Daily Information Bulletin - 1990s - 1995 - APR - ENG

 DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

ISSUED BY GOVERNMENT INFORMATION SERVICES BEACONSFIELD HOUSE, HONG KONG. TEL: 842 8777

Saturday, April 1,1995

Contents Page No,

Measures to improve future co-ordination in private sector/Govemment projects............................................................... 1

Ferry Piers in Central to be relocated in stages for reclamation. 2

Appointment of Justice of Appeal....................................... 4

Injured employees should be duly compensated........................... 4

Plea on slope safety................................................... 5

Lai Wah constituency electors reminded to vote tomorrow................ 7

Pilot job matching programme launched.................................. 7

More financial assistance to MACs and VOs.............................. 8

Fire safety advice for grave-sweepers.................................. 9

HK Stadium noise complaint report...................................... 9

Firing practice scheduled for two days in April....................... 10

New health centre improves service.................................... 10

Ching Ming Festival clinic service................................. 11

Fresh water cut in Central......................................... 11

Hong Kong Monetary Authority money market operations.................. 12

J

- 1 -

Measures to improve future co-ordination in private sector/Govemment projects *****

The Government has completed its study on the report from the Commissioner for Administrative Complaints on the noise problem caused by pop concerts at the Hong Kong Stadium.

The Chief Secretary, Mrs Anson Chan, who has personally considered the report, said that the Government accepts that there was a lack of overall co- ordination among various Government branches and departments during the construction of the project. She met recently with representatives of the Recreation and Culture Branch, the Planning, Environment and Lands Branch, the Urban Services Department and the Environmental Protection Department to consider how, in future, co-ordination within Government branches and departments could be improved for projects of a similar nature.

In particular, Mrs Chan has directed that the following measures be taken:

in future, for similar projects i.e. those that are not being constructed under standard Public Works Programme procedures, a policy branch will be designated to be the overall co-ordinator from the outset to ensure that all established Government procedures including those governing noise and safety standards are complied with.

a checklist of major issues relevant to the projects must be drawn up; and issues that cannot be resolved speedily must be brought to the attention of senior levels in Government with a view to solving them to the satisfaction of all parties concerned.

* in planning projects of a similar nature, the Government’s laid down procedures for application of an Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) must be followed; this is already the practice insofar as Government projects are concerned.

" I wish to assure the public that the Government will take every possible step to ensure that these measures are followed up, taking into consideration also the overall observations and recommendations in COMAC’s report,” Mrs Chan said.

"In the case of the Stadium, we accept that there was a lack of co-ordination on noise control although we must also bear in mind the very tight timeframe that had been set for completion of a complex project involving not only Government departments but also outside bodies.

2

”We want to avoid a recurrence of similar problems. Policy Secretaries have been asked to keep a closer watch over major projects particularly those involving organisations outside the Government such as the Royal Hong Kong Jockey Club.”

Meanwhile, the Chief Secretary noted that the Urban Council was to hold a test concert at the Stadium this month to test some new sound equipment which it was hoped would meet the audience’s expectation as regards sound, quality but also stay u -within the applicable noise limits.

Mrs Chan said the Government would, in co-operation with the Urban Council, continue to work positively towards a solution to overcoming the noise problem at the Stadium.

”If this test concert goes as well as expected then I am sure it will enable this magnificent facility to be put to optimal use, for the benefit of the whole community.

”We are pleased that the Rugby Sevens tournament was held there successfully and that a large international audience had this opportunity to enjoy both the event and the Stadium itself. This is certainly good for Hong Kong's international image," she added.

’.i •' *

End/Saturday, April 1, 1995

Ferry Piers in Central to be relocated in stages for reclamation ■1( ♦ ♦ * * * ,,y

■ -..‘..I, .U.>. r ..

The passenger ferry services from Central to outlying islands and three new ! towns will be reprovisioned in May to operate at the new piers formed by the Central >•_, Reclamation Phase I project.

The reprovisioning will be carried out in two stages. The first stage involves the q ferry services from Central to Lamma Island, Cheung Chau, Peng Chau and Mui Wo. The second stage will affect the ferry services from Central to Tuen Mun, Tsuen Wan, Tsing Yi and Tai O and hoverferry services to Cheung Chau, Peng Chau and Mui Wo.

"The piers will have to be relocated to make way for the Central Reclamation Phase I. This project comprises the reclamation of 20 hectares of land off Exchange Square for the expansion of the Central business area as well as the construction of the Airport Railway's Hong •. Kong Station," a Government spokesman said today (Saturday). -J •

"All ferry services will be maintained throughout the reclamation project.

3

"The reprovisioning will not take place until all the planned temporary facilities are properly provided and the progress of works will be closely monitored," he said.

The exact dates of reprovisioning will be announced later.

"The public will be fully informed of the reprovisioning arrangements and the ferry company will distribute leaflets to their regular ferry users and put up notices at the old piers advising of their impending moves," the spokesman said.

In the first stage, the ferry services to Lamma Island will be relocated to a temporary pier on the western side of the Central Reclamation near Rumsey Street.

"This temporary pier will be served by a two-metre wide covered walkway with lighting, a two-lane access road, and a point for private cars, taxis and goods vehicles to set down and pick up passengers and load and unload their cargo," said the spokesman.

At the same time, the ferry piers to Cheung Chau. Peng Chau and Mui Wo will also be relocated to a new pier on the eastern side of the reclamation, next to the temporary Central-Jordan Road pier.

In the second stage, the ferry services from Central to Tuen Mun, Tsuen Wan, Tsing Yi and Tai O as well as hoverferry services to Cheung Chau, Peng Chau and Mui Wo will also be moved to another new pier on the eastern side of the reclamation.

A new bus terminus adjacent to the new piers will be opened to replace the existing bus terminus at Harbour View Street for China Motor Bus routes no. 3A, 4, 7. 37.71,91 and 94.

The new piers on the eastern side of the reclamation will be served by a 4.5 metres wide covered walkway with lighting, linking the piers with Connaught Place and the Connaught Road Centre elevated walkway system .

There will also be a two-lane temporary access road, a layby for cars, taxis and goods vehicles, as well as waiting and assembly areas for passengers.

By July this year, a permanent road linking the new piers with Harbour View Street and Connaught Place and an additional layby for cars and taxis to pick up or set down passengers will be available.

At the same time, the promenade and waiting areas in front of these two new piers will be opened to the public.

V,

- *4

A paper on the relocation of these ferry piers was issued today ( Saturday ) to members of the five concerned District Boards, including Central and Western, Islands, Tsuen Wan, Tuen Mun and Kwai Tsing.

It will be discussed by the Central and Western District Board Traffic and Transport Committee at a meeting on April 6, to be followed by the other four District Boards.

End/Saturday, April 1, 1995

Appointment of Justice of Appeal

*****

The Judiciary announced today (Saturday) that Mr Justice Mayo, currently a High Court Judge, will take up his appointment as Justice of Appeal from Monday (3 April). Mr Justice Mayo’s appointment as Justice of Appeal was announced last December.

Mr Justice Mayo was born in England in 1937. He was admitted as a solicitor in England in 1961 and as a solicitor in Hong Kong in 1963. In 1967, he was admitted as a solicitor and barrister in West Australia. Before joining the Hong Kong Judiciary as Assistant Registrar in 1968, Mr Justice Mayo was in private practice. He was appointed Registrar of the Supreme Court in 1976 and Judge of the High Court in 1980. Mr Justice Mayo is married and has a son and a daughter.

End/Saturday, April 1, 1995

Injured employees should be duly compensated

*****

The Labour Department today (Saturday) reminded employers to compensate injured employees within the period prescribed by law.

In a recent case at Tsuen Wan Magistracy, a principal contractor, Nishimatsu Construction Company Limited in Tsim Sha Tsui, and its direct employer, Tapbo Civil Engineering Company in Cheung Sha Wan, were convicted of three charges related to compensation for an injured employee.

They had pleaded guilty to failure to compensate the injured employee within 21 days after the Certificate of Compensation Assessment (Form 5) was issued ; failure to pay to the said employee a surcharge upon expiry of the payment period and; failure to pay to the said employee a further surcharge upon expiry of three months after the payment period.

5

The Nishimatsu Construction Company Limited was fined $15,000 while Tapbo Civil Engineering Company was fined $12,000.

Labour Officer (Prosecutions), Mrs Tonia Leung, said under the Employees' Compensation Ordinance, an employer had to compensate an injured employee according to what was stated in the Certificate of Compensation Assessment (Form 5) within 21 days after the certificate was issued.

"If he fails to do so upon expiry of the payment period, he shall pay a surcharge to the employee. Failure to pay the outstanding compensation and the surcharge upon the expiry of three months after the payment period will incur a further surcharge. The maximum penalty for each of the three offences is $10,000," she added.

She emphasised that under the Employees' Compensation Ordinance, a principal contractor was liable to pay compensation to an employee employed by his sub-contractor.

End/Saturday, April 1, 1995

Plea on slope safety *****

With the onset of the wet season, the Buildings Department is urging owners to ensure that all drains, surface water channels on slopes and retaining walls are kept clear and free of debris.

"All buried services should also be examined for signs of leakage or water flow," the department's Assistant Director, Mr Mike Green, said today (Saturday).

To safeguard the public and bring private slopes and retaining walls up to the required safety standard, Mr Green pointed out that the Buildings Department issued "dangerous hillsides" notices under the Buildings Ordinance on the advice of the Geotechnical Engineering Office of the Civil Engineering Department.

Since the early 80s, about 400 such notices had been served on owners of private slopes.

"These notices require the owners to appoint an authorised professional to investigate the stability of the slopes in question, to design and supervise the necessary' landslip preventive works, to monitor stability until completion of the remedial works and to give warning of impending danger," Mr Green explained.

6

’’Some 100 such notices have yet to be compiled with. Most are being properly dealt with by professionals, either appointed by the private owners in compliance with such notices or appointed by the Building Authority in the owner’s default.

’’Where the Building Authority carries out works in the owner’s default, the owner will not only be responsible for the cost of work plus supervision charge, but also liable to prosecution and, on conviction, to a fine of $50,000 and imprisonment for one year.

"He is also liable to a further fine of $5,000 per day for the period during which the failure to comply with the notice continued," he said.

Mr Green explained that such notices were initiated by the Geotechnical Engineering Office either after receiving a report of a landslip or rockfall incident or as a result of a recommendation from a geotechnical study.

Under its ongoing Landslip Preventive Measures programme, the Geotechnical and Engineering Office is carrying out initial investigation of old slopes and retaining walls catalogued in 1977/78.

The catalogue includes features of both Government and private ownership. Not all these features are sub-standard but all have to be investigated.

The initial investigation of these features is carried out in a single programme financed by Government.

Private slopes found to be dangerous or liable to become dangerous are referred to the Buildings Department for serving notices.

Mr Green stressed that even after a notice had been complied with, continuing vigilance by the owners was necessary to ensure the slope remained safe.

"Every slope and retaining wall must be regularly inspected and any maintenance works must be undertaken timely by the owners.

"Owners ignoring preventive maintenance needs will place those living near a slope or passers-by at risk.

"Natural elements will progressively work to undermine the stability of any slope, bringing with it the risk of collapse and injury to persons as well as damage to property," he cautioned.

End/Saturday, April 1, 1995

7

Lai Wah constituency electors reminded to vote tomorrow *****

The 7,346 electors of the Lai Wah constituency are urged to vote in the Kwai Tsing District Board by-election in respect of their constituency tomorrow (Sunday).

Two polling stations will be opened from 7.30 am to 10.30 pm.

They are Tung Wah Group of Hospitals' Ko Ho Ning Memorial Primary School in Lai Yiu Estate and The Incorporated Owners of Lai Chi Kok Bay Garden's Club, at 3 A, Ground Floor, Block B of Lai Chi Kok Bay Garden in Lai Chi Kok.

A spokesman for the Registration and Electoral Office said an elector was required to bring along his Identity Card to the polling station. But it would facilitate the polling proceeding if he could also bring along the poll card sent to him earlier.

"Those who have lost or failed to receive their poll card are still eligible to vote at their designated polling station," he said.

They may enquire about their designated polling station by calling 2741 1445 during the polling hours.

End/Saturday, April 1, 1995

Pilot job matching programme launched *****

The Labour Department will play an active role as a go-between to match unemployed workers with industries hard-hit by labour shortage.

A pilot job matching programme was jointly launched today (Saturday) by the Labour Department and the Employees Retraining Board (ERB) to help unemployed persons aged 30 or above to find jobs.

The Commissioner for Labour, Mr Stephen Ip, urged job-seekers aged 30 or above to register for the prograflime at the five designated Local Employment Service (LES) offices - Hong Kong, Wang Tau Hom, Tai Po, Tsuen Wan and Tuen Mun.

"Our Placement Officers will conduct in-depth interviews with job-seekers to assess carefully their job preference and training needs.

"They will then be referred to selection interviews with employers who have reported to us vacancies in their establishments," Mr Ip said.

8

In addition, job-seekers who need to acquire special skills required by employers of particular industries may be provided with tailor-made retraining courses.

Upon completion of retraining, active placement assistance will be given to them.

Mr Ip said LES officers would also contact employers of industries with acute shortage of labour and identify the skills required for the vacancies.

’’Employers will be invited to help in the design and contents of the required training courses to be organised by the ERB," he added.

For enquiries on the programme, please call 2591 1316.

End/Saturday, April 1, 1995

More financial assistance to MACs and VOs

*****

Financial assistance to Mutual Aid Committees (MACs) and village offices (VOs) is increased from $700 to $900 per quarter as from today (Saturday), representing an increase of about 30 per cent.

A spokesman for the Home Affairs Department said today that this increase followed a recent review of the costs of running MAC offices and VOs. The purpose of the financial assistance is to augment residents’ own contributions to the expenses incurred in administration of the offices.

Apart from the financial assistance, MACs and VOs can obtain subsidy from, for example. District Board Fund and Sir David Trench Fund for organising community building activities as well as the purchase of recreational and sports equipment. The Liaison Officers and Community Organisers in the Department's eighteen District Offices also provide advice on and assistance in their operation.

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"MACs and VOs are playing a vital role in providing a better living environment for and promoting mutual care among residents. They have also been giving valuable support to many community projects at the district level," the spokesman added.

End/Saturday. April 1, 1995

9

Fire safety advice for grave-sweepers * ♦ * ♦ *

The Agriculture and Fisheries Department (AFD) today (Saturday) urged the public to take extra care in handling fire when they visit their ancestral graves in the countryside during the Ching Ming festival period.

The department's Country Park Protection Officer, Mr. Edmond Lam said: " In view of the potential high fire risk during the Ching Ming festival period, the department will mobilise 22 teams of 198 fire fighters on stand-by duties round the clock to safeguard country park plantations."

Six teams of 120 Civil Aid Services personnel will join the AFD fire fighters.

Mr Lam said most of the countryside fires were caused by human negligence and could have been prevented if people observed a few simple rules.

These rules are:

* Burn worshipping items in metal containers;

* Do not leave lighted candles, joss articles and papers unattended; and

Make sure all burning items are extinguished before leaving grave sites.

Mr Lam said the 'department would provide metal containers at strategic locations inside country park areas for their use.

He also reminded picnickers to light fires only at designated barbecue sites.

"Illegal lighting of fires inside country parks may lead to a maximum fine of $5,000 and one year's imprisonment," he added.

End/Saturday. April 1, 1995

HK. stadium noise complaint report *****

In response to Government's announcement today (Saturday) of its response to the COMAC investigation report on the complaint of noise problem caused by pop concerts at the Hong Kong Stadium, Mr Andrew So, Commissioner for Administrative Complaints, said he was glad to learn of the positive response, which he found most encouraging and reassuring.

End/Saturday, April 1, 1995

10

Firing practice scheduled for two days in April *****

Firing practice will take place at the Fla Tsuen/Castle Peak Range on two days this month.

The public is advised not to enter the area when red flags are hoisted.

Following are the dates and times for the firing practice:

Date

Time

April 20 (Thursday)

April 27 (Thursday)

8.30 am - 5 pm

8.30 am - 5 pm

End/Saturday, April I, 1995

New health centre improves service *****

The Government has initiated 10 construction projects of new clinics in the health care development programme to cater for the increasing demand for services in the next 10 years, the Secretary for Health and Welfare. Mrs Katherine Fok. said today (Saturday).

Speaking at the opening ceremony of Tin Shui Wai Health Centre, Mrs Fok said: ”We are fully aware that general out- patient service is an important element in our medical and health care system."

Noting that the general out-patient service had been improved as recommended by the Working Party on Primary Health Care, Mrs Fok said she appreciated the efforts made by the Department of Health in implementing its Performance Pledge Programmes.

Mrs Fok said: ”The Department of Health has made numerous improvements since 1992 which include individual patient’s record, better clinic environment, shorter waiting time and drug labelling.

X •

’’Performance pledges now cover all the General Out- patient (GOP) Clinics and half of the Maternal and Child Health (MCH) Centres," Mrs Fok said.

Also speaking at the ceremony, the Director of Health. Dr Margaret Chan, said the Tin Shui Wai Health Centre was the fourth government clinic in Yuen Long, serving almost 100,000 residents of Tin Shui Wai.

Dr Chan said the GOP clinic and MCH centre of Tin Shui Wai Health Centre had joined the performance pledge programme for quality service.

She said: ’’To further improve service, the GOP clinic has put on trial in February the sales of afternoon consultation discs in the morning."

Dr Chan said the Health Centre would make special efforts to promote health education among patients as health education was an essential part of primary health care.

End/Saturday, April 1. 1995

Ching Ming Festival clinic service *****

The Department of Health today (Saturday) announced that there will be no public holiday out-patient clinic service on April 5 (Wednesday), which is the Ching Ming Festival.

End/Saturday, April I. 1995

Fresh water cut in Central

*****

Fresh and flushing water supply to some premises in Central will be temporarily suspended from I 1 pm on Monday (April 3) to 6 am the following day to facilitate water mains leakage detection.

The affected areas will include 1-3, 4-8, 26 and 33-37 Garden Road, 18-20 Lower Albert Road, 2 Queen's Road Central, 1 and 2 Tramway Path. Upper Albert Road, 65-73 Macdonncll Road. 1-7. 2-8 and 20-40 Kennedy Road, 22 and 23 Cotton Tree Drive. 11 Ice House Street. I Battery Path and 1 long Kong Park.

End/Saturday. April I. 1995

- 12 -

Hong Kong Monetary Authority money market operations

*****

$ million Time (hours) Cumulative change ($ million)

Opening balance in the account 2,576 09:30 -20

Closing balance in the account 2,146 10:00 -20

Change attributable to: 11:00 -20

Money market activity -20 11:30 -20

LAF today -410 15:00 16:00

LAF rate 4.25% bid/6.25% offer TWI 119.5 ♦+1.6* 1.4.95

End/Saturday, April 1,1995

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

ISSUED BY GOVERNMENT INFORMATION SERVICES BEACONSFIELD HOUSE, HONG KONG. TEL: 842 8777

Sunday, April 2,1995

Contents Eage No,

Text of the Governor’s broadcast on RTHK's ’’Letter From Hong Kong” ... 1

Postal system contract for new airport awarded........................... 5

Volunteers wanted for rehabilitation of offenders........................ 6

TDD forms Safety Advisory Unit........................................... 7

Over $15 million from Sir Robert Ho Tung Charitable Fund................. 8

Stress Management Seminar for Teachers................................... 9

Kwai Tsing District Board by-election result........................ 10

1,969 cast votes at Kwai Tsing DB by-election........................... 11

’’Cheung Hok-yau” awarded for good service.......................... 11

1

Text of the Governor’s broadcast on RTHK’s ’’Letter From Hong Kong" *****

The Last Letter from Hong Kong:

The Last Letter from Hong Kong. It sounds a bit final doesn’t it. The final curtain. The last hurrah. Well, relax. It doesn't presage the terminal collapse of literacy. Nor the closure of the Post Office. And it certainly isn’t a hint that the official censor is coming to town. All that’s happened is that RTHK is changing the format of this regular look at Hong Kong. So the envelope closes on one sheaf of letters. And, hey presto, more - not quite the same, but similar - more letters are promised in a future post.

These letters have been dropping through RTHK’s post box for 15 years. Personal views, on every subject. No prejudice un-tumed. No opinion censored. Government attacked. Government praised - well, not all that often praised! Democracy applauded. Democracy rubbished. I've heard - usually while I'm shaving on a Sunday morning - views on sexism, views on environmentalism, views on communism. Every "ism" under the sun has had its day. Every "ism" and some "was'ms". 15 years of "I told you so", and "why are they all so crazy?", and "it's a monstrous outrage". And. from time to time, 15 years of "isn't Hong Kong a great place?".

Yes, it is. And one reason is - in a sense - shown by a decade and a half of these letters: the best possible reflection of a free society in which no one is afraid to say what they think. Free speech. Not just for some, depending on your political affiliation or the size of your bank deposit. And not just free speech in the privacy of your own home, curtains drawn and lights out. But free speech for everyone. Free speech out in the open. And free shouting, too, if you want. Freedom to say what you want, when you want, and on a government owned radio station too. Free speech - the high octane of a free society.

I first visited Hong Kong as a young-ish backbench Member of Parliament just before these programmes started. I remember the buzz I got on that first trip in 1979. Like the shot of adrenalin when I made my first visit as a student to New York and America. The feeling of "oomph" -pzazz, the Americans would say. A community which throbs with vitality. Free to breathe. Free to get on with its life. Believing in progress. Believing that you can make things better yourself. Make life better for yourself, your family, your community. That you can make a difference. That you can pull yourself up through your own efforts.

2

I felt exactly the same sense of energy and drive, mostly harnessed to a decent cause, when I arrived as Governor nearly three years ago. Back in those days, the West Kowloon reclamation had hardly begun. There was no mighty bridge at Tsing Ma, just designs on a drawing board. No airport growing up out of the sea off the northern Lantau coast. No Western Crossing starting to tunnel below the waters of our great harbour.

Nor for that matter had we in those days started to address, started but far from finished, the task of giving the disabled a decent deal - in the office, the factory, the home, on the buses and the trains, in hostels and training centres. We had less generous welfare provision than we've got today. Taxes were higher. Inflation was above today’s level, too. And crime was higher, as a matter of fact. What was just the same, exactly the same, was the throbbing market economy - in a gloomy world, an economy with a smile. And, most of the time, an economy with a heart as well. And so it should have. In a civilised and decent society, the better-off help those in need. That’s a duty, and in a way a privilege. A duty and a privilege in Hong Kong, just like everywhere else.

But unlike a lot of other places. Hong Kong doesn't suffer from some of the mortal sins that impoverish other societies, impoverish them morally, and economically as well in due course. There's a bit of corruption. But not much, and we crack down on corruption very hard wherever we find it. And the international view is that we’ve got just about the cleanest procedures for handing out government business and handing out government contracts in the world. We don’t suffer from over- government. Too much red tape, maybe, from time to time, but according to business magazines and think- tanks, this is just about the most business-friendly place in the world.

There’s another virtue which I think we should celebrate. We don't allow envy to masquerade as economic policy. I'm sure you know what 1 mean. We're not jealous of others who get on, make a fortune, buy a big car. Class-war isn't the root of our politics, thank heavens.

But naturally we do have political arguments. Is that un-Hong Kong, unAsian? Well, hardly. I think it's rather patronising when people suggest that Hong Kong families aren't really interested in politics, in their futures, in helping to shape their own lives. That tends to be an excuse for not wanting to listen to what Hong Kong people have to say. If you don't want to listen to the answer, pretend that no one is interested in the question.

Truth to tell, people in Hong Kong - better-off. better-travelled, better-educated - are just as interested in politics as anyone else. Which is to say that it doesn't dominate their lives, but they don't want to be ignored, taken for granted, taken for fools, taken for a ride, consumers of goods but never of ideas. You don't need to be a Marxist to know that that's twaddle.

Hong Kong's political life has developed. It's developed even in the last 3 years, with the government becoming more open and more accountable. Steps along a promised road. And have those steps led to Hong Kong's ruination? Look around. We’re better-off than ever. Our finances are - if you look at the books - as prudently managed as they've always been. Our taxes, as 1 said, arc lower. Our reserves are higher. A more open Hong Kong isn't poorer. And it's not less stable. It's richer and it's more strongly based.

The surprise for me, it should be a surprise for anyone who looks further than the tip of the bonnet on their Mercedes, is that politics in Hong Kong is so blessedly moderate. Hong Kong has lived on the foothills of great events for 50 years. And we rush towards 1997, a momentous year though one that I'm sure Hong Kong will take in its stride. But still the debate, the dialogue, is usually civil and restrained. Nothing to get in a nervous flap about - a mark of Hong Kong's maturity and sense.

Back to that momentous year. Is 1997 going to change Hong Kong? Will all these qualities that I'm always talking about go overboard, into the harbour - cleaner. I hope, by then - in one big splash? I'm asked that question more than any other. And I usually give a pretty conventional answer.

1 talk about the Joint Declaration.

I talk about geese and golden eggs: I'm sure you know that one.

I talk about "face", rather as a distinguished member of China's politburo did the other day.

I talk about the innate strength of the values that make I long Kong special.

And I talk about the rule of law.

There's not an argument, I guess, with which you're not familiar, not an argument you haven't inspected, weighed up. pronounced on.

But let me tell you the argument I feel most strongly. Feel in my bones.

4

Hong Kong will change in 1997. It’s bound to change in some respects. It’s a largely Chinese city, with an international outlook, which the chance of history made a British colony. The last major British colony. And come 1997 it's a Chinese city in China, albeit with its special qualities preserved and guaranteed.

But, I don’t think Hong Kong will change fundamentally if the men and women who live here don't want it to change. Fatalism, thinking there’s nothing you can do, expecting the worst, is self-fulfilling. Things don't have to change for the worst and I don’t believe they will. And that’s a reason for not being pessimistic, for not throwing in the towel.

Now, it's not a cop-out for me to say these things. I have to do all I can before midnight on 30 June two years hence to give Hong Kong under Chinese sovereignty the best chance of continuing to thrive, to succeed, to hit the record books.

But much, most, depends on Hong Kong.

If people want our freedoms to survive they won't offer Faustian deals which imply that provided one can go on making money, none of this stuff about freedom and the rule of law really matters. That sort of attitude shows a non-existent sense of morality and, arguably, a very short-sighted grasp of how to go on doing good business.

If people like newspapers, radio stations and television channels which will tell them pretty openly what's happening here and in the rest of the world then it's up to them to make that clear. Self-censorship is especially corrosive. And it's unnecessary. Journalists, editors, proprietors, shouldn't take the scissors to their own work when no one else would dare to do so.

If Hong Kong wants its government to go on doing business on the basis of who offered the best deal, not whose name is on the note-paper, then we musn't collude at infringements of this vital principle.

If people believe in themselves and their values, they really will survive. Thinking and expecting the worst can, as I've said, be unpleasantly self-fulfilling. Do you remember that old advertisement for self- development courses - "Be positive"? Well, it's not a bad slogan for us. Be positive and act positive, too.

So I think there is every reason to be cheerful when we look to the horizon. We should know that we can all, individually, make our mark. This great city was built up, created, in circumstances far from ideal. The citizens of this territory can keep Hong Kong great. They - you - can make a difference. We should believe the best of ourselves and expect and demand the best of China. I think China will respond. Will want to respond. So when I get asked after 1997, to write a letter to Hong Kong, still with its freedom of speech and still able to entertain every point of view, I believe that I'll still be addressing a free, prosperous, decent society, living with the rule of law - under a Chinese flag.

If the people of Hong Kong believe that, too. and want it to happen, it will. Because Hong Kong is a taste of the future not a left-over from the past. That is Hong Kong's achievement; no one can take it away.

End/Sunday, April 2. 1995

Postal system contract for new airport awarded *****

The Postmaster General. Mr M Pagliari. announced today that the contract for the provision and installation of a Postal Mechanization System (PMS) for the New Air Mail Centre at Chek Lap Kok Airport had been awarded to AEG Electrocom GmbH of Germany on April 1, 1995, ata cost of $187 million.

This is one of the government contracts awarded on the Airport Core Programme (ACP) for the new airport.

The Hong Kong Post Office is one of the biggest postal administrations in the world in terms of international mail volume, and ranks third in the world in terms of the volume of EMS (Speedpost) traffic handled. Airmail traffic, in particular, has been growing rapidly. For airmail letters and packets alone, a total of 135 million items were sent and 79 million items received in 1994. representing an overall increase of 11.7% over the previous year.

The PMS, which incorporates state-of-the-art technology in postal mechanisation, will serve to maintain the high quality of the airmail service in the face of the ever growing traffic and to achieve greater operational efficiency. The system consists of the most modern sorting equipment in the world for letters, packets, parcels and Speedpost items, a dedicated storage and retrieval system for mailbags and airline containers, as well as a comprehensive mail conveyance system.

The letter sorting equipment will continue the present system which Hong Kong was the first in the world to adopt for machine-reading and sorting letters without the necessity of postcodes or zip codes. It will comprise a unit of Culler-Facer-Canceller for facing and datestamping letters, two Optical Character Recognition (OCR) units with on-line and off-line video coding facilities, two Letter Sorting units and an automatic letter-bundle wrapping unit. The Culler-Facer-Canceller, the OCR and Letter Sorting units can process about 30,000 letters per machine-hour.

There will also be two Packet Sorting Machines and one Parcel Sorting Machine. Their hourly output will be 10,000 and 6,000 items per machine respectively. The Packet Sorting Machines will be the first equipment of its kind to be introduced in Hong Kong for processing airmail packets, the volume of which has been increasing every year. The machine output is about four times that of the existing manual sorting system.

The storage and retrieval system is designed to suit both mail bags and airline containers. Nowadays more and more advanced postal administrators are moving away from use of the conventional mail bags in favour of despatching mail in airline containers. Airline containers are larger than conventional mail bags and they can accommodate mail in loose form. The use of containers will therefore speed up the processing of mail resulting in higher quality of service accorded to the mail. The provision of such facility at the New Air Mail Centre will bring Hong Kong in line with the advanced mail handling systems of other major postal administrations.

The provision of the Postal Mechanisation System will fully mechanise the airmail operation at the New Air Mail Centre. It will be a major milestone in the history of the Hong Kong Post Office.

End/Sunday, April 2, 1995

Volunteers wanted for rehabilitation of offenders *****

The Social Welfare Department is looking for volunteers to help with the rehabilitation of offenders.

People, aged 21 or above, with secondary school education, mature personality and an interest in the rehabilitation of offenders, are invited to join the Volunteer Scheme for Probationers (VSP).

7

A Social Welfare Department spokesman today (Sunday) said the scheme aimed to promote interest and concern of the public towards helping and rehabilitating offenders and by so doing bring greater community involvement and stronger community action against crime.

"It also helps to meet the specific need of suitable probationers through service offered by volunteers and complement the efforts of probation officers in the social rehabilitation of probationers," he added.

The period of service is normally six months, but the volunteer may serve for further terms for the same or other offenders.

"Selected volunteers will be given a thorough briefing before they start to assist the probation officers by befriending, helping and advising probationers on a personal basis," the spokesman said.

Former volunteers of the scheme are welcome to apply again.

Application forms are now available at the centre for VSP on the seventh floor, Wu Chung House, 213 Queen's Road east. Wan Chai, probation offices attached to the magistracies, community centres as well as children and youth centres.

Completed forms should be returned to one of the above centres on or before May 5. Enquiries about the scheme can be made on tel 2892 5117.

End/Sunday, April 2, 1995

TDD forms Safety Advisory Unit *****

The Territory Development Department (TDD) has set up a Safety Advisory Unit to enhance construction site safety for the department's projects.

The main responsibilities of the unit, which is headed by a Safety Advisor of senior engineer rank, was to promote awareness of construction site safety among TDD staff, consultants, contractors and workers in accordance with Government policies, the department's Director Mr Lee Shing- see said today (Sunday).

8

"The unit also assists in policy formulation and implementation in relation to construction safety, as well as monitoring safety measures, including site inspection and to recommend further improvement," he noted.

The Safety Advisor will provide assistance and advice to TDD's project engineers in the Development Offices and resident site staff on all matters relating to construction site safety.

Meanwhile, the unit will also arrange training opportunities for professionals and resident site staff to enhance their site safety awareness.

Mr Lee stressed that construction safety had been accorded a very high priority by the Government.

"All TDD staff are therefore asked to ensure that safety on construction sites receives close attention, and that the safety message is spread as widely as possible," he said.

End/Sunday, April 2, 1995

Over $15 million from Sir Robert Ho Tung Charitable Fund *****

The Sir Robert Ho l ung Charitable Fund has recently granted a total of $15.3 million to 52 charitable organisations in I long Kong.

Announcing this today (Sunday), the Chairman of the Fund's Allocation Committee, Mr Bob Wilson, said major grants this year included $2.73 million to the Tung Wah Group of Hospitals. Of this amount, $1 million would be used to fund the setting up of geriatric rehabilitation wards in Fung Yiu King Hospital to improve the service for the elderly.

Another $2.5 million was injected to the Samaritan Fund, which is under the management of the Hospital Authority, to enable it to provide heart valves, cardiac catheters and intraocular lenses to needy patients.

- 9 -

The St. John Council for Hong Kong received a sum of $1.38 million for strengthening its various services.

Other grants included: $0.75 million to Po Leung Kuk for renovating a dayactivity centre cum hostel for mentally handicapped people; $0.42 million to the Prince of Wales Hospital for advancing its equipment for organ transplantation; and $0.28 million to the Caritas for providing comprehensive after school care service for children.

The Sir Robert Ho Tung Charitable Fund, one of the largest charitable trusts in Hong Kong, was set up with a bequest of $0.5 million by the late Sir Robert Ho Tung in 1956.

In 1966, the capital of the Fund was increased through an injection of $4.95 million from the China Charitable Fund set up by him.

The Sir Robert Ho Tung Charitable Fund is managed by HSBC Trustee (Hong Kong) Ltd.

Applications arc invited in June every year through the Department of Health, the Hospital Authority, the Social Welfare Department, the Education Department and the Home Affairs Department.

End/Sunday, April 2, 1995

Stress Management Seminar for Teachers *****

Secondary school principals and teachers are invited to attend a half-day seminar on "Stress Management for Teachers" to enhance their ability to cope with stress.

A spokesman for the Education Department said the seminar consists of talks by doctors following by a panel discussion.

In the seminar, he said, doctors will help participants to achieve a better understanding of stress and its cause, to help them to learn about the effects of stress on both body and mind and to handle it, the spokesman said.

- 10 -

The seminar - jointly organised by the Hong Kong Medical Association (HKMA) and the Education Department - will be held at the Queen Elizabeth Stadium in the morning of Saturday, May 6.

The spokesman said the HKMA and the Department had conducted a pilot scheme between April and July 1993 when doctors, including psychiatrists and general practitioners, were invited to give talks to 76 schools on ’’Mental Health and Stress Management”.

As the talks were very successful and found to be helpful, more talks were delivered by 67 doctors to 43,000 students from 101 schools during the 1993-1994 school year, he said.

Circulars and reply slips have been sent to schools inviting principals to nominate teaching staff to attend the seminar.

Completed reply slips should be returned to Senior Education Officer (Careers and Guidance Services) at Room 206, Mong Kok Government Offices, 30 Luen Wan Street, Mong Kok, Kowloon on or before April 13, 1995.

For further enquiries, please contact the Careers and Guidance Services Section at 2399 2183 or 2399 2177.

End/Sunday, April 2, 1995

Kwai Tsing District Board by-election result ***** ♦

Counting of votes for Kwai Tsing District Board by-election in respect of Lai Wah constituency has been completed at 00.30 am today (Monday). The result is as follows:

Candidate

Mr Wong Yiu-chung

Mr Lau San-ching

Number of votes

1,231 (elected)

732

End/Monday, April 3, 1995

1,969 cast votes at Kwai Tsing DB by-election *****

The poll for the Kwai Tsing District Board by- election in respect of Lai Wah constituency closed at 10.30 pm today (Sunday).

During the 15-hour poll, a total of 1,969 voters have cast their votes, representing 26.8 per cent of the total of 7,346 registered electors.

End/Sunday, April 2, 1995

"Cheung Hok-yau" awarded for good service

*****

The quality service of Mr Cheung Hok-yau and three other staff members of the Education Department paid off when they were presented with the Education Department's Staff Incentive Award.

Appearing with Mr Cheung in the presentation ceremony are the three other winners: Ms Hui Sau-king, Ms Or Shuen- ling and Mrs Chu Lee To-chu.

Presenting the awards, which comprised a certificate of merit and a watch embossed with the department's logo, the Director of Education, Mr W K Lam said all staff members should keep up the service in helping the public with an open and friendly attitude.

Mr Cheung Hok-yau, Clerical Officer of Sham Shui Po District Education Office, was awarded not because he has the same name as a local popular singer but his friendliness and helpfulness in receiving the public.

With his sincere and frank manner in dealing with parents of new immigrant children from China seeking advice and assistance, he was able to answer their enquiries to their satisfaction.

Mr Cheung has no difficulties in communicating with visitors from different walks of life as he can speak English and several Chinese dialects, including Putonghua, Chiu Chow, Hakka and Cantonese.

- 12 -

Ms Hui Sau-king, Educational Psychologist in the Special Education Section, was nominated for her prompt action and dedicated service in rendering support to schools.

Her outstanding performance in providing counselling to the classmates of a schoolboy who was kidnapped and killed in September last year greatly impressed the school and her supervisor.

Ms Or Shuen-ling, Education Assistant with the Secondary School Places Allocation Section, was nominated for her patience and courtesy in handling enquiries from the public. Her understanding of the actual concern of the public and the genuine help she offered to them are worthy of praise.

Mrs Chu Lee To-chu, Clerical Officer of Yuen Long Public School, received the award for her readiness to give assistance to both students and parents.

Mrs Chu feels affection towards the students and takes good care of them at school. She is also effective and efficient in handling enquiries from parents.

End/Sunday. April 2. 1995

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

ISSUED BY GOVERNMENT INFORMATION SERVICES BEACONSFIELD HOUSE, HONG KONG. TEL: 842 8777

Monday, April 3,1995

Contents L’ageXo.

AG stresses importance of early CFA................................... 1

Tax system to be kept simple.......................................... 2

Domestic helpers featured in HK Monthly Digest of Statistics.......... 3

Requirement for trained teachers in kindergartens..................... 4

Campaign against mosquito breeding.................................... 5

Opening of the Sha Tin Transfer Station............................... 7

VMs transfer to facilitate camp closure............................... 8

Tai Lam Country Park extension........................................ 8

Water storage figure.................................................. 9

Hong Kong Monetary Authority money market operations.................. 9

AG stresses importance of early CFA *****

The establishment of the Court of Final Appeal (CFA) by July 1996 at the latest would enable the court to gain acceptance and to build up a track record of jurisprudence, the Attorney General, Mr Jeremy Mathews, said today (Monday).

Speaking at the opening of a meeting of the American Bar Association's International Labour Committee, Mr Mathews said the early setting up of the CFA would eliminate any uncertainty about what sort of a court would be set up after 1997.

"If the court is not established before 1997, there would be complete uncertainty as to what form the legislation would take, whether it would be based upon existing and familiar principles or not, and as to who the judges of the court would be," Mr Mathews said.

"Moreover, there would be a very damaging judicial vacuum, of at least a year, during which there would be no avenue of appeal from the Court of Appeal," he added.

Mr Mathews said there were also other reasons for the establishment of the CFA by July next year, one of which was the appointment of permanent judges and recruitment of support staff for the Court.

"There is also a need to form panels of non-permanent local and overseas judges. Although the Chief Justice has made initial contacts with various common law jurisdictions, any follow-up action prior to the enactment of the CFA Bill is likely to be futile," he said.

Mr Mathews said the other tasks to be performed before the court could begin operations included making the premises ready; amendments to the organisation and nomenclature of our court system; the preparation of rules of procedure for inclusion into subsidiary legislation; and drawing up practice directions relating to the CFA.

Many of these tasks would only be meaningful if the Government was sure that the Bill to provide for the establishment of the CFA would be enacted. The Government also needed to consult the legal profession on some of these tasks, he said.

The legislation therefore needed to be in place by July of this year, Mr Mathews stressed.

2

On the composition of the CFA, Mr Mathews said neither the Joint Declaration, nor the Basic Law conferred an unfettered discretion on the CFA to invite judges from other common law jurisdictions to sit on the court.

Instead they established a general principle that the CFA was to have a power to invite such judges to sit on the court, but left the precise scope of that power to be defined in the course of implementation of that general principle, he said.

The Attorney General said both the Joint Declaration and the Basic Law were in this case framework provisions which were intended to be fleshed out by more detailed legislative provisions. In particular they left the detailed composition and workings of the CFA to be defined at a later date.

’’They do not specify, for example, the number of judges who are to sit in the CFA. It does not follow that all such matters are left to the unfettered discretion of the CFA itself. It is clearly contemplated that they will be the subject of further legislative provision,” he said.

Mr Mathews said the fact that the general principle referred to the power to invite visiting ’’judges” (in the plural) did not mean that there must be a power to invite at least two judges to sit at any one sitting.

He said: "The provision in the Joint Declaration is to be interpreted as meaning that in the cases that it hears the court may invite overseas judges. The 4 plus 1 formula satisfies this meaning. Under that formula, the court can invite overseas judges (in the plural) to sit on the court, albeit not more than one for each case."

End/Monday, April 3. 1995

Tax system to be kept simple ♦ * * ♦ ♦

The Government intends to keep its tax system simple, low and predictable, the acting Financial Secretary, Mr Donald Tsang, said today (Monday).

In a speech entitled "Hong Kong’s Tax Regime: Helping Business to Prosper" to the British Chamber of Commerce, Mr Tsang said Hong Kong’s tax system reflected the Government’s economic philosophy.

3

"This simple philosophy has served us well, and I firmly intend to uphold it,” he said.

On a simple tax system, Mr Tsang said the Government wanted to keep down the costs of collection and compliance.

"We introduced, from April 1, 1994, a system of composite tax return for individuals. This was designed to make life easier for the taxpayer as well to reduce the costs of assessment and collection in the Inland Revenue Department,” he said.

He added that the Government generally avoided special tax concessions and incentives and did not use fiscal means to achieve social policy objectives.

Despite the low tax rates, Mr Tsang said profits and salaries tax had proved to be very strong and steady sources of revenue thanks to years of economic growth.

Over the past 10 years, their contribution to total revenue (including revenue from land transactions) had increased from 36 per cent to 40 per cent, Mr Tsang said.

“But we are not complacent. We must maintain the real value of the different sources of revenue. And we must ensure that we have as broad a revenue base as possible,” he said.

Stressing that Hong Kong's tax regime was predictable, Mr Tsang said certainty was very important to business confidence.

"We will avoid radical change. And will clarify, where necessary, the operation of the law," he said.

End/Monday, April 3. 1995

Domestic helpers featured in HK Monthly Digest of Statistics *****

A feature article entitled "Domestic helpers" is published in the March 1995 issue of the Hong Kong Monthly Digest of Statistics (HKMDS).

Employment of domestic helpers becomes popular in I long Kong. Households requiring domestic service may employ live-in. full-time and part-time domestic helpers depending on their own requirements.

- 4 -

This feature article presents the characteristics of live-in domestic helpers employed in late 1993.

Analysis was made on the age, sex, marital status, educational attainment and monthly salary of live-in domestic helpers.

Characteristics of households employing them such as monthly household income and household size were also included.

The March 1995 issue of the HKMDS is on sale at $50 a copy.

Purchase can be made at the Government Publications Centre, Ground Floor, Low Block, Queensway Government Offices, 66 Queensway, Hong Kong.

The publication is also available on sale at the Publication Section of the Census and Statistics Department, 19th Floor, Wanchai Tower, 12 Harbour Road, Wan Chai, Hong Kong.

Regular subscription can also be arranged with the Publication Sales Section of the Information Services Department on tel 2598 8194.

End/Monday, April 3, 1995

Requirement for trained teachers in kindergartens

*****

The Education Department announces today (Monday) that with effect from this September, at least 40 per cent of the teaching staff in each session of a kindergarten will be required to have completed training recognised by the department.

A department spokesman said the new requirement was to promote the development of high quality kindergarten education.

The spokesman said the training included Qualified Assistant Kindergarten Teacher Training Course or the Qualified Kindergarten Teacher Training Course or an equivalent training course.

5

As announced in the 1994 Policy Address, the Government has embarked on the initiative requiring each kindergarten to have at least 40 per cent of their teachers having completed basic training by September 1995.

The following are courses recognised by the department:

* Two-year Part-time Day Release In-service Course of Training for Kindergarten Teachers

* 16-week Part-time Day Release In-service Course of Training for Kindergarten Principals

* Part-time Day Release In-service Qualified Assistant Kindergarten Teacher Training Course

* Part-time Evening In-service Qualified Assistant Kindergarten Teacher Training Course

The spokesman reminded supervisors of all kindergartens to observe the new requirement in the employment of teachers and to encourage serving teachers to receive the appropriate training if they did not have the qualifications.

End/Monday, April 3. 1995

Campaign against mosquito breeding *****

With the approach of the summer season, the Health Education Unit of the Department of Health will launch a campaign in April against mosquito breeding.

During the month, the unit's 24-hour hotline 2723 0013 will carry a two-minute message in Cantonese on mosquito prevention.

"Aller listening to the taped message, callers may leave their questions with the answering machine and staff to the unit will call back," a spokesman for the department said.

Entitled "Remove stagnant water to eliminate mosquito breeding", the campaign is sponsored by the Urban and Regional Councils.

6

It aims at reminding building contractors and households to take preventive measures to reduce mosquito nuisance and prevent mosquito-borne diseases such as malaria and Japanese Encephalitis.

”To prevent mosquito infestation, it is important to eliminate all stagnant water which is the potential breeding ground for mosquitoes,” the spokesman said.

’’Contractors should inspect their construction sites regularly to ensure that there are no abandoned containers and empty tins holding water.

"They should pump and drain stagnant waler in holes, trenches and hollow spaces and fill them up with soil.

"Spray a thin layer of diesel oil on the water surface if draining of stagnant water is impossible," he said.

The spokesman advised households to cover tightly all water containers, storage tanks and wells and leave no water in Hower pot trays.

"Keep all drains free from choking," he said: "It is an offence under the Public Health and Municipal Services Ordinance to allow the accumulation of waler liable to mosquito breeding. The maximum fine for the offence is $10,000."

In 1994. a total of 471 prosecutions were made.

During the campaign period, exhibition boards will be put on public display at the unit's resource centre on the eighth floor of the Urban Council Fa Yuen Street Complex in Mong Kok.

"The centre also provides preview and loan service of educational materials like tapes and video tapes.

"A variety of printed material such as posters, leaflets and slickers may also be obtained free from the centre," the spokesman added.

Meanwhile, the department will be sending advisory letters, and educational leaflets and posters to owners incorporations, mutual aid committees, management offices of large private housing estates and building contractors to enlist support.

Members of the public seeking advice or help in mosquito prevention may also contact the respective District Environmental Hygiene Offices of the Urban Services or Regional Services Departments.

End/Monday. April 3, 1995

7

Opening of the Sha Tin Transfer Station ♦ ♦ * * *

Sha Tin Transfer Station, the first refuse transfer station built in the New Territories, is officially opened today (Monday).

The $200-million station is part of the Government's long-term waste management strategy under which three strategic landfills and a network of transfer stations are planned to meet Hong Kong's waste disposal needs in the next 15 to 20 years.

Situated near the Shek Mun Quarry and with a design capacity of handling 1,000 tonnes of refuse per day, the transfer station provides a cost effective transfer system for waste arisings in Sha Tin, Tai Po and North districts.

Wastes collected in these areas and delivered to the transfer station will be compacted and containerised before being transported to the West New Territories landfill for disposal.

Speaking at the opening ceremony, Sha Tin District Board Chairman, Mr Choy Kan-pui, said this method of bulk transportation of waste would greatly reduce environmental nuisances.

He noted that the transfer station would be operated to very high environmental standards whereby all air and effluent emissions from the facility would be properly treated before discharge.

The modem facilities at the station include an exhaust ventilation system, a wastewater treatment plant, a computerised weighbridge system, a vehicle wash system and three live floor/compactor systems for handling refuse.

The project has been developed under a "design, built and operate" contract agreement under which the contractor, the Swire BF1 Waste Services Ltd., is responsible for all aspects of the facility over a 15-year operating period.

The Sha Tin Transfer Station is the third refuse transfer station commissioned by the Environmental Protection Department. The first one was commissioned in Kowloon Bay in 1990 serving the East Kowloon area while the second one, Island • East Transfer Station, was commissioned in 1992 serving the Hong Kong Island.

End/Monday, April 3, 1995

8

VMs transfer to facilitate camp closure *****

Vietnamese migrants (VMs) living in Section 8 of Whitehead Detention Centre will soon be transferred to High Island Detention Centre (North) to enable the closure of this section of Whitehead, a Government spokesman announced today (Monday).

The spokesman explained that the Government constantly reviewed its camp closure programme to ensure the most cost-effective use of limited resources and that with this transfer, the Government would be able to consolidate the VM population in fewer camps.

"The 1,100 VMs in Section 8 will be counselled to cooperate with the camp management and will be transferred when they come forward. Independent monitors will observe the counselling," the spokesman added.

End/Monday, April 3, 1995

Tai Lam Country Park extension

*****

The Tai Lam Country Park in northwest New Territories has been extended by 40 hectares following approval by the Governor-in-Council of the replacement map for the country park.

A spokesman for the Agriculture and Fisheries Department (AFD) said the extension included four hectares of woodland at Ma On Kong and another 38 hectares of rehabilitated borrow area at Tai Tong.

He said the extension at Ma On Kong would make up for the loss of two hectares of country park land needed to be excised from the park to enable the construction of the Route 3 project.

The spokesman pointed out that the excised area had been revised from 1.8 hectares to two hectares following slight modification of the road alignment in response to an objection raised. But he stressed that this would not have major environmental implications since the area affected was mainly grassland with sparse shrubs and few trees.

9

The extension at Tai Tong will help meet the recreational needs in the area which is formerly a borrow area. Successful afforestation works have been carried out and various facilities including barbecue sites, picnic sites, nature education trail, tree walk, viewing points and other ancillary facilities have now been provided.

An order designating the area shown in the approved map to be Tai Lam Country Park will be published in the Gazette on Friday (April 7). The new map will be available for inspection at the Land Registry and for sale at AFD from April 7, 1995.

End/Monday, April 3, 1995

Water storage figure ♦ ♦ * ♦ ♦

Storage in Hong Kong’s reservoirs at 9 am today (Monday) stood at 67.0 per cent of capacity or 392.369 million cubic metres.

This time last year the reservoirs contained 393.038 million cubic metres of water, representing 67.1 per cent of capacity.

End/Monday, April 3, 1995

Hong Kong Monetary Authority money market operations ♦ ♦ ♦ * ♦

$ million Time (hours) Cumulative change (Smillion)

Opening balance in the account 2,146 0930 +459

Closing balance in the account 2,148 1000 +459

Change attributable to : 1100 +579

Money market activity +468 1200 +579

LAF today -466 1500 +468

1600 +468

LAF rate 4.25% bid/6.25% offer TWI 119.6 *+0.1 * 3.4.95

10 -

Hong Kong Monetary Authority

EF bills EF notcs/Hong Kong Government bonds

Terms Yield Term Issue Coupon Price Yield

1 week 4.97 14 months 2605 6.35 100.23 6.22

1 month 5.16 23 months 2702 7.50 101.54 6.72

3 months 5.43 28 months 3707 6.95 100.34 6.90

6 months 5.71 34 months 3801 8.00 102.50 7.12

12 months 6.14 60 months 5003 7.75 100.72 7.72

Total turnover of bills and bonds - $35,677 million

Closed April 3, 1995

End/Monday, April 3, 1995

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

ISSUED BY GOVERNMENT INFORMATION SERVICES BEACONSFIELD HOUSE, HONG KONG. TEL.: 842 8777

Tuesday, April 4,1995

Contents Page No,

Requirements on HK Branch of Barings lifted.............................. 1

Closure of Wan Chai illegal structures sought............................ 1

Director of Public Prosecutions to visit Guangdong....................... 2

Executive Director (Banking Supervision) to leave HKMA................... 2

Hong Kong Monetary Authority tender results............................   3

Hong Kong Monetary Authority money market operations..................... 4

Wednesday, April 5,1995

Contents Page No,

Health chiefs to visit China................................................ 5

Education delegation to visit Melbourne..................................... 5

EMSD services meet pledged standards........................................ 6

Healthy travellers’ tips.................................................... 7

Labour Department’s major publications now available........................ 8

1

Requirements on HK Branch of Barings lifted * ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

The Hong Kong Monetary Authority announced today (Tuesday) the lifting of the requirements which were imposed under section 52 (1) (A) of the Banking Ordinance on the Hong Kong Branch of Baring Brothers & Co., Limited (in administration) on February 27, 1995.

Baring Brothers & Co., Limited subsequently changed its name to Bishopscourt (BB & Co) Limited on March 10.

The Deputy Chief Executive (Banking). Mr David Carse, said: "There are no prudential reasons for us to want to continue with the restrictions.

"The Barings Group has been acquired substantially by the ING Group, a leading Dutch banking group.

"ING has also established a new bank in the UK, Baring Brothers Limited, to take over the operations of the Hong Kong Branch and has stepped in to meet its expenses and obligations."

Baring Brothers Limited will only be undertaking corporate advisory activities in Hong Kong. Such business docs not require authorisation as an authorised institution.

End/Tuesday, April 4, 1995

Closure of Wan Chai illegal structures sought *****

The Building Authority is seeking to close two unauthorised structures in Wan Chai so that they can be demolished without endangering the occupants and the public.

The two single-storey unauthorised structures used for dwelling are located at the rear lane of 76-80 Stone Nullah Lane and 1 Hing Wan Street and at the rear lane of 82A and 82B in Stone Nullah Lane respectively.

Notices applying for Closure Orders from the District Court under the Buildings Ordinance on August 8 were posted on the premises today (Tuesday).

Demolition works are expected to start as soon as the Closure Orders are issued.

End/Tuesday, April 4, 1995

2

Director of Public Prosecutions to visit Guangdong *****

At the invitation of the Guangdong Provincial People’s Procuratorate, the Director of Public Prosecutions. Mr Peter Nguyen, will lead a group of six Crown Counsel from the Legal Department to visit Guangdong Province from tomorrow (Wednesday) to April 12.

A delegation of the Guangdong Provincial People's Procuratorate had visited the Legal Department in July last year. The forthcoming visit to Guangdong is a reciprocity with an aim to strengthen the contacts between Crown Counsel working in the Prosecutions Division and their counterparts in China.

During their stay in China, the delegation will meet with officials of the People’s Procuratorates at the provincial and municipal levels and other legal institutions. It is hoped that by such visits, the delegates will acquire a better understanding of the structure and operation of the various Chinese legal institutions.

End/Tuesday, April 4, 1995

Executive Director (Banking Supervision) to leave HKMA

*****

The Hong Kong Monetary Authority (HKMA) announced today (Tuesday) that Mr Albert Cheok. Executive Director (Banking Supervision) is leaving at the end of the month to pursue family business interests in Malaysia.

Mr Cheok. 44. joined the former Office of the Commissioner of Banking as a Deputy Commissioner in 1989. The office was combined with the Office of the Exchange Fund to become the HKMA two years ago.

"During his six years of service. Mr Cheok has made a major contribution to building up the supervisory capacity of the HKMA." the Chief Executive of the HKMA, Mr Joseph Yam, said.

"We regret his personal decision to leave and wish him every success in his new endeavour."

Mr Check's replacement will be announced shortly.

End/Tuesday, April 4. 1995

3

Hong Kong Monetary Authority tender results *****

Tender date 4 Apr 95

Paper on offer EF bills

Issue number Q514

Amount applied HK$6,600 MN

Amount allotted HK$l,500MN

Average yield accepted 5.41 PCT

Highest yield accepted 5.42 PCT

Pro rata ratio About 78 PCT

Average tender yield 5.44 PCT I long Kong Monetary Authority

Tenders to be held in the week beginning April 10, 1995

Tender date 10 Apr 95 10 Apr 95

Paper on offer EF bills EF bills

Issue number Q515 H562

Issue date 11 Apr 95 H Apr 95

Maturity date 12 Jul 95 11 Oct 95

Tenor 91 days 182 days

Amount on offer HK$ 1.500) 300 MN HKS800+160 MN

End/Tucsday, April 4, 1995

4

Hong Kong Monetary Authority money market operations

*****

$ million Time (hours) Cumulative change (^million)

Opening balance in the account 2,148 0930 +465

Closing balance in the account 1,413 1000 +465

Change attributable to : 1100 +565

Money market activity +566 1200 +566

LAF today -1,301 1500 +566

1600 +566

LAF rate 4.25% bid/6.25% offer TWI 119.4 *-0.2* 4.4.95

Hong Kong Monetary Authority

EF bills EF notes/Hong Kong Government bonds

Terms Yield Term Issue Coupon Price Yield

1 week 4.97 14 months 2605 6.35 100.24 6.21

1 month 5.13 23 months 2702 7.50 101.62 6.67

3 months 5.39 28 months 3707 6.95 100.43 6.85

6 months 5.69 34 months 3801 8.00 102.59 7.08

12 months 6.11 60 months 5003 7.75 101.00 7.64

Total turnover of bills and bonds - $21,639 million

Closed April 4, 1995

End/Tuesday, April 4. 1995

5

Health chiefs to visit China *****

At the invitation of China's Ministry of Public Health, a delegation led by the Secretary for Health and Welfare, Mrs Katherine Fok, has left for Beijing today (Wednesday).

Other members include Mrs Shelley Lau, Deputy Secretary for Health and Welfare; Dr Margaret Chan, Director of Health; Dr E K Yeoh, Chief Executive of the Hospital Authority; Dr W M Ko, Deputy Director of Operations of the Hospital Authority; and Dr P Y Lam from the Department of Health.

During their stay in Beijing, they will call on the Minister of Public Health, Professor Chen Minzhang, and exchange views with him on issues of mutual interest, including the use and practice of Western and Chinese medicine in the two territories.

They will also visit the Xi Yuan Hospital of the Research Academy of Chinese Medicine, the Beijing University of Medical Sciences, the People's Hospital, and the State Administration of Traditional Chinese Medicine.

The party will leave for Shanghai on April 9. Apart from meeting officials of the Municipal Bureau of Public Health, they will also tour the Chinese Medicine Hospital there.

The visit will end on April 12.

End/Wedncsday, April 5, 1995

Education delegation to visit Melbourne

*****

A nine-member delegation of the Curriculum Development Council (CDC) left today (Wednesday) for a nine-day visit to Melbourne, Australia.

The Chairman of the Council, Mr Kenneth Ting, said the objective of the delegation was to study how projects similar to the Target Oriented Curriculum (TOC) were developed, implemented and assessed in Australia.

6

"We will be visiting educational institutions and organisations in Melbourne that are actively involved in projects similar to TOC.

"We will also be holding discussions with educators and officials to exchange views and experience on the implementation of TOC, in particular formative and summative assessments," Mr Ting said.

End/Wednesday, April 5, 1995

EMSD services meet pledged standards *****

The Electrical and Mechanical Services Department (EMSD) achieved good results in its performance pledge last year.

Over 96 per cent of the department's activities met the pledged standards, a spokesman for the department said today (Wednesday).

"Wd find this very encouraging and that staff of EMSD will continue to dedicate their efforts to further improve their services which contribute to public safety and the quality of life of citizens of Hong Kong," he stressed.

The department launched its performance pledge on 15 types of services to the public last year.

They include processing of applications for registration of electrical workers, gas installers and contractors; handling of reports of illegal equipment or installations; providing advice on safety matters and attending to general enquiries on gas, electricity, lifts and escalators.

The performance standards arc expressed in response time.

The spokesman pointed out that EMSD installed an interactive voice response system and established a Customer Service Office in January last year.

"These had enabled the public to quickly obtain information and services from EMSD," he said.

A total of 11,197 calls were received through this system last year.

The majority of the enquiries were related to issues on registration of electrical workers and cylinder wagon permits.

7

Meanwhile, the spokesman said the department had recently produced a new colourful pamphlet on its performance pledge.

Entitled "Your Safety and Quality of Life - Our Pledge", the bilingual pamphlet lists out the various services to the public under its performance pledge.

Copies of the pamphlet arc available to the public free of charge at all District Offices of the Home Affairs Department and the headquarters of EMSD.

End/Wednesday, April 5. 1995

Healthy travellers' tips

*****

Holidaymakers travelling abroad during the coming Easter Holidays are advised to guard against gastro-intestinal diseases such as cholera, viral Hepatitis A and dysentery.

The appeal was made by the Department of Health's Chief Port Health Officer, Dr Mak Kwok-hang.

Dr Mak said: "Travellers are strongly advised to observe personal and food hygiene at all time.

"They should take extra precautions in choosing their food and drinks as gastrointestinal diseases are transmitted through contaminated food and drinks," he said.

Dr Mak cited the following points for travellers to observe to guard against gastro-intestinal diseases in places where hygienic condition is poor:

* take only thoroughly cooked food, and food fresh from sealed packs or cans:

* do not eat meal, fish and shellfish like clams, oysters etc. that are not thoroughly cooked;

* do not eat fruits that have been peeled and fruits and vegetables that are not thoroughly cleansed;

* do not eat cold dish such as salad:

8

* drink only boiled water, canned or bottled drinks, and pasteurised milk or dairy products;

* do not patronise unlicensed food hawkers;

use your own utensils or disposable items; and

* always wash your hands before eating.

Dr Mak also advised travellers to consult a doctor at once if they felt unwell or have such symptoms as fever, chills, rashes, diarrhoea and vomiting.

Dr Mak said: "It takes a little effort to be a healthy traveller, but it is worthwhile. Do not let illness and accidents spoil the precious holiday trips.”

End/Wednesday, April 5, 1995

Labour Department's major publications now available

*****

Members of the public can now obtain 15 major publications produced by the Labour Department in six of its major offices throughout the territory.

These publications cover the services being provided by different divisions of the department and also major labour legislation on employment benefits and industrial safety.

The 15 major publications arc :

* Performance Pledge 1995

* The Labour Department Offers You Its Services

* Labour Department General Enquiry Telephone Service

* A Concise Guide to the Employment Ordinance

* Guide to Employees' Compensation Legislation

* How to Apply for Employees' Compensation and Related Procedures

* A Guide to the Construction Sites (Safety) Regulations

* Notification of Workplaces

* Leaflet on Local Employment Service

* Guide to Occupational Diseases Prescribed for Compensation Purposes

* Employ the Disabled : Give them a chance to prove themselves

* Services of the Selective Placement Division

* Choosing Your Career

9

Code of Practice for Pressure Equipment Owners

The International Labour Organisation and the Application of International Labour Conventions in Hong Kong

"The extension of distribution outlets aims to provide better service and greater convenience to members of the public who can now obtain various information at one convenient location," a Labour Department spokesman said.

The addresses of the six offices are as follows :

* Southom Centre, 130 Hennessy Road, Wan Chai

fourth floor, Canton Road Government Offices, 393 Canton Road, Yau Ma Tei

* sixth floor, Kowloon East Government Offices, 12 Lei Yue Mun Road, Kwun Tong

second floor, Tsuen Wan Government Offices, 38 Sai Lau Kok Road, Tsuen Wan

first floor, Tuen Mun Government Offices, 1 Tuen Hi Road, Tuen Mun

fifth floor, Citylink Plaza, 1 Shatin Station Circuit, Sha Tin

"Besides these six offices, publications on certain services and legislation are also available from related divisional and sub-divisional offices," the spokesman said.

Enquiries about the distribution of the publications can be made at 28524125.

End/Wednesday, April 5, 1995

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

ISSUED BY GOVERNMENT INFORMATION SERVICES BEACONSFIELD HOUSE, HONG KONG. TEL: 842 8777

Thursday, April 6,1995

Contents Page No,

Transcript of the Governor......................................... 1

Secretary of State & Chinese Foreign Minister to meet in New York 6

Japan gives full support to HK promotion........................... 6

Bilingual glossary of legal terms.................................. 7

Induction programme for immigrant children from China.............. 9

Governor's factory visit in Tsuen Wan............................. 10

Weakened fresh water supply in Tsuen Wan....................... 11

Post offices closed during Easter.............................. 11

Hong Kong Monetary Authority money market operations

12

1

Transcript of the Governor *****

Following is the Governor's media session after visiting factories in Tsuen Wan:

Governor: Despite what some people suggest wrongly, manufacturing remains one of the key strengths of the Hong Kong economy, contributing about 12 per cent on the United Nations' formula to our overall economy. It is extremely important to our prosperity that we can continue to have a vibrant and profitable manufacturing sector. Today, I've been pleased to see two very different firms, both doing extremely well in competitive markets. First of all, ACL in the printed circuit boards field also manufacturing DISKExpress. Secondly, Central Textiles here in the spinning sector, one of the crucial parts of the textile industry, doing an extraordinary job. Like the rest of the industry a great deal of labour has been shredded over the years while we still manage to go on producing the same quantity of output. Both firms have shown very clearly what we need to do here in Hong Kong which is to ensure that we keep on going for higher technologies, more productive ways of manufacturing, applying as much knowledge and intelligence to the manufacturing process as possible. It is imperative that we do that if we are going to stay competitive in manufacturing which we all want to see happen. I've been very pleased to see two such excellent firms this afternoon. They both got different challenges and problems. I've been pleased to hear from the management about the particular difficulties and problems and opportunities which they face. But I've been extremely impressed by the quality of the management that I have managed to see and the quality of, of course, the workforce as well.

Question: The Chinese and British foreign ministers will meet in New York this month. You expect what kind of Hong Kong issues they will discuss ?

Governor: They meet reasonably regularly. They have a dialogue on a whole range of issues of common interest. I'm sure that as ever they'll have a broad agenda, touching on international issues which are of common concern to both China and Britain and of course touching on Hong Kong as well.

Question: It is a bit earlier than we expected. I mean is it a signal of any change in the relationship ?

2

Governor: I hope it's signalling a determination of both sides to work together to accomplish what as Douglas Hurd said is a shared interest.

Question: Would the government table the draft bill of the Court of Final Appeal if the current JLG meeting can't reach an agreement ?

Governor: I very much hope that we will sooner rather than later get an authoritative and comprehensive response from the Chinese side to the legislation to implement an agreement, I underline an agreement, reached between Britain and China in 1991. A bill was given, as you know, to the Chinese side last May. A few technical amendments were passed to the Chinese in January. I think it's difficult for people who hear what Chinese officials say about their attachment to the rule of law to understand what is taking so long, to understand that why it's taking so long for Chinese officials to confirm that the bill is totally, absolutely in line with the 1991 agreement.

Question: .... more specific as to what Hong Kong issues will be discussed in the meeting between Douglas Hurd and Qian Qichen ?

Governor: No. 'Obviously, Mr Qian and Mr Hurd are going to discuss the range of issues which are of concern to both sides. They're always, both of them, exceptionally well briefed about the subject in which they both take a close personal interest. So I'm sure that they will want to cover all issues in their normal way.

Question: Concerning incursion matters, one Chinese official has commented that they're going to try the two men arrested in Chinese court. How do you comment on that ?

Governor: We've made our position absolutely plain when we're pursuing through diplomatic channels. And I hope that we will get a positive response from Chinese officials. This after all is a good example of whether or not one is supportive of the rule of law.

Question: Do you think that the meeting of the two foreign ministers can help in .. the CFA ... approval of the Chinese side ?

3

Governor: I very much hope that the meeting between the two foreign ministers will help improve co-operation on all issues.

Question: Will Mr Hurd mention about the problem of the CFA....

Governor: Mr Hurd as I said earlier will I'm sure want to cover the whole range of issues which are of concern to Britain and China.

Question: A recent survey conducted by the Federation of Trade Unions showed that illegal workers in Hong Kong, especially from the Philippines and Thailand is very serious. What will you do more to tackle this problem and to improve this situation ?

Governor: We've been taking as you know tough measures to deal with both employers who take on illegal workers knowingly and to deal with illegal workers as well. But one of the difficulties as you know that we face with illegal workers is that they're invariably working in substandard health and safety conditions, in sometimes fly-by-night industries or sectors of the economy. So we do have to take a tough line. Very often, you find where there is illegal worker there is exploitation, and they're very often on the edge of other sorts of crime as well. So we take a very serious view about it and we'll go on pursuing it as vigorously as possible. It's reasonable for the trade union movement to take such a considerable interest in the issue and I can assure you that interest is shared by the government and shared by all good employers.

Question: .... go ahead with tabling the Court of Final Appeal Bill

4

Governor: I have answered questions on that There's imit, the number of ways in which I can say the same thing Clear!' rom our side, we're disappointed when JLG raiks don't go bette 'han they appear to be going this week. Though I say "appear to ne going" becu. se there is still some more time left and I hope that better progres- will be maoe I'm afraid that the message isn't a new one. It's not just the Iasi year or two or three that we haven't seen as much progress as we would like in the JLG The storv goes back a very long way and I think that when people look at the effort made by Hong Kong government officials, they know that there shouldn't be any criticism of what we've been trying to do. Sometimes, we are extremely puzzled in why it is that it takes so long to make progress or. issues which are of importance to Hong Kong's future and also if 1 may say so of some importance to China as well. But we remain hopeful and we continue to work very hard to achieve as much progress as we can. I hope that if progress hasn't been made in the first couple of days of the JLG, there will be some more progress tomorrow But that's a matter which I'm sure Chinese officials will want to answer about in due course. The CFA is one of the issues on which we would like to see greater progress. I said earlier that we were very puzzled about why an issue which is of such fundamental importance to Hong Kong seemed to be taking so much time on the Chinese side. There's all sort of speculations that I've read in the newspapers and heard talked about on the radio and television. I don't know whether any of that speculation is true or not What I do know is that whenever Chinese officials are asked by business leaders or by foreign audiences or here in Hong Kong about the rule of law, they put their hand on their heart and promised that they're absolutel' committed to it One can show how committed one is to the rule of law and by the progress that's been made on the Court of Final Appeal.

Question: This assassination of the ICAC witness in Singapore. Do you think this is time to ... the witness protection programme?

Governor: Well I think as the ICAC have made clear protection was offered to this particular witness who was in Singapore I don't want to comment on the details of the case though it is a case we have been pursuing extremely seriously. And what appears to have happened will I think underline the fact that we have been right to take this particular case very seriously. But obviously it would not be helpful to the ICAC. or to the Police either here or in Singapore for me to comment in any more detail on that point.

5

Just say once again that all of us will, I am sure, be pleased that Mr Qian and Mr Hurd are meeting once again. This is one of their regular series of meetings. And we hope that the meeting will bring in due course good news for Hong Kong and good news for elsewhere in the region and in the world where Britain and China have their shared concerns and shared interests. The important thing is that the Foreign Ministers are meeting, are talking, are discussing matters which concern both sides. Thank you very much.

Question: What can you say about the smuggling into China........

Governor: No. I think you are a little confused there . We are of course discussing the exact delineation of territorial waters. But I don't think that is remotely relevant to the case the other day. There is no argument I think put forward by the Chinese side relating to the exact line in the territorial waters. The Chinese side have offered several explanations of what happened. But I don't think any of those explanations suggested that somehow there was confusion about which territorial water the incident took place in. The truth is every body I think is fairly clear in their own minds what happened. We are glad that there has been a reduction in this sort of incidents over the years. We don't want to see any more incidents like this. The best way of bringing this incident to a close and the best way of ensuring that this incident does not make it more difficult to establish the sort of harmonious relationship we would like is to return the vessels and the Hong Kong residents forthwith, not at some indefinite time in the future but immediately. There is no question about the jurisdiction in this case. So I hope that we will have through diplomatic channels which is how very properly and moderately we have been pursuing it. I hope that we will have a response through diplomatic channels as soon as possible. Thank you very much.

End/Thursday, April 6, 1995

6

Secretary of State & Chinese Foreign Minister to meet in New York * * * * *

The Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, the Rt Hon Douglas Hurd, and the Chinese Vice-Premier and Foreign Minister, Mr Qian Qichen, have agreed to meet in the margins of the NPT Review Conference in New York on April 18, 1995.

End/Thursday, April 6, 1995

Japan gives full support to HK promotion *****

The Japanese Government has pledged full support to a plan by the Hong Kong Government to stage a major promotion in the country to strengthen the already close business, economic and cultural links.

The message was conveyed by the Japanese Prime Minister, Mr Tomiichi Murayama, to the Hong Kong Government's Principal Representative in Japan, Mr David Lan, yesterday (Wednesday) afternoon when Mr Lan called on Mr Murayama to brief him about the latest developments in Hong Kong and the Hong Kong promotion in Japan scheduled to take place from September 25 to 29 this year.

The Hong Kong promotion will target at Tokyo, Osaka and Fukuoka. The core programme in each city will include a business seminar, social functions and cultural events to highlight and further enhance the Hong Kong-Japan partnership.

The promotion will be presented in conjunction with the Hong Kong Trade Development Council and Hong Kong Tourist Association with private sector participation.

7

The Chief Secretary, Mrs Anson Chan, will be leading a delegation comprising senior government officials and businessmen to visit the three cities and take part in the major events.

Noting that Japan is Hong Kong's third principal trading partner, the second largest foreign investor and the largest foreign investor in the manufacturing industry, Mr Murayama agreed that it was important that this partnership should continue and, indeed, be strengthened.

In the context of closer co-operation, the Prime Minister told Mr Lan that the Japanese Government would be very happy to give the Hong Kong promotion in Japan its maximum support.

Yesterday's meeting was the first of a series of courtesy calls by Mr David Lan on senior government officials and business leaders in Japan to muster their support for the Hong Kong promotion.

End/Thursday, April 6, 1995

Bilingual glossary of legal terms * * * * *

A bilingual glossary of legal terms containing some 4,600 Chinese terms or expressions was published by the Legal Department today (Thursday).

Launching the English-Chinese Glossary of Legal Terms at a press conference today, the Acting Law Draftsman, Mr Tony Yen, said the terms and expressions contained in the glossary were extracted from legislation which was either enacted bilingually or in respect of which there was an authenticated Chinese text.

He said these terms or expressions were either legal terms themselves or expressions which were frequently used in legislation or legal documents.

8

"The Glossary therefore should be a useful reference material for the legal profession, legal academics, legal translators, linguists, law or language students and anyone who is interested in the bilingual legal system," Mr Yen said.

"It would also make a significant contribution in the use of Chinese in the law," he added.

The Glossary will be on sale from tomorrow at the Government Publications Centre, Queensway Government Offices, Low Block, Ground Floor, 66 Queensway, at $68 a copy.

Mr Yen said the Glossary reflected bilingual legislation as at November 30 last year. In view of the increasing number of bilingual legislation, further editions would be issued from time to time to reflect progress in the bilingual laws programme.

He said in order to preserve an accurate reflection of legislation, the terms and expressions were produced in the Glossary largely in the form as they appeared in the relevant legislation.

Mr Yen added: "Also, for some English terms or expressions there may be a number of Chinese equivalents to suit different contexts, therefore it may be necessary to refer to the sources of such terms or expressions to appreciate how a particular Chinese rendition was produced in its present form and how it should be used.

"Moreover, the Glossary is intended to be an easy and introductory reference for readers to locate particular texts in bilingual legislation, and for this purpose the source of each Chinese term or expression is cited in the Glossary," he said.

End/Thursday, April 6, 1995

9

Induction programme for immigrant children from China *****

New immigrant children from China between six and 15 years of age and having arrived in Hong Kong for less than six months are invited to attend a four-week induction programme on social adjustment and educational support.

A spokesman for the Education Department said: "The programme is aimed at helping new immigrant children from China to adapt to the local social and school environment, promoting inductive learning of Chinese and English languages among new immigrant children who have not yet enrolled in school and providing homework guidance to those who have already enrolled."

The programme, sponsored by the Education Department, is operated by non-profit-making voluntary agencies.

A newly-produced leaflet containing addresses and telephone numbers of these organisations is available for collection at the District Education Offices, the District Offices and the District Social Welfare Offices throughout the territory.

Single journey children also receive the leaflet when arriving at the Lo Wu Immigration Checkpoints, the spokesman said.

"The course is free of charge and the contents include social adjustment and educational support.

"The objectives are to explain to the participants the rules and regulations in school and the community, the use of public amenities in the community and public transport, to provide them with guidance in learning Chinese and English languages and to teach them study skills," the spokesman said.

He advised parents to contact the organisations in their district for the time and venue offering the courses in the leaflets.

End/Thursday, April 6, 1995

10

Governor's factory visit in Tsuen Wan *****

The Governor, the Rt Hon Christopher Patten, today (Thursday) visited two factories, ACL Electronics (Hong Kong) Ltd and Central Textiles (Hong Kong) Ltd in Tsuen Wan.

Accompanied by the Director-General of Industry, Miss Denise Yue, Mr Patten first visited ACL Electronics (Hong Kong) Ltd. Mr Patten was briefed by Managing Director of ACL Electronics Mr Michael Gardiner on the factory's production and toured the company's printed circuit board manufacturing lines and research and development department.

Founded in 1985, ACL Electronics (Hong Kong) Ltd is one of Hong Kong's leading manufacturers and suppliers of speciality printed circuit board.

Its innovative superpower data transceiver DISKExpress won the 1994 Governor's Award for Industry in Consumer Product Design.

In recognition of its efforts in environmental control (including the installation of waste water treatment and exhaust-air scrubber systems), ACL was awarded the 1994 Governor's Award for Industry in Environmental Performance.

The Governor next visited a major cotton spinning mill, Central Textiles (Hong Kong) Ltd.

At Central Textiles, Mr Patten was briefed by the company's Deputy Chairman Mr Alexander Woo on the factory's production, and toured its production lines in respect of rotor spinning and ring spinning.

Established in 1953, Central Textiles is a pioneer in the field of rotor spinning, and specialises in the manufacture of quality yarns for local weaving, knitting and dyeing factories.

End/Thursday, April 6, 1995

11

Weakened fresh water supply in Tsuen Wan * * * * *

Fresh water supply to some premises in Tsuen Wan will be weakened from 11 pm on Saturday (April 8) to 5 pm the following day to facilitate water mains connection.

The affected areas include Texaco Road, Yeung Uk Road, Hoi Hing Road, Tsuen Wan MTR station, Luk Yeung Sun Tsuen, Riveria Garden and those along the section of Castle Peak Road from Tsuen Wan to Ting Kau. 1

J. 3! '

• • " >i Ji.z.

End/Thursday, April 6, 1995

Post offices closed during Easter *****

The Postmaster General, Mr Mike Pagliari, announced today (Thursday) that all post offices would be closed during the Easter holidays from April 14 to 17.

A special mail delivery would be provided on April 14 (Friday), but no delivery would be made on April 15, 16 and 17. . I

A • • • ; . \ • * . * .J''.

End/Thursday, April 6, 1995

12

Hong Kong Monetary Authority money market operations

*****

Time Cumulative change

$ million (hours) ($million)

Opening balance in the account 1,413 0930 +1,204

Closing balance in the account 2,558 1000 +1,204

Change attributable to: 1100 +1,191

Money market activity +1,166 1200 +1,191

LAF today -21 1500 +1,176

1600 +1,166

LAF rate 4.25% bid/6.25% offer TWI 119.1 *-0.3* 6.4.95

Hong Kong Monetary Authority

EF bills EF notes/Hong Kong Government bonds

Terms Yield Term Issue Coupon * • • 1 Price Yield

1 week 5.19 14 months 2605 3 • . e , 6.35 100.29 6.16

1 month 5.17 23 months 2702 7.50 101.63 6.66

3 months 5.43 28 months 3707 6.95 100.46 6.84

6 months 5.68 34 months 3801 8.00 102.62 7.07

12 months 6.09 60 months 5003 7.75 101.13 7.61

Total turnover of bills and bonds - $28,861 million

Closed April 6, 1995

End/Thursday, April 6, 1995

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

ISSUED BY GOVERNMENT INFORMATION SERVICES BEACONSFIELD HOUSE, HONG KONG. TEL: 842 8777

Friday, April 7,1995

Contents Page No.

Actions to assure HK's future............................................ 1

32nd JLG meeting Joint Communique........................................ 2

Personal Data (Privacy) Bill gazetted.................................... 3

Proposed Companies Ordinance amendments.................................. 5

New fixed telecommunication network services licences.................... 6

Govt to expand elderly services actively.............................

HK delegation attends World Health Day in Beijing........................ 8

D-G of Trade heads HK delegation to APEC meeting in Singapore........ 9

One fifth of Govt expenditure spent on education........................ 10

Building regulations to be amended...................................... 12

New floating dock starts to operate..................................... 12

Airport Projects Resource Centre moves to new home...................... 13

Draft Ngau Tau Kok and Kowloon Bay OZP amended.......................... 14

Smithfield Extension improvement works.................................. 15

Covers for footbridges to be constructed................................ 16

Tenders invited for two architectural projects.......................... 17

Unauthorised building closed for public safety.......................... 17

Hong Kong Monetary Authority money market operations.................... 19

1

Actions to assure HK's future *****

The Governor, the Rt Hon Christopher Patten, today (Friday) called upon China to undertake some actions which would help dispel some of the anxieties in and outside Hong Kong about the territory's future prospects.

Speaking at the 50th Conference of Asia-Pacific Council of American Chamber of Commerce, the Governor said one of these actions was to assure people that the rule of law would be maintained after 1997 with the setting up of the Court of Final Appeal.

The Governor said it was agreed in 1991 that a Court of Final Appeal would be set up in Hong Kong.

e l

And in last May, a Draft Bill incorporating in every particular and every detail of the agreement in 1991 had been passed to China.

"Now China continues to say that it wants a Court of Final Appeal, that it stands by the agreement we reached in 1991 and that it's happy to see that court set up before 1997 so that there is no legal vacuum in Hong Kong.

"It hasn't so far, however, responded to the Bill that we handed over last May except to ask a number of technical questions all of which we've answered.

"I hope that China will give its approval to that Bill very soon, will make it clear that it supports the Bill and wants to see it rapidly put on to the statue book."

The Governor said a second example of the "great eloquence of deeds than words would be faster progress on the transitional business which Britain, China and Hong Kong need to complete before the handover of sovereignty".

He said the building of the new airport was one example.

Despite the signing of an overall agreement on the financing of the airport last Autumn, the related parties were still haggling over the Financial Support Agreements, he said.

The third deed, the Governor said, was an appreciation of the non-political civil service. .

I

4

- 2 -

•V*. ><

"One thing that would, I'm sure, give great reassurance to Hong Kong that China understands why things work here would be for Chinese officials to show that they appfeciate the important role of. our non-political meritocratic uncorrupt civil service, an extremely important role in our success story, and they're prepared as well to listen to voices, not only from the civil services, but from right across the community."

* .r- . .

-•f J

' '• 7. .

End/Friday, April 7, 1995

32nd JLG meeting Joint Communique ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

• - - i- OJV-i - j;.(. ,..s. , .

The Joint Liaison Group held its 32nd meeting in Hong Kong on April 4, 6, and 7, 1995.

The Group had a discussion about matters relating to Hong Kong's international rights and obligations; Hong Kong's air services agreements and renewal of air services arrangements between Hong Kong and Taiwan; the Transfer of Government; Civil Service matters; the defence of Hong Kong and public order; franchises and contracts extending beyond 1997 and related matters (including reclamation plans, the Railway Development Strategy and Container Terminal No. 9, etc); Hong Kong's sewage disposal scheme; investment promotion and protection agreements between Hong Kong and relevant countries; surrender of fugitive offenders agreements between Hong Kong and relevant countries; mutual legal assistance in criminal matters between Hong Kong and certain countries; the reciprocal, enforcement of judgments between Hong Kong and foreign countries; localisation of laws; adaptation of laws; the Court of Final Appeal; the implementation of the provisions of the Joint Declaration relating to the right of abode in Hong Kong after 1997; Visa Abolition Agreements; retirement protection and social welfare and Vietnamese Migrants in Hong Kong (Boat People and Refugees).

The next meeting of the Joint Liaison Group will take place at a time and location to be agreed by the two sides.

End/Friday, April 7, 1995

3

Personal Data (Privacy) Bill gazetted *****

A Bill to protect the privacy interests of the individual with respect to personal data has been approved by the Executive Council and was gazetted today (Friday).

A Government spokesman said the Personal Data (Privacy) Bill would also contribute to Hong Kong’s continued economic well-being by safeguarding the free flow of personal data to Hong Kong. This is because an increasing number of countries are enacting data protection laws with provisions to restrict the transfer of personal data to jurisdictions that do not have adequate statutory protection for the privacy of personal data.

The enactment of laws to protect the privacy of the individual with respect to personal data is part of an international trend, the spokesman said. To date 27 countries have enacted national data protection legislation. Such legislation is a response to concerns about the potential adverse impact on individuals of personal data that is inaccurate, or is not collected or used fairly.

The spokesman pointed out that the Bill implements most of the recommendations of the Law Reform Commission in its report on reform of the law relating to the protection of personal data published in August 1994. That report was based on more than four years’ work by the Law Reform Commission including a thorough public consultation exercise in 1993.

Key elements of the Personal Data (Privacy) Bill are the rights of access and correction it gives to individuals with respect to their own personal data and the limits it places on the uses to which personal data are put.

Subject to the exemption provisions, personal data may not be used for purposes other than those for which the data were to be used at the time of collection, which must be specified to the data subject where the data is collected from him or her, or directly related purposes. Personal data can only be used for different purposes with the consent of the data subject, the spokesman said.

The main features of the Bill are as follows:

* It gives statutory effect to internationally accepted data protection principles, which provide for the fair collection of personal data; requirements that personal data be accurate and not kept for longer than necessary; limits on the use of personal data; security of personal data; openness by data users about the kinds of personal data they hold and purposes to which they are put; and for data subjects to have rights of access and correction with respect to their personal data.

4

* It contains detailed provisions to enable individuals to obtain access to and seek correction of personal data held by either private or public bodies.

* It establishes an independent statutory body - the Privacy Commissioner for Personal Data - to promote and enforce compliance with the legislation.

The Privacy Commissioner is given powers to: approve and issue codes of practice giving guidance on compliance with the Bill; specify classes of data users required to submit annual returns on the kinds of personal data they hold and purposes to which the data are put for compilation on a central register of such data users; and inspect personal data systems and investigate suspected breaches of the Bill’s requirements.

* It subjects the transfer of personal data to places outside Hong Kong to suitable control to ensure that (he privacy interests of data subjects are not adversely affected by such transfer.

* It provides for a broad exemption for personal data held for domestic purposes and narrowly defined exemptions from the requirements on subject access and use limitation to cater for a variety of competing public and social interests, such as: human resources management; security, defence and international relations; the prevention and detection of crime; the assessment or collection of taxes; financial regulation; an individual's physical or mental health; and news gathering and reporting.

* It provides for a variety of offences, including non-compliance with an enforcement notice issued by the Privacy Commissioner, which carries a fine in the range of $25,001 to $50,000 and imprisonment for two years. Provision is also made for an individual who suffers damage as a result of a contravention of the Bill to be entitled to compensation.

The Personal Data (Privacy) Bill will be introduced into the Legislative Council on April 19, 1995.

End/Friday, April 7, 1995

5

Proposed Companies Ordinance amendments *****

The Government has proposed amendments to the Companies Ordinance to introduce a new class of preferential payment for depositors in the event of the liquidation of a bank.

A'

Details of the proposals are contained in the Companies (Amendment) Bill 1995 which has been gazetted today (Friday).

Explaining the background of the proposed amendments, a Government spokesman said the Government decided in 1993 that legislative amendments should be pursued to provide for priority payment for bank depositors in the event of the liquidation of a bank.

’’This is intended to provide a measure of comfort for depositors,” the spokesman said.

Under the proposal, eligible depositors would receive priority payment of the first $100,000 net deposits in the event of the liquidation of a bank.

The new class should rank immediately after the existing classes for remuneration and other payments to employees and statutory debts.

The spokesman said the proposal covered all depositors except those who were connected with the bank, such as its directors, controllers, senior management, parent, sister and subsidiary companies; the Hong Kong Monetary Authority and banking institutions.

fhe new class may diminish dividends to very large depositors, excluded depositors and ordinary creditors where less than full dividend is paid.

However, the proposal would contribute to a more speedy liquidation by reducing the number of creditors very considerably at an early stage of the winding up.

The spokesman said some 80 per cent to 90 per cent of deposit accounts typically fell into the $100,000 or below category.

’’The notional loss of having to give up a certain percentage of dividend payment may be more than compensated for by the accelerated receipt of their money by the other creditors and the reduction in administrative costs." the spokesman said.

4

- 6 -

Besides the introduction of the new preferential class, other aspects of the liquidation are not affected by the Bill and will continue to be governed by established liquidation law and practice.

The spokesman added that the Bill also provided for the use of either Chinese or English under the various provisions in the Ordinance and the use of certificates of incorporation with pre-printed signatures.

He said the proposal to allow for the use of either Chinese or English under the various provisions would place the two languages on an equal footing.

As regards the use of certificates of incorporation with pre-printed signatures, this would allow better use of resources and is merely an efficiency measure.

The Bill is scheduled for introduction into the Legislative Council on April 19, 1995.

End/Friday, April 7, 1995

New fixed telecommunication network services licences *****

The Telecommunication (Amendment) Regulation 1995, which sets out the form of the new fixed telecommunication network services licence to be issued to the Hong Kong Telephone Company and three new competitors, was gazetted today (Friday).

The Hong Kong Telephone Company's current monopoly in the provision of local fixed network telephony will expire on 30 June this year.

"The new licence specifies in detail the terms and conditions governing the services to be provided by Hong Kong Telephone and the three new entrants, namely Hutchison Communications, New T & T Hong Kong and New World Telephone," a spokesman from the Economic Services Branch said.

The new licence contains comprehensive provisions to safeguard consumer

interests and fair competition among the four competitors.

7

’’After consultation with the Chinese side, the new licence has been approved by the Executive Council and is now specified in the Telecommunication Regulations.

"The completion of the gazetting procedure means that the licences can now be formally offered to the four companies by the Telecommunications Authority, enabling the new entrants to put in place their new networks and offer services to the public.

"We expect competition in local fixed network telephone services to lead to lower prices and a wider range of service offerings," the spokesman said.

Following the Government's decision to liberalise local telephone services when Hong Kong Telephone Company's franchise expires on June 30 this year, three new entrants, Hutchison Communications, New T & T Hong Kong, and New World Telephone, were selected to provide local fixed network telecom services in competition with Hong Kong Telephone.

The Chinese side have recently confirmed their endorsement of the grant of the four licences which arc valid for 15 years and renewable for another 15 years, straddling 1997.

End/Friday, April 7, 1995

Govt to expand elderly services actively *****

To cater for the ageing population in Hong Kong, the Government has been actively improving the quality and quantity of elderly services in the past few years, the Chief Secretary’, Mrs Anson Chan, said.

Officiating at the opening ceremony of SAGE Madam Ho Sin Hang Home for the Elderly today (Friday), Mrs Chan said the Working Group on Care for the Elderly appointed by the Governor put forward 71 proposals for the improvement of elderly services in its report in August last year.

"In accordance with one of the proposals, the Health and Welfare Branch established the Elderly Services Division to co-ordinate and monitor various elderly service policies so that other proposals in the report can be implemented more effectively," she said.

8

In order to regulate the homes for the elderly which provide hostel care for persons over 60 and to ensure their services are up to standard, the Government formulated the Residential Care Homes (Elderly Persons) Ordinance in October last year and implemented it on April 1 this year, she added.

Mrs Chan hoped that the community and non-government organisations would continue to support and participate in local elderly services in different ways.

End/Friday, April 7. 1995

HK delegation attends World Health Day in Beijing ♦ ♦ * * *

The Hong Kong delegation, currently in Beijing on a visit to the Ministry of Public Health, were invited to attend the celebrations of World Health Day today (Friday).

The World Health Organisation's (WHO) global target of "A World Without Polio" by the year 2000 has been adopted by China, the venue chosen by WHO for celebrating World Health Day this year.

The Director-General of WHO, Dr Hiroshi Nagajima, and Regional Director for the Western Pacific, Dr S T Han, both spoke at the opening ceremony held in the Great Hall of the People. They warmly praised China's success in eradicating polio in the country by the end of 1995, five years ahead of the global target.

The opening ceremony was attended by State Councillor of the Chinese National State Council, Madam Peng Peiyun; Minister of Public Health, Professor Chen Minzhang; other senior officials in the Ministry of Health; and hundreds of representatives from the United Nations Development Programme, the United Nations Children's Fund and other international organisations.

The leader of the Hong Kong delegation, the Secretary for Health and Welfare, Mrs Katherine Fok, said members of the delegation were delighted and privileged to be invited to the World Health Day celebrations.

"In Hong Kong, we have eradicated polio since 1985, but in accordance with the WHO target, we continue our efforts through our comprehensive immunisations programme for all infants," said Mrs Fok.

"As WHO emphasised, owing to the ease with which polio can cross national boundaries, we must continue this programme until polio is eradicated world-wide."

Mrs Fok added that participation in the World Health Day events further strengthened the Hong Kong delegation's understanding of China's health care programmes.

The delegation, including the Director of Health, Dr Margaret Chan; the Chief Executive of the Hospital Authority, Dr E K Yeoh; and the Deputy Secretary for Health and Welfare, Mrs Shelley Lau, will visit health care institutions in Beijing before departing for Shanghai on Sunday (April 9). There, they will visit traditional Chinese medicine institutions and hold further discussions with health care officials.

Mrs Fok will return to Hong Kong next Wednesday (April 12).

End/ Friday, April 7, 1995

D-G of Trade heads HK delegation to APEC meeting in Singapore * ♦ ♦ * ♦

The Director-General of Trade, Mr Tony Miller, will lead a Hong Kong delegation to the second special session of the Senior Officials Meeting (SOM) of the Asia Pacific Economic Co-operation (APEC) to be held on April 11 and 12 in Singapore. The meeting is to follow up on the first special session of SOM held in Fukuoka, Japan, in February this year.

Senior Officials of APEC economies will continue to work on drawing up an "action agenda" for realising the goal of free and open trade and investment in the region by the year 2020.

The free trade goal was promulgated by the 18 economic leaders of APEC at their meeting in Bogor, Indonesia, in November last year.

10

The first special session of SOM has agreed that the ’’action agenda” would contain three components - trade and investment liberalisation and facilitation, and economic and technical co-operation. Short, medium as well as long-term action programmes on specific areas will need to be worked out for the "action agenda".

Prior to the special session of the senior officials, the Committee on Trade and Investment as well as experts on investment and customs procedures will meet to consolidate their action plans on trade facilitation for consideration by the Senior Officials.

The Hong Kong delegation will comprise senior officials from the Trade and Industry Branch, the Industry Department, the Customs and Excise Department and the Trade Department.

Members of APEC are Australia, Brunei Darussalam, Canada, Chile, the People’s Republic of China, Hong Kong, Indonesia, Japan, the Republic of Korea, Malaysia, Mexico, New Zealand, Papua New Guinea, the Philippines, Singapore, Chinese Taipei, Thailand and the United States of America.

End/Friday, April 7, 1995

One fifth of Govt expenditure spent on education ♦ * * * ♦

Education has always taken up the largest share of the government's recurrent budget and in the 1995-96 financial year, a total of over $16.7 billion has been allocated to the Education Department.

The acting Director of Education, Miss Elaine Chung, said this when addressing the Rotary Club of Admiralty today (Friday).

Miss Chung said over $6 billion would be spent on primary education, $8.8 billion on secondary and $707 million on special education.

Miss Chung said education spending represented over one fifth of recurrent public expenditure and the Government was committed to increasing recurrent spending on education further, by 15.8 per cent in real terms from now to 1997.

‘•Ji. • . . .

"In Hong Kong, the education system is fair and accessible and no child is denied education due to lack of means.

11

"If the first priority in the early 70s was to ensure 100 per cent provision for all school age children, we have reached a stage in recent years when our focus is on qualitative improvements in the provision of the best possible education for our children," Miss Chung said.

She said in terms of education expenditure as a percentage of total government spending, Hong Kong was consistently among the top 15 in the world and among the top three in Asia according to the United Nations International Children Emergency Fund Year Book. . ,

"At the beginning of the decade in 1989-90, the Education Department had an allocation of $7.7 billion. Today our budget has more than doubled and stands at $16.7 billion.

"While the school student population indicates a downward trend, our spending for 1995-96 will increase by $609.3 million or 3.8 per cent in real terms over last year, resulting in an even higher growth in funding allocation on a per student basis," she said.

She said the increase in the education budget reflected the Government's continued determination to invest in the future of children in Hong Kong and to bring out the best of all children, whatever their abilities and interests.

On improving the quality of education, Miss Chung said: "We have 70 per cent graduate teachers in all secondary schools. We are working towards the goal of 35 per cent of graduate teachers in all primary schools by 2007."

In addition, she said, the Education Department wanted to increase the number of whole day primary schools, reduce class size and improve teacher to student ratios.

Turning to new spending initiatives for 1995-96, Miss Chung said these included increasing the number of teachers and upgrading teacher posts in primary and secondary schools, providing additional facilities at a cost of $613 million under the School Improvement Programme, running special courses for immigrant children, implementing Target Oriented Curriculum in 76 schools and promoting the image of teachers.

She said another $340 million would be spent on building three more practical schools and seven skills opportunity schools.

End/Friday, April 7, 1995

- 12 -

Building regulations to be amended *****

The Government is to amend the Building (Planning) Regulations to improve the standards of means of access to a building for fire fighting and rescue purposes.

The Building (Planning) (Amendment) Regulation 1995 gazetted today (Friday) sought to ensure that fireman's lifts should be so designed and located that, in the event of a fire, firemen could have safe and unobstructed access to the lifts and to the floors served by the lifts.

The amended regulation also seeks to allow the firemen to make better use of all facilities in a firefighting and rescue stairway (FRS) in case of a fire.

• • • w** •

"In future, only fireman's lifts are to be installed in a FRS, and the access stairway in a FRS shall serve all floors of a building," a Government spokesman said.

"These are pragmatic changes which will provide better protection against fire and other hazards ih a building.

"A revised code of practice on means of access for firefighting and rescue will be issued in parallel with the amended Regulations which are expected to come into effect on May 22."

Enquiries about the revised regulations and the code may be made either in person at Buildings Department Headquarters, 11th floor, Murray Building, Garden Road, Hong Kong or by telephone at 2848 2222.

End/Friday, April 7, 1995

New floating dock starts to operate ♦ ♦ * ♦ *

With one of the world's largest floating docks coming into operation in Yam O Wan, Lantau, the ship repair industry in Hong Kong is well set to meet the growing demand for these services in the years ahead, the Director of Marine, Mr Ian Dale, said today (Friday).

Speaking at a ceremony to mark the commencement of operations of the latest floating dock, Mr Dale said: "Hong Kong, as the biggest container handling port in the world and one of the busiest in terms of vessel movement, must be capable of providing a full and efficient repair and maintenance service. The 'United' dock adds significantly to that capability."

13

Owned by the Hongkong United Dockyard Ltd, the floating dock is the largest built anywhere in the world for many years. Its length of 290 metres, and an operation width of 41.8 metres gives it a lifting capacity of 40,000 tonnes.

Mr Dale said that the operation of this new dock also underlined the owner's confidence in Hong Kong's ability to attract more ship repair works, as the industry began to recover from a worldwide recession.

He noted that the new dock is designed to service a wide range of ships, including the latest generations of container vessels trading in the Far East.

Hongkong United Dockyard is an established operator in the industry, having been repairing ships in Hong Kong for more than 130 years.

The new floating dock was built in Singapore and arrived in Hong Kong early last February for final installation. Together with this new dock, there are now eight floating docks operating in Hong Kong.

End/Friday, April 7, 1995

Airport Projects Resource Centre moves to new home

*****

The Airport and Port Projects Resource Centre located in Central will be closed tomorrow (Saturday) for. removal to its new premises in Causeway Bay.

It will re-open on April 11 (Tuesday) for public use at its new office on the 22nd floor, East Exchange Tower, 38 Leighton Road, Causeway Bay, Hong Kong.

With a total area of about 83 square metres, the new Centre will house over 900 reference books, reports and press clipping sets relating to the airport core programme and the port. These reading materials are computer- catalogued for easy access by users.

Visitors to the Centre will also be able to see two large models, one depicting a cross-section of the Tsing Ma Bridge and the other showing the layout of the new airport at Chek Lap Kok.

There will also be video shows to further enhance public understanding of the 10 airport core programme projects.

14

The Resource Centre was opened in July 1991 in the French Mission Building in Central.

The new Centre in Causeway Bay will be opened to the public free of charge from 9 am to 5 pm during weekdays and closed for lunch-break from 1 pm to 2 pm. Opening from 9 am to noon on Saturdays, it will be closed on Sundays and public holidays.

Visitors coming in groups are advised to make advance bookings by calling 2577 0231.

End/Friday, April 7, 1995

Draft Ngau Tau Kok and Kowloon Bay OZP amended * ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

The Town Planning Board today (Friday) announced amendments to the draft Ngau Tau Kok and Kowloon Bay Outline Zoning Plan (No. S/K13/8).

One of the amendments is to rezone an area at the junction of Wang Chiu Road and Kai Cheung Road from ’’Industrial”, "Open Space" and "Road" to "Govemment/Institution/Community" for the Royal Hong Kong Auxiliary Police Headquarters, which will be relocated from its existing site at Gun Club Hill Barracks.

Another amendments is to rezone a site at the junction of Wang Kwong Road and Kai Cheung Road from "Industrial" to "Commercial" to serve the industries and local industrial workers in Kowloon Bay. To swap with the industrial site at Wang Kwong Road and Kai Cheung Road, a site at Wang Chiu Road and Lam Lee Street has been rezoned from "Commercial" to "Industrial".

The amendment plan (No. S/K13/9) is available for public inspection until April 28 at:

* Planning Department,

16th floor, Murray Building,

Garden Road,

Hong Kong;

15

* Kowloon District Planning Office, 11th floor, Leighton Centre, 77 Leighton Road, Hong Kong; and

* Kwun Tong District Office, ground floor, Kwun Tong Government Offices Building, Tung Yan Street, Kwun Tong, Kowloon.

Any person affected by the amendment plan may submit written objection to the Secretary of the Town Planning Board, c/o Planning Department, 13th floor, Murray Building, before April 28.

Copies of the draft plan can be bought at the Survey and Mapping Office, Lands Department, 14th floor, Murray Building, and Kowloon Map Sales Offices, ground floor, 382 Nathan Road, Kowloon.

End/Friday, April 7, 1995

Smithfield Extension improvement works ♦ ♦ * ♦ ♦

Tenders are being invited for the construction of the Smithfield Extension -Mount Davis Road Junction Improvements.

The works consist of the construction of a new elevated road link to improve the connection between Mount Davis Road and Pok Fu Lam Road, widening of a section of Pok Fu Lam Road, slope works and retaining structures.

Works are expected to start in July and complete in March 1997.

A notice on tender invitation was gazetted today (Friday).

Forms of tender and further particulars may be obtained from Pypun Engineering Consultants Ltd, third floor, Asian House, 1 Hennessy Road, Wan Chai, Hong Kong. Enquiries can be made on tel 2866 3688.

16

Tenders must be addressed to the Chairman, Central Tender Board, and placed in the Government Secretariat Tender Box at the lift lobby on the lower ground floor of the Central Government Offices (East Wing), Lower Albert Road, Hong Kong, before noon on May 5. Late tenders will not be accepted.

. jr' z i '.

The works have been designed and will be supervised by Pypun Engineering Consultants Ltd for the Highways Department.

End/Friday, April 7, 1995

Covers for footbridges to be constructed *****

The Government is inviting tenders for constructing covers to two existing footbridges across Kwun Tong Road near the Mass Transit Railway Kowloon Bay Station.

Apart from the building of the covers, the project also includes the associated lighting and drainage works.

The works are expected to start in July and be completed in January next year. A notice on tender invitation was gazetted today (Friday).

Forms of tender and further particulars may be obtained from the Regional Highway Engineer/Kowloon, Highways Department, 13th floor, room 1311, Nan Fung Commercial Centre, 19 Lam Lok Street, Kowloon Bay, Kowloon. Enquiries can be made on tele 2707 7205.

Tenders must be addressed to the Chairman, Public Works Tender Board, and placed in the Public Works Tender Box at 34th floor, Queensway Government Offices, 66 Queensway, Hong Kong, before noon on April 28. Late tenders will not be accepted.

The works have been designed and will be supervised by the Highways Department.

End/Friday, April 7, 1995

17

Tenders invited for two architectural projects ♦ ♦ * * *

The Architectural Services Department is inviting tenders for the construction of recreational facilities in Shek O.

Works include the construction of a two-storey beach building, a single-storey service building, a refuse collection point, a promenade with covered walkways, a barbecue comer with 35 barbecue pits and a children's play area.

Refurbishment of the existing changing rooms will also be carried out.

Meanwhile, tenders are also being called for the construction of Elaine Field Special School in area 9, Tai Po.

Works include the construction of a two-storey special school building with ten classrooms, ten special rooms, a library, a medical inspection room, administrative offices and ancillary facilities.

It is expected that the two projects will start in June and July respectively for completion by middle to late 1996.

Tender forms and further particulars can be obtained from the Architectural Services Department, 34th floor, Queensway Government Offices, 66 Queensway.

Tender offers will close at noon on April 28.

End/Friday, April 7, 1995

Unauthorised building closed for public safety * ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

In the interest of public safety, all buildings not constructed in accordance with approved plans are liable to demolition.

This message was reiterated by the Acting Director of Buildings, Mr Cheng Wei-dart, upon the execution today (Friday) of a closure order by the Buildings Department on a three-storey building at No. 26 Shek O village (also known as House No. 208-210 Shek O Village), Shek O Lot No. 1489, Shek O.

Mr Cheng said the owner had constructed the building without the Building Authority's approval.

"The unauthorised building was constructed in contravention of the Buildings Ordinance.

"There was no approved plan. Details of its design and construction were not known.

"If the building were to collapse, the occupants and other innocent people could be injured," Mr Cheng said.

"In the circumstances, we have to take enforcement action. A Buildings Ordinance Section 24 order was issued in 1991 to require the owner to demolish the building.

’’The owner ignored the order and we have to apply for a closure order. This is executed today after we have given ample notice to the owner and his tenants.

"In the intervening period, the owner has appealed to the Appeal Tribunal, the District Court and the Court of Appeal against the Building Authority's decision. The Building Authority’s decision has been upheld,” Mr Cheng added.

"Our consideration throughout this case has been public safety and compliance with the law," Mr Cheng stressed.

End/Friday, April 7, 1995

19

Hong Kong Monetary Authority money market operations * ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

$ million Time (hours) Cumulative change (Smillion)

Opening balance in the account 2,558 0930 +42

Closing balance in the account 2,104 1000 +42

Change attributable to : 1100 +76

Money market activity +112 1200 +27

LAF today -566 1500 +127

1600 +112

LAF rate 4.25% bid/6.25% offer TWI 119.0 *-0.1* 7.4.95

Hong Kong Monetary Authority

EF bills EF notes/Hong Kong Government bonds

Terms Yield Term Issue Coupon Price Yield

1 week 5.20 14 months 2605 6.35 100.31 6.14

1 month 5.20 23 months 2702 7.50 101.74 6.60

3 months 5.42 28 months 3707 6.95 100.57 6.78

6 months 5.68 34 months 3801 8.00 102.75 7.02

12 months 6.06 60 months 5003 7.75 101.36 7.55

Total turnover of bills and bonds - $21,189 million

Closed April 7, 1995

End/Friday, April 7, 1995

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

ISSUED BY GOVERNMENT INFORMATION SERVICES BEACONSFIELD HOUSE, HONG KONG. TEL: 842 8777

Saturday, April 8,1995

Contents Page No,

Hong Kong architecture and city planning exhibition...................... 1

Public urged to plant trees under annual scheme.......................... 2

Hong Kong Monetary Authority money market operations..................... 4

Sunday, April 9,1995

Contents Page No,

The Governor's "Letters to Hong Kong".................................... 5

EPD spokesman on HK Stadium noise monitoring............................. 7

57 new building plans approved in January................................ 8

Intensive English programme for S6 students.............................. 9

Airport Projects Resource Centre to reopen in new premises.............. 10

Young musicians invited to join HK Youth Chinese Orchestra.............. 11

Easter holiday clinic service........................................... 12

Welfare payment arrangements for public holidays........................ 12

1

Hong Kong architecture and city planning exhibition *****

An exhibition of Hong Kong architecture and city planning which had been highly praised in Europe and the United States will be staged in Hong Kong from April 10 to 30.

Entitled "Hong Kong - City of Vision", the exhibition features building models, designs and photographs of notable architectural and development projects in the territory.

It will be held in the 46th floor Sky Lobby at Central Plaza, 18 Harbour Road, Wan Chai, and open to the public from 2 pm to 7.30 pm on April 10, then between 8.30 am and 7.30 pm each day until April 30. Admission is free.

In conjunction with the exhibition, lectures will be given by the Director of Planning, Dr Peter K S Pun, and two Hong Kong renowned architects, Dr Simon Kwan and Mr Anthony H H Ng, at 6 pm on April 25 in the Rayson Huang Theatre of University of Hong Kong. The lectures will be delivered in Cantonese and admission is free. ;

Dr Pun will speak on "Land for Urban Growth" while Dr Kwan and Mr Ng's lectures are entitled "The Application of Chinese Art Theory in Architecture" and "Architecture and the Environment", respectively.

The exhibition had recently, been displayed at the Chicago Athenaeum's Museum of Architecture and Design between October last year and February as part of the successful Hong Kong-USA '94 promotion. )t,

It also had an acclaimed run at the German Architecture Museum in Frankfurt from November 1993 to March last year.

I j <

Apart from giving an overview of the different development patterns of Hong Kong, the exhibition highlights the planning of various other areas including commerce, industry, transport, housing, community, education, recreation and preservation.

It also features seven projects of vision: Bank of China Tower, Shun Tak Centre, Central Plaza, Hongkong Bank headquarters, the new airport passenger terminal building in Chek Lap Kok, south east Kowloon development and harbour reclamations.

2

Also on display will be models of 22 Hong Kong's prominent buildings and development projects.

The exhibition is jointly presented by the Planning Department, Architectural Services Department and Information Services Department. The venue is sponsored by Sino Group, Sun Hung Kai Properties Group, Ryoden Group and Central Plaza Management Co Ltd.

Attention News Editors:

The exhibition will be opened by the Secretary for Planning, Environment and Lands, Mr Tony Eason, at 11.30 am on Monday (April 10).

Also officiating at the opening ceremony will be the Director of Planning, Dr Peter K S Pun; the acting Director of Architectural Services, Mr S H Pau; and the Director of Information Services, Mrs Irene Yau.

Your representatives are invited to cover the opening ceremony to be held in the 46th floor Sky Lobby of Central Plaza, 18 Harbour Road, Wan Chai.

End/Saturday, April 8, 1995

Public urged to plant trees under annual scheme

*****

Members of the public are urged to contribute towards the greening of Hong Kong's countryside by planting seedlings under this year's "Community Tree Planting Scheme" now in full swing.

From tomorrow (Sunday) to end of April, members of the community can plant trees between 10 am and 4 pm during Sundays and public holidays at four designated country parks of the Agriculture and Fisheries Department (AFD).

They are Tai Mo Shan, Quarry Bay, Pat Sin Leng (Tai Mei Tuk) and North Lantau (Nam Shan).

3

An AFD spokesman said countryside visitors were most welcome to plant trees at the four designated country parks. Tree seedlings, tools and technical advice would be provided by AFD at planting sites.

Schools and organisations wishing to join the scheme are also welcome as eight other country park sites have been selected for tree plantation before the end of next month. Those interested may contact AFD's Conservation Education Unit on tel 2733-2121 so that arrangements can be made.

The spokesman said the scheme had become increasingly popular year by year since its inception in 1957.

This year, over 5,000 trees had been planted at country parks by members of the public and community organisations since the launching of the scheme.

Tree species planted include Acacia confusa, Acacia mangium, Tristania conferta. Machilus spp. and Schima superba.

This year's "Community Tree Planting Scheme" was launched by the Secretary for Planning, Environment and Lands, Mr Tony Eason, at the Sai Kung Country Park late last month.

The spokesman was confident that this year's scheme would be more successful than that of last year, which attracted more than 26,000 participants planting over 34,000 trees.

He said: "Trees can enrich our life. In the countryside, trees help prevent soil erosion, provide habitat and food for wildlife. They also constitute to biodiversity and improve the capacity of ecological environment."

On tree planting, he stressed that it was undoubtedly the best commitment the community could contribute towards nature conservation. Through active participation, the entire community can be fostered with more respect to the nature.

"Also, by taking part in the scheme, members of the community would be made more aware of trees and of the need to protect them," he added.

End/Saturday. April 8. 1995

4

Hong Kong Monetary Authority money market operations ♦ ♦ ♦ * *

$ Million Time (Hours) Cumulative Change ($ Minion)

Opening Balance in the account 2,104 09:30 Nil

Closing Balance in the account 1.491 10:00 + 17

Change Attributable to: 11:00 + 17

Money Market Activity +17 11:30 + 17

Laf Today -630 15:00

Laf Rate 4.25% Bid/6.25% Offer TWI 118.8 *-0.2* 8.4.95

End/Saturday. April 8. 1995

5

The Governor's "Letters to Hong Kong"

*****

Following is the full text of Governor the Rt Hon Christopher Patten's broadcast on RTHK's "Letter to Hong Kong" today (Sunday):

It's obviously much better to be wise after the event than not wise at all. Stupid after as well as before doesn't score many brownie points.

But best of all, as a Greek philosopher argued, is being wise before things happen. Foresight is one of the great virtues even though its fruits tend to earn criticism at the time, and rarely get the applause they deserve later on.

Well, we've got a chance these days in Hong Kong to show we're smart. Not by investing in the stock market. Or buying a piece of fancy real estate. Or spotting a niche in the market. Or salting away a good racing tip for next season. The chance I'm talking about is different. Different but very, very important. We should seize it with both hands.

All those of us who come from Europe, or come from North America, have seen at least some of the consequences of one of the most awful evils of so-called civilised life in the last decades of the 20th Century. And it's been a curse in parts of Asia and the rest of the world. Drugs. Drugs - soft, hard, killing. Broken lives on street comers. Young hopes in the gutter.

I've seen all that in London, in Australia, in Paris, in Madrid, in New York, in L.A., and so on and on. I don't want to see it in Hong Kong. And we don't have to see it - or to be strictly accurate - see it getting worse in our own city.

The wreckage among families. The distraught parents. The haunted young. The crime - often violent - to pay for the murderous habit. The extra burden on the police and social workers. The costs of fighting the menace: the cost of coping with it.

So far, as I've said, things aren't as horrendous here as they are elsewhere. But the lights are starting to flash warnings, if we only look. Last week I was in one of our new towns, mostly built in the last twenty years. The District Officer there showed me where the dealers hang out in the evenings. Where the youngsters drift from apathy to drug abuse. He showed me the staircase in the public flats where heroin is sold most nights. The openings in the wall where the money is left and the drugs are picked up. That's Hong Kong. Every night, despite the best efforts of our excellent police, that's the story somewhere in this city.

6

We can see that from the figures. Most of the figures for crime in Hong Kong don’t look too bad. Of course, any crime is bad - for the victim it’s one crime too many. But in comparison with most other places, the figures are pretty good, and some of them - for instance for violent crimes - are actually falling. But you can forget that as far as drug abuse is concerned, especially drug abuse by youngsters. Since 1989 the number of reported drug abusers under the age of 21 has increased by over 200 per cent. The absolute figure has now passed 4,000. And every year it gets bigger. Most of these youngsters are male. Eight out of 10 of them are destroying their lives with heroin.

One of the odd things is that some of the reasons given for drug abuse elsewhere don't apply to nearly the same extent in Hong Kong. Above all, there's little youth unemployment here, but still the figures climb.

So what should we do about it?

One thing that we should be able to agree is that this has got to be a priority. And if it is, and we all give the campaign against drug abuse our support, then maybe we can stop our own rising problem turning into the sort of disaster we see elsewhere.

We need even stronger policing and Eddie Hui is dedicated to that. We are increasing the resources available to the police, particularly to prevent drugs getting in and to hit the dealers hard. We are going to toughen penalties and crack down on the funds salted away by the traffickers.

But there’s much more to the campaign than that. We need more and better research - that's not an excuse for delay, we really do - to find why young people destroy their own lives, how best to stop them, and how to cure those who are hooked. We have to work more imaginatively in our schools to improve the quality of education about drugs and other health hazards. I saw 10 year olds the other day learning some helpful lessons about tobacco and alcohol. I know how many good teachers are already showing great initiative in this area. We want to give them more back-up and show other teachers how to tackle these subjects.

And we have to work with them, not least the voluntary organisations, who are trying to help drug abusers to kick the lethal habit and rejoin the land of the hopeful and the living. We mustn't be inhibited by old prejudices in giving a hand to the men and women who work so heroically in this field. 1 want us to learn what works best and then give it all the support we can.

7

I hope, too, that the community will accept that the facilities we need to help present and former drug abusers, have to go somewhere, and that they don't represent a danger to a neighbourhood. A much bigger danger to every neighbourhood comes from not having the means to treat those who are sick from taking drugs.

There's something for all of us to do to get this campaign off the ground. Something for everyone - parents, teachers, employers, sponsors, trade unions, social workers, youth groups, police. A part for everyone to play.

Does it matter? Of course it matters.

Can it really work? Heaven help us if it doesn't.

We've had the warning. We've got the time. And the resources. No one will forgive us if we throw away this chance.

End/Sunday, April 9, 1995

EPD spokesman on HK Stadium noise monitoring *****

In response to press enquiries on noise monitoring results at the Hong Kong Stadium today (Sunday), a spokesman for the Environmental Protection Department (EPD) said:

"The amplified music noise of the new sound system was successfully controlled by Wembly International to within the legal limits during the day and evening periods.

"The only exceedance (67-71 db(A)) at So Kon Po Cottage Area during the evening period was due to crowd noise. Since there have been fewer complaints than previous concerts, we feel that we should seek legal advice on whether it is fair and reasonable to include crowd noise into the noise assessment."

End/Sunday, April 9, 1995

8

57 new building plans approved in January

* ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

The Buildings Department approved 57 building plans in January this year.

Of the plans, 37 are for Hong Kong Island, six for Kowloon and 14 for the New Territories.

The approved plans include 20 for apartment and apartment/commercial developments, five for commercial development and three for factory and industrial developments.

In the same month, consent was given for work to start on 40 building projects, which involve 59,640.9 square metres of usable domestic floor area and 92,224.7 square metres of usable non-domestic floor area.

The declared cost of new buildings completed in the month totalled about $2,334 million.

Of the buildings certified for occupation in the month, usable floor areas for domestic and non-domestic uses are 60,562 square metres and 142,610 square metres respectively.

In the same month, the department issued 27 Occupation Permits - eight for Hong Kong Island, eight for Kowloon and 11 for the New Territories.

In addition, seven demolition consents involving 18 buildings were issued.

The Buildings Department's Control and Enforcement Division received 581 complaints of unauthorised building works, carried out 1,584 inspections and issued 251 Removal Orders on unauthorised works.

The department's Dangerous Buildings Section also inspected 794 buildings and obtained an Emergency Closure Order from the court.

End/Sunday, April 9, 1995

9

Intensive English programme for S6 students

*****

Secondary 5 students who have taken at least 50 per cent of the subject in the 1995 Hong Kong Certificate of Education Examination (HKCEE) in Chinese may apply for the first Pre-Secondary 6 course under the Intensive English Programme (IEP) in August 1995.

A spokesman for the Education Department said students who were prepared to proceed to Secondary 6 in September 1995 might apply for the course.

He said the purpose of the course was to help students who had studied through the medium of Chinese to achieve the standard of English required to enter local tertiary institutions.

The IEP, which is operated by the British Council, will be conducted in three stages, he said.

The first stage is a two-week whole-day Pre-S6 course from August 21 to August 31 this year. The second stage is a four-week Post-S6 course to be held in the Summer of 1996 and the third is a four-week Post-S7 course to be held in the Summer of 1997 before students entering local tertiary institutions.

The spokesman said current S5 students who were eligible for the 1995 Pre-S6 course might now obtain an application form from their schools. Private candidates may get the form from one of the 19 District Education Offices.

The completed forms should be submitted to the Education Department in August 1995.

To be eligible for the Pre-S6 course, students must:

* have been admitted to S6 in the 1995-96 school year;

* have satisfied the requirements for taking the Hong Kong Advanced Level Examination in the summer of 1997; and

* have taken examination in Chinese in at least 50 per cent of the subjects in the 1995 HKCEE apart from Chinese Language, Chinese Literature, Chinese History, English Language, English Literature, Buddhist Studies, Shorthand and Typewriting.

10

Applicants obtaining S6 places in Stage I to Stage IV under the 1995 S6 Admission Procedure should return the application form to the Education Department through the principals of their S6 schools on. or before Day 4 of the S6 Admission Procedure. Day 1 is the date of announcement of the HKCEE results.

Applicants getting S6 places through Central Allocation Stage V as well as those in a non-bought place private school, the admission to which is not governed by the S6 Admission Procedure, should return the application form to Education Department through the principal of their S6 school on or before Day 9.

Meanwhile, applicants taking the 1995 HKCEE as private candidates are required to complete a separate application form and forward it to the Education Department through the principals offering S6 places to them, together with a copy of their HKCEE Admission Slips and a copy of the HKCEE Result Notice.

The list of successful applicants will be posted at the following three places at 10 am on Day 10 of the S6 Admission Procedure:

* Lui Kee Educational Services Centre, 269 Queen's Road East, Wan Chai;

* British Council Head Office, 255 Hennessy Road, Wan Chai; and

* Education Department Kowloon Sub-Office, 405 Nathan Road, Yau Ma Tei.

End/Sunday, April 9, 1995

Airport Projects Resource Centre to reopen in new premises

*****

The Airport and Port Projects Resource Centre will be opened to the public on Tuesday (April 11) after it moves from Central to its new premises in Causeway Bay.

The new Resource Centre will be located on the 22nd floor, East Exchange Tower, 38 Leighton Road, Causeway Bay, Hong Kong.

It will be opened from 9 am to 1 pm and 2pm to 5 pm from Mondays to Fridays, and from 9 am to noon on Saturdays. It will be closed on Sundays and public holidays.

11

Members of the public can make use of the Centre to read reference materials on projects of the new airport and the port. There will also be videos and newspaper clippings available for viewing.

Two large floor-models, one showing a cross-section of the Tsing Ma suspension bridge and the other on the layout of the new airport at Chek Lap Kok will be on display in the Resource Centre.

Entrance to the Centre is free of charge and photocopying service is available at a basic fee. For enquiries and advance group booking, call 2577 0231.

End/Sunday, April 9, 1995

Young musicians invited to join HK Youth Chinese Orchestra * * * ♦ ♦

Young musicians under the age of 25 wishing to join the Hong Kong Youth Chinese Orchestra will now have a chance to do so.

The orchestra, under the Music Office of the Recreation and Culture Branch, is recruiting members for 1995-96.

Applicants should have attained at least Grade VI in the Music Office's internal assessment. Qualified candidates will be invited to attend an audition on May 6.

Application forms are available at all centres of the Music Office. Completed forms should reach the Kwun Tong Music Centre, 4th floor, Ngau Tau Kok Government Offices, 21 On Wah Street, Kowloon, by April 22. Enquiries can be made on 2796 7523.

Set up in 1978, the Orchestra aims at providing orchestral training to young people. It has since taken part in a number of concerts, district art festivals and overseas music exchange programmes in the past years. The orchestra plans to perform overseas in December this year.

A spokesman for the Music Office said today (Sunday) that an intensive training programme would be drawn up which covered master classes and rehearsals conducted by local and overseas musicians.

All rehearsals will be held on Saturday afternoons at the Mong Kok Music Centre.

End/Sunday, April 9, 1995

- 12 -

’ » Easter holiday clinic service i1

Eight general out-patient clinics will open on April 15 (Saturday) and April 16 (Sunday) during the coming Easter Holidays.

- • •* . ; r • ,

A spokesman for the Department of Health said today (Sunday) these clinics would be open from 9 am to 1 pm.

cn * . ‘ . v

The eight clinics are Violet Peel Health Centre and Shau Kei Wan Jockey Club Clinic on Hong Kong Island; Kwun Tong Jockey Club Health Centre, Robert Black Health Centre, and Yau Ma Tei Jockey Club Clinic in Kowloon; and Lady Trench Polyclinic, Shek Wu Hui Jockey Club Clinic and Yuen Long Jockey Club Health Centre in the New Territories.

There will be no holiday out-patient clinic service on Good Friday (April 14) and on Easter Monday (April 17).

’ >f : ? >..p > To ............i . / ...

End/Sunday, April 9, 1995

Welfare payment arrangements for public holidays

Recipients of Comprehensive Social Security Assistance under the bank payment system may receive their payments on Thursday (April 13) if their paydays fall on the Easter public holidays (April 14 to 17).

A spokesman for the Social Welfare Department said today (Sunday) that special payment arrangements would also be made for recipients of Social Security Allowance whose pay-days fell on April 14 to 17.

Those who have bank accounts with the Hongkong and Shanghai Bank or Hang Seng Bank will receive their payments on Thursday (April 13) whereas those with accounts in other banks will receive their payments next Tuesday (April 18).

In case of doubt, recipients are advised to contact their respective social security field units.

End/Sunday, April 9, 1995 ni

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

ISSUED BY GOVERNMENT INFORMATION SERVICES BEACONSFIELD HOUSE, HONG KONG. TEL: 842 8777

Monday, April 10,1995

Contents Page No.

Drug trafficking ordinance to be amended................................. 1

Initial report on HK under the Convention Against Tortune now available . 2

FS to visit Shenzhen..................................................... 3

HK combines high densities and quality environment....................... 4

Eligible electors of old functional constituencies urged to register. 5

Second quarter rates due on April 29..................................... 7

Water storage figure..................................................... 9

Hong Kong Monetary Authority money market operations..................... 9

1

- 1 -

Drug trafficking ordinance to be amended

*****

The Drug Trafficking (Recovery of Proceeds) Ordinance is to be tightened up to provide more effective enforcement and better compliance with international standards.

A Bill to amend the Ordinance will be published in the Gazette on Thursday (April 13).

The intention to introduce legislative amendments was announced by the Governor at his summit meeting on drugs held on March 6.

The Commissioner for Narcotics, Mr Alasdair Sinclair, said: ’’The proposed amendments will help prevent convicted criminals from retaining their drug proceeds.

"Operational experience has revealed some areas where the Ordinance needs to be rewarded," he added.

The Commissioner cited several examples of gaps in the current law:

* If a defendant absconds or dies before conviction, the proceeds of his drug trafficking cannot be confiscated.

If additional proceeds are discovered after a confiscation order has been made, the prosecutor cannot apply to have the amount of the order increased.

* Production orders only apply to information that is already in existence, meaning that a fresh order has to be obtained whenever updated information is required.

* It is not clear at present whether a drug trafficker can be charged with money laundering in relation to his own proceeds.

Mr Sinclair said under the proposed amendments it would still be necessary to prove beyond reasonable doubt that a person was guilty of a drug trafficking offence.

"However, once his guilt has been established, it is proposed that the amount by which he has benefited should be determined on the standard of proof applicable to civil proceedings, as is the practice in the United Kingdom," he said.

The Commissioner noted that legislation in Hong Kong already met many of the international requirements in this area but it was necessary to bring it up to date.

2

"International standards are evolving quickly and we need to keep in step," he said.

Amendments proposed for this purpose include the establishing of a criminal offence of dealing in property, knowing that it represents the proceeds of drug trafficking,

The Bill also introduces powers for authorised officers to seize specified property being imported into or exported from Hong Kong which represents the proceeds of drug trafficking.

"Hong Kong is committed to depriving criminals of their ill-gotten gains and preventing money laundering," Mr Sinclair said.

Relevant professional associations in the legal and financial sectors have been consulted on the Bill.

"Where appropriate their suggestions have been accepted and relevant changes made to the Bill,” the Commissioner said.

Many provisions in the Organised and Serious Crimes Ordinance are modelled closely on the Drug Trafficking (Recovery of Proceeds) Ordinance. To maintain the correspondence, it is proposed to amend these in parallel.

The two Bills will be introduced into the Legislative Council on April 26.

End/Monday, April 10, 1995

Initial report on HK under the Convention Against Torture now available *****

The initial report on Hong Kong under the Convention Against Torture and Other Cruel, Degrading or Inhuman Treatment or Punishment will be tabled at the Legislative Council on April 19.

The report covers the legislative, administrative, judicial and other measures that have been taken by the Hong Kong Government to prevent any acts of torture, as defined in article 1 of the Convention, from being committed in Hong Kong.

"The Convention which was ratified by the United Kingdom Government in 1988, was extended to Hong Kong in December 1992," a Government spokesman said.

»

- 3 -

To give effect in Hong Kong to provisions of the Convention, the Crimes (Torture) Ordinance was enacted in January 1993. It creates and defines the offence of torture, and provides for a maximum penalty of life imprisonment for a person convicted of the crime. It also provides the legal channels for the extradition of torturers and suspected torturers.

Other measures taken include: ensuring our interrogation rules and instructions are compatible with the Convention; providing adequate and reliable complaints channels and machinery for inspection and supervision of custodial arrangements; and ensuring in the legal system that the victim of an act of torture obtains redress and has an enforceable right to fair and adequate compensation.

Under Article 19 of the Convention, States Parties are required to submit to the United Nations Committee Against Torture periodic reports on the measures they have taken to give effect to their undertakings under the Convention.

"We were formally notified by the United Kingdom Government on March 29, 1995 that the initial report on Hong Kong was submitted by the United Kingdom Government to the United Nations late last month,” the spokesman said.

"Copies of the report on Hong Kong and the text of the Convention, in both Chinese and English, are available at the Marketing Office ot the Government Information Services at the 17th Floor, Siu On Centre, 176-192 Lockhart Road, Wan Chai, Hong Kong," he said.

"The report will be issued again in the form of a booklet in May and copies will be made available in public libraries and District Offices for public information then," he added.

End/Monday, April 10, 1995

FS to visit Shenzhen

*****

The Financial Secretary, Sir Hamish Macleod, will visit the city of Shenzhen at the invitation of the Shenzhen Municipal Government on Thursday (April 13).

Sir Hamish will visit various infrastructural developments in Shenzhen such as the port facilities at Yantian and the airport. He will also visit the Shenzhen Stock Exchange.


- 4 -

He will be accompanied by the Secretary for Economic Services, Mr Gordon Siu, and Chairman of the Securities and Futures Commission, Mr Anthony Neoh.

Attention News Editors:

Arrangements will be made for the media to cover the return of the Financial Secretary at Lok Ma Chau on Thursday.

Media members covering the event are requested to register for a border permit. They should telephone the Secretariat Press Office (Finance and Transport) on tel 2810 2116 or 2810 2977, giving their names and identity card numbers, by 3 pm Wednesday (April 12).

End/Monday, April 10, 1995

HK combines high densities and quality environment *****

Hong Kong has undergone a remarkable three-dimensional transformation that has established the territory as a world leader in the field of urban design and architecture, the Secretary for Planning, Environment and Lands, Mr Tony Eason, said today (Monday).

Speaking at the opening ceremony of an exhibition entitled "Hong Kong - City of Vision", Mr Eason said Hong Kong had been able to demonstrate convincingly that high densities and a high quality environment could be successfully combined.

"And, in the process, other significant benefits can be produced, as illustrated by the efficiency with which our city generally functions.

"All this is testimony to the vision, skill, dedication and hard work of our business entrepreneurs, planners, architects, engineers, contractors and all those who are involved in Hong Kong's progressive physical transformation," he said.

The exhibition in the 46th floor Sky Lobby of Central Plaza is open to public between 8.30 am and 7.30 pm until April 30. Admission is free.

It features building models, designs and photographs of notable architectural and development projects in the territory.

J

- 5 -

Apart from giving an overview of the different development patterns of Hong Kong, the exhibition highlights the planning of various activities including commerce, industry, transport, housing, community, education, recreation and preservation.

It also features seven projects of vision which include Bank of China Tower, Shun Tak Centre, Central Plaza, HongkongBank headquarters, the new airport passenger terminal building in Chek Lap Kok, south east Kowloon development and harbour reclamation.

In conjunction with the exhibition, lectures will be given by the Director of Planning, Dr Peter K S Pun, and two Hong Kong architects, Dr Simon Kwan and Mr Anthony H H Ng, at 6 pm on April 25 in the Rayson Huang Theatre of the University of Hong Kong.

Dr Pun will speak on "Land for Urban Growth". Topics of Dr Kwan and Mr Ng's lectures will be "The Application of Chinese Art Theory in Architecture" and "Architecture and the Environment" respectively.

The exhibition is jointly presented by the Planning Department, Architectural Services Department, and Information Services Department. The venue is sponsored by Sino Group, Sun Hung Kai Properties Group, Ryoden Group and Central Plaza Management Co Ltd.

End/Monday, April 10, 1995

Eligible electors of old functional constituencies urged to register * * ♦ ♦ ♦

The Registration and Electoral Office (REO) today (Monday) urged all eligible electors of the 20 old functional constituencies of the Legislative Council to register as electors.

This is part of the overall campaign to appeal to eligible electors to register for the September Legislative Council elections.

A spokesman for the REO said the franchise of most of the 20 functional constituencies had been expanded.

Under the new franchise, corporate electors are replaced by individual electors in the capacity of "relevant persons" of the eligible corporations. They include company directors, sole proprietors, partners, management and executive committee members, and trade union officers.

6

The right to register as electors is given to a maximum of four officers in respect of each eligible trade union, and six ’’relevant persons" in respect of each eligible corporation other than a trade union.

There will no longer be any appointment of authorised representatives by corporations to vote on their behalf.

The REO has written to the relevant corporations in these old functional constituencies to obtain the list of their "relevant persons."

. Based on the information so obtained, the REO is issuing letters to the individual "relevant persons", inviting them to register in their respective functional constituency. r 4

The spokesman said all the "relevant persons" had to do is to complete the registration form sent to them and return it to the REO.

. • . ... .4 '»•*.- »•

They may call an REO hotline 2827 9175 for enquiries or additional copies of the registration form.

"For these old functional constituencies where there is a quota of ’relevant persons’ who can register as electors in respect of each eligible corporation, the applications for registration received by the REO before May 1 will be considered first," he said.

/ • .-.J -’

Those who are eligible to vote in an old functional constituency by virtue of their individual qualifications will soon receive application forms.

The spokesman noted that all applications for registration, including those for the geographical constituency, the old and the new functional constituencies, must reach the office by June 1 for inclusion in this year’s Final Register of Electors.

"To ensure you are eligible to vote in the September Legislative Cotmcil elections, you must return your voter registration form to us before that date.

"We appeal to you not to forego your right to register to vote," he said.

End/Monday, April 10, 1995

i

7

Second quarter rates due on April 29 *****

Rates for the second quarter of this year are payable on or before April 29, a spokesman for the Treasury said.

Payment can be made using the Payment by Phone Service or by post addressed to the Director of Accounting Services, P.O. Box 8000, GPO, Hong Kong, or in person at any of the following offices:

The Treasury Headquarters Collection and Payment Office, Immigration Tower, first Floor, 7 Gloucester Road, Wan Chai, Hong Kong;

The Central Sub-Treasury, Central Government Offices (West Wing), 11 Ice House Street, Hong Kong;

The North Point Sub-Treasury, Max Share Centre, first Floor, 373 King’s Road, North Point, Hong Kong;

The Sai Wan Ho Sub-Treasury, Eastern Law Courts Building, Ground Floor, 29 Tai On Street, Sai Wan Ho, Hong Kong;

The Yau Ma Tei Sub-Treasury, Kowloon Government Offices, fourth Floor, 405 Nathan Road, Kowloon;

The Kowloon City Sub-Treasury, Man Sang Commercial Building, first Floor, 348-352 Prince Edward Road, Kowloon;

The District Office at Sai Kung, Sha Tin, Tai Po, North, Yuen Long, Tuen Mun, Tsuen Wan or Kwai Tsing.

The spokesman said ratepayers who had not received their demand notes should bring along those for any previous quarter to any of the Treasury collection offices.

Duplicate demand notes will be issued to them, he said.

If they cannot produce demand notes for any previous quarter, they should inquire at the Treasury Rates Section, Immigration Tower, 30th Floor, 7 Gloucester Road, Wan Chai, Hong Kong.

Non-receipt of the demand note does not alter the requirement that the rates must be paid on or before April 29 and unless so paid, ratepayers may be subject to a surcharge of five per cent under section 22 of the Rating Ordinance.

8

A further surcharge of 10 per cent may be levied on the outstanding amount (including the five per cent surcharge) which remain unpaid six months after the due date.

Ratepayers who have submitted a valid direct debit authorisation should note that if the wording "Payment to Be Made By Autopay" is shown, payment will be made by direct debit to their bank accounts on April 29.

They should then ensure that their bank accounts contain the necessary funds on that date.

If the above wording is not shown, they should pay according to the instructions as set out in the demand notes.

Rates are payable on vacant properties but are refundable under the conditions as specified in section 30 of the Ordinance.

Under sections 30(1 A) and (2A), however, no refunds will be made in the case of vacant tenement last used or intended to be used wholly or primarily for domestic purposes or for the parking of vehicles (unless vacant by reason of an order of the Government).

To save queuing time, the spokesman urged ratepayers to use the Payment by Phone Service, or pay by post using cheques or cashier orders, or by early personal attendance at any of the collection offices.

"However, the most convenient payment method is autopay," he said.

Applications for autopay are obtainable from Treasury collection offices, District Offices and all major banks in Hong Kong or by telephoning 2829 5019.

For additional information regarding the Payment by Phone Service, please call 1702 22329.

End/Monday, April 10, 1995

9

Water storage figure *****

Storage in Hong Kong’s reservoirs at 9 am today (Monday) stood at 66.5 per cent of capacity or 389.780 million cubic metres.

This time last year the reservoirs contained 391.677 million cubic metres of water, representing 68.8 per cent of capacity.

End/Monday, April 10, 1995

Hong Kong Monetary Authority money market operations

*****

$ million Time (hours) Cumulative change (Smillion)

Opening balance in the account 1,491 0930 +1,223

Closing balance in the account 2,504 1000 +1,223

Change attributable to : 1100 +1,223

Money market activity +1,223 1200 +1,223

LAF today -210 1500 + 1,223

1600 +1,223

LAF rate 4.25% bid/6.25% offer TWI 118.5 *-0.3* 10.4.95

Hong Kong Monetary Authority

EF bills EF notes/Hong Kong Government bonds

Terms Yield Term Issue Coupon Price Yield

1 week 5.21 14 months 2605 6.35 100.29 6.16

1 month 5.23 23 months 2702 7.50 101.71 6.61

3 months 5.44 28 months 3707 6.95 100.49 6.82

6 months 5.69 34 months 3801 8.00 102.63 7.06

12 months 6.09 60 months 5003 7.75 101.10 7.62

Total turnover of bills and bonds - $12,942 million

Closed April 10, 1995

End/Monday, April 10, 1995

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

ISSUED BY GOVERNMENT INFORMATION SERVICES BEACONSFIELD HOUSE, HONG KONG. TEL.: 842 8777

Tuesday, April 11,1995

Contents Page No.

Government announces senior level appointments............................... 1

SEM Mr Michael Leung retires in September.................................... 5

Governor on retirement of Mr Michael Leung................................... 5

Mr T H Chau welcomes appointment............................................. 6

Disability Discrimination Bill approved...................................... 6

Unauthorised building works problem recognised............................... 9

1A million employees' information for voter registration in new FCs received 11

Regulations on voter registration appeal procedures to be gazetted.......... 12

APEC Finance Ministers Meeting.............................................. 13

Volume and price movements of external trade in January 1995 ............... 13

Quarterly business receipts indices for service industries for the fourth quarter and the whole year of 1994 ................................................. 20

Prosperity depends on port development...................................... 24

HK to observe partial eclipse............................................... 26

Work arrangements during rainstorms urged................................... 27

Hong Kong Monetary Authority tender results................................. 29

Hong Kong Monetary Authority money market operations........................ 30

1

Government announces senior level appointments *****

The Government announced today (Tuesday) a series of appointments at senior levels of the Administration.

Mr Joseph Wong will be appointed Secretary for Education and Manpower in September 1995. He will succeed Mr Michael Leung who will proceed on preretirement leave on September 1, 1995.

Mr Kwong Hon-sang will be appointed Secretary for Works in October 1995 following the departure of Mr James Blake on end of agreement leave.

Mr Chau Tak-hay will be appointed Secretary for Recreation and Culture in November 1995 upon the retirement of Mr James So.

Miss Denise Yue will be appointed Secretary for Trade and Industry and will take over from Mr Chau Tak-hay in November 1995.

Mrs Regina Ip will take over from Miss Denise Yue as Director-General of Industry.

Mrs Shelley Lau will take over from Mr Joseph Wong as Director of Home Affairs.

Brief biographical notes on these officers are as follows:-

Mr Michael LEUNG Man-kin. CBE, JP

Aged 56. Mr Leung joined the Administrative Service in 1965 and rose to his present rank of Secretary, Government Secretariat in 1988. During the early years of his career, he held appointments in Home Affairs Department and Finance Branch. He was Deputy Director of Home Affairs from 1978 to 1980 and Deputy Director of Education from 1980 to 1984. He served as Director of Education from 1984 to 1987 and Secretary for Transport from 1987 to 1993. He took up the present post of Secretary for Education and Manpower in June 1993.

2

Mr Joseph WONG Wing-ping. JP

Aged 46. Mr Wong joined the Administrative Service in 1973 and rose to his present rank of Administrative Officer Staff Grade A in 1994. He served in a number of departments and branches, including Finance Branch, the former New Territories Administration, the former UMELCO and Trade Department. He was Deputy Secretary for the Civil Service from 1988 to 1989, Deputy Secretary for Trade and Industry from 1989 to 1991 and Permanent Representative of Hong Kong to the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade in Geneva from 1991 to 1994. He took up the present post of Director of Home Affairs in November 1994.

Mr James BLAKE. JP

Aged 61. Mr Blake was appointed to the Administrative Service as Secretary for Works in September 1991. Before joining the Hong Kong Government, Mr Blake has worked in Hong Kong for 27 years, involved in engineering consultancy, supervision, and as a contractor for a number of major infrastructure projects. A Chartered Engineer with a strong commercial background, Mr Blake is a Past President of the Hong Kong Institution of Engineers.

Mr KWONG Hon-sang. JP

Aged 56. Mr Kwong joined the Civil Service as an Apprentice Engineer in 1963. He was promoted to Chief Engineer in 1981, Government Engineer in 1988 and Principal Government Engineer in 1992. He served as Project Manager, Tsuen Wan from 1991-1992 and was appointed Project Director, Lautau Fixed Crossing from 1992-1993. He was promoted to the present rank of Director of Highways in December 1993.

Mr James SO Yiu-cho. OBE.JP

Aged 55. Mr So joined the Civil Service in 1962 and was appointed to the Administrative Service in 1966. He rose to his present rank of Secretary, Government Secretariat in 1993. Mr So served in a number of branches and departments, including the former Resettlement Department, Home Affairs Department, Urban Services Department, Home Affairs Branch, Civil Service Branch and Transport Department. He served temporarily as Secretary of the former Administrative Services and Information Branch from 1986 to 1987. He was Commissioner for Transport from 1987 to 1989 and Director of Urban Services from 1989 to 1991. He took up the present post of Secretary for Recreation and Culture in June 1991.

3

Mr CHAU Tak-hay. CBEJP

Aged 52. Mr Chau joined the Civil Service in 1967 and was transferred to the Administrative Service in 1982 as Administrative Officer Staff Grade B. Through a series of promotions, he rose to his present rank of Secretary, Government Secretariat in 1993. The early years of his career were spent in the former Trade, Industry and Customs Department, rising to the rank of Deputy Commissioner in 1979. He served in Geneva as Counsellor (Hong Kong Affairs) from 1979 to 1984. On return from Geneva, he served as Deputy Secretary for Health and Welfare from 1984 to 1985 and Deputy Regional Secretary (Hong Kong and Kowloon) in the former City and New Territories Administration from 1985 to 1986, when he was appointed Regional Secretary (Hong Kong and Kowloon). He served as Secretary for Health and Welfare from 1988 to 1990 and was appointed Director-General of Trade from 1990 to 1991. He took up the present post of Secretary for Trade and Industry in May 1991.

Miss Denise YUE Chung-yee, JP

Aged 42. Miss Yue joined the Administrative Service in 1974 and rose to her present rank of Administrative Officer Staff Grade A in 1994. She served in a number of branches and departments, including Home Affairs Department, Finance Branch, the former New Territories Administration, the Chief Secretary’s Office, Urban Services Department and Education and Manpower Branch. She was Deputy Director of the Hong Kong Economic and Trade Office in New York from 1985 to 1987, when she was sent to Harvard University on a one-year training programme. On return, she served as Principal Assistant Financial Secretary in Finance Branch from 1988 to 1991, Deputy Director of Regional Services from 1991 to 1992 and Deputy Secretary for Trade and Industry from 1992 to 1993. She took up the present post of Director-General of Industry in May 1993.

Mrs Regina IP LAU Suk-yee, JP

Aged 44. Mrs Ip joined the Administrative Service in 1975 and rose to her present rank of Administrative Officer Staff Grade Bl in 1994. During the early years of her career, she held appointments in Civil Service Branch, Home Affairs Department, the former New Territories Administration and Security Branch. She attended the Sloan Programme at the Stanford University in 1986-87. On return, she served as Assistant Director-General of Trade from 1987 to 1990 and Deputy Director of Administration from 1990 to 1993. She took up the present post of Deputy Secretary for Trade and Industry in May 1993.

4

Mrs Shelley LAU LEE Lai-kuen.JE

Aged 45. Mrs Lau joined the Civil Service in 1971 and was appointed to the Administrative Service in 1972. Through a series of promotions, she rose to her present rank of Administrative Officer Staff Grade Bl in 1995. She served in a number of branches and departments, including Home Affairs Department, the former UMELCO, Government House, the former New Territories Administration, Finance Branch and Civil Service Branch. She attended an overseas training programme in Harvard from 1984 to 1985. She served as Deputy Secretary-General of the former OMELCO from 1986 to 1989, Commissioner for Recreation and Culture from 1989 to 1991 and Secretary-General of the former OMELCO from 1991 to 1993. She took up the present post of Deputy Secretary for Health and Welfare in February 1993.

Attention News Editors:-

Arrangements have been made for the media to meet the government officials today (Tuesday) following the announcement of the appointments.

Government Official Time Venue

Miss Denise Yue, Director-General of Industry 2 pm Industry Department Conference Room, 14/F, Ocean Centre, 5 Canton Road, Tsim Sha Tsui, Kowloon.

Mr James Blake, Secretary' for Works and Mr Kwong Hon-sang, Director of Highways 3.15 pm 19/F. Murray Building, Garden Road, Central, Hong Kong

Mr Michael Leung, Secretary for Education and Manpower 4 pm Room 933, Central Government Office (West Wing), Ice House Street, Central, Hong Kong.

Mrs Regina Ip, Deputy Secretary for Trade and Industry 4.30 pm Room 149, Central Government Offices (East Wing).

Mr Joseph Wong, Director of Home Affairs 5.15 pm Home Affairs Branch Conference Room, 31/F, Southorn Centre, 130 Hennessy Road, Wan Chai, Hong Kong.

End/Tucsday, April 11, 1995

5

SEM Mr Michael Leung retires in September *****

The Government announced today (Tuesday) that it had accepted an application from Mr Michael Leung, Secretary for Education and Manpower to begin his preretirement leave in September this year.

"We will be very sorry to see Michael go," said the Chief Secretary, Mrs Anson Chan, today commenting on the news.

"Michael has served this community very ably and with dedication for 30 years, since joining the Administrative Service in 1965," she added. "He has decided to exercise his option to retire and we must respect that decision."

Mr Leung is 56. He is on the New Pension Scheme and therefore has an option to retire at any time between the age of 55 and 60. He has been Secretary for Transport since February 1987, and Secretary for Education and Manpower since June 1993.

End/Tuesday, April 11, 1995

Governor on retirement of Mr Michael Leung * * * * ♦

The following is issued by the Governor, the Rt Hon Christopher Patten:

"Mr Michael Leung is an outstandingly able public servant and he will be missed by both his colleagues and the community he has served so well for the last 30 years.

"During his career, Michael has handled many difficult problems with great skill and sensitivity and I have particularly valued his advice on the very complex issues relating to retirement protection.

"I wish him well in his retirement."

End/Tuesday, April 11, 1995

6

Mr T H Chau welcomes appointment * * * * *

Commenting on his appointment as Secretary for Recreation and Culture in November this year, Mr T II Chau said today (Tuesday) that he very much welcomed the change as well as the challenges which his new assignment would bring.

Mr Chau is at present in Geneva on official business related to the World Trade Organisation.

"November is an appropriate time for the change. By then, I will have participated in this year's three Asia Pacific Economic Co-operation (APEC) Ministerial Meetings, scheduled to be held in September in Adelaide, Australia, in October in Beijing and in November in Osaka," Mr Chau said.

"These meetings, culminating in the 1995 APEC Economic Leaders Meeting to be held in November in Osaka and at which Hong Kong will be represented by our new Financial Secretary. Mr Donald Tsang, will bring to a close this year's APEC activities, which are of great importance to Hong Kong," Mr Chau added.

"I have spent a most interesting, exciting and rewarding four years as Secretary for Trade and Industry. 1 greatly look forward to taking up my new responsibilities in November and to an equally rewarding involvement in the cultural life of the people of Hong Kong," Mr Chau commented.

End/Tuesday, April 11. 1995

Disability Discrimination Bill approved *****

The Govemor-in-Council has approved the Disability Discrimination Bill which is scheduled to be introduced into the Legislative Council on May 3.

Speaking at a press conference this (Tuesday) afternoon, the acting Secretary for Health and Welfare. Mr Bob Wilson, said this marked another important milestone in working towards the Government's objective of integrating people with a disability into the community.

7

"The Bill which was approved today is the culmination of extensive consultation locally, of research of the relevant experience overseas, and of careful drafting work," he said.

"It will give people with a disability, their families and those who care for them a comprehensive system of redress in areas of life in which they may face discrimination, harassment or vilification.

"These include: employment; education; transport; access to buildings and services; and participation in partnerships, professional organisations, clubs, and sports."

Mr Wilson stressed that the Bill would not nevertheless require employers to hire a certain quota of people with a disability; nor would it require all existing buildings, ferries, and buses to provide improved access and certain levels of service.

He said: "It will not place unreasonable demands on employers, service providers or property owners. But it will make it unlawful for anybody to treat a person with a disability less favourably than others on account of their disability.

"We have sought to strike a balance," he added.

Buildings and services will need progressively to be adapted to facilitate their use by people with a disability over time, but with immediate effect it will become unlawful, for example, to harass or otherwise unfairly treat people with a disability on account of their disability.

The Bill provides for two main defences against complaints of discrimination.

The first is "unjustifiable hardship" which means a developer, landlord or transport service operator could defeat a claim of discrimination by proving that it would cause them "unjustifiable hardship" to make special arrangements to meet the needs of a person with a disability.

"For example, a bus company could argue that it would cause unjustifiable hardship to change its bus fleet overnight to accommodate wheelchair bound passengers," said Mr Wilson.

The second defence is "genuine occupational qualification" which means where a person with a disability could not meet the requirements of a particular position, because of their disability, the employer would not be breaking the law in not hiring him or her.

8

The enforcement of the provisions of the Bill, Mr Wilson said, would be carried out by the courts and the Equal Opportunities Commission which was going to be set up under the Sex Discrimination Bill.

The Commission will receive and investigate complaints of discrimination, most of which are likely to be settled through conciliation. Where this fails, complainants can take their cases to the courts.

The Commission will also issue Codes of Practice so that all parties involved will have practical guidelines to follow regarding how they are expected to behave in any given sector.

In drafting these codes, the Commission will consult groups representing people with a disability and the sector concerned.

A special District Court will be set up to deal with cases under the Disability Discrimination Bill and the Sex Discrimination Bill.

Mr Wilson said although the Government was spending $34 million between 1993-94 and 1996-97 on activities to promote a more positive attitude towards people with a disability, it was clear that not all the Government wished to achieve could be achieved by persuasion and education alone.

’’That is why in July last year we recognised we would need to do more and we announced our intention to draft disability discrimination legislation.

"Hong Kong can be proud to join the growing ranks of places in the world where people with a disability have a powerful weapon - the law - to protect them against discrimination and to fight for equal opportunities.

"It is going to make a very real difference to their lives. And 1 look to the community to respond positively to this new and exciting challenge," he added.

Concluding. Mr Wilson called on the press to help change public attitudes towards people with a disability in the community.

Ue noted that in an ideal world the Disability Discrimination Bill should not be needed.

"But in the real world in which we live, it is a necessary and useful tool which people with a disability can use to obtain the fair deal they deserve," he said.

End/Tuesday. April 11. 1995

9

Unauthorised building works problem recognised

*****

The acting Director of Buildings, Mr Cheng Wei-dart, today (Tuesday) welcomed the recognition by the Commissioner for Administrative Complaints (COMAC) that the problem of unauthorised building works (UBW) is "complex and difficult".

Responding to a report on unauthorised building works released by COMAC, Mr Cheng said the Buildings Department would study carefully all recommendations in the report, and follow them up as necessary.

Noting COMAC’s view that the Government's policy of prioritised enforcement was "inherently unfair and inconsistent", he felt this was over simplifying a longstanding problem.

"Given that the nature of the problem is so complex, the scale so big and the resources are not unlimited, some form of prioritisation is necessary.

"Our enforcement policy is aimed first at protecting public safety and second at containing and reducing the size of the problem," said Mr Cheng.

He pointed out that, since the current policy was introduced in 1988 - after extensive public consultation, the policy had been working satisfactorily in containing the problem.

This was reflected by the following performance indicators:

* About 140,000 UBW of all types had been cleared and the Buildings Department is maintaining the momentum at a vigorous rate of clearing 20,000 items a year.

* The figure of compliance with demolition orders had tripled from about 2,200 to 6,400 during the same period.

* Notwithstanding the increase in population and buildings over these years, the policy had maintained its deterrent effect. This was rellected in the number of complaints made to the Buildings Department being remained at a steady level of 7,000 a year.

* fhe number of inspections made by Buildings Department staff had almost doubled, from 11,000 in 1988 to 21,000 in 1994.

10

The Director of Buildings cautioned that it would be impossible to remove all unauthorised building works in a specified time frame as there were currently 60,000 private buildings, many of which had been altered and added to without approval. Moreover, the problem was not static as on average, about 500 new buildings came on stream each year.

However, Mr Cheng said the present situation represented a significant improvement over that before the new policy was introduced and he was confident that the problem was being contained and gradually reduced.

Commenting on the time frame and procedure in tackling the High Priority UBW, Mr Cheng noted that on average, most unauthorised building works were removed within six months.

He also noted that the UBW procedures were under constant review and in the light of last year’s review, the following improvements had been made:

* The procedures had been revised, resulting in better co-ordination among Government departments in respect of rooftop residents requiring rehousing or other assistance.

* The necessary deterrent effect had been further strengthened by more rigorous prosecution and disciplinary action against offenders.

* Greater efforts were being made in educating the public about the importance of building safety. These include a major publicity campaign in the year on the subject and better liaison with the Law Society, the Consumer Council, District Boards and local communities in the dissemination of such information.

In addition, Mr Cheng said: ”a proposal to raise fines for unauthorised building works three times present levels is also being considered.

’’All these measures show that we are sparing no efforts in refining the present policy in order to make it work better in the light of the changing circumstances. Where practicable, we will consider adopting those recommendations in the report that would further improve our policy," Mr Cheng said.

End/Tuesday, April 11, 1995

11

1.4 million employees’ information for voter registration in new FCs received * ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

Information on some 1.4 million employees for registration as voters in the nine new functional constituencies of the Legislative Council was received by the Registration and Electoral Office (REO) as at end of last week, the Secretary for Constitutional Affairs, Mr Nicholas Ng, said today (Tuesday).

Speaking at a Lions Club of South Kowloon luncheon meeting, Mr Ng said these returns, which covered the employees' names and identity card numbers, were provided by close to 170,000 employers in response to the REO's request for information.

Mr Ng urged those who had not responded to the REO's request to reply as soon as possible so that all eligible people could cast their vote in the Legislative Council elections on September 17.

"Since late last month, staff of the Home Affairs Department have been conducting follow-up visits to collect employees' information from those employers who have not yet responded," he said.

For the 1.4 million employee records received, a preliminary estimate was that about half of the employees included in the employers' returns were general electors on the General Electoral Roll (GER), Mr Ng said.

"The REO is issuing letters to these people informing them the functional constituency they belong to according to their employer's main line of business.

"Until last weekend some 420,000 such letters have been sent and these employees will be registered as voters in the relevant new functional constituency if they raise no objection," he said.

. •• •

"For the remaining employees who are not yet on the GER, government staff will approach them at their workplaces to facilitate their registration in both the GER and a relevant new functional constituency."

Mr Ng added that residents could also get a voter registration form from any of the 1,500 outlets throughout the territory to get themselves registered before June 1 for the Legislative Council elections.

"These outlets include banks, post offices and a number of Government department offices," he said.

12

As for the registration of general electors, Mr Ng said a l^rge-scale voter registration drive would be held at the same time.

"Home Affairs Department staff will pay household visits to new housing estates and set up mobile counters at vantage points in various districts to register eligible electors and to update change of addresses," he said.

' . . .•>: . : - U..

End/Tuesday, April 11, 1995 .j .

l • -I •- . J :

Regulations on voter registration appeal procedures to be gazetted * ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

Two sets of regulations to make technical changes to the appeal procedures in respect of the registration of electors will be gazetted on Thursday (April 13), a Government spokesman announced today (Tuesday).

They are the Legislative Council (Electoral Provisions) (Registration of Electors) (Functional Constituencies and Election Committee Constituency)(Appeals) Regulation and the Electoral Provisions (Registration of Electors)(Geographical Constituencies)(Appeals)( Amendment) Regulation 1995.

• .■< • .. ■ \

"The regulations make technical changes to the procedures for lodging an appeal to the Revising Officer against a decision of the Registration Officer in respect of voter registration in both the geographical and functional constituencies," the spokesman said.

"Similar appeal procedures are also provided for the registration of electors in the new Election Committee." . \ :

The spokesman explained that the changes were to tie in with the new voter registration cycle this year, adding that the deadline for registration would be June 1.

The regulations are expected to be introduced into the Legislative Council on April 19 this year.

End/Tuesday, April 11, 1995

13

APEC Finance Ministers Meeting

* ♦ * ♦ ♦ • ‘ !

The Secretary for the Treasury, Mr K C Kwong, will lead a Hong Kong delegation to take part in the Asia Pacific Economic Co-operation (APEC) Finance Ministers Meeting in Indonesia on April 15 and 16.

Ministers of the 18 APEC member economies will attend the conference which will be held at the Grand Bali Beach Hotel.

The major issues to be discussed will include the recent economic developments in APEC member economies, issues associated with capital movements among member economies, effects of exchange rate movements on trade and investment in the region, and resource mobilisation for financing infrastructure development.

End/Tuesday, April 11, 1995

Volume and price movements of external trade in January 1995

*****

The volume of re-exports in January 1995 increased by 22% over January 1994, while the volume of domestic exports increased by 16%, according to the statistics released today (Tuesday) by the Census and Statistics Department.

Taking re-exports and domestic exports together, the volume of total exports increased by 21%. Meanwhile, imports increased by 24% in volume.

The growth in the volume of trade is derived from the growth in trade values with the effect of price changes being discounted.

As regards price changes over the same period of comparison, the prices of reexports and domestic exports increased by 2.9% and 2.0% respectively. Import prices increased by 5.4%.

Price changes are reflected by changes in unit value indices, which are compiled based on average unit values or, for certain1 commodities, based on specific price data.

14

The terms of trade index, defined as the ratio of total export price index to import price index, decreased by 2.7% in January 1995 over January 1994.

Caution should be exercised in interpreting the changes in the volume of trade for a single month at the beginning of each year which may be affected by the timing of the Lunar New Year holidays. It is more meaningful to make comparisons over a longer period.

Comparing the three months ending January 1995 with the three months ending January 1994, the volume of domestic exports and re-exports increased by 4.5% and 15% respectively. The volume of imports grew by 18%.

t /1 ’ 1 ■ . . •. . v..

The changes in the value, unit value and volume of re-exports by end-use category are shown in Table 1.

Comparing January 1995 with January 1994, the volume of re-exports of all end-use categories recorded increases of various magnitudes: fuels (+61%), foodstuffs (+57%), capital goods (+29%), raw materials and semi-manufactures (+22%); 'and consumer goods (+19%).

Over the same period of comparison, increases in the prices of re-exports were noted of all end-use categories: raw materials and semi-manufactures (+7.1%), fuels (+3.7%), foodstuffs (+2.7%), consumer goods (+1.4%) and capital goods (+0.6%).

The changes in the value, unit value and volume of domestic exports by principal commodity group are shown in Table 2.

Comparing January. 1995 with January 1994, commodity groups which recorded increases in volume of domestic exports included metal ores and scrip (+50%); electronic components (+48%); and watches and clocks (+33%).

The volume of domestic exports of radios of all kinds and footwear decreased by 82% and 64% respectively.

, ' I

Commodity groups which recorded increases in domestic export prices included textile made-ups and related articles (+16%); and metal ores and scrap (+4.9%).

'• J .J .

The domestic export price: of travel goods, handbags and similar articles decreased by 3.1%.

15

The changes in the value, unit value and volume of imports by end-use category are shown in Table 3.

The import volume of foodstuffs increased by 46% in January 1995 compared with January 1994.

Significant increases were recorded in the import volume of soya bean oil, peanut oil, vegetable oil and lard; and sugar. However, decreases in the import volume were noted of animals of the bovine species, live; and swine, live.

Over the same period of comparison, the import volume of consumer goods increased by 18%.

Increases in import volume were recorded in all classes of consumer goods, especially in cameras, flashlight apparatus and supplies for photography; watches; miscellaneous made-up articles of textile materials; and radios, television-sets, gramophones, records, tape recorders and amplifiers.

The import volume of raw materials and semi-manufactures increased by 18% in January 1995 compared with January 1994.

Significant increases in import volume were noted of raw cotton; and wool and other animal hair. However, the import volume of silk fabrics; and paper and paperboard declined.

Imports of fuels increased by 141% in volume in January 1995 compared with January 1994.

As regards capital goods, the import volume increased by 37% in January 1995 over January 1994.

Notable increases were recorded in the import volume of transport equipment: and scientific, medical, optical, measuring and controlling instruments and apparatus. The import volume of textile machinery however declined.

Comparing January 1995 with January 1994, the import prices of most end-use categories increased: raw materials and semi-manufactures (+7.8%), foodstuffs (+5.0%), consumer goods (+4.6%), and capital goods (+3.6%). The import prices of fuels however decreased by 1.3%.

Details of the above statistics are published in the January 1995 issue of the "Hong Kong Trade Index Numbers".

16

The report will be available on sale at about Thursday at $14 per copy at either the Government Publications Centre on the ground floor, Low Block, Queensway Government Offices, 66 Queensway; or the Publications Section of the Census and Statistics Department on the 19th floor, Wanchai Tower, 12 Harbour Road, Wan Chai.

Enquiries regarding regular subscription to this report may be directed to the Publications Sales Section of the Information Services Department at 28th floor, Siu On Centre, 188 Lockhart Road, Wan Chai, Hong Kong on tel 2598 8194 and enquiries on trade indices to the Census and Statistics Department on tel 2582 4918.

17

Table 1 : Changes in re-exports by end-use category

i Comparing JAN with JAN 1995 1994

% changes

n End-use category Value Unit Value Volume

1 Foodstuffs 60.9 2.7 56.9

Consumer goods 19.8 1.4 18.9

Raw materials and semi-manufactures 30.3 7.1 21.7

Fuels 66.3 3.7 61.1

Capital goods 26.2 0.6 V 28.7

ALL COMMODITIES 24.5 2.9 22.2

18

Table 2 : Changes in domestic exports by principal commodity group

Comparing JAN 1995 with JAN 1994

% changes

Commodity group Value Unit Value Volume

Clothing 16.8 1.2 15.9

Textile fabrics / -1.7 3.8 -5.4

Textile yarn and thread 0.8 -1.0 0.9

Textile made-ups and related articles -14.5 15.7 -30.0

Radios of all kinds -82.9 -0.4 -81.8

Electronic components 50.6 4.2 48.4

Footwear -63.2 -1.0 -63.6

Metal manufactures 1.7 -0.3 4.6

Metal ores and scrap 63.2 4.9 49.8

Watches and clocks 37.4 3.4 32.9

Travel goods, handbags and similar articles -0.8 -3.1 2.0

Domestic electrical appliances -17.2 • -1.9 -16.5

ALL COMMODITIES 18.5 2.0 16.3

19

Table 3 : Changes in imports by end-use category

Comparing JAN 1995 with JAN 1994

End-use category % changes

Value Unit Value Volume

Foodstuffs 53.2 5.0 46.0

Consumer goods 23.1 4.6 18.2

Raw materials and semi-manufactures 28.1 7.8 18.5

Fuels 138.5 -1.3 141.0

Capital goods 42.0 3.6 37.0

ALL COMMODITIES 30.6 5.4 24.4

End/Tuesday, April 11, 1995

20

Quarterly business receipts indices for service industries for the fourth quarter and the whole year of 1994

*****

According to statistics released today (Tuesday) by the Census and Statistics Department, business receipts in the insurance industry in 1994 registered a strong growth of 24% in value terms when compared with a year ago. The increase was mainly attributable to the growth in general insurance business.

For 1994 as a whole, business receipts in the hotels industry increased by 16% in value terms over 1993. This was in line with the continued growth in tourist arrivals during the year.

Business receipts in the financing (except banking) and the communication industries also rose by 15% and 14%, respectively.

Meanwhile, increases in business receipts were also recorded in the following service industries : wholesale (+14%); import/export (+13%); retail (+12%); and transport (+10%).

Business receipts in the banking industry however grew moderately by 5%.

Comparing the fourth quarter of 1994 with the same quarter of 1993, business receipts in the insurance and the import/export industries registered a strong growth in value terms of 24% and 23%, respectively.

Marked increases in business receipts were also registered in the following service industries : wholesale (+18%); transport (+17%); and hotels (+16%).

Concurrently, business receipts in the banking industry also showed a sharp pick-up (+11%), after having registered a small decline in the preceding quarter.

On the other hand, business receipts in the financing (except banking) industry dropped markedly by 28%, reflecting the sluggish performance in the stock market. Business receipts in the business services and the restaurants industries also decreased by 7% and 4% respectively.

Compared with the third quarter of 1994, and bearing in mind that this comparison may be affected by the seasonal factor, a marked increase of 32% was recorded in the hotels industry in the fourth quarter.

- 21

Table 1 presents the provisional business receipts indices for the fourth quarter of 1994. Revised indices for the third quarter of 1994 are also included. The quarterly average of business receipts in 1992 was taken as 1 (TO.

Table 2 shows the time series of quarterly business receipts indices. Annual indices are also included.

Statistics on banking are obtained from the Hong Kong Monetary Authority; and those on retail and restaurants business are obtained from two existing surveys regularly conducted by the Census and Statistics Department.

The report "Quarterly Business Receipts Indices for Service Industries, Fourth Quarter 1994" is now on sale at $6 per copy at the Government Publications Centre, Queensway Government Offices, Low Block, Ground Floor, 66 Queensway, Hong Kong. It can also be purchased from the Publications Section of the Census and Statistics Department, 19th floor. Wanchai Tower, Wan Chai, Hong Kong.

Enquiries about the survey results may be directed to the Business Services Statistics Section of the Census and Statistics Department on 2802 1244.

22

Tabic 1 : Business receipts indices for 3rd and 4th quarter 1994

(Quarterly average of 1992 - 100) (“AAr^^zp^lStt = 100)

Type of Service Industry 3rd Quarter 1994 -AA0< 4th Quarter 1994 -AAE$ 4th Quarter 1994 compared with 3rd Quarter 1994 -AAE3^»ES$^ ~AAS^BH?1W 4th Quarter 1994 compared with 4th Quarter 1993 -AAK^BQ^W

(Revised figures) BiTW#) (Provisional figures) Points (&) % Points (fe) %

Wholesale 129.2 134.8 + 5.6 + 4.3 + 20.2 + 17.7

Import / Export ig&D 130.4 141.7 + 11.4 + 8.7 + 26.6 + 23.1

Retail gg 128.8 133.2 + 4.5 + 3.5 + 12.7 + 10.6

Hotels 120.2 158.7 + 38.6 + 32.1 + 21.8 + 15.9

Restaurants tfc£fi<2) 109.6 111.1 + 1.5 + 1.4 - 4.4 - 3.8

Transport if if} 134.2 134.5 + 0.3 + 0.3 + 19.8 + 17.3

Storage £[g 114.8 108.4 - 6.3 - 5.5 + 12.8 + 13.4

Communication jgTfl 135.7 148.3 + 12.6 + 9.3 + 17.4 + 13.3

Banking 120.6 137.0 + 16.4 + 13.6 + 13.5 + 10.9

Financing (except Banking) ££(®7(4) 157.9 158.9 + 1.0 + 0.6 - 62.6 - 28.3

Insurance 146.4 152.5 + 6.1 + 4.2 + 30.0 + 24.5

Business services 130.8 132.f + 1.4 + 1.0 - 10.0 - 7.0

Notes ft ft:

(1) Based on the survey results of the Monthly Survey of Retail Sales

(2) Based on the survey results of the Quarterly Survey of Restaurant Receipts and Purchases

(3) Business receipts data are obtained from the Hong Kong Monetary Authority

(4) Excluding investment and holding companies

IWc_2_LJlJacJi£d£^CQuArt(^IxJlu5i^^

(Quarterly Average of 1992 =100)

<-AAXi^WI8«( - 100)

I

m CM

I

Year Quarter Wholesale Import/Export Retail Hotels Restaurants Transport 3W

Indices Compared with preceding ycar/samc quarter a year ago WJ-.W.IJf-HfUft • T Indices Compared with preceding ycar/samc quarter a year ago W.EW.r/l-H’FltUi Indices Compared with preceding ycar/samc quarter a year ago WI-.WJJfHTl-tW Indices m Compared with preceding ycar/samc quarter a year ago 9LI:<!7±«m?lt« Indices iri« Compared with preceding ycar/samc quarter a year ago w±<r/±<rmii« Indices Compared with preceding ycar/samc quarter a year ago

<f- f

% % % % % %

1993 106.3 ♦ 63 108.8 ♦ 8.8 112.7 ♦ 12.7 112.5 ♦ 12.5 106.1 6.1 111.8 ♦ 11.8

1994 • 121.0 ♦ 13.8 123.4 ♦ 13.4 126.1 ♦ 11.9 131.1 ♦ 16.5 110.0 3.7 123.0 ♦ 10.0

1993 1 98.4 N.A. 96.5 N.A. 104.7 NA. 101.2 N.A. 99.2 N.A. 101.6 NA.

2 102.8 N.A. 105.4 N.A. ' 107.5 N.A. 105.1 N.A. 983 N.A. 109.6 N.A.

3 109.5 NA. 118.3 N.A. 118.1 N.A. 106.8 NA. 111.5 N.A. 1212 NA.

4 114.5 N.A. 115.1 N.A. 120.5 N.A. 137.0 N.A. 115.5 NA. 114.7 NA.

1994 1 108.4 ♦ 10.2 108.0 ♦ 12.0 123.4 ♦ 17.9 121.3 ♦ 19.9 1143 ♦ 152 112.2 ♦ , 10.4

2 111.6 ♦ 8.5 113.5 ♦ 7.8 119.1 ♦ 10.7 124.1 + 18.0 105.1 7.0 111.0 13

3 129.2 ♦ 17.9 130.4 ♦ 102 128.8 ♦ 9.0 1202 4 12.5 109.6 - 1.7 1342 ♦ 10.7

4 • 134.8 ♦ 17.7 141.7 ♦ 23.1 133.2 ♦ 10.6 158.7 4 15.9 111.1 - 3.8 134.5 ♦ 173

Year Quarter Storage Communication ilTj’H Banking Financing (except Banking) Insurance Business Services

Indices IHR Compared with preceding ycar/samc quarter a year ago Indices Compared with preceding ycar/samc quarter a year ago Indices Compared with preceding ycar/samc quarter a year ago «±«i7±<iWtt;tt Indices m Compared with preceding ycar/samc quarter a year ago Indices Compared with preceding ycar/samc quarter a year ago Indices Compared with preceding ycar/samc quarter a year ago

<f- f

% % % % % %

1993 98.5 - 1.5 118.8 ♦ 18.8 116.6 ♦ 16.6 148.7 ♦ 48.7 1193 4 193 117.3 4 173

1994 • 106.1 ♦ 7.7 135.7 ♦ 14.2 122.5 4 5.1 170.5 > 14.7 147.8 4 23.8 127.9 4 9.0

1993 1 105.1 N.A. 107.4 NA. 1093 NA. 109.3 NA. 115.0 NA. 93.9 NA.

2 92.4 NA. 115.6 NA. 111.5 NA. 117.0 N.A. 118.0 NA. 111.9 N.A.

3 101.0 NA. 121.4 NA. 121.9 N.A. 146.8 N.A. 121.7 N.A. 121.2 N.A.

4 95.6 NA. 130.9 N.A. 123.5 NA. 221.5 NA. 122.5 NA. 142.1 NA.

1994 1 95.1 - 9.5 129.5 ♦ 20.6 116.9 ♦ 6.9 219.6 4 101.0 150.2 4 30.7 125.6 4 33.8

2 106.1 ♦ 14.8 129.4 ♦ 11.9 115.4 ♦ 3.5 145.7 4 24.5 141.9 4 203 123.0 4 9.9

3 114.8 ♦ 13.6 135.7 ♦ 11.8 120.6 - 1.1 157.9 4 7.6 146.4 4 20.3 130.8 4 7.9

4 • 108.4 ♦ 13.4 148.3 ♦ 133 137.0 ♦ 10.9 158.9 - 28.3 152.5 4 243 132.1 - 7.0

N.A. : Not available * : Provisional figure E’Etyl^

End/Tuesday, April 11, 1995

24

Prosperity depends on port development ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

The Chairman of the Hongkong Bank, Mr John Gray, said the development of Lantau Port was fundamental to the continued prosperity of Hong Kong.

Speaking as Chairman of the Port Development Board, Mr Gray said: "Building the port will bring enormous economic benefits, not only to Hong Kong, but to southern China as a whole. Failure to do so will lead to significant economic losses.

"It is plain that such a huge project will have some environmental effects. But, all these will be kept within the strict parameters laid down by the Government."

He added: "Any responsible person living in Hong Kong wants to protect the environment. But, we must carefully weigh possible effects on the environment against the enormous benefits the new port will bring."

Mr Gray was replying to a petition recently handed to him by Friends of the Earth and the World Wide Fund for Nature Hong Kong. The petition expressed concern about the environmental impact of the port development.

He pointed out that the Advisory Council on the Environment had endorsed plans for Container Terminals 10 and 11 (the first phase of Lantau Port) after studying the environmental impact assessment (EIA) on the project.

"Now, we must get on with bringing these two terminals into operation as soon as possible. They are urgently needed to cope with the continuing demand for increased container throughput.

"Hong Kong handled more than 11 million twenty-foot- equivalent units in 1994," he said. "That was a 20 per cent rise over 1993. And, so far as our container terminals are concerned, the first two months of this year show a 19 per cent rise over the same period last year.

"So, the pressure for new container facilities continues. The port remains the life-blood of Hong Kong, both for our workforce and for our economy as a whole."

He pointed out that in 1994, container handling alone added some $214 billion to the local economy. Based on 1994 prices, forecasts produced by the Port Development Board, which take into account the development of China's own container ports, show that this will rise to $384 billion in 2001 and $633 billion in 2011.

25

• - , . 4 .

Mr Gray said these benefits to the economy would come about only if the port continued to expand to meet the demand.

’’China is developing its own container ports," he said, "but they alone will not be able to handle the huge growth in throughput forecast for the next few years.

"If we can continue to cope with demand then the chances are that we shall be able to continue to anchor our service industries here. If we fail, then they will surely follow the cargo."

The PDB Chairman pointed out that Lantau Port was not being built in isolation, it was part of the overall Port and Airport Development Strategy (PADS) which was first announced amid great publicity in 1989.

The PADS study recognised the need to develop all future cargo handling facilities required for port expansion away from urban and residential areas. Indeed, one of the prime objectives was to ensure that the plan for port development would both safeguard, and contribute to an improvement in, the quality of the physical and living environment in Hong Kong.

"Since then," he said, "the project has been continually refined and modified. Many of those modifications were made to further reduce possible effects on the environment."

He added: "A recent report in the press said that the Port Development Board was planning to 'increase the volume of freight cargo trucked through the territory from 20 million tonnes in 1996 to 70 million tonnes in 2011.' We are not planning anything of the kind.

"The Port Development Board's task is to advise the Government on what cargo demands will be in the future and on what port facilities will be needed to meet those demands. The demands will be there whether the facilities are built or not."

"There will be additional traffic as a result of port expansion, but this is being provided for in the planning of new road systems such as the Lantau Fixed Crossing and Route Three. We believe these will provide adequate transport facilities to cope with the opening of Lantau Port.

He continued: "We realise there will be some loss of fishing grounds at and in the vicinity of the development. I am aware that ways to replace these are being examined. ..4

26

"I must emphasise," Mr Gray said, "that our port currently generates 20 per cent of Hong Kong’s Gross Domestic Product. This will rise to 26 per cent by the year 2011, if the provision of port facilities keeps pace with demand.

"Between now and the second decade of the next century there is no alternative to building new port facilities in Hong Kong. The territory's continued prosperity and people's livelihood depend on the development.

"There is no doubt that a balance between development and sustaining the environment can be struck which enhances our economy to everyone's benefit here in Hong Kong."

End/Tuesday, April 11, 1995

HK to observe partial eclipse

*****

Weather permitting, a partial eclipse of the moon will be observable in Hong Kong after moonrise on Saturday (April 15).

Details of the eclipse are as follows:

Hong Kong Time Azimuth Direction Elevation (Degrees)

Moon enters penumbra 1808 (April 15) East -6

Moonrise 1837 East-southeast 0

Moon enters umbra 1941 East-southeast 14

Middle of eclipse 2018 East-southeast 22

Moon leaves umbra 2056 East-southeast 29

Moon leaves penumbra 2228 Southeast 46

Moonset 0624 (April 16) West-southwest 0

The eclipse would best be observed in places with no obstruction of sight to the East-southeast.

The magnitude of the eclipse will be 0.117. This means that 11.7 per cent of the moon's diameter will be obscured by the shadow of the earth at the middle of the eclipse.

End/Tuesday, April 11, 1995

27

Work arrangements during rainstorms urged

*****

Prior agreement between employers and employees with regard to work arrangements and contingency measures in times of rainstorms is important to avoid unnecessary misunderstanding and disputes.

With the advent of the rainy season. Senior Labour Officer (Labour Relations Promotion) of the Labour Department. Mrs Bernadette Lai, today (Tuesday) reminded employers and employees to reach an agreement on work arrangements during inclement weather without delay.

"Statutory regulations of work arrangements in times of rainstorms would not be practicable because of the diversity in nature and requirements of job in various trades and industries.

"Therefore, employers arc strongly advised to adopt a flexible approach in drawing up work arrangements during inclement weather. Due consideration should be given to employees' safety in workplace as well as their journey to and from work," she said.

The Labour Department has published a bilingual booklet entitled "Code of Practice in Times of Typhoons and Rainstorms" which serves as a reference guide to facilitate employers and employees to make early work arrangements for inclement weather.

Copies of the Code have been sent to 240 employer associations and 559 trade unions. This publication is also available at various Labour Relations Service offices throughout the territory.

"In addition, the message has also been delivered to the managing personnel through the regular personnel managers club meetings since this February," Mrs Lai said.

An agreement on work arrangements should normally cover rules regarding report of duty, release from work, resumption of work and wages calculation.

"The agreement should also state clearly the colour code of rainstorm under which employees arc not required to work and the time of issue of such signals when they are not required to report for duty," Mrs Lai said.

28

Noting that some industries may require employees to work under the Black Rainstorm Warning. Mrs Lai said such a requirement should be clearly stated before the employment commences or sufficient notice should be given to the employees.

"The work arrangements should also include instructions regarding the release of employees when the Red or Black Rainstorm Warning is in force during working hours," she said.

"Employers and employees should also make prior agreements on conditions under which employees should return to work when rainstorm warnings are lowered during working hours."

However, employers are urged to adopt a flexible approach towards resumption of duty as some employees may have difficulties in returning to work.

"As rainstorms are natural calamities, due consideration should also be given to employees who are absent from or late for work so that their earnings, including attendance bonus, are not adversely affected," Mrs Lai said.

To better protect workers, Mrs Lai said the Employees' Compensation Ordinance had been amended to provide compensation to workers who were injured while travelling between their place of residence and their place of work when the Red or Black Rainstorm Warning was issued.

Employers or employees who require assistance arc welcome to approach the nearest Labour Relations Service branch office.

Attention News Editors :

Media representatives wishing to conduct interviews on work arrangements during rainstorms can contact the Information and Public Relations Division at 2852 4124, 2852 4126 or 2852 4127.

End/Tuesday, April 11, 1995

- 29 -

Hong Kong Monetary Authority tender results ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

Tender date 11 Apr 95 11 Apr 95

Paper on offer EF bills EF bills

Issue number Q515 H562

Amount applied HK$7,370 MN HK$4,300 MN

Amount allotted HK$ 1,500 MN • i • G .. HK$800 MN

Average yield accepted 5.43 PCT 5.67 PCT

Highest yield accepted 5.44 PCT 5.68 PCT

Pro rata ratio About 60 PCT About 53 PCT

Average tender yield 5.46 PCT 5.73 PCT

Hong Kong Monetary Authority

Tenders to be held in the week beginning April 17, 1995

Tender date 18 Apr 95 18 Apr 95

Paper on offer EF bills EF bills

Issue number Q516 Y588

Issue date 19 Apr 95 19 Apr 95

Maturity date 19 Jul 95 17 Apr 96

Tenor 91 days 364 days

Amount on offer HK$ 1,500+300 MN HKS500+150MN

End/Tuesday, April 11,1995

30

Hong Kong Monetary Authority money market operations ♦ * ♦ ♦ ♦

$ million Time (hours) Cumulative change (Smillion)

Opening balance in the account 2,504 0930 +211

Closing balance in the account 2,134 1000 +211

Change attributable to: 1100 +201

Money market activity +190 1200 +191

LAF today -560 1500 +191

1600 +190

LAF rate 4.25% bid/6.25% offer TWI 119.0 *+0.5* 11.4.95

Hong Kong Monetary Authority

EF bills EF notes/Hong Kong Government bonds

Terms Yield Term Issue Coupon Price Yield

1 week 5.22 14 months 2605 ’ 6.35 100.31 6.14

1 month 5.24 23 months 2702 7.50 101.70 6.62

3 months 5.42 28 months 3707 6.95 100.47 6.83

6 months 5.66 34 months 3801 8.00 102.60 7.07

12 months 6.06 60 months 5003 7.75 101.07 7.63

Total turnover of bills and bonds - $15,571 million ' .✓• z • I •

Closed April 11, 1995

End/Tuesday, April 11, 1995

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

ISSUED BY GOVERNMENT INFORMATION SERVICES BEACONSFIELD HOUSE, HONG KONG. TEL: 842 8777

Wednesday, April 12,1995

Contents Page No.

Governor welcomes Appeal Court decision.................... 1

Transcript of Governor’s media session..................... 2

Governor visits Sau Mau Ping Estates....................... 6

Court of Appeal judgment on VMs welcomed................... 6

Insider Dealing Tribunal................................... 7

Judicial review of seizure of patient cards dismissed...... 8

Director of Public Prosecutions returns from Guangdong..... 9

First BEC public consultation meeting..................... 10

External trade statistics classified by country and commodity for

February 1995 ........................................... 11

December 1994 employment and vacancies statistics......... 22

ED Automatic Telephone Enquiry System suspended........... 25

Junior Leaders Corps Easter camp.......................... 26

Two NT lots to let........................................ 27

Disciplined Services Medals awarded to 27 customs officers. 28

Hong Kong Monetary Authority money market operations....... 28

1

Governor welcomes Appeal Court decision * * * * *

The Governor, the Rt Hon Christopher Patten, today (Wednesday) welcomed the decision of the Court of Appeal to reverse a High Court ruling under which three Vietnamese migrants (VMs) were released from detention. The Governor was speaking to the media after a visit to the Sau Mau Ping Estate in the afternoon.

He said that the Government would be getting in touch with the lawyers of the VMs to discuss their re-detention as soon as reasonable and possible.

"But we will do that in as humane a way as possible," he added.

On the VM problem, Mr Patten said that every community recognised that it had to limit those who came and lived in it, particularly when they had come for economic rather than political reasons.

"If they come illegally, it is perfectly reasonable and recognised as such by the international community that they should be detained until they can be returned to their country of origin.

"That is done in many countries around the world . There are few countries which have handled such a difficult problem as humanely as Hong Kong has done.

"Of course we have our problems from time to time . We've learnt from those problems.

"We've continued to handle the issue firmly, but with I think considerable humanity," he said.

End/Wednesday, April 12, 1995

2

Transcript of Governor's media session ***** ■ *^- •

The following is a transcript of the Governor the Rt Hon Christopher Patten's media session after his visit to Sau Mau Ping Estate today (Wednesday).

Question: Some said that the new government secretaries are not experienced or too young to take over the job. What do you feel?

h

Governor: I think we have got wonderful civil servants in Hong Kong. The people who have been promoted and appointed to their new jobs have got a great deal of professional commitment. Given their years, they have got a great deal of experience and they've got a great deal of drive. I am delighted that we have got so much strength in depth in our civil service. Obviously, it's sad to see the retirement of outstanding public servants like James So and Michael Leung. Michael Leung, whose retirement was announced yesterday, has given over 30 years of outstanding service to Hong Kong I've enjoyed working with him, particularly closely while he's been Secretary for Education and Manpower. I think he has done an extremely good job. But I am pleased that we've got other civil servants coming up behind to take over those posts.

Question: Is it true that more and more senior officials are going to retire and the musical chair will continue before 1997?

Governor: I very much hope that we will be able to retain as many of our outstanding civil servants as possible. Just as I hope we will be able to retain others in the public service, for example police officers. I've said again and again that we are doing everything we can before 1997 to retain our excellent staff, people who have done an outstanding job for Hong Kong and I hope that Chinese officials will realise that they have their part to play, to give reassurances about what happens after 1997. It's not provocative to note that where there are concerns, they are not usually related to what happens before 1997. So we need to see reassurance not only in words but also in deeds. One of the ways we could see that reassurance is by greater progress in the issues on which we all want to co-operate, for example those issues that are covered by the Joint Liaison Group.

3

Question: This morning's verdict on the VBPs. From a humanitarian or from a morality point of view, can you justify why the Government should continue to hold people who are essentially not criminals.

Governor: First of all, I would like to say very clearly that we welcome the decision by the Court of Appeal. Obviously, we would want to study the judgement in detail. We will be getting in touch with the lawyers of the Vietnamese migrants to discuss their re-detention as soon as is reasonable and possible. But we will do that in as humane a way as we can. But I repeat, we welcome the decision taken by the Appeal Court. Every community recognises that it has to limit those who come and live in it. Particularly where they come not for any political reasons, but for economic reasons. If they come illegally, it is perfectly reasonable and recognised as such by the international community that they should be detained until they can be returned to their country of origin. That is done in many countries around the world. There are very few countries , there are very few communities which have handled such a difficult problem as humanely as Hong Kong has done. Of course we have our problems from time to time, we've learnt from those problems. But we've continued to handle the issue firmly, but with I think considerable humanity. That is what we will continue to do. I don't think that there is anybody who can reasonably give us lectures about how to deal with the difficult problem like this.

Question: What do you have to say to the Vietnamese who wonder how much longer they have to stay in there?

Governor: I'll say to them that they do not have to stay any longer at all. They can all return to Vietnam as rapidly as possible. You and I both know that Vietnam is starting to pick up speed economically, not least thanks to substantial investments from Hong Kong. Hong Kong is just about the biggest investor in Vietnam now. Not only in terms of absolute cash, but also in terms of the number of projects. It makes no sense at all for people to stay in camps in Hong Kong at the expense of our people rather than to return to Vietnam where they've got a life to lead and a contribution to make to the further development of the Vietnamese economy. So we will continue to return Vietnamese migrants as rapidly as possible and nobody should be in any doubt that that is our firm and clear intention. We intend to see it through.

4

Question: After Mr James So's retirement, the Secretary for Education and Manpower has also retired. Do you think the Government has decided to apply responsibility for their own job, like, for example, the one for James So about the playground, and also about Lau Chin-shek's resignation. Do you think the Government has started to do this kind of system?

Governor: No, I think that both resignations come at the end of long and distinguished public careers. During the course of any career, as a civil servant or as a public official like me, you have occasionally to get involved in controversial decisions and you carry them out as well and as competently as you can. But both Michael and James did an outstanding job over the years and I think we should be grateful for the contribution they've made. We do, all of us, have lessons to learn from time to time, when things don't go as well as we would've liked. We said we intended to learn lessons from the report that we've had on the building and commissioning of the Hong Kong Stadium. There are lessons that we have to learn from the COMAC report on unauthorised building works. As the COMAC said, it's a complex and difficult problem, one we have been tackling at the rate of about twenty thousand structures a year. But we obviously can learn about how to do things better and how to co-ordinate our activities more successfully.

Question: Now you almost have the team for transition because they are young now. And so how would you expect the Chinese side to respond about your team of administration?

Governor: I said when I came to Hong Kong that I wanted to have in place as rapidly as I could a team of local officials and we've delivered on that promise. And I think the whole community recognises that that team is an outstandingly capable one, efficient, competent, young but also experienced. There is nothing wrong , there is no crime in being young ,as I am sure,, all of you would agree. I doubt whether there is a better , more qualified, more committed public service anywhere in the world. And I hope that China recognises that and I hope that Chinese officials would recognise that people in Hong Kong are promoted on merit and that is going to continue to be the case. Last question.

Question: Is the government prepared to fight the Vietnamese case in the Privy Council?

5

Governor: Well, if anybody takes the case to the Privy Council, if they are able to do so , and I am sure they would want to study the terms of the judgment before making that decision. We would obviously wish to contend whatever they were saying even if it went to the Privy Council, but it's difficult for me to say whether that is possible or likely until we've actually had a chance of studying the precise terms of the Court of Appeal's decision. All I would say, again, is that we welcome that decision. We think it's a judgment which makes sense and I very much hope that our contacts with the Vietnamese migrants' lawyers will mean early re-detention.

Question: The Legco members have drafted a human right report, so why did the government not include them in the first place?

Governor: Well, we are having a dialogue with Legislative Council members about the content of the report that we submit under the international covenant and that's what happens in every other community as far as I know. And what we are doing in Hong Kong shows, perhaps a more open dialogue about this matters than happens elsewhere.

Question: Will they be forcibly re-detained?

Governor: I very much hope that we'll be able to work sensibly with their lawyers and see their peaceful re-detention as soon as possible. Throughout this case, we have behaved with maximum care, and maximum concern for judicial process and I think vye should expect that the lawyers of the Vietnamese migrants will co-operate, now that the Court of Appeal has made the decision clear.

Question: When will you visit Vietnam?

Governor: That is a decision which hasn't been made . I've been invited, I've been invited to a lot of places. But we have to work these things out in a reasonable order. There was a recent visit, as you know, to Vietnam by our Secretary for Security which I know he found very useful. One reason why it would make sense for me to go to Vietnam at some stage is because of the close economic and trade relationship that we have with Vietnam. As I said, we are just about the biggest investor in Vietnam and there's a lot of commercial and economic business to discuss with them. Thank you very much.

End/Wednesday, April 12, 1995

6

Governor visits Sau Mau Ping Estates

* * * * *

The Governor, the Rt Hon Christopher Patten, today (Wednesday) visited Sau Mau Ping (I) and (II) Estates to look at changes taking place under the redevelopment programme and the social services provided in the area.

Accompanied by Director of Housing Mr Fung Tung, the Governor was briefed on the different phases of redevelopment and the on-going 'CARE' (condition, appraisal, repair, examination) programme which is a cyclical maintenance system to provide improved services to tenants.

The party then visited a family of seven which had moved to Block 24 of Sau Mau Ping II Estate as a result of relief of overcrowding. The family now occupied two units with a total internal floor area of 47.8 square metres.

Next stop was the Ho Ping Social Centre for the Elderly run by Sik Sik Yuen in the same block and Mr Patten watched the elderly enjoying the wide range of recreational activities organised by the centre. He also stopped at the Mutual Aid Committee office of that block where he was met by the chairman.

On arrival at Sau Mau Ping I Estate, the Governor visited a family of five in Sau Fu House. The family had moved to this two-bedroom flat through the pre-redevelopment transfer exercise in 1994.

Mr Patten finally visited the Chan Han Day Nursery of Tung Wah Group of Hospitals at Sau Fu House. He was told that the nursery provided full day care for children aged two to six.

End/Wednesday, April 12, 1995

Court of Appeal judgment on VMs welcomed

*****

The Court of Appeal today (Wednesday) reversed a High Court decision under which three Vietnamese migrants (VMs) were released from detention earlier this year.

It also dismissed their lawyers' claim that the detention of all VMs in Hong Kong was illegal.

7

A Government spokesman said the Administration obviously welcomed the Court of Appeal decision.

"We shall be in contact with the VMs' lawyers on the early re-detention of their clients," the spokesman added.

End/Wednesday, April 12, 1995

Insider Dealing Tribunal He * * * *

The Government has proposed to amend the Securities (Insider Dealing) Ordinance to provide for divisions of the Insider Dealing Tribunal to conduct more than one inquiry concurrently.

Explaining the purpose of the proposed amendments, a Government spokesman said today (Wednesday) that the Insider Dealing Tribunal was presently constituted under section 15 of the Securities (Insider Dealing) Ordinance.

"The Ordinance, as it now stands, does not permit differently constituted tribunals to operate at the same time."

He said the present Tribunal, chaired by Mr Justice Stock, had conducted two inquiries over the past year.

"There are now two pending cases and it is envisaged that investigations by the Securities and Futures Commission into suspected insider dealing will generate more cases in the next two years.

"The proposed amendments would enable divisions of the Tribunal to be set up to handle more insider dealing cases," he said.

The spokesman said the Bill also sought to make some other minor amendments to the Securities (Insider Dealing) Ordinance to improve the operation of the Tribunal.

8

Details of the proposed amendments are contained in the Securities (Insider Dealing) (Amendment) Bill 1995 which will be gazetted tomorrow (Thursday).

The Bill will be introduced into the Legislative Council on April 26.

End/Wednesday, April 12, 1995

Judicial review of seizure of patient cards dismissed *****

In response to press enquiries, a spokesman for the Inland Revenue Department (IRD) said:

"The motions for judicial review of the seizure of the patient cards have been dismissed today by consent.

"Under the agreement reached with Dr Shiu, the Commissioner will be permitted to make copies of all patient cards seized which he considers are necessary for him to discharge his duties and exercise his powers under the Inland Revenue Ordinance.

"The Commissioner will take steps not to copy from the cards information which is not necessary for this purpose. This would include medical history, clinical and other diagnostic aids pertaining to the health, well being or otherwise of patients.

"Under the terms of the consent order representatives of Dr Shiu are permitted to be present when the copying takes place.

"The Commissioner is pleased that agreement has now been reached. As he has said previously, the IRD has no interest in the medical history of the patients. The only interest it has in the cards is the information they may contain which provides evidence in ascertaining the income of the doctor."

End/Wednesday, April 12, 1995

9

Director of Public Prosecutions returns from Guangdong

*****

A group of government lawyers, led by the Director of Public Prosecutions, Mr Peter Nguyen, returned to Hong Kong today (Wednesday) after an eight-day visit to Guangdong Province.

The visit is a general familiarisation visit by Mr Nguyen and six Crown Counsel working in the Prosecutions Division and the China Law Unit.

During their stay in China, the delegation visited Guangzhou, Foshan, Dongguan and Shenzhen and had useful meetings with officials involved in the legal and judicial system of Guangdong Province.

Members of the delegation were briefed by the authorities in Guangdong about the legal and judicial systems in China.

The organisations they visited include the People's Procuratorates at the provincial and municipal levels, Department of Justice, the People's Court, Department of Public Security, Customs and Shenzhen Municipal Legislative Affairs Bureau.

At the provincial level, the delegation met senior officials of the Guangdong Provincial People's Procuratorate including the Deputy Chief Procurator Zhang Xuejun, and had an interesting discussion with the AntiCorruption and Bribery Bureau and the Criminal Procuratorial Department.

They also met representatives from the Department of Public Security, Higher People's Court, Department of Justice and Law Institute of Guangdong Province.

At the municipal level, the delegation also had useful meetings with officials from the Municipal People's Procuratorate of Guangzhou, Foshan, Dongguan and Shenzhen.

The Director of Public Prosecutions, Mr Peter Nguyen, said on his return today: "The delegation acquired a good understanding of the work of the various legal and judicial institutions in Guangdong Province.

10

"There is a clear wish on both sides to increase contacts and to further improve this understanding."

End/Wednesday, April 12, 1995

First BEC public consultation meeting *****

The Boundary and Election Commission (BEC) will hold its first public consultation meeting tomorrow (Thursday) on the proposed guidelines on election-related activities in respect of the Legislative Council elections.

During the one-hour session, the Chairman of the Commission, Mr Justice Woo Kwok-hing, will meet a member of the public, Mr Chu Kun-keung, to discuss matters including whether the distribution of election publicity materials and canvassing activities should be prohibited on the polling day.

The meeting will be held at 2.30 pm in the BEC conference room, 10th floor, Harbour Centre, Wan Chai.

Another session is scheduled to meet Legislative Council member, Ms Emily Lau, on April 21. The meeting will be held at the same venue at 9.30 am.

Attention News Editors:

All public consultation meetings are open. You are welcome to cover the events and will be informed if more meetings are scheduled.

End/Wednesday, April 12, 1995

11

External trade statistics classified by country and commodity for February 1995 *****

Detailed statistics on external trade with breakdown by country/territory and commodity for February 1995 released by the Census and Statistics Department today (Wednesday) showed that the value of re-exports continued to increase substantially, by 18% over a year earlier to $70.0 billion in February 1995.

Comparing February 1995 with February 1994, increases were recorded in the value of re-exports to China (+38%), Singapore (+30%), South Korea (+21%), Taiwan (+19%), Canada (+16%), Japan (+14%), the United States (+9.8%) and the Netherlands (+2.9%).

However, the value of re-exports to the United Kingdom and Germany decreased by 12% each.

Changes in the value of Hong Kong's re-exports to 10 main destinations are shown in Table 1.

The value of re-exports in the first two months of 1995 was $153 2 billion, 21% higher than that in the same period in 1994.

Comparing the first two months of 1995 with the same period in 1994, the value of re-exports to most main destinations showed increases of var ous magnitudes: Singapore (+30%), Canada (+28%), Taiwan (+28%), China (+26%), South Korea (+25%), Japan (+25%), the United States (+20%), the Netherlands (+19%) and the United Kingdom (+2.0%).

However, the value of re-exports to Germany decreased margr'nally by 0.9%.

Table 2 shows changes in the value of re-exports of 1G principal commodity divisions.

12

Comparing the first two months of 1995 with the same period in 1994, increases of various magnitudes were recorded in the value of re-exports of most principal commodity divisions. <

More notable increases were registered for telecommunications and sound recording and reproducing apparatus and equipment (by $5.7 billion or 45%); electrical machinery, apparatus and appliances, and electrical parts thereof (by $5.4 billion or 51%); textiles (by $3.3 billion or 34%); miscellaneous manufactured articles consisting mainly of baby carriages, toys, games and sporting goods (by $3.3 billion or 23%); office machines and automatic data processing machines (by $2.3 billion or 47%); and photographic apparatus, equipment and supplies, optical goods, watches and clocks (by $1.4 billion or 25%).

Over the same period, a decrease in the value of re-exports was recorded for clothing (by $1.6 billion or 11%).

The value of domestic exports in February 1995, at $14.8 billion, increased by 9.6% over a year earlier.

Comparing February 1995 with February 1994, increases were recorded in the value of domestic exports to Taiwan (+26%), Japan (+26%), China (+25%), Singapore (+15%), France (+7.6%) and the United States (+5.5%).

However, the value of domestic exports to Germany, the United Kingdom, Canada and the Netherlands decreased by 23%, 10%, 5.4% and 5.2% respectively.

Changes in the value of domestic exports to 10 main destinations are shown in Table 3.

Comparing the first two months of 1995 with the same period in 1994, the value of domestic exports to most main destinations showed increases of various magnitudes: Japan (+37%), France (+36%), Singapore (+22%), the Netherlands (+17%), China (+15%), Taiwan (+15%), the United States (+11%), Canada (+9.8%) and the United Kingdom (+2.8%).

13

However, the value of domestic exports to Germany decreased slightly by 2.4%.

Taking all destinations together, the value of domestic exports in the first two months of 1995, at $32.9 billion, increased markedly, by 14% over the same period in 1994.

Table 4 shows changes in the value of domestic exports of 10 principal commodity divisions.

Comparing the first two months of 1995 with the same period in 1994, increases in the value of domestic exports were registered for electrical machinery, apparatus and appliances, and electrical parts thereof (by $1.1 billion or 34%); office machines and automatic data processing machines (by $941 million or 41%); clothing (by $563 million or 6.1%); photographic apparatus, equipment and supplies, optical goods, watches and clocks (by $417 million or 20%); and telecommunications and sound recording and reproducing apparatus and equipment (by $267 million or 18%).

Over the same period, decreases in the value of domestic exports were recorded for textiles (by $20 million or 1.0%); and manufactures of metals (by $9 million or 1.4%).

The value of imports continued to increase substantially, by 26% over a year earlier to $99.7 billion in February 1995.

Changes in the value of imports from 10 main suppliers are shown in Table 5.

Comparing February 1995 with February 1994, the value of imports from all main suppliers showed increases of various magnitudes: France (+101%), South Korea (+51%), Malaysia (+45%), Japan (+37%), Taiwan (+37%), Singapore (+37%), the United States (+23%), Germany (+20%), China (+14%) and the United Kingdom (+11%).

14

Comparing the first two months of 1995 with the same period in 1994, the value of imports from all main suppliers showed increases of various magnitudes: France (+136%), Singapore (+55%), South Korea (+40%), Malaysia (+37%), Japan (+29%), the United States (+29%), Taiwan (+28%), Germany (+24%), China (+22%) and the United Kingdom (+21%).

The value of imports in the first two months of 1995, at $204.6 billion, increased markedly, by 28% over the same period in 1994.

Table 6 shows changes in the value of imports of 10 principal commodity divisions.

Comparing the first two months of 1995 with the same period in 1994, increases were recorded in the value of imports of most principal commodity divisions.

1 .... ... i J-.’.* ■’ ■' ■

More notable increases were registered for electrical machinery, apparatus and appliances, and electrical parts thereof (by $8.2 billion or 48%); telecommunications and sound recording and reproducing apparatus and equipment (by $6.4 billion or 42%); textiles (by $4.3 billion or 31%); office machines and automatic data processing machines (by $2.9 billion or 50%); miscellaneous manufactured articles consisting mainly of baby carriages, toys, games and sporting goods (by $2.2 billion or 21%); and photographic apparatus, equipment and supplies, optical goods, watches and clocks (by $2.0 billion or 27%).

Over the same period, a decrease in the value of imports was recorded for clothing (by $500 million or 3.8%).

All the trade statistics described here are measured at current prices and no account has been taken of changes in prices between the periods of comparison.

A separate analysis of the volume and price movements of external trade for February 1995 will be released in early May 1995.

Detailed trade statistics analysed by commodity and by country/ territory are published in trade statistics reports.

15

The February 1995 issue of the "Hong Kong External Trade" with detailed analyses on the performance of Hong Kong's external trade in February 1995 will be available for sale at $122 per copy around April 22.

The report can be purchased either at the Government Publications Centre, ground floor, Low Block, Queensway Government Offices, 66 Queensway, Hong Kong, or the Publications Section of the Census and Statistics Department, 19th Floor, Wanchai Tower, 12 Harbour Road; Wan Chai, Hong Kong.

Enquiries regarding regular subscription to this report may be directed to the Publications Sales Section, 28th Floor, Siu On Centre, 188 Lockhart Road, Wan chai, Hong Kong on tel 2598 8194 and enquiries on trade statistics to the Census and Statistics Department on tel 2582 4915.

16

TABLE 1 : RE-EXPORTS TO TEN MAIN DESTINATIONS

DESTINATION FEB 1995 (HKD Mn.) FEB 95 OVER FEB 94 (% CHANGE) JAN-FEB 1995 (HKD Mn.) JAN-FEB 95 OVER JAN-FEB 94 (% CHANGE)

CHINA 25,796 ♦ 37.6 51,793 * 26.2

UNITED STATES 13,125 + 9.8 31,265 + 19.7

JAPAN 4,029 * 14.3 9,154 + 24.5

GERMANY 2,802 - 11.7 6,692 - 0.9

UNITED KINGDOM 1,655 - 12.3 4,054 ♦ 2.0

TAIWAN 1,894 + 18.9 4,003 + 27.7

SINGAPORE 1,626 + 30.3 3,581 + 30.2

SOUTH KOREA 1,405 <• 21.4 2,851 * 25.2

CANADA 1,084 + 15.9 2,488 + 28.3

NETHERLANDS 1,029 + 2.9 2,466 ♦ 19.4

17

TABLE 2 : RE-EXPORTS OF TEN PRINCIPAL COMMODITY DIVISIONS

FEB FEB 95 JAN-FEB JAN-FEB 95

COMMODITY DIVISION 1995 OVER 1995 OVER

FEB 94 JAN-FEB 94

(HKD Mn.) (% CHANGE) (HKD Mn.) (% CHANGE)

TELECOMMUNICATIONS AND SOUND

RECORDING AND REPRODUCING

APPARATUS AND EQUIPMENT 8,365 * 49.7 18,183 + 45.1

MISCELLANEOUS MANUFACTURED ARTICLES (MAINLY BABY CARRIAGES, TOYS, GAMES AND SPORTING GOODS) 6,785 + 2.8 17,175 + 23.4

ELECTRICAL MACHINERY, APPARATUS AND APPLIANCES, AND ELECTRICAL PARTS THEREOF 7,937 + 59.4 15,869 + 51.2

ARTICLES OF APPAREL AND CLOTHING ACCESSORIES 5,309 - 24.4 13,079 - 10.8

TEXTILE YARN, FABRICS, MADE-UP ARTICLES AND RELATED PRODUCTS 6,210 + 42.4 12,775 + 34.4

FOOTWEAR 4,284 + 6.3 9,777 + 15.0

OFFICE MACHINES AND AUTOMATIC DATA PROCESSING MACHINES 3,467 + 53.9 7,213 + 46.9

PHOTOGRAPHIC APPARATUS, EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES, OPTICAL GOODS, WATCHES AND CLOCKS 3,158 + 14.7 6,905 + 25.3

TRAVEL GOODS, HANDBAGS AND SIMILAR CONTAINERS 1,727 - 12.1 4,880 + 12.6

GENERAL INDUSTRIAL MACHINERY AND EQUIPMENT, AND MACHINE PARTS 1,992 + 24.1 4,033 + 25.1

TABLE 3 : DOMESTIC EXPORTS TO TEN MAIN DESTINATIONS

DESTINATION FEB 1995 (HKD Mn.) FEB 95 OVER FEB 94 (% CHANGE) JAN-FEB 1995 (HKD Mn.) JAN-FEB 95 OVER JAN-FEB 94 (% CHANGE)

CHINA 4,049 ♦ 25.1 8,489 + 15.1

UNITED STATES 3,607 * 5.5 8,166 + 11.1

SINGAPORE 947 + 14.7 2,064 + 21.9

JAPAN 819 * 25.9 1,868 * 36.9

GERMANY 712 - 22.6 1,832 - 2.4

UNITED KINGDOM 650 - 10.1 1,503 + 2.8

TAIWAN 479 + 26.0 1,012 + 14.9

NETHERLANDS 312 - 5.2 793 + 16.5

CANADA 296 - 5.4 674 + 9.8

FRANCE 196 + 7.6 481 + 36.1

19

TABLE 4 : DOMESTIC EXPORTS OF TEN PRINCIPAL COMMODITY DIVISIONS

COMMODITY DIVISION FEB 1995 (HKD Mn.) FEB 95 OVER FEB 94 (% CHANGE) JAN-FEB 1995 (HKD Mn.) JAN-FEB 95 OVER JAN-FEB 94 (% CHANGE)

ARTICLES OF APPAREL AND CLOTHING ACCESSORIES 4,114 - 5.8 9,805 * 6.1

ELECTRICAL MACHINERY, APPARATUS AND APPLIANCES, AND ELECTRICAL PARTS THEREOF 2,088 + 31.0 4,237 + 34.5

OFFICE MACHINES AND AUTOMATIC DATA PROCESSING MACHINES 1,506 + 41.8 3,235 + 41.0

MISCELLANEOUS MANUFACTURED ARTICLES (MAINLY JEWELLERY, GOLDSMITHS' AND SILVERSMITHS' WARES) 1,245 + 3.8 2,766 * 7.3

PHOTOGRAPHIC APPARATUS, EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES, OPTICAL GOODS, WATCHES AND CLOCKS 1,014 + 1.7 2,514 + 19.9

TEXTILE YARN, FABRICS, MADE-UP ARTICLES AND RELATED PRODUCTS 874 + 0.1 1,964 - 1.0

TELECOMMUNICATIONS AND SOUND RECORDING AND REPRODUCING APPARATUS AND EQUIPMENT 822 + 34.9 1,714 + 18.4

PLASTICS IN PRIMARY FORMS 342 + 28.6 679 + 43.3

MANUFACTURES OF METALS 304 - 4.1 634 - 1.4

PROFESSIONAL, SCIENTIFIC AND CONTROLLING INSTRUMENTS AND APPARATUS 194 + 51.4 408 + 46.8

20

TABLE 5 : IMPORTS FROM TEN MAIN SUPPLIERS

SUPPLIER FEB 1995 (HKD Mn.) FEB 95 OVER FEB 94 (S CHANGE) JAN-FEB 1995 (HKD Mn.) JAN-FEB 95 OVER JAN-FEB 94 (% CHANGE)

CHINA 30,822 * 14.4 72,591 + 21.6

JAPAN 17,866 + 37.1 31,774 + 29.1

TAIWAN 8,617 + 36.7 17,163 + 28.4

UNITED STATES 7,634 + 22.8 15,078 + 29.1

SINGAPORE 5,157 ♦ 36.6 11,074 + 54.9

SOUTH KOREA 5,462 + 51.3 10,249 + 39.7

FRANCE 2,143 +101.3 4,969 +135.8

GERMANY 2,504 + 19.6 4,688 + 24.1

UNITED KINGDOM 2,089 + 11.2 4,208 + 21.2

MALAYSIA 1,999 + 45.1 3,858 + 37.2

21

TABLE 6 IMPORTS OF TEN PRINCIPAL COMMODITY DIVISIONS

COMMODITY DIVISION FEB 1995 (HKD Mn.) FEB 95 OVER FEB 94 (% CHANGE) JAN-FEB 1995 (HKD Mn.) JAN-FEB 95 OVER JAN-FEB 94 (% CHANGE)

ELECTRICAL MACHINERY, APPARATUS AND APPLIANCES, AND ELECTRICAL PARTS THEREOF 13,214 * 51.7 25,415 + 47.5

TELECOMMUNICATIONS AND SOUND RECORDING AND REPRODUCING APPARATUS AND EQUIPMENT 10,650 * 56.2 21,772 + 41.9

TEXTILE YARN, FABRICS, MADE-UP ARTICLES AND RELATED PRODUCTS 9,164 + 34.0 18,207 + 30.5

MISCELLANEOUS MANUFACTURED ARTICLES (MAINLY BABY CARRIAGES, TOYS, GAMES AND SPORTING GOODS) 5,789 + 15.4 12,768 + 21.3

ARTICLES OF APPAREL AND CLOTHING ACCESSORIES 5,239 - 16.9 12,747 - 3.8

PHOTOGRAPHIC APPARATUS, EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES, OPTICAL GOODS, WATCHES AND CLOCKS 4,369 + 13.9 9,186 + 27.3

OFFICE MACHINES AND AUTOMATIC DATA PROCESSING MACHINES 4,390 + 68.3 8,548 + 50.5

FOOTWEAR 3,561 + 3.8 8,253 + 15.4

ROAD VEHICLES 3,506 - 14.6 6,697 + 3.1

NON-METALLIC MINERAL MANUFACTURES 3,277 + 12.4 6,281 + 12.3

End/Wednesday, April 12, 1995

22

December 1994 employment and vacancies statistics

*****

Comparing December 1994 with December 1993, there was continued growth in employment in various service sectors, but employment in the manufacturing sector declined further.

Meanwhile, employment on construction sites registered a large increase.

Vacancies in the manufacturing sector continued to fall compared with a year earlier, while those on construction sites registered a substantial increase.

Over the same period, vacancies in the wholesale, retail and import/export trades, restaurants and hotels sector also increased.

According to the figures released today by the Census and Statistics Department, there were 423,000 persons engaged in the manufacturing sector in December 1994, representing a decrease of 12.5% from December 1993.

Employment in the wholesale, retail and import/export trades, restaurants and hotels sector, at 1,021,900 in December 1994, was 7.7% higher than in December 1993.

Employment in the financing, insurance, real estate and business services sector, at 369,600, was up by 9.3% over a year earlier.

Employment on construction sites (manual workers only), at 63,100, was 12.9% higher than in December 1993.

The employment figures for December 1994 in selected major industry sectors, compared with the corresponding figures for December 1993 and September 1994, are as follows:

23

Persons engaged (employment) Percentage change

Selected major industry sector Dec 93 Sep 94 Dec 94 Dec 94 over Dec 93 Dec 94 over Sep 94

Manufacturing 483,600 438,400 423,000 -12.5 -3.5

Construction sites (manual workers only) 55,900 60,400 63,100 +12.9 +4.4

Wholesale, retail and import/export trades, restaurants and hotels 948,900 1,051,200 1,021,900 +7.7 -2.8

Financing, insurance, real estate and business services 338,100 361,100 369,600 +9.3 +2.4

The above statistics for selected major industry sectors in December 1994 were derived from the Quarterly Survey of Employment and Vacancies and the Quarterly Employment Survey of Construction Sites conducted by the department.

In the former survey, employment in the retail trade excluded hawkers and persons working at retail pitches but included those working in market stalls.

24

The two surveys mentioned above also provide the vacancy statistics for selected major industry sectors. The vacancy figures, together with a comparison with the corresponding figures for December 1993 and September 1994, are as follows:

Number of reported vacancies

Percentage change

Selected major industry sector Dec 93 Sep 94 Dec 94 Dec 94 over Dec 93 Dec 94 over Sep 94

Manufacturing 11,890 12,090 10,520 -11.5 -12.9

Construction sites (manual workers only) 540 980 860 +61.1 -11.7

Wholesale, retail and import/export trades, restaurants and hotels 27,500 34,650 29,650 +7.8 -14.4

Financing, insurance, real estate and business services 10,440 12,270 10,410 -0.3 -15.2

Comparing December 1994 with December 1993, vacancies in the manufacturing sector fell by 11.5%, while those in the financing, insurance, real estate and business services sector were little changed.

25

Vacancies in the wholesale, retail and import/export trades, restaurants and hotels sector increased by 7.8%. Vacancies on construction sites also recorded a substantial increase of 61.1% in December 1994 over a year earlier.

The remarkable increases in employment and vacancies on construction sites reflected the heavy demand for construction workers in the new airport projects and some private building projects.

Detailed breakdowns of the above statistics are available from the Quarterly Report of Employment, Vacancies and Payroll Statistics, December 1994 and the Quarterly Report of Employment and Vacancies at Construction Sites, December 1994. They will be available at $24 per copy and $13 per copy respectively at the Government Publications Centre, Queensway Government Offices, Low Block, Ground Floor, 66 Queensway, Hong Kong and at the Publications Section of the Census and Statistics Department on the 19th floor, Wanchai Tower, 12 Harbour Road, Wan Chai, Hong Kong.

End/Wednesday, April 12, 1995

ED Automatic Telephone Enquiry System suspended *****

The Education Department's 24-Hour Automatic Telephone Enquiry System 2891 0088 will be suspended from 5 pm tomorrow (Thursday) until 8.30 am next Tuesday (April 18).

A spokesman for the Education Department today (Wednesday) said the suspension was due to examination works to the electricity supply system in Wu Chung House during the Easter holidays.

End/Wednesday, April 12, 1995

26

Junior Leaders Corps Easter camp *****

The Royal Hong Kong Regiment (The Volunteers) Junior Leaders Corps will conduct its last series of military style field exercises for its members in Sha Tau Kok from April 13 to 16.

About 100 members of the Junior Corps will take part in the exercise and the main area of activity will be in Gallipoli Camp.

The programme includes map reading, radio communication, campcraft, fieldcraft, obstacle crossing, weapon training, shooting, night patrolling and orienteering.

The Junior Leaders Corps, under the aegis of the Royal Hong Kong Regiment, was founded in 1970. The youth programme provides an environment in which boys aged between 14 and 17 years selected from the community can develop their character, leadership skills and a sense of community awareness.

Over the years, Junior Corps has grown into a strength of 300 boys.

With the disbandment of the Royal Hong Kong Regiment this September, the J Corps will loose not only its financial support but also its permanent premises. So this Easter camp will be the last field exercise for the boys.

A Royal Hong Kong Regiment spokesman, however, revealed that as an evolutionary expansion to the old Junior Corps, a company named the Hong Kong Adventure Corps has already been formed recently.

"As it is quite clear that not only there is a demand for a successor for the J Corps but that a successor can continue the highly successful character and leadership development programme that has been benefiting the Hong Kong community for years", he said.

He pointed out that girls would also be recruited as to enjoy the same type of training as much as the boys.

27

Attention News Editors:

You are invited to cover the programme scheduled for the J Corps members on Sunday (April 16).

?

A press coach will leave CGO for Gallipoli Camp, Sha Tau Kok Road, at 9 am sharp on Sunday (April 16) and GIS officers will be on hand to assist.

End/Wednesday, April 12, 1995

Two NT lots to let *****

The Lands Department is inviting tenders for the short-term tenancies of two pieces of Government land in the New Territories.

With an area of 6,400 square metres, the first lot is located in Area 30A, Sheung Shui, for use as a car park or for repair/maintenance of vehicles, equipment and machinery.

The tenancy is for two years, renewable quarterly.

The second lot situated in Ping Che, New Territories, has an area of 2,886 square metres for use as open storage of tenant's goods excluding containers, container trailers and tractors, vehicles, cement/sand, scrap metal, chemical products and dangerous goods.

The tenancy is also for two years, renewable quarterly.

Closing date for submission of tenders for the two lots is noon on April 28.

Tender forms, tender notice and conditions may be obtained from the District Lands Office, North, the District Lands Offices Kowloon, 10th floor, Yau Ma Tei Car Park Building, 250 Shanghai Street, Kowloon and the Lands Department, 14th floor, Murray Building, Garden Road.

Tender Plans can also be inspected at the offices.

End/Wednesday, April 12, 1995

28

Disciplined Services Medals awarded to 27 customs officers

*****

The Commissioner of Customs & Excise Department, Mr Don Watson, today (Wednesday) presented the Hong Kong Disciplined Services Medals to 27 officers at a ceremony held at the department's Senior Officers' Mess.

Among them, 16 received the First Clasp medals while one was awarded a Second Clasp medal.

At the ceremony, Mr Watson also presented a meritorious certificate issued by the World Customs Organisation to the former Commissioner, Mr Clive Oxley, in recognition of his excellent services rendered to the organisation.

End/Wednesday, April 12, 1995

Hong Kong Monetary Authority money market operations

■j I. ' : ’ • I; • ***** Cumulative change (Smillion)

$ million Time (hours)

Opening balance in the account 2,134 0930 +563

Closing balance in the account 2,165 1000 ‘ +563

Change attributable to : 1100 +576

Money market activity +538 1200 +538

LAF today -507 1500 +538

1600 +538

LAF rate 4.25% bid/6.25% offer TWI 118.8 *-0.2* 12.4.95

- 29 -

Hong Kong Monetary Authority

EF bills EF notes/Hong Kong Government bonds

Terms Yield Term Issue Coupon Price Yield

1 week 5.24 13 months 2605 6.35 100.35 6.10

1 month 5.23 22 months 2702 7.50 101.76 6.58

3 months 5.42 27 months 3707 6.95 100.55 6.79

6 months 5.64 33 months 3801 8.00 102.67 7.04

12 months 6.02 59 months 5003 7.75 101.22 7.59

Total turnover of bills and bonds - $20,830 million

Closed April 12, 1995

End/Wednesday, April 12, 1995

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

ISSUED BY GOVERNMENT INFORMATION SERVICES BEACONSFIELD HOUSE, HONG KONG. TEL: 842 8777

Thursday, April 13,1995

Qintents

Pags-No,

FS’s transcript............................................................ 1

Resumption of vehicle holding area in Kwai Chung........................... 3

Establishment of marine sanctuary.......................................... 4

Financial assistance to full-time students................................. 6

Transcript of CS's media session........................................... 8

Two ACP contracts awarded.................................................. 9

Six Queen’s Counsel appointed.............................................. 9

Promotion of services study completed.................................. 11

Joint operation to flush out illegal immigrants........................... 12

Board amends Mong Kok Outline Zoning Plan................................. 13

New road proposed for village flood protection works...................... 15

/Reclamation at....

Contents

Page No,

Reclamation at Tai O endorsed............................................ 16

Submarine pipeline proposed for Yim Tim Tsai............................. 16

Tenders invited for two architectural projects........................... 17

Air Quality Report for March.......................................... 18

Prequalification of tenderers for Hung Hom road works.................... 19

CS visits Home Affairs Department and Sai Kung........................... 20

NationsBank, N.A. (Carolinas) granted licence............................ 21

Hong Kong Monetary Authority money market operations.................. 21

1

FS’s transcript

*****

Following is the transcript of the Financial Secretary, Sir Hamish Macleod, at a media session on his return at Lok Ma Chau today (Thursday):

We have had a very good visit over here, really, catching up on developments and infrastructure: the port, the airport, of course the stock exchange - we had a particular interest in that; and also, actually, now just discussing the question of border crossing procedures. There is a clear awareness on the Chinese side as well as our side that things need to be speeded up. Really, the pressure of numbers is just growing all the time and they, apparently, have a number of ideas on how to speed the whole system up - computerisation and so on, so I think that is encouraging.

The other thing that struck me, not having been to this area for four years, the pace of building is still going on at a tremendous speed, whether you are talking about actual residential, commercial or, of course, highways; not just the famous super highway but a number of other new road links, either under construction or being planned.

So it is useful to have these exchanges, really, just to learn from each other what is going on or what is planned, what problems are foreseen.

The airport, too, I must say is a success story in the sense that the volume of passengers is already up to about, I think, one-fifth the size of Kai Tak, which is a pretty fast expansion in a relatively short period. So, I think very useful for us and I hope very useful for the Shenzhen officials that we met.

Any questions?

Question: Talking about the problems foreseen(inaudible)...?

FS: We were not really mainly talking about problems, although I think the one which clearly was in their minds as well as ours was the one I mentioned earlier, on speeding up border crossing. I think there are pressures on all of us from the business community, from tourists, from lorry-drivers and all the rest of it, to try and find some solutions to this problem. I am told at the moment, for instance, at this crossing, coming across from the other side, a lorry probably has to take about an hour - it depends what time of day of course. That is a very long time and has an economic cost for Shenzhen and for Hong Kong. So there is a clear awareness that something has to be done on that.

Question: We've heard some talk recently about possibly someone taking money to allow people through ... foot passengers, train passengers. Was there any talk mentioned about that, whether they were ...?

2

FS: No, we didn’t discuss that. They were certainly telling us some of the things that they have done and some of the things that they are thinking of doing, they're planning to do, in terms of computerisation, in terms of training, in terms of streamlining procedures. And of course we are very ready to co-operate with advice or in any other way to help that process.

Question: Any talk about some of these infrastructure projects that will be straddling 1997, as far as balancing the funding, any more discussion on that?

FS: No, no, we weren't talking about that, no.

Question: Did the Chinese officials talk about something on the Economic Zone, the proposed Economic Zone in the delta area, and what role can Hong Kong play in it?

FS: No. We were really here dealing very specifically with Shenzhen and the particular projects that I have just talked about. I actually asked to see those projects, those are the ones that I have an interest in. Because obviously, when we are planning our own expansion, we want to have a clear idea of the direction of port and airport development here. I think, on the airport, it was confirmed that the airport here is very much a domestic airport. The number of international flights is quite small, so it really complements the role of Hong Kong.

Question: Any talks about the air-traffic control system and how that's going to work out?

FS: We didn’t on this occasion, no, talk about it. It’s not really my particular area, so we didn’t talk about that.

Question: How about Yantian? Is it doing as good as predicted?

FS: I don't know if it is doing as well as predicted because I don't know what the prediction was but it is obviously in the very early stages. It's quite quiet, but has enormous scope for expansion in the sense that the land set aside, both for the actual berths and for the back-up areas, is huge. And it is deep water, so it has, I think, quite a lot of potential. They're going to have, of course, some of the same problems that we've got in terms of getting access by road and later by rail. They have got a rail link but at the moment it's the road link which matters. But they seem quite confident. The main partner, of course, is Hong Kong, is Hutchison, and they seem quite confident on the future of that port. But it is, at the moment, of course, very small. It has potential.

Thank you very much. Thank you.

End/Thursday, April 13, 1995

3

Resumption of vehicle holding area in Kwai Chung *****

In response to press enquiries in connection with a slow drive by container truck drivers at the Kwai Chung container port today, a spokesman for the Transport Department said the truck drivers were well aware that they had to leave the site in question (Site M) upon the availability of a new container vehicle park at Stonecutter’s Island which was opened on January 1, this year.

The spokesman said Site M has always been used as an emergency vehicle holding area to relieve traffic congestion at the Kwai Chung container port.

The site is essential in relieving the lock-up of traffic queues along Container Port Road by providing a temporary off-street accommodation.

In September last year, when container vehicle parks on Tsing Yi Island were closed to make way for Airport Projects, a group of container truck drivers, led by the Chairman of the Container Transportation Employees General Union (CTEGU), claimed they could not secure sufficient parking spaces in the existing and new parking lots and approached the District Lands Officer/Kwai Tsing for assistance.

After a meeting with the Union and taking into consideration that the loss of parking spaces might cause traffic congestion in the container port area and might delay the taking over of the container vehicle parks for the critical Airport Projects, the Government agreed with the Union that Site M would be made available for free parking of container trucks temporarily until a new site on Stonecutter’s Island site was available.

However, when the new container vehicle park at Stonecutter’s Island was opened on January 1 this year, the container truck drivers refused to leave Site M as promised despite written reminder from the Transport Department. They claimed that the Government should have given the Union more weight when the new vehicle park at Stonecutter’s Island was tendered, and that the new operator at the Stonecutter’s Vehicle Park was letting out parking spaces in batches of 2 or 3 instead of individual parking spaces.

In response, the Transport Department successfully arranged with the operator of the Stonecutter’s Vehicle Park so that the terms of rental could meet the Union’s requests. This should have been able to provide some parking spaces for CTEGU’s members. In addition, in March this year, the CTEGU has successfully tendered a parking lot in Kwai Chung which can accommodate about 40 container vehicles.

4

Meanwhile, drivers continued to occupy Site M, despite the earlier agreement to move out by November 1, 1994 and despite the efforts made to facilitate parking arrangements elsewhere. Resumption of Site M therefore has to be initiated so that it can be restored back as an emergency vehicle holding area before the typhoon season begins when the holding area will be used more frequently.

The spokesman appeals to the Union members concerned to act reasonably in pursuing their course and avoid causing inconvenience to other road users.

End/Thursday, April 13, 1995

Establishment of marine sanctuary * * * ♦ *

The Government today (Thursday) confirmed its intention to seek the early establishment of a marine sanctuary for dolphins in the waters of western Hong Kong.

This was one of the detailed conditions set down for Government authorising the construction of a temporary aviation fuel receiving facility at Sha Chau to serve the new airport, announced in today's Gazette.

The official notice said the Govemor-in-Council had authorised works for the facility at Sha Chau under the Foreshore and Sea-Bed (Reclamations) Ordinance, subject to a number of conditions.

The area covered is 319.5 hectares of foreshore and sea-bed comprising an area near Sha Chau for the construction of an offshore fuel receiving facility and a strip of sea-bed for two buried pipelines and a submarine power cable to connect the facility to the new airport.

"The conditions set down include the requirement that the construction of a permanent aviation fuel pipeline to the replacement airport be carried out as speedily as possible," a government spokesman said.

"Once the permanent pipeline is completed, the temporary aviation fuel receiving facility will be used only as an emergency back-up."

The Government will create, monitor and enforce a marine sanctuary for dolphins in the area of Sha Chau and nearby Lung Kwu Chau and it will implement an artificial reef programme within the sanctuary.

5

In addition, all the practicable environmental mitigation measures recommended by the final Environmental Impact Assessment Report on the proposed fuel facility, and by the Provisional Airport Authority's own cetacean expert, will be implemented by the Authority or other parties under its supervision.

Today's gazettal of approval for the project follows extensive consultations with environmental and other groups, including the Advisory Council on the Environment, the Airport Consultative Committee, the Legislative Council's Panel on Environmental Affairs and consideration by the Executive Council.

I •

Meanwhile, the notice of authorisation and the plan relating to the undertaking can be seen on the notice boards at the following locations:-

* Tung Chung Rural Committee Office;

* Ma Tau Wan, Tung Chung;

* Tuen Mun Rural Committee;

Tai O Rural Committee;

* Sha Lo Wan Village Office;

San Tau Village; and

* San Tau Village Office.

The plan can also be seen at the Lands Department's Survey and Mapping Office, 14th floor, Murray Building, Garden Road; ihe Island District Office, 20th floor, Harbour Building, 38 Pier Road, Central; and the Tuen Mun District Office, second floor, Tuen Mun Government Offices, 1 Tuen Hi Road, Tuen Mun.

Any person who considers that his interest, right or easement in or over the foreshore and sea-bed involved will be affected, may submit a written claim for compensation to the Director of Lands on or before April 13, 1996.

He should state in his submission the sum of money that he is willing to accept in full and final settlement of his claim and submit particulars to substantiate his claim.

End/Thursday, April 13, 1995

6

Financial assistance to full-time students ♦ ♦ * * ♦

The Student Financial Assistance Agency (SFAA) which administers the Government's Local Student Finance Scheme (LSFS) today (Thursday) announced the arrangements for applications in respect of the 1995-96 academic year.

The LSFS is a means-tested scheme, which provides financial assistance in the form of grant and /or loan to needy students attending full-time courses at the City University of Hong Kong, the Hong Kong Baptist University, the Hong Kong Polytechnic University, the Lingnan College, the Chinese University of Hong Kong, the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, the University of Hong Kong, the Hong Kong Technical College (Chai Wan), the Hong Kong Technical College (Tsing Yi), the Prince Philip Dental Hospital (for students studying the course leading to Diploma in Dental Technology only), and the Hong Kong Institute of Education (for students studying full-time pre-service two-year or three-year course).

Applicants must either have the right of abode in Hong Kong or have resided or have had their homes in Hong Kong continuously for at least three years immediately prior to the commencement of their courses.

Students should submit their applications to the SFAA via their respective institutions. Applicants whose siblings are also applying for the LSFS (1995-96) at the same time should hand in their applications together with those of their siblings to his/her institution or the institution of his/her sibling.

Current students may obtain application forms from their respective institutions. Prospective students who satisfy the entrance requirements of, and have applied for admission to the University of Hong Kong may obtain application forms from the said institution on production of the result slips of their Advanced Level Examination.

They should, however, submit their applications only after they have been offered admission.

New students admitted by the City University of Hong Kong, the Hong Kong Baptist University, the Hong Kong Polytechnic University, the Lingnan College, the Chinese University of Hong Kong, the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, the Hong Kong Technical College (Chai Wan) and the Hong Kong Technical College (Tsing Yi), the Prince Philip Dental Hospital and the Hong Kong Institute of Education may obtain application forms from the institutions concerned at the time of registration.

7

Completed applications should be returned to the applicant’s or his/her sibling’s (for sibling cases) institution before the deadline as specified below:

Current students

: April 26, 1995

(The deadline for current students of the Hong Kong Institute of Education is June 1, 1995)

New students

Hong Kong University of Science and Technology'

Hong Kong Baptist University

City University of Hong Kong/Hong Kong Polytechnic University/Lingnan College

Prince Philip Dental Hospital

Chinese University of Hong Kong

: September 15, 1995

: September 22, 1995

: October 6, 1995

: October 18, 1995

: the second Friday after the commencement of the first school term (1995-96)

University of Hong Kong

: 21 days from the date of offer of admission

Hong Kong Technical College (Chai Wan)/ Hong Kong Technical College (Tsing Yi)

: October 25, 1995

Hong Kong Institute of Education

: deadline will be announced in due course via the respective campuses

For postgraduate students newly enrolled to their courses in 1995-96

: the deadline is three months from the date of registration (in any case not later than the end of February 1996)

Applicants are advised that they should

make sure that all supporting

documents are attached to their application forms. Applications not duly completed or without full set of supporting documentary proofs would be referred back to the applicants concerned for completion.

8

If necessary, the applicant and/or an adult member of his/her household who is fully aware of the family's circumstances will be invited to attend an interview at the SFAA to clarify information reported in the application.

The Agency's spokesman, however, warned that any wilful misrepresentation or omission of information in the applications may lead to disqualification and court proceedings.

As from the 1995-96 academic year, an Extended Loan Scheme (ELS) will be established as an additional component of the LSFS to help those applicants who marginally fail the means test and those successful applicants with a low level of financial assistance. The ceiling of the ELS will be $15,000 for the 1995-96 academic year.

Enquiries should be directed to the SFAA at ninth floor, National Mutual Centre, 151 Gloucester Road, Wan Chai, Hong Kong, or on 2802 1666.

End/Thursday, April 13, 1995

Transcript of CS's media session * ♦ * ♦ *

The following is a transcript of the Chief Secretary, Mrs Anson Chan, speaking to the media after visiting Tsueng Kwan 0 District this (Thursday) afternoon:

Question: I probably ask you the same question...

CS: I'll say, first of all, it is quite a normal development that in the years to come, you'll get people retiring, for whatever reasons, largely for personal reasons. And you might get the odd individuals deciding they want to have a change of environment or go to another job. I don't think this in itself is anything very surprising. And, we are confident that we are giving younger officers every opportunity to be trained, to get exposure and a variety of experience. And in particular those whom we have appointed to succeed policy secretaries retiring in the next few months, we are fully confident that they will be more than able to handle the job. Between them, they have a great deal of experience and they are all very capable people.

Question: Do you think it is a rather large number all at once?

CS: No, not at all.

End/Thursday, April 13, 1995

9

Two ACP contracts awarded * * * * *

The Government has awarded two contracts under the Airport Core Programme (ACP).

The first contract, valued at $12.5 million, was awarded by the Royal Observatory to Radian Corporation of the United States of America for the provision of two wind profilers for the new airport at Chek Lap Kok.

The two wind profilers will be integrated with the Operational Windshear Warning System to detect topographically-induced windshear and turbulence.

The second contract, valued at $8.9 million, was awarded by the Architectural Services Department to the China State Construction Engineering Corporation.

The contract included design and construction of piled foundation for a district police station in Tung Chung under the l ung Chung Development Phase I.

End/Thursday, April 13, 1995

Six Queen’s Counsel appointed *****

The Chief Justice, Sir Ti Liang Yang, is pleased to announce that the Queen has appointed Mr Patrick Fung Pak-tung, Mr Peter Van Tu Nguyen, Mr John H N Bleach, Mr William D Stone, Mr Benjamin Yu and Mr Peter W Garland as Her Majesty’s Counsel for Hong Kong.

A ceremony will be held in No. 1 Court of the Supreme Court at 10 am on April 29 (Saturday), to call within the Bar the six new Queen's Counsel. The Court, which will include members of the Bench at all levels, will be presided by the Chief Justice, Sir Ti Liang Yang.

Mr Patrick Fung, aged 49, was called to the English Bar in 1968 and admitted to the Hong Kong Bar in 1970. He has since been in practice in Hong Kong. Mr Fung's field covers commercial, common law and chancery cases, especially real property, trust and probate work. He served as a Deputy District Judge for a brief period in 1980.

10

Mr Fung was Secretary of the Hong Kong Bar Association in 1975. He was also a member of the Performing Right Tribunal in 1980-91, the Air Transport Licensing Authority in 1981-87 and Law Reform Commission’s Sub-committee on Unfair Contract Terms in 1983-86. He has been a member of the Barristers Disciplinary Tribunal Panel since March 1993. He has also been a member of the Listing Committee of the Stock Exchange of Hong Kong and a member of its Working Party on Corporate Governance since November last year.

Mr Peter Nguyen, aged 51, was called to the English Bar in 1970 and admitted to the Hong Kong Bar in 1974. Mr Nguyen served in the Attorney General’s Chambers as a Crown Counsel between September 1970 and November 1974. He entered private practice in Hong Kong afterwards, specialising in criminal cases. He was appointed Director of Public Prosecutions in July last year.

Mr Nguyen served on the Bar Committee in 1984 and sat twice on Committees of Inquiry appointed by the Chief Justice under the Legal Practitioners Ordinance. From 1986 to 1988 he was on the Law Reform Commission's Subcommittee on Bail in Criminal Proceedings. He also served as a member of the Bar's Special Committee on the Future of the Legal Profession in 1989.

Mr John Bleach, aged 42, was called to the English Bar in 1974 and was admitted to the Hong Kong Bar in 1975. He has since been in practice in Hong Kong. He deals mainly with commercial and common law cases.

Mr Bleach has been actively involved over the past five years in the work of the Law Society in an advisory capacity and on disciplinary proceedings.

Mr William Stone, aged 49, was called to the English Bar in 1976 and admitted to the Hong Kong Bar in the same year. He was a lecturer at the University of Hong Kong between 1971 and 1978 before starting his full-time practice here. He is principally engaged in commercial law, admiralty and construction cases.

Mr Stone is a Fellow of the Chartered Institute of Arbitrators and has been Chairman of the Buildings Appeal Tribunal since 1993.

Mr Benjamin Yu, aged 38, was admitted to the Hong Kong Bar in 1979 and has since been in practice here. He specialises in commercial, common law, and chancery

cases.

11

Mr Yu was previously Secretary and Member of the Bar Council. He is currently an honorary lecturer in the Department of Professional Legal Education of the Faculty of Law of the University of Hong Kong.

Mr Peter Garland, aged 40, was called to the English Bar in 1978 and admitted to the Hong Kong Bar in 1982. He has since been in practice in Hong Kong. His practice is largely in the intellectual property field, with patents, copyright, trade marks and passing off forming the bulk of his work.

End/Thursday, April 13, 1995

Promotion of services study completed *****

A major consultancy study which was completed today (Thursday) suggests Hong Kong's thriving services would benefit from additional, concerted promotional efforts led by the Government.

In the over 100 page report prepared by KPMG Management Consulting Limited, the consultant finds a strong case for pursuing a cross-sectoral approach to emphasise Hong Kong's unique position as an international class, multi-faceted service centre serving the Asia Pacific Region.

The commissioning of the study by the Government in December last year reflects the growing importance of Hong Kong's services industry, and the Government's recognition that a more vigorous approach towards overseas promotion of trade in services is called for.

Up to now, the Government's role in promoting trade in services has been rather modest. The Government has mainly confined its role to the promotion of trade in goods, through the good work of the 1 fade Development Council.

The consultant has identified three main service sector groupings: trade and transport services; financial and business services; and media, advertising, marketing and communications services, as forming a sound framework for the cross-sectoral promotion effort.

The consultant has also concluded that the most cost-effective organisational option for undertaking further promotion of Hong Kong services overseas would be to extend the remit of the Trade Development Council to cover promotion of Hong Kong services.

12

The Government will consult the business community and in particular the services industry on the recommendations of the consultant after the Easter holidays. It is expected that the consultation period would last until the end of May.

"We would consider carefully the consultancy report and take into account the views expressed during the consultations before deciding on the best way forward.” said a spokesman from the Trade and Industry Branch, which has been overseeing the conduct of the consultancy study.

End/ Thursday,April 13, 1995

Joint operation to flush out illegal immigrants *****

A territory-wide operation against illegal immigration jointly mounted by the Police, Immigration Department and Labour Department has resulted in the arrests of 107 people.

The operation was part of the Government’s continuous effort to flush out illegal immigrants.

The 107 suspected illegal immigrants arrested by the Police had been referred to the Immigration Department. Those found to be illegal immigrants will be repatriated.

A Government spokesman reiterated today (Thursday) that there was no question of any amnesty for illegal immigrants.

"Our latest operation should drive home the point that there will be no change to this policy. Anyone foolish enough to believe otherwise is only cheating oneself," he said.

The spokesman stressed that apart from continuous checks throughout the territory, there was no let-up in anti-illegal immigration efforts at the border.

"A high state of vigilance will continue to be maintained by the Police and the security forces both at the land and sea borders," he said.

During the joint operation, which began at 5 am yesterday (Wednesday) and ended at 5 am today, the Police stepped up their identification spot checks in public places and carried out checks at suspicious locations throughout the territory.

13

As a result, a total of 25,457 persons, 2,587 vehicles and 447 vessels were stopped for identification checks.

During the operation, immigration investigators visited a total of 24 residential addresses and business establishments and arrested 21 suspected immigration offenders.

Among the 21 arrestees, there were 16 women and five men aged between 18 and 51, of whom four were Two Way Permit holders, two were illegal immigrants from China, seven were foreign domestic helpers, one was an imported worker and the remaining seven were Hong Kong residents.

AH the Two Way Permit holders, foreign domestic helpers and imported workers were arrested at places of work. They were suspected to have taken up illegal employment or overstayed in Hong Kong. Six Hong Kong residents were suspected of being employers of the arrestees and the remaining one local resident was a suspected aider and abettor.

On the labour front, inspectors of the Labour Department visited 2,000 establishments to weed out any illegal immigrants who might be working there and to check that employers fulfilled their legal obligation of keeping proper records of their employees.

A total of 5,643 employees had their proof of identity checked and 12 establishments were found not able to provide a record of employees for inspection.

The spokesman reminded employers that they could be fined up to $250,000 and jailed for up to three years if they were found to be employing illegal immigrants.

End/Thursday, April 13, 1995

Board amends Mong Kok Outline Zoning Plan *****

The Town Planning Board today (Thursday) announced amendments to the draft Mong Kok Outline Zoning Plan (No. S/K3/8).

An area of about 0.19 hectare to the east of an existing "Government/Institution/Community” ("GIC") site at the junction of Prince Edward Road West and Sai Yee Street has been rezoned from "GIC” to "Other Specified Uses" annotated "Railway Station Development".

14

The site has been vested in the Kowloon-Canton Railway Corporation (KCRC) for railway purpose under the KCRC Ordinance and will form an integral part of a proposed hotel cum office/commercial development, including a social centre for the elderly.

Another amendment is to rezone an area of about 0.29 hectare at the junction of Fuk Tsun Street and Walnut Street from "Open Space" ("O") to "GIC" to facilitate the commencement of work of the proposed Tai Kok Tsui Urban Council (UC) Complex in mid-1995.

The UC complex will provide facilities including a mini-library, a leisure centre which comprises an indoor leisure pool, sports activities rooms and indoor sports arena.

To swop with the "GIC" site at Fuk Tsun Street and Walnut Street, an area of about 0.28 hectare at the junction of Tai Kok Tsui Road and Ivy Street, which is the existing Tai Kok Tsui Temporary Market, has been rezoncd from "GIC" to "O".

The swopping of the two sites will facilitate the construction of the UC complex without causing disruption to the Tai Kok Tsui Temporary Market.

The amendment plan (No. S/K3/9) is available for public inspection until May 4 at:

* Planning Department,

16th floor, Murray Building,

Garden Road, Hong Kong;

* Kowloon District Planning Office,

11th floor, Leighton Centre,

77 Leighton Road, Flong Kong; and

* Yau Tsim Mong District Office, ground floor, Mong Kok Government Offices, 30 Luen Wan Street, Mong Kok, Kowloon.

4

15

Any person affected by the amendment plan may submit written objection to the Secretary of the Town Planning Board, c/o Planning Department, 13th floor, Murray Building, before May 4.

Copies of the draft plan can be bought at the Survey and Mapping Office, Lands Department, 14th floor, Murray Building, and the Kowloon Map Sales Office, ground floor, 382 Nathan Road, Kowloon.

End/Thursday, April 13, 1995

New road proposed for village flood protection works *****

The Territory Development Department has proposed building a new road in Pok Wai, Yuen Long, for local pedestrian access and maintenance of village flood protection facilities.

During the construction period, some existing tracks or footpaths will be closed, but alternative access will be maintained.

A notice about the proposed works was gazetted today (Thursday) and the plan of the proposed undertaking can be seen at:

* The Public Enquiry Service Centre of the Central and Western District Office, Ground Floor, Harbour Building, 38 Pier Road, Central;

* The Yuen Long District Lands Office, 9th to

11th floors, Yuen Long Government Offices and Tai Kiu Market, 2 Kiu Lok Square, Yuen Long, New Territories; and

* The Yuen Long District Office, Yuen Long District Branch Offices Building, 269 Castle Peak Road, Yuen Long, New Territories.

Any person wishing to object to the proposal should write to the Secretary for Transport, central Government Offices, East Wing, second floor, Lower Albert Road, not later than June 12, describing his interest and manner in which he will be affected.

End/Thursday, April 13, 1995

16

Reclamation at Tai O endorsed

*****

The Governor-in-Council has authorised the Territory Development Department to proceed with reclamation at Tai O, Lantau Island, to provide land for a sewage pumping station.

The reclamation will be carried out within an area of about 4,860 square metres of foreshore and seabed.

The works will begin in September for completion in August 1997.

The extent of the area affected is described in a notice of authorisation published in the Government Gazette today (Thursday).

The notice and its related plan can be seen at the Lands Department’s Survey and Mapping Office, 14th floor, Murray Building, Garden Road, Central; the Islands District Office, 20th floor, Harbour Building, 38 Pier Road, Central; and the Mui Wo Sub-office of the Islands District Office, ground floor, Mui Wo Government Offices, 2 Ngan Kwong Wan road, Mui Wo, Lantau island.

Any person who considers that his interest, right or easement in or over the foreshore and seabed involved will be affected may submit a written claim for compensation to the Director of Lands on or before April 13, 1996.

He should state in his submission the sum of money he is willing to accept as full and final settlement of his claim and to give particulars to substantiate the claim.

End/Thursday, April 13, 1995

Submarine pipeline proposed for Yim Tin Tsai

*****

The Government plans to lay a submarine pipeline at Sai Kung Hoi to provide water supply to Yim Tin Tsai and Kau Sai Chau including the proposed golf course at Kau Sai Chau.

The pipeline will be laid within an area of about 10,150 square metres of foreshore and seabed.

The work will begin in August for completion in May, 1996.

17

The extent of the area affected is gazetted today (Thursday) and the notice and its related plan can be seen on notice boards near the site.

The plans can also be seen at the Lands Department's Survey and Mapping Office, 14th floor, Murray Building, Garden Road, and at the Sai Kung District Office, ground floor, Sai Kung Government Offices, 34 Chan Man Street, Sai Kung.

The plan can also be purchased at the Survey and Mapping Office.

Any person who considers that he has an interest, right or easement in or over the foreshore and seabed involved, and it will be affected, may submit a written objection to the Director of Lands on or before June 13.

End/Thursday, April 13, 1995

Tenders invited for two architectural projects ♦ ♦ * ♦ ♦

The Architectural Services Department is inviting tenders for the construction of a prevocational school in Kwai Chung.

The project involves the construction of a general and a special classroom block, an assembly hall, minor ancillary buildings as well as drainage and external works.

Works are scheduled to start in July for completion in 12 months.

Meanwhile, the department is also inviting tenders for the construction of a sportsground which comprises a sportsfield of about 18,000 square metres gross area and two covered spectator stands in Tsucn Wan.

Works are expected to begin in August for completion by January next year.

Tender forms and further particulars can be obtained from the Architectural Services Department, 34th floor, Queensway Government Offices, 66 Queensway, Hong Kong.

Tender offers for the two projects will close at noon on May 12 and May 19 respectively.

End/Thursday, April 13, 1995

18

Air Quality Report for March *****

The Environmental Protection Department today (Thursday) released air quality information for March.

The announcement contains monitoring results from Mong Kok, Central/Westem and Kwai Chung, which represent three important land use types in the territory :

* locations close to road traffic in built-up urban areas;

* combined commercial and residential districts; and

* districts close to industrial areas.

The department currently monitors air quality continuously at eight stations, including the three above mentioned districts. Short-term measurement exercises are also undertaken as and where the need arises.

The reported air pollutants include sulphur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), total suspended particulates (TSP) which comprise all sizes of dust particles, and the respirable fraction of the dust (RSP). All these pollutants can affect respiratory health in sufficient concentration.

Levels of air pollution had great variation in March and there were several exceedances of the 24 hour Air Quality Objectives.

On March 13, the TSP and RSP limits were exceeded at Mong Kok monitoring station and the RSP limit was breached at Central/Western monitoring station. On March 22, the NO2 limit was exceeded at Central/Western while levels of NO2 were also high at the other two stations.

The gases and particles described originated from various sources. SO2 is mostly produced when fuels that contain sulphur are burned. NO2 is formed during combustion by the combination of nitrogen and oxygen, and by the atmospheric oxidation of nitric oxide (NO), also a product of combustion.

Vehicle exhaust is an important source of NO and NO2 in terms of impact on local air quality. It is also a major source of airborne particulate matter, especially the smaller respirable particles.

19

Diesel-engined vehicles such as taxis, public light buses, passenger coaches, franchised buses and light and heavy goods vehicles are the greatest contributor of particulate matter. Other sources include industry, furnaces and boilers, construction activities, the sea and the soil.

It is worth noting that while the weather and climate always affect the concentrations of pollutants in the air, the only sure way of reducing the levels is to reduce emissions from the man-made sources.

Note to Editors:

For further information on this air quality report, please contact Mr S W Pang at 2594 6413.

End/Thursday, April 13, 1995

Prequalification of tenderers for Hung Hom road works *****

The Highways Department is inviting applications from contractors or joint ventures to prequalify for tendering for the construction of the Hung Hom Bypass, Princess Margaret Road Link and roadworks in Hung Hom Bay.

The works mainly consist of the construction of a 1.3-kilometre four-lane elevated road (the Hung Hom Bypass), between Salisbury Road at Mody Lane and Hung Hom Road at Whampoa Garden and another 1.2-kilometrc long elevated road (the Princess Margaret Road Link), linking the Hung Hom Bypass with Chatham Road South, Hung Hom Interchange and Princess Margaret Road.

Works will also include the construction of local roads, footbridges, drainage, landscape and other ancillary works in 1 lung Hom Bay.

Construction is expected to commence in October for completion around October 1998.

A notice on the invitation for prequalification was published in the gazette today (Thursday).

20

Contractors and joint ventures interested in prequalifying are invited to write to the project consultants, Maunsell Consultants Asia Ltd, 14th floor, 1 Kowloon Park Drive, Tsim Sha Tsui, Kowloon, Hong Kong.

Completed prequalification applications shall be submitted as directed not later than noon on May 19.

Tenders will be called from the prequalifed contractors in mid 1995.

End/Thursday, April 13, 1995

CS visits Home Affairs Department and Sai Kung ***** »

The Chief Secretary. Mrs Anson Chan, today (Thursday) visited the Home Affairs Department Headquarters and Sai Kung District.

She first called at the Sai Kung District Office’s Tseung Kwan O Sub-office cum public enquiry service centre at Po Lam Estate to see the operation there.

She was later escorted by the Sai Kung District Officer, Mr Parrish Ng, to a vantage point for a panoramic view of Tiu Keng Leng Cottage area and was briefed on some of the latest developments in the area.

Afterwards Mrs Chan visited the King Lam Neighbourhood Centre where an exhibition on Building Management organised by the Area Committee was being held.

She also saw some activities taking place al the Christian Family Service Jackie Chan Children and Youth Centre.

After the visit to Sai Kung. Mrs Chan went to the Home Affairs Department Headquarters at Southorn Centre in Wan Chai where she was received by the Acting Secretary for Home Affairs. Mr Joseph W P Wong.

There she met with the staff side representatives of the Home Affairs Department Departmental Consultative Committee and a selection of front-line staff from the District Offices.

End/Thursday. April 13. 1995

21

NationsBank, N.A. (Carolinas) granted licence *****

A Government spokesman said today (Thursday) that NationsBank, N.A. (Carolinas) (NB) had been granted a banking licence to conduct business in Hong Kong.

NB is the fifth largest banking group in the USA and ranks 30th in the World in terms of capital. It operates 423 domestic branches and has four overseas branches in London, Singapore, Grand Cayman and Nassau.

In Hong Kong, NB has been operating a representative office since August last year. NB believes that as a branch bank, it would be able to provide better service to its clients with business transactions in Hong Kong and the Asian region. The principal business of the proposed branch will include trade financing and money market transactions.

The spokesman said the continuing interest of foreign banks in entering the local market reflected Hong Kong’s continued importance and attractiveness as a major international financial centre. The licence for NB is the first banking licence granted in 1995.

There are now 180 licensed banks in Hong Kong, of which 149 are incorporated outside the territory.

End/Thursday, April 13, 1995

Hong Kong Monetary Authority money market operations

*****

$ million Time (hours) Cumulative change (Sinillion)

Opening balance in the account 2,165 0930 +517

Closing balance in the account 2,293 1000 +517

Change attributable to : 1100 +517

Money market activity +518 1200 +518

LAF today -390 1500 +518

1600 +518

LAF rate 4.25% bid/6.25% offer TWI 118.8 *+0.0* 13.4.95

22

Hong Kong Monetary Authority

EF bills EF notes/Hong Kong Government bonds

Terms Yield Term Issue Coupon Price Yield

1 week 5.12 13 months 2605 6.35 100.38 6.07

1 month 5.17 22 months 2702 7.50 101.83 6.54

3 months 5.41 27 months 3707 6.95 100.69 6.72

6 months 5.64 33 months 3801 8.00 102.80 6.99

12 months 5.96 59 months 5003 7.75 101.55 7.50

Total turnover of bills and bonds - $ 19.225 million

Closed April 13, 1995

End/Thursday, April 13, 1995

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

ISSUED BY GOVERNMENT INFORMATION SERVICES BEACONSFIELD HOUSE, HONG KONG. TEL: 842 8777

Friday, April 14,1995

Contents Page No,

Public access to information scheme well received............. 1

9

Licensing Office for Elderly Homes Operational................ 3

Bus-only lane scheme benefits passengers...................... 4

Saturday, April 15,1995

Contents Page No,

More safety officers required................................. 6

Latest review of cigarette tar and nicotine yields released. 7

March weather report.......................................... 8

1

Public access to information scheme well received

*****

Since the Code on Access to Information was introduced on March 1, 97 formal requests for information were received by the first nine Government departments and branches to which it applies.

These initial nine departments and branches are the Architectural Services Department, Customs and Excise Department, Government Supplies Department, Highways Department, Home Affairs Department, Social Welfare Department, Home Affairs Branch, Recreation and Culture Branch, and Works Branch.

Of the 97 requests for information received up to 11 April , 60 were met, one was refused and one was withdrawn. Another 16 requests were still being processed, nine were referred to other departments for follow-up action and 10 oral requests were required to be confirmed in writing.

The Social Welfare Department received the largest number of requests for information (24), followed by the Home Affairs Department (16) and the Highways Department (14).

The contents of the requests were wide-ranging. They included requests for copies of performance pledges and organisation charts of departments, Legislative Council and District Board membership lists, slope stability reports, standards and guidelines on street lighting, traffic accident compensation, lists of subvented organisations, social welfare payment eligibility criteria, and information on old age allowances and centres for the elderly.

A spokesman for the Government Efficiency Unit which developed the Code and is responsible for its implementation, said he was pleased that the scheme had been so well received by members of the public.

2

"Much of the information which had been released in response to requests would not have been accessible to the public before the Code was introduced," the spokesman said.

"Some initial nervousness has been replaced by willing acceptance, and in some cases enthusiasm for the new arrangements on the part of the Government agencies already covered by the Code, and those to be covered in future," he added.

One surprising fact was that of all the requests for information so far received, only one was identifiably from a media organisation.

"While this could indicate that existing informal avenues for gaining access to Government information continue to be adequate, elsewhere in the world the media are major users of formal access to information schemes.

"We hope that the media would make use of the Code, and would also play a role in informing the public at large of this avenue for gaining access to information held by the Government.

"The Government is publicly committed to extending the Code's coverage to all its departments by the end of 1996, and is now considering how this can be done as quickly as possible," the spokesman said.

Attention News Editors:

For further enquiries, please contact Mr David Weeks, Deputy Head (SD) of the Efficiency Unit, on 2656 2331; or Mr Chan Tat-kuen, Principal Executive Officer (SD) of the Unit, on 2565 8213.

End/Friday, April 14, 1995

3

Licensing Office for Elderly Homes Operational *****

The former Registration Office of Private Homes for the Elderly of the Social Welfare Department has been restructured and renamed the Licensing Office of Residential Care Homes for the Elderly (LORCHE) from April 1 to cope with the implementation of the related legislation.

The Residential Care Homes (Elderly Persons) Ordinance, with the exception of Section 6, has come into operation on April 1 this year.

"With the implementation of the Ordinance, residential care homes for the elderly have to comply with the licensing requirements on location, space, design, structure, safety, fire precautions, staffing and quality of care to the residents before they are allowed to operate," said the SWD's Senior Social Work Officer (LORCHE), Mrs Loretta Chau.

"The new legislation aims to regulate homes established for residential care of elderly persons who have attained the age of 60 years so as to ensure that these homes provide services of a reasonable standard and that the well-being of the elderly residents is safeguarded," she said.

"Although the LORCHE only came into existence in April, we have been very busy during the past few months in preparing all the logistics to set up the new office.

"The new office is formed by strengthening manpower in the social work stream on the one hand and by injecting new blood seconded from the Buildings Department and Fire Services Department on the other," Mrs Chau said.

At present, the LORCHE has an establishment of 31 officers comprising social workers, building surveyors, senior station officers and clerical support.

Mrs Chau said with multi-disciplinary professionals working under the same umbrella, it was hoped that the licensing office could handle and process applications more efficiently and effectively.

4

"If we do not have our own expertise in the fields of building safety and fire safety, whenever we receive an application we have to seek professional advice from other departments on every occasion.

"Such a practice is time-consuming and involves a lot of paper works. The new arrangement certainly helps speeding up the processing of applications," she said.

Apart from handling applications, Mrs Chau said staff members of the LORCHE are prepared to meet prospective applicants who might have queries about the new legislation and the applications formalities.

"Appointment for a meeting can be made by letter or through the duty officer of the LORCHE on 2961 7211 or 2834 7414," she added.

Any persons who are interested in operating residential care homes for the elderly or operators of existing homes who wish to apply for a licence or a certificate of exemption are welcome to contact the LORCHE located at Room 2354, 23rd floor, Wu Chung House, 213 Queen's Road East, Wan Chai.

End/Friday, April 14, 1995

Bus-only lane scheme benefits passengers *****

The bus-only lane scheme on the approaches to Tate's Cairn Tunnel proved effective in reducing journey times for public transport commuters without significantly affecting other traffic.

Commenting on the effectiveness of the scheme which was introduced in late December last year, a spokesman for the Transport Department said average bus journey times observed have been reduced by more than two minutes between Siu Lek Yuen Road and the Tate's Cairn Tunnel toll area, representing a significant reduction of 19 per cent in journey time.

5

The bus-only lane scheme is in force between 7 am to 10 am daily except Sundays and public holidays.

"At the same time, queue lengths of traffic observed in the before and after periods did not change much although there was initial fluctuation.- The loss of road space given to the bus-only lane scheme has not reduced the southbound throughout of the Tate's Caim Tunnel during the morning peak hours. The flow still exceeds 3,000 vehicles per hour which is the Tunnel's oneway practical capacity," he said.

About 100 franchised buses and up to 30 non-franchised buses use the bus-only lanes under the scheme benefiting about 12,000 passengers.

The spokesman said the scheme was introduced as part of the response to addressing mounting public complaint about delays to public transport between the New Territories and Kowloon.

It comprises three separate lengths of bus-only lanes on the approaches to the Tate's Caim Tunnel: one on the left hand approach lane to the toll lane area, one in the middle lane along Siu Lek Yuen Road at the junction with its slip road to the Tate's Caim Tunnel, and one on the left hand lane along Siu Lek Yuen Road approaching Sha Tin Wai Road.

The spokesman said since the introduction of the scheme, the Transport Department had monitored the traffic impact but the intervening Christmas and the Chinese New Year holiday periods and then the completion of the reconstruction of the Lion Rock Tunnel Road have all had some effect on traffic flows.

"Now that traffic has had chance to settle down, before and after comparisons of journey times and queue lengths have been made and indicate that the resultant impact of the bus-only lane scheme gives overall positive benefits," the spokesman said.

End/Friday, April 14, 1995

6

More safety officers required *****

Building contractors and shipyard owners are reminded today (Saturday) that more safety officers will be required on construction sites and shipyards when the Factories and Industrial Undertakings (Safety Officers and Safety Supervisors) (Amendment) (No. 2) Regulation 1994 becomes effective on June 11, 1995.

Chief Factory Inspector of the Labour Department, Mr Chan Talking, said under the amended regulation, a contractor who has 100 or more employees on his construction site is required to engage a full-time safety officer.

In the existing regulation, only a site with 200 or more employees needs to have a full-time safety officer.

Although shipyards are not covered by the present regulations, the Amendment Regulation will require a shipyard owner to employ a full-time safety officer if he has 100 or more employees in his shipyard.

"Where 20 or more persons are employed in a shipyard, the owner has to employ a safety supervisor," Mr Chan added.

The Amendment Regulation also requires the owner to display in a conspicuous place in his industrial undertaking a notice with his own name and the particulars of the responsible safety officer or safety supervisor.

"Anyone who fails to comply with these legal obligations will be prosecuted and liable to a maximum fine of $50,000," he cautioned.

End/Saturday, April 15, 1995

7

Latest review of cigarette tar and nicotine yields released *****

The Government's latest review of tar and nicotine yields of cigarettes has shown that the average tar and nicotine yields of the 108 brands surveyed were 13.2 milligrams (mg) and 0.93 mg per cigarette respectively.

Releasing the findings today (Saturday), a spokesman for the Health and Welfare Branch pointed out that the average tar and nicotine yields of cigarettes had been decreasing consistently over the past years.

The respective figures published in the first review in 1984 were 17.6 mg/cigarette and 1.36 mg/cigarette. When compared to 1993, the average tar yield reported in the present review (covering January to December 1994) has decreased by 0.1 mg/cigarette while that for nicotine yield has increased by 0.1 mg/cigarette.

Under the Smoking (Public Health) Regulation, cigarettes are classified into four tar groups according to their determined tar yields:

low tar 0 to 9 mg/cigarette

low to middle tar 10 to 14 mg/cigarette

middle tar 15 to 17 mg/cigarette

high tar 18 to 20 mg/cigarette

Out of the 108 brands of cigarettes surveyed, 23 brands were in the low tar group, 33 brands in the low to middle tar group, 40 brands in the middle tar group and 12 brands in the high tar group.

All 108 brands of cigarettes reported in the present Table carried on their packets and cartons a tar group designation as claimed by their manufacturers.

But 13 brands were found to have declared tar groups inconsistent with test findings with 12 of them being under- reported and one overreported.

8

The spokesman explained: "Manufacturers may continue to sell the cigarettes using the previous designation for a period of 12 months.

"If the determination made by the Government Chemist for any brand of cigarettes differs by not more than one mg from the previous one and has the effect of placing the cigarettes in a tar group other than that to which they would have belonged, the brand may continue to use its previous designation subject to the Director of Health's written approval."

He said the Government is currently reviewing the maximum permissible level of tar and nicotine contained in cigarettes so as to reduce smokers' exposure to these harmful substances.

"However, the best way to protect health and prevent smoking-related illnesses is to quit smoking or never to start it at all," he said.

End/Saturday, April 15, 1995

March weather report *****

March was dry in terms of rainfall. The monthly rainfall of 32.4 millimetres was 52 per cent below the March average.

This was according to a monthly weather report released by the Royal Observatory today (Saturday).

The total rainfall recorded in the first quarter of 1995 was 86.6 millimetres, 37 per cent below the normal of 138.3 millimetres for the same period. The month was also marginally cooler than normal with a mean air temperature of 17.9 degrees.

Under the influence of a moist easterly airstream, the first day of the month was cloudy and cool with rain. More rain fell the next day but skies cleared on March 3 as a dry northerly airflow reached the territory. Fine and dry weather continued the following day with strong winds persisting in the early morning. A pedestrian was hurt by a blown-down sign board at Lai Chi Kok.

9

It gradually became milder and more humid from March 5 to 10 as the continental airstream subsided. Another surge of cool and moist northeast monsoon arrived at the South China coast on the night of March 10. Overcast, cool and humid conditions prevailed until March 15.

With the monsoon moderating, widespread sea fog occurred on March 16 and the visibility fell below 1 000 metres inside Victoria Harbour during the morning. Foggy conditions persisted the next morning and three reported incidents of ship collision occurred. Among these, two catamarans collided 500 metres southwest of Tsing Yi Island and 14 passengers were injured.

With the arrival of a cool northerly airflow that afternoon, fog dispersed and the temperatures dropped rapidly to the month's minimum of 12.5 degrees on the early morning of March 18.

The weather remained cloudy on March 19 but turned mainly fine in the next couple of days as winds became light.

Thick fog again hampered sea traffic and three more cases of ship collision were reported on the morning of March 22 with one person injured. It was fine that afternoon but became generally cloudy the next day.

Apart from some morning fog, the weather was fine and warm on March 24. The month's highest temperature of 25.2 degrees was reached in that sunny afternoon.

A cold front over South China advanced south and reached the coast during the morning of March 25. Strong gusty winds affected the offshore areas and a fishing boat capsized in squally showers near Tap Mun. One woman was drowned and a man was reported missing in the incident. Two students were also injured when their canoes overturned in rough seas at Sai Kung.

10

The strong and cool northeast monsoon also lowered the temperatures by about four degrees in two hours at the Royal Observatory. Rain quickly eased off that afternoon and the weather became generally fine and dry during the next couple of days.

It was cloudy from March 28 to 30. Mist was reported over the territory almost the whole day on March 29. A cool northeast monsoon reached the territory and brought occasional rain on the last day of the month.

No tropical cyclone activity was observed over the western North Pacific and the South China Sea in the month of March.

Details of the issuance/hoisting and cancellation/lowering of various wamings/signals in the month are summarised in Table 1.1. Monthly meteorological figures and departures from normal of March are tabulated in Table 1.2.

Table 1.1 Warnings and signals in March

Wamings/Signals Effective date and time

Strong Monsoon Signals 3 Mar 2200 - 4 Mar 0930 25 Mar 1200 - 26 Mar 0800

Thunderstorm Warning 17 Mar 1030 - 17 Mar 1330

Fire Danger Warnings Yellow 5 Mar 0600 - 6 Mar 0605 19 Mar 0600 - 19 Mar 2315 26 Mar 0000 - 26 Mar 0600

Red 4 Mar 0600 - 5 Mar 0600 26 Mar 0600 - 27 Mar 0600

11

Table 1.2 Figures and Departures from Normal - March

Total Bright Sunshine 80.5 hours; 15.9 hours below normal

Mean Daily Global Solar Radiation 9.72 MJ/SQM, 1.52 MJ/SQM below normal

Total Rainfall 32.4 mm; 34.5 mm below normal

Mean Cloud Amount 79 per cent; 3 per cent above normal

Mean Relative Humidity 78 per cent; 3 per cent below normal

Mean Daily Maximum Temperature 20.3 degree celcius; 1.0 degree celcius below normal

Mean Air Temperature 17.9 degree celcius; 0.6 degree celcius below normal

Mean Daily Minimum Temperature 16.1 degree celcius; 0.4 degree celcius below normal

Mean Dew Point 13.8 degree celcius; 1.2 degree celcius below normal

Total Evaporation 69.3 mm; 22.9 mm below normal

Remarks: All measurements were made at the Royal Observatory except sunshine, solar radiation and evaporation which were recorded at King's Park.

End/Saturday, April 15, 1995

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

ISSUED BY GOVERNMENT INFORMATION SERVICES BEACONSFIELD HOUSE, HONG KONG. TEL: 842 8777

Sunday, April 16,1995

Contents Bage_NOx

Remarks made by Secretary for the Treasury on Derivatives .. 1

Illegal wage deducation warned.......................... 1

Tuen Mun Road bus-only lane trial period to be extended. 3

Side spans for Kap Shui Mun Bridge completed............ 4

Fresh water cuts in Yuen Long and Sai Kung.............. 6

Monday, April 17,1995

Contents Page No,

Hong Kong radio station broadcasts to the Front Line.... 7

ETV Programmes on TOC and mother-tongue education....... 8

Majority confident of HK's future....................... 9

Tuen Mun bus-only lane extended for three more weeks.... 10

Handbill on safety of fixed electrical installations.... 11

Stamp exhibition souvenir cover......................... 12

1

Remarks made by Secretary for the Treasury on Derivatives *****

The Secretary for the Treasury, Mr K C Kwong today (Sunday) told the APEC Finance Ministers Meeting that Hong Kong supported greater transparency and better international co-operation in the regulation of financial markets.

In response to the Canadian Finance Minister, Mr Paul Martin Jr.'s invitation to comment on derivatives, Mr Kwong said the recent problems with derivatives had arisen because:

a. accounting treatment of such instruments had not been clear;

b. accounting treatment was not uniform, financial institutions had different risk management control systems, and regulators have difficulty agreeing to "level-playing field" rules for capital adequacy; and

c. there are not only problems of co-operation and co-ordination in supervision between different financial systems in the domestic market but also between international markets.

"We therefore support Mr Rubin's (U.S. Secretary of the Treasury) suggestion for greater transparency and better international co-operation in the regulation of financial markets," he said.

End/Sunday, April 16, 1995

Illegal wage deduction warned *****

The Labour Department today (Sunday) warned employers not to deduct wages from employees except under certain circumstances.

Optical 88 Limited in Kowloon Bay was recently fined $10,000 at Kwun Tong Magistracy for deducting wages from an employee illegally.

2

Labour Officer (Prosecutions), Mrs Tonia Leung, said under the Employment Ordinance, an employer could deduct wages from his employee only under the following circumstances

(a) if the employee is absent from work, the deductions should be proportionate to the period of absence ;

(b) if the employee damages or loses the employer's goods, equipment or property, the maximum deduction for each occasion is $300 and the total of such deductions shall not exceed one quarter of the wages payable to the employee for that wage period ;

(c) if the employer supplies food and accommodation to the employee;

(d) the employer can recover any advanced or over- paid wages to the employee provided that the total of such deductions shall not exceed one quarter of the wages payable to the employee for that wage period ; and

(e) the employer can recover, with the employee's written consent, any loan made to the employee.

"Except with the approval in writing of the Commissioner for Labour, the total of all deductions, excluding those for absence from work, made in any one wage period must not exceed half of the wages payable for that period," Mrs Leung added.

The maximum penalty for illegal deduction of wages is a fine of $100,000 and imprisonment for one year.

End/Sunday, April 16, 1995

3

Tuen Mun Road bus-only lane trial period to be extended * * * * *

The Tuen Mun Road bus only-lane trial scheme is to be extended for a further three weeks starting from April 18.

Announcing the extension today (Sunday), Assistant Commissioner for Transport, Mr Alan Lui, said the decision to extend the trial period of the scheme was reached at a recent meeting of the Govemment/District Boards Working Group on Traffic Improvements for the Yuen Long/Tuen Mun - Tsuen Wan/Kwai Tsing Corridor.

The scheme was put on trial on March 25 for an initial period of three weeks. Initial observations were discussed at the Working Group meeting. Having considered the views of the Working Group it was decided that the scheme be given a further trial with minor modifications, pending a final decision on the future of the scheme after detailed information and data were obtained and analysed.

In the mean time, consideration will be given to the suggestion that the Siu Lam and Sham Tseng interchange traffic restrictions be relaxed.

Mr Lui said the minor modifications were shortening of the operation hours of the scheme by putting back the starting time from 6.30 am to 7 am and the installation of traffic signals at the Tai Chung roundabout to allow easier exit of vehicles from Castle Peak Road.

At the same time, action will be taken to prepare for the opening up of the section of Castle Peak Road between Sham Tseng and Tai Chung roundabout to New Territories taxis so that they can have an alternative access route to Tsuen Wan MTR Station.

Initial observation revealed that bus journey times along Tuen Mun Road had been reduced by an average of six to seven minutes during the bus-only lane operation hours. Bus services had become more reliable with no lost trips recorded during the trial period. Before the introduction of the bus-only lane, up to 30 lost trips were recorded during the morning peak period.

4

The introduction of two new services from Sam Shing and Sham Tseng to the Tsuen Wan MTR Station were well received by bus passengers. All trips were over half full and patronage had been increasing. As a result, some 80,000 bus passengers benefited from the bus only lane scheme.

It was also found that other traffic on Tuen Mun Road experienced a slight delay of a few minutes while that on Castle Peak Road was delayed by around 12 minutes on average.

A full review of the scheme will be made in early May when the working group will also make a decision on the future of the scheme.

End/Sunday, April 16, 1995

Side spans for Kap Shui Mun Bridge completed

*****

Construction of the Kap Shui Mun Bridge, Hong Kong’s first cable-stayed bridge, is progressing smoothly with its two side spans completed earlier this month.

Over 50 per cent of the work on the Kap Shui Mun Bridge has been finished so far and the bridge is on schedule for completion in mid-1997,” the Project Director of the Highways Department’s Lantau Fixed Crossing Project Management Office, Mr K C Yeung, said today (Sunday).

The Kap Shui Mun Bridge and a viaduct across the Ma Wan island are being built by Kumagai-Maeda-Yokogawa-Hitachi Joint Venture under a $1.6 billion design and construct contract awarded by the Highways Department in November 1992.

The cable-stayed bridge, carrying both road and rail traffic, will span the channel between the islands of Ma Wan and Lantau.

5

Together with the 2.2-kilometre-long Tsing Ma suspension bridge, it will form part of the Lantau Fixed Crossing on the 34-kilometre-long highway network of the Airport Core Programme linking the new airport at Chek Lap Kok and the Tung Chung new town to urban Kowloon and Hong Kong.

The two side spans of the bridge deck and two short sections of the main span near the twin bridge towers are formed by 20 concrete segments precast on site.

Work on the side spans started in mid-July last year with the positioning of these 20 concrete segments from both Ma Wan and Lantau ends.

"Only nine months have passed and the work is now completed," Mr Yeung said.

Other works on site are also moving ahead rapidly.

"The 150-metre-tall bridge tower on Ma Wan has been completed while the tower on Lantau will be ready by the end of April.

"Construction of the 430-metre-long main span is now scheduled to commence late next month," Mr Yeung said.

A major part of the main span will be formed by precast segments made of steel and concrete. The steel frames of these main span segments are being fabricated in Shekou, China. The first batch of frames for six segments has already arrived on site And the frames are being assembled and concreted at the assembly yard on Lantau.

When ready, the segments will be transported to the Kap Shui Mun Channel by a purposely built barge, lifted up by specially designed cranes and then connected at bridge deck level.

6

Mr Yeung pointed out that the main span construction would last for about 11 months until April next year, during which the Kap Shui Mun Channel would need to be closed for one day each week to allow works to proceed.

"The Highways Department will be maintaining close liaison with the contractor, Marine Department and Marine Police to ensure implementation of proper marine traffic arrangements and to minimise the impact on marine traffic," he said.

End/Sunday, April 16, 1995

Fresh water cuts in Yuen Long and Sai Kung * * * * *

Fresh water supply to some villages in Yuen Long and Sai Kung will be temporarily suspended from 11 pm on Tuesday (April 18) and Wednesday (April 19) respectively to 6 am the following day to facilitate water mains leakage detection.

The affected areas in Yuen Long will include all the villages along the section of Kam Tin Road between Ko Po Tsuen and Kam Sheung Road, including Tsz Tong Tsuen, Tai Hong Tsuen, Kat Hing Wai and Shek Wu Tong Tsuen.

In Sai Kung, all the villages along the section of Clear Water Bay Road between Pik Uk and Pine Villas, including Tai Po Tsai Sheung Tsuen, Tai Po Tsai San Tsuen and Ta Kwu Ling San Tsuen will be affected by the water cut.

End/Sunday, April 16, 1995

7

Hong Kong radio station broadcasts to the Front Line *****

What is thought to be Hong Kong’s first direct contribution to the United Nations effort in Bosnia Herzegovina begins this week when a local radio station starts daily satellite transmission to the war-tom country.

The troops from 28 Transport Squadron, The Queen’s Own Gurkha Transport Regiment are based in Colchester in England, and have deployed as part of the British Force supporting the UN in Bosnia on Operation Grapple.

The British Forces Broadcasting Station (BFBS) runs a 24-hour a day English radio service in the British sector of Bosnia and Croatia for UK troops.

From Wednesday (April 19) the headquarters of the BFBS Nepali service, which is in Hong Kong, will provide a 1 O-minute programme of Nepali news and requests for the approximately 100 Gurkha troops on duty in this operational area.

The programme will be produced each weekday at BFBS in Hong Kong and sent alive, using satellite links to Bosnia via London, and is to be presented by Mrs Sudha Gurung who has been with BFBS for five years.

The programme will only be heard in Bosnia by UN’s Nepali Army contingent and a number of ex- British Gurkhas who now work in the country as civilian employees of the UN.

Network Director of the Nepali Service, Mr Kishore Gurung, an ex-Serviceman himself says:

’’The boys in the field will be working hard supporting the UN humanitarian effort. When they do get time off, news from home is vital. We are delighted to be able to offer this service of keeping them in touch with home.’’

8

There will be a photocall session for media representatives at BFBS, Borneo Lines, Sek Kong Camp, Pat Heung, New Territories on Wednesday (April 19) at 2.30 pm when Mrs Sudha Gurung will be available for photographs in the BFBS studios.

Those attending the photocall session or require further information are requested to contact Mr Kishore Gurung, Network Director of the Nepali Service, BFBS Hong Kong. (Tel number 2483-8004 or Fax 2488-5455).

End/Monday, April 17, 1995

ETV Programmes on TOC and mother-tongue education

*****

A special programme on Target Oriented Curriculum and Mothertongue Education will be telecast during the ETV secondary school programme transmission hours in late April and early May.

A spokesman for the Education Department said the screening of the programme is to help primary and secondary students to have a better understanding of two major education initiatives, Target Oriented Curriculum at the primary level and Mother-tongue Education at the secondary level, launched by the department.

"Through exposition by the narrator, the concept and benefits of Target Oriented Curriculum will be explained, in the first part of the programme whereas unedited views of secondary school students and teachers on the medium of instruction will be brought together in the second part of the programme," he said.

The spokesman encouraged principals and teachers to make arrangements for their students to view the programme which could be seen during class time or used as supporting materials in various activities such as talks, seminars, parents' gatherings and panel discussions.

9

He said parents would also find the programme useful when making decisions on sending their children to a primary school implementing Target Oriented Curriculum or a secondary school using Chinese as the teaching medium.

The transmission schedule is as follows:

Date Time Channel

April 24 (Monday) May 2 (Tuesday)

May 5 (Friday)

11.10 to 11.30 am

12.20 to 12.40 pm

12.40 to 1 pm

TVB Pearl

ATV World

ATV World

Meanwhile, the secondary ETV programmes which had been scheduled to be shown at the above time will be cancelled.

End/Monday, April 17, 1995

Majority confident of UK's future

* * * * *

A recent survey conducted by the Home Affairs Branch showed that 62 per cent of the respondents were confident that Hong Kong would continue to be prosperous and stable.

This represented a rise of five percentage points compared to a similar survey conducted two months earlier.

Releasing the findings of a bimonthly survey conducted in March, a spokesman for the Home Affairs Branch also pointed out that 62 per cent of respondents expected the situation to improve or remain about the same in the next 12 months, compared with 56 per cent in January.

As to the overall , performance of the Government, 43 per cent expressed satisfaction while 30 per cent thought otherwise.

The corresponding figures in January were 40 per cent and 33 per cent respectively.

10

On the three most-mentioned problems facing the territory, housing-related issue continued to top the list with 37 per cent, which was eight percentage points down from the last survey.

This was followed by transport-related problems which, at 34 per cent, was about the same as that in January (36 per cent).

Hong Kong's future attracted the third most attention at 24 per cent, compared with 26 per cent in the previous survey.

The survey was the 57th in the series to gauge the trend of public opinion in respect of perceived problems in Hong Kong and the community's views of the general situation.

Conducted between March 13 and 17, a total of 1,517 persons were interviewed using a random sample of residential telephone numbers.

Within the household of a selected telephone number, a respondent aged between 15 and 64 was randomly chosen for interview.

End/Monday, April 17, 1995

Tuen Mun bus-only lane extended for three more weeks

*****

The Transport Department reminds motorists that the trial bus-only lane scheme for Tuen Mun Road will be extended tor another three weeks from tomorrow (Tuesday).

The operating hours of the lane will start at 7 am instead of 6.30 am and will last until 9 am.

Arrangements at Siu Lam and Sham Tseng interchanges will remain unchanged. Traffic on Castle Peak Road will not be allowed to join Tuen Mun Road Kowloon-bound at Siu Lam Interchange. Vehicles on Castle Peak Road cannot join Tuen Mun Road both bounds at Sham Tseng Interchange.

- 11 -

New Territories taxis are still not allowed to travel to Tsuen Wan Mass Transit Railway Station via the section of Castle Peak Road between Ting Kau and Tsuen Wan Road.

End/Monday, April 17, 1995

Handbill on safety of fixed electrical installations *****

The Electrical and Mechanical Services Department (EMSD) has produced a handbill on the responsibilities of owners of fixed electrical installation.

The bilingual leaflet is being distributed to all households in Hong Kong together with the electricity bills of the two power companies.

An EMSD spokesman today (Monday) said the handbill aimed at reminding owners of fixed electrical installation in buildings their duties for ensuring the safety of their equipment.

"Electrical safety in buildings will be enhanced if the owners fulfil their responsibilities," he said.

Under the Electricity Ordinance, such owners are responsible for preventing electrical accidents.

"They are required to ensure that there is no illegal alteration or addition to the fixed electrical installation," he said.

The spokesman stressed that in case of doubt and to prevent accidents, owners should consult and employ registered contractors and electrical workers to do electrical jobs such as installation, maintenance and modification works.

An owner failing to fulfil his duties might commit an offence, he added.

t

- 12 -

"If an owner believed that his electrical installation was likely to cause an electrical accident, he must immediately have it rectified," the spokesman said.

He noted that the most common hazardous malpractices in fixed electrical installation included unauthorised uprating of main switch or fuse, and unauthorised addition of circuits or socket outlets resulting in a fixed electrical installation exceeding the loading as approved by the power company.

Enquiries on the safety of fixed electrical installation can be directed to the Customer Service Office of EMSD, ground floor, 98 Caroline Hill Road, Causeway Bay, or on 2882 8011 during office hours.

End/Monday, April 17, 1995

Stamp exhibition souvenir cover

*****

The acting Postmaster General, Miss Nancy Law, today (Monday) announced that a souvenir cover will be issued on April 27 to commemorate Hong Kong Post Office's participation in "Stamp ’95" International Stamp Exhibition to be held at the Wembley Exhibition Centre in London from April 27 to 30.

The souvenir cover will be on sale at $2 each at all post offices from April 20.

Hand-back service will be provided on April 27 at all post offices to official and privately made covers bearing indication of the event. A special postmark and a cachet will also be introduced on April 27.

End/Monday, April 17, 1995

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

ISSUED BY GOVERNMENT INFORMATION SERVICES BEACONSFIELD HOUSE, HONG KONG. TEL: 842 8777

Tuesday, April 18,1995

Contents RageJN^

Chief Secretary's visit to Europe......................................... 1

Unemployment and Underemployment Statistics for December 1994 -

February 1995 ............................................................ 2

Board of Discipline to investigate ship collision................... 3

Plans to mitigate marine risks in reclamation projects................... 4

7,495 agreements lodged with Land Registry in March................. 6

Index of industrial production for 1994 ............................ 6

Mid-term review on Commercial Radio's broadcasting licence.......... 9

Tender for the seventh issue of 3-year Exchange Fund Notes.......... 10

Rock blasting for improvement works to Tuen Mun Road................ 11

Water storage figure................................................ 13

Hong Kong Monetary Authority tender results......................... 14

Hong Kong Monetary Authority money market operations................ 15

- 1 - -y<. ->■

" * ' . , \ x • v?J

Chief Secretary's visit to Europe ♦ * ♦ ♦ ♦

The Chief Secretary, Mrs Anson Chan, will depart Hong Kong on Saturday (April 22) for a week-long visit to Belgium, the Netherlands and Germany.

On the first day of her visit in Brussels, Mrs Chan will have separate sessions with the President of the European Commission, Mr Jacques Santer, and the Vice-President of the Commission, Sir Leon Brittan.

' • <

On April 25 (Tuesday), she will call on the Belgian Prime Minister, Mr Jean-Luc Dehaene, to discuss matters of mutual interest.

She will also call on the President of the European Parliament, Mr Klatis Hansch, and meet with the European Parliament-Hong Kong Friendship Group.

She will attend a luncheon hosted by the Royal Institute for International Affairs in Brussels and address members of the Institute on "Hong Kong: Europe's Partner for the Pacific Century".

On April 26 (Wednesday), she will address a dinner hosted by the Netherlands-Hong Kong Society in Hague which will be attended by over 120 guests from the business community, including traders, bankers, manufacturers and shipping and airline executives. She will speak bn "Hong Kong into the 21st Century".

While in Hague, Mrs Chan will call on the Prime Minister of the Netherlands, MrWimKok.

She will also call on the Vice-Minister-President and Minister for Foreign ' Affairs, Mr Hans van Mierlo, and the Director-General for Foreign Trade, Ministry of Economic.Affairs, Dr Franciscus Aloysius Engering.

On April 27 (Thursday), Mrs Chan will depart for Dusseldorf and attend a luncheon hosted by Westdeutsche Landesbank Girozentrale where she will meet prominent members of the business community.

On arrival in Bonn on the same day, she will call on the Federal Minister for Special Tasks and Head of Federal Chancellery, Mr Friedrich Bohl.

Mrs Chan will return to Hong Kong on April 29 (Saturday).

End/Tuesday, April 18, 1995

2

Unemployment and Underemployment Statistics for December 1994 - February 1995 ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

The seasonally adjusted unemployment rate for December 1994 - February 1995 was 2.5%, and the underemployment rate was 1.5%, according to the latest labour force statistics released today (Tuesday) by the Census and Statistics Department.

The provisional seasonally adjusted unemployment rate for the period of January - March 1995 was 2.8%, while the provisional underemployment rate was 1.4%.

Commenting on these figures, a Government spokesman said the rise in the unemployment rate was partly due to workers quitting jobs at around the Chinese New Year to seek jobs with better terms of employment, but in part it was also due to layoffs.

Nevertheless, the continued low underemployment rate suggested a generally high intensity of manpower utilisation for those in employment.

During the period of December 1994 - February 1995, the number of unemployed persons, adjusted for seasonal variations in the proportion of first-time job-seekers in the labour force, was estimated at 73,500, while the number of underemployed persons was estimated at 43,800.

The unemployment and underemployment statistics were obtained from a continuous General Household Survey conducted by the Census and Statistics Department.

The survey for December 1994 - February 1995 covered a quarterly sample of some 12,600 households or 42,900 persons, selected scientifically to represent the land-based civilian non-institutional population in Hong Kong.

Relevant data were obtained from the survey by interviewing each individual member aged 15 or over in the households sampled.

In the survey, the definitions used in measuring unemployment and underemployment follow closely those recommended by the International Labour Organisation.

Detailed analysis of labour force characteristics is given in the report on the General Household Survey which is published four times a year. The next report covering the quarter ending March 1995 will be available at the Government Publications Centre by the end of June at $32 a copy.

End/Tuesday, April 18, 1995

3

Board of Discipline to investigate ship collision ♦ ♦ ♦ * *

The Director of Marine, Mr Ian Dale, has appointed, under the Pilotage Ordinance, a Board of Discipline, to investigate the circumstances leading to the collision of two container vessels on Sunday (April 16) night.

The Board will investigate in particular how the collision occurred when each of the vessel was under compulsory pilotage.

The two container vessels, M V Tanghe, inward and the other, M V California Luna, outward bound, each piloted by a licensed pilot, collided about one and half nautical miles north west of Green Island at about 7.30 pm on Sunday (April 16).

The two vessels sustained minor damage in the collision. There were no injuries.

Some containerised fireworks on board the California Luna caught fire after the collision. A total of 13 containers, four laden with fireworks and the others general cargo, were damaged in the fire. The fire was put out at about 1.30 pm the following day.

The Marine Department started its investigation immediately after the collision. The department has interviewed the masters and senior officers of both vessels.

Based on the findings of these initial investigations, Mr Dale ordered the setting up of the Board to take the matter further.

The Board will make its recommendations to the Pilotage Authority who is the Director of Marine.

End/Tuesday, April 18, 1995

4

Plans to mitigate marine risks in reclamation projects *****

The Government had assessed the marine risks involved in reclamation projects at the early planning stage and had incorporated plans to mitigate the risks if there were such a need, the Director of Marine, Mr Ian Dale, said today (Tuesday).

’’These plans have been, and will continue to be phased in as reclamation proceeds,” Mr Dale said, adding that he was satisfied that with these plans in place levels of marine risk would continue to be acceptable.

He believed recent comments in the media which linked reclamations to unacceptable marine risks stemmed from misunderstanding or uninformed views.

"The theory that more vessels and less water equals increased risks is true only if no corrective action is taken," Mr Dale said.

From a strictly marine traffic planning and safety view point, he said, calls to stop reclamations would be counter-productive in the longer term.

Contrary to common belief that the marine risk levels in the harbour will increase because of reclamation, Mr Dale pointed out that reclamation projects in Victoria Harbour would eventually help to improve overall marine traffic management.

"The final lines of reclamations in the central part of Victoria Harbour will create a properly defined and safe east-west channel for forecast traffic, providing specific zones for crossing traffic and reducing haphazard movements," he said.

Marine Department’s longer term traffic management plans were made on that basis, Mr Dale added.

"Let us not turn the clock back by heeding calls for a moratorium on these necessary projects," he said.

He also corrected the apparent widely held opinion that the Comprehensive Study on Marine Activities. Associated Risk Assessment and Development of a Strategy for the Optimum Usage of Hong Kong Waters (MARAD Study) was to be carried out in acknowledgment of current marine risk levels in the harbour.

The MARAD Study concept began as two separate studies, strategic water planning and risk throughout territorial waters, which were later sensibly combined into one consultancy.

5

"The study is part of an on-going process to look at future needs based on forecast marine traffic growth and to improve our planning of the use of Hong Kong's waters," Mr Dale said.

He said his department aimed at providing an accident-free environment for marine operators but in reality no marine traffic system could eliminate all accidents as there would always be some vessel operators taking dangerous short cuts.

"It is the Marine Department's responsibility to police fairways to reduce to a minimum acts which contravene the rules, through advice, education, instruction, and if necessary prosecution," Mr Dale said.

"As Hong Kong's maritime trade expands and marine traffic levels rise, we must acknowledge that our waters must be subject to increasing level of control. Like our roads where we have one way systems, traffic lights, and clearways, I am implementing the marine equivalents," he added.

The Marine Department is implementing the necessary controls in Hong Kong waters. The first stages are in place. Others will follow.

Attention News Editors:

The Director of Marine, Mr Ian Dale, will give a press conference at 3 pm today (Tuesday) on marine safety issues.

Also present will be the acting Assistant Director of Marine/Port Services, Mr Barrie Hird, and Senior Surveyor/Shipping Casualty, Mr B B Rao.

It will be held at Conference Room A, Marine Department Headquarters, 22nd floor, Harbour Building, 38 Pier Road, Central, Hong Kong.

You are invited to attend.

End/Tuesday, April 18. 1995

6

7,495 agreements lodged with Land Registry in March *****

A total of 7,495 sale and purchase agreements for building units, which include both residential and non-residential properties, were lodged with the Land Registry last month.

The figure represents an increase of 85.7 per cent from that of February 1995, and a 43.4 per cent drop compared with March 1994.

The total consideration of these agreements is $20.4 billion, up 71.6 per cent and down 62 per cent as compared with the amounts for February 1995 and March 1994 respectively.

The figures are contained in the monthly statistics released today (Tuesday) by the Land Registry on deeds relating to property transactions received for registration in the Urban and New Territories Land Registries last month.

Relevant statistics for February 1995 and March 1994 were provided for comparison.

Figures on sale and purchase agreements received for the past 12 months and the year-on-year rate of change were also released.

The statistics generally relate to land transactions executed up to four weeks prior to their submission for registration, as there is usually a time lag between the execution of deeds and their lodgement for registration.

End/Tuesday, April 18. 1995

Index of industrial production for 1994 *****

The index of industrial production for the whole year of 1994 decreased marginally by 0.1% over 1993, according to the results of a survey released today (Tuesday) by the Census and Statistics Department.

The industry group of electrical and electronic products, machinery, professional equipment and optical goods registered a moderate increase of 3.3%. Within this group, the production of machinery, equipment, apparatus, parts and components increased by 3.4%, while that of consumer electrical and electronic products increased slightly by 0.4%.

7

Output of the paper products and printing industry group also increased by 2.7%.

Small increases were recorded in the food, beverages and tobacco industry group (1.5%) and the wearing apparel (except footwear) industry group (0.2%).

On the other hand, decreases were recorded in the industry groups of chemical, rubber, plastic and non-metallic mineral products (-8.8%); basic metals and fabricated metal products (-1.1%); and textiles (including knitting) (-0.8%).

The index of industrial production for the fourth quarter of 1994 increased slightly by 0.7% and 0.4% respectively over the same quarter of 1993 and the third quarter of 1994.

The index of industrial production reflects changes of local manufacturing output in real terms. In other words, it measures the volume of local production after discounting the effect of price changes.

More detailed information can be obtained from the ’’Quarterly Index of Industrial Production, 4th Quarter 1994" report, which is on sale at $5 a copy at the Government Publications Centre, Low Block, Ground Floor, Queensway Government Offices, 66 Queensway, Hong Kong, or at the Census and Statistics Department Publications Section, 19th floor, Wanchai Tower, 12 Harbour Road, Wan Chai. Regular subscription may also be arranged.

Enquiries about the survey result may be directed to the General Economic Surveys Section of the Census and Statistics Department on tel 2805 6643.

8

Indices of industrial production by industry group and selected component industry.

(1986 = 100)

Industry group / Selected component industry Index for 4th Qtr. 1994 % change over Percentage change in the index for 1994 as a whole

4th Qtr. 1993 3rd Qtr. 1994

1. Food, beverages and tobacco 177 -5.2 +8.4 + 1.5

2. Wearing apparel (except footwear) 133 + 1.4 +6.3 +0.2

3. Textiles (including knitting) 135 +3.1 * -0.8

4. Paper products and printing 270 +4.5 -14.7 . +2.7

5. Chemicals, rubber, plastic and non-metallic mineral products 67 -9.0 -5.5 -8.8

within which : Plastic products (44) (-14.8) (-9.0) (-18.7)

6. Basic metals and fabricated metal products 96 -2.6 -7.4 -1.1

within which : Fabricated metal products (except machinery and equipment) (95) (-3.9) (-8.3) (-0.5)

7. Electrical and electronic products, machinery, professional equipment and optical goods 179 +5.0 +4.9 +3.3

within which : Consumer electrical and electronic products (115) (+1.5) (-9.4) (+0.4)

: Machinery, equipment, apparatus, parts and components (267) (+4.0) (+10.5) (+3.4)

8. Miscellaneous manufacturing industries 88 -6.0 -0.3 -4.6

ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES 137 +0.7 +0.4 -0.1

Notes : 1. Four selected component industries, which carry relatively large weights and are major

components of their relevant industry groups, are also included in the above table. For easy reading, the figures of these selected component industries are shown in brackets.

2. As from the first quarter of 1992, the Hong Kong Standard Industrial Classification (HSIC) is used to form the industry groups and selected component industries presented in the above table. For the exact coverage of the industry groups and component industries in terms of HSIC codes, please refer to the publication 'Quarterly Index of Industrial Production, 4th Quarter 1994’.

3. The % change figures in the above table are derived based on the more precise figures of the production indices up to 2 decimal places.

t j , _ , , ,____- - - -    ■ __!_■!-■-----• • ••• * * M »»» * « * M •••••• ••• • •• •••••••• “ —

* Change within ±0.05%.

End/Tuesday, April 18, 1995

9

Mid-term review on Commercial Radio’s broadcasting licence

*****

The Broadcasting Authority (BA) reviewed at its meeting held last Thursday (April 13) the progress on the mid-term review being conducted on the sound broadcasting licence held by Commercial Radio.

The independent research firm commissioned to conduct the sound broadcasting survey has completed the fieldwork and is analysing the data.

"The survey will give us the quantitative input for the review," a spokesman for the Authority said. "As regards the qualitative input, we have plans for two public hearings which will take place between 6.30 pm and 9.30 pm on May 9 and 18 at the Science Museum, Tsim Sha Tsui.

"Community participation will greatly assist the work of the BA. Information pamphlets on the areas covered by the mid-term review will be available at District Offices for collection towards the end of April.

"The BA hopes that as many radio listeners as possible could come and give us their opinions," the spokesman added.

The BA also endorsed its Complaints Committee's recommendations on a number of complaints against television and radio programmes.

It decided that Wharf Cable should be given a serious warning for an advertisement appearing in a programme on January 7, 1995, in contravention of the licence condition which prohibits it from broadcasting any advertisement.

Wharf Cable was given another warning for allowing its subscribers who have not opened special accounts for its pay-per-view channel (Cineplex House C) to have free access to the channel at certain transmission hours. Controlled access is a condition imposed by the BA when it approved the adult channel.

Metro Broadcast received a warning in respect of the programme "Banana Club" broadcast on January 15, 1995. The programme contained conversations and expressions which were not suitable for broadcast at a time when there was likely to be a large group of young listeners.

10

Among the complaints considered by the BA were three against programmes broadcast on Star TV, two against programmes on ATV and one against programmes on Commercial Radio.

’’The BA advised the broadcasters concerned to observe more closely the relevant provisions in the BA's codes of practice and in the licence concerned," the spokesman said.

End/Tuesday, April 18, 1995

Tender for the seventh issue of 3-year Exchange Fund Notes *****

The Hong Kong Monetary Authority announces that the tender for the seventh issue of three-year Exchange Fund Notes will be held on Monday (April 24) for settlement the following day.

Similar to the previous issue, an amount of HKS500 million three-year notes will be on offer.

In addition to that, another HK$100 million will be held as reserve by the Hong Kong Monetary Authority for supply to Market Makers in the secondary market.

The notes will mature on April 27, 1998. and will carry interest at the rate of 6.9% per cent per annum payable semi-annually in arrears.

Members of the public who wish to tender for the notes may do so through any of the market makers or recognised dealers on the published list which can be obtained from the Hong Kong Monetary Authority on 30th floor. 3 Garden Road, Hong Kong, tel 2878 8150.

Each tender must be for an amount of HK$50,000 or integral multiples thereof.

11

Following is a table giving detailed tender information for the seventh issue of 3-year Exchange Fund Notes:

Issue Number : 3804

Tender Date and Time : Monday 24 April 1995, 9.30 am to 10.30 am

Issue and Settlement Date : Tuesday 25 April 1995

Amount on Offer : HK.S500 million plus an additional HK$100 million as reserve stock, for the Monetary Authority

Maturity : Three years

Maturity Date : 27 April 1998

Interest Rate : 6.9% per annum payable semi-annually in arrears

Interest Payment Dates : 25 Oct 1995, 25 Apr 1996 25 Oct 1996, 25 Apr 1997 27 Oct 1997, 27 Apr 1998

Tender Amount : Each tender must be for an amount of HK$50,000

or integral multiples thereof. Members of the public who wish to tender for the Notes may approach Market Makers or Recognized Dealers on the published list.

Other details : Please see Information Memorandum published or approach Market Makers or Recognized Dealers.

End/Tuesday, April 18, 1995

Rock blasting for improvement works to Tuen Mun Road *****

The first rock blasting operation for improvement works to Tuen Mun Road is to be carried out at Tai Lam, east of Brothers Point at noon on Thursday (April 20).

Both carriageways of Tuen Mun Road and Castle Peak Road will have to be closed during the operation for about 10 minutes.

12

Announcing details of the blasting operations today (Tuesday), the Government Engineer/Project Management of the Highways Department, Mr Peter Orange, said the rock blasting operations were required for the construction of climbing lanes at four uphill sections of the Kowloon-bound carriageway of Tuen Mun Road.

These sections are at Sam Shing, So Kwun Wat, Tai Lam and Ting Kau.

"The use of blasting methods for cutting back the existing rock slopes along the road is considered necessary in order to complete the road widening work in a reasonable time so as to minimise overall effects of the works on the travelling public and local residents," Mr Orange said.

"From now on, blasting operations will be carried out quite frequently until March 1996," he added.

The programme and frequency for the blasting operations are as follows:

Sections Programme Frequency (times per week)

Sam Shing Hui May 95 to October 95 1-2

So Kwun Wat July 95 to November 95 1

Tai Lam April 95 to March 96 3-5

Ting Kau May 95 to January 96 2-3

For safety reason and protection of the public, it was necessary to evacuate the area within 150 metre of the blasting site, Mr Orange said.

He said it was therefore necessary to close both carriageways of Tuen Mun Road during each blasting operation. For a short section at Tai Lam, it is also required to close Castle Peak Road during blasting because of its proximity.

The carriageways will have to be closed for about 10 minutes at each blast to provide time for the blasting operation and subsequent checking.

Results of traffic surveys show that the hour from noon to 1 pm is the least busy hour during the day with traffic flow figures at 2,500 each way on Tuen Mun Road and 200 each way on Castle Peak Road. The blasting operations are therefore planned to be carried out at this hour.

The Highways Department will maintain a close liaison with the Traffic Police and Transport Department.

13

In the event of unusual or emergency situation existing on Tuen Mun Road, the blasting operation planned for the day may be abandoned or deferred till later in the day. f

Stringent controls will be exercised to limit the vibration due to each blast such that noise and vibration are kept within acceptable limits.

• Xf . ...t

The Highways Department has awarded a contract in May last year to design and build climbing lanes with a wide hard shoulder in the Kowloon-bound carriageway of Tuen Mun Road at the four locations in order to alleviate the traffic congestion problem on the Road.

A trial closure at two sections of Tuen Mun Road was conducted on September 16 last year. The trial indicated that the queue lengths at Ting Kau and Sam Shing Hui on both carriageways were,acceptable and traffic resumed to normal mode within five to seven minutes after the carriageways were re-opened.

Motorists are urged to drive with care and patience.

End/Tuesday, April 18, 1995

Water storage figure

*****

Storage in Hong Kong’s reservoirs at 9 a.m. today (Tuesday) stood at 66.0 per cent of capacity or 386.989 million cubic metres.

This time last year the reservoirs contained 389.771 million cubic metres of water, representing 66.5 per cent of capacity.

End/Tuesday, April-18, 1995


14

Hong Kong Monetary Authority tender results ♦ ♦ ♦ * *

Tender date 18 Apr 95 18 Apr 95

Paper on offer EF bills EF bills

Issue number Q516 Y588

Amount applied HK$6,640 MN HK$2,450 MN

Amount allotted HK$ 1,500 MN HK$500 MN

Average yield accepted 5.38 PCT 5.96 PCT

Highest yield accepted 5.39 PCT 5.98 PCT

Pro rata ratio About 35 PCT About 66 PCT

Average tender yield 5.41 PCT 6.02 PCT

Hong Kong Monetary Authority

Tenders to be held in the week beginning April 24, 1995

Tender date 24 Apr 95 25 Apr 95 25 Apr 95

Paper on offer EF notes EF bills EF bills

Issue number 3804 Q517 H563

Issue date 25 Apr 95 26 Apr 95 26 Apr 95

Maturity date 27 Apr 1998 26 Jul 95 25 Oct 95

Tenor 3 years 91 days 182 days

Amount on offer HKS500+100MN HKS 1,500+300 MN HKS800+160MN

Coupon 6.90 PCT

End/Tuesday, April 18, 1995

15

Hong Kong Monetary Authority money market operations

*****

$ million Time (hours) Cumulative change (Smillion)

Opening balance in the account 2,293 0930 +521

Closing balance in the account 3,275 1000 +521

Change attributable to : 1100 +421

Money market activity +402 1200 +402

LAF today +580 1500 +402

1600 +402

LAF rate 4.25% bid/6.25% offer TWI 118.0 *-0.8* 18.4.95

Hong Kong Monetary Authority

EF bills EF notes/Hong Kong Government bonds

Terms Yield Term Issue Coupon Price Yield

1 week 5.15 13 months 2605 6.35 100.45 6.00

1 month 5.16 22 months 2702 7.50 101.97 6.45

3 months 5.38 27 months 3707 6.95 100.85 6.64

6 months 5.58 33 months 3801 8.00 102.97 6.92

12 months 5.90 59 months 5003 7.75 101.76 7.45

Total turnover of bills and bonds - $15,199 million

Closed April 18, 1995

End/Tuesday, April 18, 1995

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

ISSUED BY GOVERNMENT INFORMATION SERVICES BEACONSFIELD HOUSE, HONG KONG. TEL: 842 8777

Wednesday, April 19,1995

Contents Page No,

Public entertainment licensing system to be simplified.... 1

More CCTV cameras to enhance traffic surveillance......... 3

More time for submission of views on the implementation of Covenant...................................................... 4

Police duties related fees to be revised....................... 6

52 fined for breaching anti-pollution law...................... 6

Advanced anti-drug course for teachers......................... 8

Harbour to feature first 21 -Gun salute afloat................. 9

37 VMs return home voluntarily................................ 10

Fresh water cut in Sham Shui Po........................... 11

Hong Kong Monetary Authority money market operations .... 11

1

Public entertainment licensing system to be simplified

*****

The licensing system for public entertainment will be simplified if the proposed Public Entertainment and Amusement (Miscellaneous Provisions) Bill is passed into law.

Under the new bill, the power of the Commissioner for Television and Entertainment Licensing to issue permits to govern the form and content of public entertainment under the Places of Public Entertainment Ordinance will be abolished.

"Organisers of public entertainment will in future only need to obtain a licence from the Licensing Authority (the Urban Council in the urban area and the Regional Council in the New Territories) to cover the safety and hygiene of the venue, and safety of the participants," a spokesman for the Recreation and Culture Branch explained today (Wednesday).

"Public live performances will continue to be controlled by Section 12A of the Summary Offences Ordinance which stipulates that it is an offence to take part in, provide or manage public live performance of an indecent, obscene, revolting or offensive nature.

"Police officers acting under a warrant can enter premises where it is suspected that such a performance is or may be taking place, conduct a search and seize articles related to the performance."

The spokesman pointed out that the proposed abolition of the permit system was part of Government's continued efforts in promoting freedom of expression and simplifying governmental procedures.

"Under the existing permit system, because of the nature of the performance, the permit is ineffective to guard against impromptu indecent content in public entertainment anyway," he added.

2

The bill also aims at including mechanical devices which are driven by human physical power but which carry potential danger under the control of the Amusement Rides (Safety) Ordinance.

Subsequently, the definition of amusement ride in the ordinance will be amended to introduce legislative controls over mechanical devices like multi-axis chairs which are solely driven by human power but can be potentially dangerous.

"The proposed amendment will put manually driven amusement devices like multi-axis chair under comprehensive safety regulation but still exempting simple devices like swings or see-saws from unnecessary legislative controls," the spokesman said.

The bill further proposes to update the list of entertainment governed by the legislation and empower the Licensing Authority to impose licensing conditions concerning crowd control and the provision of first aid services for better ensuring the safety of participants.

Outdated forms of entertainment such as exhibition of abnormal persons or animals will be removed and a new form of entertainment, i.e. laser projection display, will be added.

"The Licensing Authority's power to imposed licensing conditions concerning crowd control and the provision of first aid services is to give effect to Mr Justice Bokhary's recommendations as a result of the Lan Kwai Fong incident," the spokesman said.

The bill will be gazetted this Friday (April 21) and introduced into the Legislative Council on May 3.

End/Wednesday, April 19, 1995

3

More CCTV cameras to enhance traffic surveillance *****

The Transport Department has awarded a contract in connection with the installation of 22 closed-circuit television (CCTV) cameras as part of the programme to enhance traffic surveillance in Tsuen Wan and Kwai Tsing districts.

The contract, worth $5.47 million, is for electrical works only. It was signed by the Assistant Commissioner for Transport (Technical Services and Planning), Mr Lee Shu- chee, and representatives of the contractor.

A spokesman for the department said under the project, estimated to cost $12 million, 18 new cameras would be installed at various strategic roadside locations in Tsuen Wan, Kwai Chung and Tsing Yi.

The existing four cameras in the Container Port area will be integrated, with central monitoring facilities to be provided under the contract at the Transport Department's New Territories Area Traffic Control Centre in Tsuen Wan, and at the New Territories Police Regional Command and Control Centre in Tai Po.

"With these facilities, Transport Department staff and the Police will be able to monitor centrally the traffic conditions, adjust traffic signal timings, and respond to traffic incidents quickly to minimise traffic congestion," the spokesman said.

Work under the contract will start soon and is scheduled to complete by early next year.

At the same time, the first phase of a CCTV system for centrally monitoring the traffic conditions and incidents along Tuen Mun Road came into operation today.

4

Under this first phase, eight cameras have been installed at various locations along Tuen Mun Road. They will relay live pictures to the New Territories Police Regional Command and Control Centre in Tai Po, and to the Transport Department's New Territories Area Traffic Control Centre in Tsuen Wan.

Works under this phase started in July last year and were completed recently.

The second phase of the system will involve the addition of 11 cameras to provide better and full coverage of Tuen Mun Road.

Work is already underway and the full system is expected to be operational in July this year.

The system will enable the Police and the Transport Department to monitor the traffic conditions from their central control centres, and at times of traffic congestion or incidents, take necessary actions quickly.

End/Wednesday, April 19, 1995

More time for submission of views on the implementation of Covenant * * * * *

The period for the submission of views on the state of the implementation of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR) in Hong Kong will be extended to allow interested parties more time to prepare their submissions.

The Legislative Council, non-government organisations (NGOs) and other interested parties will now have until May 15 to express their views before the Administration prepare and submit its draft report to the United Kingdom Government.

- 5 -

A government spokesman said today (Wednesday): "We understand the Legislative Council is planning to hold special meetings to receive representations from NGOs before formulating their submission to the Administration.

"We attach great importance to LegCo and NGOs' views. To enable us to consider their views before we prepare and submit our draft report to the UK, we have decided to extend the deadline for submission of views to May 15, 1995."

The United Kingdom Government intends to submit its Fourth Periodic Report under the ICCPR in respect of Dependent Territories to the United Nations in summer this year. The report will cover development up to December 31, 1994.

The Hong Kong Government will contribute to the report by preparing a draft submission to the UK on the state of the implementation of the Covenant in Hong Kong.

"To enable the Administration to take into account views during the drafting of the report, and also to meet the deadline of submission set for this summer, further extension beyond May 15 will not be possible," the spokesman said.

To facilitate comments, the Administration has prepared an outline of topics which it intends to include in the draft report.

NGOs or individuals who would like to express their views can write to the Secretary for Home Affairs before 15 May 1995. Copies of the outline of the draft report can be obtained from the Home Affairs Branch, 31st floor, South Centre, Wan Chai, on request.

End/Wednesday, April 19, 1995

- 6 -

Police duties related fees to be revised *****

Fees for the issue and renewal of temporary liquor licence and massage establishment licence will be revised from May 25 this year, a Government spokesman announced today (Wednesday).

In addition, fees related to licences issued and storage services provided under the Firearms and Ammunition Ordinance will be adjusted on the same day.

Details of the revised fees are set out in the Dutiable Commodities (Amendment) Regulation 1995, Firearms and Ammunition (Amendment) Regulation 1995, Firearms and Ammunition (Storage Fees)(Amendment) Order 1995 and Massage Establishments (Amendment) Regulation 1995 to be gazetted on Friday (April 21).

The spokesman said the revised fees were set at levels sufficient to recover the full costs of providing the services.

End/Wednesday, April 19, 1995

52 fined for breaching anti-pollution law *****

A total of 52 convictions were recorded in the courts last month for breaching anti-pollution legislation enforced by the Environmental Protection Department.

Among them, 18 were made under the Air Pollution Control Ordinance, 16 under the Noise Control Ordinance, 15 under the Water Pollution Control Ordinance, two under the Ozone Layer Protection Ordinance and one under the Waste Disposal (Livestock Waste) Regulations.

The fines ranged from $2,000 to $100,000. Topwide Engineering Limited was fined $100,000 upon its second conviction for permitting the use of power mechanical equipment for construction work without a permit.

7

The company had earlier committed a similar offence and was fined $75,000 - the highest fine imposed on a first conviction since the Noise Control Ordinance came into force in November 1989.

Attention News Editors :

Enquiries on specific cases can be directed to the following officers

Cases Officers Tel

Cases 1 - 5 19 38-40 Ms Mable Mak 2516 1800

Cases 6-13 20-26 41 -43 Mr Dick Rootham 2755 2200

Cases 14-17 27-29 44-46 Mr Fung Sang 2411 9601

Cases 18 30 47-51 • Mr Perry Lai 2417 6074

Cases 31-34 37 52 Mr Patrick Lei 2685 1133

Cases 35 - 36 Mr Raymond Leung 2594 6401

However, enquiries on general issues should be directed to the department's Media Relations Unit.

End/Wednesday, April 19, 1995

8

Advanced anti-drug course for teachers

*****

Secondary school teachers attending a new advanced drug education course organised by the Education Department will explore ways to help students say 'no’ to drugs by strengthening their assertiveness, self-esteem and self- confidence.

The two-day activity-oriented course, which will start tomorrow (Thursday), is part of the Government’s effort to step up anti-drug education as mentioned at the Governor’s anti-drug summit last month.

The course will be attended by 20 secondary school teachers, most of whom are responsible for handling drug education in their respective schools.

The course will stress that drug taking has an attraction for young people who lack an optimistic perception of the future or worthwhile opinion of themselves. On the other hand, people with a strong sense of identity and feeling of being in control of their lives are more likely to adopt health-enhancing behaviours.

Discussion on how to help students to view themselves as worthwhile and to give the classroom a non-threatening, non-judgmental atmosphere to foster acceptance of students will also be conducted.

Participants of the ’’Life Skills Training Course for Secondary School Teachers” will take a look at the decision- making process in respect of taking or resisting drugs, together with the values and feelings associated with different alternatives to drugs.

Also discussed will be the importance of self-esteem, assertiveness, self-confidence, interpersonal relationships and ability to tackle stress in beating drugs.

The course is jointly organised with the Community Drug Advisory Council. It is in addition to two courses for secondary school teachers in the package of anti-drug measures at the Governor’s anti-drug summit.

End/Wednesday, April 19, 1995

9

Harbour to feature first 21-Gun salute afloat

* * * * * JI , -t f

After a break of at least 40 years, the Royal Navy's annual series of 21-gun salutes are to be fired from a commissioned warship as it steams through the heart of Hong Kong harbour.

The first such salute will be fired on Friday (April 21) by HMS Starling to mark the official birthday of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II.

Hong Kong is an officially-designated saluting base and as such the Royal Navy maintains the ancient British tradition of firing a series of 21-gun salutes each year to mark a number of Royal anniversaries.

For at least the last 40 years the salutes have been fired by three historic saluting cannon dating from before World War I.

The guns were mounted initially shore-mounted on the waterfront of the original HMS Tamar, now the Prince of Wales Barracks in Central.

Since the move of the Royal Navy to Stonecutters Island in 1993 they have been fired from a site on the south shore of that island.

However the site was unsatisfactory since it was invisible to the public. In addition it has now been enveloped by preparatory work for the new naval base being built for the People's Liberation Army Navy.

New saluting cannon brought out from Britain have been installed, initially aboard HMS Starling, so that the salutes can be fired from a seagoing warship in the full view of much of the city.

The salute will begin at noon as HMS Starling passes between Tsim Sha Tsui and Central. The ship will be on a westerly heading through the main harbour channel.

10

Attention News Editors:

Your representatives are invited to cover the salute. A second vessel will be provided as a photographic platform. This photographic vessel will formate on HMS Starling as she fires the salute. The photographic vessel can provide a stable platform despite harbour conditions but photographers should be prepared for a distance from themselves to the saluting deck aboard HMS Starling of about 100 to 300 metres.

Reporters and photographers should arrive at the Main Gate, Prince of Wales Barracks, by not later than 10.45 am. The photographic vessel will sail at 11 am. Representatives may expect to disembark after the facility at about 12.30 pm.

End/Wednesday, April 19, 1995

37 VMs return home voluntarily *****

A group of 37 Vietnamese Migrants today (Wednesday) returned to Vietnam under the Voluntary Repatriation Programme of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees.

Comprising 15 men, eight women, nine boys and five girls, they were the 228th batch to go back under the programme.

The group brought to 714 the total number of Vietnamese Migrants who had returned voluntarily this year, and to 44,908 the total number of returnees since the programme started in March 1989.

End/Wednesday, April 19, 1995

11

Fresh water cut in Sham Shui Po

*****

Fresh water supply to some premises in Sham Shui Po will be temporarily suspended from 11 pm on Friday (April 21) to 6 am the following day to facilitate water mains leakage detection.

• ' A

The suspension will affect all the premises at Fuk Wing Streeit, Cheung Sha Wan Road, Kweilin Street, Nam Cheong Street and Pei Ho Street.

End/Wednesday, April 19, 1995

Hong Kong Monetary Authority money market operations *****

Cumulative

Time change

$ million (hours) (Smillion)

Opening balance in the account 3,275 0930 -331

Closing balance in the account 2,554 1000 -331

Change attributable to : 1100 -492

Money market activity -491 1200 -490

LAF today -230 1500 -490

1600 -491

LAF rate 4.25% bid/6.25% offer TWI 117.7 *-0.3* 19.4.95

12

» A

Hong Kong Monetary Authority

‘J5r ii- ..k.. .•

EF bills EF notes/Hong Kong Government bonds

Terms 4. • Yield Term Issue Coupon V- Price Yield

1 week 5.19 13 months 2605 6.35 100.49 5.95

1 month 5.18 22 months 2702 7.50 102.02 6.41

3 months 5.39 27 months 3707 6.95 100.89 6.62

6 months 5.58 33 months 3801 8.00 103.10 6.86

12 months 5.92 59 months 5003 7.75 101.73 7.46

Total turnover of bills and bonds - $19,085 million

Closed April 19, 1995

End/Wednesday, April 19, 1995

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

ISSUED BY GOVERNMENT INFORMATION SERVICES BEACONSFIELD HOUSE, HONG KONG. TEL: 842 8777

SUPPLEMENT

Wednesday, April 19,1995

Contents Page No,

Legislative Council meeting:

No extension to the operating hours of the airport................. 1

Motion debate on aircraft movements at airport..................... 2

Review of the planning for North West New Territories.............. 8

Motion debate on Sewage Services (Sewage Charge) Regulation.......... 12

Bills seeking to provide greater protection for vulnerable witnesses. 14

Criminal Procedure (Amendment) Bill 1995 ......................... 17

Evidence (Amendment) Bill 1995 ................................... 20

Personal Data (Privacy) Bill...................................... 21

Companies (Amendment) Bill 1995 .................................. 23

Second reading of Occupational Deafness (Compensation) Bill 1995 . 25

Rating (Amendment) Bill 1994...................................... 25

/’’Hung Lau”..

Contents

Page No.

’’Hung Lau" recommended as a monument................................... 27

Franchised bus drivers.................................................. 28

Local branch of Chinese Communist Party not registered.................. 30

Importation of labour scheme............................................ 31

Cigarette smuggling..................................................... 32

Directional signs on expressways........................................ 33

Student exchange scheme to improve oral English skills.................. 34

Practice of handcuffing suspects........................................ 35

Number of housing units produced........................................ 36

Engineering graduates joining the Government............................ 38

Expenses on Code on Access to Information............................... 40

Smoking areas in schools................................................ 42

Education for the blind and mentally handicapped......................   43

Model Scale I civil servants............................................ 44

Five-day working week................................................... 46

Finding of anti-collision equipment to vehicles......................... 47

Pedestrian passageway obstruction....................................... 49

Foreign domestic workers undertaking non-domestic work.................. 50

Land allocated rent free for container truck operators.............. 51

Delays in completion of HOS estates..................................... 53

1

No extension to the operating hours of the airport *****

The Administration has decided not to pursue the proposal for an one hour extension to the operating hours of the Kai Tak airport suggested in the consultation document on maximising Kai Tak capacity in the light of the strong body of public opinion against the proposal, and, in particular, the concerns expressed about the possible impact on the health of residents, the acting Secretary for Economic Services, Mrs Elizabeth Bosher, said today (Wednesday).

In other words, the existing curfew on landings and take-offs between midnight and 6.30 am will be maintained.

Replying at the Legislative Council meeting to the motion on ’’Aircraft movements at Kai Tak Airport”, Mrs Bosher said on the other hand, the Administration had not yet reached any final decisions on whether to implement some increase in the number of landings and take-offs in the hours of 6.30 to 7 am and 9 to 11.30 pm.

She said: ”We believe that before final decisions on this issue are taken, further work should be carried out to see whether there are ways of reducing still further the disturbance to residents - not just from possible additional flights, but also from existing aircraft movements.

Mrs Bosher said steps had already been taken to reduce noise disturbance caused by existing flights. The Director of Civil Aviation already monitors strictly the time-keeping of late evening movements and takes action, when necessary, with the airlines concerned.

Further measures will now be examined in greater details.

These measures will include a more detailed assessment of the degree of noise nuisance to the residents in particular areas; the possible installation of more sophisticated noise monitoring equipment, to help ensure that aircraft operate in accordance with the relevant noise abatement procedures; and the establishment of more effective procedures for the recording and investigation of complaints from the public about aircraft noise.

"Once we have completed examination of these issues, the next step will be for the Administration to seek the advice of the Advisory Council on the Environment (ACE) on the impact of the possible introduction of additional flights between 6.30 am to 7 am and between 9 - 11.30 pm," she said.

2

"Until this step has been taken, no additional flights will be programmed during these hours.

Mrs Bosher said contrary to the assertions of some members who had spoken in support of the motion this afternoon, the discussion was not about whether economic considerations should prevail over environmental concerns.

"It is a question of finding the right point of balance between the two. It is also, in my view, quite wrong to depict the issue as one of big business interests versus the rights of the ordinary man in the street.

"There is no one in this community who does not benefit, in some way, from the fact that Hong Kong is home to one of the most efficient and well-managed airports in the world.

"It is for this reason that the Government has continued to invest in the physical expansion of Kai Tak, to invest in new state-of-the-art navigational and meteorological equipment and in the training of competent airport management and air traffic control staff in order to ensure that the airport functions at maximum efficiency."

End/Wednesday, April 19, 1995

Motion debate on aircraft movements at airport ♦ ♦ * ♦ ♦

Following is the speech by the acting Secretary for Economic Services, Mrs Elizabeth Bosher, in the Legislative Council motion debate on aircraft movements at Kai Tak Airport today (Wednesday):

Mr President,

When the Administration launched a public consultation exercise on 19th December 1994 to assess public opinion on proposals to enhance the operating capacity of Kai Tak Airport, we knew the question we were putting to the community was not an easy one. I am not surprised, therefore, that this evening’s debate has produced strongly expressed views both for and against the motion.

A combination of history, sustained economic growth and the rapid pace of urban development in Hong Kong have combined to place the fourth busiest airport in the world - in terms of international passengers - and the second busiest - in terms of international freight handled - right in the heart of a densely populated city.

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Every day of the year, those living under, or in close proximity to the flight paths in and out of the airport suffer disturbance from aircraft noise, so it is small wonder that there are those in the community, and in this Council, who consider that it would be adding insult to injury to increase this level of nuisance in any way.

The good news, of course, is that all such disturbance will disappear for good on the opening of our new airport at Chek Lap Kok. Unfortunately, we cannot simply sit back and wait for our new airport to open. In the interests of the growth of our economy and maintaining Hong Kong's position as one of Asia's leading financial and commercial centres, we must do all we can to ensure Kai Tak keeps up with the increasing demands upon it.

This is why the Administration initiated public consultation, in December last year, on the possibility of:

(a) providing a total of 26 additional slots within the airport's existing operating hours in the periods between 6:30 to 7:00 a.m. and between 9:00 and 11:30 p.m.; and

(b) extending the airport's operating hours by one hour to provide 6 additional departure slots.

In the consultation paper the Administration set out clearly the problem which we face: namely that Kai Tak is now operating close to capacity and that, as a result, during the 1994/95 winter scheduling season, we were already having to turn away some 300 flights a week. Incidentally, we expect this figure will increase to over 400 per week later this year. We also explained that, although the Administration - and in particular the Civil Aviation Department - have done their best to increase the throughput of aircraft, and hence passengers, at the airport, during the hours of 7 a.m. -9 p.m., there is little more that can be done because virtually all the runway time slots for takeoffs and landings during these hours are either now occupied, or cannot be taken up because of scheduling difficulties at the other end.

The Administration will continue to do all we can to enhance the handling capability of Kai Tak:

by continuing to improve air traffic control systems in order to increase the number of aircraft movements that can be programmed each hour (an increase from 28 to 29 movements per hour was introduced on 30th October 1994 and a further increase to 30 movements per hour is planned);

by continuing to expand and improve the efficiency of the passenger terminal;

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by encouraging airlines to deploy larger aircraft; and

by encouraging airlines to make use of unused runway capacity in the early morning.

As a result of these efforts, we expect Kai Tak to be able to handle an additional 98 movements per week by the end of 1995. Unfortunately, this is still not enough and we will still be turning away over 300 flights per week or approximately 2.5 million passengers a year.

The proposals contained in the Administration's consultation paper would, if implemented in full, make available an additional 224 slots per week. They would also help to achieve a better utilisation of some early morning slots by enabling more planes to arrive in the late evening, stay overnight in Hong Kong and depart early the next day.

However, as the Administration has freely acknowledged, the proposals in the consultation paper would create a degree of additional noise disturbance to residents living near the airport in the early morning and late evening hours, when the number of aircraft movements has traditionally been restricted for noise mitigation reasons.

Mr President, contrary to the assertions of some honourable Members who have spoken in support of the motion this evening, this discussion is not about whether economic considerations should prevail over environmental concerns. It is a question of finding the right point of balance between the two. It is also, in my view, quite wrong to depict the issue as one of big business interests versus the rights of the ordinary man in the street.

There is no one in this community who does not benefit, in some way, from the fact that Hong Kong is home to one of the most efficient and well-managed airports in the world. It is for this reason that the Government has continued to invest in the physical expansion of Kai Tak to invest in new state-of-the-art navigational and meteorological equipment and in the training of competent airport management and air traffic control staff in order to ensure that the airport functions at maximum efficiency.

Kai Tak is our gateway to the world. In 1994, Hong Kong people made more than 7.1 million air trips - to visit friends and relatives overseas, to travel on business, to go on holiday. Each week, 63 airlines provide about 3,000 regular flights to some 100 destinations world-wide. We take for granted the ability to be able to go out and make air reservations to almost any comer of the world, in the time it takes to tap a few keys on a computer terminal. The ease and efficiency of our air links both within the region and to the rest of the world is one of the reasons why so many major companies choose to base themselves in Hong Kong.

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An efficient airport is also essential to our manufacturers and exporters of high value-added products. Their business depend on regular and reliable air links to meet delivery dates. In 1994, HK$448 billion worth of cargo was shipped into and out of Hong Kong by air.

Last but not least, the airport is fundamental to the success of our tourism industry. Of the 9.3 million visitors who came to Hong Kong last year, over 68% entered and left via the airport. While in Hong Kong they contributed to a total visitor spending of HK$64 billion on accommodation, shopping, dining and entertainment -contributing some 7% to our Gross Domestic Product. Let's not forget that this expenditure creates jobs for the over 200,000 people in our community - whom it is estimated, are employed in tourism related employment in shops, restaurants, hotels, places of entertainment and transportation.

If Kai Tak cannot continue to grow to cope with increasing demand in the last few years of its life then the whole community will pay an economic price. For example, as a number of members this afternoon have already said

we will forego HK$4.3 billion a year in income from spending by additional overseas visitors;

businesses and industries associated with airport operations such as freight forwarders and shippers will face constraints in growth and increased difficulties in meeting consignment delivery dates;

flights which cannot be accommodated at Kai Tak may increasingly divert to other neighbouring airports - business which may not come back to Hong Kong even when our new airport is open; to this extent, I cannot agree with Dr Huang's assessment;

the development of new or expanded air links with our aviation partners might also be held back.

Having said all this, Mr President, the Administration has no intention of riding roughshod over the views of those Hong Kong residents who have to bear the burden of aircraft noise on a day-to-day basis. It is for this reason that we have already taken steps to reduce the noise disturbance caused by existing flights :

by no longer permitting airlines to schedule their arrivals after 10:30 p.m. - this is a measure of particular benefit to the residents of North Kowloon;

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by requiring all aircraft programmed to operate after 9 p.m. to comply with the most stringent noise abatement standards laid down by the International Civil Aviation Organisation - and some 97% of aircraft operating in and out of Kai Tak already meet these standards; and

by making mandatory on airlines, with effect from November last year, the adoption of ICAO approved noise abatement procedures on take-off.

At the same time, Mr President, we are openly and sincerely soliciting the views of the public before deciding whether to implement measures which may add to that burden, as I spoke of earlier.

I would now like to turn to the outcome of the public consultation exercise. As of today, we have received over 100 responses including 8 from District Boards and 73 from groups , and organisations. Some 54 % of these responses are supportive of the proposals in the Administration's consultation paper, with representations from the business sector - which includes trade organisations, chambers of commerce and travel and tourism-related companies - unanimous in their support for measures which they consider will stimulate business and bring substantial direct and indirect economic benefits to the whole community.

31% of the responses, including those from three District Boards; residents groups; , and a number of non- business organisations are opposed to any increase in the number of flights programmed. A further 12% of responses are opposed to the proposed 1 hour extension of airport operating hours, but do not rule out some increase in capacity during existing operating hours.

Mr President, in the light of the strong body of public opinion against the proposal, and, in particular, the concerns expressed about the possible impact on the health of residents, the Administration has decided not to proceed with implementation of the 1 hour extension to the operating hours of the airport suggested in the consultation document. In other words, the existing curfew on landings and take-offs between mid-night and 6:30 a.m. will be maintained.

On the other hand, the Administration has. not yet reached any final decisions on whether to implement some increase in the number of landings and take-offs in the hours of 6:30 to 7 a.m. and 9 to 11:30 p.m. We believe that before final decisions on this issue are taken, further work should be carried out to see whether there are ways of reducing still further the disturbance to residents - not just from possible additional flights, but also from existing aircraft movements.

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I have already outlined, earlier in this speech, the measures which have already been introduced to reduce noise nuisance. The Director of Civil Aviation already monitors strictly the time-keeping of late evening movements and takes action, when necessary, with the airlines concerned. The further measures which will now be examined in greater detail will include :

a more detailed assessment of the degree of noise nuisance to residents in particular areas;

the possible installation of more sophisticated noise monitoring equipment, to help ensure that aircraft operate in accordance with the relevant noise abatement procedures; and

the establishment of more effective procedures for the recording and investigation of complaints from the public about aircraft noise.

In answer, Mr President, to a point raised by Dr Huang and Mr Peter Wong, we have also looked into the possibility of how much it would cost to provide double-glazing and air-conditioning to residents which are most affected by aircraft noise. Apart from the cost which would be very considerable, we have estimated that it would probably take between three to five years to complete work of this sort which I think therefore rules it out as possible mitigation measures.

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Once we have completed examination of these issues, the next step will be for the Administration to seek the advice of the Advisory Council on the Environment (ACE) on the impact of the possible introduction of additional flights between 6:30 a.m. to 7:00 a.m. and between 9:00 - 11:30 p.m. Until this step has been taken, no additional flights will be programmed during these hours.

Mr President, I would respectfully suggest that, until the Administration has had an opportunity to complete its evaluation of the public response to our consultation exercise and has undertaken the further studies which I have just outlined, it would be premature for members of this Council to rule out entirely the proposals contained in the consultation paper. Official members of the Council will be voting against the Honourable Martin Lee's motion and I would ask other members to do the same.

End/Wednesday, April 19, 1995

8

Review of the planning for North West New Territories

Following is the speech by the acting Secretary for Planning, Environment and Lands, Mr Canice Mak, in the Legislative Council motion debate on review of the planning for North West New Territories today (Wednesday):

President,

- • ■ . i .. ;.<•

I welcome this debate because it gives me an opportunity to set out the Government's position on planning in the Northwest New Territories. In particular, I welcome the positive spirit behind the motion which is by and large consistent with the Government's strategic planning intentions for the Northwest New Territories. I will deal with the motion under four headings. First, I will present the Government's planning for the Northwest New Territories, highlighting the relationship between the territory-wide planning, the problems and the potential for the future. Second, I will describe the Government's infrastructure plans for the Northwest New Territories, particularly in respect of transport infrastructure and port development. Thirdly, I will deal with land use in the area, focusing on the characteristics, constraints and possibilities. Fourthly, I will update Members on the latest developments in cross-border infrastructure co-ordination by referring to the work of the Infrastructure Coordinating Committee.

Northwest New Territories planning

The Government's strategic planning intentions for the Northwest New Territories are four-fold. First, to take advantage of the vast amount of flat land in the area, particularly in Tin Shui Wai. The Northwest New Territories will provide a strategic growth area to accommodate part of the anticipated increase in population. Secondly, lying between Hong Kong's Central Business District, the port and the airport and the Pearl River Delta, the Northwest New Territories is strategically located to serve as a transport node for cross-border traffic. Thirdly, taking advantage of this location factor, the Northwest New Territories is also a good service centre for the container trade and China- related business activities. Fourthly, the Northwest New Territories is highly significant in terms of natural conservation, country parks and recreation. The Mai Po Marshes and wetland are internationally important wildlife habitat and nature conservation areas. There are beautiful Country Park areas, attractive enclosed valleys and scenic coastal areas. These are important areas to satisfy the growing demand for an improved living environment and an alternative lifestyle.

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Infrastructure

Recognising the strategic location of the Northwest New Territories in the context of cross-border transportation links, the Government has firm plans to provide new road and rail systems which would facilitate the passage and access of passengers and freight between Hong Kong and China. These projects will also improve the transportation between the Northwest New Territories and the Metro area.

The dual 3 lane Route 3 (Country Park Section) is due to open in mid 1998. It will greatly reduce the journey time from the Northwest New Territories to the urban area and will improve transportation links between the border and the container port. In the meantime, we will relieve traffic congestion on the Tuen Mun Highway by constructing additional climbing lanes in the most congested uphill sections by July 1996. There are other plans to facilitate cross-border traffic, including for example improvements to the Lok Ma Chau border crossing point by adding 10 extra channels by early 1998, providing an extra lane in the Tolo Highway from Sha Tin to Tai Po for completion also by 2001, constructing Route 16 from Sha Tin to Cheung Sha Wan by 2001, and building a new link from the New Territories Circular Road to the Man Kam To border crossing.

Following the announcement of the Railway Development Strategy in December last year, the Kowloon-Canton Railway Corporation has been invited to submit proposals for building a new Western Corridor Railway from the border to West Kowloon, with a spur line to Tuen Mun north. This new railway will allow the transportation of freight containers direct from the border into the container port, thus relieving the New Territories road system. It will also greatly enhance cross-border passenger travel and will provide a commuter service to carry Northwest New Territories residents to the urban area. Completion of the railway will enhance the land development potential in the area, and will relieve pressure on external road links.

To cope with the rapidly increasing volume of cargo traffic between the Pearl River Delta and the port of Hong Kong, shippers are also seeking alternative means to transport containers to and from China. They are increasingly looking to the Pearl River. This is reflected in the dramatic increase in containerisation of river cargoes in recent years. Tuen Mun in the Northwest New Territories provides an ideal location for a river trade terminal handling cargo to and from Pearl River Delta ports. By using Tuen Mun, river vessels will be able to avoid the busy Ma Wan Channel and will also operate away from the ocean-going vessels using Kwai Chung and the New Lantau Port. The Government will invite tenders for the building and operation of the river trade terminal later this year. The first phase of the terminal is expected to begin operation by late 1998.

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To address the flooding problem in NT, the Government has carried out the Territorial Land Drainage and Flood Control Strategy Study which has produced a Basin Management Plan for each major drainage basin. The Plan provides the Government with a rational framework for managing the drainage systems in each basin, and for implementing structural and non-structural flood loss mitigation measures. In the Northwest New Territories a series of river training projects to alleviate flooding and a number of village flood protection schemes are being implemented at a total cost of some $3.1 billion. In addition, we are carrying out a river regulation project of the Shenzhen River in co-operation with the Shenzhen .p/ authorities.

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Land-Uss

Turning now to land use. I have to mention the very serious problem of uncontrolled use of rural land for open storage and container related activities. This , problem is prominent in the Northwest New Territories where large areas of flat land are readily available, particularly in strategic locations near the border. Another problem is flooding which I have mentioned. Until such time as the flooding problem is contained, land use in the rural area is subject to this constraint. Another constraint . is the lack pf sewers outside new towns. Again this puts a limit on the level of development. I have also mentioned the importance of conservation areas such as Mai Po and the,Country Parks, which also limit the potential for development. Indeed, the Government has decided to designate Mai Po as a wetland of international importance under the Ramsar Convention. Apart from these factors, land use in Yuen Long in particular is further constrained by the fact that the Kam Tin Valley and Yuen Long South are topographically enclosed, resulting in poor air dispersion.

Taking these characteristics and constraints into account, what then are the possibilities for co-ordinated land use planning for the Northwest New Territories? The Government's plan is for high density development in new towns, medium density in areas around transport nodes, and low density in other areas. Land in strategic locations will have to be used for transport and other infrastructure. Suitable sites will be identified , fpr .container storage and container lorry parking. Conservation areas like Mai Po and, Country Parks will be maintained. Outdoor recreation sites on the outer edges of the rural-urban fringe will be developed in due course.

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Cross-border Infrastructure Co-ordination

■ c ■ ■'* ■ .. ' • <.■_ f

The motion has rightly highlighted the rapid economic development in China and Hong Kong and the need to improve the transportation links between the two places. I would like to take this opportunity to update Members on the work of Infrastructure Co-ordinating Committee (ICC) which is tasked with improving the coordination between Hong Kong and the Mainland in respect of major infrastructure projects straddling the border.

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The ICC has made a very good start. Both sides have taken this valuable opportunity to seek new contacts and good working relationships with each other. Channels of communication and foundations for co-operation and co- ordination have been firmly established. Both sides recognise that there is much to be done. In particular, Hong Kong needs to consider the complementary provision of infrastructure within the territory to help facilitate development in the Pearl River Delta. The Pearl River Delta itself will probably need to focus on the co-ordination of its own infrastructure development and how the various projects should be coordinated with Hong Kong. In this connection, the ICC and its four panels would provide a valuable platform for a regular exchange of views. With the good will and professionalism which have characterised the early stages of the Committee's work, I am sure that the ICC will continue to be a successful feature of the close relationship between Hong Kong and China.

Concluding Remarks

Mr President, I have set out the Government's position on planning, infrastructure development and land use in the New Territories. I have outlined the Government's strategic planning intentions for the Northwest New Territories. I have highlighted the problems to be overcome as well as the characteristics, constraints, and possibilities for future development. The Government's plans recognise the strategic location of the Northwest New Territories in terms of cross- border economic relationships in the provision of transport infrastructure, new port development and land for container back-up activities. However, these plans have to take into account ownership pattern, flooding and the lack of basic infrastructure in the rural areas outside new towns. 1 have emphasised the need to preserve conservation areas and country parks.

The Government will keep under review the planning tools such as the Territorial Development Strategy and the Northwest New Territories Development Statements Study and will do all it can to make sure that the infrastructure planned for the area will be completed on time. I would like to point out, however, that in so doing the Government has a duty to strike a balance between the development of Northwest New Territories and other areas in Hong Kong. With these remarks and in line with the positive spirit behind the motion, the ex-officio Members will support the motion.

Thank you. Mr President.

End/Wednesday, April 19, 1995

12

Motion debate on Sewage Services (Sewage Charge) Regulation ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

Following is the speech by the acting Secretary for Planning, Environment and Lands, Mr Canice Mak, in the Legislative Council motion debate on Sewage Services (Sewage Charge) Regulation today (Wednesday):

Mr President,

1 would like to start with a brief statement on the history of this legislation.

As Members will recall, the Administration has for several years been advising this Council - and the community at large - of the need to apply the Polluter Pays Principle and to introduce this principle to sewage charges. Most modem communities pay such charges and the time has now come for Hong Kong to pay them too.

Consequently, the Administration held very detailed discussions with Members of the Bills Committee to study the Sewage Services Bill, the enabling Bill for the Sewage Charge Regulation, which was introduced into this Council on 6 July 1994. The outcome of these discussions was agreement on a simpler charging scheme for the majority users of sewage services so as to keep the effect of charges on domestic users as low as reasonably possible. That is to say, after six meetings of the Bills Committee, we agreed with Members to amend the Bill in order to simplify the tariff structure by deleting the fixed charges - which would have varied with meter size and user category - and by calculating the sewage charges for all consumers based on a simple uniform volumetric charge only. Subsequently, the Sewage Services Ordinance was passed in this Council on 14 December 1994.

The revised scheme therefore proposes a uniform rate of $1.2 per cubic metre of water supplied for all service users. This revision further reduced what was already a modest and affordable charge to households. Consequently, the draft Regulation setting out the revised scheme was considered by the Sewage Services Bills Committee at its meeting on 22 November 1994 and was accepted by the majority of the Bills Committee Members. As I have noted, the Ordinance was then duly passed in December last year.

After the passage of the Ordinance, the subsidiary legislation were approved by the Executive Council in February 1995 and tabled in this Council on 1 March 1995. A Sub- committee was formed to consider the charging regulations and. during its four meetings, considered the effect of the Sewage Services (Sewage Charge) Regulation on heavy water users, especially the bleachers and dyers.

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After discussions, the Administration agreed to amend section 2(2) of the Sewage Charge Regulation, to reduce the discharge factor from 80% to 70%, to reflect the added financial burden on some heavy water users because of the simplification of the charging scheme. This will also help address the concern of heavy water users that sewage charges may significantly increase the operating costs of their businesses. The amendment regulation was subsequently approved by the Executive Council on 11 April 1995 and gazetted on 13 April 1995.

As I have said, Mr President, the sewage charging scheme in its present form is based on volumetric consumption. The logic of the scheme is that polluters should pay. In other words, the less water one uses, the less one pollutes the environment, the less one uses sewage services, and the less one has to pay. As a result, under the revised charging scheme, the first 12 cubic metres of water for households will be exempted from charges, 16% of domestic account holders will in fact pay nothing, 50% will pay less than $8 a month, and 85% will pay less than $18 a month. I think this is far from the straw that breaks the camel’s back. This is a very modest charging scheme by any measure and is acceptable to a large majority of the community, an acceptance clearly retlected in a public opinion survey in November 1994. The survey found that an overwhelming majority of the 500 respondents (about 85%) supported the polluter pays principle. The majority also expressed a willingness to pay sewage charges of up to $30 a month, a sum which is substantially more, indeed nearly double, what 85% of households will have to pay.

It is therefore surprising that it is now proposed to further reduce charges for households alone. This proposal breaches the Polluter Pays Principle - which this Council has in the past soundly endorsed. It also ignores the fact that households as a whole contribute to about 60% of the organic pollution in Hong Kong, and that as they too contribute to pollution, they too should contribute to its solution. It ignores too the fact that we agreed with the Bills Committee to simplify the charging scheme to further reduce sewage charges for households.

But the amendment proposed is unacceptable for other reasons as well. Members will recall that, in March 1994, they approved the establishment of the Sewage Services Trading Fund under the Trading Funds Ordinance. This Ordinance requires the Trading Fund to fund itself through charges, a requirement accepted by Members during the thorough discussions on this Ordinance. The motion now proposed would result in an annual loss of some $100 million to the Trading Fund -clearly an unacceptable loss - and breach of a key objective of the Fund.

It has been suggested that recurrent subsidies could be credited to the Trading Fund by taxpayers. As was explained during the thorough discussions with Members on this Ordinance, such subsidies are outside the framework of the Sewage Services Trading Fund. Moreover, to meet the objectives of the Trading Fund, it would be necessary to recover the charges foregone by either increasing the charges on other service users, or increasing the charges significantly in subsequent years to make up for the shortfall, which would be clearly unacceptable.

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Last but not least, I would like to mention that according to the legal advice of the Attorney General's Chambers, the proposed amendment to the Regulation is ultra vires as mentioned by Members. Under section 12 of the Sewage Services Ordinance, which was passed in this Council on 14 December 1994, the Govemor-in-Council may make a regulation to prescribe 'the rate' to be used for sewage charges and, under section 3 of the Ordinance, a consumer shall pay to the Government ’a sewage charge at a prescribed rate', based on the volume of water supplied by the Water Authority. There is no provision under the Ordinance to allow the imposition of different sewage rates for different service users.

In concluding my remarks, Mr President, I invite this Council, once again, to accept that the time has come for the community to meet its responsibility and to support a sewage charging scheme which is modest and which is in line with the polluter pays principle. As I have said, most other modem cities pay these charges -now it is Hong Kong's turn.

The sewage charges we now propose are modest and affordable - less than twenty-five cents per day for an average household. These levels are, I am sure, acceptable to this Council and to the community as a whole.

Thank you. Mr President.

End/Wednesday, April 19, 1995

Bills seeking to provide greater protection for vulnerable witnesses *****

Two bills seeking to provide greater protection for vulnerable witnesses when giving evidence in criminal courts were introduced into the Legislative Council today (Wednesday).

Moving the second reading of the Criminal Procedure (Amendment) Bill 1995 today, the Attorney General, the Hon Jeremy Mathews, said vulnerable witnesses, including children, the mentally handicapped and those who feared for their safety if they gave evidence, might feel intimidated by the atmosphere of the court; upset by the presence of the offender and dismayed at having to give an account of the facts firstly to the police and secondly in court.

He said an additional problem was caused by the rule that a defendant could not be convicted on the unsworn evidence of a child, no matter how reliable it might be, in the absence of corroboration.

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These problems were addressed by way of the Criminal Procedure (Amendment) Bill 1995 and the Evidence (Amendment) Bill 1995, he said.

The amendments proposed by the two bills were based on the recommendations made by Committee on the Evidence of Children in Criminal Proceedings; the working party appointed by Chief Justice and chaired by Mr Justice Wong to study mentally handicapped people giving evidence in court and the Fight Crime Committee.

Mr Mathews said that the purpose of the Criminal Procedure (Amendment) Bill was to provide greater protection for vulnerable witnesses when giving evidence in criminal courts, by introducing four new procedures.

The first procedure, he said, would enable vulnerable witnesses, with the leave of the court, to give evidence at trial in a room separate from the court room through a live television link.

This would allay their anxiety arising from giving evidence in court and child victims, in particular, would be spared the trauma of being close to the alleged abuser again, he said.

Mr Mathews said: "Secondly, interviews with children and mentally handicapped witnesses can be conducted and video recorded in informal surroundings.

"The video recording can later be accepted as evidence in court. This will mean that the witness will not have to repeat the ordeal of describing the incident," he said.

"A third procedure will prevent child or mentally handicapped witnesses from being required to give evidence in court twice in relation to serious abuses - once at the committal proceedings and again at the trial.

"Committal proceedings will not be needed when the prosecution issues a "notice of transfer" certifying that the evidence is sufficient for the accused to be committed for trial," he said.

"In cases where it was unavoidable that a trial could be heard without delay, or where exposure to a full trial would endanger the physical or mental health of the child or mentally handicapped witness, a written deposition taken by a magistrate could be admissible as evidence without further proof," Mr Mathews said.

Mr Mathews also emphasised the introduction of the new procedures would not prejudice the accused's right to a fair trial.

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He said, for example, where a video recording was used as evidence, the witness had to appear in court so that cross-examination was possible.

He noted that the question of whether the maximum penalty for the offence of child abuse under the Offences Against the Person Ordinance should be increased was currently under urgent consideration by the Administration as a separate exercise.

Mr Mathews added that the problems surrounding vulnerable witnesses where being tackled vigorously on a number of fronts.

They included a comprehensive range of preventive and family support services to combat child abuse; professional assistance such as counselling before, during and after the trial by clinical psychologists or social workers provided for mentally handicapped witnesses; and the establishment of a central Witness Protection Unit within the Police Force to formulate, co-ordinate and implement witness protection measures.

Mr Mathews, when moving the second reading of the Evidence (Amendment) Bill 1995, said that the bill proposed a change to the law of evidence which was considered essential to ensure that justice might be done in cases involving child witnesses.

He said: ’’Under the existing law, children under seven years of age are not competent to give evidence, and unsworn evidence given by children under the age of 14 years must be corroborated by some other independent evidence before the accused may be convicted.”

He said that the bill abolished the two rules and provided that all children under the age of 14 years were able to give evidence unsworn.

He added: ”lf a child is able to give relevant and understandable evidence, the court or jury will evaluate that evidence, even in the absence of other corroborative evidence, and decide how much reliance to place upon it.”

”1 believe that these proposed amendments will, by abolishing unjustifiable technicalities, enable the courts to do justice in cases involving child witnesses,” said Mr Mathews.

Debate on the two bills was adjourned.

End/Wednesday, April 19, 1995

17

Criminal Procedure (Amendment) Bill 1995

***** .

Following is the speech by the Attorney General, the Hon Jeremy Mathews, in moving the second reading of the Criminal Procedure (Amendment) Bill 1995 in the Legislative Council today (Wednesday):

Mr President,

I move that the Criminal Procedure (Amendment) Bill 1995 be read a second time.

In the Policy Commitments I made last October, I told Honourable Members of this Council that one of the immediate issues I would address was a scheme to ensure that vulnerable witnesses in criminal cases can give their evidence without fear and without suffering emotional distress.

There are three classes of witnesses who are particularly vulnerable when giving evidence in criminal courts: children, those who are mentally handicapped and those who fear for their safety if they give evidence. These vulnerable witnesses may feel intimidated by the atmosphere of the court; upset by the presence of the offender and dismayed at having to give an account of the facts firstly to the police and secondly in court. An additional problem is caused by the rule that a defendant cannot be convicted on the unsworn evidence of a child, no matter how reliable it may be, in the absence of corroboration. Recently, serious concern has been expressed by the community, the courts, and Members of this Council about the law and procedure relating to vulnerable witnesses.

Mr President, these problems are being addressed by the Administration by way of two Bills: the Criminal Procedure (Amendment) Bill 1995, which I am now introducing, and the Evidence (Amendment) Bill 1995, which I will introduce later this afternoon. The amendments proposed in these two Bills spring from recommendations made by three committees.

In September 1993 I set up a Committee on the Evidence of Children in Criminal Proceedings chaired by Mr I G Cross, QC. It was clear to me then that reforms were needed in respect of child witnesses. The Committee recommended that procedures similar to those set out in the English Criminal Justice Acts of 1988 and 1991 should be adopted in Hong Kong in cases involving children who are witnesses of offences involving sexual abuse, physical abuse or cruelty.

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In March 1994, a working party appointed by the Chief Justice and chaired by Mr Justice Wong published a Report on Mentally Handicapped People Giving Evidence in Court. The working party also recommended the introduction of procedures, similar to those recommended by the Cross Committee, in order to allay the anxiety of mentally handicapped witnesses giving evidence in criminal proceeding.

As members of this Council are aware, the need for improved witness protection arrangements was considered by the Fight Crime Committee which made a number of recommendations in April 1993. Whilst many of the recommendations have been implemented administratively, a recommendation that a witness who is in fear should be able to testify by a live television link in a room separate from the courtroom requires legislation.

The two Bills 1 have referred to propose to introduce desirable changes in the law, but they are not the only measures being taken. The problems surrounding vulnerable witnesses are being tackled vigorously on a number of fronts. I would like to describe briefly the other measures which arc being taken to deal with child abuse, the mentally handicapped, and witnesses in fear.

Mr President, this Administration is committed to combating child abuse through a comprehensive range of preventive and family support services. We will spend around $1.1 billion on family and child welfare services in this financial year, an increase of almost 20% over last year.

The handling and treatment of child abuse cases require multi-disciplinary cooperation, and a comprehensive set of guidelines has been compiled for use by the professionals concerned. A task force was set up last month to examine procedures and to work out guidelines to improve the handling of child sexual abuse cases. The Child Protective Services Unit of the Social Welfare Department has been charged with the operational and coordinating role in handling child abuse cases. The unit will be strengthened by more workers in this financial year to improve its capacity to protect vulnerable children. To promote better understanding of child abuse among different professionals and to tackle the problem on a district basis, the Social Welfare Department will set up multi-disciplinary district committees on child abuse in five districts in this financial year. The department has also set up a Public Education Subcommittee on Child Abuse to coordinate publicity and public education programmes on the prevention of child abuse. The first stage of the programme was launched last month focusing on educating the general public on the early detection and reporting of child abuse cases. In order effectively to implement the proposed legislative changes in handling child abuse cases in court, intensive training courses will be conducted for the various types of professionals concerned, to better equip them in this specialized area of work.

19

Turning now to mentally handicapped witnesses, these witnesses will continue to receive professional assistance as appropriate. This includes counselling before, during and after the trial by clinical psychologists or social workers. Support will also be provided to carers and family members of mentally handicapped witnesses throughout the process.

The protection of witnesses in fear is now the responsibility of a central Witness Protection Unit which has been set up within the Police Force to formulate, coordinate and implement witness protection measures. The unit comprises a headquarters element, an operational support group and a cadre of operational staff on reserve.

The purpose of the Criminal Procedure (Amendment) Bill is to provide greater protection for vulnerable witnesses when giving evidence in criminal courts, by introducing four new procedures. First, vulnerable witnesses will, with the leave of the court, be able to give evidence at trial in a room separate from the court room through a live television link. This will allay their anxiety arising from giving evidence in court and child victims, in particular, will be spared the trauma of being close to the alleged abuser again. Secondly, interviews with children and mentally handicapped witnesses can be conducted and video recorded in informal surroundings. The video recording can later be accepted as evidence in court. This will mean that the witness will not have to repeat the ordeal of describing the incident.

A third procedure will prevent child or mentally handicapped witnesses from being required to give evidence in court twice in relation to serious abuses - once at the committal proceedings and again at the subsequent trial. Committal proceedings will not be needed when the prosecution issues a ’’notice of transfer” certifying that the evidence is sufficient for the accused to be committed for trial. In cases where it is unavoidable that a trial cannot be heard without delay, or exposure to a full trial would endanger the physical or mental health of the child or mentally handicapped witness, a written deposition taken by a magistrate will be admissible as evidence without further proof.

I should emphasise that the introduction of the new procedures will not prejudice the accused's right to a fair trial. For example, where a video recording is used as evidence, the witness must appear in court so that cross-examination is possible.

20

Mr President, another aspect of the law relating to children that has caused concern is the maximum penalty for the offence of child abuse under the Offences Against the Person Ordinance. The question of whether the penalty should be increased falls outside the ambit of the two Bills I am introducing today but is currently under urgent consideration by the Administration as a separate exercise.

I believe that the proposed amendments in this Bill will go a long way to assist vulnerable witnesses to give evidence free from intimidation and anxiety, thereby enhancing the proper administration of justice.

End/Wednesday. April 19, 1995

Evidence (Amendment) Bill 1995 *****

Following is the speech by the Attorney General, the Hon Jeremy Mathews, in moving the second reading of the Evidence (Amendment) Bill 1995 in the Legislative Council today (Wednesday):

Mr President,

1 move that the Evidence (Amendment) Bill 1995 be read a second time.

The Bill proposes a change to the law of evidence which is considered essential to ensure that justice may be done in cases involving child witnesses. A moment ago, when introducing the Criminal Procedure (Amendment) Bill 1995, 1 explained that a problem exists in respect of the evidence of children. Under the existing law, children under seven years of age are not competent to give evidence, and unsworn evidence given by children under the age of 14 years must be corroborated by some other independent evidence before the accused may be convicted. This rule has been recently described by one judge as a "child molester's charter". The Evidence (Amendment) Bill abolishes the two rules I have described and provides that all children under the age of 14 years are able to give evidence unsworn. If a child is able to give relevant and understandable evidence, the court or jury will evaluate that evidence, even in the absence of other corroborative evidence, and decide how much reliance to place upon it.

I believe that these proposed amendments will, by abolishing unjustifiable technicalities, enable the courts to do justice in cases involving child witnesses.

End/Wednesday. April 19. 1995

21

Personal Data (Privacy) Bill

*****

Following is the speech by the Secretary for Home Affairs, Mr Michael Suen, in moving the second reading of the Personal Data (Privacy) Bill in the Legislative Council today (Wednesday):

Mr President,

I move that the Personal Data (Privacy) Bill be read a second time.

The purpose of the Bill is to protect the privacy interests of individuals in relation to personal data. The Bill will also contribute to Hong Kong’s continued economic well being by safeguarding the free How of personal data to Hong Kong. This is because an increasing number of countries have data protection laws with provision to restrict the transfer of personal data to places without similar protection for personal data.

The Bill implements most of the recommendations of the Law Reform Commission in its report on reform of the law relating to the protection of personal data published in August 1994. That report was based on more than four years' work by the Law Reform Commission, including a thorough public consultation exercise in 1993.

In common with such legislation elsewhere, the Bill gives statutory effect to internationally accepted data protection principles. These are set out in Schedule 1. The data protection principles provide for: the fair collection of personal data; requirements that personal data be accurate and not kept for longer than necessary; limits on the use of personal data; security of personal data; openness by data users about the kinds of personal data they hold and purposes to which they are put; and for data subjects to have rights of access and correction with respect to their wrong personal data. Detailed provisions to enable individuals to obtain access to and to seek correction of their personal data held by data users in both the private and public sectors are contained in Part V of the Bill.

Part II of the Bill establishes an independent statutory body, the Privacy Commissioner for Personal Data, to promote and enforce compliance with the legislation. Schedule 2 of the Bill makes provision for financial matters with respect to the Privacy Commissioner. It also gives the Director of Audit the power to examine the economy, efficiency and effectiveness with which the Privacy Commissioner has expended his resources.

22

Part III of the Bill provides for the Privacy Commissioner to approve and issue codes of practice giving guidance on compliance with the Bill. Part IV provides for the Privacy Commissioner to specify classes of data users required to submit annual returns on the kinds of personal data they hold and purposes to which the data are put. The Privacy Commissioner is required to compile such returns in a register and to provide facilities for any person to have access to the register.

Part VI of the Bill subjects the automated comparison of personal data and the transfer of personal data to places outside Hong Kong to suitable control to protect the privacy interests of subject data. It also contains provision for individuals to require the erasure of personal data used for direct marketing purposes.

Part VII of the Bill makes provision for the Privacy Commissioner to inspect personal data systems and to investigate suspected breaches of the Bill’s requirements either on complaint from an individual or on the Privacy Commissioner’s own initiative. It also provides for the Privacy Commissioner to be able to enter premises for an inspection or investigation, to take evidence and make reports, and where necessary to issue enforcement notices. The Bill provides for appeals against certain decisions of the Privacy Commissioner to be dealt with by the Administrative Appeals Board.

Part VIII of the Bill contains exemption provisions. A broad exemption from the requirements of the Bill is provided for personal data held for domestic purposes, which include the management of personal affairs and recreational purposes. There are several exemptions from the subject access provisions in order to ensure continued efficient and effective human resources management. For example, in relation to staff planning and personal references. In addition, there is provision for a transitional exemption from the subject access provisions for employment-related personal data provided in confidence by third parties prior to the coming into effect of the Ordinance.

Part VIII of the Bill also provides for exemption from the subject access and use limitation provisions of the Bill where their application would be likely to prejudice a variety of specified public interest purposes. Such purposes include: security, defence and international relations in respect of Hong Kong, the prevention and detection ofcrime, the assessment or collection of taxes and financial regulation. In essence, these provisions seek to strike a balance between the individual’s right to privacy with respect to personal data and the public interests involved.

23

The Bill also seeks to strike a balance between privacy with respect to personal data and the right to gather and report news. Accordingly, in Part VIII there is an exemption from the subject access provision for personal data held for news gathering and reporting purposes prior to the publication or broadcasting of the data concerned. Provision is also made for an exemption from the use limitation provisions to allow personal data collected for other purposes to be passed on for publication where this is in the public interest. In addition, personal data held for the purposes related to news gathering and reporting are exempt from the Privacy Commissioner's power to inspect personal data systems and investigate suspected breaches of the Bill's requirements other than on complaint.

Part IX of the Bill provides for offences and compensation. The offences include non-compliance with an enforcement notice issued by the Privacy Commissioner, which carries a fine in the range of $25,001 to $50,000 and imprisonment for 2 years. Provision is made for an individual who suffers damage, including injury to feelings, as a result of a contravention of a requirement of the Bill to be entitled to compensation. This would be assessed by the court under normal civil proceedings. Provision is made for reasonable care by a user of personal data to be a defence in such proceedings.

Mr President, I move that the Second Reading debate for this Bill be now adjourned.

End/Wcdnesday, April 19. 1995

Companies (Amendment) Bill 1995

*****

Following is a speech by the Secretary lor Financial Services, Mr Michael Cartland, in moving the second reading of the Companies (Amendment) Bill 1995 in the Legislative Council today (Wednesday):

Mr President,

1 move the second reading of the Companies (Amendment) Bill 1995.

There are three main objectives in these proposed amendments to the Companies Ordinance. They first of all seek to introduce a new class of preferential payment for depositors in the event of the liquidation of a bank. Secondly they provide for the use of either Chinese or English under various provisions in the Ordinance; and thirdly they enable the use of certificates of incorporation with pre-printed signatures by the Companies Registry.

24

The new preferential class would enable eligible depositors of licensed banks to receive priority payment of up to $100,000 for their net deposits in the event of the liquidation of a bank. The new class should rank immediately after the existing classes for remuneration and other payments to employees and statutory debts. The proposal is intended to provide a measure of comfort for depositors, which would in turn contribute to the stability of the banking sector.

The proposal covers all depositors except persons and companies that are connected with the bank being liquidated, for example its directors and its subsidiary companies. Also excepted is the Hong Kong Monetary Authority as the bank regulator, which places deposits with banks in the name of the Exchange Fund. Certain banking institutions arc also excluded, such as licensed banks, restricted licensed banks, deposit-taking companies and multilateral development banks.

Where less than full dividend is paid to creditors, the new class will somewhat diminish dividends to very large creditors, excluded depositors and ordinary creditors. However, the proposal would contribute to a more speedy liquidation by reducing the number of creditors very considerably at an early stage of the winding up. Past research has shown that some 80% to 90% of deposit accounts of retail banks have a balance of $100,000 or below. Hence the notional loss of having to give up a certain percentage of dividend payment may be more than offset by the accelerated receipt of their money by the other creditors and the reduction in administrative costs of the liquidation.

Besides the introduction of the new preferential class, other aspects of the liquidation are not affected by the Bill and will continue to be governed by established liquidation law and practice.

The Bill also amends a number of provisions in the Ordinance to permit the use of either Chinese or English to file documents with the Companies Registry, thereby placing both languages on an equal footing. The proposal to use certificates of incorporation with preprinted signatures would allow the Registry’s resources to be used in a more cost effective and efficient manner.

Mr President, this is a package of useful amendments, necessary to increase confidence in the banking system and to facilitate access to the Companies Registry.

End/Wednesday, April 19. 1995

25

Second reading of Occupational Deafness (Compensation) Bill 1995 *****

Following is the speech by the Secretary for Education and Manpower, Mr Michael Leung, on the second reading debate on the Occupational Deafness (Compensation) Bill 1995 in the Legislative Council today (Wednesday):

Mr President,

I am grateful to Members for their support of this important Bill. I am sure Members will share with me the gratitude that we can finally at long last bring into operation a compensation scheme for our workers for occupational deafness which has been discussed for the last six years. 1 am sure members will agree with me also that whilst the scheme is not perfect, this is only the beginning of the improvements and I'll certainly promise to review the scheme after one year's operation. I would like to thank Mr Michael Ho and Members of the Bills Committee for their efforts in making a detailed examination of the Bill and for their very useful suggestions and views. Having considered the views and suggestions from the Bills Committee, I will be moving a number of amendments to the Bill at the Committee Stage later, and will explain these in more detail. Thank you, Mr President.

End/Wednesday, April 19, 1995

Rating (Amendment) Bill 1994 *****

Following is the speech by the Secretary for the Treasury, Mr K C Kwong, in the resumption of second reading debate on the Rating (Amendment) Bill 1994 in the Legislative Council today (Wednesday):

Mr President,

I thank the Hon Moses Cheng for the clear exposition of the purposes of the Bill, the discussion of the Bills Committee, and the administration’s views on the points raised by members of the Bills Committee.

The Bills Committee chaired by the Honourable Moses Cheng has offered valuable advice to us. We are grateful for the Committee's support for the proposed transfer of the Collector of Rates' functions to the Commissioner of Rating and Valuation. Subject to Members' approval, we are keen to implement the proposal as soon as possible so as to provide a one-stop service for ratepayers and to allow better use of the resources of the departments concerned.

We also welcome the Committee' backing >f the miscellaneous amendments to streamline the procedures for rates assessment, service of notices and rating appeals. The aim of these amendments is to improve efficiency and the quality of service to the public. In the light of the Committee's views, we agreed to reinstate the provision relating to the power to make regulations under the Rating Ordinance so that the power will remain with the Executive Council This Council will, of course, retain the right to scrutinise (and amend if appropriate) the regulations in the usual way. The Committee Stage Amendments which I shall move later this afternoon will give effect to the agreement.

There is, however, one area where the Administration and some Members of the Bills Committee have not been able to reach a consensus. That is the proposed abolition of half-refund of rates for vacant non-domestic properties. As the Hon Moses Cheng pointed out. we believe that rates are a general charge on properties to finance the costs of government and municipal council services. Both occupied and vacant buildings benefit from these services, such as fire protection and police cover. It is therefore reasonable for the owners of vacant properties to pay a fair share whether they are domestic or non-domestic properties

There have been suggestions that the proposal will hit our industry severely. With respect, 1 cannot agree Rates have an insignificant effect on the property market. Rates represent about 4% of rental value of non-domestic premises; so half rates amount to only about 2% of the rental value or 0.1% of the capital value. According to information available to us, the proposal will only affect very few industrial properties, in the third quarter of 1994. owners claim half refund for only 5% of total stock of industrial buildings subject to rates assessments. In 90% of these cases, the properties arc vacant pending sales or letting. These are commercial decisions and should not affect their duty to pay rates

For the reasons 1 have set out. 1 hope Members will support our proposal to abolish the half refund of rates on non-domestic properties. Mr President, I commend this Bill to the Council, subject to the amendments which I shall move shortly.

End/Wednesday. April 19. 1995

27

’’Hung Lau" recommended as a monument

*****

The following is a question by the Hon Man Sai-cheong and a reply by the Secretary’ for Recreation and Culture, Mr .lames So, in the Legislative Council today (Wednesday):

Question :

It is learnt that the Antiquities Advisory Board has agreed that a recommendation should be made to the Recreation and Culture Branch for declaring the "Hung Lau" building at the Castle Peak Farm in Tuen Mun as a monument. In this connection, will the Government inform this Council what specific follow-up actions it has taken, and what decision it has made, on the Board's recommendation?

Reply :

Mr President

I would first like to clarify that the AAB did not specifically recommend the declaration of Hung Lau itself as a monument. At its meeting on 28 February 1995, the Antiquities Advisory Board recommended for preservation as a monument the former Castle Peak Farm, within which boundaries Hung Lau stands.

The Administration now proposes to invite the Regional Council to establish and manage a public park on part of the site of the old Castle Peak Farm in keeping with the local surroundings and the history of the Farm for the benefit of the people of Hong Kong. We aim to include the Hung Lau building as a focal point within this park. A concrete proposal will be drawn up for the Regional Council's consideration in due course.

Since February 1995, the Antiquities and Monuments Office has taken various steps to follow-up on this matter. The AMO is consulting all interested branches and departments within government to ascertain the precise boundaries, ownership, occupation, use, zoning and any future plans for the various publicly and privately owned lots lying within the old Castle Peak Farm's boundaries. In addition, the owners of the various lots are now being contacted to obtain their views on the declaration. This process is rather complex and must be done thoroughly. It will therefore take some time to complete.

28

Preliminary discussions have also been held with the owner of the private lot on which Hung Lau stands. We have now obtained agreement in principle from the owner to surrender to Government the relevant part of this lot, including Hung Lau itself, subject to certain aspects, such as the handling of the existing tenants in Hung Lau, being satisfactorily resolved.

We hope to be able to resolve most of the key issues within the next 12 months or so to enable us to formally declare part of the former Castle Peak Farm in Tuen Mun as a monument.

End/Wednesday, April 19, 1995

Franchised bus drivers

*****

Following is a question by the Hon Miriam Lau and a written reply by the acting Secretary for Transport, Mr Rafael Hui, in the Legislative Council today (Wednesday):

Question:

Under the current system for the licensing of drivers, holders of driving licences for vehicles of classes 9 and 10 (Private Bus and Public Bus) are authorized to drive vehicles of classes 4 and 5 (Private Light Bus and Public Light Bus) without having to submit separate applications for the latter type of licence. However, holders of driving licences for vehicles of class 17 (Public Bus-Franchised) are required to pass a driving test before they are permitted to drive vehicles of classes 4 and 5. The Transport Department maintains that this system will help to ensure an adequate pool of drivers for franchised buses. In this connection, will the Government inform this Council:

(a) whether it is aware of any difficulties encountered by the franchised bus companies in the recruitment of bus drivers in the past three years; if so, what was the wastage of drivers of franchised buses during this period;

(b) whether the Transport Department is in possession of any information to show that the wastage rate in respect of franchised public bus drivers who are also holders of driving licences for vehicles of classes 4 and 5 is higher than that of those franchised public bus drivers without the latter type of licence;

29

(c) what are the differences in the driving standard requirements between a driving licence for vehicles of classes 9 and 10 (Private Bus and Public Bus) and a driving licence for vehicles of class 17 (Public Bus-Franchised);

(d) whether it will consider permitting holders of driving licences for vehicles of classes 17 to drive vehicles of classes 4 and 5 on the same basis as holders of driving licences for vehicles of classes 9 and 10?

Reply :

Mr President,

There has always been an overall shortage of franchised bus drivers. Over the past three years, 1700 bus drivers left franchised bus companies representing a wastage rate of about 8%. During the same period, franchised bus driver requirement increased at an annual rate of over 2% to meet the need arising from service improvements. Despite constant recruitment exercises conducted by franchised bus companies the driver requirement could not be fully met and on average there were over 150 vacancies during the 3-year period.

The Transport Department does not have any information to show that the wastage of franchised bus drivers who hold private and public light bus driving licences is higher. As 74% now working with franchised bus companies are licensed to drive franchised buses only, the comparison would not provide a meaningful indicator.

As far as driving tests are concerned, there is no difference between the standards required for driving private, public and franchised buses.

An ample and continuous supply of qualified bus drivers is essential for maintaining proper bus services. The primary concern of the Transport Department is that bus services provided to the travelling public arc adequate and reliable. A separate and distinct category of franchised bus driving licence is therefore necessary to safeguard the interest of the vast majority of the travelling public who use franchised bus services.

30

The franchised bus companies provide free and specialised training to new recruits and make arrangements for them to attend Transport Department's driving test. These arrangements constitute an important part of the obligations of the companies to ensure that there is a stable and secured pool of manpower. By providing free training, allowances and job opportunities to unqualified trainees, it is only reasonable to expect that resources devoted to these programmes are not wasted.

Any potential drain on the supply of franchised bus drivers therefore must be a matter of concern. Nevertheless, the Transport Department has indeed examined the possibility of direct issue of private and public light bus driving licences to holders of franchised bus driving licences. In principle, and subject to franchised bus services not being adversely affected, consideration may be given to relaxing the licensing conditions governing franchised buses when it is opportune to do so.

End/Wednesday, April 19, 1995

Local branch of Chinese Communist Party not registered

*****

Following is a question by the Hon Christine Loh and a reply by the Secretary for Constitutional Affairs, Mr Nicholas Ng, in the Legislative Council today (Wednesday):

Question:

Will the Government clarify the status under Hong Kong law of the local branch of the Chinese Communist Party, which is commonly stated to be under the leadership of a body called the I long Kong and Macau Work Committee, and state whether such an entity is registered under the Societies Ordinance or another law; if not, why not?

Answer:

No such entity is registered under any Hong Kong Ordinance. Nor has any such entity applied for registration, or notified the Societies Officer of the particulars required under the Societies Ordinance.

End/Wednesday, April 19, 1995

31

Importation of labour scheme ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

Following is a question by the Hon Lee Cheuk-yan and a reply by the Secretary for Education and Manpower, Mr Michael Leung, in the Legislative Council today (Wednesday):

Question :

With regard to the importation of labour scheme, will the Government inform this Council:

(a) of the current distribution of imported workers by job titles in each of the industrial and service sectors;

(b) whether the list of employers of imported workers will be disclosed; if not, why not; and

(c) whether the 500 health-care workers, which the Social Welfare Department has indicated that it plans to import for privately-operated homes for the aged, will come under the quota of the 25,000 workers to be imported?

Reply:

Mr President,

(a) The latest statistical breakdown of imported workers by sectors and by job titles are in the Annex tabled with this reply. Because this annex runs to 104 pages, members will appreciate that we can’t translate this in time. I hope to have it ready as soon as possible.

(b) The General Scheme has been operating smoothly over the years and with a high degree of transparency. The classification of industry groups, the quota allocation criteria and the allocation results by industry groups are already made public including of course to this Council. However, disclosure of information about individual employers of imported workers would involve disclosure of their own manpower planning policies and practices within the companies concerned which some companies may not wish to make public. Members will appreciate as the employers had not been notified of such an arrangement before they applied for the quota allocation, we cannot do this without their consent.

32

We will however consider the feasibility of disclosing the names of employers in the next allocation receive when we review the allocation operation in the coming few months.

(c) Importation of health-care workers arc allowed under the General Scheme and are subject to the same application procedures and quota allocation criteria and including the ceiling of 25,000 workers.

End/Wednesday, April 19, 1995

Cigarette smuggling

*****

Following is a question by the lion Chim Pui-chung and a reply by the Secretary for the Treasury, Mr K C Kwong, in the Legislative Council today (Wednesday):

Question :

With regard to the problem of cigarette smuggling, will the Government inform this Council of:

(a) the total number of smuggled cigarettes seized by the law enforcement departments, together with the loss in revenue, in the past three years;

(b) what effective measures does the Government have to eradicate cigarette smuggling activities?

Answer:

Mr President.

During the past three years, the Customs and Excise Department has seized a total of 249 million sticks of cigarettes with duty potential of$!44 million.

The Government tackles cigarette smuggling in three ways.

* first, by taking vigorous enforcement action both at the border control

points and at street level

33

* secondly, by encouraging the public to participate by operating an incentive scheme which rewards informers.

* thirdly, by close co-operation with neighbouring Customs bodies to share information and intelligence on both a regular and ad hoc basis.

End/Wednesday, April 19, 1995

Directional signs on expressways *****

Following is a question by the Hon Roger Luk Koon-hoo and a written reply by the acting Secretary for Transport, Mr Rafael Hui, in the Legislative Council today (Wednesday):

Question:

Will the Administration inform this Council whether there is any plan to introduce a system of identification numbers for the exits and entrances along the territory’s major expressways so as to reduce the chances of drivers losing their orientation?

Reply:

Mr President,

At present, directional signs are provided for all major roads in the territory. The format adopted for such signs is consistent with international practice in terms of their size, location, layout and the indication of destinations.

Directional signs on expressways show both route numbers and destinations. Once a destination has been indicated on a directional sign, it is retained on subsequent signs until the destination is reached. In addition, on major routes, these include exit markings for local destinations. For example, Route 1, which runs from Hong Kong Island to Lok Ma Chau, shows turn-offs for Ma On Shan, Tai Po North, Fanling and Sheung Shui.

Identification or junction numbers arc allocated to interchanges on motorways in the United Kingdom and in some other countries. These numbers appear on directional signs and in route maps. They arc useful as an aid to motorists and also, for example, in relation to public announcements about road closures and accident locations. With the expansion of the expressway system in Hong Kong, the Transport Department is looking into the desirability of including junction numbers on expressway directional signs.

End/Wednesday, April 19, 1995

34

Student exchange scheme to improve oral English skills ♦ * ♦ ♦ ♦

The following is a question by the Hon David Li and a written reply by the Secretary for Education and Manpower, Mr Michael Leung, in the Legislative Council today Wednesday):

Question :

The American Chamber of Commerce has launched an English conversation programme in a bid to increase the use of spoken English in the territory. This pilot programme will involve matching two English speaking volunteers with eight to ten participants to brush up their English skills through conversation about different topics and interests. Will the Government inform this Council whether consideration will be given to adopting a similar programme in primary and secondary schools in the territory through student exchanges among these schools so as to increase the use of spoken English in schools?

Reply:

Mr President,

The American Chamber of Commerce English conversation programme is designed to assist people at work. At the school level, there are a number of English speaking skills programmes organised for students, which can be considered as broadly comparable to the American project.

Since October 1993, the Education Department and the Radio Television Hong Kong (RTHK) have been running a programme "Teen Time” which provides opportunities for both local and expatriate students to practise English. Earlier this month the Education Department and RTHK have started another English radio programme "The Reading Ear" for local and expatriate students to discuss together literature, poetry, drama and films.

A number of local secondary schools also organise joint activities with English Schools Foundation schools and other international schools in Hong Kong.

With the support of the Language Fund, a number of new initiatives will be implemented in 1995-96. They include:

35

(a) a three-year joint project, between the Education Department and the Chinese University of Hong Kong, starting from July 1995. The project involves 12 English-speaking summer camps for 2200 junior secondary students from 90 secondary schools, with native-speaking senior form students as camp leaders; and

(b) a Chatteris Education Foundation programme to provide 16 local secondary schools with native-speaking English language teaching assistants over a period of 3 years.

End/Wednesday, April 19, 1995

Practice of handcuffing suspects *****

The following is a question by the I Ion Tam Yiu-chung and a written reply by the Security for Security, Mr Peter Lai, in the Legislative Council today (Wednesday):

Question:

Regarding the practice of handcuffing certain suspects and putting chains around their waists while they are under police escort, will the Government inform this Council whether it will consider changing such practice so as to avoid giving the public the impression of the Police abusing their power?

Reply:

Mr President,

Police General Orders specify that personal restraints such as handcuffs or handcuff transport belts may be used on prisoners/arrested persons:

(a) to ensure the safety and control of a person whom the police officer has reason to believe is likely to escape; and.

(b) to protect the Police officer or any other person, including the person to be restrained, from injury.

36

It is the duty of police officers to ensure that prisoners/arrested persons do not escape from lawful custody, and that they will not harm themselves or others whilst in custody. It should be borne in mind that the escape of a prisoner/arrested person would very likely result in disciplinary action against the officer responsible for the prisoner/arrested person.

The Police have issued strict guidelines governing the use of the wrist restraints. The use of handcuff transport belts must be authorised by the Duty Officer at a police station or an officer of the rank of Sergeant or above. These are normally used for prisoners/arrested persons with a tendency to become violent or to attempt escape and thus require a high degree of security. In so far as the use of handcuffs is concerned, a police officer is expected to exercise his professional judgement on whether this is necessary.

Any abuse of police powers in this respect may be subject of a complaint to the Complaints Against Police Office which will then be thoroughly investigated. Disciplinary action may result if abuse of police powers could be established.

The existing guidelines governing the use of wrist restraints are considered adequate. We will, however, keep the matter under review.

End/Wednesday, April 19. 1995

Number of housing units produced *****

Following is a question by the I Ion Frederick Fung Kin-kee and a written reply by the Secretary for Housing, Mr Dominic Wong, in the Legislative Council today (Wednesday):

Question:

The Housing Branch has indicated that 84,000 housing units will be produced each year from 1995-96 to 2000-01. In this connection, will the Government inform this Council of -

(a) the respective numbers of public rental housing units, Home Ownership Scheme (HOS) Hats, Private Sector Participation Scheme (PSPS) flats, Sandwich Class Housing (SCH) Hats and private housing units to be produced on newly developed land annually during the above-mentioned period;

31

(b) the respective numbers of public rental housing units, HOS flats, PSPS flats, SCH flats and private housing units to be produced in redeveloped areas annually during the above-mentioned period; and

(c) the respective numbers of public rental housing units and private housing units expected to be demolished annually during the above-mentioned period?

Answer

The Housing Branch has indicated that the target for the next six years is to provide 141,000 rental flats and 168,000 subsidised Hats for sale in the public sector, and to enable the production of 195,000 Hats in the private sector. This is equivalent to an average production of 84,000 new flats a year. Specific figures requested are given below.

(a) The estimated annual flat production from 1995-96 to 2000-01 on newly developed land is as follows -

Financial year ending Public'1’ Private2*

Rental 1 IOS'” PSPS'” sen'”

3/1996 8.400 8,800 4.300 1,000 11,800

3/1997 3.800 4.400 2.400 900 12,300

3/1998 14.300 11,800 13,400 8.500

3/1999 14,000 10,700 15,300 2,300 64.000

3/2000 14.200 16.800 12.600 5.400

3/2001 19,100 11,100 6.600 1,900

Total 73.800 63,600 54.600 20.000 88.100

(b) The estimated annual flat production from 1995-96 to 2000-01 on redevelopment sites is as follows -

Financial year ending Public'1’ Private12*

Rental IIOS'” PSPSy) sen'”

3/1996 6.800 4,300 0 0 14,400

3/1997 1 1.400 9.200 0 0 15,000

3/1998 9,500 1.500 0 0

. 3/1999 15.200 1,700 0 0 78.000

3/2000 13.800 5.800 0 0

3/2001 10.900 7,300 0 0

Total 67.600 29,800 0 0 107,400

38

(1) The figures in (a) and (b) above are subject to regular review in terms of exact timing and split between different public housing categories. This is particularly true of the later part of the period, i.e. financial years 1999-2000 and 2000-01, where the forecast split between rental and HOS/PSPS categories is tentative. All the figures may also be subject to refinement upon completion of a comprehensive assessment of housing demand later in 1995.

(2) All private housing figures are based on calendar year provisional estimates.

(3) HOS - Home Ownership Scheme

PSPS - Private Sector Participation Scheme

SCH - Sandwich Class Housing

(c) According to the Housing Authority’s latest Comprehensive Redevelopment Programme, the numbers of public rental housing units to be demolished each year from 1995-96 to 1998-99 are as foftows -

Financial year ending No. of units to be demolished

3/1996 15,363

3/1997 14,388

3/1998 7,756

3/1999 13,695

The corresponding figures for private housing are not available.

End/Wednesday, April 19, 1995

Engineering graduates joining the Government

*****

Following is a question by Dr the Hon Samuel Wong Ping- wai, and a written reply by the acting Secretary for the Civil Service, Mr Chris Jackson, in the Legislative Council today (Wednesday):

Question:

Will the Government inform this Council :

39

(a) of the respective number of graduate apprenticeships offered by the Government to engineering graduates from the local universities in the civil, structural, mechanical and electrical disciplines, in the past three years; and

(b) how many of such graduate apprentices were able to join the Government as engineers in the respective disciplines at the end of their training period?

Reply

Mr President,

My reply to the two questions is as follows : -

(a) Number of graduates from local universities offered engagement as Engineering Graduates in Works Group and Housing departments in

1992, 1993 and 1994 Discipline 1992 1993 1224

Civil 37 35 30

Geotechnical 1 1 3

Building Services 4 5 6

Electronic 3 1 2

Electrical 3 4 6

Mechanical 3 2 3

(b) Number of Engineering Graduates in (a) who joined the Government as Assistant Engineers through selection exercises

Discipline Normal Training

Period (Year) 1992 1221 1224

Civil 3 * # #

Geotechnical 3 # #

Building Services 2 3 * #

Electronic 2 1 *

Electrical 2 1 * #

Mechanical 2 3 * #

40

* The actual number of Engineering Graduates to be appointed as Assistant Engineers will depend on the number of vacancies and applications from these Engineering Graduates upon completion of their training in August/September 1995.

# Still under training.

End/Wednesday, April 19, 1995

Expenses on Code on Access to Information

*****

The following is a question by the Hon Christine Loh and a written reply by the Secretary for Home Affairs, Mr Michael Suen, in the Legislative Council today (Wednesday):

Question :

The Government has recently asserted that in order to implement my proposed Access to Information Bill, 24 new posts and an additional $21 million per annum are estimated to be required for the Office of the Commissioner for Administrative Complaints (COMAC). Will the Government inform this Council :

(a) how does the Government arrive at those figures; whether reference has been made to other jurisdictions and if so, how does the Government transpose any such examples into the Hong Kong context;

(b) what the specific responsibilities and remunerations of the different

posts are;

(c) whether the additional $21 million includes what the Government is planning to spend on the Code on Access to Information; if not, whether the additional amount is above and beyond what the Government will spend on the Code;

(d) whether the Government has consulted COMAC in arriving at these estimates; if so, what was the basis of COMAC’s estimates; if not, why not;

41

(e) what portion of the estimated resources will be allocated to the extension of COMAC's jurisdiction to include public bodies not already covered under the COMAC Ordinance;

(f) whether the estimated additional expenditure of $21 million includes any amount attributable to COMAC assuming the responsibility of making a binding determination?

Reply:

Mr President,

(a) In assessing the possible charging impact of the bill in so far as the review mechanism is concerned, because of the lack of a suitable precedent in Hong Kong we referred to a number of similar arrangements in other places. The estimate is essentially based on the staff costs incurred by the Ontario Information and Privacy Commissioner who has functions similar to those set out for COMAC under the bill, with adjustments for the difference in population size. (The population in Ontario is about 10 million.)

(b) We have assumed for the purposes of this estimate that complaints under the bill would be handled by a separate division headed by a D2 officer. Under him would be 3 investigation teams, each comprising a team leader at Chief Executive Officer (CEO) level and four investigators at Senior Executive Officer (SEO) level. These officers would be supported by 1 translator and 7 secretarial/ clerical staff. The breakdown of the annual staff cost of $18.8 million is as follows:

D2 2.0

3 CEOs 4.0

12 SEOs 10.7

1 Translator 0.6

7 secretarial/clerical staff 1,5

18.8

(The remaining $2.2 million would be for rental and other expenses.)

42

(c) The estimate of $21 million was calculated quite separately from our calculations of the expenditure required for the implementation of the Code on Access to Information.

' .... "•• •: . !,_• .‘j )

(d) We have not consulted COMAC. As stated above, the estimate was made with reference to the costs of similar arrangements in other places. The bill would confer new powers and responsibilities on COMAC. COMAC would not be in any better position than us to estimate the resources required to cover these responsibilities.

(e) The number of complaints arising from requests for information made in relation to public bodies was not a factor in arriving at the estimate.

(f) The basis of the estimate has been explained above. We have not a estimated separately the additional cost arising from COMAC’s responsibility to make a binding determination.

End/Wednesday, April 19, 1995

' • * ' • • • 15

Smoking areas in schools ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

Following is a question by the Hon Eric Li Ka-cheung and a written reply by the Secretary for Health and Welfare, Mrs Katherine Fok, in the Legislative Council today (Wednesday):

Question:

According to the "Youth Smoking and Health Survey - Report No.2" published in March this year, 30% of secondary school students have seen their teachers smoking. Will the Government inform this Council whether it will consider requesting all schools in the territory to designate school premises as non-smoking areas, and to set aside special smoking areas outside the main student activity areas for teachers with smoking habits so that they cannot be seen by students whilst smoking?

Reply:

Youngsters are easily influenced to start smoking, particularly if they see adult role models doing so. In this regard, teachers are regularly reminded of the importance of setting a good example for the younger generation. Teachers who are smokers are requested to refrain from smoking in school premises, especially in front of students.

43

Regulation 51 of the Education Regulations stipulates "no smoking shall be permitted in any classroom during school hours". Offenders are punishable on conviction by a fine not exceeding $5,000 and a term of imprisonment not exceeding 2 years. The Education Department also issues a circular at the beginning of every school year to remind school heads and supervisors that staff of schools should not be seen smoking when appearing in public in an official capacity.

Individual schools are encouraged to make their premises smoke-free or to set aside no-smoking areas for the benefit of their non-smoking staff, and many schools have already done so. The Education Department is currently in the process of consulting the Professional Teachers' Union and school councils on whether all schools should be designated as no-smoking areas. If the response is positive, we shall amend the Smoking (Public Health) Ordinance (Cap 371) to give this statutory effect.

End/Wednesday, April 19, 1995

Education for the blind and mentally handicapped *****

The following is a question by the Hon Peggy Lam and a written reply by the Secretary for Education and Manpower, Mr Michael Leung, in the Legislative Council today (Wednesday):

Question :

Regarding the present arrangement of putting some blind and mentally handicapped children together to be taught in the same school, will the Government inform this Council:

(a) how many schools are at present adopting such an arrangement;

(b) whether there are any differences in the curricula taught to the blind and the mentally handicapped children in these schools; and

(c) whether the Government has considered separating the handling of resources allocated to the education of blind and mentally handicapped children in these schools; if not, why not?

44 -

Mr President, ; r * •-

' I

(a) Under our present policy, blind children are placed in special schools for the blind arid mentally handicapped children in special schools for the mentally handicapped. The only exception is one special school, the Pokfulam Training Centre, which caters specifically for blind children who are also mentally handicapped.

(b) The curricula for the blind children and mentally handicapped children are designed to meet their specific needs. In addition to orientation and mobility training, blind children generally follow the regular academic curriculum as far as possible. For mentally handicapped children, the Education Department has specifically designed programmes to prepare them for living and functioning in their homes and in the community, and to equip them with basic academic skills, functional mathematics and work habits for further vocational training. The curriculum used in the Pokfulam Training Centre is basically the same as the one for mentally handicapped children, with additional elements on orientation and mobility training.

(c) As explained in (a) above, blind children and mentally handicapped children will not be placed in the same school. Under .the present funding arrangement, special schools for the blind and special schools for the mentally handicapped receive different levels of Government subsidies to meet their specific needs. j.

End/Wednesday, April 19, 1995 n;,

Model Scale I civil servants ■ - s)

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

The following is a question by the Hon Cheung Man- kwong and a written reply by the acting Secretary for Civil Service, Mr Chris Jackson, in the Legislative Council today Wednesday):

Question:

Regarding civil servants remunerated on the Model Scale I (MOD I), will the Government inform this Council:

- 45 -

(a) of the number and ranks of MOD I staff in various Government departments;

(b) of the number of MOD I staff in various Government departments who have reached the maximum salary points of their ranks, together with the number of years of service since attaining the maximum salary points; what is the percentage of these staff out of the total number of MOD I staff; and

■•I * . ..

(c) what specific measures the Government will put in place in the near future to improve the situation of MOD I staff who have reached their maximum salary points and without any incremental increase for many years?

Reply:

Mr President,

My reply to the question is as follows:

(a) There are altogether 24,169 staff remunerated on the Model Scale 1 (MOD 1) pay scale. A breakdown of the number and ranks in Government departments is shown in the attached list.

(b) The total number of staff who have reached the maximum point of their pay scale is 21,921. A breakdown by ranks and departments is also shown in the attached list. We regret that we are not able to obtain within the notice available the number on the years of service these staff have attained since reaching their maximum salary points. The data would have to be compiled manually which would be time consuming and would divert valuable resources.

(c) We had proposed to the staff sides a performance-related long service award scheme for junior civil servants who have reached their maximum salary points. The government was prepared to propose to the Finance Committee a one off injection of over $80 million into the scheme to cover "catch up" costs while future funding would be taken into account in determining the annual pay adjustment. We consulted the staff sides on the proposal earlier this year. However, we have been unable to come to an agreement with the staff side - including the MOD 1 Council - on the principle of the recurrent funding. The scheme has therefore had to be shelved for the time being . We are considering other incentive measures but any proposal would have to be viewed against resource constraints.

End/Wednesday, April 19, 1995

46

Five-day working week ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ‘ ( 1

Following is a question by the Hon Steven Poon and a written reply by the acting Secretary for Civil Service, Mr Chris Jackson, in the Legislative Council today (Wednesday):

Question :

Regarding tjie feasibility of implementing a five-day working week, will the Government inform this Council whether :

(a) it has conducted any study on the feasibility of implementing a five day working week in Government departments over the past 20 years; if so, what was the rationale behind its decision of maintaining a five-and-a-half-day working week;

(b) it is still necessary for Government departments to maintain a five-and-a-half-day working week, in view of the adoption of a five-day-working week in China, Japan, Australia, and countries in North America and Europe; if so, what the reasons are ;

(c) a study will be conducted to re-assess the possible effects of a five-day working week on the people's livelihood, economic activities, commerce and industry as well as government operations; and

(d) it is aware of any major organisations in the territory currently adopting a five-day working week?

Reply:

Mr President,

My replies to the four questions raised are as follows:-

(a) The Government has looked into the case of implementing a five-day working week in Government departments on various occasions in the past 20 years. (This issue was also discussed at a Legislative Council meeting in November 1979.) We believe that the working hours of the civil service should follow rather than lead the private sector and therefore the Government should continue to operate on five and a half days a week as long as the community it serves does so. That said, heads of departments may allow their staff to work on an alternate Saturday off system, provided that the required conditioned hours of work are not reduced. This system builds in a degree of flexibility for the civil servants while maintaining service to the public.

47

(b) According to a survey in 1994, the five-and-a-half-day working week is still very common in the private sector in Hong Kong. 31% of private sector companies require their office staff to work five and a half days a week and a further 21% of companies require their employees to work five and a half days or six days every other week. We remain of the view that the Government should follow rather than lead private sector practice. We also believe that many of the people we serve continue to expect government offices to be open on Saturdays.

(c) A regular study/review is in fact carried out by the Pay Survey and Research Unit of the Standing Commission on Civil Service Salaries and Conditions of Service when it conducts its regular fringe benefit surveys into private sector practice. We will continue to monitor the findings and will review the situation if and when the five-day working week becomes the norm in the private sector.

(d) We are aware that there are certain companies in the territory adopting a five-day working week. However as pointed out above, a five-day working week is not yet a community norm.

End/Wednesday, April 19, 1995

Finding of anti-collision equipment to vehicles ***** 9

Following is a question by Dr the Hon Conrad Lam Kui-shing and a written reply by the acting Secretary for Transport, Mr Rafael Hui, in the Legislative Council today (Wednesday):

Question:

According to the findings of a survey, vehicles with anti-collision equipment installed in the front will cause more serious injury to pedestrians as well as more severe damage to other vehicles in a traffic accident. As the number of vehicles installed with anti-collision equipment is on the increase, will the Government inform this Council whether:

(a) the Transport Department has granted approval for the installation of anti-collision equipment in vehicles during the past three years; if so, how many approvals have been granted and what are the reasons and guidelines for granting such approvals;

48

(b) random inspections have been conducted during the past three years to check if there is any installation of anti-collision equipment in vehicles; if so, how many inspections have been conducted and what the results are; and

(c) the Government will consider imposing a requirement that vehicle owners should obtain prior approval of the Transport Department for the installation of anti-collision equipment in their vehicles, so as to reduce the number of such vehicles?

Reply:

Mr President,

May I first clarify that the Administration has not commissioned any survey on this subject. The answers to the Hon Member's question are as follows :

(a) There is no legislation governing the fitting of anti-collision equipment to vehicles. Government approval is not therefore required and, therefore, no records of the numbers of vehicles fitted with such devices have been kept.

(b) Random inspections have not been conducted to check on the installation of anti-collision equipment. However, the Police may refer a vehicle to Transport Department for road-worthiness and safety inspection if it is suspected that anti-collision equipment has been insecurely mounted, obscures lights or registration plates, or has projections that constitute a danger to other road users. So far, records have not been kept on the number of such Police referrals, but the Transport Department is now establishing a database.

(c) On the basis of information currently available both locally and from overseas, it is not possible to determine the effects of anti-collision equipment, beneficial or otherwise, in the event of traffic accident. While the Government has no immediate plans to require vehicle owners to seek approval prior to the installation of such equipment, its use is now being carefully studied with a view to establishing whether there is a need for more stringent regulation.

End/Wednesday, April 19, 1995

49

Pedestrian passageway obstruction *****

The following is a question by the Hon Tik Chi-yuen and a written reply by the Secretary for Housing, Mr Dominic Wong, in the Legislative Council today (Wednesday):

Question:

At present, quite a number of shop operators in shopping arcades and markets of public housing estates place their goods on pedestrian passage ways causing obstruction to pedestrians. This situation has not improved over the years. In this connection, will the Government inform this Council what specific measures the Housing Department will put in place to tackle the problem?

Answer:

Mr President,

The Housing Department now manages about 15,000 commercial premises in 151 public housing estates. The estate staff and Mobile Operations Teams regularly take enforcement action against shop front obstruction.

.r

The first step is for Housing Department staff to try to persuade offending commercial tenants to remove obstructions to common areas and, where necessary, to issue oral or written warnings. When this fails to achieve the desired results, the Department is authorised (under section 24(1 )(d) of the Housing Ordinance) to seize the concerned goods. Serious offences are prosecuted under section 4A of the Summary Offences Ordinance. Upon conviction, offending tenants are subject to a maximum fine of $5,000 or imprisonment for three months. In 1994-95, the following action was taken against shop front obstructions -

70,972

6,748

1,771

warnings seizures of goods prosecutions

The Housing Department may also exercise the contractual right to terminate the tenancy, or not to renew the tenancy, of a persistent offender. In the last 12 months, five tenancies have been terminated for this reason.

Apart from punitive measures, the Housing Department is also working to improve the design of commercial premises in order to provide adequate space to meet the operational needs of different trades. In this way, the problem of encroachment on to common areas for displays of goods for sale will be reduced.

End/Wednesday, April 19, 1995

50

Foreign domestic workers undertaking non-domestic work

*****

Following is a question by the Hon Mrs Selina Chow and a written reply by the Secretary for Security, Mr Peter Lai, in the Legislative Council today (Wednesday):

Question:

In regard to the problem of foreign domestic workers undertaking non-domestic work in the territory, will the Government inform this Council:

(a) of the number of cases in the past year regarding foreign domestic workers found to be engaged in non-domestic work;

(b) whether the Government has done any estimate of the total number of foreign domestic workers engaged in non-domestic work; if so, what is the percentage of such workers out of the total number of foreign domestic workers in the territory; and

(c) . whether the Government will review the existing monitoring measures so as to make them more effective in preventing and combating the problem of foreign domestic workers engaged in work not stipulated in their employment contracts?

Reply:

Mr President,

(a) In 1994, 345 foreign domestic helpers (FDHs) were arrested in connection with unauthorised work, and 162 of them were subsequently prosecuted.

(b) There is no reliable means of estimating the number of foreign domestic helpers engaged in non-domestic work. In addition to the arrest figures mentioned in (a) above, we estimate that there were approximately 4 000 FDH overstayers in 1994. It is possible that most of these overstayers were engaged in unapproved employment, including non-domestic work. These two figures represent 3% of the 1994 year-end population of 141 368 FDHs in Hong Kong.

51

(c) To combat the problem of unauthorised work by FDHs, we have strengthened our enforcement efforts and carry out regularly raids at places of employment. An Immigration Task Force was formed in July last year; the Budget this year provides for the doubling of its size. This will enable more raids to be carried out at places of employment. We also encourage members of the public to pass us any relevant information by calling the Immigration Department's-24-hour hotline (Tel no. 2824 1551).

End/Wednesday, April 19, 1995

Land allocated rent free for container truck operators

* * * * * i •

■:i mi

The following is a question by the Hon Lee Wing-tat and a written reply by the acting Secretary for Planning, Environment and Lands, Mr Canice Mak, in the Legislative Council today (Wednesday):

Question:

It is learnt that the' Government has recently allocated a piece of land near the container terminal in Kwai Chung, which is intended to be used for relieving traffic congestion, to a trade union of container truck operators for use as a carpark by its members on a rent-free arid short-term basis. In this connection, will the Government inform this Council: '

(a) whether the above-mentioned case is the first in which land is allocated rent-free to a trade union; and what the terms of the land allocation are;

(b) of the policy on which such an allocation is based;

. . ■ . . 1 i'K *.// J,’-

(c) whether4 the Government is aware of the reported arrangement under which members of the trade union have to pay for parking on the land in question; if so, whether such an arrangement is in breach of the terms of the land allocation; and

(d) whether the tenure of the land allocation will result in a delay in the land reverting to its original intended usage for relieving traffic congestion; if not, what the reasons are?

52

Answer:

Mr President,

(a) The Container Transportation Employees General Union (CTEGU) was permitted to use a site in front of Container Terminal No. 7 at Kwai Chung for temporary parking of container trucks on an exceptional basis. The site in question is reserved for use as an emergency "vehicle holding area" when there is traffic congestion at Kwai Chung container port. It is locked up and is opened only when it is required to ease traffic congestion. Between August and October 1994, four container truck parking sites under Short Term Tenancies in Kwai Tsing were closed down to make way for Airport Core Projects (ACP). As a result, there was an acute shortage of parking spaces for container vehicles. On 29 September 1994, following negotiations between CTEGU and the relevant government departments, it was agreed that:

(i) the CTEGU should be permitted to use the site on a temporary basis and without charge with effect from 1 October 1994 for parking container trucks. The site could accommodate about 200 trucks;

(ii) the CTEGU would be responsible for the management of the site and required to provide the licence numbers and driver details for the vehicles within the site; and

(iii) the CTEGU had to return the site to the Government once a short term tenancy of a new parking site at Stonecutter's Island was ready. It was expected at the time that this temporary arrangement would last about a month only. However, the tender of the new site was not completed until the end of December 1994 due to unforeseen boundary problems.

(b) The temporary arrangements mentioned above were made on emergency traffic grounds, taking into account the very tight ACP Programme and the need to address the problem of shortage of parking spaces during the interim period.

53

(c) The agreed temporary arrangements did not specifically cover any fee collection arrangement. However, the CTEGU agreed in writing to manage the site on a non-profit making basis.

(d) Action is being taken to clear the site so that it can be put to its original use as an emergency vehicle holding area from 1 May 1995. Having further negotiated with the CTEGU on 13 April 1995, the CTEGU openly announced that it would surrender the site to Government by 28 April 1995.

End/Wednesday, April 19, 1995

Delays in completion of HOS estates *****

The following is a question by the Hon Fred Li Wah-ming and a written reply by the Secretary for Housing, Mr Dominic Wong, in the Legislative Council today (Wednesday):

Question :

There have been many instances of delay in the completion of estates under the Housing Authority's Home Ownership Scheme (HOS) in recent years, which have resulted in the deferral of the occupation dates of a number of HOS estates. In this connection, will the Government inform this Council -

(a) of the number of HOS estates which were not completed on schedule in the past five years, together with their exact locations and the respective periods of delay;

(b) of the reasons why the fines collected by the Housing Authority from the developer for the 6-month delay in the completion of Ko Chun Court in Yau Tong were not used to compensate owners of HOS flats in the Court; and

(c) what long-term measures the Housing Authority will put in place to solve the problem of delays in the completion of HOS estates?

54

Answer:

(a) A list showing the names of 53 Home Ownership Scheme (HOS) projects due for completion between 1990-91 and 1994-95, their locations, target completion dates, actual handover dates and periods of delay (if any) is annexed. The common reasons for delay in flat completion are changes in technical specifications, such as building finishes, during the contract period.

(b) Under the terms of the Agreement for Sale and Purchase (ASP) of a HOS flat, the Housing Authority is entitled to extensions of the building completion period caused by factors beyond the control of the Authority. In the case of Ko Chun Court, the extension is due to factors beyond the control of the Authority, namely, delays on the part of the building contractor. As such, the Authority has no legal obligation to pay compensation to the purchasers.

(c) The Housing Authority will consider measures to protect the interest of purchasers. These measures include, for example, minimising the number of variations in technical specifications permitted during the contract period, and paying compensation in clearly defined circumstances.

End/Wednesday, April 19, 1995

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

ISSUED BY GOVERNMENT INFORMATION SERVICES BEACONSFIELD HOUSE, HONG KONG. TEL: 842 8777

Thursday, April 20,1995

Contents Page No,

Ensure freedoms under rule of law.................................. 1

Governor sends message of condolence on Oklahoma City bomb blast............................................................. 3

Construction Output Statistics 1994 ............................... 3

New permit conditions for Qantas................................... 6

Value of manufacturers' orders-on-hand in February................. 7

UGC's visit to Guangdong........................................... 10

Kingland Apartments rooftop residents walk out of meeting...... 11

FS denies report on budget discussions with China................. 12

Tuen Mun Pumping Station free from flooding threats............... 12

Special marine traffic arrangements for Tin Hau Festival.......... 14

DHA calls on members of the public to register as voters....... 15

List of EI A reports released..................................... 16

Hong Kong Monetary Authority money market operations........... 21

1

Ensure freedoms under rule of law *****

To preserve the favourable economic environment in Hong Kong, the Government is fully committed to ensuring freedoms under the rule of law, the Chief Secretary, Mrs Anson Chan, said this (Thursday) evening.

Speaking at the General Committee Dinner of the Chinese Manufacturers' Association of Hong Kong, Mrs Chan said Hong Kong's strong economic fundamentals put the place in a good position to take advantage of the increasing business opportunities around.

"But we can only do so if we collectively, that is the Government and the business community, do all we can to preserve and strengthen those features that give us stability and growth.

"Above all, we need to ensure that the provisions in the Joint Declaration and the Basic Law that guarantee freedoms under the rule of law are fully and faithfully implemented."

Mrs Chan said the broadened and deepened regional and international dimension of the Hong Kong economy over the years had much to do with the territory's consistently liberal but prudent economic policies.

These include the practice of free trade, freedom of capital and information flows, fully convertible and stable currency, low tax regime, and generally conservative budgetary stance.

"Additionally, we maintain a firm commitment to the rule of law, highly efficient infrastructure, and extensive facilities for education and training.

"And we are keen to promote competition and deter restrictive practices in the economy.

"These, coupled with our entrepreneurship, a hard working and resilient labour force, and a highly efficient civil service, have been and should continue to be the key ingredients for our economic success in the future, whether before or after 1997," the Chief Secretary said.

2

When talking about Hong Kong's economic prospects, Mrs Chan said apart from China, Hong Kong had established a wider economic role in relation to the Asia-Pacific region as a whole.

"First and foremost is the rapid expansion in our trade links with other economies in the region.

"More specifically, our trade with the APEC economies has grown by an average of 17 per cent per annum over the past five years.

In 1994, the APEC (Asia Pacific Economic Co-operation) economies taken together accounted for 80 per cent of Hong Kong's total visible trade, with a 76 per cent share of the territory's exports and an 84 per cent share in imports.

Mrs Chan also noted that Hong Kong was amongst the top five trading partners for the other three Asian dynamic economies namely Taiwan, Singapore and South Korea, as well as for Vietnam and the Philippines.

For other economies in East Asia such as Japan, Thailand and Malaysia, Hong Kong's ranking as their major trading partner is within the top 10.

On outward investment, Mrs Chan said Hong Kong had invested US$50 billion in China. In Indonesia, Hong Kong is the second largest source of foreign direct investment, with a total investment value of US$13.7 billion.

The territory also ranks among the top three foreign investors in Vietnam, Thailand and Taiwan, with the respective direct investment ranging from US$1.6 billion to US$2 billion.

The investment in all the East Asian economies taken together, excluding China, is estimated to be in the region of US$24 billion.

End/Thursday, April 20, 1995

3

Governor sends message of condolence on Oklahoma City bomb blast *****

The Governor, the Rt Hon Mr Christopher Patten, has written to the US Consul-General in Hong Kong, Mr Richard Mueller, with a message of deepest sympathy and condolences to the families and friends of those who were killed in the bomb blast in Oklahoma City. He asked Mr Mueller to convey to the American people HK's sadness and grief over the tragedy.

The Governor said today: "I was shocked to learn about the devastating bomb blast. It was a terrible tragedy, and we hope that the culprits will be brought to justice very soon."

End/Thursday, April 20, 1995

Construction Output Statistics 1994 *****

The nominal gross value of construction work performed by main contractors, including general and special trade contractors, amounted to $89.2 billion in 1994, representing an increase of 18.4% over 1993, according to the results of the Quarterly Survey of Construction Output released today (Thursday) by the Census and Statistics Department.

The increase was largely due to more active construction work at both private and public sector sites.

When measured at constant (1990) market prices, the gross value of construction work performed by main contractors showed an increase of 13.8% over the preceding year.

The gross value of construction work performed at private sector sites rose substantially by 22.9% at nominal value and 18.2% at constant (1990) market prices. The corresponding increase in the gross values of construction work performed at public sector sites were 10.9% and 10.1%.

4

The nominal gross value of construction work, performed by general contractors at locations other than construction sites recorded an increase of 16.3%. When measured at constant (1990) market prices, it represented an increase of 6.8%. Work in this category included minor new construction activities and renovation work at erected buildings and structures.

The nominal gross value of construction activities performed by special trade contractors at locations other than construction sites, comprising mainly electrical and mechanical fitting work, increased by 30.5%. When measured at constant (1990) market prices, the increase was 23.4%.

Analysed by end-use, residential building projects (including commercial/residential(composite) buildings) continued to account for the greatest portion of the gross value of construction work performed at construction sites. The nominal gross value of construction work performed in these projects, recorded an increase of 6.4%.

Transport projects remained the second largest category of construction site work. The nominal gross value of construction work performed in these projects rose substantially, by 25.3%. The increase was mainly attributable to a number of major infrastructural projects.

Commercial building projects constituted the third largest category of construction site work. The nominal gross value of construction work performed in these projects increased by 21.2%.

Comparing the fourth quarter of 1994 with the fourth quarter of 1993, the nominal gross value of construction work performed by main contractors increased by 12.1%. When measured at constant (1990) market prices, it represented an increase of 7.6%.

Compared with the third quarter of 1994, the nominal gross value of construction work performed by main contractors in the fourth quarter rose by 7.8%. The corresponding increase measured at constant (1990) market prices was 4.3%, and bearing in mind that the comparison may be affected by seasonal fluctuations.

5

The gross values of construction work at constant (1990) market prices are derived by deflating the nominal values with appropriate price indices to the price level of 1990.

Owing to the widespread sub-contracting practices in the construction industry, a construction establishment can be a main contractor for one contract and a sub-contractor for another contract at the same time.

The gross value of construction work performed by main contractors, including both general and special trade contractors, covers only those projects in which the construction establishment takes the role of a main contractor, but not projects in which it takes only the role of a sub-contractor.

However, sub-contractors' contribution to projects should have been included in the gross value of construction work performed by main contractors for whom they worked.

More detailed statistics on construction output are given in the "Report on the Quarterly Survey of Construction Output, 4th Quarter 1994".

The report is now on sale at $8 a copy at the Government Publications Centre, Queensway Government Offices, Low Block, Ground Floor, or at the Census and Statistics Department Publications Section, Wanchai Tower, 19th floor, 12 Harbour Road, Wan Chai. Regular subscription may also be arranged.

Enquiries about the survey may be directed to the Building, Construction and Real Estate Statistics Section of the Census and Statistics Department on 2805 6426.

End/Thursday, April 20, 1995

6

New permit conditions for Qantas *****

The Government has issued a new operating permit to Qantas with conditions that will apply if the current problem involving the level of fifth freedom traffic carried by the airline is not resolved within a two month grace period.

Fifth freedom rights cover the carriage of passengers and freight by an airline between destinations outside its home country.

The permit, issued by the Director of Civil Aviation today (Thursday) and is valid until October 28, replaces the current one which is due to expire on April 30.

The permit includes a restriction limiting Qantas's carriage of fifth freedom traffic on its Hong Kong - Bangkok and Hong Kong - Singapore services to 50 per cent of the total number of passengers carried on each flight, with effect from July 1.

A Government spokesman said that the aim was to encourage Qantas to carry more through passengers, to and from Australia, on those services. It was now necessary to impose the condition because of failure by Australia at recent negotiations to agree to a reduction in the proportion of fifth freedom traffic.

"The mix of traffic is inconsistent with the guiding principles set out in the Air Services Agreement between Hong Kong and Australia and we drew this to the attention of the authorities there in May 1994," the spokesman said.

Discussions were held in November last year but these failed to produce a solution. A second round of talks was held in Canberra in early April but also ended without reaching any agreement.

"Given the lack of progress in these talks, we have had little, option but to take action over Qantas's fifth freedom activities," the spokesman said.

7

He said a decision was taken at the earliest opportunity after the latest talks to alleviate any uncertainty on the part of passengers who had bookings for the period after April 30.

The spokesman said the grace period was intended to serve several purposes.

"In addition to removing passenger uncertainty, it gives Qantas adequate time in which to consider the impact of the new permit conditions and to take whatever steps are necessary to meet these conditions.'

"It also allows time for the two sides to have further discussions before the introduction of the restriction,' he explained.

"We are not inflexible on the matter of fifth freedom traffic and it is our strong preference for a solution to be found before July 1," the spokesman emphasised.

End/Thursday, April 20, 1995

Value of manufacturers' orders-on-hand in February *****

The value of manufacturers' orders-on-hand for local production in February increased by 7% over a year earlier, according to the provisional results of a monthly survey released today (Thursday) by the Census and Statistics Department.

Comparing February this year with February 1994, significant increases in the value of outstanding orders were recorded in the electronic products industry (+33%) and the plastic products industry (+12%). Increases in orders were also recorded in the printing and publishing industry (+7%), the wearing apparel industry (+4%) and the electrical products industry (+3%).

8

On the other hand, significant decreases in orders were registered in the fabricated metal products industry (-35%) and the textiles industry (-16%).

Compared with January, and bearing in mind that this comparison may be affected by seasonal factors, the value of manufacturers' orders-on-hand in February decreased by 1 %.

The Monthly Survey of Orders-on-hand covers a sample of some 300 manufacturing firms engaging 50 or more workers.

Manufacturers' orders-on-hand refer to orders and parts of orders received earlier by manufacturers for local production which remain unfilled as at the end of the reference month.

Orders received by traders not engaged in production are included if such orders are further placed to manufacturers for production locally.

However, orders placed to manufacturing firms for production in China and other places outside Hong Kong are not included in this series of orders-on-hand statistics.

A spokesman of the department pointed out that caution should be exercised in interpreting the manufacturers' orders-on-hand figures in a single month. Instead, the trend movement of the series as displayed over a wider span of time points should be looked at.

The survey report for February, at $6 a copy, is now available for sale at the Government Publications Centre, Queensway Government Offices, Low Block, Ground Floor, Queensway, and at the Census and Statistics Department Publications Section, 19th Floor, Wanchai Tower, 12 Harbour Road, Wan Chai.

Enquiries about the survey results may be made to the Industrial Production Statistics Section of the Census and Statistics Department on 2805 6441.

The following table shows the year-on-year percentage changes in the value of orders-on-hand in different manufacturing industries.

9

Percentage changes in the value of orders-on-hand in

January 1995 over January 1994 February 1995 over February 1994

(Revised) (Provisional)

All industries covered in the survey +5 +7

* Wearing apparel +2 +4

* Textiles -13 -16

* Electronic products +31 +33

* Electrical products -8 +3

* Fabricated metal products -29 -35

* Plastic products +2 + 12

* Printing and publishing -6 +7

End/Thursday, April 20, 1995

10

UGC's visit to Guangdong *****

The University Grants Committee (UGC) delegation which visited Guangdong during April 12-15 returned to Hong Kong last Saturday.

"The visit has enabled us to increase our understanding of higher education institutions and policies on higher education in the Guangdong Province, and to gain a better understanding of the regional socio- economic context within which Hong Kong's higher education system operates," UGC Chairman, Mr Antony Leung, said.

"The delegation visited Dongguan, Shunde and Guangzhou, where members had useful meetings with officials of the Guangdong Provincial Government, and Dongguan and Shunde Municipal Governments," Mr Leung added.

"The discussions focused on current education policy and practice in Guangdong Province, including the funding of higher education, collaboration with industry, etc., and the industrial and economic development of the Pearl River Delta region," he said.

Members of the delegation also visited the Zhongshan University, South China University of Technology and the Polytechnic of Dongguan as well as some high schools and factories in Guangdong Province.

"During all of our meetings we also took the opportunity to explain the role and function of the UGC in Hong Kong's higher education system," Mr Leung said.

Mr Leung concluded that the UGC's visit to Guangdong had been very successful.

"The delegation has initiated a useful dialogue with Guangdong officials and institutions on many educational issues and has a better understanding of the higher education system as well as the industrial and economic development in Guangdong," Mr Leung said.

End/Thursday, April 20, 1995

11

Kingland Apartments rooftop residents walk out of meeting

*****

The Director of Buildings, Mrs Helen Yu, had arranged with other government departments to meet residents of the illegal rooftop structures on Kingland Apartments this morning (Thursday) to further discuss their rehousing arrangements.

Present were representatives from Buildings Department, Housing Department, Social Welfare Department and District Office/Yau Tsim Mong.

After only a brief exchange, representatives of the residents walked out.

The Director of Buildings was disappointed over the residents' refusal to discuss.

"At my meeting with them on Tuesday, I had undertaken to confer with other departments concerned to consider how best the government can realistically and reasonably meet the wishes for rehousing. This morning's joint meeting was intended to help resolve matters.

"The residents are not acting in their own interest by walking out. The government's policy ensures that no one needs to be homeless," she said.

Of the 39 families involved, five have moved out voluntarily, 11 have accepted the government's rehousing offer, 13 are considering the government's offer, and 10 are refusing to accept the government's offer to the urban Temporary Housing Area.

Mrs Yu reiterated that her department had a statutory duty to execute. She will apply to the District Court for closure order on Monday (April 24) as notified to the residents in December last year.

End/Thursday, April 20, 1995

12

FS denies report on budget discussions with China *****

In response to media enquiries, the Financial Secretary, Sir Hamish Macleod, today (Thursday) said there was no truth whatsoever in an English newspaper report that there had been a change in stance over discussions with China over the 1996-97 Budget.

He said: "Our position has been very clear and consistent. It has not changed."

"We have handed over to the Chinese side a detailed programme of proposed activities and we are awaiting their response. One stage ol this programme involves a Chinese team observing the planning and preparation process for the 1996-97 Budget. A later stage involves consultations on the 1997-98 Budget.

"We hope to hold further meetings with the Chinese side at mutually convenient times as soon as possible."

End/Thursday, April 20, 1995

Tuen Mun Pumping Station free from Hooding threats

*****

The acting Deputy Director of Water Supplies, Mr Watt Chi-ngong, is confident that the Tuen Mun Pumping Station and treatment works will not be flooded again following the introduction of a wide range of preventive measures.

Mr Watt, who accompanied members of the Tuen Mun District Board and Tuen Mun Rural Committee on a tour to the pumping station and treatment works this (Thursday) morning, gave an assurance that all necessary steps had been taken to prevent further occurrence of floodings at the station.

- 13 -

"Joint efforts have been made by the staff of Water Supplies Department, Drainage Services Department and Territory Development Department to avoid the recurrence of floodings of the pumping station and treatment works in the last two years," he said.

The major improvement works undertaken include:

* raising of the side walls of the open drainage channels in the vicinity of the site;

* installation of flood alarms for the open channels;

* building of raised concrete kerbs and flood gates around the perimeter of the pumping station and treatment works;

* sealing or relocation to higher levels the openings of all buildings at low levels;

* erection of flood gates and stop logs at the entrances of all buildings; and

* installation of large capacity sump pumps in the basements of the pumping station and the main building of the treatment works.

Apart from the completion of these works, Mr Watt noted that a number of measures have also been devised to safeguard the normal operation of the pumping station and treatment works in providing water supply to Tuen Mun residents.

"Whenever the No.3 typhoon signal or the red or black rainstorm warning is hoisted, a special standby team will be posted to the pumping station and treatment works to monitor the run-off conditions of the area and to enforce the predetermined emergency procedures.

"Coordinations between departments concerned have also been stepped up to deal with emergency situations arising from heavy rainfall," he said.

End/Thursday, April 20, 1995

14

Special marine traffic arrangements for Tin Hau Festival

*****

Special marine traffic arrangements will be implemented at Joss House Bay tomorrow (Friday) and on Saturday (April 22) to facilitate worshippers going to the Tin Hau Temple to celebrate the Tin Hau Festival, the Marine Department announced today (Thursday).

"Special arrangements for embarkation and disembarkation will be made at the pier on the eastern side of Joss House Bay," the Senior Marine Officer (East Region), Mr C Y Tsang, said.

Officers from the Marine Department and Marine Police will be on patrol in the area to assist local craft owners and operators to transport worshippers.

Mr Tsang also urged these owners and operators to pay particular attention to marine safety and not to overload their vessels.

"They should exercise self-discipline and be considerate to other users," he stressed.

Worshippers should take care when boarding and alighting from all vessels including those of the Hongkong and Yaumati Ferry Company Limited which will operate services between Joss House Bay and North Point on these two days.

Mr Tsang also advised masters of all other vessels navigating in the Tathong Channel over the festival period to proceed with caution in view that numerous local crafts would be sailing through Lei Yue Mun to Joss House Bay.

End/Thursday, April 20, 1995

• ♦

- 15 -

DHA calls on members of the public to register as voters

*****

The Director of Home Affairs, Mr Joseph Wong, today (Thursday) called on members of the public to exercise their civic rights and register as voters in the September 17 Legislative Council elections.

Speaking at the foundation stone laying ceremony for the Sai Kung Central Lee Siu Yam Memorial School, Mr Wong also appealed for employers' support by giving their staffs data to the Registration and Electoral Office as potential voters for the nine functional constituencies.

He urged those who had not yet registered to do so right away and those who had already done so to remind their friends and families to become voters.

Turning to the school, which was established by amalgamating five small rural schools in Sai Kung, Mr Wong paid tribute to the Sai Kung District Board and other local bodies and community leaders for their support and active participation.

Mr Wong said with the keen support of the local community in improving education facilities in the district, the fourth central primary school will be completed in Sai Kung by September. Two similar schools have already been set up in the district.

He said the 1981 White Paper on Primary Education and pre-primary services stated that, in order to provide schools of an educationally viable size in rural areas, Government would encourage the building of central primary schools to replace rural schools of less than six operating classes.

The school, located at area 4 in Sai Kung Town, includes 30 classrooms, teaching rooms and an assembly hall.

The Management Committee of the school, chaired by the District Board Chairman Mr George Ng Sze-fuk, has so far raised $3.4 million to buy furniture and equipment.

End/Thursday, April 20, 1995

16

List of EIA reports released *****

The Environmental Protection Department (EPD) today (Thursday) released a list of environmental impact assessment (EIA) reports of major development projects completed in the last three months.

The department will continue to inform the public on a regular basis of EIA reports that have been completed as well as those will be completed in the next 12 months.

Under Government policy, proponent departments of major projects are required to place Government-owned EIA reports for public reference at the relevant district offices, Urban Council/Regional Council public reference libraries, the Office of Members of Legislative Council Library and EPD headquarters. Private sector proponents are encouraged to do the same.

Following is a list of EIA reports completed between January and March:

1. Route 5: Section between Shek Wai Kok and Chai Wan Kok (Highway Department)

2. HEC Lamina Power Station Ash Lagoon (Hong Kong Electric Company Ltd)

3. Reclamation and Servicing of Tuen Mun Area 38 for

Special Industries - EIA Study

(Territory Development Department)

4. Main Drainage Channels for Ngau Tam Mei, Yuen Long and Kam Tin: EIA Study for Kam Tin Section (43 CD) and village Flood Protection Works (30 CD) (Territory Development Department)

5. Container Terminals No. 10 & II - Preliminary Design (Civil Engineering Department)

6. Container Terminals No. 10 & II - Ancillary Works (Design) (Civil Engineering Department)

17

7. Aviation Fuel Receiving Facility at Sha Chau (Provisional Airport Authority)

Major EIAs that are likely to be completed in the next 12 months include:

1. Ting Kau & Sham Tseng Sewerage Scheme (Drainage Services Department)

2. Feasibility Study for Castle Peak Road Improvement between Area 2 and Ka Loon Tsuen, Tsuen Wan (Highways Department)

3. Backfilling of South Tsing Yi Marine Borrow Area (Civil Engineering Department)

I

4. West Kowloon Refuse Transfer Station Detailed EIA (Environmental Protection Department)

5. Centralised Incineration Facilities (CIF) (Environmental Protection Department)

6. Green Island Cement Manufacturing and Concrete Batching Area

17, Southwest Tsing Yi (Relocation of the Kennedy Town) (Green Island Cement)

7. Hongkong Electric Company's Lamma Power Station Jetty and Navigation Channel

(Hongkong Electric Company Ltd)

8. Hong Kong Cement/Concrete Batching Plant and Material Storage Facilities at Northwest Tsing Yi Island (Hong Kong Cement/Sun Hung Kai)

9. 8 Potential Land Based Borrow Areas (Civil Engineering Department)

10. Main Drainage Channels for Ngau Tam Mei, Yuen Long and Kam Tin

(Territory Development Department)

1

18

11. Northwest New Territories (NWNT) Landfills Restoration (Environmental Protection Department)

12. Outlying Island Refuse Transfer Facilities (Environmental Protection Department)

13. Reclamation by Public Dump for District Open Space and Govemment/Institute/Community, North Tsing Yi

(Civil Engineering Department)

14. Restoration of Urban Landfills - Stage II (Environmental Protection Department)

15. Shenzhen River Regulation Project Stage 2 Works (Drainage Services Department, Hong Kong Government/ Shenzhen River Regulation Office of Municipal Government)

16. Sheung Shui Slaughter House (Regional Services Department)

17. San Miguel Brewery, Yuen Long Industrial Estate (San Miguel Brewery),

* ■ ' <* ,

18. North West New Territories Development, Kam Tin By-pass Stage I EIA

(Highways Department)

19. Tuen Mun Area 38 for Special Industrial Area: Improvements to Roads & Junctions within Tuen Mun (Highways Department)

' ' ' J: ■ ’■ . ' ’ •

20. Tseung Kwan O Development - Town Centre North (Territory Development Department)

21. Commercial/Residential Development at Shiu Wing Steel Mill Site in Tseung Kwan O Area 72

(Shiu Wing Steel Ltd) . . ' ,

22. Residential Development at Hong Kong Oxygen

Plant Site in Areas 50 & 51, Tseung Kwan O (Hong Kong Oxygen & Acetylene Co. Ltd)

19

23. Green Island Reclamation (Part) - Public Dump (Civil Engineering Department)

24. Central, Western & Wanchai West Sewerage (Implementation) (Drainage Services Department)

25. Island West Refuse Transfer Station (Environmental Protection Department)

26. Chai Wan Road/Wing Tai Road Widening (Highways Department)

27. EIA for Four Potential Housing Development Sites (Environmental Protection Department)

28. Route 16: From West Kowloon to Shatin (Highways Department)

29. Aviation Fuel Supply System - Tsing Yi Pipeline (Provisional Airport Authority)

30. Sham Tseng Link Feasibility Study (Highways Department)

31. Backfilling of North Lantau Marine Borrow Area (Civil Engineering Department)

32. West Kowloon Reclamation - Sandwich Class Housing North of Man Cheong Street (Housing Society)

33. Sand Extraction and Backfilling of Eastern Waters Marine Borrow Areas

(Civil Engineering Department)

34. Central Reclamation, Phase III (Territory Development Department)

- 20 -

35. West Kowloon Reclamation Comprehensive Traffic Analysis Review and EI A

(Territory Development Department)

36. Sha Lo Tung Revised Development Supplementary EIA (Sha Lo Tung Development Co. Ltd)

37. Discovery Bay Development-Extension (Hong Kong Resort Co. Ltd.)

38. Strategic Sewage Disposal Scheme Stage I, Implementation Stage EIA

(Drainage Services Department)

39. Design of Reclamation & Edge Structures for Container Terminals 10 & 11 and Back-up Areas (Civil Engineering Department)

40. Hong Kong Ferry Pier Development at Central Reclamation, Phase I (Hong Kong Ferry)

41. 40,000 Tonnes Lifting Capacity Floating Dock - Yam O, North Lantau '

(Hong Kong United Dockyards Ltd.)

42. Reclamation for Shipyard at To Kau Wan, EIA for Operation Phase (Civil Engineering Department)

43. Tsung Pak Long Flood Protection Scheme (Civil Engineering Department)

44. Main Drainage Channel for Fanling, Sheung Shui and Hinterland (Civil Engineering Department)

45. Rural Drainage Rehabilitation Scheme (Civil Engineering Department)

End/Thursday, April 20, 1995

21

Hong Kong Monetary Authority money market operations *****

Cumulative Time change

$ million (hours) ($million)

Opening balance in the account 2,554 0930 + 131

Closing balance in the account 2,065 1000 +131

Change attributable to : 1100 +145

Money market activity +139 1200 +143

LAF today -628 1500 +143

1600 +139

LAF rate 4.25% bid/6.25% offer TWI 118.2 *+0.5* 20.4.95

Hong Kong Monetary Authority

EF bills EF notes/Hong Kong Government bonds

Terms Yield Term Issue Coupon Price Yield

1 week 5.19 13 months 2605 6.35 100.46 5.98

1 month 5.19 22 months 2702 7.50 102.00 6.42

3 months 5.39 27 months 3707 6.95 100.85 6.64

6 months 5.59 33 months 3801 8.00 103.04 6.89

12 months 5.93 59 months 5003 7.75 101.64 7.48

Total turnover of bills and bonds - $14,462 million

Closed April 20, 1995

End/Thursday, April 20, 1995

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

ISSUED BY GOVERNMENT INFORMATION SERVICES BEACONSFIELD HOUSE, HONG KONG. TEL: 842 8777

Friday, April 21,1995

Contents Page_NQ,

Disappointment over Australian Government’s decision........................ 1

Residential Mortgage Survey Results for March 1995 ......................... 1

Harmonised pay scale proposed for kindergarten teachers and child care workers 7

Payroll statistics for December 1994 ....................................... 12

Buildings Department to introduce Energy Efficiency Requirements............ 14

Occupational Deafness Compensation Scheme........................................ 15

Three bills to be introduced to LegCo....................................... 16

Japanese bank granted licence.................................................... 18

Voter registration campaign................................................. 18

Lady Hogan has passed away.................................................. 20

Pre-qualification submissions for bridge construction....................... 21

Laying of fresh water mains in Tuen Mun..................................... 21

Road bridge for Siu Lek Yuen................................................ 22

Roadworks for Ma Wan proposed............................................... 23

Tenders for refuse station in Central....................................... 23

Closure of Hong Wah Street.................................................. 24

Closure of Tai Kok Tsui illegal structures sought........................... 24

Hong Kong Monetary Authority money market operations........................ 25

1

Disappointment over Australian Government’s decision

*****

The Government has expressed its disappointment over the Australian Government’s decision, announced yesterday, to limit Cathay Pacific's operating authorisation for Australian services to the end of June.

A Government spokesman said direct services between Hong Kong and Australia were not an issue in the current dispute, and the Hong Kong Government had been careful in its own actions to ensure that they remained unaffected and that inconvenience to the travelling public was avoided.

The spokesman downplayed fears that Cathay's permit might not be extended beyond June 30.

"We urge the Australian Government to act responsibly, taking into full account the interest of travellers between Hong Kong and Australia and the economic interest of both territories, and extend Cathay’s permit in good time before June 30 to allay passenger uncertainty," the spokesman said.

He added that, any further action against Cathay’s services to and from Australia would be regarded as a very serious escalation.

"Under such circumstances, we would have little alternative but to consider appropriate measures against Qantas and Ansett in response."

End/Friday, April 21, 1995

Residential Mortgage Survey Results for March 1995

*****

The growth in residential mortgage loans for the purchase of properties in Hong Kong remained modest in March, according to the results of the latest monthly survey conducted by the Hong Kong Monetary Authority (HKMA).

The latest figures show that the total amount of outstanding mortgage lending by the 33 institutions in the survey rose by 0.3% in March (0.2% in February) to $239.6 billion. The growth rate is below the monthly average of 0.79% over the last 12 months.

2

The annualised rate of growth in lending over the last three months decreased to 3.9%, compared with 5.0% in the three-month period to February. The 12-month average of outstanding loans declined slightly to an annualised growth rate of 9.5% from 10.6% in February.

However, the amount of new loans approved but not yet drawn surged by 260.4% or $6.6 billion to $9.2 billion in March.

"These figures reflect the resurgence of activity in the property market and suggest that the growth rate of outstanding loans will be much higher in April," the Acting Deputy Chief Executive (Banking) of HKMA, Mr Peter Pang, said.

Lending for the purchase of properties in China increased by 2.3% to $4.70 billion in March from $4.6 billion in the preceding month. Gross loans made in March also rose both in number (to 293 from 83) and in amount (to $161 million from $50 million).

New loans approved in March increased in number (to 253 from 181) but the amount, at $112 million, remained the same as in the previous month.

3

Residential Mortgage Loans in Hong Kong Results of Survey for March 1995

33 authorised institutions Mar 1995 HK$ Mn Feb 1995 HK$ Mn

1. Outstanding lending

a. Amount 239,614 238,589

b. Monthly change 0.3% ** 0.2%

c. Twelve-month change 9.7% ** 10.7%

d. Average change (annualized)

Latest three months 3.9% ** 5.0%

Latest twelve months 9.5% ** 10.6%

2. Gross loans made during month

a. Amount

b. Number

5,178

3893

3,843

2452

3. New loans approved during month

a. Amount

b. Number

12,040

7493

.3,793

2599

4. New loans approved during month

but not yet drawn

a. Amount

b. Number

9,225 .2,560

5424 1832

Note : ** Adjusted for the effect of re-classification of residential mortgage loans by some institutions amounting to a net HK$0.2 billion.

4

Chart A


RESIDENTIAL MORTGAGE. LOANS IN HONGKONG. (33 institutions)

Outstanding balance at end of month

Remarks : The significant fall of outstanding balance in December 1994 was due to the effect of reclassification, securitization and sale of loans by some institutions.

3-month and 12-month moving average growth rate on annualised ba’sis

5

Chart B

RESIDENTIAL MORTGAGE LOANS IN HONG KONG (33 institutions)

GROSS LOANS MADE DURING THE MONTH

Thousand

Amount

B1

Number of accounts

*

6

Chart C

RESIDENTIAL MORTGAGE LOANS IN HONG KONG

i''”‘ (33 institutions)

Q1 NEW LOANS APPROVED BUT NOT YET DRAWN

Thousand Billion

Amount

•K'C •

C1

Number of accounts

C2

End/Friday, April 21, 1995

7

Harmonised pay scale proposed for kindergarten teachers and child care workers *****

The Administration proposes to introduce a "harmonised" pay scale for kindergarten teachers (KTs) and child care workers (CCWs) following the completion of a review on the existing pay scales for the two grades.

In proposing the "harmonised" pay scale for consideration by the reconstituted Working Party on Kindergarten Education, reference has been made to comparable entry qualifications for grades within the civil service.

The Working Party recommended that the minimum entry qualification for both KTs and CCWs should be Form V with two passes.

"On this basis, the Administration concluded that it would be appropriate to accommodate both KTs and CCWs, if they were civil service grades, in Group III of the Higher Diploma. Diploma and Related Grades, the benchmark for which is Master Pay Scale (MPS) 7," a Government spokesman explained today (Friday).

"Grade Ill comprises grades which require a full School Certificate plus one year full-time training or at least a Form IV level of education plus two years' training.

"This is broadly in line with the entry qualification/training requirement for KTs and CCWs," he said.

The spokesman recognised that the Education Commission Report No. 2 had originally recommended a scale of MPS 10-18 for qualified kindergarten teachers.

"But this recommendation was made on the basis that such teachers would have a minimum academic qualification of HKCEE with five passes. The scale was also recommended based on reference to the salary of child care supervisors." he explained.

"In fact, it has proven difficult to recruit kindergarten teachers at this level and so the recommended academic qualification has been changed to HKCEE with two passes.

"This change in academic qualification, taken together with the amount of training now required of a kindergarten teacher, has necessitated an adjustment in the starting point of the scale to MPS 7 by comparison with the civil service pay scales.

8

"Appropriate conversion arrangements will be made to ensure that serving kindergarten teachers will not lose out in the adjustment exercise, if the recommendations are endorsed," the spokesman added.

At present, qualified kindergarten teachers are appointed Kindergarten Principals and paid $11,315 to $17,290 (MPS 10-18) plus a monthly allowance of $960. This is unsatisfactory, since Kindergarten Principals may be in charge of up to 1,000 children for two half-day sessions. Child Care Supervisors currently have their own scale, that is $13,535 - $19,055 (MPS 13-20).

To ensure that the pay and conditions in one sector are not out of line with another sector with similar clients/work, the working group recommended that Child Care Supervisors and a new rank of Kindergarten Principal should be paid on a scale ofMPS 14-22.

In recognition of the fact that some kindergartens are very large (and much larger than child care centres), it has also been proposed that the scale for Kindergarten Principals may be extended to MPS 24 in exceptional cases.

Another recommendation made by the Working Party was the introduction of a hew training rank based on the civil service Training Pay Scale (TPS) on the ground that both grades provided in-service training.

The provision of the new TPS will give unqualified kindergarten teachers an immediate boost in salary ($565 per month) and subsequent increments while under training (at present they stay on MPS I for three years).

They will then get a jump in pay to MPS 7 after two to three years on their appointment as qualified kindergarten teachers following completion of training.

It is further proposed to grant child care staff working in residential and special child care centres an allowance equivalent to one salary increment while they are attending the special training course, and an allowance equivalent to two salary increments upon completion of the training.

The staff working in these centres require special knowledge and skills in looking after children from broken families who may have bchavioural/emotional difficulties or in providing education and training for children with a physical and/or mental disability.

The proposed allowance will provide the appropriate incentive for people to apply to join and for staff to remain in these most demanding fields of child care.

9

The spokesman stressed that the above proposals should be looked at as a whole package to harmonise the different salary scales of KTs and CCWs.

The new Kindergarten Principal scale going well above the present limit of MPS 18 should be welcomed since about one third of the existing qualified kindergarten teachers are in fact principals.

The new TPS for unqualified kindergarten teachers represents a major improvement to their terms of service and should help to reduce their wastage rate which is as high as 30 per cent at present.

Child care workers and Child Care Supervisors will also receive increased salaries in recognition of their qualifications, training and responsibilities.

"Taken as a whole, the new harmonised pay scales will provide a fair and logical pay structure for KTs and CCWs to pursue long term career in pre-primary services," he said.

"The proposed salary scales will represent a major step forward in Government’s efforts to harmonise the services provided by kindergartens and child care centres.

"The proposed pay scales are supported in principle by the Working Party on Kindergarten Education which composes representatives of the kindergarten and child care sectors."

The proposals would be submitted to the Executive Council for consideration in due course.

10

EXISTING SALARY SCALES OF KINDERGARTEN TEACHERS AND CHILD CARE WORKERS

(Current dollar values given within brackets)

Grade of

Kjnd^gmenJ^^hing-Siafl

Kindergarten Principal

MPS 10'18 plus $960 allowance ($11,315 -$17,290 plus $960)

Grade of

Child Care Supervisor

MPS 13-20 ($13,535 -$19,055)

Qualified Kindergarten Teacher

MPS 10-18 ($11,315-$ 17,290)

Qualified Assistant Kindergarten

Teacher

MPS 3-11

($7,295-$ 12,010)

Child Care Worker

MPS 3-11 or 4-13 depending on entry qualifications ($7,295-$12,010 or $7,765-513,535)

Unqualified Kindergarten Teacher

r

MPS 1 ($6,430)

Trainee Child Care Worker

MPS 2-11 or 3-13 depending on entry qualifications ($6,845-$ 12,010 or $7,295-$13,535)

MPS - Master Pay Scale

11

PROPOSED SALARY SCALES OF KINDERGARTEN TEACHERS AND CHILD CARE WORKERS

(Current dollar values given within brackets)

Grade of

Kindergarten Teaching-Staff

Kindergarten Principal

MPS 14-22/24

($14,220 - $20,955/522,975)

Grade of

ChiliCarg-CsnttguSiaff

Child Care Supervisor

MPS 14-22 ($14,220 - $20,955)

Qualified Kindergarten Teacher

MPS 7-18

($9,395 -517,290)

Child Care Worker

MPS 7-17) ($9,395 -$16,475)

Trainee Kindergarten Teacher

TPS 4 -5/6

(56,995 - 57,450/57,940)

Trainee Child Care Worker

TPS 4 - 5/6

($6,995 - $7,450/57,940)

MPS = Master Pay Scale TPS = Training Pay Scale

End/Fridav, April 21, 1995

12

Payroll statistics for December 1994 * * * * ♦

Average labour earnings in all major sectors of the economy taken together, as measured by average payroll per person engaged, recorded a notable increase of 14.3% in December 1994 compared with December 1993, according to statistics released today (Friday) by the Census and Statistics Department.

After discounting changes in consumer prices, the increase was 4.8% in real terms.

Analysed by industry sectors, average payroll per person engaged in the manufacturing sector increased by 15.3% in nominal terms or 5.8% in real terms between December 1993 and December 1994.

For the wholesale, retail and import/export trades, restaurants and hotels sector, average payroll per person engaged increased by 11.8% in nominal terms or 2.6% in real terms.

Average payroll per person engaged in the transport, storage and communication sector increased significantly, by 24.5% in nominal terms or 14.2% in real terms. This was mainly due to the issue of more year-end bonuses in some transport industries in December 1994 when compared with December 1993.

Average payroll per person engaged in the financing, insurance, real estate and business services sector recorded a more moderate increase of 2.1% in nominal terms, equivalent to a decline of 6.4% in real terms. This was mainly related to a slow-down in real estate and securities business in recent quarters.

For the community, social and personal services sector, average payroll per person engaged increased markedly, by 14.8% in nominal terms or 5.3% in real terms.

Changes in average payroll per person engaged between December 1993 and December 1994 for selected industry sectors, in both nominal and real terms, are shown in the attached table.

Statistics on average payroll per person engaged arc compiled at quarterly intervals based on the results of the Labour Earnings Survey conducted by the Census and Statistics Department. The wage indices are also compiled from the same survey at half-yearly intervals for March and September of the year.

13

Average payroll includes wages as well as all other irregular receipts such as bonuses and overtime payment. A spokesman for the department pointed out that statistics on average payroll tend to show larger quarter-to-quarter changes, affected by the number of hours actually worked and the timing of payment of bonuses and back-pay.

Detailed breakdowns of the above statistics are published in the "Quarterly Report of Employment, Vacancies and Payroll Statistics, December 1994". The report will be available for sale at $24 per copy at the Government Publications Centre, Queensway Government Offices, Low Block. Ground Floor, 66 Queensway, Hong Kong and at the Publications Section of Census and Statistics Department, 19th floor, Wanchai Tower, 12 Harbour Road, Wan Chai, Hong Kong.

For enquiries about statistics on average payroll per person engaged, please contact the Census and Statistics Department on tel 2582 5076.

Year-on-Year Change in Average Payroll

Eer. Person Engaged by Selected Industry Sector

% change for December 1994

over December 1993

Selected Industry Sector in nominal terms in real terms

Manufacturing + 15.3 +5.8

Wholesale, Retail and Import/Export Trades, Restaurants and Hotels + 11.8 +2.6

Transport, Storage and Communication +24.5 + 14.2

Financing. Insurance, Real Estate and Business Services +2.1 -6.4

Community, Social and Personal Services +14.8 +5.3

All Industry Sectors + 14.3 +4.8

End/Friday. April 21. 1995

14

Buildings Department to introduce Energy Efficiency Requirements

*****

The Buildings Department will introduce for the first time requirements for buildings to be constructed to be energy efficient, the Assistant Director (Structural Engineering) of Buildings Department, Mr Ng Hon-keung, said in a press conference today (Friday).

"This will come into effect in July when the new Building (Energy Efficiency) Regulations are introduced," he said.

In explaining the new requirements, Mr Ng said: "For the design and planning of energy efficient buildings, the Government is developing a comprehensive energy code.

"As a first step all commercial buildings and hotels must be designed in such a way that solar heat gain into the buildings will be reduced and thus the electricity required for air-conditioning will also be reduced."

This is controlled by limiting the Overall Thermal Transfer Value of the Building.

Under these new requirements, architects and engineers will need to consider thermal conductivity of the walls and roof of the building, to avoid extensive glass walls, to choose windows of low thermal transmittance, or to introduce shading to the windows.

A Code of Practice, which gives all the necessary technical information to enable architects and engineers to design buildings to comply with the Energy Efficiency Regulations, has just been put on sale at the Government Publications Sales Centre.

Professionals involved have co-operated with the Government in drawing up these requirements and they welcome the move.

Developers are being encouraged when planning their next building tq ensure that it meets all the up-to-date energy saving features that are now used worldwide.

Mr Ng emphasised that the Government arc continuing to promote energy efficiency and will be monitoring the effectiveness of these requirements.

Lighting and air-conditioning requirements are also being considered as part of the comprehensive building energy code, he added.

End/Friday, April 21. 1995

15

Occupational Deafness Compensation Scheme *****

Employees suffering from noise-induced deafness by reason of their employment can apply for compensation under the Occupational Deafness Compensation Scheme to be launched in early July.

The Commissioner for Labour. Mr Stephen Ip, said today (Friday) the scheme would provide compensation to workers who had developed occupational deafness.

To apply for compensation, an applicant should be suffering from sensorineural hearing loss amounting to at least 50 decibels in each ear, being due in the case of at least one ear to noise and being the average of pure tone loss measured by audiometry over the one, two and three kilohertz frequencies.

Moreover, he should have at least 10 years of employment in aggregate in specified noisy occupations in Hong Kong and a period of continuous employment in a noisy occupation at any time either within the 12 months preceding the application for compensation or within the 72 months before the implementation date of the scheme.

’’The scheme will be funded by a 1.5 per cent across-the-board levy on the insurance premiums of all employees’ compensation policies, to be collected by the Employees’ Compensation Insurance Levies Management Board,” Mr Ip said.

To set up the scheme, the Government will provide a start-up fund of $215 million, including a government injection of $100 million and an interest-free loan of $115 million.

fhe Government, as an employer, will be required to contribute to the scheme an amount of about $3 million per annum.

An Occupational Deafness Compensation Board, tripartite in composition with medical professionals, will be set up to administer the scheme.

Mr Ip said compensation for occupational deafness would follow the compensation formula for permanent incapacity under the Employees' Compensation Ordinance.

’’Compensation will be paid in the form of a lump sum payment calculated according to a claimant’s age. earnings and degree of permanent incapacity. Under the scheme, total deafness due to prolonged exposure to occupational noise will be equated to 60 per cent incapacity,” he added.

16

Mr Ip emphasised that the scheme was but a remedial measure for dealing with the problem of occupational deafness. The Government, he said, was addressing the issue of the prevention of occupational deafness as a longer term strategy.

"The Factories and Industrial Undertakings (Noise at Work) Regulation is being actively enforced to protect workers' hearing," Mr Ip said.

"When employees in an industrial undertaking are exposed to hazardous noise, the proprietor is required to appoint a competent person to assess the situation.

"The proprietor has then to adopt remedial measures. If these measures prove to be inadequate, he should demarcate ear protection zones or specify ear protection distances and ensure that suitable ear protectors are worn by the employees working within these zones and distances," Mr Ip explained.

Employees should co-operate with employers by using suitable ear protectors provided for them by the proprietor and report any defects in the machine to him.

"Breaching the Regulation will incur a maximum fine of $50,000 for employers and $10,000 for employees," Mr Ip added.

To enhance the awareness of preventive measures on occupational deafness, the Labour Department has initiated various promotions on noise at work requirements and launched industry-based hearing conservation programmes among workers in factories and construction sites.

End/Friday, April 21, 1995

Three bills to be introduced to LegCo

*****

Three bills will be introduced into the Legislative Council on May 3 to give effect to revenue proposals announced in the 1995-96 Budget.

The Bills - the Inland Revenue (Amendment)(No.2) Bill 1995, the Dutiable Commodities (Amendment) Bill 1995 and the Estate Duty (Amendment) Bill 1995 --are published in the Gazette today (Friday).

17

The Inland Revenue (Amendment) (No. 2) Bill 1995 proposes a number of salaries tax concessions with effect from the 1995-96 year of assessment. In particular, the Bill will:

* increase the basic allowance and married person's allowance by 10% to $79,000 and $158,000 respectively;

* increase the single parent allowance by 25% to $40,000;

* increase allowances for dependent parents, grandparents, first and second child by 10%; and

* introduce a new disabled dependant allowance for taxpayers who support a disabled dependant who is eligible to claim the Government's disability allowance.

"This Bill also specifies in greater detail the nature of records which businesses must keep and increases the maximum fine for non-compliance from $5,000 to $100,000. We hope that the new provisions will both help businesses to develop good record keeping practices and encourage compliance with the law." a Government spokesman said.

The Dutiable Commodities (Amendment) Bill 1995 increases the specific duty on hydrocarbon oils and tobacco by 8% in line with inflation in 1994 in order to maintain the real value of the duty.

The Estate Duty (Amendment) Bill 1995 adjusts the level at which estate duty is levied so as to reduce the impact of the tax on relatively small estates. The level below which no duty is payable will be increased from $5.5 million to $6 million. In addition, the Bill also adjusts the band levels above the threshold.

The revenue proposals will, in total, cost $660 million in 1995-96 and $5.2 billion up to 1998-99.

End/Friday. April 21, 1995

18

Japanese bank granted licence * ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

A Government spokesman said today (Friday) that the Hokkoku Bank, Ltd (HB) had been granted a banking licence to conduct business in Hong Kong.

HB is a Japanese regional bank founded in 1943 by the merger of three local banks. It operates 148 offices in the Hokuriku region and has representative offices in London, New York and Hong Kong. It is the 45th largest bank in Japan and ranks 209th in the world in terms of capital.

In Hong Kong, HB has been operating a representative office since November 1989. The bank wishes to upgrade to a branch to provide a wider range of banking services to its customers in Hong Kong, China and Southeast Asian countries. The principal business of the proposed branch includes lending, trade financing and securities investment.

The spokesman said that the continuing interest of foreign banks in entering the local market reflected Hong Kong’s continued importance and attractiveness as a major international financial centre. The licence for HB is the second banking licence granted in 1995.

There are now 181 licensed banks in Hong Kong, of which 150 are incorporated outside the territory. Of these, 44 are from Japan.

End/Friday, April 21, 1995

Voter registration campaign ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

A territory-wide voter registration campaign will be launched this Sunday (April 23) to help eligible residents become electors.

Promotional activities will be organised by each of the 18 district offices, including bus parades in 13 districts, to encourage members of the public to participate in the September Legislative Council elections.

Variety shows and singing performances will be staged in North District, Wong Tai Sin, Tsuen Wan, Wan Chai and Sham Shui Po, while a carnival will be organised in Tuen Mun.

19

For the Islands district, district office staff will travel to various outlying islands to assist residents to register as voters.

Voter registration counters will also be set up in many locations throughout the territory.

Meanwhile, the Commercial Radio Chinese Channel One will also broadcast reports on promotional activities in Central and Western District, Wong Tai Sin and North districts between 2 pm and 5 pm.

Details of the various functions are as follows:

Bus Parade

District Starting Time Venue

Sham Shui Po 11.15am Lai Chi Kok Park

Yau Tsim Mong 2 pm Mong Kok KCR station, Luen Wan Street

Kwun Tong 10 am Kwun Tong Govt Offices Bldg, Tung Yan Street

Wong Tai Sin 10 am San Po Kong Govt Offices Bldg, King Fuk Street

Kowloon City 10 am 141 Kau Pui Lung Road

Southern 10 am Aberdeen Centre Square

Central & Western 12 noon Harbour Building, 38 Pier Road

Eastern 11 am Eastern Law Courts Bldg

Wan Chai 11.30 am Times Square

Yuen Long 10 am 269 Castle Peak Road

Kwai Tsing 10.30 am Kwai Chung Plaza, Kwai Yan Road

Tai Po 11 am Fu Hang Estate Open Stage

Sai Kung 10 am Sai Kung Tang Shiu Kin

Sports Ground

20

Variety Shows/Singing performances

District Time Venue

Wan Chai 11 am-11.30am Times Square

Sham Shui Po llam-12.30pm Lai Chi Kok Park

Tsuen Wan 1.30pm-4.30pm Luk Yeung Exhibition Square, Luk Yeung Sun Tsuen

Wong Tai Sin 2 pm - 5pm Podium Plaza, Lok Fu Shopping Centre (Phase II)

North District 2.30pm-5pm North District Community Centre, Lung Sum Road

Carnival

Tuen Mun 1 pm-6 pm Tuen Mun Cultural Square

Attention News Editors:

Your representatives are invited to cover these activities.

End/Friday, April 21, 1995

Lady Hogan has passed away ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

The Judiciary has received information that Lady Hogan, wife of former Chief Justice, Sir Michael Hogan, has passed away.

There will be a memorial service on Monday (April 24) at the Chelsea Roman Catholic Church in the UK.

Lady Hogan was the founder of the Hong Kong Community Chest. Sir Michael was Chief Justice of the Hong Kong Judiciary between 1955 and 1970.

End/Friday, April 21, 1995

21

Pre-qualification submissions for bridge construction *****

The Territory Development Department is inviting pre-qualification submissions for the construction of Duplicate Tsing Yi South Bridge.

The project comprises building two precast segmental balanced cantilever bridges over the Rambler Channel together with approach viaducts, seawall, retaining walls, vehicular underpass, reclamation, submarine outfalls and noise mitigation structures.

The works are expected to begin in January 1996 for completion in 31 months.

A notice inviting pre-qualification submissions was gazetted today (Friday).

Only contractors on the Approved Contractors for Public Works List I Group C for roads and drainage works, or List II for roads and drainage works are invited to apply for prequalification documents from Scott Wilson Kirkpatrick (Hong Kong) Limited. 38th floor, Metroplaza lower 1. 223 Hing Fong Road. Kwai Fong, New Territories.

The closing date for returning the document is noon on May 12, 1995.

The department plans to invite pre-qualified contractors to tender for the contract in July.

End/Friday, April 21. 1995

Laying of fresh water mains in Tuen Mun *****

The Government intends to lay four fresh water mains with a diameter ranging from 300 to 1,200 millimetres within an area of about 450 square metres of foreshore and sea-bed at a section of Tuen Mun Nullah adjoining the Tuen Mun Hospital.

The works form part of a project aimed at improving fresh water supply to west Tuen Mun.

The works will commence in August for completion in I ebruary. 1997.

22

The extent of the area affected is described in a notice published in the Government Gazette today (Friday).

Any person who considers that he has an interest, right or easement in or over the foreshore and sea-bed involved may submit a written objection to the Director of Lands before June 21.

The English and Chinese notices together with the related plan (No. TMM 1429) can be seen on notice boards posted near the site.

The plan can also be inspected at the Survey and Mapping Office, Lands Department, 14th floor, Murray Building. Garden Road, Hong Kong, (where copies can be purchased on order) and at the Tucn Mun District Office, second floor, Tuen Mun Government Offices, 1 Tuen Hi Road, Tuen Mun, the New Territories.

End/Friday, April 21, 1995

Road bridge for Siu Lek Yuen *****

The Territory Development Department is planning to construct a five-lane dual carriageway road bridge over Siu Lek Yuen Nullah, Sha Tin.

The project, which is part of the continuing development programme for the new town, also includes the construction of a pedestrian subway across Siu Lek Yuen Road, and a restricted access road.

The roadworks will provide an alternative vehicular, pedestrian and bicycle access for the Shek Mun industrial area.

A notice of the proposed works was gazetted today (Friday).

The plan and scheme of the proposed works can be seen during office hours at the Public Enquiry Centre of the Central and Western District Office; the Sha Tin District Lands Office, and the Sha Tin District Office.

Any person wishing to object to the proposal should write to the Secretary for Transport. Central Government Offices, East Wing, second floor. Lower Albert Road, Hong Kong no later than June 20, describing his interest and manner in which he will be affected.

End/Friday, April 21. 1995

23 -

Roadworks for Ma Wan proposed *****

The Government has .proposed constructing roadworks on Ma Wan Island for providing access to the proposed development on the island.

The roadworks will include an elevated vehicular link between the Lantau Fixed Crossing and Ma Wan, tis well as a local road network.

A notice of the proposed works was gazetted today (Friday).

The plan and scheme of the proposed works can be seen at the Public Enquiry Services Centre of the Central and Western District Office; the Tsuen Wan District Lands Office and the Tsuen Wan District Office.

Any person objecting to the proposal should write to the Secretary for Transport, Central Government Offices, East Wing, second floor, Lower Albert Road, Hong Kong no later than June 20 describing his interest and manner in which he will be affected.

End/Friday, April 21, 1995

Tenders for refuse station in Central

*****

The Architectural Services Department is inviting tenders for the construction of a refuse collection point at the junction of Caine Road and Arbuthnot Road in Central.

The works will comprise the construction of a two-storey refuse collection ; point with a gross area of 540 square metres.

Works are expected to start in July for completion by May 1996.

Tender forms and further particulars may be obtained from the Architectural Services Department, 34th floor Queensway Government Offices, 66 Queensway, Hong Kong. "i- '■ . • t

Tender offer will close on Friday, May 12, 1995.

End/Friday, April 21, 1995

24

Closure of Hong Wah Street

*****

The Government has proposed to permanently close part of Hong Wah Street to the south of the carpark entrance of the Tsz Wan Shan East Estate Community Centre from mid-August.

The closure is to avoid the excessive gradient ofrthe Street and make way for the adjacent redevelopment of Tsz On Estate Phase I.

A notice on the proposed road closure was gazetted today (Friday).

The plan and schedule may be inspected during office hours at:

The Public Enquiry Service Centre of the Central and Western District Office, ground floor, Harbour Building, 38 Pier Road, Central, Hong Kong;

* Kowloon East District Lands Office, Yau Ma Tei Carpark Building, 10th floor, 250 Shanghai Street, Kowloon; and

Tsz Wan shan Sub-office of the Wong Tai Sin District Office, first floor, Tsz Wan Shan South Estate Community Centre, Shung Wah Street, Tsz Wan Shan, Kowloon.

Any person wishing to object to the proposal should write to the Secretary for Transport, Central Government Offices, East Wing, second floor, Lower Albert Road, Hong Kong, no later than June 20 describing his interest and manner in which he will be affected.

End/Friday, April 21, 1995

Closure of Tai Kok Tsui illegal structures sought ♦ * ♦ ♦ ♦

The Building Authority is seeking to close eight unauthorised structures in Tai Kok Tsui so that they can be demolished without endangering the occupants and the public.

The single-storey structures used for dwelling are located on 11th floor, 12th floor and 13th floor of a building at 1, 3 and 5 Li Tak Street respectively.

25

Notices applying for Closure Orders from the District Court under the Buildings Ordinance on June 21 were posted on the premises today (Friday).

Demolition works are expected to start as soon as the Closure Orders are issued.

End/Friday, April 21, 1995

Hong Kong Monetary Authority money market operations

*****

$ million Time (hours) Cumulative change (Smillion)

Opening balance in the account 2,065 0930 +628

Closing balance in the account 1,653 1000 +628

Change attributable to : 1100 +642

Money market activity +643 1200 +643

LAF today -1,055 1500 +643

1600 +643

LAF rate 4.25% bid/6.25% offer TWI 118.8 *+0.6* 21.4.95

Hong Kong Monetary Authority

EF bills EF notes/Hong Kong Government bonds

Terms Yield Term Issue Coupon Price Yield

1 week 5.19 13 months 2605 6.35 100.49 5.95

1 month 5.18 22 months 2702 7.50 102.08 6.37

3 months 5.35 27 months 3707 6.95 100.95 6.59

6 months 5.54 33 months 3801 8.00 103.14 6.84

12 months 5.89 59 months 5003 7.75 101.82 7.43

Total turnover of bills and bonds - $9,395 million

Closed April 21, 1995

End/Friday, April 21, 1995

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

ISSUED BY GOVERNMENT INFORMATION SERVICES

BEACONSFIELD HOUSE, HONG KONG. TEL: 842 8777

Saturday, April 22,1995

Contents Page No.

Chief Secretary's media session...........................   1

ACP contract for roads and drainage works awarded........... 3

Architecture exhibition seen by 90,000 visitors............. 3

Social worker commended..................................... 4

Hong Kong Monetary Authority money market operations......... 5

Sunday, April 23,1995

Contents Page No,

Hong Kong tops the world container throughput............... 6

Four new aided day creches open soon........................ 7

Action against selling of substandard plugs and adaptors.... 9

Voter registration day well-received....................... 10

Get registered to vote: District Officers.................... 12

Water Supplies Department warns against illegal use of water. 12

How to help pupils with problems........................... 13

Country park visitors urged to take part in meeting........ 15

1

Chief Secretary's media session *****

. x >i.

The following is a transcript of the Chief Secretary, Mrs Anson Chan's media session this (Saturday) afternoon:

Chief Secretary: Good afternoon everyone. I thought I would have a word with you so that you don't have to come out to the airport when I leave this evening. You all know I shall be paying a one-week visit to three European countries, that is Brussels, the Hague and Bonn. This will be my first official visit to the EU countries since I assumed the post of Chief Secretary. I very much welcome this opportunity to meet with the Prime Minister of Belgium and the Prime Minister of the Netherlands and with other senior officials and with the business community in these three countries, because it will give me a very good opportunity to bring them up to date on what's hapenning in Hong Kong, to try and address matters of mutual concern and in particular to explain to the people in these countries how we are preparing for the transition and for the reversion of sovereignty to China in 1997. I am sure that this will be a very, very productive and fruitful visit and I am very much looking forward to it.

Question: Mrs Chan, the experts in the JLG are meeting next week to talk about the Court of Final Appeal. Is this the last chance to come to some kind of substantive agreement... so that the Bill can be introduced with the agreement of Beijing.

Chief Secretary: I am sure you are all aware of the importance to Hong Kong, not only to the people in Hong Kong but also to the wider investing community for us to be seen to be taking every possible step to set up the Court of Final Appeal as soon as possible. We have a 1991 agreement with the Chinese. Both sides have stated on many occasions that they desired to see this Court of Final Appeal established before 1997. The Chinese have had the draft Bill since May. We've had several discussions with the Chinese and we've answered all the questions that they have put to us so far. We understand that the Chinese have farther questions and I very much hope that at the next expert group meeting, which is scheduled for next week, that the Chinese will let us have all their outstanding questions and I can assure them that we will do our very best to answer their questions. I further hope that either at these expert group meeting or very, very shortly after that the Chinese will be able to let us know that they agree to the draft Bill so that we can put it forward to the Legislative Council. It remains our objective to try and get the legislation enacted before the current session of Legco ends, which is towards the end of July.

2

Question: can I take it it is the last chance. You know time is running out. How much more time...

Chief Secretary: We want to put the Bill forward with the agreement of the Chinese and clearly we are giving every possible opportunity to the Chinese to comment on the Bill. Because as you know the draft Bill has been ready some months but it is because we very much want to have the agreement and the cooperation of the Chinese on this draft Bill that we have waited until now. But you also realise that time is running very short and there is not much time left. So, I repeat again I very much hope that the Chinese will let us have an ... approval at the next expert group meeting or very, very shortly after that.

Question: (PWC's criteria for Hong Kong citizens after 1997)

Chief Secretary: There are a number of questions, outstanding questions, and issues to be resolved concerning immigration matters. Who is a permanent Hong Kong resident, who has a right of abode and what sort of travel documents there will be after 1997. These are all questions that we are anxious to discuss and resolve with the Chinese side. As you know the Director of Immigration will be going up very shortly to continue his informal discussions with the Chinese and I very much hope that this next round of discussion will produce some concrete result. I think the Chinese are fully aware that the community here is very concerned about these issues and I am sure that both sides will work very hard to try and resolve these issue as soon as possible.

End/Saturday, April 22, 1995

3

ACP contract for roads and drainage works awarded

* * * * *

The Secretary for the Treasury, on the advice of the Central Tender Board, has approved the award of an Airport Core Programme (ACP) contract for the construction of roads and drainage works in the southern area of the West Kowloon Reclamation.

The contract, valued at $467.4 million, has been awarded by the Territory Development Department to Paul Y Construction Limited of Hong Kong.

The work will comprise mainly the construction of 4.5 kilometres of roads, related drainage works, fresh water and salt water mains, as. well as a footbridge and an extension of an existing pedestrian subway at the junction of Jordan Road and Ferry Street.

The contract also includes non-ACP works which involve part of the works for the roads, drains and water mains.

Work will start later this month for completion in mid 1997.

End/Saturday, April 22, 1995

Architecture exhibition seen by 90,000 visitors

* * * * *

More than 90,000 people have visited the city planning and architecture exhibition, entitled "Hong Kong - City of Vision", since it opened last week.

The exhibition in the 46th floor Sky Lobby of Central Plaza in Wan Chai has attracted not just office workers and professionals but also thousands of students and tourists.

4

While the current exhibition will end on April 30, in view of its popularity, there are plans to move it to Kowloon and the New Territories afterwards.

In conjunction with the exhibition, there will also be open lectures by two architects, Dr Simon Kwan and Mr Anthony H H Ng, and the Director of Planning, Dr Peter K S Pun, on Tuesday (April 25) beginning at 6 pm. The lectures will be held at the Rayson Huang Theatre of University of Hong Kong.

Admission to the exhibition and lectures are free.

End/Saturday, April 22, 1995

Social worker commended *****

The Director of Social Welfare, Mr Ian Strachan, commended a social worker for her professionalism in handling a case which occurred in Yau Ma Tei last Tuesday (April 18).

Miss Wong Wai-sheung, probation officer in the South Kowloon Magistracy, sustained slight injuries during a confrontation when making a home visit to a client in a private premises in Woosung Street, Yau Ma Tei.

Mr Strachan yesterday (Friday) presented a commendation letter to Miss Wong to express the department’s deep appreciation on the way she handled the situation.

“You have fully demonstrated your experience, serenity and professional skills and I feel proud to have you on the staff of this department,” he said.

Mr Strachan also wished Miss Wong a speedy recovery.

End/Saturday, April 22, 1995

5

Hong Kong Monetary Authority money market operations

***>!< *

$ million Time (hours) Cumulative change ($ million)

Opening balance in the account 1,653 09:30 +45

Closing balance in the account 1,493 10:00 +45

Change attributable to: 11:00 +45

Money market activity +45 11:30 +45

LAF today -205 15:00

LAF rate 4.25% bid/6.25% offer TW1 118.4 *-0.4* 22.4.95

End/Saturday, April 22, 1995

6

Hong Kong tops the world container throughput

*****

With an annual throughput of more than 11 million TEUs (twenty foot equivalent units) in 1994, Hong Kong for the third successive year tops the world’s container throughput as the busiest container port in the world, the Director of Marine, Mr Ian Dale, announced today (Sunday).

Hong Kong acquired the world's busiest container port status first in 1992 when it handled 7,971,758 TEUs. In the following year, the annual container throughput rose by 15.5 per cent to 9,204,236 TEUs, and last year at 11,050,050 TEUs, an increase of 20.1 per cent was achieved.

"Recently the annual increases in throughput are exceeding our long term forecasts," Mr Dale said.

"While these figures show a sustained and growing demand, which the port is adapting to meet, they also clearly underline the urgent need for the development of additional container terminal facilities to meet forecast increases," he said.

"Hong Kong, and its adjacent port must co-ordinate development to ensure their facilities are in place to meet the needs of the trade," Mr Dale added.

The container terminals in Kwai Chung including terminal 8 on Stonecutters Island handled 7,278,117 TEUs, in 1994, representing a 25.6 per cent increase.

During the same year, throughput in river trade sector rose by 52.8 per cent to 932,721 TEUs while the stream operators handled 2,840,392 TEUs, an increase of 1.2 per cent over a year ago.

The comparative container statistics in TEUs are:

7

1994 1993 Percentage Increase

Kwai Chung Container Terminals 7,278,117 5,796,570 25.6

Stream and Elsewhere 2,840,392 2,806,220 1.2

River Trade 932,721 610,313 52.8

To avoid double counting figures are adjusted downwards by 8,867 TEUs in 1993 and 1,180 TEUs in 1994 respectively.

End/Sunday, April 23, 1995

Four new aided day creches open soon *****

Four new aided day creches will be open in the next three months to meet growing demand for day creche services.

The Senior Social Work Officer (Child Care Centres) of the Social Welfare Department (SWD), Mr Chan Kam-chor, said the four creches, with a total of 250 places, would be in Wong Tai Sin, Sha Tin, Tai Po and Tsing Yi.

At present, there are 21 aided day creches providing 1,250 places throughout the territory. Managed by 10 non- governmental organisations, they are in Wan Chai, Sai Ying Pun, Shau Kei Wan, Hung Hom, Kowloon City, Mong Kok, Ngau Tau Kok, Wang Tan Hom, Sau Mau Ping, Shek Kip Mei, Lam Tin, Yau Tong, Tsuen Wan, Kwai Chung, Yuen Long, Tuen Mun and Fanling.

’’The White Paper On Social Welfare has set out the objective of phased expansion of day creche services, especially in the new towns. Of the four creches to be operational later, three arc in the new towns," Mr Chan said.

8

Day creches provide full-day care and cater to children under the age of two in a healthy and happy environment, lending a helping hand to social needs families and working parents.

Staff are professionally trained to look after children at an average ratio of one to six. Physical and intellectual programmes, including drawing, storytelling, muscle exercises and games, are tailor-made for children suitable for their age. All toys and teaching materials used at day creches are specially selected and designed to ensure safety.

’’There is a schedule of daily activities to enable children to develop healthy habits. There is a timetable, for example, for feeding and rest. We prepare a balanced diet scaled to the age and need of the children,” Mr Chan said.

Day creches are generally open from 8 am to 6 pm on weekdays and from 8 am to 1 pm on Saturdays. They are closed on Sundays and public holidays.

Members of the public who want to enquire day creche services are welcome to contact the Child Care Centre Advisory Inspectorate of the SWD on tel 2836 3114 or call the department’s hotline 2343 2255. They can also approach any day creche to find out more about the services.

"Our staff will make regular inspections to ensure that the provision of services at day creches is kept to the required standard," Mr Chan said.

Mr Chan noted that a number of creches also provided half-day and fullday occasional care services. He called on parents to make full use of these services and not to leave children unattended at home under any circumstances.

"Persons from low-income families who need services because of work or other reasons but have financial difficulties can apply for fee assistance.

"The amount of assistance to be offered is calculated on the basis of the family’s disposable income and, at its maximum, can cover the full cost," he added.

End/Sunday, April 23, 1995

9

Action against selling of substandard plugs and adaptors

*****

The Electrical and Mechanical Services Department (EMSD) will take action against people who still sell substandard plugs and adaptors, a spokesman for the department warned today (Sunday).

The Plugs and Adaptors (Safety) Regulation which came into effect on March 23, ban the sale of all such products not meeting the safety standards prescribed in the regulation.

The spokesman said EMSD had so far inspected 149 shops for substandard electrical products since the regulation was enforced.

"Of these, 39 shops were found still supplying plugs, adaptors or electrical products which fail to comply with the regulation.

"Warning letters have been served to these suppliers and prosecution against the serious offenders is being considered," he said.

The maximum penalty for the offence, is a fine of $50,000 on first conviction and a fine of $100,000 and imprisonment for six months on subsequent conviction.

The spokesman also noted that there was a common misconception that the new statutory requirement to replace the two-pin plugs of the household electrical products with suitable three-pin plugs could not provide adequate protection because there was still no earthing connection after the replacement.

He pointed out that not every type of electrical product requires earthing connection.

"Some electrical products which arc provided with double or reinforced insulation do not require earthing connection.

"The major objective of the requirement to replace two- pin plugs of household electrical products with suitable three-pin plugs is to make sure the plugs compatible with the three-pin-hole sockets in Hong Kong so that the hazards such as loose electrical contact can be eliminated." the spokesman explained.

End/Sunday. April 23. Ic>95

10

Voter registration day well-received *****

The five-month voter registration drive reaches a crescendo with the launching of the Voter Registration Day today (Sunday) with hundreds of thousands of people throughout Hong Kong being approached to register to vote.

Hundreds of dedicated district and housing staff, community organisers and volunteers put their collective shoulders behind the wheel to promote the "Get-Yourself-Register" message which is fresh and alive in every corner of the territory.

There was an impressive line-up of activities and assortment of programmes in all the 18 districts with an overall aim of providing an enjoyable environment in which to register.

Local celebrities were called in to help spread the message. Pop singers were invited to translate the message into songs at popular shopping centres and parks spotted with temporary registration booths and man-size comic characters and mascots to draw crowds.

Brightly decorated buses boasting eye-catching features paraded the busy streets in districts such as Kwai Tsing, Sai Kung, Yuen Long, Central and Western, Kowloon City, Wan Chai, Wong Tai Sin, Southern and Yau Tsim Mong.

A giant balloon was flown 31 metres above Sha Tin Central Park with flying messages of voter registration.

The interest of islanders and holiday-seekers were also whooped up when they saw a government vessel "Clementi" decorated with distinctive banners cruising around Lantau, Peng Chau and Cheung Chau. Lion dances were performed at Cheung Chau pier.

11

There was a flow of 20-plus taxis donning posters and messages in the North District.

Joyful holiday shoppers at Sha Tin New Town Plaza wrapped a central theme concert organised by Radio Television Hong Kong featuring performances by pop singers including Andy Lau, Noodle Cheng, Leo Koo and Winnie Lau.

The Chairman of the Boundary and Election Commission, Mr Justice Woo Kwok-hing and the two Commission members, Mr Norman Leung and Mr Chan Wing-tai, also attended the concert.

The chairman urged all eligible electors to support the voter registration drive.

"Register to vote is a simple matter, it will only take you a few minutes and you will be entitled to vote in September's Legislative Council Elections," he said.

He also thanked all those involved in today's activities for a job well done, adding that putting together a territory-wide function like this needed a lot of hard work and good partnership.

Mr Justice Woo said district staff would visit companies and factories in the first two weeks of May to help employees register as electors.

The Commission also visited Causeway Bay and Tsim Sha Tsui to see how the registration work went about.

The registration drive will last until June 1.

End/Sunday, April 23, 1995

12

Get registered to vote: District Officers *****

"Get registered to vote" was the message conveyed by the 18 district officers (DOs) in the territory to all the residents today (Sunday).

Officiating at promotional activities organised by their respective district offices, the DOs urged all eligible voters to cast their ballots in the September Legislative Council elections.

In this territory-wide voter registration campaign, bus parades were conducted in 13 districts and variety shows or singing performances were staged in Sham Shui Po, Wong Tai Sin, Tsuen Wan, Wan Chai and North District.

A carnival was also organised in Tuen Mun.

For the Islands District, district office staff travelled to various outlying islands to assist residents to become electors.

Voter registration counters were also set up in many locations throughout the territory.

End/Sunday, April 23, 1995

Water Supplies Department warns against illegal use of water

*****

The Water Supplies Department today (Sunday) issued a warning that any person caught illegally using water from fire hydrants and other fire fighting equipment will be prosecuted.

The warning follows the arrest earlier of a taxi driver who was caught red-handed washing his vehicle with water from a fire hydrant/hose near the MTR station in Tsuen Wan.

13

He admitted a charge of illegal use of water before a magistrate who fined him $2,500.

A department spokesman said a cooked food stall operator at On Ting estate in Tuen Mun was also due to appear in Court soon.

' ..--J

He has been charged with illegally altering a fire fighting equipment and illegal use of water from the fire fighting facility.

End/Sunday, April 23, 1995

How to help pupils with problems *****

The Education Department has recently issued a circular to principals of all primary and secondary schools in advising them how to handle student problems.

The circular provided some practical suggestions to school principals, teachers and parents on how to help pupils with problems.

An Education Department spokesman said it had always been the department's concern about students with behaviour problems and schools are encouraged to adopt a more positive approach in helping these students.

The spokesman said: "Most of the problems are neither serious nor permanent and can be overcome if appropriate help can be given in time to pupils concerned."

He advised schools and parents to work closely in helping pupils with behaviour problems as prevention was better than cure.

14

"Paying more attention to students' overall development, in particular ‘ their emotional development, is better than putting too much emphasis on their academic achievement," the spokesman added.

• . ’ • • •

Teachers should observe carefully those pupils who tend to break the school rules frequently, those who are withdrawn, have sudden behaviour or mood changes or tend to be attention-seeking.

When helping students with behaviour problems, teachers should be patient, sensitive to the pupils' feeling, warm and concerned but firm and consistent.

Teachers should also liaise with the parents to seek their co-operation and support. . ,r

The spokesman said: "Class teachers should seek advice and assistance from the school principals, guidance teachers and parents when having problems in understanding the pupil with behaviour problems.

"If required, teachers can also seek professional advice from the Student Guidance Teacher, the School Social Worker or the Special Education Section," he said. J

The spokesman stressed that if disciplinary measures were considered necessary, they should be carried out through,more positive means. . A,

• ■'-I • • ■ • • ■ i- ■ •' *

He said teachers should inform parents of the misbehaviour of the pupils and the disciplinary measure to be taken. <r.......v

On the other hand, he said, teachers should be sensitive to the feelings of the pupils when carrying out any punitive measures.

'f ... - . • . . »

End/Sunday, April 23, 1995

15

Country park visitors urged to take part in meeting *****

Country park visitors wishing to make suggestions on improving facilities and services at these scenic areas are called on to register as participants in a biannual liaison group meeting next month.

Members of the public with first hand experience of country parks are also welcome to take part in the meeting to discuss with Agriculture and Fisheries Department (AFD) staff on matters concerning country parks and special areas.

The forthcoming Country Park Visitors Liaison Group meeting will be held between 2.30 pm and 4.30 pm on May 27 (Saturday) at the Ranger Head Office, Shing Mun Country Park.

An AFD spokesman said the liaison group, established in 1993, was aimed at collecting views from the public, particularly country park visitors, to improve facilities and services provided in these areas.

Those interested in participating in the May 27 meeting are required to collect a leaflet on the liaison group from any of the country park visitor centres in Pak Tam Chung, Shing Mun, Tai Mo Shan, Aberdeen, Tai Mei Tuk and Clear Water Bay and the Lions Nature Education Centre in Sai Kung. The leaflet contains a reply slip which, after being filled in, should be returned to AFD on or before May 10.

Copies of the leaflet have also been sent to Country Parks Board members and hiking groups to invite them to attend or nominate representatives to take part in the meeting.

The spokesman said response on previous liaison group meeting held last November had been encouraging, with about 20 public representatives taking part.

Among issues discussed at the meeting were: public transport information, telephone helpline, new barbecue sites, way marker improvements, littering and traffic problems, kiosk and toilet facilities and visitor rescue.

16

?- is? ■ " . . '"j

The spokesman expected more people with better suggestion would participate in the forthcoming meeting following the increased awareness in the community on the importance of protecting country parks.

Further enquiries on the liaison group or its meeting can be made to AFD's Country Parks Protection Section on 2733 2132 or 2733 2125.

End/Sunday, April 23, 1995

■ ■. . ■ >■:•>,I ,‘i v w._.

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

ISSUED BY GOVERNMENT INFORMATION SERVICES BEACONSFIELD HOUSE, HONG KONG. TEL: 842 8777

Monday, April 24,1995

Chief Secretary meets top European Union leaders........................... 1

Consumer Price Indices for March 1995 ..................................... 2

Governor's monthly anti-drugs visit........................................ 9

HKMA appoints new Executive Director (Banking Supervision)............ 10

S for H visits pubic housing estates.................................. 11

Closure of illegal rooftop structures on Kingland Apartments.......... 11

Hong Kong remains a magnet for multi-nationals............................ 12

Beach, marine and inland water quality reports published.................. 14

Household Expenditure Survey 1994-95 ..................................... 16

Supply of particulars in Central Register of Establishments............... 17

Royal Navy sailor decorated........................................... 18

Water storage figure...................................................... 19

Fresh water cuts in Sham Shui Po and Sai Kung............................. 20

Hong Kong Monetary Authority tender results............................... 20

Hong Kong Monetary Authority money market operations...................... 21

1

Chief Secretary meets top European Union leaders *****

The Chief Secretary, Mrs Anson Chan, held top level meetings in Brussels today (Monday) at the start of her week-long official visit to three European countries - Belgium, the Netherlands and Germany.

In Brussels, Mrs Chan met the President of the European Commission, Mr Jacques Santer, and the Vice-President, Sir Leon Brittan.

The talks covered Hong Kong/EU relations in general and a range of transitional issues. Both Mr Santer and Sir Leon stressed the EU's interest in seeing a continuation of Hong Kong’s present systems beyond 1997.

Mrs Chan briefed them on what was happening in Hong Kong and also raised the issue of visa-free travel arrangements for Hong Kong citizens visiting EU countries.

Mrs Chan was also briefed by Sir Leon on his visit to China last week where he met the Director of the Hong Kong and Macau Affairs Office, Mr Lu Ping. Sir Leon said he had told Mr Lu that the early setting up of the Court of Final Appeal would strengthen European confidence in the future of Hong Kong.

The Chief Secretary's visit to Europe is aimed at strengthening ties with the European Union, which forms the third largest market for Hong Kong’s worldwide trade. It also comes on the heels of an initiative by the European Commission which last year produced a policy paper calling for a more pro-active economic strategy towards Asia.

Earlier in the day Mrs Chan had a breakfast meeting with a group of business leaders, including the Chairman of the Federation of Belgian Industries, Mr G Jacobs.

The industrialists mentioned that they were doing good business with and through Hong Kong at present but they expressed concern that they would be able to continue to do so after 1997.

Mrs Chan said in view of the EU's growing interest in the Asian region it was necessary to update European leaders, both in the private sector and government, on the latest developments in Hong Kong, not only as a gateway to China, but the region as a whole.

2

She pointed out that European companies already had a significant stake in most sectors of Hong Kong’s economy - manufacturing, trade, finance, insurance, retailing and others.

I • >

”We need to assure investors that Hong Kong will continue to be an ideal place to do business, not only in the lead up to 1997, but well into the future,” Mrs Chan said.

The Chief Secretary also explained during her meetings how Hong Kong was preparing to resolve the transitional issues in co- operation with the Chinese authorities.

End/Monday, April 24, 1995

Consumer Price Indices for March 1995 ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

The Consumer Price Index (A) in March 1995 was 9.5% higher than in March 1994, according to figures released today (Monday) by the Census and Statistics Department. This was higher than the corresponding increase of 8.9% in February this year.

Commenting on the CPI figures for March, a Government spokesman said: "The pick-up in consumer price inflation was attributable to both continuing inflationary pressures from domestic sources as well as a greater amount of imported inflation.

"On domestically generated inflation, continuing rapid increases were recorded for rentals of private housing and prices of consumer services, and electricity charges were also raised," the spokesman said.

• *• ■ hk.

"As to imported inflation, there were faster price increases in recent months for foodstuffs, including fresh produce as well as processed food items. This may be due in part to the effect of inflation in China filtering through into Hong Kong via higher prices of such imported food items.

"Also showing considerable price increases since the early part of last year were clothing and footwear. This may be due to higher import prices in local currency terms brought about by the weakening of the Hong Kong dollar in line with the US dollar," the spokesman added.

3

The rate of increase in the Consumer Price Index (B) and the Hang Seng CPI were 10.0% and 9.9% respectively, compared with the corresponding increases of 9.6% and 9.7% in February.

The Composite CPI, which is compiled based on the combined expenditure pattern of households covered by the three CPIs, showed an increase of 9.8% in March 1995 over the same month in 1994. This was also higher than the corresponding increase of 9.4% in February.

Comparing Maith 1995 with March 1994, relatively faster price increases than the overall average increase were recorded for housing (13.2% in the CPI(A) and 14.5% in the CPI(B)); clothing and footwear (12.2% and 13.5%); miscellaneous services (11.8% and 11.1%); and fuel and light (10.2% and 10.3%). ;’ • • • ...

On the other hand, relatively slower price increases than the overall average increase were recorded for durable goods (3.9% in the CPI(A) and 4.4% in the CPI(B)); meals bought away from home (6.9% and 6.7%); alcoholic drinks and tobacco (7.1% and 6.4%); food (excluding meals bought away from home) (8.2% and 8.0%); transport (8.6% and 8.5%); and miscellaneous goods (8.4% and 7.2%).

Comparing March 1995 with February 1995, the CPI(A), CPI(B) and Composite CPI all increased by 0.5%.

For the first quarter of 1995, the CPI(A) and CPI(B) were, on average, higher by 9.5% and 10.0% respectively over a year earlier. The corresponding increase for the Composite CPI was 9.8%.

For the 12 months ended March 1995, the CPI(A) and CPI(B) were, on average, higher by 8.7% and 9.2% respectively than in the preceding 12-month period. The corresponding increase for the Composite CPI was 9.2%.

Seasonally adjusted series are also available for the CPIs. The deseasonalised CPI(A) and CPI(B) increased at an average rate of 0.7% and 0.8% per month during the three months ended March 1995. The corresponding increase for the Composite CPI was 0.6%.

Further details are shown in Tables 1-2 and Charts 1-4.

4

The Consumer Price Index Report

More details are given in the "Consumer Price Index Report" for March 1995, which is available at $23 per copy from the Government Publications Centre, Queensway Government Offices, Low Block, gound floor, 66 Queensway, Hong Kong; or from the Publications Section of the Census and Statistics Department, 19th floor, Wanchai Tower, 12 Harbour Road, Wan Chai, Hong Kong,

For local and overseas mailings, contact should be made with the Information Services Department, 28th floor, Siu On Centre, 188 Lockhart Road, Wan Chai, Hong Kong.

For enquiries about the indices, please telephone the Consumer Price Index Section of the Census and Statistics Department at 2805 6403.

Details regarding the Hang Seng CPI are contained in the Hang Seng CPI Report issued by the Economic Research Department of Hang Seng Bank Ltd.

5

Table 1 Consumer Price Indices and Rates of Increase for March 1995 (Oct. 89 - Sep. 90 = 100)

CPI(A) CPI(B) Hang Seng CPI Caiposite CPI

Ccnponent Index for Mar 95 % change over Mar 94 Index for Mar 95 % change over Mar 94 Index for Mar 95 % change over Mar 94 Index for Mar 95 % change over Mar 94

Food 149.4 +7.5 151.2 47.2 153.1 +7.5 150.8 +7.4

Meals bought away from heme 160.6 46.9 160.0 46.7 160.4 +7.2 x 160.3 ft' 46.9

Food, excluding meals bought away from heme 138.3 4-8.2 139.0 48.0 140.6 +8.1 138.9 +8.1

Housing 179.1 4-13.2 183.5 414.5 187.2 +13.5 183.3 +13.7

Fuel and light 134.4 4-10.2 133.9 410.3 132.5 +8.4 133.9 49.9

Alcoholic drinks and tobacco 197.0 4-7.1 185.8 46.4 180.2 +5.9 190.7 46.7

Clothing and footwear 140.4 4-12.2 142.1 413.5 149.7 +12.2 144.2 +12.7

Durable goods 115.7 4-3.9 115.9 44.4 119.3 +3.2 116.8 +3.9

Miscellaneous goods 140.1 4-8.4 135.6 47.2 133.5 46.9 136.7 +7.6

Transport 153.7 4-8.6 153.7 48.5 153.7 +8.1 153.7 +8.4

Miscellaneous services 171.2 4-11.8 165.0 +11.1 153.0 +8.9 163.3 +10.7

All items 156.1 49.5 157.4 410.0 159.7 49.9 157.5 +9.8

Monthly consumer price indices are carpi led on the basis of (a) expenditure patterns of relevant households and (b) prices collected currently in the month. The expenditure patterns underlying the 1989/90-based consumer price indices are based on those patterns derived from the 1989/90 Household Expenditure Survey. The CPI (A) is based on the expenditure pattern of about 50% of households in Hong Kong, which had an average monthly expenditure of $2,50O-$9,999. in 1989/90(broadly equivalent to $3,600-$14,600 at 1994 prices). The CPI(B) is based on the expenditure pattern of the next 30% of households, which had an average monthly expenditure of $10,000-$17,499 in 1989/90(broadly equivalent to $14,6(X>-$26,000 at 1994 prices). The Hang Seng CPI is based cn the expenditure pattern of the next 10% of households, which had an average monthly expenditure of $17,500-$37,499 in 1989/90(broadly equivalent to $26,000-$56,000 at 1994 prices).

khereas the CPI (A), CPI(B) and Hang Seng CPI are based on the expenditure patterns of groups of households with different magnitudes of household expenditure, the Caiposite CPI is compiled based ai tlie expenditure pattern of all these households taken together. Ihus, while the CPI (A), CPI(B) and Hang Seng CPI show the inpact of consumer price changes on different groups of households, the Caiposite CPI shows thg impact of consumer price changes on the household sector generally.

6

Table 2 i‘i.r Consumer Price Indices for January 1992 - March 1995

(Oct. 89 - Sep. 90 = 100)

Year/month CPI(A) CPI(B) Hang Seng CPI Conposite CPI

1992 January February March 119.7 121.8 122.5 119.3 119-4 121.2 121.0 121.9 121.8 119.5 121.4 122.1

April May June 124.0 123.4 122.9 123.5

124.0 123.8 124.2 .124.0

125.3 125.1 . 125.2 125.2

July 125.5 125.4 s- 125.4 125.4

August September 125.6 12-8.3 125.9 125.8 127.9 127.5 125.8 128.0

October 128.4 128.4 128.6 128.5

November 128.5 129.0 129.9 129.0

December 129.3 129.8 130.0 129.7

1993 January February March 131.8 132.4 132.0 131.6 131.5 132.2 132.0 132.2 133.1 131'.7 132.2 132.4

April May June 133.5 134.5 133.9 134.5 134.8 136.3 133.9 135.1

136.0 135.9 137.1 136.3

July 135.8 136.1 136.9 136.2

August September 136.3 138.4 136.6 137.4 138.3 139.2 136.7 138.6

October November 140.0 139.4 139.6 140.7 139.9 142.2 140.0 140.3

December 140.4 140.9 143.3 141.3

• 1994 January February March 140.0 142.7 142.5 140.7 143.4 142.9 144.9 143.0 145.3 141.1 143.3 143.4

A ? April May June 143.8 145.0 146.2 144.8 147.9 146.1 150.0 146.9 151.0 145.2 146.7 147.7

July August September 147.3 149.6 150.3 147.9 150.5 149.6 151.7 150.8 C 153.4 148.3 150.1 151.3

October November December 151.1 151.4 153.0 152.2 155.3 153.1 157.3 154.3 158.1 152.6 153.5 154.8 xU?

1995 January February March 154.1 155.4 156.1 155.3 158.2 156.6 * 159.0 157.4 159.7 ~ 155.6 156.7 157.5

7

Chart 1 Year-on-year Rates of Increase in CPI(A)

Chart 2 Year-on-year Rates of Increase in CPI(B)

8

Chart 3 Year-on-year Rates of Increase in Hang Seng CPI

Chart 4 Year-on-year Rates of Increase in Composite CPI

End/Monday, April 24, 1995

9

Governor's monthly anti-drugs visit

*****

The Governor, the Rt Hon Christopher Patten, will visit the Wu Oi Long Ke Detoxification and Rehabilitation Centre in Sai Kung tomorrow (Tuesday) afternoon.

> ■

This is the second in a series of visits following the anti-drug summit to keep the Governor abreast of the community involvement in the fight against drug abuse.

Wu Oi Christian Centre, founded in 1973, offers religious detoxification and rehabilitation programmes to drug abusers and helps them reintegrate into society.

Many of the Wu Oi staff are former drug abusers who have stayed on after recovery to look after new comers and help them face their problems.

The Long Ke Centre caters for up to 70 drug abusers. The detoxification and rehabilitation programme comprises a twelve month treatment and a six month followup programme.

The Long Ke site is provided by the Government at nominal rent.

Attention News Editors :

You are invited to cover the Governor's visit to the Wu Oi Long Ke Centre tomorrow. A press coach will leave the CGO car park at 1.30 pm sharp for Sai Kung and return to CGO at around 7.30 pm. Private cars will not be admitted at the High Island Reservoir.

Please note that there is a 25-minutc walk on a rough hill path from the reservoir east dam to the Centre. It is therefore advisable to travel light and wear shoes suitable for walking.

End/Monday, April 24, 1995

10

HKMA appoints new Executive Director (Banking Supervision) * ♦ ♦ * *

The Hong Kong Monetary Authority (HKMA) announced today (Monday) the appointment of Mr Yiu-kwan Choi as the new Executive Director (Banking Supervision) effective from May 1, 1995.

’ • • • •

Mr Choi, aged 40, will bring to the new job abundant experience in banking supervision and banking policy.

He joined the former Office of the Commissioner of Banking in 1974 and in 1990 became an Assistant Commissioner of Banking shortly after he completed a secondment to the Bank of England.

In 1990 Mr Choi was seconded to the former Office of the Exchange Fund. After three years' experience in market intervention and monetary policy formulation, he rejoined the Office of the Commissioner of Banking to take charge of the Banking Policy Division. In that position, which he also filled after the establishment of the HKMA in April 1993, Mr Choi worked closely with the banking community and addressed a number of supervisory issues including the new liquidity supervisory regime, the loan classification system and the regulation of interest rate risk and market risks.

Mr Choi became Head of the Administration Division of the HKMA in early 1994, a job he has held until now.

"Mr Choi's wide experience in banking supervision and policy formulation and other aspects of the HKMA's work will be very valuable in continuing the important task of building up the supervisory capacity of the HKMA," the Chief Executive of the HKMA, Mr Joseph Yam, said.

Mr Choi replaces Mr Albert Cheok, who as previously announced is leaving the HKMA to pursue family business interests in Malaysia.

End/Monday, April 24, 1995

11

S for H visits public housing estates *****

The Secretary for Housing, Mr Dominic Wong, today (Monday) took a close look at the day-to-day activities of the Housing Department in managing and producing public housing and in clearing and rehousing squatters.

Accompanied by senior Housing Department officials, Mr Wong visited a squatter area at Diamond Hill under clearance to make way for the construction of home ownership and public rental flats.

Mr Wong next called on the Kai Lok Temporary Housing Area in Kowloon Bay to see for himself the conditions of a conventional THA.

The full-day programme also took him to Tse Wan Shan where an extensive public housing redevelopment programme is underway. Mr Wong also took time out to visit a family at Tsz Man Estate and sample flats of the new harmony block at Tsz On Court.

He concluded the visit with a tour of the Lok Fu Shopping Centre.

End/Monday, April 24, 1995

Closure of illegal rooftop structures on Kingland Apartments

*****

The District Court today (Monday) issued a closure order for the illegal rooftop structures on Kingland Apartments in Mong Kok.

Upon execution by the Police, Buildings Department staff and the Government contractor started preparations for the demolition of the illegal structures.

"Our prime concern is building safety," Assistant Director of Buildings Mr Lok Che-leung said. "The Building Authority has a duty to safeguard public interest.

"These illegal structures pose a threat to safety. Many of them are in an advanced state of dilapidation. Some are two storeys high. Some sit on water tanks. Some are erected on the cantilevered rook canopy which was not designed for this purpose," Mr Lok said.

12

"Cracking is evident, also spalling on concrete and rusting of reinforced concrete. These illegal structures pose a threat to the safety of the parent building.

"They also present a health hazard to the residents below. Severe water seepage at various locations creates serious sanitation and health problems.

"In the interest of building safety and public health, we have to require the demolition of these illegal structure," he said.

Notice of demolition was first given in August 1994 and again in December last year to the owners and occupants of the illegal rooftop structures.

"All the affected rooftop occupants have been offered rehousing, staff from Housing Department, Social Welfare Department, the Yau Tsim Mong district Office and Buildings Department are on site to offer whatever further assistance to the occupants as may be necessary," Mr Lok added.

End/Monday, April 24, 1995

Hong Kong remains a magnet for multi-nationals *****

Hong Kong continues to grow as the regional hub for multi-national companies.

That was the clear message given by the Secretary of Hong Kong’s Port Development Board. Mr Tony Clark, today (Monday) at the Terminal Operations Conference Asia ’95 in Singapore.

He was commenting on a view to the contrary that Singapore was likely to grow at Hong Kong's expense in advance of the British colony’s 1997 handover to China.

Mr Clark told delegates: "In the 17 months up to the middle of 1994, eight multi-nationals had indeed relocated their regional headquarters from Hong Kong. But in the same period. 86 overseas companies had established new regional headquarters in Hong Kong. This took the total based there to 714.

"Why did they choose Hong Kong - rather than. say. Singapore? Well, don't rely on me; look at what Fortune Magazine said in November last year. It said:

13

’Hong Kong is regarded as the best city for business in the world, followed in descending ranking by New York, London, Atlanta, Chicago, Singapore, Toronto, San Francisco, Frankfurt and Miami;

Hong Kong is at the vortex of an economic boom that will transform not only China but all of Asia and, indeed, the entire global economy. It is the crowded entryway to the Asia-Pacific region, and offers unique access to China, the fastest-growing economy and biggest potential market in the world;

Hong Kong is an ideal base from which to manage businesses spread across Asia. It has arguably the most pro-business government in the region. It has low income tax rates. Most importantly, Hong Kong residents are well equipped to seize the many opportunities unfolding before them.’”

Mr Clark added: ”In fact, the closer we get to the transfer of sovereignty, the greater has been the rate of establishment of regional headquarters in Hong Kong. Clearly there are concerns in Hong Kong about our future - the same can be said of many cities - but don't expect the lights all to go out in Hong Kong in 1997.

He said Hong Kong had one very significant additional advantage: ”We are geographically in the right place - on the doorstep of potentially the world’s biggest economy - China; an economy which is expanding incredibly rapidly; not only that, we sit in deep water at the mouth of one of the world’s great river-trading systems.

"The economies of Hong Kong and China are already very much interwoven with Hong Kong being the port and service centre for industrial development across a major portion of southern China. The great majority of those industries are Hong Kong financed, Hong Kong owned and Hong Kong managed.

"Some four million people in neighbouring Guangdong Province alone are employed in businesses wholly or partly owned from Hong Kong. That's not going to change after 1997. Nor, is our geographic position."

As far as Hong Kong's port is concerned, Mr Clark continued: "We are making sure that we can face the future and maintain our place among the world's leading container ports and remain the hub port for southern China.

"Not because of any warm feelings we get from being the world's number one container port. You can't bank warm feelings. But you can bank the significant economic gain you get from handling cargo.

14

"Our policies are to match the demands of cargo with the supply of port infrastructure - if that makes us number one - OK. Equally OK if it makes us number 101. But just to match forecast demand on our port - and remember our demand forecasts take into account the growth of a whole host of ports in the south China region - just to match demand, Hong Kong will have to treble its container capacity by 2011. A daunting task.

"All these port facilities will be built and operated by private enterprise. It’s probably the biggest port development programme in the world including the most impressive plans here in Singapore.

"Unlike Singapore, we in Hong Kong build to match forecast demand rather than in advance of demand. That system, which is supported by an extensive cargo forecasting process, maintains the opportunity for private sector investment, whilst minimising the risks," said Mr Clark.

• r.

End/Monday, April 24. 1995

Beach, marine and inland water quality reports published *****

The Environmental Protection Department (EPD) has published three reports to give a comprehensive account of the results of its marine and river water quality monitoring programmes in 1993 and beach water quality monitoring programme in 1994.

The "River Water Quality in Hong Kong for 1993" reviews the state of 12 priority rivers and 21 minor streams or nullahs in the territory while the "Marine Water Quality in Hong Kong for 1993" reports the state of marine water and bottom sediment quality of Hong Kong's territorial waters during that year.

The "Bacteriological Water Quality of Bathing Beaches in Hong Kong" summarises the water quality at 42 gazetted and 14 ungazetted beaches in Hong Kong during 1994.

Principal Environmental Protection Officer Dr Malcolm Broom said: "The department has been conducting water quality surveys since 1986 to provide a basis for planning and assessing progress in achieving and maintaining water quality objectives.

15

"Under the monitoring programmes, information is collected each year from about 90 river, 100 marine and 115 beach sampling stations and a wide range of physico-chemical and biological parameters are measured at each location for detailed analyses."

He said: "The river report shows that the water quality of some rivers, where legislative controls have been successful, has improved, continuing an overall improving trend which has been apparent for some time.

"For the first time, two rivers showed full compliance with all the stipulated water quality objectives in 1993.

"However, for rivers which are still heavily polluted, particularly those in the north and northwest of the territory, there is unlikely to be much improvement until effective control over livestock waste disposal is fully implemented and planned new sewerage works are completed."

He said the marine report highlighted the continued and serious water pollution problems in Victoria Harbour and other areas which received significant inputs of liquid wastes from nearby population centres.

For the bathing beaches, Dr Broom said: "Compliance with the bacteriological water quality objective in 1994 was similar to that in 1993. However, the general momentum towards improvement, built up during the 1980s, has stalled.

"Real and long-lasting improvements in marine and river water quality will only come about with the full implementation of the Sewerage Master Plans and the Strategic Sewage Disposal Scheme, coupled with effective livestock waste control and comprehensive enforcement of the water pollution control legislation in all 10 water control zones in Hong Kong.

"Localised improvements affecting mainly the beaches may be seen as improvements to local sewerage networks are implemented, but in areas where beach water quality is poorest, this will take another four or five years."

The reports contain useful information for professionals such as scientists, engineers and town planners whose work relates to the water and beach environment.

They also serve as a useful reference for researchers, teachers and students as well as the public who arc interested in water and beach pollution problems.

16

The three reports are now available at the Government Publications Centre at the ground floor, Low Block, Queensway Government Offices, 66 Queensway, Hong Kong.

The costs of the river water quality report, the marine water quality report and the beach report are $56, $67 and $28 respectively.

Note to Editors:

Further enquiries can be directed to EPD’s Principal Environmental Protection Officer (Waste and Water Services) Dr Malcolm Broom on tel 2835 1234.

End/Monday, April 24, 1995

Household Expenditure Survey 1994-95

*****

The 1994-95 Household Expenditure Survey which will last one complete year till September to collect up-to-date information on household expenditure patterns for rebasing the Consumer Price Index (CPI) has been half completed since its commencement in October last year.

"In addition to collecting data continuously on the price movements of goods and services, there is a need to establish the household expenditure patterns as basic information for the compilation of the CPI," a spokesman from the Census & Statistics Department said today.

"In the past six months, some 2.700 households have participated in the survey. So far, public response to the survey has been very encouraging. Households invited to take part in the first six months of the survey were generally very co-operative in providing the required information," the spokesman said.

The survey is jointly conducted by the Census and Statistics Department and the Hang Seng Bank. Households participating in the survey will be requested to keep record of all expenses for a specified period of 14 days. Interviewers performing work in this survey will provide assistance to participating households as needed.

17

"Information provided by households will be kept in the strictest confidence and will not be released to other government departments and external organisations in any identifiable form. It will be used by this Department solely for producing statistics, from which particulars of individual households cannot be identified," the spokesman added.

The spokesman appealed to all households to co-operate fully if they were selected to participate in the 1994-95 Household Expenditure Survey in the coming months.

Anyone who has queries about the survey may call the Department at 2805 6101 or 2805 6102 during office hours.

End/Monday, April 24, 1995

Supply of particulars in Central Register of Establishments *****

Updated information kept in the Central Register of Establishments in respect of the fourth quarter of 1994 is now available.

The Census and Statistics Department maintains a comprehensive and up-to-date computerised Central Register of Establishments which contains around 400,000 active business establishments in Hong Kong.

The Register serves mainly as the sampling frame for various economic surveys conducted by the department.

Besides, many other government departments and private organisations also make use of the records kept in the Register in their publicity, business promotion, survey and research work.

Information kept in the Register is updated on a quarterly basis.

A sample listing containing 20 per cent of the records randomly selected from the Register is accessible by prospective users.

18

Application for the supply of non-confidential particulars such as the name, address, major type of business activity and employment size* class of all or part of the listed records can be made to the Central Register of Establishments Section of the department.

The information can be supplied in the form of photocopies or specially-run magnetic tapes. A charge will be levied for this service, at the following rates:-

* $5.3 per page of photocopy; or

* a minimum charge of $580 for a job requiring computer run time of up to 20 CRUs (Computer Resources Units) plus $29 for each additional CRU in excess of 20 CRUs, if the information is required on magnetic tapes. The magnetic tape can be provided by the applicant, or by the department at a charge of $105 per tape.

Further details about the provision of this service can be obtained from the Central Register of Establishments Section of the department on tel 2582 4760.

End/Monday, April 24, 1995

Royal Navy sailor decorated *****

A Royal Navy sailor who shot an armed smuggler to save a colleague from a vicious attack has been awarded a Queen’s Commendation for Bravery.

Master at Arms Allan Potts, who was serving in HMS Plover as a Regulating Petty officer at the time of the incident, shot the smuggler after Leading Weapon Engineering Mechanic Frazer Manson was attacked with a meat cleaver, bottles and a screwdriver.

The two men had been taking part in anti-smuggling operations in January last year and, after a high-speed chase through Rockey Harbour in one of HMS Plover’s fast pursuit craft, they boarded a Chung Fei loaded with television sets. When Potts went to cut the fuel line, the crew set about Manson. He was unable to fight off his attackers and shouted to Potts for help.

19

As one of the men bore down on Manson with a meat cleaver Potts drew his pistol and, when his challenge was ignored, he fired, wounding the attacker in the stomach. The incident was over in a minute and once the boat had stopped Potts gave first aid to the injured man.

It was not until much later that Potts realised he had also been wounded. His right foot had been sliced through and he was taken to hospital for treatment.

The bravery citation reads: "His calm, fast and effective reaction displayed the highest level of professionalism and bravery throughout a most dangerous operation. His action in opening fire undoubtedly saved Manson from death or, at least, a serious head injury."

Master at Arms Potts is now serving as an Instructor at the Royal Navy School of Leadership and Management at HMS Excellent, Whale Island, in the UK, and still remains modest about the incident.

"Frazer was in trouble and he needed help," he said. "What I did was just automatic. It was something I was trained to do so I just got on and did it."

End/Monday, April 24, 1995

Water storage figure

*****

Storage in Hong Kong's reservoirs at 9 am today (Monday) stood at 66.4 per cent of capacity or 389.273 million cubic metres.

This time last year the reservoirs contained 388.290 million cubic metres of water, representing 66.3 per cent of capacity.

End/Monday, April 24, 1995

20

Fresh water cuts in Sham Shui Po and Sai Kung

*****

Fresh water supply to some premises in Sham Shui Po will be temporarily suspended from 11 pm on Wednesday (April 26) to 6 am the following day to facilitate water mains leakage detection.

The suspension will affect all the premises at Cheung Sha Wan Road, Nam Cheong Street, Tai Po Road, Wong Chuk Street, Fuk Wing Street, Fuk Wa Street and Shek Kip Mei Street.

Meanwhile, fresh water supply to some premises in Sai Kung will also be temporarily suspended from 10 pm on Thursday (April 27) to 6 am the following day to facilitate water mains connection.

All the premises at the section of Clear Water Bay Road between Silver Cape Road and Mang Kung Uk will be affected by the water cut.

End/Monday, April 24, 1995

I long Kong Monetary Authority tender results

*****

Tender date 24 Apr 95

Paper on offer EF notes

Issue number 3804

Amount applied HK$2,850 MN

Amount allotted HKS500 MN

Average price (yield) accepted 100.16 (6.96 PCT)

Lowest price (yield) accepted 100.16 (6.96 PCT)

Pro rata ratio About 38 PCT

Average tender price(yield) 100.12 (6.97 PCT)

End/Monday, April 24. 1995

21

Hong Kong Monetary Authority money market operations

*****

Cumulative

$ million Time (hours) change (^million)

Opening balance in the account 1,493 0930 +1,209

Closing balance in the account 1,799 1000 +1,209

Change attributable to : . 1100 + 1,210

Money market activity + 1,206 1200 + 1,210

LAF today -900 1500 +1,210

1600 + 1,206

LAF rate 4.25% bid/6.25% offer TW1 118.2 *-0.2* 24.4.95

Hong Kong Monetary Authority

EF bills EF notes/Hong Kong Government bonds

Terms Yield Term Issue Coupon Price Yield

1 week 5.18 13 months 2605 6.35 100.48 5.96

1 month 5.19 22 months 2702 7.50 102.06 6.38

3 months 5.38 27 months 3707 6.95 100.93 6.60

6 months 5.58 33 months 3801 8.00 103.15 6.84

12 months 5.91 59 months 5003 7.75 101.70 7.46

Total turnover of bills and bonds - $ 9,703 million

Closed April 24, 1995

End/Monday, April 24. 1995

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

ISSUED BY GOVERNMENT INFORMATION SERVICES BEACONSFIELD HOUSE, HONG KONG. TEL: 842 8777

Tuesday, April 25,1995

Contents

Page No,

Governor’s transcript..................................................... 1

CS in ’’one country two systems” concept.................................. 5

Expert talks on the Court of Final Appeal................................. 7

STI to visit Toronto and Washington DC.................................... 7

Warning against linking labour standards with trade....................... 8

TAC endorses Lantau taxi fares increase................................... 9

Provisional statistics of retail sales for February 1995 ................ 10

Technical courses offer to secondary students............................ 14

Young music lovers invited to join summer camp........................ 15

Fifty inmates pass public examinations................................... 15

Hong Kong Monetary Authority tender results............................   16

Hong Kong Monetary Authority money market operations..................... 17

1

Governor's transcript *****

The following is a transcript of the media session by the Governor, the Rt Hon Christopher Patten, today (Tuesday) after visiting the Wu Oi Christian Centre in Sai Kung:

Governor: This is the second drug-related visit that I've made since the drug summit a few weeks ago. And I'll be making similar visits to this over the coming months and indeed years because I do want to continue to give priority to our efforts to combat drug abuse here in Hong Kong. The first visit I made was to one of the LEAP projects, one of the efforts to improve education for young people about substance abuse and drug abuse. I deliberately want to come to this Gospel-based rehabilitation centre as soon as possible because we are undertaking an objective, comprehensive review of what works best in the field of detoxification and rehabilitation. I don't think we can afford to have any hang-ups about individual programmes of rehabilitation, I think we want to have a detailed look of what works most effectively where we can best put our resources as a community not only in financial terms but in terms of voluntary activities and professional work as well. And I must say I am very impressed by what everybody is doing here, it's a very difficult but hugely important job. I'll be looking at more Gospel-based rehabilitation centres over the coming weeks and months. I would like to, once again, say how grateful I am to all those who run this centre, who've built it from nothing and who've made it work so successfully. One other thing I should say is that tomorrow I'll be tabling the amendments to a drug trafficking legislation in order to toughen up the measures against illicit profits from drugs and laundering money made from trading in drugs. We've got to remember all the time that there are of course two sides to the campaign against drugs. One is the positive measures that we have to take, the other is the negative measures that we must take as effectively as possible and to stop people who traffic in drugs and to deal with them as toughly as possible when we catch them. So two sides of the campaign and it's a campaign that I intend to continue to pursue as vigorously as possible.

Question: How can the Government maximise the facilities here.......which is under-

utilised by about half at the moment?

2

Governor: I said earlier that what we are attempting to do over the coming weeks is to have a comprehensive review of all the rehabilitation measures that we take and that of course include looking at where we fund and where we put our own efforts. I don't think that there is a huge resources problem in the field of dealing with drug abuse, what I mean by that, is I think that the community wants us to put in as much money as it required, that the question which we have to look at quite properly as a government is how we can most intelligently use money. At a centre like this, at the moment, there are sorts of government help, though no direct subvention. When I say there are sorts of government help, first of all, the land is provided with a nominal rent. We help the Gospel-based organisations with charitable fund raising, and if they are charging board and lodging, then those who are having to pay that can get CSSA rates which of course, comes to the Gospel-based organisations themselves. So there is in a way some indirect financial help. But what we've got to look at is whether more is required in order, as the question has said, in order to maximise the facilities which are available. I should just add that I think the majority of the gospel based organisations haven't actually asked for direct government subventions, presumably because they may be a little concerned about the strings that tend to go with subventions from government. But I want to look at all these issues and I want to get the right answers as soon as possible. I repeat that as far as I am concerned , I don't start with any preconceptions, I don't start with any assumptions of what is best. I think we need to look at what appears to work in Hong Kong's circumstances and back whatever appears to work to the maximum extent possible.

Question: Well, my question is not about drugs, that's the JLG. The Chinese team leader, Mr Chen, how do you react (to what) Mr Chen has said about the permanent resident definition?

Governor: Well, it is for Mr Chen to explain the difference between an agreement and an understanding; those are questions of semantics. I don't think they are very helpful. What I know is that people in Hong Kong want us to clear up the questions of right of abode for after 1997 because one of the things that people are inevitably concerned about is how they can remain residents, how others who have left Hong Kong in the past can become permanent residents. They want, I think, to be confident about the future and about right of abode in the future. So, I very much hope that the discussions which have been taking place under the umbrella of the JLG will reach a satisfactory conclusion. And I don't know whether I disagree with Mr Chen Zuo'er in saying that. For me a satisfactory conclusion is one that allows people in Hong Kong to rest easy about the question of right of abode in the future.

Question: Mr Chen said that this problem won't be settled before 1997. Do you think that it will resolved?

3

Governor: I think that if people are continuing to be anxious until July 1, 1997, it would be very bad for Hong Kong, and very bad for confidence in the future. I am sure that Mr Chen’s words didn't mean to say that reassurance shouldn't be given before July 1, 1997.1 think that he was perhaps camped in the no man's land between talking about agreements and talking about understandings. I repeat what we want to have is the maximum reassurance for people in Hong Kong . That’s what we in the Hong Kong Government are striving to achieve so that people aren't worried about whether they can be residents after 1997 and people aren’t worried about how they or their families will acquire and hold on to the right of abode. I don't think that Mr Chen Zuo'er would want to increase anxieties on those points. I am sure that on reflections, he probably slightly rephrase what he said.

Question: The Chinese and British sides are going to meet shortly about the discussion of setting up the Court of Final Appeal, what are your expectation of that?

Governor: I very much hope that since we're unclear at the moment what it is that's holding things up on the Chinese side, I very much hope that at the meeting of experts this week we'll manage to clear up any doubts there may be and answer any remaining questions which Chinese officials have. It's now almost a year since we gave the Chinese side the Bill which faithfully implements the agreement reached in 1991. I think you would have noticed from the public remarks that have been made that no one at all has suggested that there are some specific ways in which the draft Bill doesn’t implement the agreement. If there are ways, I hope that the Chinese side will say what they are and then we'll be able to deal with them. So if there aren't any respects in which the Bill doesn't implement the agreement, what's the problem ? It's for Chinese officials to tell us.

They know that businessmen after businessmen, say to Chinese officials in China and out of China that one of the issues which is crucial to Hong Kong's confidence is establishing the Court of Final Appeal and preventing any sort of legal vacuum in 1997. They know that they get that message not only from the local businessmen but from businessmen from other communities. They know they also get that message from international statesmen like Sir Leon Brittan who was speaking about it in Peking the other day. So it's not just the Governor of Hong Kong or the Chief Secretary of the Government of Hong Kong who is making the point. It's being made by almost everybody who speaks to Chinese officials. I don't think there is any reason why we should have an argument or row about this. I think that it's in the interest of Hong Kong and in the interest of the prosperity of Hong Kong that we deal with it as rapidly as possibly.

Question: But how confident are you that the Bill can be tabled in LegCo next month?

4

Governor: If you can tell me what it is that is encouraging Chinese officials to drag their feet, I'll be able to answer your question. But it's very difficult to answer the question since I don't think anybody knows what the problem is .

Question: Do you mean that you won't take action before both sides reach agreement?

Governor: That's not what I said. What I said was that I very much hope that we'll be able to proceed on the agreed basis to implement the legislation. If we can't get agreement, our responsibility is absolutely clear.

Question: Just a follow-up question on the permanent residency. Well, what do you think if both sides - Britain and China - cannot reach an agreement on that issue?

Governor: I really think that you'll have to be quite careful when you talk about both sides, the problem isn't on the Hong Kong Government's side. The problem isn't on the British side. If there isn't an understanding, it won't be from want of trying on our part. That's why the Director of Immigration is in Peking this week and that's why he agreed to talk informally to the members of the PWC. We recognise because we are concerned about the interest of the people of Hong Kong. We want to put their minds at rest. We are concerned to get an understanding and agreement on these issues. It matters to Hong Kong's confidence. I would have thought that that was a shared interest for China, Hong Kong and Britain. One more question.

Question: There are many Western countries having surging addiction problems. Hong Kong's addict population has been relatively stable for 15 years except the younger than 21s. Do you believe Hong Kong has learned how to contain such a problem?

Governor: I think it would be dangerously complacent of us to say that. It is perfectly true that the statistics on drug abuse in Hong Kong are much lower than in many other communities and certainly much lower than in communities of comparable economic and social development. But I have been worried, others have been worried, including the Commissioner of Police, at the alarming increase in statistics in the last few years. And as you say quite rightly at the way that increase seems to have concentrated on young people, on the under 21s. That's why we've decided to launch a much bigger initiative to beat drugs. We are trying to deal with every aspect of the problem from preventive measures, from better education, to tougher policing and penalties at the other end, within the middle the difficult and back breaking work of rehabilitation for those who unfortunately have been abusers, who have been damaging their health and their lives.

5

I hope that we'll be able to develop even more successful, even more comprehensively constructive programmes for dealing with this problem. And maybe as a result of that we'll have things to teach other people. But I would hate to start ( bragging about our successes in Hong Kong and then find in a couple of years' time that we were getting as bad a problem, as difficult a problem, as it has enblighted so many other places.

What I think is clear is there isn't a simple answer and it interests us that some of the characteristics of communities which have suffered severely from drug abuse among young people, some of the problems that they face, socially and economically, don't actually face us in Hong Kong. For example, I was saying earlier we don't have high levels of unemployment in Hong Kong, we certainly don't have high levels of youth unemployment and yet we have been seeing against the background of unparalleled prosperity, we've been seeing some of the same sort of consequences of r social alienation, which have increased drug abusers elsewhere. So we've got to learn, even as we try to put better programmes in place. And one reason why I am here today is to try to learn, and to learn how these Gospel-based organisations are working and to see what we can discover from their activities. Thank you very much indeed.

End/Tuesday, April 25, 1995

CS in "one country two systems" concept *****

The Chief Secretary, Mrs Anson Chan, today (Tuesday) called on China, Britain and Hong Kong to work together to realise Deng Xiaoping's visionary concept , of "one country two systems".

Speaking at the Royal Institute for International Affairs luncheon in Brussels, Mrs Chan said she believed Hong Kong's future was bright, but she was under no illusion that the remaining 800 days of transition to Chinese sovereignty would be plain sailing.

"We will have to continue to do our best to put in place the legal and administrative framework that will ensure the future SAR Government can start off life with the high degree of autonomy that is promised in the Joint Declaration," she said.

M.

Mrs Chan said 1997 was a challenge, but it was also an opportunity to a much larger relationship that embraced a rapidly modernising China.

6

"I’m sure that hard-nosed businessmen like yourselves will not fail to make the most of these opportunities,” she added.

During her speech to 140 business and political leaders, the Chief Secretary touched on some of the problems Hong Kong was encountering in dealing with China, including the Court of Final Appeal, the airport financial support agreements, travel documents and the adaptation of laws. Issues, she added, that needed to be resolved "sooner rather than later" as time was fast running out.

However, Mrs Chan made it clear that despite these problems there was regular and very good co-operation with the Chinese on a day-to-day basis. She instanced the recent establishment of the infrastructure co-ordinating committee which considers major projects straddling the border between Hong Kong and China; the co-operation between the Royal Hong Kong Police Force on cross-border crime; and the big increase in tfee number of official delegations visiting China or Hong Kong last year.

''.■I-. I • .. . o • ■ • '

"This co-operation and contact will intensify in the months ahead, paving the way for what we're all hoping for - a smooth transition."

She said the international community, including the European Union, had a major stake in seeing Hong Kong continue to develop and prosper, not simply from an investment point of view, but for maintaining a stable East Asian region.

The Chief Secretary also spoke of the opportunities for European businesses in the East Asian region as living standards in the emerging markets rose. This would present tremendous opportunities for the best that Europe had to offer across the board from brand-name consumer goods to telecommunications and construction.

"Above all, Hong Kong is the hub of Asia. With our business-friendly environment, first class communications systems and well-developed infrastructure, we are the natural base for any company wanting to be a part of the dynamic Asian region," Mrs Chan said.

• ' it

Earlier today, the Chief Secretary called on the Belgian Prime Minister, Mr Jean-Lye Dehaene; held discussions with the UK Permanent Representative to the European Commission, Sir John Kerr; and briefed members of the European Parliament-Hong Kong Friendship Group on the latest developments in Hong Kong and how it will continue to remain a very attractive place in which to do business in the lead up to 1997 and well into the next century.

4-

End/Tuesday, April 25, 1995

7

Expert talks on the Court of Final Appeal

*****

The sixth round of talks between experts of the British and Chinese sides of the Joint Liaison Group on matters relating to the Court of Final Appeal will be held in Hong Kong on April 27 and 28. The British team will be led by British Representative, Mr Alan Paul. The Chinese team will be led by Chinese Representative, Mr Chen Zuo'er. They will be assisted by experts from the two sides.

End/Wednesday, April 25, 1995

STI to visit Toronto and Washington DC * ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

The Secretary for Trade and Industry, Mr T H Chau, will leave Hong Kong tomorrow (Wednesday) to visit Toronto and Washington DC.

In Toronto, he will meet the Canadian International Trade Minister, Mr Roy MacLaren, to exchange views on subjects of mutual interest, such as Asia-Pacific Economic Co-operation (APEC) and the World Trade Organization (WTO).

In Washington DC, Mr Chau will meet, among others, the US Trade Representative, Ambassador Mickey Kantor, and the Assistant to the President for Economic Policy, Ms Laura D'Andrea Tyson, to discuss subjects such as APEC, the WTO and China's Most Favoured Nation (MFN) status in the US.

He will also call on some Members of the US Congress, including the Chairman of the Ways and Means Committee of the House of Representatives, Congressman Bill Archer.

Mr Chau will be accompanied on the visit by the Assistant Director-General of Trade, Mrs Rebecca Lai.

He will be back in Hong Kong on May 4.

End/Tuesday, April 25, 1995

8

Warning against linking labour standards with trade ♦ * ♦ ♦ *

Deputy Director-General of Trade, Mr Thomas Yiu, today (Tuesday) warned against harmonising labour standards among trading economies through trade measures and other artificial means.

He pointed out that it was precisely because of the differences in factors of production that trade among economies was meaningful and that trade was mutually beneficial.

"Any artificial attempt to equalise such factors including labour will only be counter-productive and disrupt international trade," he cautioned.

Mr Yiu was speaking as head of a Hong Kong delegation at the 51st plenary session of the United Nations' Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP) being held from April 24 to May 1 in Bangkok.

He noted that in the past few years some people had been advocating the promotion of social progress by the harmonisation of a set of labour standards. They believed the world trade arena should be a level playing field, and differences in labour conditions among trading nations give unfair advantage to some when they trade with others.

Mr Yiu pointed out unequivocally that these beliefs were based on fallacious conceptions.

"To start with, it cannot be more wrong for us to go after a mechanical interpretation of a level playing field," he said.

"The very reason why there is international trade is because we are in a playing field in which the trading economies arc not all level in all aspects. In other words, there is comparative advantage."

Mr Yiu said the playing field of international trade need not be flat, but it should be fair in the sense that, like all playing fields, it should be governed by rules.

"The present playing field of trade is built essentially on the basis of the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade and currently the World Trade Organisation," he said.

9

"These institutions rightly refrain from the start from trying to flatten out the playing field. They do what they should do, that is to enshrine common trade rules and codes of conduct, under which international trade is fairly and orderly conducted.

"Thus, while there are rules on tariffs and non- tariff barriers, on export subsidies, on anti-competitive behaviour by firms engaged in international trade and so on, they have never attempted to dictate how members should run their domestic economies by imposing arbitrary social standards.

"Changing the role of the institutions to that of a social policeman will only undermine their legitimacy, and jeopardise the fair and free trading system which has been established after years of hard work, and which has served us well for years.

"We must not let attempts to create a link between trade and arbitrary social standards open up new opportunities for protectionism."

Speaking to the plenary session's main theme "Strengthening regional cooperation in human resources development, with special reference to the social implications of sustainable economic growth in Asia and the Pacific", Mr Yiu also outlined in his speech Hong Kong's experience in human resources development, particularly in education and labour.

End/Tuesday, April 25. 1995

TAC endorses Lantau taxi fares increase *****

The Transport Advisory Committee (TAC) today (Tuesday) endorsed an 11.1 per cent fare increase for Lantau taxis from July 1995.

The existing fares and recommended fares are as follows:

Existing fares Recommended fares

Flagfall for first 2 km $9.0 $10.0

Fare for every subsequent 0.2 km $0.9 $ 1.0

Waiting time charge for every 1 minute $0.9 $ 1.0

- 10 -

Telephone booking surcharge $5.0

Surcharge for every article of baggage, animal or bird $4.0

$ 5.0 (no change)

$ 4.0 (no change)

In making the recommendation, members noted that the endorsed fare rise was lower than the 33.3 per cent applied for by the Lantau Taxi Association. Lantau taxi fares were last increased by 12.5 per cent in February last year.

Members felt that the recommended fare rise was necessary to ensure the financial viability of taxi operations, taking into account the forecast increase of 15.3 per cent in operating costs and changes in ridership between the last fare increase and July this year.

An 11.1 per cent fare increase would be slightly below the inflation rate of 12.4 per cent forecast for the same period.

Members also noted that the fare increase would help maintain an acceptable level of taxi service on Lantau and a reasonable fare differential between Lantau taxis and New Lantau Bus services.

End/Tuesday, April 25, 1995

Provisional statistics of retail sales for February 1995

*****

The value of total retail sales in February 1995, estimated at $15.3 billion, increased by 1% when compared with February 1994, according to provisional figures released today (Tuesday) by the Census and Statistics Department.

After discounting the effect of price changes over the period, total retail sales decreased by 5% in volume.

It should however be noted that retail sales in January and February are usually affected by the timing of the Chinese New Year. As the Chinese New Year was in January this year but in February last year, it is more appropriate to compare the retail sales figures for January and February taken together.

11

Taking the first two months of 1995 together, total retail sales rose by 8% in value and 1% in volume over the same period last year.

"These figures suggest that the growth in retail sales in the first two months of this year has moderated further from the latter part of last year. Nevertheless, the year- on-year growth rate is affected by a high base of comparison in the first two months of 1994, with the growth rate at that time reaching 12%," a Government spokesman said.

The moderate increase in total retail sales in the first two months of 1995 was partly attributable to a decline in the sales of motor vehicles, by 3% in value and 13% in volume.

Sales of food, alcoholic drinks and tobacco also fell by 5% in volume, although there was an increase of 3% in value.

Nevertheless, sales of a number of commodity items continued to show increases of various magnitudes, and in some cases, a notable increase was recorded.

Sales of jewellery, watches and clocks and valuable gifts went up by 14% both in value and in volume. Sales of clothing and footwear rose by 14% in value and 3% in volume.

Sales of fuels increased by 10% in value and 2% in volume. Those of consumer durable goods (other than motor vehicles) recorded an increase of 6% in value and 2% in volume.

The volume of retail sales is derived from the value of retail sales after adjusting for price changes. The relevant components of the Consumer Price Index are used as deflators.

Table 1 presents the revised total retail sales figure for January 1995 and the provisional figure for February 1995.

Table 2 shows the value and volume indices of retail sales in January and February 1995 for all retail outlets and by type of retail outlet, with average retail sales from October 1989 to September 1990 taken as 100.

Comparisons of the February 1995 results with those for January 1995 and those for February 1994, as well as comparisons of retail sales in the period from January to February of 1995 with the same period in 1994 are also given.

12

The report containing the analysis of the February 1995 results is now on sale at $4 per copy at the Government Publications Centre, Queensway Government Offices, Low Block, ground floor, 66 Queensway; and the Publications Section of the Census and Statistics Department, 19th floor, Wanchai Tower, Wan Chai.

Enquiries about the survey results may be directed to the Wholesale and Retail Trade Statistics Section of the Census and Statistics Department on tel 2802 1258.

13

TABLE 1 : TOTAL RETAIL SALES

Total Retail Sales for February 1995 (Provisional Figure) = HK$15,322.7 million

for January 1995 (Revised Figure) = HK$20,664.7 million

TABLE 2 : VALUE AND VOLUME INDICES OF RETAIL SALES FOR JANUARY 1995 AND FEBRUARY 1995

(Monthly average of Oct. 89 - Sept. 90 = 100)

Type of Outlet Type of index Index number February compared January 1995 wi th 1995 February compared February 1995 wi th 1994 Jan.-Feb.1995 compared with Jan.-Feb.1994

January 1995 (Revised figures) February 1995 (Provisional figures)

(A) (B) FOR ALL RETAIL OUTLETS BY TYPE OF RETAIL OUTLET Value Volune (Point) 220.0 169.4 (Point) 163.2 125.8 (Points) -56.9 -43.6 (%) -25.9 -25.7 (Points) ♦0.9 -6.9 (X) ♦0.6 -5.2 (Points) (X) ♦14.0 *7.9 ♦2.0 +1.4

Food, alcoholic drinks Value 150.5 122.5 -28.0 -18.6 -4.7 -3.7 ♦3.4 +2.6

and tobacco (other than supermarkets) Volume 108.2 88.2 -20.0 -18.5 -7.3 -7.6 -5.3 -5.1

Supermarkets <t> Value Volume 197.2 137.4 134.0 91.4 -63.2 -46.0 -32.1 -33.5 -22.5 -25.3 •14.4 -21.7 ♦5.9 +3.7 -5.3 -4.4

Fuels Value Volume 145.8 100.4 119.2 81.0 -26.7 -19.4 -18.3 -19.3 ♦9.5 # ♦8.6 # ♦11.9 +9.8 ♦1.6 +1.8

Clothing, footwear and Value 385.1 195.6 -189.5 -49.2 -12.3 -5.9 ♦36.5 *14.4

allied products Volume 266.3 136.0 -130.3 -48.9 -26.4 -16.3 ♦5.1 *2.6

Consuner durable goods Value Volume 191.5 156.0 189.7 148.3 -1.9 -7.7 -1.0 -4.9 ♦7.8 -5.0 ♦4.3 -3.3 ♦2.9 +1.6 -7.0 -4.4

- Motor vehicles Value 175.1 225.3 ♦50.1 ♦28.6 ♦20.0 ♦9.8 -6.9 -3.3

and parts Volume 119.1 151.5 ♦32.4 ♦27.2 -1.7 -1.1 -20.3 -13.0

- Consumer durable Value 203.4 163.9 -39.5 -19.4 -1.0 -0.6 ♦10.0 ♦s.s

goods other than motor vehicles and parts Volume 182.6 145.9 -36.7 •20.1 -7.5 -4.9 ♦2.6 +1.6

Department stores Value Volume 219.4 158.9 142.7 103.4 -76.7 -55.5 -35.0 -34.9 -12.2 -20.2 -7.9 -16.3 +9.1 ♦S.S -5.2 -3.8

Jewellery, watches Value 222.4 174.2 -48.2 -21.7 ♦ 17.5 ♦ 11.1 ♦23.7 +13.6

and clocks, and valuable gifts Volume 212.0 166.2 -45.8 -21.6 ♦ 16.1 ♦ 10.7 ♦22.7 *13.6

Other consumer goods Value 231.2 186.6 -44.6 -19.3 ♦ 19.2 ♦ 11.5 ♦22.4 +12.0

not elsewhere classified Volume 179.2 144.1 -35.1 -19.6 ♦ 7.9 ♦5.8 ♦9.6 +6.3

NOTE : £ Not including supermarkets operating in department stores-. # denotes a figure within ±0.05

End/Tuesday, April 25, 1995

14

Technical courses offer to secondary students

*****

Government secondary technical schools offer a wide range of subjects in arts, science, technical and commercial studies for prospective secondary students.

A spokesman for the Education Department said today (Tuesday): "In addition to general core subjects provided by ordinary secondary grammar schools, Government secondary technical schools also offer technical and commercial subjects for students according to their interest and aptitudes.

"These subjects include electronics and electricity, technical drawings, design and technology, travel and tourism, typewriting and ceramics."

In addition to secondary studies, all Government secondary technical schools also offer sixth form classes for students wishing to pursue tertiary study.

At present there are nine such schools - three on Hong Kong Island, four in Kowloon and two in the New Territories.

Choices to enrol in secondary 1 places in these schools are included in the Secondary School Places Allocation (SSPA) system.

Parents of primary 6 students may consider choosing SI places in Government secondary technical schools for their children when filling the SSPA form next month.

Attention News Editors:

The Education Department has organised a press visit to Tang Shiu Kin Victoria School on Thursday (April 27).

The press will be taken to watch classes conducting arts, science, technical and commercial subjects; exhibition panels displaying special features of Government secondary technical schools; and briefing by principals and teachers from the nine Government secondary technical Schools.

Media representatives wishing to cover the event are requested to assemble at the main entrance of the Tang Shiu Kin Victoria School, 5 Oi Kwan Road, Wan Chai, at 2 pm.

End/Tuesday, April 25. 1995

15

Young music lovers invited to join summer camp

*****

A summer music camp, which will provide young music lovers an opportunity to receive intensive music training in a delightful atmosphere, is being organised by the Music Office of the Recreation and Culture Branch.

The 1995 Hong Kong Youth Music Camp, sponsored by the Royal Hong Kong Jockey Club, is to take place at the Sai Kung Outdoor Recreation Centre from July 15 to 25.

A spokesman for the Music Office said the aim of the camp was to enable participants, both local and overseas, to foster cultural exchange through music.

"Participants will be able to join master classes, workshops and seminars conducted by renowned musicians. They may also enjoy recreational activities such as karaoke, video shows, swimming, badminton and billiard in their free time," the spokesman said.

Applicants must be aged under 23 on July 15 this year. I hey should play at least one Chinese or western orchestral instrument and orchestral experience will be an advantage.

Fees will be $255 per head for three days, $415 for five days and $590 for seven days. All fees include tuition, three meals a day and lodging.

Application forms are now available at all music centres of the Music Office and deadline for applications is Friday (April 28). Enquiries can be made on 2582 5314.

End/Tucsday. April 25. 1995

Fifty inmates pass public examinations

*****

Fifty male inmates from the Shek Pik Prison today (Tuesday) received certificates for passing public examinations.

The inmates took part in the Hong Kong Certificate of Education Examination, the London Chambers of Commerce and Industry examinations (LCCI), Pitman examinations, the General Certificate of Education examinations and Fat Kwong Shan World Buddhist Study.

16

They obtained a total of 13 distinctions in Pitman and LCCI examinations. Meanwhile, 13 inmates obtained full marks in Buddhist study.

Officiating at the certificate-presentation ceremony, a Eastern district board member Mr Desmond Lee praised the inmates for their diligence in study. He was particularly impressed by the inmates' initiative in pursuing academic studies although they were in prison.

At present, opportunities for academic pursuits are offered to adult offenders on a voluntary basis. These are provided in the form of remedial classes, correspondence course and self-study courses.

End/Tuesday, April 25, 1995

Hong Kong Monetary Authority tender results *****

Tender date 25 Apr 95 25 Apr 95

Paper on offer EF bills EF bills

Issue number Q517 H563

Amount applied HKS6.960 MN HK$4,750 MN

Amount allotted I IKS 1.500 MN HKS800 MN

Average yield accepted 5.43 PCT 5.65 PCT

Highest yield accepted 5.44 PCT 5.66 PCT

Pro rata ratio About 73 PCT About 52 PCT

Average tender yield 5.46 PCT 5.70 PCT

17

Hong Kong Monetary Authority

Tenders to be held in the week beginning May 1, 1995

Tender date 2 May 95

Paper on offer EF bills

Issue number Q518

Issue date 3 May 95

Maturity date 2 Aug 95

Tenor 91 days

Amount on offer HK$ 1,500+300 MN

End/Tuesday, April 25, 1995

Hong Kong Monetary Authority money market operations *****

$ million Time (hours) Cumulative change (Smillion)

Opening balance in the account 1,799 0930 +905

Closing balance in the account 2,299 1000 +905

Change attributable to : 1100 +897

Money market activity +665 1200 +897

LAF today -165 1500 +665

1600 +665

LAF rate 4.25% bid/6.25% offer TW1 118.4 *+0.2* 25.4.95

18

Hong Kong Monetary Authority

EF bills EF notes/Hong Kong Government bonds

Terms Yield Term Issue Coupon Price Yield

1 week 5.19 19 months 2611 6.90 101.01 6.30

1 month 5.21 22 months 2702 7.50 101.96 6.44

3 months 5.41 30 months 3710 7.25 101.29 6.79

6 months 5.62 36 months 3804 6.90 100.00 7.02

12 months 5.97 59 months 5003 7.75 101.41 7.54

Total turnover of bills and bonds - $ 22,452 million

Closed April 25, 1995

End/Tuesday, April 25, 1995

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

ISSUED BY GOVERNMENT INFORMATION SERVICES BEACONSFIELD HOUSE, HONG KONG. TEL: 842 8777

Wednesday, April 26,1995

Contents Page No.

Chief Secretary talks with top European leaders..................... 1

Legal Department to improve briefing out system..................... 3

HK-Guangdong talks on boundaries of administration.................. 5

31 industrial projects to be financed by Government................. 5

Contract signed for airport civil works............................. 7

Chung Uk Tsuen works contract signed................................ 7

44 VMs return home voluntarily...................................... 8

Central and Western DB report available............................. 8

Flushing water cuts in Tai Wai and Sha Tin.......................... 9

Hong Kong Monetary Authority money market operations............ 9

1

Chief Secretary talks with top European leaders *****

The Chief Secretary, Mrs Anson Chan, continued her top-level discussions with European leaders today (Wednesday) when she met the Dutch Prime Minister, Mr Wim Kok, in the Hague.

The meeting lasted half an hour and covered a range of topics, including bilateral trade, investment and a planned visit by Mr Kok to China later in the year which was also likely to take in Hong Kong. Mrs Chan said she and the Governor would welcome a visit by Mr Kok.

The Prime Minister noted that the Netherlands was the fourth largest external investor in Hong Kong's manufacturing industries and a significant investor among the European nations. As a result, there was a shared interest in ensuring that Hong Kong's present systems were maintained and that it continued to be a major international business centre well beyond 1997.

Mrs Chan also had a fruitful exchange of views with the Belgian Prime Minister, Mr Jean-Luc Dehaene, at a meeting in Brussels yesterday.

Mr Dehaene showed a great deal of interest in both Hong Kong and China and raised a number of points such as Hong Kong's infrastructure development, relations with China and the current levels of emigration from Hong Kong.

The Chief Secretary extended an invitation to Mr Dehaene to visit Hong Kong when this could be fitted into his schedule.

At a dinner in the Hague last night, Mrs Chan also took the opportunity to express the hope that European countries would support Hong Kong in its efforts to maintain the territory's unique formula for economic success "far into the next century".

"Plainly, Hong Kong's Chinese future will shape our ties with the rest of the world into the next century," she said.

2

One of Hong Kong's principal roles had been to serve the needs of the Chinese economy in its transactions with the outside world. That important role would continue well beyond the transition.

"Our hope is that as China's commercial and financial ties with the global economy expand, so Hong Kong's business opportunities will increase. But we cannot take success for granted.

"Hong Kong is very well aware that we will have to continue to earn our way in the world, continue to justify the levels of profit we enjoy and the wages we pay ourselves," she said.

Mrs Chan said as Chief Secretary she was determined that Hong Kong would maintain its status as the region's premier business location - the principal gateway not just to China but to developing East Asia as a whole.

During a question and answer session after her speech, Mrs Chan assured the 120 business and political leaders that the Hong Kong dollar link with the United States dollar would be maintained despite the present weakness in the American currency.

She said exchange rate stability was extremely important, particularly in the run-up to 1997, so the government had to take the long-term view.

Mrs Chan noted that if the present trend in the weakness of the US dollar continued, Hong Kong might see more imported inflation. On the other hand, however, Hong Kong's exports would be much more competitive.

The Chief Secretary stressed that it was not simply the Hong Kong Government or the Monetary Authority that had said the link with the US dollar would remain, it was also the view of the Chinese authorities.

In addition to her meeting with the Dutch Prime Minister, Mrs Chan also had discussions with the Minister for Foreign Affairs, Mr Hans Van Mierlo; the Director-General for Foreign Trade, Dr Franciscus Engering; and a luncheon meeting with some of the Netherlands top business people.

End/Wednesday, April 26, 1995

3

Legal Department to improve briefing out system *****

The Legal Department welcomed the part of the Director of Audit's report published today (Wednesday) on the briefing out of prosecution work to private counsel, a spokesman for the department said today.

The spokesman said the report re-affirmed the importance of the briefing out system, which was introduced in 1964, and identified certain areas where there were room for improvement, mainly in relation to keeping of records and formalisation of procedures.

He said the Legal Department would study the report and recommendations carefully with a view to introducing improvements to the briefing out system.

On the amount of prosecution work briefed out to private counsel, the spokesman said it was always the department's intention to handle as much prosecution work in-house as practicable.

But the department was bound by the fact that it had to tackle an everrising amount of workload while the strength of Crown Counsel had not been increased correspondingly, he said.

"As the Director of Audit acknowledged in its report, 'whilst the total court days of the (Prosecutions) Division increased substantially by 40 per cent from 8,009 in 1984 to 11,206 in 1993, the establishment of Crown Counsel in the Division only increased by 11.7 per cent from 94 to 105 during the same period," the spokesman said.

Nevertheless, he said the department was always mindful to improve the briefing out system and had regularly reviewed its operation.

It had already taken steps since January this year to improve the briefing out procedures, he said.

4

These included:

* the documentation on file of the reasons for briefing out in each case;

* the keeping of record of all approaches to counsel for briefing out;

* the documentation on file of the reasons for selecting a particular counsel for non-standard briefing out cases;

* the setting up of a selection panel, consisting of two Deputy Crown Prosecutors, responsible for the selection of and negotiation with private counsel for non-standard briefing out;

* the introduction of fee assessment for all standard briefing out cases so that counsel's brief is marked with a fee commensurate with the length and complexity of the case; and

* the imposition of a maximum, capped monthly payment, stipulated either on a per counsel basis or per case basis for large and complex cases so that approvals for payments exceeding the limit or the cap have to be given by the Law Officers and brought to the attention of the Attorney General.

These steps were consistent with those recommended by the Director of Audit, the spokesman said, adding that the department would consider the Director's recommendaQons carefully with a view to introducing further improvements to the briefing out system.

End/Wednesday, April 26, 1995

5

HK-Guangdong talks on boundaries of administration * * $ * $

Further discussions on matters relating to the boundaries of administration between Hong Kong and Guangdong will take place in Guangzhou on April 28 and 29 between the Hong Kong Government and the Guangdong provincial authorities, a Government spokesman said today (Wednesday).

Deputy Political Adviser Mr John Ashton will lead the Hong Kong team.

The Guangdong team will be led by Mr Xiao Jinzhe, Deputy Director, Foreign Affairs Office, Guangdong Provincial Government.

End/Wednesday, April 26, 1995

31 industrial projects to be financed by Government *****

The Industry and Technology Development Council (ITDC) today (Wednesday) approved 31 projects to be financed by the government's $210 million Industrial Support Fund this financial year.

The funds, provided on a yearly basis, aim at supporting industrial projects which can contribute to the overall industrial or technological development of Hong Kong and to the competitiveness of Hong Kong's manufacturing industries.

The Secretary of ITDC and an Assistant Director-General of Industry, Mr Raymond Young, said the objectives of the successful projects could be broadly categorised as infrastructure support, manpower training, environmental control, promotion of new technology and development of industrial databases.

6

If classified according to the relevant industrial sector, 10 are in the biotechnology sector, three in the electronics sector, three in information technology sector, six in the metals sector, two in the plastics sector, two in the textiles and clothing sector and five in the general category.

"The vetting process was not easy because of the volume and technical nature of the applications. Expert opinions from members of various sectors of industry were sought in the vetting process, and the main criterion adopted by members of the Projects Vetting Committee of the ITDC was whether the application was 'market driven', i.e. whether there was a genuine need in the industry for the deliverables of the proposed projects," he said.

The total project cost, amounting to some $138.7 million over a period of three years, would be disbursed to the applicant organisations according to the yearly cost estimates of individual projects.

Funds required in the 1995-96 financial year would be around $88.8 million, with a commitment of $37.7 million and $12.2 million for fiscal years 1996-97 and 1997-98 respectively.

"Of these successful applications, nine are from industrial support bodies such as the Hong Kong Productivity Council, 16 from higher education institutions, two from trade and industrial organisations, three from a research institute and one from the Industry Department," Mr Young said.

"The successful applicants will be informed of the decision of the ITDC shortly and funds will be disbursed as soon as possible for projects which cost less than $10 million.

"However, one of the approved projects which seeks to establish an 'Electro-magnetic Compatibility Compliance Engineering Centre' will have to be submitted to the Finance Committee of the Legislative Council for approval because its project cost exceeds $10 million," he added.

Mr Young indicated that about $35 million still remained uncommitted, and ITDC welcomed funding applications for projects which commenced within this financial year.

End/Wednesday, April 26, 1995

7

Contract signed for airport civil works

* * * * *

The Civil Engineering Department today (Wednesday) signed a $60-million contract for the maintenance and construction of minor civil engineering works at the Hong Kong International Airport.

The works comprise mainly the routine maintenance of runway, aircraft pavements, day-markings, road, bridges, car parks, drainage and associated miscellaneous works, as well as construction of minor civil engineering works within the airport boundary.

The contract will last for two years commencing from next Monday (May 1).

The works will be designed and supervised by the Development and Airport Division of the Civil Engineering Office, Civil Engineering Department.

End/Wednesday, April 26, 1995

Chung Uk Tsuen works contract signed

* * * * *

The Civil Engineering Department today (Wednesday) signed a $9 million contract for site formation, roads and drainage works at Chung Uk Tsuen.

The works comprise the formation of four hectares of site together with 400 metres of road and 1,500 metres of footpath. Stormwater drains and sewers of approximately 1,500 metres and 1,800 metres length will also be constructed.

On completion, new serviced sites for some 156 small houses at Chung Uk Tsuen will be formed.

The works will commence in May and will take 12 months to complete.

8

The works was designed and the construction will be supervised by the development and Airport Division of the Civil Engineering Office of the department.

End/Wednesday, April 26, 1995

44 VMs return home voluntarily *****

A group of 44 Vietnamese migrants today (Wednesday) returned to Vietnam under the Voluntary Repatriation Programme of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees.

Comprising 20 men, 11 women, eight boys and five girls, they were the 229th batch to go back under the programme.

The group brought to 758 the total number of Vietnamese migrants who had returned voluntarily this year, and to 44,952 the total number of returnees since the programme started in March 1989.

End/Wednesday, April 26, 1995

Central and Western DB report available

* * * * *

Free copies of the 1993 - 1994 Central and Western District Board Working Reports will be available from today (Wednesday).

The 45-page report with Chinese text and colourful pictures gives a detailed account of the work and activities of the board members from January 1993 to September 1994.

The report can be obtained from the public enquiry service centre of the Central and Western district office, 38 Pier Road, Central, Hong Kong.

End/Wednesday, April 26, 1995

9

Flushing water cuts in Tai Wai and Sha Tin *****

Flushing water supply to some premises in Tai Wai and Sha Tin will be suspended from 8 am to 8 pm on Friday (April 28) to facilitate checking of the supply system.

In Tai Wai, the suspension will affect Mei Lam Estate, May Shing Court, Glamour Garden, Grandway Garden, Grandeur Garden, Holford Garden, Tai Wai San Tsuen and Tai Wai Industrial Area.

The affected areas in Sha Tin will include Hin Keng Estate, Lung Hang Estate, Sun Chui Estate, Sun Tin Wai Estate, Chun Shek Estate, Carado Garden, Golden Lion Garden Phases I and II, Green View Garden, Worldwide Garden, Julimount Garden, Happy Dragon Recreation Park, Tin Sum Tsuen, Kak Tin Tsuen, San Tin Tsuen and Lei Uk Tsuen.

End/Wednesday, April 26, 1995

Hong Kong Monetary Authority money market operations

*****

Time Cumulative change

$ million (hours) (Smillion)

Opening balance in the account Closing balance in the account Change attributable to:

Money market activity LAF today

2,299 0930 +111

2,125 1000 + 111

1100 +170

+128 1200 +126

-302 1500 +126

1600 +128

LAF rate 4.25% bid/6.25% offer TWI 118.2 *-0.2* 26.4.95

10

Hong Kong Monetary Authority

EF bills

EF notes/Hong Kong Government bonds

Terms Yield Term Issue Coupon Price Yield

1 week 5.49 19 months 2611 • 6.90 100.85 6.41

1 month 5.50 22 months 2702 7.50 101.79 6.54

3 months 5.68 30 months 3710 7.25 101.19 6.84

6 months 5.85 36 months 3804 6.90 99.91 7.05

12 months 6.10 59 months 5003 7.75 101.13 7.61

Total turnover of bills and bonds - $ 39,019 million

Closed April 26, 1995

End/Wednesday, April 26, 1995

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

ISSUED BY GOVERNMENT INFORMATION SERVICES BEACONSFIELD HOUSE, HONG KONG. TEL: 842 8777

SUPPLEMENT

Wednesday, April 26,1995

Contents Page No,

Legislative Council meeting:

Motion debate on travel insurance.............................. 1

MTRC annual report............................................. 4

KCRC annual report............................................. 5

Radiation regulations.......................................... 7

Securities (Insider Dealing) (Amendment) Bill 1995 ............ 8

Drug Trafficking (Recovery of Proceeds) (Amendment) Bill 1995 . 9

Organized and Serious Crimes (Amendment) Bill 1995 ........... 10

Builders’ Lifts and Tower Working Platforms (Safety) Bill. 11

Housing (Amendment) Bill 1995 ................................ 12

Air quality problems in HK.................................... 13

/Inaccurate information.

Contents Page No.

Inaccurate information in electoral roll................................... 18

Interviewing Witness Scheme................................................ 20

Noise nuisance caused by airport railway works............................. 21

More optical readers to be installed....................................... 24

Visa application procedure................................................. 25

Truck drivers from China.................................................   27

Number of container trucks...............................................   29

Subsidy for residential care homes for the elderly......................... 29

Measures to ensure navigation safety................................... 31

Schemes to improve financial situation of elderly.......................... 33

Letting markets to single operators........................................ 34

Social security assistance payments........................................ 36

Water supply to remote villages in NT...................................... 37

Future development of Sai Tso Wan.......................................... 39

Appointments to advisory boards and committees............................. 41

Water pollution in Tolo Harbour............................................ 42

Sex education.............................................................. 44

Linkage between HKFE and Philadelphia Stock Exchange....................... 46

1

Motion debate on travel insurance ♦ ♦ * ♦ ♦

Following is the speech by the acting Secretary for Trade and Industry, Mrs Regina Ip, in the Legislative Council motion debate on travel insurance today (Wednesday):

Mr President,

I am grateful to the Honourable Howard Young for moving the present motion for debate, and for other Honourable Members who have spoken for their helpful comments. We will study carefully the suggestions and comments they have made in our consideration of the proposals for the protection of outbound travellers to be submitted by the Travel Industry Council.

The Government agrees in principle with Honourable Members that measures should be introduced speedily to improve the protection available to outbound travellers against the risks to their lives and properties while travelling overseas. The question is how and to what extent. Over the years we have, in conjunction with the outbound travel industry, introduced new initiatives to enhance the protection of outbound travellers. This is an on-going process which requires the support and cooperation of the travel industry and outbound travellers. We have always kept under review the need for new protection measures.

As the Hon Fred Li recognised, since December 1994, the Government has been in close touch with the Travel Industry Council and the Consumer Council with a view to formulating proposals to improve protection for outbound travellers in case of accidents occurring outside Hong Kong. In particular we have focused on the need for insurance cover for both outbound travellers and travel agents. At the same time, the Consumer Council and the Travel Industry Council have strengthened their publicity efforts to promote awareness among the general public of the benefits of being covered by an insurance policy while travelling outside Hong Kong. Travel agents have been advised to remind their clients to take out insurance coverage to protect themselves.

- 2 -

As several members had pointed out, there are three basic types of travel insurance available in the market which may give protection to outbound travellers and travel agents, namely : personal travel insurance for individuals, group travel accident insurance for travellers and public liability insurance for travel agents. When travelling abroad, individual travellers may protect themselves by taking out personal travel insurance according to their own needs. The insurance package for individual travellers can be tailor-made to cover death, injury and medical expenses in the event of an accident, as well as loss of luggage, delayed flights, loss of cash, etc. I agree entirely with members who have spoken about this subject that the taking out of such insurance cover is entirely a matter for the individual traveller. The second type of insurance is group travel accident insurance which may enable travellers to claim compensation payments at the earliest opportunity in case of accidents without the need to prove that the travel agent is at fault. This type of insurance may offer protection to travellers as well as travel agents. The third type of insurance is public liability insurance. As a general rule, travel agents are. responsible for liabilities arising from the operation of their businesses irrespective of whether they have taken out public liability insurance. Public liability insurance would insure travel agents against possible claims from their clients and enable travellers to get compensation upon proof of negligence on the part of the travel agent.

The Advisory Committee on Travel Agents discussed the question of providing insurance cover for outbound travellers at its meeting in February 1995. The Committee considered the views of the public and the travel industry, submissions received from organisations and individuals, and requirements for insurance coverage in other countries. It recommended that travel agents should be required to take out compulsory group travel accident insurance for their clients initially through changes to the Travel Industry Council’s membership requirement, and in the long term through legislative changes. In addition, outbound travellers should have the choice of taking out an insurance policy according to their own needs. Travel agents should encourage their clients to take out insurance to provide additional coverage and to inform them of the details of any insurance coverage included in the travel package. We welcome the recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Travel Agents in principle, and have requested the Travel Industry Council to study the feasibility of these recommendations and come up with firm proposals for our consideration.

The Travel Industry Council has appointed a committee to consider possible options. The committee has held several meetings to discuss the matter, including meetings with representatives of the insurance industry. I understand the Travel Industry Council has finalised its proposals and we are looking forward to receiving them from the Council.

3

As an interim measure, the Travel Industry Council has asked its members to encourage their clients to take out travel insurance themselves and to provide them with detailed information on the travel insurance services available on the market. It has also advised travel agents to disclose details of any insurance coverage included in the travel services provided to their clients.

Turning now to the more specific points made by Members. Several Members have referred to the technical difficulties in requiring travel agents to take out compulsory group travel insurance for their clients and the need for the Government to undertake broad-based consultation before arriving at a decision on the best way forward.

In fact the Hon Miriam Lau, the Hon Chim Pui-chung and the Hon Henry Tang all urged the Government to conduct, to consult, concerned parties before formulating proposals.

We fully recognised the need for adequate and broad-based consultation. The Hon Miriam Lau suggests that working group join members from interested parties should be established to deliberate on the issue. In this regard, I'm please to point out that members of the Advisory Committee on the travel agents is already playing this role. It's members are all joined from all walks of life. In particular the Travel Industry Council and Consumer Council.

The Honourable Tam Yiu-chung suggested that a special fund should be established to grant ex gratis payments to victims of travel accidents. We will study his suggestion in conjunction with the proposal for establishing a contingency fund unveiled by the Travel Industry Council yesterday.

The Hon Fred Li has expressed concern about the proposal for establishing a contingency fund announced by the Travel Industry Council yesterday. We are awaiting the details of this proposal from the Council and will no doubt take into account the views of this Council in examining the proposal from the Travel Industry Council.

4

In conclusion, we share Honourable Members’ views that travellers should be encouraged to take out individual travel insurance according to their own needs. We are pleased to note that according to the information released by an insurance company, increasing awareness of the perils of travel abroad has triggered a five-fold jump in the number of local residents taking out personal travel insurance since 1990. This is a good sign. I do hope more and more travellers will be aware of the benefits of taking out travel insurance notwithstanding the concern about bringing bad luck as the Honourable Howard Young had pointed out. As regards insurance cover for travellers and travel agents, we have yet to receive a formal submission from the Travel Industry Council. In the light of the proposals and the advice of the Advisory Committee on Travel Agents, we shall consider whether it is necessary to require travel agents to take out group insurance for their clients and if so, to what extent and how.

With these remarks, Mr President, I support the motion.

End/Wednesday, April 26, 1995

MTRC annual report ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

Following is the speech by the Financial Secretary, the Hon Sir Hamish Macleod, on the Mass Transit Railway Corporation Annual Report 1994 in the Legislative Council today (Wednesday):

Mr President,

In accordance with section 16(4) of the Mass Transit Railway Corporation Ordinance, I table the annual report and accounts of the Corporation for the year ending 31 December 1994.

In 1994, the MTR carried 804 million passengers, 3% more than 1993. Fare revenue increased by 12.8% to $4,315 million, while total operating costs increased by 13.5% to $2,236 million. Interest and finance charges were $1,269 million, 1.4% higher than last year.

The Corporation earned a net profit of $1,038 million compared with HK$735 million in 1993. Cumulative losses were reduced to $1,295 million.

5

We are very pleased that following the signing of the Agreed Minute on the financing for the Airport and the Airport Railway, Finance Committee’s approval was obtained last November for a total equity of $23.7 billion to be committed for the Airport Railway project. This has since enabled the Corporation to make significant progress in letting some of the major contracts, whilst discussion on the Financial Support Agreement continues. It is encouraging to note that the Corporation expects to complete the project within budget.

The Corporation is committed to providing a safe, reliable and efficient service and has plans to spend $8 billion on major improvement projects by the year 2000. In an effort to achieve greater transparency and accountability, it has published two booklets to provide Members with more financial and operational information. Performance pledges have once again been set and the results made public.

I would like to pay tribute to Mr Hamish Mathers, who has retired last month, and thank the Board, the management and the staff of the MTRC for another fruitful year and wish the new Chairman and the Corporation continuing success.

End/Wednesday, April 26, 1995

KCRC annual report

*****

Following is the speech by the Financial Secretary, the Hon Sir Hamish Macleod, on the Kowloon-Canton Railway Corporation Annual Report 1994 in the Legislative Council today (Wednesday):

Mr President,

In accordance with section 14(5) of the Kowloon-Canton Railway Corporation Ordinance, I table the annual report and accounts of the Corporation for the year ending 31 December 1994.

The Corporation maintained a strong financial position in 1994. Operating revenue stood at $2,668 million, an increase of 10% over 1993. Including the income from property development, net profit for the year was $1,124 million. No dividend was paid to the Government this year after fully taking into account the Corporation's cash flow requirements and investment needs, particularly arising from the invitation to the Corporation to submit proposals to construct the Western Corridor project announced in the Railway Development Strategy.

6

During 1994, major improvements were made to enhance customer service on both the Kowloon-Canton Railway (KCR) and the Light Rail Transit (LRT) System, the two core services operated by the Corporation. Punctuality was improved, with the KCR achieving an average of 99.4% and the LRT an average of 98.9%.

The KCR carried 220 million passengers in 1994, an increase of 7% over 1993. Of these, 40 million passengers travelled to and from Lo Wu, an increase of 8%. Through train traffic between Kowloon and Guangzhou decreased by 14% to 2.5 million. To improve passenger comfort, the waiting areas at Lo Wu Station have been enclosed and air-conditioned. Work to enlarge the subway at Kowloon Tong Station linking the KCR and MTR has been progressing well and is near completion.

The LRT carried 130 million passengers in 1994, an increase of 11%. During the year, Phase 3 of the Tin Shui Wai Extension was completed and came into service in March 1995. Platforms at various stops were widened, platform shelters extended, and more service information was provided to passengers.

During the year, the Corporation's freight services faced very keen competition, with modest declines recorded for inbound traffic from 2.3 million tonnes to 2.1 million tonnes, and for outbound traffic from 1.2 million tonnes to 1.1 million tonnes.

The Corporation has planned to invest $7 billion in infrastructure and service improvements by the end of the decade. A number of major projects are already under way.

To summarise, the Corporation has continued to operate successfully and credit goes to the Chairman, the Managing Board, as well as the management and the staff of the Corporation for their achievements in the past year.

End/Wednesday, April 26, 1995

- 7 -

Radiation regulations *****

Following is the speech by the Secretary for Health and Welfare, Mrs Katherine Fok, in moving the Radiation (Control of Irradiating Apparatus) (Amendment) Regulation 1995 and Radiation (Control of Radioactive Substances) (Amendment) Regulation 1995 in the Legislative Council today (Wednesday):

Mr President,

I move that the Radiation (Control of Irradiating Apparatus) (Amendment) Regulation 1995 and Radiation (Control of Radioactive Substances) (Amendment) Regulation 1995 as set out under my name in the paper circulated to Members be approved.

The Radiation Ordinance and its subsidiary legislation regulate, inter alia, exposure to ionizing radiation according to international standards so as to ensure effective protection of workers and the public as regards their health and safety.

Recently, international standards on this front have been updated by scaling down the limits of ionizing radiation exposure to radiation workers and the public, hence our Amendment Regulations. Technical amendments to terminology related to the regulations are also made.

The Amendment Regulations also seek to allow the use of irradiating apparatus for specified medical purposes under certain conditions by radiographers, who need to operate irradiating apparatus when delivering their services. Radiographers will be required to be statutorily registered under the recently made Radiographers (Registration and Disciplinary Procedure) Regulation.

The Amendment Regulations enhance radiological protection according to international standards and provide strict, but reasonable, conditions under which certain persons may operate irradiating apparatus for specified purposes. The Radiation Board, the licensing authority in respect of radioactive substances and irradiating apparatus set up under section 3 of the Radiation Ordinance, has been consulted and support the Amendment Regulations.

With these remarks, I move the motion.

End/Wednesday, April 26, 1995

8

Securities (Insider Dealing)(Amendment) Bill 1995 ♦ * ♦ ♦ ♦

Following is the speech by the acting Secretary for Financial Services, Mrs Lessie Wei, in moving the second reading of the Securities (Insider Dealing) (Amendment) Bill 1995 in the Legislative Council today (Wednesday):

Mr President,

I move the second reading of the Securities (Insider Dealing) (Amendment) Bill 1995.

The Bill has two main objectives. First, it seeks to amend the Securities (Insider Dealing) Ordinance to make it possible, for an additional division or divisions of the Insider Dealing Tribunal to be set up so that two or more insider dealing cases can be heard at the same time. Secondly, it makes other amendments to the Ordinance to improve the operation of the Tribunal.

Investigations by the Securities and Futures Commission into suspected insider dealing are likely to generate a caseload that one tribunal will not be able to deal with alone without long delay. However, the Ordinance at present does not permit more than one tribunal, each with a different chairman and members, to operate at the same time. That insider dealing cases cannot be dealt with expeditiously may reduce the deterrent effect of the tribunal process and give the false impression that the Government does not consider insider dealing a serious matter.

Insider dealing undermines confidence in the fairness and the integrity of the market. The ability of the Tribunal to hear cases without undue delay is an important element in protecting the investing public and maintaining market integrity.

To facilitate the setting up of an additional division or divisions of the Tribunal, it is also proposed that in addition to High Court judges, former High Court judges should be eligible for appointment as chairmen of divisions of the Tribunal. This is to widen the pool of candidates who will be eligible for appointment as chairmen.

Other amendments to the Ordinance are proposed to improve the operation of the Tribunal. Of these amendments, the more significant ones are the introduction of new provisions to empower the Tribunal to award costs to persons attending inquiries of the Tribunal and to provide certain immunity to witnesses from subsequent criminal and civil proceedings in respect of evidence given at proceedings before the Tribunal.

End/Wednesday, April 26, 1995

9

Drug Trafficking (Recovery of Proceeds) (Amendment) Bill 1995 *****

Following is the speech by the Secretary for Security, Mr Peter Lai, in moving the second reading of the Drug Trafficking (Recovery of Proceeds) (Amendment) Bill 1995 in the Legislative Council today (Wednesday):

Mr President,

I move the second reading of the Drug Trafficking (Recovery of Proceeds) (Amendment) Bill 1995.

The Drug Trafficking (Recovery of Proceeds) Ordinance provides for the tracing, restraining and confiscation of proceeds derived from drug trafficking and the criminalization of assisting a drug trafficker to launder his drug proceeds. It also provides for the designation of countries and territories outside Hong Kong so that external confiscation orders can be enforced here. The Ordinance helps to reduce the profitability of drug trafficking and acts as a deterrent to money laundering. It enhances Hong Kong’s cooperation with overseas countries in the fight against illicit drugs. Since the coming into operation of the Ordinance in September 1989, assets to the value of $233 million have been ordered to be confiscated; of these $ 194 million have been paid to the Government. Further assets amounting to $153 million are under restraint.

The purpose of the present Bill is to improve the operation of the Ordinance in the light of experience since its enactment, and to bring its provisions into line with the standards in the 1988 United Nations Convention Against Illicit Traffic in Narcotic Drugs and Psychotropic Substances.

The Bill empowers the court to make a confiscation order, where proceedings in respect of a drug trafficking offence have not concluded because the defendant has absconded or died. It also empowers the court to increase the amount to be recovered under a confiscation order where additional proceeds are discovered subsequent to the making of the confiscation order.

The Bill seeks to extend the scope of production orders to cover information that is likely to become available, as well as information which is already in existence; and to make it clear that it is an offence for a drug trafficker to launder his own proceeds of crime.

10

The Bill also provides, in line with United Kingdom practices, that once a person has been proven guilty beyond reasonable doubt of a drug trafficking offence, the amount by which he has benefited should be determined on the standard of proof applicable to civil proceedings. Likewise, the Bill seeks to introduce powers for authorized officers to seize specified property reasonably suspected to be the proceeds of drug trafficking, which is being imported into, or exported from Hong Kong. The power to order forfeiture of such property will be given to the Courts.

• To bring the Ordinance into line with the UN Convention, the Bill seeks to establish a criminal offence of dealing in property, knowing that it is the proceeds of drug trafficking; and provides for the recovery of income or other benefits derived from property which represents the proceeds of drug trafficking.

Relevant bodies in the legal and financial sectors, namely the Bar Association, The Law Society, the Hong Kong Association of Banks, the Hong Kong Deposittaking Companies Association, the Hong Kong Society of Accountants, and the Securities and Futures Commission, have been consulted in the course of the drafting of this Bill.

Thank you, Mr President.

End/Wednesday, April 26, 1995

Organized and Serious Crimes (Amendment) Bill 1995 *****

Following is the speech by the Secretary for Security, Mr Peter Lai, in moving the second reading of the Organized and Serious Crimes (Amendment) Bill 1995 in the Legislative Council today (Wednesday):

. ■ i / . •

*

Mr President,

I also move the second reading of the Organized and Serious Crimes (Amendment) Bill 1995.

The confiscation and money laundering provisions of the Organized and Serious Crimes Ordinance were modelled on the provisions of the Drug Trafficking (Recovery of Proceeds) Ordinance. In moving the Drug Trafficking (Recovery of Proceeds) (Amendment) Bill be read a second time, I have just explained the need for amending that Ordinance, and the principal amendments proposed. To maintain compatibility and to achieve effective enforcement, it is necessary to make similar changes to the Organized and Serious Crimes Ordinance.

11

There are, however, two main differences between these two Bills. First, the Organized and Serious Crimes (Amendment) Bill does not contain amendments in respect of external confiscation orders, because the Organized and Serious Crimes Ordinance itself does not provide for such orders. Secondly, this Bill does not provide powers of seizure and detention for the proceeds of the crime which are being imported into, or exported from, Hong Kong, because it is not considered essential for such powers to be sought beyond dealing with the proceeds of drug trafficking.

Thank you, Mr President.

End/Wednesday, April 26, 1995

Builders' Lifts and Tower Working Platforms (Safety) Bill *****

Following is the introductory speech by the acting Secretary for Works, Mr Keith Kwok, in moving the third reading of the Builders' Lifts and Tower Working Platforms (Safety) Bill in the Legislative Council today (Wednesday):

Mr President,

I move that the clauses specified be amended as set out in the paper circulated to members.

These amendments are proposed for the Bill after we have carefully considered the comments of the Assistant Legal Adviser to this Council on the Bill and consultation with Attorney General's Chamber. They involve the removal of an unnecessary definition in the Bill and the rewording of a clause so as to make its meaning more explicit. For the clauses in connection with the disciplinary tribunal and the appeal board, the amendments are to ensure that Director of Electrical and Mechanical Services will be notified of the time and place of the hearings and to make it clear that the presence of a legal adviser at the hearings is to deal with legal matters. I confirm that these amendments would not change the Bill in any substantial manner.

Furthermore, I would like to add that the amendments proposed for the Chinese version are intended to achieve more accurate translation and better presentation.

Mr President, I commend the amendments to Members for favourable consideration.

Thank you, Mr President.

End/Wednesday, April 26, 1995

12

Housing (Amendment) Bill 1995 ♦ * * ♦ *

Following is a speech by the Secretary for Housing, Mr Dominic Wong, in moving the third reading of the Housing (Amendment) Bill 1995 in the Legislative Council today (Wednesday):

Mr Chairman,

I move that clause 7(2) be amended as set out in the paper circulated to Members.

The original clause 7(2) provides that an appeal tribunal appointed under the proposed section 7A(6) of the Housing Ordinance, in determining an appeal, should have regard to the Hong Kong Housing Authority's policies that applied to the subject matter of the appeal, and which the Housing Authority relied on when it decided to terminate a lease or to issue a notice to quit to which the appeal relates. The proposed amendment to clause 7(2) ensures that the concerned appellant was or could reasonably be expected to have been aware of the Housing Authority's policies when it made the decision.

Mr Chairman, I beg to move.

Second reading of new clause 7A

Mr Chairman,

I move that new clause 7A as set out in the paper circulated to Members be read the second time.

.■>

Clause 7A arises from our policy intention to deter the creation of mortgages or charges not authorised by the Housing Authority by making them void and rendering the offenders liable to prosecution. Legal advice is that clause 6 of the Bill only deals with the question of voidance and is not adequate to render those who create unauthorised mortgages or charges liable to prosecution. It would also be inappropriate to take prosecution action on the basis of clause 6 of the Bill or the existing offence-creating section 27A of the Housing Ordinance. We therefore propose the addition of a new clause to clarify the legal position and to make people who lend or borrow on the basis of unauthorised mortgages or charges liable to prosecution.

13

Mr Chairman, I beg to move.

Mr Chairman,

I move that new clause 7A be added to the bill.

End/Wednesday, April 26, 1995

Air quality problems in HK ♦ * ♦ ♦ ♦

Following is a question by the Hon James To Kun-sun and a reply by the Secretary for Planning, Environment and Lands, Mr Tony Eason, in the Legislative Council today (Wednesday):

Question :

Regarding the air quality studies conducted by the Environmental Protection Department, will the Government inform this Council of:

(a) the findings of such studies in various districts of the territory in the past three years;

(b) the causes of air pollution; and

(c) the measures which will be taken to abate air pollution?

Reply :

Mr President,

(a) Air quality problems in Hong Kong can be described in terms of four key air pollutants: sulphur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), total suspended particulates (TSP) and respirable suspended particulates (RSP). I will briefly summarise the results of air quality monitoring recorded at our eight monitoring stations over the past three years. Details arc given in the table attached to the written version of this answer (Table 1).

14

Sulphur dioxide has been recorded at low levels throughout the territory. The yearly averages for all monitoring stations have been well within the air quality objective.

Nitrogen dioxide has been recorded at higher levels, with concentrations within the air quality objective at around 80%, with one exception. Because motor vehicles are a major source of nitrogen dioxide, levels tend to be high in districts with heavy road traffic, e.g. Mong Kok.

TSP and RSP are dust in the air. Levels of TSP have been high and the air quality objective has been exceeded at all stations, except Sha Tin. However, it is RSP which are of more concern in terms of health effects because they are small enough to breathe into the lungs. Levels of RSP have generally been within the air quality objective in Sha Tin, Tai Po and Kwai Chung; but in districts with heavy traffic, e.g. Kwun Tong, Sham Shui Po and Mong Kok, the concentrations of RSP have been higher than the air quality objective.

(b) As for the causes of air pollution, the fuels burnt in factories and used by motor vehicles are the major causes of sulphur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide and particulates; dust emissions from construction works and open burning activities also contribute to the particulates problem.

(c) The Government is determined to improve air quality in Hong Kong. The Air Pollution Control (Fuel Restriction) Regulations introduced in 1990 reduced the sulphur content of liquid industrial fuel to 0.5% by weight and brought ambient sulphur dioxide concentrations well within the air quality objective. A number of other measures have also helped reduce polluting emissions. These include the extension of controls on specified processes under the Air Pollution Control Ordinance; the introduction of unleaded petrol in 1991; the requirement for all vehicles imported since 1992 to comply with stringent vehicle emission standards and newly imported petrol vehicles be equipped with catalytic converters; and the smoky vehicle control programme. In addition, with effect from 1 April 1995, we have introduced cleaner diesel fuel for vehicles and even more stringent vehicle emission standards.

We are also working towards the introduction of additional measures to ensure that the air quality objectives are achieved. The measures being considered include:

15

* control of construction dust;

control of dust and smoke from open burning;

* higher penalties for smoky vehicles;

* requiring light duty vehicles to use unleaded petrol and catalytic converters;

* stricter inspection to ensure diesel vehicles are well maintained;

* use of alternative fuels for vehicles in the longer term; and

* more environmentally friendly transport policies.

'6

Table 1 - Air Quality Monitoring Results at Eight Stations 1992 to 1994

(all results are yearly averages in microgram per cubic metre)

1992 I 1993 1994 (provisional)

u SULPHUR DIOXIDE (Air Quality Objective - 80)

Kwun Tong 21 31 25

Sha Tin 8 10 10

Tai Po 12

Sham Shui Po 12 28

Central/Western 24 19

Tsuen Wan 36 - 30

Kwai Chung 22 33 25

Mong Kok 49 43 54

NITROGEN DIOXIDE (Air Quality Objective = 80)

Kwun Tong 74 66 60

Sha Tin 40 40

Tai Po 57 42 46

Sham Shui Po 50 65

Centra1/Western 50 50 53

Tsuen Wan 63 60

Kwai Chung 44 48 46

Mong Kok 75 76 88

17

TOTAL SUSPENDED PARTICULATES (Air Quality Objective = 80)

Kwun Tong 104 104 106

Sha Tin 81 74 70

Tai Po 87 91 86

Sham Shui Po 124 11? 101

Central/Western 81 87

Tsuen Wan 107 99

Kwai Chung 91 88 87

Mong Kok 159 148 157

RESPIRABLE SUSPENDED PARTICULATES (Air Quality Objective - 55)

Kwun Tong 72 64 58

Sha Tin 51 41 49

Tai Po 53 50 50

Sham Shui Po 71 68 61

Central/Western 55 56

Tsuen Wan 64 62

Kwai Chung 55 53 51

Mong Kok 71 65 69

End/Wednesday, April 26, 1995

18

Inaccurate information in electoral roll

*****

Following is a question by Dr the Hon Yeung Sum and a reply by the Secretary for Constitutional Affairs. Mr Nicholas Ng. in the Legislative Council today (Wednesday):

Question:

It is learnt that during the recent Municipal Council election, a number of candidates came across various inaccurate information in the electoral roll while making their rounds of home visits. As such problem had been identified during the 1991 Legislative Council election, will the Government inform this Council:

(a) of the estimated percentage of inaccurate information in the electoral roll;

(b) what methods the Government adopted during the past three years to rectify the inaccurate information in the electoral roll; and

(c) of the reasons for the recurrence of the same problem in the recent election?

Reply:

Under the existing system, an electoral roll is compiled annually on a roll-over basis and published before 8 August of each year. Existing entries are carried forward to the next roll, after updating changes of electors' particulars as known to the Registration and Electoral Office. New entries are also added as the new roll is compiled. Deletion of an entry from the roll is effected only after going through certain statutory safeguards to ensure that an elector is not disenfranchised lightly. An electoral roll comes into force on the date of its publication and will remain in force until the publication of a new roll in the following year. There is no interim adjustment.

The current electoral roll which was used for the September 1994 District Board elections and the March 1995 Municipal Council elections was published on 1 August 1994 and it reflected the position as at that point in time. Given the population mobility in Hong Kong, it is inevitable that some of the information on the current electoral roll has become outdated since its publication last year. The information can only be updated when a new electoral roll is published in August this year, in time for use in the Legislative Council elections in September.

19

In the recent Municipal Council elections in March, some 120,000 of the official election mail were returned undelivered to the Registration and Electoral Office. In addition, the Registration and Electoral Office discovered about 50,000 suspected cases of incorrect personal particulars in the current electoral roll through its earlier updating and matching exercises. Thus, on the basis of the information available to us, about 170,000 out of the 2.45 million entries on the current electoral roll are suspected to be outdated. This represents about 7% of the total electorate. Even allowing for other cases of wrong information not known to us, it is estimated that inaccuracy of the current electoral roll should at most be not more than 10%.

We attach great importance to maintaining the accuracy of the electoral roll. However, under our existing system, the accuracy of the electoral roll depends, to a large extent, on the initiative of the electors themselves to report to the Registration and Electoral Office of any changes.

The Registration and Electoral Office arranges intensive publicity to encourage and remind electors to report changes of particulars. For instance, in the 1994 voter registration exercise, we obtained and updated information of over 330,000 electors on the electoral roll.

In the annual compilation of the new electoral roll, the Registration and Electoral Office takes active steps to trace the whereabouts of electors who are suspected to have changed addresses. Through this process of vetting, latest information obtained from electors would be reflected in the new electoral roll.

Apart from updating the roll in response to information provided by electors, the Registration and Electoral Office has also adopted a pro-active approach to update the roll through special matching exercises. The electors' particulars on the roll are matched against records kept by the Registration of Person's Office, the Housing Department, the Housing Society, the Transport Department and the Post Office. Where more current information appears on these records, the electoral roll would be updated accordingly.

I am sure Members will appreciate that, despite all the measures taken by the Government to update the electoral roll, ultimately our electoral roll can only be as accurate as our electors want it to be. It is our civic duty to register as an elector and it is our obligation to inform the Registration and Electoral Office of any changes of particulars after we have registered.

End/Wednesday, April 26. 1995

20

Interviewing Witness Scheme *****

Following is a question by Dr the Hon Conrad Lam Kui-shing and a reply by the Secretary for Security, Mr Peter Lai, in the Legislative Council today (Wednesday):

Question:

In regard to the Independent Police Complaints Council’s practice of interviewing witnesses, will the Government inform this Council of the procedures involved and the purposes of such a practice, and whether it has achieved its intended results?

Reply:

Mr President,

As part of a package of measures to improve the present system for handling complaints against the Police, the Administration introduced the Interviewing Witnesses Scheme for Members of the Independent Police Complaints Council in July 1994. The first interview was conducted in October 1994. So far, 13 witnesses involved in six cases have been invited for interview and 10 of them have agreed to be interviewed.

The main purpose of the Scheme is to improve the ability of the Independent Police Complaints Council to monitor investigations conducted by the Complaints Against Police Office (CAPO). The intention of the Scheme is to enable Members to clarify matters with witnesses, but not to take over CAPO’s investigatory role.

The Independent Police Complaints Council has full discretion to decide who should be invited for interview including complainants. Interviews arc conducted by a panel, consisting of two Council Members supported by staff of the Council’s Secretariat. Only one witness is interviewed at a time and interviews are conducted in private. Since the interviews are solely to clarify areas of doubt, witnesses are not required to sign or to acknowledge any documents. The panel then prepares a record of the interview for consideration by the full Council. Where necessary, the Council will follow up with CAPO on the information obtained through the interviews.

21

The Scheme is very useful and has helped Members of the Independent Police Complaints Council fulfil their independent monitoring role. Through these interviews, the Council can clarify ambiguities in statements given by witnesses or allow them to elaborate on their side of the story. This valuable information cannot be readily obtained from scrutiny of the files or from correspondence with CAPO. In fact, these interviews have so far enabled the Independent Police Complaints Council to re-examine the classification of four complaint cases and to confirm the findings in two other cases.

The Independent Police Complaints Council, together with the Administration, would keep the interviewing system under review to see if any improvements are warranted in the future.

End/Wcdnesday, April 26, 1995

Noise nuisance caused by airport railway works *****

Following is a question by the lion Lee Wing-tat and a reply by the Secretary for Planning, Environment and Lands, Mr Tony Eason, in the Legislative Council today (Wednesday):

Question:

Regarding the noise nuisance caused by the airport railway construction works, will the Government inform this Council whether:

(a) the Mass Transit Railway Corporation (MTRC) has made a verbal or written undertaking that the noise level from such works will be kept below 75db: if so, what the details of the undertaking are and what monitoring measures have been adopted by the Government;

(b) it is aware that the noise level from such works at Lai King has frequently exceeded 75db, and even reached 90 db on one occasion, since the commencement of the works: if so. whether any attempts have been made to find out the reasons for such high noise levels and whether remedial measures have been adopted: and

22

(c) it will reconsider giving the residents of the two blocks in Lai King Estate, which are situated ten metres only from the construction site, the option to move into other blocks in Kai King Estate or other estates where the level of noise nuisance is lower?

Reply:

Mr President,

(a) The Mass Transit Railway Corporation carried out a full Environmental Impact Study to identify potential impacts during construction and operation of the Airport Railway prior to construction. The study report was put to the Advisory Council on the Environment in April 1994 and endorsed.

Among other mitigation measures, the MTRC voluntarily adopted a target daytime construction noise limit of 75 db for noise measured at the nearest sensitive receiver between 7 am and 7 pm from Monday to Saturday excluding General Holidays. These are the hours under the Noise Control Ordinance for which no noise level restrictions have been specified for construction works, except piling work.

At meetings with the Kwai Tsing District Board in March 1994 and the Advisory Council on the Environment in April 1994 and February 1995, the MTRC assured members of their commitment to the undertakings and the mitigation measures recommended in the EIS. In the Finance Committee information note on the Airport Railway [FCRl(94-95)], Members were also informed of the details of the environmental mitigation measures for the Airport Railway.

The EIS established comprehensive Environmental Monitoring and Audit Programmes for the MTRC to monitor the environmental impacts of the Airport Railway and the effectiveness of the mitigation measures. In addition, the Environmental Protection Department set up the Environmental Project Office (ENPO) - Kwai Chung/Tsing Yi to monitor and audit the cumulative environmental impacts arising from construction activities in the area, including the Airport Railway construction works. ENPO, in addition to reviewing their reports on environmental monitoring data with the MIRC, also conducts regular site inspections and obtains noise level measurements, and takes prompt action when necessary to advise the MTRC to improve the effectiveness of mitigation measures in hand. The Environmental Protection Department and the MTRC have set up telephone hotlines for receiving enquiries and complaints, and site procedures allow virtually immediate response if this is necessary.

23

I wish to assure Members that the MTRC and the Government have taken the environmental issues very seriously, with dedicated staff resources to address such matters. The MTRC has 8 general staff with another 7 overseeing staff carrying out supervisory work and environmental control, while the Government has 6 overseeing staff.

(b) Mr President, construction work at Lai King commenced almost twelve months ago, whereas noise complaints only began to be received early this year. The complaints have been traced to source, and it is true that there have been exceedences of the MTRC’s self-imposed 75db noise limit despite the considerable efforts made to stay inside this limit. The problem stems from the need to construct substantial concrete footings involving rock excavation for a noise enclosure structure, which is itself a temporary but essential part of the noise mitigation measures being provided for construction of the permanent works. Following completion of this noise enclosure by May 1995, i.e. next month, the MTRC is confident that the 75db limit will be adhered to. In the meantime, constant efforts have been made to reduce noise impacts, and the record shows continuous improvement so that the levels are now contained to about 75 to 77 db.

The Administration will continue to work closely with the MTRC to contain the noise impact problems at Lai King, and indeed elsewhere arising from the construction of the Airport Railway. Local residents are being contacted almost daily and local representative bodies also are being kept fully in the picture.

(c) The Housing Department is unable to offer rehousing to tenants of Lai King Estate as a general practice on the grounds of noise nuisance over a limited period of time. However, it is always willing to consider sympathetically exceptional arrangements for tenants with special needs, e.g. where there are health grounds for transfer. Apart from the resource considerations, the Department believes that it is essential and most effective to mitigate noise levels at source, and this as I have pointed out is the approach which the MTRC and other government departments are adopting.

End/Wednesday. April 26. 1995

24

More optical readers to be installed ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

Following is a question by the Hon Howard Young and a written reply by the Secretary for Security, Mr Peter Lai, in the Legislative Council today (Wednesday):

Question:

Regarding the installation of optical readers at the LoWu and Airport • immigration control points, will the Administration inform this Council:-

(a) of the respective average processing times for each traveller before and after the installation of the optical readers;

(b) of the respective numbers of passengers that can be processed each hour in a normal situation and during peak hours; and

(c) whether optical readers will be installed at the HK - Macau and HK -China ferry immigration control points in the near future?

Reply:

Mr President,

(a) At Lo Wu, the average processing time for a Hong Kong Identity Card holder is 20 seconds at present. Before the installation of optical readers the average processing time was 24 seconds i.e. there is a reduction of the processing time by 4 seconds.

At the Airport, the average processing times for arrival and departure clearances arc different. For a Hong Kong Identity Card holder, the average for arrival clearance is 30 seconds at present, compared with 34 seconds before the installation of optical readers. That for departure clearance is 39 seconds, compared with 43 seconds before.

We plan to install more optical readers to facilitate clearance. At present. 350 optical readers have been installed for clearance of Hong Kong Identity Card holders only. An additional 270 optical readers will be installed in September this year at the control points for handling machine readable passports as well. We estimate that using the optical readers, the current average processing time for machine readable passports of 90 seconds for arrivals and 60 seconds for departures will be reduced by 20 seconds for each machine readable passport holder.

25

(b) Lo Wu is now able to process 9,200 passengers per hour during normal times and 11,500 passengers during peak periods. This represents an increase of 28% in the handling capacity for normal times and 35% for peak periods. The Airport is able to process 5,800 passengers per hour during normal times and 8,200 passengers per hour during peak periods. The increase in capacity is 4% and 5% respectively. As the proportion of machine readable passports cleared at the Airport is much larger, there will be a considerable improvement in the handling capacity when optical readers are installed for machine readable passport holders by September this year.

The increase in handling capacity is made possible not only by the installation of optical readers, but by an increase in manpower. Last year, we created 113 additional posts for Lo Wu. This year, we have just created 44 additional posts for the Airport.

(c) Optical readers were installed at the Macau and China Ferry Terminals last September for clearance of Hong Kong Identity Card holders. Additional readers will be installed this September. In fact, from September this year, all the counters at major control points will be installed with optical readers.

End/Wednesday, April 26, 1995

Visa application procedure

*****

The following is a question by the Hon Simon Ip Sik-on and a written reply by the Secretary for Security. Mr Peter Lai, in the Legislative Council today (Wednesday):

Question:

Will the Government inform this Council whether measures will be taken to make employment and commercial visa application procedures more efficient and transparent to applicants: if so. what the measures are, and whether the Immigration Department will consider adopting the following additional measures:

26

(a) issue and publicise guidelines for those applying for employment or commercial visas after their arrival in Hong Kong;

(b) issue and publicise clearer guidelines on the documentation required at the outset of an application, so that an applicant does not need to make several trips back to the Department to submit documents not originally requested;

(c) issue and publicise more detailed instructions for completing application forms, including glossaries of terms used therein; and

(d) take steps to shorten the lengthy queues faced by applicants?

Reply:

Mr President,

Procedures for the application for visas for employment and investment are designed to be as simple and straightforward as possible. Information pamphlets and application forms are available at service outlets of the Immigration Department, District Offices and British visa posts overseas. Guidance notes attached to visa application forms distributed in Hong Kong set out in detail the supporting documents needed and highlight areas requiring special attention. Public enquiries can be made at the Immigration Department’s Information Office, through the Department’s 24-hour enquiry hotline (tel. no. 2824 6111) or at British visa posts overseas.

We are committed to providing an efficient and courteous service to the public. To this end, we continue our efforts to improve and simplify visa application procedures. For example, we introduced in October last year a dual-track system where applicants seeking to enter Hong Kong for employment, investment, training, residence or education may either submit their visa applications to their nearest British visa post or send them to the Immigration Department, either directly or through their local sponsors. The direct application facility reduces normal processing time by up to two weeks.

As regards the additional measures referred to in the Honourable Member's question:

27

(a) Persons who wish to work or set up business in Hong Kong should apply to British visa posts or to the Immigration Department for visas before they come to Hong Kong. Applications from visitors for employment or investment after their arrival should be regarded as exceptions.

(b) As explained above, application forms and guidance notes are widely available. Applicants or their sponsors are encouraged to provide all the necessary documents at the outset, so that there should be no need to make repeated trips. Staff of the Immigration Department are ready to answer any queries, through telephone enquiries if desired, by applicants or their sponsors on the documentation required.

(c) Visa application forms are already written in plain language and are designed to be user-friendly. Immigration Department staff are ready to assist applicants who have difficulty in completing the forms.

(d) Applicants for visas need not apply to the Immigration Department in person. They may send their applications directly to the Immigration Department by post, or apply through British visa posts overseas. They should then be able to avoid any need for queuing. Visitors who seek to change their status after arrival may submit their applications to the Department's Entry Visa "Other Services" Section, and their applications are normally received over the counter, after a short preliminary screening. However, they may also send their applications by post, thus avoiding any need for queuing.

End/Wednesday, April 26, 1995

Truck drivers from China *****

Following is a question by the Hon Lee Cheuk-yan and a written reply by the Secretary for Security, Mr Peter Lai, in the Legislative Council today (Wednesday):

Question:

Will the Government inform this Council of the number of container truck and truck drivers from China driving such vehicles to enter and leave the territory in the course of their work per month in the past year; and whether such drivers are classified as imported labour?

28

Reply:

Mr President,

PRC drivers employed by companies in China who drive trucks (including container trucks) into Hong Kong in the course of their work enter on multiple-journey visit visas. As at April 18, 1995, there were 713 PRC truck drivers holding valid visas. These PRC drivers are not classified as imported workers as they are employed by companies in China.

We do not have monthly statistics on the arrival/departure of PRC truck drivers on visas. Statistics are available only for all PRC drivers entering on visas, i.e. PRC drivers of trucks, passenger coaches, private cars etc. The statistics for the past 12 months are as follows:

1224 Arrival Departure

April 9,667 9,742

May 9,918 9,660

June 10,525 10.442

July 10,964 11,099

August 11,521 11,426

September 11,272 11.293

October 11,238 11,206

November 10,719 10,561

December 11,166 11,202

Total: 96,990 96,631

122i Arrival Departure

January 10,979 11,003

February 8,716 8.628

March 14.632 14,493

Total: 34,327 34.124

End/Wednesday, April 25, 1995

29

Number of container trucks

*****

Following is a question by the Hon Vincent Cheng Hoi-chuen and a written reply by the Secretary for Transport, Mr Haider Barma, in the Legislative Council today (Wednesday):

Question:

Will the Administration inform this Council of the projection of the number of container trucks in the next decade, given the Administration’s projected number of container units that will be handled by the territory’s container facilities in the next 12 years up to 2006?

Reply:

Mr President,

As at 1 April 1995, the number of licensed container vehicles in Hong Kong is 12,862. The number is projected to increase to 20,000 by 2001 and 27,000 in 2006.

End/Wednesday, April 26, 1995

Subsidy for residential care homes for the elderly

*****

Following is a question by the Hon Moses Cheng Mo-chi and a written reply by the Secretary for Health and Welfare, Mrs Katherine Fok. in the Legislative Council today (Wednesday):

Question:

The Government has indicated that a provision of $50 million will be set aside to subsidize private residential care homes for elderly persons (RCHs) to improve their facilities so that they can comply with the requirements specified in the Residential Care Homes (Elderly Persons) Ordinance, which came into effect on 1st April 1995. In this connection, will the Government inform this Council :

30

(a) when it will announce the application procedures concerning the subsidy scheme so that private RCH operators in need of financial assistance can submit applications as soon as possible;

(b) of the estimated number of private RCHs which will apply for subsidy;

(c) of the estimated average amount of subsidy to be granted in respect of

each application;

(d) what monitoring measures it will adopt to ensure that the funds granted are properly used by subsidized private RCHs; and

(e) whether, in regard to those private RCHs whose applications for subsidy have been rejected, consideration will be given to providing other means which will help them to meet the requirements of the Residential Care Homes (Elderly Persons) Ordinance?

Reply:

The reply is as follows :

(a) We aim to announce the application procedures for the Financial Assistance Scheme before the end of May 1995. Operators of private homes and self-financing non-profit-making homes for the elderly will then be invited to submit applications accordingly.

(b) & (c) Existing private homes vary enormously in terms of their financial condition and the scale of improvement or alteration works which they may need in order to comply with the new statutory requirements. It is, therefore, difficult to estimate the number of private Residential Care Homes (RCHs) which will apply for the subsidy and the amount of subsidy which will be appropriate in each

case.

31

(d) The Social Welfare Department is devising application, vetting and payment procedures for the Financial Assistance Scheme in order to ensure that the funds granted are properly used. RCHs will be required to meet certain eligibility criteria when they make their applications. While all applications will have to be based on estimates made by professional consultants or qualified contractors, the scope of work and project costs will need to be vetted and approved by the Social Welfare Department on the advice of a professional works team established especially for that purpose in the Department. This team will monitor the progress of each successful application and the payment of grants will be made only on a reimbursement basis against certified receipts.

(e) The most likely reason for the rejection of an application made by an RCH would be that the RCH concerned had locational or structural problems which could not be rectified even through major improvement works. In such a case, the operator would be advised to seek alternative premises to continue the operation of the RCH. In the event that a home may need to be closed for whatever reason, the Social Welfare Department will assist operators to find alternative places for any elderly persons affected.

End/Wednesday, April 26, 1995

Measures to ensure navigation safety *****

The following is a question by the Hon Miriam Lau and a written reply by the Secretary for Economic Services, Mr Gordon Siu. in the Legislative Council today (Wednesday):

Question :

Despite steps taken by the Marine Department to ensure navigation safety in the territory's waters, two serious collisions involving passenger catamarans have occurred in the territory's waters within a period of four months. In view of this, will the Government inform this Council whether :

32

(a) the Marine Department will adopt any special measures to prevent the occurrence of similar accidents; and

(b) the Marine Department has any contingency plans to deal with such accidents?

Reply:

Mr President,

The Director of Marine is inquiring into the causes of the two recent collision incidents involving passenger catamarans. Only one of those incidents occurred within Hong Kong waters; the other occurred within Chinese waters. In the light of the outcome of those inquiries, the Administration will implement all necessary measures to prevent the occurrence of similar accidents.

The Director of Marine has already implemented a number of proactive measures to minimise the risk of collisions. These include the establishment and realignment of fairways, the stepping up of harbour patrols, augmenting the regulations and procedures of the vessel traffic system and the establishment of additional local traffic control stations. These measures have already improved the regulation of traffic flow in the harbour. For the future, a new Marine Control Station at Ma Wan is to be commissioned in June and an additional 24-hour harbour patrol team will be deployed later this year to step up surveillance and harbour control. A longer term strategy for the management of Hong Kong waters is being developed in conjunction with a comprehensive study on marine navigational issues which we propose to start later in the year.

As regards contingency planning, comprehensive plans are in place. For example, in the event of accidents, the Marine Rescue Co-ordination Centre coordinates rescue operations in conjunction with the Marine Police who may call upon support as necessary from the Fire Services Department, the Government Flying Service and such other specialist services as may be necessary.

End/Wednesday. April 26. 1995

33

Schemes to improve financial situation of elderly

*****

The following is a question by the Hon J D McGregor and a written reply by the Secretary for Health and Welfare. Mrs Katherine Fok, in the Legislative Council today (Wednesday):

Question :

Elderly citizens who are now the recipients of the normal Old Age Allowance and the higher Old Age Allowance have been given the expectation that they would be able to receive an Old Age Pension of at least $2,300 per month at 1995 price levels. However, the abandonment by the Government of the proposed Old Age Pension Scheme has now left these elderly citizens without any apparent improvement to their small Old Age Allowances. In this connection, will the Government inform this Council what measures it now proposes to take to improve the financial situation of these elderly people estimated at over 400,000 who are not subject to inclusion in the Comprehensive Social Security Assistance Scheme, together with a timetable for the introduction of any such measures?

Reply:

The proposed Old Age Pension Scheme (OPS) was designed as a contributory scheme to provide income security for all eligible elderly persons. The Old Age Allowance for elderly persons is non-contributory and, apart from an income declaration for those aged 65 to 69, is a non-means tested grant. Our Comprehensive Social Security Assistance (CSSA) Scheme is designed to provide financial support to those in genuine financial need i.e. it is a means-tested welfare payment.

It is important that the fundamental differences between these various schemes are fully appreciated. The Government is proceeding with a mandatory privately managed provident fund scheme (the MPF) in place of the OPS to address the need for financial security in retirement. The Administration intends to introduce legislation to establish the MPF system in this legislative session.

34

In addition, the Review of the CSSA scheme currently in hand should be concluded in the first quarter of 1996. The Financial Secretary has agreed to reserve funds to enable some, if not all, of the Review’s recommendations to be implemented in the 1996-97 financial year.

The financial needs of the elderly are best addressed by a successfill implementation as early as possible of the MPF system and any enhancements of CSSA payments for the elderly which may be recommended in the CSSA Review and which could increase the number of elderly persons entitled to CSSA support. It is the development of these two schemes, rather than the Old Age Allowance scheme which is not targeted at those in need, which will be the best way of meeting the financial needs of elderly persons in the future.

End/Wednesday, April 26, 1995

Letting markets to single operators * ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

Following is a question by the Hon Tam Yiu-chung and a written reply by the Secretary for Housing, Mr Dominic Wong, in the Legislative Council today (Wednesday):

Question:

There has been an increasing trend in recent years of the Housing Authority letting entire markets or shopping centres in public housing estates to single operators. As the sublessees at different levels need to make a profit, the costs borne by the direct operators of these markets and shopping centres have in consequence increased substantially, and these are in the end passed on to the consumers. Recently, the direct operators in Kwong Tin Estate in Lam Tin have taken strike action, because they are unable to bear the substantial rises in rent. In this connection, will the Government inform this Council:

(a) whether the Housing Authority will consider discontinuing the mode of letting markets and shopping centres in housing estates to single operators; and

(b) what measures the Housing Authority will put in place to monitor the situation in housing estates where an entire market or shopping centre has been let to a single operator, in order to prevent the occurrence of similar strike incidents?

35

Answer:

a) At present, there are six markets and six supermarket-cum-markets in Housing Authority estates which have been let to single operators. Past surveys conducted of ten of these markets showed that the products and services provided were well received by residents. By letting these commercial premises to single operators, the Housing Authority expects them to provide an efficient service, while at the same time containing staff growth. For these reasons, the Housing Authority does not intend to discontinue the single-operator practice in the housing estates concerned. However, it will continue to monitor the services provided with a view to improving the letting system if necessary.

b) In letting markets to single operators, the Housing Authority adopts the following measures to safeguard the interests of residents -

(a) the operator is required under the tenancy agreement to run a variety of essential trades and services;

(b) the operator is required to submit individual sub-tenancy agreements to the Authority prior to their execution, and to bring any subsequent change or termination to the notice of the Authority;

(c) the premises should be kept open for business between 7 a.m. and 8 p.m. daily; and

(d) the Authority retains the right to terminate the agreement with the single operator in case of unsatisfactory performance on the part of the operator or his sub-tenants.

Moreover, the practice of letting commercial premises to single operators is not adopted unless there is an alternative market in the vicinity. This ensures consumer choice and continuity of service to residents in case of disruption.

36

c) Operators and sub-tenants of single-operator markets in public housing estates are given a free hand to make their own commercial decisions. In the case of Kwong Tin Estate, which houses a supermarket-cum-market run by a single operator, the recent temporary closure of the wet market was decided on by stallholders during negotiations over the terms of renewal of their tenancies. Notwithstanding the temporary closure of the wet market, the operator has been able to maintain service in the supermarket section.

d) While the Housing Authority does not exercise direct control over the contractual terms and conditions under which individual stalls are sublet by the operator, the Authority always encourages dialogue between the operator and sub-tenants to resolve disputes and to maintain harmonious relationships. In the event of a serious service disruption, the Authority will intervene with a view to restoring service to the public as soon as possible.

End/Wednesday, April 26, 1995

Social security assistance payments *****

The following is a question by the Hon Christine Loh and a written reply by the Secretary for Health and Welfare, Mrs Katherine Fok, in the Legislative Council today (Wednesday):

Question:

In his reply to a written question which I asked concerning the Programme Area on Social Security in the context of the examination of Draft Estimates of Expenditure 1995-96, the Director of Social Welfare has stated that the Comprehensive Social Security Assistance (CSSA) rates have increased by about 15 times over the last two decades while the rate of inflation as measured by the Consumer Price Index (A) has gone up only six times. In this connection, will the Government inform this Council how it has calculated this increase in CSSA payments and, in particular, how it can demonstrate the real increase in the last ten years?

37

Reply:

When the Public Assistance Scheme, which is now known as the Comprehensive Social Security Assistance (CSSA) Scheme, was set up in 1971, the basic (now standard) rate for a single person was $70 per month. Since then, the standard rates have been adjusted in accordance with increases in the cost of living. Real increases have also been made to the rates. In 1994, the standard rate for a single person became $1,115 per month, representing an increase of about 15 times over the rate in 1971. The Consumer Price Index (A) (CPI(A)) rose from 21.0 in 1971 to 146.9 in 1994, representing an increase of about 6 times.

From 1985 to 1994, the standard rate for a single person increased from $510 per month to $1,115 per month, representing an increase of 119%. The CPI(A) rose from 72.8 in 1985 to 146.9 in 1994. representing an increase of 102%. This demonstrates a real increase in the CSSA payment rates over the last ten years.

End/Wednesday, April 26, 1995

Water supply to remote villages in NT *****

Following is a question by the Hon Albert Chan Wai-yip and a written reply by the acting Secretary for Works, Mr Keith Kwok, in the Legislative Council today (Wednesday):

Question:

In his written reply to a question regarding complaints about the lack of water supply to squatter areas at the Council sitting on 30 June 1993, the Secretary for Works indicated that a Public Works Programme Item "Water Supply to Remote Villages in the New Territories" had been created. However, the residents of Lin Fa Shan in Tsuen Wan have recently complained that the area is still without water supply. In this connection, will the Government inform this council of:

(a) the progress of the project for the provision of water supply to Lin Fa

Shan :

(b) the target date for completion of the project:

38

(c) the villages in the New Territories which are currently without water supply :

Reply :

Mr President,

(a) The progress of the project for the provision of water supply to Lin Fa Shan :

Provision of water supply to Lin Fa Shan in Tsucn Wan has been planned as part of the project 'Chuen Lung & Ha Fa Shan Scheme' which comprises a 2-stagcd pumping system. Tender for the works will be gazetted in June 1995 and construction will commence in September 1995.

There are however still land problems to be resolved, and consequently difficulties in finding suitable routes for the water mains in the area. Unless the land problem can be resolved before the tender date, some delay is expected for the completion of the project.

(b) fhe target date for completion of the project:

The project is expected to complete by end of 1996 and metered water supply will also be available to the villagers of Lin Fa Shan at the same time.

(c) The villages in the New Territories which, are currently without water supply :

Out of the 774 villages identified under the New Territories Water Supply Scheme, 640 villages have been provided with metered water supply. There arc a total of 134 villages not yet provided with metered water supply and for these villages, actions at different stages are being taken as follows

39

(a) Villages for which works are at design or 50

construction stage (Construction works for villages were underway. Works for the other villages were being designed).

(b) Villages under planning. 19

(c) Villages presently not planned for metered 30

water supply but are being reviewed.

(d) Villages cleared or to be cleared. 4

(e) Villages which are deserted or are sparsely 31

populated.

Total 134

End/Wednesday, April 26, 1995

Future development of Sai 'Iso Wan 9|C $ * * $

The following is a question by the Hon Fred Li Wah-ming and a written reply by the Secretary for Planning, Environment and Lands, Mr Pony Eason, in the Legislative Council today (Wednesday):

Question:

It is learnt that the Planning Department has undertaken a study on the future development of Sai Tso Wan in Cha Kwo Ling. Kwun Tong. In this connection, will the Government inform this Council:

(a) when the Planning Department has started to study the land use of that site;

(b) of the reasons why the Planning Department has not yet released any findings of the study, and whether preliminary findings of the study will be made public; and

40

(c) whether the Planning Department will be able to complete the report of the study before the land lease of the clay mine situated at the above-mentioned site expires in 1996; if not, what actions the relevant departments will take to solve the noise and air pollution problems caused by the mine to residents in Cha Kwo Ling and Laguna City?

Reply:

Mr President,

The answers to the three-part question arc -

(a) The Planning Department commissioned the Central and East Kowloon Development Statement Consultancy study in December 1994. The objective of the study is to provide a broad planning framework to guide the planning and development of Central and East Kowloon up to 2011 having regard to Metroplan and the latest strategic planning, transport and infrastructure proposals relevant to the study area. The study area covers Kwun Tong, Wong Tai Sin and part of Kowloon City. The land use of Cha Kwo Ling, Kwun l ong is covered by this study.

(b) Upon completion of the above-mentioned study, relevant district boards will be consulted on its findings and recommendations.

(c) The study is scheduled for completion in l ebruary 1996 which is before the expiry' of the land lease of the clay mine in mid-1996. The Environmental Protection Department (EPD) has been and will be continuing its monitoring on the operation of the clay mine against any breaches of the statutory limits under the Air Pollution Control Ordinance (Cap.311) and the Noise Control Ordinance (Cap.400). Further legislative control, in the form of a licence control system under the Air Pollution Control Ordinance will be in place by August 1995. By then, EPD can impose licensing conditions on the operator to tighten the control over air emissions. The operator has commissioned a consultant to work out the necessary upgrading measures with a view to reducing air emissions to the minimum.

End/Wednesday, April 26. 1995

41

Appointments to advisory boards and committees ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

Following is a question by the Hon Cheung Man-kwong and a written reply by the Secretary for Home Affairs, Mr Michael Suen, in the Legislative Council today (Wednesday):

Question:

Regarding the Government’s policy on the appointment of members of advisory boards and committees, will the Government inform this Council:

(a) whether there are specific criteria for such appointments; if so, what these criteria are;

(b) whether members’ attendance rate constitutes one of the criteria for reappointment; and

(c) whether, in regard to the situation of individual members of certain boards or committees with a low attendance rate, the Government will draw up measures, such as stipulating a minimum attendance rate, so that those members who fail to attain such a rate will not be reappointed at the expiry of their terms of office, in order to ensure that members will make every effort to attend meetings?

Reply:

(a) In general terms, appointments to advisory boards and committees are made on the basis of the merits of the individuals concerned taking into account their personal ability, experience, integrity, commitment to public service and their overall suitability for appointment.

(b) An individual’s commitment to public service is taken into account in considering his re-appointment to advisory boards and committees. Attendance at meetings is only one of the many measures of one’s commitment to public service.

(c) In light of the above, it is not considered necessary to specify a minimum attendance rate as a criteria for re-appointment as to do so will introduce too much rigidity into the system.

End/Wednesday, April 26, 1995

42

Water pollution in Tolo Harbour ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

The following is a question by Rev the Hon Fung Chi-wood and a written reply by the Secretary for Planning, Environment and Lands, Mr Tony Eason, in the Legislative Council today (Wednesday):

Question :

Despite a number of work projects and measures being taken by the Government to tackle the water quality problem in Tolo Harbour, no improvement has been made to the problems of water pollution and red tides, as evidenced by the recurrence of the red tides problem which has resulted in the death of large quantities of fish and the emission of stench affecting nearly half of the district of Tai Po. In view of this, will the Government inform this Council:

(a) whether the continued existence of water pollution and red tides is an indication that the existing measures adopted have had no practical effects or that there are problems in the enforcement of these measures; and

(b) whether, apart from the projects launched by the Government to divert sewage to other places, consideration will be given to removing the pollutants in the water by dredging the silt on the seabed in order to solve the water pollution problem in Tolo Harbour on a permanent basis?

Reply :

Mr President,

The statement in the preamble to the question that there has been no improvement to water quality in Tolo Harbour is incorrect. The answers to (a) and (b) are as follows:

43

(a) The Tolo Harbour Action Plan (THAP) was put in place in 1987 to tackle water pollution and red tides in Tolo Harbour. The organic and nutrient pollution loads have been reduced by 45% and 36% respectively since the inception of the THAP. Much of these reductions is the result of enforcement action under the Water Pollution Control Ordinance, following declaration of the Tolo Harbour & Channels Water Control Zone in 1987, and of livestock waste control through the Waste Disposal Ordinance since 1988. Enforcement action and other measures have brought about a marked improvement in water quality, as indicated by lower densities of algae and a reduction in the number of red tides in recent years. Nevertheless, because some polluting inputs continue, red tides occur from time to time, especially in the spring when algal blooms are more likely to occur. Further improvement to water quality is expected as more sources of pollution are removed.

Effluent export from the Sha Tin sewage treatment works, a key part of the THAP, was commissioned in April 1995. The same will be done for the Tai Po sewage treatment works in August 1995. Overall, this scheme is expected to further reduce organic and nutrient loadings by 10% and 30% respectively. The works to provide 14 Sha Tin villages with new sewers are nearing completion and works to provide 25 villages in Tai Po with the same have already begun. Further reductions in Tolo Harbour's pollution loading will occur when domestic sewage from these villages is diverted to the public sewers. These major improvement works, together with continued enforcement of the Water Pollution Control Ordinance to remove expedient connections and illegal discharges, the collection of leachate from the Shuen Wan landfill for treatment and restoration of the landfill upon its closure later in 1995, will also bring about further reductions in pollution loads.

(b) Dredging the Tolo Harbour seabed would not help much. Although organic sediments on the seabed release nutrients, their contribution to red tides is small compared to the amount of pollution coming from land-based sources. Dredging the sediments would also lead to resuspension and dispersion of the nutrients and other pollutants into the water body. The most effective way to tackle water pollution in Tolo Harbour is to reduce pollution loads entering the water as outlined under (a) above.

End/Wednesday, April 26, 1995

44

Sex education

*****

Following is a question by the Hon Eric Li Ka-cheung and a written reply by the acting Secretary for Education and Manpower, Miss Jacqueline Willis, in the Legislative Council today (Wednesday):

Question:

It has been pointed out in a number of surveys in recent years that young persons have gradually adopted an open attitude towards sex, and yet their sexual knowledge is relatively limited. In this connection, will the Government inform this Council:

(a) of the respective numbers of serving and pre- service teachers who have received training in sex education, together with the number of schools which have borrowed teaching materials related to sex education in the past three years;

(b) whether the Education Department has completed its survey, which started last year, on the knowledge and attitude of secondary school students on sex and sex education; if so, what the findings are;

(c) when a review will be conducted of the effectiveness of the "Guidelines on Sex Education in Secondary Schools" published in 1986, which is still in current use, in promoting the mode and curricula of sex education; and whether other professionals and members of the public will be invited to participate in such a review; and

(d) whether consideration will be given to drawing up new sex education curricula for primary one to primary six, form one to form three, form four to form five and matriculation classes, which are more specific than the general guidelines and which will enable teachers to be more effective in teaching sex education?

45

Reply :

Mr President,

(a) Over the past three years, a total of 2,550 pre- service and 363 in-service teachers have received training/re-training in sex education.

The pre-service figure is made up of 2,500 students from the former Colleges of Education, and 50 students from the Chinese University of Hong Kong. The in-service figure wholly relates to serving teachers who attended the special training courses in sex education sponsored or run by the Education Department.

During the same period, 62 schools have borrowed teaching or display materials related to sex education from the two Education Department Sex Education Resource Centres.

(b) This survey is being conducted by a research team from the Chinese University of Hong Kong on behalf of the Education Department. It is scheduled for completion in August this year.

(c) The Education Department will review the Guidelines on Sex Education in the light of the results of the survey mentioned at (b) above. The Department intends to involve professionals, school principals, teachers, parents and members of the public in this review.

(d) Besides the Guidelines on Sex Education, over 60 topics relating to sex education are currently taught at different levels in the context of ten different school subjects e.g. biology, social studies etc. While these topics are reviewed regularly, the need for separate curricula for different school levels will be considered in the review mentioned at (c) above.

End/Wednesday, April 26, 1995

46

Linkage between HKFE and Philadelphia Stock Exchange *****

Following is a question by the Hon Steven Poon Kwok-lim and a written reply by the acting Secretary for Financial Services, Mrs Lessie Wei, in the Legislative Council today (Wednesday):

Question:

In view of the decision of the Hong Kong Futures Exchange (HKFE) to form a linkage with the Philadelphia Stock Exchange (PSE) in the United States which will enable the same futures product to be traded on both exchanges, will the Government inform this Council whether -

(a) it will ask the HKFE to clarify if the HKFE’s establishment of a linkage with the PSE, which will facilitate the PSE in trading futures contracts on Hong Kong stocks, goes against HKFE’s original intention of launching stock futures contracts and the Government's undertaking given to this Council and the securities industry, bearing in mind that when the plan for introducing futures contracts on the Hongkong and Shanghai Banking Corporation Holdings and Hongkong Telecom stocks was explained to Members of this Council, the Government highlighted in particular the need for the HKFE to introduce the product as soon as possible so as to forestall a launch by the Singapore International Monetary Exchange of futures contracts on these two stocks;

(b) the HKFE has received encouragement from the Securities and Futures Commission (SFE) and the Government in making this decision;

(c) such a decision requires the prior approval of the SFC; if so, whether the SFC in granting its approval has assessed the overall implications of the HKFE’s decision on the territory's securities industry and whether the SFC's findings will be published; if not, whether consideration will be given to amending the relevant legislation so that the launching of similar plans requires the prior approval of the SFC; and

(d) the Government and the SFC have consulted the Stock Exchange of Hong Kong (SEHK) on HKFE’s decision; if so, what the SEHK's views are and whether the SEHK has raised any issues warranting particular concern?


Answer:

The Hong Kong Futures Exchange (HKFE) has no plans to link with the Philadelphia Stock Exchange (PHLX) to enable the same futures product to be traded on both exchanges. The proposed linkage with PHLX announced by HKFE in March is to allow PHLX currency options to be traded at HKFE during Asian trading hours. All transactions will be cleared through and guaranteed by a clearing company in the USA. The linkage does not include Hong Kong stock-based or index- based futures contracts.

End/Wednesday, April 26, 1995

t

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

ISSUED BY GOVERNMENT INFORMATION SERVICES BEACONSFIELD HOUSE, HONG KONG. TEL: 842 8777

Thursday, April 27, 1995

Contents

Eage Nq,

Governor’s question and answer session in LegCo............................ 1

Eligibility to register as electors explained............................. 15

Decision on Mandatory Provident Fund Scheme important..................... 17

Hong Kong will remain successful after 1997 .............................. 18

Customer service consultant appointed..................................... 19

Ways to curb misleading sales descriptions of flats....................... 20

Gazettal of Airport Authority Bill deferred............................... 22

Mr Justice Gall to visit Beijing.......................................... 23

New anti-smoking measure effective tomorrow.............................   24

Results on language grouping for P6 pupils release tomorrow............... 24

Cessation of computerised driving test.................................... 26

Government schools join Performance Pledge Programme...................... 26

Japanese Finance Minister lends support to HK promotion................... 28

/Grading of...

»

Contents Page No,

Grading of beach water quality.......................................... 29

International Curriculum Conference held in Hong Kong................... 32

BOE members visit TOC Resource Centre................................... 33

BCCHK announces 9th dividend to creditors............................... 34

Hong Kong Monetary Authority money market operations.................... 35

1

Governor's question and answer session in LegCo ♦ * * * ♦

The following is a transcript of the Governor, the Rt Hon Christopher Patten's question and answer session in Legislative Council today (Thursday):

Mr Lee Cheuk-yan (through interpreter): Mr President and Mr Governor, I would like to talk about residential places for the severely mentally handicapped adults. We now have a shortfall of some 2,000 places and with regard to the waiting queues, now in the waiting list we are still only dealing with those already registered back in 1987. So you will have to wait some eight years before you can even be considered for a residential place. So Mr Governor, for these severely mentally handicapped adults, how long do they have to wait before all those on the waiting list will be dealt with? And I know that the severely mentally handicapped children's parents are also very worried. So we want to know the time frame. When will all the registered people on the list be cleared?

Governor: The Honourable Member raises an important question to which, and to the first part of which, the simple answer is that the severely mentally handicapped and their families have already had to wait a great deal too long for residential places. In 1992, we set out a programme for meeting the then targets in the Green Paper on Rehabilitation, targets both for day-care places and training places and for residential accommodation. As we made clear in our progress report last Autumn, for a variety of reasons, which I can go into in detail a little later if the Honourable Member would like, we found it more difficult, to deliver places at the rate we promised than we would have wished. By and large we're going to be able to achieve our targets on daycare places. We're having more difficulty with hostel places and we're having more difficulties, for a number of reasons including the provisional purchase of premises, and including I have to say, some hostility in parts of the community to the establishment of residential homes for the severely mentally handicapped.

We are at present looking at ways in which any slippage or any shortfall in the provision of places can be dealt with as rapidly as possible and can be limited to the smallest amount possible. I want to make it clear to the Honourable Member that even though we are having difficulty in achieving that target, I intend to do everything we reasonably can to deliver on the promises that we've made to the mentally handicapped. I know that the parents of the severely mentally handicapped who are among the real heroes and heroines of this and every other community have addressed Honourable Members on the subject and have set out some of their anxieties. I'm intending to arrange to meet them myself so I can go through with them precisely what the position is and what we are trying to do in order to cope with the problem. Not least by, if we can, expediting the completion of the project in Aberdeen which I think as the Honourable Member will know is going to be responsible for a large proportion of the places.

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The Honourable Member is also right to say that having met the targets set out in the Green Paper of 1992, we’ve then got to look at whether there are additional targets and we have to bring forward plans for dealing with those as well. But our immediate priority is to do everything we humanly can to meet the targets that we set in good faith in 1992, and which the parents of the severely mentally handicapped expect us to deliver on.

Mr Lee Cheuk-yan (through interpreter): A follow-up question Mr President. For 1992/93 for your policy address you promised that there would be some 3,930 places and the Governor said that the shortage will be reduced as far as possible. But Mr Governor, in 1997 for example, what will be the number of residential places provided? You want to reduce the shortfall but in the end, for example in 1997, what will the shortfall be? If in the end the shortfall will still be in excess of 1,000 then we are only marking time, but if in the end the ultimate shortfall is small then at least to the parents they will regard that as a piece of good news. So we are worried that in the end the shortage may still be rather large.

Governor: First of all, as I think the Honourable Member knows, not all the places in residential homes are for the severely mentally handicapped, but a large proportion of them of course are. Secondly, we are looking at the moment at the shortfall or the likely shortfall. I think none of us regard it as acceptable and we wish to do everything we can to reduce it to the minimum. I want to meet the parents of the severely mentally handicapped so I can go through those figures with them. We will then make clear to the Honourable Member and his colleagues who share his concern about this subject, and I think that speaks for most of the Legislative Council, we’ll then make clear to them what in our judgement is the irreducible minimum but we do intend to do everything we can to deliver on these targets.

It’s important to see the targets in human terms. If a family is not able to find a place in a hostel, in a home, for a loved one who’s severely mentally handicapped, then that means that the family have to cope with an additional and considerable strain for that much longer and I don't think any of us find that acceptable.

So, I want to repeat as strongly as I can to the Honourable Member that we have had problems and they're problems that we identified in the progress report last Autumn. We are determined to cope with them as energetically as we can and that we will make clear, we will come clean, at the end of the day on where we're gong to fall down on our targets, if we are, and how we intend to minimise any shortfall.

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Mr Hui Yin-fat: Governor, it so happened that I happen to ask always the same question for some new light, perhaps you can develop some more thinking on that. This is about your pledge in 1992, as has been said by Mr Lee, that you promised severely disabled persons, not only for mentally handicapped persons, a residential place, additional residential places of 3,930. And however this plan failed to account for the increase in demand over the years. It has been estimated that residential places for severely disabled persons increased by 130 per year which means that disregarding the factor of slippage of planned services, there will still be an additional shortfall of around 650 places by 1997. Sir, since it takes time to plan and to implement a service, how would you sort of deal with this slippage and additional need? Although I know that you have been saying that you try your best, but what about the additional need and so forth because the severity is really much? Thank you Sir.

Governor: Well, I won't go over all the ground that I explored in my first answer. I hope the Legislative Council will take our word that we are determined to do everything we can to come as close to meeting the targets that I set out in 1992 as possible. The Honourable Member is quite right to say that those were the targets identified on the basis of present knowledge in the Green Paper on Rehabilitation. We'll be issuing a White Paper on Rehabilitation this Summer, I hope within the next month or so, and when we issue that White Paper we will have to look at how targets are rolled forward and the implications for future provision and therefore future expenditure patterns.

There have been a couple of problems that we mentioned last Autumn in going forward as rapidly as we would have liked. The first which I mentioned in my earlier answer is that not all neighbourhoods have been as positive about receiving the mentally handicapped as I'm sure the majority of the community would have liked. I think a now infamous egg which greeted my arrival at a housing estate a few weeks ago was specifically associated with provision for the mentally handicapped in that estate.

Governor: As I was saying, we faced two problems in providing the facilities that we want. First of all there has been hostility in some parts of the community. Secondly we weren't able to purchase or to provide all the premises that we would have liked in housing estates and we're having to look at whether we should purchase more properties ourselves or build more properties ourselves and we've set aside the capital funds to make that possible. I'm afraid that it's not as simple as just making more funds available. We've actually almost doubled the amount of money available in the last couple of years for the rehabilitation of the severely mentally handicapped and we've increased by about HK$2 billion the total amount available for rehabilitation services as a whole. The difficulty isn't finding the money, the difficulty is spending the money as rapidly and as effectively as we would like but we're looking at how we can do that. We're looking, as I said, at how we can expedite work in Aberdeen and I can assure the Honourable Member, whose concern about this matter I know well, that we'll do everything we can for a group in the community whose needs are well understood by this Council and by others.

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Dr Yeung Sum (through interpreter): Thank you Mr President. Concerning rehabilitation services the crux of the matter is to enable these disabled persons to reintegrate into society. A few days ago we met with tens of elderly people together with their children and when they go to these training centres they sometimes have to go to Kowloon, Yuen Long and Tuen Mun because these centres are usually sparsely distributed and they have to take their children to school and back from school. And because these people are disabled they have to take them to and from school and they are usually of the lower income group, and they request you or your officials to study the following and that is, whether for the disabled they can enjoy half-fare just like the elderly people? This is a new request and that is, for transport they want to enjoy halffare. I think it’s just a matter of saying yes or no. Could you accept this proposal and you can discuss with your government officials as to whether this proposal is feasible? Because this could certainly help the disabled to reintegrate into society because very often when they go to school or join any public functions, if they do not get any subsidy in public transport this is certainly a hindrance for them to integrate into society. I wonder if you could do so.

Governor: Interestingly, while I’ve had two summits on the disabled and transport, I don’t think that particular issue has been raised at them though other questions have been raised regarding both the cost of transport and the availability of public transport which meets the requirements and needs of the disabled. But we can consider that issue at the next summit we have. On the whole, I think the problems relating to public transport and the disabled are more to do with some of the issues of physical access to both trains and buses than they are to do with cost and my own instincts are always if there is a problem of financial need or cost, to try to deal with it through basic welfare benefits rather than to introduce specific schemes which may not always be fair because not everybody will have an equal need of the service which is being subvented. So I am not very much in favour of that progress though I am strongly in favour of us doing more to make public transport easier for the disabled or for those looking after the disabled to use.

Dr Yeung Sum (through interpreter): Mr Governor, I hope that you can continue studying this proposal and another more direct means to do it, I think you can increase the supply of REHAB BUS. Actually, in the Social Welfare Department this is easier to be done.

Governor: We have, as I think the Honourable Member knows, increased the provision of REHAB Bus which is a terrific service which does help the disabled in our community. It is one of the steps that I think we should take. We’ve already done a good deal, I think we can do more. I think that it is important for us to give a greater priority to the disabled in every aspect of our lives and the community’s lives. We’ve been looking at the issue of the disabled in employment as well as the disabled and transport. This Council will of course be considering over the coming weeks the question of discrimination against the disabled and I hope will put in place a legal infrastructure to deal with that particular issue. So there is a good deal that we can do to make sure that Hong Kong is as fair a place for the disabled as possible.

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Can I just add one other point. I would be very happy to discuss that issue of transport needs with the parents of the severely mentally-handicapped when I see them.

Dr C H Leong: Thank you Mr President. Governor, I would like to turn to the issue of drug abuse. Now, I am embarrassed to say that there are a few members, and luckily only a few members, of my constituency who are black sheep and who have actually been engaging in selling soft drugs. In short, they are really drug peddlers. But unfortunately, current laws in Hong Kong are such that it is very difficult and actually rather impossible to incriminate them as such, so that at the end of the day the Medical Council which controls us has to charge them on the lesser charge, such as keeping improper records. Yes, the Medical Council still imposes a heavy penalty on them, such as deregistering them from practising medicine for a period of time, a long period of time, but unfortunately, when they go to the high Court of Appeal, because of the lesser charge or the lesser incrimination the whole thing could well be squashed and this has been an example. The end result is that it not only makes a mockery out of the Medical Council but it also allows the 'big fish1 as it were, to slip out of the net and puts the whole profession in a bit of a problem. I wonder what Government can do and what is Government doing towards this direction? I do understand this particular area was not brought up in its entirety at the Drug Summit recently.

Governor: No, it wasn't. We discussed related issues, for example the number of inspections which the Health Department is able to make in order to try to ensure that there isn't abuse, but this particular issue wasn't, I think, explored in any depth. We are in the process of trawling through all the individual proposals that were made at that summit and we are intending to do that by sort of mid-summer, by the end of June, and we will certainly look at that proposal as well because the Honourable Member is right, if a serious offence is being committed but there is only a small penalty available for it, then that is rightly a matter of concern to the community and the enforcement of rigorous laws is one aspect, though only one aspect, of our Campaign Against Drug Abuse.

Dr Conrad Lam (through interpreter): Mr President, I would like to say a few words on the civil service transition. I would like to make some comments and then I would like to ask some questions of the Governor. Mr Governor, now, in the public gallery there was some disturbance a moment ago. To a certain extent that reflected the difficulties encountered by civil servants. Now why do I say this? For certain policies their present boss may tell the civil servants to do things in a certain way but their future boss may say otherwise and then these civil servants may have to change the way they present certain policies. So, let me go back to my central point. Now for the public in general, with regard to wastage of experienced civil servants the public are concerned about that. So my question to the Governor is: now, you have come to Hong Kong for a number of years and in concrete terms what have you done to raise the morale of the civil service* particularly 1 am referring to the transition of Policy Secretaries, whether they can straddle 1997? Do you encounter any difficulties? If there are difficulties, in what way can you overcome these difficulties?

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Governor: I'm not entirely sure that I accept an analogy between the behaviour in the gallery, which seemed to me to give quite a good argument a bad name, and the position in which civil servants find themselves. While we occasionally have vigorous arguments within the Administration before we come to our unanimous wisdom, the argument is rarely associated with that sort of behaviour. But the Honourable Member raises what I think the whole community regards as a hugely important issue because the community recognises that one of the main reasons for Hong Kong's prosperity and decency as a community is the quality of public service in Hong Kong and all of us, therefore, want to retain good civil servants and want to do everything we can to boost the morale of our civil servants. I think morale is a slightly intangible commodity but I suspect that there are two aspects to it.

First of all, we want to ensure that civil servants can go on doing a first class job; that they go on delivering government in an efficient and cost-effective way. I think our civil service have been doing that. They've been delivering more extensive programmes from health and education to housing and others; they've been doing that in a way which meets the performance pledges that we've set out and they've been doing it in a way which is more open and more accountable and not least to this Legislative Council. People sometimes talk about the challenges which the public service has faced in the last few years because of the growth of representative democracy in Hong Kong. I happen to think that the civil service has coped extremely well and that if you look back on the last four years for example, since this Legislative Council became elected at least in the majority, I think since then you see no dilution in the quality of public service and I would argue, improvements in the quality of the ways services are delivered. So the first thing I want to say is that morale is about delivering high quality services, it’s about taking decisions, it's about getting things done and I just want to make it clear that so far as I am concerned the best way in which we can secure the morale of the civil service is by continuing to take decisions and continuing to govern in the interests of Hong Kong and that we intend to do until the 30th June 1997 and I'm sure the Chief Executive of the SAR will have the same ambition thereafter. So, nowhere sitting on our hands, nowhere sitting back and letting things coast along until the transfer of sovereignty.

Secondly, morale is also about a state of mind. There are anxieties. I don't think that they are anxieties focused on anything that I or we do before the 30th June 1997 but inevitably, there are concerns about what comes after that date. Concerns about pensions, that is why we've proposed to set aside seven billion, just in case that should ever be required - not that I believe that it will be. We've proposed common terms for the civil service which I hope will be agreed. We've also proposed better housing support for civil servants which I hope will deal with some of their longer term worries. We've also been implementing far more extensive training, not least in written and spoken Putonghua and so on, so that we will have in due course, I hope, a properly - let me get it right - trilingual and bi-literate civil service.

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We’ve also been encouraging greater contacts between the civil service in Hong Kong and their opposite numbers in China. There is a regular and steady flow of civil servants in both directions. In the last month I think we’ve had five Secretaries from Hong Kong actually in Peking or China; there were times when I think we were more likely to get a quorum for senior officials meetings in China than in Hong Kong, but I think it is useful to see those contacts continually increased.

What can Chinese officials do to help provide reassurance and help increase confidence? Well, what we should all be trying to do is laid out very specifically in the Joint Declaration and the Basic Law but we have to behave - not only speak but behave as well - in a way which clearly recognises our joint commitment to the spirit as well as the letter of the Joint Declaration and the Basic Law. There are opportunities for Chinese officials to do that. I’m told that Director Lu Ping is coming to Hong Kong in May for another visit and I unreservedly welcome him. I think we'd all like it if he came even more regularly to Hong Kong. I've made it clear to him, once again, that I think we should meet our obligations under the Memorandum of Understanding on the Airport, signed by the Prime Ministers of China and the United Kingdom, to meet. He knows perfectly well that whenever he would like to do so, I am available to meet him. I think the community is surprised that that doesn't happen. They look around the world, they see everywhere officials meeting to discuss difficult arguments whether in Ireland or Bosnia or other trouble spots around the world, and they wonder what it is that sets Chinese officials apart from what officials everywhere else do. But regardless of whether Director Lu Ping meets me, we will want to treat him with courtesy and we will want to treat him as positively as possible. And just as I have made it clear that I would be happy to see him, so my Chief Secretary, the Hong Kong Government's Chief Secretary would be perfectly happy to see him and we’ve made it clear that she would be happy to see him with a group of her senior Secretaries and colleagues so that they could discuss with him matters of concern to the future of Hong Kong. We've made that proposal and I hope it will meet with a positive response because it is through those sort of contacts whether formal or informal that I am sure we can get a better understanding of one another and I hope that Director Lu Ping and his colleagues will get a better understanding of what the concerns of the civil service in Hong Kong are from time to time. I don't think that we should exaggerate the problem. The wastage rate in the civil service is at present very low, though rather higher in senior ranks of the directorate. Recruitment is good but there are worries about the future and I think it's incumbent on all of us to try to deal with them.

Dr Conrad Lam (through interpreter): Mr President, in his reply the Governor pointed , out one fact and that is, to boost civil servants' morale civil servants will need to continue to make decisions. Yesterday, the civil servants decided not to respond to Miss Loh's motion. I don't think this will help in boosting morale. According to my observation, in reply to our questions during LegCo sittings they tend to be very eloquent but yesterday when we talked about the CCP they tended to be evasive or they tended to be coy. So I would like to know whether there is an invisible hand to shut up these civil servants? Is the invisible hand yours or the Chinese Government's or any other anonymous people?

Governor: Sometimes the greatest eloquence is silence and I'll respond just as one of my senior colleagues and secretaries responded not yesterday but last week. We have many responsibilities, my colleagues and I, which keep us occupied night and day. Those responsibilities, the Honourable Member will know, don't include on my part or on any of my secretaries' part, responsibility for the activities of the Communist Party of China and I think that we have quite enough to do answering questions about things for which we are responsible without branching out in the speculative and exotic way in which we are invited to do. I’m sure that had anybody spoken yesterday they would have been as eloquent on the subject under discussion, which seemed to provoke what I think is called euphemistically a lively debate, I think they would have been as eloquent on that subject as they are on every other. But I repeat that sometimes silence is golden.

Mr K K Fung (through interpreter): Thank you Mr President, I would like to ask the Governor this question. Now, he said he welcomed Mr Lu Ping to meet with him. I would like to know whether you, Mr Governor, have given a formal invitation to Mr Lu Ping so that when he comes to Hong Kong you can meet him to discuss transition matters because many people in Hong Kong would like to see you and Mr Lu Ping meeting formally in Hong Kohg. So my first question is whether you have given any formal invitation to Mr Lu Ping and if so, have you received a response? And if you haven't received any response have you thought about other ways in order to have such a meeting with Mr Lu Ping?

Governor: I’ve given two recent formal invitations, though as I said earlier, I think that Director Lu Ping will know that there is a standing invitation whenever he seeks to take it up. But to be absolutely explicit and to relate it directly to Director Lu Ping's visit to Hong Kong in the middle of May, we have given two direct invitations, the first of which was in February so that he would have plenty of time to consider it because I know that people's diaries get filled up very quickly. I have also, to repeat what I said to the other Honourable Member, I've also made it perfectly clear to Director Lu, not only that I'll be available to meet him anytime up to midnight on the 30th June 1997, and doubtless thereafter though with slightly less relevance to the problems of Hong Kong, and also that the Chief Secretary would be delighted to meet him. He met the Chief Secretary's predecessor on an informal occasion at, I think, Victoria House, and very nice too, and the Chief Secretary has made it plain that she would be delighted to meet Director Lu either formally or informally so as to introduce him to some of her senior colleagues in the Administration.

Now, we cannot be more courteous, more constructive, more open-handed than that. And I repeat what I said earlier, I know of no other part of the world where that wouldn't receive an equally courteous response.

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Mr Eric Li (through interpreter): Mr Governor, I'd like to return to the subject of rehabilitation. Now as you said just now, even if you have the money you may not be able to acquire premises for such services but I don't know if you know that there is also a manpower problem. At present for associations providing such services they are subject to such difficulties. I agree that for these disabled people they should be given priority but in terms of manpower the rehabilitation sector will need to compete with other areas for manpower. For example, in terms of auxiliary medical staff, they have to compete for staff members with the Hospital Authority and in terms of child care workers they may have to compete with the Education Department and they may also have to compete for staff with other NGO's. In Chapter 13, paragraph seven, 13.7. of the Green Paper on Rehabilitation there is a proposal there and that is the Health and Welfare Branch should have a central co-ordinating body established to monitor manpower supply and demands but over the past three years it seems like progress on this subject has been very slow and we haven't seen any concrete proposal on this subject yet. For example, in terms of physiotherapists or speech therapists, etc., these are very important staff members. We haven't even conducted a demand study for such staff members so I hope that you can pay more attention to this problem so that we can provide improvement in this area.

Governor: It's an important issue and an important area but I don't believe that vital as it is, it's the reason for the difficulty that we've had in meeting the targets that we set in 1992. But it is a subject that we will, of course, be addressing in the White Paper on Rehabilitation which, as I said, we hope to publish before the end of May. I say again that if you look at the expenditure which has rightly gone into this area, and which has rightly been endorsed by this Council, for Rehabilitation it has risen almost exponentially in the last couple of years with further increases to come and I don't think that resources or even manpower, important as that is, are the main problem in delivering on these targets. But the Honourable Member is, of course, correct in drawing attention to the need for developing some of the paramedical services that he referred to.

Mr Eric Li (through interpreter): Yes, a simple follow-up. I agree to what you said just now Mr Governor. Recently some rehabilitation sector, they met with me and they said that they have difficulties in maintaining the existing services because of a shortage of staff. For example, for some paramedical staff, for example occupational therapists or physiotherapists, they have gone to the Hospital Authority. So it's very difficult for them to maintain the same level of services and they hope that you can pay attention to this problem and contact the relevant NGO's.

Governor: I can.

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Mr Man Sai-cheong (through interpreter): A question on Civil Service transition please. Now in certain countries languages may stir emotions in people. Now 800 more days, or fewer than 800 more days, we will see the transition of sovereignty. So Mr Governor, with regard to the Civil Service, in departments for example have you looked at the use of Chinese in this Government's departments and also the use of Chinese between Civil Servants of different departments and the use of Chinese between Civil Servants and the public in general? Do you have a timetable so that when we have the SAR both languages will equally be used in the Civil Service? Have you started the study on language use yet? If yes, what is your timetable? So Mr Governor, maybe you yourself have to initiate the study or can you just refer the matter to the Civil Service Branch?

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Governor: Well, it is of course a subject which we've been studying, but more important we've been acting on it. I think I'm right in recalling that there will be about 14,000 Civil Servants who will be doing, over the next year or so, our Putonghua training and about half that number who will be doing the training in the written language. So, we are beefing up very substantially our language training, just as we're also trying to increase the language training for expatriate administrative officers, for example improving their working knowledge of Cantonese. They're very important issues. I know, the Honourable Member feels very concerned about this particular subject and I can assure him that the Secretary for the Civil Service and all of us give the matter a good deal of thought and are doing all that we can to increase the language skills of the Civil Service. As I said earlier, what we are looking for and it's difficult but not unique if you look around the world, is a Civil Service which can manage in three oral languages and can manage in two written languages and that's quite a challenge.

Mr Man Sai-cheong (through interpreter): Let me follow-up briefly. What are your targets in the language front? Is it to ensure that both Chinese and English can be used in the Civil Service, that is in the Government Departments, or would it be the case that you are trying to move from one language to the other, especially whpn we talk about documents? That is, for Government Departments, will it go from the language of English to Chinese? Have you made a decision on that yet?

Governor: I think inevitably Chinese languages will be used far more in Government as we get closer to '97 and beyond '97. I think that is inevitable and right but I think it would be a mistake if in making that progress English language skills suffered a great deal because Hong Kong is an international centre of distinction and one of the ways that is reflected is in our ability to cope in other languages, particularly English. But we intend to do all that we can before 1997 to ensure that the SAR Government has the Civil Service that can manage in the two languages written and in the three languages spoken. I would imagine that my successor and his or her senior colleagues would find themselves working for most of the time in Chinese.

Mr James Tien: Thank you Mr President. Well Governor, I have a relatively easy one for you regarding ...

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Governor: Those are always the difficult ones.

Mr James Tien: . . . regarding infrastructure co-ordination with China, and this time not about CT9 or the Container Port but rather with the Lo Wu crossing every morning. You are aware that the KCR trains going through Lo Wu every morning, they go every two or three minutes, and right now you might not be aware that every morning between like 8.00 - 10.00 on Hong Kong side and between 5.00 - 7.00 on the China side there's a long queue. They have to wait roughly between 30 minutes to one hour. Immigration Department may tell you the queue is only five minutes, which is probably true, but what they might not have told you is that when you get off the train in Lo Wu you have to queue up half an hour before you go through the turnstile to put in your train ticket. So to get out of that section first before you queue up for immigration. As you well know management have to pay for our employees time, even queuing up in the morning. From businesses' view it will probably cost us a lot. of manpower and financially because of all these people waiting and queuing up. So Governor, what do you think could be improved to make some co-ordinated improvement between KCRC, the Hong Kong Government and the Chinese Government regarding this?

Governor: It won't surprise the Honourable Member that the problems of Lo Wu and the connections, the rail connections between Hong Kong and PRC are one of the liveliest subjects on the agenda of the Infrastructure Co-ordinating Committee and indeed are one of the reasons why it’s important to have a co-ordinating committee on infrastructure projects. One of the four panels which have been set up under the ICC is one dealing with rail links and rail connections and I know that this subject has been discussed in the panel and I’m sure that when we come to some decisions that will be welcome to the Honourable Member and welcome to those who as he says are queuing for rather more than five minutes. It’s a very, very busy crossing and will get, I guess, even busier. So we need to ensure that there are adequate resources to expedite the passage of people through.

Mr Steven Poon: Thank you Mr President. Recently, the Government announced the unemployment rate as being 2.8 per cent. By world standards this is not a terribly high figure but by Hong Kong standards this is really quite high, as Hong Kong has not' experienced such a record figure for some time and being a very small place, congested, and people haven’t got very many places to go, and the very fact that we haven’t got a very good, or a very sophisticated social security system, the worries are justified in my opinion and the public has raised a lot of concerns on this number. Governor, would you be able to tell us whether you expect this figure to go up in the next 12 months? And is there anything the Government or you yourself and your secretaries are doing in terms of identifying where this figure happens most; I mean more frequently; I mean where the unemployment is actually concentrated in terms of industry centres or services or restaurants and what-have-you and whether there are any means and measures that you are now planning to lower the figure in the foreseeable future?

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Governor: The Honourable Member is right to say that the figures in Hong Kong even at the level of just under thsee per cent which he mentioned, are low by international standards. He is equally right to say that the figures recently look high by recent Hong Kong standards. I think the Honourable Member knows that it is only in the last two or three months that the figures have suddenly jumped and I think the first thing we have to do and the first thing that we are doing is looking at the figures and the background to the figures as searchingly as possible to see whether what we have got is the beginning of a trend or whether it is merely a blip on the screen. I think when we have got a clearer idea of that in the next month or two, we will have a clearer idea of what we should do in response. Overall, if you look at the likely growth projections for Hong Kong and the consensus of those who make these predictions about our economic outlook over -the next year or two, there shouldn't be too much reason for worrying about growing slackness in the labour market and growing unemployment. For example, we will be reaching the peak in some of our construction activity in Hong Kong with implications for employment. But nevertheless, we do need to have a pretty searching look at the figures and if, in the Financial Secretary's judgment and my judgment we need to take action in a few months time, then we won't hesitate to do so.

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Mr Steven Poon: Thank you Mr President. Governor, you touched upon one of the possible suggestions I am going to put forward to you, that is the very fact that Hong Kong is going to spend tens of billions of dollars in various projects, in particular infrastructure projects, I suggest that maybe some of the effort ought to be channelled into whether some of this money ought to be spent - I won't say in the areas but the areas of spending has already been identified - but ought to be spent in a way where the local labour force could be best utilised. I don't quite honestly know what I am talking about but if contracts can be written, for example, that a certain amount of local labour ought to be employed in a construction contract, then maybe it is one way that the Government ought to think of.

Governor: The Honourable Member has just made the sort of confession that more of us should make more of the time. We'd certainly earn an honesty award were we to do so. I think that it is quite difficult to envisage circumstances in which we could either so change our tendering procedures or so focus our capital spending as to have a direct impact on local employment without risking a reputation which we've won internationally which I think is good for Hong Kong and gives us from time to time the best prices in the international market for having the most open and competitive public procurement policy anywhere.

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There is another issue which I suppose is relevant to what the Honourable Member has said and that is a disagreement between the representatives of employers and the trade unions about the effect of the importation of labour and the argument which is put by some trade union representatives that employers don’t use the importation of labour scheme in the way that was intended. Now that is an argument which I think we need to have out in the open in the community and try to resolve. It obviously has some bearing on the specific point which the Honourable Member was suggesting as a way of dealing with growing local unemployment if that is happening. But I repeat, we’ve seen a couple of months of bad-ish figures here in Hong Kong and I think we want to be a bit clearer on whether we’re seeing the beginning of a trend or whether it is just something short term. If it is a trend, then we need to act.

Mrs Miriam Lau: Mr Governor, 1 wish to return to the question of services for the mentally-handicapped. In your answer to Mr Lee Cheuk-yan earlier on, you mentioned that there is hostility in parts of the community to the establishment of homes for the severely mentally-handicapped - you mentioned that one - yes, right. My question is, what has the Government done to promote the public image of the mentally-handicapped, particularly the severely mentally-handicapped? It seems to me that the movie ’Forrest Gump’ which is still on show I think, has done more than the Government to promote a positive image for the mentally-handicapped. And if there is that much resistance from the community, so much so that it is delaying the provision of services, shouldn’t the Government be doing more in this area?

Governor: Well, I'm perfectly content to take second place to Tom Hanks. I must say, having seen the film myself. I'm not sure whether it's the hero who is mentally-handicapped or the rest of us because he seems to behave in an eminently sane and rational way for much of the film. To be serious, the Honourable Member is entirely right to argue that this problem does need more public education. Of course we are right to follow the lead given by the Honourable Member and introduce legislation to ban discrimination, that's an important part of the educational process. But I think there is a positive aspect to this as well. I have tried, for example in my programmes of visits, to make sure that I visit as many centres - training centres, day-care centres, hostels for the mentally-handicapped as possible and doubtless I could do more and will be able to do more. But there is a role for all of us. I think the Health and Welfare Department have been taking an active role in this but frankly, we have some way to travel still in the community. Not as far as Forrest Gump ran but certainly some way to travel in order to ensure that the handicapped, not just the mentally-handicapped but all handicapped people, all people with a disability, get the fair chance in our society which they deserve.

Mrs Miriam Lau: Mr President, will the Governor ensure that when overseas dignitaries such as Princess Diana comes around to Hong Kong, arrangements will be made for these dignitaries to not only watch tennis but also to make visits and trips to day-care centres and similar institutions?

14

Governor: Well to be fair, which I know the Honourable Member would want to be. Her Royal Highness spent the first morning that she was in Hong Kong with several groups of cancer patients talking to them about their problems and the way they were trying to work together, and then went on to Youth Outreach which is one of the best projects that we have in the community, I think, trying to help young people and take young people off the streets and get them back into their homes and she spent a good deal of time with them too. She then managed to raise in the course of 36 hours a large amount of money for cancer, for Youth Outreach and for the Red Cross; and, as well, on the Sunday saw some of the work that is being doing with drug-abusers. So she had what by most standards would have been regarded, I think, as a rather busy weekend. And admirable as it always is to watch Michael Chang winning a game of tennis, doing so in the temperature of the centre court at Victoria Park on Sunday afternoon wasn’t all a bunch of roses.

Mr Albert Chan (through interpreter): Thank you Mr President. Just now Mr Governor talked about the silence of civil servants. I think he has a new interpretation of the term "silence is golden". The success of parliamentary democracy depends on debates. If "silence is golden" is the new motto for parliamentary politics, I’m sure this means the end of parliamentary democracy. I’m sure you don't want to see that.

So my question is concerning the infrastructure co-ordination with China. In 1989 when the Hong Kong Administration worked out a plan for port development, at that time there were no detailed plans relating to planning in South China and recently there were some new plans. Recently I talked to the Planning Department officials about port development. Very often Hong Kong Government officials do not have details of harbour planning in China. Because of the lack of information this may affect the long-term planning of Hong Kong ports and harbours. In view of such difficulties, does the Administration has any plans to overcome such difficulties and in terms of planning I hope the lack of such information will not hamper the long-term planning of the Administration and will not result in mistakes being made by the Administration?

Governor: I can assure the Honourable Member on his first point, that he will usually find members of the Administration in this chamber convincingly articulate rather than silent. I'm sure that he'll find members of the Administration convincingly articulate next week when the Council debates a motion on the Court of Final Appeal, if it does, and just to make the point clear in advance, I hope Honourable Members won't be surprised if we listen very carefully to what they say in that debate. Some Honourable Members seem to be surprised when we listened to what they said on pensions very carefully. We'll be listening very carefully to what Honourable Members say in that debate on a subject which I think is of considerable importance. But we'll be replying too, and replying with golden and silver tongues.

15

Secondly, on port development. We do take account in the decisions we make on developing our port, in the decisions we make on the need for new container terminals for example, we do take account of the developments that are taking place in Southern China and we couldn’t possibly come to rational decisions about port capacity unless we were to do so, but plainly the Honourable Member is right to say that the Infrastructure Co-ordination Committee gives us a framework within which to discuss these sort of economic infrastructure issues with those who are responsible for them in Southern China as well. Our economies are intimately linked, are bound up inextricably together, to our mutual advantage and that must require us to look constructively at the impact of economic development on our transport and our infrastructure as a whole. So the simple answer to the Honourable Member is yes we do have to look at what’s happening elsewhere in the Region and he’s quite correct to press us on that. We also have to look I think at some of the implications for, we have to look more carefully than we perhaps have, at some of the implications for the storage of containers around our own community which is a consequence of the development of our port.

The President: In accordance with Standing Orders I now adjourn the Council until 2.30 pm, Wednesday 3rd May, 1995.

End/Thursday, April 27, 1995

Eligibility to register as electors explained *****

The Deputy Secretary for Constitutional Affairs, Mr Lee Lap-sun, said today (Thursday) that under existing laws, subject to the fulfilment of other requirements in the electoral laws, a non-permanent resident may register as an elector if he or she has ordinarily resided in Hong Kong for the seven years immediately preceding the date of his or her application.

He pointed out that the provision had been in place for a long time and there was nothing new that foreign nationals who met the ordinary residence requirements under the law could, irrespective of their nationality and occupation, register as electors and vote in elections.

’’This was the case before 1982 when elections were held for the Urban Council, and remains so under the existing electoral laws for elections to the three-tier representative Councils and Boards," he said.

Mr Lee was explaining the provisions under existing electoral laws governing eligibility to register as electors at a meeting with representatives of the Hong Kong Employers of Overseas Domestic Helpers Association (HKEODHA). The meeting was held at the Association's invitation.

16

Mr Lee said the qualifications for electors were reviewed in 1980 when a comprehensive public consultation exercise was conducted.

The decision, as recorded in the White Paper: District Administration in Hong Kong published in January 1981, stated that "Government considers that foreign nationals who meet the age and residence requirements should not be excluded from registering and voting.”

The White Paper further stated: "First, this would be a retrograde step in that existing Urban Council franchise does not exclude them.

"Secondly, and in Government’s view this is a more important consideration, Hong Kong is a very open society and foreign nationals have made and will no doubt continue to make an important contribution to the well-being and development of the community.”

Mr Lee said the electoral laws had been extensively reviewed and revised many times since then, but the practice of enfranchising foreign nationals who had lived and worked for more than seven years had never been questioned.

As regards the HKEODIIA's suggestion that foreign domestic helpers should not be treated in the same manner as other foreign nationals working in I long Kong when it comes to being eligible for voting, Mr Lee said as long as a foreign worker, irrespective of nationality, satisfied the ordinary residence and other relevant qualifications under existing electoral laws, the Administration could not deny him the right to become registered.

"Foreign domestic helpers’ lawful residence in Hong Kong for employment purposes may be regarded as ordinary residence," he said.

As regards the'point that only permanent residents will be entitled to vote and stand as candidates under the Basic Law, Mr Lee said the Basic Law would only come into effect on July 1, 1997, and the definition of "permanent residents" was a matter under discussion in the Sino-British Joint Liaison Group.

"Until that wider issue is settled, it would be premature to amend existing electoral laws to differentiate the electoral right of permanent residents and nonpermanent residents," he said.

End/Thursday, April 27, 1995

17

Decision on Mandatory Provident Fund Scheme important *****

One very important development for both Hong Kong and the insurance industry would be a decision on the Mandatory Provident Fund Scheme, the Financial Secretary, Sir Hamish Macleod, said today (Thursday).

Speaking at the Annual Dinner of the Hong Kong Federation of Insurers, Sir Hamish said, under this proposal all employers and employees would be required jointly to contribute 10 per cent of salary into an occupational retirement scheme which employees might draw down upon reaching the qualifying age of 65.

"The assets of these schemes will need to be invested.

"Thus insurers may expect phenomenal growth in the retirement fund portion of their business," Sir Hamish said.

"If insurers are to succeed in retaining a healthy portion of it, the range of retirement products they offer must be promoted vigorously, transparently and attractively.

"This is a challenge which I am sure the insurance industry is more than willing and capable of meeting," he said.

Sir Hamish said Insurance had become an important industry in its own right, contributing substantially to the prosperity of Hong Kong.

"The industry had recorded annual growth rates of 20 per cent and 30 per cent in recent years, at the same time evolving in sophistication and complexity," he said.

He said the Insurance Companies Ordinance was amended over the years to keep up with rapidly changing conditions in the marketplace and to improve protection of the interests of the insuring public.

But change continued, and this year further amendments will be introduced. These amendments seek:

* first, to define the functions and duties of the Insurance Authority;

* secondly, to permit the beneficial exchange of information between the Authority and other financial regulators;

18

♦ thirdly, to permit the Authority to approve the transfer of general business between insurers. This proposed amendment, which introduces a statutory mechanism for the transfer of general business with the approval of the Authority, will not only save time and costs for insurers but also ensure that policy holders are adequately protected.

Sir Hamish said further scope of improvements would include transparency in insurance products and services, for instance in the fixing of insurance premia and claims handling procedures; setting a reasonable time limit for payment of claims; providing more channels for policy holders to obtain information on insurance matters; and simplifying the wording of insurance policies.

End/Thursday, April 27, 1995

Hong Kong will remain successful after 1997 ♦ * * * *

It was in China’s best interest that Hong Kong would remain as successful as present after 1997, the Governor, the Rt Hon Christopher Patten, said.

Speaking in the Pensions 2000 Conference today (Thursday), Mr Patten said he hoped China would recognise the people of Hong Kong wanted to make a success of the transition and be trusted to make contribution towards that goal.

The Governor was confident that the economy of Hong Kong would survived the return of the territory to Chinese sovereignty in 1997.

"First of all, it's hugely in China's interest that Hong Kong should remain as successful as this," he said.

He admitted that there were concerns and anxieties about the future of Hong Kong. However, he believed that nobody would worry about what happened before June 30, 1997, but what lied beyond.

"And those worries can only really satisfactorily be resolved by China and by Chinese officials, not just in words but in deeds as well.

"Above all, by being more positive and more constructive in working with us to tackle some of the transitional issues which undoubtedly affect morale.here in the community," said the Governor.

19

These issues included the adaptation of the Hong Kong laws, the Court of Final Appeal, and the question of the right of abode.

"All those are issues on which the community looks to China for a more positive and constructive show of sincerity,” said Mr Patten.

End/Thursday, April 27, 1995

Customer service consultant appointed *****

The Efficiency Unit of the Chief Secretary’s Office today (Thursday) commissioned Coopers & Lybrand Management Consultants Ltd. to conduct a 12-month consultancy on customer service.

The Trade Department and the Department of Health have been selected for the project, the cost of which is some $2.5 million. The Judiciary has also decided to participate.

The Head of the Efficiency Unit, Mr Robert Footman, said after the contractsigning ceremony today that the purpose of the consultancy was to assist the Unit in the provision of advisory and support services to Government departments in improving their customer service to the public.

The consultants’ main tasks arc two-fold.

"First, they will advise and assist the selected departments and the Judiciary in identifying and improving areas of customer service. This includes measuring and improving customer satisfaction level through surveys, customer liaison, customer service training for staff, immediate complaint procedures and so on," Mr Footman said.

"Secondly, they will help the Efficiency Unit to provide a central advisory service to other departments on ways to improve customer service."

The consultants will work closely with the Efficient Unit and the departments concerned.

After a period of familiarisation with the Efficiency Unit, the consultants will work first with the Trade Department, commencing during May, and later in the year with the Department of Health and the Judiciary.

20

The consultancy on customer service is part of the Government’s commitment to improve the quality of public services under the Serving the Community Programme announced by the Governor in his Policy Address in October 1992.

Mr Footman said: "Every Government department which serves the public directly has now made a performance pledge on the standard of service it offers. Our next step is to focus more on how we serve members of the public in our individual transactions with them.

"Using customer feedback to improve services is very important. The people we serve have a clear understanding of the kind of service they want, the performance measures that matter to them, and how the service we provide compares with their expectations.

"By drawing on this knowledge, we can begin to bridge the gap between what we actually do and these expectations, in order to provide the best service we can within available resources."

Mr Footman said one way to do this was through Customer Liaison Groups. Since the idea was developed in late 1993, 26 departments have set up 39 Groups.

These have proved fertile ground for suggestions: changes introduced as a result include one-stop shopping for learner driving licences and test application forms in the Transport Department; extension of single queuing arrangements to more post offices and the sale of stamp booklets through 7-Eleven stores etc.

"Training of front-line staff is important in locking-in a new culture of service. Some 33.000 front-line staff have received customer service related training over the past couple of years," he added.

End/Thursday, April 27, 1995

Ways to curb misleading sales descriptions of flats *****

The Law Reform Commission today (Thursday) issued a report on the ways to curb misleading sales descriptions of uncompleted flats in Hong Kong.

In November 1992, the Commission appointed a sub-committee, chaired by Professor Derek Roebuck of the Department of Law of the City University, to consider the sales descriptions of uncompleted residential property.

21

In April last year, the sub-committee, which includes among its members lawyers, architects and others with relevant expertise, issued a Consultative Document, containing its interim recommendations for public consultation.

The report issued today contains the Commission’s final recommendations on the subject and reflects the comments made in response to the Consultative Document. Professor Roebuck said the report endeavoured to balance the views of conflicting interests, while achieving its objective of enhanced consumer protection.

While the Law Reform Commission report covers only uncompleted residential property in Hong Kong, Professor Roebuck said public comments on the Consultative Document indicated strong support for regulation of the sales descriptions of overseas uncompleted residential properties sold or advertised in Hong Kong.

In response to this concern, the sub-committee has already commenced an examination of the sales descriptions of overseas uncompleted residential property and the Commission will publish a separate report on this in due course.

The main recommendations in the report are:

* The term gross floor area in sales literature should be standardised by legislation. The definition in regulation 23(3) of the Building (Planning) Regulations (Cap 123), which is used by the Building Authority in approving building plans, should be adopted generally.

* The inclusion of saleable area in sales literature should be made mandatory by legislation.

* The definition of saleable area in Legal Advisory and Conveyancing Office Circular Memorandum No. 1 dated June 23, 1993 should be recognised in legislation as the standard method to describe saleable area in all sales literature.

* The sales brochure should contain floor plans with specified details such as the external dimensions of individual units, the orientation, location of ingress and egress points, load bearing walls, exposed pipes, etc.

There should be a list of specified fittings and finishes in all sales brochures. The brands and countries of origin of the fittings and finishes should be stated.

* The sales brochure should state the construction completion date, the expected date of legal completion, and the expected date of vacant possession.

22

* The sales brochure should state the salient points of the Deed of Mutual Covenant, such as the definition of common parts, apportionment of management charges and restrictions on use of common parts.

* The developer should deposit copies of the English and Chinese versions of the full text of the Deed of Mutual Covenant for free inspection at either the sales office or the solicitors’ office. (This recommendation will in effect require the developer to arrange for the Chinese translation of the Deed of Mutual Covenant.)

* The developer should produce, for all sales, both private and public, a sales brochure and keep at least one copy of it for public inspection until the occupation permit or, where applicable, the certificate of compliance is issued.

* All information in the sales brochure should be accurate at the time of first sale of units in a development. If there have been any material changes in the information in the sales brochure between the date of its printing and the time of first sale, a note to that effect should be attached to the sales brochure or the price list.

* Advertisements (other than a sales brochure) for the public sale of flats by developers or the private sale of flats by property agents must state that a sales brochure is available. Information given in the advertisements must be consistent with the information given in the sales brochure.

* All the recommendations should be enforced by legislation.

End/Thursday, April 27, 1995

Gazcttal of Airport Authority Bill deferred *****

The Government has decided to defer the gazettal of the Airport Authority Bill.

Following the Executive Council's approval of the introduction of the Airport Authority Bill into the Legislative Council, an advance copy of the Bill was passed to the Chinese side on April 25.

The original plan was to gazette the Bill tomorrow (Friday) and to introduce it into the Legislative Council on May 3.

23

However, the Chinese side has requested more time to study the legal wording in the Bill. The Government considers the request reasonable and have therefore decided to defer gazettal.

It remains the Government’s intention to introduce the Bill into the Legislative Council in May.

End/Thursday, April 27, 1995

Mr Justice Gall to visit Beijing *****

The following statement is issued by the Judiciary in response to a report in the Eastern Express today (Thursday) headlined ’’Judge makes secret trip to China”:

It is true that a High Court Judge, Mr Justice Gall, will visit Beijing between tomorrow (Friday) afternoon and Sunday. But the visit will be entirely private and will have nothing whatsoever to do with the Court of Final Appeal, as suggested in the Eastern Express article.

The purpose of Mr Justice Gall's visit is to familiarise himself with the arbitration system in China.

Whilst in Beijing, he will visit the Arbitration Commission Centre and meet a director of the China International Economic and Trade Arbitration Commission.

If time allows, the Judge hopes to be able to see the Supreme Court and Intermediate Courts as a matter of professional interest.

Mr Justice Gall will be accompanied by his wife and two friends who are also interested in arbitration work. All expenses arc being personally paid by each of those in the party.

Mr Justice Gall has a special interest in international arbitration and has met socially in Hong Kong various academics and members of the Arbitration Commission of the PRC who are interested in the same subject.

End/Thursday, April 27, 1995

24

New anti-smoking measure effective tomorrow *****

The new law requiring restaurant owners and operators to display a statutory sign showing whether a no-smoking area is provided on the premises will come into effect tomorrow (Friday).

A spokesman for the Health and Welfare Branch today (Thursday) said today there had been misunderstanding that owners must set aside a no-smoking area in their restaurants.

"This is not true," the spokesman said. "In fact, they are free to decide whether or not to provide such areas.

"All they are required to do under the law is to display a sign indicating whether a no-smoking area is provided in the restaurant so that customers can decide whether or not to patronise it.

"Failure to display such a sign will be subject to a maximum fine of $25,000," the spokesman warned.

The sign should have a minimum size of 15cm x 15cm with the colour of the content contrasts with that of the background. Restaurant operators may enlarge the size and select the types of material they prefer so that it could fit in with the decoration of the restaurant.

The Hong Kong Council on Smoking and Health (COSH) can assist restaurant operators to establish no-smoking areas and has liaised with the Federation of the Hong Kong Restaurant Owners to send a copy of the sign to all restaurants in Hong Kong.

Those who wish to get one may contact COSH on 2838 8822 or the Federation on 2523 2617.

End/Thursday, April 27, 1995

Results on language grouping for P6 pupils release tomorrow

*****

Parents of Primary 6 pupils taking part in the Secondary School Places Allocation (SSPA) scheme will be provided tomorrow (Friday) with information on the grouping of their children in terms of their ability to learn in English or Chinese.

The information will enable parents to choose a secondary school which offers a suitable language of instruction for their children under the SSPA scheme.

25

An Education Department spokesman said the language proficiency of 83,853 Primary 6 pupils participating in the SSPA scheme has been assessed under the ’’Medium of Instruction Grouping Assessment" (MIGA) exercise.

"The grouping is based on the schools’ internal assessments on pupils at the end of Primary 5 and during the mid-year of Primary 6, both of which are scaled by the Academic Aptitude Test.

"Pupils in Group I should be able to learn effectively in cither English or Chinese. Pupils in Group II should learn more effectively through the Chinese medium. Those in Group III should learn better through the Chinese medium but probably also be able to learn effectively in English," the spokesman explained.

This year, among the 83,853 Primary 6 pupils participating in the SSPA scheme, a total of 27.879 pupils (33.25 per cent) are in Group I. while 49.454 pupils (58.98 percent) are in Group II and 6.215 pupils (7.41 percent) in Group III.

MIGA is not applicable to the non-Chinese speaking pupils and the pupils with incomplete assessments. A total of 305 pupils (0.36 per cent) belong to this group.

The spokesman said: "Information on MIGA for Secbndary I entrants will be distributed to parents through the pupils' primary schools tomorrow.

"A leaflet on MIGA together with a leaflet promoting Chinese as the medium of instruction will be issued to parents at the same time.

"In addition, parents will receive a secondary schools list showing schools’ choice of teaching medium.

"The information will serve as useful reference for parents in choosing a secondary school which offers a suitable language of instruction for their children," the spokesman said.

Any enquiries relating to the results of MIGA should be referred to the Secondary School Places Allocation Section of Education Department on tel 2891 2200 during office hours.

1-nd/Thursday. April 27, 1995

26

Cessation of computerised driving test ♦ ♦ ♦ * ♦

The Hong Kong School of Motoring has informed the Transport Department that the computerised "touch-screen” Part A (Written) Test pilot project, undertaken by the School but open to all candidates taking driving tests, will cease on June 30 due to cost-saving reasons.

A spokesman for the Transport Department said today (Thursday) that with this cessation, only the '‘conventional” - paper and pen written test - will be provided at the two written test centres located at the Transport Department licensing offices on the third floor, United Centre, Queensway, Hong Kong and the ninth floor. Park-in Commercial Centre, Dundas Street.

With effect from Monday (May 1), all candidates will be offered Part A Written Test of the conventional type only.

“There will be no change in waiting time or syllabus," the spokesman said.

In order to meet additional demand for the conventional written test, the Transport Department will’arrange extra sessions of such test to be held from June 30 onwards.

End/Thursday/April 27, 1995

Government schools join Performance Pledge Programme

* * * * *

The Education Department's Performance Pledge Programme will he extended to the school level tomorrow (Friday) with four government schools making performance pledges to the public under a pilot scheme.

The move represents part of the department's effort to further improve services following successful achievement of its goals in the last package of performance pledges announced in August 1993.

Four schools located in different districts arc taking part in the pilot scheme on performance pledges in government schools. They arc: Jockey Club Government Secondary Technical School, Tseung Kwan O Government Secondary School, Hennessy Road Government Primary PM School and Wong Tai Sin Government Primary School.

27

Through direct participation of pilot schools in making and fulfilling performance pledges, the pilot scheme aims to acquire experience so as to propose feasible plans for extending the Performance Pledge Programme to more government or even aided schools in the future. The pilot scheme will start tomorrow and last until the end of July.

Under the scheme, the four pilot schools will launch a set of performance pledges jointly developed among themselves, targeting at parents and members of the public. The pledges will focus on:

(a) Information services for parents and members of the public;

(b) Parent-school communication and co-operation; and

(c) Service environment in school.

A leaflet on the pledges has been produced and will be distributed to parents of students at the four pilot schools tomorrow. Members of the public who are interested can also obtain a copy from these schools or from the district education offices of the Education Department.

Enquiries should be directed to the Education Department on 2961 7432.

”To formally implement the Performance Pledge Programme at school level and to further improve services provided by schools, the department hopes that parents and members of the public will lend active support to the Pilot Scheme and offer constructive suggestions,” a department spokesman said.

A review will be conducted after the pilot scheme to map out plans for the way ahead.

End/Thursday, April 27, 1995

28

Japanese Finance Minister lends support to HK promotion *****

The Hong Kong Government’s plan to mount a major promotion in Japan in late September continues to receive strong support in Japan and its Finance Minister, the Hon Masayoshi Takemura, has recently pledged his keen interest in the promotion and its business activities in particular.

Mr Takemura welcomed Hong Kong's initiative to foster closer business tie with Japan when the Hong Kong Government's Principal Representative, Mr David Lan, called on him last Friday (April 21) to brief him about the Hong Kong Promotion in Japan including the business seminars and workshops in the target cities of Tokyo, Osaka and Fukuoka.

Noting that one of the themes of the workshops would be on Hong Kong's strategic importance as a financial centre, Mr Takemura said this subject would attract a lot of attention among the financial and banking sectors in Japan.

Organised in conjunction with the Hong Kong Trade Development Council and Hong Kong Tourist Association and with private sector participation, the Hong Kong Promotion will also hold cultural events and social functions in each of the three cities in the week beginning September 25 to highlight and enhance the Hong Kong-Japan partnership.

Mr Takemura understood that Japanese banks and securities houses had a strong presence in Hong Kong; one out of four foreign banks in Hong Kong were Japanese owned whereas 25 per cent of foreign stock brokers were headquartered in Japan and this would continue to serve the mutual interests of the two communities.

Last Friday's meeting was one of a series of courtesy calls by Mr David Lan on senior Government officials and business leaders in Japan to muster their support for the Hong Kong Promotion.

Among those who have given full support to the promotion are the Japanese Prime Minister, the Hon Tomiichi Murayama, and three former Japanese Prime Ministers, the Hon Yasuhiro Nakasone, the Hon Toshiki Kaifu and the Hon Tsutomu Hata.

End/Thursday, April 27, 1995

29

Grading of beach water quality *****

The Environmental Protection Department (EPD) today (Thursday) announced the first grading of Hong Kong's beaches for this swimming season, based on the bacteriological water quality.

The purpose of the grading system is to inform swimmers and the general public about the state of bacteriological pollution at various beaches.

The grading will be announced bi-weekly during the bathing season to coincide with the frequency at which beach waters are usually sampled.

The grading is based on the most recent data obtained by EPD in its routine monitoring programme.

It gives an estimate on the risk of contracting some minor skin or gastrointestinal illnesses resulted from swimming at a beach with some degree of pollution.

The estimate is based on a large scale epidemiological study carried out in Hong Kong in the past bathing seasons.

The grading of some beaches fluctuates during the summer. In most cases, this represents a natural fluctuation in the bacteriological quality of bathing waters as rain and tides bring more or less pollution to the beaches.

Beaches with highly developed hinterlands are likely to be more polluted than the grades suggested during and after heavy rain.

Principal Environmental Protection Officer Dr Malcolm Broom said: "Bathers should avoid swimming at such beaches for two to three days after a storm, or even longer if the weather remains overcast, shorter if there is strong sunshine."

However, the bi-weekly grades give a general picture of the most recent water quality at bathing beaches at the time of reporting and form the best available forecast for the immediate future.

The system for grading beach water quality is as follows:

Grade "1" indicates that the water quality is good. The E coli count is no more than 24 per 100 millilitres at each beach so graded, and the expected risk of minor illness to swimmers is undetectable.

30

Grade ”2” indicates that the water quality is fair. The E coli count is no more than 180 per 100 millilitres at each beach so graded, and the expected health risk is no more than 10 cases of minor illness per 1,000 swimmers.

Grade ”3” indicates that the water quality is poor. The E coli count is no more than 610 per 100 millilitres at each beach so graded, and the expected health risk is no more than 15 cases of minor illness per 1,000 swimmers.

Grade "4” indicates that the water quality is very poor. The E coli count is more than 610 per 100 millilitres at each beach so graded, and the expected health risk is more than 15 cases of minor illness per 1,000 swimmers.

The decision whether,or not to close a beach to swimmers is based on a judgment of what degree of pollution is acceptable.

Normally, the closure of a beach would only be considered by the Urban or Regional Council if a grade ”4” occurred repeatedly, so that the average health risk over the bathing season exceeded 15 cases per 1,000 swimmers.

At present four gazetted beaches, namely Anglers’, Castle Peak, Old Cafeteria, and Rocky Bay, are closed to swimmers.

The decision to close the beaches has been made by the Regional and Urban Councils on the basis of beach water quality monitoring data for 1994. The public are advised not to swim at these beaches. They are identified by an "X" in the following list.

The grades of the bacteriological water quality of various beaches in Hong Kong today are listed below:

Beach

Present Grading (as at 27.4.95)

Hong Kong South Big Wave Bay Chung Hom Kok Deep Water Bay Hairpin Middle Bay Repulse Bay ShekO South Bay St. Stephen's Turtle Cove Stanley Main Rocky Bay To Tei Wan*

3 1.

1

1 1

1

2

1

1 .

2 X

1

31

Tucn Mun District

Golden Beach 3

Old Cafeteria X

New Cafeteria 3

Castle Peak X

Kadoorie 3

Butterfly 3

Sai Kung District

Campers 1

Clear Water Bay 1st Beach 1

Clear Water Bay 2nd Beach 1

Hap Mun Bay 1

Kiu Tsui

Pak Sha Chau

Silverstrand 2

Trio (Hebe Haven) 1

Islands District

Cheung Sha Upper I

Cheung Sha Lower 2

Discovery Bay*

Hung Shing Yeh 1

KwunYamWan

Tong Fuk 1

Lo So Shing 1

Pui O 1

Silvermine'Bay 2

Tung Wan, Cheung Chau 1

Tung O* 1

Tsuen Wan District

Anglers’ X

Approach 4

Casam 3

Gemini 3

Hoi Mei Wan 3

Lido 3

Ting Kau 4

Tung Wan, Ma Wan 2

Note: "X" The beach has been closed for swimming purposes.

* Ungazetted beaches.

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In addition to this regular reporting system, an annual review of the bacteriological water quality of all the bathing beaches in Hong Kong will continue to be prepared by EPD after each bathing season.

This will advise the beach management authorities on the suitability of individual beach for swimming purposes. The latest annual report [entitled "Bacteriological Water Quality of Bathing Beaches in Hong Kong, 1994" (English and Chinese versions)], for the bathing season of 1994, is available for sale at the Government Publication Centre, Low Block, ground floor, Queensway Government Offices.

Note to Editors:

For further enquiries, please contact Principal Environmental Protection Officer Dr Malcolm Broom on tel 2835 1234.

End/Thursday, April 27, 1995

International Curriculum Conference held in Hong Kong * * * * *

The International Curriculum Conference on "Partnership in Curriculum Development: Towards More Effective Learning" will be held at the University of Hong Kong tomorrow (Friday) and Saturday.

The onc-and-half-day conference is organised by the Education Department’s Curriculum Development Institute and Department of Curriculum Studies of the University of Hong Kong, and sponsored by the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD).

The aim of the conference is to explore ways of enhancing partnership in curriculum development to achieve higher qualities of curriculum development.

The Deputy Director of OECD, Professor Malcolm Skilbeck, and the Director of the Centre for Continuing Education, Australian National University, Dr Kerry Kennedy, will deliver the keynote speeches on learning to share responsibility and developing genuine partnership with the community.

Over 300 participants from the United Kingdom, Holland. Japan, Australia, China, Taiwan, Macau and Hong Kong will take part in the conference.

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A total of 56 papers will be presented under the sub-themes of cross curricular approaches, curriculum integration, curricular continuity, task-based curriculum and curriculum and society.

Attention News Editors:

Your representatives are invited to cover the opening of the International Curriculum Conference which will start at 1.30 pm tomorrow at Runme Shaw Building, University of Hong Kong, Pok Fu Lam Road.

End/Thursday, April 27, 1995

BOE members visit TOC Resource Centre *****

Chairman of the Board of Education, Dr Tam Man-kwan, and three other Board members, today (Thursday) visited the Target Oriented Curriculum Resource Centre at To Kwa Wan Market and Government Offices.

The TOC Resource Centre was set up in January last year to provide teachers with resources that facilitate the implementation of TOC and prepare selected materials for free distribution to schools.

Besides, the Centre also provides a place for teachers to meet each other as well as subject inspectors to share their views and experience.

fhe other Board members visiting the Centre were Ms Sansan Ching Teh-chi, Mr Michael Hong Man-hoi and Mrs Minnie Lai Wei Kit-lin.

On arrival, the group was welcomed by Principal Inspector (TOC/Development) Ms Chan Wai-ming.

They were told that there were altogether 854 sample learning and assessment tasks covering Chinese. English and Mathematics on display at the Resource Centre. Teachers at schools implementing TOC had found these materials very useful.

34

The Education Department is now planning to set up two more resource centres, one on the Hong Kong Island and one in the New Territories.

At present, the Centre has a collection of 5,249 titles of course books, references and other publications, 107 titles of journals, 176 sets of learning aids and 102 pieces of computer software.

End/Thursday. April 27. 1995

BCCHK announces 9th dividend to creditors * * * * *

The following is issued on behalf of the Official Receiver and Liquidator of Bank of Credit and Commerce Hong Kong Limited (In Liquidation):

Mr Robin Hearder. the Official Receiver and Liquidator of Bank of Credit and Commerce Hong Kong Limited (In Liquidation) today (Thursday) announced that a ninth dividend to creditors will be declared in the amount of 4% of their admitted claims on April 28.

The 4% announced today will be the ninth dividend to creditors owed more than HK$ 100.000 and will bring dividends declared to 87%. Creditors owed HK$ 100,000 or less were paid in full following a Scheme of Arrangement approved in September, 1992.

Cheques will be despatched from April 28 and all should have been sent by May 5.

This is the fifth dividend payment in the past 12 months and is in accordance with the dividend timetable originally estimated by Mr Hoarder of dividend payments every three months, subject to the timing of asset realisations and the resolution oi significant claims.

An ongoing review of the levels ofcash balances which need to be reserved in order to meet potential dividends to known depositors and other claimants, pending trust claims and future expenditure has allowed the Special Managers to further reduce some of those provisions.

This reduction of provisions taken together with continuing debt recoveries has enabled the Special Managers to declare this dividend.

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At the time of the payment of the seventh dividend, the Special Managers estimated that the overall return to creditors would be in excess of 80%.

Whilst this dividend takes the total return to over 86%, the final payout remains entirely contingent on future realisations and other settlements and cannot be estimated with any precision at this stage.

To the extent that funds are available to make further distributions to creditors it is anticipated that dividends will be paid every four to six months and the size of any future dividends will probably be reduced.

A \

Mr Hearder also issued his third report to creditors today, copies of which will be sent to creditors with their dividend cheques.

For further information please contact:

Mr A R Hearder 2867 2426

Mr NP Etches 2826 7236

Mr G C K Tam 2826 7259

Joint Special Managers

End/Thursday, April 27, 1995

Hong Kong Monetary Authority money market operations

*****

£ million Time (hours) Cumulative change (Smillion)

Opening balance in the account 2,125 0930 +333

Closing balance in the account 2,463 1000 +333

Change attributable to : 1100 +345

Money market activity +338 1200 +338

LAF today Nil 1500 +338

1600 +338

LAF rate 4.25% bid/6.25% offer TWI 118.5 *+0.3* 27.4.95

36

Hong Kong Monetary Authority

EF bills

EF notes/Hong Kong Government bonds

Terms Yield Term Issue Coupon Price Yield

1 week 4.97 19 months 2611 6.90 100.93 6.36

1 month 5.24 22 months 2702 7.50 101.89 6.48

3 months 5.52 30 months 3710 7.25 101.23 6.82

6 months 5.72 36 months 3804 6.90 99.98 7.02

12 months 6.03 59 months 5003 7.75 101.24 7.58

Total turnover of bills and bonds - $ 38,959 million

Closed April 27, 1995

End/Thursday, April 27, 1995

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

ISSUED BY GOVERNMENT INFORMATION SERVICES BEACONSFIELD HOUSE, HONG KONG. TEL: 842 8777

Friday, April 28, 1995

Contents Page No,

European business leaders optimistic about HK's future.................. 1

CS winds up a successful visit to Europe................................ 2

Administration of Justice Bill gazetted...