Daily Information Bulletin - 1970s - 1973 - DEC - ENG

 PftH 7

IgisI |«|

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Saturday, December 1t 1973

CONTENTS

Paffi Nof

More classrooms needed for next yearfs School Certificate exams. ................................................      |

Reclamation at Sha Tin for sewage treatment works......,tJ

Workers on overseas employment advised to enter into contracts •«...•••••••••.............................. • • • ♦

Proposed land grant to ferry company ...................     5

Macau visitor impressed by health education.exhibition-.*• •» 6

Heavy transformer to be moved from Central to North Point • • 7

Lai Chi Kok Road will be partly closed to facilitate roadworks ............................................................ 8

Lady MacLehose to visit two Community Chest member agencies in Kowloon ..•••••....• • •..............................

Three lots of Crown land for auction .........

Issued by Government Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong. Tel: 5’233191

Saturday, December 1, 1973

MORE CANDIDATES TO SIT FOR SCHOOL CERTIFICATE EXAMINATION

23jOOO More Classroom Seats Needed For Two Subjects *

Some 55,000 candidates are expected to sit for the Chinese language and English Language subjects in next year’s Certificate of Education examination to be held in May.

This number is far in excess of hall accommodation, a spokesman for the Education Department said today.

These two subjects comprise nine papers and three mornings will be required for the examinations. It will be necessary therefore to provide about 25,000 classroom seats in addition to hall space.

,fThe only way in which this can be done, without delaying the publication of results, will be to close some 7^ government and aided secondary schools on May 17 and 20 - Friday and Monday respectively,11 the spokesman said.

As the schools affected will not, in any case, be having classes on May 18, which is a Saturday, pupils in these schools who are not Certificate of Education examinations candidates will have two extra days holiday in 197^ so that their classrooms may be used for the examinations.

The spokesman pointed out that in the past great difficulty had been experienced in providing sufficient suitable accommodation for large numbers of candidates entering for the examinations.

/’’It is......

Saturday, December 1, 1975

2 -

”It is for this reason that for some year certificate examinations have had to be held on Saturday mornings when classrooms are available for use in addition to school halls,n he said.

The Director of Education has notified the 74 schools of his

intention to exercise his powers under Regulation 82 of the Education Regulations to require them to give a holiday to their pupils on May 17 and 20.

Those schools not already notified will operate as usual.

--------0---------

Saturday, December 1, 1973

- 3 -

SHA TIN RECLAMATION

*******

More than 75 acres of land will be reclaimed at Sha Tin to provide space for the development of utility projects to serve the new town*

The site to be reclaimed is an area of foreshore and sea bed on the western coast of Tide Cove, about half a mile northeast of Ho Tung Lau — next to the proposed reclamation for the new race course.

The main public works project to be developed there is a permanent sewage*treatment works.

The treatment works will have the capacity to serve the population • of the new town, and is designed at the same time to treat sewage from the future race course.

Other uses of the reclaimed land will be for realigning Tai Po Poad and for constructing a sand depot, a salt water pumping station and public landing steps by the shore.

The area will be landscaped and planted with trees and flowering shrubs to present an attractive appearance.

Anyone who has objections to the proposed reclamation or has any claim of private right is asked to write to the Director of Public Works within two months.

-------0---------

A....

Saturday, December 1, 1973

- 4 -

OVERSEAS EMPLOYMENT

Workers Advised To Obtain Contracts For Their Protection ********

Manual workers proceeding overseas for employment are advised to enter into a contract with their prospective employers in accordance with the provisions of the Contracts for Overseas Employment Ordinance.

The head of the Employment Division of the Labour Department, Mrs. Soo Mok Sau-hau, said today the purpose of a contract was to safeguard the workers’ interests and well-being.

She said the contract must be in written form and should set out in full detail the rights and obligations of the parties concerned. It should include, among other things, the right of the employee to repatriation; remittances to the employee’s family, hours of work, holidays and restdays, provisions for sick leave, wages, and compensation for injury at work.

The contract must be attested by the Commissioner of Labour, who might require a Hong Kong resident nominated by the employer to furnish him with a guarantee or bond. ’’This is to ensure that the guarantor will indemnify the employee for all losses, and expenses and meet claims for damages in case the employer fails to carry out any of his obligations under the contractshe said.

Mrs. Soo stressed that the Commissioner had the power to refuse to attest a contract the terms of which were unfair to the employee.

The Overseas Employment Service of the Labour Department administers the Contracts for Overseas Employment Ordinance. Those who intend to take up employment overseas but have not yet drawn up a contract with their employer should as soon as possible contact officers of the Service for advice. (Tel. No. 5-282523 ext. 45 and 46).

Saturday, December 1, 1973

5

PROPOSED LAND GRANT TO FERRY CO.

*«*«***«

Tho government intends to grant about 3*5 acres of land to the Hong Kong and Yaumati Ferry Co. Ltd. in exchange for five lots currently occupied by the company’s shipyard in Tai Kok Tsui.

The exchange, representing an increase of about 1-52 acres in favour of the company, is to revise the boundaries of the shipyard to allow for road construction and also for expansion of the repair facilities of the company’s ferry fleet.

The 3.5 acres of land, to be reclaimed by the company and known as Kowloon Marine Lot No.112, will include the whole of the proposed reclamation in front of the existing shipyard up to the line of the seawall to be constructed.

The company had applied for a re—grant of the existing lots, the leases of which are due to expire in 1975-

However, these lots are affected to a greater or lesser extent by the longterm proposals for Tai Kok Tsui Road. The marine access of the lots would similarly be adversely affected by the eventual reclamation in that area.

In view of the company’s projected expansion and the recognised need of marine frontage for the proper maintenance of its ferry fleet which provides valuable services to the community, the government intends to make a new grant in exchange for the five lots.

The extent of the reclamation was published in a notification in yesterday’s gazette which calls upon those having objections to the proposals or any claim of private right to submit them in writing to the Director of Public Works within two months.

The notices, in both English and Chinese, have also been posted near the site. 0

/6........

Saturday, December 1, 1973

- 6 -

HONG KONG HEALTH EXHIBITION IMPRESSES MACAU VISITOR

********

Senora Eunice Freire, Social Assistant of the Health Department of the Government of Macau, joined hundreds of school children in the Yuen Long Town Hall yesterday at the end of the Medical and Health Deportment1s lastest health education exhibition.

She made the trip especially to see how a show of this sort could be duplicated in the Portuguese province, and to collect information on health education so as to improve training facilities among hygiene staff in Macau.

She spent several hours touring the exhibition, making notes of the various items on display, taking photographs of some of them, and carrying back with her to Macau a handful of the government’s latest leaflet on how to avoid accidents in the home.

”1 am very impressed,” she said.

The exhibition centred on the theme of ”home safety,” and the message was put across with models, graphs, drawings, all designed in Chinese for easy comprehension by an audience of rural folk. Sections were devoted to food hygiene, nutrition, protection of the eyesight, and the prevention of intestinal diseases.

The department’s Health Education Unit, New Territories, was responsible for organising the exhibition. It will be repeated soon in Tsuen Wan.

-------0---------

/7........

Saturday, December 1, 1975

- 7 -

HEAVY TRANSFORMER ON ROADS TOMORROW

*********

A 42-ton transmitter of the Hong Kong Electric Company will be moved from its present location at On Lan Street in Central to Tin Chong Street in North Point tomorrow (Sunday) evening.

A spokesman for the Transport Department said that due to the weight of the load, the transporting vehicle would make very slow progress, and special traffic arrangements had been arranged to regulate traffic flow in the area.

The section of Wyndham Street between On Lan Street and Queen's Road Central will be closed to all traffic between 5*15 p*m. and 9»^5 p»m. tomorrow.

Only vehicles seeking access to Wellington Street will bo permitted to enter Wyndham Street during this period. All other traffic will be diverted east into Lower Albert Road.

At the same time, since the transporting vehicle will take about 15 minutes to cross Queen’s Road Central from Wyndham Street into Pedder Street, east and westbound traffic flow along Queen’s Road Central will be stopped from about 9-50 p.m. to 9-^5 p.m. tomorrow.

Traffic signs will be posted to guide motorists.

-------0---------

/8.......

Saturday, December 1, 1973

- 8 -

PART CF LAI CHI KOK HOAD TO BE CLOSED

A section of Lai Chi Kok Road in Mong Kok, Kowloon, will be closed to through traffic as from Tuesday (December 4).

With effect from 8 a.m. on that day, no vehicles will be allowed to enter the section of Lai Chi Kok Road between Poplar Street and Prince Edward Road, where work will begin on the construction of an elevated road.

A spokesman for the Transport Department said that special traffic re-arrangements and clearway systems would be introduced in the area during the construction period to maintain traffic flow.

Westbound traffic will be routed via Prince Edward Road and Tong Mi Road to Lai Chi Koi: Road, and eastbound traffic via Tong Mi Road and Prince

Edward Road to Lai Chi Kok Road.

Vehicles wishing to gain ac 'ess to premises on both sides of the closed section of Lai Chi Kok Road will have to use Cedar Street and Canton Road.

An urban clearway will bo introduced daily between 7.JO a.m. and

7 p.m. in Tong Mi Road between Lai Chi Kok Road and Prince Edward Road, and in Prince Edward Road between Tong Mi Road and Nathan Road to improve traffic circulation.

No motor vehicles, except franchised buses, will be allowed to wait on the clearway.

The existing westbound bus stop in Lai Chi Kok Road for KIIB routes 2 and 2A will be resited to Tong Mi Road, and the eastbound bus stop for routes 4A, 12, JO, j6B and 50 will be resited to Prince Edward Road.

Traffic signs will be posted to guide motorists.

--------0---------

/9........

Saturday, December 1, 1973

- 9 -

VISITS BY LADY MACLEHOSE

*««**«**

Two member agencies of the Community Chest in Kowloon will be visited by Lady MacLehose, the President of the Chest, on Tuesday morning (December 4).

Thay are the Yang Social Service Centre at Waterloo Road and the Hong Kong School for the Deaf at Hammer Hill Road.

On arrival at the Yang Social Service Centre, Lady MacLehose will be met by Dr. L.K. Ding, Chairman of the Centre’s Board, and Dr. Timothy Chow* the Secretary.

She will be taken on a tour of the facilities provided by the Centre* including the dental clinic, the day nursery, the family service centre and the field work training unit.

The Centre is sponsored by the Ward Memorial Methodist Church, and is named after Rev. Chester Yang who devoted his life to serving the needy people of Hong Kong. It has changed from a relief oriented centre in 19^4 to a sophisticated laboratory aiming to improve the qualify of life in Hong Kong.

The objectives of the Hong Kong School for the Deaf are to train deaf children to speak and lip-read Cantonese, and to provide a general education up to Form V standard. Vocational training is also provided.

Lady MacLehose will be received at the school by Miss K.E. Barker, supervisor and Chairman of the School Council; Miss Bow Siu-may, the Principal; and two teachers in charge, Miss K.Y. Ho and Miss K.K. Ip.

/She will

Saturday, December 1, 1973

- 10 -

She will see the various primary and secondary classes in progress. Courses offered include rhythm training, composition, typing, domestic science, individual speech and art.

Lady MacLehose will be accompanied on the visits by Miss Susan Hume, Social Secretary of Government House; and Mr. Colin Morrison, Executive Director of the Chest.

Note to Editors:. You are invited to have the visits covered. Two cars will leave the car park behind the Tsim Sha Tsui post office at 10 a.m. sharp on Tuesday to take the Press to the Yang Social Service Centre. Hiss Brigitta Wong, Administrative Assistant of the s Chest, will be on hand to assist Press representatives.

The Yang Social Service Centre is located at 5^ Waterloo Road, and the Hong Kong School for the Deaf at Hammer Hill Road on Diamond Hill.

-------0 - -

Saturday, December 1, 1973

- 11 -

CRCWN LAND SALE

******

Three lots of Crown land at Lai Chi Kok in Kowloon and at Aberdeen on Hong Kong Island will be put up for sale later this month*

The two lots in Kowloon are located between Lai Chi Kok Road and Cheung Sha Wan Road, and have been earmarked for industrial and/or godown purposes. They have a total area of more than 25,000 square feet»

The lot on Hong Kong Island is reserved for private residential development. It is situated at Black’s Link, and has an area of 47,000 square feet.

The auction will take place on Friday, December 28 at 2.30 pun* in the lecture room on the 8th floor of the City Hall High Block.

Full particulars and conditions of sale may be obtained from the Public Enquiry sub-office, Central Government Offices (west wing); or at the Crown Lands and Survey Office, Kowloon Government Offices, 405 Nathan Road.

-------0----------

Release time: 2.30 p.m.

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Monday, December 3, 1975

CONTENTS

No*

New Recreation Council gets down to work.......1

Alarming rise in measles recorded ................ ••••••••4

Temporary closure of Jackson Road in Central .................

Chai Wan fire victims to get new sites .................. 6 Astronomical guide for 1974 now on sale...................................................... ft Temporary water interruption in Yuen Long ................,8 Implementation of Community and Youth Officers scheme ....... 5 Castle Peale Hospital sports day on Wednesday .............. *10 Pre-war building in Lai Chi Kok declared dangerous »••••••••« 11

Daily guide to wholesale prices and supplies of basic food commodities ............................ .

Ittued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong. Tel: 5*233191

Monday, December 3, 1973

INAUGURAL MEETING OF THE COUNCIL FOR RECREATION AND SPORT *********

The Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, today described "recreation for everyone" as three simple works but ones which represent a vast problem "in the densely packed population of Hong Kong".

Sir Murray, who was speaking at the inaugural meeting of the newly formed Council for Recreation and Sport, said: "I do not underrate the challenge that confronts you."

In stressing the importance he attached to the Council’s work, he said that it represented something entirely new, although long advocated by some of its members: "Acceptance by the government that it has an obligation to try and ensure that there is recreation for everyone."

The Council for Recreation and Spurt was officially established last Thursday (November 29) under the chairmanship of the Secretary for Home Affairs.

The official members are the Secretary for Social Services, the .Secretary for the Environment, the Director of Urban Services, and the Deputy Financial Secretary. The unofficial members are Mr. A. de 0. Sales, Mr. K.C. Thorton, Mr. H.C. Ma, Mr. F.K. Hu and Mr. Wong Chung-cheun.

The terms of reference of the council are to ensure that facilities for recreation and sport in both the urban and rural areas are expanded, consistent with resources available, that their use is maximised and that facilities and services are provided appropriate to meet the leisure-time needs of young people.

/The following ••••••

Monday, December 3, 1973

2 -

The following is the full text of the Governor’s speech:

"This is your inaugural meeting. I asked to attend it for two reasons. Firstly I wish to thank you all for your public spirit in accepting appointment to this Council; secondly I wish to emphasise the importance I attach to your work. This is not just another advisory committee. It represents something which is entirely new, although long advocated by some of you. Acceptance by the Government that it has an obligation to try and ensure that there is recreation for everyone.

"Recreation for everyone’ are three simple words. With the great experience you all have of administration and social service you will realise what a vast problem these three words represent in the densely packed population of Hong Kong, and I assure you I do not undex*-rate the challenge that confronts you.

"In a recent speech to the Legislative Council I said that in the present circumstances of Hong Kong provision of facilities for recreation, leisure and sport had taken a new and urgent significance; that they were no longer luxuries but a part of our social infrastructure which we would neglect at our peril. I do ask you to take these words most seriously The need for imaginative and vigorous and coordinated action is as urgent as it is apparent.

"It is now up to you to advise the Government on what that action should be and I shall await this with the greatest interest.

”The field is vast, but as your terms of reference suggest, it can be broken down into different sectors. There are possibilities for making greater use of facilities already in existence, and to this is linked the expansion of supervisory services. Perhaps it is here that your quickest returns could be obtained. Then there is the possibility of expansion

of ......

Monday, December 3, 1973

- 3 -

of the facilities themselves. This is longer term, but obviously of the greatest importance. In the unique circumstances of Hong Kong I believe that here there is room for some original thinking. There is the possibility of assisting amateur sporting organisations not only to improve the quality of sport, but the number of people participating in it. Finally9 there are the immense opportunities for recreation offered by our mountains and beaches. Obviously these are closely connected with the programme of recreational development and nature conservation. Expanded use of the rural areas must be matched by expanded supervision and instruction to ensure the areas are not destroyed.

’Your terms of reference include the leisure-time needs of young people. Let us not forget that we have built the homes of Hong Kong in a form in which it is hard to obtain leisure in them. This social problem must be recognised and faced.

:,Much work is already being done in these fields by departments of Government, the voluntary agencies, and private organisations. I wish you all success in your task of co-ordination, expansion and innovation. I shall watch your progress with the greatest interest and, I must admit, some impatience and I do assure you of the strong support of qyself and the whole Government."

-------0---------

A.........

Monday, December 3, 1973

- 4 -

SERIOUS INCREASE IN INCIDENCE OF MEASLES

k

******

There were 112 notifications of measles during October, and one death, according to the monthly health returns issued by the Medical and Health Department today.

The figures brought the total of measles’ notifications so far this year to 714, with 12 deaths.

A spokesman for the department said the totals justified a warning to parents of the possibility of a measles epidemic this winter, and he urged them to take advantage of the second phase of the 1973 antimeasles vaccination campaign starting on December 3, and lasting one month, to have their children immunised.

’’Since measles’ immunisation was begun in Hong Kong in January, 1968, there has been a very great reduction in the nvuber of deaths from the disease, but even so, in the period between January 1968 and November 1973j 105 children have needlessly died from measles,” he commented.

With the use of measles vaccine, it had been hoped that the epidemics occurring every two years would be a thing of the past, but this seemed, according to a reading of the chart, not to be the case.

’’The biennial characteristic of the disease seems to be reappearing, and it is likely that an epidemic of measles could be developing, which could reach its maximum between January and April next year,” the spokesman said.

/In view .......

Monday, December 3, 1973

- 5 -

In view of this, he urged parents of susceptible children between six months and five years to bring them immediately to the nearest government maternal and child health centre for immunisation. The campaign period was "simply a time of added publicity emphasis, and free vaccine is available throughout the year."

Of the 99 deaths recorded during October, tuberculosis accounted for 98.

Three cases of malaria were notified, but the spokesman said all three were "imported" by visitors.

No local case of malaria had been recorded for the last five years, and the disease could be said to have been virtually eliminated from Hong Kong.

There were no reports of diphtheria, meningitis or poliomyelitis during October. The incidence of other communicable diseases showed no appreciable variation.

During the month, Hong Kong remained free from cholera and other quarantinable diseases.

-------0---------

TEMPORARY ROAD CLOSURE

* ♦ * ♦ ♦ «

Motorists are advised that Jackson Road, between Connaught Road Central and Chater Road, will be closed to vehicles between p.m. and 8.45 p.m. tomorrow (Tuesday).

No vehicles, other than those proceeding under police authority, will be allowed into the closed section. Traffic signs will be posted to guide motorists.

-------0--------- /5......................

Monday, December J, 1973

6

NEW SITES FOR CHAI WAN FIRE VICTIMS

*******

Victims of the squatter fire which broke out at Chai Wan early yesterday (Sunday) morning were helped today by staff of the Squatter Control Office (Hong Kong) to fill in applications for licenced area sites.

Earlier in the morning, they attended a site identification to establish their claims. A total of 35 families, comprising 153 people, turned up at the site.

Altogether 37 illegal structures, all of them not covered by the 1964 survey, were destroyed in Sunday’s fire.

Immediately after the outbreak, staff of the Housing and Social Welfare Departments rushed to the scene and registration of viotnms was completed at about 6 o’clock in the morning.

Six families, comprising 27 people who required temporary sheltered accommodation, were taken to the Queensway Transit Centre by transport provided by the Housing Department.

A spokesman for the Housing Department said it was the government’s policy to provide licenced area sites for the genuine fire victims who lived in illegal unsurveyed huts.

”In addition, they will be given cash grants from the Emergency Relief Fund at the new rate, which is not less than $1,330 a family,” he added.

/’’Arrangements

Monday, December 3, 1973

- 7 -

’’Arrangements for site allocation and distribution of cash allowances will be made as soon as final processing on the identity of the victims has been completed.”

Hie spokesman explained that the squatters were only entitled to resite accommodation because their huts were illegal and not covered by the general survey on squatter huts carried out in 1964.

’’Public housing is offered only to those living in structures recorded during the survey,” he explained.

-------0----------

Monday, December 3, 1973

- 8 -

NEW ASTRONOMICAL GUIDE NOV ON SALE

********

A new booklet of astronomical tables and star charts for Hong Kong are now on sale at $4*50 per copy.

Compiled by the Royal Observatory, it lists the astronomical events of 1974, times of sunrise and sunset, times of moonrise and moonset, phases, declinations, perigees and apogees of the moon, as well as information on the sun and the planets, and star charts for each month of 1974.

For those who are interested in the comet Kohoutek (1973F), the booklet contains a special table giving all available information on this comet and its predicted positions in the night sky between November 9, 1973 and February 22, 1974.

The booliet is available at the Government Publications Centre at the Star Ferry Concourse, Hong Kong; the Government Printing Department; and from the Royal Observatory, Nathan Road, Kowloon.

Copies may also be ordered through leading bookstores.

-------0---------

WATER CUT

*****

Water supply to a number of premises in Yuen Long will be interrupted for eight hours from 10 p.m. tomorrow (Tuesday) to facilitate a water mains connection at Castle Peak Road near Shun Fung Wai, Yuen Long.

Premises along Castle Peak Road from San Hing Tsuen to Shun Fung Wai will be affected, including Lam Tei Area.

/9.........

0 - -

Monday, December 3, 1973

- 9 -

COI3IUNITY AND YOUTH OFFICERS SCHEME PRESS CONFERENCE ******

Note to Editors: The Social Welfare Department will be

implementing the new Community and Youth Officers Scheme on Wednesday (December 5)•

A press conference will be held that day by Mr. Thomas C.Y. Lee, Deputy Director of Social Welfare, to announce details of this scheme and to introduce the first Community and Youth Officers being appointed.

Also present will be Mr. Peter Ng, City District Commissioner, Hong Kong Island, representing the Home Affairs Department and Mr. J.S. Warren, District Officer (Tsuen Wan), representing the New Territories Administration, the two departments with which the coiranunity and youth officers will be working closely.

The press conference will be held at 3<50 p.m. in the 35 mm cinema of the Government Information Services on the 5th floor of Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.

You are invited .to. have it covered.

-------0----------

/10........

Monday, December 3, 1973

- 10 -

CASTLE PEAK HOSPITAL SPORTS DAY

The annual sports and fete of the Castle Peak Hospital will be held on Wednesday (December 5)• About 1,000 patients and staff will participate in the affair , to be held in the sports ground of the hospital beginning at 10 a.m.

More than 100 patients, doctors, nurses, and other staff have entered for the various competitive events, including what promises to be the most interesting, a tug-of-war involving evenly-assembled groups.

The band of the Gurkha Regiment stationed in the area of the hospital will add colour to the day by providing a concert. Members of the forces have always supported the hospital on festive occasions.

"The sports day and fete are eagerly looked forward to by the patients," a hospital spokesman said. "From the staff’s point of view, the events have great social and therapeutic value."

Dr. Q.H. Choa, Director of Medical and Health Services, will attend and distribute prizes to winners.

Note to Editors: You are invited to have the occasion covered.

-------0---------

*

Monday, December 3, 1973

- 11 -

DANGEROUS BUILDING

******

A three-storey pre-war building at No. 97 Lai Chi Kok Road in Kowloon was today declared to be in a dangerous condition by the Building; Authority.

The Principal Government Building Surveyor said a detailed inspection of the building had revealed serious deterioration of reinforced concrete members in positions where further decay could lead to a failure. Major repairs, he said, were considered impractical.

In addition, some movement in the party walls was noted.

A notice of intention to apply for a closure order was posted on the building today. Die application will be heard in Kowloon District Court on February 5 at 9 a.m.

-------0---------

/12.......

Monday, December J, 1973

- 12 -

CONSUMER ADVISOR! SERVICE

Daily Guide To Wholesale Market Prices And Supplies

********

The following prices were realised today (Monday) at sales

under the Rice Control Scheme and at the Vegetable Marketing Organisation Wholesale Market and the Fish Marketing Organisation Wholesale Market at

Cheung Sha Wan, Kowloon:

Supplies and Wholesale Prices of Rice

Grade Availability of Supply Wholesale Price (S/catty)

China Rice Average

SK Mew- Old Cr°P Good 1.64

- new crop 1.72

S.C. Jien - old crop Good 1.58

Po Ngai Good 1.42

Chu Cho Thai Rice Good 1.22

10a' Whole Good 1.52

1015% Brokens Good 1.50

A1 Super Extra Good 1.45

A1 Super Good 1.37

Whole Glutinous Scarce 1.52

U.S, Rice Good 1.62

Australian Rice Good 1.52

Pakistan Rice Good No Sale

Taiwan Rice Good No Sale

Supplies and Wholesale Prices pf Marine Fish

Availability Wholesale Price

Species of Supply (3/catty) High Low Average

Golden Thread Good 4.2 2.8 5.5

Big-Ryes Good 2.5 0.65 1.5 /Squid *••••••

Monday, December J, 1973

- 13 -

Species Availability of Supply Wholesale Price (3/catty)

High Low Average

Squid Normal 6.0 2.0 4.5

Haia>-Tails Good 2.4 1.2 1.9

Lizard Fishes Limited 3.1 1.1 2.0

Croakers Good 1.85 1.2 1.5

Conger-Pike-Bols . Normal 2.6 2.3 2.4

Melon Coat Normal 2.2 1.5 1.8

Breams Scarce 6.0 3.0 4.0

Yellow Belly , Limited 1.5 0.9 1.3

Mackerels Limited 4.0 3.0 3.5

Red Goat Fish Scarce 3.2 0.8 2.0

Fork-Tail • —- • Scarce 1.6 1.0 1.2

Horse-Mead Good 5.5 3.3 4.0

Melon Seed Limited 2.6 1.4 2.4

Pomfrets Scarce • •• 8.5 7.0 7.5

Garoupas Limited 6.8 5.7 6.5

Yellow Croaker Limited 5.0 3-3 4.5

Supplies and Wholesale Prices of

Locally Produced Vegetables

Type Availability of Supply Wholesale Price (S/catty)

Flowering cabbage Normal High 7786 Low oTSo Average 1.40

White cabbage Good 0.35 0,08 0.28

Chinese lettuce Good 0.45 0.10 0.30

/Chinese kale

Monday, December J, 1973

- 14 -

Type Availability of Supply Wholesale Price ($/catty)

High Low Average

Chinese kale Normal 1.00 0.35 0.70

Spring onion Normal 1.20 0.30 0.80

Spinach Normal 1.20 o.4o 0.70

Water cress Normal 1.20 0.40 0.80

Leaf mustard cabbage Scarce 0.50 0.20 0.55

Tomato Scarce 2.20 1.4o 1.80

Supplies and Wholesale Prices of Pork (Live weight)

Availability of Supply

Wholesale Price (S/picul)

Pork

Good

285

-------0---------

Release time: 7*^5 P«m

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Tuesday, December 4, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No».

New scheme to improve traffic in Central from Sunday •••«««• 1

Further advance payments for Lamma fish farmers for losses following oil spillage ..............................••.••••• J

Fireboat 1Alexander Grantham* still going strong after 20 years of service .......................................• •••« 4

New centre for AMS sub-unit on Lant< ..........................  6

More than 100 new building plans approved in October ••••••. T

Factory visit by Acting Director of Commerce and Industry •• 8

Daily guide to wholesale prices and supplies of basic food stuffs .....................• •................................  9

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong. Tel: 5-233191

Tuesday, December 4, 1973

; - 1 -

FIRST STAGE OF CENTRAL DISTRICT TRAFFIC SCHEME STARTS SUNDAY *******

Hie Commissioner for Transport announced today that the first stage of a scheme for improving traffic flow in Central District will be introduced on Sunday (December 9).

The first stage will be a relatively minor one, with public light buses prohibited from entering Gilman Street (between Connaught Road Central and Des Voeux Road Central) and the section of Wing Wo Street, between Connaught Road Central and Des Voeux Road Central.

At the same time, a new public light bus stand will be opened at the Jubilee Street Ferry Concourse, capable of holding 20 minibuses. Hiis new off-street terminal is expected to prove convenient to intending passengers and will at the same time ensure that public light buses do not pick up passengers in congested side streets.

The second stage of the traffic scheme is due to be introduced on January 6, 197^> when public light buses will be prohibited form entering Des Voeux Road Central in either direction between Redder Street and Morrison Street, and westbound along Des Voeux Road Central between Jackson Road, and Redder Street. At the same time, a second PLB stand will be opened to the east of the Central Bus Station, with PLB stops provided in both Wellington Street and Stanley Street.

Also in the second stage, the traffic routing in Queen Victoria Street and Jubilee Street is likely to be reversed and public light buses will be prohibited from entering Pottinger Street.

/Early next........ •

Tuesday, December 4, 1973

- 2 -

Early next year, it is proposed to introduce a ban on all goods vehicle loading/unloading in Central during the peak hours of 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. to 7

The purpose of the scheme is to keep traffic moving along the congested roads of Central District, whilst at the same time ensuring that adequate and convenient pick-up points are available for public light bus passengers.

- 0 - -

Tuesday, December 4, 1973

- 3 -

SECOND ADVANCE PAYMENTS TO LAMMA FISH FARMERS

****** /

Further advance payments will be made by the Government to fish farmers in Sok Kwu Wan, Lamma,for losses of fish suffered by them following last month’s Shell oil spillage.

The payments will be made at the South Lamma Rural Conraittee Office at Sok Kwu Wan between 11 a.m. and 5 p*m. on Thursday (December 6) and between 11 a.m* and 1 p.m. on Friday (December 7)• Those farmers who have not yet collected their first payment may do so at the same time*

A spokesman for the New Territories Administration sand today (Tuesday) that the payments would be made on the same basis as those made r 10 days ago - that is to say, against further losses established by the Agriculture and Fisheries Department in conjunction with the staff of the District Office, Islands.

’• Although it is considered that the Government is under no obligation to make any payments in respect of the oil spillage, it has been decided to make these payments to relieve the hardship which has occurred," he stressed.

-------0---------

Tuesday, December 4, 1975

- 4 -

TWENTY HECTIC YEARS OF SERVICE : AND STILL GOING STRONG ******

The Fireboat ’Alexander Grantham’ — one of the largest of its kind in the world — enters her 20th year of service with the Fire Services this year.

Built in Hong Kong in 1955, the 551-ton vessel is still going strong and has recently returned to active service with a new lease of life after extensive refitting at the Government Dockyard.

. _ During her colourful career, the ’A.G.’ — as she is affectionately known in the service — has played a leading role in a diversity of rescue •perations in such incidents as ship fires, aircraft crashes, oil pollution and land fires, the latter by supplying large quantities of sea water throu^i her powerful pumps to the scene of fire.

Among the more notable incidents she attended to were a fire involving the s.s. Ala in 195&, a fire at Kowloon Bay in 19^0, an aircrash in Kowloon Bay in 19^7, fires involving the tanker Cerberus and the USS Coastal Sentry in a shipbrealdlng yard in Hang Hau in 19^8, a blaze on board the s.s. Eastern Star in Kowloon Bay in 1969, and the Jumbo Floating Restaurant fire in Aberdeen the year before last.

She also escorted the liner Seawise University into Hong Kong Harbour for refitting in July 1971 and, half a year later, took part in the battle to save her from her tragic destruction.

Though the A.G’s complement of one fire officer and 15 men normally expects arduous and often dangerous work, life is not always grim and on many occasions she has joined in the festive spirit by putting up spectacular water displays for the enjoyment of her crew and the public.

/Currently, .......

Tuesday,,December 1975

- 5 -

Currently, she is taking part in the Fire Prevention Campaign.

For those interested in technical detail a, the 1Alexander Grantham1 is of J51 gross tons with a draft of 10# feet. Her normal speed is 11.7 knots with a fuel consumption of 26 gallons of dieseline per hour when fully loaded.

In addition to an array of fire-fighting equipment, she has a hydraulic rescue and water tower with a platform which can be raised 60 feet above sea level. A 20*»foot motor boat is carried along for use when the fireboat is anchored offshore for rescue work.

Note to Editors: Copies of a photograph of the ’Alexander

Grantham’ are boxed for collection.

-------0---------

Tuesday, December 4, 1973

NEW TRAINING CENTRE FOR AMS SUB-UNIT

********

Hie Auxiliary Medical Service sub-unit at Tung Chung on Lantau Island will soon have its own training and operational centre thanks to the Rotary Club of Kowloon West which donated 553,000 for the project*

The two-storey centre, now being built in the vicinity of

Tung Chung Road near Tung Chung Fort, will provide space for a lecture room, a duty room and a dormitory for members of the sub-unit on typhoon and emergency duties.

At present, members of the Tung.Chung AMS sub-unit, totalling 60 men and women, make temporary use of the Tung Chung Public School for training and operational purposes.

The centre will have a garage for the sub-unit1s new landrover type ambulance which was also donated by the Rotary Club.

-------0---------

/7.......

Tuesday, December 4, 1973

- 7 -

NEV/ BUILDING PLANS APPROVED

A total of 102 new building plans were approved by-the But 1dings Ordinance Office in October this year, compared with 79 in the same month last year.

Most of the plans submitted were for multi-storey apartment/ commercial buildings with 57 of them to be located on Hong Kong Tsi and, 14 in Kowloon and 31 in the Nev/ Territories •

These included a 29-storey apartment/commercial building in Caine Road on the Island, one of 23 storeys in Soy Street in Kowloon and one of 21 storeys in Po Kong Village Road, San Po Kong.

In the same month, 38 completed buildings were certified for occupation. Hie total declared costs of these buildings was over $52 million.

The Office also approved work to start on 57 new building projects, including a club house for the Hong Kong Cricket Club in Wongneiohong Gap Road.

/8.........

Tuesday, December 4, 1975

- 8 -

FACTORY VISITS BY MR. MCGREGOR

Note to Editors: The acting Director of Commerce and

Industry, Mr. J.D. McGregor, will pay familiarisation visits to two factories in Kwun Tong on Thursday (December 6).

He will be accompanied by Mr. K.H. Yeung, Principal Trade Officer of the Industrial Development Branch.

They will first call at Colex Ltd. in Tak Sing Industrial Building, 28A Hung To Road, 11th floor, Kwun Tong, before proceeding to Texwood Ltd., 18? Wai Yip Street, Kwun Tong. Colex Ltd. manufactures electronic calculators while Texwood specialises in ready-to-wear garments.

You are invited to have the visits covered.

The visiting party will arrive at Colex Ltd. at 9.45 a.m. and will stay for about 90 minutes. They will be at Texwood Ltd. at about 11.30 a.m.

/9........

Tuesday, December 4, 1973

- 9 -

CONSUMER ADVISORY SERVICE

Daily Guide To Wholesale Market Prices And Supplies

The following prices were realised today (Tuesday) at sales under the Rioe Control Scheme and at the Vegetable Marketing Organisation Wholesale Market and the Fish Marketing Organisation Wholesale Market at Cheung Sha Wan, Kowloon:

Supplies and Wholesale Prices of Rice

J Grade Availability of Supply Wholesale Price (8/catty)

China Rice Average

See Mew ~ old croP Good 1.64

- new crop 1.72

S.C.Jien old crop Good 1.58

Po Ngai Good 1.42

Qiu Clio Good 1.22

Thai Rice 100% Whole Good 1.52

10-15% Brokens Good 1.50

A1 Super Extra Good 1.45

A1 Super Good 1.37

Whole Glutinous Scarce 1.52

Rice Good 1.62

Australian Rice Good No Sale

Pakistan Rice Good No Sale

Taiwan Rice Good No Sale

Supplies and Wholesale Prices of Marine Fish

Species Availability of Supply Wholesale Price (8/Catty)

High Low Average

Golden Thread Good 4.0 2.6 3.4

Big-Eyes Good 2.6 0.6 1.5 /Squid

Tuesday, December 4, 1973

10

Availability Wholesale Price

Species of Supply (3/catty)

High Low Average

Squid Limited 5-2 1.7 3.8

Hair-Tails Good 1.8 1.0 1.5

Lizard Fishes Normal 2.7 0.9 1.7

Croakers Normal 1.5 0.5 1.0

Conger-Pike-Eels Normal 2.7 1.5 1.8

Melon Coat Normal 2.2 1.2 1.7

Breams Scarce 5.2 2.5 4.0

Yellow Belly Normal 1.4 0.7 1.15

Mackerels Good 4.2 2.6 3.0

Red Goat Fish Good 2.3 0.55 1.1

Fork-Tail Normal 1.3 0.7 1.0

Horse-Head Normal 5.8 2.0 3.8

Melon Seed Limited 3.2 2.0 2.4

Pomfrets Scarce 8.0 6.5 7.5

Garoupas Scarce 8.2 6.0 7.0

Yellow Croaker Normal 4.5 1.8 3.0

Supplies and Wholesale Prices of

Locally Produced Vegetables

Type Availability Wholesale Price

of Supply (3/catty)

High Low Average

Flowering cabbage Limited 2.00 0.80 1.60

White cabbage Good 0.40 0.08 0.30

Chinese lettuce Good 0.45 0.12 0.30

/Chinese kale

Tuesday, December 4, 1973

- 11 -

'.type Availability of Supply Wholesale Price

High (8/catty)

Low Average

Chinese kale Normal 1.00 0.50 0.70

Spring onion Normal 1.40 0.50 o.8o

Spinach Normal 1.20 0.40 o.8o

Water cress Normal 1.50 0.50 0.90

Leaf mustard cabbage Scarce 0.50 0.20 0.50

Tomato Scarce 2.20 1.20 1.80

Supplies and Wholesale Prices of Pork (Live weight)

Availability Wholesale Price

of Supply (8/picul)

(Average)

Pork Good 285

--------©

Release time; 7«0Q

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Wednesday, December 1973

CONTENTS

Page Not.

Six Community and Youth Officers appointed ................• 1

Contractors urged to help prevent accidents on building sites............................ •......................  • 3

Temporary water cut in Shamshuipo............................  5

”No stopping” marks being introduced this week............• • 6

More workers get paid holidays under new provisions.......«• 7

Governor and Lady MacLehose on two-day informal visit to Macau ........• •..........................................„ 8

AMS band to give Christmas concerts in hospitals.............. 9

Two pre-war buildings in Central declared dangerous ......... 10

Governor will inspect Prisons Department’s annual parade on

Friday ....................................................   11

Daily guide to wholesale prices and supplies of basic food commodities ...............................................   12

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong. Tel: 5-233191

Wednesday, December 1973

- 1 -

CaH-IUI'llTY & YOUTH OFFICERS SCHEME ESTABLISHED

*********

The Social Welfare Department formally established the Community and Youth Officers Scheme today (Wednesday) with the appointment of six officers to work at the district level in different areas of Hong Kong Island, Kowloon, and the New Territories.

The six community and youth officers appointed are Mr. Lam Kwok-wan for Eastern District, Mr. Lam Hark-chee for Wanchai, Mr. Lai Cham-kan for Western on Hong Kong Island; Mr. Yeung Wai-tsang for Yaumatei, Mr. Chan Chap-yun for Shamshuipo in Kowloon and Mr. Fung Ka-ching for Tsuen Wan in the New Territories.

Announcing their appointments at a press conference today, Mr. Thomas C.Y. Lee, Deputy Director of the Social Welfare Department said the idea of working with communities or neighbours is not new to the Department.

’’Since 19&0, the Group and Community Work Division of the Department has been doing community work through its community and social centres.

The Community and Youth Officers Scheme is an extension of the department’s community work in urban and rural areas.

”We are starting off with six districts first. The other five urban districts will have CYOs appointed in February and the other four rural districts in July next year.

Nr. Lee said this Scheme was the result of an experiment which the Social Welfare Department started in 19$9 known as the District Community Officer Scheme.

V /”The aim ••••••

Wednesday, December 5, 1973

- 2 -

’The aim of community and youth work is the development of a more integrated and better community with the help of the social worker and the maximum participation of the people themselves as well as the development of youth to become more civic-minded and contributing members of the community/1 he said.

He explained the main functions of the Community and Youth Officer will be to establish a wider and closer contact with groups and organisations in the districts, and to involve .them in the development of welfare programmes and activities, such as community recreation, community service and volunteers to meet the changing needs of different communities or districts.

TFThe Community and Youth Officer is a trained social worker and as such will have the know-how to involve the community in developing or bringing about such programmes and activities."

He noted that the work of the community and youth officer will be closely related to that of the City District Officer and the District Officer in the Hew Territories.

,!In fact, they will work as a team," he said.

Being a social worker, Mr. Lee pointed out, the CYO will be able to provide the City District Officer and the District Officer with the necessary expertise in the initiation and organisation of community activities. He believed the Community and Youth Officers Scheme would be a valuable addition to the work of the district as a whole.

Note to Editors: Photographs of the newly appointed community

and youth officers are boxed for collection.

0 - -

Wednesday, December 5? 1973

- 3 -

THIRTY DIE ON BUILDING SITES THIS YEAR

Apathy Towards Safety Precautions Criticised J «*«**«#*

The number of accidents on Hong Kong construction sites leapt by 70 per cent in October, bringing the monthly toll to three dead and 509 injured.

So far this year, accidents on construction sites have claimed 30 lives and injured 31653 workers. A very large number of the injured have been crippled for life.

The Commissioner of Labour, Mr. I.R. Price, said today that in the past 10 years there had been more than 28,000 accidents in the construction industry; and these accounted for one fifth of all accidents at work during the same period.

,rUnless building contractors and their workers appreciate tho^r magnitude of the problem, and urgently take remedial measures, the situation will continue to get worse,” he warned.

Mr. Price stressed he was not talking about statistics, but of human lives and suffering.

IJThe tragedy is that nearly all of these accidents could have been avoided if proper safety precautions had been taken," he added.

About 60 per cent of the accidents were due to persons or objects falling from heights, misuse of handtools, incorrect manual lifting and handling, and tripping over objects.

Mr. Price urged management and workers in the construction industry to visit the department’s Industrial Safety Exhibition at the CMA Fair beginning on Tuesday, December 11.

/The exhibition ••••..

Wednesday, December 5 7 1973

- 4 -

The exhibition - the first of its kind in South East Asia -includes a special section on safety in the construction industry, and illustrates, among other items, the new safety regulations for the industry which will come into force on May 1, 1974. Copies of a guide to these regulations will also be available free of charge.

The exhibition, which will last for the whole period of the CHA Fair from December 11 to January 9 will also illustrate by actual demonstrations, films, and workshop settings, work hazards in a wide range of other industries, and the measures required to counter them. ”Die exhibition is a must for every employer, manager, supervisor and worker1’, Mr. Price said.

The Commissioner said the exhibition was supported by other government departments, various employers’ organisations, and individual industrial establishments. ’’The willingness of so many employers to join forces with the government in staging this exhibition clearly indicates that there is an awareness on the part of management that it needs to play a greater part in promoting work safety.

’’And the success of the fight against accidents at work depends on the growth of this support,” he said.

Mr. Price added that the Labour Department's Industrial Safety Training Centre had recently organised a number of courses specifically designed to explain the requirements of the new building safety regulations.

’’These courses are free of charge, and any contractor who has not yet applied for places should do so without delay,” he said.

/”So far ••••••.

*

Wednesday, December 1973 - 5 -

”So far only 38 out of the 1,600 registered contractors have come forward to take part in the courses.

"This indicates an irresponsible and frightening apathy by those who should be most concerned for their worker’s safety.

"Officers from a recently-formed unit of the factory inspectorates are already visiting construction sites to. offer advice as to how contractors can meet quickly the higher standards of safety required by the new regulations when they become effective on May 1, 1974.”

-------0---------

WATER CUT

******

Water supply to a number of premises in Sham Shui Po will be interrupted for five hours from 1 a.m. on Friday (December 7) to facilitate a test for leakage.

The area affected is bounded by Kiu Kiang Street, Po On Road, Pratas Street, Castle Peak Road, Tonkin Street, Fuk Wing Street, Camp Street and Cheung Sha Wan Road, including Shamshuipo Barracks Mechanical Workshop.

-------0----------

/6........

Wednesday, December 5i 1973

- 6 -

»'JC STOPPING1 KERB MARKINGS BEING INTRODUCED

**********

*Ho stopping* markings in bright yellow will be painted along the kerbside of bus and tram stops to make it clear that only franchised buses and trams may stop within the marked area.

The markings will extend about 50 feet on both sides of the bus and tram stops«

The first *no stopping* markings will be introduced on Friday (December 7) along Hennessy Road on Hong Kong Island, and along Taipo Road and Castle Peak Road in Kowloon.

A spokesman for the Transport Department said that the main purpose of the measure was ±o ensure that bus and tram stops were free of parked vehicles«

This will enable the buses to pull into their stops unhindered.

He reminded motorists that it is an offence under the Road Traffic (Paricing and Waiting) Regulations to park or wait on a road within 50 feet of a designated bus or tram stop.

He said that very often vehicles could be seen parked on the approaches to bus stops, making it difficult or impossible for buses to pull into the stops.

As a result, buses were forced to pick up or set down passengers in the middle of the road, thus causing obstruction to following vehicles and inconveniencing and placing passengers at risk.

The new measure should be able to eliminate all these, the spokesman said.

-------0---------

/?........

Wednesday, December 5, 1973

- 7 -

I-IOIE WORKERS ENTITLED TO PAID HOLIDAYS

*******

A leaflet explaining new provisions under which more amploy^QS will be entitled to paid holidays has been prepared by the Labour Department.

The new provisions, which come into effect on January 1, 1974, apply to all manual workers irrespective of earnings and to those non-manual workers earning 31,500 a month or less and who have worked continuously for their employer at least three months before a statutory holiday.

These are: Lunar New Year’s day; the second day of Lunar New Year; Ching Ming Festival; Tuen Ng (Dragon Boat) Festival; the day following the Chinese Mid-Autumn Festival; and the first day of January.

Under the new provisions, restaurant workers and shop assistants will enjoy the same benefits as industrial workers. Previously, the benefits applied only to manual workers and non-manual workers in industry with a monthly earning of up to 8700 and who had been with their employer for more than six months.

An employer may give his employee an alternative holiday before or after a statutory holiday, provided he gives sufficient notice and the employee agrees.

Details of these arrangements are explained in the leaflet which also sets out the methods of calculating the rate of holiday pay, and payment.

Employers who fail to grant their employees any holiday or the holiday pay due will be liable to a fine of 35»000 on conviction.

Copies of the leaflet, in both English and Chinese, are available free of charge from the Labour Department’s branch offices, City District Offices and District Offices of the New Territories Administration.

-------0---------

/8........

•4

Wednesday, December 1973

- 8 -

GOVERNOR LEAVES FOR MACAU

******

The Governor and Lady MacLehose left this (Wednesday) morning for Macau on an informal visit as guests of the Governor of Macau and Madame Nobre de Carvalho.

. I

They were accompanied by the Aide-de-Camp, Mr. P.A. Barkley and the Political Adviser, Mr. R.J. Stratton.

Travelling with the party on board the hydrofoil, the Flying Sandpiper, was the Portuguese Consul General in Hong Kong, Mr. C.A. Simoes Coelho, and Mrs. Coelho.

Sir Murray and Lady MacLehose will spend the day visiting places of interest in Macau.

This evening, they will attend a dinner at the Governor*s residence.

Before returning to Hong Kong tomorrow (Thursday) afternoon, the Governor and Lady MacLehose will pay a visit to Taipa and Coloane Islands.

Note to Editors: A photograph taken before the departure of

the Governor and Lady MacLehose will be distributed separately in the G.I.S. press boxes this evening.

-------0----------

/9........

Wednesday, December 5, 197 J

- 9 -

CHRISTMAS CHEER AT HOSPITALS

*««*»***

The band of the Auxiliary Medical Service will bring Christmas cheer to several hospitals in a series of yuletide concerts beginning on December 15•

it[le do this every year in response to requests, and we find that the patients and staff look forward eagerly to this break from routine,” says Major G.F. Doggett, Medical Defence Staff Officer.

f,The programmes blend well-known selections with a sprinkling of carols and some pop, because we find that we have to please all tastes."

Major Doggett says the AMS band is composed of 50 members, who train regularly, and who have a personal interest in music. They take part in numerous ceremonial occasions, and are always in demand<

.the first concert this season will be given in the Ruttonjee Sanatorium and St. Paul’s Hospital on Saturday, December 15, beginning at 10.50 a.m. and 5 p*m. respectively.

On December 19, the venues will be the Queen Elizabeth Hospital in the morning, and the Kwong Wah Hospital in the afternoon.

The lost concert will be for the benefit of patients and staff at the Grantham Hospital on December 21, at 12.50 p.m.

Note to Editors: You are invited to have these concerts

covered• --------------------0---------

/10........

Wednesday, December 5, *1973

- 10 -

TWO PRE-WAR BUILDINGS IN CENTRAL CONDEMNED ♦*♦*

The Building Authority today declared Nos. 115 and 117 Wing Lok Street, in Central District, to be in a dangerous condition, and No. 115 liable to become dangerous.

In a statement, the Principal Government Building Surveyor said that these three-storey pre-war buildings were recently inspected in detail following the discovery of defects in No. 117 which had been under observation for some time.

’’This inspection revealed a total failure of the rear portion of the party wall between Nos. 115 and 117 in the ground floor. It is considered that there is imminent danger of collapse of this portion,” he said.

Serious fracturing and fresh movement in the front and rear walls of No. 117 was also observed together with many defective timbers, he added.

’’The condition of the party wall between Nos. 115 and 115 is also such that there is risk of failure leading to collapse of No. 115 during the demolition of No. 115.”

Notices of intention to apply for Closure Orders in Victoria District Court at 9*30 a.m. on December 15 were posted today.

-------0---------

Wednesday, December 5> 1975

- 11 -

PRISONS DEPARTMENT ANNUAL PARADE

* ♦ ♦ * * ♦

Note to Editors: The Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, will

inspect the annuil parade of the Prisons Department on Friday (December ?).

Ten contingents comprising about 230 men from various prisons and centres of the department will take part in the parade.

The Governor will present Colonial Prison Service Medals and Clasps to 17 officers.

Lady MacLehose will also attend the ceremony which begins at 4 .,45 p®m. on the parade ground of the department’s Staff Training Institute in Stanley.

Members of the press are invited to cover the event. Transport will be provided. A car will leave Queen’s Pier at 3-50 p.m. for Stanley.

Reporters and photographers assigned to cover the occasion are advised that no one will be allowed to enter the parade area after 4.55 p.m®

-------0---------

/12

Wednesday, December 5, 197J

- 12

CONSUMER ADVISORY SERVICE

Daily Guide To Wholesale Market Prices And Supplies-

*****>»

The following prices were realised today (Wednesday) at sales under the Rice Control Scheme and at the Vegetable Marketing Organination Wholesale Market and the Fish Marketing Organisation Wholesale Market at Cheung Sha Wan, Kowloon:

Supplies and Wholesale Prices of Rice

Grade Availability of Supply Wholesale Price (S/catty)

China Rice Average

See Mew “ old OTOP Good 1.64

- new crop 1.72

S.C.Jien - old crop Good 1.58

Po Ngai Good 1.42

Chu Clio Good 1.22

Thai Rice 10C^ Whole Good 1.52

10-15# Brokens Good 1.50

A1 Super Extra Good 1.45

A1 Super Good 1.37

Whole Glutinous Scarce 1.52

U.S, Rice Good 1.62

Australian Rioe Good 1.52

Pakistan Rice Good

Taiwan Rice Good

/Supplies and

Wednesday, December 5, 1973

- 13 -

Supplies and Wholesale Prices of Marine Fish

Species Availability of Supply Wholesale Price (8/catty)

High Low Average

Golden Thread Good 4.0 2.5 3.3

Big-Eyes Good 2.5 0.65 1.6

Squid Limited 5.3 2.5 4.2

Hair-Tails Good 1.6 0.9 1.3

Lizard Fishes Normal 2.5 0.7 1.5

Croakers Normal 1.4 0.8 1.2

Conger-Pike-Eels Normal 2.3 1.8 2.0

Melon Coat Limited 2.0 1.0 1.8

Breams Normal 4.5 2.8 3.5

Yellow Belly Limited 2.2 0.7 1.5

Mackerels Good 3.3 2.1 2.8

Ped Goat Fish Normal 2.9 0.6 1.5

Fork-Tail Normal 1.5 0.8 1.0

Horse-^Head Normal 5.5 3.0 3.8

Melon Seed Normal 2.8 1.8 2.0

Pomfrets Scarce 8.0 6.0 7.0

Garoupas Normal 6.8 4.0 6.5

Yellow Croaker Good 4.8 2.1 2.8

/Supplies and

Wednesday, December 5i 1973

1A

Supplies and Wholesale Prices of

Locally Produced Vegetables

Type, Availability of Supply Wholesale Price

High ($/catty)

Low Average

Flowering cabbage Limited 2.2 1.0 1.6

White cabbage Normal 0.6 0.15 0.45

Chinese Lettuce Normal 0.5 0.15 0.4

Chinese Kale Normal 1.0 0.3 0.7

Spring onion Normal 1.4 0.4 1.0

Spinach Normal 1.3 0.6 1.0

Water cress Normal 1.2 0.3 0.8

Leaf mustard cabbage Scarce 0.5 0.2 0.3

Tomato Scarce 2.2 1.4 1.8

Supplies and Wholesale Prices of Pork (Live weight)

Availability of Supply Wholesale Price ( 8/ picul) (Average)

Pork Good 285

-------0---------

Pveleque time: 7*3°

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Thursday, December 64 1973

CONTENTS • » •

Pilot tunnel for soil investigation to help in design of Aberdeen Tunnel ...................................  1

Director of Oil Supplies to meet media representatives tomorrow  .......................................... J

Governor opens United Christian Hospital in Kwun Tong •. •.. 4

Deadline for public comment on Education green paper extended ........................................... 7

Call for voluntary student contributions to maintain Anti-TB ward  ........................................... 8

Survey on employment situation in local manufacturing industry  .........................................  9

Eighty-two apprentices to sign contracts with KMB.. 10

Daily guide to wholesale prices and supplies of basic food commodities......   • ............................ 11

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong. Tel: 5-233191


Thursday, December 6, 1973

- 1 -

WORK BEGINS ON DESIGN OF ABERDEEN TUNNEL

Soil Investigation To Be Carried Out Shortly

********

A pilot tunnel is to be driven shortly along the line of the proposed Aberdeen Tunnel to investigate the sub-strata properties and to measure the rock behaviour.

This will help to determine the nature and distribution of stresses within the rock so that an economic design of temporary support systems and permanent lining may be produced.

It will also enable prospective contractors for the main work to examine visually the nature of tunnelling conditions involved before submitting tenders.

A spokesman for the Public Works Department said today that the pilot tunnel would be about five feet wide and eight feet high and would be driven into the hillsides from both ends at Happy Valley within the Colonial Cemetery and Wong Chuk Hang.

The work, expected to begin in January next year will take six to nine months to complete.

The spokesman said: ”A certain amount of geological investigations, sufficient to determine the optimum general alignment of the tunnel and to prove its feasibility, has been carried out.” In the meantime, consulting engineers have begun work on the detailed design of the tunnel.

Construction of the 6,000-foot long twin tube foui^-lane tunnel is expected to begin in 1975- It will run from a point within the Colonial Cemetery in Happy Valley to the Wong Chuk Hang area near Aberdeen.

/Access from ......

Thursday, December 6, 1973

- 2 -

Access from the north will be by means of a dual two-lane elevated extension to the existing Canal Road flyover, passing along the line of Morrison Hill and Wongneichong Road to the north portal. This will provide rapid and convenient access to Waterfront Road and the Cross-Harbour Tunnel.

In the south, a grade separated interchange will link the tunnel approaches to the existing Wong Chuk Hang Road which will be widened to dual three-lane carriageways.

Provision will also be made for suitable access to future facilities planned for the area such as an oceanarium and to a possible new government stadium.

The tunnel and southern approaches are expected to cost about 8185 million. In addition, the elevated link in the north to the Caral Road flyover will cost some 370 million. This amount includes funds for considerable ground level improvements to the congested road junctions in the area.

"With the rapid expansion of industrial and housing development at Aberdeen, the need for providing a high capacity road link connecting Aberdeen to the north side of Hong Kong Island is becoming more apparent," the spokesman said.

"The proposed Aberdeen Tunnel will, on completion, not only greatly reduce the travelling time but also help relieve traffic congestion on the narrow and winding Pokfulam Road in the west and Stubbs Road and Repulse Bay Road in the east.”

/He pointed .....

Thursday, December 6, 1973

- 3 -

Ho pointed out that while Aberdeen Tunnel was a long-tern answer to the traffic problem between Aberdeen and the urban areas, it ’would talze at least five years to materialise.

To solve the immediate traffic problem, he said, improvements were being carried out in various sections of Pokfulam Road.

-------0----------

PRESS CONFERENCE BY MR. PORTER

********

Note to Editors: Mr. Roy Porter, the Director of Oil

Supplies, will be holding a press conference in the 35 nun Cinema in Beaconsfield Houset 5th floor at 11 a.m. tomorrow, Friday (December '?) •

Members of the Press, Radio and Television

are invited to attend.

-------0----------

Thursday, December 6, 1973

- 4 -

GOVERNOR OPENS NEW HOSPITAL IN KWUN TONG

********

Residents of Kwun Tong and New Kowloon will receive the best possible medical facilities at low cost with the opening of the United Christian Hospital and the extension of further medical facilities in the area, the Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, said today.

He was speaking at the official opening of the new hospital which he described as r,a good example of what can be achieved when the government and the community work together.”

The hospital was built through the joint efforts of its board of directors, the Royal Hong Kong Jockey Club, local and overseas religious and educational organisations, and the government.

It provides 555 beds and will function as an acute general hospital providing a full range of facilities for casualty and emergency cases.

The charges are the same as in government hospitals — 82 a day for in-patients and $1 per visit for out-patients, thus making it possible for government medical institutions to refer patients directly to the United Christian Hospital for admission.

f3?his means that this hospital will make an immediate contribution to the provision of low-cost medical facilities in the Kvmn Tong and East Kowloon areas,” the Governor said.

To meet the needs of the 500,000 residents in the area, Sir Murray said, two further clinics had been planned at Lam Tin and Ngau Tau Kok. Site formation work had already started on a polyclinic for East Kowloon in Hammer Hill Road.

"In addition, the Rodrigues Report has recommended that of the four new hospitals which the government should construct over the next ten years, a 1,200-bed general hospital for East Kowloon should be accorded the first priority/’ he said.

v ’ /The following.......

Thursday, December 6, 1975

- 5 -

The following is the full text of the Governor’s speech:

Bishop Baker, Mr. Chairman and Directors of the United Christian Hospital, Ladies and Gentlemen.

The United Christian Hospital has been built through the joint efforts of its Board of Directors, the Royal Hong Kong Jockey Club, many V ~ —• w local and overseas religious and educational organisations and your Government. It is a good example of what can be achieved when the Government and the community work together.

This hospital, and the Alice Ho Miu Ling Nethersole Hospital with which it is closely linked, will be under one organisation, the United Christian Hospitals. This is a charitable organisation which in addition to providing care for the sick, especially for the poor and needy, trains nurses, mid-wives and other medical staff.

The United Christian Hospital, with 555 beds, will function as an acute general hospital and will provide a full range of facilities for casualty and emergency cases. In addition, the charges levied will be the same as those in Government hospitals:- $2 a day for in-patients and 31 a visit for out-patients. Ihese arrangements will permit Government medical institutions to refer patients - particularly those in Kwun Tong -directly to the United Christian Hospital for admission. This means that this hospital will make an immediate contribution to the provision of low-cost medical facilities in the Kwun Tong and East Kowloon areas.

/Kwun Tong .......

Thursday, December 6, *1973

- 6 -

Kwun Tong now has a population of half a million, almost double that of seven years ago. To meet the needs of this community, two further clinics have been planned at Lam Tin and Ngau Tau Kok, and site formation work has started on a polyclinic for East Kowloon in Hammer Hill Road* In addition, the Rodrigues Report has recommended that of the four new hospitals which Government should construct over the next ten years, a 1,200-bed general hospital for East Kowloon should be aeoorded the first priority.

The people of Kwun Tong make a vital contribution to our industry and economy. The opening of this hospital, and the extension of further medical facilities in this area, will ensure that this community rocelyos the best possible medical facilities.

Mr. Lam, Board of Directors, I congratulate you on your zeal end dedication and on a job well done.

I now have great pleasure in declaring open the United Christian Hospital.

-------0---------

Thursday, December 6, 1973

- 7 -

HIGH DEMAND FCR EDUCATION GREEN PAPER

Deadline For Public Comments Extended To January J1

********

The government has decided to extend the period for public comments on the Education "Green Paper" to the end of January 1974, a government spokesman announced today.

This follows increasing demand for copies of the Board of Education’s Report on the proposed expansion of secondary school education in Hong Kong over the next decade.

Since the Report became available at the end of October, 2,800 copies in English and 10,300 copies in Chinese have been distributed. In addition, some 100.000 copies of a Chinese leaflet containing a summary of the Board’s terms of reference and its main recommendations have also been distributed.

The demand has been so great that supplies of the English version were exhausted a fortnight ago and since then many requests have been received.

Fresh supplies of both the English and Chinese versions of the "Green Paper" are now available and can be obtained from City District Offices, Government Information Services and the Education Department.

- - - - 0--------

/8.........

Thursday, December 6, 1973

- 8 -

STUDENTS URGED TO SUPPORT ANTI-TB SCHOOL CHILDREN’S WARD

******

The Director of Education, Mr. J. Canning, has appealed to supervisors and heads of schools to urge their students to make voluntary contributions to support the ’’School Children’s Ward” in the Ruttonjee Sanatorium.

Ihis ward of ten cots is the only one of its kind in Hong Kong.

School donations enable the children in this ward to receive medical care and attention which might otherwise not be available to them.

In a circular to schools, Mx-. Canning said individual contributions should be limited to 50 cents and must be entirely voluntary.

”1 sincerely hope that schools will continue to maintain this ward by individual and collective efforts,” he said.

Schools may consider various other ways and means of raising money to support this praiseworthy cause.

Last year, schools contributed about $187,600, a sum which Mr.

Canning described as ”a splendid achievement and a credit to all concerned.” School contributions, preferably by crossed cheques payable

to the Anti-Tuberculosis and Thoracic Diseases Association, should be sent in envelopes marked ”Anti-TB” to the Education Department Headquarters, Lee Gardens, 3rd floor, Causeway Bay, Hong Kong.

/9........

- - 0 - -

Thursday, December 6, 1973

EMPLOYMENT SURVEY OF MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY

******

The Census and Statistics Department is conducting a comprehensive postal survey on employment and job vacancies in the local manufacturing industry.

Some 30,000 establishments have been sent printed enquiry cards which should be fully completed and returned in the pre-paid envelopes provided by Sunday, December 9*

Information sought by the department includes the number of employees, classified by sex, and the number of vacancies as at December 4.

The survey is an extension of previous quarterly employment surveys on industrial establishments registered with the Labour Department, and covers all known manufacturing establishments.

A comprehensive register of them has been compiled by matching and combining factory records of the Labour Department with field reticulation records of the Census and Statistics Department.

Commenting on the survey, the Commissioner for Census and Statistics, Mr. D.S. V/hitelegge, said: "The manufacturing industry is the largest employer of Hong Kong’s work force and in view of its importance a full coverage of employment in this sector is essential.”

He appealed to all recipients of the enquiry cards to co-operate by filling them in correctly and returning them promptly to his department.

"Ilanufacturers may rest assured that information provided will be treated in strict confidence and only statistical summaries will be released," he said.

The cards would be destroyed, he added, after the relevant information had been extracted and summarised.

-------0--------- /10.........................

Thursday, December 6, 1973

- 10 -

APPRENTICESHIP CONTRACTS

*******

Note to Editors: The Kowloon Motor Bus Company is to sign

apprenticeship contracts with 65 craft apprentices and 17 technician apprentices on Saturday (December 8) at 10.00 a.m. at its administration office at No. 1, Po Lun Street, Lai Chi Kok.

Present at the occasion will be Mr. Ronald Louey, General Manager of KMB and Mr. H.R. Knight, Senior Training Officer of the Labour Department.

You are invited to send a reporter/photographer to cover the occasion.

-------0---------

/11 .......

Thursday, December 6, 1975

- 11 -

CONSUMER ADVISORY SERVICE

Daily Guide To Wholesale Market Prices And Supplies

*♦

The following prices were realised today (Thursday) at sales under the Rice Control Scheme and at the Vegetable Marketing Organisation Wholesale Market and the Fish Marketing Organisation Wholesale Market at Cheung Sha Wan, Kowloon:

Supplies and Wholesale Prices of Rice

Grade. Availability of Supply Wholesale Price (S/catty)

China Rice Average

See Hew " old crop - new crop Good 1.64 1.72

S.C.Jien - old crop Good 1.58

Po Ilgai Good 1.42

Qiu Cho Good 1.22

Thai Rice 100^ Whole Good 1.52

10-15% Brokens Good 1.50

A1 Super Extra Good 1.45

A1 Super Good 1.37

Whole Glutinous Scarce 1.52

U.S. Rice - Good 1.62

Australian Rioe Good 1.52

Pakistan Rice No Sale

Taiwan Rice ■B No Sale

/Supplies and ••••«••

Thursday, December 6, 1975

- 12

Supplies and Wholesale Prices of Marine Fish

Species Availability of Supply Wholesale Price

High (S/catty)

Low Average

Golden Thread Good 4.0 2.5 3.2

Big-Eyes Normal 2.5 0.7 1.8

Squid Limited 5.5 2.0 4.0

Hair-Tails Good 1.4 0.7 1.0

Lizard Fishes Limited 2.5 1.0 1.8

Croakers Limited 1.5 0.7 1.3

Conger-Pike-Eels Normal 2.9 1.8 2.2

Melon Coat . Limited 1.8 1.4 1.6

Breams Limited 5.0 3.0 3.5

Yellow Belly Limited 1.6 0.8 1.2

Mackerels Good 3.0 2.0 2.5

Red Goat Fish Normal 2.7 0.5 1.7

Fork-Tail Normal 1.3 0.7 0.9

Horse-Head Normal 5-2 3.8 4.0

Melon Seed Limited 2.8 1.3 2.0

Pomfrets Limited 8.0 7.0 7.5

Garoupas Normal 8.0 5.5 6.3

Yellow Croaker Good 5.0 3.8 4.2

/Supplies and .......

Thursday, December 6, 197?

15

Supplies and Wholesale Prices of

Locally Produced Vegetables

Availability of Supply Wholesale Price (S/catty)

High Low Average

Flowering cabbage Limited 2.0 0.8 1.5

White cabbage Normal 0.5 0.15 0.3

Chinese lettuoe Normal 0.5 0.2 0.35

Chinese kale Normal 1.0 0.3 0.6

Spring onion Normal 1.5 0.5 1.0

Spinach Normal 1.4 0.7 1.0

Water cress Normal 1.2 0.3 0.7

Leaf mustard cabbage Scarce 0.5 0.2 0.3

Tomato Scarce 2.2 1.4 1.8

Supplies and Wholesale Prices of Pork (Live weight)

Pork

Availability of Supply

Good

Wholesale Price (S/picul)

(Average)

285

-------0----------

Release time:

Z!22J£i51i

PRM 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN*

Friday, December 7» *1973

CONTENTS

Page No.

Emergency regulations introduced to deal with any possible fuel shortage ................................................   1

Governor outlines further measures to improve the prisons system .............................. .....................

Transport Commissioner emphasises that resiting of PLB stands in Central aims at improving traffic flow ............... 6

Teachers in aided schools included in allowance scheme .... 7

Proposed extension of building freeze in Mid-Levels ............ 3

Improved communal lighting in Tsz Wan Shan Estate .........

Hong Kong architect obtains second award for hospital design ....................................................

New drug treatment centre opened ..........................    1.3

Hillock in Ila Tau Kok to be levelled for roadworks............ 15

Secretary for Hone Affairs addresses St. Stephen's Boys' College annual speech day gathering.....................•••• 15

Daily guide to wholesale prices and supplies of basic food commodities ...............................................

Issued by Government Infocmetion Servfcet, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong. Tel: 5*233191

Friday, December 7? 1973

- 1-

REGULATIONS FOP CONTROL OF OIL SUPPLIES ********

The Government has introduced wide-ranging powers under emergency regulations to deal with any possible fuel shortage.

The Director of Oil Supplies, Mr. Roy Porter, made two orders under these regulations today. The first restricts the use of certain lighting throughout the day and most hours of darkness.

The order prohibits, except between 6 pm and 10.30 pm, the use of neon and electric lights for advertising; electric lights for display on or in buildings, including lighting in shops for displaying articles in windows and decorative lights; and electric lights for floodlighting recreation, entertainment and sporting events.

Mr. Porter said today that the restrictions would come into force from midnight on Sunday (December 9).

The maximum penalty for contravening the order is /

a fine of -r30,000 and six months imprisonment.

A second order also gazetted today, prohibits filling stations from supplying motorists with petrol, diesel and oils in containers. This is aimed at stopping hoarding and also comes into effect from midnight on Sunday.

The maximum penalty for breaches of this order is a fine of ^5,000 and three months imprisonment.

/The.......

Friday, December 7, 1973

2

The Emergency (control of Cil) Regulations 1973 were approved by the Governor in Council this week and gazetted this morning. Among other things they provide for

* the regulation of the supply and consumption of oil, electricity and gas;

* the price at which oil may be supplied;

* the regulation of the use of vehicles on roads and the use of all forms of transport, including ferries, aircraft and ships; and

the requisitioning of oil stocks.

Should any of these measures become necessary, the Director of Cil Supplies is backed up by tough regulations for their enforcement. These include the powers of entry, inspection and arrest; powers to require any person to keep books and returns which he considers essential; powers to provide against obstruction of the Director or his staff in carrying out their duties; and powers to give directions.

The regulations carry stiff penalties for anyone contravening any orders which may subsequently be made by the Director.'

The heaviest penalty, a fine of >;100,000 and imprisonment for two years, can be imposed on a supplier who contravenes or fails to comply with any directions given to him on the storage, supply, use or disposal of any oil.

Mr. Porter said that the regulations have been introduced to provide the means for controlling oil stocks in Hong Kong.

/He ......

Friday, December 7$ 1975

3

He continued: ’’The powers contained in the emergency regulations are wide, hut these are necessary in view of the uncertainty of the world oil situation. The Government must be able to act swiftly should the need arise.”

Mr. Porter emphasised that it did not follow that all these powers will be used. The public had already shown a fair response to the Government’s appeal to save electricity and fuel.

Z • ‘ A * ' <

’’Even though it will be legal to have advertising and display lighting on during the specified hours, it would nevertheless be helpful if advertisers could restrict the use of neon signs within this period’’, he added.

’’Although stocks are normal at the moment, it would be irresponsible of the Government to assume that Hong Kong will not be affected by the world wide fuel shortage. It is obviously prudent to take further measures at this stage to conserve fuel stocks,” he concluded.

------o-----

Friday, December 7, 1975

- 4 -

GOVERNOR OUTLETS FURTHER MEASURES TO IMPROVE PRISONS SYSTEM

******

An inspectorate will be set up shortly to regularly examine and report on the efficiency and functioning of all prison institutions in Hong Kong, the Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, announced today.

A special unit was also being planned, he added, ”to co-ordinate intelligence and other work in the Prisons Department, against•triadsj narcotics and corruption.”

Speaking at the annual parade of the Prisons Department at Stanley, the Governor said these measures followed the disturbances at Stanley Prison last April which demonstrated the need to modernise facilities there and to review the organization and management of the department.

He said: ’’Many changes have been made, or are in hand.” These included the strengthening of senior management to take care of various specialised aspects of prison work such as prison industries, vocational training, nursing and after-care.

Additional posts were also being created at the middle management level to ensure that specific tasks, particularly dealing with security, receive closer attention. ’’Coupled with this is the progressive and continuing introduction of new security measures at Stanley Prison itself.”

Commenting on the detention centre scheme, Sir Murray noted that the success of the first detention centre had led to a second one being built j>his year, and had encouraged the government to believe that it should make such centres c. permanent feature in the fight against crime.

Friday, December 7, 1973

- 5 -

Many of the detainees* parents had praised the achievements of the centres in-handling their sons, he said and this proved‘the value of the prison officers1 efforts.

The Governor commended the prison officers for their "high degree of discipline and initiative" and said the community appreciated and respected the contribution they made to public safety.

Earlier, Sir Murray inspected the parade of 10 contingents comprising about 2J0 officers from various prisons and centres operated by the department.

During the ceremony, he presented Colonial Prison Service Medals to six officers and three trade instructors, and Colonial Prison Service Clasps to eight officers.

Lady MacLehose was among the guests attending the parade.

Note to Editors: Copies of the full text of the Governor’s

speech are distributed as a special supplement to today’s D.I.B.

i -------0---------

/6.........

Friday, December 7j 1973

- 6 -

AIM OF RESITING PLB STANDS IN CENTRAL CLARIFIED

Govt Not Trying To Squeeze Mini-Buses Out Of Business Says Mr. Wilson

******

The Commissioner for Transport, Mr. Brian Wilson, today reiterated that the new traffic management scheme for public light buses is aimed at improving traffic flow in Central District.

He described allegations that the government is trying to put PLBrs in Central out of business as totally unfounded.

"What the government is trying to do," he explained, "is to shift PLB loading points to the outskirts of Central where there are less congested access routes."

The Commissioner said that this would neither reduce the volume of PLB business nor cause problems for passengers, because the new loading points were not too far away and offered adequate spac i.

Mr. Wilson further pointed out that by shifting the loading points, the government had to set aside valuable land in Central for new PLB termini.

The provision of more suitable loading points, he said, would not only improve traffic flow in Central area but also enable passengers to board the PLB’s in safety.

"It is because of these that the government has decided to go ahead with the scheme," Mr. Wilson said.

; The first stage of the scheme to be introduced on Sunday (December 9) will prohibit public light buses from entering Gilman Street (between Connaught Road Central and Des Voeux Road Central) and the section of Wing Wo Street, between Connaught Road Central and Des Voeux Road Central.

/At the •••••••

Friday, December ?, 1973

- 7 -

At tlio cane time, a new public light bus stand, situated at the-Jubilee Street Perry Concourse, will be opened.

‘Z:is now off-street terminal, capable of holding 20 minibuses, is ozrpo’ctcd to prove convenient to intending passengers and will also ensure tlic'.t public light buses do not pick up passengers in congested side streets.

/ffic ‘-Q editors: Copies of a photograph showing the new

public light bus stand outside the Vehicular Ferry Pier in Central District are boxed.

-------0----------

ATJXmMCS F03 AIDID TEACIIZSS AMD STAFF

«*'*«****•

Teacher's and other eligible staff in aided schools who receive salaries of up to approver tely $4,000 a month, will receive an allowance _ror. December 1 lil:o their government counterparts.

A:7r.cv.::ci:r; t'lis today, a government spokesman said the allowance in the male cc. lo ranges from $75 a month to $200 a month.

ho cold: f,A circular will be issued shortly to schools in the aided sector authorising payment where possible in December. All those eligible to receive this allowance should be paid not later than January 1974.”

-------0----------

/8.........

Friday, December 7? 1975

- 8 -

BUILDING FREEZE IN MID-LEVELS TO BE EXTENDED

*******

The temporary restriction on building development in Pok Fu Lam and Mid-Levels is to be extended for a further 11 months under amending legislation which will shortly be introduced in the Legislative Council.

The restrictions, contained in the Temporary Restriction of Building Development (Pok Fu Lam and Mid-Levels) Ordinance, were introduced on August 2, 1975? and are due to expire on January 31? 197^* Basically, the Ordinance empowers the Building Authority to refuse to approve plans for new buildings in the two areas for a period of six months as from July 4 this year. Modifications of leases where they are required to permit re-development will also not be granted.

Hie measures were introduced in an attempt to forestall serious traffic problems which would result if building continued to be unrestricted in the areas.

The restrictions apply to the area of Pok Fu Lam from Mount Davis to Wah Fu Estate and in the Mid-Levels between Caine Road/Bonham Road and the 70^-foot contour bounded on the east by Glenealy and extending to the west as far as Kotewall Road and the University of Hong Kong.

Commenting on the proposed extension of the restrictions, a Public Works Department spokesman said consultants had conducted an intensive traffic study in the two areas during the past four months.

"In the light of the recommendations in the traffic study it is clear that further restrictions on development in these two areas wjl1 be necessary pending a solution of the problem of access to Pok Fu Lam."

The additional time is therefore needed for detailed study of the consultants1 recommendations and for the selection of the more effective forms of traffic management in the two areas.

Friday, December 7» 1973

- 9 -

BETTER LIGHTING FOR OLD ESTATES

***«*»*»

Lighting in the central-corridor type public housing estates is to rot better. Six blocks in Tsz Wan Shan Estate have just been rewired and ceiling lights have been installed in every corridor bay and on every staircase and entrance hall.

Mr. Ralph Husband, Assistant Director of Housing, said the improvements were an integral part of a multi-million dollar project to create a better environment for tenants.

”This is just a start, •’he said. ”In the next two or three years, we will carry out improvements, including lighting improvements to all 276 blocl^s of the Mark III and onward central corridor type at a cost of more than J.5 million dollars.”

Mr. Husband pointed out that the improvements did not run counter to the energy conservation moves being urged by government.

’’Public areas in this type of block have long been in need of better lighting,” he said. ”The latest addition will merely bring them up to an acceptably normal standard.”

The earliest estate blocks have outside balcony access and the need for improved lighting is not so great. But in later blocks, access to households is by a long internal corridor. The old standard of a Genii ng light in every third bay is not considered adequate.

/”The reason

Friday, December 7, 1973

- 10 -

T,The reason we are having a go at Tsz Wan Shan Estate first,” Mr. Husband went on,"is that it is the most populous of all Group B estates and all 65 blocks there are Mark III to VI, which need to be improved.”

Meanwhile, re-wiring work is at hand for seven more blocks on the estate. It should be completed early next February.

Mr. Cheng Hung Kai, Estate Manager of Tsz Wan Shan Estate, said tenants1 reaction to the improvements has been most favourable.

"Many tenants said increased lighting should have some deterrent effect on criminals. It has also made things more convenient for tenants especially for those who have to return home late at night," he said.

In an effort to conserve energy, only alternate ceiling lights are switched on during the day time while at night they are turned on to the full.

0 - -

Friday, December 7» 1973

*. 11 -

SECOND DESIGN HONOUR FOR HONG KONG ARCHITECT *******

A government architect has been awarded another medal for hospital design.

He is Mr. Edwin Wong of the Public Works Department’s Architectural Office who received a silver for excellence in architecture this (Friday) evening fi*om the Hong Kong Institute of Architects. The award was made to Mr. Wong for his design of the Kowloon Hospital West Wing.

It is the second time Mr. Wong has been honoured for hospital design. In 19&3j the Royal Institute of British Architects awarded him and another P.W.D. architect a bronze medal for their design of the Queen Elizabeth Hospital, one of the largest and most up-to-date in Asia.

Kowloon Hospital West Wing, which provides ^36 beds for the rehabilitation and after-care of patients, was completed in 1970. In his design, Mr. Wong laid particular stress cn economy of space and he achieved this remarkably well through a special lay-out of wards — each of which has two sub-units sharing common treatment and service facilities.

The lay-out reduces walking distance and saves circulation area without affecting the standard of acccmmod^tion. This functional simplicity was developed from experience gained from the design of Queen Elizabeth Hospital, and has been adopted as the standard for the new Princess Margaret Hospital at Lai Chi Kok which is to open next year.

Describing the new ward concept which has won him the new honour, Mr. Wong said it was designed with basic consideration to Hong Kong’s particular social and economic conditions.

/’’It was

Friday, December 7» 1973

- 12 -

"It was a complete departure from usual practices and in the three years of operation of the new hospital, it has proved,Ratisfantory from both a functional and a medical point of view," he said.

Mr. Wong, who worked as an architect in New Zealand and England before joining the P.W.D. team in Hong Kong in 1957, emphasized the importance of team work in architecture.

"Every design of a building may be conceived by one architect," he said, "but it takes a whole team to translate the idea to reality.

"The complexity of building a hospital is enormous and every aspect of the building industry participates in the work in order to achieve the initial concept."

In particular, Mr. Wong was appreciative of the contribution of one of his assistants, Mr. Johnson Lau, who has since joined the Chinese University as a Senior Architect.

Kowloon Hospital West Wing is not only an achievement in that it is a successful building; in terms of economy and design, it could be invaluable as a prototype for the further study of the development of medical facilities planned by the government for the next ten years.

At the handing-over ceremony of the hospital in 1970, the Director of Medical and Health Services, Dr. G. H. Qioay acknowledged its merit and described it as a ’milestone’ for his department.

Not only did it provide more beds for a growing population, Dr. Choa said, but it also met "changing needs in the pattern of medical services for the community".

Note to Editors; Copies of a photograph of Mr. Wong and a model of the Kowloon Hospital are boxed for collection.

/13........

- - 0 - -

Friday, December 7» 1973

- 13 -

HEW DRUG TREATMENT CENTRE OPENED ♦ ♦ *♦***

The Director of Social Welfare, Mr. K.W.J. Topley, said today the government "means business" in tackling the drug problem in Hong Kong.

He said this was borne out by the fact that the government was now re-organising itself to deal with the drug problem and had a Commissioner for Narcotics, a senior officer whose sole responsibility was to attack the problem on all fronts.

The Action Committee Against Narcotics was also being placed on a new footing.

"The government cannot sweep the drug problem under the rug even if it wanted to and neither can the Hong Kong community," he said.

Mr. Topley was speaking at the opening ceremony of the Yuen Long Rehabilitation Centre run by the Hong Kong Discharged Prisoners’ Aid Society. It was built with government assistance.

Housed in the Yuen Long Estate, the Centre provides hostels and treatment facilities for 24 men and 10 women who will undergo treatment for three months.

Mr. Topley described the centre as an important part of the community programme against narcotics.

"No form of human disability is pretty, whether it is blindness, deafness, the results of cerebral palsy or mental illness or alcoholism. The results of drug addiction are not very nice either.

/"We would .......

Friday, December 7? 1973

- 14 -

”We would much rather the problem did not exist. Like the crime with which it is related, we would all like this problem to go away. It won’t. It cannot be swept away either,” he said.

Hie hostel has been opened for people who have a drug problem and have come forward to say they want to beat it.

’’These people are alive and they need help. They need to be helped somewhere and they cannot be effectively helped to re-enter society if they are hidden away in a remote place,” he said.

Mr. Topley said DPAS are to be congratulated in their initiative and concern in this field. He said it was a demonstration of public support for the fight agaisnt drugs, support which was vital if success was to be achieved.

Note to Editors: Copies of Mr. Topley’s speech are distributed

separately in the G.I.S. press boxes.

-------0---------

/15........

Friday, December 7, 1975

- 15 -

MA TAU KOK HILL TO BE LEVELLED FOR ROAD INTERCHANGE

......

A small hill in the Ma Tau Kok area will be removed shortly to make way for a road interchange.

The hill is bounded by Kowloon City Road, Sheung Heung Road and To Kwa Wan Road. Work is expected to begin in January next year and will take about six months to complete.

On completion it will produce a level area of about 300,000 square feet for the construction of the road interchange.

This will, be the first part of the road project to provide a fast vehicular route linking the existing Hung Hom Interchange with the Airport Tunnel Road now under construction.

-------0---------

SCHOOL SPEECH DAY

Note t.Q J^tqrs: The Secretary for Home Affairs, Mr. D.C. Bray,

today officiated the Speech Day ceremony of the St. Stephen’s Boys’ College at Stanley. Copies of Mr. Bray’s address are distributed separately in the G.I.S. Press boxes.

-------0---------

/16........

Friday, December 7, 1973

- 16 -

CONSUMER ADVISORY SERVICE

Daily Guide To Wholesale Market Prices And Supplies

********

The following prices were realised today (Friday) at sales under the Rice Control Scheme and at the Vegetable Marketing Organisation Wholesale Market and the Fish Marketing Organisation Wholesale Marlcet at Cheung Sha Wan, Kowloon:

Supplies and Wholesale Prices of Rice

Grade Availability of Supply Wholesale Price (3/catty)

Average

See Mew " old crop - new crop Good 1.64 1.72

S.C.Jien - old crop Good 1.58

Po Ngai Good 1.42

Chu Cho Good 1.22

Thai Rice 10# Whole Good 1.52

10-15% Brokens Good 1.50

A1 Super Extra Good 1.45

A1 Super Good 1.37

Whole Glutinous Scarce 1.50

U.S. Rice Good 1.62

Australian Rice Good No Sale

Pakistan Rice Good No Sale

Taiwan Rice Good No Sale

/Supplies ......

Friday, December 7, 1973

- 17 -

.Supplies and Wholesale Prices of Marine Fish

Species Availability of Supply Wholesale Price (3/catty)

High Low Average

Golden Thread Good 4.3 2.3 3.3

Bi^-Dyes Good 2.8 0.5 1.7

Squid Limited 5.6 2.0 4.0

Hair-Tails Normal 2.0 1.0 1.3

Lizard Fishes Limited 2.3 0.9 1.7

Croakers Limited 1.8 0.8 1.3

Conger-Pike-Eels Good 2.45 1.5 2.0

Melon Coat Limited 2.5 1.3 1.8

Breams Limited 5.3 3.0 3.8

Yell oiv Belly Limited 2.2 0.8 1.5

Mackerels Good 3.0 2.1 2.4

Red Goat Fish Normal 1.8 0.55 1.2

Fork>-Tail Normal 1.3 0.7 0.9

Horse-Head Normal 6.0 3.0 4.0

Melon Seed Normal 2.5 1.5 2.0

Pomfrets Scarce 8.5 7.0 7.5

Garoupas Limited 6.5 5.5 6.0

Yellow Croaker Limited 4.8 1.5 4.3

/Supplies •••••••

Friday, December 7, 1973

- 18 -

Supplies and Wholesale Prices of

Locally Produced Vegetables

Availability of Supply* Wholesale Price (g/catty)

High Low Average

Flowering cabbage Limited 2.20 0.80 1.60

White cabbdge Normal 0.50 0.15 0.35

Chihese lettuce Normal 0.50 0.20 0.35

Chihese Izale Normal 1.00 0.25 0.55

Spring onion Normal 1.40 0.40 1.00

Spinach Normal 1.40 0.50 1.00

Water cress Normal 1.10 0.25 0.70

Leaf mustard cabbage Scarce 0.50 0.20 0.35

Tomato Scarce 2.20 1.40 1.60

Supplies and Wholesale Prices of Pork (Live weight)

Availability of Supply Wholesale Price (8/picul)

. Average

Pork Good 285

-------0----------

Release time: 8,00 p,m.

PR 33 4000039

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

SUPPLEMENT

Friday, December 7, 1973

SPEECH BY H.E. THE GOVERNOR, SIR MURRAY MACLEHOSE, AT THE ANNUAL INSPECTION OF THE PRISONS DEPARTMENT ON FRIDAY, 7TH DECEMBER J2Z5_____________________________

When I spoke to you last year, we were already planning our measures to fight violent crime. This fight continues. I know that one result is to place an added burden on your shoulders - not only in prison accommodation, but in the type of offender being sent to prison.

The trend is for offenders to be younger, more opposed to authority and more prone to use violence. You have done well in coping with this change. From the incidents which have occurred you will have learnt lessons.

The disturbances in April demonstrated the need to modernise facilities there, and to review the organisation and management of the department. Many changes have been made or are in hand.

Senior management is being strengthened to take care of various specialised aspects of prison work such as prison industries, vocational training, nursing and after-care. An inspectorate will shortly be set up to visit all prison institutions regularly, examining each in depth and reporting on its efficiency and functioning. A special unit is being .planned to .coordinate intelligence, and other work in the department, against triads, narcotics and corruption.

Additional posts are being created at the middle management level to ensure that specific tasks, particularly dealing with security, receive closer attention. Coupled with this is the progressive and continuing introduction of new security measures at Stanley Prison itself.

/The success .......

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House. Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Friday, December 7? 1973

- 2

The success of the first detention centre has led to a second being built this year, and has encouraged us to believe we should make such centres a perrfianent feature of our fight against crime. Many of the detainees’ parents have praised the achievements of the centres in handling their sons. This proves the value of your efforts.

However, all these measures depend upon our having sufficient dedicated and well-trained officers such as yourselves to see them implemented. Your work requires a high degree of discipline and initiative. The conununity appreciates this and respects the contribution you make to its safety.

I congratulate you on your appearance and bearing and wish you every success in the year ahead.

-------0---------

PKH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Saturday, December 8, 1973

CONTENTS

Page Ho%

Warning to fuel users by the Smoke Abatement Adviser of the

Labour Department .............................................. 1

*

Anti-narcotics exhibition opens in Tsuen Wan ................... 3

Temporary Post Office to be opened at CMA Exhibition ........... 4

Temporary traffic arrangements .............................     5

Opening of Immigration branch office in Shau Kei Wan ........... 6

Two schools to hold dedication ceremonies ...................... 7

Sunday D.I.B..................................................   7

Deputy Director of Education to present swimming trophy ... 8

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Saturday, December 8, 1975

- 1 -

WARNING TO FUEL USERS BY SMOKE ABATEMENT ADVISER

A

Fuel users who wish to install or alter any furnace, oven or chimney on their premises are required by law to obtain prior approval from the Commissioner of Labour 28 days before such work is commenced^ according to the Smoke Abatement Adviser of the Labour Department, Mr. K. Higginson.

In a recent circular letter to fuel users, known to the department, Mr. Higginson said failure to do so constituted an offence under the Clean Air (Furnaces, Ovens and Chimneys) (Installation and Alteration ) Regulations 1972 and was punishable by fines of up to 55,000 and an additional fine of 350 for each day on which the offence continued.

Mr. Higginson said the Regulations laid down statutory requirements in respect of the design of furnaces, ovens or chimneys.

"However,” he said, "users of fuel not exceeding five gal1ons of liquid fuel, 70 pounds of solid fuel, or 10 therms of gaseous fuel per hour are not affected by the Regulations, nor is any furnace or oven operated solely by electricity.”

In his letter, Mr. Higginson also reminded fuel users of their obligations under a set of newly enacted regulations — the Clean Air (Restriction and Measurement of Smoke Emission) Regulations 1975- The Regulations were designed to reduce the risk of air pollution and would become effective on January 1, 1974.

/He said.........

Saturday, December 8, 1975

- 2 -

He said: ’’The Regulations will apply to all premises where liquid oil, solid fuel, gas, electricity or other fuels are used which give rise to the emission of grit, dust or smoke.”

Under the Regulations it is an offence for any plant to emit grit ’or dust exceeding the statutory limit. A fine of $5,000 may be imposed for the use of liquid fuel with a viscosity exceeding 120 seconds redwood No. 1, unless the occupier has obtained prior permission from the Commissioner of Labour.

”Tlie Regulations also require occupiers to install, if necessary, gas sampling points and to maintain such points in safe and good condition. Those who fail to comply shall be guilty of an offence and shall be liable on conviction to a fine of $1,000,” Mr. Higginson said.

0 - -

Saturday, December 8, 1973

- 3 -

A1ITI-NARCCTICS DISPLAY OPENS IN TSUEN WAN

***«»«*

A special anti-narcotics exhibition opened in the New Territories satellite town of Tsuen Wan today.

The week-long exhibition forms part of a pilot scheme being held in Tsuen Wan during the three-month Keep Hong Kong Drug-Free Campaign launched by the Action Committee Against Narcotics on October 1.

The scheme, which features film shows, lectures, competitions and displays, lias been specially designed to educate a target audience of 45,000 students aged between 12)4 and 15.

Backing up this important aspect of the programme is a special survey designed to gauge the overall drug knowledge of people in the Tsuen Wan district.

Information gathered in the survey, which is being carried out by market research teams, will be used by ACAN to formulate plans for major campaigns in the future.

liany groups have co-operated to stage the anti-narcotics exhibition, which is being held in the Princess Alexandra Community Centre in Tai Iio Hoad.

They include the Royal Hong Kong Police Narcotics Bureau, the Preventive Service, the Society for the Aid and Rehabilitation of Drug Addicts and the Social Welfare Department.

Two of the exhibits feature works that won the top two prizes in a special anti-narcotics display competition held between schools in the Tsuen Wan district.

/They .....

Saturday, December 8, 1973

- 4 -

They were prepared by the winner, Chuen Yuen College, and the runners-up, Tsuen ’.Van Government Secondary Technical School.

Other displays feature the winning entries in anti-drug essay and poster competitions organised by the Tsuen Wan Anti-Narcotics Action Group.

Ball pens, calendar cards, key chains and pamphlets carrying anti-drug messages will be distributed free to people visiting the exhibition.

It will be open from 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. each day.

-------0----------

OPENING OF TEMPORARY POST OFFICE

*******

Tire Post Office announced today that, as in previous years, a temporary Post Office will be provided at the J1st Exhibition of Hong Kong Products to be held at the Wanchai Reclamation from Tuesday, December 11 to January 9 next year.

The hours of business will be from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. and from

2 p.m. to 6 p.m. daily except Sundays and holidays.

A stamp vending machine has been installed to provide availability of 10-cent stamps outside office hours.

All classes of Post Office business will be transacted at this office except the acceptance of insured letters and boxes.

-------0---------

Saturday, December 8, 1975

- 5 -

TEMPORARY TRAFFIC ARRANGEMENTS

******

An hour-long demonstration of various fire fighting techniques will be staged by the Fire Services Department at the City Hall Esplanade tomorrow (Sunday) from 7. JO p.m. as part of the current Fire Prevention Campaign.

As a result, the following temporary traffic arrangements will be introduced in the vicinity of Ediburgh Place:

Ediburgh Place East will be closed to all vehicles, except those authorised by the police, from 7-15 p*m. to 8.JO p.m.

All metered car parks in Edinburgh Place East will be suspended between 6 p.m. and 8.4j p.m.

The public light bus stand in Edinburgh Place East will be moved to the slip road at the junction of Edinburgh Place East and Harcourt Road from 7*15 to 8.4J p.m.

On the other side of the harbour, temporary traffic arrangements will be introduced on Tuesday (December 11) morning to facilitate the construction of a temporary footbridge in conjunction with the widening of Argyle Street at its junction with Waterloo Road.

The footbridge is to be built over both carriageways of Argyle Street between midnight on Monday (December 10) and 4 a.m. on Tuesday (December 11).

Traffic will be locally diverted onto the opposite carriageway for a two hour period on each carriageway while the new footbridge spans are lifted in.

Traffic will be controlled by the police and short temporary diversions will be in operation.

Normal traffic arrangemwnts will be resumed at 4 a.m. on Tuesday when the work is completed.

--------0--------- /6......................

Saturday, December 8, 1975

- 6 -

OPENING OF IMMIGRATION BRANCH OFFICE

******

Note to Editors: Mr* Cheung Kam-tim, Chairman of the Shau

Kei Wan Kaifong Welfare Association, will officiate at the opening of the Immigration Branch Office in Tai On Building, Shau Kei Wan, on Monday (December 10) at 10 a.m.

Among those present will be prominent residents and community leaders of the Shau Kei Wan area.

After the opening ceremony, Mr. Cheung, accompanied by Mr. W.E. Collard, Director of Immigration, and Mr. T.H. Barma, City District Officer (Eastern), will tour the office.

Mr. Collard will personally issue the first travel document.

You are invited to send a reporter and/or photographer to cover the opening ceremony which will be held at G24-25, Tai On Building, Shau Kei Wan, on Monday at 10 a.m.

-------0---------

/7

Saturday, December 8, 197?

- 7 -

TWO SCHOOLS TO HOLD DEDICATION CEREMONIES

****«««

A Government-built estate primary school and a private nonprof it—maiding•secondary school will be holding dedication ceremonies tomorrow (Sunday) afternoon.

They are St. Philip Lutheran School, Ko Chiu Road, Yau Tong, and the Wing Kwong College, which is run by the Pentecostal Holiness Church in Lung Cheung Road, Kowloon.

The Assistant Director of Education (Development), Mr. J. Whiteley, will address the gathering at the primary school in Yau Tong while the Assistant Director of Education (Examinations), Mr. D.B.M. Board will speak at the secondary school.

Note to Editors: You are invited to have the ceremonies

covered. The dedication ceremony at St. Philip Lutheran School begins at 2.30 p.m. while the ceremony at Wing Kwong College starts at 3 p«m.

Copies of the two Assistant Directors’ speeches will be available for collection in the News Room, Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, 6th floor, at 3.15 p.m. tomorrow (Sunday).

-------0---------

SUNDAY D.I.B

Note to Editors: There will be an issue of the Daily Information

Bulletin tomorrow (Sunday).

Copies will be ready for collection in the G.I.S. News Room at 3.15 p.m.

-------0---------- /8.....................

r

Saturday, December 8, 1973

- 8 -

DEPUTY DIRECTOR OF EDUCATION TO PRESENT SWIMMING TROPHY *$«*«**

The Deputy Director of Education (Professional), Mr. N.M Ho will present the trophy and prizes to the winners of the Schools1 International Swimming Match between Hong Kong Schools and Singapore Schools at the Morrison Hill Swimming Pool in Oi Kwan Road, Hong Kong, at 5*30 p*m. tomorrow (Sunday).

The two-day event begins at 2 p.m. today.

Note to Editors: You are invited to have the Swimming Match,

which is being hosted by the Hong Kong Schools Sports Association, covered.

-------0---------

Release time: 3.00 P*m«

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Sunday, December 9» 1975

CONTENTS

Page Iio,

Co-operation between the Education Department and sponsoring

bodies is essential for development of schools ................. 1

The Assistant Director of Education (Examinations) speaks of challenge to private non-profit-making schools........... 4

Issued by Government Informetion Services, Beeconsfield Home, Hong Kong. Tel: 5-233191

PRH 7

Sunday, December 9? 1973

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

EDUCATION DEPARTMENT AND SPONSORING BODIES CO-OPERATION

Essential For Development Of Schools

*******

Co-operation between the Education Department and sponsoring bodies is essential in order to accomplish the demanding targets now set for the number and variety of school places to be provided at both the primary and secondary levels.

This was stated by Mr. J. Whiteley, Assistant Director of Education (Development), this afternoon at the Dedication Ceremony and Open Day of St. Philip Lutheran School at Yau Tong, Kowloon.

This primary school is one of 67 free standing estate schools built by the Government as part of a housing estate and then handed over to a sponsoring body to operate.

"The cost of building such a school at present day prices is about $850,000," Mr. Whiteley said.

The Government also pays the recurrent costs under the Subsidy Code. The sponsors pay for the equipment and furniture for the school and for any improvements they wish to make to the school building itself.

For this particular school the Lutheran Church contributed some $140,000.

"This is an example of the type of co-operation between the Education Department and sponsoring bodies in running schools that I mentioned earlier as being essential in order to provide the required number of schools," the Assistant Director said.

/Speaking ....

I sued by Government Information Strvicr.i, Beatonsf iald Home, Hong Kong. Tel: 5-233191

Sunday, December 9? 19Z5

- 2 -

Speaking about the development of this type of primary school building, Mr. Whiteley said it was a vast improvement on the type that was provided in the resettlement estates almost 20 years ago.

"At first the schools were provided on the rooftops of the domestic blocks, then on the ground floor, then on the top floor and now they are provided in separate buildings like this one. In the latest estate schools to be built the roof playground has been covered in to provide an assembly hall.

"The development of the estate school will not stop at this point because the Education Department is now working on new ideas to improve the physical standard and layout of the school building,’1 he said.

Mow that a free place has been provided for every child at all primary levels., Mr. Whiteley then spoke about the provision of secondary school places for the Yau Tong distiict.

During the last 18 months, two fully subsidized secondary grammar type schools have been opened in Yau Tong.

In addition there are plans to provide two more secondary schools in Yau Tong in the near future - a Government secondary technical school and a private non-profit making secondary school.

The Government technical school for which plans are at an advanced stage is to be built on a site very near to St. Philip Lutheran School at the eastern end of Ko Chiu Road. Work will begin as soon as the site is available. Cftiis school will accommodate 920 boys and girls and will offer classes from Form I to Form VI.

/The private

Sunday, December 9» 1975

- 5 -

The private secondary school will be built with the aid of a Government interest-free loan, on a site in Yau Tong Road next to the Po Chiu College. ’’This again will be co-educational and offer accommodation for some 920 pupils from Form I to Form VI level,” Mr. Whiteley said.

In addition, a Government Technical Institute is now actually under construction in nearby Kwun Tong and is scheduled to start operating in September 1975*

”1 am sure you will welcome these additional educational facilities at the post-primary level,” he said.

The Assistant Director thanked the Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod, Hong Kong Mission, for its concern for the education of Hong Kong children.

’’Throughout the Colony the Church sponsors kindergartens, primary, secondary and special schools for handicapped children both during the day and in the evenings. Further, the Church also operates boys’ and girls’ clubs in certain housing estates. Therefore, you will appreciate that the Church is heavily involved in education of many kinds from the kindergarten stage to secondary level,” Mr, Whiteley said.

-------0---------

........

Sunday, December 9, 1975

- 4 -

HIGH QUALITY EDUCATION

Challenge To Private Non-Profit-Making Schools

*««««$*

Private non-profit-making schools in Hong Kong offer in some respects the greatest challenge to any group of educators aiming at providing high quality education at a price that the generality of parents can afford, the Assistant Director of Education (Examinations), Mr. D.B.M. Board said this afternoon.

He was speaking at the Dedication Ceremony of the Wing Kwong College, Lung Cheung Road, Kowloon.

This secondary school, built with the aid of a Government interest-free loan, is run by the Pentecostal Holiness Church.

Mr. Board said overseas visitors '’may find the local educational scene deplorable, even chaotic; but there are certain important merits in our approach to the up-bringing of our children which should not be overlooked.

”In particular, the existence of two large private sectors, profit-making and non-profit-making, ensures that the wishes of the general public, in terms of curriculum and language-medium of instruction, are plain for all to see.

/’’This is.......

Sunday, December 9? 1973

- 5 -

’’This is not to deny that the professional educator has genuine insights into the needs of children, which may not be fully appreciated by all parents; but it does moan that we are not in the grip of a monolithic system dictated by experts of one kind or another.

’’For good or ill, public opinion is an effective force in Hong Kong education, which theorists ignore at their peril,” Mr. Board said.

The Assistant Director pointed out that the Education Department’s syllabuses were merely ’’suggested”, and the Certificate of Education syllabuses were drawn up by subject committees on which the schools were strongly represented.

It was simply not true as it was sometimes said that there was little experimentation in Hong Kong schools because they were bound, hand and foot, by the syllabuses of the Department or the public examination.

Mr. Board said: ”My colleagues in the Inspectorate are only too anxious to consider sympathetically any reasonable proposals by individual schools; and likewise it is the firm policy of the Board of the Certificate of Education, which is an independent board, to meet any reasonable request for new subjects, alternative syllabuses and modes of examination, and the like.”

He added: ’’Similar principles apply to the Secondary School Entrance Examination, which is quite rightly kept under constant and careful scrutiny.

”At this time we are especially concerned to improve it, and in the Examination Division of the Department we shall be delighted to receive any suggestions, verbally or in writing, concerned cither with the examination itself or with the associated allocation procedures; and this applies also, of course, to the Certificate of Education Examination.”

/Hr. Board ••••••«

Sunday, December 9j 1973

- 6 -

Mr. Board who unveiled the Dedication Stone of Wing Kwong College, congratulated the Pentecostal Holiness Church for bringing the building

project to a successful conclusion.

■•Release Tine: 3*30 p.m.

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Monday, December 10, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No.

Director of Oil Supplies calls for full compliance with lighting restrictions ......................................... 1

Temporary water interruption in Sai Kung......................  2

UN narcotics control chief on two-day visit to Hong Kong •• 3

Shanghai Street will be rebuilt ............................... 4

Opening of new Immigration branch office in Shau Kei Wan •• 5

AI!S plans to train 1,000 life savers.......................... 6

New workshop block for light industries in Shek Kip Mei .. 7

*****

Daily guide to wholesale prices and supplies of basic food commodities

Release, time •_ 7*pO P-

Issued by Government Informitior Services, Beacomf.c’d House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5»233191

Monday, December 10, 1973

1

/ LIGHTING RESTRICTIONS NCW IN FORCE

Mr. Porter Calls For 100 Per Cent Compliance

********

The order banning the use of certain types of lighting, except for four and a half hours each evening, has now come into force and it appears that the majority of people are complying with it.

The Director of Oil Supplies, Mr. Roy Porter, said today he had noticed that most of the advertising signs and display lights had been switched off by midnight last night in accordance with the order.

However, he stressed that in order to make the fullest possible use of this fuel saving measure, there must be a 100 per cent compliance.

The restrictions Mr. Porter said, applied throughout the day and during most hours of darkness. He said some shops were allowing their advertising or display lights to be turned on during the day, but this was against the order. nAll those lights covered by the order are only permitted between the hours of 6 p.m. and 10.30 p-.m., for the remainder of the time they must be switched off.”

Breaches of the order could lead to a maximum fine of 330,000 and six mont’is imprisonment.

At the same time, Mr. Porter clarified a number of points which had subsequently been raised since the introduction of the lighting restrictions.

lie said there seemed to be some misunderstanding over the restrictions on display lighting, and pointed out that they applied to the use of lights in shop windows to display any particular article or articles.

Display lights in shop counters and cabinets also had to be switched off. In oases where these lights were wired to the overall lighting system in shops it would be necessary for them to make alternative arrangements.

Doth these rules applied to shops in arcades. In some cases, Mr. Porter explained, arcade shops may well have to rely on the public lighting system in the buildings to light up their shop windows. /However

Monday, December 10, 1973

- 2 -

However, the restrictions, did not apply to normal shop lighting or public lighting inside buildings and arcades.

Mr. Porter again emphasised that the new restrictions should not unduly affect business, as shops were still adequately lit by their normal lighting.

He said that the restrictions also applied to display signs such as those advertising restaurants or night clubs, whatever part of the building they occupied. But night clubs could still use spotlights during performances by artists inside their clubs.

As far as indoor sports were concerned, Mr. Porter said that these should generally not be affected, except where they use clusters of lights for floodlighting. Indoor 10-pin bowling should not be affected by the ban, provided any display lights are switched off.

There are certain exemptions to the restrictions including display signs indicating hospitals, doctors, dentists and pharmacists.

-------0---------

WATER CUT

******

Water supply to a number of premises in Sai Kung will be interrupted for eight hours from 10 p.m. on Wednesday (December 12) when a fresh water mains connection will be made in the area.

All premises between Luk Mei Village and Po Lo Che, Sun On Tsuen, including those along Hiram’s Highway, Sai Kung, will be affected.

-------0---------

/3.........

Monday, December 10, 1973

- 3 -

UN NARCOTICS CONTROL CHIEF ON HONG KONG VISIT

The head of a United Nations *body that monitors the effectiveness of international treaties designed to curb drug trafficking and drug abuse today began a two-day visit to Hong Kong. • • . .

He is Sir Harry Greenfield, the 75-year-old president of the Geneva-based Ihtematiohal" Narcotics Control Board (INCB). ►

Sir Harry, INCB president for the past five years, is one of the world’s most respected and experienced drug-fighters.

He is chairman of the Institute for the Study of Drug Dependence in the United Kingdom. His past positions include:- India representative on the UN Commission on Narcotic Drugs (19^6); vice-president of the Permanent Central Narcotics Board (1948-52); and president of the Permanent Central Narcotics Board (1953-68).

Today Sir Harry, accompanied by the INCB secretary, Monsieur Joseph Dittert, was briefed on Hong Kong’s dangerous drugs problem by the Commissioner for Narcotics, Hr. N.G. Rolph; the Chief Superintendent of the Royal Hong Kong Police Force Narcotics Bureau, Mr. H.J. Rumbelow; and the Assistant Commissioner of the Preventive Service, Mr. R.V.L. Hatton.

The briefings were followed by a meeting with the oner of

Police, Mr. C.P. Sutcliffe.

Tomorrow morning the two INCB officials will have meetings with senior Government officials and the chairman of the revamped Aotion Committee Against Narcotics^* Sir Albert Rodrigues.

/Sir Harry

i

Monday, December 10| 1975

Sir Harry and Monsieur Dittert will leave Hong Kong by air for New Delhi tomorrow (Tuesday) night.

Note to Editors: Sir Harry Greenfield will give a press

conference in the Press Conference Room in the V.I.P. Lounge at Kai Tak Airport at 7 p>m* tomorrow (Tuesday) before boarding his aircraft for New Delhi. The Commissioner for Narcotics% Mr> NtG* Rolph, also will be present.

Member of the Press > Radio and Televisjnn are invited to attend.

Sir Harry is leaving by flight BA. 9*5* S.T.D. 8 p.m<

---- -------------------0---------

SHANGHAI STREET TO BE REBUILT ♦ * * ♦ ♦ * ♦ * ♦

The section of Shanghai Street between Argyle. Street and Nelson Street will be rebuilt early next year.

The work will involve reconstruction of nearly JOO-feet of the three-lane carriageway and will be carried out in three stages to manntain through traffic during the construction period.

The project, designed by the Highways Division of the Public Works Department, will begin in February 197^» and will take about four months to complete.

-------0---------

/5

Monday, December 10, 1975

- 5 -

NEW IMMIGRATION OFFICE IN SHAD KEI WAN

******

Another immigration branch office was opened today in conformity with the Immigration Department’s policy of providing the public with adequate and convenient immigration facilities in a comfortable environment, in their own neighbourhood.

The new branch office is located at G24-25, Tai On Building, 57-87 Shau Kei Wan Road and will provide a full range of immigration services, to residents in Shau Kei Wan, Chai Wan and Nor^h Point.

Speaking at the official opening ceremony this morning, the Director of Immigration, Mr. W.E. Collard, noted that this was the third branch office to be opened this year.

Another one would come into operation in Yuen Long early next month, he said, while arrangements were in hand to open a similar office at Sham Shui Po, probably in February.

11 We are also preparing a long-term programme for the provision of immigration facilities, as the need arises, in other parts of Hong Kong, such as the new towns at Shat in and Tuen Mun,TtMr. Collard said.

Mr. Cheung Kam-tim, Chairman of Shau Kei Wan Kaifong Welfare Association, who performed the opening ceremony, said that the advent of the operation of immigration service in the area indicated that the government had already taken a further step towards the pr ^notion of greater interest in the betterment of the fellow-residents of Shau Kei Wan and the community in general.

-------0--------

/6.........

Monday, December 10, 1973

- 6 -

1,000 LIFE SAVERS IN TIME TO COME

**.****

Sir Kenneth Ping-fan Fung, President of the Hong Kong Branch of the Royal Life Saving Society, tonight commended the aim of the Auxiliary Medical Service to train eventually 1,000 life savers, and he had no doubt this target would be achieved.

He was speaking at a dinner in the Hong Kong Life Guard Club to celebrate the winning of the Governor’s Shield by the A.M.S.

Sir Kenneth, himself a member of the A.M.S., was welcomed by

Dr. G.H. Choa, Director of Medical and Health Services and Controller of the A.M.S.

Sir Kenneth said in winning the coveted Shield, the A.M.S. had shown what a sound training it had received from those charged with putting its members into shape.

He urged A.M.S. members to push ahead from strength to strength, ’’winning fi*esh laurels through the years, and serving with undiminished energy the community for which }ou are well known.”

Dr. Choa told the gathering that as Controller he was “delighted and very proud that the A.M.S. had won the Governor’s Shield this year, and also obtained second place for the Urban Services Department’s shield."

He thanked members for having worked hard and unselfishly in the interest of the community, and he noted with pleasure that the life-saving team had now become “a strong unit within the Auxiliary Medical Service."

-------0---------

/7........

Monday, December 10, 1973

- 7 -

NEW WORKSHOP BLOCK AT SHEK KIP MEI

********

A nine-storey workshop block will be built at Shek Kip Mei Estate to accommodate the light industries affected by the Shek Kip Mei Rehousing Scheme.

The workshop block will be situated to the north of existing Block 18 of the estate along Pak Tin Street Extension.

When completed in early 1975, the workshop building will provide 390 working units of about 260 square feet each. Facilities such as lifts and delivery parking spaces will also be provided.

Piling work is already in hand and the construction of the superb-structure is expected to begin in March next year. It will take twelve months to complete.

According to a Housing Department spokesman there are 108 workshop trades operating in t_ie Shek Kip Mei Estate — mostly woodwork, rattan ware, or plastic toy making.

“Of these, 15 workshops were affected in the early phase of the *

rehousing operation and have been temporarily accommodated in Lower Pak Tin Estate and block 1? of Shek Kip Mei Estate.

, r,The location of the workshop block next to the estate is so chosen in order that these workshop operators will not encounter any inconvenience when they continue their business there," the spokesman explained. "After all the workshops have moved into the new block, they will no longer cause inconvenience to domestic tenants."

-------0---------

1 onday, December 10,

consih-./.r advisory service

Guide To V’bt I er;!. Market Prices And Supplies

U A A

:• <.‘l l.o’.v । in •: price.*; wc-r< ren 1 i.»cd today ( . at sales

under the die Control. Scheme and at the Vegetable Marketing Organisation

• 1 ;:u'l.c ixcckcl :.»d the J i;:li licit. Ling Organisation Wholesale: Market at

Cln . vn,. SI in ‘>ir, •Vr./loon:

‘ 4j?j?1 11' ',|r! I?'' l! ’ c Pr j cor, of Rico

(Irade Availability of Supply Wholesale Price (8/catty)

China. Ric * Average

. .. - old crop ;pr.’ hev/ G’nnf’ 1.^'

- now crop -1 ■ •

1.5S

.'’•. ‘.Jian - old crop

fo j.’gai

%u Cho

Thai. J lice 7< X/7 Mi'o.'l o

10-15^ Brokens

Al Super JSxtra

Al Si per

YZiolo Glut j nous

..S. Rice

Avjj ’ ral iim i.co

Jaki-ntnn Rico

iaiv/ai; Rice

• A *

'r •..-'d

Coed

I'o

Good

Good

Good

Limited

,?ord

•* • !

‘nod

1.50

1 JjG

/Supplies and .......

Supplies and Wholesale Prices of Marine Fish

Species Availability of Supply Wholesale Price (S/catty)

Hirf 1 Low • Avprago

Golden Thread Homul 6.5 2.2 • 3.5

Big-Eyes C.o.od ’ 2.7 0.8 1.8’

Squid ?!orrr?l 6.0 2.5 6.0

Hair-Tails Good • — * 1.2 1.8

Lizard Fishes rmol 2.5 1.5 2.0

Croakers I’orn-.,1 2.0 0.6 1.6

Congor-Pike-Eols T’omal 2.5 2.1 2 •.?

Melon Coat IToiwl 2.5 1.5 2.0

Breatis Normal 5.5 4.5

Yellow Belly Good . 1.5 0.3 1.0

Mackerels Good 3.6 2.2 3.o

Rod Goat Fish Good 2.2 0.5 A

Fork-Tail Limited 1.6 o.8 1.5

Horso-Hoad Limited 6.0 2.5 6.5

Melon Sood normal .3.5 1.5

Ponfrots Sc vrcc 8.0 6.0 7.0

Garoupas Normal 7.0 6.5 5*5

Yellow Croaker Sc./’CC 5.8 5.0 r,.r.

1 1 '

/Supplies and •,« • ••••

1

and Ytholcnrla Pyletfl of ' locally _firoducod Vcggtabl.efl

* Availability of Supply Eiolccolo Erica _ (S/catty)

IHdi 1/377 *■ ■ m

Floncring cabbogo Limited 2.4 1.0 1.8

Thito (Kfibnjp Normal 0.7 0.2 0.45

Chinese lettuoa Normal 0.6 0.2 o.4o

...••• Chinese kale. Normal 1.0 0.25 0.55

a? <7 Spring onion Normal 1.2 0.40 0.8

apimch,. Normal 1.6 0.70 1.20

Eater cress Normal 1.2 0.5c 0.70

leaf Bustard calihnga Scarce - 0.60 0.20 0.40

Tomio Scarce 2.20 1.20 1.50

CiTnplj^f/I and Pho? er.alo Pri CQn of. P03fo (Mvo. Height)

5. Pori:

Availability of Supply._ ,.

Normal

.rholecale Price (fl/picul) ______

(Average)

285

0

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Tuesday, December 11, 1975

CONTENTS

Page No,

1O-acre site on Tsing Yi Island sold by private treaty to American Company for huge polystyrene plant.......... 1

Major step forward in attracting technologically advanced industries to Hong Kong •••••••;......................••••• 7

Governor calls for joint effort in prevention of industrial

accidents ................................................, 9

Civil servants asked to set example in fuel conservation.. 12

New children’s centre opened by Director of Social Welfare 13

Extra deliveries for local Christmas mail.................. 14

Traffic arrangements in So Uk Estate .........................  15

Death sentence commuted ....................................... 15

****»»**»»

Daily guide to wholesale prices and supplies of basic food commodities

Delease time: 8.^3 P*m.

issued by Government Inforomt’on Services.

House, Hong Kong. Tei:

5-2331^

Tuesday, December 11, 1973

- 1 -

AMERICAN COMPANY TO BUILD HUGE POLYSTYRENE PLANT IN HONG KONG More Land For Selected Heavy Industries

Hong Kong will house one of the world’s largest production plants for polystyrene in 1975.

Disclosing this today, the Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, said approval in principle had been given by the Executive Council for a 10-acre site on Tsing Yi Island to be sold by private treaty to an American company to build the plant.

’’The plant, which will deliver this essential material to our plastics industry by mid-1975i will not cause pollution and if properly r.nntrol 1 ed and managed, poses no threat or danger to the environment,” Sir Murray said when opening the 31st Chinese Manufacturers’ Association Exhibition.

The site is to be sold to Dow Chemical Pacific Ltd. by private treaty under the government’s modified industrial land policy which provides for the development of carefully selected heavier industries which cannot be accommodated in high-rise buildings.

In his address, the Governor said: ’’Government will continue, on an individual basis along these lines, to try and meet the needs of selected larger industries which would make a significant contribution to Hong Kong’s economic growth.”

/He revealed •••••••

Tuesday, December 11, 1973

- 2 -

He revealed that consideration was being given to selling additional land, by private treaty, to the Outboard Marine Corporation which purchased the first restrictive user site on Tsing Yi by public tender in April this year. Die company has applied for an extension of the original site in order to double its estimated production and to treble the value added by virtue of the engineering work done in Hong Kong.

The Governor also announced that a third major project was being planned for a plant to produce polyester filament and fibre for Hong Kong's textile industry.

"A site has already been identified in the Castle Peak area and discussions are being held with the applicants about the feasibility of the project on this site. This is distinctly hopeful,” he said.

Sir Murray emphasised that unless advance preparation of suitable land was made, "many useful land intensive industries will be lost to Hong Kong."

To meet these needs, a working party has been identifying areas in the New Territories suitable for development as industrial estates, and he hoped that an announcement could be made in early summer about areas which could be made available.

"Similarly, the Junk Bay area, originally developed as a ship-breaking area is being re-examined to see whether a more economic usage could be permitted for the relatively large tracts of idle land in the area," he added.

/He emphasised .......

Tuesday, December 11, 197?

- 3 -

He emphasised that a properly thought out industrial land policy is essential for industrial development and, ultimately, for Hong Kong’s economic growth. ’’Jhilure to meet this requirement could result in a few years time, in our growth rate, instead of continuing to rise, being stuck on a plateau.”

The Governor noted that a great deal of work had been done in the past year within the government to examine land requirements for various sectors of industry, not only to encourage large new ventures but also to ensure that existing industries could continue to develop and expand.

He appreciated, however, that industrial progress did not solely depend on the availability of adequate land. Technical training, productivity, standards, design and marketing were all important contributors to industrial efficiency.

Welcoming the formal establishment in October of the new Heng Kong Training Council, he said it had a vital part to play in ensuring that young people are adequately trained to undertake the skilled industrial work which is more and more needed. He also noted that the special education project — the C.M.A. Prevocational School — was going forward and should be ready for classes in 1975*

Turning to the oil situation, the Governor gave an assurance that the government was doing everything it could and was in constant touch with the British and other governments. In particular, he mentioned the ”helpful and sympathetic attitude” of Her Majesty’s Government and of the Chinese Government.

/The world .......

Tuesday, December 11, 1973

~ 4 -

The world shortage in oil, he said, could affect us in various ways. Most directly and immediately, supplies for consumption in Hong Kong could and probably will be reduced.

"In the first place everyone of us must do what he can to help reduce demand. Substantial savings can be made simply by reducing waste," he stressed.

While it was impossible to judge at this time whether Hong Kong was going to faoe seriously reduced supplies in oil and oil products, he said, it was prudent to achieve a reduction in consumption of 10 to 15 per cent now, in anticipation of a reduction in supplies later.

"If reduction in supplies is of this magnitude we may expect personal inconvenience rather than economic damage to result. But damage could come from the less direct impact of the world shortage.

,rFor instance, in the medium term, world oil shortage must affect our supply of oil-based raw materials — certainly as to price and probably as to volume. The first need not necessarily affect our competitive position but the second could affect our earnings," he said.

Furthermore, he went on, demand for our exports might be affected if, in the longer term, oil shortage were to slow down the growth of the economies of our major markets.

The Governor said that although tentative reports received forecast a slowing down in Hong Kcrg,s markets, he felt that not too much credence should be placed on such forecasts at this early stage. "At present there is no real certainty as to the exact course that cuts in supply will take or of the impact they will have on our major markets."

/All this .......


Tuesday, December 11, 1973

All this, he pointed out, amounted to a new and disturbing prospect which called for careful thought and perhaps some adjustments, but which could not at present be fully assessed.

”We would be wrong to take it lightly, but we would be even more wrong to embrace gloom,” he said.

Another new problem, the Governor continued, was the serious shortages of essential raw materials and semi-manufactured materials which had developed with some rapidity, coupled in some cases by price rises of a size unprecedented in recent times.

Virtually everyone of Hong Kong’s export industries was experiencing difficulty in securing an adequate supply of raw materials, he said, and price increases had occurred where raw materials are available.

While it was difficult for Hong Kong to influence production in the supplying countries, Hong Kong was not entirely helpless and wherever possible the government had taken steps to improve supplies and would continue to do all in its power.

Sir Murray described improvement >f supplies as ” a field of the greatest importance” and assured industrialists that the government would continue to maintain close contact with industry about it.

Referring to trade discrimination against Hong Kong, the Governor re-iterated that the government would continue to fight it ”with the utmost vigour.”

He believed that the continuing, unrelenting and highly expert effort of our trade officials was having some practical success as well as giving Hong Kong’s trading partners a better understanding of its problems.

/Re welcomed •••••••

Tuesday, December 11, 1973

- 6 -

He welcomed the recent decision by the Japanese authorities to reduce the Hong Kong exceptions list to their generalised preferences from 96 items to 12, but expressed concern over the exclusion in 197^ of Hong Kong’s textile and footwear from the EEC’s preference scheme.

’’Since our textiles are already heavily restricted to that market by quotas, and since our footwear industry is relatively small and not particularly competitive by world standards, we can see absolutely no justification for this discriminatory treatment by the Community,” he said.

Sir Murray noted, however, that the British Government had given notice to the Community of its intention to seek cancellation of these exclusions in 1975*

The Hong Kong Government was also participating in the negotiations in Geneva of a new multilateral arrangement for textiles of all fibres, and Hong Kong’s knowledge and expertise in this complex field ’’ensures that the views of our representatives are listened to with respect,” he added.

Hote to Editors: Copies of the full text of the Governor’s

speech are distributed separately as a supplement to today’s D.I.B.

-------0----------

/7

Tuesday, December 11, 1973

- 7 -

MAJOR ADVANCE IN ATTRACTING NEV INDUSTRIES TO HONG KONG * * * ♦ * 4c * * * * *

51ie Acting Director of Commerce and Industry, Mr* Jimmy McGregor, today welcomed the decision by Dow Chemical Pacific Ltd. to construct the world’s biggest polystyrene manufacturing plant in Hong Kong.

”It marks a major leap forward in the efforts we have been making to attract technologically advanced industries to Hong Kong/lie said.

Approval in principle has been given by the Executive Council for direct sale to the company of a 10-acre site on Tsing Yi Island*

Details of the project were given at a Press Conference following today's official opening of the C.M.A. Exhibition by the Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose.

Mr, McGregor revealed that several applications for land for special industrial projects unsuitable for high-rise buildings are now being considered by the government.

Provision has been made by the Executive Council for industrial land to be sold by private treaty or by restricted user tender in response to specific applications which meet fairly detailed economic criteria, he added.

,;We are taking account of the need to broaden Hong Kong’s industrial base by making sites available for land-intensive Industry which has particular significance for our future industrial development,’’Mr. McGregor said.

Outlining the background to the revised policy, he said that for many years industrial land had generally been sold by public auction without restriction of user to any particular

/industry ........

Tuesday, December 11, 1973

- 8 -

industry or limitation on subsequent assignment.

This policy had proved economically sound both by the revenue it has brought to the public purse, and by ensuring that land was put to the most profitable use.

Rapidly increasing land prices had made multi-storey development inevitable, however, and these buildings were suitable for the many light industries that have prospered in Hong Kong.

But this development had in recent years inhibited the establishment of industries that could not operate in high-rise buildings, such as medium and heavy engineering, foundries, chemical processing, and heat and chemical treatment plants.

Mr. McGregor said that the revised policy approved by the Executive Council defined a number of principles and specific criteria which would be applied when applications for land to be granted on a restricted user basis were considered.

The projects concerned would have to be new to Hong Kong or represent a technological up-grading to a significant degree of an existing industrial process.

They would also have to provide employment opportunities at a generally higher level of skill than prevailed in existing industries and some, like the Dow polystyrene project, would provide essential raw materials for our export oriented manufacturing industry.

Mr. MoGregor pointed out that polystyrene was the basic raw material of a large section of Hong Kong’s toy industry, and supports other main industries such as electronics.

He expressed his belief that Hong Kong would attract

further major industrial projects in the near future.

Tuesday, December 11, 1973

- 9 -

GOVERNOR CALLS FOR JOINT EFFORT IN INDUSTRIAL SAFETY

The Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, today called on Industry and Commerce to join the government in a joint attack on the growing problem of accidents at work in Hong Kong.

Speaking at the opening of the C.M.A. Association Exhibition, Sir Murray said: "I am sure that only by such a combined attack will this terrible toll in human lives and suffering be reduced."

The Governor welcomed the Industrial Safety Exhibition being staged as a major feature of this year’s Exhibition as a sign that industry, commerce and the government were launching such a combined attack.

Tne Safety Exhibition, sponsored by the Labour Department with the backing of the Commerce and Industry Department, the Fire Services Department and the Marine Department, and with support from industry and commerce in the form of donations and loaned machinery, is the first of its kind in South-east Asia.

"Both the government and the private sector were becoming increasingly alarmed at the huge toll each year of accidents at work," Sir Murray said.

"Such accidents are now happening at the rate of one every seven or eight minutes throughout the day - twice the road accident injury rate.

"Last year 2Q6 people were killed and nearly 30,000 injured at work. Virtually every one of these accidents could have been avoided by proper safety precautions."

/In his ......

Tuesday, December 11, 1973

10 -

In his speech at the official opening ceremony, the President of the Chinese Manufacturers’ Association, Dr. C.W. Chuang said that in the past, industrial safety had been largely underrated by manufacturers.

”It is an integral element in any effort aimed at ‘ improving the quality of life, quite apart from its economic implications,” Dr. Chuang said.

Attitudes in industry are apparently changing. But what we have done now is only the beginning. Much greater efforts will be required in future to maintain improvement in safety standards.

”1 would call upon management, labour and the government to work together to reduce health and safety hazards at work by consultation and legislation, by education and training, and by practice and co-operation.” In a special statement to mark the opening of the Industrial

Safety Exhibition, the Commissioner of Labour, Mr. I.R. Price, said the prime responsibility in reducing the appalling number of accidents at work rested squarely upon those managers who had, so far, taken little interest in the positive side of accident prevention.

’There is plenty of evidence to show that there is a close relationship between the safety performance of a concern and the effectiveness of its management,” said Mr. Price.

’^/hat is required is a marked change in attitude and an end to complacency towards accidents.

”It is not sufficient for management to hold that their only jbligation is to take out insurance against claims for workmen’s compensation,” he said.

/’’Accidents

i

Tuesday, December 11, 1973

- 11 -

"Accidents do not just happen. They are caused by unsafe acts -which can be controlled by preventive action by management."

The Industrial Safety Exhibition which has been financed jointly by industry, commerce and the government, will be opened everyday until the close of the CliA Fair on January 9-

By means of displays showing workshop settings involving Hong Kong’s major industries and machines and equipment most commonly involved in accidents, it shows a wide range of work hazards, and the measures required to counter them.

Among the other features of the exhibitions are demonstrations, films, scale-working models and life-like settings depicting accidents.

’’This Exhibition is unique in this part of the world, and no employer, manager, supervisor or worker in Hong Kong should miss it," Mr. Price said.

-------0---------

/12........

t

Tuesday, December 11, 1973

- 12 -

100,000 CIVIL SERVANTS ASKED TO SAVE FUEL

*******

The government today took another step in publicising the need for fuel economy by sending out letters to 100,000 civil servants, outlining ways in which they can help in ’’saving fuel”.

The letter points out that Hong Kong is unlikely to escape the effects of the world wide shortage of oil.

Although there is no shortage at the moment, the government has decided to make the best use of the stocks and future supplies so that essential services and industry do not suffer.

Ihe letter outlines some ’’simple ways” in which civil servants and their families can economise without seriously affecting their daily lives - either at work or at home •

At work, the civil servants are exhorted to keep all lighting to a minimum, switch off air conditioners, switch off electrical motors when not required, travel to work by public transport wherever possible and use public transport rather than a government vehicle during the day.

At home, the measures that could be taken include, replacing high-power bulbs for low-power ones, limiting the use of electric or gas cookers and geysers and household appliances, and put on warm clothing rather than switch on an electric heater.

The letter says that an appeal has already been made to the public to avoid wastage of electricity and fuel and points out that by carrying out these simple economies civil servants will set an example to their neighbours and friends as well as the general public.

-------0--------- /13..................

Tuesday, December 11, 1973

- 13 -

DIRECTOR OF SOCIAL WELFARE OPENS NEW CHILDREN'S CENTRE

The Director of Social Welfare, Mr. K.W.J. Topley, said today the success of a centre for young people depends very much on the active participation of members as well as on the support of local residents.

He was speaking at the opening of the new Ko Chiu Road Children’s Centre run by the Boys’ and Girls’ Clubs Association at the Ko Chiu Road Rousing Estate which had a population of more than 24,000 petjple.

”In a community like this, it is important to have centres to which young people can go for social and recreational purposes,” Mr. Topley said. ”It not only provides healthy recreation for the children but also offers a well-equipped library and study room.

’’The purpose of these programmes is to encourage young people to become involved in worthwhile activities and interests, to assist them to become mature, responsible and contributing members of the community,” he added.

Mr. Topley said the Boys’ and Girls’ Clubs Association was already well-known for its provision of children services and this was another of its remarlcable ventures.

He called on parents in the estate to encourage their children to make full use of the centre.

-------0---------

/r4........

Tuesday, December 11, 1973

- 14 -

CHRISTMAS POSTAL ARRANGEMENTS

*»»«««

Special counter positions for the acceptance of locally—addressed Christmas cards will be operated at the Kowloon Central Post Office, the Tsim Sha Tsui Post Office and the General Post Office in Central to speed up the handling and delivery of local Christmas mail.

The special arrangements will come into effect from Thursday (December 13) and will continue until December 21. Any quantity of *ards will be accepted at these counters but customers are asked to separate their cards clearly among Hong Kong, Kowloon and New Territories addresses.

A Post Office spokesman said that during this period, the normal limitation on acceptance of cash in prepayment of postage will be ra Jaxed at all branch offices except those in the New Territories.

Any customers with at least 40 items with a total postage of $4 er more may hand the items over the counter without affixing stamps. A receipt will be given in exchange for the postage paid on the items concerned* The latest time for the postings of local items to ensure del ivory before Christmas is 6 p.m. on December 21. Postings after this date cannot be guaranteed delivery before Christmas.

Special letter deliveries have also been arranged on holidays.

One delivery is scheduled for Sunday, December 16, and two for the folTowipg Sunday, December 23* There will also be one delivery on Boxing Day, December 26.

/But there .......

Tuesday, December 11, 1975

- 15 -

But there will be no delivery on Christmas Day and New Year Day when all post offices will be closed.

However, counter facilities will be available on Boxing Day from

9 a.m. to 12 noon in J2 post offices and branch offices, including Kowloon Central, Tsim Sha Tsui and the General Post Office in Central.

-------0---------

TRAFFIC ARRANGEMENTS IN SO UK ESTATE

*******

Motorists are advised that from 10 a.m. on Thursday (December 1?) Orchid Street in So Uk Estate will be re-routed one-way from Larkspur Street to Lilac Street to improve traffic circulation in the area.

Traffic signs will be posted to guide motorists.

-------0---------

DEATH SENTENCE COMMUTED

********

The Governor, after taking into consideration the advice of Executive Council, has decided that the death sentence passed on August 15, 1973 on LAM Po should be commuted to a term of imprisonment for life. LAM Po was found guilty of the murder of LI Pui-kuen.

0 - -

Tuesday, December 1'1, 1973

CONSUMER ADVISORY SERVICE

p-'p- r To Wholemlo Market Prices And Supplies

The following prices were realised today (Tuesday) sales under the Rice Control Scheme and at the Vegetable Marketing Organisation Wholesale Market and tho Fish Marketing Organisation Wholesale Market at

Cheung Cha Wan, Kowloon:

Sunniion and Wholesale Prices of Rice

Grado China Rico Availability of Supply Piolesale Price (fl/entty)

Average

,, old crop Eco Hcv' - now crop Normal 1.64 1.72

S.C.Jion - old crop - now crop Po Ilgai Good Good 1.58 1.66 1.42

Chu Cho Good 1.22

l6i# Vpaofo Good 1.52

1O-15JS Brokcns Good 1.50

A1 Super Extra Good '' 1.45

A1 Super Good 1.37 - 1.22

Wholo Glutinous Limited 1.52

q,Se Rice . • Good 1.62

Australian Rioe Good No Sale

Pakistan Rice Good No Sale

Taiwan Rico. Good . No Sale

/Supplies and ••••••»

Tuesday, December 11, 1973

Supplies and Wholesale Prices of Marine Fish

Species Availability of Supply Wholesale Price (8/catty)

High Low • Average.

Golden Thread Limited 4.8 3.0 3.8

Big-Eyes Good 2.k 0.4 1.5

Squid Limited 6.2 2.4 4.5

Hair-Tails Normal 2.6 1.1 1.8

Lizard Fishes Normal 2.8 1.0 1.7

Croakers Good 1.8 0.6 1.4

>

Conger-Pike-Eels Good 2.6 1.6 2.2

Melon Coat Normal 2.6 1.4 1.8

Breams Limited 4.5 2.8 4.0

Yellow Belly Normal 1.2 0.75 1.0

Mackerels Limited 3.5 2.6 3.2

Rod Goat Fish Normal 1.3 0.5 0.8

Fork-Tail Limited 1.4 0.7 f 1.2

Horse-Head Limited 4.8 3.2 4.0

Melon Seed Normal 3.2 . •1.4 2.6

PonfTcts Limited 7.5 5.5 7.0

Garoupas • Limited 8.0 4.5 7.0

Yellow Croaker Scarce 5.8 3.8 4.5

/Supplies and •/

Tuesday, December 11, ?.?75

Supplies and Wholesale Prices of Locally Produced Vegetables

jtype Availability of Supply Wholesale Price

High (8/catty)

Low Averago

Flowering cabbage Limited 2.4 1.0 1.8

White cabbage Normal 0.6 0.2 0.4

Chinese Lettuce Normal . • 0.6 0.2 0.4

Chinese Kale Normal 1.0 0.25 0.5

Spring onion Normal 1.4 0.4 0.8

Splxiaoh . . Normal 1.5 0.7 1.0

Wator cross i Normal 1.2 0.3 0.7

Loaf mustard cabbage Scarce 0.5 0.2 0.3

Tomato Scarce 2.2 1.4 1.8

Rinmlios and Wholesale Prices of Pork (Live weight)

Availability Wholesale Price

of Supply ( 8/ picul).

• • (Average)

Pork Good •285

- 0 -

PR 33 4000035

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

SUPPLEMENT

Tuesday, December 11, 1973

Speech by His Excellency the Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, at the opening of the 31st Chinese Manufacturers’ Association Exhibition. 11.12. 73_______________________

Dr. Chuang, Ladies and Gentlemen,

Might I congratulate you, Dr. Chuang and your Committee, on all the energy and imagination that has produced this 31st CMA exhibition.

I spoke last year of difficult trading conditions, currency uncertainties, increasing restraints on our textile exports and the concern over our trading position when Britain joined the European Economic Community. All these problems are still very much with us.

But, in recent months, other problems have arisen or have become more acute. I refer in particular to the acceleration of world inflation, of which we in Hong Kong have certainly had to bear our share. There is also the shortage of certain industrial raw materials which lias presented acute difficulties for some of our industries, particularly plastics. Finally there is the restriction of oil exports from the Middle East. All these have presented or are presenting problems for Hong Kong.

Our traditional trading problem is discrimination aga~i nst our । exports. This can take a number of forms - unwarranted restraints on our textile exports, discrimination against us and in favour of our close competitors in generalised preference schemes, or direct quantitative restrictions against our exports. Whatever form such discrimination may take, you may ....................................................................

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House. Hong Kong. Tel: 5-233191

Tuesday, December 11, 1973

- 2 -

you may rely on your Government to fight against it with the utmost vigour. This continuing, unrelenting and highly expert effort by our trade officials, is well known to many of you, and I believe is having some practical success, as well as bringing our trading partners to a better understanding of the matters which cause us concern. I am pleased, for example, that the Japanese authorities have recently reduced the Hong Kong exceptions list to their generalised preferences scheme from 96 items to 12. Although the 12 items represent a substantial proportion of our export trade to Japan, the Japanese Government’s move was a welcome step in the right direction, and they have undertaken to review this list again in the near future•

Unfortunately, problems are arising over other preference schemes, particularly that of the now enlarged European Economic Community. Whilst our direct competitors are given full access to the EEC Preference Scheme, Hong Kong’s textiles and footwear will be excluded in 1974. Since our textiles are already heavily restricted to that market by quotas, and since our footwear industry is relatively small and not particularly competitive by world standards, we can see absolutely no justification for this discriminatory treatment by the Community. We shall continue to press most vigorously for its removal, and we note with satisfaction that H.M.G. have given notice to the Community of their intention to seek the cancellation of these exclusions in 1975*

Your Government is also participating fully in the negotiations in Geneva of a new multilateral arrangement for textiles of all fibres. Hong Kong’s knowledge and expertise in this complex field ensures that the views of our representatives are listened to with respect.

/As regards •••••

Tuesday .^December -4%.. 197.5

- 3 -

As regards our trading performance we have so far done better this year than night at one time have been expected. In the first ten months of this year, our domestic exports increased by some 2J%, our re-exports by 57% and our imports by 28% compared with the same period last year. Though two-thirds of this might be attributable to higher prices, nevertheless these are encouraging figures in which you as industrialists can rightly take pride. I think they also show that our policy of maintenance of a strong currency has proved, as we had hopedt compatible with a strong export position. Overseas, the recent improvement in the fortunes of the United States dollar is a welcome development which augurs well for future economic developments in our largest marl ret. Next* the new problems, The first is the serious problem of shortages of essential raw materials and semi-manufactured material a which has developed with some rapidity, coupled in some cases by price rises of a size unprecedented in recent times. Virtually every one of our export industries is experiencing difficulty in securing an adequate supply of raw materials, and price increases have occurred where raw materialr are available. It is difficult for us to influence production in the supplying countries and have had to depend largely on the vigour and skill of our traders to secure the materials so -essential to our economic well being. But we are not entirely helpless and, wherever possible, the Government has taken steps to improve the supply position. It will continue to do all in its power. This is a field of the greatest importance. I assure you the Government will continue to maintain the closest possible contact with industry about it.

/I come ••••••

Tuesday, December 11, 1973

I cone now to oil and its products. I need not outline the background of our present problem of oil supply and storage, since events in the Middle Last have filled our newspapers in recent weeks, and you are all aware of the potential gravity of an interrupted flow of oil to r Hong Kong. Again we must rely on outside sources and.are largely dependent on the skill of our buyers and suppliers to obtain a fair share of the oil -products that we need. But what your Government can do I assure you it is doing, and it is in close touch with Her Majesty’s Government and other Governments. I should like to mention the helpful and sympathetic attitude of Her Majesty’s Government and of the Chinese Government.

The world shortage in oil could affect us in various ways, Firstly, and most directly and immediately, supplies for consumption in Pong Kong could and probably will be reduced. In the first place every one of us must do what he can to help reduce demand. Substantial savings can be made simply by reducing waste. At this point in time, it is impossible^ to judge whether we in Hong Kong are going to face seriously reduced supplies of oil and oil products. But we think it prudent to achieve a reduction in consumption of 10 - 15% now, in anticipation of reduction in supplies later. If reduction in supplies is of this magnitude we may expect • personal, inconvenience rather than economic damage to result. But damage could come from the less direct impact of the world shortage.

For instance, in the medium term, world oil shortage must affect our supply of oil-based raw materials - certainly as to price and probably as to volume. The first need not necessarily affect our competitive position but the second couldaffect our earnings.

/Furthermore, ••••..

Tuesday, December 11, 1973

- 5 -

Furthermore, demand for our exports might be affected if, in the longer term, oil shortage were to slow down the growth of the economies of our major raarlcets® Though the tentative reports we have received forecast a slowing down in our markets in 197V75, I suggest that too much credence should not be placed on such forecasts at this early stage; at present there is no real certainty as to the exact course that cuts in supply will trice or of the impact they will have on our major markets.

All this amounts to a prospect which is new and disturbing and which will call for careful thought and perhaps some adjustments, but which cannot at present be fully assessed. We would be wrong to take it lightly, but we would be even more wrong to embrace gloom.

Dr. Chuang, Ladies and Gentlemen, traditionally our industries produce light consumer goods. For a long time it has been widely assumed that medium and heavy industries, other than, perhaps, ship repairing, would not be financially viable in our environment. But rapid growth of our light industries has created sufficient demand for materials and services to make the establishment of some carefully selected heavier industries a feasible proposition. Last year I said that the Government’s industrial land policy was being modified to take account of the need to remove disincentives to the development industries which are desirable but by their nature cannot be accommodated in high-rise buildings. The first fruits of this policy are beginning to appear.

/The first

Tuesday, December 11, 1973

The first site, on Tsing Yi Island, was sold by public tender in April this year to an American company which will manufacture outboard engines for export. That company has subsequently applied for an extension of the original site in order to double its estimated production and to treble the value added by virtue of the engineering work done here. This additional sale, on a private treaty basis, is at present under considearation

The sale by private treaty of a 10 acre site, again on Tsing

Yi Island, to another American company, has recently been approved in principle by Executive Council. This will be used to establish one of the largest production plants for polystyrene in the world. The plant, which will deliver this essential material to our plastics industry by mid-1975> will not cause pollution and if properly controlled and managed, poses no threat or danger to the environment.

A third major project is a plant to produce polyester filament and fibre for our textile industry. A site has already been identified in the Castle Peak area and discussions are being held with the applicants about the feasibility of the project on this site. This is distinctly hopeful.

Government will continue, on an individual basis along these lines, to try and meet the needs of selected larger industries which would make a significant individual contribution to Hong Kong?s economic growth. But it is clear that unless advance preparation of suitable land is made, iw»y useful land intensive industries will be lost to Hong Kong. To meet these needs, a working party has been identifying areas in the New Territories

/suitable

Tuesday, December 11, 1973

- 7 -

suitable for development as industrial estates. Criteria for selection are fairly tight, as services must be economical and the land formation costs must not be too high, if the land is to be made available at prices which industry can support. However, I hope that an announcement can be made in the early summer about areas which <?an be made available. Similarly the Junk Bay area, originally developed as a ship-breaking area is being re-examined to see whether a more economic usage could be permitted for the relatively large tracts of idle land in the area.

A properly thought out industrial land policy is essential for industrial development and, ultimately, for our economic growth. Failure to meet this requirement could result in a few years time, in our growth rate, instead of continuing to rise, being stuck on a plateau. A great deal of work has been done in the past year within the Government to examine the land requirements for various sectors of industry; not only to encourage large new ventures such as those I have just mentioned, but also to ensure that existing industries can continue to develop and expand.

Industrial progress does not, of course, depend only upon adequate land being available. There are other elements too numerous to mention. But technical training, productivity, standards, design and marketing are all important contributors to industrial efficiency. I think it is not too much to say that there has been continued improvement in all of these. Like you, Dr. Chuang, I was particularly pleased to see the formal establishment in October of the new Hong Kong Training Council under the chairmanship of Mr. T.K. Ann. This Council has a vital part to play in ensuring that our young people are adequately trained to undertake the skilled industrial work which is now more and more needed. I note

/also •••••

Tuesday, December 11, 1973

- 8 -

also that the special educational project,the C.M.A. Prevocational School, is now going forward and should be ready for classes in 1975. Your Association has shown great initiative and foresight in promoting and helping to finance this.

One of the highlights of this year’s exhibition, which you also mentioned fir. Chuang, is Hong Kong’s first - indeed, I am told, South-East Asia’s first - major Industrial Safety Exhibition, which is being held in the exhibition pavilion to my left. Both the Government and the private sector are becoming increasingly alarmed at the huge toll each year of accidents at work, which are now happening at the rate of one every seven or eight minutes throughout the day - twice the road accident injury rate. Last year 296 people were killed and nearly 30,000 injured at work. Virtually every one of these accidents could have been avoided by proper safety precautions. I am particularly pleased that this safety exhibition represents a joint effort by industry, commerce and the Government, because I am sure that only by such a combined attack will this terrible toll in human lives and suffering be reduced.

Dr. Chuang, Ladies and gentlemen, I congratulate you on this Exhibition, and I wish it all success. I am sure its success will be just as bright if, against tradition, I do not switch on the lights while there is still daylight.

I now have much pleasure in declaring open this 31st Exhibition of Hong Kong products.

0 - -

PR 33 400003S

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

SUPPLEMENT December 11, 1973

MASS TRANSIT RAILWAY SYSTEM Government To Negotiate With Japanese Consortium

****»»«

The Government announced this evening that it has decided to enter into negotiations with the Japanese Consortium, represented locally by Jardine, I latheson and Company Limited, to see whether it is possible to conclude a contract for the construction and equipment of the first four stages of the Mass Transit Railway. This decision has been taken following upon a series of discussions which have taken place between the I lass Transit Steering Group and the three consortia which had put forward single contract proposals.

In announcing this decision a Government spokesman stressed that the negotiations will take a number of months, but will begin immediately. Whether or not the negotiations can be brought to a successful conclusion will depend upon the Japanese Consortium’s ability and willingness to conform to the Government’s detailed requirements for a contract.

The Government spokesman said that one of the most important requirements laid down by the Government was that the contract price should be limited to $5,000 million. This was because it was considered that this was the maximum sum the railway could afford within a given fare structure and bearing in mind the long period over which the debt lias to be repaid, resulting in a very heavy interest burden. "The Japanese Consortium’s proposal was the only one which was within this limitation,"' he said.

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House. Hong Kong. Tel: 5-233191 /Should ...........................................................

Tuesday, December 11, 1973

- 2 -

Should it not be possible to conclude a contract with the Japanese Consortium, the Government spokesman added, consideration would be given to negotiating with one or both of the other consortia, the Anglo-Italian Group represented locally by Hutchison International and the Anglo-French-German Consortium by Hong Kong Metro Constructors,

-------0----------

gelease Time: 8,^0 p.m>

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Wednesday, December 12, 1973

CONTENTS

fiagjBL

Securities Bill introduced in Legislative Council •«•••••>• 1

Proposed legislation for the protection of investors 5

New rent bill will come into force on Saturday ..................  7

Government urged to set up advisory committee on rent control ........................................................  10

Loan scheme suggested to help civil servants buy flats •••• 12

Restriction period on building development in Mid-Levels extended .................• 15

Provisions for suspending prison sentences extended ••••••• 17

Permanent ferry service between Central and Kwun Tong approved •••••••••••......•••••••.............................    19

Seven bills passed in Legco...................................... 20

Governor sets example in fuel conservation....................... 21

Chairman of Oil Policy Committee will meet the Press tomorrow ........................................................ 22

New post office in Mei Foo Sun Chuen ...........................  23

Temporary water interruption in Sha Tin ......................... 23

Education olerk retiring after 25 years in public service • 24

**#«**»

Daily guide to wholesale prices and supply of basic food commodities

Release time: 9*30 p<m.

• wued by Government Gffrw<?cs. Oacansfa-kl '.-tan® Tn*. 5-233191

Wednesday, December 12, 1973

- 1 -

SECURITIES BILL INTRODUCED IN LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL

Financial Secretary Outlines Proposed Amendments »»**«***

The government intends to defer implementation of that section of the Securities Bill dealing with "insider trading" pending the publication and assessment of United Kingdom legislation on the same subject.

Announcing this today, the Financial Secretary, the Hon. C.P. ” Haddon—Cave, told the Legislative Council that the term "insider trading" was fraught with difficulty as regards adequate definition of what it includes and in suggesting means of averting it.

■’Phus there is a danger that, in attempting to deal with the problem, the definition will be cast so wide as to hamper legitimate activities without preventing the objectionable abuse," he said. "This obviously we must avoid."

The Financial Secretary also gave notice of his intention to propose a host of other amendments to various sections of the bill at a later stage.

In a detailed explanation of the bill, Mr. Haddon-Cave emphasised that it "does not in any way restrict the rights of responsible participants in the market.

"Rather, it provides the basic framework which will permit the securities industry in Hong Kong to evolve rationally, thereby assuming its rightful place as one of the leading stock markets in the world."

/Since •••••••

J Wednesday, December 12, 1973

- 2 -

Since the bill was first published for public comment, he said, nearly JOO comments, queries and recommendations had been received. The number of suggestions for amendments alone was about 2J0, of which about half were acceptable to the government and would be subject of motions when the bill is considered in committee.

He stressed, however, that none of the proposed amendments involved any retreat on a point of principle, only of application and clarification.

One amendment he proposed to make concerned the establishment of one common compensation fund for all stock exchanges within one month of the particular section in the bill coming into force.

”The principle of one common compensation fund has become possible as a result of the close co-operation which has developed recently between the exchanges and which I regard as a most welcome development,” ho said.

At present, the bill proposes that each stock exchange is to have its own compensation fund which is to be administered by a committee of each exchange. This fund would consist of two parts — a reserve account consisting of an initial 550,000 to be deposited by the stock exchange on behalf of each member and a subsequent deposit to be determined by the Securities Commission six months later either in cash or securities or in the form of a bank guarantee; and a primary account that would be built up by a monthly payment starting with the enactment of the bill .

Under the proposed amendment to be made by the Financial Secretary, each Stock oxchange would deposit with the Securities Commission an initial sum equivalent to S50>000 per member which would be divided egnal 1 y into a cash deposit of 525,000 and an irrevocable bank guarantee in the sum of 525,000.

/"With

Wednesday, December 12, 1973

- 3 -

"With roughly 1,000 members these deposits would amount to i}25 million in cash and v25 million in bank guarantees," he said. 'Whether these deposits arc provided directly from the funds which the exchange itself holds as a corporate body or by calls on their members would be entirely a matter for the exchange."

He added that where an exchange had, or was prepared, to establish a scheme whereby the transactions of each broker were guaranteed to a substantial sum, the Commissioner would be empowered to dispense with the bank guarantee of £25,000.

Mr. Haddon-Cave felt that these proposals were practical and simple and should not prove to be burdensome to the stock exchanges or their members. It was clear, however, that this was a field from which we could only learn from experience.

He undertook, therefore, that whatever arrangements were finally written into the bill would be subject to review in two years time.

The Financial Secretary described the part dealing with the establishment of compensation funds as "perhaps the most controversial" but he was adamant on two points; namely that a compensation fund of significant size must be set up at once mostly in liquid form, and that the investment of this fund must be vested in an independent body on which the proposed Federation of Stock Exchanges should be represented.

Ho went on to say that he would probably also move an amendment whereby a committee of the Federation — as opposed to the four committees of the stock exchanges — would have responsibility for assessing and approving claims against the fund.

/Claims •••••

Wednesday, December 12, 1973

Cl anms paid from the fund would continue to be limited to a total of million per member, but such payments would have to be made good by the individual stock exchange to whom the member incurring the liability belonged.

The control of the investment policy of the actual compensation fund itself would be vested in a Standing Committee of the Comniaeion on which the Federation would have two representatives. The interest earned on this investment would be repaid to the individual stock exchanges annually.

The Financial Secretary also intends to introduce amendments to:

* Tlie powers of the Securities Commission to make rules under clause 12.

Clause 25 so as to provide for prior consultations with the Federation of Stock Exchanges before the Commissioner exercises his powers to close the exchanges for five days in case of emergency.

Part VII of the bill dealing with records, so that the Commissioner may be empowered to inspect only the register of securities when he believes an offence has been committed. Where he does inspect them he may only reveal the contents to the Attorney General and to no other person.

* Clause 72 to spell out at greater length the provision dealing with hawking of shares.

0 - -

Wednesday, December 12, 1973

- 5 -

LEGISLATION TO PROTECT INVESTORS INTRODUCED IN LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL

*«>»*«**

The Protection of Investors Bill 1973, introduced into the Legislative Council for the first time today, makes it an offence for anyone to induce investors by fraudulent and reckless means to buy and sell securities, or to invest in any profit making scheme based on securities, or any other form of property.

It also bans advertisements which invite the public to invest in any form of property.

*

In moving the second reading of the bill, the Financial Secretary, the Hon. C.P. Haddon-Cave, said the term "advertisement” was widely defined, and it would be an offence to have in one’s possession a document containing such an advertisement if it was intended for issue.

There were a number of exemptions, however, the more important of which were prospectuses of companies, unit trusts and mutual funds, and advertisements containing offers made to the public by registered dealers in securities, or by persons who buy and sell property, other than securities, in the course of their business.

The Securities Commission also has the power to exempt any advertisement.

The penalties for infringement are heavy and range from a fine of 5500,000 and three years’ imprisonment on conviction on indictment for contravention of the provision regarding advertisement to a fine of 51 ml115 on and imprisonment for seven years for fraudulent or reckless inducement to invest.

/Mr, Haddon-Cave •••*•••

Vfednesday, December 12, 1975 - 6 -

Mr. Haddon-Cave said that under the bill, it was an offence to advertise that a person was prepared to give investment advice or manage a portfolio for payment, unless he was registered as an investment adviser under the Securities Ordinance. But if there was no specific payment or remuneration for the services, no offence was committed.

One of the clauses provides that if anyone considers he has ... lost money by acting on a false or misleading statement or forecast, he has the right to claim damages against the person who made it.

- - - - 0---------

4

i

t

? Wednesday, December 12, 1973 NEW RENT BILL COMES INTO FORCE ON SATURDAY

*********

The Landlord and Tenant (Consolidation) (Amendment) (No* 2) B411 1973 passed its third and final reading in the Legislative Council today with a number of amendments.

The Bill, which comes into effect from Saturday (December 15), will enable landlord and tenants to freely negotiate any increase in rents by agreement at any time. Otherwise, the landlord is only permitted to increase the rent by a fair amount not exceeding 21 per eent over a two-year period-.

One of the amendments, moved by the Hon. P.C. Woo on behalf of the Unofficials, will exempt those flats with an annual rateable value of more than <530,000 from the 21 per cent limitation.

He said the method of ascertaining the rateable value would be prescribed in a new, sub-section of the bill.

”The effect will be that the landlords of such flats will be able to raise their rents by 1/5 of the difference between current rental now being paid and the fair market rent.”

He pointed out that only about 1,500 tenants in the luxury bracket would be affected by this change. Another 1,500 such flats were owner-occupied and hence not at present affected.

Other amendments included:

* A new section enabling the court to make an order for possession where the sub-tenant as well as the tenant lias caused unnecessary annoyance.

....r /* A new ••••••


Wednesdayj December 12, 1973

- 8 -

* A now sub-clause enabling the court to make an order for possession of premises in favour of a landlord where the tenant has sub-let the whole or part of the premises without the landlord’s consent. Another section of the bill makes it compulsory for tenants to notify the landlord after December 14 of any sub-letting.

* A landlord will be required to notify the Commissioner of Dating and Valuation of the rent payable by a new tenant after the existing tenant moves out and a new tenancy is entered into.

IIrt Woo said it had been pointed out that any future increase in rates, if passed onto a tenant, might be construed as an increase in rent under the new section 65(6). Since this was not the intention, he said an amendment would exclude rate increases from the operation of the section.

The Secretary for Housing, the Hon. I.M. Lightbody, also moved a number of amendments to the bill.

Among these was the effective date of this enactment which had been changed from December 1 to December 15.

The next point dealt with tenancy agreements existing before the enactment of this bill by which agreed rent increases would have already become payable but for the ”freeze” Ordinance passed in June this year, or will become payable on or after the enactment of the hi 11.

/In such

Wednesday, December 12* 1973

- 9 -

In such oases where the tenant had contracted to pay an increased rent, it would be a reasonable concession to landlords to allow such agreed increases*he said* 'Tenants in these cases would of course enjoy the security of tenure afforded by the bill."

Mr* Lightbody noted that the bill provided for on»going rent increases* and should ensure property owners a reasonable return on their investment while leaving newly completed premises free of control* "At the same time*” he added, "existing tenants are protected r • * +

against unreasonable rent ipcroases and win enjoy security of tenure*"

• W • 0 ---------

Wednesday, December 12, 1973

* - 10 -

ADVISORY COMMITTEE ON RENT CONTROL PROPOSED

****»«

The Government was today urged to set up an advisory committee on rent control and a commission of inquiry into housing matters.

The proposals were put forward to the Legislative Council by the lion. P.C. Wt>r< when he epoke at the resumed debate on the Landlord and Tenant (Consolidation) (Amendment) (No. 2) Bill 1973.

He said these were some of the pointe raised in representations made to the Unofficial Members of the Council since the Bill wac published.

It was proposed that the advisory committee should include members » * ...

of the public representing both tenants -and landlords as well as developers

This committee would keep under review the level of rents end the a. • operation of rent control legislation.

Mr. Woo felt that the idea had much to commend it. "The complexities of rent control have become very apparent during the course nf enactment of legislation this year on the subject.

’’Obviously there will have to be further legislation in the future since the control of rent increases cannot be abolished overnight."

He noted that it would be very useful to have a standing committee which could keep under review all these complexities and propose amendments which might be needed to suit the changing circumstances, or the needs of particular groups or categories of cases.

"Hie same committee would be consulted on the details of future draft legislation. This would be in accordance with Government’s announced intention of taking responsible public ''pinion into account before making final decisions,” he added.

/On the ••••••••

Wednesday, December 12, 1973

- 11 -

On the second proposal, Mr, Woo said it was suggested that the comission of inquiry should report on the measures necessary to overcome the present shortage of accommodation and on related matters of land utilisation.

”0n this proposal I have rather more reservations since it is not clear that the additional inquiry would achieve any useful purpose on top of the work constantly being done in this sphere by the newly constituted housing authority and by Government’s planning committees,

’’But there is, I think, a case for greater unofficial representation at the planning stages.

”In particular unofficial representation! on the Land Development Planning Committee and the various committees set up to co-ordinate the development of new towns seem highly desirable,” he said.

-------0----------

/12

Wednesday, December 12, 1973

- 12 -

LOAN SCHEME PROPOSED TO HELP CIVIL SERVANTS BUY FLATS

********

The government was today urged to consider setting up a loan scheme to assist public servants in the middle income group who are not entitled to government accommodation or housing allowances, in buying their own flats.

The suggestion was made in the Legislative Council by the Hon.

Hilton Cheon^Leen who described the scheme as ’’one way to constructively stimulate the real estate market.”

His proposal envisaged a government loan to meet two-thirds of any down payment on any flat purchased, and subsequently to lend up to half of any monthly instalment payments.

Any funds advanced by the government would be charged, subject to the agreement of the Staff Associations, against the pension account of the civil servant concerned. The interest rate charged should vary between five per cent and seven and a half per cent.

"Such a loan scheme using some of the government’s surplus funds would not only bring direct benefit to local people. It would also help to create more home-ownership and to that extent to reduce ovei>-speculation in the buying and selling of small and medium-sized flats," Mr. Cheong-Leen said.

The real estate market, he went on, was in a rather inactive state, and several thousands of recently completed flats were still vacant.

He noted that most of the flat owners preferred to sell rather than to rent, but the anomaly was that the middle income families who were desperately in need of such accommodation could not afford the usual 25 per cent down paynent’ /The loan.......

I

Wednesday, December 12, 1973 - 13 -

The loan scheme, he felt, would be of great benefit to both the real estate market and those civil servants who were neither entitled to allocation in public housing nor were given government accommodation or housing allowances.

Mr. Cheong-Leen made the remarks when speaking in support of the Landlord and Tenant (Consolidation) (Amendment) (No. 2) Bill.

The bill itself, he said, was "a genuine attempt to stabilise domestic rentals, provide security of tenure, keep down inflation, and yet not to greatly inhibit private enterprise from investing in new building projects to provide even more domestic accommodation.0

The Hon. Wilfred Wong also spoke in support of the bill which,he said, would serve to continue to provide security of tenure during the life of the legislation, permitting the landlord to regain possession under certain circumstances.

It would rationalise the rent increases as the sharp rise in the rental level of new lettings justified such legislation, and it would also encourage now building by not limiting rents for them, he said.

Deferring to suggestions that high class flats should be exempt from control, Mr. 'Jong said that to take this step would be to ignore the relativity of high class flats with medium class flats "and make it harder for the higher income executives and owners of large families to live. ”

On the whole, he said, there would only be a few cases which would exceed the 21 per cent increase since rents for high class flats had been free from control for more than 10 years.

/As regards •••••

Wednesday, December 12, 1973

- 14 -

As regards real estate developers, he said they performed a service to the community and were entitled to earn their ’’legitimate profit.”

Mr. Wong noted it was reassuring to a real estate developer that any new building completed after the bill comes into effect would be exempt from control and the developer would be able to charge whatever the traffic could bear.

0---------

Wednesday, December 12, 1973

- 15 -

RESTRICTION ON BUILDING DEVELOPMENT IN MID-LEVELS *********

The Director of Public Works, the Hon. A.S. Robertson, said today that the temporary restriction on building development in Pok Fu Lea and Mid-levels should be extended to give the Government more time to consider the implications of the consultants report on the traffic problems in the areas.

He was speaking in the Legislative Council this afternoon when he moved the second reading of the Temporary Restriction of Building Development (Pok FuLam and Mid-levels) (Amendment) Bill 1975*

The Bill aims to extend the period of restriction on approval of building plans in these areas to December 31, 1974.

The restrictions, contained in the Temporary Restriction of Building Development (Pok FuLam and Mid-levels) Ordinance, were introduced on August 2, 1973*

The Ordinance empowers the Building Authority to refuse to approve plans for now buildings in the two areas for a period of six months os from July 4 this year.

The measures were introduced in an attempt to forestall serious traffic problems which would result if building continued to be unrestricted in the areas.

Referring to the consultants report, Mr. Robertson said it did not offer any. hope of an easy solution to the problems.

/He said: ...  •

Wednesday, December 12, 1973

- 16 -

He said: ’’Such road improvements as are possible in the congested area of the’ Mid-levels will be more than offset by the increase in traffic caused by new development under construction or for which plans have been approved.

"The only possibility of even keeping traffic moving as it does at present is to institute traffic management schemes," Mr. Robertson said.

Hie Public Works Department, he added, was already discussing a number of these schemes with other interested departments, but it would inevitably be some time before such schemes could be implemented, and still longer before their effect could be assessed.

Therefore, it is clear that it is not yet possible to remove the restrictions on development in the Mid-levels and pok areas,

Mr. Robertson reiterated that in view of the size of the problem and the limitations of any feasible road system, "we should not be too sanguine that a solution will be easy to find or quickly achieved."

-------0----------

/17.........

Wednesday, December 12, 1973

- 17 -

PHOVISIONS FOR SUSPENDING PRISON SENTENCES

Extended For Another Three Years * *****

The Legislative Council today approved a resolution to extend for a further three years the provisions for suspension of prison sentences under the Criminal Procedure Ordinance.

In moving the resolution, the Attorney General, the Hon. J.W.D. Hobley, said the extension would provide an adequate opportunity for a realistic assessment of the effectiveness of the provisions.

He stressed that steps had been taken to ensure that as much information as possible would be available by the time the matter came up for review again.

Mr. Hobley said the Chief Justice strongly felt that the provisions should continue in operation. !,He : s supported in this by the magistrates — by whom the power to suspend is most frequently used in practice.

”They consider that it provides them with a valuable alternative way of dealing with some offenders.”

Reviewing the past operation of these provisions, he said: ”The position is that, since March 1971 when they came into operation, a prison sentence has been suspended in 1,362 cases.

”In 2j>2 of those cases, the defendants have subsequently committed further offences and the suspended sentences have taken effect. Those figures give some ground for thinking that suspended sentences have been successful.”

/However, •••••••

Wednesday, December 12, 19Z5

- 18 -

However, he said they might be misleading for two main reasons* Firstly, many of the suspended sentences could still take effect, since the period for which a sentence might be suspended could be for up to three years* And secondly, it was impossible at this stage to be sure that the apparently low rate of further convictions was not attributable to the fact that further offences had not been detected, he said*

-------0----------

/19.......

Wednesday, December 12, 1973

19

NEV/ CENTRAL-KWUNTONG FERRY SERVICE APPROVED ******

The Legislative Council today adopted a motion permitting the Hong Kong and Yaumati Ferry Company Limited to operate a permanent passenger ferry service between Central District (Jubilee Street) and Kwun Tong.

Speaking on the motion, the Financial Secretary, the Hon. C.P. Haddon-Cave, said that the company had been operating this service sinoe May 1972 under a temporary licence granted by the Commissioner for Transport.

’’The experimental service has proved to be very popular with / weekday commuters as indicated by rhe fact that approximately 360,000 passengers travel by it every month/’ he said.

’’Since the majority of these passengers would otherwise have to travel by various forms of land transport between Kwun Tong and other harbour crossing points in Kowloon rhe service has helped to ease road congestion.n

The Financial Secretary pointed out that the ferry company’s application for inclusion of this new service ir its franchise had the support of the Transport Advisory Committee.

-------0---------

/20........

Wednesday, December 12, 1973

- 20 -

BILLS PASS FINAL READINGS ******

Seven bills passed their third and final readings in the Legislative Council today.

They were: the Miscellaneous Amendments (Powers of the Governor in Council) Bill 1973; the Cross-Harbour Tunnel (Amendment) Bill 1973; the Rating (Amendment) Bill 1973; the Crown Leases Bill 1973; the Law Revision (Miscellaneous Amendments) Bill 1973; the Po Leung Kuk Bill 1973; and the Landlord and Tenant (Consolidation) (Amendment) (No. 2) Bill 1973-

Three other bills were read for the first time but debate on them was adjourned. These were the Securities Bill 1973? the Protection of Investors Bill 1973? and the Temporary Restriction of Building Development (Pok Fu Lam and Mid-Levels) (Amendment) Bill 1973-

Four reports were tabled at the meeting. They were the annual reports of the Legal Aid, Marine, and Registration of Persons departments and the Royal Observatory.

-------0----------

Wednesday, December 12, 1973

- 21 -

GOVERNOR SHOWS THE WAY IN CONSERVING FUEL

The Governor and Lady MacLehose are setting an example for other residents of Hong Kong in their efforts to economise on the of fuel*

A number of measures have been introduced in Government House and these have led to big savings not only in electricity, but in fuel consumption as well.

The Governor’s large car has virtually been "mothballed" and the main vehicle used, wherever possible, is a smaller estate car which can cover more than twice the mileage on the same amount of fuel.

Since the economy car was introduced several weeks ago there has been a reduction of per cent in the amount of fu61 consumed over Octobers figure, and this is expected to be reduced even further this month.

In the use of electricity, it is estimated that there has been a 4? per cent reduction in consumption brought about by the adoption of certain other measures at Government House>

All floodlighting has been turned off since November 22 and the air—conditioning has been shut—off except for ventilation where this is necessary.

In contrast with other years, there will be no illuminated Christmas tree in the grounds of Government House. In the past something like 2,000 bulbs have been used to light the tree.

The operation of the laundry has also been curtailed for one day each week to cut down on the use of electricity.

-------0----------

/22........

Wednesday December 12, 1975

- 22 -

PRESS CONFERENCE ON OIL

********

Note to Editors; A press conference given by the Deputy Colonial Secretary and Chairman of the Oil Policy Committee, Mr, M.D.A. Clinton, will be held at 12 noon tomorrow (Thursday) in the G«I«S» 35 mm theatre, 5th floor., Beaconsfield House.

Also attending will bo the Director of Oil Supplies, Mr, Roy Porter$ the Assistant Economic Secretary, Mr. Richard Butler, and the . , Director of Information, Mr. David Ford.

Ulis is intended to be the first in a series of regular press conferences to keep you in touch with the oil situation in general. You are invited to send a reporter and/ or photographer to cover the conference.

-------0---------

Wednesday, December 12, 1975

- 25 -

NEW MEI FOO SUN CHUEN POST OFFICE • ******

A new post office will open at Lai Wan Road in the Mei Foo Sun Cliuen Estate on Friday (December 14) at 10 a.m.

Except for the acceptance of insured letters and boxes, the full range of post office business will be transacted at the new office.

The hours of business will be from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. and from 2.15 to 5 p.ra. on weekdays, and from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturdays.

A stamp vending machine giving 2Miour availability of 10-cent stamps has been installed.

The Mei Foo Sun Chuen Post Office will bring the total number of post offices to 68, including a mobile post office in the New Territories.

------- 0--------

WATER CUT

Water supply to a number of premises in Sha Tin will be interrupted for eight hours from 10 p.m. on Friday (December 14) when water connections work will be carried out at the junction of Lion Rock Tunnel Road and Taipo Road.

Affected by the temporary stoppage will be Ha Wo Che, Fo Tan, Ho Tung Lau and the Kowloon-Canton Railway workshop at Sha Tin.

-------0---------

/24.........

’Wednesday, December 12, 1973

- 24 -

EDUCATION CLERK RETIRING

Mr. Lau Sheung-man, a Clerical Officer Class I in the Education Department’s Information and Public Relations .Section, is going on leave shortly prior to retirement after 25 years service.

He will be presented with a gift from his friends and colleagues on Friday (December 14) by the Assistant Director of Education (Administration), Mr. M*C. Horgan.

Hr. Lau began his career in the government as a Temporary Clerk in 1948 when he was posted to the Library Section of the Colonial Secretariat.

In 1954 he was promoted to a Class 2 Clerk. Later the same

9

year, Mr. Lau was transferred to the Education Department. Seven years later he was promoted to his present rank.

Note to Editors: You are invited to send a representative

to cover the presentation ceremony at 4 p.rn. on December 14 in the Education Department’s Conference Room, Lee Gardens, 3rd floor, Hysan Avenue, Causeway Bay, Hong Kong.

0--------

Wednesday, December 12, 1975

CONSUMER ADVISORY SERVICE

Daily Guide To Wholesale Market Prices And Supplies

*******

The following prices were realised today (Wednesday) at sales under the Rice Control Scheme and at the Vegetable Marketing Organisation Wholesale Market and the Fish Marketing Organisation Wholesale Market at Cheung Sha Wan, Kowloon:

Supplies and Wholesale Prices of Rice

Availability Wholesale Price

Grade of Supply (S/catty)

China Rico Average

o - old crop See Mew Good 1.64

- new crop 1.72

S.C.Jien - old crop Good 1.58

Po Ngai Good 1.42

Chu Cho Good 1.22

Thai Rice 1OC96 VZhole Good 1.52

10-15# Brokers Good 1.50

A1 Super Extra Good 1.45

A1 Super Good 1.37

Whole Glutinous Limited 1.52

U.S. Rice Good 1.62

Australian Rice

Pakistan Rice

Taiwan Rice - -

/Supplies and

Wednesday, December 12, 1975

Supplies and Wholesale Prices of Marine Fish

Availability Wholesale Price

Species, of Supply ($/catty)

High Low Average

Golden Thread Normal 4.2 2.8 3.5

Big-Eyes Good 2.4 0.6 1.7

Squid Limited 5.5 1.5 4.0

Hair-Tails Good 2.0 0.8 1.4

Lizard Sishes Normal 2.6 1.0 1.8

Croakers Good 1.6 0.7 1.2

Conger-Pike-Eels Normal 2.3 1.7 2.0

Melon Coat Good 2.7 1.5 2.0

Breams Limited 4.5 3.8 4.2

Yellow Belly Normal 1.2 0.8 1.0

Mackerels Good 3-7 2.5 3.2

Red Goat Fish Good 0.6 0.4 0.55

Fork-Tail Limited 1.0 0.6 0.8

Horse-Head Limited 4.5 3.2 3.8

Melon Seed Limited 3.0 1.3 2.2

Pomfrets Scarce 8.0 6.0 7.0

Garoupas Limited 8.0 5.5 7.0

Yellow Croaker Normal 5.5 3.5 4.5

/Supplies and ••••«••

Wednesday, December 12, 1973

Supplies and Wholesale Prices of

Locally Produced Vegetables

Availability of Supply Wholesale Price (fl/catty)

High Low Average

Flowering cabbage Limited 2.4 0.8 1.6

White cabbage Normal 0.6 0.2 0.4

Chinese lettuoe Normal 0.6 0.2 0.4

•Chinese kale Normal 1.0 0.25 0.5

ji'ing onion Normal 1.2 0.4 0.8

Spinach Normal 1.5 0.7 1.0

’/a ter cress Normal 1.2 0.3 0.7

Leaf mustard cabbage Scarce 0.5 0.2 0.3

Tomato Scarce 2.2 1.2 1.6

Supplies and Wholesale Prices of Pork (Live weight)

Availability of Supply Wholesale Price (fl/picul) Average

Normal 285

EIS I®

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Thursday, December 1^, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No>

New rent control ordinance clarified ...................... 1

Night hydrofoil service to Macau approved ................• « 4

UK study team completes survey on proposed Hong Kong register of shipping ........................................  ..... 5

Second ECAFE conference for Asian shippers •••••••••.......• 7

Improvement works to be carried out in estate communal bathrooms ................................................. 8

Official opening of Sha Tin Government Secondary School ••• 9

1974 Royal Observatory calendar on sale now........... 10

Awards to voluntary rainfall observers ...................... 11

«*«*«**

Daily guide to wholesale prices and supply of basic food commodities

Release time: 8.1j> p,m«

Issued by Government Services &encorshvMXoui>e, Hon® Konjj Te* 5-233191

Thursday, December 13, 1973

I®/ RENT CONTROL PROVISIONS CLARIFIED

********

A spokesman for the Rating and Valuation Department today clarified some points in the new rent control ordinance which was passed by the Legislative Council yesterday, and which will come into effect this Saturday (December 15).

Following an amendment proposed by the Hon. P.C. Woo on behalf of the Unofficials, premises with a rateable value of over 330,000 will be allowed to have a rent increase of over 21 per cent of the current rent.

This allowed increase, however, will still be limited to one-fifth of the difference between the current rent and the fair market rent assessed by the department.

For example, if the current rent is 32,200 and the fair market rent is assessed to be 85,000; one-fifth of their difference is 8560. This will be the maximum amount of increase that can be charged for the premises if it has a rateable value of over 830,000.

If the premises has a rateable value of 830,000 or less, the increase in rent will be limited to 21 per cent of the current rent, that is 3462.

On rate increases, the spokesman pointed out that these may be passed on to tenants, regardless of the rateable value of the premises.

Any rate increase, if passed on to tenants, cannot be counted as a rent increase under the Ordinance.

The spokesman revealed however- that there are no plans for a general review of rateable values next year.

/Copies of ......

Thurs'day, December 1J, 1973

- 2 -

Copies of a simple booklet explaining the main points of the Ordinance will be available free of charge from next week at the Rating and Valuation Department, City District Offices, Tenancy Enquiry Bureaux and District Offices in the New Territories. Forms to be used under the new Ordinance will also be available at these places.

Members of the public are urged to obtain copies of the boolilet if they are not clear about the new legislation.

The new Landlord and Tenant (Consolidation) (Amendment) (No. 2) Ordinance covers virtually all existing domestic tenancies in post-war premises; and provides existing tenants with security of tenure up to December 15, 1976.

Among others, the Ordinance:

* doos not control tenancies in new buildings certified for occupation after December 14, 1973*

* invalidates any agreement between landlords and tenants to contract out of the control of the legislation;

* allows landlords and tenants to agree freely to any rent increase;

* provides, failing agreement, for the landlord to apply to the Rating and Valuation Department for a certificate of rent increase;

sets the limit of rent increase to one-fifth of the difference between the current rent and the fair market rent; the latter to be assessed by the

/department ......

Thursday, December 13, 1973

- 3 -

department - provided that for premises with a rateable value of 1130,000 or less, the increase cannot exceed 21 per cent of the current rent.

* controls the new rent for two years after the . increase, if the increase is made after December 14, 1973;

* disallows a rent increase within one year of the last increase, if that increase was made on or before December 14, 1973» or within one year of the tenancy;

* requires the landlord to serve a notice of the certified increase on the tenant, specifying the effective date of increase, which cannot be earlier than one month from the date of service of the notice;

* allows the landlord who lets his premises to a new tenant after December 14, 1973» to agree any rent, although he will have to notify the Commissioner of Rating and Valuation of the new rent;

* allows the landlord to regain his premises, on application to the District Court, if he wants the premises for his own domestic use or if he intends to rebuild it;

* provides for an Independent Rent Tribunal to review certificates of rent increase issued by the Rating and Valuation Department, and provides for either the landlord or tenant, if not satisfied with the Tribunal’s decision, to appeal to the District Court;

/* allows •••••

Thursday, December 13j 1973

- 4 -

* allows rent increases to be passed to sub-tenants, although the increase should generally follow those paid by the principal tenant and in any case not above 21 per cent of the original rent, and

* allows rates increases to be passed on to tenants, although this increase will not count as a rent increase for the purposes of the Ordinance.

-------0---------

HYDROFOIL NIGHT OPERATIONS APPROVED

********

The Marine Department has given the go-ahead for a night hydrofoil

service to Ilacau subject to certain conditions, it was announced today.

This.follows a series of night trials aboard the hydrofoil

M.V. Patane using a low level television system known as Vidar.

However, the approval is subject to certain mechanical modifications

being made to the Vidar installation and some minor improvements to the bridge layout aboard the hydrofoil.

Officers operating such hydrofoils would also require special training in the use of the Vidar coupled with radar as an anti-collision device.

/5........

Thursday, December 131 1973

- 5 -

PROPOSED HONG KONG SHIPPING REGISTER

UK Study Team Completes Work

The British study team of the Department of Trade and Industry has completed its work in Hong Kong in relation to the proposed Hong Kong Register of Shipping.

The team is led by Dr. J. Cowley and comprises Mr. G.W. Thompson, Captain E.G. Anderson and Mr. A.J. Hunt. On return to the United Kingdom a comprehensive report will be prepared and submitted to the department.

The team has not been concerned with policy matters. Their terms of reference were confined to professional and technical matters. Any terms which may be negotiated for a separate Register will be in the nature of a package and it is not possible to forecast before further discussions in London what form such a package might take. No decision has yet been taken on the establishment of a separate Register.

Whilst in Hong Kong, the members of the team have studied in depth many aspects of the proposed Register and their work has included visits to Hong Kong-owned ships in normal service to meet the officers and crews and to witness the general operation of the vessels. In addition, a number of deck and engineer officers were interviewed with the object of assessing the general standards appertaining to Hong Kong-owned ships.

Local suppliers, servicers and manufacturers of safety equipment have been visited to examine the facilities available and to ascertain the part which they fulfil in the shipping industry. Ship repair and dockyards were of interest to the team not only in relation to their ship servicing function but also with reference to the part which they might play in providing practical training for future marine engineer officers.

/Since the........

Thursday, December 13, 1973

- 6 -

Since the safe and efficient operation of ships depends to a high degree on the standards of directed training and associated professional education of the ships’ officers and crews, the team was particularly interested in the education and training facilities available to prospective and serving personnel. Several educational and training establishments were inspected and discussions were held on the nature and duration of the courses with college staffs and school instructors.

Just over two weeks of the team’s programme were spent in Japan where inspections were made of ships under construction for Hong Kong shipowners in a number of shipyards. Testing, research and other establishments were inspected and manufacturers of safety and related equipment were visited.

During their stays in Hong Kong and Japan the members of the team discussed on an informal basis various aspects of ship operation with government and classification society surveyors, superintendents, manufacturers, shipbuilders, training officers, ship-repairers, educationalists and seamens’ welfare officers and representatives. All were most helpful.

The team also met several Hong Kong shipowners and were impressed by their approachability and by the close contact they maintained with their superintendents and other support staff.

Whilst making its investigations the team has been working with and received full eo—operation from the Director of Marine and his staff,

-------0----------

/7........

Thursday, December 13, 1973

- 7 -

ASIAN SHIPPERS TO DISCUSS COMMON PROBLEMS

******

Hong Kong will be taking part in a shipping conference in Bangkok organised by ECAJE to study the problems of shippers in the region.

Representing Hong Kong will be Mrs. Susan Yuen, Honorary Secretary of the Hong Kong Shippers’ Council, and Mr. Paul K.C. Wong, Assistant Director of Commerce and Industry (Commercial Relations).

Hie meeting wi11 be held from December 17 to 19 and will be attended by representatives of governments and shippers’ organisations.

It wi11 consider a plan of action to develop co-operation among shippers at the national, sub-regional and regional levels. Consideration will be given to the quality and frequency of shipping services available to shippers and there will be an effort to determine whether they are suited to the needs of the trade.

Special attention will be devoted to the relationships between Shippers Councils (or other representatives of shippers) and Shipping Conferences and ways will be explored of strengthening shipping bodies so that they can meet Conferences on more equal terms.

This is the second meeting organised by the ECAFE to promote shipper interests in the region. The first meeting resulted'in the training course to help in the establishment of Shippers* Councils which was hosted by the Hong Kong Government last year.

Following this training course, a number of Shippers’ Councils have been formed and it is expected that these will be represented at the ECAJE meeting.

-----0----------

/8........

Thursday, December 13?1973

- 8 -

MORE PRIVACY IN ESTATE BATHROOMS

******

The Housing Department is to spend several million dollars to improve the female communal bathrooms and latrines in all old Mark I and II public housing blocks.

The improvement consists of fitting metal gates to individual compartments and strong solid wooden doors with bolts to the main entrance of the bathrooms. Water taps will also be installed in each cubicle•

Work has already started in four blocks at Chai Wan Estate. Improvement to other blocks in the estate will be carried cut shortly.

A ’’lump sum” tender has been called for the improvement works which are scheduled to be completed in four to five months.

Mr. Ralph Husband, Assistant Director of Housing, said the need for improvement had long been felt.

’’The fitting of doors to individual cubicles in the bathrooms will give more privacy to the users, and the strong wooden door at the entrance will surely provide added security,” he said.

Last year, similar improvements were carried out at Tung Tau Estate, and tenants’ reaction had been most favourable.

-------0---------

/9........

Thursday, December 13, 1973

- 9 -

OPENING OF SHA TIN GOVERNMENT SECONDARY SCHOOL

**«**«*»«

The newly completed million Sha Tin Government Secondary School will be officially opened tomorrow (Friday) by Mr. P.C. Woo, Senior Unofficial Member of the Legislative Council and Chairman of the Board of Education.

The school will provide accommodation for 920 pupils. At present there are 4o0 pupils in Forms 1 and 2.

Apart from 24 normal .classrooms, there are four laboratories, seven specialist teaching rooms, an assembly hall, a covered playground and a basketball court.

Before Mr. Woo unveils- a plaque, the Director of Education, Mr. J. Canning will invite the Principal Government Architect, Mr. C. Bramwell, to hand the keys of the school to the Principal, Mr. J. Ormerod.

Note to Editors: You are invited to have the opening ceremony

covered. It begins at 4 p<,m. tomorrow.

A 14— seater van for press representatives will leave the Kowloon Sub-Pool behind the Tsim Sha Tsui Post Office at 3 p«m. sharp for the school on Friday.

As seats are limited, you are invited to reserve one for your representative by telephoning the Education Department’s Information and Public Relations Section, Tel. 5-778311 ext. 155 as soon as possible.

- - 0 - -

/10

Thursday, December 13, 1973

- 10 -

1974 ROYAL OBSERVATORY CALENDAR ON SALE

*********

The Royal Observatory Calendar for 1974 is now on sale at 36 per copy.

Extra copies have been printed this year in view of the high demand in the past and those interested in the meteorological, astronomical and tidal data contained in it, are advised to get their copies early to avoid disappointment.

The 1974 calendar is similar in layout to that of the 1973 edition and contains, in both English and Chinese, times of sunrise, sunset, moon rise and moon set, times and heights of high and low tide.

Astronomical events such as eclipses and phases of the moon, and other useful and informative diagrams and illustrations are also contained in the calendar.

Copies of the calendar are available at the Government Publications Centre at Star Ferry Concourse, Hong Kong; the Government Printing Department, Java Road, North Point and the Royal Observatory, Nathan Road, Kowloon or can be ordered through leading bookstores.

-------0---------

/11

Thursday, December 13, 1973

- 11 -

AWARDS FOR VOLUNTARY RAINFALL OBSERVERS

*«**«»*

Mr. G.J. Bell, Director of Royal Observatory, tomorrow will present awards to five voluntary rainfall observers for their outstanding service in the maintenance of their rainfall stations.

The presentation ceremony will he held at the headquarters of the Observatory in Nathan Road, Kowloonf at 3.30 p.m.

The Royal Observatory maintains a network consisting of about 120 rainfall observing stations situated at various places in Hong Kong.

Many people from all walks of life have willingly given their services as voluntary observers.

As a gesture of appreciation for their co-operation, the Royal Observatory has invited them to a special reception tomorrow. They will he shown the work of the Observatory and the instruments used.

The five voluntary observers who will receive the awards are: Mr. Lam Chi-chi ng, from Tai Lam Chung Forest Reserve Station; Mr. Ng Wai-tin, from Sha Tin Public Primary School? Mr. William Chan, from Tai Mei Tuk Marine Laboratory; Mr. Sze Kam-ching, fro# Tsuen Wan Public Primary School and Mr. Ching Wing-choy, from Tai Mo Shan Farm.

Note to Editors: You are invited to have the presentation

and reception covered. The reception starts at 2.30 p.m. The presentation ceremony will be held at 3.30 p.m.

-------0---------

Thursday, December 15» 1975

CONSUMER ADVISORY SERVICE

Daily Guide To Wholesale Market Prices And Supplies

******

The following prices were realised today (Thursday) sales under the Rice Control Scheme and at the Vegetable Marketing Organisation Wholesale Market and the Fish Marketing Organisation Wholesale Market at 0

Cheung Sha Wan, Kowloon:

Supplies and Wholesale Prices of Rice

Grade Availability of Supply Wholesale Price (8/catty)

China Rice Average

old crop See Mew ‘ — new crop Good 1.64 1.72

S.C.Jion - old crop Good 1.66

Po I Igai Good 1.42

Chu Cho Cood • t 1.22

Thai Rico

lOCjHmole Cood Ko Sale

10-15# Brokens Good 1.50

A1 Super Extra Good ' 1.45

A1 Super Good 1.37-1.22

Whole Glutinous Limited 1.52

U.S. Rice Good 1.62

Australian Rioe

Pakistan Rice • • e

Taiwan Rico — • t ••

/Supplies and *•••••*

Thursday, December 1J,

Supplies and Wholesale Prices of Marine Fish

Availability Wholesale Price

of Supply (8/catty)

Sjaecies

Hj£h Low • Average

Golden Thread Good 4.J0 2.50 3.50

Big-Eyes Good 2.60 0.60 1.60

Squid Konnai 6.00 1.80 4.00

Hair-Tails Good 2.20 1.50 1.80

Lizard Fishes Normal 2.40 0.80 1.70

Croakers Good 2.00 0.50 1.60

Conger-Pike-Eels Normal 2.30 1.70 2.00

Melon Coat Good 2.40 1.30 1.70

Breams Normal -5.00 2.50 4.80

Yellow Belly Good 1.20 0.70 0.90

Mackerels Good 3.00 2.C0 2.50

Red Goat Fish Good 2.20 0.70 1.60

Fork-Tail Normal. 1.20 0.40 0.80

Horse-Head Normal 5.50 2.50 4.CO

Melon Seed Limited 2.70, 1.70 2.00

Ponfrots Scarce 9.00 7.50 8.50

Garoupas 5 Normal 8.50 5.50 7.50

Yellow Croaker -

/Supplies and

Thursday, December 1J, 1973

Supplies end Wholesale Prices of

Locally Produced Vegetables

type Availability of Supply Wholesale Price

(S/catty)

Low Average

Flowering cabbage Limited 2.20 0.70 1.50

White cabbage Normal 0.60 0.20 0.40

Chinese Lettuce Normal • 0.60 0.20 0.40

Chinese Kale Normal 0.80 0.15 0.45

Spring onion Normal 1.20 0.40 0.80

Spinach Normal 1.40 • 0.60 1.00

Water cross : Normal 1.10 0.20 0.60

Loaf mustard cabbago Scarce 0.50 0.20 0.35

Tomato Scarce 2.20 1.20 1.60

Supplies and Wholesale Prices of Pork (Live woi^it)

• * • Availability of Supply Wholesale Price ( 8/ picul) (Average)

Pork • Good ’285

0

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Friday, December 14, 1973

CONTENTS

Page, N»t

Motorists asked to voluntarily reduce the use of their vehicles •«••••.•••...........................................  1

Report on Apliohau oil spillage submitted to Governor ......... J

Labour Commissioner deplores unnecessary huge losses caused by industrial accidents ....................................... 4

Sha Tin to get more schools to keep pace with development • 6

Re-appraisal of type of education being provided in Hong Kong........................................................... 8

Contribution to society of secondary technical education •• 10

$6.8 million expansion project in South Kwai Chung polyclinic ................................................... 12

Special review on employment in manufacturing industries published •••«•••••••••....................................... 13

Section of Electric Road routed one-way temporarily ••••••• 1J

New time-table for holiday passenger train services .......... 14

Clear Water Bay Read to be re-aligned in development programme...................................................   15

Estate shop tenancy agreement finalised ...................... 16

New Police divisional headquarters in Kwai Chung ............. 18

Daily guide to wholesale prices and supply of basic food commodities

Release time: 8.>0 p.r.i.

Issued by Government Information Sfeivta Hong Kong. Tel: 5*2331 %1

Friday, December 14, 1975

- 1 -

IS THAT Ti> TP TO THE NEW TERRITORIES REALLY NECESSARY ******

The government is sending out letters, in English and Chinese,

9

to 200,000 motorists asking them to voluntarily cut back on the use of their vehicles, in a determined drive to economise on the use of fuel.

The letter states that it must now be obvious to everyone that Hong Kong cannot escape some of the effects resulting from reduced oil production.

It points out that owners of motor vehicles can assist by cutting out unnecessary journeys and adopting a few simple economies, and asks ’’must you really take that trip to the New Territories next weekend?”

The letter recommends that motorists set a target of JO per cent reduction in their fuel bill, which it says ’’can easily be done with sensible driving, by sharing, by reducing pleasure trips and by cutting out all unnecessary journeys.”

Giving advice to motorists in other ways to economise, the letter says that when using a vehicle, drivers should: reduce speed, do not raoe the engine, cut out engine idling; and use the accelerator gently - drive, and brake, smoothly.

The letter also suggests the possibility of motorists setting up a roster or pooling system in their neighbourhoods as one way of improving the efficiency of cars and reducing fuel consumption.

/It says •••••••

Friday, December 14, 1973

2

It says that the government has already appealed to the community to economise where they can, and points out that there are other sectors where economies can be made without causing great inconvenience to our daily lives.

At a news conference yesterday, the Deputy Colonial Secretary, Mr. M.D.A. Clinton, who is also Chairman of the Oil Policy Committee, stressed the need for community co-operation. The more we save now by voluntary cut-backs, the more we reduce the need for mandatory controlr later.

-------0---------

/3........

Friday, December 14, 1975

- 5 -

IffiPOHT ON APLICHAU OIL SPILLAGE COMPLETED

The three-man Commission of Inquiry into the oil spillage at Aplichau last month submitted its report to the Governor today.

The report covers 15 pages and includes four appendices of detailed drawings, technical charts and relevant engineering information.

The Commission, headed by Judge W.S. Collier, was appointed on November 15, with Professor S. Mackey and Mr. P.K. Ng as members.

During their investigations they made several site inspections and held a number of preliminary hearings. Public hearings were held in the Legislative Council Chamber on December 4 and 6.

Most of the evidence presented at the hearing was in the form of written reports. Altogether 18 submissions were made. These included reports by the Fire Services Department, the Marine Department, the Public Works Department, Gammon Ltd., Tian San Construction Company, and the Shell Company.

The Commission was given up to January 51, 1974 to submit its report•

Its terms of reference were:

* To enquire into the circumstances in which a storage tank at the Shell Oil Installation at Aplichau fractured during the night of the 8th/9th November, 1973.

* To ascertain how oil escaped from that tank into the sea in spite of the various safety devices provided, and

* To make recommendations to the Governor for the prevention of similar accidents in future.

The question of pollution caused by the oil, any damage resulting therefrom, and the steps taken to remove the spilled oil were outside the Commission’s terms of reference.

-------0---------

A.........

*

Friday, December 14, 1973

- 4 -

INDUSTRIAL ACCIDENTS CLAIM RECORD TOLL THIS YEAR

Final Responsibility Lies With Management: Labour Commissioner

One in every seven people employed in Hong Kong in the past 10 years had been injured at work badly enough to require medical treatment, the Commissioner of Labour, Mr. I.R. Price, said today.

’’The number of accidents in this period was nearly 180,000,” he said. ”0r let me put it another way: imagine the entire population — man, woman and child — of the Tsz Wan Shan and Tung Tau housing estates, all injured and undergoing medical treatment.”

Mr. Price was speaking at a reception held to mark the opening of South-East Asia’s biggest-ever Industrial Safety Exhibition in the Chinese Manufacturers’ Association Pavilion at the C.M.A, Fair.

Guests at the reception included representatives of industrial, commercial and shipping firms who donated funds or loaned machinery and equipment for the exhibition.

Hr. Price said: ’’During the same period of 10 years, 2,}4O people have been killed at work — imagine some JO double-decker buses, stretched along Queen’s Road, Central, and in every seat a mangled, lifeless body.”

Mr. Price said people did not realise the magnitude of the toll Hong Kong faced from accidents at work in terms of human lives, injuries, and huge losses to the economy.

”IIow many realise that the number of people killed at work is about three times the number killed in crimes of violence?” he asked. ’’And that the number of injured at work is double the road accident rate?

/’•Today, ......

Friday, December 14, 1975

- 5 -

’’Today, this year’s accident toll is approaching — if not actually passing last year’s record high. Last year’s toll was 296 dead and 29j639 injured. About 24 hours ago, the latest figures for this year showed 293 dead and 29v4^0 injured in accidents at work.

”As has been said before, accidents are now happening at the rate of one every seven or eight minutes throughout the working day.”

Mr. Price said: ’’The cost of accidents in terms of wasted time and production is enormous. In the past ten years, 3.1 million mandays have been lost as a result of accidents at work — say a five-day break for our entire present industrial workforce.

’’And what has been the cash cost to management — and to the economy? In the past 10 years, I estimate, about $1,388 million, without doubt the greatest loss from any single factor.

’’This enormous bill in human misery and economic losses must be reduced and reduced quickly.

”The only way in which this can be achieved is for management to take positive action in the essential work of accident prevention. While all must play their part, the final responsibility must rest upon the shoulders of management.”

The Industrial Safety Exhibition is open every morning and evening until January 9-

It shows working models, accident tableaux featuring lifelike dummies, operating machinery, films and other aids to show the main accident hazards in Hong Kong’s major industries, and the best ways to combat them.

-------0---------

/6........

Friday, December 14, 1975

- 6 -

MANI SCHOOLS TO BE BUILT IN SHA TIN

******

The Sha Tin Government Secondary School is one of the forerunners of many schools, to be built in the township of Sha Tin, according to Mr. P.C. Woo, Senior Unofficial Member of the Legislative Council and Chairman of the Board of Education.

’This fine new secondary school will meet a need that is already being felt in the district,” he said when he officially opened the school today.

”Its existence now makes it possible for a larger number of young people of the area to complete their secondary education, as it were ’at home’, thus avoiding the tiresome journeys to and from Kowloon or Hong Kong Island.”

The school, built by the government at a cost of 85*5 million, should also serve the valuable purpose of bringing together the young people of the area to share in their studies and other school activities, thus helping to cement those ties which will be required if Sha Tin was to develop and maintain a healthy community spirit.

Mr. Woo said the pace and extent of new developments in Sha Tin was going to accelerate greatly.

”In the very near future we are going to see here in this valley a staggering growth in the population and the establishment of an imposing township in which it is planned to provide its residents with all these amenities and services normally associated with- such a development.

/’’A very........

Friday, December 14, *1975

”A very important part of the social services which must be made

available will be the provision of sufficient educational facilities, both for primary and secondary education, to meet the needs of the young people who will live here,” he said.

Mr. Woo noted that the opening of the 24-classroom school was very-

real proof of the continuing expansion of Hong Kong’s secondary educational facilities.

Note to Editors:

Copies of the full text of Mr. Woo’s

speech are boxed for collection.

/8 .......

0 - -

Friday, December 1*t, 197.

- 8 -

RE-APPRAISAL OF TYPE OF EDUCATION BEING PROVIDED IN HONG KONG

*♦

Hong Kong, now in the midst of a period of rapid expansion of secondary education, is going through a period of re-appraisal of the type of education that is being provided.

’’This process has been going on quietly for a number of years now but is now more noticed, more discussed,” the Assistant Director of Education (Secondary), Mr. R.M. Cameron said this morning.

Speaking at the Speech Day of Tsung Tsin College in the City Hall, Mr. Cameron added: ’’For example, in recent years there have been considerable changes in the public examinations. In the questions being set in the various subject papers the emphasis has slowly moved away from those questions requiring mainly factual answers to those which require thought, selection of relevant data and analysis.

’’Rote learning is no longer the path to success. Students are required to think for themselves and to use their own judgement.”

On the development of secondary education, Mr. Cameron reiterated the government’s stated policy to achieve as soon as possible a minimum of three years secondary education for all children in Hong Kong and to make provision for 40 per cent of children in the 12-16 age group to receive five years secondary schooling leading to the Certificate of Education.

The Assistant Director described this as ”an ambitious programme by any standards” and it would make great demands on the resources of Hong Kong.

/He said .......

Friday, December 14, 1973

- 9 -

He said schools like Tsung Tsin College would have a part to play in this development and he was confident that they would do so readily and enthusiastically. ’’The Government,” he added, ’’will certainly do all it can to assist them to do so.”

On extra-curricular activities, he said Tsung Tsin College had established a very fair range of extra-curricular activities, thus greatly increasing the opportunities for its students to receive a well-rounded education.

-------0---------

/10........

Friday, December 14, 1973

- 10 -

VALUE OF SECONDARY TECHNICAL EDUCATION UNDERLINED

*******

The Deputy Director of Education (Technical), Mr, A.J. Kingwell today stressed the value of secondary technical education at the Speech Day of the Victoria Technical School,

"If Hong Kong is to meet the needs of this technological age the public must come to recognise the value to society of trained technicians and technologists as well as the value of a secondary technical education as a sure foundation for further studies at university level for a wide variety of professions and not necessarily a branch of engineering," he said.

Describing the results of the students of both the lower and upper 6 forms as "excellent", Mr. Kingwell said: "These are the kind of results which wj11 persuade future students to choose a secondary technical education as their first choice.

"When this begins to happen, there will then be no problem concerning recognition by the universities and the Polytechnic of the suitability of graduates from secondary technical schools to take courses to qualify at professional level."

The Deputy Director said it must be stimulating for secondary technical students to hear that they have been "in the vanguard of a great social and educational advance."

By September 1976 lower form students of Victoria Technical School may be in a new school which is being expressly designed to meet the future requirements of secondary technical education.

/"There is

Friday, December 14, 1975

- 11 -

"There is no reason why technical education should not grow in popularity as a suitable medium for girls* It is happening elsewhere, why not in Hong Kong?" Hr. Kingwell said.

He announced that after the Victoria Technical School had vacated the building in Wood Road, the premises would be refurbished to form part of the new College of Technical Education - a technical teachers college to provide the additional teachers which will be required to meet the needs of the expanding technical education system.

The need for additional technical teachers was so urgent that a start would be made in September 197^ in adjacent premises which originally housed the Junior Technical School.

"It was in 1957 that the original Junior Technical School in Hong Kong moved into those premises and became the Victoria Technical School offering a complete five-year secondary technical education," he said.

Note to Editors: Copies of Mr. Kingwell‘s speech are boxed

for collection.

-------0---------

/12........

Friday, December 14, 1973

- 12 -

36.8 MILLION POLYCLINIC EXPANSION PROJECT *******

The South Kwai Chung Jockey Club Polyclinic is to be expanded with the addition of another building on an adjacent site to provide rehabilitation and specialist services for residents in the Tsuen Wan and Kwai Chung townships.

Work on this 36,8 million second phase of the Polyclinic will begin early in the new year, with completion expected in 15 months. The building will consist of two wings, rising to six and seven storeys respectively.

The existing Polyclinic is already providing general out-patient, maternal and child health, chest and X-ray services. The extension vn 11 add substantially to these by providing a rehabilitation centre, a day treatment centre for psychiatric cases, and various specialist units.

The rehabilitation centre will be on the ground floor. It will have facilities for physiotherapy, occupational therapy, orthopaedic and prosthetic appliances and medical social work.

The first floor will be devoted to a paediatric out-patient cl ini c and general administration offices.

Medical out-patient and orthopaedic clinics will be located on the second, and surgical out-patient and social hygiene clinics on the third floor.

There will be obstetrical and gynaecological out-patient clinics and ophthalmic, and car, nose and throat out-patient clinics on the fourth floor.

The remaining floors will house a psychiatric day treatment centre.

-------0---------

/13........

Friday, December 14, 1973

EMPLOYMENT ANALYSIS OF MANUFACTURING INDUS’CRY

*******

A special review article analysing the employment situation in the manufacturing industry is publisher in the October issue of the Hong Kong Monthly Digest of Statistics new on sale.

It is one in a series of reviews on special subjects of interest prepared for public information by the Census and Statistics Department.

The article discusses in concise terms certain salient features of the manufacturing work force such as -industrial structure, growth, wages and fringe benefits and standard of living.

Statistical references are irawn from the resu_ ts of the 1971 Census of Manufacturing Establishments and regular surveys on employment and wages conducted by the department.

The monthly digest is available from the Government Publications Centre at the Star Ferry Concourse. Hong Kong, at 34 per copy.

-------0---------

TRAFFIC ARRANGEMENTS IN NORTH POINT

*******

The section of Electric Road from Watson Road to North Point Road will be re-routed temporarily to one-way eastbound starting from 10 a.m. on Sunday (December 16).

A spokesman fcr the Transport Department explained that the temporary arrangement was to facilitate trench works in the area.

□'IB route 23 buses which normally use Electric Road for both east-and westbound journeys, will now be re-routed to operate via Kan Hong Street and King’s Road on westbound journeys.

The temporary arrange mentE; are expected to last for about three weeks, the spokesman added. Traffic signs will be posted to guide motorists.

- 0 -

Friday, December 14, 1973

- 14

HOLIDAY PASSENGER TRAIN SERVICES REVISED * • *♦♦♦♦♦♦

The Kowloon-Canton Railway today announced that starting from Sunday (December 16) new arrangements will be introduced, for passenger train services on general holidays.

Between 8.J0 a.m. and 1 p.m. on Sundays and public holidays, up-trains Nos. 6, 8, HD, 12 and 14, and special passenger up-trains Nos. 4^0, 452 and 454 will not pick up passengers at Mong Kok railway station.

A spokesman for the Kowloon-Canton Railway explained that these up-trains were usually full when they left the Tsim Sha Tsui station, and it was not possible to take aboard more passengers at Mong Kok. At the same time, down-train No. 5 will be cancelled on general holidays.

The time table for passenger trains operating on weekdays will remain unchanged, the spokesman added.

-------0---------

/15.........

Friday, December 14, 1975

- 15 -

RE-ALIGNMENT OF CLEAR WATER BAY ROAD

********

The alignment and level of a section of Clear Water Bay Road will be altered early next year to provide a better gradient and a safer connection to a new road to be built to its south.

The alteration will affect the section of the road between Fei Ngo Shan Road and Anderson Road.

The new road will form part of Clear Water Bay Road Development which includes building platforms and roads for a government housing estate now under construction at Shun Lee Tsuen, a road link to Sau Mau Ping Road and future construction for a government housing estate at Ngau Chi Wan.

A notice concerning the alteration was published in today’s Gazette. Objections to the proposal should be made to the Director of Public Works in writing before January 14, 1974, and claims for compensation should be made before February 14, 1974.

-------o----------

/16........

Friday, December 14, 1973

- 16 -

NEW SHOP TENANCY AGREEMENT FINALISED

The Housing Department and representatives of public housing estate shop tenants and Kaifongs today (Friday) finalised the terms of a new draft shop tenancy agreement to replace the present tenancy card scheme on Group B estates.

The meeting at the department’s San Po Kong offices was the latest in a series between Housing officers, the Public Housing Estate Merchants’ Association, estate Kaifongs and individual tenants.

When longterm agreements were first proposed in August, tenants raised objections which were discussed when the Secretary for Housing, Mr. Ian Lightbody later met their representatives.

The original December 1 deadline for converting to the new agreement was deferred to allow time for consultation between the two sides.

After today’s meeting, Mr. Eu Chen-wan, Senior Estate Manager said: ”We have tried to allay the suspicions and doubts of tenants and convince thorn of the Housing Authority’s good intentions. The Authority is writing to all affected tenants giving details of the new draft agreement.” The main principles agreed in answer to points raised by tenants are:

Security of tenure

Tenancies will be of a fixed term for two years which will be renewed automatically at the end of each term provided there has not been a persistent or blatant breach of the agreement. However, tenants may opt for a monthly tenancy if they wish.

/Inheritance ........

Friday, December 14, 1973

- 17 -

Inheritance

The present tenant will be allowed to transfer his right to a member of his family.

Change of trade

Tenants will have the right to apply for a change of trade provided it meets with local demands and does not adversely affect the living environment of the estate.

Transfer of shop tenancies

Present tenants who held tenancies before April 1, 1973 will be allowed to assign them. In the past, they could only assign to authorised tenants of an estate. Now they can assign to anyone.

/18........

Friday, December 14, 1973

- 18 -

NEW POLICE DIVISIONAL HEADQUARTERS AT KWAI CHUNG

A new police divisional headquarters will soon be built in Kwai Chung in the New Territories as part of the Force’s multi-million-dollar expansion programme.

The Kwai Chung complex, situated at the junction of Kwai Chung Road and Kwai Foo Road, will consist of a 17-storey block, a two-storey annex block and a single-block ancillary building.

The high block will incorporate a podium of two floors for offices, lecture room, cells and a spacious report room. The report room will have a public waiting area and individual interview rooms for handling public complaints and criminal cases.

Other floors will be taken up by barracks for about 600 rank and • « file members, quarters for the families of four senior officers, a canteen, recreation room and changing rooms.

A special feature of the new building is that the rank and file barracks are designed for better comfort. Instead of one big common barrack room, single officers will share smaller rooms designed for three to four people.

The annex block will have a number of radio control rooms and will. house other equipment for telecommunication. Space for car-parking, dog kennels and general storage will be provided in the ancillary building.

/The design .......

Friday, December 14, 1975

- 19 -

The design of the Kwai Chung police station complex is basically the same as the one for the North Point Station now being constructed^ and two other new stations to be built in Central and Ho Man Tin in 197^«

Piling work for the Kwai Chung Divisional Headquarters will be completed in February 197^i and construction is expected to begin in March talcing about 21 months to complete.

0 - -

Friday9 December 14S 1975

CONSUMER ADVISORY SERVICE

Daily Guido To Wholesale Market Prices And Supplies

000900

Tho following prices v/ere realised today (Friday) sales under the Rice Control Scheme and at the Vegetable Marketing Organisation Wholesale Market and the Fish Marketing Organisation Wholesale Market at Cheung Sha Wan^ Kowloon:

Sunnlies and Wholesale Prices of Rice

Availability Wholesale Price

of Supply (8/catty) __

China Rico Average

„ w old crop See Mew - new crop Good 1.64 1.72

S.C.Jion - old crop Good 1.58 *1 ££

- now cron I .DO

Po Ilgai Good 1.42

Chu Clio Good 1.22

Thai Rice

lOpfH'hble Good 1.52

10-15$ Brokens Good 1.50

A1 Super Extra Good ' 1.45

A1 Super Good . 1.37

Whole Glutinous Limited 1.52

U.S. Rico Good 1.62

Australian Rioo

Pakistan Rice • * • *

Taiwan Rico - *

Friday, December 14, 19Z5

Supplies and Wholesale Prices of Marine Fish

Species • Availability of Supply . Wholesale Price (8/catty) _

High Low • Average.

Golden Biread Normal 4.0 2.5 3.5

Big-Eyes Good 2.4 0.8 1.5

Squid Normal 5.3 1.5 4.0

Hair-Tails Good 2.0 1.1 1.5

Lizard Fishes Good 2.0 0.8 1.5

Croakers Good 2.0 0.6 1.2

Con^er-Pike-Eels Normal 2.3 1.5 2.0 ’

• Melon Coat Good 2.5 1.3 1.8

Breams Normal 4.0 2.8 3.2

Yellow Belly Good 1.2 0.65 0.8

Mackerels Normal ■ ■' 3.2 2.6 3.0

Rod Goat Fish Good 2.1 0.5 1.8

Fork-Tail Limited 1.1 0.5 0.7 .

Horse-Head ■ Normal 5.7 ' 3.0 4.0

Melon Seed Limited 2.8. 1.3 • 2.1

Poof rots «■ .y -■

Garoupas • . / Normal 6.5 5.0 6.0

Yellow Croaker Good 4.5 3.0 3.5 •

■» /Supplies and «•••««•

T

. Friday, December 1^+, 1973

Supplies and Wholesale Prices of -

Locally Produced Vegetables

Type Availability of Supply Wholesale Price (8/catty)

J High Low Average

Flowering cabbage Limited 2.2 0.6 1.4

White cabbage Normal 0.6 0.2 0.4

Chinese Lottuoe Normal 0.5 0.15 0.35

Chinese Kale Normal 0.7 0.15 0.45

Spring onion Normal 1.0 0.3 0.7

Spinach Normal 1.4 0.6 1.0

Hater erose i Normal 1.0 0.2 0.6

Loaf mustard cabbage Scarce 0.5 0.2 0.35

Tonato Scarce 2.2 1.2 1.6

Supplies . nnfl Wholesale Prices of Pork (Live weight)

1 Availability of Supply Wholesale Price (8/ picul)

T . (Pork (Average)

Good • 285

i i • 0 -

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Saturday, December 15i 1973

CONTENTS

Page No,

Hong Kong and U.K, reach understanding on sterling balances.. 1

Public Works Department takes further steps to save fuel • • • • 2

Proposed ban on reflective ’’mirror windows” on cars....... 4

Foun-day fire prevention campaign in licensed areas ........... 5

Call for close partnership to improve quality of school places ...................................................      6

Expansion of refuse dump in Shuen Wan  ........................ 8

New site for Kowloon Reception Centre  .......................  9

Middle Road to be re-routed for two-way traffic ........••••• 9

Weather report for November .................................. 10

Release time: 2.^0 p,m.

issued by Gotwnment IM&fmafon Services, Beaconsfield House. Hong Kong Tel: 5-233!^<

Saturday, December 15i 1973

- 1 -

HOIIG KONG AND U.K. REACH UNDERSTANDING ON STERLING BALANCES ********

A Government spokesman announced today that the British and Hong Kong governments have now reached an understanding under which Hong Kong will participate in arrangements for the guarantee of its sterling balances during the six months ending March 31, 1974.

Commenting on this announcement the Financial Secretary, Mr»- C»P. Haddon-Cave, said that the agreement was in respect of official sterling holdings and was satisfactory to both sides.

It was the result of detailed discussions extending over some months. These discussions were concerned with the application to Hong Kong of the unilateral offer made by the British Government in September last to guarantee eligible sterling balances at a rate of United States Dollars 2.4213 to one pound sterling for a period from September 25?1973 to March 31, 1974.

The present guarantee, Mr. Haddon-Cave added, will be confined to official, i.e. Government’s foldings of sterling. The coverage of the previous Five-Year Sterling Guarantee Agreement was exceptional in that the Hong Kong Government brought the sterling holdings of local banks under the umbrella of the agreement.

The exclusion of the banks from the new arrangement brings the position of Hong Kong into line with that of other sterling holders and reflects the fact that the sterling holdings of local banks are no longer judged to be sufficient to warrant their inclusion.

0 - -


Saturday, December 15, 1973

- 2 -

p.W.D. INSTITUTES FURTHER MEASURES TO SAVE FUEL *********

The giant incinerators at Lai Chi Kok and Kennedy Town have been mobilised to play their part in Hong Kong’s fuel saving drive by Maki ng the maximum use of their own ’’body heat” as a source of power.

A spokesman for the Public Works Department explained today that fuel economy is a built-in concept in the design and functioning of the incinerators.

”In a recycling process, the steam produced from incineration is fed into a turbine to produce electricity. But if a turbine lias to be closed down, such as for overhaul, then the plants have to use electricity supplied by the power companies.”

However, the Electrical and Mechanical Office, which runs the incinerators, is now intensifying its efforts to reduce to an absolute minimum the number of occasions when ’’outside” electricity is used.

At Lai Chi Kok, in particular, the water cooling system is to be improved to obviate the need to close down the turbine at certain times.

Another fuel-saving measure taken by the office is to reduce the standby boiler capacity at some public institutions, including hospitals.

”However, for obvious reasons,” the spokesman said, ’’this sort of economy must be finely calculated, particularly at hospitals, because the welfare of patients cannot be jeopardised. But where we are satisfied that the standby resources allow some safe extra leeway for economy, we are shutting off part of the plant.”

• •• /Instructions •••••••

Saturday, December 15, 1973

- 3 -

Instructions have also gone out to all P.W.D. units which use powered machinery that all machines must be switched off when not in use. This applies, for example to the lathes used in the Electrical and Mechanical Office and to the marine engines and other equipment in the vessels of the Port Works Division of the Civil Engineering Office.

In addition, all contractors on P.W.D. lists have been urged to make similar fuel economies on their work sites.

Throughout the Public Works Department there has been a widespread positive response to a personal appeal by the Director, Mr. A.S. Robertson, that all staff should take every possible common-sense measure to save power and eliminate waste.

‘Many corridor lights have been permanently switched off, office lights have been cut to the bare essential and vehicles are being shared wherever possible•

In fact, figures in the first week of December indicated that there had been a saving in electricity consumption of about 40 per cent over the previous week in Murray Building alone.

-------0---------

A

Saturday, December 151 1973

- 4 -

DEFLECTIVE MIRROR WINDOWS ON CARS MAY BE BANNED

***«***««

Proposals are in hand to ban the use of "mirror window" reflective material on vehicles* the Commissioner for Transport revealed todaya

The proposed ban, which is to be made under an amendment to the Road Traffic {Construction and Use) Regulations, will not however affect tinted glass installed by some manufacturers.

The Commissioner warned motorists that reflective material of the one-way mirror window type should not be used on windscreens and 'windows of motor cars.

"Tliis material has a dazzling effect that ©an cause accidents if the sun is reflected into the eyes of another driver," he saidt

"It also has the effect of preventing anybody outside from seeing the interior of the vehicle and, although there is nothing wrong in having privacy* vehicles treated in this way could be used by crimi nal.s to avoid detection."

-------0---------

/5........

Saturday, December 151 1973

- 5 -

SQUATTERS TO BE TAUGHT HOW TO PREVENT FIRES

********

The Housing Department is to mount a four-day Fire Prevention Campaign jointly with the Fire Services to educate the 31i000 people living in licensed areas throughout Hong Kong and Kowloon.

Starting next Tuesday (December 18), a van equipped with loud-hailers will tour the 18 domestic licensed areas and three licensed areas for industrial undertakings.

Fire officers will broadcast simple fire prevention rules to the squatters over the public address system, and distribute illustrated leaflets containing similar messages.

Mr. Brian Coak, Administrative Officer, Squatter Control, said the campaign was launched in view of the dry and windy weather.

T,It is essential to let the people know that negligence could be the cause of a disaster. Many squatter fires could have been avoided if the people had been careful with fire and paid some attention to the simple fire prevention rules,” he said.

The Fire Prevention programme will begin on Hong Kong Island.

On Tuesday, the van will tour the licensed areas at Chai Wan, Fu Tau Wat, Pak Fule Road, Tin Wan, and Wong Chuk Hang.

It will visit the licensed areas at Cheung Sha Wan, Ha Kwai Chung, Tai '.'lor Hau, Yau Ma Hom, Lei Muk Shue and Tai Wor Ping on Wednesday; Sam Ka Tsuen, Kwun Tong, Hip Wo Street, Hong Ning Road and Kowloon Bay on Thursday; and Junction Road, Ma Chai Hang and the ex-rifle range on Friday.

-------0---------

/o •••••••••

Saturday, December 15, 1973

- 6 -

liiPROVEMENT IN QUALITY OF SCHOOL PLACES

Close Workmanlike Partnership Essential

********

A close and workmanlike partnership of school sponsors with the Education Department is essential in order to meet both expansion in the number and improvement in the quality of school places.

This was emphasised by Mr. J. Whiteley, Assistant Director of Education (Development), at the blessing ceremony of Caritas St. Paul Pre-vocational School in Cheung Chau this afternoon.

Since it is the government’s policy to provide primary and secondary schools through the aided sector wherever possible, the demands upon the financial resources and educational expertise of experienced sponsors vzill become increasingly more heavy.

The Caritas St. Paul Pre-vocational School is an example of the co-operation mentioned by Mr. Whiteley. Caritas bought part of the site and the rest was granted free by the government.

The total cost for the school portion of the building is some $4,2J5,OOO of which the Education Department gave #31598,000 and Caritas #637,000.

The recurrent costs for the school will be paid for by the Education Department under the Unified Code.

In addition, Caritas provided from its own funds a sewing room and a typing room. These two rooms will be used for evening classes for girls.

/There are .......

Saturday, December 15, 1973

- 7 -

There are six classrooms and six special rooms in the school building. The special rooms will be equipped for teaching technical drawing, woodwork, metalwork, electrical work, general science and for a library.

The school will accommodate some 3&0 boys and offer a three-year pre-vocational course.

Mr. Whiteley thanked Caritas for its concern for the education of Hong Kong children. He said Caritas was deeply involved in community development work in Hong Kong in general and in pre-vocational education in particular.

"Besides this school,it operates two government subsidized and one private pre-vocational schools and has plans together with the Marden Foundation to sponsor three more pre-vocational schools at Chai Wan, Sha Tin and Tuen Mun respectively," he added.

0 - -

Saturday, December 15, 1973

- 8 -

TAI PO LAP SAP DUMP TO 3E ENLARGED

********

The Shuen Wan Refuse Dump in Tai Po will be enlarged and turned into a controlled tip to cope with the increasing amount of refuse generated by the growth and ur'oanisation of the New Territories.

At present, about 50 per cent of the refuse collected in the New Territories outside Tsuen Wan goes to the Shuen Wan dump which has almost reached its full capacity.

It is proposed to enlarge the dump by extending the rubble mound on its western side. Apart from increasing its capacity, the proposed extension will enable the site to be converted into a much larger recreational area or for other uses on the closure of the dump.

Sanitary conditions at the dump will also be further improved once it ie converted into a controlled tip.

This disposal method involves the spreading and compacting of *

refuse, covering each layer with suitable material as tipping proceeds and scaling all working faces at the end of each day's work in order to contain noxious smells, control vermin and to eliminate fire hazard.

Anyone having objections to the proposed project or any claim of private right, should submit them in writing to the Director of Public Worlds within two months.

-------0---------

/9.........

Saturday, December 15, 1973

- 9 -

NEW SITE FOR KOWLOON RECEPTION CENTRE

The former Lai Chi Kok Women’s Prison at Butterfly Vai 1 ey Road in Kowloon is to be demolished to make way for the new Kowloon Reception Centre•

Demolition work is expected to begin in January next year, and will take about three months to complete. A portion of the adjacent hi11aide will be cut back and formed to provide additional building land. The total area of the site will be about 150,000 square feet.

Construction of the Kowloon Reception Centre is scheduled for the end of 197^, and is expected to take two years to complete.

The Centre will be a maximum security institution providing accommodation for 9^0 inmates. Quarters and barracks will be provided for residential staff.

-------0---------

TRAFFIC ARRANGEMENTS IN TSIM SHA TSUI

**4M**»

Motorists are advised that with effect from 10 a.m. on Monday (December 17) the section of Middle Road in Tsim Sha Tsui from Nathan Road to the multi-storey car park will be re-routed to permit two-way traffic.

At the same time, vehicles travelling along Middle Road will not be allowed to turn right into Salisbury Road. The new arrangements are to improve traffic flow in the area.

Traffic signs will be posted to guide motorists.

-------0---------

/10.......

Saturday, December 15, 1973

- 10

NOVEMBER WEATHER ROUNDUP

********

Last month’s weather was more or less normal for November, according to the Royal Observatory’s monthly weather review.

No measurable rainfall was recorded during the first 24 days of the month, but rain fell continuously during the next five days to bring the monthly total 9«3 mm — 33.8 mm below normal -

Three tropical cyclones were reported near South Vietnam, the Philippines and over the South China Sea during the month, but did not affect Hong Kong. No thunderstorm or heavy rain warnings were issued.

Due to the dry weather, two red and four yellow fire warnings were issued.

The maximum temperature for the month of 28.0 degrees Celsius was recorded on November 15, and the minimum temperature of 15.5 degrees Celsius on November 25, 26 and 27.

Note to Editors: A full report prepared by the Royal

Observatory on November’s weather is boxed for collection.

-------0---------


DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Monday, December 17, 1973

CONTENTS * Page No.

November General Consumer Price Index shows eight point drop ..........•.•••••••••........................  ••.......

Students being briefed on ways to economise on fuel *............ 2

Christmas surface mail from U.K. to Hong Kong delayed »«•••• 3

Shop tenants representatives accept new draft agreement •••• h

New reservoir to be built in Kowloon shortly.........c....... 6

Voluntary welfare organisations receive nearly 51.5 million from Sir Robert Ho Tung Fund ..................................   7

Safety hints for operating winches ....

Employers reminded that Winter Solstice is a statutory holiday .............••••••«» ••••«••.......................

Pre-war building in Western declared dangerous ................. 11

• « • • c • •

Daily guide to wholesale prices ana supply of basic food commodities

Release time: 7. <30 P*m»-

»wued ^>y Go*ef .wmnt Servian, House. Hong Kong Te!: 5-2331Jfr •

, . Monday, December 17, 1973

- 1 -NOVEMBER G.C.P.I. DROPS ANOTHER EIGHT POINTS ********

The General Consumer Price Index for November 1973 was 169 -eight points lower than that for the previous month.

The drop was the second in two months - the first being in October when a drop of four points was recorded.

During November, the index for foodstuffs dropped by 16 points. On the other hand, the index for fuel and light went up by four points while that for durable goods advanced by three points.

Increases of two points each were recorded in the index for clothing and footwear, the index for miscellaneous goods and the index for services.

The index for alcoholic drink and tobacco also rose by one point. Movements in the indexes for other sections of community were insignificant.

When adjusted to allow for seasonal fluctuations, the General Consumer Price Index for November 1973 was 172 - five points lower than that for the previous month.

Compared with the previous month, the average retail price of fresh vegetables fell by 46 per cent as a result of a substantial increase in both local supplies and imports.

The average retail prices of marine fish, fresh water fish, poultry and fresh fruit also declined due to seasonal influences.

But the average retail prices of rice and charges for meals bought away from home increased.

As to non-food items, the increase in the index for fuel and light was attributable to the upward revision in the prices of kerosene and liquefied petroleum gas towards the end of the month.

-------0--------- /2.....................

Monday, December 17, 1973

- 2 -

SAVE FUEL DRIVE IN SCHOOLS

*******

Hundreds of thousands of school children throughout Hong Kong are being told of ways in which they can help in the current save fuel drive by the government#

At school assemblies or during classes the pupils are being told of the need to reduce the consumption of electricity both in schools and at their homes.

This follows a circular sent to all teachers by the Director of Education in which he said he had been asked to reduce the electricity consumption within the department by some 15 per cent.

He pointed out that this figure could not be achieved without the full co-operation of all staff.

The Economic and Public Affairs Section of the Education Department has already introduced this major subject into the appropriate lessons in the secondary schools.

In this way the students become more involved and more aware of the world oil situation. This in itself emphasises the need to economise on the use of fuel.

A spokesman for the department eaid today that about 30 secondary schools on both sides of the harbour had organised special E^FUU forums on ,rthe subject of oil” and this will be expanded during the next few weeks.

To assist in the preparation of the lessons, the Section is obtaining reference material from the Director of Oil Supplies and various reports from newspapers and) magazines.

-------0---------

/3........

Monday, December 17, 1973

- 3 -

U.K. CHRISTMAS SURFACE MAIL TO HONG KONG DET .A YET)

*******

The Post Office announced today that Christmas sea mail from the United Kingdom to Hong Kong has been delayed en route and because of late arrival it will not now be possible to deliver the mail until after istmas.

The mail is on board the container vessel Hong Kong Express which was due to arrive today (Monday). The shipping agents have informed the Post Office, however, that the vessel is not expected to reach Hong Kong until Christmas Day.

The Hong Kong Express is carrying three containers of Christmas mail for Hong Kong, consisting of 862 bags of letter mail and 366 bags of parcels.

A Po§t Office spokesman said that as far as Christmas sea mail to the United Kingdom was concerned, the British Post Office had confirmed that the ship carrying mail posted in Hong Kong by October 25 — the latest date for posting Christmas sea mail to the U.K. — had arrived in England on schedule.

A....

0--------

Monday, December 177 1973

SHOP TENANT .’REPRESENTATIVES ACCEPT NEW DRAFT AGREEMENT ********

Commenting on the reported objections from some public housing estate shop tenants to the new draft two-year tenancy agreement announced last Friday, Hr. Jolin Walden, acting Director of Housing, said today that the terms of the agreement had been accepted by representatives of tenants 'c and kaifongs after a scries of meetings with senior staff of the Housing Department.

The objections, he said, appeared to come from a small group of shop-keepers who broke off from the talks earlier because they did not want any change whatsoever in tenancy conditions.

When long term agreements were first proposed in August, tenants raised objections which were discussed at a meeting with the Secretary for Housing, Hr. Ian Lightbody. Subsequently, the Public Housing Estates Merchant Association - which has representatives from every estate concerned -chose a small committee to represent the association’s point of view to the Housing Department. Similar meetings were held with estate kaifong representatives.

’’Although Friday’s meeting clearly indicated that the negotiations with the association had been successfully concluded, we are not surprised at the continuing objection from the small minority,” Mr. Walden said.

”The Housing Department has done everything possible to meet the points made by the tenants and the representatives at the meeting expressed

their satisfaction.”

/The new

4

Monday, December 17» 1973 - 5 -

Hie new agreement now meets their requirements in the following respects:

1. Security of tenure Tenancies will be of a fixed term of two years and will be renewed automatically at the end of each term, provided there has not been a persistent or blatant breach of the agreement. However, tenants may opt for a monthly tenancy if they wish.

2t Inheritance

The present tenant will be allowed to transfer his right to a member of his family.

J. Change of trade

Tenants will have the right to apply for a change of trade, provided it meets with local demand and does not adversely affect the living environment of the estate.

4. Transfer of shop tenancy

Present tenants who held tenancies before April 1, 1973> will be allowed to assign them. In the past they could only assign to authorised tenants of an estate. Now they can assign to anyone.

A oopy of the new draft agreement with a letter explaining it is going out to every shop tenant.

,fI7e hope they will all take advantage of the considerable benefits this new agreement offers,” said Mr. Walden.

-------0---------

/6........

Monday, December 17 j 1973

NEW RESERVOIR FOR NEW KOWLOON EAST

********

A fresh water service reservoir is to be built shortly on the

hillside off Anderson Road in Kowloon to cope with future water demand brought about by the development in the area.

The reservoir will have a storage capacity of two million gallons and will be situated about 2,000 feet from Clear Water Bay Road.

It is part of a scheme to extend fresh water supply to the high level areas in New Kowloon East, including Shun Lee Tsuen.

To facilitate traffic flow in the area during construction work, a section of Anderson Road from Clear Water Bay Road to the site, measuring about 1,600 feet, will be rebuilt.

Work on the reservoir project will begin in the middle of next month and will take about two years to complete.

Commenting on the project, a spokesman for the Public Works Department said that public housing planned for the area would attract an additional population of 106,000 to the area in the next few years.

In addition, private development in the area is also expected to bring in more people.

The spokesman said that a pumping station would later bo built at Shun Lee Tsuen to transfer water from the existing Kwun Tong High Level Fresh Water Service Reservoir to the new service reservoir.

”This pumping station will be equipped to meet the demand anticipated over the next decade with provision for further extension,” he said.

-------0---------

/7

Monday, December 17, 1973

- 7 -

GRANTS TO WELFARE ORGANISATIONS

•»««*«*

Grants totalling almost 31.5 million have been made available to 42 voluntary welfare organisations from the Sir Robert Ho Tung

Charitable Fund.

The grants were recently approved by the Governor and bring the total amount allocated from the fund for this year to about 82*7 million, * • ' • • • । In the latest allocation, the Pok Oi Hospital in Yuen Long received the biggest grant of 3500,000 which will be used in a programme to improve medical facilities and staff quarters at the hospital.

Among other large grants were 3158,000 for the Rennie’s Mill

Student Aid Project for the construction of a new dormitory at the Tung

Wan School on Lantau Island; and three separate grants of 3100,000 each for the Hong Kong Adventist Hospital, the Caritas medical centre in

Kowloon and the Hong Kong Arts Festival Society.

The Sir Robert Ho Tung Charitable Fund was established in 5956

with a bequest of 3500,000 from the late Sir Robert Ho Tung to make funds available for organisations involved in welfare, education and medical fields.

The first grants from the income of the fund were made in 1960 and since then many charities have benefited from it.

-------0---------

/8 ••»••••

Monday, December 17, 1973

- 8 -

SAFETY HINTS ON OPERATING WINCHES

********

Tho Director of Marine, Mr. A. ELetcher has dravzn the attention of shipmasters and dock workers to the dangerous practice of placing ropes on the drums of winches that arc running unattended.

There should always be a second person at the winch controls *

whenever ropes are being worked on a warping or whipping drum, he said*

In o. recent accident, a man was killed when he was caught between » a rope and tho revolving drum of a winch. ,fHis life may have been saved if there had been a second man at the controls to stop the winch,” tho Director said.

He stressed that whenever practicable, the winch should be stopped before placing ropes on the winch drums. If it is necessary to have the winch in motion while taking ropes or wires to the warping or whipping drums* a low speed should be used.

-------0 - -

CHINESE CHESS TOURNAMENT

*********

The next events in the monthly chess tournament organised by the Princess Alexandre. Community Centre of the Social Welfare Department will be held on Thursday evening (December 20).

Two chess games will be hold to allow more participants • Individual or group chess players are welcome to join. Application should be made to the Group Work Unit, 2nd floor, Princess Alexandra Community Centre, Tai Ho Street, Tsuen Wan, New Territories.

/9........

0 - -

Monday, December 17i 1973

- 9 -

CHINESE WINTER SOLSTICE FESTIVAL

Statutory Holiday for Industrial Workers

«»****«

The Commissioner of Labour, Mr. I.R. Price, today reminded employers that Saturday, December 22 - the day of the Chinese Winter Solstice Festival - is one of the six statutory holidays to which industrial workers are entitled under the Industrial Employment (Holidays with Pay and Sickness Allowance) Ordinance.

Mr. Price said that with few exceptions, all manual workers in industrial undertakings paid on a monthly, daily, or piece-rate basis must be given a holiday on that day. Non-manual workers in industrial undertakings earning not more than S700 a month had the same right.

To qualify for holiday pay, which is in addition to the four rest days a month under the Employment Ordinance, a worker must have worked at least 180 days during a period of 12 months and at least 20 days in the 28 days preceding December 22.

”A worker who does not qualify to receive holiday pay must al so be given a holiday,” Mr. Price said.

"An employer may grant a holiday on another day instead of December 22, but he must do so within 60 days after that date and must post a notice of his intention at least 48 hours in advance.”

The Commissioner added that the provisions of the Industrial Employment (Holidays with Pay and Sickness Allowance) Ordinance had been * extended and incorporated in the Employment Ordinance. ”The revised law, which will become effective on January 1, 1974, apply to all manual workers irrespective of earnings and non-manual workers earning S1,300 a month or less The new provisions also simplifies the qualification for holiday pay,” he said /The six

Monday, December 17, 1973

- 10 -

Hie six statutory holidays under the new provisions are Lunar

New Year’s Day; the second day of Lunar New Year; Ching Ming Festival; * •

Tuen Ng (Dragon Boat) Festival; the day following the Chinese Mid-Autumn

Festival; and the first day of January.

"An employer is therefore required to give his employees a holiday on January 1, 197^ ? and if such an employee has worked continuously for him for three months preceding that day, the employee is entitled to receive I

holiday pay," Mr. Price said.

Any worker or employer who is in doubt of his rights or obligations regarding statutory holidays should consult officers of the Women and Young Persons Unit at Tel. No. 3-667755*

-------0----------

/11


Monday, December 17, 1973

- 11 -

BUILDING DECLARED DANGEROUS

***««*«$

The Building Authority today declared No* 7 Sai Street in Western District to be in a dangerous condition and Nos. 3 and 5 liable to become dangerous.

The Principal Government Building Surveyor said these three—storey pre-war buildings had been under observation for some time and rapid deterioration of reinforced concrete elements in No. 7 indicated that there is a risk of failure which could lead to a collapse.

The condition of Nos. 3 and 5 Sai Street is such that there is risk of failure during or after the demolition of No. 7 Sai Street.

Notices of intention to apply for Closure Orders in Victoria District Court at 9*30 a.m. on December 31 for No. 7 and at 903° a-®- on. February 1, 197^ for Nos. 3 and 5 Sai Street were posted today.

-------0----------

Monday, December 17, 1775

CONSUMER ADVISORY SERVICE

Daily Guido To Wholesale Market Prices And Supplies

Tho following prices were realised today (Monday) at sales under tho Rice Control Scheme and at tho Vegetable Marketing Organisation Wholesale Market and tho Fish Marketing Organisation Wholesale Market at Choung Sha Wan, Kowloon:

Supplies and Wholesale Prices of Rice

Grado Availability of Supply Wholesale Price (S/catty)

China Rico Average

Seo Men ~ old crop Good 1.64

- new crop 1.72

S.C.Jion - old crop Good 1.53

- new crop 1.66

Po llgai Good 1.42

Chu Cho Good 1.22

Thai Rice Good 1.52

lOCfH/holo

10-15/° Brokens Good 1.50

A1 Super Extra Good 1.45

A1 Super Good . . 1.37

Whole Glutinous Limited 1.55

U.S. Rico Good 1.62

Australian Rioo Good 1.52

Pakistan Rice Good 1.42

Taiwan Rice. •w •

/Supplies and •••••••

Monday, December 17, 1;'. >

Supplies and Wholesale Prices of Marine Fish

Availability Wholesale Price

Species of Supply . (8/catty)

High Low • Average

Golden Thread Good 3.8 2.6 5.3

Big-Eyes Good 2.4 0.6 1.7

Squid Limited 5.5 1.5 4.2

Hair-Tails Normal 1.8 1.1 1.6

Lizard Fishes Normal 2.1 0.8 1.6

Croakers Good 1.6 0.5 1.1

Conger-Pike-Eols Normal 2.5 1.8 2.2

Melon Coat Normal 2.0 1.2 1.6

Brearjs Limited 4.° 3.4 3.8

Yellow Belly Good 2.0 0.6 1.2

Mackerels Good 3.8 2.6 3.2

Rod Goat Fish Good 2.6 0.6 1.6

Fork-Tail Normal 1.0 0.5 0.7

Horse-Head Normal 5.o 3.0 4.2

Melon Seed Limited 2.6- • 1.5 2.0

Poof rets Scarce 7.0 6.5 6.8

Garoupas • • Normal 5.0 4.2 4.5

Yellow Croaker

/Supplies and •_«

Monday, December 17> 1973

Supplies and Wholesale Prices of

Locally Produced Vegetables

Availability of Supply Wholesale Price (8/catty)

High Low Average

Flowering cabbage Limited 2.40 0.80 1.60

White cabbage Normal 0.70 0.20 0.40

Chinese Lottuoe’ Normal • • 0.60 0.20 0.40

Chinese Kale Normal 0.70 0.20 0.50

Spring onion Normal 1.40 0.50 1.00

Spinach , Normal 1.40 0.60 1.00

Water cross Normal 1.00 0.25 0.60

Loaf mustard cabbage Scarce 0.70 0.20 0.40

Tomato • i •• Scarce 1.60 0.80 1.40

Supplies and Wholesale Prices of Pork (Live weight).

Availability Wholesale Price

of Supply ( 8/ picul)

Pork • • Good (Average) 285

-----0-----

*RH 7

DAI LY1NFORMATION BULLETIN

Tuesday, December 18, 1975

CONTENTS

Vago NjQ*

Owners of business firms and shops warned against using prohibited lighting........................................, 1

Further moves by government departments to save fuel ........... 2

Contract for computerised traffic control system in Vfost Kowloon to be signed tomorrow.............................• 4

Over 2^0 labour disputes settled in November with the help of the Labour Relations Service ...............................  5

Headmaster of a pro-vocational school returns study course in Turin.......................................    • 6

Another "box" junction to be introduced in Tsucn Wait LhLo week ..........................................................  7

Members of the public urged to take part in social services....................*...........................  • 8

Daily guide to wholesale prices and supply of basic food commodities

Reloago time: r/.G0 p»m,

issued by Government Irforrr.M.-on •/‘.v.-s House, Hony Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Tuesday, December 18, 1973

- 1 -

WARNING’ON USE OF PROHIBITED LIGHTING

******

The Director of Oil Supplies, Mr. Roy Porter, said today that some business firms and shops were still not fully complying with the terms of the new restrictions on lighting.

This was particularly noticeable in shops which continued to use lights to display goods inside shop counters and cabinets.

He pointed out that this constituted display or decorative lighting which was prohibited under the law.

"These lights must be switched off during the day and for most hours of darkness, except for the permitted period between the hours of 6 p.m* and 10.30 p*m*n

Mr. Porter added that in cases where these lights were vzired to the overall lighting system in shops it would be necessary for them to make alternative arrangements.

He said that the police were now taking out summonses against people who were contravening the new law.

At the same time, Mr. Porter appealed for voluntary restrictions on lighting during the period when display and advertising lights oould be turned on. ’TBesause they are allowed to be on between 6 p.m. and 10.30 p.n., does not mean that they have to be switched on.”

-------0----------

/2.........

Tuesday, December 18, 1973

- 2 -

DEPARTMENTS STEP UP FUEL-SAVING MEASURES

********

A number of government departments have taped over light and power switches to prevent them from being used, in a positive move to save fuel#

These measures, coupled with the removal of non-essential light bulbs or fluorescent tubes from office and corridor lighting, are resulting in substantial reductions in the amount of electricity consumed.

The Marine Department, the Medical and Health Department and the Treasury are among the offices where these steps have been taken.

In a special circular, the Director of Medical and Health Services, *

Dr. G.H. Choa said that economies in a medical service are not easy, but they are possible "particularly in the consumption of electricity" and he urged the staff to do all they could to meet a 15 to 20 per cent cut back.

In Queen Elizabeth and Queen Mary Hospitals, evening inspections have been carried out during which bulbs were removed from non-essential lights, and some other switches were turned off and taped over.

At Marine Department headquarters, about 20 per cent of the fluorescent lights and 50 per cent of the electric light bulbs in the building and the Seamen's Recruiting Office have been put out of action either by removing the lights, taping over the switches or by shutting off the electricity at the mains.

/Air-conditioning ••«•••

Tuesday, December 18, 1975

- 3 -

Air-conditioning has been switched off, except for ventilation where this is necessary.

Notices are also being displayed at strategic locations requesting officers to switch off all lights not required for immediate use.

In the Treasury, a number of lights which are to be switched off permanently have been identified by special labels.

The steps being taken by the various departments clearly illustrate the government’s determination to set a lead to the Community by saving now for later.

-------0---------

Tuesday, December 18, 1973

TRAFFIC CONTROL BY COMPUTER

********

Note to Editors:- A contract for the supply and installation of a computerised traffic control system in West Kowloon will be signed at 11 a.m. tomorrow (Wednesday) in the Public Works Department conference room.

The Area Traffic Control System — introduced for the first time in S.E. Asia — will, among other things, ease traffic flow and clear routes for emergency vehicles in heavily congested areas.

Representing the government in signing the contract will be the Principal Government Highway Engineer, Mr. G.A.G. Sapstead.

The Senior British Trade Commissioner, Mr. T.W. Aston, will also be present.

Officer-in-charge of the P.W.D. Area Traffic Control Unit, Mr. K.E. Softly, and his assistant, Mr. K.H. Lee will be available for interviews afterwards.

You are invited to send your representative to cover the occasion. The P.W.D. conference room is on the 6th floor of Murray Building, Garden Road.

-------0---------

Tuesday, December 18, 1975

5 -

LRS HELPS SETTLE 242 LABOUR DISPUTES IN NOVEMBER

********

The Labour Relations Service of the Labour Department helped settle 242 of the 547 disputes last month.

Of the remaining cases, 75 were referred to the Labour Tribunal and 11 to the Legal Aid Department. The rest were either withdrawn by the applicants or settled by direct negotiation.

The head of the Labour Relations Service, Mr. T.F. Tsui, said as a result of agreements reached, 5&0 employees had received a total of 3620,026 as outstanding wages, payment in lieu of notice, statutory holiday pay, bonuses, severance pay and other ex-gratia payments.

"During the month officers of the Service also handled 1,479 consultations and enquiries about labour laws, industrial relations and personnel management," Mr. Tsui said.

-------O'-------

Tuesday, December 18, 1973

- 6 -

HEADMASTER RETURNS FROM STUDY COURSE

*******

Mr. Lee Shxuig-tak, headmaster of the Caritas St. Godfrey Pre-vocational School, has returned from Turin after attending a 12-week course in training methodology at the International Centre for Advanced Technical and Vocational Training.

The oourse was designed to further the knowledge and develop the skills and competence of the heads of technical and vocational training institutions. It was financed by the United Nations Development Programme.

Mr. Lee was sponsored by the government and is the first person outside the civil service to have received such training.

Mr. H.R. Knight, Senior Training Officer of the Labour Department said his department supported Mr. Ice’s nomination be ause ”we are confident that such training is invaluable to Hong Kong’s vocational and pre-vocational institutions.”

Mr. Lee himself considered the braining extremely useful and expressed his appreciation to the Labour Department for making it possible for him to attend the course.

He said the programme included the extensive use of modern training techniques and research findings. ’’The additional knowledge gained from visiting vocational and pre-vocational institutions in Europe will definitely enable me to run my school more effectively,” he added.

Note to Editors: Copies of Mr. Lee Shung-tak’s photograph

are boxed for collection.

-------0----------

Tuesday, December 18, 1975

- 7 -

BOX JUNCTION IN TSUEN WAN

******

Another ’’box” junction will be introduced on Thursday (December 20) at the junction of Castle Peak Road and Texaco Road in Tsuen Wan.

The ’’box” junction will be clearly identifiable by yellow crisscross lines painted on the carriageway with warning signs at the approaches.

K. Transport Department spokesman reminded motorists that it is an offence to drive into the box unless the exit is clear. If the exit > »

is blocked, he said, then drivers must wait even if the traffic signals show green.

’’The object is to prevent road junctions being blocked in all directions by vehicles which cannot get out of the intersection during a green phase of the signals controlling traffic approaching the junction,” the spokesman said.

-------0---------

/8.........

i

Tuesday, December 18, 1975 - 8 -

CALL FOR PUBLIC PARTICIPATION IN SOCIAL SERVICES

********

The Director of Social Welfare, Mr. K.W.J. Topley, today called for continued public involvement in social services.

He said public activity in this field would certainly contribute to the stability and progress of Hong Kong,

Mr. Topley was speaking at the opening of the new premises of the Eastern District Women’s Welfare Club in Marble Road, North Point.

He said in its 18 years of existence the club with a membership of over 2,000 had been actively providing various social services to Hong Kon$. These included a primary school for about 1,000 pupils in Chai Wan, an evening school for adults, and a nursery.

Mr. Topley also officiated at the swearing-in of the Club’s 7th term office bearers. Mrs. Topley presented certificates of appointments to them.

-------0---------

Tuesday, December lb, 1975

CONSUMER ADVISORY SERVICE

Daily Guido To Wholesale Market Prices And Supplies

Tim following prices were realised today (Tuesday) at sales under the Rice Control Scheme and at the Vegetable Marketing Organisation Wholesale Market and the Fish Iteketing Organisation Wholesale Iterfot at Cheung Sha Wan, Kowloon:

Supplies and Wholesale Prices of Pico

Avail ability Wholesale Price

Grado ox Supply (fl/catty)

China Rico Average

- old crop See Mew Good ' 1*64 1.7?

- new crop

1.53

S.C.Jion - old crop Good

now crop 1 t>OO

Po Ilgai Good U:-2

Chu Cho Good 1.22

Thai Rice

lOO/H Paolo Good 1<52

10-15# Brokens Good

A1 Super Extra Good

A1 Super Good . 1.37

Whole Glutinous Limited 1.52

• tLS* Rice Good 1o62

Australian Rioe

Pnkiptan Rico •• ««

Taiwan Rico

/Supplies and ^oa«#o»

Tuesday, December 18, 1973

Supplies and YJholesale Prices of Marine Fish

Species • Availability of Supply Wholesale Price (8/catty) High Low • Average

Golden Thread Good 3.7 2.4 3.0

Big-Eyes Good 2.6 0.6 1.5

Squid Scarce 6.0 1.7 4.5

Hair-Tails Good 1.7 0.5 1.1

Lizard Fishes Normal 2.3 0.7 1.7

Croakers Normal 1.2 0.6 0.9

Conger-Pike-Eels - • Normal 2.3 1.5 2.0

Melon Coat Normal 1.8 1.0 1.5

Breons Normal 4.8 2.5 3.2

Yellow Belly Good 1.6 0.55 0.9

Mackerels Good 3.2 2.4 2.8

Red Goat Fish Good 2.0 0.5 1.5

Fork-Tail Normal 1.1 0.6 0.75

Horse-Head Normal 5.2 3.0 4.0

Melon Seed Limited 2.5. 1.6 2.3

Pomfrcts Scarce 8.5 6.0 7.0 .

Qaroupas Normal 7.0 4.0 5.0

Yellow Croaker Good 4.8 2.0 3.5

/Supplies and

Supplies and Wholesale Prices of

Locally Produced Vegetables

type Availability of Supply Wholesale Price

(S/catty)

Low Average

Flowering cabbage Limited 2.2 0.8 1*5

White cabbage Normal 0.6 0.2 0.4

Chinese Lottuoo Normal. 0.55 0.2 c.4

Chinese Kale Normal 0.7 0.2 0.45

Spring onion Normal 1.2 0.4 1.0

Spinach Normal 1.4 0.5 1.0

Water cross Normal 1.0 0.55 0.5

Loaf mustard cabbage Scarce 0.6 0.2 0.4

Tomato Scarce 1.5 0.8 1.2

Supplies and Wholesale Prices of Pork (Live weight)

Availability Wholesale Price

of Supply ( 8/ picul)

(Average)

Pork Good • 285

- - 0

FH

|gis| |f ife|

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Wednesday, December 1% 1973

CONTENTS

Page No.

British firm awarded contract for Hong KongTs pilot computerised traffic control system • • • ..........  ............... 1

Summer Time back in Hong Kong — another Government move to save fuel ....• •............................... 3

Students praised for their awareness of community problems... 6

Passing-out parade of Fire Officers .................... 7

Director of Marine gives advice on the maintenance of private moorings............•••........-................. 8

Magistrate joins 0 Pui Shan Boys1 Home Christmas party . 9

*******

Daily guide to wholesale prices and supply of basic food coLmiodities

Release Tiiue: 7.00 P*a»

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaeorr fK-kQfouse, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Wednesday, December 19, 1973

- 1 -

CONTRACT FOR COMPUTERISED TRAFFIC CONTROL SYSTEM SIGNED

*«*»*««*

A scheme to install Southeast Asia’s first computerised traffic control system in West Kowloon advanced a major step today with the signing of a contract for the supply and installation of the system.

The 88.8 million contract has been awarded to GEC-Elliott Traffic Automation Ltd. Signing on behalf of the company was Mr. J.M. Weedon, Managing Director of GEC (H.K.) Ltd., local agents for GEC-Elliott. Representing the government was Mr. Gordon Sapstead, Principal Government Highway Engineer.

The senior British Trade Commissioner, Mr. T.W. Aston, was also present at the signing.

The computerised scheme, known as Area Traffic Control, has been adopted successfully in a number of cities in Europe and America, and is being introduced for the first time in Southeast Asia.

It will initially cover Yaumati, Mong Kok, parts of Tsim Sha Tsui, and Sham Shui Po to the west of Nathan Road. The system is expected to be fully operational by 1976 and may be extended to other areas with heavy traffic.

Basically, the system will consist of a network of hidden cables under the road surface which will record traffic conditions and transmit the information to a central computer which will instantly synchronise traffic signals in the whole area to enable traffic to flow more smoothly.

/Traffic .......

Wednesday, December 19, 1973

. z -

Traffic information, such as the number of passing cars, speed of traffic and the length of queues^ will also be fed to the Traffic Police enabling them to spot and clear traffic jams immediately.

With the computer, it will also be possible to create a clearway for fire engines and other emergency vehicles by advising the quickest route and co-ordinating the traffic lights along it.

A special team of traffic engineers and computer experts has been set up to design and supervise the installation of the system.

Their office is in the Kowloon Government Offices in Nathan Road, where the central computer will be installed.

•------0---------

Wednesday, December 1% 1973

- 3 -

SUMMER TIME BACK IN HONG KONG

Another Move By Government To Save Fuel

********

Hong Kong is to change to Summer Time on Sunday, December JO, as another measure to conserve fuel and electricity.

Announcing the Governor in Council’s decision this afternoon, a Government spokesman said that clocks should be put forward one hour from J.JO a.m. on that day.

Commenting on the announcement, Mr. Richard Butler, Assistant Economic Secretary, said a change to Summer Time could save up to about 50,000 tons of fuel oil in 197^ when Hong Kong faced a possible reduction in oil supplies.

i:It is most important for us to save fuel oil which is used for generating electricity and on which our industry, and therefore our economy, depends,’1 Hr. Butler said.

"Moreover," he went on, "it is believed that the community as a whole will welcome this move, though there will be a certain amount of inconvenience to some."

Commenting on the effect on schools, a Government spokesman said that the implication for them had been carefully considered, particularly as it related to primary school children. There are J61,000 primary school children who attended morning sessions, some of whom would be affected by the change. On the other hand J14,OOO young children attending afternoon sessions stand to benefit from the lighter evenings on their way home.

Wednesday, December 19y 1973

- 4 -

The possibility of changing school hours has been examined and the Director of Education has said that there is no objection to headmasters making adjustments in school hours so that the minimum inconvenience to the children is caused.

The Government spokesman added: ’’The date of the change -December 30 — has been chosen because it will be during the schools’ Christmas holidays. This will allow children some days to get used to the time change before they return to school and will enable any mod 5 ficatj ons to be made to school times.”

Commenting on other effects of the change, the spokesman said:”This change to summer time will avoid offices and factories having to switch on lighting and sometimes heating until much later. In many cases, in the evenings, lights will not have to be switched on at all before offices and factories close.”

“Games and open air activities could also continue longer in natural, rather than artificial light,” he added.

“Every measure in fuel economy currently being implemented helps, and together the measures will add up to a substantial saving,” the spokesman concluded.

Background Mote to Editors

The following information on school attendance and hours of work may be of interest.

/The number .......

Wednesday, December 19, 1973

- 5 -

The number of primary school pupils attending a.m. classes is just over ?61,800 while the number of secondary is nearly 71,600.

In the afternoon, 314,600 primary pupils go to school while just over 60,000 secondary students attend classes.

Primary

In rural areas most primary schools start at 7*45 a.m*

In urban areas some start at 7- 30 a.m. but most schools start at 7*45 a.m.

Most schools, urban and rural, finish at 6 p.m.

Secondary

Most secondary schools, urban and rural, start at 8 a.m. and finish at 6 p.m., but there are some schools which start at 7*3^ a.m. and there are some which finish at 6.30 p-»m.

Wednesday, December 19, 1973

- 6 -

SECONDARY PUPILS’ A7/ARENESS OF COMMUNITY PROBLEMS

********

A very significant development in recent years has been the increasing awareness of community problems and issues among secondary school pupils, the Assistant Director of Education (Secondary), Mr. R.M. Cameron said this evening.

Mr. Cameron was speaking at the Speech Day of St. Mary’s Canossian College.

The Assistant Director pointed out that many schools were already participating in community service work even before the introduction of the Anti-litter, Fight Crime and Road Safety Campaigns.

’U?he campaigns, of course, have brought about an even greater interest in such activities,” Mr. Cameron said.

"This is a very healthy sign. It means that before they have to enter the wider, adult community an increasing number of our young people are involving themselves and becoming knowledgeable in the problems facing our society.

’This is valuable preparation for the time when they themselves will take their place in that society. They will not enter completely uninformed.

But Mr. Cameron felt it was even more important that before the pupils enter this wider community they were given a chance ’’to play a part within a self-contained social group, to express their opinion, to make suggestions and have them turned down at times by the majority, to learn to rub along with others without losing their individuality — in other words, to learn the give and take of life."

/Mr. Cameron

Wednesday, December 19, 1973

- 7 -

Mr. Cameron believed that only when classroom lessons were complemented by a range of pupil centred interest activities that a day-school oould provide an all round education.

He praised St. Mary’s Canossian College for having completed another successful year and congratulated all concerned for achieving a strong corporate spirit which was continuing to flourish within the school.

At the ceremony successful pupils received prizes and awards from Mrs. Cameron.

--------0---------

PASSING OUT PARADE OF FIRE OFFICERS

******

Mr. R. Holmes, Chief Fire Officer, will take the salute at a passing-out parade of Fire Officers on Saturday (December 22)•

The parade will take place at the Fire Services Training School, Fan Kam Road, Pat Heung, New Territories at 10.30 a.m.

Among those passing out are two from Brunei.

Also on parade will be about 100 instructors and trainees.

Note to Editors: You are invited to send a reporter and/

or a photographer to cover the passing-out parade which will start at 10.30 a.m.

--------0---------

/8........

Wednesday, December 19 > 1973

- 8 -

ADVICE ON MAINTENANCE OF PRIVATE MOORINGS *********

The Director of Marine, Mr. A. Fletcher, has given hints on the use and maintenance of private moorings to their owners.

In a notice, he said: "All such moorings should be maintained in good condition and kept in correct position.

"Only the recommended types and sizes of mooring components should be used and regular maintenance must be carried out after the mooring has been laid."

Owners of double moorings, Mr. Fletcher said, should draw the buoys together on leaving the berth. This would keep the fire lanes clear for navigation and reduce the possibility of damage to boats and moorings.

To transfer ownership of a private mooring from one person to another, the formalities must be completed by both parties and received by the Director of Marine before bills for buoy dues can be re-directed to the new owner.

0 - -

Wednesday, December 19, 1973

9

CHRISTMAS PARTY

*******

A Christmas party will be held tomorrow (Thursday) afternoon for boys in the 0 Pui Shan Boys’ Home and other children in the Sham Shui Po and Lai Chi Kok areas.

The party will be held at the 0 Pui Shan Boys* Home at Kau Wa Keng, Lai Chi Kok.

The City District Officer (Sham Shui Po), Mr. Chan Hon-kwong will officially start the party at 2.15 p.m.

Guests will include Mr. J.M. Hanger, Magistrate of Kwun Tong Court and officers of the Probation and Corrections Division of Social Welfare Department under which the Home is operated.

The party will be held in two parts, one for indoor events and one for outdoor. The first part of the afternoon will include carol singing, stage plays and folk dancing*

The highlight of the afternoon will be a fun fair of 12 stalls organised by different groups including scouts and secondary and university students.

Altogether some 350 boys at the Home and children from the surrounding areas will take parte

Note to Editors? You are cordially invited to cover the party tomorrow.

-------0---------

Wednesday, December 1% 1975

CONSUMER ADVISORY SERVICE

Dally Guido To Wholesale Market Prices And Supplies

The following prices were realised today (Wednesday) at sales under tho Rice Control Scheme and at the Vegetable Marketing Organisation Wholesale Haricot and tho Fish Marketing Organisation Wholesale Market at Cheung Sha Wan, Kowloon:

Supplies and Wholesale Prices of Rice

Grade Availability of Supply Wholesale Price (8/catty)

China Rico Average

_ .. old crop Seo Mew r - new crop Good ’ 1.64 1.72

S.C.Jion - old crop new crop Po Ngai Good Good 1.58 1.66 1.42

Chu Cho

Thai Rico lO^H/hofo Good 1.52

10-15# Brokens Good . 1.5

A1 Super Extra Good 1.45

A1 Super Good 1.37 •

Whole Glutinous Limited 1.52

» U.S. Rice • Good 1.62

Australian Rioe Good 1.52

Pakistan Rice ••

Taiwan Rice — • •• • /Supplies and •••••<•

Wednesday, December 19, 1973

fillies and Wholesale Prices of Marine Fish

Species • Availability nf Sunnly Wholesale Price (8/catty)

Hi& low ■ Average

Golden Thread Big-Eyes Squid Hair-Tails Lizard Fishes Croalcors Conger-Pike-Eels . Melon Coat Breams Yellow Belly Mackerels Red Goat Fish Fork-Tail Horsc-4Ioad Melon Seed Poof rets Garoupas ’ Yollow Croaker Good Good llornal Good Good ■« Good Normal Normal Limited Good Normal Good Good Normal Normal Limited Normal Good 3.5 2.4 5.5 1.7 2.3 1.3 2.5 2.0 3.3 2.0 3.4 . 2.1 1.4 4.5 2.0. 7.5 6.5 5.0 2.6 0.45 1.7 0.8 0.8 0.55 1.7 1.3 3.0 0.6 2.8 0.5 0.45 2.2 1.5 ■ 6.0 4.2 3.5 3-0 1.5 4.0 1.4 1.6 1.0 2.0 1.8 3.5 1.5 3.0 1.6 1.0 3.2 1.8 6.5 5.0 4.0

/Supplies and

Wednesday, December 191 '*973

Supplies and Wholesale Prices of Locally Produced Vegetables

Typo. Availability of Supply Wholesale Price (8/catty)

High Low Average.

Flowering cabbage Limited 2.2 0.8 1.4

White cabbage Normal 0.6 0.2 0.4

Chinese Lettuce Normal. 0.55 0.2 0.4

Chinese Kale Normal 0.65' 0.2 . 0.4 5

Spring onion Normal 1.2 0.4 0.8

Spinach . Normal 1.4 0.5 1.0

Water cross Normal 1.0 0.55 0.65

Loaf mustard cabbage Scarce 0.5 0.2 0.4

Tomato Normal 1.5 0.8 1.0

Supplies and Wholesale Prices of Pork (Live weight) Availability Wholesale Price

of Supply ( 8/ picul)..

t . (Average)

Pork Good *

5

-----o - -

RH 1

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Thursday, December 201 1973

CONTENTS

Page Not

Two special stamps to be issued to mark the Lunar New Year.. 1

New rice import quota for the first quarter of 1974 •••••... J

Three lots of Crown land to be auctioned next month •••«•••• 4

Kowloon Bay Development ••••••••........................ 5

Opening of the new Registration of Persons Sub-office in Tai Po ••••••••••«••«•••....................................... 6

Better environment for old public housing estates .......... 7

Water interruption in Aberdeen and Ho Man Tin areas ........ 7

Marine Department launches to steam at reduced speeds to save fuel .........«•••••••••.................................... 8

Daily guide to wholesale prices and supply of basic food commodities.

Release time: 7,.jQ P.«i»

•ssued by Government Information Services, Bc’aconsficfd House, Hong Kong Tel: 5-233191

Thursday, December 20, 1973

- 1 -

STAMPS FOK LUNAR NEW YEAR

To Mark Year Of The Tiger

*******

Two special stamps to mark the Lunar Nev/ Year 197^ will be placed on sale at all post offices on January 8, 197^-

The denominations will be 10 cents and $1.J0, and are the eighth in the series of Lunar New Year stamps.

The stamps,which commemorate the ,rYear of the Tiger”, were designed in London.

Special First Day Covers will be on sale at all post offices from Friday, December 28 at 20 cents each, and the public are asked to obtain their requirements early to avoid disappointment.

Advance orders for servicing of First Day Covers will be accepted at the General Post Office, Pedder Street; Kowloon Central Post Office, Nathan Road and Tsim Sha Tsui Post Office, Salisbury Road.

For this service, addressed First Day Covers must be handed-in with an order form together with a remittance to cover the cost. The charge will be 31.50 per cover which includes the cost of two stamps together with a service fee of 10 cents. The covers must be fully addressed by the applicant and not less than 10 covers will be accepted with each order.

Order forms will be available at the General Post Office, Kowloon Central Post Office and Tsim Sha Tsui Post Office on Friday, December 28.

Any person ordering serviced covers addressed to a local destination may collect them on January 9? 197^ from the office where the order was placed.

/Covers .......

Thursday, December 20, 1973

- 2 -

Covers addressed overseas will be sent forward by ordinary post, surface nail, unless sufficient stamps are affixed to cover airmail and/or registration charges. The latest acceptance date for advance orders of serviced covers will be noon on Friday, January 4, 1974.

A service will be provided on Tuesday, January 8, 1974 at all post offices v/hereby First Day Covers will be accepted over the counter, impressed with the normal post office date stamp and handed back to the person presenting them.

Iio time type will appear in the postmark. The special conditions for this service are:-

1) only articles bearing an indication that they are ,fFirst Day Cover" will be so treated;

2) the articles must be addressed to a local address;

5) the articles must not bear any other cancellation;

4) no registered items will be processed by this method.

Special posting boxes will also be available at the General Post Office, Kowloon Central Post Office and Tsim Sha Tsui Post Office on January 8, 1974 for those who wish to have First Day Covers carefully hand-postmarked before despatch to the address on the cover.

Note to Editors: Copies of a photograph of the stamps will

be distributed separately in the press boxes this evening. -------------------0---------

Thursday, December 20, 1973

- 3 -

NEW RICE IMPORT QUOTA

*#*«**«

The rice import quota for the first three months of 1974 has been provisionally fixed at 72,000 metric tons, the Commerce and Industry Department announced today.

This represents a 20 per cent reduction on the normal basic quota of 90,000 metric tons.

Mr. M.D. Sargant, Assistant Director of Commerce and Industry, said that the quota has been reduced to take account of the relatively large stocks held by importers and the improved international supply position.

He said that rice stocks at present amount to approximately 100,000 metric tons.

’’The department will continue to keep developments in the trade and the supply situation under close study,” he added, ”and a supplementary quota will be issued if the circumstances require it.”

Since January this year Hong Kong has imported a total of 326,342 metric tons of rice. *

Of this amount, China has supplied 43 per cent and Thailand about 29 per cent. The balance has been imported from the United States, Australia and Pakistan.

-------0---------

A....

Thursday, December 20, 1975

- 4 -

CROWN LAND FOR SALE * * * * 4> *

Three lots of Crown land, with a total area of 85,590 square feet, will be put up for auction next month.

The auction, to be held on January 18 in the lecture room on the eighth floor of the City Hall, will start at 2.50 p.m.

Two of the lots are in Hong Kong and are for private residential purposes. One of them located at Braemar Hill Road measures 28,000 square feet and the other at Black’s Link has an area of 41,000 square feet.

The Kowloon lot, located between Cheung Sha Wan Road and Lai Chi Kok Road, covers an area of 16,390 square feet and is for industrial and/or godown purposes.

Full particulars and conditions of sale may be obtained from and sale plans inspected at the Public Enquiry Sub-office, Central Government Offices (West Wing), ground floor, Hong Kong end at the Crown Lands &Survey Office, Kowloon Government Offices, 405, Nathan Road, 10th floor, Kowloon.

-------0----------

/5.......

Thursday, December 20 * 1973

- 5 -

KOWLOON BAY DEVELOPMENT

♦»♦***♦♦

Work will begin shortly to excavate some 500,000 cubic yards of earth from a hillside near Cornwall Street in Kowloon Tong for the reclamation of Kowloon Bay.

To be carried out at the same time will be associated slope protection and drainage works. r

On completion of the project, a piece of flat land, measuring about six acres, will be formed on the hillside.

This piece of land will be for future recreational use while the reclaimed land at Kowloon Bay will be used for building road connections to the east of the Airport Tunnel Road now under construction.

V/or!z on the project is expected to start in the middle of next month and will take about 16 months to complete.

The project has been designed and work will be supervised by the Development and Airport Division of Civil Engineering Office of the Public Works Department.

0 -

/6........

Thursday, December 20, 1973

- 6 -

JEW REGISTRATION OF PERSONS SUB-OFFICE IN TAI PO **«*««*

A new Registration of Persons Sub-office will open in Tai Po at 9 a<cit tomorrow (Friday) to serve the residents there and those in the surrounding areas of the New Territories.

Situated at 89-91 Wan Tau Street, the new office will deal with the registration of children for juvenile identity cards and the re-registration of holders of juvenile identity cards for adult identity cards at the age of 18.

Notifications of changes in registered particulars will al so be processed in the new office.

The telephone number of the new office is 12-666545*

Registration of new arrivals and applications for replacement identity cards due to loss, defacement or changes in registered partial J ars will eontinue to be dealt with at the branch offices of the Registration of Parsons Department listed below:-

New Territories Branch Office, Far East Bank Building, Ground floor, Tsuen Wan

Kowloon Branch Office, Canton Road Government Offices, 2nd floor, Kowloon

Hong Kong Branch Office, Causeway Bay Magistracy Building, 3rd floor, Causeway Bay, Hong Kong ---------------0 --------

/7

I

Thursday, December 20, 1975

BETTER ENVIRONMENT FOR OLD PUBLIC HOUSING ESTATES

******

The Housing Department is continuing its efforts to improve the environment of the older public housing estates by providing extra amenities•

At Kwai. Chung Estate, two concrete Ping Pong tables have been built in an internal courtyard playground near Block 27.

In addition, two swings and a see-saw as well as a number of benches have been installed within the estate.

,rThese added amenities have proved to be very popular to the children,” said Mr. Norman Haw, Estate Manager.

At Chai Wan Estate, flowers and shrubs will shortly be planted by staff of the Urban Services Department to beautify the area.

-------0---------

WATER CUT

Water supply to parts of Aberdeen on Hong Kong Island and Ho Man Tin Hill in Kowloon will be turned off for five hours from 1 a.m. on Saturday (December 22).

Hhe temporary stoppage will enable the Waterworks Office staff to carry out leakage tests in the areas.

In Hong Kong, the area affected will be Aberdeen Main Road from Aberdeen Trade School to Aberdeen Dock, including Old Main Street, Wu Nan Street, Wu Pale Street, Tung Sing Road, Chengtu Road, Sai On Street, Lok Yeung Street and Tsung Man Street.

In Kowloon, the area affected is bounded by Argyle Street, Peace Avenue, Iio Man Tin Street, Princess Margaret Road, Ho Man Tin Hill Road and Soares Avenue.

-------0----------

/8........

Thursday, December 20, 1973

- 8 -

MARINE DEPARTMENT IAUNCHES TO STEAM AT REDUCED SPEEDS Another Measure To Save Fuel **«*««*

In a further measure to save fuel, the Marine Department has instructed that all its launches are to steam at reduced speeds.

A spokesman for the department said today that although exact savings in respect of each launch have yet to be work out, it is expected there will be an overall saving of diesel fuel of some 20 to 25 per i . cent.

He emphasised, however, that the instructions would not apply during emergency conditions.

At the same time, government officers requesting the use of Marine Department pool launches to destinations served by ferries are being required to use public transport. The sharing of launches for essential duties has also been implemented where possible.

The spokesman said that contingency plans were being drawn up for the operation of the department’s launches in the event of the fuel situation worsening.

Commenting on these instructions, a spokesman for the Oil Supplies Department said that other boat owners should follow the example set by the Marine Department and adopt similar economy measures.

"If everyone co-operated in this respect it would lead to a considerable saving in diesel fuel," he said.

-------0---------

Thursdayt December 20, 1973

CONSUMER ADVISORY SERVICE

Daily Guido To Wholesale Market Prices And Supplies

Tho following prices were realised today (Thursday) at sales under the Rice Control Scheme and at the Vegetable Marketing Organisation Wholesale Market and‘the Fish Marketing Organiaation Wholesalo Marlcot at Choung Sha Wan, Kowloon:

Supplies and Wholesale Prices o? Rico

Availability Wholesale Price

Grado of Supply (f>/catty) _

China Rico Averago

’ 1.64 •

- old crop Soo Men Good 1.72

* - new crop 1.58 1.66

S.C.Jion - old crop Good

new crop Po'llgai Good 1.42

Chu Cho Good 1.22

Thai Rice lO^n.Qiolo Good 1.52

10-15# Brokens Good 1.50

A1 Super Extra Good 1.45

A1 Super Good 1.57 •

Whole Glutinous Limited 1.52

• U.S, Rice Good 1.62

Australian Rioe

Pakistan Rico — •

Taiwan Rico. r • /Supplies and ••••••«

Thursday, December 20t 1973

Supplies and Wholesale Prices of Marine Fish

Species • Availability of Supply Wholesale Price (8/catty)

Low Average

Golden Thread Good 4.2 2.8 3.5

Big-Eyes Good 2.5 0.6 1.5

Squid Normal 5.5 2.5 4.0

Hair-Tails Good 1.2 0.5 0.8

Lizard Fishes Normal 2.3 0.8 1.7

Croakers Good 1.7 0.6 1.2

Conger-Pike-Eels Normal 2.4 1.8’ 2.2

Melon Coat Normal 2.2 1.4 1.8

Breams • Limited 4.0 5.2 3.5

Yellow Bolly Good 1.2 0.55 0.8

Mackerels Normal 5.5 2.5 3.0

Red Goat Fish Good 1.4 0.6 1.2

Fork-Tail Good 1.1 0.5 0.8

Horse-Head Normal 4.8 . 3.0 3.8

Melon Seed Normal 2.5- 1.5 2.0

Pocrflrcts Scarce 7.8 ’ 6.0 7.0

Gcrorupas • Normal 5.5 4.5 5.0

Yellow Croaker OB ••

/Supplies and

Thursday, December 20/1973

Supplies and Wholesale Prices of

Locally Produced Vegetables

Availability Wholesale Price

Typo of Supply (S/catty) 0

High Low Average

Flowering cabbage Limited 2.2 0.8 1.5

White cabbage Normal 0.6 0.25 0.^5

Chinese Lettuce Normal. 0.6 0.2 0.4

Chinese Kale Normal 0.65 0.2 o.4

Spring onion ~ Normal 1.4 0.5 1.0

Spinach Normal 1.4 0.5 1.0

Water cross • Normal 1.0 0.35 0.65

Leaf mustard cabbage Normal 0.5 0.2 0.35

Tomato Normal • 1.6 0.8 1.2

Supplies and Wholesale Prices of Pork (Live weight)

• • • • Availability of Supply Wholesale Price ( 8/ picul) (Average) -

Pork Good " 285

- - 0

PR

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Friday, December 21, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No,

Lighting restrictions to be eased during New Year Festivals • 1

Flyover to be built to link Garden Road and Queensway......... 2

New measures to deal with less amenable offenders in training centres ........................................................ 3

Better conditions for rehabilitation of drug addicts ........... 5

Hong Kong manufacturers are more aware of the need for good product design.................................................. 7

Passenger ferry services for Shau Kei Wan, Rennie’s Mill and

Hang Hau ..................................................... 8

Mail destroyed in plane accident • •••.......................... 9

Exchange of children’s paintings to promote world peace ....... 10

New Centre for children vzith learning difficulties ........... 11

Deputy Director of Education outlines the broad aims of education ••••••....................•••••••••.................. 1?

Airline companies to reschedule late evening flights .......... 14

More branch offices of the Registration of Persons Office to be opened.............................• • •..................  15

C.A.S. Cadet Day..........................................      16

Daily guide to wholesale prices and supply of basic food commodities

Release time: 7.,45 p.m.

Issued by Government Info'

P~»C4X*»fteld House, Hong Kong.Tel’ 5*233191

Friday, December 21, 1973

LIGHTING RESTRICTIONS FOR NEW YEAR FESTIVALS

**«*«**«

The Government is to grant a temporary and partial extension to the period in which lights are allowed to be turned on during the forthcoming new year festivals.

The Chairman of the Oil Policy Committee, Mr. M.D.A. Clinton, said today that the present 10.30 p.m. "switch off" deadline would be extended on New Year’s Eve (December 31) until 1 a.m. the next day.

For the Lunar New Year, the extensions will be spread over three days. On the nights of January 20 and January 21, the normal 10.30 p.m. deadline will be extended till 1 a.m. on the following days. On the night of January 22 the lights will be permitted to remain on until 7 a.m. the following morning (January *23), which is the first day of the Lunar New Year.

Mr. Clinton said the decision had been made after taking into consideration the opinions of a wide cross-section of the Community.

The extension to the hours of lighting was in keeping with the traditions of these two festivals fL’om which so many people derived enjoyment.

Hr. Clinton explained that Christmas was not included because it was felt that the neon lights were not essential for the celebration of this festival which, by tradition, is more of a family affair at home.

He stressed that the extension was only for a total of four days, and that at all other times, the existing restrictions must remain in force.

Although the lights are permitted during the specified hours, Mr. Clinton

9

said, it does not mean that they must be turned on.

,rIn fact, the more voluntary restraints we have, the less likelihood there is of mandatory restrictions appearing at a later date."

-------o--------- /2..........

Friday, December 21, 1973

2 -

FLYOVER TO LINK GARDEN ROAD AND QUEENSWAY

********

The Public Works Department is proposing to construct a flyover from Garden Road to Queensway.

At present traffic proceeding down Garden Road and wishing to travel east along Queensway must pass through the busy junction of Garden Road and Queensway, and then go round the Hong Kong Cricket Club Ground by way of Jaclzson, Chater and Murray Roads.

The proposed 700-foot long flyover will provide a two-lane one way direct traffic route from Garden Road, passing over the signal controlled junction into the eastbound lane of Queensway.

A footway will be provided integrally with the flyover with branches to link the Multi-Storey Carpark, the Hilton Hotel high level prornenadA and the existing footbridge at Queensway over Cotton Tree Drive.

An additional footbridge is also included in the project to give safe pedestrian access across•Connaught Road Central at its junction with Murray Road.

Minor ground level improvements will be carried out as part of the scheme to facilitate ground level traffic circulation in the general area.

An announcement in the Government Gazette giving notice of an order to be made under the Streets (Alteration) Ordinance is made today. The closing date for objections will be January 21, 1974, and any claims for compensation should be made by February 21, 1974.

Friday, December 21, 1973

I®/ HEAjURES TO BE INTRODUCED IN TRAINING CENTRES

To Deal With Younger And Less Amenable Offenders

********

New measures are being proposed to deal more effectively with the present generation of younger and less amenable offenders detained in training centres.

These proposals are contained in the Training Centres (Amendment) Bill 1975 which will soon be introduced into the Legislative Council.

The Bill, published in the Gazette today, reduces the minimum period of detention from nine to six months so that those who are to benefit from a short period of treatment need not be detained unnecessarily long.

It provides that the period of supervision in future will run for three years from the date of release rather than, as at present, for four years from the date of sentence.

The existing system gives rise to the anomaly that those released earlier are subject to a longer period of supervision than those for whom an early release is considered undesirable.

A person who fails to comply with any requirements specified in a supervision notice shall be liable, upon conviction, to a fine of 85,000 and imprisonment for 12 months.

A section of the Bill provides that if a person is imprisoned for not more than two years whilst he is being detained in a training centre or under a supervision notice or order of recall, the sentence of detention or notice or order shall be suspended until the expiration of his term of imprisonment• /However, .•••••

Friday, December 21, 1973

- 4 -

However, if he is imprisoned to a term of more than two years, or a new sentence of detention is passed on him, the first mentioned sentence of detention, or the notice or order shall cease to have effect.

Provision is also made in the Bill that a person liable to detention, whether actually detained or at large, may be declared incorrigible and the unexpired part of his term of detention will be commuted to a term of imprisonment.

The Bill specifies that courts shall not remand to a training tentre a person who is considered not suitable for detention there.

These proposals will add up to a new and tougher approach to training centre detention.

However, the primary objective of training centres will not be reduced in importance — the tighter discipline needed will in no way prejudice the training programmes involved.

These provisions are introduced because it is generally felt that there should be a sharper regime with stricter discipline in training centres•

------.0----------

/5........

Friday, December 21, 1973

- 5 -

BETTER CONDITIONS FOR REHABILITATION OF DRUG ADDICTS

*******

A number of improvements to present procedures relating to the detention of drug addicts in drug addiction treatment centres will be made under a new Bill to be introduced into the Legislative Council shortly.

These improvements are aimed at providing better conditions for the rehabilitation of drug addicts and reducing the problem of drug addiction.

The Bill, known as the Drug Addiction Treatment Centres (Amendment) Bill 1973? was published in today*s Gazette.

Under the Bill, a conviction shall only be entered on the offender’s record if the court considers that the circumstances of the offence so warrant and so orders.

Commenting on the proposed legislation, a spokesman for the Prisons Department said: ’’The treatment is regarded as medical rather than punitive; it is in the interest of successful rehabilitation that offenders, particularly young and first offenders, should be able to return to normal life with a clean sheet.”

A further provision of the Bill enables the Commissioner of Prisons to recall a person to a centre for further treatment if he fails to comply with a supervision order under which he is allowed to leave the centre.

A person recalled to an addiction treatment centre will be detained until the expiry of 18 months from the date of the original detention order or the expiry of six months from the date of his arrest following recall, whichever is the later.

/This will .......

Friday, December 21, 1973

- 6 -

This will replace the present provision under which the procedure for such a breach involves a further appearance before a magistrate.

Another change is made to provide better opportunities for the rehabilitation of drug addicts sentenced to prison.

Under present legislation, a detention order lapses if the person concerned is sentenced to any term of imprisonment.

"It is not in the interest of such a person that provision for his treatment and supervision should cease when a short period of imprisonment is imposed on him,” the spokesman said.

Under the new Bill, a detention order, supervision order or recall order will be suspended during any period of imprisonment of two years or less to which an addict is sentenced. In the event of a greater sentence of imprisonment, the detention order, supervision order or recall order, as the case may be, shall cease to have effect.

The Bill also provides that a prisoner may be transferred by order of the Governor from a prison to a treatment centre during the lust 18 months of his sentence if it is in his interest and the public interest that he should receive treatment and rehabilitation.

On the other hand, inmates in a detention centre, who are considered a bad influence may, also by order of the Governor, be transferred to a prison.

-------0---------

/7........

Friday, December 21, 1973

- 7 -

IMPORTANCE OF GOOD PRODUCT DESIGN EMPHASIZED * * ♦ * * ♦ * * *

The need for Hong Kong manufacturers to maintain improvements in product design was stressed today by the Director of Commerce and Industry, Mr. David Jordan.

’’The degree of sophistication of our consumer goods is steadily increasing and, in the foreseeable future, this is where our strength will be,” he said.

Mr. Jordan was speaking at the C.M.A. Exhibition at a prize-giving ceremony for the Best Stalls Competition. The awards were presented by his wife.

"The average standard of stall design is very high,” said Mr. Jordan, "and I take this to reflect an increased awareness by manufacturers of the need for good product design.

•Without continuing improvements in this field, Hong Kong will fail to maintain its position in traditional overseas markets and lag behind in the hunt for new ones — especially in view of the increasing competitiveness of other East Asian suppliers.0

Hr. Jordan said that light industry would continue to predominate in Hong Kong, but there was still a need for further diversification.

Recent developments at the heavier end of industry were encouraging, he added, and gave grounds for certain optimism regarding our lon^-term industrial future.

Note to Editors: Copies of Mr. Jordan’s speech, in English and

Chinese, will be distributed separately in the press boxes this evening.

-------0---------

/8........

Friday, December 21, 1973

- 8 -

PASSENGER FERRY SERVICES

For Shau Kei Wan, Rennie1s Mill and Hang Hau

*******

The Government today invited tenders for the exclusive right to operate a passenger ferry service between Shau Kei Wan, Rennie’s Mill and Hang Hau for a period of three years.

A tender notice published in the Gazette stipulates that the maximum fares which may be charged will vary between 30 and cents, depending on the destination.

The successful tenderer will be required to maintain and provide a ferry service for the conveyance of passengers and their luggage between the hours of 6 a.m. and 10 p.m. daily in accordance with a schedule of service to be first approved by the Commissioner for Transport.

He is also required to provide by February 1 next year, or another date to be agreed, an adequate number of ferries to operate an efficient service•.

Each tenderer will have to state in his tender the arrangements that he proposes for the embarking and disembarking of passengers at Shau Kei Wan, Rennie’s Mill and Hang Hau.

The successful tenderer will have to pay the Government a fixed monthly rent, which is payable in advance on the first day of each month, from the commencement of the term of licence. Therefore, each tenderer must state in his tender the amount of rent he offers the Government.

/All tenders .......

Friday, December 21, 1975

- 9 -

All tenders should be addressed to the Secretary, Central Tender Board, and placed in the Tender Box situated in the lift lobby on the ground floor of the Colonial Secretariat, Central Government Offices (Main Wing) before noon on Friday, February 1, 1974.

-------0--------

MAIL DESTROYED IN PLANE ACCIDENT

*******

The Postmaster General regrets to announce that mail conveyed on the Lufthansa aircraft (Flight No.LH645) involved in an accident in New Delhi earlier this week v/as destroyed.

The nail concerned was posted in Hong Kong on December 1u and 19 to places in West Germany, Greece, Bulgaria, Hungary and Dahomey.

-------0----------

/10........

Friday, December 21, 1973

- 10 -

i »

EXCHANGE OF CHILDREN’S PAINTINGS TO PROMOTE WORLD PEACE

Fifty-three water colour paintings by Japanese school children

in Kagoshima have been sent to the Hong Kong Education Department by the Kagoshima UNESCO Association.

In a letter to the Director of Education, the Association’s representative, Mr. Saburo Kanemaru, said that the object of sending the paintings was to promote world peace through the cultivation of international understanding and East-West exchange.

Commenting on the paintings, a spokesman for the Education Department’s

Arts Section said: ’’They are bold in style and are of very high standard.

’•Twenty paintings by Hong Kong children have been selected and presented to the Kagoshima UNESCO Association in return,” he said.

The Japanese children’s paintings are on display at the Cultural

Craft Centro of the Education Department in North Point.

The Centre is organising an open exhibition from January 28 to

February 2 next year when the paintings will be displayed together

with selected articles and garments made by Hong Kong secondary school needleworly'drcss students.

Note to Editors: Copies of two photographs - one showing pupils

and their teachers admiring the Japanese children’s paintings and the other showing three teachers exami nj-ng the paintings - are distributed in the G.I.S. press boxes this evening.

-------0---------

/11........

0

Friday, December 21, 1973

- 11 -

NEV/ CENTRE FOR CHILDREN WITH LEARNING DIFFICULTIES Exhibition Of Special Teaching Aida

The Special Education Services Centre, which provides diagnostic and remedial services for children with learning difficulties, wi 11 be opened by the Director of Education. Mr. J. Canning on January 3, 1974.

The Centre is on the second floor of Sir Ellis Kadoorie Government Primary School (Western). It is run by the Education Department’s Special Education Section.

Coinciding with the opening is a three-day exhibition of special teaching aids to be held at the adjacent Sai Ying Pim Government Primary School.

Exhibits will include remedial and specially adapted materials designed for children with learning problems related to visual, auditory, physical and speech handicaps and school failures.

,fThe exhibition will also show assessment and therapeutic materials for children with learning difficulties and graded materials in relation to curriculum development in special education,” a spokesman for the Department said.

He added: ’’Films on the education of children with learning difficulties related to visual, auditory and physical handicaps and school failures will also be shown.”

/Primary school

Friday, December 21, 1973

- 12 -

Primary school teachers and students at the three Colleges of

Education have been invited to attend the exhibition. Members of the public are also welcome.

Noto to Editors:

You are invited to send representatives to

cover the opening ceremony of the Centre on January

3, 1974 at 10.00 a.m. at Sir Ellis Kadoorie Government Primary School (Western), Hospital Road, Hong Kong.

Your representatives are also invited to cover the Exhibition of Special Teaching Aids.

- - 0 - -

/1J

Friday, December 21, 1973

- 13 -

BROAD AIMS OF EDUCATION OUTLINED

**«***»*«

The Deputy Director of Education (Profession), Mr. N.M.Ho, this afternoon stressed the importance of determining the aims of education in the context of modern life and outlined briefly the broad aims of education.

Ho was speaking at the dedication and blessing of the Holy Family Canossian College, a Government subsidized secondary school.

Mr. Ho said: <fIt is not enough that we should devise the means of education and elaborate them with all the aids that modern thought can contribute.

"We must, in all sincerity, try to determine the ends of education, and so give purpose and direction to our efforts to discover the best means of achieving those ends."

In his opinion, Mr. Ho said that education meant much more than teaching children to acquire certain skills and to learn certain facts.

"It is concerned with the whole child - his physical, mental and spiritual growth; his feelings, attitudes and relationships; his character and his personality,11 he said.

The Deputy Director pointed out that it was obvious that the education of the whole child could not be undertaken entirely, or even primarily, by the School, although the school would play an important part in it.

Mr. Iio added: "Education is already well advanced before the child comes to school, whether he comes at the age of five or six years. Education is tho sum total of our learning which in turn is the result of our experience. ’Experience, in its usually accepted sense, begins at birth and continues throughout life, and it is gained in whatever place we happen to be, and from all things that we perceive and the people whom we encounter.u

-------O----------

/14........

Friday, December 21, 1973

- 14 -

AIRLINE COMPANIES INSTRUCTED TO RESCHEDULE LATE EVENING FLIGHTS

Result Of Decision To Change To Summer Time

******

Following the decision to change to summer time on December 30, airline companies operating through Hong Kong International Airport have been instructed to make any necessary re-scheduling of late evening flights within thirty days.

Commenting on last Wednesday’s announcement, the Acting Director of Civil Aviation, Mr« Brian Keep, said that all airlines were required to notify their plans for new late schedules before the introduction of summer time but because of international obligations some airlines would require up to four weeks before rescheduling could be completed«

Mr. Keep went on to explain: ’’This will mean that for just over two weeks after the change to summer- time, we have to face the fact that some aircraft movements presently taking place between 11 p.m. and midnight local time, will operate between midnight and 1 acm. due to the advancing of the clock.

”1116 a 5 ri 5 res have urged to ch inge their schedules at the earliest possible date and I will ensure that a very valid reason will have to be given for any aircraft movement that takes place after midnight,” he said.

”1 am very conscious that instances of noise up to 1 a.m. will cause sone disturbance due to the change to summer time but I can assure the public that by January 20, 197^ at the latest, we will be back to normal operations at the airport,” Mr. Keep concluded.

-------o--------- /15........

Friday, December 21, 1973

- 15 -

REGISTRATION OF PERSONS OFFICE EXPANSION PLAN

******

The Commissioner of Registration, Mr. A. Chapman, today outlined his department’s plans for future expansion.

Speaking at the opening of the new Registration of Persons Suboffice in Tai Po, he said that a long-term programme had been drawn up to provide the public with adequate and convenient registration facilities.

’’Registration facilities will be provided in other parts of .

Hong Kong, such as the new townships at Shatin and Tuen Mun, as the need arises,” he said.

Referring to the new Sub-office in Tai Po, Mr. Chapman said it was the fifth office of the department and that arrangements were in hand to open a similar office in the Western District of Hong Kong Island.

The new Sub-office will -serve the residents in Tai Po and t^ose in the surrounding areas of the-New Territories.

-------0---------

/15........

Friday, December 21, 1973

- 16 -

C.A.S. CADET DAY

*******

The Civil Aid Services Cadet Corps will hold its annual Cadet

Day on Sunday (December 2J), between 9 a.m. and 1 p.m. at the C.A.S.

Kowloon Training Centre at 204, Argyle Street.

More than 1,000 cadets will participate in various events, Including demonstrations of foot drill, rescue, first aid and trick bicycling.

There will also be 20 game stalls designed and decorated by the •adets themselves.

A C.A.S. spokesman said the aim of involving the cadets in the preparation of this annual function was to develop the initiative of the boys, to exercise them in organising and conducting activities, and to premote close friendship and mutual co-operation amongst the cadets.

The C.A.S. Commissioner, Mr. P.C. Woo, will inspect the parade and present the Dulce of Edinburgh Award certificates and medals to cadets. He will also officiate at the opening ceremony and address the gathering.

Note to Editors: You are invited to have the event covered.

Mr. Fung Kwok Him, Senior Training Officer, Cadets, will be present to assist the press.

-------0---------

Friday, Decorate? 21, 197

Supplies and Wholesale Prices of Marine Fish

Species Availability of Supply Wholesale Price

11 High fg/catty) Average

Low -

Golden Thread Normal 4.50 2.50 3.50

Big-Eyes Good 2.50 0.50 1.40

Squid Normal 5.80 2.50 4.00

Hair-Tails Normal 0.80 0.40 0.60

Lizard Fishes Limited 2.50 1.00 1.30

Croakers Good 1.70 0.50 1.20

Conger-Pike-Eels Normal 2.80 1.80 2.50

Melon Coat Limited 2.60 1.50 2.20

Breams Limited 4.50 5.50 4.00

Yellow Bolly Good 1.20 0.50 0.80

Mackorols Normal 4.co 2.50 3.CO

Red Goat Fish Good 2.50 0.40 1.50

Fork-Tail Good 0.70 0.30 0.50

Horse-Head Limited 4.50 3.00 3.50

Melon Seed Normal 3.00^ 2.50 2.80

Poof rets Scarce 8.50 6.00 7.0c

Garoupas Normal 6.50 4. co 5.00

Yellow Croaker Normal 4.70 3.2c -'.-.co

/Supplies and ...

Friday, December 21, 1975

Supplies and Wholesale Prices of

Locally Produced Vegetables

ifrpo. Availability of Supply Wholesale Price (S/catty)

Low Average

Flowering cabbage Limited 2.2 0.8 1.6

White cabbage Normal 0.6 0*2 0.45

Chinese Lottuoe Normal. 0.6 0.2 0.45

Chinese Kale Normal 0.7 ’ 0*25 0.5

Spring onion Normal 1.4 0.5 1.0

• Spinach Normal 1.5 0.5 1.0

tfator’ cross Normal 1.1 0.4 0.7

Loaf mustard cabbage Scarce 0.6 0.2 0.4

Tomato Normal 1.6 0.8 1.2

Supplies and Wholesale Prices of Pork (Live weight) Availability Wholesale Price of Supply (8/ picul)

(Average)

Pork Good * 285

Friday, December 21, 1973

CONSUMER ADVISORY SERVICE

Daily Guido To Wholesale Market Prices And Supplies

Tho following prices were realised today (Friday) at sales under tho Rice Control Scheme and at the Vegetable Marketing Organisation Wholesale Market-and tho Fish Marketing Organisation Wholesale Market at Cheung Sha Wan, Kowloon:

Supplies and Wholesale Prices of Rice

Availability Wholesale Price

Grado of Supply ($/catty)

China Rice Average

.. - old crop Soo Hew Good 1.64

- new crop 1.72

S.C.Jion ~ old crop Good 1.58

new crop 1.66

. Po Ngai Good 1.42

Chu Clio •w

Thai Rico logTifiioio - ••

*10-15% Brokens Good 1.50

A1 Super Extra -

A1 Super Good 1.37

Whole Glutinous Limited 1.52

• U.S. Rico Good 1.62

Australian Rioo -

Pakistan Rice * e ••

Taiwan Rico

/Supplies and

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Saturday, December 22, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No,

Recent intimidation attempts on housing estate shop representatives denounced ..................................... 1

Post Office aims to achieve a saving of over 15 per cent in electricity ................................................ 4

Commissioner for Transport announces further measures to improve traffic in Central District ........................... 6

Duty free bottle of brandy from Macau...................,. 6

Regulations to limit the emission of dust or grit from industrial furnaces to come into effect shortly................ 7

All taxi written tests will be held in Kowloon as from next year . •................................................   8

New multi-fibre textile agreement to come into effect on January 1 ..................................................... 9

Release time? 5,.00 p.m.

Issued by Government Informetlo1'. -n. • jd House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Saturday, December 22, 1973

- 1 -

SECRETARY FOR HOUSING DENOUNCES SHOPKEEPER INTIMIDATION *♦♦♦♦♦

Mr. Ian Lightbody, Secretary for Housing today (Saturday) denounced recent attempts to intimidate shop representatives who had discussed new shop tenancy terms with the Housing Department.

There had been several reports of intimidation since Friday when the new shop tenancy terms were announced, he said, and these had been brought to the attention of the Police for necessary action. Shop tenants who felt they were being threatened should inform the Police or Housing Department officers.

Mr. Lightbody said that during the two months since he met shop tenants1 representatives the Housing Department had spared no effort to ascertain the views of shopkeepers both by direct contact and through the association set up to represent the shop tenants.

He went on: ”As a result of these very useful meetings new shop tenancy terms have been worked out which I believe are very resonable and should be acceptable to tenants.”

Mr. Lightbody said that a group of shopkeepers had claimed that the new terms in some way threatened their continued security of tenure.

He stressed that this was completely unfounded; the Housing Authority had no intention of terminating any shop tenancies unless (as has always been the case) the tenant persistently disregarded the tenancy conditions. All co-operative shop tenants were completely secure in their tenancies. A proper agreement of the sort prepared is necessary to make clear the rights and delegations •

/The special .......

Saturday, December 22, 1973

- 2 -

The special concessions agreed for shop-keepers in Group B estates who had their tenancies before April 1, 1973 are:-

1. Security of Tenure

Tenancies will be for a fixed term of two years (during which shop rents will not be raised) and will be renewed automatically at the end of term provided there has not been a persistent or blatant breach of the agreement. However, shop tenants may opt for a monthly tenancy if they wish (although in law such terms give less security than a fixed term agreement).

2. Inheritance

The present shop tenant will be allowed to transfer big right to a member of his family, either in his life time or, on death.

3- Change of Trade

Tenants will be able to apply for a change of trade provided it meets with estate requirements and does not adversely affect the living environment of the estate.

4. Transfer of Shop Tenancy

Shopkeeper who held tenancies before April 1, 1973 will be allowed to assign the tenancy, but the transferee will have no such right. In the past they could only assign to authorised tenants but they would now be free to assign to anyone.

/’’These arrangements .

Saturday, December 22, 1973

- 3 -

’’These arrangements,” said Mr, Lightbody, ’’taken with the low rents payable compared with private seetor shops, put Housing Authority shop tenants in a favourable position, and I am sure all tenants as well as the general public appreciate this.

”1 see no grounds for any further change in the proposed terms” said Mr. Lightbody, ’’and I hope tenants will take advantage of the new deal and remove the uncertainty that now surrounds tenancy transfers. If shop tenants have any queries about the new terms the management staff at their estate will be ready at any time to give them further explanation and assistance.”

A

Saturday, December 22, 1975

- 4 -

OVER 15 PER CENT ELECTRICITY SAVING

Aimed By Post Office

*««*** A

Fuel economy officers have been appointed within the staff of the Pest Office to ensure that savings in the use of electricity and fuel /

are made wherever possible in the department.

The officers are responsible for carrying out any economy measures in their offices or sections.

A set of guidelines has been drawn up to assist them in their task and the performance of each unit is monitored by comparing current monthly consumption with that of the corresponding month a year ago.

Among the measures being taken include the removal of non-essential lighting, re-arranging lighting in offices to achieve maximum economy, and the switching off at all times of spotlights over post ing boxes in branch offices.

The use of mechanical appliances is also being restricted to the minimum to achieve the efficiency and output required.

The scheme was put into operation earlier this month as part of the government’s overall plan to economise on the use of fuel, and at this stage it is too early to give positive figures. However, the Post Office estimates that the savings will be well in excess of the target of 10 to 15 per cent.

A similar system has also been adopted within the Fire Services Department where command fuel economy officers have been appointed to ensure that all personnel are fully aware of the reasons for increased economy and the methods of implementing fuel saving measures.

/In a........

Saturday, December 22, 1973

- 5 -

In a general message to all command stations, the Director of Fire Services, Mr. A.E.H. Wood, said operational efficiency must not be impaired by the need to economise, but ”inconvenience will not be considered an acceptable reason for failure to achieve the target percentage.”

-------0---------

/6..........

Saturday, December 22, 1973

- 6 -

FURTHER MEASURES TO CONTROL TRAFFIC IN CENTRAL DISTRICT

*****♦

The Commissioner for Transport has announced further measures to control and improve traffic in Central District.

With effect from Sunday (December 30), the loading and unloading of goods vehicles will be prohibited between 7 a.m. and 10 a.m. and between 4 p.m. and 7 p*m. on parts of Connaught Road Central, Des Veeux Road Central, Queen’s Road Central and on Chater Road.

At the same time Jubilee Street between Connaught Road Central and Queen’s Road Central, will be re-routed southbound and Queen Victoria Street, between Connaught Road Central and Queen’s Road Central will be re-routed northbound.

-------0---------

BOTTLE OF BRANDY FROM MACAU

Concession Announced For Holidays

******

The Director of Commerce and Industry announced today that passengers arriving from Macau during the two days following Christmas Day (i.e. December 26 and 27) may bring into Hong Kong free of duty one bottle of Portuguese brnady containing not more than one litre.

This is in lieu of the customary one quart bottle of grape wine at present allowed.

-------0---------

/ 7 ............

Saturday, December 22, 1975

- 7 -

REGULATIONS TO LIMIT EMISSION OF DUST OR GRIT FROM CHIMNEYS

To Come Into Effect In Ten Days

*******

The Assistant Commissioner of Labour, Mr. David Lin, today reminded fuel users that the new set of regulations to limit the emission of dust or grit from industrial furnaces, ovens, flues and chimneys will become effective on January 1, 197^*

The new regulations - the Clean Air (Restriction and Measurement of Smoke Emission) Regulations 1973 - will apply to all premises where liquid oil, solid fuel, gas, electricity or other fuels are used which give rise to the emission of dust, grit or smoke.

Mr. Lin’said: "If grit and dust emitted from any premises is found to be in excess of the statutory limit, the occupier will be liable to a fine of $5^000 plus a daily fine of $50 if the offence continues."

The regulations also stipulate that an occupier who is given 60 days1 notice will have to install specified sampling points on his premises to enable officers from the Labour Department to take samples of dust or grit and to measure the density of smoke. The occupier will also have to ensure safe access to the sampling points and to keep them in good conditions.

Section five of the regulations forbids the use of liquid fuel,with a viscosity exceeding 120 seconds Redwood No. 1, unless the occupier has obtained prior permission from the Commissioner of.Labour. "But permission would only be granted if the Commissioner is satisfied that the use of such fuel would not result in the emission of dark smoke," Mr. Lin said.

Mr. Lin added that most likely domestic premises and restaurants would not be affected by section five because the liquid fuels commonly used on such premises were kerosene, gas or diesel fuel oil, the viscosity of which was well below 120 seconds Redwood No. 1.

-------o--------- / 8..........

Saturday, December 22, 1973

- 8 -

TAXI WRITTEN TEST

******

The Transport Department announced today that with effect from January 2, 197^-, written tests for applicants for taxi driving licences will be conducted only in the examination hall of the Pui Ching Road Office.

At present, taxi written tests are held at both the Rumsey Street Licensing Office, Hong Kong, and the Pui Ching Road Office, Kowloon.

.A spokesman for the department said: ”In view of the limited testing space at the Rumsey Street Office, there is a delay of some five months for a Hong Kong applicant to be given a test.

"A new examination hall has been provided at the Pui Qiing Road Office, capable of accommodating all the candidates currently tested in Hong Kong and Kowloon, plus an extra one third. By conducting all tests in Kowloon, more Hong Kong candidates can be accommodated, with a reduced waiting time.”

The spokesman said that starting from the same day, all applications for taxi written test appointments will be accepted at the Pui Ching Road Office only.

- - - - 0 -------

/ 9.......

Saturday, December 22, 1973

- 9 -

NEW MULTI-FIBRE TEXTILE AGREEMENT ♦ ♦♦♦♦ ♦♦ ♦ * * Mr. Bill Dorward, Deputy Director of Commerce and Industry, returned from Geneva last night after representing Hong Kong at talks by member nations of the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) to establish a new multi-fibre textile agreement.

The new agreement will come into effect on January 1, 197^»

for a four-year period. It replaces the existing Cotton Textile Arrangement * * which expires at the end of this year.

Commenting on the outcome, Mr. Dorward said that this represented the culmination of nearly two years’ work on the part of the countries concerned. The main negotiations had:-been over the last eight months.

”If Hong Kong had its way,” Mr. Dorward said, ’’there would be no such restraint arrangements on world trade in textiles. The choice lay, however, between the rule of law in this vital sector and a situation which some delegations in Geneva described as the law of the jungle.

”So we contributed our maximum efforts over the months to shaping the new rules to our best advantage. I like to think we have succeeded in many important respects. Certainly the new rules are much better for Hong Kong than those under the 11-year-old Cotton Textiles Arrangement which expires next week.”

/The Hong Kong •••••••

Saturday, December 22, W3

- 10 -

The Hong Kong delegation to the crucial three-week session which concluded on December 20 included Mr. G.L. Pearson, Counsellor for Hong Kong Affairs in Geneva; Mr. P.V. Dodge, Counsellor for Hong Kong Commercial Affairs in Brussels and Mr. P.K.Y. Tsao, of the Commerce and Industry Department.

Mr. Dorv/ard paid tribute to the contribution made by the three members of the Textiles Advisory Board, Mr. B.J. Barlow, Mr. Jack Tang and Mr. Francis Tien, who-accompanied "the- delegation.

-------0---------

I

PH i.

DAILY iNFORMATfOrrWOETIN

INAUGURATION OF LONG-TERM GUIDANCE SCHEME FOR SCHOOL LEAVERS

*********

A long-term guidance scheme to provide dvico c-.nd assistance to school leavers will be inaugurated on Sunday (December JO).

The project, to be known as '•The Youth Guidance Scheme on Employment and Further Studies,” is a joint effort between the Social Welfare Department fs Tai Hang Tung Community Centre and the West Kowloon Youth Guidance Council.

Also participating will be college students or graduates who will be assisting in planning and organisation work.

Miss Lilian Wong. Warden the Tai Hang Tung Community Centre and Co-ordinator of the project, said the aim of the scheme is to provide students leaving school with advice and assistance on employment mat tears or further studies.

”By doing this we hope the students will be better prepared to face the outside world with confidence to find the right place for themselves in society,” she said.

A series of programmes which will include 1ectures, seminars and group discussions will start next month lasting into the middle of the

new year.

”We intend to invite people from different fields to take part in these programmes so that the participants in the scheme will be able to get as much information as possible on what opportunities are open to them either in employment or in pursuing further studies,” Miss Wong said.

School leavers will be discussing these possibilities in small group settings in which they will also be able to share the experiences of young adult volunteers from the Community Centre who themselves at one

time faced the same problems of deciding their future*

Issued by Government lnformat»on House, 5'233191

Monday, December 24, 1973

Those taking part in the scheme, Miss Wong said, will later be able to assist others in similar schemes in future.

The ceremony marking the beginning of this project on Sunday will be held at the Tai Hang Tung Community Centre in Tong Yam Street, Kowloon. It will start at 2 p.m.

Mr. Wong Shui-cheuk, President of the West Kowloon Youth Guidance Council will officiate. The programme will include a discussion on "A General Introduction to Employment and Further Studies.”

Talcing part in this will be Mr. Yuen Shui-sun, Chairman of the Council; Ur. Tang Wing-hung, the Vice-Chairman; Miss Wong Shuk-chuen, a university undergraduate; Mr. Ho Man-kwong, an executive and Miss Wong.

During the ceremony questionnaires will be distributed to some 300 Form Five students attending with a view to finding out the actual needs of young people to ensure that programmes are organised accordingly.

Note to Editors: You are invited to cover the inauguration

ceremony marking the start of this project on Sunday, December 30, starting at 2 p.m.

Monday, December 24, 1973

- 3 -

TEMPORARY TRAFFIC DIVERSIONS

********

A section of the westbound carriageway of Wong Chuk Hang Road at its junction with Nam Long Shan Road will be closed to traffic for about two months from 10 a.m. on Thursday (December 2?) to facilitate road works in the area.

During this period, traffic will be temporarily diverted to the eastbound carriageway.

Meanwhile, Road D5 at Tuen Mun will be closed for about four days from Friday (December 28) to facilitate the laying of telephone cables• K.M.B. buses on route No. 59 to Pillar Point Road will operate via Causeway Road.

Traffic signs will be put up in both areas to guide motorists.

-------0 --------

I.R.D. SECTION MOVES TO NEW ADDRESS

********

The Profits Tax (Unincorporated Business) Subsection of the Inland Revenue Department has moved to new premises on the 10th floor of the Murray Road Multi-Storey Car Park Building in Central.

The Subsection deals with files having a prefix 40 (land and property dealing) or 67 (hotels, boarding houses, amusements and restaurants).

As from today (Monday) all enquiries relating to files with these prefixes should be made at the new address. The new telephone number is 5-256061.

Office hours are from 8.30 a.m. to 5 p-m. from Monday to Friday, and from 9 a.m. to 12 noon on Saturdays.

-------0---------

Release time 5.00 p.m.

THE

♦ DIRECTOR •

d EDITORS AND’ 6

• ALL THE STAFF CF • d GOVERNMENT INFORMATION i SERVICES EXTEND TO ALL READERS

OF THE DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

THE WARMEST GREETINGS OF THE SEASON

AND EVERY GOOD WISH FOR T:IE COMING YEAR

O O Q Q Q

,GGGGC.GGGG

gg

GGCGGG^ • u

rG ’GGGCGOGGG

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

"aursday, December 27, 1973

COingisTS

Page No*

Further processing of Kowloon Tsai fire victims for re-housing ............................................    ............. 1

Economy measures by Prisons Department to save fuel 4

Temporary water cuts in Kowloon City and Wong Tai Sin ...... 5

Eight heroes to be commended for rescuing people from the sea •••••••.................................................. 6

Commendation for worker and fireman for rescuing woman from fire •«•  ................................................... 7

New Year Day is a statutory holiday for workers 8

♦ * ♦ ♦ * ♦ + * *

Daily guide to wholesale prices and supply of basic food commodities

Delease time; 7»3Q p*m*

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Thursday, December 27, 1973

- 1 -

FURTHER PROCESSING OF FIRE VICTIMS ON SATURDAY

Many Impostors Trying'To Cash In On Fire tragedy

********

The Housing Department today called on people who lost their homes in the Kowloon Tsai squatter fire on Christmas Day to report to the Tai Hang Tung Community Centre in Tong Yam Street on Saturday (December 29) for further processing of their claims.

Notices telling the victims of the exercise are being posted at all eight temporary accommodation centres, the Sham Shui Po City District Office and the police mobile reporting centre at Tai Hang Tung.

In the squatter fire, about 350 structures in Man Heung Yuen, Ilan San Lane and Sai Man Lane in the Kowloon Tsai area were destroyed. A total of 6l6 families, comprising 2,507 people, have been registered homeless. (

The further processing exercise will begin at 9 a.m. on Saturday and will probably last throughout the day. Only the head of the household or an adult representative from each family should attend the personal processing exercise.

They should bring along with them their identity card, emergency relief card issued by the Social Welfare Department, the birth certificate of all members of their families and any other document which can help them to substantiate their claims.

They are also advised to bring some warm clothing and food with them in view of the time needed to attend the large number of people turning up for the exercise.

Mr. Leslie Pogue, Assistant Director (Operations) of the Housing Department, said that the exercise was a very important step to weed out impostors. ......

Thursday, December 27, 1975

- 2 -

11 We have confirmed that there is quite a number of impostors mixing up with the genuine victims,” Mr. Pogue said.

’’These people are trying to cheat the department to give them public housing or resite accommodation as well as cash allowance from the Emergency Relief Fund.

”By checking through our records we have been able to find out that 45.families who have already been rehoused have turned up and registered themselves as victims.

’’One family who is now living in Sau Mau Ping Estate even split up its members and registered as two separate families.”

Mr. Pogue explained that this was the main reason for carrying out further processing and he assured that arrangements to allocate licensed area sites or public housing units to the genuine victims would be made as soon as final processing was completed.

He said all those occupying surveyed structures in Man Heung Yuen and Sai Man Lane which had been earmarked for clearance would be offered public housing.

”In line with current policy, people living in tolerated structures in Man San Lane will also be offered public housing,” he added. Occupants of unsurveyed huts will be accommodated in licensed areas.

Mr. Pogue went on: ’’Cash allowances from the Emergency Relief Fund, administered by the Social Welfare Department, will be given to those allocated licensed area sites to help them to meet the building and re-*equipment costs.

/’’Those eligible....... •

Thursday, December 27, 1973

3

’’Those eligible for public housing will only get the re-equipment allowances.”

Distribution of the cash allowances will be made as soon as possible.

Meanwhile, Mr. H.K. Qian, City District Officer of Sham Shui Po, •ommended the public-spiritedness and enthusiasm of the 100-odd students and volunteers who sacrificed their holiday yesterday — Boxing Day — to help in relief work.

Among them were about JO girls from Tak Nga College in Yau Yat Chueh who cancelled their Christmas party and called at the CDO to offer their services.

Mr. Chan said the students and volunteers worked throughout the day helping sort out various relief articles, processing Fat Choy Fund recipients, cleaning up the temporary accommodation centres, baby sitting for mothers, serving food and other work.

Each of the estimated 2,JOC fire victims, Mr. Qian said, received $20 yesterday from the Fat Choy Fund. •“ *

He also expressed his appreciation to the people who generously advanced loans to be distributed to the victims, as the banks were closed yesterday.

Since the fire on Christmas Day, Mr. Chan said, more than $25,000 in cash donations were received, including $10,000 from the Tung Wah Group of Hospitals, $10,000 from the Chiu Chau Chambf.r-of ’Commerce and $4,000 from the Wong Tai Sin Sik Sik Yuen.

These would be distributed to the victims soon, he said.

All of the victims have been given warm clothing, blankets and quilts, and other daily necessities and are receiving two hot meals a day. He pointed out that there was adequate washing facilities at the temporary accommodation centres and hot water was supplied to all victims at the centres both in the morning and evening.

Mr. Chan re-iterated that any of the fire victims who needed long ternr relief could approach the Social Welfare Department or his office.

-------o--------- /4 .......

Thursday, December 27, 1973

- 4 ~

PRISONS JODI DRIVE TO SAVE FUEL

A ylumber of economy measures have beei. uit. ‘ due ad by the Prisons Department, including ah earlier ’’lights out f.r prisoners and inmates”, as part of the government’s drive to cut back on the use of fuel.

A working party was appointed within the department to achieve maximum savings without jeopardising security.

Among the measures which have been implemented are a reduction in the wattage of the cell and dormitory light bulbs; a ban on unauthorised electrical equipment in any moss zr barrack accommodation; all lights in eells, dormitories, offices and workshops to be turned off when not occupied; and all machinery to be switched off when not in use.

In addition, all lights required at night have been clearly marked, and only these are permitted to be switched on. In al_. Prisons Department institutes the ’’lights out” has been advanced by 30 minutes.

Instructions have also been issued to regulate the supply of fuel for such things as cooking and bathing. The distrib i ion of fuel to messes is being limited to minimum daily requirements, and meal hours for staff have been readjusted wherever possible to minimise consumption of fuel in staff messes.

In order to keep a check on the situation, each Prisons Department institute will submit monthly returns to headquarters giving a breakdown of the various fuels used.

/The Commissioner .......

Thursday, December 27, 1973

- 5 -

The Commissioner of Prisons, Mr. T.G. Garner, said today his department was doing everything possible to reduce fuel consumption. It was too early at this stage to assess the effectiveness of these measures, but he was certain it would be well in excess of the government’s target figure of a 15 per cent cut back.

--------0---------

WATER CUTS IN KOWLOON

*******

Water supply to a number of premises in Kowloon City and Wong Tai Sin will be interrupted for five hours tomorrow and Saturday morning to facilitate tests for leakage in the districts.

In Kowloon City, the temporary stoppage will start from 1 a.m. tomorrow (Friday) and will affect premises bounded by Argyle Street, Peace Avenue, Ho Man Tin Street, Princess Margaret Road, Ho Man Tin Hill Road., and Soares Avenue.

That in Wong Tai Sin will begin at 1 a.m. on Saturday (December 29) and will affect premises bounded by Fu Mei Street, Wang Tau Hom North Road, Wang Tau Hom East Road, Fu Yue Street, and Wang Tau Hem Estate Blocks 17 to 20, including Junction Road and Fu Mei Street Resite Area.

-------0---------

o

Thursday, December 27, 1973

- 6 -

COMMENDATIONS FOR RESCUE HEROES

******

Eight members of the public and a Marine Police Constable will, receive Certificates of Commendation tomorrow (Friday) from the Director of Marine, Mr. A. Fletcher, in recognition of their courage and public spirit in rescuing people from the sea.

The recipients are: Messrs. Chung Kam-shui, Qian For-kan, Chan Kam-ying, To Chau, Leung Choi-hei and Chan Kai-fat, all crew members of the Hong Kong and Yaumati Ferry Company; Constable Kong Chuen of the Marine Police; Mr. Tsui For-kan, owner of a lighter; and Mr. Lee Kam-shui, a sailor.

They are all commended for rescuing people who tried to commit suicide or who fell into the harbour during the past year. In addition to the certificates, the eight members of the public will reoeive monetary awards of $100 each.

Note to Editors.: You are invited to have the presentation

ceremony covered. It will start at 10 a.m. tomorrow in the.Examination Hall of the Marine. Department on the 10th floor of the Rumsey Street Multi-Storey Carpark, Connaught Road, Central.

-------o;— -

Thursday, December 27, 197?

- 7 -

WORKER AND FIREMAN COMMENDED

********

A metal worker, Mr. Lee Dai-kau, who displayed great initiative and publio-spiritedness in rescuing a woman trapped by fire last month, will receive the Director of Fire Services Commendation and a cash award for his bravery.

Mr. Lee went to the rescue of the woman after her kitchen caught fire and she became trapped in a precarious position on a sixth floor window in Wan .Lok Street, Kowloon, on November 14. With the help of firemen the woman was later hauled to safety.

Mr. Lee will receive his commendation from Mr. H.T.J. Hutchins, Chief Fire Officer of Kowloon, at a ceremony at 11 a.m. on Saturday (December 29) at the Tsim Sha Tsui Fire Station.

At the same time, a fireman, Mr. Leung Hun-biu, will be presented with the Chief Fire Officer’s Commendation for his part in rescuing a man in another fire in Nathan Road on November 27.

The rescued person, Mr. Luk Siu-wan, has donated a sum of money to the Fire Services Welfare Fund as a token of his gratitude and vnll be attending the presentation ceremony on Saturday to meet his rescuer.

Note to Editors: You are invited to send your representative to cover the occasion. The presentation starts at 11 a.m. on Saturday (December 29) at the Tsim Sha Tsui Fire Station.

-------0---------

/8.........

Thursday, December 27, 1973

- 8 -

NEW YEAR’S DAY IS A STATUTORY HOLIDAY

********

The Commissioner of Labour, Mr. I.R. Price, today reminded employers that next Tuesday (January 1) is one of the six statutory holidays to which all non-manual employees earning not more than $1,500 a month and all manual employees irrespective of the amount of their earnings are entitled under the Employment Ordinance.

"It is important to note that the ordinance does not make a distinction between industrial and non-industrial employees," Mr. Price said.

To qualify for pay on the coming statutory holiday, which must be granted in addition to the four rest days a month provided by the same ordinance, an employee must have been employed continuously by his employer for three months or more immediately preceding the statutory holiday.

An employee who is not so qualified must be given a holiday but he is not entitled to be paid, although an employer may voluntarily agree to pay him.

Any employee or employer who is in doubt about his rights or obligations regarding the statutory holiday or holiday pay may consult officers of the Labour Relations Service at telephone numbers 5-282523, 12-422096, ^20^6^8 and 3-898520.

-------0---------

Thursday, Decerfjer 27,

CONSUMER ADVISORY SERVICE

Daily Guido To Wholesale Market Prices And Supplies

Tho following prices were realised today (Thursday) at sales under tho Rice Control Scheme and at the Vegetable Marketing Organisation Wholesale Haricot and tho Fish Marketing Organisation Wholesale Market at Cheung Sha Wan, Kowloons

Supplies. and Wholesale Prices of Rico

Grado — — —• Availability of Supply Viholecale Price (S/cntty)

China Rico Average

_ - old crop Seo Mew - now crop Good 1.5-1 1.72

S.C.Jion - old crop Good 1.66

Po Ilgai Good 1.^?

Chu Clio Good 1.22

Thai Rice lOcyFwioie - ••

10-15/* Brokens

A1 Super Extra Good 1.^5

A1 Super Good 1.57

Whole Glutinous Lisi 1.52

• U.S, Rice • Good 1.62

Australian Rioo Good 1.52

Pakistan Rico

Taiwan Rico

/Supplies end •••••••

Thursday, December 2?, 197.’"

Supplies and Wholesale Prices of Marine Fish

Availability of Supply

Wholesale Price (S/catty)

51121 Low • Average

Golden Thread Limited 5.4 3.0 4.3

Big-Eyes Good 2.6 0.6 1.8

Squid Limited 5.8 2.5 4.5

Hair-Tails Good 1.6 0.7 1.0

Lizard Fishes Normal 2.85 1.0 0 1 .c

Croakers Normal 1.8 -0.6 1.5

Congcr-Pike-Eels Normal 3.2 2.-1 2.6

Melon Coat Limited 2.7 1.4 1.3

Breons Normal 4.5 2.2 3-5

Yellow Belly Good 1.2 0.65 1.0

Mackerels Good 3.2 2.2 2.5

Rod Goat Fish Good 2.5 0.55 1.5

Fork-Tail Good. 1.3 0.65 0.95

Horse-Hoad Limited 5.2 2.8 4.0

Melon Seed Normal 2.8 . 1.4 2.3

Ponfrcts Scarce 8.5 6.7 7.0

Gcroupaa Limited 7.5 5.0 6.0

Yellow Croaker - - -

/Supplies and v

Thursday t December 27« 197J

Supplies end Wholesale Prices of

Locally Produced Vegetables

Availability of Sunnly • Wholesale Price (S/catty) _ _.

High Low Average

Flowering cabbage Limited 2.8 1.2 2.0

White cabbage Normal 1.0 0.4 0.7

Chinese Lettuce Normal. 1.0 o.j 0.7

Chinese Kale Normal 1.4' 0.4 c.9

Spring onion Normal »2 0.** 0.8

! Spinach . Normal 1.8 0.8 1.4

1 Hater otoes Normal 1.4 0.4 0,9

Loaf mustard cabbage Scarce 1.0 0.J5 0.6

Tomato Normal 1.6 0.8 1.2

Supplies nnd TOioJcoale Priccn of Pork (Live weight)

Availability of Supply Wholesale Price ( $/ picul)

* • (Average)

Pork . • Good z8;-

- 0 -

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Friday, December 28, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No.

Lighting ban to be extended by one hour from next week ..... 1

Nev? licensing scheme to check on export and re-export of plastic raw materials ...................................... 2

Restrictions for import and export of gold to be lifted .... 3

Nev; edition of Imports and Exports Classification List comes into effect on January 1 ................................... 4

Hong Kong’s domestic exports increased by 44 per cent last month ••«••................................................. 5

New estate in Tsuen Wan for 27,000 people................... 7

Safety standards in quarries to be tightened................ 8

Chief Justice will appoint temporary District Judges and

Magistrates ................................................ 9

Site in Tai Hom Village cleared for Mass Transit System •••• 10

Transport Department clarifies misunderstandings on Kowloon taxi fare issue ............................................ H

Delayed Christmas sea mail from U.K. arrives ................. 1J

Daily guide to wholesale prices and supply of basic food commodities

Release time: 7<PQ

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

i'

Friday, December 28, 1973 - 1 -

ADVERTISING AND DISPLAY LIGHTING BAN EXTENDED ******

The ban on advertising and display lighting is to be extended z by one hour with the introduction of summer time next week. This means *

i* that such lighting will only be allowed between 7 p.m. and 10.30 p.m.

At the sane time, floodlighting of buildings will be completely prohibited.

Announcing these measures today, Mr. Roy Porter, Director of

Oil Supplies, said that despite the Arab decision to increase production by • -X

10 per cent we are still likely to be short of oil and it was still necessary to be prudent. It would be wasteful to allow display lighting during the extra hour of daylight, he added.

Mr. Porter said: ”1 appreciate that when new measures are introduced

it is impossible to avoid hurting some sector of the community. This reduction of one hour in the permitted period for lighting display would, I think, cause less harm to Hong Kong’s economy as a whole than any other power saving measures.”

In explaining the ban on floodlighting of buildings, Mr. Porter said that floodlighting was one of the least essential uses of electricity.

On sports and recreation, Mr. Porter said: "I am writing to every sports club in Hong Kong asking them not to use floodlighting even during the permitted period except for major sporting events which large numbers of people would attend.”

Mr. Porter again called on the public to exercise voluntary restraint.

It was still essential for consumers to exercise economies in the use of electricity so that the need to introduce further mandatory measures, which would cause more hardship, will be avoided.

/2........

- - 0 - -

Friday, December 28, 1975

- 2 -

EXPORT LICENSING OF PLASTIC MATERIALS

******

A licensing scheme to check on the export and re-export of plastic raw materials from Hong Kong is to be introduced by the Commerce and Industry Department.

From January 1 licences will be required for all exports and re* exports of plastic materials, regenerated cellulose and artificial resins*

The items concerned are classified under Group 5$1 of the Hong Kong Imports and Exports Classification List.

An amendment to permit licensing has been made to the Import and Export (General) Regulations.

The Deputy Director of Commerce and Industry, Mr. Jimmy McGregor, said today that licensing was being implemented as a precautionary measure on the advice of the Trade and Industry Advisory Board.

nIt would be foolhardy to ignore the fact that our supplies of plastic raw materials may be affected considerably by reduced oil ■production,” he added.

”We need, therefore, to keep a close check on re-exports, and the introduction of licensing will enable this to be done.”

Mr. McGregor pointed out that during 1973 re-exports as a proportion of imports have been rising and this was causing concern to the industry. If this trend continued it may be necessary to restrict re-exports.

/,rMuch will .......

Friday, December 28, 1973

- 3 -

"Much will depend on the trade itself," he said. "We don’t want to introduce restrictions if these can be avoided and will apply them only if they become necessary in order to assist our industry to retain essential supplies of these important materials."

In case export quota controls become necessary, the Commerce and Industry Department will call within a few days for past performance records of re-exports covering 1972 and 1973•

• *• i

-------o----------

GOLD RESTRICTIONS LIFTED

******

Import and export restrictions relating to gold, diamonds and currency notes and coins will be removed with effect from January 1, 1974, a government spokesman announced today.

Consequently, licences will no longer be required for the importation or exportation of these items.

------0----------

A

Friday, December 28, 1975

- 4 -

NEW IMPORTS AND EXPORTS CLASSIFICATION LIST *******

A new edition of the Hong Kong Imports and Exports Classification List will come into force as from January 1, 1974.

The new edition will incorporate the existing 1971 edition, as amended in 1975j as well as certain new amendments.

The classification list is made up of two parts, a countries list and a rcisnodities list. The commodities list is based on the United Nations Standard International Trade Classification, Revised (S.I.T.C. Revised) and sets out the classified description of some 2,550 items.

The nev7 amendments affect mainly items of plastic materials and clothing. These amendments are necessary in view of the importance of the trade in the items concerned and of the demand for separate claflsification* This will make it easier to compare the Hong Kong trade statistics with those of trading partners, and will therefore, enhance the value of Hong Kong’s trade statistics.

Importers and exporters are urged to ensure that the staff responsible for completing trade declaration forms become fully conversant with the amendments as they affect the commodities with which they deal.

Copies of the new edition will go on sale from January 6 at 86 per copy at the Government Publications Centre at the Star Ferry Concourse, Hong Kong. ......

- 0 - -

/5.......

Friday, December 28, 1975

- 5 -

NOVEMBER EXPORTS UP BY 44 PER CENT

********

The value of Hong Kong’s domestic exports last month amounted to $1,935 million — an increase of $592 million or 44.1 per cent over Bovember 1972, according to provisional trade figures released today by the Census and Statistics Department.

Imports increased by 58*9 per cent and re-exports by 57*6 per cent over the same month last year.

Commenting on the provisional figures, Mr. M.D. Sargant, Assistant Director of Commerce and Industry, said that during the period January to November this year domestic exports increased by 24.8 per cent over the same period last year, v/hile re-exports rose by 5$«9 per cent and imports by 31*2 per cent.

For the 12-month period December 1972 to November 19731 figures show an increase of 23*8 per cent for domestic exports, 55*2 per cent for re-exports and 29*8 per cent for imports .over the previous 12-month period.

Note to Editors; A statistical table of November’s provisional trade figures is given below with comparative tables.

/MERCHANDISE........

Friday, December 28, 1973

6 -

IfERQIAilDISE : COMPARATIVE FIGURES Domestic Exports : $1,935 million Imports : $3,049 million Re-exports : $ 6% million

November November Increase or

19.73 , 1972 decrease

8 Mn. ’ 8 Mn. 8 Mn. %

Domestic Exports 1,935 1,343 + 592 +44.1

Imports 3,049 1,919 +1,130 +58.9

Re-exports 656 416 + 240 +57.6

Sent.-Nov. Sept.-Nov. Increase or

1973 ■ 1972 decrease

2 Mn. S Mn. $ Mn. %

Domestic Exports 5,755 4,317 +1,438 +33.3

Imports 8,756 5,721 +3,036 +53.1

Re-exports 2,140 1,203 ;• 936 +77.C

Jan.-Nov. Jan.-Nov. Increase or

. 1975 1972 decrease

& Mn. $ Mn. 5 Mn. %

Domestic Exports 17,515 14,032 +3,483 +24.8

Imports 25,948 19,784 +6,164 +31.2

Re-exports 5,904 3,764 +2,141 +56.9

Dec. 1972 - Dec. 1971 - Increase or

Noy. 1975 Nov..1972 decrease

- . —. 8 Mn. $ Mn. 8 Mn. %

Domestic Exports 18,728 15,132 +3,596 +23.8

Imports 27,928 21,510 +6,418 +29.8

Re-exports 6,295 4,057 +2,238 +55-2

- - 0 - -

Friday, December 28, 1975

- 7 -

NEW ESTATE TO HOUSE 27,000 PEOPLE

******

The Housing Authority is to build a new public housing estate, the Shing On Estate, in the Shek Wai Kok area in Tsuen Wan to provide homes for 27,000 people.

As a new feature of the estate, the living units will be planned on the new space allocation standard of 50 square feet per person.

About 1.J million square feet of land adjacent to the Cheung Shan Estate is to be resumed for the housing project. Details of the lots of land affected are published in today's gazette.

Shing On Estate is one of several estates included in the earlier part of the ten year housing programme.

It will be carried out in two stages. The first phase, to be completed in about four years, will provide self-contained units for about 17,000 people. The second phase will be finished in the following year and will house another 10,000 people.

The estate will have all the essential recreational, welfare, educational and medical facilities similar to those provided in existing public housing estates.

-------0---------

/8.........

Friday, December 28, 1973

- 8 -

TIGHTER CONTROL ON QUARRIES SAFETY STANDARDS ******

The government is to tighten control over safety standards in quarries.

The Quarries (Safety) (Amendment) Regulations 19Z5, which will become effective on January 1, 1974, offer a greater degree of safety to workers operating at a height on the face or top of quarries. Commissioner of Mines, Mr. I.R. Price, said the amending regulations were yet another in a series to bolster Hong Kong’s safety legislation.

Expressing deep concern about the safety and welfare of workers engaged in quarry work and in other fields, Mr. Price said: ”It is my duty to ensure that safety measures in all places of work are always up to the required standard to safeguard the workers’ well-being.”

Almost all falls of persons from quarry faces, he said, resulted in fatal injuries. Since the enactment of the original quarries regiii ations four years ago, 10 of the 14 fatal accidents recorded in quarries had resulted from falls. In seven of the accidents the workers had not been secured by safety ropes. In another case the safety rope had broken.

"The amending regulations therefore specifically require a quarry proprietor to provide each of his workers with a safety harness, which the worker has to wear, and a safety rope, one end of which must be securely attached to the safety harness and the other to an anchorage,” he said. ”Any person who contravenes the regulations is liable on conviction to a fine of 55,000.”

/The regulations .......

Friday, December 28, 1973

- 9 -

The regulations also impose a duty on a quarry supervisor to inspect anchorages, safety harnesses, ropes and helmets, and mechanical equipment. ”A supervisor is also responsible for ensuring that no person should use such equipment until it has been put into safe and efficient working order,” he added.

The Commissioner stressed that management of quarries must organise their operations in such a way that workers engaged in hazardous work were properly secured as required by the law. Quarry workers on the other hdnd should take utmost precautions at all times.

--------0---------

APPOINTMENTS OF DISTRICT JUDGES AND MAGISTRATES

******

Authority to appoint temporary District Court Judges and Magistrates is to be delegated to the Chief Justice, by viture of two new bills published in today’s gazette.

At present, temporary appointments to the District Court are made by the Governor, although the Chief Justice appoints Commissioners to the Supreme Court.

The District Court (Amendment) Bill will enable the Chief Justice to appoint temporary District Judges.

Under the Magistrates (Amendment) Bill, the Governor will be able to delegate his authority regarding the appointment of Magistrates to the Chief Justice. The wording of existing legislation at present precludes tho delegation of such powers.

--------0---------

/10 /

Friday, December 28, 1973

10 —

DIAMOND HILL SITE CLEAl^ED FOR UNDERGROUND RAILWAY STATION ■ 'r m***

A site in Tai Hom Village in the Diamond Hill area was cleared this (Friday) morning to make way for the Mass Transit System.

The land will be used as a work site for the construction of the diamond Hill Station.

A total of 163 structures, 82 of them illegal, were demolished* in the clearance operation.

Nearly 600 people from 116 families who were affected by the clearance had moved into public housing units at Sau Mau Ping Estate. Another 226 people from M families have been offered sites at Yan Oi licensed area to rebuild their homes.

Mr. Chiu Shing, Senior Clearance Officer in charge of this 4

morning1 operation, said he was thankful for the co-operation of the squatters.

”Without their support,’1 he said, ”1 am sure the operation would not have been carried out so smoothly*”

-------0---------

Friday, December 28, 1973

- 11 -

TAXI FAKE INCREASE APPLICATION BEING PROCESSED *******

The Transport Department today indicated that the government may prove sympathetic to a request by Kowloon taxi operators to increase their fares on the basis of more recent figures supplied by a taxi operators association.

A spokesman stressed, however, that the decision lay with the Governor-in-Council and it was not possible to say more at this stage.

- Commenting on recent statements by some Kowloon taxi operators, the spokesman said that hotheaded demands for time limits and demonstrations by some of the operators were pointless and would not affect the issue.

,rInstead of attracting public sympathy, such demands are more likely to antagonise people,” he warned.

The mistaken impression among some of the operators that the government was blocking a legitimate demand for a fare increase, he said, was unfortunate and the department was anxious to dispel this wrong view.

’’Recent statements in the press about giving the government a time limit within which to agree to a fare increase,” he added, ’’were based on misunderstandings.”

He explained that a year ago a taxi operators association proposed to raise the level of Kowloon taxi fares to that of Hong Kong taxis, on the grounds that it cost Kowloon operators more to run a taxi.

The Kowloon taxi operators were then asked to provide audited accounts of a few typical taxi operators, to substantiate their claim and to indicate what level of increase might be justified.

/’’But the

Friday, December 28, 1973

- 12 -

"But the figures provided did not prove anything, so the exact requirements were spelt out again to the association.

, "It was explained that applications for taxi fare increases must be considered against the same criteria for increases of bus, tram and ferry fares.

"There was no question of approving taxi fare increases uni ess a. good case was made out, and the case must demonstrate what the increase should reasonably be.

"This has somehow been misinterpreted as an outright refusal by the Government to consider a Kowloon fare increase," he said.

"In fact, on the basis of more recent figures supplied by a taxi operators association, it is possible that the Government may prove sympathetic towards the request, but the decision lies with the Governor in Council and it is not possible at this stage to say more."

The Transport Department welcomed the statements by responsible officials of the taxi operators associations for taxi men to exercise patienoe, he added.

--------0---------

/13

Friday, December 28, 1973

13

DELAYED CHRISTMAS SEA MAIL FROM U.K. ARRIVES

The Christmas sea mail from Britain which was delayed en route to Hong Kong arrived yesterday on board the ,THong Kong Express”.

Three containers with 729 bags of letters and cards and 117 bags of parcels were delivered to the General Post Office yesterday afternoon, and all of these were delivered to the addressees today (Friday).

Another container from the ship with 343 bags of parcels from

the United Kingdom reached the G.P.O. this morning and these parcels will be delivered tomorrow.

A. Post Office spokesman said 10 other containers of mail from the

United States were received at the G.P.O. on Christmas Day and Boxing Day. This consignment consisted of 494 bags of letters and cards and 1,377 bags of parcels.

Post office staff worked throughout the two holidays to ensure that this mail was delivered on December 26 and 27, he said.

Note to Editors: Copies of a photograph showing the unloading of

the U.K. mail at the G.P.O. wharf this morning are boxed for collection.

- - 0 -

Friday, December 28, *1975

CONSUMER ADVISORY SERVICE

Daily Guido To Wholesale Market Prices And Supplies

Tho following prices were realised today (Friday) at sales under tho Rice Control Scheme and at the Vegotablo Marketing Organisation Wholesale Market and* tho Fish Marketing Organisation Wholesale Market at Choung Sha Wan, Kowloon:

Supplies and Wholesale Prices of Rice

Availability Wholesale Price

Grade of Supply (8/catty)

China Rico Average

_ .. old crop See Mew - new crop Good 1.64 1.72

S.C.Jion - old crop Good 1.66

Po Ilgai Good 1.42

Chu Cho -

Thai Rico -

Brokens -

A1 Super Extra Good 1.45

A1 Super Good . 1.37

Whole Glutinous Limited 1.52

U.S. Rice Good 1.62

Australian Rioo ••

Pakistan Rice

Taiwan Rice

/Supplies and

Friday, December 29, 1973

Stg>plie»s and Wholesale Prices of Marine Fish

Species Availability of Supply Wholesale Price

nj& (8/catty) Average

Low •

Golden Thread Limited 5.5 •? *>. 4.0

Big-Eyes Good 2.5 0.7 1.8

Squid Limited 6.0 3.0 4.5

Hair-Tails Normal 2.1 0.8 1.7

Lizard Fishes Limited 2.9 1.0 1.8

Croalters Normal 2.2 1.0 1.6

Conger-Pike-Eels Limited 3.2 2.5 • 2.8

Melon Coat Good 2.6 1.65 2.0

Breams Limited 4.5 3.0 4.2

Yellow Belly Good 1.4 0.7 1.2

Mackerels Good 3.8 2.5 3.5

Bod Goat Fish Good 3.1 0.65 2.2

Fork-Tail Normal 1.2 0.8 1.0

Horsc-Hoad Limited 5.5 3.0 4.2

Melon Sood Normal 3.3. 1.4 2.5

Porrfi'ets Scarce 8.5 7.0 8.0

Garoupas Normal 7.5 5.5 6.0

Yollon Croaker •* •••

/Supplies and v

Friday, December 23, 1975

Supplies end Wholesale Prices of

Locally Produced Vegetables

typ°. Availability of Supply Wholesale Price (8/catty)

High Low Average

Flowering cabbage Limited 2.8 1.2 ■2.0

White cabbage Normal 1.2 0.5 0.8

Chinese Lettuce Normal. 1.0 0o2 0.6

Chinese Kale Normal 1.4 ' 0.4 0.9

Spring onion Normal 1.2 0.5 0.8

Spinach Normal 1.8 0.8 1.3

Water cross Normal 1.5 0.5 1.0

Loaf mustard cabbage Scarce 1.2 0.4 o.8

Tomato Normal 1.6 0.8 1.2

Supplies and Wholesale Prices of Pork (Live weight)

Availability of Supply Wholesale Price ( C/ picul)

(Average)

Pork Good • 285

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Saturday, December 29, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No.

Processing of housing for Christmas Day fire victims being expedited........................................................ 1

Twenty five per cent increase in allowance for disaster victims.......................................................... 3

Issue of Daily Information Bulletin tomorrow................... 3

High-powered committee set up t advise on pollution problems 4

Planning for education expansion to be continued with vigour in the new year.................................................. 6

Daylight Saving Time coming into effect tomorrow................. 7

I

Cne-seeond time adjustment to be made on January 1............... 8

Four workers killed on construction sites last month......... 9

Temporary sewage treatment plant for Sha Tin New Town........... 10

Release time: 2.30 p.m.

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong. Tel: 5-233191

Saturday, December 29, 1973

- 1 -

NEW HOMES FOR CHRISTMAS DAY FIRE VICTIMS ♦ * * * * * *

Staff of the Housing Department will work through the weekend to speed up the intake process of the Kowloon Tsai squatter fire victims into public housing or resite accommodation.

Occupants of surveyed structures in Man Heung Yuen and Sai Man Lane which have been earmarked for clearance, and those structure in Man San Lane which were covered by the 19^4 general squatter survey will be offered public housing.

All other genuine fire victims who occupied un-surveyed structures will be offered sites at Cheung Sha Wan Licensed Area on which they may erect new homes.

People who registered as victims of the Christmas Day fire were called to the Tai Hang Tung Community Centre today (Saturday) for further processing

Those persons who had been living within the screened area of the fire site were processed at the Tai Hang Tung Community Centre. Those who lived within the unscreened area of the fire site were called to identify the actual site of their structures. The object of the exercise was to weed out impostors and those who may have overclaimed.

Pre-letting interviews started this morning for those who are known to be eligible for public housing and intake into Kwai Fong and Lam Tin Estates will begin on Wednesday. For the remainder who are considered eligible for public housing the intake will take place on January 7* /Registration .....

Saturday, December 59, 1973

_ 2

Registration of those eligible for licensed area sites will take place tomorrow (Sunday) at Homantin Licensing Office and sites at Cheung Sha Wan will be offered as soon as possible.

Mr. Brian Coak, Administrative Officer,Squatter Control, of the Housing Department said that everything possible has been done to speed up the intake process into public housing or licensed area accommodation.

"We have mobilised all available staff to cope with the work. These officers worked throughout the X'mas holidays and will work again throughout the weekend and New Year fe pay until the operation is completed," he said.

In the squatter fire more then 350 structures in Man Heung Yuen, Man San Lane and Sai Man Lane in the Kowloon Tsai area were destroyed leaving a total of more than 2,500 people from 620 families homeless.

Most of the victims are staying with relatives or friends and about 500 are taking shelter at the eight temporary accommodation centres opened by the Housing Department.

-------0---------

Saturday, December 29, 1973

- 3 -

2? P3B INCREASE IN ALLOWANCE FOR DISASTER VICTIMS * * ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

The re-provisioning allowance from the Social Welfare Department’s Emergency Relief Fund for victims of disasters such as the Christmas Day fire in Tai Hang Tung is to be increased by 25 per cent with immediate effect.

Tlie increase from 380 to #100 per person was made by the Emergency Relief Fund Committee at the request of the Housing Department.

The money is for victims who are given accommodation in government housing to carry out minor work such as whitewashing before moving in.

This increase follows a similar increase last month in the re-accommodation branch for victims who are not entitled to public houshg but who are given sites in licensed areas by the Housing Department to rebuild their homes.

-------0----------

SUNDAY D.I.B.

«•«*«*

Note to Editors*. There will be an issue of the Daily Information Bulletin tomorrow (Sunday). Copies will be available for collection at 2 p.m. from the Press room of the Government Information Services, 6th floor, Beaconsfield House•

-------0---------

A....

Saturday, December 29, 1973

- 4 -

HEW ADVISORY COMMITTEE ON ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTION SET UP

A high-powered Committee has been formed to advise on the increasing problem of environmental pollution.

Called the Advisory Committee on Environmental Pollution, the Committee lias, been created by the amalgamation of the former Advisory Committee on Air Pollution and the Advisory Committee on Environmental Pollution on Land and Water.

It will come into effect on January 1 and will advise on all forms of pollution control on land, sea, water and air and also on noise pollution.

The Committeefs terms of reference are to keep under constant review the state of the environment and pollution and to advise the Secretary for the Environment on appropriate measures which might be taken to combat pollution of all kinds.

Tiie Chairman is Mr. J.L. Marden, until recently Chairman of the Advisory Committee on Air Pollution.

Other unofficial members are appointed from industry, the universities and other organisations. They include Miss Pauline Chan, Mr. Chan Pak Yip, Mr. Hilton Cheong-L.een, Dr. L.K. Ding, Mr. W.M. Donald, Mr. H.M.G. Forsgate, Dr. Norman Ko, Hr. Henry Litton, Dr. Daniel Ng, Professor D.S. Payne, Mr. W.M. Sulke, Professor L.B. Thrower, and Mr. Geoffrey Yeh.

Official representation will*be provided from the New Territories Administration, Commerce & industry Department, Public Works Department, Agriculture 8c Fisheries Department, Royal Observatory, Labour Department, Medical 8c Health Department, Civil'Aviation Department, Urban Services Department, Marine Department, and the Transport Department.

' •’ /The Deputy ......

Saturday, December 29, 1973

- 5 -

The Deputy Secretary for Environment is also a member and the administrative and secretarial services will be provided by the Environment Branch of the Colonial Secretariat.

Announcing the formation of the new Committee, a government spokesman said: nThe formation of the Committee demonstrates the government’s determination to combat environmental pollution and to improve the quality of life for the people of Hong Kong.

,rIt is highly appropriate that this new Committee should be formed at a time when public concern has been expressed at the need for tougher control measures to cope with possible pollution problems arising from the establishment of special industries, such as the polystyrene plant at Tsing Yi and the proposed oil refinery and the proposed petrochemical plant at Lamma Island”, he added.

It is expected that the Committee, whose first meeting is scheduled for January 17 will organise itself into three sub-committees on land and sea, air, and noise pollution. Mr. J.J. Robson, Secretory for the Environment has accepted an invitation to address the Committee at its first meeting.

-------0---------

/6..........

Saturday, December 29, 1973

- 6 -

EDUCATION DIRECTOR’S YEAR-END MESSAGE ««***«#

The Director of Education, Mr. J. Canning, says the initial steps taken this year in the planning for the expansion of technical education, teacher training, special education, adult education and youth recreation will be continued with vigour in 197^.

Mr. Canning made this statement in a year-end message today.

The following is the full text of the Director’s message: ”1973> which is now drawing to its close, has been a year of consolidation in all fields of education and one of planning for the future. The number of student® in all types of educational institutions and schools reached a new record level at almost 1.3 million which represents nearly one-third of the total population. Good progress was maintained towards achieving educational goals set in the past; goals which were not set merely in quantitative terms but also in terms designed to improve the quality of education.

”At the same time, 1973 was a year of intense planning for the future. The Board of Education produced a report containing fai>-reaching proposals for the expansion of secondary education over the next decade. This report has been published by the government as a Green Paper in order to afford the general public the opportunity to comment upon the proposals before a White Paper containing the government's policy on the subject is finalised.

/’’Planning......

Saturday, December 29, 1973

- 7 -

’Tlanning for the expansion of technical education, teacher training, special education, adult education and youth recreation was also undertaken and initial steps have been taken in all these fields. All this work will be continued with vigour in 197^, which promises to be a year of solid achievement and progress towards the educational aim of making our children good, responsible and industrious citizens of the future.”

_______0_________

DAYLIGHT SAVING TIME REMINDER ********

Daylight Saving Time comes into effect at 5*30 a«m. tomorrow (Sunday) and residents are reminded to advance their clocks and watches by one hour before going to bed tonight.

The switch back to summer time is being introduced earlier than usual as part of a concerted effort to save fuel.

-------0---------

Saturday, December 29, 1973

- 8 -

ONE-SECOND TIME ADJUSTMENT IN HONG KONG TIME

*»«*«**

The usual six-pip time signals from the Royal Observatory will not be broadcast at 9 a.m. on Tuesday (January 1) but will be resumed at 9-15 a.m. that day, a Royal Observatory spokesman said today.

This is to enable a correction to be applied which will result in an apparent delay of one second to the resumed time service signals, he explained.

The need to set the clocks back by one second arises because world-wide time standards are now based on the atomic time scale.

”This provides a more precise and uniform second than that derived from the rate of rotation of the earth measured by astronomical means,” the spokesman said.

Hong Kong’s time service has been maintained by reference to the atomic time scale since January 1, 1972.

The spokesman said that one day on the astronomical time scale is, on the average, three-thousandths of a second longer than the day on the atomic time scale.

”However, it has been internationally agreed that the two times should n6ver differ significantly and that periodic adjustments of the whole second would be made to the time shown by those clocks using or being maintained by reference to the atomic time scale. By the end of December, the difference will be almost four-tenths of a second.”

The correction of one second, called a leap-second, is analogous ’• • • •

to February 29 in a leap year with which everyone is familiar.

-------0---------

/9..........

Saturday, December 29, 1973

- 9 -

FOUR KILLED ON WORK SITES LAST MONTH

********

Four workers were killed and 401 injured last month in accidents on construction sites, according to statistics released today by the Labour Department.

The department’s Industrial Safety Training Officer, Mr. A.H. Carter said that despite repeated appeals to industry to take utmost precautions to cut back the soaring accident rate, the number of accidents at work so far this year had not shown any improvement over the 1972 figure.

Mr. Carter said many accidents on construction sites were due to poor housekeeping. One would not be surprised to find hand tools lying about the sites and other materials blocking passageways.

t:In fact it is as easy to keep a site tidy as it is to develop it into a jungle of industrial waste,” he said. ’’Good housekeeping will not only increase productivity, but also lower accident rate and reduce fire risks.”

Mr. Carter stressed that accidents could be prevented. And the most effective method was for management to train supervisory staff to be safety conscious. He said the Industrial Safety Training Centre currently ran a wide-range of courses free of charge for personnel in industry. The courses included accident prevention in building construction and civil engineering industries, manual lifting and handling, fire prevention, electrical safety, and work in confined spaces.

”A visit to the industrial safety exhibition at the CI-IA fair site will also help industrialists, supervisors and workers to see what can be done to promote industrial safety,” he added.

-------0----------

/10..........

Saturday, December 29, 1975

- 10

NEW SEWAGE TREATMENT PLANT FOR SHATIN ********

A temporary sewage treatment plant will soon be built in Shatin New Town to provide facilities for about 33,000 people in the first phase development of the town.

The scheme incorporates a complete sewage purification works consisting of preliminary units for the removal of large floating and organic solids and detritus material, biological tanks consisting of package plants for the removal of organic pollutants and a decanter centrifuge for the dewatering of the sludge.

The clarified effluent will be discharged into Tolo Harbour while the dewatered sludge will be disposed off in land fill or taken out into the sea for dumping.

The plant, to be built on the seaward side of Tai Po Road at the 12 Milestone and opposite the Jardines Dyeing and Finishing Factory, is designed to produce effluent which will not deteriorate the quality of water in Tolo Harbour.

The engineering works comprises mainly the construction of four large circular tanks, a pumping station, channels, sewers and three single storey structures for plant equipment and administration offices.

The work is expected to start in February next year and will take about 22 months to complete.

0 - -

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Sunday, December 30, 1973

SAVE-FUEL DRIVE UNAFFECTED BY COLD SPELT,

The current cold weather has not meant any slackening in the momentum of the governments drive to economise on the use of fuel.

In government buildings that are centrally heated, the temperature has been reduced by several degrees as one way of cutting back on the amount of fuel consumed. Where the heating is operated on a zone system, arrangements have been made for the heating to be switched off whenever the zones are not being used.

In buildings not centrally heated, electric heaters are normalTy distributed freely to each office with the onset of the colder weather.• However, because of the world fuel situation, heaters arc now only issued on request end in some cases the decision is made by the head of the department *

At the same time, a number of civil servants are breaking away from the traditional shirt and tie mode of dress and turning to warmer ,rroll neck" sweaters and jackets.

The staff of at least one government department has quickly adapted to the ratiier colder conditions by switching to the "new mode of dress,”, thus obviating the need to resort to electric heaters.

It is too early at this stage to gauge the amount of electricity saved by these and other economy measures being adopted throughout the government, but it is expected to be well above the target figure of a 15 per cent reduction in fuel consumption.

-------0---------

/2 •••••••• '

*taued by Services. Brecon J »r!d Hong Kong Tel: 5'23ffl

Sunday, December 30, 1973

- 2 -

CRASH HELMET REGULATIONS EFFECTIVE FROM TUESDAY

*»***««

The Commissioner for Transport, Mr. B.D. Wilson, today reminded motorcyclists and their pillion riders that starting from Tuesday (January 1) they will be required by law to wear approved crash helmets while riding a motor cycle. They must also have the crash helmets securely fastened.

The new regulations are laid down in the Road Traffic (Protective Equipment) Regulations 1973, which were approved by the Executive Council in June this year.

Any motorcyclist or pillion rider who fails to comply with the regulations will be liable to a fine of 8500 and three months’ imprisonment on first conviction. The maximum penalty on second or subsequent convictions is a fine of 31,000 and six months’ jail.

Approved protective helmets are those satisfying the following standards, as indicated by the label in the helmet: British Standard 2001; British Standard 1869; British Standard 2495; Japanese Industrial Standard JIS T 8135-1970; Australian Standard E 33-1968; American National Standards Institute Z90.1-1966, Z90.1-1970 and Z90.1-1971; Institute Beige De Normalization BENOR NBN 626; Deutsche Normen DIN 4848; French National Standard AHIOR NFS 72-301; and Dutch National Institute for Road Vehicles TWO.

-------0---------

Sunday, December JO, 1973

- 3 -

CHICKEN BREEDING AN IMPORTANT INDUSTRY

*******

Family-type chicken farms in the New Territories play an important role in chicken farming in Hong Kong.

These farms, which number about 4,000, form the nucleus of the industry which, in terms of value, is an essential form of livestock husbandry in Hong Kong, yielding more than 1148 million for the farmers last year.

Chicken raising is carried out extensively in many parts of the N.T. and the products supplied almost JJ per cent of the total domestic consumption of live chickens in 1972.

The Agriculture and Fisheries Department gives every encouragement and assistance to the farmers to help them develop their industry and improve their products.

A spokesman said that the chief beneficiaries of the department1s services were the operators of the family-type farms, each of which produced between 500 and 70»000 chickens a year, depending on their sizes.

He said poultry husbandry experts of the department recommended to the farmers modern methods of the industry, such as incubation, poultry nutrition, ration formulation and poultry housing so as to put their operation on a more scientific basin.

A recent addition to this team is Miss Tam Yuen-yin v/ho returned to Hong Kong just a few months ago from Britain after studying poultry husbandry for two years.

The department also helped the farmers to prevent and control major fowl diseases such as Newcastle and fowl cholera. These diseases could be responsible for high mortality ratesythe spokesman pointed out.

/The......

Sunday, December 30, 1973

- 4 -

The inoculation and vaccination programmes of the Department had been successful in containing these diseases by the prevention of widespread epidemics and thus limiting them from causing financial damages to the farmers.

Tiie Department’s Castle Peak Poultry Breeding Centre provides inoculation and vaccination servicese Advice and preventive medicine were also given to the farmers for their fowls.

Farmers wishing to have good quality chicks for raising can buy them from the Centre’s Poultry Production Unit where three flocks — Cantonese, Wai Chow and New Hampshire are maintained for hatching chicks and eggs.

A Apart from the family-type farms, he said there were several

large enterprisertype farms which were well managed and equipped.

The largest of them, the Kau Hing Farm at Sek Kong, occupies a site of 210,000 square feet with an annual output of about 100,000 chickens.

The spokesman went on to aay that the rising ccsts in chicken feed had posed difficulties to the farmers.

’’The cost of chicken feed, especially that of maize, is the chief economic concern of the farmers.

’’Higher feed cost discourage them from carrying out bold expansion plans* Last year, the local chicken production decreased by 14 per cent as a result of higher cost of imported chicken feed.”

Due to reduced production of maize in Thailand which is the main source of supply of the crop, the price of maize last year rose from §32 to $60 a picul in Hong Kong.

However, he said the price of maize had dropped by more than 20 per cent since the early part of this year, thus enabling the farmers to sell their products at competitive prices again.

”In order to maintain local products at a competitive position, there is a need for ways to be worked out to avoid production cost being affected by fluctuation -of chicken feed-cost,” the spokesman observed.

/Farmers.........

Sunday, December 30 ♦ 1973

- 5 -

Farmers were being.encouraged to make a joint effort in ccnjunction with the Department to overcome the problem of fluctuation of chicken feed prices, he addedt

w W • • V w 9

Release Time: 2a00

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Monday, December J1f 1973

CONTENTS

Page No,

Public urged to help prevent hill fires............ 1

Christmas Day fire victims get new homes........... 4

Second salt water pumphouse to be built at Kai Tak airport .. 6

New Year’s Honours List to be published tomorrow .. 6

Government Gazette to be published in new format .. 7

November figures show increase in measles cases ... 8

Clearance of Tai Hang Sai Cottage Area deferred until after the Lunar New Year...............................   9

♦ ♦♦♦♦

Daily guide to wholesale prices and supply of basic food commodities

Release time: 7 p_»ja.

Issum! by Gjwwnment

SMmrnRtk! HomMl. Hwy Kony. TH- 5-233191

Monday, December 3*1, 1973

- 1 -

HILL FIRES REACH RECORD HIGH

Public Urged To Prevent Destruction Of Countryside By Fire

******* •**

An urgent appeal to the public to help prevent hill fires was made today as Hong Kong headed for one of its worst fire seasons on record.

Since the start of the dry weather in October, a record number of over 800 reports of hill fires have been received, many of them resulting in the devastation of the countryside. In financial terms, the damage wrought in government plantations is estimated at more than S15 million.

According to a spokesman for the Agriculture and Fisheries Department, .64-of the fires occurred in established government plantations, affecting nearly two and a half square miles of hillside and destroying 1.5 mi115on trees.

’’This is the highest record both in terms of the total number of fires and trees destroyed in the last 10 years,” he said.

Calling for greater public co-operation in preventing hill fires, the spokesman noted that several disastious fires had swept plantations in reservoir areas during the past two jveeks.

These resulted in the destruction of more than 1,300 acres of pine and hardwood plantations of 10 to 20 years old which were established for soil stabilisation, water conservation and amenity uses.

The spokesman emphasised that it was exceptionally difficult to control forest fires due to the difficult terrain and other factors, and it was therefore important to exercise the greatest possible care with naked flames whether they be matches, cigarettes, stoves or picnic and camp fires. /’’Persons............................................................

Monday, December J1, 1973

- 2 -

’Tersons going into the countryside for picnics or camping should not light fires while these very dry and windy weather conditions persist« Fanners and gardeners too must not attempt to burn rubbish where sparks can spread to nearby vegetation,” he stressed.

’’These precautions may cause inconvenience, but as the fire reports show, the results of years of painstaking work in improving the environment are being destroyed in a few hours, and the community is losing mi11 tons of dollars worth of its amenities.”

The spokesman pointed out that persons found guilty of damaging the vegetation by lighting fires in or near government plantations wore Hahl p to heavy penalties.

Penalties under various ordinances at present range from fines cf up to 52,000 and imprisonment of 10 years«

The spokesman stressed that fire prevention was the responsibility of everyone and he gave the following simple guidelines to reduce the risk of fires.

PREVENTING HILL FIRES

* Be careful with matches and cigarette ends

If going out for picnic, bring pre-cooked food instead of barbecuing

Report any outbreak of fire to forest fire control centre of the Argiculture and Fisheries department (during office hours; K-688.523: after office hours: K-781211) or Fire Services Department (dial 999)

* Help to put out fire wherever possible

/fighting .......

Monday, December 31, 1973

- 3 -

FIGHTING GRASS FIRES

* If a grass fire starts, don’t panic, but ACT QUICKLY.

* STAMP ON THE FLAMES while they are still small.

* BEAT THE FLAMES with a LEAFY BRANCH from a tree or shrub. Work at the side of the fire, not with it blowing into your face. Work in the same direction as the wind.

Ask other parties of visitors to help.

* Go to nearest Forestry Post or fire lookout cabin, or telephone the Conservation & Forests Division, (during office hours: K-688523, after office hours: K-781211).

Note to Editors: Copies of a sketch map showing the Government

plantation areas affected by major hill fires during the current fire season are boxed for collection.

-------0----------

A....

Monday, December 31, 1973

-Li-

nearly 300 FAMILIES OF CHRISTMAS DAY FIRE GET PUBLIC HOUSING

The Housing Department has offered public housing to a total of 295 families comprising 1,273 people who lost their homes in the Christmas Day fire at the Kowloon Tsai Squatter Area.

Another 37 families comprising 119 people have been offered licensed area accommodation.

The offers were made following the site identification exercise last Saturday and- the further processing and screening during the weekend.

At present, staff of the department are sorting out some 90 doubtful cases involving about 350 people. These people have either over-claimed or could not produce sufficient evidence for their claims. These cases are being settled as quickly as possible.

In the further processing exercise carried out during the weekend, 58 families comprising 197 people have been found to Lj impostors.

”In addition, 98 families comprising 3&9 people who registered themselves as victims failed to turn up at the site identification exercise,’1 said Mr. Leslie Pogue, Assistant Director, Operations..

’’This explains why it is essential to carry out all these steps though this means extra work for the Housing Department staff and some delay in re-housing the genuine victims.”

Cash allowances from the Emergency Relief Fund will be paid out to the Kowloon Tsai fire victims on Thursday at the Squatter Control Office at Li Cheng Uk Estate.

/Those allocated

I

Monday, December 31, 1973

- 5 -

Those allocated licensed area sites will be given re-accommodation grants at the new rate of 81,250 per family. An extra $200 will be given to each additional head of a family compr:.sing more than five people.

Each member of the family will also get 8100 re-equipment grant.

The grant has just been raised by 20 per cent at the request of the Housing

Those offered public housing will be paid the re-equipment grant to help them meet the basic decoration cost.

Referring to the two fires which broke out today in Clear Water Bay Village and at the squatter area behind Block 19 of Lam Tin Estate, Mr. Pogue said that the victims will be re-housed as soon as normal processing on their claims was completed.

All victims of surveyed structures will be given public housing, in accordance with the current policy and victims of .jisurveyed structures will be offered licensed area sites,

A total of 27 families comprising 132 people have been registered as victims of the fire at Clear Water Bay Village, where some 40 structures were destroyed.

About 25 domestic squatter huts and some six sties were burned in the blaze at the squatter area near Lam Tin Estate. A site identification exercise was immediately carried out at the fire scene-

As a result, only 15 families (comprising 58 people) out of 27 families (132 people) registered were found to be genuine fire victims.

Of the other 12 families, seven (comprising 3^ people) were found to be impostors and five (comprising 25 people) were found to be tenants of Lam Tin or Ngau Tau Kok Estates.

-------0----------

/6 .......

Monday, December 31, 1973

- 6 -

ANOTHER SALT WATER PUMPHOUSE FOR KAI TAK

******

A second salt water pumphouse will be built at Kai Tak Airport in March next year to provide cooling water for the air-conditioning system serving the Now Kai Tak Terminal Building.

The pumphouse will house three pumps, each having a delivery rate of 2,500 gallons of water per minute.

Construction work, designed and supervised by the Port Works Division of the Public Works Department, will be completed by November 1974.

The installation of the equipment will be finished by March 1975, well before the completion of the New Terminal Building at the end of 1975.

--------o---------

NEW YEAR’S HONOURS LIST

* *** **

Note to Editors: A special issue of the Daily Information Bulletin will be

published tomorrow (Tuesday) which will contain the Queen’s New Year Honours List.

Copies will be available from the Press Room, 6th floor,

Beaconsfield House, from 5 p.m., together with the military list.

Publication of the list is permitted in Hong Kong newspapers on Wednesday (January 2) — but NO news agency or overseas radio may carry the information without the embargo qualification.

The news may be broadcast from 7 a.m. onwards on Wednesday (January 2) over the local radio and television stations.

On NO account should any of the recipients of honours be contacted for interviews or approached in any way in connection with thoir awards before these have been publicly announced.

-------0---------

/7.........

Monday, December J1,

- 7 -

NEW FORMAT FOR GOVERNMENT GAZETTE

<'*'***««

The Hong Kong Government Gazette is changing its format with effect from the next issue on Friday (January h).

The main change will be in the sine of the gazette and its suj . VjBK.its. They will now be printed in standard metric size (AS) which is slightly smaller than the present size.

A government spokesman said today that the reduction would result in a saving of paper as well as furthering the government’s policy of adopting the metric system.

In the past it had been necessary for the Government Printer to stock a supply of non-standard size paper which war; not econ< ’c u •. in view of the present world shortage of paper, undesirable.

Another change will be the separation of the public notices from the main body of the gazette. From Friday’s edition, those notices will be published as Supplement No. 6. The main gazette will, in future, be confined to government notices.

Monday, December 3'1, 1973

- 8 -

HEALTH REPORT FOR NOVEMBER

*->**.»?

Thore were 129 notifications of measles during November, and one death, according tc the monthly health returns issued by the Medical and Health Department today.

This compared unfavourably with the 112 cases notified in October, bringing the total notifications for the first ’1 "vzihr; of the year to 843, compared with 7 33 in 19'4--

Fatalities for the same period totalled 13. Last j’csi\ between January and November, there were only nine deaths caused by measles.

Commenting on these figures, a spokesman for the Med.’.cel ani Health Department urged parents of susceptible children betwee . nine months and five years to have them jmrrvnised

,TFrec vaccine ie available throughout the year at all -and child health centres,•’ he stressed<.

Of the other 95 deaths recorded during No*•er.her, >1 were caused, by tuberculosis, and one by typhoxd.

There were 29 notifications of bacillar j dyaenrery, one of cerebrospinal meningitis, 23 of chickenpox, 26 of typhoid, and two of paratyphoid.

Again there were no reports of either diphtheria or poliomyelitis.

The incidence of other comimwicable diseases showed no appreciable variation.

During the month, Hong Kong remained free from cholera and other quarantinable diseasesr

-----„ 0 -

/9.......

Monday, December }1, 1973

- 9 -

TAI HAI IC- CLEARANCE DEFERRED *******

The Housing Department lias decided to postpone the clearance of some 210 structures at the Tai Hang Sai Cottage Area so that residents will be able to remain there until after the Lunar New Year if they wish.

A notice was sent out t’lis (lionday) afternoon to the residents informing them that the clearance would now be carried out on February 26 and 27, 197^.

A spokesman for the housing Department said the deeision to postpone the clearance was made at the request of many of the residents• "They had on many occasions come to us to see whether it was possible for them to remain there until after the Lunar New Year," he said.

"The decision taken now will enable them to make their removal plan well after the Lunar Hew Year."

The Tai Hang Sai Cottage Clearance will affect some 300 families comprising about 1,700 people.

They have been offered public housing units at Upper Pak Tin Estate•

Hore than 250 families liave already taken up their tenancy and some of them have already moved to their new homes.

The site will be used for the first stage of the Tai Hang Tung Estate redevelopment scheme.

Monday, December J1, 1975

CONSUMER ADVISORY SERVICE

Daily Guide To Wholesale Market Prices And Supplies emu

Hie following prices were realised today (Monday) at sales under the Rice Control Scheme and at the Vegetable Marketing Organisation Wholesale Market and the Fish Marketing Organisation Wholesale Market at Cheung Sha Wan, Kowloon:

Supplies and Wholesale Prices of Rice

Grado Availability of Supply Wholesale Price (ft/catty)

China Rico Average

_ - old crop See Men •• new crop Good ’ 1.64 1.72

S.C.Jion - old crop •• OB

Po Ilgai Good 1.42

Chu Cho Good 1.22

Thad Rico Wwhole Good 1.52

10-15# Brokens Good 1.50

A1 Super Extra Good 1.45

A1 Supor Good . . 1-37

Whole Glutinous Limited 1o52

• U.S. Rico • Good 1.62

Australian Ripe

Pakistan Rice Good 1.42

Taiwan Rico Good 1.42 •

/Supplies and

Monday, December ;1, ?.

Supplies and Wholesale Prices of Marine Fish

Availability Wholesale Price

Species of Supply (8/catty)

Low • Average

Golden Thread Good 4.8 3.5 4.0

Big-Eyes Good 2.7 0.6 1.7

Squid Limited 6.7 3.2 5.5

Hair-Tails Normal 1.5 0.8 1.2

Lizard Fishes Limited 3.2 1.1 2.2

Croalters Good 2.0 0.5 1.4

Conger-Pike-Eels Limited 3-3 2.6 3.0

Melon Coat Normal 2.8 1.5 2.5

Breams Limited 4.5 3.8 4.0

Yellow Belly Good 1.5 0.7 0.9

Mackerels Normal 4.2 3.7

Red Goat Fish Good 0.7 0.55 o.f>5

Fork-Tail Normal 1.8 0.9 1.5

Horse-Head Normal 5-0 2.8 4."'.

Melon Seed Limited 3.7 2.0

Poof rets Scarce 7.5 6.5 7.0

Garoupas Normal 7.5 5.5 6.0

Yellow Croaker

/Supplies and • * A a A . .

* .

*

Mondayt December

f.v’pn 15 ’ □ r ' 4 rZiolernlo rrieer^jrf

Jr.-' *';lv P Ve/AJ'nt'Jos

nsr.^ Availability cf .'hrvxly Wholesale Price (ft/-atty)_

nigh Ix?n Avernre

Flonoring cabbage Limited JoO 1o4 2«2

(Shite cabbage Limited 1O6 0ft6

Chinese Lettuce’ Konnai, V> o«Jt 1..P

Chinese Kola Normal 1.5 - 0.6 1.>0

Spring onion Normal 1,2 0o5 1.0

Spinach . Normal 1„8 0.8 1.4

TZiter crocs i Normal 1.5 0.6 1.0

Loaf mustard cabbage Scarce 1.5 0.5 1.0.

Tomto Scarce * 1.5 i.o 1.4

Svrrnlies and Wholesale Prices of Pork (Livelweight)

Availability Wholesale Prico

- (Avorago)

JTcoft normal • 285