Employment of Children Ordinance: he also acted as Inspector under the Factory (Accidents) Ordinance, 1927.
His report (Annexe B) contains an interesting survey of the results of the working of factory legislation in the Colony.
LABOUR.
32. No strikes or other disputes of importance which had an economic origin occurred during the year, but attempts to create disturbances for political objects, followed the success of extre- mist elements at Hankow and elsewhere. These were met by the proscription of two organisations, the Chinese Seamen's Union and the General Labour Association of Hong Kong, both of which openly advocated Communism and World Revolution." Action taken in April by the Canton authorities against similar organisations in the province had a favourable effect in Họng Kong though sporadic attempts were made towards the end of the year to extend to Hong Kong the outbreak of looting and disorder with which the City of Canton was afflicted in the month of December. These attempts were frustrated by prompt action against Communist gangs and in particular against a society calling itself the Knitting Workers' Union the activities of which included vitriol throwing and the distribution of Com- munist leaflets. A noteworthy event was the disbanding of the notorious Hong Kong strikers, though the so-called Strike Com- mittee continued to hold office and draw a subsidy until the end of the year.

STAFF.
Secretary for Chinese Affairs.
33. Hon Mr. E. R. Hallifax acted as Colonial Secretary from 5th October and Hon: Mr. R. A. C. North acted as Secretary for Chinese Affairs from the same date.
Chief Assistant to Secretary for Chinese Affairs.
Mr. R. A. C. North acted as Chief Assistant to Secretary for Chinese Affairs up to October 4th and Mr. T. W. Ainsworth acted from the 5th October.
C 6
- Assistant to Secretary for Chinese Affairs.
Mr. E. H. Williams continued as an Assistant to Secretary for Chinese Affairs.
Mr. T. Megarry went on leave on May 28th.
Mr. R. R. Todd acted as an Assistant to Secretary for Chinese Affairs from June 20th.
Emigration Sergeant.
Sergt. J. O'Donovan went on leave on March 19th and was succeeded by Sergt. T. O'Connor.
Emigrant Examining Officer.
Sergt. G. I. Haywood was seconded from the Police Depart- ment to undertake this work.
May 2nd, 1928.
R. A. C. NORTH, Secretary for Chinese Affairs.
T
Heads of Revenue.
Table I.
Revenue for the years 1926 and 1927.
Details of Revenue.
Licences and Internal Revenue not other- wise specified,
******
Fees of Court or
Office, Payments for

Specific Purposes,
and Reimburse-
ments-in-aid,.
Interest,.
Chinese Boarding House Licences, Marriage Licences,
Emigration Passage Brokers' Licences, Forfeitures,
Certificates to Chinese proceeding to foreign countries
Bond by Non-resident Householders, Official Signatures,
3
Interest accrued on official account,
Permits for Firework Displays,
*
Other Miscellaneous
Receipts,
Ordinance under which received.
Revenue in Revenue in 1926. 1927.
Increase.
Decrease.
c.
C.
C.
No. 1 of 1889 & No. 4 of 1908. No. 7 of 1875 & No. 15 of 1902. No. 30 of 1915,
16,721
*
20,383 *
* 3.662
820
820
1,200
1,200
b.
No. 6 of 1923.
400
150
250
No. 3 of 1888.
No. 14 of 1913.
104
80
24
415
394
21
80
110
30
Total,...$
19,740.62
22,318.25
3,692
1,115
Deduct Decrease,:.
'Total Increase,
1,115
2,577
* Cents omitted except in the totals.
-07 —
1.
Table II.
Revenue and Expenditure of the Secretariat for Chinese Affairs since 1918.
Revenue.
Expenditure.
Year.
Total.
Decrease.
Increase.
Total.
Decrease.
Increase.
*
Percent-
age of
Expen.
diture to
Revenue.
$
C.
C.
$
C.

C.
%
1918,
26,678.50
15,307,98
50,117.67
1,749.51
187.86
1919,
21,430.72
5,247.78
52,634.57
2,516.90
245.60
1920,
18,007.65
3,423.07
57,716.27
5,081.70
329,51
1921,
15,659.34
2,348.31
18,705.03
39,011.24
102.25
1922,
15,514.50
144.50
21,115.67
2,410.64
136.10
1923,
16,777.69
1,263.19
28,795.63
7,679.96
171.63
1924,
18,716.08
1,938.39
27,512.96
1,282.67
147.00
1925,
15,741.94
2,974.14
29,225,63
1,712.67
185.66
1926,
19,740,62
3,998.68
8,147.42
21,078.21
41.19
1927,
22,318.25
2,577.63
11,533.80
3,386.38
51.68


Table III.
*
Number of Women and Girls detained in a Place of Refuge by the Secretary for Chinese Affairs under Sections 34 and 35 of Ordinance No. 4 of 1897, and arrangements made regarding them.
Permitted to leave,
Permitted to leave under bond,
Restored to husband,
Restored to relatives,
Married,..
Under Detention on 1st January, 1927.
Detained during 1927.
Total.
Total.
Prostitutes. Emigrants. Total. Prostitutes. Emigrants.
1
...
...
5
...
1
1
19
...
...
1
1
20
1
Sent to native place,
Adopted,
Sent to Refuge or Convent,.
Died,
Awaiting marriage,
Cases under consideration,
Total,
Cases brought forward, 3.
...
...
1
...
...
I
...
1
...
1
...
...
2
: : :
...
2
1
...
1
Cases dealt with during the year, 29.
...
1
26
1
27
30
Cases carried forward, 1.
C 10
Table IV.
Number of Female Passengers and Boys examined and passed before the Secretary for Chinese Affairs under "The Asiatic Emigration Ordinance,
1915," during the year 1927.
Women and Children, 1927.
Total Women
Destination.
and Children
Women: Girls.
Boys.
Total.
1926.
Macassa
349
85
230
664
409
Japan
Straits Settlements and F.M.S.
19,795
3,788
6,994
30,577
24,219
Dutch Indies
Belawan Deli
838
222
395
1,455
857
British North Berneo
1,170
270
497
1,937
954
Honolulu
58
12
29
99
90
· Central America
17
2
21
40
.1
Canada,
1
5
6
656
United States of America,
118
15
204
337
Mexico,
South America,
1
Mauritius & Re-Union,
67
49
118
155
Australia,
5
9
14
16
India,
5,008
594
1,131
6,733
.93
South Africa,
Vancouver,
121
80
Batavia,
1,621
271
849
2,741
West Indies (Jamaica),
*
6,223
Sourabaya,
Balikpapan,
Rangoon,
Port Elizabeth,
60
14
57
131
1
4
5
10
Delagoa Bay,
9 158
14
11
Salina Cruz,
Callao,
21
Billiton,
Or
Victoria,
Seattle,
42
58
3
20
9
61
177
228
323.
Total, 1927,
29,176
5,284
10,842
45,083
34,249
Total, 1926,
C 11
Table V.
Number of Assisted Emigrants.
Rejected.
Year.
Examined.] Passed.
Un-
at
Rejected Rejected
Total
willing.
S.C.A.
by
Percentage of
rejected. Doctor.
rejection.
as unfit.
1925,
1926,
1927,
11,129
11,055
36
19
19
74
'66
.....
15.536 14,804
181
21
2.1
229
1.47
26,266 21,626
66
57
16
139
*52
Treatment of Rejected Emigrants for 1927.
Sent home through Tung Wah Hospital at expense of
Boarding Houses,
117
Rejected by doctor and sent back to boarding houses to
be cured,
17
Total rejected,.................
134
Native districts of Assisted Emigrants passed.
West River,
East River,
North River,
Canton,.....
Delta,
Kwong Sai,.....
Southern Districts,
Mandarin, (Ilunan, Kwong Sai and Kiang Si),
Total,
1,485 10,421
493
1,507
943
2,673
3,727
377
21,626
C 12
Table V,-Continued.
Destinations of Assisted Emigrants.
Whither bound.
Male Assisted Emigrants.
1926
1927
Straits Settlements and F.M.S.,
750
637
British North Borneo,
1,229
1,868
Dutch Indies :
Banca,
4,354
6,852
Billiton,
2,457
3,512
Balikpapan,
Belawan Deli,
5,194
8,125
British Solomon Island,
11
India,
47
Samoa,
194
Ocean Island,
192
401
Nauru,
580
Makatea,
Solomon Islands,
Tihiti,
Sydney,
TOTAL
19
65
28
12
14,783
22,052
3142 passenger's passes were issued for 1st and 2nd class Straits Settlements passengers during the year.
Classification of the Assistant Emigrants examined, accord- ing to the language spoken gives the following figures:-
Cantonese, Hakka,
Hoklo,
Southern Mandarin (mostly from
Kwong Sai and Hunan),
Hainanese,
TOTAL
Table VI.
12,834
3,253
7,576
754
1,849
26,266
Chinese Boarding House Licence Returns under Boarding House
Ordinance No. 23 of 1919.
Class
No. in existence at beginning of 1927 No. in existence at end of 1927
I
II IV V VI VII
3 48 11 293 200 104
3 57 14 268 155 99
- of
!
- C 13
Table VII.
Statement of the Receipts and Expenditure relative to the Hong Kong District Watchmen's Fund for the year 1927.
Receipts.
Expenditure.
C.
To Balance,
46,627,01
By Wages and Salaries:
Chief District Watchmen,
**
Contributions, (Victoria $53,424.77
and Kowloon $9,769.23)
63,194.00
men, Detectives,.
Assistant Chief District Watch-
1st Class District Watchmen,... 8,137.00
$
C.
$
C.
3
975.00
3,106.00
6,467.06
Grant by Hong Kong Government....
2,000.00
2nd
**

3rd
"
""
""
Payment for District Watchmen for
Special Services,......
10,260.35 1,622.74
30,568.15
1,080.00
་་
Interest on Hong Kong Government
6% War Loan,
Miscellaneous :--
Cooks......
1,380.00
Coolies,
Messengers,
840.00
720.00
96.00
1,656,00
Interest on Current Account,
364.59
"
Reward Fund,..
10.00
Office Staff:-
"
Manager,
90.00
Writer,
132.00
""
Fines,..........
18.00
Interpreter,
Clerk,
House Rents,
1,537.00
Collectors,
"
Forfeiture,......
35.00
"
Total.....
996.00
1,218.00
33,442.15
Total, .......$ 116,245.60
1:
Other Charges :—
Allowance to Detectives,
1.338.66
Medal Allowance,
1,175,07
Ammunition.
132.00
Oil Allowance,
128.40
Electric charges,
513.39
Conservancy Allowance,..
63.60
Coolie Hire and Conveyance
Allowance,
$16.99
Stationery and Printing.....
395.46
Uniform and Equipments,
5,101.67
Repairs and Fittings,
1,146.79
Furniture.
82.60
lent of Telephone,
432.00
Premium on Fire Policies,
274.86
997.50
גי
Gratuities and Rewards,
Balance due to Wan Shun Lee
for building Yaumati D.W. Quarters..
1,200.00
Crown Rent.
Photos for D. W.S.............................. Sundries,
20.12 3.30
446.21
14,268.62
Pensions:-
Ex. C.D.W. Fung Fong and others,..
4,506.00
Total Expenditure,...........................
52,216.77
Balance,
64,028.83
Total,
116,245.60
Balance in Colonial Treasury :-
Hong Kong Government 6% War Loan, ... $18,000.00 Cash,.
Fixed Deposits..
""
Hong Kong, 31st December, 1927.
16,028.83
10,000.00
20,000.00
Total,.........
$64,028.83
Examined and found correct.
WONG KAM FUK,
Member of
District Watchmen Committee.
Patients.
Table VIII.
Number of Patients under treatment and other statistics concerning the Tung Wah Hospital during the year 1927.
Admitted.
Out-patients.
Male,
Female,
283 3,361 2,691 6,052 6,335 4,576 1,364 395 150 972 2,269 3,241 3,391 2,694 612
69,669 27,014 96,683|2,776 985 499 85 77,306 21,214 98,520
527
Total,..
433 4,333 4,960 9,293 9,726 7,270 | 1,976
480 146,975 48,228 195,203 2,776 1,512
499
Total for 1926,
433 3,543 3,975 7,518 7,951 5,677 1,841
433 130,514 22,972 153,486 1,2351,320
548
:
C 14
Receipts.
C 15
Table IX.
TUNG WAH HOSPITAL CASH ACCOUNT 1927.
Amount.
*Payments.
Amount.
C.
e.
Cash Balance from last year :—
Man Mo Temple....
Maternity Hospital
Tung Wah Hospital account.$93,182.55
Emergency Fund
Debit balance against Kwong Wah Hos-
pital from last year..
9,433.34
59,118.63
Current account with Kwong Wah Hos-
57,925.84
pital....
78,024.04
1,595.86
211,822.88
Current account with Tung Wah Eastern
Hospital .....
855.89
Cash from the Tung Wah Hospital
(Eastern) at end of 1926...
* Current account with Kwong Wah Hos-
pital
1,270.94
54,832.78
Current account with Man Me Temple Current account with Emergency Fund... Current account with Maternity Hospital Amount lent out on mortgage on behalf
16,873.19
847.00
3,818.14
Current account with Tung Wah Eastern
Hospital
}
of Tung Wah Eastern Hospital
145,000.00
256,254.12
Provisions for staff
14,249.01
Current account with Mar Mo Temple Current account with Maternity Hospital... Interest and subscriptions collected on
behalf of Emergency Fund
Rents from houses
Subscriptions collected from steamers
26,141.20
Salaries for staff
42,065.02
4,058.30
Provisions for sick rooms
30,061.25
Sick room sundries
9,128.46
1,390.22
Hospital sundries
6,494.57
98,096.52
Chinese drugs...
37,505.75
4,688.62
Western drugs.
16,732.61
Annual subscriptions of Hongs......
9,502.00
Repairs...
8,249.93
Subscriptions from wealthy persons........
4,550.00
Destitutes' and. Patients' passages
813.09
Subscriptions and donations.
4.603.07
Repairs to landed property
2,378.68
Subscriptions from Directors past and pre-
Lights
7,270.39
sent
1,553.00
Insurance
875.00
Special contributions for supply of medi-
Crown rent and taxes
10,767.14
cines, quilted clothing, coffins and shrouds
Additions to coffin home building
43,676.68
2,793.41
Sundries for coffin home & burial ground..
2,710.34
Government grants
8,000.00
Additions to Yat Pit Ting building
5,750.00
Amount received from Government on
Small-pox Hospital expenses
2,361,88
account of Western medicines for 1925
Building water closet & constructing
and 1926
5,000.00
concrete work on hill side......
4,593.39
Grant from Man Mo Temple....
2,500.00
Stamps, stationery and advertisements
3,551.16
Contributions from Theatres..
1,257.14
Grant to Kwong Wah Hospital
2,000.00
Hong Kong War Loan repaid
50,000.00
Grant to Fong Pin Hospital
1,000.00
Interest on loans and deposits
53,483.85
Burial of bodies by Tung Wah Hospital...
3,852.57
Premium on notes and discount on goods
Coffins for bodies buried by Tung Wah
purchased
2,076.58
Hospital.
7,115.61
Subscriptions for coffin home
4,250.00
·
Burial of bodies by Government Mor-
Fees for Patients
3,865.70
tuary
2,497,35
Rents from Coffin home
20,897.50
Coffins for bodies buried by Government
Sale of medicines, kitchen refuse, boat-
hire and rents from Yat Pit Ting and
Mortuary..
Interest on deposits........
5,720.00
5,744,20
iron burner....
-11,869.71
Balance
310,741.86
تم ہے
Grand Total.......
$ 844,757.54
Grand Grand Total......
$844,757.54
The Balance of $310,741.86 consists of the following credit balances minus a debit balance of $32,624.60
against the Kwong Wah Hospital:-
Tung Wah Hospital
Man Mo Temple
Emergency Fund...
Maternity Hospital.............
Tung Wah Eastern Hospital.
Minus account against Kwong Wah Hospital
Balance......
.$105,005.57
66,386.64
58,469.06
1,836.02 111,669.17
$343,366.46
32,624.60
.$310,741.86
(For particulars see separate sheet attached).
}
C 16
Table IX (A).
PARTICULARS AS TO CREDIT BALANCES.
TUNG WAH HOSPITAL IN ACCOUNT WITH KWONG WAH HOSPITAL.
To Amount received during 1927
Balance
"
......
$ 54,832.78 32,624.60
$ 87,457.38
By Debit Balance brought from 1926. $ 9,433.34
Amount paid during 1927
78,024.04
$ 87,457.38
TUNG WAH HOSPITAL IN ACCOUNT WITH MAN MO TEMPLE.
To Credit balance brought forward
from 1926
Amount received during 1927
$ 59,118.63 26,141.20
By Payments during 1927
Balance
$ 85,259.83
TUNG WAH HOSPITAL IN ACCOUNT WITH EMERGENCY FUND.
To Credit balance brought forward
from 1926
$ 57,925.84
By Payments during 1927
Balance
""
嗲嗲
Interest received during 1927
1,390.30
$ 59,316.06
TUNG WAH HOSPITAL IN ACCOUNT WITH MATERNITY HOSPITAL.
To Credit balance brought forward.
from 1926
**
Amount received during 1927
$ 1.595.86 4,058.30
$5,654.16
By Payments during 1927
Balance
$18,873.19 66,386.64
$ 85,259.83
$
847.00 58,469.06
$ 59,316.06
$ 3,818.14 1,836.02
$ 5,654.16
TUNG WAH HOSPITAL IN ACCOUNT WITH TUNG WAH EASTERN HOSPITAL.
To Cash received at end of 1926 Amount received during 1927
1,270.94 By Payments during 1927
256,254.12
$257,525.06
Balance
$145,855.89-
111,669.17
$257,525.06.
Income.
Funds brought forward from 1926
- C 17
Table X.
TUNG WAH HOSPITAL.
INCOME AND EXPENDITURE.
Amount.
$ 93,182.55 Maintenance.
Expenditure.
Amount.
Ordinary.
Subscriptions:-
Annual. subscriptions of
Hongs
Provisions:
$ 9,502.00
Subscriptions
collected
Food for staff
Food for sick room
Surgery and Dispensary
Chinese drugs
$14,249.01 30,061.25
$44,310.26
$ 37,505.75
on steamers
..........
4,688.62
Western drugs
16,732.61
Subscriptions and dona-
54,238.36
tions
4,603.07
Establishments:
Subscriptions from weal-
Light
$.7,270.39
thy persons
4,550.00
Insurance
875.00
Subscriptions from Dir-
Repairs
8,249.93
ectors past and pre-
Repairs to hospital pro-
sent
1,553.00
perty
2,378.68
24,896.69
Sick room expenses
9,128.46
Grants:
Small pox Hospital ex-
Government
8,000.00
penses
2,361.88
Government
for medi-
Coffin home and bury-
cines for 1925 and
1926
5,000.00
ing ground expenses. Crown rents and taxes.
2,710.34
10,767.14
Man Mo Temple..
2,500.00
43,741.82
15,500.00
Special contributions :-
For Mortuary expenses. $ 4,250.00
Salaries, wages, &c.:
Staff salaries Sundries
$ 42,065.02 6,494.57
From theatres
1,257.14
48.559.59
For supply of medi-
Appeals, grants, &c.:
cines, quilted cloth-
Destitutes' & Patients'
ing, coffins and
passages
813.09
shrouds
2,793.41
8,300.55
Kwong Wah and Fong
Pin Hospitals
3,000.00
Investments:
3,813.09
Rents
98,096.52
Miscellaneous :
Interest
53,483.85
Hong Kong War Loan
repaid
50,000.00
201,580.37
Other receipts:-
Premium on notes and discount on goods purchased
Rent from coffin home. Fee for Patients
Sale of medicines, kit-
chen refuse, boat hire- and sundries and rents from Yat Pit Ting and iron burner
$ 2,076.58
20,897.50 3,865.70
Stationery &c.
Burial of bodies by
Tung Wah Hospital. Coffins for bodies buried by Tung Wah Hospital Burial of bodies by
Government mortuary Coffins for bodies buried
by Government Interest on deposits
Extraordinary.
$ 3,551.16
3,852.57
7,115.61
2,497.35
5,720.00

· 5,744.20
28,480.89
11,869.71
Cost of building addi-
38,709.49
Do.
tions to coffin home. $ 43,676.68.
Yat Pit Ting.
Cost of building water-
closet &c.
Balance
TOTAL
$382,169.65
TOTAL
5,750.00
4,593.39
54,020.07 105,005.57
$382,169.65
LI HOI TUNG,
SAN SHING SAM,
Directors.
Table X (A).
Statement of Receipts and Payments of the Tung Wah Eastern Hospital, 1927.
Receipts.
Amount.
Expenditure.
C
To Balance from 1926
1,270.94
By Deposit on mortgage
"
Subscriptions
255,279.12
Sundry Expenses
"}
Interest on mortgage
975.00
Balance
""
:
TOTAL
$257,525.06
Amount.
$
C.
145,000.00
855.89
111,669.17
TOTAL
$257,525.06
Receipts.
Table XI.
Emergency Fund Account, 1927.
Amount.
Payments.
Amount.
C.
C.
Balance from account 1926.
57,925.84
Gratuity to destitutes,
490.00
Interest
1,390.22
Passage money for destitutes,
'357.00
Balance,
58,469.06
Total,..
59,316.06
Total,.
59,316.06
Receipts.
Table XII.
Man Mo Temple Fund Account, 1927.
Amount.
Payments.
Amount.
Balance from account 1926,
59,118
Rent of stalls and Temple property,
18,313
Subscription to Tung Wah Hospital, Free Schools and sundries,
2,500
13,741
Rent from Temple keeper,...
6,099
Government Grant in Aid of free schools,
5,295
Repairs to Temple property, free schools, and the Man Mo Temple,
· 851
Interest,
1,418
Police, Rates, Crown Rent, and Insurance
Refund of Crown Rent,.
14
Premium,
1,573
Water accounts and repair to water pipes, Balance,
206
66,386
Total,...
85,259.83
Cents omitted except in the totals.
Total,...
85,259,83
-
Table XIII.
Statement of Receipts and Payments of the Western Maternity Hospital, 1927.
Receipts.
Amount.
Balance from 1926,
1,595
Rent of Hospital Property,
4,020
Interest,
38
Total,
*
5,654.16
Expenditure.
Amount.
$
...
3,200
508
Rent of hospital property handed over to 'the Secretariat for Chinese Affairs,
Police, Rate, Crown Rent, & Insurance Premium,
Repairs to Hospital Property,
Balance,
Total,
Cents omitted except in the totals.
109
1,836
5,654.16
21
Table XIII (A).
WESTERN MATERNITY HOSPITAL.
Statement of Accounts for the year ending 31st December, 1927.
Receipts.
Amount.
Expenditure.
· Amount.
To Balance
Subscriptions
$ 2,088.90
By Salary
Drugs
742.00
$4,598.75
1,478.22
Donation from :-
Stationery and Printing
Chinese Public Dispen-
saries Fund
4,500.00
Bedding
Chinese Recreation Ground
Furniture
Gas and Electricity
Repairs and Fitting
Clothing and Uniform
Food for patients, pupils
951.96
945.73
837.70
69.65
·
83.00
461.56
Fund
1,200.00
and midwives in
the
Rent of houses purchased
Hospital
3,235.93
with Tung Wah Hos-
Instruments
379.66
pital Jubilee Donation.
3,200.00
Fee for District Watch-
9,642.00
men on duty at the
door
540.00
Fees paid by patients in the Hospital.
6,103.05
Crown Rent
1.00
Money paid by pupils in the Hospi-
Water Account
292.50
tal for their food
780.00
Telephone
9.00
Fees paid by patients who had
Washing
741.54
venereal diseases
72.00
Miscellaneous
3,079.37
Interest
23.81
$ 17,705.57
Balance with Colonia! Treasury
1,004.19
TOTAL
$ 18,709.76
TOTAL
$18.709.76
CIÁRI
Cents omitted except in the totals.
C 22
C 23
Table XIV.
Revenue and Expenditure of the Brewin Charity during the year 1927.
Revenue.
Amount.
Expenditure.
Amount.
To Balance from 1926
$165,603.43
Subscriptions from Directors, Tung
Wa Hospital
2,050.00
**
ti
Subscriptions from Committee, Po
Leung Kuk
1.200.00
""
Subscriptions from Directors, Kwong
Ming
"
Wa Hospital
550.00
""
Stamps
Interest from Mr. Chiu Cheuk U for
By Charity for widows and orphans
Subscription to Old Men's Home Salary for Accountant Mr. Chan Yik
Wan
Salary for Clerk 'Mr. Wong, Shut
Conveyance expenses for collecting
mortgage
4,320.00
Interest from Mr. Lau Kwai Nam for
71
mortgage
2,160.00
$ 7,648.40 2,400.00
100.00
60.00
2.85
interest, etc.
10.20
Printed matters by the Wing Fat
8.25
Balance
$173,912.93
Interest from Mr. Yan Leung Kang
and others for mortgage
3,840.00
Interest from Mr. Kan Iu Cho for
mortgage
1,536.00
Interest from Mr. Chak Yuk Tong for
mortgage
1,968.00
17
Interest on War Bonds of Singapore
319.55
Interest on Current Account with
Shanghai Bank
184.05
Interest on War Bonds from Shanghai
Bank
360.00
""
Interest on Fixed deposit of Wong Fung Sze with Shanghai Bank
51.60
TOTAL
$184,142.63
TOTAL
$184,142.63
:
By Fixed deposit with Mr. Chiu Cheuk U on mortgage of six
houses in Temple Street
$ 48,000.00
""
Fixed deposit with Lau Kwai Nam and others on
mortgage of four houses in Temple Street
24,000.00
,, Fixed deposit with Mr. Yan Leung Kang and others on mortgage of house property in Connaught Road W...
40,000.00
""
Fixed deposit with Mr. Kan Iu Cho on mortgage of house
property in Wanchai Road
16,000.00
""
War Bonds of Shanghai Bank
10,000.00
""
War Bonds of Singapore Government
5,000.00
""
Deposit and interest of Sat A Li with Wing Hing Bank
320.10
""
Current Account deposits with Shanghai Bank
28,642.15
""
Deposit with Tung Wah Hospital
752.45
""
Fixed deposit and interest of Wong Fung Sze with
Shanghai Bank
1,198.23
TOTAL
$173,912.93
Examined and found correct. LI HOI TUNG,
SAN SHING SAM,
Directors.

}
Patients.
Table XV.
Number of Patients under treatment and other statistics concerning the Kwong Wah Hospital during the year 1927.
on 31st December, 1926.
Remaining in Hospital
Chinese Treatment.
European Treatment.
Total.
Admitted.
Total Number of pa-
tients under treatment.
Discharged.
Deaths.
Remaining in Hospital
on 31st December, 1927.
Out-patients.
Chinese Treatment.
European Treatment.
Total.
Male,
Female,
125
68
1,292 | 2,5323,9243,9492,509 1,298
142 43,163 22,060 65,223
185
4
|
397 3,2458,642 3,710 2,730 863
117
39,895 19,219 59,114
133
...
Total,..
193
1,689 5,7777,466 7,659 5,239 2,161
|
259 83,058 41,279 | 124,337
318
4
...
Total for 1926, 198
|
1,400 4,738 6,138 6,336 4,594 1,549
193 67,083 32,646 99,729
401
:
Vaccinations.
Dead bodies brought to Hospital Mortuary
for burial.
Destitutes sent home.
C 24-
علم
Receipts.
-- C 25
Table XVI.
KWONG WAH HOSPITAL.
Cash Account 1927.
Amount.
$
*A
Payments.
Amount.
C.
Balance brought forward from
previous year,..........
Government Grant,
*"
""
Special Donation,... Donation for West-
ern drugs for 1925 and 1926,..
Subscription from Tung Wah
Hospital, for giving free coffius. 2,000.00 Current account with Tung Wah
Sick room expenses,
Charcoal,
Current account with Tung Wali
5,942.27
Hospital, .....
54,832.78
8,500.00
Salaries to Hospital staff,
18,541.65
25,000.00
Provisions for staff,
6,134.87
Hospital sundries,
1,283.91
5,000.00
Provisions for patients,
15,086.69
7,184.08
1,013.51
Chinese drugs,
15,599.07
Hospital,
78,024.04
Western drugs,
16,311.86
Subscriptions from charitable
Lights,
3,008.82
persons and yearly subscrip- tions,
Telephone rent,
262.00
15,753.32
Stationery, stamps, and adver-
Subscriptions from Ko Shing, Tai
Ping, Lee and New Theatres,... Donations from A. Fong and Tai
Wo Photographers,
tisements,
1,512.49
3,407.14
Water,
283.25
Discount on notes,
8.79
600.00
Furniture and repairs,
2,407.88
Donations from Old Yaumati Chinese Public Dispensary, Donations from Po Hing Theatre.. Sale of Chinese Medicines,
Building contract,...
1,305.00
6,561.98 | Coffins,
5,558.45
594.00
Burial of bodies from Hospital
497.45
Mortuary,
433.35
Premium on notes,
279.17
Burial of bodies from Yaumati
Sale of kitchen refuse,
421.24
Public Mortuary,
458.10
Payments by in-patients and for
drugs,
Old Men's Asylum,
46.90
5,193.41
Grave stones,
236.40
Interest,
138.51
Cumsha to coolies, sale of refuse,
Amount transferred from Free Chinese Drugs Special Fund to Income and Expenditure account,
Repaid by Tung Wah Hospital out of deposit of $129,181.90 (Free Chinese Drugs Special Fund),
Subscriptions from charitable persons for Free Chinese Drugs Special Fund, ..........
Interest and house rent collected
&c.,
286.51
Crown Rent,...
1.00
10,136.64
64,420.10
900.00
in respect of Free Chinese Drugs Special Fund,
9,445.44
Maternity Hospital Fund sub-
scribed,
22,016.76
Grand Total,..................... ..$264,831.47
Building work in connection
with extension of sick room,... Amount transferred from Free Chinese Drugs Special Fund to Income and Expenditure account,.. Amount paid for purchase of landed property on behalf of Free Chinese Drugs Special Fund including expenses and repairs, Amount paid for Crown rent, taxes, etc. on behalf of Free Chinese Drugs Special Fund, Maternity Hospital Fund de- posited with Tung Wah Hospital, BALANCE,..
10,136.64
64,420.10
208.80
21,806.76
15,921.81
Grand Total,........
..$264,831.47
540,00
Income.
C 26
Table XVI (A),
KWONG WAH HOSPITAL.
INCOME AND EXPENDITURE 1927.
Amount.
Expenditure.
Amount.
To amount transferred from Free
Chinese Drugs Special Fund
A.-MAINTENANCES :·
$10.136.64
A.-ORDINARY:-
Government Grant
$8,500.00
Provisions:
Staff Patients
$ 6,134.87 15,086.69
8,500.00
$ 21,221.56
Subscriptions:
Tung Wah Hospital for
free coffins
$2,000.00
Charitable persons
15,753.32
Dispensary:-
Chinese drugs Western drugs
$15,599.07
16,311.86
17,753.32
31.910.93
Entertainments :—
Establishment:·
and New Theatres
Lights
Ko Shing, Tai Ping, Lee
Po Hing Theatre
Donations:
A. Fong and Tai Wo
Photographers
Old
Yaumati
Dispensary
Patients Payments :—
In and Out Patients
Chinese drugs sold
$3.407.14
$ 3,008.82
2
594.00
Furniture and repairs.
2,407.88
4,001.14
Sick room expenses
7,184.08
Charcoal
1,013.51
Telephone rent
262.00
$ 600.00
Water
283.25
Public
Sundries
1,570.42
6,561.98
Building Contract
1,305.00
7,161.98
Crown rent
1.00
17,035.96
$ 5,193.41 497.45
Salaries:
5,690.86
Hospital Staff
$18,541.35
Other receipts:
18,541.65
Premium on notes
$
Interest
279.17 138.51
Miscellaneous:
Sale of kitchen refuse,
Stationery, stamp and
&c.
421.24
advertisements
$1,512.49
838.92
Discount on notes
8.79
Coffins
5,558.45
B.-EXTRAORDINARY :
Burial of bodies
433.35
Burial of bodies from
Donations:
Yaumati
458.10
nation
Government Special Do-
Government Special Do-
Old Men's Asylum
$25,000.00
Grave stones
46.90 236.40
8,254.48
nation for Western drugs for 1925 and 1926
5,000.00
30,000.00
Balance
12,881.72
TOTAL
$ 96.964.58
TOTAL
$ 96,964.58.
NGAN SHING KWAN,
WONG HOK SAN,
Directors.
77
1.
C 27
Table XVI-(B)
FINANCIAL POSITION OF THE KWONG WAH HOSPITAL.
Free Chinese Drugs Special Fund deposited with the Tung Wah Hospital.
Amount left deposited with Tung
Wah Hospital at end of 1926... $129,181:90
$129,181.90
Amount returned by Tung Wah
Hospital during 1927 Balance with Tung Wah Hospital
at end of 1927
$ 64,420.10
64,761.80
$129,181.90
Current account with Tung Wah Hospital.
Amount paid to Tung Wah Hospital
during 1927
Amount overdrawn on Tung Walı
Hospital at end of 1927
$ 54,832.78
32,624.60
Amount overdrawn on Tung Wah
Hospital in previous year Amount received from Tung Wah
Hospital in 1927.
$ 9,433.34
78,024.04
$87,457.38
$ 87,457.38
Maternity Hospital Fund.
Amount deposited with Tung Wah
Hospital during 1927
Amount collected in 1927...
$ 22,016.76
Cash in hand
$ 21,806.76 210.00
$ 22,016.76
$ 22,016.76
3
Analysis of Cash in hand.
Cash in hand as per Cash account.. $ 15,921.81
Kwong Wah Hospital General
Fund
Maternity Hospital Fund.....
$ 15,711.81 210.00
$15,921.81
$ 15,921.81
SUMMARY. -
Free Chinese Drugs Special Fund deposited with Tung Wah
Hospital ....
Maternity Hospital Fund deposited with Tung Wah Hospital Maternity Hospital Fund in cash with Kwong Wah Hospital Kwong Wah Hospital General Fund in cash....
Total.....
Less amount overdrawn on Tung Wah.Hospital on
current account
.$ 64,761.80 21,806.76 210.00 15,711.81.
$102,490.37°
32,624.60
Net Funds
.$ 69,865.77

Besides the above there is the sum of $1,752.33 which has been advanced out of the Hospital General Fund to the Sick Room Extension Special Fund which however seems to have no means of repaying this advance.
For further particulars, see below :--
Kwong Wah Hospital in account with Sick Room Extension Special Fund.
Amount advanced to this Fund during previous years Amount further advanced to this Fund during 1927
$

1,212.33 540.00
$
1,752.33
Kwong Wah Hospital in account with Free Chinese Drugs Special Fund.
To Balance of last year's account... $129,181.90
"yearly subscriptions collected in
1927. ......
Interest & house rent collected
""
in 1927
By amount transferred to Income
and Expenditure account amount paid for purchase of landed property including expenses and repairs ...
900.00
92
9,445.44
""
$139,527.34
""
amount paid for Crown rent,
taxes etc.
Balance
$ 10,136.64

64,420.10
208.80 64,761.80
$ 189,527.34
*
C 28
Table XVII.
Summary of work done by the Chinese Public Dispensaries: Victoria, Harbour, Shaukiwan, and Kowloon Peninsula.
!
Description.
*
Grand Grand Total. Total Total 1927. 1926.
New Cases,.......
Return Cases,
Total,.........
Certificates of nature of disease issued,
""
cause of death,.
Patients removed to hospital by ambulance,...
Corpses removed to hospital or mortuary,......
Attendances at cleansing of infected premises,
Compensation claims sent in,
Applications received for coffins,
for midwives,
""
Confinement cases in Maternity Hospital,......
Infants brought to Dispensaries, (alive),
99
>>
27
88,799
72,571
161,570 139,469
1
315
340
...
281
270
839
745
94
85
.297
353
1,003
778
(dead),.
1,335
Total,...........
1,335
1,015
46
*
Vaccinations at private houses,
""
,, Dispensaries,
Total,.
31,031
1
...
31,077
11,342
་་
Table XVIII.
CHINESE PUBLIC DISPENSARIES.
Statement of Accounts for the year ending 31st December, 1927:
C 29
Receipts.
$
Expenditure.
To Balance,
"
Grant by Government,
Donations from :-
Tai Ping Theatre,
Lee Theatre, San Theatre,
Ko Shing Theatre,
Subscriptions, Land,..
83,922.50
By Maintenances of Dispensaries :-
Victoria,
28,141.70
9,000.00
.. ....
Harbour and Yaumati,
6,867.76
Shaukiwan,..
Kowloon,
7,191.05
4,316.13
5,400.00
683.00
46,516,64
800.00
14.28
Subscription in aid of the Fund of
Western Maternity Hospital,
4,500.00
18,241.40
Harbour & Yaumati..
10,985.00
Balance in Colonial Treasury :-
Shaukiwan,
1,895.25
"
On Fixed Deposit, .......
40,000.00
Kowloon City,
560.00
Do.
15,000.00
38,578,93
On Hong Kong Public Works Loan. 11,000.00
ナナ
Fees from Maternity Hospital in
In Cash,
18,688.37
Interest,
Chinese Public Dispensaries, Wan-
chai,.......
""

"
Interest on Hong Kong Government
6% War Loan,
Total,.....
1,971.70
491.88
Advance to :-
Dispensaries Clerks,
120.00
84,808.37
1,860.00
$ 185,825.01
Total,.
135,825.01
* Cents omitted except in the totals.
R. A. C. NORTH, Secretary for Chinese Affairs.
Table XIX.
HUNGHOM DISPENSARY.
Statement of Accounts for the year ending 31st December, 1927.
Receipts.
Balance Subscription etc. Donation from :-
Po Hing Theatre Kun Yam Temple Tai Ping Theatre Scavenging Contractor at Hunghom
Expenditure.
1,847.00
2,190.00
Through Secretariat for Chinese Affairs.... Through Local Committee
2;142.00
3,126.00
Balance :-
600.00
At Colonial Treasury
428.00
600.00
With Local Committee
560.00
540.00
480.00
6,257.75
6,257.75
* Cents omitted except in the totals.
CHUNG IU SHAN,
Chairman,
TSANG PING SHAN,
Accountant.
... Chinese Public Déspensary, Hunghom,
30
To Balance,
Receipts.
Donation from :—
29
Po Hing Theatre,
Table XIX (A).
SHAMSHUIPO DISPENSARY.
Statement of Accounts for the year ending 31st December, 1927.
Sam Tai Tsz, Tin Hau and Pak Tai Temples,
· Rent from the eight houses at Shamshuipo,...
Grant by Government,
Total,
Expenditure.
1,527.00 By Through Secretariat for Chinese Affairs,
550.00
646.00
"
1,660.00
3,000.00
Through Local Committee,
Balance :-
At Colonial Treasury,
With Local Committee,.
7,385.29
* Cents omitted except in the totals.
...
2,740.00
2,816.00
1,018.00
810.00
Total,
7,385.29
WONG IU TUNG,.
Fice-Chairman.
AU TO NAM,
Accountant.
Chinese Public Dispensary, Shamshuipo.
*
31
Number of deaths.
Number certified.
Table XX.
Deaths of Chinese in Hong Kong and Kowloon during 1927 showing number in which the cause of death was duly certified and number in which a
1
N

post-mortem examination was held.
7
uncertified.
Number
Victoria,
Harbour,
9,835
5,259
4,576
53.5
785
7.9
3,791
38.5
741
234
507
31.6
301
40.6
206
27.8
Kowloon,....
3,324
935
2,389
28.1
327
9.8
2,062
62.3
.
Shaukiwan,
378
326
52
86.2
42
11.1
10
2.6
Other Villages in Hong Kong,......
247
240
7
97.2
7
2.8
Total,..
14,525
6,994
7,531
48.1
1,462
10.1
6,069
45·2·
Percentage of 3 to 2.
Number examined after death' and not
sent to mortuary.
Percentage of
6 to 2.
Number sent to
mortuary.
Percentage of
8 to 2.
32
9
Table XXI.
Monthly Return of Bodies of Chinese considered by the Secretary for Chinese Affairs to have been abandoned during the year 1927.
Victoria.
Month.
Harbour. Kowloon.
West.
Central.
East. Total.
Hong Kong outside . Victoria.
Territories.. New
Grand
Total.
Total.
A
January,
February,
March,...
10
April,
1728
12
17
16
18
2708
33
29
31
: 4
5
57
36
10
72
252
...
6
::
7
30
10
72
May,
June,
13
24
.12
56
*****
29
62
68
99
89
125
85
115
73
97
11
12
31
44
9
62
93
July,
August,
September,
October,
November,
10
11
26
7
53
16
76
102
10
22
15
26
9
50
72
• December,
∞ a com
6
12
3
1727
8
23
11
50
7
68
91
20
16
56
20
92
112
22
3
48
10
61
83
9
18
37
4
59
68
Grand Total,
77
93
137
307
116
600
96
812
Total for 1926,
74
72
124
270
.90
724
69
...
:
:
1,119
*
783
1,033 †
* In 1927, of 1,119 none was taken to Chinese Public Dispensaries. † In 1926, of 1,033 none was taken to Chinese Public Dispensaries.
C 33
·
*
Ở 34
Table XXII.
Return of Bodies abandoned during the years 1924, 1925 and 1926. *
(Figures supplied by the Police Department.)
1927.
Male.
Female.
Unknown.
Over
15 years.
15 years and under.
Over
15 years.
Victoria,...
44
172
Kowloon,....
27 379
Harbour,
36
42
Elsewhere,
14
51
G+ -
15 years
and under.
Over
15 years.
15 years
and under.
86
307
191
600
31
3
116
26
96
Total,
121
644
11
334
9.
1,119
1926.
Victoria,
11
136
1
79
227
Kowloon,...
28 326
281
1
637
Harbour,
25
43
10
20
98
Elsewhere,
12
35
1
23
71
Total,
76
540
13
403
1
1,033
1925.
Victoria,
142
Kowloon,....
367
Harbour, Elsewhere,
24
...
95583
129
269
50
28888
30
32
Total,
383
610
9 460
:
3
: : co
1,115
272
648
113
82
*
Total.
*
"
Shanghai Bank,
162.37
To Balance,
"
Receipts.
Table XXIII.
Statement of Receipts and Payments of the Chinese Permanent Cemetery for 1927.
Interest from Hong Kong and
Amount.
C.
Payments.
43,556.37 By Rent of telephone,
""
Repairs to roads, and embankment etc. by Yeung Tam-kee,. Wages for Ma Shu-hoi & gardeners,
Tai San Bank,...
575.83
Printed matters by the Shing Fat,
"}
""
War Bonds,
480.00
""
Manure, bamboo brooms, scythes etc.,...
""
""
**
1
Sale of 174 lots,
9,310.00
""
Stamps,
""
Stone Embankment,.......
2,610.00
Rent of wharf,
>>
""
Wages from Dr. S. W. Tso for refilling vaults,
""
Rates for getting water from river,
226.00
Crown Rent,
Interest from Mr. Tso Kon
""
Chai,
3,320.00
"
24 Joss paper pots from the Hop Cheung,..
وو
""
??
Wages for Pun Yan Chin & Chau Wan Kok,
Printed matters by the Wo Hing,
Flower pots and water jars from Tung Tai Chan, Balance,
Total,
60,240.57
Ş. W. TSO, Secretary,
T. N. CHAU, Treasurer.
Total,..
Amount.
$
C.
180.00
16,903.56
1,553.00
3.00
178.35
12.00
1.00
1.00
.50
480.00
84.00
11.70
75.20
40,755.26
60,240,57
By deposits with Hong Kong & Shanghai Bank,
.$33,764.09
""
"
Cash,
Tai San Bank,
Examined and found correct,
6,500.00
491.17
$40,755.26
LI PO KWAI.
35
E
To Balance,.....
""
Rent of Stalls,
Receipts.
Table XXIV.
CHINESE RECREATION GROUND.
Receipts and Expenditure, 1927.
Payments.
4,074.00 By Wa
By Wages of Watchmen, etc,
""
Water Account,
3,282,00
29
Consumption of Gas,
890.00
* 177.00
270.00
""
Subscription to Western Maternity Hospital, 1,200.00
Lime Washing,
Furniture and repairs,
Miscellaneous,
90.00
275.00
50.00
""
Balance,
4,403.88
Total,.
7,357.24
* Cents omitted except in the totals.
Total,....
7,357.24
36
Y
Table XXV.
Statement of Accounts of Passage Money Fund, 1927.
Receipts.
Payments.
By Gifts to 7 women on being married, Charitable Allowances to two persons for 3 months,
Subscription to Alice Memorial Hospital,
""
Eyre Diocesan Refuge,
Hawker's and Boat Licences to destitute per-
song,
Gifts in aid of repatriation of emigrants,......| Balance on Fixed Deposit, ......$ 4,250
To Balance on Fixed Deposit,
.*$4,250
>>
in Colonial Treasury,
2,864
""

7,114
"}
""
Passage Money received,
589
""
"
Less Refund,
201
"
388
"
"
Interest on Fixed Deposit,
170
"
,, on money deposited in Treasury,
79
.249
Total,
$
7,751.58
""
in Colonial Treasury,
Total,
14
18
50
170
79
123
3,046
7,296
$ 7,751.58
* Cnts omitted except in the totals.
R. A. C. NORTH,
Secretary for Chinese Affairs.
C 37
Table XXVI.
Prosecutions under Ordinances No. 3 of 1888, No. 30 of 1915, and No. 4 of 1897.
Offence.
Convicted.
. Discharged.
No. of
Cases.
Male.
Female.
Male.
Female.
42
36
Ordinance No. 3 of 1888.
Bills,-Posting without permission,
Fireworks, Discharged without permission, Drums and Gongs,-Night noises by beating, Processions,-Organising in the public streets without permission,
Householders' Registration,-Failing to register,
Ordinance No. 30 of 1915.
Decoying men or boys into or out of the Colony,... Emigration House offences,...
Personating emigrants, ......
Sending assisted emigrants out of the Colony with- out notifying the Secretary for Chinese Affairs,
Ordinance No. 4 of 1897.
Indecent assult upon female,
****.
:
:
1
Decoying women and girls into or away from the
Colony,
Detaining, harbouring, or receiving women or girls,... Deriving profits from prostitution and trading in
women, ..................
4.
1
...
:
5
...
:
....
::
...
I
...
:.
Remarks.
:
3
Co
2
88
11
79
6
C 39
ANNEXE A.
Report on the work of the Po Leung Kuk for the year 1926.
*
The Po Leung Kuk Society was founded in 1878 to aid in the detection and suppression of kidnapping, especially of girls and women, and to shelter such girls or women as had been kidnapped in the interior and brought to Hong Kong for sale or emigration. Its name means "institution for the protection of good women”. The initiative in its formation came from the Chinese themselves, and ever since by subscription and personal service, they have continued to support it.
There is a paid Chinese staff-matron, amahs and nurses, and two clerks who are secretaries to the managing committee. This Committee meets every evening from Monday to Friday at 7 p.m. the principal meeting of the week being held at 12 noon on Sunday. It not only manages the Po Leung Kuk, but acts as an advisory committee to the Secretary for Chinese Affairs, in all cases affecting women and children, and Chinese family life generally, which are often extremely difficult and tedious. It corresponds when necessary with charitable institu- tions and private persons in various parts of China, traces parents of lost children or ill-treated mui tsai, and shelters for the night any Chinese woman or girl who chooses to go. When parents or relations cannot be traced, the Committee arranges for the girls in its care to be given in marriage (never as con- cubines) or in adoption, always under bond and always with the consent of this office; and in every case this office ascertains the girl's willingness before giving consent to either adoption or marriage.
In addition to the annual Committee appointed by co-option there is a Permanent Committee, which serves to maintain continuity of policy, and of which the Secretary for Chinese Affairs is the ex-officio chairman.
The following gentlemen were elected in March to serve as Managing Committee for the year:
Lo Chung Kui, Ma Chi Lung,
Ho Wing Chun, Au Lim Chun, Ng Yu Cham,
Tang Shiu Kin,
Lau Sing Chong, Ng Wah, Ho Chi Sang; Kwan Shü Chung, Leung Ying Kun, Wong Pak Yan.
C 40 -
The number of inmates of the Po Leung Kuk on 1st. January, 1927 was 45 and during the year 502 persons were admitted as against. 299 in 1926. The circumstances of admis-, sion and the action taken in regard to them are set out in Table A.
27 women and girls were admitted under warrant and 400 were admitted without warrant. Of the remainder 12 were lost children, 28 were accompanied by parents or guardians, and 35 were maid-servants or "mui tsai" who had left their masters or mistresses.
On leaving the Kuk 250 women and girls were restored to husbands or other relatives, 37 were sent to charitable institu- tions in China, 12 were given in adoption, 1 married, 151. re- leased (5 released under bond), 10 sent to Convent or Refuge and 1 died. The number of inmates remaining in the Kuk on December 31st was 39.
The institution was visited monthly by Justices of the Peace, Messrs. A. G. Coppin and Dr. S. W. Tso who on no occasion found cause for adverse comment.
The matron reports favourably on the conduct, health and industry of the inmates during the year. There were 40 cases of sickness of which 10 were sent to the Tung Wah Hospital for treatment and of these 5 died.
Lady Shouson Chow and Mrs. R. H. Kotewall, (the wives of the two Chinese Members of the Legislative Council) con- tinued to undertake the duty of regular monthly visits of inspec- tion during the year.

R. A. C. NORTH, Secretary for Chinese Affairs. President.
We, Chau Tsun Nin and Ma Chi Lung, members of the Board of Direction of the Po Leung Kuk Incorporated Society do solemnly and sincerely declare that the attached statement of Assets and Liabilities of above Society on the 31st December, 1927; marked "A" and signed with our names on the 21st February, 1928, is a true statement, and we make this solemn declaration conscientiously believing the same to be true and by virtue of the provisions of "The Statutory Declaration Act, 1835".

T. N. CHAU.
馬持隆
C 41
Declared by the declarants Chau Tsun Nin and Ma Chi Lung, at Victoria, Hong Kong the 21st February 1928 through the interpretation of Luk Yam Ko of Hong Kong the said Luk Yam Ko having also first declared that he had truly, distinctly and audibly interpreted the. contents of this document of the said declarants and that he would faithfully interpret the con- tents of this document to the said declarants and that he would faithfully interpret the declaration about to be administered unto them.
Before me,
T. W. AINSWORTH,
Justice of Peace.
You do solemnly and sincerely declare that you understand the English and Chinese languages, and that you have truly and audibly interpreted the contents of this document to the declarants Chau Tsun Nin and Ma Chi Lung and that you will truly and faithfully interpret the declaration about to be ad- ministered to them.
Declared at the Secretáriat for Chinese Affairs, Hong Kong. This 21st February, 1928.
Before me,
LUK YAM KO.
R. A. C. NORTH,
Secretary for Chinese Affairs.
Statement A of Assets and Liabilities of the Po Leung Kuk incorporated Society on the 31st December, 1927:
Assets.
Liabilities.
Fixed deposit with Mrs. Lei Ho Shi
on mortgage
$20,000.00
Nil.
At current account with Ng Chau and
Yik. On banks
6,118.58
$26,118.58
This is the statement "A" referred to in the Declaration
of Chau Tsun Nin and Ma Chi Lung. Declared before me this 21st day of February, 1928.
T. N. CHAU.
T. W. AINSWORTH,
Justice of Peace.
馬持隆
January, 1927, In the Po Leung Kuk on 1st
Total,
Table A.
arrangements made regarding them. Number of Women and Girls admitted to the Po Leung Kuk during the year 1927 and the
Committed under Warrant from the Secretariat for Chinese Affairs
Committed under Warrant from
the Emigration Office. Pending the opening of the Secretariat for Chinese Affairs. Sent with their own consent by the Secretary for Chinese Affairs Sent with their own consent from Singapore and Bangkok.
Sent with their own consent by the Police.
Lost Children.
Accompanying parents or
guardians.
Runaway maid-servants.
Total.
2
9
Admitted during the year,
26
85 129
37 149 12
28 | 25
502
Kuk on the 31st Decem-
Remaining in the Po Leung
ber, 1927,
1
28
2 88 140
1 동
:
8
!
37 160 18
28
46
10
9
со
i
39
11
45
517
647
147
146
:
14 10
*

45
Released after enquiry.
Released under bond.
Placed in charge of husband,
Placed in charge of parents and relatives.
Sent to Charitable Institutions
in China.
Sent to School, Convent, or Refuge.
Adopted.
Married.
Died.
Cases under consideration.
Total.
5 42 208 37
10
12
1
5
36
502
5 42 22:
N
5
15 | 18
7
39 547
- C 42
Table B.
PO LEUNG KUK.
Statement of Receipts and Expenditure from 1st January to 31st December, 1927.
RECEIPTS.
Balance from previous year,
Subscriptions:-
The Society for the Prevention of ill treatment to Muitsais,
$
*
C.
27,645
478
Yue Lan Celebrations, West Point,...
40
Guilds,
5,279

Man Mo Temple,
Theatres,
Interest :-
On Mortgage,
1,650
On Current Account,
874
Tótal,..
2,524
36,468.58
EXPENDITURE.
By the Elected Committee :-
(see Table C),
Mortgage to Mrs. Li Ho Shi,.
Balance :-

10,350
20,000
...
On Deposit,
2,000
500.
6,299
At Current Account,
4,118
6,118
Total,..
36,468.58
* Cents omitted except in the totals.
Certified by the Statutory Declaration of Chau Tsun Nin and Ma Chi Lung, Members of the Board of Direction,
1
Table C.
Statement showing particulars of Expenditure by the Elected Committee from 1st January to 31st December, 1927.
C 44 -
RECEIPTS.
$
EXPENDITURE.
$

Balance from previous year,
12
Decorations,
59
Received from Permanent Board,.
10,350
Food,..
2,922
Miscellaneous Receipts,...................
8
Light and Fire,
1,036
Premium on bank notes,
7
Miscellaneous,
266

Passage Money,
232
Petty Expenditure,
423
Printing,
195
Repairs,..
971
Stationery,
128
Telephone,
108
Insurance,
128
Wages,
3,876
Balance,
10,348
28
......
Total,.........$
10,377.50
Total,.
10,377.50
* Cents omitted except in the totals.
C 45
ANNEXE B.
Report of the Inspector of Factories for the year 1927.
The ordinance regulating the employment of children in factories has now been in force for five years and it may not be out of place to survey briefly the results attained.
This or- dinance (No. 22 of 1922) was the first piece of constructive factory legislation introduced into this Colony and to the Chinese factory owners was an entirely new departure. In the earlier stages a large number of the younger children were dismissed from the factories, the owners finding it easier to dispense with child labour than to comply with the requirements of the ordinance as to hours of work, overtime and holidays. The children so dismissed have not been replaced and it is now admitted that the absence of child labour need not affect out- put. In factories where children have been retained the condi- tions of the ordinance have been accepted without serious objection. No European firms in the Colony employ children under the age of 15 years and the total number of children employed has been reduced until at present there are not more that one hundred and fifty children under that age regularly at work in factories. This large reduction is partly accounted for by the depression in the knitting trade and cigarette factories. No new beginners have been taken on during the
year and many of these who have hitherto been registered under the ordinance have now outgrown the age of registration. The cigarette factories which formerly employed a large number of young girls were closed for a considerable part of the year: production has now been resumed but on a limited scale and where formerly 160 children were engaged in packing cigarettes there are now but 15 at work. Apart from the cigarette trade the knitting factories of Kowloon are the principal employers of women and girls. Some of these have closed down during the year: others have found markets elsewhere to replace those lost and have built up a considerable export trade with Singapore and the Dutch East Indies. The trade outlook appears brighter and some firms are installing new machinery and plant in anti- cipation of improved trade in the near future.
Dangerous Trades.-Glass making, boiler chipping and fire- work making Visits of inspection have been made to all places where the these trades are carried on. No breaches of the ordinance have occurred.
Building material etc.-The practice of engaging children to carry coal, bricks and sand up the Peak, once so common and the subject of so much comment has almost entirely ceased. Isolated cases still occur where children are found helping their mothers but they are not now regularly employed and engaged by contractors for this work.
4
C 46
ACCIDENTS IN FACTORIES.-The Factory (Accidents) Ordin- ance, No. 3 of 1927 came into force on the 14th April last, and required factory owners to provide guards and fencing to all dangerous parts of machinery and belting and to report all accidents causing loss of life or absence from work for more than three days.
Copies of the ordinance in English and Chinese were sent to all factories with a covering note to say that the Inspector of Factories were prepared to give advice and assistance to any owners who might be in doubt as to the most effective manner of fencing their machinery. This was taken advantage of in a large number of factories and the owners were always found ready to carry out any suggestions put forward. No trouble has been met with the factory owners agree that guards are necessary and willingly incur the expense of providing and in- stalling fencing when asked to do so. The number of accidents reported since the introduction of this ordinance from 14.4.27 to 31.12.27-is shown below. It will be noted that once the machinery has been fenced the majority of accidents are due to falls and are the results of carelessness on the part of the work- men. This has been found to be the case in the United Kingdom where in order to reduce the number of these accidents the employers have embarked on a "safety first" campaign by means of illustrated posters in the factories.
These posters soon lose their effectiveness unless constantly changed and would probably not appeal to the Chinese mind.
ACCIDENTS IN FACTORIES FROM 14-4-27 тo 31-12-27.
Shipbuilding
Sugar Refining
Electric Power Stations
Oil Installations
Cement Factory
Steam Laundry
Gas Works
Printing Works
Rope Works
Rubber Factory
21 (8 fatal) 7 (1 fatal)
4
2
1
1
1
TOTAL
43
No. of accidents due to machinery
No. of accidents due to falls etc.
March 3rd, 1928.
19 (1 fatal)
24 (8 fatal)
F. MEADE, Inspector of Factories.
?

CORRIGENDA
Owing to the Entrances only having been taken into account relating to Steam Launches "Local Trade" when compiling the figures for 1925 and 1926 the following correctious should be made in the Annual Reports for those years.
PAGE 2.
Report for the Year 1925.
SHIPPING TABLE.
SHOULD READ,
1925.
Decrease.
No.
Tonnage.
No.
Tonnage.
Steam Launches ply- ing in water of the Colony.....
625,848 16,101,878
52,902 520,928
Grand Total
694,101 49,520,523
70,891 7,210,554
Net Decrease
70,391 7,210,554
PAGE 3.-1st PARAGRAPH.
during the year 1925
49,520,523 Tons
amounted to 694,101 vessels of "1924 show a decrease of 70,391
vessels and a decrease of 7,210,554 Tons".
PAGE 4.-1st PARAGRAPH.
"in Steam Launches of 52,902 and a decrease in tonnage of 520,928 tons". Remainder of sentence to be cancelled.
Report for the Year 1926.
PAGE 3.
SHOULD READ.
Decrease.
Tonnage.
SHIPPING TABLE.
1925.
1926.
No.
Tonnage. No. Tonnage. No.
Steam Launches
plying in water
of the Colony ... 625,848 | 16,101,878 | 499,824 | 13,950,144|126,024 | 2,151,734
Grand Total...
694,101 49,520,523 | 560,273 43,796,436 | 137,347 | 5,977,997
Net Decrease
133,828 | 5,724,087
1st Paragraph Line 2. "Year 1926 amounted to 560,273 vessels of 43,796,436 tons'
"1925 show а decrease of
133,828 vessels and a decrease of 5,724,087 tons.
Tables XXIV and XXV on Pages 40 and 41 in the 1925 Report and Pages 44 and 45 in the 1926 Report should be altered accordingly.
TABLE XXIV.
Year.
Total Tonnage All Classes.
1925........
1926..
49,520,523 43,796,436
Appendix C.
REPORT OF THE SECRETARY FOR CHINESE AFFAIRS
FOR THE YEAR 1927.
REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE.
(Tables I and II).
1. The revenue derived from all sources during the year was $22,318 and the expenditure was $11,534.
PROTECTION OF WOMEN AND GIRLS.
Women and Girls Protection Ordinance, No. 4 of 1897. Po Leung Kuk Incorporation Ordinance, No. 6 of 1893.
(Table III).
2. The number of persons reported by Hong Kong residents to the Po Leung Kuk ás missing during the year was 45 of whom 8 were found, as compared with 36 and 8 in 1926: The total number of persons reported missing including reports from China and Macao was 50 of whom 8 were found, as compared with 8 out of 36 in 1926.
3. Four names were added to the list of girls under bond to report themselves periodically to the Secretary for Chinese Affairs. The number of names on the list on December 31st was 12. The names of 3 girls of whom 1 ran away were struck off the list.
EMIGRATION.
Asiatic Emigration Ordinance, No. 30 of 1915.
(i)-Emigration of Women and Children, (Free). ·
(Table IV).
4. The number of female and minor passengers examined and allowed to proceed shows an increase of 66% over the number for 1926.
5. The record of the occupations of the female emigrants over 16 years of age shows that 66% went either with or to join relatives, 25% went as maid servants and the remainder con- sisted of tailoresses, farmers and hairdressers."
6. 66 women were detained for enquiries; none were detain- ed in 1926.
:
C 2
7. The number of women and girls repatriated during the year was 92.
8. 5 prosecutions were undertaken by this office under the Women and Girls Protection Ordinance, and four convictions were obtained.
(ii)-Male Emigration, (Assisted).
(Table V).
9. The figures for the year show an increase of over 31% over the number for 1926.

CHINESE BOARDING HOUSES.
The Boarding House Ordinance, No. 23 of 1917.
(Table VI).
10. 'Under, this Ordinance Chinese Boarding Houses are divided into six classes for the purposes.
11. During the year 16 convictions were obtained for breaches of the Ordinance as compared with 7 in 1926.
Ordinance No. 3 of 1888.
(i)-District Watch.
(Table VII).
12. The District Watch Committee met on 12 occasions; the average attendance being 14. The loyal advice and assist- ance of the Committee (which deals with every kind of question affecting the Chinese Community) continue to be, of the greatest value to the Government.
13. The Hon: Sir Shouson Chow, Messrs. Lo Cheung Shiu, Wong Iu Tung and To Sz Tun's terms of 5 years expired and they were re-appointed by His Excellency the Governor for a further period of 5 years.
14. During the year the two members selected from the retiring Committees of the Tung Wa Hospital and the Po Leung Kuk who hold their appointments for one year, were Mr. Tam Woon Tong and Mr. Chau Tsun Nin vice Mr. Ma Chui Chiu and Mr. Li Yik Mui whose terms had expired.
15. At the end of the year the District Watch Force reached full strength consisting of 122 members. S.I. Shaftain continued in charge of the Force until November when he went on leave and his place was taken by S.I. Andrew. The number of con- victions secured by members of the force was 606, a number
C 3
far above any previous record, as compared with 467 in 1926 Particular attention was given to the activities of pick-pockets with gratifying results; 17% of convictions were of this class. Larceny cases made up 34% and unlawful possession added another 17%..
(ii)-Permits.
16. Permits to issue fire-crackers were given in 1,197 cases of which 871 were for weddings, 150 for theatricals, and the remainder were for religious ceremonies and processions.
REGISTRATION OF BOOKS.
Ordinance No. 2 of 1888.
17. 26 books were registered during the year as compared with 27 in 1926.
TUNG WA HOSPITAL AND MAN MO TEMPLE,
Ordinance No. 1 of 1870, No. 9 of 1904 and No. 10 of 1908.
(Table VIII to Table XII),
18. The following is a list of the Directors for 1927:-
Li Hoi-tung,.
San Shing-sam,
Ng Yu-hon,
Tong Shun,
Chau Pok-hing,
Au Kung-ue,
Uen Lan-suen,-
To Chak-man, Lui Ka On, Tsang lu-ting, Yung Kung-man, Cho Shuk-kon, Luk Kung-luk, Lam Shin-po.
19. The following gentlemen were elected to form the Com-
mittee for 1928:-
Tang Shiu Kin, Lo Yin Nin,
Ng Wa,
Li Chi Tseung,
Siu Shuk Lim,
Fung Kang Ue,
Mak Sui Cho
Lo Leung Wo, Lau Sing Chong, Wong Chung To, Ng Yiu Ting, Tsang Hiu Man, Li Chak Man, Li Yiu Tseung.
20. The number of out patients was 195,203 and that of in- patients was 9,293. 25% of the out-patients and 53% of the in-patients elected to be treated by European methods.
21. The number of destitutes temporarily housed and then sent to their homes was 499; most of whom were sent to the Hospital from this office.
22. Substantial progress was made during the year in preparing for the erection of the Eastern Branch of the Tung Wa Hospital. Funds in hand amounted to over $250,000 and plans are now ready for a beginning of actual building during 1928.
C 4-
KWONG WA HOSPITAL.
(Table XV to Table XVIB).
23. The number of out-patients was 124,337 and that of in- patients was 7,466. 33% of the out-patients elected to receive European treatment. 15% of the in-patients were brought to Hospital in a dying condition and died shortly after arrival. Of the remainder 77% elected to receive European treatment.
TSAN YUK MATERNITY HOSPITAL (WEST POINT).
(Table XIII and Table XIIIA).

24. The Matron, Miss Leung, returned from her course at Rotunda Hospital in March.
The work in the in-patient department has increased con- siderably during the year, and new sisters had to be engaged to cope with this increase.
WAN TSAI MATERNITY HOSPITAL.

25. The work of this hospital has steadily increased since it, was established in 1919. 1,003 cases were admitted as against 773 in 1926.
CHINESE PUBLIC DISPENSARIES AND PLAGUE HOSPITAL.
(Table XVII to Table XXII).
26. The number of cases treated show an increase of 11% over that of 1926, whilst the number of vaccinations increased by 200%.
The number of these vaccinations was 31,077.
CHINESE PERMANENT CEMETERY.
(Table XXIII).
27. The balance at the end of the year was $40,755 as against $43,556 in 1926.
28. The total number of translations done by the Translators was 1,145 as against 737 in 1926. In addition a large number of translations made in other Government Departments are sent to this office for revision.
CHINESE RECREATION GROUND.
(Table XXIV).
29. The Ground continued its contribution of $100 p.m. to the funds of the Tsan Yuk Hospital.
7
C 5
PASSAGE MONEY FUND.
(Table. XXV).
30. The net income shows a considerable increase.
FACTORIES.
31. Mr. Meade continued to act as inspector of factories under the Industrial Employment of Children Ordinance: he also acted as Inspector under the Factory (Accidents) Ordinance, 1927.
His report (Annexe B) contains an interesting survey of the results of the working of factory legislation in the Colony.
LABOUR.
32. No strikes or other disputes of importance which had an economic origin occurred during the year, but attempts to create disturbances for political objects, followed the success of extre- mist elements at Hankow and elsewhere. These were met by the proscription of two organisations, the Chinese Seamen's Union and the General Labour Association of Hong Kong, both of which openly advocated Communism and World Revolution." Action taken in April by the Canton authorities against similar organisations in the province had a favourable effect in Họng Kong though sporadic attempts were made towards the end of the year to extend to Hong Kong the outbreak of looting and disorder with which the City of Canton was afflicted in the month of December. These attempts were frustrated by prompt action against Communist gangs and in particular against a society calling itself the Knitting Workers' Union the activities of which included vitriol throwing and the distribution of Com- munist leaflets. A noteworthy event was the disbanding of the notorious Hong Kong strikers, though the so-called Strike Com- mittee continued to hold office and draw a subsidy until the end of the year.

STAFF.
Secretary for Chinese Affairs.
33. Hon Mr. E. R. Hallifax acted as Colonial Secretary from 5th October and Hon: Mr. R. A. C. North acted as Secretary for Chinese Affairs from the same date.
Chief Assistant to Secretary for Chinese Affairs.
Mr. R. A. C. North acted as Chief Assistant to Secretary for Chinese Affairs up to October 4th and Mr. T. W. Ainsworth acted from the 5th October.
C 6
- Assistant to Secretary for Chinese Affairs.
Mr. E. H. Williams continued as an Assistant to Secretary for Chinese Affairs.
Mr. T. Megarry went on leave on May 28th.
Mr. R. R. Todd acted as an Assistant to Secretary for Chinese Affairs from June 20th.
Emigration Sergeant.
Sergt. J. O'Donovan went on leave on March 19th and was succeeded by Sergt. T. O'Connor.
Emigrant Examining Officer.
Sergt. G. I. Haywood was seconded from the Police Depart- ment to undertake this work.
May 2nd, 1928.
R. A. C. NORTH, Secretary for Chinese Affairs.
T
Heads of Revenue.
Table I.
Revenue for the years 1926 and 1927.
Details of Revenue.
Licences and Internal Revenue not other- wise specified,
******
Fees of Court or
Office, Payments for

Specific Purposes,
and Reimburse-
ments-in-aid,.
Interest,.
Chinese Boarding House Licences, Marriage Licences,
Emigration Passage Brokers' Licences, Forfeitures,
Certificates to Chinese proceeding to foreign countries
Bond by Non-resident Householders, Official Signatures,
3
Interest accrued on official account,
Permits for Firework Displays,
*
Other Miscellaneous
Receipts,
Ordinance under which received.
Revenue in Revenue in 1926. 1927.
Increase.
Decrease.
c.
C.
C.
No. 1 of 1889 & No. 4 of 1908. No. 7 of 1875 & No. 15 of 1902. No. 30 of 1915,
16,721
*
20,383 *
* 3.662
820
820
1,200
1,200
b.
No. 6 of 1923.
400
150
250
No. 3 of 1888.
No. 14 of 1913.
104
80
24
415
394
21
80
110
30
Total,...$
19,740.62
22,318.25
3,692
1,115
Deduct Decrease,:.
'Total Increase,
1,115
2,577
* Cents omitted except in the totals.
-07 —
1.
Table II.
Revenue and Expenditure of the Secretariat for Chinese Affairs since 1918.
Revenue.
Expenditure.
Year.
Total.
Decrease.
Increase.
Total.
Decrease.
Increase.
*
Percent-
age of
Expen.
diture to
Revenue.
$
C.
C.
$
C.

C.
%
1918,
26,678.50
15,307,98
50,117.67
1,749.51
187.86
1919,
21,430.72
5,247.78
52,634.57
2,516.90
245.60
1920,
18,007.65
3,423.07
57,716.27
5,081.70
329,51
1921,
15,659.34
2,348.31
18,705.03
39,011.24
102.25
1922,
15,514.50
144.50
21,115.67
2,410.64
136.10
1923,
16,777.69
1,263.19
28,795.63
7,679.96
171.63
1924,
18,716.08
1,938.39
27,512.96
1,282.67
147.00
1925,
15,741.94
2,974.14
29,225,63
1,712.67
185.66
1926,
19,740,62
3,998.68
8,147.42
21,078.21
41.19
1927,
22,318.25
2,577.63
11,533.80
3,386.38
51.68


Table III.
*
Number of Women and Girls detained in a Place of Refuge by the Secretary for Chinese Affairs under Sections 34 and 35 of Ordinance No. 4 of 1897, and arrangements made regarding them.
Permitted to leave,
Permitted to leave under bond,
Restored to husband,
Restored to relatives,
Married,..
Under Detention on 1st January, 1927.
Detained during 1927.
Total.
Total.
Prostitutes. Emigrants. Total. Prostitutes. Emigrants.
1
...
...
5
...
1
1
19
...
...
1
1
20
1
Sent to native place,
Adopted,
Sent to Refuge or Convent,.
Died,
Awaiting marriage,
Cases under consideration,
Total,
Cases brought forward, 3.
...
...
1
...
...
I
...
1
...
1
...
...
2
: : :
...
2
1
...
1
Cases dealt with during the year, 29.
...
1
26
1
27
30
Cases carried forward, 1.
C 10
Table IV.
Number of Female Passengers and Boys examined and passed before the Secretary for Chinese Affairs under "The Asiatic Emigration Ordinance,
1915," during the year 1927.
Women and Children, 1927.
Total Women
Destination.
and Children
Women: Girls.
Boys.
Total.
1926.
Macassa
349
85
230
664
409
Japan
Straits Settlements and F.M.S.
19,795
3,788
6,994
30,577
24,219
Dutch Indies
Belawan Deli
838
222
395
1,455
857
British North Berneo
1,170
270
497
1,937
954
Honolulu
58
12
29
99
90
· Central America
17
2
21
40
.1
Canada,
1
5
6
656
United States of America,
118
15
204
337
Mexico,
South America,
1
Mauritius & Re-Union,
67
49
118
155
Australia,
5
9
14
16
India,
5,008
594
1,131
6,733
.93
South Africa,
Vancouver,
121
80
Batavia,
1,621
271
849
2,741
West Indies (Jamaica),
*
6,223
Sourabaya,
Balikpapan,
Rangoon,
Port Elizabeth,
60
14
57
131
1
4
5
10
Delagoa Bay,
9 158
14
11
Salina Cruz,
Callao,
21
Billiton,
Or
Victoria,
Seattle,
42
58
3
20
9
61
177
228
323.
Total, 1927,
29,176
5,284
10,842
45,083
34,249
Total, 1926,
C 11
Table V.
Number of Assisted Emigrants.
Rejected.
Year.
Examined.] Passed.
Un-
at
Rejected Rejected
Total
willing.
S.C.A.
by
Percentage of
rejected. Doctor.
rejection.
as unfit.
1925,
1926,
1927,
11,129
11,055
36
19
19
74
'66
.....
15.536 14,804
181
21
2.1
229
1.47
26,266 21,626
66
57
16
139
*52
Treatment of Rejected Emigrants for 1927.
Sent home through Tung Wah Hospital at expense of
Boarding Houses,
117
Rejected by doctor and sent back to boarding houses to
be cured,
17
Total rejected,.................
134
Native districts of Assisted Emigrants passed.
West River,
East River,
North River,
Canton,.....
Delta,
Kwong Sai,.....
Southern Districts,
Mandarin, (Ilunan, Kwong Sai and Kiang Si),
Total,
1,485 10,421
493
1,507
943
2,673
3,727
377
21,626
C 12
Table V,-Continued.
Destinations of Assisted Emigrants.
Whither bound.
Male Assisted Emigrants.
1926
1927
Straits Settlements and F.M.S.,
750
637
British North Borneo,
1,229
1,868
Dutch Indies :
Banca,
4,354
6,852
Billiton,
2,457
3,512
Balikpapan,
Belawan Deli,
5,194
8,125
British Solomon Island,
11
India,
47
Samoa,
194
Ocean Island,
192
401
Nauru,
580
Makatea,
Solomon Islands,
Tihiti,
Sydney,
TOTAL
19
65
28
12
14,783
22,052
3142 passenger's passes were issued for 1st and 2nd class Straits Settlements passengers during the year.
Classification of the Assistant Emigrants examined, accord- ing to the language spoken gives the following figures:-
Cantonese, Hakka,
Hoklo,
Southern Mandarin (mostly from
Kwong Sai and Hunan),
Hainanese,
TOTAL
Table VI.
12,834
3,253
7,576
754
1,849
26,266
Chinese Boarding House Licence Returns under Boarding House
Ordinance No. 23 of 1919.
Class
No. in existence at beginning of 1927 No. in existence at end of 1927
I
II IV V VI VII
3 48 11 293 200 104
3 57 14 268 155 99
- of
!
- C 13
Table VII.
Statement of the Receipts and Expenditure relative to the Hong Kong District Watchmen's Fund for the year 1927.
Receipts.
Expenditure.
C.
To Balance,
46,627,01
By Wages and Salaries:
Chief District Watchmen,
**
Contributions, (Victoria $53,424.77
and Kowloon $9,769.23)
63,194.00
men, Detectives,.
Assistant Chief District Watch-
1st Class District Watchmen,... 8,137.00
$
C.
$
C.
3
975.00
3,106.00
6,467.06
Grant by Hong Kong Government....
2,000.00
2nd
**

3rd
"
""
""
Payment for District Watchmen for
Special Services,......
10,260.35 1,622.74
30,568.15
1,080.00
་་
Interest on Hong Kong Government
6% War Loan,
Miscellaneous :--
Cooks......
1,380.00
Coolies,
Messengers,
840.00
720.00
96.00
1,656,00
Interest on Current Account,
364.59
"
Reward Fund,..
10.00
Office Staff:-
"
Manager,
90.00
Writer,
132.00
""
Fines,..........
18.00
Interpreter,
Clerk,
House Rents,
1,537.00
Collectors,
"
Forfeiture,......
35.00
"
Total.....
996.00
1,218.00
33,442.15
Total, .......$ 116,245.60
1:
Other Charges :—
Allowance to Detectives,
1.338.66
Medal Allowance,
1,175,07
Ammunition.
132.00
Oil Allowance,
128.40
Electric charges,
513.39
Conservancy Allowance,..
63.60
Coolie Hire and Conveyance
Allowance,
$16.99
Stationery and Printing.....
395.46
Uniform and Equipments,
5,101.67
Repairs and Fittings,
1,146.79
Furniture.
82.60
lent of Telephone,
432.00
Premium on Fire Policies,
274.86
997.50
גי
Gratuities and Rewards,
Balance due to Wan Shun Lee
for building Yaumati D.W. Quarters..
1,200.00
Crown Rent.
Photos for D. W.S.............................. Sundries,
20.12 3.30
446.21
14,268.62
Pensions:-
Ex. C.D.W. Fung Fong and others,..
4,506.00
Total Expenditure,...........................
52,216.77
Balance,
64,028.83
Total,
116,245.60
Balance in Colonial Treasury :-
Hong Kong Government 6% War Loan, ... $18,000.00 Cash,.
Fixed Deposits..
""
Hong Kong, 31st December, 1927.
16,028.83
10,000.00
20,000.00
Total,.........
$64,028.83
Examined and found correct.
WONG KAM FUK,
Member of
District Watchmen Committee.
Patients.
Table VIII.
Number of Patients under treatment and other statistics concerning the Tung Wah Hospital during the year 1927.
Admitted.
Out-patients.
Male,
Female,
283 3,361 2,691 6,052 6,335 4,576 1,364 395 150 972 2,269 3,241 3,391 2,694 612
69,669 27,014 96,683|2,776 985 499 85 77,306 21,214 98,520
527
Total,..
433 4,333 4,960 9,293 9,726 7,270 | 1,976
480 146,975 48,228 195,203 2,776 1,512
499
Total for 1926,
433 3,543 3,975 7,518 7,951 5,677 1,841
433 130,514 22,972 153,486 1,2351,320
548
:
C 14
Receipts.
C 15
Table IX.
TUNG WAH HOSPITAL CASH ACCOUNT 1927.
Amount.
*Payments.
Amount.
C.
e.
Cash Balance from last year :—
Man Mo Temple....
Maternity Hospital
Tung Wah Hospital account.$93,182.55
Emergency Fund
Debit balance against Kwong Wah Hos-
pital from last year..
9,433.34
59,118.63
Current account with Kwong Wah Hos-
57,925.84
pital....
78,024.04
1,595.86
211,822.88
Current account with Tung Wah Eastern
Hospital .....
855.89
Cash from the Tung Wah Hospital
(Eastern) at end of 1926...
* Current account with Kwong Wah Hos-
pital
1,270.94
54,832.78
Current account with Man Me Temple Current account with Emergency Fund... Current account with Maternity Hospital Amount lent out on mortgage on behalf
16,873.19
847.00
3,818.14
Current account with Tung Wah Eastern
Hospital
}
of Tung Wah Eastern Hospital
145,000.00
256,254.12
Provisions for staff
14,249.01
Current account with Mar Mo Temple Current account with Maternity Hospital... Interest and subscriptions collected on
behalf of Emergency Fund
Rents from houses
Subscriptions collected from steamers
26,141.20
Salaries for staff
42,065.02
4,058.30
Provisions for sick rooms
30,061.25
Sick room sundries
9,128.46
1,390.22
Hospital sundries
6,494.57
98,096.52
Chinese drugs...
37,505.75
4,688.62
Western drugs.
16,732.61
Annual subscriptions of Hongs......
9,502.00
Repairs...
8,249.93
Subscriptions from wealthy persons........
4,550.00
Destitutes' and. Patients' passages
813.09
Subscriptions and donations.
4.603.07
Repairs to landed property
2,378.68
Subscriptions from Directors past and pre-
Lights
7,270.39
sent
1,553.00
Insurance
875.00
Special contributions for supply of medi-
Crown rent and taxes
10,767.14
cines, quilted clothing, coffins and shrouds
Additions to coffin home building
43,676.68
2,793.41
Sundries for coffin home & burial ground..
2,710.34
Government grants
8,000.00
Additions to Yat Pit Ting building
5,750.00
Amount received from Government on
Small-pox Hospital expenses
2,361,88
account of Western medicines for 1925
Building water closet & constructing
and 1926
5,000.00
concrete work on hill side......
4,593.39
Grant from Man Mo Temple....
2,500.00
Stamps, stationery and advertisements
3,551.16
Contributions from Theatres..
1,257.14
Grant to Kwong Wah Hospital
2,000.00
Hong Kong War Loan repaid
50,000.00
Grant to Fong Pin Hospital
1,000.00
Interest on loans and deposits
53,483.85
Burial of bodies by Tung Wah Hospital...
3,852.57
Premium on notes and discount on goods
Coffins for bodies buried by Tung Wah
purchased
2,076.58
Hospital.
7,115.61
Subscriptions for coffin home
4,250.00
·
Burial of bodies by Government Mor-
Fees for Patients
3,865.70
tuary
2,497,35
Rents from Coffin home
20,897.50
Coffins for bodies buried by Government
Sale of medicines, kitchen refuse, boat-
hire and rents from Yat Pit Ting and
Mortuary..
Interest on deposits........
5,720.00
5,744,20
iron burner....
-11,869.71
Balance
310,741.86
تم ہے
Grand Total.......
$ 844,757.54
Grand Grand Total......
$844,757.54
The Balance of $310,741.86 consists of the following credit balances minus a debit balance of $32,624.60
against the Kwong Wah Hospital:-
Tung Wah Hospital
Man Mo Temple
Emergency Fund...
Maternity Hospital.............
Tung Wah Eastern Hospital.
Minus account against Kwong Wah Hospital
Balance......
.$105,005.57
66,386.64
58,469.06
1,836.02 111,669.17
$343,366.46
32,624.60
.$310,741.86
(For particulars see separate sheet attached).
}
C 16
Table IX (A).
PARTICULARS AS TO CREDIT BALANCES.
TUNG WAH HOSPITAL IN ACCOUNT WITH KWONG WAH HOSPITAL.
To Amount received during 1927
Balance
"
......
$ 54,832.78 32,624.60
$ 87,457.38
By Debit Balance brought from 1926. $ 9,433.34
Amount paid during 1927
78,024.04
$ 87,457.38
TUNG WAH HOSPITAL IN ACCOUNT WITH MAN MO TEMPLE.
To Credit balance brought forward
from 1926
Amount received during 1927
$ 59,118.63 26,141.20
By Payments during 1927
Balance
$ 85,259.83
TUNG WAH HOSPITAL IN ACCOUNT WITH EMERGENCY FUND.
To Credit balance brought forward
from 1926
$ 57,925.84
By Payments during 1927
Balance
""
嗲嗲
Interest received during 1927
1,390.30
$ 59,316.06
TUNG WAH HOSPITAL IN ACCOUNT WITH MATERNITY HOSPITAL.
To Credit balance brought forward.
from 1926
**
Amount received during 1927
$ 1.595.86 4,058.30
$5,654.16
By Payments during 1927
Balance
$18,873.19 66,386.64
$ 85,259.83
$
847.00 58,469.06
$ 59,316.06
$ 3,818.14 1,836.02
$ 5,654.16
TUNG WAH HOSPITAL IN ACCOUNT WITH TUNG WAH EASTERN HOSPITAL.
To Cash received at end of 1926 Amount received during 1927
1,270.94 By Payments during 1927
256,254.12
$257,525.06
Balance
$145,855.89-
111,669.17
$257,525.06.
Income.
Funds brought forward from 1926
- C 17
Table X.
TUNG WAH HOSPITAL.
INCOME AND EXPENDITURE.
Amount.
$ 93,182.55 Maintenance.
Expenditure.
Amount.
Ordinary.
Subscriptions:-
Annual. subscriptions of
Hongs
Provisions:
$ 9,502.00
Subscriptions
collected
Food for staff
Food for sick room
Surgery and Dispensary
Chinese drugs
$14,249.01 30,061.25
$44,310.26
$ 37,505.75
on steamers
..........
4,688.62
Western drugs
16,732.61
Subscriptions and dona-
54,238.36
tions
4,603.07
Establishments:
Subscriptions from weal-
Light
$.7,270.39
thy persons
4,550.00
Insurance
875.00
Subscriptions from Dir-
Repairs
8,249.93
ectors past and pre-
Repairs to hospital pro-
sent
1,553.00
perty
2,378.68
24,896.69
Sick room expenses
9,128.46
Grants:
Small pox Hospital ex-
Government
8,000.00
penses
2,361.88
Government
for medi-
Coffin home and bury-
cines for 1925 and
1926
5,000.00
ing ground expenses. Crown rents and taxes.
2,710.34
10,767.14
Man Mo Temple..
2,500.00
43,741.82
15,500.00
Special contributions :-
For Mortuary expenses. $ 4,250.00
Salaries, wages, &c.:
Staff salaries Sundries
$ 42,065.02 6,494.57
From theatres
1,257.14
48.559.59
For supply of medi-
Appeals, grants, &c.:
cines, quilted cloth-
Destitutes' & Patients'
ing, coffins and
passages
813.09
shrouds
2,793.41
8,300.55
Kwong Wah and Fong
Pin Hospitals
3,000.00
Investments:
3,813.09
Rents
98,096.52
Miscellaneous :
Interest
53,483.85
Hong Kong War Loan
repaid
50,000.00
201,580.37
Other receipts:-
Premium on notes and discount on goods purchased
Rent from coffin home. Fee for Patients
Sale of medicines, kit-
chen refuse, boat hire- and sundries and rents from Yat Pit Ting and iron burner
$ 2,076.58
20,897.50 3,865.70
Stationery &c.
Burial of bodies by
Tung Wah Hospital. Coffins for bodies buried by Tung Wah Hospital Burial of bodies by
Government mortuary Coffins for bodies buried
by Government Interest on deposits
Extraordinary.
$ 3,551.16
3,852.57
7,115.61
2,497.35
5,720.00

· 5,744.20
28,480.89
11,869.71
Cost of building addi-
38,709.49
Do.
tions to coffin home. $ 43,676.68.
Yat Pit Ting.
Cost of building water-
closet &c.
Balance
TOTAL
$382,169.65
TOTAL
5,750.00
4,593.39
54,020.07 105,005.57
$382,169.65
LI HOI TUNG,
SAN SHING SAM,
Directors.
Table X (A).
Statement of Receipts and Payments of the Tung Wah Eastern Hospital, 1927.
Receipts.
Amount.
Expenditure.
C
To Balance from 1926
1,270.94
By Deposit on mortgage
"
Subscriptions
255,279.12
Sundry Expenses
"}
Interest on mortgage
975.00
Balance
""
:
TOTAL
$257,525.06
Amount.
$
C.
145,000.00
855.89
111,669.17
TOTAL
$257,525.06
Receipts.
Table XI.
Emergency Fund Account, 1927.
Amount.
Payments.
Amount.
C.
C.
Balance from account 1926.
57,925.84
Gratuity to destitutes,
490.00
Interest
1,390.22
Passage money for destitutes,
'357.00
Balance,
58,469.06
Total,..
59,316.06
Total,.
59,316.06
Receipts.
Table XII.
Man Mo Temple Fund Account, 1927.
Amount.
Payments.
Amount.
Balance from account 1926,
59,118
Rent of stalls and Temple property,
18,313
Subscription to Tung Wah Hospital, Free Schools and sundries,
2,500
13,741
Rent from Temple keeper,...
6,099
Government Grant in Aid of free schools,
5,295
Repairs to Temple property, free schools, and the Man Mo Temple,
· 851
Interest,
1,418
Police, Rates, Crown Rent, and Insurance
Refund of Crown Rent,.
14
Premium,
1,573
Water accounts and repair to water pipes, Balance,
206
66,386
Total,...
85,259.83
Cents omitted except in the totals.
Total,...
85,259,83
-
Table XIII.
Statement of Receipts and Payments of the Western Maternity Hospital, 1927.
Receipts.
Amount.
Balance from 1926,
1,595
Rent of Hospital Property,
4,020
Interest,
38
Total,
*
5,654.16
Expenditure.
Amount.
$
...
3,200
508
Rent of hospital property handed over to 'the Secretariat for Chinese Affairs,
Police, Rate, Crown Rent, & Insurance Premium,
Repairs to Hospital Property,
Balance,
Total,
Cents omitted except in the totals.
109
1,836
5,654.16
21
Table XIII (A).
WESTERN MATERNITY HOSPITAL.
Statement of Accounts for the year ending 31st December, 1927.
Receipts.
Amount.
Expenditure.
· Amount.
To Balance
Subscriptions
$ 2,088.90
By Salary
Drugs
742.00
$4,598.75
1,478.22
Donation from :-
Stationery and Printing
Chinese Public Dispen-
saries Fund
4,500.00
Bedding
Chinese Recreation Ground
Furniture
Gas and Electricity
Repairs and Fitting
Clothing and Uniform
Food for patients, pupils
951.96
945.73
837.70
69.65
·
83.00
461.56
Fund
1,200.00
and midwives in
the
Rent of houses purchased
Hospital
3,235.93
with Tung Wah Hos-
Instruments
379.66
pital Jubilee Donation.
3,200.00
Fee for District Watch-
9,642.00
men on duty at the
door
540.00
Fees paid by patients in the Hospital.
6,103.05
Crown Rent
1.00
Money paid by pupils in the Hospi-
Water Account
292.50
tal for their food
780.00
Telephone
9.00
Fees paid by patients who had
Washing
741.54
venereal diseases
72.00
Miscellaneous
3,079.37
Interest
23.81
$ 17,705.57
Balance with Colonia! Treasury
1,004.19
TOTAL
$ 18,709.76
TOTAL
$18.709.76
CIÁRI
Cents omitted except in the totals.
C 22
C 23
Table XIV.
Revenue and Expenditure of the Brewin Charity during the year 1927.
Revenue.
Amount.
Expenditure.
Amount.
To Balance from 1926
$165,603.43
Subscriptions from Directors, Tung
Wa Hospital
2,050.00
**
ti
Subscriptions from Committee, Po
Leung Kuk
1.200.00
""
Subscriptions from Directors, Kwong
Ming
"
Wa Hospital
550.00
""
Stamps
Interest from Mr. Chiu Cheuk U for
By Charity for widows and orphans
Subscription to Old Men's Home Salary for Accountant Mr. Chan Yik
Wan
Salary for Clerk 'Mr. Wong, Shut
Conveyance expenses for collecting
mortgage
4,320.00
Interest from Mr. Lau Kwai Nam for
71
mortgage
2,160.00
$ 7,648.40 2,400.00
100.00
60.00
2.85
interest, etc.
10.20
Printed matters by the Wing Fat
8.25
Balance
$173,912.93
Interest from Mr. Yan Leung Kang
and others for mortgage
3,840.00
Interest from Mr. Kan Iu Cho for
mortgage
1,536.00
Interest from Mr. Chak Yuk Tong for
mortgage
1,968.00
17
Interest on War Bonds of Singapore
319.55
Interest on Current Account with
Shanghai Bank
184.05
Interest on War Bonds from Shanghai
Bank
360.00
""
Interest on Fixed deposit of Wong Fung Sze with Shanghai Bank
51.60
TOTAL
$184,142.63
TOTAL
$184,142.63
:
By Fixed deposit with Mr. Chiu Cheuk U on mortgage of six
houses in Temple Street
$ 48,000.00
""
Fixed deposit with Lau Kwai Nam and others on
mortgage of four houses in Temple Street
24,000.00
,, Fixed deposit with Mr. Yan Leung Kang and others on mortgage of house property in Connaught Road W...
40,000.00
""
Fixed deposit with Mr. Kan Iu Cho on mortgage of house
property in Wanchai Road
16,000.00
""
War Bonds of Shanghai Bank
10,000.00
""
War Bonds of Singapore Government
5,000.00
""
Deposit and interest of Sat A Li with Wing Hing Bank
320.10
""
Current Account deposits with Shanghai Bank
28,642.15
""
Deposit with Tung Wah Hospital
752.45
""
Fixed deposit and interest of Wong Fung Sze with
Shanghai Bank
1,198.23
TOTAL
$173,912.93
Examined and found correct. LI HOI TUNG,
SAN SHING SAM,
Directors.

}
Patients.
Table XV.
Number of Patients under treatment and other statistics concerning the Kwong Wah Hospital during the year 1927.
on 31st December, 1926.
Remaining in Hospital
Chinese Treatment.
European Treatment.
Total.
Admitted.
Total Number of pa-
tients under treatment.
Discharged.
Deaths.
Remaining in Hospital
on 31st December, 1927.
Out-patients.
Chinese Treatment.
European Treatment.
Total.
Male,
Female,
125
68
1,292 | 2,5323,9243,9492,509 1,298
142 43,163 22,060 65,223
185
4
|
397 3,2458,642 3,710 2,730 863
117
39,895 19,219 59,114
133
...
Total,..
193
1,689 5,7777,466 7,659 5,239 2,161
|
259 83,058 41,279 | 124,337
318
4
...
Total for 1926, 198
|
1,400 4,738 6,138 6,336 4,594 1,549
193 67,083 32,646 99,729
401
:
Vaccinations.
Dead bodies brought to Hospital Mortuary
for burial.
Destitutes sent home.
C 24-
علم
Receipts.
-- C 25
Table XVI.
KWONG WAH HOSPITAL.
Cash Account 1927.
Amount.
$
*A
Payments.
Amount.
C.
Balance brought forward from
previous year,..........
Government Grant,
*"
""
Special Donation,... Donation for West-
ern drugs for 1925 and 1926,..
Subscription from Tung Wah
Hospital, for giving free coffius. 2,000.00 Current account with Tung Wah
Sick room expenses,
Charcoal,
Current account with Tung Wali
5,942.27
Hospital, .....
54,832.78
8,500.00
Salaries to Hospital staff,
18,541.65
25,000.00
Provisions for staff,
6,134.87
Hospital sundries,
1,283.91
5,000.00
Provisions for patients,
15,086.69
7,184.08
1,013.51
Chinese drugs,
15,599.07
Hospital,
78,024.04
Western drugs,
16,311.86
Subscriptions from charitable
Lights,
3,008.82
persons and yearly subscrip- tions,
Telephone rent,
262.00
15,753.32
Stationery, stamps, and adver-
Subscriptions from Ko Shing, Tai
Ping, Lee and New Theatres,... Donations from A. Fong and Tai
Wo Photographers,
tisements,
1,512.49
3,407.14
Water,
283.25
Discount on notes,
8.79
600.00
Furniture and repairs,
2,407.88
Donations from Old Yaumati Chinese Public Dispensary, Donations from Po Hing Theatre.. Sale of Chinese Medicines,
Building contract,...
1,305.00
6,561.98 | Coffins,
5,558.45
594.00
Burial of bodies from Hospital
497.45
Mortuary,
433.35
Premium on notes,
279.17
Burial of bodies from Yaumati
Sale of kitchen refuse,
421.24
Public Mortuary,
458.10
Payments by in-patients and for
drugs,
Old Men's Asylum,
46.90
5,193.41
Grave stones,
236.40
Interest,
138.51
Cumsha to coolies, sale of refuse,
Amount transferred from Free Chinese Drugs Special Fund to Income and Expenditure account,
Repaid by Tung Wah Hospital out of deposit of $129,181.90 (Free Chinese Drugs Special Fund),
Subscriptions from charitable persons for Free Chinese Drugs Special Fund, ..........
Interest and house rent collected
&c.,
286.51
Crown Rent,...
1.00
10,136.64
64,420.10
900.00
in respect of Free Chinese Drugs Special Fund,
9,445.44
Maternity Hospital Fund sub-
scribed,
22,016.76
Grand Total,..................... ..$264,831.47
Building work in connection
with extension of sick room,... Amount transferred from Free Chinese Drugs Special Fund to Income and Expenditure account,.. Amount paid for purchase of landed property on behalf of Free Chinese Drugs Special Fund including expenses and repairs, Amount paid for Crown rent, taxes, etc. on behalf of Free Chinese Drugs Special Fund, Maternity Hospital Fund de- posited with Tung Wah Hospital, BALANCE,..
10,136.64
64,420.10
208.80
21,806.76
15,921.81
Grand Total,........
..$264,831.47
540,00
Income.
C 26
Table XVI (A),
KWONG WAH HOSPITAL.
INCOME AND EXPENDITURE 1927.
Amount.
Expenditure.
Amount.
To amount transferred from Free
Chinese Drugs Special Fund
A.-MAINTENANCES :·
$10.136.64
A.-ORDINARY:-
Government Grant
$8,500.00
Provisions:
Staff Patients
$ 6,134.87 15,086.69
8,500.00
$ 21,221.56
Subscriptions:
Tung Wah Hospital for
free coffins
$2,000.00
Charitable persons
15,753.32
Dispensary:-
Chinese drugs Western drugs
$15,599.07
16,311.86
17,753.32
31.910.93
Entertainments :—
Establishment:·
and New Theatres
Lights
Ko Shing, Tai Ping, Lee
Po Hing Theatre
Donations:
A. Fong and Tai Wo
Photographers
Old
Yaumati
Dispensary
Patients Payments :—
In and Out Patients
Chinese drugs sold
$3.407.14
$ 3,008.82
2
594.00
Furniture and repairs.
2,407.88
4,001.14
Sick room expenses
7,184.08
Charcoal
1,013.51
Telephone rent
262.00
$ 600.00
Water
283.25
Public
Sundries
1,570.42
6,561.98
Building Contract
1,305.00
7,161.98
Crown rent
1.00
17,035.96
$ 5,193.41 497.45
Salaries:
5,690.86
Hospital Staff
$18,541.35
Other receipts:
18,541.65
Premium on notes
$
Interest
279.17 138.51
Miscellaneous:
Sale of kitchen refuse,
Stationery, stamp and
&c.
421.24
advertisements
$1,512.49
838.92
Discount on notes
8.79
Coffins
5,558.45
B.-EXTRAORDINARY :
Burial of bodies
433.35
Burial of bodies from
Donations:
Yaumati
458.10
nation
Government Special Do-
Government Special Do-
Old Men's Asylum
$25,000.00
Grave stones
46.90 236.40
8,254.48
nation for Western drugs for 1925 and 1926
5,000.00
30,000.00
Balance
12,881.72
TOTAL
$ 96.964.58
TOTAL
$ 96,964.58.
NGAN SHING KWAN,
WONG HOK SAN,
Directors.
77
1.
C 27
Table XVI-(B)
FINANCIAL POSITION OF THE KWONG WAH HOSPITAL.
Free Chinese Drugs Special Fund deposited with the Tung Wah Hospital.
Amount left deposited with Tung
Wah Hospital at end of 1926... $129,181:90
$129,181.90
Amount returned by Tung Wah
Hospital during 1927 Balance with Tung Wah Hospital
at end of 1927
$ 64,420.10
64,761.80
$129,181.90
Current account with Tung Wah Hospital.
Amount paid to Tung Wah Hospital
during 1927
Amount overdrawn on Tung Walı
Hospital at end of 1927
$ 54,832.78
32,624.60
Amount overdrawn on Tung Wah
Hospital in previous year Amount received from Tung Wah
Hospital in 1927.
$ 9,433.34
78,024.04
$87,457.38
$ 87,457.38
Maternity Hospital Fund.
Amount deposited with Tung Wah
Hospital during 1927
Amount collected in 1927...
$ 22,016.76
Cash in hand
$ 21,806.76 210.00
$ 22,016.76
$ 22,016.76
3
Analysis of Cash in hand.
Cash in hand as per Cash account.. $ 15,921.81
Kwong Wah Hospital General
Fund
Maternity Hospital Fund.....
$ 15,711.81 210.00
$15,921.81
$ 15,921.81
SUMMARY. -
Free Chinese Drugs Special Fund deposited with Tung Wah
Hospital ....
Maternity Hospital Fund deposited with Tung Wah Hospital Maternity Hospital Fund in cash with Kwong Wah Hospital Kwong Wah Hospital General Fund in cash....
Total.....
Less amount overdrawn on Tung Wah.Hospital on
current account
.$ 64,761.80 21,806.76 210.00 15,711.81.
$102,490.37°
32,624.60
Net Funds
.$ 69,865.77

Besides the above there is the sum of $1,752.33 which has been advanced out of the Hospital General Fund to the Sick Room Extension Special Fund which however seems to have no means of repaying this advance.
For further particulars, see below :--
Kwong Wah Hospital in account with Sick Room Extension Special Fund.
Amount advanced to this Fund during previous years Amount further advanced to this Fund during 1927
$

1,212.33 540.00
$
1,752.33
Kwong Wah Hospital in account with Free Chinese Drugs Special Fund.
To Balance of last year's account... $129,181.90
"yearly subscriptions collected in
1927. ......
Interest & house rent collected
""
in 1927
By amount transferred to Income
and Expenditure account amount paid for purchase of landed property including expenses and repairs ...
900.00
92
9,445.44
""
$139,527.34
""
amount paid for Crown rent,
taxes etc.
Balance
$ 10,136.64

64,420.10
208.80 64,761.80
$ 189,527.34
*
C 28
Table XVII.
Summary of work done by the Chinese Public Dispensaries: Victoria, Harbour, Shaukiwan, and Kowloon Peninsula.
!
Description.
*
Grand Grand Total. Total Total 1927. 1926.
New Cases,.......
Return Cases,
Total,.........
Certificates of nature of disease issued,
""
cause of death,.
Patients removed to hospital by ambulance,...
Corpses removed to hospital or mortuary,......
Attendances at cleansing of infected premises,
Compensation claims sent in,
Applications received for coffins,
for midwives,
""
Confinement cases in Maternity Hospital,......
Infants brought to Dispensaries, (alive),
99
>>
27
88,799
72,571
161,570 139,469
1
315
340
...
281
270
839
745
94
85
.297
353
1,003
778
(dead),.
1,335
Total,...........
1,335
1,015
46
*
Vaccinations at private houses,
""
,, Dispensaries,
Total,.
31,031
1
...
31,077
11,342
་་
Table XVIII.
CHINESE PUBLIC DISPENSARIES.
Statement of Accounts for the year ending 31st December, 1927:
C 29
Receipts.
$
Expenditure.
To Balance,
"
Grant by Government,
Donations from :-
Tai Ping Theatre,
Lee Theatre, San Theatre,
Ko Shing Theatre,
Subscriptions, Land,..
83,922.50
By Maintenances of Dispensaries :-
Victoria,
28,141.70
9,000.00
.. ....
Harbour and Yaumati,
6,867.76
Shaukiwan,..
Kowloon,
7,191.05
4,316.13
5,400.00
683.00
46,516,64
800.00
14.28
Subscription in aid of the Fund of
Western Maternity Hospital,
4,500.00
18,241.40
Harbour & Yaumati..
10,985.00
Balance in Colonial Treasury :-
Shaukiwan,
1,895.25
"
On Fixed Deposit, .......
40,000.00
Kowloon City,
560.00
Do.
15,000.00
38,578,93
On Hong Kong Public Works Loan. 11,000.00
ナナ
Fees from Maternity Hospital in
In Cash,
18,688.37
Interest,
Chinese Public Dispensaries, Wan-
chai,.......
""

"
Interest on Hong Kong Government
6% War Loan,
Total,.....
1,971.70
491.88
Advance to :-
Dispensaries Clerks,
120.00
84,808.37
1,860.00
$ 185,825.01
Total,.
135,825.01
* Cents omitted except in the totals.
R. A. C. NORTH, Secretary for Chinese Affairs.
Table XIX.
HUNGHOM DISPENSARY.
Statement of Accounts for the year ending 31st December, 1927.
Receipts.
Balance Subscription etc. Donation from :-
Po Hing Theatre Kun Yam Temple Tai Ping Theatre Scavenging Contractor at Hunghom
Expenditure.
1,847.00
2,190.00
Through Secretariat for Chinese Affairs.... Through Local Committee
2;142.00
3,126.00
Balance :-
600.00
At Colonial Treasury
428.00
600.00
With Local Committee
560.00
540.00
480.00
6,257.75
6,257.75
* Cents omitted except in the totals.
CHUNG IU SHAN,
Chairman,
TSANG PING SHAN,
Accountant.
... Chinese Public Déspensary, Hunghom,
30
To Balance,
Receipts.
Donation from :—
29
Po Hing Theatre,
Table XIX (A).
SHAMSHUIPO DISPENSARY.
Statement of Accounts for the year ending 31st December, 1927.
Sam Tai Tsz, Tin Hau and Pak Tai Temples,
· Rent from the eight houses at Shamshuipo,...
Grant by Government,
Total,
Expenditure.
1,527.00 By Through Secretariat for Chinese Affairs,
550.00
646.00
"
1,660.00
3,000.00
Through Local Committee,
Balance :-
At Colonial Treasury,
With Local Committee,.
7,385.29
* Cents omitted except in the totals.
...
2,740.00
2,816.00
1,018.00
810.00
Total,
7,385.29
WONG IU TUNG,.
Fice-Chairman.
AU TO NAM,
Accountant.
Chinese Public Dispensary, Shamshuipo.
*
31
Number of deaths.
Number certified.
Table XX.
Deaths of Chinese in Hong Kong and Kowloon during 1927 showing number in which the cause of death was duly certified and number in which a
1
N

post-mortem examination was held.
7
uncertified.
Number
Victoria,
Harbour,
9,835
5,259
4,576
53.5
785
7.9
3,791
38.5
741
234
507
31.6
301
40.6
206
27.8
Kowloon,....
3,324
935
2,389
28.1
327
9.8
2,062
62.3
.
Shaukiwan,
378
326
52
86.2
42
11.1
10
2.6
Other Villages in Hong Kong,......
247
240
7
97.2
7
2.8
Total,..
14,525
6,994
7,531
48.1
1,462
10.1
6,069
45·2·
Percentage of 3 to 2.
Number examined after death' and not
sent to mortuary.
Percentage of
6 to 2.
Number sent to
mortuary.
Percentage of
8 to 2.
32
9
Table XXI.
Monthly Return of Bodies of Chinese considered by the Secretary for Chinese Affairs to have been abandoned during the year 1927.
Victoria.
Month.
Harbour. Kowloon.
West.
Central.
East. Total.
Hong Kong outside . Victoria.
Territories.. New
Grand
Total.
Total.
A
January,
February,
March,...
10
April,
1728
12
17
16
18
2708
33
29
31
: 4
5
57
36
10
72
252
...
6
::
7
30
10
72
May,
June,
13
24
.12
56
*****
29
62
68
99
89
125
85
115
73
97
11
12
31
44
9
62
93
July,
August,
September,
October,
November,
10
11
26
7
53
16
76
102
10
22
15
26
9
50
72
• December,
∞ a com
6
12
3
1727
8
23
11
50
7
68
91
20
16
56
20
92
112
22
3
48
10
61
83
9
18
37
4
59
68
Grand Total,
77
93
137
307
116
600
96
812
Total for 1926,
74
72
124
270
.90
724
69
...
:
:
1,119
*
783
1,033 †
* In 1927, of 1,119 none was taken to Chinese Public Dispensaries. † In 1926, of 1,033 none was taken to Chinese Public Dispensaries.
C 33
·
*
Ở 34
Table XXII.
Return of Bodies abandoned during the years 1924, 1925 and 1926. *
(Figures supplied by the Police Department.)
1927.
Male.
Female.
Unknown.
Over
15 years.
15 years and under.
Over
15 years.
Victoria,...
44
172
Kowloon,....
27 379
Harbour,
36
42
Elsewhere,
14
51
G+ -
15 years
and under.
Over
15 years.
15 years
and under.
86
307
191
600
31
3
116
26
96
Total,
121
644
11
334
9.
1,119
1926.
Victoria,
11
136
1
79
227
Kowloon,...
28 326
281
1
637
Harbour,
25
43
10
20
98
Elsewhere,
12
35
1
23
71
Total,
76
540
13
403
1
1,033
1925.
Victoria,
142
Kowloon,....
367
Harbour, Elsewhere,
24
...
95583
129
269
50
28888
30
32
Total,
383
610
9 460
:
3
: : co
1,115
272
648
113
82
*
Total.
*
Interest from Hong Kong and
To Balance,
Receipts.
Table XXIII.
Statement of Receipts and Payments of the Chinese Permanent Cemetery for 1927.
Amount.
C.
Payments.
43,556.37 By Rent of telephone,
"
"
Shanghai Bank,
162.37
""
Repairs to roads, and embankment etc. by Yeung Tam-kee,. Wages for Ma Shu-hoi & gardeners,
Tai San Bank,...
575.83
Printed matters by the Shing Fat,
"}
""
War Bonds,
480.00
""
Manure, bamboo brooms, scythes etc.,...
""
""
1
Sale of 174 lots,
9,310.00
""
Stamps,
""
Stone Embankment,.......
2,610.00
Rent of wharf,
>>
""
Wages from Dr. S. W. Tso for refilling vaults,
""
Rates for getting water from river,
226.00
Crown Rent,
Interest from Mr. Tso Kon
""
Chai,
3,320.00
"
24 Joss paper pots from the Hop Cheung,..
وو
""
??
Wages for Pun Yan Chin & Chau Wan Kok,
Printed matters by the Wo Hing,
Flower pots and water jars from Tung Tai Chan, Balance,
Total,
60,240.57
Ş. W. TSO, Secretary,
T. N. CHAU, Treasurer.
Total,..
Amount.
$
C.
180.00
16,903.56
1,553.00
3.00
178.35
12.00
1.00
1.00
.50
480.00
84.00
11.70
75.20
40,755.26
60,240,57
By deposits with Hong Kong & Shanghai Bank,
.$33,764.09
""
"
Cash,
Tai San Bank,
Examined and found correct,
6,500.00
491.17
$40,755.26
LI PO KWAI.
35
E
To Balance,.....
""
Rent of Stalls,
Receipts.
Table XXIV.
CHINESE RECREATION GROUND.
Receipts and Expenditure, 1927.
Payments.
4,074.00 By Wa
By Wages of Watchmen, etc,
""
Water Account,
3,282,00
29
Consumption of Gas,
890.00
* 177.00
270.00
""
Subscription to Western Maternity Hospital, 1,200.00
Lime Washing,
Furniture and repairs,
Miscellaneous,
90.00
275.00
50.00
""
Balance,
4,403.88
Total,.
7,357.24
* Cents omitted except in the totals.
Total,....
7,357.24
36
Y
Table XXV.
Statement of Accounts of Passage Money Fund, 1927.
Receipts.
Payments.
By Gifts to 7 women on being married, Charitable Allowances to two persons for 3 months,
Subscription to Alice Memorial Hospital,
""
Eyre Diocesan Refuge,
Hawker's and Boat Licences to destitute per-
song,
Gifts in aid of repatriation of emigrants,......| Balance on Fixed Deposit, ......$ 4,250
To Balance on Fixed Deposit,
.*$4,250
>>
in Colonial Treasury,
2,864
""

7,114
"}
""
Passage Money received,
589
""
"
Less Refund,
201
"
388
"
"
Interest on Fixed Deposit,
170
"
,, on money deposited in Treasury,
79
.249
Total,
$
7,751.58
""
in Colonial Treasury,
Total,
14
18
50
170
79
123
3,046
7,296
$ 7,751.58
* Cnts omitted except in the totals.
R. A. C. NORTH,
Secretary for Chinese Affairs.
C 37
Table XXVI.
Prosecutions under Ordinances No. 3 of 1888, No. 30 of 1915, and No. 4 of 1897.
Offence.
Convicted.
. Discharged.
No. of
Cases.
Male.
Female.
Male.
Female.
42
36
Ordinance No. 3 of 1888.
Bills,-Posting without permission,
Fireworks, Discharged without permission, Drums and Gongs,-Night noises by beating, Processions,-Organising in the public streets without permission,
Householders' Registration,-Failing to register,
Ordinance No. 30 of 1915.
Decoying men or boys into or out of the Colony,... Emigration House offences,...
Personating emigrants, ......
Sending assisted emigrants out of the Colony with- out notifying the Secretary for Chinese Affairs,
Ordinance No. 4 of 1897.
Indecent assult upon female,
****.
:
:
1
Decoying women and girls into or away from the
Colony,
Detaining, harbouring, or receiving women or girls,... Deriving profits from prostitution and trading in
women, ..................
4.
1
...
:
5
...
:
....
::
...
I
...
:.
Remarks.
:
3
Co
2
88
11
79
6
C 39
ANNEXE A.
Report on the work of the Po Leung Kuk for the year 1926.
*
The Po Leung Kuk Society was founded in 1878 to aid in the detection and suppression of kidnapping, especially of girls and women, and to shelter such girls or women as had been kidnapped in the interior and brought to Hong Kong for sale or emigration. Its name means "institution for the protection of good women”. The initiative in its formation came from the Chinese themselves, and ever since by subscription and personal service, they have continued to support it.
There is a paid Chinese staff-matron, amahs and nurses, and two clerks who are secretaries to the managing committee. This Committee meets every evening from Monday to Friday at 7 p.m. the principal meeting of the week being held at 12 noon on Sunday. It not only manages the Po Leung Kuk, but acts as an advisory committee to the Secretary for Chinese Affairs, in all cases affecting women and children, and Chinese family life generally, which are often extremely difficult and tedious. It corresponds when necessary with charitable institu- tions and private persons in various parts of China, traces parents of lost children or ill-treated mui tsai, and shelters for the night any Chinese woman or girl who chooses to go. When parents or relations cannot be traced, the Committee arranges for the girls in its care to be given in marriage (never as con- cubines) or in adoption, always under bond and always with the consent of this office; and in every case this office ascertains the girl's willingness before giving consent to either adoption or marriage.
In addition to the annual Committee appointed by co-option there is a Permanent Committee, which serves to maintain continuity of policy, and of which the Secretary for Chinese Affairs is the ex-officio chairman.
The following gentlemen were elected in March to serve as Managing Committee for the year:
Lo Chung Kui, Ma Chi Lung,
Ho Wing Chun, Au Lim Chun, Ng Yu Cham,
Tang Shiu Kin,
Lau Sing Chong, Ng Wah, Ho Chi Sang; Kwan Shü Chung, Leung Ying Kun, Wong Pak Yan.
C 40 -
The number of inmates of the Po Leung Kuk on 1st. January, 1927 was 45 and during the year 502 persons were admitted as against. 299 in 1926. The circumstances of admis-, sion and the action taken in regard to them are set out in Table A.
27 women and girls were admitted under warrant and 400 were admitted without warrant. Of the remainder 12 were lost children, 28 were accompanied by parents or guardians, and 35 were maid-servants or "mui tsai" who had left their masters or mistresses.
On leaving the Kuk 250 women and girls were restored to husbands or other relatives, 37 were sent to charitable institu- tions in China, 12 were given in adoption, 1 married, 151. re- leased (5 released under bond), 10 sent to Convent or Refuge and 1 died. The number of inmates remaining in the Kuk on December 31st was 39.
The institution was visited monthly by Justices of the Peace, Messrs. A. G. Coppin and Dr. S. W. Tso who on no occasion found cause for adverse comment.
The matron reports favourably on the conduct, health and industry of the inmates during the year. There were 40 cases of sickness of which 10 were sent to the Tung Wah Hospital for treatment and of these 5 died.
Lady Shouson Chow and Mrs. R. H. Kotewall, (the wives of the two Chinese Members of the Legislative Council) con- tinued to undertake the duty of regular monthly visits of inspec- tion during the year.

R. A. C. NORTH, Secretary for Chinese Affairs. President.
We, Chau Tsun Nin and Ma Chi Lung, members of the Board of Direction of the Po Leung Kuk Incorporated Society do solemnly and sincerely declare that the attached statement of Assets and Liabilities of above Society on the 31st December, 1927; marked "A" and signed with our names on the 21st February, 1928, is a true statement, and we make this solemn declaration conscientiously believing the same to be true and by virtue of the provisions of "The Statutory Declaration Act, 1835".

T. N. CHAU.
馬持隆
C 41
Declared by the declarants Chau Tsun Nin and Ma Chi Lung, at Victoria, Hong Kong the 21st February 1928 through the interpretation of Luk Yam Ko of Hong Kong the said Luk Yam Ko having also first declared that he had truly, distinctly and audibly interpreted the. contents of this document of the said declarants and that he would faithfully interpret the con- tents of this document to the said declarants and that he would faithfully interpret the declaration about to be administered unto them.
Before me,
T. W. AINSWORTH,
Justice of Peace.
You do solemnly and sincerely declare that you understand the English and Chinese languages, and that you have truly and audibly interpreted the contents of this document to the declarants Chau Tsun Nin and Ma Chi Lung and that you will truly and faithfully interpret the declaration about to be ad- ministered to them.
Declared at the Secretáriat for Chinese Affairs, Hong Kong. This 21st February, 1928.
Before me,
LUK YAM KO.
R. A. C. NORTH,
Secretary for Chinese Affairs.
Statement A of Assets and Liabilities of the Po Leung Kuk incorporated Society on the 31st December, 1927:
Assets.
Liabilities.
Fixed deposit with Mrs. Lei Ho Shi
on mortgage
$20,000.00
Nil.
At current account with Ng Chau and
Yik. On banks
6,118.58
$26,118.58
This is the statement "A" referred to in the Declaration
of Chau Tsun Nin and Ma Chi Lung. Declared before me this 21st day of February, 1928.
T. N. CHAU.
T. W. AINSWORTH,
Justice of Peace.
馬持隆
January, 1927, In the Po Leung Kuk on 1st
Total,
Table A.
arrangements made regarding them. Number of Women and Girls admitted to the Po Leung Kuk during the year 1927 and the
Committed under Warrant from the Secretariat for Chinese Affairs
Committed under Warrant from
the Emigration Office. Pending the opening of the Secretariat for Chinese Affairs. Sent with their own consent by the Secretary for Chinese Affairs Sent with their own consent from Singapore and Bangkok.
Sent with their own consent by the Police.
Lost Children.
Accompanying parents or
guardians.
Runaway maid-servants.
Total.
2
9
Admitted during the year,
26
85 129
37 149 12
28 | 25
502
Kuk on the 31st Decem-
Remaining in the Po Leung
ber, 1927,
1
28
2 88 140
1 동
:
8
!
37 160 18
28
46
10
9
со
i
39
11
45
517
647
147
146
:
14 10
*

45
Released after enquiry.
Released under bond.
Placed in charge of husband,
Placed in charge of parents and relatives.
Sent to Charitable Institutions
in China.
Sent to School, Convent, or Refuge.
Adopted.
Married.
Died.
Cases under consideration.
Total.
5 42 208 37
10
12
1
5
36
502
5 42 22:
N
5
15 | 18
7
39 547
- C 42
Table B.
PO LEUNG KUK.
Statement of Receipts and Expenditure from 1st January to 31st December, 1927.
RECEIPTS.
Balance from previous year,
Subscriptions:-
The Society for the Prevention of ill treatment to Muitsais,
$
*
C.
27,645
478
Yue Lan Celebrations, West Point,...
40
Guilds,
5,279

Man Mo Temple,
Theatres,
Interest :-
On Mortgage,
1,650
On Current Account,
874
Tótal,..
2,524
36,468.58
EXPENDITURE.
By the Elected Committee :-
(see Table C),
Mortgage to Mrs. Li Ho Shi,.
Balance :-

10,350
20,000
...
On Deposit,
2,000
500.
6,299
At Current Account,
4,118
6,118
Total,..
36,468.58
* Cents omitted except in the totals.
Certified by the Statutory Declaration of Chau Tsun Nin and Ma Chi Lung, Members of the Board of Direction,
1
Table C.
Statement showing particulars of Expenditure by the Elected Committee from 1st January to 31st December, 1927.
C 44 -
RECEIPTS.
$
EXPENDITURE.
$

Balance from previous year,
12
Decorations,
59
Received from Permanent Board,.
10,350
Food,..
2,922
Miscellaneous Receipts,...................
8
Light and Fire,
1,036
Premium on bank notes,
7
Miscellaneous,
266

Passage Money,
232
Petty Expenditure,
423
Printing,
195
Repairs,..
971
Stationery,
128
Telephone,
108
Insurance,
128
Wages,
3,876
Balance,
10,348
28
......
Total,.........$
10,377.50
Total,.
10,377.50
* Cents omitted except in the totals.
C 45
ANNEXE B.
Report of the Inspector of Factories for the year 1927.
The ordinance regulating the employment of children in factories has now been in force for five years and it may not be out of place to survey briefly the results attained.
This or- dinance (No. 22 of 1922) was the first piece of constructive factory legislation introduced into this Colony and to the Chinese factory owners was an entirely new departure. In the earlier stages a large number of the younger children were dismissed from the factories, the owners finding it easier to dispense with child labour than to comply with the requirements of the ordinance as to hours of work, overtime and holidays. The children so dismissed have not been replaced and it is now admitted that the absence of child labour need not affect out- put. In factories where children have been retained the condi- tions of the ordinance have been accepted without serious objection. No European firms in the Colony employ children under the age of 15 years and the total number of children employed has been reduced until at present there are not more that one hundred and fifty children under that age regularly at work in factories. This large reduction is partly accounted for by the depression in the knitting trade and cigarette factories. No new beginners have been taken on during the
year and many of these who have hitherto been registered under the ordinance have now outgrown the age of registration. The cigarette factories which formerly employed a large number of young girls were closed for a considerable part of the year: production has now been resumed but on a limited scale and where formerly 160 children were engaged in packing cigarettes there are now but 15 at work. Apart from the cigarette trade the knitting factories of Kowloon are the principal employers of women and girls. Some of these have closed down during the year: others have found markets elsewhere to replace those lost and have built up a considerable export trade with Singapore and the Dutch East Indies. The trade outlook appears brighter and some firms are installing new machinery and plant in anti- cipation of improved trade in the near future.
Dangerous Trades.-Glass making, boiler chipping and fire- work making Visits of inspection have been made to all places where the these trades are carried on. No breaches of the ordinance have occurred.
Building material etc.-The practice of engaging children to carry coal, bricks and sand up the Peak, once so common and the subject of so much comment has almost entirely ceased. Isolated cases still occur where children are found helping their mothers but they are not now regularly employed and engaged by contractors for this work.
4
C 46
ACCIDENTS IN FACTORIES.-The Factory (Accidents) Ordin- ance, No. 3 of 1927 came into force on the 14th April last, and required factory owners to provide guards and fencing to all dangerous parts of machinery and belting and to report all accidents causing loss of life or absence from work for more than three days.
Copies of the ordinance in English and Chinese were sent to all factories with a covering note to say that the Inspector of Factories were prepared to give advice and assistance to any owners who might be in doubt as to the most effective manner of fencing their machinery. This was taken advantage of in a large number of factories and the owners were always found ready to carry out any suggestions put forward. No trouble has been met with the factory owners agree that guards are necessary and willingly incur the expense of providing and in- stalling fencing when asked to do so. The number of accidents reported since the introduction of this ordinance from 14.4.27 to 31.12.27-is shown below. It will be noted that once the machinery has been fenced the majority of accidents are due to falls and are the results of carelessness on the part of the work- men. This has been found to be the case in the United Kingdom where in order to reduce the number of these accidents the employers have embarked on a "safety first" campaign by means of illustrated posters in the factories.
These posters soon lose their effectiveness unless constantly changed and would probably not appeal to the Chinese mind.
ACCIDENTS IN FACTORIES FROM 14-4-27 тo 31-12-27.
Shipbuilding
Sugar Refining
Electric Power Stations
Oil Installations
Cement Factory
Steam Laundry
Gas Works
Printing Works
Rope Works
Rubber Factory
21 (8 fatal) 7 (1 fatal)
4
2
1
1
1
TOTAL
43
No. of accidents due to machinery
No. of accidents due to falls etc.
March 3rd, 1928.
19 (1 fatal)
24 (8 fatal)
F. MEADE, Inspector of Factories.
?

CORRIGENDA
Owing to the Entrances only having been taken into account relating to Steam Launches "Local Trade" when compiling the figures for 1925 and 1926 the following correctious should be made in the Annual Reports for those years.
PAGE 2.
Report for the Year 1925.
SHIPPING TABLE.
SHOULD READ,
1925.
Decrease.
No.
Tonnage.
No.
Tonnage.
Steam Launches ply- ing in water of the Colony.....
625,848 16,101,878
52,902 520,928
Grand Total
694,101 49,520,523
70,891 7,210,554
Net Decrease
70,391 7,210,554
PAGE 3.-1st PARAGRAPH.
during the year 1925
49,520,523 Tons
amounted to 694,101 vessels of "1924 show a decrease of 70,391
vessels and a decrease of 7,210,554 Tons".
PAGE 4.-1st PARAGRAPH.
"in Steam Launches of 52,902 and a decrease in tonnage of 520,928 tons". Remainder of sentence to be cancelled.
Report for the Year 1926.
PAGE 3.
SHOULD READ.
Decrease.
Tonnage.
SHIPPING TABLE.
1925.
1926.
No.
Tonnage. No. Tonnage. No.
Steam Launches
plying in water
of the Colony ... 625,848 | 16,101,878 | 499,824 | 13,950,144|126,024 | 2,151,734
Grand Total...
694,101 49,520,523 | 560,273 43,796,436 | 137,347 | 5,977,997
Net Decrease
133,828 | 5,724,087
1st Paragraph Line 2. "Year 1926 amounted to 560,273 vessels of 43,796,436 tons'
"1925 show а decrease of
133,828 vessels and a decrease of 5,724,087 tons.
Tables XXIV and XXV on Pages 40 and 41 in the 1925 Report and Pages 44 and 45 in the 1926 Report should be altered accordingly.
TABLE XXIV.
Year.
Total Tonnage All Classes.
1925........
1926..
49,520,523 43,796,436
Appendix D
REPORT OF THE HARBOUR MASTER
FOR THE YEAR 1927.
CONTENTS.
PAGE.
5
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
Bunker Coal shipped
Bouy Plan
Crews, Nationality of
...
Emigration and Immigration
Examination of Pilots
:
:
:
Examination of Masters, Mates, and Engineers ..
Gunpowder Depôt ...
Junks
:
:
Launches...
Lighthouses and Signal Stations...
Mercantile Marine Office
Marine Magistrate's Court
Marine Courts of Enquiry
Marine Surveyors' Office
Moorings
Outstations
Passenger Trade
Port Facilities...
Registry of Shipping
Revenue and Expenditure"
Shipping Report
Sunday Cargo Working
Trade
...
:
:
:
Yaumati Slipway and Coaling Depôt
:
47
5
10
12
12
18
6
10
14
16
:
:
:
11
11
16
15
13
7
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:.
:
:
:
:
:
:
45
10
...
3
12
5
19
D 2
TABLES.
TABLE.
Arrivals and Departures all Vessels Summary
IX
Boat Licences etc. issued ...
XII
Emigration to Destinations other than China.
XIV
Do.
in quinquennial periods
XV
Do.
in annual periods
XVI
Immigration from countries other than China
XVII
Do.
in quinquennial periods
XVIII
Do.
in annual periods
XIX
Junks entered
VII
Do. cleared
VIII
Launches entered
Do.
cleared
X
:
ΧΙ
Revenue
Revenue and Expenditure comparison
Shipping Total 1907 to 1927 ...
Do. Graph all classes 1907 to 1927
:
XIII
XXIII
XXIV
XXV
Do.
do. Ocean Going British and Foreign Vessels
1907 to 1927
XXVI
...
Do.
Vessels entered showing Number Tonnage and Crews
do. Ocean Going British Vessels 1907 to 1927 ...XXVII
Do. cleared
Do. entered at each port
'do.
Do.
cleared
do.
Do.
of each nation entered...
Do.
do.
cleared...
Do.
I
II
III
IV
V
VI

in Foreign Trade comparison of Tonnage 1915 to 1926 XXII
Do. Registered
Do. Struck off the Register...
XX
XXI
ہو
D 3
1.-Shipping.
A comparison between the years 1926 and 1927 of all Shipping entering and clearing Ports in the Colony is given in the following table:
1926.
Class of Vessels
No.
1927.
Decrease.
Increase.
Tonuage. No. Tonnage. No. Tonnage. No. Tonnage.
British Ocean-
going,
3,101
9.257,417 3.861 9,660,440)
Foreign Ocean
going,
1,468
12,057,279 6,767| 16,039,724|
British River
Steamers, 4,276
5,473,429 7,549 7,300,082
Foreign River
Steamers,
230
107,735 1,165
561,155|
:
Steamships
under 60
tons (For-
eign Trade) 2,829
Junks, Foreign
Trade,
15,027
87,330 7,803
1.387,914 24,054
233,374
:
3,039.239
Total, Foreign
Trade,
30,231 | 28,371,104 51.289| 36,834,014]
Steam Laun-
ches, Local
Trade.. 499,824 13,950,144|219,555| 5,771,970 280,869 8,178,174
Junks, Local
Trade,
*30,218 *1,175,188 +27,863 †1,521,177 2,355
460 403,423
2,299 8,982.445
3,273 1,826.653
935
453.420
5,064 146,041
9,027 1,651,325
21,058 | 8,462,910
45,989
Grand Total...560,273 43,796,436|298,707|44,127.161282 624 8,178,174 21,058 8,508,899
Net,
261,566
330,725
* Including 16,294 Conservancy and Dust Boats of 736,688 tons.
11
15,358
ני
*
of 993,280
"
It will be seen from the above table that the total Shipping entering and clearing Ports in the Colony during the year 1927 amounted to 298,707 vessels of 44,127,161 tons, which compared with the figures of 1926 show a decrease of 261,566 vessels and an increase of 330,725 tons.
Of the above 51,289 vessels of 36,834,014 tons were engaged in Foreign Trade as compared with 30,231 vessels of 28,371,104 tons,
in 1926.
There was an increase in British ocean-going shipping of 460 ships of 403,023 tons.
Foreign ocean-going vessels show an increase of 2,299 ships and an increase of 3,982,445 tons.
D 4
These figures are affected by the stoppage due to vessels of the China Navigation Co. being laid up from 1st July, 1927, to 7th September, 1927.
British river steamers show an increase of 3,273 ships and an increase of 1,826,653 tons. This increase in ships and tonnage is due to the vessels again running on the Canton and West rivers.
Foreign river steamers shows an increase of 935 ships and an increase of 453,420 tons.
In steamships not exceeding 60 tons employed in foreign trade there is an increase of 5,064 ships with an increase in tonnage of 146,044 tons.
Junks in foreign trade show an increase of 9,027 vessels, and an increase of 1,651,325 tons.
In local trade (i.e. between places within the waters of the Colony) there is a decrease in steam-launches of 280,269 and a decrease in tonnage of 8,178,174 tons. This is partially due to the extension of the harbour limits, which now include places for which statistics were formerly required.
Junks in Local trade show a decrease of 2,355 vessels and an increase of 45,989 tons.
Of vessels of European construction 5,316 ocean steamers, 4,353 river steamers and 3,936 steamships not exceeding 60 tons entered during the year, giving a daily average of 373 ships.
Thus :-
Steamers.
No. of times entered.
Total Tonnage.
Flag.
1926. 1927. 1926. 1927.
1926.
1927.
British,
339
Japanese,
207
346|1,686 346 1,686 5,702
5,702 4,597,357 4,597,357 264 7551,109
1,109 | 2,236,8359
8,466,960
2,236,359
2,927,207
U.S.A.,
69
79 236 245 1,510,383
1,510,383
1,495,775
Chinese,
61
81
606 1.315
245,697
847,073
German,
34
43
90
151
373,318
487,160
Danish,
14
11
23
48
78,025
153,341
Dutch,
40
41
232
251
785,696
849,766
French,
31
32
108
246
445,567
629,144
Italian,
9
27
26
127,870
141,566
Panamanian,
1
1
9,953
Norwegian,
47
61
472
152,641
657,005
Portuguese,
5
33
73
23,856
15,526
Russian, Siamese, Swedish, Spanish, Mexican, Belgian,
241
73
12
30
46,180
103,182
8
19,236
1
1,183
1
1
3,181:
*
*
Total,
869
997 3,930 9,669 10,619,560 16,774,788
*(River Steamers included.)
D 5
The Nationalities of the Crews in British and in Foreign Ships were as follows:-
OTHER EURO-
VESSELS.
BRITISH
PEANS AND AMERICANS.
ASIATICS.
1926. 1927. 1926. 1927.
1926. 1927.| 1926. 1927.
British,
339 364 36,391 42,028
809 1,321 286,579 292,594
Foreign, 530 633 611 1,374 38,618 45,734 149,135 237,818
Total,
869 997 37,002 43,402 39,427 46,055 435,714630,412
Hence in British ships
and in Foreign ships:-
1926. 1927.
1926.
1927.
11.24 %
00.25 %
9.68 % of the crews were British. 00.33 % of the crews were other Europeans & Americans.
00:33 %
00:48% of the crews were British.
20.50 %
15-75% of the crews
were other Europeaus &
Americans.
88.51 %
90.04% of the crews
79.17%
83.77% of the crews
were Asiatics.
were Asiatics.
100.00 %
100.00%
100.00% 100·00 %
2.-Trade.
Details of vessels of European type of construction, shipping bunker coal and oil fuel are as follows:-
Steamers.
1926.
EXPORTS.
1927.
No. Coal Tons. No.
Oil Tons,
No.
Coal Tons. No. Oil Tons.
3,930 252,752
River Steamers, 2,262 41,504
Total,
6,192 294,256
:..
5,316 365,375 5,316 88,821
4,353 92,919 4,353
586
9,669 458,594 | 9,669 | 89,407
D 6
-
The River Trade compared with 1926 is shown in the
following Table :--
1926..
1927..
Year.
Imports. Tons.
Exports.
Passengers.
Tons.
117,421
123,222
1,071,211
350,340
494,518 2,331,588
The following Tables show the Junk Trade of the Colony for the year 1926 and 1927 :-
IMPORTS.
1926.
1927.
Junks.
Tonnage.
Junks. Tonnage.
Foreign Trade,...... 7,388
704,111
11,990
1,502,466
Local Trade,...
6,859
323,352
5,947
253,175
Total,
14,247
1,027,463
17,937
1,755,641
Cargo 1927.
Cattle, 3,333 head,
Swine, 25,454 head,
Tons.
391
1,496
General,......
...330,072
Total,.......
331,959
EXPORTS.
1926.
1927.
Junks.
Tonnage.
Junks.
Tonnage.
Foreign Trade,...... 7,639 Local Trade,... 7,065
683,803
12,064
1,536,773
415,148
6,558
274,722
Total,
14,704 1,098,951
18,622
1,811,495
Cargo 1927.
Tons.
Kerosine, 1,087,252 Cases,
Rice and Paddy,
Coal,
General,.
39,611 .252,593
90,931 ...695,647
Total,.....
.1,078,782
-D7-
13. Passenger Trade of the Port for the year 1927 :—
Passengers.
Emigrants.
No. of Ships.
Arrived.
Departed. Returned. Departed.
British Ocean-going,
Foreign Ocean-going,
British River Steamers,
Foreign River Steamers,
1,165
3,361 263,045 6,767 304,106 7,549 1,072,191 119,649
273,125 100,889 138,263
350,309
80,211 147,330
1,050,596
89,152
Total,.
19,342
1,758,991
1,743,182
181,100 2:5,593
Steam-launches, Foreign Trade,
7,893
108
Junks, Foreign Trade,...........
24,054
85,772
176 86,596
Total, Foreign Trade,
51,289
1,844,871
1,829,954 181,100 285,593
Junks, Local Trade,....
27,863
Total, Local Trade,
Steam-launches, Local Trade, .| 219,555 | 1,579,533 1,575,292
Grand Total,
247,418 | 1,579,533 1,575,292
298,707 3,424,404 3,405,246 181,100 285,593
3. Revenue and Expenditure.
The total Revenue during the year was $1,000,229.80 as against $820,888.39 collected in the previous year showing an increase of $179,341.41 or 17.92%.
Light Dues,
Light Dues, Special Assessments,
Licences and Internal Revenue,...
Fees of Courts and Offices,
Miscellaneous Receipts,
1926.
$110,543.80 $132,379.31
1927.
Decrease. Increase.
$21,835.51
127,655.26 158,762.56
31.107.30
186,778.70
192,771.04
5,992.34
395,226.50
515,988.54
120,762.04
681.13
328.35
355.78
$820,888.39 $1.000,229.80
355.78 $179,697.19
?
D $
3.-Revenue and Expenditure,-Continued.
The principal individual increases are:--
Light Dues,
Light Dues, Special Assessments,
Boat Licences,
Chinese Passenger Ships", Licences for
Fines,
$ 21,835,51 31,107.30
926.65
150.00
3,348.06
Junk Licences,
335.25
Steam Launch Licences,
1,710.45
Engagement and Discharge of Seamen,
1,583.60
Fees of Government Buoys,
15,995.81
Gunpowder Storage,
1,467.33
Medical Examination of Emigrants,
36,151.30
Official Signatures,
492.00
Registry Fees,
142.00
Steam Launch Survey,
630.00
Sunday Cargo Working Permits,
65,275.00
The principal individual decreases are:-
Forfeiture,.....
189.67
Fishing Stake and Station Licences,
243.40
Examination of Masters etc.,
302.50
Survey of Steamships,
733.50
Sale of Condemned Stores,
357.00
Interest,
39.78
The Expenditure $610,480.26 as against $534,675.91 expended in 1926 showing an increase of $75,804.35. This increase is principally due to additional staff, stipulated increments and the taking over of the crews of all Launches of the various Government Departments excepting Police and Fire Brigade.
excluding Special Expenditure was
Special Expenditure included:-
1 Gig at Stanley,
1 Dinghy at Tai O,
1 New Launch to replace Victoria first instal-
ment,
2 Reversible Buoys,
Renewal of Rock Buoys and Moorings,
135.00
185.00
16,650.00
4,000.00
671.10
$ 21,641.10
·
Light Dues were collected during the year 1927 as follows :-
Special Assessment.
No. of
Class of Vessels.
Trips.
Tonnage.
Rate
per ton.
Fees
Collected.
Rate
per ton.
Fees
Collected.
Total Fees
Collected.
$
C.
I cent.
Ocean Vessels,......
5,566
12,860,204
1 cent.
128,602.04
Steam-launches,
2,892
101,400 1
""
1,014.00 1
River Steamers, (Night Boats),..
1,425
828,981
2,763.27
"}
до
Do.,
(Day Boats),
2,744 3,000,193
Nil.
T
Total,.
12,627
16,790,778
$132,379.31
>>
A
:
- D 9
$
128,602.04
$ C.
257,204,08
1,014.00
2,028.00
4,144.91
6,908.18
25,001.61
25,001.61
$158,762.56 $291,141.87
D 10
4.-Steam-launches.
On the 31st December, 1927, there were 450 Steam-launches (including 130 licensed motor boats) employed in the harbour. Of. these 389 were licensed for the conveyance of passengers, etc.,
37 were
the property of the Colonial Government, including 9 motor boats and 4 belonged to the Imperial Government, comprising 3 Steam- launches and 1 motor boat and 20 Naval (including 5 motor boats). In addition there were 30 motor boats privately owned for pleasure and private purposes.
New licence books for Steam Launches and Motor Boats were issued as follows in three classes during the year 1927, under Regulations, Section 37 of the Merchant Shipping Ordinance, No. 10 of 1899.
Class I......... 42 licences
Class II
15
Class III ...... 87
For incompetence or negligence in performing their duties:-
1 coxswain's certificate was suspended for 12 months,
4 for 6 months, 3 for 3 months and 1 for 2 months.
2 certificates of Coxswains who had absconded were suspend-
ed until they reported at harbour office for enquiry.
721 engagements and 714 discharges of masters and engineers were recorded during the year.
5.--Emigration and Immigration.
285,593 emigrants left Hong Kong for various places during the year 1927 (216,527 in 1926). Of these 138,263 were carried in British ships and 147,330 in Foreign ships.
181,100 returning emigrants were. reported to have been brought to Hong Kong from the several places to which they had emigrated either from this Colony or from Coast Ports, as against 128,661 in 1926. Of these, 100,889 arrived in British ships and 80,211 in Foreign ships.
6.-Registry, etc., of Shipping.
During the year, 12 ships were registered under the provisions of the Merchant Shipping Acts, and 26 Certificates of Registry cancelled. 215 documents, etc., were dealt with in con- nection with the Act, the fees on which amounted to $1,776.00 as compared with $1,634.00 in 1926.
1
-. D 11
7.-Marine Magistrate's Court.
were heard in
Three hundred and twenty-four (324) cases the Marine Magistrate's Court during 1927 (as compared with 393 in 1926).
The principal offences were :~~
Mooring within 100 yards from low water mark in pro-
hibited hours.
Boarding ships without permission.
Carrying excess passengers.
Failing to carry the regulation lights.
Failing to observe the Rule of the Road.
Dumping rubbish in the Harbour without a permit.
Dredging in Harbour without a permit.
>
8. Marine Courts of Enquiry.
(Under Section 19 of Ordinance 10 of 1899).
During the year 1927 four courts were held, viz:-
(1) On the 14th March, 1927, to enquire into a charge of misconduct against Mr. G. A. Carter certificate of competency No. 3999 of Hong Kong as 1st Mate of the British Steamship Kwong Fook Cheung Official No. 152,106 of Hong Kong.
(2) On the 3rd, 4th & 5th days of May, 1927, to enquire into the circumstances of the collison between the British Steamships "Anjou" and "Wing On" official Nos. 135,104 and 133,251 of Hong Kong. Mr. John Webster certificate of competency as Master No. 043,964 and Mr. C. Mutton certificate of competency as Master No. 034,605 were Masters.
(3) On the 18th & 19th May, 1927, to enquire into the circum- stances of the collision between the British Steam- launch "Moonshine" official No. 152,107 of Hong Kong and the Chinese Steamship "Leung Kwong' of Canton. Mr. James Wilson certificate of compet- ency as Master No. 034,393 was Master of the S. S. "Leung Kwong".
(4) On the 15th December, 1927, to enquire into the circumstances of the collision between the British Steamship "Anjou" and British Motor vessel "Wing Hung" official Nos. 135,014 and 152,089 of Hong Kong. Mr. A. H. Brown certificate of competency as Master No. 025,479 of Belfast and Mr. E. P. Smith certificate of competency as Master (ordinary) No. 1,990 of Hong Kong were Masters.
D 12
9.-Examination of Masters, Mates, and Engineers. (Under Bourd of Trade Regulations.)
The following Tables show the number of Candidates examined under Ordinance No. 10 of 1899 for Certificates of Compe-
tency.
Grade.
Passed.
Failed.
Master,
Master, River Steamers,
First Mate,
Second Mate,
15
10
7
3
1
Mate, River Steamers,
* Total,
22
15
First Class Engineer,
Second Class Engineer,
255
15
27
==
11
19
† Total,
42
30
* Passed 59.5 per cent. † Passed 58.3 per cent.
Failed 40-5 per cent. Failed 41-6 per cent.
For Steamships not exceeding 60 tons, under Section 37 of Ordinance 10 of 1899:-
Master, Engineer,
...
Candidates.
Total,...
Passed.
Failed.
96†
32
88*
8
184
40.
* Including 6 candidates from Government Launches examined.
t
13
"
"1
"
10.-Examination of Pilots.
(Under Ordinance No. 3 of 1904.)
Twenty-three licences were renewed during the year. No examination for pilots was held.
11. Sunday Cargo-Working.
Under Ordinance No. 1 of 1891, 1,324 permits were issued during the year as compared with 743 in 1926.
The Revenue collected under this head amounted to $145,550 as against $80,275 in 1925 showing an increase of $65,275.
D 13
12. Harbour Master's Out-Stations
The Out-stations attached to the Harbour Department issued
Licences, etc., as follows:-
1926.
1927.
Shaukiwan,....
Aberdeen,
Stanley,
5,654
5,668
6,150
6,817
401
465
Yaumati,
......
3,878
4,316
Cheung Chau,
3,719
4,419
Tai 0,.......................
1,967
2,144
Tai Po,
1,516
1,779
Saikung,
814
695
Longket,
850
897
Deep Bay,
$33
668
Lantao,
822
624
26,604
28,492
The following is a comparative statement showing the amount of fees collected at out-Stations during the years 1926 and 1927.
Station.
1926.
1927.
Increase.
Decrease.
$ C. $
C.
$
$
Shaukiwan,..
22,907.75
25,369.95* 2,462.20
Aberdeen,
16,513.00
16,451.50
361.65
Stanley,
1,096.30
828.75
267.55
Yaumati,
31,164.00
32,221.75† 1,057.75
,Cheung Chow,
11,614.25
11,102.50
511.75
Tai 0,
4,603,85
4,882.35 278.50
...
Tai Po,
4,331.40
Saikung,
Longket,
4,952.15
2,207.50 1,794.75 2,488.90 2,497.35
...
620.75
412.75
Deep Bay,
2,205.90 1,909.40
Lantao,
1,925.40 1,834.40
8.45
...
296.50
91.00
Total,
101,358.25 103,844.85 4,427.65
1,941.05
*Excluding Dispensary Fees $2,148.70

22
"
"}
$3,103.40
D 14
13.-Lighthouses and Signal Stations.
GAP ROCK LIGHTHOUSE.
During 1927 a total number of 1,064 vessels were signalled and reported including 258 by Flash lamp.
4,226 messages, including meteorological observations for the Observatory, were sent by telegraph, and 162 by wireless, 494 messages were received by telegraph and 117 by wireless including weather reports.
Telegraphic communication was interrupted for 14 days.
There were 266 hours and 10 minutes of fog, and fog signals were fired 1,657 times.
The fortnightly reliefs were delayed 4 times owing to bad weather.
WAGLAN LIGHTHOUSE.
During 1927, 3,739 vessels were signalled and reported in- cluding 1,021 by Flash lamp.
3,880 messages including meteorological observations for the Royal Observatory were sent by telegraph and 214 by wireless.
861 messages were received by telegraph and 40 by wireless including weather reports.
Telegraphic communication was interrupted for 18 days.
There were 595 hours 10 minutes fog, and fog signals were fired 7,414 times.
The Diaphone fog signal was sounded for 578 hours 55 minutes.
On one occasion the relief was delayed owing to bad weather.
GREEN ISLAND LIGHTHOUSE AND SIGNAL STATION.
During 1927, 1,838 vessels were signalled and reported. 10 vessels were not reported owing to telephonic communication being interrupted.
356 messages were sent and 21 were received.
Aga lights (including Green Island) are now 17 and have worked accurately and continuously throughout the year.
The Beckwith Bell fog signal has worked satisfactorily during the fog season from January to May. The whole apparatus was washed away during the Typhoon of August 23rd, this will be replaced and in working order on or about February 15th, 1928.
KAP SING LIGHTHOUSE.
This station has been regularly inspected and has worked satisfactorily throughout the year.
D 15
KOWLOON SIGNAL STATION,
At the Signal Hill Station, Kowloon, 3,848 vessels were signalled and reported as entering and 2,470 as leaving the harbour. 135 Typhoon and non-local signals were hoisted.
14. Harbour Moorings.
GOVERNMENT MOORINGS.
Government Moorings as detailed below are available for the
use of vessels frequenting the Port :-
Daily Rental. Number Available.
1926.
1927.
A Class for Vessels 450/600
feet long
...
$8.00
17
17
B Class for Vessels 300/450
feet long
6.00
17
18
C Class for Vessels less than
300 feet long...
4.00
22
21
Total...
56
56
Of the above 56 Moorings there are 16 special Typhoon Moorings viz., 14 A Class and 2 B Class.
(i) In the aggregate these moorings were in use throughout the year as follows:-
A Class 4,155 days.
B Class 4,480
C Class 6,849
1
(ii) In addition they were used by Naval Vessels and Transports, for which no charge was made, as follows:-
A Class 500 days.
B Class 49 ""
C Class 12 31
(iii) In the aggregate the following moorings were vacant owing to dredging operations :--
A Class 302 days.
B Class 218
REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE.
The gross revenue for the year, including $1,210 from Private Buoys, was $88,726.00. (The loss of revenue due to (ii) and (ii) above amounted to $8,066.00) and the expenditure for upkeep was $19,067.00. In addition to this $13,325.34 was ex- pended in providing chain for new moorings.
D 16
PRIVATE BUoys.
Permission was granted to various industrial concerns to maintain private buoys and moorings to the number of 26, and the total revenue derived from that source. was $1,210.
15.-Mercantile Marine Office.
37,500 seamen were shipped and 34,122 discharged at the Mercantile Marine Office and on board ships during the year, com- pared with 32,982 shipped and 30,929 discharged during 1926.
62 distressed seamen were received and admitted to Sailors' Home and Boarding Houses; of these 10 were sent Home, 1 to. Melbourne, 4 to Shanghai, 4 to Singapore, 2 to Vancouver, 1 remain- ed in Hospital, and 40 obtained employment.
$846.07 was expended by the Harbour Master on behalf of the Board of Trade in the relief of these distressed seamen.
16. Marine Surveyor's Office.
The total number of vessels surveyed for Passenger Certificates in 1927 was 128 vessels of 362,296 gross tons, 39 being surveyed at Kowloon Docks, 61 at Taikoo Dockyard, 6 at Cosmopolitan Docks, 1 at Aberdeen Dock and 20 on Chinese slipways, the remainder being surveyed in the Harbour on bottom Certificates.
The nationalities and tonnage of these vessels were as follows:
British,
Chinese,
...
108 vessels of 328,077 tons (gross)
9
7,287
Norwegian,
Danish,
21,140
""
""
"1
2
5,792
"
+
""
8 vessels of 68,801 gross tons were granted Bottom Certifi- cates at Hong Kong during the year, all were of British Nationality.
Emigration surveys were held on 59 British and 78 Foreign Steamships, as compared with 60 British and 70 Foreign Steamships in the previous year.
Year.
Return of Work performed by the Government Marine Surveyor's Department.
Passenger Certificate
Certificate of Appro- val of Load Line.
Bottom Inspection.
Emigration.
Measurement of Tonnage for British Registration.
British Tonnage Certificates for Foreign Vessels.
Recording change of name and Endors- ing Carving Note.
Inspection of Crew Space, Lights, and Markings.
Minor Inspections.
Inspection of
Tracings and Draw- ings of Boiler.
Survey of Licensed Passenger Launches.
Survey of Boilers under Construction.
Inspections of Government Launches,
Piracy Fitting etc. Examination
of Engineers.
Examination of
Chinese Engineers
of Launches & M. B.
Estimated Total Number of Visits in connection with foregoing Inspections.
LI Ɑ -
1925 111
9 11
98
11
1926 120
13
4130
5
18
6
13
33
6
123
21
176
739
34
900
88
151
15
198
10
724
14
1,224
100
142
1927 128
27
8137
12
24
12
45
615
24
759
16
1,140
73
96
4,488
D 18
17.-Government Gunpowder Depôt.
During the year 1927 there were stored in the Government Gunpowder Depôt, Green Island :---
No.
of Cases.
Approx- imate Weight.
Ib.
Gunpowder, privately owned,
Do., Government owned,. Cartridges, privately owned,.....
Do., Government owned,
Explosive Compounds, privately owned,
805
23,861
29
4,100
82
7,587
86
8,300
6,243
355,516
Do.,
Government owned,
150
5,530
Non-explosives, privately owned,..........
120
22,908
Do.,
Government owned,
34
1,370
Total,
7,549 429,175
During the same period there were delivered out of the Depôt :-
No. of Cases.
Approxi-
mate
Weight.
lb.
For Sale in the Colony :-
Gunpowder, privately owned,
252
6,344
Cartridges, privately owned,.
19
3,025
Explosive Compounds, privately owned,.
2,148
143,146
Non-explosives, privately owned,
353
For Export :-
Gunpowder, privately owned,
159
5,400
Cartridges,...
26
2,990
Explosive Compounds, privately owned,.
2,659
133,112
Government owned :—
Gunpowder,

Cartridges,
Explosive Compounds,
12
103
3,160
...
3,676
Delivered to be destroyed: --
Cartridges, Government owned,
Explosive Compounds, Government owned,
52
67
29
6,467 1,450
Total,.......
5,476
309,123
D 19
On the 31st December, 1927, there remained as follows :--
No. of Cases.
Approxi-
mate
Weight.
Ib.
Gunpowder, privately owned,.............
394
12,120
Do, Government owned,
17
940
Cartridges, privately owned,
37
1,572
Do. Government owned,
Explosive Compounds, privately owned,
19
1,833
1,436 79,258
Do.,
Government owned,
18
404
Non-explosives, privately owned,
118
22,555
Do.,
Government owned,
34
1,370
Total....
2,073 120,052
18.-Government Coaling Depôt, Yaumati.
Government Launches received coal or oil fuel as required during the year. 6,912 tons of coal was received into the Depôt and 6,695 tons issued to launches. 17,892 gallons of Kerosene and 6,172 gallons of Petrol were received and 17,229 gallons Kerosene and 5,912 gallons Petrol were issued to motor launches.
GOVERMNENT SLIPWAY, YAUMATI.
Government launches were slipped, aggregating 94 times at regular intervals during the year and the slip was occupied 304 days.
¡
D 20
SHIPPING, 1927.
Table I.-NUMBER, TONNAGE, AND CREWS, OF VESSELS ENTERED AT PORTS IN THE COLONY C
BRITISH.
FOREIGN.
COUNTRIES WHENCE ARRIVED.
WITH CARGO.
IN BALLAST.
WITH CARGO.
IN BALLAST
Vessels.
Tons.
Vessels. Crews.
Tons.
Crews.
Vessels.
Tons.
Crews. Vessels.
Tons.
Australia & Pacific Islands including New Zealand
22
66,102
2,488
1
2,674
69
9
36,053
1.135
British North Borneo,..
37
78,652
3,070
:
36 94,505 2,467
Canada,
13
130,721
7,120
...
Ceylon,
1
3,164
86
:
:
India including Mauritius,
77
273,010
11,300
41
135,054
2,773
7
35,284
South Africa,
1
3,164
110
1
1,983
89
Straits Settlements & F.M.S.,
160
537,586
18,260
4
12,541
261
137
510,628 11,658
6
5,365
United Kingdom,..............
82
423,761
9,818
3
19,430
582
15
84,652
2.338
China ......
998
1,644,872
26,801
32
46,337
2,496
1,141 1,973,139
80,573
294
363.421
11
River Steamers,
Steamships under 60 tons...
Junks,
Denmark,
Europe not specially mentioned,
France,
Formosa,
2,843 2,843,699 | 185,244
..
..
:.
511
:
280,371
31.236
1,908
:
5,696
:
:
:.
63 352
663,031
6 31,953
23,914
1,835
48,290
99,051 5,266
706,398
249
Germany,
Holland,.
4
17,663
516
***
8
30,517
569
3
13,909
360
6
28,779
501
1
3,226
85
1
12
:
50,770
714
31
193,977 5,659
:
:
139
191,068 7,428
3
3,938
52
:
:
3,335
49
5
234,019 4,282
24,550
1
3,628
374
Italy,
10 56,639
829
Indo-China (French),
127
159,368 8,703
2
2,542
122
429
565,657
27,566
7
12,458
Japan,
104
456,756
15,782
10
39,590
657
398
1,851,462
29,641
3
3,082
Macao,
;
63
10,204 1.786
14
8,151
River Steamers,
932 800,951 48,600
67
10,854 1,004
19
Steamships under 60 tons,
Junks,
Netherland East Indies,..
Philippine Islands,
:
:
:
90
:
F:.
:
:
2,224 | $60
103
2,672
416
64,249 8,623
612
68.788
13
37.927
881
6,481
192
105
9,505 354,729
1,027
48
246,371
9,493
3
18,787
662
105
631,616 15,429
2,437
Russia in Asia,
3
14.768
360
1
5,880
17
17
11
49,115
505
Siam,
79
121,902
6,470
1
1,556
92
167
205,276
11,842
1.110
South America,
8,855
98
:
4
:
:
18,092
418
Sweden,
United States of America,
73
330,040
5,254
3
29,958 1,276
123
6 20,570
728,291
198
17,294
24,42:
TOTAL,
5,638 | 8,275,766 | 361,969
64
191,094 6,621
11,733 8,634,160 399,151
8,160 1,290,47:
D 20
SHIPPING, 1927.
RED AT PORTS IN THE COLONY OF HONG KONG FROM EACH COUNTRY IN THE YEAR 1927.
FOREIGN.
TOTAL.
GRAND TOTAL.
WITH CARGO.
IN BALLAST.
WITH CARGO.
IN BALLAST.
Vessels. Tons. Crews. Vessels. Tons.
Vessels. Crews.
Tons.
Crews. Vessels. Tons. Crews. Vessels. Tons.
Crews.
9
36,053 1.135
.31
:
102,155
3,623
1
2,674
69
32
104.829
3,692
36
94,505
2,467
73
173.157
5,537
73
:
:
13
130,721
7,120
:
:
1
3,164
86
:
:
173,157
5,537
13
130,721 7,120
1
3,164
86
:
:
41 135,054
2,773
7
35,284
277
118
408,061
14,073
7
35,284
277
125
443,348
14,350
3,164
110
1
1,983
89
2
5,147
199
137
510,628 11,658
6
5,365
286
297
1,048.214
29,918
10
17,906
547
307
1,066,120
30,465
15 84,652 2.338
97
508,413
12,156
3
19,430
582
100
527,843 12,738
1,141
1,973,139
80,573
294
363,421 14,855
2,139
3,618,011|107,374
326
409,758
17,351
2,465 | 4,027,769 | 124,725
511
280,371
31.236
3,354 3,124,070 | 216,480
3,354 3,124,070 | 216,480
:
1,908
63 352 23,914
48,290 1,835
18,656
1,908
5,696
663,031
5,266 99,051
706,398
91,650
$5,696
63,352 23,914
663,031 99,051
1,835
48,290
18,686
3,743
111.642
42,600
5,266
706,398
91,650
10,962
1,369,429 190,701
6
6
31,953
249
31,953
249
6
31.953
219
16
12
50,770
714
68,433 1,230
16
:
...
68,433
1,230
:..
39
31
193,977
5,659
224,494 6,228
39
:
224,494 6,228
139
191,068
7,428
3
3,938
118
142
204,977
7,788
3
3,938
113
145
208,915 7,906
52 234,019 4,282
1
3,628
51
58
262,798
4,783
3,628
51
59
266,426 4,834
:
5 24,550
374
6
27,776
459
3,335
49
7
31,111
508
10
10
56,639
829
56,639
829
:
:
10
56.639
829
:
...
a
429
565,657 27,566
7
12,458
324
556
725,025
36,269
9
15,000
446
565
740,025
36,715
?
398
1,351,462
29,641
3
3,082
107
502
1,808,218
45,423
13
42,672
764
515
1,850,890 46.187
63
10,204
1,786
14
8,151
584
63
10,204
1,786
14
8,151
581
77
18,355
2,370
..
67
10,851 1,004
:
999 811,808 49,604
999
811,808 49,60+
:
90
2,224
$60
103
2,672
1,034
90
2,224
860
103
2,672
1,034
193
4,896
1,894
416
64,249 8,623
612
68,788
9,352
416
64,249
8,623
612
68,788
9,352
1,028
133,037 17,975
2
105
9,505 354,729
1
1,027
33
118
392,656
10,186
3
7,508
225
121
400,164 10,411
2
105
631,646
15,429
2
2,437
100
153
878,017 24,922
21,224
762
158
899,241 25,684
14
64,213
865
1
7
il
49.145
505
5,880
77
15
70,093
942
:
~
12
167
205,276 11,842
1.110
73
246
327,178
18,312
2
2,666
165
248
329,844
18,477
7
4
18,092
418
6
76
123
20,570
728,291 17,294
198
5
24,423
352
26.947
6 20,570
196 1,058,331
516
7
:
:
26,947
516
198
6
20,570
198
22,548
8
54,381
1,628
201
1,112,712
24,176
21
11,733 | 8,634,460 | 399,151
8,160 1,290,472 137,882
17,371 16,912,226 | 761,120
8,224 1,481,566 | 144,506 25,595 18,393,792 | 905,626
Table II-NUMBER, TONNAGE, AN
BRITISH.
COUNTRIES TO WHICH DEPARTED.
WITH CARGO.
IN BALLAST.
Vessels.
Tons.
Crews.
Bunker Fuel Coal. Oil.
Vessels. Tons.
Crews.
Bunker Coal.
Fuel
Oil.
Australia & Pacific Islands including New Zealand
26
77,018 3,049
25 5,460
1
2,215
30
6
British North Borneo,........
27
51,294 2,616 2,625
22
61,943
1,045 1,790
1,93€
Canada,
18
181,308 9,392
3
9,264
92
100
57:
Ceylon,
:
:
India including Mauritius,....
78
286,907
11,919
10,720
:
7,319
142
200
South Africa,
3
9,492
325 1,120
:
Straits Settlements & F.M.S..
80
United Kingdom,.
76
China,.
(
River Steamers,
173,939 7,527 7,150 9,121
420,654 12,155 4,550 1,100
948 1,429,826 82,935 70,713
2,840 2,848,993 | 189,005
27 44,413
1,740 2,300 1,960
10,050
310
5,688
41
65,563
2,981
2,503
830
63,211
586
99
Steamships under 60 tons,.
:
Junk,
:
:
Denmark......
Europe, (not specially mentioned),
5
21,069
779
1,600
France,
1
6,910
165
Formosa,
1
3,294
44
:
Germany,
18
91,919
1,642 2,550
Holland....
Italy,
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
***
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
Indo-China, (French,).......................................
117
Japan,........
205
144,183 8,226 18,413
875,573 25,659 16,631
150
34
52,979
2,151
4,995
420
9,558
7
31,471
470
450
Macao,
:
River Steamers,
39
934
S06,436 50,530 7,915
:
"
Steamships under 60 tons,
Junk,
Netherlands East Indies,
Philippine Islands,
:
:
:
:
:..
:
:
:
:
:
:
...
:
Russia in Asia,
Siam,
South American,
:
:
:
Sweden,
United States of America,
19 245,015 3,923
950
1,600
7
19,107
385
1,380
280
26 197,834 9,418 2,170
23 124,400 1,905
2
6,615
75
1
4,798
75
74 114,326 6,203 9,459 7,257
1
1,872
39
:
:..
:
:
:
:
62,633
1,872
2,130
TOTAL,
5,549 | 8,110,420 |427,417 |219,835 40,820
159 383,242 11,407 14,024
8,152
D 21
Table II-NUMBER, TONNAGE, AND CREWS OF VESSELS CLEARED IN THE COLONY OF HONG KONG TO I
BRITISH.
FOREIGN.
IN BALLAST.
WITH CARGO.
IN BALLAST.
er
Fuel Oil.
Vessels. Tons. Crews.
Bunker Fuel
Coal.
Vessels.
Tons.
Crews.
Oil.
Bunker Coal.
Fucl Oil,
Vessels. Tons. Crews.
Bunker Fuel Coal. Oil.
Vesst
15 5,460
2,215
30
6
12
51,300
1,632
150
3
25
22
:
:
61,943
1,045
1,790
1,930
13
23,361
820
1,010
210
10
25,948
194
1,000
820
3
9,261
92
400
575
:
:
:
:
:
:
2
7,319
142
200
7
22,742
298
:
:
:
20
108
370,732
6,935 1,050
18
20
11
39,376 862
200
T
:
50
9,121
27
44,413
1,740 2,300
1,960
64
129,879 4.791
8,367
348
13
26,026
727
2.030
50
14
10
1,400
10,050
310
38
206,728 5,456 1,050
11
3
5,688
41
65,563
2,981
2,503
830
1,128
1,524,360 69,417
54,331 3,704
176
247,016 9,450 11,748
417
2,070
1
586
520
:
:..
:
:
:
:
0
:
:
:
:
:.
:
:
:
:
:
269,176 | 30,410
21,357
2,651
80,811
31,430
:
9,731 1,267,709 176,482
1,105
31,093
11,291
1,413
140,875
16,503
:
:
:..
3,360
2,651
9,731
8
40,290
299
:
&
:
4
20,804 412
T
35
216,387 6,910
680
5,705
:
:
93
119,995
6,782
619
278
44
59,140
1,719
2,141
:
49
221,577
4,054
300
:
***
:
:
...
:
:
:
6
30,100
367
:
13
70,214 1,099
60
36
94
67
6
13
3
150
9,558
34
7
52,979 2,151
31,471
470
4,995
420
316 434,457 21,464 42,048 3,610
180
450
...
337 1,285,603 80,177
11,355
5,350
270,217
15,533
7,940 20,491
500
463
317
165
542
:
:
...
:
...
:
:.
:
:
:
62 10,136
1,515
177
9
3,421
362
320
62
67
10,854 1,005
406
:
148
3,399 1,446
53
896 125,398 16,463
:
:
1,533
521
24
2,791
359
:
:
1,001
148
896
2
19.107
6,615
385
1,380
280
95
339,606 10,144 1,003
B
75
:
92
601,629 15,486
:
:
:
16,213
532
865
95
4
11,647
139
600
1
4,798
75
:
15
77,674
755
550
60
1
4,129
58
73
:
133223
118
38
7,257
1
1,872
39
126
145,417
:..
:.
:
:
24
8,342
117,022 2,677
39,282
100
28
40,758 1,672
5,980
200
24
:.
:
13 47,228
144
400
13
:
1,600
62,633
1,872
2,130
182 1,091,085
26,464
4,249
10,945
13
65,272
971
700
7,500
231
40,820
159 383,242 11,407
14,024
8,152
16,887 8,972,307 | 484,540 | 187,944
31,010
3,099
984,354 53,383 46,248
9,452
22,436
KONG TO EACH COUNTRY IN THE YEAR 1927.
TOTAL.
GRAND TOTAL.
WITH CARGO,
IN BALLAST.
.r
Fuel Oil.
Vessels. Tons. Crews.
Bunker Fuel Coal. Oil.
Vessels.
Tons.
Crews.
Bunker Coal,
Fuel Oil.
Bunker Fuel
Vessels.
Tons. Crews.
Coal.
Oil.
...
38 128,318 4,681
175 5,460
1
2,215
30
6
39
130,533 4,711
181
5,460
820
40 74,655 3,436
3,635
210
32
90,891
1,539
2,790
2,750
72
165,546 4,975
6,425
2.960
:
18 181,308 9,392
3
:..
9,264
92
400
575
21
190,572
9,184
400
575
:
:
...
186 657,639
18,854
11,770
9
30,061
440
200
195
687,700
19.294 11,970
...
14
48,868 1,187 1,320
14
48,868 1,187 1,320
50
144
303,818 12,318 15,517 9,469
40
70,139 2,467
4,330 2,010
184
374,257 14.785 19,847 11,479
114
627,382 17,611
5,600
1,400
2
10,050
310
116
...
417
2,076 | 2,954,186 152,352 | 125,044
9,392
217
312,579 12,431
14,251
1,247
3,360 3,118,169 | 219,415
84,568
586
:
:
2,651 80,811 31,430
1,105
31,093 11,291
637,432 17,921 5,600 1,400
2,293 3,266,765 164,783 139,295 10,639
3,360 3,118,169 | 219,415 84,568
3,756
111,904 12,721
586
9,731 1,267,709 176,482
1,413 140,875
16,503
11,144 1,408,584 | 192,985
8
40,290
299
8
40,290
299
41,873 1,191 1,600
9
:
41,873 1,191
1,600
36
223,297 7,075
680 5,705
94
123,289 6,826
619
278
44
59,140
1,719 2,441
67
313,526 5,696
2,550
300
36
223,297 7,075
680
5,705
138
:
:
182,429 8,545 3,060
278
67
:
:
6 30,100 367
:
13
70.214 1,099
60
13
313,526 5,696 2,550
30,100 367
70,214 1,099
300
60
500
463
578,640 29,690 60,461 3,760
214
323,196 10,091 25,486
920
677
901,836 39,781 85,947
4,680
165
542 | 2,161,176 55,836 27,989 14,908
13
47,004
817
450
165
555
2,208,180 56,653 28,439 15,073
:
62 10,136 1,515
177
9
3,421
362
320
71
...
1,001
:
:
:
:
:
:
148
896
718,290 51,535 8,351
3,399 1,446
125,398 16,463
95 339,606 10,144
118
799,463 24,904
:
1,001
13,557 1,877
817,290
497
51,535 8,351
53
1,533
521
201
4,932 1,967
24
2,791
359
920
1,003
2,170
:
:
:
20
20
35,320
917
2,245
280
6
18,262
214
600
124
38
202,074
2,660
550
60
2
8,927
133
73
:
:
128,189 16,822
115 374,926 11,061 3,248
817,725 25,118 2,770
280
40
211,001 2,793
623
60
200
24
259,743 14,545 18,741
13 47,228
7,357
29
42,630 1,711
5,980
229
302,373 16,256 54,721
7,357
117,022 2,677
444
400
7,500
231 1,336,100 30,387 5,199 12,545
22 127,905 2,843
24
:
117,022 2,677
:
13
:
...
47.228
441
400
700 9,630
253
1,464,005 33,230 5,899
22,175
9,452
22,436 17,082,727 911,957 | 407,779 71,830 3,258 1,367,596 64,790 60,272 17,57725,694 18.450,323 976,747 | 468,051 89,407

D 22
Table III.-TOTAL NUMBER and TONNAGE of VESSELS ENTERED at EACH PORT in the COLONY of HONG KONG in the YEAR 1927.
1,680
181
4,647
99 2,967
82 1,680
181
4,647
106
4,329
34 2,017
140
6,346
106
4,329
34
2,017
140
6,346
208
13,847
28
1,369
236
15,216
208
13,847
28
1,369
236
15,216
95
2,579
6
183
101
2,762
95
2,579
6
183
101
2,762
BRITISH.
FOREIGN.
TOTAL.
GRAND TOTAL.
Names of Ports.
WITH CARGO.
IN BALLAST.
TOTAL.
WITH CARGO.
IN BALLAST.
TOTAL.
WITH CARGO.
IN BALLAST.
Vessels. Tons, Vessels. Tons.
Vessels. Tons.
Vessels. Tons.
Vessels. Tons. Vessels. Tons.
Vessels.
Tons.
Vessels. Tons.
Vessels.
Tons.
:
Aberdeen,
Cheung Chau,...
Saikung,
Stanley,
:
:
:
:..
383
:
:
:
99
2,967
82
:
:
5,638 | 8,275,766
64191,094 5,702 8,466,860 11,225 8,612,738
8,010 1,285,223, 19,235 | 9,897,961
16,863 16,888,504
8,074 |1,476,317) 24,937 |18,364,821
Total,
5,638 8,275,766
64 | 191,094
5,702 8,466,860 11,733 8,636,460 8,160 1,290,472 19,893 9,926,932 17,371 16,912,226
|1,290,472,
|
8,224 1,481,556 25,595 18,
18,393,792

(Victoria now includes Shaukiwan and Yaumati.)
* No statistics available.
Tai 0,
Tai Po,*
Deep Bay,*.
:
:.
:
:
:
:
:
:
:.
Junk Bay,*
Victoria,
...
D 23
Table IV. TOTAL NUMBER and TONNAGE, of VESSELS CLEARED at EACH PORT in the COLONY of HONG KONG in the YEAR 1927.
84
1,843
164
4,477
BRITISH.
FOREIGN.
TOTAL.
GRAND TOTAL.
Names of Ports.
WITH CARGO.
IN BALLAST.
TOTAL.
WITH CARGO.
IN BALLAST.
TOTAL.
WITH CARGO.
IN BALLAST.
Vessels,
Tons. Vessels. Tons.
Vessels.
Tons.
Vessels.
Tons.
Vessels. Tons. Vessels.
Tons.
Vessels. Tons. Vessels.
Tons,
Vessels.
Tons.
Aberdeen,
Cheung Chau,
:
59
Saikung,
Stanley,
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:.
:
:
1,693
81 4,581
140
6,274
59
1,693
81
4,581
140
6,274
112
7,191
123 7,401
235
14,575
112
7,191
123
7,404
235
14,595
66
...
:
1,560
33
1,144
99
2,704
66
1,560
33
1,141
99
2,704
..
:.
:..
:
...
:..
F.
:.
...
...
:
Tai O,
Tai Po,*
:
...
Deep Bay,*
:
:
Junk Bay,*
...
Victoria,.
5,549
8,110,420
J
*
4:
...
...
80
2,634
:
84
1,843
164
:.
:
4,477
:.
...
80
2,634
:
...
...
159 383,242
5,704 8,478,756 16,570 | 8,959,229
2,778 969,382 19,352 9,943,517 22,119 17,069,619 2,937 1,352,624 25,056 18,422,273
5,704 8,478,756 16,887 8,972,307 3,099 984,354 19,990 9,971,567 22,436 17,082,727
(Victoria now includes Shaukiwan and Yaumati.)
3.258 | 1,367,596
25,694 18,150,323
***
Total,
5,549
8,110,120
159383,242
* No statistics available.
++
- D 24

Table V.-NUMBER, TONNAGE, and CREWS of VESSELS of EACH NATION ENTERED at Ports in the Colony of Hong Kong in the Year 1927.
ENTERED.
WITH CARGO.
IN BALLAST.
TOTAL.
NATIONALITY,
Vessels. Tons. Crews.
Vessels. Tons. Crews.
Vessels. Tons. Crews.
British,
""
Riversteamers,
American, Chinese,
1,863 4,631,113 128,125 3,775 3,644,653 233,844 229 1,423,234 72,815 697 468,798 16,121
64 191,094
6,624
1,927
4,822,207 134,749
3,775
3,644,653 233,844
16 72,541 107 97,904 5,626
803
245
1,495,775 73,618
804
566,702 21,747
35
Riversteamers, Junks,
511
280,371
31,286
511
......
280,371
31,236
6,112
727,280
107,674
5,878 775,186 101,002
11,990
1,502,466
208,676
Danish,
47
151,998
1,731
1
1,343
44
48
153,341
1,775
Dutch,
235
833,354
11,999
16
16,412
588
251
849,766 12,587
French,
230
609,362
15,232
16
19,782
1,025
246
629,144
16,257
Italian,
25
136,689
424
1
4,877
96
26
141,566
520
Japanese,
.....
1,029
2,819,339
94,711
80 107,868
4,421
1,109 | 2,927,207
99,132
Norwegian,
376
519,976
13,351
96 137,029
4,037
472
657,005
17,388
Portuguese,
Russian,
German,
Swedish,
Siamese,
Belgian,
Chilian,..
Panaman,
Mexican,
68
12,933
1,039
5
2,593
285
73
15,526
1,324
......
148 481,720
7,413
3
5,440
121
151
487,160
7,534
28
99,002
622
2
4,180
73
30
103,182
695
......
.....
1,998 65,576
24,774
1 1,183 1,938 50,962 19,720
50
1
1.183 3,936 116,538 44,494
50
......
17,371 16,905,398 761,111
8,224 1,488,394 144,515
25,595 |18,393,792 905,626
Steamships under 60
tons trading to Ports outside the Colony,
TOTAL,
D 25
Table VI.-NUMBER, TONNAGE, and CREWS of VESSELS of EACH NATION
CLEARED at Ports in the Colony of Hong Kong in the Year 1927.
CLEARED.
WITH CARGo.
IN BALLAST.
TOTAL.
NATIONALITY.
Vessels. Tons. Crews.
Vessels. Tons. Crews.
Vessels. Tons. Crews.
British,
1.775
4,454,991187,882
159 383,242
11,407
""
Riversteamers,
3,774
3,655,429 239,535
American,.
227
Chinese,
682
"?
Riversteamers,
520
"
Junks,
10,627
1,428,892 66,326 434,022 20,531 269,176 21,357 1,393,107192,945
19 77,192 121 134,000
791 6,833
803
520
1,934 4,838,233 199,289 3,774 | 3,655,429 239,535 246 1,506,084 67,117 568,022 27,364 269,176 21,357
1,437 143,666
16,862
12,064 | 1,536,775 |209,807
Danish,
43
142,562 1,368
Dutch,
237
819,161
11,324
12
5 10,779 28,889
317
48
153,341
1,685
586
249
848,050
11,910
French,
224
601,174
13,248
21 27,584
1,057
245
628,758
14,305
Italian
26
141,566
520
26
141,566
520
Japanese,
945
2,626,098
88,932
166 304,091
13,418
1,111
2,930,189
102,350
Norwegian,
324
462,466
16.324
141
189,938
10,414
465
652,404
26,738
Portuguese,
69
13,678 1,101
5
4,273
2.47
74
17,951 1,348
Russian,
Panaman,
Swedish,
28
99,002
867
2
4,180
71
30
Siamese,
German,
140
468,214 7,011
8
16,115
785
103,182
148 184,329
938
7,796
Spanish,
...
Belgian,
Steamships under 60 tons
trading to Ports outside the Colony,
2,799
84,210 32,876
1,158
32,626
11,812
3,9 57
116,836 44,688
TOTAL,..... 22,440 17,093,748 902,147
|
3,254 1,356,575
74,600 25,694 18,450,323 976,747
Table VII.
Total Number, Tonnage, Crews, Passengers, and Cargoes of Junks ENTERED in the Colony of Hong Kong, from Ports on the Coast of China and Macao, in the Year 1927.
CARGO.
BALLAST.
TOTAL.
Vessels.
Tons. Crew,
Passen- Cargo, Ves- gers. Tons. sels.
Tons. Crew.
Passen-
gers.
Vessels Tons. Crew.
Passen- Cargo,
gers. Tons.
Canton,..
West River,
Macao,
East Coast,
West Coast,
2,032
116
323 69,387 6,804 3,225 444,586 71,649 80,477 416 64,249 8,623
137,244 18,698
11,814 1,900
28,153 1,952 373,301 37,414
122,446 | 2,944 317,716 50,946 31,526 612 68,788 9,352
2,275 442,688 44,218 5,169 762,302122,595
28,153
80,477
122,446
1,028 133,037 17,975
31,526
*
5,023
93,901 309 8,790 2,239 1,741 61 6,591 1.051
272
2,341
177
146,034 20,937 5,295
18,405 2,951
93,901
1,741
Total, 1927, ...
6,112
727,280 107,674 85,500
277,767 5,878775,186 | 101,002
272
11,990 | 1,502,466 | 208,676
85,772
277,767
Total, 1926,
5,312
421,181 64,613 | 12,707
198,799 | 2,076 | 282,930 31,923
217
7,388 704,111 96,536 12,921 189,799
D 26
Table VIII.
.
Total,
Total Number, Tonnage, Crews, Passengers, and Cargoes of Junks CLEARED in the Colony of Hong Kong, for Ports on the Coast of China and Macao, in the Year 1927.
Ballast.
Vessels.
Tons. Crew.
Passen-
gers.
Cargo,
tons.
Ves-
sels.
Tons. Crew.
Passen-
gers.
Vessels.
Tons.
Crew.
Passen-
gers.
Cargo,
tons.
Cargo.
D
27
Canton,
2,527
West River,
5,679
Macao,
East Coast...
West Coast,
468,105 48,428
720,232 |112,827 79,956
896 125,398 16,463
1,477 62,968 12,600 148 16,404 2,621
6,565
472,771 13 134
422,797 558 55,313 7,673 $3,163 21 2,791 359 26,571 808 81,715 8,287 10,142 34 2,928 409
919
2,540
469,024 48,562
472,771
6,137
775,545 120,500
79,956
422,797
920
128,189 16,822
83,163
75
2,285
182
144,683 20,893 6,640
26,571
19,332 3,030
10,142
Total 1927,
10,627 1,393,107192,945 86,521 | 1,015,444 |1,437 | 143,666 16,862
75 12,064 | 1,536,773 | 209,807 86,596 | 1,015,444
Total 1926,
4,911
491,402 69,231
27
303,133 2,728 |192,401 28,958
440
7,639 683,803 98,189
467 303,133
FOREIGN TRADE.
D 28
Table IX.
Summary of Arrivals and Departures of all Vessels.
1926.
1927.
No. of
No. OF VESSELS.
TONS.
CREW.
VESSELS.
TONS.
CREW.
British Ships entered with Cargo
3,736
7,087,842
314,778
Do.
do. in Ballast,
80
231,740
9,001
5,638 64
8,275,766 191,094
361,969
6,624
Total,
3,816
7,319,582
323,779
5,702
8,166,860
368,593
British Ships cleared with Cargo,
3,694
7,011,969
317,492
5,519
8,110,420
427,417
Do.
do. in Ballast,
167
399,295
11,480
159
383,242
11,407
Total,
3,861
7,411,264
328,909
5,708
8,493,662
438,824
Foreign Ships entered with Cargo,
2,232
5,858,462
181,658
3,623
7,843,604
266,703
Do.
do. in Ballast,
126
216,990
6,706
344
464,324
17,160
Total,
2,358
6,075,452
188,364
3,967
8,307.928
283,863
Foreign Ships cleared with Cargo,
2,170
5,716,693
175,769
3,461
7,494,990
258,719
Do.
do.
in Ballast,
170
372,869
8,494
504
808,062
24,709
Total,
2,340
6,089,562
184,263
3,965
8,303,052
283,428
:
Steamships under 60 tons entered with Cargo,....
Do.
do.
in Ballast,
524
18,146
6,126
1,998
65,576
24,774
do.
875
23,370
9,073
1,938
50,962
19,720
Total,
1,399
43,516
15,199
3,936
116,538
44,494
Steamships under 60 tons cleared with Cargo,
1,045
32,753
11,415
2,799
84,210
32,876
Do.
do.
do.
in Ballast,......
385
11,061
4,062
1,158
32,626
11,812
Total,
1,430
43,814
15,477
3,957
116,836
44,688
Junks entered with Cargo, Do. do. in Ballast,
5,312
421,181
64,613
6,112
727,280
107,674
2,076
282,930
31,923
5,878
775,186
101,002
Total,
7.388
704,111
96,536
11,990
1,502,466
208,676
Junks cleared with Cargo,
4,911
491,402
69,231
10,627
1,393,107
192,945
Do. do. in Ballast,
2,728
192,401
28,958
1,437
143,666
16,862
Total,
7,639
683,803
98.189
12,064
1,536,773
209,807
Total of all Vessels entered with Cargo and in Ballast,
Total of all Vessels cleared with Cargo and in Ballast,
--
14,961 14,142,661 15,270 14,228,443
623,878 626,838
25.595 18,393,792 25,694 18,450,323
905,626
976,747
Total of all Vessels entered and cleared, in
Foreign Trade,
}
30,231
28,371,104
1,250,716
51,289 36,844,115
1,882,373
LOCAL TRADE.
Total Junks entered,
Do.
cleared,
Total Local Trade entered and cleared,.
6,859
323,352
73,118
5,947
253,175
57,546
7,065
415,148
74,671
6,558
274,722
63,101
13,924
738,500
147,789
12,505
527,897
120,647
Total Foreign Trade entered and cleared, Total Local Trade entered and cleared,
30,231 13,924
28,371,104 738,500
Grand Total,
44,155
29,109,604
1,250,716 147,789
1,398,505
51,289 12,505
36,844,115
1,882,373
63,794
527,897
37,372,012
120,647
2,003,020
1
Table X.
Statement of Licensed Steam-launches Entered in
the Colony of Hong Kong during the year 1927.
PLACES.
TOWING.
NOT TOWING.
TOTAL.
Within the Waters of the Colony, 1926,
...
137,411
Do.,
1927,
Outside the Waters of the Colony :-
Canton,.....
West River,
Macao,
East Coast,
Other places,
Total,.
Vessels.
Tonnage.
Crew.
Passengers.
Tons.
Cargo,
Vessels.
2,679,527 | 1,342,172
757,507
76,276 | 1,623,611
153 3,555 1,722
211 5,643 2,863
90| 2,224| 860
131| 5,352 | 1,431
1,413 48,802 17,898
1,998 65,576 24,774
24,774
:.
:
:
:
:
:
:
F:
Tonnage.
Crew.
Passengers.
Tons.
Cargo,
112,501 | 4,295,545 | 1,722,468 | 6,278,615 13,385
33,500 1,252,327 414,641 | 1,579,533
Vessels.
Tonnage.
Crew.
Passengers.
Cargo,
Tons.
16,574
249,912 | 6,975,072 | 3,064,640 | 6,278,615 109,776 | 2,885,938 1,172,148 1,579,533
13,385
16,574
104 3,166 1,097
89 3,242 1,131
:
108
103 2,672 1,034|
|
:
:.
270 9,591| 2,799
:
:
257 6,721 2,819
300 8,885 3,994
193 4,896 1,894
:
108
:
:
:
401 14,948 4,230
:
1,372 32,291 13,659
627
2,785 81,093 31,557
627
1,938 50,962 19,720
108
627
3,936 | 116,538 44,494
108
627
D 29
Table XI.
Statement of Licensed Steam-launches Cleared in the Colony of Hong Kong during the year 1927.
- D 30
PLACES.
TOWING.
NOT TOWING.
TOTAL.
Vessels.
Ton-
nage.
Crew.
Bunker Cargo Vessels. Coal. Tons.
Ton-
nage.
Crew.
Passen- Cargo, | Bunker Vessels. gers. Tons. Coal,
Ton-
nage.
Crew.
Passen- Cargo, Bunker Coal.
Tons.
gers.
Do.,
Within the Waters of the Colony 1926, 1927,
137,273 2,675,788 1,341,145 23,896 76,284 | 1,633,391 757,379 13,786
112,639 | 4,299,284 | 1,723,495 | 6,338,913 35,515 | 1,252,641 412,788 1,575,292
10,074
14,598
25,278
13,021
249,912 6,975,072 | 3,064,640 | 6,338.913 109,779 2,886,032 | 1,170,167 | 1,575,292
10,074 49,174
14,598
26,807
Outside the Waters of the Colony :-
Canton,.....
West River,
175 4,203 1,979 1,105 225 6,255 3,042 3,656
758
167
88 2,566
926
13
544
263 6,769 2,905
180 1,649
...
270
84 2,932 1,030 |
167 1,456
251
309 9,187 | 4,072
167 1,726 3,907
53 1,533
:
:
Macao,
East Coast,
Other places,
Total,
......
148 3,399 1,446
229 8,663 2,425 1,247 2,022 61,690 23,984 7,164
2,799 84,210 |32,876 13,930
753 19,137 7,446
437 1,158 32,626 11,812
176 3,264 4,784 3,957 116,836 44,688
9| 1,549| 9,799
176 3,701 18,714
521
216
217
201 4,932 1,967
216
975
180 6,458 1,889
30 1,137
409 15,121 4,314
:
30 2,384
9
1,549 2,635 2,775 80,827 31,430)
THY,
Table XII.
Number of Boat Licences, Permits, etc., issued and Fees collected during the year 1927.
(Under Table U, Section 40, of Ordinance No. 10 of 1899.)
DESCRIPTION.
LICENCE.
LICENCE DUPLICATE BOAT RE- SPECIAL BOOKS. LICENCE. PAINTING
FEES.
PERMITS.
D
Licence Books,
Boat Repainting, ..25 Cents
Special Permits, .25
";
Passenger Boat, Classes A & B,
Lighter, Cargo and Water Boats,
:
3,200
:
:
4,485
2,355
Other Boats,
Fish Drying Hulks,
2,643
2,076
12,574
65
...
:
:
:
:
:.
...
:.
Duplicate Licence,
11
:
:
:.
:
$ 3,269.00
1,121.50
588.75
14,022.50
54,461.00
42,340.75
565.75
11.00
ΤΟΤΑΙ,
17,358
3,200
11
4,485
2,355 $116,380.25
D 32
Table XIII.
Comparative Statement of Revenue collected in the Harbour
Department during the years 1926 and 1927.
Sub-head of Revenue.
Amount
Amount
1926.
1927.
C.
C.
1. Light Dues, Ordinance 10 of 1899,
110,543.80
132,379.31
Special Assessment, Ord. 10 of 1899, 127,655.26
158,762.56
2. Licences, Internal Revenue not otherwise
specified :-
Boat Licences, Ordinance 10 of 1899, Chinese Passenger Ship Licences, Or-
dinance 1 of 1889,
115,405.85
116,380.25
!,875.00
2,025.00
Fines,
5,487.10
8,835,16
Forfeitures,
310.00
120.33
Fishing Stake and Station Licences,
Ordinance 10 of 1899,.
38.30
34.50
Fishing Stake and Station Licences, do.,
from the New Territories,
1,141.00
Junk Licences, &c., Ord. 10 of 1899,
41,935.25
901.40 41,377.50
Junk Licences, &c., Ord. 10 of 1899,
from the New Territories,
Pilots Licences, Ordinance 3 of 1904, Steam-launch Licences, &c., Ordinance
10 of 1899,
3. Fees of Court or Office, Payments for specific purposes, and Reimbursements- in-Aid :-
Court Fees, Ordinance 3 of 1873,................... Engagement and Discharge of Seamen,
Ördinance 10 of 1899,...
Engagement of Masters and Engineers of Steam-launches, Ord. 10 of 1899, Examination of Masters, &c., Ordinance
10,167.50
11,012.75
150.00
115.00
10,258.70
11,969.15
34,625.00
36,208.60
345.50
360.50
10 of 1899,
2,825.00
2,522.50
Fees for use of Government Buoys,
Ordinance 10 of 1899,..........
72,730.19
88,726.00
Gunpowder Storage, Ord. 10 of 1899, Medical Examination of Emigrants, Ord.
6,702.01
8,169.34
1 of 1889,....
*143,957.30
180.108.60
Official Signatures, Ordinance 1 of 1889, Printed Forms, Sale of, Ord. 1 of 1889,.. Registry Fees (Merchant Shipping Act),
Ordinance 10 of 1899,...
4,904.00
5,396.00
683.50
719.50
1,634.00
1,776.00
Steam-launches, Surveyor's Certificates,
Ordinance 10 of 1899,...
10,945.00
11,575.00
Survey of Steamships, Ordinance 10 of
1899.......
1
35,600.00
34,876.50
Sunday Cargo Working Permits, Ord.
1 of 1891,
80,275.00 145,550.00
4. Miscellaneous Receipts :-
Sale of condemned stores,
Other Miscellaneous Receipts, Interest,
Total,...........$ 820,888.39 1,000,229.80
560,00
203.00
41.00
...
124.13
84.35
*
Sce next page.
L

D 33
* Statement of Emigration Fees, 1927 :-
Expenditure incurred by.
$ 13,300.00 (Estimated.)
Revenue
collected by.
Harbour Department,...... $180,108.60
Office of Secretary for
Chinese Affairs,
16,110.00
11,346.00
Medical Department,......
$ 207,564.60
$ 46,280.08
Stamp Office, on account
of Bill of Health,
...
4,124.00
28,856.08
Net Revenue.................................. $161,284.52
Statement of Emigration Fees, 1926 :—
Revenue collected by.
Expenditure
incurred by.
Harbour Department,...... $143,957.30
$ 13,300.00
Office of Secretary for
Chinese Affairs,
12,945.00
3,418.00
Stamp Office, on account
of Bill of Health, Medical Department,......
9,342.00
47,041.90
$166,244.30
$ 63,759.90
Net Revenue.
.$102,484.40
Table XIV.
Summary of Chinese Emigrants from Hong Kong to Ports other than in China, during the year 1927.
BRITISH SHIPS.
FOREIGN SHIPS.
GRAND TOTAL,
Adults.
Children.
Adults.
Children.
Adults.
Children.
PORTS.
Total.
Total.
Total.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
— D 34 —
Australia................................
1,552
3
16
2 1,573
329
33
1
1
364 1.881
36
17
3
1,937
Africa,
298
27
49
3 377
273
176
112
86
647 571
203
161
89
1,024
British N. Borneo,
4,872 | 1,234
511
· 307
6,924
4,872
1.234
511
307
6,924
Canada,
6,035
11
75
} 6.122
304
171
5
· 326
6,339
28
80
1
6,448
Calcutta,
1,509
192
98'
39 1,838
15
9.
1
25 1,524
201
98
40
1,863
Delagoa Bay,
63 39.
**30
1
133
63:
39
30
1
133
:
Dutch Indies,
|25,024 | 2,902| 1,574
474 29,974 25,024|| 2,902 | 1,574
474
29,974
Fiji,
120
4.
,124
120
4
124.
...
Honolulu,
10,397 225
57
27 10,706 10.397
225
57
27
10,706,
Mexico,
641
18
63
.722
641
18
63
...
Mauritius,
543
101
71
2
720
543
104
71
ลง
722
720.
New Zeland (Dunedin)
8
8
8
8%
...
New Caledonia (Noumea),
6
6
64
6;
C
New Guinea (Raboul),
45
1
46
45;
46;
Nauru Island,
530
530
530
530:
Ocean Island,
370
370
370
370
Portuguese East ofrica
8
Panama (Balboa), South America,..
Sumatra (Belawan Deli), Straits Settlements,.. Tahiti,
United States of America, Zanzibar Island
.....
161
8
176
8.
8
161
6
8
176;
1,049
611
244
236 2,140 1,049 611
244
236
2,140
2,316 243 106 84 82,757 22,229 8,115 3,572
2,749 5,937
632
262
133
53
1
9
6
194 7,025 8,253 875 *368
116,673 61,384 15,025 6,532 2,794 85,735 144,141 37,254 14,647 6,366 | 202,408 148
54| 8;968
1
278
9,774
208 149
...
133 24|| 9,349 | 9,021
9
6
208 150
148.
24 9,403
1
1
.....
1,532 84,871 | 167,357 29,358 |15,012
4,010 138,268 (114,563 19,9019,037 | 3,839 | 147,330 215,701 43,953 18,090 3,268 131,658 69,528 8.775 5,036 Total Passengers by British Ships, Total Passengers by Foreign Ships,
7,849 | 285,593
4,800 216,527
101,148 24,052, 9,053 4,010 138,263 114,653 19,901 9,037 | 3.839 | 147,330
Difference,.
|13,450 4,151, 16 171 9,067
Total 1927,
Total 1926,
101,148 24,052 9,053
97,829 20,583 | 9,976
Table XV.
Statement of Average Number of Emigrants from Hong Kong to Ports other than in China, for Quinquennial Periods from 1890 to 1925 inclusive.
1890.
66,706
1895. 1900. 1905. 1910. 60,360 66,961 73,105 88,452
1915.
109,110
1920.
84,602
1925.
129,004
Table XVI.
Number of Male and Female Emigrants from Hong Kong to Ports other than in China, for Ten Years, from 1918 to 1927 inclusive.
D 35
Whither bound.
1918.
1919. 1920. 1921, 1922.
1923. 1924. 1925.
1926.
1927.
Straits Settlements, Males. Straits Settlements, Females,
Total,
Other Ports, Males, Other Ports, Females,
5,914 7,424 30.330 2,105 4,214 13,605 8,019 11,638 43,935
67,032 39,616 52,011 58,051 20,292 10,740 13,573 17,631 87,324, 50,356 65,584
78,505 127,863 | 158.788 19,047 29,422 43,620
75,682
97,552157,285 | 202,408
Total,
35,811
48.331 61,323 68,687
Grand Total,
43,830
59,969 |103,258 |156,011
98,393 | 120,224 | 129,859 | 140,534 | 216,527 | 285,593
34,096 46,044 59,128 64.293 44,109 48,773 49,427 1,715 2,287 2,195 4,394 3,928 5,867 4.750
48,037 54,640 54,177 42,982 59,242 89,185
40,198 54,506 2,784
4,736
75,003
8,182
Table XVII.
Summary of Chinese Emigrants Returned to Hong Kong from Ports other than in China, during the year 1927.
BRITISH SHIPS.
FOREIGN SHIPS.
GRAND TOTAL.
Adults.
Children.
Adults.
Children.
Adults.
Children.
PORTS.
Total.
Total.
Total.
M.
F.
M.
1.
M.
F.
M.
1.
JL.
E
M.
F.
Australia
Africa,
...
1,442
71
39
42
80
13
19
12
22
1,594
1,442
71
39
42
1,594
124
80
13
19
12
124
Bangkok,
116
88
38
30
272
609
217
105
56
987
725
305
143
86
1.259
British N. Borneo,
617
159
108
56
910
27
27
644
159
108
56
967
Canada,
3,424
54
75
37
3,590
815
51
33
914
4.239
105
108
52
4,504
Continent of Europe,
36
46
235
77
36
359
271
85
38
11
405
Dutch Indies,
63
11
5
79
13,368
1,564 1,563
676
17,171
13,431
1.5751,568
676
17,250
Honolulu,
430
52
38
24
541
430
52
38
24
544
Mauritius,
79
8
9
100
79
9
4
100
South America, ...................
280
76
20
17
393
280
76
20
17
893
Straits Settlements,
70,644
12.898 6,796 |3,776
94,114
33,406
4,821
2,661 | 1,694
42.582
104,050
17,719 | 9,457 |5,470 | 136,696
Sumatra (Belawan Deli),
11,558
1,717
975 584
United States of America,
27
3
30
1,924
204
162 110
14.834 11,558 2,400
1,951
1,717 975 584 14,834 165
204 10 2,430
Total 1927.
76,528
13,3107.094 |3,957 | 100,889
62,652
8,779 5,593|3,187
80,211 139.180
22,089 12.687|7,144 |181,100
Total 1926,
58,945
9,650 4,883 2.669 76,147 41,537 5,299 3,715 1,963 52,514
100,482
14,949 8,598 4,632 | 128,661
Total Passengers by British Ships,
"}
Excess of
Foreign
British
93
""
>>
76,528. 13,310 7,094 | 3,957 | 100,889
62,652
8,779 5,593 3,187
80,211
13,876 4,531 1,50! 770 20,678
D 36
Table XVIII.
Statement of Average Number of Emigrants Returned to Hong Kong from Ports other than in China, for Quinquennial Periods from 1890 to 1925 inclusive.
1890. 1895. 1900. 1905. 1910. 1915. 96,068 104,118 109,534 137,814 146,585 151,728
1920.
100,641
1925.
129,106
Table XIX.
Number of Male and Female Emigrants Returned to Hong Kong from Ports other than in China, for Ten Years, from 1918 to 1927 inclusive.
- D 37 -
Where from.
Straits Settlements, Males, Straits Settlements, Females.
Total,.
Other Ports, Males,.. Other Ports, Females,
36,662 60,812 68,316 2,534 2.871 4,610 39,196 63,683 72,926 | 100,693 | 85,644
1918. 1919. 1920. 1921. 1922.
1923. 1924. 1925. 1926. 1927.
91,203 74,694 58,800 9,490 10,950 7,186
65,047 52,220
72,194113.507
9,216 8,671 14,761 23,189
65,986
32,014
2.899
70,070
2,267
46,776
2,736
52,429 52,596
5,942
307
Total.
34,913 72,337
49,512
58,371
57,903
55.116
74,263 60,891 50,374 51,031 27,888 36,886 38,360 4,742 4,900 2,843 4,820 6,044 55,931
86,955 136,696
30,731 41,706 44,404
Grand Total,
74,109 |136,020 | 122,438 | 159,064 | 143,547 | 121,102130,194
91,622 | 128,661 | 181,100
Table XX.
Return of Vessels Registered at the Port of Hong Kong during the year 1927.
Name of Vessel.
Official
Number.
Horse
Power.
Rig.
Build.
Where and when built.
Remarks.
D 38
1. Chung On
116,036
727 N.H.P. 86
Not.
Clinker. Hong Kong...
2. Tai Hing
154,005
633
3. Hing Wah
154,006
24
106
24
. 1904] Formerly under Chinese flag as ex Lin Tan ..1927 First Registry.
Chung On *
"
Schooner.
Canton.
4. Sai Cheong
152,447
240
None.
Clincher. Hong Kong.
Wah ".
About
5. On Man
154,007
175
Carvel.
71
6. Yuen Wo..
154,008
4
B.H.P. 20
""
$9
Unknown.
Hong Kong.
7. Intaba
129,345
3,039
N.H.P. 572
8. Kong Ning
142,216
658
75
13
9. Ling Nam
142,385
3,975
515
Schooner.
99
10. Motorlight
142.142
28
B.H.P. 75
Aberdeen.
Schooner. | Clencher. Nil. Carvel. Hong Kong. Clinker. Hamburg.
Clincher. Shanghai.
11. Hoi Loong
154,009
32
N.H.P. $
12. Snipe
154,010
17
B.H.F. 8
Noue.
Chinese.
Carvel.
Hong Kong.
1923 Formerly Chinese unregistered vessel as "Hing Wah
.1923 Formerly Chinese unregistered vessel as
.1885| Formerly Chinese unregistered vessel as "On
Shun
.1920 Formerly unregistered vessel owned by British Subject as “Leung 1".
1910 Transferred from Aberdeen.
1918 Registered anew for alteration of her means of propulsion.
.19031 Formerly under Chinese flag as "Ling Nam" ** Field Marshal ".
ex
""
.1915 Formerly unregistered vessel owned by Chinese as "Mui Wo ex "Motorlight" registered in Shanghai as British vessel.
..1900| Formerly unregistered vessel owned by Chinese as Hoi Loon
""
... 1904) Formerly unregistered yacht.
Ying
1:
Table XXI.
Return of Registers of Vessels Cancelled at the Port of Hong Kong during the year 1927.
Name of Vessel.
Official
Number.
Rig.
Build.
Where and when built.
Reason of Cancellation.
1. Northern Star
123,078
51
22. 6. 1907.
None.
Carvel.
Hong Kong
2. Southern Star.
123,080
51
22. 6. 1907.
.194 Sold to foreigner (Chinese). ..1900
(
).
3. Taikoo Wo
151,415
6
20. 10. 1920.
None.
"
4. Redoubtable
133,546
22
30.
5. 1924.
Canton
"
"J
..1920 Totally lost from collision with Taisho Maru" on 25th July, 1926.
1922 Sold to foreigner (Chinese).
5. Wing Tung..
153,540
24
16. 4. 1924.
1921
*
י,
"}
).
6. Radiance.
153,557
23
9.
7. 1924.
"
1924
!!
).
7. Rubi..
153,572
6
5. 12. 1924.
Clincher.
-1
Hong Kong
1924
"3
(French).
8. Chung Fu
153,542
28
26. 4. 19.4.
Carvel.
Canton
1924
"
(Chinese)
9. San Jorge
153,574
B
5. 12. 1924.
.1924
*
""
;}
).
10. San Nicolau
153,573
14
5. 12. 1924.
Clincher.
1920
""
**
(
、,
11. Lien Shing
".
).
153,545
1,462
28. 5. 1924.
Schooner.
Hong Kong
.1924
Totally lost through striking Amherest Rocks
12. Race...
153,511
54
13. Ivy Leaf
153,534
48
2. 2. 1924. 23. 3. 1924.
None.
Carvel.
Canton
}}
14. Kong Ning
142.216
480
29.
1. 1919.
Nil.
>>
Hong Kong
15. Harold Dollar.
129,531
2,823
26. 2. 1925.
Fore & Aft. Clinker.
Dumbarton
Schooner.
16. Rooster
153,541
33
16. 4. 1924.
None.
Carvel.
Canton
17. Gembrook
153,551
32
23.
6. 1924.
1922
"
""
35
18. Chee Fat
152,429
39
5. 9. 1923.
"3
Hong Kong
.1913
19. Echidna
127,000
15
9. 10. 1908.
.1908
>>
.
20. St. Day
142,217
35
2. 5. 1919.
Schooner. Clencher.
}}
21. St. Doymael
142,218
35
2. 5. 1919.
1919
27
"
22. St. Monance
142,228
44
6.
2. 1920.
1919
19
,.
"}
23. Poet Chaucer
142.230
84
7. 2. 1920.
Nil.
1919
}}
24. Rosebud
153.553
41
23. 6. 1924.
None.
Carvel.
Canton.
off Woosung at Shanghai on 12th December,
1926.
1923 Sold to foreigner (Chinese).
1918 Totally lost at Canton,
}
1918, Converted into Steam Ship and registered anew on 8th July, 1927.
.1910 Transferred to Glasgow.
1924 Sold to foreigner (Chinese).
.1919 Registry not required as per advice from the
Secretary of the Admiralty.
1924 Sold to foreigner (Chinese).
(Japanese).
Do.
Do.
Do.
25. Polar Star
123,079
51
22.
6. 1907.
"7
26. Rhamses
133,257 378
29. 7. 1914.
Nil.
Hong Kong Clencher. Renfrew
..1902
1884
).
5. for breaking up.
*
D 39 -
D 40
S
Table XXII.
Number and Tonnage of Vessels in Foreign Trade Entered and Cleared since 1916.
YEAR.
No. of VESSELS.
TONNAGE.
T
1916
48,350
22,308,311
d
1917
48,026
20,547,119
1918
43,436
16,955,332
1919
41,985
21,072,129
1920
43,364
24,194,022
1921
52,222
27,852,616
1922
50,127
29,543,561
1923
49,900
35,947,534
1924
57,765
38,770,499
1925
41,336
32,179,053
1926
30,231
28,371,104
1927
51,289
36,834,014
Table XXIII.
Revenue and Expenditure of the Harbour Department.
Year.
Total Revenue of Departinent.
Total
Expenditure of Department Excluding Special Expenditure.
Percentage of Expenditure to Revenue.
C.
C.
%
1916,
649,732.24
165,295.31
25.44
1917,
666,102.79
198,015.49
29.73
1918,
594,278.91
173,527.64
29.20
1919,
633,794.25
192,026.19
30.29
1920,
701,493.26
230,033.12
32.79
1921,
800,798.13
246,295.53
30.76
1922,
857,576.04
280,625.57
32.72
1923,
925,643.02
300,484.95
32:46
1924,
997,530.74
318,412.04
31.92
1925,
878,118.83
452,106.42
51:48
1926,
820,888.39
534,675.91
65.13
1927,
1,000,229.80
610,480.26
61.03
Appendix E.
REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF IMPORTS AND EXPORTS FOR THE YEAR 1927.
I. LIQUOR.
1.-Duties.-The total net revenue collected was $1,483,098.20 as compared with $1,179,586.05 collected last
year.
To this total European liquor contributed about one-third, Chinese liquor about two-thirds. Details will be found in Tables I, II and III.
The receipts from European liquor show an increase of some $60,000. This is entirely attributable to the increased consumption of beer coincident with the presence of a larger European Garrison. .
Champagne, Whisky, and Port Wine remain remarkably constant: Brandy, and Liqueur show a slight drop compensated for by a rise in Gin and Vermouth.
Chinese liquor gives an increased return of $240,000. Com- parison with 1926 is difficult as the rate was raised (from 60 cents to $1.20) only in October of that year. There is a striking fall in the number of gallons paying duty.
2.-Licences.-The responsibility for collecting fees in res- pect of Chinese Wine and Spirit Shops, Dealers, and Distil- leries was transferred to the department on 1st April. Table III gives the amount collected for the last three quarters. It also gives the amount collected in respect of warehouses hitherto included under the heading of 'Duties.'
3.-Administration :·
(a) No special comment is called for in respect of Euro-
pean liquor.
(b) In the case of Chinese liquor the doubling of the rate brought the duty to about twice the wholesale price of the liquor. This gave a considerable im- petus to evasion. Seizure of smuggled liquor on junks and sampans hailing from Macao and its neighbourhood effected by this department alone exceeded 3,900 gallons.
One large local distillery was convicted of Sunday dis- tilling and of using a concealed store of fermenting material for the purpose.
One spirit shop was convicted of fraud in the use of duty labels entrusted to it to facilitate its trading operations. The labels, though precisely accounted for in the books as having
E 2
been fixed to duty-paid liquor issued from the shop, were found intact, in conjunction with a large consignment of dutiable liquor, on a junk recently arrived from Macao. Another spirit shop was convicted of using old labels to cover dutiable material. In all 78 convictions were obtained.
The new distillery regulations were gradually applied. As a result about 63% of the smaller and less accessible stills in the New Territories went out of business; the remain effecting the prescribed improvements.
4.-Legislation.-Sections 59 and 86 of the Liquor Con- solidation Ordinance were amended.
II. TOBACCO.
1-Duties.The total nett
revenue collected was
$1,925,113.40 an increase over 1926 of $100,000.
Details are given in Table IV.
There is a notable increase in the amount of imported cigarettes especially of lower grade, and an equivalent decrease in the amount of locally manufactured cigarettes paying duty.
2.-Licences.-The revenue collected was $15,609.64.
3. Administration.-Contraband tobacco seized by the de- partment is shown in Table VII. In addition, two very large seizures—amounting to over 538,000 cigarettes and 221 lbs. of tobacco-were effected by the Police Department. In all 26 convictions were obtained.
III.-OPIUM.
The gross revenue was $3,344,370.65 as compared with $2,900,082 in 1926. Table V shows the number of taels sold. Sales of the special brand known as KAMSHAN which is retailed in three tael tins to a limited number of registered smokers, maintained their normal level by comparison with last year. The brand was sold throughout the year. The brand described as 'Hong Kong-Bengal' was sold as usual at $14.50 until October 3rd when it was withdrawn, sales having sagged con- tinuously even below the low level set by the previous year. During the currency of this brand, i.e., between January 1st and October 3rd seizures of illicit material reached a total of 35,000 taels (16053 raw and 18760 prepared) or about 26% of the number of taels officially sold (133,666). What proportion of smuggled material is represented by the seizures must, of course, be left to speculation. On October 3rd two brands (Blue and Red label) of lower quality were substituted at the price respec- tively of $8.33 and $6.66-prices related to the price of equiva- ient illicit grades. This was made possible by the large accumu- lation of confiscations, both Persian and Chinese, in the hands of the department. If a considerable quantity was sold it is reason- able to assume that an equivalent quantity of illicit material was kept out and if a considerable gross revenue was obtained it is
7
E 3
reasonable to assume that it was diverted from the illicit trade which supplied the bulk of the raw material. In point of fact this assumption has lately received curious verification. At the time of writing it has been found necessary, owing to the ex- haustion of material, to withdraw these grades. The withdrawal took place on January 27, 1928. On March 16, 1928 a seizure was effected on s.s. Taiszema of 3190 taels of raw and 440 taels of prepared opium. The material was elaborately concealed in
19 bales manifested as cassia for London and marked
35.
The following is extracted from the Inward Goods ledger of the consignee (who was arrested and convicted).
22nd Aug., 1927 10 bales cassia 1680 catties nett $5.60 $94.08
mark
35
31st Aug.
12 bales cassia 2016 catties nett $5.60 $112.89
/35
mark
15th Sept.
10 bales cassia 1680 catties nett $5.60 $94.08
Mark.
35
21st Sept.
10 bales cassia 1680 catties nett $5.60 $94.08
Mark
35
At this date the entries abruptly cease. Ten days later the new official grades made their appearance.
Table VIII section (a) is a departmental record of the num- ber of persons convicted of offences against the Opium Ordinance The total includes some on complaint of this department alone.
2,500 divan-smokers who allowed their bail to be estreated. It also includes a handful of cases-some 30 or 40-in which the Magistrate cautioned the smoker without actually recording a conviction. This explains any discrepancy between the Table and the official Magistracy figures which are as follows:-
Persons charged under Opium Ordinance
7,783
convicted
>>
6,726
""
E 4
It is notable that of a total of 7,740 persons imprisoned during the year 3,040 were imprisoned for Opium offences: and that out of a total of 1,513 deported 666 were deported for Opium offences.
Table IX is a complete list of seizures. The list naturally covers a wide range. It includes the merest fraction of a tael of prepared opium found in a divan and the parcel of several hundreds of taels of raw or prepared found on a ship. On 1631 occasions less than one tael of prepared was taken: on 28 occa- sions more than 100 taels of prepared opium was taken: on 36 occasions less than a tael of raw opium was taken and on 36 occasions more than 100 taels of raw opium was taken. A selec- tion of the more important seizures will be found in Table XIII. The remarks in the column headed 'Destination' must, of course, be accepted with reserve. It should be explained that opium classified as 'Amoy' is Chinese. The separate heading is given as a matter of convenience, for Amoy opium is notorious- ly destined for Singapore. Accordingly if a comparison is sought between this year and last year as regards the volume of illicit material of Chinese origin destined for consumption on the local market a juster result will be reached by excluding Amoy seizures in each case. The result is approximately as follows:-
1926 prepared opium seized 15,500 taels
1927
21
71
"}
19,600
an increase in the current year of approximately 25%. The figures for raw opium give a like result namely,
1926 raw opium seized ......15,000 taels
1927
...20,000
11
It may be added that the reduced seizures of Amoy opium must not necessarily be taken as proof of any diminution in the traffic from that port. So far as this department is concerned it is explicable by the fact that, in view of the constant stream from other sources and clearly destined for Hong Kong, it has not been possible to pay so much attention to this transit traffic. The great bulk of the material classified generally as 'Chinese'- fully 90%-is traceable to Wuchow. That is to say the prepared opium is prepared at Wuchow and the raw, emanating no doubt from the poppy fields of Yunnan, is shipped at Wuchow. It has been introduced in large or small consignments by every vessel plying between that port and this. The following is the record of a single ship for a few weeks.
5
:
E 5
Seizures of illicit opium on board S.S. "TAI HING”.
April 4, 1927, 500 taels prepared opium. Concealed in cargo.
Concealed in saloon
locker.
Concealed in a basket
of duck's eggs.
prepared opium. Concealed in saloon
July 2,
2
"
19
22
Aug. 3,
480
raw opium
Aug. 19,
5
19
80
12
21
60
23
">
30
raw opium.
locker.
Concealed on the per-
son.
ד
i
7
raw opium.
""
Concealed in 1st class
saloon lockers.
prepared opium.) Concealed in 2nd
prepared opium.
15
"'"
31
Aug. 29,
Sept. 9,
6
16
,,
""
>"
""
"
5
Sept. 19,
32
1
21
"
class saloon lockers.
Concealed on the per-
son.
Concealed in the
Crew's quarters.
Concealed in Euro-*
pean pantry.
Separately concealed
in pantry.
Concealed in the
forecastle.
Concealed on the per-
son of pantry boy.
By comparison with this source seizures from other sources are numerically trifling. But they are not without interest. Several seizures were effected of a variety of brands of prepared opium all packed in tins conveniently for export claiming Check Hom, Kwong Chau Wan as the place of manufacture, as for example the 'Kung Kei' brand packed by Hop Kei, the 'Flving Phoenix' of Tin Cheung, and the 'Flying Dragon' of Kung Hing.
During the first half of the year the usual seizures of 'Eagle' and Flying Horse', well-known export brands of the Macao farm, were made. After 1st July, when the Macao Government assumed the monopoly, these disappeared; but there reappeared in their place two brands of an earlier farm for which these two had been substituted, namely 'Golden Cock' and 'Red Lion'. This would seem to indicate an attempt by someone to maintain the old connections.
The seizures of Indian raw opium included a seizure of the equivalent of one and a half chests (believed to have been part of three) of Calcutta opium introduced by a ship hailing from Kwong Chow Wan, and a seizure of some 900 taels in small balls, similar in make up to Malwa opium, taken on a ship hailing from Calcutta.
– E 6 -
Prepared opium is almost always packed in a tin bearing a trade mark. Seizures made during the year under review alone reveal examples of about 150 different brands all implicating South China: a figure which may be compared with the number of brands of cigarettes on the local market commonly smoked by the Chinese to-day 80 or the total number of brands standing on the registers to-day-280.
Raw opium is covered very commonly by a label indicating its origin. The labels found on seizures made during the year abundantly confirm the reports of the notorious prosperity of the Yunnan poppy fields and of the movement of raw opium by the ton down river from Wuchow.
As to the actual position within our own borders, no catalo- gue can shew this. In forming an opinion it must be borne in mind that the waterways of this colony are the waterways of Kwang Tung, the frontiers of this colony march with Kwang Tung and the population of this colony is drawn from and constantly interchanging with the population of Kwang Tung; and it is therefore necessary to decide whether upon entering our borders the addict loses his craving and, if not, whether Chinese ingenuity and resource is capable of supplying the demand.
This department can only point to the one tael-tin substi- tuted for the heel of a shoe, the ten tael packet secreted in the hollow haft of a saw, the parcel of 100 taels made up to represent a baby on its mother's back, the parcel of 500 stripped from the false back of a sampan, the parcel of a thousand dragged from the bed of the harbour: and more than 10,000 persons haled be- fore the Court for opium offences.
Opium for U.S.A. and the Philippines.
The traffic, of which some account was given in last year's report, continues. Reports of heavy fines inflicted on trans- Pacific ships introducing prepared opium to the Pacific coast of the U.S.A. have been received on several occasions. This department was able to put at the disposal of the U.S.A. authorities certain letters in substantiation of a smuggling charge. Occasional seizures of parcels of prepared opium in transit to U.S.A. were effected locally, notably a seizure of 100 five-tael tins, bearing the Lam Kei. Hop mark, on the point of being put aboard a Dollar Line ship. A fine of $60,000 was inflicted in this case.
Little has been heard of smuggling to the Philippines during the year.
Letters from a Chinese resident of Manila ordering supplies of 'Eagle' brand were found in the possession of a local Chinese resident and placed at the disposal of the U.S. authorities. Unfortunately the replies to this correspondence
}
E 7-
were not obtainable and the case instituted against the recipient virtually collapsed. It is evident, if reliance can be placed on the Manila press, that there was a glut of opium on the Manila market during the latter part of the year; and it is concluded that this was carried direct from Amoy.
Persian Opium.
Information of an attempt to secure tonnage in this port by a Chinese syndicate operating in Macao or its neighbourhood for the introduction of 1000 piculs of Persian opium was received. The arrival at Macao of the S.S. Kairyo Maru and the simul- taneous seizure by the Macao authorities of 80,000 taels of Persian raw opium on a craft in the harbour was noted. The Kairyo Maru cleared from Bushire for Vladivostock with 447 chests.
T
IV.-DANGEROUS DRUGS.
Table XII gives a statement of authorised imports; Table XIV of seizures effected.
The last two seizures concerned a pink pill-described as an anti-opium pill-and containing heroin.
V. STAFF.
Mr. G. R. Sayer assumed charge of the department on the departure on leave of Mr. J. D. Lloyd on 28th May, 1927. Mr. B. C. K. Hawkins replaced Mr. W. J. Carrie as Assistant Superintendent on 10th November, 1927.
Revenue Officer Marks and Revenue Officer Tallon were absent on long leave during the year.
Revenue Officer Pearse was seconded to the District Office
North.
Revenue Officer Tuck and Revenue Officer Davidson were engaged on probation.
Revenue Officer Ward was promoted to the first class. The death of Revenue Officer Knight is recorded with regret.
G. R. SAYER,
Superintendents
- E 8
Table I.
Return of Liquor duty Collected during the year 1927.
European Type Liquor.
Class of Liquor.
Gallons.
Amount of Duty collected.
$
C.
Ale, Beer, Cyder and Stout
423,288
169,315.20
Brandy
9,724
58,344.00
Whisky
18,453
110,718.00
Gin and Cocktail
10,103
60,618.00
Rum
918
5,508.00
Champagne and Sparkling Wine..
2,102
21,020.00
Claret
4,131
12,393.00
Port Wine
5,679
22,716.00
Sherry and Madeira
2,446
9,784.00
Vermouth
5,139
15,417.00
Liqueur
1,402
14,020.00
Spirits of Wine
134
1,340.00
Miscellaneous
6,703
20,109.00
Difference on Overproof and
Fractions
219.57
Total
$521,521.77
Note:-Fractions of a gallon are not shown in this Table.
*
E 9
Table II.
Return of Liquor duty Collected during the year 1927.
Chinese and Japanese Liquor.
Native
Spirits
not more than 25% of alcohol by weight
Native Spirits
Liquors Amount of
Amount of
Imported
Total Amount of
distilled
locally.
duty collected.
liquor.
duty collected.
duty collected.
gallons.
gallons.
*
440,391 *484,430.54
207,833 249,400.13
733,830.67
over 25% of alcohol by weight
22,374 32,366.31
58,163
Northern spirits
over 25% of
alcohol
by
weight..
Sake
:
Difference
on
overproof and
fractions.........
3.77
49,944 197,891,13 230,257.47
3,496
4,202.20
4,202.20
Total
406.19
409.96
968,700.30
Note :-Fractions of a gallon are not shown in this Table.
=
*Excludes 7,111 gallons $7,822.94 duty collected and paid
into Treasury by the District Officer, North.
Table III.
Summary of Liquor Duties and Licence Fees.
DUTIES.
(1) European Liquor
(2) Chinese Liquor
Less refund
LICENCES AND FEES.
Warehouse Overtime Fees
(1) Warehouse Licences
((2) Dealers Licences
Last three (3) Distillery Licences
Quarters
(4) Chinese Wine and Spirit Shop
Licences
Less refund of (4)
$ 521,521.77 976,523.24
$1,498,045.01 14,946.81
$1,483,098.20
$
6,583.42 123.00 20,000.00
7,743.75
161,770.83
$ 196,221.00 325.00
$ 195,896.00
CLASS OF TOBACCO.
Cigars..
Cigarettes
European Tobacco
Chinese Prepared Tobacco
Raw Tobacco Leaf
Snuff
Table IV.
Return of Duty Paid Tobacco for the year 1927.
MANUFACTURED LOCALLY.
IMPORTED.
High Grade,
Low Grade.
High Grade.
Low Grade.
mille.
lbs.
Duty.
mille.
lbs.
Duty,
mille.
lbs.
Duty.
mille.
lbs.
Duty.
723
28,920.00
1,734
13,396.59
58
2,320.00
9,962
122,781
491,124.00 563,658
752,617.48
15,565
59,147.00
274,519
11,604
17,405.88
2,744
1,551.96
49,597
14,879.08
54,786
16,435.92
33
55.01
33,819.43
377,584.80
386,187
115,856.25
Total
123,504
11,637
537,504.89 565,392 107,157
798,881.03
15,623
61,467.00
284,481
386,187
527,260.48
Duty on Imported Tobacco
...
Duty on Tobacco Manufactured Locally
Retailer's License Fee
$ 1,336,385.92 588,727.48
13,191.00
Licensed Warehouse Fee
Manufacturer's License Fee
Importer's License Fee
Licensed Warehouse Overtime Fee
Tobacco Storage Fee
Less Refund of Tobacco Duty
Grand Total
975.00
792.00
488.00
90.00
73.64
Total.
$ 1,940,723.04 14,711.29
...
$ 1,926,011.75
NOTE:- Fractions of a pound are not shown in this Table,
E 10
E 11
Table V.
Total amount of Prepared Opium sold during the year 1927.
Old Hong Kong Bengal Opium
Blue Label Opium
Red Label Opium
Kamshan Opium
Total
133,667.4 Taels
117,770.64
26,470.46
""
14,922.0
292,830.5 Taels
Table VIA.
Statement of Opium Transhipped during 1927.
Persian
Turkish
Total
chests.
chests.
chests.
From Bombay........
500
500
Port Said
20
20
"}
Total......
500
20
520
Persian chests.
Turkish chests.
Total chests.
To Keelung
"y
Dalny......
Yokohama
100
100
400
400
20
20
""
Total......
500
20
520
E 12
Table VIB.
Statement of Opium in Transit during 1927.
Turkish
Total
chests.
chests.
From Port Said
149
149
"
Constantinople
40
40
Total.....
189
189
To Yokohama
"}
Dalny
Tokio.
"
Total......
Turkish
Total
chests.
chests.
87
588
87
80
80
22
22
189
189
Table VII.
CONTRABAND SEIZED BY THE I. AND E. DEPT.
OPIUM,
*Prepared
*Raw
ARMS.
Ammunition
Pistols and Revolvers
TOBACCO.
European
Chinese
Cigarettes
Cigars
LIQUOR.
Chinese Spirits
European Wines and Spirits
DANGEROUS DRUGS.
Heroin
Heroin Pills
13,227.9 taels 17,843 taels
28,606 rounds
100
10 pounds 188 pounds
.224,278 200
3,972 gallons
3 gallons
560 ounces
39,756 pills
*Excluding small quantities seized in numerous cases by the officers
engaged on the suppression of divans.
7
}
E 13
Table VIII.
CONVICTIONS OBTAINED.
(a)—Opium Ordinance.
Divan Smok- keeping.
Possess
Forged
Boiling.
Total.
ing.
ion.
Labels.
Hong Kong,
1,113
3,902
64
558
3
5,640
Kowloon,
517
1,871
99
546
3,035
New Territory,
1
5
1
3
10
Grand Total,
1,631
5,778
164 1.107
10
8,685
(3.)—Tobacco Ordinance.
26
(c.)-Liquor Ordinance.
Hong Kong...
New Territory
(d.)-Gambling Ordinance.
2
(e.)-Arms Ordinance.
10
.78
2
(f)-Dangerous Drugs Ordinance.
3
(9.)-Coinage Offences Ordinance.
3
*Note: This total include approximately 2,500 smokers in divans whose
bail was estreated.
Table IX.
Classified List of Total Opium Seizures 1927.
Number of Seizures.
Taels
Seized.
Prepared Opium, Chinese
1,981
15,509.13
Macao
73
1,277.40
""
Kwong Chow Wan Amoy
20
2,873.30
8
4,798.80
Hong Kong
22
29.69
Opium Dross, all kinds
Dross Opium, all kinds
Raw Opium, Chinese
17
Opium Matter
Opium Solution
322
409.05
312
78.94
174
20,746.47
Bengal
Persian
3
3,655.00
62.00
1.10
Pints seized.
116
119.5
E 14
Table X.
Fines and Forfeitures collected by the Courts under Opium, Liquor and Tobacco Ordinances.
Hong Kong Magistracy
Kowloon Magistracy
District Office, North
District Office, South
Table XI.
$ 69,352.43
29,122.30
978.00
1,433.60
$100,886.93
Rewards Paid.
For Opium, Drugs, Liquor and Tobacco
$74,550.10
Table XII.
Importation of Dangerous Drugs during the year 1927.
Tinet Opium
30 lbs.
Opium Powder and Preparations containing ......810 grains
Preparations containing Echyl Morphine
Hydrochloride
Preparations containing Morphine
Preparations containing Cocaine
Morphine Salts
Cocaine Salts
.264
1
663
.150
.223 oz.
.203
""
Heroin Hydrochloride
1011,,
:
ས་
Table XIII.
The Chief Seizures of Opium during the year 1927.
Place, Boat or Ship.
Amount in
Taels.
Kind.
Origin.
Destination.
Remarks.
S.S. Ko Chow.
Connaught Rd. West.
{
1,050
Raw.
50
Prepared.
}
Wuchow.
Hong Kong.
110
Prepared.
Boat 317
155
""
Wing Lok St. Wharf.
176
Raw.
13
""
23, Sharp St. East, 1st
floor
262
>>
>>
S.S. Tai Hing
500
""
>>
S.S. Wing Hung
112
Junk B1758Y.
200
Junk 4089 W
1,260
S.S. Wo Kwai
{
720
Prepared.
Raw.
Prepared.
Raw.
""
295
Prepared.
}
S.S. Kwong Ying
120
Raw.
""
}}
S.S. Shing On
520
""
S.S. Chung On Junk 2898W
S.S. Cremer
140 Prepared.
1,340
Amoy.
Singapore.
100
Raw.
Amoy.
Wuchow.
""
Singapore.
Hong Kong.
Fore hold under cargo.
A carrier, in waist band. Importer unknown.
A carrier, import ship unknown.
Importing ship unknown. Fore hold.
In one of the ship's boats. Importing ship unknown. Importing ship unknown. Under cargo forehold.
In latrine.
Chinese Saloon linings. In a bag on deck.
Importing ship unknown.
In carpenter's tools-imitation.
>>
-E 15-
Table XIII.-Continued.
The Chief Seizures of Opium during the year 1927,-Continued.
Place, Boat or Ship.
Amount in
Taels.
Kind.
Origin.
Destination.
Remarks.
Forepeak.
False sides built in junk. Importing ship unknown. Came off Wing On.
Placed in cook-house under sink.
Importing ship unknown.
Thrown over from Sui Tai.
Came off the Hai Ching.
In bunker.
Chinese saloon linings.
Thrown over board off Tung Ku Light. Came down in San Ning from Wuchow. Chinese saloon linings.
140
Raw.
S.S. Kwong Foon
Wuchow.
Hong Kong.
78 Prepared.
Junk 2066V
2,676
Raw.
Indian.
"}
Junk B956V
500
Wuchow.
Junk A2950V
230
53, Jervois St., 1st floor...
233
""
Sea bed at Chung Sha
Wan
970
??
Junk 2555V
172
""
Douglas Wharf
140
Prepared. Kwong Chow
Wan.
Macao.
Kwong Chow
Wan.
Macao.
Amoy.
"1
"
"}
260
""
Hai Ching
>>
360
Raw.
"
Chung On
475
Prepared.
Wuchow.
""
Kwong Ying
500
Raw.
>"
>>
Hoi On Wharf
980
""
Wing Hung
840
""
""
- E 16 -
+
Place.
Table XIV.
Seizures of Dangerous Drugs during the year 1927.
Substance
amount.
Origin.
Destination.
S.S. Atsuta. Maru
Heroin Hydrochloride
Switzerland
Shanghai
560 ounces
Chiu On Wharf and 2, Tsung Hing Lane
39,700
Heroin Pills
Unknown
113, Jervois Street
56
Heroin Pills
Unknown
Remarks.
E 17
Concealed in false back of a Wardrobe Trunk. One man and one woman convicted. Woman had accompanied trunk from Marseilles and man had come to Hong Kong from Shanghai to arrange for landing the drug in that port.
A possession case. 9,000 found in a house in Hong Kong and 30,700 were being landed. from an unknown steamer. One woman convicted.
A possession case. Believed to be a sample of a large consignment. One man con- victed.
1
Appendix F.
REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR
OF THE ROYAL OBSERVATORY, HONG KONG,
FOR THE YEAR 1927.
I.-GROUNDS AND BUILDINGS.
The grounds were kept in order by the Botanical and Forestry Department. The paths, which were badly damaged by the floods of May, July and August, were repaired by the Public Works Department in November. Attempts were made to prevent the roof of the main building from leaking, but without success.
Magnetic Station at Au Tau.-The buildings for the new Magnetic Station at Au Tau were completed in March. The co-ordinates of the pier used for absoluté measures of magnetic declination and horizontal force are:-
Latitude 22°. 26′ 50′′.6 N.
Longitude 114°. 2′ 40′′.5 E.
A description of the buildings and instruments will be given in the first Bulletin of magnetic observations.
The site chosen in 1924 was about 150 yards to the east of the Au Tau Police Station but objections to its use as a magnetic station were raised by the Chinese of a neighbouring village. Another site, in view of the Police Station, was there- fore chosen in my absence; but the Chinese again objected and in deference to their wishes the present site, about 30 yards to the NNW, was adopted; the offending buildings being obscured from the village by a small hillock. Unfortunately it is also obscured from the Police Station; moreover there is no suitable azimuth mark visible from the observing hut; a pipe on a house about a mile to westward is available in clear weather, but for use in misty weather a mark has been painted on rising ground 50 yards to westward.
Underground Chamber for Seismograph and Clocks.-The diurnal inequality of temperature in the underground chamber continues to be negligible, its automatic registration has there- fore been discontinued. The annual range in 1927 amounted to 11°.6 as against 9°.1 in 1926.
The humidity also shows no appreciable diurnal inequality, but is seriously affected by large changes in the open air. The annual range in 1927 was 42%, the same as in 1926. Automatic registration was discontinued at the end of the year.
F 2
In the following table the mean monthly temperature and humidity in the Underground Chamber are compared with the temperature and humidity in the Open Air.
Mean Monthly Temperature and Relative Humidity in the Underground Chamber and in the Open Air, during the year 1927.
In Underground Chamber.
In the Open Air.
Month 1927.
Excess of Under- ground Chamber over Open Air.
Temper- Relative Temper- ature Humidity ature
Relative Temper- | Relative Humidity ature Humidity
O
%

%
January,.. 70'7 February,. 68.7
66
59'7
74
+110
8
69
58.5
78
+10°2
9
March,.....
67.7
April,
68.8
May,
72.1
June,
75'7
July,
78.1
August,...
79'2
September 79°3
Nã ã ã 066
73
60'I
80
+ 76
7
87
67°2
84
+ 1.6
+ 3
96
75-6
86
3.5
+10
97
81.6
84
5'9
+13
95
819
84
P
3.8
+11
95
82.1
85
2.9
+io
88
80
+8
79°3
:
October,.. 77.8
74.8
+ 3.0
November, 76.2 December, 74.0
65
71'0
64
+ 5.2
0∞ +-
65.5
72
+ 8.5
II. METEOROLOGICAL INSTRUMENTS.
Barometers.-The Marvin compensated barometer worked satisfactorily during the year. On January 13 the coil of the combined buzzer and hourly time-mark apparatus was burnt out, owing to the tongue of the relay sticking. When repaired separate coils were provided for the time-mark apparatus and the buzzer, with more satisfactory results.
The station barometer No. 1323 and the large Casella barometer were compared with the Observatory Standard on June 23 and December 3.
Beckley Anemograph.-This instrument was oiled and the orientation of the vane checked once a month.
Dines-Baxendell Anemograph.-This instrument was dis- mantled on January 14. The cistern was cleaned, fresh distilled water provided and a film of liquid paraffin poured on the water before inserting the float, in order to prevent evaporation inside and outside the float.
F 3
The action of the float having become unusually sluggish at low wind velocities, on April 12 a buzzer was fitted so as to vibrate the spindle of the float every minute. This however had no appreciable effect. The instrument was therefore again dismantled on May 19. It was found that the liquid paraffin had mixed with the water and so caused the float to stick. The mixture was poured away and replaced by fresh distilled water, on which was poured sufficient kerosene to make a very thin surface film. The performance of the instrument has since been more satisfactory. The action of the buzzer is now to bring the float gradually to its correct position when, in nearly calm weather, it tends to stick. This may take several hours to achieve.
23.
The instrument was calibrated on February 15 and August
The mean monthly results of comparisons with the records of the Beckley Anemograph from 1910-1926 are given in the following table, together with the results for 1927:-
Factor for converting the actual run of the Beckley Anemograph
cups to velocities recorded by the Dines Pressure
Tube Anemograph.
Factor (Dines Beckley).
3
Month.
Mean 1910-1926.
1927.
January, February,
I'94
1'97
1.88
2.22
March,
2°02
2.56
April,.
2'04
2.68
May,
2.17
2.83
June,
2.10
2.75
July,
2.23
2.60
Angust,.
2.20
2.79
September,
2'22
2'14
October,....
2.12
2.17
November,
2'00
2°27
December,
1.92
214
Year..
2.08
2.42
Thermometers.--All thermometers in use are compared with
Kew Standard No. 647 in winter and summer.
F 4
III.-METEOROLOGICAL OBSERVATIONS AT THE OBSERVATORY.
Automatic records of the temperature of the air and evaporation were obtained with a Richard dry and wet bulb thermograph, and of the direction and velocity of the wind with a Beckley and a Dines-Baxendell anemograph, modified as described in the report for 1912. The amount of rain is re- corded automatically by a Nakamura pluviograph and the amount of sunshine by two Campbell-Stokes universal sunshine recorders. Eye observations of barometric pressure, temperature of the air and of evaporation and the amount of cloud are made at each hour of Hong Kong Standard time. The character and direction of the motion of the clouds are observed every three hours. Daily readings are taken of self-registering maximum and minimum thermometers.
Principal features of the Weather. The principal features of the weather in 1927 were:-
(a) Rainfall very considerably above normal in May and considerably above normal in July and August. 6.01 inches fell from May 6 to 8 and 15.75 inches from May 17 to 24.
(b) Temperature considerably below normal in March and April and considerably above in November and December.
(c) A typhoon which passed a few miles to the South of Hong Kong in the morning of July 25, causing a moderate gale. Another typhoon which passed a few miles to the South of Gap Rock in the morning of August 20, causing a violent gale at Hong Kong.
Barometric Pressure was persistently below normal from January to August, and again in November and December. In September it was considerably above normal and in October moderately above. The mean pressure for the year at station level (109 feet above sea level) was 29.830 ins. as against 29.857 ins. in 1926 and 29.842 for the past 44 years. The highest pressure was 30.305 ins. on February 7 as against 30.384 ins. in 1926 and 30.509 ins. for the past 44 years. The lowest pressure was 28.927 ins. on July 25 as against 29.229 ins. in 1926 and 28.590 ins. for the past 44 years.
The temperature of the air was considerably below normal in March and April and considerably above in November and December. The mean temperature for the year was 71°.4 as against 71.6 in 1926 and 71°.8 for the past 44 years. The highest temperature was 93°.1 on August 19, as against 92°.5 in 1926 and 97°.0 for the past 44 years. The lowest temperature was 45°.9 on February 7, as against 43°.2 in 1926 and 32°.0 for the past 44 years.
1
L
F 5-
The rainfall was very considerably above normal in May and considerably above normal in July and August. The total for the year was 107.86 ins. as againts 100.78 ins. in 1926 and 86.06 ins. for the past 44 years. The greatest fall in one civil day was 7.25 ins. on May 23 as against 21.02 ins. in 1926; the highest on record. The greatest fall in one hour was 2.10 ins. between 12th. and 13th. on May 1, as against 3.96 ins. in 1926; also the highest on record.
The wind velocity was normal in April and December, but below normal in every other month; considerably in October and November. The mean velocity for the year was 11.7 m.p.h. as against 12.2 m.p.h. in 1926 and 12.5 m.p.h. for the past 44 years.
The maximum velocity for one hour, as recorded by the Beckley anemograph, was 83 m.p.h. at 14h. and 16h. on August 20, as against 75 miles in 1926 and 108 miles for the past 44 years. The maximum squall velocity, as recorded by the Dines-Baxendell anemograph, was at the rate of 116 m.p.h. at 15h. 23m. on August 20 as against 101 m.p.h. in 1926 and 130 m.p.h. for the past 18 years.
The relative humidity was slightly above normal in January and February, and from May to September. In December it was considerably above normal. The mean relative humidity for the year was 78% as against 79% in 1926 and 77% for the past 44 years. It frequently exceeded 95% and the lowest for the year was 24% on December 9 as against 17% in 1926 and 4% for the past 44 years.
Rainfall at four Stations.-In the following table the monthly rainfall for the year 1927 at the Observatory is com- pared with the fall at the Police Station, Tai Po; the Botanical Gardens; and the Matilda Hospital, Mount Kellet:-
Month,
Observatory Police Station
(Kowloon). (Taipo).
Matilda
Botanical
Gardens Hospital (Hong Kong).(Hong Kong)
inches.
inches.
inches.
inches.
January,
0.310
C'13
044
0'41
February,
4'350
4'64
4.66
3°33
March,
4'535
6.48
4'90
4'95
April,
7.125
7.81
8.08
6.70
May,
25*445
15.82
26.88
19°23
June,
11.680
9.64
13.29
9°32
July,
18.735
29.64
21.85
16.71
August,
20.905
8.66
23°37
13711
September...
6.165
5*44
6.59
+41
October,
5°420
4'53
6.46
5.52
November,
1.825
2.20
1.32
0'50
December,
1.370
0'20
2'27
1.90
Year....
107.865
95'19
120 11
86.09
Period.
F 6
Floods. The heaviest rainfall occurred at the Observatory
as follows:-
Amount.
Duration.
Greatest fall
in 1 hour.
Amount.
Time.
d.
h.
d. h.
inches.
hours.
inches.
d. h.
May 6
1
to
May 8 2
5.92
14
164 May
May ...17
14
to
May 25
15.75
53
1.89
May 23 2
June 7 2
to
June 10 14
6.28
56
0.62
June 7
June...30 5
to
July 2
19
8.51
26
1 40
June 30 23
July...24 17 to
July 26 10
5.84
35
0.75
July
26 5
Aug....20 5 to Aug....29 17 to
Aug. 21 8
8.33
26
1 28
Aug. 20 16
Aug. 31 13
4.53
17
1.62
Landslides and floods were caused by these rains.
Aug. 30 2
The wireless mast at the Observatory was struck by lightning during a thunder storm on August 10. The operator was thrown out of his chair.
Typhoons. The tracks of 19 typhoons and 21 of the principal depressions which occurred in the Far East in 1927 are given in two plates in the Monthly Meteorological Bulletin for December, 1927.
A typhoon passed a few miles to the South of the Observatory on a WNW track on the morning of July 25. By this time its violence had abated, however. It produced only a moderate gale at Hong Kong. Another typhoon which passed about 70 miles, to the South of the Observatory in the forenoon of August 20, on a westerly track, produced a violent gale at Hong Kong. The maximum squall velocity was at the rate of 116 m.p.h. at 15h. 23m. A typhoon formed to the North of the Paracels on the morning of November 20. It approached Hong Kong but filled up on reaching the land. The maximum squall velocity was at the rate of 74 m.p.h, at 12h. 27m. A depression formed near Pratas on the morning of August 30 and pansed between Hong Kong and Gap Rock in the afternoon. The wind velocity increased from 11 m.p.h. at 13h. to 28 m.p.h. at 14h, and a squall at the rate of 57 m.p.h. occurred at 14h. 23m. By 19th. it was dead calm.
IV.-PUBLICATIONS.
Daily Weather Report and Map.-A weather map of the Far East, for 6 a.m. of the 120th. meridian time, is constructed daily and lithographed at the Observatory. On the verso is printed the morning weather report, from about 40 stations in China, Indo-China, Japan, Borneo and the Philippines, and a weather forecast for the following districts:
1. Formosa Channel.
2. S. E. Coast of China between Hong Kong and
Lamocks.
3. Hong Kong to Gap Rock.
4.
S. Coast of China between Hong Kong and Hainan.
F 7
This publication is exhibited on notice boards at the Hong Kong and Kowloon Ferry Piers, the Harbour Office, at the offices of the Cable Companies and, since November 18, at the General Post Office. It is also distributed to subscribers to the "Daily Bulletin" and to various officials. Copies are sent weekly to the Hydrographic Office, Bangkok. A weather map tor 2 p.m. of the 120th meridian time is also constructed daily. It is not published but an evening weather report and forecast based thereon is telephoned to the morning papers and exhibited on the notice boards.
The service of daily weather broadcasts, formerly undertaken by Cape d'Aguilar, was transferred to the Observatory W/T Station on April 1. This station now broadcasts meteorological observations from 26 stations in the Far East at 0400 G.M.T. and from 19 stations at 1200 G.M.T. with repetitions at 0500 and 1300 G.M.T. All on 800 metres I.C.W. The transmitter being of the valve type, 1.5 kilo-watts. It also listens on 800 metres.
The change from 600 to 800 metres was made on account of the jamming on 600 metres. The experiment has not been very successful, however. Some ships cannot send on 800 metres and the range of the Observatory Station is smaller than that of Cape d'Aguilar. Hence the number of observations received from ships was considerably less in 1927 than in 1926. It is proposed however to continue the experiment for at least another typhoon season.
A circular is being issued drawing attention to the fact that the Observatory Station, in accordance with the latest practice, is sharply tuned, and it is hoped that this will induce ships' operators to persevere in their efforts to communicate with the Observatory. It is also anticipated that as the existence of the Station becomes more generally known, the number of weather reports will increase.
Typhoon warnings are broadcast by Cape d'Aguilar on a 600 metre spark, and repeated on 800 metres I.C.W. by the Observatory Station at 18 minutes past every hour and also on 300 metres telephony at 48 minutes past every hour.
V.-WEATHER TELEGRAMS, FORECASTS AND STORM WARNINGS.
Daily Weather Telegrams.-In addition to the ordinary 6h. and 14h. observations, which the Cable Companies transmit free of charge, the 11h. and 17h. observations were received at half rates from the following stations:
Shanghai Gutzlaff
Amoy
Macao Lao Kay Yunnan
Phu-lien Tourane
Cape St. James.
The 6 a.m. observations from Pelew were received regularly by radio-telegraphy until May 27, and from October 21. Since when the 6 a.m. observations at Saipan and Ponape have been included in the message.
F 8-
Extra Weather Telegrams.-The following stations send extra weather telegrams at half rates during typhoons, on receipt of certain code words from Hong Kong:-Amoy, Canton, Macao, Phulien, Sharp Peak and Taihoku. The Director of the Philip- pines Weather Bureau also sends extra telegrams, at his discretion, from Aparri or some other station nearer the typhoon centre. The 9 p.m. observations from Swatow, kindly sanctioned by the Chinese Telegraph Administration, were occasionally received the same evening, but usually on the next or following day.
The Director of the Taihoku Observatory sends extra weather telegrams from the two stations in Formosa nearest to the centre during the passage of a typhoon.
Weather Telegrams from Ships by Radio.-The following table gives the monthly number of ships from which radio meteorological messages have been received, and the number of messages received (each arrival and departure is counted separately):-
British (including H.M. Ships).
Other National- Total
ities.
H.M.S. in ports.
Month.
January,... February, March,. April, May, June, July, August,
September,
October,
November,
December,
w w t t t A Y‡‡N
225
15
259
198
158
682
44
147
14
285 62
180
120
612
44
179
19
259 45
204
108 642
121 20
194 23
80 65
380
124 12
146 26
109
80 379
45
131
$
83 26
69
79
283
48
129
9
113 33 87
90 329
44
117
9
87 31
109
84
313
46
182 II
140 31
107
88 429
48
198
4
94 39 112
101
404
39
106 8
36
143
15
[1927,
544
29 100 76 296
18 46 69 277
1802 154 1838 435| 1386 1133 5026
1926, 1058* 5216*
:
831 2376 1889 8883
752 1762 1439 3961
요이
88
Totals 1925,
687
2199
1924, .:::::
665
1703
1923,
196
409
...
852 1667 1517 3370
431 698
627 1107
* British, including H.M. Ships.
- F 9
It will be seen that the number of British ships sending these messages decreased from 1058 in 1926 to 698 in 1927. The number of ships of other nationalities decreased from 831 to 435.
During the first three months of the year 1927 (before the service was taken over by the Observatory W/T Station) the number of British ships sending was 227 as against 232 in the first three months of 1926, and the number of ships of other nationalities was 179 as against 162 in 1926.
On April 1 Stonecutters W/T Station ceased to be available for the reception of meteorological observations from H.M. ships. The latter were accordingly instructed to transmit the observa- tions direct to the Observatory station. The result of the order was that no observations were received from H. M. ships, except from those stationed at Swatow and Canton, or at sea a short distance from Hong Kong. On July 21 this was reported to the Naval Authorities, who, after investigation found it pos- sible to suspend the order, temporarily. Meteorological observa- tions from H.M. ships are now being received via Stonecutters as well as by the Observatory station.
Father Gherzi, of the Zikawei Observatory, after patient experiment and with the utmost good will, has recently inaugurated a short wave broadcast service, by which we obtain ai 9h. 45m, the 6h. observations from 7 stations on the Yangtze and North China. The thanks of all concerned are due to Father Gherzi for these valuable observations.
The Meteorological Authorities at Pratas continue to send, with commendable regularity and promptitude, their 6h., 11h., 14h, and 17h, observations and the 6h. observations from some Philippine stations. They also send hourly observations during the passage of a typhoon.
On 1928, January 15 and 18, observations from 12 stations in the Korean réseau were received via Pratas.
It is very desirable that these observations should be received regularly, direct by Cape d'Aguilar.
The 6 a.m. and 2 p.m. observations from Phu-lien, Tourane, Cape St. James and Kwong Chow Wan, are received by radio-telegraphy via Hanoi. The morning message contains also the 4 p.m. observations of the previous day from Lao Kay and Yunnan, and the evening message contains the 10 a.m. observations of the same day from these stations. A request has recently been sent for observations from Donghoi and Nhatrang, as data from these stations would increase the accuracy and utility of the weather map.
- F 10
The Japanese Authorities have not yet found it possible to adopt the Hong Kong 6-letter Code in their daily weather telegrams. We are still being deprived, therefore, of temperature and weather data from the Japanese réseau.
Results of Weather Forecasts.-The results of comparison of the daily weather forecasts with the weather subsequently experienced are given below, together with the results of the previous five years:-
Year.
Complete Partial Success. Success.
Partial
Total
Failure.
Failure.
%
%
1922"
'67
30
1923
66
30
1924
71
24
1925
62
34
1926
72
26
wwww www.de
%
%
3
3
5
1927
70
26
olo о могу оооо
The forecast comprises wind direction, wind force, and weather. Complete success means correct in three elements. Partial success means correct in only two elements. Partial failure means correct in only one element. Total failure means correct in no element.
The method of analysis is described in the 1918 Report.
Storm Warnings.-The symbols of the China Seas Storm Signal Code are displayed on Kowloon Signal Hill and on the roof of No. 49 Godown of the Hong Kong and Kowloon Wharf and Godown Co.
The following Ports are warned by a telegraphic adaptation of the code:-Sharp Peak, Swatow, Amoy, Santuao, Macao, Canton, Wuchow, Phulien, Taihoku, Manila, Labuan and Singapore. 186 storm warnings were sent in 1927. 154 were received from Manila, and 188 from Zikawei. The corresponding numbers in 1926 were 156, 110 and 106 respectively.
At the request of the Director of Indian Observatories arrangements were made with the Eastern Extension Telegraph Co., in 1925 to send warnings to Simla of any typhoon passing westward over Indo-China. Only three such warnings were necessary during the year; namely, on July 27, September 20 and October 7. The warnings are now sent to Calcutta to which station the service has been transferred.
F 11
The Day Signals of the Local Code are displayed at the
following stations:-
Royal Observatory
H.M.S. "Tamar"
Gough Hill
Standard Oil Co.,
Lai Chi Kok
Harbour Office.
Green Island
Hong Kong and Kowloon Wharf & Godown Co.,
Kowloon.
Field Officer's Quarters,
Lyemun.
The Night Signals are displayed at sunset, at the following
stations:
Royal Observatory
H.M.S. "Tamar" Gough Hill
Harbour Office
Railway Station
They have the same signification as the day signals.
A translation of both Day and Night Signals is displayed at the General Post Office and at the Upper Tram Station.
When Local Signals are displayed in the Harbour signals are displayed at out stations as follows:-
When No. 1 Signal is displayed in the Harbour.
Red T by day.
2 Red Lights vertically by night.
When Nos. 2 to 7 Signals are displayed in the Harbour.
Black Cone by day.
2 Green Lights vertically by night.
These Signals will be displayed at the following
Stations:
Aberdeen Cheung Chow
Gap Rock
Ping Shan Stanley Shaukiwan
Saikung Shataukok
Tai Po
Tsun Wan
Tai O
Waglan
F 12
In the following table are given the number of times and number of hours the local signals were hoisted in each of the years 1923-1927:—
Red Signals.
Black Signals.
Bombs.
Year.
Number of times.
Number of hours
Number
Number
Number of times.
of hours
displayed.
displayed.
of times fired.
1923
ΙΙ
181
1924
IO
186
1925
1926 1927
10 10:00
5
128
50 169
0 +3 +
8
252
4
85
2
57
4
103
I
61
I
The figures in the above table include the number of hours that night signals, corresponding to the day signals, were hoisted.
The red signal indicates that a depression or typhoon exists which may possibly cause a gale at Hong Kong within 24 hours. The black signals indicate that a gale is expected at Hong Kong.
Three bombs fired at intervals of 10 seconds indicate that wind of typhoon force is anticipated..
Arrangements were made early in the year for the more rapid dissemination of typhoon warnings by telephone. The Observatory now warns 6 Stations, 3 of which are distributing Stations. Of these one warns 7 stations, 3 of which are dis- tributing stations. Of the latter, one warns 11 stations, 2 of which are distributing stations. In all 86 stations or officials are warned.
VI.-METEOROLOGICAL OBSERVATIONS FROM SHIPS,
TREATY PORTS, &c.
Logs received.-In addition to meteorological registers kept at about 40 stations in China, meteorological logs were received from 169 ships operating in the Far East. These logs, represent- ing 7,221 days' observations have been utilised for amplifying the weather maps and verifying typhoon tracks. The corres- ponding figures for the year 1926 were 230 and 8,680.
Comparison of Barometers.-The corrections to ships' barometers are usually obtained by comparing their readings while at Hong Kong with those of the Observatory Standard. Occasionally ship captains bring their barometers to the Observa- tory to be compared with the Observatory Standard.
F 13
VII.-MAGNETIC OBSERVATIONS.
Magnetic horizontal force, declination, and dip are observed at the observatory once a month. In the dip observations 4 needles are used in rotation, the result for each month being the mean of determinations with two needles.
In the following table are given the annual values of the magnetic elements in 1927, as derived from observations made the magnetic hut with magnetometer Elliott 83 and dip circle Dover 71:-
Declination (West)
0.31.7
Dip (North)
30.39.9
Horizontal Force (C.G.S. unit)
0.37376
Vertical Force (C.G.S. unit)
0.22161
Total Force (C.G.S. unit)
0.43452
Monthly determinations of horizontal force and declination have been made at the new Magnetic Station, Au Tau, simultaneously with those at the Royal Observatory from March to December inclusive, the new Magnetometer (Cooke Troughton and Simms No. 31) being utilised for the purpose.
The results (mean for 10 months) are:-
Declination (West)
0.44.4
Horizontal Force (C.G.S. unit)
0.37433
No observations of dip were made as the inductor received in 1926 had to be returned for repair. It was not received back until late in the year and several difficulties had to be overcome before the instrument could be brought into regular
use.
A comparison of the two magnetometers was made at the Royal Observatory during January and February, and indicates that a correction of 9y is necessary to reduce the horizontal force results by the Cooke instrument to those of Elliott No. 83. No appreciable difference was found in declination determina- tions.
F 14
The Au Tau Station is 27 miles by road from the Royal Observatory. Owing to time spent in travelling, necessary reconstruction of piers, difficulties with electric light, and alteration to the magnetic apparatus the requisite adjustments have only recently been completed. It is hoped to commence registration in February, 1928. Transport to Au Tau has been mainly furnished by the Railway Department during the year but this is not entirely satisfactory as a car cannot always be obtained at short notice.
VIII.-TIME SERVICE.
Time Ball.-The Time Ball on Kowloon Signal Hill is dropped at 10h. and 16h, daily, except on Saturdays when it is dropped at 10h, and 13h. and on Sundays and Holidays when it is dropped at 10h. only (120th Meridian Time).
The Ball is hoisted half mast at the 55th minute and full mast at the 57th minute. If the ball fails to drop at the correct time it is lowered at 5 minutes past the hour and the ordinary routine repeated at the following hour, if possible.
Time Signals are also given at night by means of three white lamps mounted vertically on the Observatory radio mast. The lights are extinguished momentarily every second from 20h. 55m. to 21h., except at the 28th, 54th, 55th, 56th, 57th, 58th and 59th seconds, of each minute. The 21h. signals were repeated at midnight on December 31st, the last signal indicat- ing the close of the year 1927. The hours refer to Hong Kong Standard Time (8 hours East of Greenwich).
The Time Ball was dropped successfully 659 times. There was one failure, on May 17th at 10h. owing to an electrical defect; the ball was successfully dropped at 11h. however. The ball was not raised on August 20th and August 30th at 10h. or 16h, owing to high wind; also on August 23rd owing to electrical defects.
The error of the Time Ball due to the accumulated error of the standard clock during cloudy periods was0s.8 on January 11th.; Os.6 on January 13th. and Os.4 on August 19th; it was 1s.6, +0s.4 and 1s.1, due to over correction of the mean time clock on July 4d. 10h, October 17d. 16h. and December 2d. 10h. respectively. error was Os.3 or less. The sign was late.
On all other occasions the indicates that the Time Ball
F 15
The probable error of the time ball in each month of the past five years is given in the following table:-
Probable Error of the Time Ball.
Month.
1923
1924
1925
1926 1927
January,
+0.16
±0.26
±0.38
±0.13
±0.14
February,
14
*13
*22
*18
*I 2
March,
*I I
*17
*22
'II
'I I
April......
*18
*27
*16
*13
•10
May,
*13
*23
'I I
⚫IO
14
June,
*21
*27
*IO
*10
13
July,
'I 2
*21
*10
'10
'10
August,
*28
16
*12
10
"I2
September,
*24
*13
'10
*10
'IO
October,
*15
*18
*12
*I I
I
November,
'21
*14
*10
*IO
'10
December,
*13
*12
ΙΟ
*13
13
Means,
±0.17
±0.19 ±0.15 10*12 ±0*12
·Time Signals by Radio-Telegraphy.—In addition to the time signals given by the Time Ball, and on the radio mast, signals are broadcast at 10h. and 21h. by radio-telegraphy, via Stonecutters until March 31 and subsequently via Cape D'aguilar. Particulars of the programme
are given in Government Notifications Nos. 428 of 6.8.26. and 111 of 25.2.27.
333 observations of the rhythmic radio time signals emitted by Nauen at 8h. a.m., Hong Kong Standard Time, have been made during the year and 81 observations of a similar signal emitted by Bordeaux at 4 p.m. Hong Kong Standard Time.
The observations have been utilized for clock regulation during cloudy weather and have been tabulated for longitude determinations. These cannot be completed until the errors of the time signals are received.
The results of observations made in 1926 are as follows:
Station.
No. of Observations.
Deduced Longitude of Hong Kong.
b.
m.
S.
Nauen
272
7. 36.
41.15 E
Bordeaux
125
7. 36. 41.29 E
******
F 16
From observations of the Bordeaux signals in October and November, 1926, differences of longitude between Hong Kong and 9 other observatories have been determined as follows:--
S.
1.68
Shanghai Washington
h. m. + 0.29.
12. 44. 56.95
Tsingtau
+ 0.24. 35.60
Helwan
5. 31. 19.35
Dehra Dun
2. 24. 29.39
Algiers
7. 24. 32.69
Athens
6. 1. 49.35
Paris
7. 27. 20.21
6. 22. 46.60
Cape of Good Hope
+Signifies E of Hong Kong
Signifies W of Hong Kong
Transit Instrument.-Routine transit and level observations were made by the Chinese computers throughout the year. The Collimation and Azimuth determinations and occasional transit observations were made by the Chief and First Assistants.
The number of observations in the years 1926 and 1927 was as follows:
Transits
Level determinations ......
1926 1927
1325 1156
689 566
Azimuth determinations (mark)
119
42
Azimuth determinations (transits
121
of circumpolar stars)
Collimation determinations (mark) 102
44
Clocks.-Sidereal clock Cottingham and Mercer, No. 507, has been in use as the Observatory Standard throughout the year. It stopped on February 19th owing to a defective bat- cery. The losing rate was altered before re-starting, and since that date has varied between Us.12 (on March 2nd and 26th) and + Us.53 (on October 13th) corresponding to variations of pressure in the clock case.
The Sidereal clock, Dent 39741, was cleaned and the rate altered on August 17. Since that date, its rate has been altered as found necessary to keep its error approximately the same as Cottingham.
The Mean Time clock, Leroy 1350, was used for dropping the Time Ball, maintaining the electric time service in the Observatory, and sending hourly signals to the Railway, the
F 17
Post Office, the Telephone Co., and the Eastern Extension. Telegraph Co. The clock is corrected daily before 10h. and 16h. by the electric regulating apparatus. The daily rate of the pendulum is kept below 0.5 sec. by the addition or withdrawal of weights. Mean Time clock Dent, 39740, has been corrected daily and its rate regulated as in the case of Leroy 1350.
Batteries, Power Supply, &c.-The necessary current for the Time Service has been supplied by accumulator batteries, charged as found necessary from the alternating mains of the China Light and Power Co., Ltd., by the rotary converter or the Tungar rectifier.
IX-MISCELLANEOUS.
Seismograph.-New mirrors were fitted to both components of the Milne-Shaw Seismograph. 202 earthquakes were recorded during the year as against 210 in 1926. A large earthquake was recorded on May, 23. The amptitude was greater than in the Japanese earthquake of 1923, August 31-September 1. The seismograms have been forwarded to the President of the Seismological Committee, Oxford.
Upper Air Research.-11 flights with pilot ballons were made during the year, supplemented by 2 from H.M.S. "Argus" (Lieut.-Commander A. E. Dodington, R.N.) and 16 temperature flights in sea planes were made by Lieut. -Commander H. S. Murray Smith, R.N., who also observed upper air wind direction and velocity on four occasions, by means of smoke bursts from H.M.S. "Hermes" when at sea. Lieut.-Commander Dodington similarly observed wind direction and velocity on 2 occasions at Wei Hai Wei and on 4 occasions between Wei Hại Wei and Hong Kong.
The following days were selected by the International Com- mission as days for international ascents. February 15-17, June 13-18 and October 17-22. October was chosen as the "inter- national month".
No balloon ascents were made from the Observatory on February 15-17 on account of cloud, but Lieut.-Commander Murray Smith secured temperature observations in a sea plane up to 14,400 feet on February 15 and up to 11,000 feet on February 16, under unfavourable conditions. On Febuary 17 conditions were too bad for flying.
By the end of April our stock of hydrogen was exhausted owing to leakage from the cylinders, and no funds were available for a further supply. Temperature flights were made by Lieut.- Commander Murray Smith, however, at Hong Kong on June 15-18 and by Lieut.-Commander Dodington, off Shanghai, on June 14-17.
F 18
The results of the Pilot balloon observations have been forwarded to the Secretary of the International Commission for the exploration of the upper air. The results of the temperature flights have been tabulated, but they are not sufficiently numerous for discussion at present.
On January 13 and 30 Commander A. L. Jackson, R.N., H. M. Survey Ship "Iroquois" and Lieut.-Commander H. V. Silk, R.N., H. M. Survey Ship "Herald", brought new pattern declinometers to be compared with the Observatory Standard. A report on the performance of each was furnished.
Visitors. A party from the Y.W.C.A. visited the Obser- vatory on March 16, the Ranger Company of Girl Guides on June 30, and 20 students of the Canton Middle School on October 14.
Naval Officers' Course of Meteorology.-Lieut.-Commander J. A. B. Willson, R.N. and Lieutenant G. A. M. Williams, R.N., of H.M.S. "Vindictive", took a course of meteorology at the Observatory between July 4 and August 22.
Air Route to Shanghai.-On November 24 Flying Officer R. Vanghan Williams R. A. F. came to interview the Director in connection with the establishment of an air route from Hong Kong to Shanghai.
Expenditure.-The annual expenditure on the Observatory for the past ten years is as follows:—
Year:
Total Expenditure.
Increase.
Decrease.
$
C.
$
$
C.
1918
20,028.24
6,862.26
1919
23,450.57
3,422.33
1920
25,965.66
2,515.09
1921
32,700.51
6,734.85
1922
38,350.10
5,649.59
1923
38,522.58
172.48
1924
52,638.49
14,115.91
******
1925
41,955.51
10,682.98
1926
45,158.87
3,203.36
1927
36,664.99
8,493.88
Acknowledgements.-Acknowledgements are here made to the Naval Authorities for their co-operation in securing daily observations from H.M. ships and upper air temperatures by means of sea planes; to the Directors of Weather Services in the Far East, and the Chinese Maritime Customs Authorities, for daily observations by cable and radio-telegraphy, and extra
F 19
observations during typhoon weather, to the Telegraph Com- panies for transmitting the majority of the observations free of charge, to the Commanders of vessels who have furnished meteorological observations by post and by radio-telegraphy, to the Directors of the various Observatories and Institutions, and private persons, who have presented their publications to the Library, and to the Observatory staff for the efficient manner in which they have carried out their respective duties. Special mention should be made of the services rendered by Messrs. Jeffries and Evans in mounting and adjusting the new magnetic instruments at Au Tau.
23rd February, 1928.
T. F. CLAXTON,
Director.
A
[
Appendix G.
REPORT OF THE REGISTRAR OF THE SUPREME COURT FOR THE YEAR 1927.
1.-ORIGINAL JURISDICTION.
Four hundred and ten (410) actions were instituted in this division of the Court during the year 1927, as against 515 in 1926. One hundred and eight five (185) were disposed of during the year and 80 were settled or withdrawn before trial as against 283 and 95 respectively in 1926.
The claims amounted to $6,669,108.43.
The debts and damages recovered amounted to $2,651,486.11 as against $4,159,824.74 in 1926.
The fees collected amounted to $18,760.80 as against $20,605.75 in 1926.
Tables setting out in detail the figures contained in this and the following paragraphs are printed at pages 01, 02, Y2 and Y3 of the Blue Book for the year 1927.
2.--SUMMARY JURISDICTION.
One thousand eight hundred and fifty seven (1,857) actions were instituted during the year as against 2,901 in 1926.
The cases were disposed of as follows:-Settled or with- drawn 447, Judgment for the Plaintiff 861, Judgment for the Defendant 46, Nonsuit 8, Struck off, Dismissed or Lapsed 47, and Pending 448; as against 867, 1,342, 71, 18, 54 and 549 respectively in 1926.
The claims amounted to $557,994.12 as against $728,417.75 in 1926, and the amounts recovered were $251,590.09 as against $353,745.39 in 1926.
The number of Rent Distress Warrants issued was 1,334 representing unpaid rents amounting to $307,287.79, of which $80,569.92 was recovered by enforced sales in 477 Warrants; as agains 1,623, $43,268.48 and $128,283.06 respectively in
1926.
Eight hundred and thirteen (813) Warrants were withdrawn on settlement between the parties as against 1,060 in 1926, and the remaining Warrants were cancelled or otherwise disposed of.
The fees collected amounted to $20,966.70 as against $28,253.60 in 1926.
G 2
3.-CRIMINAL JURISDICTION.
There were 112 cases and 199 persons committed for trial at the Criminal Sessions, as against 73 and 118 respectively in 1926.
The number of the persons actually indicted was 199 of whom 112 were convicted, 47 were acquitted, 39 discharged (case abandoned), and one bail forfeited. In 1926 the figures were respectively 118, 74, 18 and 25.
4.-APPELLATE JURISDICTION.
Ten Appeals were lodged during the year.
Of the ten, two were dismissed, none was granted, six are pending and the remaining two were withdrawn or settled.
5.-ADMIRALTY JURISDICTION.
Sixteen actions were instituted during the year.
One was tried, thirteen were settled and the others are pending.
The fees collected amounted to $650.25 as against $612.25 in 1926.
6.-BANKRUPTCY JURISDICTION.
Thirty nine (39) petitions were filed, 26 being creditors' petitions and 13 debtors' petitions. The figures for 1926 were respectively 56, 35 and 21.
The number of Receiving Orders made was 25, being 15 on creditors' petitions and 10 on debtors' petitions. The figures for 1926 were respectively 37, 26 and 11.
The number of Public Examinations held was 27 as against 19 in 1926. There were 15 Adjudications as against 37 in 1926.
There was one Scheme of Arrangement. Three petitions were withdrawn, one bankrupt obtained his discharge, 2 Receiving Orders were rescinded, 7 petitions were dismissed and 2 Adjudications annulled.
The estimated assets, in cases where Receiving Orders were made and not subsequently rescinded, were $449,097.52 and the estimated liabilities $2,788,520.55 as against $644,739.00 and $1,645,327.00 respectively in 1926.
The fees collected amounted to $6,414.90 as against $5,103.75 in 1926, and the Official Receiver's Commission as Trustee, where no Trustee had been appointed by the Creditors. was $14,960.87 as against $7,837.43 in 1926.
1
G 3
7.--PROBATE AND ADMINISTRATION.
Two hundred and ninety nine (299) grants were made by the Court being:-
Probate
Letters of Administration
Declarations for Commissioner
138
161
299
=
The figures in 1926 were respectively 120, 152 and 1.
Court fees amounted to $18,917.20 and Official Administra- tor's Commission to $393.04. The figures in 1926 were respectively $22,225.15 and $3,119.99.
At the end of the year, there were 269 Deceased Estates Accounts on the Court books. The invested funds for these Estates totalled $50,402.17 and the cash balances $74,901.56.
103 Accounts were closed during the year and 130 new Accounts were opened.
8.--OFFICIAL TRUSTS.
The number of Trust Estates in the hands of the Official Trustee at the end of the year was 22. The invested funds totalled $160,803.73 and the cash balances $17,964.86. No trust was wound up during the year and one new trust was opened.
The amount of commission collected was $151.02 as against $81.34 in 1926.
9.-REGISTRAR OF COMPANIES.
On the 31st December there were 512 companies on the Hong Kong Register, of which 61 were in course of liquidation. During the year 47 new companies were put on the Register and 33 struck off. One company was transferred from the Shanghai to the Hong Kong Register and no company from the Hong Kong to the Shanghai Register.
The fees collected in respect of "China" companies amounted to $125,196.99, and those in respect of other com- panies to $12,564.80.
One firm was registered under the Chinese Partnerships Ordinance, 1911, and no firm was registered under the Limited Partnerships Ordinance, 1912.
G 4
Deposits to the total value of $3,904,600 have been made by Insurance Companies under the Fire and Marine Insurance Companies Deposit Ordinance, 1917.
10. FEES AND COMMISSION,
The total sum collected during the year by way of fees and commission amounted to $96,254.96 as against $117,252.61 in the previous year.
11. STAFF.
Sir Henry C. Gollan, Kt. C.B.E., Chief Justice, was absent on long leave from 9th February to 12th October, and Mr. Justice Wood, Puisne Judge, acted as Chief Justice for this period.
Mr. J. H. B. Nihill, Cadet Officer, acted as Puisne Judge from 9th February to 15th March, and then left Colony on being transferred to Iraq.
Mr. P. Jacks, Land Officer, acted as Puisne Judge from 16th March to 12th October.
Mr. A. W. Hill, Head Bailiff, left Colony on 11th June on long leave prior to retirement on pension. Retired on 3rd October. Mr. J. Wiltshire, Principal Warder, acted as Head Bailiff from 1st September to 31st December.
Mr. E. L. Stainfield, Clerk and Usher, proceeded to Australia on long leave on 16th December, and Mr. R. Cunningham, Police Sergeant, acted as Clerk and Usher from that date to the end of the year.
Table showing total number of Cases dealt with and Expenditure and Revenue of the Supreme Court.
(From 1917 to 1927).
- G 5
Total
Expenditure
Revenue
Number
Percentage of Revenue
Year.
of cases
dealt with
to
Total
Increase Decrease
Total
Increase
Decrease Expenditure
C.
C.
$
$
$99
%
1917.
764
99,662.88
5,589.56
*48,334.81
8,384.81
48
1918.
931
98,281.40
1,381.48
*68,032.72 19,697.91
69
1919.
982
98,844.23
562.83
*61,305.87
6,726.85
62
1920.
872
113,082.79
14,238.56
*55,957.81
5,348.56
49
1921.
851
118,782.72
5,699.93
*58,830.97
2,873.66
49
1922.
827 126,424.34
7,641.62
*60,448.59 1,617.62
47
1923
962 128,838.62
2,414.28
*69,955.20 9,506.61
54
1924
1,549
136,136.63
7,298.07
*89,624.99
19,669.79
65
1925.
1,908
150,698.14
14,561.45
1926.
3,416 | 133,680.40
1927
2,267
141,493.29
7,812.89
*121,606.20 17,017.74*117,252.61
*Not including amounts paid direct to Treasury for fees in respect of Licences to keep Local Registers and China Companies Fees by the Registrar of Companies under the Companies Ordinances, 1911 and 1925.
31,981.21
80
4,353.59
87
*96,254.96
...
20,997.65
68
10TH FEBRUARY, 1928.
HUGH A. NISBET, Registrar, Supreme Court.
Appendix H.
REPORT OF THE POLICE MAGISTRATES' COURTS
FOR THE YEAR 1927.
(Victoria)
Mr. R. E. Lindsell acted as First Police Magistrate and Coroner from the 1st January to the end of the year.
Mr. W. Schofield acted as Second Police Magistrate from. the 1st January to 18th February.
Major C. Willson, O.B.E. acted as Second Police Magistrate from the 19th February to the end of the year in addition to his duties as First Clerk.
(Kowloon)
Mr. T. W. Ainsworth acted as Police Magistrate from the 1st January to 18th February.
Mr. W. Schofield acted as Police Magistrate Kowloon from 19th February to the end of the year.
Mr. W. F. Kerr acted as First Clerk throughout the year.
The number of cases was 32,122 as compared with 30,516 in 1926 and the Revenue was $223,811.97 as compared with $233,529.18 in 1926.
Table I shows the total number of cases tried and the Revenue and Expenditure of the Magistracy for the years 1918-1927.
Table II gives a return of punishments awarded in respect of different classes of offences during the year.
Table III give an abstract of cases under cognizance of the Police Magistrates' Courts during the year.
Table IV shows the number of offences under various Ordinances tried during the year.
Table V gives an abstract of cases brought under cognizance of the Police Magistrates' Courts during the last ten years.
R. E. LINDSELL,
First Police Magistrate.
2nd March, 1928.
Table I.
Table showing total. Number of Cases tried in, and Expenditure and Revenue of the Magistracy for the years 1918 to 1927.
EXPENDITURE.
REVENUE.
YEAR.
Total.
Increase.
Decrease. Total. Increase.
Decrease.
Total.
Number
of Cases
tried.
Percentage
of Ex-
penditure to Revenue.
–H 2 —
$
$
C.
$
1918.
1919.
1920.
1921.
1922.
24,694.04* 2,827.02
1923.
24,532.48*
1924.
30,069.20*
5,536.72
...
1925
36,520.85*
6,451.65
...
40,804.18* 2,294.11 40,774.23*
45,539.94* 4,765.71 21,867.02*
...
29.95 90,851.35* 21,247.97 103,132.51* 12,281.15 23,672.92 149,195.72* 46,063.21 159,928.50* 10,832.68 161.56 184,926.15* 24,998.65 261,372.23* 76,446.08 211,227.43*
...
C.
69,603.39
C.
%
5,787.78
19,051
58.62
...
12,998
44.77
15,304
44.15
17,374
14.65
18,221
15.44
21,811
13.27
...
27,877
11.50
50,144.80
25,989
17.29
1926.
15,665.69*
1927.
3,724.58
20,855.16 233,529.18* 22,301.75 11,941.38 223,811.97
30,516
6.71
9,717.21
32,122
1.66
* Cases tried in New Territories Courts not included.
CLASSIFICATION OF OFFENCES,
H 4
Table III.
ABSTRACT of CASES under COGNIZANCE of the POLICE MAGISTRATES' COURTS during the Year 1927.
CASES, HOW DISPOSED OF, AND THE NUMBER OF MALE AND FEMALE PRISONERS UNDER EACH IIEAD.
Ordered to find Security.
WRITS ISSUED BY THE POLICE MAGISTRATES DURING THE YEAR.
Warrants.
at the Supreme Court.
Committed to Prison or Detained pending Orders of H.E. the Governor.
To keep the Peace.
To be of Good Behaviour.
To answer
any Charge.
Witnesses punished for preferring False Charge or giving wilful False Testimony.
Undecided.
M. F. M. F.
M. F.
M. F. M.
F.
M.
F.
J. F.
M. F.
Assaults and other offences Į against the person, .... Malicious injuries to property, Gambling,
629
799
279 | 119
144
17
26
11 2
7
758
2,106 2,085 53
250
16
116
19 22
...
...
...
2,066 2,179 | 1,629: 71
391
25
46
:
:
:
196 19
4
1
1
...
::
...
5 2 6
:
2 1
:
:
Offences against property other
than malicious injuries to property or predial larceny, Offences against Revenue Acts, Highway Acts, Health Acts, and other Acts, relating to the social economy of the Colony,
Offences against Opium Ordin- ance No. 30 of 1923, Offences against Masters and ServantsActs, including Acts, relating to indentured coo- lies,...
Other offences,

1,871 1,924 1,642 56
219
5,163 7,869 6,610 150 1,077
28
40
44 14
26
་་་
-
21,578 23,499 20,844 | 853 | 1,387 66 24
Total,
|32,122 [38,746 33,114 [1306] 3,501|160 93
1333
:
:.
:
:.
Total Number of Prisoners.
Summons for Defendants.
Summons for Witnesses.
Notices of Re-hearing.
Arrest.
Distress.
Search.
For entering
Gambling Houses.
Magistrates' Orders.
TOTAL.
M. F.
M.
F.
1
643
157 9,663 79
258) 99 473 612
79 11,293
23
3
2,335
71
2,079
99
...
2
:
12
1,875 61
***
3
...
:
:
:
...
...
:
.
:
:
:
:
7,691
178
44
233
22
...
22
25
1
39
4
87
22,639
947
414
43
35
42
...
100
|37,329 | 1,516
9,663 79
* TOTAL MALES AND FEMALES,
* Consisting of Offenders not sentenced to Imprisonment.
38.815
:
258 99 473
642
79 11.293
Table II.
HONG KONG, KOWLOON AND NEW TERRITORIES.
RETURN of PUNISHMENTS awarded in respect of CERTAIN CLASSES of OFFENCES, during the Year.
PUNISHMENTS.
Offences against
Offences against Offences against
Revenue Acts,
Assaults and other offences
Masters and
Description.
Number of each kind inflicted.
against the
Malicious injuries to property.
Gam-
bling.
person.
property other than malicious injuries to pro- perty or predial larceny,
Highway Acts, Health Acts, and
Servants Acts,
Other
other Acts relating to the social economy of the colony.
including Acts
offen-
relating to
ces.
indentured coolies.
.
H 3 -
46
324
18
22,021
Fines,
26,815
252
6
1,986
111
4,315
14
20,098
Imprisonment in lieu

of fine or security,
2,547
44
51
148
1,886
418
:
Peremptory Imprison-
ment,
4,585
98
94
1,255
2,172
Whipping,
426
1
9
153
St
960
175
Juvenile Prison,
:
...
:
Exposed in Stocks,
Sentenced to House of
Detention,
Bound over with or
without Sureties,
TOTAL.......
:
:
:
O
670
216
10
5
16
34,989
614
18
2,140
1,716
46
:
:
5
8:162
OFFENCES.
Table IV.
POLICE COURTS.
LIST of OFFENCES TRIED during the year 1927.
NO. OF
CASES.
No. of
PRI-
SONERS.
OFFENCES.
No. of
CASES.
No, OF
PRI-
SONERS.
- H 5-
Brought forward,..
152
170
Accessories and Abettors Ordinance-3 of 1865 Advertisement Regulation Ordinance~19 ‹f 1922
Arms and Ammunition Ordinance-2 of 1900,- Contraventions of
Bankruptcy Ordinance-7 of 1891
19
**
4 Common Law Offences
S5
રા
101
3
Coroners Abolition Ordinance-5 of 1888..
3
3
نات
Criminal Intimidation Ordinance-13 of 1920..
25
36
101
106
Dangerous Goods Ordinance-1 of 1873.—
2
2
Contraventions of Regulations made thereunder..
22
22
Births and Deaths Registration Ordinance—7 of 1896,— Contraventions of
Dangerous Drugs Ordinance-22 of 1923
9
تت
3
+
Deportation Ordinance- 25 of 1917
190
194
Boarding House Ordinance-23 of 1917
20
20
Dogs Ordinance—5 of 1893,-
Chinese Marriage l'reservation Ordinance-42 of 1912
Contraventions of
618
616
Coinage Offences Ordinance-7 of 1865,-
Emergency Regulations Ordinance-5 of 1922.
10
12
Offences relating to the King's gold and silver coin, (Sections 3-12)
Electricity Supply Ordinance-18 of 1911
3
10
10
Eating House Ordinance - 9 of 1911
15
15
C
$7
13-14)
5
15
Cinematograph Film Ordinance—23 of 1923.
2
Employers and Servants Ordinance-45 of 1902,— Proceedings under
37
41
Carried forward..
152
170
Carried forward
1,163 | 1,222
OFFENCES.
Table IV,-Continued.
LIST of OFFENCES, ETC.,—Continued.
No. 0
CASES.
No OF
PRI-
SONERS.
OFFENCES.
No. of
CASES.
NO. OF
SONERS,
PRI-
- H 6 —
Brought forward,.
1,163 1.222
Brought forward,
Extradition Act Ordinance—1870-1906
1
1
Larceny Ordinance-5 of 1865,— Larceny by Bailee (Section 4)
Forest Offences Ordinance-32 of 1923
10
2,01,0 3,734
15
16
Simple Larceny
Larceny of cattle and other animals. (Sections 9-17).. of things attached to or growing on land, (Sections 22-28)
1,073 | 1,115
4
194
211
6
Larceny from the person and similar Offences,
26
(“ections 29-37).
361
390
14
Sacrilege. Burglary and house breaking, (Sections
2
38-47)
57
66
Larceny in dwelling houses. (Sections 48-49).
61
62
2
N
"
1

80
66
6
6
54
54
158
187
Forgery Ordinance-11 of 1922-(Sections 2—3).
4-8)
Uttering forged bank notes, (Section
9).
10-15).
""
16-21).
22-28).
270212
Forts Protection Ordinance-3 of 1911
Fugitive Offenders Act., 1881
2
Fisheries (dynamite) Ordinance-4 of 1911
1
2
Gambling Ordinance-2 of 1891,—
Contraventions of and Offences under
Gunpowder and Fireworks Ordinance-14 of 1801,— Contraventions of and Offences under
Indecent Exhibition Ordinance-3 of 1918
Carried forward,
in ships, Wharves. &c., (Sections 50-53) or embezzlement by clerks, servants, &c.,
(Sections 54-60)
Frauds by bankers, agents, &c., (Sections 62—74) Obtaining property by false pretences, (Sec. 75—78).... Receiving stolen property, (Sections 79—87)
7582.406 Apprehension of Offender's and other proceeding, (Sections 91-97).
7
13
14
2,00 3,734
Licensing Ordinance--8 of 1887,— Contraventions of and Offences under
">
of Regulations made thereunder
Carried forward,
N
1
3,958 3.906 2,397 2,408
10,431 12,227
OFFENCES.
Table IV,-Continued.
LIST of OFFENCES, ETC.,-Continued.
NUMBER No. of
OF
PRI-
CASES.
SONERS.
OFFENCES.
NUMBER No. of
OF
PRI-
CASES. SONERS.
- H 7 —
Brought forward..........
|20,431 |12,227
Brought forward,..
Live Stock Import and Export Regulation Ordinance- 15 of 1903
1
Liquor Licence Ordinance-9 of 1911,—
Contraventions of and Offences under Part I,
Merchant Shipping Ordinance-10 of 1899,- Contraventions of and Offences under Part VI, (Sections 21-30).
Contraventions of Regulations made thereunder
|13,422 |16,658
12
***
(Sections 3-40)
70
Part II, (Sections 41-73)
"" III, (
"
74-96)
89
089
74
Merchandise Marks Ordinance-4 of 1890.—
6
7
Contraventions of and Offences under
9
to
95
Midwife Ordinance-22 of 1910..
1
Macao Extradition Ordinance-1 of 1881
1
Magistrates Ordinance—3 of 1890.~
Misdemeanour Punishment Ordinance-1 of 1898.- Offences under
120
125
Offences under
...
2,793 4,210
New Territories (Regulations) Ordinance-8 of 1899
3
Malicious Damage Ordinance—6 of 1865.–
Injuries by ea or River bauks etc., (Sec. 25—26) Miscellaneous injuries, (Sections 42-44)
16
25
Offences against the person Ordinance-2 of 1865,- Homicide, (Sections 2-9)
14
11
Marine Store Protection Ordinance-13 of 1919
20
3
Acts causing or tending to cause danger to life, &c., (Sections 16-31)
33
47
Assaults, (Sections 32-43)
417
Marrried Women (Maintenance in case of desertion)
537
Ordinance-10 of 1905,-
Forcible taking or detention of persons, (Sections
44-45)
15
34
Proceedings under
11
14
Medical Registration Ordinance-1 of 1884
Loitering at night and suspected of felony (Section
I
1
57)
I ¦
2
Carried forward
13,422 16,658
Carried forward,
14,050 17.454
OFFENCES.
Table IV,-Continued.
LIST of OFFENCES, ETC.,-Continued.
NUMBER No. of
PRI-
OF CASES. SONERS.
OFFENCES.
NUMBER No. of
OF
PRI-
CASES. SONERS.
- H 8-
Brought forward,
14,050 || 7,452 |
Brought forward
Opium Ordinance--30 of 1923.-—
Contraventions of, Part I, (Sections 1-
Prison Ordinance-4 of 1899,–—
3)
70
81
Offences under
19,285 25,421
2
"}
>>
IL, C
III, (
4-
""
8)
31
34
9-20)
5,060 7,752
་་
IV, (
21-43)
2
2
Protection of Women and Girls Ordinance-1 of 1897,- Offences under
162
175
"
"
Pawn Brokers Ordinance—1 of 1860,—
Contraventions of
26
25
Public Health and Buildings Ordinance-1 of 1903,— Contraventions of Part I, (Sections 1- -7)
"}
Peak Tramway Ordinance.
19
II, (
III. (
VI. (
8-95)
483
508
19
96-235)
54
57
::>
255-264)
12
11
་་
99
Plant Ordinance-11′ of 1920
Failure to comply with B. A. Notice
15
15
S. B.
258
258
""
}}
Pharmacy Ordinance-9 of 1916
1
Piracy Prevention Ordinauce-23 of 1914
1
1
Public Places Regulation Ordinance-2 of 1870,- Contraventions of Regulations made thereunder
7
Piracy Ordinance Sec. 7 Will. IV & Vict, Chap. 88.
21 | Perjury Ordinance-21 of 1922
1
1
Offences under
Police Force Ordinance-11 of 1900,—
Prevention of Crimes Ordinance-4 of 1887
Post Office Ordinance--6 of 1900,—
Railway Ordinance--21 of 1909
4
30
40
Registration of Persons Ordinance—35 of 1923.
13
15
Regulation of Chinese Ordinance—3 of 1888,— Offences under l'art V, (Sections 22-28)..
40
40
"}
"}
Contraventions of and Offences under
......
2
Printers and Publishers Ordinance-4 of 1886
Carried forward.......
2
1
[19,285 |25,421
VII, (
(
50-51)
52-55)
4
2
+2
River Steamer Ordinance—6 of 1895.
}
1
Curried forward,..
20,351 26,530
OFFENCES.
Table IV;-Continued.
LIST of OFFENCES, ETC.,—Continued.
No. of
No, OF
CASES,
PRI-
SONERS.
OFFENCES.
NO. OF
CASES.
No. of
PR1.
SONERS
- H 9-
Brought forward,
Rogue and Vagabond 5 Geo. IV, c. 83
|20.351|26,530
Brought forward,.
26,847 (33,452
32
34
Tobacco Ordinance-10 of 1916
47
51
Sale of Food and Drug Ordinance - 8 of 1896
7
Tramways Ordinance-10 of 1902,—
Contraventions of Offences under.
10
10
Seditious Publication Ordinance-6 of 1914
24
23
Travellers Restriction Ordinance-19 of 1915
i
3
Servant Quarters Ordinance-11 of 1903, —
Offences under
Vagrancy Ordinance-9 of 1897,-
Proceedings under
92
100
Small tenements Recovery Ordinance-10 of 1897
Vaccination Ordinance-2 of 1923
Societies Ordinance-8 of 1920
S
Special Folice Reserve Ordinance −24 of 1914
Vehicles and Traffic Regulation Ordinance—40 of 1912,—
Contraventions of Regulations made thereunder
Stamp Ordinance-8 of 1921.
and Offences
""
Offences under
48
48
Volunteer Ordinance-2 of 1920..
4.6464,639
426
"
15
439
13
13
Stowaways Ordinance—5 of 1903.-
Offences under
26
40
Water Works Ordinance-16 of 1903,— Offences under
3
Summary Offences Ordinance-1 of 1845,-
Nuisances, Trespasses and Similar Offences, (Sections 3–21)
5,7105,861
Weights and Measures Ordinance-2 of 1885, — Contraventions of and Offences unde
22
22
Offences against goswl onder, (Sections 22–35)
259

Puss swing of stolen goods, (Sections 36–41) Proceedings under Miscellaneous Provisions, (Sections
376
501
387
Wild Birds and game preservation Ord.-6 of 1885
6
(2-31)
3
9
Undecided Vases
100
100
Carried forward,.
26,847 (33,452
|33,452 |
TOTAL,
|32,222 | 38,846
H 10
Table V.
4. ABSTRACT of CASES brought under COGNIZANCE of the POLICE MAGISTRATES' COURTS during a period of ten years 1918-1927.
CASES, HOW DISPOSED OF, AND THE NUMBER OF MALE AND FEMALE PRISONERS UNDER EACH HEAD.
Total Year number
of
cases
Convicted and punished.
Ordered to find security
To keep the
Discharged.
Coinmit- ted for trial at
Committed to prison or detained pending or- der of His
Supreme Excellency
Court.
the Governor.
Escaped before being
brought
for trial at
the Ma-
absconded.
Did not appear and
peace, to be of
good beha viour, and to
answer any
charge.
Escaped.
gistracy.
Punished for preferring false charge
Undecided.
Total number
or giving false testimony.
of defendants.
2
3
4
5
6 7
8
9
10
11
12
13
ཧཱུཾ།
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
M.
F.
M.
F.
M. F.
M. F.
M.
F.
M.
M. F.M.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
:
2

8
5
1918,
9,805
9,359
373
1,947
127 117 10
1919,
12,961
13,788
364
1,662
108 146
ลง
1920, ... 15,267
15,520
517
1,541
119136
or
5
1921, ... 17,374
18,726
695
2,247
151
85
00
1922,
18,535
18,338
614
2,018
76 198
Total, 73,942 75,7312,563
:
:
:
197
41
76
7
143
19
173
5
246
30
...
:
9,415
581682 25
11
835 102
:
1
49
11,665
545
39
2
13,673
475
1
35
17,380
665
38
5
21,275
864
35
2
20,835
722
:
:
CL
...
+
:
:..
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
Averago)
per Year.
14,788-4 15,146-2 | 512-6
1,883116-2136-4 | 5
2.2
167 204
:
196
11
84,828 3,271
39.2
2.2
16,965.6 654-2
98
5
26,773
450
176
15
34,585 1,090

200
30,696 1,864
123
35,509 1,592
100
37,330 | 1,516
:
697
22
164,893 | 6,612
1923,
...
21,720
22,975 356
3,190
72 246
1924,
27,724
28,708
859
5,154
172 171
CO
6
:
:
1925, ... 25,790
25,896
1,595
4,099
242 178
1926,... 30,516
31,3601,379
3,540
149
83
~
:
1927, 32,122
33,114 1,306
3,501
160 93
:
264
17

376
38
:
323
23
403 64
521
49
1
Total,137,872142,053 | 5,495
19,484
795771 9
Average
per Year,
27,574-4 23,410 6 1,099
3,896.8
159 154-2 1-8
:
:
1,887
191
1
377 4 88.2
Grand
Total
for the
211,814
217,784 | 8,058
28,899 1,376 1,453] 34
11
2,722
293
10 Years,
Average
per
21,1814 21,7784 805-8 2,889-9137.6 145-434
1.1
..
272.2 29.3
:
01
:
:
...
Year,
:
:
139.4 4.4
32,9786 1,302.4
*
2
893
33
249,721 | 9,783
.2
89.3 3.3 24,972-1978.8
SUPREME COURT AND MAGISTRACY.
COMPARATIVE TABLE showing the Number of Offences, Apprehensions, Convictions, and Acquittals for the last Four Years.
1924.
1925.
1926.
1927.
- H 11 —
The number of persons apprehended by the Police or summoned before the Police Magistrates
35,484
32,358
36,978
38,746
The number of summary convictions :-
1. For Offences against the person
411
330
313
398
2. Gambling
1,958
1,921
1,504
2,140
3. For Offences against the property other than predial larceny
2,013
· 2,500
1,552
1,713
4. For other Offences
18,728
17,847
22,881
23,409
5. For Opium Offences
6,457
5,895
6,489
6,760
The number of persons acquitted in the Inferior Courts
5,326
4,339
3,689 *
3,661
Appendix I
REPORT OF THE LAND OFFICER FOR THE YEAR 1927.
REGISTRATION.
1.—(1). During the year four thousand six hundred and twenty eight (4,628) instruments were registered under the pro- visions of Ordinance No. 1 of 1844.
(2). The total number of instruments registered under the provisions of the above mentioned Ordinance (since 1844) to the end of the year 1927 was 108,328.
(3). The number of instruments registered each year during the last ten years is shewn in Table 1.
2.-The total consideration on sales, mortgages, surrenders and miscellaneous land transactions amounted to $114,749,525.71 particulars of which are shewn in Table 1.
GRANTS OF LAND.
1. The total area of land leased during the year under review was 454 Acres 3 Roods and 26.1/5 poles, of which 327 Acres 3 Roods and 6.2/5 poles were dealt with by the District Officers.
*-
2. Particulars of grants surrenders and resumptions during the year are shewn on pages W 1 and 2 of the Blue Book for 1927.
SURRENDERS.
One hundred and twenty four (124) Surrenders of land required for public purposes were prepared and registered in the Land Office, the total consideration for which amounted to $682,894.01.
CROWN LEASES.
1.-One hundred and ninety six Crown Leases were issued during the year.
2. The number of leases issued each year during the last ten years is shewn in Table III.
FEES.
1.-The total amount of fees collected (exclusive of the New Territories) amounted to $77,607.50 being $313.50 less than the preceding year.
- I 2
2.-Land Registration fees in the New Territories amounted to $5,585.50 and Crown Lease fees to $30.00.
3.The total fees collected during the past ten years is shewn in Table IV.
STAMP DUTIES.
1. Stamp Duties paid on registered documents (exclusive of Probates and Letters of Administration) amounted to $460,146.45.
2.-Stamp Duties on Probates and Letters of Administration registered amounted to $315,876.30.
CROWN RENTS.
1.-(1). The number of lots entered on the HONG KONG Crown Rent Koll was 5,334, a decrease of 102 on the preceding year.
(2). The Crown Rents on this Roll amounted to $549,374.46, a decrease on the preceding year of $17,831.03.
2.-(1). The number of lots entered on the VILLAGE Crown Rent Roll was 3,317, a decrease of 61 on the preceding year.
(2). The Crown Rents on this Roll amounted to $1,832.55 as compared with $1,982.55 in the preceding year, a decrease of $150.00.
3.-(1). The total Crown Rents amounted to $551,207.01, a decrease of $17,981.03 on the year 1926.
(2). The decrease was occasioned by Surrenders, Re-entries and Resumptions,
DOCUMENTS.
Nine hundred and nineteen (919) documents were prepared in the Land Office during the year, viz.:
(a) One hundred and ninety six Crown Leases and
Counterparts.
(b) One hundred and thirty three Memorials for the registration of Undertakings relating to Verandahs and Balconies over Crown Land.
(c) One hundred and twenty four Surrenders of land required for public purposes and improvements. (d) Twenty three Deeds of Covenant relating to
Scavenging Lanes.
(4) Seventy five Agreements for leases exchanges or
Surrenders.
- I 3
(f) One hundred and twenty seven Memorials of re-
entry.
(g) Two hundred and forty one miscellaneous docu-
ments.
NAVAL AND MILITARY LANDS.
1.-Wongneichong Battery and Bowen Road Military Hospital were transferred to His Majesty's Secretary of State for War.
2. Two parcels of land abutting on Kennedy Road were transferred by His Majesty's Secretary of State for War to the Colonial Government for the purpose of widening Kennedy Road.
STAFF.
On the 14th March, His Excellency the Governor was pleased to appoint the Land Officer Mr. Philip Jacks to act as Puisne Judge until further notice, the Assistant Land Officer Lt-Col. Frederick Eaves, D. S. O. to act as Land Officer and Mr. William James Lockhart-Smith to act as Assistant Land Officer with effect from the 16th March, 1927.
31st January, 1928.
F. EAVES,
Land Officer.
Piers
Marine
Inland
1
6
CO
I 4
Table I.
INSTRUMENTS REGISTERED IN THE LAND OFFICE DURING
THE YEAR 1927.
No. of Lots
Description of Instruments.
Number registered.
or portions
of Lots affected.
Total Consideration
$
C.
Assignments
1,389
1,578
40,285,432.67
Mortgages and Transfer of
Mortgages
1,234
1,752
40,658,513.27
Reassignments and Satis-
faction
1,132
1,460
31,596,423.32
Surrenders
124
183
682,894.01
Judgments and Orders of
Court
93
183
1,118,654.67
Probates and Letters of
Administration
123
266
315,876.30
Miscellaneous Documents.
533
771
407,607.77
Total
4,628
5,193
114,749,525.71
Table II.
CROWN LEASES GRANTED DURING THE YEAR 1927.
Hong Kong.
Kowloon.
Rural Building
Garden
Quarry Bay Inland
Shaukiwan Inland
Aberdeen Inland
Aplichau Inland
31
9 2 1
19
6
CO
1
اسممم
Pier
Marine
Inland
New
Total.
Kowloon.
Hung Hom Inland
Inland
Sheung Shui Inland
1 268 3 45 1.
196
I 5
-
Table III.
NUMBER OF INSTRUMENTS REGISTERED AND CROWN LEASES GRANTED DURING THE YEARS 1918 TO 1927.
Year.
Instruments registered.
Crown Leases granted.
1918
2,922
117
1919
3,021
114
1920
3,045
74
1921
4,466
84
1922
4,146
207
1923
6,837
209
1924
6,000
90
1925
4,226
178
1926
!
4,360
250
1927
4,628
196
Table IV.
FEES COLLECTED DURING THE YEARS 1918 to 1927.
Year.
Registration of
Searches and Copies of Docu-
Grants
Deeds.
of Leases.
Total.
ments.
cts.
$
cts.
$
cts.
$
cts.
1918
45,225.00
3,399.35
3,505.00
52,129.35
1919
45,896.00
3,486.90
3,102.00
52,484.90
1920
52,569.00
3,849.75
2,870.00
59,288.75
1921
70.617.00
4,235.00
2,685.00
77,537.00
1922
65,407.00
4,683.50 5,550.00
75,640.00
1923
109,671.00
7,280.00
6,680.00
123,631.00
1924
93,304.00 5,824.25
2.470.00
101,598.25
1925
65,068.00
1926
65,843.00
4,778.75 5,210.00 4,443.00 7,635.00
75,056.75
77,921.00
1927
67,115.00
5,050.50 5,442.00
77,607.50
I 6
Table V.
HONG KONG & KOWLOON RENT ROLL..
Locality and Description.
No. of Lots.
Total Crown Rent
$ cts.
Victoria Marine Lot
353
,,
Praya Reclamation Marine
Lot Inland Lot
76
2,055
Quarry Bay Marine Lot
2
Inland Lot
13
81,662.91
8,161.91 204,988.22
18,458.00 4,166.00
Victoria Farm Lot
8
401.55
Garden Lot
45
Rural Building Lot
206
1,478.00 37,379.58
Aberdeen Marine Lot
5
579.16
Inland Lot
84
2,265.16
71
Aplichau Marine Lot
24
152.84
Inland Lot
39
261.48
Shaukiwan Marine Lot
10
1,928.00
Inland Lot
215
4,281.29
"
Stanley Inland Lot
4
4.00
Kowloon Marine Lot
55
45,933.23
Inland Lot
1,259
77,060.79
Garden Lot
1
1.00
Hung Hom Marine Lot
2
6,140.00
Inland Not
Sheko Inland Lot
154
9,062.00
3
9.00
Tai Tam Inland Lot
1
1.09
Tong Po Inland Lot
1
1.00
New Kowloon Marine Lot
5
18,608.00
Inland Lot
669
18.855.84
Farm Lot
4
135.50
Rural Building Lot
1
42.00
Tai Po Inland Lot
8
480.00
Fan Ling Lot
2
1,192.00
Sheung Shui Lot
910.00
Ping Chau Farm Lot
1
225.00
Mining Lot
1
302.00
Tsun Wan Marine Lot
1
2,008.00
Inland Lot
9
1,644.00
New Kowloon Dairy
12
514.00
Tsing I Marine Lot
1
82.00
Total
5,334
$549,374.46
I 7
VILLAGE RENT ROLL.
Locality and Description.
No. of Lots.
Total Crown Rent.
$
cts.
Wongneichung
Aberdeen
53
36.00
19
73.00
Pokfulam
24
28.25
Tai Hang
156
632.50
Ah Kung Ngam
25
18.25
Shaukiwan
28
15.50
Hok Un
9
13.09
Tokwawan
5
8.50
Ma Tau Wei
81
150.00
Hau Pui Loong
13
49.50
Wong Tsuk Hang
2
34.50
Tai Hang Stream
17
72.00
Little Hong Kong
1
2.00
Tong Po
1
2.50
Stanley
9
18.00
Tytam
1
3.59
Tytam Tuk
2.50
Chai Wan
7
15.00
Shek O
8
23.00
Hok Tsui
1
1.50
Chung Hom Bay
1
3.00
Chinese Joss House, Bowen Road
Victoria
3.00
Aplichau
42
75.00
Telegraph Bay
13
`43.50
Little Hong Kong
1,577
280.25
Shek O
315
68.00
Hok Tsui
Chai Wan
181
34.50
724
126.30
Total
3,317
$1,832.55
I 8
REPORT OF THE REGISTRAR OF MARRIAGES
FOR THE YEAR 1927.
TRANSFER OF REGISTRY.
1.-(1). By Ordinance No. 14 of 1926, the Governor was enabled to appoint such person as he pleased to be Registrar of Marriages.
(2). On the 31st December, 1926, His Excellency the Governor was pleased to appoint the Land Officer to be Registrar of Marriages, and the Assistant Land Officer to be the Deputy Registrar of Marriages with effect in each case from and includ- ing the 1st January, 1927, and thereupon the Secretary for Chinese Affairs and his Assistants ceased to be Registrar and Deputy Registrars of Marriages respectively, and the Marriage Registry was transferred to the Land Office.
MARRIAGES.
2. The number of Marriages celebrated in the Colony during the year was 176, (of which 70 were between Chinese Persons) as compared with 161 (and 55) respectively in 1926. Particulars are given in Table I.
FEES.
3. The total amount of Fees received under the Second Schedule of The Marriage Ordinance 1875 was $1,538.00, as compared with $820.00 in 1926-an increase of $718.00. Parti- culars are shewn in Table II.
F. EAVES,
Registrar of Marriages.
I 9
Table I.
MARRIAGES CELEBRATED DURING 1927.
(1). Marriages by SPECIAL LICENCE.-19.
(a) At Licenced Places of
Public Worship.
(b) At the Office of the
Registrar of Marriages.
7.
12.
(2). Marriages by REGISTRAR'S CERTIFICATE.-157.
(a) At Licenced Places of
Public Worship.
134.
(b) At the Office of the
Registrar of Marriages.
23.
Table II.
FEES RECEIVED DURING 1927.
Fee.
Total Fees.
164 Certificates of Notice (Re- gistrar's Certificates)
2 Searches
31 Certified Copies
$
C.
@ $ 1.00
164.00
@
1.00
2.00
1.00
31.00
9 Licences to Registrar of Marriages to issue his Certificate
10.00
90.00
18 Special Licences
@
50.00
900.00
1 Special Licence
1.00
1.00
35 Marriages at the Office of
the Registrar
@
10.00
350.00
Total
$1,538.00
Appendix J.
REPORT ON THE NEW TERRITORIES FOR THE YEAR 1927.
A.-NORTHERN DISTRICT.
I. STAFF,
Mr. J. A. Fraser continued in charge throughout the year. Mr. W. G. Routley, junior land bailiff returning from leave in February, acted as senior land bailiff in the absence of Mr. G. J. Chambers from 25th June to the end of the year. Revenue Officer H. V. Pearse (attached from I. & E. Dept.) acted as junior bailiff from June to October.
II. MAGISTRACY.
Table A shows the number of cases heard by the District Officer sitting as Police Magistrate and as Judge of the Small Debts Court.
There was a marked decrease in the number of serious offences in the latter half of the year. The most noteworthy was an attempt on a ferry-junk which was commandeered by armed men and taken out of its course to Tolo Channel, with passengers confined in the hold. One of these, an elderly Chinese, showed rare coolness and initiative. Obtaining access to the deck of the junk about dusk on a slight pretext, he attracted the attention of an approaching police launch by jump- ing overboard, and thus secured the arrest of the offenders, who were subsequently committed, tried and sentenced.
Prompt police action in investigating offences committed near the Northern frontier, together with a continuous patrol of the approaches to British Shataukok have reduced "border outrages" to a negligible minimum. An unfortunate result of the troubled conditions across the frontier is the increased number of fraudulent marriages and adoptions, which in some cases amount to kidnapping, to and even from the Territory, and of which a few only come to light. Cases of damage to trees centred round Sheung Shui and Ts'ung Pak Long, and were mainly the result of attempts to discourage depredations on the very tempting forestry reserves in that neighbourhood.
The number of small debts cases exceeds the average for the past five years by about two hundred per cent. It would however be wrong to consider this abnormal: the reverse is the
J 2
M
cuse.
Reference to previous returns shows that the Small Debts Court opened in 1910 with 240 cases. The number decreased to 42 in 1914, rose again to 313 in 1919, dropped to 62 in 1922, since when it rose steadily till 1926, and in 1927 again crossed the two hundred mark. Allowing for abnormalities, the average number of small debts cases heard annually at Taipo is about two hundred. The extra fifty in 1927 are due partly to the swing of the pendulum, and partly to the recent increase in Chinese immigration and facilities for trade.
After a long period of disorganization consequent on the strike, the land boom and the boycott, this increasing tendency to refer disputes, together with the decrease in crime, is a most hopeful sign.
64
Besides the cases quoted, there were 31 miscellaneous, 32 'women and girls" cases, and 139 land disputes, in addition to 15 death enquiries, two of which were formal, at Taipo.
At Ping Shan, there were 187 cases of all descriptions in 1927, as against 87 in 1926, the average for the past five years being 70.
The total amount paid into Court in cases of all kinds in 1927 was $12,542.92.
III.-LAND OFFICE.
The number of sales and other transactions affecting land during the year is set out in table B.
The number of memorials was 2,743 as against 2,417 in 1926. Fees received were $3,617.30, against $2,855.00 in the previous year.
The main features of land office work were (a) the reversion to Government of the last of the undeveloped building-sites sold during the land boom, mostly in the hands of Hong Kong owners, and (b) increases in sales of land for agriculture and in the number of small conversions. It will be noted in this connection that the number of conversions for 1927 was 105 against 66 in the previous year, while the built-over area was 2.94 against 4.51 acres in 1926. These figures express an all- round village development.
In semi-urban areas the centres of development were again Taipo, Fanling and Yuen Long.
IV.-REVENUE.
The Revenue collected in this office is set out under the appropriate heads in Table C, totalling $127,251.02.
Harbour Dues
J 3
The following amounts paid by the district but not through this office should be added to the figures in Table C:-
*Liquor duties, Sai Kung
""
"
$
cts.
3,189.12
1,794.75
No. 1 Launch
""
4,952.15
No. 2 Launch
1,909.40
73
No. 4 Launch
2,497.35
19-
Mining Licence fees for Ma On Shan area
500.00
Tobacco Licence fees
Tobacco Duties paid to S. I. E.
Crown Rent paid in Land Office
16,427.04
144.00
2,884.00
Total.....
.$34,297.81
*For half year only. After April, liquor duties were collected by
the I& E. Dept.
In April, new distillery regulations were enforced, and collection of revenue from this source was transferred to the I. & E. Department.
V.-GENERAL.
Afforestation.—(a) Planting. The vote for this purpose was doubled in 1927, with as far as can be judged satisfactory results. (b) Hill fires were fewer than before, and confined mostly to the border, Saikung, and Taipo districts.
Communications.-A patrol path along the Northern boun- dary was projected, and is now in hand. When completed, it will form a long needed link between the isolated stations on the frontier.
ex-
Nearly the whole of the local public works vote was pended in improving Chinese main roads and bridges, as detailed in table E.
Trade.-Local trade with Chinese territory has resumed normal proportions, and follows the usual routes. There were the regular imports of cattle from Lung Kong, Tam Shui and Wai Chau, which with the import of pigs to Hong Kong brought local prices down to only slightly above the usual level. Pigs continue to be bred in large numbers for the Hong Kong market. Exports were mainly unhulled rice, and fish. The resumption of export of salt-water fish to Sheklung, Tung Kwun and else- where in China had a stimulating effect on the local fisheries, and the re-crection of a number of stake-nets in competition with the bright-light fishing-boats is a sure sign of prosperity. Chinese vegetables notably Chinese celery (k'an ts'oi ) and a tuber, pachyriza, (sha kot ) at one time imported from China, are now exported from the Territory in large quan- titles to Tung Kwun and neighbouring districts. There was a
J 4
noticeable increase in the number of dried beancurd manufac- tories, producing for export through Hong Kong to Colonial Chinese abroad. There is still no market for the bricks produced by the large works at Lo Wu and Castle Peak, while native brickworks were unable to cope with local demands.
Agriculture.—(a) Rice. In spite of unfavourable weather conditions, the rice-crops were on the whole good. The first, retarded by cold, was short and heavy, and grain uncut at the end of the harvest, which was more than a fortnight later than usual, was partly destroyed by heavy rain. The yield was about 1.6 piculs per tau chung, (roughly 1.6 acre local reckoning) or about 4 picul less than in a good year. The second crop being necessarily planted late, was light, and yielded about 1.2 piculs per tau chung, or about 8 picul less than might have been expected. Prices were good, ranging from $4.40 to $7.00 per picul, according to quality.
(b) Fruit. Laichees though plentiful in the Hong Kong market, were scarce in the District. Pineapples gave a good crop. This fruit is locally considered the best-adapted for grow- ing in the Territory.
(c) Vegetables were scarce during the first half-year, owing to rains. Chinese vegetables form the bulk of the crop. Euro- pean vegetable-growing is in the hands of a few growers, who make it a specialty. The tomato is perhaps most grown.
(d) Sugarcane cultivation steadily decreases, imported sugar being cheaper than the native product, which however still sup- plies a special market in Hong Kong.
(e) Agricultural Show. With the help of a committee of Europeans and local Chinese, the Rev. H. R. Wells 0. B. E., of the London Missionary Society, carried through the difficult project of initiating an agricultural show for the purpose of encouraging local agriculture and improving native methods of production.
The show was under the patronage of H. E. the Governor, who opened it at Sir Robert Ho Tung's garden at Sheung Shui on 7th December. The number of exhibits received was varied and satisfactory, and the show was popular locally and in Hong Kong. The greatest credit is due to the Chairman and organi- zers of the show. Arrangements are in hand to make it an annual event.
28th February, 1928.
J. A. FRASER,
District Officer,
Northern District.
- J S
Table A.
POLICE COURT.
1927
Average from
1922-1926.
Cases heard
309
333
Persons brought before the
Police Magistrate
508
511
Persons convicted and punished
279
345
Persons bound over
97
39
Persons discharged
119
117
Persons committed
13
9
Persons imprisoned
85
94
Fines inflicted
$8,358.00 $10,954.12
Warrants executed
30
51
SMALL DEBTS COURT.
1927
Average from 1922-1926.
Cases heard
258
87
Writs of Execution
96
32
Table B.
No. of
Increase Decrease Amount
Sales,
No.
Area
Headings.
Permits,
of
111
Licences, Lots.
Acres.
of
Annual
Rent.
of
Annual
of
Rent.
Premia,
Fees, &c.
&c.
Amount
paid for
Resump-
tion of
Land.
Term
of
years.
}
- J 6-
C.
C.
e
Sales of Land for Agriculture..
111
18:09 acres.
51.66
1,934.06
""
>>
Buildings
""
>>
Orchards
>>
12
}}
""
Threshing Floors..
Conversions
138
2.65
167.50
183
}}
1,239.00
5
20.73
20.90
>>
1,312.00
C.
75
75
75
11
*36
1.49
132.50
75
""
105
2.94
169.50
86.00
75
""
Permits to occupy land for Agriculture.
21
46
25.61
61.95
"}
225
369
117.53
""
411.05
>>
21
Extensions
Re-entries
for other purposes
10
11
36.32
96.40
11
*03
3:00
16.0
75
POEDD51IE
"
118
39.56
Surrenders
28
6.70
1,461.58
617.75
Resumptions
48
7.35
11.75
""
1,285.63
Stone Quarry Permits
64
305.00
Permits to cut Earth, etc.
153
740.00
Matshed Permits
315
4.62
1,205.50
Ferry Licences
5
9.00
Forestry Licences
448
418
25700:00
""
2,572.49
Pine-apple Land Leases
31
31
14.98
Grave Certificates..
27
44.94
13.25
Deeds Registered, and Fees.
2,749
3,617.30
*
J 7
Table C.
Revenue for Average of
Revenue for
1927
1922-1926.
Crown Rent, (Leased Land)
Kerosene Oil Licences
Chinese Wine and Spirit retail
Licences
Distillery Licences
Pawnbrokers' Licences
$ 88,723.04 $ 87,203.05
464.00
398.00
4,539.50
4,628.75
Nil
2,665.55
1,200.00
1,200.00
Moneychangers' Licences
350.00
432.00
Fines
1,027.00
2,086.15
??
(Land Sales)
480.00
229.00
71
Reward Fund (Opium).
453.00
1,050.30
23
(Liquor and
Tobacco)
525.00
122.10
Forfeitures
78.00
199.91
(Land Sales)
3,035.00
27.00
Distress Warrants
133.00
40.60
(Crown Rent)
Nil
25.00
Liquor Duties
7,822.94
14,693.74
Arrears of Revenue
12.60
135.86
Other Miscellaneous Receipts
21.00
97.39
Forestry Licences
2,572.49
2,692.83
Permits to cut Earth &c.
740.00
463.40
Grave Certificates
13.25
67.44
Pineapple Land Leases
44.94
26.36
Matshed Permits
1,205.50
754.10
Permits to occupy Land
850.58
942.54
Stone Quarry Permits
305.00
451.60
Stone Quarry Leases
300.00
866.92
Waterwheel Licences
Nil
2.00
Piers
Nil
9.00
Ferry Licences
9.00
9.00
Certified Extracts
172.00
195.00
Sunprints
75.00
101.00
Premia on land sales
4,719.56
5,911.13
Stamps for deeds
3,617.30
3,840.57
Boundary Stones
60.00
166.30
Deposits not available
3,672.32
1,271.61
Crown Leases
30.00
60.00
Total...... $127,251.02 $187,065.20
J 8-
Table D.
REVENUE COLLECTED FROM 1918-1927.
1918
$120,244.93
1923
$280,848,61
1919
117,174.51
1924
209,105.18
1920
115,865.45
1925
141,862.65
1921
121,080.38
1926
139,773.95
1922
159,191.56
1927
127,251.02
Table E.
LOCAL PUBLIC WORKS, 1927.
New Works.
Road from Cheung Shu Tan to the Main Road
Read between Ping Shan and Ha Tsun
Matsheds for the Agricultural Show at Kam Tsin
REPAIRS.
$
60.00
350.00
770.00
Bund at Wo Hang
Road at Ngau Tam Mei
25.00
Dam at Ngau Tam Mei
150.00
100.00
Bridges near Tai Shui Hang
25.00
Bridge near Sheung Tsun
80.00
Bund near Tai Po Old Market
100.00
I'ath near Chung Mei
9.50
Bridge near Kam Tin
270.00
Bridge below Tsai Kek, Lam Tsun Valley
600.00
Bund at Kong Ha
150.00
Road from Kam Tin to Pat Heung Gap
400.00
Bridge near Kat O
400.00
Water Gate at Nam Chung
600.00
Bridge at Wu Kau Tin
700.00
Un-expended
210.50
$5,000.00
J 9
Table F.
RAINFALL AT TAIPO POLICE STATION.
1927
January
February
March
April
Average 1922-1926.
inches
inches.
.13
4.00
4.59
3.67
6.08
3.63
7.81
8.00
May June
15.86
7.18
9.64
17.52
July
29.64
22.14
August
8.66
22.78
September
5.44
7.14
October
4.53
6.19
November
2.20
1.95
December
.20
.48
Table G.
SERIOUS CRIMES REPORTED.
(a) On Land
1927
1920
Murder
3
2
Armed robbery and wounding
1
1
Double armed robbery and wounding
1
Robbery with violence
Double armed robbery and kidnapping
Attempted armed robbery
2
1
1
Armed robbery and kidnapping
Armed robbery
Highway robbery
Robbery
5
6
11
2
Total
17
21
(b) On Water.
1927
1926
1
Double Murder Armed Robbery
Armed Robbery and wounding Armed Robbery and Kidnapping
Piracy
Assault with intent to rob
Total
2
1
10
5
J 10
REPORT ON THE NEW TERRITORIES
FOR THE YEAR 1927.
B.-SOUTHERN DISTRICT.
1.-STAFF.
Mr. E. 1. Wynne-Jones continued in charge throughout the year.
Mr. S. H. Peplow was promoted to first class Land Bailiff on 5th August, and Mr. Ng Tsoi Chung, Land Registry Clerk, retired on medical grounds, after 20 years service, on 1st November.
2.-MAGISTRACY.
Table A gives the number of cases heard by the District Officer, sitting as Police Magistrate and as Judge of the Small Debts Court.
3.-LAND OFFICE.
Table B gives the number of sales and other transactions affecting land which took place through the year.
The number of memorials registered was 931 as against 876 in 1926.
The fees received as stamp duties amounted to $1,968.20 as against $1,598.55 in 1926.
These figures are typical of the gradual upward trend, both financial and psychological, in the local land market, consequent upon the restoration of confidence after the recovery from the slump and strike effects.
4.-REVENUE.
The Revenue collected by the District Officer is set out under the appropriate heads in Table C totalling $42,046.73. Tables D and E respectively show the Revenue collected by Police and other Departments, and Table F gives for purposes of comparison the total revenues from all sources collected in the District for the past three years.
5.-GENERAL.
The general state of the District for the last year has been good, shewing a fair increase in prosperity.
There was a slight increase in crime, attributable to the presence of bad characters who came in to seek shelter from the troubles in the surrounding districts, The Police however worked well to keep crime in check.
*
J 11
Tai 0-Business shewed a distinct improvement. The vegetable and rice crops were good and prices fair.
The fishing gave results above the average, especially the Wong Fa, of which a record catch of 600 piculs was recorded on 20th October.
The Typhoon of 19th August caused great damage to the matsheds. Three houses were also partially blown down result- ing in the deaths of three persons, into which full enquiry was held. The Police here worked very well in assisting those whose homes were wrecked.
Eight cases of serious crime were reported, in seven of which the offenders were apprehended and punished.
Cheung Chau:-Business generally has been better: large quantities of fish were caught but the prices generally were lower.
The market has flourished exceedingly and a new scale of fees was authorized after the hawkers had been restricted to the extra-market areas.
The health of the community was good, except for a strange sequence of about 50 deaths about July. This was ultimately traced to Fish Poisoning amongst the boat people.
The system of free vaccination was continued and greatly appreciated.
St. John's Ambulance Association assisted in this work, and also kindly arranged for a series of lectures on sanitation and hygiene, which should have a good effect.
The Electric Lighting of the village failed to give satis- faction through the year, owing to inadequate plant. Steps are being taken to arrange for an improved supply in the future.
The "Wooden Pier" was badly damaged by the typhoon, and a new light iron one is now in course of erection and should be ready for use early in the year.
The Eastern side of Lantao and Ping Chau were quiet : the limekilns on the latter island benefited by the increased building activity.
Tsuen Wan-The agricultural produce for the year showed a steady improvement especially in pineapples and bean curd, but the wine and spirit distilleries were adversely affected.
A new bathing beach at Sham Tseng was opened and the matshed sites there were rapidly taken up.
J 12
Local Public Works.-The small local works undertaken and assisted by the District Officer is shewn in Table G attached.
General-Early in the year the ground survey in con- nection with the air survey of the Colony made by H.M.S. Pegasus, was completed.
All the local village and place names were carefully checked and have been forwarded to the cartographers, so that the resultant maps, when ready, may be expected to be extremely
accurate.
Dr. Brock of the University of British Columbia also completed the geological survey of the New Territories during the spring, so that the final report thereon may be expected shortly.
Several finds of ancient stone axeheads and pottery were made on Lantao Island by Dr. Heanley; these are of great archeological interest and should help to throw light on the early history of South China.
A monograph on the subject by Dr. Heanley is in course of publication.
1st March, 1928.
E. I. WYNNE-JONES,
District Officer, South.
きってい
܀
J 13
Table A.
POLICE COURT.
1925.
1926.
1927.
Cases heard,
201
156
196
Persons brought before the
Police Magistrate,
370
295
306
Persons convicted and pun-
ished,
318
174
140
Persons bound over,
44
1
Persons committed,
12
Persons imprisoned,
70
22
2
8
43
28
Persons discharged,
52
53
50
Fines,
$2,635.53 $1,704.11
$2,273.57
Arms Fines,
60.00
271.00
524.95
Forfeitures,
349.20
427.61
57.00
Revenue Reward Fund,
1,006.87
....
1,449.42
1,433.60
SMALL DEBTS COURT.
1925.
1926.
1927.
Cases heard,
31
66
100
Writs of Execution,
5
2
16
Headings.
No. of Sales,
Permits, Li- cences, etc.
No. of Lots.
Area in Acres.
Table B.
Land Sales for Buildings...
""
""
Agriculture
Grave
Drying Ground
Land Let on Permit for Agriculture.....
47
47
1.59
$
112.00
$
2
4
.52
.76
1
1
8.80
8.80
1
1
.22
1.00
...
2
Cemetery
1
1
Conversions
*
Stone Quarry Leases.
3
COOTH N
14.60
29.50
C.
¤A
858.00
187.00
75
75
959.00
75
94.00
75
10 10 10 10 10
.35
1.00
.19
24.25
80.23
295.00
Permits to occupy Land
52
220.23
Matshed Permits on Crown Land
775
948.00
Private Land
62
316.25
""
Earth Permits
276
1,215,50
Forestry Licences
120
1,527,21
Pineapple Licences
365
661.97
Deeds Registered
Resumptions
Surrenders
Re-entries
931
1,968.20
73
33
59
2388
5.40
220.41
80.79
450.20
16,743.41
9.11
124.10
Increase of Crown Rent.
Decrease of Crown Rent.
Amount of Premia, Fees, etc.
- J 14
Amount paid
for Resump- tion of Land.
Term of Years.
J 15.
Table C.
.
4
Revenue collected by the District Officer, Southern District, New Territories.
1926.
1927.
$ c.
$ C.
Land Sales,
718.20
2,098.00
Boundary Stones,
42.00
81.00
Permits to cut Earth and Stone,
1,193.50
1,215.50
Forestry Licences,
1,691.18
1,527.21
Forfeitures,
427.61
57.00
Fines,
1,704.11
2,273.57
Water Wheel Licences,
22.10
*
Deeds Registration Fees,
1,598.55
1,968.20
Warrants of Attachment,
179.00
*
Crown Leases,
Legal Costs,
Grave Certificates,
97.00
157.01
9.25
*
Crown Rent,
26,799.82 26,308.68
Matshed Permits on Crown Land,
755.80
948.00
Matshed Permits on Private Land,
559.95
316.25
Permits to occupy land,
254.16
220.23
Pineapple Land Leases,
736.40
661.97
Market Fees,
1,715.92 1,706.30
Leases of Stone Quarries,
295.00
270.00
Interest on Deposit Account,
107.98
72.86
Other Miscellaneous Receipts,
11.00
206.40
Miscellaneous Receipts (Certified Ex-
tracts),
26.00
*
Miscellaneous Receipts (Sunprint Plans)
*
Revenue Reward Fund,
1,449.42
1,433.60
Arms Fines,
271.00
524.95
Total,
$40,664.95 $42,046.73
*Included in Other Miscellaneous Receipts.
Station.
*
Wine and
Spirit.
Pawn
Money
Kerosene.
Dogs. Brokers. Changers.
Total.
Table D.
· Licence Fees collected by the Police Department.
Kowloon City
Sham Shui Po
Tai O
Cheung Chau
Tsun Wan
Lamma Island
:
:
:
:

نه

C.
c.
$
J 16
727.00
3,000.00
3,727.00
456.00
7,000.00
250.00 7,706.00
725.00
60.00
400.00 ¦
40.00
1,225.00
950.00
74.00
800.00
60.00
1,884.00
500.00
42.00
542.00
75.00
75.00
Total
2,250.00
176.00
1,183.00 11,200.00
350.00
15,159.00
J 17
Table E.
Revenue collected through other Departments from the Southern District, New Territories.
1926
1927.
C.
$
c.
Treasury, (Village Rates),
80,662.42
92,134.86
""
(Crown Rent for Inland
Lots),
41,484.65 42,713.43
J
(Quarries in New Kowloon),
2,577.35
4,312.75
"3
(Eating
House Licence
Fees),
280.00
240.00
Police, (Licence Fees),
34,058.00
15,159.00*
Harbour Office (Harbour Dues, Stake-
nets),
18,143.50
17,819.25
Import & Export Department, (Dis- tillery, Wine, and Spirit Licence Fees),
Total,
21,850.00
$177,205.92 $194,229.29.
*See Table D.
Table F.
Total Revenue collected from Southern District, New Territories, during the last three years,
By District Office,
1925.
1926.
1927.
$ C $ c.
C.
42,538.70
40,664.95
42,046.73.
By Other Departments, . 171,273.24 177,205.92† 194,229.29†
Total .... $213,811.94 $217,870.87 $236,276.02
See Table E.
- J 18 -
Table G.
LOCAL PUBLIC WORKS, 1927.
Repairs.
$ c.
The village road leading to Sheung Yuen Ling Village,
Kowloon City,
150.00
Buildings used as schools at Tsun Wan,
450.00
Bridge at Cheung Shu Au, Tsun Wan,
15.00
School at Ping Chau,
15.00
Road in Cheung Chau European Reservation, Cheung
Chau
150.00
Village Road at Tai O.,
10.00
Wai Chiu School at Cheung Chau,
250.00
Pathway between Tai O Police Station and Shek Tsai
Po Village, Tai O
250.00
Wooden Pier at Cheung Chau,
635.00
Purchase of a bridge over the ravine at Lai Muk Shu,
Tsun Wan,
Total,
75.00
$2,000.00
Appendix K.
REPORT OF THE CAPTAIN SUPERINTENDENT OF
POLICE FOR THE YEAR 1927.
SUMMARY OF CRIME FOR 1927.
1. The total number of cases reported to the Police during the year 1927 was 24,444 as against 20,048 in 1926, being an increase of 4,396 or 21.9%. The average for the last five years is 18,608.
2. In the division of these cases into serious and minor offences there were 4,553 serious cases in 1927 as against 3,713 serious cases in 1926, an increase of 840 cases or 22.8%. There were 19,891 minor cases in 1927 as against 16,335 minor cases in 1926, an increase of 3,556 or 21.7%. Please see Table I.
CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION DEPARTMENT.
1. The strength of the Department on December 31st
was :-
1927
1926
Europeans Chinese
34
33
123
122
TOTAL
157
155
2. The number of Searchers employed on Steamers, and Launches, on December 31st was:-
1927
1926
Europeans
6
6
Chinese Regular
95
85
Chinese Temporary
25
44
Females
31
31
TOTAL
157
166
- K 2-
These figures include both Hong Kong and Kowloon.
The number of Temporary Searchers is now reduced to 25, and the number of Regular Searchers has been increased by 10.
During the outbreak of fighting in Canton from 16.4.27 until 13.6.27 R.O's took over searching of outgoing steamers, while the Water Front Searchers dealt with the incoming pas- sengers. On a second outbreak from 14.12.27 until 14.1.28 the Water Front Searchers attended to both out-going and incoming vessels, being assisted by the Revenue Department in the latter.
During the months of October and November 1927, political agitation was prevalent among ships' crews, especially those of British owned vessels.
A seizure of arms consisting of eleven revolvers and forty nine rounds of ammunition was made on the S.S. "Ko Chow" on 21.1.27 prior to her sailing to West River Ports. From the condition of the arms, and the method of concealment, it was quite evident that they were intended to be used for a piracy.
The same vessel, S.S. "Ko Chow", which runs between Hong Kong and Wuchow, was pirated on 1.9.27 but this piracy occurred after the ship had called at a Chinese Port to take on passengers and cargo.
"
3. Serious crime in 1927 showed, an increase over that in 1926-4,553 cases against 3,713 in 1926. Minor crime also showed an increase-19,891 cases against 16,335 cases in 1926.
The increase in serious crime is accounted for almost entire- ly by increases under burglary and larceny. Throughout the year there was a large number of unemployed in the Colony, while the Force, owing to difficulty in obtaining recruits, was appreciably below establishment strength.
There were decreases of 10 and 9 cases in murder and rob- bery respectively.
There has been a very considerable increase in the popula- tion of the Colony during the year, due to a gradual steady return of people and interests that left Hong Kong in 1925. This flow was increased to a flood at two periods-one during the political upheaval in Canton in April, the other in November and December when political disturbance culminated in a Com- munist rising and burning of part of the City. During the latter phase it is estimated that at least 50,000 refugees came to Hong Kong. The Police countered the internal effect of these movements by diverting temporarily certain sections from normal duty to search and surveillance of incoming passengers. Special patrols have also assisted in keeping Hong Kong immune
K 3-
from abnormal crime waves which have been experienced in other ports. The Colony is also indebted to cordial co-operation throughout the year from the Police Authorities in Canton and Macau.
4. Table II shows the number of piracies committed in adjacent waters during the year 1927.
5. Table III gives the number of Discharged Prisoners, Deportees, and Vagrants dealt with by the Records Office during the year 1927.
FINGER PRINT DEPARTMENT.
A summary of work executed in this Department for the year 1927 is as follows:
Number of Number of finger prints
Number of
Number of convictions
Number of
convictions
persons
records
under
examined.
identified.
filed.
underMarket
Deportation Ordinarice.
Ordinance.
1926 1927
12 986
3.079
11.799
92
1.190
14,131
3.109
13,221
172
779
Increase Decrease
1,145
30
1,422
80
411
Number of records on file: 98,734.
33 persons returned from banishment after having been banished
under the Opium Ordinance.
74 persons were birched in addition to their sentence for return-
ing from banishment.
15 persons had been previously birched.
PHOTOGRAPHIC DEPARTMENT.
The total number of photographs taken of scenes of Serious Crimes and Accidents throughout the year was 1875.
PROPERTY REPORTED STOLEN AND PROPERTY RECOVERED.
The estimated value of property stolen during the year was $612,293.36 as against $484,382.53 in 1926, an increase of $127,910.83 or 26.4%.
The average for the last five years is $587,790.15.
The value of property recovered during the year was $63,308.25 or 13% of the value of the property stolen, as against $53,359.30 or 11% of the property stolen in 1926, an increase of 2% in ratio between the property stolen and property recovered.
K 4
LOST PROPERTY.
The following is a return showing Property lost or re-
covered:
Year.
Articles reported *
lost.
Value
Articles re- covered and
Value of
articlés
lost.
found but not}
found.
reported lost.
1927
348
18,125.18
122
1,453.80
1926
410
$29,268.07
133
$3,119.74
GAMBLING.
There were 239 successful Gambling Cases for year ending December 1927 as against 233 in the year 1926.
There were six cases in which no conviction was obtained.
There were 74 lottery cases, compared with 99 in 1926.
MENDICANTS.
During the year 1927 seven hundred and forty five mendi- cants were arrested and dealt with as follows:
8 mendicants charged before the Magistrate.
4
5
sent to Tung Wah Hospital. released.
handed back to parents.
sent to Canton.
22
4
""
7
**
481
""
sent out of Colony once.
241
more than once.
"
DEAD BODIES.
The following table shows the number of unknown dead bodies found by Police in the Streets and elsewhere during the last 5 years :
Mak
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
Victoria,..
959
579
285
268
367
Kowloon,............
381
819
674
637
801
Harbour,....
169
219
124
110
37
Elsewhere,
19
99
98
99
112
Total.
1,528
1,716
1,181
1,114
1,317
Males, Females,... Unknown,
Children,
Adults,
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
827
968
670
644
791
670
715
472
430
479
...
31
33
39
40
47
1,468
1,610
1,136
1,020
1,185
60
106
45
94
132
- K.5

DOGS ORDINANCE.
Owing to the prevalence of rabies in the Colony the muzzl- ing order continued in force throughout the Year. A further vigorous dog-shooting campaign necessitated by the large num- ber of apparently ownerless and unmuzzled dogs found roaming at large about the Colony resulted in the destruction of 1,216 dogs as compared with 1,872 in 1926 when the anti-rabies com- paign started:
1927
1926
Dogs Licensed
3241
4955
Dogs Licensed (free)
4
26
Dogs Impounded
267
481
Dogs Destroyed
1216
1872
Weights and Measures
Weights and Measures examined.
Total.
Correct. Incorrect.
1927.
1926.
Foreign Scales
425
7
432
407
Chinese Scales
1,725
48
1,773
1,868
Yard Measures
293
293
250
Check Measures..............
628
628
590
Total.....
3,071
55
3,126
3,115
The following prosecutions were instituted under the Weights and Measures Ordinance.
Number of Cases.
Convictions.
Fines.
1927.
1926.
1927.
1926.
1927.
1926.
21
16
21
15
$449.00 $420.00
DANGEROUS Goods.
The following prosecutions were instituted under the Dangerous Goods Ordinance.
Number of Cases.
1927.
Convictions.
Fines.
1926.
1927.
1926.
1927.
1926.
17
26
16
25
$1,867
$1,000.00

K 6 -
ARMS ORDINANCE.
Table IV (a) shows Arms and Ammunition seized and con- fiscated during the year 1927.
Table IV (b) shows seizures classified according to places of origin.
TRAFFIC IN ARMS AND AMMUNITION.
1. General.-Police have been unable to locate any definite arms smuggling agency in the Colony during the year, but the seizures made indicate that such agencies still exist, though their activities are somewhat reduced compared with previous years. The following paragraphs give a summary of the more important cases and seizures effected during the year.
2. On the 20th January, 1927, police found 11 revolvers and 49 rounds of ammunition on the S.S. "Ko Chow", about to proceed to Wuchow. Subsequent enquiries showed that the arms, which were old and rusty, were intended to be used for a projected piracy.
3. On the 23rd March, 1927, police searched the S.S. "Hopsang", which was about to proceed to Canton, and discover- ed 35 gunny bags containing in all, 20 Lewis guns with tripods and spare parts: 9 Spanish revolvers: one German automatic pistol: 380 rounds of revolver ammunition and 19,800 rounds of rifle ammunition. Police could not obtain any definite inform- ation, but it was alleged that the arms and ammunition were shipped at Shanghai, and were destined for Canton for delivery to a political party unknown. Police enquiries were hampered by the fact that the ship had been pirated on her voyage down from Shanghai. The Lewis guns which were manufactured by the Savage Arms Company, Utica, New York, were embossed with the mark of the United States Naval Department dated 1917, but enquiries by the Chief of the United States Naval Operations, through the United States Consul-General at Hong Kong, and the Commander of the United States South China Patrol (whose representative examined the guns) revealed no useful information.
4. On the 15th April, 1927, European Revenue Officers searched a Chinese marriage boat in the harbour and seized 6 automatic pistols, with spare magazines, and 690 rounds of am- munition. Five persons were arrested of whom one, a quarter- master of a Blue Funnel ship was convicted and sentenced to three years hard labour.
5. On the 21st July, 1927 the master of a harbour sampan was convicted for possession of 24 revolvers and 3,600 rounds of ammunition. Police enquiries showed that the arms had been smuggled into the Colony on board a French Mail boat from Marseilles, and were probably destined for Canton.
No parti- culars could be obtained concerning the manufacturers of the revolvers.
K7-
6. Two Chinese coolies were arrested in the street on the 8th December, 1927, for possession of 40 American made Smith and Wesson revolvers and nearly 2,000 rounds of ammunition. Despite careful police enquiries, no trace could be found of the principal smugglers or the origin of the arms.
TRAFFIC REGULATIONS.
The following prosecutions were instituted under the Traffic Regulations (Notification No. 377: Government Gazette of 27th June, 1924)-(For the purpose of comparison 1926 figures are also inserted).
Year.
Prosecu- Convic- With-
tions. tions.
Dis- drawn. charged.
Remanded. Result.
1927......
5,740
5,431
129
102
78 $22,441.50
1926..
6,000
5,712
168
67
333333
53 22,730.50
Manslaughter
1927........
2
1
1926...
2
2
The total number of persons examined as Motor Drivers during the year was 876 as against 854 in 1926.
The total number of persons passed as motor drivers during the year was 680 as against 576 in 1926.
The total number of accidents reported during the year was 611 as against 593 in 1926.
The total number of fatal accidents was 39 as against 34 in 1926.
The total number of motor cars examined and refused licences during the year was 116 as against 91 in 1926.
The total number of motor cars examined and granted licences during the year was 680 as against 561 in 1926..
K8 -
P
The total number of Motor driver's licences suspended during the year was 13 as against 20 in 1926.
The total number of motor vehicles licensed:
From 1st July 1925 to 30th June 1926 ...
1,983
From 1st July 1926 to 30th June 1927 ... 2,332
The total number of motor driver's licences cancelled during the year was 4 as against 8 in 1926.
LICENCES.
The following licences were issued during the year:-
1926
1927
Public Jinrikshas
1,783
1,717
Private Jinrikshas
1,007
930
Public Chairs
676
610
Private Chairs
143
121
Drivers and Bearers
.16,598
17,155
Truck licences
1,109
1,018
Motor cars (Livery)
365
348
Motor cars (Private) ·
905
1,000
Motor cars (Drivers)
2,417
2,717
Motor cycle (Licences)
463
511
Motor cycle (Drivers)
475
426
Money Changers
198
209
Pawnbrokers
110
119
Chinese Wine & Spirit licences.
371
Transferred to S.I.E. Dept.
Auctioneer Licences
5
4
Billiard Tables & Bowling Alleys
3
Distillery Licences
Marine Stores
K 9-

33 {
Transferred
to
S.I.E. Dept.
29
29
Game Licences
404
358
Hawkers
... 8,528
10,891
Dangerous Goods ......
976
946
Poisons
17
22
EXECUTIVE STAFF.
Mr. D. Burlingham proceeded on leave to the United King- dom on April 11th, 1927, and was still on leave on December 31st, 1927.
Mr. C. G. Perdue was appointed to act as Deputy Superin- tendent Kowloon during Mr. Burlingham's absence.
Mr. W. R. Scott proceeded on long leave from India on March 9th, 1927 and returned to the Colony on December 9th, 1927 and resumed duty.
REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE,
Table showing the Total Strength, Expenditure and Revenue of the Police Department for the years 1917 to 1927:—
Year
Total Strength
Expenditure
Revenue
1917
1,229
1918
1,228
$ 694,115 727,233
$ 210,071
219,012
1919
1,228
840,977
225,031
1920
1,281
1,165,084
229,122
1921
1,341
1,443,627
259,876
1922
1,381
1,533,772
376,347
1923
1,589
1,633,847
349,443
1924
1,774
1,877,948
389,176
1925
1,965
1,898,823
375,832
1926
1,994
1,745,085
374,549
1927
2,026
1,759,132
393,557
.
- K 10
ESTABLISHMENT RETURN.
Return showing the Establishment and Casualties in the Force during the year 1927:—
Nationality.
Establishment
of the Force.
Enlistments.
Deaths.
Resignations
through
sickness.
Resignations through expiry of terms of service! or otherwise.
Dismissals or Desertions.
Total Number
of Casualties.
Europeans, ...
246
13
1
1
15
6
Indians,
759
206
4
13
26
Chinese,
780.
101
3
104
63
181
Water Police..
240
39
15
མག་མ
28
Total, 2,026 359
5
18
147 106 276
This number includes the Police paid by other Depart- ments, also the Engineers, Coxswains, Stokers, and Seamen, but it is exclusive of:-
7 Superintendents.
2 Accountants.
2 Storekeepers.
1 Police Secretary.
23 Clerks.
11 Telephone Clerks.
70 Interpreters.
128 Messengers and coolies.
2 Indians and 2 Chinese Constables who are employed
by Private Firms.
2 Shroffs.
Actual Strength on the 10th December, 1927.
Europeans.
Indians. Chinese.
Total.
Present,
209
668
707
1,584
Sick or Absent on
leave,
31
41
47
119
Excess over Estimates
44
44
Vacancies,
G
62
68
...
Total,
246
753
816
1,815
1
- K 11
CONDUCT.
"A" Contingent.
The conduct of the European Contingent (average strength 246) was good. The total number of reports against them was 119 as against 89 in 1926. There were 14 reports for being drunk or under the influence of drink as against 9 in 1926. Four were reported for sleeping on duty as against two in 1926. There were 24 reports for neglect of duty as against 24 in 1926.
"B" Contingent.
The conduct of the Indian Contingent (average strength 753) was fair. There were 779 reports as against 628 for the preceding year. For drunkenness there were 21 as against 10, for disorderly conduct 139 as against 28, for neglect of duty 49 as against 42, for absence from duty and station 99 as against 12, for gossiping and idling on duty 133 as against 133 and för sleeping on duty 45 as against 30. Minor offences 293. 345 men had no report as against 278 in 1926.
"C" Contingent.
The behaviour of the Chinese Contingent (Cantonese) (average strength 600 as against 576 in 1926) was fair. There were altogether 1,343 reports as against 1,149 in 1926. For drunkenness there were five as against 1 in 1926. 121 for sleeping on duty as against 105, 14 for disorderly conduct as against 29 and 1,276 for minor offences as against 1,014. 258 men had no report as against 125 in 1926. 12 men were con- victed by the Police Magistrate (dismissed from the Force) 3 for preparing and possession of prepared opium, 1 for accepting bribe, 1 for larceny and 7 for conspiring to make illegal exactions from hawkers.
"D" Contingent.
The behaviour of the Chinese Contingent (W.H.W.) (average strength 216) was good. There were altogether 498 reports as against 779 in 1926. For drunkenness there were 2 as against 5, 39 for sleeping on duty as against 83, 60 for disorderly conduct as against 36 and 387 minor offences as against 655 in 1926. 76 men had no report as against 66 in 1926.
One was convicted by the Police Magistrate (dismissed from the Force) for harbouring an unmarried girl.
"W"-Water Police.
The conduct of the seamen. coxswains, engineers and stokers (average strength 230) was fair. There were 387 reports as compared with 322 for the previous year. For disorderly con- duct there were 14 as against 16 in 1926, 21 for neglect of duty as against 13, 226 for absence from Station or launch and being late for duty as against 233 and 9 for sleeping on duty as against 5 for the previous year. 95 men had no report recorded against them as compared with 127 in 1926. 2 were convicted by the Police Magistrate, 1 for demanding money (dismissed from the Force) and 1 for possession of prepared opium, (fine paid).
- K 12
HEALTH.
Admissions to Hospital during the last three years are as
follows:
1925.
1926.
1927.
Nationality. Establish- Admis-
ment.
sions.
Establish- Admis-
ment.
Establish-
Admis-
sions.
ment.
sions.
Europeans,... 246
168
246
148
246
118
Indians,....... 564
409
572
368
753
405
Chinese,.
865
771
946
731
816
442
REWARDS AND COMMENDATIONS.
I. His Majesty the King was graciously pleased to approve the following appointment in the Most Distinguished Order of St. Michael and St. George:-
To be an Ordinary Member of the Third Class or Com- panion:-
Edward Dudley Corscaden Wolfe Esq.
II. His Majesty the King was pleased to award the Im- perial Service Medal to Mr. John Grant, lately Chief Detective Inspector.
III. His Majesty the King was pleased to award the King's Police Medal to Sub-Inspector K. W. Andrew for the successful disposition of the Police on the occasion of the encounter with armed robbers at Kwai Chung, Gin Drinkers' Bay, on 2nd December, 1926.
IV. The Honourable Colonial Secretary was directed to express to the Captain Superintendent of Police, to Mr. T. H.. King, and to the other Police Officers concerned, His Excellency the Governor's thanks for the valuable service rendered during the Bias Bay punitive expedition of 1st September 1927.
V. The Honourable Colonial Secretary was directed by His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government, to ex- press to Mr. T. H. King his high appreciation of the energy and resource displayed by the latter as Director of Criminal Intel- ligence in securing the arrest and conviction of the men who murdered Mrs. Mackay at Chai Wan on the 6th August 1927.
VI. His Excellency the Governor was pleased to specially commend Mr. L. H. V. Booth, Assistant Director of Criminal Intelligence, for zeal and resource in the investigation and pro- secution of the charge against the Cantonese Police Hawker Squad for making illegal exactions from Hawkers during 1927. Before the Police Magistrate on 25.10.27, 7 constables were convicted. Two constables concerned had previously absconded.
K 13
VII. His Excellency the Governor was pleased to grant Medals and Commendations for meritorious services rendered by them during the year 1927 to the following Police Officers:
European:
A.S.P.
Sub-Inspector Inspector L.S.A. 107 Acting C.DI. Inspector
>>
...
MEDALS.
W. Kent
D. W. Barnett P. Grant T. McMahon A. N. Reynolds H. J. Paterson R. Marks
2nd Class Medal.
""
"
3rd
"}
""
''
4th
"
""
""
19
""
""
11
*
**
Indian:
E. Bloor
19
"
F. W. Shaftain A. J. W. Dorling
Sub-Inspector Miran Bux
""
P.C.B. 323 Sgt. Major P.S.B. 381 P.C.B. 382
Cantonese:
Inspector P.C.C. 62 Inspector Sgt. Major P.C.C. 406
...
...
Nand Singh Abdulla
Niamat Khan Sirdar Ali Khan Mohamed Ashar
Chu Heung Wong Hin
Ng Muk
Kwong Tin Kan Fong Cheung Chan Piu
....
....
....
3rd Class Medal.
11
"
17
"J
"
4th
""
"
33
2nd Class Medal.
3rd
""
""
4th
"}
""
"}
""
16
''
19
P.S.C. 64
Lo Wong
""
""
"
P.C.C. 446
Liu Tung
"
447
Chan Tim
"
""
"
643
Ng Fuk
""
""
"1
COMMENDATIONS.
Inspector
Acting Inspector
L.S.A. 156
P.C.C. 314
196
R. Lanigan.
C. P. Fallon
W. C. R. Lamprill.
Ng Chau.
Tsang Tak.
MUSKETRY AND REVOLVER Courses 1927.
A.-Musketry: Europeans.
192 Officers fired their Annual Musketry Course at Taikoo Rifle Range, Quarry Bay during December 1927 and are classi- fied as under:
K 14
Inspector Booker obtained the highest score with 186 out of a possible 220. L.S.A. 126 McKay was second with 179.
Classification Part II.
Advanced Course.
Marksmen
24
Marksmen
3
1st Class Shots
34
1st Class Shots
38
2nd
18
2nd
67
"}
3rd
Nil.
3rd
8
91
Failures
Failures
Nil.
''
TOTAL
76
TOTAL
116
76
Total Fired
192
A.-Revolver: Europeans.
203 Officers fired their Advanced Revolver Course at Ken- nedy Road Revolver Range as against 199 in 1926 and are classified as under:
1st Class Shots
2nd
3rd
Failures
TOTAL
117
59
27
Nil.
203
B.-Musketry: Indians.
581 Indians fired their Annual Musketry Course and are classified as under:
I.P.C.B. 4 obtained the highest score with 152 out of a
possible 220.
Advanced.
Classification Part II.
Marksmen
6
Marksmen
14
1st Class Shots
10
1st Class Shots
98
2nd
17
2nd
177
37
-
3rd
Nil.
3rd
226
""
Failures
Failures
33
TOTAL
33
TOTAL
548
33
Total Fired
581
K 15
B.-Revolver: Indians.
569 Indians fired their Preliminary Revolver Course. sible score 110. 550 passed. 19 failed.
D.-Musketry: Wei Hai Wei.
Pos-
75 Wei Hai Wei men fired their Annual Musketry Course and are classified as under:-
P.S.D. 55 obtained the highest score with 118 out of a
possible 160.
Marksmen
1st Class Shots
2nd
23
3rd
27
Failures
TOTAL
2
16
23
24
10
75
D.-Revolver: Wei Hai Wei.
150 Wei Hai Wei men fired the Preliminary Revolver Course. Possible points 110. 143 passed.
143 passed. 7 failed.
C.-Musketry: Cantonese.
Cantonese Police are not armed with rifles,
C.-Revolver: Cantonese.
483 Chinese fired the Preliminary Revolver Course. Pos- sible 110. 470 passed. 13 failed.
SPECIAL EVENTS.
1.-GENERAL.
As foreshadowed in the Annual Report of 1926 the resump- tion of regular intercourse between Hong Kong and Canton in October 1926 which resulted in a slight increase in crime in the Colony towards the end of that year led to a further increase particularly in burglaries and larcenies in 1927. Serious crime although showing an increase over 1926 showed also a marked decline in murders and generally in crime due to political motives. A very good working year from a Police point of view was however marred by a shooting affray between a Police Search Picquet and a small band of armed robbers who were just returning from a successful venture in the Western District of Victoria. When held up by the Search Picquet the robbers immediately opened fire on the picquet seriously wounding the European Sergeant in Charge and a Chinese Detective. The Sergeant though wounded shot one robber dead. Another rob-
K 16
ber was wounded and captured but not before he had shot fatally two constables who joined in the chase. A third robber was captured unwounded. The fourth was arrested later. This affray and the murder of an European lady who was attacked by footpads at Shaukiwan early in August while walking along a lonely footpath after dark were the only two really serious outrages of the year within the Colony itself and there is little doubt that in the murder case the original motive was robbery only and that the murder was unintentional.
2.-PIRACY.
Piracies of ocean going steamers continued spasmodically throughout the year until the Autumn and protests to Canton received no response whatever. It was therefore decided to send a Naval expedition to Bias Bay, the seat of the trouble affecting coastal shipping. On March 23rd following the pirat- ing of the British steamer "Hop Sang", a Naval expedition to which a party of Police was attached was got ready and landed off the village of Hoi Chau at the head of Bias Bay at dawn on that date. The villages of Hoi Chau and Kwai Chow, well known pirate nests, were destroyed. A number of pirate craft were also destroyed. There were no casualties on either side. Following this expedition no further attacks on British vessels took place until the 30th August when the "Yat Shing", another steamer owned by the Indo China Navigation Co., was pirated. A second expedition to Bias Bay was organized on September 1st and destroyed a portion of the pirate village of Cheung Pai including a number of pirate dwellings and also a number of pirate dwellings in the village of Fan Lo Kong the centre of pirate activities in Bias Bay. Further native craft in the Bay were also destroyed. Since that date there has been a complete cessation of attacks on British coastal steamers. In October a Chinese steamer, the S.S. "Irene", was pirated and, while entering Bias Bay, was called upon to heave to by H.M. Submarine L.4 which was in the vicinity. The pirates refused to allow the officers to stop the ship and it was not until a shell landed in her engine room that the steamer stopped. She eventually caught fire and a number of pirates and passengers were drowned, while the bulk of the passengers and 7 pirates were rescued and taken to Hong Kong. The failure of this piracy following so closely on the punitive measures against Bias Bay villages appears to have had a sobering effect on the pirates and there have been no further outrages since. In all 15 pirates were actually hanged for piracy in Victoria Gaol during 1927. This number comprized 8 who took part in the Sunning piracy in 1926 and the 7 "Irene" pirates. The number lost by drowning owing to the miscarriage of these two piracies cannot be less than 30. Coastal piracy may therefore be con- sidered as having received a salutary check in 1927. River piracies have not been so successfully dealt with during the year. The piracy of the S.S. "Kochow" a Hong Kong--Wuchow steamer, was the most notable River piracy.
:
K 17
3.-POLITICAL.
The political situation assumed a very serious aspect early in 1927 when anti foreign, and particularly anti British pro- paganda, disseminated by Bolshevik Agents made itself felt throughout China, particularly in the Yang Tse region and also in Canton. As a result of the strengthening of the Naval and Military forces in Hong Kong as well as in Central China peace was maintained and the local situation improved very consider- ably as the year advanced. Early in the year several Labour Unions, which had voluntarily closed during the 1925 boycott but had not been officially closed, re-opened and renewed their political activities in the Colony. As a result labour troubles began again but these were successfully checked by the closing of the two principal political unions, i.e. the Hong Kong General Labour Union and the Seamens' Union whose seditious activi- ties in Hong Kong have been notorious for some years. Since the closing of these two Unions a much more healthy atmos- phere has prevailed in labour circles and strikes have been few and far between. There was a slight recrudescence of illegal labour activity at the end of the year following on the short lived Communist success in Canton on the 10th December. After the successful coup carried out against Marshal Li Chai Sam's adherents during his temporary absence in Shanghai, General Cheung Fat Fui, who took over control of Canton, was unable to maintain order in that city and for two days it was in the hands of the Reds who wrought very considerable damage and murdered and looted extensively. They were eventually driven out by a mixed force in which General Li Fuk Lam figured conspicuously. Within a short time Marshal Li recover- ed control and General Cheung and his followers were com- pelled to retire in disgrace. Two days after the Canton outbreak a few posters exhorting the people to rise and assert themselves against the Imperialists were found in the streets and a mild attempt was made to interfere with the Low Level Tram Ser- vice. Otherwise the Canton coup failed to elicit any response locally.
4. INSTITUTIONS.
During the year two new institutions connected with the Police came into existence. The Hong Kong Police Reserve. which was disbanded in 1919 was re-established on a permanent basis and fresh legislation was introduced to effect the change. Since 1925 the Special constables had been continuously en- rolled, it was therefore considered advisable to call up and reorganize as an auxiliary force those who were anxious to be- come more familiar with and efficient in Police work. A Chinese Company was first formed which numbered 70 at the end of the year and later an Indian Company of roughly 50. Flying Squad (Motor cyclists) who have continued to render most valuable service to the Police and the community were embodied in the Reserve and finally at the close of the year a Sharpshooters Company (International) was formed thus bring- ing up the Reserve to close on 200. The Reserve is not large but all its members are keen and all sections have already rendered most useful service.
The
K 18
The Special Constables are still enrolled and they number 300.
The Second Institution connected closely with the Police which was inaugurated in 1927 was the General Charities Organization. It had been felt for some time that a central body which would represent all Charitable Institutions in the Colony and act as a general Information Bureau would be most desirable to prevent waste of funds and check the granting of promiscuous and often misplaced charity to the undeserving. As a result of the formation of the General Charities Organiza- tion any unknown person appealing for help is now referred in the first place to the Honorary Secretary of the Association who holds the records of all persons who have received help during recent years, and no assistance beyond temporary board and lodging is granted until it is ascertained that the applicant is a deserving person. Although full information has not yet been forthcoming from all Charitable Institutions in Hong Kong, loafers and professional beachcombers, who prey on one society after another, have received a check, and it is hoped will be completely eliminated, if business firms and also private individuals will refer their cases to the General Charities Organization before distributing largesse to all and sundry.
The Organization consists of a representative from each Charitable Society which contributes towards the funds of the Organization also a Chairman, Secretary and Treasurer elected by these representatives. Government makes an annual grant of $500 which sum together with the annual contributions of the Charitable Associations represented in the Organization goes towards defraying the cost of a paid clerk who keeps the records and supplies the required information on all applicants for Charity who are known to the Organization. Residents of the Colony in receipt of regular help from any particular Charitable Association do not come within the scope of the General Charities Organization and their names are not sent forward for inclusion in the General Charities Organization General Register. Their cases are dealt with privately by the Institutions con- cerned.
ANNEXES.
WATER POLICE.
Details concerning the Water Police are contained in Annexe A.
RECRUITING AND POLICE TRAINING SCHOOL.
Details concerning recruiting and the Police Training School will be found in Annexe B.

K 19
REPORT ON NEW TERRITORIES.
A report on the New Territories
the New Territories (North) is attached.
Annexe C.
GUARDS.
Details concerning the Anti-piracy and Shore Guards are in Annexe D.
STREET BOYS' CLUB.
A report on the working of the Street Boys' Club is attach- ed. Annexe E.
23rd April, 1928.

E. D. C. WOLFE, Captain Superintendent of Police.
SERIOUS OFFENCES.
K 20
Table I.
I:
YEARLY RETURN OF CRIME FOR THE WHOLE COLONY FOR THE YEAR 1927.
Charge cases.
Cases without charge.
Total cases.
Charge cases.
Cases without charge.
Total cases.
1926.
1927.
% Charge cases to total.
Europeans.
Indians,
Chinese.
Europeans.
Indians.
PERSONS
CONVICTED.
PERSONS DISCHARGED.
VALUE OF PROPERTY STOLEN
Chinese.
VALUE OF PROPERTY
RECOVERED.
$ C.
Arins,
112
7
119
85
19
104
81%
3
Assault (Serious),
4
32
2
34 94%
79
34
...
34
12
asa
Assault with intent to rob,
2
2
5
5 100%
:
Burglary,
7
46
Coinage Offences,
...
Deportation,
80
80
88
53
16
75
91 18%
13
13 100%
172
172 | 100%
16
12
172
762
4
4
I
Embezzlement,
22
59
81
15 34
49
30%
1
House and Godown Breaking,
24
47
71
25
79
104 .14%
Intimidation and Extortion,..
17
17
-20
20 100%
Kidnapping,
Larceny,
11
4
15
10
10 100%
:
1,068 1,087 2,155 1,389
1,226
1,226
2,156
2,156 56%
4
Larceny from Dwelling Houses,
49 455
504
67
517
584
11%
Larceny on Ships and Wharves, Manslaughter,
Murder,
Murder, Attempted,
37
62
99
69
88
157
43%
...
12
...
29
19
14
11
3
...
2 1,328
4
169 144,503.86
23,188.69
63
70
...
11,869.38
2 254,150.49
1 21,936.59 4,156.38
2,698.65
12,527.42
11 92,281.11 14,858.81
7 25,337,32
2,176.10
8
8
5
11
16
27
10
27
7 71%
3
...
17
58%
4
8
2
2
1
1 100%
Obtaining by False Pretences, .
50
20
70
60
22
82 73%
3
53
11
8,478.40 1,049.73
Receiving,
118
118
159
159 100%
90
101
Robbery,...
23
96
119
26
74
Women and Girls,...
8
8 13
100 26% 13 100%
Other Serious Offences,
135
20 155
202
14 216 93%
6
:::
CO
39
10
6
7
164
Total,..
1,794 1,919 3,713 2,394 -2,159 4,553
17
...
18 2,212
:
14 43,481.21 2,340.47
93 10,255.00
498 611,293.36 63,308.25
312.00
MINOR OFFENCES.
-K 21
Table I.- Continued.
YEARLY RETURN OF CRIME FOR THE WHOLE COLONY FOR THE YEAR 1927.
1926.
1927.
PERSONS
CONVICTED.
Chinese.
Europeans.
VALUE OF
PERSONS
DISCHARGED,
PROPERTY
STOLEN.
Indians.
Chinese.

5
VALUE OF
PROPERTY
RECOVERED.

*Assault,
310
310
332
332 100%
20
355
1
ลง
72
Damage to Property,
40
40
13
13 100%
2
10
Dangerous Goods,
53
53
25
25 100%
25
Drunkenness,...
38
38
24
24 100%
17
3
7
Forestry Offences,
391
391
334
334 100%
462
...
...
Gambling, ......
335
335
503
503 | 100%
2,417
Hawking Offences,.
7,839
7,839 9,109
9,109 100%
9,112
Lottery Offences,
224
224 288
288 100%
301
...
Mendicants,
45
45
13
13 100%
12
Merchant Shipping Ordinance,
306
306
273
273 100%
1
501
Morphine,
...
31
3
7
7❘ 100%
3
Nuisances,
513
513
248
248 | 100%
260
Opium,
3,726
1 3,727 5,855
5,855 100%
9,741
Revenue,
53
53
183
:
183 100%
*Rogue and Vagabond,
50
50
47
47 100%
Stowaways,
23
23
26
26 100%
16
Co
*Unlawful Possession,
258
258
326
326 100%
307
...
Vagrants,
37
37
39
39 100% 40
CO
Vehicles and Traffic,.
1,026
1,026
773
773 100%
...
776
:.
*Women and Girls,
39
39 103
103 100%
2
101
Other Miscellaneous Offences,.
1,025
1,025 1,370
1,370 100%
21
8 1,662
ลล
6
22
220
249
70
1
14
2
12
1,119
196
1
24
38
12
...
19
2
44
1
29
2
13
...
125
218
2
...
Total,.
16,334
116,335 19,891
19,891
112
42 26,305
11
32,037 611,293.36 63,308,25
Grand Total,
20,084 18,128 1,920 |20,084 |22,285| 2,159 24,441
129
60 28,517
15
6 2,535 611,293.36 63,308.25
* Shown in Serious,
C.
- K 22
Table II.
PIRACIES REPORTED TO HONG KONG POLICE During 1927 othER THAN BIAS Bay.
Date.
Ship, Name and address of Complainant.
Place of Occurrence.
Estimated No. of Pirates. Dialect spoken.
Estimated Value of Pro- perty Stolen.
No. of Persons Kidnapped.
Remarks.
Jan.
4
Cargo Junk T3699H.
8
Cargo Junk T4089H.
13
""
14.
19
"
Feb. 4
24
26
Mar. 6
Apr.
11
4
11
May 5
Cargo Junk No. unknown Cargo Junk T1784H.
Fishing Junk No. unknown Cargo Junk T3855H.
Cargo Junk Unlicenced Cargo Junk 156W.
Fishing Junk No. unknown Fishing Junk 2325 H.W.
Fishing Junk 3784 H.A. Cargo Junk T4139H.
Cargo Junk No. unknown
Fishing Junk Unlicenced
Chinese Waters, Between Hong
Kong and Shekki Chinese Waters, near Lin Tin British Waters, off Fu Tau Mun Chinese Waters, off Ping Chau Chinese Waters, near Ki 0, Heungshan
Chinese Waters, Between Hong Kong and Macao
Unknown.
$8,400.00
1,995.00
7 males, 1 female.
8
650.00
6 Hoklos.
1,275.00
8
-685.00
1 male.
All crew.
Boarded from boat.
Taken by a Steam Launch. Boarded from boat.
""
""
Unknown.
210.00
4 males.
Taken by a Steam Launch.
6 Hoklos.
20.00
30
10
Boarded from boat.
Boarded from boat and Junk taken
Junk taken.
Boarded from Junk.
One man
Chinese Waters, near Kim Mun Chinese Waters, at Kwai Chau Chinese Waters, near Kit Shek Chinese Waters, near Sam Mun
Chinese Waters, off Ping Hoi Chinese Waters, 8 Miles from Ping Hoi City
British Waters, at mouth of Sam Chun River
Chinese Waters, in San Mei Harbour
Chinese Waters, Between Ping Hoi
and Hong Kong Chinese Waters, off Ma Hong
4 small boats full of Hoklos. 8 Hoklos.
5 boats full of Hoklos.
6
5
15
30 Punti and
Hoklo.
72.00 Unknown.
J
950.00
wounded.
Attack beaten off.
290.00 321.00 180.00
2 males.
Boarded from boat.
1 male.
100 00 19.00
2 males.
Boarded from Boats.
Junk &c. taken and recovered at Cheung Chow. 4 men arrested. Boarded from a Junk.
Boarded from junk. Driven off by a Steam Launch.
Attack beaten off.
Boarded from boats. Junk and Crew
held until ransom paid.
Boarded from boats.
9
Cargo Junk T1108H.
23
"
26
31
Cargo Junk T4572H.
June 2
Cargo Junk T4779H.
16
13
Fishing Junk 21 H.W.
2 boats full of Hoklos.
Aug. 4
Cargo Junk T3148H.
12
2,149.00
28
Cargo Junk T1732.
British Waters, near Kwo Chow Is..
14
2,314.00
Chinese Waters, S.E. of Single Is.. Chinese Waters, in Harlem Bay, Ping Hoi
British Waters, Between Hau Hoi and Hong Kong
7 Punti.
K 23
Table II,-Continued.
PIRACIES REPORTED TO HONG KONG POLICE DURING 1927 OTHER THAN BIAS BAY.
Date.
Ship, Name and address of Complainant.
Place of Occurrence.
Estimated No. of Pirates. Dialect spoken.
Estimated Value of Pro- perty Stolen.
No. of Persons Kidnapped.
Remarks.
$
Sept. 3
S.S. Ko Chow (Capt. Morgan)
Chinese Waters, between Shum
Shui and Shiu Hing (W. River).
72
1,500.00
113
9
Fishing Boat 2556 H.W.
""
Chinese Waters, off Tau Tau, Ping Hoi
Unknown,
14.40
19
Fishing Boat 2226 H.W.
Chinese Waters, off Ping Hoi
11
28
Fishing Boat 2617 H.W.
Chinese Waters, near Tai Shing Chun Ping Hoi
10
Not given.
Oct.
1
Cargo Boat T1638H.W.
Chinese Waters, off Sha Wan Hau Pun U.
Unknown.
5,840.00
14
S.S. Shing On
Chinese Waters, near White Sand, West River
Not given.
60
21
28
29
Nov. 2
Cargo Junk No. unknown Fishing Junk 2603 H.W. Fishing Junk No. unknown
S.S. Shing On
Chinese Waters, between Kit Shek and Hong Kong
6 Punti.
482.00
Chinese Waters, 35 Miles S.W. of Waglan
5 Hoklos.
945.00
Chinese Waters, between Hoi Mun and Hong Kong
Unknown.
315.00
Chinese Waters, off lang Koo Choi, West River
7
""
Dec.
Fishing Junk 1809 H.W. Cargo Boat Unlicenced
Chinese Waters, off Tau Tau near San Mei
15 IIoklos.
970.00
Chinese Waters, off Sha U Chung
near San Mei
12
12 passengers held up the ship and 50 others boarded later. Chief Engineer killed.
Boarded from Hoklo Boat. One man
killed.
Attack beaten off, I man wounded.
Boarded from boat.
Chinese officer and soldiers acting as escort turned pirates.
Held up by passenger-pirates. Again pirated in November. Boarded from a boat.
wounded.
Boarded from boat.
One inan
Pirated twice on same voyage and left adrift without sailing gear. Fired on from shore. An attempt by one of the crew to stop the vessel failed. Previously pirated in October.
Boarded from boat.
One man killed. Attackers did not
board.
K 24
J
Table II.-Continued.
PIRACIES REPORTED TO HONG KONG POLICE DURING 1927 IN BIAS BAY.
Estimated
Date.
Ship, Name and address of Complainant.
Place of Occurrence.
Estimated No. of Pirates. Value of Pro- Dialect spoken. perty Stolen.
No. of Persons Kidnapped.
Remarks.
Jan. 29
S.S. Seang Bee
Between Hong Kong and Singapore.
50
$40,000.00
10
5
Mar. 23
S.S. Hopsang
Between Swatow and Hong Kong.
14
10,000.00
14
July 21
S.S. Solviken
120 miles S. of Hong Kong
30 to 40
32,167.30
Sept. 1
S.S. Yatshing
Oct. 21
S.S. Irene
.......
Between Swatow and Shanghai Between Shanghai and Amoy ......
20 13 to 18
20,099.00
Vessel taken to Bias Bay. Some of the pirates later identified among those of S.S. Irene.
Vessel taken to Bias Bay. One European passenger wounded. Vessel taken to Bias Bay, Captain and 2nd Officer wounded. Some of the pirates later identified among those of S.S. Irene. Vessel taken to Bias Bay. Vessel stopped by a Submarine en- tering Bias Bay. Vessel and contents lost. 7 pirates captured and executed.
*
יד
Year.
-K 25-m
Table III.
DISCHARGED PRISONERS, DEPORTEES AND VAGRANTS 1927.
Number of persons
Banished from Hong Kong.
Number of persons dis:
charged from Gaol, of whom descriptions are on record.
Number of persons Deported from Singa- pore and Re-Banished
Number of Vagrants
from Singapore sent away.
Number of Undesirables from Dutch East Indies
repatriated.
Number of Rangoon
1926
1,185
2,370
546
156
378
1927
1,513.
2,539
667
284
545
Deportees.
6889
Decrease
Increase
328
169
121
128
167
30
50
Number of Undesirables
from Nauru and Ocean Island.
Nil.
50
}
K 26
Table IV (A).
ARMS AND AMMUNITION SEIZED AND CONFISCATED DURING THE YEAR, 1927.
In Store on December 31st, 1927.
Description of Arms.
Arms Seized.
Ammunition seized.
Arms.
Ammunition.
Winchester Rifles
Rifles-Various German Rifles
Mauser Pistols
Automatic Pistols Revolvers
Shot Guns
Luger Pistols
22
20
2,191
11
23
1,911
7
9,875
5
650
9
17
25,567
3
125,165
33.
5,542
17
10,643
150
16,941
97
7,323
5
382
5
435
23
4.927
342
50,041
1
German Machine Gun
Walking Stick Guns
American Machine Guns
20
19,800
303
- K 27
Table IV (B).
ARMS AND AMMUNITION 1927.
Classification of Seizures of Arms and Ammunition according to place of origin.
:
Grand
Spanish. U.S.A. French. Austrian.
Belgian.
British. Canadian. German. Unknown.
Total.
Rifles Winchester
Amm:
659
6599
20
""
Various
Amm:
100
Mauser
Amm:
""
20
1,532
2,191
23
23
1,811
1,911
5
5
650
650
Pistols: Mauser
Amm:
80
8,000
1.000
17
4,467
17
12,020
25,567
,,
""
Automatic
2
4
4
7
33
''
Amm:
1,573
1,508
700
""
256
23
1,505
5,542
23
Luger
Amm:
3,733
1,194
4,927
""
""
Revolvers
6
Amm:
57
4,515
3,713
""
Shot Gun
Amm:
382
Lewis Machine Gun
20
. Amm:
19,800
=
Primers
4,000
1
87
2,121
6,586
150
16,941
4
5
382
20
19,800
900
4,900
K 28
Annexe A.
REPORT ON THE WATER POLICE.
The strength of the Water Police during the year was 1 Inspector, 3 Sub Inspectors, 3 Crown Sergeants, 25 Lance Sergeants (including 1 at Lok Ma Chau), 34 Coxswains, 120 Seamen, 38 Engineers, 39 Stokers, 4 Boatswains, 4 Barrack Sergeants, Motor Mechanic, 8 Detectives, 6 C. C. Searchers, 6 Temporary Searches, 1 Female Searcher, 17 Boatmen. Total 310.
The above includes all the detectives at the Water Police Station and those employed under the Piracy Prevention Ordinance.
CRUISING LAUNCHES.
During the year under review Cruising Launches Nos. 1, 2, 3 & 4 have had their yearly survey and annual overhaul, besides being slipped quarterly, when minor repairs were effected. No. 3 is not very seaworthy and has been condemned and will be replaced in 1928.
HARBOUR LAUNCHES.
Launches Nos. 5, 6, 7, 9 & 14 have been overhauled and are in good condition, and have been employed on Harbour Beats throughout the year. A new launch is being supplied in 1928 to replace the old No. 8 which was condemned and ceased running on 25/11/25.
MOTOR BOATS.
Motor Boats Nos. 10, 11 & 12 have been overhauled, and are in good running condition.
SEARCHLIGHTS.
Searchlights on Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 & 14 Launches have been overhauled and exercised and are in good working order.
PULLING BOats.
All Pulling boats and gear are in good order, including the sampan taken over by the C.I.1). "T" for duty in the Harbour.
WIRELESS.
No. 4 Launch Wireless Cabin was refitted to take an extra Wireless Operator, and two operators are now carried. was fitted with wireless on 15.1.27, and carries one operator. No. 2 There is room for a second operator, and it is hoped that another operator will be provided early in 1928.
1
:
K 29
MUSKETRY.
Vickers Gun Courses have been fired every Quarter on Nos. 1, 2, 3 & 4 launches. The guns are in good condition. Chinese Boatswains, Coxswains and Seamen who normally carry firearms have been periodically exercised in the use of Revolvers and Winchester Rifles, and Courses have been fired.
Return of Changes in the Establishment in 1927: •
Resignations
Dismissals
Struck Off
Retirements
Invalided
On transfer to Land Force
4
11
1
9
2
N
Enlistments
2 enlistments to cover 2 vacancies
on 31.12.26.
10 enlistments additional according
to 1927 Estimates.
Vacancy on 31.12.27
28
39
1
40
Annexe B.
POLICE TRAINING SCHOOL.
I. RECRUITING TABLE FROM 1.1.27 TO 31.12.27.
Euro-
pean.
Canton-
Indian.
District Watch-
ese.
men.
Continuing instruction
from 1926
14
112
25
6
Recruited
21
170
102
20
Passed out
20
137
38
21
Struck off
1
16
16
Transferred to Gaol Staff..
1
Transferred to Guards
Department
Appointed Teacher
Resigned
Continuing Instruction
21
2
1928
2
3
13
126
71
2
1
K 30
II.-EXAMINATIONS.
During the year Twenty-two examinations were held for promotion. The following table shews the number of Officers who qualified for the various ranks.
In- Sub In-Sergeant spector. spector.
Major.
Sergeant.
Lance Sergeant.
European
Indian
11
10
20
20
2
12
14
2223
Chinese
(Cantonese)
III.
SPECIAL TUITION.
A.-During the year 22 Indian and 39 Chinese (Northern Contingent) Police were specially trained in Traffic Duties: 20 Indians and 37 Chinese (Northern Contingent) qualified and were appointed to the Traffic Staff: 2 Indians and 2 Chinese failed to qualify and were returned to regular duty.
B. The Chinese, Indian, and Flying Squad Detachments of the Hong Kong Police Reserve were trained in Drill, Revolver Firing, and Police Duties. The following table shews the num- ber of Officers who have passed in the various subjects.
Drill.
Revolver Course.
Knowledge of Instruction Book.
Chinese Company
Indian Company.
Ac
57
68
46
46
23
42
31
Flying Squad (Motor
Cycles)
23
12
6
C.-First Aid:-The following table shews the number of regular Police Officers and Recruits who were trained, and passed or failed, in First Aid to the Injured.
Trained.
Qualified. Failed.
Undergoing a Course.
European..........
93
69
24
Indian
159
136
23
60
Chinese
(Cantonese)...
323
274
49
58
i
K 31
IV. DISCIPLINE.
One European recruit was dismissed for misconduct. One Indian recruit was on the 18th November, 1927, sentenced to 4 months imprisonment for insubordination, and subsequently dismissed and fifteen Indian and sixteen Chinese recruits were struck off during the year as unsuitable. Discipline was other- wise satisfactory.
Annexe C.
REPORT ON THE NEW TERRITORIES (NORTH).
1.-ESTABLISHMENT.
The following changes occurred in the Police establishment during the year:-
(a) Taipo. On the 5th September the W.H.W. Police
were replaced by Sikhs.
(b) Ping Shan.-On the 17th June the W.H.W. Police
were replaced by Mohamedans.
(c) Castle Peak.-On the 22nd June the W.H.W.
Police were replaced by Mohamedans.
(d) Sha Tin.-On the 26th August the W.H.W. Police
were replaced by Sikhs.
(e) Au Tau.—On the 9th May the W.H.W. Police
were replaced by Mohamedans.
NOTE:-There are now no W.H.W. Police in the N.T. (N).
ན་
2.-SICKNESS.
There were 363 fewer cases of malaria in 1927 than in the preceding year, every station showing improvement with the single exception of Ping Shan. The figures for Sha Tau Kok are remarkable: 7 cases in 1927 as against 80 in 1926. The decrease in malaria cases is probably due to the excessive rain- fall which kept the streams and pools free of mosquito larvae and the continued substitution of Indian for W.H.W. Police at 5 stations. The Indian Police withstand malaria very much better than the Northern Chinese.
3.-ACCIDENTS (TRAFFIC).
Motor Traffic in the N.T. (N) was responsible for 24 accidents-1 fatal and 23 other. The figures for 1926 were 4
and 20 respectively.
K 32 →→→
Accidents, Fatal (Non Traffic).
Total 5. Three deaths were due to accidents on the railway and 2 to drowning. One of the latter was the accidental drown- ing of Signalman C. E. Scarlett, 13th Infantry, in a stream near Sheung Shui,
4.-FIRE.
There were 3 fires in 1927, compared with 11 in 1926. Only one of the three fires was of a serious nature, i.e. the total destruction of the Fu Lung Beancurd Factory at Tai Kiu, Un Long, involving a loss of $4,000.
a loss of $4,000. With regard to Hill Fires these were considerably less than in previous years.
5.-CRIME.
Serious offences committed in the N.T. (N) during 1927 numbered 23 compared with 26 in 1926. There were 3 murders and 14 robberies on shore and 5 robberies and 1 piracy afloat.
Of the 17 Land Crimes, 8 were committed in the first Quarter compared with only 2 in the last Quarter of the year. On the 5th August an encounter between police and robbers occurred at Tsung Un Ha, on the Ta Ku Ling border, resulting in the wounding of 3 robbers, one of whom died after escaping to C.T., and the wounding of P.C.B. 140. It is noteworthy that since this affair no further border raids have occurred.
6.-FRONTIER INCIDENTS.
The situation across the border, as. elsewhere in C.T., has developed into one of chronic unrest, and there are no present indications of any change for the better. Fortunately however no serious frontier outrages occurred during the year.
Annexe D.
Guards.
STRENGTH.
The average strength for the year was 725 (Ships Guards 317, Shore Guards 408) as compared with 702 in 1926 (Ships Guards 250, Shore Guards 452). Ships Guards are employed in anti piracy protection duties. Shore Guards are employed as watchmen throughout the Colony.
K 33
The number of registrations during the year was
of dismissals
189
37
>>
"
of men taken on strength during the year was. 220
The majority of guards who resigned returned to India on leave and will in due course return to the Colony.
There was a steady demand for guards throughout the year, and as sufficient suitable men were not available locally, it was found necessary to recruit 50 guards from Singapore in February and 80 in October.
CONDUCT.
Discipline throughout the year was good. There were 37 dismissals for misconduct.
LEWIS GUNNERS (GUARDS).
A special force of 50 Guards ex soldiers and trained Lewis Gunners was employed during the year to supplement the Police in small Police posts and in the New Territories.
Annexe E.
STREET BOYS' CLUB.
The membership of the Club is 26 of whom 10 boys were in the Club in January 1927.
*
During the year 15 Boys absconded from the Club, some for no apparent reason. A number of Boys who had been arrested for minor offences were discharged by the Police Magistrates and admitted to the Club as a temporary measure. However in many cases these boys absconded on the following day. 4 Boys left the Club to look for work and no further news has been heard of them. 5 boys were sent away, (one was found to be a leper) for offences committed outside the Club premises. 9 boys obtained employment during the year, 2 have since rejoined the Club as their services were no longer required.
K 34
The funds of the Club to date are $2,523.52.
The employed boys are encouraged to save part of their salaries with the result to date they have saved $128.14, 1 boy has $40.34 in the Bank, another $35.24, others have smaller
sums.
The boys are supplied with 2 meals per diem for which they pay themselves. This arrangement has proved quite a success. It insures that they have regular meals.
During the Summer months the Boys attended Kennedy Town bathing beach regularly every week for swimming. 8 boys took part in the Police Aquatic Sports held at the V.R.C. Baths in September. During the Winter months hot baths are pro- vided regularly at Police Headquarters.
During the year the Club Premises were moved from Police Headquarters to the top floor of No. 40 Hollywood Road not far from Police Headquarters. The new premises were rented to the Club by Mr. Chung Shu Cheung for 3 months rent free and are now occupied at half rent as long as the Club occupies them. A Chinese Sergeant together with his wife reside on the premises and attend to the welfare of the Boys.
It is significant that the average number of juvenile offenders in Victoria Gaol during 1926 and 1927 was only 5.
A
in
K 35
REPORT BY THE CHIEF OFFICER HONG KONG FIRE BRIGADE.
1. Cost of Fire Brigade. The cost of the Fire Brigade for the year 1927 was $190,350.27 as compared with $206,232.50 in 1926 and $333,846.00 in 1925. Special Expenditure amounting to $14,036.23 is included.
2. Owing to the financial stringency it has not been possible to commence work on any of the new Stations required by the Fire Brigade either in Hong Kong or Kowloon. The Fire Brigade in Kowloon is still housed in one small Station at Tsimshatsui and some leased Chinese premises at Mong Kok.
3. Recruits. The difficulty in connection with recruits for the Fire Brigade has now disappeared although vacancies are still of frequent occurrence owing to the ease with which men can leave the Brigade if they wish to do so, i.e. on one month's notice. However, during 1927 it was not possible to bring the staff up to establishment owing to the lack of accommodation; this defect has now been remedied.
4. It is satisfactory to record that there were no really serious fires in Hong Kong or Kowloon during the year 1927. It is a matter of regret that one fireman was killed in the execution of his duty.
The full report of the Superintendent, Fire Brigade, giving details of the work of the Brigade during the year 1927 is attached.
20th March, 1928.
E. D. C. WOLFE
Chief Officer, Fire Brigade
K 36
REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT HONG KONG FIRE BRIGADE FOR THE YEAR 1927.
CALLS TO FIRES.
The number of calls received during the year totalled 183; 119 to fires, 22 to chimney fires, 13 to collapses or landslides, and 29 false alarms.
Compared with the previous year (1926) there is an increase of 13 calls.
There were 6 serious fires, details of which appear in Table II.
Of the false alarms; 6 were maliciously given, 11 were given with good intent, and 12 were due to electrical faults of Fire Alarms.
LIVES LOST; PERSONS INJURED; PERSONS RESCUED.
Two persons lost their lives or received such injuries that they subsequently succumbed.
Five persons received minor injuries from which they re- covered.
Four persons were rescued by means of the Fire Brigade appliances.
Fourteen persons were extricated alive by the Brigade from collapses and landslides, while 5 corpses were recovered.
PERSON INJURED WHILE GIVING ASSISTANCE.
Private E. Kendall, 1st Queen's Regiment, was injured on the head by falling masonry whilst assisting the Brigade at the fire in Reclamation Street, Yaumati, on the 23/12/27. He has since recovered.
STAFF KILLED OR INJURED IN THE EXECUTION OF DUTY.
Killed Injured
HEALTH OF STAFF.
1
13
During the year there were 179 cases of illness mostly due
to beri-beri and fever.
- K 37
STRENGTH OF STAFF.
The authorised strength of staff for the year 1927 was as follows:
1 Chief Officer (Hon. C.S.P.)
1 Superintendent.
2 Station Officers.
1 Consulting Engineer (A.G.M.S.) 4 Sub Officers.
1 Mechanical Engineer.
1 Asst. Mechanical Engineer.
16 Sub Officers.
5 Foremen.
120 Firemen,
32 Motor Drivers.
(Chinese)
16 Ambulance Attendants.
1 Clerk.
10 Telephone Clerks.
69 Other ranks.
THEATRE AND OTHER DUTIES.
Duties performed by members of the Brigade at public and private entertainments during the year totalled 878, comprising altogether 5,696 hours.
MOTOR AMBULANCE SERVICE.
The number of cases attended during the year by the res- pective Ambulances is shewn in the following summary :-
Cases.
Distance run.
Total
Police Private
(miles)
No. 3 Ambulance (Hong Kong)
663
1,009
1,672
12,054
No. 2 No. 4 No. 1
207
339
546
3,734
>>
"
(Kowloon)
325
408
733
5,034
102
134 236
""
""
2,077
Totals
1,297
1,890 3,187
22,899
The yearly increase in cases attended is shewn in the fol- lowing summary :—
Previous years.
Last year (1927).
1926
1925 1924 1923
Cases attended
3,187
2,637 2,2652,129 | 1,712
K 38
REVENUE.
Theatre and other duties
$ 2,634.00
Motor Ambulance Service
$ 4,632.00
Total
$ 7,266.00
GENERAL.
Staff. Following their engagement as European Sub Offi- cers in the Fire Brigade Department, Messrs. Smith, Buckeridge, Walton, and Woollard arrived in the Colony during the early part of the year and were appointed to respective Fire Stations.
Superintendent H. T. Brooks returned to duty from vaca- tion leave on the 11th November.
During the absence of the Superintendent, Assistant En- gineer and Station Officer G. C. Moss acted as Superintendent while Sub Officer W. McI. Smith acted as Station Officer.
During the year 16 Chinese members resigned, 17 were dismissed and 22 absconded. 60 Recruits were enrolled and trained as firemen and passed out of the Drill Class into the Brigade while 35 men were engaged and appointed to fill vacancies in other ranks of the Department.
Equipment. The following appliances were supplied during the year and added to the equipment of the Brigade.
1 B.S.A. Motor Fire Cycle equipped with a 75/100
g.p.m. Leyland motor pump;
1 Rolls-Royce-Dennis Motor Fire Engine equipped with
a 250/300 g.p.m. turbine pump.
while the following unserviceable appliances were condemned and sold during the year:-
No. 1 Motor Lorry and No. 7 Motor Tender.
Fire Inspection Work.-The returns show that 64 theatres, cinemas and buildings; 94 garages; and 124 inflammable structures were inspected and reported upon by the Brigade during the year, while 124 chemical extincteurs, located to various Government buildings, were recharged.
The thanks of the Brigade are due to local Boy Scouts, members of the St. John's Ambulance Brigade, Civilians, and members of the Naval and Military Forces who have generously assisted the Brigade from time to time during the year.
H. T. BROOKS, Superintendent, Fire Brigade.
13th February, 1928.
- K 39
Table I
Summary of Estimated Monetary Loss by Fire for the year 1927.
Not Exceeding
Exceed-
Month
Under
$500
ing
Total
$5,000
$750 $1,000 $2,500 $5,000,
January..
97
February...
599
March
230
April
132
:
:
:
:.
:
May
323
June
26
July
457
August
358
September..
840
:
:
:
225
October
778
...
1,300 3,500
36,000
40,897
800
1,399
2,000 | 7,200 6,000
15,430
2,000
25,000
27,132
:
323
:.
:
26
...
900
::.
:.
:
4,000
:
:
1,357
4,358
:.
16,000
16,840
778
1,100
November..! 100.
December. 58 700
1,000
:
...
Total... 3,998
3,000 101,500 105,258
5,300 17,700 184,500 700 2,700 5,300 17,700 184,500 214,898
- K 40
Table II.
Short Report of Serious Fires.
Date
1927
Time of Call (Hours)
Fire Extinguished by
Address
Business
Hyd- Eng- Fire rants ines Floats
Jan. 21 15.54
136 Jervois Street.
Joss paper and Fire- wood merchants.
Co
3
Jan. 28 06.19
23 Connaught Rd. C., Victoria.
Government Contractor.
4
1
Aug. 27
19.28
19 Tai Wo Street, Wanchai.
Engineering Workshop and Garage.
1
Damage
A building of 3 floors about 35 x 14 feet (used as shop, workroom and store) and contents severely damaged by fire and collapse of roof and upper floors.
Asst: Engr and Station Officer G.C. Moss, Sub Officer Harold Chan and Motor Driver Yeung Hop all of H.K.F.B. injured in the above collapse and taken to Hospital. (Since recovered).
A building of 4 floors about 90 x 15 feet (used as shop, office, store and dwelling). (Third floor unoccupied). Two upper floors and about one-half of first floor and contents severely damaged by fire and roof off, rest of first floor and contents damaged by heat, smoke and water. Shop and con- tents damaged by water.
Two males (Chan Ting, aged 63; and Chan Shiu Cheung aged 21) and one female (Chan Pak Shi, aged 55) rescued from 2nd floor by No. 6 Escape.
One female (Chan Pak Shi aged 55,) rescued from 2nd floor by No. 6 Escape.
One male (Chan Shiu Yin, aged 19 years) escaped from 2nd floor by sliding down rope from verandah to street.
One motor car and 2 motor cycles severely damaged by fire on ground floor, rest of contents damaged by heat, smoke and water.
Pang Yut aged 21 years (Apprentice) burned to death. Tang Yuen, male, aged 17 years, burned about hands and feet and taken to hospital. (Since recovered).
49 Matsheds destroyed by fire.
A range of 5 buildings each of 3 floors, covering an area of about 75 x 40 feet (used as rattan godowns, shops and dwellings). Nos. 64, 66, and 62 and contents severely damag- ed by fire and roofs off, first and second floors and contents of Nos. 60 and 68 severely damaged by fire, ground floors and contents damaged by heat, smoke, water and breakage.
One male (Wong Ling Tai aged 18 years) rescued from second floor of No. 62 by No. 5 Escape.
A building of 2 floors about 100 x 30 feet (used as godown) and contents severely damaged by fire and n of roof off.
Sept. 9
09.48
Repulse Bay, (Bathing Beach).
2
Dec. 1
05.55
Lai Chi Kok Road.
Rattan Dealer.
1
3
1
Dec. 11-
01.27
Sai On Lane, West Point.
Nut oil & Firecracker
Merchant.
,
N
A
Appendix L.
REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF PRISONS FOR THE YEAR 1927.
Convicted by Court Martial
1. The number of prisoners received into prison during the year and the corresponding number for year 1926 were as follows:
Convicted by Ordinary Courts
Convicted by High Court Wei-hai-wei... Debtors
1926. 1927.
5,663
6,582
4
1
64
67
On remand or in default of finding
surety
780
1,086
Total
6,511 7,740
There was an increase of 1,229 on the total number of admission as compared with the year 1926. There was an increase of prisoners convicted for larceny during the year under review the number being 1,452 against 1,083 for the previous year.
2. The number of Revenue Grade prisoners admitted to prisons was 4,842 made up as follows:
Convicted under the Opium Ordinance
Gambling Ordinance
2,775
201
Arms & Ammunition Ord.
38
Vehicle Ordinance
72
""
Harbour Regulations
16
39
Water Works Ord.
6
11
Marine Hawkers Ord.
42
"
Dangerous Goods Ord.
12
"}
Ordinance
""
22
Chinese Wine and Spirit
Societies Ordinance
Public Health & Buildings
Ordinance
24
13
22 23
28
Truck Ordinance
""
Women and Girls (Protec-
tion Ordinance)
17
Importation and Exporta-
""
tion Ordinance
Pharmacy & Poisons Ord.
9
وو
,,
Tobacco Ordinance
23
Carried forward
3,294
12
825
L 2
F
Brought forward
Convicted under the Police Regulations
Convicted of removing dead body without permis-
sion
committing nuisance in the street
unlawfully boarding steamers
3,294
16
3
9
41
11
hawking without a licence
cruelty to animals
31
keeping house for prostitution illegal pawning
278
8
24
18
1
"
drunkenness
trespass
disorderly conduct
assault
16
35
19
48
21
obstruction
39
""
cutting trees
61
"
removing sand without permission
11
mendicancy
9
9
unlawful possession of lottery tickets
82
19
unlawful possession
445
""
stealing
176
21
ful purpose
"
offering bribe
the purpose of prostitution.
11
possession of implement fit for unlaw-
obtaining by false pretences
soliciting in a public thoroughfare for
unlawful receiving
19
26
58
1
96
11
travelling on tram car without paying
legal fare
4
spitting in Court
Total
6
4,842
3. The above figures show that 74 per cent of the total admissions to prison were Revenue Grade prisoners.
The following table shows the number of prisoners com- mitted to prison without the option of fine and in default of payment of fine:
In default of payment of fine.
Without
Served the
Year. option of
Paid full
Paid part
Total.
fine.
imprison-
fine.
fine.
ment.
1926
1,154
3,946
117
446
5,663
1927
1,740
4,220
190
432
6,582
L 3
4.-Seventy five (75) juveniles were admitted during the year, with sentences varying from 24 hours detention to 6 months hard labour. In 7 cases corporal punishment was awarded in addition.
5. The percentage of convicted prisoners admitted to prison with previous convictions recorded against them was 19.1 as compared with 19 for 1926.
6. There were 188 prisoners admitted who were convicted by Police Courts in the New Territories, against 133 for the previous year.
7. The following table shows the number of convicts in custody on the 31st December for the past 10 years, and the percentage of the total number of prisoners in custody to the estimated population of Hong Kong:-
Year.
Estimated Number of population, convicts.
Percentage
Daily
Precentage
of
average
to
number of
population.
prisoners.
population.
1918
558,000
224
*040
601
*108
1919 598,100
259
·043
756
126
1920 648,150
275
*043
755
•117
1921 665,350
231
*035
764
•115
1922
662,200
259
*039
787
*119
1923
681,800
294
*043
861
•126
1924 799,550
345
*043
1,066
*133
1925 874,420
394
*045
1,116
*128
1926 786,920
409
*052
1,054
•134
1927 890,400
392
*044
1,189
*136
Victoria Gaol.
8.-13,857,160 forms were printed and issued to various Government Departments and 123,620 books bound or repaired as compared with 13,319,014 forms and 74,030 books in 1926. The introduction of a wire stitching machine resulted in a marked increase in the number of books bound and repaired.
9. The Gaol was again overcrowded and additional con- gestion was caused through having to accommodate sick prisoners in the Halls during the rebuilding of the Hospital. It is hoped that the new Hospital will be ready for occupation early in 1928.
10.-Repairs were effected to buildings. A section of the Roof of F Hall and the roof of a paper store were renewed. Other roofs were found to be defective. These will be repaired in 1928.
L 4
11.-4 prisoners succeeded in a combined attempt in escaping on 10.11.27.
Lai Chi Kok Prison.
12.-Much progress has been made with the land resumed in 1926-which has been largely cultivated and reclaimed. This land affords much needed useful employment for prisoners at Lai Chi Kok.
13.-There was no escape or attempt at escape.
General.
14. There were 616 punishments awarded for breach of prison discipline as compared with 516 for the preceding year. Corporal punishment was inflicted in thirteen cases for prison offences.
15. One hundred and seventy one (171) prisoners were whipped by order of courts.
16. There were 35 deaths (14 natural causes and 21 executions).
17. The conduct of the Staff, with a few exceptions, has been very good.
18. The general health of the staff has been good. There has been a marked decrease in malarial cases at Lai Chi Kok and practically no dysentery. This decrease is attributed to the conversion of the low lying area resumed in 1926 (see 12) from an evil smelling swamp into prepared land.
19. Existing fire appliances are in good condition but inadequate. Provision has been made in the 1928 estimates for efficient fire fighting apparatus to be supplied to each prison.
20. The rules laid down for the Government of prisons have been complied with.
21. I append the usual returns.
27th February, 1928.
J. W. FRANKS, Superintendent of Prisons.
Table I.
Return showing the Expenditure and Income for the year 1927.
EXPENDITURE.
INCOME.
Pay and allowance of officers including Uni-
Earning of prisoners
form, etc.
327,123.64
Debtors' subsistence
Victualling of prisoners
98,086.03
Naval
do.
Fuel, light, soap, and dry earth
36,088.27
Military
do.
Clothing of prisoners, bedding, and furniture
32,150.94
Marine
do.
Vagrants
do.
Total
$493,398.88 To Balance
1926
$472,337.42
Total.
Average annual cost per prisoner $284.67, in 1926 $306.11, and in 1925 $305.20.
A
(
154,929.16
432.50
40.00
74.90
20.65
20.00
337,881.37
- L 5
$493,398.88
- L 6
Table II.
Return showing Expenditure and Income for the past 10 years.
Actual cost
Year.
Expenditure.
Income.
of prisoners' maintenance.
Average cost per
prisoner.
*
€.
C.
e.
C.
1918......
108,651.95
70,747 97
37,903.98
63.07
1919...... 135,550.16
69,277.07
66,273.09
87.66
1920...... 258,609.17
66,547.61
192,061.56
254.37
1921...... 297,970.56
79,635.73
218,334.83
286.78
1922......
291,175.12 126,124.62
165,050.50
209.72
1923......
324,698.26 117,302.22
207,396.04
240.88
1924
375,158.14 121,664.03
253,137.11
237.56
1925...... 462,827.14 122,221.20
340,605.84
305.20
1926...... 472,337.42 148,667.08
322,640.12
306,11
1927.... 493,398.88 154,929.44 · 338,469.44
284.67
Table III.
Return showing value of Industrial Labour for the year 1927.
8
Value of
earnings.
(Difference between
columns
3 and 7.)
1
2
3
4
5
6
Value of
Value of
Nature of Industry.
January 1st purchased.
1927.
stock on
Value of
hand
materials
Total Dr.
Value of
articles
manufactur-
Value of
articles
manufactur-
stock on
ed or work
hand
Total Cr.
ed or work!
done for
December
done for
payment.
Gaol or other 31st, 1926.
Departments.]
- L 7-
C.
C.
C.
c.
C.
C.
Oakum,
83,79
83.79
772.00
83.79
Coir,......
4,328.48
Net-making,
2.55
Tailoring,
14,780.80
2,666.11
289.00
11,244.01
6,994.59
2,186.68
2,994.95
3,959.53
855.79
9,141.16
772.00
2,116.57
291.55
371.35
26,024.81
275.60 99.85 8,766.09
3.90
650.85
359.30
19,733.65
28,599.59
2,574.78
Rattan,
15.80
813.90
829.70
4.60 !
1,043.10
2.00
1,049.70
220.00
Tin-smithing,
222.83
1,259.81
1,482.61
102.45 2,868.47
175.02
3,145.94
1,663.30
Carpentering,
2,359.87
4,442.19
6,802.06
601.93
6,248.81
1,138.63
7,989.37
1,187,31
Grass-matting,
1.98
388.00
389.98
642.80
1.05
643.85
253.87
Shoe-making,
2,951.60
8,246.49
11,198.09
97.12
9,166.48
2,941.10 | 12,204.70
1,006,61
Laundry,
9.82
3,539.19
3,549.01
Printing and Bookbinding,
23,135.62
50,946.87
74,082.49
Photography,
5.45
978.80
984.25
Total,.........$
47,898.59 | 84,814.37 |132,712.96
.20 13,908.64 704.31 197,018.64 4.30
1,263.53
4,944.79 244,197.11
6.50 13,915.34 10,366.33
10,426.83 208,149.78 134,067.29
312.08
38,500.50 287,642.40 154,929.44
Paid into Bank during 1927, which sum includes $232.25 for work executed in 1926, $4,899.95. Value of work executed during 1927 for which payment was deferred to 1928, $483.10.
28.50 1,296.33
















































































REPORT ON SANITARY
DEPARTMENT
HONG KONG
FOR THE YEAR
1927.
M 3
CONTENTS.
1. Report of the Head of the Sanitary Department :-
Sanitary Board Members
Legislation
Staff
Administration

...
Work done under the Public Health & Buildings
Ordinance
...
Work done under Food and Drugs Ordinance and Sec.
83, P. H. & B. O.
Vaccination
Scavenging
...
Refuse Removal
Nightsoil Removal...
*
Work done at Disinfecting Stations Ambulance and Dead Box Service Public Bath Houses

...
...
Water Closets and Public Conveniences Markets and Special Food Licences Cemeteries, Mortuaries, Crematoria Births and Deaths Registration Revenue and Expenditure
...
2. Report of the Medical Officer of Health :-
Meteorological data
Population
Immigration and Emigration.
Births
Deaths
...
...

...
...
...
Page
10
5
5
6
6
Co
6
...
10
10
10
11
11
11
12
12
12
12

13
14
...
...
...
::

...
39
39
42
42.
43
Age distribution of deaths
Tables
...

...
44
57-69
:
:
: :
3. Report of the Colonial Veterinary Surgeon :-
Staff
General Statistics
Lard Factories
...
...

::
71
71
73
111
...
M 4
CONTENTS, -Continued.
...
Crematorium .. Grass growing Quarantine
...
Observation Cases...
4. Appendices (H. S. D.'s Report):
Appendix A. Staff...
+--
B. Nuisances reported...
classified
Page
73
...
74
76
...
...
...
77
by Health Districts
""
C.
""
""
D. (i)
(ii) Prosecutions
>>
E. House Cleansing
...
F. (i) Number of Chinese Houses, Hong Kong
(ii)
G. Houses limewashed
Kowloon.
15
...
16
...
...
17
19
20
21
22.
23
24
***
H. Children vaccinated
25
2.
""
""
""
"3
****
Boxes
M. Markets ..
...
...
I. Table 1. Cost of Refuse Collection
3. Comparative cost for 2 years.
J. Work done at Disinfecting Stations K. (i) List of Ambulance Stations
(ii) Calls made for Ambulance and Dead
L. Public Bath-houses
26
***
Removal
27
...
27
...
...
...
...
...
J.
...
31
N. Burial space in Cemeteries
O. (i) Interments
(ii) General Exhumation
(iii) and (iv) Private Exhumation
and Cremations
P. Certified and Uncertified deaths
...
...
100
...
...
"
""
Q. Revenue
55
R. Expenditure
...
...
...
...
...
:
** 2*-2** ***
28
29
29
30
32
33
33
34
35
36
37
5. Tables (M. O. H.'s Report) :-

Table 1. Deaths registered
6. Maps:-
2. Notifiable diseases cases
"}
3.
""
>>
distribution
...
57
...
58
59
60
61
4. Monthly distribution of plague infected
rats
...
...
...
5. Number and causes of deaths
Hong Kong Health Districts Kowloon
15
...
...
::
::
...
::
28 ***
...
41
43
M 5
REPORT OF
THE HEAD OF THE SANITARY DEPARTMENT.
1.--SANITARY BOARD.
The following were members of the Sanitary Board during the year:-
President, the Head of the Sanitary Department, Mr.
N. L. Smith, from 1st January to 11th November, and Mr. W. J. Carrie from 12th November to 31st December.
Vice-President, the Director of Public Works, the Honourable Mr. H. T. Creasy for whom Mr. H. T. Jackman acted from 19th March to 31st Decem- ber.
The Secretary for Chinese Affairs, the Honourable Mr. E. R. Hallifax, C.M.G., C.B.E., for whom Mr. R. A. C. North acted from 5th October to 31st December.
The Medical Officer of Health, Mr. G. W. Pope, L.R.C.P.-
& S., D.P.H.
Lieutenant-Colonel & Brevet-Colonel J. S. Bostock, C.B.E., R.A.M.C. appointed on 10th November, vice Lieutenant-Colonel S. Boylan Smith, D.S.O., O.B.E., R.A.M.C. resigned.
Dr. W. V. M. Koch for whom Mr. J. P. Braga acted
from 1st January to 6th November.
Mr. Tso Seen-wan, LL.D.
Mr. Wong Kwong-tin.
Dr. S. C. Ho.
Mr. J. P. Braga appointed on 8th December vice Dr. J. C. Macgown, resigned on expiry of term of office.
2.-LEGISLATION.
The following By-law was made by the Board :—
The Offensive Trades By-laws were amended so as to include the trade of resin-boiling within the mean- ing of Offensive Trades.
M 6
3.-DEPARTMENTAL STAFF.
Inspectors :-
The Establishment was increased by one Senior Inspec- tor (in place of one First Class Inspector) and four Second Class Inspectors. The numbers of Inspec- tors on duty on 1st January, 1st July and 31st December were 39, 35 and 45 respectively.
Clerical Staff:—
The Establishment was increased by one Assistant Secretary, one General Office Assistant, one Class III Clerk and five Interpreters.
The distribution of the Staff is shown in Appendix A.
4.-ADMINISTRATION.
General Sanitary Work:-The functions and control of the Sanitary Board, as determined by the Public Health and Build- ings Ordinance No. 1 of 1903, are limited to the Island of Hong Kong, Kowloon, and New Kowloon.
The Island of Hong Kong is divided into the City of Victoria; its extension eastwards as far as and including Shauki- wan; the Hill District; and the outlying villages of Aberdeen, Aplichau, Stanley and Taitam.
The City proper is divided into eastern, central, western- central and western districts each with a sanitary office, and subdivided into 12 Health Districts each with a Sanitary Inspector in charge, (see map A). The Hill District is worked in conjunction with Health District 3. The Shaukiwan exten- sion has a Sanitary Inspector in charge. The Sanitary Inspector posted in Aberdeen is in charge of Aberdeen, Aplichau, Stanley and Taitam districts.
Kowloon is divided into Kowloon Peninsula, Shamshuipo and Kowloon City each with a sanitary office, and subdivided into seven Health Districts each with a Sanitary Inspector in charge (see map B).
Scavenging and Nightsoil Removal:-For the purpose of Refuse Collection the City and Hill District is divided into three, main districts East, Central and West, each with an Inspector in charge. There are two Inspectors in charge of Kowloon Peninsula and the District Inspector of Health District 15 com- bines supervision of refuse collection with district work. The Inspector in charge of Shaukiwan Health District also supervises refuse collection in this district. The villages of Aberdeen, Aplichau, Stanley and Taitam were scavenged by contractors
M 7
-
under supervision of the Sanitary Inspector in charge. Inspec- ters in charge of refuse collection also supervise the removal of nightsoil in this area; the removal itself is carried out by con- tractors.
The disposal of refuse from the City of Victoria and Kowloon is supervised by a Senior Sanitary Inspector who is also in charge of street-watering in Victoria. Kowloon street-watering is under the direction of the Inspector in charge of scavenging (Kowloon).
Disinfection :--For the purposes of disinfection of infected clothing there are Disinfecting Stations in Victoria and in Kow- loon each under the control of an Inspector. Transport is made by means of an infected-clothing motor van on either side. Use is also made of portable "Sack" Disinfectors.
Cemeteries-Public cemeteries are under the charge of special Inspectors.
Markets: The Central ånd Western Markets are under an Overseer. Other markets are supervised by the local district Inspectors.
Veterinary Work:-There is a Government depot at Ken- nedy Town (Hong Kong) for the reception of all cattle, sheep, swine, and goats brought into the Colony for slaughter. There are also Government Slaughter Houses at Kennedy Town and Ma Tau Kok (Kowloon) and controlled slaughter houses at Aberdeen and Sai Wan Ho at one of which all animals for food must be slaughtered. The Government depot and slaughter houses are under the direct charge of the Colonial Veterinary Surgeon and Assistant Colonial Veterinary Surgeon and a staff of four Inspectors. All beef in Hong Kong and Kowloon is conveyed from slaughter house to market in specially constructed motor vans.
Depot fees are 50 cents for cattle, 10 cents for sheep, 10 cents for swine: Slaughter fees (which are not additional to depot fees) are 40 cents for cattle, 20 cents for sheep and 30 cents for swine. There is a crematorium at Kennedy Town Slaughter House at which carcases can be destroyed on payment of a prescribed fee. A certain number of private factories are established in the immediate vicinity of the Government Slaugh- ter Houses (Kennedy Town and Ma Tau Kok) at which lard and meat products derived solely from these slaughter houses are prepared for export under the direct supervision of the Colonial Veterinary Surgeon and his staff.
M 8
5.-WORK DONE UNDER THE PUBLIC HEALTH AND
BUILDINGS ORDINANCE.
(i) Sanitary Nuisances and Contraventions of Sanitary By- laws:-Appendix B shows the total number of nuisances re- ported and the action taken to obtain compliance and the amount of fines. Of the total number of nuisances reported in which action was taken 50% were abated after receipt of a letter. In 354 cases a legal notice failed to produce compliance. Of the summonses which followed 314 secured convictions, 12 were dis- charged, 1 abandoned and 28 withdrawn.
Appendix C shows the nuisances in respect of which action was taken.
Appendix D (i) shows the Health Districts from which these nuisances were reported and Appendix D (ii) gives details of all prosecutions and amount of fines inflicted.
(ii) Building Nuisances:-Appendix D (i) line 1 shows by districts the number of nuisances under Part III of the Public Health and Buildings Ordinance reported by this Department to the Building Authority for action. These are additional to those referred to in paragraph (i) above.
(iii) Miscellaneous Improvements:-Appendix D (i) lines 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, show miscellaneous improvements effected by Dis- trict Inspectors in their districts. Lines 9, 10, 11, 12, show the number of houses demolished and erected. The great majority of these are tenement houses.
(iv) House Cleansing :-The routine work under the by-laws for the Prevention and Mitigation of Epidemic Disease was carried out during the year. Appendix E shows the number of floors cleansed in the various districts and as compared with the last two years.
House cleansing was carried out on only four mornings a week from 1st February 1927 to 30th September 1927 owing to shortage of staff and for five mornings a week for the remainder of the year. Appendix F shows approximately the total number of Chinese houses liable for cleansing.
(v) Limewashing:-The usual limewashing required by the Domestic Cleanliness and Ventilation by-laws was carried out during the year. Appendix G shows the number of floors lime- washed. The difference between this total and the total in Appendix F is due partly to exemptions, some floors being new and not requiring limewashing. A certain number has also been carried over into 1928.
M 9
The Board abandoned the practice, which had prevailed for several years, of employing a contractor to carry out any lime- washing which might be necessary under By-law 4 or which the Board had been asked to do on behalf of a landlord and instituted departmental limewashing. Limewashing, when done by the department is done with a spray and not with a brush. There were several complaints towards the end of the year of damage done by the lime coming into contact with tenants' effects. Additional wrappers to cover up furniture etc. were therefore issued.
The contract system failed mainly on account of the poor lime used and the scamping of the work by sub-contractors. In several cases the limewashing had to be done five or six times by the contractor before it could be passed as satisfactory. When the work is done by the department with the spray there is undoubtedly greater initial dislocation but the work is better and more quickly done and tenants have expressed their appre- ciation that the necessary upheaval is so brief.
(vi) Rat Catching :-Twenty-eight members of the cleansing staff were employed during the year setting traps, bird lime boards and rat poison; collecting rats from street rat bins, private premises, etc., and taking them to the Public Mortuary for examination. A special campaign in March was undertaken when rat-poison was distributed throughout urban districts. The total number of rats caught was:
Hong Kong
Kowloon
102,855
52,660
Of these, none were found to be plague infected.
(vii) Mosquito Prevention:-The routine work of oiling pools and inspecting dwellings for breeding places was carried out by District Inspectors, and by two Foremen with coolies specially employed. Full use was made of the powers given by the by- laws for the Prevention of Dissemination of Disease by Mosqui- toes. The usual cutting of undergrowth in May and October was carried out in conjunction with the Botanical and Forestry Department and the Military Authorities (as regards Military lands).
6.-WORK DONE UNDER THE FOOD AND DRUGS ORDINANCE
AND SECTION 83 OF THE PUBLIC HEALTH AND
BUILDINGS ORDINANCE.
Samples of fresh milk were submitted for analysis under section 12 of the Food and Drugs Ordinance, of which 168 were found to pass the standard and 5 to be below standard,
A
M 10
In addition the following samples of Food and Drugs were taken:
Bread 85; flour 33; butter 39; cheese 19; coffee 70; tea 55; sugar 58; bean curd, lard, etc. 39; vinegar 6; oils 7.
Prosecutions were undertaken in 8 cases where the samples failed to satisfy the legal requirements.
There were no food stuffs seized and ordered to be destroyed under Section 83 of the Public Health and Buildings Ordinance.
7.-VACCINATION,
Under the Vaccination Ordinance, No. 12 of 1923, all Public Vaccinators are under the control of the Principal Civil Medical Officer, who is the Superintendent of Vaccination. As Registrar of Births, the Head of the Sanitary Department is responsible for ensuring the vaccination of all children whose births are registered, and Appendix H shows the results of action so taken.
8.-SCAVENGING.
Approximately 323 tons of refuse were received daily at the refuse depots from the City of Victoria, Hill District, Shaukiwan, Quarry Bay and Kowloon Peninsula. About 5 tons daily were collected from Kowloon City and dumped on waste ground. The cost of the service in Hong Kong (including Shaukiwan and Quarry Bay) and Kowloon is shown in Appendix I attached. Table (iii) shows a comparison with last year.
There are now 15 refuse-lorries in use, 11 being used in Hong Kong and 4 in Kowloon.
Outlying villages of Stanley and Taitam, and Aberdeen and Aplichau were scavenged by contract at a yearly charge of $350 for the first two and $180 for latter two. The contractor has the privilege of receiving nightsoil in each case in addition. Scavenging by contract has proved unsatisfactory and as from 1st January 1928 the work will be done departmentally.
9.-REFUSE REMOVAL.
The bulk of the refuse from the City of Victoria and Kow- loon was, as hitherto, taken by barges and dumped at sea. Some 15,543 tons were dumped at Cheung Sha Wan where a reclamation is being gradually formed.
Appendix I, Table (ii) shows cost of removal from Victoria, the Hill District and Kowloon Peninsula. Figures for the last two years will be found in Table (iii). Barges were delayed on one occasion only by weather conditions.
-
www
M 11
10.-NIGHTSOIL REMOVAL.
The contractors for the removal of nightsoil from Victoria and Kowloon gave notice in August that they desired to be relieved of the contract. They were prevailed upon to continue until 31st January 1928. During the year the monthly payments due from the contractor were further reduced by $120 a month qu account of the opening of a flush closet in Kowloon. The total reduction since the commencement of the contract in 1921 was $1,845 a month in Victoria and $1,146.90 in Kowloon, and owing to the exceptional circumstances prevailing the contrac- tors were relieved of all payment of fees for five months amount- ing to $10,790.50.
The Shaukiwan Conservancy Contract was cancelled on 31st March owing to the failure of the Contractor to pay the fees due. A new Contract was made from 1st April for a term of two years and nine months. The Contracts for Aberdeen and Aplichau, Stanley and Taitam were carried out satisfactorily.
11.-WORK DONE AT DISINFECTING STATIONS.
Appendix J shows the number of articles and vehicles. disinfected and washed after disinfection during the year 1927. The figures for 1926 are given for comparison. The use of portable "sack" disinfectors has been much extended.
Miscellaneous repairs and new construction of various articles were done at the Hong Kong and Kowloon Disinfecting Stations to the value of $5,017.35 and $1,216.88 respectively. At the Central Garage miscellaneous repairs to the value of $1,008.74 were also carried out.
12.-AMBULANCE AND DEAD BOX SERVICE..
Ambulances and Dead Boxes are obtainable at any hour of the day or night at the two Disinfecting Stations and also by day at the Eastern and Western District Sanitary Offices at which a staff of bearers is kept. This service is now supple- mentary to that of the Motor Ambulances which are controlled by the Police Department.
L
3
Appendix K (i) shows the stations at which Sanitary Department ambulances are obtainable in emergencies. At these stations there are no bearers attached and volunteer bearers must be obtained when required. Appendix K (ii) shows the number of times manpower ambulances and dead boxes were used; there was again a reduction in the use of manpower ambulances due to the wider use of the motor ambulances.
M 12
13. PUBLIC BATH-HOUSES.
Appendix L shows the number of men, women and children who used the Bath-Houses during the years 1926 and 1927.
14.-WATER CLOSETS AND PUBLIC CONVENIENCES.
During the year one public trough closet was completed, namely at Jordan Road, and one temporary public dry latrine was erected at Un Chow Street.
Three privately owned public latrines were demolished,
at Jordan Road,
at Hok Un Kok at rear of 208, Ma Tau Wai Road, and at Stone Nullah Lane.
Two privately owned public dry latrines were completed;
at Junction of Ma Tau Wai Road and To Kwa Wan, and West of the south gate of Old Kowloon City.
The Board approved the installation of 777 water closets, 71 trough closets and 77 urinals on private premises.
15.-MARKETS AND SPECIAL FOOD LICENCES.
No new market was opened during the year.
104 additional food licences were issued under Section 78 of the Public Health and Buildings Ordinance.
Appendix M gives details of rentals of the stalls in the various markets.
16.-CEMETERIES, MORTUARIES, CREMATORIA.
Appendix N shows the approximate burial space in the main cemeteries and the net available space on 31st December 1927.
Appendix O (i) shows the number of interments at the various cemeteries during the year 1927.
Appendix 0 (ii) shows the number of general exhumations carried out at the Public expense, and Appendix O (iii) shows the number of exhumations carried out by relatives of the deceased.
Appendix O (iv) gives particulars of cremations, bodies deposited in the Tung Wah Hospital Mortuary, and removals from the Colony before burial.
- M 13
17.-BIRTHS AND DEATHS REGISTRATION.
The General Registration Office established by Ordinance No. 7 of 1896, as amended by Ordinance No. 26 of 1923, for registration of both births and deaths is situated at the Sanitary Department Head Office, Post Office Building.
At this office all non-Chinese births and deaths must be registered. Chinese are required to register in the district within which the birth or death occurred. A list of such district registries for births and deaths respectively is appended. Yaumati, Nos. 2 and 7 Police Stations are available for registra- tion of deaths on Sundays and Public Holidays only, when the General Registration office is closed. The Head of the Sanitary Department is ex officio Registrar and has appointed the Police officers in charge of stations, the Inspector in charge of Kowloon Disinfecting Station and the principal clerks in charge of Dis- pensaries on the appended list as assistant registrars.
Death registration, being a necessary preliminary to burial is almost universal but there is considerable ignorance of the law among Chinese as regards registering of births. As a proof of this it may be pointed out that the records of registered midwives show a total of 8124 births, whereas only 7500 births were actually registered during the year. Female births in particular are frequently not registered. This is no doubt due to the presence of a large fluctuating population wholly unaccus- tomed to the system.
Appendix P shows the ratio of Certified and Uncertified
deaths.
DEATHS REGISTRATION OFFICES.
Sanitary Department, Head Office.
Kowloon Disinfecting Station.
Shaukiwan Police Station.
Aberdeen Police Station.
No. 7 Police Station.
No. 2 Police Station.
Kowloon City Police Station.
Sham Shui Po Police Station.
Stanley Police Station.
Yaumati Police Station.
M 14
BIRTH REGISTRATION OFFICES.
Sanitary Department, Head Office. Yaumati Chinese Public Dispensary. Hunghom Chinese Public Dispensary. Sham Shui Po Chinese Public Dispensary. Kowloon City Chinese Public Dispensary. Eastern Chinese Public Dispensary. Western Chinese Public Dispensary.
Central Chinese Public Dispensary. Shaukiwan Chinese Public Dispensary. Aberdeen Police Station.
Stanley Police Station.
18.-REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE.
Appendix Q shows under the various heads the revenue collected by the Department during 1927 and also the revenue paid into the Treasury in respect of the Department's contracts. As regards the former, markets and special food licences show a small increase while slaughter house fees have recovered con- siderably. Though still below the figures for 1924, the last pre-strike year, they approximate closely to those of 1923 and exceed those of 1922. An increase in receipts for scavenging is due to payments by the Military Authorities for the removal of refuse from Military premises. Revenue from Contracts again shows a decrease on account of the reductions allowed to the Conservancy Contractors.
Appendix R shows under various heads the Department's expenditure for the year 1927. The increase in the total expen- diture is mainly due to an increase of about $16,000 under Running Expenses of Motor Refuse Lorries &c. although this is partly offset by a reduction of $5,350 in Purchase and Main- tenance of Bullocks. The total mileage covered by the Refuse Lorries during the year was 122,496 miles in Hong Kong and 30,951 in Kowloon. This represents a 70% increase over the figures for 1926 for Hong Kong, due to the closing down of the Central Refuse Depot opposite the new Fire Brigade Station and to the extra work given to the lorries through the enlarging of the Sections covered by them. The opening of a Central Garage for the lorries and the laying down of a stock of spare parts also accounts for part of the increased expenditure. The increased work carried out in the Slaughter Houses accounts for an increase in the expenses of the Animal Depot and Slaughter Houses under various heads.
Other details of the working of the Department will be found in the reports of the Medical Officer of Health and the Colonial Veterinary Surgeon.
W. J. CARRIE,
Head of the Sanitary Department.
March 2nd, 1928.
...
:
...
...
...
100 1300
...
...
...
Shankiwan.
13, 2a.
2
1
1
1
1

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...
...
191
...
...
...
...
2.
...
3.
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...
་་་
...
...
...
24.
229
...
...
4.
....
...
...
199
...
coolies temporarily engaged for limewashing. Salaries paid from Suspense Acct.-Limewashiu.
M IS
Appendix A. 1927.
***
5.
...
الوعد
...
193

6.
....
MA
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H. D.'s.
7.

8.
1
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9.
...
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10.
11.
12.
1
1
...
13.
26
...
14.
: :
/

15+
...
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...
1
16.
10
1
1
17.
:
co - co
24
3
11
30 2
:
22
100
1
:
1
1
District Offices.
-:
1
2
Jan 2
1
1
...
...
27
1
1
1
1
5
46
41
1
2
1
1
2
་་་
3
10
19
2
5
10 10
27
33
2
1
2
1
1
1
7
22
15
51
56
10
121
171*
67
61
879
18
12
2
1
21
4
10
4
9
5
1
1 H. S. D.
3 M. O. H.
2 C. V. S.
1 A. H. S. D.
27 Clerks and Shroffs
1 Supt. S. and W.
1 Secretary
1 Asst, Secretary.
1 General Office Asst.
...
5 Senior Inspectors.................
.46 Inspectors
44 Interpreters
1 Storekeeper
2 Overseers
1 Asst., Storekeeper
1 Office Attendant
2 Office Coolies
3 Foremen. G.I..........
10
19
2.
3.
"
2
4..
"
5.
27
6.
33
>>
2
"
2
"}
9
}}
5 Engineers
1 Boatswain
7.
.....
Artisans.
Drivers
Cleansers
1 Stoker
1 Seaman
7 Caretakers
45 Sextous
1 Foreman Tallyman
5 Tallymen
8 Messengers..
6 Bullock Boys.
99
121 Bargemen
Drivers
168 Cl. Coolies...
879 Scavenging Coolies 18 Artisans
12 Skld. Labourers
2 Apprentices
1 Motor Mechanic
24 Motor Drivers
......
4 Motor Drivers' Mates
10 Bath-House Attendants
4 Post Office Building Coolies
...
***
...
...
Office.
Head
23
D. S.
D. S.
Hong Kong.
Kowloon.
S. H. Kennedy Town.
S. H. Ma Tau Kok.
...
..
...
...
...
1
1
3
1
3
1
N
JOI
...
48
6
6
...
...
000
...
...
...
4
...
2
212
...
2
...
1
...
2
1
1
2-
...
5
1
...
2
...
56 10
34
1
8
...
Cemeteries.
Street Watering.
Refuse Disposal..
H.
D.'s 1-3 and Peak.
***
***
...
...
...
...
1
...
...
...
1
..
1
...
...
...
4.4
1
.
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
***
...
...
1
...
***
...
...
1
1
...
...
8
1
...
...
1
1
...
...
...
*

10 00
H. D.'s 4-6.
H.
D.'s 7-10.
Kowloon.
SCAVENGING
...
...
1
1
2
..
...
...
4
...

...
...
23
་་་
...
D:..
...
***
..
...
2
108
...
...
:
123
DAR
197
95
161
...
...
...
...
4
6
Shaukiwan.
Aberdeen.
Shankiwan.
...
2
2
...
1
I
...
...
co co
...
...
2
...
...
1
...
1.
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
***
...
...
...
...
...
...
234
24
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
4
...
...
...
***
...
...
***
***
...
...
...
...
1.
...
...
*B[
2a.
2.
.
...
1
3.
M 15.
Appendix A. 1927.
I
1
I
...
...
...
...
...
...
4.
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
5.
6.
...
f
r
...
6a.
...

...
...
...
...
pa
...
78
**
H. D.'s.
1
1
7.
8.
T
9.
M 16
Appendix B.
RETURN FOR THE YEAR, 1927.
Outstanding (31st December, 1926) ....
Number of nuisances reported
No. of nuisances reported in which no
action taken
No. of first letters sent
Compliance on first letters
9,944
8,065
74
409
16,150
No. of first letters withdrawn
No. of second letters sent
|
Compliance on second letters
No. of legal notices sent (sections 29
and 30)
8,327
No. of legal notices withdrawn (section
31)
21
No. of legal notices modified (section
31)
No. of legal notices time extended
(section 31).....
Compliance on legal notices
7,610
No. of summons applied for (section
32)
354
No. of summons refused
No. of summons withdrawn
27
No. of Magistrate's order (section 33).
105
Compliance after Magistrate's order (including compliance after sum- mons) Fines $2,907
Cases discharged
Cases abandoned through defendant
absconding or otherwise
Re-summons for future to comply
(section 35)
Compliance after re-summons Fines
$396
No. of re-summons withdrawn
No. of further re-summons
Compliance after further re-summons
F'ines $20
Nuisances abated by the Sanitary
Department (section 35)
Expenses of abating
Outstanding
TOTAL
293
12
1
مصر
21
18
1
J
N
435
16,559 16,559
- M 17
Appendix C.
CLASSIFICATION OF NUISANCES REPORTED.
1927.
1. Defective gratings
3,351
2. Defective wastepipes, rain water pipes, eaves
gutters etc.
2,602
3. Illegal cubicles
1,271
4.
No dust bins
1,233
5. Choked wastepipes, rain water pipes, eaves gut-
ters etc.
1,205
6.
Absence of gratings
813
7. Defective cement rendering
762
8.
Defective floor surfaces
692

9.
Breeding of mosquitoes
661
10.
Accumulation of refuse
531
11.
Obstruction of verandahs
442
12. Rat Runs filled in
410
13. Dirty premises
404
14. Gratings not properly fixed
354
15. Illegal height of cubicles
258
16. Use of basement for habitation, as workshop etc.
175
17. No receptacles to latrines
133
18. Use of rooms without windows opening for sleeping
purposes
126
19. No cement rendering
73
23.
24
28
30
20. Discharge of sullage water, urine and excreta
21. Use of verandahs for cooking and sleeping purposes 22. Illegal wooden bunks
Obstructions of windows, doors and ventilating
opening
Insufficient glazed area to windows opening
25. Illegal wooden partitions in verandah and kitchen.. 26. Choked drains
27. Water closets not maintained in thoroughly
efficient condition
Accumulation of stagnant water
29. No urinal accommodation
Illegal showcases
31. Use of kitchens for sleeping purposes
32. Offensive trades (Rag-storing, Soap-boiling etc.)
73
64
64
62
57
54
52,
43
27
26
22
18
18
M 18
+∞∞∞
14
8
8
7
5
3
3
10 4 ∞ co
2
21
1
33. Accumulation of undergrowth
34.
Illegal urinals
35. Keeping of cattle and swine without licence 36. Bakehouses without licence
37. No fly-proof covers to receptacles of latrines
Obstructions of yards
38.
39. Illegal wooden covers over cubicles ....
Black smoke issuing from chimney and funnel
41. Defective flushing cistern to latrine
42. Exposing of fruit and vegetable for sale without
licence
43.
Urinal or water closet constructed without permis-
sion of the Board
44. Laundry without licence
45. No sump provided for pigsty
46. Defective sump and cover etc. to pigsty 47. No cover to sump for pigsty
48. Damp wall
49.
Staircase so dark as to be dangerous
50. Insanitary and defective water closet and urinal
TOTAL
1
1
1
1
1
16,150
M 19
Appendix D (i).
'WORK DONE IN THE SEVERAL HEALTH DISTRICTS.
6
6a & 7a
7
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17 Shaukiwan Aberdeen
Total
147
69
178
60
23
71
44
62
54
84
15
69
903
748
889
887
964
1,307
573
892
1,118
52
25
57
69
33
54

51
41
1,168
91
303
2
748
29
656
21
តន
68
472
45
312
1,526
16,150
25
11
51
692
...
...
...
::
:
17
2
21
46
16
18
13
43
42
85
51
25
27
18
15
...
79
2
...
81
28
54
11
10
30
31
13
32
...
:
17
6
I
9
16
64
16
20
12
2
27
48
17
5
3
11
86
27
4
13
78 ***
9
...
39
5
10
===
17
24
11
9
...
3
504
1
410
1
287
5
777
143
1
...
240
172
2
...
475
51
81
21
15
46
326
99
14
46
126
47
108
47
23
5
410
108
69
12
1,327
5
13
་ ་ ་
...
1
coco::
...
5
...
...
13
4
...

4
1
la & 2a
2
M 19
Appendix D (i).
CONSPECTUS OF WORK DONE IN THE SEVERAL HEALTH DISTI
15
3
4
5
6
6a & 7a
8
9
Applications for B.A. Notices,
Applications for S.B. Notices,
...
Ground surfaces repaired,
Ground surfaces concreted,
...
Obstructions removed from open space,
43
108
115
...
517
708
1,055
260
29380
87
135
147
69
178
767
903
903
748
889
887
11
28
32
11
18
52
25
57
6589
60
23
964
33
...
::
...
2
3
Buildings),
Obstructions removed to light and ventilation, Rat runs filled in,
...
Water closets installed in private Buildings,
Houses demolished and No. of floors (Domestic {
Houses erected and No. of floors' (Domestic
8
22

9
33
...
...
56
Houses
...
Floors
63
Houses
32
15
Buildings),
Floors
113
50
29 2018
13
13
59
***
2
13
31
17
9
9
42
85
212
167
...
14
55
1333
16
72646
I
19
54
10
17
38
64
2 00
1
17
5
81
Houses demolished and No. of floors (Non
Houses
...
Domestic Buildings),...
...
...
Floors
21
46
16
51
25
27
11
10
30
*5
6
6
16
20
12
5
3
11
21
15
46
5
13
...
...
...
...
Houses
erected and No. of floors (Non
Houses
...
...
...
...
Domestic Buildings),...
{ Floors
...
...
...
:
M 20
{
Appendix D. (ii)
PROSECUTIONS CLASSIFIED BY HEALTH DISTRICTS 1927.
75.00
1
3.00
6A &
| Shan- Aber- Total No.
Total amount
5
8
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
7A
kiwan.] deen.
of cases.
of Fines.
2
1
Go

10
8
1
N
2
5
2
1
58
$306.00
:
:
:.
:..
.:..
1
1
:
:
:..
:.
:
:
:
::
:
:
...
...
...
...
...
1
1
:
5
...
...
1
...
:.
:
...
:
:
...
:
:
:.
:
:
1
5
:
:..
:
1
...
:
:
:.
:
:.
:..
:
:
:
:.
:..
50.00
10.00
6
251.00
12
68.00
50.00
-:
1
::
...
...
1
-:
1
...
...
4
71.00
1
:
90.00
:
:.
:
...
:.
...
1
...
:
:
...
...
D:
:
...
:
:.
1
2
1
...
1
...
:
.:..
:
:
:
:.
:
:
...
:
...
...
:
:
:.
:
:
:
...
...
:
:
...
:
...
...
...
1
...
...
:
1
2:4
...
21
25
8
9
− →
...
19
41
...
1
...
...
:
...
...

6
25
256
2
:
1
25.00
185.00
38.00
...
...
35.00
5
10.00
2
1.00
11
27
377
8,323.00
==
:7
47
9
11
34
29
29
38
20
18
22
49
9
26
17
15
28
490
$4,621.00
::
ded, 27 cases summons withdrawn, 1 case re-summons withdrawn, 1 case cautioned, 1 case imprisoned for 5 days and 2 cases for 7 days.
***
9
==
11
27
2:5
N
001
3
...
40
222223
Nature of Offence.
M 20
Appendix D. (ii)
PROSECUTIONS CLASSIFIED BY HEALTH DISTR
...
...
:
...
:
1
1
1
:
1A &
1
3
4
5
6
2A
6A &
7 A
1
7
8
9
10
11
1
1
N
1
3
ex
10
:.
...
::
:
:
:
...
2
...
***
...
...
:
:
:
...
...
:
:
:.
::
:
::
...
...
...
:
...
:
...
:
:
:
...
:
:
:
:
...
...
1
:
...
::
:
:
...
...
:.
1
Dumping Rubbish, Nightsoil etc.. Maintenance a water closet without
2
permission of the Board......... Assulting S.B. Foreman and Coolies in Market
Using premises for Offensive Trade without S.B. Licence.
Obstruction of avenue etc.
markets
in
Slaughtering swine in premises not appointed for that purpose
Selling unsound food.
Selling tinned milk not properly labelled
Selling food, drugs etc. not of the nature, substance or quality required
Using Government Property for sleeping purposes
Failing to limewash within the prescribed period after due warning
Keeping Swine and Goats without S.B. Licence
Selling Fruit, Pork, Vegetable etc. without S.B. Licence.
Using basement for habitation, workshop etc. without S.B. Licence
Using stall for another purposes ... Using premises as a bakehouse without S.B. Licence
Prosecution on S.B. Nuisance Notices
:
::
:
:.
:
1
...
1
...
1
:མ
18
:
...
:.
...
...
...
:..
...
∞o:
8
::
:
...
:
:
...
1
...
...
:.
...
...
:
1
...
...
:
:
1
:
:
1
:
1
:.
:
:
:
...
:
...
...
:.
:
:
...
14.30
...
N
1
...
1
...
...
:.
1
2
:
285
26
2:24
12
40
9
:=
11
:.
:
22:5
27
22
21
25
8
28
9
9
29
14
47.
9
11
34
29
15
293
38
20
In 13 cases defendants discharged, 2 cases defendants absconded, 27 cases summons withdrawn, 1 case re-summons withd
Total
M 19
Appendix D (i).
OF WORK DONE IN THE SEVERAL HEALTH DISTRICTS.
#
6
6a & 7a
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
Shaukiwan Aberdeen
Total
84
1,168
.91
303
༢© ༠༠
69
748
21
656
25595
68
45
472
312
11
51
1,526
16,150
692
5
43
393353
32
ཁ:མ
:
79
81
28
:
1
9
16
2
27
48
27
4
13

58 **
39
17
11
10
24
9
1
287
143
172
:::
5
1
2
51
47
47
23
5
99
14
46
126
108
108
69
12
3112262
504
410
777
240
475
410
1,327
5
...
...
13
3
3
...
...
4
4
147
69
178
903
748
889
887
52
25
ότ
68888
60
2835
23
71
44
62
54
964
1,307
578
892
1,118
33
54
9
51
41
...
17
42
85
25
210
21
46
16
18
13
51
25
27
18
15
54
11
10
30
31
13
17
*5
6
6
...
64
16
20
12
17
5
· 3
11
81
21
15
46
295
86
326
5
...
13
....

...
***
...
:
1
1
...
:.
:
Applications for B.A. Notices, Applications for S.B. Notices,
...
...
...
...
Ground surfaces repaired,
...
Ground surfaces concreted,
...
Obstructions removed from open space,
:
...
1
la & 2a
2
3
co
- M 19
Appendix D (i).
CONSPECTUS OF WORK DONE IN THE SEVERAL HEALTH DISTR
4
5
6
6a & 7a
7
8
9
43
108
115
20
87
135
147
69
178
60
23
517
708
1,055
260
767
903
903
748
889
887
964
11
28
32
11
18
52
25
57
69
33
...
...
2
3
223223
28 7898
:
22
13
33
13
59
***
2
13
31
17
9
9
42
85
:
2103
167
1
19
54
21
10
17
...
63
6
::
38
64
15
14
4
2
17
50
55
16
8
81
21
46
16
51
25
27
11
10
30
5
6
6
16
20
12
5.
3
11
21
15
46

Buildings),
Obstructions removed to light and ventilation, Rat runs filled in,
...
...
Water closets installed in private Buildings,
...
Houses demolished and No. of floors (Domestic {
...
...
Houses erected and No. of floors' (Domestic
9
56
Houses
Floors
Houses
Buildings),
Floors
113
...
...
...
Houses demolished and No. of floors (Non
Houses
Domestic Buildings),.......
Floors
...
Houses
erected and No. of floors (Non
Houses
...
Domestic Buildings),...
...
{ Floors
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
13
...
&
2
M-20
Appendix D. (ii)
PROSECUTIONS CLASSIFIED BY HEALTH DISTRICTS 1927.
::
Shau- Aber- Total No. kiwan. deen. of cases.
Total amount
of Fines.
2
1
58
$306.00
1
50.00
...
2
10.00
:..
:
:..
:
:
6
251.00
12
68.00
...
1
50.00
4
71.00
...
...
:
90.00
...
...
::
...
:
::
:
:
...
6A &
3
00
00
4
6
8
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
7A
1
2
1
3
5
8
10
8
1
2
2
1
1
:.
:
:
...
:
...
:
:
: :.
:.
:.
...
...
...
...
:..
.:.
1
:
:.
...
:
:
...
:
:
:
.:.
:
1
...
:
:
12.
F:
...
...
:
...
:
1
:
:
1
5
10
1
:..
2
:
::
...
::
:
:
:
...
...
:
...
:
:
:.
...
...
...
...
1
.:.
:..
...
...
1
::
1
...
1
1
7:
...
...
1
...
...
:-
:
...
:
:
:
D:.
1
...
:
...
...
:
...
...
...
:..
:.
...
...
1
...
:..
:.
N
:
1
1
1
...
:
...
:
:
:.
...
:
::
:
...
...
:
:.
...
...
...
...
:
:
...
::
:
:.
...
:
...
::
:
...
D:.
...
...
1
...
1
:
...
:∞
8
9
13
...
...
19
41
:
:
N
2
75.00
1
3.00
:
...
I
25.00
185.00
38.00
...
::
...
***
35.00
10.00
:7
7
11
22535
1.00
27
377
3,323.00

6
25
29
14
47
9
11
34
29
29
38
20
18
22
49
9
26
17
15
28
490
$4,621.00
:
...
...
~ :
...
cases defendants absconded, 27 cases summons withdrawn, 1 case re-summons withdrawn, 1 case cautioned, 1 case imprisoned for 5 days and 2 cases for 7 days.
...
:
:
:
...
285
...
...
...
...
26
12
40
9
11
27
22
21
25
...
::
M 20
Appendix D. (ii)
PROSECUTIONS CLASSIFIED BY HEALTH DISTRICTS 1927.
1A &
1
2
3
4
པ་
2A
Nature of Offence.
Dumping Rubbish, Nightsoil etc. Maintenance a water closet without permission of the Board..
2
...
:
:
1
...
2
ลง
2
1
...
...
1
...
:
6A &
5
8
ទូ
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
7 A
1
1
:
...
...
3
:.
:
:
:
:..
N
...
1.
2
...
...
...
:
:..
:..
:
:
:.
::
:
:
...

...
1
:.
:
...
...
...
:
1
3
5
10
8
1
...
:
:
...
::
...
...
:
:
1
1
1
1
1
-:
1
...
100
5
:
:
...
:
:
1
:-
...
...
...
...
...
1
...
...
...
...
...
:
:..
:
:.
:
:
:
1
:
...
:..
...
...
:
:
...
:
...
:
...
...
30 1
:
N
...
1
...
:
1
:
:
...

...
:
:
:
...
:
:
1
...
1
1
...
:
1
...
:
N
:
:
.:.
:
:
...
...
...
:
:
:
:.
:
...
...
:
:
:
:
::
...
22
21
3:25
:23
225
...
26
12
40
9
11
27
:
...
...
...
1
...
:∞
8
19
41
25
...
...
25
Total
28
Q
9
29
14
47.
రా
11
34
29
29
38
20
18
22
49
9
26
In 13 cases defendants discharged, 2 cases defendants absconded, 27 cases summons withdrawn, 1 case re-summons withdrawn, 1 case cautioned, 1 case imprisone
:
1
:
Assulting S.B. Foreman and Coolies in Market
Using premises for Offensive Trade without S.B. Licence.
Obstruction of avenue etc. in
markets
Slaughtering swine in premises not
appointed for that purpose
Selling unsound food.
Selling tinned milk not properly labelled
Selling food, drugs etc. not of the nature, substance or quality required
Using Government Property for sleeping purposes
Failing to limewash within the prescribed period after due warning
Keeping Swine and Goats without S.B. Licence
Selling Fruit, Pork, Vegetable etc. without S.B. Licence.....
Using basement for habitation, workshop etc. without S.B. Licence
Using stall for another purposes... Using premises as a bakehouse without S.B. Licence. Prosecution on S.B. Nuisance Notices
:~
2
:
...
18
...
::
8
:∞
15
M 21
Appendix E.
HOUSE CLEANSING RETURN.
Floors Cleansed.
1925
1926
1927
Eastern District (Shaukiwan
1, la and 2a, 2)
28,093
27,804
23,771
Central Districts (3, 4 and 5)
19,462
21,606
21,826
Western Central Districts (6,
6a and 7a, 7)
19,223
16,448
18,505
Western Districts (8, 9, and 10).
21,536
21,703
20,438
. Aberdeen
2,253
2,677
3,072
TOTAL
90,567
90,238
87,612
Kowloon (11, 12, 13, 14, 15,
16 and 17)
44,800
50,095
48,754
Districts Nos. 1, 1A and 2A, 3, 4, 5, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 14, 15,
16, 17 and Shaukiwan were cleansed twice, Nos. 2, 6, 7 and 13
were cleansed three times and 6A and 7a and Aberdeen four
times.
Health Districts.
1 storey.
2 storeys.
3 storeys.
Appendix F (i).
Table Showing Number of Chinese Houses and Floors, Victoria, 1927.
Shaukiwan
Aberdeen and Aplichau
261
261
571
144
...
59
126
111
1
53
402
231
281
...
la & 2a
21
64
333.
417
2
3 101
538
393
8
65
176
87
15
4
13
75
640 503
49
5
19
116
493
...
300
47
6
59
36
292 331
67
...
6a & 7a
16
175
205
16
...
9
223
382
...
36
8
34
69
456
420
...
...
9
12
129
444 457
59
10
93
:
498 574
108
Total...
545 1,562 5,181 | 4,494
455
4 storeys.
5 storeys.
6 storeys.
7 storeys.
8 storeys
Houses.
Floors.
1,237
3,027
2:48
296
644
2.18
967
...
2,674
2.76
835
2,816
3:20
1,043
3,431
3.29
343
1,081
3:15
NO
1,282
4,352
34
977
3,177
3.25
785
2,666
3:40
415
1,460
3.52
Co
665
2,500
3.76
1,029
:::
3,470
3.37
...
1,101 3,725
3:38
:
1,281
4,524
3.53

7
9
12,256
39,592
3.23
M 22
Average.
Appendix F (ii).
Table Showing Number of Chinese Houses and Floors, Kowloon, 1927.
1
Health Districts.
1 storey.
2 storeys. 3 storeys. 4 storeys. 5 storeys 6 storeys
7 storeys
8 storeys Houses.
Floors.
11
12
...
105
327
146
4
...
44
682
442
13
4
...
41
406
312
14
14
27
444
425
15
...
...
1,073
293
528
17
16
22
...
187
557
267
17
139
47
658
119
-
Average.
1
580
1,777
3.06
1,172
3,906
3.33
763
2,553
3.34
910
3,100
3.40
1,911
3,311
1.73
- M 23 -
1,033
3,135
3.03
963
2,683
2.78
Total
1,258
744
3,602
1,728
7,332
20,460
2.79
M 24
Appendix G.
LIMEWASHING, 1927.
Victoria
Kowloon
Shaukiwan included
Floors limewashed by owners
24,505
16,935
Floors limewashed by S.B.'s Con-
tractor at owners' request
696
89
Floors limewashed by S.B. at
owners' request
680
231
Floors limewashed by S.B. owing to owners' failure to comply with By-law
106
Floors limewashed by S.B.'s Con-
tractor owing to owners' failure to comply with By-law
598
533
s
TOTAL
J
26,585
17,788

Registry.
Appendix H.
VACCINATION RETURN FOR 1927.
B. F.
New Total Vaccin-
Left
Unvac-
births. liable.
ated.
Dead.
Colony.
cinated.
Cannot Had Insus- Small-
be
found. pox.
ceptible.
Unfit.
Total
C. F.
Total.
Sanitary Department (Non-Chinese) Sanitary Department (Chinese) Eastern Chinese Public Dispensary Yaumati Chinese Public Dispensary Western Chinese Public Dispensary Shamshuipo Chinese Public Dispensary. Shaukiwan Chinese Public Dispensary Hunghom Chinese Public Dispensary Kowloon City Chinese Public Dispensary Central Chinese Public Dispensary...
Total...
158 324 482
249
1,199
897 2,096
382
8
132
354 1,443 | 1,797
286
79
301 2,262 2,563
511
26
732 1,320 2,052
|
177
2815558
20
27
1
5
174
482
102
10
1,462
2,096
244
930
1,797
37
206
12 1,771
2,563
* 420
1,398
2,052
275
287 562
102
20
26
409
562
7
292
299
29
5
37
42
8
15 193 154
24
-69
3
90
166
299
5
1
21
42
13
104
154
39
495 534 33
2
496
534
3,085 7,496 10,581 1,801
201 479 1,135
2
01
326,93110,581
M 25
}
1. Salary of Coolies
2. Salary of Motor Drivers
3. Salary of Bullock Drivers
4. Scavenging Gear
Appendix I (i).
COST OF REFUSE COLLECTION.
Hong Kong.
Kowloon.
Total.
74,864.91
36,438.61
111,303.52
5,355.18
3,035.50
8,390.68
706.12
126.00
832.12
4,076.67
1,339.59
5,416.26
5.
Maintenance of Bullocks
10.00
2.55
12.55
6. Maintenance of Dust Carts
180.00
94.00
274.00
7. Running Expenses: Motor Refuse Lorries
15,485.49
7,742.75
23,228.24
8. Depreciation at 10%
4,882.27
2,441.13
7,323.40
TOTAL
105,560.64
51,220.13
156,780.77
M 26 -
:
Appendix I (ii).
COST OF REFUSE REMOVAL.
Salary of Bargemen
Repairs, Stores and Coal for Launches and Barges
TOTAL
City Scavenging Kowloon Scavenging
Removal
སྐར་
Hong Kong.
Kowloon.
Total.
22,983.80
533.22
23,517.02
27,253.27
22,983.80
533.22
50,770.29
Appendix I (iii).
COMPARATIVE TABLE FOR 2 YEARS.
1926.
1927.
101,843.95
46,798.30
105,560.64
51,220.13
59,602.87
50,770.29
M 27
Appendix J.
WORK DONE AT DISINFECTING STATIONS.
1926.
Eastern
Western
District
District
Hong Kong Kowloon
Office.
Office.
Disinfect- Disinfect-
ing
ing
Station.
Station.
Portable Sack
Disinfectors.
1927.
Hong Kong Kowloon Disinfect- Disinfect- ing Station. Station.
ing
Eastern
Western
District
District
Office.
Office.
Portable Sack Disinfectors.
M 28
Number of Articles disinfected..
19,911
3,548
237
543
19,876
3,924
2,570
1,029
Number of Public Vehicles disinfected
118
244
95
217
Number of Days Disinfecting Apparatus in Use
177
236
11
151
217
73
36
Number of Articles washed after Disinfection
4,384
91
4,161
M 29
Appendix K (i).
AMBULANCE AND DEAD BOX SERVICE.
LIST OF AMBULANCE STATIONS.
Race Course, Wong Nei Chung Road. Belcher's Street, Scavenging Coolies' Quarters. Government Civil Hospital.
Western Market, North Block.
No. 6 Police Station. Central Policè Station. Post Office Building. Pokfulam Police Station. Bay View Police Station. Aberdeen Police Station. Stanley Police Station. Shaukiwan Police Station. Mount Gough Police Station. Tsim Sha Tsui Police Station. Sham Shui Po Police Station. Kowloon City Police Station. Sha Tau Kok Police Station. Au Tau Police Station.
Tai Po Police Station.
Appendix K (ii).
CALLS MADE FOR. AMBULANCES AND DEAD BOXES.
Hong Kong Kowloon
Eastern Western
Disinfect- Disinfect-
ing Station. Station.
District
District
ing
Office.
Office.
Ambulances, Euro-
pean
7
3
Ambulances, Chinese.
60
65
32
49
Dead Boxes
528
1,678
375
443
"
Wanchai, Cross Lane Bath-House,
Second Street Bath-House
Pakhoi Street Bath-House
Pound Lane Bath-House
Appendix L.
PUBLIC BATH-HOUSES.
Men.
1926.
1927.
Women. Children. Men. Women. Children.
216,101
242,600
* 39,001
167,299
90,855
165,700
* 17,925
42,008
61,320 200,412 90,804 193,356 215,996 151,531 162,649 * 16,838 48,399 17,997 26,347 15,056 147,755 69,070 26,318
376,339
*Pakhoi Street Bath-House was not in use from 6th March to 12th April, 1926, owing to water restrictions.
}
M 30
M 31
Appendix M,
MARKETS.
26
The following statement shows the Revenue derived from Markets :-
Markets.
1914-1923
(average for
1924.
1925.
1926.
1927.
10 years).
$
$
c.
$
C.
C.
$
Central
61,145:82
62,614.80
62,614.80
62,614.80
Hung Hom...
4,270.95
4,450.80
4,450.80
4,450.80 *
Mong Kok Tsui
Sai Wan Ho
́Sai Ying Pun. Shaukiwan
Shek Tong Tsui
So Kon Po
Tai Kok Tsui
Tsim Sha Tsui
Wan Tsai
Western (North Block)
1,679.45
3,366.00
3,366.00
12,592.00
c.
62,614.80
7,930.00
11,118.20
2,407.63
2,872.50
2,854.80
2,854.80
2,854.80
16,241.53
16,525,20
16,525.20
16,525.20
2,099.65
2,132.40
2,132.40
2,132.40
16,525.20
2,132.40
928.31
942.00
942.00
942.00
964.00
1,628.45
2,080.80
2,095.00
2,202.00
2,911.50
715.80
872.40
872.40
872.40
872.40
4,454.60
4,576.80
5,307.40
5,409.50
5,408.00
4,855.12
4,910.40
4,910.40
4,910.40
4,910.40

19,250.20 -
23,180.40
24,681.60
25,314.70
25,626.80
Western (South Block)
1
31,820.65
32,920.40
32,906.40
32,906.40
32,906.40
Yaumati
11,415.91
21,439.80
20,637.60
19,765,10
19,272.40
Aberdeen
455.74
445.20
852.00
.852.00
852.00
Canal Road opened on 1/4/13
516.00
516.00
516.00
516.00
516,00
*Praya East opened on 1/12/13
375.22
948.60
900.50
904.80
Closed
Reclamation Street opened on 1/9/13
2,887.06
3,283.20
3,286.00
3,315.00
3,289.50
Staunton Street opened on 1/10/12
957.38
952.80
952.80
952.80
955,50
Tai Hang opened on 1/4/14
809.81
565.20
565.20
565.20
565.20
Sham Shui Po opened on 1/6/18
3,375.62*
2,947.80
2,950.80
2,956.80
2,974.80
Kowloon City opened on 1/1/22
299.95
279.60
279,60-
271.80
254.40
Reclamation Street, (Poultry) opened on 1/6/23
1,454.40*
1,454.40
1,454,40
1,454.40
Monmouth Path opened on 1/1/24
2,012.80
2,027.60
2,001.20
1,765.20
Wong Nei Chung opened on 1/1/24.
2,322.00
2,322.00
2,322.00
2,322.00
Quarry Bay opened on 1/7/24
1,280.30
2,212.60
1,948.60
1.861.90
Whitfield opened on 1/10/24.. Waterloo Road opened on 1/10/24
Kun Chung opened on 1/2/25
Total,.....
172,590,85
* Closed in October, 1926.
...
2,866.80
7,636.90
5,494.50
5,524.70
...
252.00
996.00
984.00
984.00
...
16,300.90
13,575.50
13,839,90
203,011.40
227,550.10 231,607.10 233,206.80

f
(1)
Cemetery.
(2)
Approxi-
mate
(3)
Available
space as on burial space. 31/12/26.
i.
M 32
Appendix N 1927.
(4)
(5)
(6)
(7)
.(8)
(9)
Subsequent Exhumation.
Net
Gross .available
Private.
Public.
space.
Burials since 31/12/26.
available space on 81/12/27.
Average burials for last 10 years.
Average
(10)
private exhumation
for past 10 years.
Last previous General Exhumation.
Year No. Year No. Year No.
Colonial
10,200
1,279
1,280
67
Roman Catholic
8,000
3,619
122
::
1,213
72
2
3,741
.158
3,583
-150
22
1917 288
1923 765
Mohammedan
3,500
354
1
355
57
298
65
...
Parsee.....
200
99
99
99
1
Mount Caroline
23,000
8,940
229
490
9,659
1,033
1913 1,669 1918
864
1916 338 1920 | 1,921
8,626
936
245
1923 920
1924 641
1925
650 1926 468
Chinese Protestant........
1,800
504
504
91
413
66
Eurasian (Ho Tung)
200
181
181
4
-177
3
1920 1,952 1923 1,631
Kai Lung Wan East.
25,500
2,069
228
1,369
3,666
1,205
2,461
1,367
195
1924 1,604
1925 1,542
1926 992
Tung Wah (K.L.W. West)'.
53,486
5,188
56
2,501
7,745
5,188
2,557
5,054
54
1919 6,000 1923 2,753 1924 1,406 1925 1,605
1926 2,862
Mohammedan T.S.K...
8,000
7,065
7,065
3
7,062
3
Sai Yu Shek
5,400
4,701-
4,701
181
4,520
148
166
Shaukiwan (Chai Wan)
6,700
1,097
1,046
2,141
257
1,884
249
29
{
1911 1,276 1924 548
1920|1,197
Shaukiwan Christian ·
185
80
:
80
7
73
3
Stanley (Tung Tau Chau)....
1,090
49
So Kon Po Roman Catholic...
20,000
11,826
Aberdeen (Shum Wan)......... Jewish ...
2,000
1,131
17
T-E
7
56
16
50
28
3
1
100
11,927
1,596
10,331
1,365
:
200
1,348
200
1,148
216
39
560 1923
1924 785
250
110
...
110
2
108
: Shek O
-
Malay
100
98
98
...
Ho Mun Tin
Chinese Permanent.
Mohammedan, Ho Mun Tin
...
32,250
10,720
10,720
4,720
98 6,000
...
4,393
1-
98
300
...
:
800
1
299
67.
3
:
$.
Public.
M 33
Appendix O (i).
INTERMENTS.
Private.
Sai Yu Shek
181
Roman Catholic, Happy
Valley
158
Ho Mun Tin
4,720
Tai Shek Koo
4
Mohamedan,
Valley
Happy
57
Colonial
67
Jewish, Happy Valley
Mount Caroline
1,033
Parsee, Happy Valley
Kai Lung Wan East
1,205
Malay, Happy Valley
Chiu Chow Kai Lung
Wan East
26
Chai Wan
257
Chinese Roman Catho-
lic (Sokonpo)
Tung Wah Hospital.... 5,188
1,596
&
Chai Wan Christian
7
Chinese
Permanent,
Aberdeen
98
Shum Wan
200
Chinese Protestant
91
Tung Tau Chow ....
16
Eurasian (Ho Tung)
4
Shek O
6
Kowloon Christian
56
7,722
7,250
Appendix O (ii).
GENERAL EXHUMATION, 1927.
Chai Wan
1,046
Kai Lung Wan East
1,369
Kai Lung Wan West
2,501
Mount Caroline
490
Sham Wan
200
Ma Tau Wai
3,982
Hau Pui Lung
145
9,733
34
Appendix O (iii).
Exhumations were carried out by relatives as follows:
Aberdeen
Mohamedan
17
1
3
1
Cheung Sha Wan
Chinese Permanent
Chai Wan
Colonial
1
Hau Pui Lung
736
Kai Lung Wan East
228
Kowloon Tong
37
Kowloon Christian
1
Ma Tau Wai
Mount Caroline Mount Davis Roman Catholic
Sai Yu Shek
68 229
5
122
223
Stanley
7
Tung Wah Hospital
56
So Kon Po Roman Catholic
Kennedy Town Plague Cemetery
1
Places other than authorized cemeteries.
9
1,760
Appendix 0 (iv).
(a) Cremations.
At Japanese Crematorium
At Sikh Temple
(b) Deposited in Tung Wah Hospital Mortuary.
Awaiting burial
(c) Removals from the Colony.
Before burial
22
10
32
109
327
www
:
NON-CHINESE.
M 35
Appendix P.
RETURN OF CERTIFIED AND UNCERTIFIED DEATHS.
CHINESE.
N
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
Number uncertified.
Number certified.
Number uncertified.
Number Number
of certified. by private reference.
Notified
Medical Coroner.
Percentage
certified.
Percentage Number HongKong. Kowloon. Total. \T.W.H. uncertified. of
K.W.H.
Medical
Notified
Coroner. Percentage
Percentage
Reference. by private
certified. uncertified.
practi-
tioners.
Chinese
practi-
deaths.
tioners.
Non-
*
Chinese
deaths.
+
+
26
84.4
15.6
12,336
4,027
2,566
6,593
674
220
50
13
4,786
53.08
46.52
1
25
88.98
11.02
14,525
2,233
4,761
6,994
771
562
111
18
6,069
48.15
51.85
1926
180
152
2
ลง
...
1927
236
210
N.B.-" Certified" signifies a death the cause of which has been certified on Form 16 of Ordinance No. 7 of 1896 by a registered medical practitioner or licentiate who has attended the case before death.
:
---
-M 36
Appendix Q.
LIST OF REVENUE FROM JANUARY TO
DECEMBER, 1927.
Chinese Undertakers' Licences
Forfeitures
$ c.
900.00
172.98
Special Food Licences
12,645.60
Official Signatures
2.00
Ambulance and Cremation Fees
778.00
Births and Deaths Registration
3,033.20
Chinese Cemetery Fees
6,829.00
Official Certificates
Lands Not Leased Laundries
Markets
3,639.00
Use of Motor Vans
7,474.95
Slaughter House, Kennedy Town
180.00 2,400.00
231,535.20 95,599.60 29,260.00
- t
Slaughter House, Ma Tau Kok
Interest
Condemned Stores, &c.
Other Miscellaneous Receipts
Scavenging City, Villages and Hill District
TOTAL 1926
51.35
417.00
SHAHBO-ZOX
3,527.16
3,255.70
$401,700.74
. $360,235.35
;
Revenue from Contracts.
Conservancy Contract Victoria,
Deduction.
$38,400 $26,745.00 $11,655.00 Kowloon,.. 23,400 19,828.30 3,571.70 Shaukiwan,
2,520
504.00 2,016.00
Blood and Hair, Kennedy Town,
8,256.00
Ma Tau Kok,
3,420.00
Slaughtering Contract, Sai Wan Ho,
4,020.00
Slaughtering Contract, Aberdeen,
TOTAL
1,488.00
$34,426.70
A
}
in
F
M 37
Appendix R. .
LIST OF EXPENDITURE FROM JANUARY TO DECEMBER, 1927.
C.
Personal Emoluments
434,031.25
Advertisements
1,687.92
Ambulances, Coffins, Dead Vans and Dead Boxes
583.69
Bamboo Poles, and Rope
413.06
Baskets, Buckets, and Shovels
3,650.44
Bath-Houses, Fuel, Light etc.
1,722.14
Bonuses to Dispensary Licentiates and Clerks for
Vaccination of children and registration of
births
1,636.20
Brooms, Brushes, and Bamboo Hats
2,026.14
Burial of Infected Bodies
474.60
Coal for Official Quarters
1,329.88
Conveyance and Motor Allowances
9,690.93
Disinfectants
11,398.22
Disinfecting and Cleansing Apparatus
1,523.05
Disinfectors
651.91
Dust and Water Carts
228.25
Exhumation, Recurrent
15,911.12
Fuel for Blacksmith's Forges
266.40
Furniture in Official Quarters
53.55
General Cleansing, Chinese New Year
538.50
Head Stones
1,915.55
Incidental Expenses
2,092.73
Incidental Expenses, Markets
293.93
Light, Bullock Stables at Victoria and Kowloon
175.01
Light, Central Market
1,149.74
Light, Disinfecting Stations, District. Sanitary
Offices and Coolies Quarters
1,727.18
Light, Official Quarters
640.34
Light, Smaller Markets
2,403.26
Light, Tsim Sha Tsui Market
821.16
Light, Western Market North and South Blocks
3,132.05
Motor Lorries, Vans and Cars, Running Expenses..
33,226.41
Nightsoil Receptacles
814.00
Paint, Turpentine &c.
1,639.82
Purchase and Maintenance of Bullocks
12.55
Rat Poison, Rat Traps, etc.
1,787.63
Rent of Quarters for Inspector and Sanitary Officers
774.65
Rent of Quarters for Scavenging Coolies
Scavenging City, Villages, and Hill District
Scavenging Gear
2,663.40
765.88
1,866.50
Scavenging Gear, Kowloon
Street-watering
Transport
468.49
920.96 1,743.84
ī
M 38
$ c.
Uniform for Staff
8,896.68
Workshop Apparatus
340.32
A. D. & S. H. :-Fuel
5,809.92
A. D. & S. H. :-Incidental Expenses
989.24
A. D. & S. H.:-Light
598.30
A. D. & S. H.:-Motor Meat Vans: Running
Expenses
4,262.41
Cattle Crematorium and Refuse Destructor
496.34
TOTAL
1926
$570,245.57
$559,499.10
Special Expenditure.
2 Motor Refuse Lorries
Seal for Registrar of Births and Deaths
TOTAL
1926
17,819.14 90.00
$17,909.14
$ 9,805.74
Į
KENNEDY TOWN
SHEKTONGTSUI
10
:
SEI
9
VNEDY TOWN
SHEKTONGTSUI
SEI YING POON
ING POO
10
9
8
TA
سال

SHEUNG WAN
27
6
7A
6A

A
B
B
CHOONG WAN
LO
5
4
(
د اليال
по
2
U
R
2
MAP "A"
WAN CHAI
HA WAN
2A
1 A
BOWAINGTON
WON
NO,
CAUSEWAY BAY
SEWAY
WON
1
:
4
SHAUKIWAN
:
KENNEDY TOWN
SHEKTONGTSUI
SEI YING
10
9
CITY OF
SEI YING POON
டா
SHEUNG WAN
9
8
7
7A
6A
ITY OF VICTORIA
سال
مال
6
LO
5
3
H
A
CHOONG WAN
4
حســ
ONG WAN
حسـ

2
:
1
R
W
HA WAN
2A
2A
WAN CHAI
BOWRINGTON
1 A..
1
WONGNEI CHUNG VALLEY
CAUSEWAY BAY
АУ
SHAUKIWAN
.UKIWAN
:
"
17
■MARKET
SHAM SHUI PO
MARKET
16
MAP "B"
KOWLOON HEALTH DIS
YAUMATI STATION
MARKET
14
MONGKOKTSUI
HARBOUR
OF
REFUGE
YAUMATI
KOWLOON HOSPITAL
CHINESE
CEMETERY
INDIAN CEMETERY
MA
[
CHI CEMET
EUROPEAN PROTESTANT CEMETERY
R. C. CEMETERY
CHINESE CEMETERY
DISINFECTING STATION
13
MARKET
PAKHOI ST. BATH HOUSE
KING'S PARK
No 12
HILL
T.
12
MARK
C
MAP "B"
WLOON HEALTH DISTRICTS
STATION
+
CHINESE CEMETERY
KOWLOON HOSPITAL
INDIAN! CEMETERY
MA TAU WAI
*
CHINESE
CEMETERY?
EUROPEAN PROTESTANT CEMETERY R. C. CEMETERY
CHINESE CEMETERY
SINFECTING
STATION
13
T.
SE
KING'S PARK
NO 12 HILL
15
MA TAU KOK
CATTLE DEPOT
TO KWA WAN
CHEKSHAN
MARKET
17
■MARKET
SHAM SHUI PO
MARKET
16
CHINESE
CEMETERY
YAUMATISTATION
KOWLOON HOSPITAL
INDIAN! CEMETERY
♫ MARKET
14
MONGKOKTSUI
HARBOUR
OF
REFUGE
YAUMATI
MA TAU WAI
CHINESE
CEMETERY?
EUROPEAN PROTESTANT CEMETERY R. C. CEMETERY
CHINESE CEMETERY
DISINFECTING
1
■ MARKET
STATION
PAKHOI ST. BATH HOUSE
13
KING'S PARK
WAR DEPT.
12
■ MARKET
No 12 HILL
HUNG HOM
BAY
TO KV
CHEKSHAN
MARKET
STATION
CHINESE CEMETERY
KOWLOON
HOSPITAL INDIAN!
CEMETERY
MA TAU WAI
CHINESE CEMETERY/
EUROPEAN PROTESTANT CEMETERY
R. C. CEMETERY
CHINESE CEMETERY
SINFECTING
STATION
E
13
KING'S PARK
No 12 HILL
HUNG HOM
BAY
15
MA TAU KOK
CATTLE DEPOT
TO KWA WAN
CHEKSHAN
MARKET
M 39
REPORT OF THE MEDICAL OFFICER OF HEALTH.
The area of the Colony, except when otherwise mentioned, dealt with in this report, includes the island of Hong Kong, the Kowloon peninsula and that portion of the New Territories known as New Kowloon on the mainland, but does not include the remaining or greater portion of the New Territories, such being without the jurisdiction of the Sanitary Board.
The latitude and longitude of the Royal Observatory in the Kowloon peninsula are:-Lititude 22° 18' 13.2" N., Longitude 114° 10′ 26.4′′ E.
METEOROLOGICAL DATA.
The following table gives the means or totals of the meteorological data for the several months of the whole year
1927.
Month.
Barometer
at M.S.L.
TEMPERA- TURE.
HUMI-
DITY.
Max. Mean. Min.
Rel.
Abs.
Cloudiness.
Sunshine.
WIND
Rain.
Direction. Vel.
ins.
о
O
p.c. ins.
p. c.
hours. ins.
points. miles p.h.
January,
March,
30.15 64.2 59.7 February, 30.11 62.2 58.5 55.2 30.03 63.6 60.1 57,0
56.3
74
0.39
67
137.5 0.310
ENE
12.0
78 0.39
90
43.4
4.350
ENE
13.6
80 | 0.43
65.7 4.535 E by N
14.6
April,
29.94 71.6] 67.2 | 61.1
84
0.64
83
105.9 7.125
E
13.9
May,
29.84 80.5 75.6 | 72.3
86
0.77
117.8 25.445
E
12.3
June,.... July,
29.71 86.5 81.9 78.5 August, 29.69 87.5 82.1 | 78,0 September, 29.88 53.6 79.3 76.1 October, 30.0279.674.8 | 70.9 November, 30.08 | 75.9 | 71.0|67,1 December, 30.13 70.2 65.5 | 61,9
29.76 85.981.6 78.7
84
0.91
191.9 11.680 SE by F
10.3
84
0.92
80
161.3 18.735 SE by S
9.9
85 0.93 67 80 0.80 71 0.63 64 0.49 36 72 0.46 60
211.0 20.905 SE by S
8.6
78
147.1 6.165
E
10.3
232.8 5.420 | ENE
12.0
231.4 1.825 ENE 176.1
10.9
1.370| ENE
11.7
Mean or 29.91 73.9 | 71.4 | 68.0
Total,
78 0.65 71
151.8 107.86 E
11.7
POPULATION.
The estimated population of the Colony at the end of 1927 was as follows:-
Non-Chinese Civil population
Chinese population:-
City of Victoria (including the Peak) 500,000 Villages of Hong Kong
16,500
39,900
Kowloon (including new Kowloon). 240,000
New Territories (land)
87,500
Population afloat
94,000
Total Chinese population
961,400
Total Civil population
977,900
M 40
The following table shows the distribution of the population for the years 1917 to 1927 (inclusive) in the area throughout which the Sanitary Board has jurisdiction. It also shows the population in the various districts in respect of which weekly and quarterly death rates are calculated and submitted for the information of the Board.
Since the year 1916 the population in the area under the jurisdiction of the Board has increased by more than 100 per
cent.
Civilian population of Hong Kong (excluding N.T. except New Kowloon) according to death registration districts from 1917 to 1927.
1917
1918
1919
1920
1921
1922
1923 1924 1925
1926 1927
British and Foreign Com- munity
Chinese Community
Victoria Registration Dis-
trict (including the Peak) 280,700
13,500 13,500 13,600 14,000 14,100 15,200| 15,500 16,000 16,500 16,500 16,500
Victoria Harbour
39,400
299,450 320,080 342,000 360,000 340,000 350,000 420,000 465,000 465,000 500,000 39,400 42,710 46,300 49,800 47,000 48,000 50,000 52,000 52,000
54,000
Kowloon (including New
Kowloon)
Shaukiwan-Land.
Boat
77,200
11,400 11,400 6,500.
77,200
݂ܕ
Aberdeen-Land
3,200 3,200
3,500
3,800 4,000
Boat
12,250
13,400
14,480
15,600.16,000
Stanley-Land
'700
700
720
750
7.60
Boat....
360
400
31
""
Total Chinese-Land
350 350 373,200 391,950 423,150 465,050 498,360 498,700
Boat 58,500 59,650 64,250 69,300 73,420 Land & Boat 431,700 451,600 487,400 533,350 571,780
Grand Total..
All deaths in the British and Foreign Community are registered at the principal registration office in the City of Victoria. The Chinese deaths are registered in the districts in which they occur.
420
8,400 9,000 9,000 6,100 6,500 7,200 7,200 9,000 10,000 11,000. 11,000 1,200 1,300 1,400: 1,400 300 350 380: 516,300 629,800 698,040 698,040 779,900 65,500 68,750 72,380 72,380 94,000 563,000 581,800 698,550 770,420 770,420 873,900 445,200 465,100 501,000 547,350 585,880 578,200 597,300 714,550 786,920 786,920 894,400
7,200 8,000 8,200
86,550 104,000 120,000 133,000 140,000 180,000 200,000 200,000 240,000 12,300 13,500 13,600 18,500 19,000 22,000 24,440 24,440 6,500 6,700 7,000
28,400
20,000
6,000
10,000.
9,000
18,000
1,200.
1,500.
300
380
2,000
64,300
M 42
**
FLUCTUATION IN POPULATION,
The population of the Colony is liable to much variation dependant on political conditions in South China and the state of trade in Hong Kong.
During the year 1927 the exchange of people between Hong Kong and neighbouring Chinese Territory by river steamships and railway shows a balance of 55,786 in favour of emigrants.
The actual figures so furnished are shown in the following table.
Immigrants
Emigrants
By railway
363,347
314,640
By Steamships
181,100
285,593
Total
544,447
600,233
These figures do not take into account the large interchange of population by sailing vessels.
BIRTHS.
In dealing with Birth Statistics in Hong Kong it is essential to remember that Registration of Births is largely evaded by the Chinese especially in regard to female children.
The births registered during the year 1927 numbered 7500.
The distribution of these births according to race and sex is shown in the following table:-
Males.
Females.
Total.
Chinese
Non-Chinese
1926 1927 1926 1927 1926 1927
2,022 4,128 1,202 3,048 3,724 7,176
163 163 154 161 317 324
Total...
2,185 4,291 1,356 3,209 4,041 7,500
This gives a general civil birth rate of 8.4 compared with 4 5 per 1,000 in
1926.
M 43
The birth rate for the Non-Chinese civil population was 19.6 as compared with 19.21 in 1926.
The birth rate for the Chinese population as calculated from the registered births was 8.2 per 1,000 as compared with 4.18 per 1,000 in 1926. This is the highest Chinese birth rate ever recorded.
The following table shows the birth rate calculated from the registered birth for the last ten years.
Year
Non-Chinese
Chinese
1918
22.07
3.6
1919
20.6
3.9
1920
19.78
3.96
1921
25.88
5.68
1922
22.84
6.25
1923
23.03
6.97
1924
19.8
5.47
1925
22.6
4.25
1926
19.21
4.18
1927
19.6
8.2
Sex of the newly born.
For the Non-Chinese community the ratio of male to female children for the year 1927 was 101 males to 100 females.
The nationality of the Non-Chinese parents was as follows.
British 142, Portuguese 65, Indian 60, American 13, Filipino 8. Malay 7, Eurasian, German, Japanese, Spanish and Anna- mite 3 each. Dutch and Panamanian 2 each, French, Canadian, Parsee, Danish, Siamese, Javanese and Celonese 1 each.
DEATHS.
The total number of deaths registered in the Colony during the year 1927 was 14,761 (12,516 in 1926).
The general civil death rate was 16.5 per 1,000 (15.9 in 1926).
The Chinese deaths numbered 14,525 (12,336 in 1926).
The Chinese death rate was 16.6 per 1,000.
0
The Non-Chinese deaths numbered 236 including 18 from the Navy and Army.
M 44
The death rate for the Non-Chinese civil population was 13.2 per 1,000 (10.9 in 1926).
The nationality of the Non-Chinese deaths was as follows:
British 76, Portuguese 50, Indian 45, Japanese 21,
Malay 11, Filipino 8, Eurasian 6, American 5, French 4, Italian, West Indian, Persian, Canadian, Norwegian, German, Australian, Annamite, Peru- vian and Esthonian 1 each.
AGE DISTRIBUTION OF DEATHS.
The number of deaths of children under one year was 4,669 (3,424 in 1926) of which 4,637 were Chinese and 32 Non-Chinese.
Of these 1,478 Chinese and 12 Non-Chinese were under one month of age.
The ratio of deaths of infants to the total deaths registered was 31.6 per cent (27.3 in 1926)
.
For the Chinese deaths above the ratio was 31.6 per cent (27.5 in 1926), while for the Non-Chinese it was 13.2 per cent (8.3 in 1926).
The following table shows the death rates for the last ten years:
Year
Chinese
Non-Chinese
General
1918
24.50
19.50
24.40
1919
23.30
21.90
23.20
1920
22.78
17.90
21.19
1921
20.29
18.08
20.27
1922
25.47
20.46
25.16
1923
26.27
14.83
25.98
1924
21.90
15.06
21.75
1925
19.12
14.60
19.05
1926
16.01
10.9
15.9
1927
16.6
13.2
16.5
INTERMEDIATE DEATH RATES.
A so-called weekly death rate is calculated for each period of seven days and a so-called quarterly death rate each period of thirteen weeks.
Tables are given below to show these death rates for the year 1927, but the period covered by them does not correspond exactly with the actual year for which the death rates (annual) are given in this report.
M 45
Weekly (7 days) Death Rate during 1926.
Week ended Chinese Non-Chinese Total | Week ended | Chinese Non-Chinese| Total
Jan..........
14.5
9.5
144 July
3
25.1
18.9
25.0
9
15.4
25.3
15.6
10
22.5
28.4
22.6
"
"}
.16
14.4
25.3
14.4
..17
23.2
12.6
29
1+
23.0
23
13.3
3.5
13.2
..24
21.5
22.1
21.5
"}
"
...30
14.8
9.5
14.7
...31
23.1
15.8
"
"
22.9
Feb.
6
17.5
12.6
17.4 Aug.
7
24.3
18.9
24.2
.13
15.5
25.3
15.7
....14
21.4
25.3
21.5
.20
17.4
9.5
17.2
...21
23.7
9.5
""
23.4
..27
193
12.6
19.1
..28
20.0
18.9
20.0
14
March...... 6
16.6
9.5
16.5 Sept.
21.0
34.7
21.3
13
17.9
6.3
17.7
...11
20.3
3.2
19.9
91
..20
17.5
15.8
17,5
..18
18.9
12.6
18.9
""
..27
17.7
9.5
17.5
..25
18.4
3.2
19
18.1
April
3
20.0
3.2
19.7 Oct.
2
16.4
9.5
16.3
.10
18.8
6.8
18.5
9
18,9
12.6
18.8
.17
16.3
9.5.
16.1
1.6
19.8
6.3.
19.5
.24
22.8
12.6
22.6
.23
21.4
12.6
21.2
May
I
19.9
12.6
19.7
..30
19.5
6.3
19.3
8
17.4
15.8
17.3 Nov.
6
18.9
25.3
19.0
19
15
16.1
22.1
16.2
13
16.1
12.5
29
159
11
22
15.7
12.6
15.6
.20
18.5
15.8
18.5
19

29
21.2
9.5
20.9
..27
17.0
12.6
16.9
"
""
June
5
14.8
9.5
14.7
Dec.
4
16.9
22.1
17.0
.12
22.7
18.9
22.6
.11
18.2
9.5
95
18.0
.19
21.0
15.8
20,9
18
15.7
9.5
15.5
.26
25.5
15.8
25.3
.25
14.9
6.3
14.7
For the actual year 1927 the death rate for Chinese was 16.6 per 1,000.
In the above tables the weekly death rates are lower than this for 15 weeks.
TABLE OF QUARTERLY DEATH RATE FOR 1927.
British & Foreign Community.
Chinese Community.
General.
First quarter
12.7
16.7
16.7
Second quarter..
13.1
19.9
19.8
Third quarter
16.7
21.2
21.1
Fourth quarter..
11.6
17.7
17.7
The so-called quarters in the above tables are periods of thirteen weeks and the table covers the same total period as does that of the weekly death rates given above.
M 46
DEATHS FROM CERTAIN NON-NOTIFIABLE DISEASES.
Respiratory Diseases.
1. Excluding tuberculosis in its various forms the number of deaths from Respiratory Diseases during 1927 was 4,239 (3,566 in 1926) of which 34 were Non-Chinese (27 in 1926) and 4,205 Chinese (3,539 in 1926).
Deaths of children under one year of age accounted for 1614 of these (1921 in 1926).
The deaths ascribed to Lobar Pneumonia and Pneumonia (type not specified) were 426 (398 in 1926) and 340 (182 in 1926) respectively or a total of 768.
Of these 263 (170 in 1926) were deaths of children under one year of age.
Broncho-Pneumonia accounted for 1,739 deaths (1,693 in 1926) of which 19 were Non-Chinese (9 in 1926). Of these 721 were deaths of infants under one year of age (1,115 in 1926). Of these infants 5 were Non-Chinese (2 in 1926).
2. Including tubercular infections the total deaths among the Chinese from Respiratory Diseases was 5,769 (5,105 in 1926) giving a percentage of the total Chinese deaths of 39.7 (41.3 in 1926).
The rate of mortality from Respiratory Diseases for the Chinese population (excluding the New Territory except New Kowloon) for the year 1927 was 6.6 per thousand (6.49 in 1926).
Tuberculosis (all types).
Tubercular infections of the respiratory system caused 1,595 deaths in the year 1927 (1,517 in 1926). Of these 31 were Non- Chinese (28 in 1926).
Other tubercular infections caused 528 deaths (395 in 1926) 10 of which were Non-Chinese (8 in 1926).
The total deaths from tubercular infections was therefore 2,123 (1,912 in 1926).
The percentage of deaths from tubercular infections of the total deaths registered was 14.38 (15.27 in 1926).
Tuberculosis according to type of infection and age groups.
For the purpose of showing the various forms of tubercular disease which caused the above mentioned deaths this infection is here divided in five types as follows:-
Type 1. Pulmonary and acute miliary tuberculosis. Type 2. Tubercular Meningitis.
Type 3. Abdominal Tuberculosis.
Type 4. Disseminated or General Tuberculosis.
Type 5. Other Tubercular Diseases.
M 47
The following table shows the number of Chinese deaths from each of these types distributed according to age groups for the year 1927:
Age Groups.
Types.
3
4
10
5
Under 1 year
144
17
14
63
0
Over 1 year and under 5 years
241
36
26
141
Over 5 years and under 15 years Over 15 years and under 25 Over 25 y ars and under 45 years Over 45 years and under 60 years Over 60 years
164
20
27
years
179
3
12
643
42
221
0
1
56
In three cases of pulmonary tuberculosis the age was not stated.
The deaths from Tubercular Diseases (all types) for both Chinese and Non-Chinese are shown distributed according to age groups according to the following table which covers ten years 1917 to 1927 with the ommission of the year 1918.
The deaths from Tubercular Diseases (all types) for both Chinese and Non-Chinese are shown distributed according to age groups by the following table which covers ten years 1917 to 1927 with the omission of the year 1918.
Age Groups.
Years.
1917 1919 1920 1921
1922 1923
1924 1925 1926 1927
Under 1 year
193 1 to 5 years... 290 5 to 15 years...
129 124 159
...
15 to 25 years...... 25 to 45 years..... 486 569 641 45 to 60 years.....
205 258 278 Over years... 43 62 65
171
108 231 219 200 213 302 469 340 393 419 139 204 157 180 169 207 181 203 613 610 256
269 313 511 468
220 240
339 450
173
157 221
233
221
202
212 203
673 750
737
641
713
351
91
93
301 319 63 81
3.7
291 233
79
56
60
Total...
1,469 || 597
All Chinese Deaths
Percentage of Chinese deaths
2,059 1,8~7|| 2,060 |2.071 |2,358 |2.291|1,916 |2,120
|10,244 11,348 12,151 11,604 14,241 15,289 |15.301|14,735 12,336|14,525
due to Tuber- culosis
14:3 14.0 16.9 16.2 14.4
13.5 15.7 15.5 15.5 14.6
M 48
Tetanus and Convulsions.
These diseases accounted for 147 deaths of children under
five years of age.
Out of 85 deaths ascribed to Tetanus 64 were of children under one month old and one of a child over one month and under one year old.
Convulsions accounted for the deaths of 73 children under five years old. Of these 67 were under one month and five over a month and under one year old.
Malaria.
Malarial Fever is not a notifiable disease. The figures and tables given below therefore are compiled from the registers of deaths.
Deaths of Chinese are registered according to the district in which they occur. For this purpose there are five Registra- tion Districts, namely, Victoria District which includes the Peak and the Harbour, Kowloon District which includes New Kowloon, Shaukiwan, Aberdeen and Stanley Districts.
All Non-Chinese deaths are registered in Victoria.
It does not follow that, because a death from Malaria is registered in a given district, the infection was acquired in that district.
The flow of the population to and from neighbouring Chinese territory, amounting in a year to more than the estimated population of the Colony, makes it impossible to say to what extent the infection of Malaria causing deaths within the Colony may have occurred herein.
During 1927 the total deaths from Malaria were 635 (587 in 1926). Of these 3 were Non-Chinese (4 in 1926).
This number of deaths is a percentage of 4.9 of the total registered deaths.
The Chinese deaths from Malaria in the City of Victoria (excluding the Peak and Harbour) numbered 260 (172 in 1926) in an estimated population of 500,000 giving a death rate of 0.52 per thousand (0.38 in 1926).
The following table shows for fourteen successive years the deaths in the Colony from Malaria Fever expressed as a percentage of the total deaths registered each year and the incidence of such deaths per thousand of the population.
י
M 49
Total
Year deaths from
Malaria.
Deaths from Malaria Deaths from Malaria
per cent, of total deaths.
per 1,000 of population.
1914
241
2.51
0.58
1915
328
4.14
0.78
· 1916
337
3.19
0.78
1917
411
3.93
0.92
1918
388
2.93
0.83
1919
314
2.69
0.62
1920
332
2.67
0.59
1921
332
3.79
0.55
1922
454
3.11
0.78
1923
674
4.33
1.14
1924
707
4.54
0.98
1925
702
4.68
0.89
1926
587
4.69
0.75
1927
635
4.90
0.70
This table suggests that Malaria Fever has increased its incidence during recent years.
Beri-beri.
The deaths from this disease during 1927 were 744 (1,192 in 1926) being a percentage of 5.04 of the total deaths registered (9.5 in 1926). This is a very considerable drop from the high mortality from this disease registered in 1925.
The following table shows the numbers of deaths ascribed to Beri-beri during the last twelve years and the percentage rate of these on the total deaths.
Year
No. of deaths from Beri-beri.
Percentage of total registered deaths.
1916
520
4.92
1917
654
6.26
1918
804
6.09
1919
555
4.76
1920
361
4.90
1921
526
4.42
1922
829
5.69
1923
1270
8.17
1924
1502
9.65
1925
1744
11.63
1926
1192
9.5
1927
744
5.04
M 50
Influenza.
The deaths registered during 1927 as caused by this disease number 29, this being the smallest number of deaths ascribed to this disease for the last ten years.
The following table shows the numbers of deaths due to Influenza for each month since the year 1918.
Month.
1918
1919
1920
1921
1922
-1923
1924
January
0
21
39
February
0
16 118
March
25 75 20 13
222
20 13 19
5
13
6
April
0
41 38 22 18
10
May
1 75 32
27 13
7
5
June
108 137 61
26
44 13
5
July..
53 77 22
54
40 14
9
11
August
10 30
14
30
30
3
September....
1 8
30
28
40 11
October
70
8
44
13 64
November
95
9 35 27
76
December...... 67
34 17 58
724
3
OOT-OM4DD AD - MO
AWIAA W NW W
1925
1926
4
212966 OHLO LO Q Q
1927
Total...... 405 449 542 303 422 | 83 52
45
232323353
29
NOTIFIABLE INFECTIOUS DISEASES.
The incidence of these diseases was slight during 1927, the total number of cases notified being 612.
Many of these were imported, the local cases amounting only to 541. Of these local cases 266 were Typhoid and Paratyphoid cases. For the fourth year in succession there were no cases of plague.
The following table shows, besides the total cases of these diseases, the numbers of cases which were of local origin, im- ported and brought from the New Territory for the Chinese and Non-Chinese sections of the community,
The following table shows the notifiable diseases registered during 1927. The by-laws governing Notification of Infectious disease do not apply to the New Territory other than New Kowloon but a few cases which have been notified are known, to have come during illness from such New Territory.
Chinese Cases
Non-Chinese Cases
Total
Disease
Cases
Imported
N.T.
Imported
N.T.
Chinese
Local Cases
Non-Chinese
Plague
0
Cholera
3
2
0
1
Small-pox
149
14
0
Cerebro Spinal Fever
32
1
Enteric Fever
307
28
12
Paratyphoid
7
0
1
Diphtheria
87
0
Scarlet Fever
2
0
Puerperal
Fever
16
Relapsing Fever
2
Typhus Fever
0
Yellow Fever
0
Rabies (Men)
.1
POHOOO
0
1
1
0
0
0
OIHIQI2000000
4
1
129
29
1
204
4
61
2
13
1
1000H
༤༣ ཨཻཕྱུརྞ -c༠༠
0
0
2
0
57
1
20
0
2
Total..
606
50
8
21
1
443
83
Six cases of rabies in animals occurred during the year; of these two were reported from the New Territory.
M 51 -
M 52
Plague.
There were no cases of plague notified during 1927. The date of the notification of the last case of this disease in the Colony was September 27th, 1923.
The Colony has therefore been assumably free from plague for well over four years.
The last notification of a plague infected rat was on Septem- ber 17th, 1923.
The following table shows the monthly incidence of plague for the last ten years.
Month.
1918. 1919. 1920, 1921.|1922.1923. 1924. 1925. 1926. 1927
January,.
4
February,
1
March,
30
April,
2
94
9
25 110
3
23
74
247
May,
44
171
28
28
454
47
June,
84
132
56
64
237
49
July,
103
26
20 24
77
August,
23
4
14
29 10
September,..
6
I
8
October,
2
1
November,
1
December,
ww+
3
6
10
3
2
~~~O*2* |||
10
23
Total,
266 464 138 150 1,181 148
I
I
}
The cases of Plague recorded in the Colony since the dis- covery here of this disease in 1894 are given in the following
table.
Year
Cases
Year
Cases
1894
*5,000
1911
269
1895
44
1912
1,857
1896
1,204
1913
408
1897
21
1914
2,146
1898
1,320
1915
144
1899
1,486
1916
39
.
1900
1,087
1917
38
1901
1,651
1918
266
1902
572
1919
464
1903
1,415
1920
138
1904
510
1921
150
1905
272
1922
1,181
1906
893
1923
148
1907
240
1924
0
1908
1,073
1925
0
1909
135
1926
0
1910
25
1927
* This is an estimate and is probably much too low.
1
.
M 58
Cholera.
No case of locally acquired Cholera has been notified in the Colony since September 1922.
Three cases were reported during 1927, all were imported. One case being Non-Chinese and two Chinese.
Small-pox.
There was a minor epidemic of this disease during the early part of the year. With the arrival of warmer weather the disease gradually disappeared.
The total number of cases notified being 149 of which 131 were local cases and 18 imported.
The Non-Chinese cases numbered 6 of which 4 were in- ported.
The following table shows the monthly incidence of Small- pox for the last ten years.
MONTHLY PREVALENCE OF SMALL-POX 1918 To 1927.
Month
1918 1919 1920 1921 1922
1923 1924 1925 1926 1927
January.. February March April
May June July August September..
October..... November.. December
Total
2
13
32
27
210163-00000
2639 +200000-
~0~+~~-HOOON | N
11
10
36
58
58
15
1E08840HOBOK
8
3
433
7
6
33
8 255
6
25 38 137
54
62
347
19
6
47
21
14
61
61
28
14
19
91
40
19
29
165
397
1
407
422210341000
❤30444200000 |
26
62
19
8
34 191
212
1320 913 66 49 149
4
Cerebro Spinal Fever.
The incidence of this disease during 1927 continued to be slight. The cases notified numbered 32 of which 30 were local cases and 2 were imported.
The Chinese cases numbered 31 of which 1 was imported there being 1 imported Non-Chinese case.
The following table shows the monthly incidence of Cerebrɔ Spinal Fever for each year since it was first notified in 1918.
Month
M 54
MONTHLY PREVALENCE OF CEREBRO. SPINAL FEVER.
1918 1919 1920 1921 1922 1923 | 1924 | 1925 | 1926 | 1927
January
23 18
5
8
10
February
165 32 13
9
13
10
March
454 71
40
59
4
16
April
274
58
44
18
4
17
10
May
146
24
10
8
10
16
June.
96
15
10
14
July
52
13
7
August......
14 12
3
September..
10
3
1
10
October
.....
November....
5
December...)
178
woaa
6
6
1
3
1221
2
142227 HD | NO
10
5
11
13
14
9
231~ -
4
4
2
ة
3
4
2
4
1
5
47
Total 1,232 267 158 125
333
53
107
81
73 14 32
Enteric and Paratyphoid Fevers.
The total of cases of these diseases notified during 1927 was 314 of which 307 were cases of Enteric Fever and 7 of Paratyphoid Fever.
The cases of local origin were 266 being 204 cases of Enteric Fever and 4 cases of Paratyphoid Fever amongst the Chinese and 57 cases of Enteric and 1 of Paratyphoid Fevera, amongst the Non-Chinese population.
There were 28 Chinese and 12 Non-Chinese imported cases of Enteric Fever and 5 Chinese and 1 Non-Chinese cases from the New Territory.
There were 2 cases of Paratyphoid Fever 1 being imported and 1 from New Territory.
The following table shows the monthly incidence of Enteric and Paratyphoid Fevers in the Colony for the last 10 years.
``
TYPHOID AND PARATYPHOID FEVERS.
The following table shows the prevalence of these diseases for the year 1927 and the previous nine years.
Month.
1918.
1919.
1920.
1921. 1922. 1923.
1924.
1925.
1926.
1927.
- M 55
January,
23
11
10
104
93
7
12
20
February,
20
3
63
85
10
112
17
March,
9
6
84
68
9
173
18
10
April,....
17
5
219
142
20*
105
6
18
1808
13
61
20
271
322
May,
32
7
14
94
14
492
125
131
10
51
June,
44
10
14'
179
121
473
12
72
6
381
July,
241
14'
22
124
73
323
4816
4
264
32
August,.
17
92
92
97
152
266
41
173
291
21
September,
22
28
123
39
141
254
283
191
23
25
October,
16
12
123
7131
17
151
193
13
19
151
November,
71
5
71
510
14
173
18
81
30
201
December,
16
14
44
83
92
152
20
12
19
131
Total,..
2472
1333
11814
11579
13927
27230
24837
1549
1977
3077
T.
182
101
71
75
100
207
152
111
174
237
Chinese cases
P.
0
1
2
41
6
8
!!
4
6
5
Small figures in month groups indicate paratyphoid cases and large figures indicate Typhoid cases
";
DIPHTHERIA.
The number of cases of this disease notified during 1927 was 87 of which 65 were Chinese and 22 Non-Chinese. Two Non-Chinese and four Chinese cases were imported leaving 61 Chinese and 20 Non-Chinese cases of local origin.
The following table shows the monthly incidence of Diphtheira for the last ten years.
DIPHTHERIA CASES NOTIFIED DURING EACH MONTH OF THE YEARS 1918 TO 1927 INCLUSIVE.
Month
1918
1919
1920
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925 1926 1927
January
February
March
April
May
●售辱
...
...
...
June...
July...
August
September
October
...
November...
December...
...
...
27
16
4
5
13
...
.9
10
GO LOSE 60 60 61
12
15
4444622
10
15.
12
7
6
21
28
19
6
12
9
11
6
10
8
9
1
11
7
4
...
4
1
3
13
4
10
6
17
11
12
13
13
10
14
19ONET | BERE
14
12
11
10
1
13
13
Total
:
118
50
...
.76
85
71
Chinese
109
39
...
...
42
47
56
28
91
90
85
73
.59
63
59
51
215
87
GEANGANAJOZER
65
G. W. POPE,
& Medical Officer of Health,
M 56 -
*
- M 57-
Table I.~DEATHS REGISTERED IN THE COLONY OF HONG KONG DURING 1927.
1
10
2 7
30 31
8
1
:
9172
Relapsing Fever.
Typhus Fever.
Yellow Fever.
Rabies (Hydrophobia.)|
Dengue Fever.
Paratyphoid Fever.
Influenza.
Small-pox.
Measles.
Typhoid Fever.
Diphtheria.
Cerebro-spinal
Meningitis..
Dysentery.
Plague.
Malarial Fever.
Cholera.
Puerperal Fever.
Septic Infections.
Syphilis.
Poisoning.
Injuries. Developmental Diseases.
Old Age.
General Tuberculosis.
Beri-beri.
Cancer.
Paralysis and Convulsions.
Heart Diseases.
Pneumonia.
Phthisis & Pulmonary Tuberculosis.
Enteritis and Gastro-
Enteritis.
Cirrhosis of Liver.
Peritonitis.
Nephritis.
Other causes.
Unknown.
All causes.
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:.
:
:
:
D
10
Co
2
:
:
86
323
32 23120
6 2
42
8
со
}
11
09
I
:
Co
3 7
:
236
7184369432 | 139 | 469
ཅ་ྕ ྃ་
16
171 41
3
53 263 134 | 154
17
25 53
83 98 128 1,541 1105 897 6 14 70 142 20
838 252 231
50 24 43 2796 112
9,835
14138 58 741
10 69667 22 3,324
5 36
:.
:
2 48
o
2
25 20 14
...
:
5
6
1
:.
4
:
19
48
} 17
6 1
10
1
5
6
:
...
3833
:
...
9
...
:
:
...
:
:
6
:
3
:
2
F
:
:
:
2
:
...
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
50 18
293
18
85
1
2
01
119
1
86
CC
27
...
1
3
3
19
4
20 188
272 1
27
201
شم
6
2
+
ཧོ་ན
3
1
3
:
a
2
18 89
2 10
6 20
:
:
:
:
:.
F
:
:
:
:
E
D.
:
:
F.
:
:
:
10
:
4
...
7:
:
:
38
:
1 4
:
6
4 80
:
:
:
:
:
39
:
:.
:
4
+3
3
12 159
1121
:
:
}
:
!
:
27202
10 179
:
:
3
:
I
31278
སྒྱུ
11897 | 447892|294|744|114|134|202|2,505 |1595|1176|| 60
24237 73 228 259 504 | 200|1192| 111 | 105 | 176 | 2,273|151
40 526 3850 215 14,761
|15171015| 015) 33 28 425 2909 204 | 12,516
5
:
2
.
— M 57 —
Table I.-DEATHS REGISTERED IN THE COLONY OF HONG KONG DURING 19.
3
1
2
19
7
10
2
Scarlet Fever.
Blackwater Fever.
Relapsing Fever.
Typhus Fever.
Yellow Fever.
Rabies (Hydrophobia.)
Dengue Fever.
Paratyphoid Fever.
Influenza.
Small-pox.
Measles.
Typhoid Fever.
Diphtheria. Cerebro-spinal
Meningitis.. Dysentery.
Plague.
Malarial Fever.
Cholera.
Puerperal Fever.
Septic Infections.
Syphilis.
Poisoning.
Injuries.
Developmental Diseases.
Old Age.
General Tuberculosis.
Cancer.
Paralysis and Convulsions.
British and
Foreign Civil,
Community,
3
10
68
2
3
...
:
1
4 20188
7 | 184 369 |432|13|| 83
98
1
1
4
...
6
58
16 58
6
80 2100
53263 13 17
25
38
1
20
5 36
2
7
5
:
18
:
ལྔ
:
:
6
19
འའ
4
:
:
1
:
:
B
:
:
:
:
:
:.
:
:
4
:
:
...
48
F
6
2
F
:
:
3
98
32
23 120
6
1
11
6
42
8
2
60
3
:
4
18 20
:
4
3
:
:
...
:
:
...
1
1
:
:
:
:
:
:.
:
:
18
2
6

:
:
:
:
.Ca
3
:
:
:
:
:.
:
:
:
:
:
10
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:.
:
:
:
F
*
F:
:
:
:.
1
:..
:
:
...
...
:
:.
1
Victoria and Peak,.]
Harbour,
Kowloon,....
Shaukiwan, Land..
Chinese
Community,
Shaukiwan, Boat ..
Aberdeen, Land
Aberdeen, Boat
Stanley, Land......
Stanley, Boat
Total, 1927,
""
1926,
}
i
29|126
12 159
26 1 121
>
i
11 397 447 892|29114 | 134
73228 | 259|304|20111|105
12 20
27202
635 3 6 31278
10179
587
1
10
24 237
:
:
;
:
!
!
January.
February.
March.
April.
May.
M 58
Table II.-CASES OF NOTIFIABLE DISEASES RECORDED IN EACH MONTH OF.
THE YEAR 1927.
June.
July.
August.
September.
Plague
European..
Chinese
Others
:
:
...
European....
5
6
1
2
5
10.
5
3.
3
46
10
Typhoid Fever
Chinese
8
12
19
30
46
27
19
16
20
Others
1
3
2
1
3
6
3
2
European..
1
ཡ: :
14
15
11
237
307
174
197
2
I
24
13
1
1
Paratyphoid Fever.....
Chinese
1
1
1
...
5
-J
Others

...
1
I
...
European.
...
...
1
Cholera
Chinese
...
1
...
...
...
...
1
2
7
1
6
7
Others
:
...
European..
T..
...
Small-Pox
Chinese
4
25
57
22
19
8
3
Others
European..
1
3
Diphtheria
Chinese
11
8
188
...
1
2
2
3
...
4
...
1
"1
1
...
2.
...
5
6
CO
Others
...
...
1
1
1
...
European..
1
...
Puerperal Fever
Chinese
2
1
1
1.
1
2
3
Others
+
1
...
...
...
...
European..
...
...
...
Scarlet Fever
Chinese
...
...
...
1
2
2
143
149
45
49
6
2
5
19
19
8
65
87
52
73
3
2
...
1
1
1
2
14
16
6
1
2
2
تایی
Q
Others
...
...
....
...
European.
...
...
...
Relapsing Fever....
Chinese
...
2
2
...
...
Others
...
...
European.
...
...
...

Typhus Fever...
Chinese
...
...
...
:..
...
:
Others
...
..
44
...
...
European..
Cerebro Spinal Fever...
Chinese
2
4
...
4
2
3
4
...
1
...
1
1
1
1
3
7
31
32
13
14
Others
...
...
...
European..
...
Yellow Fever
Chinese
...
...
...
...
Others
...
...
...
...
Chinese
...
...
9
...
...
Rabies
Others
1
! Dogs
1
...
...
2
...
I
7
1
23
2
6
13
Total, 1927
35
59
Total, 1926.
28
22
388 285
99
383333
106
70
81
56
47
35
18
34
38
29
40
40
15
43
42
25
24
38
29
...
:
612
...
375
:
October.
November.
December.
Total, 1927.
Total, 1926.
}
Table III.-The following Table shows the nature and distribution of the notifiable diseases during 1927.
~
City of Victoria: Health Districts.
**
4
6
8
9
10
Total, 1926.
Plague
:.
:
Enteric Fever
24
17
6
22
6
Paratyphoid Fever...
17-
14 31
10
9
70
15
6
15
12
40
307
197
2
1
1
1
7
7
Cholera
3
3
3
Small-pox
26 16
1 3
3
3
40
18
149
49
Diphtheria
3
7
2
ลง
4
-+
39
6
87
73
Puerperal Fever....
3
1
2
2
16
7
Scarlet Fever
2
Relapsing Fever.
Typhus Fever...
Cerebro-Spinal Fever.
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1 6
2
:
:
1
2
1
8
2
Yellow Fever
...
Rabies
{
Human..
Dogs
:
:::
::
32
14
10
2
2
❤>>
13.
යප
M 59 -
ALTAMINTE
M 60
Table IV.
MONTHLY DISTRIBUTION OF PLAGUE-INFECTED RATS
DURING THE YEAR 1927.
CITY OF VIctoria,
:
::
January,
February.
March.
April.
May.
June.
July.
: August.
September.
October.
November.
December.
Total.
Mus Rattus,. Mus Decumanus,
Total Infected Rats,.....
Human Cases of Plague,..

Local.... Import-
ed,..
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
...
:
MONTHLY DISTRIBUTION OF PLAGUE-INFECTED RATS
DURING THE Year 1927.
KOWLOON.
:
: February.
March.
April.
|| May.
::
June.
July.
August.
| September.
December.
:: October,
|| November.
Total.
January.
Mus Rattus, Mus Decumanus,
Total Infected Rats,
1
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
The total number of Rats caught in Hong Kong
Do.
Do.
Kowloon
Human Cases
of Plague,...
Local,. Import- ed,
..
+
:
102,855
52,660
10
14
Tinidomin diconcoc
CAUSES.
BRITISH
AND
FOREIGN
COMMUNITY.
Civil.
Troops.
Women & Children.
Camp
followers.
Army.
Navy.
No. 1.
No. 2.
No. 3.
No. 4.
1. Enteric Fever
2. Paratyphoid Fever
3. (a) Relapsing Fever
(b) Malta Fever
4. Malaria
5. Small-pox:---
(a) Vaccinated
(b) Not vaccinated
(c) Doubtful
6. Measles
7. Scarlet Fever
8. Whooping Cough
9. (a) Diphtheria
(b) Membranous laryngitis.
(c) Croup ..........
10. Influenza
11. Blackwater Fever
12. Asiatic Cholera
13. Cholera Nostras
14. Dysentery
15. Plague
16. Yellow Fever
17. Leprosy
18. Erysipelas
10
...
2
1
:
....
:
:
:
...
:
:
:
:.
:
:
...
:
:
:
.:.:.
:
...
:.
3
1
2
:
2
:
:
:
...
:..
:
14
18
4
:
:

8
00
:
:
:.
6
1
:
:
:
1
مر
10
40
51
12
18
24
27
25
:
9 27
2
1
:
...
...
8 13
:
:
:
1
...
:
...
:
...
:
:
:
:
:
:
:.
:
:.
:
:
:.
:
:
:
:
:
:
:.
:.
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
1
10
5
:
:.
:
:
1
1
8
2
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
17
:
:
CD
3
:
:
:
:
1
1
4
4
1
:
:
2232
:
14
23
:
:.
1
2
28
:
:
:
:
:
...
:
2
1
1
1
:
1
2
1
1
::
1
:
:
:

:
:
:
:
7
6
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
1
:
:
3
:
:
:
:
:
3
7 20
?
:
:
:
;
:
:
:.
:
:
:
No. 5.
No. 6.
No. 7.
No. 8.
VICTORIA.
HEALTH DIstrict.
No. 9.
RETURN shewi
M 61-
ETURN shewing NUMBER and CAUSES of DEATHS Registered during the Year ending the 31st day
VICTORIA.
CHINESE COMMUNITY.
TH DISTRICT.
No. 7.
No. 8.
1
No. 9.
No. 10.
10
10
22
265
25
:
:
2
Unknown.
Peak,
14
14
2
:
:
1
1
:
:
KOWLOON
SHAUKIWAN
ABERDEEN
DISTRICT.
DISTRICT.
DISTRICT.
DISTRICT. STANLEY
Under 1
month.
it
Harbour.
Land
Population.
Boat
Population.
Land
Population.
:
:
2
:
2
:
:
1
1
3
:
...
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
3
7
20
8
:
:
:
: :
;
Population.
480X
42
33
: : F

: : :
:
:
:..
201
17
:
:
Population.
Boat
Population.
Land
Population.
Boat
Population.
Non-Chinese.
purJ
...
88
: : :
20
2
4
6
:
:
N
:
4
8
:
:
:.
10
309 8:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:.
:
:
:
:
:
:
3
:
:
333
: :
:
:
4
:
:
4
:.
:
:
:
Chinese.
...
:
months.
under 12 and
I month
:
:
:
: : :
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
frond
:
: :
:
Non-Chinese.
:
:
:
: :
:
: :
:
: :
:
Chinese:
:
:
:
:
:
فسر
: :
:
:
20
: :
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
24
1
:
:
1
2
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
3
1
4
:
:
:
1
:
:
:
:
:
:
225
B
:
:
:
F:D
1
1
2
6
1
2
:
J
:
:
:
:
2
:
:
:
:
:
2
:
ཀླ
23
:
3
5
:
6
:
:
1
:
20
:
Non-Chinese.
he 31st day of December, 1927.
1 month and under 12
months.
:
Chinese.
50
:
1
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
25
:
2
:
:.
:
15
2
1
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
65
1
:
6
:
:
113
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
65
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
1
:
:
:
:
:
:
Non-Chinese.
40
:
Chinese.
Non-Chinese.
Chinese.
TOTAL AT THE DIFFERENT AGE Periods.
Non-Chinese.
1 year
and under 5
5 years and under 15
15 years and under 25
25 years
and under 45
45 years
and under 60
60 years
Age Un-
and over.
kuown.
GRAND TOTAL.
years.
years.
years.
years.
years.
3
28
:
:
:
:
:
4
54
3
:
122
2 219
1
82
:
19
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
H
:
:
:
:
202
3
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
29
:
Chinese.
:
:
:
Non-Chinese.
Chinese.
14
1
:.
1227
5
45
:
:
:
Non-Chinese.
3
Chinese.
:
:
126
12
:
:
635
Non-Chinese.
Chinese.
159
3
Non-Chinese.
Chinese.
:
:
:
:
1
:
:
:
ཚ་ :
18
40
51
12
:
:.
:
:
:
:
24
24
27
:
...
:
...
25
25
1
14 23
26
1
:
1
عر
:
4
:
:
:
1
:
:
:
:
:.
:
6
2
27
1
:
13
:
:
28
12
:
T
2
ลง
:
:
:
:
:
:
4
2
1
1
1
1
1
:
:
:.
:
CO
3
:
:
:
:
:
Co
6
3
1
2
1
1
2
1
1
3
1
:
:
:
:
:
?
:
:
...
:
...
:
:
...
:
...
:
:
...
:
:
...
...
...
8
:
...
:
:
...
1
:
:
...
:
:
...
...
:.
:
:
:
:.
:
:
:.
:
.:..
:
:
:
:
:
:
2
3
...
:
:
:
:
:
:.
:..
1
2
:
...
2
:
2. Paratyphoid Fever
3. (a) Relapsing Fever
(b) Malta Fever
4. Malaria
5. Small-pox:-
(a) Vaccinated
(b) Not vaccinated
(c) Doubtful
6. Measles
7. Scarlet Fever
8. Whooping Cough
9. (a) Diphtheria
(b) Membranous laryngitis ...
(c) Croup
10. Influenza
11. Blackwater Fever
:
12. Asiatic Cholera
13. Cholera Nostras
1
14. Dysentery
5
15. Plague
:.
:
:
3
6
1
7
...
:
7
t-
20
8
:
...
:
:
:
:..
A:..
:
:
:
:
:.
:
:.
:
:.
:.
:.
:.
:
:.
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:.
:
???
:.
GO
:
:
:
8
17
...
:
:
...
:
:
:
:
:
:
***
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:.
..
:
:
:.
:.
:
...
:
...
...
:
:
...
...
...
...
2 1
...
...
:
*..
:
...
6
2
:
:.
:
:
:
:
:
:
2
1
2
1
2
:
:
:
:
1
2
...
...
:
...
:..
...
.:.
...
...
...
:
:
:
1
نم
2
:
...
:
26
21
91
35
71
59
196 59
101
...
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
223
:
***
:
:
...
...
:
2
1
4 67
...
:
:
:.
:
:
:
...
40 75 10
423
27
31
1
191 210 31
68
888
68
...
...
:
:.
:
:
...
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:.
:
:
:
:
:
1
30
2
16. Yellow Fever
17. Leprosy
18. Erysipelas
19. Other Epidemic diseases
(a) Mumps
(b) German measles
(c) Varicella
(d) Fever (undefined)
20. (a) Pyaemia
(b) Septicaemia
(c) Vaccinia
21. Glanders
22. Anthrax
23. Rabies Hydrophobia
24. Tetanus
25. (a) Actinomycosis
:
...
...
1
:
(b) Other mycoses
26. Pellagra
27. Beri Beri
Carried forward.......
:
:
23
26
12
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
10
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
201
17
38
7
50
33
4
:
:
:
28
12
4
8
20
2
4
3
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
3
3
:
:
:
:
F:
3
:
: :
20
8
35
:
6
4
2
8
:
:
:
: :
:
:
:
:
:
E
6
:
:
:
:
6
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
: :
:
:
1
:
10
60
:
:
:
:
:
:
N
:
2
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
: :
:
:
:
:
3
:
:
:
:
: :
:
:
:
:
:
:
::
:
:
:.
:
:
4
:
:
:
:
:
: :
:
:
:
:
4
1
1
:
:
: : :
:
:
:
3
4
:
:
:
:
:
:
: : :
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
E
:
20
:
:.
:
9:0
:
:
:
24
42
1
1
2
6
:
:
: :
:
:
:
:
:
:
: :
:
1
:
:
:
:
3
:..
:
F.
:. :
F
:
:
:
:
:.
:
:
:
N
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:.
:
:
:
:
:
E
: :
91
35
91
16
23
154
18
48
17
6
10
196
101
152
63
510
43
98
28
57
38
:
:
::.
:
:
:
3
3
1
2
?..
:
:
:
:
1
:
:
:
67
:.
:
:
:
:
: :
6
:
:
:
4
:
:
:
:
7
:
:
:
:
:
: :
:
:
2
:
8
:
:
:
:
1
:
2
38
17
75
3
106
4
164
:
:
100
5
:
:
:
7
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
2
:
:
20
:..
:
:
24
24
42
1
2
6
:
:
3
1
2
1
1
4
:
:
:
:
:
:
8
2
:
:
:
:
:
: : :
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
3
:
50
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
23
1
15
:
:
:
:
4.
:
:
:
: : :
14
:
÷
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
20
: : :
:
:
2
: :
:
113
:
:
25
2
: : :
2
: :
:
:
1
:
:
5
2
: :
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
18
:
:
2
:
:
:
122
2
:
:.
F
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
219
1
82
:
15
:
F:
:
:
T
65
:..
:
6
:
3
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
T
:
:
-
:
:..
:
21
:
:
: :
:
:
:
:
1
65
39
:
1
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
2
:
:
:
:
:
1
:
1
:
:
:
:
:
:.
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
ADD
:
D.
:
1
:
F:
:
:
:
E :
:
:
38
17
18
1
152
:
361
133
22
22
744
;
106
4
164
2
237
8
344
10
1730
4
306
1
89
1
2,085
1
85
:
31
:
:
:
:
3
202
1
635
29
1
...
126
12
1
45
5
3
CAUSES.
BRITISH
AND
FOREIGN COMMUNITY.
Civil.
No. 1.
No. 2.
RETURN shewing NI
No. 3.
Troops..
Women & Children.
Camp followers.
Army.
Navy.
No. 4.
VICTORIA.
CHINE
HEALTH DISTRICT.
No. 5.
No. 6.
No. 7.
No. 8.
No. 9.
No. 10.
56
1
191
210
31
68
68
71
59
59
196
101
!
1
146
125
16
20
42
16
48
10
139
26
43
68
4
47
32
21
31
24
144
41
:
:
:
:
:
...
:
:
Q
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
3
2
...
:

16
41
1
GO
4
:
Brought forward...... 30
28. (a) Pulmonary tuberculosis..
(b) Phthisis
29. (a) Acute Phthisis
(b) Acute Miliary
Tuberculosis
30. Tuberculous meningitis
31. (a) Abdominal Tuberculosis..
(b) Other abdominal tubercle
32. Tuberculosis of the Spine
...
24
E
6
4
:
:
CO
6
:
:
:
1
~
1
2
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212223
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6
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385
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83. Tuberculosis of Joints
84. (a) Lupus
(b) Scrofula
(c) Tuberculosis of other
organs
85. Disseminated Tuberculosis
86. (a) Rickets
(b) Osteomalacia
37. Syphilis
38. (a) Soft Chancre
(b) Gonococcus infection
(c) Purulent Ophthamia
39. Cancer and other malignant
tumours of the buccal cavity. 40. Cancer and other malignant tumours of the stomach, liver
41. Cancer and other malignant
:
:.
1
:
3
:
:
:
N
:
:
:
:
:.
:
:
10
5
:
:
N
:
:
:
2
4
3
...
:
2
:
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:

:
N
2
2
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4
*
:
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:
8.
6
'1
''ONT
ICTORIA.
M 62 -
TURN shewing NUMBER and CAUSES of DEATHS Registered during the Year ending the 31st day of
CHINESE COMMUNITY.
H DISTRICT.
No. 8.
No. 9.
No. 10.
59 196
10 139
24 144
5
101
1152
26 26
41
36
:
:
:
:
:
Unknown.
Peak.
KOWLOON SHAUKIWAN ABERDEEN
STANLEY
Under 1
DISTRICT.
DISTRICT.
DISTRICT.
DISTRICT.
month.
Harbour.
Land
Population.
Boat
Population.
Land
Population.
Boat
Population.
Land
Population.
Boat
Population.
Land
Population.
Boat
Population.
Non-Chinese.
63 510
43
86
68 53
4
3
40 199 30 17
1
1
56
...
:
:
1
:
2
1
21
3
2
2
4
7
6
1
4
6
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:
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:
:
:..
:
:
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7
3
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4
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:
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:
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:
FF.
...
12
3
:
9
:
F
F
:
80
Jand
:
2
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
1
134
11
2
1
:
:
6
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
2
1
1
...
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
28
57 38
6
1
:
:
22 23
10
5
32
6
1
2
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:..
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
2282
:
-1
1
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
1
:
:
Chinese.
:
2
33
17
13
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
107
:
:
:
:
:
62
2
:.
:
:
Non-Chinese.
106
64
23
:
1 month
and under 12 months.
Chinese.
Non-Chinese.
Chinese.
Chinese.
I year
and under 5
years.
5 years and under 15
years.
15 years and under 25
25 years and under 45
45 years
and under 60
60 years
and over.
Age Un- known.
GRAND
TOTAL.
years.
years.
years.
TOTAL AT THE DIFFERENT AGE PERIODS.
day of December, 1927.
1st day
1 month and under 12
months.
"ASANIDO-HOLT
Chinese.
Non-Chinese.
Non-Chinese.
Chinese.
Non-Chinese.
Chinese.
Non-Chinese.
Chinese.
Non-Chinese.
Chinese.
Non-Chinese.
Chinese.
237
8
344 10
730
306
1
89
1
1
2,085
127
5 80 14 162
4
137
1
21
1
768
28
2 97
2 480
2
82
35
2
827
130
72
2
:
3
106
164
64
23
:.
:
:
:
:
:
2
33
17
1333
41
36
3 26
:
1
9
20
CO
6
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
N
1
:
:
3
2
2
:
4
:
:
:
:
:
:
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:
:
:
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:
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:
:
:
:
:
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:
:
699
62
2
1
1
1 141
:
:
:
:
:
:
888
84
56
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
1
:
:
:.
:
:
2
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
27
F:
:
:
10
:
2.
42
:
:
:
28
3
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
50
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
20
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
::
:
:
:
:
:
:
107
1
20
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
16
4
1
9
:
:
...
1
294
1
278
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
1
18
1
5
:
:
1
41
146
125
16
20
42 16
48
10 139
26
43
68
4 47 32
21
31
24
144
41
...
:
:
2
1
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56
1
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2
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4
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7
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:
:
1
1
1
2
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72
:
:..
...
4
:
:
:
:
N
:
:
:
N
:
::.
:.
:.
:
:
:
F:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
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:
16
41
1
3
4
:
:
1
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:
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4:..
:
.:.
...
:
:
:
:
:
...
47
14
1
82
14
:
:
:
1
1
3
2
5
:
:
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:
1
2
3
:
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:
...
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:
:
:
:
:
:
:
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CO
6
4
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:
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1
1
28. (a) Pulmonary tuberculosis..
(b) Phthisis
29. (a) Acute Phthisis
(b) Acute Miliary
Tuberculosis
30. Tuberculous meningitis
31. (a) Abdominal Tuberculosis..
(b) Other abdominal tubercle
32. Tuberculosis of the Spine
83. Tuberculosis of Joints
84. (a) Lupus
(b) Scrofula
(c) Tuberculosis of other
organs
85. Disseminated Tuberculosis
86. (a) Rickets
(b) Osteomalacia
37. Syphilis
38. (a) Soft Chancre
:
:
...
:

2
:.
:
2
:
1
:
:
:
2
:
:
:
:
(b) Gonococcus infection
(c) Purulent Ophthamia
39. Cancer and other malignant
tumours of the buccal cavity. 40. Cancer and other malignant tumours of the stomach, liver
41. Cancer and other malignant tumours of the peritoneum intestines, rectum....
42. Cancer and other malignant
tumours of the
genital organs
female
43. Cancer and other malignant
tumours of the breast
44. Cancer and other malignant tumours of the skin
45. Cancer and other malignant tumours of other organs and of organs not specified
46. (a) Angioma
(b) Adenoma
(c) Other tumours
47. Rheumatic Fever
48. (a) Chronic Rheumatism
(b) Other arthritis
....
1
2
:
:
...
LO
5
:
1
:
:
:
:
:
:
:.
:
5
:
4
2
2
:
7
...
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**
6
:
:
:
:
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:
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:
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:
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:
:
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:
:
10
:
3
:
:
:
3
:
:
:
:
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49. Scurvy
:
...
:
...
50. Diabetes
1
2
1
:
:
51. Exophthalmic goitre
:
:
Carried forward.........
81 2
3
587
460
54
...
1
:
:
:
.:.
2
2
:
2
Q
:
158 162 127 157 107
193 704
...
2
:
1
:.
1
2
:
:
99.
139
26
26
14
144
41
36
:
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6
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193
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f:.. :..
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3
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68
53
40
199
30
17
5
32
1
2
4
6
134
:
12
:
4
1
:
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2
80
6
:
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:
189 1,009
96
125
25
:
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:
6
4
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1
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1
1
11
2
1
:
:
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:
34
:
:
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1
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:
91
44
10
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6
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:
:
:
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:
:
134
:.
:
:.
:
:
:
:
:
10
:
:
:
:
:
:
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:
32
1
1
:
:
: :
:
427
:
:
:
:
:
22
2
64
23
:
:
:
33
:
2
17
: :
:
:
1
13
3
:
:
:
:
:
6
:
:
:
:
:
:
69
:
:
:
: :
:
62
22
2
: :
:
:
107
I
:
:
:
:
:
1
∙1
11
64
130
127
5
80
14
162
4
137
127
21
23
72
28
2
97
2
480
2
82
35
:
...
33
2
17
41
36
:
6
20
13
3 26
6
:
:
:
:
22
62
2
107
:
:
:
1 *141
:
:
1
:
:
:
20
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
10
:
:
:
:
:
27
:
:
:
427
:
...
....
:
2
3
: :
10
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
N
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
6
:
:
N
:
:
:
:
:
N
632
:
20
1
4
:
:
:
:
:
:
N
2
1
:
:
:
3
:
1
42
:
50
:
:
1
16
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
1
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
....
:
6
:
:
1
28
:
:
:
2
17
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
2
1
:
18
:
:
:
2
:
:
1
2
:
:
က်
:
768
2
827
1
:
1
10
:
6
:
:
6
2
:
10
:
88
:
:
10
:
N
N
84
56
:
:
:
1
:
1
4
2
294
3
2
:
:
278
2
:
1
41
:
t
:
6
CO
CO
8
12
36
7
1
13
3
475
15 561 31 -1,524 15
602
6 179
2
4
4,624
:
CAUSES.
BRITISH
AND
FOREIGN COMMUNITY.
Civil.
No.
1.
Troops.
Women & Children.
Camp followers.
Army.
Navy.
~
***
:
:
...
:..
:
:
:
...
3
...
No.
2.
No.
3.
No.
4.
587
460
54
:
:
...
...
Brought forward...... | 81
52. Addison's disease
53. (a) Leucocythaemia
(b) Lymphadenoma
54. Anæmia chlorosis
55. (a) Diabetes insipidus
(b) Purpura
(c) Hæmophilia
(d) Other General Diseases.
56. Alcoholism
57. (a) Occupational lead
poisoning
(b) Non-occupational lead
poisoning
58. Other chronic poisonings
(occupational)
59. Other chronic poisoning
(non-occupational)
60. Encephalitis
*
61. (a) Cerebro-spinal Fever .....
(b) Simple Meningitis (c) Meningitis (nature
unspecified)
62. Locomotor Ataxy
63. Other diseases of spinal cord.
(a)
(b)
64. (a) Apoplexy
(b) Serous apoplexy (œdema
of heain)
1
:
:
1
3
:
RETURN shewing
No.
5.
VICTORIA.
CI
HEALTH District.
No.
6.
No.
7.
No.
8.
No.
9.
158 162 127
157
107 704
1
1
:
:
:
:.
:
:
:
:
...
7
:
.:.
:.
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:.
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
...
:
:.
:
:
:
:.
:
:
2
1
:
:
:
:
:.
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:.
:
:
:
:
168
1
:.
:
:
:.
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
2
1
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
1
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
2
14
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
1
:
:
:
:.
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:.
:
:
14
1
13
1
1
1
13
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
: :
:
:
:
:
2
14
:
29
:
1
1
13
12
1
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
157
:
13
2
:
107
:
1
:
No. 7.
:
VICTORIA.
LTH DISTRICT.
No. 8.
No. 9.
CHINESE COMMUNITY.
- M 63 -
ETURN shewing NUMBER and CAUSES of DEATHS Registered during the Year ending the 31st day
704
193
231
: :
:
:
Jak
:
:
2
:
:
:
:
2
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:.
:
No.
:
10.
Unknown.
:
:
2
:
:
: : :
: :
: :
:
:
:
:
: :
:
:
Peak.
Harbour
Land
Population.
Boat
Population.
Land
Population.
189 1,009
96
125
:
6
:.
:
:
:
E :
:
: : :
:
: :
:
E
: :
: :
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:.
:
:
::.
:
:
KOWLOON
SHAUKIWAN
DISTRICT.
DISTRICT.
DISTRICT. ABERDEEN
DISTRICT. STANLEY
Under 1
month.
under 12 and 1 month
480{
Population.
Land
Population.
Boat
Population.
Land
Population.
Boat
Population.
Non-Chinese.
34
91
44
10
:
:
:
: :
:
:
: :
:
1
:
:
:
:
:
: :
CYD
3
1
87
:
:
:
1
3
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
Chinese.
134
5
427
:
:
Non-Chinese.
months.
Chinese.
MEDICAL REPORT
HONG KONG
FOR THE YEAR
1927
M (1) 3
CONTENTS
I.-Administrative :-
(a.) Staff,
Changes in,........
(b.) Financial,
Page
5
6
6
II. Vital Statistics,
7
III.-General Remarks,....
IV.-Hospitals, Institutes, etc.,
8
9
V. The Chinese Midwives,
30
The Bacteriological Institute,
34
The Public Mortuaries,..
71
The Chemical Laboratory,
38
The Office of the Health Officer of the Port, .
50
RETURNS, STATISTICS :-
Statistics of Diseases and deaths,
59
Statistics of Diseases and deaths, Tung Wah
Hospital
Statistics-Venereal Diseases,.
==
69
31
Statistics of post-mortem examinations (Victoria)
71
Do.,
do.
(Kowloon)
75
Statistics from the Bacteriological Institute,..... Statistics from the Chemical Laboratory,
37
38
Statistics from the Health Officer of the Port,
53
- M (1) 5-
ANNUAL MEDICAL REPORT FOR THE YEAR ENDING 31st DECEMBER, 1927.
1.-ADMINISTRATIVE,
(a) Staff:
Principal Civil Medical Officer
Medical Officers,
Bacteriologist,
Health Officer of the Port and Inspector of
Emigrants,
Assistant Medical Officer in Charge of Native
Hospitals,
Assistant Medical Officer for Schools,
Chinese Medical Officers,
Resident Surgeon, Tung Wah Hospital, Analyst,
Assistant Analysts,
Assistant Analysts (Class II)
Nursing Staff:-
Principal Matron,
Matrons,
Home Sister,
Nursing Sisters,
Charge Nurses,
Staff Nurses,
Probationer Nurses,
Dressers,
Head Attendant (Lunatic Asylum),
Assistant Attendant (Lunatic Asylum),
Female Attendant (Lunatic Asylum), Wardmasters,
Midwives,
Dispensers :-
Apothecary,
Assistant Apothecary,
5th Grade Dispensers, 6th Grade Dispensers,
Probationer Dispensers,
1
10
1
2
1
1
3
1
1
2
2
1
41
2
7
17
13
4
2
112 N N
2
Clerical Staff:-
Accountant,
Class III Clerk, Class IV Clerks,
Class V Clerks,
Class VI Clerks,
Other Officers:
Steward,
Sampler (Temporary),
M (1) 6
Class II Laboratory Assistant,
1
1
2 2 0
1
1
1
Class IV Laboratory Assistant,
Class VI Laboratory Assistant,
1
Linen Maid,
1
Public Vaccinators,
12
Office Attendants, Wardboys, Amahs, Cooks and
others,
272
During the latter part of the year Dr. J. T. Smalley acted as Principal Civil Medical Officer owing to the illness of the late Dr. J. B. Addison, M.B.E.
Dr. W. B. A. Moore was absent on leave from February 5th to the end of the year. On his way back to the Colony he attended the 7th Congress of the Far Eastern Association of Tropical Medicine which was held at Calcutta from December Srd to 10th.
(b) FINANCIAL.
The amount sanctioned in the Estimates was $781,991 and the Expenditure was $717,532.41.
Revenue received:
For Medical Treatment
Medical Certificates
.$ 92,454.26
25.00
Bacteriological Examinations
7,664.62
Chemical Analyses
16,146.00
Bills of Health
""
11,346.00
Medical Examination of Emigrants.... 180,108.C
Total
.$307,744.48
- M (1) 7
2.-VITAL STATISTICS.
The population of the Colony is estimated to be:-
British and Foreign Civilians
Chinese Civilians
Total number of Chinese births registered..
Total number of non-Chinese births
16,500
977,900
7,176
324
The general birth rate for the civil population is estimated to be 8.4 and that of the Chinese 8.2 per 1,000.
The total number of deaths was 14,761 and the general civilian death rate was 16.5 per 1,000. Of this total there were 14,525 Chinese and 218 non-Chinese civilians and the death rate was respectively 16.6 and 13.2 per 1,000.
Infantile mortality.-Among infants of one month or less, 12 non-Chinese and 1,478 Chinese, died. Of those infants who were more than a month old but less than a year, 20 non- Chinese and 3,159 Chinese died. The total number of children who died at the age of a year or less was therefore 32 non- Chinese and 4,637 Chinese. These figures are derived from reliable statistics because the registration of death is compulsory, but as births are not registered in every case the Chinese birth rate given above is not accurate. (These statistics are derived from the Medical Officer of Health's Office).
3.-GENERAL REMARKS.
In order to obtain a complete view of the medical affairs in the Colony this report should be read in conjunction with the report of the Sanitary Department which deals with all matters of public health, statistics of the incidence of infectious diseases, death rates, etc.
The Colony was free from any serious epidemic of disease during the year.
Small-pox.-Only 149 cases of small-pox were reported, of which 131 were of local origin, the remaining 18 being imported. There were 126 deaths, all Chinese.
Plague. There has been no case of either rat or human plague notified since September 1923.
A rat flea survey will be undertaken during 1928 and the findings may throw some light on our present immunity.
During the year 155,515 rats were examined.
Cholera.-Only three cases of true cholera were notified, ail of which were imported. The Colony's immunity from this disease, which occurs epidemically in other ports in constant communication with us, is probably due to the absence of rivers and wells which in other countries are the main source of infection.
M (1) 8
Malaria. This disease has shown a steady decrease for us past three years.
The cases treated in the Government Hospitals being:
1925
1926
1927
1,142
920
670
Cases occurring among the Police in the New Territories during the same period were : —
1925
1926
1927
1,205
877
428
of the respiratory
Tuberculosis. Tubercular infections of system caused 1,595 deaths (1,517 in 1926) of which 31 were non- Chinese (28 in 1926). The total deaths from tubercular infection was 14.38% (15.27 in 1926) of the total deaths registered.
Hospitals Included in the report on the Civil Hospital will be found a short account of the work done by the University Clinic. The Staff of the Clinic consists of the Professors of Medicine, Surgery, Obstetrics and Pathology.
About 90 beds are allotted to the Clinic which also takes sole charge of the out-patient department.
Co-
The arrangement, which is probably unique, has worked very satisfactorily for several years and there is close oneration between the University Staff and the Government Medical Officers.
The Professors attached to the Clinic are also Honorary Consultants to the Government and their services are constantly made use of.
Victoria Hospital.-Formerly this hospital was reserved for the treatment of women and children. The accommodation was however never fully taxed and it was decided to reserve half the Hospital for the treatment of male patients. The admission of men began in December-three patients only being treated. The opening of this hospital to men will relieve the Civil Hospital and prove a welcome boon to many patients who could not afford to go to the Peak Hospital. and would not be eligible for admission to the Matilda Hospital which only admits non- paying patients.
Two sisters were added to the strength of the nursing staff to cope with the extra work caused by this change.
M (1) 9
4.-HOSPITAL, INSTITUTES, &c.
Civil Hospital.
Dr. D. J. Valentine, M.C. was the Medical Officer in charge. Dr. J. R. Craig succeeded Dr. W. L. Paterson, M.C. as second Medical Officer, the latter proceeding to East Africa on transfer.
Buildings etc.-No structural additions or alterations were made during the year.
The new admissions to hospital (exclusive of the Maternity Block and Lunatic Asylum) were 4,698.
The daily average of in-patients was 188.
There was rarely a vacant bed in the general wards of the hospital.
All nationalities of both sexes (except European women and children) were treated, but by far the greatest proportion of patients were Chinese Males.
European Japanese etc. Indian
Chinese
603
77
1002
3212
The Patients were divided as follows:
1st class
2nd class
3rd class
The Males numbered
The Females numbered
47
189
4658
3952
942
A large proportion of the 3rd class patients were treated free of charge.
Deaths-416 Patients died and of these 185 died within 24 hours of admission.
The high death rate is mainly accounted for by the fact that a large number of Chinese patients come to hospital in the last stage of disease, especially pulmonary tuberculosis. Major accidents occurring in various parts of the island were also responsible for this high death rate.
Incidentally 60 infants under the age of one year died in hospital. The commonest cause was Broncho-pneumonia.
Table 1 is a detailed list of the number of cases and deaths of each particular disease. A few of these call for special
comment.
M (1) 10-
There were no serious epidemics of any magnitude.
A few cases resembling cholera occurred in July, August, and September, but only two of them proved to be true cholera, the remainder being bacillary dysentery due to Shiga's bacillus.
During the year the number of cases of certain diseases was considerably greater than for the previous year, viz., Diphtheria 23 (8 in 1926), Dengue fever 78 (42 in 1926) Typhoid fever 61 (28 in 1926), Broncho-pneumonia 74 (34 in 1926).
A large number of venereal cases, especially soft sores and buboes 31 (19 in 1926) and syphilis 108 (81 in 1926) were treated.
On the contrary the number of Malaria cases showed a big drop 383 (622 in 1926), so also in the case of Beri-beri 60 (109 in 1926).
Again there was not a single case of plague.
There was only one case of Rabies which died.
The Police Force:-The total number of admissions to hospital was made up as follows:-
European
Indians,
Cantonese
Wei-hai-wei
153 529 (1)
197 (1) 141
Deaths. Nil. Phthsis. G. S. Wound.
Nil.
Government servants were attended to daily, as out-patients between the hours of 9 a.m. and 10.30 a.m. The daily average
was 12.
Out-patients Department:-This department was well patronised by the poorer class Chinese of both sexes who attended in the morning and afternoon.
They received treatment including medicines and dressings free of charges.-Teaching clinics were held at certain hours.
FIGURES.
Morning
Attendance Dressings
12,719
16,489
Afternoon
Medical Clinic
2,394
Surgical Clinic
2,652
Eye Clinic
1,708
M (1) 11
22,276 Prescriptions were dispensed.
The Maternity Department:-This Block, accommodating about 20 beds, the majority of which are at the disposal of the Professor of Obstetrics, University, of Hong Kong, is mainly for the use of Asiatic women.
There are a few private rooms for treatment of better class Chinese, Japanese and Portuguese patients, Europeans being sent to Victoria hospital, except under special circumstances.
Admissions:
1st class
2nd class
3rd class
British
Portuguese
Japanese
Indians
Chinese
Still Births
Miscarriages
False labour Pains
Deaths (maternal)
Deaths (infantile)
Twins
10.-X-RAY DEPARTMENT.
No. of Patients X-rayed
Films exposed
686
4
20
662
4
4
25
25
628
32
11
61
7
7
4
Screened Only
1980
2087
67
TREATMENTS.
Number of Patients.
Deep Therapy
4
Diathermy
59
Ultra Violet Light
33
Faradism
42
Galvanism
42
Kromeyer Lamp
30
Fees earned
$3,829.50
This Department was under control of Dr. C. W. McKenny up to the time of his departure from the Colony September, 1927. The New X-ray plant and accessories, the Diathermy machine, the Ultra Violet Lamp, Kromeyer Lamp were installed in April. At once the Department became very busy-not only in the taking of ray pictures, but also in the demand for treat- ment both by private and hospital patients.
The work has lapsed considerably since Dr. McKenny left but it is still kept on by the efforts of Mr. Murray, Acting Radiographer.
M (1) 12
UNIVERSITY CLINIC.
MEDICAL UNIT.
Staff:-
John Anderson, M.A., B.Sc., M.D., D.T.M. & H. (Pro- fessor of Medicine and Tropical Medicine, Consulting Physician to the Government and to the South China Command. Late Overseas Research Fellow, London School of Tropical Medicine; Senior Assistant Physician, Ruchill Fever Hospital, Glasgow.)
G. H. Thomas, M.D., B.S. (Lecturer in Tropical Medicine).
D. J. Valentine, M.C., M.B., B.S., D.T.M. & H. (Lecturer
in Therapeutics).
T. Y. Li, M.B., B.S., D.T.M. & H. (Assistant to the
Professor of Medicine).
F. 1. Tseung, M.B., B.S. (Clinical Assistant).
T. Z. Bau, M.B., B.S.,
J. S. Guzdar, M.B., B.S.
(House Physician).
(House Physician).
During the year, the Medical Unit was strengthened by the return of Dr. Li Tsoo Yiu who had carried out post-graduate studies, under a Rockefeller Travelling Fellowship, in Europe and America. Dr. Li joined the staff in February as Assistant to the Professor and conducted the lectures on Pediatrics and Syphilology. He also undertook part of the clinical teaching in the wards and in the Out-door Department of the Government Civil Hospital.
The clinical classes in the Hospital were larger than in any previous year but the beds placed at the disposal of the Medical Unit being always fully occupied there was no lack of clinical material for teaching purposes.
Dr. Bau Tsu Zung and Dr. J. S. Guzdar each held the appointment of House Physician for the normal period of six months and assisted materially in the supervision of the student ward-clerks.
Dr. Tseung Fat Im, by virtue of his tenure of the Jordan Scholarship carried out most of the work in Bio-chemistry and continued his investigations on blood chemistry.
M (1) 13
In February, Dr. M. B. Osman became Assistant to the Professor of Pathology and as part of his duties he conducted the postmortem examination for the University Cliniques at the Government Civil Hospital. In connection with the medical clinique he carried out nearly a hundred autopsies and his demonstrations in morbid anatomy proved a most valuable adjunct to the clinical teaching.
The three hospital wards allotted to the medical clinique contains 42 beds and 4 cots. During the year, the patients- men, women, and children, admitted to these wards numbered 621. In the out-patient department, clinical teaching is con- ducted on two afternoons per week, and the new patients who passed through these cliniques numbered 2398. Two morning sessions per week are also allotted to the Medical Unit and the new patients who attended these sessions numbered over 5000.
The following paper was published:
Staff:-
"The Present Position of Malaria" by J. Anderson,
Caduceus, July 1927.
SURGICAL UNIT.
Kenelm H. Digby, M.B., B.S., F.R.C.S. (Professor of Surgery and Ho Tung Professor of Clinical Surgery, Consulting Surgeon to the Government and to the South China Command; Late Surgical Registrar at Guy's Hospital, London).
S. W. Phoon, M.B., B.S. (Assistant to the Professor of
Surgery).
C. W. McKenny, B.A., M.D., D.M.R.E. (Lecturer in
Radiology and Anaesthetics).
T. P. Tu, M.B., B.S. (Clinical Assistant).
C. H. Yeoh, M.B., B.S. (House Surgeon).
The Professor of Surgery went on leave from April to the end of the year. Dr. S. W. Phoon carried on his work in his absence with the help (as Consultant) of Dr. C. W. McKenny and later of Dr. D. J. Valentine at the Government Civil Hos- pital. Dr. G. H. Thomas conducted the course of Operative Surgery. Dr. J. Morrison conducted a course of systematic lectures in Ophthalmology, in addition to the clinical classes.
The following papers were published during the year:-
"Preliminary Note on a New Method of Plating Frac- tures" bv K. H. Digby, China Medical Journal, April 1927.
M (1) 14
T
"The Approach to the Iliac Fossa by a Muscula- Aponeurotic Flap" by K. H. Digby, China Medical Journal, June 1927.
"A Case of Epithelial Odontome of the Maxilla" by
K. H. Digby, Caduceus, March 1927.
"The Student and Radiology" by C. W. McKenny,
Caduceus, March, 1927.
"A Note on Prediverticulties and Diverticulosis" by
C. W. McKenny, Caduceus, July 1927.
430 In-patients were treated in the wards of the Surgical Clinic at the Government Civil Hospital. 500 surgical opera- tions under anaesthesia were performed.
The Out-patients attendance in the surgical clinic (including Ear, Nose and Throat) numbered 2652. There were also 1708
new patients, who attended the ophthalmic out-patients.
Staff:
OBSTETRICAL AND GYNAECOLOGICAL UNIT.
R. E. Tottenham, B.A., M.D., D.P.H., F.R.C.P.I. (Pro- fessor of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Consulting Obstetrician and Gynaecologist to the Government and to the South China Command : Late Assistant Master Rotunda Hospital, and Gynaecologist to Dr. Steeven's Hospital, Dublin).
D. K. Pillai, M.B., B.S., L.M. (Assistant to the Professor
of Obstetrics and Gynaecology).
Lam Shiu Kwong, M.B., B.S. (Clinical Assistant).
J. S. Guzdar, M.B. B.S.,
Bau Tsu Zung, M.B., B.S.
(House Obstetrician).
(House Obstetrician).
The attached clinical report describes in some detail the work of the department for the last year.
In the Government Civil Hospital, there are altogether 21 beds under the control of the Obstetrical and Gynaecological Clinic. Fifteen of these cases were attended by students. The remaining six beds are in B. Block and are devoted to gynaeco- logy.
During the year 116 gynaecological patients were admitted, 66 of whom were operated upon.
M (1) 15-
During the year, our association with the Tsan Yuk Hospital has become very much closer. In January 1927, Dr. Lam, our Clinical Assistant, was appointed Resident Medical Officer of the Hospital, and since then Dr. (Mrs.) Hickling has been kind enough to allow us to undertake in association with her the medical care of the patients, and when she went on leave in April, the care of the patients was entrusted to us. The Obstetrical Department owe Dr. Hickling a debt of gratitude for the great facilities she has given, not only for expansion, but, for the opportunity to help in the spread of western midwifery in the Colony.
There are approximately fifty beds in the Tsan Yuk Hos- pital, rather more than half or which are devoted to midwifery, and the remainder to gynaecology. During the year 999 mater- nity cases, 176 gynaecological cases were admitted, and 78 of the latter were operated upon. The entire nursing staff is Chinese, the matron, Miss Leung, has been trained in the Rotunda Hospital, Dublin.
The total of the Department for the year is thus, as follows:
Maternity cases
Gynaecological
Operations
Outpatients
1584
292
144
2000
approximately.
year:
The following were published by the Professor during the
"Aids to Gynaecology" 7 ed. (Bailliere, Tindall &
Cox, London).
"Some Observations on the Practice of Medicine as a
Profession" Caduceus, March 1927.
"Stricture of the Vagina among the Chinese" Caduceus,
July 1927.
"Clinical Report of the School of Obstetrics and Gynaecology for the year ending 30th April 1927" Caduceus, November 1927.
The following papers were read but not yet published:-
"Prolapse of the Uterus" read before the Hong Kong and China Branch of the British Medical Associa- tion.
"History of Eclampsia" read before the Hong Kong
Chinese Medical Association.
M
M (1) 16
DEPARTMENT OF PATHOLOGY.
Staff:
C. Y. Wang, M.D., B.Sc. F.R.C.P. (Professor of Pathology, Pathologist to the University Clinics at the Government Civil Hospital: Formerly Assistant Superintendent Royal College of Physicians Laboratory, Edinburgh).
M. B. Osman, M.B., B.S. (Assistant to the Professor of
Pathology).
Alexander Cannon, M.B., Ch.B., Ph.D. (Teacher in Morbid
Anatomy, Part-time).
E. P. Minett, M.D. (Brux.) M.R.C.S., D.P.H., D.T.M. & H. (Lecturer in Medical Jurisprudence and Public Health, Part-time).
The department provides courses of instruction in Pathology and Bacteriology for the third and fifth year students, in the Faculty of Medicine. It also undertakes the examination of specimens, and conducts post-mortems for the three University Clinics. During the year reports were issued on 1502 specimens examined, as against 1059 in 1926, and autopsies were per- formed on 151 cases.
The staff includes a professor, a whole-time assistant and a technician, and their time is almost fully occupied in routine work. Efforts are being made to prepare a set of mounted specimens adequate for teaching purposes, and to classify them along with the microscopic preparations which now number several thousands, but it is found that without further assistance in men, this work cannot be properly carried out.
The immediate needs of the department are the provision of a full-time clerk to relieve the existing staff of some of the clerical and routine work, and the erection of an animal house, without which research of any importance is well-nigh im- possible. The present hut for housing animals is totally un- suitable, and inadequate by reasons of its situation and size.
The following papers were published during the year:-
"Infantile Tetanus (Tetanus Neonatorum) by C. Y.
Wang, Caduceus, Vol. VI, No. 3, 1927.
"Short Report on Gynaecological Specimens" by C. Y.
Wang, Ibid.
"Experimental Immunisation with Bacteria Detoxi-
cated by Gold Chloride" by M. B. Osman. The Journal of Immunology, Vol. XIII, No. 3, 1927.
"The Autopsy".
M (1) 17
Its place in Medicine" by M. B. Osman, Caduceus, Vol. VI, No. 1, 1927.
"Diverticulitis" by Alexander Cannon, Caduceus, Vol.
VI, No. 2, 1927.
"Negri Bodies and Rabies" by E. P. Minett, Caduceus,
Vol. VI, No. 1, 1927.
"Rabies and Anti-Rabic Treatment" by E. P. Minett,
Caduceus, Vol. VI, No. 2, 1927.
The Lunatic Asylum:-This Institute is an annexe of the Civil Hospital.
The two Government Medical Officers are the same as for the Civil Hospital:-
Admissions
267
Discharged (Apparently cured)
111
27
(Relieved)
100
29
(to Canton)
18
Died
18
Table I.
Nationality and Sex of Patients treated in 1927.
Nationality.
Remain- ing in at end of
Admit- ted in 1927.
Total Dis- treated. charged.
Died.
1926.
Remain- ing in at end of 1927.
M. F. M F. M. F. M. F.
M.
F.
M. F.
European American Japanese Indian Hawaiian
20
8235
18
3 23
Chinese Negro
16
146
88 162
: 8:
OT COLO 50
6
8235,
3
2
6 3
91 131
12
19 19
1
Totals,.
21
7 174 93 195 100 156
73
14
25
23
M (1) 18
Table II.
LUNATIC ASYLUM.
Discharge.
Diseases.
Femaining
in Hospital at end of 1926.
Admitted during 1927.
Total
Cases
Transferred
Remaining
in
Hospital
Treated. Apparently Relieved. to Canton
Cured.
Asylum.
Died.
at end of
1927.
Errors of Development :-
Imbecility Congenital Imbecility Moral
1
1
10 T
1
Feeblemindedness
1
6
7
Disorders of Function:
(Acute
1
18
19
Mania Intermittent
¡Chronic
i
1
"associated with:-
Epilepsy
Lactation
Melancholia :·
Acute
1
2
1
1
HR |
Agitated
Chronic
"associated with:-
Climacteric
Lactation
Maniacal Depressive Insanity Stupor Anergic
Delusional Insanity:-
Acute
Chronic
Obsessional Insanity
Insanity of Infective, Toxic and other
General Conditions
Acute Delirious Mania
Insanity associated with Acute
Infective Diseases :-
Confusional Insanity
General Paralysis
Tabes Dorsalic
Insanity associated with Cerebral
Injury
Insanity due to Alcohol:-
Alcoholism Acute
Alcoholism
Chronic
Delirium Tremens
1
42
1
1

N
10
+
@ | | | |
4 2
10
3
3
GOD TH
1
1
1 (1)
3
3 (2)
312
1
1
1
1
1
+
1
011
952
10
2
✪ ∞ N
6
J
2
1
3
1
| | |
2
1
2
1
2
2
121
3 (3)
1
--
1
1
2 00
2
1
3
1
3
2 (4)
1
1
1
7
10
5
5
7
512
Dementia Praecox
Primary
,་
Secondary
Co Co A
19
23
18
2
3
27
30
22
3
1 (5)
4
6
3
2 (6)
Senile
5
1
"
from Epilepsy
6
6
2
1
1
1
111
112
78
26
5 (8)
WWWA A W
4
3
3
3
Dementia:
Observation
Totals:-1927
Totals:- --1926
(1) Pulmonary Tuberculosis.
(2) Cardiac Failure.
(2) Asthenia & Cardiac Failure.
(2) Cellulitis & Septicaemia Asthenia.
(3) Cardiac Failure.
(3) Broncho-pneumonia.
(3) Broncho-pneumonia.
28
267
295
111
100
18
18
18
290
308
114
135
15
16
88998
48
28
(4) General Paralysis of the Insane.
(4) Syphilis.
(5) Asthenia, Cardiac Failure.
(6) Syphilis.
(6) Tuberculosis.
(7) Intercranial haemorrhage.
(8) Chronic Interstitial Nephritis &
Cardiac Failure.
(8) Broncho-pneumonia.
(8) Broncho-pneumonia.
(8) Intercranial haemorrhage.
(8) Cirrhosis of Liver.
KENNEDY TOWN INFECTIOUS DISEASES HOSPITAL.
Disease.
Total Cases
treated.
Local.
Imported. Deaths.
Observation of 'contacts.
European. Native.
Confluent
1
1
Small-pox
[Discrete
6
5
Cholera
Other Conditions:-
Vaccinia
1
6
2
1
1
2
Total number of patients for year 1927-nine.
M (1) 19
M (1) 20-
VICTORIA GAOL HOSPITAL.
Dr. Alexander Cannon was Medical Officer in Charge.
The total number of prisoners admitted was 7,740, of which 504 were females, and 75 juveniles.
Of the new admissions, the number placed on labour was 329, on labour 224, and 30 were admitted to Hospital direct as unfit for any kind of labour, A new hospital is in course of construction and in order to accommodate the sick, a portion of one of the prison corridors was partitioned off and this with the adjacent cells constituted the Prison Hospital. The number of admissions totalled 355.
The "Phthisis Party" amounted to 60 for the Year, and as being under the special care of the Medical Officer, is included in the tabular returns, making a total of 415 in-patients.
The following were the more common diseases among the out-patients :-
Chronic opium poisoning
Beri-beri
Gonorrhoea
Scabies
Syphilis
Debility
Ringworm
1,348
325
225
164
69
53
89
There were twelve remissions of sentences on medical grounds, namely:-
Leprosy
Glioma
Cancer
Beri-beri (advanced)
Tuberculosis (advanced)
Cirrhosis of liver, with portal obstruction Eclampsia
6
1
1
1
1
1
1
Eight prisoners were removed to the G.C. Hospital for treatment not available in the Prison, as well as two for X-ray examination. There were two births and two abortions in the Female Prison.
During the Year, there were 14 deaths from natural causes (12 Victoria Gaol 2 Lai Chi Kok):~
Acute miliary tuberculosis
Tuberculous broncho-pneumonia
Pyaemia
Advanced beri-beri
Typhoid fever
Endocarditis
Cerebral haemorrhage
5
1
1
4
1
1
1
In addition there were 21 executions, the M.O. being pre-
sent in each case to certify cause of death.
- M (1) 21
LAI CHI KOK PRISON.
288 Prisoners remained at the end of 1926
420
Out-Patients:·
"
1927
Diseases caused by infection:-
Septicaemia
Syphilis
Gonorrhoea
24
68
19
Rheumatism
12
Anaemia
Diseases of the blood:
Diseases due to Disorders of Nutrition :-
7
Beri-beri
18
Diseases of the Eye
17
Ear
9
22
J
Respiratory system
121
""
Digestive system
25
Cellular tissue
107
71
Skin
12
Teeth
19
"
Poisons:
Chronic opium poisoning
522
Local injuries
11
Parasites
5
Malingering
14
Observation
1
TOTAL OUT-PATIENTS
.1011
In-Patients:
Diseases caused by infection :-
Rheumatism
Syphilis
Septicaemia
Gonorrhoea
Dysentery
Malaria
Diseases due to Disorders of Nutrition :-
Beri-beri
Diseases of the blood:
Anaemia
2
6
10
3
31
162
24
2
Diseases of the Circulatory system
3
"
Respiratory system
7
Digestive system.
10
Cellular tissue
7
Local injuries
Poisons:
Chronic opium poisoning
Observation
3
26
14
310
M (1) 22
VICTORIA GENERAL & MATERNITY HOSPITAL.
Dr. J. T. Smalley replaced Dr. W. B. A. Moore on February 4th as Medical Officer in charge, the latter going on leave.
Dr. W. Ware was appointed in September to assist the Medical Officer in charge.
In December a part of the General Hospital was opened for the reception of 1st and 2nd class male patients. Three were admitted during the month.
Admissions numbered 315 in the general wards making a total of 323 patients treated as compared with 267 last year.
In the Maternity Hospital 62 patients were admitted, making a total of 63 patients treated and a grand total of 386 for the whole Hospital.
The Nationalities of the patients were:
Europeans
Eurasians
Chinese
297
8
18
323
Deaths. 8 Deaths occurred during the year in the general block. The causes of death were:
Cerebro-spinal fever Lobular pneumonia Tubercular meningitis Puerperal Septicaemia Carcinoma of liver
Phthisis
Enteritis
Eclampsia.
Operations. During the year 136 operations were performed under general anaesthesia in the operating theatre, as compared with 96 in 1926.
THE MATERNITY HOSPITAL.
There were 62 admissions to the Maternity Hospital. Of these one was an Eurasian and the remainder European. These were all first and second class patients.
From these admissions 61 children were born and all sur- vived; of these three were delivered by forceps and one was a case of Caesarean section. Mother and child did well.
M (1) 23
The only death in the Maternity Hospital was in a case of eclampsia which expired a few hours after admission, the foetus was not removed.
A case of locked twins, associated with intense cyanosis and general anasarca was treated in the General Hospital and died after a Caesarean section. Both children lived, but one died 4 months later from bronchitis.
All the cases of abortion-seven in number-were treated in the General Hospital and are included in its figures.
KOWLOON HOSPITAL.
Dr. Newton was in charge for the greater part of the year, Dr. Smalley and Dr. Fehily each being in charge for a short time. Dr. Dovey attended in the Out-patient Department and acted as anaesthetist to the Hospital.
980 patients were admitted during the year, 896 being males and 84 females. The nationalities were made up as
follows:-
British Chinese
Other Nationalities
223
684
73
Chinese women and children and Indians are not admitted except under very urgent circumstances as there is not the accommodation for them.
A table showing the various diseases is attached.
17 patients were transferred to the Government Civil Hospital and 18 to the Kwong Wah Hospital. 130 operations were performed under general anaesthesia. There was a slight increase (sixteen) in the number of cases of malaria admitted, many of which were of a very malignant type accounting for 8 deaths out of a total of 44 deaths from all causes. All these more severe cases occurred in Northern Chinese who had recent- ly come to Hong Kong and were living at Kowloon City.
In the Out-patient Department there were 11,114 attend- ances 1,697 of these being cases of external diseases of the eye.
The total cases were made up as follows:-
New cases
Old cases Dressings
TOTAL
6,918
2,067
2,129
11,114
As shown per month:
M (1) 24
1927
Patients.
Dressings.
January
249
86
February
245
110
March
394
169
April
390
147
May
401
158
June
580
209
July
610
142
August
717
115
September
725
216
October
977
289.
November
933
259
December
697
229
TOTAL
6,918
2,129
These figures show a steady monthly increase and suggest that the Out-patient Department is likely to assume very large proportions in the future.
GOVERNMENT DISPENSARY, KOWLOON RAILWAY STATION.
Dr. Dovey was in charge. The attendances, consisting of Government servants and their families, amounted to 2,925 as compared with 595 for the last three months of 1926. The Government servants attended for treatment as follows:-
:-
Kowloon Canton Railway
Police
Others
Families of above
TOTAL
1,202
980
279
464
2,925
1,363 prescriptions were dispensed. 8 patients were treated with Anti-Rabic vaccine. 206 applicants for posts attended for physical examination.
THE NEW TERRITORIES.
All Police Stations were visited during the year. There was a great reduction in the number of cases of Malaria, 428 as compared with 877 last year, the most striking example being Tai Po with 82 cases, last year's figure being 219. A table is appended showing complete figures. Two epidemics of an acute enteritis, one at Ping Shan and the other at Au Tau
M (1) 25 -
were investigated. These epidemics had a high mortality rate among children.
There was a similar epidemic among cattle throughout the whole of the New Territories but as the cases were not reported until the epidemics were at an end it was not possible to assign a cause. Investigations are still being carried out. There was a case of illegal vaccinating at a village near Sha Tin; this was investigated and the vaccinator pro- secuted.
Dr. Luk was in charge of the Government Dispensaries during the year except in April and May when he was on leave.
At Tai Po Dispensary the total number of new cases treated was 1,689 as compared with 2,466 last year, the corresponding figures for old cases being 1,191 and 1,765. At Un Long Dis- pensary dresser Ting Ping Nam was in charge. 3,089 cases were treated as compared with 3,055 last year.
Vaccinations:—
Tai Po Dispensary
1,316
Un Long Dispensary
400
In addition to the above 50,591 vaccinations were performed
by members of the St. John's Ambulance Brigade.
Name
of
Stations
Chinese
Total
January
February
March
Table showing season incidence of Malaria at Police Stations in Kowloon and New Territories.
Establishment
1927
April
May
June
Water Police
41
36
255
332
1
1
3
Yaumati
17 35
49
101
1
10 -
1
4
15
1
Sham Shui Po..
8
20
23
51
...
...
...
Hunghom
3
11
21
35
1
1
1
4
...
...
Kowloon City..
4
25
15
44
1
2
Tsun Wan
I
10
2
13
2
4
2
31
Tai Po.....
2
19
27
10
16
6
1
7
24
6
2
82
Tai O
2
12
22
...
Sheung Shui
2
15
6
23
1
1
Ta Ku Ling
14
17
4
1
1
2
Sha Tin
1
10
1
12
1
4
10
Sha Tau Kok......
Lok Ma Chau...
Au Tau
Un Long (Sub)..
Ping Shan
Castle Peak.
Cheung Chau....
Sai Kung
Mong Kok Tsui |
Total
221
12
2
16
1
1
2
3
10
11
14
27
1
4
9
3
13
3
2
2
2
2
1
36
1
12
12
111:
12
10
3
02220:
6
4
1
2
14
...
4
1
2
15
9
7
12
12
70
39
4422
2218
14
...
4
3
6
8
14
17
10
6
74
15
3
8
12
3
I
10
2
5
26
1
1
2
4
...
47
25
25
27
33333
19
13
333
79
39
53
30 | 30 428
July
August
September
October
November
- M (1) 26 —
December
Total
- M (1) 27
TSANG YUK MATERNITY HOSPITAL.
The work in the In-patient Department has increased con- siderably during the past year, and we are very grateful to Professor Tottenham for directing the work in the Gynaecological and Midwifery Departments during Dr. Hickling's absence. We should also like to thank Dr. Pillai for his valuable assistance during Professor Tottenham's absence in the summer.
1.-STAFF.
The matron, Miss Leung, returned from her course at the Rotunda Hospital early in March and took up work immediately at the Tsan Yuk Hospital. The two sisters, Chau Tai Ku and Chau I Ku, have done good work in the Hospital during the past year, but owing to the increase in the number of patients we were obliged in May, to engage a sister for night work-Miss Kum Sau Yung. On November 15th a new sister was obtained, Miss Lai Kwai Sang, for help particularly in the Gynaecological work.
Twelve probationers have been in training during the year, 6 passed the examination of the Midwives Board last March and 6 new nurses were admitted to the Hospital. The English classes held by Miss Heung have continued, but the nurses have also had the help of individual teaching by ladies, who have very kindly volunteered for this work. We should like to take this opportunity of thanking Mrs. Southorn, Mrs. Maitland and their helpers for this valuable assistance.
2.-FINANCE.
Amount collected from General Ward Patients
$6,511.45
19
""
Private Students
15
Total
""
859.00
864.00
$8,234.45
Expenditure by petty cash
Furniture and Repairs
$3,079.37
1.789.66
>
Gas Bills
530.34
Electric Light Bills
415.39
Clothing and Blankets
83.00
Food For Nurses, Students and Patients
3,235.93
Total
$9,133.69
M (1) 28
3.-MATERNITY WARDS.
Patients were admitted as below:-
From Western District
765 cases
Central District
137
""
Aberdeen District
16
""
""
Yaumati District
26
27
11
Causeway Bay District Shaukiwan District
20
11
9
""
Boating Population
Total.
17
""
990 cases
Cases attended in their own homes
CLASSIFICATION OF CASES.
Vertex Presentation
"
with forceps
""
??
retained placenta prolapsed cord
Placenta Praevia
Breech Presentation
Transverse Presentation
Abortion
Twins
Face Presentation
Vesicular Mole
Went out before labour
Of these cases 40 were still-born.
In 1923 there were 436 patients
1924
600
"?
1925
609
,,
"}
,"
"
1926
693
"}
""
1927
"}
990
11
37
875
15
6
2
5
15
4
22
1
2
37
4. INFANT WELFARE.
Number of Babies brought 435
Total number of visits paid 2481
Each Baby is bathed weighed and inspected and advice, when necessary, is given to the Mother as to feeding. Minor ailments are treated at a daily clinic at 2 p.m.
5.-GYNAECOLOGICAL WARDS.
Owing to the increased number of patients we have had to engage another sister to help in this department. Over 6,000 patients were seen at the special women's Clinics at the Dis pensaries, and from these our In-patients are drawn.
- M (1) 29
176 patients were treated during the year.
The diseases treated were as follows:-
Foreign Body in Uterus 1 Beri-Beri
Growth in Vagina
1
..
Incomplete Abortion
9
1
Salpingitis
1
Retroversion
33
Ovarian Cyst
8
Prolapse
15
Placenta Praevia
1
Abscess
5
Dysmenorrhea
1
Perineal Tear
6
Fibroad
9
Cancer of Uterus
4
Stricture of Vagina
5
Infantile Uterus
7
Ectopic Gestation
1
Tear of Cervix
5
Cancer of Breast
1
Ankylostomiasis
1
Eresion of Cervix
5
Vesicular Mole
2
Venereal Disease
4
Acute Anteflexion of Uterus 1
Chronic Constipation
1
Vulvitis
3
Asthma
2
Metrorrhagia
1
Morbus Cordis
1
Urethritis
3
Phthisis
1
Cystitis
2
Diarrhoea
1
Haemorrhoids
1
Sapraemia
1
Pruritus Vulvae
1
Puerperal Fever
1
Operations done were as follows:
Section of Cervix for ex-
amination
1
Ovariotomy
11
Curettage
21:
Internal Version
I
Removal of foreign body
Ventral Suspension
13
from uterus
1
Laparotomy
1
Vaginal repair
1
Hysterectomy
2
For Prolapse
.13.
For Vaginal Stricture
1
Incision of Abscess
5
For Extra-uterine gesta-
Perineorraphy
6
tion
1
Myomectomy
For Erosion of Cervix
3
Radical Amputation of
For Haemorrhoids
Breast
1
Trachelorraphy
2
6.-OUT-PATIENT DepartmENT.
A special Clinic for Diseases of Women was held every
Saturday morning.
Number of new cases seen
19
464
old
459
>>
17
private cases seen
55
Total
978
7.-CLINIC FOR VENEREAL DISEASES.
Number of patients seen
""
injections given
61
ཙཚ
91
M (1) 30
5.
THE CHINESE MIDWIVES.
Seven midwives were employed as in previous years, and six pupils were being trained in midwifery at the expense of Government.
Number of confinement attended by Government Midwives at the different stations in 1927:-
1927.
Shaukiwan.
Yaumati.
January
19
15
February
28
13
10 50
March
30
19
April
26
24
May
22
20
June
27
22
July...
20
24
August
31
18
September
36
25
October
39
25
November
26
25
December
29
20
If 31 C0 00 IN IN ON A NOI Ow
Tai Po
Yun Long.
Tsun Wan.
Cheung Chau.
Total.
3
12
5
4
10
obob6a778296
5
7:2063 000
28
78
13
65
13
75
15
78
5
14
71
6
72
12
67
20
80
20
95
6
16
101
6
16
87
4
16
83
Total
333
250 48
90
42 189
952
THE MATILDA HOSPITAL.
The number of patients remaining at the end of 1926 was ...
""
""
>>
""
admitted during 1927 was
deaths was
THE HO MIU LING HOSPITAL.
The number of patients remaining at the end of 1926 was
""
admitted during 1927 was
};
deaths was
15
276
10
20
440
27
THE NETHERSOLE HOSPITAL.
The number of patients remaining at the end of 1926 was
admitted during 1927 was
"
12
17
"
deaths was
THE ALICE MEMORIAL MATERNITY HOSPITAL.`
The number of patients remaining at the end of 1926 was
admitted during 1927 was
"}
22
??
deaths was
30
496
48
2
406
က
W. B. A. MOORE, Principal Civil Medical Officer.
A Statement showing the number of cases of Syphilis and Gonorrhoea reported from certain Hospitals and Institutions during the last ten years :—
M
31
Civil Gaol Hospital. Hospital.
Kowloon
Hospital.
Tung Wah Victoria Kowloon Hospital. Mortuary. Mortuary.
TOTAL.
1918.
Syphilis
89
6
CO
108
357
4
564
Gonorrhoea.
66
48
114
1919.
Syphilis.
125
8
74
119
का
331
Gonorrhoea.
125
|
18
143
1920.
Syphilis.
148
10
161
317
9
645
Gonorrhoea.
184
2
29
215
1921.
Syphilis.
181
53
249
152
14
649
Gonorrhoea.
140
121
42
303
1922.
Syphilis.
182
7
351
54
29
623
Gonorrhoea.
140
9
61
210
1923.
Syphilis.
183
6
587
65
70
911
Gonorrhoea.
133
72
207
1924.
Syphilis.
171
427
99
113
811
Gonorrhoea.
125
5
58
188
1925.
Syphilis.
146
5
207
113
Gonorrhoea.
96
13
42
1926.
Syphilis.
83
4
17
378
49
Gonorrhoea.
105
15
4
98
1927.
Syphilis.
104
69
24
355
15
Gonorrhoea..
106
225
5
58
༄།།ཡ།
43
514
151
13
544
222
12
579
394
M (1) 32.
REPORT FOR 1927 OF THE ASSISTANT MEDICAL
OFFICER FOR SCHOOLS.
A small advance has been made in respect of inspections. A much larger number of children has been vision-tested, a test being taken through Class 5 (the middle class of senior schools). A very high percentage of vision defect is shown, and the remedy remains an outstanding problem. A few of the schools have dark class rooms or in some the lighting is badly arranged, but many have been improved. Sight probably deteriorates at an earlier age than that at which English teaching begins. When boys are admitted to the lowest class of Anglo-Chinese Schools at the age of 14, defects are so well-established that it is difficult to get results from treatment. A lower age of admission would be better from a health point of view. Boys (and girls) go first to a Vernacular School (of which there are over 500 in the Colony) for 4 to 7 years, until they are able to attain the standard in Chinese for admission to the Government Anglo- Chinese schools. No medical inspection has yet been possible in these vernacular schools, but there is little doubt that the most important years, as regards preventive treatment of defect, and the formation of good health habits, are spent here. There are, roughly, 40,000 children in school here, of which only about 10,000 are in medically inspected schools.
Treatment of defect other than in vision is still almost negligible, except among British children, whose parents arrange with their own doctors.
Table of comparison between numbers for 1926 and 1927.
1926 1927
Schools inspected
16
18
No. examined (Entrants)
1,104 1,189
Defects found (Entrants)
407
426
Percentage of defect (Entrants Anglo
Chinese Schools)
38.8
39.1
Percentage of defect (Entrants British
Schools)
41.0
37.5
Special cases and re-inspections
196
756
Cases seen by Oculist
258
215
"
provided with glasses
215
169
M (1) 33
Height and weight tables have been drawn up, giving the comparative weight indices of over 600 Chinese boys and 350 girls. These numbers are too small to give any conclusive results, but it is shown that Chinese children are below British development and that, from the small numbers (under 100 of each) of British boys and girls examined, those here are above the home rate of growth. Growth seems particularly rapid in British girls of 11 to 13 years of age.
Hygiene teaching is being carried on, and lantern slides have been useful. The lack of any tropical hygiene department in the public Museum here prevents teaching on specimens which would be interesting.
Hygiene has been made a compulsory subject in each year of the three years' Technical Institute training course for teachers.
The control of infectious diseases is difficult as only the British schools have definite regulations as to quarantine of sufferers or contacts.
E. M. MINETT,
Medical Officer for Schools.
M (1) 34
BACTERIOLOGICAL INSTITUTE.
REPORT FOR THE YEAR 1927.
By E. P. MINETT, M.D., D.P.H., D.T.M. & H.
GOVERNMENT BACTERIOLOGIST.
1.-STAFF.
Dr. W. K. Dunscombe was appointed Assistant Bacteriolo- gist in May, and after attending a special course of instruction at the Lister Institute, he joined the staff in Hong Kong on 5th January, 1928.
2.-PREPARATION OF CALF LYMPH.
The preparation of calf lymph was carried on as usual and as many buffalo calves were vaccinated as could be purchased, they continue to be very expensive and difficult to obtain.
The number of calves vaccinated was 67.
The average yield of 100 cc. glycerinated calf lymph per calf was maintained.
The number of tubes of lymph issued was 57,504, an in- crease over last year of 34,687 tubes.
The quantity of lymph in stock on 31st Dec. 1927 was 7,563 cc. calculated to be sufficient to vaccinate 226,893 persons, a very considerable increase on last year's stock, being sufficient for vaccinating an additional 20,000 persons.
The value of the free issue of calf lymph was $10,991.50, the bulk of this issue was to various Chinese Dispensaries and to the Port Health Officer.
The Institute was able to supply all demands for lymph from private Medical Practitioners also the Naval and Military Forces.
3. ANTI-MENINGOCOCCUS SERUM.
During the year 720 cc. were issued being 185 cc. less than the 1926 issue.
The quantity of anti-meningococcus serum in stock and ready for issue, was 105,745 cc.
The value of the serum issued free was $84.00.
The agglutinating power of the serum was satisfactory; and each batch was carefully tested for sterility before issue.
M (1) 35
4. CONTAGIOUS ABORTION VACCINE.
No cases occurred amongst the Dairy Farm herd during the year and no vaccine was issued.
A few agglutination tests were carried out at the request of the Veterinary Surgeon.
5.-MILK ANALYSIS.
The number of samples examined was 105, being an increase of 23 samples over last year.
Both fresh milk and pasteurised milk samples were examined weekly.
6. ANTI-RABIC TREATMENT.
Two strains of virus were kept going during the year, the Saigon and a local strain.
111 patients were treated with protective vaccine, a re- duction of 49 cases on the previous year.
2,394 graduated doses of vaccine were issued, being 446 doses less than 1926.
The value of the free issue was $2,274.00.
36 dogs' brains were examined for the presence of negri bodies, of these 5 were positive.
One monkey suspected of rabies was also examined.
A number of dogs were given a protective dose of anti- rabies vaccine, prepared at the Institute, from a local strain.
7. CLINICAL EXAMINATION.
The number of specimens examined for Government Insti- tution and Private Practitioners was 8,515, an increase of 552 over the number examined in the previous year.
A few specimens of tissues were examined for the presence of malignant disease, mostly from Government or Charitable Institutions.
8.-RIDEAL WALKER TEST.
Ten specimens of various disinfectants were examined at the request of the Sanitary Department.
M (1) 36-
9.-ANTI PLAGUE WORK.
The post mortem examination of rats is now carried out at the Mortuaries by the Medical Officer in charge.
Microscopic examinations of slides sent up from the Mortu- ary were carried out daily, 3,650 slides being dealt with and reported upon.
A few rats were specially examined at the request of the United States Consulate.
No cases of human or rat plague occurred during the year.
10. BACTERIOLOGICAL EXAMINATION OF WATER SUPPLIES.
The total number of water samples examined was 1,679 an increase of 595 samples over the previous year. Of this total 1,044 samples were tap water supplies, 393 were filtered water supplies, in addition 66 special samples were examined.
:
The new filters installed by the Government were thoroughly tested by the Bacteriologist as regards the purity of the effluent. Only one specimen of water was examined from outside the Colony.
381 filter candles were examined for various domestic water supplies.
11.-STOCK VACCINES.
The following stock vaccines were issued:
T. A. B. Vaccine, 98 cc.
Value of free issue,
Value of free issue,
$46.00 12.50
Cholera Vaccine, 9,734 cc.
Anti Meningococcus Vaccine, No issue.
Plague Vaccine, 80 cc.
Staphylococcus Vaccine, 12 cc.
12.-AUTOGENOUS VACCINES.
Of
Special autogenous vaccines were prepared for 28 cases. these 13 were for Private Practitioners and 15 cases were a free issue to Government or Charitable Institutions.
13.-MEDICO LEGAL WOrk.
The number of articles examined for the Police was 45 articles, the necessary evidence was given by the Government Bacteriologist in the Magistrates Court and in the Supreme Court.
The number examined shows an increase of 5 articles over that of the previous year.
14.-MALIGNANT DISEASE.
16 Specimens were examined and reported upon for the presence of Malignant disease.
M (1) 37
Nature of Examination.
Jan.
Feb. Mar. Apr. May June July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec.
Total Total
for for
1927. 1926.
Examination of Faces Cultivation Blood for Widal.
for
for
With B. Typhosus,
31 25 29 31 36
B. Paratyphosus A.,...
31 25 29 31 36
B....
31
25
29
Wassermanu
reaction,
45
46
62
Malaria Parasites,
Filaria,
22
18
Blood counts, etc.,
I
Bacillus Diphtheria,
19
20
Meningococcus,
2
2222 ::~~
42
42
57 46
31
36
42
57
46
56
54
83
43
58
14
24 24
25
18
41
99983
57 46 50 27 31
50
50
50
61
1
1
33
37
12
22
19
1
1
1
1
:: 양영영향
NOT: HONNN
17
422 311
27 31
17
422
311
27
31
17
422
311
59
79
53
688
469
56 18 10
331
386
2
2
...
5
17
16 13
29
240
375
2
3
22
27
Typhosus, Paraty pliosus,
Cholera, etc.,
1
3
Helminth ova,....
17
10
17
19
10
Amœbæ of Dysentery,
3
1:1
5-100
6
3
11
4
13
2
73x
14
10 45
40
112
12
141
184
1
65
96
1
16
15
Tissues for Section,
Sputa,
Pus,
23
23
7
1
7
5
2
Urine,
3
2
5
3
Rat Smears for B. Pestis,...|
310
282
310
300
312
300
310
Animals for Rabies,
1
2
1
1
3
Materials for medico legal
purposes,...
Weil Felix Reaction for Typhus
fever,
Bacteriological Analyses of Water,
Bacteriological Examination of
12
:
:
1
:.
:
110
102
Milk,
8
10
Autogenous vaccines prepared,...
2
2
00 -
2
130 106 123 122 147 166
10
2
:
:
:
211
202
147
113 1,679 1,084.
∞ 2
9 10
8
10
8 105
82
4
6
2
1
28
35
Rideal Walker's Estimation of
disinfectants
1
2
N
1
1
7
6
...
Freshly prepared vaccines tested
for sterility,
10
10
10 10
14
6
Co
60
9
3
༢༧
H
1
2
139
108
Filter Candles sterilized for
domestic filters,
20
29 41
26
41
37
36 36
38
22
223
Miscellaneous,.
7
11
5
6
5
7
8
19
5
3
8
22
28 27 381
198
86
74
Total,
705
665 757 741
789
787
863
882
881 826 750
6589,304|8,401
00

ོ འཡ
:
:
13
18
13
14
14
218
(254
6
2
3
2
4
51
47
4
5
4
5
6
50 101
312
300
310
303
311
3,660 3,672
3
5
.6
1
36
84
16
I
45
40
-
M (1) 38 -
ANALYST'S DEPARTMENT.
REPORT BY MR. E. R. DoVEY, A.R.C.Sc., F.I.C., F.C.S., GOVERNMENT ANALYST.
The number of analyses performed during the year was 2,733 as against 2,213 in 1926.
The following classification shows the nature of the work
done:
CHEMICO-LEGAL.
1927. 1926.
Toxicological examinations (in-
cluding 56 stomachs)
98
86
Leaves from stomach,
1
Blood,
Clothing etc. for stains,
0
Liquids,
6
Powders,
1
16
Vomits,
7
2
Food,
3
2
Medicines,
3
6
Glass tubes,
0
1
Food residues,
14
1
Crystals,
1
1
Bombs and Explosives,
3
8
Bullets etc.,
Paper packages,
2
Ghee,
1
Herbs,
3
6
Pills,
1
0
Opium,
0
Tablets,
1
Other substances,
3
Biochemical examinations,
51
DANGEROUS GOODS ORDINANCE.
1927.
1926.
Fuel Oil,
16
8
Firecrackers,
5
23
Liquids for flash point,
1
Gasolene,
1
Ships for inflammable vapour,
60
46
Diesel oil,
0
2
Kerosene,
7
3
Coal Gas,
1
1
Oxygen gas,
0
1
Ether,
1
Potassium chlorate, Alcohol,
1
0
1
0
1
- M (1) 39
FOODS AND DRUGS ORDINANCE.
1927. 1926.
Biscuits,
1
0
Brandy,
0
1
Bread,
75
43
Butter, fresh,
26
7
Butter,
tinned,
12
6
Cheese,
19
9
Chinese wine,
0
3
Chocolate,
1
Coffee,
71
22
Confectionery,
22
0
Flour,
49
31
Honey,
1
Jam,
2
Lard,
17
5
Margarine,
1
0
Milk, Condensed,
3
5
Milk, Fresh,
144
136
Milk, Skimmed,
6
0
Milk, Tinned,
32
9
Mustard,
0
11
Olive oil,
7
4
Peas, tinned,
1
Pepper,
0
Rice,
31
8
Strawberry essence,
1
0
Sugar,
59
27
Tea,
54
12
Tea Dust,
1
0
Turpentine Linament,
6
Tincture of Iodine,
4
Tincture of Camphor Co.
4
Tapioca,
1
Vinegar,
6
24
Whisky,
1
WATERS.
1927. 1926.
Public Supplies,
1,248
903
Distilled water,
3
4
Wells and springs,
3
7
Sea water,
0
191
River water,
Water from steamers,
Water from swimming pool, Nullah water,
Miscellaneous supplies,
1
0
0
9
HHO
1
0
1
0
0
1
Cement,
Sand,
Wood,
Lime,
Clay,
M (1) 40
BUILDINGS MATERIALS ETC.
Water pipe,
1927.
1926.
3
1
4
4
2
22
4
0
1
OILS.
1927. 1926.
Anise Oil, Cassia Oil,
12
11
9
47
Wood Oil,
121
41
Tea Seed Oil,
5
Tallow,
1
Sandlewood Oil,
2
Rape Seed Oil,
1
Lard Oil,
12
20
PHARMACY ORDINANCE.
1927.
1926.
Chinese drugs,
1
3
Novocaine,
0
1
Patent medicines,
1
1
Ampoules,
6
1
Mixtures,
1
1
Pills,
1
2
Powders,
1
1
Morphine & atropine solution,
1
0
CHEMICALS.
1927.
1926.
Bleaching powder,
1
1
Sodium hydroxide,
1
1
Sulphuric acid,
39
30
Chloroform,
1
Potassium carbonate,
1
Barium sulphate,
1
Magnesium chloride,
0
1
Carbolic acid solution,
1
0
Zinc iodide solution,
1
Aluminium sulphate,
1
Other substances,
0
NOO
·M (1) 41 -
MINERALOGICAL.
1927. 1926.
Metals,
66
126
Ores,
73
87
Minerals,
2
4
Rocks,
12
Coals,
79
10
Coal briquettes,
3
Clinker,
1
Magnetite,
1
Carbonaceous shale,
1
0
Limestone,
2
MISCELLANEOUS.
1927. 1926.
Coal Tar Disinfectants,
11
17
Lotol,
0
1
Dog's stomach,
0
1
Chicken's stomach,
0
1
Soy,
3
8
Peanuts,
2
Bird lime,
1
Septic tank effluents,
2
Insecticide,
1
Tobacco,
1
Rusted nails,
1
Algae,
1
Book paint,
1
1
Gunny bags,
1
Battery,
1
Felt,
1
Thermometers for calibration,
Meat juice,
Mineral water,
2
1
1
Mercury,
Paper,
Padi,
Earwig exterminator,
Rice bag,
Fertilizer,
Refractometers for calibration,
Paraffin wax,
Musk,
Apple for presence of arsenic,
Chinese sauce,
Alumina ferric,
Alumina,
Nga tin powder,
Meat cover,
Steel rail,
Hay for presence of poisonous
plants,
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
oooooo
0
1
0
M (1) 42
MISCELLANEOUS,-Continued.
Green leaves,
i
Soil,
1
Slime, (filter bed slime)
2
Transformer oil,
Purico,
1
1
Lumber,
Silica threads,
Total,
1
2,733 2,213
TOXICOLOGICAL.
Among the investigations carried out during the year were 93 cases of suspected human poisoning.
The following Table shows the results of these:-
No Poison found,
Opium found,
Animal toxins (ptomains) found, Formalin found,
Carbolic acid found,
Opium and oil of peppermint found,
Alcohol found,
Chloral hydrate found,
Alkali found,
Datura alba found,
Iodine, phenol & camphor found,
Kerosene found,
Veronal found,
Unfinished on Dec. 31st,
Total,
38 Cases.
36
11
4
1
4
1
""
2
1
3
1
1
3
98 Cases.
A bottle of liquid submitted by the Police, the contents of which were supposed to have caused the death of a suicide, proved to be acetic acid of 44.0% strength. Some white crystals found on the person of a Chinese woman who had attempted suicide was found upon analysis to be oxalic acid, which is a very toxic substance.
In 1926, four cases of poisoning by carbolic acid occurred and in my last Report I suggested that should this tend to increase, the question of more stringent control of the sale of carbolic acid disinfectants might have to be considered. Four cases were investigated during the present year and as this represents no increase on 1926 the matter may be left as it is for the time being.
M (1) 43
Four cases of food poisoning occurred due to the presence of animal toxins (ptomains). In one case the organic base neurine (Trimethylvinylammonium hydrate) was separated from the contents of the stomach.
A number of samples of blood were received from the public mortuaries during the cold weather, taken from the bodies of children where the cause of death was diagnosed as capilliary bronchitis and in а number of these the presence of carbon monoxide was definitely proved. The presence of carboxyhaemoglobin was shown by spectroscopic examination before and after reduction, using the Hilger wave-length spectroscope, by the sodium hydroxide, tannic acid, and lead acetate tests and by Buckmaster and Gardner's method (Proc. Roy. Soc. 1909. B. 81.575). The most probably source of the carbon monoxide is the common Chinese charcoal stove or chattie used in a small room or cubicle. Charcoal stoves have been the cause of many fatal cases of poisoning all over the world and there seems to be no reason to doubt that the use of such charcoal chatties in confined spaces does frequently lead to lung trouble and in the case of young children may lead to a fatal issue.
One fatal case of Chloral hydrate poisoning occurred during the year, the deceased having taken a sleeping mixture contain- ing this substance. Investigation showed that a mixture was being sold freely in the Colony containing 25 grains of chloral hydrate per fluid ounce. It would seem that a greater check is required on such ready-made mixtures.
BIO-CHEMICAL WORK.
This work which has become of great importance during recent years, was started during the year and the following tests etc. can now be carried out here:-
Urine. Qualitative and Quantitative tests for Urea, Ammonia, Uric acid, Total nitrogen, Non-protein nitrogen, Albumen, Phosphates, Acetone, Diastatic Index, Acid excretion tests for acidosis, Urea excretion test for renal efficiency, Hydrogenion concentration, Sugar estimations (both glucose and lactose), inorganic, ethereal and total sulphur, qualitative tests for blood, bile pigments, indican, etc. and microscopical examina- tion of deposits.
Blood.-Haemoglobin estimations, blood urea nitrogen, non- protein nitrogen, blood sugar, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, maethaemoglobin, plasma bicarbonate for alkali reserve, sugar tolerance tests. etc.
Cerebro-spinal fluid:-Butyric acid test for excess globulin, Pandy's test, Lange's colloidal gold test, for meningitic, paretic, and syphilitic type fluids.
M (1) 44
The above can be carried out on isolated samples but the Laboratory is not at present equipt to carry out any considerable number of such tests.
The following Table shows the nature of some of the bio- chemical examinations made:
-
Blood for Urea Nitrogen
Blood for Blood Sugar
Blood for Carbon Dioxide Content
Blood for Carbon Monoxide Content
Cerebro-spinal fluid
Urine
Faeces
Miscellaneous
Total
1927.
4
1926.
2
2
25
1
10
3
1
6
51
CO
3
11
FOOD AND DRUGS ORDINANCE.
During the year 579 samples of food and drugs were examined, as compared with 356 samples in 1926. Of these only 14 or 2.42% were found to be adulterated. The following Table shows the nature of the substances examined:
Substance.
Number Number of samples found
analysed. genuine.
Number
found ad-
ulterated.
Milk, fresh
141
135
6
Milk, tinned
32
32
Milk, skimmed
5
5
Bread
75
75
Flour
33
32
1
Coffee
71
70
1
Tea
55
52
3
Sugar
58
58
Olive oil
7
7
Lard
13
12
1
Cheese
19
19
Butter, fresh
26
26
Butter, tinned
12
10
2
Margarine
1
1
Confectionery
22
22
Biscuits
1
1
Chocolate
1
Tinned peas
1
1
Vinegar
6
Total
579
565
14
M (1) 45
In view of the fact that highly coloured sweets and cakes were found on sale in Shanghai which on examination were found to be coloured with ordinary poisonous paint pigments, samples of coloured sweets and cakes were purchased at a number of Chinese shops in Hong Kong and Kowloon and examined at the Laboratory. No really harmful pigments were found, the colouring matters present being either vegetable colours or harmless aniline dyes free from arsenic and other dangerous contaminating substances.
The sample of flour reported as unfit for human consump- tion was found to be dirty and infested with the common meal mite, (Acarus farinae) to the extent of 100 per grain of flour or 43,200 per oz. Small maggots were also present.
All the samples of commerical sugar examined were tested by the electrical conductivity method in addition to the ordinary determinations; the former proving to be a very sensitive method for detecting foreign inorganic soluble substances. one case the presence of 0.08% of common salt in the sugar caused a rise in the electrical conductivity of over 550 reciprocal megohms.
In
year
A more sensitive method was introduced during the for detecting traces of carbon bisulphide in flour which had been treated with the vapour of this substance for insecticidal pur- poses. This was in connection with the treatment of naval stores at the Kowloon depot.
MINERALOGICAL ANALYSES.
The 139 samples of metals and ores examined during the year comprised the following:--
Metals.
Ores.
Substance.
1927. 1926. Substance.
1927. 1926.
Tin... Antimony
Alloys Lead
4200
114
Wolfram
30
34
4
+32
Manganese ore.
28
4
6
Bismuthite
12
36
Antimony ore..
2
11
Tin ore ...
0
1
Galena
1
***
Gold ore
1
0
Total,..
66
126
73
87
M (1) 46
WATER SUPPLIES.
The examination of the Colony's water supplies is a part of the work of the Laboratory which has rapidly increased in the past few years. The following Table shows the number of samples examined during each of the past seven years:
Year.
1921.
1922.
1923.
1924.
1925.
1926.
1927.
Samples. 36
56
164
286
595
903
1248
The 1248 samples examined during 1927 comprise the regular samples taken of the filtered and unfiltered water at the various filtration plants and also a large number of tap samples from houses and office buildings all over the City and Kowloon to test the condition of the water as it reaches the
consumer.
A considerable amount of work was done in connection with the new Bowen Road mechanical filtration plant, samples of local lime being examined for percentage of free lime, also samples of alumina-ferric used in the purification of the water, for strength. Many determinations of the colour of the filtered water were made with the Lovibond tintometer to check the efficiency of the beds and to regulate the dose of coagulants added.
The hydrogenionean concentration of the filtered water is now being determined daily in order to keep the water within the correct limits of alkalinity.
The water from the various filter beds has been found to be satisfactory on the whole, as regards colour, transparency and chemical purity. Most of the City supplies showed a colour of well under 10 Lovibond colour units, the highest reading being from the Elliot beds in August (18.9 units); this was however quite exceptional. No nitrites or heavy metals nor excess free chlorine were found, the albumenoid ammonia in no supply reached 0.005 parts per 100,000 and was usually below 0.003. The oxygen absorbed was in nearly all cases below 0.050 per 100,000 which is very satisfactory.
SPECIAL REPORTS.
Special Reports have been prepared during the year on :- "The preparation of Vitamine B Extract for Ber-beri treat- ment", "The composition of certain Chinese ores", "The speci- fication for Pure Rapeseed Oil".
M (1) 47
LABORATORY BULLETINS.
The first of these made its appearance during the year the subject being "Chinese Wood Oil". In it was collected all the scientific information on the subject likely to be of value to the merchant and exporter. Descriptions of all the heat tests are given in detail, together with Hong Kong, London and New York Specifications for the pure oil, explanations of the various terms used in the Certificates and a set of Tables for making certain calculations and corrections, determining the weight per cubic foot from the Specific Gravity, for freight purposes etc., etc.
It is hoped that shortly similar Bulletins will be ready on "Chinese Tin" and "Chinese Cassia Oil". Work on these is proceeding at present.
RESEARCH.
Questions as to the best methods for sampling Chinese ingot tin arose early in the year and a considerable amount of work was done on the distribution of pure tin in the ingots after casting. If such an ingot were cast with one pouring from a large ladle, the purest tin would crystallise in the outer portion of the ingot and most of the impurities tend to concentrate in the inner portion. Such ingots are however usually cast with six or seven separate pourings and the exact distribution was therefore a matter of conjecture unless accurately determined. Portions of tin from every part of a tin ingot were analysed and from the plotted results a new method of sampling was worked out which should give an accurate indication of the composition of the whole.
The presence of synthetic cinnamic aldehyde in Chinese Cassia Oil was raised during the year also the presence in this oil of kerosene and alcohol as adulterants. Work was done on the best methods of detecting these substances and correspon- dence has taken place with analysts in London and elsewhere with the object of establishing a uniform and standard method for the examination of such oil for freedom from these adul- terants. A method worked out in this Laboratory has been submitted for consideration as such a standard method.
Some work has been done on the detection of carboxy- haemoglobin in blood in cases of suspected carbon monoxide poisoning and on methods for differentiating this from nitroxy- haemoglobin a product liable to be formed by post-mortem decomposition.
A number of samples of rice, supposed to have been the cause of Beri-beri, were examined during the year, and in addition an examination was made of all the ordinary commer- cial varieties on sale in the Colony, to ascertain what available kinds passed the minimum standard of 0.4% of Phosphorus
M (1) 48
pentoxide. Any rice yielding 0.4% or over of Phosphorus pen- toxide is held to be safe from the beri-bei point of view. None of the white polished rices came up to this standard, though No. 2 Saigon Round Rice yielded 0.33% P205. All the brown rices passed easily, Brown Seemin rice yielding 0.67%. Samples of New Territory padi of the white unpolished type yielded 0.47%. The preparation of Vitamine B Extract for the treat- ment of beri-beri is at present under consideration.
Some work was also carried out on the complete analysis of Bismuthite, an ore exported in considerable quantities from Hong Kong and in which the determination of some of the im- purities is a matter of great commercial importance, especially traces of tungsten, molybdenum and tellurium.
A modified method for determining the phosphorus in manganese ores was also worked out.
SAMPLING.
The following sampling of ores, metals, oils etc. was done by the Laboratory sampler during the year:-
Tin
.24,200 ingots
Antimony metal
120 cases
Wood oil Cassia oil
.29,633 containers
145 cases
Antimony ore
50 cases
Anise oil
417 cases
Bismuth ore
18 cases
Tea-seed oil
1 tank
Bleaching
Lard
3,656 cases
powder
60 drums
Tallow
74 casks
Wolframite
Manganese ore ...10,860 tons
3,752 bags
Paraffin wax
250 cases
Condensed
Coal
1 lot
milk
39 cases
MISCELLANEOUS SERVICES.
In June, 1927, the assistance of the Laboratory was re- quested in dealing with insects in the herbarium of the Botanical and Forestry Department. It was therefore fumigated with prussic acid gas for 24 hours. The Superintendent reports that since then no insects have been observed among the books, plant specimens or in the room treated.
The filling of balloons with hydrogen gas for the Royal Observatory was another matter to which attention was given. A simple method of generating hydrogen gas was selected and a suitable apparatus supplied. Micrometric measurements were also made of fused quartz threads for the suspensions of some of the Observatory instruments.
M (1) 49
REVENUE,
The fees paid into the Treasury during the year amounted to $16,146.00 as against $16,422.50 in 1926. The value of the work done as determined from the Tariff of Fees (Government Notification No. 439 of 1918) was $46,428.00 as against $42,202.50 in 1926.
STAFF.
Mr. Tam Yam Yeuk resigned during the year and Mr Edwards was appointed in his place. No other change of staff took place during the year.
A
E. R. DOVEY,
Government Analyst.
M (1) 50-
THE OFFICE OF THE HEALTH OFFICER OF THE PORT.
REPORT BY DR. B. H. MELLON, Health Officer of the Port.
I. THE INSPECTION OF SHIPS ARRIVING IN PORT.
During the year 1927, the number of inward bound ocean going vessels was 9,669, and these were all visited by the Health Officers.
Such particulars of the voyage as ports of call, dates of departure, numbers of passengers and crews and the incidence of cases of illness or death etc., were noted on the prescribed forms and attested by the master of the vessel as required under Table W, Section 22 (2) of the Merchant Shipping Ordinance of 1899. Of the steamers arriving 5,702 were on the British register and 3,967 on the foreign register. River steamers from Canton, Macao and West River ports, junks and small craft are not visited except in cases of sickness or death.
Ships which arrive with a corpse on board must obtain a permit in order to land it and before this is granted enquiries are made to determine the cause of death. If death occurs within twenty-four hours of a ship's arrival in port or whilst the ship is in harbour, the body is inspected and the case in- vestigated. If the cause of death is doubtful the body is sent to a mortuary for further examination.
During the year, 162 special visits were made to ships for this purpose, 129 permits were granted and 33 bodies sent to the mortuary. Seventeen cases of leprosy were detected amongst Chinese passengers. Forty-one Chinese lunatics arrived in the Colony during the year. Bills of Health number- ing 1,942 were issued.
II.-EMIGRATION.
The total number of emigrants examined was 288,745 which shows an increase of 61,320 over 1926, 157,763 over 1924 228,776 over 1919. Emigration from the Port of Hong Kong has increased consistently each year since 1919 and has added greatly to the work of the Port Health Service.
The great majority of the emigrants proceeded to the Straits Settlements. Table I shows the number and destinations of the emigrants. The months of March, April and May proved to be the most popular for emigration. During February the smallest number departed owing to the occurrence of the
3
M (1) 51
Chinese New Year Festivities in that month. Table II gives the number of emigrants that sailed each month. The Asiatic Emigration Ordinance, Sections 25-28, requires that all Asiatic. steerage passengers embarking on vessels bound for certain ports and the crews of these vessels must be examined by the Health Officer and those found medically unfit are not allowed to proceed.
The number of rejections during the year was 1,278 and the cause of rejection is outlined in Table III. All vessels carrying emigrants must be provided with a hospital, certain surgical instruments and a supply of drugs. The list of drugs required was revised and brought up to date during the year. These are liable to inspection by the Health Officer prior to the ship's departure. British ships entering the port may also be required to produce their medicine chests for inspection.
Asiatic emigrants are classified as under:-
(a) Free emigrants who pay their own fares. 269,005
free emigrants left during the year.
(b) Assisted emigrants to the number of 19,740 sailed mainly to work in the rubber plantations and tin mines of the Straits Settlements, the sugar planta- tions of Java and Hawaii, the timber forests and oil fields of Borneo or in the nitrate deposits of certain islands in the South Seas. These men have their fares paid by their employers.
(c) Women and children. These consist largely of the
wives and families of the emigrants.
III. QUARANTINE DUTY.
All vessels arriving from "infected" ports and those having infectious or suspicious cases on board fly the "Q" flag and go to the quarantine anchorage for examination. The number of
vessels arriving in quarantine was 874 with 113,644 passengers and crews of 74,587 compared with 427 vessels 49,392 passengers and crews of 46,906 for 1925. They underwent medical ex- amination and vaccination in addition if bound from a small-pox infected port. The monthly return of quarantine ships is given in Table V.
Medical supervision of the passengers and crew during the period of quarantine and vaccination when necessary were attended to before pratique was granted. One hundred and fifty-two cases of infectious disease were investigated and found to be due to non-quarantinable diseases. These were dealt with in the usual manner. This involved the examination of a large number of sick persons and many special visits to ships in the Harbour.
M (1) 52-
Eighty-seven vessels were fumigated for various reasons during the year. Each fumigation was supervised by a Health Officer.
The total number of persons medically inspected during 1927 was 542,561 which is equivalent to 1,541 examinations for each day of the year as compared with a daily rate of 795 for 1925. Table VI shows the Quarantine Notifications issued by the Hong Kong Government for 1927.
IV.-VACCINATION DEPARTMENT,
The Vaccination Ordinance of 1923 requires that all emigrants from the Colony shall be protected against small-pox. Emigrants can be vaccinated at the Government Centre cheaply. and efficiently and 9,582 presented themselves for this purpose during 1927 as compared with 7,724 in 1925 and 1,877 in 1924. In addition 9,599 non-emigrants were vaccinated at the various Centres.
At the examination of emigrants on board ships those who in the opinion of the Health Officer, were not sufficiently pro- tected had to undergo revaccination.
Owing to the great increase in the work of the Port Health Service the new launch H. O. II is now indispensable.
In July Dr. J. P. Fehily was permanently appointed as 2nd Health Officer of the Port and Drs. Tsoi and Cheah as assistant Health Officers.
B. H. MELLON, Health Officer of the Port.
- M (1) 53
Table I.
SHOWING EMIGRATION PASSES AND REJECTIONS FOR 1927.
Port of Destination.
Passengers.
Crews. Rejected.
Straits Settlements
202,253
16,949
1,047
Canada
6,573
9,687
2
United States of America
9,422
18,458
10
Honolulu
10,555
9
Dutch East Indies
25,916
4,241
91
British North Borneo
6,924
4,817
25
Belawan Deli and Muntok
15,159
3,770
52
Australia
2,046
3,476
30
South Sea Islands
1,229
178
7
Shanghai and Japan
2,878
South America
2,576
1,772
Panama
176
Mexico
151
South Africa
1,321
881
1
Rangoon
671
78
1
Manila
185
Mauritius
710
288,745
64,307
1,278
Table II.
SHOWING MONTHLY RETURNS OF EMIGRANTS, CREWS AND REJECTIONS
Months.
Ships Examined.
Emigrants. Crews.
Rejected.
January
31
23,593
5,138
33
February
30
16.022
4,324
103
March
38
37,357
5,467
540
April
44
39,275
6,072
119
May
36
30,287
5,625
159
June
35
23,745
5,550
77
July
32
18,312
5,018
28
August
35
17,684
5,693
36
September
35
23,234
5,369
74
October
34
19,295
5,718
47
November
38
20,376
5,549
29
December
39
19,565
4,784
33
427
288,745
64,307
1,278
M (1) 54-
Table III.
SHOWING CAUSES OF REJECTIONS OF EMIGRANTS.
Diseases.
Number rejected.
Skin Diseases:
Scabies
Tinea
Favus
613
33
16
Urticaria
Eye Diseases :-
Trachoma
Ophthalmia
Blindness
Infectious Diseases :-
Small-pox
Chicken-pox
Measles.
1
39
8
1
3
1
4
Phthisis
17
Leprosy
8
C. S. fever
1
Fever Malaria
483
1
Dysentery
1
Syphilis
Beri Beri
Pneumonia
10
1
3
Cardiac disease
2
Nephritis
1
Jaundice
Enlarged Spleen
Lunacy
Deformity
5
2
4
Sarcoma
Debility
Senility
1
3
2
Hernia
Carbuncle
Parotitis
4
1
1
Ábscess
Ulcer
1
3
1,278
Table IV.
Showing the number of ships detained in Quarantine with ports of origin, causes, dates and periods of detention.
Name of Vessel.
Port of Origin.
Causes,
Cases.
Date of arrival in quarantine.
Date of departure from quarantine.
M (1) 55
Takliwa
Singapore.
Small-pox
1
6th February, 1927.
after fumigation.
Takliwa
Shanghai.
2
""
28th February, 1927.
1st March, 1927.
Kwai Sang
Kohsichang.
2
9th March, 1927.
"
Hanoi
Hoihow.
Cholera Suspicious
1
22nd May, 1927.
Taishan
Macao.
1
""
Van Overstraten
Swatow.
""
Morea
Shanghai.
""
Kut Sang
New Mathilde
Amoy.
Hoihow.
1
""
19th Sept., 1927.
1st August, 1927.
17th August, 1927.
2nd Sept., 1927.
2nd Sept., 1927.
10th March, 1927.
25th May, 1927.
1st August, 1927.
18th August, 1927.
3rd Sept., 1927.
7th Sept., 1927.
20th Sept., 1927.
Months.
M (1) 56 Table V.
Showing number of passengers crews and ships arriving
in Quarantine each month, 1927.
No. of Passenger.
No. of Crews.
No. of
Ships.
January
1,211
1,007
14
February
855
1,447
19
March
352
602
8
April
391
1,372
19
May
4,135
4,652
61
June
5,925
5,799
94
July
6,240
5,384
73
August
16,778
8,032
101
September
26,899
14,575
150
October
26,924
16,797
190
November
23,256
13,970
132
December
678
950
13
113,644
74,587
874
Table VI.
Showing Quarantine Notifications issued by the Hong
hong Government for 1927.
Port
or
Date & Number Date & Number
=
Disease.
Locality.
of Notification.
of
Cancellation.
Sourabaya.
Plague.
No. 627 of
No. 91, of
Macassar.
Plague.
No. 712 of
30th Dec.,
Haiphong.
Cholera.
No. 18 of
7th Jan., 1927
Vladivostock.
Plague.
Bangkok.
Cholera &
Small-pox.
Saigon.
Cholera.
No. 201 of 7th April, No. 265 of
Haiphong.
Cholera.
4th May, 1927 No. 279 of
10th May, 1927 7th
Swatow.
Haihow.
Mascassar.
Cholera.
No. 449 of
Cholera.
4th Aug., 1927 No. 471 of
Plague.
15th Aug., No. 494 of
Shanghai.
Amoy.
Cholera.
No. 496 of 1st Sept.,
Cholera.
No. 509 of
Sourabaya.
Plague.
No. 691 of
Batavia.
Cholera.
No. 718 of
18th Nov., 1926 17th Feb., 1927
No. 73 of 10th Feb.,
25th Aug.,
5th Sept.,
No. 92 of
No. 90 of
12th Feb., 1927 ¡No. 200 of
1927 7th April, 1927
No. 441 of
1927 27th July, 1927 No. 485 of
22nd Aug., 1927 No. 510 of
Sept., 1927 [No. 692 of
19th Nov., 1927 No. 670 of 1927 16th Nov., 1927
No. 555 of 1927 29th Sept., 1927
No. 693 of
1927 19th Nov., 1927
No. 669 of
1927 15th Nov., 1927
19th Nov., 1927
No. 746 of
2nd Dec., 1927 22nd Dec., 1927
1926 17th Feb., 1927

*
Month, 1927.
M (1) 57

METEOROLOGICAL RETURNS, 1927.
MONTHLY VALUES of METEOROLOGICAL ELEMENTS.
MONTHLY VALUES of the METEOROLOGICAL ELEMENTS in the YEAR 1927.
Barometric Pressure.
(British Units).
Air Temperature.
Highest.
Lowest.
Mean.
Inequality
(Range.)
Mean Diurnal
Mean
Temperature
of Evaporation.
Highest.
Vapour Tension
Lowest.
Mean.
O
O
о
O
O
O
O
ins.
ins.
ins.
ins.
ins.
ins.
ins.
January..
30.296
29.796
30°030
0112 751 470 28′1 64°2 56°3 | 7959755′3| 0·629
0'127 0.389
February.....
*305
•697
29'993
•102 742 459 | 28°3 (62·2 | 55°27.0585 550
·660
135 *395
March...
'III
-651
*912
April....
018
•627
•829
May....
29'937
421
*727
102 767 47°2 29.5 63.6 57.0 6.660·1567 090 83.6575 26·1 71·6 641 | 7·5672 641 080 89.2 66.0 23°2 805 72°3 | 8.2 756726
788
*198
426
•893
*302
*566
*988
*429
*766
June......
•816
*501
•6+4
078 912736 17·6 85′9 78°7 || 72816779
1'082
-767
*910
July....
•812
28.927
*598
066 905 754 15°1 86·5 785 | 8.081978-2
1*087 *792
918
August....
.803
*953
*576
September.....
*950
29.525
-765
October
30*142
*579
*995
070 894 70319°1 83.6 76·1 090 88-360 3 28.0 79.6 70.9
083 931 739 | 19′2 | 87′578′0 9.5 82.1 78.5 1·164
| 75793 747
-785
*929
1063
507
.805
87 748 68.6
0975
*194
·633
November...........
·682
*204
*964
098 824 587 237 75'9 671
8.8 710634
.806
*170
*488
December.......
*199
*770
30.016
102 799 491 308 02 619
8-365-5503
.697
122
*462
Year.
30°305 28927
29.830 0.089 931 459 472 759 68.0
79714671 1164
O'122
0.641
Feb. 7. July 25.
Date.
Aug. 19.
Feb.
:
:
Aug.
Dec
6.
7.
9.
Degree of Humidity.
Clouds.
Bright
Sunshine.
Rainfall.
Wind.
Month, 1927.
Mean.
Lowest.
Mean amount
(0-100).
Direction of
motion *
Daily Duration
of
of
Upper.
Lower
Percentage
of Possible
Sunshine
Resultant, t
Observed Velocity
Total.
Direct-
ion.*
Velo
Mean. †
city.-
Maxi- Maxi-
mum. † Hourly
mum‡
Squall
%
Jan....... 74
Feb......78 35
%
गेल
о
о
30
67 264
hrs
88137°5
dio 7
%
ins.
hrs.
ins.
ins.
ins
41 0'310
20
30015 0145 | 0*040
с m.p.h.
73
10 2
m.p.h.
12.0
m p.h.
m p.h
29
39
90 271
92
2222
434 14 4'350
82
I I
Mar...... 80
43
April... 84 52
+
86
May
June..... 84 63 78
6:7 18 4:535 92 91267
28 83 272 112
105'9
7*125 104
49 85269 147 1178 29 25445 115
93
0053 1685 0.560
130049 1550 0450
16 0.069 2015 1.610
72 11.5 13.6 42
53
77 12:2
14'6
38
53
85 120 13'9
34
47
19
0.221
7.255
2*100
86
9.2 12.3
33
56
36 183 1919 4711680 126
20
0'093
3045 | 1400
I 20
47
10'3 27
47
July... 84 61
80
Aug...... 85
Sept. 80
Oct...... 71 31
66 67
قا شمه
53 171 1613 39 18735 109
24
0172 310 1290 143
4'5
-9'9
45
72
351204
211'O
53 20.905
74
19
0282 5650 1620 | 149
$6
2.3 8.6
83 116
5878 280 100
1471 40 6·165
50
17 0 123
44
280
95 2328 65 5420
232.865
+4
Nov..... 64 25

36 254
83 2314 70
1.825
19
Dec...... 72
24
60
241 85 1761 53 1370 33
70*123
6 0096 1525 0·665
30042 0820 | 0*305
1135
2*350 0550
1.080 86
6.6 10.8
34 56
12.0 69 9.6
45 60
68 8.5 10.9
52
74
65 94117
30
38
Year.
78 2+
72 282 114|18219| 41
107-865 869 | 158 | 0*124 7255
2'100
81 7'9
11'7
8.3
116
Dec.
:
:
:
:
:
Date.
9.
May May
23.
1d13h
:
Aug. Aug.
* 0° North, 90°-East &c.
+ Beckley Anemograph.
20d 14 b 20d
16h 15h23m
Dines-Baxendell Anemograph
M (1) 59
Table I
Diseases and Deaths in 1927 at the Civil, Victoria, and Kowloon Hospitals.
VICTORIA HOSPITAL.
KOWLOON HOSPITAL.
Remain. Yearly Total. Total
CIVIL HOSPITAL.
Nomenclature.
Remain- Yearly Total. Total
ing in
Remain-
ing in
Hospital
on 31st
Dec., 1926.
Admis-
sions.
Cases
Treated.
Remain Yearly Total. ing in
Remain-
Total
ing in
Hospital Hospital
Cases
Hospital
ing in
Hospital
Deaths.
on 51st Dec., 1927. Dec., 1926.|
on 31st
Admis-
sions.
Deaths.
(Treated.
on 31st
on 31st
Cases
Treated.
Dec., 1927. Dec, 1926,
Admis-
sions.
Deaths.
Remain.
ing in
Hospital
on 31st
Dec, 1927.
DISEASES CAUSED BY INFECTION.
Chicken-pox
Diphtheria
Dengue
Cholera
Dysentery :-
(a) Protozoal
(6) Bacillary
Enteric Fever :-
(a) Typhoid fever
(b) Paratyphoid fever
Erysipelas
Gonococcal infection Influenza
Leprosy :--
(a) Nodular
(b) Anæsthetic
Mixed Forms
Madura Disease
23
78
****
24
78
2
+2*2
1
30
34
9
2 O
:
co co co
...
1
2
18
*:*:
4
4
1
I
...
3
18
19
...
19
...
31
34
1
2
~:
...
2
:
::
+7
14
17
14
1
17
+7
...
: -
58
15
61
4
1
3
2
3
}
3
3
...
103
138
...
106
141
8
16
...
~:::9
4
15
1
16
...
...
ة
16
1
11
12
...
3
...
...
...
3
1
...
Malaria
(a) Benigu tertian

6) Sub-tertian
10
373
4
383
(c) Malarial Cachexia
1
17
18
(d) Quartan..........
Measles
13
13
...
Blackwater Fever
Meningococcal Infection :--
(a) Cerebro-Spinal Fever
2

Mumps
5
210
5
Plague.
Pyogenic Infectiou~Abscess.——
Osteomyelitis
Pyæmia
Pyrexia of uncertain Origin
Relapsing fever
Rabies
Carried forward.
...
1
1
12
12
::
1
...
1
...
...
...
...
...
...
9
243
6
10
243
6
...
...
ة
***
...
...
26
2
-~-
1
...
...
26
1
...
...
2
...
1
...
...
223
916
44
938
22
1
65
1
66
1
3
849
11
352
9
M (1) 60-
Table 1,- Continued
Diseases and Deaths in 1927 at the Civil, Victoria, and Kowloon Hospitals.
VICTORIA HOSPITAL.
CIVIL HOSPITAL.
KOWLOON HOSPITAL.
Nomenclature.
Remain Yearly Total.
Remain-
ing in
Total
Remain Yearly Total.
ing in
ing in
Total
Hospital
Cases
on 31st Admis- Dec., 1926. sions.
Deaths. Treated.
Hospital
on 31st on 31st Dec., 1927. Dec., 1926.
ing in ing in
Remain Remain Yearly Total.
Total
Remain-
Hospital
Cases
Admis-
Deaths. Treated
sions.
Hospital Hospital on 31st on 31st Dec., 1927, Dec., 1926.;
Admis- sions.
Deaths.
Cases Treated
ing in
Hospital
on 31st Dec., 1927.
Septicæmia
Small-pox
Scarlet fever
Syphilis :-
Brought forward..............
(a) Acquired
(6) Congenital
Tetanus
Tuberculosis
Whooping cough
Rheumatic fever....
Yaws
Rheumatism
22
22
916
44
938
22
I
65
1
66
1
3
349
11
352
...
...
2:
2
1
~::
2
2
1
...
...
...
1
...
:::
::
:::
...
: : :
8
94
:
:
:
:
:
ܣ
3
2
17
13
2
6
16
2ས2::ཁྱ
:::
102
5
19
1
16

DISEASES OF THE NERVOUS SYSTEM.
Diseases of the Nerves:
Inflammation :-
(a) Localised
(b) Multiple
Diseases of the Spinal Cord :
Paralysis....
Degeneration
Infantile Paralysis
Myelitis
Concussion
Spinal Hæmorrhage
Tabes Dorsalis
Spastic paraplegia
Diseases of the Cerebral Meninges:
Inflammation
Tuberculosis
Diseases of the Brain :-~
Glioma
2
N:
11
=20
28
::
11
30
...
...
...
...
::
::
2
2
...
...
2
...
2
...
...
1
24
1
2:2-2
1
1
...
...
1
1
...
1
3
1
1
44
44
#coco co —
3
1
1
1
...
1
1
5
2
15
14
15
10 12
5
...
1
1
~:
: :
...
Haemorrhage
9
Apoplexy
1
Paraplegia
1
Embolism
7
:*- :~
:
8
1
2
...
:9117
6
Carried forward......
39 1,188
91
1,227
30
1
74
!
L
...
N
1
-:
...
::
...
...
:
...
::
::
...
...
75
2
...
: : : : : : :
5
...
::
...
NAN N
2
2
1
...
9
...
1
...
...
...
::
1
1
1
1
::
...
: : : :
co
3
3
...
::
***
...
...
3
388
18
391
11
உ.
J
༞། འ
M (1) 61
Table 1,-(Continued).
Diseases and Deaths in 1927 at the Civil, Victoria, and Kowloon Hospitals.
CIVIL HOSPITAL.
VICTORIA HOSPITAL.
KOWLOON HOSPITAL.
Remain-
ing in Yearly Total. Total
Dec., 1927. Dec., 1926
Admis-
sions.
Deaths.
Cases
Treated
Remain-
ing in
Hospital
on 31st
Dec., 1927.
Nomenclature,
Remain-
ing in
Hospital
on 31st
Dec., 1926.
Yearly Total.
Total
Cases
Remain-
ing in
Hospital
Admis-
sions.
Deaths.
Treated.
on 31st
Remain-
ing in
Hospital
on 31st
Yearly Total. Total
Remain-
Dec., 1927. Dec., 1926.
Admis-
sions,
Deaths,
Cases
[Treated.
ing in Hospital Hospital on 31st
on 31st
Brought forward.................
39
1,188 91
1,227
30
1'
74
~
75
2
19
Diseases of the Brain,-Continued.
3
388
18
391
11
Vertigo
1
12
13
...
Epilepsy
15
15
Migraine
ة
1
Neurasthenia
2
3
2
3
3
...
Hemiplegia
3
...
...
Encephalitis Lethargia
...
1
Hydrocephalus
Mental Diseases :-
Mania
Melancholia..
Dementia...
Delusional Insanity.
General paralysis of the Insane
Insomnia
Hysteria
Diseases of the Eye :-
Conjunctivitis.
Cataracts
Iritis
Trachoma
Keratitis
* A N
1
1

4
21
25
1
4
5
6
6
13
13
1
4
4
3
543
:
}
1
Entropion
Optic neuritis
Dacrocystitis
Hypopyou
Ophthalmia neonatorum
Discases of the Ear
Inflammation of ext. meatus Otitis media (acute)
Mastoiditis
Chronic catarrh of middle ear
+
""
suppuration
""
>>
Diseases of the Nose :-
Adenoids
...
...
1
...
***
:::
1
...
:
...
6
6
1
4
లు:
3
4
...
::
Polypus
Sarcoma
Epistaxis.
Sinusitis
10
1
1
:.
4
10
I
::ས:
Deflected Septum
Carried forward...... 48 1,340
95 1,388
35
...
:
1
89
...
...
...
...
...
1
1
...
:
...
1
I
co:
...
...
...
:
...
::
41.22-
...
Ι
2
ลง
2
3
...
...
1
...
1
...
...
...
1
3
1
1
...
...
...
...
::
...
...
...
Ι
...
2
...
co:
3
1
...
...
...
...
1
...
...
...
1
...
3
3
...
2
...
***
...
...
ลง
2
90
2
4
110
18
414
12
- M (1) 62
Table I.- Continued
Diseases and Deaths in 1927 at the Civil, Victoria, and Kowloon Hospitals.
CIVIL HOSPITAL,
VICTORIA HOSPITAL.
KOWLOON HOSPITAL.
4
...
1
44x
1
...
Nomenclature.
Remain. Yearly Total.
ing in
Total
Remain- ing in
Remain Yearly Total.
ing in
Total
Remain Remain Yearly Total.
ing in
Hospital
Cases
on 31st
Dec., 1926.
Admis- sions.
Deaths, Treated.
Hospital on 31st
on 31st |Dec., 1927.Dec., 1926.
Hospital
Cases
Hospital
Admis-
Deaths. Treated:
on 31st
ing in Hospital on 31st
sions.
Dec., 1927, Dec., 1926.)
Admis- sions.
Deaths.
Total Cases [Treated.] on 1st
Remain- ing in Hospital
:
-
Dec., 1927.
Brought forward.......
48
1,340
95
1,388
35
1
89
2
06
2
4
410
18
414
12
11
4
11
1
1
13
6
13
1
1
2
16
18
1
5
5
1
...
2
5
1
...
1
1
3
:-
...
...
I
4
1
7
...
1
...
3
2
00 - 20
1
1
3
1
3
...
Diseases of the Circulatory System:-
Endocarditis
Myocarditis, fatty degeneration... Mitral valve
Aortic valve
Dilatation of heart..
Aortitis
Aneurysm
Hyperpiesis..
Varix
Thrombosis of Veins
Syncope
Malformation
Auricular flutter....
Ventricular fibrillation Pericarditis
Diseases of the Blood -
Anaemia
Pernicious Anaemia
Leukaemia
Purpura haemorrhagica
...
...
...
...
22
3
...
...
...
2 3
3
2
23
22
1
2
1
...
...
6
WN
2
22
23
2
: ~ :
...
ཤf2:
76
32
· 1
1
2 d
:
I
...
...
3

3
...
...
...
...
...
...
6 2
9
...
...
1
15
81
1
34
2
...
...
1
...
...
:
1
...
1
...
:
...
...
...
...
1
...
...
...
...
...
...

1
...
3
1
:

...
...
1
...
...
...
3
2
...
1
...
~
...
...
...
...
: -
...
...
...
::
...
...
...
1
...
..
:::
...
Co - co
3
...
4
1
...
1
;
...
...
***
...
Ni
2
1
දයලය
1
...
...
::
:::
...
...
Carried forward......
59
1,584
117
1,643
50
3
102
2
105
2
4
440
21
444
:
13
2
13
1
*
Haemophilia
Diseases of the Spleen :-
Splenomegaly
Rupture
Banti's Disease
Diseases of the Lymphatic System:-
Inflammation of LymphaticGlands
Suppuration of
Tuberculosis of
Elephantiasis
:::
1
5
""
""
2
""
""
Carcinoma (Lympho Sarcoma)..
Discases of Endocrine Glands :-
(a) Goitre ....
(b) Myxoedema
Addison's Discase
Diseases of the Respiratory System:--
Laryngitis
A telectasis

T
...
::
13
M (1) 63
Table I,-(Continued).
Diseases and Deans in 1927 at the Civil, Victoria, and Kowloon Hospitals.
CIVIL HOSPITAL.
VICTORIA HOSPITAL.
KOWLOON HOSPITAL.
Nomenclature.
Remain-
ing in
Hospital
on 31st
[Dec., 1926.
Yearly Total.
Total
Admis-
sions.
Deaths.
Cases
Treated.
Remain- Remain- ing in ing in Hos; ital Hospital on 31st on 31st Dec., 1927. Dec., 1926
Yearly Total.
Admis-
sions.
Deaths.
Total
Cases
on 31st Treated
Remain-Remain- ing in ing in Hospital Hospital on 31st Dec., 1927. Dec., 1926.
Yearly Total. Total
Admis-
sions,
Deaths.
Cases
Treated.
Remain.
ing in
Hospital
on 31st
Dec., 1927
Brought forward................. 59 1,584 117
1,643
50
3
102
2
105
2
440
21
414
13
Discases of the Respiratory
System, Continued.
Pleurodynia.....
1
...
:
Bronchitis (Acute)...
3
76
9
9
1
9
...
9
Brouchitis (Chronic)
51
2
51
5
1
1
16
16
...
Asthma
2
68
70
4
1
}
:
Pneumonia (Lobar)
4
35
14
39
2
I
2
1
1
...
2
""
(Lobular)
74
50
74
I
1
I
1
Pulmonary Tuberculosis
7
114
48
121
6
I
5
6
2
9
2
11
...
Pleurisy
1
25
26
3
11
11
Empyema
...
...
...
Hæmoptysis
...
12
...
12
1
Bronchitis (Chronic)
Diseases of the Teeth and Gums :- Dental caries
Pyorrhoea alveolaris
Gingivitis
Cancrum Oris
Alveolar Abscess
Odontoma
Discases of the Digestive System :-
18
...
18.
ة
2
2
22
23
1
]
1
2
I
...
...
~
...
...
1
}
...
- 2 20
...
3
3
128
...
1
...
::
...
J
...
...
1
...
...
:
Hyper trophy tonsils
4
1
Necrosis of Jaw
3
4
Tonsillitis
46
1
46
Pharyngitis
4
4
Gastritis
11
Gastric Ulcer
15
Gastric Carcinoma
7
to os ::
11
...
8
...
30
...
...
30
8
...
1
3
12
1
9
...
...
15
1
9
...
16
1
...
...
2
7
...
Haematemesis
...
Indigestion
80
30
...
...
Enteritis
Appendicitis
Colitis
58
27
59
2
19
32
3
32
2
13
21
13
...
...
...
11
11
20
11
3
20
11
2
3
...
...
...
Gall stones
10
4
10
...
...
Spruc
1
3
3
...
Hernia inguinal
I
22
23
1
1
1
Hernia ventral
1
1
...
...
Diarrhoea..
Constipation
55
65
185
55
...
67
4
4
5

2
2
2
2
1
Tuberculosis
Hernia femoral
...
:
Diverticulitis
Carried forward.....
83
2,458
278
2,541
79
...
6
204
10
1
2
...
210
5
10
564
23
574
16
M (1) 64-
Table 1,- Continued
Diseases and Deaths in 1927 at the Civil, Victoria, and Kowloon Hospitals.
CIVIL HOSPITAL.
VICTORIA HOSPITAL.
KOWLOON HOSPITAL.
Nomenclature.
Remain Yearly Total.
ing in
Total
Remain- ing in
Hospital
on 31st Admis- Dec., 1926. sions.
Cases Deaths. Treated
Remain Yearly Total. ing in Hospital Hospital on 31st on 31st Dec., 1927.| Dec., 1926.
Admis- sions.
Remain- Total
ing in Cases Hospital on 31st Deaths. Treated. Dec., 1927, Dec., 1926
Remain Yearly Total.
Total
Remain-
ing in
Hospital on 31st
Admis-
Cases Treated.
Deaths.
sions.
ing in Hospital on 31st Dec., 1927.
83 2,458 278 2,541
79
6 204
5
210
LO
5
10 564
23 574
16
...
Brought forward......
Diseases of the Digestive System,-
Contd.
Liver abscess
Fissure of the anus
Fistula in ano
Haemorrhoids
Hepatitis
Cirrhosis of liver
A
2
1
2
1
6
10
16
17
2
20
20
4
4
com
2
2
3
3
12
12
Carcinoma of liver
14
14
4
1
Jaundice
1
6
10
1
1
...
Cholecystitis
3
5
2
2
Peritonitis-acute general
1
...
...
...
...
...
Prolapse of rectum..
8
...
...
Ascites
Dilatation of stomach.
Gastroptosis
3
1
3
3
...
:
-
1
Pancreatitis, acute.
Inflammation of rectum.
Stricture of rectum
Umbilical fistula....
Duodenal ulcer
Duodenal catarrh
Rupture of liver
Rupture of intestine
...
Obstruction of intestines
Cholangitis...
Acute fatty degeneration of Liver.
Diseases due to Disorders of Nutrition
or of Metabolism :
Inanition ......
Diabetes mellitus
Scurvy....
Beri-beri
Gout
Prematurity
Diseases of the Male Organs of
Generation -
Epithelioma of Penis.
Phimosis
Stricture of urethra
Rupture of urethra....
...
...
...
:
...
1
2
4
:
1
1
100
...
1
:
...
...
2
...
4
::
1
1
1
...
59
3
3
...
:ད ེ
1
::
...
:
:ངས
:-2
Carried forward...... 93
60
3
: 8*
.:.
...
...
...
...
2
...
10.

...
1
1
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
::
2
1
...
::
...
::
...
I
1
4
::
...
20
1
6
23 6
:*::
4
: : :
4
...
....
2,678 297 2,771
90
6 221
6
227 7
4

1
1
...
***
...
...
1
2
...
...
...
24
1
4
:+
::
...
10 617
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
***

...
...
...
...
24
1
:::ཀ::
4
...
1
!

***
26
627
17
Nomenclature.
Brought forward.......
Diseases of the Male Organs of
Generation, Contd.
M (1) 65-
Table I,-(Continued).
Diseases and Deaths in 1927 at the Civil, Victoria, and Kowloon Hospitals.
CIVIL HOSPITAL.
VICTORIA HOSPITAL.
Remain-
ing in
Hospital
on 31st
Yearly Total. Total
Dec., 1926.
Admis-
sions.
Cases
Treated.
Remain-
ing in
Hospital
Deaths.
on 31st [Dec., 1927. Dec. 1926.
Remain-
ing in
Hospital
on 31st
Yearly Total. Total
Admis-
sions.
Deaths,
Cases
[Treated.
Remain-
ing in
Hospital
Remain-
ing in
Hospital
on 31st
on 31st
Dec., 1927, Dec., 1926.
Admis-
sions.
Deaths.
KOWLOON HOSPITAL.
Yearly Total. Total
ing in
Hospital
on 31st
Dec., 1927.
Remain-
Cases
Treated
932,678 297
2,771
90
6
221
227
10
617
26
627
17
Prostatitis
1
Soft Sore
31
31
Prostatic hypertrophy
1
I
Hydrocele
11
11
...
Orchitis
41
41
1
1
3
co:
...
...
...
I
1
3
6
Epididymitis
Urethritis
Diseases of the Female Organs of
Generation :-
Cancer of Breast
Adenoma of Breast
Ovarian cyst
4
4
1
: :
2
10
12
3
Vaginitis
Endometritis
Vaginal fistula
Amenorrhoea
Dysmenorrhoea
3
...
Menorrhagia
Abortion
I
1
2
16
16
1
...
Puerperal Septicaemia
}
1
I
...
Mastitis
8
8
Prolapse of uterus
Post partum hæmorrhage
Retroversion of uterus
1
1
2
:
6
1
...
:::
::
...
...
: : : :
...
2
...
::
N:
2
...
...
...
...
...
Ι
...
...
7
2
3
3
...
1
1
...
...
Parturition
Fibroid of uterus.
Pregnancy
Laceration of Cevix
6
...
7
2
1
62
2
6
63
2
4
4
I
I
1
...
1
2
...
1
1
...
...
...
Perforation of Uterus
..
1
I
:
:
...
Adherent placenta

Rupture of perineum
4
...
Salpingitis
25
25
I
Cancer of uterus
6
1
6
...
3
3
1
1
::
2

>>
Ovary
4
4
...
...
::
::
::
Discases of the Organs of
Locomotion :—
Osteitis
10
11
1
Ankylosis of joints
2
2
1
2 -
1
...
...
2
21
...
1
161
...
::
***
Carried forward.......
100 | 2,893
303
2,993
101
7
323
8
330
629
27
640
17
...
Nomenclature.
Total
Hospital
Cases
Remain- ing in Hospital
M (1) 66-
Table 1,- Continued
Diseases and Deaths in 1927 at the Civil, Victoria, and Kowloon Hospitals.
CIVIL HOSPITAL.
Remain Yearly Total.
ing in
VICTORIA HOSPITAL.
KOWLOON HOSPITAL.
Remain- Yearly Total.
ing in
Total
on 31st Admis- Dec., 1926. sions.
Deaths. Treated.
on 31st
Hospital on 31st Dec., 1927. Dec., 1926.
Cases
Admis- sions.
Deaths. Treated
Remain- ing in Hospital on 31st
Admis- on 31st Dec., 1927, Dec., 1926 sions.
Remain Yearly Total.
Total
ing in
Hospital
Deaths.
Cases Treated.
Remain- ing in
Hospital
on 31st
Dec., 1927.
100 2,893
3032,993
101
7
323
8
330
11
11
629
27
610
17
Brought forward.......
Diseases of the Organs of
Locomotion,-Continued:- Osteo-Myelitis.....
4
9
1
13
Synovitis..
16
16
Myalgia
0700
1
19
20
Lumbago......
5
5
Rheumatoid arthritis
4
34
38
2
Arthritis
7
8
3
...
7
19
3
26
4
...
Bursitis
Tuberculosis of joints Ingrowing toe nail.. Periostitis
Diseases of the Areolar tissue:-
Cellulitis
Abscess
Carbuncle
Gangrene...
Diseases of the Skin:-
Lupus
Melanotic Sarcoma.
Boils.......
Urticaria
Eczema
Impetigo
Tinea
Scabies
Lichen
Herpes
Psoriasis
Ulcer
::
18
3
:~ : ~
1
122
8
Dermatitis
Diseases of the Urinary Organs :-
Nephritis, Acute......
: :
1
1
::
21
201
::
::
...
...
1
2
18
125
8
...
12
ལུམ :
2
: : :
2
2
::
:
1
43
9
4
9
2
: ༠ 2 ཡ རྞ དྨ
+
1
44
4
10
4
MENDAGOAZAR
:
...
...
:
1
...
4
4
1
5
...
1
1
100
2
::
2
2
උය 10
3
...
4
ة
1
...
:
...
10
5
1
: :
1
...
LO Q
5
2
2
2
3
3
::
10 1-6
575
:
:
11
11
...
2
2
1
1
1
}
1

2
Chronic
Cystitis
1
15
1
43
1
10
Haematuria
Enuresis
109 4
9-
:
16
44
6
11
1
Chyluria
Retention of urine
1
Calculus
3
23
26
Carried forward....... 133 3,377 332 3,510
129
9
343
00
:
:::
...
9
1
1
:
...
~!
:
9
...
2
2
362
12
698 28
710
22
:
Nomenclature.
Brought forward..
Disenses of the Urinary Organs, -
Contd.
M (1) 67
Table I,-(Continued).
Discuses and Deaths in 1927 at the Civil, Victoria, and Kowloon Hospitals.
CIVIL HOSPITAL.
VICTORIA HOSPITAL.
KOWLOON HOSPITAL.
Remain-
ing in
Hospital on 31st Admis- Dec., 1926. sions.
Yearly Total.
Total
Cases
Remain-
ing in
Hospital
Deaths.
Treated.
on 31st
Remain-
ing in
Hospital
on 31st
Yearly Total.
Remain-
Remain-
Total
Cases
ing in
ing in Yearly Total. Total
Hospital Hospital
Dec., 1927. Dec., 1926.
Admis-
sions,
Deaths,
Treated.
on 31st Dec., 1927. Dec., 1926.]
on 31st
Admis-
sions.
Deaths.
Cases
Treated.
Remain-
ing in
Hospital
on 31st
Dec., 1927.
133 3,377 332
3,510 129
9
343
352
11
12
698
28
710
22
Alcoholism
Local Injuries:-
Septic
A brasion
Hydronephrosis
1
Pyelitis
...
Rupture of Kidney.
General Injuries:-
Burns
4
48
Scalds
1
19
Multiple Injuries
19
Immersion
33
39
:::
: :
1
...
1
1
...
2
3271
:
52
20
19
33
39
22288
I
1
...
1
...
+297
1
1
4
...
...
4291:
...
1
...
...
::
LO
5
96
101
3
...
:
53
53
Wounds, Incised.
3
114
117

Contused
1
111
115
>>
Lacerated
155
156
4
2
""
Stab..
14
20
1
...
...
"
Gun shot.
23
2
23
3
Sprain
23
23
Fracture-
Skull..
I
34
26
35
>>
Jaw, lower
3
>>
Jaw, upper
2
::
...
...
1
1
1
32
33
23
23
3
41
44
2
22
1
22
2
Ι
23
24
8
8
10
1
10
2
7
11
11
1
...
""
Spine....
1
...
...
""
::
>>
Ribs
Clavicle.
Scapula
Humerus
Radins
10
10
...
...
...
...
3
1
1
...
I
...
...
1
15
2
16
18
2
Ulna
8
...
1
1
1
...
1
1
1
1
3
4
"}
and Radius
:
3
}}
-
">
Pelvis
9
1
"9
Femur
10
23
33
3
""
Tibia
4
12
16
6
...
...
...
Fibula
2
10
12
...
2
1372
1
...
...
...
4
1
Patella
6
6
...
...
,,
Tibia and Fibula
21
4
21
2
::
...
2
...
Carried forward...... 179
4,313 390
4,492
163
350
8
359
11
23 917
43
940
30
Nomenclature.
Remain- Yearly Total.
ing in
Total
Hospital
Cases
on 31st
Dec., 1926.
Admis- sions.
Deaths. Treated,

Remain- Remain Yearly Total. ing in
ing in Hospital Hospital on 31st
on 31st Dec., 1927. Dec., 1926.
- M (1) 68-
Table I,- Continued
Diseases and Deaths in 1927 at the Civil, Victoria, and Kowloon Hospitals.
CIVIL HOSPITAL.
KOWLOON HOSPITAL.
Remain-Yearly Total.
VICTORIA HOSPITAL.
Total
Cases
Admis- sions.
Deaths. Treated.
Remain- ing in Hospital Hospital on 31st on 31st Admis- Dec., 1927. Dec,, 1926.j sions.
Total
ing in
Deaths.
Cases Treated.
Remain- ing in
Hospital on 31st Dec., 1927.
4,492
163
9 350
8
359
11
223
917
43
3333
940
30
Brought forward...... 179 4,313 390
Local Injuries,-Contd.
Fracture-Phalanges.....
10
5
1
Nasal bone
Debility
...
Marasmus
...
:
6
1
22
22
...
4
2
4
...
1
8
8
4
51
6
55
3
1
3
21
1
24
1
2
40
14
40
1
1
1
1
16
...
...
...
6414
1
16
...
...
1
4
5
4
...
***
Dislocations
Tumours and Cysts. Malformations
Poisons-Opium........
وو
Kerosene
Eucalyptus......
Datura & Belladonna...
Ammonia
92
""
Lysol
""
Ptomaine
"2
Lead
29
""
5
Caustic soda
Sulphuric Acid
Strychnine
Animal Parasites-Ascaris lum-
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
bricoides...
1
23
Ankylostoma
19
223
duodenale...
2
4
Tænia solium
1967
2
24
...
:
""
Filaria
"1
bancrofti
Clonorchiasis
N. A. D.....
In attendance
Under Observation...........
Electric shock......
Dog bite
...
1
1
...
1
...
***
...
...
2
2
...
3
3
ලද
1
...
2
2
1
22
22
2
40
42
3
10
2
42
44
1
4
4
...
44
ང་
41
Miscellaneous
Malingering
...
...
:..
:
TOTAL.....
196
4,698 416 4,891 173
9 367
...
10 4
3
...
00
8
386
...
1393
5
1
...
1
223
...
1
1
5
2
:
2
...
:
1
1
16
16
5
957
44 980
...
3223
M (1) 69
RETURN OF DISEASES AND DEATHS IN 1927 AT THE TUNG WAH HOSPITAL.
'Diseases.
Remain- ing in Hospital at end of
1926.
Yearly Total.
Admis- sions
Remain- ing in Hospital
Remarks.
Deaths. at end of
1927.
Chicken-pox
Diphtheria
Dysentery
Enteric fever
Erysipelas
Gonococcal infection
Influenza..
Malaria
\ easles
26
5
4
6
143
38
...
39
22
1
3
58
2
137
18
6
168
17
2
34
21
1
Mycotic infection
Pyogenic infection
Pyrexia of uncertain origin.
Rheumatism, acute...
Syphilis
3
27
827
108
161
1
00
347
8
Tetanus
:
14
14
: : : :
46
23
Tuberculosis:-(a) miliary
39
39
(b) pulmonary
41
687
256
64
Diseases of the Nervous System
52
""
Circulatory System...
Respiratory
48
"
Urinary
79
Alimentary Locomotory
22
19
وو
39
Lymphatic
~~*ENON
576
129
48
2
108
31
3
822
296
67
17
381
124
29
768
194
46
108
12
76
21
""
""
""
多肉
Blood.......
Male generative organs
Female
Ductless glands..........
6
1
82
Co
3
""
བྱརྒྱས
64
18
درم 00
3
1
2
...
Skin
146
";
Skin (ulceration and
gangrene)
40
561
40
38
""
Eye
11
212
17
""
Ear, Nose, and Throat Mind
16
4
Disorders of Nutrition and
Metabolism.
(a) Inauition
(b) Diabetes mellitus..
(c) Beri-beri
Injuries
New Growths and cysts Congenital deformities
Animal parasites
Chronic Opium poisoning Destitution
Senility
Partarition
Miscellaneous
TOTAL...
::
16
16
1
...
::
36
118
76
4
17
346
98
38
39
19
2
...
:
108
ลง
2
...
23
243
181
20
62
8
208
187
13
Il
1,526
5
8

23
...
433
9,293
1,976
480
W
M (1) 70-
DISEASES AND DEATHS IN 1927 SHOWING THE ADMISSIONS AND MORTALITY IN THE KWONG WAH HOSPITAL WITH THE PROPORTION OF CASES TREATED BY EUROPEAN AND CHINESE METHODS RESPECTIVELY.
Remaining in Hospital at
ADMISSIONS.
DEATHS.
the end of
DISEASES.
Dec.
Dec. 1926 1927
European
Treatment.
Chinese
Treatment.
Total.
European
Treatment.
Chinese
Treatment.
Total
GENERAL.
Measles
Mumps
Diphtheria
Typhoid Fever
Septicaemia
10
1
23
:
3
2222+
10
સાં
61
2
...
1
24
17
6
2
I CO
1
4
Tetanus...
Influenza
Cerebro-Spinal Fever
Small-pox
Plague
O
13
13

18
28
46
со
18
+
6
8
2
8
11
1
1
1
7
2
9
1
Dysentery
4
53
43
Beri Beri
40
40
260
300
560
Leprosy.
889
96
105
225
22
11 33
83 188
2
...
Malarial Fever:
(a) Benign Tertain
14
6
185
118
303
62
19
(b) Malignant
7
178
94
272
81
21 105
(c) Malarial Cachexia
...
Syphilis (a) Acquired
56
2
58
31
1
းးး
81
32
Gonorrhoea
1
...
:
Rheumatism.
New growth:
(a) Malignant
(b) Benign
Anaemia
Senility.
Tuberculosis :
6
69
52
121
3
9
N
14
1
27
1
1
3
8
5
13
3
(a) Pulmonary
(b) Generalised
(c) Adenitis
Diseases of Nervous System
(I) Organic:--
Diseases of the Nerves
Meninges, brain and cord
1
7
74
9
83 29
5
31
(II) Functional :-
Mental Diseases
16
277
154
431
44
6
20
1:|:1 ཚོ ཚེ
6
6
27
3
4
7
194
80
474
50
27
3
30
20
4
Diseases of Eye
Diseases of Ear, Nose, and Throat..
Diseases of Circulatory System :-
(a) Diseases of Heart
(b)
""
Artery.
Diseases of Respiratory System : (a) Diseases of Bronchi
::
(b)
""
(c)
Pleurae
,, Lung
Diseases of Digestive System-
(a) Diseases of Gastro-intestinal
tract
Liver
(b) Diseases of Urinary System :-
(a) Diseases of Kidney
8
17
(b)
,, Urinary Passages
2
Diseases of the Thyroid Glands
Diseases of the Generative System:-
(a) Male
(b) Female......
Diseases of Bones and Joints.
:
1
1
I
2
2
the Cellular Tissue
29
48 379
17
Skin
1
""
""
Injuries
Effects of Heat or Cold
Poisons :-
(a) Acute Poisoning (b) Opium Habit
Parasites, Intestinal,
Labour Immersion
25
2
2
3:ག
3
ون
GO GA
36
22
WN
2 38
25
1
24
30
15
6
21
9
1
10
5
1
6
6
9
179
154
92
46
138
4
554
665
424
74
498
,
8
13
620
202
822
9
1
838388
343
10
741
417
8
13
163
100
263 89
34
123
46
4 50
10
1
11
.:.
:
35
1
36
56
1
57
30
9
39
24 403
20
1
21
23 334 160
494
43
43
21
21
K
c༠=་ ིིbs
2
2
...
13
13
4
4
29
GO
32
16
:
:
21
3
4
:.
:
:
4
16
2
18
20
20
22
1,834 16
1,834
1
16
1
Total....
193
259 5,796 1,604 7,400 1,667
494 2,161
M (1) 71-
PUBLIC MORTUARY, EXAMINATIONS.
ROPORT ON POST MORTEM EXAMINATIONS.
Number of post-mortem examinations performed
3,816
Male bodies examined
1,784
Female bodies examined
2,032
Claimed bodies sent from hospitals, &c.
3,276
Unclaimed bodies mostly abandoned
Number of Chinese bodies examined
540
3,807
""
European Japanese
1}
17
Eurasian
""
""
Annamite
""
4
3
11
1
1
Total
3,816
Victoria District sent
3791
Chinese
2 European
3 Japanese
1 Annamite
3797
Harbour Police sent
6 Chinese 2 European
Shaukiwan District sent
8
1 European
10 Chinese
| |
11
M (1) 72
EPITOME OF CAUSES OF DEATH.
I. Local diseases :-
(a) of the Nervous System
(b)
""
Circulatory System
(c)
Respiratory System
21
Digestive System
Genito-urinary System
"
Diseases caused by infection
(d)
(e)
(f)
""
(g) of diseases due to disordered metabolism... · (h) Of Conditions affecting child as a result of
36
19
2,788
373
7
187
92
68
123
mechanical causes
(i) of diseases of the blood
(j)
""
(k)
>"
skin lymphatics
11
(1) Malformations
1
(m) Too decomposed for diagnosis
10
II. Deaths from Violence :---
(a) General
(b) Local
III. Specific Infection
I. LOCAL DISEASES
(a) of the Nervous System:-
Purulent Meningocele Tuberculous Meningitis
Pneumococcal Meningitis
Cerebro-spinal Meningitis
(b) Of the Circulatory System :-
Arteriosclerosis
Aortitis
Aneurysm of heart
Ruptured aneurysm of Aorta
Chronic Valvular disease of the Heart
Atheroma of Coronary Artery
24
53
77
24
1
24
36
2
1
8
4
1
19
M (1) 73
(c) Of the Respiratory System :
Acute Bronchitis
Broncho-pneumonia
Pleuro-pneumonia
Lobar Pneumonia
Tuberculous broncho-pneumonia
Pulmonary Tuberculosis
Empyema
Congenital Atelectasis
Abscess of Lung
Fibroid Phthisis
(d) Of the Digestive System: —
Acute enteritis
Beri-beri (of alimentary origin)
663
1,099
495
12
98
209
100
10
1
1
2,788
86 79
3
888
68
1
1
40
Acute intussusception
Jaundice (Simple)
Peritonitis
Perforated Gastric Ulcer
Generalized tuberculosis)
Perforated Duodenal Ulcer
Tuberculous enteritis (often associated with
Sarcoma of Liver
Acute intestinal obstruction
Amyloid diseases (of alimentary tract origin) Perforated Colon
Acute Haemorrhagic Pancreatitis
Acute (Perforated) Appendicitis
Marasmus of alimentary origin
1223 12
80
373
1
1
Interstitial
(e) Of the Genito-Urinary System:
Chronic Parenchymatous Nephritis Chronic Interstitial Nephritis Hydronephrosis with Chronic
Nephritis
Acute Parenchymatous Nephritis Nephrolithiasis
122
7
M (1) 74-
(f) Of the diseases caused by Infection :
Small Pox
Haemorrhagic Small Pox
Typhoid (enteric) Fever
Diphtheria
Generalized Tuberculosis
Streptococcal Septicaemia
Staphylococcal Pyaemia
Syphilis
(g) Of the diseases due to disordered metabolism :
Henoch's Purpura (of metabolic origin)
Immaturity
Malnutrition
68
1
52
2
46
1
2
15
187
1
21
70
92
(h) Of conditions affecting the child as a result of mechani- cal causes: -
Still birth
(i) Of diseases of the blood:-
Pernicious Anaemia Malaria
Acute Miliary Tuberculosis. Pneumococcal Septicaemia Secondary syphilis
(k) Of diseases of the lymphatics:-
Tuberculous adenitis
(1) Malformations:-
Congential Pyloric stenosis
68
1
42
40
36
4
123
11
(m) Too decomposed for diagnosis
10
M (1) 75 ·
II. Deaths from Violence :-
Multiple injuries
Hanging
Strangulation
Throttling
Burns
Buried by earth
Ruptured bladder & fractured pelvis Fractured spine
Fractured skull
Air embolism (result of stab wound) Drowning
Ruptured Liver
Ruptured Spleen
Ruptured heart
Cut throat
Stab wound abdomen
Bullet wound through brain Bullet wound through heart Electrocution
4
11
ลงคร
1
2
21
1
12
1
4
1
1
1
1
1 6
77
Number of rats examined
99,990
Number of rats found plague infected
Nil.
PUBLIC MORTUARY, KOWLOON.
REPORT ON POST MORTEM EXAMINATION.
1927.
1926.
Male bodies examined,
1,408
1,168
Female bodies examined,
872
652
Sex Unknown (Decomposed),
17
Total,
2,286
1,837
Claimed bodies,
1,402
288
Unclaimed bodies,
884 1,549
Total,
2,286
1,837
M (1) 76
Infantile Mortality:-3 years and under,
Males,
Females,
Of these 128 died from Enteritis.
1927.
1926.
1,608
905
703
324
Capillary Bronchitis &
Broncho Pneumonia.
Bodies from the Peninsula,
2,071
1,620
Bodies from the Harbour,
215
217
Total,
2,286
1,837
Nationalities:
European,
Indian,
Eurasian,
Chinese,
Unknown,
2
2
2,262
1,830
13
Total,
2,286
1,837
EPITOME OF CAUSE OF DEATH.
I.-Local Diseases:·
(a) Nervous System,
11
8
(b) Circulatory System,
142
31
(c) Respiratory System,
945
689
(d) Digestive System,
238
386
(e) Genito-urinary System,
40
14
(f) Diseases consequent upon Parturition:-
I. To the Mother,
71
99
II. To the Child,
165
(g) Infective Diseases,
394
234
(h) Diseases due to disordered Meta-
bolism and Nutrition,
23
77
(i) Other Diseases,
7
9
II.-Deaths from Violence:-
(a) General,
(b) Poisons,
(c) Local,
125
7
75
250
54
15
65
107
156
Total,
..
2,286
1,837
III.-Undiagnosed. (Decomposed),
M (1) 77
I.-(a) Nervous System:
Cerebral Haemorrhage,
Tubercular Meningitis, Meningitis
Epilepsy,
(b) Circulatory System:-
1927.
1926.
2
1
1
3
6
2
Total,
11
8
Acute pericarditis,
53
6
Suppurative pericarditis,
4
1
Endocarditis,
12
1
Valvular Disease of Heart,
5
13
Myocarditis,
8
Myocardial Degeneration,
25
5
Aortitis,
5
Arteriosclerosis,
4
Q
Congenital Heart Diseases:
I. Patent foramen ovale,
II. Other types,
2
Aneurysm,
1
Splenic Anaemia,
13
Haemophilia,
1
Acute dilatation,
1
Purpura,
3
Adherent Pericardium,
Total,
142
31
(c) Respiratory System:-
Acute Bronchitis,
6
31
Capillary Bronchitis,
110
Lobar Pneumonia,
183
81
Lobular Pneumonia,
328
456
Pleurisy-I. Tubercular,
45
II. With serious effusion,
23
4
Empyema,
39
19
Pulmonary Tuberculosis,
145
81
Bronchiectasis & purulent T. B.
Pneumonia,
47
3
Congenital atelectasis of lung,
19
14
Total,
945
689
Appendix N.
HONG KONG
REPORT ON THE BOTANICAL AND FORESTRY DEPARTMENT FOR THE YEAR 1927.
GENERAL REMARKS.
The weather throughout the whole year was unfavourable for gardening owing to the excessive rainfall which delayed planting and spoiled to a great extent the show of flowers on annuals and herbaceous plants; on the other hand forestry operations were much benefitted by wet conditions which pre- vailed up to about the third quarter of the year. The fourth quarter of the year was mild and dry and insect pests were in consequence very numerous.
The rainfall for the year was 120.12 inches in 176 days as against 96.77 inches on 162 days in 1926.
Typhoon signals were hoisted on seven occasions during the year and considerable damage was done to flowering and other trees in many parts of the Colony; the force of the exceptionally long gale which approached the Colony on August 20th was responsible for the major portion of the damage; in the Botanical Gardens the damage was fortunately comparatively slight.
GARDENS, PARKS AND GROUNDS.
Botanic Gardens.-Alterations to earth banks were under- taken in the immediate vicinity of the plant houses in the Old Garden, this and the rebuilding of a retaining wall enabled a much needed compound and water tank to be established.
A number of old paths which were originally made of Chunam and which were dangerous in wet weather were broken up and relaid with cement granite.
The plot on the west side of the fountain terrace was sown with seed of "Dhoob Grass", the seeds germinated freely and at the end of the year the grass was in fair condition although weaker than that obtained by laying turf.
A 15 year old tree of Cassia javanica flowered for the first time and produced a fine show of large pink blooms.
The total number of young trees and plants sold during the year was 1681.
N 2
The number of regular and casual visitors was noticeably larger, this was most probably due to the fact that a further number of the roads in the Colony are now open to motor traffic.
Government House Grounds.-The bamboo hedges on the north side of the grounds were repaired and extended.
Tennis lawns were given such attention as they required and the various grass banks were cleared of undergrowth re- gularly.
A small path was made in order to give access to the lower grounds from the north side of the house.
The interior of the house was decorated on June 3rd the occasion of the Birthday of His Majesty the King, other portions of the house were decorated as required, throughout the year.
Mountain Lodge Grounds.-A number of young specimens of Cupressus macrocarpa and Cunninghamia sinensis were plant- ed in various parts of the grounds, those in the higher and more exposed parts were damaged and in many cases killed by gales, those in the valley were doing well at the end of the year.
Amaryllis bulbs and Iris tectorum were planted alongside the stream and in sheltered spots in the valley.
On grassy slopes in various parts of the grounds seeds of Pinus Massoniana were sown in 2,250 sites.
Worn portions of the lawns were lifted and replaced with new turf, the whole turfed area was given a dressing of artificial
manure.
Colonial Cemetery.-The debris which was piled on various plots after the severe rainstorm of July 18th and 19th, 1926 was removed by the Public Works Department and the damaged areas were levelled and returfed, this has greatly improved the appearance of the lower portion of the cemetery.
A large number of the indigenous trees on the older terraces were removed in order to avoid damage to graves and head- stones.
The Eyrie Grounds.-A number of Cupressus macrocarpa, Pinus Massoniana and Hibiscus Lambertianus were planted on level areas.
N 3
The lawns were given heavy dressings of soil and vegetable ash and have much improved in consequence.
Blake Garden, West End Park, King's Park, Kowloon, Civil Hospital and Lunatic Asylum, Senior Officers' Quarters, Leighton Hill, Indian School, Sukunpo, Volunteer Headquarters, Helena May Institute, Statue Square, Victoria Hospital, Senior Officers' Quarters, Homestead, Government Pavilions and Villas, Royal Observatory and Kowloon Magistracy. The grounds of all the places mentioned were kept in order during the year, undesirable undergrowth was removed, storm damaged trees and shrubs were removed and replaced and grass lawns, banks, trees, shrubs and other plants were given such attention as they required.
HERBARIUM AND LIBRARY.
The interior of the building was treated by the Government Analyst on June 16th and 17th with Hydrocyanic gas in order to destroy the insects which cause so much destruction among the books and plant specimens, up to the end of the year no live insect was found in any part of the building.
Plant specimens of botanical interest and economic value were identified for local collectors and institutions in the Colony and elsewhere.
FORESTRY.
Formation of Pine Tree Plantations.-Increased areas were dealt with during the year, and the number of in situ sowings of seed of Pinus Massoniana amounted to 197,476 as against 70,500 in 1926. Not less than 5 seeds were sown in each site in order to allow for failure and damage by small animals and birds; the total weight of seed used in this method of re- afforestation was 115 pounds.
The areas dealt with were West Bay peninsula, Mount Collinson, Stanley Mound Catchwater, Tai Wo Po, Shek Li Pui reservoir area, Kowloon Tsai, hills adjoining Kowloon Bay. Castle Peak near the Police Station, Taipo Forestry Reserve and bare hills in the Peak District.
Other and more grassy areas where germination of seeds without preparation of sites may be expected were sown by the broadcast method, the total weight of seeds of Pinus Massoniana used in this work was 995 pounds; trials are now being made with Leucaena glauca and 129 pounds of seeds of this tree were used, experimental sowings were made with small lots of Pinus insularis, Cunninghamia sinensis, Acacia pennata and Acacia confusa.
Broad-leaved Trees Planted.-Small groups of the following trees were planted in the young Pine plantations and the more sheltered areas on the Island and in the New Territories, the major portion of such work being carried out in Taipo Forestry
N 4
Reserve, Tristania conferta, Aleurites Fordii, Acacia confusa, Cunninghamia sinensis, Pithecolobium Saman, Cinnamomum Camphora, Ginkgo biloba, Celtis sinensis and Glyptostrobus heterophyllus.
The planting of roadside trees for shade and decorative purposes was maintained and extended during the year, large number of trees were killed or damaged by the gale of August 20th and could not be replaced before the end of the year; the force of the gale did most damage between Castle Peak and Sheung Shui where many fine specimens of Melaleuca Leucaden- dron were destroyed.
Trees Felled.-Increased motor traffic necessitated the removal of a number of large shade trees from the sides of the motor roads.
Other felling was carried out in connection with the develop- ment of building sites, the formation of dairy farms and the leasing of the necessary grass growing areas adjoining the farms, extensions of cemeteries and work in connection with reservoir catchment areas.
Miscellaneous Planting.-Planting of shade and flowering trees, shrubs and creepers was carried on in large numbers of otherwise unused small open spaces in all parts of the Colony.
Undergrowth Clearing.-Anti-malarial clearing has now been extended to Taipo district where systematic removal of under- growth is carried out in the vicinity of houses and public build- ings, twice annually.
During the year the total areas cleared in connection with anti-malarial measures totalled 3,905,835 square feet, for other purposes such as surveys, training of nullahs and other public improvements the areas cleared amounted to 2,642,305 square
feet.
Insect Pests.-Pine Tree Caterpillars (Eutricha punctata) appeared in the Pine plantations in many parts of the Colony in March and were in evidence at the end of the year; serious damage was done to Pine trees during the month of June. Collection and burying of the caterpillars was commenced when there was no longer any hope of weather condition destroying the pest, the total amount collected and destroyed in all parts of the Colony was 14,637 pounds.
Protection from fire.-A total of 30 hill and plantation fires occurred during the year, no serious damage was done to any Government plantation but large numbers of wild trees on the slopes of Tai Mo Shan were destroyed. Little or no assistance in dealing with fires was given by village people living within short distances of the burnt areas; most of the fires appeared to be due to careless dropping of lighted tobacco or matches.
N 5
The wet days preceding the Tsing Ming and Chung Yeung festivals prevented the usual number of fires which break out in vicinity of isolated graves and cemeteries.
Fire barriers in plantations, in the vicinity of cemeteries and graves were cleared, the major portion of the work being completed before the end of the year.
A new fire barrier was made at West Bay in order to protect the young plantations which have been established there.
Forest Guards Service.-The total number of persons arrest- eu and charged with forestry offences during the year was 355, of these 300 were fined or imprisoned, 26 cautioned, 10 had ⋅ their bail estreated, 10 were discharged, 6 bound over in per- sonal bonds of $100 each and charges against 3 were withdrawn.
Full particulars of these cases are given in Tables I & II.
Fifteen persons who were convicted of a second and in some cases of a third or fourth forestry offence were banished. A number of the persons so dealt with lived entirely on the proceeds of timber and other thefts and their absence from the Colony has undoubtedly lessened the destruction of mature timber in the older plantations.
Chiefly as a result of penalties inflicted and warnings given in District Officers' Courts the amount of illicit felling of the larger indigenous trees in outlying districts was much less than during the past five years.
Efforts are still being made to stop the cutting of New Year Flower (Enkianthus quinqueflorus) and notices are now posted in all parts of the Colony for some weeks prior to Chinese New Year warning the villagers against destroying this flowering shrub; this and the fact that a plentiful supply is now brought down from Canton has had the effect of lessening the more serious wholesale cuttings but thefts of small quantities in the Wanchai Gap and Tytam districts were again numerous.
A Forest Guard was seriously assaulted by villagers from Chung Pak Long while on duty in the Pine plantations at Fan Ling the offenders were subsequently arrested and sentenced to terms of imprisonment.
Forestry Service Paths.-One new path leading from Stanley Gap to West Bay was made, all other paths were given such attention as they required.
Forestry Licences, New Territories.-Fees collected during the year amounted to $4,099.70 as against $4,888.74 in 1926.
*
N 6
AGRICULTURE ETC.
A general exhibit of foreign vegetables was staged at the first New Territories Agricultural Show which was held at Sheung Shui on November 7th and 8th.
More interest is now displayed in the cultivation of both foreign and native vegetables for local consumption, this is chiefly due to increased motor transport and the communication between the Hong Kong markets and the New Territories villages which was established during labour troubles and conse- quent shortage of fresh vegetables during 1925.
Inspection of Nursery Stock.-Eleven consignments of bulbs of Narcissus Tazetta were inspected during the year, of these four consignments totalling 57,106 bulbs were exported to United States of America and Honolulu; seven consignments totalling 177,840 bulbs were exported to Britain and British. Colonies.
Sinall consignments of fruits, dried legumes and vegetables were inspected before being exported to the Philippine Islands by local firms.
SEED COLLECTION.
Seeds of the following were collected for local use and for the purpose of exchange, Casuarina equisetifolia, Cunninghamia sinensis, Glyptostrobus heterophyllus, Leucaena glauca, Bauhinia variegata, Cassia fistula, Tristania conferta, Sterculia lanceolata, Ficus retusa, Callistemon lanceolata, Garcinia oblongifolia, Melia Azedarach, Callistemon rigidus, Cinnamomum Camphora, Poinciana regia, Aleurites Fordii, Aleurites montana, Aleurites triloba, Acacia pennata and Pinus Massoniana.
EXCHANGE OF SEEDS, &c.
The Department is indebted to the following donors of seeds, plants &c. The Curator, Lloyd Botanic Garden, Darjeeling; Director of Agriculture, Peradeniya; Superintendent, La Mortola, Ventimiglia, Italy; Director, Forestry Department, Sandakan; Botanic Gardens, Glasgow; Bureau of Forestry, Manila; Horto Botanico Tergestino, Trieste, Italy; Dr. A Gundersen (New York); Professor J. Balme (Mexico); Lt. Colonel E. D. Matthews; Mrs. R. M. Dyer and Messrs. J. F. Grose; C. H. Blason; M. J. Quist (Consul-General for the Netherlands); W. Dixson (Sydney); R. A. Nicholson, W. W. Hornell, and C. C. Nelson.
The following were the principal recipients. Director, Imperial Institute, England; Department of Agriculture, Peradeniya; Ministry of Agriculture, Horticultural Section, Giza (Mudiriya), Egypt; Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew; Senor Matheus d'Andrade (Azores); Sir Edward Stubbs (Jamaica);
- N 7
Director of Agriculture, Cape St. Mary, Colony of Gambia; Brother Barry Benedict; Secretary, Royal Hong Kong Golf Club; Father U. Galbiati; Lt. Colonel E. D. Matthews; Rev. W. W Rogers; Conservator of Forests, Medan, Sumatra; and Messrs. M. J. Quist (Consul-General for the Netherlands); H. G. Keith (Sandakan); F. G. Walsingham (U.S.A.); D. M. Damle (India); W. Y. Chun; R. H. Canibage (Australia); R. A. Nicholson; D. Chun; R. H. Cambage (Australia); R. A. Nicholson; D. Wilson; F. A. McClure (Canton); R. N. Parker (India); Chan Yuk Sang; W. Cradwick (Jamaica) and H. D. McLaren (N Wales).
REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE,
Statements of the Revenue collected by the Department and comparison of Revenue and Expenditure are given in Tables III and IV.
STAFF.
The Assistant Superintendent Mr. G. B. Twemlow proceed- ed on leave on April 2nd until the end of the year.
28th February, 1928.
H. GREEN,
Superintendent.
N 8
Table I.
FOREST GUARDS SERVICE OFFENCES.
11
Grass Bamboo stealing. cutting
Fern
stealing.
Wild
flower
stealing.
Digging
up tree
roots.
Soil
Turf Extract- ing stone. stealing.
lifting.
Damaging
Govern- grazing in
ment plantation. plantation.
Offering
Cattle
Seed
stealing.
Trespass
ing upon
plantation.
bribe to
Conspiring Assault on to bring
Forest
Forest
Guard.
a false
Guard.
charge.
ig.
REPORT OF :·
1
4
1
2
| -
1
7
8
2
6
1
5
1
N
2
1
1
1
8
1
4
2
1
212
100
2
77
19
10
2
118
10
22
1
6
N 8
Table I.
FOREST GUARDS SERVICE OFFENCES.
REPORT OF:-
Village or
District.
Pine tree Pine tree
Pine tree
Block.
Compartment. stealing.
branch
stealing.
needle
Barking
pine tree.
stealing.
Brush-
wood
stealing.
Grass Bamboo Fern cutting stealing, stealing.
Wild
flower
stealing.
Digging
Turf
E
up tree
roots.
lifting. in
Victoria
A.B.D.E.G.
3
2
8
1
1
Wongneichung
2
A.B.C.D.G.
6
1
10
Shaukiwan
B.D.E.F.
2
1
1
11
1
1
Tytam
C.
3
4
4
Stanley
A.B.F.
1
Ι
Aberdeen
6
A.B.D.
10
1
14
Pokfulam
Kowloon
Harbour Belt
A.C.D.E.F.G.
2
3
1
Cheungshawan
10
500
8
B.
21
5
1
9
A.B.C.D.
20
7
13
1
21
2
Kang Hau
11
New Territories.'
12
4
5
15
Total for 1927.
76
20
15
N
85
Total for 1926.
79
42
8
2
97
1855
8
2
2
1
1
1
6
4
2
1
Appendix 0.
REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF EDUCATION
FOR THE YEAR 1927.
Staff.
Summary of Contents.
Pupils in Government Schools.
British Schools.
English Teaching Government Schools (for other than
British Pupils).
Grant Schools.
Vernacular Schools.
The Technical Institute.
Board of Education.
Board of Examiners.
Health.
Revenue and Expenditur.
Annexes.
A.--Report of the Inspector of English Schools.
B.
C.-
Director, Technical Institute.
Inspector of Vernacular Schools, Urban
Districts and Rural Districts.
Tables.
I.-Board of Education. II.--Board of Examiners.
III.-Government Schools.
IV. Grant Schools.
V.-Amount of Fees Remitted to Free Scholars during
1927.
VI.-Chart shewing numbers in Schools 1901-1927.
VII.-University, External Examinations.
VIII.-Technical Institute.
IX-XIX.-Scholarship Accounts
0 2
1.-STAFF.
Mr. H. H. Beddow, Miss D. M. Jaques, Miss H. Gilmore, Miss D. S. Smith, Miss A. E. E. Steele, and Miss M. B. Watts joined the Staff on appointment from England.
At the end of the year the staff consisted of:
Inspectors
Sub-Inspectors
Teachers
British
Non-British
Total
Men
Women Men
Women
ลง
:.
3
10
5
...
8
8
27
51
140
32
250
Total......
29
51
151
32
263
Four Students-in-Training graduated at the University and were appointed to masterships in Government Schools.
One Educational Scholar graduated took up an appointment at a Grant-in-Aid School.
At the end of the year the number of University Trained Teachers Graduated on the staff was 19.
2.-PUPILS IN GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS.
Particulars and Statistics of the various Government Schools are given in Table III.
A.-British Schools.
A much-needed extension was made to Kowloon Junior School by the addition of a large double-room, capable of accommodating 40 pupils, and certain other improvements to the building were carried out.
Provision was made in 1928 Estimates for a no less needed extension to the Central British School.
The total number of pupils on roll at the 5 schools, Central British, Kowloon Junior, Peak, Quarry Bay and Victoria British, was 409. In 1926 it was 397.
0 3
B.-English-teaching Government Schools.
(for other than British pupils).
The total number of pupils on roll in December 1927 was 3,315, as against 2,852 in December 1926, 1,898 in December 1925 and 3,339 in December 1924.
In February King's College was taken over by the Military Authorities for use as an emergency hospital. The pupils were accommodated partly in Queen's College and partly in Ellis Kadoorie School. That the work of both these schools proceeded so smoothly and satisfactorily in spite of every difficulty is highly creditable to their Headmasters and Staffs.
At the end of the year King's College was restored to this department to be ready for the re-opening of school at the New Year.
A Committee of the Board of Education was appointed to consider the question of raising the fees in these schools, and its recommendations were accepted by the Board and afterwards by the Government.
The report of the Committee was printed as Sessional Paper No. 8 of 1927.
The only changes made were as follows:
Queen's College ...
and
Classes I to III Increase from
$60 to $96 per annum,
1928.
King's College
Queen's College and
King's College
Ellis Kadoorie School ]
Yaumati School
Wantsai School
Classes IV to VIII to remain
at $60 per annum.
Increase from $33 to $60 per
annum.
Belilios Public School Increase from $22 to $36 per
for Girls
Į
Ellis Kadoorie School |
annum.
for Indians
Increase from $22 to $24 per
{
annum.
Gap Road School
J
These changes were to come into force from January 1,
C.-Grant Schools.
The number of these schools was reduced by the removal of one which fell short of the required standard. The remaining schools for the most part did excellent work. Statistics are given in Table IV.
D.-Vernacular Schools.
Interest in the Government Vernacular Middle School, opened in 1926, was fully maintained. The site of the school- the old Saiyingpun School-is definitely bad but no other is at present available. Of the 5 students in the highest standard of the Middle School division, it is satisfactory to note that 4 were successful in the special final examination conducted by the Hong Kong University. This Examination which is open to other students as well as those of the Vernacular Middle School was inaugurated this year, and it is hoped that the successful candidates may, in the event of a Department of Chinese Studies coming into being at Hong Kong University, be accepted as having the qualifications necessary for admission into that Department.
The Vernacular Normal School for Women, in its quiet way, is one of the best in the Colony.
New and better quarters were found for it in Lee Garden Street, where it occupies 12 flats. With more room and an increased staff, its scope was extended to include a Third Year Normal Class. 132 pupils were on the roll, as compared with 113 in 1926 and 49 in 1925.
The number of private urban Vernacular schools was 590 and of pupils 31,010, as against 545 and 28,102 in 1926. About one-third of these, viz. 196 schools with 12,592 pupils, received Subsidies from Government totalling $88,100.
Rural Vernacular schools at the end of the year numbered 185 with 5,875 pupils, as against 191 and 4,890 in 1926.
More than half, viz. 101 schools with 3,462 pupils, received Subsidies from Government totalling $12,665.
There can be no doubt about the impetus given to Verna- cular schools in the last few years, and the old prejudice against simple readers and improved methods is happily far less marked.
E-Technical Institute.
The Technical Institute designed to supply instruction in various subjects for those desiring the opportunity of evening study, was well attended. Details are given in Table X.
0 5
3.-BOARD OF EDUCATION.
The Board met six times during the year.
Chev. J. M. Alves was re-appointed as from January 23.
Rev. Fr. Byrne, S.J., PH.D. was appointed as from February 28, vice Rt. Rev. Bishop Valtorta resigned.
Mr. B. Wylie was appointed as from May 20, vice Rev. G. R. Lindsay resigned.
Mr. A. el Arculli was re-appointed as from July 8.
I have to record with great regret the death of Dr. Wan Man Kai who was for many years a valued Member of the Board.
4.-BOARD OF EXAMINERS.
The Board met 19 times and held 7 Examinations of Hong Kong Cadets and Police Probationers, 9 Examinations of F. M. S. Cadets and Police Probationers, 15 Examinations of Sub- ordinate Officers under G.O. 115, 4 Examinations of Officers studying for Bonus under G.O. 120, 14 Examinations of Inter- preters and 2 Examinations of Translators.
In addition to this, Language Examinations of Police Officers and Gaol Warders were conducted by the Sub- Committee at the Police Headquarters every Tuesday afternoon.
5.-HEALTH.
The Medical Officer for Schools, Mrs. Minett, M.D., B.S., D.PH. did excellent work, and the following are extracts from her report:-
"This year, again, it was possible to inspect only the Entrant group.
Attention was given in more detail to the "Specials and Re-inspections"-group. This group consists of children noted by teachers as being subnormal in health, and those found during routine inspection to have defects. Defects of vision have been treated, as far as provision of spectacles goes, very satisfactorily. Other defects such as carious teeth; adenoids; enlarged tonsils; trachoma; scabies, etc.-have had less satisfactory treatment owing to the difficulty of securing continued attendance by pupils at the Government Civil Hospital or Chinese Public Dispensaries. Treatment clinics, for school children only, are much needed.
The numbers seen, etc. are best shown in tabular form. The Vernacular Middle School was added to the number of Government Schools and Entrants were inspected there; 23 out of 57 boys had some health defect.
6
1926
1927
Schools Inspected
16
18
Number examined (Entrants)
1104
1189
Defects found (Entrants)
407
426
Percentage of defect (Entrants Anglo Chinese
Schools)
38.8
39.1
41.0 37.5
756
Percentage of defect (Entrants, British Schools) Special cases and re-inspections
196
These figures show the need of remedial, and still more important, preventive, measures for this large percentage of defect.
Vision.-Vision tests were made for every pupil in Class 5 in the Central British and the senior Anglo-Chinese Schools. The percentage of serious defect found, particularly when com- pared with that found in the entrant group, makes a very serious showing.
School
B.P.S.
Q.C.
K.C.
E.K.S.
Class 5 33.3 38.9 17.8 22.9
W.T.
16.0
Y.M.T.
V.M.S.
C.B.S.
21.05 not exd. 12.5
Entrants 5.2 19.4 9.0 10.4 14.8 12.0 15.7 0.
The same rise during school life, in much less degree, was found years ago in England, before much attention was paid to lighting, desks, etc.-and girls were found to be worse than boys, probably on account of needlework often taking the place of boys' outdoor work.
Cases seen by Dr. Morrison in 1926.....258. in 1927.....215..
Provided with glasses
in 1926.....215. in 1927.....169.
Results have been excellent when Dr. Morrison's prescrip- tions have been used.
Grant Schools.-Premises have been inspected half-yearly and have in several cases improved greatly during the year, provision of playground space, drill rooms or sheds, and better arrangement of rooms and lavatories having been managed.
One grant school was thoroughly inspected, all its pupils having routine medical inspection. Opportunity was taken by the Headmistress to interest the elder girls in health matters, and some definite good has resulted in defects being noted and treatment sought.
A swimming-bath in St. Paul's Girls' School has been a great addition to the health equipment of the school and good use has been made of the provision.
Teaching of Hygiene. Student-teachers in training at the University have had a course of ten lectures on the hygiene of schools and scholars. Two practical demonstrations were well attended. The Technical Institute has given a First and Second year course in Hygiene, which is now a compulsory subject in each of the three years of training.
A course of six hygiene lectures was given at the Women's Vernacular Normal School.
Infectious Disease.-40 children were vaccinated in British Schools in spring, during a small-pox epidemic; and a large number were vaccinated by different units of the St. John Am- bulance Brigade.
Tuberculosis.-No special measures are taken for the pre- vention or treatment of consumption in this colony. It is possible in a few schools to note regularly the weight of children who seem subnormal, and this gives some index to the general condition if there seems to be predisposition to tuberculosis. Here again the school nurse's visits to a few homes have been useful.
Nutrition. From the data of inspection of over 600 town boys, and over 300 town girls in British and Government Anglo- Chinese Schools and one Grant-in-Aid School, we have made out a table of Heights and Weights, comparing by graph the various lines of development. Rather unexpectedly, British Children here are above the standard for their ages at home. Larger numbers are needed to verify these results, for it is pos- sible that the earlier development of young adolescents, both mental and physical, gives a high standard which is not kept up. The result of each year will be interesting.
Office work.-Records of children found defective, cases seen by Dr. Morrison, glasses prescribed, etc. are now systematically kept. One clerk has been attached to this sub-department and he and the School Nurse have done willing and useful work, which will gradually increase.
Arrangements for medical inspections, preparation of the cards, etc. have given extra work to all heads of schools and to many of the staff, and I should like to acknowledge gratefully the help that has been given. It may be recognised now that medical work in schools is necessary and ultimately helpful, but this does not prevent medical inspection, arranging for oculists' or hospital appointments, and record-keeping, from being an infliction on teachers who have already enough to do, and one is proportionately thankful to be welcomed instead of endured, in the schools.'
8
7.—REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE.
The only Revenue collected by this Department comes from school fees, which amounted in 1927 to $121,981.75 as against $109,464.75 in 1926.
The Expenditure
was $1,091,423.21 an increase of $181,360.12 over the previous year. These figures do not in- clude Expenditure on School Buildings or Furniture which are debited to Public Works.
The increase was mainly due to expenditure under Building and other Grants, Personal Emoluments, and Equipment of Schools.
29th March, 1928.
*
A. E. WOOD,
Director of Education.
3
Annexe A.
REPORT BY THE INSPECTOR OF ENGLISH SCHOOLS.
Government SCHOOLS.
(Table III)
Queen's College:-Head Master, Mr. A. H. Crook, M. A.
The Maximum Enrolment (including 192 from King's College) was 787 (537 in 1926).
The Average Attendance (including King's College) was 693 (452 in 1926).
There was a great demand for admission during the year, and nearly 500 applicants had to be turned away.
All pupils in Class 1 take the Matriculation or the Senior Local and all in Class 2 take the Junior Local Examination of the Hong Kong University.
Class 4 pupils take the "Annual Class 4 Examination" held by the Education Department; Queen's College presented 59 boys of whom 31, or 52.2 per cent passed.
The following remarks are extracted from the Head Master's Report,-
Owing to the requirements of the Military, King's College was taken over as a hospital and accordingly seven classes from that College, comprising 192 scholars, were taken in here, making a total on the roll of 787. The year's sojourn with us of these classes from King's College passed very peacefully and prosperously. They competed more or less successfully in our sports competitions and examinations. We welcomed this all the more because in these matters a little healthy rivalry is some times beneficial.
Another small innovation which took place this year was the attendance of two classes (Junior and Matriculation), for Mathematical subjects, of girl students from the Belilios Public School. This, too, was due to exigencies of Staff distribution. The system came as near to co-education as these systems generally do, and seemed to work well. The girl students were such models of assiduity and application that teachers were naturally anything but averse to taking them.
0 10
The health of the school was good. The discipline and morale have been good; and in this connection I wish to thank the Perfects on whom so much depends and who performed their work so well.
As far as possible we distribute the sports over the various months of the year so that there may not be a surfeit of them all together.
The volley-ball and football competitions are always keenly contested. When I state that, in the volley-ball 25 teams and in the football 27 teams, competed for the inter-class shields you will see to what a large proportion of the school these games give healthy exercise.
Through the kindness of the Chinese Y.M.C.A. we were enabled to have our Swimming Sports again this year; the meeting was very successful. Earlier in the year on
a few holidays we had all-day bathing parties when upwards of 600 boys went out to bathe. Thanks to the kindness of the Military Authorities we were enabled to have ten good swimmers from the regiment with us each time who were always swimming about in the water in case of emergency. Fortunately there were no mishaps. These all-day picnics are an expensive item which cannot be indulged in frequently.
Our Annual running and jumping competitions took place in April in very good weather. A large contingent of the Members of the Q. C. Old Boys' Association and other old boys were present and added to the interest by competing in some of the events. The interest and appreciation which the past pupils show in the activities of the present pupils is a greater stimulus almost than anything else in the work and sport of the school.
Another close and very important link is the school magazine. It has had a very successful year.
But after all, the chief work of a school is the developing of boys in mind and the moulding of their characters so as to fit them for the occupations of their after years. We have carried through the year's work steadily and on the whole well. The standard of work as judged by examinations seems to be getting slightly harder. The actual courses of work done are systematic, broad, and helpful.
Boys are coming to us younger than they used to do. The Director of Education has demanded that in future the limit of age to Class 8 be made a year younger still.
In the lower school 375 were examined and of these 303 or 80.5% passed. In Class 3 we examined 174 boys, and of these 93 or 53.5% passed,
Ŏ 11
B
}
In the previous year the percentage of passes in the lower school and upper school were respectively 85% and 57%. This year
for the Junior Local Examination we presented 108 students. Of these 45 passed or 42%, gaining 50 distinctions. Of these students 67 were Q. C. boys of whom 36 passed, or 53%, gaining 44 distinctions. (Last year 51 entered for the Junior and 22 passed, or 43%, gaining 8 distinctions.) Forty- one boys were from King's College Classes. Of these 9 passed or 22%, with six distinctions.
For the Senior Local and Matriculation Examinations we presented 30 boys. Of these 24 passed, or 80%. Twelve of these were in the Matriculation and 12 in the Senior Local, with 8 distinctions and one boy in the honours list. Last year we presented 28 boys of whom 20 passed or 71%.
We are pleased to see that among those whom the Univer- sity has honoured this year are some of our former pupils. The Ho Fook Scholarship at the University which is the award to the best student in the Arts Course, 2nd Year, has been awarded to our Senior Morris Scholar of two years ago. And in the 3rd Year at the University the Chan Kai-ming Scholarship which is the award to the best student in the 3rd Year, Arts Course, has been awarded to a Senior Morrison Scholar of three years ago. These results are very gratifying.
King's College: -Head Master, Mr. A. Morris, A.C.P.
The Maximum Enrolment (January only) was 644.
The Average Attendance (January only) was 628.
The College began the year well with 644 pupils in January, but during the Chinese New Year Holidays the building was handed over to the Military. Boys in Classes 8 to 5 (inclusive) were transferred temporarily to the Ellis Kadoorie School and the remainder to Queen's College.
The Head Master, Mr. A. Morris, was transferred to the Education Office where he gave welcome and valuable assistance and Mrs. Morris to the Victoria British School where she very ably took the place of the Head Mistress, Mrs. Clark, who was on leave. The remaining Members of the Staff were transferred with their Classes to Queen's College or the Ellis Kadoorie School.
This arrangement continued until 31st December. Reports upon Queen's College and the Ellis Kadoorie School contain references to this arrangement.
O 12..
Ellis Kadoorie School:-Head Master, Mr. F. J. de Rome B.Sc.
The Maximum Enrolment (including 400 from King's College) was 883 (423 in 1926).
The Average Attendance (including King's College) was 755. (398 in 1926).
At the Annual Examination for Class 4, of 45 boys examined 37 passed.
In the other classes 599 passed out of 689 examined.
The year has been very satisfactory, as regards both school work and games, and the school generally is making steady progress.
Former pupils continue to do well; several have recently graduated at the Hong Kong University.
Like Queen's College, this school was called on to accommo- date a number of boys from King's College, over 400 boys being thus transferred.
The following extracts are from the Head Master's Report,-
"Within the last two years many improvements have been effected in the amenities of the building: the sanitary arrange- ments have been much improved both for boys and staff: the hitherto open class rooms on the top floor have been enclosed: electric light and overhead fans have been installed throughout :
The Libraries have been kept in splendid condition in spite of heavy usage. The English Library for boys consists of 700 volumes, all within the compass of a school boy and graded ac- cording to class: it is used entirely for Silent Reading Lessons in school hours and many boys read through 9 or 10 books in the course of the year. This is bound to have a great effect event- ually on the boys' knowledge of English and moreover induces the habit of reading which is really one of the functions of a school. The Chinese Library of 1200 volumes is much used for home reading. A Teachers' Library was initiated two years ago and now boasts 600 volumes, grouped under various teaching subjects: new volumes are added every few months and I am glad to say the Library is largely availed of by the staff.
Many new maps, charts, pictures and local photographs have been added recently: also much apparatus for the teaching of Arithmetic and Object Lessons.
The elaborate Half-Yearly Examination in all subjects has been abolished as unnecessary and taking up far too much time: the Head Master's periodical tests throughout the year in Arithmetic, Dictation, Composition and Stories have been sub- stituted, and in future will be counted towards prizes. All boys
;
2
O 13
in the school get many hours of teaching per week from a European Master or Mistress: this will have a very beneficial effect in the long run from many points of view.
Script writing was introduced in the lowest classes two years ago and there has been a marked improvement in the hand- writing.
Games, Drill, Excursions by launch, train and motor-bus, Swimming and Educational Walks are an essential part of our curriculum and I find that time allowed off during the afternoons in which to play Volley Ball Competitions, Football at Cause- way Bay, to swim at Kennedy Town, to explore the island and the New Territories in connection with Geography lessons, to visit the reservoirs, industrial undertakings, etc. does not react unfavourably on the work in school:
The Medical Officer for Schools visited the school on many occasions and, apart from many defects in eyesight, reported favourably both on the boys and school premises. Over 700 boys were vaccinated at the school in March.
The Boy Scouts (6th Troop) is not a very flourishing organisation it is difficult to get boys to join. At Tsing Ming they had a camp at Sai Wan.
I note with great satisfaction that the maximum age for admission to Class 8 has been reduced to 13.
I feel that 8 years in the schools of Hong Kong and 5 or 6 years subsequently at the University would so stamp or mould boys as to leave permanent marks: this would redound to the credit of Hong Kong and to the advantage of China-boys with discipline, ideals, and a desire to remember that character and service and not self-interest are the highest things in life.
Yaumati School:-Head Master, Mr. A. O. Brawn.
The Maximum Enrolment was 280 (257 in 1926).
The Average Attendance was 247 (246 in 1926).
At the Annual Examination 91% passed.
At the Annual Class 4 Examination 38 passed out of 41 examined,-92.7% a distinct improvement on the previous year, when only 75% passed.
Former pupils continue to do well, several every year swelling the list of Queen's College successes.
The discipline and tone of the school continue very good.
Ở 14
The School Library is much used by the pupils.
Health has been good generally.
Sports are very popular and the new sports ground in King's
Park has been much used.
A very successful Sports' Meeting was held during the year. Wantsai School:-Head Master, Mr. R. J. Birbeck, M.A. The Maximum Enrolment was 210 (210 in 1926).
The Average Attendance was 197 (203 in 1926).
In the Annual Examination out of 190 examined 183 passed, while in the Annual Class 4 Examination 44 boys passed out of 47. Owing to the large number of boys promoted to Class 7 in this School from Gap Road, there was no Class 8 this year.
The English-Speaking Club in Class 4 continues to flourish and the Library has been extensively used. Discipline and health are satisfactory.
Interest in games is maintained and the Annual Sports' Meeting was held as in previous years.
The School won the Junior Basket Ball League, -a very satisfactory victory, con- sidering that the school was probably the smallest in the League.
Swimming is growing in popularity.
Gap Road School-Head Master, Mr. Lo Yuk Lun. The Maximum Enrolment was 143 (150 in 1926).
The Average Attendance was 132 (140 in 1926).
The year's work was very satisfactory. At the Annual Examination 132 boys were presented and 129 passed, the per- centage of passes being 98 as against 90 in 1926.
Discipline and health continue to be very good.
Football is played with enthusiasm during the winter months, notwithstanding the lack of a suitable playground, and during the summer several swimming picnics were held.
It is gratifying to report that pupils passing from this school to senior schools continue to do well; two recently passed the Matriculation Examination of the Hong Kong University.
Tai Po School: -Head Master, Mr. Fung So. The Maximum Enrolment was 68 (64 in 1926).
The Average Attendance was 57 (52 in 1926).
At the Annual Examination 50 boys passed out of 52 examined.
✪ 15
Pupils promoted from this school to senior schools continue to do creditable work, one passing the Matriculation Examination of the Hong Kong University in December.
Discipline and health were good. There were fewer cases of malaria than in previous years.
The pupils have shown increased interest in football in spite of the fact that the only ground on which they can play is a considerable distance from the school.
Un Long School:-Head Master, Mr. Lee King Shum. The Maximum Enrolment was 56 (58 in 1926).
The Average Attendance was 46 (43 in 1926).
At the Annual Examination 37 boys passed out of 39 examined.
Hand writing shews a considerable improvement, and all written work was neat. Map-drawing was very creditable.
Interest in Sports continues, and health has been good.
Ellis Kadoorie School for Indians :-Head Master, Mr. A. R. Sutherland, M.A.
The Maximum Enrolment was 114 (112 in 1926).
The Average Attendance was 107 (98 in 1926).
At the Annual Examination 100% again passed the Class 4 Examination, and in the remaining classes 92% passed, as against 88% last year.
Written and Colloquial work were good throughout; Hand- writing, at one time very bad, is now exceptionally good, as the result of the introduction of the Script style.
Urdu is well taught.
Discipline and health have been very good.
Physical Drill is taken by all Class Masters.
The School Garden is in a flourishing condition.
Keen interest continues to be taken by all boys in Cricket, Tennis and Football.
Cheung Chau School-Head Master, Mr. Hon Kau Fung. The Maximum Enrolment was 42 (68 in 1926).
The Average Attendance was 32 (59 in 1926).
O 16
The School is still carried on in temporary premises, pending the erection of a new building to replace that destroyed by a Typhoon in the previous year.
At the Annual Examination 24 boys, or 89% passed.
All written work was neatly done and the results of the year's work generally were very satisfactory.
Chinese studies continue to shew progress.
Health and discipline are very good. The Head Master reports "The manners and discipline of the boys have greatly improved, their language is polite and their behaviour is excel- lent".
The Annual Sports' Meeting was again successful and has become a popular institution in the Island.
The School is doing good work.
Belilios Public School-Head Mistress, Miss H. F. Skinner.
The Maximum Enrolment was 536 (575 in 1926).
The Average Attendance was 475 (493 in 1926).
During Miss Skinner's absence on Leave, from February to December, Miss Newsholme acted as Head Mistress with great
success.
At the Annual Examination satisfactory results were obtained; 329 pupils were promoted out of 432 examined. At the University Matriculation and Senior Local Examination in December 11 Candidates were presented; of these 4 pupils passed the Matriculation and 5 the Senior Local Certificates. At the Junior Local Examination 12 candidates were presented and 9 passed.
Drawing calls for special mention.
The pupils in Classes I and II went to Queen's College regularly for Mathematics; the Head Master of the College reported "the girl students were such models of assiduity and application that teachers were naturally anything but averse to taking them." Two Masters from Queen's College also assisted with the translation at the Belilios School.
A School Journal has been started under the able editorship of Miss Hughes; the first issue of the magazine styled "The Belilios School Journal" appeared during the year.
The Victoria Nursing Division of the St. John Ambulance Brigade continues to flourish, and has a total membership of 23.
A
0 17
First Aid Lectures were given by Dr. Minett, M.O.S., 14 took the Examination in July and 12 passed.
The Division attended the Annual Inspection by H. E. the Governor, and took charge of a Hospital Tent.
Members of the Division took duty on various public occasions during the course of the year. In April 124 women and children were vaccinated by them at the School and at the Young Women's Christian Association.
A Company of Girl Guides, "The B. P. S. Company, 3rð Hong Kong" was formed in January of this year. Interest is well maintained under the leadership of Mrs. Cressy and Miss Lopes. The Company has taken part in public functions during the year.
Mrs. Southorn, Commissioner for the Colony, has visited the School during the year.
BRITISH SCHOOLS.
There are 5 British Schools, 4 being Junior Schools and the fifth a first class Secondary School. All these schools are co-educational.
Among the special features of these schools are Drawing and Painting. The pupils are examined by the Royal Drawing Society and the following figures show the excellent results obtained this year,-
Number of pupils examined
22
Honours Certificates
Pass Certificates
165
67
67
Central British School-Head Master, Mr. G. F. Night- ingale.
Mr. Nightingale was absent on Leave for 8 months, his duties as Head Master being during this period very efficiently performed by the Rev. G. E. S. Upsdell, M. A.
The Maximum Enrolment was 180 (173 in 1926).
The Average Attendance was 130 (131 in 1926).
The School is very liberally equipped; there are good Chemistry and Physics Laboratories with a complete stock of apparatus and material required for the teaching of Chemistry, Heat, Light and Sound.
There is a well-trained and highly efficient staff.
L
O 18
The number of pupils is steadily increasing and the building is too small to accommodate those already in attendance. Additions to the building are now being made.
During the Summer Term there were cases of measles and during the autumn Term, of influenza, resulting in the lowering of the Average Attendance for the year. Otherwise the general health was good; indeed, the healthy appearance of the pupils has frequently been the subject of comment on the part of visitors.
Excellent results were obtained in the Hong Kong University Examinations. All pupils in Class 1 entered for the Matricula- tion and Senior Local Examinations, and all passed gaining 10 distinctions. For the first time in its history the school gained the King Edward VII Scholarship, being placed first on the list. The Government Education Scholarship for girls was also won. Two pupils were awarded Matriculation Honours with 5 distinctions, 2 passed the Matriculation with 2 distinctions, 1 gained Senior Local Honours with distinction in 2 subjects, and 1 passed the Senior Local Examination with distinction in one subject. Thus all gained at least one distinction. The Mortargis French Prize (Senior) was also won.
In Class 2, 20 pupils entered for the Junior Local Examina- tion and 13 passed, 12 distinctions were gained by six of these candidates. The Montargis French Prize (Junior) was also won.
The result of the Annual Examination in Classes 3-6 was satisfactory showing the good work that is being done. The most noticeable result was the advance made in the study of English in all Classes. In the University Examination 11 distinctions in this subject were awarded.
Drawing is again excellent throughout the School. At the Annual Examination of the Royal Drawing Society of 95 pre- sented 87 passed: 3 candidates, having gained "Honours" in all Divisions, were awarded "Full" certificates. The Overseas Prize, 1927, Division VI, was won by a candidate from this school.
In April the Annual School Sports were held at King's Park, nearly all the pupils competing. The Empire Day Picnic was held at Clear Water Bay. A special feature of the games was the number of matches with Service teams. The Bandsmen of the Queen's Regiment, and teams from the Submarines, H.M.S. Ambrose, the King's Own Scottish Borderers and the Amazons did much to improve the Hockey and Football, and to help the strong sporting spirit now so evident among the boys. Many inter-school matches were played. Tennis was very popular and the courts were in splendid condition. Interest in sport, at one time nearly absent, is now so great that fre- quently no less than three matches are in progress in one after- noon. The School grounds are in use almost daily.
I
O 19
Physical Instruction and Boxing Classes were held regularly during the cooler weather.
Interest in the Girl Guides is well maintained, the School Company this year winning the Prince of Wales' Banner.
The pupils continued their interest in the cause of charity, assisting in the sale of poppies on Armistice Day and at the Sale of Work of the Ministering Children's League.
Discipline is satisfactory; the tone of the School is good due, to a large extent, to the influence and example of the Prefects, and to the keen interest of the Staff in everything that pertains to the School.
The former Pupils' Association has held various gatherings of a social character during the year. The Water Polo Team again secured second place in the Annual League Competitions.
Victoria British School:-Head Mistress, Mrs. E. M. Clark,
The Maximum Enrolment was 62 (51 in 1926).
The Average Attendance was 48 (25 in 1926).
During a portion of the year Mrs. A. Morris acted with great success for Mrs. E. M. Clark, who was on Leave.
The School has made considerable progress. The 3 pupils eligible to do so entered the Class 7 Examination for promotion to the Central British School, and all passed.
Eight pupils entered for the Royal Drawing Society's Examination (Preparatory Division) and all passed with
Honours.
An epidemic of measles caused the school to be closed for a few days in February; otherwise the health of the pupils has been good.
Physical Exercises and Organized Games form part of the daily routine.
Kowloon Junior School:-Head Mistress, Miss Mary Cooper, B. A.
The Maximum Enrolment was 100 (104 in 1926).
The Average Attendance was 83 (88 in 1926).
Work generally was good; out of 18 children in Class 7, 12 qualified for admission to the Central British School.
+
L
O 20
At the Royal Drawing Society's Examination 27 pupils were presented of whom 14 passed in the Preparatory Division, 5 obtained honours, and 1 pupil passed in Division I.
A new Kindergarten Room has been built during the year, and additional lavatory accommodation provided.
Peak School-Head Mistress, Mrs. P. Y. Stark.
The Maximum Enrolment was 65 (57 in 1926).
The Average Attendance was 49 (56. in 1926).
Very satisfactory work continues to be done. Fourteen pupils were presented for the Royal Drawing Society's Examina- tion; of these 7 passed, 4 with "Honours".
Quarry Bay School:-Head Mistress, Miss G. M. Cotton.
The Maximum Enrolment was 44 (41 in 1926).
The Average Attendance was 38 (31 in 1926).
Very good work is being done.
At the Examination of pupils in Class 7 for admission to the Central British School 6 were examined and 4 passed. At the examination in Drawing 21 were presented, of whom 4 obtained honours and 3 passed,
The health of the pupils has been good; no case of infectious or contagious disease occurred during the year.
GRANT SCHOOLS.
There are eleven English Grant Schools as against twelve in 1926, one school having been removed from the Grant List as "inefficient".
The Maximum Enrolment was 3901.
The Average Attendance was 3446.
All these schools were visited and inspected during the year.
The work done is very satisfactory; the maximum Grant was awarded to each school.
As in previous years faults and' weaknesses, where noticed, were discussed with the Heads of the Schools concerned who ever shew themselves anxious to co-operate with the Education Department, and adopt any suggestions offered.
✪ 21
The chief weakness in all schools is inevitably the English Language, written and spoken, but a steady improvement is shewn.
+
As in Government Schools, all pupils in Classes 1 and 2— the highest Classes-in the Grant Schools are required to sit for the Examinations of the Hong Kong University.
The results are shewn in detail in Table VII.
Increased attention is being given to Hygiene, Physical Drill and Sports.
REPORT ON ENGLISH PRIVATE SCHOOLS, 1927.
Day Schools.-The total number of schools on the register at the end of December was 54 as against 46 in 1926; the number of students enrolled was, in round numbers 3000 as against 2000 in 1926.
During the year 18 new schools were registered, 8 closed and 2 disappeared without giving notice.
Of the existing schools eight are girls schools, and one is a kindergarten. The rest are boys' schools of which 3 prepare students for the University Local Examinations.
Night Schools.—There
were 60 schools in existence as against 89 in the previous year. During the year 17 new schools came into being and 23 closed and an equal number disappeared. The total number of students enrolled. was 1721 with an average attendance of 1308.
E. RALPHS,
Inspector of English Schools.
March 29, 1928.
O 22
Annexe B.
REPORT BY THE DIRECTOR OF THE TECHNICAL INSTITUTE, 1927.
(Table VIII.)
The Institute was open as usual during eight months of the year.
The number of students in attendance during the Session ending June 30th, was 620 against 460 in 1926.
In June and for Teachers' Classes in December-Examina- tions were conducted as in previous years by independent examiners. 245 Students were examined (173 in 1926); of these, a total of 128 students or 52% passed (71, or 41% in 1926). As remarked in my last Report the low percentage of passes is due to the high standard required throughout, but particularly in the Teachers' Classes, where it has again been raised. Gratifying reports continue to be received of the good work done in various Schools of the Colony by Teachers-Men and Women, English and Vernacular-who have been trained in these Classes. At the December examination, of 37 Teachers examined in the "English" Teachers' Classes, 22 passed; in the "Vernacular" Classes 112 Teachers were examined and 39 passed. Final "Teachers' Certificates" were gained by 6 men and 3 women in the "English" Teachers' Classes and, by 4 women in the "Vernacular" Teachers' Classes. Hygiene is now a compulsory subject in the "Englsh" Teachers' Course. Cookery has become a popular subject.
E. RALPHS,

O 23
Annexe C.
REPORT BY THE INSPECTOR OF VERNACULAR SCHOOLS, 1927.
1.-GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS.
Vernacular Middle School-Head Master, Mr. Li King Hong, B. A.
The Maximum Enrolment was 178 (150 in 1926).
The Average Attendance was 166 (137 in 1926).
In December, the students of the highest Standard in the Middle School Division-5 in number-sat for "The Government Vernacular Middle School Final Examination" conducted by the University of Hong Kong. Four were successful, with one Distinction in Mathematics.- -a very creditable result.
The 11 Final Students in the Normal Division were examined by 2 external examiners, and 2 passed. The results were very disappointing. Increased attention should be paid to "Mathematics" and "Method"--both Theoretical and Practical.
Referring to the public interest in the school and to the sphere of sports, the Head Master states : --
"Messrs. Fung Ping Shan and Li Yik Mui, in the name of a body of Chinese friends interested in our school, continued their generosity by giving scholarships of $30 each per annum to students obtaining the highest position in entrance and annual examinations and to those who would otherwise be financially unable to come to study. We have also to thank these gentle- men for their kind gift of some useful furniture and a set of Encyclopaedia Britannica.
In the sphere of sports, the school has done particularly well this year. Games continued to be popular, and Football, Volley-Ball, Basket Ball and Ping Pong have all shown signs of great improvement. We were able this year to send in a Volley Ball team to compete for the Senior Shield and scored a good number of points. In Football, we played some twenty friendly matches with schools and clubs outside: we lost 5 games and won the rest. Our Ping Pong team is the strongest of all: a number of schools came to challenge us, but we remained in- vincible all the year round".
O 24
Health is reported to have been satisfactory on the whole.
Vernacular Normal School for Women:-Head Mistress, Miss Chan Yat Hing.
The Maximum Enrolment was 132.
The Average Attendance was 115.
The school removed to Lee Garden Street this year, and is well-housed, occupying 12 flats. A new feature of the school is the Third Year Normal Class, providing advanced studies for Passed Students who wish to return to further their studies
though they have finished the 2 years' course. There were 8
in this class.
The staff was strengthened by the appointment of 2 additional masters.
Eleven students of the Second Year Normal class sat for their Final Examination, and seven obtained their Teachers' Certificate. The remainder of the class, if they stay on, would be allowed to move up to the Third Year Class, though they were not considered sufficiently qualified for the certificates awarded to Passed Students of the 2nd year class.
Very good work continues to be done in this school.
Discipline and tone was excellent.
Taipo Vernacular Normal School: -Head Master, Mr. Chan Pun Chiu.
The Maximum Enrolment was 59.
The Average Attendance was 42.
The school has 2 classes this year, i.e. "1st year" and “2nd year". The staff is increased by the appointment of an assistant Master. As was anticipated in the last Annual Report, only a few of the 2nd year class were ready for their Final Examination at the end of this year. In December, 2 were examined by out- side examiners, and both passed. The syllabus of work done. in this school is less ambitious than in the 2 Normal Schools in town, but in Chinese studies, the standard reached by the country students compares favourably with that of the town schools.
II. GRANT SCHOOLS.
"There are 4 Upper Grade Grant Schools as before. The Maximum Enrolment in the 4 schools was 1051, and the Average Attendance was 924.
O 25
The Ying Wa Girls' School entered 4 students from the highest "Chung Hok" class for the Junior Local Examination for the first time in the history of Vernacular Schools, and all passed a remarkable achievement.
In these schools, the teaching of Reading in the upper classes which at one time was generally too mechanical has shown a steady improvement during the last few years. One would, however, like to see a higher standard reached in Com- position. The tone of all the 4 schools continues to be very good.
III.-PRIVATE SCHOOLS, URBAN DISTRICTS.
Subsidized Schools. Of the 191 Subsidized Schools existing at the end of 1926, 2 closed and 1 was transferred to the Non- Subsidy List at the beginning of this year. During the year, 14 schools were added to, and 6 schools were removed from this list: thus 202 schools have received Subsidies, but only 196 remain on the list at the end of the year. The total enrolment in these schools was 12,592, and the average attendance was 11,260. Of the $90,000 Subsidies Vote, the amount actually expended was $88,100. This amounts on the average to $436.14 per school and $7.01 per pupil ($458.01 and $8.22 in 1926).
Non-Subsidized Schools.-131 new schools were registered- a record year, breaking the record of 1925, which was 120. This increase was doubtless due to the influx of a number of the more conservative teachers who find this Colony more congenial to their teaching. 84 schools closed during the year, 14 schools were transferred to, and 7 transferred from, the Subsidy List. The number of schools on this Non-Subsidy List at the end of the year stands at 388 (348 in 1926). The Total Enrolment in these schools was 17,367, and the Average Attendance, 14,585. (16,423 and 14,622 in 1926).
The total number of Private Day Schools is now 590 (545 in 1926), which consist of 2 exempted, 4 Grant, 196 Subsidized and 388 Non-Subsidized Schools. The Maximum Enrolment was 31,010 (28,102 in 1926, 23,707 in 1925 and 14,335 in 1917), and the Average Attendance was 26,769. About one third of the number were girls.
Free Scholarships-29 boys and 12 girls from Subsidized Schools were admitted to the various Government English Schools. The 4 scholarships tenable at the Vernacular Middle School were competed for by 27 candidates, and were awarded to the best 4.
Night Schools--20 Night Schools were newly registered and 18 closed. The number is now 19, with a total enrolment of 663, average attendance, 443).
26
IV. PRIVATE SCHOOLS, RURAL DISTRICTS.
Subsidized Schools-Of the 103 schools on the Subsidy List at the end of 1926, 14 closed and 5 were removed to the Non- Subsidy List during the year, but 17 were added to this list, thus making the number at the end of the year to be 101.
Special Subsidies.-The Subsidy System in the Rural Districts has been somewhat modified this year, i.e. (i) The better schools need not wait, as they had to in previous years, till the end of the year before getting their class A or class B Subsidy, and (ii) Special Subsidies are given to a larger number of schools. In addition to the 3 former ones (i) Shung Tak School, Taipo; (ii) Shui Lau Tin; and (iii) Chung Him School, Fanling, 13 others have received Special Subsidies. These are: 3 schools at Cheung Chau (i) The Kaifong Kung Lap; (ii) The "Tung Kwun"; and (iii) The "Wai Chiu", 2 at Tsuen Wan (i) The "Kung Hok"; (i) Nam Yuen and the following:-(i) Tung Shin Girls' School, Un Long, (ii) Peng Chau, Cheung Chau District, (iii) Shuen Wan, (iv) Sha Lo Tung, (v) Tap Mun, (vi) Teng Kok, (vii) Ko Po and (viii) Saikung R.C.M. Towards the end of 1926, the offer of a Special Subsidy up to $20 per month each was made to 10 of the comparatively distant and more needy villages, in order to persuade them to find suitable teachers, and the result was as under: Sha Lo Tung made the best endeavours and secured a qualified teacher; the elders of Peng Chau and Tap Mun also showed some interest in their respective village schools, and a satisfactory teacher was found by each; at Tung Chung, Tai Shui Hang and Ko Tong, the special considerations given attracted several teachers to go there and establish schools of their own, a type of schools better than those that had existed in these villages in previous years; Lung Ku Tan retained its teacher who had been there in 1926, and continued to receive a Subsidy of $5; at Mui Wo, Kow To and Tong Fuk, the special offers seemed to have fallen on deaf
ears.
English, Subsidized School.-The Saikung Roman Catholic Mission English School was still the only Private English School in the Territory. The attendance fell to 15, and, recently, for some reason or other, there has not been the same enthusiasm in these parts for the study of English as was noticed 3 or 4 years ago. A monthly Subsidy of $10 was awarded to this school.
Total Subsidies paid to Vernacular Schools amount to $12,665, i.e. $3.66 per pupil, almost exactly the same as for the previous year.
Free Scholarships.-The number of Free Scholars admitted from Vernacular Schools to Government English Schools were: 3 to Taipo School, 2 to Un Long School, 2 to Cheung Chau School, 4 to Yaumati School (from Sha Tin District) and 5 to King's College (from Tsuen Wan).
Y
O 27
Non-Subsidized Schools.-There were 48 new schools re- gistered, but 36 schools closed during the year. With 12 schools transferred to, and 5 from, the Subsidy List, the number of Non-Subsidized Schools at the end of the year is again 84, the same as at the beginning of the year.
Attendance. The total enrolment in Subsidized schools was 3,462, including 387 Girls, (3,262 with 359 Girls in 1926) and the average attendance, 2,767. (2,742 in 1926). The number in Non-Subsidized Schools was 1,913, including 141 Girls (1,628 with 87 girls in 1926), and the average attendance, 1,439 (1,291 in 1926).
All schools have been inspected at least once during the year.
Y. P. LAW,
Inspector of Vernacular Schools.
t
O 28
1
Table I.
THE BOARD OF EDUCATION.
The Director of Education (Mr. A. E. Wood). Inspector of English Schools (Mr. E. Ralphs). Inspector of Vernacular Schools (Mr. Y. P. Law). Rev. T. W. Pearce, O.B.E., LL.D.
Rev. A. D. Stewart
Mr. S. W. Tso, LL.D.
Dr. Wan Man Kai
Chev. J. M. Alves
Mr. A. el Arculli
Captain J. Charnock
Mr. H. B. L. Dowbiggin
Rev. Fr. Byrne, S. J., Ph. D.
Mr. B. Wylie
Secretary Mr. G. P. de Martin
Table II.
THE BOARD OF EXAMINERS.
The Director of Education, Chairman
Secretary for Chinese Affairs
Assistants to the Secretary for Chinese Affairs
+ Deputy Superintendents of Police
Assistant Superintendents of Police
Rev. Thomas William Pearce, O.B.E., LL. D. Rev. Herbert Richmond Wells, O.B.E.
John Roskruge Wood
David William Tratman
Alan Eustace Wood
Roger Edward Lindsell
Law Yan Pak
Ex. Officio.
Yu Wan
Norman Lockhart Smith
Geoffrey Robley Sayer
Roland Arthur Charles North
+Members of the Sub-Committee for the Examination of subordinate officers of the Police and Gaol in English, Chinese and Hindustain.
7
A
}
4
<
Ŏ 29
· Table III.-
GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS.
STAFF.
NAME AND NATURE. (1) ̧
Certificated Anglo- Teachers. Chinese.
Vernacular.
Maximum Average At- Monthly Fees Enrolment. tendance. per mensem
Rate of
Fees
Collected.
or Term.
ENGLISH SCHOOLS.
Central British, Kowloon Junior, Victoria, Quarry Bay and Peak† Schools-for children of European British Parentage. Primary and Secondary .....
Queen's College and King's College-mainly for Chinese and Indians. Prepare for Hong Kong University Matriculation and for Commercial Examinations..
Ellis Kadoorie, Wantsai, and Yaumati Schools- for Chinese. Prepare for Upper School at Queen's College
Belilios Public School for Girls-mainly for Chinese. Primary and Secondary
Gap Road-for Chinese. Primary
31
1 Pianist,
1 Carpentry Instructor, & 1 Drill
Sergeant
30
1. Boxing Instructor.
$7-$10
1 Chinese
Teacher.
409
$10-$15*
335
15,655.00
$30-$40†
per term.
29
17
787
694
$5
39,460.00
per mensem
10
40
11
1,373
1,204
$3
39,930.00
per mensem
15
1 Portuguese Teacher.
10
2 Needlework
536
474
$2
9,294.00
Teachers
per mensem
2
143
132
$2
2,766.00
per mensem
Ellis Kadoorie School for Indians--prepares for Upper School, Queen's College
1
...
114
107
$2
2,272.00
per mensem
Tai Po, Un Long, and Cheung Chau Schools-Elemen- tary English for Chinese. Primary
$1.00*
9
166
184
50 cents
995.50
per mensem
Vern. Middle School,* Vern. Normal School for Taipo,† and Vern. Normal for Women‡
I
10
22
369
322
*$12 p. a.
+$2 p.m.
7,009.00
† Free.
(1) For boys unless otherwise stated.
3,897
3,402
.:..
117,381,50
1
CONTROLLED SCHOOLS IN RECE
No.
Name of School.
Mission.
1
St. Joseph's College,
2
Italian Convent,
3
French Convent,
7
8
9
St. Mary's School,
13
St. Francis' School,
14
St. Joseph's Branch,
15
Ying Wa College,
*
Diocesan Girls' School,
Diocesan Boys' School,
""
C. of E.
R. C. M.
>>
99
L. M. S.
16
St. Paul's College,
17
Wah Yan College,
18
St. Stephen's Girls' College,
* Struck off Grant List. (C.S.O. 133,128).
ENG
Higher Classes.
Average Attend-
ance.
Rate.
CAPITAT
Remo
1 Average Total. Attend-
ance.
$
R. C. M.
8-1/400
720
645
131
50
6,550
366
""
8 & Inf. 378
425
399 26
50
1,300
128
8 & Inf.
1/350
235
210 25
50
1,250
77
8 & Inf.
- 380
241
204
21
50
1,050
88
8
375
272
211 51
50
2,550
117
s & Inf.
/403
300
281 18
50
900
89
4 & Inf.
205
182
152
32
4
1/400
130
117
...
53
...
...
C. M. S.
8
1366 370
477
401 51
50
2,550 234
691
630
110
50
C. M. S. 8 & Inf./367
228
193 33 50
5,500 1,650 82
382
3,901 3,446 466
|23,300 1,648
VERN A
Number
Number Maximum
Name and Nature of School.
Mission.
Classes.
Average of of School Monthly Attendance.
Days. Enrolment.
Rate.
$
...dea, (Girls)
C. M. S.
7
220
302
256
11
Victoria Home (Girls)
7
221.
195
159
11
""
20
Ying Wah (Girls)
L. M. S,
11-
214
233
225
21
St. Paul's (Girls)
C. M. S.
.11
227
315
284
11
882
1,045
924
4,783
4,491
1,390
NOTE.-R. C.
Roman Catholic.
C. of E.
Church of England.
O 31
TABLE IV.
√ RECEIPT OF A GRANT UNDER THE GRANT CODE
ENGLISH SCHOOLS.
CAPITATION GRANT.
A
Total
UNIVERSITY EXAMINATION GRANT.
Classes.
Remove Classes.
Lower Classes.
Capitation
Grants
Senior.
Junior.
Honours.
Re
.ate.
1 Average Total. Attend-
2
Rate.
Total.
ance.
Average Attend.
ance.
Rate.
3 Total.
of Columns 1, 2 & 3.
of F
No. of Rate. Pupils.
4 Total.
No. of, Rate. Pupils.
5 Total.
No. of Rate. Pupils.
6 Total.
49
€0
$
$3
ملے کرتے
$
$
$
$
$
JA
$
$
50 |6,550 366 30 10,980 148
20 2,960
20,490
36
30
1,080
70
15
1,050

100
200 1,7
50 1,300 128 -30
3,840 245 20
4,900
10,040
9
30
270 13
15
195
50
1,250 77 30
2,310 108 20
2,160
5,720
6
30
180
11
15
165
50
1,050
88 30
2,640 95 20
1,900
5,590
30
150
12
15
180
50
2,550
117 30
3,510 43 20
860
6,920
22
30
660
21
15
315
100
300
50
900
89
30
2,670
174 20
3,480
7,050
30
210
12. 15
190
ས°་
32
30
960 120 20
2,400
3,360
་་་
53 30
1,590 64 20
1,280
2,870
...
50 2,550
50
50
234° 30 5,500 382 30 | 1,650 82 30
7,020 119 11,460
138
2,460 78
222
20 2,380 11,950
21
30
630
21
15
315

20
2,760
19,720 35
30
1,050
49
15
735
1,
20
1,560 5,670 13
30
390
17
15
255
4
23,300 1,648
49,440 1,332
26,640 99,380 154
4,620
226
3,390
5
500
6,4
ERNACULAR SCHOOLS.
(Upper Grade.)
ن
e.
Rate.
$
Principal Grant.
11
2,816
11
1,749
11
2,475
11
3,124
10,164
109,544
land.
C. M. S. L. M. S.
Church Missionary Society. London Missionary Society.
NT UNDER THE GRANT CODE.
OOLS.
:
A
Total ipitation
UNIVERSITY EXAMINATION GRANT.
B
C
D
Grand
Total
Total
Local
Senior.
Junior.
Honours.
Refund
Grants
Special
Rent
of
Grants of Columns
Science
of
Columns
of Fees.
Grant
Grant
,
2 & 3.
No. of Rate. Pupils.
1 Total.
5
6
Columns
No. of Rate. Pupils.
No. of Rate.
Total.
Total.
4, 5, 6, & 7.
A,B,C & D,
Pupils.

$
*A

$.
##
$
$
20,490
22
& & &::: ∞ & & & & &
30
30
30
30
30
30
36
10,040
9
5,720
5,590
5
6,920
7,050
3,360
2,870
11,950 21
30
630
21
15
315
19,720 5,670
35
30
1,050
49
15
735
13
30
390
17
15
255
1,080
70
15
1,050
N
270 13
15
195
180 11
15
165
150
12
15
180
660
21
15
315
100
8
210
12.
15
190
100
200
1,780
4,110
376
841
324
669
284
614
300
752
2,027
284
674
99,380
151
1,620
226
€3,390
10
6,389
6,204
9,867
7,724
3,360
...
2,870
...
1,104
1,104
672
1,617
840
14,407
1,536
3,321
760
23,801
461
1.109
10
...
6,789
500
6,472
-14,982
3,030
1,104
118,496
8 : : : : : :
500
25, 100 10,881
920
al
HOOLS.
Church Missionary Society.
London Missionary Society.
Grant in aid of Reut.
Total

2,816
1,749
2,475
1,200
4,324
1,200
11,364
2,304
129,860
Ó 88
Table V.
Amount of Fees Remitted to Free Scholars in Government
School during 1927.
Queen's College
Ellis Kadoorie School
King's College
Yaumati School
Wantsai School
Indian School
Gap Road School
Belilios Public School
Central British School
Victoria British School
Kowloon Junior School
Quarry Bay British School
Peak School
Taipo Government School
Cheung Chau Government School
Un Long Government School
Vernacular Middle School
Vernacular Normal School for Women
$4,550.00
924.00
1,124.00
1,644.00
729.00
176.00
266.00
770.00
795.00
Nil.
30.00
10.00
Nil.
131.00
11.00
20.50
157.00
120.00
Total
$11,457.50
1
40,000
39,000
38,000
37,000
36,000
35,000
34,000
33,000
Tal
Average Attendance in all Government and
Technical Institute, which was opene
Note. The figures prior to 1913 are not very t
until that year.
The figures for the New Territories were includ The University and Police School were not ine English Schools :-Red.
Vernacular Schools :-Black.
1901. 1902. 1903. 1904. 1905. 1906. 1907. 1908. 1909. 1910. 1911.
1912. 1913
32,000
!
C
31,000
30,000
29,000
28,000
27,000
26,000;
O 35
Table VI.
Average Attendance in all Government and Grant Schools, and total enrolment at Private Sch
Technical Institute, which was opened in 1908.
Note.--The figures prior to 1913 are not very trustworthy, as there was no right of entry into priv:
until that year,
The figures for the New Territories were included in 1913 for the first time.
The University and Police School were not included.
English Schools :-Red.
Vernacular Schools:- -Black.
3.1904. 1905. | 1906. | 1907. | 1908. | 1909. 1910. | 1911. 1912. 1913. 1914. 1915. 1916.
1917. 1918. 101:
5
e VI.
raut Schools, and total enrolment at Private Schools and the n 1908.
stworthy, as there was no right of entry into private schools
1 in 1913 for the first time.
led.
1914. 1915. 1916.
1917. | 1918. 1919. 1920. 1921. 1922. | 1923 1924. 1925. 1926. 1927
1
32,953
29,010
28,922
27,136
37,244
$
31,000
30,000
29,000
28,000
27,000
26,000
25,000
24,000
23,000
22,000
21,000
20,000
19,000
18,000
17,000
16.000
15,000
4,000
3,000
2,000
11,000
1,000
10,327
12,989
10,327
12,989
12,092
r1,919
13,230
15,461
16,641
16,582
i
18,
989
11,919
12,092
13,230
15,461
16,641
16,582
18,915
23,610
11,672
23,484
29,010
28,922
| 13,730
13,442
14,980
27,136
10,218
10,153
11,867
[
21,000
20,000
19,000
18,000
17,000
16.000
15,000
14,000
13,000
12,000
11,000
10,000
9,000
8,000
4
7,000
8,140
9,863
10,327
6,785
6,000
6,100
6,065
5,752
5,420
5,527
5,582
5,000
5,230
5,096
4,580 4,540
4,660
4,630
4,430
4,610 4,490
4,000
3,970
3,680
3,213 3,375
3,000
2,900
12,989
6,442
r1,919
7,462
·
1

·
1
:
1
8,140
į
9,863
10,327
12,989
6,442
5,752
5,582
5,527
r1,919
12,092
13,230
15,461
16,641
16,582
18,915
¦
9,792
9,145
8,962
8,474
7,873
7,764
7,462
11,672
;
13,730
13,442
14,980
10,153
صر
#
1,919
12,092
13,230
15,461
16,641
16,582
18,915
9,792
9,145
8,962
8,474
7,873
7,764
7,462
11,672
13,730
13,442
14,980
10,153
10,218
11,867
















































































Appendix Q.
REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC WORKS FOR THE YEAR 1927.
Expenditure.
1. The amounts voted, as compared with those actually expended by the Department under the various headings, were as follows:--
Amount voted.
In Estimates.
Supplement- ary Votes.
Total.
Actual Expendi- ture.
(i) Personal Emoluments and Other Charges,
$
1,268,349.00
1,268,349.00 1,117,271.48
(ia) Other Charges, ....... 209,682.00
(iB) Special Expenditure,
14,250.00
4,000.00 213,682.00 177,164.73
6,330.00 20,580.00 14,681.13
(ii) Annually Recurrent
Works,
1,540,400.00
(iii) Extraordinary Works, 3,706,264.00
6,738,945.00
258,550.00 1,798,950.00 |1,542,494.95
772,290.00 4,478,554.00 | 2,966,390.69
1,041,170.00 |7,780,115,00 5,818,003.01
Less amount met out of savings, under the above Heads as per Financial Messages for the year 1927,
Total, .$ 6,738,915,00
430,075.00
430,075.00
611,095.00 | 7,350,040.00 | 5,818,003.01*
Detailed Statements of (ii) and (iii) are given in Annexes A and B.
With regard to (i), the savings are due partly to higher rate of exchange than the one at which the sterling salaries in the Estimates were converted and also on account of vacant posts provided for in the Estimates not having been filled during the year under review.
In the case of (ia), (iB) and (ii), savings were effected on the following sub-heads:-
*In addition to this expenditure a sum of $1,537,261.16 was expended on works charged to Loan Funds, and $747,065.25 on works undertaken for the Military and Naval Authorities.
Expenditure.
Sub-heads:-
2
HEAD 29.-P.W.D.
1. Personal Emoluments,
OTHER CHARGES,
$151,552.16
2. Conveyance and Motor Allowances,
13,916.29
3. Drawing Materials and Mounting Plans,
2,959.64
4. Electric Fans and Light,
3,396.51
5. Incidental Expenses,
5,778.81
6. Lifts Maintenance, Government Buildings,
42.20
7. Surveying Instruments and Contingencies, ..
1,641.76
9. Uniforms,
2,740.36
10. Upkeep of Government Garage,
944.23
11. Upkeep and running expenses of Motor
Lorries and Cars,
87.32
12. Upkeep and running expenses of Motor and
Steam Rollers, P.W.D.,
339.00

13. Upkeep of Quarry Plants,
1,731.58
RADIO TELEGRAPH BRANCH.
14. Incidental Expenses,
15. Repairs and Stores,
16. Transport,
SPECIAL EXPENDITURE.
17. Equipment of Government Garages and
Workshop,
18. Harbour Surveying,
19. Three Motor Cars,
46.25
92.71
463.08
682.49
2,068.45
3,114.46
Sub-heads:
Q B
HEAD 30.-P.W.R.
HONG KONG.
Expenditure.
1. Buildings,
$ 8,755.31
2. Communications,
6,880.74
4. Lighting,
3,568.55
6. Waterworks,
27,686.47
7. Miscellaneous,
9,073.44
KOWLOON.
8. Buildings,
16,687.54
9. Communications,
8,179.48
10. Drainage,
2,840.98
11. Lighting,
6,278.94
14. Miscellaneous,
5,221.57
NEW KOWLOON.
15. Buildings,
11,933.83
16. Communications,
2,473.24
17. Drainage,
69.86
18. Lighting,
1,139.82
19. Typhoon and Rainstorm Damages,
2,795.68
20. Waterworks,
204.80
NEW TERRITORIES.
22. Buildings,
9,656.75
23. Communications,
1,287.45
24. Drainage,
323.59
25. Typhoon and Rainstorm Damages,
24,072.04
26. Waterworks,
859.66
27. Miscellaneous,
100.00
Expenditure.
The savings were far more than counterbalanced by excesses on other sub-heads as set forth below:-
Sub-heads:
HEAD 29.-P.W.D.
8. Transport and Travelling Expenses,
SPECIAL EXPENDITURE.
New Machinery for Cape D'Aguilar Wireless
Telegraph Station,
Provision of one Safe for the Account Sub-
Department, Wanchai Stores, P.W.D., .
HEAD 30.-P.W.R.
HONG KONG.
$ 1,702.72
5,985.08
311.45
3. Drainage,
1,058.68
5. Typhoon and Rainstorm Damages,
74,047.96
KOWLOON.
12. Typhoon and Rainstorm Damages,
57,099.55
13. Waterworks,
18,342.03
NEW KOWLOON.
21. Miscellaneous,
1,710.30
(iii) The savings under this Head were due to some works, for which substantial sums were allocated, not being proceeded with during the year on account of the necessity for economy.
Comparison of Expenditure, 1926 and 1927.
2. The following is a statement of the expenditure in 1927 as compared with that of the previous year:-
1926.
1927,
Increase.
Decrease.
C.
(i) Personal Emoluments 1,089,567.46
ૐ C.
1,117,271.48
$
C.
c.
27,704.02
(ia) Other Charges,
158,351.43
177,164.73
18,813 30
Works,
(IB) Special Expenditure, (ii) Annually Recurrent
(iii) Extraordinary Works, 4,720,000.19 | 2,966,390.69
946.00
1,822,816.80 1,542,494.98
14,681.13
13,735.13
280,321.82
1,753,609.50
Total,
7,791,681.885,818,003.01
60,252.45 2,033,931.32
Q 5
With reference to-
Expenditure.
(i), the increase is due to increments on salaries.
(IA), this increase is due to additional expenditure on the Vote "Other Charges", i.e. Electric Fans and Lights, Lifts Maintenance, Upkeep and Running Expenses of Motor Lorries, Cars, Motor and Steam Road Rollers, Radio Telegraph Branch Repairs and Stores.
(iB), the increase is due on account of additional Wireless Apparatus and two new Morris Touring Cars purchased during the year.
(ii), the decrease is due to the absence of heavy commit- ments on account of Typhoon and Rainstorm Damages which were necessary in 1926.
(iii), the decrease is due to economies effected owing to the conditions which have prevailed locally as in the past two years, and consequently works` not of an urgent nature were' not pro- ceeded with during the year under review.
COMPARISON OF EXPENDITURE ON PUBLIC WORKS
DURING 1917-1927.
Personal Emoluments
Year.
and Other
Special Annually Extraordinary Expendi- Recurrent
Works.
ture.
Works.
Total Expenditure.
Charges.

C.
CA
C.
$ c. $
CA
C1
0.
1917
402,772,20
609,308.45
1,612,835.28
2,624,915,93
1918
374,906.32
296.30
712,675.37 1,578,149.12
2,666,027.11
1919
390,006.29
1,376.35
822,509.87 2,235,002.95
3,448,895.46
1920
468,371.82
3,850,359.17
1921
650,900.00 1922 820,529,49 1923 900,573,35 1924 1,184,482.27 1925 1,346,091.10 1926 1,247,918.89 1927 1,294,436.21
615.96 825,493.70 2,555,877.69 699.00 938,582.38 3,053,525.11 4,643,706.49 1,145.40 1,074,646.30 3,575,635.19 5,471,956.38 1,209.36 1,424,532,80 4,716,602.94 7,042,918.45
285.631,793,968.69 78,919.11 1,574,431.75
946.00 1,822,816.80
14,681,131,542,494,98
8,112,785.49|11,091,522.08
8,638,930.87 11,638,372.83 4,720,000.19 7,791,681,88 2,966,390.69 5,818,003,01
Total...$ 9,080,987.94 100,174.24 13,141,461,09 43,765,735.52 66,088,358.79

Expenditure.
6
REVENUE FROM WATERWORKS.
3. Waterworks › Revenue.—The following is a statement of the revenue derived from Waterworks in 1927, the figures for 1926 being given in a parallel column for purposes of com- parison:-
1927.
Locality.
Excess Con-
sumption.
Rate 2%.
Total.
$ C.
C.
City including Wong Nei
1926 Total.
C.
$ C.
Chong Village
and
properties bordering
Shau Ki Wan Road,...
285,991.47
423,542.03
709,533.50
677,270.82
Hill District,
15,208.43
9,978.68
25,187.11
24.812.14
Pokfulam District,
10,442.38
10,442.38
9,630.19
Kowloon including Sham
Shui Po and Kowloon
City,
179,121,73
106,696.00
285,817.73
221,611.25
Aberdeen,
Kepulse Bay, Shau Ki Wan, Tai Tam Tuk,
Lai Chi Kok, Fan Ling, Tai Po
3,954.75
1,452.37
5,407.12
5,186.26
2,741.65
2,741.65
3,240.35
8,580.67
9,161.10
17,741.77
16,866.02
1.05
141,060.25
1+1,060.25
18,844.75
2,161,25
2,161.25
2,618.67
513.13
513,13
471.51
Total,
:
649,775.71
550,830.181,200,605.89
980,553.01
COMPARISON OF WATERWORKS REVENUE, 1926 AND 1927.
:
1926.
$677,270.82
24,812.14
9,630.19
1927. $ 709,533.50
25,187.11
City (as above stated), Hill District,
Pokfulam District,
Kowloon,
Aberdeen,
Repulse Bay, Shau Ki Wan,
Tai Tam Tuk,
Lai Chi Kok,
Fan Ling,
Tai Po,
:
...
:
10,442.38
221,611.25
285,817.73
5,186.26
5,407.12
3,240.35
2,741.65
...
16,866.02
17,741.77
1.05
18,844.75
141,060.25
...
2,618.67
471.51
2,161.25
513.13
:
:.
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
$980,553.01 $1,200,605.89
Q 7

Land Sales.
Land Sales, etc.
4. Land Sales, Extensions, Grants, etc.-The total amount of premia paid into the Treasury during the year was $146,242.24 of which $3,308.50 was derived from fees for boundary stones. The estimate for the year was $300,000.
The following is a comparative statement of the Revenue derived from Land Sales, &c., for the years 1925-1927:-
1925.
1926.
1927.
$ C.
C.
$ c.
Sales by Auction,
211,797.00
30,370.50
39,840.50
Sales without Auction,
155,467.93
55,761.18
50,038.31
Extensions granted,
89,662.78
112,449.79
22,334.87
Grants on Nominal Terms,
Grants on Short Leases,
Extensions of Leases,
20,800.00
3,321.00
Premia derived from sale of rights to
erect piers,
233,00
1.280.00
564.20
Fees for Boundary Stones to define Lots,
6,593.25
6,515.50
3,575.25
Conversions and Exchanges,
77,746.93
94,334.20
44,425.70
Total,
541,500.89
321,511,J7
164,099.83
Actual amount of premia paid into
Treasury,
$ 581,160.88 325,569.79 146,242.24
The difference between the above totals is accounted for by the payment of premium and interest, and of contributions to forming sewers, &c., in connection with certain transactions arranged during the previous year as well as refunds and re- adjustments, and the failure to pay premium on transactions in 1927.
5. Sales by Auction.-No lots were sold in Hong Kong during the year. Two lots were sold in Kowloon and one lot in New Kowloon which realized $26,940.50 and $8,100 respec- tively. The District Officer (South) sold 16 lots which realized $375 and the District Officer (North) 174 lots for $4,425.
6. Sales without Auction.-Seven lots were sold under this heading in Hong Kong, the amount realized being $45,867.75. One lot in Kowloon realized $782 and another in New Kowloon $630. The District Officer (South) sold 29 lots which realized $1,666 and the District Officer (North) 91 lots for which $1,092.56 was realized.
Land Sales, etc.
8
7. Extensions Granted.-The extensions granted in Hong Kong comprised additional areas to 18 Inland Lots and 5 Rural Building Lots which realized the sum of $19,271.58. In Kow- loon, extensions were granted to 5 Inland Lots realizing $2,524.09 and in the New Territories to one lot realizing $466.20. The District Officer (South) granted extensions to 7 lots realizing $57, while the District Officer (North) granted extensions to 5 lots realizing $16.
8. Conversions and Exchanges.-In Hong Kong 21 lots were granted in exchange at a premium of $16,984, in Kowloon 38 lots at a premium of $12,277.25, and in New Kowloon 11 lots. at a premium of $15,078.45. In some cases the lessees failed to pay the premia or applied for a cancellation of the exchanges. In some special cases ex gratia payments were made as com- pensation for old lots. The District Officer (South) arranged the conversions and exchanges of 6 lots without premium, and 105 lots were likewise dealt with by the District Officer (North) at a total premium of $86.
The following amounts were paid during the year as com- pensation for land and buildings on old lots. These amounts include certain ex gratia payments made in lieu of exchanges:-
Hong Kong, Kowloon,
New Kowloon,
TOTAL
$ 22.121.55
33,426.96 47,484.21
$103,032.72
9. Grants on Nominal Terms.-In Hong Kong the follow- ing grants were made:-An area of 12,400 square feet (I.L. 2627) to the Wesleyan Methodist Missionary Society for a Church Manse. An area of 156,500 square feet (I.L. 2686) to the Tung Wah Hospital for a hospital. An area of 58,000 square feet as an extension to the Roman Catholic Cemetery (I.L. 299). There were no grants in Kowloon or the New Territories.
10. Grants on Short Leases.-In Hong Kong the following grants were made:-/
-An area of 24,600 square feet (I.L. 2377) to the Helena May Institute for a further period of 5 years as a tennis court and garden. An area of 45,870 square feet (I.L. 2685) to the Church Missionary Society for a term of 5 years for a play-ground. No grants were made in Kowloon. Two lots were granted by the District Officer, (South) but none by the District Officer (North).
11. Permits to occupy land for short periods, etc.-These were of a very miscellaneous character and too numerous to admit of individual mention; most of them were for small areas on half-yearly or yearly permits.

g
Land Sales, etc.
The total number of these permits for Hong Kong, Kowloon and New Kowloon was 2,440, of which 581 were new permits, and the fees collected amounted to $148,121.19.
Fifty-two permits were issued by the District Officer (South), the fees for which amounted to $223.54.
The District Officer (North) issued 235 yearly permits and 21 for 5 years, the total fees amounting to $569.40.
12. Extension_of_Leases.-In Hong Kong the lease of R.B.L. 28 was extended for a further period of 75 years and the leases of G.L's 26 and 28 for a further period of 21 years at a total premium of $3,321.
13. Prospecting and Mining Licences.-One Mining Licence for an area at Ma On Shan (Mining Lots Nos. 1 and 2) was renewed for a period of one year.
14. Plans, etc.-Plans and tracings numbering 8,265 were issued during the year and comprised 5 Sale and 270 Lease Plans: 421 Tracings: 6,849 Sunprints: and 720 Cyclostyle Prints. They were prepared for the Land Officer in connection with the issue of Crown Leases, for sale to the public, and for dealing with Government works as required by various officers.
15. Naval and Military Lands.-Revised plans of the area between Queen's Road and Kennedy Road were prepared with a view to its final transfer to the Military Authorities, and the matter is under consideration. Plans were also prepared for the final transfer of the site of the Hospital at Bowen load, and the matter is now completed.
L
The Wong Nei Chong Battery site and the Sanitarium Barrack Officers Quarters were transferred by the Military Authorities to the Colonial Government, the former being credited with the sums of $963.17 and $20,000 in respect thereof in the Military Lands Account.
Various areas in Hong Kong and Kowloon were temporarily placed at the disposal of the Military Authorities in connection with the Shanghai Defence Force.
16. Piers:-
(a.) Permanent Piers.-There is nothing to report under this heading in Hong Kong and the New Territories. In Kowloon, permission was granted to erect two piers (Kowloon Permanent Piers Nos. 52 and 53) opposite K.M.L. 93, and for an extension to Kowloon Permanent Pier No. 3 opposite K.M.L. 47 at a total premium of $564.20.
(b.) Temporary Piers.-Licences to erect 7 temporary piers were issued during the year, the total fees amounting to $605.
Surveys.
Q 10
17. Cemeteries.-In Hong Kong, an area of 58,000 square feet (I.L. 299) was granted as an extension to the Roman Catholic Cemetery. In Kowloon, the Indian Cemetery at Tai Shek Ku was closed. An area (.35 acre) was granted on a 5* years' permit to the Tung Kun Society by the District Officer (South).
18. Re-entries.-70 lots in Hong Kong, 51 in Kowloon, 31 in New Kowloon, 55 in the Southern District (New Territories) and 118 in the Northern District (New Territories) were entered upon during the year.
SURVEYS.
19. Ordnance Survey.-City of Victoria.-This survey is now completed, but owing to road improvements, erection of new buildings, and reconstruction a good deal of revision work is necessary; a total of 27.09 acres has been surveyed and plotted, the chainage being 5.8 miles.
The Peak.-Revision work has been commenced, the area surveyed being 8 acres and the chainage just over a mile. Several stations have been lost from various causes necessitating fresh traverses. Two main traverses were run, one from Jardine's Corner along Stubbs Road to the junction of Bowen Road, and the other from Stubbs Road along Barker Road to the Peak Tramway Station, the total length being 5 miles.
Repulse Bay. The survey was completed and plotted, the area being 31 acres and the chainage 5 miles.
Aberdeen. The whole of the village was surveyed and plotted, the area- being 35.63 acres and chainage 3 miles.
Aplichau.-This survey was commenced, stations being fixed on the Island from stations in Aberdeen Village.
Shau Ki Wan.-The greater part of the area between Quarry Bay and the Tramway terminus has been surveyed and plotted, and the survey is being carried on to include Shau Ki Wan East and the village of Ah Kung Ngam. The area aiready surveyed is about 60 acres with a chainage of about 8 miles.
Quarry Bay-Twenty-two acres have been surveyed with a chainage of about 5 miles.
Kowloon. During the period under review 605 acres were surveyed and 581 acres plotted, the chainage being 55 miles.
*


Q 11
Surveys.
20. Traverses.-These were run from Causeway Bay to Shau Ki Wan connecting with the Triangulation stations at North Point, Quarry Bay and Taikoo, and permanent marks were established at various points, the distance being nearly 5 miles. A traverse was also run from the Triangulation station at Stanley Gap through Repulse Bay and Aberdeen connecting with a main traverse as the junction of Mount Davis and Pokfulam Roads, and the Triangulation stations at "Overbays' (Repulse Bay), Kai Lung Wan and Pokfulam Reservoir, the distance being 9.12 miles.
21. Triangulation.-The triangulation mentioned in the Report for 1926 was completed. Monuments were erected at Jardine's Lookout, Mount Butler, Hill 800, Violet Hill, Boa Vista, Red Hill and Shek O Gap. Observations were taken from these stations, and, in addition, from Partridge Hill, Channel Rocks, Stanlev Mound, Mount Collinson, Shek O and Wong Ma Kok, the whole being completed and tied into the main triangulation of the Colony with very good results.
In the New Territories, beacons were erected at Tate's Cairn, Hill 1610 Sha Tau Kok, Ping Chau Island, Kat O, Shek Ngau Chau. Hill 1344. Tai Po. Pat Sin, Port Island, Sharp Peak, Ma On Shan, Peak A, Long Ket, High Island, High Junk Peak and Basalt Island, most of the field work being well advanced. The observations from these points were well advanced by the end of the year, and it is hoped to complete the whole of them and the computations in the coming year.
22. Revenue Surveys and General.--Surveys were made for plans to be attached to Crown Leases of 270 lots, and of 5 areas to be sold by auction.
Centre lines were laid down for various streets and permanent marks fixed; boundaries of many lots were set out for the Drainage, General Works, and Roads Offices. In Hong Kong, 37 frontage lines to streets were checked as well as 84. in Kowloon and New Kowloon. Boundaries of 64 lots in Hong Kong and 108 in Kowloon and New Kowloon were defined on the ground. Permanent marks at the intersection points of proposed streets have been fixed and a plan was prepared showing the setting out of the district between To Kwa Wan and Prince Edward Roads.
Contour surveys were made of the hillside adjoining Wong Nei Chong and between Staunton Creek, Aberdeen, and Deep Water Bay Brickworks, the areas being 6 and 78 acres respec- tively. A survey of the area occupied by the Country Club at Shek O and the adjoining coast line was commenced towards "the end of the year.
In Kowloon, surveys of various areas aggregating 146 acres were made during the year.
B.0.0. Work.
Q 12
23. Boundary Stones.-Three hundred and one boundary stones were fixed to 81 lots in Hong Kong and 376 to 107 lots in Kowloon and New Kowloon.
24. Cemeteries.-The boundaries of the following Ceme- teries were defined on the ground:-
Mount Caroline (I.L. 393), Parsee (I.L. 364), Colonial (Protestant), Eurasian (I.L. 1415). Chinese Chris- tian (I.L. 899), Kai Lung Wan West (I.L. 952). Kai Lung Wan East (I.L. 1776). I. L. 1707, and the Roman Catholic Cemetery, Kowloon.
25. New Territories.-The most important surveys carried out in the district were :
A survey of 18 acres with a chainage of 5,200 feet at Un Long for a new development scheme. A survey of the area between Au Tau and Un Long, which included the river between Kam Tin and Au Tau, salt paddy fields, fish ponds, roads, etc., for the laying out of the proposed new village was completed. The area is about 154 acres and the chainage 30,600 feet. A survey of a site for St. Joseph's College at Castle Peak, about 100 acres in extent, with a chainage of 6,900 feet. A survey of Lots 4509 and 4510, D.D. 51, at Fan Ling, about 5 acres, with a chainage of 8,600 feet. A survey of the frontier path at the Sha Tau Kok of a chainage of 7,500 feet. A survey of the cultiva- tion at Wong Tai Shek, Tai Po, about 4 acres in extent, with a chainage of 1.200 feet. A survey of the Lo Wu Brickworks and the adjoining culti- vation area, about 35 acres in extent, with a chainage of 14,600 feet. Numerous minor surveys, fixing of boundary stones, etc., as required by the District Officer (North).
Works under the Buildings Ordinance. 26. An increase has to be recorded in the number of new works dealt with in 1927 as compared with the number during the two years immediately preceding.
Although there was a larger number of works in progress, the number of domestic buildings actually completed during the year shows a marked decrease as compared with last year, and the number of "non-domestic" buildings shows an increase of one only. There was, throughout the year, a gradual absorption of the surplus housing accommodation, and during the latter months there was a noticeable improvement in the building activity of a non-speculative character.
Attention is drawn to the graph embodied in this Report which is of interest as showing a comparative statement of the number of plans approved and houses certified during the period from 1905 to 1927.
·
1905
N
149
500
1400
145T
148*
360
1910]
195
1000
12
220
13
354
141
512
15
3.2

Con
12
1500
$35
-30%
17
18
19
1920
ANNUALLY
2600
3500
1571
263
(16
946
1208
1191
1477
1644
1886-
1609-
1426
1712
1818
2049
1965-
2016-
2458-
2155.
2461
726
1993.
2850-
38870
2498

211
22
2.5
985
24
1955-
25
175/
26
27
459
N.B. BLACK CURVE SHOWS No. OF PLANS APPROVED.
RED
}}
>>
DOMESTIC BUILDINGS CERTIFIED.
1930
31
32
33
500
11500
2000
12500
3500
4000
}
Q 13
B.0.0. Work.
27. Plans.-The following is a tabulated statement showing the number and type of buildings, in connection with which ⚫ plans were deposited during the year, the figures for 1926 being
given in a parallel column for purposes of comparison:-
Buildings, &c.
1926.
1927. Increase. Decrease.
New European houses,
67
89
22
New Chinese houses,
147
201
54
New Buildings and Structures
other than the above,
180
281
101
Alterations and additions to
existing buildings,
1,932
2,427
495
Verandahs,
144
151
7
Balconies,
38
37
1
...
Sunshades,
35
29
Areas,
Piers,
10
Wells,
56
17
Total,.........
2,608
3,249
680
39
The number of plans (covering the buildings in the tabulated statement above) deposited during the year was 2,158 as .compared with 1,874 in 1926.
The number of plans approved during the year was 2,481 as compared with 2,155 in 1926.
28. Certificates.-The following Certificates for new build- ings were issued :—
224 under Section 204 of Ordinance No. 1 of 1903, covering 459 domestic buildings, of which 110 were European and 349 Chinese dwellings, and
and 106 covering 118 non-domestic buildings.
These figures show a decrease of 355 in the case of "domestic" and an increase of 1 in that of "non- domestic" buildings. Of the 110 European houses completed and certified, 60 are on the Kau Lung Tong Estate.
B.O.O. Work.
Q 14
29. Notices and Permits.-The following is a tabulated statement of the notices served and permits issued during the year, the figures for 1926 being given in a parallel column for purposes of comparison:-
Dangerous Structure Notices, Miscellaneous Notices.....
Private Street Improvement Notices, including footpaths under verandahs and balconies.
1926.
1927.
Increase, Decrease.
322
262
60
404
135
31
16
104
88
Notices in respect of Nuisances
reported by Officers of the Sanitary Department,
2,368
2,665
297
Notices in respect of Signboards,...
New Permits issred..........
826
716
110
Permits renewed,...
954
611
343
Fees charged for the issue of new
permits,
50
$
36
:
Fees charged for the issue of plans
for Theatrical heds,
10
$ 5
J4
5
Fees charged for issue of permits
for Stalls for sale of Joss Sticks, Charges made for permission to obtain Sand and Stone from Crown Land,
Charges made for damage to Trecs... *Fees charged for display of Ad-
vertisements on hoardings................ Miscellaneous fees charged for duplicate copies of acknow- ledgments, &c.....
Fees charged for sale of turf, Fees charged for re-instating road
surface,
Penalties imposed for breach of
Tramway Permit Conditions,
en G
30
$ 700
of th
SA
$
:
:
$
30
$ 700
69 59
CC
Տ
$45.85
$45.85
25
$ 125 $ 100
* Displays of advertisements on hoardings are now disallowed as far as possible.
30. Typhoon and Rainstorm Damages.-During the typhoon and heavy rainfall on the morning of August 20th, a few private buildings were seriously affected, but it was unnecessary to take action in more than six cases.
The usual procedure was adopted in each instance, of inspecting and, where necessary, arranging for shoring. The most serious collapse occurred at No. 191, Nanchang Street, on N.K.I.L. 222. This caused the death of three persons, and in- juries to six others.
Q 15
B.0.0. Work.
31. Prosecutions.-The following is a tabulated statement of the cases in which legal proceedings were taken with regard to illegal works and other nuisances, the number of convictions obtained, and the amount of fines imposed:
Nature of Offence.
No. of Cases.
No. of Convictions.
Amount
of Fines.
Defective Mortar,
Defective Building Works,..
Illegal works (ie., divergence from approv-
ed plans, non-submission of plans before commencing building opera- tions, construction of illegal works, and occupation of matsheds, &c., without permission),
Other cases (ie, non-compliance with
notices issued under the Public Health & Buildings Ordinance),......
17
72
10 N
15
2
1,350 125
28
21
1,275
36
26
694
32. Cemeteries.-In connection with the provision of addi- tional grave spaces, the work of forming new terraces and paths, and repairing paths, channels and culverts proceeded as usual at the Chinese Cemeteries at Mount Caroline, Chai Wan, Kai Lung Wan, and Shum Wan in Hong Kong.
The construction of a new reinforced cement concrete bridge at the Kai Lung Wan Cemetery, and the repair to the Shum Wan Jetty were also carried out.
At the Chinese Cemeteries in Kowloon,-Kowloon Central and Sai Yu Shek,-similar works were also carried out.
In the Kowloon Central Cemeteries new nullahs were also constructed, and the work on the training of stream courses was continued.
33. Reclamations.-The following is a statement of the private reclamations which were completed or in progress during the year:
M.L.'s 430 and 431, North Point
Area in sq. ft.
(nearing completion),
833,975
K.I.L.'s 1558 to 1561, Ma Tau Kok
(in progress),
407,985
N.K.M.L.'s 6 and 7, Lai Chi Kok (considerable progress was made and construction of sea-wall com- menced),
374.400
630,000
Tsün Wan I.L.'s 1 to 4 (completed),
498,750
Tsün Wan M.L. 2 (work suspended-
nothing has been done during the year),
874,400
B.0.0. Work.
Q 16
In connection with the reclamation of about 215 acres of foreshore and sea-bed at the head of Kowloon Bay, referred to in previous years' Reports, work remains suspended.
34. Principal Works of a Private Nature.-The following blocks of business premises, etc., in the City were completed during the year:--
"Exchange Building"-Shop, Restaurant and Office Block-on M.L. 7, Sec. A, Des Voeux Road, Central.
St. Paul's Girls' School on I.L. 2459, Macdonnell
Road.
The following blocks of business premises, etc., in the City were in course of erection :·
Shops, and Office Block, on I.L. 619, Sec. B, R.P.,
Queen's Road, Central.
Building for the Sailors' and Soldiers' Home on I.L.
2616, Praya East.
European Flats on I.L. 2483, May Road.
The following is a list of the principal works in other parts of the City and outlying districts which were completed during the year:
13 Chinese houses on M.L.'s 42 and 43, Lee Tung
Street.
98 Chinese houses on M.L. 365 and I.L.'s 29 and 457,
Percival Street, etc., (East Point Hill).
Theatre "Lee Theatre" -on I.L. 1452, Percival Street
and Sharp Street, East.
Church, School and Quarters on I.L. 2550, Soo Kun Po,
Sugar Refinery on Q.B.M.L. 1, Quarry Bay.
Refined Sugar Godown on Q.B.M.L. 1, Quarry Bay. Filter House on Q.B.M.L. 2, Quarry Bay.
Garbage Incinerator and Wash House on Q.B.I.L. 8,
Quarry Bay.
Godown on S.I.L.'s 503 and 504, Main Street, Shau
Ki Wan.
Hotel on M.L. 236, Sec. A, etc., Connaught Road,
West.
Hotel on M.L. 325, Connaught Road, Central, Dew
Vœux Road, Central, and Morrison Street
17
B.0.0. Work.
Restaurant on I.L. 834, Sec. B, s.s. 2, Queen's Road,
West.
2 Godowns (Ground floor) on M.L. 187, Secs. G and
H, French Street.
1 Godown (Ground floor) on M.L. 302, Des Voeux Road,
West.
10 Chinese houses on M.L. 239, R.P., Belcher's Street.
25 Chinese houses on M.L. 239 and I.L. 1355, Hee
Wong Terrace and Holland Street.
School on R.B.L. 51, Pokfulam.
A large garage and quarters on A.I.L. 97, Aberdeen.
A number of garages and sub-stations in various dis-
tricts.
The following is a list of the principal works in other parts of the City and outlying districts which were in course of erec- tion:-
A Godown on M.L.'s 113 and 114, Wanchai Road, was demolished, and the erection thereon of 6 Chinese houses (flats) were almost completed.
A Godown on M.L.'s 113 and 114, Praya East, was demolished and ટી new one was in course ci erection.
A Godown on I.L. 2623, Praya East.
The demolition and rebuilding of old property on I.L. 499 and M.L.'s 271 and 283, Tin Lok Lane, Praya East, Bowrington Road, and Wanchai Road.
Site formation and retaining walls on I.L. 1946 and extension, Broadwood Road, and Caroline Road, was in progress.
A large extension to the Generating Station of The Hong Kong Electric Co., Ltd., on M.L. 321, North Point.
Dyeworks on Crown Land near S.I.L. 527, Sai Wan
Ho.
Re-building of Ko Shing Theatre on M.L. 58 R.P.,
Queen's Road West.
Theatre on I.L.'s 48, R.P., and 601, R.P., Queen's
Road, Central, and Circular Pathway.
B.0.0. Work.
18
Girls' School on I.L. 590, Bonham Road.
Extension to The Nethersole Hospital on I.L.'s 590
and 1897, Bonham Road.
Site formation for 22 European houses on I.L. 2302, Stubbs Road, was nearing completion. Two houses were completed.
Site formation for 28 European houses on I.L. 2354, Stubbs Road, was nearing completion. Three houses were completed and one was in course of erection.
A block of 24 European flats on R.B.L. 78, Stubbg Road, (Hill District), near the Peak Hotel, was roofed in, and the interior work was in progress.
Site development for 28 European houses on R.B.L
245, Deep Water Bay, was nearing completion. Roads were completed and sullage drains almost completed.
The following is a list of the principal works in the Kowloon district which were completed during the year:--
Godown on K.M.L. 11, Canton Road.
Garage on K.I.L. 2087, Nathan Road.
Cinematograph Theatre on K.I.L.'s 1778 and 1930, Canton Road and Reclamation Street, Mong Kok Tsui.
Knitting Factory on K.M.L. 50, R.P., Pitt Street,
Mong Kok Tsui.
Shui Yut Kung Temple on K.I.L. 1974, Hak Po Street
and Shantung Street, Mong Kok Tsui.
Cinematograph Theatre on N.K.I.L. 992 and 1006, La.
Chi Kok Road.
Sugar Boiling Sheds on K.M.L. 77, Chung Hing Street.
Fuk Tsun Heung.
Girls' School on K.I.L. 2024, Shek Shan Road.
Nunnery on N.K.I.L. 1007, Ngau Chi Wan.
Godown and Workshops on K.I.L. 1404, Mok Cheong
Street, Ma Tau Kok.
Dyeworks on Lot 7162, S.D. 1, Sec. A, Chuk Ün.
Ginger Factory on Farm Lot 668, S.D. 4, Tai Po Road
Vermilion Factory on Lot 1065, S.D. 3, Lyemun.


Q 19
B.0.0. Work.
60 European houses on the Kau Lung Tong Estate.
A number of garages and sub-stations in various dis-
tricts.
The following is a list of the principal works in the Kowloon district which were in course of erection :-
Work on the "Peninsula Hotel" on K.I.L. 1461, Salisbury Road, was about to be resumed at the end of the year. The building was in the occupa- tion of the Military Authorities during the greater part of the year.
Cinematograph Theatre on K.I.L. 570 R.P., Nathan
Road.
School-"Ying Wah College"-on K.I.L. 1784, Bute Street and Sai Yeung Choi Street, Mong Kok Tsui.
School on K.I.L. 1568, Sec. A., s.s. 1, Tung Choi
Street, Mong Kok Tsui.
Sugar Factory on K.M.L. 48, R.P., Pitt Street, Mong
Kok Tsui.
Machine Workshop and Quarters on K.I.L. 1569, at the junction of Nelson and Fa Yuen Streets, Mong Kok Tsui.
Lubricating Oil Godown on K.M.L. 32, Kremer Street,
Tai Kok Tsui.
Preserved Fruit Factory "on K.I.L. 2088, Fuk Tsun
Street, Tai Kok Tsui.
Seven Workshops on N.K.I.L. 435, R.P., Tin Liu
Street, Sham Shui Po.
Sugar Candy Factory on N.K.I.L. 152, Yen Chow
Street, Sham Shui Po.
Ground Nut Oil Factory on N.K.I.L.'s 1023 and 1024,
Hai Tan Street, Sham Shui Po.
Vermilion Factory on K.I.L.'s 1956, 1957, 1965, and
1966, Pak Tai Street, Ma Tau Kok.
Dyeworks on Lot 5784, S.D. 1, Kowloon City.
Dyeworks on Lots 5779 and 5782, S.D. 1, Kowloon
City.
Knitting Factory on K.I.L. 1678, Tam Kung Road,
Kowloon City.
Distillery Sheds on Tsün Wan I.L. 3, D.D. 355, Tsün
Wan;
Vermilion Factory on Tsün Wan I.L. 4, Tsün Wan.
E.0.0. Work.
Q 20
Church on K.I.L. 2059, Ho Mun Tin.
Seventy European houses on the Kau Lung Tong
Estate.
35. Valuations and Resumptions.-The sub-department known as the Valuation and Resumptions Office makes all the property valuations required by the Government for various pur- poses including the valuations for resumptions for street widen- ing and the development of areas in accordance with the approved Town Planning Scheme. The number of resumptions actually effected during the year is given in the schedule on page 22.
The total number of properties valued for all purposes during the year was 464 with a total value of $21,557,522.
Proceedings under the Crown Lands Resumption Ordinance were carried out as under:
Lots resumed.
Government's offer based on Valuation and
Resumption Officer's Valuations.
Amount of Claim Submitted.
Result of proceedings.
$$3
K.I.L. 894, Sec. A.
45,830.00
146,550.00
Board awarded $45,830.00
Tsat Tsz Mui Lots Nos. 5
and 68.
6,890.00
No claim submitted.
6,890.00
Tsat Tsz Mui Lots Nos.
10 and 19.
4,423.00
Do.
4,423.00
820.63
Do.
958.38
To Kwa Wan Lots Nos. 11, 31 and 39 and G.L. 37 Secs. A and B.
37 lots on the Kai Tak Reclamation owned by the Kai Tak Land In- vestment Company and containing a net area of 4,487,400 square feet.
1,001,250.00
2,000,000.00
No Board sat. The Com. pany ultimately agreed to accept and was paid by Government the sum of $1,001,250 for all the lots with the exception of Secs. L, M and V of N.K.I.L. 133 containing an area of 21,442 square feet.
21
B.0.0. Work
In addition to the valuations for resumptions given in the schedule on page 22 the undermentioned valuations for other purposes were made:
1. For the Estate Duty Commissioner-146 properties
totalling $3,965,551.
2. For the Colonial Treasurer for securities-25 pro-
perties totalling $190,562.
3. Special valuations required by Government of sundry
properties-86 properties totalling $718,794.13.
4. Confidential valuations required by Government-17
properties totalling $2,057,237.
5. For Stamp Duties-27 properties totalling $540,750.
6. For Registrar of Supreme Court-8 properties total-
ling $264,000.
7. For insurance of Government Buildings at present held by the Military Authorities and others--two properties totalling $606,000.
8. For rental of properties taken over for occupation by the Military Authorities-29 properties totalling a capital value of $8,840,915.
·
9. For resumption of areas required for flight gap in connection with the Aerodrome for civil aviation on the Kai Tak Reclamation-78 lots totalling $34,732.29.
10. For Opium Monopoly' Costing Scheme-9 properties
totalling $2,834,650.
#
B.0.0. Work.
Resumptions in connection with Street Widening, New Roads, Improvement Schemes, etc.
Number of
Purpose of Resumption.
Vote debited.
properties Amount paid. dealt with.
Total area in
Average
square feet.
per square foot.
Remarks.
Hong Kong.
$
(a.) Street Widenings
Head 31, sub-head
11
$5
9,933.28
3,244
3.062
49
(b.) New Roads
do.
5,690.00
2,581 2.204
(c.) Development Schemes
.do.
3
5,078.00
(d.) Sundry purposes...
do.
12
119,556.42
13,000
1,520 3.340
9.196
(e.) Extension to Govern-
ment Civil Hospital.
do.
253,500.00
41,771
6.072
$ 393,757.70
Kowloon.
Development in accord-
Head 31,
5
52,922.83
29,325
1.804
ance
with the Town
sub-head
Planning Scheme.
76
do.
do.
41
21,444.97
village.
lots
New Kowloon.
$
$
1
74,367.80
Includes $100,000 for the resumption of I.L.'s 1614, 1643, 1644 and 1645, Po Hing Fong.
Resumption of old Dioce- san Boys' School, I.L. 831.
$523.04 per lot
Development in
in accord-
Head 31,
78
34,955.21
¡
$448.14 per lot
ance
with the Town
sub-head
Planning Scheme.
100
village lots
Aerodrome for Civil Avia-
Loan
tion.
Account
37 lots on the Kai Tak
$1,001,250.00 4,465,958 0.224
Resumed under the Crown
Lands Resumption Or- dinance.
Reclama-
tion
190
GRAND TOTALS
|
properties $1,504,330.70 4,557,399 square feet.
1 á
23
P.W.R. Hong Kong.
PUBLIC WORKS, RECURRENT.
HONG KONG.
36. Maintenance of Buildings.-General renovation work and repairs to Government Buildings were carried out in accordance with the deferred programme referred to in last year's Report.
Estimates,
Expenditure,
$170,000.00
$161,297.43
37. Improvements to Buildings.-The principal improve- ments carried out under this heading comprised the following:
Belilios School-Erection of glazed partitions to subdivide the existing classrooms. Harbour Office.-Connecting the wing. previously used by the Imports and Exports Department to the main building, and sundry other alterations in connection there- with. Magistracy.-Filling in verandah openings with glazed casement windows. Beaconsfield Arcade.-Strengthening the verandahs by erecting stanchions, and sundry alterations to provide accommodation for the Port Development Office and the Central Medical Store. Government House.-Sundry altera- tions such as replacing wooden floors with concrete and tiles, tilling the walls of the servery with white glazed tiles, etc. New Government Offices.---Alterations to provide accommodation for the Electrical Office on one floor. Wanchai Store.-Erection of partitions to provide office accommodation for Europeans. Police Training School.-Erection of temporary bath room. Mountain Lodge.-Removal of verandah, erection of window, and substitu- tion of framed glazed doors and shutters. Supreme Court.-Pro- vision of additional lavatory accommodation.
Estimates,
Expenditure,
$26,000.00
$21,397.90
38. Maintenance of Lighthouses.-The deferred programme of works for the maintenance of Lighthouses was carried out.
Estimates,
Expenditure,
$4,000.00
$1,841.43
39. Maintenance of Furniture.-During the year six com- plete sets of furniture for the European Clerical Staff Quarters in Ventris Road were supplied and four part sets added, where necessary, to the Senior and Subordinate Officers' Quarters. In addition, six part sets were supplied to Queen's Gardens Flats and 110 articles were provided for offices and schools.
*
P.W.R. Hong Kong.
Q 24
Repairs were effected to many existing articles for their proper maintenance.
Estimates,
Sup. Vote,
Expenditure,
$23,000.00
10,000.00
$33,000.00
$29,707.93
40. Maintenance of Roads and Bridges in City.\
Approxi-
Improvements to Roads and Bridges in City. f mately 64 mules of roads.-The road surfaces were generally maintained in a satisfactory condition, the asphaltum treatment of the carriageways being still further extended throughout the City.
At the Government Quarry the total quantity of stone of various grades which passed through the crushers was 26,997 cubic yards, of which 4,791 cubic yards were made into tar macadam, 628 cubic yards into sand carpeting, and 26,286 cubic yards were delivered direct to various works. Further, 16,865 granolithic paving slabs were provided for use on footways, 247 reinforced concrete standards for railings and fencing, and 3 garden seats were made.
The following are particulars of the additional areas laid with improved surfacing during the year:
Substitution of granite sets for macadam or
concrete,
Substitution of 2" asphaltum laid on cement
concrete bed for macadam,
Square Yards.
357
Tarring and sanding,
3,083
10,852
2,282
$125,000.00
$120,677.33
21" granolithic paying slabs laid on footways,
Estimates,
Expenditure,
41. Maintenance of Roads and Bridges, outside City.\ Improvements to Roads and Bridges, outside Cityj Approximately 78 miles of roads.—The road surfaces generally were maintained in a satisfactory manner.
The Island Road between the Aberdeen Village and the junction of Deep Water Bay Brickworks Path was strengthened with tar macadam and tar painted.
&
Q 25
P.W.R. Hong Kong.
The following are particulars of the improved surfacing introduced on a number of roads in addition to those mentioned in previous Reports:-
Tarring and sanding,
24" granolithic paving slabs laid on footways,
Substitution of tar macadam for ordinary
macadam,
Estimates,
Expenditure,
Square Yards
27,000
415
1,300
$136,000.00
$133,565.66
42. Maintenance of Telephones, including all Cables.-The lines and instruments were maintained in good order, and twenty-two exchange telephones and nine extensions were installed during the year.
Alterations and improvements were effected to existing lines, and the aerial route between Victoria Gap, Pokfulam, and Aberdeen was reconstructed.
on
The submarine cable to Waglan was damaged during the typhoon on the 20th August, but it was repaired and working again on the 6th September. The submarine cable to Gap Rock also sustained damage, apparently by an anchor. the 17th May; it was repaired and working by the 26th May. The submarine cable between Tai Kok Tsui and Stonecutters' Island also suffered damage during the typhoon on the 20th August, and, after effecting the necessary repairs, was again operating on the 16th September. The telephone cable to Cape D'Aguilar Wireless Telegraph Station was damaged during the thunderstorm on the 13th September, temporary repairs being effected on the same day. It was finally in order by the 20th idem.
Estimates, Expenditure,
$9,000.00 $8,876.27
43. Maintenance of Sewers, Nullahs, etc. The sewers, stormwater drains, and trained nullahs generally were cleansed. repaired and maintained in good condition, the open nullahs and channels in the City of Victoria and in the Shau Ki Wan listrict being cleansed by the Sanitary Department. The automatic flushing tanks were operated during periods of low tide. Sand deposits were cleared as they occurred.
The Septic Tanks at Lugard Road, Repulse Bay, Deep Water Bay, near R.B.L. 137, Pokfulam Road, and at F.L.'s 29 and 30, Pokfulam, were periodically sludged.
P.W.R. Hong Kong.
Q 26
All metal work in connection with the various drainage systems was inspected, and, where found necessary, repaired and tarred. Repairs were also effected to septic tanks, sewers, stormwater drains, nullahs and channels, the most important being to those situated as shewn below:
Sewers.
Near No. 503, The Peak, be- tween Lamp-posts 506 and 507 in Stubbs Road; near Homestead Flats, The Peak; in Garden Road opposite Lower Peak Tram- way; on the West side of the nullah, Shing Wo Road; in Peak Road. South-West of "Bahar Lodge".
Stormwater Drains.
In Queen's Road, East, junc-
tion of St. Francis Yard.
-
Nullahs.
Parapet walling at Soo Kun Po nullah; parapet walling at Tai Hang nullah; West wall of Glenealy nullah be- low Robinson Road; walls at Shek Tong Tsui nullah; nullah wall at Tai Shing Paper Mills, Aberdeen.
Channels.
Between Pokfulam Road and Sands Street; above Bowen Road, East side of Military Hospital.
Many defective traps, gullies, gratings, etc., were renewed, and a number of old disused drains of various sizes and types destroyed and .filled in.
Estimates,
Sup. Vote,
Expenditure,
$20,000.00
2,000.00
$22,000.00
$21,058.68
44. Gas Lighting,-City, Suburbs and Hill District.—The total number of lamps in use at the end of the year in the City and its precincts was 1,592, an increase of 33 over the figures for the previous year, and in the Hill District 223, an increase of one as compared with 1926.
Improvements to the existing lighting in Des Voeux Road, West, and Queen's Road, West, were made by altering the square lanterns into. "Littleton" swan-neck lights.
Estimates, Expenditure,
$95,000.00
$91,597.35
27
P.W.R. Hong Kong.
45. Electric Lighting,-City, Hill District and Shau Ki Wan.-The number and positions of incandescent lamps in the principal roads of the City are as under:---
City of Victoria
(Along Tramway route, 83- 100 C.P.
Chater Road, junction
with Jackson Road, Chater Road, junction with Murray Road,. JConnaught Road, Cen- tral, near the Star Ferry Wharf,
Des Voeux Road, Cen- tral, junction with Jackson Road,
Various Roads,
1- 300 **
2- 100
1- 200
1- 300 60-1,000
"
Aberdeen,
25- 100
"1
Aplichau Village,
12- 100
Barker Road,
2- 16
Bowen Road,, .............
19-
32
""
Breezy Point Government Quarters,
1-
50
"
Brewin Path,
6
32
Excelsior Terrace,
4
32
""
Harlech Road,
18-
32
""
Homestead Path,
8-
100
Kennedy Town Pier,
1-
50
Lugard Road,
26-
32
Latrines,
79-
8
Magazine Gap Road,
25-
32 ""
Morrison Hill Road,
5-
100
Mount Cameron Road,
11.
""
100 ""
Mount Davis Road,
22-
100
North Point Cable Area,
Path from Bowen Road to May Road,
T CO
1-
100
""
6
32
""
Pokfulam Road,
26
100
""
Queen's Pier,
2-
32 ""
Do.
5- 200 ""
Do.
&
600
Sassoon Road,
11-
100 ""
Shau Ki Wan Road,
28-
50
4
100
>
""
Do.
Stanley,
Stubbs Road,
Tregunter Path,
Wanchai Gap Road-Bowen Road, Wong Nei Chong Recreation Grounds,.
Traffic Control Lights.
12- 32 "
103- 100
18- 32 39
20-
100
5- 100
??
Bonham Road, junction with High
Street,
2-
50 C.P.
Caine. Road, junction with Arbuthnot
Road,
3-
Cain Road, near No. 8 Police Station,
2-
5809
P.W.R. Hong Kong.
28
Garden Road, junction with Lower
Albert Road,
3-
50 C.P.
Garden Road, junction with Queen's
Road, East,
3—
Pokfulam Road, junction with Bonham
Road,
3-
영영
50
50.,,
Queen's Road East, junction with
Arsenal. Street,
2- 100 1- 100
"
Stubbs Road, junction with Gap Road,
In addition to these, the Taikoo Dockyard and Engineering Company of Hong Kong provide 10 lamps, each having a cluster of three-100 C.P. incandescent lamps for lighting the road adjacent to their property, and the Taikoo Sugar Refining Com- pany also provide and light seven 2,000 C.P. incandescent lamps for the roads adjacent to their property.
Estimates, Expenditure,
$40,000.00 $39,939.32.
46. Extension of Lighting.-Thirty-five Gas and one Electric lamps were installed during the year.
Estimates, Expenditure,
$3,000.00 $2,894.78
47. Typhoon and Rainstorm Damages.-The work executed under this heading mainly arose through damages caused by the typhoon of the 20th August. Considerable damage to windows, jalousies and roofs occurred at the following buildings in a varying degree:-Central Police Station; Government Offices, Albert Road; Fire Station Building; Imports and Exports Sheds; Government Civil Hospital; Police Training School; Gough Hill Police Station; Mountain Lodge; "The Eyrie"; "Lysholt"; Homestead flats and houses; Government Pavilions, 157, The Peak; Peak Hospital; Leighton Hill Quarters; Queen's Gardens flats; and Tsat Tsz Mui Police Station. Other Government buildings suffered to a smaller extent. In addition to the above, the matshed. Market at Wanchai was blown down and so was that of the Chair Coolies at The Peak.
Landslides occurred on Aberdeen New Road, Deep Water Bay Road, Island Road, Mount Davis Road, Road from Wong Nei Chong Gap to Repulse Bay, Shek O Road, Stubbs Road, Tai Hang Road, and on several others.
Dangerous boulders were subsequently removed from the hillside above Shau Ki Wan Village, the slope at the rear of Quarry Bay School, and from the hillside above the Bowen Road Conduit,
29
P.W.R. Hong Kong.
Repairs were also necessary to several nullahs, culverts, stormwater drains and sewers, including the following:-
Nullahs at:·
Cadogan Street, Chatham Path, Glenealy, Monmouth Path, Shau Ki Wan East, Shek Tong Tsui, Soo Kun Po, Smithfield, The Albany, Wong Nei Chong, and Yeung Wo Nursing Home.
Culverts and Stormwater
Drains at:
Caroline Hill Road, North Point, Smithfield, Wanchai
Road, and Zetland Street.
Sewers:
From "Craig Ryrie", Mt. Austin, and sewer outfall, Kellett Bay.
Estimates, Sup. Vote,
Expenditure,
$100,000.00
123,700.00
$223,700.00
$174,047.96
48. Maintenance of City and Hill District Waterworks.— The year opened with a restricted supply in all the Rider Main Districts.
The following table shews the restrictions which were in operation during the year:-
District.
Period.
Remarks.
West of Eastern
Street,
West of Garden
Road,
do.
West of Eastern
Street,
January 1st to 7th...12 hours' supply daily
January 8th to 30th February 3rd to April
30th
November 18th to
December 31st
by Rider Mains. Total Period of restricted restricted supply =162 days.
The rainfall, for the fifth year in succession, was well above the average and was well distributed throughout the year.
A comparative statement of the local rainfall in inches for the year at various points is given on page 33.
The consumption during the year is the highest ever recorded, and from June to October inclusive the average daily consumption was 10.37 million gallons. This was undoubtedly largely due to the influx of refugees from Canton.
The total quantity of water stored in the impoundir reservoirs on the 1st of Januarv amounted to 1,638.91 million gallons, of which 321.26 million gallons in the gravitation reservoirs and 1,317.65 million gallons in the low-level reservoirs required pumping. Storage reached a minimum on 25th March when the total was 1,119.13 million gallons there being 304.11 million gallons in the gravitation reservoirs.
P.W.R. Hong Kong.
Q. 30
at or over their permanent overflow
The reservoirs were levels for the following periods:-
Reservoirs.
Tai Tam,
Tai Tam Bywash,
Capacity to permanent
overflow level. (Million gallons.)
384.80
22.36
?
Tai Tam Intermediate,..
195.90
Tai Tam Tuk,
1,419.00
Wong Nei Chong,
Pokfulam,
30.34
66.00
Period.
44 days between 23rd May and 2nd Septem- ber.
35 days between 23rd May and 1st Septem- ber.
262 days between 1st January and 31st December.
141 days between 26th May and 14th October. 14 days between 23rd May and 22nd August. 37 days between 23rd May and 2nd Septem- ber.
The rainfall for the year amounted to 107.87 inches (Observatory) or 7.09 inches more than last year and was 21.81 inches above the average for the last forty-four years. Although there was considerable rainfall during February, March and April, the wet season did not set in until May. The first heavy rains fell at the end of March when the reservoirs commenced to rise, and the dry season set in late, the last considerable rain falling on the 12th October.
The maximum quantity of water impounded in all the reservoirs during the year reached 2,118.41 million gallons on the 2nd and 3rd July. The total quantity of water remaining in the reservoirs at the end of the year was 1,457.57 million gallons.
The total quantity of water pumped from Tai Tam Tuk Reservoir during the year amounted to 1,304.61 million gallons. of which 1,128.22 million gallons were pumped by the new Simpson Engine and 176.39 million gallons by the Tangye Engines. This total exceeds that of last year by 27.85 million gallons.
No. 1 Engine (Tangye) ran
No. 2
1
No. 3
(Simpson)
No. 4
No. 5
30 days.
123
134
121
19
151
""
Q 31
P.W.R. Hong Kong.
The following is a statement of the cost of pumping during 1926 and 1927:
TAI TAM TUK PUMPING STATION.
1926.
1927.
c.
$ c.
Coal,
72,161.72
55,644.50*
Wages,
15,859.49
16,663.81
Miscellaneous, including repairs
and stores other than coal,
10,018.10
7,697.45
Total,
$ 98,039.31
80,005.76
*This is the value of coal consumed during the year. Coal to the value of $12,637.50 was carried forward from 1926 to 1927, and coal to the value of $12,325 was carried forward from 1927 to 1928. The price of coal was $12.50 per ton during the whole year in 1927.
The total quantity of water supplied during the year amounted to 3,288.41 million gallons filtered, and 42.26 million gallons unfiltered, making a grand total of 3,330.67 million gallons or 459.13 million gallons more than during 1926.
The average consumption of filtered water per head per day for all purposes throughout the year was about 21.7 gallons. In arriving at this figure the population has been estimated at 413,640. Full details of consumption, etc., will be found in Annexes C and D.
The analyses made by the Government Analyst show that the water was of good quality throughout the year, whilst the results obtained by bacteriological examination were most satisfactory.
The quantity of water pumped to the High Level District of the City was 181.63 million gallons, equal to an average daily consumption of about 498,000 gallons, whilst 80.43 million gallons were pumped to the Hill District, giving an average daily consumption of 220,000 gallons. As compared with 1926 there was an increase of 3.79 million gallons pumped to the High Level District and an increase of 13.48 million gallons to the Hill District.
P.W.R. Hong Kong.
Q 32
The grand total pumped during the year to the High Level District amounted to 262.06. million gallons as compared with 244.79 million gallons in 1926, an increase of 17.27 million gallons. Tabulated statements containing particulars of the quantities of water pumped to the High Levels of the City and to the Hill District respectively will be found in Annexe E.
All engines, motors and station buildings have been kept in good order throughout the year. The work of overhauling the valves on the principal mains in the City was continued during the year, 334 being thoroughly repaired.
The number of meters in use at the end of the year aggre- gated 3,266 in the City and 245 in the Hill District making a grand total of 3,511, as compared with 3,239 and 242 or a total of 3,481 at the end of 1926. These figures do not include 61 meters in use at Pokfulam.
The quantity of water supplied by meters was as follows:-
Filtered:-
Government Buildings, for all
purposes, free of charge, ... 146.68 million gallons.
Trade,
385.64
""
,"
Domestic (City and High Level), 340.84
""
""
Domestic (Hill District),
77.03
Unfiltered,
42.26
J
རྒྱུ
TOTAL
992.45
These figures show an increase of 24.23 million gallons in the quantity supplied by meters as compared with 1926.
New services were constructed or old ones altered, improved, repaired, or connected to the mains to the number of 4,172 and 76 supplies were laid on for building purposes.
The number of inspections of services carried out was 9,905. Defective services were found in 267 cases all of which were put in proper repair after the usual notices had been served.
Estimates,
Expenditure,
$255,000.00
$235,175.46
Q 33
A comparative statement of the local rainfall in inches for the year at various points is given below.
P.W.R. Hong Kong.
Shek Lei
Tai Po
Shing Mun Shing Mun Shing Mun Reservoir Reservoir Reservoir
No. 1.
No. 2.
No. 3.
Kowloon
Reservoir
No. 4.
Pui
Reservoir
No. 5.
Tai Tam Wong Nei Public Tai Tam Tuk Pokfulam Chong Gardens. Reservoir. Reservoir. Reservoir. Reservoir. Quarters.
January
0.310
0.44
0.19
0.10
0.28
0.13
0.09
0.11
0.02
0.34
0.19
February
4.350
4.66
3.99
4.16
3.60
4.18
4.64
5.18.
5.36
4.22
5.10
3.94
March
4.535
4.90
5.68
5.77
3.86
5.82
6.48
10.02
10.02
7.82
5.26
4.21
April
7.125
8.08
6.44
6.22
7.31
7.57
7.81
7.65
7.59
7.02
7.33
5.84
May
25.445
26.88
23.21
19.87
23.09
21.42
15.82
Under repair|
20.60
18.48
18.68
17.61
June
11.680
13.30
15.70
17.82
5.67
11.14
9.65
11.31
11.76
10.17
10.82
7.30
July
18.735
21.85
25.01
14.86
23.12
27.03
29.64
33.08
33.09
31.74
24.82
19.02
August
20.905
23.37
15.89
12.98
18.25
19.76
8.66
25.67
25.03
24.01
23.52
18.01
September
6.165
6.59
8.80
8.31
4.15
8.60
5.44
5.15
5.52
4.52
4.78
3.37
October
5.420
6.46
6.68
6.60
5.52
6.32
4.53
6.73
7.19
6.50
6.11
4.83
November
1.825
1.32
0.87
1.08
0.54
1.25
2.20
1.07
1.11
1.01
1.22
0.86
December
1.370
2.27
2.18
1.75
1.74
0.94
0.20
1.13
1.20
0.95
1.25
0.98
Total, 1927,
107.865
120.12
114.64
99.52
97.13
114.03
95.20
107.08
128.58
116.46
109.23
86.16
Total, 1926,
100.780
96.77 103.37
92.83
104.49
146.36
87.63
90.52
37.43
33.42
97.13
80.75
Increase or Decrease. +7.085
+23.35
+11.27
+-6.69
-7.36
-32.33
+7.57
+16.56
+91.15
+-83.04
+-12.10
+-5.41
Month.
Royal
Observa-
tory.
41
:
-.
D
P.W.R. Hong Kong.
Q 34.
49. Maintenance of Waterworks, Shau Ki Wan.-A con- stant supply of, water by fountains was maintained throughout the year, which was rendered possible by the temporary con- nection to the City Mains, the total quantity of water drawn therefrom amounted to 1.86 million gallons.
The total consumption of filtered water for the year was 68.23 million gallons which includes 3.49 million gallons supplied to the boat population giving an average of 186,000 gallons per day. An unfiltered supply of 3.04 million gallons was given to the Barracks at Sai Wan, which with the total of filtered supply stated above amounted to 71.27 million gallons or 195,000 gallons per day. The details of the consumption are given in Annexe F.
There were 65 meters in use at the close of the year.
Estimates, Expenditure,
$1,200.00 $ 828.83
50. Maintenance of Waterworks, Aberdeen.-A satisfactory supply of water was maintained throughout the year, the total consumption being 31.16 million gallons inclusive of 3.45 million gallons supplied through the water-boat station, as compared with a total consumption of 30.36 million gallons and a water- boat supply of 4.42 million gallons during 1926.
The average consumption throughout the year was 85,000 gallons per day, the details of which are given in Annexe G.
There were 16 meters in use at the close of the year.
Estimates, Expenditure,
$1,200.00 $ 715.91
51. Maintenance of Waterworks, Repulse Bay. The total quantity of water supplied during the year amounted to 6.42 million gallons or an average consumption of 17,000 gallons per day against a total supply of 8.10 million gallons and an average consumption of 22,000 gallons per day during 1926.
There were 24 meters in use at the close of the year.
Estimates,
Expenditure,
$1,000.00 $ 692.67
52. Water Account (Meters, etc.).~The number of meters examined and repaired during the year was 1,630. A systematic overhaul of all meters is now being carried out.
The total expenditure for the year was $17,300.66.
Estimates,
Expenditure, ......
$24,000.00
$17,300.66
}
3
35
P.W.R. Hong Kong..
53. Maintenance of Praya Wall and Piers:-The principal items executed under this heading were the general repairs to the Keng Shan Wharf, Western Market Pier and Jubilee Street Pier at a cost of $3,496.92, $1,912.57 and $1,173.44 respec- tively.
Repairs were also carried out to the sea-wall from Causeway Bay to Hing Fat Street and from Hing Fat Street to Watson Road and a portion near Kennedy Town.
Estimates, Expenditure,
$20,000.00 $17,865.67
54. Maintenance of Public Cemeteries.-The cemeteries generally were maintained in a satisfactory condition, and the work of forming an additional burial area at the Colonial Ceme- tery was started.
Estimates, Expenditure,
$2,500.00 $2,491.75
55. Maintenance of Chinese Cemeteries.-The work carried out under this heading has been alluded to in paragraph 32 of this Report.
Estimates, Expenditure,
56. Maintenance
of
$2,500.00 $2,497.01
Public Recreation Grounds.-The
various grounds were maintained in good order. The use of departmental labour for the purpose of mowing grass, cleansing ditches, etc., was continued.
Estimates, Expenditure,
$4,000.00
$3,869.78
57. Dredging_Foreshores.-The No. 1 Grab Dredger was employed at the following places and removed the quantities of material as stated hereunder during the year:-
Drain outfalls,
Sanitary and other Piers,
On hire,
TOTAL,
Cubic Yards.
13,746
13,287
620
27,653
:
P.W.R. Kowloon,
Q 36
The greater part of the dredged material was deposited on the Sham Shui Po Reclamation, the remainder being dumped either on the Kowloon Bay Reclamation or outside the Harbour limits.
The Dredger was taken to the Kwong Hip Loong Shipyard for the annual overhaul on 25th January at a cost of $2,279 and was re-commissioned on the 9th of March. For the hire of the Dredger a sum of $393.60 was received during the year.
Estimates, Expenditure,
$14,000.00
$10,572.05
4
58. Stores Depreciation.—The adjustment of store values and reconditioning of old stores have been met from this vote, amounting to $10,758.99.
The following sums were credited to this vote:-$6,184.30 being rebate on Freight Charges in connection with stores pur- chased in England through the Crown Agents; $4,539.09 being the value of stores returned which had been issued prior to 1927.
The result showed a net expenditure on this vote of $35.60.
Estimates, Expenditure,
$100.00 $ 35.60
59. Boundary Stones.—A statement of the boundary stones fixed is given in paragraph 23 of this Report.
Estimates, Expenditure,
$5,000.00 $2,407.67
60. Survey of Colony.-An account of the principal survey work executed during the year is given in paragraphs 19, 20, 21, 22, and 25 of this Report.
Estimates, Expenditure,
P. W. R. KOWLOON.
$5,000.00 $4,287:03
61. Maintenance of Buildings.-General renovation and re- pairs to Government Buildings were executed under the usual annual programme of works, and they were maintained in a satisfactory condition.
Estimates, Expenditure,
$35,000.00 $22,250.09
62. Improvements to Buildings.-The works effected under this heading were small and of a minor nature. The chief items were the erection of a kitchen at the Kun Chung Market, Mos-
37
P.W.R. Kowloon.
quito proofing the Duty Room at the Kowloon Hospital, and improvements to the ventilation of the temporary class rooms at the Central British School, Kowloon.
Estimates,
Expenditure,
$6,000.00
$4,602.97
63. Maintenance of Furniture.-Four part sets of furniture to the Subordinate Officers' Quarters, and fifteen articles for the use of offices and schools were supplied; in addition, considerable repairs were effected during the year.
Estimates,
Expenditure,
64. Maintenance of Roads and Bridges.
Improvements to Roads and Bridges.
$5,000.00
$2,459.40
Approximately
361 miles of roads.—The road surfaces 'were generally main- tained in a satisfactory manner.
The following are particulars of the additional areas laid with improved surfacing during the year:—
Square Yards.
Tarring and sanding,
110,741
21" granolithic paving slabs laid on
footways,
6,720
Estimates,
$72,500.00
Expenditure,
$64,617.78
65. Maintenance of Telephones.-The lines and instruments were maintained in good order. An additional telephone was installed, and a number of alterations and improvements to the existing lines were carried out during the year.
Telephones and bells were installed in the new offices of the Mechanical Engineer of the Kowloon-Canton Railway at Hung Hom.
Estimates, Expenditure,
$2,500.00 $2,202.74
66. Maintenance of Sewers. Nullahs, etc.-The sewers, stormwater drains, and trained nullahs were cleansed, repaired and maintained in good condition, the open channels and nullahs being cleansed by the Sanitary Department. The automatic flushing tanks were kept working continuously and sand deposits as they accumulated were removed.
P.W.R. Kowloon.
38
Repairs were made to the sewers, stormwater drains, and nullahs, the most important being to those situated as shewn below:-
Sewers.
In Peking Road, Tsim Sha Tsui; near the Slaughter House, Ma Tau Kok, and in Nathan Road, Kowloon Point.
Stormwater Drains.
North-West of the Y.M.C.A. building at Salisbury Road; at inlet to the stormwater drain at
Lo Lung Hang; dam at the summit of the stormwater drains in Lo Lung Hang Valley; and West of the Kow- loon Hospital, Kau Lung Tong.
Nullahs.
Waterloo Road nullah; branch nullah off Waterloo Road; and nullah below the Railway Bridge, Yau Ma Ti.
Many defective traps, gullies, gratings, etc., were renewed, and a number of old disused drains destroyed and filled in. All metal work in connection with the drainage systems was in- spected, and, where found necessary, repaired and tarred.
Estimates, Expenditure,
$9,000.00 $6,159.02
67. Gas Lighting.-The total number of lamps in use at the end of the year was 536, an increase of 11 over the previous year.
Estimates, Expenditure,
$32,000.00 $26,961.55
68. Electric Lighting.-The total number of lamps in use. at the end of the year, all of which are incandescent, was 288, as for the previous year.
Estimates,
Expenditure,
$17,000.00
$16,114.77
69. Extension of Lighting.-Eleven gas lamps were 0. stalled during the year in the Kowloon District.
Estimates, Expenditure,
$1,000.00 644.74
70. Typhoon and Rainstorm Damages.-The damage done to Government Buildings in Kowloon by the typhoons of July and August was chiefly to roofs, windows and jalousies of the following buildings:-The Royal Observatory,
Observatory, Disinfecting Station, Tsim Sha Tsui, Mong Kok, and Yau Ma Ti Police
རྞ,,、、°
Q 39
P.W.R. Kowloon.
Stations. In addition, the sea-wall and pier at Green Island were badly damaged by the seas, and matsheds which were blown down at the Royal Observatory, Junior School, and the Children's Playground at Chatham Road were restored.
Small washouts occurred at Chatham Road, King's Park, Kowloon City Road, Lai Chi Kok Road, Ma Tau Kok Road, Ma Tau Wei Road, Prince Edward Road and Waterloo Road. Many streets were cleared of debris deposited by the rains.
The nullahs in Waterloo and Gascoigne Roads and the catchpits at Hung Hom were completely, and the Mong Kok, Argyle Street, and Lo Lung Hang nullahs partly choked with spoil, the removal of which was effected as quickly as possible.
The public pier at Kowloon Point was damaged by typhoon seas on the 24th July. The repair work necessitated the replac- ing of five piles, reconstruction of the three sets of landing steps, and the removal and re-erection of all underwater ties, struts and braces, and it was progressing satisfactorily at the end of the year.
It is anticipated the pier will be ready for use in June, 1928.
Estimates,
Sup. Votes,
Expenditure,
$ 10,000.00 92,500.00
$102,500.00 $ 67,099.55
71. Maintenance of Waterworks.-Early in the year the Shing Mun supply was connected to the Kowloon system by an 18" C.I. pipe from the Reception Reservoir, and a consider- able quantity of water from Shing Mun has been used to augment the supply to the Peninsula.
A constant supply was maintained in all the districts throughout the year, and the consumption constitutes a record, being 30% in excess of 1926, whilst the daily consumption on a few occasions exceeded 4 million gallons. This may be attributed to the following causes:
(a.) Influx of Chinese refugees from Canton district. (b.) Larger number of metered services granted.
(c.) British Troops billeted on the Peninsula.
The total quantity supplied was 1,088.73 million gallons giving an average daily consumption of 2.98 million gallons or 18.5 gallons per head per day, taking an estimated population of 160,660. The details are given in Annexe H.
"
P.W.R. Kowloon.
40
The quantity of water stored in the impounding reservoirs on 1st January amounted to 406.45 million gallons and it reached a minimum on the 29th March with 213.42 million gal- lcns. The reservoir was at or above its permanent overflow level from 25th May to 16th October on various dates. The quantity of water remaining in the reservoirs at the end of the year amounted to 403.47 million gallons.
The analyses made by the Government Analyst and the examinations by the Bacteriologist were satisfactory.
*...
The various buildings. were kept in a good state of repair during the year. There were 1,937 meters in use at the close of the year, an increase of 374 as compared with 1926. House services were constructed, alter