Daily Information Bulletin - 1970s - 1976 - JAN - ENG

 4000035 P.R. M

HONG KONG GOVERNMENT

NFORMATION

SERVICES

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

SUPPLEMENT

Thursday, January 1, 1976

EiiB/iRGOED NEWS ITEi 1S:

NOTE TO EDITORS OF NEWSPAPERS, NEWS AGENCIES, BROADCASTING STATIONS: ________________

The following announcement regarding the New Year Honours List is being made simultaneously in London at 2359 hours G.H.T. on January 1.

Publication is permitted in Hong Kong newspapers tomorrow (Friday), Jan. 2, but no news agency or overseas radio transmission of the announcement may carry the information without the embargo qualification.

The news may be broadcast from 7.00 a.m. onwards over the local radio and television stations on Friday.

On NO account should any of the recipients of Honours be contacted for interviews or for information relative to their careers or be approached in any way in connection with their awards before these have been publicly announced.

Thursday, January 1, 1976

- 2 -

NEW YEAR HONOURS LIST

C.M.G. ( Companion of the Order of St. Michael & St. George) The Honourable Kenneth Wallis Joseph Topley, J.P.

Mr. Topley, Director of Education, joined the Hong Kong Government in 1955 as an Administrative Officer.

In 1964, he was appointed Deputy Commissioner for Labour. He has subsequently headed three departments: Census & Statistics, Social Welfare and Education. His exceptional administrative ability, enthusiasm and capacity to obtain the maximum assistance and co-operation of all concerned has led to the development of very comprehensive long-term plans for social welfare and for secondary education.

C.B.E. (Commander Order of the British Empire)

Mr. John Louis Marden, J.P.

Mr. Marden is chairman and director of many companies in Hong Kong. He has a long and distinguished record of public service.

He became Chairman of the Advisory Committee on Air Pollution in 1966 and of the Advisory Committee on Environmental Pollution in January ^974. Under his leadership, these committees have made valuable recommendations to the Government for the control of all types of pollution.

Mr. Marden and his wife take a direct interest in the promotion of education and in 1973 jointly founded the Marden Foundation which has undertaken the building of three pre-vocational schools.

/C.B.E

Thursday, January 1, 1976

- 3 -

C.B.E. (Commander Order of the British Empire)

hr. PAO Yue-kong, J.P.

Mr. Pao has built up VorxdL Wide Shipping Ltd. to a stage where it has the largest independent shipping fleet in the world and is still expanding. He has also established an excellent training school for his apprentice seamen.

Mr. Pao is now a considerable international figure, on the board of

1 eading banks and companies in the U.K., U.S., Japan, Hong Kong and elsewhere. His knowledge and international prestige, and the help he is always willing to give the Hong Kong Government in its international dealings, have represented a very special and valuable contribution.

O.B.E. (h) (Officer Order of the British Empire) (Military)

Lieutenant Colonel John Rule Heywood,' E.D., J.P.

Lt. Col. Heywood, Commanding Cff.icer of the Royal Hong Kong Regiment, has given unstintingly of his own time and energies to the advancement of the Regiment.

He took over command in *’973 and is the first Volunteer to lead the Regiment in 20 years. Under his command there has been a realistic change in the role of the regiment which he has both advocated and implemented while maintaining a high standard of morale and efficiency. His decisive and effective leadership has resulted in a highly efficient Regiment. He will relinquish command in April 1976.

/O.B.E.

Thursday, January 1, 1976

- 4 -

O.B.E. (Officer Order of the British Empire)

Mr. John Howard Bamforth

Mr. Bamforth is currently Assistant Director (Administration)

in the Medical and Health Department. He joined the Overseas Civil Service in 1952 as an Administrative Officer and served in Sierra Leone, retiring in 1965 as Permanent Secretary, Ministry of Health. He was appointed to the Bahamas in 1965 and was Chairman of the Public Services Commission in the Bahamas from 1969-75*

He joined the Hong Kong Government in 1975 as an Administrative Officer.

O.B.E. (Officer Order of the British Empire)

The Honourable John Henry Bremridge, J.P.

Mr. Bremridge was appointed to the Legislative Council in 197^ and has an impressive record of public service. He is Chairman of the Hong Kong Tourist Association and a member of the Trade Development Council, the Trade and Industry Advisory Board and the Aviation Advisory Board.

He is Chairman and Managing Director of John Swire & Sons (HK) Ltd.

O.B.E. (Officer Order of the British Empire) Mr. Allan Fletcher, J.P.

Mr. Fletcher joined the Marine Department in 1953 as a Surveyor of Ships. He was promoted to Deputy Director of Marine in 1967 and to Director in 1973*

He has proved to be a most able Director of Marine, and his department enjoys the trust and confidence of the shipping industry in Hong Kong.

/O.B.E.

Thursday, January 1, 1976

- 5 -

O.B.E. (Officer Order of the British Empire)

Mr. Wilfred Thomas Knight, J.P.

Mr. Knight has been in the Public Works Department since 195% and since 1961 has worked in the Waterworks Division. He became Director of Water Supplies in 1973*

He is a very able engineer and administrator and has been closely involved with the development of several major engineering projects, including the High Island Water Scheme and the Desalination Plant.

O.B.E. (Officer Order of the British Empire)

The Honourable LO Tak-shing, J.P*

Mr. Lo was appointed member of the Legislative Council in 197% He previously served as an appointed member of the Urban Council from 1970-7%

Mr. Lo, a solicitor by profession, has a distinguished record of public service, including current membership of the Public Services Commission, Social Welfare Advisory Committee, Transport Advisory Committee and the Hong Kong Tourist Association.

/O.B.E.

Thursday, January 1, 1976

6

O.B.E. (Officer Order of the British Empire)

Mrs. Susan Yuen, J.P.

In 1959 Mrs. Yuen became Secretary of the working party which led to the formation of the Federation of Hong Kong Industries. She also became its first Executive Director and served until 1970.

By her energy, initiative, efficiency and perseverance, she has made an outstanding contribution to the development and establishment of the Export Credit Insurance Corporation, the Productivity Council and the Trade Development Council. Mrs. Yuen still carries the chief executive responsibilities for the Management Association, and the Design, Packaging and Shippers Councils.

O.B.K. (H) (Officer Order of the British Bmnire). (Honorary)

Mr. Henry HU Hung-1ick

Mr. hu was first elected to the Urban Council in 19&5 and was

elected by his colleagues to be Vice-Chairman in 1975* He serves on many committees of the Council and is Chairman of the Hawkers Select Committee, where he spares np effort and time on the many problems which confront the Council in hawker matters. His other interests include the Kiangsu & Chekiang Association, the Hong Kong Playground Association, the Hong Kong Council of Social Service and the* Criminal & Law Enforcement Injuries Compensation Board.

I.S.O. (Imperial Service Order)

Mr. Iskandar Agafuroff

Mr. Agafuroff is a Treasury Accountant with the Kcwloon-Canton Railway. He has given long and faithful service of an exceptional standard. His contribution to the Kowloon-Canton Railway has far exceeded the requirements of his post. In addition to his accounting duties he has for many years additionally carried out the work of Secretary to the Railway.

/I.S.O.......

Thursday, January 1, 1976

- 7 -

I.S.O. ( Imperial Service Order)

Mr. Siema Grunberg *4

Mr. Grunberg, Chief Engineer in the Railway Division of the Public Works Department, has been responsible for the planning and construction of the new terminus and the double-tracking of the Railway.

The new terminus project was very complicated end called for a high degree of co-ordination. Mr. Grunberg worked extremely hard and skilfully to completethe project successfully•

M.3.Z, (Member Order of the British Empire)

Miss Wendy Dorothy. Barnes

Miss Barnes, who retired in 1975» came to Hong Kong in 1967 with a high reputation in broadcasting gained in London, Malta, Egypt, Cyprus and Kenya.

Her extensive broadcasting experience and her great ability was used to create the highest standards in Radio Hong Kong’s radio and television public affairs programmes.

M.B.E. (Member Order of the British Empire)

Mrs. Leonora Lewthwaite

Mrs. Lewthwaite was appointed in 19&7 to take charge of the Airport Reception and Information Service, with special responsibility for looking after VIPs.

She gave outstanding service in this post. Her natural desire to help people and an ability to do so efficiently created a very favourable impression on the many people with whom she came into contact.

Mrs. Lewthwaite left Hong Kong in July 1975 on retirement.

/M.B.E.

Thursday, January 1, 1976

8

h.B.E. (Member Order of the British Empire)

Mr. John Llewellyn

Mr. Llewellyn joined the University of Hong Kong in 1957 after a

career as a field geologist. He was promoted Senior Lecturer in 1960 and It-. .

acted as Dean of the Faculty of Arts during the summer of 196j.

he was a highly successful Warden of University Hall from 1961 to 1972, in addition to his duties first as a teacher and subsequently as an administrator• He was appointed Master of Robert Black College from the summer of 1974 until his retirement in June 1975*

h.B.E. (Member Order of the British Empire)

Mr. LO Hin-shing, J.P.

Mr. Lo,now retired, was a well-known magistrate and barrister who made an exceptionally significant contribution to the development of the judicial system in Hong Kong.

He was a barrister in Hgng Kong from 1926 to 1948. In 1948 he was appointed a magistrate and served until i960 when, at the age of 70, he returned to the Bar. He served again as a magistrate from 1961-62 and from 1964-71, retiring for the last time at the age of 81.

h.B.E. (Member Order of the British Empire)

Mr. John William Tucker

Mr. Tucker is the Principal of the Outward Bound School. He set

up the Duke of Edinburgh’s Award scheme in Hong Kong and in 1969, was appointed to start the Outward Bound School. The School has been an outstanding success and has given training and enjoyment to many people.

Mr. Tucker personally controls all the day to day activities of the school and he and his family have devoted themselves to the character and physical training of many young people in Hong Kong.

/h.B.E. ••.••

Thursday, January 1, 197$

- 9 -

M.B.E. (Member Order of the British Empire)

Mr. WATT Hew~ki, C.P.M.

Mr. Watt served as a Senior Divisional Officer in the Auxiliary Fire Service for 25 years until its disbandment in 1975- He served at all times with outstanding loyalty and merit, particularly when the availability of the regular professional fire protection resources had been fully extended.

M.B.E. (H) (Member Order of the British Empire )(Honorary)

Mr. YEW Shin-kan

Mr. Yew joined the Government in 1950 as a Police Inspector.

He was appointed as a Land Assistant in the New Territories Administration in 1959 and was promoted to Senior Land Assistant in 1970.

During his career with the Government, he has demonstrated outstanding zeal and a very ready acceptance of the many responsibilities of his office. During the past four years he has been the Senior Land Assistant in charge of land resumption for the High Island Water Scheme.

B.E.M, (British Empire Medal)

Mr. AU-YEUNG Chau

Mr. AU YEUNG joined H.M. Dockyard as a Labourer in 1957 and in 1960 was transferred to the Public Works Department as an Office Attendant.

His conduct has always been exemplary and he is a most loyal,

reliable and devoted public servant.

Thursday, January 1, 1976

10

B.E.n. (British Empire he dal)

Mr* CHAN Hung

Mr. Chan served for nearly 12 years with H.M. Dockyard before joining the Urban Services Department in 1958* As an Overseer, Mr. Chan is diligent and responsible and commands the respect of his colleagues and senior officers.

B.E.M. (British Empire Medal)

Mr. CHAN Ping-ki

Mr. Chan, Senior Coxswain, joined the Marine Department in 19^6. He holds the Advance Certificate of Navigation, and his skill has earned him the respect of both his superiors and his colleagues.

B.E.M. (British Empire Medal)

Mr. CHAN Yiu

Mr. Chan, a labourer with the Urban Services Department, joined the Government in 19^1® He is hardworking and loyal and sets an excellent example to his colleagues by his industriousness and efficiency.

B.E.M. (British Empire Medal)

Mr. CHEUNG Chung-pak

Mr. Cheung, Clerical Officer, joined the public service in 19^5 and was transferred to the Police Force in 1960. His long service has been marked by exceptional devotion to duty and untiring energy.

Thursday, January 1, 1975

- 11 -

B.E.M. (British Empire Medal)

Mr. Rajab Abdul Curreem

Mr. Curreem joined the General Clerical Service in 1946 and was posted to the Police Force in 1964. By his energy, ability and sound leadership, he has contributed significantly to the efficient and effective operation of Police Headquarters and to the development of the Police Civilian Staff Club.

B.E.M. (British Empire Medal)

Mr. Kong Chi-hung

Mr. Kong joined the Government in 194-7 and was transferred to the Fire Services Department in 1958-

Mr. Kong is a faithful and loyal Clerical Officer who has consistently carried out his duties conscientiously and efficiently.

B.E.M. (British Empire Medal)

Mr. LAU Fat

Mr. Lau retired from Government service in 1974 after 35 years of loyal and dedicated service to the Urban Services Department and the Urban Council. Mr. Lau carried out his duties in a most efficient and conscientious manner.

B.E.M. (British Empire Medal)

Mr. LEUNG Bun-loong

Mr. Leung, an overseer with the Urban Services Department, joined the Government in 1945- He has an unblemished service record and has performed his duties in an outstanding manner.

Thursday, January 1, 1976

- 12 -

B.E.h. (British Empire Medal) hr. LI Yiu-hung

Mr. Li joined the Government in 19^+9 and was posted to the Secretariat for Chinese Affairs (now Home Affairs Department) in 1962* Since 1969 he has been Clerk-in-Gharge of the Newspaper Registration Office. He has always given efficient, loyal and devoted service.

B.E.H. (British Empire Medal)

Mr. TSE Tung-tang

Mr. Tse was employed in the Royal Naval Dockyard from 19^+5 to 1959 and then joined the Labour Department as Messenger. He has always performed his work with great efficiency, outstanding zeal and devotion to duty.

B.E.h. (British Empire Medal)

Mr. YEUNG Kam-piu

Mr. Yeung’s long service as an Interpreter in the Royal H.K. Police Force has been distinguished by his hard work, efficiency and complete reliability. He has to give evidence in court in the most serious criminal cases and is received there with trust and respect.

^.P.n. (Queen’s Police Medal)

Mr. Patrick Joseph Clancy, C.P.M.

Mr. Clancy, Chief Superintendent of Police, joined the Force in 1952. He was promoted to Senior Superintendent in 1973.

Mr. Clancy has served in the Criminal Investigation Department, the Special Branch and the Uniform Branch. His high professional competence, his ability as an operational commander, his loyalty, strength of character, and determination have served the Force well.

He has been the Director of Criminal Investigation since 197*+-/Q.P.M. .....................................................

Thursday, January 1, 1975

-- 15 •"

Q.P.M. (Queen1s Police Medal)

Mr, Howard John Rumbelow, C.P.M.

Mr. Rumbelov?, Chief Superintendent, joined the Royal Hong Kong Police Force in 19^9* In May 1973 he assumed command of the Narcotics Bureau. By his outstanding leadership and a high degree of diplomacy in dealing with other government agencies and foreign police forces,he succeeded in disrupting the largest illegal drug syndicate in the Far East and instituting prosecutions of many of its most senior organisers.

x

C.P.M. (Colonial Police Medal) (Royal Hong Kong Police Force) Mr.CHEAH Phee-chuan, Chief Inspector of Police Mr. Malcolm George FARNHAM, Superintendent of Police Mr. HSIAH Chun-ching, Chief Inspector of Police Mr. LEUNG Tak-kwong, Senior Inspector of Police (Auxiliary) Mr. Keith Harry LCMAS, Superintendent of Police Mr. Ronald Lorraine REDPATH, Superintendent of Police Sergeant Ghulam SABIR

Mr. Peter TSAO Kv/ang-yung, Superintendent of Police (Auxiliary) Mr. Chester H. WONG, Superintendent of Police (Auxiliary) Mr. WONG Yiu-ming, Station Sergeant (Auxiliary)

Mr. YAU Kin-chung, Station Sergeant

/(Fire Services

Thursday, January 1, 1976

- 14 -

(Fire Services Department)

Mr. CHAN Biu, Senior Ambulanceman

Mr. HO Kwai-chin, Principal Fireman

Mr. JO Tai-chang, Divisional Officer

Mr. KWAN Kam-hung, Principal Fireman

Mr. KWONG Wah-piu, Principal Fireman

Mr. IAM Lok-bun, Divisional Officer

Mr. LEE Ying-fat, Principal Fireman

Mr. LEUNG Yuen, Principal Fireman

Mr. John Howard MARCH, Divisional Officer

Mr. TAM Yuk-fan, Assistant Divisional Officer

Mr. YEUNG Kam-sing, Principal Fireman • .

Mr. YU Kar-kee, Principal Fireman

BADGE OF HONOUR

Mr. CHING Chun-kau

Mr. Ching is a former Chairman of the Board of Directors and currently Permanent Adviser to the Pok Oi Hospital, which owes much to his energy and enthusiasm.

Mr. J1Q Man-chung

Mr. Ho is chairman of several community associations and is an enthusiastic supporter of community and welfare projects in Wanchai ••• •

/Mr. KU ......

Thursday, January 1, 1976

- 15 -

Mr. KU Lung-man

Mr. Ku is a community leader in Kowloon City and a committee member of the Hung Hom Kaifong Association. He has given much assistance to welfare activities.

Mr* LO Ki-chung

Mr. Lo is Chairman of the Nam Hoi Sha Tau Association in Mong Kok and is a keen promoter of charitable, welfare and recreational activities in the district.

Mr. NG Hon-sum

Mr. Ng is Chairman of the Central District Kaifong Welfare Advancement Association. He has worked with great energy for the promotion of welfare and community projects.

Mr. YAU Kei

Mr. Yau is the Chairman of the Hang Hau Rural Committee, and has a long record of fostering social developments and community work.

Mr. YEUNG Yuk-lun

Mr. Yeung, a teacher resident on Cheung Chau Island, has worked actively to promote youth activities, -particularly tho Scout movement and sport.

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IgisI If ill

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

9

4 * 4 *

FRIDAY, JANUARY 2, 1976 *

CONTENTS ' ’ PAGE NO.

INDUSTRIAL SITE ON TSI NG Yl ISLAND TO BE AVAILABLE

BY TENDER ...................................••• 1

PRESS CONFERENCE ON COMING ANTI-NOISE CAMPAIGN . 1

OWNERS OF BOILERS URGED TO CHECK THEIR EQUIPMENT REGULARLY ...................................... 2

PARTY FOR 120 OLD PEOPLE TO BE GIVEN AT TSUEN WAN COMMUNITY CENTRE ............................... 2

DRIVERS ON CASTLE PEAK ROAD ASKED TO BE CAREFUL DURING

ROAD WORKS  .................................... 3

. • i

INSTITUTE OF LINGUISTS EXAMINATIONS ....,....... 3

GENERAL HOLIDAYS IN 1976 AND 1977 .............. 4

FIRING PRACTICE ON CASTLE PEAK RANGE ........... 6

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kopg.Tel: 9*233191

FRIDAY, JANUARY 2, 1976.

- 1 -

TSI NG Y! ISLAND SITE TO BE PUT UP FOR TENDER if ft if if if if

THE GOVERNMENT IS SHORTLY TO PUT UP FOR TENDER A SITE ON TSING Yl ISLAND TO BE USED EXCLUSIVELY FOR SHIPBUILDING, SHIP REPAIRING AND HEAVY ENGINEERING, A SPOKESMAN FOR THE NEW TERRITORIES ADMINISTRATION SAID TODAY.

HE SAID THE SITE, ON THE SOUTH WEST OF THE ISLAND, HAS A TOTAL AREA OF ABOUT 765,000 SQ. FT. CONSISTING MAINLY OF FORESHORE AND SEABED. RECLAMATION WORK AND SITE DEVELOPMENT, INCLUDING ROADWORKS AND DRAINAGE, WILL BE THE RESPONSIBILITY OF THE SUCCESSFUL TENDERER.

THE SUCCESSFUL TENDERER WILL BE NOTIFIED IN WRITING BY THE GOVERNMENT AND REQUIRED TO SIGH AN AGREEMENT WITHIN 14 DAYS. HE CAN PAY THE PREMIUM EITHER IN FULL WITHIN ONE MONTH OR BY NINE ANNUAL INSTALMENTS WITH INTEREST AT FIVE PER CENT. f

CROWN RENT WILL BE $$2,000 ANNUALLY.

A GOVERNMENT NOTICE GIVING FULL DETAILS OF THE CONDITIIONS OF TENDER IS TO BE PUBLISHED WITHIN THE NEXT FORTNIGHT.

THIS WILL ALSO STATE THE CLOSING DATE FOR TENDERS, EACH OF WHICH MUST BE ACCOMPANIED BY A DEPOSIT OF SI MILLION.

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ANTI-NOISE POLLUTION CAMPAIGN if if if if if if

NOTE TO EDITORS«

THE HONG KONG GOVERNMENT AND THE ADVISORY COMMITTEE ON ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTION (EPCCT1) WILL HOLD A PRESS CONFERENCE AT 2.30 P.U. ON MONDAY (JANUARY 5, 1976) TO LAUNCH ITS MONTHLONG ANTI-NOISE POLLUTION CAMPAIGN.

THE PRESS CONFERENCE WILL DE HELD AT THE INFORMATION SERVICES DEPARTMENT THEATRE, 5TH FLOOR, BEACONSFIELD HOUSE.

SPEAKERS AT THE CONFERENCE WILL DE MR. HENRY LITTON, CHAIRMAN OF THE NOISE POLLUTION SUD-COMMITTEE OF EPCOt-1, AND MR. HILTON CHEOtJG-LEEN, A MEMBER OF THE SUD-COMMITTEE. ALSO PRESENT WILL DE MR. HARNAM GREWAL, DEPUTY SECRETARY FOR THE ENVIRONMENT.

YOU ARE INVITED TO SEND YOUR REPRESENTATIVES TO COVER THE CONFERENCE.

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/2......

FRIDAY, JANUARY 2, 1976

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OWNERS URGED TO CHECK BOILERS REGULARLY K # K H ft K ft

THE LABOUR DEPARTMENT HAS DISCONTINUED, AFTER MORE THAN TEN YEARS, THE PRACTICE OF REMINDING OWNERS OF BOILERS AND PRESSURE RECEIVERS THE NEED TO RE-EXAMINE THEIR EQUIPMENT WHEN THE CERTIFICATE OF FITNESS FOR THEIR MACHINES EXPIRES.

MRS. SOO MOK SAU-HA, ASSISTANT COMMISSIONER FOR LABOUR, EXPLAINED THAT THE BOILERS AND PRESSURE RECEIVERS ORDINANCE HAD BEEN IN FORCE SINCE MARCH 1963, AND BOTH OWNERS AND EXAMINERS SHOULD, BY NOW, BE WELL AWARE OF THE LEGAL REQUIREMENTS IN THIS RESPECT.

SHE URGED THESE OWNERS TO DISPLAY MORE INITIATIVE IN FUTURE AND NOT TO RELY ON REMINDERS FROM THE LABOUR DEPARTMENT TO HAVE THEIR EQUIPMENT RE-EXAMINED AT APPROPRIATE TIMES, • . t

+THE FITNESS EXPIRY DATE IS WRITTEN AT THE BOTTOM OF EACH CERTIFICATE WHICH IS NORMALLY VALID FOR ONE OR TWO YEARS, DEPENDING ON THE TYPE OF EQUIPMENT,* SHE SAID.

FOR ENQUIRIES AS TO WHEN CERTAIN PARTICULAR EQUIPMENT SHOULD BE RE-EXAMINED, OWNERS OF BOILERS AND PRESSURE RECEIVERS SHOULD CONTACT EITHER THEIR APPOINTED EXAMINERS OR THE PRESSURE EQUIPMENT UNIT OF THE LABOUR DEPARTMENT AT 3-688752 FOR ADVICE.

A LIST OF APPOINTED EXAMINERS IS ALSO AVAILABLE ON APPLICATION FROM ANY OF THE BRANCH OFFICES OF THE FACTORY INSPECTORATE OF THE DEPARTMENT.

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NEW YEAR PARTY FOR THE AGED a a n n a

ABOUT 120 ELDERLY RESIDENTS OF TSUEN WAN WILL BE ENTERTAINED IN A NEW YEAR PARTY AT THE PRINCESS ALEXANDRA COMMUNITY CENTRE ON SUNDAY (JANUARY 4) AT 2.30 P.MO

THE TWO-HOUR ENTERTAINMENT PROGRAMME WILL INCLUDE GAMES AND A LUCKY DRAW.

THE PARTY IS ORGANISED BY THE TSUEN WAN TOWN AREA COMMITTEE ON WELFARE SERVICES FOR THE AGED.

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FRIDAY, JANUARY 2, 1976

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ROAD WORKS IN CASTLE PEAK ROAD: DRIVERS ASKED TO BE CAREFUL ft ft ft ft ft ft

ROAD WORKS WILL BE CARRIED OUT ON FIVE SECTIONS OF CASTLE PEAK ROAD IN THE NEW TERRITORIES FROM MONDAY (JANUARY 5) AND WILL LAST ABOUT ONE MONTH.

WHEN WORKS ARE GOING ON, THE ROAD SURFACE MAY BECOME ROUGH AND MOTORISTS ARE ADVISED TO PROCEED WITH GREAT CARE WHEN DRIVING THROUGH THESE SECTIONS OF THE ROAD.

THE SECTIONS OF CASTLE PEAK ROAD TO BE AFFECTED ARE BETWEEN TEXACO ROAD AND THE FAR EAST BANK, AT THE 9 MILESTONE BETWEEN HOUSE NOS. 1 - 3, AT THE 11 MILESTONE BETWEEN NOS. 10 - 14, AT THE 12 MILESTONE BETWEEN NOS. 2-7, AND BETWEEN THE GARDEN BAKERY AND THE KOWLOON TEXTILE COMPANY.

INSTITUTE OF LINGUISTS EXAMINATIONS ft ft if n ft «

THE NEXT INSTITUTE STUDENTS TAKING ENGLISH

OF LINGUISTS EXAMINATIONS FOR CHINESE WILL BE HELD IN MAY.

EXAMINATIONS AT VARIOUS LEVELS WILL TAKE PLACE BETWEEN 21 AfJD CANDIDATES MUST BE AVAILABLE ON ANY DAY FROM MAY 12 TO 31 FOR THE PART I (ORAL) TESTS.

01LL DE AVAILABLE FROM JANUARY 5 AT THE EDUCATION S EXAMINATIONS division, the canton road government

Or r I

together with identification documents p??w«2 £A?S£0RIZn 1 nPH0T™,RA?HSi MUST DE returned in person BETWEEN 9 A.M. AND 4 P.M. BY JANUARY 9.

EXAMINATION FEES WILL HAVE TO BE PAID DY JANUARY 12.

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/4

4

FRIDAY, JANUARY 2, 1976

GENERAL HOLIDAYS FOR 1976 AND 1977 ******

GENERAL HOLIDAYS FOR THIS YEAR AND FOR 1977 ARE PUBLISHED IN THE GOVERNMENT GAZETTE TODAY.

THE LUNAR NEW YEAR HOLIDAYS THIS YEAR WILL STRETCH FROM JANUARY 31 (SATURDAY) TO FEBRUARY 3 (TUESDAY).

GOOD FRIDAY FALLS ON APRIL 16, DRAGON BOAT FESTIVAL ON JUNE 2 AND THE DAY FOLLOWING MID-AUTUMN FESTIVAL ON SEPTEMBER 9.

THE FOLLOWING ARE THE LISTS OF GENERAL HOLIDAYS*

GENERAL HOLIDAYS FOR 1976

EVERY SUNDAY.........................................     t

THE FIRST WEEK-DAY IN JANUARY .............. THURSDAY, JANUARY 1

LUNAR NEW YEAR’S DAY........................ SATURDAY, JANUARY 31

THE THIRD DAY OF LUNAR NEW YEAR............. MONDAY, FEBRUARY 2

THE FOURTH DAY OF LUNAR NEW YEAR............ TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 3

THE DAY FOLLOWING CHING MING FESTIVAL ...... MONDAY, APRIL 5

GOOD FRIDAY ................................. FRIDAY, APRIL 16

THE DAY FOLLOWING GOOD FRIDAY .............. SATURDAY, APRIL 17

EASTER MONDAY .............................. MONDAY, APRIL 19

THE BIRTHDAY OF HER MAJESTY THE QUEEN ...... WEDNESDAY, APRIL 21

TUEN NG (DRAGON BOAT) FESTIVAL ............. WEDNESDAY, JUNE 2

THE FIRST WEEK-DAY IN JULY.................. THURSDAY, JULY 1

THE FIRST MONDAY IN AUGUST............... MONDAY, AUGUST 2

THE LAST MONDAY IN AUGUST, WHICH SHALL BE LIBERATION DAY .......................... MONDAY, AUGUST 30

THE DAY FOLLOWING THE MID-AUTUMN FESTIVAL . THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 9

THE DAY FOLLOWING CHUNG YEUNG FESTIVAL .... MONDAY, NOVEMBER 1 / A

■ • * • I

/CHRISTMAS DAY

FRIDAY, JANUARY 2, 1976

5

CHRISTMAS DAY THE FIRST WEEK-DAY AFTER CHRISTMAS DAY .... GENERAL HOLIDAYS FOR 1977 EVERY SUNDAY THE FIRST WEEK-DAY IN JANUARY LUNAR NEW YEAR’S DAY THE SECOND DAY OF LUNAR NEW YEAR THE FOURTH DAY OF LUNAR NEW YEAR CHING MING FESTIVAL GOOD FRIDAY THE DAY FOLLOWING GOOD FRIDAY EASTER MONDAY THE BIRTHDAY OF HER MAJESTY THE QUEEN TUEN NG (DRAGON BOAT) FESTIVAL THE FIRST WEEK-DAY IN JULY THE FIRST MONDAY IN AUGUST THE LAST MONDAY IN AUGUST, WHICH SHALL BE LIBERATION DAY THE DAY FOLLOWING THE MID-AUTUMN FESTIVAL . CHUNG YEUNG FESTIVAL THE FIRST WEEK-DAY AFTER CHRISTMAS DAY .... THE SECOND WEEK-DAY AFTER CHRISTMAS DAY ... SATURDAY, DECEMBER 25 MONDAY, DECEMBER 27 SATURDAY, JANUARY 1 FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 18 SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 19 MONDAY, FEBRUARY 21 TUESDAY, APRIL 5 FRIDAY, APRIL 8 SATURDAY, APRIL 9 MONDAY, APRIL 11 THURSDAY, APRIL 21 TUESDAY, JUNE 21 ‘FRIDAY, JULY 1 MONDAY, AUGUST 1 MONDAY, AUGUST 29 WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 28 FRIDAY, OCTODER 21 MONDAY, DECEMBER 26 TUESDAY, DECEMBER 27

FRIDAY, JANUARY 2, 1976

FIRING PRACTICE

FIRING PRACTICE WILL TAKE PLACE ON THE CASTLE PEAK RANGE ON TWO DAYS THIS MONTH.

IT WILL TAKE PLACE BETWEEN 8.30 A.M. AND 6 P.M. ON JANUARY 13 (TUESDAY) AND BETWEEN 11 A.M. AND 4 P.M. ON JANUARY 30 (FRIDAY). '

THE PUBLIC ARE REMINDED THAT IT IS DANGEROUS TO ENTER THE AREA WHEN THE RED FLAGS ARE FLYING DURING THE TIME OF FIRING PRACTICE.

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

SATURDAY, JANUARY 3, 1976

CONTENTS PAGE NO.

* 1 1

MAJOR PROJECTS UNDER SHA TIN DEVELOPMENT SCHEME TO START SOON....................................................... 1

DRUG EDUCATION PROJECT DESIGNS TO BE EXHIBITED ............ 2

BANKING STATISTICS FOR NOVEMBER ........................... 3

MOBILE REGISTRATION OF PERSONS TEAM TO VISIT SOUTH LANTAO .................................................... k

IN-SERVICE COURSE FOR SCHOOL LABORATORY TECHNICIANS .... 5

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

SATURDAY, JANUARY 3, 1976

1

PROGRESS MADE IN SHA TIN DEVELOPMENT

)

STEADY PROGRESS IS BEING MADE IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF SHA TIN NEW TOWN WHICH WILL EVENTUALLY HOUSE SOME 520,000 PEOPLE IN A MODERN SELF-CONTAINED TOWNSHIP INCORPORATING ALL ESSENTIAL SERVICES AND COMMUNITY FACILITIES.

CONSTRUCTION WORK UNDER STAGE ONE OF THE SCHEME IS PROGRESSING ON A BROAD FRONT AND WORK IS EXPECTED TO START SHORTLY ON TWO MAJOR PROJECTS FOR WHICH TENDERS HAVE BEEN CALLED BY THE PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT.

ONE OF THESE IS FOR A MULT I-MILL ION-DOLLAR IMPROVEMENT SCHEME OF A THREE-KILOMETRE SECTION OF TAI PO ROAD BETWEEN TAI WAI AND FO TAN, WHICH FORMS PART OF THE MAJOR HIGHWAY NETWORK FOR THE NEW TOWN.

MR. GEORGE CHIEN, CHIEF ENGINEER OF THE P.W.D.’S SHA TIN NEW TOWN DEVELOPMENT OFFICE, SAID TODAY WORK ON THE DUAL TWO-LANE ROAD SHOULD START IN MARCH AND WOULD TAKE ABOUT 27 MONTHS TO COMPLETE, z

THE IMPROVED ROAD WILL BE AN IMPORTANT LINK IN ROAD COMMUNICATIONS BETWEEN KOWLOON AND SHA TIN AND WILL ALSO BENEFIT THROUGH TRAFFIC TO AND FROM AREAS IN THE NEW TERRITORIES NORTH OF SHA TIN.

+THE INTERESTS OF EXISTING VILLAGES AND ACCESS TO PROPERTIES IN THE AREA HAVE ALSO BEEN TAKEN INTO ACCOUNT, ■ AND A NUMBER OF BRIDGES, FOOTBRIDGES AND PEDESTRIAN SUBWAYS WILL BE PROVIDED,+ HE SAID.

OF THE TWO BRIDGES TO BE BUILT, ONE WILL SPAN THE KOWLOON-CANTON RAILWAY TRACKS NEAR MILESTONE 48 AND THE OTHER WILL BE CONSTRUCTED ACROSS FO TAN NULLAH.

AS PART OF THE ROAD IMPROVEMENT WORKS AN ABUTMENT STRUCTURE WILL ALSO BE CONSTRUCTED IN CONNECTION WITH A FUTURE ROAD INTERSECTION NEAR SHA TIN RAILWAY STATION.

ABOUT TWO KILOMETRES OF A TRUNK SEWER, WHICH WILL FORM AN IMPORTANT SECTION OF THE MAIN SEWERAGE SYSTEM FOR THE NEW TOWN, WILL ALSO BE LAID.

MR. CHIEN SAID WORK WAS ALSO EXPECTED TO BEGIN IN FEBRUARY ON THE CONSTRUCTION OF ABOUT ONE KILOMETRE OF RIVER WALLS ALONG SHING MUN RIVER TO THE NORTH-EAST OF THE EXISTING SHA TIN BRIDGE.

/THE PITCHED .....

SATURDAY, JANUARY J, 1976

THE PITCHED RIVER WALLS WHEN COMPLETED WILL ENABLE FURTHER RECLAMATION TO BE CARRIED OUT IN PROVIDING MORE LAND FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF PUBLIC AND PRIVATE HOUSING, OPEN SPACE AND VARIOUS OTHER USES.

THE RIVER WALLS ARE EXPECTED TO BE COMPLETED IN MID-1977.

THESE WORKS HAVE BEEN DESIGNED BY MESSRS. MAUNSELL ' CONSULTANTS ASIA FOR THE NEW TERRITORIES DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT OF THE P.W.D. THE CONSULTANTS WILL ALSO SUPERVISE THE CONSTRUCTION WORKS.

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DRUG EDUCATION PROJECT DESIGN COMPETITION

THE 15 SECONDARY SCHOOLS WHICH TOOK PART IN THE DRUG EDUCATION PROJECT DESIGN COMPETITION LAST MONTH ARE TO PUT THEIR SUCCESSFUL ENTRIES ON EXHIBITION AT THE CITY HALL NEXT MONDAY (JANUARY 5). . '

THE COMPETITION WAS JOINTLY ORGANISED BY THE PREVENTIVE EDUCATION AND PUBLICITY SUB-COMMITTEE OF THE ACTION COMMITTEE AGAINST NARCOTICS (A.C.A.N.) AND THE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT TO HELP STUDENTS GAIN A BETTER UNDERSTANDING OF THE PROBLEMS OF DRUG ABUSE AND DRUG ADDICTION.

PRESENTATION OF PRIZES FOR THE SUCCESSFUL ENTRIES WILL TAKE PLACE AT THE CITY HALL EXHIBITION HALL AT 2.30 P.M. ON MONDAY (JANUARY 5), AFTER WHICH THE EXHIBITION WILL BE OPEN TO THE I. PUBLIC FOR THREE DAYS.

NOTE TO EDITORSi

YOU ARE INVITED TO COVER THE EVENT.

■'-V?*1'>/• '■* ’ 1 - — j.AftlThx»y ,■>..» ;<■. «.'" -■ ■■ - '

SATURDAY, JANUARY 3, 1976.

NOVEMBER BANKING STATISTICS ft ft ft ft ft ft

BANK DEPOSITS AS AT THE END OF LAST NOVEMBER STOOD AT •35,768 MILLION, COMPRISING 89.635 MILLION IN DEMAND DEPOSITS $13,634 MILLION IN TIME DEPOSITS AND $12,499 MILLION IN SAVIN' DEPOSITS.

AS AT NOVEMBER 30 THERE WERE 74 LICENSED BANKS IN HONG KONG.

THE FOLLOWING TABLE DISCLOSED TODAY BY THE COMMISSIONER OF BANKING, GIVES A DETAILED BREAKDOWN OF BANK LIABILITIES AND ASSETS FOR THE MONTH«

$ MILLION

LIABILITIES

1. DEPOSITS

2. AMOUNT DUE TO BANKS ABROAD

3. OTHER LIABILITIES

35,768

20,836

8,540

TOTAL LIABILITIES 65,144

ASSETS

1. CASH . 652

2. AMOUNT DUE FROM BANKS ABROAD1 (I) DEMAND AND SHORT TERM CLAIMS 18,373 (II) TIME DEPOSITS 2,056 20,429

3. LOANS AND ADVANCES!

(I) HONG KONG 24,537

(II) ABROAD 10,410 34,947

’ /4. INVESTMENTS



1 f --

SATUBDAY, JANUARY J, 1976

4 -

INVESTMENTS!

HONG KONG ABROAD

OTHER

ASSETS! HONG KONG ABROAD

TOTAL ASSETS

2,772

49

4,415

1,880

2,821

6,295

65,144

AVERAGE

LIQUIDITY DURING MONTH

49.29%

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PERSONS REGISTRATION TEAM TO VISIT LANTAO

******

SET UP

TEAM FROM THE REGISTRATION OF PERSONS DEPARTMENT WILL A TEMPORARY OFFICE IN THE SOUTH LANTAO RURAL COMMITTEE

FOR THE CONVENIENCE OF RESIDENTS THERE

THE OFFICE WILL OPEN BETWEEN 11 AM AND 3.30 PM NEXT MONDAY (JANUARY 5) AND BETWEEN 10 AM AND 1 PM ON TUESDAY.

LOCAL RESIDENTS AND THOSE FROM NEARBY AREAS ARE URGED

TO MAKE FULL USE OF THE FACILITIES TO CHILDREN FOR JUVENILE IDENTITY CARDS.

REGISTER THEIR 11-YEAR-OLD

THOSE ALREADY HOLDING A JUVENILE 18 SHOULD REGISTER FOR ADULT IDENTITY

CARD AND HAVING REACHED CARDS.

CHANGES IN EMPLOYMENT. ADDRESSES ANY OTHER PARTICULARS SINCE THEY WERE

AND MARITAL STATUS, OR LAST REGISTERED, SHOULD

ALSO BE REPORTED TO THE MOBILE REGISTRATION OFFICE

SATURDAY, JANUARY 3, 1976

5

100 LABORATORY TECHNICIANS ATTEND IN-SERVICE COURSE n n n n H «

LABORATORY TECIJU IC I AUS PLAY Afi IMPORTANT ROLE Iti THE IMPLEMENTATION OF THE JUNIOR SECONDARY SCIENCE CURRICULUM, THE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT’S DEPUTY CHIEF INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS, MRS. VIVIAN FONG SAID THIS HUUUIIJG.

SHE WAS SPEAKING AT THE OPENING OF AH IN-SERVICE COURSE BEING ATTENDED DY ABOUT ICO LABORATORY TECHNICIANS FROM 80 GOVERNMENT AND AIDED SECONDARY SCHOOLS.

MRS. FONG SAID THAT THE AIM GF THE COURSE, ORGANISED BY THE ADVISORY INSPECTORATE’S SCIENCE SUBJECTS SECTION, WAS TO GIVE LABORATORY TECHNICIANS IDEAS OF THE EQUIPMENT AND APPARATUS REQUIREMENTS GF THE JUNIOR SECONDARY SCIENCE CURRICULUM AND TO ENCOURAGE THE CONSTRUCTION AND USE CF HOME-MADE APPARATUS.

+IN ORDER TO ACHIEVE THE OBJECTIVES OF THE JUNIOR SECONDARY SCIENCE SCHEME (FORMERLY KNOWN AS INTEGRATED SCIENCE), IT IS ESSENTIAL THAT PUPILS CARRY OUT AS MUCH PRACTICAL WORK AS POSSIBLE.

♦PUPILS ARE ENCOURAGED TO PARTICIPATE ACTIVELY IN FOLLOW-UP DISCUSSIONS AID ARE GUIDED TO DRAW THEIR GUN CONCLUSIONS. WITH THESE TEACHING METHODS, THE WORK OF LABORATORY TECHNICIANS IS IMPORTANT,* MRS. FONG SAID.

TODAY’S FOUR-HOUR SESSION AT THE JOCKEY CLUB GOVERNMENT SECONDARY TECHNICAL SCHOOL WAS ON WORKSHOP AND HOME-MADE APPARATUS THIS WILL DE FOLLOWED DY THREE WHOLE DAY SESSIONS OH I HE SYLLABUS DEGINNING OH JANUARY 26 AT THE DISHOP HALL JUBILEE SCHOOL, THE GRAuTHAI-1 COLLEGE GF EDUCATION AUD THE NORTHCOTE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION RESPECTIVELY.

THE MAIN PART CF THE COURSE IS BEING HELD AT THAT TIME BECAUSE IT IS THE EID CF THE SCHOOL TERM WHEN LABORATORY TECHNICIANS CAN DE RELEASED FROM NORMAL DUTIES TO ATTEND THE SESSIONS.

THE TUTORS COMPRISE SCIENCE INSPECTORS, COLLEGE OF EDUCATION LECTURERS, SCIENCE TEACHERS AUD LABORATORY TECHNICIANS.

THIS IS THE SECOND COURSE CF ITS KIND FOR LABORATORY TECHNICIANS'1 THE FIRST CF URICH WAS HELD IN 1973-74.

IN THE PAST, SEMINARS AND IN-SERVICE TRAINING COURSES WERE RUN FOR PRINCIPALS AND SCIENCE TEACHERS TO PROVIDE THEM WITH THE BASIC TRAINING CH THE APPROACH AND METHOD OF TEACHING JUNIOR SECONDARY SCIENCE CURRICULUM.

o - -

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

SUNDAY, JANUARY 4, 1976

APPOINTMENTS OF DEPUTY SECRETARY FOR INFORMATION AND NEW DIRECTOR OF INFORMATION SERVICES « ft ft a a

MR. DAVID FORD, DIRECTOR OF INFORMATION SERVICES, HAS BEEN APPOINTED DEPUTY SECRETARY FOR INFORMATION IN THE HOME AFFAIRS AND INFORMATION BRANCH. HE WILL DE RESPONSIBLE FOR SUPERVISING GOVERNMENT’S INFORMATION AND PUBLIC RELATIONS WORK.

MR. FORD WILL TAKE UP HIS NEU POST-LATER THIS MONTH.

MR. RICHARD LAI, ASSISTANT DIRECTOR (PUDLIC RELATIONS), HAS BEEN PROMOTED TO BE DIRECTOR OF INFORMATION SERVICES FROM THE SAME DATE.

AS DEPUTY SECRETARY FOR INFORMATION, MR. FORD WILL ALSO BE RESPONSIBLE TO THE SECRETARY FOR HOME AFFAIRS AND INFORMATION . FOR THE CO-ORDINATION OF THE PUBLIC RELATIONS WORK OF THE HOME AFFAIRS DEPARTMENT, THE INFORMATION SERVICES DEPARTMENT AND RADIO HONG KONG.

THIS RESPONSIBILITY IS AT PRESENT SHARED BETWEEN THE HOME AFFAIRS AND INFORMATION BRANCH AND THE INFORMATION SERVICES DEPARTMENT.

MR. FORD JOINED THE HONG KONG GOVERNMENT IN 1967 AND SERVED IN THE COLONIAL SECRETARIAT UNTIL 1968 WHEN HE WAS APPOINTED CHIEF INFORMATION OFFICER IN THE INFORMATION SERVICES DEPARTMENT. HE WAS APPOINTED AS DEPUTY DIRECTOR IN JUNE, 1972 AND DIRECTOR LATER THE SAME YEAR.

MR. LAI, THE FIRST CHINESE OFFICER TO BE APPOINTED AS DIRECTOR OF INFORMATION SERVICES, JOINED THE DEPARTMENT AS A PRINCIPAL INFORMATION OFFICER IN 1962 AND WAS PROMOTED TO ASSISTANT DIRECTOR IN 1974.

BEFORE JOINING HONG KONG GOVERNMENT, MR. LAI WORKED WITH THE SECRETARIAT OF THE UNITED NATIONS IN NEW YORK AND THE BRITISH BROADCASTING CORPORATION IN LONDON.

f

MR. LAI IS THE AUTHOR OF +A HISTORY OF CHINESE LITERATURE+ PUBLISHED BY CASSELL IN LONDON AND JOHN DAY IN NEW YORK AND IN PAPERBACK BY CAPRICORN OF NEW YORK.

/2

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Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

SUNDAY, JANUARY 4, 1976

2

APPLICATIONS FOR DRAGON YEAR GOLD COIN CLOSE ON WEDNESDAY tt U N U

APPLICATIONS FOR THE GOLD COINS TO NARK THE YEAR OF THE DRAGON, THE FIRST IN A SERIES THAT NAY DE ISSUED TO DEPICT THE 12 ANIMALS TRADITIONALLY REPRESENT IIJG THE LUNAR HEU YEARS, WILL CLOSE ON WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 7.

COLLECTORS WHO ARE INTERESTED IN ODTAIHING THE COIN. OF WHICH THERE WILL DE UNCIRCULATED AND PROOF ISSUES, CAN OBTAIN APPLICATION FORMS AT THE HEAD OFFICE OR ANY BRANCH OF THE HONG KONG AND SHANGHAI DAUKo

A GOVERNMENT SPOKESMAN SAID TODAY (SUNDAY) THAT RESPONSE SO FAR HAS DEEN GOOD SINCE APPLICATIONS OPENED LAST MONDAY.

THE DRAGON YEAR GOLD COINS WILL HAVE A LIMITED CIRCULATION OF NO MORE THAN 3D,CSO ABOUT 10,000 CF WHICH WILL DE PROOFS.

THE COINS WILL DE LIMITED TO ONE FOR EACH APPLICATION AND IF THE ISSUE IS OVERSUDSCRIDED THEY WILL DE ALLOCATED DY BALLOT.

THE COINS ARE MADE OF 22 KARAT GOLD. EACH WILL HAVE A STANDARD WEIGHT CF 15.976 GRAMMES AND MEASURE 20.4 MM IN DIAMETER. EACH COIN, WHICH WILL COST $1,C. 0 FOR THE UNCIRCULATED ISSUE AND Sln5C0 FOR THE PROOF, UHL DE SUPPLIED WITH AU ATTRACTIVE PRESENTATION CASE AUD DESCRIPTIVE BOOKLET.

THE SPOKESMAN SAID THE COINS WERE ALSO BEING SOLD OVERSEAS AND IT IS EXPECTED THAT ABOUT HALF THE COINS MINTED WILL BE AVAILABLE TO COLLECTORS IN HONG KONG.

HE SAID THAT THE ROYAL VISIT COIN WAS SOLD IN NINE OVERSEAS COUNTRIES. IT IS EXPECTED THAT THE DRAGON YEAR COIN WILL BE SOLD IN AT LEAST THE SAME NUMBER.

THE SPOKESMAN POINTED OUT THAT THE COIN WAS SOLD OVERSEAS TO HELP PROMOTE HONG KONG GENERALLY AND TO ENSURE THAT THERE WAS A GOOD AFTERMARKET IN THE COIN.

ON THE SUBJECT OF AFTERMARKET PRICE HE SAID THAT THIS WOULD DEPEND OH A NUMBER CF FACTORS AND IT WAS HOT POSSIBLE TO PREDICT WHAT THE PRICE WOULD EE IN THIS MARKET, BUT HE NOTED THAT THE ROYAL VISIT COINS WERE SELLING OVERSEAS AT A SUBSTANTIAL PREMIUM OVER THE ISSUE PRICE.

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SUNDAY, JANUARY 4, 1976

3 -

TWO MORE WASTE DISPOSAL TIPS TO DE SET UP IN N.T. if if « if

TWO HORE CONTROLLED TIPS FOR THE SYSTEMATIC DISPOSAL OF SOLID WASTES WILL DE SET UP IN THE NEW TERRITORIES DY THE PUDLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT.

ONE OF THE TIPS WILL DE LOCATED AT SHIU LANG SHU I IN TUEN MUN AND THE OTHER AT MA TSO LUNG IN YUEN LONG.

HR. NG TECK-SHENG, CHIEF ENGINEER OF THE P.W.D.’S DEVELOPMENT AND AIRPORT DIVISION OF THE CIVIL ENGINEERING OFFICE, SAID TODAY THAT PRELIMINARY ROAD AND DRAINAGE WORKS ON THE TWO SITES WERE EXPECTED TO START 111 FEBRUARY.

+THE MA TSO LUNG TIP SHOULD DE READY FOR USE DY MID-1976 WHILE THE LARGER TIP AT SHIU LANG SHU I IS EXPECTED TO DE READY BY LATE 1977 OR EARLY 1970,4- HE SAID.

♦WHEN FULLY COMPLETED AND CLOSED,+ HE ADDED, +THE TOO TIPS WILL PROVIDE MORE THAN SEVEN HECTARES OF NEW LAND FOR RECREATIONAL USE.

♦THIS IS ONE OF THE ADDED ADVANTAGES IN CONTROLLED TIPPING,-*-HE SAID, +DECAUSE HOT OHLY DOES THE SYSTEM PROVIDE FOR AN ECONOMICAL AND SANITARY MEANS OF SOLID WASTE DISPOSAL, DUT IT ALSO ENABLES FULL USE tO BE MADE OF THE SITES FOR THE BENEFIT OF RESIDENTS ONCE

THE TIPS ARE CLOSED AND TOPPED OFF.+

HE EXPLAINED THAT IN CONTROLLED TIPPING, REFUSE IS SPREAD IN LAYERS AND COMPACTED DY BULLDOZERS TO A THICKNESS OF ABOUT SIX FEET EACH TIME. THIS LAYER IS THEN COMPLETELY COVERED WITH INERT SOFT EARTH TO PREVENT NOXIOUS SMELLS AND TO ELIMINATE HEALTH AND FIRE HAZARDS.

THE MA TSO LUNG TIP, HE SAID, WOULD HAVE A CAPACITY OF 160,000 TONNES AND WAS SCHEDULED TO DE CLOSED WITHIN THREE YEARS WHEN IT WOULD PROVIDE ALMOST 1.5 HECTARES OF FORMED LAND FOR USE AS OPEN SPACE AND RECREATION.

♦THE TIP AT SHIU LANG SHU I WILL BE MUCH BIGGER WITH A CAPACITY OF 560,000 TONNES.

♦IT WILL HAVE A LIFE EXPECTANCY OF SIX OR SEVEN YEARS AND EVENTUALLY SHOULD YIELD AN ADDITIONAL 5.6 HECTARES OF LAND FOR RECREATIONAL USE,-*- HE SAID.

MR. NG, SAID BOTH TIPS WOULD BE LINED WITH A WATERPROOF PLASTIC MEMBRANE TO PREVENT SURFACE WATER SEEPING THROUGH THE COMPACTED REFUSE FROM REACHING THE GROUND VIA TER.

/THE intercepted .....

SUNDAY, JANUARY 4, 1976

4

THE INTERCEPTED WATER, WHICH MIGHT CONTAIN DISSOLVED AND FINELY SUSPENDED SOLID WASTES AUD MICRODIAL WASTES, WILL DE CHANNELLED OFF THROUGH A NETWORK OF SUB-SOIL DRAINS TO SEWERS.

MR. NG NOTED THAT ALTHOUGH CONTROLLED TIPPING HAD BEEN USED IN BRITAIN AND THE UNITED STATES FOR MANY YEARS, IT WAS BASICALLY A NEW CONCEPT IN THE FAR EAST AND WAS FIRST ADOPTED DY HONG KONG IN 1973.

♦REFUSE DISPOSAL EXPERTS FROM OTHER COUNTRIES, SUCH AS AUSTRALIA, THAILAND, INDIA AND MACAU, HAVE VISITED HONG KONG ON MANY OCCASIONS TO STUDY THIS METHOD,* HE SAID.

SO FAR, THREE CONTROLLED TIPS HAVE DEEN SET UP IN THE NEW TERRITORIES AT A COST OF 614 MILLION. THEY ARE LOCATED AT GIN DRINKER’S DAY IN TSUEN WAN, SHUN WAN IN TAI PO, AUD NGAU TAM MEI IN YUEN LONG.

THE TIP AT NGAU TAM MEI WAS CLOSED LAST FEBRUARY AND MADE AVAILABLE 1.1 HECTARES OF LAND FOR RECREATIONAL USE.

THE OTHER TWO ARE SCHEDULED TO DE CLOSED TOWARDS THE END OF 1976 AND IT IS ESTIMATED THAT THEY WILL PROVIDE MORE THAN 20.2 HECTARES OF ADDITIONAL RECREATIONAL SPACE.

ANOTHER TIP IS ALSO BEING DEVELOPED AT NGAU CHI WAN NEAR CLEAR WATER DAY ROAD AND EVENTUALLY SHOULD YIELD ABOUT 7.3 HECTARES OF OPEN SPACE.

- - o ----------

,/5

-SUNDAY, JANUARY 4, 1976 - 5 -

TECHNICAL EDUCATION IN THE NEXT DECADE ft if if

A PROGRAMME PLAN FOR TECHNICAL EDUCATION FOR THE NEXT DECADE IS AT PRESENT BEING PREPARED AND HOPEFULLY THIS SHOULD BE FINALISED EARLY IN THE NEW YEAR, MR. DANIEL WATERS, ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF EDUCATION (TECHNICAL), SAID THIS EVENING.

SPEAKING AT THE DINNER AND BALL OF THE HONG KONG TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL TRAINING TEACHERS’ ASSOCIATION, THE HONG KONG TECHNICAL TEACHERS’ ALUMNI ASSOCIATION AND THE HONG KONG TECHNICAL TEACHERS’ COLLEGE STUDENTS’ UNION, MR. WATERS SAID THAT A STAFFING REVIEW FOR THE TECHNICAL BRANCH OF THE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT WAS CARRIED OUT RECENTLY.

+THE POLYTECHNIC, THE TECHNICAL INSTITUTES, PREVOCATIONAL SCHOOLS AND SECONDARY TECHNICAL SCHOOLS DO IN SOME WAY AFFECT EACH OTHER. IT IS VERY NECESSARY THAT TECHNICAL EDUCATION BE VIEWED AS A ’SEAMLESS GARMENT’ AND NOT AS A DISJOINTED WHOLE,* MR. WATERS STRESSED.

REVIEWING THE DEVELOPMENT OF TECHNICAL EDUCATION IN HONG KONG MR. WATERS SAID, +ANOTHER MAJOR STEP FORWARD CAME ON THE 1ST OF AUGUST 1973 WHEN THE TECHNICAL COLLEGE WAS HANDED OVER TO THE BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE HONG |(ONG POLYTECHNIC. IT WAS THUS NO LONGER UNDER THE DIRECT CONTROL OF THE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT AND BECAME AN AUTONOMOUS INSTITUTION.

♦IN 1973 THE INDUSTRIAL TRAINING ADVISORY COMMITTEE WAS SUPERSEDED BY THE HONG KONG TRAINING COUNCIL,* HE SAID.

ON SEPTEMBER 1, 1974 THE TECHNICAL TEACHERS’ COLLEGE WAS ESTABLISHED.

THE WHITE PAPER ON SECONDARY EDUCATION WAS PUBLISHED IN OCTOBER 1974. AMONG OTHER THINGS, THIS DOCUMENT RECOMMENDED THAT 25-30 PER CENT OF THE CURRICULUM IN SECONDARY SCHOOLS SHOULD BE OF A TECHNICAL/PRACTICAL NATURE.

IN SEPTEMBER 1975 TOO MORE TECHNICAL INSTITUTES OPENED, ONE AT KWAI CHUNG AND ONE AT KWUN TONG.

+THE CHEUNG SHA WAN TECHNICAL INSTITUTE IS DUE TO OPEN IN 1977 AND THE SAN PO KONG TECHNICAL INSTITUTE, HOPEFULLY, A YEAR LATER IT IS EXPECTED THAT THREE MORE TECHNICAL INSTITUTES WILL OPEN, ONE AT SHA TIN, ONE AT TUEN MUN AND ONE AT TSUEN WAN IN THE EARLY 1980’S,+ MR. WATERS SAID.

HE ADDED: +WHEN THE APPRENTICESHIP BILL, PREPARED BY THE LABOUR DEPARTMENT, SHORTLY COMES INTO BEING, IT IS HOPED THAT THIS WILL MAKE ITSELF FELT ON THE NUMBERS OF PART-TIME DAY-RELEASE STUDENTS IN TECHNICAL INSTITUTIONS.*

SUNDAY, JANUARY 4, 1976 — 6 •

TEMPORARY WATER CUT a a « « a #

WATER SUPPLY TO A NUMBER OF PREMISES IN THE SHOUSON HILL ROAD AREA OH HONG KONG ISLAND WILL BE INTERRUPTED FOR FIVE HOURS NEXT TUESDAY (JANUARY 6) FROM 1 A.M. TO 6 A.M.

THE PREMISES ARE BOUNDED BY MILITARY ROAD, DEEP WATER BAY ROAD, WONG CHUK HANG ROAD AND SHOUSON HILL ROAD.

TRAFFIC ARRANGEMENTS a a a a a

WITH EFFECT FROM 9 A.M. ON TUESDAY (JANUARY 6), SOUTHBOUND TRAFFIC IN KAM HONG STREET WILL NOT BE ALLOWED TO TURN RIGHT INTO JAVA ROAD FOR ABOUT TWO WEEKS BECAUSE OF RE-CONSTRUCTION OF A SECTION OF JAVA ROAD BETWEEN KAM HONG STREET AND TONG SHU I ROAD.

DURING THIS PERIOD, BUSES ON ROUTES 23 AND 23B WILL BE RE-ROUTED ALONG KAM HONG STREET AND KING’S ROAD.

APPROPRIATE TRAFFIC SIGNS WILL BE ERECTED TO GUIDE MOTORISTS.

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Monday, January 197$

CONTENTS PAGE NO,

Month-long campaign against noise pollution gets underway.... 1

A number of streets in Sham Shui Po to be re-routed in connection with M.TtRt construction .......................     3

Unofficials to raise the matter of the Education White Paper in Legco.....................................................   5

• • •

Lunar New Year stamps go on sale in two weeks ................. 6

Water cut in Hung Hom.......................................... 7

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Monday, January 5, 197$

1

Anti-Noise Pollution Campaign Launched

A month-long campaign against noise pollution was launched by the Government and the advisory Committee on Environmental Pollution (EPCOM) today (Monday).

The campaign is aimed at drawing the attention of the public to the fact that noise is a form of pollution and that a great deal of noise is avoidable•

Posters will be displayed prominently throughout Hong Kong, and a JO-second film will also be shown nightly on television during the period of the campaign.

Speaking at a press conference to launch the campaign, Mr. Henry Litton, Chairman of the Noise Pollution Sub-Committee of EPCOM, said that the purpose behind the campaign was to bring home the message that excessive noise was a form of pollution. He said in Hong Kong many people do not associate noise with pollution.

To them pollution was smoke belching out from vehicle exhausts or from factory chimneys or may be from refuse thrown out of a window, Mr. Litton said.

Excessive noise, he said, was also a type of pollution of the environment•

Mr. Litton cited some typical examples of avoidable noise pollution in the home, which included: television and radio sets and hi-fi equipment.

Because of the high population density in Hong Kong’s high-rise buildings, the sound from T.V. and radio sets is all the more concentrated and intense.

The Chairman called on the public to be a little more considerate and turn down the volume of their sets, especially at night.

/He said that •••••

Monday, January 1976

- 2 -

He said that this little gesture would go some way towards reducing noise pollution#

Touching on mahjong games, Mr. Litton called on players to use insulated tables to reduce the noise of tiles clattering on the table top.

In mentioning noise produced by the construction industry, Mr. Litton said that pile driving was banned between the hours of 8 p.m. and 6 a.m. and all day on Sundays and public holidays. Legislation was being drafted extending this ban to other items of noisy construction equipment.

The Chairman also called on motorists and motorcyclists to pay « * particular attention to their vehicles’ defective exhausts, which, he said, were another source of noise pollution. As for the motorcyclists who deliberately tamper with their exhausts, they must realise, he added, that they are acting illegally and courting punishment.

Mr. Litton pointed out that more and more summonses had been issued under Section/3 of the Summary Offences Ordinance which deals with disturbing public tranquility between the hours of 11 p.m. and 6 a.m. In 197^ over 840 people had been summonsed under this section of the Ordinance while up to November 1975» 1,555 people had been summonsed.

Mr. Litton called on the Mutual Aid Committees to help in "spreading the message" that excessive noise is a kind of pollution and that everyone can make some contribution towards reducing the problem by showing concern for their neighbours and keeping noise to a minimum.

Also present at the press conference was Mr. Hilton Cheong-leen, a member of the Noise Pollution Sub-Committee of EPCOM and Mr. Harnam Grewal, Deputy Secretary for the Environment.

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/3......

Monday, January 5, 1976

5

M.T.R. TRAFFIC RE-ROUTINGS IN SHAM SHUT PO

A number of streets in Sham Shui Po, Kowloon will be re-routed and bus routes altered from 10 a.m. on Wednesday, January 7•

A spokesman for the Transport Department said that this was the first of a series of changes in Kowloon resulting from the construction of the Mass Transit Railway.

The re-routing of traffic'and bus services will be implemented in stages which will spread over a three-month period.

The streets affected by the re-routing are:- Hai Tan Street (between Yen Chow Street and Boundary Street) which will be re-routed one-way westbound; Pei Ho Street (between Hai Tan Street and Yee Kuk Street) which will be made one-way southbound; Yee Kuk Street (between Nam Cheong Street and Boundary Street) which will be re-routed one-way eastbound, and, Boundary Street (between Nam Cheong Street and Tai Kok Tsui Road) which will become ope-way westbound.

f At the same time, there will be no right turns from Tai Kok Tsui Road into Tung Chau Street.

When these changes are implemented, Tung Chau Street and Hai Tan Street will form a quick relief route for traffic proceeding to Lai Chi Kok and Tsuen Wan.

The public light bus stands in Hai Tan Street will be re-located to the opposite side of the road as a result of the reversal of traffic in the street.

Franchised buses serving this area will also be affected. KI-iB Route Nos. 12, 30, 36B and 50 will be re-routed to operate via Tong Mi Road, Tung Chau Street, Tai Kok Tsui Road, Boundary Street, Hai Tan Street and Yen Chau Street instead of via Tong Mi Road, Lai Chi Kok Road and Yen Chow Street.

/Route No. 2E .....

Monday, January 5, 1976 - 4 -

Route No. 2E buses on their return journeys from Shek Kip Mei will be routed through Yee Kuk Street, instead of Hai Tan Street.

Bus stops serving these routes and now located in Tong Mi Road and Lai Chi Kok Road will be relocated to Tung Chau Street and Hai Tan Street.

A spokesman for the Transport Department said that adequate traffic signs would be put up to guide motorists. Notices will also be posted at all affected bus stops to advise bus passengers of the new routes.

-------0 --------

CORRECTION

Note to Editors:

In the New Year Honours List, hr. John William Tucker was awarded a MBE. In the citation, it was erroneously stated that Mr. Tucker set up the Duke of Edinburgh’s Award scneme in Hong Kong. In fact,.he started the scheme in Malaysia (not in Hong Kong) and came to Hong Kong in 1969 io ^set up the Outward Bound School.

The mistake is regretted.

It would be appreciated, if a correction could be published in your newspapers.

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/5......

Monday, January 5i 1976

- 5 -UNOFFICIiiLS TO RAISE EDUCATION rtHITE PAPER

Three Unofficials will bring up the matter of implementation of the White Paper on Secondary Education in the Legislative Council on Wednesday (January 7).

The subject will co raised in an adjournment debate by the Hon. Hilton Cheong-Leep, the Hon. Mrs. Joyce Symons and the Hon. Miss Ko Siu-wah.

Mrs. Symons will also ask during the questions session for the Government’s views on a scheme of*Government assistance proposed by the Hong Kong Private Anglo-Chinese Schools Association.

Other Unofficials will ask questions on the outcome of the HK/EEC textile talks, a possible way of reporting crime at CDO and Kaifong offices and simplification of the reporting system, staffing of the Official Receiver’s Office, and utilsation of Government school playgrounds and premises after school•

Questions will also be asked on the progress of the working party on legislation required to govern professions supplementary to medicine, on more restrictions on piling noise for the protection of both workers and residents, and on the need for review of sentences imposed on offences against the person.

There will be other questions on the scheduled removal of the Sheung Shui Tanneries, the pilot scheme to install aerators to improve water quality in Kowloon Bay, proper maintenance of the tower clock at the old KCR terminus and the maintenance of air traffic control standard.

Four new bills will be introduced into the Council. They are the Companies (Amendment) Bill 1976, the Country Parks Bill 1976, which protects the vegetation and wild life of selected country areas for the benefit of the public, the Wild Animals Protection Bill 1976, and the Apprenticeship Bill 19751 which improves apprentice training and regulates the employment of apprentices in certain trades. -------------------------------------0--------- /6......................................................................

Monday, January 5, 1976

- 6 -

LUNAR NEW YEAR STAMPS CN SALE IN TWO WEEKS *********

Two special stamps to commemorate the Year of the Dragon will be put on sale at all post offices on January 21 (Wednesday)*

The stamps, in denominations of 20 cents and 31.30, are the tenth in the series of Lunar New Year stamps.

They will be on display on the first floor lift lobby of the General Post Office in Pedder Street on January 13 and 14 from 9.30 a.m. to 4.30 p.m.

Special first day covers have been designed and will be placed on sale at 20 cents each at all post offices from Wednesday, January 7. Members of the public are advised to get them early to avoid disappointment.

Advance orders for the servicing of these first day covers will be accepted at the General Post Office in Pedder Street, the Kowloon Central Post Office in Nathan Rond and the Tsim Sha Tsui Post Office- in Salisbury Road.

The addressed first day covers must be handed in with an order form together with a remittance to cover the cost. The charge will be :?1.70 per cover — 31.50 for the stamps and 20 cents service fee.

The covers must be fully addressed and no fewer than ten will be accepted with each order.

Order forms will be available at the same three post offices at the same time as the first day covers. The latest acceptance date for advance orders of serviced covers is 5 p.m. on Friday, January 15.

/Anyone •••••

Monday, January 1976

7

Anyone ordering serviced covers addressed to a local destination will be able to collect them on January 22 from the office where the order was placed. Covers addressed overseas will be sent forward by ordinary post, surface mail, unless there are sufficient stamps to cover airmail and/or registration charges.

In addition, first day covers will be accepted at all post office counters on the issuing day, impressed with the normal post office date chop and handed back to the person presenting them.

However, no time type will appear in the postmark and the articles must bear an indication that they are ’’first day covers". T.iey must bo addressed to a destination and must not be registered or bear any other cancellation.

Special posting boxes will also be available at the General Post Office, Kowloon Central Post Office and Tsim Sha Tsui Post Office on January 21 for those who wish tc have first day covers carefully hand-postmarked before despatch.

WATER INTERRUPTION

Water supply to a number of premises in Hung Hom will be cut off from 1 a.m. to 6 a.m. on Thursday (January 8) to enable the Waterworks Office to carry out leakage tests.

The premises affected are bounded by Chatham Road, Winslow Street, Ming On Street and Bulkeley Streat.

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PRH 7

G5

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Tuesday, January 6, 1976

CONTENTS PaGE NO.

Many still unaware of new postal rates....................    1

Decision on airport coach service expected next Monday .... 1

Deadline for gold coin applications ••••••••••••............  2

New road opens on Wan Chai Reclamation.....................   2

Public reminded of need to register for identity cards •••• 3

Passing-out parade for Immigration Department recruits .... 4

Temporary water interruption in Wong Tai Sin................  4

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Tuesday, January 6, 1976

1

PUBLIC REMINDED OF NEW POSTAL RATES

The Post Office has expressed concern that thousands of aerogrammes and letters are being posted without sufficient postage following the increase in some air mail postal rates from January 1*

A Post Office spokesman today reminded the public that the cost of an aerogramme posted to any part of the world was now 60 cents while the basic air mail postal rate of letters to destinations in South-east Asia and. India (Zone 1) was 80 cents for the first half ounce.

He said that rather than surcharging all these aerogrammes and letters or sending them by sea instead of by air, the Post Office, wherever possible, returned them to the senders so that they might affix the necessary additional stamps.

•’Some short delay is unavoidable in these cases, but the Post Office believes the senders prefer this to several weeks of delay or the imposition of a charge on the addressee at the other end,” the spokesman said.

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SUPPORT FOR AIRPORT COmCH SERVICE ENCOURAGING

Transport Department officials are ’’cautiously optimistic” of the KiiB airport coach service between Kai Tak and Central District continuing.

In the first week of operation since a $2 fare and a revised route were introduced, an average of 1,348 passengers used the Route 200 service each day compared to only 640 a day previously. However, at least 1,500 passengers a day or an average of 15 a trip are needed to ensure that the service covers its operating costs.

A spokesman said that a Transport Department research team would be interviewing all passengers using the service on January 7 and 8. ”A final decision on the fate of the route would probably be made on January 12 in conjunction with senior KMB officials.”

Tuesday, January 6, 1976

2

TOMORROW IaST DAY TO SUBMIT BIDS FOR GOLD COINS

Tomorrow (January 7) will be the last day to submit applications for the gold coins to mark the Year of the Dragon, the first in a series that may be issued to depict the twelve animals traditionally representing the Lunar New Years.

Collectors who are interested in obtaining the coin, of which there will be uncirculated and proof issues, can obtain application forms at the head office or any branch of the Hong Kong and Shanghai Bank.

The Dragon Year gold coins will have a limited circulation of no more than 30,000, about 10,000 of which will be proofs.

Each application will be limited to one coin and if the issue is oversubscribed the coins will be allocated by ballot. The successful applicants will be notified individually.

The coins should be available for collection before the Year of the Dragon actually begins.

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NEW ROAD OPENS ON WAN CHAI RECLAMATION

As part of the Wan Chai reclamation scheme, the final stretch of Harbour Road has been completed and will be opened to traffic on Thursday (January 8).

This newly completed section of road, 180 feet in length, is at the western end of Harbour Road at its junction with Fleming Road.

Traffic signs have been put up in the area to guide motorists.

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/5......

Tuesday, January 6, 1976

3

REGISTER FOR I.D. C~RDS, PUBLIC URGED

The Commissioner of Registration, Mr. John Mitchell, today reminded the public of the need to register for identity cards.

Parents and guardiahs should register their children at the age of eleven for juvenile identity cards and young people reaching the age of eighteen must register for adult identity cards.

Mr. Mitchell also called on adults who had not yet possessed an id^nijity card to come forward and register themselves.

New arrivals who intend to stay in Hong Kong for more than 90 days are also reminded of their obligation to register for an identity card within 30 days of their arrival. Possession of a travel document, including a British passport, does not absolve a person from registering.

Failing to comply with the regulations of the Registration of Persons Ordinance is an offence.

Those who want to seek advice on these matters can approach the Department’s Hong Kong branch office in Causeway Bay Magistracy Building, the Kowloon branch office in Canton Road Government Offices, the San Po Kong sub-office in San Po Kong Government Offices, the Tsuen Wan branch office in the Far East Bank Building, Tsuen Wan or the Tai Po sub-office in Tai Po Market.

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A

Tuesday, January 6, 1976

- 4

PASSING-OUT' PARADE

Note to Editors:

Sixteen Assistant Immigration Officers have completed their training and will take part in a passing-out parade on Thursday (January 8) at the Royal Hong Kong Regiment parade ground.

Legislative Councillor Mr. John Bremridge will inspect the parade and address the recruit officers.

You are invited to cover the parade. It will start at 10 a.m. The Hong Kong Regiment parade ground is at Sports Road, Happy Valley.

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WATER-STOPPAGE IN WONG TAI SIN

A number of premises in Wong Tai Sin will be without water from

1 a.m. to 6 a.m. on Friday (January 9) to allow a leakage test to be carried out.

The area affected is bounded by Kong Fuk Street, Sam Chuk Street, Tsat Po Street, Sze Mei Street and Prince Edward Road including San Po Kong Factory Blocks 1-6.

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PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Wednesday, January 7i 197$

CONTENTS

PAGE NO.

Progress on implementing Education White Paper expected this year...................................................... 1

Apprentice training to be improved under new legislation •.. 5

Question of ’’excess" textile exports to the EEC settled .... 8

Legislation proposed to protect and develop country parks .. 10

Measures to reduce construction noise being studied .......... 12

Improvements on crime reporting system constantly reviewed.. 1?

Proposed scheme of assistance to private schools being considered.................................................... 15

Legislation governing professions supplementary to medicine being drafted................................................. 17

Pilot scheme to improve water quality in Kowloon Bay e envisaged .................................................... 18

C & I Deputy Director appointed to Geneva post...............  19

Sheung Shui tanneries must move by end of July................ 20

Bills passed ................................................. 21

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Wednesday, January 7» 1976

1

ADJOURNMENT DEBATE ON EDUCATION ’/HITE PAPER

Government planners involved in the White Paper on Secondary, Education have made a thorough analysis of the situation and ’’now can see pretty clearly what can be done and what cannot,” the Director of Education, the Hon. Kenneth Topley, told the Legislative Council today.

”1 am confident that this year I shall be able to make some progress • t

in implementing the 'White Paper,” he said. .

He said however that this was the most he should and could go and he could not anticipate the budget proposals.

Mr. Topley was replying in an adjournment debate to three Unofficials —. the Hon. Hilton Cneong-Leen, the Hon. Mrs. Joyce Symons and the Hon. Miss Ko Siu-wah .— who had urged the Government to implement the White Paper in the coming financial year.

He said: ”The Education Department and the Finance and Social Services Branches of the Secretariat have been locked not in battle but in deep discussion of how we can meet the deep-felt wish of members, indeed of the whole community, for decisive action in the realm of secondary education”.

He said that children leaving primary school without completing it were the ”true drop-outs,” as distinguished from those who had no secondary education because no secondary places were available.

”They leave school of their own volition in many cases because they don’t like it and are therefore ill-prepared for life, vulnerable to b^.d influences and in some cases turn to crime.

”1 am establishing a departmental Working Party to look at the age structure of our primary school population to find out why children enter school late in some instances and leave school without completing the course' In others.

/”I am also .....

Wednesday, January 7» 1976

2

”1 am also placing increasing stress upon ’activity* approach in primary schools with a view to creating better conditions for learning,” he said.

He hoped that when he could abolish the Secondary School Entrance Examination, the atmosphere of primary schools, with a broader curriculum in primary five and six, would further improve.

As for the 12 to 14 year olds not at school, Mr. Topley said there appeared to be general agreement, aid it was the conclusion of the Interdepartmental Committee on Services for Youth, that the main and vital thing to be done for them was to get .them into school.

He gave an assurance that the Committee would be commissioning further activities and studies.

Mr. Cheong-Leen had in his speech said one of the prime reasons for the serious state of violent crime was the build-up over the past years of a hard-core number of primary school drop-outs and 12-14 year olds who could not continue school or find work lawfully.

He noted that surveys had been completed on primary school drop-outs and the 12-14 year youngsters not in school in Wong Tai Sin and Chai Wan. ”1 suggest that steps be taken urgently to initiate similar surveys in all the other districts, he said.

He urged that' plans be formulated to pinpoint and to reduce the number of primary school drop-outs to the absolute minimum.

’’The out-reach programme has to be expanded quickly together with other suitable programmes to take care of the hard-core elements in the 12-14 age group, before they are led astray into a life of chronic and hardened crime,” he added.

/faong Kong’s •••••

Wednesday, January 7» 1976

- 3 -

Hong Kong’s greatest asset was its people, and the quality of that asset was in their educational, intellectual, technological and moral standard, Mr. Cheong-Leen said.

He asked how this standard could be improved if every year more than 30,000 children were dbill either primary school drop-outs or could net find places in a secondary school.

Mrs. Symons asked that the 1976 target of the White Paper be reached at the very least by one or other or all of the methods of expansion suggested.

’’The time has come for action,” she said, ’’and there will be little good-will shown to Government in general and the Education Department in particular if the implementation of the White Paper is not firmly begun this September.”

The methods suggested by the White Paper were: building of new schools, the use of converted primary schools or other under-utilised government buildings, extended day and flotation and judicious buying of places.

Mrs. Symons said the Education Department by now would have the correct figures and costings of the target number of public sector places in forms I to III in September 1976, provisionally given as 136,961 in the White Paper.

”1 conclude my appeal confident that given the necessary funds the Education Department will see that the target is reached, if not surpassed this coming September,” she said.

Miss Ko Siu-wah was concerned about possible criminal influence on the young school drop-outs.

According to the recent report on ’’Social Causes of Violent Crimes Among Young Offenders in Hong Kong”, offenders were more often found among youngsters who did not attend school, she said.

/’’Being poorly .....

Wednesday, January 7» 1976

- 4 -

,fBeing poorly equipped with knowledge and skill, some are likely to take up early employment, receiving low economic reward and tending to drift from job to job. Some will remain idle.

"Under such circumstances, they are more likely to encounter the triad elements, who some would view as daring and exciting, and thus become delinquents," she said.

She urged that before nine-year education could be provided for all children, more organisations 'run evening schools for children of the 12-14 age group and provide more opportunities for pre-vocational training.

She also urged that the Youth Guidance Projects with an out-reaching approach be expanded as soon as possible in different districts.

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/5.....

Wednesday, January 7, 1976

5

APPRENTICESHIP BILL INTRODUCED INTO LEGCO *»***«*»« .

A bill to improve existing and future apprentice training in certain trades was introduced in the Legislative Council by the Commissioner for Labour, the Hon. Ian Price, today.

Moving the second reading of the Apprenticeship Bill 1975, he said: “I regard this Bill'-as an.important beginning op which to build much good for industry and for the young who acquire, their skills in industry.” . • . •• ?.

Mr. Price said an apprenticeship was a form of systematic training for three or four years whereby a youth acquired the skills* and knowledge needed for his trade. J

“The practical element of such training takes place under supervision within ’the employer’s undertaking; and the related technical education is normally provided by a part-time day-release course run in a technical education institution.

“Experience elsewhere has shown that an apprenticeship along these lines provides the best and most economical method of training skilled manpower because apprentices are exposed to the pressures of industrial conditions, and are usefully and productively employed,’* ho said.

The essence of the Bill is that an employer may engage a young person in a designated trade only if he has entered into a contract of apprenticeship, or he has already completed an apprenticeship in that trade and holds a certificate.

“A valid contract of apprenticeship is both the principal element of the legal framework of the Bill and the lynchpin of proper apprentice training,” the Commissioner said.

/The original .

Wednesday, January 7, 197$

6

The original intention was to limit the Bill to craft trades only. However, Mr. Price said the various bodies associated with industrial training had consistently advised that technicians, as well as craftsmen, were best trained.through apprenticeship! and voluntary training schemes for technician apprentices have made considerable progress. ’•Therefore, it is both realistic^ and consistent with the needs of industry, to make provision within the Bill for the eventual inclusion of technician apprentices,11 he said.

The Bill would initially apply to young people aged between 14 and 16 employed in designated craft trades and to their employers.

He stressed that this was just the first step towards the long term objective of bringing within the scope of this legislation apprentice training in all designated trades for all people under 21 employed in these trades.

Under the Bill, an employer is required to provide adequate training, and to make returns and reports, while an apprentice must attend a related technical course in addition to his practical training.

/If the Bill .....

Wednesday, January 7, 1976

7

If the Bill was passed into law, Mr. Price said he would introduce regulations to provide for detailed terms and conditions to be included in an apprenticeship contract.

He told the Council that he would consult the Hong Kong Training Council before tendering advice to the Governor in respect of raising the upper age limit in the definition of a "young person", or specifying a trade or occupation as a designated trade.

The Commissioner went on to say that the Training Council at its meeting on January 13 would decide which trades to recommend in the first instance for designation by the Governor.

This first batch of trades would be selected on the basis of the degree of skills involved, their numbers and importance to industry, and with regard to the availability of related technical education facilities.

He assured the Council that ample notice would be given before a / • « trade was designated, and that the law would be enforced with discretion in the early stages.

Officers of the Labour Department’s Industrial Training Division, he added, would assist to the greatest possible extent any employer who needed help in understanding or carrying out the requirements of the Bill.

On the need for this proposed legislation, Mr. Price pointed out that about 2,500 craft apprentices and 500 technician apprentices were now undergoing adequate training in voluntarily registered schemes.

But according to the latest manpower surveys, about 15,000 apprentices or trainees at the craft level and 2,000 at the technician level were under some form of training. "These figures clearly show that many apprentices • • or trainees are not receiving proper training."

- - 0--------

/8......

Wednesday, January 7, 1976

8

QUESTION OF HONG KONG'S "EXCESS" TEXTILE EXPORTS TO EEC SETTLED

The Director of Commerce and Industry, the Hon. David Jordan, confirmed today that the question of Hong Kong’s ’’excess” textile exports to the European Economic Community had now been settled.

The last in a series of talks on this issue took place in the middle of last month.

These consultations, Mr. Jordan explained to Legislative Council today, had been sought by the EEC to eettle difficulties arising from exports that exceeded the notional limits for 1975 set out in the agreement between Hong Kong and the Community.

He described these limits as notional because they clearly could not be applied in all cases.

Hong Kong and the EEC did not reach agreement until July 18, over half-way through the year.

In some cases, where the trade had up to then been under no restriction at all, exports had already reached or nearly reached the so-called ’’limits”.

”It was clearly out of the question to reduce exports to nil or to a mere trickle until" December 31 • This would have been contrary to the basic purposes of the agreement and indeed of the international arrangement under which we negotiated”, Mr. Jordan pointed out.

.-.''I.; . M ,

”So some ’excesses over these notional limits were inevitable from the start. The question was what - if anything - should be done about them,” he said.

Mr. Jordan continued: ”We finally agreed on a number of different ways of dealing with them: in some cases the so-called ’excesses’ were not

/very large •••••

Wednesday, January 7» 1976

9

very large and we agreed to write them off; in others we used the flexibilty provisions in the agreement itself to reduce them to nil; in others we transferred unused quota from one member state to another; in some we transferred quota from one category to another; and finally in a limited number of cases, where the so-called "excesses" were very considerable, where in other words we had in 1975 exported a lot more than the 1975 notional limit, we agreed to deduct a proportion of the excesses from the 1976 quotas.

"In conducting these consultations my pri nc.i pal concern was to preserve for Hong Kong at least as much a quota for 1976 as we had for 1975. This would also ensure that we had enough quota in 1976 to be able to make a full allocation to every quota-holder who qualifies by exporting at least 95% per cent of his quota in 1975i that is to say that in 1976 he will get no less than his quota for the five-and-a-half months from July 18, 1975 grossed up for a twelve-month period.

"In only one case, that of knit shirts exported to Denmark, is there a possibility (depending on the final export figures) that we may not be able fully to meet this requirement, but if this happens we shall be able to compensate the quota-holders concerned by offering them quota in the same category for another Member State or in another category for Denmark.

"The outcome of consultations like these can never be entirely satisfactory for both sides but in this sase I believe it represents a reasonable compromise between positions that were originally very far apart, and at least it provides stability and certainty for 1976".

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/10......

Wednesday, January 7> 1976

10

NEW LEGISLATION TO PROTECT COUNTRYSIDE

*******

The Country Parks Bill will give comprehensive protection to the countryside and develop it for open air recreation, the Secretary for the Environment, the Hon. James Robson, said in the Legislative Council today.

In moving the second reading of the bill, he said the legislation seeks to create a special authority with the powers to control and protect the countryside and the responsibility to develop for informal recreation those areas under its control and protection.

Under the bill, the Director of Agriculture and Fisheries, who is already responsible for the development of country parks and recreational facilities in the countryside, will be the Country Parks Authority.

He will be assisted by a Country Parks Board of not fewer than ten members, of whom at least five will be public officers.

"The Board is intended to be a high powered one so as to give the Authority the full support of both the community and the Government," Mr. Robson said.

The powers given to the Authority were comprehensive, he said.

Once the draft map prepared by the Authority showing proposed country parks is gazetted, new development within the area without the prior approval of the Authority would be prohibited.

Objections to the draft map would be heard by the Country Parks

Board and the area shown in the map, amended where necessary, would be ; • -t

designated as a country park on qjproval by the Governor in Council.

Mr. Robson said that a considerable area would be designated, much of which would be in the New Territories and much within Waterworks catchment areas.

/"In view of .....

Wednesday, January 7, 1976

11

"In view of our land shortage and the many uses to which land is put in Hong Kong, it is very necessary to protect the interests of those whose land will lie within the boundaries of any country park or special area designated under the Bill,” he said.

The control of land in these areas would remain with the appropriate Land Authority. However, the Country Park Authority may request the relevant Land Authority to require the occupier of any leased land to stop or modify any use of his land which is incompatible with the purpose of the country park.

The Governor will also be empowered to exclude from any country park any village areas, traditional burial grounds, temples, buildings of histone value, and any area leased for purposes of recreation and tourism.

"The Secretary for the New Territories is now drawing up a plan which will delineate these areas and I think it can be accepted that he will protect the legitimate interests of New Territories villagers should any conflict arise between them and the Country Parks Authority,” Mr. Robson said.

Under the Bill, landowners would have a right to claim compensation if:

the Authority refuses to approve new development permitted by the lease conditions under which the land is held; or

• the occupier is required by the Land Authority to stop or modify an otherwise legitimate use of any land.

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/12......

Wednesday, January 7, 1976

12

PROPOSALS aGAINST NOISE POLLUTION UNDER STUDY

********

Proposed measures to reduce noise nuisance created by construction works are being examined by various branches and departments of government.

The Director of Public Works, the Hon. David McDonald, said this in his reply in the Legislative Council today to the Hon. Alex Wu’s question on noise pollution arising from piling works.

He said that one of these proposed measures, put forward by the Noise Pollution Sub-Committee of EPCOM, was to extend the present ten hour ban on piling works to cover the period between 7 p.m. and 7 a.m.

However,- Mr. McDonald emphasised that though further reduction of noise pollution was highly desirable, "consideration must be given to the overall effects of restricting working hours".

In the case of extending the ban on piling works, he said it was thought that this would not have a serious effect on programming or costs .in the construction industry.

Mr. Wu also asked whether the Government would make it cnmpi.il spry for employers of piling workers to provide such workers with protective hearing equipment while operating pile-drivers.

In reply, the Commissioner for Labour, the Hon. Ian Price, said the Government would certainly consider what practical steps should be taken to protect workers’ hearing.

"However, at this stage I prefer to keep open the options as to whether such protection should be by the method suggested in the question and whether or not it should be limited only to workers employed on pile drivers," Mr. Price added.

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/13

Wednesday, January 7, 1976

- 13

CREME REPORTING SYSTEM UNDER CONST. J T RSVIEh

*********

The Commissioner of Police will continue to keep under review the system of reporting and recording crime with a view to reducing to tho minimum the tine spent by members of the public in making reports.

The Secretary for Security, the Hon. Lewis Davies, said this in the Legislative Council today in reply to the Hon. Hilton Cheong-leen’s question on the simplification of the crime reporting system.

Mr. Davies said that the system had been simplified and improved in a number of ways since 1973•

The improvements include provision of separate facilities in most urban police stations for members of the public making reports, a streamlining of actual reporting and recording procedures and an increase in the number of places whore a report can be made.

As for simplification of procedures, Mr. Davies said that in the case of a minor crime, basic essential details were recorded directly ento a proforma, and into the investigator’s notebook, thereby eliminating the lengthy process of taking statements verbatim. However, the taking of statement was still required in cases of a mere serious nature, he added.

Mr. Davids said: "Though tho system f reporting and recording crime is under continual review, there is a limit to the extent tc which the system can bo further simplified.”

”The primary purpose of reporting crime is to enable tho criminal tbe identified and brought to court,” he said. ’’Consequently it is essential that the Police obtain all the relevant facts tb enable a successful prosecution to t-'.ko place.”

He said th it tc achieve this goal, ”a degree of inconvenience to the public is inevitable”.

/Mr. D vies •••••

Wednesday, January 7, 1976

14

Hr. Davies th ught th it the emphasis should bo on greater co-operation between the Police And combers of the public.

Ho said that the Police had tried to get this message across through a campaign, the Police Call, the Junior Police Call, the V< ice of Junior Police Call, various Radio Hong Kong programmes, Press releases and a Press conference.

Hr. Hilton Cheong-Leon also suggested making available at CDG’s, Kaifong offices and other suitable places a simple report f rm fcr use by members of the public who were not prepared to use the normal channels to report crime.

In reply, Mr. Davies said: "A system such as my Honourable colleague proposes would detract from the present satisfactory trend <. f increased reporting cf crime tc the Police by members of the public." Ho said that by providing the simple report farms, "it would probably produce more reports, but I believe it would also produce more paper and perhaps confusion."

"Certainly their reliability and content would be -f a much lower standard than those made direct tc a police officer sc their use for investigative and statistical purposes would be lessened," ho added.

It might also give a wrong impression that it was sufficient to fill in a form in reporting crime.

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/15.......

Wednesday, January 7, 1976

15

GOVERNMENT AID TO PRIVATE SCHOOLS: SCHEME BEING STUDIED

44441*$

The Director of Education, the Hon. Kenneth Topley, told the Legislative Council today that the proposed scheme of government assistance submitted by the Hong Kong Private Anglo-Chinese Schools Association was being examined in the context of two considerations.

"First, Government must be satisfied that any scheme of assistance to independent private schools that may be agreed upon does not constitute subsidising profits.

"Second, it would not be appropriate, in my view, to consider the proposals in isolation from the Departments plans to expand secondary education and to implement the 197^ White Paper," Mr. Topley said.

However, he assured the Hon. Mrs. Joyce Symons who asked about the proposdd scheme that the Education Department had always recognised the contribution of private schools in the provision of education in Hong Kong. "For this reason, its policy has always been to try to help private schools whenever possible," he said.

Financial assistance to independent private schools at present is , • .* * generally limited to fee assistance for pupils occupying bought plh'cesdh • these schools.

The proposed scheme, the Director said, concerned an extension of government assistance "over and above the present arrangements."

In reply to the Hon. Miss KO Siu-wah’s question on the better use of government school playgrounds and premises after school or in the evenings for recreational activities, Mr. Topley said that the Sports and Recreation Unit of the Education Department was investigating ways of expanding the present evening and weekend use of all school premises for recreation and sports programmes.

/A pilot •••••

Wednesday, January 7, 1976

16

A pilot scheme, involving the use of school premises as district games centres on Saturday afternoons, was being conducted in four districts, he said.

At present, government schools are used to a near maximum.

For fresh venues for welfare and educational activities out of school hours, it would be necessary generally to look to the aided schools, Mr. Topley said.

"If there is an unsatisfied demand from voluntary welfare agencies for the use of premises, then requirements should be worked out carefully, co-ordinated through the Hong Kong Council for Social Service, and put to me,” he said.

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/17......

Wednesday, January 7? 1976

17

LEGISLATION GOVERNING PROFESSIONS IN MEDIC/iL FIELD

»««***•*

Two working drafts of proposed legislation to govern the professions supplementary to medicine have already been prepared and considered, the Director for Medical and Health Services, Dr. the Hon. Gerald Choa, said this afternoon.

He was replying to a question raised in the Legislative Council by Dr. the Hon. Harry Fang as to what progress had been made by a working party set up some two years ago to consider such legislation.

Dr. Choa said, ”the working party had concluded that such legislation was both ’’feasible and desirable”. Referring to the two working drafts, he said, ’’some amendments still require to be made.”

He said that once the Ordinance had been enacted, it would be necessary for regulations to be prepared to deal with each of the seven professions concerned.

He pointed out that a first rough draft had, in fact, been prepared of regulations dealing with medical laboratory technicians and this would be considered as soon as the Ordinance had been finalised.

”It is hoped that this set of regulations, when in complete form, ’’ill provide a pattern on which the regulations for the other professions can be based,” he said.

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/18.......

Wednesday, January 7, 1976

18

PILOT SCHEhE TO INSTjxLL AIR DIFFUSERS IN KOWLOON BnY

********

2m application has been made to include in the Public Works Programme a pilot study of air diffusers in Kowloon Bay in an attempt to improve the water quality there.

In reply to a question by the Hon. Roger Lobo in the Legislative Council today, the Hon. James Robson, Secretary for the Environment, said: ”It is hoped that this will be implemented during the 1976/77 financial • . ■ • • • * year."

The pilot scheme would involve the installation of 20 air diffusers at a cost of about to3>00,000, Mr. Robson said. It was endorsed by the Advisory Committee on Environmental Pollution.

a technical report produced by the Public Works Department last June stated that air diffusers fixed to the sea bottom would be the most suitable method of improving water quality. These diffusers would bubble air through the polluted water to increase levels of dissolved oxygen, thus improving water quality and eliminating smells.

Preliminary investigations indicated that about 420 air diffusers would probably be needed at a capital cost of million, and an annual 1 y recurrent costs of *>800,000.

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/19......

Wednesday, January 7, 1976

19

MILLS APPOINTED TO GENEVA POST

*»««**»* , c

The Director of Commerce and Industry, Mr. David Jordan, announced today the appointment of Mr. Lawrence Mills as an alternate member of the Textile Surveillance Body (TSB) which is based in Geneva.

The TSB is set up to oversee the workings of the Arrangement covering international trade in ■textiles. Membership for this year consists of representatives from the United States, the European Economic Community, Japan, Korea, Egypt, Finland and Mexico. The eighth seat will be shared by Austria, Jamaica and Singapore.

’’The composition of the Body also allows for ’alternate’ representatives and we have been invited by the Government of the Republic of Korea for a nomination to serve as their alternate”, Mr. Jordan explained. Mr. Mills has been Hong Kong’s chief textile negotiator for the past two years. He will replace Mr. Bill Dorward who was nominated as a member in the TSB, for 1975.

Mr. Mills is already in Geneva to take up his new post. In Hong Kong, Mr. Peter Tsao has been appointed Deputy Director of Commerce and Industry (Commercial Relations) in place of Mr. Mills, in which capacity Mr. Tsao will become Hong Kong’s chief trade negotiator. Mr. Dorward will return to Hong Kong to take up the post of Deputy Director of Commerce and Industry (Industry and Administration) in March.

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/20 .....

I .

• J

Wednesday, January 7i 1976

20

' t NO REPRIEVE FOK SHEUNG SHUI TANNERIES

***♦*-**♦

The Government has no intention of granting any further relief to the Sheung Shui tannery owners and will clear the land by July 31 this year.

This was stated by the Secretary for the New Territories, the Hon. David Akers-Jones, in the Legislative Council meeting this afternoon.

In a reply to the Hon. Roger Lobo, Mr. Akers-Jones pointed out that the owners of tanneries at Sheung Shui had been given every assistance and encouragement to develop their new sites at Kwai Chung.

He noted that nearly four years had elapsed since the owners were warned that they would have to move to Kwai Chung or shut down.

"Building plans have been approved but no one has started to build and it is clear that the tannery owners have made no serious effort to move," he told the Council.

He said: ,rWe can no longer tolerate the appalling pollution of Sheung Shui caused by the tanneries."

Mr. Akers-Jones Recalled that the sites at Kwqi Chung were granted to the tannery owners in 1973 when the land then was valued at tf20 to #40 per square foot depending on the date of the land exnhange entitlements being surrendered.

Furthermore, he said, the owners were given the benefit of paying this in 20 annual instalments at five per cent interest.

"Even when one takes the cost of the acquiring land exchange rights into consideration, no one would, I think, disagree if I said that these terms were far from onerous and, in fact, payment of premium instalments is up-to-date," he said.

He said that during the past two years since the grants were executed, none of the owners had started to construct any new factory buildings.

"It is most unlikely that any suitable premises will be completed and ready for the tanneries to move into before July 31, 1976," he added.

Wednesday, January 7, 1976

- 21 -

BILLS PASSED

*****

Three Bills, including the Deposit-taking Companies Bill 1975, passed through their committee stage and third reading in the Legislative Council today.

The other two were the Bankruptcy (Amendment) Bill 197$ and the Pensions (Amendment) Bill 1976.

Four new Bills were introduced into the Council. They were the Companies (Amendment) Bill 1976, the Country Parks Bill 1976, the Wild Animals Protection Bill 1976, and the Apprenticeship Bill 1975-

Debate on then was adjourned.

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PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Thursday, January 8, 1976

CONTENTS PaGE NO.

PWD’s progress towards metrication to be shown at exhibition ...... 1

First joint NT athletic meet to be held this Sunday................ 3

Minor amendments made to Education Gode of Practice ............... 4

Land auction in NT fetched $32 million last year ................... 6

Public warned of bogus Labour Department officers .................. 7

Taxpayers advised to heed due date ................................. 8

130 to participate in seminar on evaluation of welfare services . • 9

Fire Services Department issues fire danger warning ............... 11

Traffic in Sai Yeung Choi Street to be re-routed................... 12

PViD to hold 8th Sports Day......................................   13

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

o

Thursday, January 8, 1976

1

P.W.D. TAKES PART IN METRICATION EXHIBITION

*««**»** % . .

. Visitors to Hong Kong’s first metrication exhibition which opens

at the Hong Kong Polytechnic tomorrow (Friday) will be given a deeper insight into the metrication system and the application of metric units in every day use•

The Public Works Department, which has been in the forefront of the gradual changeover to the metric system in Hong Kong, is taking part in the exhibition and will demonstrate the metrication progress in the various areas of P.W.D. activities.

The four-day exhibition, jointly organised by the Hong Kong Polytechnic and the Federation of Hong Kong Industries, will be held at the Keswick Hall of the Polytechnic,.Hung Hom, and will be open daily to the public between 11 a«m. and 7 p.m. from January 9 to 11.

The P.W.D. stand will feature a range of graphic material, including ’’think metric” posters, photographs of P.W.D. projects, building plans and maps designed and planned — and in some cases already completed — in metric units.

Also on display will be a variety of metric measuring equipment and tools such as metric conversion slides, levelling staffs, survey tapes, scale rules, rods, tide gauges, stream gauges and micrometers.

A feature of the display will be electromagnetic measuring equipment which is being used by the department’s Crown Lands and Survey Office in measuring metric distances.

Copies of metric publications produced by P.W.D. will also be available for sale at the stand.

Mr. Jim McGuinniety, P.W.D. Metrication Officer, noted today that since 1971 the Public Works Department had been actively engaged in planning and implementing the changeover to the metric system for all disciplines within P.W.D.

/’’The changeover.....

Thursday, January 8, 1976

2

"The changeover has now almost effectively been completed," he said* "A finalisation programme graph indicating the progress of P.W.D.

in the metric changeover will also be on display," he added.~ "It will indicate in graphic form the extent of the completeness of the changeover." Mr. McGuinniety pointed out that from June 197^, all new design projects in the architectural and engineering disciplines had been produced in metric terms, and the calling of tenders had progressively moved in favour of metric contracts rather than imperial contracts.

Metric scales had also been adopted in the preparation of maps, he said, and maps in metric scales and contours were now available. Samples of metric scale maps would be displayed at the exhibition.

He also noted that from June this year, the sale of Crown Land would . J , f .

be exclusively conducted in metric terms. • ■ • • Last December, he continued, the Buildings Ordinance Office issued

Practice Notes and a Schedule of Metric Equivalents which would enable Authorised Persons to seek approval of plans and documents prepared on the prescribed metric system.

"The optional submission of documents in metric form became effective on January 1 this year and authorised persons now have the option of amaking submissions for approval in either imperial or metric terms," he said.

"Further P.W.D. programme regarding the private sector anticipated the compulsory submission of documents solely in metric terms and is intended to become effective as from January 1, 1977• " 9

Mr. McGuinniety praised the Hong Kong Polytechnic and Hong Kcng Federation of Industries in staging the exhibition and said that it would help industry to realise the extent to which metrication had already taken place in Hong.Kong.

/"It will also ••

Thursday, January 8, 1976

- 3 -

”It will also convey to the public at large the inevitability, universality and simplicity of the system and help allay fears due to lack of understanding.

’’Once one had had a practical encounter with metrication,u he added, ’’the apparent difficulties disappear and the inadequacy of the imperial system becomes evident.”

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NEW TERRITORIES ATHLETIC MEET

******

Note to Editors:

The first New Territories athletic meet, jointly organised by the Heung Yee Kuk, the Recreation and Sport Service of the Education Department and the New Territories Schools Sports Association, will be held at Mongkok Stadium, Boundary Street, Kowloon, beginning at 9 a.m. on Sunday (January 11).

The prize-giving, at which the Secretary for uhe New Territories, Mr. David Akers-Jones, will make a short speech, will take place at 4 p.m.

Prizes will be presented by Mr. Cheung Yan-lung and Mr. Lan Shu-chun, Vice-chairmen of the Heung Yee Kuk, and Mr. Deacon Chiu, President of the New Territories General Chamber of Commerce.

Mr. Michael Caswell, Principal Education Officer of the Education Department, will present attendance certificates to trainees of the district atheletic coaching courses.

You are cordially invited to send members of your staff to cover both the athe-letic meet and the prize—giving ceremony.

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A......

Thursday, January 8, 1976

- 4 -

MINOR AMENDMENTS MADE ‘TO EDUCATION DEPARTMENTS CODE OF PRACTICE ********

Minor amendments to the Code of Practice issued exactly a year ago by the Director of Education, Mr. Kenneth Topley, come into force today.

The amendments are of terminology in a few paragraphs dealing with general principles, textbooks, exercise books and other items. These amendments have been made to ensure that the Code is effective and not misinterpreted or misunderstood. The Code, which aims at eradicating malpractices, lays down procedures for the sale of such items, including school uniforms and other school accessories.

In a circular to the heads of all schools, Mr. Topley said: "It has been gratifying that school authorities have acted so responsibly in following the Code during the first year of its existence.

"However, my Action Committee on School Textbooks and Supplies has monitored throughout 1975 the working of the.^ode in order to assess its effectiveness and to consider any need for its amendment."

Following consultations with 12 major school councils and associations it was decided.to make the minor amendments.

Mr. Topley again asked the heads of schools to ensure that the provisions of the Code were implemented. .

He stressed that in all matters concerning the sale of textbooks, exercise books, equipment, uniform and school accessories, the procedures laid down by the Code must be observed in full to avoid any cause of complaint.

/The Chairman .....

Thursday। January 8, 1976

5

The Chairman of the Education Department’s Action Committee on School Textbooks and Supplies, Mr. Colvyn Haye, wrote to the school councils and associations to thank them for their views and their cooperation.

Mr. Haye said that the Department, through its Action Committee, would continue to oversee the operation of the ^ode.

He added: "I shall be happy to receive from your. Council/Association throughout 1976 any suggestions for the code’s even more effective working”.

Since the Action Committee was set up in December 1974, it has received 308 complaints against 222 schools. Of these, 148 were substantiated and resolved; in 139 cases the allegations were unsubstantiated and in 21 cases investigations were continuing.

None of the complaints involved any Government Schools. Forty-seven of the complaints were made against aided primary schools, ten against aided secondaries, 88 against vocational schools.

During the last seven months, 102 complaints were received compared with 206 in the first five months. The actual number of schools involved dropped to 62 from 160 while the number of substantiated cases fell to 47 from 101 and the number of unsubstantiated cases also decreased to 63 from 76.

"These figures indicated that the Code has been successful and is : working for most schools, parents and pupils.

"In every case investigated and found to have substance, immediate action was taken to eradicate the irregularities and schools have been most anxious to comply," Mr. Haye said.

/He said .....

Thursday, January 8, 1976

6

He said that the complaints against 222 schools in the past year should be seen in relation to more than 2,600 schools in operation.

The Action Committee works in close liaison with the Consumer Council. Members of the public who have any complaints on textbooks or school supplies are once again advised to lodge them with the Action Committee (Tel. 5-778311 Ext. 254) or write to the Chairman, Action Committee, Education Department, Lee Gardens, 3rd floor, Hysan Avenue, Causeway Bay, Hong Kong with full details.

Note to Editors: Copies of the School Circular together with the revised Code of Practice are distributed separately in the G.I.S. press boxes this evening.

-------0---------

N.T.LAND AUCTIONS NET $32M LAST YEAR

The Government last year netted $32,130,000 from land auctions in the New Territories.

A New Territories Administration spokesman said the plots, 15 in all, ranged in area from 8,700 to 200,300 square feet.

Prices paid per square foot varied from $399 for a 16,920 sq. ft.

site in Kwai Chung Road to $12.28 for a 75,700 sq. ft. site at Silverstrand, Clearwater Bay. The average price per square foot was $58.53*

Only one lot had to be withdrawn from auction because of lack of bidders - a 21,530 sq. ft. site at the 17 milestone, Castle Peak Road.

The total area of land auctioned in the New Territories during 1975 was 548,920 sq. ft.

The largest amount of money - $6,750,000 - was realised from auctioning the Kwai Chung Road site in August.

-------0--------- /7....................

Thursday, January S, 1976

7

BEWARE OK BOGUS LABOUR DEPARTMENT OFFICIALS

********

The Labour Department today warned factory proprietors to be on guard agiiinst bogus Labour Department officials.

Mrs. SOO MOK Sau-ha, Assistant Commissioner for Labour, said complaints were often received from proprietors who had been approached by people claiming to be Labour Department officers for money for advertisements in purported departmental publications.

She stressed that no publication of the department carried advertisements.

’’All services provided by the Labour Department are free, and from time to time, the department published pamphlets on labour legislation, in English and Chinese, which are also available free to the public.”

She reminded factory proprietors that all Labour Department officers carried with them government identity cards and warrants which showed the photograph an’ name of the holders.

Members of the factory and labour inspectorates are under instruction to identify themselves by producing their warrants when visiting factories,” she added,

Mrs. Soo advised proprietors that they should ascertain the idendity of the visiting officer, and if in doubt, should immediately report to the Police.

.... - 0------

/8

Thurscl-.y, January 8, 1"

8

QUICKER ACTION NOW. LIKELY! ON OVERDUE TAXES

**»»****»

The Inland Revenue Department today (Thursday) advised people to pay their taxes on time because followup action on overdue tax was likely to take place far s oner now than in the past.

A spokesman for the deportment said this was the result of the partial computerisation of the department’s Collection Section*

1'Taxpayers who d not pay their tax on or before the due date should expect the imposition of a surcharge for late payment almost immediately afterwards with recovery action taking place shortly after that,11 he said.

The spokesman also stressed that deferment of payment of tax would only be considered in the most exception?!! cases of hardship so t requests for deferment would invariably be rejected.

He pointed out that the two instalment system of payment introduced this year for the first time represented, in itself, a a substantial concession compared with previous years.

Also, in order to avoid the inconvenience of queueing up at collection offices, he advised people to pay their tax by post addres./c to the Commissioner of Inland Revenue, Central Mail Office, Club Lusitanc Building, ground floor, Hong Kong.

He said there would be no surcharge if the payments were received late so lang as the envelope was postmarked not later than the date on which the tax was due as shown in the demand note.

Thursday, January 8, 1976

9

SEMINAB ON EVALUATION OF WELFARE SERVICES

********

About 150 directors or executive secretaries of voluntary welfare agencies and officers of the Social Welfare Department will attend a half-day seminar on Saturday (January 10) on evaluation of welfare services.

The seminar arranged by the Social 'Welfare Advisory Committee, is to review the effectiveness of the initial evaluation exercise which was carried out last year covering five voluntary welfare agencies and one Social Welfare Department institution. Proposals for t e conduct of future evaluation studies will be formulated.

The pilot evaluation exercise, which concentrated largely on management, organisation, staffing, salaries and the quality of services provided, was aimed at establishing clearcut guidelines in general welfare undertakings.

It was jointly undertaken by the Hong Kong Council of Social Service and the Social Welfare department, under the auspices of the Social Welfare Advisory Committee Sub—Committee on Evaluation, of which Miss Siu—wah is » i f J the Chairman.

Mr. Thomas Lee, Director of Sowial Welfare and Chairman of the Social Welfare Advisory Committee, will chair the seminar. In his opening address, Mr. Lee will speak on the possible roles of evaluation.

The seminar will be divided into nine discussion groups, six to be conducted in Cantonese and three in English. All participants will have an opportunity to express their views on evaluation.

/The group .....

Thursday, January 8, 1976

10

The group leaders will later make a report to the Chairman, who will then prepare an overall report on the seminar for issue to all participants.

Attending the seminar will be representatives of the 8j voluntary welfare agencies that receive Government subvention; lecturers from the Social Work Department of the two Universities; representatives of the Hong Kong Council of Social Service and the Social Welfare Department; members of the Evaluation Sub-Committee; and a number of people receiving welfare services.

»*««*** z

Note to Editors:

You are cordially invited to. cover the seminar to be held on Saturday (January 10) at 9.30 a.m. at the Lady Trench Training Centre, 44 Oi Kwan Road, Wan Chai, Hong Kong.

-------0--------- •

r

/11 .....

Thursday, January 8, 1976

11

PUBLIC URGED TO HEED FIRE PRECAUTION WARNINGS ♦ * ♦ * * * ♦ ♦

The Fire Services Department today urged members of the public to be more careful with fires; especially in the countryside.

A spokesman for the department said that because of the prolonged spell of very dry weather, the average daily number of fires for the first seven days of this montn totalled 44, compared with 21 for the same period last month.

'’During tnis period,” he added, ’’there were J06 fires of which 183 were hill fires. It is most disappointing to see that such a large percentage of fires occurred in the countryside in spite of repeated warnings to the public to be careful.”

The spokesman attributed the increase largely to carelessness and failure to take precautions in view of the fire danger brought about by the present dry spell. Burning of weeds or other waste materials by villagers on open ground was another main cause of hill fires.

”If all available firemen and engines are deployed to fight hill fires which normally take hours to put out, there might not be enough people to call on should fires occur at the same time in multi-storey buildings,” he said.

He urged smokers to be particularly careful when discarding cigarette ends and matches and appealed to visitors to the rural areas this weekend to do all they could to prevent causing fires.

/The spokesman .....

Thursday, January 8, 1976

12

The spokesman also pointed out that it was an offence to light or use a fire in or near a forest, plantation, prohibited area, or open countryside.

’’Fire prevention in the countryside is the same as anywhere else,” he added, ’’all it requires is a little care and thought.”

-------0---------

TRAFFIC RE-ROUTING IN KOWLOON

********

Traffic in Sai Yeung Choi Street between Prince Edward Road and Nullah Road will be reversed from one-way northbound to one-way southbound as from 10 a.m. on Saturday (January 10).

This is in connection with the elevated road project linking Prince Edward Road and Lai Chi Kok Road.

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/13

Thursday, January 8, 197$

13

PwD SPORTS DAY ******

Public ‘Jorks Department staff will put aside their slide rules and set squares this Sunday (January 11) and converge on the South China Athletic Association Stadium to test their skills in 27 track and field events.

The occasion will be the Eighth P.W.D. Sports Day, the highlight in the department’s sporting calendar.

This year a record number of entries, including 62 from female staff, have been received for the various events and the meeting promises to be the best and most exciting ever.

The events include a variety of races, hurdles, high jump, long jump, shot put, javelin, relays, tug-of-war, cricket ball throw, and a walk race.

Special events arc also scheduled for veterans over 40 and 50 years old, as well as for children aged between six and elevon.

Apart from individual honours in the various events, competitors will be vying for the all roun<j Best Athlete title in the men’s nd ladies’ sections.

Trophies and prizes will be presented to the winners by Mrs. McDonald, wife of the Director of Public Works. Mr. David McDon .Id will marshall the finals of the men’s 1,500 metre sprint and will later address the competitors and guests.

/The Sports......

Thursday, January 8, 1976

14

The Sports Day, which aims at promoting sportsmanship and physical recreation among P.W.D. staff, will start at 8.25 aand last until noon.

During breaks, guests will bo entertained by the Pipes and Drums of the RoyoJ. Heng Kong Police Force.

Note to Editors: Your representat::ves are cordially invited to cover the occasion between 8.25 a.n. and 12 noon on Sunday (Jan. 11) at the South China Athletic Association Stadium, Caroline Hill Road.

□ 5

1 iw

I Imm

PRH 1

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Fridayt January 9i 1976

CONTENTS

PAGE NO.

Sha Tin New Town planned to house 500»000 people..........

Bill to prevent spread of plant pests and diseases.........

Work on MTR Kowloon Bay Station starts in February.........

Navigation mark post to be built in East Lamma Channel.... Government accounts for October 1975 show smaller deficit. Post Office Recreation Club holds party on Sunday..........

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Friday, January 9, 197$

1

SHA TIN NE17 TOWN HOME FOK HALF A MILLION

*******

The new town now being developed at Sha Tin will be a thriving community of some 500,000 people of all ages and incomes living and working in a vastly improved environment where they will be able to develop socially with a sense of pride and belonging.

This was stated today by Mr. Allan Crosby, Chief Planning Officer of the Public Works Department’s Sha Tin New Town Development Office, in a luncheon address to the Rotary Club of Kowloon North.

The massive scheme, which is being carried out in two stages of progressive balanced development, would involve a government investment of over 54,000 million and it was envisaged, he said, that private developers would invest a similar amount.

’Mr. Crosby said opportunities to develop a healthy and vigorous community would certainly be provided at Shr? $in, ’’Facilities will be provided to meet the basic needs of the residents — their safety, shelter, security, health, education, employment and recreation/’

This year, he said, a wide variety of major developments — ranging from reclamations to high-rise buildings and from railway double-tracking to road works — would be carried out at Sha Tin by both the P.W.D. and private agencies at a total commitment of about <$1,500 million. ’•What is particularly inportant about most of this work is that it is being carried out as part of a comprehensive plan for the creation of a modern city within the comparatively short period of ten years,” he said.

Mr. Crosby said the main goal of the scheme was to house 500,000 people in Sha Tin Valley, which now has a population of only about 50,000, in an attractive environment within the next decade.

Of the ......

Friday, January 9, 1976

- 2 -

Of the projected population of the new town, he said about 60 per cent would live in eleven public housing estates accommodating about 300,000 people.

The first of these estates, Lek Yuen Estate with accommodation for 23,000, was nearing completion and work had already begun on the next estate at Wo Che, adjoining Lek Yuen.

The Wo Che Estate was scheduled to be completed in early 1979 and would provide home-s for another 34,000 people.

Mr. Crosby pointed out that although the government had accepted the challenge to house the largest proportion of the population within the new town, about 80 per cent of the residential land with Sha Tin New Town would be allocated to provide housing of various population densities.

Mr. Crosby stressed however that housing alone did not make a town and it was an essential part of the planning for the new town that every housing estate, both public and private, had its own local primary and secondary schools, local open space and playgrounds, local shops and basic facilities.

In keeping with the needs of the community, he said, a total of 43 additional primary schools and 41 more secondary schools would be built during the course of the development of the new town.

In addition, at least one technical institute would be developed conventiently close to the Sha Tin Railway Station and central bus station to give technical training facilities and serve the local industries for the whole area.

Sites were also being reserved for an additional technical institute, a polytechnic and teachers’ training college.

/To support .......

Friday, January 9» 1976

5

To support the existing clinic at Sha Tin, Mr. Crosby said, additional clinics would be provided as the population increased. The next clinic would be a clinic to bo provided alongside the Lei: Yuen Housing Estate.

”In addition, a site has been reserved for a district teaching hospital with 1,200 ’acute* beds near Sha Tin .Vai together with a special poly-clinic for out-patients.

’’Other hospital sites have been reserved such as the Sun

Yat Sen private hospital n-ar Lion Rock Tunnel and a possible additional general hospital near Tai ’Vai if required.”

-------0---------

PREVENTION OF SPREAD OF PLANT PESTS AND DIS JASES

New Legislation Proposed

******

A bill which aims to prevent the spread of plant pests and diseases by controlling the import tion of plants and soil was publisher in today’s Gazette for general information.

Entitled Plant (Importation .and Pest Control) Bill 1976, it will give legislative effect to the Plant Protection Agreement for South East Asia, the terms of which Hong Kong is committed to comply.

Under the bill, which is expected to be introduced into the Legislative Council shortly, the importation of certain plants and soil will be prohibited unless there is an import licence and a phytosu litary certificate issued by the country from which it was exported.

In certain cases, if imported, the plant must be grown in quarantine. However, the bill will not affect the importation of cut flowers, fruit and vegetables for consumption, grains, seeds and spicas for human and animal consumption or for industrial use, timber, dried tobacco and manufactured articles incorporating dried leaves and plants produced in and imported from China.

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A.........

Friday, January % 1976

*1

WORK STARTS NEXT MONTH ON KOWLGON BAY STATION

Work will begin next month on that part of the overhead Mass Transit Railway known as Kowloon Bay Station and the adjacent line sections, footbridge, and Kwun Tong -Koad improvements.

Details of the effect on Kwun Tong Road resulting from the construction works are notified in today’s Government Gazette.

The station will be sited immediately to the swest of Kwun Tong Road south of the junction with the Ngau Tau Kok and Choi Jan Roads.

From time to time during the period of construction, parts of Kwun Tong Road will be reduced to a minimum of two lanes of traffic in each direction.

However, these restrictions will not be imposed until the new Wai Yip Street Extension has been completed at the end of July 1976. This will provide an alternative route with the additional capacity of four traffic lanes.

Plans showing the areas affected by the project are displayed at the City District Office, Central and Western Enquiries Office, Central Government Offices, West Wing, the Crown Lands and Survey Office, 10th floor, Kowloon Government Offices Building, 405 Nathan Road, and the City District Office, (Kwun Tong), Kwun Tong District Branch Offices Building, Tung Yan Street, 3rd floor 3rd floor, Kowloon.

The Notice gazetted today stipulates that any person making a claim for compensation must send his claim in writing to the Director of Publi* Works. The claim must reach the office of the Director before the expiration of one year from the date of closure of the street or from the completion of the substantial alteration which is alleged to have caused the pecuniary loss or damage. --------------------------------------0---------

/5........

Friday, January 9, 1976 - 5 -

NAVIGATION MARK POST IN EAST LAfiMA CHANNEL

*******

The Government will build a navigation mark post at Pollux Rock in the East Larnma Channel to improve safety for vessels passing through there.

The rock lies outside the normal route for local vessels sailing between Aberdeen and Sulphur Channel and is close to shore south of Wah Fu Estate.

V *

However the navigation mark will warn vessels of possible damage when they sail off-course to avoid other vessels.

For the construction of this mark post, a work area of about 10,000 sq. ft. will have to be marked off.

The extent of the area involved is destribed in a notice published in the Gazette today and posted on notice boards in both English and Chinese near the site.

Anyone who has objections to the project or has any claim of private right should write to the Director of Public Works within the next two months.

Work on the construction of the navigation mark post is expected to take about four months.

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/6........

Friday} January $)> "1976

6

GOVERRi-jjiNT ACCOUNTS FOK OCTOBER 1975

********

The Hong Kong Government accounts for the month of October 1975 show a deficit of $97 million as compared with a deficit of 4163 million in October 197*U

This has resulted in an accumulated deficit of 46OJ million for the first seven months of the financial year, compared with a deficit of 3980 million for the same period in the last financial year.

Total revenue for the month at 3^37 million was 361 million more than in October 197^* mainly because of increased receipts from rates and internal revenue.

Total expenditure at «5> million was #5 million less than the same month in the last financial year.

-------•

PARTY FOR CHILDREN OF POST OFFICE EMPLOYEES

********

Note to Editors:

About 1,000 children of Post Office employees will be entertained at a party organised by the Post Office Recreation Club this Sunday (January 11) from 1 to 5 p.m.

Guest artists from Radio Hong Kong, Commercial Radio and H.K.-T.V.B. will be present to give performances.

There will be refresnments and toys for the children and a lucky draw

I • by Mrs. M. Addi, wife of the Postmaster General.

Music will be provided by the Band of the Hong Kong Sea Cadet Corps.

You are cordially invited to cover the event.

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I

HONG KONG HOUSING AUTHORITY

>t>/| l^-JTfRj

Friday, January 9, 1976

NE.7 ESTATE IN TSUEN JAN *********

Housing Authority’s Ila Kwai Chung Estate in Tsuen Wan is now more than half completed.

Three huge twin-tower blocks of 21 to 24 storeys high arc being constructed on a 22-acre terraced site which overlooks the whole of the Tsuen Won/Kwai Chung area.

These blocks, eventual homes for over 15,000 people, will be X X

completed in about six months.

Meanwhile, tenders are invited for the building of the last jhase of the housing project consisting of a 13-^torey slab block, a secondary school and a community hall.

The slab block will house about 3,300 people bringing the population of the estate to about 19,000.

Because cf the sloping site, housing blocks have to be built on different levels. Housing Department Architects have devised a system of covered walkways and lifts to link the block with the lower-level podium.

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PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Saturday, January 10, 1976

CONTENTS PAGE NC.

Director of Social Welfare stresses the need for co-operation in evaluating welfare services • ••«...........................   1

Early pay days for public assistance .........................

Urban cle.xway restrictions to be introduced in Sham Shui Po. lr

Government to grant land on Tsing Yi Island to oil company... 5

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Saturday, January 10, 1976

1

CO-OPERATION NEEDED IN EVALUATING WELFARE SERVICES

»*»»*»*»

, The Social welfare Advisory Committee is consulting directly representatives of voluntary agencies and other interested parties on how evaluation of welfare services should be conducted in Hong Kong*

This was stated by Mr. Thomas Lee, Director of Social Welfare and Chairman of the Social Welfare Advisory Committee, in his opening address at the seminar on evaluation this (Saturday) morning.

hr. Lee stressed that any future evaluation exercise could only be successful with the co-operation of those who were directly involved in providing the services.

The Director noted that evaluation would frequently result in a change of the existing situation. "We must be prepared to accept that successful evaluation should result in a change for the better, and therefore in an improvement in the quality or effectiveness of our welfare services in Hong Kong,11 he said.

Mr. Lee outlined three possible approaches to evaluation in Hong Kong. He said: "One school of thought is that evaluation should be integrated with the plarning and review process in order to provide more reliable basic data for planning purposes.

’’Another view is that we should first seek to achieve some degree of rationalisation of our existing agency services. This approach would be designed to effect a more equitable distribution of resources towards the areas of greatest need.

/"A third .....

Saturday, January 10, 1976

2

"A third view is that the first objective of evaluation should be to set minimum acceptable standards against which performance can be measured.”

Turning to the objectives of evaluation in the local social welfare context, the Director said, "There appears to be general agreement that rather than continue on an agency-based approach to evaluation, evaluation in the future should take a broader perspective of services in order to establish: firstly, the need for a particular service and, possibly, differing categories of need in order of priority.

’‘Secondly, the relevance of the objectives^of the group of agencies providing a service to the need for tne service; thirdly, the extent to which agencies are meeting their objectives with regard to services.”

”And fourthly, any gaps that exist in an area of service and the steps that are necessary to fill those gaps,” he continued.

On the need for evaluation, hr. Lee noted: “Government, as the main financier of the voluntary sector, is in effect ’buying1 welfare services through subvention,aand therefore has a duty to provide the means of ensuring.that the resources expended on agency services arc properly utilised.

“This has become particularly important in recent years as Government has become involved to an ever-increasing extent in the financing of voluntary welfare services.”

Mr. Lee also mentioned other reasons why evaluation was desirable. "For example,” he said, "the need to upgrade the quality of services for its own sake or to provide basic information for planning purpose. But the

/inescapable

Saturday, January 10, 1976

- 3 - s * inescapable fact is that the need for evaluation stems primarily from government’s responsibility to ensure that resources are used to the best possible advantage for the good of the community.”

The seminar, arranged by the Social Weflare Advisory Committee, was to review the effectiveness of the initial evaluation exercise which was carried out last year covering five valuntexry welfare agencies and one Social welfare Department institution.

The initial evaluation exercise was undertaken jointly by the Hong Kong Council of Social Service and the Social Welfare Department as a pilot . * project to enable them to gain some experience of evaluation and to establish guidelines for the conduct of future evaluation studies.

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Saturday, January 10, 1976

4

EAKLY PAY DAYS FOK PUBLIC ASSISTANCE ********

People receiving public assistance or disability and infirmity al 1 nwance.s the pay days of which fall within the Lunar New Year Holidays will be able to get their money earlier, a spokesman for the Social Welfare Department announced today.

hr. Stephen Ng, Deputy Secretary (Operations), said that as in previous years, arrangements had been madd with the post offices, district offices in the New Territories and treasury offices, to enable recipients to cash their vouchers earlier.

Tb#se whose pay days fall on January 31, February 1, 2, 3 will be able to get their money on January 27, 28, 29 and 30 respectively.

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CLEARWAY RESTRICTIONS IN SHAM SHUI PO

********

Urban clearway restrictions will be introduced in Wong Chuk Street between Tai Nan Street and Lai Chi Kok Road in Sham Shui Po from 10 a.m. next Wednesday (January 14).

..... All motor vehicles, except franchised buses, will be prohibited from stopx^ing in tais section of Wong Chuk Street to pick up or set down passengers and to load and unload goods between the hours of 7 a.m. and 7pm daily.

From the same day, all public light buses will be prohibited from stopping in this section of hong Chuk Street to set down or pick up passengers between the hours of 7 a.m. and midnight daily.

Appropriate traffic signs will be put up to guide motorists.

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/5.......

Saturday, January 10, 197$

5

GRANT OF LAND ON TSING YI ISLAND TO OIL COMPANY

********

The Government intends to grant an area of about 20,180 square feet of foreshore and seabed off Sai Tso Wan on the west coast of Tsing Yi Island to the Peninsula Petroleum Company.

The proposed leased area, which includes the site of an existing pier and dolphins, is to provide the company with berthing facilities.

It is intended to grant the lease for the residue of a term of 99 years less the last three days beginning from July 1, 1898.

The extent of the area involved is described in a notice in the Government gazette.

In the notice, the Director of Public Works invites those who have objections to the proposal or claims of private right to submit them to him in writing within two months from today.

Plans of the area may be inspected at the P.W.D.’s Port Works Division, 5th floor, hurray Building, Garden Road, Hong Kong, or at the Tsuen Wan District Office, New Territories.

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PRH 7

Sunday, January 11, 1976

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

FLOATING CLINICS PROVIDE MUCH-NEEDED SERVICE TO VILLAGERS

Kat 0, Tap Mun, Po Toi Island, So Kwu Wan - these are but a few of the isloated islands in Hong Kong served by the Medical and Health Department's two floating clinics.

The two floating clinics, ’Chee Wan’ and ’Chee Hong’, have been in service for 16 and 17 years respectively and are still going strong.

Their patients come from some 20 different places, mainly islands which are not easily accessible. The main area of operation for ’Chee Wan* is the cluster of islands round Tolo Harbour while ’Chee Hong* looks after residents on islands scattered throughout other parts of Hong Kong waters.

For five and a half days a week, rain or shine, the two vessels set sail early in the morning to these remote islands to attend to the sick. It is only during public holidays or when storm signal no. 3 or above is up that they are forced to take a break.

On arrival at an island, the vessel will pull a hooter to notify people. e

However, the signal has now become more of a formality than a necessity.

’’After all these years, the clinical visit is being regarded as a personal call from a friend,” a doctor serving on the ’Chee Hong* said.

At some of the sparsely populated islands which have no berthing facilities, people have to row out to the clinics in their own sampans.

/Despite their .....

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Sunday, January 11, 1976

2

Despite their relatively small size, the floating clinics are sufficiently equipped to cope with the treatment for most of the common sicknesses, such as influenza and skin and eye diseases. Normally, attendance is higher in the summer months.

For the more serious cases requiring hospital care, the floating clinic will take the patients to town. The doctor on board will make use of the wireless installations on the vessel to get an ambulance ready on shore to take the patients to hospital.

During the past two years, there has been a significant increase in attendance at the two floating clinics. In 1973, the attendance was 7,784 and this increased to 17,066 in 1974, showing that the floating clinics are providing a much-needed service to the population in outlying areas. Attendance in the first three quarters of 1975 reached 14,709*

Both ’Chee Wan’ and ’Chee Hong* are docked for maintenance for a • w

fortnight twice every year. During this period, ships from the Marine Department will stand in to ensure that normal services of the fleating clinics will not be interrupted.

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Sunday, January 11, 1976

5

SEVEN NEW RECORDS SET Us’ PWD SPORTS DAY • »♦♦♦♦

Joyce Yuen and R.H. Lloyd today established themselves as the best athletes in the Public Works Department in an exciting sports meet which saw seven new records set.

For Lloyd, an engineer with the Civil Engineering Office, it was the second successive win of the best athlete cup. This year he ran away with three gold medals and two bronze to retain the title.

In the process he smashed the longstanding record of 11.80 sec. for the men’s 100 m race held since 1971 by Chiang Kwok-kwan of the Buildings Ordinance Office — by completing the distance in a creditable 11.58 sec.

Joyce Yuen of the Electrical and Mechanical Office also won three golds and set new times for the ladies’ 100 m sprint (15.28 sec.) and for the ladies’ 60 m dash (9-11 sec.).

Other records were set by Ning toing-tak of the Architectural Office who cleared 1.61 m in high jump; Chan Kam-to of the Electrical and Mechanical Office who bettered his own 1970 record in hurdles with 16.52 sec.; Mok Tit-keung of Architectural Office who improved on his 1972 record in shot put with a final 11.57 m; and Shum Shee-tak of Highways Office who completed the 80mm race for men over 40 years in 10.81 sec.

The sports day, held at the South China Athletic Association Stadium, was the eighth organised by the department. Its main objective is to promote sportsmanship and physical recreation among PWD staff.

/This year’s .....

Sunday, January 11, 1976

4

This year’s meet was the brightest and best attended with some 400 competitors taking part in the 27 events which included races, hurdles, high jump, long jump, shot put, javelin, relays, tug-of-war, cricket ball throw and walk races, as well as special events for children.

All eleven offices of the department were represented but the glory of the day went to the El ectri cal and Mechanical Office which swept the best office cup for track and field for the fifth successive year. Runners up were the Architectural Office and Highways Office.

In a brief closing address, the Director of Public Works, Mr. David McDonald, congratulated the competitors and noted that the sports day was one of the* few occasions when all staff could get together in an informal way and compete in friendly rivalry where rank and seniority meant nothing and where sheer skill and physical ability were the only keys to success.

He also thanked those organisations and associations which had assisted in making the occasion such success.

Mrs. McDonald presented the trophies to the winners.

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REOPENING OF ARGYLE STREET

*******

Work is nearing completion on Argyle Street where a burst watermains in December closed sections of the road and flyover.

The westbound section of Argyle Street between house no. 250 and the Kowloon City roundabout will reopen to traffic tomorrow (January 12) when buses will-also revert to the bus-stops opposite the Prince Hotel.

The section of the flyover between Kai Tak Road and no. 250 Argyle Street will reopen to traffic on January 16.

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PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Monday, January 12, 1976

CONTilNTS

PAGS NG.

Vehicular subway in Kowloon to open to traffic shortly ....... 1

Dragon Year gold coins oversubscribed ......................   2

Water cut in Guam Shui Po ................................  • 2

Topley lays secondary school foundation stone ...............

New traffic arrangements in Wan Chai ......................... 4

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Monday, January 12, 1976

1

VEHICULAR SUBWAY IN KOWLOON

*****»««

Motorists will be able to travel along Lung Cheung Road without interruption-as from Thursday (January 15) when the Public Works Department opens its newly completed vehicular subway at the Nam Cheong Interchange.

The subway will enable eastbound traffic along Lung Cheung Road wishing to turn into Nam Cheong Street to make a free flowing right turn without holding up traffic from the other direction.

At present, westbound raffic along Lung Cheung Road heading towards Shek Kip Mei and Sham Shui Po has to stop at the junction of Nam Cheong Street and Lung Cheung Road to give way to traffic turning right into Nam Cheong Street. ’’With the opening of the subway, eastbound traffic along Lung Cheung Road will turn into Nam Cheong Street via the subway under Lung Cheung Road without interrupting westbound traffic flow,” a PWD spokesman said.

The temporary traffic signals at the junction will be eliminated on Thursday when the subway opens.

The subway is part of the PWD’s Nam Cheong Interchange which is expected to be fully operational later this month.

It consists of three levels — the vehicular subway, ground level roads and a vehicular bridge spanning Lung Cheung Road.

The bridge, which also incorporates a pedestrian footpath to enable pedestrians to cross Lung Cheung Road in safety, will provide vehicular access to proposed developments in the Tai Wor Ping area.

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/2

Monday, January 12, 1976

2

HEAVY DEMAND FOR DRAGON YEAR GOLD COINS

*******

Over 30,000 applications for the gold coins to mark the Year of the Dragon were received from Hong Kong residents when applications closed last Wednesday (January ?)•

A government spokesman said today that there were 25,000 applications for uncirculated and 9,700 for proof issues — more than twice the number of coins to be issued locally,

4 As a result of oversubscription, a ballot was held on computer.

The coins — the first in a series that may be issued to depict the twelve animals traditionally representing the Lunar New Years — should be available for collection before the Year of the Dragon begins.

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WATER CUT ♦ ♦ ♦ *♦

A number of premises in Sham Shui Po, Kowloon, will be without water from 1 a.m. to 6 a.m. on Thursday (January 15) to allow a leakage test to be carried out.

The area affected is bounded by Lai Chi Kok Road, Kiu Kiang Street, Cheung Sha Wan Road and Kweilin Street.

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/3.....

Monday, January 12, 1976

3

TOPLEY LAYS SECONDARY SCHOOL FOUNDATION STONE

The Director of Education, Mr. Kenneth Topley this afternoon laid the foundation stone of the Hong Kong Chinese Women’s Club Secondary School at the site in Sai Wan Ho, Shau Kei Wan.

In support of Government’s policy on the expansion of secondary education, the Club launched the project - a standard 24 classroom school with 11 special rooms and a hall. The plan provides for the school to accommodate 1,200 pupils.

A lot of time and effort have been devoted selflessly by the Club officials to the planning and execution of the project.

Today’s ceremony marks another milestone in the Club’s educational role.

The Club, founded some 40 years ago, began its educational role by operating a number of free night schools on Hong Kong Island.

With Government assistance, its subsidized primary school came into being in 1965 with 12 classes and an enrolment of 540. Since then, its enrolment grew steadily as a result of good operating standards.

The same premises are being used to operate evening primary classes. The school lays much emphasis on social and moral education and organises a variety of extra-curricular activities.

Speaking in Cantonese, Mr. Topley said that modern education must adapt itself to modern needs.

/Social contacts ••.••

Monday, January 12, 1976

4

Social contacts were becoming more frequent and more varied, ant children should learn to be good mixers and to understand other people's point of view.

"Moreover, they must be able to adapt themselves to sudden changes in the occupations they are likely to take up, and even to change their careers.

"The individual must not only become more adaptable as a worker, but must also be in a position to select for himself some worthy and useful way of occupying his free time," the Director said.

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’NEW TRAFFIC ARRANGEMENTS

*******

New traffic arrangements will be introduced at the junction of Hennessy Road and Canal Road, Wan Chai, on Thursday (January 15) to improve traffic flow.

Starting from 10 a.m., eastbound traffic on Hennessy Road will not be allowed to turn rigtit into Canal Road East while westbound traffic on H?-nnessy Road will not be allowed to turn right into Canal Road West.

At the same time, northbound traffic on Canal Road West and southbound traffic on Canal Road east will not be allowed to turn right into Hennessy Road.

Appropriate traffic signs will be put up in the area to guide motorists.

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DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Tuesday, January 15, 197$ •

CONTENTS PAGE NO.

Training levy on construction work .............................. 1

Busy month for Fire Prevention Bureau ........................... 3

Youth leaders to attend training course on human relations ...... 4

Airport coach service to continue operating for at least six more weeks .................................... 5

Crown land sales ................................................ ?

N.T. land sales net nearly $2 million............................ /

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Tuesday, January 13, 1976

1

TRAINING LEVY ON CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS ********

A training levy of 0.25 p^r cent of the value df all construction work undertaken in H-,ng Kong and payable by the contractors concerned will come into effect on Sunday (January 18).

Announcing this today, the Chairman of the Construction Industry -training Authority, Nr® Jeffrey Yeh, said the levy would be collected by the authority to establish and maintain a training centre to provide one-year full-time basic training for about 660 craft trainees in the key construction trades.

’’The training centre will play a major role in ensuring not only tlxat the industry will be adequately supplied with trained skilled workers, but .also that it will become more efficient,” he said.

Construction work on the training centre, located in Tai Yip Street, Kwun Tong, is expected to begin next month.

This rate of 0.25 per cent, announced in the Gazette last month, is imposed under the Industrial Training (Construction Industry) Ordinance 1975.

Contractors and authorised people responsible for all construction work started on or after September 5, 1975, the date when the Ordinance became effective, are obliged to notify the Training Authority in a prescribed form (Form 1 in the regulations).

Under the Ordinance, contractors are required to notify the Authority within 14 days after a payment is made to them in respect of any construction work.

/They arc .....

Tuesday, January 13, 1976

2

They arc also required to notify the Authority in another prescribed form (Form 3 in the regulations) not later than 14 days after the completion of any such work or of any stage of such work.

Those who fail to comply with either of these provisions will be liable to a fine and a surcharge not exceeding twice the amount of the assessed levy may also be imposed on the contractors.

The Training Authority will notify contractors in writing of the assessment of levy payable by the contractors within 28 days after receipt of notices.

Prescribed forms can be obtained from the Training Authority at

Asian House, 12th floor, Room 10, 1 Hennessy Road, Hong Kong. Enquiries may be directed to the Secretary of the Authority at 3-280008.

The Ordinance does not apply to construction work which started before September 3, 1975» and no levy is payable for any or part of any work completed before Sunday (January 18).

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Tuesday, January 13, 1976

5

FIRE PREVENTION BUREAU KEPT BUSY LaST MONTH

*******

The Fire Prevention Bureau carried out 151662 inspections last month, compared with 12,843 for the previous month.

The largest number of inspections, as usual, related to means of c-scapc, totalling 8,602. Of this,7,645 inspections were in response to complaints.

During the month, 86 vehicles used to carry inflammable liquids and compressed gases were inspected, bringing to 546 the number of such vehicles examined since April last year.

There was a big increase in the number of inspections on factories and other industrial undertakings in December - 3,234 compared with 2,652 for the preceding month. A further 1,586 general complaints were also looked into.

Other inspections covered: premises used for storing or manufacturing dangerous goods (595), building ventilation systems (477), schools (165), fire service installations in residential and industrial buildings (384), restaurants and nightclubs (274), places of public assembly (134), timber yards and storage (13), neon signs (7) and miscellaneous (86).

Nineteen fires were investigated in detail by officers from the Bureau.

The Bureau finalised 501 plans for new building projects, issued or renewed 349 dangerous goods licences and four timber licences. Over 5$0 fire hazard abatement notices were issued and 88 prosecutions were taken out resulting in the imposition of fines amounting to over $44,460.

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Tuesday, January 13, 1976

4

TRAINING COURSE FOR YOUTH LEADERS »**«**«*

Forty youth leaders will attend a training course next month designed to help them develop their skills arid knowledge in human relations.

The course, organised by the Youth Work Unit of the Social Welfare Department, will adopt a “laboratory” approach in which participants will learn through experimenting in a secure environment.

Lectures will be given every Monday and Thursday evening from 7*30 p.m. to 9.30 p.m. between February 16 and 26 at the Lady Trench Training Centre in Oi Kwan Road, Wan Chai.

The course will end with an overnight camp at the Diocesan Youth Centre in Pok Fu Lam Road on February 28.

It is open to all young people between 18 and 25 who have completed at least Form Five level.

As the course’is limited to 40 participants, enrolment will be on a first-comc-first-served basis. Application forms are available at Room 908, Causeway Bay Magistracy Building, Hong Kong (Tel. 5-712467) and on the Top Floor of the Kowloon Central Post Offices Building at 405 Nathan Road, Kowloon (Tel. 3-884111 Ext. 331) until February 6. There will be a charge of #15 a person.

Six similar courses have been organised since early 1974. More than 250 applications were received in the last course held in November 1975, indicating that there was a demand for this type of training among young people.

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/5.........

Tuesday, January 15 197'

- 5 -

REPRIEVE FOR AIRI-ORT COACH SERVICE

M _K,,V V V V v v V V v A l\ A A A A A

The airport coach service, Route 20'/, is to continue operating at least for another six weeks.

The decision was taken following talks at the weekend between the Transport Department and KIiB on results of the two-week trial period which featured a revised route and lower fares.

During the trial period from December 29 to January 12, the service carried an average of 1,25$ passengers a nay compared with an average of 715 for the period December 1 to 28.

Although this figure is still below the bre^k-even point, which at a $2 fare calls for 1,425 passengers a day, officials are encouraged by the response to the recent changes in route ano fare. The company has suggested that the service be continued for a further period up to the end of February in the hope that passenger traffic will increase.

While there has been an increase in the numb r of passengers carried to and from intermediate points the survey conducted by Transport Inspectors on January 7 ano 8 shows 74 par cent of passengers were travelling to the airport and 65 per cent from the airport. During the survey a total of 1,247 passengers were interviewed.

The Central District terminus is located in Ice House Street, between Connaught jioad Central and Chater Road and the Airport terminus is situated at the western end of the Arrivals Hall, next to the public car park.

The first coach leaves Central at 7 a.m. and the Airport at 7«25 anr' the service then operates every 15 minutes until 7-40 p.m. from the Airport and 8.15 p-m. from Central.

/On journeys.....

Tuesday, January 15, 1976.

6

On journeys to the Airport, coaches travel via Ice House Street, Chater Hoad, Murray Road, Queensway, Hennessy Road, Great •George Street, Gloucester •o-6, ’.aterfront Road, Cross-harbour Tunnel, Hong Chong Road, Chatham Road, Ma Tau Wei Road, Chi Kiang Street, To Kwa Wan Road, Sung Wong Toi Road, Olympic Avenue, Airport Departure Level and Airport Arrival Level.

On journeys to Central, the ■oute is via Olympic Avenue, Tam Kung Road, Ma Tau Wei Road, Chatham Road, Hong Chong Road, Crossly rbour Tunnel, Waterfront Road, Gloucester Road, Paterson Street, Yee Wo Street, Causeway Road, Irving Street, Pennington Street, Yee Wo Street, Hennessy Road, Queensway, Jackson Road, Chater Road, Club Street, Connaught Road Central and Ice House Street.

The fare is i>2 per single journey but passengers who board after the ocach has passed through the Cross-harbour Tunnel pay only 5,1.

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Tuesday, January 13, 1976

7

CROW L?ND SALES

V, V. -V-.VL A* JU. A A A A "• A A

Two lobs of Crown land on Hong Kong Island will be put up for sale by auction next month.

The auction will take place on February 13 (Friday) at 2.30 p.m. in the lecture room, 8th floor, City Hall.

One lot is situated between Upper Lascar Row and Hollywood Road. It measures 4,700 sq. ft. and is earmarked for non-industrial purposes.

The other lot, measuring 12,060 sq. ft., is at Chung Hom Kok Road. It is for private residential purposes.

Full particulars and conditions of sale may be obtained from the Public Enquiry Sub-office, Central Government Offices (West Wing), ground floor, Hong Kong and at the Crown Lands and Survey Office, Kowloon Government Offices, 405 Nathan Road, 10th floor, Kowloon.

Sale plans can also be inspected at these offices.

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LAND SALES IN NT. NET NEARLY $2 MILLION

-W V W V W- V V- M w v A A A A A A A AAA

Two lots of Crown land in Clearwater Bay Road were sold by auction today (Tuesday) at an average price of $21.34 per square foot.

The first lot, totalling 27,950 sq. ft., went for $640,000; the second lot totalling 62,500 sq. ft., was sold for <>1,290,000-

Both lots will be used for private residential purposes.

The auction took place in San Po Kong Government Offices and was administered by staff of the District Office, Sai Kung.

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PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Wednesday, January 14, 1976

CONTENTS PaGE NO.

Expanding exports and solid growth forecast by Governor ......... 1

Higher and more practical evening courses envisaged ..........• 2

Successful gold coin bidders to be notified next week............ 4

Traffic re-routing on Castle Peak Road.........................   4

Public advised to watch out for bogus firemen ................... 5

Speech by Colonial Secretary on "Hong Kong and Britain” ......... 6

Temporary water interruption in Tsim Sha Tsui ................... 6

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5^233191

Wednesday, January 14, 197$

1

RISING EXPORTS AND SOLID GROWTH FORECAST

*******

The Governor, Sir Murray lacLehose, said today that Hong

Kong could now look forward to a period of expanding exports and solid growth provided "we hold our competitive edge and our ability to attract custom".

He was speaking at a ceremony at Government House in which he presented the Governor’s Award for Hong Kong Design. The competition was organised by the Federation of Hong Kong Industries.

Referring to the economic difficulty experienced last year, the Governor said: "We are dtill some way short of complete recovery, and we may not be looking for a return of boom conditions, but obviously the worst of the recession is behind us."

Sir Murray expressed the hope that Hong Kong’s next period of growth would see a greater diversification of the industries on which Hong Kong depended.

The Government, he added, would play its part in this with regard to land policy, provision of industrial estates, promotion of foreign investment, and the rapid. expansion of technical education.

The Governor said it was clear that the production of consumer goods would remain Hong Kong’s chief source of income for the foreseeable future and that the prosperity of this industry would depend to a large extent on a continual upgrading of quality and design.

Note to Editors:

The full text of th^ Governor’s speech is contained in a supplement to today’s Daily Information Bulletin.

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Wednesday, January 1^, 197$

2

EVENING COURSES SHOULD BE EXTENDED TO SIXTH FORM LEVEL

********

Evening education' is an integral part of "continuing education," the Assistant Director of Education (Further), hr. William Fisher-Short,, said today.

He was speaking to graduates of the Evening Institute Secondary School Course, Hong Kong English Section, at the Clementi Middle School.

Ke hoped that many of the graduates would be able to continue with their education and training.

People in Kong Kong tended to think of adult education as either in "retrieval" or "enrichment." Mr. Fisher-Short felt that this was a rather outdated concept.

"No matter what validity’it had in the past, the time is soon coming when such a concept can no longer provide an adequate theoretical basis for the conduct of adult education classes," the Assistant Director said.

On the line of thought about "continuing education" in evening schools, Hr. Fisher-Short, who is leaving Hong Kong in some two months* time on retirement, voiced two personal opinions.

He said: "First, I am convinced that in the near future we should try to extend our evening academic courses to the Sixth Form level. I am sure my successor will consider this.

"Second, when carrying out courses to a level beyond the Hong Kong Certificate of Education, I am convinced that we should provide not only courses which will bring people up to the entrance standard necessary for a University course, but also studies which relate more directly to the needs of business, commerce and industry.

/"Indeed ......

Wednesday, January 14, 197$

3

‘'Indeed I would go beyond this and say that if ever Hong Kong has an open University system, or a system of external or part-time degrees, then the evening adult education should be prepared to provide the basic facilities for group seminar's and tutorial work which are essential to any of those systems.

"Such developments are, of course, for the future but they illustrate the emergent and evolutionary nature of an adult education system rooted in a developing society."

Mr. Fisher-Short said there was much adult educators could do in

Hong Kong.

He said: "We have social problems with drugs, corruption, morality; we must re-inforce our drive to civic cleanliness, public health, conservation; family affairs, consumer affairs, worker education merit greater concern. All tnese areas are legitimate fields for the adult educator. To limit our nonacademic programmes to recreation and enrichment in the narrow sense is to deny the public we serve an opportunity for personal and social development."

Adult educators, he said, were in direct contact with the community they served and were best placed to appreciate those needs and to bring them to the attention of the Government.

Note to Editors: Copies of the full text of Mr. Fisher-Short’s speech in English are distributed separately in the Press Boxes, Government Information Services this evening.

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A......

Wednesday, January 14, 1976

4

GOLD COINS: SUCCESSFUL BIDDERS TO BE NOTIFIED SOON «****««

Letters to applicants who were successful in the Dragon Year Gold Coin ballot will be sent out early next week and the cheques will be returned to unsuccessful applicants soon after, a Government spokesman announced today.

He confirmed that there were 25,000 applications for 10,500 brilliant uncirculated coins and 9,659 applications for 5,000 proof coins.

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ROAD WORKS ON CASTLE PEAK ROaD

*******

Motorists are advised that a section of Castle Peak Road at the 15 milestone will be made one-way, with alternating traffic flow controlled by either traffic lights or signals, from Friday (January 16) until about the end of March.

This is because of construction work on the new Tuen Mun Road. However two-way traffic flow will resume during the Lunar New Year holiday period.

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/5......

Wednesday, January 14, 1976

5

' BE ALERT AGAINST BOGUS FIREIjEN ******

The Fire Services Department today warned members of the public to watch out for bogus firemen, especially during the Lunar New Year period.

A spokesman for the Department said that reports of this nature had been received from time to time.

In a recent case, four men in civilian clothes wont % to a school in Kowloon. They claimed to be Fire Services personnel and tried to gain access into the premises. However, the principal of the school became suspicious and refused to allow them in. She later chocked with the Fire Prevention Bureau and was told that no such visit was made on that date.

’’All fire officers calling on premises are dressed in full uniform,” the spokesman said. ’’They are issued with a numbered warrant card and they also carry a Government identity card bearing the holder’s photograph.”

Any member of the public in the slightest doubt should first ask to seo those cards. If they are still not satisfied, they should telephone the Fire Services Department or the Police immediately.

The spokesman pointed out that these men, having tried on one occasion, would very likely try again and the public should be on t eir guard.

’’Apart from being criminal,” he stressed, ’’this type of action brings unwarranted discredit upon the Department."

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/6......

V

Wednesday, January 14, 1976

6

SPEECH BY COLONIAL SECRETARY

********

Note to Editors:

The full text of a speech by the Colonial Secretary, Sir Denys Roberts, at the annual dinner of the Hong Kong General Chamber of Commerce at the Hong Kong Club at 8 p.m. today is contained in a supplement to the Daily Information Bulletin.

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WATER STOPPAGE IN TSIM SHA TSUI

********

A number of premises in Tsim Sha Tsui will be without water from

1 a.m. to 6 a.m. on Friday (January 16) to allow a leakage test to be carried out.

The area affected is bounded by Nathan Road, Salisbury Road, Chatham Road and body Rci.d.

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PR 33

DAILY INFORMATION,.BULLETIN SUPPLEMENT

PRESENTATION OF GOVERNOR’S FOR HONG KONG DESIGN

Full Text Of Governor’s Speech

The Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, today presented award to winners in the '‘Governor’s Award for Hong Kong Design” competition at ?. ceremony in Government II use.

The following is the full text of the Governor’s speech at the ceremony:

”It is a great pleasure to be able again to acknowledge the efforts made to advance the quality of Hong Kong design and improve the image of Hong Kong products overseas.

"We have just experienced a year of exceptional difficulty and anxiety in which orders were scarce, margins had to be cut to the bone, and real distress was felt by many. Nevertheless, during this period Hong Kong re-acc.uired something it was in danger of losing during the inflation and the stock market mania of 1973 and 197^ — its highly competitive edge in what matters most to Hong Kong — its export industry.

’'During my recent absence in the United Kingdom and America a well-known figure remarked to me that Hong Kong’s management and work force were so sensitive to demand, and so quick to adapt to it, tae.t the slightest puff anywhere in the world’s economy would fill Hong Kong’s sails.

’’Indeed I was impressed and encouraged by views expressed to mo everywhere that Hong Kong would quickly benefit from the slow recovery in the world now beginning. I beli^va tM® true, ”’e are still some

way short of complete recovery, and we may not be looking for a return oi Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House. Hong Kong. TeZ^P?&3H)1 • •• •

2

boom conditions, but obviously the worst of the recession is behind ’ us, and we can look forward to a period of expanding exports and solid growth - provided that is tp say, that we hold our competitive ed :e and our ability to attract custom.

"I very much hope that Hong Kong’s next period of growth will see a greater diversification of the industries on which we depend* You may be assured that the Government will play its part in this with regard to land policy, provision of industrial estates, promotion of foreign investment, and the rapid expansion of technical education.

"But it is clear that the production of consumer goods will remain Hong Kong’s chief source of income for the foreseeable future a and that the prosperity of this industry will depend to a large ezztent »

on a continual upgrading of quality and design. Producers of low cual?ty goods will find it increasingly difficult to retain their share of international markets in the face of competition from lower labour cost countries.

"The Industrial Design Council has an important role to play in impressing upon industry the need to use to the full the design skills and ability available in Hong Kong. I am interested to h.ar that the Council is paying attention to the protection of designs as one moans of encouraging original work. A very important innovation introduced last year was the setting up of the Design Depository, where owners may lodge their original designs in order to provide prima facie evidence of copyright ownership.

"The importance of good design to the marketability of proc.uct cannot be overemphasised. I share Mr. Wu’s distaste for bogus aesthetics and fussiness. I think we still produce too many designs which are over complicated rand gimmicky - but then, so do the most advanced industrial countries - and I am glad to say that more of our manufacturers now understrand that well designed consumer products are often deceptively simple. The award winning products here today well demonstrate this.

/"I am

5

"I am happy to learn that they are well up to international standards in terms of function, ease of use and maintenance, hccith and safety requirements and appearance as well as marketability. They arc all original Hong Kong designs, demonstrating the existence of high technical skills and creative ability among our industrial designers.

"The winner of the Governor’s Award this year is a transistor radio - so common a product that our electronics industry produces thousands each day, yet so outstanding th- t it has been selected from the numerous entreis by the judges. It is fitting that one of our most popular products should receive this award for it will draw the attention of many industrialists to the fact that it is within their abilities to turn out ever better products which will enhance profitability and sales.

"Ladies and Gentlemen, I am pleased to announce the name of the winner of this year’s Governor’s Award. It is Bolton Electronics Ltd., who h. vc won it with their transistor radio/fL ashlight combination. I now have pleasure in asking the representative of :dton Electronics Ltd to come forward to receive the trophy."

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A.....

Wednesday, January 14> 1976*

- 4 -HONG KONG AND BRITAIN

V V V- V V W- w w ,y..V A A A A A A A A A A A

The following is the full text of the speech by the Colonial Secretary, Sir Denys Roberts, at the annual dinner of the Hong Kong General Chamber of Commerce at the Hong Kong Club today (Wednesday)• INTRODUCTION

”1 have decided to talk to you about Hong Kong’s relationship with Britain; both because it is fundamental to our existence and because it is a frequent source of misunderstanding on both sides.

’’Hong Kong’s link with Britain has remained strong for over 1J0 years, surviving a series of dramatic changes in the political structure of Asia and in the international relationships of Eastern and Western countries. Yet the nature of Hong Kong’s relationship with Britain has inevitably altered. In I84I Britain was a strong, enterprising world power, Hong Kong insignificant trading post. Gradually, in the last century, Britain has mellowed, relinquished her expansionist ambitions and begun to adapt to her new role as a medium sized Western country and a member of the European community. Hong Kong has grown in stature to become one of the largest exporters in the world, a regional centre for commerce, banking and trade and an economic entity which is capable in most respects of making its own way in the world.

’’Hong Kong’s attitude towards Britain mi ht perhaps be compared to

/a successful....

5

a successful son’s view of his father. V/hen young, the son needs to be cared for, encouraged and protected. But when he becomes an adult able to stand on his own feet, his opinion of his father is ambivalent. He is usually anxious to prove his independence, but sometimes needs support, affection and help. It is a change which demands patience and understanding from both of them.

”1 have said that our link with Britain is fundamental to our existence. Indeed, and let there be no mistake about this, Hong long as we know it will survive only for as long as it remains under the protection of Britain. This is a reality which is fully recognised by Britain. The recent Defence Costs Agreement once more restated, in the clearest terms, the obligation of BMG to preserve the security and integrity of Hong Kong.

’’Because our relationship must continue, it is important th. t both sides, and particularly Hong Kong, should understand its nature, the benefits which it brings and the stresses which are inseparable from it and with which we must learn to live. Above all, we should not allow disputes and difference;' of view to undermine the common history, the mutual advantage and the real affection which bind us together.

CRITICISM OF HONG KONG

’’Many of us are upset, from time to time, by criticisms of Hong Kong from abroad. They hurt us more if they come from Britain than from elsewhere. And those which attract most attention here are the ones delivered by the media or by a few British politicians or reformers who find some of the features of our kind of society unattractive.

’’The concentration of British media on subjects which show us in a poor light, such as corruption, unsatisfactory housing,

/insufficient......

6

insufficient education or social welfare, oj unpleasant working conditions should not be taken as evidence of any general malice towards us. Rather does it show that some of the things of which we are ourselves not proud are the most newsworthy. It is only fair to remember that the British media devote far more of their attention to stories which reveal the least satisfactory aspects of British life.

’’Natux-ally, we do not find it easy to welcome adverse comments by politicians or social reformers - nor their proposals for the solution of problems w'th which /e have been grappling for years.

’’But we should not overlook the sense of responsibility which many of them feel towards Hong Kong. Because we are a dependency, the Secretary of State is answerable to Parliament for the conduct of affairs in Hong Kong. From this it follows that Members of Parliament have a proper and constitutional interest in our administration.

”1 suggest to you, therefore, that most of these critics speak because they are concerned, not because they want to cause trouble for its own sake. If they visit us, most of them come to learn, not to instruct; to listen rather than to speak. The Hong Kong Government encourages and assists these visits, firstly because we believe that informed criticism is a great advance on ignorant criticism and secondly because experience has shown that the most ardent critic leaves here with some appreciation of the difficulties we face, of the extent to which vie have overcome them and or our not inconsiderable achievements.

”It would be foolish to deny that our society suffers from grave defects, which we are constantly striving to overcome. Nobody who visits our worst squatter areas, who sees the conditions under which

/some workshops....

7

some workshops operate or appreciates the unsatisfactory standards of life endured by too many of our residents# will feel satisfied with what we have achieved. Nor should we expect British politicians to feel differently. Kost of them are men of social conscience who want to see an improvement in the lot of the less fortunate members of mankind. If anythin^, they are more critical of the slums of British industrial towns than they are of anything which they see here.

“Furthermore, we should make allowance for the common human tendency to expect oth rs to think and act in the same ways as we do. Linked to this is the desir- to impose our beliefs and standards on our fellows, whether or not these are appropriate to their circumstances.

"Consequently, it is understandable that some British reformers should feel that we ought to adopt he?'e the political machinery and state paternalism which have been applied in Britain. And because they live under one kind of economic and social system, they regard alternatives with some suspicion.

"One particular allegation is that we are a laissez-faire society. The implication is that such a society is ruthless, uncaring and indifferent.

"The label would be an accurate description of Hong Kong if it meant that as a government we recognize that bureaucrats should confine themselves to administration, that business is best conducted by businessmen and that through the market mechanism free enterprise will discover for itself, (without state direction) those methods of production and the types of product mo t suited to our needs as a trader with world wide interests.

"But this does not mean that we tolerate inhuman conditions of work or the exploitation of employees. We have prohibited the employment .of children in industrial undertaking's, we have controlled the hours of

/work and.....

8

works and working conditions of women and children, we htve provided for compulsory holidays.and sickness benefits.

“From our general revenues we have striven, and with some success, to provide decent medical services, and education for a population which is eight times what it was thirty years ago. We have constructed public housing for if million people. Over 120,000 receive allowances, as of right by reason of age or infirmity, or by way of public assistance. We have committed ourselves to a series of programmes which will greatly improve the conditions in which our people live. These are not the actions of a callous society.

ILLATIONS WITH HfrlG

"In addition to the friction which may be caused by the criticisms of press and reformers, there rxe occasions when it may seem that HbiG is not giving us the- support, or the understanding of our needs, which we feel we should get. Obvious recent examples of this are the reintroduction of the death penalty, the imposition of trade restraints and the defence costs agreement.

"When Britain’s interests on a particular issue are not the same as ours, we can hardly expect that ours will prevail, though I believe that in practice they do receive more consideration than those of countries which are not dependencies of Britain.

"We must not, however, hope for too much. No British Government, however well disposed to Hong K-ng, can afford to ignore domestic political realities, or the financial and commercial interests of Britain.

"As to the death penalty, the constitutional position is that there is a right to petition the Queen, who acts on the advice of the Secretary of State for Foreign < Commonwealth Affairs. The latter is answerable to Parliament and must therefore be satisfied that he can defend the advice which he has tendered to the Crown if it is attacked in the /House..................................................................

9

House. Successive Secretary of States have formed the opinion that, if they were to advise the Queen that a death sentence should be carried out in Hong Kong, they would not be able to secure majority support in Parliament for such advice. It would be unrealistic of us to expect them to take this risk, however strong our feeling's may be.

"By virtue of our striking success as traders, we have become, in some respects a serious competitor to British manufacturers, both within’Britain and abroad.. It would required a remarkable degree of detachment for Britain to refrain from taking the measures which she believes necessary to protect herself, even if these measures are inimical to our interests. We have, in a sense, become the victims of our own achievements.

"The recent negotiations on a new defence costs agreement afford another example of a clash of interests. This was resolved, after months of tough negoitation, in a manner which, while it did not fully satisfy either party, could fairly be described as a reasonable compromise in the circumstances. One important feature of these negotiations was the way in which they were conducted; not like a bitter wrangle between enemies, but like a hard but. •*-good humoured argument within the family.

"I have spoken of the degree to which we ere upset by criticism from Britain. By contrast, you may be surprised to learn how wounded many British visitors are by har' things which are said of Britain here. Certainly, Britain is no longer a world power. Her economy may be in trouble and her society disturbed. But the British are a proud and clever people and take no more kindly to criticism than we do.

"It is, therefore, important, if we want our point of view to be understood, for us to show the British some of the wisdom, tolerance and detachment which we demand from them. indeed, I have reason to believe that some of our most bitter and persistent critics first become hostile because of what to them seemed to be unreasonable and prejudiced criticism of Britain by people whom they met in Hong Kong. It would be well for us to remember that when meeting' politicians, journalists or influential Britons, we are all, to some extent ambassadors for Hong Kong. /ADVANTAGES...

10

ADVANTAGES

"I do not propose to discuss the material advantages of our association with Britain, save to remark th^.t (as you all know) it ’ins conferred, and will continue to confer, substantial financial and commercial advantages on both sides.

"I should like, however, to mention briefly soma of the other benefits which we derive from it, though some of these can also be argued to have indirectly contributed to our material success.

r,0ne of the most important reasons for our prosperity is the initiative and enterprise of our manufacturers, traders and ccr;:• rcial leaders. These men have flourished because they know that, provided they kept within the bounds of laws which were liberal in origin and humanely applied, they will not be discouraged or obstructed. They know that they moy speak with complete freedom in public or in private, subject only to those restrictions on sedition and libel which any immunity must accept.

'"This freedom of thought and expression is essential to the full development of the human spirit. It encourages an open society in which ideas and enterprise develop without constraint and in which in-enuity and originality can flower.

’It is the sad lesson of other countries that the repression of personal opinion 1c '.ds, sooner or l:.t r, to bad administration, to aS vi1 unrest and ultimately to violence and insurrection. The British tr. .c’ition of freedom of expression, which has been transplanted with such success to Hong Kong, is perhaps best illustrated by the way in which our nedi' operate. They arc loud and insistent in their criticism of persons, departments and institutions. In this they perform an essential function, by ventilating grievances and ensuring that the territory is administered in a humane and realistic way.

/'’Allied......

- 11

"Allied to the freedom of speech is the independence of thought and action of the Judiciary. Although this is a British concept of long-standing, it is inadequately understood or appreciated hero. Many people find it hard to believe that Humbers of the Judiciary, wo are servants of the Crown and paid from revenues collected by the Government, are able to preserve a complete detachment when adjudicating between the Government and a private citizen. f

"Yet I can assure the doubters that this is indeed so and that tho administration doos not, and by long custom and tradition may not, try to influence the Courts in the way in which they deal with their cases•

"Thore is, of course, considerable public criticism, because the courts do not impose sufficiently severe sentences to satisfy a community which is outraged by the activities of robbers .and hooligans.

"I suggest that these attacks on the Judiciary illustrate that this is a healthy society. It is healthy because people are prepared to express their indignation publicly. It is healthy because t icy arc prepared to criticise the Judiciary openly. It is healthy because tho Judiciary makes up its own mind as to tho extent to which it will accept these criticisms.

"I ask anyone who argues that the Government should be able

to give instructions to tho Judici ry, to consider what happens in countries in which this is post ible. If the administration is ado to ensure tho punishment of those who criticise it or who ?.rc- unpop«l r with it, there remains only a very short step to autocracy, injustice

and oppression.

/ArprT’Irr’T.Trr’

12

ATTITUDE GF AVERAGE BRITON

I have spoken of the critical view taken of Hong Kong by some British papers, politicians•or reformers, but I like to b~li. vc that is not typical of the attitude of the average Briton, insofar as th t mythical figure has any knowledge of, or interest in, Hong Kong. I guess that his feelings are a mixture of amused affection and admiration.

’’Perhaps he has relatives or friends who have visited Ilong Kong, particularly as members of the Armed Forces. They will hr.Vu told him, in laudatory terms, of the bustle, gaiety and beauty of the place, for it is rare for someone who has been here not to have been bewitched by it.

”He may have be~n to a Chinese restaurant in England; here he will have oaten an extraordinary amalgam of oriental, and occidental food which ho will have imagined to be a Chinese meal, even though dishes like chop sucy and chips would be unrecognisable to us.

’’Ho will h’Vv mot in this restaurant, and probably elsewhere, Hong Kong people who have settled in Britain. He- will have discovered that they are, almost without exception, courteous, considerate and beautifully behaved. Of all the immigrant communities in Britain, the Chinese arc acknowledged as the most hardworking, law-abiding and self-sufficient.

”Our average Briton will have bought a variety of Heng Kong products, ranging from shirts and shoes to plastic goods, toys and transistors. He will have found them to be well designed, of good quality and lower in price than their competitors. He no longer thinks of Hong Kong as a place in which cheap and shoddy goods are produced.

’’From

- 13

’’From time to time, he hears criticisms of Hong Kong, some of which are accurate, some of which used to be true but are so no longer and some of w .ich arc without foundation, though he will not know into which category they fall. Some of them may make on impact upon him and he will realise that Hong Kong has its flaws - as indeed we all admit. But they will not have seriously affected his admiration for Hong Kong and for its remarkable achievements.

CONCLUSION

: There is nothing rougher th^n a family squabble. The air rings with accusations of bias, dishonesty, stupidity .and blindness. The outsider could be forgiven for supposing that each protagonist nourished an intense and irreparable distaste for his closest relatives. But the outsider would bo wrong, as he would discover very quickly if he were rash enough to enter the argument himself. Ho would find trat those who had compared one another to a selection of the lower animals (much to the latter’s advantage) would close ranks and join together in sudden accord to repel the intruder.

"So it has often been with Britain. From her people we have received considerable criticism, some of it ill-informed or based upon inaccurate assumptions. But when danger arises Britain has never left us unaided. When our interests have been threatened, she has defended then vigorously against a hostile world. We arc bound together by history and by political realities. Uneasy bedfellows wo may sometimes be, but the disadvantages and pinpricks arc heavily outweighed by the benefits which accrue abundantly to both aides from the relatbnship.”

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PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Thursday, January 15» 197$

CONTENTS page no.

work on large modern estate in Chai Wan enters new stage ........

Misunderstanding of textile quota transfer notice clarified ...... 5

Press conference on effects of r-iTR work......................... 4

Press conference on hill fires ................................... 4

Round the peak walk for both the handicapped and able-bodied .... 5

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Thursday, January 15, 1976

1

NEW HObiES FOR 15,000 AT CH Al WAN

*,»«***

The Public >vorks Depc\rtment will shortly begin construction work on the second stage of a large new modern estate at Chai Wan which will house a total of 15,390 people.

The ^51 million housing complex is being built by the Architectural Office of the P W,D. on behalf of the Housing Authority as part of the ten year housing programme.

when fully completed in March 1978, it will contain 2,240 self-contained flats, a central shopping centre, two primary schools^ a welfare hall, a post office, an inoculation centre, recreational grounds and a restaurant,

Mr. Thomas Ku, Senior Architect of P.W.D.’s Architectural Office, said today construction work on the second stage of the estate would start in April and should be completed within two years.

Tenders for the project, which involves construction of a 22-storey domestic block and a market and carpark complex, will be invited this week.

"The 22-storey block will be the tallest in the estate and will provide. 1,524 spacious rooms for 10,171 people. Each unit will have its own kitchen and toilet facilities," he said.

Mr. Ku said foundation work on the three other blocks being built under Stage Ono was almost finished and work on the superstructure would begin in a few weeks.

"These three seven-storey blocks should be ready by January next year and the first of the 5,200 tenants will be able to move in shortly after.

"by then," he added, "the two estate primary schools, the welfare hall, 1 inoculation centre, post office and much of the recreational open space being provided will also be ready to serve residents."

/He noted .....

Thursday, January 15, 197$

2

He noted that a secondary school was also being built outside the estate boundary. This school would serve the whole district.

Mr. Ku said the planning of centralised facilities for the future estate residents had enabled a more generous allocation of open space for the area.

Nearly four acres of open space would be provided in and around the estate to cater for the recreational needs of the residents. There would include two rest gardens and children’s playgrounds.

To enable tenants and nearby Residents to go about their daily shopping activities cinveniently, the’p.W.D. architects have designed a large market and carpark complex next to the estate.

’’This shopping complex,’’ Mr. Ku said, ’’will be of a higher standard to make up for the rather inadequate commercial and marketing facilities in the adjacent older estates.”

Two footbridges would be built over Chai Wan Road to provide easy access for residents of the old CHai Wan Estate to make use of the shopping facilities and other amenities of the new estate.

The market complex, to be managed by the Urban Services Department, would provide 59 large and 556 mini-stalls, complete with washing, scalding, storage and refuse disposal facilities. Provision has also been made for 20 cooked-food stalls with a centralised fume-extracting system.

Incorporated in the complex would be a library, U.S.D. registration offices and a carpark.

Mr. Ku said it was intended initially to build only two floors of the carpark providing spaces for 225 cars, but allowance would be made to extend it at a later stage to provide another 527 parking spaces.

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/3......

Thursday, January 15, 1976

3

DC & I CLARIFIES MISUNDERSTANDING

********

It is believed that some people in the textile trade have somehow had the wrong impression that the DC & I has changed its rules and is currently not allowing people to transfer their textile quotas.

A Commerce and Industry Department spokesman said categorically today that this was not so.

’’This is an erroneous impression due probably to a recent misreporting by several Chinese newspapers of a DC & I Notice to exporters. This Notice stated that only certain preliminary quota allocations made to certain specified companies may not be transferred for the time being,” he said.

The reason for this, the spokesman continued, was that those companies’ quota entitlements had still to be checked. ’’This is an isolated case and the situation is a temporary one.”

He said that for many years now, quotas had been transferred among people in the textile trade, and these were still transferrable. Transfers, he added, enabled maximum utilisation of quotas and this was something the departments accepted.

The Notice to exporters which was wrongly reported in several Chinese newspapers was issued on November 29, 1975, Series 2 (EEC) No. 28/75, and concerns preliminary quota allocations for 1976 in respect of exports of restrained textiles to the EEC.

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A.......

Thursday, January 15j 1976

4

PRESS CONFERENCE ON MASS TRANSIT RAILWAY

********

NOTE TO EDITORS:

A press conference will be held in the G.I.S. Theatre at 3 p*m. tomorrow (Friday) about the effects of the construction of the Mass Transit Railway.

Officers from the Public Works Department, the Home Affairs Department, Transport Department, Royal Hong Kong Police and the Mass Transit Railway Corporation, will be on hand to answer questions from the Press.

You are cordially invited to attend.

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PRESS CONFERENCE ON HILL FIRES

********

NOTE TO EDITORS:

A press-conference will be held at 10.30 a.ra. tomorrow (Friday) at the G.I.S. Theatre, onthe fifth floor of Beaconsfield House, in connection with the recent series of hill fires.

The conference will be given by Mr. H.S. Grewal, Deputy Secretary for the Environment, Colonial Secretariat, and Mr. P.A. Daley, Senior Forestry Officer of the Agriculture and Fisheries Department.

You are invited to cover the conference.

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Thursday, January 15, 197&

5

"PHAB WALK” ROUND THE PEAK

»««»*«**

About 400 people, including more than 100 handicapped, are expected to take part in a walkathon round the Peak on Saturday (January 17).

The walk, the second jointly organised by the Hong Kong PHAB Association and the Education Department’s Recreation and Sport Service, will begin at 10.50 a.m. from the Peak carpark.

Participants will go round the Peak through Lugard Road and Harlech Road.

Mr. Thomas Lee, Director of Social Welfare, Mr. Michael Caswell, Principal Education Officer, Recreation and Sport, and the Acting Commissioner of Police, Mr. Roy Henry, will officiate at the opening ceremony.

Dr. Harry Fang, Legislative Councillor, will present prizes at the conclusion of the walk.

Note to Editors: You are cordially invited to cover the event.

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PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Friday, January 16, 1976

CONTENTS PAGE NO.

Secretary for the Civil Service comments on Air Traffio Controllers* requests .............................................

Traffic on Nathan Hoad to be re-routed for MTR wcrks ............... 4

More land for developing Lantau resort ............................. 6

Firing Practice ...................................................

Road improvements in Aberdeen ...................................... 7

Sham Shing Hui business operators receive advance compensation payment ..........................................................

Traffic arrangements for *’Walk for a Million”...................   10

Central-Hung Hom ferry sailing times re-scheduled ................. 11

Need to train youths to think for themselves....................... 12

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong. Tel: 5'233191

Friday, January 16, 1976

1

STATEMENT BY SECRETARY FOR CIVIL SERVICE

-W V W M M W W m r- A A A A A

The Secretary for the Civil Service, Mr. Alan Scott, said today (Friday) that the Air Traffic Control Association had informed the Director of Civil Aviation, Mr. R. Downing, that the Association intended within the next seven days to take work-to-rule action in support of its request for improved pay and conditions of service.

While regretting that the Association found it necessary to make this announcement, Mr. Scott said that both he and the Director, had most carefully examined several times the requests and arguments put forward by the Association, and had been unable to agree that a substantial enough case had been made for the improvements requested. There had been regular meetings between the Director and the Association representatives, and on December 19 a very full reply on the various points had been sent to the Association by the Director.

The Association’s requests cover several points including: pay, changes in the volume and complexity of work, and the risk of losing their jobs because of annual medical and proficiency examination requirements.

On pay, the Association claims that salaries should be related to aircrew pay.

”No evidence has been put forward that any administration accepts this, and the commercial factors and conditions of work affecting aircrew are not comparable with those of Air Traffic Control staff holding secure civil service appointments,” Mr. Scott said.

” There is clear evidence that Hong Kong Air /Traffic.................................................

Friday, January 16, 1976

2

Traffic Controllers salaries arc better than those of similar staff in the region, including Hew Zealand; and are comparable with Australia; and this docs not take into account tax effects, non—contributory pensions, and subsidised housing,” he pointed out.

On changes in workload, the government view is that the 1971 Salaries Commission considered most carefully the position as at that time. The Director, as government’s professional adviser in the field, has reexamined with considerable care the whole position, and considers that the 1971 Commission was not out of line in its assessment; and that the position has not significantly altered since 1971 •

On medical and proficiency tests, the facts do not support what would otherwise be a valid matter for concern by the Association. Mr. Scott noted that in the last 25 years, only two officers have been invalided out, and both, he said were rhemployed on Air Traffic Control duties elsewhere.

"A clear assurance has been given by the Secretary for the Civil Service that any officer in this position would be most sympathetically treated and other employment found, if at all possible, in the civil service. The same would apply to any officer who failed to pass the proficiency tests. No officer has ever been retired on this account.”

Mr. Scott went on to say that the Air Traffic Control Officer is trained from the age of 18 or 19 at government expense and his time of training is pensionable service. The salary structure enables the typical Air Traffic Control Officer to reach the main professional maximum (£6910) at age 32, which is earlier than other professions. These factors recognise adequately the stress and complexity factors in their work.

/’’The Government

Friday, January 16, 1976

- 3 -

"The Government fully understands and accepts the right of staff associations to make representations for improved conditions, but has the duty to ensure that public funds are properly spent, along with its responsibility as an employer to provide fair remuneration and benefits for civil servants. There will be occasions when an association will be dissatisfied, because management feels that it cannot reasonably give concessions

In this particular case, the Secretary for the Civil Service considers that Air Traffic Controllers are reasonably remunerated although, as the Director has already said to them, there may be aspects of their career structure which can be looked into and which he has invited them to disevss.

Work-to-rule is not a very precise term and it may mean one thing to an employee and another to an employer. In this instance, the regulations for the work of Air Traffic Controllers are clearly laid down by the Director in accordance with international standards. It may therefore be said that working-to-rule is exactly what is expected of Air Traffic Controllers all the time, and that any delays which result from this proposed action indicate that they are not performing their jobs properly and efficiently. If this turns out to be the case, then it will be necessary to consider whether salaries are being fully earned and if not, whether some action should be taken.

The Secretary for the Civil Service regards this as a sad prospect, because the aim is to keep the public services going and to keep civil servants reasonably content. He therefore hopes that the Association will review its stand and rejoin the Director in the Consultative Council before these matters escalate unnecessarily.

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A.......

Friday, January 16, 197$

4

STREET ALTERATIONS DUE TO MTR WORKS IN NATHAN ROAD

**«««**»*

Construction of the Mass Transit Railway stations and tunnels in Nathan Road between Salisbury Road and Boundary Street will begin in March this year and will be completed by the end of 1979-

This part of the system includes the construction by cut-and-cover methods of undergrounds stations at Tsim Sha Tsui, Jordan Road, Waterloo Road, Argyle Street and of works near Prince Edward Road and Boundary Street.

The running lines between these works will be constructed by bored tunnel methods. The stations include the construction of entrances and ventilation shafts which will appear as permanent ground level structures.

However, before work can start on this section of the Mass Transit Railway, certain street alterations and diversions affecting principally Nathan Road and Shanghai Street, have to be made.

Details of the street alterations and diversions are notified in today’s Government Gazette.

The road alterations involve various traffic diversions and re-routings which will be implemented at different dates during a four-month period and which will result in a new traffic routing plan becoming operative to facilitate the construction of the stations in Nathan Road.

Details of this new traffic routing plan, which will come into operation before the Mass Transit Railway construction work starts, will be announced through the mass media.

Traffic diversions will be substantial and all classes of vehicles will be affected.

/In general ..•••

Friday, January 16, 1976

5

In general, southbound traffic only will continue to use Nathan Road and the displaced northbound traffic will therefore have to use alternative streets, Ferry Street/Tong Mi Road on the west and Princess Margaret Road on the east.

Southbound traffic may also use Shanghai Street between Lai Chi Kok Road and Waterloo Road. Certain streets will of necessity have traffic restrictions imposed but every effort will be made to minimise public inconvenience.

The new Prince Edward Road/Lai Chi Kok Road Flyover forming an eastwest cross-route will be brought into use before the diversions come into effect.

At a later date the Gascoigne Road/Tong Mi Road Flyover will provide a further east-west cross-route.

Plans showing the areas affected by this section of the Mass Transit Railway may be inspected at the City District Office, Central and Western Enquiries Office, Central Government Offices, West Wing, Hong Kong, aid at the Crown Lands and Survey Office, 10th floor, Kowloon Government Offices Building, 405 Nathan Road, Kowloon.

The plans are also on display at the City District Office, Kowloon City, 379 Prince Edward Road; the City district Office, Mong Kok, 751-Nathan Road; the City District Office, Sham Shui Po, 299-303 Lai Chi Kok Road; and the City District Office, Yau Ma Tei, 260-264 Temple Street, Kowloon.

Today’s Government Gazette stipulates that any person making a claim for compensation must send his claim in writing to the Director of Public Works.

The claims must reach the Office of the Director before the expiration of one year from the date of closure of the street or from the completion of the substantial alteration which is alleged to have caused pecuniary loss or damage •

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/6......

Friday, January 16, 1976

6

PIER AT LaNTAU RESORT TO 3E EXTENDED

*******

The Government intends to grant a lease of foreshore and seabed of 8.3 acres to the Hong Kong Resort Co. Ltd in connection with the construction of a self-contained leisure and resort complex on Lantau Island.

The area will be used for the extension of the existing pier at Tai Pak, Discovery Bay.

The extension is necessary following the company’s decision to make the extended pier the main access to the area.

A notification to this effect was published in today’s Gazette for general information.

Any person who has objections to the proposal or any claims of private right should submit such objections or claims or both in writing to the Director of Public Works within two months.

Earlier, the Government•had announced its intention to grant a lease of foreshore and seabed of"up to about 105 acres at Discovery Bay to the company for the construction of the resort complex.

Facilities at the resort include an international class hotel, about 2,200 resort homes of various sizes, golf courses, a yachting marina, tennis courts, an indoor sports hall and a cable-car link.

-------0 --------

FIRING PRACTICE

~ • J •

Firing practice will take place on the Castle Peak Range between

11 a.m. and 4 p.m. on January 30 (Friday).

The public are reminded that it is dangerous to enter the area when the red flags are flying during the time of firing practice.

Friday, January 16, 1976

7

ROaD IMPROVEMENTS IN ABERDEEN

**«#**#«

The Publia Works Department is to further improve a number of road sections in Aberdeen as part of a major project to provide a fast route between Central District and Aberdeen.

Mr.* S.C. Chen, Chief Engineer of PWD's (H.K.) Division, said today traffic movement on the existing road network between the two districts had increased significantly as a result of rapid development in the Aberdeen and Pokfulam areas, and the aim was to provide an alternative direct route, between Central and Aberdeen.

The new highway, he said, would ultimately consist of a four-lane carriageway with two lanes of traffic in ea*h direction from Wong Chuk Hang Road to the new Shek Pai Wan Road now being built. ,

He noted that the Public Works Department had already carried out several schemes of improving traffic conditions on the existing road network serving Central and Aberdeen.

’’For example, the existing Wong Chuk Hang Road has been widened to provide two lanes of traffic ineeither direction and work is progressing to widen Shek Pai Wan Road.

’’Several sections of Pokfulam Road have also been widened and the remaining sections will be improved in stages,” he said.

Mr. Chen said it was intended to build the intervening road connection between Wong Chuk Hang Road and Shek Pai Wan Road in several phases.

/”The present ••.•.

Friday, January 16, 1976

8

’’The present phase comprises essentially construction of a new road on the existing reclamation between Shek Pai Wan Road west of Tin Wan Hill Road and Aberdeen Main Road near the Wholesale Fish Market.”

He added that a foot bridge spanning the new road would also be built to the south of Tin Wan Street to enable pedestrians to cross in safety.

The proposed works will involve alterations to the alignments, widths and levels of short sections of Shek Pai Wan Road, Aberdeen Main Road, Yue Lei Street, Yue Ko Street and the access road leading to the Chinese Permanent Cemetery.

Notice of the proposed undertaking is published in today’s Gazette. Any person objecting to the proposal must send his objection in writing to the Director of Public Works to reach his office not later than February 16, 1976>

Copies of the plan showing the proposed alterations may be inspected at the Crown Lands and Survey Office, Murray Building, 19th floor, Hong Kong; the City District Office (Central and Western) Enquiry Branch, Central Government Offices; the Central CDO, 205A Des Voeux Road West, Ground Floor; or the City District Office (Southern), 52-6*+ Aberdeen Hain Road, Hong Kong.

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/9.....

Friday, January 16, 1976

_ c _

CObJ>*ftbATION PaY-OUT TO SAM SHING HUI BUSINESS OWNERS ******««

Owners of business premises in Sam Shing Hui, New Territories, due to bo cleared to make way for a residential and commercial complex and the Tuen Mun/Tsuen Wan Highway, today each received an advance payment of compensation of $2,000*

About 130 businessmen were involved in the payment administered by Housing Department officials and held in the District Office, Tuen Mun.

The businessmen are now constructing new premises at a nearby resite area built on reclaimed land. Movement to the resite area will begin towards the end of February and be completed by April 30- When the location they are at present vacating is fully redeveloped, the business owners will be given the opportunity to take part in a restricted tender for the commercial sites.

*otal compensation varies from $6,000 to $20,000 and is calculated on the area each business occupies. The balance will be paid at the time the restricted tender is held.

Others included in the Sam Shing Hui clearance are boatyard operators and people who live on boats. The boatyards operators will move to a resite area designed specially for them for use as slipways, while the boat people will either be provided with space in a new temporary typhoon shelter or other accommodation.

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/10......

Friday, January 16, 1976

- 10 -

TRAFFIC /dtRANGEMLNTS IW 'WALK FOR A MILLION' ********

A number of temporary changes in traffic arrangements will be made in Tsuen Wan on Sunday (January i8) because of the "Walk for a Million" event.

From 7 a.m. until about 2 p«m. the following roads will be closed to vehicular traffic: Kwok Shui Road between Shing Mun Road end Fu Uk Road; Shing Mun Road between Wo Yi Hop Road and Pine Apple Dam (Shing Mun Reservoir); all of Ting Fung Street; all of Ting Kwok Street; all of Fu Uk Road; all of Yau Ma Hom Road; and Cheung Wing Road between Yau Ma Hom Road and Wo Yi Hop Road.

Parking spaces will be temporarily suspended in the closed roads and in the unnamed street opposite the Tsuen Wan police station leading to the Tsuen Wan technical secondary school. Only official and emergency vehicles will be allowed to park in these roads.

Parking spaces in Tai Ha Street will also be suspended and reserved for coaches of the organised groups taking part in the walk.

Bus routes affected from 7 a.m. until about 2 p.m. include Kl-IB route No. 32 which will be suspended temporarily, and route No. which will be diverted along Castle Peak Road instead of Kwok Shui Road on both east and west-bound journeys.

A Transport Department spokesman said that as very large crowds are expected motorists should drive with extreme care.

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/11 ......

Friday, January 16, 1976

11

MM SAILI1IG THIES FOR CEl^TRAL-HUNG HOM FERRY SERVICE

*******

The Transport Department announced today that the Star Ferry would be introducing new sailing times for its service from Central to Hung Hom from Monday, January 19.

A spokesme-.n for the department said: ’’The company now has exclusive use of the berth at Hung Hom which it previously shared with the Hong Kong and Yaumati Ferry Company. This will enable the Star Ferry to operate a more regular service between Hung Hom and Edinburgh Place.”

Starting from Monday, the new timetable will be:

From Edinburgh Place From Hung Hom

Mondays to 7»00 a.m. to 7«00 p.m. 7»00 a.m. to 7*20 p.m. every 20 min.

Saturdays

Sundays 8c 7.00 a.m. to 7.20 p.m. 7«00 a.m. to 7*^0 p.m. every 20 min.

Public holidays

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/12......

Friday, January 16, 197b

12

TRAINING YOUTHS TO THINK FOR THEMSELVES

*******

The training of young men and women to think for themselves and to make decisions based on their own observations and evaluations should still be the main aim of education, the Director of Education, Mr. Kenneth Topley, said this evening.

"Such young men and women will be assets to any society which cherishes freedom of thought and speech," Mr. Topley told the gathering at the Speech Day of St. Paul's Co-Educational College and the official naming of the school hall in honour of the late Sir Robert Kotewall.

The Director continued: "It cannot be denied that such training can be given through the teaching of the so-called 'academic* subjects.

"The mind is trained by the method of study, not by the content. This is not to say. that the content can be ignored. It has to be kept as up-to-date as is possible at the school level or it will not find acceptance among the students ?s worthwhile material upon which to exercise their intellectual powers."

Mr. Topley stressed that it must relate to the real world outside the classroom. Properly taught, however, the "academic subjects have just as valuable a part to play in preparing the young to take their places as adult members of the community as have the more obviously society-oriented subjects of the curricula.

He said: "Preparation for life as adults in the wider community outside the school is important and this importance should be recognised in what we teach in our classrooms and in the opportunities we provide in our extra-curricular programmes,

/"To........

Friday, January 16, 1976

13

”To impart knowledge of the community and its problems and to instil a strong community spirit in our pupils should certainly be one of our conscious goals in education. But this should not be done at the expense of what we must still regard as the main aim of education."

The Director paid tribute to Sir Robert Kotewall in this diamond jubilee year of St. Paul’s Co-Educational College. He said that it was very appropriate that formal recognition should be given to the long and distinguished service to the school of the Kotewall family -service which began 53 years ago, only seven years after the founding of the school and which had involved, besides Sir Robert, four other members of the family, including the present principal, Dr. Kotewall.

Mr* Topley said Sir Robert was a great can with very wide interests and enthusiasms and his value as a nenber of the comtiunity was recognised by his being called to serve on both the Legislative and Executive Councils, where he greatly distinguished himself. In good tines and bad he gave always of his best. The service which he gave to Hong Kong was of the noblest and finest.

"Being himself well-versed in both the Chinese and western cultures he encouraged their coning together and mutual understanding. In Hong Kong in particular he always strove to ensure the harmonious living together of the Chinese and English-speaking communities.

,rThroughout his life he constantly sought to improve the living conditions of Hong Kong’s residents and played a valuable role in the extension of recreational and cultural facilities available to the general public. He was also one of those responsible for the establishment of many societies in the field of social welfare which still flourish in Hong Kong today," Mr. Topley said.

0 - -

HONG KONG HOUSING AUTHORITY

Friday, January 16, 1976

TAI HANG TUNG REDEVELOPMENT WORK PROGRESSES SMOOTHLY

********

Housing Authority’s Tai Hang Tung Redevelopment Project is moving ahead as scheduled.

ihree multi-storey buildings to serve as reception blocks, are being constructed on the former Tai Hang Sai Cottage Area site.

Building work is progressing well and has now reached the third floor level.

Two more similar blocks are to be built on an adjourning site to provide a total of 1,700 self-contained flats for the existing tenants of Tai Hang Tung Estate.

The Housing Authority today (Friday) invites tenders for site formation work for the latter blocks.

The Tai Hang Tung Redevelopment project involves the rehousing of the 35>000 tenants of the old Tai Hang Tung Estate, giving them a much improved living condition.

/All 14 .....

2

All 14 existing Mark I blocks on the estate will be demolished and in their place will be new 12-storey blocks of self-contained flats with a ■private balcony, kitchen, toilet and shower.

The future population of the redevelcped estate will still be about 35i000 but because of large site area the population density will drop from the present 2,700 people per acre to 1,700 per acre.

There will be adequate shopping and marketing facilities. It will have its own restaurant, large department store, super market and an ample provision of open space.

- 0--------

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

SATURDAY, JANUARY 17, 1976.

CONTENTS < PAGE NO.

EXPANDING WORK OF PO LEUNG KUK PRAISED BY GOVERNOR ........ 1

FACILITIES FOR CHECKING VEHICLES TO BE EXTENDED ........... 2

PLACES STILL AVAILABLE ON TOOL AND DIE MAKING COURSES ... 3

NEW LIST OF COMMON JURORS TO BE POSTED ................... 3

4

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong. Tel: 5-233191

SATURDAY, JANUARY 17, 1976

PO LEUNG KUK’S WORK PRAISED * M K * * M

THE GOVERNOR, SIR MURRAY MACLEHOSE, TODAY PRAISED THE PO LEUNG KUK FOR ITS SUCCESS IN EXPANDING ITS FACILITIES, PARTICULARLY IN EXTENDING ITS SERVICES TO RESIDENTS OF THE NEW TERRITORIES.

THE NEW NURSERY AND THE SMALL GROUP HOME AT THE KWAI CHUNG ESTATE, HE SAID, HAD CERTAINLY PROVIDED A MUCH NEEDED SERVICE AND NO DOUBT THE PROJECTS PROPOSED FOR LEI MUK SHU AND SHAT IN WOULD BE EQUALLY WELCOME.

SIR MURRAY WAS SPEAKING DURING A VISIT TO THE KUK TO SEE FOR HIMSELF THE PROGRESS. MADE SINCE HIS LA.ST VISIT IN 1972.

THE FOLLOWING IS THE FULL TEXT OF THE GOVERNOR’S SPEECHs-

+THANK YOU, MR. CHAIRMAN, FOR INVITING ME TO VISIT THE PO LEUNG KUK ONCE AGAIN. IT IS INDEED A GREAT PLEASURE TO BE ABLE TO SEE FOR MYSELF THE PROGRESS MADE SINCE MY LAST VISIT IN 1972.

+FOR ALMOST A CENTURY THE KUK HAS ADHERED TO AND ACHIEVED THE OBJECTIVES FOR WHICH IT WAS ESTABLISHED, NAMELY THE PROTECTION OF WOMEN AND CHILDREN. BUT MORE THAR THIS, AS THE CHAIRMAN HAS JUST TOLD US, THE KUK’S WORK AND METHODS HAVE KEPT PACE WITH THE MARCH OF TIME. NOR MERELY ARE YOUNG PEOPLE PROTECTED AND THE WEAK CARED FOR, BUT THEY ARE GIVEN AS NEARLY AS POSSIBLE WHAT A REAL HOME, RATHER THAN AH INSTITUTION, SHOULD GIVE, NAMELY EDUCATION, INDIVIDUAL ATTENTION AND OPPORTUNITIES FOR- THE HEALTHY ENJOYMENT OF THEIR LEISURE TIME.

+1 WISH TO' TAKE THIS OPPORTUNITY TO CONGRATULATE YOU AND YOUR FELLOW DIRECTORS ON THE KUK’S IMPRESSIVE ACHIEVEMENTS WITHIN THE TERM OF OFFICE OF THE CURRENT BOARD. I AM SURE THE COMMUNITY WILL SHARE MY APPRECIATION OF THE TIME, EFFORT AND FINANCIAL BACKING WHICH YOU HAVE GIVEN FOR THE WELFARE OF THE KUK’S CHILDREN.

+1 ALSO CONGRATULATE YOU ON YOUR SUCCESS IN EXPANDING THE KUK’S FACILITIES, PARTICULARLY ON EXTENDING YOUR SERVICES TO RESIDENTS OF THE NEW TERRITORIES. YOUR NEW NURSERY AND THE SMALL GROUP HOME AT THE KWAI CHUNG ESTATE HAVE CERTAINLY PROVIDED A MUCH NEEDED SERVICE AND NO DOUBT THE PROJECTS PROPOSED FOR LEI' MUK SHU AND SHAT IN WILL BE EQUALLY WELCOME.

+1 AM PARTICULARLY INTERESTED IK THE TWO PROPOSED PROJECTS MENTIONED IN YOUR ADDRESS: NAMELY THE HOLIDAY CAMP AT PAK TAM CHUNG AND THE HOSTEL AND WORKSHOP FOR MENTALLY-RETARDED PEOPLE AT KO CHIU ESTATE. I AM SURE THAT THEY WILL BE OF GREAT VALUE.

/♦APPRECIATION


SATURDAY, JANUARY 17, 1976

2

UAP ^APPRECIATION AND SUPPORT OF THE PUBLIC FOR THE KUK HAS ElEN FULLY DEMONSTRATED EY THE KUK’S SUCCESS IN FUND RAISING EFFORTS THIS YEAR. THE PROCEEDS TOTAL NEARLY ,3 MILLION OF WHICH 0.87 MILLION WAS COLLECTED ON ITS FLAG DAY ALONE --A RtCORD IN THE KUK’S HISTORY.

+FI NALLY I SHOULD LIKE TO WISH THE PO LEUNG KUK EVERY 17^’ AND MY PERS0NAL APPRECIATION FOR ALL THOSE WHOSE WORK IS IN ANY 'JAY CONNECTED WITH THE KUK AND FOR ^orthy^cause^^ ^iave given SO GENEROUSLY TO SUPPORT THIS

-----o------

EXTENSION OF VEHICLE INSPECTION CENTRE ******

THE VEHICLE INSPECTION CENTRE AT TO KWA WAN, "KOWLOON IS TO BE EXTENDED TO PROVIDE MUCH NEEDED ADDITIONAL FACILITIES FOR THE INSPECTION OF TAXIS AND PUBLIC VEHICLES.

MR. W.T. MOK, CHIEF ARCHITECT OF THE PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT’S ARCHITECTURAL OFFICE, SAID TODAY WORK ON THE EXTENSION WAS EXPECTED TO START IN MARCH AND SHOULD BE COMPLETED BY JULY THIS YEAR.

THE WORKS, HE SAID, WOULD BASICALLY INVOLVE CONSTRUCTION OF TWO BRAKE TESTING BAYS, FOUR INSPECTION PITS, TWO HYDRAULIC HOIST BAYS, A TAXI METER TESTING ROOM AND ASSOCIATED WORKSHOPS AND PUBLIC WAITING OPEN SPACES.

ON COMPLETION OF THE EXTENSION AT TO KWA WAN, THE TEMPORARY VEHICLE TESTING CENTRE AT WHITFIELD BARRACKS IN TSIM SHA TSUI WILL BE CLOSED TO MAKE WAY FOR THE MASS TRANS IT'RA ILWAY PROJECT.

LAST YEAR, ABOUT 8,000 PUBLIC VEHICLES WERE INSPECTED AT THE TO KWA WAN CENTRE AND ANOTHER 9,000 AT WHITFIELD EARRACKS.

WITH THE ADDITIONAL FACILITIES TO BE PROVIDED AT TO KWA WAN BY THE P.W.D., IT IS ANTICIPATED THAT-THE EXTENDED CENTRE WILL EE ABLE TO CARRY OUT ABOUT 20,000 INSPECTIONS A YEAR.

------o---------

/3

i

SATURDAY, JANUARY 17, 1976. 3 -

TOOL AND DIE MAKING COURSES CONDUCTED DY EXPERTS FROM U.K. ft ft ft ft ft ft

THREE PART-TIME DAY-RELEASE COURSES ON TOOL AND DIE MAKING ARE AT PRESENT RUN BY TWO EXPERTS FROM THE UNITED KINGDOM AT THE HONG KONG TECHNICAL TEACHERS’ COLLEGE.

THE EXPERTS ARRIVED HERE ABOUT TWO MONTHS AGO TO ADVISE ON THE TEACHING OF THE SUBJECT.

APPLICATIONS ARE NOW INVITED FOR THE LIMITED NUMBER OF PLACES STILL AVAILABLE.

THE HOURS OF ATTENDANCE ARE FROM 9 A.M. TO 7 P.M. ON ONE WEEKDAY PER WEEK.

THE LANGUAGE OF INSTRUCTION IS ENGLISH, WITH CHINESE TRANSLATIONS WHERE NECESSARY.

APPLICANTS EMPLOYED OR ARE EXPECTED TO BE EMPLOYED AS TOOL AND DIE MAKERS ARE ELIGIBLE FOR APPLYING. EMPLOYERS WILL BE ASKED TO RECOMMEND THE APPLICANTS.

APPLICANTS ARE ADVISED TO CONTACT IMMEDIATELY THE HONG KONG TECHNICAL TEACHERS’ COLLEGE, 373, QUEEN’S ROAD EAST, WANCHAI HONG KONG (TEL. 5-745311/4).

------0-------

NEW JURY LIST ft ft ft ft

THE REGISTRAR OF THE SUPREME COURT, MR. JOHN OLIVER ANNOUNCED TODAY THAT A FURTHER LIST OF COMMON JURORS WOULD EE POSTED ON THE NOTICE BOARD NEAR THE LIFT INSIDE THE SOUTH-WEST ENTRANCE OF THE SUPREME COURT BUILDING ON

THIS LIST WILL REMAIN POSTED FOR 14 DAYS.

DURING THIS PERIOD ANY PERSON MAY APPLY BY NOTICE IN WRITING TO THE REGISTRAR REQUIRING THAT HIS NAME OR THE NAME OF SOME OTHER PERSON BE POSTED OR REMOVED UPON CAUSE DULY ASSIGNED IN THE NOTICE.

REMOVE

THE REGISTRAR SHALL IN HIS DISCRETION, POST OR

SUCH NAME ACCORDINGLY AND SHALL, IF NECESSARY, ALTER THE LIST.

- - o - -

• • PRM 7

IgisI laM

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

SUNDAY, JANUARY 18, 1976

PATIENTS ADMITTED TO G.E.H. TOP MILLION MARK ' # K O# #

QUEEN ELIZABETH HOSPITAL, OKE OF THE LARGEST AND EEST EQUIPPED GENERAL HOSPITALS IN THE COMMONWEALTH, HAS REACHED ANOTHER MILESTONE' IN THE HISTORY OF HONG KONG’S MEDICAL AND HEALTH SERVICES.

IN A SHORT SPAN OF 12 YEARS SINCE ITS INCEPTION ON DECEMBER 3, 1963, THE NUMBER OF PATIENTS ADMITTED TO THE HOSPITAL HAS ALREADY TOPPED THE MILLION MARK, A REMARKABLE RECORD EVEN LY WORLD STANDARD.

THE MILLIONTH PATIENT WAS ADMITTED TO THE GENERAL WARD ON JANUARY 12, HERALDING THE START OF THE HOSPITAL’S 13TH YEAR GF SERV ICE.

BUILT AT A COST OF SOME $65 MILLION, INCLUDING EQUIPMENT, THE 1,600-EED HOSPITAL (WHERE THERE ARE USUALLY AN EXTRA 3OO TO 400 CAMP BEDS FOR EMERGENCY CASES) HAS BECOME A FAMILIAR LANDMARK TO HONG KOhlb RESIDENTS. THE FOUNDATION STONE OF THE HOSPITAL WAS LAID LY PRINCE PHILIP IN MARCH, 1959.

112 FIRST YEAR 0F OPERATION 41,532 PATIENTS WERE ADMITTED AND 112,500 CASES WERE TREATED IK THE CASUALTY DEPARTMENT. THESE WERE DRAMATICALLY INCREASED TO 140,281 AND 242,478 RESPECTIVELY IN 1975.*

CN THE FIGURES, A SPOKESMAN FOR THE MEDICAL AND HEALTH SAIJ» + THESE FIGURES ILLUSTRATE WHAT THE QUEEN ELIZABETH HOSPITAL HAS COME TO MEAN TO US IN HONG KONG. IT IS A SOBERING THOUGHT THAT THE EQUIVALENT OF A QUARTER OF OUR TOTAL POPULATION HAVE BENEFITTED FROM THE SERVICES PROVIDED DY THIS ONE HOSPITAL.*

M* D0UET S0ME HAVE HAD CAUSE FOR COMPLAINT, THE GREAT

MAJORITY HAVE GONE AWAY GRATEFUL TO THE HOSPITAL AND ITS STAFF FOR RESTORING THEM AND THEIR FAMILIES TO GOOD HEALTH,* HE ADDED.

r,u*LCENT 0F ALL ADMISSIONS CAME THROUGH THE CASUALTY SECTION, WHICH OPERATES 24 HOURS A DAY. DURING 1975. ATTENDANCE WAS ON AN AVERAGE OF 700 A DAY, OR ONE PATIENT EVERY TWO MINUTES.

/THE SPOKESMAN .....

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong. Tel: 5-233191

SUNDAY, JANUARY 18, 1976

2

riIT SPOKESMAN SAID THE HOSPITAL WAS AT PRESENT QUITE OVERCROWDED BUT IT WAS HOPED THAT THIS WOULD BECOME LESS APPARENT AS THE PRINCESS MARGARET HOSPITAL GRADUALLY MOVED INTO FULL OPERATION. ™INGESS

+WE DO NOT CLAIM THAT THE QUEEN ELIZABETH HOSPITAL IS IN ANY WAY PERFECT, BUT WE DO CLAIM THAT THESE FIGURES ARE IMPRESS VE AND THE RATE OF ADMISSION IS ONE OF THE HIGHEST IN THE WORLD + HE

SAID.

+THIS IS SOMETHING OF WHICH HONG KONG MAY BE JUSTIFIABLY

PROUD,+ HE ADDED. .uuo1 if 1ault

-----0------

SHA TIN SITE TO DE DEVELOPED

******

GOVERNMENT IS TO INVITE TENDERS FOR A SITE AT SHA TIN TO BE DEVELOPED FOR PRIVATE, RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERCIAL PURPOSES.

A NEW TERRITORIES ADMINISTRATION SPOKESMAN SAID THE SITE WAS ON THE EASTERN SIDE OF SHA TIN COVE AND THE SUCCESSFUL BIDDER WOULD BE RESPONSIBLE FOR RECLAMATION AND CONSTRUCTION AS WELL AS PROVIDING ROADWORKS AND DRAINAGE.

THE TOTAL AREA TO BE RECLAIMED IS ABOUT 20 ACRES, OF WHICH SOME 11 .ACRES WILL BE RETAINED BY THE DEVELOPER. THE BALANCE WILL BE USED BY GOVERNMENT FOR ROADS AND OPEN SPACES.

THE DEVELOPER-WILL BE REQUIRED TO PROVIDE OPEN SPACES AND OTHER FACILITIES WITHIN THE AREA.

THE SITE, SITUATED CLOSE TO YUEN CHAU KOK, WILL HAVE A VIEW OF THE FUTURE RACE COURSE.

DOCUMENTS ARE NOW BEING PREPARED AND IT IS HOPED THAT THE TENDER WILL TAKE PLACE EARLY IN KARCH.

THE SUCCESSFUL TENDERER WILL DE REQUIRED TO DEPOSIT L-10 MILLION AND PAY THE REMAINDER OF THE PREMIUM TENDERED EITHER BY ONE LUMP SUM OR DY NINE EQUAL ANNUAL INSTALMENTS, INCLUDING INTEREST AT 10 PER CENT.

SUNDAY, JANUARY 18, 1976

CERTIFICATE OF EDUCATION EXAMINATION 1977 * * K * H H * /

THE SECRETARY OF THE HONG KONG CERTIFICATE OF EDUCATION BOARD TODAY REMINDED SCHOOLS WISHING TO ENTER FORM V OR MIDDLE V CANDIDATES AND +ENGLISH ONLY* CANDIDATES, BOTH FOR THE FIRST TIME, TO SIT FOR THE CERTIFICATE OF EDUCATION EXAMINATION 1977, TO SEND THEIR APPLICATIONS TO HIM NOT LATER THAN FEBRUARY 1.

+SCHOOLS WISHING TO ENTER CANDIDATES EOR THE FIRST TIME IN SHORTHAND, TYPEWRITING, CHEMISTRY, BIOLOGY, POTTERY, PHYSICS, DOMESTIC SUBJECT (COOKERY AND NEEDLEWORK), DRESSMAKING, WOODWORK, METALWORK, PRACTICAL ELECTRICITY AND TECHNICAL DRAWING SHOULD ALSO MAKE APPLICATION BY THE SAME DATE,+ THE SECRETARY SAID.

THE ADDRESS OF THE HONG KONG CERTIFICATE OF EDUCATION EXAMINATION BOARD IS CANTON ROAD GOVERNMENT OFFICES, 11TH FLOOR, 393, CANTON ROAD, KOWLOON.

APPLICATION FORMS FOR THE 1977 CERTIFICATE OF EDUCATION EXAMINATION MAY BE OBTAINED FROM THE SECRETARY.

ENGLISH AND CHINESE HANDBOOKS OF REGULATIONS AND SYLLABUSES FOR THE EXAMINATION ARE ON SALE AT THE GOVERNMENT PUBLICATIONS CENTRE, STAR FERRY CONCOURSE, HONG KONG.

FRH 7

IgisI I wl

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 1976

• •

CONTENTS PAGE NO.

PROPOSALS TO REPLACE SECONDARY SCHOOL ENTRANCE EXAMINATION PUBLISHED FOR COMMENT ............... 1

DEMAND FOR BOTH PRIVATE AND PUBLIC HOUSING WILL CONTINUE 4

BIRTH RATE SHOWED DOWNWARD TREND LAST YEAR ...... 6

AMBULANCE COMMAND ANSWERED 16 PER CENT MORE CALLS IN 1975 ............................................ 7

TRAFFIC ARRANGEMENTS IN YUEN LONG FOR NEW YEAR FAIR .... R

WATER INTERRUPTION IN CLEAR WATER BAY ROAD ARFA . R

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong. Tel: 5-233191

MONDAY, JANUARY 19, 197

1

REPLACEMENT OF THE SECONDARY SCHOOL ENTRANCE EXAMINATION

& H n ft ft k

ALLOCATION OF PUPILS TO SCHOOLS ON AH AREA BASIS, THE SUBSTITUTION OF WIDE INTERNAL SCHOOL ASSESSMENTS OVER THREE TERMS FOR A NARROWER PUBLIC EXAMINATION CONDUCTED IN ONE DAY, A FAIRER SYSTEM OF INTAKE FOR SECONDARY SCHOOLS AND A MORE EGALITARIAN SCHOOL SYSTEM - THESE ARE THE MAIN FEATURES OF THE REPORT OF THE WORKING PARTY. OH THE REPLACEMENT OF THE SECONDARY SCHOOLS ENTRANCE EXAMINATION (S.S.E.E.) ISSUED TODAY DY THE DIRECTOR OF EDUCATION, HR. KENNETH TOPLEY.

FOLLOWING THE PUBLICATION OF THE WHITE PAPER ON THE EXPANSION OF SECONDARY EDUCATION IN OCTOBER 1974, THE DIRECTOR OF EDUCATION APPOINTED THE WORKING PARTY TO MAKE RECOMMENDATIONS ON HOW PRIMARY 6 LEAVERS WOULD BE ALLOCATED TO SECONDARY SCHOOLS WHEN THERE WERE SUFFICIENT FORMS l-lI I PLACES FOR'EVERY CHILD IN THE APPROPRIATE AGE GROUP AND THE S.S.E.E. WAS RO LONGER NECESSARY.

THE 26-MEMBER WORKING PARTY, CHAIRED BY THE FORMER DEPUTY DIRECTOR OF EDUCATION, MR. CHARLES LOWE, CONSISTED OF HEADS AND TEACHERS OF SCHOOLS OF ALL KINDS AND REPRESENTATIVES OF GOVERNMENT DEPARTMENTS.

COPIES OF THE REPORT IN ENGLISH AND CHINESE HAVE BEEN SENT TO ALL PRIMARY AND SECONDARY SCHOOLS AS WELL AS TO EDUCATIONAL BODIES FOR THEIR INFORMATION AND COMMENTS, A SPOKESMAN FOR THE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT SAID.

THE DIRECTOR OF EDUCATION WISHES ALL CONCERNED TO HAVE AN OPPORTUNITY TO STUDY ARD DISCUSS THE REPORT BEFORE HE MAKES A DECISION WHETHER TO ADOPT ITS RECOMMENDATIONS.

THE SPOKESMAN EXPRESSED THE HOPE THAT COMMENTS WOULD REACH THE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT BY THE END OF FEBRUARY, TO PERMIT AN EARLY DECISION AND THE NECESSARY FORWARD PLANNING IN THE BEST INTERESTS OF PUPILS, PARENTS AND SCHOOLS.

A SUMMARY OF THE REPORT COULD HARDLY DO JUSTICE PROFESSIONAL DOCUMENT, THE E.D. SPOKESMAN SAID, BUT, A BRIEF RESUME WAS POSSIBLE, THE REPORT HAD MADE THE MAJOR RECOMMENDATIONS :

TO A COMPLEX INSOFAR AS FOLLOWING

REGIONALISATION

THE ALLOCATION OF PRIMARY '6 LEAVERS SHOULD DE ON A REGIONAL BASIS, BUT BECAUSE OF THE UNEVEN DISTRIBUTION OF SCHOOLS, IT WAS NOT PRACTICABLE TO FOLLOW NEAT GEOGRAPHICAL BOUNDARIES. INSTEAD, A SYSTEM OF SCHOOL +HETWORKS+ SHOULD EE DRAWN UP IN SUCH A WAY THAT THEY WOULD COVER BROAD GEOGRAPHICAL AREAS AND THAT EACH WOULD HAVE THE SAME MIX OF THE DIFFERENT TYPES OF SECONDARY SCHOOL PLACES. EACH SCHOOL NETWORK SHOULD CONTAIN THE SAME PROPORTION OF ANGLO-CHINESE AND CHINESE MIDDLE PLACES, GRAMMAR AND TECHNICAL PLACES, AND SO ON. THIS SHOULD MEAN THAT NO CHILD WOULD BE PLACED IN A DISADVANTAGEOUS POSITION BECAUSE HE BELONGED TO A PARTICULAR SCHOOL NETWORK.

/INTERNAL .....

MONDAY, JANUARY 19, 1976

2

INTERNAL ASSESSMENTS

THESE SHOULD EE USED AS A DAS IS FOR DECIDING PRIORITY OF ALLOCATION: THE RESULTS OF THE PRIMARY 5 FINAL EXAMINATION AND THE PRIMARY 6 MID-YEAR AND FINAL EXAMINATIONS SHOULD BE TAKEN INTO CONSIDERATION IN DETERMINING THE ORDER OF MERIT WITHIN EACH PRIMARY SCHOOL. ALL SUBJECTS TAUGHT IN THOSE TWO YEARS, EXCEPT PHYSICAL EDUCATION, SHOULD BE COUNTED AND THE WEIGHTING TO EE GIVEN TO INDIVIDUAL SUBJECTS SHOULD REFLECT THE TIME SPENT TEACHING THEM IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE RECOMMENDATIONS CF THE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT.

ALLOCATION I

EACH INTERNAL ORDER OF MERIT WOULD EE DIVIDED INTO FIVE EQUAL BANDS, AND ALL THE PUPILS IN EACH BAND WOULD THEN BE GROUPED TOGETHER AND CONSIDERED FOR ALLOCATION. CHILDREN IN BAND 1 WOULD EE ALLOCATED BEFORE THOSE IN BAND 2, BAND 2 BEFORE BAND 3, AND SO ON. ALLOCATION WOULD EE BASED ON PARENTAL CHOICE, AND IF THERE WERE MORE CHILDREN CHOOSING A PARTICULAR SECONDARY SCHOOL THAN THERE WERE PLACES AVAILABLE, A STATISTICALLY FAIR RANDOM SELECTION WOULD BE MADE OF THE NUMBER OF CHILDREN TO FILL THE VACANCIES IN THAT SCHOOL.

MIXED-ABILITY INTAKE

ADOPTING A 5-BAND SYSTEM AND TREATING ALL CHILDREN IN THE SAME BAND AS BEING EQUAL IN ATTAINMENT AND ABILITY WHETHER THEY CAME FROM THE SAME PRIMARY SCHOOL OR NOT, WOULD RESULT IN A SUBSTANTIAL ELEMENT OF ABILITY MIX IN SECONDARY SCHOOL INTAKE. THE WORKING PARTY WAS NOT IN FAVOUR OF GREATER DEGREE OF ABILITY MIX IN THE FIRST FEW YEARS OF THE NEW SYSTEM SINCE LOST SCHOOLS AND TEACHERS IN HONG KONG WERE HOT EXPERIENCED IN HANDLING CHILDREN OF A WIDE RANGE OF ABILITY. TREATING ALL PRIMARY SCHOOLS SIMILARLY WOULD LEAD TO A MORE EGALITARIAN PRIMARY SYSTEM SINCE THERE WOULD BE LESS REASON FOR PARENTS TO SEND THEIR CHILDREN TO THE PRESTIGIOUS PRIMARY SCHOOLS. THIS WOULD REMOVE A CONSIDERABLE AMOUNT OF THE PRESSURE AND ANXIETY ROW FELT BY PARENTS AND CHILDREN.

DISTRICT COUNCILS

IN ORDER TO ENSURE THAT THE SYSTEM OF INTERNAL ASSESSMENT WOULD WORK SMOOTHLY AND FAIRLY, SUPERVISORY BODIES KNOWN AS DISTRICT COUNCILS SHOULD BE SET UP, ONE FOR EACH SCHOOL NET. THESE COUNCILS SHOULD BE COMPOSED OF AH EQUAL NUMBER OF PRIMARY AND SECONDARY SCHOOL HEADS, AS WELL AS REPRESENTATIVES OF THE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT AND THE RELEVANT CITY DISTRICT OFFICE OR NEW TERRITORIES ADMINISTRATION DISTRICT OFFICE.

/FEEDER .....

MONDAY, JANUARY 19, 1976

5

FEEDER SCHOOLS

THE PRESENT FEEDER SCHOOL SCHEME INCREASE EQUALITY OF OPPORTUNITY. AT

SHOULD DE MODIFIED TO PRESENT ALL THE FORM I THEORY DE TAKEN UP SOLELY

PLACES IN A SECONDARY SCHOOL COULD IN

DY PUPILS FROM THE LINKED FEEDER PRIMARY SCHOOL. IN FUTURE ONLY 50 PER CERT OF THE PLACES SHOULD DE RESERVED FOR FEEDER ALLOCATION, AND THIS PERCENTAGE SHOULD EE THREE YEARS AFTER THE NEW SYSTEM HAD BEEN

REVIEWED HOT LATER THAN

PUT INTO OPERATION

MOTE TO ED I TORS

COPIES OF THE WORKING PARTY’S REPORT LOXES, GOVERNMENT FLOOR, THIS EVENING

SEPARATELY IN THE PRESS BEACONSFIELD HOUSE, 5TH

WILL DE DISTRIBUTED INFORMATION SERVICES,

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A

MONDAY, JANUARY 19, 1976

4

ROOt: FOR PRIVATE AND PUBLIC HOUSING TO CO-EXIST

*****

THERE IS ROOM 111 HONG KONG FOR BOTH PRIVATE AND PUBLIC HOUSING TO CO-EXIST AND PROSPER, .IRS. ELAINE CHIA, PRINCIPAL ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR HOUSING, SAID TODAY.

+GOVERNMENT+, SHE SAID, +IS AS CONCERNED WITH GIVING ENCOURAGEMENT TO PRIVATE DEVELOPERS AS IT IS TO PROMOTE NEW HOUSE-BUILD IHG li! THE PUBLIC SECTOR.+

SPEAKING AT THE FIRST QUARTERLY MEETING FOR 1975/76 OF THE HONG KONG COUNCIL OF SOCIAL SERVICE, MRS. CHIA SAID RECENT STUDIES INDICATED THAT ABOUT HALF OF ALL FAMILIES IN HONG KONG COULD AFFORD PRIVATE HOUSING. THE REMAINDER WOULD REQUIRE AIDED HOUSING, AS AGAINST 32 PER CERT OF ALL HOUSEHOLDS (OR 44 PER CENT OF THE POPULATION) ALREADY IN PUBLIC HOUSING.

ON PUBLIC HOUSING, SHE SAID THE HOUSING AUTHORITY FACED , TWO TASKS. ONE WAS TO BUILD AS MANY NEW ESTATES AS FUNDS AND OTHER RESOURCES WOULD ALLOW FOR OVERCROWDED FAMILIES IN BOTH PRIVATE AND PUBLIC HOUSING, SQUATTERS, LICENSED AREA OCCUPANTS AND EMERGENCY VICTIMS. THE OTHER ..AS TO REHOUSE THE 500,000 PEOPLE NOW LIVING IN VERY UNSATISFACTORY CONDITIONS IN THE OLDEST ESTATES.

THESE TWO TASKS, SHE ADDED, WERE INTER-RELATED AND HAD TO BE TACKLED CONCURRENTLY.

MRS. CHIA SAID: +DESPITE THE UNFAVOURABLE ECONOMIC SITUATION IN 1975, THE HOUSING PROGRAMME HAS NOT BEEN TOO BADLY AFFECTED. AT THE END OF 1975, THERE WERE TEN PUBLIC HOUSING PROJECTS UNDER CONSTRUCTION, WHILE SIX OTHERS WILL HAVE THEIR CONTRACTS LET BEFORE APRIL THIS YEAR.

+THESE ESTATES WILL BE COMPLETED BEFORE 1979 AND TOGETHER, THEY CAN ACCOMMODATE UP TO 30.0,000 PEOPLE. +

SHE POINTED OUT THAT AT TODAY’S PRICE, THE TOTAL COST OF THE HOUSING PROGRAMME FOR THE NEXT TEN YEARS WOULD BE IN THE REGION OF $5,500 MILLION.

IN ADDITION, LAND FORMATION CHARGES COST $1,600 MILLION MORE, THUS MAKING A TOTAL OF $7,130 MILLION. THIS AMOUNT REPRESENTS 21 PER CENT OF THE 1974 HONG KONG GROSS DOMESTIC PRODUCT.

HRS. CHIA SAID: +GOVERNMENT ALLOCATES A LUMP SUM EVERY YEAR FOR CAPITAL EXPENDITURE ON PUBLIC HOUSING AND NEW TOWN DEVELOPMENT WORK. THIS SUM WILL NOT BE ENOUGH TO PAY FOR THIS AMBITIOUS BUILDING PROGRAMME, NOT TO MENTION THE PREMIUM PAYMENTS FOR ESTATE SITES, OR RECURRENT EXPENSES OF MANAGING ESTATES•+

Ahe gap, .......

MONDAY, JANUARY 19, 1976

5 -

THE GAI SHE SAID, 'WOULD HAVE lO EE FINANCED FROM ANY SURPLUS THE HOUSING AUTHORITY COULD PRODUCE FROM I IS ESTATES.

+TO ENSURE THAT ITS REVENUE AT LEAST KEEPS PACE WITH INFLATION, TiE AUTHORITY HAS THE UNENVIABLE TASK OF REVIEWING, IT THE LIGHT OF TENANTS’ INCOME AilD COMPARISONS WITH PRIVATE PROPERTY IN THE NEIGHBOURHOOD, ITS DOMESTIC AND COMMERCIAL RENTS (hOST OF WHICH HAVE REMAINED STATIC FOR A NUMBER OF YEARS),+ MRS. CHIA CONTINUED.

+YOU ’./ILL AGREE THAT INCREASED CONTRIBUTIONS FROM TENANTS WILL TAKE THE HOUSING AUTHORITY ANOTHER STEP NEARER TO BUILDING MORE HOMES FOR THE 100,000 FAMILIES STILL Oil OUR WAITING LIST.+

MRS. CHIA MENTIONED CREATING COMMERCIAL COMPLEXES IN ESTATES AS ONE OF THE METHODS OF INCREASING INCOME.

SHE SAID THE HOUSING AUTHORITY WAS EXPLORING EVERY POSSIBLE OPTION 30 AS TO REDUCE ITS DEPENDENCE ON GOVERNMENT LOANS.

IN CONCLUSION, MRS. CHIA SAID THE GOVERNMENT AND THE HOUSING AUTHORITY WERE DETERMINED, WITHIN AVAILABLE RESOURCES, TO PRESS ON WITH THE PUBLIC HOUSING PROGRAMME.

SHE DESCRIBED THE TASK AHEAD AS +AN UPHILL ONE+ BUT EXPRESSED CONFIDENCE THAT THE HOUSING AUTHORITY +WILL NEVER LOSE olGHT OF ITS GOALS.+

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MONDAY, JANUARY 19, 1976

6

I

BIRTHS AND DEATHS REGISTERED IN 1975 ******

FEWER BIRTHS AND DEATHS WERE REGISTERED LAST YEAR THAN IN 1974, ACCORDING TO FIGURES RELEASED TODAY BY THE REGISTRAR GENERAL, MR. WALTER HUME.

THE NUMBER OF BIRTHS REGISTERED IN 1975 WAS 78,200, WHICH WAS 3,679 FEWER THAN THE 1974 FIGURE OF 81,879, WHILE THE NUMBER OF DEATHS REGISTERED DECREASED BY 859 TO 21,191.

ALTHOUGH THE DECREASE IN REGISTERED BIRTHS WAS ONLY ABOUT 4.4 PER CENT, MR. HUME SAID IT WAS SIGNIFICANT IN THAT 1975 WAS THE FIRST YEAR SINCE 1971 IN WHICH THE TOTAL OF REGISTERED BIRTHS SHOWED A DECREASE AS COMPARED WITH THE PRECEDING YEAR.

THE GREATEST NUMBER OF BIRTHS REGISTERED IN ANY ONE YEAR WAS IN 1963, WHEN 115,263 WERE REGISTERED. THEREAFTER THE NUMBER DECLINED EVERY YEAR UNTIL THE DOWNWARD TREND WAS REVERSED IN 1972.

OF THE TOTAL NUMBER OF BIRTHS REGISTERED LAST YEAR, 76,157 WERE CHINESE (39,703 MALE AND 36,454 FEMALE) AND 2,043 HON-CHINESE (.1,051 MALE AND 992 FEMALE).

A TOTAL OF 20,017 WERE REGISTERED ON HONG KONG ISLAND, 43,944 IN KOWLOON AND 9,239 IN THE NEW TERRITORIES. THESE REPRESENTED DECREASES OF 4.59 PER CENT, 2.25 FER CENT AND 14.66 PER CENT RESPECTIVELY AS COMPARED WITH THE 1974 FIGURES.

IN ISSUING THESE FIGURES, MR. HUME EMPHASISED THAT THEY WERE IN RESPECT OF REGISTERED BIRTHS OHLY. +THERE ARE ALWAYS A NUMBER OF BIRTHS EVERY YEAR WHICH ARE NOT REGISTERED BY THE PARENTS AT THE TIME, WITH THE RESULT THAT WHILE THE FIGURES FOR THE REGISTERED BIRTHS SHOW TRENDS, THEY DO NOT GIVE A COMPLETELY ACCURATE PICTURE,+ HE SAID.

THE TOTAL NUMBER OF REGISTERED DEATHS COMPRISED 20,891 CHINESE (11,457 MALE AND 9,429 FEMALE AND 5 UNKNOWN SEX) AND 300 HON-CHINESE (203 MALE AND 92 FEMALE)

THE NUMBER OF REGISTERED DEATHS OF INFANTS UNDER ONE YEAR OF AGE WAS 1,173 AS AGAINST 1,421 IN 1974, WHILE THAT OF INFANTS UNDER ONE WEEK OLD WAS 671 COMPARED WITH 717 THE PREVIOUS YEAR.

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MONDAY, JANUARY 19, 1976.

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1975 — A BUSY YEAR FOR AMBULANCE COMMAND ******

THE NUMBER OF CALLS DEALT WITH BY THE AMBULANCE COMMAND OF THE FIRE SERVICES DEPARTMENT HAS BEEN RISING EACH YEAR AS A RESULT OF GREATER ACCEPTANCE DY THE PUBLIC OF THE SERVICES PROVIDED.

ACCORDING TO STATISTICS RELEASED TODAY, THE COMMAND ANSWERED A TOTAL OF 126,538 CALLS uURItiG 1975 COMPARED WITH 109,103 FOR THE PREVIOUS YEAR. THIS REPRESENTS AN INCREASE OF 16 PER CENT.

OF THE TOTAL, 42,343 WERE 01.' HONG KONG ISLAND, 58,959 IN KOWLOON AND 25,236 IN THE NEW TERRITORIES. ABOUT 85 PER CENT OF THESE CALLS WERE EMERGENCY CASES.

THE NUMBER OF PATIENTS CARRIED SHOWED AN IuCREaSE OF 15 PER CENT, FROM 132,775 IN 1974 TO 152,816 IN 1975.

THE COMMAND, WHICH HAS A STAFF OF 560, DAS TOTALLY COMMITTED ON A HUMBER OF OCCASIONS DURING THE YEAR. A NEW RECORD WAS SET ON DECEMBER 23 ».HEN IT ANSWERED A TOTAL OF 456 CALLS -- OR 19 CALLS EVERY HOUR.

AMBULANCES ARE BASED IN FIRE STATIONS AS WELL AS IN AMBULANCE DEPOTS SO AS TO GIVE WIDER COVERAGE. AT PRESENT, THE COMMAND HAS A FLEET OF 91 AMBULANCES AND THERE ARE NINE DEPOTS/STATIOHS.

TO COPE WITH THE INCREASING DEMAND, THE AMBULANCE FLEET IS TO BE FURTHER EXPANDED AND THERE ARE ALSO FLANS FOR SEVERAL NEW DEPOTS AND STATION’S bY 1980. THE FIRST OF THESE WILL BE A STATION AT HING WAH ESTATE IN CHAI WAN WHICH IS DUE FOR COMPLETION SHORTLY.

TRAINING OF PERSONNEL IN MODERN AMBULANCE AID METHODS CONTINUED THROUGHOUT THE YEAR UNDER REVIEW. A NUMBER OF AMBULANCE SUPERVISORS HAD ATTENDED COURSES ON EMERGENCY MATERNITY AND INFANT CARE AT THE QUEEN ELIZABETH HOSPITAL NURSING SCHOOL.

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MONDAY, JAHUARY 19, 197<>

TRAFFIC ARRANGEMENTS FOR LUNAR NEV. YEAR FAIR

* * * * * %

T--;O ROADS IM YUEN LONG, iiE-.' TERRITORIES. ».ILL DE CLOSED TO VEHICULAR TRAFFIC FROM THURSDAY TO NEW YEAR'S EVE (JANUARY 22 TO 31) IN CONNECTION WITH THE LUiiAR Li.. YEAR FAIR TO EE HELD THERE.

THEY ARE ON NING ROAD BETWEEN MA MIU ROAD AND TAI KU I ROAD AND A Iiv YuUHG RoAD.

TRAFFIC SIGNS WILL BE PUT Ui' TO GUIDE DRIVERS.

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’..'ATER INTERRUPTION * * * * * (

WATER SUPPLY TO A NUMBER OF PREMISES IN THE CLEAR WATER BAY ROAD AREA WILL BE I INTERRUPTED FROi'i 3 P.M. ON WEDNESDAY (JANUARY 21) TO 3 A.I-:. ON THURSDAY (JANUARY 22) lu ALLOj WATERWORKS TO BE CARRIED OU I.

AFFECTED WILL BE PREMISES ALONG CLEAR WATER BAY ROAD BETWEEN PIK UK PRISON AND BAYSIDE VILLA, INCLUDING VILLAS AND VILLAGES IN CLEAR WATER LAY ROAD, HANG HAU ROAD, SILVER STRAND BEACH ROAD AND WO KAR ROAD, SAI KUNG,

ALSO AFFECTED - ILL BE PREMISES 111 PO LAM ROAD AUD RENNIES MILL, INCLUDING MA YAU TONG VILLAGE AND PREMISES /vLO HIRAM’S HIGHWAY, BETWEEN HAM ..El AND LIU KAR TSE, AND VILLAGES ALONG HIRAM’S HIGHWAY, SA I KUNG.

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DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

X X

TUESDAY, JANUARY 20, 1976

CONTENTS PAGE NO.

QUESTIONS ON VIOLENT CRIMES TO BE ASKED AT LEGCO MEETING.............................................  1

SWD’S WELFARE BUILDING TO CELEBRATE 7TH ANNIVERSARY . 2

FEWER MARRIAGES CONTRACTED LAST YEAR ................ 3

CDO’S NOW HAVE GOVERNMENT PUBLICATIONS FOR SALE ..... 4

TRAFFIC ARRANGEMENTS FOR OPENING OF NAM CHEONG INTERCHANGE 5

WATER INTERRUPTION IN WESTERN DISTRICT AND IN SHEK KIP MEI 6

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong. Tel: 5-233191

TUESDAY, JANUARY 20, 1976

1

QUESTIONS ON VIOLENT CRIMES IN LEGCO K # W H

THE QUESTION OF THE ADEQUACY OF SENTENCES FOR VIOLENT CRIMES ‘■'ILL BE BROUGHT UP AT THE LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL MEETING TOMORROW (WEDNESDAY).

DR. THE HON. HARRY FANG WILL ASK THE GOVERNMENT TO BRING THE VIEWS EXPRESSED IN TOO RECENT SESSIONS OF THE COUNCIL AND BY THE PUBLIC DURING THE LAST YEAR TO THE ATTENTION OF THE CHIEF JUSTICE.

THE HON. JOHN BREMRIDGE WILL ASK THE GOVERNMENT FOR A LIST OF THE SENTENCES FOR VIOLENT CRIMES AWARDED BY THE SUPREME COURT AND THE DISTRICT COURTS DURING THE YEAR ENDED LAST SEPTEMBER.

STILL ON THE PROBLEM OF CRIME, THE HON. HILTON CHEONG-LEEN WILL PROPOSE FOR CONSIDERATION THE USE OF MUTUAL AID COMMITTEES.. IN CO-OPERATION WITH THE DISCHARGED PRISONERS AID SOCIETY, TO SUPERVISE AND HELP YOUNG FIRST OFFENDERS AFTER THEIR RELEASE.

THE HON. JAMES WU WILL ASK IF AN INVESTIGATION IS BEING CONDUCTED INTO ALLEGATIONS THAT A PERSON CONVICTED OF MURDER WAS IN FACT INNOCENT.

DIFFERENT ASPECTS OF PUBLIC TRANSPORT WILL ALSO COME UP IN THE COUNCIL.

THE HON. OSWALD CHEUNG WILL ASK THE GOVERNMENT TO CONSIDER GIVING AT AN EARLY DATE A GENERAL LICENCE TO TAXIS AND PUBLIC LIGHT BUSES TO USE THE TSI NG Yl BRIDGE.

THE HON. LI FOOK-WO WILL WANT TO KNOW IF KCR HAS ENOUGH LOCOMOTIVES AND EQUIPMENT TO COPE WITH INCREASING GOODS TRAFFIC FROM CHINA, AND DR. THE HON. HARRY FANG WILL URGE THE GOVERNMENT TO IMPROVE VENTILATION IN THE LION ROCK TUNNEL.

ON OTHER MATTERS, THE HON. MISS KO SIU-WAH WILL ASK FOR STATISTICS ON THE NUMBER OF PROSECUTIONS FOR EMPLOYING CHILDREN UNDER 14 IN ANY INDUSTRIAL UNDERTAKING OR DANGEROUS TRADE. THE HON. Q.W. LEE WILL ASK HOW THE MUTUAL AID COMMITTEES ARE BEING HELPED TO COLLECT MAINTENANCE FEES FROM BUILDING OCCUPIERS.

THE HON. ROGER LOBO WILL ASK FOR THE NUMBER OF MOTORCYCLE ACCIDENTS LAST YEAR AND THE NUMBER OF CASES WHERE THE DRIVERS WERE UNLICENSED OR HELD ONLY A PROVISIONAL LICENCE.

TWO NEW BILLS WILL BE INTRODUCED AT TOMORROW’S SITTING OF THE COUNCIL.

/THEY ARE......

TUESDAY, JANUARY 20, 1976

2

THEY ARE THE PLANT (IMPORTATION AND PEST CONTROL) BILL 1976, WHICH SEEKS TO PREVENT PLANT PESTS AND DISEASES FROM SPREADING TO HONG KONG, AND THE FACTORIES AND INDUSTRIAL UNDERTAKINGS (AMENDMENT) BILL 1976, WHICH GENERALLY PROHIBITS THE OPERATION OF REGISTRABLE WORKPLACES IN NEW NON-INDUSTRIAL BUILDINGS.

DEBATE WILL RESUME ON THE SECOND READING OF THE COMPANIES (AMENDMENT) BILL 1976, THE WILD ANIMALS PROTECTION BILL 1976 AND THE APPRENTICESHIP BILL 1975.

THE HON. IAN PRICE WILL MOVE A MOTION FOR THE FACTORIES AND INDUSTRIAL UNDERTAKINGS (AMENDMENT) REGULATIONS 1976 TO BE APPROVED. THESE REGULATIONS ENSURE BETTER STANDARDS OF CLEANLINESS, AND STATE MORE PRECISELY THE PRECAUTIONS REQUIRED AGAINST FIRE IN REGISTRABLE WORKPLACES.

DR. THE HON. S.Y. CHUNG WILL RAISE THE SUBJECT OF METRICATION IN AN ADJOURNMENT DEBATE. >

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I . •

WELFARE BUILDING’S 7TH ANNIVERSARY

******

THE SOCIAL WELFARE DEPARTMENT’S ESTATE WELFARE BUILDING AT LAM TIN ESTATE IN KOWLOON WILL MARK ITS 7TH ANNIVERSARY ON FRIDAY (JANUARY 23).

TO CELEBRATE THE OCCASION, A TWO-DAY EXHIBITION ON ACTIVITIES AND SERVICES PROVIDED BY THE VARIOUS AGENCIES IN THE ESTATE WELFARE BUILDING WILL EE HELD.

DURING A BRIEF OPENING CEREMONY, WINNERS OF COMPETITIONS ORGANISED OR SPONSORED BY THE MANAGEMENT COMMITTEE OF THE WELFARE BUILDING WILL RECEIVE THEIR PRIZES.

NOTE TO EDITORS:

YOU ARE CORDIALLY INVITED TO COVER THE OPENING CEREMONY TO BE HELD AT THE HALL OF THE LAM TIN ESTATE WELFARE BUILDING (EAST) AT PING TIN STREET, LAM TIN ESTATE AT 3 P.M. ON FRIDAY.

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TUESDAY, JANUARY 20, 1976.

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MARRIAGE STATISTICS FOR 1975

******

THE NUMBER OF MARRIAGES REGISTERED IN 1975 WAS 36,192, 1,442 FEWER THAN THE 1974 ALL-TIME RECORD OF 37,634, THE REGISTRAR GENERAL, MR. W. HUME, ANNOUNCED TODAY.

+THE TOTAL INCLUDED 4,041 MARRIAGES BETWEEN PARTIES ALREADY PREVIOUSLY MARRIED IN OTHER WAYS, AS COMPARED WITH 3,864 MARRIAGES OF THIS CATEGORY IN 1974. EXCLUDING THESE ’REMARRIAGES’, THE TOTAL NUMBER OF REGISTERED MARRIAGES DECREASED BY 1,619 FROM 33,770 TO 32,151,+ MR. HUME SAID.

THE SLIGHT DECREASE MAY HAVE DEEN PARTLY DUE TO THE FACT “THAT THE CURRENT LUNAR YEAR, WHICH BEGAN ON FEBRUARY 11, 1975, IS ROT AN AUSPICIOUS YEAR FOR MARRIAGES AMONGST THE CHINESE BECAUSE IT IS A ’BLIND YEAR’, THAT IS TO SAY, A YEAR IN WHICH THERE IS NO FIRST DAY OF SPRING (LAP CHUN), WHEREAS THE PRECEDING LUNAR YEAR WAS A PARTICULARLY AUSPICIOUS YEAR WITH TWO FIRST DAYS OF SPRING.

THERE WAS A SLIGHT DECREASE IN THE NUMBER OF CHURCH MARRIAGES IN 1975, THE TOTAL BEING 2,413 AS COMPARED WITH 2,641 IN 1974. MOST OF THE REGISTERED MARRIAGES WERE, AS USUAL, CELEBRATED AT THE MARRIAGE REGISTRIES. THE TOTAL OF SUCH MARRIAGES WAS 33,779, 1,214 FEWER THAN THE 1974 FIGURE.

IN THE NEW TERRITORIES, REGISTERED MARRIAGES CONTINUED TO INCREASE, WITH A TOTAL OF 6,910 MARRIAGES CELEBRATED, UP BY 868 OR 14 PER CENT AS COMPARED WITH 6,042 IN 1974. THERE ARE NOW FOUR FULL-TIME REGISTRIES AND 13 PART-TIME REGISTRIES OPERATING IN THE NEW TERRITORIES.

THE TOO PRINCIPAL MARRIAGE REGISTRIES AT THE CITY HALL AND THE KOWLOON GOVERNMENT OFFICES REMAIN THE MOST POPULAR REGISTRIES, WITH 35 PER CENT OF ALL REGISTRY MARRIAGES CELEBRATED THERE. ANOTHER POPULAR REGISTRY WAS THE SAN PO KONG REGISTRY, WHERE 6,466 MARRIAGES TOOK PLACE DURING THE YEAR.

THE CITY HALL MARRIAGE REGISTRY CONTINUED TO OPERATE ON SUNDAY MORNINGS DURING THE YEAR AND A TOTAL OF 536. SUNDAY MORNING MARRIAGES WERE PERFORMED. IN MANY CASES, SUNDAY WAS CHOSEN BECAUSE IT HAPPENED TO BE A LUCKY DAY ACCORDING TO THE CHINESE CALENDAR- IN OTHERS SIMPLY BECAUSE OF CONVENIENCE FOR WORK OR OTHER REASONS.

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TUESDAY, JANUARY 20, 1976

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NEW SALES OUTLETS FOR GOVERNMENT PUBLICATIONS M * * M M ;

SALES OUTLETS FOR GOVERNMENT PUBLICATIONS OF INTEREST TO THE PUBLIC HAVE BEEN EXTENDED TO INCLUDE CITY DISTRICT OFFICES.

A SPOKESMAN FOR THE GOVERNMENT INFORMATION SERVICES. WHICH

IS RESPONSIBLE FOR THE SALE OF GOVERNMENT PUBLICATIONS, SAID TODAYS +WE ARE CONSTANTLY LOOKING FOR NEW OUTLETS AND THE INCLUSION OF CITY DISTRICT OFFICES IS AN IMPORTANT STEP IN ENSURING THAT PEOPLE CAN OBTAIN GOVERNMENT PUBLICATIONS WITHOUT HAVING TO GO OUT OF THEIR WAY.+

THE TITLES OBTAINABLE FROM CITY DISTRICT OFFICES INCLUDE NEW PUBLICATIONS SUCH AS +THE QUEEN IN HONG KONG+ AND THE 1976 HONG KONG ARTS FESTIVAL SOUVENIR BOOKLET.

L

ALTOGETHER A TOTAL OF 15 PUBLICATIONS WILL BE ON SALE AT C.D.O. OFFICES, RANGING FROM THE HONG KONG YEARBOOK TO BOOKS ABOUT DIFFERENT FEATURES OF LIFE IN HONG KONG AND OFFICIAL GUIDE MAPS. OTHER TITLES WILL BE ADDED IN THE LIGHT OF MARKET DEMAND.

SINCE G.I.S. TOOK OVER RESPONSIBILITY FOR THE SALE OF GOVERNMENT PUBLICATIONS LESS THAN TWO YEARS AGO, THE VALUE OF SALES HAS INCREASED BY MORE THAN 50 PER CENT, TOTALLING $3.4 MILLION IN THE LAST FINANCIAL YEAR. /

SALES IN THE CURRENT FINANCIAL YEAR ARE ALREADY WELL IN EXCESS OF THOSE FOR 1974-75 AND AN INCREASE OF 20 PER CENT ON THE LAST FINANCIAL YEAR IS PREDICTED.

THE CREATION OF NEW SALES OUTLETS, WHICH NOW NUMBER 80 ALTOGETHER AND INCLUDE LEADING BOOKSHOPS, HAS BEEN A KEY FACTOR IN BOOSTING INCOME, WHICH GOES INTO THE GOVERNMENT’S GENERAL REVENUE ACCOUNT.

AS WELL AS MARKETING HONG KONG GOVERNMENT PUBLICATIONS, THE G.I.S. IS ALSO THE SALES AGENT FOR PUBLICATIONS PUBLISHED BY THE ORGANISATION FOR ECONOMIC CO-OPERATION AND DEVELOPMENT (O.E.C.D.) AND HER MAJESTY’S STATIONERY OFFICE (H.M.S.O.) IN BRITAIN.

’’ /

ARRANGEMENTS ARE NOW BEING MADE FOR PUBLICATIONS PUBLISHED BY THE EUROPEAN ECONOMIC COMMUNITY (E.E.C.) AND THE WORLD HEALTH ORGANISATION (W.H.O.) TO BE MARKETED IN HONG KONG IN THE SAME WAY.

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TUESDAY, JANUARY 20, 1976

5

NEW TRAFFIC ARRANGEMENTS FOR

M * * M *

INTERCHANGE OPENING

m- TRAFFIC ARRANGEMENTS WILL BE INTRODUCED AT THE JUNCTION LUNG CHEUNG ROAD AND NAM CHEONG STREET FROM 10 A.M ON

?MTF?rJLicANUARY 24) W,TH THE OWNING OF THE NAM CHEONG

IN 1t KCrlANGt •

nr I T° AIID FR0M THE TAI WOR PING AREA NORTH

OF LUNG CHEUNG ROAD WILL USE A NEW FLYOVER WHILE WESTBOUND TRAFFIC ON LUNG CHEUNG ROAD WILL GAIN ACCESS TO TAI WOR PING ROAD BY A NEW GROUND-LEVEL SLIP ROAD.

A VEHICULAR SUBWAY, PART OF THE NAM CHEONG INTERCHANGE, WAS OPENED LAST THURSDAY TO ALLOW EASTBOUND TRAFFIC ALONG LUNG CHEUNG ROAD TO TURN INTO NAM CHEONG STREET WITHOUT INTERRUPTING WESTBOUND TRAFFIC FLOW.

MEANWHILE, FROM 10 A.M. ON FRIDAY (JANUARY 23), LEARNER DRIVERS WILL BE PROHIBITED FROM ENTERING TSING CHAU STREET FROM MA TAU WEI ROAD.

AT THE SAME TIME, THE PROHIBITION ON LEARNER DRIVERS ENTERING PUI CHING ROAD FROM WATERLOO ROAD WILL BE REMOVED.

THE ARRANGEMENTS ARE TO FACILITATE THE CONDUCT OF DRIVING TESTS.

APPROPRIATE TRAFFIC SIGNS WILL BE PUT UP IN THE AREAS TO GUIDE MOTORISTS.

- - 0

TUESDAY, JANUARY 20, 1976.

- 6 -

WATER STOPPAGE

I

A NUMBER OF PREMISES IN THE WESTERN DISTRICT WILL BE WITHOUT WATER FROM 1 A.M. TO 6 A.M. ON THURSDAY (JANUARY 22) TO ALLOW A LEAKAGE TEST TO BE CARRIED OUT.

' PREMISES NORTH OF QUEEN’S ROAD 'WEST AND THOSE IN DES VOEUX ROAD WEST WHICH ARE BOUNDED BY EASTERN STREET, SUTHERLAND LANE AND THE SEAFRONT WILL BE AFFECTED.

ALSO AFFECTED WILL BE PREMISES IN QUEEN’S ROAD WEST BOUNDED BY WESTERN STREET AND EASTERN STREET, INCLUDING THOSE IN WESTERN STREET, CHUNG CHING STREET, KI LING LANE, SAI YUEN LANE, CENTRE STREET, KWAI HEUNG STREET AND MUI FONG STREET.

IN SHEK KIP MEI, KOWLOON, WATER SUPPLY TO A NUMBER OF PREMISES WILL BE INTERRUPTED FROM 9 P.M. ON THURSDAY TO 6 A.M. THE FOLLOWING DAY TO ALLOW WATERWORKS TO BE CARRIED OUT.

PREMISES WHICH WILL EE AFFECTED ARE HONG KONG SETTLERS HOUSING CORPORATION LTD. AT TAI HANG SAI ESTATE, TAI HANG TUNG ESTATE BLOCKS 4-6, TAI HANG SAI WELFARE CORPORATION AND TAI HANG TUNG ROAD CONCORDIA LUTHERAN SCHOOL.

0 -------

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 21, 1976

CONTENTS PAGE NO.

METRICATION BILL TO BE INTRODUCED INTO THE LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL SOON .......................................... 1

DEBATE ON APPRENTICESHIP DILL ......................... 3

RESTRICTIONS ON THE USE OF TSINC Yl BRIDGE TO BE LIFTED SHORTLY ............................................... 5

ACTION AGAINST FACTORIES IN NON-1NDUSTRI AL BUILDINGS PROPOSED .............................................  6

MORE LOCOMOTIVES FOR KCR .............................. 7

LEGCO APPROVED REGULATIONS TO ENSURE SAFER AND CLEANER WORKPLACES ............................................ 8

MUTUAL AID COMMITTEES MAY BE ABLE TO HELP YOUNG OFFENDERS. 10

INSPECTION OF PARADE AT STANLEY ...................... 11

SEMINAR ON LEARNING AND TEACH INC*TECHNICAL SUBJECTS BY

ACTIVITY METHODS ..................................... 11

LION ROCK TUNNEL VENTILATION ADEQUATE ................ 12

BILLS PASSED IN LEGCO ......................'......... 13

TEMPORARY WATER INTERRUPTION IN FANLING .............. 13

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong. Tel: 5-233191

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 21, 1976

1

METRICATION BILL TO BE INTRODUCED INTO LEGCO SHORTLY

A BILL WILL SHORTLY BE INTRODUCED TO GIVE LEGISLATIVE EFFECT TO THE METRIC SYSTEM AND TO PROVIDE FOR THE USE OF METRIC UNITS IN ALL EXISTING LEGISLATION WHERE IMPERIAL OR CHINESE UNITS HAVE BEEN LAID DOWN.

THIS WAS ANNOUNCED TODAY IN THE LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL BY THE DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC WORKS, THE HON. DAVID MCDONALD, IN REPLY TO POINTS RAISED DURING AN ADJOURNMENT DEBATE ON METRICATION.

MR. MCDONALD SAID A FEW OUTSTANDING POINTS REGARDING ORGANISATIONAL MATTERS HAD BEEN LARGELY SETTLED AND THE BILL WOULD BE PUBLISHED SHORTLY FOR GENERAL INFORMATION.

THE DIRECTOR EMPHASISED THAT THE GOVERNMENT WAS RESOLVED TO MOVE AHEAD IN ENCOURAGING THE WIDER ADOPTION OF METRICATION IN THE COMMUNITY AS A WHOLE, BUT THE PRIVATE SECTOR WOULD NOT BE COMPELLED TO ADOPT METRIC MEASUREMENTS.

THE GOVERNMENT, HE SAID, HAD SOME RESERVATIONS AS TO WHETHER THE SETTING UP OF A METRICATION BOARD SUPPORTED BY A FULL-TIME SECRETARIAT, AS RECOMMENDED BY THE METRICATION COMMITTEE, WAS THE MOST SUITABLE WAY OF ORGANISING FURTHER MOVES TOWARDS METRI CAT I ON.

+OUR PRESENT VIEW, ALTHOUGH IT .HAS YET TO BE FINALLY SETTLED AND CLEARLY WE MUST CONSULT THOSE JDUTSIDE THE GOVERNMENT WHO HAVE AN INTEREST, IS THAT A NON-STATUTORY ADVISORY BODY SHOULD BE SET UP WITH THE TASK OF GUIDING AND FACILITATING THE ADOPTION OF THE INTERNATIONAL SYSTEM OF UNITS THROUGH ALL SECTORS OF THE COMMUNITY,* HE SAID.

HE ADDED IT WOULD TAKE A LITTLE TIME BEFORE THE COMPOSITION AND TERMS OF REFERENCE OF THIS BODY COULD BE SETTLED, BUT IN THE MEANTIME A METRICATION OFFICER WAS TO BE APPOINTED TO THE ECONOMIC SERVICES BRANCH OF THE COLONIAL SECRETARIAT WHO WOULD BE RESPONSIBLE FOR INTRODUCING METRICATION THROUGHOUT THE GOVERNMENT AND ADVISING THE PRIVATE SECTOR ON METRICATION MATTERS GENERALLY.

THE INTENTION, HE SAID, WAS THAT THE METRICATION OFFICER WITH A SMALL STAFF WOULD FORM THE NUCLEUS OF THE TEAM WHICH WOULD SERVICE AND SUPPORT THE PROPOSED NON-STATUTORY ADVISORY BODY.

MR. MCDONALD NOTED THAT WHILE THE GOVERNMENT HAD NOT BEEN ABLE FOR VARIOUS REASONS TO PRESS AHEAD AS QUICKLY AS HAD BEEN HOPED WITH THE METRICATION PROGRAMME, A CONSIDERABLE AMOUNT OF PROGRESS HAD BEEN ACHIEVED IN AREAS DIRECTLY UNDER THE GOVERNMENT’S CONTROL.

/IN THE .....

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 21, 1976

2

IN THE PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT, FOR EXAMPLE, THE PROGRAMME FOR METRICATION WAS BEING ADHERED TO AND THE TARGET DATES BEING MET.

THE ROYAL OBSERVATORY AND THE POLYTECHNIC WERE USING METRIC UNITS EXCLUSIVELY, AND THE SYSTEM HAD BEEN EXTENSIVELY INTRODUCED IN THE CURRICULA OF SCHOOLS THROUGHOUT HONG KONG.

IN ADDITION, THE TRANSPORT DEPARTMENT WAS NOW USING METRIC SYSTEM IN ALL NEW LEGISLATION. FOR EXAMPLE, THE DRAFT MOTOR VEHICLE CONSTRUCTION AND USE REGULATIONS NOW BEING PREPARED WOULD USE METRIC TERMS ALONGSIDE IMPERIAL MEASUREMENTS.

MR. MCDONALD ALSO POINTED OUT THAT PLANS HAD BEEN PREPARED FOR CHANGING ROAD SIGNS TO METRIC.

EARLIER, DR. THE HON. CHUNG SZE-YUEN URGED THE GOVERNMENT TO ACCEPT AND IMPLEMENT" THE FINAL RECOMMENDATION OF THE METRICATION COMMITTEE SO THAT HONG KONG COULD GO AHEAD WITH FULL STEAM ON METRICATION WITH MINIMUM DELAY.

HE SAID THAT 99 PER CENT OF THE WORLD’S POPULATION HAD GONE OR WERE GOING METRIC.

WITH THE INCREASING USE OF THE INTERNATIONAL SYSTEM OF UNITS, GENERALLY KNOWN AS SI UNITS, HE SAID, THE DREAM OF WORLD STANDARDIZATION ON WEIGHTS AND MEASURES WOULD SOON COME TRUE AND A GREAT DEAL OF INEFFICIENCY AND WASTE RESULTING FROM THE PARALLEL USE OF TWO MAJOR SYSTEMS COULD ULTIMATELY BE ELIMINATED.

+THIS IS PARTICULARLY TRUE TO HONG KONG’S EXPORT-ORIENTED MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES,* DR. CHUNG SAID.

ANOTHER UNOFFICIAL MEMBER, THE HON. JAMES WU, SAID WHILE THERE WOULD HAVE TO BE SOME INITIAL EXPENSES FOR THE CHANGE, THESE WOULD BE FAR OUTWEIGHED BY SUBSEQUENT BENEFITS.

HE AGREED THAT THE SPEED WITH WHICH HONG KONG COULD PROCEED WITH METRICATION WAS TO SOME EXTENT DICTATED BY THE DEMAND IN ITS MARKETS BUT NOW THAT THE UNITED STATES HAD DECIDED TO GO FULL STEAM AHEAD, THIS RESERVATION SHOULD HAVE BEEN REMOVED.

MR. WU SAID THAT IN A SURVEY BY THE FEDERATION OF HONG KONG INDUSTRIES, HONG KONG MANUFACTURERS, MANY OF WHOM HAVE BEEN USING PARALLEL SYSTEMS, SAID IT WOULD TAKE FROM ONE TO THREE YEARS FOR A COMPLETE CHANGE.

HE ASKED THE FINANCIAL SECRETARY TO APPROPRIATE A SUM OF LESS THAN ONE MILLION DOLLARS IN THE FORTHCOMING BUDGET SO THAT THE METRICATION BOARD AND THE SECRETARIAT COULD BE SET UP AND GET ON WITH THE JOB WHICH HE DESCRIBED AS IMPORTANT TO +OUR COMMERCE, INDUSTRY AND DAILY LIFE.*

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WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 21,

1976

- 3 -

DEBATE ON APPRENTICESHIP BILL * * * *

DR. THE HON. S.Y. CHUNG TOLD THE LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL TODAY THAT ONE OF THE MAIN OBJECTIVES OF THE APPRENTICESHIP BILL SHOULD BE TO PROVIDE MINIMUM STANDARDS FOR APPRENTICE TRAINING AND TO MINIMISE EXPLOITATION OF APPRENTICES BY UNSCRUPULOUS EMPLOYERS.

SPEAKING IN SUPPORT OF THE BILL, HE EXPRESSED RESERVATION ON A CLAUSE WHICH EMPOWERS THE COMMISSIONER FOR LABOUR TO EXEMPT AN EMPLOYER FROM THE PROVISIONS OF THE BILL IF THE EMPLOYER IS UNABLE TO GIVE ANY YOUNG PERSON ADEQUATE TRAINING IN THE DESIGNATED CRAFT TRADE.

DR. CHUNG THOUGHT IT WOULD BE WRONG IN PRINCIPLE TO EXEMPT ANY EMPLOYER FROM HIS LEGAL OBLIGATIONS SIMPLY BECAUSE HE WAS UNABLE TO MEET THE MINIMUM TRAINING STANDARDS REQUIRED BY THE BILL.

HE NOTED FROM THE SPEECH OF THE COMMISSIONER FOR LABOUR TWO WEEKS AGO THAT ALTHOUGH THE BILL IN THE FIRST INSTANCE WOULD APPLY ONLY TO CERTAIN DESIGNATED CRAFT TRADES, IT WOULD EVENTUALLY COVER ALL CRAFT TRADES. THE COMMISSIONER SAID THEN THAT THE FIRST BATCH OF RECOMMENDED CRAFT TRADES WOULD BE SELECTED ON THE BASIS OF THE DEGREE OF SKILLS INVOLVED, THEIR NUMBERS AND IMPORTANCE TO INDUSTRY AND WITH REGARD TO THE AVAILABILITY OF RELATED TECHNICAL EDUCATION FACILITIES.

+THIS IS FINE FROM THE INDUSTRIAL POINT OF VIEW,+ HE SAID, +BUT IT APPEARS THAT THE GOVERNMENT WILL IGNORE, FOR A LONG TIME TO COME, THOSE APPRENTICES ENGAGED IN MINOR CRAFT TRADES.*

DR. CHUNG POINTED OUT THAT IF THERE WERE ANY EXPLOITATION OF APPRENTICES, IT WAS MOST LIKELY TO BE IN THE MINOR CRAFT TRADES.

ANOTHER UNOFFICIAL SPEAKING IN FAVOUR OF THE BILL WAS THE HON. FRANCIS TIEN, WHO REMINDED THE GOVERNMENT THAT THE AIMS OF THE BILL WOULD ONLY BE ACHIEVED IF IT WAS EFFECTIVELY ADMINISTERED.

HE HOPED THAT THIS LEGISLATION +WILL NOT BECOME MEANINGLESS BECAUSE INADEQUATE MANPOWER IS PROVIDED TO ADMINISTER IT.+

MR. TIEN SAID THERE WAS ONE POINT IN THE BILL ABOUT WHICH A GREAT DEAL OF MISGIVINGS HAD BEEN EXPRESSED RECENTLY.

HE SAID THAT THE INDUSTRY TRAINING BOARDS HAD MADE STRONG REPRESENTATIONS TO THE TRAINING COUNCIL REQUESTING IT TO DO ALL THAT WAS POSSIBLE TO RAISE THE UPPER AGE LIMIT TO UNDER 19 YEARS OF AGE IN THE DEFINITION OF A YOUNG PERSON BEFORE THE BILL BECAME LAW.

/MR. TIEN ......

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 21, 1976

- 4

MR. TIEfi EXPLAINED THAT SETTING THE UPPER AGE LIMIT AT ’’UNDER 17” COULD EFFECTIVELY DEFEAT THE PURPOSE OF THE BILL.

+ALL THAT EMPLOYERS NEED TO DO TO BYPASS THE BILL WOULD BE TO EMPLOY ONLY YOUNG PEOPLE OF 17 OR OVER,* HE SAID.

ANOTHER REASON WAS THAT YOUNG PEOPLE OF UNDER 17 MIGHT, AS A RESULT OF THE BILL, FIND IT DIFFICULT IN THE IMMEDIATE FUTURE TO OBTAIN OPPORTUNITIES FOR TRAINING IN DESIGNATED TRADES.

MR. TIEN SAID HE INTENDED TO MOVE AN AMENDMENT TO THE DEFINITION OF A YOUNG PERSON, AT THE COMMITTEE STAGE, IN HIS OWN PERSONAL CAPACITY AS WELL AS ON BEHALF OF THE TRAINING COUNCIL.

ALSO SPEAKING IN SUPPORT OF THE BILL, THE HON. JAMES WU SAID : +TO INCREASE THE OUTPUT AND PRODUCTIVITY OF OUR INDUSTRIES, WE MUST MAKE SURE THAT ALL OUR WORKERS GET ADEQUATE TRAINING TO EARN THEIR WAY IN THE JOB MARKET.*

IN REPLY, THE COMMISSIONER FOR LABOUR, THE HON. IAN PRICE, EXPLAINED THAT THE CLAUSE TO WHICH DR. CHUNG REFERRED WAS NOT SPECIFICALLY DRAFTED TO PROVIDE A METHOD WHEREBY SMALL FACTORIES COULD BE EXEMPTED FROM THE REQUIREMENT TO TRAIN APPRENTICES.

+RATHER IT WAS FELT DESIRABLE TO INCLUDE A GENERAL PROVISION WHEREBY AN EMPLOYER COULD BE EXEMPTED FROM THE LEGISLATION IN CIRCUMSTANCES IN WHICH THERE WAS GOOD REASON FOR HIM BEING UNABLE TO PROVIDE ADEQUATE TRAINING FOR AN APPRENTICE — THE CRITERION IS INABILITY NOT UNWILLINGNESS.*

HE POINTED OUT THAT DURING THE EARLY DAYS OF THIS NEW LEGISLATION AN INBUILT DEGREE OF FLEXIBILITY WAS ADVANTAGEOUS.

HOWEVER, MR. PRICE SAID THAT THE CLAUSE COULD BE DELETED AT SOME LATER DATE IF IT PROVED PRACTICAL.

REFERRING TO THE GROUP OF CRAFT TRADES RECOMMENDED FOR DESIGNATION, MR. PRICE ASSURED DR. CHUNG THAT IN PREPARING THE FIRM LIST OF RECOMMENDATIONS DUE CONSIDERATION WOULD BE GIVEN TO THOSE TRADES IN WHICH IT WAS KNOWN THAT APPRENTICES WERE BEING EXPLOITED.

HE STRESSED THAT THE GOVERNMENT HAD NO INTENTION OF IGNORING THOSE CRAFT TRADES IN WHICH EXPLOITATION WAS MOST LIKELY.

BUT HE EMPHASISED THAT EVERYTHING COULD NOT BE TACKLED AT ONCE AND A START MUST BE MADE WITH A LIMITED GROUP, WHICH MIGHT NOT, FOR PRACTICAL REASONS, INCLUDE MINOR TRADES IN WHICH ONLY FEW APPRENTICES WERE EMPLOYED.

MR. PRICE SUPPORTED AN AMENDMENT TO BE PROPOSED BY MR. TIEN AT THE COMMITTEE STAGE TO RAISE TO ’’UNDER 19 YEARS OF AGE” THE UPPER AGE LIMIT IN THE DEFINITION OF ’’YOUNG PERSON”.

- - 0 - -

/5

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 21, 1976

5 -

RESTRICTIONS ON USE OF TSING Yl BRIDGE TO BE EASED « « « ft «

THE GENERAL RESTRICTION ON THE USE OF TSING Yl BRIDGE WILL BE LIFTED VERY SHORTLY, THE SECRETARY FOR THE ENVIRONMENT, THE HON. JAMES ROBSON, SAID IN THE LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL TODAY.

REPLYING TO A QUESTION BY THE HON. OSWALD CHEUNG, MR. ROBSON SAID HOWEVER THAT IT WOULD STILL BE NECESSARY TO IMPOSE SOME RESTRICTIONS ON THE ROAD GOING NORTH FROM THE BRIDGE TO TSING Yl TOWN ITSELF.

_ +IT IS PROPOSED TO ALLOW TAXIS, A LIMITED NUMBER OF PUBLIC LIGHT BUSES AND PRIVATE CARS BELONGING TO RESIDENTS, TO HAVE ACCESS TO THE TOUN,+ MR. ROBSON SAID.

+UNRESTRICTED ACCESS OF PUBLIC LIGHT BUSES TO THE ISLAND WOULD LEAD TO A CHOKING OF THE ROAD NETWORK AND THIS IS NOT NECESSARY BECAUSE A KMB BUS SERVICE ALREADY RUNS FROM TSIN% Yl TOWN TO LAI CHI KOK AND THE HQJIG KOIIG AND YAUMATI FERRY COMPANY PROVIDES A SERVICE TO TSUEN WAN AND CENTRAL.

+APART FROM THE RESTRICTIONS ON P.L.b’s, THERE WILL BE NO RESTRICTIONS ON VEHICLES USING BOTH THE BRIDGE AND THE ROAD GOING SOUTH FROM THE BRIDGE TO THE POWER STAT I ON,+ HE ADDED.

MR. ROBSON SAID THE EASING OF RESTRICTIONS WAS POSSIBLE BECAUSE OF IMPROVEMENTS TO THE ACCESS ROADS LEADING TO THE BRIDGE AND TO THE ROAD JOINING THE BRIDGE TO THE TOWN. t

THE NEW ARRANGEMENTS WOULD BE ADEQUATE FOR THE PRESENT REQUIREMENTS BUT WHEN THE FIRST HOUSING BLOCKS WERE COMPLETED, IT WOULD BE NECESSARY TO CONSIDER THE NEED OF A FRANCHISED BUS SERVICE TO TSUEN WAN, HE SAID.

•'/ ! -------------o------------------ X

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 21, 1976

6

FACTORIES IN NON-INDUSTRIAL BUILDINGS: GOV’T TO ACT ««****

THE SECRETARY FOR THE ENVIRONMENT, THE HON. JAMES ROBSON, TOLD THE LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL TODAY THAT WITH THE PRESENT SURPLUS OF FLATTED FACTORY ACCOMMODATION, THE GOVERNMENT SHOULD MAKE A START ON A STAGED PROGRAMME OF ACTION AGAINST CERTAIN INDUSTRIAL UNDERTAKINGS IN NON-INDUSTRIAL BUILDINGS.

IN MOVING THE SECOND READING OF THE FACTORIES AND INDUSTRIAL UNDERTAKINGS (AMENDMENT) BILL 1976, HE SAID THAT IN THE PAST, THE ECONOMIC FACTS OF LIFE IN HONG KONG HAD DICTATED ACCEPTANCE OF INDUSTRIAL ACTIVITY IN NON-INDUSTRIAL BUILDINGS ON A WIDE SCALE.

HOWEVER, HE SAID, +MANY FAMILIES ARE NOW UNWILLING TO PUT UP WITH THIS KIND OF DISCOMFORT AND AT THE PRESENT TIME THIS IS QUITE RIGHT BECAUSE REASONABLY CHEAP FLATTED FACTORY ACCOMMODATION IS NOW IN MORE PLENTIFUL SUPPLY THAN REASONABLY PRICED RESIDENTIAL FLATS.+

REFERRING TO THE ACTION PROGRAMME, HE SAID THE FIRST STAGE WOULD INVOLVE AN ATTACK ON THREE FRONTS BY LAW AND LEASE ENFORCEMENT AGENCIES IN THE URBAN AREAS AND IN THE NEW TERRITORIES.

+THE FIRST ACTION TO BE TAKEN WILL BE TO REMOVE DANGEROUS AND OBNOXIOUS INDUSTRIAL UNDERTAKINGS FROM EXISTING NON-1NDUSTRI AL BUILDINGS. IN THIS RESPECT, THE DIRECTOR OF FIRE SERVICES AND THE COMMISSIONER FOR LABOUR ESTIMATE THAT BETWEEN 200 AND 350 EXISTING DANGEROUS OR OBNOXIOUS INDUSTRIAL UNDERTAKINGS WILL BE AFFECTED,* MR. ROBSON SAID.

+NEVERTHELESS, UNLESS THE RISK TO PUBLIC HEALTH AND SAFETY IS INTOLERABLE, REASONABLE NOTICE WILL BE GIVEN TO OPERATORS TO ENABLE THEM TO MOVE THEIR UNDERTAKINGS TO MORE SUITABLE PREMISES.*

AT THE SAME TIME, HE CONTINUED, ACTION WOULD BE TAKEN TO PREVENT NEW INDUSTRIAL UNDERTAKINGS, EXCEPT SPECIFIC SERVICE TRADES, GAINING A FOOTHOLD IN NEW NON-1NDUSTRI AL BUILDINGS.

WHENEVER POSSIBLE DURING THE FIRST STAGE OF PROGRAMME, ACTION WOULD ALSO BE TAKEN TO CLEAR INDUSTRIAL UNDERTAKINGS FROM PURELY RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS.

MR. ROBSON SAID: +IF HOWEVER, INDUSTRIAL UNDERTAKINGS IN EXISTING NON-INDUSTRIAL BUILDINGS ARE NEITHER DANGEROUS NOR OBNOXIOUS, THEY WILL NOT BE TARGET FOR ACTION DURING THE FIRST STAGE. FUTURE ACTION AGAINST THEM WILL DEPEND ON WHETHER THERE ARE REASONABLE MEANS BY WHICH THE INDIVIDUAL UNDERTAKING CAN CONTINUE TO OPERATE.*

/UE SAID .....

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 21, 1976

7

HE SAID THAT OWNERS OF SUCH UNDERTAKINGS SHOULD NOT, HOWEVER, ASSUME THAT THEY WERE UNDER INDEFINITE REPRIEVE. NOR SHOULD THEY ASSUME THAT THE LINE OF ACTION THE GOVERNMENT INTENDED TO TAKE WOULD PROTECT THEM FROM SUCH LEGAL REMEDIES AS OWNERS AND RESIDENTS OF THE BUILDING MIGHT WISH TO PURSUE.

MR. ROBSON SAID THAT IMPLEMENTATION OF THE FIRST STAGE OF THE ACTION PROGRAMME +WILL BEGIN IN EARNEST ON MARCH 1, 1976.+

REFERRING TO THE BILL ITSELF, HE SAID ITS PURPOSE WAS TO PROHIBIT THE COMMISSIONER FOR LABOUR FROM REGISTERING ANY WORKPLACE IN NEW NON-INDUSTRI AL BUILDINGS OTHER THAN WORKPLACES FOR SPECIFIED SERVICE TRADES.

- - - - 0 ---------

KCR TO GET MORE LOCOMOTIVES HOM

ADDITIONAL LOCOMOTIVES ARE BEING ACQUIRED AND TRACK CAPACITY IS BEING EXPANDED FOR THE KOWLOON-CANTON RAILWAY TO CARRY THE INCREASING VOLUME OF GOODS TRAFFIC FROM CHINA, THE SECRETARY FOR THE ENVIRONMENT, THE HON. JAMES ROBSON, SAID TODAY.

IN HIS REPLY TO QUESTIONS BY THE HON. LI FOOK-WO IN THE LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, MR. ROBSON S/TID HE HAD BEEN ADVISED THAT THE FINANCE COMMITTEE HAD APPROVED THE GOVERNMENT’S PROPOSAL TO BUY TWO NEW LOCOMOTIVES, SUBJECT TO THE INCLUSION OF PROVISION IN THE- 1976-77 ESTIMATES IF THE BUDGETARY SITUATION SO ALLOWED.

+AS REGARDS TRACK CAPACITY, DOUBLE-TRACKING BETWEEN HUNG HOM AND SHA TIN, THE BUILDING OF A MARSHALLING YARD AT LO WU AUD THE CONSTRUCTION OF GOODS SIDINGS AT FO TAN ARE ALL PROCEEDING ARD WILL BE COMPLETED IN 1977,+ HE SAID.

+WORK OH A GOODS SIDING AT HO MAN TIN FOR THE UNLOADING OF LIVESTOCK WILL ALSO START SOON AUD IS EXPECTED TO BE COMPLETED BEFORE THE AUTUMN OF THIS YEAR.

+THE COMPLETION OF THESE TRACK WORKS WILL GREATLY INCREASE THE RAILWAY’S CAPACITY FOR FREIGHT TRAFFIC,* HE ADDED.

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/8

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 21, 1976

- 8 -

REGULATIONS TO ENSURE SAFER AND CLEANER WORKPLACES

K # KM#

THE LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL TODAY APPROVED REGULATIONS TO ENSURE STRICTER PRECAUTIONS AGAINST FIRE AND BETTER STANDARDS OF CLEANLINESS AND TIDINESS IN INDUSTRIAL UNDERTAKINGS.

MOVING A RESOLUTION FOR THE APPROVAL OF THE FACTORIES AND INDUSTRIAL UNDERTAKINGS (AMENDMENT) REGULATIONS 1976, THE COMMISSIONER FOR LABOUR, THE HON. IAN PRICE, SAID THEY WERE OF ”A TIDYING-UP NATURE.’’

HE SAID THE NEW REGULATION ON PRECAUTIONS AGAINST FIRE WAS MORE PRECISE IN RELATION TO THE FIRE RESISTENT CHARACTERISTICS OF DOORS LEADING OUT OF REGISTRABLE WORKPLACES, AND THE NEW REQUIREMENTS WERE IN LINE WITH THE BUILDING (CONSTRUCTION) REGULATIONS 1975.

ON GENERAL HOUSEKEEPING, THE COMMISSIONER SAID AN AMENDMENT WAS MADE TO THE PRINCIPAL REGULATIONS TO PROVIDE FOR THE REPAINTING AND VARNISHING OF REGISTRABLE WORKPLACES.

IN ORDER TO PREVENT ARGUMENTS AS TO WHEN SUCH DECORATION HAS BEEN CARRIED OUT, THERE WOULD BE A NEW REQUIREMENT FOR KEEPING THE APPROPRIATE RECORDS.

+TO REDUCE THE RISK OF ACCIDENTS CAUSED BY BAD HOUSEKEEPING,* MR. PRICE SAID, +ALL PROPRIETORS ARE AT PRESENT REQUIRED, AS A SPECIAL PRECAUTION UNDER SECTION 7(4) OF THE FACTORIES AND INDUSTRIAL UNDERTAKINGS ORDINANCE. TO MAINTAIN WALLS AND FLOORS IN GOOD REPAIR, KEEP FLOORS EVEN, NON-SLIPPERY AND GENERALLY FREE FROM HAZARDS, AND KEEP GANGWAYS CLEAR.

+THEY ARE ALSO REQUIRED TO STORE AND STACK GOODS AND MATERIALS IN A PROPER MANNER.*

HE WENT ON TO SAY THAT BECAUSE 40 PERCENT OF ALL INDUSTRIAL ACCIDENTS WERE ATTRIBUTABLE TO STEPPING ON OR STRIKING AGAINST OBJECTS, FALLING OBJECTS OR HANDLING GOODS OR RAW MATERIALS, IT WAS CONSIDERED THAT A NEW REGULATION SHOULD BE ADDED TO THE PRINCIPAL REGULATIONS RATHER THAN RELY ON SPECIAL PRECAUTION ORDERS AS AT PRESENT.

THE PRINCIPLES OF THESE REGULATIONS HAD BEEN UNANIMOUSLY APPROVED BY THE LABOUR ADVISORY BOARD. THE DIRECTOR OF FIRE SERVICES HAD ALSO BEEN CONSULTED AND HE FOUND THEM DESIRABLE, MR. PRICE. ADDED.

/DR. THE HON. S.Y. CHUNG .

\

\

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 21, 1976

9

DR. THE HON. S.Y. CHUNG WELCOMED THE AMENDING REGULATIONS BUT DREW THE ATTENTION OF THE COMMISSIONER TO TWO POINTS. REFERRING TO THE REGULATION GOVERNING GENERAL HOUSEKEEPING OF WORKPLACE, HE SAID THERE HAD BEEN FAST INCREASING USE OF AIR-CONDITIONING WITH EFFICIENT AND EFFECTIVE AIR FILTERING IN FACTORIES, EITHER DUE TO THE NEED OF THE MANUFACTURING PROCESS OR FOR IMPROVING THE WORKING CONDITIONS AND LABOUR PRODUCTIVITY.

+TO GROUP THIS KIND OF AIR-CONDITIONED OPERATIONS WITH OTHER NON-AIR-CONDITIONED ONES WOULD SEEM RATHER UNFAIR.

+THE VERY RIGID REQUIREMENT OF LIMEWASHING ALL WALLS AND CEILINGS AT LEAST ONCE IN EVERY YEAR FOR AIR-CONDITIONED WORKPLACES IS, IN MY VIEW, AN UNNECESSARY BURDEN BOTH IN COST AND ESPECIALLY DISRUPTION OF WORK,+ HE SAID.

IN REPLY, MR. PRICE SAID HE DID CONSIDER THE QUESTION OF REGISTRABLE WORKPLACES IN WHICH AIR-CONDITIONING WAS INSTALLED, BUT DECIDED THAT THERE WAS ”NO STRONG CASE” FOR WRITING INTO THESE REGULATIONS PROVISIONS EXEMPTING SUCH WORKPLACES FROM THE REQUIREMENT OF THE REGULATION GOVERNING GENERAL HOUSEKEEPING.

HE GAVE AN ASSURANCE THAT HE WOULD GIVE ’’SYMPATHETIC CONSIDERATION” TO ANY REPRESENTATIONS THAT THIS REGULATION WAS OPERATING, OR BEING APPLIED, HARSHLY AfcAINST A PARTICULAR WORKPLACE.

WHERE HE WAS CONVINCED THAT THERE COULD BE INJUSTICE, HE WOULD BE PREPARED TO EXERCISE HIS POWERS TO GRANT EXEMPTIONS.



WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 21, 1976

- 10 -

MAC’S MAY BE ABLE TO HELP YOUNG OFFENDERS * * * * *

THERE MAY BE OCCASIONS WHEN MEMBERS OF A MUTUAL AID COMMITTEE COULD ASSIST AND ADVISE A YOUNG DISCHARGED PRISONER LIVING IN THE SAME BUILDING WHO IS ANXIOUS TO MAKE A FRESH START, THE SECRETARY FOR HOME AFFAIRS, THE HON. DENIS BRAY, SAID TODAY.

HE WAS REPLYING IN THE LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL TO THE HON. HILTON CHEONG-LEEN WHO HAD PROPOSED FOR CONSIDERATION THE USE OF MAC’S, IN CO-OPERATION WITH THE DISCHARGED PRISONERS AID SOCIETY, TO HELP YOUNG OFFENDERS.

MR. BRAY SIAD THIS WAS A GOOD IDEA AND WAS SOMETHING THE BETTER MAC’S HE KNEW OF COULD DO WELL.

+ INDEED, IT IS CLEARLY IN THE MAC’S OWN INTEREST TO DO SO AS THEY ARE SO MUCH CONCERNED WITH PERSONAL SECURITY,* HE SAID.

HE POINTED OUT HOWEVER THAT TWO POINTS HAD TO BE MADEi THE INITIATIVE TO SEEK ASSISTANCE AND ADVICE SHOULD COME FROM THE EX-PRISONER HIMSELF AND THE MAC MUST COMPLEMENT, NOT REPLACE, THE EXCELLENT WORK OF THE SOCIETY.

HE SAID HE WOULD BE HAPPY TO ENSURE THAT THE SOCIETY WAS FULLY AWARE OF THE EXISTENCE AND ROLE OF THE MAC’S AND IT APPRECIATED THAT IT MIGHT SEEK THEIR ASSISTANCE WHEREVER APPROPRIATE.

IN REPLY TO ANOTHER QUESTION BY THE HON. Q.W. LEE ON HELP GIVEN TO MUTUAL AID COMMITTEES TO, COLLECT FEES, MR. BRAY SAID THE HOME AFFAIRS DEPARTMENT HAD SOME 113 COMMUNITY ORGANISERS APPOINTED SPECIFICALLY TO ASSIST THE COMMITTEES IN THEIR WORK.

i

‘ +HELPING MAC’S IN THE COLLECTION OF MAINTENANCE FEES — USUALLY BY PERSUASION AND MEDIATION — IS A NORMAL PART OF THIS ASSISTANCE AND HELPS TO BRING ABOUT A BETTER UNDERSTANDING OF THE MANAGEMENT PROBLEMS BETWEEN THE MAC’S AND THE OCCUPIERS,* HE SAID.

MR. BRAY ADDED THAT THE SMALL CLAIMS TRIBUNAL, WHEN SET UP, WOULD SIMPLIFY THE PROCEDURE FOR CIVIL ACTION TO COLLECT OUTSTANDING FEES ALTHOUGH IT WOULD NOT IN ITSELF ENSURE THAT THERE WOULD BE NO MORE PROBLEMS AS IT DID NOT ALTER THE FUNDAMENTAL LAW RELATING TO CONTRACT AND TORT NOR CREATE ANY NEW RIGHTS FOR MAC’S.

THE TRIBUNAL WOULD PROBABLY BE OF MORE HELP TO THOSE MULTI-STOREY MANAGEMENT ORGANISATIONS WHICH HAD FORMED THEMSELVES INTO OWNERS CORPORATIONS THAN TO MAC’S, HE SAID.

0 -------

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 21, 1976

11 -

GOVERNOR TO INSPECT PARADE AT STANLEY

M M * #

THE GOVERNOR, SIR MURRAY MACLEHOSE, WILL TAKE THE SALUTE AND PRESENT COLONIAL PRISON SERVICE MEDALS AND CLASPS TO 40 PRISON OFFICERS AS WELL AS A NUMBER OF CIVILIAN STAFF AT THE DEPARTMENT’S ANNUAL INSPECTION AT STANLEY ON FRIDAY (JANUARY 23).

TEN CONTINGENTS FROM 15 PENAL INSTITUTIONS AND THE DEPARTMENT’S STAFF TRAINING INSTITUTE WILL TAKE PART IN THE CEREMONIAL PARADE.

SIR MURRAY WILL INSPECT THE PARADE ACCOMPANIED BY THE COMMISSIONER OF PRISONS, MR. T.G. GARNER.

THE BAND FROM CAPE COLLINSON TRAINING CENTRE WILL BE IN ATTENDANCE.

NOTE TO EDITORS :

YOU ARE CORDIALLY INVITED TO SEND A REPORTER/PHOTOGRAPHER TO COVER THE PARADE. THE CEREMONY WILL BEGIN AT 4.30 P.M. ON FRIDAY (JANUARY 23) AT THE STAFF TRAINING INSTITUTE PARADE GROUND AT STANLEY. PRESS REPRESENTATIVES ARE ADVISED TO ARRIVE NOT LATER THAN 4 P.M. COPIES OF THE PROGRAMME AS WELL AS THE GOVERNOR’S SPEECH WILL BE AVAILABLE AT THE CEREMONY.

-----o------

SEMINAR ON LEARNING AND TEACHING TECHNICAL SUBJECTS

* * M M

A SEMINAR ON THE LEARNING AND TEACHING OF TECHNICAL SUBJECTS BY ACTIVITY METHODS WILL BE HELD TOMORROW (THURSDAY) AND FRIDAY IN THE TECHNICAL TEACHERS’ COLLEGE, WAN CHAI, FROM 9 A.M. TO 4.30 P.M. EACH DAY.

ACTIVITY METHOD IS A WAY OF TEACHING WHEREBY STUDENTS CARRY OUT SIMPLE AND PRACTICAL INVESTIGATIONS IN ORDER TO DISCOVER FOR THEMSELVES THE PRINCIPLES INVOLVED RATHER THAN MERELY GETTING THE TEACHER TO CHALK-AND-TALK BY WAY OF EXPLANATION.

I -

THE SEMINAR, TO BE OPENED BY MR. P.R. SMITH, PRINCIPAL OF THE TECHNICAL TEACHERS’ COLLEGE, ENABLES PARTICIPANTS TO EXCHANGE IDEAS AND OPINIONS ON THE APPLICATION OF ACTIVITY METHOD TO THE TEACHING OF TECHNICAL SUBJECTS.

IT WILL CONSIST OF ACTIVITY GROUPS CONSTRUCTING PROJECTS AND INVESTIGATIONS FOR THE TEACHING OF TECHNICAL SUBJECTS.

-----0-----

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 21, 1976

- 12 -

LION ROCK TUNNEL VENTILATION ADEQUATE

M * * M *

ADEQUATE VENTILATION EXISTS AT THE LION ROCK TUNNEL TO DISPERSE FUMES EMITTED BY VEHICLES, THE DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC WORKS, THE HON. DAVID MCDONALD, TOLD THE LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL TODAY.

MONITORING DEVICES OPERATING AT LION ROCK TUNNEL, HE SAID, INDICATED THAT UNDER PRESENT USAGE VISIBILITY AND CARBON MONOXIDE LEVELS WERE WELL WITHIN ACCEPTED INTERNATIONAL LIMITS, AND NO ADDITIONAL VENTILATORS WERE REQUIRED AT THIS TIME.

MR. MCDONALD WAS REPLYING TO A QUESTION FROM DR. THE HON. HARRY FANG, WHO WANTED TO KNOW WHETHER THE VENTILATION IN THE TUNNEL WOULD BE IMPROVED.

THE DIRECTOR NOTED THAT THE VENTILATION EQUIPMENT WAS OPERATED TO SUIT PREVAILING TRAFFIC CONDITIONS AND THE PLANT NORMALLY RAN AT BETWEEN 20 PER CENT AND 85 PER CENT OF FULL POWER.

+THERE IS THEREFORE SPARE CAPACITY TO IMPROVE CONDITIONS WHENEVER THIS IS FOUND TO BE NECESSARY,+ HE SAID.

MR. MCDONALD POINTED OUT THAT FURTHER IMPROVEMENT COULD BE EXPECTED WHEN THE SECOND LION ROCK TUNNEL, NOW UNDER CONSTRUCTION, IS COMPLETED TOWARDS THE END OF NEXT YEAR.

+WHEN BOTH TUNNELS ARE IN USS EACH TUBE WILL OPERATE ON A ONE-WAY TRAFFIC SYSTEM, AND THE INTRODUCTION OF THIS SYSTEM WILL IMPROVE VENTILATION DUE TO THE PISTON EFFECT CREATED BY ONE-WAY VEHICLE MOVEMENT,* HE SAID.

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WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 21, 1976

- 15 -

DHLS PASSED « n Ji M M

THE COMPANIES (AMENDMENT) BILL 1976 AND THE WILD ANIMALS PROTECTION BILL 1976 PASSED THEIR COMMITTEE STAGE AND THIRD READING IN LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL TODAY.

TWO OTHER LILLS, THE PLANT (IMPORTATION AND PEST CONTROL) BILL 1976 AND THE FACTORIES AUD INDUSTRIAL UNDERTAKINGS (AMENDMENT) BILL 1976 WERE INTRODUCED FOR FIRST READING.

DEBATE ON THEIR SECOND READING WAS ADJOURNED WHILE DEBATE RESUMED ON THE APPRENTICESHIP BILL 1975.

A MOTION TO HAVE THE FACTORIES ARD INDUSTRIAL UNDERTAKINGS (AMENDMENT) REGULATIONS 1976 APPROVED WAS PASSED BY THE COUNCIL.

- o - -

WATER CUT IN FALLING * M * * W

WATER SUPPLY TO A NUMBER OF PREMISES IN FANLING, NEW TERRITORIES, WILL BE INTERRUPTED FROM 1.9 P.M. ON FRIDAY (JANUARY 23) TO 6 A.M. THE FOLLOWING DAY TO ALLOW WATERWORKS TO BE CARRIED OUT.

AFFECTED WILL BE ALL PREMISES ALONG SHA TAU KOK ROAD BETWEEN FANLING ROUDABOUT AND Sll4\ TAU KOK MARKET, INCLUDING THE VILLAGES ALONG PING CHE ROAD, SHA TAU KOK ROAD AND LUEN WO MARKET.

— o-

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

THURSDAY, JANUARY 22, 1976

CONTENTS PAGE_NO.

' f

ROAD TRAFFIC REGULATIONS REVISED TO DETER BUS OVERLOADING ...............................................

EDINBURGH PLACE TO BE CLOSED FOR TWO HOURS FOR ARTS FESTIVAL OPENING REHEARSAL ................................

CONSUMER PRICE INDEXES LAST MONTH REMAINED STABLE ......... 3

TUNG WAH LEADERS CALL ON NEW HOME AFFAIRS DIRECTOR .... 4

PRESENTATION CEREMONY AT SHAM SHU I PO YOUTH CENTRE........ 4

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield.House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5'233191

1

THURSDAY, JANUARY 22, 1976 - 1 -

NEW REGULATIONS TO DETER OVERLOADING OF BUSES # # H H M K X "•

ROAD TRAFFIC REGULATIONS HAVE BEEN AMENDED TO ENSURE BETTER BRAKING SYSTEMS FOR ARTICULATED-LORRY TRAILERS, TO IMPOSE STIFF PENALTIES ON A BUS COMPANY RATHER THAN THE DRIVER OF AN OVERLOADED BUS, AND TO SET REVISED LIMITS ON THE NUMBER OF PASSENGERS CARRIED BY GOODS VEHICLES.

, THE ROAD TRAFFIC (CONSTRUCTION AND USE)(AMENDMENT) REGULATIONS 1976, TO BE GAZETTED TOMORROW (FRIDAY), ADD TO THE SAFETY OF BUS PASSENGERS BY MAKING THE OWNER OF THE BUS LIABLE TO A $2,000 FINE FOR CARRYING EXCESS PASSENGERS.

A TRANSPORT DEPARTMENT SPOKESMAN SAID THAT PREVIOUSLY IT WAS THE BUS DRIVER WHO WAS MOST LIABLE TO BE PROSECUTED, AS IT WAS VIRTUALLY IMPOSSIBLE TO PROVE TO THE SATISFACTION OF A COURT THAT HIS EMPLOYER HAD PERMITTED HIM TO CARRY AN EXCESS NUMBER OF PASSENGERS.

+THIS WAS OBVIOUSLY MOST UNFAIR,* THE SPOKESMAN SAID, +ESPECIALLY TO DRIVERS OF THE MANY ONE-MAN OPERATED BUSES WHO HAD TO DEPEND ON THE COMPANY REGULATORS LIMITING THE NUMBER OF PASSENGERS BOARDING AT BUSY BUS STOPS.

+IT IS HOPED THAT THE NEW REGULATION WILL DETER THE BUS COMPANIES FROM ALLOWING OR ENCOURAGING THE OVERLOADING OF BUSES AS , PROSECUTION OF THE BUS OWNER WILL BE MUCH MORE STRAIGHTFORWARD,* HE SAID.

THE REVISED REGULATIONS ALSO PROVIDE FOR GREATER SAFETY TO PEDESTRIANS AND MOTORISTS BY SETTING STRICT NEW STANDARDS ON BRAKING SYSTEMS OF TRAILERS. THIS WAS CONSIDERED NECESSARY BECAUSE OF THE LARGE NUMBER OF 20-FOOT AND 4O-F00T CONTAINERS NOW BEING TRANSPORTED BETWEEN THE SHIPPING BERTHS AND FACTORIES.

ACCORDING TO THE SPOKESMAN, THE REVISED REGULATIONS RESULTED FROM DISCUSSIONS BETWEEN THE TRANSPORT DEPARTMENT AND THE MOTOR TRADERS ASSOCIATION. +INITIALLY, ONLY NEW TRAILERS MANUFACTURED ON OR AFTER JULY 23, 1976, THAT IS SIX MONTHS FROM THE INTRODUCTION OF THE NEW LAWS, WILL HAVE TO COMPLY WITH THE NEW STANDARDS. AT THE END OF A FURTHER SIX MONTHS, THAT IS JANUARY 23, 1977, ALL EXISTING TRAILERS WILL HAVE TO COMPLY WITH THE NEW STANDARDS FOR BRAKING SYSTEMS.*

THE SEATING CAPACITY OF GOODS VEHICLES HAS ALSO BEEN REVISED SO AS TO ALLOW MORE PASSENGERS TO BE CARRIED IN THE CAB OF VEHICLES UNDER TWO TONS UNLADEN WEIGHT. AND IN THE CASE OF GOODS VEHICLES OVER TWO TONS, SIX PEOPLE MAY BE CARRIED IN THE REAR IN ADDITION TO THE SEATING CAPACITY OF THE CAB WHICH NOW CANNOT EXCEED FIVE.

/THE SPOKESMAN......

THUHSDAY, JANUARY 22, 1976

2

THE SPOKESMAN SAID THAT THE AMENDMENTS WERE MADE AFTER TAKING INTO ACCOUNT THE FREQUENT NEED TO MOVE WORK-CREWS WITH THE VEHICLES.

AN ADDITIONAL AMENDMENT TO THESE REGULATIONS, WHICH WILL NO DOUBT BE WELCOMED BY NEW TERRITORIES RESIDENTS, ALLOWS EXCESS PASSENGER PERMITS TO BE ISSUED TO VEHICLES OF UNDER TWO TONS. PREVIOUSLY THESE PERMITS WERE RESTRICTED TO VEHICLES OF TWO TONS OR MORE.

THE TRANSPORT DEPARTMENT SPOKESMAN SAID THAT BECAUSE OF THE IMPROVED DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION OF THESE SMALLER VEHICLES IN RECENT YEARS, THE RESTRICTIONS WERE NO LONGER NECESSARY. THE EXCESS PASSENGERS PERMITS ARE USED BY VILLAGERS MAINLY FOR MOVING THEIR FARM PRODUCE TO MARKET IN AREAS NOT OTHERWISE SERVED BY BUSES.

-----0------

I

TEMPORARY CLOSURE OF EDINBURGH PLACE O O * *

EDINBURGH PLACE, BETWEEN QUEEN’S PIER « THE CITY HALLj W'LL the^rehIarsal^of*theAgala^open!ng K FEST.vL

BUSES AND MAXICABS WILL NOT BE AFFECTED BY THE CLOSURE.

TEMPORARY TRAFFIC SIGNS./WILL BE PUT UP IN THE VICINITY OF EDINBURGH PLACE.

-----o-----

* I

/5........

THE

THE SAME

THE

THURSDAY, JANUARY 22, 1976.

- 3 -

CONSUMER PRICE INDEX FOR DECEMBER 1975

- M * * * * *

NEW CONSUMER PRICE INDEX (A) FOR DECEMBER 1975 WAS 108.

AS THAT FOR THE PREVIOUS MONTH.

• i

INDEX FOR FOODSTUFFS FOR THE MONTH FELL BY TWO POINTS.

THE AVERAGE RETAIL PRICE OF FRESH VEGETABLES DECLINED WHILE THAT OF FRESH WATER FISH ADVANCED.

ON THE OTHER HAND, THE INDEX FOR ALCOHOLIC DRINKS AND TOBACCO ROSE BY SIX POINTS MAINLY BECAUSE OF HEAVIER DUTIES IMPOSED.

THE INDEX FOR TRANSPORT AND VEHICLES INCREASED BY TWO POINTS AS A RESULT OF UPWARD REVISION IN THE FARES CHARGED BY THE HONG KONG TRAMWAYS, THE STAR FERRY AND THE PEAK TRAMWAYS.

AT THE SAME TIME, AS THE RENTS OF PRIVATE POST-WAR BUILDINGS INCREASED SLIGHTLY, THE INDEX FOR HOUSING ROSE BY ONE POINT.

AN INCREASE OF ONE POINT EACH WAS ALSO RECORDED IN THE INDEX FOR FUEL AND LIGHT AND MISCELLANEOUS'GOODS BECAUSE OF HIGHER PRICES FOR KEROSENE, LIQUEFIED PETROLEUM GAS AND MEDICINES.

THE NEW CONSUMER PRICE INDEX (B) FOR DECEMBER STOOD AT 108, ONE POINT LOWER THAN THAT FOR THE PREVIOUS MONTH.

A DROP OF ONE POINT WAS RECORDED IN THE INDEX FOR FOODSTUFFS BECAUSE OF LOWER PRICES FOR FRESH VEGETABLES.

FOR REASONS SIMILAR TO THAT FOR INDEX (A), THE INDEX FOR ALCOHOLIC DRINKS AND TABACCO ROSE BY FIVE POINTS AND THE INDEX FOR TRANSPORT AND VEHICLES ADVANCED BY TWO POINTS. THE INDEX FOR FUEL AND LIGHT AND MISCELLANEOUS GOODS ROSE BY ONE POINT EACH.

MOVEMENTS IN THE INDEXES FOR OTHER SECTIONS OF COMMODITY AND SERVICE WERE INSIGNIFICANT.

THE NEW CONSUMER PRICE INDEX (A) IS BASED ON WEIGHTS DERIVED FROM THE EXPENDITURE OF HOUSEHOLDS SPENDING BETWEEN $400 — $1,499 A MONTH WHILE INDEX (B) COVERS HOUSEHOLDS SPENDING $1,500 — $2,999.

- - 0 - -

THURSDAY, JANUARY 22, 1976

4

NEW DIRECTOR OF HOME AFFAIRS MEETS TUNG WAH LEADERS ******

THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF THE TUNG WAH GROUP OF HOSPITALS LED BY THE CHAIRMAN, MR. KONG WING-ON, PAID A COURTESY CALL ON THE NEWLY APPOINTED DIRECTOR OF HOME AFFAIRS, MR. JOHN WALDEN, THIS AFTERNOON (THURSDAY).

, X

DURING THEIR MEETING, MR. WALDEN PRAISED THE TUNG WAH GROUP OF HOSPITALS FOR ITS SERVICES TO THE COMMUNITY AND URGED THAT THE CLOSE LINK WHICH HAD LONG EXISTED BETWEEN THE GROUP AND THE HOME AFFAIRS DEPARTMENT BE CONTINUED.

MR. KONG BRIEFED MR. WALDEN ON SOME OF THE TUNG WAH GROUP’S DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS. THEY INCLUDE TWO NEW FUNERAL HOMES IN DIAMOND HILL AND HUNG HOM, A HOME FOR THE AGED IN LEK YUEN ESTATE, SHA TIN, A GERIATRIC CENTRE IN PLOVER COVE, A TUNG WAH CENTENARY BUILDING, AND NOS. 4-8 TUNG WAH SECONDARY SCHOOLS.

- o - -

PRIZE PRESENTATION CEREMONY

******

W-INNERS OF COMPETITIONS SPONSORED BY THE SOCIAL WELFARE DEPARTMENT’S SHAM SHUI PO YOUTH CENTRE WILL RECEIVE THEIR PRIZES AT A CEREMONY AT THE MAPLE STREET PLAYGROUND IN SHAM SHUI PO ON SATURDAY (JANUARY 24) NIGHT.

THE COMPETITIONS, PART OF THE CENTRE’S PLAYLEADERSHIP SCHEME, INCLUDED A FOOTBALL TOURNAMENT, A CHINESE BILLIARD COMPETITION AND A CARD DESIGN COMPETITION.

- OFFICIATING AT THE CEREMONY WILL BE MR. LAM KWOK-WAN, PRINCIPAL SOCIAL WELFARE OFFICER OF THE GROUP AND COMMUNITY WORK DIVISION-MR. CHAN CHAP-YAN, COMMUNITY AND YOUTH OFFICER (SHAM SHUI PO) AND MRS. LEUNG WONG KWOK-SHING, OFF ICER-1N-CHARGE OF SHAM SHUI PO YOUTH CENTRE.

NOTE TO EDITORS:

YOU ARE CARD I ALLY INVITED TO COVER THE CEREMONY, WHICH STARTS AT 8 P.M.

- - 0 - -

FRH 7

IgisI Iml

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

FRIDAY, JANUARY 23, 1976

EFFORTS STEPPED UP TO EDUCATE THE YOUNG AGAINST SMOKING......... 1

ADDITIONAL TRAIN SERVICES TO SERVE LUNAR NEW YEAR COMMUTERS... 2

GOVERNOR SAYS PRISONS DEPARTMENT MAKING GOOD PROGRESS IN EXPANSION AND TRAINING PROGRAMMES............................... 3

NEW TELEPHONE NUMBERS FOR PWD KOWLOON OFFICES................... 4

RECLAMATION AT LEI YU MUN BAY FOR MTR DEPOT..................... 5

*

PIER TO BE BUILT AT TSING Yl FOR TANKERS........................ 5

EMPLOYERS REMINDED OF LUNAR NEW YEAR HOLIDAYS FOR WORKERS....... 6

SAM SHING HUI BUSINESSMEN GET NEW SHOPS......................... 7

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong. Tel: 5-233191

FRIDAY, JANUARY 23, 1976

- 1 -

DRIVING HOME THE ANTI-SMOKING MESSAGE

* * H M K *

THE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT HAS TAKEN STEPS TO REINFORCE ITS PROGRAMME FOR EDUCATING YOUNG PEOPLE ON THE DANGERS OF SMOKING.

A GOVERNMENT SPOKESMAN SAID TODAY THAT THIS EXPANDED PROGRAMME WAS IN KEEPING WITH THE RECENT EXECUTIVE COUNCIL DECISION TO GIVE EDUCATION FIRST PRIORITY IN COMBATTING THE SMOKING PROBLEM.

+THIS SUBJECT HAS ALREADY BEEN INCLUDED IN THE PRIMARY AND SECONDARY SCHOOL SYLLABUS, AND WE ARE NOW CONSIDERING OTHER MEASURES TO DRIVE THE MESSAGE HOME,+ SAID THE SPOKESMAN.

HE RECALLED THAT THE REPORT OF THE AD HOC COMMITTEE ON CIGARETTE SMOKING HAD RECOMMENDED THAT THE GREATEST EMPHASIS SHOULD BE GIVEN TO THE HEED TO DETER YOUNG PEOPLE FROM SMOKING.

JUDGING FROM THE RESULTS OF AN OPINION SURVEY WHICH FOLLOWED PUBLICATION OF THE REPORT, THIS VIEW WAS STRONGLY SUPPORTED BY THE PUBLIC AT LARGE.

ANOTHER PROPOSAL RECOMMENDED BY THE AD HOC COMMITTEE, ENDORSED BY THE PUBLIC AND APPROVED BY THE EXECUTIVE COUNCIL WAS CONCERNED WITH SMOKING IN ENCLOSED PUBLIC AREAS AND IN PUBLIC TRANSPORT.

PERSUASIVE MEASURES TO REDUCE THIS NUISANCE WERE NOW BEING EXAMINED.

THE GOVERNMENT WOULD ALSO BE SEEKING THE CO-OPERATION OF THE TOBACCO INDUSTRY IN DRAWING UP A VOLUNTARY CODE OF ADVERTISING PRACTICE, THE SPOKESMAN ADDED.

-----0------

FRIDAY, JANUARY 23, 1976.

- 2 -

SPECIAL TRAIN SERVICES OVER LUllAR NEW YEAR

******

THREE SPECIAL UPTRAINS AND FIVE DOWNTRAINS WILL BE RUN DURING THE LUI AR NEW YEAR HOLIDAYS FOR THE CONVENIENCE OF PICNICKERS AND VISIT RS TO AND FROM THE NEW TERRITORIES.

THF THREE SPECIAL UPTRAINS WILL LEAVE KOWLOON (HUNG HOM) STATION AT 12.A 1 P.M., 2.13 P.M. AUD 3.43 P.M. ON THE FOUR DAYS FROM JANUARY 31 (NEW YEAR DAY) TO FEBRUARY 3.

THESE TRAINS, TOGETHER WITH 13 REGULAR TRAINS DEPARTING AT VARIOUS TIMES BETWEEN 6.30 A.M. AND 3.12 P.M., WILL NOT STOP FOR PASSENGERS AT MONG KOK STATION DURING THIS FOUR-DAY PERIOD.

ALL PASSENGERS FOR THESE TRAINS ARE REQUESTED TO GO TO KOWLOON STATION. MONTHLY TICKET HOLDERS WILL BE ALLOWED TO BOARD THESE TRAINS WITHOUT EXTRA CHARGES.

THE FIVE SPECIAL DOWNTRAINS WILL START THEIR SOUTHBOUND JOURNEY FROM DIFFERENT STATIONS IN THE NEW TERRITORIES.

TWO WILL DEPART FROM FANLING AT 12.44 P.M. AND 3.51 P.M., TWO FROM 10 WU AT 1.50 P.M. AND 5.12 P.M. AND ONE FROM TAI PO MARKET AT 1.57 P.M.

THE LAST SPECIAL TRAIN, LEAVING FROM LO WU, WILL ARRIVE AT KOWLOON AT 6.50 P.M.

TICKETS FOR TRAINS TO KOWLOON WILL NOT BE AVAILABLE FOR SALE AT MONG KOK STATION.

A SPOKESMAN FOR THE KOWLOON-CANTON RAILWAY SAID THAT ON THESE FOUR DAYS, THE UPTRAINS WOULD PROBABLY BE FULL BETWEEN 6 A.M. AND 3 P.M. WHILE THE DOWNTRAINS WOULD PROBABLY BE SO BETWEEN 3 P.M. AND 9 P.M.

HE GAVE AN ASSURANCE THAT FURTHER SPECIAL TRAINS WOULD BE RUN IN THE LATE EVENINGS IF THERE WAS PUBLIC DEMAND.

-------0--------

FRIDAY, JANUARY 23, 1976

3

PRISONS DEPARTMENT MAKING +GOOD PROGRESS+ - GOVERNOR

******

THE GOVERNOR SIR MURRAY PRISONS 'EPARTMENT aAS MAKING PROGRAMME AND IN THE TRAINING

MACLEHOSE, SAID TODAY THAT THE GOOD PROGRESS IN ITS EXPANSION OF ITS STAFF.

IN THIS WAY, HE SAID, PRISONS STAFF COULD BE EQUIPPED TO CARRY OUT THEIR PRIME FUNCTION OF +PROTECTING THE COMMUNITY FROM ITS OWN WORST ELEMENTS, WHILST ENSURING THAT EVERY EFFORT IS MADE TO REFORM AND REHABILITATE WHEREVER POSSIBLE.+

SiR MURRAY WAS ADDRESSING THE DEPARTMENT’S ANNUAL INSPECTION AT STANLEY THIS AFTERNOON AT WHICH TEN CONTINGENTS FROM 15 PENAL INSTITUTIONS AND THE DEPARTMENT’S STAFF TRAINING INSTITUTE TOOK PART.

THE GOVERNOR ALSO TOOK THE OCCASION TO PRESENT COLONIAL PRISON SERVICE MEDALS AND CLASPS TO 40 PRISON OFFICERS AS WELL AS A NUMBER OF THE DEPARTMENT’S CIVILIAN STAFF.

THE FOLLOWING IS THE FULL TEXT OF HIS SPEECH:

+V;iEN I ADDRESSED '/OU AT THE LAST ANNUAL INSPECTION IN DECEMBER, 19/+, I SPOKE ABOUT THE STEPS BEING TAKEN TO DEAL WITH OVER. CROWDING IN THE PRISONS. SINCE THEN, PIK UK PR ISON"FOR 60' AND THE HEI LING CHAU DRUG ADDICTION TREATMENT CENTRE FOR 365 HAVE BEEN OPENED. TODAY, IN ADDITION, THE P!l* IK CORRECT I D AL INSTITUTION FOR 400 YOUNG OFFENDERS COMES INTO OPERATION. THE CONTRACT FOR CONSTRUCTION OF THE LAI CHI KOK RECEPTION CENTRE FOR 960 WILL BE LET VcRY SOON. WO. K ON IMPROVING THE SECURITY OF STANLEY PRISON WILL CONTINl ’. SO PROGRESO iS BEING MADE. CLEARLY YOU MUST HAVE THE BUILDINGS IN WHICH TO DO YOUR JOB.-

+1 »AVE NO DOUBT THAT BEFORE CRIME IS BEATEN THE PRISON POPULAi : i: JILL iCCF ASE. IN THE LAST YEAR IT ROSE FROM 8,000 TO OVER 8,500 AND TP. NUMBER OF THOSE RECEIVING ’’AFTER CARE” "M 2,900 TC 3,400. SO YOU MUST EXPECT THE DEMANDS ON YOUP DEPARTMENT - . fONTINUE TO INCREASE.

+T0 MELT THESE L'.HANDS YOU YOURSELVES MUST BE PROPERI.Y TRAINED' AND IT IS RELEVANT THAT YOU ARE A STRIKINGLY YOUNG SERVICE. I AM THEREFORE PARTICULARLY PLEASED TO NOTE THE PROGRESS IN THIS Fit D. IT IS A REMARKABLE RECORD TO HAVE ORGANISED NO LESS T.hN 83 COURSES IN THE PAST YEAR FOR AS MANY A. 1,7JO STAFF. IN THIS WAY YOU CAN BE EQUIPPED TO CARRY OUT YOUR PRIME FUNCTION OF PROTECTING THE COMMUNITY FROM ITS OWN CURST ELEMENTS, WHILST ENSURING THAT EVERY EFFORT IS MADE TO REFORM AND REHABILITATE WHEREVER POSSIBLE.

FRIDAY, JANUARY 23, 197&

4 -

+l AM DELIGHTED TO NOTE THAT THE DEPARTMENT IS MAKING SUCH GOOD PROGRESS BOTH IN TERMS OF BRICKS AND MORTAR AND IN TERMS OF PRODUCING A PRISON SERVICE EDUCATED TO DISCHARGE ITS MANY-SIDED FUNCTIONS.

+l AM SURE THAT YOU WILL ALL CONTINUE TO RESPOND TO THE DEMANDS OF YOUR VITAL ROLE IN THE FIGHT AGAINST CRIME, AND I CONGRATULATE YOU ON YOUR ADMIRABLE BEARING HERE TODAY.

+l WISH YOU EVERY SUCCESS DURING THE COMING YEAR.+

______0 _ - - -

NEW TELEPHONE NUMBERS FOR PWD KOWLOON OFFICES ******

A NEW TELEPHONE EXCHANGE, 3-045211, WILL COME INTO SERVICE ON MONDAY (JANUARY 26) AT THE GOVERNMENT BRANCH OFFICES AT FARM ROAD, KOWLOON.

FNOLJ IRIES MAY BE DIRECTED THROUGH THIS NUMBER TO THE TRAFFIC ENGINEERING (MAINLAND) DIVISION, PWD, ON EXTENSION 88= THE HIGHWAYS (KOWLOON) DIVISION ON EXTENSION 08“ AND THE HIGHWAYS (NEW TERRITORIES) DIVISION ON EXTENSION 59.

AFTER OFFICE HOURS, GENERAL ENQUIRIES MAY BE MADE THROUGH 5-251111, THE MAIN EXCHANGE OF THE PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT IN MURRAY BUILDING.

DURING EMERGENCIES, SUCH AS RAINSTORM AND TYPHOONS, THE HIGHWAYS (KOWLOON) DIVISION MAY BE CONTACTED AT ALL HOURS ON

OR 3-045212.

3-045211

THE EMERGENCY NUMBERS FOR THE HIGHWAYS (NEW TERRITORIES) ARE 3-045221 AND 3-045222.

DIVISION

DRAINAGE COMPLAINTS MAY BE DIRECTED TO THE HIGHWAYS fKOWLOON DIVISION ON 3-045211 EXT. 16 OR ON 3-010920 DURING ^F ICE ElouSs" US ON 3-045210 OR 3-010920 AFTER OFFICE HOURS.

------0-------

/5

FRIDAY, JANUARY 23, 1976

- 5 -

RECLAMATION AT LEI YUE MUN BAY

*****

WORK IS EXPECTED TO START SHORTLY ON THE/CONSTRUCT I ON OF A ROCK BUND AND THE RECLAMATION OF THE SEABED BETWEEN THE NEW ROCK BUND AND THE EXISTING HIGH WATER MA«K AT LEI YUE MUN BAY.

THE RECLAMATION IS REQUIRED IN CONNECTION WITH THE CONSTRUCTION OF THE MASS TRANSIT RAILWAY AND.WILL BE FORMED BY THE DUMPING OF SPOIL FROM M.T.R. EXCAVATIONS ON HONG KONG ISLAND.

THE RECLAMATION WILL EVENTUALLY FORM PART OF THE FUTURE M.T.R. CHAI WAN DEPOT.

WORK ON THE FIRST STAGE OF THE ROCK BUND IS EXPECTED TO START NEXT MONTH AND THE FIRST STAGE OF RECLAMATION IS EXPECTED TO BEGIN IN MAY.

.-----0 ------

• PIER TO BE BUILT AT TSI NG Yl FOR TANKERS ******

THE GOVERNMENT PROPOSES TO GRANT AN AREA OF FORESHORE AND SEABED ON THE SOUTHERN BOUNDARY OF TSI NG Yl ISLAND FOR THE CONSTRUCTION OF A PIER TO PERMIT THE BERTHING OF OCEAN-GOING TANKERS.

THE PIER WILL BE USED FOR THE LOADING AND UNLOADING OF PETROLEUM PRODUCTS ARRIVING FROM CHINA BY SEA AND WILL BE USED IN CONJUCTION WITH THE OIL STORAGE DEPOT CURRENTLY UNDER CONSTRUCTION AND OWNED BY THE CHINA RESOURCES COMPANY

THE EXTENT OF THE AREA INVOLVED IS DESCRIBED IN A NOTIFICATION IN THE GOVERNMENT GAZETTE TODAY.

ALL PERSONS WHO HAVE OBJECTION TO THE PROPOSAL OR ANY CLAIM OF PRIVATE RIGHT SHOULD WRITE TO THE DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC WORKS WITHIN THE NEXT TWO MONTHS.

THE NOTICE, IN BOTH ENGLISH AND CHINESE, CAN ALSO SEEN ON NOTICE BOARDS POSTED NEAR THE SITE.

0 -------

/6......


FRIDAY, JANUARY 23, 1976

LUNAR NEW YEAR HOLIDAYS FOR WORKERS

* * M * * *

THE COMMISSIONER FOR LABOUR, MR. IAN PRICE, TODAY REMINDED EMPLOYERS THAT THE FIRST AND SECOND DAYS OF THE LUNAR NEW YEAR WHICH FALL ON JANUARY 31 AND FEBRUARY 1, 1976, ARE TWO OF THE SIX STATUTORY HOLIDAYS APPOINTED UNDER THE EMPLOYMENT ORDINANCE.

THIS YEAR THE SECOND DAY OF THE LUNAR NEW YEAR FALLS ON A SUNDAY WHICH IS.LIKELY ALSO TO BE A REST DAY FOR MANY EMPLOYEES COVERED BY THE ORDINANCE.

+IN THESE CIRCUMSTANCES,* SAID MR. PRICE, +AN EMPLOYER

■ MUST GRANT HIS EMPLOYEES ANOTHER REST DAY BECAUSE THE EMPLOYMENT ORDINANCE STIPULATES THAT A REST DAY SHALL BE IN ADDITION TO ANY STATUTORY HOLIDAY.*

MR. PRICE EMPHASISED THAT THE PROVISIONS OF THE EMPLOYMENT ORDINANCE APPLIED NOT ONLY TO INDUSTRIAL EMPLOYEES BUT ALSO TO EMPLOYEES IN THE ENTIRE COMMERCIAL SECTOR, INCLUDING THE SERVICES AND CATERING TRADES^ AND domestic SERVANTS.

UNDER THE ORDINANCE, ALL NON-MANUAL EMPLOYEES EARNING NOT MORE THAT $2,000 A MONTH AND ALL MANUAL EMPLOYEES IRRESPECTIVE OF THEIR EARNINGS ARE ENTITLED TO THE HOLIDAYS. AND THEY MUST ALSO BE PAID FOR THE TWO DAYS OFF IF THEY HAVE WORKED CONTINUOUSLY FOR THEIR EMPLOYERS FOR THREE MONTHS IMMEDIATELY PRECEDING THE STATUTORY HOLIDAYS.

+AN EMPLOYEE WHO IS. NOT EMPLOYED ON A CONTINUOUS CONTRACT — FOR EXAMPLE, ONE WHO WORKS FOR LESS THAN SIX HOURS A DAY OR HAS BEEN EMPLOYED BY THE SAME EMPLOYER FOR LESS THAN THREE MONTHS — IS STILL ENTITLED TO THE HOLIDAYS, BUT HAS NO LEGAL ENTITLEMENT TO BE PAID,* MR. PRICE SAID.

IF THE EMPLOYER REQUIRES AN EMPLOYEE TO WORK ON A STATUTORY HOLIDAY, HE MUST GIVE HIM AT LEAST 48 HOURS’ NOTICE, AND HE MUST GIVE HIS EMPLOYEE AN ALTERNATIVE HOLIDAY WITHIN 60 DAYS OF THE STATUTORY HOLIDAY.

IF THE EMPLOYER INTENDS TO GIVE HIS EMPLOYEE AN ALTERNATIVE HOLIDAY BEFORE THE STATUTORY HOLIDAY, HE MUST NOTIFY HIS EMPLOYEE 48 HOURS IN ADVANCE OF THAT ALTERNATIVE HOLIDAY. AND IF AN ALTERNATIVE HOLIDAY IS TO BE GIVEN AFTER THE STATUTORY HOLIDAY, THE EMPLOYER MUST INFORM HIS EMPLOYEES OF THE ARRANGEMENT AT LEAST 48 HOURS BEFORE THE STATUTORY HOLIDAY.

IF THE EMPLOYER AND EMPLOYEE AGREE, ANY DAY WITHIN 30 DAYS OF A STATUTORY HOLIDAY OR ALTERNATIVE HOLIDAY MAY BE TAKEN BY THE EMPLOYEE AS A SUBSTITUTED HOLIDAY. 1

COMPLAINTS OR ENQUIRIES ABOUT STATUTORY HOLIDAYS MAY BE MADE TO THE NEAREST BRANCH OFFICE OF THE LABOUR RELATIONS SERVICE. THE TELEPHONE NUMBERS ARE s FOR KOWLOON EAST 3-205638= KOWLOON WEST 3-201652= KWUN TONG 3-898520= TSUEN WAN 12-422096= AND HONG KONG ‘ISLAND 5-282523 EXT. 60.

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FRIDAY, JANUARY 23, 1976 - 7 -

NEW SHOPS FOR SAM SHING HUI BUSINESSMEN KOO#

CONTRACTORS ARE BUSY PUTTING UP ON A RESITE AREA 130 SHOPS AND WORKSHOPS FOR THE PRESENT OWNERS OF BUSINESS PREMISES IN SAM SHING HUI WHICH ARE DUE TO BE CLEARED IN A FEW MONTHS TO MAKE WAY FOR DEVELOPMENT. k

UNDER AN AGREEMENT REACHED WITH THE DISTRICT OFFICER, TUEN MUN, THE BUSINESS OPERATORS ARE TO MOVE TO THE RESITE AREA BETWEEN FEBRUARY AND APRIL. ADVANCE PAYMENTS OF COMPENSATION TO HELP COVER EXPENSES HAVE ALREADY BEEN MADE.

ALSO AS PART OF THE AGREEMENT, THE SAM SHING HUI SHOPKEEPERS WHOSE BUSINESSES CATER LARGELY FOR THE LOCAL FISHING INDUSTRY, WILL BE GIVEN AN OPPORTUNITY TO TAKE PART IN A RESTRICTED TENDER FOR THE COMMERCIAL SITES, WHICH TOGETHER WITH HOUSING BLOCKS AND PART OF THE TUEN MUN-TSUEN WAN HIGHWAY, WILL BE ON THE LAND THEY ARE NOW LEAVING.

AS IT MAY BE SOME YEARS BEFORE THE NEW DEVELOPMENT IS COMPLETED, THE DISTRICT OFFICER, TUEN MUN, MR. TONY BENNETT, HAS URGED THAT THE RESITE AREA SHOPS EE CONSTRUCTED OF SUBSTANTIAL MATERIAL. SOME HAVE TAKEN HIS ADVICE AND ARE BUILDING WITH BRICK= OTHERS ARE USING WOOD AND TINSHEET. A HEIGHT RESTRICTION OF 13-1/2 FEET HAS BEEN WAIVED SO THAT THE SHOPOWNERS MAY BUILD A COCKLOFT OVER THEIR PREMISES IN WHICH TO LIVE. A NEW HEIGHT LIMIT OF 16 FEET HAS BEEN SET.

MR. BENNETT SAID: +A SPIRIT OF COOPERATION HAS GROWN UP BETWEEN THE REPRESENTATIVES OF THE SAM SHING HUI SHOPKEEPERS AND THE DISTRICT OFFICE. THE REPRESENTATIVES HAVE CONTRIBUTED A GREAT DEAL IN THE WAY OF PRACTICAL PROPOSALS AND THIS HAS BEEN A SIGNIFICANT FACTOR IN OVERCOMING D IFF ICULTIES.+

COMPENSATION FOR THE SHOPKEEPERS IS BASED ON THE AREA AT PRESENT OCCUPIED AND VARIES FROM $6,000 TO A MAXIMUM OF $20,000. ADVANCE PAYMENTS HAVE BEEN MADE AND THE BALANCE WILL BE PAID AFTER THE RESTRICTED TENDER HAS BEEN HELD.

MR. BENNETT SAID THE SHOPS ON THE RESITE AREA ARE BEING CONSTRUCTED BY THE SIDES OF A ROAD WHICH WILL VERY LIKELY BE NAMED SAM SHING HUI STREET. AN OFFICIAL OPENING CEREMONY WILL PROBABLY EE HELD WHEN ALL THE NEW SHOPS ARE READY TO OPEN FOR BUSINESS.

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DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

i r

SATURDAY, JANUARY 24, 1976

CONTENTS ” " PAGE NO.

TEMPERATURE LOWEST ON RECORD LAST MONTH ............. 1

BATHROOMS WITH HEATERS MUST HAVE PROPER VENTILATION . 2

I

PASSENGERS FROM MACAU MAY BRING ONE BOTTLE OF DUTY-FREE BRANDY ............................................   3

ARRAN STREET CLINIC TO BE EXPANDED .................. 3

DIRECTOR OF EDUCATION OPENS NEW JAPANESE SCHOOL BUILDING 4 X 1

I

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Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield'House, Hong Kong. Tel: 5'233191

SATURDAY, JANUARY 24, 1976

1

RECORD LOW TEMPERATURE LAST MONTH M * X H K w

SEVERAL NEW RECORDS IM TEMPERATURE READINGS WERE SFT IN DECEMBER 1975.

THE MINIMUM TEMPERATURE OF THE MONTH, 4.3 DEGREES CELSIUS, WAS THE LOWEST TEMPERATURE FOR 1975 AND WAS ALSO A NEW RECORD FOR DECEMBER.

THE MEAN TEMPERATURE OF 14.5 DEGREES CELSIUS AND THE MEAN MINIMUM TEHPERA I URE OF 12.1 DEGREES CELSIUS WERE THE LOWEST ON RECORD FOR THE MONTH.

EXPLAINING THE WEATHER FOR DECEMBER, THE DIRECTOR OF ROYAL OBSERVATORY, MR. GORDON DELL, NOTED THAT HONG KONG EXPERIENCED COLD WEATHER FOR NEARLY THE WHOLE MONTH EXCEPT FOR THE FIRST EIGHT DAYS.

THE FIRST EIGHT DAYS WERE MILD AND HUMID. THE MONTH’S MAXIMUM TEMPERATURE OF 25.8 DEGREES CELSIUS WAS RECORDED ON DECEMBER 7.

HOWEVER, WITH THE ARRIVAL OF A COLD FRONT ON DECEMBER <3, TEMPERATURE BEGAN TO FALL STEADILY. THE WEATHER THEN REMAINED CLOUDY WITH PERIODS OF RAIN FOR QUITE SONE TIME.

BETWEEN DECEMBER 13 AND 17, SLIGHT SNOW WAS REPORTED AT TAI MO SHAH WHILE WIDESPREAD ICE AND FROST WERE OBSERVED ON HIGH GROUl.-J AND IN THE NEW TERRITORIES. THE LOWEST TEMPERATURE OF 4.3 DEGREES CELSIUS WAS RECORDED ON DECEMBER 14.

MR. BELL NOTED THAT IT WAS OF INTEREST THAT DURING , THIS PERIOD THE AIR TEMPERATURES WERE ABOVE FREEZING AT ALL LEVELS BETWEEN THE SURFACE AND 3,200 METRES.

HE SAID THAT ONE REASON FOR THE FORMATION OF WIDESPREAD ICE WAS THAT +THE MOUNTAIN TOPS WERE COOLED BY RADIATION AND WERE COOLER THAN THE SURROUNDING AIR Al' THE SAME LEVEL. SO THAT RAIN DROPS WOULD HAVE FROZEN AFTER MAKING CONTACT WITH THE GROUND.+

THE WtATHER IMPROVED ON DECEMBER 15 AND THE REST OF THE MONTH WAS FINE AND DRY. FIRE DANGER WARNINGS WERE IN FORCE FOR THE ENTIRE PERIOD.

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SATURDAY, JANUARY 24, 1976

2

WARNING ON WATER HEATERS K * * # M M

THE FIRE SERVICES DEPARTMENT TODAY AGAIN WARNED THE PUBLIC TO BE CAUTIOUS WHEN USING WATER HEATERS IN BATHROOMS WHICH'HAVE LITTLE OR NO VENTILATION.

A SPOKESMAN FOR THE DEPARTMENT SAID THAT WARNINGS HAD BEEN ISSUED FROM TIME TO TIME IN THE PAST BUT DEATHS AND INJURIES STILL OCCURRED.

SINCE APRIL LAST YEAR, THERE HAD BEEN 15 CASES OF BATHROOM ACCIDENTS INVOLVING WATER HEATERS. AS A RESULT, TWO PEOPLE DIED AND 13 OTHERS INJURED.

+WHETHER THESE PEOPLE WERE OVERCOME BY GAS LEAKING FROM A DEFECTIVE CYLINDER, OR THROUGH LACK OF OXYGEN,+ THE SPOKESMAN SAID, +THE DEATHS AND INJURIES WOULD PROBABLY NOT HAVE OCCURRED HAD THERE BEEN PROPER VENTILATION.+

HE POINTED OUT THAT HANY SHOWER CUBICLES AND BATHROOMS HAD BEEN CONVERTED FROM COLD TO HOT WATER SUPPLY BY THE INSTALLATION OF A GAS HEATER.

HE SAID: +IN SOME CASES WHERE THESE CONVERSIONS HAVE BEEN CARRIED OUT, PROPER VENTILATION HAS NOT DEEN PROVIDED.+

+WE HOPE THAT BY ALERTING THE PUBLIC, FURTHER TRAGEDIES COULD BE AVOIDED,+ THE SPOKESMAN ADDED.

SATURDAY, JANUARY 24, 1976

- 3 -

DUTY FREE BRANDY FROM MACAU

* * H K X *

THE DIRECTOR OF COMMERCE AND INDUSTRY HAS ANNOUNCED THAT PASSENGERS ARRIVING FROM MACAU DURING THE TWO DAYS FOLLOWING LUNAR NEW YEAR’S DAY, THAT IS, FEBRUARY 1 AND 2, MAY BRING INTO HONG KONG FREE OF DUTY ONE BOTTLE OF PORTUGUESE BRANDY CONTAINING NOT MORE THAN ONE LITRE.

THIS IS IN LIEU OF THE CUSTOMARY ONE QUART BOTTLE OF GRAPE WINE AT PRESENT ALLOWED.

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EXTENSION TO ARRAN STREET EYE CLINIC

* M H *

THE PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT IS TO ADD ANOTHER FLOOR TO THE ARRAN STREET EYE CLINIC IN MONG KOK TO HOUSE ADDITIONAL WELFARE AND MEDICAL FACILITIES FOR RESIDENTS IN THE AREA.

THE PWD’S ARCHITECTURAL OFFICE IS TO BEGIN WORK ON THE EXTENSION IN MARCH AND IT SHOULD EE COMPLETED BY AUGUST THIS YEAR.

THE ADDITIONAL FLOOR WILL PROVIDE CONSULTING ROOMS, LABORATORIES, WORKSHOPS AND OFFICE ACCOMMODATION.

AT PRESENT, THE CLINIC CONSISTS OF A ONE-STOREY BUILDING AND IS USED AS AN EYE CLINIC FOR FOLLOW-UP CASES.

WHEN IT IS EXTENDED, THE BUILDING WILL HOUSE TOO SPECIALIST SERVICES OPERATED BY THE MEDICAL AND HEALTH DEPARTMENT.

THESE ARE A CHILD DEVELOPMENT CLINIC WHICH WILL PROVIDE FULL-TIME ASSESSMENT CLINIC FACILITIES FOR PHYSICALLY AND MENTALLY DISABLED CHILDREN, AND A CENTRAL HEARING AID REPAIR CENTRE.

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SATURDAY, JANUARY 24, 1976

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OPENING OF NEW JAPANESE SCHOOL BUILDING ******

THE JAPANESE COMMUNITY IS AMONG THE NATIONAL GROUPS IN HONG KONG WHICH HAVE ESTABLISHED SCHOOLS TO PROVIDE FOR THE EDUCATION OF THEIR CHILDREN SO THAT ON THEIR RETURN TO THEIR MOTHERLAND THEY WILL BE ABLE TO FIT INTO THEIR OWN NATIONAL EDUCATION SYSTEM, MR. KENNETH TOPLEY, DIRECTOR OF EDUCATION SAID THIS AFTERNOON.

MR. TOPLEY WAS SPEAKING AT THE OFFICIAL OPENING OF THE NEW SCHOOL BUILDING OF THE HONG KONG JAPANESE SCHOOL, 157 BLUEPOOL ROAD.

THE SCHOOL, BUILT ON A 28,000 SQ. FT. SITE AT THE TOP OF THE ROAD, HAS 19 CLASSROOMS, SIX SPECIAL ROOMS AND MANY OTHER ANCILLARY FACILITIES. IT ALSO HAS A SWIMMING POOL. AT PRESENT THE SCHOOL HAS AN ENROLMENT OF SOME 60'0 PUPILS.

THE SCHOOL WAS REGISTERED WITH THE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT IN 1966 AND IN THE BEGINNING IT CONSISTED OF ONLY SIX CLASSROOMS IN TOWER COURT AT HYSAN AVENUE.

•WITH AN INCREASE IN THE SIZE OF THE JAPANESE COMMUNITY THE SCHOOL FIRST EXPANDED TO HAPPY VIEW TERRACE AT BROADWOOD ROAD AND THEN TO YUN PING ROAD.

BUT THE ADDED SPACE AND FACILITIES DID NOT PROVIDE THE ENVIRONMENT THE SCHOOL BOARD WISHED JAPANESE CHILDREN TO STUDY IN. IN 1973 LAND WAS OBTAINED FOR THE BUILDING OF A NEW SCHOOL WHICH WAS SIMILAR TO A TYPICAL PRIVATE SCHOOL IN JAPAN.

TO ENSURE A TRULY JAPANESE EDUCATION, THE SCHOOL BOARD / HAS EMPLOYED ADMINISTRATIVE AND TEACHING STAFF FROM JAPAN.

CONCLUDING WITH A FEW WORDS IN JAPANESE, MR. TOPLEY SAID HE WAS SURE THE SCHOOL WOULD CERTAINLY PROGRESS WITH HONG KONG’S PROSPERITY AND HE OFFERED HIS HEARTFELT CONGRATULATIONS TO THE SCHOOL BOARD AND THE ENTIRE JAPANESE COMMUNITY.

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FRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

SUNDAY, JANUARY 25, 1976

CONTENTS

PAGE NO.

S13 MILLION PAID TO WORKERS IN DISPUTES SETTLED LAST YEAR tsuenTJanS 0F "UTUAL aid C0MH|TreEs fast recognised in ELyearRholid?yIA,<E EXrRA FIRE precaution during lunar party FOR ELDERLY PATIENTS IN PRINCESS MARGARET HOSPITAL..

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong. Tel: 5'233191

1

SUNDAY, JANUARY 25, 1076

$13H Ph ID Oul Tn wuiiKtRS IN 1075

7 ? * x 7 * iC 7•

EMPLOYERS PAID NEARLY 013 Mil LION TO 12,753 EMPLOYEES I ast

YEAR III lADOUR-HAHACLi.ENf PISPUi. S WHICH WERE SETTLED Till OUGH Tur EFFORTS GF THE I ADOUR DERAIL I i-IEil j ’IaROUR RELATIONS SERV CF A rL THIS COMPARED W I TH &10 MILLION IU 1074. ctviut LL.hoJ.

PAID IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE EMPLOYMENT ORDINANCE, ALMOST HALF OF THE TOTAL , OR -6,213,272, .EL- SEVERANCE rAYMEIT. TO 5 7/a EMPLOYEES fitND. 'A.ji REDUNDANT i,Y C I .CJ; ;;>TAI.C S OF I. CESSION.

Tilt REMAINDER WAS PAID AS ARREARS OF WAGES, PAYMENT li LIEU OF NOTICE, STATUTORY HOLIDAY PAY, .OPUS At.!; OTHER DUE TO EMPLOYEEJ.

-uTiivr ON THESE STATISTICS, THE CHIEF LATOUR OFFICER.

Tv "c. TSUI TII.-H .’k, SAID 1975 ..AS A U I.UIAIXC YEAU IN KE IlWALs’oF IIOBU KCW’* LABOUR RELATIONS.

+ IT tlARi'.EI THE EMD GF A LOI1., TRYING PERIOD OF RECESSION DROUGHT 0 1Y T.LH- . IDE EC:'.: IS U11-F I CULT IES, So COURAGEOUSLY ENDURED iY u tPLoVetS AND i 4 uYl, . h ALL TLE TRADi.j Al.i; ILbUSTRIES AFFr.C I Fit.

+ IT ;A > aLSO A YE/tR OF iL*.. < ■ .'!<3 I t!v'ULVEr>cLl Al.:; COliS IDEiiALLc SUCCESS FO; THE LACOUR RELATlm;., ..i.VICE,-* HE SAIj».

HAD IT HOT PEEN FOR THE TIM: • Y ENACTMENT OF THE SEVERANCE PAY I EG IS! AT I OH I . AUGUST 1974, SAL- ; .. TSUI, THE RET F./iCHi-ENT LAST YtAR l.'OIII n IIAV - >>.-oUL TED In i-iAi Y VARIOUS DISPUTES AND liFLlCTED HARUSIlIP OH Re. i" .CIIEn Ef-iPL OVE . > <j I’liElR FAi-ilL I : S.

♦FORTUNATELY SEVERANCE PAYMENTS UNDER THE EF.Fl GYMENT ORDINANCE HCLIT-1 I NY such EMPLOYEES Tlf;e ( .’Ll.' F I I.Ai.C I Al. D lr F lit LTIE5 Ui.TIL SUCH TH-.. ■ -.S I.IEY COULD Fl. 1 L.i'.i t <»Y; .Ei. i' AGAIN, fi r-. AVOIDING OitlGU. ,i IL "J T‘. Lt- AtH'r1'.

RE M.-.. I.:.- THE .;ORK OF TLE LI. > IK 1975, MR. TSUI SAID THE SERVICE । I H <3/■'l; WTRiFS i/D CONSULTATIONS, AN L CHEaSE GF 11,// CAS R :•*: PL-fi T c. Al.t.ii l;l i,-l 1974.

+A3 EXPECTED, MOST C'F THE .TTLRS REL ATED TO PROI.LEMS

AR I.. I. Fl RECESSION, AND Tl . I: :. CONCEI . . ERSONNEL

. ?.|/.Ci >'i: : i ' .iil; L;> AJi/CTu .. li.u t<.. I Sf/i jiiUIMALCc.+

nr.’., it.: tip7 recession only •'7,603 man-days

3 rr II 3, f:c 'A, .1) WITH hi,7.' uCLAIIjG DAYS DURING ^>V , A..- 5- ,C?1 DAYS I. i. .-’.’A. .u.» IN io ci •;i:'.).

LEPE LOST hi Lci.T li: 22 STOPPAGES 1973 PRIOR TO THE

/IIP. SAID

SUNDAY, JANUARY 25, 1976

- 2 -

HE SAID BOTH EMPLOYERS AND EMPLOYEES HAD ADOPTED A REMARKABLY CO-OPERATIVE ATTITUDE TOWARDS EACH OTHER THROUGHOUT THE PERIOD OF RECESSION.

THE LR3 ALSO DEALT WITH 6,585 DISPUTES IN THE YEAR, OF WHICH ONLY 125 OR 1.89 PER CENT WERE LABOUR DISPUTES IN THE GENUINE SENSE OF THE TERM. THE REST WERE MONETARY CLAIMS OF A GRIEVANCE NATURE. THIS CONTRASTED WITH 5,878 DISPUTES DURING 1974, GF WHICH 94 OR 1.6 PER CENT WERE LABOUR DISPUTES.

OF THE 6,585 DISPUTES, AN OVERALL 60 PER CENT WERE SETTLED WITH THE HELP OF THE LRS.

IN ADDITION TO ITS OTHER COMMITMENTS DURING THE YEAR, THE LRS THOROUGHLY INVESTIGATED 218 MAJOR COMPLAINTS ABOUT ALLEGED CONTRAVENTIONS OF PROVISIONS OF THE EMPLOYMENT ORDINANCE CONCERNING STATUTORY HOLIDAYS, REST DAYS AND IMPROPER DEDUCTIONS FROM WAGES.

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SUNDAY, JANUARY 25, 1976

3

RAPID GROWTH OF MUTUAL it

AID COMMITTEES IN TSUEN WAN it it it it

CLOSE TO ONE IN SIX OF TSUEfl WAN’S POPULATION NOW LIVES IN A BUILDING WHICH HAS A MUTUAL AID COMMITTEE OR A MULTI-STOREY BUILDING OWNERS’ INCORPORATION. AND THE RATIO SHOULD BE ONE IM THREE BY THE END OF THIS YEAR.

THE TOWN, WHOSE 450,000 POPULATION IS EXPECTED TO MORE THAN DOUBLE BY 1955, HAS A TOTAL OF 107 MUTUAL AID COMMITTEES AT PRESENT, WITH TEN MORE EXPECTED TO DE FORMED BY THE END OF MARCH. THERE ARE 18 OWNERS’ INCORPORATIONS.

THE FORMATION OF MACS BEGAN IN JULY 1973 AND WITHIN EIGHT MONTHS 48 HAD DEEN SET UP. BY MARCH 1975 THE NUMBER HAD RISEN TO 67 AND ANOTHER 40 HAVE BEEN ADDED SINCE. ALTOGETHER 75,000 PEOPLE LIVING IN 15,000 HOMES ARE NOW COVERED DY,AN MAC.

MR. CHOW KIM-MING, A TSUEN WAI? DI STR ICT OFFICE LIAISON OFFICER WITH RESPONSIBILITIES FOR SETTING UP AND MAINTAINING CONTACTS WITH MACS, SAYS IT IS HOPED TO DOUBLE THE NUMBER OF MACS BY TH lb TIME NEXT YEAR. +WE ARE MAKING SUCH GOOD PROGRESS,+ HE DECLARED, +THAT IT HAS BEEN NECESSARY TO TAKE ON MORE STAFF.+ UNDER MR. CHOW ARE EIGHT COMMUNITY ORGANISERS, THREE OF .-.HOM WERE RECRUITED ONLY THIS WEEK.

MR. CHOW STRESSED THAT VERY CLOSE CONTACT IS MAINTAINED WITH AN MAC AFTER IT HAS DEEN FORMED. WELL ATTENDED MEETINGS, AT WHICH TALKS HAVE BEEN GIVEN DY OFFICERS OF THE POLICE FORCE, THE INDEPENDENT COMMISSION AGAINST CORRUPTION, THE URIAH SERVICES DEPARTMENT, AND THE FIRE SERVICES DEPARTMENT, ARE HELD MONTHLY. +wE DISCUSS HANY DIFFERENT TOPICS, INCLUDING LAW Ai.D ORDER, CLEANLINESS AND FIRE PREVENTION,* SAID HR. CHO... HE SAID OCCUPANTS OF BUILDINGS ARE ENCOURAGED TO TAKE UP PROBLEMS WITH 1-iAC MEMBERS.

MOST OF THE MACS HAVE BEEN FORMED IN PRIVATE HOUSING BLOCKS BUT EFFORTS IN THE FUTURE ARE GOING TO BE CONCENTRATED ON PUBLIC HOUSING ESTATES SUCH AS SHEK LEI, TAI WOR HAU AMD LEI MUK SHUE.

APART FROM MEETINGS EVERY MONTH, OTHER ACTIVITIES SUCH AS PICNICS ARE ARRANGED, TO FOSTER 4 ..IDER SPIRIT OF CO-OPERATION. A NUMBER OF I-AC MEMBERS PARTICIPATED IM THE RECENT TERRITORIES WALK FOR A MILLION” AND OTHERS SPONSORED ENTRANTS.

MR. CHOW SAID RESISTANCE TO THE ESTABLISHMENT OF MACS WAS OCCASIONALLY MET FROM PEOPLE WHO FELT THEY PREFERRED TO PROVIDE THEIR OWN SECURITY, BUT SUCH CASES WERE IN THE MINORITY.

+IN MANY BUILDINGS, BEFORE AN MAC VMS FORMED, FAMILIES SEEMED VIRTUALLY UNAWARE THAT OTHER FAMILIES EXISTED,* MR. CHOW REMARKED. HOWEVER, IT IS SURPRISING THE WAY PEOPLE SOON COME TOGETHER AND APPEAR ANXIOUS TO HELP WITH EACH OTHER’S PROBLEMS ONCE AN MAC HAD BEEN ORGANISED.* HE SAID THAT A NUMBER OF RESIDENTS HAD TOLD HIM THAT SINCE AN MAC HAD BEEN SET UP IN THEIR BUILDING SECURITY HAD IMPROVED CONSIDERABLY.

MR. CHOU HAS ALSO BEEN INVOLVED, TOGETHER WITH THE POLICE, IN ORGANISING NEIGHBOURHOOD SECURITY PATROLS IN THE KWAI SHING AND K..AI HING ESTATES. A FIVE-EVENING COURSE WAS ORGANISED RECENTLY BY THE DISTRICT OFFICE, TSUEN JAN, AND LOCAL POLICE AMD WAS ATTENDED BY 72 MAC MEMBERS.

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SUNDAY, JANUARY 25, 1976

-

BE CAREFUL WITH FIRES OVER NEW YEAR HOLIDAYS

& "X ¥: k 5c

A FIRE SERVICES DEPARTMENT SPOKESMAN TODAY CALLED ON MEMBERS OF THE PUBLIC TO TAKE EXTRA FIRE PRECAUTION DURING THE COMING LUNAR NEW YEAR HOLIDAYS.

HE SAID SPECIAL ATTENTION SHOULD BE PAID TO THE BURNING OF JOSS STICKS AND PAPERS. HE SUGGESTED THAT ALL BURNING SHOULD BE DONE In AN OPuN SPACE AND NEVER IN A CONFINED AREA SUCH AS A ROOM OR CORRIDOR.

DC NOT LEAVE THE FIRE ALONE AND MAKE SURE IT WAS OUT BEFORE YOU LEAVE IT. LETTER STILL, HAVE A BUCKET OF WATER HANDY, HE ADDED.

COMMENTING ON THE CHINESE TRADITION OF FRYING DELICACIES BEFORE THE NEW YEAR SETS IN, THE SPOKESMAN ADVISED RESIDENTS NOT TO STORE TOO MUCH KEROSENE OR L.P. GAS OR EVEN COOKING OIL.

HE REMINDED THEM THAT THE LAW PROHIBITS THE STORAGE OF MORE THAN FOUR GALLONS OF KEROSENE OR 100 POUNDS OF L.P. GAS IN THE HOME.

TURNING TO FACTORIES AND OFFICES WHICH WERE HOT OPENING FOR BUSINESS DURING THE HOLIDAYS, THE SPOKESMAN CALLED ON OPERATORS AND EMPLOYERS TO HAVE ALL THEIR PREMISES THOROUGHLY CHECKED TO ENSURE FIRE SAFETY BEFORE CLOSING.

THE SPOKESMAN ALSO CALLED OH DEPARTMENT STORES TO ENSURE THAT THE EXITS INSIDE THEIR SHOPS ANO STORES WERE NOT BLOCKED AND THAT EXIT SIGNS WERE PROPERLY LIT. HE SAID THIS WAS VERY IMPORTANT AT THIS TIME OF THE YEAR WHEN SHOPPERS WERE DOING THEIR PRE-NEW YEAR SHOPPING.

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SUNDAY, JANUARY 25, 1976

5

LUNAR NEW YEAR PARTY FOR PATIENTS IN PRINCESS MARGARET HOSPITAL *****

MORE THAN 100 ELDERLY PATIENTS WILL BE ENTERTAINED IN PRINCESS MARGARET HOSPITAL AT A PARTY ON JANUARY 28 (WEDNESDAY).

THE PARTY, ORGANISED BY THE PHYSIOTHERAPY AND OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY STAFF IN THE GERIATRIC UNIT, JILL BE THE FIRST FUNCTION OF THIS KIND TO TAKE PLACE IN THE NEWLY-OPENED HOSPITAL AND WILL EE HELD ON THE PROMONTORY OVERLOOKING LAI CHI KOK DAY.

AN ENTERTAINING AND COLOURFUL PROGRAMME HAS BEEN DRAWN UP.

THE HIGHLIGHT WILL BE A LION DANCE TO MARK THE ADVENT CF THE LUNAR NEW YEAR. THE LION DANCERS WILL ALSO PERFORM IN OTHER UNITS OF THE HOSPITAL FOR THE ENJOYMENT OF ALL PATIENTS AND STAFF.

DR. K.L. THONG, DEPUTY DIRECTOR OF MEDICAL AND HEALTH SERVICES, WILL ’’BREATHE” LIFE INTO THE LION BY DOTTING ITS EYES.

OTHER PROGRAMMES INCLUDE A MAGIC SHOW, A LUCKY DRAW AND BAMBOO DANCING DY A GROUP CF FILIPINO DANCERS.

THE AUXILIARY MEDICAL SERVICE BAND WILL GIVE A CONCERT IN THE OPEN GROUND OF THE HOSPITAL.

NOTE TO EDITORS :

YOU ARE WELCOME TO COVER THE PARTY, WHICH WILL BEGIN AT 2 P.M.

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PRH

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

MONDAY, JANUARY 26, 1976.

CONTENTS PAGE NO.

FIRE LOSSES DOWN BY 20 PER CENT LAST YEAR .............. 1

POSTAL ARRANGEMENTS FOR LUNAR NEW YEAR HOLIDAYS ........ 2

SECTION OF BOUNDARY STREET TO BE ROUTED ONE-WAY EASTBOUND .............................................. 2

PENALTIES FOR SUBMITTING LATE IMPORT AND EXPORT DECLARATIONS DOUBLED ..........................•........ 3

LETTERS IN POSTING BOX DAMAGED BY FIRE ................  3

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong. Tel: 5'233191

MONDAY, JANUARY 26, 1976

1

FIRE LOSSES DOWN BY 20 PER CENT IN 1975 ******

THE NUMBER OF FIRE CALLS RECEIVED BY THE FIRE SERVICES ARTMENT IN 1975 SHOWED A SLIGHT INCREASE, BUT THE ESTIMATED TOTAL LOSSES WERE DOWN BY ABOUT 20 PER CENT.

ACCORDING TO STATISTICS RELEASED TODAY, THE DEPARTMENT RESPONDED TO 7,370 FIRE CALLS LAST YEAR COMPARED WITH 6,971 FOR THE PREVIOUS YEAR. DIRECT MONETARY LOSSES FROM FIRES IN 1975, ESTIMATED AT $40 MILLION, WERE SIGNIFICANTLY DOWN ON THE FIGURE OF $50 MILLION FOR 1974.

A TOTAL OF 399 INDUSTRIAL FIRES COSTING ABOUT $29 MILLION WERE REPORTED. THIS MEANS THAT ALTHOUGH ONLY 5.4 PER CENT OF FIRES OCCURRED IN THIS SECTOR, THEY ACCOUNTED FOR 72 PER CENT OF TOTAL MONETARY LOSSES. THE RESPECTIVE FIGURES FOR 1974 WERE 377 FIRES AND $38 MILLION.

THERE WERE ALSO 868 DOMESTIC FIRES, 1,854 GRASS FIRES AND 31 SHIP FIRES DURING THE YEAR UNDER REVIEW.

.AS IN PAST YEARS, THE LARGEST NUMBER OF FIRES WERE ATTRIBUTED TO CARELESS HANDLING OR DISPOSAL OF CIGARETTE ENDS AND MATCHES (2,293) AND ELECTRICAL FAULTS (1,087).

THIRTY-EIGHT PEOPLE DIED,' 412 PEOPLE INCLUDING 25 FIREMEN WERE INJURED AND 513 PEOPLE WERE RESCUED BY FIREMEN.

THE YEAR’S MOST EXPENSIVE FIRE BROKE OUT ON CHRISTMAS DAY IN A FACTORY BUILDING IN LEE CHUNG STREET, CHAI WAN, WHERE THE LOSS AMOUNTED TO $5.1 MILLION. IT TOOK FIREMEN MORE THAN EIGHT HOURS TO PUT OUT THE BLA^E.

DECEMBER WAS THE BUSIEST MONTH FOR FIREMEN WHEN 1,265 CALLS WERE DEALT WITH, FOLLOWED BY NOVEMBER WITH 863 FIRES.

IN ADDITION, THE DEPARTMENT ALSO HANDLED 3,651 SPECIAL SERVICE CALLS INCLUDING DROWNINGS, HANGINGS, TRAFFIC ACCIDENTS AND OTHER MISHAPS IN WHICH 279 DEATHS AND 1,470 INJURIES OCCURRED.

COMMENTING ON THE STATISTICS, THE DIRECTOR OF FIRE SERVICES, MR. FRED WATSON, SAID: +ALTHOUGH THERE WAS A DROP OF 20 PER CENT IN FIRE LOSSES LAST YEAR, THERE IS STILL CONSIDERABLE ROOM FOR IMPROVEMENT AND NONE WHATEVER FOR COMPLACENCY.+

HE CONSIDERED THAT THE REDUCTION COULD PARTLY BE DUE TO THE INTENSIVE FIRE PREVENTION ACTIVITIES CARRIED OUT BY THE DEPARTMENT THROUGHOUT THE YEAR.

HOWEVER, HE CONTINUED: +A GREATER AWARENESS OF FIRE DANGERS BY MEMBERS- OF THE PUBLIC AS WELL AS THE COMMISSION OF A NUMBER OF NEW AND IMPROVED FIRE APPLIANCES MIGHT ALSO HAVE ACCOUNTED FOR THE SUBSTANTIAL FINANCIAL SAVING.+

.---0----

/2...

2

MONDAY, JANUARY 26, 1976

LUNAR NEW YEAR POSTAL ARRANGEMENTS

V ******

POSTAL ARRANGEMENTS FOR THE LUNAR NEW YEAR HOLIDAYS WERE ANNOUNCED BY THE POST OFFICE TODAY.

THERE WILL BE NO MAIL DELIVERIES ON LUNAR NEW YEAR’S DAY (JANUARY 31) AND ON FEBRUARY 2 (MONDAY). ALL POST OFFICES WILL BE CLOSED.

ON FEBRUARY 1 (SUNDAY) AND ON FEBRUARY 3 (TUESDAY), THERE WILL BE ONE DELIVERY OF MAIL.

ON FEBRUARY 3, 32 POST OFFICES, INCLUDING THE GENERAL POST OFFICE, THE KOWLOON CENTRAL POST OFFICE AND THE TSIM SHA TSUI POST OFFICE, WILL BE OPEN FOR BUSINESS BETWEEN 9 A.M. AND 12 NOON.

ALL OTHER POST OFFICES WILL BE CLOSED.

----0----

BOUNDARY STREET TRAFFIC RE-ROUTINGS *****

MOTORISTS ARE ADVISED THAT WITH EFFECT FROM 10 A.M. ON WEDNESDAY (JANUARY 28), TRAFFIC IN BOUNDARY STREET BETWEEN SAI YEE STREET AND TAI HANG TUNG ROAD WILL BE ROUTED ONE-WAY EASTBOUND. \

AS A RESULT, WESTBOUND TRAFFIC IN BOUNDARY STREET WILL BE ALLOWED TO TURN RIGHT ONLY AT ITS JUNCTION WITH TAI HANG TUNG ROAD. IN ADDITION, SOUTHBOUND TRAFFIC IN TAI HANG TUNG ROAD^WILL BE PROHIBITED FROM TURNING RIGHT INTO BOUNDARY

APPROPRIATE TRAFFIC SIGNS WILL BE PUT UP TO GUIDE MOTORISTS.

MONDAY, JANUARY 26, 1976

- 3 -PENALTIES FOR LATE IMPORT AND EXPORT DECLARATIONS DOUBLED * * * * H *

PENALTIES FOR SUBMITTING LATE IMPORT AND EXPORT DECLARATIONS HAVE BEEN DOUBLED, THE COMMERCE AND INDUSTRY DEPARTMENT REMINDED TRADERS TODAY (MONDAY).

THE REVISED PENALTY, ANNOUNCED IN THE GOVERNMENT GAZETTE LAST FRIDAY, IS NECESSARY BECAUSE OF THE CONTINUING LARGE NUMBER OF DECLARATIONS WHICH ARE SUBMITTED LATE,•COMPLI CAT I NG GREATLY THE TASK OF COMPILING ACCURATE TRADE STATISTICS.

THE NEW PENALTY IS BETWEEN $10 AND $200 PER DECLARATION, DEPENDING ON THE VALUE OF THE GOODS AND THE LENGTH OF THE DELAY.

DETAILS OF THE REVISED REGULATION ARE AVAILABLE AT THE AD VALOREM CHARGES COLLECTION OFFICE OF THE COMMERCE AND INDUSTRY DEPARTMENT AT 46 CONNAUGHT ROAD CENTRAL, GROUND FLOOR, TEL. 5-242566 AND FROM THE D C AND' I'S KOWLOON OFFICE AT ROOM NO. 610,664 NATHAN ROAD, 6/F, TEL. 3-960432.

IMPORTERS AND EXPORTERS ARE ALSO INFORMED ABOUT ANOTHER AMENDMENT UNDER THE IMPORT AND EXPORT (REGISTRATION)(AMENDMENT) REGULATION 1976.

THIS AMENDMENT EXEMPTS FROM AD VALOREM CHARGES TWO MORE CATEGORIES OF GOODS, NAMELY AIRCRAFT SPARES, IMPORTED OR EXPORTED BY AIRLINES FOR THE MAINTENANCE OR REPAIR OF THEIR AIRCRAFT- OR FOR NON-PROFIT-MAKING EXCHANGES BETWEEN AIRLINES FOR THE PURPOSE OF MAINTAINING INTERNATIONAL SERVICES- AND PARTS IMPORTED BY AIRLINES AND SHIPPING COMPANIES FOR THE REPAIR, OR MAINTENANCE, OF THEIR FREIGHT CONTAINERS.

0 --------

LETTERS DESTROYED * *

IN POSTING BOX FIRE * * * *

THE POST OFFICE REPORTED TODAY THAT A NUMBER OF LETTERS WERE DAMAGED OR TOTALLY DESTROYED WHEN A FIRE BROKE OUT IN THE POSTING BOX ON THE CORNER OF ICE HOUSE STREET AND DES VOEUX ROAD CENTRAL SHORTLY AFTER 9 P.M. LAST FRIDAY (JANUARY 23).

A SPOKESMAN SAID THAT THE REASON FOR THE FIRE WAS NOT KNOWN.

HE ASKED PEOPLE WHO POSTED LETTERS IN THIS BOX BETWEEN 6.30 P.M. AND 9.09 P.M. LAST FRIDAY TO CONTACT THE SENIOR CONTROLLER OF POSTS (HONG KONG) ON 5-232516 TO VERIFY WHETHER THEIR POSTINGS ARE INTACT.

-----0-----

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

TUESDAY, JANUARY 27, 1976.

CONTENTS PAGE N0,

HONG KONG EXTERNAL TRADE CONTINUES TO RECOVER ....... 1

FIVE-DOLLAR COINS TO BE ISSUED IN AUGUST ............ 3

FACTORIES GOING UP IN TSUEN WAN NEW TOWN ............ 4

CONTRACT FOR CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY TRAINING CENTRE TO BE SIGNED TOMORROW ........................ 5

TWO BUILDINGS IN MONGKOK AFFECTED BY METRO CONSTRUCTION ........................................ 6

DESTINATION BOARDS TO BE FITTED ON PLB’S ............ 7

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

TUESDAY, JANUARY 27, 1976

- 1 -

VALUE OF DECEMBER EXPORTS UP BY $561 MILLION ******

THE VALUE OF HONG KONG’S DOMESTIC EXPORTS IN DECEMBER LAST YEAR AMOUNTED TO $2,292 MILLION, ACCORDING TO PROVISIONAL FIGURES RELEASED BY THE CENSUS AND STATISTICS DEPARTMENT TODAY.

THIS REPRESENTED AN INCREASE OF $561 MILLION OR 32.4 PER CENT, BY VALUE, COMPARED WITH DECEMBER 1974.

THE VALUE OF IMPORTS AT 3,438 MILLION WAS 35.3 PER CENT MORE THAN THAT FOR DECEMBER 1974, WHILE RE-EXPORTS WERE UP BY 18.9 PER CENT TO $626 MILLION.

COMMENTING ON THESE FIGURES, A SPOKESMAN FOR THE COMMERCE AND INDUSTRY DEPARTMENT SAID THAT HONG KONG’S EXTERNAL TRADE HAD CONTINUED TO RECOVER SINCE SEPTEMBER.

FIGURES FOR THE LAST QUARTER OF 1975 SHOWED SIGNIFICANT INCREASES, BY VALUE, COMPARED WITH THE SAME QUARTER OF 1974, OF 27.5 PER CENT FOR DOMESTIC EXPORTS, 29 PER CENT FOR IMPORTS AND 18.6 PER CENT FOR RE-EXPORTS.

HOWEVER, BECAUSE OF THE DECLINE IN EARLIER MONTHS OF THE YEAR, THE VALUE FIGURES FOR THE WHOLE YEAR OF 1975 COMPARED WITH 1974 SHOWED DECREASES OF 0.2 PER CENT FOR DOMESTIC EXPORTS, 1.9 PER CENT FOR IMPORTS AND 2.1 PER CENT FOR RE-EXPORTS, THE SPOKESMAN SAID.

NOTE TO EDITORS: THE FOLLOWING TABLE WITH COMPARATIVE FIGURES IS GIVEN FOR YOUR EASY REFERENCE:

DOMESTIC EXPORTS i $2,292 MILLION

IMPORTS : $3,438 MILLION

RE-EXPORTS 8 $ 626 MILLION

COMPARATIVE FIGURES

DECEMBER DECEMBER INCREASE OR

1975 1974 DECREASE

$ MN. $ MN. $ MN. %

DOMESTIC EXPORTS 2,292 1,732 + 561 + 32.4

(% OF TOTAL EXPORTS)(78.5%) (76.7%)

IMPORTS 3,438 2,542 + 896 + 35.3

RE-EXPORTS 626 527 + 100 +18.9

(% OF TOTAL EXPORTS) (21.5%) (23.3%)

/OCT. - DEC........

TUESDAY, JANUARY 27 ♦ 1976

- 2 -

OCT. - DEC. 1975 OCT. - DEC. 1974 INCREASE OR DECREASE

S MN. $ MN. S MN. %

DOMESTIC EXPORTS 6,586 5,167 +1,420 +27.5

IMPORTS 9,762 7,570 +2,193 +29.0

RE-EXPORTS 1,914 1,614 + 300 +18.6

JAN. - DEC. 1975 JAN. - DEC. 1974 INCREASE OR DECREASE

$ MN. S MN. $ MN. %

DOMESTIC EXPORTS (% OF TOTAL EXPORTS) 22,859 (76.6%) 22,911 (7&.39O - 52 - 0.2

IMPORTS 33,472 34,120 -648 -1.9

RE-EXPORTS (% OF TOTAL EXPORTS) 6,973 x i (h.4%) 7,124 (23.7%) - 151 - 2.1

a» «■ • - 0 - - - - /J

TUESDAY, JANUARY 27, 1976

- 3 -

NEW FIVE-DOLLAR COIN *****

THE INTRODUCTION OF THE NEW FIVE-DOLLAR COIN HAS BEEN ADVANCED TO AUGUST THIS YEAR.

ANNOUNCING THIS TODAY, A GOVERNMENT SPOKESMAN SAID THAT THE ESCALATION OF BANK NOTE PRINTING COSTS HAD MADE IT ECONOMICALLY BENEFICIAL TO DO SO.

HE SAID THAT FOR TECHNICAL REASONS, IT HAD PROVED NECESSARY TO DEFER THE ISSUE OF THE NEW ONE-DOLLAR COIN.

AS RECOMMENDED BY THE COINAGE REVIEW COMMITTEE, THE NEW FIVE-DOLLAR COIN WILL BE TEN-SIDED WITH A PLAIN EDGE SIMILAR TO THE TWO-DOLLAR AND TWENTY-CENT COINS NOW IN CIRCULATION.

IT WILL MEASURE 31 MM DIAGONALLY AND WEIGH 10.76 GRAMS AND WILL BE ROUGHLY THE SAME SIZE AS THE PRESENT ONE-DOLLAR COIN. HOWEVER, BECAUSE OF ITS SHAPE AND A,REDUCTION IN THE THICKNESS OF THE COIN, IT WILL BE SLIGHTLY LIGHTER IN WEIGHT THAN THE PRESENT DOLLAR COIN.

AN ABRIDGED VERSION OF THE COINAGE REVIEW COMMITTEE’S REPORT WAS PUBLISHED IN 1974 AS A STATEMENT OF GOVERNMENT POLICY ON THE FUTURE OF HONG KONG’S COINAGE. THE RECOMMENDATIONS IN THIS REPORT INCLUDED THE INTRODUCTION OF NEW TWO-DOLLAR AND TWENTLY-CENT COINS, WHICH HAVE NOW BECOME FAMILIAR TO EVERYONE. OTHER RECOMMENDATIONS WERE FOR REPLACEMENT OF THE ONE-DOLLAR COIN IN 1976 AND THE FIFTY-CENT COIN IN 1977 WITH COINS BOTH SMALLER AND LIGHTER IN WEIGHT AND FOR THE MINTING OF A NEW FIVE-DOLLAR COIN TO REPLACE THE BANK NOTES CURRENTLY IN USE.

- - 0 - -

A

TUESDAY, JANUARY 27, 1976

4

MORE FACTORIES GOING UP IN TSUEN WAN NEW TOWN * M «

TEN NEW FACTORY BUILDINGS WERE COMPLETED OR PARTIALLY COMPLETED IN TSUEN WAN NEW TOWN BETWEEN OCTOBER AND DECEMBER LAST YEAR WHILE A FURTHER 23 WERE UNDER CONSTRUCTION. PLANS FOR 17 MORE WERE APPROVED.

THIS INDICATION OF INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT IN TSUEN WAN IS CONTAINED IN THE QUARTERLY REPORT OF THE TOWN’S WORKS PROGRESS COMMITTEE FOR THE PERIOD OCTOBER 1 TO DECEMBER 31, 1975.

ONE OF THE PLANS APPROVED WAS FOR A TEXTILE FACTORY WITH A POTENTIAL WORK FORCE OF MORE THAN 19,000. THE MAJORITY OF THE INDUSTRIAL BUILDINGS ARE EITHER TEXTILE FACTORIES OR GODOWNS° THEY ARE BEING BUILT LARGELY BY EXISTING FIRMS WANTING TO EXPAND OPERATIONS. THE PRICE BEING BID FOR INDUSTRIAL LAND IN THE AREA IS ABOUT $160 PER SQ. FT.

BESIDES INDUSTRIAL BUILDINGS, SIX OTHER BUILDINGS WERE COMPLETED OR PARTIALLY COMPLETED- 23 WERE UNDER CONSTRUCTION AND THE GO-AHEAD WAS GIVEN FOR 35 FURTHER BUILDINGS TO BE CONSTRUCTED.

ESTATE STAFF ATTACHED TO THE DISTRICT OFFICE, TSUEN WAN, NEGOTIATED MORE THAN 50 OTHER TRANSACTIONS DURING THE QUARTER, INCLUDING PRIVATE TREATY GRANTS, EXCHANGES, MODIFICATIONS AND SHORT-TERM TENANCIES. ONE OF THE BIGGEST DEALS INVOLVED A $200 MILLION PRIVATE DEVELOPMENT.

MUCH OF THE PRESENT INDUSTRIAL EXPANSION OF TSUEN WAN NEW TOWN IS TAKING PLACE IN SOUTH KWAI CHUNG ON LAND RECLAIMED FROM GIN DRINKER’S BAY, BUT THE EMPHASIS WILL SHIFT EVENTUALLY TO DEVELOPMENT, BOTH INDUSTRIAL AND RESIDENTIAL, OF NORTH TSUEN WAN.

ALREADY THE NEW TERRITORIES’ MOST POPULOUS TOWN, TSUEN WAN WILL HAVE BY 1985 ABOUT 850,000 PEOPLE, OR ROUGHLY DOUBLE THE PRESENT NUMBER LIVING THERE.

THE READY AVAILABILITY OF MANPOWER TO WORK IN THE GROWING NUMBER OF FACTORIES IS A MAJOR CONSIDERATION TO AN INDUSTRIALIST LOOKING FOR A SITE FOR HIS FACTORY- SO IS THE TOWN’S PROXIMITY TO THE CONTAINER BERTHS, OF WHICH THERE WILL BE SIX EVENTUALLY.

BESIDES TSUEN WAN ITSELF, THE NEW TOWN TAKES IN KWAI CHUNG AND TSI NG Yl ISLAND. THE ISLAND IS PROVING AN ATTRACTIVE SITE FOR SETTING UP FACTORIES TO BOTH LOCAL AND OVERSEAS MANUFACTURERS. TENDERS ARE NOW BEING INVITED FOR A SITE ON THE ISLAND TO BE USED EXCLUSIVELY AS A SHIPBUILDING AND SHIP-REPAIRING YARD.

-----o------


TUESDAY, JANUARY 27, 1976

- 5 -

CONTRACT FOR TRAINING CENTRE TO BE SIGNED ******

A CONTRACT-SIGNING CEREMONY TOMORROW (WEDNESDAY) WILL MARK A SIGNIFICANT BREAK-THROUGH IN THE TRAINING OF SKILLED MANPOWER FOR HONG KONG GENERALLY AND FOR THE CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY IN PARTICULAR.

THE CONTRACT INVOLVES A $6.2 MILLION PROJECT FOR BUILDING THE CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY TRAINING CENTRE IN KWUN TONG WHICH WILL PROVIDE ONE-YEAR FULL-TIME BASIC TRAINING FOR 660 CRAFT TRAINEES ANNUALLY IN KEY CONSTRUCTION TRADES.

BUILDING WORK IS EXPECTED TO BEGIN NEXT MONTH, SCHEDULED FOR COMPLETION BY APRIL 1977 WHEN THE FIRST BATCH OF TRAINEES WILL BE RECRUITED.

THE TRAINING CENTRE FOLLOWS THE ENACTMENT OF THE INDUSTRIAL TRAINING (CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY) ORDINANCE IN AUGUST LAST YEAR.

A CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY TRAINING AUTHORITY WAS SUBSEQUENTLY FORMED TO ADMINISTER THE CENTRE WHICH IS TO BE FINANCED BY A LEVY OF 0.25 PER CENT OF THE VALUE OF ALL CONSTRUCTION WORK UNDERTAKEN IN HONG KONG AND PAYABLE BY THE CONTRACTORS CONCERNED.

THE CONTRACT WILL BE SIGNED TOMORROW BY MR. GEOFFREY YEH, CHAIRMAN OF THE CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY TRAINING AUTHORITY, AND MR. J.E. WARD, MANAGING DIRECTOR OF GAMMON (H.K.) LIMITED — •THE CONTRACTOR FOR THE PROJECT.

THE TRAINING CENTRE IN TAI YIP STREET, KWUN TONG, WILL BE A FIVE-STOREY STRUCTURE WITH AN AREA OF OVER 14,000 SQ. FT. PER FLOOR ON A SITE OF ABOUT 59,000 SQ. FT. GRANTED BY THE GOVERNMENT TO THE AUTHORITY AT NIL PREMIUM.

IT WILL HOUSE THE ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICES OF THE AUTHORITY AND VARIOUS PROPERLY EQUIPPED WORKSHOPS FOR TRAINEES IN THE KEY CONSTRUCTION TRADES, INCLUDING :-

* BRICK-LAYING, PLASTERING, TILING, GRANOLITHIC AND TERRAZZO WORK-

* CARPENTRY-

* PAINTING, DECORATING AND SIGN-WRITING-

* PLUMBING AND PIPE-FITTING-

* BAMBOO SCAFFOLD ING-

* MASONRY- AND

* PLANT MAINTENANCE AND REPAIRS.

/THE TRAINEES .....

TUESDAY, JANUARY 2?, 1976

6

THE TRAINEES WILL ALSO RECEIVE RELATED TECHNICAL EDUCATION ON A PART-TIME BASIS AT A TECHNICAL INSTITUTE. ON COMPLETION OF THE ONE-YEAR TRAINING, THE CENTRE WILL ENDEAVOUR TO PLACE THEM WITH CONTRACTORS AS SECOND-YEAR CRAFT APPRENTICES FOR A FURTHER TWO TO THREE years TO COMPLETE THEIR TRAINING IN THEIR RESPECTIVE TRADES.

GOVERNMENT TO RESUME TWO BUILDINGS IN MONGKOK REQUIRED FOR METRO CONSTRUCTION

* * * * *

THE OWNERS AND TENANTS OF 2-4 TAI PO ROAD AND 2O5-2O5A.

SAI YEUNG CHOI STREET ARE BEING ADVISED TODAY THAT GOVERNMENT

WILL SHORTLY BE INSTITUTING STATUTORY RESUMPTION PROCEEDINGS UNDER THE MASS TRANSIT RAILWAY (LAND RESUMPTION

ORDINANCE IN ORDER TO ACQUIRE THE LAND ON STAND FOR THE CONSTRUCTION OF THE METRO.

AND RELATED PROVISIONS) WHICH THEIR BUILDINGS

ADVISORY NOTICES ARE BEING POSTED TO NON-RESIDENT OWNERS OF THE BUILDINGS CONCERNED WHILE STAFF OF THE CITY DISTRICT OFFICE. SHAM SHU I PO, ARE NOW VISITING THE OCCUPANTS OF THE BUILDINGS TO PERSONALLY HAND OVER THE ADVISORY NOTICES TO THEM.

THE ADVISORY NOTICE WARNS THAT STATUTORY RESUMPTION NOTICES SIGNIFYING THE BEGINNING OF RESUMPTION PROCEDURES WILL BE POSTED ON THE BUILDINGS ON FEBRUARY 13, 1976 AND THAT ON APRIL 13, 1976, THAT IS, TWO MONTHS AFTER THE POSTING OF THOSE NOTICES, THE PROPERTIES WILL REVERT TO THE GOVERNMENT.

THE OWNERS AND OCCUPANTS ARE BEING ADVISED THAT UNDER THE MASS TRANSIT RAILWAY (LAND RESUMPTION AND RELATED PROVISIONS) ORDINANCE, ANYONE WHO HAS ANY CLAIM FOR COMPENSATION CAN FILE THIS CLAIM DIRECT WITH THE DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC WORKS WHO MAY SETTLE IT ADMINISTRATIVELY WITHOUT RECOURSE TO THE LANDS TRIBUNAL.

HOWEVER, IF AT THE END OF FOUR MONTHS FROM THE RECEIPT OF A CLAIM BY THE DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC WORKS, IT HAS NOT BEEN POSSIBLE TO SETTLE THE CLAIM, THE CLAIMANT CAN SEEK SETTLEMENT THROUGH PROCEEDINGS WITH THE LANDS TRIBUNAL.

THE OWNERS AND TENANTS ABE ALSO BEING ADVISED THAT

IN ORDER TO ASSIST ALL INTERESTED PARTIES, MEETINGS WILL BE ARRANGED BY STAFF OF THE MASS TRANSIT STUDIES OFFICE OF THE PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT TO EXPLAIN TO THEM CLAIMS PROCEDURES AND THEIR STATUTORY RIGHTS. THESE Meetings WILL BE HELD DURING MARCH.

DOMESTIC TENANTS HAVE ALREADY BEEN INFORMED THAT IF THEY HAVE NO ALTERNATIVE ACCOMMODATION THEY WOULD BE CONSIDERED FOR REHOUSING IN PUBLIC HOUSING ESTATES.

- - 0 - -

TUESDAY, JANUARY 27, 1976

- 7

PLBS TO HAVE NEW-STYLE DESTINATION BOARDS

******

PLANS PUT FORWARD BY THE TRANSPORT DEPARTMENT FOR ALL NEW MINIBUSES TO BE FITTED WITH CENTRAL ROOF-MOUNTED DESTINATION INDICATOR BOARDS HAVE BEEN ACCEPTED BY PLB ASSOCIATIONS.

THIS FOLLOWED A MEETING YESTERDAY (MONDAY) BETWEEN REPRESENTATIVES OF THE ASSOCIATIONS AND THE DEPARTMENT.

THE DESTINATION BOARDS, SIMILAR TO THOSE OF FRANCHISED BUSES, WILL BE INSTALLED BY THE MANUFACTURERS OF ALL NEW MINIBUSES

IMPORTED INTO HONG-KONG FROM AUGUST 1, 1976. THIS FOLLOWS MONTHS OF TALKS BETWEEN THE MANUFACTURERS’ AGENTS AND THE DEPARTMENT.

18

TRANSPpRT

THE BOARDS, WHICH WILL BE ILLUMINATED AT NIGHT, WILL HAVE A ROLLER BLIND, WOUND FROM INSIDE THE CAB, WITH THE DESTINATION IN ENGLISH AND CHINESE, COLOUR CODED BY AREAi DARK BLUE FOR ROUTES ON HONG KONG ISLAND- GREEN FOR KOWLOON- YELLOW FOR THE NEW TERRITORIES- AND RED FOR CROSS-HARBOUR ROUTES.

MINIBUSES LICENSED BEFORE AUGUST 1976 WILL BE GIVEN UNTIL AUGUST THE FOLLOWING YEAR TO INSTALL THE NEW-STYLE BOARDS. BUT DURING THE INTERIM THEY WILL NOT BE ALLOWED TO DISPLAY MORE THAN ONE DESTINATION BOARD WHICH MUST BE AT THE CENTRE BASE OF THE WINDSCREEN.

DURING YESTERDAY’S MEETING, THE PLB ASSOCIATIONS ACCEPTED THAT THEIR EARLIER THREE-POINT PLAN FOR NATHAN ROAD DURING THE METRO CONSTRUCTION, WHICH WAS WIDELY PUBLICISED IN THE PRESS A WEEK AGO, HAD IN FACT BEEN CONSIDERED AT LENGTH BY THE VARIOUS GOVERNMENT DEPARTMENTS OVER THE PAST THREE YEARS.

FIRSTLY THE SUGGESTION FOR PLB STANDS IN NATHAN ROAD WAS ACCEPTED BY THE PLB OPERATORS AS BEING QUITE IMPRACTICABLE CONSIDERING THE EXPECTED CONGESTION WHEN HALF THE WIDTH OF NATHAN ROAD IS CLOSED IN MARCH 1976.

THE SECOND POINT, OF PROHIBITING ALL PARKING IN PORTLAND STREET SO THAT PLBS COULD PICK UP PASSENGERS THERE, WAS ACCEPTED AND HAD ALREADY BEEN PLANNED IN CERTAIN SECTIONS.

THE FINAL POINT WAS OF CLEARING HAWKERS FROM CANTON ROAD SO AS TO MAKE THIS A FURTHER ARTERY. A TRANSPORT DEPARTMENT SPOKESMAN ASSURED THE PLB ASSOCIATIONS THAT THIS ASPECT WAS STILL BEING LOOKED INTO, THOUGH THERE WERE PROBLEMS OF WHERE TO MOVE THE OLD-ESTABLISHED COOKED FOOD STALLS.

/AT THE MEETING .....

TUESDAY, JANUARY 2?, 197.6

- 8 -

AT THE MEETING THE PLB ASSOCIATIONS ALSO WELCOMED PLANS THE TRANSPORT DEPARTMENT TO REOPEN APPLICATIONS FOR NEW PLB DRIVING TESTS ON MARCH 1, 1976, AFTER A LAPSE OF ALMOST THREE YEARS.

BY

A SPOKESMAN SAID APPLICATIONS WOULD ONLY BE ACCEPTED BY POST FROM DRIVERS WITH AT LEAST THREE YEARS’ DRIVING EXPERIENCE AND WHO HAVE NOT BEEN DISQUALIFIED.

AFTER RETURNING THE APPPLICATION FORMS BY POST, SUCCESSFUL APPLICANTS WOULD THEN BE NOTIFIED WHEN TO COLLECT THEIR TEST FORMS FROM THE TRANSPORT DEPARTMENT LICENSING OFFICES. THEY SHOULD BRING ALONG THEIR IDENTITY CARDS, DRIVING LICENCES AND A TEST FORM FEE OF 1150.

ALL TESTS WILL BE CONDUCTED AT THE NEW CENTRE AT SHEK LEI IN KOWLOON BUT SOME TESTS MIGHT BE HELD AT SOO KUN PO ON HONG KONG ISLAND IF THERE IS ANY SPARE CAPACITY.

----0----

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 28, 1976

contents page NO.

BRIGHT FUTURE FOR ENGINEERING INDUSTRIES IN HONG KONG .. 1

NEW DIRECTOR OF PROTOCOL APPOINTED ....................... 2

FEWER REGISTERED VEHICLES AT END OF LAST YEAR ............. 3

DEATH SENTENCES COMMUTED ................................. 3

......... 4

RESIDENTIAL SITE AT CLEARWATER BAY TO BE AUCTIONED ........ 5

^:°^LnR^0RT 0N SHIPBUILDING AND REPAIRS INDUSTRY ON □ALt TOMORROW ............................................. x

............................   o

BANKING STATISTICS FOR DECEMBER .........................  7

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

1

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 28, 1976

BRIGHT PROSPECTS FOR ENGINEERING INDUSTRIES ******

ENGINEERING INDUSTRIES ENGAGED IN THE PRODUCTION OF WATCHES, CAMERAS, MACHINE TOOLS AND SIMILAR ITEMS ARE LIKELY TO SEE THE MOST PROFITABLE AND MOST EXCITING DEVELOPMENTS IN HONG KONG OVER THE NEXT FIVE YEARS, SAYS THE DEPUTY DIRECTOR OF COMMERCE AND INDUSTRY, MR. ROY PORTER.

MR. PORTER, WHO WAS ADDRESSING A LUNCHEON MEETING OF THE ROTARY CLUB OF ISLAND, EAST, SAID THE BIGGEST POTENTIAL FOR INDUSTRIAL DIVERSIFICATION AND GROWTH LAY IN THESE INDUSTRIES.

HE SAID THAT HONG KONG ALREADY HAD SOME EXCELLENT FACTORIES PRODUCING THESE ITEMS AND THAT THE BEST OF THEM WERE AS GOOD AS ANY IN THE WORLD.+BUT OVERALL WE ARE STILL WEAK IN THE ENGINEERING INDUSTRIES,* HE ADDED.

MR. PORTER EXPLAINED THIS SITUATION AROSE FROM A NUMBER OF FACTORS WHICH WERE LARGELY HISTORICAL BUT WHICH WERE NOW CHANGING.

HE POINTED OUT THAT ENGINEERING INDUSTRIES GENERALLY EMPLOYED A HIGHER PROPORTION OF MEN THAN DO MOST OF OUR OTHER INDUSTRIES.

+FURTHERMORE, THEY MANUFACTURE HIGH VALUE PRODUCTS AND REQUIRE GREATER SKILLS TO DO SO. THEY, THEREFORE, PROVIDE WELL PAID AND SATISFYING JOBS TO THE ALL IMPORTANT'FATHER AND HUSBAND OF THE FAMILY: AN IMPORTANT SOCIOLOGICAL AS WELL AS ECONOMIC FACTOR.* MR. PORTER POINTED OUT.

+THE NEW INDUSTRIAL ESTATE NOW BEING CONSTRUCTED NEAR TA IPO WILL WITHOUT DOUBT HAVE A PREPONDERANCE OF ENGINEERING INDUSTRIES. IN FACT, THE CASE FOR THE ESTABLISHMENT OF THE NEW TYPE OF INDUSTRIAL ESTATE WAS VERY LARGELY MADE ON THE BASIS OF THEIR NEEDS AND THE SUPPORT AND SERVICES WHICH THEY CAN SUPPLY TO OTHER INDUSTRIES.

+THE INDUSTRIAL INVESTMENT PROMOTIONAL ACTIVITIES OF THE COMMERCE AND INDUSTRY DEPARTMENT, THE HONG KONG GENERAL CHAMBER OF COMMERCE AND THE TRADE DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL ARE AIMED LARGELY AT THEM, NOT BECAUSE ANYONE HAS DECIDED THAT THESE ARE THE INDUSTRIES WE MUST HAVE - AS YOU KNOW, THAT IS NOT THE TYPE OF EMPIRICAL DECISION WE TAKE IN HONG KONG - BUT BECAUSE WE ARE SO WELL SUITED TO THEM, THIS IS WHERE WE CAN GET THE GREATEST RETURN ON THE RESOURCES WE INVEST IN PROMOTION. OF THE 26 FACTORIES WHICH CAME IN TO HONG KONG IN 1975 FROM OVERSEAS, 12 WERE IN FACT IN THESE FIELDS.

+HONG KONG IS FORTUNATE TO HAVE SO MANY GOOD ENTREPRENEURS AND I HAVE NO DOUBT tHAT THE GREAT MAJORITY OF OUR FUTURE INDUSTRIAL INVESTMENT WILL CONTINUE TO COME FROM WITHIN. BUT BECAUSE WE ARE NOW MOVING INTO SUCH ADVANCED AND HIGHLY TECHNOLOGICAL FIELDS, INVESTMENT FROM OVERSEAS WILL ASSUME AN INCREASED IMPORTANCE. INVESTMENT FROM ANY SOURCE WILL CONTINUE TO BE EQUALLY WELCOME AND TO BE EQUALLY TREATED, HOWEVER.

/+THE CONTINUED......

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 28, 1976 - 2 -

+THE CONTINUED GROWTH OF OUR MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES WILL, IN GENERAL TERMS, ASSURE OUR OVERALL ECONOMIC GROWTH AND MORE ESPECIALLY IT WILL PROVIDE MOST OF THE NEW JOBS WHICH OUR YOUNG PEOPLE WILL REQUIRE EACH YEAR. NEW FACTORIES WILL CONTINUE TO OPEN IN MANY DIFFERENT INDUSTRIES. A GREAT MANY OF THEM WILL BE PRODUCING ENTIRELY DIFFERENT PRODUCTS TO THOSE WHICH WE NOW MANUFACTURE IN HONG KONG. AT THE SAME TIME, NEW, HIGHER QUALITY AND MORE SOPHISTICATED PRODUCTS LINES WILL CONTINUE TO REPLACE EXISTING LINES IN THE OLDER FACTORIES. THESE DEVELOPMENTS ARE WHAT I MEAN BY DIVERSIFICATION AND THEY WILL COME ABOUT NOT BECAUSE OF ANY EXHORTATION, GENERAL ECONOMIC THEORY OR VAGUE FEARS ABOUT HAVING TOO MANY EGGS IN TOO FEW BASKETS, BUT BECAUSE COMPETITION FROM LOWER COST INDUSTRIALISING COUNTRIES WILL FORCE IT- BECAUSE WE ARE CAPABLE OF IT AND BECAUSE IT WILL BE MORE PROFITABLE TO DIVERSIFY IN THIS WAY.

+ALL OF US IN HONG KONG WILL BENEFIT FROM THESE DEVELOPMENTS. EVERYONE, BUT PARTICULARLY THE YOUNGER GENERATION, ASPIRES TO BETTER WORKING AND LIVING CONDITIONS AND A HIGHER INCOME. IF THE ECONOMY IS TO CONTINUE TO BE VIABLE THIS CAN ONLY COME ABOUT BY PRODUCING AND EXPORTING HIGHER VALUE, MORE TECHNOLOGICAL GOODS WHICH DEMAND HIGHER SKILLS TO MANUFACTURE AND SO PAY HIGHER WAGES TO THEIR EMPLOYEES.+

- - - - 0 --------

NEW DIRECTOR OF PROTOCOL

******

SIR JOHN CURLE, K.C.V.O., C.M.G., IS EXPECTED TO ARRIVE IN HONG KONG EARLY IN APRIL TO TAKE UP THE POST OF DIRECTOR OF PROTOCOL.

SIR JOHN, WHO STARTED HIS CAREER IN THE DIPLOMATIC SERVICE IN 1944 AFTER WAR SERVICE, WAS UNTIL RECENTLY HEAD OF THE PROTOCOL AND CONFERENCE DEPARTMENT IN THE FOREIGN AND COMMONWEALTH OFFICE.

HE IS TO SUCCEED BRIGADIER R.G. LEWTHWAITE, C.V.O., O.B.E. M.C., WHO WILL LEAVE HONG KONG IN MARCH ON COMPLETION OF HIS SERVICE WITH THE HONG KONG GOVERNMENT. HE HAS BEEN DIRECTOR OF PROTOCOL FOR SIX AND A HALF YEARS.

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/3

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 28, 1976

3

REGISTERED VEHICLES SHOW SEVEN PER CENT DROP

M * * * * *

THE COMMISSIONER FOR TRANSPORT, MR. IAN MACPHERSON, REPORTED TODAY (WEDNESDAY) THAT THERE WERE 188,000 VEHICLES OF ALL CATEGORIES ON THE REGISTER OF VEHICLES AT THE END OF DECEMBER 1975. THIS REPRESENTS A DROP OF 7 PER CENT WHEN COMPARED TO THE END OF 1974 WHEN THE FIGURE WAS 193,000.

THE NUMBER OF PRIVATE CARS WAS JUST OVER 114,000, A DROP OF JUST OVER 4 PER CENT WHEN COMPARED TO THE 1974 TOTAL OF 119.000. ALTHOUGH MONTHLY FIGURES INDICATE AN UPTURN IN NEW REGISTRATIONS, THESE ARE STILL BEING OUTNUMBERED BY CANCELLATIONS.

MR. MACPHERSON POINTED OUT THAT THE NUMBER OF GOODS VEHICLES HAD INCREASED FROM 31,231 AT THE END OF 1974 TO 31.660 AT THE END OF LAST YEAR. BUT THE CATEGORY OF VEHICLE WHICH HAS SHOWN THE MOST CONSISTENT INCREASE HAS BEEN BUS FLEETS OF KMB AND CMB, WHICH NOW STAND AT 1,560 AND 629 RESPECTIVELY.

OTHER CATEGORIES HAVE REMAINED STATIC, ALTHOUGH THE NUMBER OF MOTORCYCLES HAS DROPPED BY ABOUT 1,000 DURING THE YEAR.

THE COMMISSIONER SAID THAT THE STATISTICS REFLECTED MAINLY THE HIGHER COST OF PRIVATE MOTORING. AS THERE WERE SUBSTANTIAL INCREASES IN THE PRICES OF CARS, PETROL AND INSURANCE PREMIUMS DURING 1975. +ALSO THE EFFECTS OF SUCH INCREASES HAD BEEN ALLEVIATED ONLY MARGINALLY BY THE INTRODUCTION OF CHEAPER PARKING RATES AT GOVERNMENT CAR PARKS,+ HE SAID.

MR. MACPHERSON SAID THAT IT WAS TOO EARLY TO ESTIMATE WHAT THE OVERALL POSITION ON REGISTRATIONS WAS LIKELY TO BE IN 1976 BECAUSE OF THE ABOLITION OF COMMONWEALTH PREFERENCE TAX AND THE REVISED SCALE OF FIRST REGISTRATION TAX INTRODUCED TOWARDS THE END OF THE YEAR AFFECTING MOTOR VEHICLES IMPORTED FROM COMMONWEALTH COUNTRIES.

--.-0----

DEATH SENTENCES COMMUTED

* M * * *

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR, AFTER TAKING INTO CONSIDERATION THE ADVICE OF THE EXECUTIVE COUNCIL, HAS DECIDED THAT THE DEATH SENTENCES PASSED ON MARCH 13, 1975 ON TSOI CHOR-LUK AND LEUNG YIU-KEUNG SHOULD BE COMMUTED TO LIFE IMPRISONMENT IN EACH CASE.

BOTH WERE FOUND GUILTY OF THE MURDER OF CHAN KWOK-HUNG.

-----o------

/4

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 28, 1976

- 4 -

STATEMENT ON WORK-TO-RULE BY TELEPHONE OPERATORS ******

THE SECRETARY FOR THE CIVIL SERVICE TODAY COMMENTED ON REPORTS ABOUT THE WORK-TO-RULE BY GOVERNMENT TELEPHONE OPERATORS AND THE STATEMENT FROM THE TELEPHONE OPERATORS UNIT OF THE HONG KONG CHINESE CIVIL SERVANTS ASSOCIATION THAT FURTHER ACTION WOULD BE TAKEN IN SUPPORT OF THEIR REQUEST FOR INCREASED PAY.

HE SAID THAT HE WAS UNAWARE OF ANY SIGNIFICANT EFFECTS OF THEIR ACTION SO FAR, BUT HE NOTED THAT MANY OPERATORS WORKED AT HOSPITALS AND IF THEY FAILED TO CARRY OUT THEIR PRESCRIBED DUTIES, IT COULD INCONVENIENCE PEOPLE AT TIMES OF REAL NEED.

THE TELEPHONE OPERATORS ARE REQUESTING THAT THEIR SALARY SCALE SHOULD BE THE SAME AS COMMUNICATIONS CONTROLLERS (PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT) AND POLICE COMMUNICATORS. A DETAILED EXAMINATION BY THE CIVIL SERVICE BRANCH OF THE WORK OF ALL THREE GROUPS HAS CONFIRMED THAT THERE IS REASON FOR MAINTAINING SOMEWHAT HIGHER PAY RATES FOR THE COMMUNICATIONS CONTROLLER AND POLICE COMMUNICATOR, WHOSE WORK INCLUDES, IN ADDITION TO NORMAL TELEPHONE OPERATING, DUTIES SUCH AS i

COMMUNICATIONS CONTROLLER 1 CALLING OUT AND DIRECTING REPAIR STAFF TO WATER SUPPLY FAULTS.

POLICE COMMUNICATOR! REGULAR SHIFT DUTY, TRANSFER

WITHIN THE FORCE AT REGULAR INTERVALS, AND LIABILITY TO POLICE DISCIPLINE.

TELEPHONE OPERATORS IN THE CIVIL SERVICE ARE PAID ON A SCALE FROM $815 TO $1,340, WHICH IS CONSIDERED FAIR IN RELATION BOTH TO PRIVATE SECTOR PAY RATES'FOR COMPARABLE WORK AND TO COMMUNICATIONS CONTROLLERS AND POLICE COMMUNICATORS, WHO ARE ON A SCALE FROM $875 TO $1,540. TELEPHONE OPERATORS MAY, OF COURSE, APPLY FOR THE OTHER POSTS, AND 16 VACANCIES FOR POLICE COMMUNICATORS WERE RECENTLY ADVERTISED FOR WHICH THEY MAY APPLY. ADVERTISEMENT OF VACANCIES FOR TELEPHONE OPERATORS INVARIABLY ATTRACTS A CONSIDERABLE NUMBER OF APPLICATIONS- FOR EXAMPLE, OVER 700 PEOPLE APPLIED LAST MONTH IN RESPONSE TO AN ADVERTISEMENT.

THE SECRETARY FOR THE CIVIL SERVICE WENT ON TO SAY THAT DISCUSSIONS WERE CONTINUING WITH THE HONG KONG CHINESE CIVIL SERVANTS ASSOCIATION, AND THAT IN PARTICULAR THE TELEPHONE OPERATORS WOULD BE REMINDED EXACTLY WHAT THEIR DUTIES ARE AND IF THEY DO NOT CARRY OUT THESE DUTIES REASONABLY, IT MAY BE NECESSARY, IN THE FIRST INSTANCE, TO CONSIDER REDUCING THEIR PAY AS PROVIDED IN REGULATIONS.

/THF.TP PRESCRIBED.....

WEDNESDAY, JANDABY 28, 1976

- 5 -

THEIR PRESCRIBED DUTIES ARE TO OPERATE A PRIVATE TELEPHONE SWITCHBOARD AND TO HANDLE ENQUIRIES MADE BY TELEPHONE OR IN PERSON AND TO DISTRIBUTE MESSAGES. LIKE ALL CIVIL SERVANTS, THEY MAY ALSO BE REQUIRED TO CARRY OUT SUCH OTHER DUTIES AS THEIR HEADS OF DEPARTMENTS MAY REQUIRE.

EVERY CARE IS TAKEN TO ENSURE THAT NO INDIVIDUAL OPERATOR’S WORKLOAD EXCEEDS A REASONABLE LEVEL. ANY POST WHICH THE ASSOCIATION HAS PUT FORWARD AS CARRYING TOO HEAVY A WORKLOAD HAS BEEN EXAMINED AND THE SECRETARY IS SATISFIED THAT THE SITUATION IS REASONABLE.

-----0------

CLEARWATER BAY LOT TO BE AUCTIONED

******

A PIECE OF LAND AT TA KWU LING, CLEARWATER BAY, MEASURING 58,000 SQ. FT., IS TO BE AUCTIONED NEXT MONTH.

THE LAND IS TO BE USED FOR PRIVATE RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT AND THE SUCCESSFUL BIDDER WILL BE REQUIRED TO PUT DOWN A DEPOSIT OF $140,000.

THE AUCTION WILL BE HELD AT SAI KUNG DISTRICT OFFICE IN SAN PO KONG GOVERNMENT OFFICES, AT 2.30 P.M. ON FEBRUARY 17.

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/6

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 28, 1976

6

MANPOWER REPORT ON SALE TOMORROW

THE REPORT OF THE SECOND MANPOWER SURVEY OF THE SHIPBUILDING AND SHIP REPAIRS INDUSTRY, IN BOTH ENGLISH AND CHINESE, WILL BE ON SALE TOMORROW (THURSDAY) AT $6 A COPY AT THE GOVERNMENT PUBLICATIONS CENTRE, STAR FERRY CONCOURSE, HONG KONG.

THE SURVEY WAS CONDUCTED IN JUNE AND AUGUST, 1974 BY THE SHIPBUILDING AND SHIP REPAIRS INDUSTRY TRAINING BOARD OF THE HONG KONG TRAINING COUNCIL WITH THE ASSISTANCE OF THE LABOUR DEPARTMENT AND THE CENSUS AND STATISTICS DEPARTMENT.

IT COVERS ALL SHIPYARDS, BOATYARDS, REPAIRS PONTOONS, SHIPPING FIRMS, SHIP SURVEYOR AND CONSULTANT FIRMS, AND COMPANIES WHICH SERVICE MARINE ENGINES.

PREPARED BY THE BOARD, THE REPORT PROVIDES STATISTICAL INFORMATION AND ANALYSIS ON THE EMPLOYMENT STRUCTURE OF THE INDUSTRY, INCLUDING

M DESCRIPTION OF PRINCIPAL JOBS

* NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES ENGAGED IN EACH OF THE PRINCIPAL JOBS

M PREFERRED EDUCATIONAL STANDARDS OF WORKERS FOR DIFFERENT JOBS

* DISTRIBUTION OF EMPLOYEES BY TOTAL MONTHLY 'INCOME RANGE, AND

* ADDITIONAL NUMBER OF WORKERS REQUIRED TO COVER WASTAGE BETWEEN 1975 AND 1978

THE REPORT ALSO CONTAINS PROPOSALS AND RECOMMENDATIONS, MADE TO BOTH INDUSTRY AND THE GOVERNMENT, ON MEASURES NECESSARY TO MEET THE TRAINING NEEDS OF THE INDUSTRY, AS WELL AS ON ROUTES FOR TRAINING TECHNOLOGISTS, TECHNICIANS AND CRAFTSMEN IN THE INDUSTRY.

THE MAIN OBJECT OF THE SURVEY, ACCORDING TO MR. HORACE KNIGHT, ASSISTANT COMMISSIONER FOR LABOUR (INDUSTRIAL TRAINING), IS TO COLLECT UP-TO-DATE INFORMATION ON TECHNICAL MANPOWER NEEDS TO ENABLE THE SHIPBUILDING AND SHIP REPAIRS INDUSTRY TRAINING BOARD TO MAKE MEANINGFUL PROPOSALS AND RECOMMENDATIONS.

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/7

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 28, 1976

7 -

DECEMBER BANKING STATISTICS

* M M * * *

BANK DEPOSITS AS AT THE END OF DECEMBER STOOD AT $36,343 MILLION, COMPRISING $9,911 MILLION IN DEMAND DEPOSITS, $13,629 •MILLION IN TIME DEPOSITS AND $12,803 MILLION IN SAVINGS DEPOSITS.

AS AT DECEMBER 31, THERE WERE 74 LICENSED BANKS IN HONG KONG.

THE FOLLOWING TABLE DISCLOSED TODAY BY THE COMMISSIONER OF BANKING, GIVES A DETAILED BREAKDOWN OF BANK LIABILITIES AND ASSETS FOR THE MONTH i-

$ MILLION

LIABILITIES

1. DEPOSITS 36,343

2. AMOUNT DUE TO BANKS ABROAD 21,243

3. OTHER LIABILITIES 8,011

;OTAL LIABILITIES 65,597

ASSETS

1. CASH 775

2. AMOUNT DUE FROM BANKS ABROAD:

(I) DEMAND AND SHORT TERM CLAIMS 19,044

(II) TIME DEPOSITS 2,001 21,045

3. LOANS AND ADVANCES:

(I) HONG KONG 24,998

(II) ABROAD 10,077 35,075

/INVESTMENTS:

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 28, 1976

8

4. INVESTMENTS!

(I) HONG KONG

(II) ABROAD

2,891

50 2,941

OTHER

ASSETS! HONG KONG ABROAD

5

3,525

2,236 5,761

TOTAL ASSETS 65,597

AVERAGE LIQUIDITY DURING MONTH

49.77%

-----0-----

HONG KONG HOUSING AUTHORITY

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Wednesday, January 28, 1976

JATEJtFALL BAY PARK NOW OPEN

***«*»«

Wah Fu Estate residents will be able to spend their leisure hours touring Waterfall Bay Park now that it is completed.

The park, which is built along the coast of the headland where Wah Fu stands^ is now opened to the public.

Architects of ths Housing Department, responsible for its design and construction, have handed it over to the Urban Council.

a unique feature of the park is its mile-long walkway. There are children’s playgrounds, sitting-out areas and barbeque pits.

At one end is a pavilion overlooking a 100-foot waterfall from which the park derives its name. Adjacent to it is a plaque inscribing the history of the area.

The park will be planted with trees, shrubs and flowers. As it stretches all the way from Waterfall Bay to Kellet Bay, the park will have various exits where the public can enter or leave.,

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DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

THURSDAY, JANUARY 29, 1976

CONTENTS PA6E N0*

AMENDMENTS TO ICAC ORDINANCE PROPOSED TO ENSURE MORE EFFECTIVE OPERATION ..................................... 1

VISAS FOR VISITS TO THAILAND NOT REQUIRED ............... 3

GOVERNMENT’S POLICY ON GAMBLING EXPLAINED ..............  4

PUBLIC URGED TO HELP PREVENT HILL FIRES .................. 5

CHINESE NEW YEAR WITH KCR ...............................  6

PROJECT TO HELP SCHOOL DROP-OUTS MAKING PROGRESS ......... 7

MODEL FISHERMEN TO RECEIVE CERTIFICATES AND PR'IZES ..... 8

NEW PRIMARY SCHOOL AT SAM TSENG OPENED *.................. 9

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

I

THURSDAY, JANUARY 29, 1976

1

AMENDMENTS TO ICAC ORDINANCE! ******

A NUMBER OF AMENDMENTS ARE TO BE MADE TO THE INDEPENDENT COMMISSION AGAINST CORRUPTION ORDINANCE TO ENSURE THE CONTINUED EFFECTIVE INDEPENDENT OPERATION OF THE COMMISSION. THESE AMENDMENTS ALSO INCLUDE MEASURES DESIGNED FOR THE PROTECTION OF THE PUBLIC AGAINST PERSONS KNOWINGLY MAKING FALSE REPORTS TO THE ICAC OR FALSELY PRETENDING TO BE, OR HAVE THE POWER OF, AN ICAC OFFICER.

IN ADDITION, PROVISIONS IN THE PREVENTION OF BRIBERY ORDINANCE DESIGNED TO PREVENT CORRUPT OFFICERS FROM MAKING OFF WITH THEIR ILL-GOTTEN GAINS ARE TO BE MADE MORE EFFECTIVE.

THE CHANGES ARE CONTAINED IN THE INDEPENDENT COMMISSION AGAINST CORRUPTION (AMENDMENT) BILL 1976 AND THE PREVENTION OF BRIBERY (AMENDMENT) BILL 1976 TO BE PUBLISHED TOMORROW. THE BILLS ARE EXPECTED TO GO BEFORE THE LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL ON FEBRUARY 11.

COMMENTING ON THE AMENDMENTS, A GOVERNMENT SPOKESMAN EXPLAINED THAT, IN THE MAIN, THE .NEW POWERS FOR THE INDEPENDENT COMMISSION AGAINST CORRUPTION ARE POWERS WHICH POLICE OFFICERS ALREADY HAVE.

HE POINTED OUT THAT BECAUSE OF THE URGENCY WITH WHICH THE INDEPENDENT COMMISSION AGAINST CORRUPTION WAS SET UP IN 1973. THE LEGISLATIVE PROVISION FOR IT WAS CONFINED TO WHAT WAS CONSIDERED NECESSARY TO ENSURE THAT IT COULD FUNCTION EFFECTIVELY.

+HAD TIME BEEN NOT SO PRESSING, MOST OF THE AMENDMENTS NOW BEING PROPOSED WOULD HAVE BEEN INCORPORATED INTO THE INDEPENDENT COMMISSION AGAINST CORRUPTION ORDINANCE.*

AS IT IS, ALL THE AMENDMENTS HAVE BEEN PROVED NECESSARY IN THE LIGHT OF EXPERIENCE OF THE WORKING OF THE ORDINANCE AND OF DEVELOPMENTS, SINCE THE LATTER PART OF 1974.

ONE OF THE AMENDMENTS PROPOSED IN THE INDEPENDENT COMMISSION AGAINST CORRUPTION (AMENDMENT) BILL WILL GIVE THE COMMISSION’S OFFICERS POWER TO ARREST A PERSON FOR ANY OFFENCE WHICH MAY COME TO LIGHT DURING INVESTIGATIONS INTO ALLEGED CORRUPTION NOTWITHSTANDING THAT THE OFFENCE IS NOT UNDER THE PREVENTION OF BRIBERY ORDINANCE OR THE CORRUPT AND ILLEGAL PRACTICES ORDINANCE. ICAC OFFICERS WILL ALSO BE GIVEN POWER TO ENTER PREMISES IN SEARCH OF A SUSPECT WHO IS TO BE ARRESTED.

REGARDING THE EXTENSION OF POWERS OF ARREST, THE SPOKESMAN SAID IT IS TO COVER TWO MAIN CLASSES OF CASES.

ONE OF THESE IS WHERE THE COMMISSION’S INVESTIGATION OF ALLEGED CORRUPTION UNAVOIDABLY INVOLVES ENQUIRIES INTO OTHER OFFENCES AND IT IS NOT PRACTICABLE FOR THE COMMISSION TO DISENGAGE ITSELF FROM THE INQUIRY AND HAND IT OVER TO THE POLICE FORCE.

/THE OTHER

THURSDAY, JANUARY 29, 1976

- 2 -

THE OTHER IS WHERE IT IS CONSIDERED APPROPRIATE TO INSTITUTE A PROSECUTION FOR AN OFFENCE OTHER THAN A CORRUPTION OFFENCE, WHETHER OR NOT THERE IS ALSO EVIDENCE OF AN OFFENCE UNDER THE PREVENTION OF BRIBERY ORDINANCE.

AT PRESENT THE COMMISSION HAS NO AUTHORITY TO RELEASE AN ARRESTED PERSON ON BAIL EXCEPT THROUGH THE POLICE FORCE, AND AN AMENDMENT IN THE BILL WILL ENABLE AN OFFICER OF THE COMMISSION TO GRANT BAIL ALONG THE LINES PROVIDED FOR IN THE POLICE FORCE ORDINANCE. BAIL GRANTED UNDER THIS PROVIS ION MAY BE EXTENDED FROM TIME TO TIME BY AN ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF THE COMMISSION.

ALSO INCORPORATED INTO THE ORDINANCE ARE CLAUSES DEALING SPECIFICALLY WITH THE POWERS OF OFFICERS OF THE COMMISSION TO SEARCH PERSONS ARRESTED IN CONNECTION WITH AN OFFENCE OR ANYONE SUSPECTED OF BEING GUILTY OF AN OFFENCE WHICH THE COMMISSION IS INVESTIGATING. THE NEW CLAUSES ALSO DEAL WITH THE SEACHI NG OF PREMISES IN WHICH SUSPECTED PERSONS ARE ARRESTED AND INCLUDE A GENERAL POWER TO SEIZE ANYTHING WHICH IS BELIEVED TO BE EVIDENCE OF SUCH AN OFFENCE.

THERE IS ALSO PROVISION FOR THE SEARCH OF PREMISES, UNDER A MAGISTRATE’S WARRANT, IN CONNECTION WITH THE COMMISSION’S INVESTIGATION OF OFFENCES AND FOR THE TAKING OF PHOTOGRAPHS, FINGERPRINTS AND MEASUREMENTS FOR RECORD PURPOSE.

THE BILL ALSO INTRODUCES THREE NEW OFFENCES - RESISTING OR OBSTRUCTING AN ICAC OFFICER IN THE EXECUTION OF HIS DUTY° KNOWINGLY MAKING A FALSE REPORT TO AN ICAC OFFICER OR MISLEADING HIM BY FALSE INFORMATION OR STATEMENTS, AND, FALSELY PRETENDING TO BE, OR TO HAVE THE POWERS OF AN ICAC OFFICER.

IN THE PREVENTION OF BRIBERY (AMENDMENT) BILL, IT IS PROPOSED TO PROVIDE, AS AN ALTERNATIVE TO PERSONAL SERVICE, THAT A NOTICE OR ORDER UNDER THE PREVENTION OF BRIBERY ORDINANCE RESTRAINING A SUSPECT OR A THIRD PARTY FROM DEALING WITH PROPERTY MAY BE SERVED IN ANY WAY AUTHORISED BY THE DISTRICT COURT.

IT IS ALSO PROPOSED THAT ALL PROCEEDINGS BEFORE A MAGISTRATE IN RELATION TO THE SURRENDER OF TRAVEL DOCUMENTS BE HEARD IN CHAMBERS.

TWO OF THE NEW OFFENCES PROPOSED IN THE INDEPENDENT COMMISSION AGAINST CORRUPTION (AMENDMENT) BILL FOLLOW OFFENCES ALREADY IN THE POLICE FORCE ORDINANCE AND THE THIRD, WHICH IS BASED ON SECTION 22 OF THE SUMMARY OFFENCES ORDINANCE, IS FOR THE PROTECTION OF THE PUBLIC TO MINIMISE THE DANGER OF IMPERSONATION OF ICAC OFFICERS. THE SPOKESMAN NOTED THAT SINCE MAY 1974 THERE HAD BEEN 22 REPORTED CASES OF IMPERSONATION.

- - 0--------

/3

THURSDAY, JANUARY 29, 1976.

- 3 -

AGREEMENT WITH THAILAND TO ABOLISH VISAS ******

NOTES HAVE BEEN EXCHANGED BETWEEN THE THAI CONSUL GENERAL IN HONG KONG AND THE COLONIAL SECRETARY CONS I TUT I NG AN AGREEMENT BETWEEN THE THAI AND HONG KONG GOVERNMENTS TO ABOLISH VISAS FOR VISITS OF UP TO 15 DAYS BY HOLDERS OF BRITISH (HONG KONG) PASSPORTS TO THAILAND AND THAI PASSPORT HOLDERS TO HONG KONG.

DETAILS OF THE AGREEMENT ARE AS FOLLOWSi-

(1) HOLDERS OF BRITISH (HONG KONG) PASSPORTS SHALL BE PERMITTED TO VISIT THAILAND WITHOUT VISAS FOR A PERIOD NOT EXCEEDING 15 DAYS, INCLUDING THE DATE OF LANDING.

(2) THIS PERIOD SHALL NOT BE EXTENDED EXCEPT UNDER EXTENUATING CIRCUMSTANCES.

(3) HOLDERS OF BRITISH (HONG KONG) PASSPORTS VISITING THAILAND WITHOUT VISAS UNDER THE ABOVE ARRANGEMENTS SHALL BE SUBJECT TO THE IMMIGRATION LAWS AND REGULATIONS IN FORCE IN THAILAND. IN PARTICULAR, THEY WILL BE REQUIRED TO BE IN POSSESSION OF ADEQUATE FUNDS FOR THEIR MAINTENANCE IN THAILAND, AND ONWARD OR RETURN TICKETS WHICH WILL ENABLE THEM TO LEAVE THAILAND WITHIN THE PERMITTED STAY PERIOD.

(4) HOLDERS OF PASSPORTS ISSUED BY THE COMPETENT AUTHORITIES OF THAILAND SHALL BE PERMITTED TO VISIT HONG KONG WITHOUT VISAS FOR A PERIOD NOT EXCEEDING 15 DAYS ON RECIPROCAL BASIS AND UNDER ARRANGEMENTS IDENTICAL TO THOSE DESCRIBED ABOVE.

THIS AGREEMENT WILL COME INTO EFFECT AS FROM JANUARY 30, 1976.

/4

- 4 -

THURSDAY, JANUARY 29, 1976

GOVERNMENT EXPLAINS GAMBLING POLICY

******

A GOVERNMENT SPOKESMAN SAID TODAY GOVERNMENT’S POLICY ON GAMBLING IS TO REDUCE FORMS OF RAMPANT ILLEGAL GAMBLING THAT EXPLOIT MEMBERS OF THE PUBLIC.

THE MEANS OF CONTROL ADOPTED IS TO PROVIDE LEGAL AND WELL-CONTROLLED CENTRES RUN BY THE ROYAL HONG KONG JOCKEY CLUB WHERE PUNTERS MAY PLACE THEIR BETS.

. +IN ADDITION TO SAFEGUARDING THE INTERESTS OF THE PUBLIC, THE IMPLEMENTATION OF THIS POLICY HAS ALLOWED THE POLICE TO CONCENTRATE ON MAINTAINING LAW AND ORDER,+ SAID THE SPOKESMAN, +AND IS ALREADY HAVING A POSITIVE EFFECT ON REDUCING ILLEGAL GAMBLING.*

MANY OFF-COURSE'BETTING CENTRES HAVE BEEN SET UP IN DENSELY POPULATED AREAS WHERE DEMAND FOR THE SERVICES PROVIDED BY THE ROYAL HONG KONG JOCKEY CLUB IS THE GREATEST. IT IS TO BE EXPECTED THAT ILLEGAL GAMBLING ACTIVITY WILL INCREASE IN POPULATED AREAS WHERE CONTROLLED CENTRES DO NOT EXIST. ■

REFERRING TO THE SITE ORIGINALLY ALLOCATED FOR A BETTING CENTRE IN KO CHIU ROAD ESTATES, THE SPOKESMAN SA IDs +FOLLOWING THE ADVICE OF UMELCO -'AND TAKING INTO CONSIDERATION THE FACT THAT A KINDERGARTEN ADJOINS THE PREMISES - IT WILL BE SUGGESTED TO THE HOUSING AUTHORITY THAT THIS PARTICULAR SITE IS NOT SUITABLE FOR THIS PURPOSE.*

THE PROBLEM OF COMBATTING PRESENT AND POTENTIAL ILLEGAL GAMBLING STILL REQUIRES SOME CONTROLLED BETTING OUTLETS IN EVERY CENTRE OF POPULATION.

0

' /5

THURSDAY, JANUARY 29, 1976

- 5 -

PUBLIC URGED TO HELP PREVENT HILL FIRES ******

THE AGRICULTURE AND FISHERIES DEPARTMENT TODAY ISSUED ANOTHER APPEAL TO THE PUBLIC TO EXERCISE CARE AND FIRE PRECAUTIONS WHEN GOING OUT TO THE COUNTRYSIDE DURING THE COMING HOLIDAYS THIS WEEKEND.

HE ALSO WARNED PICNICKERS THAT ANYONE CAUGHT LIGHTING FIRES CARELESSLY IN THE COUNTRYSIDE COULD BE LIABLE TO A FINE OF $2,000 AND A YEAR’S JAIL.

+REMEMBER, IT IS YOUR COUNTRYSIDE. TREAT IT LIKE YOU TREAT YOUR PERSONAL PROPERTY,+ HE SAID.

THE SPOKESMAN SAID THAT THERE WAS REALLY NO REASON FOR PEOPLE TO LIGHT FIRES IN OPEN AREAS BECAUSE THERE ARE OVER A THOUSAND BARBECUE PITS IN THE NEW TERRITORIES FOR THEM TO USE.

EVEN SO, HE SAID, THEY SHOULD BE VERY CAREFUL IN LIGHTING A FIRE AND MAKE SURE THAT IT IS COMPLETELY OUT AFTER THEIR BARBECUE.

+IT IS IMPERATIVE THAT PICNICKERS UNDERSTAND THE DANGER OF HILL FIRES AND THE DAMAGE THEY CAN CAUSE TO THE ENVIRONMENT OF THE COUNTRYSIDE. THAT IS WHY WE REPEAT OUR WARNING SO VERY OFTEN+.

THE SPOKESMAN SAID THAT IF PICNICKERS SHOULD SPOT A HILL FIRE, ESPECIALLY A SMALL ONE, THEY COULD HELP BY STAMPING OR BEATING IT OUT.

+YOUR EFFORTS MIGHT HELP IN PREVENTING A DISASTER,+ HE SAID.

HOWEVER, HE WARNED PEOPLE NOT TO TACKLE LARGE AND SPREADING HILL FIRES BUT THEY SHOULD INSTEAD ALERT THE NEAREST FORESTRY OFFICER OR CALL THE POLICE OR FIRE SERVICES.

DURING THE FOUR-DAY HOLIDAY WHICH BEGINS ON SATURDAY, STAFF OF THE AGRICULTURE AND FISHERIES DEPARTMENT TOGETHER WITH THE CIVIL AID SERVICES WILL BE MOBILISED TO PATROL POTENTIAL DANGER SPOTS WHERE THERE IS A HIGH RISK OF FIRE. A NUMBER OF 100-MAN UNITS WILL BE PATROLLING THE KOWLOON HILL AREAS OF SHEK LI PUI, ROUTE TWISK, TAI LAM CHUNG AND TAI MEI TUK.

THE GOVERNOR HAS ALSO AUTHORISED A LIMITED CALL OUT OF 80 PERSONNEL OF THE ROYAL HONG KONG REGIMENT GTHE VOLUNTEERS) TO ASSIST IN PATROL DUTIES ON SATURDAY (JANUARY 31), SUNDAY (FEBRUARY 1) AND ON TUESDAY (FEBRUARY 3).

IN ADDITION, THE BRITISH FORCES WILL BE PROVIDING FIRE FIGHTING UNITS ON STANDBY TO HELP OUT IF NECESSARY.

FIRE WARNINGS AND APPEAL MESSAGES WILL ALSO BE BROADCAST ON TRAINS AND FERRIES THIS WEEKEND.

THURSDAY, JANUARY 29, 1976

- 6 -

CHINESE NEW YEAR WITH KCR * * H * M *

THE SECRETARY FOR THE ENVIRONMENT, MR. JAMES ROBSON, AND MRS. ROBSON WILL UNVEIL A BELL, LINKED WITH HALF A CENTURY OF HONG KONG HISTORY, IN THE MAIN CONCOURSE OF THE NEW HUNG HOM RAILWAY TERMINUS TOMORROW (FRIDAY).

THE ONE-TON BRONZE BELL, MADE IN 1919, WAS PREVIOUSLY INSTALLED IN THE TSIM SHA TSUI RAILWAY STATION CLOCK TOWER.

AFTER THE UNVEILING, THE BELL WILL BECOME A PERMANENT FEATURE AT THE NEW STAT ION.THOUGH IT WILL NO LONGER CHIME EVERY HOUR ON THE HOUR, IT IS HOPED THAT IT MAY SERVE AS A FOCAL POINT WHERE PASSENGERS AND THEIR FRIENDS OR RELATIVES CAN MEET.

THE GENERAL MANAGER OF KOWLOON-CANTON RAILWAY, MR. REG GREGORY, SAID THE BELL WOULD BE DECORATED WITH MANDARINES FOR THE CEREMONY BY THE MIRAMAR HOTEL.

KCR IN CONJUNCTION WITH THE HOTEL WILL ALSO PRESENT A VARIETY SHOW AT 3 P.M. ON MONDAY (FEBRUARY 2) IN THE MAIN TERMINUS CONCOURSE.

THE SHOW, LASTING ONE AND A HALF HOURS, CONSISTS OF CHINESE CLASSICAL FOLK DANCES, SONGS, A PUPPET SHOW AND A LION DANCE BY THE ENTERTAINMENTS GROUP OF THE HOTEL.

MR. GREGORY SAID THIS WAS ONE OF A FEW EXAMPLES OF JOINT VENTURE BETWEEN A GOVERNMENT DEPARTMENT AND A PRIVATE ORGANISATION AND HE HOPED THAT THIS INITIATIVE WOULD BE FOUND SATISFYING TO THE GENERAL PUBLIC.

ANOTHER EXAMPLE IS THE INTRODUCTION OF A NEW RANGE OF POCKET-SIZE TIMETABLES WHICH WILL BE ISSUED ON WEDNESDAY (FEBRUARY 4). AT THE SAME TIME, ILLUMINATED TIMETABLE DISPLAY CASES.PROVIDED BY THE BRITISH AMERICAN TOBACCO COMPANY AT ALL RAILWAY STATIONS WILL COME INTO OPERATION.

TO GIVE THE HUNG HOM STATION A HOLIDAY ATMOSPHERE, A LARGE NEW YEAR GREETING CARD HAS BEEN PUT UP BY THE KCR AND DECORATED WITH FLOWERS BY THE URBAN SERVICES DEPARTMENT.

MR. GREGORY ALSO ANNOUNCED THAT FROM FEBRUARY 4, THE FIRST DAY AFTER THE HOLIDAYS, THERE WOULD BE AN ADDITIONAL TRAIN TO SERVE NEW TERRITORIES RESIDENTS COMING TO THE URBAN AREAS. IT WILL LEAVE FANLING DAILY AT 6.29 A.M. AND ARRIVE AT KOWLOON AT 9.39 A.M.

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THURSDAY, JANUARY 29, 1976

7

PROGRESS IN PROJECT TO HELP SCHOOL DROPOUTS *****

THE HOME AFFAIRS DEPARTMENT PROJECT TO HELP SCHOOL DROPOUTS IS MAKING SATISFACTORY PROGRESS TOWARDS SOLVING THE PROBLEMS OF CHILDREN BETWEEN 12 AND 13 WHO ARE NEITHER AT SCHOOL NOR AT WORK.

THE PROJECT IS CARRIED OUT BY THE DISTRICT COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT CO-ORDINATION COMMITTEES IN FOUR CITY DISTRICTS OF HONG KONG EAST, KWUN TONG, WONG TAI SIN AND SHAMSHUIPO UNDER THE AUSPICES OF THE CITY DISTRICT OFFICES AND OTHER CONCERNED GOVERNMENT DEPARTMENTS.

THE MAIN EMPHASIS OF THE PROJECT IS TO KEEP THE CHILDREN FROM LOITERING IN THE STREETS BY HELPING OR ENCOURAGING THEM TO RE-ENROLL IN SCHOOLS OR TORECEIVE SUITABLE PREVOCATIONAL TRAINING, AND, FOR THOSE APPROACHING 14 YEARS, TO FIND SUITABLE JOBS.

SINCE THE PROJECT STARTED LAST SEPTEMBER, MORE THAN 200 SCHOOL DROPOUTS IDENTIFIED HAVE BEEN RE-ENROLLED OR PLACED IN GAINFUL EMPLOYMENT AS A RESULT OF EFFORTS IN THIS DIRECTION. SO FAR EIGHT INDUSTRIAL UNDERTAKINGS HAVE RESPONDED TO THE PROJECT BY MAKING OFFERS OF APPRENTICESHIP AND JOB VACANCIES THE NUMBER OF WHICH EXCEEDS THAT REQUIRED BY DROPOUTS.

BESIDES SCHOOL AND JOB PLACEMENTS, OTHER SERVICES OFFERED TO THE DROPOUTS INCLUDE RECREATIONAL ACTIVITIES, ENCOURAGEMENT FOR THE CHILDREN TO PARTICIPATE IN COMMUNITY SERVICES AND INDIVIDUAL COUNSELLING. CAMPS, PICNICS, FRIENDSHIP GROUPS, VARIOUS INTEREST CLASSES SUCH AS TAILORING AND CARPENTRY AND WEEKEND RECREATIONAL GAME CENTRES HAVE BEEN ORGANISED OR PROVIDED FOR THE DROPOUTS. THE PURPOSES ARE TO ENABLE THEM TO HAVE SUITABLE ENTERTAINMENT AS WELL AS TO EXPERIENCE GROUP LIFE AND TO LEARN HOW TO GET ALONG WITH OTHERS. AT PRESENT, ABOUT 130 CHILDREN ARE PARTICIPATING IN THE PROGRAMMES.

HOWEVER, A SPOKESMAN FOR THE HOME AFFAIRS DEPARTMENT SAID : +THE PROJECT IS NOT WITHOUT DIFFICULTIES AND PROBLEMS. SOME PARENTS ARE FOUND TO BE RELUCTANT IN ACCEPTING HELP OFFERED TO THEIR CHILDREN, PROBABLY DUE TO MISCONCEPTIONS AND IGNORANCE, OR BECAUSE THEY CANNOT SPARE THEIR CHILDREN HELPING WITH HOUSEHOLD CHORES TO TAKE PART IN THE PROGRAMMES.

+NONETHELESS, HAVING LAUNCHED THE PROJECT FOR ALMOST HALF A YEAR, THE DISTRICT COMMITTEES IN THE FOUR DISTRICTS HAVE FOUND THAT THE DIMENSIONS OF THE PROBLEM OF SCHOOL DROPOUTS DO NOT APPEAR AS GREAT AS IT MAY SEEM TO BE.+

MORE AND MORE SUPPORT ARE FORTHCOMING FROM PARENTS AND THE PUBLIC. WITH PERSEVERANCE AND IMPROVEMENT IN'THE ECONOMY, CONTINUED PROGRESS TOWARDS THE SOLUTION OF THIS PROBLEM CAN BE ACHIEVED, THE SPOKESMAN SAID.

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THURSDAY, JANUARY 29, 1976

- 8 -

PRESENTATION OF CERTIFICATES AND PRIZES TO FISHERMEN »*#***

FISHERMEN WHO LANDED THE LARGEST CATCHES AND WHO SAVED LIVES AT SEA LAST YEAR WILL BE COMMENDED AT A SPECIAL CEREMONY THIS SUNDAY (FEBRUARY 1).

FORTY-EIGHT MEMBERS OF THE FISH MARKETING ORGANIZATION WHO*HAVE HAD 25 YEARS’ LOYAL SERVICE WILL ALSO RECEIVE MEMENTOS AND CERTIFICATES.

THE DIRECTOR OF AGRICULTURE AND FISHERIES, MR. EDWARD NICHOLS, WILL ADDRESS THE GATHERING AND MRS. NICHOLS WILL PRESENT CERTIFICATES AND PRIZES.

THE SEVEN FISHERMEN TO BE COMMENDED FOR SAVING LIVES ARE LAW CHO-NG, WONG AH-MEI, WONG SO, SO YA-SAM, LEUNG KIN-SAU, MA FUNG-KWONG AND MA MUK-KAN.

THE NUMBER OF FISHERMEN TO BE AWARDED CERTIFICATES AND PRIZES FOR HAVING MARKETED THE LARGEST VALUE OF FISH THROUGH THE FMO TOTALS 44.

THEY ARE FROM VARIOUS FISHING CENTRES IN HONG KONG AND MAKE THEIR LIVELIHOOD ON VARIOUS TYPES OF VESSEL.

NOTE TO ED I TORSi

YOU ARE WELCOME TO COVER THE PRIZE-GIVING CEREMONY. IT WILL BE HELD AT 12 NOON ON SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 1 (SECOND DAY OF THE LUNAR NEW YEAR) AT THE CHEUNG SHA WAN WHOLESALE FISH MARKET IN FAT CHEUNG STREET.

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THURSDAY, JANUARY 29, 1976

9

NEW SCHOOL BUILDING FOR SAM TSENG ******

A NEW $1.4 MILLION SCHOOL BUILDING TO REPLACE ONE WHICH IS TO BE DEMOLISHED SOON TO MAKE WAY FOR A HIGHWAY VIADUCT WAS OPENED AT SAM TSENG, NEW TERRITORIES, TODAY (THURSDAY) BY THE DISTRICT OFFICER, TSUEN WAN, MR. JAMES HAYES.

THE SCHOOL IS THE EMMANUEL CHURCH PRIMARY SCHOOL WHICH WILL CATER FOR A TOTAL OF 450 PUPILS IN MORNING AND AFTERNOON SESSIONS.

THE SCHOOL WAS DESIGNED AND BUILT BY THE ARCHITECTURAL OFFICE OF THE PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT WITH FUNDS ALSO PROVIDED BY THE GOVERNMENT. CONSTRUCTION BEGAN IN 1974 AND WAS COMPLETED THIS WEEK.

THE 1,1OO-FOOT VIADUCT IS A CRUCIAL STAGE OF THE TUEN MUN TO TSUEN WAN HIGHWAY AND WILL PASS OVER SAM TSENG VILLAGE AT A HEIGHT OF ABOUT 90 FEET.

MR. HAYES, IN A SHORT ADDRESS, PRAISED THE +CO-OPERATION AND UNDERSTANDING* OF THE CHURCH WHICH HAS SURRENDERED SOME OF •ITS LAND TO MAKE WAY FOR THE VIADUCT.

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

FRIDAY, JANUARY 30, 1976

INQUIRY INTO LEUNG WING-SANG CASE * * * * *

FOLLOWING RECENT RENEWED ALLEGATIONS IN RELATION TO THE CASE OF MR. LEUNG WING-SANG WHO WAS CONVICTED OF MURDER ON JAN. 9, 1974, THE GOVERNOR IN COUNCIL ON THE RECOMMENDATION OF THE ATTORNEY GENERAL HAS APPOINTED A COMMISSION OF INQUIRY TO INQUIRE INTO THE MATTER.

THE COMMISSION WILL CONSIST OF A SINGLE COMMISSIONER WHO WILL BE MR. JUSTICE T.L. YANG. THE COMMISSION’S TERMS OF REFERENCE ARE i-

♦TO INQUIRE INTO -

(I) THE CIRCUMSTANCES LEADING UP TO AND SURROUNDING THE ARREST AND CHARGING OF LEUNG WING-SANG- AND

(II) WHETHER OR NOT THESE CIRCUMSTANCES MIGHT HAVE PREJUDICED LEUNG’S TRIAL*.

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HIRE OF MOTOR BOATS FOR PREVENTIVE SERVICE • *****

TENDERS ARE INVITED FOR THE SUPPLY OF MOTOR BOATS ON HIRE AT HOURLY RATES TO THE PREVENTIVE SERVICE OF THE COMMERCE AND INDUSTRY DEPARTMENT FOR A PERIOD OF ONE YEAR STARTING FROM APRIL 1, 1976, IT IS NOTIFIED IN TODAY’S GOVERNMENT GAZETTE.

THE BOATS WILL BE- USED TO CONVEY PREVENTIVE SERVICE OFFICERS FOR JOURNEYS BETWEEN THE SHORE AND SHIPS AT ANCHOR IN THE HARBOUR AND FOR PATROLS WITHIN THE WATERS OF THE COLONY. IT IS EXPECTED THAT THE TOTAL SAILING TIME PER MONTH WILL NOT BE LESS THAN 200 HOURS AND THE TOTAL WAITING TIME 500 HOURS.

FROM ROOM HONG

FORMS OF TENDER AND FURTHER PARTICULARS MAY BE OBTAINED THE GENERAL OFFICE OF THE PREVENTIVE SERVICE HEADQUARTERS. 1020, RUMSEY STREET CAR PARK BUILDING, 10TH FLOOR.

IZAKI/? 9 9

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Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

FRIDAY, JANUARY 30, 1976

2

FIRING PRACTICE ******

FIRING PRACTICE WILL TAKE PLACE ON CASTLE PEAK RANGE BETWEEN 9 A.M. AND 5 P.M. ON FEBRUARY 5 AND 6, AND BETWEEEN 9 A.M. AND 4 P.M. ON FEBRUARY 9 AND 10 AND BETWEEN 9 A.M. AND 3 P.M. ON FEBRUARY 26.

THE PUBLIC ARE REMINDED THAT IT IS DANGEROUS TO ENTER THE AREA WHEN THE RED FLAGS ARE FLYING DURING THE TIME OF FIRING PRACTICE.

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