Daily Information Bulletin - 1970s - 1973 - APR - ENG

 DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Sunday, April 1, 1973

NW TROPICAL CYCLONE WARNING SIGNALS

********

The Director of Royal Observatory reminded members of the public today that the new tropical cyclone warning signal system was now in use.

The former Nos- 5* 6, 7 and 8 signals have been replaced by a uniformed No. 8 signal accompanied with directional denotations in both oral and written weather reports.

No. 5 signal has been renamed No. 8NW signal. Its symbol is an upward triangle and the lights are white-green-green.

No. 6 signal has become No. 8SW. The symbol is an inverted triangle and the lights are green-white-white.

No. 7 signal has been renumbered No. 8NE. The symbol is two vertical upward triangles and the lights are green-green-white.

No. 8 signal now reads No. 8SE. The symbol is two vertical inverted triangles and the lights are white-white-green.

All these signals are used as warnings of gales and storms from the various directions. ”Gale” means winds with average mean speed of 3^-47 knots, and ’’storm” means winds with average mean speed between 48-63 knots.

The other signals, that is Nos. 1, 3, 9 and 10, remain unchanged and are still in use.

/The Director ....

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191



Sunday, April 1, 1973

- 2 -

The Director of Royal Observatory said the new warning signal system came into effect at the beginning of this year after consultations with various departments and organisations concerned.

Apart from simplification, he said, the new system would eliminate public misunderstanding of typhoon signals caused by numerical order.

”As a matter of fact, the old Nos. 3, 6, 7 and 8 signals were only used to differentiate directions of winds with same force,” he explained.

”As far as these four signals are concerned, wind speed and the likelihood of danger did not correspond with the numerical order.

Nev; System

”We hope that the new system will remove public misunderstanding of the warning signals, and thus minimising danger and loss caused by tropical cyclones,” the Director said.

The Government Information Services has now prepared a pamphlet entitled ”Preliminary Information on Hong Kong’s New Tropical Cyclone Warning Signals”. It gives a simple description and definition of the new warning signals.

Further details of the new system have also been printed on separate information cards. These cards tell the public what step of precaution should be taken when various signals are hoisted.

They also contain a map for plotting tropical cyclone trades and should be useful on every desk.

Copies of these publications are now available free of charge at all City District Offices, New Territories District Offices, the Marine Department, the Education Department and the Government Information Services.

/Note to Editors:

4

Sunday, April 1, 1973

- 3 -

Note to Editors: Copies of the pamphlet, "Preliminary

Information on Hong Kong’s New Tropical Cyclone Warning Signals," and the information card on the warning signals are available for collection from the G.I.S. press room.

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Release Time: 1,00 p ,m.

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Monday, April 2, 1975

contents

Page No,

The Education Department has announced that schools will open as usual on Wednesday.......... .......................  ••••••••• 1

The new Housing Department began work today in its new form ........ 4

This year’s anti-measles campaign is now underway ••••••••••••••« 6

The new Rating law is now in force ............................... 8

The foundation stone for the new Yuen Long family planning centre was laid today by Lady MacLehose •••••••.........................* 9

A number of premises on both sides of the harbour will be without water on Wednesday...........................................,10

Nearly 50,000 doses of anti-poliomyelitis vaccine have been administered since February • ••................................... 11

Part of Clear Water Bay Road will be closed to goods vehicles on Sundays and holidays as from Thursday.....................• «••• 11

Work on the road improvement scheme in Kwun Tong is to start in a few months.................................••••••••.............  12

A housing survey will be carried out this month to assess housing needs in Hong Kong................................................. 1j

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Monday, April 2, 1973

- 1 -

SCHOOLS TO OPEN AS USUAL ON WEDNESDAY **»«*»«•

Schools in Hong Kong will be open for normal sessions on Wednesday.

Announcing this today the Assistant Director of Education (Primary), Mr. K.S. Yeung, said he had asked headmasters to make this point clear to parents and pupils.

"I am sure that the vast majority of teachers will follow their normal timetables on Wednesday and will be teaching their pupils as usual,” he added.

"Teaching is a profession which instills a sense of responsibility and I am confident that our teachers will, as always, be conscious of their duty to their pupils."

Commenting on the proposed course of action announced at a meeting of teachers on Sunday, Mr. Yeung said he regretted that the leaders of the certificated masters had apparently rejected the new pay scale now being implemented.

Regarding the criticism that under the new scale a teacher must wait 19 years to reach the maximum, Mr. Yeung said the normal scale ran from 31,175 to 31,750 by annual increments over a span of eight years. The extended scale up to 32,050, was reached by three increments of five years, three years and three years.

"The majority of certificated masters are in aided schools and have recently benefitted by the introduction of a new structure which provides many more promotion posts", he added.

/"In the .........

Monday, April 2, 1973

- 2 -

"In the primary school sector promotion posts have increased from

76 to 1891, and in the secondary school sector from 88 to 23$. As :nany more certificated masters will be promoted, fewer will have to move on to the extended scale.

"The Government had considered most carefully the situation regarding the salaries of certificated masters, and in particular the points raised by them in their various representations."

Mr. Yeung pointed out that the independent Morgan Working Group carried out a detailed analysis of their conditions, in comparison with 2^ other grades at this level in the government service, and based its recommendations on this study.

"Contrary to allegations that the report represents a rejection of the teachers’ claims, careful reading shows that to a significant extent it supports their claims, though not in every single respect," he commented.

"While accepting the basic recommendations of the working group, the Government has implemented them sooner than the group envisaged by establishing the higher entry point of 81,250 this year, for those who graduate from training colleges with credit.

"The Government’s final decision was reached after careful consideration in Executive Council and the Finance Committee of the Legislative Council. Steps are now being taken to implement the new scale and teachers will receive the additional benefits as soon as possible.

"These benefits include, for those at' the top of the existing scale, automatic entry to the extra scale proposed by the Morgan Group. But this extra scale rises to 82,050, which is higher than the Group envisaged, and does not require the teacher to forfeit his chances of promotion.”

/Following

Monday, April 2, 1973

- 3 -

Following is a comparison between the old and new scales for

Certificated Masters.

Scale w.e.f.

Scale before 1.4.72 (i.e.

1.4.71 with 3% increase) Percentage

1044 1215 16.37%

1109 1295 16.77%

1173 1375 17.22%

1244 1455 16.96%

1315 1535 16.73%

1585 1615 16.6 %

1457 1715 17.7 %

1528 1815 18.78%

1598 1815 13.57%

,fExtra scale"

1915

2015

2115

One important effect of the increase in the maximum scale from

Increase

31,398 to 32,115 is that the maximum pension is subsequently raised by 28

per cent.

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A.....

Monday, April 2, 1973

- 4 -

NEW HOUSING DEPARTMENT TAKES SHAPE

*********

The new Housing Department today started working as an integrated housing administration.

It is an amalgamation of the former Housing Division (which serviced the previous Housing Authority) and of the Resettlement Department.

The department will be the executive arm of the new Housing Authority whose membership were announced on Saturday.

Its headquarters is the former Housing Division office block at Ma Tau Wai Estate, Kowloon, which also houses the Architectural Division and the Secretariat to the Housing Authority.

The headquarters of the Estates Management Division is now at the Government Offices at San Po Kong.

This integrates the management of all public housing estates under one roof, including estates built by the former Housing Authority, Low Cost Housing Estates and Resettlement Estates.

The Applications Section, which formerly dealt only with Waiting.

List applicants for public housing, is now located in the former Resettlement Department headquarters in Middle Road, and will handle all applications for public housing, including those from people cleared from land required for development, and from dangerous buildings.

/The Housing •••••

Monday, April 2, 1973

- 5 -

The Housing Department's Squatter Control and Squatter Clearance Sections will remain in the Middle Road building.

These moves are the outcome of the decision to introduce a more streamlined housing organisation to service the new Housing Authority and its 1O-year public housing building programme.

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Monday, April 2, 1973

- 6 -

ANTI-MEASLES CAMPAIGN 1973 Nine-Week Drive For Immunisation Starts Today *********

Tlie Director of Medical and Health, Dr. G.H. Choa today appealed to parents of susceptible children to have them immunised against measles during the nine weeks of the 1973 anti-measles campaign, beginning today.

During this period, free measles vaccine will be offered to children between six months and five years at all maternal and health centres as well as at 25 new fixed centres which have been set up in resettlement estates, health offices, government clinics, dispensaries and hospitals.

A total of 21 mobile teams with 48 inoculators have been set up. They will make door to door visits among resettlement and housing estate residents•

In the Nev; Territories, in addition to the fixed centres located in the town areas, mobile teams will visit villages.

The Medical and Health Department’s two floating dispensaries or clinic launches will carry the vaccine to outlying islands for the immunisation of children there.

The campaign is aimed at children in the ’’susceptible age11 between six months and five years. All are born with some degree of immunity against the disease which they receive from their mother, but before the first year is up, this natural immunity is usually gone.

/The campaign •••••••

Monday, April 2, 1973

- 7 -

The campaign is on a large scale, and during the nine weeks, radio, television, and the cinema will be used to bring home the message that measles remains the last of the childhood diseases which has still to be controlled in Hong Kong.

Last year, the campaign was held between August and October. This year, the time has been advanced in an attempt to ’’beat the heat.”

”1 am sure it is not difficult for us to understand that many children are bom every year, and they are not all immunised, and are therefore susceptible to an attack of the disease,” Dr. Choa said.

"These susceptible children not only run the risk of getting the disease themselves, but can also transmit the disease when they mingle with other susceptible children, either in their own family or in the community.

"For this reason, immunisation campaigns are mounted every year in order to prevent the disease from spreading."

Dr. Choa repeated that although measles was a common and perhaps not a very serious disease, danger reposed in the complications that could arise from it — such as bronchitis, pneumonia, middle ear infection, and encephalitis.

He strongly advised parents not to cling on to the erroneous belief that "every child should be made to go through an attack of measles instead of being prevented from getting it, or having it suppressed."

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/8...........

Monday, April 2, 1973

- 8 -

NEW RATING LAW NOW IN FORCE

********

The Commissioner of Rating and Valuation, Mr. R.A. Fry, today reminded ratepayers that with effect from April 1 this year refunds of rates on vacant premises will be limited to half the amount paid, excluding any surcharge.

Where land (without buildings) is vacant and where premises are unoccupied because of a Government order, rates will continue to be refunded in full.

The Commissioner emphasized that ratepayers must give notice in writing not later than the 15th day of the month from the first day on which the premises become vacant, otherwise no refund may be approved.

However, in respect of premises assessed to rates for the first time, premises assessed following alterations and premises assessed following a period of exemption the department must be notified of any vacancy not later than the last day on which rates are payable.

Refunds of rates on account of vacancy are payable only where premises are vacant for one or more entire months and anyone wishing to have further information on this subject may enquire at the offices of the Rating and Valuation Departmentt 1 Garden Road, Hong Kong or telephone 5-249021•

Monday, April 2, 1973

- 9 -

NEW FAMILY PLANNING CENTRE FOR YUEN LONG ON THE WAY

Lady MacLehose Commends F.P.A. Work

*******

A new centre will be set up in Yuen Long by the Family Planning Association to provide residents with family planning and maternal and child health services.

Speaking at the foundation stone laying ceremony of the centre at 11 a.m. today (Monday), Lady MacLehose commended the Association for its "vital contribution to the family health and welfare of our community."

She also acknowledged the achievement of voluntary bodies "in pioneering the acceptance and practice of family planning among eligible women."

Family planning, she said, had played an important role in helping Hong Kong to maintain "a standard of living which is the envy of many in this part of the world."

The following is the full text of Lady MacLehose1s speech:

Madam Chairman, Ladies and Gentlemen,

I am delighted to be able to participate this morning in the laying of the foundation stone of a very worthwhile project, the Yuen Long Family Planning Centre which is to be built on this -site.

I agree with you, Madam Chairman, that the population problem is a universal one and indeed particularly applicable to Hong Kong in view of the very high density of population. Family Planning is therefore a subject which is of the utmost importance to us in Hong Kong. We have been fortunate enough so far to have achieved and maintained a standard of living which is the envy of many in this part of the world. As has been said before the necessity is to lay stress on quality rather than quantity.

/The magnificent ........

I


Monday, April 2, 1973

- 10 -

The magnificent efforts of the voluntary bodies, in particular the Family Planning Association of Hong Kong in pioneering the acceptance and practice of family planning among eligible women need hardly be repeated on this occasion. Suffice it to say that in almost half a century of hard and dedicated work in close association with the Government Maternal and Child Health Service, the Family Planning Association have made vital contributions to the family health and welfare of our community.

I have no doubt that services provided by this Centre will achieve all that your Association have hoped for, i.e. to provide an effective and much needed Family Planning and Maternal and Child Health Service for the rural people in the Yuen Long area. May I conclude by wishing you and the Family Planning Association the very best of luck in your new venture.

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WATER INTERRUPTION

A number of premises on both sides of the harbour will be without water supply for five hours on Wednesday (April 4) starting from 1 a.m.

The temporary stoppage is to allow the Waterworks Office to carry out leakage tests in the areas.

On Hong Kong Island, the affected buildings are Nos. 865 to 1021 and 992 to 105*+, King’s Road, including North Point Model Housing Estate, Finnie Street, Hoi Tai Street, Hoi Wan Street, Tong Chong Street, Hoi Kwong Street, Pan Hoi Street and Parker Road.

In Kowloon, all premises within the area bounded by Lung Cheung Road, Tung Tau Tsuen Road and Sheung Tak Street will be affected.

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/11 .......

Monday, April 2, 1973

- 11 -

ANTI-POLIOMYELITIS CAMPAIGN 1973

25,717 Doses Of Vaccine Administered Since February 26

**«$****

During the week ending cn March 24, 1973, a total of 6,814 doses of the anti-poliomyelitis vaccine was administered, according to figures released by the Medical and Health Department today.

Of these, 1,055 doses were administered on the Island, 3,316 in Kowloon, and 2,443 in the New Territories.

Since the second phase of the annual anti-poliomyelitis campaign began on February 26, 1973, the total number of doses adm-jnj stored amounted to 25i717• The second phase of the 1973 campaign ended on March 31•

But the vaccine remains available free at all Medical and Health Department inoculation and maternity and child health centres on a year-round basis.

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RESTRICTIONS ON GOODS VEHICLES USING CLEAR WATER BAY ROAD

********

Clear Water Bay Road between Lung Cheung Road and Fu Nga Slian Road will be closed to all goods vehicles travelling in an easterly (uphill) direction between 9 a.m. and noon on Sundays and public holidays.

The restrictions aim at reducing traffic congestion in the area and will apply from Thursday (April 5) to October 8.

Owners of goods vehicles wishing to use Clear Water Bay Road during the restricted hours may apply for permission to do so from the Commissioner for Transport.

Appropriate traffic signs will be posted to guide motorists.

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/12.......

Monday, April 2, 1973

- 12 -

KWUN TONG ROAD IMPROVEMENT SC WIE ««***»*

Work is expected to begin in July this year on the realignment of a section of Kwun Tong Road to form part of the North East Kowloon Corridor.

The project, at an estimated cost of $18 million, involves the widening of the section of Kwun Tong Road between the main entrance to R.A.F. Kai Tak and Choi Wan Road. This section will be widened from six to 12 lanes.

To further relieve the present congestion in the area, an elevated roadway will be built to link Kwun Tong Road and the future Wai Yip Street extension. Upon completion, this dual-two-lane road will allow both eastbound and westbound traffic to merge with and diverge from the main Kwun Tong Road traffic.

A pedestrian footbridge will also be constructed to the west of Choi Shek Lane to permit safe-crossing of the road.

The design of this project has allowed for the planned development of roads on the Kowloon Bay reclamation.

It has also taken into account future requirements for the Mass Transit Kowloon Bay Station and maintenance depot.

The scheme is expected to be completed in 1975.

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/15

Monday, April 2, 1973

- 13 -

1973 HOUSING SURVEY

********

The Census and Statistics Department is to carry out a housing survey later this month to review housing needs in Hong Kong in connection with the Government’s Ten Year Housing Plan.

The object of the 12-day survey, which begins on April 18, is to get uj>to-date and accurate data regarding the size of households and the degree of sharing of living quarters.

A number of living quarters in all types of housing have been selected systematically for the survey.

In addition, an official letter, in both English and Chinese, has been sent out today to inform the occupants of the selected living quarters about the survey.

Commenting on the survey, a Department spokesman said only two questions would be asked — the number of households in the living quarters, and the number of persons in each household.

He expressed the hope that all households in the selected living quarters would give their fullest co-operation in answering the questions when they are visited.

All information regarding individual households will be kept strictly confidential.

For identification purposes, all enumerators will carry an official Census and Statistics Department identity card.

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Release Time: 7«3Q

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Tuesday, April 3, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No.

Hong Kong's domestic exports show 12.5 per cent rise in February .................................................................... 1

The City Hall library will remain open during the Ching Ming Festival......................................................       2

More post offices are to be built to meet increasing demands • •••• 3

Fifty three members of the community will be presented with insignia by the Governor tomorrow ................................. **

Special events have been arranged by the Social Welfare Department to celebrate Children’s Day .......................................  5

A building in Sham Shui Po has been condemned......................  6

The reconstituted Urban Council held its first formal meeting today ..........................................................     7

The Certificate of Education practical examinations are to be held tomorrow as scheduled.........................................  8

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Tuesday, April 3, 1973

- 1 -

FEBRUABY TRADE FIGURES SHOW INCREASE

**«*«*»*

Hong Kong’s domestic exports in February amounted to 31,246 million — an increase of 3139 million or 12.5 per cent over the same period last year.

According to provisional figures issued today by the Census and Statistics Department, the value of imports during the month was 81,916 mi 115on.

Compared with last, year’s corresponding figure, this showed an increase of 3348 million or 22.2 per cent.

The value of re-exports at 3364 million represented a rise of 382 million or 29.1 per cent.

A spokesman for the Commerce and Industry Department said that during the three-month period, December 1972 to February 1973, domestic exports totalled 83,673 million, while imports amounted to 35,754 million and re-exports 81,112 million.

These figures represented increases of 9*5 per cent, 19.3 per cent and 29*0 per cent respectively compared with the corresponding period 12 months ago.

Figures for the first two months of this year showed increases over the same period last year of 9«1 per cent for domestic exports, 21.8 per cent for imports and 26.8 per cent for re-exports.

A comparative table is given below:

Dec. 1972 to Feb. 1973 8 Million Dec. 1971 to Feb. 1972 3 Million Increase or decrease

8 Million Per Cent

Domestic Exports 3,673 3,353 + 319 + 9.5

Imports 5,754 4,824 + 930 + 19.3

Re-exports 1,112 862 + 250 + 29.0

/Domestic

Tuesday, April J, 1973

2 -

Jan.-Feb. 1973 Jan.-Feb. 1972 Increase or decrease

3 Million 3 Million 3 Million Per Cent

Domestic Exports 2,460 2,254 + 206 + 9.1

Imports 3,774 3,099 + 675 + 21.8

Re-exports 722 569 + 152 + 26.8

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CITY HALL HOLIDAY ARRANGEMENTS

********

The City Hall, other than the City Hall Library and the City Museum and Art Gallery, will remain open on Thursday (April 5) which is a public holiday.

Also open to the public will be the Lei Cheng Uk Museum (12 noon to 7 p.m.), the Yau Ma Tei Branch Library (9 a.m. to 1 p.m.), the Aberdeen/ Pokfulam Branch Library and the Kowloon Park students’ study room (1 p.m. to 5 p.m.)

The branch libraries at Ping Shek and Waterloo Road will be closed for the day.

Meanwhile, the Postmaster General announced that all post offices will be closed and there will be no mail delivery on Thursday.

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/3........

Tuesday, April 3, 1973

- 3 -

MORE POST OFFICES ON THE WAY To Cope With Increasing Demand *******

The Post Office is to continue its expansion programme and adopt new postal methods and procedures to meet the increasing demands being placed upon it.

At present, the Post Office handles nearly one million letters and parcels every day and exchanges mail with over 130 countries.

A spokesman for the Post Office said today that plans were in hand to build seven more branch offices to serve residents in various districts on both sides of the harbour.

They will be designated at Cloudview Road, Guildford Road, Perkins Road, Tsat Tse Mui, Wong Chuk Hang, Waterloo Road North and Lam Tin.

’’All the planned new post offices are expected to be opened within the next 12 months,” the spokesman said.

In the meantime, two other new post offices are under construction — one in the Mei Fu Sun Chuen Estate and the other in the Ko Chiu Road Government Low Cost Housing Estate.

Both are expected to open for business in the near future.

At present, there are 65 post offices in operation in Hong Kong, including a mobile post office serving residents in the rural areas.

Referring to the new General Post Office in Central and the International Mail Centre at Hung Hom, the spokesman said: ’’The feasibility mechanisation layouts of these two projects were finalised by the British Post Office Consultancy Service, and the detailed planning of the new buildings is now in hand.”

Tuesday, April 3, 1973

- 4 -

Piling work for the new General Post Office is expected to begin sometime next month.

It is scheduled for completion at the end of 1975 and for occupation in the following year.

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PRESENTATION OF INSIGNIA

*******

Note to Editors: The Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose will present

insignia to 53 members of the community at a ceremony at Government House tomorrow (Wednesday) at 11 a.m.

Copies of a list of recipients and citations will be available for collection from the G.I.S. press room at 11 a.m. tomorrow.

No press photographers other than those provided with special passes will be admitted to Government House.

Press representatives assigned to cover the ceremony are requested to assemble at the guard room of Government House not later than 10.30 a.m.

G.I.S. officers will be on hand to give assistance.

Newspapers not receiving passes will be able to obtain photographs by making arrangements for the supply of prints in the ordinary way with Asia Photo Supply Ltd., Hang Cheong Building, Queen1s Road Central, Hong Kong, Telephone No. H-236429»

/5.........

- - 0 - -

Tuesday, April 3, 1973

- 5 -

CAMP FIRE PARTY TO CELEBRATE CHILDREN’S DAY

*******

About 180 children, parents and young people will be taking part in a camp fire party at the Social Welfare Department’s Wong Tai Sin Community *

Centre tomorrow (Wednesday) between 8 and 9*30 p.m. to celebrate children’s day.

Performances will be given by the children and they will be participating in games organised by young members of the centre. . . . . .

The aim is to foster parent-child relationships, and provide youth members with an opportunity for community involvement and leadership development.

A talk dealing with the role of parents will be given by Mr. Chow Yat-yu, ehairman of the Hong Kong Subsidised Primary Schools Headmasters Association.

Children’s day events are also being organised for about 500 children by the Sau Mau Ping (South) Community Work Office of the Social Welfare Department, in conjunction with local welfare agencies and schools.

Preliminary rounds in a children’s talent contest will .take place tomorrow in morning and afternoon sessions in the hall of the Sau Mau Ping (South) Estate Welfare Building.

Thirty entrants will be selected for the finals which jri.ll be staged in the hall between 3-30 to 5 p.m. on Saturday, April 7.

There will also be a children’s games day on Saturday atethe estate’s football pitch between 2 to 3 .30 p.m.

Note to Editors: You are invited to send a reporter and

photographer to cover the events arranged to celebrate children’s day.

-------o -------- /£......................

Tuesday, April 3, 1973

- 6 -

BUILDING IN WESTERN DISTRICT CONDEMNED

*«**«**«

The Building Authority today declared No. 2 Connaught Road West to be in a dangerous condition, and No. 1 Connaught Road ’West and Nos. 1 and 3 Nev/ Market Street liable to become dangerous.

In a statement issued this morning, the Principal Government Building Surveyor said these four-storey pre-war buildings were inter-dependent structures*

They had been under observation since certain essential repairs were ordered to be carried out after a routine inspection.

A further inspection recently showed evidence of new movement in the front verandah of No. 2 Connaught Road West and it was considered that there was a risk of failure at this point which could lead to a collapse.

In addition, there were fractures in the load bearing walls and the roof was extensively decayed.

The condition of No. 1 Connaught Road West and Nos. 1 and 3 New Market Street was poor with defective timber and fracture brickwork.

Since these buildings were inter-dependent, it was considered there was a risk of collapse during or after the demolition of No. 2 Connaught Road West.

Accordingly, notices of intention to apply for closure orders were posted on these buildings today. Hearing will be in the Victoria District Court at 9*30 a,m. on May 2.

/7........

- o —

Tuesday, April 3, 1973

RECONSTITUTED URBCO GETS DOWN TO WORK

*******

The new Urban Council held its first meeting today when its 24-member Standing Committee formally endorsed the election of Mr, A, de 0. Sales as the Council’s first non-Government Chairman, and Mr. Hilton Cheong-Leen as the Vice-Chairman.

Items which the Council then immediately discussed included the Council’s budget, its new Select Committee structure in the coming year and the Keep Hong Kong Clean Campaign. These will be tabled at the Council’s first open meeting on April 10.

Today’s discussions lasted for nearly an hour.

Mr. Sales, on taking the chair, paid tribute to the outgoing Chairman, Mr. David Alexander, for his hard work, ability and scrupulously correct manner in dealing with Councillors and Council affairs over the past years.

”Mr. Alexander was a gentleman at all times and we appreciated greatly his co-operation and ability,” Mr. Sales said.

To his fellow Councillors Mr. Sales said that it would be in the interest of the Urban Council that all Select Committees worked closely in the discharge of their respective responsibilities.

After the meeting Mr. Sales paid a visit to his new office in the City Hall where he met the people who will be working with him as well as Mr. Darwin Chan, the City Hall Manager.

Mr. Sales said that the office would be used by the Council for meeting and welcoming local and visiting dignitaries, as well as such local citizens who may have cause to want to see him.

/As the

Tuesday, April 3, 1973

- 8 -

As the office was still to be furnished Mr. Sales indicated his preference for Chinese furniture which he said was more in keeping with the character of Hong Kong and would be better appreciated by visitors.

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CERTIFICATE OF EDUCATION EXAMINATIONS

********

The Education Department announced today that the Certificate of Education practical examinations to be held tomorrow (Wednesday) will take place as scheduled.

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Release time; 7.30 p.m

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Wednesday, April 4, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No*

Director of Civil Aviation signs $3*7 million contract for extensive air transport study...........................  ,......... 1

Fifty-three Hong Kong residents receive insignia frcm the Governor .................................................................... 2

Junk builders are to receive a 20 per cent wage increase............ 3

The Morrison Hill swimming pool will be closed for several hours during the weekend .............................................     3

Another ’Meet the Media’ session will be held this Friday •......... 4

The Superintendent of Prisons is retiring this month •.............. 5

Two buildings in Sham Shui Po have been condemned .................  6

A registration team will visit the New Territories on Friday • ••• 7

All completed forms returned in connection with the recent employment and vacancy surveys have been destroyed ................. 7

The Government Quantity Surveyor will retire in a few months .... 8

Visa arrangements for the export of restrained textiles to the U.S.A, have been suspended ..........................  ..............9

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Wednesday, April 4, 1973

1 -

AIR TRANSPORT SURVEY

*******

A multi-million-dollar contract for a long-term planning study of

Hong Kong’s air transport system was signed in the office of the Director

of Civil Aviation this (Wednesday) morning.

A firm of consultants, the Ralph M. Paasons Company of Los Angeles, will undertake this 33*7 million study.

At the signing ceremony today were Mr. T.R. Thomson, Director

of Civil Aviation, representing the Government, and Mr. J.N. Fehrer,

the company’s Contract Manager.

The consultants’ main concerns will be to provide:

(a) a forecast of the future demand for air transport services in Hong Kong, together with an assessment of the impact and likelihood of external events which could modify that demand;

(b) a thorough assessment of the ultimate capacity of the present airport and an understanding of the consequences of demand reaching that capacity;

(c) an identification of all viable alternatives to the present airport in providing facilities for air services and an analysis of the impact of each; and

(d) the formulation of several- alternative courses of action and an analysis and measured prediction of the economic and social costs and benefits to Hong Kong associated with each course of action.

The survey, which will begin this month, is expected to take about

15 months to complete.

A spokesman for the Civil Aviation Department said: ’’The firm will be required to submit to the Director of Civil Aviation periodical interim reports and a final report at the conclusion of the study.

”It is hoped that these reports would then provide the essential

information and analysis necessary to enable the Director to draw up an

overall policy for the future of civil aviation in Hong Kong.” ---------------------------------0 -------- /2...................

Wednesday, April 4, 1973

2 -

PRESENTATION OF INSIGNIA

********

Fifty-three Hong Kong residents and members of the Services, who were decorated by Her Majesty the Queen for services to the community, received their insignia from the Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, at a presentation ceremony at Government House today.

The insignia included two C.B.E.’s, five O.B.E.’s and six M.B.E.’s Most of the decorations were awarded by the Queen in her New Year Honours List.

Among the recipients were nine members of the Royal Hong Kong Police Force and the Fire Services who took part in rescue operations during the Jumbo Floating Restaurant fire in October 1971.

Note to Editors: The citations for 25 of the awards and the

full list of names are issued separately as a supplement to today’s Daily Information Bulletin.

-------0---------

Wednesday, April 4, 1973

- 3 -

WAGE INCREASE FOR JUNK BUILDERS

»»****«*

All monthly-paid workers of the junk building trade will receive a 20 per dent increase in wages, with effect from April 1. Carpenters and caulkers will each have a daily wage increase of #10.

The demand for wage increase was put forward to the Shipyard

Employers General Association (Tung Yee) by the "Sai Yee" Junk Builders

* Association in early March, 1973.

With the advice given by officers of the Labour Relations Service of the Labour Department, both parties managed to reach an agreement on March JO* Representatives of both Associations today signed the agreement in the presence of a Labour Officer at the office of the Labour Relations Service (Kowloon West)*

The Sai Yee Junk Builders Association represents some 500 workers in the trade.

-------0---------

TEMPORARY CLOSURE OF SWIMMING POOL

*********

The Morrison Hill Swimming Pool will be closed to the public for several hours on Saturday and Sunday (April 7 and 8). When the Hong Kong Chinese Aaateur Swirming Association will be holding its spinning gnin.

The events will take place between 1.45 and 5.15 p.m.

A...........

o - -

Wednesday, April 4, 1973

FOURTH ’MEET THE MEDIA’ SESSION

********

The next session in the *Meet the Media’ series will be held this Friday (April O at 3 p*m. at the Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House.

Attending the meeting will be the Commissioner for Narcotics, Mr. N.G. Rolph; the Chief Superintendent (Narcoties Bureau), Mr. G.R. Dunning; and the Assistant Director of the Preventive Services, Mr. M.C. Morgan.

The ’Meet the Media’ sessions are arranged by the Government Information n

Services to enable newsmen to meet senior government officers and question them directly about the work of their department.

The meetings are on the record and T.V. and radio coverage facilities are provided.

Note to Editors: You are cordially invited to send a

reporter and photographer to cover Friday’s session. It will be held in the G.I.S. 35 mm theatre on the 5th floor of Beaconsfield House.

Television representatives covering this meeting are requested to have their equipment set up before the start of the meeting.

-----0---------

/5........

Wednesday, April 4, 1973

- 5 -

SENIOR PRISONS OFFICER RETIRES

*********

Mr. G.P. Fox, Superintendent of Prisons, will be leaving Hong Kong on pre-retirement leave on April 20 after 22 years of distinguished service.

To mark the occasion, the Commissioner of Prisons, Mr. T.G. Gamer, will present a memento to Mr. Fox at a special ceremony this Saturday at the Stanley Club, Stanley.

Mr. Fox.first joined the department as Prison Officer Class I in 195O« He was promoted Principal Officer in 1956, Assistant Chief Officer in 1960 and attained the rank of Chief Officer two years later.

He was appointed to his present post in 1968. The same year he was commended by the Governor for diligence ih the performance of his duties.

Note to Editors: You are cordially invited to send a reporter

and/or photographer to cover the presentation ceremony which will be held on Saturday (April 7) at 12.30 p.m. in the Stanley Club, Stanley.

-------0---------

/6.........

Wednesday, April 4, 1973

- 6 -

BUILDINGS DECLARED DANGEROUS

*******

Two buildings in Sham Shui Po — Nos. 91 and 93 Yu Chau Street — have been declared dangerous by the Building Authority.

The Principal Government Building Surveyor said in a statement today that an inspection of the four-storey pre-war buildings had shown that the reinforced concrete columns, floors, and beams were seriously spalled and the reinforcement badly corroded.

There were also many areas of defective brickwork. The worst spalling and deterioration occurred in the kitchen blocks and involved a risk of collapse.

After a recent reassessment, it was considered that the kitchen blocks could not be repaired. The overall extent of the repairs that would be required to remove the risk of failure was so large that it could not be justified.

Notices to apply for Closure Orders were posted on the buildings today. Hearing will be in Kowloon District Court at 9.JO a.m. on May 9«

-----0 - - - .

/7

Wednesday, April 4, 1973

- 7 -

REGISTRATION TEAM TO OPERATE IN NEW TERRITORIES

********

A team from the Registration of Persons Department will carry out registrations at the Kam Tin Rural Committee Office on Friday (April 6) and Monday (April 9)•

Business hours will be from 9*00 a.m. to 5.00 p.m.

Residents in the area are urged to make use of the team’s visits to register themselves and their children for identity cards.

They should also report to the team any changes in address and other particulars.

Young people 17 years of age and over and holding juvenile identity cards should register for adult identity cards.

• • ••«••••••

------0----------

EMPLOYMENT RETURNS DESTROYED

********

All enquiry cards completed and returned by managements in response to employment and vacancy surveys carried out last May, June and September were destroyed•today (Wednesday).

Disclosing this today, the Commissioner of Labour, Mr. Paul Tsui, said an officer of the Labour Statistics and Surveys Unit had personally supervised the destruction of the forms in the Lai Chi Kok incinerator.

’’This was to ensure that the information supplied by managements could no longer be identified with individual places of employment,” Mr. Tsui explained.

-------0----------

/8.........

Wednesday, April 4, 1973

- 8 -

GOVERNMENT SURVEYOR RETIRING

*********

Mr. H, Miller, Government Quantity Surveyor, will retire in a few months after 18 years of service*

lo mark the occasion, the Director of Building Development, Mr. C.R.J. Donnithorne, will present him with a gift on behalf of his colleagues.

The presentation will take place at p.m. on Friday (April 6) in the Conference room of the Public Works Department Headquarters, Murray Building, 21st Floor, Garden Road.

Note to Editors: You are invited to cover the presentation.


/9........

Wednesday, April 4, 197J

- 9 -

SUSPENSION OF VISA ARRANGEMENTS

For Export Of Restrained Textile Items To U.S.A.

«**«***««

The Director of Commerce and Industry today announced that the Certificate of Origin/Visa arrangements for exports of restrained cotton, man-made fibre and wool textiles to the U.S.A, have been suspended.

The announcement was contained in Notice to Exporters: Series 2 (U.S.A.) No. 10/73.

The department will suspend the issue of visaed Certificates of Origin on April 9, 1973.

Applications received before this date will be processed in the normal manner.

The Director said there was no need for companies to apply now for visaed certificates in respect of shipments by sea.

The department will, however, continue to receive applications and issue visaed certificates for air shipments leaving Hong Kong before April 9.

Copies of the notice will be sent to trade associations and exporters on the department’s mailing list.

Anyone wishing to have advance notice of the contents may obtain copies from the department’s reception counter on the Ground Floor, 46 Connaught Road Central, Hong Kong, or contact the following officers of the department:

Mr. Y.K. Tong - Industry Assistant

Tel. No. 5-239625

Mr. L. Chung - Industry Assistant

Tel. No. 5-448686

Mr. J.T.W, Leung - Industry Assistant Tel. No. 5-223360 -----------------0---------

Release Time: 7.00 p.m.

4000035 P.R. 33

HONG KONG GOVERNMENT

NFORMATION

SERVICES

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

SUPPLEMENT

Wednesday, April 4, 1973

PRESENTATION OF INSIGNIA

**#*41*#*

The following is the citation for 25 of the awards at today’s presentation of insignia ceremony at Government House THE HON. PAUL TSUI KA-CHEUNG, CBE

Mr. Tsui has served as head of two major departments and as a Legislative Councillor. By his courage, integrity and force of character he has made a major contribution to the effective government of Hong Kong. MR. LIANG YUEN-CHONG, CBE (HONORARY)

Mr. Liang had a war record of the highest distinction. Since then as businessman, banker and philanthropist he has been a most constructive and trusted member of the community, and has contributed significantly to harmonious relations between Hong Kong and Macau.

MR. D.W.A. BLYE, CBE

lir. Blye lias been Accountant General since 1970. His work has been invaluable, and the soundness of Hong Kong’s finances owes much to his energy, expertise and total commitment to his duty.

MR. N.G. ROLPH, OBE

Mr. Rolph has served Hong Kong with the highest distinction and devotion in the Royal Hong Kong Police and the St. John’s Ambulance Brigade, and more recently in the new appointment of Commissioner for Narcotics. He has proved himself to be a fine public servant.

/MR. G.R. SNEATH, ........

Wednesday, April 4, 1973

2

MR. G.R. SNEATH, OBE

Mr. Sneath has served with distinction in the post of Solicitor General since 19&&, and has frequently acted as Attorney General. His wide knowledge of law and excellent qualities of leadership will greatly be missed in Hong Kong on his retirement.

MR. FRANCIS TIEN YUAN-HO, OBE

Mr. Tien has been a member of the Textile Advisory Board since 19^5 and a founder member of the Trade Development Council. His ability, energy and good judgement have made a considerable contribution to Hong Kong’s export industry.

MR. YANG YUAN-LOONG, OBE

Mr. Yang has been a member of the Cotton Advisory Board/Textiles Advisory Board since 1961. His judgement on textile issues has proved invaluable to the Government and to the development of Hong Kong’s textile industry.

MR. HO SAI-CHU, MBE

Mr. Ho has made a major contribution to the community through his activities in charitable and professional fields. These include the Tung Wah Hospital Group, the Discharged Prisoners’ Aid Society and the Action Committee Against Narcotics, the Industrial Training Advisory Committee and the Metrication Advisory Committee.

/mrs. sally ........

Wednesday, April 4, 1973

3 -

MRS. SALLY LEUNG CHEUK-HANG, MBE

Mrs, Leung is very active in a wide field of community work, particularly in the Po Leung Kuk, of which she was the first lady chairman. In addition she has served on a variety of committees, mainly concerned with educational matters.

MR. PHILIP WONG KING-HANG, MBE

Mr. Wong has taken a very active part in community service, particularly in the work of the Tung Wah Group of Hospitals of which he became a Director in 1968 and Chairman of the Board of Directors in 1971* He has also served on a wide variety of other charitable organisations. MR. RAMON YOUNG, MBE

Mr. Young has served in the Royal Hong Kong Auxiliary Police for over 21 years, and is currently Assistant Superintendent. He has displayed great devotion to the Force, and has set a fine example to his fellow officers and to those under his command.

MR. CHAN KWOK-YING, MEE (HONORARY)

Mr. Chan joined Government service in the clerical grade in 1934.

His exemplary conduct and integrity, courteous and helpful manner and thorough knowledge of his duties have earned him the respect and admiration of all those with whom he has come into contact.

■ -/MR. WONG........

Wednesday, April 4, 1973

MR. WONG MAN-YUI, MBS (HONORARY)

Mr. Wong has worked in the Health Inspectorate since 1940, and was appointed Assistant Director (Cleansing) in 19$9* His exceptional ability, wide knowledge and total dedication have made a material contribution to public health and to the success of the recent Keep Hong Kong Clean campaign. SQUADRON LEADER B.L. MORGAN, AFC

For devotion to duty and outstanding contributions to flying instruction in the Royal Australian Air Force.

MR. CHOI CHOR, GM

During a fire at the Jumbo Floating Restaurant Mr. Choi rescued three people from the sea. Following this he dived into the water and despite intense heat and numberous explosions helped to rescue a further three who were hanging on to the hull and yet another two who were in the water and whom he towed to a nearby boat. During this operation Mr. Choi displayed a complete disregard for his own safety and with gallantry of the highest order persevered until all involved had reached a place of safety. ;

MR. CHAI; SHING-TAK CONSTABLE CHAN SHING-YUK CONSTABLE LEUNG SHING-CHAU MR. LO SHIU-KUEN CONSTABLE LUI CHIU-KWAN MR. PUN WAI-CHEUNG CONSTABLE TAM WAI-HUNG MR. WONG SHIU-HUNG — Queen*s Commendations for Brave Conduct

On 30th October 1971 the Jumbo Floating Restaurant moored in

Aberdeen Harbour caught fire. The superstructure burnt fiercely and the

/radiated ...........

Wednesday, April 4, 1973

- 5 -

radiated heat was so intense that approach in wooden vessels was hazardous and to swim in the heat area was a tremendous test of both courage and endurance. At this time these eight gentlemen, members of the Royal Hong Kong Police Force and the Fire Services Department, were called to the scene, and without exception they displayed complete disregard for their safety in going to the assistance of the workers who had been on the vessel, many of whom were swimming in the harbour or clinging on to the hull. Although some were not strong swimmers they swam to the assistance of the injured and frightened and towed them to places of safety, continuing their efforts until everyone possible had been saved. Their actions were in the highest traditions of bravery and saved the lives of many. MR. LAU KAN-YAN and

MR. TSE YUEN-CHI — Queenfs Commendations for Brave Conduct

Mr. Lau and Mr. Tse were both employed in a bank which was the scene of an armed robbery attempt. Mr. Lau deliberately tripped the .?1 Arm system to summon the police, knowing that if his action had been seen his life would have been endangered, and thereafter acted in a dilatory way to allow the police time to arrive on the scene. Mr. Tse, although unarmed, tackled an armed man and recovered some $5i000 with total disregard for his own safety. The action of both Mr. Lau and Mr. Tse is worthy of the highest praise•

/PRESENTATION OF

1

Wednesday, April 4, 1973

PRESENTATION OF INSIGNIA, APRIL 4, 1973

Recipients

Hon, Paul Tsui Ka-cheung, C.B.E.

Mr. Liang Yuenr-chong, C.B.E (Honorary)

Mr. D.W.A. Blye,O.B.E.

Mr. N.G. Rolph, O.B.E.

Mr. G.R. Sneath, O.B.E.

Mr. F. Tien, O.B.E.

Mr. Yang Yuai>-loong, O.B.E.

Mr. Ho Sai-chu, M.B.E.

Mrs. Sally Leung Cheuk-hang, M.B.E.

Mr. Philip Wong Kin-hang, M.B.E.

Mr. Ramon Young Chun-sheung, M.B.E.

Mr. Chan Kwok-ying, M.B.E. (Honorary)

Mr. Wong Marnyui, M.B.E.

Supporters

Hon. Sir Douglas Clague, C.B.E., M.C.

Q.P.M., T.D., J.P.

Sir Lindsey Ride, C.B.E.

Hon. Sir Albert Rodrigues, C.B.E., E.D.

J.P.

Hon. Sir Yuet-keung Kan, C.B.E., J.P.

Mr. E.A. Nichols, O.B.E.

Mr. B. Suart, O.B.E.

Hon. Sir Hugh Norman-Walker, K.C.M.G., O.B.E., J.P.

Hon. D.T.E. Roberts, C.B.E., Q.C., J.P.

Hon. D.T.E. Roberts, C.B.E., Q.C-, J.P.

Hon. Oswald Cheung, O.B.E., Q.C., J.P.

Hon. Sir Yuet-keung Kan, C.B.E., J.P.

Hon. Sir Sik-nin Chau, C.B.E., J.P.

Hon. Ann Tse-kai, O.B.E., J.P.

Hon. Sir Sik-nin Chau, C.B.E., J.P.

Mr. Ho lu-kwong, M.B.E.

Dr. K.L. Stumpf, O.B.E.

Hon. Sir Yuet-keung Kan, C.B.E., J.P.

Lady Fung, O.B.E.

Hon. Sir Yuet-keung Kan, C.B.E., J.P.

Hon. Woo Pak-chuen, O.B.E., J.P.

Hon. Sir Douglas Clague, C.B.E., M.C.,

Q.P.M., T.D., J.P.

Hon. Sir Kenneth Ping-fan Fung,

C.B.E., J.P.

Mr. Leung Tak-wah, M.B.E.

Mr. Chau Wa-shang, M.B.E •

Hun. D.R.W. Alexander, C.B.E., J.P.

Mr. Chan Tak-chun, M.B.E.

/SQUADRON LEADER

Wednesday, April 4, 1973

- 7 -

SQUADRON LEADER BRIAN LAURENCE MORGAN, Air Force Cross

MR CHOI GHOR, George Medal

FIREMAN CHAN SHING-TAK, Queen’s Commendations for Brave Conduct

POLICE CONSTABLE CHAN SHING-YUK, Queen’s Commendations for Brave Conduct

POLICE CONSTABLE LEUNG SHING^CHAU, Queen’s Commendations for Brave Conduct

STATION OFFICER LO CHIU-KUEN, Queen’s Commendations'for Brave Conduct

POLICE CONSTABLE LUI CHIU-KWAN, Queen’s Commendations for Brave Conduct

ASSISTANT STATION OFFICER PUN WAI-CHEUNG, Queen’s Commendations for Brave Conduct

POLICE CONSTABLE TAM WAI—HUNG, Queen’s Commendations for Brave Conduct

FIREMAN WONG SHIU-HUNG, Queen’s Commendations for Brave Conduct

MR. LAU KAI'UYAN, Queen’s Commendations for Brave Conduct

MR. TSE YUEI'UCHI, Queen’s Commendations for Brave Conduct

SERGEANT HARRY JOHN ALEXANDER MORE, British Empire Medal (Mi 1 itary)

STATION SERGEANT CHAN CHOR-CHOI, British Empire Medal

MR. CHAN PING-CHUEN, British Empire Medal

MR. CHIU AH-CHCW, British Empire Medal

MR. NGAI CHAN-YUNG on behalf of MR. NGAI SHEK-YUE, British Empire Medal

MR. TSE LONG-CHIU, British Empire Medal

PRINCIPAL FIREMAN WONG KAI-WAN, British Empire Medal •

MR. CHENG YIU-KWONG, Colonial Police Medal, .for .Meritorious Service

SERGEANT CHI WU-MIN, Colonial Police Medal for Meritorious Service

SENIOR AMBULANCEI-IAM CHOW KAM—TONG, Colonial Fire Brigades Medal for

Meritorious Service

MR. CECIL JAMES CUNNINGHAM, Colonial Police Medal for Meritorious Service

/STATION SERGEANT

Wednesday, April 4, 1973

- 8 -

STATION SERGEANT JOHN VALENTINE DA SILVA, Colonial Police Medal for

Meritorious Service

MR. MICHAEL EDWARD DAVIS, Colonial Police Medal for Meritorious Service

AMBULANCE DRESSER FUNG KAN-HO, Colonial Fire Brigades Medal for Meritorious Service

STATION SERGEANT KO HING—WAH, Colonial Police Medal for Meritorious Service

MR. KUAN CHACX-YIU, Colonial Police Medal for Meritorious Service

MR. LAU SHIU-CHEUNG, Colonial Police Medal for Meritorious Service

SERGEANT LI HONG, Colonial Police Medal for Meritorious Service

MR. DENNIS CASSERLY LYTH, Colonial Police Medal for Meritorious Service

PRINCIPAL FIREMAN NG KAT, Colonial Fire Brigades Medal for Meritorious Service

SERGEANT NGAI YIU-PING, Colonial Police Medal for Meritorious Service

MR. NORMAN EDWARD TEMPLE, Colonial Police Medal for Meritorious Service

MR. RICHARD TSING, Colonial Fire Brigades Medal for Meritorious Service

MR. JOSEPH TSO MING, Colonial Fire Brigades Medal for Meritorious Service

MR. HERBERT JAMES WOODTHORPE, Colonial Police Medal for Meritorious Service

MR. YAU TAT-FUNG, Colonial Fire Brigades Medal for Meritorious Service

MR. LESLIE YIU, Colonial Fire Brigades Medal for Meritorious Service

DR. LA\/RENCE KADOORIE, Associate Knight of the Order of St. John

- • - - 0 ------

Release time; 10,30 a.m> '

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Friday, April 6, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No*

Sai Kung Peninsula has been earmarked as a future holiday resort ..................................................... 1

Extensive improvement works in Yau Ma Tei are underway •••• 3

GIS officers have been seconded to various departments for Press liaison work .......................................... 5

The new memberships of the Textiles Advisory Board and of the Trade and Industry Advisory Board have been announced....... 7

The first payment under the new disability and infirmity allowance scheme was made today............................. 9

The 11th intei>-sports meeting of the various social welfare centres will take place this Sunday ........................ 10

A two-storey annex is to be built at Broadcasting House ••• 11

A building in Central District has been condemned  ......... 12

Mok Cheong Street in Kowloon is to be reconstructed......... 12

A new origin criteria has been adopted as the quota rule for exports of restrained finished piecegoods .................. 13

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Friday, April 6, 1973

- 1 -

DEVELOPMENT OF SAI KUNG PENINSULA

As Holiday Resort

********

The vast and scenic Sai Kung Peninsula, barely exploited so far, has been earmarked by the Government as a future recreational outlet.

At the same time Sai Kung Town itself is undergoing expansion.

A firm of consultants has recently been commissioned to carry out an extensive study for the recreational development of the Peninsula.

Disclosing this today, the District Officer, Sai Kung, Mr. A.G. Eason, said development projects arising from this study were expected to follow on from the 51,300 million High Island Water Scheme, now in full swing.

In recent years, he said, Sai Kung had become increasingly popular with hikers, picnickers and yachtsmen but the peninsula had still not been fully opened up for recreational purposes.

Mr• bason stressed that the peninsula would not be a playground for local people only. The Government saw possibilities for establishing resort areas beyond Tai Mong Tsai which would also attract foreign visitors.

The construction of about 17 miles of new roads in various parts of the peninsula, including the improvement of the existing road from Sai Kung Town to Tai Mong Tsai, is well advanced.

Most of the new roads are at present being used to provide access to the High Island reservoir and tunnel contractors1 works sites.

/Chiefly ......

Friday, April 6, 1973

- 2 -

Chiefly because of the dangers associated with such sites, the roads will not be open to the general public until the water scheme has been completed,

Mr. Eason said that several of the new roads had been designed and built to cope with future weekend traffic to and from scenic areas and popular picnic spots.

Referring to another future development, he said that in a few years’ time motorists would be able to drive from Sai Kung to the Ma On Shan Pier near Sha Tin and possibly even as far as Sha Tin itself later on.

On the development at Sai Kung Town, Mr. Eason said that work on the new reclamation and seawall to the east of the town had almost been completed.

On part of the reclamation eight five-storey blocks are being built for the villagers affected by the High Island reservoir. Three of these blocks are due to be ready for occupation in about two months’ time while another three should be available in September this year.

A village-type school will be built near the rehousing blocks for children of the villagers.

Mr. Eason explained that sites on the reclamation had also been provided for a market and hawker bazaar, a Government- office block, clinic and bus terminus.

Extensive commercial and residential areas will also be available once the town’s sewage treatment plant has been built.

-------6---------

/3..........

Friday, April 6, 1975

- 3 -

EXTENSIVE IMPROVEMENTS IN YAU MA TEI UNDERWAY

New Roads, Open Space, Cargo Handling Facilities

*******

The waterfront at Yau Ma Tei is taking on a new look with the addition of more than 20 acres of reclaimed land between Man Cheung Street and Cherry Street.

A new road running parallel to Nathan Road, more open space and larger cargo handling areas will be provided under the SJO million Tong Mi Road Extension scheme.

The new road will not only ease present traffic congestion in the West Kowloon area, but will also serve as a relief route when the mass transit railway is under construction along Nathan Road.

Included in the scheme is an elevated road which is now in an advanced state of design. It will form part of the future road network linking Tsuen Wan and North Kowloon with Tsim Sha Tsui.

There is now less than an acre of land in Yau Ma Tei for open space but a further five acres will be provided by reclamation to improve the environment there.

The existing arrangements in the area for loading and unloading craft are also considered unsatisfactory and another five acres of reclaimed land is to be made available to improve this.

The entire scheme is phased into three stages. Stage I consists of building a seawall between Lee Tat Street and Soy Street and is virtually complete. Reclamation behind it is well advanced.

/Stage II.........

Friday, April 6, 1973

- 4 -

Stage II involves constructing a seawall between Soy Street and Cherry Street on the north, and another between Lee Tat Street and Man Cheung Street on the south. Both seawalls are also nearing completion.

Stage III includes building a seawall in the north-east corner of the Yau Ma Tei typhoon shelter. This is now in catagory ”A" of the Public Works Programme and work on it will begin soon.

Meanwhile, construction of roads and drains on the reclamation in Yau Ma Tei typhoon anchorage is to begin in May this year.

It involves reconstructing the existing carriageway, a central divider and footpath to parts of Ferry Street, Tong Mi Road, Argyle Street and Cherry Street.

A 3,500-foot three-lane dual carriageway will also be constructed on the reclamation linking Ferry Street and Cherry Street. About 25,000 square yards of cargo handling area will also be built.

In addition, 6,200 feet of storm water drains, with sizes ranging from nine to 72 inches in diameter, will be laid.

On completion, these works will form a major road linking Ferry Street with Tong Mi Road.

These works are expected to be completed in the second half of next year, and the whole reclamation for the Tong Mi Road Extension scheme at the end of 1974.

- - 0 --------

Friday, April 6, 1973

- 5 -

GIS OFFICERS POSTED TO VARIOUS DEPARTMENTS

To Help Improve Liaison With The Press And Public

**********

Ten experienced officers of the Government Information Services have been seconded to ten other departments for Press liaison and public relations work.

Their appointments, published in the Gazette today, are part of the Government’s plan to establish closer contact and promote better understand^ng with the public.

The departments strengthened with these G.I.S. officers are those whose daily work involves a great deal of direct contact with the people.

Following are the names of the officers and the departments:

Housing Department — Principal Information Officer,

Mi*. B.K. Robinson. (Tel: >624311 Ext. 67)

Social Welfare Department — Principal Information Officer,

Mr. B.J. Hickman. (Tel. >767784)

Education Department — Principal Information Officer, Mr. J.H. Evans. (Tel. >778311 Ext. 140)

Urban Services Department — Principal Information Officer,

Mr.-6;F. Xavier. (Tel. >95393)

Medical and Health Department — Principal Information Officer,

Mr. A. da Cruz. (Tel. >762311 Ext. 37)

Public Works Department — Principal Information Officer, Mr. D.K. Lewis. (Tel. >251111 Ext. 2113)

Labour Department — Acting Principal Information Officer, Mr. B. Walsh. (Tel. >778271 Ext. 72)

/Royal Hong Kong ......

Friday, April 6, 1973

- 6 -

Royal Hong Kong Police Force (Police Public Information Bureau) — Senior Information Officer, Mr. R.H. Clarke.

Secretariat for Home Affairs (Narcotics Bureau) — Senior Information Officer, Mr. J.G. Marshall. (Tel. 5-450107 Ext. 13) New Territories Administration — Senior Information Officer, Mr. A.R. Clark. (3-688354).

Note to Editors: Press queries relating to the work and

duties of these departments may be put to the respective Press Liaison officers.

-------0----------

/7.........

Friday, April 6, 1973

- 7 -

TEXTILE ADVISORY BOARD

New Membership Announced

* * * « * * * *

The new memberships of the Textiles Advisory Board and of the Trade and Industry Advisory Board are published in today’s Gazette.

In both cases, the appointments are for a period of one year effective from April 1, 1973.

The Director of Commerce and Industry is the ex-officio chairman of both Boards.

Members appointed to the Textiles Advisory Board are:

The Honourable Sir Sik-nin Chau, C.B.E., J.P.

The Honourable George Ronald Ross, O.B.E., J.P.

Mr. Francis Yuan-hao Tien, O.B.E., J.P.

Mr. Bryan Irlam Barlow, J.P.

Mr. Chow Chung-kai, J.P.

Mr. Lam Kun-shing, J.P.

Mr. Wong Toong-yuen, J.P.

Mr. Chan Sui-kau.

Mr. Chao Kwong-piu.

Miss Lydia Dunn.

Mr. Philip Lai.

Mr. Lee Yiu-wah.

Mr. Frank Huipo Lin.

Mr. Shen Hsi-jui.

Mr. Jack Chi-chien Tang.

Mr. William Tsu-liang Yao.

/The terms .........

Friday, April 6, 1973

- 8 -

The terms of reference of the Board are to advise the Director of Commerce and Industry on any matter, other than labour matters, which affects the textile and garment industries.

The following members were appointed to the Trade and Industry Advisory Board:

The Hon. T.K. Ann, O.B.E., J.P.

The Hon. P.G. Williams, J.P.

The Hon. James M.H. Wu, J.P.

Miss Pauline Chan, O.B.E.

Mr. H.M.G. Forsgate, J.P.

Mr. Daniel S.H. Lam, O.B.E., J.P.

Mr. M.C. Lee.

Mr. R.E. Moore, J.P. • • • •

Mr. W.H. Newton. • •

Mr. M.G.R. Sandberg, J.P. • •

Mr. T.D. Sorby, J.P.

Dr. C.W. Chuang, LL. D., L.H.D.

Mr. J.H. Bremridge, J.P.

Mr. P.Y. Wong.

Mr. D.C. Lyth, C.P.M.

Mr. H.T. Woo.

Deputy Economic Secretary.

The terms of reference of the Trade and Industry Advisory Board are to advise the Director of Commerce and Industry on matters, other than labour, which affect Hong Kong’s trade and industry.

0

Friday, April 6, 1973

- 9 -

FIRST PAYMENT MADE UNDER D.I.A. SCHEME

*******

Payment of the Government’s new disability and infirmity allowances has started.

The first payment was made today at the Wanchai Post Office to a 76-year-old man who received the monthly infirmity allowance of 355, after being issued with a voucher book bearing the serial number D 00001•

The infirmity allowance was paid in addition to his public assistance grant of 3173 a month.

Other applicants whose claims have been processed are now starting to receive their allowances, which are backdated to April 1 for those who applied before that date.

Claims submitted after April 1 will take effect from the date on which the application was received.

So far the Social Welfare Department has received about 14,000 claims for allowances, which are payable to residents who are aged 75 or over and to the severely disabled.

jJote to Editors: A photograph showing the first recipient

receiving his allowance is being issued through the Press Boxes this evening.

-------0--------

/10........

Friday, April 6, 1973

- 10 -

INTER-CINTRE SPORTS MEETING FOR YOUTH MEMBERS

********

Five hundred youth members from 10 Social Welfare Department community, youth and social centres will take part in the 11th inter-centre sports meeting ! > •,, 41

at Boundary Street public sports ground, Kowloon, on Sunday, April 8.

A programme of 48 track and field events, including an inter-division staff invitation relay, will be taking place from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

The meeting has been organised by the Youth Representative Council of the Group and Community Work Division of the Social Welfare Department. The council is made up of youth representatives from the Department’s community, youth and social centres.

There will be participants at the meeting from the Princess Alexandra, Wong Tai Sin, Tai Hang Tung and Kwun Tong community centres, the Tsan Yuk and Sheung Shui social centres, Shamshuipo Youth Centre, Fanling Rotary Youth Centre, the Mobile Library and the Youth Work Unit.

At the prize-giving at 5 p»m. an address will be given by Mr. Stephen Law Chi-kin, Senior Principal Social Welfare Officer of the Group and Community Work Division. The prizes will be presented by Mrs. Law Chi-kin.

Note to Editors: You are invited to send a reporter and

photographer to cover the sports meeting.

-------0---------

/11 ........

Friday, April 6, 1975

- 11 -

EXTENSION TO RADIO HONG KONG

«**»*«**

A two-storey annex will be built at Broadcasting House in Broadcast Drive this summer to provide additional office accommodation for Radio Hong Kong.

The annext to be constructed on the existing podium adjacent to the building will have a total floor area of 2,500 square feet.

It is a part of Radio Hong Kong’s plan to expand office and storage facilities.

The rooms on the ground and lower ground floors of Broadcasting House will be converted into store rooms for television equipment.

Security gate kiosks will be erected at the entrance and exit of the premises.

The construction and conversion work is expected to be completed towards the end of this year.

-------0---------

/12.........

Frllay, April 6, 1975

DANGEROUS BUILDING

*******

The Building Authority today declared No. 42 Elgin Street, Hong Kong , to be in a dangerous condition.

In a statement issued this morning the Principal Government Rui Iding Surveyor said that the three storey pre-war building had been under observation for some time.

The recent demolition of the adjoining dangerous riding floor structure at No. 44 Elgin Street revealed considerable movement of the front main wall of this building indicating that there was a danger of failure leading to collapse.

In addition the other load bearing walls were fractured.

Notice of intention to apply for a Closure Order in the Victoria District Court at 9»3O a.m. on May 3 v/as posted today.

-------0----------

KOWLOON ROAD IMPROVEMENT SCHEME

*******

A section of Mok Cheong Street, between Yin On Street and Kowloon City Road, will shortly be reconstructed as part of the Government’s road reconstruction programme to ensure the safety of motorists.

Work is expected to start in May and will take about five months to complete.

Notice for tenders for the project, which will cost 3277,000, was published in the Gazette today.

Tenders must be submitted before 1? noor on April 27. The Government does not bind itself to accept the lowest or any tender.

0

/13

Friday, April 6, 1975

- 15 -

ORIGIN CRITERIA AND QUOTA RULE

For Exports Of Restrained Finished Piecegoods

**«*««*

The Director of Commerce and Industry today issued a number of Notices to Exporters in connection with the export of restrained finished piecegoods to overseas markets.

The notices concern the adoption of the revised origin criteria as the quota rule for the export of these goods to all markets, with the exception of exports of cotton denims to Australia.

Trade associations and companies on the Commerce and Industry Department’s mailing list for the relevant notices will shortly be receiving copies.

Copies are also available from the department’s receptionist counter on the ground floor.

Anyone requiring more information regarding the contents of the notices may ring Mr. P.L.C. Lau, Assistant Trade Officer, at Tel. 5-^52049.

-------0---------

Release .time: 7.00 p ♦ m.

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Friday, April 6, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No*

Sai Kung Peninsula has been earmarked as a future holiday resort ..................................................... 1

Extensive improvement works in Yau Ma Tei are underway •••• 3

GIS officers have been seconded to various departments for Press liaison work .......................................... 5

The new memberships of the Textiles Advisory Board and of the Trade and Industry Advisory Board have been announced....... 7

The first payment under the new disability and infirmity allowance scheme was made today............................. 9

The 11th intei>-sports meeting of the various social welfare centres will take place this Sunday ........................ 10

A two-storey annex is to be built at Broadcasting House ••• 11

A building in Central District has been condemned  ......... 12

Mok Cheong Street in Kowloon is to be reconstructed......... 12

A new origin criteria has been adopted as the quota rule for exports of restrained finished piecegoods .................. 13

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Friday, April 6, 1973

- 1 -

DEVELOPMENT OF SAI KUNG PENINSULA

As Holiday Resort

********

The vast and scenic Sai Kung Peninsula, barely exploited so far, has been earmarked by the Government as a future recreational outlet.

At the same time Sai Kung Town itself is undergoing expansion.

A firm of consultants has recently been commissioned to carry out an extensive study for the recreational development of the Peninsula.

Disclosing this today, the District Officer, Sai Kung, Mr. A.G. Eason, said development projects arising from this study were expected to follow on from the 51,300 million High Island Water Scheme, now in full swing.

In recent years, he said, Sai Kung had become increasingly popular with hikers, picnickers and yachtsmen but the peninsula had still not been fully opened up for recreational purposes.

Mr• bason stressed that the peninsula would not be a playground for local people only. The Government saw possibilities for establishing resort areas beyond Tai Mong Tsai which would also attract foreign visitors.

The construction of about 17 miles of new roads in various parts of the peninsula, including the improvement of the existing road from Sai Kung Town to Tai Mong Tsai, is well advanced.

Most of the new roads are at present being used to provide access to the High Island reservoir and tunnel contractors1 works sites.

/Chiefly ......

Friday, April 6, 1973

- 2 -

Chiefly because of the dangers associated with such sites, the roads will not be open to the general public until the water scheme has been completed,

Mr. Eason said that several of the new roads had been designed and built to cope with future weekend traffic to and from scenic areas and popular picnic spots.

Referring to another future development, he said that in a few years’ time motorists would be able to drive from Sai Kung to the Ma On Shan Pier near Sha Tin and possibly even as far as Sha Tin itself later on.

On the development at Sai Kung Town, Mr. Eason said that work on the new reclamation and seawall to the east of the town had almost been completed.

On part of the reclamation eight five-storey blocks are being built for the villagers affected by the High Island reservoir. Three of these blocks are due to be ready for occupation in about two months’ time while another three should be available in September this year.

A village-type school will be built near the rehousing blocks for children of the villagers.

Mr. Eason explained that sites on the reclamation had also been provided for a market and hawker bazaar, a Government- office block, clinic and bus terminus.

Extensive commercial and residential areas will also be available once the town’s sewage treatment plant has been built.

-------6---------

/3..........

Friday, April 6, 1975

- 3 -

EXTENSIVE IMPROVEMENTS IN YAU MA TEI UNDERWAY

New Roads, Open Space, Cargo Handling Facilities

*******

The waterfront at Yau Ma Tei is taking on a new look with the addition of more than 20 acres of reclaimed land between Man Cheung Street and Cherry Street.

A new road running parallel to Nathan Road, more open space and larger cargo handling areas will be provided under the SJO million Tong Mi Road Extension scheme.

The new road will not only ease present traffic congestion in the West Kowloon area, but will also serve as a relief route when the mass transit railway is under construction along Nathan Road.

Included in the scheme is an elevated road which is now in an advanced state of design. It will form part of the future road network linking Tsuen Wan and North Kowloon with Tsim Sha Tsui.

There is now less than an acre of land in Yau Ma Tei for open space but a further five acres will be provided by reclamation to improve the environment there.

The existing arrangements in the area for loading and unloading craft are also considered unsatisfactory and another five acres of reclaimed land is to be made available to improve this.

The entire scheme is phased into three stages. Stage I consists of building a seawall between Lee Tat Street and Soy Street and is virtually complete. Reclamation behind it is well advanced.

/Stage II.........

Friday, April 6, 1973

- 4 -

Stage II involves constructing a seawall between Soy Street and Cherry Street on the north, and another between Lee Tat Street and Man Cheung Street on the south. Both seawalls are also nearing completion.

Stage III includes building a seawall in the north-east corner of the Yau Ma Tei typhoon shelter. This is now in catagory ”A" of the Public Works Programme and work on it will begin soon.

Meanwhile, construction of roads and drains on the reclamation in Yau Ma Tei typhoon anchorage is to begin in May this year.

It involves reconstructing the existing carriageway, a central divider and footpath to parts of Ferry Street, Tong Mi Road, Argyle Street and Cherry Street.

A 3,500-foot three-lane dual carriageway will also be constructed on the reclamation linking Ferry Street and Cherry Street. About 25,000 square yards of cargo handling area will also be built.

In addition, 6,200 feet of storm water drains, with sizes ranging from nine to 72 inches in diameter, will be laid.

On completion, these works will form a major road linking Ferry Street with Tong Mi Road.

These works are expected to be completed in the second half of next year, and the whole reclamation for the Tong Mi Road Extension scheme at the end of 1974.

- - 0 --------

Friday, April 6, 1973

- 5 -

GIS OFFICERS POSTED TO VARIOUS DEPARTMENTS

To Help Improve Liaison With The Press And Public

**********

Ten experienced officers of the Government Information Services have been seconded to ten other departments for Press liaison and public relations work.

Their appointments, published in the Gazette today, are part of the Government’s plan to establish closer contact and promote better understand^ng with the public.

The departments strengthened with these G.I.S. officers are those whose daily work involves a great deal of direct contact with the people.

Following are the names of the officers and the departments:

Housing Department — Principal Information Officer,

Mi*. B.K. Robinson. (Tel: >624311 Ext. 67)

Social Welfare Department — Principal Information Officer,

Mr. B.J. Hickman. (Tel. >767784)

Education Department — Principal Information Officer, Mr. J.H. Evans. (Tel. >778311 Ext. 140)

Urban Services Department — Principal Information Officer,

Mr.-6;F. Xavier. (Tel. >95393)

Medical and Health Department — Principal Information Officer,

Mr. A. da Cruz. (Tel. >762311 Ext. 37)

Public Works Department — Principal Information Officer, Mr. D.K. Lewis. (Tel. >251111 Ext. 2113)

Labour Department — Acting Principal Information Officer, Mr. B. Walsh. (Tel. >778271 Ext. 72)

/Royal Hong Kong ......

Friday, April 6, 1973

- 6 -

Royal Hong Kong Police Force (Police Public Information Bureau) — Senior Information Officer, Mr. R.H. Clarke.

Secretariat for Home Affairs (Narcotics Bureau) — Senior Information Officer, Mr. J.G. Marshall. (Tel. 5-450107 Ext. 13) New Territories Administration — Senior Information Officer, Mr. A.R. Clark. (3-688354).

Note to Editors: Press queries relating to the work and

duties of these departments may be put to the respective Press Liaison officers.

-------0----------

/7.........

Friday, April 6, 1973

- 7 -

TEXTILE ADVISORY BOARD

New Membership Announced

* * * « * * * *

The new memberships of the Textiles Advisory Board and of the Trade and Industry Advisory Board are published in today’s Gazette.

In both cases, the appointments are for a period of one year effective from April 1, 1973.

The Director of Commerce and Industry is the ex-officio chairman of both Boards.

Members appointed to the Textiles Advisory Board are:

The Honourable Sir Sik-nin Chau, C.B.E., J.P.

The Honourable George Ronald Ross, O.B.E., J.P.

Mr. Francis Yuan-hao Tien, O.B.E., J.P.

Mr. Bryan Irlam Barlow, J.P.

Mr. Chow Chung-kai, J.P.

Mr. Lam Kun-shing, J.P.

Mr. Wong Toong-yuen, J.P.

Mr. Chan Sui-kau.

Mr. Chao Kwong-piu.

Miss Lydia Dunn.

Mr. Philip Lai.

Mr. Lee Yiu-wah.

Mr. Frank Huipo Lin.

Mr. Shen Hsi-jui.

Mr. Jack Chi-chien Tang.

Mr. William Tsu-liang Yao.

/The terms .........

Friday, April 6, 1973

- 8 -

The terms of reference of the Board are to advise the Director of Commerce and Industry on any matter, other than labour matters, which affects the textile and garment industries.

The following members were appointed to the Trade and Industry Advisory Board:

The Hon. T.K. Ann, O.B.E., J.P.

The Hon. P.G. Williams, J.P.

The Hon. James M.H. Wu, J.P.

Miss Pauline Chan, O.B.E.

Mr. H.M.G. Forsgate, J.P.

Mr. Daniel S.H. Lam, O.B.E., J.P.

Mr. M.C. Lee.

Mr. R.E. Moore, J.P. • • • •

Mr. W.H. Newton. • •

Mr. M.G.R. Sandberg, J.P. • •

Mr. T.D. Sorby, J.P.

Dr. C.W. Chuang, LL. D., L.H.D.

Mr. J.H. Bremridge, J.P.

Mr. P.Y. Wong.

Mr. D.C. Lyth, C.P.M.

Mr. H.T. Woo.

Deputy Economic Secretary.

The terms of reference of the Trade and Industry Advisory Board are to advise the Director of Commerce and Industry on matters, other than labour, which affect Hong Kong’s trade and industry.

0

Friday, April 6, 1973

- 9 -

FIRST PAYMENT MADE UNDER D.I.A. SCHEME

*******

Payment of the Government’s new disability and infirmity allowances has started.

The first payment was made today at the Wanchai Post Office to a 76-year-old man who received the monthly infirmity allowance of 355, after being issued with a voucher book bearing the serial number D 00001•

The infirmity allowance was paid in addition to his public assistance grant of 3173 a month.

Other applicants whose claims have been processed are now starting to receive their allowances, which are backdated to April 1 for those who applied before that date.

Claims submitted after April 1 will take effect from the date on which the application was received.

So far the Social Welfare Department has received about 14,000 claims for allowances, which are payable to residents who are aged 75 or over and to the severely disabled.

jJote to Editors: A photograph showing the first recipient

receiving his allowance is being issued through the Press Boxes this evening.

-------0--------

/10........

Friday, April 6, 1973

- 10 -

INTER-CINTRE SPORTS MEETING FOR YOUTH MEMBERS

********

Five hundred youth members from 10 Social Welfare Department community, youth and social centres will take part in the 11th inter-centre sports meeting ! > •,, 41

at Boundary Street public sports ground, Kowloon, on Sunday, April 8.

A programme of 48 track and field events, including an inter-division staff invitation relay, will be taking place from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

The meeting has been organised by the Youth Representative Council of the Group and Community Work Division of the Social Welfare Department. The council is made up of youth representatives from the Department’s community, youth and social centres.

There will be participants at the meeting from the Princess Alexandra, Wong Tai Sin, Tai Hang Tung and Kwun Tong community centres, the Tsan Yuk and Sheung Shui social centres, Shamshuipo Youth Centre, Fanling Rotary Youth Centre, the Mobile Library and the Youth Work Unit.

At the prize-giving at 5 p»m. an address will be given by Mr. Stephen Law Chi-kin, Senior Principal Social Welfare Officer of the Group and Community Work Division. The prizes will be presented by Mrs. Law Chi-kin.

Note to Editors: You are invited to send a reporter and

photographer to cover the sports meeting.

-------0---------

/11 ........

Friday, April 6, 1975

- 11 -

EXTENSION TO RADIO HONG KONG

«**»*«**

A two-storey annex will be built at Broadcasting House in Broadcast Drive this summer to provide additional office accommodation for Radio Hong Kong.

The annext to be constructed on the existing podium adjacent to the building will have a total floor area of 2,500 square feet.

It is a part of Radio Hong Kong’s plan to expand office and storage facilities.

The rooms on the ground and lower ground floors of Broadcasting House will be converted into store rooms for television equipment.

Security gate kiosks will be erected at the entrance and exit of the premises.

The construction and conversion work is expected to be completed towards the end of this year.

-------0---------

/12.........

Frllay, April 6, 1975

DANGEROUS BUILDING

*******

The Building Authority today declared No. 42 Elgin Street, Hong Kong , to be in a dangerous condition.

In a statement issued this morning the Principal Government Rui Iding Surveyor said that the three storey pre-war building had been under observation for some time.

The recent demolition of the adjoining dangerous riding floor structure at No. 44 Elgin Street revealed considerable movement of the front main wall of this building indicating that there was a danger of failure leading to collapse.

In addition the other load bearing walls were fractured.

Notice of intention to apply for a Closure Order in the Victoria District Court at 9»3O a.m. on May 3 v/as posted today.

-------0----------

KOWLOON ROAD IMPROVEMENT SCHEME

*******

A section of Mok Cheong Street, between Yin On Street and Kowloon City Road, will shortly be reconstructed as part of the Government’s road reconstruction programme to ensure the safety of motorists.

Work is expected to start in May and will take about five months to complete.

Notice for tenders for the project, which will cost 3277,000, was published in the Gazette today.

Tenders must be submitted before 1? noor on April 27. The Government does not bind itself to accept the lowest or any tender.

0

/13

Friday, April 6, 1975

- 15 -

ORIGIN CRITERIA AND QUOTA RULE

For Exports Of Restrained Finished Piecegoods

**«*««*

The Director of Commerce and Industry today issued a number of Notices to Exporters in connection with the export of restrained finished piecegoods to overseas markets.

The notices concern the adoption of the revised origin criteria as the quota rule for the export of these goods to all markets, with the exception of exports of cotton denims to Australia.

Trade associations and companies on the Commerce and Industry Department’s mailing list for the relevant notices will shortly be receiving copies.

Copies are also available from the department’s receptionist counter on the ground floor.

Anyone requiring more information regarding the contents of the notices may ring Mr. P.L.C. Lau, Assistant Trade Officer, at Tel. 5-^52049.

-------0---------

Release .time: 7.00 p ♦ m.

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Saturday, April 7, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No.

The public is urged to help prevent mosquito breeding .......... 1

A mobile registration team will visit Yuen Long next week ... 2

The Lion Rock Tunnel will be closed for several hours next week ........................................................    2

Hong Kong’s accounts for January show a surplus of 3j43 mil 1 i on ................................................................ 3

Tung Lo Wan Road is to be routed one-way eastbound for six

months ......................................................... 4

Special immigration facilities are being provided for N.T. residents  ..................................................... 5

Special traffic arrangements may be introduced in the New Territories tomorrow ........................................... 6

There will be an issue of the D.I.B. tomorrow.................. 6

The successful tenderer for the Tsing Yi site for new industry will be announced on Monday...................................

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Saturday, April 7, 1973

PREVENTION OF MOSQUITO BREEDING

Public Co-operation Needed

*********

The Urban Services Department today called on the public to help prevent mosquitoes from breeding during the coming rainy season.

A department spokesman said that this could be done if householders made sure that no discarded tins, jars and water tanks were left uncovered.

HA11 unused articles capable of retaining rain water should be removed from open spaces or turned upside down and all drain inlets should be cleared of refuse to prevent them from choking” he said.

The spokesman reminded householders that the maximum penalty for allowing mosquitoes to breed on their property was 32,000.

,rIt is only through the co-operation of the public that nuisances of this type can be prevented,” he added.

-------0---------

/2

Saturday, April 7, 1973

- 2 -

REGISTRATION TEAM TO VISIT YUEN LONG

********

A team from the Registration of Persons Department will carry out registrations at the Yuen Long Resettlement Estate during the next two weeks.

The team will operate at the estate’s Kai Fong Welfare Association Office from April 10 - 1J and from April 17 - 19.

Business hours will be from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Residents of the Yuen Long area are urged to make use of tho opportunity to register their children from six to 17 years of age for juvenile identity cards.

Young persons 17 and over and holding juvenile identity cards are reminded to register for adult identity cards.

-------0---------

LION ROCK TUNNEL CLOSURE

********

The Lion Rock Tunnel will be closed to all traffic between midnight and 6 a.m. from Tuesday to Saturday (April 10 to 14), the Commissioner for Transport announced today.

The temporary closure is to allow essential maintenance work in the tunnel to be carried out.

Motorists who must travel during these hours are advised to use Tai Po Road.

/3.........

0 - -

Saturday, April 7, 1975

- 3 -

GOVERNMENT ACCOUNTS FOR JANUARY 1973

**»»**»*»*

The Hong Kong Government accounts for the month of January 1973 show a surplus of 3A3 million compared with a surplus of 3186 million in January last year.

This has resulted in a total surplus of 3902 million for the first ten months of the financial year 1972-73-

Total revenue for the month at 3711 million was 3237 million more than in January 1972. The total revenue for the first ten months of the financial year 1972-73 at 33,9^3 million was 31,010 million more than the same period last year.

Total expenditure amounted to 3368 million, an increase of 380 million over the same month last year.

This brings the total expenditure for the first ten months of the financial year to 33f041 million, which was 37^8 million more than the same period last year.

-------0---------

A

Saturday, April 7, 1973

- 4 -

NEW TRAFFIC ARRANGEMENTS AT TUNG LO WAN ROAD

********

The section of Tung Lo Wan Road between Causeway Road and Tai Hang Road on Hong Kong Island will be routed one-way westbound for about six months from 10 a.m. on Tuesday, April 10.

This temporary arrangement is to facilitate drainage works at Tung Lo Wan Road.

During this period, the existing terminus at Tung Lo Wan Road for CMB buses on route No. 5 will be resited to the Causeway Bay Magistracy Carpark.

Buses on routes No. 2 and No. 19 will not be affected.

Appropriate traffic signs will be put up to guide motorists.

-------o --------

/5

Saturday, April 7, 1973

- 5 -

SPECIAL IMMIGRATION FACILITIES IN N.T.

*********

People living and working in the New Territories who want to obtain travel documents can do so from mobile immigration office which tours the New Territories each week.

As from Monday (April 9) the mobile office will be starting a new schedule.

Previously one of its stops included Kwun Tong. But with the recent opening of an immigration department branch office there, the mobile office will now operate in the New Territories. This has enabled a stop at Sok Kong to be included.

The types of business it will conduct include the issuing of single and multiple journey re-entry permits, the issuing and processing of application forms for entry permits, Certificates of Identity, new passports and renewal of passports and for United Kingdom Entry Certificates as well as the issuing of application forms for Naturalisation and registration as British Subjects.

The following are times and locations at which the mobile office will call.

DAY TIME LOCATION

Monday 10.30 a.m. - 12.45 p.m. San Hui (Castle Peak Estate Office) San Tin (Rural Committee Office)

2.30 p.m. - 3.45 p.m.

Tuesday 2.00 p.m. - 4.00 p.m. Sai Kung (Rural Committee Office)

Wednesday 10.15 a.m. - 1.00 p.m. Yuen Long (Town Hall)

2.00 p.m. - 3*45 p.m. II II If fl

Thursday 10.00 a.m. - 12.00 noon Sek Kong (Army Cinema Carpark)

2.00 p.m. - 4.15 p.m. Sha Tin (Rural Committee Office)

Friday 10.00 a.m. - 1.00 p.m. Tai Po (Rural Committee Office)

2.00 p.m. - 3*45 p.m. II H II II 11

o —

/6.........

Saturday, April 7> 1975

- 6 -

TRAFFIC ARRANGEMENT IN THE NEW TERRITORIES

The Commissioner for Transport said that the volume of traffic to the Nev/ Territories tomorrow, (April 8) was likely to be high and it might therefore be necessary to introduce the following one-way traffic system:

Tai Po Road from Route 1 to Fanling Roundabout will be one-way northbound.

* Castle Peak Road from Fanling Roundabout to Sheung Shui Cross-road will be one-way northbound. Traffic will either turn left into Route 2 or turn right into Sun Fung Avenue.

* Sun Fung Avenue will be one-way northbound from Sheung Shui Cross-road to Jockey Club Road. Traffic may either turn left towards Sheung Shui or turn right towards Fanling Roundabout.

If these measures are implemented, eastbound traffic on Castle Peak Road will be required to turn left into Sun Fung Avenue.

-------0---------

SUNDAY D.I.B. ..... ♦♦*♦***♦♦

Note to Editors: There will be an issue of the D.I.B. tomorrow

(Sunday). Copies will be available for collection at the G.I.S. Press room at 1 p.m.

-------0 - - - -

Saturday, April 7, 1973

TENDER RESULTS FOR TSING YI SITE

«*****»*»

Note to Editors: The Successful tenderer for the five*«acre

site on Tsing Yi Island for new industry will be announced on Monday (April 9) at 10 a.m. when the agreement will be signed.

The announcement and signing ceremony will take place in the G.I.S. theatre on the 5th floor of Beaconsfield House and will be followed by a Press conference.

You are cordially invited to send a reporter and/or photographer to cover the signing and Press conference.

•------0---------

Release time: 2.30 p.m.

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Sunday, April 8, 1973

PUBLIC ENQUIRIES WHEN TYPHOON SIGNAL IS UP

**********

Members of the public should ring up the Public Enquiries Centre of the Secretariat for Home Affairs at No. 3-456381, if they require nontechnical information when a tropical cyclone warning signal is up.

,rrhe staff of the Royal Observatory are very busy at that time and they only answer questions on more technical points,” the Director of the Royal Observatory said today.

"The public should therefore co-operate by not telephoning the

Royal Observatory unless absolutely necessary."

In fact, the quickest and most convenient way is to listen-in to • *

the weather bulletins prepared by the Royal Observatory for radio broadcast.

When a tropical cyclone is likely to affect Hong Kong, the Royal Observatory will issue local warning bulletins containing relative information useful to the public.

These bulletins, and all other latest information, will be passed through the Government Information Services at any time to the Press and radio and T.V. stations.

When No. 1 or No. 3 signal' is hoisted, about 11 bulletins are broadcast daily by Radio Hong Kong and Commercial Radio.

/When higher .......

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Sunday, April 8, 1973

- 2 -

When higher signals are up, the Royal Observatory will issue these bulletins day and night. They will be broadcast at the 30th and 58th minutes of the hour by radio stations which will usually remain on air throughout the night.

Under the new format of local warning bulletins now in use, general information that can be easily understood by the man in the street is contained in the first half of the bulletins, with more technical details in the second.

Apart from change of signals and their respective meaning, the bulletins also indicate the intensity of the tropical cyclone, its latest position and movement. The trend of the tropical cyclone’s movement and its likely effects on Hong Kong are also shown.

Whenever possible, the bulletins will point out the wind force near the centre of the tropical cyclone, the average wind speed and gust speed recorded in the harbour and from the coast.

The bulletins also forecast the amount of rainfall which may accompany the tropical cy‘2 one and the possible tidal change within Hong Kong’s waters.

’’This information can usually satisfy the general needs of residents and enable them to decide on necessary precaution,” the Director of Royal Observatory said.

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Release time: 2.30 p.m.

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Monday, April % 1973

CONTENTS

Page No,

Special hearing aids are to be provided free to partially deaf children .......................................  ..... 1

The reconstituted Urban Council is to hold its inaugural meeting tomorrow •••••••••••••...................................... 3

Hong Kong’s delegation to the ECAFE meeting in Tokyo leaves tomorrow •••••••••.............................................. 4

Plans are in hand to provide better homes for Tai 0 residents ................................................................ 5

The second phase of this year’s anti-poliomyelitis campaign has ended ..................................................     6

A wellknown French pianist will give a recital in the City Hall on Thursday ..........................  ............... 6

Two more basketball courts have been built in the New Territories by the Army .................................................... 7

A scroll has been presented to the new Urban Council by the Japanese government...........................................   8

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Monday, April 9, '1973

- 1 -

FREE HEARING AIDS FOR DEAF CHILDREN ******

Special hearing aids will be provided free of charge to children whose hearing is impaired so as to enable them to benefit more fully from ordinary and special education.

A total of 268 hearing aids has been bought for this purpose by the Special Education Section of the Education Department.

The cost of the equipment, which amounted to more than 395,000, was granted through the Government Lotteries Fund.

With the help of the hearing aids, deaf and partially-hearing children will be able to make maximum use of their residual hearing in developing speech and language.

The Special Education Section also provides free audiological services in its Special Education Services Centre at Sir Ellis Kadoorie (Western) Primary School.

Last year, 1,200 children were referred to the Centre by parents, voluntary agencies, clinics, doctors, Social Welfare Department and Medical & Health Department for audiological assessment.

If these children are in need of medical or surgical.treatment, they are referred to the government ear, nose and throat specialists for advice and treatment.

Children with severe hearing-impairment are referred to special schools for the deaf.

/At present

Monday, April % 1973

- 2 -

At present there are three government subsidised and four private special schools for the deaf accommodating 410 and 330 pupils respectively. One of the subsidised special schools provides both primary and secondary school courses.

Children with less severe impairment are referred to special classes for partially-hearing children in ordinary schools. At present there are eight such .classes in government primary schools.

Partially-hearing children remain in these special classes for basic subjects, and integrate with normally-hearing children of their own age for cultural subjects.

The aim of these integrated classes is to encourage hearing-impaired children to develop better speech and language, and acquire self-confidence, so that they can become contributing members of society.

Children with mild hearing-impairment are placed in ordinary cl a saps , They are also given free hearing-aids and are under regular supervision by the staff of the Special Education Section.

Like normal children, deaf and partially-hearing children in the Government and government subsidised schools are alsn enjoying free primary education.

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/3........

Monday, April % ‘1975

- 3 -

URBAN COUNCIL INAUGURAL MEETING

******** • • Note to Editors: This is to remind you that the new Urban

Council will hold its first open meeting at 4.00 p.m. tomorrow (Tuesday)•

The meeting will be proceeded by an inaugural ceremony at 3*00 p.m., which will be attended by the Governor.

The brief ceremony will include speeches by Sir Murray and the new Council Chairman, Mr. A. de 0. Sales.

Sir Murray will also hand over a gavel to the new Chairman.

As local dignitaries -are invited to the ceremony, space in the Council Chamber will be very limited. Special arrangements have therefore had to be made for news coverage.

It may be necessary to have only photographers in the Council Chamber and reporters in the room adjoining the Chamber where a loud speaker will be set up to enable them to hear the speeches. This, however, will depend on how many reporters and/or- photographers turn up. If possible, everyone will be accommodated in the Chamber. •

Your representatives are kindly asked to be at the Urban Council-Chamber not later than 2.30 p.m. so that the Urban Services Department’s Public Relations Officer, Mr. Gerry Xavier, can explain the special ^rr^ngemefits to“them and . .accommodate them in the best way possible.

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A.........

Monday, April 9, 1973

H.K. TO BE REPRESENTED AT ECAFE MEETING

The Hon. Ann Tse-kai, Unofficial Member of the Legislative Council, is to lead the Hong Kong delegation to the 29th session of the Economic Commission for Asia and the Far East to be held in Tokyo this year.

The session, which begins on Wednesday, will end on Monday, April 23.

During the two»week meeting, a wide range of problems concerning the economic and social development of the region will be discussed.

The other members of the delegation are Mr. E.P. Ho, Director of Commerce and Industry; Mr. J.D, McGregor, Deputy Director of Commerce and Industry; Mr. Thomas Lee Churwyon, Deputy Director of Social Welfare; Mr. W.Y.H. Kwok, Trade Officer of the Commerce and Industry Department and Miss J.A. Willis, Assistant Secretary, Economic Branch of th’- Colonial Secretariat.

Hong Kong became an associate member of E.C.A.F.E. in 1 *7, and since then has played an active part in it.

Note to Editors: The Hong Kong delegation will leave by air for

Tokyo tomorrow (Tuesday, April 10) at 11,45 a.m, by Northwest Airlines Flight No. 4. Mr. Ann will be accompanied by his wife. Mr. E.P, Ho will join Mr. Ann in Tokyo on Mondayt April <6,

/5........


Monday, April 9, 1973

- 5 -

TAI 0 HOUSING SCHEME

********

More than 3,000 people will be provided with self-contained housing in Tai 0 with the completion of the proposed Government Low Cost Housing Estate at Yim Tin.

This was revealed today by Mr. D.C. Bray, District Commissioner, New Territories, at the opening ceremony of the Tai 0 Rural Committee Office.

He said that workshop areas would also be formed to enable the development of light industry.

In recent years, Tai 0 had undergone ”a new phase of development" — from an isolated fishing port into a well-equipped town — with the provision of new roads, water treatment works, a town hall, and sites for a first secondary school and a playground.

Mr. Bray said that with this fast pace of development "the burden on the shoulders of the Rural Committee is heavy", but he was confident that the Committee would be fully capable of meeting the challenge with the support of the local people.

The building cost of the new Rural Committee Office exceeded $100,000, with the greater part contributed by local residents.

Note to Editors: Copies of the full text of Mr. Bray’s speech

are distributed separately in the G.I.S. Press boxes this evening.

0--------

/6.......

Monday, April 9, 1973

- 6 -

ANTI-POLIOMYELITIS CAMPAIGN 1973

Second Phase Ends With 31,145 Children Immunised

********

The second phase of the Anti-Poliomyelitis Campaign 1973 ended on March 31 with 31,145 children immunised.

Announcing this today, a spokesman for the Medical and Health

Department described the total as "satisfactory."

The first phase of the annual campaign was held between December 28, 1972, and February 2, 1973, when 28,149 children were immunised.

The second phase was intended as a follow-up. It began on February 26, and ended at the end of March.

In the last week, 5,428 doses of the anti-polio vaccine were administered -970 on the Island, 2,951 in Kowloon, and 1,507 in the New Territories.

-------0---------

PIANO RECITAL

*****

Top French pianist France Clidat will give a recital at the City Hall Concert Hall on Thursday (April 12) at 8 p.m. under the joint sponsorship of the Urban Council and the Alliance Franeaise.

An exponent of Liszt’s piano music, she will play a programme mainly consisting of works by Liszt and other pieces by Debussy and Ravel.

Tickets at S3 (for students), 35 and 38 are available daily from

10 a.m. to 8 p.m. at the City Hall Box Office.

-------0 - - - -

/?.........

Monday, April 9, 1973

MORE SPORTS FACILITIES FOR TAKWULING

********

Mr. A.N. Savage, District Officer Tai Po and Lieutenant-Colonel P.T. Bowring, Commanding Officer, second battalion 2nd K.E.O. Gurkha Rifles, will jointly officiate at the opening ceremony of two basketball courts at the Sing Ping Public School, Ping Che Road, Takwuling.

The ceremony will take place on Tuesday (April 10) at 2.JO p.m.

The basketball courts were built by the men of the 2/K.E.O. Gurkha Rifles under the Army Community Relations Project Scheme.

Materials which cost approximately 38,000 were supplied by the Education Department and District Office, Tai Po, from their local public works funds.

The addi tion of the two basket ball courts at the Sing Ping School, which is the principal venue of sports activities in the Takwuling Districtt will greatly benefit the youths in this remote part of the New Territories where sports facilities are relatively limited.

A friendly match between the Army and a local team will be played following the opening ceremony.

Note to Editors; You are invited to have the ceremony

covered. Press transport AM21J2 will leave Kowloon Tsim Sha Tsui Post Office subpool at 1.15 p«m. on Tuesday (April 10)• An officer of Tai Po District Office will be on hand to assist the Press.

Monday, April 9, 1975

- 8 -

JAPANESE CULTURAL MISSION CALLS ON NEW URBCO CHAIRMAN

*******

A nine-man Japanese Cultural Exchange Mission called on the new Urban Council Chairman, Mr. A. de 0. Sales, at the City Hall today and presented him with a scroll on behalf of the Japanese Government.

The Mission, led by Mr. Ki i chi Miyazawa, Member of the House of Representatives, is currently on a South Asian tour which has so far taken them to Indonesia, Thailand, Burma and South Vietnam.

It was the first official mission to be received by Mr. Sales as Chairman of the Urban Council.

The Director of Urban Services Department, Mr. D.R.W. Alexander, and the Assistant Director (Cultural Services), Mr. Darwin Chen, were also present to welcome the Mission.

The visitors spent more than an hour at the City Hall looking -over its facilities.

Mr. Sales said afterwards that Mr. Miyazawa showed great interest in Hong Kong’s cultural activities and he looked forward to more exchange visits by cultural groups.

At the end of the visit,Mr. Sales presented Mr. Miyazawa with an album containing pictures of Hong Kong in 1846.

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jtej-ease. tj-Mfi: 7«30 p•m.

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Tuesday, April 10, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No.

Inauguration of the reconstituted Urban Council by the Governor .................................................................... 1

The Board of Education is to discuss the proposals of the Joint Secretariat of Thirteen Educational Bodies .••••••••••••••••••» 4

The land sale programme for the next six months has been announced .............................c..................................... 10

No reprieve for man convicted for murder ........................   12

Measures are being taken to prevent the importation of smallpox into Hong Kong.................................................

A second manpower survey of the building and civil engineering industry is to be held later this month ..........................  15

Tunnelling tests for the Mass Transit Railway system are to start in May..................................................      17

Officers of the Immigration Department will stage a passing-out parade this Friday .......................................... 18

New traffic arrangements are to be introduced in Kowloon Tong •• 18

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Tuesday, April 10, 1973

- 1 -

GOVERNOR INAUGURATES NEW URBAN COUNCIL

Describes Council’s Work As Vital

»****#«*«*

The reconstituted Urban Council has a vital role to play in the Government’s overall plan to improve the quality of life of the people of Hong Kong.

This was the message given by the Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, at the inauguration of the new Urban Council this (Tuesday) afternoon.

"The work of this Council, and the particular field it covers,”

Sir Murray said, "has always struck me as of crucial importance."

He said he was amazed by people who deprecated the Council’s role or claimed that it had no importance or effect on the daily lives of the community.

"On the contrary, much of what it handles is what matters Dost to many people for much of the time."

The Governor cited hygienic food and restaurants, clean streets, parks and playgrounds as some examples of the important responsibilities of the Council.

He fully agreed with the Council that playgrounds were of immense social importance and that there were too few of them, and described the swimming complexes managed by the Urban Council as being "amongst the finest civic amenities in the world."

The Governor noted that the Council’s list of appointed activities was now much longer and he believed that the new arrangements for the Council would *give it new financial and administrative freedom.

/He said:

Tuesday, April 10, 1973

2 -

He said: ,fI like the verve and vitality of the Council and its members, and I am sure you are now going to make things hum in your sector.h Turning to the administration, the Governor revealed that plans were already in hand or being prepared for social advances on a broad front.

These included:

* Education, particularly the provision of universal secondary education and the overhaul of the examination system which this will permit, and a considerable expansion of technical education.

* A vastly expanded housing programme based on a new concept and directed by a new unified authority with a single Government department working to it.

* A phased expansion of the social services so as to progressively provide a system of social security underpinned by a specially trained cadre of professional social workers.

In addition, the reconstituted Medical Development Advisory Board would report by the end of July on plans for further development in the next 10 years, including the enormous programme necessary to provide facilities for the new towns and New Territories and to consolidate and improve what has already been achieved in the urban areas.

Once these plans mature, and if they were accompanied by decisive advances within responsibilities of the Urban Council, the Governor said, "we should find ourselves on the edge of really significant new developments.n

/Broadly ......

Tuesday, April 10, 1973

- 3 -

Broadly speaking, he added, Hong Kong would then have the assurance that, provided its prosperity lasted, some of the existing major defects would be eliminated within a measurable time-

It would also mean that "a term has been put to the makeshift conditions forced upon Hong Kong by the influx of population in the Fifties and early Sixties.”

The Governor said there were of course many other problems to be tackled, including crime and corruption, narcotics, traffic and off-street parking, the need for proper markets for hawkers and the need to coordinate the solution of these interconnected problems.

"Above all," Sir Murray said, "there is a need to maintain the « * f

expansion of the prosperity of this city on which all else depends."

The Governor concluded by assuring the Council of his interest and support, and said he was sure that if all parts of government worked together "Hong Kong can achieve the better life we all want, and achieve it within a decade."

Note to Editors: Copies of the full text of the Governor’s

speech are distributed separately in the G.I.S. Press boxes this eveing.

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A.......

Tuesday, April 10, 1973

V

BOARD OF EDUCATION TO DISCUSS JOINT

SECRETARIAT PROPOSALS

Commenting further on the statement issued by the Joint Secretariat of Thirteen Educational Bodies on Saturday, a Government spokesman said today:

Education is one of the Government’s top priorities. This was made very clear by the Governor in his speech at the opening session of the Legislative Council last October.

His Excellency said that the Government planned ’’free prd mary education for all, followed by secondary education for all to the age of 14; the latter to include an expanded pre-vocational or technical stream.”

”At that point”, he added, ’’there will be on the one hand greatly expanded facilities for further secondary education leading to the Certificate of Education; on the other, young people will be able to choose between going into industry, or acquiring a qualification in a technical institute.”

In his budget speech in March, the Financial Secretary emphasised this priority by saying that ’’expenditure on education does and will continue increasingly to dominate expenditure”, pointing out that it now absorbed 19 cent of total expenditure compared with 14 per cent ten years ago.

The Joint Secretariat’s concern with these issues has much in common with that of the Government, and the recommendations which appear in their

statement warrant serious consideration

Tuesday, April 10, 1975

- 5 -

These recommendations cover the expansion of secondary education, the abolition of bi-sessionalism in primary schools, the position of teachers •f

in private schools and the ratio of teachers to classes.

Tlie general objectives behind these proposals are in line with the Government's policy on education.

The reconstituted Board of Education, appointed in January of this year, is charged with advising the Governor on all educational matters. In particular, it has been given the task of taking a new look at the educational and examination system that will be appropriate to the conditions of expanded secondary education envisaged by the Government. It will also advise on the speed with which this can be implemented.

The Board has publicly asked for comments and suggestions from all interested parties to help them in their deliberations.

The Chairman of the new Board, Mr. P.C. Woo, said tonight that suggestions from the Joint Secretariat had already been noted by the Board and would be carefully considered.

”We would be happy to consider further representations from the Joint Secretariat and to discuss the present proposals with them if necessary’’, Mr. Woo added.

The Board’s report will be submitted by August of this year and will then be published as a ’’Green Paper” ••••• for public discussion and comment.

/The Board •••••••

Tuesday, April 10, 1973

- 6 -

The Board will be advising on the best way of achieving, within the shortest time practicable, the objectives of providing three years of secondary education for all in the 12-14 year age group, and of doubling places for the full five-year course.

In making their recommendations the Board will obviously be concerned both with quality and quantity and will have to take into account the availability of staff and buildings amongst other factors.

On the question of the Secondary Schools Entrance Examination, nobody likes a system whereby the whole of a child’s secondary education is determined by his performance in one afternoon.

As more secondary school places become available the secondary schools entrance examination will be made easier and will become less critical.

The Board of Education will be advising on the examinations system in general, and in particular will advise on the system of allocation to be adopted once there is a secondary school place available for every child.

Obviously there will need to be a system of placing children in the type of secondary school most suited to their talents.

V/e shall wish to achieve this as quickly as possible, but we cannot put a date to it until the Board has examined all the implications.

Educationally, whole-day sessions are clearly more desirable than the bi-sessional system now practised in primary schools.

Ue shall change over to whole-day sessions in government primary schools as circumstances permit.

/A start •••••••

Tuesday, April 10, 1973

- 7 -

A start has already been made in one government primary school which has been converted to whole—day sessions to allow pupils more time for extra-curricular activities.

This scheme is to be extended in September of this year, when seven more primary schools will also operate whole-day sessions.

The Board of Education has also been asked to advise on the degree of bi-sessionalism it considers appropriate in the short and long term in secondary schools.

The Government shares the concern of the Joint Secretariat for the position of teachers in private schools.

Much has been done for teachers in private non-profit making secondary schools. These teachers already benefit from schemes which provide assistance from public funds to help pay their salari es, and these allowances have recently been increased to bring the salary scales of these teachers into line with the recently improved salary scales in government and aided sectors. Details will be announced shortly.

Furthermore these schools also benefit from a classroom al 1 envance which helps meet their.recurrent expenditure. This allowance has been doubled within the last month.

Private profit making schools, however, are free to distribute their profits as they like. It is therefore difficult to work out a scheme to provide financial assistance for teachers in these schools, since it is not the Government’s policy to subsidise private profit making ventures with taxpayers’ money.

/The Government

Tuesday, April 10, 1973

- 8 -

The Government however is seeking to improve the treatment of teachers in these schools by giving guidance to the proprietors in making appointments and setting out conditions of service.

The position of teachers in private schools is another aspect of education the Board of Education will consider.

There is already a problem in providing sufficient teachers to meet the increased demands of education in the 70fs. To staff the expansion approved up to 1976, the output of the three existing Colleges of Education will be increased by 2,000 by 1976. Thereafter the construction of a fourth college or other means would be necessary to meet the increased expansion envisaged by the Governor in his speech.

The present estimates are based on a ratio of 11 teachers to 10 classes in primary schools, 13 teachers to 10 classes in form 1 to form and two teachers for every class in form 6.

On educational grounds, it is accepted that it would be desirable to increase the ratio of teachers, but the implications of such a change would need to be carefully examined.

As an example, in the aided primary sector alone, a change from a ratio of 1.1 to 1.3 would mean recruitment and training of an additional 2,468 teachers.

However the expansion of facilities for the training of teachers is high on the list of topics for consideration by the Board of Education, which will no doubt be making recommendations on this issue.

/The points ......

Tuesday, April 10, 1973

- 9 -

The points raised by the Joint Secretariat have extensive implications* It is not possible to analyse them in detail at this stage, but they will be considered further by the Board of Education.

As the Chairman of the Board has already stated, the Board will be pleased to consider these present proposals and any others the Joint Secretariat might have on this vital issue.

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/10

Tuesday, April 10, 1973

10

LAND SALE PROGRAMME FOR APRIL-SEPTEMBER

Upset Prices To Be Announced At Start Of Auction

***»*«*«*

Twenty-two lots of Crown land with a total area of nearly 260,000 square feet will be put up for sale by auction during the next six months.

This was announced today by the Director of Lands and Survey in his Land Sales Forecast for the six-month period ending September JO.

Of the 22 lots, five are for industrial use, nine for non-industrial purposes and eight are for residential development.

In addition, more than fifty sites of various sizes and uses are included in a separate Sales Forecast for land within the New Territories.

These will also be sold by public auction during the same six-month period.

The Director also announced that in future, the Particulars of

Sale for most lots would not state an ,rUpset Price” - previously the sum at which bidding.commenced.

It had been apparent for some while that the advance publication of "Upset Prices" had caused inconvenience at auctions and had proved misleading to the public, he said.

Sale Conditions had to be printed and made available to intending purchasers some five weeks before the auction, and if Upset Prices were to > • be included, they in turn had to be determined some two months in advance of sale.

/This meant .......

Tuesday, April 10, 1973

This meant that on a fast moving market the Upset Price was already out of date and had little significance by the time of the auction.

’’Recent experience”, he added, ”has shown that intervening sales of other similar lots often prove Upset Prices determined in advance to be totally unrealistic by date of sale, but when Upset Prices have been published, they cannot be changed and considerable time is wasted for all present at the auction by bidding having to commence at an inappropriate figure.”

”In future, therefore, immediately prior to the commencement of each sale, the auctioneer will announce the figure that would be acceptable to him as an opening bid.”

Current Values

The Director said this figure would take into account current values and the need to leave room for movement in the bidding. As it would not have to be determined a long time in advance, the assessment would be able to have regard to the most recent similar sales.

”This will save time for all concerned and also avoid the misconceptions that arise as a result of lots selling at prices far in excess of published but unrealistic Upset Prices,” he explained.

Particulars of the Land Sale Forecasts together with plans showing the location of the lots in the TTrban Areas to be offered for sale may be inspected at the Crovzn Lands & Survey Office, Murray Building, Garden Road, Hong Kong and in the Kowloon Branch Office, 10th floor, Kowloon Government Offices, Nathan Road. ......

/Particulars

Tuesday, April 10, 1973

- 12 -

Particulars and plans may also be inspected at the Public Enquiry Bureau, Central Government Offices, West Wing, Ground floor, Ice House Street; all the City District Offices, in the office of the District Commissioner, New Territories, North Kowloon Magistracy, Tai Po Road and in the Commerce and Industry Department, Fire Brigade Building, 46 Connaught Road Central, Hong Kong.

Copies of the forecast may be obtained free of charge by calling at any of the above offices or by written request to the Crown Lands & Survey Offices.

The sale dates for each lot will be notified in the Government Gazette and advertised in English and Chinese newspapers in the usual way.

At the time of advertising, detailed Conditions of Sale and sale plans will be available to the public and these may be obtained at the Crown Lands & Survey Office listed above or at the Public Enquiry Bureau, Central Government Offices, West Wing, Ground floor, Ice House Street.

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REPRIEVE NOT GRANTED

******

His Excellency the Governor, after taking into account the advice of the Executive Council, has decided not to grant a reprieve in the case of Tsoi Kwok-cheong, who was found guilty on November 2, 1972 of the murder of Ng Sung-por.

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/13

Tuesday, April 10, 1973

- 13 -

PREVENTION OF IMPORTATION OF SMALLPOX

Surveillance Of Arrivals Without Certificates From Today

**•«***«

People arriving in Hong Kong without a valid smallpox certificate are being put under medical surveillance.

This means that after being vaccinated at Kai Tak Airport, or their ship, they are required to report to a health officer every day for 14 days, or until they leave, if they are not staying for two weeks.

"This measure is intended to prevent the importation of smallpox into Hong Kong at a time when the disease is causing concern in many parts of the world,” said Dr. G.H. Choa, Director of Medical and Health Services.

He recalled that Hong Kong has not had a case of smallpox since June,' 1952 - it was imported - and "we intend to maintain this record by every means open to us."

As a further protective measure, the department has sought the aid of the Board of Airline Representatives, the Hong Kong Hotels’ Association, and the Hong Kong Association of Travel Agents to impress upon their travellers, air crews, and staff the need for vaccination against the disease at .this time. •

The Hong Kong Tourist Association is advising Association members to this effect, as well as informing Association offices abroad by telegram and telex.

The Association circular says: "Travellers arriving at Kai Tak Airport from non-infected areas who are not in possession of a valid smallpox vaccination certificate will be vaccinated on arrival. Any passenger who refuses to be vaccinated may be denied permission to land in Hong Kong."

/These........

Tuesday, April 10, 1973

- 14 -

These measures are also being adopted for persons arriving by sea.

Dr. Choa said a valid certificate against smallpox had always been a requirement for travellers arriving in Hong Kong, but in March, for example, 467 passengers had disembarked without such a certificate.

They were vaccinated at Kai Tak, or their ship, and allowed entry into Hong Kong, but the immunity so provided was not guaranteed since it took two weeks, in some cases, for the vaccination to be effective.

■The surveillance will help us to make certain that nothing goes wrong,” Dr. Choa explained.

A third measure in the current effort to safeguard Hong Kong against smallpox will take effect from Tuesday, April 16, when passengers arriving without valid certificates will also be required to deposit a bond of up to $400 with the Port Health authorities, in addition to being placed under surveillance.

’•The bond is intended to see that- the passengers concerned co-operate fully with the authorities during the period of their medical surveillance,” Dr* Choa said. *’ '

• -------o----------

/15 .......

Tuesday, April 10, 197J

- 15 -

SECOND MANPOWER SURVEY Of Building And Civil Engineering Industry ********

A major survey of Hong Kong’s building and civil engineering industries will be carried out between April 24 and 26.

It will cover some 1,400 construction sites and 600 contracting firms in the three-day period.

The survey - the second of its kind - will be conducted by the Building Trades Industrial Committee of the Industrial Training Advisory Committee, with the assistance of the Labour Department and the Public Works Department.

Questionnaire forms and explanatory letters in both English and Chinese were sent today to construction sites and contracting firms.

About 200 students from the Hong Kong Polytechnic and the Morrison Hill Technical Institute will assist in the survey by visiting sites and firms to help employers complete the questionnaire.

The Secretary of the Committee, Mr. Au-Yeung Man-tak, said that in the first manpower survey, made in August 1968, almost all construction sites and contracting firms approached had co-operated fully.

”1 am confident that this month’s survey will meet with equal success he said.

The information obtained in 1968 was compiled and analysed by the Committee and the findings and recommendations were subsequently published. Many of the recommendations made to both the industries and Government have now been implemented.

/Mr. Au-Yeung ••••••••

Tuesday, April 10, 1973

- 16 -

Mr. Au-Yeung said: 'The first survey showed that a total of 28,446 workers were employed on a total of 464 construction sites.

”In March 1973» however, the number of construction sites - both Government and private - recorded by the Public Works Department had increased to 1,380.

,rIn view of the substantial increase in the number of sites - and inevitably in the number of workers employed - the committee has decided to conduct a second survey to obtain up-to-date information on new manpower and training requirements in this field.”

The information which employers will be asked to supply will include:

* the number of workers at present employed;

* the number of workers at present under training; and

* the number of existing vacancies.

Mr. Au-Yeung stressed that the information collected would be handled in strict confidence and would only be published in the form of statistical summaries, without reference to individual sites or contracting firms.

He urged employers to co-operate by providing accurate answers to the questionnaire forms. Any queries about the questionnaire should be directed to the Industrial Training Unit of the Labour Department by ringing 5-282523 Ext. 85 and 88 during office hours.

- - 0 - -

/17

Tuesday, April 10, 1973

17

TUNNELLING TESTS FOR MASS TRANSIT RAILWAY

*»»**««*»

Work on four test tunnels for the Mass Transit Railway system is scheduled to start in May of this year.

Before the construction of the railway itself begins, trial tunnels are to be excavated at four separate locations to obtain information concerning the practical difficulties of tunnelling in Hong Kong.

The trial tunnelling works will be carried out at four sites — in the area of the former Naval Dockyard between Harcourt Road and Queensway on the Island; to the south of Salisbury Road, opposite the Peninsula Hotel in Tsimshatsui; beside Wang Tau Hom East Road, in the open area opposite Lok Fu Resettlement Estate; and beside the Castle Peak Road in Lai Chi Kok.

All the four sites involved are on Crown land.

The Government Mass Transit Engineer, Mr. S.A. Barden, said today that exact information on ground conditions is required to provide the essential data for the design of the permanent tunnels and the best methods of constructing them.

The tunnels forming part of the Mass Transit Railway would have to be bored through soils varying from solid rock to soft clay.

"We may encounter special problems at these four sites and our intention is to find out as much as we can about them and use this information in the design of the system and its construction”, he said.

The v/ork at these sites will involve no disruption of traffic. Pavements for pedestrians will be available during the work and every effort will be made to keep the noise level at all sites to the minimum.

The work is expected to continue until the end of the year.

0 - -

/18

Tuesday, April 10, 1973

- 18 -

PASSING-OUT PARADE OF IMMIGRATION OFFICERS

******

Nineteen Assistant Immigration Officers, including five women, will take part in a passing-out parade to be held on Friday (April 13) at the Royal Hong Kong Regiment Parade Ground in Happy Valley.

The Honourable Sir Douglas Clague will inspect the parade and present awards to the top recruits.

•••«•••

Note to Editors; You are invited to send a reporter and/or

photographer to cover the parade which will take place at 9*30 a.m.

-------0---------

TRAFFIC RE-ROUTING

********

The section of Dorset Crescent in Kowloon Tong fronting houses Nos. 6, 8 and 10 will be re-routed one-way for north-west bound traffic with effect from 10 a.m. on Thursday (April 12).

A spokesman for the Transport Department said that the re-routing was to improve local traffic circulation.

Appropriate traffic signs will be set up to guide motorists.

Release time: 8.30 p.m.

-------0 -

PR 33 4000038

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN SUPPLEMENT

Tuesday, April 10, 1973

INAUGURATION OF NEW URBAN COUNCIL BY H.E. THE GOVERNOR

The following i e full text of the speech given by H.E. the Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, ah ie inauguration of the reconstituted Urban Council today (Tuesday).

"I am most grateful for this invitation to meet you. This enables a me to salute the new-style Urban Council. Its inauguration is an important and happy event, and I do wish you all success in your work.

"The work of this Council, and the particular field it covers has always struck me as of crucial importance. I am amazed by people who deprecate the Council’s role, or say that it has no importance or effect on the daily lives of the population.

"On the contrary, much of what it handles is what matters most to many people for much of the time. Hygienic food and restaurants - its importance is self-evident. Clean streets and a clean environment and a clean appearance to the city - consider what the recent campaign has done for so many people; consider too the effect on them if the new-found cleanliness were dissipated.

"Parks to relax in - in most cities these are mere pleasure grounds, but in densely populated Hong Kong they are an absolute necessity. They are also intensely difficult to build, and I will watch with great interest how you w

solve the problem of h?T construct parks Aid gardens that can be used by the numbers that wish to and yet stay inviting, green and unsoiled.

/"Playgrounds - •••••••

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House. Hong Kong. Tel: 5-233191

Tuesday, April 10, 1973

2

"Playgrounds - obviously they give pleasure, but I entirely agree with you that they are of immense social importance and that there are far too few of them. In a mini-blitz during and subsequent to the "Keep Hong Kong Clean" campaign about 45 new sites for recreation areas have been formed or found, and 32 additional provisional sites have been located#

"The beach facilities and guards that you manage are vital services, and the swimming complexes must be amongst the finest civic amenities in the world•

"Then there is the whole field of civic entertainment. In recent years and months in both the Hong Kong Festivals and the Festival of the Arts, peoples* hunger for cultural enjoyment has been amply proved, and I hope that the Council will continue to expand the imaginative services which it already provides and provides for all tastes.

New Momentum

"The list of your appointed activities is of course much longer, but the point I want to make is that in some cities these sorts of services and amenities can be taken as a matter of course, but for Hong Kong real excellence in these fields could go so far to mitigate the hardships of a densely packed population, just as failure could make them unendurable.

"I believe that the new arrangements for the Council will give it new financial and administrative freedom. With the sheets eased the ship should gather way. If this is how you feel I think it comes at the right time.

"As you know, the Government is committed to social advance on a broad front. The will and the means are there. The sectors covered so far are: education, particularly provision of universal secondary education and the overhaul of the examination system which this will permit, and tho considerable expansion of technical education. /"Secondly, «•••••••

Tuesday, April 10, 1973

- 3 -

’’Secondly, housing: a vastly expanded programme based on a new concept and directed by a new unified authority with a single Government department working to it.

’’Thirdly, the phased expansion of the social services so as progressively to provide a system of social security, underpinned by a specially trained cadre of professional social workers.

’fourthly, the reconstituted Medical Development Advisory

Board will report by the end of July on plans for further development in the next 10 years, including the enormous programme necessary to provide facilities for the new towns and New Territories and to consolidate and improve what has already been achieved in the urban areas.

Problems

’’There are of course many other problems to be tackled. There are crime and corruption to be mastered:, there is the problem of narcotics, the most intractible and baffling problem of all. There is the problem of our traffic and our motor cars, the need for off-street parking, the need (within. the Council’s own responsibilities) for proper markets for people who are now called hawkers, and the need to co-ordinate the solution of these interconnected problems.

’’Above all there is the need to maintain the expansion of the prosperity of this city on which all else depends.

”0ur plans for advance in the major fields I mention are already laid or in preparation. If this effort is accompanied by decisive advances in the field within the responsibilities of the Urban Council, and I know how determined you are to achieve this, I think that once our plans mature, and inexorably this •« will take time, we should find ourselves on the edge of really significant new developments• /Broadly ••••••••

Tuesday, April 10, 1973

- 4 -

” Broadly speaking, our city will then have the assurance that provided our prosperity lasts some of the major defects in the life of Hong Kong as we know it will be eliminated within a measurable time, and that a term has been put to the makeshift conditions forced upon Hong Kong by the influx of population in the ’50s and early ’60s.

"May I say how grateful I am for the advice which some of you have been kind enough to give me, and how much I admire the Council’s devotion to our community. I like the verve and vitality of the Council and its members, and I am sure you are now going to make things hum in your sector. I am sure too that if all parts of our government work together Hong Kong can achieve the better life we all want, and achieve it within the decade.

”1 assure you of my interest and support, and I am sure that in wishing you all success I am speaking for the entire community you serve.”

It is with this thought that I have much pleasure in handing you, Mr. Chairman, the gavel presented to you for use in this Council by the Amateur Sports Federation and Olympic Committee of Hong Kong.

- - 0 -

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Wednesday, April 11, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No.

The final report of the Commission of Enquiry into the June rainstorm disasters has been tabled in Legco ................... 1

Special arrangements have been introduced to maintain maternity services ....................................................    5

The compensation provisions for the resumption of land are to be amended • • •.........................................     6

Proposals will be submitted shortly for reorganising the New Territories Administration «• •................................  9

Recommendations for making the loan scheme for small industries more attractive have been submitted to Government.............  11

A full-scale investigation into the recent power failure in Kowloon is in progress........... • • ........................  12

A building in Central has been condemned ,«••••••••••••••••• 13

Leading textile factory sets up apprenticeship training scheme ........................................  •»••••••«•• 1^

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Wednesday, April 11, 1973

- 1 -

STEPS TAKEN TO MAKE ALL MAJOR LANDSLIDE AREAS SAFE BEFORE COMING RAINY SEASON

Consultants To Carry Out Comprehensive Study Of Potential landslide Areas ********

All major landslide areas affected by the rainstorms in June last year will be rendered safe before the coming rainy season.

The Director of Public Works, the Hon. J.J. Robson, gave this assurance in the Legislative Council today when tabling the final report of the Commission of Enquiry appointed to look into the disasters.

In general, said Mr. Robson, the Government accepted the specific recommendations of the Commission but there were certain matters ’’about which the Government takes a somewhat different view.”

Reviewing remedial work undertaken by the Government following the rainstorm tragedy, Mr. Robson said: ”A11 those areas damaged in the 1972 June rainstorm, for which private owners are responsible, have been surveyed in detail and necessary action taken where appropriate to make sure these sites are safe.”

He added: ”In the event that remedial work cannot be completed ahead of this year’s expected rainstorms, a warning system has been devised to safeguard the public should this be necessary.”

The Director also disclosed that in addition to the current repair works, steps had been taken to investigate the general landslide problems in Hong Kong.

/In this ••••••••••

Wednesday, April 11, 1973

- 2 -

In this regard, approval would shortly be sought from the Finance Committee for the employment of private consultants to carry out a comprehensive study of potential landslide areas in urban areas.

"This study will not only consider measures which may be required to make the areas less susceptible to landslides but also whether any restrictions on development need to be imposed.”

An interim guide on the problems of hillside stability in Hong Kong, with particular reference to both temporary and permanent site formation work, was also being prepared by consultants in conjunction with the Building Ordinance Office, he said.

Private Consultants

This guide was expected to be ready by next month at the latest and would be distributed to both government and private architects and engineers involved with these problems.

Agreement had also been reached with other private consultants who had very specialised equipment available in Hong Kong, said Mr. Robson.

Together with a geophysicist, backed by an experienced civil engineering team, they would be engaged to identify any specific building site that might be suspect so that, if necessary, works could be ordered to make them safe.

In addition, proposals were now being considered to strengthen the Civil Engineering Unit seconded' to the Buildings Ordinance Office and to make it a permanent feature.

Reporting on the progress of remedial work at the landslide sites, Mr. Robson said that for all practical purposes, all work carried out by his department had been completed, except at Sau Mau Ping and at Po Shan Road.

/On the Island, ••.••

Wednesday, April 11, 1973

- 3 -

On the Island, the sites at Tai Tam Road, Shouson Hill, Repulse Bay Road and the Peak had also been completely reinstated.

He said that at Po Shan Road, where the problems were "more complex," 95 per cent of all earthworks would have been finished by the end of next month, as would repair work at Sau Mau Ping in Kowloon.

"The remaining areas are the concern of private developers and have either been made safe or work is progressing satisfactorily."

Mr. Robson said that in-depth investigations by consultants at squatter, resite and licensed areas so far indicated that there was no danger, but further detailed work was in hand to make doubly certain.

Detailed Investigation

All known suspected landslide areas adjacent to public highways had also been inspected, he went on and certain areas of doubtful stability along Ching Cheung Road and at Tai Wor Ping were being subjected to detailed investigation.

Turning to the Commission’s report, Mr. Robson noted that the Commission did not think it necessary to set up a panel of civil engineering specialists to which design problems could be referred.

"Government, however, feels that while a possible adequate reservoir of local specialists may exist, it is necessary to safeguard the public by appointing a special panel of civil and soils engineers so as to utilise this reservoir to the fullest extent and to prevent any inexperienced engineers and architects attempting sophisticated earthwork design," Mr. Robson said.

In this regard the Government had recommended that this matter be loft in abeyance for the time being pending the result of the further studies carried out by the Buildings Ordinance and its consultants.

/Arising •••••••

Wednesday, April 11, 1973

- 4 -

Arising from this study, he added, a Manual of Practice would be compiled which would eventually replace the interim guide now being prepared for the use of architects and engineers.

The Director also denied statements in the Commission’s report which implied that the main reasons for intensive development of hillside sites were a desire for greater revenue from land sales, Government’s yielding to commercial pressure and the prospect of filling for reclamation being provided cheaply.

-------0 - -

Wednesday, April 11, 1973

ARRAIIGEFENTS FOR MAINTAINING MATERNITY SERVICES

*********

Dr. G.H. Choa, Director of Medical and Health Services, announced

this morning that because a number of midwives had stopped working on call duties, some maternity clinics would be closed tonight, and staff reposted to other clinics so as to maintain normal services.

Notices have been posted in all clinics giving details of the nearest clinic available for maternity services.

On Hong Kong Island, all maternity clinics are closed with the exception of those at Shaukiwan and Aberdeen. Residents in need of maternity services in all Hong Kong Island areas will be admitted either to these two clinics or the Tang Shiu Kin and Tsan Yuk hospitals.

In Kowloon, all maternity clinics are closed with the exception

of those all Li Kee (Kowloon City), Wang Tau Hom, Kwun Tong, Li Po Chun (Shamshuipo), and Cheung Sha Wan. All Kowloon cases will be admitted either to these five clinics or the Queen Elizabeth Hospital.

In the New Territories, Dr. Choa said normal services would be

maintained. On outlying islands, because of the presence of resident doctors and nurses, normal services would also continue.

’■Midwives from all maternity clinics which have been closed will

be posted to the clinics that are being kept open,” Dr. Choa said. ’They will do shift duty.”

In a reference to developments last (Tuesday) night. Dr. Cha-, said reports

coming to him from 26 maternity clinics throughout the Colony showed that midwives had worked normally in five.

0 - -

/6

Wednesday, April 11, 1973

- 6 -

COMPENSATION FOR RESUMED LAND

Changes In Zoning To Be Disregarded

**********

Land owners whose land are rezoned in draft town plans will be awarded appropriate compensation under the Crown Lands Resumption (Amendment) Bill 1973.

This was stated by the Director of Public Works, the Hon. J.J. Robson, when he moved the second reading of the Bill at the Legislative Council meeting today.

The Bill amends the compensation provisions in the existing ordinance to ensure that no land-owner suffers because his land is rezoned in a draft town plan.

Mr. Robson said the amendment was necessary so that the Compensation Board would disregard changes of zoning when assessing compensation resulting from compulsory acquisition.

At present, he explained the Crown Lands Resumption Ordinance provided that a Compensation Board in assessing compensation must take the* value of the land to be the amount which the land, if sold in the open market, might be expected to realize.

nThis value would normally be based on the development obtainable in accordance with any restrictions contained in the Crown Lease,” said Mr. Robson.

However, under the Town Planning Ordinance, if a private lot was rezoned for a public purpose, the compensation had to be related to the use of the lot for that purpose.

/Citing an

Wednesday, April 11, 1973

Citing an example, Mr. Robson said that if a resumed lot formed part of an area zoned for open space, the Compensation Board could only take this use into account when assessing the value of the land even though development for commercial or residential purposes might be allowed by the Crown Lease.

He pointed out that this obviously bears unfairly on the land owner affected.

Speaking in support of the motion, the District Commissioner, New Territories, the Hon. D.C. Bray, said the question of resumption of land in the New Territories was an extremely sensitive one.

Anxiety

He recalled that when the Bill was published it gave rise to considerable anxiety as it was thought that the Bill emphasised that the compensation for agricultural land must be assessed without regard to the development potential of that land.

f*Dhe Bill has no bearing on this vexed problem. Nor does the Bill, as some in the New Territories thought, give new powers under the Town Planning Ordinance to resume land," he stressed.

He said the question of compensation had been the subject of prolonged discussions between himself and the Heung Yee Kuk.

!,These discussions stand adjourned, with agreement of the Kuk, pending the formulation by the Government of specific proposals which will take into account the range of problems discussed with the Kuk,” said Mr. Bray.

/In the .......

Wednesday, April 11, 1973

- 8 -

In the meantime, agreement had been reached on a scheme under which any ormer of land within a new town who felt frustrated in his development aims could surrender his land in exchange for the grant of land outside layout areas.

Mr. Bray said that this opportunity to exploit the development potential of agricultural land in new towns by exchange grants outside had been welcomed.

-------0---------

/9........

Wednesday, April 11, 1973

- 9 -

CALL TO BOLSTER NEW TERRITORIES ADMINISTRATION

To Meet Rural Development Problems

The District Commissioner, New Territories, the Hon. D.C. Brayj said today two new Administrative Districts should be created to cover the new towns of Sha Tin and Tuen Mun to cope with the development in those areas.

The two towns are now part of Tai Po and Yuen Long Districts.

Speaking at the Legislative Council meetingf Mr. Bray also said that the New Territories Administration should be reor^-jiised and strengthened to meet the two major types of development problems — new town development and rural development.

he said proposals on these lines would be submitted shortly.

In reply to a question by the Hon. Q.W. Lee, Mr. Bray said he would ask the Finance Committee shortly to consider an increase of 67 per cent of geographically deployed Land Assistants and supporting staff.

Mr. Bray said he had just completed an examination of addi ti nna.1 Estate Surveyor posts required, in conjunction with the Crown Lands and Survey Office.

These proposals, he said, would now be reviewed centrally before a submission was made to the Finance Committee.

/,rThe next......

Wednesday, April 11, 1973

- 10 -

"The next tasks will be to assess technical land staff requirements specifically geared to the ten-year development programme," Mr. Bray said.

In addition, the role of liaison staff in the districts -particularly in existing urban areas and in the new towns — would also bo reviewed.

This, he added, should complete the re-structuring of the department to deal with rapid urban development, re-development of rural slums, and exploitation of the opportunities for recreational and resort development and conservation of the countryside.

-------0---------

Wednesday, April 11, 1973

- 11 -

DISAPPOINTING RESPONSE TO LOAN SCHH-ffi

By Small Industries «*««***«

Recommendations aimed at making the loans scheme for small industries more attractive were submitted today to the Government for consideration.

This was disclosed by the Director of Commerce and Industry, the Hon. E.P. Ho, at the Legislative Council meeting in reply to a question by the Hon. Q.W, Lee.

The proposals, endorsed by the Trade and Industry Advisory Board on Monday, were made by the re-constituted Loans for Small Industry Committee following "disappointing response" to the new facility.

Mr. Ho said that since the launching of the scheme in July last year, five hundred enquiries were received.

But after this first flush, he said, the numbers of enquiries dropped to a mere handful a month.

He pointed out that these enquiries were only for information and could not be classified as applications for loans.

"In fact, the number of actual applications received to date is twenty-four," said Mr. Ho.

Of these, fourteen applicants eventually decided against proceeding further.

Of the remaining ten cases, six loans totalling $91500 had been approved, three applications totalling $287,000 had been rejected or abandoned and one for $120,000 was being processed.

--------0----------

Wednesday, April 11, 1973

- 12 -

FULL-SCALE INVESTIGATION INTO RECENT POWER FAILURE IN PROGRESS

********

The Director of Public Works, the Hon. J.J. Robson said today he was confident that the two electricity companies would take the necessary measures to prevent a repetition of the recent widespread power fan lure in Kowloon and the New Territories.

The China Light and Power Company was currently holding a full-scale investigation into the power failure, he said and would keep the Government informed of its findings.

Mr. Robson was speaking in the Legislative Council in reply to a question by the Hon. P.C. Woo as to whether the Government would take steps to ensure that similar failures would not occur again.

Both companies, said Mr. Robson, had always been aware of their responsibility to provide the public with an adequate and reliable supply of electricity, as shown by their records which "compare favourably with electricity generating undertakings elsewhere."

The only control which Government had over the operations of the two electricity companies, he added was through the Electricity Supply Ordinance and the associated Regulations.

These regulations were solely concerned with safety standards for the protection of the public, he explained.

1 • • •

-------0---------

/13

Wednesday, April 11, 1973

- 13 -

DANGEROUS BUILDINGS

*«***»

The Building Authority today declared No. 2 Lok Hing Lane to be in a dangerous condition and Nos. 4-6 Lok Hing Lane and 38-40 Pottinger Street liable to become dangerous.

In a statement issued this morning the Principal Government Building Surveyor said that No, 2 Lok Hing Lane was inspected following a complaint received from one of the tenants.

Inspection revealed serious settlement at the rear of this building and there was a risk of collapse.

The adjoining buildings at Nos. 4-6 Lok Hing Lane and 38-40 Pottinger Street were also inspected and because of extensive fracturing of the party walls, together with advanced decay to timber work, it was considered they were liable to become dangerous during or after the demolition of No. 2 Lok Hing Lane.

Notices of intention to apply for Closure Orders in the Victoria District Court at 9-30 a.m. on 15th May 1973 were posted today.

- - 0 - -

/14.........

Wednesday, April 11, 1973

- 14 -

TEXTILE FACTORY SPONSORS APPRENTICESHIP TRAINING SCHEME

*********

One of Hong Kong’s leading textile manufacturers, the South Sea Textile Manufacturing Company Limited, today (Wednesday) signed contracts with a number of its apprentices in line with the apprenticeship training scheme sponsored by the Apprentice Training Unit of the Labour Department.

Under the contracts signed between the company and apprentice textile technicians and textile mechanics, the apprentices will receive planned on-the-job training and related technical education on a dayrelease basis. The technician apprentices will receive technical training at the Hong Kong Polytechnic, and the craft apprentices will receive tuition at the Morrison Hill .Technical Institute.

Mr. H.R. Knight, Senior Training Officer of the Labour Department, was present at today’s ceremony at South Sea’s Tsuen Wan factory, to explain to the apprentices and their parents the terms of the contracts.

Mr. Knight said: ’There are now about 150 firms running apprenticeship training along the lines of our proposed scheme. The, Apprentice Training Unit will give every assistance and advice to any employer who wishes to start proper training.”

Under the scheme, the apprentices will get a certificate of apprenticeship ■from the company on completion of their training. The certificates will be countersigned by the Commissioner of Labour and the principal of their technical institution.

/After ••••••

Wednesday, April 11, 1973

- 15 -

After today’s signing ceremony, the mill manager of the South Sea Manufacturing Co. Ltd., Mr. Ditman Chang said: "Although this is the first time vze have set up apprenticeship training on this basis, we have for many years been in the forefront as far as training in the textile industry is concerned."

He said the lack of technical manpower-well-trained in both practice and theory—^es one of the most serious problems confronting the textile industry. Without a ready and adequate supply of such people, it would not be possible to increase productivity, improve quality standards and upgrade products while keeping prices competitive.

"Organised apprentice training is, I believe, the answer to Hong Kong’s acute shortage of technicians, "Mr. Chang said, "industry as a whole must embark on a concerted training effort."

...----o----------

Release time: 8.00 p.m.

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Thursday, April 12, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No.

Government comments on latest statement issued by the Joint Secretariat of 1? Educational Bodies .................... 1

A proposal has been made to suspend public issues for one month ..................................................j

Maternity services operate well under alternative arrangements .............................................................. 4

Housing Department warns against imposters ................ 5

A new method of refuse tipping is being employed •••••••••• 6

Two lots of Crown land on outlying islands are to be sold next week .................................................. 7

Cholera quarantine restrictions against some arrivals have been cancelled ............................................ 7

A new training workshop for apprentices is underway ••••••• 8

Morrison Hill swimming pool will be closed for several hours on Saturday .................................................. 9

Export of restrained textiles to Britain ................... 10

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Thursday, April 12, 1975

t r - 1 -

GOVlsRI'lENT COMMENTS ON THE. LATEST STATEMENT ISSUED

BY THE JOINT SECRETARIAT OF THIRTEEN EDUCATIONAL BODIES »******««

Commenting on the statement issued by the Joint Secretariat of thirteen Educational Bodies last night, a Government spokesman said today:

Church leaders, leading members of the community and, above all, parents, have advised Certificated Masters not to support the boycott action proposed by the Joint Secretariat for tomorrow.

An elected leader of the teachers has said that his members are not going to support the boycott and are opposed to such action.

It is difficult to believe that the Joint Secretariat represents the views of all Certificated Masters. Teachers are responsible people who obviously have the interests of children at heart since they chose teaching as a profession. We cannot and do not believe, therefore, that they would wish to associate themselves with the action proposed by the Joint Secretariat, which must be condemned by all right thinking people.

The inexplicable changes in the attitude of the Joint Secretariat, as reflected in their public statements during the last week, must cal 1 into question both their sincerity, motives, and indeed their objectives.

In their statement issued on April 7 they are on record as saying: r,We solemnly declare that, if the Government accepts the following four recommendations to improve education in Hong Kong, we are willing to cancel the scheduled strikes on April 13, May 2 and May 3, and the boycott of the Secondary Schools Entrance Examination”, and that ”we are ready to undergo personal sacrifices for the sake of the common good”.

/These points ........

Thursday, April 12, 1973

- 2 -

These points were reiterated in a personal letter to the Colonial Secretary.

The Government responded positively to this statement and accepted that the general objectives behind their proposals are in line with government policy. It promised that the Board of Education, which has all three church leaders as members, would carefully consider the points made by the Joint Secretariat, and Mr. P.C. Woo the Chairman of the Board has said that the Board would be happy to discuss the proposals with them.

The Government statement was welcomed by church and civic leaders yesterday. On the other hand, the Joint Secretariat has chosen to ignore its substance and has simply dismissed it.

Despite their earlier assurances the Joint Secretariat yesterday set aside previous undertakings and decided to go ahead with further boycott action.

In view of this one can only conclude that the Joint Secretariat is determined to take militant action for its own sake. We deplore the anxiety so inflicted on children and parents alike.

-------0---------

/3.........

Thursday, April 12, 1973

- 3 -

PROPOSAL TO TEMPORARILY SUSPEND PUBLIC ISSUES

**4>«*«*4i

The Securities Advisory Council today considered a proposal for a temporary suspension of public issues for about one month due to the .effect the tremendous over-subscriptions were having on the distribution of available liquidity within the banking system.

The proposal was fully considered by the Council at its meeting this morning and, although it was not in favour of a complete suspension, it had no objection for the time being to lengthening substantially the time between public offers.

The Council this afternoon conveyed its views to the Financial Secretary who accepted them.

The Commissioner for Securities subsequently met the Chairmen of the four exchanges and informed them accordingly.

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A....

Thursday, April 12, 1975

- 4 -

SMOOTH OPERATION OF MATERNITY SERVICES

Alternative Arrangements Working Well

*******

Dr, G.H. Choa, Director of Medical and Health Services, said this morning that maternity services operated smoothly in the clinics kept open last night.

In rural districts and on the outlying islands, conditions were al so mostly normal.

Dr. Choa said that, for the time being, urban maternity services would continue to be available only at the following clinics:

On Hong Kong Island: Clinics at Shaukiwan and Aberdeen, and Tang Shiu Kin and Tsan Yuk hospitals.

In Kowloon: Clinics at Li Kee (Kowloon City), Wang Tau Hom, Li Po Chun (Sham Shui Po), Kwun Tong and Cheung Sha Wan, and Queen Elizabeth Hospital.

In the New Territories, only two of the 10 maternity clinics have been closed. These are the Lady Ho Tung, at Shek Wu Hui, and the Kam Tin Clinic.

On outlying islands, normal maternity services have not been disturbed, because of the presence of resident doctors and nurses.

’’These arrangements will continue so long as a number of midwives refuse to work on call duties,” Dr. Choa said.

He emphasised that only the maternity sections of eight clinics have been closed to enable the department to repost midwives to shift duty elsewhere so that normal maternity services could be maintained. There are 27 maternity clinics in all.

Notices have been displayed in all clinics giving details of the alternative maternity services available.

-------0--------- /5.......................

Thursday, April 12, 1973

- 5 -

GUARD AGAINST IMPOSTERS—HOUSING DEPARTMENT WARNS

**********

The Housing Department today warned applicants for public hnufn ng to be on guard against people impersonating government officials and demanding tea money or advance rents to guarantee accommodation.

In the past few months, several cases have been reported where people who had applied for public housing had been visited by a man who claimed to be a government officer. In return for tea money, he promised early processing of their applications.

A spokesman for the Housing Department said today that anyone who is approached in this manner should contact the department or the police immediately and in no case should they pay any money.

,n.7e charge no fee for processing applications,” he said.

”xhe impersonator is trying to cheat innocent people of their money*"

Thursday, April 12, 1973

- 6 -

NEW WAY OF TIPPING REFUSE * * >(-• + * ♦ ♦ *

The Government is to employ a new method of refuse tipping at Gin Drinkers Bay in Kwai Chung with an aim to form a piece of land for recreational use •

A spokesman for the Public Works Department said the method, known as controlled tipping, calls for the spreading of refuse in layers.

"As tipping proceeds, each layer will be covered with inert material and, at the .end of each day all working faces will be sealed off so as to contain noxious smells, control vermin and to eliminate health and fire hazards,u he added.

The covering material will be obtained principally by the excavation of suitable earth from areas in Kwai Chung used specially for this purpose.

Ash from incinerators will axso be used when it becomes available.

To ensure the systematic disposal of refuse, delivered to the dump by sanitary and inoffensive methods, access roads and drainage will have to be built.

Tenders for the construction work and the controlled tipping of refuse at Gin Drinkers Bay are now being invited.

The project is expected to begin next month and last for a period of 18 months with the option of an extention of 12 months.

The works have been designed and will be supervised by the Development and Airport Division of the Civil Engineering Office. Public Works Department.

------ 0 - - • —

/7........

Thursday, April 12, 1973

- 7 -

N.T. LOTS FOR SALE

*********

Two lots of Crown land on the outlying islands are to be sold by public auction in the District Office, Islands, next Tuesday (April 24) at 2,30 p.m.

The first lot, located on Peng Chau, has an area of 4,000 square feet and is for private residential purposes. The upset price is 860,000.

The second lot with an area of 2,500 square feet is located at Mui Wo, Lantau Island and is for non-industrial use. The upset price for this lot is $73?000.

Full particulars and conditions of sale may be obtained at the New Territories Administration, North Kowloon Magistracy, Tai Po Road and the District Offices of Yuen Long, Tsuen Wan, Tai Po and Sai Kung.

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CHOLERA QUARANTINE RESTRICTIONS CANCELLED

*********

• . . Hi? !•' • ‘

The Director of Medical and Health announced today that cholera quarantine restrictions imposed against arrivals from Jerusalem and from the Indonesian Ports of Makasar, Tjirebon, Sorong and Tjilatjap have now been removed.

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/8 ........

Thursday, April 12, 1973

- 8 -

J

NEW TRAINING WORKSHOP FOR APPRENTICES UNDERWAY

***************

A new apprentices training workshop is to be built this year to meet the need for more properly trained artisans and technicians for government departments.

Construction work on the new workshop, which will be located in the electrical and mechanical office complex at Caroline Hill Road, is expected to start in August for completion towards the end of next year.

It will provide accommodation for more than 100 apprentices and will have more facilities than the present workshop in the Old Whitfield Barracks in Kowloon.

The Government has been operating a modern apprenticeship scheme for craftsmen and technicians since 1969.

According to Mr. E.M. Laishley, Superintendent of Apprentices, 480 technical and craft apprentices were presently undergoing training, and he anticipated that by February next year 640 would be taking the course.

The first group of 93 is expected to complete the course by September 197^*

Technical apprentices receive four and a half years of theoretical training leading to the Higher Certificate of Engineering at the Hong Kong Polytechnic.

/Prospective ••*•••


Thursday, April 12, 1973

- 9 -

Prospective technical apprentices must be between 16 and 18 years of age and completed Form 5-

Craft apprentices are taught such trades as fitting, welding, machining, automobile and diesel repairing, sheet metal work and electrics.

They must be between the age of 14 and 15 and must have completed Primary 6,

Their training lasts four years during which they have to attend lectures at the Morrison Hill Technical Institute one day and two evenings a week for theoretical trainings

All apprentices must first have one year’s basic training in the use of hand tools and machines and are then placed in various Government Departments for ’on the job’ training.

-------0 --------

POOL CLOSURE

********

The Morrison Hill Swimming Pool will be closed to public use on Saturday (April 14) from 12.45 p.m< to 6.15 p.m.

During this period, the Hong Kong Sports Association for the Physically Handicapped will be using the pool for its swimming gala.

/10.........

Thursday, April 12, 1973

- 10 -

EXPORT OF RESTRAINED TEXTILES TO BRITAIN

The Director of Commerce and Industry today issued a notice to exporters concerning.export of restrained textiles to Britain.

The notice gives’details of the allocations under Phase I of the High Hong Kong Cost Content Scheme, 1973 for the export of restrained textiles to Bid.tain.

Details of the introduction of Phase II of the scheme from 8»3O a.m. on Tuesday, April 24, 1973 are also given. • •

Copies of the notice have been sent to trade associations and companies on the Department’s mailing list for Notice to Exporters, Series I (Britain). .

Anyone wishing to have advance information of the notice may contact the following officers of the Department: -

Mr. H.P. Lee - Trade Officer

Tel. No. >443144

. . . • 1 . • ■ -> • ' ' * •

Mr. C.K. Ng - Industry Assistant

T^L., No.’ .5-4307*19

•. '

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Release time: 7.30 p^m

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Friday, April 13, 1973

CONTENTS

Page Nos.

Sickness allowance and holiday pay for manual workers are to be extended ...................................................   1

Part of the Harcourt Road Temporary Carpark will be closed as from tomorrow ..............................................   2

A $100 million road project is to be launched in the New Territories..................................................     3

Mr. J.W.D. Hobley has been appointed the new Solicitor General .................................................................... 4

Cheung Chau Ferry Pier will be renovated ••••••••••••.•••••• 5

The draft outline zoning plan for the Peak has been published .................................................................... 6

Four buildings in Central have been condemned..........•••••• 8

The wife of the Director of Social Welfare will present Duke of Edinburgh awards to recipients next Sunday •••••••••••••• 9

Two amendments have been made to the Yau Ma Tei zoning plan ..............................................................   10

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Friday, April 13, 1973

- 1- -

SICKNESS ALLOWANCES AND HOLIDAY PAY FOR WORKERS . To Be Extended ********

Nev/ legislation is underway to extend sickness allowances and holiday pay to all manual workers irrespective of their earnings, and to non-manual workers whose monthly earnings do not exceed $1,500.

Details of the bill are published in today’s Government Gazette. The bill — entitled the Employment (Amendment)'(No. 2) Bill 1973 — will be introduced into the Legislative Council on April 25.

The Assistant Commissioner of-Labour, Mr. M.C. Lao, said the bill sought to replace the Industrial Employment (Holidays with Pay and Sickness Allowance) Ordinance and simplify the present qualifications for sickness allowances.

An employee will qualify to receive sickness allowance of half his wages (excluding overtime) if he has worked for his employer for not less than three months. He will not bo p..id if the duration of sickness is less than three days on any one occasion.

”This is to discourage malingering on the part of the employee”, said Mr. Lao, ”However, if the sickness exceeds three days, sickness allowance will also be paid- for the first-three days.”

.........A$ employee can accumulate the entitlement to sickness allowance at the rate of one paid sickness day for each completed month of service, with a maximum accumulation of 24 days.

/The onus •••••••

Friday, April 13, 1973

- 2 -

The onus is on the employer to produce records as proof of the number of paid sickness days, if any, taken by an employee.

Mr. Lao said that another effect of the bill was to establish a statutory right to annual holidays for those who already received them under their contracts of employment or by custom or by existing legislation, and to prescribe a minimum of six days as paid holidays.

"All qualified employees will be entitled to holiday pay after three months’ continuous service," said Mr. Lao.

- - - 0 -------

CAR PARK CLOSURE

********

The 70 spaces at the eastern end of Harcourt Road Temporary Carpark vzill be closed with effect from midnight tonight (Friday).

Announcing this today, the Commissioner for Transport said the closure was to enable the area to be designated as a tourist coach parking place.

• - - - 0 -----

'• /3.........

Friday, April 13, 1973

- 3 -

$100 MILLION ROAD PROJECT IN NEW TERRITORIES

Tenders To Be Called On International Basis * ♦ * ♦ ♦ ♦ * ♦ * *

Construction of a new and wider road linking the satellite towns of Tsuen-Wan and Castle Peak is to begin this autumn.

The road, to be' known as Tuen Mun Road, will be about nine mi 1 es long and will be built in stages.

Ultimately, the road will comprise a dual three-lane carriageway situated mainly on steep hillsides.

The first stage of the project comprises the construction of one of the two carriageways throughout, short sections of the second carriageway and two grade separated interchanges.

Part of the work of Stage One is covered by the main contract details of which were published in the Government Gazette today.

It involves heavy eartheworks, the construction of a number of large bridges and other major structures and the construction of a causeway and other marine works.

These works are expected to cost over $100 million.

Contractors of international standing who are interested in tendering for the main contract will be sent further information and requirements for pre-qualification on request to:-

Scott Wilson Kirkpatrick & Partners

Consulting Civil & Structural Engineers

1720 Star House

Salisbury Road

Hong Kong

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Friday, April 13, 1973

- 4 -

J.W.D. HOBLEY TO BE NEXT SOLICITOR GENERAL

*********

The Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs has approved the promotion of Mr. J.W.D. Hobley to succeed Mr. G.R. Sneath in the post of Solicitor General, who left on pre-retirement leave on April 124 1973. .

Aged 43t Mr. Hobley graduated from the University of Liverpool with a LL.B, degree in 19^9. He was called to the Bar (Grays Inn) in 1950 -and was in private practice in Liverpool until his appointment to Hong Kong as a Crown Counsel in November 1933.

He was promoted to Senior Crown Counsel in April 1962, and to Principal Crown Counsel in September 1963* He acted as Solicitor General on numerous occasions. He has been on secondment to the Government of Bermuda as Attorney General since April 1972.

Mr. Hobley is married with two children.

It is expected that he will arrive in Hong Kong about the middle

Friday, April 13? 1973

- 5 -

CHEUNG CHAU FERRY PIER TO BE IMPROVED

********

Cheung Chau, popular picnic spot, will soon have its passenger ferry pier renovated and extended to keep abreast with the rapid economic and social developments on the island.

The pier, which was built some ten years ago to accommodate single loading ferries, has become inadequate to cater for the large number of visitors at weekends and public holidays.

The situation will be aggravated when the Hong Kong and Yaumati Ferry Company introduces regular triple-decker ferries to the island.

It is therefore proposed to extend the pier structure by reclaiming some 3,950 square feet of Crown foreshore and sea bed. The area to be reclaimed stretches about 60 feet from the end of the pier and runs about 66 feet parallel to the waterfront.

Upon completion, it will greatly improve the berthing facilities for the triple-decker ferries and increase the covered area for passengers.

At the same time, electrically-operated lifts and ramps will also be installed to enable passengers to embark and disembark more quickly and safely.

In a public notice in the Gazette today, the Director of Public Works draws the attention of the public to the proposed undertaking and stipulates that any person having any objection to the proposed work, or any claims of private right in the matter, should submit such objections or claims in writing to him within two months.

Notices in English and Chinese, have also been posted on notice boards near the pier.

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/6........

Friday, April 13, 1973

- 6 -

OUTLINE ZONING PLAN FOR PEAK PUBLISHED r... • it********

The draft Outline Zoning Plan for the Peak area on Hong Kong Island was published by the Town Planning Board today.

The object of the plan is to provide a land use pattern and road framework within which the use and intensity of development of land may be legally controlled.

The area covers about 2,052 acres of land comprising part of the central massif of the Island. The boundary lies from the High West just above Queen Mary Hospital and extends eastward to Wong Nei Chung Gap.

It also takes in all the residential areas along both sides of Peak Road, the upper section of Stubbs Road as well as those on the high points of the Peak, and includes a section of Magazine Gap Road.

A total, of 216 acres has been zoned for residential use. Most of this zone is already developed. With the residential plot ratio restricted to 0.5, the population on full development will reach about 10,000.

Two small commercial zones are included to provide shopping facilities to the residents. One is at the upper peak tram terminus and the other in Guildford Road.

The government, institution and community zones, which amount to 30 acres, comprise existing and proposed schools and other related facilities.

ihe Government sites by the peak tram station are intended for a public transport terminus and a multi-storey carpark.

/There are

Friday, April 13, 1973

There are J2 acres zoned for open space, which include a large area intended for a park adjoining Mount Austin Road. Other areas zoned for this purpose include existing and proposed playgrounds and scenic vantage points.

The green belt zone covers 1,701 acres, more than 80 per cent of the entire planning area. This is mostly undeveloped hillsides but certain G.I.C. uses may be permitted. A number of sites within this zone have also been reserved for public utilities. .

An existing and a proposed petrol filling stations are zoned under other specified uses. •• t , •

Funds

The implementation of the plan, so far as public works are concerned, will require the approval of funds by the Finance Committee of the Legislative Council•

The draft plan is now on display until June 12 at the Public Enquiry Centre, Central Government Offices,West Wing; the Crown Lands and Survey Office, Kowloon Government Offices, 10th floor, 405 Nathan Road; and at the Central City District Office, 6*4-66 Wellington Street, Hong Kong.

People having any objections to the draft plan should write to the Secretary of the Town Planning Board, c/o Public Works Department, Murray Building, Garden Road, Hong Kong, before June 12. They should set out the reasons for their objections and propose alterations that would remove such objections.

Copies of the draft plan and explanatory statement are available for * sale at (uncoloured) and S25 (coloured) at the Crown Lands and Survey Office. Murray Building, 19th floor, Hong K^g.

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/8.........

Fridg® April 13, 1975

- 8 -

FOUR BUILDINGS CONDEMNED

********

Four pre-war buildings in Central District were today declared dangerous by the Building Authority.

♦ ' ■ ■

The Principal Government Building Surveyor said in a statement this morning that the buildings at Nos. 220-226 Des Voeux Road Central were first inspected in connection with Mass Transit proposals.

It was found that the reinforced concrete members of the kitchen blocks, the rear staircase and landings and the main rear wall were suffering from extensive spalling together with serious corrosion of the reinforcement#

The condition was such that there was a risk of a failure leading to collapse.

Notices of intention to apply for closure orders were posted on the buildings today.

Hearing will be held at 9-50 a.m. on June 1 in the Victoria District

Friday, April 13, 1973

- 9 -

DIRECTOR’S WIFE TO PRESENT AWARDS AT VARIETY CONCERT * * * * * * ♦ * ♦

Mrs. F.K. Li, wife of the Director of Social Welfare, will present awards to 31 members of the Hong Kong Federation of Youth Groups at the City Hall Concert Hall on Sunday (April 15)•

The presentation of Duke of Edinburgh’s bronze awards and awards of merit of the Royal Life Saving Society will take place at a variety concert staged by members of the Federation’s youth centres and affiliated youth groups.

The Director of Social Welfare, Mr. F.K. Li, will also be attending the function.

The evening’s programme, between 8 and 10.30 p.m., includes folk songs, dances, a judo demonstration and trampoline display and a drama.

Established in 19&2, the Federation is a voluntary youth agency with a current membership of more than 6,500 young people aged from 14 to 21.

The Federation operates 20 youth centres in various districts, a youth camp at Sai Kung and a youth hostel on Lamma Island.

Note to Editors: You are invited to send a reporter and/or

photographer to cover the concert and presentation of awards which will take place at 8.40 p.m.

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- • -r '

/10........

I

Friday, April 15, 1973

- 10 -

YAU MA TEI ZONING PLAN AMENDED

********

The Town Planning Board has agreed to two amendments to the draft Outline Zoning Plan for Yau Ma Tei published in June 1971*

One of the amendments is to provide an industrial zone of about 1.8 acres off Cherry Street at the northern end of the typhoon shelter.

This area, which originally formed part of the adjoining open space zone, could be used for a flatted factory building to be constructed near the cargo handling area.-

The building will house small factories of the type which can be found operating in breach of lease conditions in commercial residential properties in the area.

The second, amendment extends the government, institution and community use zoning between Kansu Street and Public Square Street by deleting some open space zoning.

The purpose of this is to give more flexibility in planning the complex, but the zone will include open space.

The amended draft plan is now on display until May 3 at the Public Enquiry Centre, Central Government Offices,West Wing, the Crown Lands and Survey Office, Kowloon Government Offices, 10th floor, 405 Nathan Road; and at the Yau Ma Tei City District Office, 260-264 Temple Street, Kowloon.

People having any objections to the amendments should write to the Secretary of the Board, c/o Crown Lands and Survey Office, Public Works Department, Murray Building, 18th floor, Hong Kong, before May 3« They should state the reasons for their objections and propose alterations that would remove them.

/Copies.........

Friday, April 13, 1975

11

Copies of the draft amendment plan are available for sale at 33 (uncoloured) and 325 (coloured) at the Crown Lands and Survey Office, Murray Building, 19th floor, Hong Kong.

0------

Hei ease time: .7 <00 p«m.

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Saturday, April 14, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No.

The E Squadron of the Royal Hong Kong Regiment is moving to new headquarters.............................................   1

A new salt water pumping station is to be built at Chai Wan .............................................................   2

Applications for export licences covering shipments over the Easter holidays should be made early ......................... 3

The Director of Social Welfare will open a new children’s centre on Wednesday............................................ 4

The City Hall will remain open on Monday..................... 5

Taxi restrictions at the Kowloon Star Ferry Concourse have been announced ................................................ 6

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Saturday, April 1^, 1973

- 1 -

ROYAL HONG KONG REGIMENT MOVING TO NEW HEADQUARTERS «***«*«*

Officers and men of the E Squadron (Kowloon Squadron) of the Royal Hong Kong Regiment will be taking part in a brief ceremonial march on the evening of Tuesday, April 17•

The occasion is to mark the "move in" of the squadron to the Chatham Road Camp, where they will be based in future.

The Regiment’s Commanding Officer, Lt. Col. J. Chapman, and the Adjutant, Capt. D.A.M. Le Sueur, will be attending the ceremony.

Formed in September 1971, E Squadron comprises 68 officers and men and is at present based at the Regiment’s Headquarters in Sports Road, Happy Valley.

The Royal Hong Kong Regiment, essentially a part-time volunteer force, has evolved as a professionally-minded organisation over a period of almost 120 years.

It is highly mobile and operates mainly in support of the British Armed Forces stationed in Hong Kong.

The Regiment is made up of five reconnaissance squadrons, a headquarters squadron, an infantry company together with the home guard company, and today has almost 700 volunteers and over 60 permanent staff.

The establishment of a junior leaders squadron in 1970 marked a significant step further towards the development of the Regiment.

/The junior ...•••••

Saturday, April "14, 1975

- 2 -

The junior leaders squadron caters for boys between the ages of 14 and 18 and has an enrolment of over 140. It serves no specific military purpose but simply aims at providing an additional outlet for the youth of Hong Kong through a wide range of activities, ranging from foot drill and map reading to vehicle maintenance, sailing, canoeing and photography.

* * * * * ♦ ♦

bote to Editors: You are cordially invited to send a photographer

to cover the event which will take place at the Chatham Road Camp at 7»5O p.m. on Tuesday.

-------0---------

NEW SALT WATER PUMPING STATION FOR CHAI WAN

********

The Waterworks Office is to construct a new salt water pumping station on the new seawall at Chai Wan.

With a capacity of 24 million gallons a day, the new station will replace the old one which is no longer adequate for the fast development of the area.

On completion, it will supply salt water for flushing to the district and allow reclamation work to proceed in the Chai Wan basin.

Work is expected to start this summer and should take about 15 months to complete.

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/3........

Saturday, April 14, 1975

- 3 -

SHIPMENTS OVER EASTER HOLIDAY PERIOD

Applications For Export Licences Should Be Made Early

*********

Applications for export licences and certificates covering shipments during or immediately after the four-day Easter holidays from April 20 to 23 should be made as early as possible, the Director of Commerce and Industry reminded the public today.

In order to facilitate shipments around this period, the Department had decided to waive, exceptionally, the normal two clear working days requirement for applications to be submitted.

Also every endeavour would be made to ensure that applications for licences or certificates submitted to the Certification and Licensing Offices by 5 p«m. on Wednesday (April 18) would be issued on Thursday (April 19) and those received by 5 p.m. on Thursday would be issued on Tuesday (April 24).

The Director also advised applicants for licences and certificates to take extra care in ensuring that their applications are properly and accurately completed in order to minimise delay in the processing of their applications.

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A..........

Saturday, April 14, 1973

- 4 -

DIRECTOR OF SOCIAL WELFARE TO OPEN CHILDREN'S CENTRE

The Director of Social Welfare, Mr. F.K. Li, will open a new children’s centre established by the Boys* and Girls’ Clubs Association on Wednesday (April 18).

The centre is situated at the Kwai Fong Government Low-cost housing estate, Block 8, ground floor, Tsuen Wan.

The opening ceremony will take place at 4 p.m. and Mr. Li will cut a ribbon to mark the occasion.

There will be a folk dance by members of Shek Yam Children’s Centre, gymnastics by members of Shek Kip Mei Children’s Centre and a performance by the Cape Collinson Band.

Facilities at the new Kwai Fong Children’s Centre include a club, a library, a craft centre for girls and an electrical workshop for boys. ,.h.

Note to Editors? You are invited to send a reporter and photographer to cover the opening ceremony.

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/5.........

Saturday, April 14, 1973

- 5 - -

GOVERNMENT OFFICES - HOLIDAY ARRANGEMENTS

*********

The City Hall and a number of Government offices will remain open on Monday (April 16) which is a public holiday.

The City Hall, including the restaurants, will remain open as usual. The City Museum and Art Gallery will be open from 1 p.m. to 6 p.m., and the Lei Cheng Uk Museum from 12 noon to 7 p.m*

•<

The City Hall library and the branch libraries at Ping Shek and Waterloo Road will be open from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m*, and the Kowloon Park Students’ Study Room from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. The branch libraries at Yau Ma Tei and Aberdeen/Pokfulam will be closed.

A number of post offices throughout Hong Kong and on the islands, including the General Post Office and the Kowloon Central Post Office, will be open from 9 a.m. to 12 noon for the convenience of the public.

There will also be one postal delivery on that day.

The Port Control Office, the Entry and Clearance Office and the Marine Licensing Office of the Marine Department will remain open from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m.

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/6.........

Saturday, April 14, 1973

- 6 -

TAXI RESTRICTIONS AT KOWLOON STAR FERRY CONCOURSE

********

The Commissioner for Transport announced today that with effect from 10 a.m. on Tuesday (April 17) taxis will not be permitted to pick up or set down passengers along the eastern taxi rank at the Kowloon Star Ferry Concourse except between the hours of 4 p.m. and 8 p.m. * • *

However, the western rank would remain open at all times, he added.

Appropriate traffic signs will be set up to indicate the restricted area.

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Release time: 2.g0 p.m.

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Tuesday, April 17, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No.

More life-guards will be deployed on beaches and swimming pools throughout Hong Kong this summer..............................•.. 1

The 1973 Housing Survey starts tomorrow ............................ J

The Inland Revenue Department has set up an estate duty enquiry service in Kowloon.................................................  4

Response to the current anti-measles campaign has been poor ••••• 5

There will be no delivery of letters on Good Friday................  6

The Director of Public Works Department will meet the media tomorrow ...................*......................................  7

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Tuesday, April 17, 1973

MORE LIFE-GUARDS ON BEACHES AND POOLS

Clean Beaches Campaign To Be Launched Next Month

*********

The Urban Services Department is. implementing a series of improvements to make the beaches and public swimming pools in Hong Kong cleaner and safer for swimmers this summer.

There will be more life-guards on the 37 beaches and six public swimming pools throughout Hong Kong.

There are at present 333 full-time life-guards, 79 more than last year and 143 more than of 1971.

Twelve vacancies are expected to be filled in May, a spokesman for the Department said.

The Hong Kong Life Guard Club are helping out by providing men from the ranks of its 2,000 fully qualified members to work part-time at public swimming pools and major beaches.

They will augment the Department’s life-guard service on Saturday, Sunday and public holidays from mid-June to early September.

The Department will also seek assistance from fully qualified members of the Auxiliary Medical Services to work part-time from mid-July to early September.

To keep the beaches in Hong Kong cleaner and more enjoyable this year, the Department has increased the number of litter bins and has ordered a beach-cleaner which will be delivered next month.

/The beach-cleaner ......

Tuesday, April 17, 1973

2

The beach-cleaner is able to clean one acre of sand beach in an hour. More may be bought in the future if the results prove satisfactory and labour-saving.

The U.S.D. is also using mechanised methods to remove rubbish from beaches.

A transporter capable of carrying 1,000 pounds of rubbish is now being used on the main Island beaches.

Two more will be delivered next month to expand the cleansing services.

It is intended to run a ,fKeep Your Beaches Clean” campaign next month to remind the public that keeping Hong Kong clean includes keeping the beaches clean.

The campaign will be launched on May 13 at Repulse Bay with a ’’Sunday Spectacular”.

A song-and-dance show will be staged by professional artistes, many of whom have appeared on television. HK-TVB will provide its band and dancers for the occasion.

The spokesman reminded swimmers that plainclothes litter wardens will patrol the beaches during the summer and will issue summonses to ”Lap Sap Chung” caught in the act.

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/3.........

Tuesday, April 17, 1975

- 3 -

HOUSING SURVEY STARTS TOMORROW

**********

The 1973 Housing Survey conducted by the Census and Statistics Department will staid; tomorrow and will continue until the 29th of this month.

A number of living quarters covering all types of domestic accommodation in Hong Kong have been systematically chosen for the survey.

One hundred student enumerators from the Colleges of Education have been chosen and fully 'briefed for this task.

The families in the living quarters selected for the survey will receive a call from an enumerator. They will be able to be identified by official identity cards issued by the Census and Statics Department, carrying their personal photographs.

A spokesman for the Census and Statistics Department asked all householders visited to cooperate with the enumerators in order to make this survey a success.

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A.........

Tuesday, April 17, 1973

ESTATE DUTY ENQUIRY SERVICE IN KOWLOON

***«****«*

The Inland Revenue Department has arranged for an Estate Duty Office representative to answer enquiries concerning estate duty matters at its Kowloon Office.

This service aims at helping members of the public on estate duty matters, especially for those who are unable to afford legal H ' • •

assistance.

Letters and documents addressed to the Estate Duty Office in Hong Kong may be lodged there. However, no arrangements have been made for attestation of affidavits or for payment of estate duty.

Questions concerning affidavits or accounts already submitted and under examination should continue to be taken up by the Estate Duty Office in Hong Kong.

The Kowloon Office is on the first floor, rear portion, of the old Hong Kong and Shanghai Bank Building at No. 664, Nathan Road, Mong Kok.

It will be open to the public on weekdays (excluding Saturdays and public holidays) from 8.45 a.m. to 4.00 p.m. (Tel. No. 3-886182).

Tuesday, April 17, 1973

POOR RESPONSE TO ANTI-MEASLES CAMPAIGN

Only 555 Doses Administered During First Week

********

During the first week of the 1973 anti-measles campaign, 555 doses

of the vaccine were administered, according to figures released today by the Medical and Health Department.

The campaign began on April 2 and will continue until Kay 31

Of the total, 115 children were immunised on the Island, 526 in

Kowloon, and 114 in the New Territories.

’•The results are poor,1’ a spokesman for the Medical and Health Department said.

He recalled that 25 fixed centres had been set up in resettlement estates, health offices, government clinics and hospitals, in addition to the 3^ maternal and child health centres offering measles vaccine for use by children between six months and five years.

The spokesman said in the New Territories, in addition to fixed

centres in the town areas, mobile teams were visiting villages, and the department’s two floating dispensaries were carrying the vaccine to outlying islands.

He reminded parents that although Hong Kong has not had a measles

epidemic since the last one in 1966 and 1967, when a total of 1,045 children

died, there was ”no room for complacency.”

’’Measles immunisation by vaccine was introduced in Hong Kong in 1968,

and soon resulted in the reduction of the incidence of the disease, and the near elimination of deaths,” the spokesman said.

”If there is no increase in the immunisation rate as a result of this year’s campaign, further epidemics of measles in Hong Kong can be expected.”

- - 0 -

/6

Tuesday, April 17, 1973

- 6 -

NO MAIL DELIVERY ON GOOD FRIDAY Six Out-Patient Clinics Open During Easter Holidays ********

A series of special arrangements concerning public facilities and services has been made for the Easter holidays.

The Post Office today announced that on Good Friday (April 20) there will be no delivery of mail, and all post offices will be closed.

However, there will be one postal delivery on Saturday and Easter Monday. Thirty-one post offices, including the General Post Office and the Kowloon Central Post Office, will operate between 9 a.m. and 12 noon on these two days to provide postal services.

Six out-patient clinics will remain open from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. over the holiday period. They are: the Violet Peel Polyclinic and the Royal Hong Kong Jockey Club Clinic, Shau Kei Wan on Hong Kong Island; the Royal Hong Kong Jockey Club Clinics in Kwun Tong and Yau Ma Tei, and the Robert Black Health Centre in Kowloon; and the Lady Trench Polyclinic in Tsuen Wan.

All other Government out-patient and evening clinics will be closed during the period.

The Low Block of the City Hall, the City Hall Restaurant and the Gavotte Restaurant, and the Memorial Garden will remain open as usual during the whole Easter holiday period.

The High Block of the City Hall, the City Museum and Art Gallery and all Urban Council Public Libraries will be closed on Good Friday.

/The City .........

Tuesday, April 17, 1973

, The City Museum and Art Gallery will be open on the other days of the Easter holiday period from 1 p.m. to 6 p.m., and the Lei Cheng Uk Museum from 12 noon to 7 p.m.

The City Hall Library and the branch libraries at Ping Shek, Waterloo Road and Yau Ma Tei will be open on Saturday and Sunday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. But they will be closed on Monday.

The branch library at Aberdeen/Pokfulam will be open on Saturday from 1 to 5 p.m.

Kowloon Park Students’ Study Room will be closed on Good Friday, but will be open from 1 to 5 p.m. on the remaining days of the holiday period. The Port Control Office, the Entry and Clearance Office and the Marine Licensing Office of the Marine Department will be open on Saturday, Sunday and Monday from 9 to 11 a.m.

-------0---------

D.P.W. TO MEET THE MEDIA

Note to Editors: Another ’’meet the media” session will

be held tomorrow (Wednesday) at 12 noon in the G.I.S. theatre, Beaconsfield House, 5th floor.

Attending the meeting will be the Director of Public Works, Mr. J.J. Robson.

You are invited to have the meeting covered. Television crews are advised to arrive early so that they will have ample time to set up their equipment.

Release Time: 7.00 p.m

--------0----------

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Tuesday, April 17, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No.

More life-guards will be deployed on beaches and swimming pools throughout Hong Kong this summer..............................•.. 1

The 1973 Housing Survey starts tomorrow ............................ J

The Inland Revenue Department has set up an estate duty enquiry service in Kowloon.................................................  4

Response to the current anti-measles campaign has been poor ••••• 5

There will be no delivery of letters on Good Friday................  6

The Director of Public Works Department will meet the media tomorrow ...................*......................................  7

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Tuesday, April 17, 1973

MORE LIFE-GUARDS ON BEACHES AND POOLS

Clean Beaches Campaign To Be Launched Next Month

*********

The Urban Services Department is. implementing a series of improvements to make the beaches and public swimming pools in Hong Kong cleaner and safer for swimmers this summer.

There will be more life-guards on the 37 beaches and six public swimming pools throughout Hong Kong.

There are at present 333 full-time life-guards, 79 more than last year and 143 more than of 1971.

Twelve vacancies are expected to be filled in May, a spokesman for the Department said.

The Hong Kong Life Guard Club are helping out by providing men from the ranks of its 2,000 fully qualified members to work part-time at public swimming pools and major beaches.

They will augment the Department’s life-guard service on Saturday, Sunday and public holidays from mid-June to early September.

The Department will also seek assistance from fully qualified members of the Auxiliary Medical Services to work part-time from mid-July to early September.

To keep the beaches in Hong Kong cleaner and more enjoyable this year, the Department has increased the number of litter bins and has ordered a beach-cleaner which will be delivered next month.

/The beach-cleaner ......

Tuesday, April 17, 1973

2

The beach-cleaner is able to clean one acre of sand beach in an hour. More may be bought in the future if the results prove satisfactory and labour-saving.

The U.S.D. is also using mechanised methods to remove rubbish from beaches.

A transporter capable of carrying 1,000 pounds of rubbish is now being used on the main Island beaches.

Two more will be delivered next month to expand the cleansing services.

It is intended to run a ,fKeep Your Beaches Clean” campaign next month to remind the public that keeping Hong Kong clean includes keeping the beaches clean.

The campaign will be launched on May 13 at Repulse Bay with a ’’Sunday Spectacular”.

A song-and-dance show will be staged by professional artistes, many of whom have appeared on television. HK-TVB will provide its band and dancers for the occasion.

The spokesman reminded swimmers that plainclothes litter wardens will patrol the beaches during the summer and will issue summonses to ”Lap Sap Chung” caught in the act.

-------0---------

/3.........

Tuesday, April 17, 1975

- 3 -

HOUSING SURVEY STARTS TOMORROW

**********

The 1973 Housing Survey conducted by the Census and Statistics Department will staid; tomorrow and will continue until the 29th of this month.

A number of living quarters covering all types of domestic accommodation in Hong Kong have been systematically chosen for the survey.

One hundred student enumerators from the Colleges of Education have been chosen and fully 'briefed for this task.

The families in the living quarters selected for the survey will receive a call from an enumerator. They will be able to be identified by official identity cards issued by the Census and Statics Department, carrying their personal photographs.

A spokesman for the Census and Statistics Department asked all householders visited to cooperate with the enumerators in order to make this survey a success.

-------0---------

A.........

Tuesday, April 17, 1973

ESTATE DUTY ENQUIRY SERVICE IN KOWLOON

***«****«*

The Inland Revenue Department has arranged for an Estate Duty Office representative to answer enquiries concerning estate duty matters at its Kowloon Office.

This service aims at helping members of the public on estate duty matters, especially for those who are unable to afford legal H ' • •

assistance.

Letters and documents addressed to the Estate Duty Office in Hong Kong may be lodged there. However, no arrangements have been made for attestation of affidavits or for payment of estate duty.

Questions concerning affidavits or accounts already submitted and under examination should continue to be taken up by the Estate Duty Office in Hong Kong.

The Kowloon Office is on the first floor, rear portion, of the old Hong Kong and Shanghai Bank Building at No. 664, Nathan Road, Mong Kok.

It will be open to the public on weekdays (excluding Saturdays and public holidays) from 8.45 a.m. to 4.00 p.m. (Tel. No. 3-886182).

Tuesday, April 17, 1973

POOR RESPONSE TO ANTI-MEASLES CAMPAIGN

Only 555 Doses Administered During First Week

********

During the first week of the 1973 anti-measles campaign, 555 doses

of the vaccine were administered, according to figures released today by the Medical and Health Department.

The campaign began on April 2 and will continue until Kay 31

Of the total, 115 children were immunised on the Island, 526 in

Kowloon, and 114 in the New Territories.

’•The results are poor,1’ a spokesman for the Medical and Health Department said.

He recalled that 25 fixed centres had been set up in resettlement estates, health offices, government clinics and hospitals, in addition to the 3^ maternal and child health centres offering measles vaccine for use by children between six months and five years.

The spokesman said in the New Territories, in addition to fixed

centres in the town areas, mobile teams were visiting villages, and the department’s two floating dispensaries were carrying the vaccine to outlying islands.

He reminded parents that although Hong Kong has not had a measles

epidemic since the last one in 1966 and 1967, when a total of 1,045 children

died, there was ”no room for complacency.”

’’Measles immunisation by vaccine was introduced in Hong Kong in 1968,

and soon resulted in the reduction of the incidence of the disease, and the near elimination of deaths,” the spokesman said.

”If there is no increase in the immunisation rate as a result of this year’s campaign, further epidemics of measles in Hong Kong can be expected.”

- - 0 -

/6

Tuesday, April 17, 1973

- 6 -

NO MAIL DELIVERY ON GOOD FRIDAY Six Out-Patient Clinics Open During Easter Holidays ********

A series of special arrangements concerning public facilities and services has been made for the Easter holidays.

The Post Office today announced that on Good Friday (April 20) there will be no delivery of mail, and all post offices will be closed.

However, there will be one postal delivery on Saturday and Easter Monday. Thirty-one post offices, including the General Post Office and the Kowloon Central Post Office, will operate between 9 a.m. and 12 noon on these two days to provide postal services.

Six out-patient clinics will remain open from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. over the holiday period. They are: the Violet Peel Polyclinic and the Royal Hong Kong Jockey Club Clinic, Shau Kei Wan on Hong Kong Island; the Royal Hong Kong Jockey Club Clinics in Kwun Tong and Yau Ma Tei, and the Robert Black Health Centre in Kowloon; and the Lady Trench Polyclinic in Tsuen Wan.

All other Government out-patient and evening clinics will be closed during the period.

The Low Block of the City Hall, the City Hall Restaurant and the Gavotte Restaurant, and the Memorial Garden will remain open as usual during the whole Easter holiday period.

The High Block of the City Hall, the City Museum and Art Gallery and all Urban Council Public Libraries will be closed on Good Friday.

/The City .........

Tuesday, April 17, 1973

, The City Museum and Art Gallery will be open on the other days of the Easter holiday period from 1 p.m. to 6 p.m., and the Lei Cheng Uk Museum from 12 noon to 7 p.m.

The City Hall Library and the branch libraries at Ping Shek, Waterloo Road and Yau Ma Tei will be open on Saturday and Sunday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. But they will be closed on Monday.

The branch library at Aberdeen/Pokfulam will be open on Saturday from 1 to 5 p.m.

Kowloon Park Students’ Study Room will be closed on Good Friday, but will be open from 1 to 5 p.m. on the remaining days of the holiday period. The Port Control Office, the Entry and Clearance Office and the Marine Licensing Office of the Marine Department will be open on Saturday, Sunday and Monday from 9 to 11 a.m.

-------0---------

D.P.W. TO MEET THE MEDIA

Note to Editors: Another ’’meet the media” session will

be held tomorrow (Wednesday) at 12 noon in the G.I.S. theatre, Beaconsfield House, 5th floor.

Attending the meeting will be the Director of Public Works, Mr. J.J. Robson.

You are invited to have the meeting covered. Television crews are advised to arrive early so that they will have ample time to set up their equipment.

Release Time: 7.00 p.m

--------0----------

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Wednesday, April 18, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No.

The Government is actively considering the feasibility of extending the double-track railway line between Hung Hom and

Sha Tin to Tai Po •.....•••••••••••••••..................... 1

Summer time begins on Sunday................................ 2

The Labour Department helped more than people find jobs in the first quarter of this year............................ 3

The final phase of the payment of a first dividend to Ming Tak Bank creditors will begin next week......................... 5

There has been an increase in the number of disabled people employed by local firms • ••••.............................. 6

The wife of the Social Welfare Director will visit two voluntary agencies tomorrow .......................................... 7

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Wednesday, April 18, 1973

- 1

DOUBLE-TRACK RAIL LINE BETWEEN HUNG HOM AND TAI PO Feasibility Under Active Consideration *******

The feasibility of -extending the double-track railway line between Hung Hom and Sha Tin to Tai Po Market and constructing a second railway tunnel between Kowloon Tong and Sha Tin are being actively studied by the Government•

The examination of this engineering aspect is undertaken by a Steering Group which was set up in October last year to look into the various long-term proposals for the future development of train services.

The Group comprises representatives from a number of Government departments, including the. Colonial Secretariat, the Public Works Department, the Transport Department and the Kowloon-Canton Railway.

Commenting on this today, the General Manager of Kowloon-Canton Railway, Mr. P.H. Lam, said: "With the rapid development of Tai Po, the ultimate planned population of the new town in the foreseeable future will reach 100,000 as compared with the present *40,000.

"Adequate train services are needed to cope with the expected public housing, commercial and industrial development as well as the increasing number of holiday-makers.

"Therefore, the usefulness of the railway, including double-tracking to Tai Po and a second railway tunnel should be considered in the overall context of the updating of the Major Transportation Studies and the Long Term Road Study."

_ . /In the ...........

Wednesday, April 18, 1973

- 2 -

In the meantime, detailed planning on double-tracking the section between the new Hung Hom terminus and Sha Tin is well in hand. *<

The progressive transfer of The Chinese University and the gradual development of the Sha Tin new town have been taken into account.

’furthermore,” Mr. Lam pointed out, ’’once the second race course in Sha Tin is functioning, the number of people travelling by rail is bound to increase tremendously.

”When the double-track project between Hung Hom and Sha Tin is completed by mid-1976, it will give an added daily capacity of 16,000 passengers in each direction and thus relieve greatly the present congestion in passenger trains.”

Passengers

At present, the trains carry some 25^000 passengers daily on weekdays and up to 63,000 on Sundays and public holidays.

Statistics show that the number of passengers carried by K.C.R. had almost doubled in the past ten years — from seven million in 19.62-6J to over 11 million in 1971-72. • ' *

Mr. Lam also disclosed that tenders for ^0 new passenger carriages

. ■ . . ■' i, •' • ’ ‘ : i

have been awarded to a Japanese firm.

These carriages will be delivered early next year.

”Twenty-eight such carriages will replace part of the old rolling stock while the other 12 will be used to lengthen the existing trains or to - . form an additional train set,” Mr. Lam explained.

/In addition .......

Wednesday, April 18, 1973

- 3 -

In addition, the K.C.R. will purchase a new locomotive from either the United States or Australia and an order is expected to be placed during this year.

Other railway improvements included in the double-track project are the re-building of Mong Kok, University and Sha Tin stations; provision of signalling equipment for the tunnel section; and construction of a spur line from Ho Tung Lau Workshops to the race course site.

As for the immediate future, plans aimed at improving the railway facilities generally are either underwav or will soon be carried out.

These include the extensive improvements to the Low Station and the Tsim Sha Tsui sidings, the installation of power operated barriers, construction of flyovers at level crossings, and the replacement of the existing semaphore signals and token instruments with modern colour light signals.

-------0----------

SUMMER TIME BEGINS ON SUNDAY

*******

Summer time will begin at 3*30 a.m. (standard time) on Sunday (April 22).

Residents are reminded to advance their clocks and watches one hour before going to bed on Saturday night (April 21).

Summer time will be observed until 3*30 a.m. (summer time) on

October 21 (Sunday)•

The period of summer time in Hong Kong is regulated by the Interpretation and General Clauses Ordinance.

- - 0 - -

A

Wednesday, April 18, 1973

- 4 -

SUCCESSFUL PLACEMENTS ALMOST DOUBLED

**********

A total of 1)4-34 people was successfully placed in employment by the Local Employment Service of the Labour Department during the first quarter of 1973 - 85 per cent more than the corresponding quarter last year.

In the same period, the service registered 5,006 job-seekers and introduced 4,583 of them to prospective employers for selection interviews.

The head of the Employment Division, Mr. James Yeung, said today that of the 1,4j4 people placed in employment, 632 were placed in industry, 472 in commerce, 226 in government service, 21 in public utilities and 83 in other establishments.

Of the 632 people placed in industry, 3&2 were apprentices who joined modern apprenticeship schemes with the help of the Apprenticeship Training Unit of the Labour Department.

Starting salaries for people helped into jobs by the Local Employment Service ranged from 8300 to more than 82,000 a month, with the majority (1,326) receiving up to 8999*

Mr. Yeung said: "At the moment we've got 3,094 job-seekers registered with the service, varying from the young and inexperienced to experienced and qualified persons looking for better employment.

"The service has 647. vacancies on its books, ranging from executives to office boys in commerce; from engineers to general workers in industry; and from artisans to messengers in the civil service."

/The Local ......

Wednesday, April 18, 1973

- 5 -

The Local Employment Service provides free facilities to assist employers and job-seekers alike. For the convenience of those who might have difficulty in approaching it during regular office hours, its Hong Kong Office at the New Rodney Block? Queensway, and Kowloon Office at the Canton Road Government Offices now remain open during the lunch hour from 1 p.m. to 2 p.m.

-------0---------

PAYMENT OF FIRST DIVIDEND TO MING TAK BANK CREDITORS Final Phase To Begin Next Tuesday *»«**#**»

The Official Receiver, Mr. W. Hume, announced today that the third and final phase of the payment of a first dividend of 25 per cent to creditors of the Ming Tak Bank will commence on April 24.

’’This phase”, said Mr. Hume, ’’will embrace all creditors who for any reason have been unable to call at the Official Receiver’s Office during the earlier phases to collect their dividends.”

All creditors who have not yet received payment are requested to call at the Official Receiver’s Office, 10th floor, Sutherland House, No. 3 Chater Road, Hong Kong, at any time during normal office hours on or after April 24. They should bring with them their identity cards and any documents they may possess in relation to their claims.

Mr. Hume added that any creditor who is etill unable to attend.at the Official Receiver’s Office either in person or by duly authorised representative should write to the Official Receiver as soon as possible explaining the circumstances and providing as much information as possible regarding his claim.

•M. T , ,

Wednesday, April 18, 1973

- 6 -

UPWARD SURGE IN EMPLOYMENT OF DISABLED

********

Keener interest is being shown by local firms in employing disabled workers.

A spokesman for the Social Welfare Department’s Job Placement Unit said today that the number employed last month totalled 35 — an increase of 14 over February.

As a result of recent publicity given to the working capabilities of the disabled, the Unit received a voluntary approach from Luen On Paper Products Ltd. which took on 11 as general factory workers. This group comprised seven mentally retarded, three crippled and one blind person.

Twelve other firms employed disabled workers during the month, and the total of 35 comprised eight blind, nine crippled, six deaf, two formerly mentally ill, eight mentally retarded and two recovered T.B. patients.

”The initiative shown by these firms in hiring disabled workers is most encouraging,” the spokesman said.

"It is hoped that other employers in the commercial and industrial field will come to recognise the working capabilities of the disabled.”

Records kept by the Job Placement Unit show that for the year ending March 31 employment was found for a total of 293 disabled persons.

This number comprised 114 crippled, 55 deaf, 48 formerly mentally ill, 3^ blind, 22 mentally retarded, 13 recovered T.B. patients and three ex-lepers.

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/7..........

Wednesday, April 18, 1973

- 7 -

MRS. r.K. LI TO VISIT VOLUNTARY AGENCIES

********

Two voluntary agencies which provide social welfare services for women and children will be visited tomorrow (Thursday) by Mr. F.K. Li, wife of the Director of Social Welfare.

Starting at 10.15 a.m., she will be making a tour of the Po Leung Kuk’s premises at No. 66, Leighton Road, Causeway.Bay.

The Kuk provides residential, educational, medical and case work services to children and young women in need of care and protection. It has more than 500 children under its care.

At 11.15 a.m., Mrs. Li will be visiting the Canossian Girls’ Home at No. 5&j Caine Road. The home provides shelter for girls aged from six to 21 , and also accommodates women who are either mentally or physically handicapped.

Note to Editors: You are invited to send a reporter and a

photographer to cover these visits.

•------0 ---------

time: £.00 p,m.

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Thursday, April 19, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No.

The juvenile registration system is to be revised ... 1

Amending legislation is underway to give effect to certain tax proposals made by the Financial Secretary ......  3

Regulations on ,rluckyn car numbers are now in force. 4

Ki Lung Street in Kowloon is to be reconstructed •••••••••••• 5

The Tin Hau Festival will be celebrated next week ••••••••••• 6

A two—point increase is shown in the General Consumer Price

Index for March................................       g

Work on the Princess Margaret Hospital interchange will start in June............................   . o

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Thursday, April 19, 1975

- 1 -

NEW REGISTRATION SYSTEM FOR MINORS UNDERWAY

Age Of First Registration To Be Raised From Six To Eleven Years

****«*«*»

The juvenile registration system is to be revised under amending legislation which will shortly be introduced.

Published in today’s Gazette for general information is the Registration of Persons (Amendment) Bill 1973 which seeks to lower from 17 to 11 the age at which a person must use his registered name in dealings with the Government.

The Bill also aims at widening the powers of the Governor-in-Council to make regulations in connection with the principal Ordinance.

Commenting on the proposed changes, the Commissioner for Registration, Mr. J.V.G. Mitchell, said that, in effect, the age of registering for juvenile identity cards would be raised from six to 11 years.

At the same time, he added, it was intended to change the present form of the existing juvenile identity cards so that it would include the holder’s photograph, full personal name in English and Chinese, date and place of birth and nationality.

The new form would be based on that of the adult identity card which is also to be modified by discontinuing the present practice of having the holder’s thumbprint imposed on it.

Mr. Mitchell said it was also intended to raise the age of re-registering for adult identity cards from 17 to 18 years.

The planned new juvenile identity cards, he said, would bear the date on which it was to be exchanged for an adult card.

/Both the

Thursday, April 19» 1973

- 2 -

Both the new juvenile and adult identity cards would be bilingual. Although thumbprints would not be included on the new cards, the applicant’s prints would be taken on first registration for record purposes, he said.

In addition, it was intended to introduce a new system of numbering juvenile identity cards so that the same number allocated on first registration would be retained upon re-registration for adult cards at the age of 18.

Mr. Mitchell explained that the proposed changes were designed to make it easier for holders of juvenile identity cards to identity themselves when applying for jobs and for schooling purposes.

He noted that at present the juvenile identity cards only listed the holder’s surname and the identity card number of the parent or guardian.

The improved juvenile card, he said, would bear the holder’s full personal particulars, including his or her photograph, so that he or she would be readily indentifiable.

The Commissioner said: ”In general it is intended that existing identity cards should continue to be valid. Subject to juvenile registration requirementst they would only be exchanged for new ones, at the request of the holder, if it could be satisfactorily shown that it was necessary and desirable to do so.”

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/3.........

Thursday, April 19, 1973

- 3 -

BILL TO GIVE EFFECT TO NEW TAX PROPOSALS

Personal And Wife’s Allowances To Be Raised

«**«*«*«

An amending bill, aimed at putting into effect certain tax proposals

made by the Financial Secretary in his 1973 Budget Speech, will be introduced into the Legislative Council shortly.

If enacted, the Inland Revenue (Amendment) (No. 2) Bill 1973 will:

* increase the personal and wife’s allowances from $7,000 to $10,000;

* increase the allowance for the first child from $2,000 to $3,000, for the second child from $2,000 to $2,500 and for the third child from $1,000 to $1,500. The maximum total allowance for children will be increased from $9,500 to $11,500;

* extend the child allowance in respect of children of any age who are not employable because of mental or physical handicap;

* abolish the lower income relief, and allowances for life insurance premia, contributions to Widows and Orphans Pensions Schemes, for working wives, and for independent parents.

The amending legislation also provides new rates for salaries tax and personal assessment.

Under the rates proposed, tax will be- charged at five per cent upon the first $10,000 rising in scale by five per cent on each succeeding $10,000 up to a maximum rate of 30 per cent on any amount above $50,000. The percentage charged on gross income (less expenses and charitable donations) will still not exceed 15 per cent.

A saving provision provides that the abolished allowances remain effective for years of assessment prior to that commencing on April 1, 1973«

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A..........

Thursday, April 19, 1973

- 4 -

REGULATIONS ON ”LUCKY” CAR NUMBERS EFFECTIVE TODAY

First Auction Will Be Arranged Shortly

**«*«*****

Under regulations which come into operation today, all vehicle registration numbers without a prefix are designated as lucky numbers, together with a list of other numbers occurring in each prefixed series, e.g. AT, BC, etc.

Today’s Gazette carries a formal notice that the Road Traffic (Registration and Licensing of Vehicles) (Amendment) Regulations are brought into operation.

Existing and future registered owners of vehicles bearing these designated lucky numbers may continue to hold them and, for a fee of S200, may transfer the number from one vehicle to another, provided both vehicles are owned by the same persons.

But, if the owner of a vehicle with a lucky number applies to transfer the vehicle to someone else, the Transport Department licensing offices are required first to de-register the vehicle, recover the lucky number, re-register the vehicle with a non-lucky number, and then register transfer on payment of a fee of 810.

The Transport Department will shortly arrange the first of a number of auctions of lucky number. All proceeds from the auctions, after deducting necessary expenses, will go to the Lotteries Fund for charitable purposes.

/Details.........

Thursday, April 19, 1973

- 5 -

Details of the auction and of the numbers to be auctioned will be published nearer the time.

Those numbers have been accummulating for some time and there are now nearly 10,000 of them.

------0 ---------

KI LUNG STREET TO BE RECONSTRUCTED

********

The section of Ki Lung Street between Boundary Street and Cedar Street is to be reconstructed.

Work will begin in June and will be completed in about five months•

------0----------

/6.......

Thursday, April 19 > 1973

- 6 -

TIN HAU FESTIVAL WILL BE CELEBRATED ON WEDNESDAY Parade To Be Held In Yuen Long

One of Hong Kong’s most colourful Chinese festivals — the Tin Hau Festival — will be celebrated by boat people on Wednesday (April 25).

Thousands of holiday-makers are expected to flock to Yuen Long for the annual parade spectacular. Boat people, in their gaily decorated junks, will make their way to Joss House Bay to pay homage to Tin Hau.

Tin Hau, the ”Goddess of Heaven”, is the patron saint of the boat people and others who depend on the sea for their livelihood.

There will also be celebrations at other Tin Hau temples on a number of outlying islands on Wednesday.

The Commander British Forces, Lt.-Gen. Sir Richard Ward, and Lady Ward, will be among 3,000 guests invited to watch the annual procession in Yuen Long.

Local dignitaries, members of the Heung Yee Kuk, rural leaders as well as senior Government officials have also been invited to the function.

Organised by the Shap Pat Heung Rural Committee, the procession will feature altars to honour local gods, dragon, lion and unicorn dances, Chinese folk dances, floats and stilt walkers.

It will start from the Eastern Bus Terminus and run along the southern lane of the main road to the stadium where the celebration will be held.

For the convenience of visitors, additional bus services will be operated between the Jordan Road Ferry Concourse and Yuen Long.

/The number ........

Thursday, April 19? 1973

- 7 -

The number of people visiting the Tin Hau Temple at Joss House Bay during the festival has increased enormously in the past years.

As many as 80,000 people, mostly boat people, are expected to turn up this year.

In view of the expected congestion4lion, unicorn or other dance parties will not be allowed ashore.

Additional precautionary measures will be taken to ensure the safety of the visitors. These will include the provision of first aid facilities on shore and a helicopter pad for emergency use.

A fire boat will be standing by in case of fire.

As in previous years, the Army will provide a temporary pontoon to facilitate the landing of passengers from boats.

To cope with the large number of visitors, the Hong Kong and Yaumati Ferry Company will be operating special services to Joss House Bay on Wednesday.

Starting at 5.30 a.m., ferry services will be operated at half-hourly intervals between Wanchai Ferry Pier and Joss House Bay until 3*30 p.m.

Three triple-decker luxury ferries will be available to take visitors and tourists to Joss House Bay. The ferries will leave the Central pier at 8.30 a.m., 9*00 a.m. and 9*30 a.m.

*«**«**$«

Noto to Editors: We have been asked by the Shap Pat Heung

Tin Hau Festival Organising Committee to issue press badges for the event in Yuen Long.

The badges will be available*for collection from the Duty Officer, Government Information Services, as from 9 a.m. tomorrow (Friday).

-------0---------

/8 .......

Thursday, April 19, 1973

CONSUMER PRICE INDEX FOR MARCH

********

The General Consumer Price Index (Sept. 65/Aug. 64 = 100) for March 1975 was 154, two points higher than that for the previous month.

There were increases of three points in the index for foodstuffs and seven points in the index for housing.

The indexes for durable goods and miscellaneous goods went up by three points and two points respectively.

Increases of one point each were also recorded in the index for clothing and footwear, and the index for services.

Movements in the indexes for other sections of commodity were insignificant.

Compared with the previous month, there were increases in the average retail prices of rice, fresh vegetables, pork and beef.

On the other hand, the average retail prices of salt water fish, fresh water fish, poultry, fresh fruits and eggs dropped.

As to non-food items, the index for housing was raised seven points as a result of adjustments made to the index for rents of private post-war built dwellings.

The Modified Consumer Price Index for March 1973 was 159, three

points higher than that for the previous month, and twenty-three points higher than that for the corresponding month in 1972.

- - 0 - -

/9

Thursday, April 19, 1975

9

PRINCES MARGARET HOSPITAL INTERCHANGE

Work To Start In June

*********

Work is to begin in June to provide direct and convenient access to the 1,500-bed Princess Margaret Hospital, construction of which is progressing well in advance of schedule.

The multi-million-dollar project, to be known as the Princess Margaret Hospital Interchange, includes two flyovers totalling 1,760 feet long.

Spanning Kwai Chung Road, both flyovers will accommodate two-lane one-way traffic between the hospital complex and the busy road area.

One of the flyovers will allow westbound traffic on Kwai Chung Road to turn right to the hospital. The other will enable vehicles leaving the hospital to join westbound traffic on Kwai Chung Road.

Eastbound traffic will enter the hospital via Lai Chi Kok Terrace Road. Work on the extension of this road will soon be carried out under a separate contract.

The Interchange will also include a down ramp so that vehicles leaving the hospital may also join eastbound traffic to Kowloon.

At the same time, both carriageways of Kwai Chung Road within the Interchange area, and for some 1,700 feet to the west, will be widened to four lanes.

The widened carriageways will help improve traffic flow to and from the Container Terminal, as well as the general traffic between Kowloon and Kwai Chung and Tsuen Wan.

Work on the foundations of the Interchange is already underway. Completion of the whole Interchange has been timed with the opening of the Princess Margaret Hospital towards the end of next year.

Note to Editors: Copies of an artist’s impression of the Interchange

are distributed separately in the press boxes this evening.

-------0----------

Release Time: 7.00 p. m.

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Saturday, April 21, 1973

GOVERNMENT STEPS UP TYPHOON PRECAUTIONARY MEASURES

P.V/.D. Already Checking Possible Sources Of Danger

*********

With the approach of the 1973 typhoon season, government departments are intensifying their precautionary measures to guard against loss of life and property.

In the forefront of these preparations are staff of the Public Works Department. Guided by the principle that prevention is better than cure, many of these have been engaged, during the recent dry season, on routine inspections to check for possible sources of danger.

Engineers of the Highways Office have been particularly active, examining all main streamwaters, drains, culverts, water mains supplies and catchpits to determine their state of repair and clear any blockage.

Potentially vulnerable spots are double-checked, and contract arrangements and emergency procedures reviewed. Site inspectors and foremen are regularly briefed on their role in the event of a typhoon, severe rainstorm or any other emergency.

Similar checks are made by staff of the Civil Engineering Office, who place particular emphasis on ’’borrow” areas, where soil is extracted from hillsides for reclamation and other purposes.

Complementary to these efforts is the continued vigilance of surveyors and inspectors of the Buildings Ordinance Office, who keep developers informed on all precautions to be taken in the event of heavy rain.

/The Royal •••••••

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Saturday, April 21, 1973

- 2 -

The Royal Observatory has introduced a new numbering system •tor t.'i© tropical cyclone signals which will be simpler than the prmri ous system and should help to eliminate misunderstandings.

Signals that were formerly numbered 5 to 8 were now renamed 8NW, 8SW, 8NE and 8SE respectively, differentiating between directions of winds with the same force while at the same time avoiding any suggestion that wind speed, and the likelihood of danger, correspond with numerical sequence.

Information is collected by radio from all available •sources, including ships, islands, land stations and aircraft over a wide area. Pictures transmitted by weather satellites, both visual and infra-red, are received daily.

Centre

\/hen the centre of a well-developed tropical cyclone comes within about 240 nautical miles of Hong Kong it may be located by the observatory’s radars mounted on top of Tate’s Cairn (580 m) and tracked continuously.

The Central Forecasting Office issues warnings of violent rainstorms and thunderstorms which are also tracked by radar. A special isoecho device enables intensity of rainfall in different areas to be mapped and rainfall .county; eAtimated The Police are geared to respond to an alert immediately si gnal

No. 3 is hoisted. Emergency equipment is checked to ensure it is readily available and in good working order. At signals above No. 3, district and divisional operations rooms are opened and all police officers return to duty.

/The 999 .......

Saturday, April 21, 1973

- 3 -

The 999 system for emergency telephone calls is also equipped to handle reports of accidents and damage arising from storm conditions. The control room is manned 24 hours a day to deal with calls from all over Hong Kong Island, Kowloon and the New Territories, and is linked directly to fire and ambulance services.

All 999 cars are attached to emergency units and are on continuous patrol. They are in radio contact with control and can be promptly directed to the scene of any landslide, house collapse or other incident♦

There are two emergency units in Kowloon, one on Hong Kong Island and one in the New Territories, each comprising three platoons which operate on eight—hour shifts. These units form a task force for tackling any emergency that may arise in a police district.

Disaster

In a disaster, additional controllers are brought into the control rooms and a command post, with a senior officer in charge, is set up at the scene. Police cordon off the area, take initial rescue action and protect property.

Marine Police launches are available to ferry emergency medical cases from remote areas and outlying islands to urban hospital facilities. These operations can also be directed by the 999 call system.

During emergencies, all staff of Government Information Services are mobilised on a shift basis, and the news room becomes a nerve centre for passing on the latest weather information and reporting on conditions throughout the Colony.

/Team of

Saturday, April 21, 1973

- 4 -

Teams of information officers are allocated to vital departments to ensure a continual flow of up-to-the-minute material for the news services. Mobile teams also keep in contact with GIS to supply on-the-spot accounts of latest developments.

All government departments, together with the armed services, voluntary agencies and public utilities, such as the ferry and bus companies, liaise through GIS to keep up with events and co-ordinate rescue and relief work.

The Marine Department is heavily committed whenever the port is threatened by tropical cyclones, and its Port Communications Centre, on top of the Rumsey Street multi-storey car park, serves as the clearing house for all information concerning effects on shipping and harbour installations.

Typhoon Shelters

On the approach of a storm, all typhoon shelters are patrolled by Marine Department craft to ensure utilisation and the maintenance of fire lanes and fairways up to the last possible moment.

The harbour is patrolled by a fast launch, manned by the department’s Harbour Patrol Service to offer assistance and advice, mainly to ocean-going vessels, until weather conditions force the launch to shelter. In conjunction with this service, the Port Communications Centre allocates typhoon moorings and records the movements of vessels during the storm. Information and assistance with casualties is also dealt with by the centre •

All launches are in direct contact with the signal tower, and with each other, by means of VHF radio, as are tugs and some other commercial craft, together with Fire Services, Marine Police, Port Works, Commerce and Industry, Port Health and Immigration departments.

/A contracted ......

Saturday, April 21, 1973

- 5 -

A contracted crane barge is available to relocate, remove or repair damaged navigational aids or government moorings. It can also be utilised to remove small sunken or waterlogged craft causing obstructions.

A chain of Marine Department signal stations are linked by omnibus teleprinter circuit and are manned 24 hours a day. The centre is also connected by teleprinters to the Royal Observatory and Cable & Wireless operations room.

During typhoons, rainstorms and other emergencies the Fire Services Department, who are in a constant stage of readiness at all times, may be placed on standby alert.

Alert

On this alert, all officers and firemen are re-deployed throughout operational commands, all fire appliances and vehicles undergoing routine maintenance are returned to their respective station, and additional lorries are obtained from the Public Works Department’s transport pool and fitted with reserve equipment as temporary fire and rescue vehicles.

Workshop staff establish mobile repair and recovery units, liaison officers are despatched to controls, first aid posts manned by Auxiliary Medical Service personnel are established at all fire stations and Ambulance Command restricts attendance to emergency calls. Auxiliary Fire Service mobilises and in extreme eases off-duty officers and firemen would be re-called for duty.

/Other key ......

Saturday, April 21, 1973

- 6 -

Other key departments, including Medical and Health, Social Welfare, Agriculture and Fisheries and the New Territories Administration, have their own contingency resources ready to cope with emergencies, all of which are linked into the Government’s overall plan for this kind of situation.

Others who play key roles in this plan include the Civil Aid Services, Royal Hong Kong Auxiliary Air Force, Royal Hong Kong Regiment (The Volunteers) and voluntary organisations such as the Hong Kong Red Cross and the St. John Ambulance Brigade.

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Release Time: 2.30 p.m.

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Monday, April 23, 1973

OVER #1 MILLION SUBVENTION TO BLOOD BANK New Blood Collecting Vehicle For Red Cross ******** '

The Government will sub.vent over'4’1.3 million to the Hong Kong Red Cross for operating the Blood Bank this year.

This represents an increase of 3622,900 compared with last year’s subvention and is to meet additional expenses for increased activities to encourage donations of blood.

A spokesman for the Red Cross, Mrs. R. Fraiser, said that they had ordered from Germany a blood collecting vehicle which would be delivered next month to augment the services of the Mobile Blood Collection Unit*

The Lotteries Fund has made a capital grant of 3371,000 to the Red Cross for the vehicle.

The vehicle will be specially equipped and will have a blood refrigerator capable of storing 250 units at a time. There will be a blood donation cabin with four beds, a refreshment area and a toilet,*____

Under normal conditions, it can collect blood from 18 people in an hour.

Mrs. Fraiser described the vehicle as a well-equipped blood collection centre in miniature.

/The vehicle ........

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong. Tel: 5'233191

Monday, April 23, 1973

- 2 -

The vehicle will visit various areas throughout Hong Kong to collect blood.

Mrs. Fraiser hopes that the new blood collection centre set up in the Ocean Terminal Building in March will help collect more blood as it is spacious and easily accessible.

For the convenience of office workers, the Red Cross is considering the possibility of setting up another blood collection centre in Central District.

The Red Cross also plans to run a massive campaign to educate the public about the benefits of blood donation to the community.

The Blood Bank collected almost 3&»000 units of blood last year. It aims to collect 48,000 units this year so that it can provide blood free to all who need it.

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Release time: 2.30 P»m.

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Tuesday, April 24, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No.

Results of the 1973 taxi tenders have been announced.......... 1

The Commerce and Industry Department is trying to help local and overseas manufacturers to make business contact ......... 2

The Governor has sent a message of thanks to those concerned in last week’s major drug seizure off the South Vietnamese coast ....................................................... 3

Response to the anti-measles campaign has improved slightly ................................................................ 4

Eleven cajididates who have completed a special training course in accident prevention will receive their diplomas on Thursday ................................................................ 5

A notice on the exports of certain restrained textiles to

Sweden has been sent to exporters ........................... 6

San Po Kong will have a new refuse collection centre ••••••• 7

A section of Great George Street will be made one-way on

Thursday .................................................... 7

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Tuesday, April 24, 1973

- 1 -

OVER 770 SUCCESSFUL IN TAXI TINDERS

Total Premium Amounts To $84 Million

********

The Commissioner for Transport has announced the results of the recent tender to register 1,000 taxis.

A total of 4,158 tenders were received - 1,182 for Hong Kong taxi licences and 2,976 for Kowloon taxi licences.

Following a full analysis of these, and on the decision of the Central Tender Board, offers have been made to register 78 Hong Kong taxis and 922 Kowloon taxis for a total premium of $84,665,080.

The average premium offered for the 78 Hong Kong taxi licences was 381,688 and for the 922 Kowloon taxi licences 384,917.

A total of 777 tenderers were successful. Of these 663 were offered single licences, 78 were offered two licences and the remaining 36 were offered varying numbers of licences between three and 13; 13 being the highest number of licences offered to a single tenderer.

As it is mandatory for a taxi to be mechanically inspected before licensing, it will not be possible to issue the 1,000 licences to the successful tenderers all at once.

Appointments for inspection of the taxis are being arranged in tender price order, giving priority to the higher bidders. Inspection and licensing procedure will be carried out as quickly as possible.

Unsuccessful tenderers are being notified and arrangements will be made for their tender deposits to be returned.

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/2..........

Tuesday, April 24, 1973

DC & I TO HELP LOCAL AND OVERSEAS MANUFACTURERS

To Make Business Contact

********

The Commerce and Industry Department is trying to help local

manufacturers who wish to do business with overseas industrialists making enquiries in Hong Kong.

The Industrial Development Branch of the Department has for many

years encouraged investment in Hong Kong’s manufacturing industry. It has received many enquiries from overseas industrialists wishing to place sub-contracting orders or to enter into joint venture or licensing arrangements with local manufacturers.

The enquirers, who come from a very wide range of industries, often

ask for the names of Hong Kong factories which have the capacity and the capability to carry out particular manufacturing processes.

"Useful business comes Hong Kong’s way from these enquiries, and

the Department is anxious to enlarge the amount of information it now has on Hong Kong companies which might be interested in expanding their operations in this way,” a spokesman said.

Of particular interest are companies engaged in the metal-based

industries such as tool and die-making, electro-plating and anodizing,, and general machining to fine tolerances, but more information and contacts are needed on other industries also.

Interested parties are invited to contact Mr. Michael Leo (5-258790)

of the Department’s Industrial Development Branch, who will be pleased to answer questions on this subject.

0 - -

Z5

Tuesday, April 24, 1973

- 3 -

GOVERNOR THANKS THOSE INVOLVED IN MAJOR DRUG HAUL

*«*«o*«

The Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, has sent a message of thanks to those concerned in last week’s seizure of a major cargo of narcotics bound for Hong Kong from Thailand.

The drugs - six tons of opium and 281 lbs. of morphine - were intercepted and seized off the coast of South Vietnam.

In his message, which was sent through the Britidi Ambassador in Saigon, the Governor said: "Grateful if you would convey my personal thanks and congratulations and those of the entire Government and community of Hong Kong to those concerned in the interception and seizure of this major cargo of narcotics bound for Hong Kong from Thailand. We are all most heartened by this example of successful international co-operation to defeat the traffic in narcotics.”

-------0---------

A....

Tuesday, April 24, 1973

- 4 -

ANTI-MEASLES CAMPAIGN

Slight Improvement In Second Week’s Figures

********

During the second week of the current anti-measles campaign, a total of 938 doses of vaccine was administered, according to figures released today by the Medical and Health Department.

"This was a slight improvement over the previous week," a spokesman said.

Of the total, 205 doses were administered on the Island, 548 in Kowloon, and 185 in the New Territories.

Since the 1973 anti-measles campaign began earlier in the month, 1,495 children have been immunised against the disease. The campaign is continuing for another seven weeks.

Free vaccine is available at all government maternity and child health centres. The spokesman urged parents of children between six months and five years to have them immunised.

During the campaign period, there are 25 vaccination centres in resettlement estates, health offices, government clinics and hospitals.

In the New Territories, mobile teams are visiting villages, and the department’s two floating dispensaries are making the vaccine available to children on outlying islands.

-------0---------

Tuesday, April 24, 1973

- 5 -

PRESENTATION OF DIPLOMAS

Mr. Szeto Wai, Legislative Councillor,will present diplomas on Thursday (April 26) to eleven candidates from industry and Government departments who have successfully completed a special training course for Industrial Safety Officers.

The course - the first of its kind in Hong Kong - was organised by the Industrial Safety Traini ng Centre of the Labour Department. The course covered, in general, all aspects of accident prevention.

Mr. Szeto will be introduced to the meeting by the Commissioner of Labour, Mr. Paul Tsui.

Note to Editors; The presentation ceremony will be held

at the Industrial Safety Training Centre of the Labour Department in Canton Road Government Offices Building, 3rd floor, at 4.00 p.m. on Thursday. You are cordially invited to send a reporter/photographer to cover the occasion.

-------o---------

/6.........

Tuesday, April 24, 1975

- 6 -

EXPORTS OF RESTRAINED TEXTILES TO SWEDEN

*********

The Director of Commerce and Industry today issued a notice to exporters on the exports of certain restrained textiles to Sweden.

The notice concerns Phase II of the Export Authorisation Scheme in respect of the disposal of quota balance for knitted shirts and sweaters (Group *lb) for the 12-month period ending June 30, 1973-

Companies are reminded that the Department will accept applications for export authorisations from all comers on Friday (April 27).

Trade associations and companies on the Department’s mailing list will receive copies of the notice shortly.

However, to avoid delay caused by postal delivery, companies which are interested in participating in the scheme are strongly advised to obtain copies of this notice from the Department’s receptionist counter on the ground floor of No. 46 Connaught Road Central.

Mr. C.L. Li, Industry Assistant, can be contacted on Tel. No. 5-^5678 for further information on the subject.

0 - -

Tuesday, April 24, 197J

- 7 -

REFUSE COLLECTION CENTRE FOR SAN PO KONG

*******

An off-street refuse collection centre is to be built at the junction of Hong Koung Street and Shung Ling Street in San Po Kong.

It will relieve the heavy use of local kerb-side refuse collection*

The centre will cover an area of about 1,J00 sq. ft. It will be enclosed by reinforced concrete walls on three sides, with a concrete covered area at the south-eastern corner of the compound.

Construction will begin towards the end of next month and is expected to be completed in three months.

-------0----------

STREET TO BE MADE ONE-WAY

********

From 10 a.m. on Thursday (April 26), the section of Great George Street between Paterson Street and Gloucester Road will be made one-way eastbound.

Appropriate signs will be erected to guide motorists.

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Release Time: 7.00 p.m.

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Wednesday, April 25, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No*

Unofficials in the Legislative Council have called on the

Government to reconsider the formula for fixing new Crown rents •••• 1

Under proposed legislation, the benefits of paid holidays and sickness allowance are to be extended to more workers ••••••••••••*• 7

New regulations to ensure greater safety for people working in confined spaces have been approved by Legco......................     9

Road tests for holders of overseas driving licences are necessary for good reasons ..........................................•.........11

Four bills become law................................................1J

The Secondary School Entrance Examination will be held on May 3 as scheduled.............................................•••••.*.••• 14

A team has been appointed to prepare for the commissioning of the new Princess Margaret Hospital ................*.....••••••••••••.*• 15

A print-making competition for students will be held to publicise the Road Safety Campaign...................................••••••••• 16

Mrs. F.K. Li will visit two voluntary agencies tomorrow............. 17

Forty-three building plans were approved in February......... 18

The squatter clearance programme is under constant review •••••*•••• 19

New rent control proposals are expected next month.................  20

The Government will study the possibilities for further restrictive user sales of industrial sites *..............................*••••• 21

A new bill to implement the Financial Secretary’s tax proposals has been introduced ........................................•••••••• 22

New appointments to the Legislative Council are announced (embargoed) .................................................................    24

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Wednesday, April 25, *1973

- 1 -

DEBATE ON CROWN LEASES BILL RESUMES

Government Urged To Reconsider Crown Rent Formula

Unofficial Members of the Legislative Council today called on the Government to reconsider the formula for the re-assessment of new Crown rents.

The appeal was made during the resumed debate on the Crown Leases Bill 197? in the Legislative Council.

The Unofficials said they were unable to vote in favour of the Bill as at present drafted.

Addressing the Council, the Senior Unofficial Member, the Hon. P.C. Woo, said that the Chinese Manufacturers Association of Hong Kong and 575 associations had joined together to oppose what they regarded as the ’’unjust and unreasonable formula” for fixing re-assessed Crown rents. ... . .

At their request, he said, the Unofficial Members had listened to their further representations against proceeding on the present basis. . ..

On behalf of his Unofficial Colleagues, he called upon the Government to ’’think again before going ahead on the present basis of renewal.”

Mr. Woo recalled that there had been an ”unprecedented increase” in land values since the beginning of 1971•

What the Government should do, he said, was to think of a ’’completely different formula which will break away from the relationship between Crown rents and the extraordinarily high market value of land experienced during recent years.” ,

/tar* Woo .••.••• •

Wednesday, April 25, 1973

- 2 -

Mr. Woo pointed out that the present market was an artificially restricted market because of the small amount of land becoming available for sale.

"In tying Crown rents to these high and uncontrolled market values the Government is being illogical in the sense that the domestic rents paid by tenants of those premises subject to rent increase control are paying only one»third of the current market price," he said.

Mr. Woo said: "Many thousands of people will be affected by the new Crown rents because of the subdivision of properties."

Increased Cost

"Those who have bought their homes without realising the effect upon themselves of the forthcoming revision of Crown rents may find themselves • i . . >»*■

totally unable to bear the increased cost of home ownership.

"Those who have not yet been able to buy their own homes may find it impossible to contemplate doing so."

It was the owner-occupier who would be most heavily hit, he said.

But, he added, the ownership of a dwelling place by the ordinary man in the street was now contemplated as a possible future act of Government policy.

As the Housing Authority was about to consider extension of house ownership to units of Government low cost housing, surely "special consideration must be given to those who, through their own savings and without the benefit of any subsidy from Government, wish to acquire their own homes," Mr. Woo said.

He recalled that in May last year he challenged at length the application of the Privy Council ruling to expiring leases in general under present-day Hong Kong circumstances.

/Mr. Woo said

Wednesday, April 25? 1973

- 3 -

Mr. Woo said then that many of relevant factors had not been placed before the Privy Council and that their ruling was related to the circumstances of the particular case on which they gave their judgment.

He said that his arguments put forward at that time had since remained unanswered.

Mr. Woo suggested that the arguments, or all the relevant argumentation for and against the present policy, should be referred to that body for further advice.

"This is far too vital a matter to be allowed to stand upon the ruling given in an isolated case,” he added.

Lessees

Speaking on xhe same Bill, the Hon. Wilfred Wong concentrated on the plight and hardship which the lessees of domestic promises would face upon the expiration of the leases.

He said that many lease holders, estimated to be about 70,000 in Kowloon, bought their property in recent years and in fact they paid a heavy premium on the leases unwittingly as the leases were already close to their expiry date.

He said: "This is partly due to the fact that the clerks in solicitors’ office have been telling them that Crown rents are nominal and partly due to the fact that they have no idea that Crown rents could be increased between three hundred and a few thousand times."

Surely, he said, a fair and reasonable formula could be found and he thought that the rent should be assessed on an average of the last ten years or the 1969 market whichever was lower.

/Mr. Wong pointed......,

Wednesday, April 25, *1973

- 4 -

Mr. Wong pointed out that "a lower Crown rent would set Government up as a good example of a landlord and help in stabilising the extraordinarily inflated price of land.”

The Hon. James Wu, said a compromise solution should and must be found, if Hong Kong were to forge ahead in greater harmony and prosperity*

He said for many years, people in Hong Kong had been led to believe, by a proviso in the renewable Crown leases, that upon expiry, renewal would be granted with a new Crown rent similar to the prevailing Zone Crown Rent but ”without payment of any fine or premium” as was clearly printed in the Crown leases.

Contravention

’’The belated ’Consolidated Statement’ by the Government in 19&9 requiring the payment of a lump sum or decapitalised premium in the form of greatly increased Crown rents,” he added, ’’was considered to bo in direct contravention of this proviso and there appeared to be a credibility gap on the part of Government.”

Mr. Wu said: ”The New Kowloon area, where some 5? 000 leases are due for renewal soon, is a low-income residential and industrial area and contrary to the remarks made by the Financial Secretary last May.”

Referring to the concessions made by the Government in May last year and also last month, he said they were "grossly inadequate” bearing in mind the greatly inflated land prices in the last few years*

On the unchecked high land prices and high rental on Hong Kong’s industry and commerce, Mr. Wu said people in all walks of life were wondering ”if Hong Kong had not been allowed to price itself out of today’s competitive world markets and into self-destruction.”

/He hoped •••••••

Wednesday, April 257 1973

- 5 -

He hoped that a less painful (to the lease-holders) and less inflationary formula could be worked out based on a multiple of prevailing Zone Crown Rent or related to rates but avoiding any direct relationship to prevailing land prices.

The Hon. P.G. Williams, also speaking on the Bill, said thousands and thousands of holders of renewable Crown leases genuinely believed that their lease was altogether different from a normal commercial lease.

He said: "There is a strong sense of ownership of their land and the Crown rent is not regarded as a true rent, but more akin to a modest rate or tax."

History

"History has fashioned this concept; the wording of the terms of renewal of the Crown lease gives force to it and the failure of Government to raise Crown rents progressively over the years has contributed to it."

Mr. Williams favoured the suggestion of his Unofficial colleague, the Hon. Szeto Wai, that Crown rents might be reassessed as a proportion of the rateable value of the property.

He said the Government had consistently reassessed rates over the years and this was a far more realistic and rational base than an arguable, even illusory, market value modified by arbitrary percentage reductions.

"This basis would," he believed, "be more palatable to lease-holders and much reduce the charge of unfairness levelled against the Government today.”

/Turning •••••.•••

Wednesday, April 25, 1973

- 6 -

Turning to the social aspect of the problem, he saidj "The proposals under the Bill must be another inflationary element in this situation and could well create obstacles in any plans the Government may have to Alleviate the recent burden for which almost everyone in Hong Kong is suffering."

After the Unofficials had spoken, the Colonial Secretary, Sir Hugh Norman—Walker, moved that the debate on the motion be adjourned.

He thanked the Unofficial Members for their advice and saj d that

• ■ .. f,.

clearly they were greatly concerned about the effect that the payment of a reassessed rent for renewal of expiring 75-ye&r renewable leases would have on small property owners.

•; . .•* ' - ■ / ’• 'r -------------------------------o----------

Wednesday, April 25, 1973

PAID HOLIDAYS AND SICKNESS ALLOWANCE FOR WORKERS Benefits To Be Extended To More People *#«*«*#*

The Commissioner of Labour, the Hon. Paul Tsui today proposed that all workers earning up to 81,500 a month, whether employed in an industrial undertaking or not, should be given sickness allowance and six holidays a year.

In introducing the Employment (Amendment) (No. 2) Bill 1973 in the Legislative Council today, he pointed out that the six holidays should be in addition to the one rest day a week for women and young persons employed in industry.

The six holidays will, as before, be designated, but the holiday on Winter Solstice will be replaced by New Year’s Day.

Mr. Tsui said that under the present law, some 600,000 out of the total working population of 1.6 million did not have the right to claim the six statutory holidays or sickness allowance.

The Bill also seeks to increase the sickness allowance benefits for workers by raising the entitlement up to 24 days in two years. As present, workers are entitled only up to 12 days in one year.

Mr. Tsui said that sickness allowance would be paid for the first three days the worker was sick if he had fallen sick for four or more days.

Under the present ordinance, a worker will be paid sickness allowance only as from the fourth day if he has fallen sick for less than seven days.

/The rates .........

Wednesday, April 25, 1973

- 8 -

The rates for payment for holiday pay and sickness allowance will remain the same: for a paid holiday the same wages as the worker would have earned if he had worked on that day; and half of that sum for sickness allowance•

The Bill, if approved, will be enforced in two stages. The first part, dealing with sickness allowance, will come into force-as from July 1, 1973; and the second part, dealing with paid holidays, will be effective from January 1, 197^.

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Wednesday, April 25, 1973

•. i' ' - ■ c '

- . 9 -

GREATER SAFETY FOR WORKING IN CONFINED SPACES New Regulations Prescribe Precautionary Measures *«*««***

A set of new regulations to ensure greater safety for those required to work in confined spaces was today approved by the Legislative Council.

The regulations, entitled the Factories and Industrial Undertakings (Confined Spaces) Regulations 1973, prescribe certain safety measures to be observed by both proprietors and workers. Details of the regulations will be published in Friday’s Government Gazette.

Speaking in the Legislative Council today, the Comnissioncr of Labour, Mr. Paul Tsui, said that working in confined spaces such as chambers, tanks, wells, vats pits, tunnels, pipes, flues, boilers and pressure receivers was hazardous because workers were known to have been overcome by dangerous fumes in such places.

He said that during the period January 1968 to February 1973, officers of the Labour Department had investigated 16 such accidents in which 14 workers were killed.

’’Such sad incidents might have been reduced, if not totally avoided, had precautionary measures, such as those which are now prescribed in these regulations been taken,” he said. ~ ••

Under the regulations, every confined space in an industrial undertaking, unless there are other exits, must be provided with a manhole of adequate size.

Anyone entering a confined space must be authorized by the proprietor and must wear an approved breathing apparatus. Where practicable, he should also wear a belt with a rope securely attached.

/These •••••••

Wednesday, April 25, 1973

- 10 -

These requirements do not apply if a confined space has been certified safe for entry without breathing apparatus by the proprietor who, before making such a certification, must take steps to test for, and to prevent, the presence of dangerous fumes.

Proprietors are also required to keep a sufficient supply of approved breathing apparatus, suitable reviving apparatus, vessels containing oxygen, belts and ropes. These items must always be maintained in a satisfactory condition.

The regulations further stipulate that proprietors must not permit any person to enter or remain in any boiler-furnace or boiler-flue until it has been cooled by ventilation.

The regulations will come into effect in six months.

Mr. Tsui said this was to allow sufficient time for proprietors to make alterations, where necessary, to ensure that manholes in their industrial establishments were of adequate size.

Contravention of the regulations will result in fines up to $2,OCX) for proprietors and S500 for any person other than proprietor.

-----0------

/11

Wednesday, April 25, 1973

11

ROAD TESTS FOR OVERSEAS LICENCE HOLDERS

Requirement Upheld By Financial Secretary

**********

A holder of overseas driving licences can usually drive in Hong Kong without interruption from the time of arrival until he passes the road test and receive a Hong Kong licence, as long as he applies in good time for his test.

This was stated by the Financial Secretary, the Hon. C.P. Haddon-Cave, in reply to a question by Mrs. Ellen Li in the Legislative Council this afternoon. She had asked if the Government would drop the road test requirement for overseas licence holders in view of the large backlog of * driving tests.

Mr. Haddon-Cave said there were about 7,000 applicants a year who were holders of overseas licences.

”Thist” he said, ’’does add to the backlog of driving tests, but it is not a serious burden and there are good reasons for not issuing a Hong Kong driving licence direct without a test.”

He said the Commissioner for Transport was anxious not to place his licensing staff in the difficult position of having to check the validity of overseas licences.

He added that the Transport Advisory Committee had advised against waiving the road test requirement for holders of overseas licences.

But he said he would ask the Commissioner of Transport ”to examine the whole question again” and to seek confirmation of their previous advice from the T.A.C.

/Under the

Wednesday, April 25, 1973

- 12 -

Under the present system, holders of overseas driving licences are required to pass a Hong Kong driving test before being issued with a Hong Kong licence. They can drive in Hong Kong for up to one year provided his overseas licence is valid for that period.

Mr, Haddon-Cave said it was "at least arguable" that when a overseas licence holder became a resident after one year, he should be exempted from all local requirements.

He said it was far from easy for the Transport Department to decide whether the possession of any particular overseas driving lieence indicated driving skill and experience of a standard comparable to that required of an applicant for a Hong Kong licence.

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Wednesday, April 25, 1975

- 15 -

FOUR BILLS BECOME LAW

*1

Four bills passed their committee stage and third readings in the Legislative Council this afternoon and became law. »

They were the Crown Rent and Premium (Apportionment) (Amendment)

Bill 1975; the Public Transport Services (Hong Kong Island) (Amendment)

Bill 1975; the Public Transport Services (Kowloon and New Territories) (Amendment) Bill 1975; and the Crown Lands Resumption (Amendment) Bill 1975*

Four bills had their first and second readings.

They were the Registration of Persons (Amendment) Bill 1975; the

Inland Revenue (Amendment) (No. 2) Bill 1975; the Marine Fish (Marketing) (Amendment) Bill 1975; and the Employment (Amendment) (No. 2) Bill 1975. Debate on them was adjourned.

Debate on the second readings of six other bills was resumed.

They were the Crown Leases Bill 1975; the Crown Rent and Premium (Apportionment) (Amendment) Bill 1975;, the Public Transport Services (Hong Kong Island) (Amendment) Bill 1975; the Public Transport Services (Kowloon and New Territories) (Amendment) Bill 1975; Crown Lands Resumption (Amendment) Bill 1975; and the Employment (Amendment) Bill 1975*

-----0------

Wednesday,-April 25, 1973

- 14 -

SECONDARY SCHOOL ENTRANCE EXAMINATION

«*«**l*«>li

The Education Department confirms that the Secondary School

Entrance Examination will be held on Thursday afternoon, May 1973, as announced to participating schools in circulars dated December 11, 1972 and February 9» 1973*

The examination centres are generally unchanged. Minor exceptions if any, will be notified individually to the schools and pupils concerned,

So far as candidates are concerned, therefore, the examination will proceed in the usual manner.

There are, however, three important changes in the arrangements

(a) Participating schools will not have any classes on May J, 1973» so their entire staff will be available to assist with invigilation and with conducting the children to the examination centres;

(b) Each group of children will be accompanied by at least one teacher from their own school, not only on the way from their own school to the centre but also during the examination; and

(c) In addition to the teachers specifically nominated as responsible for groups of children from their own school, other teachers from the same school will normally be required to assist with invigilation.

The main effects of these changes will be:-

(a) The total number of teachers invigilating, or ..... otherwise assisting, is greatly increased;

(b) Each child will find at least one familiar teacher present throughout the afternoon, in addition to those from other schools; and

(c) Responsibility •

Wednesday, April 25, 1973

15

(c) Responsibility for the proper examination of each school’s candidates will rest primarily on teachers of that school.

These arrangements apply generally to the urban districts.

Those for the Mew Territories are slightly different.

Letters have been despatched to presiding invigilators explaining the arrangements in detail and inviting them to pre-examination conferences.

A spokesman for the Education Department said: ”It is expected that these arrangements will help the children by enabling then to take the examination in a calm atmosphere in the presence of a familiar teacher. They will also assist the teacher-invigilators, by increasing their number.

"The success of the examination will depend, both generally and for each particular school, on the teachers concerned responding in a thoroughly professional manner.”

-------0---------

STAFFING PLAN FOR PRINCESS MARGARET HOSPITAL

**********

A team consisting of a Medical Administrator, a Senior Nursing Officer and a Senior Hospital Secretary has been appointed to prepare for the commissioning of the Princess Margaret Hospital.

The Director of Medical and Health Services, Dr. the Hon. G.H. Choa, in reply to a question by the Hon. Mrs. Ellen Li, said: ”The 1973-74 Estimates provide 56 posts of medical officer and 642 posts in nursing and other grades, including 204 at the present Lai Chi Kok Hospital, for the new hospital.”

He said training for the medical and nursing staff in major hospitals was in progress.

’^he Commissioning Team will review staff requirements from time to time,” he added. $

/16........

Wednesday, April 25? 1973

- 16 -

PRINT-MAKING COMPETITION FOR STUDENTS

To Publicise Road Safety Campaign

The Education Department is organising a competition for primary and secondary school students to select suitable prints for use in a bilingual calendar to publicise the Road Safety Campaign.

The calendar will contain 12 road safety pictures selected from prints made by students and will be issued free to schools to remind the public of the importance of road safety throughout the year.

The theme of the competition is ”How to Prevent Traffic Accidents”. Students are free to convey the message in any style.

Direct, simple and positive approaches are preferred, but gruesome scenes should be avoided.

Slogans or titles should not be included in the prints.

Entries must be in the form of prints. They can be monochrome or coloured. The size of each print should be approximately 11# inches and 14# inches.

Prizes for the primary section are $200 for each of the six first prizes and #25 for each of the 24 consolation prizes.

In the Secondary section, there will be six first prizes of #200 each and 12 consolation prizes of #25 each.

All entries should reach the Inspector of Art and Craft, Cultural Crafts Centre, No. 4 Pak Fuk Road, 5th floor, Hong Kong, before June 50.

The layout of the calendar will be designed separately by experts.

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/17

Wednesday, April 25, 1973

- 17 -

MRS. F.K. LI TO VISIT DAY CARE CENTRE

And Home For Aged Women

*********

Mrs. Li Fook-kow, wife of the Director of Social Welfare, will visit two voluntary agencies tomorrow (Thursday).

The two agencies are the Wang Tau Hom Day Centre at Block 26, Wang Tau Hom Estate and the Poh Yeh Home for the Aged Women in Sha Tin.

The Wang Tau Hom Day Centre is one of the two centres run by the Save the Children Fund for mentally retarded children. It has been in operation since 1964.

The centre, which aims at providing day care and training to » children between six and 14, operates from 9-30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Children attending the centre are provided with transport, free lunches and refreshments.

The Poh Yeh Home for the Aged Women is a Buddhist home run by a board of directors. The Home, opened in 1955, provides free vegetarian food and lodging for 104 elderly women.

Mrs. Li will be accompanied on these visits by Mrs. Rose Goodstadt, Acting Principal Social Welfare Officer (Rehabilitation). She will arrive at the Wang Tau Hom Day Centre at 10.30 a.m. and the Poh Yeh Home for Aged Women at 11.45 a.m.

Note to Editors: You are cordially invited to send a reporter

and/or photographer to cover the visits.

• • • -------0---------

/18

Wednesday, April 25, 1973

- 18 -

FORTY-THREE BUILDING PLANS APPROVED IN FEBRUARY

*********

The Hong Kong Cricket Club’s new club house in Wong Nei Chung Gap Road was one of the 43 building plans approved by the Building Authority in February.

Also approved were building plans for four 28-storey blocks of apartment buildings in Repulse Bay Road and a 30-storey cinema and apartment/commercial building.

During the month. 57 buildings were certified for occupation. The declared total construction cost of these buildings was more than 5100 million.

The Building Authority gave permission for work to start on 29 building projects.

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NEW TELEPHONE LINES FOR PRESS ENQUIRIES

*********

Note to Editors: You are Reminded that there are now two direct line telephones to the G.’I.S. inquiry desk. The numbers are: 5-227662 • *

5-232721

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/19.......

Wednesday, April 25, 1973

- 19 -

SQUATTER CLEARANCE PROGRAMME UNDER CONSTANT REVIEW

****»*«$

The Government will keep the clearance programme for squatter areas "under constant review" to ensure as far as possible that planned developments are not held up.

This was stated by the Secretary for Housing, the Hon. I.M. Lightbody, in the Legislative Council today in reply to a question by the Hon. Wilfred Wong.

About 60,000 people living in squatter areas might have to be cleared this year as a result of the decisions to proceed with the Mass Transit Railway scheme and to bring forward the new town development plans, he said.

Mr. Lightbody explained: "These clearance demands amount to a bringing forward of clearance plans, because our new town development time-tables have advanced these schemes by 5 to 10 years, and similarly our public housing building programme, which generates significant demands for clearances, is expanding."

He said that in recent years the clearance programme for land required for all types of development had involved the clearance of around 20,000 persons a year.

He said: "there has always been a close matching of clearance time-tables with the availability of public housing; this because of our longstanding custom of rehousing all occupants of tolerated structures in the clearance areas."

"In short," he said, "clearance demands are building up so rapidly that we will have to weigh them against each other to determine priorities."

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/20..........................................

Wednesday, April 25, 1975

- 20 -

NEW RENT C0NER0L PROPOSALS EXPECTED NEXT MONTH

Proposals for rent control have been formulated and will be tabled in the Legislative Council next month, the Colonial Secretary, Sir Hugh Morman-Walker, said today.

Sir Hugh was replying to the Hon. S.Y. Chung who asked whether Government would take steps to prevent principal tenants from overcharging sub-tenants.

The Colonial Secretary pointed out that it was an offence under the Landlord and Tenant Ordinance for the principal tenant to charge more than the permitted rent.

Sub-tenants who consider that the rent they are paying is excessive can seek the advice of the Tenancy Inquiry Bureau.

Under the Rent Increases (Domestic Premises) Control Ordinance both tenancies and sub-tenancies are protected.

If the principal tenant’s rent had been increased, he said, he should apply to the Commissioner of Rating and Valuation for a certificate of increase in rent before he can raise a sub-tenant’s rent by a similar percentage.

In respect of new lettings to sub-tenants of rent controlled post-war premises, the Colonial Secretary said while it might seem desirable to limit in a principal tenant to charging only a fair proportion of the controlled rent, ’’this would be extremely difficult to supervise and would require a considerable expansion of professional staff.”

He added that generally however the existing rent control legislation had had a restraining effect and principal tenants, if their own rent was restricted, although perhaps charging more than the controlled rent, did not usually charge a full market rent to sitting sub-tenants.

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Wednesday, April 25, 1973

- 21

FURTHER SALES OF INDUSTRIAL LAND FOR SPECIALISED INDUSTRIES

Government To Consider Possibilities

*********

The Government will examine in the coming months ’’the possibilities and criteria for further restrictive user sales of industrial land designed to introduce more technological industry” to Hong Kong.

This v/as stated by the Financial Secretary, the Hon. C.P. Haddon-Cave in reply to a question by the Hon. James Wu in the Legislative Council today.

He said the Government wanted ”to remove an important impediment to the establishment of some types of industry which could be reckoned to be beneficial to the development of the economy as a whole.”

He said that the recent sale of a five-acre site on Tsing Yi Island restricted to the automotive industry was entered into on the basis of this kind of thinldng.

The ideal method, the Financial Secretary said, would be joint ventures between overseas firms with sophisticated technological knowledge and Hong Kong firms with local knowledge and backing from the resources of the local financial system.

”The Government, in conjunction with the Trade Development Council is now working to interest suitable foreign investors in the possibilities of development in Hong Kong/’ he said.

If propositions were made which looked promising but which could not be accommodated in high rise buildings, the Government would be prepared to consider tenders on a restrictive user basis, that is restricted to the range of industry it was desired to attract, Mr. Haddon-Cave added.

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Wednesday, April 25, 1973

- 22 -

NEV/ BILL TO IMPLEMENT TAX PROPOSALS

********

The Financial Secretary, the Hon. C.P. Haddon-Cave, today rejected a suggestion by some members of the Legislative Council to re-insert allowances for dependent parents and life insurance abolished under his tax reform proposals.

He said this was just not possible because the proposals were "interlocked to form a unified package.1'

The Financial Secretary was speaking in the Legislative Council this afternoon when he moved the second reading of the Inland Revenue (Amendment) (No. 2) Bill 1973.

He said: ’The fact is that, because of the growing inadequacy of the basic allowances over the years and the reluctance, in the uncertain circumstances of those times, to forego too much revenue, fundamental reform has not been possible until now."

Mr. Haddon-Cave said the three selective allowances of low income relief, working wife allowance and dependent parent allowance were introduced as palliatives to alleviate hardship, but at an administrative cost and with ’’inequitable results."

He stood firm in his belief that the relief granted since the war for insurance premia and similar payments was "quite inappropriate” in a low tax system - particularly one that was being reformed.

The Financial Secretary defended his decision to refrain from proposing that personal allowances should be retained at all levels of income charging only net chargeable income to tax.

/This, ........

Wednesday, April 25, 1973

- 23 -

This, he said, would result in such a considerable reduction of tax. Consideration of reform along these lines must await an increase in the standard rate of earnings and profits tax.

Mr. Haddon-Cave stressed that "a low standard rate of tax is fundamental to our objective of maintaining a high growth rate of the economy.” ”Our ability to maintain a low standard rate of tax will depend upon the efficiency with which our present tax laws are administered,” he added.

Mr. Haddon-Cave regarded the administrative resources that would be released by this tax reform package as important in this connection for there were areas of taxability within the existing tax law to be explored in more depth.

He deplored the ’’unjustified outcry” which occurred recently over the Commissioner of Inland Revenue’s notice following upon the reference he made in the budget debate to the tax liability of habitual dealers in the market for shares.

’Without passing any judgment whatsoever on the right level of the market at any time, these references to the tax position of habitual dealers undoubtedly led, furthermore, to an irrational over-reaction by the market as reflected in the volume of activity and the movement of prices,” he added.

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/24

Wednesday, April 25, 1973

- 24 -

EMBARGOED NEWS ITEM:

Note to Editors of Newspapers, News Agencies & Broadcasting Stations

The following announcement is embargoed until 6 a.in. tomorrow (Thursday)•

Publication is permitted in Hong Kong newspapers tomorrow (Thursday) morning, but no news agencies or overseas radio transmission of the announcement may carry the information without the embargo qualification.

On no account should local radio and television stations broadcast the item until then.

NEW APPOINTMENTS TO LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL

*********

Her Majesty The Queen has been pleased to approve the appointments of Mr. Hilton Cheong-Leen, OBE, JP, and Mr. G.M. Sayer, JP, to be Unofficial Members of the Legislative Council from May 1, 1973 to June JO, 1974.

The appointments are to fill the vacancies created by the retirement of the Hon. H.J.C. Browne, OBE, JP and the death of the Hon. Mrs. Mary WONG Wing*-cheung, MBE, JP.

Mr. Cheong-Leen was first elected to the Urban Council on April 1, 1957 and is currently the Council’s Vice-Chairman. He is also Chairman of the Council’s Local Administration and Resettlement Policy Select Committees, and a member of the Estimates, Hawker Policy, Museum and Art Gallery and Resettlement Management Select Committees. He was born in August 1922 in British Guiana (Guyana) and received his education in Georgetown, Guyana, and La Salle College, Kowloon. He was made an Unofficial Justice of the Peace in November 1964 and was awarded the Officer Order of the British Empire (OBE) in December 1971•

/Mr. Sayer •••••••

%

Wednesday, April 25, 1973

- 25 -

Mr. Sayer is the Cfeiirman of the Hong Kong and Shanghai Banking Corporation and Director of the Mercantile Bank Limited. He was born in London in January 1924. He was educated at the Millwead Preparatory School, Shrewsbury, and Peak School, Hong Kong. He first joined the Hong Kong and Shanghai Bank in 19^7 serving in London, Hong Kong, China, Malaysia, Burma and Japan. He was appointed General Manager in 19&9 and Director the following year. He became Deputy Chairman in 1971 and Chairman last year. He is a member of the Exchange Fund Advisory Committee and a Board member of the Community Chest.

The Hon. H.J.C. Browne was nominated for appointment to Legislative Council by the Unofficial Justices of the Peace in April 1968.

Tradition

By a longstanding tradition the Governor has asked Justices of the Peace to nominate one of their members for the Governor*s and subsequently the Secretary of State’s approval to serve on the Legislative Council, although this tradition has never been embodied in the formal constitution of the Colony set out in the Royal Instructions. While the fine contribution that such members have made in the Legislative Council is fully recognised, as is that made to the community by Justices of the Peace generally, the practice of calling for a nomination from this particular group does appear to have become somewhat inappropriate and even anachronistic in the present circumstances of Hong Kong.

Since all members of both the Executive and Legislative Councils, including the two new appointees, are Justices of the Peace, the views of Justices of the Peace will obviously continue to be well represented.

/After careful ••••••


Wednesday, April 25, 1973

- 26 -

After careful consideration of the historical and legal background the Secretary of State has approved that nominations should no longer be called for and they have not been on this occasion.

It i? emphasised that this departure does not reflect any change in the Government’s view of the high status of Justices of the Peace in the community, or of their fitness to serve on the Legislative and Executive Councils.

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Release time: 8.30 jp.m.

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Thursday, April 26, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No.

The Governor pledges strong support for the new housing effort ....................................................

The Asian Development Bank is urged to expand operations ••• 3

Claims for refunds for unused 15 cents receipt stamps should be made not later than the end of July......................... 6

Three Crown land lots in Kowloon will be put up for sale next month 2

A lap sap ,fblack spot” in Kwun Tong will be turned into an open space soon •••••.«•.....................................   2

A senior assistant master of the Education Department is retiring •••••••«............................................   8

The health report for March has been published................  9

Quarantine restrictions have been imposed against arrivals from Saigon on account of cholera............................. 10

Industry is urged to implement safety measures ••••••••••••• 11

Hong Kong must produce more sophisticated goods.......••••••• 13

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Thursday, April 26, 1973

- 1 -

TASK OF NEW HOUSING BODY IS TO BUILD FOR FUTURE

Governor Pledges Support For Housing Drive

*******

The primary task of the new Housing Authority is ”to build, and to build well and to build fast and to build for the future,” the Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, said today.

He was speaking at the Authority’s inaugural meeting today.

He said the inadequacy and scarcity of housing and the harsh situations that result from it was ’’one of the major and most constant sources of unhappiness and friction between the Government and the population.”

This, he said,implied no criticism of the magnificent work already achieved in this field.

He said that it was merely a ’’frank and dispassionate acknowledgement that the housing problem created by the influx of population still confronts us, is very great, and must be solved.”

The Governor noted that members of the Authority were particularly qualified to take up the various challenges.

”1 believe money will not be your principal problem,” he said, ’’but rather how to convert it into well-planned and well-managed estates quickly enough.”

Referring to the new arrangements for the construction and management of public housing in Hong Kong, Sir Murray said it would be some time before a vast new programme such as this began to show results.

/He said

Thursday, April 26, 1973

- 2 -

He said that obviously nothing could be done about the current year and probably very little next year. On the other hand, results would be considerable in three years and dramatic in four or five, he said.

The Governor continued: "But I do ask you to look anew at the figures for the financial year *7V75 and see if your joint expertise, ingenuity and enthusiasm cannot do something to improve them.

"I am sure that you are as conscious as I am of the urgency of the need and are as impatient for results."

Sir Murray pledged that the new Authority could count on his "strong interest and support."

The new Housing Authority, which came into being on April 1, has been set up to spearhead the drive for more and better housing in Hong Kong.

Its main task will be to ensure that the ten-year public housing target to house 1,500,000 people is met by- 1983*

Note to Editors: The full text of the Governor’s speech

is contained in a supplement to today’s Daily Information Bulletin.

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/3.........

Thursday, April 26, 1973

- 3 -

ASIAN DEVELOPMENT BANK URGED TO EXPAND SPECIAL OPERATIONS

To Meet Needs Of Growing Asia

*********

Hong Kong today called on the Asian Development Bank to expand its special operations to meet ’’the urgent and growing needs of developing Asia.”

The appeal was made at the sixth annual meeting of the Bank’s Board of Governors in Manila by Hong Kong’s Temporary Alternate Governor, Mr. John C.C. Chan, who was speaking on behalf of the Financial Secretary, Mr. Philip Haddon-Cave.

Mr. Haddon—Cave is a member of the Board of Governors.

Addressing the meeting, Mr. Chan noted with concern that the uncommitted balance from the Bank’s special Fund resources had dwindled to little more than US$20 million -by the end of 1972.

He welcomed the proposals put forward by the Bank’s Board of Directors to restructure and augment the Bank’s Special Fund resources through the establishment of an Asian Development Fund.

”In this connection,” he said, ”1 do not wish the Bank to overlook the possibility of receiving nominal contributions from the developing regional members themselves.”

On the management of Special. Funds, Mr. Chan said careful note had been taken of the criteria adopted in July last year by the Board of Directors for the Bank’s policy guidance in extending loans on concessional terms from Special Fund resources.

/”I am

Thursday, April 26, 1973

. - -

nI am in general agreement with these criteria," he said.

He also accepted that "there are varying degrees of need among the region’s developing countries" — that some must take priority over others for borrowing on concessional terms.

However, he hoped that the concept of country priorities "will not be allowed to colour the Bank’s policy in respect of its ordinary leading operations."

Essentially, he went on, the Bank’s ordinary and Special Fund operations were separate. Non-eligibility for Special Fund loans should not necessarily mean non-eligibility to borrow on commercial terms at normal rates of interest.

Judgment

Mr. Chan expressed the hope that in considering applications for loans from ordinary capital resources, the Bank would not base its judgment wholly on the existence or otherwise of a, "resource gap". Instead, he hoped that the Bank would take into account "such normal commercial ban!ri ng considerations as the applicant’s credit worthiness and the worthiness of the project."

It need hardly be pointed out, he added, that "an ability to invest excess liquidity in the short term, and from time to time, does not necessarily mean that there is no need for medium or long-term borrov/ing."

Commenting on the Bank’s policy of aiming at the early achievement of equality in the shares of ordinary and Special Fund loans in its total lending operations, Mr. Chan said the desire to accelerate the economic and social development of the region was "highly laudable."

/"But we .....

4

Thursday, April 26, 1973

- 5 -

"But we must not lose sight of the fact that the institution to which we all belong, the Asian Development Bank, was established primarily as a bank whose operations must stem mainly from its ordinary capital resources," he stressed.

While the Bank was a most suitable multilateral institution through which the flow of economic assistance from the developed world to developing Asia could be efficiently channelled, "this must remain a subsidiary role if the Bank’s fundamental nature and character are not to be substantially changed," he added.

"By definition, special operations will necessarily cease to be ’special’ if their scope becomes as large as, or even greater than, that of ’ordinary1 operations."

Ilr. Chan commended the management on its decision last year to adopt a new liquidity policy which aimed at maintaining liquid assets at not less than two-thirds of projected loan disbursements over the next three years.

"This was a sensible move which was more realistically geared to the Bank’s liquidity requirements," he remarked.

While he regarded the original policy of maintaining 100 per cent commitment cover not wrong in any way, continued adherence in the circumstances, he said, would have been "unnecessarily cautious."

It would also have resulted in tying up an excessive amount of liquid resources which could otherwise be used to generate higher income from longer-term investments in remunerative projects, he added.

Note to Editors: Copies of the full text of the speech are

distributed separately in the G.I.S. press boxes. -------------------0---------

/6.........

Thursday, April 26, 1973

- 6 -

ABOLITION OF STAMP DUTY ON RECEIPTS

Refunds For Unused 15 Cents Receipt Stamps

ft********

Claims for refunds in respect of unused 15 cents receipt stomps should be made not later than July 31, 1973, the Post Office announced today.

Claims may be made for cash refunds in respect of unmarked stamps of face value not exceeding 3300 at any of the following Post Offices:-

G.P.O. Victoria Aberdeen Hennessy Road Kennedy Town King’s Road Sheung Wan

Kowloon Central Cheung Sha Wan Kowloon City Kwun Tong Mong Kok Sham Shui Po Shek Wu Hui Tai Po Tsim Sha Tsui Tsuen Wan Yuen Long

Refunds exceeding 3300 may only be obtained on application to the Accounts Division, Post Office Headquarters, G.P.O., Fodder Street, Hong Kong.

Claims should similarly be addressed to be Accounts Division, Post Office Headquarters in all cases where stamps have been chopped or overprinted by the holder for the purposes of security or identification.

/7.........

Thursday, April 26, 1973

- 7 -

CROWN LAND SALES

*******

Three lots of Crown land at Canton Road, Kowloon, will be put up for sale by auction on May 11 (Friday).

The lots are for non-industrial purposes.

They are situated at Nos. 570, 810 and 938 Canton Road respectively. The lots range from 726 to 759 sq. ft. in area.

The auction will take place at 2.50 p«nu on May 11 in the Lecture Room, 8th floor, City Hall.

Full particulars and conditions of sale may be obtained from the Public Enquiry Sub-office, Central Government Offices, West Wing, ground floor, Hong Kong; and the Crown Lands and Survey Office, Kowloon Government Offices, No. ^05i Nathan Road, 10th floor.

Sale plans can be inspected at these offices.

-------0

LAP SAP BLACK SPOT TO BE TURNED INTO OPEN SPACE

*******

A lap sap "black spot" in Kwun Tong will be turned into an open space shortly.

The site occupies an area of about 57,000 square feet at the junction of Kv/un Tong Road and Hip Wo Street.

It will be developed on two different levels, following the nature of the terrain. A series of circular shaped platforms will be linked by concrete paved footpaths.

There will be flower beds, trees and benches.

Work is expected to begin in the middle of June and will take four months to complete.

-------o--------- /8 ........

Thursday, April 26, 1973

- 8 -

SENIOR ASSISTANT MASTER RETIRES

After 27 Years Service

*********

Mr. Shura How-kin, Senior Assistant Master of the Mathematics Section, is retiring after 27 years service in the Education Department.

Since his first appointment in 1946, Mr. Shum has taught in two primary schools and the Grantham College of Education.

In 1962 he took up his present post in the Mathematics Section of the Advisory Inspectorate. For the past eight years, Mr. Shum has also been head of the Kowloon Section of the Evening Institute.

Mr. Shum will receive a retirement gift from his colleagues tomorrow (Friday). The gift will be presented to him by the Assistant Director of Education (Chief Inspector of Schools), Mr. A. Brown.

.Note, foJffiAVys.s You are invited to have the presentation ceremony in the Education Department’s Conference Room at 4 p.ra. tomorrow covered.

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/9...........

Thursday, April 26, 1973

- 9 -

HEALTH REPORT FOR MARCH

One Death From Measles Reported

»**««***

Fifty-four cases of measles, resulting in one death, were reported during March, according to monthly health statistics released today by the Medical and Health Department.

In the preceding month, there were 56 notifications of measles, also resulting in one death.

"Although the rate of incidence of the disease is considered relatively low — there were 168 notifications in February and March last year — the two fatal cases in February and March this year illustrate the need for early immunisation," a spokesman said.

He was referring to the current annual anti-measles campaign which was designed to remind parents of susceptible children between six months and five years to have them immunised. The campaign is now in its fourth week.

The spokesman appealed for their co-operation to prevent the outbreak of a measles epidemic in Hong Kong. The last epidemic was in the years 1966 and 1967 when 1,045 children died.

Notifications of chickenpox showed a slight decline in March, with 46 cases reported as against 99 at the same time last year.

There was no record during the month of cerebrospinal meningitis or diphtheria. One case of poliomyelitis was notified.

Tuberculosis accounted for 949 cases and 109 deaths. There was no significant change in the monthly averages of all other notifiable diseases.

During March, Hong Kong remained free from cholera, smallpox and other quarantinable diseases. ------------------------------------0---------

/10.........

Thursday, April 26, 1973

- 10 -

QUARANTINE RESTRICTIONS

*******

Quarantine restrictions have been imposed against arrivals from Saigon (excluding port and airport) on account of cholera, it was announced today.

Meanwhile, quarantine restrictions imposed against arrivals from Banda-Atjeh (port), Indonesia, because of cholera and arrivals from Saigon (excluding port and airport), on account of plague, have been removed.

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Thursday, April 26, 1973

- 11 -

INDUSTRY URGED TO IMPLEMENT SAFETY MEASURES

In A Bid To Reduce Industrial Accidents

*******

Prevention of accidents is of vital importance to an industrial community such as Hong Kong, Mr. Szeto Wai, Legislative Councillor,said today.

He was speaking at the presentation ceremony marking the conclusion of the first special training course for Industrial Safety Officers.

The six-week full-time course was organised by the Industrial Safety Training Centre of the Labour Department. The course covered, in general, all aspects of accident prevention.

Mr. Szeto told the meeting that industrial accidents were detrimental to both workers and managements.

Accidents often resulted in painful suffering on the part of the injured workmen and their family members. Managements, on the other hand, suffered from great financial losses.

"It is therefore obvious that efforts must be made to reduce this appalling waste of our human and financial resources," he said.

In a bid to reduce the number of industrial accidents, he said, the Factory Inspectors of the Labour Department made regular inspections of all work places to ensure compliance with the legal requirements.

. . • .. ■■ « ■

"But their hard work was far from enough to serve as a complete answer to a problem of such magnitude."

"Industry itself must take initiative to implement safety measures within individual factories."

/He said that ........

Thursday, April 26, 1973

12 -

He said that an accident prevention programme would not be successful unless managements were prepared to take the lead.

He stressed that managements had a legal and moral responsibility to provide a safe workplace for their employees.

As a first step, he said, managements should issue a policy statement specifying that accident prevention was meant for the well being of all concerned.

"Safety Committees comprising representatives of workers and managements would serve a useful platform for the exchange of ideas," he added.

He said that another important facet of accident prevention was the appointment of Industrial Safety Officers on the factory premises.

Their role was to help reduce industrial hazards. They were to inspect the workplaces regularly; to identify and remove unsafe machinery and unhealthy working conditions and to make suggestions to managements as to the measures required to prevent accidents from occurring.

He said that an Industrial Safety Officer was a prominent figure in i the field of industrial safety.

"It is indeed a sad reflection on the local industrialist that only four out of 20,000 industrial undertakings considered it desirable to appoint Safety Officers on a full-time basis," he said.

He further pointed out that accident prevention required managements’ determined effort.

"Do not let any set-back affect your determination"* he said, "Officers of the Industrial Safety Training Centre are always available to help you with your technical problems."

In conclusion, Mr. Szeto praised those managements and government departments which had taken advantage of the training course for Safety Officers. He also congratulated those who had successfully completed the course and presented each of them a diploma.

- - 0 - -

/15

Thursday, April 26, 1973

- 13 -

HONG KONG MUST PRODUCE MORE SOPHISTICATED GOODS

Economy Is Basically Sound Despite Fluctuations

*******

The Chairman of the Hong Kong Association in London, Mr. Michael Herries, has emphasized the necessity for Hong Kong to raise its production of more sophisticated goods which are not yet being produced by its trading rivals.

Speaking at the Association’s annual general meeting in London yesterday (Wednesday), Mr. Herries noted that the abundant talents of Hong Kong industrialists were already directed towards this objective.

He cited the introduction of a quality mark and the attention being given to packaging as moves in the right direction and expressed the hope that they would be backed by the investment required to achieve their aims.

If Hong Kong were to remain prosperous and earn enough money to pay for the enormous public works and social programmes being undertaken, he said, it was to be hoped that the level of its trade increase would not decline further.

Mr. Herries noted that Hong Kong’s total trade had continued to expand but the growth rate had slowed down from the heady 21.9 per cent in 1969 over 1968 to only 10 per cent in 1972 over 1971, although the trend was upward in the second half of the year.

”This is still a good increase,” he said. ’’But in real terms, it was only HK$3,7OO million against HK$4,5OO million the year before and, when the increased cost of both imports and exports is taken into account, the volume of trade cannot have increased by much.”

/The prospects .......

Thursday, April 26, 1975

- 14 -

The prospects for Hong Kong deriving any great benefit from the operation of the UNCTAD General Preference Scheme, said Mr. Herries, were not too bright.

The Japanese attitude to it was not very encouraging and there were increasing import restrictions and competition from other Far Eastern countries with lower wages (and before long China would join these in the cheaper manufactured goods market), he pointed out.

Although the growth rate of Hong Kong’s manufacturing industry had slowed in recent years, said Mr. Herries, 1972 saw an influx of foreign banking and financing houses all attracted by the stability of Hong Kong’s central position and its potential as a leading money market in the Far East.

Commercial Diversification

This new industry provided employment for white collar workers and was a form of commercial diversification which should benefit Hong Kong in the years ahead.

”The performance of the Hong Kong stock market last year and early this year,” Mr. Herries continued, ”has probably not inspired confidence in overseas investors and I am sure the Government was right to issue warnings to deter speculators and to bring in legislation designed to protect genuine investors.

"Despite these fluctuations, however, the economy itself is basically very sound and Hong Kong took the floating of sterling and another devaluation of the U.S. dollar in its stride.”

/far. Herries .......

Thursday, April 26, 1973

- 15 -

Mr. Kerries said that it had been suggested by the Hong Kong branch of the Association that with Britain in the Common Market "we should spread our wings to the Continent".

While it was unlikely that the Association would form branches there, Mr. Herries together with the Secretary, Mr. Ted Bush, planned to visit several countries in Europe shortly to see what liaison, if any, was necessary and could be arranged.

Mr. Herries paid tribute to Mr. Geffrey Hamm and Sir John Keswick who were retiring from the committee of the Hong Kong Association, and to Sir Sik-nin Chau who recently retired as chairman of the Association’s Hong Kong branch. He proposed that they should all be made honorary life members of the Hong Kong Association.

Adoption of the Chairman’s report was proposed by Mr. Ernest Grimwood, European regional representative of the Hong Kong Trade Development Council, who will shortly be taking up a new post as the Trade Development Council representative in New York.

"It says much for the resilience ard drive of Hong Kong," said

Mr. Grimwood, "that it has achieved so much, despite the artificial restrictions imposed against its access to world markets, and built and developed the standard of living for all.

"But Hong Kong can, and does, take advantage of ill winds. It has traded up and achieved a high quality status that might otherwise have taken much longer to reach. I believe very firmly that but for the interest and activity shown by the Hong Kong Association access to the U.K. market would have been even more onerous."

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Heiease time: 7*30 p.m

PR 33 4000033

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

SUPPLEMENT

Thursday, April 26, 1973

INAUGURAL MEETING OF NEW HOUSING AUTHORITY

Speech By The Governor

***«*«»**

The following is the full text of a speech by the Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, at the inaugural meeting of the new Housing Authority: ”1 cannot tell you how pleased I am to meet you at this inaugural meeting: a meeting of the first single unified body charged with solving the housing problem of Hong Kong. My first reaction is ’At last’ • My second reaction is one of gratitude for your public spirit in agreeing to serve on this Authority. I am very conscious of the amount of work that will be involved for you. The problem is enormous, the difficulties immense, the social and political needs manifest and urgent.

”In foreshadowing the setting up of this Authority I said that the inadequacy and scarcity of housing and all that this implies, and the harsh situations that result from it is one of the major and most constant sources of unhappiness and friction between the Government and the population. I said that it offends alike our humanity, our civic pride and our political good sense. I meant every word of it, and this, as you all know, implies no criticism of the magnificent work already achieved in this field, work which has rightly received international acclaim. It is merely a frank and dispassionate acknowledgement that the housing problem created by the influx of population still confronts us, is very great, and must be solved.

/Indeed ........

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House. Hong Kong. Tel: 5-233191

Thursday, April 26, 1973

- 2 -

Indeed I think one can mention, with some plausibility, that the conditions of housing and the conditions of the infra-structure of everything that should go with housing like shops and playgrounds, schools and police stations, community centres and so on, that the inadequacy of these things - for good historical reasons which we all know about - is at the root of most evil in Hong Kong.

"Well, there the problem is. It presents a great challenge. It is a challenge alike to the planners, the architects, the builders and the sociologists and administrators. Also to the financiers. I believe you to be particularly qualified, on behalf of Hong Kong, to take up these various challenges. On the official side you have a highly competent and expert department under Ian Lightbody with Donald Liao and Jolin Walden. On the unofficial side you have a wealth of different expertise and experience which I believe to be complementary; on the official side you also have the heads of the departments principal 1 y concerned. You all have drive and devotion.

”The funds for the programme are available. I believe money will not be your principal problem, but rather how to convert it into well*planned and well*managed estates quickly enough •

’’One or two points of advice. You will immediately be confronted with a whole host of long and short term problems. I do ask you never to lose sight of the fact that the short-term problems however urgent and however tragic are all only facets of the overall lack of proper housing. All will be solved when you have made good that lack. In short,

/I believe

Thursday, April 26, 1973

- 3 -

I believe you shoud never lose sight of the fact that your primary task is to build, and to build well and to build fast, and to build for the future. r,Secondly, you may have guessed that I would not have set up totally new arrangements for the construction and management of public housing in Hong Kong if I had felt that all was well with current programmes* Inevitably it will be some time before a vast new programme such as this begins to show results. Obviously nothing can be done about the current year and probably very little next year. On the other hand, results will be considerable in three years and dramatic in four or five. But I do ask you to look anew at the figures for the financial year r74/75 and see if your joint expertise, ingenuity and enthusiasm cannot da something to improve them. It may be impossible, but I am sure that you are as conscious as I am of the urgency of the need and are as impatient for results.

"Thirdly, I realise the urgency of many of the short term ^problems that also confront you. Recently both Mrs. Elliott and Mr. Lightbody have drawn attention to the need for re-site areas and of the new squatter problem created by that new refugee, the regugee from the rents.

nI think that what I have already said indicates that you may count on my strong interest and support. I myself and indeed al1 Hong Kong are conscious of the need for a -new surge in the field of public housing, and all that should go with it. I sun sure that this new Authority and the new department at its disposal are well able to achieve this and I. wi sh you all success.1' »•

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Release Time: 7.30 p.m.

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Friday, April 27, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No«

Mr. R.E. Downing will be the new Director of Civil Aviation........... 1

The new town plan for Wang Tau Hom and Tung Tau has been published • • 2

Amending legislation seeks to widen the category of mentally unstable persons to be admitted to the Prisons Department Psychiatric Centre

Eighteen young people receive their Duke of Edinburgh awards ......... 6

Regulations to ensure greater safety for workers in confined spaces have been published in the Gazette......................•••••••••••••• 7

The Government comments on church leaders’ statement on teachers’ pay issue.......................••••••••.............................  9

The Jockey Club has made a $1 million grant to this year’s summer youth activities..................................................    10

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Friday, April 27, 1973

- 1 -

NEW DIRECTOR OF CIVIL AVIATION

*******

Mr. R.E. Downing will succeed Mr. T.R. Thomson as Director of Civil Aviation. Mr. Thomson will proceed on pre-retirement leave early next month.

Mr. Downing’s promotion has been approved by the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs.

Aged 49, Mr. Downing served in the Royal Air Force from 194-3 to 1947.

He arrived in Hong Kong in December 1947 on appointment as Air

Traffic Control Officer and was promoted to Assistant Director in December 1965*

He acted as Director of Civil Aviation on numerous occasions and represented the department at the meeting of Directors of Civil Aviation at New Delhi in 1970.

He also represented the Government at international meetings including technical meetings of the International Civil Aviation Organization and Air Services negotiations with neighbouring countries.

Mr. Downing is married with three children.

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Friday, April 27, 1973

- 2 -

NEW TOWN PLAN FOR WANG TAU HOM AND TUNG TAU

Future Population Estimated At 317,000

*******

The Town Planning Board today published a draft outline zoning plan for Wang Tau Hom and Tung Tau which envisages a population of about 317,000 on full development.

The object of the plan is to provide a land use pattern and major road framework within which the use and development of land may be legally controlled. Most of the land in the planning area has already been developed or is being developed.

The draft plan covers an area of 469 acres.

A total of 155 acres has been zoned for residential purposes. This includes the existing Lok Fu, Wang Tau Hom, Tung Tau, Wong Tai Sin estates, the Kaitak Housing Society estate, the proposed Tung Tau Tsuen Road Public Housing Estate and private residential development west of Junction Road.

Most of the 33 acres of land zoned for commercial/residential use is already developed. One new area zoned for this purpose is located to the south-east of Lok Sin Road.

Open space, including the existing Morse Park and Lion Rock Park, covers a total of some 100 acres. Areas zoned for this purpose are evenly distributed to provide centres of recreation within walking distance of the residential zones.

A large area located to the west of Fu Mei Street and an area to the north of Lung Cheung Road, which will serve as an extension to the Lion Rock Park, are zoned for this purpose.

/Another ........

Friday, April 27, 1973

- 3 -

Another 52 acres have been earmarked for Goverment, institution and community uses, such as schools, clinics and markets. Two sites adjoining the Wang Tau Hom and Tung Tau Estates nave been reserved for community centres. A site for a Civic Centro is located to the west of Tung Tau Tsuen Road.

New Schools, a bus terminus, car parks and other ancillary facilities will be provided on a site to the north of Lung Cheung Road.

A green belt, covering an area of 43 acres, comprises the hillside to the north of Lung Cheung Road. This area is mainly steep hillside but Government, institutional and community uses as well as open space development may be permitted on selected

Road junctions and alignments and boundaries between zones may be subject to minor alterations when detailed planning proceeds.

The draft plan for the area, published in the Government Gazette today, will be exhibited for two months until June 26 at the Public Enquiry Centre, Central Government Offices (West Wing), Hong Kong; at the Crown Lands and Survey Office, Kowloon Government Offices, Nathan Road; and at the City District Offices in Kowloon City and Wong Tai Sin.

Any person who has objections to anything appearing in the plan may write to the Secretary of the Town Planning Board. He must set out the reasons for his objections and suggest any amendment to the plan that would remove them Copies of the draft plan and explanatory statement are available at the Crown Lands and Survey Office, Murray Building, at S3 each uncoloured and $25 each coloured.

- - C .. -

Friday, April 27, 1973

- 4 -

PRISON DEPARTMENT PSYCHIATRIC CENTRE AT SIU LAM

New Bill Widens Category Of People To Be Admitted

**********

Amending legislation is to be introduced shortly to enable a wider category of mentally unstable persons to be admitted to the Prisons Department Psychiatric Centre at Siu Lam for detention, observation or specialist treatment.

The Centre was set up in November last year as a permanent institution to replace the temporary Psychiatric Observation Unit at the Victoria Remand Centre and is at present in use for the observation and treatment of people admitted to prison.

The aim of the Mental Health (Amendment) Bill 1973* published in the Gazette today for general information, is to allow those who presently may be admitted to a mental hospital under certain sections of the Mental Health Ordinance and the Criminal Procedure Ordinance.

These include:

* Convicted persons, or persons against whom the facts of an offence punishable by imprisonment have been proved.

* Persons remanded under the Mental Health Ordinance to a parison or mental hospital for observation, investigation or treatment.

* Persons remanded in custody by a Court who, at the time of remand, showed no sign of mental disorder, but while in custody develop signs of mental disorder.

* Accused persons in respect of whom a special verdict of not guilty by reason of insanity or a finding of disability has been returned.

Convicted

Friday, April 27, 1973

- 5 -

* Convicted persons in respect of whom, in the opinion of the Full Court on appeal to it, a verdict of not guilty by reasons of insanity or a finding of disability should have been returned.

* Persons in respect of whom a verdict of not guilty by reason of insanity has been returned, but in the opinion of the Full Court on appeal to it, a finding of disability should have been returned, and

* Those presently detained in a mental hospital under the Health Ordinance or under the Criminal Procedure Ordinance.

Women and persons of either sex under the age of 14 who are suffering from mental disorder will not be admitted to the new Centre; neither will convicted persons who suffer from mental disorder but who have been acquitted by the Full Court on appeal.

Under the Bill, a hospital order will be sufficient authority

for the Commissioner of Prisons to admit a person to whom the order relates to the new Centre.

Persons admitted to the Centre would be treated as if they were being legally confined in prison but their discharge from the Centre would require the prior consent of the Governor.

While in the Centre, they would not be granted any leave of absence.

The Bill also incorporates a new clause which empowers a court or

magistrate to authorise the detention in the Centre of a person who is in custody awaiting trial, if it is proved that he is mentally unsound.

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/6..........

Friday, April 27, 1973

- 6 -

GOVERNOR PRESENTS DUKE OF EDINBURGH AWARDS

*********

The Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, presented the Duke of Edinburgh’s Gold Awards to 18 young people at Government House this (Friday) evening.

The recipients comprised seven girls and eleven boys.

Two other girls who have completed their Gold Award requirements are now studying at the International Christian University of Tokyo and are unable to attend the presentation ceremony.

Another girl who has also completed her work at Gold Award level is at present studying in London University. She will receive her Gold Award at the Buckingham Palace next month.

The much coveted Gold Award is the highest award in the Scheme.

The main aim of the Scheme is to provide young men and women over 16 years of age with opportunities to occupy their leisure time in a meaningful and purposeful manner.

However, the age limit has been extended since January this year by the Duke and his Co-Trustees so as to allow more young people to take part in the Scheme.

The latest date for entry into all Awards of the Scheme is now the 23rd birthday of a candidate and he will have to complete the Award requirements by his 25th birthday.

Candidates for the three levels of Awards - Bronze, Silver and Gold -have to undergo a series of exercises according to the standards set in the Scheme, before they can qualify for the Awards.

0 - -

/7

Friday, April 27, 1973

- 7 -

NEW REGULATIONS TO HI SU RE GREATER SAFETY

For Workers In Confined Spaces

*««*«***

Details of new regulations to ensure greater safety for those required to work in confined spaces were published in the Gazette today following approval by the Legislative Council on Wednesday#

The regulations, entitled the Factories and Industrial Undertakings (Confined Spaces) Regulations 1973, prescribe certain safety measures to be observed by both proprietors and workers.

The Assistant Commissioner of Labour, Mr. David Lin, said that working in confined spaces such as wells, pits,and tunnels was hazardous because workers were known to have been overcome by dangerous fumes in such places.

He said that during the period from January 1968 to February 1973, officers of the Labour Department had investigated 16 such accidents in which 14 workers were killed.

"Had sufficient precautionary measures been taken, such as those prescribed in the present regulations, the number of such sad accidents might have been reduced, if not totally avoided," he said.

Under the regulations, every confined space in an industrial undertaking, unless there are other exits, must be provided with a manhole of adequate size.

Anyone entering a confined space must be authorised by the proprietor and must wear an approved breathing apparatus. Where practicable, he should also wear a belt with a rope securely attached.

/These

Friday, April 27, 1973

- 8 -

These requirements do not apply if a confined space has been certified safe for entry without breathing apparatus by the proprietor who, before making such a certification, must take steps to test for, and to prevent, the presence of dangerous fumes.

Proprietors are also required to keep a sufficient supply of approved breathing apparatus, suitable reviving apparatus, vessels containing oxygen, belts and ropes.

The regulations will come into effect in six months.

,wThis is to allow sufficient time for proprietors to make alterations, where necessary, to the manholes in their industrial establishments so as to comply with the requirements of the law," Mr. Lin said.

Contravention of the regulations will result in fines up to $2,000 for proprietors and $500 for any person other than proprietor.

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/9.........

Friday, April 27, 1975

-9-

S.S.E.E. EXAMINATION »***»»«*»»

Commenting on the statement by the three Church Leaders, a Government spokesman said that the Government fully supported their stand. In confirming that preliminary discussions had been held with the Church Leaders on the pay issue, the Government spokesman said that the Government was not prepared to continue with the discussions unless the boycott was renounced and the S.S.E.E. held in proper conditions. ”The children’s interests in this matter must be paramount,” he said, ”the future education of some 85,000 children could be at stake. It is therefore vitally important to their interest that the examination should be held in proper conditions. 6

------0-------

/10

/

Friday, April 27, 1973

- 10 -

S1 MILLION GRANT FOR SUMMER YOUTH ACTIVITIES

*********

The Royal Hong Kong Jockey Club has made a generous grant of more than one million dollars for this year’s summer youth activities*

Speaking at a reception this (Friday) afternoon, the Chairman of the Central Co-ordinating Committee for Youth Recreation, Mr. P.B. Will said this sum of money has enabled the Committee to recommend a sizable percentage of the financial requirements necessary for the organisation of the programme.

Mr. Williams said that publicity arrangements this year are intended to reach young people from all walks of life.

Besides regular publicity through press releases, films, radio slogans, stickers and advertisements, a special booklet will be prepared to enable youngsters to locate the youth centres within their own district and join in the activities of their choice.

A specially equipped mobile team will also visit industrial areas to give out information of the programme to young factory workers*

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Release time: 7>00 p.m.

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Saturday, April 28, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No<

The British Minister for Trade and Consumer Affairs arrives in Hong Kong on Monday.......................................••••«.•• 1

Hong Kong’s educational development generates keen interest at seminar in Britain..................................................  3

A new record maximum temperature for March was recorded last month

.......................... •••....................................... 5

A wide-ranging entertainment programme has been prepared for next month by the Urban Council.......•........................••••••••• 8

Nev/ traffic arrangements are to be introduced in Yau Yat Chuen and the Peak next Tuesday...........................................      9

A number of premises in the Mid-Levels area will be without water on Monday..........................................................  10

A registration team will visit Ngau Tau Kok next week.......... 11

There will be an issue of the D.I.B. tomorrow....................... 11

The Governor praises the Scout Movement in Hong Kong for its contribution to the community.............................••••••••• 12

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Saturday, April 28, 1975

U.K. TRADE MINISTER TO VISIT HONG KONG

********

The British Minister for Trade and Consumer Affairs, Sir Geoffrey Howe, Q}, MP, is due to arrive in Hong Kong on Monday (April 50) for a three-day visit. He will be accompanied by his wife.

During his stay, Sir Geoffrey will have talks with the Senior British Trade Commissioner in Hong Kong and with senior Government advisers.

He will also meet local businessmen and exporters and will take the opportunity to look up old friends.

Sir Geoffrey has been a member of the present British Government since its formation in June 1970, when he was appointed Solicitor General, the second of the two Law Officers of the Crown in England and Wales.

He was appointed Minister for Trade and Consumer Affairs in the Department of Industry in November 1972.

From 1964 to 1966 he was Conservative Member of Parliament for Bebington, and spoke from the Opposition front bench in the House of Commons on labour and social services.

Sir Geoffrey has been a director of several housing associations and has served on the British Medical Association’s advisory planning panel*

He has a son and two daughters.

AT ote to Editors: .........

Saturday, April 28, 1973

- 2 -

Note to Editors: Sir Geoffrey and Lady Howe are due to

arrive at Kaitak airport at about 1.J0 p.m. on Monday by Singapore Airlines (Flight SQ6J1). Press photographers and television cameramen will be welcome to film their arrival but there will be no Press conference at the airport. Sir Geoffrey will be meeting the Press before his departure on Wednesday, May 2. Arrangements for a Press conference will be announced later. Photographers are asked to assemble in the Press Room, Airport Terminal Building half an hour before scheduled arrival time. G.I.S. officers will be present to assist.the Press.

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Saturday, April 28, 1973

- 3 -

BRIGHTON S34INAR SHOWS GREAT INTEREST

IN HONG KONG’S EDUCATIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Exchange Of Views By Participants From 24 Countries

********

Great interest in Hong Kong’s educational developments has been shown in Brighton by participants at the recent five-week seminar on ”Probloms of Educational Planning.”

’’They were particularly interested in the plans for the expansion of post-primary education and the E.T.V. service,” the Deputy Director of Education (Professional), Mr* N.M, Ho said today.

Mr. Ho returned to Hong Kong a few days ago after attending the seminar at the Institute of Development Studies, University of Sussex.

The seminar was largely designed for those working in the educational field in developing countries and emphasis was laid on both primary and secondary education.

”1 consider attendance on the seminar a stimulating and valuable experience,” said Mr. Ho, ”as it enabled me to exchange views with educational planners from many countries and identify their educational problems some of which are of relevance to Hong Kong.

”1 am sure what I have gleaned from the seminar will be of use to me in my work,” Mr. Ho added.

There were altogether 26 participants representing 24 countries, most of which are members of the Commonwealth.

/The African

Saturday, April 28, 1973

- 4 -

The African countries included Ghana, Gambia, Tanzania, Uganda, Botswana, Lesotho and Egypt; the Asian countries Afghanistan, India, Sri Lanka, Malaysia, Bahrain and Hong Kong; the Caribbean countries Jamaica, Barbados, St. Lucia and Guyana. Other countries were Gibraltar, Mexico, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Colombia and Papua and New Guinea, while Britain was represented by an officer of the British Council.

The seminar was conducted by two professors of the Institute of Development Studies - Ronald Dore, a sociologist, and Richard Jolly, an economist - both of whom had a good knowledge of education in developing countries.

There were many plenary sessions where a wide variety of short talks were given either by them or, more frequently, by guest speakers drawn from Sussex, London, Cambridge, Oxford, Reading, Bristol, Edinburgh and other British universities as well as other institutions including colleges of education.

In addition, small technical groups were regularly organised to thrash out more specific problems of common interest. -The rest of the programme was made up of educational visits and individual projects.

While in Britain, Mr. Ho visited the Inner London Education Authority with whom Hong Kong has established a special relationship and the Centre for Educational Development Overseas.

He also visited Avery Hill and Brighton Colleges of Education, the London Teacher Education Centre and a number of primary and secondary schools.

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/5.........

Saturday, April 28, 1973

- 5 -

RECORD MAXIMUM TEMPERATURE IN MARCH

Weather Last Month Abnormally Warm

*********

The highest maximum temperature for March was recorded last month — on March J1 when the mercury shot up to JO.1°C.

The Royal Observatory says the abnormally warm weather in February continued last month. The mean temperature (2O.8°C), the mean maximum temperature (2J.9°C) and the mean minimum temperature (18.7°C) were all second highest on record for March.

At the beginning of the month, Hong Kong was in a warm and moist airstream from the South China Sea.

During the first five days, the weather was mainly cloudy and humid with some light rain patches. Coastal fog was reported on March 1, 2 and 4.

Early on March 5» a weak cold front passed through Hong Kong and winds freshened from the east. The Strong Monsoon Signal was hoisted that afternoon and lowered the next morning.

Weather improved on March 6 with sunny periods during the day.

Late on March 7» another warm and moist airstream from the southeast reached Hong Kong. Some drizzle patches were reported on March 79 8 and 9 and coastal fog patches from March 9 to 1J.

Strong easterly winds affected Hong Kong late on March 13 and early March 14. The Strong Monsoon Signal was hoisted on March 13 and lowered the next morning* Some light rain was also reported on these two days.

/A surge ••••••

Saturday, April 28, 1973

- 6 -

A surge of the winter monsoon reached Hong Kong during the early hours of March 15 and brought some light rain.

Temperatures fell to a minimum of 15*7°C around dawn as winds freshened from the north.

The relative humidity also fell during the next few days to a mean of 61 per cent on March 18. Yellow fire warnings were issued on March 18 and 19* A ridge of high pressure persisted and there were sunny intervals on March 19 and 20.

On March 21, a weak cold front passed through Hong Kong. Although there were a few light rain patches that evening, rapid improvement occurred the following morning and mainly fine weather prevailed on March 22 and 2?.

A trough of low pressure passed Hong Kong late on March 24. A total of 11.6 mm of rainfall was recorded during the night.

However weather improved steadily and on March 26, it became fine and dry with a mean relative humidity of 65 per cent. Yellow fire warnings were issued on March 26 and 27.

Another warm and moist airstream from the southeast reached Hong Kong late on March 27 and 28 and coastal fog on March 28 and 29.

As a ridge of high pressure over southeast China strengthened during the last three days of the month, weather became fine and hot and temperatures rose to a new record maximum of 30.1°C on March 31*

/A total ••••••

Saturday, April 28, 1973

- 7 -

A total of 31 aircraft were diverted due to adverse weather conditions during the month.

No thunderstorm or heavy rain warnings were issued during the month and there were no tropical cyclones over the western north Pacific or the South China Sea.

The month’s figures and departures from normal were:-

Sunshine 113*6 hours 18.9 hours above normal

Rainfall 13*3 mm 58.9 mm below normal

Cloudiness 78% 4% below normal

Relative Humidity 81% 2% below normal

Mean Maximum Temperature 23.9°C 4.0°C above normal

Mean Temperature 2O.8°C 3*3°C above normal

Mean Minimum Temperature 18.7°C 3*1°C above normal

Mean Dew Point 17.3°C 2.5°C above normal

Total Evaporation 118.7 mm 3*9 mm above normal

Maximum Temperature of 30*1°C was recorded on March 31•

Minimum Temperature of 15.7°C was recorded on March 15.

Saturday, April 28, 1973

- 8 -

ENTERTAINMENT PROGRAMME FOR MAY

Games, sports events and film shows are just a few of the programmes arranged by the Urban Council and the Urban Services Department for public entertainment in May.

A "Keep Your Beaches Clean" Spectacular will be held on May 1? (Sunday) at Repulse Bay between 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. Singers and dancers from HK-TVB will take part in the programme, and "Lap Sap Chung" will also make an appearance on the beach.

Variety shows, Chinese concerts and operas, roller skating and volleyball demonstrations will be held in public playgrounds throughout Hong Kong Island, Kowloon and the New Territories.

All are welcome to attend these functions and admission will be free.

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/9........

Saturday, April 28, 1973

- 9 -

NEW TRAFFIC ARRANGEMENTS

**********

New traffic arrangements will be introduced in Yau Yat Tsuen and Peak with effect from 10 a.m. on May 1 (Tuesday).

Tseuk Kiu Street in Yau Yat Tsuen will be made one-way from Tat Chee Avenue to Fa Po Street; and Fa Po Street will be re-routed one-way from Tseuk Kiu Street to Tat Chee Avenue.

The arrangements are aimed at improving local traffic flow.

In the Peak, Bowen Drive, whick links Kennedy Road and Bowen Road, will be made one-way uphill from Kennedy Road.

Appropriate traffic signs will be posted in the areas to guide motorists.

_______0_________

Saturday, April 28, 1973

- 10 -

WATER INTERRUPTION

*******

A number of premises in the Mid-Levels area will have their water supply turned off for eight hours on Monday (April 30), starting from 10 p.m.

The temporary stoppage is to enable Waterworks Office staff to connect water mains in the area.

Buildings affected include Nos. 17 to 66 Lyttelton Road, Nos. 1 to 10E Babington Path, Nos. 8 to 8a Honiton Road, Nos. 84 to 86A Bonham Road, and Nos. 2 to 16 Oaklands Path.

Also affected will be Tang Chi Ngong School of Chinese, the Administration Building, the Library and the Canteen of Hong Kong University, and Nos. 8 to 8d of the University Quarter.

On Tuesday (May 1), water supply to a number of buildings in North Point will be interrupted for five hours, starting from 1 a.n.

The temporary stoppage is to allow Waterowks Office staff to carry out a leakage test.

All premises within the area bounded by North Point Road, the seafront, Shu Kuk Street and the north side of King’s Road will be affected.

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Saturday, April 28, 1973

- 11

REGISTRATION TEAM TO VISIT NGAU TAU KOK

*********

A team from the Registration of Persons Department will conduct registrations at the Ngau Tau Kok Government Low Cost Housing Estate Office starting from May 1 to May 8.

The team will work from 9-30 a.m. to 4.30 p.m. on weekdays and from 9*30 a.m. to 12.30 p.m. on Saturday.

Another team from the Department will be stationed at the

Sap Pat Heung Rural Committee Office on Tuesday and Wednesday to register adults and children for identity cards.

Business hours will be from 9.00 a.m. to 5.00 p.m.

People living in the areas are urged to make use of the facilities provided.

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SUNDAY D.I.B.

*******

Note to Editors: There will be an issue of the Daily

Information Bulletin tomorrow (Sunday) • Copies will be available for collection at the G.I.S. Press room at 2.30 p.m.

------0---------- /12..........................................

Saturday, April 28, 1973

- 12 -

Note to Editors: This item is embargoed until 4.15 p.m.

today (Saturday)•

PRAISE FOR HONG KONG SCOUTS

The Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, today paid tribute to the Scout Movement in Hong Kong for its contribution to the community.

Addressing- the St. George’s Day Rally at the Boundary Street Police Football Ground, Sir Murray told the scouts: "Your contribution to the community is evidence of the leadership qualities promoted by the Scout Association.”

Noting the scouts active role in community projects such as the Keep Hong Kong Clean Campaign and their work during the June landslides, the Governor said: ’’This is the type of initiative and example for which I hope the Scout Movement of Hong Kong will be noted in the years ahead

Following is the full text of the Governor’s speech:

”Last year, when I first spoke to you as your Chief Scout, I said

I was looking forward to seeing many of you at camp as well as other functions.

”In November I visited your campsite at Tai Tam and was most impressed by your very high standards. Next February I will be attending the Carlton Trophy Competition. I hope then to see more of the scoutcraft and other skills which form such an important part of scouting.

”Your contribution to the community is evidence of the leadership qualities promoted by the Scout Association.

/”Your work

Saturday, April 28, 1973

- 13 -

”Your work in the June landslides, your participation in the Keep Hong Kong Clean Campaign, and the many other community events in which you have played your part, show the Scout Movement’s active role in the community.

’’This is the type of initiative and example for which I hope the Scout Movement of Hong Kong will be noted in the years ahead.

”1 congratulate all recipients of awards for their personal contributions to Scouting. In particular I should mention Mr. C-K. Lo, your Colony Commissioner, who has been awarded the Silver Wolf in recognition of his valuable services to the Movement.

”He has been Commissioner for 10 years, and his term of appointment finishes in August. But Mr. Lo has agreed to continue to serve Scouting in his new appointment as Vice-President of the Association so his wealth of experience will not be lost.

,fYou will all be pleased to hear that Mr. H.C. Ma will be appointed to succeed Mr. Lo. Mr. Ma joined the Movement as a cub in 1925*

’’Since then he has held almost every appointment in the Association and received many awards for his service. His appointment as Commissioner is the ciilnrinati on of a long career of exceptional service to the Scouts.

”1 would also like to thank the officials of the Association who have donated a new commemorative vase which will be placed on display in the City Hall. Through their generosity a large sum of money is being forwarded to the World Scouting Association to be spent on the development of international Scouting.

”To all Scouts and Scouters, I wish every success for the coming months and my sincere thanks for your good work in the past year. -----------------------------------0---------

Release Time: 2.30 p.m.

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Sunday, April 29, 1975

PEOPLE WHITE TO SALES

***♦*««*

Letters written by people from many walks of life are arriving in Mr. A. de 0. Sales’s office in a steady stream.

"I am very heartened by this,” the Chairman of the new Urban Council said, "particularly because the writers show such genuine interest in the reconstituted Council and a desire to know more about it.”

Mr. de Sales said that the letters came from a wide section of the public including many residents of resettlement estates who wrote to him in Chinese.

”1 am replying personally to all of these letters,” he said.

"There are, however, a number of letters from groups as well as from anonymous individuals.”

”Not knowing their addresses I am unable to reply to them, but I should like them to know that I am studying some of their suggestions and following up on their complaints. Where these matters involve other Government departments, these will be referred to the appropriate authorities."

Mr. de Sales said that he would also like to thank all of these correspondents for their kind wishes for the Council’s success.

"This has touched us all in the Council very much,” Mr. de Sales said.

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/2.........

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Sunday, April 29, 1973

- 2 -

CENSUS OF INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION 1973

Pilot Survey

*******

A three-week pilot survey will be carried out by the Census and Statistics Department to test the proposed questionnaire for the 1973 Census of Industrial Production.

The experience gained from this survey will enable the staff to draw up a final questionnaire and to adjust the related organizational and administrative procedures.

A spokesman for the Department said that although the questionnaire had already been discussed with many manufacturers and their associations, "it is felt that only by testing in the field can it be certain that further amendments are not required."

"In the pilot survey the questionnaire which seeks information on current and capital expenditure and receipts will be related to the year 1972," he added.

Questions would be asked relating to employment, costs of raw materials, services and wages, value of stocks and sales of finished products.

The survey which starts on Monday (April 30), will cover 500 manufacturing establishments selected at random.

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Sunday, April 29, 1973

- 3 -

SHEK KIP MEI REHOUSING PROJECT

Start Of Phase Two ♦ ♦

The second phase of the Shek Kip Mei rehousing project will start tomorrow (April 30). In the first phase which was completed on April 27, more than 11,000 domestic tenants and 44 shopkeepers were transferred to Pak Tin Estate from 6 blocks (No. 23-28) in Shek Kip Mei Estate.

These blocks have now been handed over to P.W.D. and tenders for carrying out conversion works will shortly be invited.

In the second phase, Block 3 and 4 are affected. Block 4 will be converted into self-contained flats. Block 3 will be demolished to make way for the construction of a road linking Berwick Street and Woh Chai Street to improve traffic conditions for the future Shek Kip Mei Estate.

The 5»000 domestic tenants and 25 shopkeepers in these 2 blocks will be transferred to Pak Tin Estate. Workshop operators will be offered temporary workshop spaces and will be eventually accommodated in the specially built workshop block which is being built near Block 18 Shek Kip Mei Estate.

Re-provisioning arrangements for business premises for the shopkeepers will be on a ’foot-for-foot* basis similar to that offered to shopkeepers in the first phase. The second phase is expected to be completed in four months.

Mr. John Walden, Deputy Head of the Housing Department said: ,fWe are extremely pleased with the way the first phase has gone. To assist almost 12,000 people to voluntarily move their homes and businesses from one place to another without having to evict a single family is a pretty tough job.

/f,It shows ......

Sunday, April 29, 1973

- 4 -

"It shows just how closely the tenants and the staff of the Housing Department co-operate. We have learned many lessons from Phase I which we will be able to use to make the Up-rooting easier for the tenants involved in the next phase".

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Release Time; 2.30 p.m

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Monday, April JO, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No.

Export licensing system for all exports and re-exports of processed and manufactured foodstuffs and electrical products powered by mains supply.....................••••.•••••••......... 1

Over JOO workers injured on building sites last month — mainly from "falling objects" • •••....•........................  J

Pok Oi Hospital reduces need for people in rural areas to seek treatment at overcrowded government hospitals in Kowloon •••• 5

The Acting Director of Broadcasting speaks about the responsibilities of broadcasting in Hong Kong 6

Morrison Hill Technical Institute calling for applications for its 41 courses beginning next September ....................  8

New arrangements in Kowloon Tong to improve traffic flow there ••••••••••••••................................  ••••••• 9

Weekly figures for anti-measles campaign •••••••...............  10

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Monday, April 30, 1973 • x r

- 1 -

LICENSING SYSTEM FOR CERTAIN HONG KONG EXPORTS

**««***»

The Commerce and Industry Department announced today that all exports and re-exports of processed and manufactured foodstuffs and electrical products powered by mains supply will be brought under export licensing from June 1, 1973.

It is also envisaged that toys will become subject to these conditions at some point in the future.

A spokesman for the department said that the decision to extend export licensing to these products had been taken on the advice of the Health and Safety Committee of the Trade and Industry Advisory Board. The committee was established in July 1971 to consider generally the problems of health and safety standards of the products involved, and to advise on measures which should be taken to identify and reduce problem areas.

The spokesman added: "In view of increasing consumer protection activities in Hong Kong’s major overseas markets, and the possibility that importing countries might unfairly penalise all Hong Kong products on account of the shortcomings of a few manufacturers, the committee recommended that measures should be introduced to improve basic health and safety standards." The committee also said action should be taken to prevent the export of obviously dangerous or unhygienic products which could only give rise to adverse publicity unfavourable to Hong Kong’s commercial image.

The Executive Council and the Trade and Industry Advisory Board agreed with these views.

/The spokesman

Monday, April JO, 197J

- 2 -

The spokesman explained that the surveillance export licensing scheme is the result. Under it, the Director of Commerce and Industry will have powers to refuse the issue of an export licence to a manufacturer in respect of a particular product which has been the subject of a justified overseas domplairit, or which has been proved to the satisfaction of the Director to be dangerous or unhygienic.

•’This authority will only be exercised in serious cases and where a manufacturer who has been advised to correct defects in his products has failed to do so,” the spokesman said.

Standards of health and safety, based on criteria applied in Hong Kong’s main import markets, may be used to determine the suitability of products for export licensing. In the case of foodstuffs, it is the intention to require all Hong Kong origin foodstuffs exported under licence to have been produced in premises registered for the purpose with the Urban Services Department.

The spokesman said it was not anticipated that the new licensing requirements would pose particular difficulties for manufacturers and exporters. In normal circumstances, licences will, as at present, be approved and available for issue within 24 hours of receipt of the applications.

He said the trade had been advised of the system and that the Import and Export (General) Regulations were now being amended.

- 0 -

Monday, April 30 , 1973

- 3 -

OVER JOO HURT ON BUILDING SITES LAST MONTH

«**«*»*«

A total of 358 workers were injured last month in accidents on construction sites, according to reports received by the Labour Department.

Mr. A.H. Carter, Industrial Safety Training Officer of the Department, said that for the first time in many months there was no fatality in such accidents.

"However,” he said, "this does not necessarily reflect that there was an improvement in safety measures in the construction industry.

"In fact the number of injuries showed a slight increase over the figures for February".

He said that as in December last year during which 267 workers were injured and four killed, the main cause of accidents was "falling objects".

Since April last year 610 workers had been injured and eight killed as a result of being struck by falling objects.

Mr. Carter said that many of these accidents could have been avoided had managements paid more attention to housekeeping.

He said: ,TTo reduce the number of accidents of this nature, those working at heights should be provided with proper working platforms. Small items and tools should be kept in suitable receptacles. Large items must be safely secured.”

Mr. Carter pointed out that a small nut falling from a height of 50 feet had the penetrating power of a bullet.

/"It is therefore

Monday, April JO, 1973

- 4 -

Irlt is therefore obvious that debris, scrap items and the like should never be thrown down from heights- Instead they should be lowered in properly constructed containers/1 he said.

He said he was disappointed to find that managements in general were still apathetic towards carrying out safety measures while workers, on the other hand, rarely pressed for the implementation of such.

"Some of the workers are even reluctant to take advantage of the safety equipment provided by managements," he said.

He quoted "safety helmets" as an example.

"I always advocate that the wearing of a safety helmet will definitely reduce the severity of the injury sustained by the worker in the event of an accident, but it is a pity that only a minority of workers have taken my advice."

Mr. Carter stressed that the only means to overcome industrialists1 as well as workers1 ignorance of industrial safety was properly organised accident prevention training.

"I cannot stress more the importance of safety training for those working in industry, especially on construction sites," he said.

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/5........

Monday, April 30, 1973

- 5 -

ROLE OF POK 01 HOSPITAL

Dr. G.H. Choa, Director of Medical and Health Services, said today he hoped people in the Yuen Long and Castle Peak areas of the New Territories would make full use of the expanded facilities of the Pok Oi Hospital.

He was speaking at a reception in the Medical headquarters to mark the annual visit of the Hospital’s Board of Directors, headed by the Chairman, Mr. Koo Toshing.

The Pok Oi is an assisted charitable hospital with 162 beds. It carries out the role of a general hospital for the western area of the New Territories, including Yuen Long and Castle Peak - the latter being a rapidly-expanding centre of population.

Since 1972, a number of improvements have been introduced to encourage people in rural areas to use the Pok Oi Hospital instead of attending overcrowded government hospitals in Kowloon.

In line with this policy, the Finance Committee of the Legislative Council recently approved a recommendation by Dr. Choa that from April 1 this year, the Pok Oi Hospital’s subvention be increased for the current year from 31.5 million to 32,116,000.

Twenty of its 162 beds are being set aside for non-acute cases, and can be used for the transfer of patients from other districts in the New Territories, and urban areas, so as to make full use of available beds.

The others are for acute medical, surgical and gynaecological cases.

Dr. Choa thanked members for their concern for the health and welfare of people living in rural areas and for their recognition of the growing importance of the Pok Oi Hospital in the New Territories.

Monday, April 50, 1973

- 6 -

EMBARGO NOTE TO EDITORS: The following item is embargoed

until 8 p.m. today (Monday).

RESPONSIBILITIES OF BROADCASTING IN HONG KONG

********

The job of Radio Hong Kong is to tell the truth and there can be no excuse for anything else, the Acting Director of Broadcasting, Mr. James Hawthorne, said in a talk to the Hong Kong Toastmasters Club this (Monday) evening.

He said that ’’Broadcasting in Hong Kong brings additional responsibilities.” Many people told him that so-called B.B.C. values should be applied in Hong Kong.

But, he said, the B.B.C. was a product of British society — a society which was outspoken, humourous, irreverent, polemic. It was those factors in society which largely shaped the character of the B.B.C. and created its freedom.

”In many respects broadcasting in England is easy,” Mr. Hawthorne said. ’’You haven’t to worry too much about the effect of what you say because you know that society as a whole can take it.”

In Hong Kong, however, one had to think the problem through more carefully, more especially when Radio Hong Kong was construed to be the voice of the government.

”Not only must we consider what we say, but how we might be interpreted and therefore how the task of governing may be affected,” Mr. Hawthorne said.

Objectivity, he said, was essential but it would be inappropriate and even irresponsible to use some of the techniques of ’’hard hitting journalism.”

/These exercises

Monday, April 30» 1973

- 7 -

These exercises could sometimes be legitimate and might contribute to an ordered process of change in society, he continued.

’’Broadcasters should play it a different way especially where news

' is concerned,” Mr. Hawthorne said.

On the whole, he said he would prefer ”to cool a controversy rather than add fuel to the fire.”

”Understanding is at the root of good broadcasting and compassion shouldn’t be too far away,” he added.

Note to Editors: Copies of the full text of Mr. Hawthorne’s

speech are distributed separately in the G.I.S. press boxes.

- 0 -

/a.........

Monday, April JO, 1973

- 8 -

41 EVENING COURSES OFFERED BY TECHNICAL INSTITUTE

*«*«***«

Forty-one courses will be available at various centres of the Morrison Hill Technical Institute for students enrolling for part-time evening classes which are due to begin next September.

Students who wish to apply for admission should do so immediately as completed forms must arrive at the Institute before May 16. Application forms are available from the Institute, the City District Offices or the Tsuen Wan District Office.

The courses include those at craft level, which are taught mainly in the medium of Chinese, and courses at technician level, which are mainly in English.

Courses are also offered for student technical teachers, workshop instructors, business studies and preliminary and general studies.

Three of them are recognised by the City & Guilds of London Institute.

Two other courses consist of English, Mathematics, Engineering Science and Technical Drawing to prepare students for the Ordinary Certificate and Technician Certificate courses run by the Hong Kong Polytechnic and the Morrison Hill Technical Institute.

Tuition fees vary from $40 for preliminary classes to $70 for higher classes per session. For audio-typing and business machines classes, the tuition fees are $50 per course and Pitman’s Shorthand varies from $50 to $70 per course.

/Classes ••••••••

Monday, April JO, 197J

- 9 -

Classes will be held at either the Institute in Oi Kwan Road, Wanchai or in some 16 other centres in Hong Kong, Kowloon, Tsuen Wan and Kwun Tong*

Details of the Institute’s full-time, block-release and part-time day-release courses will be announced* in the last week of July while details of short courses will be given in the middle of September.

-------0 - - - -

TRAFFIC ARRANGEMENTS IN KOWLOON TONG ' ’” * •

»•«««»«« •

Special arrangements will be introduced in Kowloon Tong to improve the flow of traffic in the area.

With effect from 10 a.m. on Thursday "(May J), motorists proceeding northwards on Embankment Road will not be allowed to turn right into Boundary Street.

Access to Boundary Street will be via Duke Street and Knight Street.

Appropriate traffic signs will be posted to guide motorists.

/10

Monday, April JO, 1973

- 10

ANTI-MEASLES CAMPAIGN

«s * . * *

During the third week of the current anti-measles campaign, a total of 585 doses of vaccine was administered, according to figures released today by the Medical and Health Department.

Of the total, 1JJ doses were administered on the Island, J01 in Kowloon, and 1J1 in the New Territories.

Since the 1973 anti-measles campaign began earlier in the month, 2*078 children have been immunised against the disease. The campaign is continuing for another six weeks.

Free vaccine is available at all government maternalfand child health centres.

The theme of the publicity campaign now gping on in the press, radio and TV is that all susceptible children between six months and five years should be immunised.

-------0-T--------

Release time: 7 <00