Daily Information Bulletin - 1970s - 1973 - JUN - ENG

 


PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Friday, June 1, 1973

CONTENTS

Pa£e No*

Students entering the two universities in 1974 will have to pay revised fees ..........................•............................  1

Hore community facilities provided in the new zoning plan for the crowded Tai Kok Tsui district......................................   4

A quantity of surface mail posted earlier in the year has been delayed or damaged due to a shipping accident •••••••...............  7

A 510 million interchange to be constructed at the junction of Nara Cheong Street and Lung Cheung Road............•...............   8

Mr, L.B. MacQuarrie appointed as the first Head of the new Institute for Social Work Training ................................   9

An open air car park to be built to serve two beaches on Castle Peak Road • •••...........................................•••••••••• 10

The Queen calls on the peoples of the Commonwealth to live up to its ideal of friendship and understanding..........................  11

Secretary for Information presents awards to fishermen for their bravery in rescue operations.....................................    1?

The Governor congratulates Princess Anne on her recent engagement.. 14

The Queen’s Birthday Honours List to be published tomorrow.......... 15

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Friday, June 1, 1973

- 1 -

UNIVERSITY FEES TO BE REVISED

****t«*****

Student fees at the two Universities are to be increased with effect from July 1, 197^, to coincide with the start of the next university financial quadrennium.

In anticipation of the fee increase the government has already agreed that the grant element of the existing scheme for financial aid to students will be adjusted as necessary. Provision already approved in respect of the current financial year is $2.8 million.

A new uniform fee of $1,750 per annum will apply to all students reading for first degrees at both the University of Hong Kong and the Chinese University of Hong Kong. At present the fees vary from $800 to 31,560 according to the university attended and the subject studied.

Introduction of the new fees, which have been agreed by the universities after discussions with the University and Polytechnic Grants Committee, will be phased by making them applicable only to new entr?Jits, starting with those joining for the academic year 197^/75- Existing students will not be affected and will continue to pay fees at present levels while reading for their bachelor degrees.

In addition to the provision for grants under the financial aid programme, the fund for interest free loans to students has recently been increased by $6,250,000 to a total of $21,250,000, and it is estimated that loans, processed by the Joint Universities Committee on Student Finance, will reach $10,5^1,000 for the current financial year.

/The scheme ••••

Friday, June 1, 1973

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The scheme for student finance provides assistance, on the basis of need, to meet all reasonable expenses likely to be incurred by the student, taking into account his financial resources. The principle is that no student offered a university place should be unable to accept for lack of means.

Commenting on these changes, a government spokesman said that tuition fees at the two universities had remained virtually unchanged for the past 10 years•

Since its inception in 1965, the independent University and Polytechnic Grants Committee had, in its regular published reports, drawn the attention of both the government and the universities to the question of revising these foes to more realistic levels.

TIThe University and Polytechnic Grants Committee took the view that any alteration of the level of fees should depend upon the prior introduction of an effective scheme of assistance to needy students,” the spokesman added.

”A scheme to provide both grants and loans was introduced for the first time in the academic year 1969/70- Administered through the UPGC secretariat and controlled by the Joint Universities Committee on Student Finance, on which both staff and students are represented, this scheme has made considerable progress since its inception.”

"Altogether 2,867 students received grants totalling 33*6^ million and 3j196 received loans totalling 39*235 million during the 1973/73 academic year,” he said.

/”The government .....

Friday, June 1, 1973

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f,The government has suggested to the universities that fees should in future be reviewed at regular intervals, possibly in relation to the foua>-ycar period used for calculating university grants, so that the universities’ income from fees remains appropriate to the general level of grants.”

’•While a phased introduction has been accepted in the case of this particular revision, it has been decided that any increases resulting from future reviews will not be phased,” the spokesman added.

He emphasised that the government student finance scheme would continue to operate with the objective that any student unable to meet current or future levels of fees would be heavily subsidised.

”The impact of the increased fees will therefore be confined to students coming from families well able to afford a more real isti c, but stHl very small, percentage of the total cost of their higher education financed from public funds.”

The spokesman said that government recurrent grants to the universities already cost 398 million for the current financial year, and as student enrolment rises the cost to public funds could be expected to increase substantially in the next quadrenniuci starting from July 1, 1974.

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Friday, June 1, 1973

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MORE COMMUNITY FACILITIES IN TAI KOK TSUI OUTLINE ZONING PLAN o*********

Residents of the crowded Tai Kok Tsui District in Kowloon are to be provided with more community facilities, such as civic centres, schools, clinics, open spaces, markets and car parks, under proposed plans for the future development of the district.

A draft outline zoning plan for the district was published today by the Town Planning Board for public inspection.

The aim of the plan is to improve the environment of Tai Kok Tsui, and the numerous proposals will affect the land use and communication pattern in the district.

It covers an area of about 385 acres, of which 36 acres will be reclaimed from the harbour west of Tung Chau Street.

Slightly over 45 acres is zoned for open space, including a large plot on the proposed reclamation site and an area at Fuk Tsuen Street.

A number of small sites throughout the district have also been ecaTnarked for landscaped amenity plots, sitting-out areas and children’s playgrounds, all within easy reach of local residents. This would be in addition to the four existing playgrounds in the district.

It is also intended to develop the decked—over area of the nun n.h in the middle of Ham Cheong Street as a landscaped pedestrian way.

The biggest portion of 113*9 acres is zoned for commercial and residenvial purposes and accounts for nearly 30 per cent of the planning area.

/The area ......

Friday, June 1, 1973

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The area zoned for government, institution and community uses covers 35 acres and includes a major area on the proposed reclamation off Tung Chau Street.

Within this area, a site is reserved for a future civic centre which will provide the main civic activities for the district.

In addition, sites are also reserved for three secondary schools, a multi-storey car park, and for other government and community purposes.

To make up for the general deficiency of land for government and community uses, three multi-purpose government complexes are proposed. These will be located at the junctions of Pei Ho Street and Tai Nam Street, Apliu Street and Maple Street, and Shanghai Street and Mong Kok Road.

It is intended that each of these complexes would serve as a local community centre and would incorporate such facilities as a market, hawker bazaar, schools, government offices, clinics, libraries, meeting halls, paricing and other much-needed community projects.

In addition to the government complexes, a number of small sites for local community centres, hawker bazaars and off-street refuse collection points are reserved throughout the district.

About two acres are reserved for residential use. The two sites zoned for this purpose include Lady Grantham Villas and the Hong Kong and Yau Ma Toi Ferry Company Ltd. workmen’s quarters which are at the junction of Tai Kok Tsui Road and Willow Street.

/Most of ......

Friday, June 1, 1973

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Most of the 18.3 acres zoned for industrial use are in the southern part of the district and most are already developed. A site on the proposed reclamation area has also been earmarked for a government flatted factory.

An area of 2.3 acres is zoned for other specified uses, including sites for a funeral parlour and a petrol filling station and a public cargo handling area on the proposed reclamation south of the Hong Kong shipyard site*

The plan makes allowance for the proposed mass transit line which is routed beneath Nathan Road and Cheung Sha Wan Road.

The draft plan can be inspected until July 31 at the Public Enquiry Centre, Central Government Offices (west wing), Hong Kong; the Crown Lands and Survey Office, Kowloon Government Offices, ^05 Nathan Road; the City District Office, Mong Kok, and the City District Sub-office, 3 Larch Street, Tai Kok Tsui.

Any person who has any objection to the draft plan should write to the Secretary of the Town Planning Board, c/o Public Works Department, Hong Kong, sta.ting the reasons for his objections.

Copies of the draft plan are available at the Crown Lands and Survey Choice, Hurray Building, 19th floor, Hong Kong at 33 for uncoloured copies and 325 for coloured prints.

to Editors: Copies of the outline zoning plan are boxed

this evening.

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/7........

Friday, June 1, 1973

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MAIL DAMAGED OR DELAYED IN TRANSIT

********

A quantity of Hong Kong surface mail posted earlier this year may have been delayed in transit or damaged as a result of an accident affecting the ship carrying the mail.

The Post Office said today the letters and parcels were on board the Ben Line vessel "Bencruachan" which was reported to have suffered severe damage from a giant freak wave off the coast of South Africa early in I-Iay.

The mail was posted from about April 4 to 12 and was destined mainly for the United Kingdom, the Irish Republic, Portugal, Poland, Finland and the West Indies.

A Post Office spokesman explained that it would be some time yet before he would be able to answer enquiries about individual cases.

However, the Controller of Posts, Overseas Services, at the G.P.O. Building (telephone 5-254196) will be pleased to help in so far as he can at this stage, he said.

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Friday, Juno 1, 1973

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ANOTHER LINK IN KOWLOON FOOTHILLS CORRIDOR NETWORK

*********

The Nam Cheong Interchange, an integral part of the Kowloon Foothills Road Corridor, will soon be built at the junction of Nam Cheong Street and Lung Cheung Road.

The corridor aims at providing a high quality highway linking the industrial areas of San Po Kong and Kwun Tong in-the east and Tsuen Wan - Kwai Chung in the west.

Estimated to cost $10 million, the interchange will allow uninterrupted traffic flow along Lung Cheung Road.

Traffic from the west will be able to enter Nam Cheong Street from Lung Cheung Road via an 18-foot underpass; while traffic from the east will be able to enter by a slip road.

A 24-foot vzide bridge spanning Lung Cheung Road will al 1, ow eastbound traffic from Nam Cheong Street to enter Lung Cheung Road. A footbridge will be provided on the bridge for pedestrians.

The bridge will also provide vehicle access to the residential area which is being formed to the north of the road junction. Site formation and ancillary works are well underway for this project.

Another footbridge to the east of the road junction will enable the anticipated heavy pedestrian movement from the Tai Wor Ping cottage area and the residential area to cross Lung Cheung Road in safety.

The works are expected to take 21 months.

Note to Editors: Copies of a sketch of the interchange are

boxed this evening.

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/9

Friday, June 1, 1973

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PRINCIPAL OF INSTITUTE FOR SOCIAL WORK TRAINING

*********

Mr. L.B. MacQuarrie, a well-known figure in the field of social work in Hong Kong, has been selected and has accepted an invitation to become the first Principal of the Institute for Social Work Training.

Mr. MacQuarrie is currently the Director of the Hong Kong Council of Social Service.

nI am delighted at being offered the post and the opportunity to be associated with this important step in the development of social work training in Hong Kong,’1 he said.

Mr. MacQuarrie described the aim of the institute as being to train front line social workers for tasks which do not require university qualifications.

At first, the institute will concentrate on providing two year courses at the end of which successful students are expected to qualify for a certificate in social work.

Tlie institute will invite applications shortly from potential students. The typo of student envisaged is one holding a Hong Kong Certificate of Education, and preferably someone who has some working experience — not necessarily in the social welfare field.

The Institute of Social Work Training will begin operations this autumn, probably early in October.

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/10..........

Friday, June 1, 1973

- 10

CAR PARK TO SERVE BEACHES IN THE N.T.

*********

An open air car park is to be built between two popular beaches on Castle Peale Road in the New Territories.

The car park, at tne 11)4 milestone, will provide spaces for 122 cars, eight tourist buses and 15 motor cycles and will basical 1 y serve Ting Kau and Lido beaches. There will also be proper setting down and picking up facilities for mini buses.

The arrangement will help improve the traffic and parking conditions on this section of Castle Peak Road during weekends and holidays.

Other works will be carried out at the same time, including .the improvement of a substandard bend on the road to the north of the site and the provision of a right turning lane for traffic coming from Castle Peak to the car park.

Construction of the car park and the associated road works is expected to begin in July and take about 15 months to complete.

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/11

Friday, June 1, 1973

- 11 -

THE QUEEN’S COMMONWEALTH DAY MESSAGE «*»*»«****

The Queen, in her Commonwealth Day message this year, calls on the peoples of the Commonwealth to live up to the association’s ideals of friendship and understanding.

"No other association of independent nations in the world’s history," she says, "has given such scope for the development of new relationships between individuals and between governments."

Commonwealth Day is observed every year in Britain and a number of Commonwealth Countries. It is also the official birthday of Her Majesty.

The Queen’s message reads:

"The Commonwealth is not for governments or statesmen । alone. It is for the people,for all the people of the Commonwealth* And the Commonwealth will be what its people will it to be.

/"The Commonwealth

Friday, June 1, 1973

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"The Commonwealth asks us to live up to its ideals of friendship and understanding. But it also provides us with practical opportunities to cooperate, to serve each other and to break down the fences between peoples. It calls for the interest, curiosity and concern of all of us and especially of the 400 million young people who are under 25•

,rI know from myv own experience how rewarding personal contacts i

in the Commonwealth can be, but we must both keep our friendship alive and at the same time never forget the importance of devising further ways of strengthening the links between us. No other association of independent nations in the world’s history has given such scope for the development of now relationships between individuals and between government "The challenges are therefore very real and very demanding. If we fail to meet them, our successors will reflect sadly on a wonderful opportunity lost. If we succeed, we shall not only build a stronger and happier Commonwealth, but we also show that mankind is capable of living in peace and amity on a scale never achieved before.”

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/13.........

Friday, June 1, 1973

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FISHERMEN REWARDED FOR SAVING LIVES

********

The Secretary for Information, Mr. Jack Cater, said today that the crime rate among Hong Kong’s fishing population is the lowest of all the many sectors of our community.

Speaking at the presentation of Fishermen’s Awards at the Lord Mountbatten’s Youth Recreation Centre in Repulse Bay, Mr. Cater said he was confident that with the fishermen’s spirit of co-operation, even this low figure will be “markedly reduced”.

Earlier, he had presented the Hong Kong Star and Rescue Certificates to 15 fishermen who were involved in rescue operations during 197^73*

Mr. Cater said that when he worked with the fishermen and farmers, which were ’’without question the happiest times in my career in Hong Kong”, he was very closely involved in promoting the scheme to encourage life saving among the fishing community.

He also disclosed that ’’close attention” is being given by the Government to a proposal by the Hong Kong Life Guard Club for special tran rn ng facilities.

Praising their effort in trying to obtain a more suitable venue, Mr« Cater assured the Club that facilities of this kind deserve nriority because “too many people are still venturing into the sea without really knowing enough about it”.

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/14..........

Friday, June 1, 1973

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GOVERNOR SENDS MESSAGE TO PRINCESS ANNE

Mt****

The Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, has sent a message of congratulations to H.R.H. the Princess Anne on the occasion of her recent engagement#

The full text of the message is:

"On behalf of the Government and the people of Hong Kong, who remember with pleasure and respect your Royal Highness’ visit in 197% v/e send out warm good wishes on this very happy occasion."

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Friday, June 1, 1975

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QUEEN’S BIRTHDAY HONOURS LIST

********

Note to Editors: The services of many Hong Kong residents are

recognised in the Queen’s Birthday Honours List to be published tomorrow (Saturday)*

They include community leaders, educationists, civil servants and members of the military services* A list of the recipients of the honours is contained in a special supplement to today’s (Friday) Daily Information Bulletin, copies of which are distributed in the G.I.S. Press boxes along with the military list.

The announcement regarding the Honours List is being made simultaneously in London at 2330 hours G.M.T. today, June 1*

Publication is permitted in Hong Kong newspapers tomorrow (Saturday) morning, but no news agency or overseas radio transmission of the announcement may carry the information without the embargo qualification.

The news may be broadcast from 6 a.m. onwards over the local radio and television stations tomorrow.

On NO account should any of the recipients of Honours be contacted for interviews or for information relative to their careers or be approached in any way in connection with their awards before these have been publicly announced.

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Release Time: 8*30 p*m*

PR 33 4000039

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

SUPPLEMENT

Friday, June 1, 1975

EMBARGOED NEWS ITEM -

NOTE TO EDITORS OF NEWSPAPERS

NEWS AGENCIES, BROADCASTING

STATIONS

The following announcement regarding the Queen’s Birthday Honours List is being made simultaneously in London at 2330 hours G.M.T. on June 2.

Publication is permitted in Hong Kong newspapers tomorrow (Saturday) morning, but no news agency or overseas radio transmission of the announcement may carry the information without the embargo qualification.

The news may be broadcast from 6 a.m. onwards over the local radio and television stations tomorrow.

On NO account should any of the recipients of Honours be contacted for interviews or for information relative to their careers or be approached in any way in connection with their awards before these have been publicly announced.

HONG KONG RECIPIENTS OF QUEEN’S BIRTHDAY HONOURS Kt. (Knight Bachelor)

The Honourable Mr. Justice William Alexander Blair-Kerr, J.P,

Mr. Justice Blair-Kerr, Senior Puisne Judge, has served on the bench in Hong Kong for about 27 years. He was born in 1911 in Perthshire, Scotland, and was educated at Edinburgh University where he graduated as M.A. in 1933 and LL. B. in 1935* He qualified as a Solicitor in Scotland in 1939*

/Later, ••••••••

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House. Hong Kong. Tel: 5-233191

Friday, June 1, 1973

- 2 -

Later, he was admitted as an Advocate and Solicitor in Singapore and he was in practice there when he was called up for military service in 1941. He escaped from Singapore after the surrender in 1942 and his military service continued in India and the United Kingdom.

In 19^5 he returned to Malaya as a military judge with the British Administration. He joined the Colonial Legal Service in 1946 and was appointed Magistrate in Kowloon. In subsequent years he served as President of the Tenancy Tribunal, Crown Counsel and Senior Crown Counsel.

He was called to the Bar in Scotland in 1951.

He was appointed a District Judge in 1959» Puisne Judge in 1961 and promoted to Senior Puisne Judge in 1971* On several occasions he acted as Chief Justice.

He is a past chairman of the Hong Kong Philharmonic Orchestra and has served as President of the Hong Kong Mountaineering Club, United Services Recreation Club (Kowloon), Royal Hong Kong Golf Club and the Hong Kong Cricket Club.

K.B.E. (H) (Knight Commander, Order of the British Empire) (Honorary)

Dr. Li Choh-ming, C.B.E. (Hon.)

Dr. Li has been the Vice Chancellor of the Chinese University since January 1964 and is largely responsible for consolidating arid developing the University during its formative years.

His academic record includes undergraduate work at the University of Nanking from 1927 to 1930, a B.A. degree from the University of California, Berkeley in 1932, an M.A. degree from the same university in 1933 and Ph. D. in 1936.

/From

Friday, June 1, 1973

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' From 1937 to 19^3 Dr. Li was Professor of Economics at Nankai, Southwest Associated, and National Central Universities in China.

He joined the University of California in 1951 as Professor of Business Administration and Director of the Centre for Chinese Studies.

Dr. Li has sat on numerous international organisations concerned with economic and educational affairs and obtained a number of honorary doctorate degrees from overseas universities and the University of Hong' Kong"/

He was awarded the C.B.E. (Hon.) in 1967 for his distinguished work. C.M.G. (Companion of St. Michael and St. George)

The Honourable Charles Philip Haddon-Cave, J.P.

Mr. Haddon-Cave has been Financial Secretary since July 1971 and has been responsible for much of Hong Kong’s trade negotiations.

He came to Hong Kong in 1962 as a Senior Administrative Officer after a distinguished career in Kenya and the Seychelles. He was immediately appointed Assistant Director of the Commerce and Industry Department and became Deputy Director three years later.

He has served as Assistant Commissioner of the Preventive Service, Deputy Director (Commercial Relations), Commerce and Industry Department, Deputy Economic Secretary, and Deputy Financial Secretary. He is an ex-officio Member of the Executive and Legislative Councils.

Mr. Haddon-Cave became an.official Justice of the Peace in 1969 and is the author Of several books.

C.M.G. (Companion of St. Michael and St. George)

The Honourable Donald Collin Cumyn Luddington, J.P.

Mr. Luddington is due to retire shortly as Secretary for Home Affairs to assume his new post of High Commissioner, Western Pacific.

/He joined ........

Friday, June 1, 1973

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He joined the Hong Kong Government service in 19^9 and became District Officer, Taipo. Since then, he has held a number of important posts including Clerk of Councils, Administrative Secretary of the Royal Hong Kong Police Force, Defence Secretary, Director of Commerce and Industry, and District Commissioner, New Territories.

A member of the Executive and Legislative Councils, Mr. Luddington is responsible for advising the Governor on issues involving Chinese law, language and custom.

He took up his duties as Secretary for Home Affairs in 197% and was appointed High Commissioner Western Pacific in March this year.

C.B.E., (Commander Order of the British Empire)

The Honourable Jack Cater, M.B.E., J.P.

Mr. Cater, Secretary for Information, has been designated the new Secretary for Home Affairs.

In this capacity he will continue his duties as Secretary for Information which he assumed in October last year.

He has distinguished himself as a -versatile and energetic officer and is Chairman of the Fight Violent Crime Campaign Committee.

Earlier in his career, Mr. Cater was largely responsible for developing the Fish and Vegetable Organisations and the Agriculture and Fisheries Department, for which service he was awarded the M.B.E, in 193$«

He has held a variety of responsible posts, including Defence Secretary and Deputy Colonial Secretary (Special Duties).

In 1968 he was seconded to the Trade Development Council as Executive Director for two years and helped to establish the Council on a firm footing.

/He returned ........

Friday, June 1, 1973

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He returned to the Government service as Director of Commerce and Industry and represented Hong Kong in a series of important negotiations to protect Hong Kong’s textile industry.

C.B.E. (.Commander Order of the British Empire)

The Honourable George Ronald Ross, O.B»E., J.P.

Mr* Ross is the Director of Deacon and Company Limited. He served as a member of the Legislative Council from 1964 to 1968 and was appointed a substantive member of the Executive Council in July last year.

He is chairman of the Standing Committee on Superscale Salaries and has been President of the Boy Scouts Association since 1964.

He v/as appointed an Unofficial Justice of the Peace in 1964 and was awarded the Officer Order of the British Empire (O.B.E.) in 1968.

C.B.E. (Commander Order of the British Empire)

Mr. Terence Dare Sorby, J.P,

Mr. Sorby became Executive Director of the Hong Kong Trade Development Council in 1970 following his retirement that same year from his post as Director of Commerce and Industry.

During his four years of service in that post, he was largely responsible for the expansion of the department and played a prominent role in the setting up of the Trade Development Council, the Hong Kong Productivity Centre and the Hong Kong Export Credit Insurance Corporation.

He joined the Hong Kong Government service in 1946 as an Administrative Officer. He was first appointed to the Commerce and Industry Department in 1933 and was associated with that department for most of his 24 years with the Government.

/He has •••••»••

Friday, June 1, 1973

-fi-

He has also held the post of Commissioner of Labour and Mines and served on the Trade and Industry Advisory Board, Textiles Advisory Board and on the Productivity Council.

He was appointed Director of Commerce and Industry in 19fi6, a post he held until his retirement in 1970.

C.B.E. (Commander Order of the British Empire)

The Honourable Woo Pak-chuen, O.B.E., J.P.

Mr. Woo has served on the Legislative Council since 1964 and is now the Senior Unofficial Member. He was made a substantive member of the Executive Council last year.

Born in Hong Kong,Mr. Woo was educated at St. Joseph’s College and the University of Hong Kong and completed his legal studies in the University of London where he obtained his LL.B, and Ph. D. degrees. ' *'

He serves on a host of committees concerned with educational and community matters and is Chairman of the Establishment Sub-Committee of the Finance Committee, the Board of Education and of the Advisory Committee on Telephone Services.

Aside from his involvement in the public service, he is active in voluntary work,being permanent advisor to the Hong Kong Juvenile Care Centre, and Commissioner of the Civil Aid Services.

Married with three children, Mr. Woo was made a Justice of the Peace in 1955 and awarded the Officer Order of the British Empire (O.B.E.) in 1963.

/7.........

Friday, June 1, 1973

Q.B.E. (Officer Order of the British Empire)

Mr. Christopher John Rowland Dawson, Q.P.M., C.P.M., J.P.

Mr. Dawson is Deputy Commissioner of Police (Operations). After his army service, he joined the Colonial Police in 19^9 and came to Hong Kong as an Assistant Superintendent.

He served as Aide-de-Camp to the Governor for about a year and held the honorary post of A.D.C. to His Excellency the Governor for a number of years since 195%

Mr. Dawson has served in all branches of the Force and has commanded

Hong Kong Island District and the Marine Police District*

He held the post of Director of Criminal Investigation and was Director of Special Branch from April 1970 until he assumed his post of Deputy Commissioner (Operations) in September last year.

He was made a Justice of the Peace in 1955 and awarded the Colonial Police Medal and the Queen’s Police Medal in 19&5 and 1970 respectively. G.E.E.(Officer Order of the British Empire)

Mr. Lam Kun-shing, J.P.

Mr. Lam, Chairman and Managing Director of Mee On Garment Manufacturers • ** ••••• Ltd., has played a leading role in the development of Hong Kong’s textile and ♦ garment industry during the past twenty years.

A longstanding member of the Textiles Advisory Board and the earlier Cotton Advisory Board, he has acted as industrial adviser to many Hong Kong teams during negotiations of restraint agreements with Hong Kong’s principal trading partners.

/He is ..........

Friday, June 1, 1973

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He is an Honorary President of the Chinese Manufacturers1 • Association and a past Chairman- Of the ‘Federation of Hong Kong Garment Manufacturers.

He has been an unofficial Justice of the Peace since October 196?• O.B.E. (Officer Order of the British Empire)

Mr. Ernest Irfon Lee, J.P.

Mr. Lee, Principal Assistant Colonial Secretary (Special Duties), joined the Hong Kong Government in 1961 on transfer from Tanganyika.

During the past 12 years, he has filled a number of senior posts with considerable success. In particular, he has had a long association with the Commerce and Industry Department, in which he served firstly as Assistant Director, and more recently as Deputy Director responsible for Administration, the Industry Division and the Preventive Service.

From time to time, he acted’ as Director of the department. At the age of 57j his services were recently extended until Match 1975*

He has devoted much of his time towards youth activities and has displayed a considerable interest in the social welfare of the community. O.B.E. (Officer Order of the British Empire)

Mr. Brian Francis Patrick Slevin, Q.P.M.,,C.P.M., J.P.

Mr. Slevin, Deputy Commissioner of Police (Administration), came to Hong Kong on transfer from Palestine in 19^9*

Since then he has served in all branches of the Police Force and has held the post of Director of Special Branch from 1966 to 1969*

/He was .••••••••

Friday, June 1, 1975

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He was promoted to his present position in September 1971. During the past two years he has played a leading role in the reorganisation of the Force to equip it for the complex tasks ahead*

He was made a Justice of the Peace in 1952, awarded the Colonial Police Medal in 1965» and the Queen’s Police Medal three years later. O*B*E* (Officer Order of the British Empire)

Mr* Alfred Evelyn Harry Wood, Q.F.S.M., J.P.

As Director of Fire Services, Mr. Wood has maintained a high standard of efficiency and discipline in his department.

In particular, he has been keen to obtain the most modern equipment for Hong Kong’s Fire Services which has been acclaimed as one of the finest in the world*

Mr* Wood first joined the department as a Station Officer in 195^ after eight years with the British Fire Service*. He was promoted to the- • rank of Deputy Director in 1968 and became the Director two years later*

He is a member of the Institution of Fire Engineers and holds tho Queen’s Fire Service Medal for distinguished service.

He was made a Justice of the Peace in 1968.

O*B.E* (Officer Order of the British Empire)

Mr. Alex Wu Shu-chih

Mr. Wu was recently appointed a member to the expanded Urban Council for a term of three years.

/fae has

Friday, June 1, 1973

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He has served on the Duke of Edinburgh’s Award Committee, the Board of Governors of New Asia College, the Hong Kong Trade Development Council and the Social Welfare Advisory Committee*

A former chairman of the Government Lotteries Management Committee, Mr. Wu is vice-chairman of Dai Nippon Printing Co. (International) Ltd., and Director of Canadian Tools Ltd.

I«S.O. (Imperial Service Order) ... _____-

Mr. Malcolm MacDonald Swan, J,P.

Mr. Swan has been head of the Government Executive Grade since 1969*

He joined the civil service as a class II member of the Senior Clerical and Accounting Staff in 1940.

He has served in a variety of responsible posts, and distinguished himself in the administration of the Executive and other grades under his control, t

He was made an Official Justice of the Peace in 1970.

M.B.E. (Member Order of the British Empire)

Sister Rose-Mary Clifford

One of the Sisters of st. Paul of Chartres, Sister Roso-Mary has devoted herself to the cause of education in Hong Kong ever since she came here in 1953.

She was principal' of St. Paul’s Convent School for 18 years, and now continues her good work as a teacher in Str Paul’s School-at Lam Tin, the planning and construction of which was largely due to her efforts.' M.B.E. (Member Order of the British Dnpire)

Mr. Colin William Morrison

Mr. Morrison is noted for his contribution to welfare services in Hong Kong.

/In many

Friday, June 1, 1973

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In many ways he was instrumental in the establishment and operation of the Community Chest, of which he has been Executive Director since 1968.

He was Director of the Church World Service in Hong Kong from 1961 until 1967.

(member Order of the British Empire)

Mr. WongShiu-cheuck, J.P,

Mr. Wong, an Urban Councillor, is widely recognised as a kaifong leader and a promotor of Chinese traditional welfare organisations and other voluntary community services.

He is Chairman of the Shamshuipo Kaifong Association and Chairman of the Hong Kong Juvenile Care Centre, in addition to a number of clansmen and district associations.

He has been a Committee Member of the Board of Management of the Chinese Permanent Cemeteries for a number of years and is currently the manager of eight subsidized schools.

(H) (Member Order of the British Empire) (Honorary)

fir. Tsang Hing-ming

Mr. Tsang has dedicated himself to both the fishing and farming communities in Hong Kong for more than 20 years.

He has been working for the Agriculture and Fisheries Department for a number of years during which he contributed substantially to the administration of the J.E, Joseph Trust Loan Fund, the Vegetable Marketing Organisation Loan Fund and the Kadoorie Agricultural Aid Loan Fund.

/12...........

Friday, June 1, 1973

“ 12 ~

B.E.M. (British Empire Medal)

Mr, Kong Hon-kit

Mr. Kong joined the Government clerical service in 19^0.

Since then, he has served in the Secretariat for Home Affairs for some 28 years, and is now the most senior Rank I member of the cl er5cal service.

B,_E.M. (British Empire Medal)

Mr. Yung Chen-tai

Mr. Yung has been a technician and senior technician in the Pathology Department of the University of Hong Kong since 19^0.

His services proved invaluable in bringing into operation and equipping the Government’s Pathology Building in the Queen Mary Hospital.

He was also noted for his community work in Shanghai before he came to Hong Kong.

E.E.E, (British Empire Medal)

Mr. Kwan Lok-sze

Mr. Kwan is at present an Overseer in the Cleansing Division of the Urban Services Department.

He was first employed as an acting Class III Foreman in 19^5 and rose to his present rank in 1958.

He has been serving at the Gin Drinker’s Bay refuse dump since 1958* B.E.M. (British Empire Medal)

Mr. Cheng Yat-wah

Mr. Cheng first joined the Government as a messenger in the Yuen Long District Office in 19^9 and is now a Senior Demarcator.

/A native

Friday, June 1, 1973

- 13 -

A native of Yuen Long, Mr. Cheng is currently concerned with the development of Castle Peak New Town and recently produced a valuable report on the problems of the removal of the old village of Tuen Mun San Hui.

B.E.M. (British Empire Medal)

Mr. Gun Yung

Mr. Gun joined the Public Works Department in 1954 as a daily paid labourer, and devoted his services to government quarries.

He was promoted to his present rank of Foreman Class I in 1959•

Mr. Gun is responsible for removing dangerous overhanging boulders and rock formations and has performed outstandingly in this field.

B.E.M. (British Empire Medal)

Mr, Wong Hok-ling

Mr. Wong has served for some 26 years in the Government. He first joined the Commerce and Industry Department as a messenger in 1946 and rose to his present position of Head Attendant in 19&5«

His service has been of a high order and he is now approaching retirement.

B.E.M. (British Empire Medal)

Sergeant Wu Yun-tsung, C.P.M,, C.P.L.S.M.

Sergeant Wu joined the Police as a Constable in 1947 and was promoted to Sergeant in 1963.

He has been awarded the Colonial Police Medal for GalJantry and holds the Colonial Police Long Service Medal.

He has been commended for courage by the Commissioner of Police and received five monetary rewards for good duty.

/14.........

Friday, June 1, 1975

BADGE OF HONOUR

Hie Badge of Honour is awarded to the following persons in recognition of their valuable services to Hong Kong.

Mr. Chan Cho-chak

Mr. Chan Hon-chung

Mr, Chan Kwok-leung

Mr. Fung Pak-choi

Mrs. I. Kitchell

Mr. Lam Hing-cheung

Mr. Lau Chi-man

Mr. Leung Hing-wai

Mr. Ma Sai-on

Mr. Tsui Mun-hei

Mr. Yan Kow

Mr. Yeung Yung-nin

Q.P.M, (Queen*s Police Medal)

Mr. Maurice Gotfried, M.B.E., C.P.M., J.P.

Mr. Gotfried joined the Special Constabulary in 19^9* S1nc*» then, . -w. - .

he has served in a series of responsible positions, rising to his present rank of Assistant Commissioner of the Royal Hong Kong Auxiliary Police Force in 1968.

He has held the post of Deputy Commandant of the Royal Hong Kong Auxiliary Police Force since April 19&7 and has acted as Commandant on many occasions.

He was awarded the M.B.E. in 1969 and the C.P.M. in 1962.

/15

Friday, June 1, 1973

- 15 -

Q.P.M. (Queen1s Police Medal)

Mr, Michael Clafton Illingworth, C.P.M., J.P.

Mr. Illingworth is an Assistant Commissioner of Police. He joined the Royal Hong Kong Police as a Sub-inspector in 19^9 after serving in the Royal Navy and the Merchant Navy.

He has served in the uniform and marine branches of the Police

Force and was A.D.C. to the Governor in 195^**55« He was promoted to his present rank in 1971 •

He was awarded the C.P.M. in 19&7.

C.P.M. (Colonial Police Medal)

Station Sergeant Chi Min-chi, C.P.L.S.M.

Sergeant Chi joined the Royal Hong Kong Police Force as a Constable in 19^9 and has served mainly in the Emergency Units and the Traffic Branch of the Force. He was promoted to his present rank last year.

In 1967, he was awarded the Colonial Police Long Service Medal.

Mr. James Walker Currie

Mr. Currie, Chief Inspector of Police, joined the Royal Hong Kong Police Force as a Probationary Sub-inspector in 1952.

He has spent all his service in the Criminal Investigation Department of the Force and ha.c -- of c.I.D. personnel in the New Territories

and various districts on Hong Kong Island since 19&5«

Mr. Ho Fuk-cheung, C.P.L.S.M.

Mr. Ho first joined the Government service as an interpreter in the Royal Hong Kong Police Force in 19M. He was transferred to the Inspectorate in 19^71 and since then has served in most branches of the Force.

/He has

r

Friday, June 1, 1973

- 16 -

He has been with the Criminal Investigation Department/Triad Societies Bureau as a Chief Inspector of Police since 1966. He was awarded the Colonial Police Long Service Medal in 1965*

Mr* Laurence Power, C.P.L,S.M.

Mr* Power is at present the Divisional Superintendent of the

Western Division on Hong Kong Island<

He joined the Force as a Sub-inspector in 1949, and was promoted to Assistant Superintendent in 1969 and to Superintendent one year later*

He was awarded the Colonial Police Long Service Medal in 1964*

* .- - • - ■ •• g ।—■ < * • -•—

Mr* William Joh.: 7.7 ;rt3

Mr. Roberts, Divisional Superintendent of Tsuen Wan, joined the Royal Hong Kong Police Force as a Probationary Sub-inspector in 1953* He was promoted to Senior Inspector in 1964 and subsequently rose to his present rank of Superintendent in 1968.

He has served in the Uniform Branch, the Special Branch and the

Marine Police.

Mr* He^ry P.onnn, C*P-L,S9M*

Mr. Ronan joined the loyal Hong Kong Police in 1952 and was promoted •e ;• -i

to Chief Inspector in 1959•

He has devoted almost the whole of his career in the Special Branch*

He was awarded the Colonial Police Long Service Medal in 1970*

Mr. Wei Chun-ki, C.S.C.M.

Mr. Wei, a Superintendent of the Royal Hong Kong Auxiliary Police Force, is Divisional Superintendent of Kwun Tong.

/He was •••••**•

Friday, June 1, 1973

- 17 -

He was awarded the Colonial Special Constabulary Medal in 1966.

Mr, Woo Wing, C.P.L.SOM.

After war service with the British Army Aid Groups in China, Mr. Woo joined the Royal Hong Kong Police Force as a Probationary Sub-inspector in 1945.

He has spent the whole of his service in the New Territories District and was promoted to Inspector in 1952•

He was awarded the Colonial Police Long Service Medal in 19^3*

Mr. Wilson Young Wai-huen, C.S.C.M.

Mr. Young joined the Special Constabulary in 1949 and is at present an Inspector of the Royal Hong Kong Auxiliary Police Force.

He was awarded the Colonial Special Constabulary Medal in 1964.

C.P.M. (Fire) (Colonial Police Medal) (Fire)

Mr. Cheung Wood-hoi

Mr. Cheung served for 16 years as a fireman until he became partly disabled as a result of severe burns at an incident.

He was regraded to the Ambulance Service and since then has largely overcome his disability and proven himself a dedicated ambulanceman.

Mr. Lan Man-sai

Mr. Lam is a Senior Fireman and is presently involved with Fire Prevention duties.

He was commended for his skill and resourcefulness displayed at a fire in 1959 and again in 1968 when, while off-duty, he went to the aid of police officers injured in a traffic accident.

/18..........

Friday, June 1, 1975

- 18 -

Mr. Leung Tak-yan

Mr. Leung has served in the Fire Services for some 24 years and is now an Assistant Divisional Officer,

He has in recent years voluntarily undertaken the work of translating from English to Chinese a complete volume of the Manuals of Firemanship for the benefit of other members of the Service,

Mr, Alfred Lumb

Mr, Lumb is a Divisional Officer and senior staff member of the Fire Prevention Bureau.

He has been involved in fire prevention, operations and training, and performed outstanding work in training search and rescue units which he welded into an effective strike force.

Mr, Mark Sum

Mr, Mark, Principal Fireman, has been with the Fire Services for about 16 years,

He has been personally responsible for training firemen in special operational aspects of the technical side of fire fighting,

Mr, John William McCarthy

Mr, McCarthy is a Divisional Officer of the Fire Services.

During his 12 years of service in Hong Kong he has d i s11ngui .shed himself as an outstanding fireground commander.

Mr, Siu Him

Mr, Siu joined the Airport Fire Service in 1950 and was posted to the Fire Services Department in 1962. He is now a Senior Fireman.

He will be retiring after 35 years of service, later this year,

-------0---------


PRH

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Saturday, June 2, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No,

Urbco launches massive tree-planting programme........••••••••..... 1

Tse Wan Shan estate residents to have a second welfare building .. 2

There will be no mail delivery on Tuesday ................••••••••••• 2

New press facilities at Kai Tak Airport ............................. 3

*

Temporary wholesale market for Cheung Sha Wan.............•••«••••••• 4

Tickets of second Government Lottery this year now on sal e ...••*• 5

Tsim Sha Tsui Post Office to be renovated ....................••••••• 6

Profits Tax Section of Inland Revenue Department moves to new premises ..........................................................   7

Restrictions for public light buses announced ••••••••«••••••••••• 8

Settlement reached in industrial dispute • • • •  ..................  9

Director of Commerce and Industry to visit Kwun Tong factories ... 10

.^Issued* by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Saturday, June 2, 1973

- 1 -

MORE TREES TO BE PLANTED THROUGHOUT HONG KONG

********

Tree-planting time is here again. And this year the programme is bigger and support greater.

Tomorrow (Sunday), more than 60 young people from the Conservancy Club of the Diocesan Girls* School and St. Claire’s College will take part in a ceremony marking another Urban Council tree-planting year.

More than 200 trees will be planted on that day, to be followed by the planting of thousands more during the year.

Ten thousand saplings were purchased from China recently and are expected to arrive in Hong Kong this month.

An Urban Council spokesman said that the trees from China would help boost greatly the current Urban Council drive to make Hong Kong a greener and prettier place.

He said other tree-planting ceremonies would be planned, and it was hoped that more young people would take part so that a greater appreciation of the environment might be developed among the young.

Mote to Editors: You are invited to send a reporter

and/or photographer to cover the ceremony at the Lo Fu Ngam Park on Sunday (June 3)• The ceremony will start at 10 a.m. and will continue throughout the day.

-------0----------

/2........

Saturday, June 2, 1973

- 2 -

A SECOND ESTATE WELFARE BUILDING WR TSZ WAN SHAN

********

A second estate welfare building will shortly be built in Tsz Wan Shan to meet the expanding social needs of the residents there.

The new centre will be a six-storey structure on the hillslope opposite Block IV of the estate.

It will accommodate offices of the Social Welfare Department as wel 1 as a library for the Boys’ and Girls’ Clubs Association, a Family Planning Clinic and a creche.

In addition, there will be a partially covered roof-top playground equipped with slides and a climbing jungle.

The ground floor of the building will be used as an assembly hall for about 300 people.

Foundation work on the building is well advanced and the erection of the superstructure will begin as soon as it is completed at the end of July.

The centre, which is expected to be ready for use at the end of June next year will be the seventh provided by the government for residents of public housing estates

------- o---- - -

HOLIDAY POSTAL ARRANGEMENTS

********

The Postmaster General announced today that all post offices wi 11 be closed for the Dragon Boat Festival on Tuesday (June 5) which is a public holiday.

There will be no mail delivery on that day.

0----

Saturday, June 2, 1973

- 3 -

PRESS FACILITIES AT KAI TAK AIRPORT

******** t

A new arrangement to facilitate press photographers covering news at Kai Tak Airport will be introduced as from Monday (June 4).

Two officers from the Government Information Services have been posted to the Airport to assist the press.

Under the new system, the two officers will provide escort service to press photographers wishing to take pictures on the tarmac of arriving or departing V.I.Ps..

They will also be responsible for the liaison between the press and the airport authorities.

With the introduction of this arrangement, which will be on a trial basis for six months, the airport ’Pool’ permits issued by the Civil Aviation Department to individual newspaper photographers will be withdrawn and cancelled with effect from Monday.

Note to Editors: The office of the two GIS officers is

located at Room 31A, Ground floor, Kai Tak Airport Terminal Building.

They can be contacted on Tel. No. K-370211, Ext. 246 between 10 a.m. and 8 p.m. daily. They can also be contacted through the Duty Officer, Government Information Services.

A....

-------0----------

Saturday, June 2, 1975

- 4 -

NEW TEMPORARY VEGETABLE MARKET FOR KOTLOON

*******

A temporary wholesale market will be built in Cheung Sha Wan to provide facilities for the handling of imported vegetables in Kowloon.

The market, occupying about 140,000 square feet, will be situated along the waterfront south-west of Lai Chi Kok Road and by the side of the existing temporary sand depot.

It will have accommodation for market stalls, a management office, and other facilities such as a canteen, kitchen, and toilets.

The construction work is expected to begin in early July this year and be completed in three months.

On completion it will relieve the heavy volume of trading now being experienced at the Kennedy Town market on Hong Kong Island.

For longer term prospects, plans are already in hand to construct a new Cheung Sha ’Jan wholesale market complex.

This complex, expected to occupy part of the temporary market site, will handle other primary products in addition to vegetables, including fruit, poultry, fresh water fish, and various types of shell fish.

/5........

Saturday, June 2, 1973

- 5 -

SECOND GOVERNMENT LOTTERY 1973 1 *. •-

*******

Tickets for the second Government Lottery this year are now on sale at 52 each.

The tickets can be obtained at all Royal Hong Kong Jockey Club selling booths and at the Yaumati Ferry Piers.

They can also be bought at the head offices and branches of the following banks: the Hong Kong and Shanghai Bank; the Chartered Bank; the Dao Heng Bank; the Hang Seng Bank; the Hong Kong Chinese Bank; the Kwong On Bank; the Overseas Trust Bank; the Shanghai Commercial Bank; the Wing On Bank; the Bank of East Asia; the Mercantile Bank; the Banque Beige Pour I’Etranger; the Banque de 1’Indochine; the United Overseas Bank; the Hang Lung Bank; the Indian Overseas Bank; the Overseas-Chinese Bank; the Hong Nin Savings Bank; the Tai Sang Bank; the Union Bank of Hong Kong;

, the Wing Hang Bank; the Liu Chong Hing Bank; the Commercial Bank of Hong Kong; and the Wing Lung Bank.

Tickets are also available at the Ngau Kee Money Changers and the Sun Cheung Kee Money Changers.

There will be a total of 57 prizes comprising one First prize, one Second prize, five Third prizes and 50 Special prizes.

The First prize will make up 40 per cent of the total proceeds, and the Second prize 10 per cent. The five Third prizes will each amount to 1 per cent of the total proceeds, and the 50 Special prizes 0.1 per cent each.

/The lucky .......

Saturday, June 2, 1973

The lucky draw will be held at the Concert Hall of the City Hal1 at 10.00 a.m. on June 23 (Saturday).

Note to Editors

The chairman of the Government Lotteries-

Management Committee, Mr. Kai-yin Chau, will give a press conference at the City Hall Restaurant on Monday (June 4) at 12.JO p.m. when he will announce plans to promote the second government lottery of the year.

You are invited to attend

0 - -

TSIM SHA TSUI POST OFFICE TO BE IMPROVED

********

The Tsim Sha Tsui Post Office near the present railway term nus will be renovated to provide better facilities for the public and postal staff.

There will be additional canopies over the two main entrances and the posting boxes, and a more convenient posting counter with a glass screen on top.

Inside, the office area will be expanded and the general appearance

brightened up.

The work will begin towards the end of July and will take about three months to complete.

It will be carried out in stages so that normal postal services will not be interrupted.

0 - -

Saturday, June 2, 1975

- 7 -

NEW PREMISES FOR PROFITS TAX SECTION

********

The Inland Revenue Department’s Profits Tax (Unincorporated Businesses) Section will move into new offices in Central District next week.

The new office, located on the second floor of Permanent Comfort Building at 74—77 Connaught Road Central, will start operation on Wednesday (June 6)*

Another section of the Department — the Profits Tax (Corporations) Section — has already been in the same building since April this year.

A spokesman for the department said that a better service would be provided by bringing the two sections together in a building centrally located in the business and financial community of Hong Kong.

He added, however, that members of the public might experience some inconvenience during the removal on Monday (June 4).

Every effort would be made to keep this to a minimum, he said, but . members of the public could cooperate by delaying their enquiries, if possible, till the new office opens.

The opening hours of the new office will be from 8.50 a.m. to 5 p«m. from Monday to Friday, and from 9 a.m. to 12 noon on Saturdays. Enquiries may be directed at telephone numbers 5-448049 and 5-456103.

The entrance to the new office will be by Gilman Bazaar and a reception counter on the second floor will assist callers.

-------0---------'

Saturday, June 2, 1973

- 8 -

PUBLIC LIGHT BUS RESTRICTIONS

********

The Commissioner for Transport announced today that new arrangements for public light buses will be introduced at Wah Fu Estate next week to improve the flow of traffic in the area.

As from 10 a.m. on Monday (June 4), a new public light bus stand will be set up in front of Wah On House and Wah Lok House (BlocJcs 1, 2 and J) of the Estate.

Public light buses will not be allowed to enter the section of the access road beyond the light bus stand.

They will also be prohibited from picking up or setting down passengers on the section of access road to the Estate between Shek Pai Wan Road and Wah On House (Block 1).

At the same time, public light buses in Kowloon will not be permtted to pick up or set down passengers from 7 a.m. to 9 p.m. daily on:-

* the north-eastbound carriageway of Nam Cheong Street between Hai Tan Street and Tai Nan Street;

* the south-westbound carriageway of Nam Cheong Street between Tai Nan Street and Yee Kuk Street;

the section of Pei Ho Street between Hai Tan Street and Lai Chi Kok Road;

* the section of Kweilin Street between Lai Chi Kok Road and Hai Tan Street;

* the north-eastbound carriageway of Yen Chow Street between Lai Chi Kok Road and Tai Nan Street; and

* the south—westbound carriageway of Yen Chow Street between Tai Nan Street and Yee Kuk Street.

/These

Saturday, June 2, 1973

- 9 -

These restrictions,effective from Monday, are intended to reduce obstruction to through traffic at the junctions of Lai Chi Kok Road with Yen Chow Street, Kweilin Street, Pei Ho Street and Nam Cheong Street by public light buses.

The existing bus termini at Hai Tan Street will be resited to Yee Kuk Street.

Appropriate traffic signs will be erected to indicate the restrictions

- _ - - - o----------

LABOUR DISPUTE SETTLED ,

******* . .

The dispute involving some 115 retrenched employees of the II.P. San & Co. Ltd. has been settled.

Under an agreement reached late yesterday, all monthly-paid workers will receive two months severance pay and 10 days retirement benefits for each completed year of service.

The total amount involved will be in the region of <300,000. Payment will be made on June 8.

The dispute started on May 7 when the company closed dona. A series of conciliation meetings over the question of severance pay were subsequently held at the Hong Kong office of the Labour Relations Service of the Labour Department.

-------0----------

/10.........

Saturday, June 2, 1973

- 10 -

DIRECTOR TO VISIT KWUN TONG FACTORIES

********

Note to Editors: The Director of Commerce and Industry,

Mr. E.P. Ho, will visit two factories in Kwun Tong on Monday (June 4).

His first stop will be at the Micro Electronics Ltd. at ?8, Hung To Road where he will spent about an hour before proceeding to the South China Bleaching and Dyeing Factory Ltd. at 102, How Ming Street.

Micro Electronics produces transistors, magnetic heads, memory cores, integrated circuits and other electronic components, while South China specialises in bleached and printed piecegoods.

Press representatives will be welcome to cover the visits.

Mr. Ho will arrive at Micro Electronics at about 3.15 p»m. and at the South China Bleaching and Dyeing Factory about an hour later.

-------0 --------

Release Time: 2,30 p.m

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Monday, June 4, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No,

Dragon boat races will be held in many centres tomorrow to mark the Tuen Ng festival ......................•••.......••»••••••••••• 1

Pig-breeding in Hong Kong to become more scientific ........••••••• 3

Book lending in public libraries increases by 46 per cent ••••••••« 4

A section of Honiton Road on Hong Kong Island closed •..............  5

Senior Education Officer retires after 18 years of government and community service ..................................................  6

Medical and Health Department statistics show a drop in notifiable infectious diseases in April..........................................7

Local artist to give piano recital on Saturday in the City Hall ... 8

Four artistes from Radio Hong Kong will take part in the draw for the second government lottery...........................................  9

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Monday, June 4, 1973

- 1 -

DRAGON BOAT RACES

********

Traditional dragon boat races will again be held at fishing communities around the shores of Hong Kong tomorrow (June 5) to celebrate Tuen Ng - the fifth day of the fifth moon on the lunar calendar.

The events commemorate the death more than 2,000 years ago of Chu Yuan, a famous Chinese statesman and poet.

Members of the public will be able to watch the festivities tomorrow at a number of places, including Tai 0, Cheung Chau, Castle Peak and Stanley. The main races, however, will be at Tai Po, Yau Ma Tei and Chai Wan.

At Yuen Chau Chai, Tai Po, 32 teams will be competing in what will be the biggest programme of the day. The District Commissioner, Nev/ Territories, Mr. Macpherson will present banners to the winners.

The races are expected to begin shortly after 11 a.m.

The boat races in the Yau Ma Tei typhoon shelter will be the most spectacular in the urban area. Twenty-two teams have entered the races to be hold between 12.45 p*m. and 4 p.m. and the Commander British Forces, Lt. Gen. Sir Richard Ward, will present the prizes.

In Chai Wan, the races will commence at 2 p.m.

/The guests ......

Monday, June 4, 1973

- 2 -

The guests of honour are Mr. Henry H.L. Hu, Urban Councillor;

Mr. T.H. Barna, City District Officer (Eastern); and Mr. C.J. Cunningham, Divisional Superintendent (Bay View Division). They will distribute prizes after the races.

Large crowds are expected to watch the boat races at the different locations and the Kowloon Canton Railway is putting on extra trains from xsim Sha Tsui to Tai Po to cope with the influx of people.

-------0---------

Monday, June 4, 1973

- 3 -

SCIENTIFIC METHODS FOR PIG BREEDING

******

A new wing will soon be added to an alI-purpose laboratory of the Agriculture and Fisheries Department in an effort to put pig breeding in Hong Kong on a more scientiiic basis&

The extension will be built to Tai Lung Farm at Sheung Shui which currently specialises in water, soil and plant analyses.

At the same time, the existing laboratory will undergo minor alterations to bring it in line with a new emphasis on pig feed analysis.

A spokesman for the Agriculture and Fisheries Department said that at present no satisfactory analytical services are available in Hong Kong.

”A scientific approach to livestock breeding is becoming increasingly necessary if the productivity of the industry is to be maximised,11 he said.

With the completion of the building at the end of this year, the Agriculture and Fisheries Department will be able to provide a free analytical and advisory service to Nev/ Territories pig farmers.

-------0---------

A

Monday, June 4, 1973

- 4 -

SCIENCE - THE MOST POPULAR TOPIC

**««*«***

More than two million books were borrowed by registered readers of the Urban Council Public Libraries last year as more and more adults and young people took advantage of the free lending facilities.

A spokesman for the Urban Council said today that five lending libraries issued 1,469»797 adult books out of the total of 2,124,499 for home reading during the year 1972/73- The other 654,702 were junior books.

The total represented an increase of 46 per cent over the previous year. This was due mainly to the introduction of an additional borrower’s %

ticket and the opening of the Ping Shek branch last year.

"In adult libraries, the most popular subjects in English were pure science, technology, fiction, arts and recreation, literature and historythe spokesman said. ’’The pattern was very much the same for Chinese books.”

Picture books were very popular with the youngest readers, while science fiction, mystery and adventure stories attracted the older children.

Books read in the lending libra?'es also reached a record 1,521,162 last year, an increase of 68 per cent compared with the previous year.

During 1972/73^ registered members of the lending libraries increased by nearly 60,000, bringing the total number to 3^3i$34.

/The public ••••••

Monday, June 4, 1973

- 5 -

The public also made good use of the reference services in the City Hall and Yau Ma Tei public libraries where a total of 328,4-71 books were consulted by readers in addition to 32,433 reference enquiries.

Readers also showed great interest in newspapers and periodicals and 184,625 back issues were consulted during the year.

The five public libraries located at the City Hall, Aberdeen/ Pokfulam, Yau Ma Tei, Waterloo Road, and Ping Shek are stocked with a total of over 500,000 books of which 65 per cent are in Chinese.

-------0---------

ROAD CLOSED CW ISLAND

**********

A section of Honiton Road on Hong Kong Island between its junction with Babington Path and House No. 8 of Babington Path has been closed to traffic.

This section of road is considered dangerous for vehi nnl ar traffic until repair work on an embankment nearby at 84-86 Bonham Road is completedi

The work is expected to take about two months.

,-------0---------

/6

Monday, June 4, 197J

- 6 -

SENIOR EDUCATION OFFICER RETIRES

********

Mr. A.W. Campbell, Senior Education Officer (Physical Education) is retiring after working more than 18 years in the Education Department.

He will be presented with a gift from his colleagues to mark his retirement. The presentation will be made by the Director of Education, Mr. J. Canning on Wednesday (June 6).

Mr• Campbell was first appointed Education Officer in December 1954.

He became an Acting Senior Education Officer in March 19&J and was confirmed to that post in September of the same year.

Apart from his service in the Education Department, Mr. Campbel1 has also held a large number of voluntary positions in non-government bodies.

He has been a member of the Urban Council Recreation and Amenities Committee, and a Technical Adviser to the Hong Kong Schools Sports Association as well as the New Territories Schools Sports Association since 1963*

At present, Mr. Campbell is a council member of the Amateur Sports Federation and Olympic Committee of Hong Kong, a member of the Hong Kong Island Advisory Committee for Recreational Development and Nature Conservation.

He is also Chairman of the Hong Kong Physical Education Association, Vice President of the Hong Kong Sports Association for the Physically Handicapped and Honorary Adviser to the Hong Kong Royal Life Guard Club.

Note to Editors: You are invited to send a reporter

and/or photographer to cover the presentation ceremony which will be held at 11.JO a.m. on June 6 in the Education Department’s Conference Room, Lee Gardens, Jrd floor, Hysan Avenue, Causeway Bay.

-------0--------- /7.........................

Monday, June 4, 1973

FEWER NOTIFIABLE INFECTIOUS DISEASES IN APRIL

**«*>»****«*

The incidence of all notifiable infectious diseases fell to 782 in April — a drop of 358 cases over the previous month.

The monthly health statistics for April released today by the Medical and Health Department also show that there was a total of 73 deaths compared to the 110 in March.

Of the deaths, one was due to typhoid, another to measles, and 71 to tuberculosis.

The incidence of chickenpox rose slightly from 46 in March to 48 in April. Reported cases of measles also increased from 54 to 73* There was no appreciable variation in the incidence of other infectious diseases.

During April, Hong Kong remained free from cholera and other quarantinable diseases.

-------0 --------

/8..........

Monday, Juno 4, 1973

- 8 -

LOCAL PIANIST TO GIVE RECITAL

**********

A young Hong Kong pianist, Frederick Tsai Chung-li, who devotes his studies to Chinese piano music, will give his second fact tai in Hong Kong at the City Hall Concert Hall next Saturday (June 9)•

Mr# Tsai। a winner in the Hong Kong Schools’ Music Festival in 19679 was awarded a fouivycar scholarship the same year which enabled him to further his studies at the Royal College of Music in London.

While attending the Royal College he won a prize in the examination held in 19&9 find later studied in Switzerland under Italian pianist, Arturo Benedetti-Michelangeli•

Since his return in February 1972, Mr. Tsai has taught piano at Chung Chi College of the Chinese University.

During next Saturday’s concert, for which tickets are now on sale, Frederick Tsai will play works by Chinese contemporary composers, including Yin Cheng Chung and Tsu Wan-hua, in addition to the works of Bach, Beethoven and Liszt.

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/9.......

Monday, June 4, 1973

- 9 -

DRAW FOR SECOND GOVERNMENT LOTTERY

***********

Four well-known personalities from Radio Hong Kong will take part in the draw for the second government lottery this year.

They orc Susanna Lung, Elaine Sung, Maria Lo, and Lancie Yeung.

This was announced today by Mr. Chau Kai-yin, Chairman of the Government Lotteries Management Committee, at a press conference held at the City Hall Restaurant.

Tickets for the current lottery are on sale now and the draw will take place in the City Hall Concert Hall on Saturday, June 23, at 10 a.m.

After the draw, there will be a half-hour entertainment programme given by Radio Hong Kong artists and this will be followed by the public auction of special car numbers held by the Transport Department.

The proceed from the auction will go to the Government Lotteries Fund.

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Release, time: 7* 00 P,ffl

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Wednesday, June 6, 1973

CONTENDS...........

Page No.

Temporary rent freeze imposed on post-war domestic premises ............................................................. 1

#........ •.-•••«........................

Acting Colonial Secretary outlines proposed long term measures for stabilising rent situation .............................. 5

Unofficial Members support the temporary rent freeze on certain domestic promises ...............................e........... 8

Dr. Chung believes rent control is not a solution to Hong Kong’s housing shortage......• •................................... 10

Programme for social welfare development set out in improved white paper and five year plan.............................. 12

Discussions in progress to establish a system to review police pay......................................................... 14

Two Legco members seek further exemptions from stamp duty ... 15

New licensed areas are being developed to meet the demands of homeless people •••«.•••..................................   1$

Building plans for a new North Point-Kwun Tong vehicular ferry link are expected to be approved soon ....................   18

A review will be made into the problems posed by offensive trades

................................................................ 19

Plans for a survey on travellers to Macau....................... 20

Lotteries grants to promote 12 social welfare projects •••••• 21

All domestic residents affected by the Ngau Tau Kok clearance offered alternative accommodation .........••••••«•••••••••••• 22

Securities Council considers delays in share transfers •••••• 25

Additional reports of the government’s management consultants

.............................................................   26

Residents of Yau Tong will have a new telephone exchange next month ............................

/2.........

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

2

Page No

A working group has been set up to review the manangement of multi-storey buildings ...................••••••...........• 28

One legislative councillor expresses serious reservations about longer term measures to control rents......... • • •  ... 29

Benefits and disadvantages of bridge to Lantau to be studied .............................................................   31

Wednesday, June 6, 1973

- 1 -

TEMPORARY RENT FREEZE ON UNPROTECTED DOMESTIC PREMISES Longer-Term Measures Being Drafted

* * ♦ ♦ ♦ « ♦ * ♦ » • -w •*-■**•

A temporary standstill is to be imposed, as from tomorrow (Thursday), on rents for all post-war domestic premises which are not covered under the existing rent control legislation.

The measure is contained in the Domestic Premises (Tenure and Rent) (Temporary Provisions) Bill 1973, which passed all three readings in the Legislative Council today.

In effect, the introduction of the new holding legislation — coupled with the existing Rent Increases (Domestic Premises) Control Ordinance, which was introduced in 1970 — means that all domestic tenants are now protected against exorbitant rent increases.

The new legislation is designed as a temporary measure pending the introduction of longer-term measures, probably next month.

The new law stipulates that a domestic tenant cannot, in normal circumstances, be evicted nor can his rent be increased, nptwithstanding any agreement to the contrary.

It also introduces new penal provisions to deal wi^h landlords who demand or receive rent in excess of that which is legally payable at the commencement of the Ordinance. A landlord on conviction may be liable to h fine of .34,000,

/The new

Wednesday, June 6, 1975

- 2 -

The new lav/ applies only to existing tenancies and does not affect lettings of vacant premises or new premises. These will be subject only to the Tenancy (Notice of Termination) Ordinance, under which a landlord must give six months’ notice when seeking possession.

Tenancies coning within the existing rent control ordinance will continue under such controls until the introduction of the proposed longer-term measures.

This means that tenants will still have the security of tenure provided by the Rent Increases (Domestic Premises) Control Ordinance, but landlords will be able to obtain the increases in rent provided for in this Ordinance, (i.e. a ’’fair increase” having regard to the ’’norm” of 15 per cent, or the five per cent increase provided for in the 1972 amendment).

These increases provide security of tenure and protection against further increases for a period of either two years or one year respectively, from the date the increase takes effect. The new legislation takes this into account•

Longer-Term Measures

Meanwhile, comprehensive longer-term measures are now being drafted and it is hoped to introduce a Bill into the Legislative Council next month. The Bill will not, however, be implemented until later this year.

It is intended that the proposed measures will apply to all post-war domestic premises which are in existence when the Bill comes into force.

/However, ••••••

Wednesday, June 6, 1975

- 5 -

However, premises newly completed when the Bill takes effect will be excluded from controls for a period of three years. This is to encourage new developers to obtain a reasonable return on their investment.

The rent control formula will be so designed as to enable it to be extended beyond the three year period, if necessary.

A three-man independent rent tribunal will be set up to review upon application by cither a tenant or landlord any increase- determined by the Commissioner of Rating and Valuation.

It is envisaged that the first rent, following the legislation, of premises not previously let (such as recently completed vacant premises and owner—occupied premises) would not be restrained in any way, but increases thereafter would be controlled.

In the case of a fresh letting of existing premises previously lot, the rent would not be allowed to exceed the fair market rent as assessed by the Commissioner of Rating and Valuation.

No increases in rent, except by agreement, would exceed 10 per cent per annum, and this would be subject to an assessment by the Commissioner.

Under the proposed measures, a landlord seeking an increase in rent would have to apply to the Commissioner, who would make an assessment of the fair market rent which would be on the lines of an up-to-date rateable value.

The increase permitted would then be calculated by dividing the difference between the existing rent, exclusive of rates, by a factor of ”5", subject to a maximum increase of 10 per cent per annum (or 21 per cent over two years).

/The following .......

•r

Wednesday, June 6, 1973

- 4 -

The following tables illustrate how the calculations would be made.

Tenement floor controlled under existing legislation:

Assessed fair market rent: $575

Existing controlled rent : $290

Divide by factor : 5/285 = $55 (rounded off)

Similar tenement floor let at the end of 1972

Assessment fair market rent: $575

Existing rent: $500

Divide by factor: 5/ 75 = $15

Increase per month: $15

Each such increase allowed would subsist for two years. If no increase is allowed, the landlord would be allowed to apply again in one year.

Increases in rent of sub-tenancies would generally follow increases in the rent of the head-tenancy.

Both the landlords and the tenants would have a right, subject to payment of a small fee, to ask the independent tribunal to review the increase allowed.

It is also proposed to tighten legislation generally, including introducing provisions to oblige a landlord to issue a receipt for rent.

It is also envisaged that conditions under which landlords can obtain possession for their own or family use, will be made more stringent.

/5.........

0 - -

Wednesday, June 6, 1973

- 5 -

LONG TERM MEASURES FOR LETTING PRIVATE DOMESTIC ACCOMMODATION *********

A new scheme will be introduced later this summer to provide for "moderate and acceptable" increases in rent in return for security of tenure.

This was announced today in the Legislative Council by the Acting Colonial Secretary, the Hon. M.D.A. Clinton, when moving the second reading of the Domestic Premises (Tenure and Rent) (Temporary Provisions) Bill 1973*

The bill is designed as an interim measure and imposes a temporary freeze on rent increases for all domestic premises, pending the introduction and implementation of substantive legislation later this year.

The provisions of the bill apply to all domestic tenancies and subtenancies no matter what their rateable value and irrespective of written agreements which purport to exclude the provisions of the bill.

Commenting on the longer-term measures to be introduced later this year, Mr. Clinton said they were designed to bring about "a more orderly and generally acceptable framework for the letting of private domestic accommodation."

In particular, rents which had been controlled at a low level would be able to move towards a "fair market rent" at a faster pace than those which were closer to market levels, he said.

He explained that, despite new construction, rents for property not subject to the restraints of the 1970 rent controls had moved upwards during the last two years and, in some cases, had "skyrocketed to absurd heights."

"On the other hand, rents of premises which are controlled by the 1970 Rent Increases Control legislation have been held down, in some cases, to unrealistically low levels."

Last year, he went on, there were indications that the supply of flats was catching up with demand, and it was hoped that by the time the existing rent control expired the situation would l.ave stabilised.

/However••••••

Wednesday, June 6, 1973

- 6 -

However, far from having stabilised, "an even larger gap exists between controlled and free rents," he said.

There were several factors for this — money supplywage levels, changing social patterns, the popularity of Hong Kong as a base for commercial operations in the Far East, and pressure on accommodation required for the professional and teclinical staff needed for Hong Kong’s development schemes and the expanding economy.

Mr. Clinton said the gap between free and controlled rents now was about 80 per cent for tenements, 150 per cent for small flats and as much as 200 per cent or more for large and medium flats.

"In other words, the effect of controlling some premises only at a time when demand has outstripped supply has forced rents in the free sector to exorbitant levels."

To prevent this from happening again, he said, it was necessary to bring all existing post-war domestic premises within the ambit of £he legislation.

Mr. Clinton outlined two points which he regarded as important and fundamental to the scheme of control which it was proposed to introduce later this year.

These were the supply of more land for private housing and the necessary encouragement to developers to continue building.

Even the government’s massive programme to provide subsidised hones fo: more than one and a half million people in the next 10 years would not be enough, he said.

Outside the limits of this programme, he said, there was enormous scope left for private developers to contribute to housing development and to continue and speed up the redevelopment of pre-war slums.

/Mr. Clinton ••••••

Wednesday, June 6, 1973

- 7 -

Mr. Clinton revealed that in addition, it was proposed to appoint consultants to examine various areas on the outskirts of Kowloon and to advise on their suitability for development as large residential estates.

"If suitable areas can be found it is the intention that they should be disposed of in large blocks for substantial development rather than in single building plots," he said.

Mr. Clinton made it clear that it was not the government’s intention to control for a period of three years the rents at which new premises could be let. Neither was it proposed to control during this period the rent of premises which had not previously been let.

However, fresh lettings of existing property would be subject to scrutiny and restraint. In those cases where the owner had obtained possession, the rent for a fresh letting to a new tenant would be restricted to the assessed market rent to be determined by the Rating and Valuation Department.

A three-man independent tribunal would be set up to review the Commissioner’s determination of assessed market rents.

The intention was, he said, that the maximum increase over a two-year period would not be more than 10 per cent a year.

Hr. Clinton pointed out that despite increased development, the proposed controls would be necessary for at least three years. Before the end of that period their continuing need would be reviewed.

He emphasised that it was the government’s aim to do "its utmost to encourage, by every means, the building of sufficient homes to house people in reasonable comfort."

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/8........

Wednesday, June 6, 1973

- 8 -

UNOFFICIALS SUPPORT RENT FREEZE

*******

Strong support was voiced today by Unofficial Members of the Legislative Council for the temporary rent freeze imposed on domestic premises not previously protected.

The Senior Unofficial Member, the Hon. P.C. Woo, said the move woi.ild prevent landlords from demanding excessive rents from their tenants#

The needs of the tenants, he said, had been the main consideration in the deliberations of the Unofficials when advising on the hill, Mr. Woo rejected outright recent newspaper allegations that the legislation had been held up by the unofficials and"said that this slur cast on them was "unjustified and far removed from the truth."

He explained that the legislation had needed careful consideration and it had been necessary to ask for additional information regarding the government’s intentions as to further long-term measures.

"Obviously, to enact this bill alone without at the same time announcing government’s later intentions would have had a most serious effect upon development," he said.

While it had been imperative to prevent rents of existing tenancies from rising at an unreasonable rate, he said, it had been equally important to find a formula which would not inhibit further development.

Mr. Woo also defended the introduction of the bill into the Legislative Council without the customary prior notice being given in the Government Gazette.

/This

Wednesday, June 6, 1973

- 9 -

This had been necessary, he explained, because advance notice in this case "might have caused some of our more rapacious landlords to take steps to squeeze out their existing tenants or greatly increase their rents in advance of the standstill freeze."

As it was, the people who would lose out more than others because of the legislation would be landlords of controlled premises.

Mr. Woo blamed the shortage of land as the cause for all Hong Kong’s misfortunes in the sphere of rental values and reiterated that it was essential for the government "to give the utmost priority to further land sales and to making available large tracts of land for private development."

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Wednesday, June 6, 1973

- 10 -

NO SOLUTION TO HOUSING SHORTAGE

******* » ♦ Dr, the Hon. S.Y. Chung said today he supported rent control as

an interim measure to curb rapid inflation ’’but not as a solution to housing shortage.”

’’Any control of this nature will not solve our housing problem and

I submit that the only effective long-term remedy is to increase the supply for meeting the demand for housing,” he stressed. ♦ • '

Dr. Chung was speaking in the Legislative Council on new holding legislation to freeze rents in unprotected domestic premises.

The acute housing shortage, he said, was due to a number of factors but the government was responsible for the two most major ones - namely, the insufficient supply of land for residential housing development, and the long delay caused by the Building Authority for approval of building plans.

Dr. Chung said he did not believe that Hong Kong could maintain the viability of its export-oriented economy ”if we have to pay such high prices of land equivalent to S300 per square foot of gross floor area.”

He added that many people also thought that the present procedure for approving building plans had outlived its usefulness. The time was long overdue, he said, for a re-examination of the whole procedure with a view to streamlining the system of control.

’’Unless the government is willing and able to eliminate, or at least improve on, these two main bottlenecks in the housing development, the appalling housing situation and the expensive domestic rental will continue to be one of our major social and economic problems,” he warned.

/Citing ••••••••

Wednesday, June 6, 1973

Citing government statistics, Dr. Chung said the average rent increases for uncontrolled domestic premises during the last three years were about 130 per cent for tenements, 200 per cent for small flats and almost 300 per cent for medium and large flats»

uThese are average rises in rents and some rapacious landlords are getting even greater increases,” he said*

He noted that in the absence of sufficient organised labour unions in Hong Kong, the government had a greater responsibility to ensure that the

weaker sector of the community should not be exploited.

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<

Wednesday, June 6, 1973

- 12 -

er

IMPROVED WHITE PAPER ON SOCIAL WELFARE * *«»»«****** I.

An improved white paper on social welfare together with a five year plan setting out a programme for social welfare development over the next five years was tabled in the Legislative Council today•

The Director of Social Welfare, the Hon. F.K. Li, said the white paper described the general aims of social welfare policy and the five year pl an expresses in practical terms the principles and priorities set out in the paper.

He recalled that the white paper was laid in draft last October and these two papers were the outcome of a consultative process both with those experienced in the field of social welfare and those with broader community interest.

"I cannot pretend that everyone would regard the proposals as ideal. But I can say that they do reflect the views of the great majority of those who commented on them.

"This is a social welfare programme of action to meet the needs of the community, drawn up in consultation with the community, which I believe represents the general wishes of the community," Mr. Li said.

The five year plan, he said, would be reviewed each year so it could be revised to take account of changing needs and circumstances, and to extend it forward a further year to provide a continuous five year projection.

/"By these

Wednesday, June 6, 1973

- 13 -

HBy these means I hope that we shall have a programme of soci al welfare development which remains in tune with the changing needs of Hong Kong,” he said.

Note to Editors: The Director of Social Welfare, Mr. F.K. Li,

will be giving a press conference on the five year ■ plan and white paper at 2.15 p.m. tomorrow (Thursday, June 7) in the GIS 35 mm theatre. You are invited to send a reporter to cover the conference.

-----0------

Wednesday, June 6, 1973

- 14 -

NO POLICE PAY REVISION AT THIS STAGE

*********

A system or formula for reviewing police pay is now being drawn up in consultation with the Commissioner of Police.

However, the Acting Colonial Secretary, the Hon. M.D.A. Clinton, indicated to the Legislative Council.today.that a further pay revision was not contemplated at this stage.

ffThe last revision was two years ago when the rank and file were granted increases ranging from about 27 per cent to 45 per cent.”

Mr. Clinton pointed out that with the police it was not possible to base salaries on the principle of fair comparison with the remuneration and conditions of service for work broadly comparable in the private sector, as was the policy with much of the civil service.

Because there was no equivalent private sector it had to be based on internal relativities and other factors.

He added that managemens ru r.’;ar/js have been drawing up a personnel resource plan for the rank and file in conjunction with the Commissioner of Police and their investigations suggest that there are a number of factors, as well as pay, which may be contributing to the ’’serious recruitment and wastage problem in the police”.

’’Both the Commissioner and I are concerned to ensure that solutions are found as a matter of urgency”, Mr. Clinton emphasised.

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/15..........

Wednesday, June 6, 1973

15

MEMBERS SEEK FURTHER EXEMPTIONS FROM STAMP DUTY

******

The Hon. Q.W. Lee called on the government to abolish all stamp duty on the transfer of shares and properties to approved charitable institutions.

He was speaking in the resumed debate on the Stamp (Amendment) Bill 1973 in the Legislative Council today.

Mr. Lee said he did not see any reason why exemptions should not be granted ”if they constitute gifts to exempted institutions.”

Such exemptions, he said, will be ”a gesture to further demonstrate Government’s welcome to charitable gifts.”

The bill seeks to give effect to the proposals made by the Financial Secretary in his Budget Speech on February 28 this year to increase, reduce or abolish stamp duties in respect of various documents.

Two proposals in the bill which increase the ad valorem stamp duty on contract notes and the transfer of shares and other marketable securities came into effect on March 1.

The Hon. R.H. Lobo, who supported Mr. Lee’s views, pointed out that in the past, the government had been greatly relieved from social welfare expenditure through ”our charity minded community.”

”It is therefore my opinion that gifts to recognised charitable institutions or non-profit making bodies dealing with welfare should be exempted from duty on gifts,” he said.

Mr. Lobo warned that ’’donors who give in memory of a beloved one or in the name of charity may not be prepared to pay stamp duty over and above their benevolence.”

’’The present law as it stands will serve as a deterrent and will discourage gifts of property and securities to charity,” he said.

- - 0 - -

/16

Wednesday, June 6, 1973

- 16 -

MORE LICENSED AREAS FOR HOMELESS

****«*««

Continuous efforts are being made to set up new licensed areas to meet the needs of homeless people, the Secretary for Housing, the Hon. I.M. Lightbody, said today.

He told the Legislative Council that some 28,000 new spaces were expected to be available by the end of the year, but even this, he added, would not be enough as there was a backlog of demand for space for some 8,000 people.

Many of these people, he said, were "potentially" rather than actually homeless as they were living in building scheduled for redevelopment Since June last year, he said, four new areas with a capacity for 6,400 people had been brought into use. Another three, with a capacity for 3»3OO were expected to be ready in the next two months.

In addition, three more sites with a capacity for 6,500 had been provisionally allocated but must first be checked for safety by consulting engineers.

Mr• Lightbody said his department had applied for four more possible sites with a capacity for 12,000 people and it was hoped that these should be ready for use by the end of this yeare

He explained that the requirement for more licensed space stemmed from the loss of a number of these areas which were declared unsafe after the rainstorms last year, and from a significant increase in the number of people seeking accommodation in licensed areas.

/The current ••••••.<.

I"

Wednesday, June 6, 1973

- 17 -

The current level of demand, he said, was 50 per cent higher than last year.

These higher numbers resulted from various clean-up campaigns and from a high level of redevelopment activity in the private sector, he added.

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/18.........

Wednesday, June 6, 1973

- 18 -

NEW VEHICULAR FERRY SERVICE

********

Approval is expected to be given soon to building plans associated with a new vehicular ferry service to link North Point with Kwun Tong.

The new service will replace the existing one between North Point and Kowloon City.

The Acting Financial Secretary^ the Hon.. D.J.C. Jones, recalled that approval in principle was given by the Legislative Council on August 30 last year for the Hongkong and Yaumati Ferry Company to alter some of its routes, mainly as a result of the opening of the cross harbour tunnel.

’’The Company also undertook to construct at its own expense, the necessary ferry berth, ramps and double-deck structure at Kwun Tong to enable the service to operate,” he said.

Mr. Jones said that another resolution will be sought from the council to fix a date for the commencement of the new service and to terminate the old one between North Point and Kowloon City when the construction of the new pier is completed, hopefully at the end of this year.

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/19..........

Wednesday, June 6, 1973

- 19 -

REVIEW OF OFFENSIVE TRADES

**********

A comprehensive review is to be made of the problems posed by offensive trades, the Director of Urban Services, the Hon. D.R.W. Alexander, told the Legislative Council today.

He said a programme was needed to provide for the removal of offensive trades into properly designated areas, and this would be studied by the various departments concerned in consultation with the Advisory Committee on Environmental Pollution on Land and Water.

Meanwhile, the District Commissioner, New Territories, the

Hon. I.F. Macpherson, reported that about 75?000 square feet of land had been reserved for tannery operators in the Kwai Chung offensive trades zone.

The balance of 244,000 square feet is reserved for other offensive trades•

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/20.......

Wednesday, June 6, 1973

- 20 -

SURVEY ON TRAVELLERS USING MACAU FERRY TERMINAL

Consideration will be given to conducting a survey to find out how many people using the Hong Kong-Macau ferry wharf are from Kowloon peninsula and from Hong Kong Island.

Revealing this in the Legislative Council today, the Acting Financial Secretary, the Hon. D.J.C. Jones suggested that the survey could be conducted by university students during their summer vacation.

The last such survey was held in 19^6, when it appeared that at that time about 5$ percent of those travelling to and from Macau started or ended their trips in Kowloon or the New Territories and about 44 per cent on Hong Kong Island.

Mr. Jones said no up-to-date information on the movements of Macau travellers was available as the large majority of all people using the Macau ferry terminal travelled on re-entry permits and were not required to fill in embarkation or disembarkation cards.

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/21..........

Wednesday, June 6, 1973

- 21 -

12 GRANTS FROM LOTTERIES FUND

»*****«***

The Legislative Council today approved the allocation of mono than 32.6 million from the Lotteries Fund to finance 12 social welfare projects.

The biggest single grant of 3698,000 is for a youth centre for tho Hong Kong Federation of Youth Groups and the Boys’ and Girls’ Clubs Association.

Another 3500,000 has been set aside for the building of a training centre for the Ebenezer School and Home for the Blind.

Other items receiving assistance from the Lotteries Fund include the redevelopment of a youth camp at Cheung Chau for Caritas and the expansion of the Arran Street Eye Clinic for tho Medical and Health Department•

The Lotteries Fund, which obtains its proceeds from the sale of Government lotteries and ’lucky’ car numbers, is set up to help tho development of social welfare services in Hong Kong.

Tho balance remaining in the fund after the latest allocations is approximately 33.8 million.

-------0---------

Wednesday, June 6, 1973

- 22 -

ACCOMMODATION FOR ALL DOMESTIC RESIDENTS

*******

All the domestic residents in the area in Ngau Tau Kok due to move out before June 12 to make way for the construction of the main Mass Transit Depot will be accommodated, a government spokesman said today.

One hundred and nineteen families comprising 538 people have been living in the area. Of this total, 73 families comprising 370 people have been given accommodation at the Lam Tin Estate. The rest, 46 families comprising 168 people, have been offered accommodation in licensed areas.

Seventy-seven of the 148 industrial undertakings are eligible for resettlement and they have been allocated government factory units, mostly at Kwai Chung. A special co-ordinating group, comprising representatives from various government departments concerned has been set up by the Housing Department to assist factory operators affected by the clearance to find suitable alternative sites.

In accordance with government policy, those undertakings which were established on the site before 1966 and which were then under 5,000 square feet of working area are eligible for the allocation of government factory units.

Eleven of the 29 shop-keepers in the area have been found to be eligible for assistance and ex-gratia sums amounting to about $116,563 will be paid to them.

/Officers

Wednesday, June 6, 1973

- 23 -

Officers from the Housing Department and the staff of the City District Office (Kwun Tong) have been visiting the area and have been available for several weeks to give advice to factory-owners and shop-keepers on their removal problems, the spokesman said. Officers of the Labour Department have also been available to help workers find other employment.

In a letter to the "Industrial and Commercial Group of Ngau Tau Kok, Western Area" on May 28 in reply to their two petitions to the Governor, dated May 15 and 22, Mr. T.J. Bedford,Assistant Colonial Secretary said that all the government departments concerned were doing all they could to minimise any hardship arising from the need to develop the land for a major project on behalf of the whole community.

He said it is earnestly hoped that all will co-operate by moving their structures and equipment before June 12.

He reminded them that all Crcwn Land Permits had been cancelled over a period in 1972, the last taking effect from April 1 of that same year.

"It is therefore true to say that you have been aware for a period of at least a year that you would be required to remove your undertakings from the area, which have always been sited there on a temporary basis," Mr. Bedford said.

The final and formal notice of the clearance given in March this year, three months before the actual date of clearance, merely confirmed a state of affairs of which all were well aware, he stressed.

/In reply...........

Wednesday, June 6, 1973

- 24 -

In reply to another point raised in the petition that factory-owners had paid rates for the land at Ngau Tau Kok, Mr. Bedford explained that the payment of rates was in respect of services to the property on the land but in no way effected the legal status of the land itself or the occupancy of it, ’’Furthermore, I understand that since the permits for the land were cancelled, rates have not been charged,” he pointed out,

’Mr. Bedford advised those undertakings not qualifying for government resettlement factory accommodation to consider renting space in private factory blocks and those factories unable to operate in flatted factories to obtain the authority of the New Territories Administration to re-establish themselves in certain selected areas of the Nev/ Territories,

He assured the factory-owners that steps have already been taken to ensure that the people working in the factories in the area are given every assistance to find alternative employment.

Officers of the Labour Department are available both at the Kwun Tong Government Offices and at the site to advise on employment opportunities and to assist workers find new employment.

”1 am confident that the majority will have no difficulty in finding other jobs in the Kwun Tong area where there are currently ample job opportunities,” Mr. Bedford said*

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Wednesday, June 6, 1973

- 25 -

SECURITIES COUNCIL CONSIDERS DELAYS IN SHARE TRANSFERS

*********

The Acting Financial Secretary1Mr. D.J.C. Jones,assured Legislative Councillors today that the problem of delays in the transfer of shares has been under active consideration by the Securities Advisory Council since it was first set up in January this year.

He pointed out, however, that it would be difficult to deal with this matter separately from other related aspects of the Second Report of the Companies Law Revision Committee, which will be laid before the council later this year.

The plea to amend section 70 of the ordinance, which deals with the length of time allowed for the transfer of shares, will be "fully borne in mind" in considering any future legislation arising from the recommendations of the Committee, he said.

Mr. Jones explained that the delay now being experienced in the issue of share certificates was the result of a spate of bonus issues and the concentration of dividend payments within the last few months.

Company registrars were sometimes required to issue new certificates within 10 days, he added.

"With the dividend season coming to an end and given the recent reduced level of activity in the stock market, .it is hoped that the situation will improve and that the transfer of shares will be registered more quickly," Mr. Jones said.

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/26..........

Wednesday, June 6, 1973

- 26 -

REPORTS BY THE MANAGEMENT CONSULTANTS «««****

The Acting Colonial Secretary, the Hon. M.D.A. Clinton, today gave an outline of the work which has involved McKinsey and Company, the management consultants, who were engaged to streamline government processes and procedures.

Apart from the main report tabled in the Legislative Council two weeks ago, the consultants have produced a 10 year programme plan for the Medical and Health Department, a long term personnel strategy for the rank and file of the Royal Hong Kong Police and a long term programme plan for the development of secondary education-,

They have also studied specific areas and problems in the Public V/orks Department, the Urban Services Department and in the Colonial Secretariat.

f,I would not like to deluge members with these various reports, plans, studies and assessments but the volume of paper produced is substantial, the Medical programme plan, for example, is over 100 pages," he added.

As to being satisfied that the public funds voted for their services had been well spent, Mr. Clinton said that the consultants had indicated how, in one particular activity, performance could be improved so as to produce cost benefits of about double their fees incurred so faro

He had no doubt that application of their concepts in other fields would produce similar improvements in cost-effectivenesso

-------0 - - - -

Wednesday, June 6, 1973

EXPANSION OF TELEPHONE SERVICES

*******

A new telephone exchange will be opened next month at Yau Tong and the one at Kwai Chung will be extended at the end of this year to relieve the critical shortage of telephone lines in these two areas#

The Acting Financial Secretary, the Hon. D.J.C. Jones, pointed out to Legislative Council members that almost 90,000 new telephone lines were installed in 1972 and the waiting list stood at about 38,000 at the end of the year.

"The average waiting period works out at about five months," he said.

"But neither the government nor the company are complacent about the present size of the waiting list," he added.

He explained that under section of the Telephone Ordinance, the Telephone Company is required to provide service to an applicant vri th in a reasonable time after his initial application.

To enable the Postmaster General to keep fully abreast of his responsibilities in the expansion of telephone and telecommunication services generally, additional professional engineering staff have recently been recruited to the Post Office, Mr. Jones said.

Putting the problem of delay in telephone installation in proper perspective, Mr. Jones said that the number of working lines had increased from 107,000 at the end of 1962 to 651,000 at the end of last year, — a more than six-fold increase in 10 years.

In addition, the waiting list as a percentage of working lines in operation had fallen from 3^ percent to less than 6 percent within the last 10 years, he said.

-------0----------

/28.........................................

Wednesday, June 6, 1973

- 28 -

MANAGEMENT OF MULTI-STOREY BUILDINGS BEING REVIEV/ED

**********

The Secretary for Home Affairs, the Hon. Jack Cater, told the Legislative Council today that the government has recently set up a working group to re-examine the whole question of the management of multi-storey buildings, including the desirability of amending the Multi-Storey Buildings (Owners Incorporation) Ordinance.

He revealed that some 400 such organisations had been formed since the ordinance was enacted about three years ago.

”The City District Officers are continuing to encourage the formation of more owners’ corporations under the existing legislation,” he said.

In connection with the Clean Hong Kong 1973 Campaign and the Fight Violent Crime Campaign, Mr. Cater said additional staff have been deployed by the Secretariat for Home Affairs and the New Territories Administration to encourage the establishment of mutual-aid committees in as many multistorey buildings as possible.

Mr. Cater said that the formation of such committees will bo subjected to riinin.nl formalitiy and they will not be required to be registered as societies under the Societies Ordinance.

He expressed the hope that sone of these mutual—aid committees would eventually end up as owners’ incorporations.

-------0---------

/29..........

Wednesday, June 6, 1973

- 29 -

OSWALD CHEUNG CRITICAL OF CERTAIN PROVISIONS IN RENT LEGISLATION

********

Tho Hon. Oswald Cheung today expressed serious reservations about proposed long term measures to control the rent situation in Hong Kong and took the government to task for not making available more land for development.

Speaking in the Legislative Council, Mr. Cheung said two features of the proposed measures struck him as being "particularly objectionable".

The first was that the proposals aimed at protecting "even the rich in their indulgence of luxury."

His other objection was that no landlord, he felt, would be permitted even to charge his tenant what the Commissioner of Rating and Valuation determined as the fair market rent of the premises.

"The truth is," he said, "that, unintentionally, we have created a privileged class of tenants, who naturally clamour for extended and further controls of rent when they sense danger of losing their privileges."

These tenants, he added, had been enjoying a standard of accommodation at what have been rents far below free market values, and substantially below fair market rentals.

In his opinion, there was a danger of creating a larger class of privileged tenants, and a danger of driving private enterprise away from providing domestic accommodation.

"We may well be right in giving temporary relief to those sections of our community that are least able to bear extra burdens," Mr. Cheung said, "but I entirely disown that we have an obligation to protect the rich."

/Mr. Cheung .......

Wednesday, June 6, 1975

- 30 -

Mr. Cheung noted that previous controls had been imposed so that supply might catch up to demand, and he questioned the government’s efforts over the past three—and—a-half years to obtain this objective.

nI regret to find that, apart from providing housing in the public sector, some measures taken by the government have not encouraged supply, and indeed have been counter-productive,1' he said.

The supply of land to the private sector had been extremely limited and the prices extremely high, he noted, while the government’s reasons for "denying” the supply did not satisfy anyone.

He also asked what had happened to negotiations with the mili tary authorities over the release of land at Lyemun Barracks and other places which could be turned to more beneficial social use.

Referring to other aspects of government activity which he found counter-productive, Mr. Cheung said it was "distressing” that over the past three years the Buildings Ordinance Office had "resorted to every stratagem imaginable to stop private enterprise from developing housing sites to the full potential permitted by the law.”

He said the basic reason given by that office was that the development legally permissible would lead to a deterioration of the environment.

’’But what are our priorities — more and cheaper housing first, or a better life first?” he asked.

Mr. Cheung also criticised the law relating to town planning which, he said, was in need of a "drastic overhaul-."

Mr. Cheung supported the Domestic Premises (Tenure and Rent) (Temporary Provisions) Bill 1973 with "the greatest reluctance,” and urged the council to carefully consider whether the proposed longer-term measures were in the public interest.

-------0---------

/31.........

Wednesday, June 6, 1973

- 31 -

REPORT ON BRIDGE TO LkNTAU

«**«**«

Planning consultants appointed to advise on the development of Lantau Island and the Sai Kung and Plover Cove peninsulas will be asked to submit a report on the benefits and disadvantages of building a bridge to north east Lantau.

If they recommend that the project should be proceeded with, they would also be asked to advise on the preferable alignment, the form it should take, what would suffice immediately, what is likely to be required in the longer term and what road pattern is needed to serve it.

Speaking in reply to a question in the Legislative Council today, the Director of Public Works, the Hon. J.J. Robson added that the construction of a bridge would be the best method of making available substantial additional areas of land for industrial and residential development.

This proposition is attractive because it could be linked with

•r?,> a new motor road to Castle Peak and with water and electricity services in the Tsucn Wan area, he said.

"But it must of course be looked at realistically, as there are many factors to be considered.

"We’re doing it as quickly as we can because the impact of provision of road access would not be restricted to Lantau itself, but would have a tremendous effect on the pattern of development of Hong Kong as a whole,” he said.

Mr. Robson stressed that Lantau being two and a half times the size of Hong Kong, its development, including industrial development of the northeastern sector, is not incompatible with the government’s policy of preserving the rest

of the island for recreational facilities

/Mr. Robson

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Wednesday, June 6, 1973

CONTENDS...........

Page No.

Temporary rent freeze imposed on post-war domestic premises ............................................................. 1

#........ •.-•••«........................

Acting Colonial Secretary outlines proposed long term measures for stabilising rent situation .............................. 5

Unofficial Members support the temporary rent freeze on certain domestic promises ...............................e........... 8

Dr. Chung believes rent control is not a solution to Hong Kong’s housing shortage......• •................................... 10

Programme for social welfare development set out in improved white paper and five year plan.............................. 12

Discussions in progress to establish a system to review police pay......................................................... 14

Two Legco members seek further exemptions from stamp duty ... 15

New licensed areas are being developed to meet the demands of homeless people •••«.•••..................................   1$

Building plans for a new North Point-Kwun Tong vehicular ferry link are expected to be approved soon ....................   18

A review will be made into the problems posed by offensive trades

................................................................ 19

Plans for a survey on travellers to Macau....................... 20

Lotteries grants to promote 12 social welfare projects •••••• 21

All domestic residents affected by the Ngau Tau Kok clearance offered alternative accommodation .........••••••«•••••••••••• 22

Securities Council considers delays in share transfers •••••• 25

Additional reports of the government’s management consultants

.............................................................   26

Residents of Yau Tong will have a new telephone exchange next month ............................

/2.........

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

2

Page No

A working group has been set up to review the manangement of multi-storey buildings ...................••••••...........• 28

One legislative councillor expresses serious reservations about longer term measures to control rents......... • • •  ... 29

Benefits and disadvantages of bridge to Lantau to be studied .............................................................   31

Wednesday, June 6, 1973

- 1 -

TEMPORARY RENT FREEZE ON UNPROTECTED DOMESTIC PREMISES Longer-Term Measures Being Drafted

* * ♦ ♦ ♦ « ♦ * ♦ » • -w •*-■**•

A temporary standstill is to be imposed, as from tomorrow (Thursday), on rents for all post-war domestic premises which are not covered under the existing rent control legislation.

The measure is contained in the Domestic Premises (Tenure and Rent) (Temporary Provisions) Bill 1973, which passed all three readings in the Legislative Council today.

In effect, the introduction of the new holding legislation — coupled with the existing Rent Increases (Domestic Premises) Control Ordinance, which was introduced in 1970 — means that all domestic tenants are now protected against exorbitant rent increases.

The new legislation is designed as a temporary measure pending the introduction of longer-term measures, probably next month.

The new law stipulates that a domestic tenant cannot, in normal circumstances, be evicted nor can his rent be increased, nptwithstanding any agreement to the contrary.

It also introduces new penal provisions to deal wi^h landlords who demand or receive rent in excess of that which is legally payable at the commencement of the Ordinance. A landlord on conviction may be liable to h fine of .34,000,

/The new

Wednesday, June 6, 1975

- 2 -

The new lav/ applies only to existing tenancies and does not affect lettings of vacant premises or new premises. These will be subject only to the Tenancy (Notice of Termination) Ordinance, under which a landlord must give six months’ notice when seeking possession.

Tenancies coning within the existing rent control ordinance will continue under such controls until the introduction of the proposed longer-term measures.

This means that tenants will still have the security of tenure provided by the Rent Increases (Domestic Premises) Control Ordinance, but landlords will be able to obtain the increases in rent provided for in this Ordinance, (i.e. a ’’fair increase” having regard to the ’’norm” of 15 per cent, or the five per cent increase provided for in the 1972 amendment).

These increases provide security of tenure and protection against further increases for a period of either two years or one year respectively, from the date the increase takes effect. The new legislation takes this into account•

Longer-Term Measures

Meanwhile, comprehensive longer-term measures are now being drafted and it is hoped to introduce a Bill into the Legislative Council next month. The Bill will not, however, be implemented until later this year.

It is intended that the proposed measures will apply to all post-war domestic premises which are in existence when the Bill comes into force.

/However, ••••••

Wednesday, June 6, 1975

- 5 -

However, premises newly completed when the Bill takes effect will be excluded from controls for a period of three years. This is to encourage new developers to obtain a reasonable return on their investment.

The rent control formula will be so designed as to enable it to be extended beyond the three year period, if necessary.

A three-man independent rent tribunal will be set up to review upon application by cither a tenant or landlord any increase- determined by the Commissioner of Rating and Valuation.

It is envisaged that the first rent, following the legislation, of premises not previously let (such as recently completed vacant premises and owner—occupied premises) would not be restrained in any way, but increases thereafter would be controlled.

In the case of a fresh letting of existing premises previously lot, the rent would not be allowed to exceed the fair market rent as assessed by the Commissioner of Rating and Valuation.

No increases in rent, except by agreement, would exceed 10 per cent per annum, and this would be subject to an assessment by the Commissioner.

Under the proposed measures, a landlord seeking an increase in rent would have to apply to the Commissioner, who would make an assessment of the fair market rent which would be on the lines of an up-to-date rateable value.

The increase permitted would then be calculated by dividing the difference between the existing rent, exclusive of rates, by a factor of ”5", subject to a maximum increase of 10 per cent per annum (or 21 per cent over two years).

/The following .......

•r

Wednesday, June 6, 1973

- 4 -

The following tables illustrate how the calculations would be made.

Tenement floor controlled under existing legislation:

Assessed fair market rent: $575

Existing controlled rent : $290

Divide by factor : 5/285 = $55 (rounded off)

Similar tenement floor let at the end of 1972

Assessment fair market rent: $575

Existing rent: $500

Divide by factor: 5/ 75 = $15

Increase per month: $15

Each such increase allowed would subsist for two years. If no increase is allowed, the landlord would be allowed to apply again in one year.

Increases in rent of sub-tenancies would generally follow increases in the rent of the head-tenancy.

Both the landlords and the tenants would have a right, subject to payment of a small fee, to ask the independent tribunal to review the increase allowed.

It is also proposed to tighten legislation generally, including introducing provisions to oblige a landlord to issue a receipt for rent.

It is also envisaged that conditions under which landlords can obtain possession for their own or family use, will be made more stringent.

/5.........

0 - -

Wednesday, June 6, 1973

- 5 -

LONG TERM MEASURES FOR LETTING PRIVATE DOMESTIC ACCOMMODATION *********

A new scheme will be introduced later this summer to provide for "moderate and acceptable" increases in rent in return for security of tenure.

This was announced today in the Legislative Council by the Acting Colonial Secretary, the Hon. M.D.A. Clinton, when moving the second reading of the Domestic Premises (Tenure and Rent) (Temporary Provisions) Bill 1973*

The bill is designed as an interim measure and imposes a temporary freeze on rent increases for all domestic premises, pending the introduction and implementation of substantive legislation later this year.

The provisions of the bill apply to all domestic tenancies and subtenancies no matter what their rateable value and irrespective of written agreements which purport to exclude the provisions of the bill.

Commenting on the longer-term measures to be introduced later this year, Mr. Clinton said they were designed to bring about "a more orderly and generally acceptable framework for the letting of private domestic accommodation."

In particular, rents which had been controlled at a low level would be able to move towards a "fair market rent" at a faster pace than those which were closer to market levels, he said.

He explained that, despite new construction, rents for property not subject to the restraints of the 1970 rent controls had moved upwards during the last two years and, in some cases, had "skyrocketed to absurd heights."

"On the other hand, rents of premises which are controlled by the 1970 Rent Increases Control legislation have been held down, in some cases, to unrealistically low levels."

Last year, he went on, there were indications that the supply of flats was catching up with demand, and it was hoped that by the time the existing rent control expired the situation would l.ave stabilised.

/However••••••

Wednesday, June 6, 1973

- 6 -

However, far from having stabilised, "an even larger gap exists between controlled and free rents," he said.

There were several factors for this — money supplywage levels, changing social patterns, the popularity of Hong Kong as a base for commercial operations in the Far East, and pressure on accommodation required for the professional and teclinical staff needed for Hong Kong’s development schemes and the expanding economy.

Mr. Clinton said the gap between free and controlled rents now was about 80 per cent for tenements, 150 per cent for small flats and as much as 200 per cent or more for large and medium flats.

"In other words, the effect of controlling some premises only at a time when demand has outstripped supply has forced rents in the free sector to exorbitant levels."

To prevent this from happening again, he said, it was necessary to bring all existing post-war domestic premises within the ambit of £he legislation.

Mr. Clinton outlined two points which he regarded as important and fundamental to the scheme of control which it was proposed to introduce later this year.

These were the supply of more land for private housing and the necessary encouragement to developers to continue building.

Even the government’s massive programme to provide subsidised hones fo: more than one and a half million people in the next 10 years would not be enough, he said.

Outside the limits of this programme, he said, there was enormous scope left for private developers to contribute to housing development and to continue and speed up the redevelopment of pre-war slums.

/Mr. Clinton ••••••

Wednesday, June 6, 1973

- 7 -

Mr. Clinton revealed that in addition, it was proposed to appoint consultants to examine various areas on the outskirts of Kowloon and to advise on their suitability for development as large residential estates.

"If suitable areas can be found it is the intention that they should be disposed of in large blocks for substantial development rather than in single building plots," he said.

Mr. Clinton made it clear that it was not the government’s intention to control for a period of three years the rents at which new premises could be let. Neither was it proposed to control during this period the rent of premises which had not previously been let.

However, fresh lettings of existing property would be subject to scrutiny and restraint. In those cases where the owner had obtained possession, the rent for a fresh letting to a new tenant would be restricted to the assessed market rent to be determined by the Rating and Valuation Department.

A three-man independent tribunal would be set up to review the Commissioner’s determination of assessed market rents.

The intention was, he said, that the maximum increase over a two-year period would not be more than 10 per cent a year.

Hr. Clinton pointed out that despite increased development, the proposed controls would be necessary for at least three years. Before the end of that period their continuing need would be reviewed.

He emphasised that it was the government’s aim to do "its utmost to encourage, by every means, the building of sufficient homes to house people in reasonable comfort."

-------0----------

/8........

Wednesday, June 6, 1973

- 8 -

UNOFFICIALS SUPPORT RENT FREEZE

*******

Strong support was voiced today by Unofficial Members of the Legislative Council for the temporary rent freeze imposed on domestic premises not previously protected.

The Senior Unofficial Member, the Hon. P.C. Woo, said the move woi.ild prevent landlords from demanding excessive rents from their tenants#

The needs of the tenants, he said, had been the main consideration in the deliberations of the Unofficials when advising on the hill, Mr. Woo rejected outright recent newspaper allegations that the legislation had been held up by the unofficials and"said that this slur cast on them was "unjustified and far removed from the truth."

He explained that the legislation had needed careful consideration and it had been necessary to ask for additional information regarding the government’s intentions as to further long-term measures.

"Obviously, to enact this bill alone without at the same time announcing government’s later intentions would have had a most serious effect upon development," he said.

While it had been imperative to prevent rents of existing tenancies from rising at an unreasonable rate, he said, it had been equally important to find a formula which would not inhibit further development.

Mr. Woo also defended the introduction of the bill into the Legislative Council without the customary prior notice being given in the Government Gazette.

/This

Wednesday, June 6, 1973

- 9 -

This had been necessary, he explained, because advance notice in this case "might have caused some of our more rapacious landlords to take steps to squeeze out their existing tenants or greatly increase their rents in advance of the standstill freeze."

As it was, the people who would lose out more than others because of the legislation would be landlords of controlled premises.

Mr. Woo blamed the shortage of land as the cause for all Hong Kong’s misfortunes in the sphere of rental values and reiterated that it was essential for the government "to give the utmost priority to further land sales and to making available large tracts of land for private development."

-------0---------

Wednesday, June 6, 1973

- 10 -

NO SOLUTION TO HOUSING SHORTAGE

******* » ♦ Dr, the Hon. S.Y. Chung said today he supported rent control as

an interim measure to curb rapid inflation ’’but not as a solution to housing shortage.”

’’Any control of this nature will not solve our housing problem and

I submit that the only effective long-term remedy is to increase the supply for meeting the demand for housing,” he stressed. ♦ • '

Dr. Chung was speaking in the Legislative Council on new holding legislation to freeze rents in unprotected domestic premises.

The acute housing shortage, he said, was due to a number of factors but the government was responsible for the two most major ones - namely, the insufficient supply of land for residential housing development, and the long delay caused by the Building Authority for approval of building plans.

Dr. Chung said he did not believe that Hong Kong could maintain the viability of its export-oriented economy ”if we have to pay such high prices of land equivalent to S300 per square foot of gross floor area.”

He added that many people also thought that the present procedure for approving building plans had outlived its usefulness. The time was long overdue, he said, for a re-examination of the whole procedure with a view to streamlining the system of control.

’’Unless the government is willing and able to eliminate, or at least improve on, these two main bottlenecks in the housing development, the appalling housing situation and the expensive domestic rental will continue to be one of our major social and economic problems,” he warned.

/Citing ••••••••

Wednesday, June 6, 1973

Citing government statistics, Dr. Chung said the average rent increases for uncontrolled domestic premises during the last three years were about 130 per cent for tenements, 200 per cent for small flats and almost 300 per cent for medium and large flats»

uThese are average rises in rents and some rapacious landlords are getting even greater increases,” he said*

He noted that in the absence of sufficient organised labour unions in Hong Kong, the government had a greater responsibility to ensure that the

weaker sector of the community should not be exploited.

-------0---------

<

Wednesday, June 6, 1973

- 12 -

er

IMPROVED WHITE PAPER ON SOCIAL WELFARE * *«»»«****** I.

An improved white paper on social welfare together with a five year plan setting out a programme for social welfare development over the next five years was tabled in the Legislative Council today•

The Director of Social Welfare, the Hon. F.K. Li, said the white paper described the general aims of social welfare policy and the five year pl an expresses in practical terms the principles and priorities set out in the paper.

He recalled that the white paper was laid in draft last October and these two papers were the outcome of a consultative process both with those experienced in the field of social welfare and those with broader community interest.

"I cannot pretend that everyone would regard the proposals as ideal. But I can say that they do reflect the views of the great majority of those who commented on them.

"This is a social welfare programme of action to meet the needs of the community, drawn up in consultation with the community, which I believe represents the general wishes of the community," Mr. Li said.

The five year plan, he said, would be reviewed each year so it could be revised to take account of changing needs and circumstances, and to extend it forward a further year to provide a continuous five year projection.

/"By these

Wednesday, June 6, 1973

- 13 -

HBy these means I hope that we shall have a programme of soci al welfare development which remains in tune with the changing needs of Hong Kong,” he said.

Note to Editors: The Director of Social Welfare, Mr. F.K. Li,

will be giving a press conference on the five year ■ plan and white paper at 2.15 p.m. tomorrow (Thursday, June 7) in the GIS 35 mm theatre. You are invited to send a reporter to cover the conference.

-----0------

Wednesday, June 6, 1973

- 14 -

NO POLICE PAY REVISION AT THIS STAGE

*********

A system or formula for reviewing police pay is now being drawn up in consultation with the Commissioner of Police.

However, the Acting Colonial Secretary, the Hon. M.D.A. Clinton, indicated to the Legislative Council.today.that a further pay revision was not contemplated at this stage.

ffThe last revision was two years ago when the rank and file were granted increases ranging from about 27 per cent to 45 per cent.”

Mr. Clinton pointed out that with the police it was not possible to base salaries on the principle of fair comparison with the remuneration and conditions of service for work broadly comparable in the private sector, as was the policy with much of the civil service.

Because there was no equivalent private sector it had to be based on internal relativities and other factors.

He added that managemens ru r.’;ar/js have been drawing up a personnel resource plan for the rank and file in conjunction with the Commissioner of Police and their investigations suggest that there are a number of factors, as well as pay, which may be contributing to the ’’serious recruitment and wastage problem in the police”.

’’Both the Commissioner and I are concerned to ensure that solutions are found as a matter of urgency”, Mr. Clinton emphasised.

-------0---------

/15..........

Wednesday, June 6, 1973

15

MEMBERS SEEK FURTHER EXEMPTIONS FROM STAMP DUTY

******

The Hon. Q.W. Lee called on the government to abolish all stamp duty on the transfer of shares and properties to approved charitable institutions.

He was speaking in the resumed debate on the Stamp (Amendment) Bill 1973 in the Legislative Council today.

Mr. Lee said he did not see any reason why exemptions should not be granted ”if they constitute gifts to exempted institutions.”

Such exemptions, he said, will be ”a gesture to further demonstrate Government’s welcome to charitable gifts.”

The bill seeks to give effect to the proposals made by the Financial Secretary in his Budget Speech on February 28 this year to increase, reduce or abolish stamp duties in respect of various documents.

Two proposals in the bill which increase the ad valorem stamp duty on contract notes and the transfer of shares and other marketable securities came into effect on March 1.

The Hon. R.H. Lobo, who supported Mr. Lee’s views, pointed out that in the past, the government had been greatly relieved from social welfare expenditure through ”our charity minded community.”

”It is therefore my opinion that gifts to recognised charitable institutions or non-profit making bodies dealing with welfare should be exempted from duty on gifts,” he said.

Mr. Lobo warned that ’’donors who give in memory of a beloved one or in the name of charity may not be prepared to pay stamp duty over and above their benevolence.”

’’The present law as it stands will serve as a deterrent and will discourage gifts of property and securities to charity,” he said.

- - 0 - -

/16

Wednesday, June 6, 1973

- 16 -

MORE LICENSED AREAS FOR HOMELESS

****«*««

Continuous efforts are being made to set up new licensed areas to meet the needs of homeless people, the Secretary for Housing, the Hon. I.M. Lightbody, said today.

He told the Legislative Council that some 28,000 new spaces were expected to be available by the end of the year, but even this, he added, would not be enough as there was a backlog of demand for space for some 8,000 people.

Many of these people, he said, were "potentially" rather than actually homeless as they were living in building scheduled for redevelopment Since June last year, he said, four new areas with a capacity for 6,400 people had been brought into use. Another three, with a capacity for 3»3OO were expected to be ready in the next two months.

In addition, three more sites with a capacity for 6,500 had been provisionally allocated but must first be checked for safety by consulting engineers.

Mr• Lightbody said his department had applied for four more possible sites with a capacity for 12,000 people and it was hoped that these should be ready for use by the end of this yeare

He explained that the requirement for more licensed space stemmed from the loss of a number of these areas which were declared unsafe after the rainstorms last year, and from a significant increase in the number of people seeking accommodation in licensed areas.

/The current ••••••.<.

I"

Wednesday, June 6, 1973

- 17 -

The current level of demand, he said, was 50 per cent higher than last year.

These higher numbers resulted from various clean-up campaigns and from a high level of redevelopment activity in the private sector, he added.

-----0------

/18.........

Wednesday, June 6, 1973

- 18 -

NEW VEHICULAR FERRY SERVICE

********

Approval is expected to be given soon to building plans associated with a new vehicular ferry service to link North Point with Kwun Tong.

The new service will replace the existing one between North Point and Kowloon City.

The Acting Financial Secretary^ the Hon.. D.J.C. Jones, recalled that approval in principle was given by the Legislative Council on August 30 last year for the Hongkong and Yaumati Ferry Company to alter some of its routes, mainly as a result of the opening of the cross harbour tunnel.

’’The Company also undertook to construct at its own expense, the necessary ferry berth, ramps and double-deck structure at Kwun Tong to enable the service to operate,” he said.

Mr. Jones said that another resolution will be sought from the council to fix a date for the commencement of the new service and to terminate the old one between North Point and Kowloon City when the construction of the new pier is completed, hopefully at the end of this year.

-------0---------

/19..........

Wednesday, June 6, 1973

- 19 -

REVIEW OF OFFENSIVE TRADES

**********

A comprehensive review is to be made of the problems posed by offensive trades, the Director of Urban Services, the Hon. D.R.W. Alexander, told the Legislative Council today.

He said a programme was needed to provide for the removal of offensive trades into properly designated areas, and this would be studied by the various departments concerned in consultation with the Advisory Committee on Environmental Pollution on Land and Water.

Meanwhile, the District Commissioner, New Territories, the

Hon. I.F. Macpherson, reported that about 75?000 square feet of land had been reserved for tannery operators in the Kwai Chung offensive trades zone.

The balance of 244,000 square feet is reserved for other offensive trades•

-------0---------

/20.......

Wednesday, June 6, 1973

- 20 -

SURVEY ON TRAVELLERS USING MACAU FERRY TERMINAL

Consideration will be given to conducting a survey to find out how many people using the Hong Kong-Macau ferry wharf are from Kowloon peninsula and from Hong Kong Island.

Revealing this in the Legislative Council today, the Acting Financial Secretary, the Hon. D.J.C. Jones suggested that the survey could be conducted by university students during their summer vacation.

The last such survey was held in 19^6, when it appeared that at that time about 5$ percent of those travelling to and from Macau started or ended their trips in Kowloon or the New Territories and about 44 per cent on Hong Kong Island.

Mr. Jones said no up-to-date information on the movements of Macau travellers was available as the large majority of all people using the Macau ferry terminal travelled on re-entry permits and were not required to fill in embarkation or disembarkation cards.

-------0---------

/21..........

Wednesday, June 6, 1973

- 21 -

12 GRANTS FROM LOTTERIES FUND

»*****«***

The Legislative Council today approved the allocation of mono than 32.6 million from the Lotteries Fund to finance 12 social welfare projects.

The biggest single grant of 3698,000 is for a youth centre for tho Hong Kong Federation of Youth Groups and the Boys’ and Girls’ Clubs Association.

Another 3500,000 has been set aside for the building of a training centre for the Ebenezer School and Home for the Blind.

Other items receiving assistance from the Lotteries Fund include the redevelopment of a youth camp at Cheung Chau for Caritas and the expansion of the Arran Street Eye Clinic for tho Medical and Health Department•

The Lotteries Fund, which obtains its proceeds from the sale of Government lotteries and ’lucky’ car numbers, is set up to help tho development of social welfare services in Hong Kong.

Tho balance remaining in the fund after the latest allocations is approximately 33.8 million.

-------0---------

Wednesday, June 6, 1973

- 22 -

ACCOMMODATION FOR ALL DOMESTIC RESIDENTS

*******

All the domestic residents in the area in Ngau Tau Kok due to move out before June 12 to make way for the construction of the main Mass Transit Depot will be accommodated, a government spokesman said today.

One hundred and nineteen families comprising 538 people have been living in the area. Of this total, 73 families comprising 370 people have been given accommodation at the Lam Tin Estate. The rest, 46 families comprising 168 people, have been offered accommodation in licensed areas.

Seventy-seven of the 148 industrial undertakings are eligible for resettlement and they have been allocated government factory units, mostly at Kwai Chung. A special co-ordinating group, comprising representatives from various government departments concerned has been set up by the Housing Department to assist factory operators affected by the clearance to find suitable alternative sites.

In accordance with government policy, those undertakings which were established on the site before 1966 and which were then under 5,000 square feet of working area are eligible for the allocation of government factory units.

Eleven of the 29 shop-keepers in the area have been found to be eligible for assistance and ex-gratia sums amounting to about $116,563 will be paid to them.

/Officers

Wednesday, June 6, 1973

- 23 -

Officers from the Housing Department and the staff of the City District Office (Kwun Tong) have been visiting the area and have been available for several weeks to give advice to factory-owners and shop-keepers on their removal problems, the spokesman said. Officers of the Labour Department have also been available to help workers find other employment.

In a letter to the "Industrial and Commercial Group of Ngau Tau Kok, Western Area" on May 28 in reply to their two petitions to the Governor, dated May 15 and 22, Mr. T.J. Bedford,Assistant Colonial Secretary said that all the government departments concerned were doing all they could to minimise any hardship arising from the need to develop the land for a major project on behalf of the whole community.

He said it is earnestly hoped that all will co-operate by moving their structures and equipment before June 12.

He reminded them that all Crcwn Land Permits had been cancelled over a period in 1972, the last taking effect from April 1 of that same year.

"It is therefore true to say that you have been aware for a period of at least a year that you would be required to remove your undertakings from the area, which have always been sited there on a temporary basis," Mr. Bedford said.

The final and formal notice of the clearance given in March this year, three months before the actual date of clearance, merely confirmed a state of affairs of which all were well aware, he stressed.

/In reply...........

Wednesday, June 6, 1973

- 24 -

In reply to another point raised in the petition that factory-owners had paid rates for the land at Ngau Tau Kok, Mr. Bedford explained that the payment of rates was in respect of services to the property on the land but in no way effected the legal status of the land itself or the occupancy of it, ’’Furthermore, I understand that since the permits for the land were cancelled, rates have not been charged,” he pointed out,

’Mr. Bedford advised those undertakings not qualifying for government resettlement factory accommodation to consider renting space in private factory blocks and those factories unable to operate in flatted factories to obtain the authority of the New Territories Administration to re-establish themselves in certain selected areas of the Nev/ Territories,

He assured the factory-owners that steps have already been taken to ensure that the people working in the factories in the area are given every assistance to find alternative employment.

Officers of the Labour Department are available both at the Kwun Tong Government Offices and at the site to advise on employment opportunities and to assist workers find new employment.

”1 am confident that the majority will have no difficulty in finding other jobs in the Kwun Tong area where there are currently ample job opportunities,” Mr. Bedford said*

-------0---------

Wednesday, June 6, 1973

- 25 -

SECURITIES COUNCIL CONSIDERS DELAYS IN SHARE TRANSFERS

*********

The Acting Financial Secretary1Mr. D.J.C. Jones,assured Legislative Councillors today that the problem of delays in the transfer of shares has been under active consideration by the Securities Advisory Council since it was first set up in January this year.

He pointed out, however, that it would be difficult to deal with this matter separately from other related aspects of the Second Report of the Companies Law Revision Committee, which will be laid before the council later this year.

The plea to amend section 70 of the ordinance, which deals with the length of time allowed for the transfer of shares, will be "fully borne in mind" in considering any future legislation arising from the recommendations of the Committee, he said.

Mr. Jones explained that the delay now being experienced in the issue of share certificates was the result of a spate of bonus issues and the concentration of dividend payments within the last few months.

Company registrars were sometimes required to issue new certificates within 10 days, he added.

"With the dividend season coming to an end and given the recent reduced level of activity in the stock market, .it is hoped that the situation will improve and that the transfer of shares will be registered more quickly," Mr. Jones said.

-------0---------

/26..........

Wednesday, June 6, 1973

- 26 -

REPORTS BY THE MANAGEMENT CONSULTANTS «««****

The Acting Colonial Secretary, the Hon. M.D.A. Clinton, today gave an outline of the work which has involved McKinsey and Company, the management consultants, who were engaged to streamline government processes and procedures.

Apart from the main report tabled in the Legislative Council two weeks ago, the consultants have produced a 10 year programme plan for the Medical and Health Department, a long term personnel strategy for the rank and file of the Royal Hong Kong Police and a long term programme plan for the development of secondary education-,

They have also studied specific areas and problems in the Public V/orks Department, the Urban Services Department and in the Colonial Secretariat.

f,I would not like to deluge members with these various reports, plans, studies and assessments but the volume of paper produced is substantial, the Medical programme plan, for example, is over 100 pages," he added.

As to being satisfied that the public funds voted for their services had been well spent, Mr. Clinton said that the consultants had indicated how, in one particular activity, performance could be improved so as to produce cost benefits of about double their fees incurred so faro

He had no doubt that application of their concepts in other fields would produce similar improvements in cost-effectivenesso

-------0 - - - -

Wednesday, June 6, 1973

EXPANSION OF TELEPHONE SERVICES

*******

A new telephone exchange will be opened next month at Yau Tong and the one at Kwai Chung will be extended at the end of this year to relieve the critical shortage of telephone lines in these two areas#

The Acting Financial Secretary, the Hon. D.J.C. Jones, pointed out to Legislative Council members that almost 90,000 new telephone lines were installed in 1972 and the waiting list stood at about 38,000 at the end of the year.

"The average waiting period works out at about five months," he said.

"But neither the government nor the company are complacent about the present size of the waiting list," he added.

He explained that under section of the Telephone Ordinance, the Telephone Company is required to provide service to an applicant vri th in a reasonable time after his initial application.

To enable the Postmaster General to keep fully abreast of his responsibilities in the expansion of telephone and telecommunication services generally, additional professional engineering staff have recently been recruited to the Post Office, Mr. Jones said.

Putting the problem of delay in telephone installation in proper perspective, Mr. Jones said that the number of working lines had increased from 107,000 at the end of 1962 to 651,000 at the end of last year, — a more than six-fold increase in 10 years.

In addition, the waiting list as a percentage of working lines in operation had fallen from 3^ percent to less than 6 percent within the last 10 years, he said.

-------0----------

/28.........................................

Wednesday, June 6, 1973

- 28 -

MANAGEMENT OF MULTI-STOREY BUILDINGS BEING REVIEV/ED

**********

The Secretary for Home Affairs, the Hon. Jack Cater, told the Legislative Council today that the government has recently set up a working group to re-examine the whole question of the management of multi-storey buildings, including the desirability of amending the Multi-Storey Buildings (Owners Incorporation) Ordinance.

He revealed that some 400 such organisations had been formed since the ordinance was enacted about three years ago.

”The City District Officers are continuing to encourage the formation of more owners’ corporations under the existing legislation,” he said.

In connection with the Clean Hong Kong 1973 Campaign and the Fight Violent Crime Campaign, Mr. Cater said additional staff have been deployed by the Secretariat for Home Affairs and the New Territories Administration to encourage the establishment of mutual-aid committees in as many multistorey buildings as possible.

Mr. Cater said that the formation of such committees will bo subjected to riinin.nl formalitiy and they will not be required to be registered as societies under the Societies Ordinance.

He expressed the hope that sone of these mutual—aid committees would eventually end up as owners’ incorporations.

-------0---------

/29..........

Wednesday, June 6, 1973

- 29 -

OSWALD CHEUNG CRITICAL OF CERTAIN PROVISIONS IN RENT LEGISLATION

********

Tho Hon. Oswald Cheung today expressed serious reservations about proposed long term measures to control the rent situation in Hong Kong and took the government to task for not making available more land for development.

Speaking in the Legislative Council, Mr. Cheung said two features of the proposed measures struck him as being "particularly objectionable".

The first was that the proposals aimed at protecting "even the rich in their indulgence of luxury."

His other objection was that no landlord, he felt, would be permitted even to charge his tenant what the Commissioner of Rating and Valuation determined as the fair market rent of the premises.

"The truth is," he said, "that, unintentionally, we have created a privileged class of tenants, who naturally clamour for extended and further controls of rent when they sense danger of losing their privileges."

These tenants, he added, had been enjoying a standard of accommodation at what have been rents far below free market values, and substantially below fair market rentals.

In his opinion, there was a danger of creating a larger class of privileged tenants, and a danger of driving private enterprise away from providing domestic accommodation.

"We may well be right in giving temporary relief to those sections of our community that are least able to bear extra burdens," Mr. Cheung said, "but I entirely disown that we have an obligation to protect the rich."

/Mr. Cheung .......

Wednesday, June 6, 1975

- 30 -

Mr. Cheung noted that previous controls had been imposed so that supply might catch up to demand, and he questioned the government’s efforts over the past three—and—a-half years to obtain this objective.

nI regret to find that, apart from providing housing in the public sector, some measures taken by the government have not encouraged supply, and indeed have been counter-productive,1' he said.

The supply of land to the private sector had been extremely limited and the prices extremely high, he noted, while the government’s reasons for "denying” the supply did not satisfy anyone.

He also asked what had happened to negotiations with the mili tary authorities over the release of land at Lyemun Barracks and other places which could be turned to more beneficial social use.

Referring to other aspects of government activity which he found counter-productive, Mr. Cheung said it was "distressing” that over the past three years the Buildings Ordinance Office had "resorted to every stratagem imaginable to stop private enterprise from developing housing sites to the full potential permitted by the law.”

He said the basic reason given by that office was that the development legally permissible would lead to a deterioration of the environment.

’’But what are our priorities — more and cheaper housing first, or a better life first?” he asked.

Mr. Cheung also criticised the law relating to town planning which, he said, was in need of a "drastic overhaul-."

Mr. Cheung supported the Domestic Premises (Tenure and Rent) (Temporary Provisions) Bill 1973 with "the greatest reluctance,” and urged the council to carefully consider whether the proposed longer-term measures were in the public interest.

-------0---------

/31.........

Wednesday, June 6, 1973

- 31 -

REPORT ON BRIDGE TO LkNTAU

«**«**«

Planning consultants appointed to advise on the development of Lantau Island and the Sai Kung and Plover Cove peninsulas will be asked to submit a report on the benefits and disadvantages of building a bridge to north east Lantau.

If they recommend that the project should be proceeded with, they would also be asked to advise on the preferable alignment, the form it should take, what would suffice immediately, what is likely to be required in the longer term and what road pattern is needed to serve it.

Speaking in reply to a question in the Legislative Council today, the Director of Public Works, the Hon. J.J. Robson added that the construction of a bridge would be the best method of making available substantial additional areas of land for industrial and residential development.

This proposition is attractive because it could be linked with

•r?,> a new motor road to Castle Peak and with water and electricity services in the Tsucn Wan area, he said.

"But it must of course be looked at realistically, as there are many factors to be considered.

"We’re doing it as quickly as we can because the impact of provision of road access would not be restricted to Lantau itself, but would have a tremendous effect on the pattern of development of Hong Kong as a whole,” he said.

Mr. Robson stressed that Lantau being two and a half times the size of Hong Kong, its development, including industrial development of the northeastern sector, is not incompatible with the government’s policy of preserving the rest

of the island for recreational facilities

/Mr. Robson

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Thursday, June 7i 1973

CONTENTS

Page No»

Programmes of action will be needed to help curb environmental pollution in Hong Kong ••••••••••...................................     1

People trapped into borrowing money at extortionate rates urged to seek legal advice ................................................    3

Organised groups wishing to use Chi Ma Wan beach must first obtain permission from the Prisons Department •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• 4

Section of Prince Edward Road remains closed to through traffic • • • • • 5

Water cut in To Kwa Wan on Saturday •••••••••••••.••••••••••••••••••• 5

Overseas Student Section of the Education Department moving to new premises ................................••.♦••••••••••................  6

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Thursday, June 7» 1973

- 1 -

STEPS TO CURB ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTION

*******

The biggest problem facing Hong Kong’s environment in the future is expected to be the ever-increasing population and the demands which will be made on the limited land resources of Hong Kong*

A government spokesman, reviewing the progress and problems concerning the environment, said that the way in which "we use the land will become increasingly important, and its waste or deterioration by pollution will not be tolerable".

To conserve and make use of what Hong Kong has will mean planning, self-control and sanctions for those who misuse and pollute the land, he said.

At the same time, it will demand programmes of action for both the government and the private sector, "but above all it demands the concern and effort of everyone who lives in Hong Kong to ensure that we do not spoil the environment which we and our successors were meant to enjoy", the spokesman stressed.

Speaking about other trends which Hong Kong must guard against in the future, he said that the great increase in the Sheung Shui tanneries between 1968 and 1970, with their pollution problems, illustrated clearly the dangers of too loose a control over land and industry.

Refuse disposal problems in the Nev/ Territories also showed that as much attention must be devoted to the disposal of urban wastes as to other forms of pollution.

/Turning .........

Thursday, June 7i 1973

- 2 -

Turning to the problem of the automobile, the spokesman said that the fumes from motor cars were again looming as a problem in a city where the buildings must inevitably grow bigger.

However, the spokesman sounded a bright note when he reviewed the achievements of the past year, which he described as being a ’’significant period for Hong Kong’s environment”.

Heading the list was the Clean Hong Kong campaign, but it was algo a year during which planning for the improvement of the environment was started and reached fruition.

The government, he said, received studies on harbour pollution and sewage treatment, and pollution of the waters of the north west New Territories The first report of the Advisory Committee on Environmental Pollution on Land and Water was also submitted and this document set out practical a-ims for the reduction of pollution in Hong Kong.

The spokesman said that further studies on the pollution of the New Territories as a whole, and ways of tackling the problems of pollution from pig and poultry farms were now nearing completion.

Plans to improve outdoor recreation in the countryside came to fruition with the commencement of the five-year development scheme prepared by the Advisory Committees for Recreational Development and Nature Conservation for Hong Kong Island and *the New Territories.

The programmes provide for a ring of country parks around Kowloon and the opening up and provision of amenities at beauty spots on the island. Plans for the development of recreational and tourist facilities on Lantau and Ma Wan Islands and on Sai Kung Peninsula will also be studied by consultants this year.

Thursday, June 7? 1973

- 3 -

LOAN SHARK VICTIMS URGED TO SEEK LEGAL ADVICE

*»*«**»*

Victims of ’’loan sharks” were today urged to seek legal advice if they have been trapped into paying extortionate rates of interest.

This advice follows recent newspaper publicity about the plight of a hawker who was assaulted after she was unable to continue paying exorbitant amounts of interest on a loan.

A government spokesman said; ’’The unfortunate victim in this case clearly was not aware that the courts have power to examine wholly unreasonable loan transactions and grant relief to borrowers who have been trapped into paying extortionate rates of interest.”

Victims of unscrupulous money-lenders are advised to seek legaL advice from a solicitor, or approach the Legal Aid Department, Top Floor, Victoria District Court building, Battery Path, Hong Kong.

-------0---------

Thursday, June 7, 1973

- 4 -

CHI MA WAN NOT A PUBLIC BEACH ********

People wishing to use the beach at Chi Ma Wan on Lantau Island should make sure they have first obtained permission from the Prisons Department,

This is the advice of the Superintendent of the Chi Ma Wan Prison, Mr. E. Barber, who emphasised today that the beach is not a gazetted public beach and is under the direct administration of the Prisons Department.

"Permission to use the facilities at* the beach are only granted to organised groups,” he said. '

As no life-guards are provided, the visiting group has to bring its own.

He said that at present, the facilities at th'e beach are heavily booked in connection with various stumer youth progr-arn s.

”It is extremely unlikely that permissio*i will be granted to any group in the near future,” Mr. Barber saido ’ •

-------0---------

Thursday, June 7, 1973

- 5 -

SECTION OF PRINCE EDWARD ROaD REMAINS CLOSED

**********

A section of Prince Edward Road between Knight Street and Waterloo Road will continue to be closed to eastbound traffic for another month.

This is to enable new sewers to be laid in this section and other service diversions to be carried out.

The work will involve the continued closure of part of Prince Edward Road except for access to premises.

Through traffic will use the temporary flyover and left-turning traffic will be routed via Knight Street and Boundary Street.

-------0---------

WATER INTERRUPTION IN TO KWA WAN

****««****

Water supply to a number of premises in the To Kwa Wan area will be cut off for five hours from 1 a.m. to 6 a.m. on Saturday (June 9)•

The temporary stoppage is to allow staff of the Waterworks Office to carry out a leakage test.

The area affected is bounded by Lok Shan Road, To Kwa Wan Road, Ma Hang Chung Road, Kowloon City Road, Ma Tau Kok Road, Tam Kung Road, San Shan Road and Pau Chung Street.

-------0---------

A....

Thursday, June 7, 1973

- 6 -

NEW OFFICES FOR OVERSEAS STUDENTS SECTION

********

The Overseas Students and Scholarships Section of the Education Department, which provides an advisory service to students to further their studies overseas, is moving from the department’s headquarters in Lee Gardens tomorrow (Friday)a

The section will occupy new accommodation on the 2nd floor of Bonaventure House, 91 Leighton Road which is very near to its former offices.

The staff of the section remains unchanged but new telephone numbers will be in use as from tomorrow (Friday) ,

For the benefit of students and other members of the general public wishing to contact the section, the new telephone numbers are as follows:

Senior Education Officer J.C.H. Gillard 5-793968

Education Officers A„ Ling 5-793869

Miss A.S.K, Yau 5-793877

C.K. Lau 5-793877

Robert C^H- Lo 5-793869

Enquiries 5-793968

- - 0 - -

Release Time: 6.4$ p.m,

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Friday, June 8, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No,

Government improving and exploring ways to sound out public opinion on policy decisions 1

Two top level postings envisaged in the McKinsey report confirmed today 3

A number of factory operators at Ngau Tau Kok begin to move out to make way for the maintenance depot for the mass transit railway ••••••••.«•.................•••*••••••••••».•• • • • • 4

270,000 square feet of residential land to be opened up near Lung Cheung Road •.............................................    6

Old Chatham Road compound converted to training/detention centre for Prisons Department •. •...........•••••••••••••••••*.*•♦•• 7

Eight new playgrounds covering 2.5 acres to be built in Wong Chuk Hang .....................................................    8

Attempts to ease traffic congestion at airport .................  9

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Friday, June 8, 1973

- 1 -

GOVERNMENT STRENGTHENS CONTACT WITH THE PUBLIC

*******

Mr. Augustine Chui Kam, a former Assistant Director of Urban Services, has been appointed to a newly created post of Principal Assistant Colonial Secretary (Public Affairs) and will head a small research department to assist the Secretary for Home Affairs.

In this job he will be co-ordinating the work of collecting and assessing public opinion for consideration by the government in its decisionmaking process.

Speaking about his new appointment today, Mr. Chui stressed that the main objective of his work would be to plan and establish regular machinery through which can be obtained a pattern of public opinion at .all levels of the community.

Dnphasis, however, will be placed on seeking the opinions of those people at the grass roots level, particularly groups which are not normally articulate, he said.

The feelings and thoughts, of young people will also be one of the main aspects he will be looking into.

Mr. Chui explained that the first phase of the work will involve consultations with government departments and various community organisations to determine the best methods of getting an accurate and realistic assessment of public reaction to government policies.

This should lead to a strengthening of existing channels of contact with the public and the creation of new sources of information.

/’’There ...•••••.

Friday, June 8, 1973

- 2 -

"There are recognised ways of doing these things, such as sampling surveys and gallup polls, but these may also have limitations as it may be difficult to make them comprehensive and for them to measure reliably the intensity of feeling by mere question and answer methods.

"The machinery of assessment has to be systematic, but the approach will need to remain basically through personal .contactj" Mr. Chui said.

He recognised, however, that the success of personal contact and discussions depends on many factors, particularly the aptitude of staff doing the work.

The people who are doing the surveys will not only have to be able to mix well with people they must also be intelligent and objective to reflect the views and opinions they have assessed without being influenced by their own personal views. .

Mr. Chui said sounding out public reaction to government policy will be a continuing process and will be carried out before and after the policies are formulated. --

"The real way of closing the gap between the government and its people relies on genuine mutual understanding. The government has always taken public opinion seriously, but it is essential for it to be accurately informed as what the community generally feels and wants," he said. •

Mr. Chui is 40 and is married with one sop and one daughter.

He graduated with two degrees front the London University and took postgraduate studies in government and publip administration at Trinity College, Oxford. He has been with the Government for 21 years mainly in posts where he has been in contact with the public.n_, ------------------------------------0---------

/3

Friday, June 8, 1973

MP. CATER AND MR. ROBSON ASSUME NEW POSTS

**********

Mr. Jack Cater has formally assumed his new post as Secretary for Home Affairs.

He succeeds Mr. D.C.C. Luddington who left Hong Kong last Saturday to take up his new appointment as High Commissioner for the Western Pacific.

Mr. Cater takes up his duties in the new framework of the Colonial Secretariat recommended by the management consultants, McKinsey and Co.

He will be responsible for policy and programmes covering information services, public relations, broadcasting, television, information on public attitudes, cultural activities, tourism and City District Offices.

Another appointment made in connection with the McKinsey reorganisation

is Mr. J.J. Robson, Director of Public Works, who is now Acting Secretary for the Environment.

Mr. Robson will be responsible for policy and programmes covering

land matters, town planning, the design, construction and timing of new towns, pollution, urban services, roads, road transport, traffic railway, car parking, mass transit (construction, engineering and land aspects) and operational and works aspects of the airport and harbour.

He will be assisted by Mr. A.T. Armstrong-Wright, Government Civil

Engineer, who has been appointed as Acting Principal Assistant Colonial Secretary in the new Environment Branch.

Mr. A.S. Robertson, Deputy Director of Public Works, has been appointed to act as Director in Mr. Robson’s place.

o -

A

Friday, June 8, 1973

NGAU TAU KOK OPERATORS START TO MOVE OUT

***********

More than JO factory operators in the Ngau Tau Kok area, due for clearance to make way for the main maintenance depot of the Mass Transit Railway, have moved or are beginning to move out. Some have begun to demolish their buildings.

The clearance of this stretch of land along Kv/un Tong Road will begin on Tuesday (June 12) so that essential site preparation can start early next month.

More than 100 families have been living in the area. All have been offered accommodation in public housing or licenced areas by the Housing Department.

Seventy eight of the 148 industrial undertakings which occupied sites on Crown Land permits - cancelled last year - have been allocated Housing Authority flatted factory units.

Fifteen of the 29 shopkeepers in the area who are eligible for assistance will be paid ex-gratia sums totalling S1J6,O76.

. Staff from the Housing Department and the City District Office, Kwun Tong, have been visiting the area giving advice to factory owners and shopkeepers on removal problems. Labour Department staff have also been available to help workers find other jobs.

The Housing Department has put several operators, who approached them for help, in touch with the Nev/ Territories Administration which in turn is offering guidance to those wanting to find alternative sites in the rural area.

/Proprietors ......

Friday, June 8, 1973

- 5 -

Proprietors of large concerns, such as steel rolling milla have been advised to negotiate for sites in Junk Bay where private land is available* The Ngau Tau Kok operators have been aware of the government’s need to recover this land for over two years and permits in the area were cancelled between January and April last year*

Typical of the proprietors who have begun to move out from the area is a foundry owner who occupied J,000 square feet of land for which he paid the former Crown Land permitee - who had left the area - 31,700 a month.

He has now been allocated seven Housing Authority factory units, with a total floor area of 1,800 square feet and is changing his trade to plastics as founderies cannot operate in flatted factories.

Another operator, running a workshop turning out wooden furniture and planks, has found himself an alternative site in Yuen Long where he will be able to continue his furniture business.

Other operators have bought land in the New Territories and are seeking permission to use it for industrial purposes.

-------0---------

/6........

Friday, June 8, 1973

- 6 -

MORE RESIDENTIAL LAND TO BE FORMED

***********

Some five-and-a-half acres of land (about 270,000 square feet) is to be carved from the North Kowloon foothills for future residential development.

The land will be formed in connection with the development of areas off Lung Cheung Road and will cover the whole of Tai Wor Ping Cottage area to the north of the Shek Kip Mei Service Reservoir.

Formation work will start next month and is expected to be completed in early 1975, at a cost of some 55.2 million.

The site will be formed in tiers of varying sizes each fitted with proper drainage facilities, and will be served by a 2,000 foot dual carriageway running through it.

About 500,000 cubic yards of earth will be removed from the site* The excavated materials will be dumped in Kowloon Bay for the formation of the Kwun Tong mass transit depot.

-------0---------

/7.........

Friday, June 8, 1973

OLD COMPOUND CONVERTED TO TRAINING /DETENTION CENTRE

********

Some 250 young offenders will be transferred to the former Chatham Road Compound tomorrow in a Prisons Department move to relieve overcrowding at the Stanley Training Centre.

Announcing this today, a spokesman for the department said the old compound has been renamed the Chatham Training/Detention Centre.

The new centre, which will be used for two years, will have accommodation for up to 500 inmates, compared to 191 at Stanley.

It will also relieve the chronic overcrowding at the Victoria Reception Centre as those now remanded there for training or detention centre reports will be housed in the Chatham Road centre.

The spokesman stressed that the move is purely a temporary measure to solve the problem of overcrowding before the completion of new centres.

"Two such centres have been planned — one at Lai Chi Kok and another at Pik Uk," he said.

No final decision has yet been made on the future of the vacated Stanley Training Centre.

,rBut it is certain that the Prisons Department will be making use of this centre in the very near future," the spokesman added.

---0------

Friday, June 8, 1975

- 8 -

MORE PLAYGROUNDS FOR WONG CHUK HANG

**********

Eight playgrounds have been planned in the Wong Chuk Hang Estate by the Urban Council to complement the existing playground between blocks 1 and 2.

The new playgrounds, with a total area of about 2.5 acres, will be built on the open spaces among the various blocks.

Three basketball courts, a roller skating rink, a volleyball court and two badminton courts will be included in the plans. Swings, slides and roundabouts will be installed for the children of the estate.

A covered rest area, concrete benches and flower beds will also be included in the construction to provide residents with pleasant sitting-out areas.

Construction of the playgrounds is expected to begin in the middle of next month, and should be completed in February, 197^•

-------o---------

/9.......

Friday, June 8, 1973

- 9 -

TRAFFIC CONGESTION AT AIRPORT ♦ * * * * * ♦

Members of the public are advised not to take their cars to the airport on weekends from about midday to 6 p.m. during the airport’s peak operating hours*

Serious traffic problems have been encountered during recent weekends because of the limited parking facilities, and some motorists have oven abandoned their cars in areas where they block the entrances or exits.

The situation is also aggravated by large numbers of mini buses, particularly from the New Territories, bringing people to meet or farewell friends and relatives booked on charter flights during the week.

The existing open-air car park in front of the terminal building has space for only about 350 cars and this is usually fully occupied every day.

A new multi-storey car park with accommodation for more than four times that number has been included in the current expansion of the airport to cater for the present and projected requirements, but the first 800 spaces will not be available for use until 1975*

In the meantime , to avoid unnecessary congestion for genuine users of the airport people are advised to leave their cars at home when visiting the terminal.

-------0---------

Release time: 7.00 p.m.

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Saturday, June 9? 1973

CONTENTS

Page No.

Two new senior postings announced today — Mr. S.T. Kidd appointed Conmissioner of the Hong Kong Government Office in London and

Mr. A.J. Scott appointed Secretary for the Civil Service .............  1

Issue of British (Hong Kong) passports reaches all-time high in May • • 3

Further restrictions imposed on the operation of mini buses in Nathan

Road ..................................•••••••••• 4

Two sections of Castle Peak Road to be widened to improve traffic conditions ••••••••..........•••••••••••.......•......................  5

Hong Kong’s new definitive stamps will be out on Tuesday ••••••••••••• 6

A seawall is to be built at the Chai Wan reclamation in connection with the proposed mass transit railway................  ..••••••••••••• 7

Water supply to Stanley will be interrupted for eight hours •••••••••• 7

Passing-out parade for 130 C.A.S. recruits ............................ 8

Press visit to the Sau Mau Ping Training Centre for spastic children ....................................................................... 9

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Saturday, June 9, 1973

- 1 -

SENIOR GOVERNMENT POSTINGS ANNOUNCED

*********

Two senior government appointments were announced today.

The Establishment Secretary, Mr, S.T. Kidd, has been appointed Commissioner of the Hong Kong Government Office in London and will take up his duties later in the year.

Mr. A.J. Scott, will take over the post of Secretary for the Civil Service, which is to be created following recommendations made in the McKinsey report.

Mr. Kidd, aged 47, who succeeds Mr. M. Wright as the Hong Kong Commissioner in London, first joined the Hong Kong Government in 1950. He was appointed Senior Administrative Officer in 1959 and became Deputy District Commissioner, New Territories, the same year.

He was appointed Principal Assistant Colonial Secretary in 1965 and Establishment Secretary in 1970. Since then he has acted as Deputy Colonial Secretary and Colonial Secretary on a number of occasions.

The Commissioner co-ordinates the many activities undertaken by the Hong Kong Government in Britain, including the dissemination of information on Hong Kong; liaison with Hong Kong residents in Britain; and the review of commercial and industrial developments and their possible effect on Hong Kong’s interests.

/In addition ......

Saturday, June 9, 1973

- 2 -

In addition, Mr. Kidd will have special responsibilities for developing the recruitment activities of the London office and for further developing the channel of communication with United Kingdom ministries and the crown agents. He will bring to this aspect of the post substantial experience in secretariat business in general and establishment matters in particular.

Mr. Scott, who is 3% joined the Colonial Service in 1958. He served in Fiji for 13 years as an administrative officer.

During his time in Fiji he served as a district officer, registrar of the University of South Pacific, establishment officer and during his last three years, as establishment secretary.

He joined the Hong Kong Government service in September 1971 and since July last year he has served as Principal Assistant Financial Secretary.

In his new position as Secretary for the Civil Service, Mr. Scott will be responsible for recruiting , staffing and personnel management in the public service. His particular interest is the development of staff relations within the government. »

Note to Editors; Photographs of the two men will be boxecl today.

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Saturday, June % 1973

RECORD NUMBER OF PASSPCRTS ISSUED

t****At

A record number of 4,601 British (Hong Kong) passports were issued in May by the Immigration Department, the highest figure for any one month.

Previously, the highest figure was 4,127 and this was recorded in March.

spokesman ^or the department explained that the issue of passports usually increased in the summer with local students leaving for overseas studies and residents likely to go away on holidays.

Up to the end of May this year, a total of 17^286 passports had

been issued, compared with 11,529 in the same period last year.

The spokesman added that the rising standard of living, cheaper

travel costs and simplified procedures for application all contributed to

....

the increase in passport applications.

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Saturday, June 9, 1973

- 4 -

RESTRICTIONS ON MINI BUSES IN NATHAN ROAD

«*****>»

Further restrictions are to be imposed on the operations of mini buses along a busy section of Nathan Road.

As from Monday (June 11) the hours during which these buses are prohibited from picking up or setting down passengers in Nathan Road between Jordan Road and Prince Edward Road, will be extended for a further three hours, to cover the period from 9 p.m. to midnight.

At present the restrictions are imposed from 7 o’clock in the morning until 9 p.m.

The new arrangement, to come into force from 9 p.m. on Monday, is being introduced to improve the flow of traffic in the area.

Appropriate traffic signs will be set up to show the extended restriction hours to the public light bus drivers .

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Saturday, June 9, 1975

- 5 -

IMPROVEMENTS TO CASTLE PEAK ROAD

********

Two sections of the existing Castle Peak Road will be widened and realigned in a plan to improve traffic conditions along the south-western coast of the New Territories.

One section of the road is situated at Brothers Point near the 15 milestone and the other is at Tai Lam Chung near the 16 milestone.

The improvements are to be carried out in association with the construction of a new Tuen Mun Road linking Tsuen Wan and Tuen Mun New Town.

This nine—mile road, to be built in two stages, will eventually have two three-lane carriageways.

Slip roads connecting the new motorway to Castle Peak Road and accesses to adjoining properties will be provided as part of the present project The proposal to undertake the work is in this week’s gazette and anyone who has objections must send them in writing to the Director of Public Works to reach his office not later than July 8.

Claims for compensation must also reach his office not later than August 8.

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/6.........

Saturday, June 9, 1973

- 6 -

NEW DEFINITIVE STAMP ISSUED ON TUESDAY

********

Hong Kong’s new definitive set of stamps, comprising 14 denominations, will be put on sale at all post offices on Tuesday (June 12)•

The total value of a full set of stamps is 341.85*

A service will also be provided on Tuesday at all post offices whereby first day covers will be accepted over the counter, impressed with the normal post office steel date stamp and handed back to the person presenting them.

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Saturday, June 9? *1973

- 7 -

OMI WAN SEAWALL TO BE BUILT

*******

A seawall 1,700 feet long is to be built to enclose part of the Chai Wan reclamation in connection with the proposed mass transit railway.

The wall will provide protection for a section which will initially be used as a works area for the construction of the railway.

.Chai Wan is intended as a junction of the proposed mass transit system and two stations and a depot have been included in the local draft outline development plan.

Work on the seawall is expected to begin in the middle of next month and take about 12 months to complete.

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. . . WATER INTERRUPTION IN STANLEY

********

Water supply to a number of premises in Stanley on Hong Kong Island will be cut off for-eight hours from 10 p.m. on Monday (June 11) to 6 a.m. the next morning.

The temporary stoppage is to allow staff of the Waterworks Office to install a fresh water hydrant at No. 7 Stanley New Street.

Areas affected are Stanley Market and Stanley Lot 469, 466, 465•< 433 of Stanley New Street, the U.S.D. Cleansing Division office of Stanley Village, Stanley Main Street and Ma Shan Village.

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/8........

Saturday, June 9, 1973

- 8 -

130 C.A.S. RECRUITS IN PASSING OUT PARADE *********

A passing-out parade for 130 Civil Aid Services recruits who have completed one year’s basic training will be held tomorrow (Sunday) at the C.A.S. Kowloon Training Centre.

Commodore J.K. Stevens, Commodore-in-Charge, Royal Navy, Hong Kong, will inspect the parade and take the salute at the march past.

Commodore Stevens will arrive at the Training Centre at 9 a.m. and will be met by the C.A.S. Commissioner, Mr. P.C. Woo, and the Chief Staff Officer, Mr. J.A. Fortune.

Special certificates will be awarded to the three top recruits and Civil Defence Long Service Medals will be presented to 11 C.A.S. officers and members.

The Military Band of the 1st Battalion, the Black Watch (Royal Highland Regiment) will play during the parade.

After the parade, recruits will be posted to various C.A.S. units for further operational training and active duty.

Noto to Editors: The parade will take place at 9 a.m. at

204 Argyle Street, Kowloon.

You are invited to send a reporter and/or photographer to cover the event.

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•i

Saturday, June 9$ 1973

- 9 -

VISIT TO TRAINING CENTRE

*******

Note to Editors: The Government Lotteries Management

Committee and the Spastics Association of Hong Kong,have organised a press visit to the Sau Mau Ping Training Centre for spastic children on Monday (June 11).

Press representatives wanting to cover the event should assemble at Queen’s Pier, Hong Kong, not later than 9*50 a.m. on Monday. Transport will be provided.

The centre, run by the Spastics Association, was set up in January this year. A grant of 3169,700 from the Lotteries Fund has been approved to be used as running expenses for the first two years.

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Release Time; 2.30 p*m.

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Monday, June 11, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No.

Public assistance rates and disability allowance will be increased by 11 per cent with effect from July 1 ............... 1

Government pensions increased by 3 per cent.................. 3

General price level rose by more than 6 per cent in 1972 • ••• 4

New temporary market in Yuen Long to provide improved facilities ................................................................. 5

Mr. Q.W. Lee ceases to be a temporary member of the Executive

Council .•••••••••••..........................................   5

Government and community trying to do more for aged ••••••••• 6

Dispute at Hong Kong Airport involving workers and contractor company has been amicably settled ••.••••.....•........<•••••• 7

The best government apprentice of the year, Mr. Leung Hip-hung, to be presented with the "Brown Cup" .........................   8

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

4

Monday, June 11, 1973

- 1 -

PUBLIC ASSISTANCE RATES AND DISABILITY ALLOWANCE INCREASED BY 11 PER CENT ************

The government is to increase the rate of public assistance and disability allowance with effect from the beginning of next month.

The increases, which have been approved by the Finance Committee, amount to approximately 11 per cent overall and are intended to restore the purchasing power of the public assistance rates so that they are worth as much as they were when new rates were introduced in April 1972*

Commenting on the increases, Mr. T.S. Heppell, Assistant Director of Social Welfare, said today: "When the government introduced the expanded public assistance scheme in 1971» it promised that the rate of the allowances would be kept under regular review. In April 1972, the rates were substantially increased, by about 60 per cent.

"This further increase with effect from July 1 demonstrates that the government is determined to protect the interests of the poorest members of the community — these who are receiving public assistance,” he said.

The new rates of public assistance will be as follows, the old

rates are shown in brackets:-

For a single person on his own' 5120 (5110)

For a family:

First three eligible members 5 90 (8 80) each

Next three eligible members 3 70 (3 65) each

Each additional eligible member 8 55 (S 50) each

•— • • •— • •’ —— — /Because

• • • t V \ 5 ’♦ k A

Monday, June 11, 1973

- 2

Because the rate of disability and infirmity allowance is linked with the rate of public assistance, that too is being increased from July 1.

As from then, the allowance payable to a severely disabled person will be 8120 a month (instead of 8110) and that payable to someone aged 75 or over will be 360 (instead of 855).

A severely disabled person getting public assistance as well, will receive an increase in both allowances.

In addition, the maximum rent allowance payable is also being increased, in line with the rents for new government housing estates. This is because the amount allowed for rent is linked to the rent payable for government housing.

At present, in calculating the amount of assistance, an allowance is made for rent which is either the actual rent payable or a maximum figure based on government housing rents, whichever, is the lower.

Mr. Heppell gave two examples of what the changes mean.

* A family of five members will receive an additi onal 340 a month in public assistance plus in some cases an extra amount for rent. In future the assistance "level" for a family of five will be 3410 plus allowances for rent, education and other expenses. The rent allow;?nce could be up to 8112 a month.

* A single disabled person who qualifies for a disability allowance as well as public assistance will receive an extra 320 a month plus an additional 310 for rent. This will give him a monthly income of $275 plus any other special allowances.

0 - -

Monday, June 11, 1973

- 3 -

PENSIONS INCREASED BY THREE PER CENT

********

Approval has been given for a three per cent ex-gratia increase in government pensions with effect from April 1, 1972.

Government pensioners whose first day of retirement was on or before April 1, 1972 and have reached the age of 55 or more will be granted the increase.

Those pensioners who retired after that date will not be eligible for the increase but their pensions will be adjusted to take into account the recent government salary changes.

Widows and Orphans pensions in payment on April 1 last year will also be increased on an ex-gratia basis by three per cent with effect from that date.

The increase in pensions will cost approximately 35 million for the current financial year.

Pensioners who are eligible for the revised benefits will receive them in their payments for September, 1973 >

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Monday, June 11, 1973

AVERAGE PRICE RISE OF 6 PER CENT IN 1972

*******

The general price level in Hong Kong rose by an estimated average

of 6.4 per cent during 1972, according to a review of the Hong Kong Consumer Price Index.

The figure compares with rises of 3*5 per cent in 1971, 5.7 per cent in 1970 and five per cent in 1969.

An account of the movements of the index, the influencing factors and comparative figures are contained in a special article in the Hong Kong Monthly Digest of Statistics.

The review points out that the General Consumer Price Index ’’which

had moved upward relatively slowly in 1971, showed a faster upward movement in 1972”.

It says that fluctuations in the index during the year were largely

influenced by movements in prices of foodstuffs, especially when supplies were affected by typhoons and rainstorms during the summer.

Despite these fluctuations, the review says, the underlying trend was upwards.

The article reveals that the largest increase in prices of foodstuffs was for fresh vegetables, which rose by 20 per cent over that of 1971•

Illustrating some of the fluctuationsv the review says that the General Consumer Price Index rose to 142 in June last year, from 1j8 the previous month, due to the sharp increase in food prices caused by the rainstorm.

In September it rose to a new peak of 143, brought about by an

unusual drop in the supply of fresh vegetables. The ”high” was again reached in November due to a typhoon threat at the beginning of the month.

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/5

Monday, June 11, 1973

- .5 -

NEW MARKET FOR YUEN LONG

*******

A temporary market will be built in Yuen Long to provide better facilities for residents there.

The market, covering an area of about 20,000 square feet, is situated between Pau Cheung Street and Sai Tai Street in Yuen Long Town.

Covered accommodation is being provided at the northern end for 81 market stalls, while the existing open hawker bazaar at the other end facing Pau Cheung Street will be re-arranged to take 236 new hawker stall sites.

The market will be enclosed by a 6-foot high chain link fence with 11 entrances.

A single storey management office will also be provided within the market.

The construction work is expected to commence in mid-July and will take three months to complete.

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EXECUTIVE COUNCIL CHANGES

*******

Mr. Lee Quo-wei, an Unofficial Member of the Legislative Council, has ceased to be a temporary Unofficial Member of the Executive Council, with effect from last Saturday (June 9)« This follows the return to Hong Kong of Sir Yuet-keung Kan.

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/6.........

Monday, June 11, 1973

- 6 -

MORE HELP FOR THE AGED

*******

The government and the community of Hong Kong are trying to do more for the aged, and the Chung Shak-hei (Cheung Chau) Home for the Aged is to have a significant role to play.

The New Territories District Commissioner, Mr. I.F.C. Macpherson, said this today at the home’s swearing-in ceremony of the 1973-7^ Board of Directors when he paid tribute to the service provided by the institution in the past few years.

The success of the home, he said, is testified by the grant of 310,000 subvention by the Social Welfare Department, and by its plans to expand the facilities to accommodate more elderly people.

The home now has accommodation for 50 people, and, pending a grant from the Government Lotteries Fund, it expects to accommodate 20 more in a year’s time.

Mr. Macpherson said the proposed expansion would not be an easy task for a relatively small community like Cheung Chau, But he understood that the land and part of the funds required were already in hand.

He described the readiness of the home to run a dormitory for the aged in the proposed Cheung Chau Estate as ’’very worthwhile”.

”1 have asked the District Officer to do his best to assist,” he added

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Monday, June 11, 1975

- 7 -

DISPUTE AT HONG KONG AIRPORT SETTLED

A dispute involving the Express Transport and Building Contractors Ltd* and 2? of its workers engaged on the Hong Kong Airport construction site has been amicably settled.

The dispute began on May 29 when the dismissed workers refused to surrender their airport entry permits and returned to the work site to demand severance pay.

Officers of the Labour Relations Service of the Labour Department visited the site twice and subsequently managed to bring the parties concerned to the conference table.

Under the agreement reached on June 8, the workers received a sum of about 517,000 from the management.

Commenting on the settlement, Mr. Sin Kwok-hung, Labour Officer in charge of the Labour Relations Service (Kowloon East) said: nThe willingness of both parties to accept our conciliation service and their readiness to compromise have helped to bring about an early settlement"•

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/8..........

Monday, June 11, 1973

- 8 -

PRESENTATION FOR BEST GOVERNMENT APPRENTICE

*0*40*1

This year’s winner of the ’’Brown Cup” for the best apprentice in government workshops is Mr. Leung Hip-hung of the Waterworks Office.

Mr. J.A. Wallace, Principal Government Electrical and Mechanical

Engineer, will present the cup to Mr. Leung in a ceremony to be held on Wednesday (June 13).

The ”Brown Cup” is awarded to an apprentice in government workshops, who makes the best progress in any year either in practical or student classes or both.

It was donated by Mr. J.C. Brown, who served as a Chief Electrical and Mechanical Engineer of the Public Works Department between 1948 and 1959.

Mr. Leung started his apprenticeship in August, 1968. His practical work has been of consistently high standard throughout this period.

His technical education has also been consistent and in the latest sessional examination he was first in his class.

During the presentation ceremony, the official signing of indentures of 24 technical apprentices will also take place.

Note to Editors: You are invited to send a reporter and/or

photographer to cover the ceremony which will take place at 3 p.m. on Wednesday (June 13) in the Cinema Room, Civil Aid Services Building, Caroline Hill Road, Hong Kong.

1

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Release time: 7*QQ P»m

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Tuesday, June 12, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No.

Ngau Tau Kok clearance begins smoothly......................... 1

The Board of Education plans to submit its report on Hong Kong’s educational and examination system to the Governor by August .« 2

New immigration regulations ................................... 4

iir. Denys Roberts pays an official visit to Mr. Anthony Royle in London .................................................... 5

ilong Kong’s new definitive set of stamps is proving very popular ............................................................... 6

The Salvation Army has started a hostel for the aged at Yau

Tong Estate ....................................................7

The llarine Department is putting out a new guide on safe working

practices in shipbuilding and ship-repairing................• • * • • 8

The Social Welfare Department has arranged a series of overnight

camping trips for young people..................................9

Death sentence oonmuted.......................................  g

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Tuesday, June 12, 1973

- 1 -

NGAU TAU KOK CLEARANCE BEGINS

**********

The initial phase of the current operation at Ngau Tau Kok was carried out smoothly today.

About 20 factories, five shops and 40 squatter huts were demolished.

Early this morning, staff of the Housing Department and the police helped a family of six to move to the Yan Oi transit centre for temporary accommodation when their hut was demolished*

They will be given public housing.

About 200 labourers from the Housing Department and another 50 workers employed by contractors were involved in today’s clearance. Three bulldozers were used.

A spokesman for the department said the operation would continue until the whole site has been cleared.

liany factory operators in the next area to be tackled were today removing machinery from their factory premises.

About 120 factories, 20 shops and 60 domestic structures will have to be cleared in the next few days.

The area cleared will form part of the site for the maintenance depot and the administrative buildings for the mass transit railway.

Note to Editors: Copies of photographs of the clearance are

boxed tonight.

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Tuesday, June 12, 1973

- 2 -

BOARD OF EDUCATION TO SUBMIT REPORT IN AUGUST

»**«**«***

The reconstituted Board of Education intends to submit its report to the Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose,by August this year and it will be published as a “Green Paper” for public discussion and comment.

The board, appointed in January this year, has been charged with advising the Governor on all educational matters.

A spokesman for the Education Department said today that in particular it has been given the task of taking a new look at the educational and examination system that will be appropriate to the conditions of expanded secondary education envisaged by the government. It will also advise on the speed with which this can be implemented.

The board has publicly asked for comments and suggestions from all interested parties to help members in their deliberations and so far 37 written representations have been received, the spokesman added.

Among other matters, the Board of Education will be advising on the best way of achieving, within the shortest time practicable, the objectives of providing three years of secondary education for all in the 12-14 year age group, and of doubling places for the full five-year course.

The spokesman said: “In making recommendations, the board will obviously be concerned both with quality and quantity and will have to take into account the availability of staff and buildings as well as other factors

It has also been asked to advise on the degree of bi-sessionalism it considers appropriate in the short and long term in secondary schools.

/The spokesman .••••

Tuesday, June 12, 1973

- 3 -

The spokesman recalled that in his speech at the opening session of the Legislative Council last October, the Governor said that the government planned "free primary education for all, followed by secondary education for all to the age of 14; the latter to include an expanded pre-vocational or technical stream.

"At tnat point,” he added, "there will be on the one hand greatly expanded facilities for further secondary education leading to the Certificate of Education; on the other, young people will be able to choose between going into industry, or acquiring a qualification in a technical institute,"

I I

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Tuesday, June 12, 1973

- 4 -

NEW IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS

*******

Hong Kong residents intending to marry Thai women or who are already married under Thai law are now required to obtain a visa for their " brides before entering Hong Kong,

In the past they could enter Hong Kong with a visa waiver and then apply for permanent stay.

However a spokesman for the Immigration Department said today this facility had been abused by some Thai women,

A number of cases had been detected recently by the immigration authorities and the police where some Thai women had been involved in immoral practices* In each case the woman involved "had been sent back to Thailand.

The spokesman said that the only sure way of curbing this practice was to stop them from coming to Hong Kong in the first place. The new procedure facilitates the screening of applicants before they arrive.

Applications for the entry visa can be obtained through the British Embassy in Bangkok and will be referred to the Hong Kong immigration office for action.

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Tuesday, June 12, 1973

- 5 -

COLONIAL SECRETARY DESIGNATE MEETS ANTHONY ROYLE

********

The Attorney General, Mr. Denys Roberts, who is at present in London, yesterday called on the Parliamentary Under Secretary of State , Mr. Anthony Royle at the Foreign and Commonwealth Office.

It was the first time Mr. Roberts had seen the Under Secretary since the announcement of his new appointment as Colonial Secretary designate.

Mr. Roberts left Hong Kong early last month on vacation leave and is due to return early in July.

On the first part of his leave, the Attorney General paid a short visit to New York where he observed the complex workings of a major American city.

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/6.........

Tuesday, June 12, 1973

NEW STAMPS POPULAR

*«•«***

Hong Kong’s new definitive set of stamps, the first since 1962, was in great demand today, the first day of sale.

On Hong Kong Island crowds of people began lining up inside the General Post Office early in the morning and business was brisk throughout the day.

A colourful folder to hold the full set of 14 stamps was specially designed for the occasion and is being sold at. $45 together with the stamps.

It shows pictures of traditional scenes of Hong Kong - the city by night, a dragon boat race and a temple - and contains informations on the design of the new set.

The stamps, with a different, colour scheme for each of the denominations, have two main design features - a plaster cast of the head of the Queen by Arnold Machin and a panel of flowers freely adapted from an antique Chinese carved brown iacquer tray.

All the stamps, from 10 cents to $20 are available at post office selling counters. The 10 cent amd 50 cent denominations are obtainable from automatic stamp-selling machines.

Note to Editors:

Copies of a photograph showing the

crowds in the GPO are boxed tonight.

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/7........

Tuesday, June 12, 1975

YAU TONG OLD PEOPLE’S HOME OPENED

A hostel run by the Salvation Anny has been opened at Yau

Tone to take in old people needing care and shelter.

Called the Yau Tong Old People’s Home, the hostel has accommodation for some 65 single men or women who are eligible for compassionate resettlement.

Admission is through the Social Welfare Department and the first residents are expected to move soon.

The Housing Department allocated nine public housing units at Bloc!: 25 of the Yau Tong Estate so that the hostel could be established. The Salvation Army is charged only a token rent for the units.

The residents do not have to pay any fee or rent although they have to pay for the meals supplied.

The cost of the project — over ,$200,000 — including fitting-out work and the installation of furniture and equipment, has been met by a grant from the Lotteries Fund.

The recurrent cost will be drawn from general revenue.

Apart from the new hostel at Yau Tong, the Salvation Army runs

similar homes at Tai Hang Tung and Kam Tin catering for a total of 67 residents.

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Tuesday, June 12, 1973

- 8 -

GUIDE ON SATE WORKING PRACTICES IN SHIPBUILDING

**********

Note to Editors: The Marine Department has produced a guide setting

out safe working practices in the ship building and shiprepairing industries.

To introduce the guide, a press conference, to be chaired by Mr. R. Blacklock, Surveyor-General of Ships, will be held at 3 p.m. on Thursday (June 14) in the G.I.S. theatre, 5th floor, Beaconsfield House.

Mr. Blacklock, who is chairman of the Working Party which compiled the guide, will take the opportunity to speak generally on the government’s policy and measures being taken towards promoting safe working conditions on board ships.

Also present will be Mr. B.S. Nakhija, Surveyor of Ships; Mr. Li Kok-choi, Divisional Officer of the Fire Services Department; and Mr. Chan Tak-king, Acting Divisional Factory Inspector of the Labour Department.

Mr. Makhija, who edited the guide, will answer any question arising from its technical content•

You are invited to send a reporter and/or photographer to cover the conference.

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Tuesday, June 12, 1973

- 9 -

OVERNIGHT CAMPS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE

********

The Youth Work Unit of the Social Welfare Department has arranged a series of five overnight camping trips for young people from now until August,

The trips which will last two to three days each will be to various locations in the New Territories and outlying islands.

Mr. Antonio Chu, officer-in-charge of the Youth Work Unit, says the aim is to encourage young people to organise such activities for themselves and to develop their basic understanding of the outdoors.

The camps are expected to cater for about 40 young people each. They will be run by the unit’s self-programming group, ’’The Eternity” which is made up of volunteers and former members who have participated in previous camps.

The camps are intended for young people from 17 to 25 and anyone interested in joining can obtain the application forms and details from the office of the Youth Work Unit in Room 908, Causeway Bay Magistracy Building, Hong Kong (telephone 5-712467), or the Kowloon office on the top floor of Nathan Road Government Offices (telephone 3-884111 ext. 334). -----------------------------------0--------- DEATH SENTENCE COMMUTED

*********

The Governor, after taking into consideration the advice of the Executive Council, has decided that the death sentence passed on April 7* 1972 on Chan Kam-*wah should be commuted to a term of 12 years imprisonment, Chan was found guilty of the murder of Lam Ah-kau. -----------------------------------0---------

Release Time: 7»QQ p.m.

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Wednesday, June 1J, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No, The Advisory Committee on Telephone Services criticises the Telephone

Company for being too conservative in its assessment of demands ........ 1

Queen Elizabeth Hospital now in its tenth year of operation............. 3

Urban Council plans to increase cultural activities .................... 6

The Director of Education commends local businessmen on their contribution

to education........................................................     8

The Kennedy Town swimming pool complex will be ready by next summer

to serve the residents of Western District •••••••••••••••••••••••••«• 9

Two buildings in Central declared dangerous •••••••••••••••••••••«•••• 10

The Labour Relations Service helped to settle 290 labour disputes in

May................................................................... 11

Water supply to certain premises in Kwai Chung and Central will be interrupted......................................................  .... 12

Commission of Inquiry appointed to inquire into anti-bribery ordinance ...................................................................... 13

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Wednesday, June 1}, 1975

- 1 -

DEPORT OF TELEPHONE SERVICES ADVISORY COMMITTEE

***********

The expansion plans of the Hong Kong Telephone Company have been described as Htoo conservative and follow proven demand rather than in assessing demand and meeting it as it arises."

In its report for 1972, the Advisory Committee on Telephone Services says that unless the company alters its existing policy, the number of people waiting for lines will not be substantially reduced#

At the end of 1972, the number of telephones per 100 people had increased from 17 to 19-but the cumulative waiting list stood at 58,271, compared with 51>177 the previous year - showing a wider gap between supply and demand.

Speaking at a news conference this afternoon, the Chairman of the Advisory Committee, Mr. P.C. Woo, pointed out that the situation was more critical in the three new industrial towns of Kwun Tong, Yau Tong and Kwai Chung.

He noted, however, that a new telephone exchange at Yau Tong and an extension of the present Kwai Chung telephone exchange were due to come into operation this summer and autumn and this would relieve the situation to a certain extent.

"Problems connected with the telephone directory again taxed the committee’s time and attention,” Mr. Woo said.

/It was ••••••

Wednesday, June 1J, 1973

- 2 -

It was thought that the telephone directory should be split alphabetically in the English edition and by character stroke in the Chinese edition rather than by geographical division as at present.

The method of distribution of the directories was also regarded as unsatisfactory and the company is now investigating a new system whereby subscribers could indicate their requirements by completing a form inserted in the telephone bill for the final quarter.

A special sub-committee was set up during the year to study the Telephone Ordinance in order to make recommendations for its revision.

Another sub-committee — on telephone services in rural areas — completed fundamental groundwork on the requirement and development of tclexaone services in the New Territories.

To assist in solving the technological side of this problem, Mr. Woo said, sites have been approved by the government for the company to install a micro-wave telephone system in the New Territories which would dispense with the difficulty of laying miles of trunk cables to connect with telephone exchanges.

,JWe hope this would expedite the company’s development plans in the area,” he added.

0 - -

Wednesday, June 13, 1973

- 3 -

QUEEN ELIZABETH HOSPITAL IN ITS TENTH YEAH

**********

Queen Elizabeth Hospital, one of the biggest in the Commonwealth, is now in its tenth year of operation, and learning to cope with pressures undreamed of when it opened in 19&3*

The number of beds in the hospital at that time was 1,338, and this figure remained about the same until 19&7. Then the complement was increased to 1,481 to meet a growing demand for admission through the casualty section.

Small increases in the bed complement were made in the next two years, for the same reason, until the total of beds reached 1,525. It then became impossible to put additional normal-size beds into the wards because of physical limitations.

Metal camp beds of smaller size with sorbo rubber mattresses were introduced, and this innovation made it possible for the number of beds to be increased to the present figure of 1,893.

’’But since the hospital does not refuse admission of cases whenever recommended by medical officers in the casualty section, even 1,898 beds are sometimes not enough,” a spokesman said.

At times, canvas folding beds are brought into service. In the past few months, it has not been unusual to have 70 or more patients in a ward originally designed for 31.

/Approximately •••••••

Wednesday, June 13, 1975

Approximately 76 per cent of all admissions in 1972 came through the casualty section. This section is open 24 hours a day. During 1972, attendance was on an average of 526 patients a day, or one patient every 2*7 minutes.

Clinical units at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital include three surgical, three medical, two obstetrical and gynaecological, two orthopaedic, two paedriatric, one radiotherapy and one neurosurgical. In addition, there are four smaller units covering ear, nose and throat, ophthalmology, dermatology and dental.

There are six operating theatre suites, each consisting of two major and one minor theatre. There are also three delivery suites for maternity cases.

The hospital has the usual ancillary departments such as radiology, pathology, pharmacy, central sterile supply, physiotherapy, occupational therapy, central kitchen, milk kitchen, and laundry.

The central kitchen serves about 5,000 meals a day, and the laundry processes as many as 1,680,000 pieces a month.

The hospital is served by a consultants’ out-patient clinic located in a separate building from the main hospital. Patients seen here are referred from doctors in private practice, and other government clinics, for an opinion or admission.

The decision to build the hospital was taken in 1952. In March 1959, Prince Philip, the Duke of Edinburgh, laid the foundation stone.

/Two Public ••••••

Wednesday, June 13, 1973

- 5 -

Two Public Works Department architects, Mr. Edwin Wong and

Mr. John Hirstf were presented the Royal Institute of British Architects’ Bronze Medal Award for 1963 for their design of the hospital.

The medal is presented for a building of exceptional merit.

The complex occupies a 30-aere site on a small hill in the centre of Kowloon peninsula. It cost 349.1^0,000 to build, and 314,500,000 to furnish and equip, including a donation of 36,000,000 from the Royal Hong Kong Jockey Club for the Radiological Institute. The hospital admitted its first patient in Deeember < 1963.

Npte to Editors: You are invited to attend an ’’open day” at the

Queen Elizabeth Hospital on Friday, June 15, at 2.15 p.m. The timing of the tour coincides with the visiting hour, and this will give the press an idea of the pressure generated by the arrival and departure of hundreds of visitors. The press, including radio and TV, will assemble at that time in the hall within the main entrance to the hospital, where they will be met by the Medical Superintendent, the Chief Hospital Secretary, and the Senior Hospital Secretary. A tour of the casualty section, wards, and certain departments will follow. Pictures will be possible, provided close-ups are avoided out of deference to the privacy of patients. The ’’open day” will end with tea and questions in the staff canteen.

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/6..........

Wednesday, June 13, 1973

- 6 -

FUTURE PLANS TO INCREASE CULTURAL ACTIVITIES

**********

The Chairman of the Urban Council, Mr. A. de 0. Sales, today gave the public, an insight into some of the ’’exciting” plans and projects envisaged by the Council.

He told a luncheon meeting of the Soroptomists Club about a long - advocated cultural complex for Kowloon which he describes as an ’’ambitious scheme,” but well within Hong Kong’s means.

lie said that it would be, in effect, a prestigious civic centre meeting the community’s needs for decades to come.

lir. de Sales also strongly criticised ’’itinerants” who described Hong Kong as a ’’cultural desert”.

’’Nothing gives the lie more eloquently to this derrogatory statement tnan the facts and figures available monthly to all who want to see them.

’•Indeed, it is not even necessary* to go so fab as to examine these returns because our press carries daily a list of happenings in the City Hall and other places, in addition to which tfyere are reports and reviews published monthly,” Mr. de Sales said.

He pointed out that the Urban Council presented many entertainment and educational programmes in both the City Hall and at other locations.

Last year, for example, there were in the City Hall no less f->an 708 performances made up of 221 concerts and recitals, 173 plays, 4-3 ballet and other dance presentations, 65 variety shows, 10 hi-fi concerts and 198 film shows. ’ .....

/’’And, .......

Wednesday, June 1J, 1973

- 7 -

’’And, well over a million people attended all these activities.” he said.

Mr- de Sales explained that it was the council’s intention to sponsor an even greater variety of cultural presentations and that it will continue to enlarge the scope of cultural interest in Hong Kong and, in the process, it will give an opportunity to local talent to develop. It is hoped also to attract more overseas artists of standing to perform locally.

With Hong Kong’s growing affluenoe more opportunities for education and far greater exposure through modern media of communication, it is inevitable that the expectation of the people for a better life must likewise rise as it does virtually everywhere else, Mr. de Sales said, ’Tor this reason, the council must never stand still, it must always keep moving forward.

JJThe aim,” he said ”is to educate and entertain, to give joy and pleasure, to encourage and develop. The purpose is to support cultural activities in the interest of the community as a whole and to afford the opportunity previously lacking for Hong Kong talent to develop.”

Note to Editors: Copies of the full text are boxed tonight.

-----•- 0-------- i

/8........

V

Wednesday, June 13» 1973

- 8 -

BUSINESSMEN HELP PROVIDE SECONDARY SCHOOLS «*«*»**»**

The Director of Education, Mr. J. Canning today paid tribute to successful businessmen in Hong Kong for their public spirited attitude in matters of education.

He was speaking at the foundation stone laying ceremony of the Hod. Ping Chamber of Commerce Secondary School in Ho Man Tin.

Ur. Canning said: "It is in keeping with the best Chinese traditions of public service, in keeping with the tradition that those who are successful should help those less fortunate and I would like to thank all those.responsible for this school."

He pointed out that the school was "another example of the splendid co-operation that exists between the government.and the voluntary agencies in Hong Kong in their joint endeavour to provide secondary schools for our community."

The immense amount of time, effort and money given to education by organisations such as the Hoi Ping Chamber of Commerce was not sufficiently appreciated in Hong Kong, he added. ............

Work on the new school project is progressing smoothly and it is. expected to be finished in September this year.

The Hoi Ping Chamber of Commerce already operates a primary school catering for some 2,000 pupils.

-------0---------

/9..........

Wednesday, June 151 1975

- 9 -

KENNEDY TOWN SWIMMING COMPLEX - READY NEXT SEASON

Work on the largest swimming pool complex on Hong Kong Island, at a site formerly occupied by the Kennedy Town cattle quarantine depot, is progressing well.

A spokesman for the Public Works Department said today that the complex should be completed shortly before the start of the next swimming season.

Construction of the filtration plant room, menial staff quarters and the swimming pool sub-structure have been completed, while the structural frame work of the main building itself, including a covered spectator stand for 800 people and a covered refreshment area, changing and toilet facilities, is almost finished.

The swimming pool complex, capable of accommodating up to 4,000 people at one time, is designed to take both fresh and sea water so it can be used even in times of acute water shortage.

It comprises two 50-metre pools, a diving pool, a paddling pool and a water-play area for children;

It is similar to its counterparts at Kwun Tong, Lei Cheng Uk and Horse Park, except that teaching pools have been omitted because of the restricted area of the site.

However, one of the 50-metre pools can be roped off for teaching < purposes.

/The whole

Wednesday, June 13, 1973

- 10 -

The whole project, costing about 38 million, is being built with funds donated by the Royal Hong Kong Jockey Club.

When completed early next year, the complex will provide much-needed recreational facilities for people in the densely-populated Western district.

Public swimming pools are very popular and the six ’district pools* managed by the Urban Council attracted over 3.6 million swimmers during the year 1972/73.

Note to Editors: Copies of a photograph showing an

artist’s impression of the complex are boxed this evening.

-------0---------

BUILDINGS DECLARED DANGEROUS

The Building Authority today declared 221 Wing Lok Street and 57

Bonham Strand West on Hong Kong Island to be in a dangerous condition.

The Principal Government Building Surveyor said that these four-storey pre-war buildings had been under observation for a considerable period following the demolition of adjoining dangerous buildings.

Fresh movement had recently occurred in the walls giving rise to a risk of collapse. Notices of intention to apply for closure orders in

Victoria District Court at 9.30 a.m. on July 25 were posted today.

-------0---------

/11

Wednesday, June 13, 1973

11

290 LABOUR PROBLEMS SETTLED IN MAY

**«**««**

The Labour Relations Service of the Labour Department last month helped settle 290 disputes*

Disclosing this today, the head of the service, Mr. T.F. Tsui, said that as a result of agreements reached, 681 employees had received a total of $5291,255.

Of this total, just over 83 per cent was paid by employers as outstanding wages, payment in lieu of notice, statutory holiday pay and bonuses.

The remaining 16.9 per cent or $49,306 was paid, apart from legal entitlements, as severance pay and other ex-gratia payments to employees.

Mr. Tsui said: ’’Officers of the Labour Relations Service also handled 1,492 consultations and enquiries about labour laws, industrial relations and personnel management.

,:Thoy visited 22 establishments to help employers introduce joint consultative machinery to strengthen communication between labour and management,” he said.

-------0---------

Wednesday, June 13, 1973

- 12 -

WATER CUTS IN CENTRAL AND KWAI CHUNG

Water supply to a number of premises in Kwai Chung and in Central District on Hong Kong Island will be cut off for eight hours from 10 p<m. on Friday (June 15) to 6 a.m. the next morning*

The temporary stoppages are to allow staff of the Waterworks Office to make a fresh water connection at the junction of Ta Cheun Ping Street and Shek Kin Street in Kwai Chung and to add an additional valve in Central, as well as connecting pipes.

The places affected in Kwai Chung are King Land Industrial Building^ Mercantile Godown, Ying Fung Distillery Building, Kin Ming Building, Wah Fung Dyeing Building, Central Industrial Building, the Oriental Industrial Building, the Sun Manufactory Ltd. and Wo Fung Industrial Building, all in Ta Cheun Ping Street.

On the Island, areas affected will be Des Voeux Road Central, No. 60-78 including Man Yee Building; Queen’s Road Central, No. 67-85 and Queen Victoria Street, No. 2-16.

-------0---------

/15..........

Wednesday, June 13, 1973

- 13 -

COMMISSION OF INQUIRY INTO ANTI-BRIBERY ORDINANCE

********

The Governor in Council has today (Wednesday) appointed the

Hon. Mr. Justice Blair-Kerr, as the Commissioner of a Commission of

Inquiry with the following terms of reference:-

(a) To report on the circumstances in which a person, whose prosecution under the Prevention of Bribery Ordinance was at an advanced stage of consideration, was able to leave Hong Kong.

(b) In the light of experience of the working of the Prevention of Bribery Ordinance, and having regard also to the need to preserve basic human rights under the law, to:

(i) report on the effectiveness of the Ordinance and to suggest amendments;

(ii) to suggest any other changes in current arrangements considered necessary.

The Hon. Mr• Justice Blair-Kerr will be the only member of the Commission; ho has been asked to report on the first term of reference within three weeks and the second term of reference within three months.

It has been left entirely to the discretion of the Commissioner

whether any part of the hearings are held in public.

- - 0 - -

Release Time: p.m.

PRH 7

IbKliwI jGISl I W|

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Thursday, June 14, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No,

A manual of safe working practices has been published by the Marine Department in an effort to reduce the risk of accidents

in shipbuilding and ship-repairing industries.................. 1

Newly appointed commission of inquiry calls for information from the public..........................•...................   4

People who have the right to land in Hong Kong are urged to apply for appropriate endorsement in their travel documents ................................................................ 5

The Census and Statistics Department is conducting a survey on industrial employment and vacancies for the second quarter

of 1973 ........................................................ 6

A new map board has been built at Silvermine Bay to assist visitors to Lantau and adjacent islands...............• •....... 7

Residents of Cheung Chau will have a new post office on Monday ................................................................ 8

Threo lots of Crown land will be put on sale on June 29 •••• 8

An exhibition of the works of six famous 1’fcendh photographers

will be held in the City Hall for one month •••••••••••••••• 9

140 firemen and ambulancemen will take part in a passing out parade on Saturday...........................................   10

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Thursday, June 14, 1973

1 -

REDUCIIIG ACCIDENT RISKS IN SHIPBUILDING AND

SHIPREPAIRING INDUSTRIES

**********

A comprehensive manual of safe working practices has been produced by the Marine Department in an effort to reduce the risk of accidents in Hong Kong’s shipbuilding and ship-repairing industries.

The guide aims at establishing a high degree of safety throughout these industries. It lists a wide variety of potential hazards and furnishes practical advice on ways to overcome them.

It was prepared by a working party comprising representatives of the Marine, Labour and Fire Services departmentstand shipping, shipbuilding and ship-repair companies.

The working party was set up in September 1971 following a number of explosions and fires in recent years on board ships, either under construction or repair.

The new code of safe working practices incorporates an earlier volume released in October last year, and is being published as one consolidated volume.

Following a recommendation by the Commission of Inquiry which investigated the fire on board the ’’Jumbo” floating restaurant in October 1971, an Industrial Safety Division is to be set up within the Marine Department.

This recommendation was endorsed by the Marine Court investigating the 1 ’Seawise University” fire last year, and accepted by the government.

/Meanwhile, .......

Thursday, June 14, 1973

- 2 -

Meanwhile, two shipping safety officers have been appointed to deal with safety of working conditions and practices and the precautions to bo exercised on board ships. And others are being recruited.

New legislation was introduced in March this year providing that no repairs on vessels over 300 tons can be undertaken without prior permission from the Director of Marine. Vessels in the precincts of a dockyard or floating dry dock are at present excluded from the legislation.

Failure to comply with this renders a person liable on conviction, to a maximum fine of 84,000 and six months* imprisonment.

The recommendations contained in the guide are to form the basis on which permission will be given for ship repairs, in addition to any other conditions the Director of Marine nay impose.

In order to achieve an acceptable standard of safety, it is imperative that all those concerned in the shipping, shipbuilding and ship-repair industries obtain copies of the guide.

Ocean-going vessels arriving in Hong Kong for repair for the first time will also require the safety guide.

Copies of the guide will be on sale at the Government Publications Centre, Star Ferry Concourse, and at the Marine Department reception counter as from tomorrow (Friday) at 33 a copy.

Written in simple English and illustrated, the guide consists of 11 sections, each dealing with a particular aspect of ship safety. The sections are further sub-divided into chapters specifically for manngpment., supervisors and workers.

/Translation

Thursday, June 14, 1973

- 3 -

Translation of the code into Chinese is now underway and is expected to be completed within six months.

Instructions for supervisors and workers will be extracted and printed separately in the form of pocketsize booklets which will be distributed free of charge.

Copies of the English version of the supervisors booklet will be ready by about July 1. The workers booklet, which will be in Chinese only, will be available after the full guide in Chinese has been published.

-------0---------

Thursday, June 14, 1973

- 4 -

COMMISSION OF INQUIRY CALLS FOR ASSISTANCE FROM THE PUBLIC

********

The newly appointed Commission of Inquiry is calling for public assistance in its investigations into the circumstances in which a person, being investigated for alleged corruption, was able to leave Hong Kong,

Anyone who may have information relevant to this matter is urged to report the details as soon as possible to the Commissioner, the Hon. Mr. Justice Blair-Kerr, Supreme Court, Hong Kong.

Ihe Commission stresses that it has to report, to the Governor on the first term of reference within three weeks and for this reason representations must be submitted as q matter of urgency.

The Commissioner has been asked to report to the Governor on the second term of reference, which relates to the effectiveness of the Prevention of Bribery Ordinance, within three months.

Representations on this aspect are also required as early as possible.

The inquiry will involve the recording of evidence and will be held in Mr. Justice Blair-Kerr’s own court in the Supreme Court Building.

Evidence given by any person before the Commissioner will be privileged, and will not be admissable against the person giving evidence in any civil or criminal proceedings, except where he is charged with an offence under the Perjury Ordinance or for any action which would amount to contempt of court if the proceedings were an ordinary trial.

The full terms of reference of the Commission of Inquiry are:

(a) To report on the circumstances in which a person whose prosecution under the Prevention of Bribery Ordinance was, at an advanced stage of consideration, able to leave Hong Kong.

/(b) In the ••••••••

Thursday, June 14, 1973

4a

(b) In the light of experience of the working of the Prevention of Bribery Ordinance, and having regard also to the need to preserve basic human rights under the law, to

(i) report on the effectiveness of the Ordinance and to suggest amendments;

(ii) to suggest any other changes in current arrangements considered necessary.

- - 0 - -

/5

Thursday, June 14, 1973

- 5 -

IMMIGRATION PROCEDURES FOR PEOPLE WITH "RIGHT TO LAND"

********

The Director of Immigration, Mr. W.E. Collard, today urged people with the right to land in Hong Kong to apply for an appropriate endorsement in their travel document to facilitate immigration procedures when travelling abroad.

Without the proper endorsement, he said, these persons would be required to prove their claim every time they wished to travel abroad and this might result in unnecessary delay <>

Mr. Collard said it was up to those who claimed the right to land to prove their claim.

They could do this by applying for an endorsement in their travel document on production of documentary proof of their right and payment of a S3 fee*

Those who have the right to land in Hong Kong are British subjects who were born, naturalised, or registered in Hong Kong, or are married to or the child of such a person; and "United Kingdom belongers" and "Chinese residents" who have resided in Hong Kong continuously for seven years.

Application forms for a right to land endorsement may be obtained from all Immigration Department offices. Copies will be sent by post on request which may be made by telephoning 5-^56063, extensions 200, 236, or 237*

-------0---------

/6.........

Thursday, June i4, i97>

V • > - 6 -EMPLOYMENT SURVEY IN INDUSTRY *******

A survey of employment and vacancies in registered and recorded industrial establishments for the second quarter of 1973 is being carried out by the Census and Statistics Department on behalf of the Labour Departmentc Printed employment return cards were sent to managements of all industrial establishments which have been registered with or recorded by the Labour Department on June 11, 1973* They were requested to provide the information sought as of tomorrow (Friday) and to return promptly the cards in the reply-paid envelopes attached, to the Census and Statistics Department on or before next Tuesday (June 19),

The numbers employed and vacancies in each of the main industries in Hong Kong will be compiled from the information collected. These statistics wil] provide up-to-date information on employment as wel I as employment trends over the years*

Mr, K.W.J. Topley, the Commissioner for Census and Statistics, said it was hoped that all managements who had received the cards wovld complete them accurately and return them promptly to his department.

During the last survey carried out by the Labour Department in March this year,the overall response rate was 6j per cent, but the response from the larger industrial establishments was 100 per cent,

"This could be further improved if all establishments, particularly the smaller ones, would respond promptly to the survey'1, Mr, Topley said. He stressed that the information provided would be kept strictly

confidential and would only be used for the preparation of statistical summaries-The cards will be destroyed under supervision after the relevant information has been extracted and summarised, • •• - .....

Thursday, June 14, 1973

1®/ GUIDE TO TOURISTS CM LANTAU

A special tourist guide for visitors to Lantau Island, highlighting the various features of the island, has been erected at Silvermine Bay.

Financed by the Hong Kong Tourist Association and designed in conjunction with the District Office, Islands, the map is the first of its Izlnd to be built in the New Territories for both local visitors and overseas tourists.

The map board, measuring about seven feet high and six feet wide, is protected from the weather by an overhanging roof finished with Chinese tiles*

All the land areas, including islands adjacent to Lantau, arc depicted in raised moulded concrete. Place names, roads, paths, picnic spots, temples, beaches, public telephones, police and fire stations and hospitals are clearly marked.

Tomorrow (Friday) a ceremony will be held at Silvermine Bay during which the Chairman of the Mui Wo Rural Committee, Mr. Tsang Lin, and the Executive Director of the Hong Kong Tourist Association, Mr. Jolin Payne, will jointly unveil the map board. . ..

Note to Editors: Tou are invited to send a representative to

cover the opening ceremony to be held at Silvermine Bay Ferry Pier at 11 a.m. tomorrow (Friday). The launch "Sir Cecil Clementi" will take the press to Mui Wo, leaving the Marine Department Pier (Central) at 9.^5 a.m. Light refreshments will be provided. Mr. Hanny Lee, Assistant Information Officer of N.T.A., will be present to help the press.

Thursday, June 14, 1973

- 8 -

NEW POST OFFICE ON CHEUNG CHAU *********

A new post office will open on Monday (June 18) to provide bettor postal services for residents of Cheung Chau Island.

Situated at 12, Tung Wan Road, the new office will have all types of postal facilities, including a 10 cent stamp vending machine, which will operate day and night.

Insured letters and boxes? however, will not be accepted.

On Monday at 10 a.m.., the Chairman of the Cheung Chau Rural Committee, Mr. Chau Li Ping, will officiate at the opening ceremony.

The existing post office at School Road will be closed after business on Saturday (June 16).

Tho opening hours of the new office will be from 9 a.m. to

1 p*m. and 2.15 p»m. to 5 p»m. on weekdays and from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturdays.

-------0----------

RESIDENTIAL LAND FOR SxLE AT KWUN TONG

*********

Two areas of Crown land in Kwun Tong, for residential development will be put up for auction on Friday, June 29.

Both lots are in Kung Lok Road - one has an area of 22,5^0 square feet and the other 20,520 square feet.

Another lot of Crown land, with an area of 1,107 square feet, in Shanghai Street will be sold for non—industrial purposes at the same auction.

The auction will be held at 2.50 p.m. in the Lecture Room, 8th floor, City Hall. ---------------------------------0----------

/9.........

Thursday, June 14, 1973

- 9 -

FRENCH PHOTOGRAPHIC EXHIBITION

*******

About 80 photographs by well-known contemporary French masters in photography will be put on display in the City Museum and Art Gallery tomorrow (Friday) for one month.

They are the works of six famous photographers who were all born at the beginning of the 20th century*

A spokesman for the City Museum and Art Gallery says these men have witnessed the strains on human society under the forces of sotial* economical and political changes. Their world*wide experience and "rich feelings” are expressed through the medium of photography and they have faithfully recorded the situation of man in these ’’dynamic years”*

The exhibition is jointly presented by the Urban Council and the Alliance Francaise de Hong Kong.

-------0---------

/10.........

Thursday, June 14, 1973

- 10 -

PASSING OUT PARADE FOR FIREMEN

******

A passing out parade for 140 firemen and ambulancemen will be held at the Fire Services Training School at Fan Kam Road, Pat Heung, New Territories, at 10 a.m. on Saturday (June 16).

Major General E.J.S. Burnett, Deputy Commander, Land Forces, will inspect the men on parade.

The ceremony will be followed by a display of fire service equipment and fire-fighting techniques.

Note to Editors: You are invited to have the event covered.

The Fire Services have arranged a press vehicle (School Bus No. AM2124) to leave the Tsim Sha Tsui Fire Station, Canton Road, for the school at 8.30 a.m. on Saturday (June 16).

-------0---------

Release Time: 7.^5 p,m.

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Friday> June 15» 1973

CONTENTS

Page No.

New Territories bus routes will be reshaped and expanded to provide inproved services......... 1

The Commerce and Industry Department assures the public over present position of rice supplies ••••••••••••••••••••••••••• J

Sixty per cent of the students at the two universities will be receiving financial assistance by 1978 ••••••••••••••>••••••• 4

A multi-million-dollar elevated road will be built to relieve traffic congestion at Argyle Street, Waterloo Road and Princess

Margaret Road •.••••••••••••••••••••,..........................  6

A speed limit will be imposed on Lantau Island on Monday • 7

Another building in the Kotewall Road landslide area re-opened ..........•......................................      8

The Urban Council organising summer swimming courses for young people •••••••••«••••....................................        9

Second Urban Council stadium will be opened tomorrow •••••••• 10

Facilities at the Electrical and Mechanical Office in Caroline Hill to be expanded •........................................ 11

A clerk in the Labour Department retires after 23 years of service ............................................................... 12

Two buildings in Wing Lok Street in Central have been declared dangerous ..................................................    13

The Heung Yee Kuk goodwill delegation leaves for London on Sunday »••«•••••••••••••»•••••••••..........................    14

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

* '• 1*7 7 " d.VlM

Friday, June 15» 1973

- 1 -

IMPROVED BUS SERVICES FOR THE NEW TERRITORIES

*«*«*«:*

Bus services in the New Territories are to be reshaped and expanded to cope with the increasing population and demand for services.

At the same time, the fare structure for KMB routes in the New Territories will be revised tp allow for a number of increases and reductions.

The changes will come into effect on July 16 under an order by the Governor-in-Council which is published in today's gazette.

The plans for reshaping and expanding bus routes in the New Territories were produced by the Kowloon Motor Bus Company, in consultation with the Transport Department, and are supported by the Heung Yee Kuk.

As from July 16, the number of bus routes will be increased from 36 to 48 and the frequency on most routes will be stepped up. Another 91 double deckers and three single deckers will be added to the NT fleet of 226 buses, making a total of 320 (205 single deckers and 115 double deckers).

These vehicles are already available and no buses will need to be withdrawn from urban routes

In addition, two long-distance express services will be introduced from Kowloon to Yuen Long and Sheung Shui. These routes will be served by a new type of double deck coach with more room and more comfortable seats.

The coaches will be able to carry a maximum of 65 passengers, but no standing passengers will be permitted®

Work is now in progress to remove overhanging branches from roadside trees to enable the double deck coaches to pass through.

/Commenting........

Friday, June 15, 1973

- 2 -

Commenting on the fare revision, a government spokesman said the aim was to ’’rationalise’’ bus fares in the New Territories*

There would be 141 increases in fares and 14 reductions while 44 would remain unchanged, he said.

The average increase will be 10 cents. The highest increase will be cents while the highest reduction in fare will be 40 cents.

’’These changes will mean that KMB ceases to operate its New Territories service at a loss of about $4.5 million.”

An up-to-date schedule of services for both Kowloon and the New Territories giving full details of the fare revisions will be published in a ’’Gazette Extraordinary” on Monday (June 18).

-------o----------

/3........

Friday, June 15, 1973

- 3 -

NO CAUSE FOR ALARM OVER RICE SUPPLIES

*«**»^**«*

The Commerce and Industry Department said today there is no reason for the public to feel alarmed over the present position regarding rice supplies.

A spokesman for the department pointed out that Hong Kong had never been solely dependent on rice supplies from Thailand, but also imported from China, Australia and the United States.

"As China is our nearest supplier, and China rice is particularly popular here, it would be quite natural for imports from China to increase, if supplies from other sources are curtailed,” the spokesman said.

He emphasised that Hong Kong rice importers could obtain supplies from any part of the world.

Hong Kong’s annual requirements — in the region of 54-0,000 tons — were only ”a drop in the ocean” compared with other countries where rice is the staple food, the spokesman said.

”We are confident, therefore, that supplies can be maintained at a satisfactory level.

He added that the government exercised stringent control over the rice trade to ensure that the control scheme is not abused and prices are maintained at a reasonable level.

At the same time, however, there was currently a world—wide shortage which had caused rice prices to increase sharply, and this must inevitably affect Hong Kong.

However, increases elsewhere to some extent could be ’’cushioned” because of the stocks that importers were required to maintain under the control scheme.

Friday, June 15, 1973

- 4 -

SIXTY PERCENT OF UNIVERSITY STUDENTS

TO RECEIVE FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE

********

The Secretary of the University and Polytechnic Grants Committee, iir» S.F. Bailey, said today that some 60 percent of the students at the two universities would be receiving financial assistance by the time the new tuition fees are fully operative in 1978•

Speaking at a luncheon of the Kowloon North Rotary Club, Mr. Bailey said that already the percentage of the total student body who were assnsted under the student finance scheme had risen from its original 33 per cent in 1969 to 54 per cent during the current academic year.

He added that grants awarded under the scheme now averaged $1,245 a year for each of the 2,9&7 students assisted in this way, while interest-free loans provided to 3,196 students averaged out at $2,890 each.

”Moreover the way the scheme is organised we can change the figures whenever we want to,” he pointed out. ”We already feed in a cost-of-living element into the loan allocations. We can raise or lower the amounts according to the students’ actual resources. And whenever the fees change we can run this into the calculations too, and go on providing the assistance actually needed whatever happens to the fees.

”It is because of this that we can say, quite categorically, and have been saying for some time, that no student who really cannot afford the new fees in full will have to pay the new fees in full, and those who cannot afford then at all will not have to pay them at al1»

/’•The only •••••••••

Friday, June 15, 1973

- 5 -

"The only students who will suffer - if suffering is the right word - will be the wealthier students who can afford to pay. And even they will still be getting a substantial subsidy of roughly 313,000 per year which comes from the fact that the new full tuition fee will still only be about 12 percent of the actual cost."

Explaining the background to the fee increases, which would only affect new students starting courses next year, Mr. Bailey pointed out that the fees being charged today - and which would go on being charged for some students until 1978 - were set 12 years ago.

"No one," he added, "needs to be reminded that in the last 12 years costs - and incomes - have risen somewhat. Costs AND incomes."

He stressed that tuition fees were decided by the universities themselves, and not by the government or the University and Polytechnic Grants Committee. The University Councils had to be reasonably convinced it was the right thing to do before altering them.

Referring to the Joint Universities Committee on Student Finance, he remarked that it would be fair to say the student aid scheme was managed mainly by university people and that students - who were chosen by the student unions and not by himself or the Vice-Chancellors - made up half of them. • > ------------------------------------o---------

/6.........


Friday, June 15, 1973

- 6 -

ELEVATED ROAD FOR ARGYLE STREET

*********

The intersection at Argyle Street and Waterloo Road will have a now look by April 1975 with the addition of an elevated road which will run above the existing Princess Margaret Road flyover.

By then, traffic will be carried on three separate levels — on the ground and the two flyovers — without interference.

When completed, the 1600-foot long elevated road will greatly relievo traffic congestion at the junction of Argyle Street, Waterloo Road and Princess Margaret Road.

The three-lane elevated road, costing more tlian £20 million, will provido a free flowing facility for through traffic along Argyle Street in both directions.

All major turning movements will be provided for at ground level and, together with pedestrian crossings, will be controlled by a comprehensive traffic signal installation.

Tenders for the project are now being called and the work should start in August and take about 21 months to complete.

Note to Editors: Photographs of a model of the elevated roadway

are boxed today.

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/7.........

Friday, June 159 1973

- 7 -

20 M.P.H. SPEED LIMIT ON LANTAU

**********

Speed restrictions will be introduced for the first time on Lantau Island starting from Monday (June 18).

With effect from 10 a.m. on that day, vehicles travelling along certain sections of South Lantau Road and Tai 0 Road will be limited to a speed of 20 miles an hour#

A spokesman for the Transport Department explained that various parts of the island roads wore narrow and steep with sharp bends, and it vzas necessary to impose a speed limit for safety reasons, especially where the roads pass through villages.

The sections of road affected pass through villages at Pui 0, Tong Fule and Shui Hau and cover a total distance of about 2/a miles.

Two other sections leading from the concourses at Mui Wo and Tai 0 are included because they are busy pedestrian ways near ferries.

At the beginning of this month, special measures were introduced to restrict the number of vehicles entering island to prevent the overcrowding of the limited road system on Lantau.

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Friday, June 15, 1975

- 8 -

LANDSLIDE BUILDING RE-OPENED

**********

Another building in the Kotewall Road area damaged in the landslide last June has been declared safe for occupation -- leaving only 21, Po Shan Road and half of Block one of Emerald Gardens still to be reopened.

The building is Skyline Mansion at 51, Conduit Road.

In a statement issued today, the Principal Government Building Surveyor said that the repair and reconstruction works to the building had been satisfactorily completed.

The stabilisation work to the hillside at the rear and side has also progressed to the stage where it is considered that the building can be safely occupied.

ihe notice of expiry of the closure order was posted on the building at 5 p»m. today.

0 -------

Friday, June 15, 1973

- 9 -

LEARNING TO SWIM - URBAN COUNCIL STYLE

********

The Urban Council announced today that swimming courses wi11 again be organised this summer at four of the public swimming pools managed by the council,

A spokesman for the Urban Council said today that this year’s scheme is basically designed to cater for office and factory workers and .young people who do not have other opportunities of taking swimming lessons*

No tuition fee will be charged this year as the council considers the scheme is a ’commitment* to the people of Hong Kong.

’’Three main types of swimming courses will be offered this summer,” he continued, ”a beginners* course for non-swimmers; an intermediate course for those who are not strong swimmers but who can swim about 25 metres; and an advanced course for swimmers who can swim 100 metres free-style.”

Swimming classes will be given either at Lei Cheng Uk, Kowloon Tsai or Kwun Tong swimming pools in Kowloon or Victoria Park swimming pool on Hong Kong.

’’Courses will be provided in two separate series, the first of which will start on June 25 and the second on July 30® Each course will last for five weeks and participants -are required to attend three 45-minute sessions each week,” he said.

Application forms are obtainable at all public swimming pools and City District Offices. Completed forms should be handed in person to one of the four swimming pools of the applicant’s choice.,

More than 1,000 people attended the Urban Council’s ’learn-to-swim’ courses last year, which had an 82 per cent success rating. This year it is intended to give swimming instruction to about 1,900 people.

? I? 'I *

Friday, June 15, 1973

- 10 -

NEW STADIUM IN KOWLOON TO BE OPENED

********

The first sports stadium in Kowloon to be operated by the Urban Council will be opened by Mr. A. de 0. Sales tomorrow (Saturday).

Formerly known as the Boundary Street Sports Ground, the site was converted into a stadium at a cost of $1,218,000 and renamed Mong Kok Stadium

Tomorrow’s ceremony will include a symbolic ’’kick-off” to mark the start of the Urban Council’s ’’Summer Youth Soccer League ’73” in which 30 teams will take part.

The stadium has seating capacity for 11,800 people, and it is the council’s second stadium, the first being the Hong Kong Stadium on the Island.

The Mong Kok stadium is expected to alleviate greatly the pressure on the Hong Kong Stadium for professional football matches and other sports.

Note to Editors: You are welcome to send a reporter/

photographer to cover the opening which is to take place at 3*00 p.m. tomorrow (Saturday).

The stadium is situated between Boundary Street and Flower Market Road.

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/11........

Friday, June 15, 1973

- 11 -

ELECTRICAL AND ME QIAN I CAL WORKSHOPS TO BE EXPANDED

********

The workshops and apprentice training facilities at the Electrical and Mechanical Office in Caroline Hill are to be expanded*

The project involves the construction of a single storey extension block and a five-storey building* Preliminary work on the project is expected to begin in the middle of next month.

This phase of the work will involve the demolition of a number of temporary brick buildings within the compound of the Caroline Hill workshop. At present they are used as offices and small workshops.

The site cleared will then be available for the expansion project* The single storey building will form an extension to the existing vehicle repair workshop and the five-storey block will house additional workshops and an expanded apprentice training workshop.

The new buildings will be constructed as soon as piling works are completed.

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Friday, June 15, 197J

• * * e •*

- 12 - „

RETIREMENT OF LABOUR DEPARTMENT OFFICER

********

To mark the retirement of Mr. Leung Yiu-kwong, after 23 years of service with the government, the Commissioner of Labour, Mr. Paul Tsui, today presented him with a retirement gift on behalf of his colleagues.

Mr. Leung joined the government as a temporary clerk in 1950 and attained his present position of clerk class I in 1968. He moved to the Labour Department in 1959.

During his service as clerk-in-charge, Industrial Safety Training Centre, he contributed much to the work of the centre and thus indirectly, to the promotion of industrial safety.

Mr• Leung is married with three children. He is currently on leave prior to retirement and will officially retire from government service on December 28.

Friday, June 15, 1975

-15-

TWO DANGEROUS BUILDINGS IN CENTRAL

**»!*«***«

The Building Authority today declared 209 and 211 Wing Lok. Street in Central District on Hong Kong Island to be in a dangerous condition*

Tho Principal Government Building Surveyor said that these threowstoroy pro*war buildings had been under observation for a considerable time following the demolition of adjoining-buildings.

Fresh movement has recently occurred in the walls giving riso to a risk of collapse.

Notices of intention to apply for Closure Orders in Victoria District Court at 9*50 a.m. on July 25 were posted today.

/14........

Friday, June 15, 1975

- U -

HEUNG YEE KUK DELEGATION TO LONDON

***********

Note to Mi tors: • The Heung Yee Kuk Goodv;i 1.1 Delegation to

Britain will leave for London on Sunday (June 17) evening.

Before the departure, the delegation will give a press conference in the V.I.P. press conference room on the ground floor of the airport terminal building, at 8.15 p.m.

Its leader, Mr. Chan Yat-sun, deputy leaders, Mr. Tang Nai-man and Mr. Stephen Wong, and the official spokesman for the delegation, Mr. Chan Po-fong will present.

. Also present will be the District ‘Commissioner, New Territories, Mr. I.F.C. Macpherson, and the Liaison officer, N.T.A*, Mr. C.C. Lo.

After the press conference, the members will board a bus outside the V.I.P. room for their plane.

You are invited to have the press conference and the departure covered.

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Release Time: 7*^5 p.m.

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Saturday, June 16, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No.

Vice Chancellor of the University of Hong Kong joins commission on teachers ..........................• ••••.................... 1

Young people can make significant contribution to clean Hong Kong and anti crime campaigns •••••••.................... 3

Tai Lam Chung reclamation for Tuen Mun motorway..............

Labour dispute involving some 120 workers settled amicably •• 5

A section of Argyle Street closed by recent rains ........... 6

Improved drainage for Sha Tin as part of new town development ................................................................ 7

Promotion for second government lottery ..................... 8

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Saturday, June 16, 1973

DR. RAYSON HUANG JOINS COMMISSION GN TEACHERS


The Vice-Chancellor of the University of Hong Kong, Dr. Rayson Listing Huang, has been appointed to the commission set up to examine the underlying causes of the recent Certificated Masters’ dispute.

He replaces the late Biship Francis Hsu, who died shortly after the commission was announced last month.

One of the University of Hong Kong’s most distinguished graduates, Dr. Huang was Vice-Chancellor of Nanyang University in Singapore before he returned to Hong Kong in September last year to take up his present post.

Dr. Huang is married with two sons aged 21 and 18. Born in Swatow, Kwantung Province, he moved to Hong Kong in 1925• Since completing his school education in 1938 at Munsang College, of which his father was headmaster, he lias been closely associated with the university world. As a Government Scholar, he then became a student at the University of Hong Kong, of which he holds the B.Ss, degree and the honorary degree of Doctor of Science.

He is a Doctor of Philosophy and Doctor of Science of Oxford University and Doctor of Science of the University of Malaya; and was engaged in university teaching and research during the 26 years before 19&9j including three and a half years at the University of Chicago and 10 as professor and head of the department of chemistry and for a period as Doan of the Faculty of Science at the University of Malaya.

He is the author of a large number of distinguished research papers published in learned journals, and has been an external examiner in chemistry at Hong Kong’s two universities.

/Since ......

Saturday, June 16, 1973

- 2 -

Since 1970 he has been President of the Association of Southeast

Asian Institutions cf Higher Learning.

Dr. Huang’s fellow members on the commission, which followed on

a settlement to the protracted negotiations on the pay scales of Certificated Masters, are Mr. T.K. Ann (Chairman) and Miss Bobbie M. Kotewall.

The commission’s term of reference are:

To examine the underlying causes of the dispute which arose between the Certificated Masters in government and aided schools and the government, including existing channels of communication and promotion prospects; and

To advise on what measures, apart from the newly announced salary scales, should be taken to obviate a recurrence of such a dispute affectirj teachers employed in government and aided schools.

Following Dr. Huang’s appointment, the commission has arranged, over the coming weeks, bo meet with various bodies who might be able to assist in their deliberations.

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/3........

Saturday, June 16, 1973

- 3 -

NEED FCP YOUNG PEOPLE TO HELP IN CAMPAIGNS *********

Young people can make a significant contribution to the ’’Keep Hong Kong Clean” and the ’Tight Violent Crime” Campaigns initiated by the government and the community.

Speaking to students at the graduation ceremony of the Ju Ching Chu English College today, the District Commissioner, New Territories, Mr. I.F.C. Macpherson, said he noted that the aim of the college was ’’cultivating useful citizenship.”

’Your education to date will go a long way towards fitting you for employment in the community, but formal education in itself does not make citizens out of you,” he said.

Mr Macpherson urged the students to do what they can to support the two public campaigns ”as a useful citizen >hould do in order to Flake Hong Kong a happier, cleaner and safer place to live in.”

Ju Ching Chu College was established in 1966 and now has an enrolment of 1,200 students.

It provides much needed educational facilities for the growing township of Tsuen Wan.

There are plans for a new school building and the government has agreed in principle to grant a free site for the project.

ffoty. to Editors: Copies of the full text in English are

boxed today.

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A..........

Saturday, June 16, 1973

RECLiU^TION FOR TUEN MUN MOTORWAY

********

A section of seashore near Tai Lnn Chung in the New Territories will bo reclaimed as part of a plan to construct a new six-lane motorway.

This high-capacity motorway, named Tuen Mun Road, will be sone nine miles long and will connect the two fast-developing towns of Tsuen Wan and Tuen Mun (Castle Peak).

The road will be constructed in two stages. The first stage includes the building of one three-lane carriageway over the whole length of the road and the building of both carriageways at certain locations.

One of those locations is at Tai Lam Chung where the road will cross the bay on a causeway.

This section of road will be about 2,200 feet long and will have a grade separated interchange at the western end.

Approaching the eastern end of the causeway, the existing Castle Peak Road will be realigned onto a reclaimed embankment stretching a quarter of a mile around Brothers Point.

The extent of the proposed works is described in detail in a notice in the latest government gazette.

Anyone having objections to the proposal or who has any claim of private right should submit them in writing to the Director of Public Worlds within two months of the date of gazetting.

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/5.........

Saturday, June 16, 1973

- 5 -

LABOUB DISPUTE SETTLED AMICABLY

*********

Some 120 daily and piece-rated workers of Arts Footwear Manufacturing Limited of Castle Peak have received a total of about 37OiOOO as severance pay and attendance bonuses following the closing down of the factory.

The payment was made yesterday at the San Po Kong Office of the Labour Relations Service of the Labour Department.

It brought to an end a dispute which arose, on May JO out of a prolonged lay-off of workers owing to the expiry of the lease on the factory premises.

The money was paid to workers in accordance with an agreement reached between the management and workers of the company after two sessions of conciliation meetings held at the Labour Department on May J1.

Under the agreement, workers received 20 days’ wages as severance pay. In addition, qualified workers in the gumming section received good attendance bonuses.

/6........

Saturday, June 16, 1973

- 6 -

RAIN CLOSES RO.'J) SECTION

********

A section of the westbound carriageway of Argyle Street has boon closed to traffic to facilitate emergency repairs to a hole in the road which has developed as a result of the recent rain.

The section of the carriageway affected is between Kowloon City Roundabout and the end of the down ramp of the flyover there.

Temporary traffic arrangements have been introduced to regulate vehicular traffic.

Vehicles going to Argyle Street from Kowloon City Roundabout will go via Prince Edward Road and Lomond Road. Those travelling to premises on the south side of Argyle Street between Fu Ning Street and Kowloon City Roundabout will have to go via the down ramp of the flyover.

K.M.B. bus routes 2At 2B 9» 9A and 1JD on westbound journeys have been diverted via Prince Edward Road and Lomond Road.

The emergency repair work is expected to take about six weeks.

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/7

Saturday, June 16, 1973

- 7 -

IMPROVED DRAINAGE FOR SHA TIN

**«««***

A large culvert, costing more than 35 million, will be constructed in Sha Tin as part of the public works programme to develop the new town.

It vn.11 serve as the main drain channelling off stormwater from the val 1 ey to the north-east of To Fung Shan as well as surface run-off from parts of the new town into Tide Cove.

The culvert, to be built in reinforced concrete, will consist of four cells, each measuring 8 feet by 9 feet and will be 1,100 feet long.

Construction work, to be supervised by consultant engineers, will begin next month and will take about 20 months to complete.

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D.I.B. ISSUE TOMORROW

**»***«*»

Note, to ;4ditorsi There will be an issue of the daily information

bulletin tomorrow (Sunday). It will be available for collection from the G.I.S. press room at 2.30 p»m. on that day.

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/8........

Saturday, June 16, 1973

- 8 -

PROMOTION FOR SECOND GOVERNMENT LOTTERY

*********

■^our well-known Radio Hong Kong personalities will be selling Government Lottery tickets at a temporary ticket selling booth in Statue Square on Monday (June 18) between 5 p.m. and 6 p.m.

They arc Miss Susanna Lung, Miss Elaine Sung, Miss Maria Lo, and Miss Lancie Yeung.

At the same time, another group of Radio Hong Kong artists wi11 perform a ’live drama’ on an open-air stage next to the selling booth as a way of promoting the sale of lottery tickets.

The winning numbers for the second government lottery this year will be drawn by the four personalities on June 23, at the City Hall Concert Hall.

By 12.00 noon today a total of 537,000 tickets had been sold. Ticket sales will close at 9 p.m. on Friday (June 22) at the Royal Hong Kong Jockey Club booth at the Star Fery Concourse.

Note to Editors: You are invited to send a reporter and/or

photographer to cover the event on Monday afternoon at the Statue Square, next to the Prince’s Building.

Release time: 2.30 p.m

- - 0 - -

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Sunday, June 17, 1973

GOVERNMENT HELPS OVERSEAS CHINESE

**********

The government is to increase its subsidy to Chinese literacy classes run by the local Chinese community in Britain as one way of retaining the cultural identity of their children.

Tiie classes, which operate on a part-time basis with emphasis on recognition of characters, were established in London and other major cities through the efforts of the local chamber of Chinese traders.

However, due to a lack of funds their development has been hampered and the Hong Kong Government Office in London has received representations for sone form of financial assistance.

At present, government help is limited to the provision of textboo’cs for classes in London and Middles-borough.

Under the expanded scheme, the government will provide a subsidy of up to £10 sterling per class per week to assist towards the cost of the teacherrs salary and such things as rent, as well as donating textbooks.

The estimated cost each year of the expanded scheme is about -340,000.

Based on a survey carried out in 1968, the estimated number of

Chinese people living in Britain was between 30,000 and 35,000 of whom about 90 per cent came from Hong Kong.

According to the Hong Kong Commissioner in London, Mr. M. Wright, one of the main problems facing the Chinese community is the difficulty of retaining their cultural identity and of preventing their children from becoming ignorant of the Chinese language.

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Sunday, June 17, 1975

- 2

URBAN council ward system «**«»****

Urban Councillors dealt with the individual problems of about 9,000 people last year.

These problems, concerning mainly hawker matters, public facilities and housing, were taken to the councillors in their 10 ward offices on Hong Kong Island and in Kowloon.

Zin Urban Council spokesman said that often matters outside the scope of the council were raised.

•’These are always noted down and promptly passed to the right authorities for action,n the spokesman pointed out.

The ward offices — four on Hong Kong Island and six in Kowloon —* are set up in some of the most densely populated areas of Hong Kong.

The spokesman urged people to take their complaints and problems to these ward offices.

The ward system was introduced in 19&5, aimed at giving members of the public an opportunity to discuss their problems at first hand with Urban Councillors.

This also gave councillors an opportunity to establish closer contact with the rm-in-the-street and to appreciate better their problems and grievances.

Urban Councillors attend ward offices regularly for meetings with anyone who wishes to see them.

Ward clerks, who are on the telephone, arrange times for such meetings.

The following is a list of the ward offices, the councillors attending them and the ward clerks and their telephone numbers.

URBAN COUNCIL

1>

Sunday, June 17, 1973

URBAN COUNCIL WARD OFFICES

District Ward Office Address Ward Clerk Urban Councillor

HONG KONG

Western Western Magistracy, Mr. TANG Yick-hong ) Mr. Henry H.L. Hu

3rd floor. Aberdeen Health Office, Island Road. (Tel. 5-460303) Mr. LAM Wing-chuen (Tel. 5-527156) ) Mr. Peter P.K. Ng ) ) )

Central Central Market, Mr. WOO Ting-chiu ) Mr. LO Tak-shing

Top floor. (Tel. 5-446111) ) Mr. Peter C.K. Chan

Wan Chai Health Office, Mr. IP Fook-kau ) Miss KO Siu-wall, K.D.E

219 Queen’s Road East* (Tel. 5-724874) ) The Hon. Hilton Cheong ) Leen, O.B.E.

Eastern North Point Housing Eatate Office, 43 Shu Rule Street, G/F. Chai Wan Resettlement Estate Office, Block 4. Health Office, Stanley Village Road. Miss CHOU Kwok-lai (Tel. 5-613619) Mr. LAU Wing-kin (Tel. 5-561627) Mr. LAU Yiu-hung (Tel. 5-931676) ) Mr. B.A. Bcrnacchi, ) O.B.E., Q.C. ) Mr. Kenneth T.C. Lo ) ) ) ) ) ) )

KaVLOGN

Yau Ma Toi Housing Department Mr. TAM Shui-fu ) Mr. H.M.G. Forsgate

Headquarters, (Tel. 3-624331, ) Dr. WONG Pun-cheul:

1, Ma Tau Kok Road. Ext. 62) ) Mr. Charles C.C. Sin

Mong Kok Sai Yee Street Depot, Mr. HO Lam-sung ) Mr. Peter P.F. Chan

2nd floor. (Tel. 3-941998) ) Miss Cecilia L.Y. Ycun;

Sham Shui Health Office, Mr. WONG Ming-yick ) Mr. Edmund *7. II. Chow

Po Un Chau Street, 4th floor. (Tel. 3-869067) ) Mr. F.K. IIu ) Mr. TSIN Soi-nin

Kowloon Health Office, Mr. WONG Man-sun ) Dr. Denny M.H. Huang

City Farm Road Annexe, Ground floor. (Tel. 3-625501) ) Mr. John MacKensio )

V/ong Tai V/ong Tai Sin Resettle- Mr. KWONG Tat-tong ) Mrs. E. Elliott

Sin nent Estate Office, Block 30. (Tel. 3-212644) ) Mr. Alex S.C. Wu )

Kwun Tong Health Office, Mr. CHOW Joe-iu ) Mr. WONG Shiu-cheuck

Kwun Tong Govt. Building, 5th floor. Kwun Tong Resettlement Estate Office, Block 1. (Tel. 3-891927) Mr. 'WONG Wai-nam (Tel. 3-424450) ) Mr. Ambrose K.C. Choi ) ) ) ) ) )

Release time>: 2.30 p.m.

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PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Monday, June 18, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No.

More than $J5 million approved for expansion of community centres, children and youth centres, and the community youth officers scheme ...............•...............................  1

The public is urged to stop panic buying of rice at inflated prices ....................................................      3

The response to this year’s anti-measles campaign is ’’poor”.. 4

Two more buildings in Wing Lok Street in Central have been declared dangerous.............................................. 5

The Director of Commerce and Industry will visit two plastics factories in San Po Kong tomorrow............................... 6

Two posters stressing the importance of safety in laboratories are being distributed to all secondary schools ................. 7

A 25-year-old man, sentenced to a further two years’ imprisonment for various offences ........................................    8

Magistrate praises waitress and police constable for arresting a robber ...................................................     9

Special one-day fire fighting course for executive staff of a local company ...............................................   10

The Princess Alexandra Community Centre will celebrate its 12th anniversary tomorrow .................................     11

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Monday, June 18, 1973

- 1 -

GREENLIGHT FOR DEVELOPMENT OF COMMUNITY CENTRES

**********

The Finance Committee of the Legislative Council has given the greenlight for a massive expansion of community centres, children and youth centres and the community youth officers scheme, in line with proposals made in the social welfare white paper and the five year development plan.

It has accepted the financial commitment of more than 835 mil l ion in both capital and recurrent costs to meet this expansion.

The main spending will be in capital cost which amounts to some 323 million. This sum will be used for building seven community centres, five estate welfare buildings and 15 community halls in different areas of Hong Kong between now and 1978.

The provision of estate welfare buildings and community halls is being extended to cover all public housing wherever possible.

Community halls will be built in public housing estates for a population of 20,000 or over while estate welfare buildings will be built in estates which house more than 50»000 people.

Community centres will be provided in areas of 100,000 people not covered by estate welfare buildings or community halls.

Of the amount approved, more than 36 million will go towards operating costs of these community centres, estate welfare buildings and community halls.

At the moment, there are some 69 children and youth work units with the majority of them operated by the voluntary agencies. Each unit provides some form of service to 2,000 children and young people in tho course of a year.

/The number ,

Monday, June 18, 1973

- 2 -

The number of these units is to be doubled between 1973 and 1978 and it is for this purpose that the sum of 84.7 million a year has been approved as subventions to the voluntary agencies for the expansion.

In line with these developments, the community youth officer scheme, which up to now has been carried out on an experimental basis only, is to be expanded into 11 areas in 1973/74.

They will cover Eastern, Wanchai, Central, and Western districts on Hong Kong Island; Kowloon City, Wong Tai Sin, Yau Ma Tei, Mong Kok, Sham Shui Po, and Kwun Tong in Kowloon and Tsuen Wan in the New Territories.

Sor 1974/751 community youth officers will be established in Yuen Long, Tai Po, Sai Kung and Islands districts.

The cost of implementing and running this scheme will be 32 million a year.

The community youth officer or CYO will operate at a district level and in full co-operation with the CDO’s and the community centres staff.

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WATER CUT IN HUNG HOM

* ♦

Water supply to a number of premises in the Hung Hom area will be cut off for five hours from 1 a.m. to 6 a.m. on Wednesday (June 20).

The temporary stoppage is to allow staff of the Waterworks Office to carry out a leakage test.

The area affected is bounded by Bailey Street, the sea-front, Hok Yuen Street, Ma Tau Wei Road, Pak Kung Street, Chatham Road, Fat Kwong Street, Shun Yung Street, Ko Shan Road, Kau Pui Lung Road, Lok Shan Road and Kowloon City Road.

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Monday, June 18, 1973

- 3 -

PUBLIC URGED TO STOP PANIC BUYING OF RICE

*»***»*«

The Commerce and Industry Department today urged the public to cease "panic buying" of rice at inflated prices.

Action taken by the department has already resulted in lower prices at many retail stores.

"But our efforts to bring about a return to normal prices vri 11 be severely hampered if the public continues to buy rice at unreasonable prices, and in unnecessarily large quantities," a spokesman for the department said.

"As we have already stated, we are confident that supplies can be maintained at a satisfactory level, and there is no cause for public alarm.

The spokesman said that auctions taking place today would put even more Thai rice on to the market, and pressure would be maintained through the rice control scheme to keep prices at a reasonable level.

"V/g have already warned wholesalers that increases in their ’mark-up’ to retailers will not be tolerated," he added.

The spokesman said that Hong Kong’s reserve stocks were sufficient to last for well over two months, and there was no fear that these would run out as imports from China, Australia and the United States continue to come in.

rr

Note to Editors: Pictures of the rice auctions will be boxed this

evening.

-------0----------

Monday, June 18, 1973

POOR RESPONSE TO ANTI-MEASLES CAMPAIGN

Response to this year’s anti-measles campaign, which has just ended, has been described by the Director of Medical and Health Services, Dr. G.H. Choa, as ’’poor”.

During the nine-week-long campaign 8,807 children were immunized against measles compared with almost 13,000 in a similar one last year.

Dr. Choa said today: ”1 consider the figures poor in relation to this particular campaign.

”But the public should realise these annual drives are run as ’reminders’ for parents who have not had their children immunized during normal visits to our maternal and child health centres.”

He stressed that although the campaign itself was over, and the special vaccine facilities and door-to-door visits to housing estates had ended, anti-measles vaccinations were still routinely available free at these centres•

In the ninth and last week of this year’s campaign, a total of 896 doses of the vaccine was administered — 161 on the Island, 552 in Kowloon, and 183 in the New Territories.

Dr. Choa recalled that the last epidemic of the disease occurred in the winter-spring of 1966-67. Free anti-measles vaccine became available from December 1967* Since then, the incidence of, and deaths from measles had remained low, ’’due, at least in part, to the immunization facilities, which are now on a year-round basis.”

/"But, ......

Monday, June 18, 1973

- 5 -

"But,” Dr. Choa said,” parents who disregard our repeated warnings should not be complacent. Susceptible children between six • • • •

months and five years should be immunized as soon as possible.

"It is not true that measles is inevitable. The disease can, and should, be prevented.”

-------0---------

TWO MORE DANGEROUS BUILDINGS IN CENTRAL

**********

Another two buildings in Wing Lok Street, Central District are to be closed following a declaration today that they are liable to become dangerous•

The two buildings affected are at 205 and 207 Wing Lok Street.

The Principal Government Building Surveyor said that these three-storey pre-war buildings had been under observation for a considerable time after the demolition of adjoining buildings.

Fresh movement had recently occurred giving rise to a risk of collapse when 209 and 211 Wing Lok Street are to be demolished. These two buildings were recently declared dangerous.

Notices of intention to apply for closure orders in Victoria District Court at 9»3$ a.m. on July 25 were posted today.

-------0---------

/6........

Monday, June 18, 1973

- 6 -

DIRECTOR VISITS PLASTICS FACTORIES

The Director of Commerce and Industry, Mr. E.P. Ho, will visit two plastics factories tomorrow (Tuesday) morning as part of his regular programme of observing actual day-to-day operations in manufacturing plants#

However, the two factories — both of them producing plastic toys — are of special interest and have been chosen so the Director can acquaint himself more fully with the problems presently facing the plastics industry#

The factories to be visited are the Charmbest Industrial Co. Ltd.

and the Jimson Plastic Factory Limited, both in San Po Kong.

The current series of factory-visits by Mr. Ho began just over one month ago.

Mote to Editors; You are .invited to send a reporter/

photographer to cover the visits. Mr. Ho is due to arrive at Charmbest Industrial Co., 23 Tai Yau Street, San Po Kong at 10 a.m. He will stay there for about one hour and is due to arrive at Jimson Factory, 2 Tai Yau Street, at 11.05 a.m. again staying for an hour. Copies of the programme are boxed this evening.

-----0------

/7.........

Monday, June 18, 1973

- 7 -

SAFETY IN SCHOOL LABORATORIES

*********

' 4 . -r.-. .

The importance of safety in the laboratory is emphasised on two • •’ . •*

posters which are being distributed to all secondary schools by the Education Department•

The posters are for display on notice boards in science laboratories . , • .. . • - S * 't ' ' * *

and are designed to impress on pupils the need to be extremely careful in thoir work.

These posters follow the distribution, in previous years, of the pamjhlet "Safety in the Laboratory" to science teachers, laboratory assistants and senior students.

In a circular to heads of secondary schools, the principals of the three Colleges of Education and the Morrison Hill Technical Institute, the Assistant Director of Education (Chief Inspector of Schools), Mr. A.G. Brown, asked them "to ensure that the posters are displayed in the laboratories and that students understand the contents."

Mr. Brown reminded science teachers and laboratory staff of "the great responsibility they have for the safety of their students."

"Students should be reminded to perform all experiments with great care and to observe strictly the basic rules set out on one of the posters." he said.

Mr. Brown called on teachers and pupils to bear in mind the slogan: "Care Ensures Safety", thus enhancing the standard of safety in school laboratories and minimising the risk of any mishap.

Note to Editors: Copies of the pamphlet and photographs of the

posters are boxed this evening,

-------o -------- /8........................

Monday, June 18, 1973

- 8 -

ADDITIONAL GAOL TERM FOR PRISONER

********

A 25-year-old man currently serving a two-year prison term was today gaoled for another two years by Judge Garcia in the Victoria District Court for a number of offences which he committed more than a year ago.

The defendant, Wong Yip-pui, pleaded guilty to two charges of robbery, and three counts of stealing a car and driving it without a licence and third party insurance.

The court was told that Wong, together with three other people, stole a car in the Wah Fu Estate on April 22, last year.

They drove the vehicle to North Point the following day and robbed a couple of some cash and a watch. But they were intercepted by the police in Shau Kei Wan after the couple reported the crime. The other three escaped and only Wong was arrested.

He also admitted having robbed another couple in South Bay Road on a previous occasion.

Wong jumped bail when he was due to appear in court for trial in June last year.

However, he was later caught in connection with the theft of some hand grenades. He was subsequently convicted for this offence and sentenced to two years’ imprisonment in the Supreme Court early last month.

-------C---------

/9.........

Monday, June 18, 197J

- 9 -

MAGISTRATE PRAISES QUICK-THINKING WAITRESS

**«*«**«

A Western Court Magistrate, Mr; E. Light, today complimented a waitress of a coffee shop in Central and a police constable for their joint effort in arresting a robber,

Mr, Light commended them after he imprisoned a 25-year-old man, Yiu Tak-shing, for two years on a charge of robbery.

Yiu went to a coffee shop in Prince’s Building on June 4 and threatened the cashier and a waitress at the counter with a knife.

He warned them: ’’Don’t move or I will stab.” Yiu then seized 3775 in cash and escaped.

The waitress chased after him, raising a hue and cry. A Police Constable caught Yiu in Des Voeux Road Central, and Yiu was subdued after a •• • • • • • • struggle•

Yiu, who has no previous conviction, pleaded .guilty to the charge and • • •

asked for leniency, saying that his whole family depended upon him for support.

-------0---------

/10...........

Monday, June 18, 1973

- 10 -

FIRE PREVENTION COURSE

***«»«$

The Industrial Safety Training Centre of the Labour Department will run a special one-day course on ’’Fire prevention in office buildings” on Thursday (June 21) in conjunction with the Fire Services Department.

The course has been arranged at the request of Butterfield and Swire Thirty-one executive staff members from the company and its subsidiaries will attend.

It will feature lectures, film shows, and a practical demonstration of portable fire fighting equipment.

The Assistant Commissioner of Labour, Mr. David Lin, will officially open the course to be held at the Industrial Safety Training Centre, Canton Road Government Offices,3rd floor. Mr. T.D. Poland, Staff Manager of Butterfield and Swire (H.K.) Ltd., will give the closing address and present certificates to participating members at 4.30 p.m. at the Tsim Sha Tsui Fire Station.

-------0---------

Monday, June 18, 1973

- 11 -

COMMUNITY CENTRE CELEBRATES ANNIVERSARY

*******

The Princess Alexandra Community Centre, run by the Social Welfare

Department in Tsuen Wan, celebrates its 12th anniversary this week.

To mark the occasion, a special ceremony will be held tomorrow (Tuesday). Mr. J.S. Warren, District Officer, Tsuen Wan, will officiate and present prizes to winners of competitions sponsored by the centre.

Volunteers who have made contributions to the community through participation in various activities, will also be presented with souvenirs.

A members’ night celebration will be held the following night when various groups from the centre will perform on stage.

Two displays, one on the work of the agencies operating in the Princess Alexandra Community Centre and another of works by its Chinese painting and photography groups are also being held now.

Note to Editors: You are invited to cover the official

ceremony tomorrow (Tuesday) which begins at 3:30 p.m. in the hall of Princess Alexandra Community Centre.

Members of the press will also be welcome to attend the members* night celebration on Wednesday (June 20). Events begin at 8 p.m.

-------0---------

Release time: 7.^5 p.m*

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Tuesday, June 19» 1973

CONTENTS

Page No,

Consultants looking into possibility of developing holiday resorts in four areas in the N.T............................ 1

General Consumer Price Index rises three points in May brought about mainly by an increase in prices of foodstuffs ............................................................ 2

Notice sent to ship-owners pointing out the importance of safety precautions on vessels during typhoons •••••••••••••• 3

Water supply to certain premises in Wan Chai will be interrupted for five hours on Thursday.................................. 4

The fourth auction of "lucky" car numbers will be held on

Saturday in the City Hall .....••.«••••••••••••••........  • 5

Certain buildings in Circular Pathway and Tsui On Lane in Central have been declared dangerous...................... 6

Stamps commemorating the Festival of Hong Kong and the Arts Festival to be issued later.................................. 6

Three young men sentenced to six years imprisonment for robbery .................................................... 7

Lady MacLehose to attend charity drama performance .......... 8

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Tuesday, June 19, 1973

- 1 -

COMPREHENSIVE STUDY ON HOLIDAY RESORTS

*******

The government has commissioned a firm of consultants to carry out a comprehensive study on the development of four areas in the Nev/ Territories into holiday resorts for both local visitors and overseas tourists.

The study, to cost 8750,000, is being undertaken by Wilbur Smith and Associates of the United States.

The major purpose is to find out the best use of land resources available in a 10-year programme at the scenic parts of South Lantau, Sai Kung Peninsula, Ma Wan Island, and Middle Island at Deep Water Bay.

The investigation will not only include the scope and nature of public amenities for the urban visitors but of accommodation and recreational facilities for overseas tourists.

The latter, to be developed by private enterprise, envisages holiday bungalows, hotels, and golf courses in addition to amenities such as picnic spots and bathing beaches, a government spokesman said.

The study will also provide the design for a balanced development programme to best meet the requirements, including future land-use patterns.

The government has approved in principle that the programme will be implemented in two stages with a capital commitment expenditure of about £50 million for the first five-year stage.

The consultants have been asked to make recommendations for a programme for the optimum development of the areas in the next 10 years; and an alternative programme which would limit the government capital expenditure to £50 million within the first five years.

The study project has just commenced and is expected to take about 12 months to complete.

Tuesday, June 19? 1973

- 2 -

CONSUMER PRICE INDEX RISES THREE POINTS IN MAY

»**»«*»

The General Consumer Price Index for May was 157 — three points higher than that for the previous month.

The Census and Statistics Department said that the increase was due mainly to a rise of six points in the index for foodstuffs.

However, the index for clothing and footwear went up by four points, while there were increases of two points each in the indexes for miscellaneous goods and for services.

Compared with April this year, there were increases in the average • i

retail prices of salt and fresh water fish, poultry, frosh vegetables, frozen, tinned and roast meat and meals bought in restaurants. On the other hand, the average retail prices of pork and beef dropped slightly.

For non-food items, the index for housing was raised by one point as a result of an increase in the rates charged on all former housing authority and government low cost housing estates. The index for services went up by two points, due to higher charges for domestic service and hairdressing.

The Modified Consumer Price Index for May was 162, three points higher than that for the previous month.

-------0 -----

/3..........

Tuesday, June 19, 1973

- 3 -

TYPHOON PRECAUTIONS FOR SHIPS IN HONG KONG

********

The Marine Department today drew the attention of masters of vessels to precautions to be taken during tropical cyclones*

In a notice issued to owners, agents and charterers, the Director of Marine, Mr. A. Fletcher, pointed out that many vessels have not been adequately manned during the hoisting of typhoon signals in the past, ’’and such inadequate manning has posed a danger to other vessels using the port at the time1’*

Insufficient manning of a ship contravenes the provisions of the Merchant Shipping (Control of Ports) Regulations, and the master is liable, on summary conviction, to a fine of 31,000.

Masters of vessels equipped with V.H.F. radio are also advised to maintain a listening watch on Channel 12 during the approach or passage of a tropical cyclone for information broadcast from the Marine Department Port Communications Centre.

Those without VeH»F» radio should maintain normal radio watches and listen to weather broadcasts from the radio and television stations.

Thirty-seven ”A” class moorings have been approved for use as special typhoon moorings for ships under 600 feet in length and there are 22 ”B” class special moorings for boats under 370 feet. The latest list of moorings can be obtained from the Port Control Office during normal office hours or from the Port Communications Centre after hours.

/In strong .........

Tuesday, June 19, 1973

- 4 -

In strong winds it is permissible for a vessel to drop an anchor ’’under foot” to minimise sheering at these moorings.

Advice on typhoon precautions are contained in the publication ’’Shipmasters Guide - Part I - Tropical Cyclones Affecting Hong Kong Waters” which can be obtained on request and free of charge at the Information Counter of the Marine Department.

-------0---------

WATER CUTS IN WAN CHAI

******

Water supply to a number of premises in Wan Chai will be interrupted for five hours from 1 a.m. to 6 a.m. on Thursday (June 21).

This is to enable the Waterworks Office to carry out leakage tests in the area.

The premises affected are bounded by Luard Road, Gloucester Road, Fleming Road, the north side of Johnston Road, O’brien Road and Hennessy Road, including 189-201 Johnston Road, 32-173 Thomson Road and the Hennessy Road Government School.

-------0---------

Tuesday, June 19,1973

- 5 -

LUCKY CAR NUMBERS AUCTION

***«**«»

Another JO ’’lucky” car numbers will be auctioned on Saturday (June 2J) in the City Hall following the draw for the government lottery* This is the fourth charity auction in the series, and the proceeds will be paid to the Government Lotteries Fund.

More than 8175»000 was raised in the last one on June 6.

The numbers to be auctioned on Saturday are:-

215 220 251 280 285

AU 1 AU 8 AU 11 AU 21 AU 28

AU 33 AU U AU 68 AU 77 AU 83

AU 99 AU 222 AU 32? AU JOO AU 555

AU 666 AU 678 AU 838 AU2000 AU2323

AU2828 AU3333 AU3838 AU8000 AU8888

It will be held at 11.JO a.m. in the Concert Hall of the City Hall Low Block.

The next auction for JO special registration numbers will be held in three weeks1 time following the draw for the third government lottery of the year.

-------0--------

Tuesday, June 19, 1973

- 6 -

DANGEROUS BUILDINGS

*********

The Building Authority today declared 8 and 9 Circular Pathway, which include 4 and J Tsui On Lane in Central District to be in a । dangerous condition.

The Principal Government Building Surveyor said that in the course of routine inspection of these four-storey pre-war buildings it was found that the walls were severely fractured and that a large proportion of floor and roof timbers was decayed.

These defects could cause collapse. Notices of intention

to apply for closure orders in Victoria District Court at 9.JO a.m.

on July J1 were posted today.

-------0---------

NEW STAMP ISSUES

**«*«***♦

Two new sets of commemorative stamps will be placed on sale in addition to the normal Lunar New Year (Year of Tiger) issue during the four-month period beginning from November.

To commemorate the Festival of Hong Kong, stamps in the denominations of 10 cents, JO cents and 81 are being designed and will be sold during November.

For the Hong Kong Arts Festival, stamps of 10 cents, $1 and 82 denominations will be issued in February next year.

-------0---------- /7.........................................

Tuesday, June 19, 1973

- 7 -

SIX YEARS FOR ROBBERY

********

Three young men, including a 16-year-old youth, were each sentenced to six years1 imprisonment by Mr. Commissioner Morley-John at the Victoria District Court today, after they pleaded guilty to a number of robbery charges.

The defendants, Tsang Kam-wah, 21, admitted three charges, Wong ilang-tai, 20, four charges, and the youth 10 charges.

Two other 21-year-old men, Mak Chi-wing and Hung Hung, were each gaoled for two years for handling stolen goods.

The court was told that the first three defendants robbed a housewife of cash and valuables worth more than Jl80,000 in her flat in Wong Nei Chung Road in November last year.

When arrested, they admitted having committed a number of robberies on other occasions.

-------0---------

/8...........

Tuesday, June 19? 1973

- 8 -

ADVICE TO PRESS PHOTOGRAPHERS

*******

Note to Editors: Lady MacLehose will attend a charity

drama performance at the Lee Theatre tomorrow (Wednesday) evening. We understand that invitations have been sent direct to the media by the sponsors.

You are requested to brief your photographers covering the function that they should refrain from using flash lights when taking photographs of Lady MacLehose. We understand floodlighting will be provided by the management of the theatre.

Your co-operation, and that of the photographers, will be much appreciated.

-------0---------

Release Time: 7.00 p.m

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Wednesday, June 20, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No,

Crown rents payable under renewed Crown leases Will* now be assessed as a percentage of the rateable value rather than on the value of the land •••••,•••••••••••••••...........................•••••••••••••••• 1

The Government imposes a ban on the establishment of commodity exchanges in Hong kong • ............J

The Financial Secretary stresses there wi11 be no rice shortage in Hong Kong • ••••....•...........................................   5

Provisions in the Magistrates (Amendment) Bill 1973 set aside for the time "being .....7

The police have already mounted 79$ raids since the beginning of the Fight Violent Crime Campaign........................... ••••••••• 9

Mr, C.P. Lloyd has been appointed acting Secretary for Security •••• 10

Legislative Council passes anti-crime bills .......................  11

The government is criticised for the intense development works in

Mid-levels prior to the landslide in June last year •••••••••••••••• 14

Lesson of co-operation must be learned from the June landslides • • • • 17

Government rejects criticism over landslides ••••••••••••••••••••••• 19

Urban Council budgets for a surplus of over S40 million in 1973/74 .....................................................................22

Student fees for the Polytechnic may be revised later on ••••••••••• 23

Steady decrease in the number of children dropping out of Primary 4, 5 and 6 ............••••••••••••••••••«••••••••••• 24

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

2

Page No,

The Marine Department is planning to purchase a specially designed launch to combat oil spillage.........................«.•••••.......  25

More than 12 million vehicles have crossed the harbour since August ..................................................................... 26

Mr. Anthony Royle meets the Heung Yee Kuk goodwill delegation ••••• 27

Famous Japanese violinist will give a recital on Saturday as a part of his cultural mission ..•••••.......................................28

Transport Advisory Committee re-examines' question of mini-bus fares ....................................................................  29

Efficient, postal service* 30

University fee increases only for those who can pay •••••••*'••••.. 31

Tribute paid to Mrs. Ellen Li......................................• 32

Issue of identity ’cards ......•.....................••••••••••••••• 33

•i! •< a ‘ 'f • « • .<0»

Wednesday, June 20, 1973

- 1 -

REVISED BASIS FOR ASSESSING CROWN RENT

********

The government has revised the basis for assessing the Crown rent payable under renewed Crown leases. Crown rent will now be assessed as a percentage of the rateable value rather than on the value of the land.

Announcing this in the Legislative Council today, the Attorney General, the Hon, J. Hobley, said that the Crown rent to be paid annually would be three percent of the rateable value at the date of renewal.

He added that this percentage had been ’’the subject of very careful consideration, with the needs of owners of smaller properties particularly in mind”.

The revised Crown rent applies to renewable Crown leases yet to be renewed. This rent will remain in force throughout the tern of the lease except where land is subsequently developed, in which case the Crown rent will be reassessed on the basis of the new rateable value once this is determined. Those whose leases have already been renewed can elect to pay Crown rent on the rateable value basis with effect from July 1, if it is to their advantage to do so.

Commenting on the background to this decision, Mr. Hobley recalled that during the second reading of the Crown Leases Bill 1973♦ which was moved on March 28, several members had urged reconsideration of the basis of assessment.

They had drawn attention to the hardship which would be experienced by small property owners, the great number of associations united in opposition to the policy and the effect of high land prices on the level of reassessed Crown rents. /The bill..................................................................

Wednesday, June 20, 1973

2

The bill at that stage was already a modified version of earlier proposals, reducing the overall level of assessment by 20 per cent and

arranging for introduction of the reassessed rent in stages so that the full impact would not be felt for some years.

Additionally, it was proposed that the effective date for reassessment should be one which ignored the greatly increased land values of recent months.

However, members had contended that the changes did not sufficiently lighten the impact on property owners, and at this point the debate was adjourned

Since then the policy had again been re-examined, particularly with a view to meeting the case of the many thousands of owners of smaller flats.

In achieving this latter goal, which Mr. Hobley described as the ’’principal aim” of the revised bill, it had not proved possible to avoid benefitting all owners, or foregoing the major part of the revenue which would have accrued under the original terms of reassessment.

He said that the changed basis of reassessment, related to rateable value, had the merit of simplicity. It enabled the collection to be made in the form of a supplementary payment on the rates. • • *

Other details of the new scheme had yet to be worked out and the necessary amendments to the bill had yet to be drafted. But it was intended that the revised bill would go forward as soon as possible.

Mr. Hobley also pointed out that since this new basis for reassessment would greatly reduce the revenue that would have been derived under the earlier proposals, the fiscal implications would clearly have to be examined.

’’Meanwhile,” he concluded, ”1 can assure Crown lessees whose leases expire at the end of this month that the legislation will provide that the leases sh^JJL. regarded as having been renewed with effect from July 1 • ”

- .... 0 - - -

Wednesday, June 20, 1973

- 3 -

BAN ON ESTABLISHING COMMODITY EXCHANGES «««»**» ’ 1 .

The Government has decided to ban for the time being, and with immediate effect, the establishment in Hong Kong of commodity exchanges dealing with specified commodities, initially 20 in all.

At present there are no specific legal controls relating to the establishment and operation of such exchanges.

The Financial Secretary, the Hon. C.P. Haddon-Cave, in a statement to Legislative Council today said that the necessary legislation to give effect to this ban is now being drafted and will be presented to the council for consideration at an early date.

However, he stressed that, if passed, the legislation‘would take effect from today (June 20).

”In other words, no person or persons will be permitted to establish a market to deal or trade in the commodities specified whether in spot or futures contracts as from today. The only exceptions will be those markets or exchanges already in business at the present time, such as the daily rice auctions, the Gold and Silver Exchange and those organisations which have an established business on an agency basis in commodity futures traded on overseas exchanges,” Mr. Haddon-Cave said.

He pointed out that it was not the government’s intention to frustrate the development of a properly regulated commodity exchange, or possibly more than one exchange, at a later stage.

/"The intention.......•

Wednesday, June 20, 1973

- 4 -

’’The intention rather is to ensure that, if and when such an exchange is established, it will operate in a well regulated and orderly manner, and in accordance with internationally accepted practices and standards.”

He said he was aware of at least four separate groups in Hong Kong which were ’’actively pursuing” the possibility of setting up commodity exchanges.

The Financial Secretary said he felt there could be some benefit to the economy and to ”our emergence as a sophisticated financial centre” from the establishment of a commodity exchange, provided it is well regulated and deals in commodities primarily of interest to the region, in addition to some of those at present being dealt in by the established exchanges overseas.

But they should not be permitted to open before adequate regulations ”so vital to the proper running of a reputable international market” have been worked out.

Mr. Haddon-Cave explained that the government was talcing the action because the establishment of a number of unregulated exchanges could well produce ”a dangerous speculative situation”e

Operations on a commodity exchange are in many ways more risky even than a stock exchange and the small man who risks his capital in this way can very easily lose it, he said.

An essential feature of a commodity exchange is the facility for making contracts for the delivery of commodities at a specified later date.

These deals are known as futures contracts and it is customary for only a proportion of the total value of the contract, usually 10 per cent, to be paid at the time of the agreement®

’’Due to the rapid movements of commodity prices there are possibilities for large’ gains as well as large losses to be made by people trading this way on margins,” the Financial Secretary added.

Wednesday, June 20, 1973

- 5 -

NO SHORTAGE OF RICE IN HONG KONG «««««*

The Financial Secretary, the Hon. C.P. Haddon-Cave, said today that there is no shortage of rice in Hong Kong; "nor will there be".

Speaking in the Legislative Council, he said the maintenance and likely future increase in imports from other principal suppliers — China, Australia and the United States — together with reserve stoclcs of nearly 70,000 tons, "are more than adequate to bridge any shortfall in supplies from Thailand".

"I am therefore satisfied that the rice supply situation is sufficient to supply our normal requirements for many months, and certainly until this year’s major rice harvests come to the market."

He said the government’s determination to maintain adequate supplies v/as evidenced by the fact that during the past week the Director of Commerce and Industry had released some 12,000 tons of rice from the control scheme reserve stock to retail outlets.

"As a result, those consumers who were buying rice on a large seale when prices were being irrationally bid up a few days ago are probably noting that rice is still plentiful in the shops and that prices are falling back to their earlier levels now that the initial wave of panic buying has receded," ho added.

But, the Financial Secretary warned that the government would use its powers to safeguard supplies, and thereby stabilise prices, if there was any further evidence to suggest that the market was not operating satisfactorily.

/Turning ..........

Wednesday, June 20, 1973

6 -

Turning to the recent price increases for vegetables and fish, Mr. Haddon-Cave pointed out that these, to a large extent, simply reflected the seasonal pattern — adverse weather conditions affecting supplies.

He emphasised that so far there had been no developments to suggest any long-term changes in the supply position.

In the case of vegetables, he said, there could be no doubt that the rather large price increases for the current month had been due to inclement weather and extensive flooding in Kwangtung Province, which had delayed imports from China. At the same time, hot and humid conditions in Hong Kong had hastened the deterioration of cut vegetables.

A further factor influencing prices this month was the Dragon Boat Festival.

Mr. Haddon-Cave said that despite this he expected some increase in the volume of vegetables coming ontc the market during the remainder of the month and a corresponding reduction in prices.

Adverse weather conditions and the Dragon Boat Festival were also the principal factors accounting for the rapid increase in fish prices this month.

However, he had already been informed that supplies were now increasing and retail prices falling as was the case with vegetables.

As to the ’’so-called heavy purchases” of local fish by Japanese interests, this actually accounted for only an insignificant proportion of total landings and he felt that it did not have any noticeable effect on the local supply and price situation.

Mr. Haddon-Cave said that he has spoken at length on the subject not only because he knew how sensitive the public is to price increases in essential foodstuffs - and rightly so - but also because he felt that an objective analysis of the facts could improve the situation by helping to dispel unfounded rumours.

Wednesday, June 20, 1973

- 7 -

SENTENCING POWERS OF MAGISTRATES SET ASIDE

****«#*««

The Legislative Council today set aside, for the time being, proposed draft legislation which seeks to increase the sentencing powers of certain magistrates.

The decision to postpone the second reading of the Magistrates (Amendment) Bill 1973 followed a further examination of the bill, in consultation with the new Chief Justice,

In moving the motion for the adjournment, however, the acting Attorney General, the Hon, J, Hobley, emphasised that the decision not to proceed immediately with the bill should in no way be regarded as a weakening in the government’s resolve in the fight against crime.

He explained that several factors had contributed to the conclusion that the bill might "safely be postponed for a while without prejudice to the interest which both the community and accused persons have in the early trial of criminal charges."

An important factor, he said, was that time ought to be taken to see whether the recent increase in the number of District Judges was sufficient to enable the District Court to deal effectively with any further increase in the number of criminal cases coming before it.

Furthermore, he went on. Unofficial Members had expressed concern that, if some of the criminal cases now tried in the District Court were to be tried before the magistrates’ courts, legal aid should be available to the accused in those cases,

/"This is a .......

Wednesday, June 20, 1973*

- 8 -

,fThis is a matter of great importance,” said Mr. Hobley, ”but it is one which calls for careful study having due regard to the various, and sometimes conflicting, factors involved.”

Mr. Hobley stressed that the object of the bill was to provide a means whereby a build-up of criminal cases awaiting trial could be tackled if necessary. It did not increase the sentence for existing offences neither did it create new offences.

The proposals to increase the sentencing powers of District Court ♦

Judges and certain magistrates were made in the face of a steady rise in the • • • •

number of criminal cases, he said, because it was essential in the interest of accused persons and in the public interest that there should be no avoidable delay in bringing accused persons to trial.

Although both the Magistrates (Amendment) Bill 1973 and the District Court (Amendment) Bin 1973 were relevant to the Fight Violent Crime Campaign, he said, ”they are not in themselves a weapon in the fight against crime.”

0 - -

Wednesday, June 20, 1973*

- 9 -

RESULTS OF VIOLENT CRIME CAMPAIGN

*********

Greater police presence on the ground and a simplified procedure for reporting crime are expected to have a deterrent effect on violent ■ criminals.

Since the beginning of the Fight Violent Crime Campaign on Monday, the police have already mounted 796 raids and have stopped and searched over 13,000 people. As a result 722 people have been detained.

The Secretary for Home Affairs, the Hon. J. Cater, told Legislative Council this afternoon that ’’the Royal Hong Kong Police and the Royal Hong Kong Auxiliary Police will be making an even greater effort during the action phase of the campaign.”

Fifteen reporting centres have been set up in Kaifong Association offices and public housing estates, and 25 similar centres will be set up next month.

In addition, police landrovers have also been deployed as mobile reporting centres in strategic locations-

Moreover, a new and simplified reporting procedure has been introduced based on the use of a simple pro forma which would help to cut down reporting time and speed up the processing of reports.

Mr. Cater said that this was only the beginning, and ’’everything possible will be done to increase the rate of detection of the violent criminal •”

-------0 - - - -

/10...........

Wednesday, June 20, 1973

- 10 -

SECRETARY FOR SECURITY APPOINTED

******

One further secretary post, as recommended in the McKinsey report, is announced today*

Mr. G.P. Lloyd, C.M.G., has been appointed acting Secretary for Security and will assume his duties in the next few days#

In his new post he will co-ordinate policy and programmes covering external security, emergencies, internal law and order, immigration, prisons, narcotics and fire services.

Mr. Lloyd, who is 46 has held top posts in the colonial service in a number of countries, the last being Fiji where he was Chief Secretary and also acting Governor on several occasions.

He was appointed to Hong Kong as Administrative Officer, Staff Grade A, in 1971# On arrival he became Defence Secretary and last year acted as Deputy Colonial Secretary for a number of months.

The government also announced today that Mr. David V/hitelegge, the present Defence Secretary, will act as Commissioner for Census and Statistics during the absence of Mr. K. Topley, who is going on leave.

Mr. V/hitelegge, 44, was appointed a Cadet Officer in Hong Kong in 1959 after serving six years in Malaya. Since then he has held a number of administrative posts including Assistant Colonial Secretary and Deputy District Commissioner, New Territories.

Note to Editors:

Photographs of Mr. Lloyd are boxed

this evening.

-------0---------

/11 .........

Wednesday, June 20, 1973

- 11 -

DISTRICT JUDGES GET IN CREASED SENTENCING POWERS

*******

Three pieces of legislation which give added weight to the government’s determination to crack down on violent crime were passed by the Legislative Council today.

The three bills are the District Court (Amendment) Bill 1973» the Criminal Procedure (Amendment) Bill 1973 and the Public Order (Amendment) Bill 1973.

The first bill gives increased sentencing powers to District Judges, the second provides for a new type of sentence to isolate habitual criminals from society, and the third strengthens the existing legislation dealing with possession of offensive weapons in public places.

In supporting the bills, the senior Unofficial Member, the Hon.

P.C. V/oo, said that members of a committee set up by the Bar Association had made certain representations to the unofficial members against the provisions of the original four bills.

He said the committee explained why it was in doubt as to the wisdom of interfering with the existing limitations of jurisdiction in the district courts and the magistracies.

”We appreciate the reasons for these views and have given them careful consideration. The Unofficials conclude that the change of jurisdiction proposed in the District Court represents the most effective and immediately practicable way of speeding up the disposition of the backlog of cases now facing the Supreme Court,” Mr. Woo said.

/He said .......

Wednesday, June 20, 1973

- 12 -

He said the bill was supported by the unofficials, but they recommended that it should be reviewed within two years to see whether it could be allowed to lapse and the additional jurisdiction relinquished.

Under the legislation, the maximum sentence which may be imposed by a District Judge is raised from five to seven years. This is to enable the court to deal more adequately with some of the more serious cases, presently tried in the Supreme Court, to be tried in the District Court.

During the Committee Stage of the Criminal Procedure Bill, Mr. Woo introduced two amendments (which were incorporated into the legislation), one restricting its operation to a list of scheduled offences, and another that altered the conditions set out in a new section which have to be met before a person can be sentenced to preventive detention.

’’All in all,” he said, ’’there should be adequate safeguards against abuse of the section."

Another unofficial member, the Hon. Hilton Cheong-Leon also supported the bill but expressed reservation about the preventive detention system.

He noted that the system had not been particularly successful in England. He hoped, however, that because of different social conditions, it would be successful in Hong Kong if it was handled with care.

He also hoped that the provisions in the bill would enable the government to clamp down on drug pushers thus stopping them from leading young people to drugs.

The Hon. Wilfred Wong gave strong support to the bill. He reasoned that "fairness to the individual should be weighed against fairness to society", and that hardened criminals should be detained in the interest of society as a whole.

/lie quoted........

Wednesday, June 20, 1973

- 13 -

He quoted a prison authority who said that 90 per cent of the inmates of a large prison were repeaters, proving that certain people have established criminal tendencies.

Referring to the Public Order (Amendment) Bill 1973, Mr. P.C. Woo noted that during the three months from the middle of December last year to the middle of March this year, 196 people had been prosecuted for possession of offensive weapons in a public place.

’’This suggests to me that the legislation is very necessary and that there can as yet be no relaxation of its provisions,” he said.

The amended bill widens the scope of punishment and sets out various ways in which a court may deal with an offender between 13 and 17 years of age.

A note of concern, however, was voiced by Mr. Hilton Cheong-Leen who said the emphasis should be on reform and not bare punishment. He stressed that steps should be taken to separate the young offenders from the older and more hardened criminals.

He also pointed out that the government had a moral obligation to find out the deeper causes of crime committed by young people and seek possible solutions.

In replying to the unofficial members, the acting Attorney General, Mr. Hobley, said the views against increased powers of sentence for District Judges were fully appreciated by the government.

He emphasised that the proposal was not put forward lightly and that the government was fully satisfied the proposed increase in sentencing power was appropriate.

He also reassured them that no one who would have received legal aid had his case been tried before the Supreme Court but who is now to be tried before the District Court will be deprived of his right to legal aid.

-------0---------

/14..........

Wednesday, June 20, 1973

- 14 -

GOVERI^ENT CRITICISED OVER MID-LEVELS LANDSLIDE

*********

The government was today criticised in connection with development works in the Po Shan Road area prior to the landslide tragedy in June last year.

Reviewing the events that led to the tragedy exactly a year ago, the Hon. Szeto Wai said: ’’The Po Shan Road disaster is a tragic example that not only points to nonchalance, negligence and procrastination, but also gives rise to speculation of collusion.”

Speaking in the Legislative Council during the adjournment debate on the final report of the Commission of Inquiry into the rainstorm disasters, he noted that the western Mid-Level area had a long history of landslips, going back as far as 1925.

’’Unfortunately, the lesson from the many disasters has not beer-learned and the nonchalant attitude was allowed to continue culminating in the worst catastrophy on record.”

In allowing intensive development in the area, he said, the government stood to be criticised, ’’not so much for the deficiencies in the building regulations as for the random granting of lease modifications to permit such intensive development without regard to the geological formation of the area which consists mainly of potentially unstable volcanic colluvial deposits.”

While the commission had found the Building Authority’s requirements for the design of site formation work for building projects generally acceptable, Mr. Szeto felt that more stringent requirements were needed in ar.'L-as where the soil consisted of volcanic colluvium. ♦

/In this regard, ......

Wednesday, June 20, 1973*

- 15 -

In this regard, he proposed that all site formation works of appreciable magnitude should require a qualified civil engineer for their proper design and formation.

He therefore welcomed and supported a proposal by the Director of Public Works for the creation of a panel of expert civil engineers who were conversant with the property, characteristics and mechanics of soils.

Referring to the Po Shan Road landslide, Mr. Szeto said ‘’negligence” could be seen in the inexplicable manner in which the Building Authority approved the very steep slope cutting at the rear of inland lot 2260 ‘’with complete disregard of the nature of the soil.”

Since approval for an 80.5 degree cut slope was normally only given to solid rock formation, it could be assumed that in this case no prior inspection by an engineer had been made to determine the nature of the soil.

’’The officer approving the plans might have been misled intentionally by the authorised architect,” he said. ”But to approve plans of such important nature without requiring a thorough site investigation and in such a casual manner is incompetent, negligent and irresponsible to say the least.”

Ample evidence of procrastination was also provided in the commission’s report, said Mr. Szeto and he cited a number of dangerous situations that had developed in the area which, in his opinion, should have served as a warning of imminent disaster.

As regards the Sau Mau Ping landslide tragedy, Mr. Szeto noted that the commission contributed the cause to the unusually long and intense rainstorm and that human error had not been a contributory factor.

/”However, the ••••••.

Wednesday, June 20, 1973*

- 16 -

”However, the wisdom of siting a licensed area with its flimsy huts and large population at the foot of such a high man-made slope in the face of Hong Kong’s monsoonal climate must be questioned,” he said.

Mr. Szeto shared the view of the commission that all excavation works should be programmed and be approved by the Building Authority to prevent exposure of large and dangerous cutting faces during wet seasons.

But he further recommended that owners of existing developments involving cut slopes of considerable height should be required to submit stability certificates by qualified engineers at suitable intervals.

This was because most cut slopes lacked maintenance after they were formed, and the chunam membrane commonly used in Hong Kong was vulnerable to craclcs through which rainwater could penetrate, he explained.

-------0---------

/1? .....

Wednesday, June 20, 1973

- 17 -

CO-OPERATION IS THE KEYNOTE

*******

The Hon. Mrs. Joyce Symons today said that the vital lesson to be learned from the ’’dreaded events” of the June rainstorms last year was that ’’co-operation is the keynote to our common wellbeing.”

She was speaking in the Legislative Council during the adjournment debate on the occasion of the first anniversary of the rainstorm disasters.

While there was no doubt that the heavy rainfall during the period had played a dominant role in the landslides, she said, ’’contributing factors may well have been human weakness.”

”By this I mean carelessness, almost callousness,” she said.

Mrs. Symons said she was convinced that from the events of June 1972 ’’must be born a new determination never again to let the public down in a matter of such significance.fl

She added: ”It must be stated categorically by the government and impressed upon all civil servants that negligence, collusion, procrastination, indifference and ineptitude have no place in the Hong Kong future.”

Referring to the Po Shan Road landslide urea, she said a landslip in a cutting in that area in August 1971 led to a temporary suspension of construction work after it was discovered that the cutting was not of rock composition.

The alarming fact was, she went on, that even before typhoon Rose ”a major cutting in that area was left unsupported and virtually unmaintained for more than seven years”.

/Regardless ..........

*"l III'

|(V < I | < ilUfi f|

Wednesday, June 20, 1973

- 18 -

Regardless of this, the same site was allowed to be redeveloped in another way in early January 1971 to provide an increase of 36 flats, all v/ith car parks.

”How else could this have been effected except at the expense of safety for all?" she asked.

The rock-cutting slope was increased to 80o5 degrees, she said, and the new architect’s statement that the slope was of rock appeared to have passed unchecked and unchallenged.

• ’’The carelessness of those concerned — the architect, the developers, the relevant staff of the Public Works Department — was in strange contrast to the many expressions of alarm.by residents 6f the Po Shan Road area,” she said. . • ••

‘’’Another factor of human weakness was the desire to make money quickly by pressing ahead with the development without any consideration for the safety of those hapless people living nearby.”

Mrs. Symons stressed that in Hong Kong, with its ’’occasional immaturity concerning public welfare,” the government must assume even more responsibility in the regulations concerning"architectural work.

The average citizen, she emphasised, had an inalienable right to expect the government to provide adequate provisions for safety to withstand torrential rain similar to that of last year..* • .

Referring to the Sau Mau Ping*'landslide site, Mrs. Symons said that while the catastrophy was of major proportions, there appeared to be less evidence of human error, according to the report' of the Commission of Inquiry into the two landslide disasters. .”

The Commissioners concluded that the landslip in this area was mainly due to the softening of the ground as a result of the exceptionally long and intense rainstorms.

-------0---------

/19

Wednesday, June 20, 1973

- 19 -

P.W.D. rejects accusations over landslides

*******

The acting Director of Public Works, the Hon. A.S. Robertson, today rejected outright accusations of alleged ’’procrastination" and "nonchalance" on the part of the Public Works Department in connection with the situation in the Mid-Levels area prior to last year’s rainstorm disasters,

Speaking in the Legislative Council, Mr, Robertson expressed surprise and disappointment at the accusations and noted that nothing to justify them could be found in the report of the Commission of Inquiry which investigated the tragedieso

"Similarly, the commission did not find any evidence for collusion and made no reference even to the possibility of collusion," he said.

Mr. Robertson was replying to criticism from two Unofficial Members — the Hon. Szeto Wai and the Hon. Mrs. Joyce Symons — during the adjournment debate on the commission’s final report.

He said the two speakers may have been influenced in their comments by the fact that no action was taken, between August 1971 and February last year, against the architect who had beer, responsible for the deep slope cutting behind inland lot 2260.

Mr. Robertson made it clear7 however, that there was no time limit on the consideration by the board of a disciplinary offence.

The maximum penalty for such an offence, he explained, was removal of the offender from the register of authorised architects, and the architect in question had done this himself in December 1972, before the commission had completed its report.

/"On the other .........

Wednesday, June 20, 1973

- 20 -

"On the other hand, any action, other than a disciplinary action, against the architect clearly had to await the deliberations of the commission,11 he added.

While he shared Mr. Szeto’s views on the need for government to tighten up its controls in particular cases of proposed site formation works, Mr. Robertson rejected suggestions that the Public Works Department had in the past been "irresponsible" in accepting statements of authorised architects.

Authorised architects, he said, were a "privileged class" licensed to practise their profession in Hong Kongo

"Their responsibilities are clearly defined under the ordinance which licenses them, and the whole system of government approvals to plans — which the government is under constant pressure to expedite and simplify — will always depend upon the authorised professional carrying his proper share of the burden of responsibility," he stressed.

He added: "We must trust our authorised architects, but I take the point that we cannot trust all of them all of the timec

"This is where the government’s responsibility lies — to ensure that authorised architects as a class are worthy of trust, and that they are generally performing satisfactorily."

Mr. Robertson re-iterated that the landslides were not the result of a deliberate land development policy designed to extract the maximum revenue from land, or to develop hillsides beyond the point of safety.

While the science of soil mechanics was becoming increasingly precise, the commission had observed that the soils in Hong Kong were not simple homogeneous materials.

/This meant, ........

Wednesday, June 20, 1973

- 21 -

This meant, he said, that a general empirical method of working safely with these soils had to be developed and that the special areas, in which the general empirical solution must be refined, had to be identified.

He assured council that the approach to both these problems was being improved and that the solutions adopted would take into account all the relevant comments made by the commission and others,

Mr. Robertson was certain that the lesson of June 1972 would never be forgotten in Hong Kong and noted that all the immediate actions which .... •. .•xy.f.c-’.t'1';.’

could be taken to meet the situation had already been taken.

Action was in hand, he said, to identify areas in which site formation work required special attention and to provide the necessary means to deal with these areas effectively.

Reporting on the progress’ of remedial work during the past two months, Mr, Robertson said that the major engineering works at Sau Mau Ping and Po Shan Road had progressed satisfactorily despite bad weather.

Both areas were now considered safe from "all but minor mudslips, which would be inconvenient but not dangerous".

Consultants had also been appointed, he said, to review the overall problem of identifying areas of potential danger and to recommend remedial action, and to prepare a manual of good practice for site ’formation work as well as to advise on the procedures necessary to check that site formation proposals were properly presented and works properly executed.

In addition, the civil engineering staff of the Buildings Ordinance Office had been strengthened further through • the- appointment of consultants to examine new site formation plans.

It was hoped to issue a preliminary guide very soon to authorised architects to assist them in the preparation of such proposals, ------------------------------------0---------

/22........

I ,

Wednesday, June 20, 1973

- 22 -

URBCO BUDGETS FOR SURPLUS

*♦* ****

The 1973/74 budget for the Urban Council — the first after its reconstitution shows an estimated surplus of 840.8 million.

Revenue for the financial year, estimated at some 8267 million includes a 820 million non-recurrent grant from the government.

The expenditure is estimated at slightly more than §226 million.

Tabling the budget in Legislative Council today, the Director of

Urban Services, the Hon. D.R.W. Alexander, pointed out that it was by necessity drawn up before the Council was reconstituted on April 1 this year. It was formally adopted at a meeting on April 10 .

The greater part of the total expenditure, about 70.7 per cent, or some 8139*9 million, is allocated for personal emoluments and allowances.

About 10.9 per cent, or 824.7 million is to be used for special expenditure, 0.4 per cent or 80.9 million for capital works, and about 18 per cent or 840.6 million for other charges.

The largest source of revenue is from rates, accounting for 8206.4 million or some 77.3 per cent of the total. The rest, about 840.6 million or 15.2 per cent, is to be derived from fees, charges and other income.

The 820 million government grant made up about 7*5 per cent of the total revenue. .-r . ,

-------0----------

/23 .........

Wednesday, June 20, 1973

- 23 -

STUDENT FEES FOR POLYTECHNIC

Strident fees for the polytechnic will not be increased in the near future but may be revised later on.

The Colonial Secretary, the Hon. Sir Hugh Norman-Walker, indicated this in the Legislative Council today when replying to a question by the Hon. Mrs. Joyce Symons.

Sir Hugh said the present fees of a year had remained the same since 1966 and were taken over by the polytechnic from the technical college when it was set up in August last year.

"It would therefore be reasonable to expect that the Board of Governors of the Polytechnic and the University and Polytechnic Grants Committee would wish to examine the adequacy of these fees in the light of the costs of running the polytechnic,” he said.

-------0---------

/24........

Wednesday, June 20, 1975

- 24 -

DROP IN NUMBER OF PRIMARY "DROPOUTS"

There has been a small but significant decrease over the last two years in the number of children dropping out of Primary 4, 5 and 6 classes.

The Director of Education, the Hon. J. Canning said today in Legislative Council that he had instructed headmasters to ensure that all children admitted to public primary schools should complete their six-year course, and he would exercise compulsory powers when necessary.

However, he pointed out that the primary school wastage figures were slightly exaggerated because they included the number of children who left school due to overage or because they wished to enter another school.

The real problem, he said, is to identify "on a school basis the true drop-outs among the children who leave one school in order to enter another."

Mr. Canning advised parents that slow-learning children did not have to abandon their studies, as the Special Education Section of his department could arrange for their placement in special schools or classes.

-------0---------

/25........

Wednesday, June 20, 1973

- 25 ~

MEASURES TO COMBAT OIL SPILLAGE

********

Approval will shortly be sought from the Finance Committee to provide the Marine Department with a specially designed launch to combat oil spillage, the Financial Secretary, the Hon. C.P. Haddon-Cave, told the Legislative Council today.

He said the 70-foot launch would enable the department’s Pollution Control Unit to meet the potential emergency of large oil spillages and to enforce anti-pollution legislation more effectively.

Although Hong Kong had never experienced any serious oil pollution, he said, both the government and industry had considered all aspects of the problem.

Careful consideration, he added, was now being given to the recommendations by a special sub-committee of the Port Executive Committee which was formed last year to consider the introduction of suitable legislation and codes of practice and to examine the adequacy of facilities and equipment for combating oil pollution.

• At present, the Pollution Control Unit consisted of seven tug boats, seven twin crew lighters for logistical support and three fast personnel carriers to transport’men and equipment, the•Financial Secretary said.

It kept 10,000 gallons of chemical dispersant in stock and another 2,000 gallons could be purchased immediately on demand plus a further 300 to 500 gallons daily on a prolonged basis.

/The unit

Wednesday, June 20, 1973

- 26 -

The Royal

for reco

The unit also maintained 500 feet of oil booms to contain oil spillages and to protect such vital areas as typhoon shelters, beaches and waterfronts, and a further 1,600 feet of light weight oil beams could, when necessary, be provided on loan by oil companies.

In addition to these facilities, the Fire Services Department maintained three fire boats which were equipped to deal with oil spillages and fully manned on a 24-hour basis, Mr. Haddon-Cave said.

Hong Kong Auxiliary Air Force helicopters were also available purposes, he added.

-------0---------

12 MILLION VEHICLES CROSS THE HARBOUR SINCE AUGUST *******

Almost 8.5 million vehicles, excluding C.M.B. and K.M.B. buses, have used the cross harbour tunnel since its opening in August last year. At the same time, 3«& million vehicles were carried on the Hongkong and Yaumati vehicular ferries.

The breakdown of the figures was given to the Legislative Council today by the Financial Secretary, the Hon. C.P. Haddon-Cave.

The figures showed that in its first month of operation nearly 693,000 vehicles used the tunnel.

This climbed to a peak of 980,000 in March this year, but then dropped back to 932,000 the following month, only to rise again in May to 944,000.

During last August, the number of vehicles carried on the ferries was just over 381,000 and since then this has fluctuated from a low of 302,500 in February to 371,000 the following month. In May the figure stood at 358,000.

0 - -

/27

Wednesday, June 20, 1973

- 27 -

HEUNG YEE KUK MEETS MR. ROYLE

*******

The Under-Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, lir. Anthony Royle, yesterday (June 19) met a delegation from Hong Kong’s Heung Yee Kuk now in London.

Led by the Kuk Chairman, Mr. Chan Yat-san, the 35-nan delegation is on an official visit to Britain during which they will see new towns and urban developments.

Mr. Chan, on behalf of the Association of Chinese Traders in London, asked Mr. Royle if the immigration regulations could be relaxed to allow more workers from Hong Kong to go to Britain.

He pointed out that Chinese employers in Britain were suffering from an acute shortage of staff, especially in the restaurant trade.

Referring to the recently published McKinsey Report, Hr. Chan said the Heung Yee Kuk had set up a six-member committee to study the report and submit its views,

Mr. Royle assured the delegates that their views would be given careful consideration by the Hong Kong government.

In the evening, the delegates were guests of honour at a reception given by Mr. Royle at Lancaster House.

Earlier in the day, the Kuk members called on the Hong Kong students centre at Bayswater.

They then visited the Hong Kong Government Office in London where they were welcomed by Mr.. AOM.J. Wright, the Commissioner for Hong Kong.

-------0---------

/28........

Wednesday, June 20, 1973

- 28 -

JAPANESE VIOLINIST TO GIVE CONCERT

*******

A well-known Japanese violinist, Takeshi Kobayashi, will give a recital on June 30 (Saturday) in the City Hall Concert Hall at 8 p.m. as a part of his cultural mission in Hong Kong.

The event is co-sponsored by the Urban Council and the Consulate-General of Japan.

Takeshi Kobayashi studied the violin under the famed teacher Shinichi Suzuki, and won the first prize in an all-Japan competition in 19^9*

In the course of his career, he became the concert-master of various orchestras, and performed with famous orchestras in Europe.

On Saturday, Takeshi Kobayashi will play sonatas by Schubert, Beethoven, Prokofieff and Brahms. He will be accompanied on the piano by Noriyuki Miyazawa, a young Japanese pianist.

Tickets at S3 (students only), 35 and 38 are available daily at the

City Hall box office from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.

-------0----------

/29........

Wednesday, June 20, 1973

- 29 -

TRANSPORT ADVISORY COMMITTEE LOOKS AT MINI-BUS FARES

********

The Financial Secretary, the Hon, C.P. Haddon-Cave, told the Legislative Council today that the question of controlling public light bus fares is being re-examined by the Transport Advisory Committee.

Until the government has received and considered the committee’s further advice, Mr. Haddon-Cave said there was nothing more he could say at present.

He was replying to a question from the Hon. Wilson Wang who asked whether the government would take steps to control the fares in view of the increases imposed from time to time by mini-bus operators.

- - 0 - -


Wednesday, June 20, 1973

-CO-

EFFICIENT MAIL SERVICE

*******

Statistical sampling carried out by the Post Office shows that about 98 per cent of the mail posted in Hong Kong is delivered in the main urban areas not later than the day following the date of posting.

The same delivery time is achieved for about 95 per cent of the correspondence in rural areas in the New Territories, the islands and some housing estates, where the small amount of mail justifies only one delivery a day.

The Colonial Secretary, the Hon. Sir Hugh Norman-Walker said today in Legislative Council that the establishment of the Post Office had been strengthened over the past two years, and would be capable of maintaining this high standard of mail delivery.

In the main urban areas there are three collections and two deliveries everyday from Monday to lYiday. There are two collections of mail in the rural areas of the New Territories on each week-day.

-------0---------

/51..........

Wednesday, June 20, 1973

31 -

UNIVERSITY FEE INCREASES

****$*«

The Colonial Secretary, the Hon. Sir Hugh Norman-Walker, today stressed that only those students who can afford to pay the recently announced new fee structure at the two universities would have to pay in full.

Those who cannot afford, or can only afford part of them, need only to approach the Student Finance Scheme which will offer assistance accordingly.

Sir Hugh said the paramount and continuing policy in this matter is to ensure that no student who has obtained a place should be denied a university education through lack of financial resources.

"The revision of fees were, therefore, accepted in the certain knowledge that the position of less well-off students would continue to be fully protected."

He pointed out that no action is necessary to avoid hardship being inflicted on existing students as the new fees do not apply to any of them.

"The new fees apply only to those students who will enrol after July 1974."

•------0---------

Wednesday, June 20, 1975

- 32 -

WARM TRIBUTES TO MRS. ELLEN LI

********

The Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, today paid warm tribute to Mrs. Ellen Li who is retiring from the Legislative Council.

He mentioned her valuable work on the Urban Council, the Social Welfare Advisory Committee, the Po Leung Kuk, the Narcotics Advisory Committee and the Family Planning Association.

,lBut in this Council she will always be remembered with, affection and respect as literally ’the first lady”, he said.

”Her knowledge and her vigour and her sincerity will be greatly missed, but above all we will miss Mrs. Li for herself.

”1 should like to wish her very happy and prosperous years ahead,” he added. ,•

The Senior Unofficial Member, Mr. P.C. Woo, also commended Mrs. Li on her contributions to the progress of Hong Kong and particularly her efforts towards improving women’s rights.

’’She has had much to do with moves towards equal pay for women% and more recently pensionability for married women in the civil service.

’’She has even infringed on the sacred sphere, of men and helped to abolish the status of concubines,” he said.

Mr. Woo said he and his colleagues wished Mrs. Li every success in the future and was -confident that she would continue to be active in community affairs.

The Colonial Secretary, Sir Hugh Norman-Walker, also joined the

Governor and Mr. Woo in thanking Mrs. Li for her work and wished her every success in the future.

Wednesday, June 20, 1973

- 33 -

ISSUE OF IDENTITY CARDS

********

For those arriving in Hong Kong legally and with the right to remain, identity cards are available after making a single application.

In reply to a question from the Hon. T.K. Ann, the Colonial Secretary the Hon. Sir Hugh Norman-Walker, said nearly 17^,000 people entered Hong Kong legally during the past financial year.

For those applicants who entered Hong Kong illegally, the majority also need to apply only once if they are, after investigation, allowed to stay.

The number of applicants in this category amounted to more than 15,000 in the 12 months ended on January J1.

In the case of a minority of illegal immigrants, Sir Hugh said it could be a difficult and lengthy process to trace their background, often because the initial information they provided was false.

’’For this reason, during the same period there were 1,640 applications from illegal immigrants who had already applied previously.

’’The Government has in hand ways and means of reducing this figure but I am by no means convinced that amendment of the Regulations is either the right, the easiest or the quickest way.”

Release Time: 9*3° P•m

PRH 7

gisI ImII

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Thursday, June 21, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No,

Urgent consideration being given to sending a mission to Japan to try to get increased supplies of plastics materials for local manufacturers • • • •..................  •......••••«•••••• 1

Spot checks by Commerce and Industry Department indicate rice prices returning to normal.............................    2

Assistant Director of Aviation to attend six—day airport operators conference in Hanover..................................    3

Technical education division expanding and moving to new accommodation .......................................................... 4

19 year-old youth receives stiff sentence for using firearm to resist arrest •...............................    ••••••• 5

Seven fishermen to receive navigation certificates ••••••••••••.»••• 6

New English enquiry programme conducted by Secretariat for Home Affairs .......••••••••••••••••••••••.••♦•...............  7

1Jth anniversary of Wong Tai Sin Community Centre......... 8

A commemorative vase symbolising the ”international brotherhood of Scouting" displayed in the City Hall ....................  9

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Thursday, June 21, 1973

- 1 -

PLASTICS MISSION TO JAPAN BEING CONSIDERED ««*«***

The Commerce and Industry Department is giving urgent consideration to sending a mission to Japan for talks with the Japanese government and materials producers in an effort to get increased supplies of plastics materials for local manufacturers.

An Assistant Director of the department, Mr. R. Porter, said today that for such a mission to be successful it would have to leave very soon if the increased supplies were to help the manufacturers over their peak production period in July and August.

"However, it would not be productive to go without all the facts at its disposal."

With this in mind, the department has embarked on a publicity campaign, starting today, appealing to plastics manufacturers to complete the questionnaires recently sent to them.

Advertisements have been placed in a number of papers asking the manufacturers to furnish accurate returns by the weekend (June 23)*

He said he hoped they would appreciate that the sole purpose of the department in asking for this was to "help them over this difficult period"• "With the help of the Trade Development Council new sources of supply have been located, but if the problem is to be overcome increased supplies from Japan are essential," Mr. Porter emphasised.

He explained that everything possible was being done to alleviate the present shortage of plastics materials.

"Many discussions have been held by Commerce and Industry Department officials with representatives of manufacturers and importers, and the Director Mr. E.P. Ho, has held discussions with the Japanese Consul-General in Hong Kong Mr. Porter said.

-------0--------- /2......................

u

Thursday, June 21, 197?

- 2 -

SPOT CHECKS SHOW FALL-OFF IN PICE PRICES

******

Spot checks by inspectors from the Commerce and Industry Department show that retail rice prices are falling back to acceptable levels.

During the past two days shops retailing rico on both sides of the harbour have been visited and rice is now being sold in the price range 81.20 to 81.80 per catty.

When "panic buying" started due to completely unfounded fears that Hong Kong might face a rice shortage, prices went as high as £2 to 82.20 per catty.

"We are now satisfied that the market has stabilised, but a close eye will be kept on prices to ensure that no unreasonable fluctuation occurs," a spokesman for the department said today.

Stem warnings to "toe the line" have been given by the department to rice trade operators who have abused the government’s control scheme.

One importer who failed to offer reasonable supplies for sale has been ordered to put on the market the balance of his stock at the normal market rates (£115 per picul for one hundred percent whole Thai Rice).

If he finds difficulty in securing buyers, the Commerce and Industry Department will authorise alternative retail outlets to purchase from him directly.

Several wholesalers who put an excessive "mark-up” on their supplies to retailers have been warned that unless they can give a satisfactory explanation it may be necessary to advise registered importers to make no further sales to them.

/Wholesalers ........

Thursday, June 21, 1973

- 3 -

Wholesalers are being requested to insist that the retailers they deal with display price tags or. -ice offered for sale in their shops.

• • . • O • 9

Note to Editors: A picture showing a spot check by

Commerce and Industry officials will be boxed this evening.

-------0----------

INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT OPERATIONS TO BE STUDIED

*******

Mr. B.D„ Keep, Assistant Director of Civil Aviation (Technical and Planning), will leave for Germany on Saturday (June 23) to represent Hong Kong at the Conference of the Airport Operators Council International.

The six-day conference opens in Hanover on June 25 and will discuss a broad range of topics concerned with operations of airports throughout the world. The questions of airport access and aircraft noise will also be discussed.

After the conference, Mr. Keep will visit airports at Berlin, Frankfurt, Munich and Zurich to study the latest development in airport operation and planning.

He is expected to return to Hong Kong early next month.

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A....

Thursday, June 21, 1973

- 4 -

NEV/ OFFICES FOR TECHNICAL EDUCATION DIVISION ♦ * * * * ♦ ♦

The Technical Education Division of the Education Department is expanding to help meet the main thrust of Hong Kong’s educational effort in secondary and technical education-

To cope with this expansion, the division is moving from the department’s headquarters in Lee Gardens to new accommodation on the 2nd floor of Bonaventure House, 91 Leighton Road, tomorrow (Friday)-

It will now be responsible for the development of 5-year courses in existing and new secondary technical schools as well as implementation of the approved programme for pre-vocational schools and technical institutes.

In addition it will maintain the closest possible links with the Hong Kong Polytechnic.

The division is headed by Mr. Andrew J. Kingwell who took up his appointment in February 1973 as Deputy Director of Education (Technical). His new telephone number is 5-793777•

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/5.........

I

Thursday, June 21, 1973

- 5 -

STIFF SENTENCE FOR USING FIREARM

««****«*

The Chief Justice, Mr. Justice Briggs, said today that the sevenyear prison term he imposed on a 19-year-old youth was to act as a deterrent to others who used firearms of whatever sort when resisting arrest.

The defendant, Mak Wing-fai had pleaded guilty to charges of possession of arms and ammunition, making use of a firearm to prevent airrest, and wounding with intent.

The Supreme Court was told that Mak had a modified toy pistol and a 16-inch knife with him when a police party raided a hilliard room in Wan Chai on February 15, this year.

He started to run on seeing the police. When he reached Luard Road, he fired at two police officers who were chasing after him.

One of the bullets hit the ballpen of an inspector who was not injured as a result.

The police later found some more modified toy weapons in Mak’s house.

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/6........

Thursday, June 21, 1973

- 6 -

CERTIFICATES FOR FISHERMEN

********

Seven young fishermen will be presented with navigation certificates tomorrow (Friday) on completion of a six-month training course conducted by the Agriculture and Fisheries Department.

They are Mr. Li Kwok-ming, Mr. Choi Chung-wo, Mr. Lo Siu-ki, Mr. Lam Chun-wai, Mr. Cheung Tung-kwai, Mr. Chan Chi-keung and Mr. Lam Wai-kit.

The training course aims at providing a working knowledge of chartwork, seamanship, signalling and navigation by "dead reckoning". The department hopes that this will encourage the fishermen to search for new and richer fishing grounds.

During their course, the seven trainees were taken on two one-week cruises on "Cape St. Mary", the department’s research vessel.

Mr. J. Thompson, Assistant Director (Fisheries) will be presenting the certificates at 2.30 p.m.

Mote to Editors: You are invited to send a reporter

and/or photographer to cover the presentation ceremony and to attend the tea party afterwards. It will be held in the navigational classroom on the second floor of the Fish Marketing Organisation’s Secondary Practical and Primary School at 2, Tin Wan Hill Road, Aberdeen.

0--------

Thursday, June 21, 1973

- 7 -

NEW ENGLISH ENQUIRY PROGRAMME *****

A new public enquiry session entitled "What’s Your Problem" will be featured in the second part of the weekly English television programme "Spectrum" to keep non-Cantonese speaking people informed of government policies and regulations.

Conducted by the Secretariat for Home Affairs, the special session aims at complementing the Chinese radio enquiry programme presented regularly over Radio Hong Kong and Commercial Radio.

Residents from all walks of life may send in their questions which will be answered by Mr. John Chambers, Deputy Secretary for Home

Affairs and Mrs, Dora Taylor, Officer-in-charge of the Information Division of the Secretariat for Home Affairs.

Senior officers of various government departments concerned are also invited to take part in the programme to give more detailed and expert answers to questions.

The television programme, covering a great variety of subjects,

is shown over the Pearl netv/ork of T.V.B. every Sunday at 5:30 p.m. and at

10:10 p.m. over the English Channel of R.T.V. every Monday.

Members of the public may send in their written questions to

"Information Division,

Secretariat for Home Affairs, International Building, 10th floor, 141 Des Voeux Road Central, Hong Kong."

or "’Spectrum - What’s your problem?’

Radio Hong Kong, Broadcasting House, Broadcast Drive, Kowloon."

Thursday, June 21, 1973

- 8 -

WONG TAI SIN COMMUNITY CENTRE ANNIVERSARY «*«***«

Another community centre run by the Social Welfare Department is celebrating its anniversary this week — the Wong Tai Sin Community Centre which was opened 13 years ago®

Since then it has become the centre of community life in the area.

Among the many projects it has started is a service for old people and programmes for leadership training and development of volunteers. "All projects are geared to cater to those living in the area”, said Mr. Basil Leung, the Warden.

Among the other services provided in the same building are a nursery, a practical training centre and a club for deaf people, all run by voluntary agencies.

A party to mark the centre’s 13th anniversary will be held tomorrow (Friday) afternoon, followed by a variety show in the evening.

Programmes have also been arranged for the coming weekend when a party for young people will be held on Saturday (J'.ine 23) evening and a fun fair for children and a Chinese opera show on Sunday. Details and tickets for these events can be obtained from the'centre’’s group work unit.

Note to Editors: You are welcome to send a reporter/

photographer to cover the celebrations. The party will take place at 4 p.m. tomorrow and the variety show at 8 p.m.

On Saturday, the party for young people starts at 8 p.m. at the Centre. On Sunday, the fun fair will be held at the centre and starts at 2 p.m. The Chinese opera show that night will be held at Morse Park beginning at 7s3P p*m.

r

Thursday, June 21, 1973

- 9 -

WORLD SCOUTING VASE ON DISPLAY

******

A commemorative vase which was presented to the Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose,by the Scout Movement in Hong Kong will be displayed at the City Hall main foyer for a week beginning today.

The vase belongs to the classical design of the ’’Clerriont” which flourished in the early 20th Century.

A number of local supporters of the Scouts acquired the commemorative vase, normally for presentation to heads of states, from the World Scout Movement. It was later presented to the Governor, the Chief Scout of Hong Kong, who asked that it be displayed at the City Hall as a symbol of the ties which inspire the international brotherhood of Scouting.

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Release Time: 7.30 p.m.

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Friday, June 22, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No.

New regulations introduced requiring compulsory wearing of crash helmets for motorcyclists and pillion passengers.....................    1

Bettor working conditions for manual workers and non*€ianual workers earning less than $1,500 ............................................ 3

New 17-storey police station to be built in North Point ................ 5

Marine Department sounds warning on overloading of cargo vessels ••• 7

Surface mail to certain African countries may have been destroyed in ship fire..........................................................   8

Sophisticated mail handling systems will be installed at the new post offices in Central and Hung Hom.................................... 9

Employers urged to offer jobs to trained blind telephone operators.. 10

Footpaths and tracks in Brick Hill will be closed to facilitate the oceanarium project..............................................        11

Rest garden to be built within the loop of the Canal Road flyover.•. 12

Princess Margaret Road flyover to be closed for five hours over the weekend ......................................................... 12

Nev/ forms for "rent freeze" legislation .......•••••••••••••.........  1J

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Friday, June 22, 1973

- 1 -

COMPULSORY WEARING OF SAFETY HELMETS BEING INTRODUCED

********

The Executive Council has approved new regulations dealing with the compulsory wearing, sale and hiring out of crash helmets to motorcyclists.

The new rules, laid down in the Road Traffic (Protective Equipment) Regulations 1973? are published in today’s gazette but will not come into effect until later.

A spokesman for the Transport Department explained that there would be a delay of about six months in order to give motorcyclists and suppl 5ers of protective helmets adequate time to acquire helmets of an approved design.

Once the regulations are in force, all motor cycle riders and their pillion passengers will be required to wear approved helmets, but it will not affect passengers sitting in a side car.

Certain groups of people, such as turbanned Sikhs, may also be exempted on application.

Failure to wea:' a crash helmet when riding a motorcycle will be an offence. The maximum penalty will be a fine of $500 and imprisonment for three months on first conviction, and a fine of $1,000 and six months’ jail for any subsequent conviction.

Approved protective helmets will be those bearing a mark applied by the manufacturer indicating compliance with the specifications in British standards 2001, 1869 or 2495; Japanese industrial standard JIS 8153-1970; Australian standard E33-1968; and American National Standard Institute Z90.1-1971•

/The Commissioner •••••

Friday, June 22, 1973

- 2 -

The Commissioner for Transport also has discretion to approve other helmets provided they afford a degree of protection from injury equal to or greater than those which comply with the quoted standards.

The term "motor cycle1’ includes motorcycles, motor scooters and all two wheeled motor vehicles with an unladen weight of not more than six hundredweight (cwt).

The regulations stipulate that only approved helemts may be sold, hired out, or displayed for sale or hiring.

Anyone who contravenes this regulation by possessing either for sale or hire an unapproved type of helmet, will be liable on conviction to a fine of 81,000 and six months’ imprisonment.

In the event of a conviction for the possession of a non-approved helmet, the courts may order the forfeiture and disposal of the helmets.

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/3........

Friday, June 22, 1973

- 3 -

BETTER CONDITIONS FOR WORKERS

»***«**»*

All manual workers and non-manual workers earning not more than $1,500 a month will be entitled to sickness allowance and holidays with pay, under new provisions in the Employment Ordinance.

They will become operative on July 1, 1973 and January 1, 1974 respectively.

Ilr. Y.N. Yiu, acting Senior Labour Officer of the Labour Department, said today that many employees such as restaurant workers and shop assistants will, for the first time, enjoy statutory rights to sickness allowance and paid holidays.

The old ordinance - the Industrial Employment (holidays with pay and sickness allowance) Ordinance - applied only to manual workers and non-manual workers with a monthly earning not exceeding $700 working in industrial establishments.

IvIr. Yiu, who was speaking at the luncheon meeting of the Rotary Club of Kowloon North, said an employee will qualify to receive sickness allowance of half his wages (excluding overtime) if he has worked for his employer for not less than three months.

He can accumulate his entitlement at the rate of one sickness day for each completed month of service, with a maximum accumulation of 24 days.

If an employee’s sickness lasted shorter than his accumulation, the balance could be brought forward.

/Mr. Yiu .....

Friday, June 22, 1973

- 4 -

Mr. Yiu explained that generally speaking, those who were qualified to receive sickness allowance were also entitled to be granted six paid holidays a year.

These six holidays are : the first two days of the Chinese New Year, the Ching Ming Festival, the Dragon Boat Festival, the day following the Mid-Autumn Festival, and the first day of January.

"To allow an employer the flexibility of operating his business/1 he said, "these statutory holidays may be changed under certain conditions."

Mr. Yiu said that the revised legislation would benefit many more workers because it covers all sectors of employment; increases the maximum sickness allowance from *12 days to 24 days; and allows employers more flexibility in fixing holidays.

He also pointed out that the law only prescribed the minimum standards to be observed and by no way precluded an employer from offering their employees better terms of employment.

Leaflets explaining the provisions of the sickness allowance and holidays with pay are being prepared by the Labour Department and will be distributed to the public free of charge as soon as they are ready.

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/5.........

Friday, June 22, 1973

- 5 -

NEW POLICE. STATION FOR NORTH POINT

********

A new police station which is also to serve as divisional headquarters will soon be built in North Point.

It will be the first of five new stations whose construction work is to start within this year. The other four are located in Kwai Chung, Stanley, Hang Hau and Ping Che.

, a ^The North Point Police Station, situated at the end of Java Road near the North Point Fire Station, consists of a 17-storey block and a single-storey ancillary building.

The high block incorporates a podium of two floors, housing the report room, cells, offices and lecture rooms.

The remaining floors are to be taken up by barnacles, emergency accommodation, canteen and kitchen, recreation room, changing room, and quarters for the families of four senior officers.

Space for parking, dog kennels and general storage is provided in the ancillary building.

Piling for the new complex has been completed, and construction is expected to start in early August, taking about 21 months to finish.

The Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, opened the Tsz Wan Shan and Ngau Tau Kok Police Stations last week.

Two other new ones at Chai Wan and Happy Valley will also be completed and opened later this year.

/While .........

Friday, June 22, 1973

- 6 -

While opening the Tsz Wan Shan station, Sir Murray said it was evident that most centres of population wanted a police station within easy reach. This, he said, was a striking testimony of the confidence of the community in the police.

He pointed out that the new stations were designed to meet the community’s ’’very reasonable wishes” that procedures in stations should be shortened, and that report rooms should be separated from charge rooms.

The Governor described this as an example of some of the practical steps taken by the police in response to the wishes of the community. He stressed that it is on this partnership of police and public that ”we must depend to defeat violent crime.”

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/?..........

Friday, June 22, 1973

- 7 -

WARNING ON OVERLOADING OF SHIPS

********

A spokesman for the Marine Department today warned masters of cargo vessels that they were liable to heavy fines if their ships were found to be overloaded.

He gave the warning after the master of a Panamanian freighter was fined 815>000 by Magistrate, Mr. P.M. Corfe, in Central Magistracy yesterday (Thursday) afternoon. . • .

The spokesman said that the Marine Department maintained a strict watch to ensure that vessels entering or leaving port were not overloaded and so endanger the lives of those on board.

The vessel involved in yesterday1s court proceedings arrived in port on Monday (June 18) with a cargo of cement.

Several hours after her arrival, a marine department harbour services patrol reported that the vessel appeared to be overloaded and two surveyors of ships were subsequently sent to investigate.

It was learned that the vessel had taken in 100 tons of fresh water shortly after her arrival, and investigations showed that she was overloaded by 1^ inches.

/8........

Friday, June 22, 1975

- 8 -

MAIL DESTROYED IN SHIP FIRE

»******»«»

The Post Office announced today that as a result of a fire on board a freighter — the M.S. Tsedek — surface mail posted in Hong Kong between April 9 and 14. to Cameroon, Ghana, the Ivory Coast, Mali, Zaire and certain other countries in Africa, may have been lost.

A spokesman said reports had been received that a fire had broken out in the mail storage areas of the Tsedek, which sailed from Hong Kong on April 17 •

Exact details were not yet known, he said, but it was feared that most of the mail had been destroyed.

-----0------

/9..........

Friday, June 22, 1973

- 9 -

SOPHISTICATED MAIL HANDLING SYSTEM FOR NEW POST OFFICES

**********

A $15 million handling system will be installed at the new General Post Office on Hong Kong Island and at the International Mail Centre in Hung Hom.

International contractors are invited in today*s gazette to apply for inclusion in a selective tendering list for the two mechanisation projects.

The new hand! t ng system will incorporate sophisticated postal equipment including special conveyors and mail sorting machines.

It will greatly assist the Post Office in its work, which involves the handling of nearly one million letters and parcels each day, and exchanging mail with over 1J0 countries.

Piling work for the new General Post Office on the Central reclamation will start next month and the building is scheduled for completion at the end of 1975 for occupation the following year.

Construction of the International Mail Centre in Hung Hom is expected to begin next year and it should be completed in 1976.

Tenders for providing and installing the mechanisation equipment for the new building projects will be invited within the next five months.

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/10..........

Friday, June 22, 1973

- 10 -

APPEAL TO EMPLOYERS TO TAKE ON BLIND TELEPHONE OPERATORS

*********

In spite of repeated appeals, employers are still showing reluctance to employ blind telephone operators, a spokesman for the Social Welfare Department said today.

He said that while more employers were beginning to accept blind workers in other jobs, many still did not recognise that they can work as telephone operators just as well.

"It is hard to understand this apathy. Blind people who choose to become telephone operators are trained for the work at the Rotary Training Centre of the Society for the Blind," he said.

"Those blind people who are holding jobs as telephone operators have been praised by their employers, and in some instances, are considered to be better than their more fortunate counterparts."

At the moment, there are five trained blind workers waiting for jobs as telephone operators.

The spokesman again called on employers to consider offering jobs to these people. This can be done through Mr. Joseph Ho of the Social Welfare Department’s Job Placement Unit at telephone 3-419221.

The unit is responsible for finding jobs for handicapped people.

During May it placed 27 disabled people in jobs. These included seven blind, 11 crippled, two deaf or dumb, three former mental patients, one mentally retarded person and three former TB patients.

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/11 .........

Iriday, June 22, 1973

- 11 -

CLOSURE OF ROADS FOR OCEANARIUM PROJECT

*******

All ’streets’ within the boundary of the Oceanarium project at Brick Hill in Aberdeen are to be closed to enable the project to proceed, There are no major roads in the area, but there is a proliferation of footpaths and tracks which will have to be closed.

The closure is also expected to affect the main access to a villa nearby and plans are in hand to provide alternative access for the residents.

Anyone objecting to the proposed order must send his objection in writing to the Director of Public Works to reach his office not later than July 22. Claims for compensation must also reach his office not later than August 22.

The claims must specify the property which will be affected and the interest of the person making the claim in the property.

They must also specify the manner in which the property will be affected and an estimate of the pecuniary loss or damage to tho property.

A plan of the area affected by the closure can be seen at the City District Office (Central) Enquiry Branch, Central Government Offices, West Wing entrance; at the Crown Lands and Survey Office, Murray Building, and at the City District Office, Aberdeen Sub-Office, 200 Aberdeen Hain Road, 1st floor.

The Oceanarium to be built within this area is being developed by Ocean Park Limited, a non-profit making organisation incorporated and financed by the Royal Hong Kong Jockey Club.

On completion, it will provide educational and recreational facilities for the people of Hong Kong.

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/12

Friday, June 22, 1973

- 12 -

NEW REST GARDEN FOR CAUSEWAY BAY

*******

• A new centrally located rest garden will be built for the residents of Causeway Bay and Wan Chai districts.

Located within the loop of the Canal Road flyovers, the rest garden will have an area of about 36,000 square feet.

* Flower beds, paving, tables and garden chairs will be installed so

that residents can have an additional green belt area near their homes.

The garden was planned as one of the amenities in the multi-million dollar cross harbour tunnel road connections project.

Construction work is expected to begin next month, and take about three months to complete.

-------0---------

TEMPORARY CLOSURE OF FLYOVER

*******

The Princess Margaret Road flyover in Homantin will be closed for a short period this weekend to enable maintenance work to be carried out.

From midnight tomorrow (Saturday) to 5 a.m. the next day (Sunday), the flyover will not be accessible to motorists.

During the five-hour period, northbound and southbound traffic will be diverted to the lower roads.

Appropriate traffic signs will be erected to guide motorists.

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/u............

Friday, June 22, 1973

- 13 -

NEW FORMS FOR ’RENT FREEZE’ LEGISLATION *******

The Commissioner of Rating and Valuation announced today that he has specified four forms for use under the newly enacted Domestic Premises (Tenure and Rent) (Temporary Provisions) Ordinance 1973? which put a temporary standstill on rents for all post-war domestic premises not already covered by existing legislation.

Three of the forms are for use by the public and are available free of charge from the Rating and Valuation Department’s offices at 1 Garden Road or 99 Queensway.

Form TR1 is an application for a certificate of primary user. This form may be used by a landlord, tenant, principal tenant or sub-tenant where there is a dispute as to whether a tenancy or sub-tenancy is domestic.

Form TR2 is a notice to quit, to be served by a landlord or principal tenant who requires possession of premises for use as a dwelling by himself or his family, or if he intends to rebuild the premises.

Form TR3 is a counter-notice, for use by a tenant or sub-tenant who has been served a notice to quit.

The Commissioner emphasised that it was important for those concerned to use the correct forms. ’’When in doubt, advice should be sought at the offices of the Rating and Valuation Department,” he said.

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Please tj.me; 7*30 p«m.

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Saturday, June 23, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No,

Murray Road car park will soon be opened to provide another 900 parking spaces in Central .......................................     1

Water safety clubs are a new feature in this year’s "Let’s Swim" •• 2

Three local secondary students commended in an essay competition among Commonwealth students........................................ 3

The Heung Yee Kuk goodwill delegation viewed British new towns and urban development..................................  .......... 4

Part of Babington Path will be closed for three months............. 5

Weather in May was hotter and wetter than usual ....................  6

New traffic arrangements introduced in North Point and Tsim Sha Tsui ................................................    ••••••••.. 8

Eighty cases of measles were reported last month ..........••••••• • 9

Water cut in Wan Chai.................•...........................    9

Winner of first prize in second Lottery gets more than S75O»OOO • •• 10

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Saturday, June 23, 1973

- 1 -

MORE PARKING SPACES TO BE PROVIDED

********

Another 900 parking spaces will come into operation in Central District within the next few weeks, to relieve the present parking congestion in the area.

The 12-storey Murray Road car park which cost about S10 million, will be handed over to the Urban Council before the end of this month.

A spokesman for the Public Works Department said today that the lower eight floors will be used for parking. Part of the ground floor, the mezzanine and the two uppermost floors covering a total area of about 90,000 square feet, will be used as government offices.

The building will have four passenger lifts, one goods lift and four stairways to serve motorists and the public.

The parking system will be similar to all other modern multi-storey car parks in Hong Kong with sloping floors and separate up and down traffic ramps.

The pay office, public lavatories and other ancillary facilities will be located on the ground floor.

On completion, it will be the fifth multi-storey car park in Central. The other four are situated at Rumsey Street, Star Ferry, City Hall and Garden Road which provide a total of 2,273 parking spaces.

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/2.........

Saturday, June 23, 1973

- 2 -

WATER SAFETY CLUBS

New Feature In This Year’s ’’Let’s Swim” Programme

********

The Urban Council intends to make the whole community aware of the importance of water safety this summer.

The formation of water safety clubs is one of the many projects launched in the Urban Council campaign this year called ’’Let’s Swim ’73”.

Schools, youth organizations and local and district associations have been asked to form water safety clubs aimed at promoting water-safety whenever the water is used for recreational activities.

For some schools and organizations which already have their own life guard clubs or units, they are invited to expand their activities and to make a start in catering for younger members by forming a water safety section in their clubs or units.

A spokesman for the Urban Council said: ’’The general theme of forming water safety clubs is to promote learn-to-swim programmes, to promote training for survival swimming and proficiency awards, to encourage life- • saving training and the gaining of a life-saving qualification, and to ensure that the basic water safety rules are widely known.”

The sponsors and organisers of this project are the Urban Council, the Education Department, the South China Morning Post, the Royal Life Saving Society (H.K. Branch) and the Hong Kong Life Guard Club.

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/3..........

Saturday, June 23, 1973

- 3 -

HONG KONG PUPILS COMMENDED

Three Hong Kong pupils have been highly commended by the Royal Commonwealth Society for their entries in the 1972-73 Essay Competition.

Mary Chan of Diocesan Girls* School and Ellen Szeto of Sacred

Heart Canossian College were ’’highly commended”’ in the Class A competition while Ellen’s schoolmate, Angela Chan received the same honour in the Class C competition. . ‘

Other essays which were ’’commended” came from Patricia Ho of

St. Mary’s Canossian College; Rebecca Lo of St. Paul’s Secondary School;

Viola Wu, Annie Fong, Ruth Yvonne Hsu and Millie Kwan of Sacred Heart Canossian College; Jerina Bas of St. Francis Canossian College and Sabrina Yih of

Diocesan Girls’ School. . .**?

The competition is held annually by the Society with a view to encouraging the progress of Commonwealth studies in the schools of the Commonwealth and among the children of British subjects everywhere.

The Hong Kong General Chamber of Commerce awards book prizes to the first three competitors in each class of the preliminary round held locally.

Hong Kong’s participation in the competition- is organized by.

Sir Douglas Clague, the Corresponding Secretary, of the Society in Hong Kong.

• - - - 0--------

A...........

»

Saturday, June 23, 1973

- 4 -f

KUK DELEGATES TOUR NEW BRITISH TOWNS

**«***««

The Heung Yee Kuk delegation, currently on an official visit to Britain, has completed a two-day tour to see new towns and urban developments.

They visited, among othersfthe Department of the Environment yesterday (June 22) for talks with British officials concerned with land acquisition policy Questions of controlling environmental pollution were ‘also raisedT

On Thursday (June 21), the 35 Kuk representatives visited the

Crawley Nev; Town some 30 miles south of London.’-

Crawley is one of several new towns built’ since the war to all eviate overcrowding in London and it is of special interest to people from the New Territories who are concerned with the problem^ of integrating Hong Kong’s own urban population overspill.

They also had discussions with staff members of the Crawley New Town Commission. A number of interesting parallels were drawn between the development of new towns in Britain and in the Nev/ Territories of Hong Kong.

On Wednesday, the delegation gave a dinner party at a restaurant in Soho in honour of their hosts in London," the Association of Chinese Traders.

Among the guests were the New Territories District Commissioner,

Mr. D.C. Bray who is currently on leave in Britain; two former Commissioners, Messrs. K.S. Kinghorn and J.T. Wakefield; the Commissioner for Hong Kong, Mr* A.M.J. Wright, and representatives from the Foreign and Commonwealth Office.

/Welcoming ..•••••

Saturday, June 23, 1973

• 5 -

Welcoming the guests, the delegation leader, Mr. Chan Yat-san, said the main purpose of their visit was to make direct contact with the Hong Kong Chinese community in Britain and Europe, and to offer whatever assistance the Kuk could give them in solving any problems they might have

Earlier in the week, the delegation had a meeting with the Undersecretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, I-lr< Anthony Royle and discussed various problems concerning Hong Kongt

« • 0 v ~ -

ROAD CLOSURE

The section of Babington Path between Nos, 17 and 27, which was closed to vehicular traffic on June 18, will remain closed for about three months to facilitate emergency road repair works now being carried out.

Barriers and signs have been posted to guide motorists.

--------0--------

/6.........

Saturday, June 23, 1973

- 6 -

REVIEW OF LAST MONTH’S WEATHER

*******

May 1973 was wetter and. hotter than usual. During the month there were only two days on which no rainfall was recorded at the Royal Observatory,

The month’s total rainfall of 516.6 mm is more than 75 per cent above the normal. The mean -temperature of 26.8 degree Celsius is the 5th highest on record for May. *

The month began with mainly fine weather apart from a few showers. A cold front arrived from the north on.May.3t bringing scattered showers and isolated thunderstorms to the Colony.

The weather was cloudy and cooler with occasional rain during the next two days. On May 6, a trough of low pressure passed through Hong Kong from the south, resulting in periods of heavy rain and widespread th under stere."

There were occasional showers on May 7 and 8. Another cold front passed through Hong Kong from the north on May 9i causing scattered thunders! and periods of heavy rain. The weather remained unsettled on May 10 and became cooler on May 11 when the minimum temperature of the month, 21.6 degree Celsius, was recorded.

On May 12, a trough of low pressure moved northwards over the South China Sea and widespread thunderstorms and heavy rain were again experienced in the Colony on May 13*

From May 14 to 26, several troughs formed over central and southerr China but did not move southwards to affect Hong Kong.

/On May 27, .•-•«..•-

Saturday, June 23, 1973

On May 27, a trough developed over the south China coast and conditions in Hong Kong became unsettled with occasional thunderstorms and heavy showers* However, the trough dissipated and the weather improved with long sunny periods on May 31*

Eleven aircraft were diverted due to adverse weather conditions during the month.

No tropical cyclones developed over the western north Pacific and the South China Sea during the month* This was the first time since 1934 when tropical cyclones were completely absent over the region during the first five months of the yearj

Thunderstorm and heavy rain warnings were issued on 15 occassions.

The month’s figures and departures from normal were:

Sunshine - 132.0 hours; 24.1 hours below normal

Rainfall 516.6 mm; 223*9 mm above normal

Cloudiness 81 per cent; 5 per cent above normal

Relative Humidity 88 per cent; 3 per cent above normal

Mean Maximum Temperature 2?.3°C; 1.5°C above normal

Mean Temperature 26.8°C; 1.6°C above normal •

Mean Minimum Temperature 25.0°C; 1.7°C above normal

Mean Dew Point 24.5°C; 2.1 °C above normal

Total Evaporation 152.5 mm; 17.2 mm below normal

A maximum temperature of 32.4 degrees Celsius was recorded on May 23, and a minimum temperature of 21.6 degrees Celsius was recorded on May 11*

-----0----------

/8.........

Saturday, June 23, 1973

- 8 -

TRAFFIC RE-ARRANGEMENTS IN NORTH POINT AND TSIM SHA TSUI

********

New traffic arrangements and restrictions will be introduced next week in several areas on both sides of the harbour so as to improve local traffic conditions.

In Kowloon, the section of Ashley Road between Salisbury Road and Middle Road will be routed one-way southbound with effect from 10 a.m. on Monday (June 25) •

This arrangement is to reduce the hazard to pedestrians crossing Ashley Road at its junction with Salisbury Road.

On the Island, Marble Road between Shu Kuk Street and Kam Hong Street in North Point will be re-routed one-way eastbound and closed to public light buses- from 10 a.m. on Tuesday (June 26).

Public light buses will also be prohibited from Kam Hong Street between Java Road and Marble Road. A stand for public light buses will be established in front of Nos. 62-78 Marble Road.

Appropriate traffic signs will be posted in both areas to guide motorists.

-------------------------------0--------- ’ * •

/9.........

Saturday, June 23, 1973

- 9 -

HEALTH REPORT Ft® MAY

********

Eighty cases of measles, and one death, were reported during May, according to the monthly health statistics released today by the Medieal and Health Department.

Also during the month, there were 48 eases of bacillary dysentery and one death, and five cases of amoebiasis and one death.

Tuberculosis accounted for 569 notifications and 103 deaths.

The incidence of all notifiable diseases rose to 790 from last month’s 782, and the number of deaths totalled 106 compared with 73 in April.

There were 26 cases of chickenpox, but no reports of diphtheria or poliomyelitis.

Other infectious diseases did not show any appreciable variation.

Hong Kong remained free from cholera and other quarantinable diseases during the month.

-------0 --------

WATER INTERRUPTION ♦ ♦♦♦♦

Water supply to a number of premises in Wanchai will be interrupted

for eight hours from 10 p.m. on Monday (June 25) to 6 a.m. the following morning.

The temporary stoppage is to enable the Waterworks Office to make a fresh water connection at Bowrington Road.

All premises in Bowrington Road, Chan Tong Street, and Nos. 3*4? Morrison Hill Road, No. 1 Leighton Road, and Nos. 251-263 and 250-270 Wan Chai Road will be affected.

--------0--------- /10.......................

Saturday, June 2J, 1973

1Q. -

SECOND GOVERNMENT LOTTERY DRAWN AT CITY HALL

********

The first prize of $753,600 for the second government lottery

this year was won by ticket No. 618853-

This and other winning numbers were drawn this morning at the Concert Hall of the City Hall by four Radio Hong Kong personalities —' Miss Susanna Lung, Miss Elaine Sung, Miss Maria Lo and Miss. Lancie Yeung.

The second prize of $18£;,4OO went to ticket No. 804802.

Ticket Nos. 88,228, 109,055, 523,393, 693,811, and 855124 won the five third- prizes of $18,840 each.

Winning numbers for the 50 special prizes of $1,884 each are as

follows:

9722 136318 345103 621092 856643

16853 143125 410495 635936 864072

18304 158682 423984 667203 865380 •

41914 178382 440136 674853 866272

84701 192726 457763 676931 870635

90785 199306 501746 719905 871816

• -• 115183 288190 516209 785412 876236

116527 289003 527829 797271 882106

118127 299098 533674 81629^ 897784

133547 338351 539084 839561 906777

- .----0

Release Time: 2.30 P»n>»

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Monday, June 25, 1975

CONTENTS

Page No. |

Closer co-operation between government and voluntary agencies in planning social services .........................................    1

Computerised traffic system to be installed in West Kowloon to improve traffic flow .............................................. 4

I lore readily available accommodation necessary to reduce rents to a reasonable level ..........................................      6

Vessels requested to keep clear of main port approaches at night to reduce risk of collision.............................  ••••••••• 9

New beach cleaner will be tried out at Shek 0 beach ...............  10

Five lots of Crown land in the New Territories to be put up for sale....................................................      ..... 11

Two robbers have been sentenced to three years imprisonment ••••••• 12

Four RTV personalities will take part in the draw for the third government lottery ...........................................••••• 15

Floodlights to be installed at the Yuen Long sports ground ........  14

Water supply in Hung Hom will be interrupted for five hours on Wednesday .....................................................      14

Senior Civil Service Council meeting discusses sal ary scales •••«•• 15

Nev/ salary scales announced for nursing grades........ 16

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Monday, June 25, 1973

GREATER GOVERNMENT PARTICIPATION WITH

VOLUNTARY AGENCIES IN PLANNING SOCIAL SERVICES

Changes that will result in a different relationship between the Social Welfare Department, representing the government, and the voluntary agencies were foreshadowed today.

This change will mean government taking a more active part in the planning of services provided by the voluntary agencies.

Mr. K.S. Hardy, Chief Executive Officer of the Social Welfare Department outlined the plan today when he presented a paper on "Government Subvention — Present Role and Future Development" at the quarterly meeting of the Hong Kong Council of Social Service.

In his paper, Mr. Hardy spelt out the future lines the department was hoping to take in regard to subventing the voluntary agencies.

Dealing with the present situation, Mr. Hardy said "......until

now due to a large measure of self sufficiency the voluntary agencies have maintained that the Social Welfare Department subvention to them has largely been in the nature of a lump-sum grant in aid."

But he said changing attitudes towards Hong Kong which is no longer considered as an under-developed territory, has resulted in overseas donations to the voluntary agencies falling to about JO per cent of what they were in the early post war years.

The voluntary agencies are now finding it difficult to raise sufficient funds to continue their activities at the established levels of efficiency.

/"Because

Monday, June 25, 1973

- 2 -

"Because this work by the voluntary sector is recognised as being of major importance to the community, the government is responding to a request from the voluntary agencies to increase social welfare subventions," he said.

He pointed out that this increase in government subvention has to be administered selectively.

"Against this background, it is also fairly reasonable to accept that as the proportion of government financial assistance to total annual budget grows, so must also the degree of joint consultation on operational plans and finance become more pronounced," he suggested.

Mr. Hardy said that as social welfare subventions become the major percentage in the agency budget, the government, through the Social Welfare Department, should be more involved in the voluntary agencies’ position on where and how the higher payments are to be put to work.

He suggested that the government can best help the voluntary sector by developing subventions along the lines of a "discretionary" and "deficiency" grants system.

,!The trend is set clearly towards a selectively expanding soci welfare subventions policy in which the larger the proportion of government subvention to total expenditure becomes, the greater will be the obligation on the part of the agency to accept in exchange a wider, deeper and constructively critical scrutiny by government of its affairs."

/Flexibility, ••••••

Monday, June 25, 1973

Flexibi_uii;y, Mr. Hardy said, is needed in determining each succeeding annual subvention budger, ana is precisely the element being introduced with decision taking at operational level.

He told the gathering it is proposed to obtain Finance Committee approval to vote a set sum each year for social welfare subventions to be used as the Social Welfare Advisory Committee (SWAC) decides.

The size of the subventions vote will be determined each year in advance as a result of a review by the Social Welfare Department of its published Five Year Plan.

No sum had yet been fixed for 1974/75, he said, but hoped that it would be between 830 to 835 million compared to 825.5 million for the current year.

In view of these expanding changes, Mr. Hai*dy said the question then arises in what new directions can the voluntary sector best redeploy a considerable free reserve of energy?

He contended tiiat there were several areas in which they could expand. These were development of community centres, children and youth services, aftercare of young offenders released from correctional institutions, and family services including a practical "meals on meals" scheme for the elderly infirm similar to that which is operated in Britain and adapted to local conditions.

Note to Editors: Full texts of Mr. Hardy’s speech will be boxed

. ..... . . this evening.

Monday, June 25, 1973

COMPUTERISED TRAFFIC SYSTEM FOR WEST KOWLOON

*******

A computerised traffic system covering some 80 sets of traffic lights is to be installed in the West Kowloon area.

Tenders for the system are being invited from a range of firms in five countries.

Initially the scheme will cover Nathan Road, Shanghai Street and Reclamation Street and parts of Castle Peak Road, Lai Chi Kok Road and Cheung Sha Wan Road.

For some time the Public Works Department has been looking into ways of improving traffic flow on the roads.

Although a large programme of arterial road building has been put in hand, the department has also been aware of the problem of improving traffic on signal-controlled ground-level roads where the scale of high density building has made widening of the existing roads almost impossible.

The technique of controlling signals by a central computer has been used in many cities of the world and the government, after investigating many of the systems now installed, has decided to go ahead with a computerised traffic control system in the West Kowloon area.

A team comprising traffic engineers and computer experts was set up by the Highways Office of the Public Works Department to design and supervise the installation of the West Kowloon system. This team is located in the Kowloon Government Offices in Nathan Road, where the central computer will be installed.

/Information

Monday, June 25, 1973

- 5 -

Information on traffic conditions measured by buried cables in the road will be fed back to the computer which will then make changes to the traffic signals to help the flow of traffic.

Additionally, information on traffic congestion will be fed to the Traffic Police who will be able to take immediate action to clear traffic jams due to accidents and other conditions.

It is also hoped that the system can be used by the Fire Services to select fire routes whereby the computer will automatically influence the traffic signal in favour of fire engines on their way to a fire.

The scheme for West Kowloon will cost about $10 million and should be fully operational by 1976.

0 - -

Monday, June 25, 1973

- 6 -

NEED FOR GREATER AND FASTER SUPPLY OF HOUSING ««*♦****

The answer to reducing rents to reasonable levels lay in a greater and faster supply of more housing, not in rent controls, the Commissioner for Rating and Valuation, Mr. R.A. Fry, said today.

Addressing the weekly meeting of the New Territories Rotary Club, Mr. Fry described rent controls as "a very negative thing" which did not provide a real remedy but which was nevertheless necessary in a situation where landlords were taking "unfair advantage" of the imbalance between demand and supply.

While it had been necessary for the government to intervene again in the domestic sector, he hoped that with the 10 year housing programme and with the full participation of private enterprise "it will not be necessary for government intervention to become a permanent feature of our property market."

In putting forward new proposals for controls, he said, the government was duty bound to take into regard the position of both landlords and tenants although it was never easy to reconcile the different views.

Referring to suggestions for government intervention to reduce some of the very high rents agreed to over the past year, Mr. Fry said he believed that this should be left to market forces, as it was extremely difficult to administer and determine "fair rents."

One of tne strongest forces in reducing prices, he said, was "consumer resistance."

,rIf tenants refuse to pay some of the very high rents demanded, landlords would have to lower their sights. I do think that sometimes tenants are too quick to agree to excessive rents or large increases,” he added.

/Rent

Monday, June 25» 1973

- 7 -

Rent legislation in recent years, he explained, aimed at providing security against eviction and protection against unreasonable increases in rent, not in fixing rents. This formula had worked successfully before.

He said the government was aware that, in the long term, the provision of more land was a very important factor. However, in the short term it would have little or no effect on rents.

"The one thing that is going to bring down rents is the provision of more housing,” he stressed. "If rents come down so will land prices, the converse is not necessarily true."

Commenting on claims that the new controls might affect future developments, Mr. Fry said this was not so as far as the government was concerned.

"Provided a developer can see a fair return on his investment, the fact that increased rents thereafter might be restricted is no real deterrent," he said»

He noted that the new legislation would provide for a three-year control-free holiday for new property and during this time "it should be possible for developers to establish rents at a stable level."

The Commissioner said it could be that controls would result in less property being available for rental, as had happened in Britain, but the trend in Hong Kong recently had been for developing companies to retain premises for investment purposes rather than to sell.

In his view, this trend would continue if the rents obtainable provided a fair return.

/"Even

Monday, June 25, 1973

- 8 -

”Even if there is some small reduction in premises for rental, this may be no bad thing as owner-occupation is the one guarantee against increased rents.”

Mr. Fry also questioned the validity of arguments that large flats and premises let on three-year leases should continue to be excluded from the new controls.

Tenants of these types of accommodation, he said, had been the hardest hit over the past year or so and it was rents for these properties which were quoted outside Hong Kong and gave a generally bad impression of housing here.

’While there may be no good reason to subsidise people occupying expensive accommodation, I do think they, like all other domestic tenants, should be protected against extortionate demands at a time when landlords are able to take unfair advantage of the imbalance between supply and demand,” he said.

’Why, in a situation such as this, should landlords of the more expensive type of accommodation be allowed to take advantage of high rents, while landlords of smaller domestic premises are restricted?” he asked*

It was because of this, he explained, the government believed that controls on rent increases must apply to all.

Referring to the concern felt by landlords of controlled premises about the large gap between controlled and free rents, Mr. Fry emphasised that the government did not consider these free rents as being fair or reasonable.

They were the result of an ’’abnormal situation,” he said, and although the machinery to reduce them could not be provided it was felt that they would come down by market forces as supply improved.

-------o---------- /9....................

Monday, June 25? 1973

- 9 -

REDUCING THE RISK OF COLLISIONS

********

The Marine Department has appealed to masters of vessels waiting to enter Hong Kong not to place their ships or crews at unnecessary risk by remaining too close to the main port approaches during the night.

Vessels intending to arrive within the port at first light, a spokesman said, should not approach closer than 25 miles of V/aglan Island until such time as they can proceed at normal full speed, without undue • * danger, to the position where pilots normally boards

"Fog, mist and heavy rain can quickly reduce visibility in the approaches to the Tathong and East Lamma Channels, increasing the collision risk which already exists in those areas," the spokesman warned.

He advised masters of vessels to time their arrival in Hong Kong so that they could embark pilots immediately on arrival.

Vessels which did not engage the services of a pilot, he said, should proceed directly to a quarantine and immigration anchorage to await clearance if this had not already been obtained.

Notices have been sent to ship owners and agents requesting them to pass on this advice to masters of vessels for which they are responsible.

-------0---------

/10...........

Monday, June 25, 1973

- 10 -

SHEK 0 BEACH CLEANING

*******

The Urban Council’s newly-acquired ’’Beemer” beach cleaner will be put through its paces on Wednesday (June 27) at Shek 0 Beach.

The 530,000 machine is the first of a number of similar machines which the Urban Council intends to buy to help make Hong Kong's beaches cleaner The demonstration is scheduled for 4.00 p.m., and will be watched by Urban Councillors including Mr. Kenneth T.C. Lo, Chairman of the Recreation and Amenities Select Committee, which oversees Urban Council beaches.

Note to Editors: You are invited to send a reporter

and photographer to cover the event. Transport will be provided. Cars No. AM2329 & AM2330, have been laid on for your representative, and will leave the Central Government Offices Car Park for Shek 0 Beach at 3»00 p,m.

-------0---------

/11 ..........

Monday, June 25, 1973

- 11 -

LAND ON PENG CHAU FOR SALE

********

Five lots of Crown land outside the urban area will be offered for sale for non-industrial and residential development.

Four of the lots are on Peng Chau Island and one at Pan Long Wan in Clear Water Bay Road.

Of the four lots on Peng Chau — all to be used for non-industrial purposes — three (lot numbers 453, 454 and 455) are in Wai Tsai San Tsuen, each with an area of about 700 square feet afid an annual rental of $4.

The other lot on the island (lot number 452) with an area of about 2,100 square feet is in Holy Family Road and has an annual rental of 824.

They will be put up for auction on July 9 (Monday) beginning at 2.30 p.m. in the District Office, Islands, at International Building, 4th floor, 141 Des Voeux Road Central.

The other piece of land for sale at Pan Long Wan (demarcation district 238, lot 513) will be auctioned on July 5 (Tuesday) at 2.50 p.m. in the District Office, Sai Kung, at the San Po Kong Government Offices, 692 Prince Edward Road, 1st floor.

The land has an area of 15,000 square feet and an annual rental of 8172. Its use is restricted to private residential purposes only.

Full particulars and conditions of sale of the five lots can be obtained? and their sale plans inspected at the New Territories Administration, North Kowloon Magistracy, Tai Po Road, Kowloon.

They are also available at the Yuen Long, Tsuen Wan, Tai Po, Sai Kung and Islands District Offices.

-------0---------

/12.........

Monday, June 25, 1973

- 12 -

THREE-YEAR SENTENCES FOR ROBBERS

********

A 29-year-old man was sentenced to three years imprisonment by Judge Byrne at the Kowloon District Court today (Monday) after he pleaded guilty to charges of robbery and wounding a taxi driver*

The court was told that the defendant, Chan Wai-lam, threatened and later stabbed the driver, Mr. Chan Ching-suen inside his taxi at Wang Tau Hom Estate on June 6 with a pair of scissors, and then robbed him of 896.10.

In another case in the same court, a 23-year-old man was jailed for three-and-a-half years by Judge Lau after pleading guilty to a charge of robbery.

• • * * • *

The court was told that the defendant, Chung Wai-chun, threatened a man, Mr. Yu Yan, with a screw driver on May 20 outside 64 Tong Mei Road, Kowloon, and robbed him of 82.60 and a wrist watch.

-------0---------

/13..........

i <

Monday, June 25, 1973

- 13 -

DRAW FOR THIRD GOVERNMENT LOTTERY

•$****•

Four popular RTV entertainers will take part in the draw for the third Government Lottery this year.

They are Miss Angelina Leung Siu-ling, Miss Helen Poon Bing-sheung, Hiss Eileen Lo Oi-lin, and Miss Violet Lee Ying.

This was announced today by Mr. David Wu Chung-shing, Senior Committee Member of the Government Lotteries Management Committee, at a press conference held at the City Hall Restaurant.

Tickets for the current lottery are on sale now and the draw will take place in the City Hall Theatre on Saturday, July 14, at 10 a.m.

After the draw, there will be a half-hour entertainment programme givon by the RTV artistes and this will be followed by the public auction of special car numbers held by the Transport Department.

The proceeds from the fifth ’lucky numbers’ auction in the series will again go to the Government Lotteries Fund.

-------0---------

/14..........

Monday, June 25, 1973

- 14 -

.FLOODLIGHTING THE YUEN LONG SPORTS GROUND

*********

The Yuen Long Sports Ground will soon be fitted with floodlights to enable the facilities to be used at night.

Four steel towers for lighting the ground’s grass football field, which can accommodate 4,000 spectators, will be erected.

The miniwsoccer pitch and the basketball court will also be provided with proper lighting.

Work on the project, which will cost an estimated $630,000, will begin in August and will take about three months to complete.

-------0---------

WATER CUT IN HUNG HOM

*********

Water supply to a number of premises in Hung Hom will be interrupted for five hours from 1 a.m. to 6 a.m. on Wednesday (June 27).

Tais is to enable the Waterworks Office to carry out leakage tests.

The area affected is bounded by Chatham Road, Winslow Street, Whampoa Street and Bulkeley Street.

0 -

Monday, June 25, 1973

- 15 -

SENIOR CIVIL SERVICE COUNCIL MEETING

DISCUSSES SALARY SCALES

««***«*

At a meeting of the Senior Civil Service Council this afternoon a discussion on the salary scales of the nursing allied grades took place. Discussion on this item was concluded at the meeting but it was not possible to reach agreement.

However, both the official and staff side of the council stressed that it is open to health auxiliaries and midwives holding a suitable Form V qualification to apply for training leading to a full nursing qualification.

Every encouragement will be given to qualified officers applying for such training.

-------0---------

/16..........

Monday, June 25, 1973

- 16 -

NEW PAY SCALES FOR NURSING GRADES

* * * ♦ ♦ * * * *

Revised salary scales are to be implemented, subject to Finance Committee approval, for midwives, nursing auxiliaries and inoculators, to replace interim scales provided early in 1972.

These salaries are effective from April 1, 1971$ and the officers will receive a further increase of about three per cent with effect from April 1, 1972.

The new scales for midwives and nursing auxiliaries will range from 8o75 to $1,650 per month on the male master pay scale. Until April 1, 1975 salaries for female officers sire determined under the equal pay scheme by which female scales progressively equate to corresponding male salaries.

For inoculators, the related male scale will range from $550 to $1,100 per month.

Announcing this today, a government spokesman said the new scales incorporated the interim increases granted in early 1972 and constituted substantial increases for the officers concerned. They also recognised changes in the level of responsibilities.

The decision to implement the revised scales comes after months of discussion in the Senior Civil Service Council, and was announced following a final breakdown in negotiations between the official and staff sides during the latest meeting this afternoon.

Commenting on the background to the discussions, the spokesman recalled that the salary scales of the nursing class were excluded from consideration by the 1971 Salaries Commission, because discussions v/ere already at an advanced stage v/ith staff representatives.

/The salary .......

*

Monday, June 25, 1973

- 17 -

The salary scale for nurses, a key grade in the class, was settled in late 1971- Interim scales were provided in early 1972 so that back pay could be given to the remaining grades in the class, and discussions continued in the Senior Civil Service Council concerning these grades.

Agreement could not be reached on four grades, midwives, nursing auxiliaries, health auxiliaries and inoculators, so in April 1972 the council set up a working party, representing both its official and staff sides, to examine the responsibilities and working conditions of these grades.

The working party completed its reports in November, and these were put to the council earlier this year. The council discussed these matters extensively at eight meetings held between February 26 and today, during which the staff side effectively put forward the case for improvements.

The official side revised its preliminary proposals in the light of these arguments, although it was unable to accept entirely the views of the staff side.

Compared with the scales before April 1, 1971, the revised scales to have effect on that date, represent, for midwives, increases averaging JO per cent; for inoculators, increases averaging 27 per cent; and for nursing auxiliaries, increases averaging 80 per cent.

These figures, of course, include the benefit of the interim increases granted in early 1972.

The arrangements will continue whereby midwives are working regular hours and are not liable to on-call duty except in emergency.

/The position .....

4 Monday, June 25, 1973

- 18 -

The position of health auxiliaries was also reviewed, in the light of the report of the working party, but the evidence did not support a further increase for the grade beyond the interim increase of early 1972.

At that time, health auxiliaries received an average increase of 25 per cent with effect from April 1, 1971* They have already received the three per cent increase with effect from April 1, 1972. The working party’s report pointed out that some members of the grade carry certain supervisory responsibilities. An allowance to recognise this will be introduced.

The spokesman said that differing duties and responsibilities in the grades of the nursing class called for differing qualifications, and meant that salary scales differed from job to job. For example, considerable changes in the level of responsibilities of nursing auxiliaries had taken place gradually since the grade was established in 1964, and this was now to be recognised in their new scale, which went beyond what the staff side had sought.

In addition to the information conveyed throughout the discussions, through the staff side of the council, the Director of Medical and Health Services, Dr. G.H. Choa, recently interviewed representative groups in each grade, at which time the proposals were put to them in full detail.

The spokesman said that a petition was received at Government House yesterday from representatives of the midwives, and added that this, of course, would receive careful consideration in case it threw any new light on their representations.

It is also expected that the Governor will reply very shortly to the petition received recently from the health auxiliaries.

-------0---------

Release Time: 9*QQ P»n»

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Tuesday, June 26, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No,

Further details given of the revised salary scales for midwives, health auxiliaries, nursing auxiliaries and inoculators ,•••••.,....... 1

New clearway systems in Lai Chi Kok Road and Cheung Sha Wan Road to speed up traffic flow............,.....................•••••••••••• J

Death sentence passed on Yeung Pui-yan has been commuted to 25 years imprisonment .......................  ................................  5

Water supply in North Point to be interrupted for five hours •••••••• 5

Government grant for new school for slow-learning children being built in Blue Pool Road • • •....•....................................  6

More off-street refuse collection depots to be built in urban areas replacing on-street collection points , •. •,.....•••••••••••«•••«••• 7

Nev? direct line installed in Fire Prevention Bureau for public enquiries ..............,...................••••••••••••••••• 8

Commission of Inquiry completes hearingn on first term of reference,t 9

Memorandum of understanding signed by Director of Commerce and

Industry and Swedish Consul General........•......•••••••••,«••••••••• 10

Application for exemption from wearing crash helmets must be made individually ............••••••<•••••♦•♦» 11

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Tuesday. June 26, 1973

- 'I -

FURTHER DETAILS OF SALARY SCALES FOR NURSING ALLIED GRADES

********

A government spokesman today gave further details of the revised salary scales announced yesterday for midwives, health auxiliaries, nursing auxiliaries and inoculators.

He stressed that a num) r of improvements to both the scales and working conditions had been incorporated as a direct result of consultations with the staff side in the Senior Civil Service Council.

• He pointed out that the interim scales provided in April 1972, which included back pay to April 1971, had been agreed by the council on the understanding that discussions would continue thereafter.

"These interim increases were, in themselves, above the overall average increase in salaries for civil servants which resulted from the recommendations of the 1971 Salaries Commission,’1 he added.

Following the introduction of the interim scales, the council set up a working party, representing both its official and staff sides, to examine the responsibilities and working conditions of the four_grades.

The working party produced a report on-each of the four grades, and these reports were submitted to the council earlier this year. The council discussec} these extensively at eight meetings held since February 26, during which the staff side effectively put forward the case for. improvements.

The official side revised its preliminary proposals in the light of these arguments, although it was unable to accept entirely the views of the staff side.

/"There is ..........

Tuesday, June 26, 1973

2 -

’’There is no doubt that the views of the staff side did much to * influence, and improve upon, the original proposals,” said the spokesman.

Discussing each of the grades in detail, he gave the following particulars of last year’s interim scales and of improvements emerging from subsequent discussions:

Midwives - Interim scale $875 - $1,475.

Improvements: Scale extended to #875 - #1,650.

On-call work abolished except in cases of emergency.

Total improvements with effect from 1.4.71: Average salary increase of 30 per cent.

All midwives can go to extended maximum. Regular shift duties, normally without on-call requirements.

Health Auxiliaries -

Interim scale #875 - #1,650.

Improvements: Officers carrying certain supervisory responsibilities to get an allowance of $100 per month.

Total improvements with effect from 1.4.71: Average salary increase of 25 per cent.

Responsibility allowances where applicable.

Nursing Auxiliaries -

Interim scale $600 - $1,100.

Improvements: Scale improved to $875 - $1,650.

Total improvements with effect from 1.4.71: Average salary increase of 80 per cent.

Inoculators *

Interim scale $525 - $1,100.

Improvements: Minimum of scale improved to $550 - $1,100.

Special allowance of $80 per month to inoculators on B.C.G. work.

Total improvements with effect from 1.4.71: Average

salary increase of 27 per cent.

B.C.G. work allowances.

-------0---------

Tuesday, June 26, 1973

- 3 -

CLEARWAY SYSTEMS TO IMPROVE TRAFFIC FLOW

*******

New clearway systems will be introduced in Lai Chi Kok Road and Cheung Sha Wan Road this week in a determined effort to speed up the flow of traffic in this congested area.

At the same time restrictions will be imposed on a number of streets in the Mong Kok and Sham Shui Po districts and in Castle Peal: in the New Territories.

From tomorrow (Wednesday), a clearway will ccme into operation along the section of Lai Chi Kok Road between Nathan Road and an un-named road linking Lai Chi Kok Road and Cheung Sha Wan Road to the east of the Lai Chi Kok Interchange.

The clearway section cf Cheung Sha Wan Road will be between Nathan Road and Hing Wah Street. It will come into effect from Thursday (June 28).

All motor vehicles, except franchised buses, will be prohibited from stopping to pick up or set down passengers and to load and unload goods along these two clearways from 7-30 a.m. to 10 a.mf and from J p.m. to 7 p.m. daily.

In addition, public light buses from tomorrow (Wednesday) will not he permitted to pick up or set down passengers from 7 a.m. to 9 p«m. daily in:

* Shanghai Street between Lai Chi Kok Road and Arran Street; and

* The northeast-bound carriageway of Tonkin Street within about 230 feet from its junction with Lai Chi Kok Road.

/With effect .........

Tuesday, June 26, 1973

- 4 -

With effect from Thursday (June 28), similar restriction for public light buses will be introduced in Yen Chow Street between Apliu Street and Fuk Wa Street; and Nam Cheong Street betweenFukVJa Street and Apliu Street.

In the New Territories, public light buses will be prohibited from picking up and setting down passengers in a section of Castle Peale Road at Sam Shing Hui also from Thursday.

Operators are advised to use the public light bus stands near the Castle Peak bus terminus and car park.

0--------

/5.........

Tuesday, June 26, 1973

- 5 -

DEATH SENTENCE COMMUTED

«**»*»*:*

The Governor, after taking into consideration the advice of the Executive Council, has decided that the death sentence passed on February 20, 1973 on Yeung Pui-yan should be commuted to a term of 25 years imprisonments

Yeung was found guilty of the murder of Tsang Wan-chung.

-------0----------

WATER CUTS IN NORTH POINT

********

Water supply to a number of premises in North Point will be turned off for five hours from 1 a.m. to 6 a.m. on Thursday (June 28).

This is to enable the Was" e Detection Section of the Waterworks Office to carry out a leakage test.

The area affected is bounded by 865-1021 and 992-1054 King’s Road including North Point Model Housing, Finnic Street, Hoi Tai Street, Hoi Wan Street, Tong Chong Street, Hoi Kwong Street, Pan Hoi Street and Mt. Parker Road.

-------0---------

Tuesday, June 26, 1973

NEW SCHOOL FOR SLOW LEARNERS

The government has granted more than $1.5 million towards tho cost of building a school for slow-learning children.

The grant has been made to the Hong Kong Association for Mentally Handicapped Children and Young Persons.

The amount represents a capital subsidy of over $921,000 towards 80 per cent of the building costs plus a special government grant of more than $624,000.

The association has received a donation from the Lions Club of

Hong Kong for the remaining 20 per cent. But due to rising costs, its share of the contribution has increased by about $30,000.

This additional cost has now been met with a grant from the Government Lotteries Fund.

Situated in Blue Pool Road, Happy Valley, the Lions Morninghill School is designed to accommodate 200 slow-learning children, and will bo subsidised by the Education Department.

The school now operates in temporary premises in the Wah Fu Estate, as the new building will not be ready until December this year.

The association, now caring for over 100 children at its school in Wah Fu, is a welfare organisation concerned with the well-being and education of handicapped children.

It is also operating another subsidised school for slow learning pupils in Yau Tong and a training centre for mentally handicapped children.

- - 0 - -

/7

Tuesday, June 26, 1973

- 7 -

MORE OFF-STREET REFUSE COLLECTION DEPOTS

Fifty-tvzo additional permanent off-street refuse collection depots have been planned in the urban areas to eliminate unsightly garbage collection points on street corners.

At present there are 43 off-street points in operation, complementing the 900 on—street ones• However it is hoped to replace these with 200 properly constructed off-street depots.

Eight of the existing off-street centres are permanent structures while the remainder will be replaced by permanent ones when suitable sites are made available.

Mr. Frank Taylor, Assistant Director of Urban Services, explained that it was the ultimate aim of the Urban Council to replace all the on-street collection points with off-street depots to avoid obstruction to traffic and to cause the least inconvenience to the public.

A permanent off-street depot was completed last month at the junction of Mong Kok Road and Shanghai Street; and one at King Lam Street in Cheung Sha Wan was handed over early this month.

Another collection point will be built in the densely populated area of Causeway Bay• It will be located near Paterson Street and will be ready at the end of the year.

Off-street collection depots will also be constructed in Yu Cliau Street and near the Jordan Road ferry in Kowloon.

/Mr. Taylor........

Tuesday, June 26, 1973

- 8 -

Mr. Taylor pointed out that Hong Kong is one of the few places in the world where residents are provided with a refuse collection service at least once a day.

"In busy areas, depending on the average amount of refuse, collections are made twice or even three times daily," he added.

Note to Editors: Photographs of a typical off-street refuse

depot will be boxed this evening. --------------------0 ---------

FIRE ENQUIRY LINE

*********

A direct telephone line has been installed in the enquiry centre of the Fire Prevention Bureau to make it easier for people to obtain information or report fire hazards.

The new number is 5-281224 and is manned 24 hours daily.

Anyone seeking information or advice on fire prevention, or who wishes to report fire hazards is urged to call the new number.

------0-------

/9.........

Tuesday, June 26, 1972

- 9 -

COWilSSION COMPLETES hearings on first term of reference

*«*«**•*

The recently appointed Commission of Inquiry, after hearing evidence and taking statements from a total of 26 witnesses, has now completed its hearings on the first term of reference.

This term called on the commission to report on the circumstances in which a person whose prosecution under the Prevention of Bribery Ordinance was, at an advance stage of consideration, able to leave Hong Kong.

The Commissioner, Sir Alastair Blair-Kerr, is now considering all the evidence and has begun drafting his report.

Ho is hopeful that he will be able to submit the report to the Govemor-in-Council within the time required by the term of reference — three weeks.

After he has completed his report, Sir Alastair will begin work on the second term of reference which requires him to report on the effectiveness of the Prevention of Bribery Ordinance and to suggest changes where necessary.

He has been asked to report on the second term of reference within three months.

-------0---------

/10........

Tuesday, June 26, 1973

- 10 -

EXPORTS OF GARMENTS TO SWEDEN *******

The Director of Commerce and Industry, Mr. E.P. Ho, and the Swedish Consul General, Mr. Carl C:son Kjellberg, today signed a Memorandum of Understanding covering the export of certain garments to Sweden from July 1, 1973 to June 30, 1974.

The memorandum covers most of the products which are currently under restraint on export to Sweden.

Some new items have been added to the restraint list including briefs and undershorts of discontinuous synthetic fibres, slacks and trousers of discontinuous synthetic fibres and bathing suits and trunks of continuous synthetic fibres.

Knitted shirts and certain knitted sweaters have been deleted from the list and are no longer under restraint. The current restraint levels for most items have been increased by 5 per cent in the new arrangements.

Details of the control arrangements and of the principles governing such matters as allocation of quotas have already been published in notices to exporters Series 6, No. 19/73 and 20/73* Copies of these can be obtained from the Textiles Licensing Branch of the Commerce and Industry Department, 46, Connaught Road, Central, Hong Kong.

-------0 --------

/11 .........

Tuesday, June 26, 1975

- 11 -

COMPULSORY WEARING OF CRASH HELMETS

********

A misunderstanding has occurred over an item issued last Fri day dealing with the compulsory wearing of crash helmets for motorcyclists and pillion passengers.

The original item referred to certain groups of people who may be exempted from wearing the helmets on application to the Commissioner for Transport.

This is true* but it must be pointed out that, under the regulations, it is the individual who must apply for the exemption. There can be no question of group exemption on the application of just one person.

- - - - 0 -------

IZeleape Time: 7 ♦00 ptm*

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Wednesday, Juno 27, 197J

CONTENTS

Page No*

Value of Hong Kong’s domestic exports continues to rise •••••••••• 1

Ngau Tau Kok clearance has been successfully completed ahead of schedule • ••...................................................     3

Pleasant country path will be constructed leading from North Point to Tai Tam reservoir for picnickers and hikers ..................... 4

Two-month survey to be carried out to ascertain the number of profit-making child care centres .................................   5

Badges for swimming proficiency are another new feature in the ’’Let’s Swim ’73” programme .......................................  6

Gough Hill Path in the Peak area will be closed to traffic ••••••• 7

Nigerian immigration matters will in future be handled by the

Liaison Office of the Federal Republic of Nigeria.......•........• 7

An 18-year-old jewel robber sentenced to eight years* imprisonment .................................................................... 8

Sample survey will be carried out to determine whether there is a need for an additional sub-treasury on Hong Kong Island •••••••• 9

Dispute involving 1,300 redundant wig factory workers settled •••• 10

issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Wednesday, June 27, 1973

- 1 -

VALUE OF TRADE CONTINUES TO RISE *******

Assistant Director of the Commerce and Industry Department, lir. M.D. Sargant, today described as ’’very satisfactory” Hong Kong’s trade figures for the past three months (March to May).

During this period domestic exports had increased by 19-7 per cent, imports by 17•5 per cent and re-exports by 4J.8 per cent over the same pei’iod in 1972.

Mr. Sargant said the figures extended further the favourable trend that was developing earlier.

Provisional trade figures published today by the Census and Statistics Department showed that domestic exports for the month of May were valued at $1,473 million — an increase of 15.4 per cent or $196 million over May last year.

Imports, worth $2,164 million, rose 15.9 per cent or $297 million. But the biggest increase was again recorded in the re-export sector which jumped by 30.5 per cent.

This represented an increase of $100 million to $430 million over the same month last year.

Details of the figures are:

/1CTQIANDISE: .........

Wednesday, June 27, 1973

2

MERCHANDISE: Domestic Exports : $1,473 million

Imports : 82. , 164 million

Re-exports 430 million

COMPARATIVE FIGURES May 1973 May 1972 Increase or decrease

S Mn. 9 Mn. 8 Mn. %

Domestic Exports 1,473 1,277 + 196 + 15.4

Imports 2,164 1,867 + 297 + 15.9

Re-exports 430 329 + 100 + 30.5

Mar.-May 1973 Mar.-May 1972 Increase or decrease

S Mn. 5? Mn. 8 Mn. %

Domestic Exports 4,080 3,409 + 671 + 19.7

Imports 6,207 5,284 + 923 + 17.5

Re-exports 1,288 896 + 392 + 43.8

Jan.-May 1973 Jan.-May 1972 ” Increase or decrease

3 Mn. 9 Mn. 8 Mn. %

Domestic Exports 6,540 5,663 + 877 + 15.5

Imports 9,981 8,383 +1,598 + 19.1

Re-exports 2,010 1,465 + 545 + 37.2

Wednesday, June 27Y 1975

- 5 -

NGAU TAU KOK CLEARANCE IS OVER

*******

The clearance operation at Ngau Tau Kok involving the demolition of some 1^ industrial undertakings, 31 shops and more than 40 domestic huts has been successfully completed ahead of schedule#

The Public Works Department is now preparing the site for the construction of the main maintenance depot of the mass transit railway#

About j60 eligible domestic residents from the site have already moved into public housing estates at Lam Tin, Sau Mau Ping and Kwai Chung and another 120 ineligible domestic residents have taken up licensed area accommodation in Junction Road.

Some 85 eligible factory operators have re-established their undertakings in government factory units in Kwai Chung and Kwun Tong. Over 350 flatted factory units were allocated to them.

Factory operators who were not eligible have been referred to the New Territories Administration for help in finding suitable sites to re-establish their business#

More than $186,000 has been paid to 17 shopowners.

Commenting on the operation a Housing Department spokesman said: !,An important factor in the smoothness of the clearance was the co-operation we had from residents, proprietors and workers in the area.

”It was particularly gratifying that heavy machinery was moved from the site by owners making the job of demolishing the structures so much easier,’1 he added#

Note to Editors: Photographs of the cleared area are

boxed this evening.

-------0 -------- ...........................

Wednesday, June 27, 1973

- 4 -

OPENING UP HONG KONG FOR PICNICKERS *******

Picnickers and hikers will soon be able to ”span!t liong Kong Island by way of a pleasant country path leading direct from North Point to Tai Tam reservoir,

A one-mile concrete footpath will be constructed from Quarry Gap to Tai Tam dam by means of joining various beaten tracks on the hillside.

The footpath will link up with another path leading from Mount

Parker Road near Quarry Bay to form a walkway with a standard width of 10 feet. Barbecue pits, landscaping, nature walks, tables and benches, and toilet facilities will be provided along the footpath, which is expected to be completed by next summer.

The project is a part of a five-year development programme recommended by the New Territories and Hong Kor.g Island Advisory Committee for Recreational Development and Nature Conservation, which aims at providing easily accessible picnic spots with various facilities for the use of large numbers of visitors.

Other projects planned on Hong Kong Island include picnic spots in Pok Fu Lam, Mount Davis and Wong Nei Chung. Country parks have also been planned in the New Territories at Shing Mun, Lion Rock, Pak Sha Wan and on Lantau Island.

-------0----------

/5

Wednesday, June 27, 1973

- 5 -

SURVEY OF PROFIT-MAKING CHILD CARE CENTRES

*********

A sitrvey is to be conducted over the next two months to find out the number of profit-making child care centres for children under the age of six including nurseries, play centres, and creches in Hong Kong.

The survey, to be carried out by the Social Welfare Department, will also look into the existing standards of services provided.

Miss Chan Joy-yin, Principal Social Welfare Officer (Research and Statistics), said the aim is to get first hand information on the situation in these child care centres to which social welfare legislation will probably be applied.

Initially three university students have been recruited to carry out the survey during their summer vacation. Those centres which are known to the department have already been sent letters informing them of the survey.

’’Centres which have not received letters are invited to contact the Research and Evaluation Unit of the Social Welfare Department in Lee Gardens,” Miss Chan said.

The information obtained in the survey will be used to assess the present situation in these centres and the number of staff required for the implementation of the proposed legislation for the control of such child care centres.

The legislation will cover profit-making and non-profit-making centres and will require them, by a given time, to maintain prescribed standards of accommodation and health, safety measures and staff qualifications.

The introduction of this legislation is one area of development in the field of Family Welfare Services in the Five Year Plan.

-------0 - - - - /6..........

Wednesday, June 27, 1973

- 6 -

LOCAL PROFICIENCY AWARDS FOR SWIMMERS

A If. *4 W ♦ ",*

A local Badge Scheme for swimming proficiency will be introduced for the first time in Hong Kong.

This is a step to provide swimmers with a chance to qualify for proficiency and survival awards offered by internationally recognised bodies, such as for life-saving awards offered by the Royal Life Saving Society (Hong Kong Branch),

This is another of the many projects launched in the Urban Council’s ’’Let’s Swim ’TJ11 Campaign*

The theme of the campaign is to make people aware of the importance of water safety this summer,

A spokesman for the Urban Council said: ’’The Local Badge Scheme is planned to encourage th-so recently 2 eamt x.) swim to improve

their swimming techniques and confidence in the water, and to provide an incentive to achieving related awards in this area of endeavour.”

’’The scheme aixn at three level; t.■ achievement of proficiency at the junior, intermediate and senior levels, which are linked to the awards of bronze, silver and gold badges,” he continued,

The tests in the Badge Scheme are planned by the Education Department, in conjunction with the Hong Kong branch of the Royal Life Saving Society and examiners qualified to test candidates will be appointed jointly by the council, the department and the society.

Other sponsors and organisers ^f the project are the South China Morning Post and the Hong Kong Life Guard Club.

Application forms to join the Local Badge Scheme are obtainable from all schools■, City District Urban Council swimming pools.

Wednesday, June 27, 1973

CLOSURE OF GOUGH HILL PATH

*

Gough Hill Path on the Peak will be closed to traffic from 10 a.m. on Monday (July 9)*

This arrangement is made as a safety measure because of the limited width of the road.

Car owners who require access to premises on the road can obtain permission from the Commissioner for Transport.

Ihey should apply in writing to the Commissioner at Blake Block, 101 Queensway, Hong Kong.

Telephone enquiries can also be made to 5-282724, extension J2.

-------0----------

ri£JGRATICH FACILITIES FOR NIGERIAN

*#***414:*

The Director of Immigration has announced that Nigerian immigration matters previously liandled by his department will be taken over by the Liaison Office of the Federal Republic of Nigeria.

The Liaison Office is on the 12th floor of Goldfield Building, 42-44 Connaught Road West, telephone 5-445171•

It will start its work from Sunday (July 1).

-------C----------

/8...........

Wednesday, June 27, 1973

- 8 -

ROBBER JAILJD FOR EIGHT YEARS

********

An unemployed youth was jailed for eight years by ilr. Commissioner de Basto in the Supreme Court today for robbing a shop of a quantity of jewellery worth about 3570,000 in Kowloon late last year#

The defendant, Luk Keung, 18, was found guilty two weeks ago when Mr« Commissioner de Basto deferred sentence until today pending reports from a probation officer and training centre•

The defendant had two previous convictions including one of robbery

Wednesday, June 27, 1973

- 9 -

NEED FOR ADDITIONAL TREASURY FACILITIES TO BE INVESTIGATED

********

A sample survey is to be carried out to determine whether there is sufficient demand for additional Treasury facilities on Hong Kong Island*

It will be conducted at both the Treasury headquarters in Central and the Causeway Bay Sub-Treasury from July to September*

Organised by the Secretariat for Home Affairs, the Census and Statistics Department and the Treasury, the survey will be undertaken by undergraduates of the? Hong Kong University.

The aim is to establish whether there is a positive need for another sub-treasury on the Island and if so, the best possible location for it.

To ensure that the survey is a success, members of the public are urged to co-operate by giving their views when approached while maldng payment of their rates, water charges and other government accounts at the two Treasury collection centres.

A similar sample survey held at the Kowloon Sub-Treasury last year provided some useful information and the government is now considering opening another branch in Kowloon.

- — - 0----------

/10 .........

Wednesday, June 27, 1973

- 10 -

WIG FACTORY DISPUTE SETTLED

********

The four-week old Gilda Fashions dispute was settled today at a meeting hold in the headquarters of the Labour Relations Service of the Labour Department in Queensway.

Under the agreement reached, the 1,300 workers formerly employed by the wig factory at Tsuen Wan — now in receivership — will be paid a total of $390,000 in severance Pay*

The head of the Labour Relations Service, Mr. T.F. Tsui, who chaired the meeting said the back wages to the workers would be paid in the factory tomorrow (Thursday) morning in the presence of officers of the Labour Relations Service.

The $390,000 in severance pay would be handed over to the workers next Wednesday in the Tsuen Wan office of the Service.

The dispute began on June 8 when the company gave the workers one month’s notice saying that the factory was to be closed because of lack of business.

The workers demanded severance pay, but the management would not moot their demands.

The Labour Relations Service subsequently arranged a series of meetings between the workers’representatives and the company’s receivers. The last three meetings in the series were also attended by the former head of Gilda Fashions Ltd.

Wednesday, June 27, 1975

- 11 -

During the course of these meetings, representatives of the Legal Aid Department also made themselves available to offer advice, but this was declined by the workers.

Mr. Tsui also announced that the dispute involving ^00 workers of the Kwun Tong nig factory of N. Wagman and Company Ltd. was settled today at a meeting held in the San Po Kong Office of the Labour Relations Service.

In this agreement, each worker will receive 3320 as severance pay. The employers will pay over the money at the Service’s San Po Kong Office on July 3.

The dispute began on June 15 when the management announced that it would cancel the workers’ guaranteed monthly basic wage.

The workers protested against the ruling and a series of conciliation meetings was subsequently arranged by the Labour Relations Service of the Labour Department.

-------0 ---------

Release time: 8,30

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Thursday, June 28, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No,

Working group studying the social causes of crime is inviting comments from all associated and interested parties.......• ••••..... 1

The Director of Education announces that the summer vacation will begin as scheduled ,«........................................         3

District organisations receiving more than $400,000 for summer youth activities •................•••••••••...........•••»•••••»•••• 5

One-year training course in work with pre-school children being offered • ••..................................•.••»••••••••••>•••••• 6

Secondary school children will soon have the chance to practise the art of puppetry «c •........••»••.............................    7

Dangerous building in Western District to be demolished • ••••......  8

Improved facilities provided in the extended Salisbury Road Post Office.............,................................................. 8

Five workers killed in construction site accidents last month........ 9

Dr. G.H. Choa announces plans to look after expectant mothers *•*••• 10

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Thursday, June 28, 1973

- 1 -

COMMENTS BEING SOUGHT ON SOCIAL CAUSES OF CRIME

********

The working group set up by the government to study the social causes of crime in Hong Kong is inviting a number of groups and organisations to participate in its study of this problem.

Mr. Peter Williams, the chairman of the working group, which is a sub-committee of the Fight Violent Crime Campaign Committee, said today that he had written to a number of bodies, including the two universities, the Hong Kong Council of Social Service, the Bar Association, and the Hong Kong Federation of Students.

nV/e know that their own studies in this field will make a very useful contribution to our work,” said Mr. Williams. ’’And similarly we hope that other organisations who may wish to comment on the social causes of crime because of their close association with the problem at a working level, will be able to do so.

”It would be helpful if we received written material in the first instance, which would be followed by discussion where this was necessary.”

He said it was natural for nearly every member of the community to have his own views and theories on the factors contributing to the rise in the incidence of violent crime over the last year or so - and leading to the current campaign aimed at curbing this growth.

For this reason, his working group would also be happy to have the views of any individual member of the community which should be submitted in writing so that the group can have the opportunity of studying them in detail.

/Mr• Williams ••••••••••

Thursday, June 28, 1973

- 2 -

Mr. Williams pointed out that many opinions had already been expressed in the press and elsewhere, and the working group was in the process of studying these.

But obviously the informed views of those with experience of the problem at close quarters, through observation in the course of their specialised work or through a serious desire to investigate the circumstances for themselves, were preferable to theory and speculation.

”We have already accumulated a considerable store of such material," he commented. "Through the City District Officers, for example, we have gained a comprehensive insight into public attitudes towards crime and punishment.

"We have some extremely useful facts and figures supplied by the police, prisons, social welfare, education and census and statistics departments.

"This material includes charts, tables and detailed statistical breakdowns of various component factors that might conceivably have some bearing on criminal motives, incentives and development."

So far the group has held four meetings to discuss and assess this material.

Mr. Williams added: "We are fully conscious of the need to examine every factor of this complex subject. And we will be call 5ng, from time to tine, for assistance from all groups and individuals competent to offer advice." Because of the extent of this problem the working group expects its study to continue for several months to come.

0

Thursday, June 28, 1973

- 3 -

SUMMER VACATION TO BEGIN AS SCHEDULED

*********

The Director of Education has given careful consideration to the suggestion that the current school term should be extended by two days but is unable to agree to it.

Explaining the position in a circular to heads of all school^ Mr. Charles Lowe, the Deputy Director of Education (Administration) said: "It is not envisaged, in the circumstances, as a productive way of serving the interest of the pupils, who will by then have completed their course of study and the terminal examination and will be anxious for the chance to relax and refresh themselves after a year of arduous work.

"It has therefore been decided that the summer programme should begin immediately when the term ends, in accordance with the arrangements already planned."

He said the summer programme has been designed to broaden pupils’ experience and interests in a non-academic way and the success of the greatly expanded programme this year will depend largely, as it has in the past, on the enthusiastic help by teachers.

Mr. Lowe pointed out that a useful contribution teachers could make was by offering voluntary help to support the summer programme either by supplementing the programme already arranged in their own schools for their pupils or by volunteering to give additional support to the summer activities programmes co-ordinated by the government.

/In the

Thursday, June 28, 1973

- 4 -

In the latter case, teachers are requested to write to the Association of Volunteers for Service, Ridley House, 2 Upper Albert Road, Hong Kong, or if they wish to obtain further information they can telephone Miss V. Chan on Tel No. 5-742376.

"Any such help by teachers will be greatly appreciated," he said.

A spokesman for the Education Department said that a reply on the lines of the school circular has been sent to the Joint Secretariat of Hong Kong Educational Bodies.

Thursday, June 28, 197}

- 5 -

FINANCING OF SUMMER YOUTH PROGRAMME

»*****«»*

A sum of 3415,050 is being made available to district organisations for conducting summer youth activities this year.

Of t.iis amount, 3215,000 is coming from government through the Social Welfare Department and the other 3200,050 has been donated by the Royal Hong Kong Jockey Club.

The money is again being administered by the Social Welfare Department in consultation with the Secretariat for Home Affairs and the Nev/ Territories Administration.

It will be used to meet basic programme expenses including food, transportation, prizes, rental of equipment and sites and handicraft material.

First payments have already gone out to some 197 different associations and groups. These are members of the 15 district youth recreational co-ordinating committees.

Their programmes include a wide variety of indoor and outdoor activities in which young people all over Hong Kong can participate.

The money from the Jockey Club is just part of the 31.07 million it is donating to the overall summer youth programme this year. The total monetary contribution from the government amounts to more than 38OO,OOC. The Urban Council estimates that its contribution will be around 3185,000.

-------0--------- /6........................................

Thursday, June 28, 1975

- 6 -

CERTIFICATE COURSE IN WORK WITH PRE-SCHOOL CHILDREN

********

Applications are invited for entry into a full-time course leading to a “Certificate in work with pre-school children.” Organised by the Social Welfare Department, this is a one year course which will commence on September 24.

To enrol, an applicant has to possess a Hong Kong Certificate of Education and be between 18 and 2? years of age.

The trainees must be willing to work with a non-profit-making nursery for a minimum of one year on completion of the course, if employment is available.

The course will include classroom study and supervised field work.

Students will be trained in work with pre-school children and provided with opportunities to test and to integrate child care knowledge in the field.

No tuition fees will be charged and trainees may receive a monthly allowance of #200.

Application forms are obtainable from the Training Section of the Social Welfare Department at the Lady Trench Day Nursery and Training Centre, 44 Oi Kwan Road, Hong Kong.

Completed application forms have to be returned to the above-mentioned

address on or before August 3•

Thursday, June 28, 1975

- 7 -

THE MASTERS OF PUPPETRY

******

The development of creative talents of some secondary school students niay be assisted in the future by the age-old custom of puppet-making and puppet shov/s •

On Saturday, a group of 60 secondary school art teachers will be given a demonstration on how to make hand and glove puppets and how to stage a puppet show.

A spokesman for the Education Department said it is hoped that from this demonstration, the teachers will be able to introduce the subject into their classes - not only to stimulate interest in puppetry but also to develop the students’ creative and expressive talents.

”It is the first time that a demonstration on this ancient form of entertainment has been organised by the Arts and Crafts Section of the Education Department in such a way,” he said.

At the same time, the section hopes the scheme will help to promote integrated teaching which is now being practised in schools. ”In this way teachers may be able to use a puppet to highlight various historical characters”.

Saturday’s demonstration in puppet-making and puppet show will be given by Mr. Calvin Wong, a secondary school art teacher and a well-known television compere.

He will introduce the other teachers to the various materials used in puppet-making, and will then stage a show which will be in the form of a drama with background music and stage decoration.

In recent years there has been a substantial growth of interest in puppetry as a craft and an educational subject in schools in a xiumber of countries.

Saturday’s demonstration to secondary school art teachers will be held in the Education Department’s Cultural Crafts Centre at Pak Fule Road, North Point.

-------0 -------- /8........................

Thursday, June 28, 1973

- 8 -

DANGEROUS BUILDING TO BE DEMOLISHED

********

The Building Authority today declared 11 Pan Kwai Lane, in Western District liable to become dangerous and ordered its demolition*

The Principal Government Building Surveyor said that this three-storey pre-war building had been under routine observation for some time.

Following a fire, adjoining buildings were recently closed and demolished which disclosed the defective condition of the walls of No. 2 Tsung Sau Lane. The latter was then also closed and an order has been made to demolish this building which shares a party wall with No. 11 Pan Kwai Lane.

Due to defective brickwork and decayed timber there is a risk of collapse as a result of demolition. Notice of intention to apply for a closure order in Victoria District Court, at 9*30 a.m. on July 26 was posted today.

-------0---------

BETTER FACILITIES AT KOWLOON PARCEL OFFICE

********

New parcel acceptance facilities have been provided in the extended portion of the Kowloon Parcel Office in Salisbury Road.

Equipped with air conditioning, the new accommodation and facilities will be opened to the public from Tuesday (July 3)»

A spokesman for the Post Office said today that this is part of a general improvement programme for the Kowloon Parcel Office costing some

Thursday, June 28, 1973

- 9 -

ACCIDENTS ON CONSTRUCTION SITES

*******

Five workers were killed and $66 injured last month in accidents on construction sites, according to figures released today by the Labour Department.

Nearly half the injured workers were hurt by falling from a height, being struck by falling objects, or tripping over objects.

“This is a regular pattern - and it’s easy to prevent,t: the Industrial Safety Training Officer, Mr. Chan Wing-kai said today.

’’All floor openings should be securely covered, barred off by metal plates, or properly fenced. And suitable, adequate means of access should be provided to all scaffolds, piling frames and cranes,” he said.

Mr. Chan said that workers should be encouraged to wear proper safety belts and safety helmets.

He said that to prevent another common cause of accidents - electrical faults - management should use tough rubber flex and proper plugs.

’’Metal-cased electrical equipment and portable tools should always be properly earthed,” he said.

The Labour Department has recently intensified its inspection of work sites in a bid to reduce the increasing number of accidents in the construction industry.

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/10..........

Thursday,' June 28, 1973

- 10 -

PLANS TO LOOK AFTER EXPECTANT MOTHERS

********

Commenting on the outcome of tonight’s meeting of government midwives, the Director of Medical and Health Services, Dr. G.H. Choa announced this (Thursday) evening that arrangements had been made to minimise any inconvenience to expectant mothers and to allay their understandable worty or concern.

,fI would be sorry if the midwives decided to take this step because obviously our midwifery service will no doubt be much inconvenienced," Dr. Choa said. "I have always believed in the high sense of responsibility, both personal and professional, which midwives have shown, and I sincerely hope that they will reconsider this decision.

r,As we said a few days ago, the Government will further consider the position of the midwives, if they can produce the evidence they say they have that other organisations pay better salaries and benefits to their counterparts in the private sector than Government does.

"But the threat of resignation has been made, not once but several times, and it is now necessary, in the circumstances and in order to allay concern, to announce our plans so that expectant mothers will not be inconvenienced by such action."

Dr. Choa emphasised that, although government midwives had been worlzLng minimum normal hours since Tuesday, April 10, and eight maternity clinics out of 27 had been closed, deliveries had continued normally; no untoward incident had occurred although clearly there has been some inconvenience.

/Plans •••••••••

Thursday, June 28, 1973

Plans to be activated in case resignations take place, are designed to maintain this record, and to allow deliveries to proceed with a minimum of inconvenience to expectant mothers.

He then outlined these steps

* Expectant mothers will be seen as usual in the pre-natal clinics of the maternal and child health centres. They will be issued with cards on which their delivery dates are recorded, and asking them to enter hospital either on that date, or before.

* In addition to government hospitals, expectant mothers will be directed to government-assisted hospitals, where all charges beyond the normal government hospital charge of 32 a day (inclusive) will be met by the Government.

Although more of the 19 maternity clinics at present remaining open will have to be closed, the maternity clinics on outlying islands will remain open, because they are staffed by nurse-midwives*

/"If these .......

Thursday, June 28, 1973

- 12’ -

"If those plans have to be implemented," Dr. Choa said, "expectant ••

mothers may have to make a longer journey to the hospital to which they will be directed. I'fy staff will make every effort to direct them to the hospital nearest to their home. I must emphasise that expectant mothers should not wait until the last minute to contact us - and of course I would give that general advice ih any circumstances.

"If this advice is followed, these plans will enable the maternity service to carry on without undue inconvenience to expectant mothers.“

- - - - 0--------

Release Time: 8.00 p.nu*

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Friday, Juno 29, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No*

Government finishes the 1972/73 financial year with a surplus of $637 million • •..<>... *.......  «,............................   1

Mr. Li Fook-wo has been appointed an Unofficial Legislative Council1 nr

for two years ••••••••....................... ••«••••••• •••••••••••• 2

Stricter safety measures to be imposed on construction sites and in the handling of cargo .......................,.....................   4

Shau Kei Wan Government Secondary Technical School will be extended to include sixth form accommodation..........r..••••• •.....••••••••• 5

All new building plans will be required to be processed within a statutory time limit of 60 days...................................    6

First phase of Lai King estate to house 15,000 people will begin soon ....................«........................................... 8

A 2,200-foct flyover to be built from Gascoigne Road to Yau Ma Tei multi-storey car pari ................ ...........,................. 9

Applications invited for a two-year full.-time social work course at the Institute for Social Work Training .......................... 11

Revised list of charitable institutions and trusts which are exempt from tax is gazetted today .......................................   13

The public are advised to take precautionary measures during the typhoon season .................................................     14

Compensation scheme for victims of violent crime has been set up in response to public demand ..................................      17

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Friday, June 29, 1973

- I -

GOVERNMENT SURPLUS FOR 1972/73

********

The government recorded a surplus of 5637 million in the financial year ending on March 31, compared with a surplus of 8640 million in 1971-72.

Total revenue for the year was $4,936 million,an increase of 31,395 million over the previous year. Expenditure increased by an even greater amount - $1,398 million - to reach a total of 84,300 million.

Government accounts for the month of March showed a deficit of 3439 million compared with a deficit of $100 million in March 1972.

Revenue for the month was $498 million - an increase of $236 million over the same month last year. However total expenditure amounted to 8938 million•

This figure included 8500 million towards the government’s contribution to the equity of the Mass Transit Railway Corporation.

A government spokesman said today that even aTter discounting this contribution, expenditure during March was the highest ever recorded for a single month.

-------0---------

Friday, June 29, 1973

2

ICT LEGISLATIVE COUNCILLOR APPOINTED **********

A prominent member of the banking profession, Mr. Li Fook-wo, has been appointed as an Unofficial Member of the Legislative Council with effect from Sunday (July 1) until June JO, 1975.

At the same time, the re-appointment of three unofficial members to the Executive Council and of four unofficial members to the Legislative Council were also announced.

Re-appointed to the Executive Council for another two-year term, from Sunday, was Mr. Woo Pak-chuen, while Mr. Szeto Wai and Mr. G.R. Ross were re-appointed for another one year term.

Mr. Woo v/as also re-appointed to the Legislative Council until June JO, 197J• Mr. Szeto Wai and Mr. Wilfred Wong Sien-bing were reappointed until June JO, 1974, and Mr. P.G. Williams was re-appointed until June, 1975•

The new Legislative Councillor, Mr. Li Fook—wo, v/as born in Hong Kong and is Chief Manager and Director of the Bank of East Asia Ltd. as well as being a director of several local public companies.

He acted as a temporary member of the Legislative Council on three occasions in 1971 and 1972 and was a member of the Public Services Commission from 1964 to 1970. He was also a member of the 1971 Salaries Commission and the Working group in 1972.

/Mr. Li .......

Friday, June 29, 1973

- 3 -

hr. Li is presently serving as a member of the Banking Advisory Committee, Social Welfare Advisory Committee, Community Relief Trust Fund Committee, Board of Review, Inland Revenue Department, and the newly constituted Medical Development Advisory Committee. He is al so a Steward of the Royal Hong Kong Jockey Club.

He was appointed an Unofficial Justice of the Peace in 19&2* and awarded the O.B.E. in 1968.

-------0---------

Friday, June 29, 1973

TOUGHER SAFETY MEASURES ON CONSTRUCTION SITES

The government is to extend industrial legislation in Hong Kong to allow for strict safety measures on construction sites and in the handling of cargo.

The Assistant Commissioner of Labour, Mr. David Lin, said today the department was alarmed at the soaring rate of accidents in the two industries.

Sixty-five workers were killed and injured last year in the construction industry, and four were killed and 193 injured in cargo handling on shore during the period July 1972 to March 1973.

,fV/e intend to make sure that safety measures are taken to cut back this huge toll in life and injuries”, he said.

As a first step, the Factories and Industrial Undertakings Ordinance is to be modified to make way for the enactment of new safety regulations.

An amendment bill - the Factories and Industrial Undertakings (Amendment) Bill 1973 - published in today’s Government Gazette includes ’’construction work’* and ’’cargo handling” in the definition of ’’Industrial Unkdertakings’* under the ordinance, thus paving the way for the introduction of new safety regulations.

The new bill will be introduced into the Legislative Council next Wednesday (July 4).

/The bill •••••••

Friday, June 29, 1973

- 3

The bill also doubles the maximum fine for breaking regulations under the ordinance from 35»000 to 310,000. And there will be an additional penalty of up to 31,000 a day for each day the offence continues.

lir. Lin said: "We hope people will take this as an indication of our determination to make building sites and cargo handling safer for workers.”

-------0---------

EXTENSIONS TO SHAU KEI WAN TECHNICAL SCHOOL

The Shau Koi Wan Government Secondary Technical School is to be expanded to include sixth form accommodation.

The project will enable the enrolment at the school to be increased from 300 to 920, as well as bringing the facilities up to the standards applied in other government secondary technical schools.

The extension, in the form of a two-storey annex building with an area of 20,000 square feet, will have a science laboratory, two classrooms and a library on the ground floor and an additional assembly hall on the top floor.

• Construction work will begin in August and is expected to take about nine months.

•The new building will be connected to the existing school by a covered walkway.

-------0---------

/6.........

Friday, June 29, 1973

- 6 -

RE-INTRODUCTION OF STATUTORY TIME LIMIT

FOR APPROVING BUILDING PLANS

*»*«*«*«

Statutory time limits for the approval of all building plans are to be re-introduced from Sunday (July 1),

Under regulations gazetted today, all new building plans will be required to be processed within 60 days. In the case of re-submission of plans, the maximum period for approval will be 30 days except where, in the opinion of the Building Authority, there has been a major revision of the former plans. In such an event the 60-day period would apply.

Commenting on the changes, the Principal Government Building Surveyor, Mr. J.G. Stean, said that plans submitted before July 1, but not dealt with, will now have to be processed within the limit of the new regulations from the date on which such plans were submittedr

The old 28-day statutory period which had previously been in force, was suspended in June last year, following the rainstorm disasters, in order to relieve pressure of work on the Buildings Ordinance Office.

Mr. Stean explained that the increase in the statutory period, compared to that in operation before the suspension, was necessary to process not only matters under the Buildings Ordinance, but also other important aspects. These included checks to ensure Mass Transit and Long Term Road Study Proposals were not adversely affected, all of which was clearly in the public interest.

/’’Every........

Friday, June 29, 1973

- <7 -

’’Every attempt will be made to process plans within the new statutory periods, but since the large number of submissions has been maintained, many of which are of a highly complex nature, there may well be difficulties, particularly as there is currently a serious shortage of professional staff in the Buildings Ordinance Office.”

However, Mr. Stean said that private engineering consultants, who are assisting in the processing of structural and civil engineering aspects of submitted plans, will continue to be engaged for the time being. Prospects of substantial recruitment of professional staff over the next few months are also quite high.

’’Moreover, a system of curtailed checks consistent with structural safety, which commenced on May 15 this year will continue which will further help in the reduction of delays.”

-------o----------

*

/8..........

Friday, June 29, 1973

- 8 -

NEW KWAI CHUNG HOUSING PROJECT

***»«»***

Homes for about 15,000 people are to be provided in the first stage of the new Lai King housing project in Kwai Chung.

Costing nearly S27 million, this phase will involve the construction of a 22-storey and three 15-storey blocks for domestic accommodation.

A spokesman for the Housing Department said today there will also be a kindergarten and two estate primary schools containing 48 classrooms, a modular market with 40 hawker stalls, 12 shops, a restaurant, a cafe and recreational facilities.

The Lai King estate will be built on a series of platforms off Kwai Chung Road which were formed as part of the overall development plan for the area.

Ultimately the estate will house 27,000 people in more than 4,000 flats. Work on this second and final phase is expected to begin in February next year and will include another 22-.ctorey and two 15-storey blocks to accommodate 12,000 people.

Several other schools providing kindergarten, primary and secondary education also form part of the final phase.

The whole estate should be ready in mid-1976.

Residents living there will have easy access to the urban areas when the proposed mass transit system is completed as provision has boon made for an underground station to be built in the centre of the estate.

Note to Editors: Photographs of a model of the estate are

boxed today.

-------o--------- /9.........

Friday, June 29, 1973

- 9 -

MAJOR FLYOVER PROJECT IN YAU MA TEI

********

Work on the first stage of the West Kowloon Corridor project — a major scheme to distribute traffic in western Kowloon and provide a direct link from the cross harbour tunnel to Kwai Chung and Tsuen Wan — wj11 begin in August•

This first phase involves the construction of a section of a 4,200 foot-long flyover in Yau Ma Tei.

This part of the flyover, measuring 2,200 feet long and 40 feet wide, starts in Gascoigne Road near Wylie Road. It will run above Gascoigne Road and across Nathan Road to terminate at the Yau Ma Tei multi-storey oar park

Construction for this section, costing about S20 million, is expected to begin in about two months’ time, and is scheduled for completion in two years• Tenders are now being invited for the work.

Caisson foundations will be used to eliminate noisy pile-driving during construction.

This is done by sinking a large hollow tube into the ground by means of excavating through the tube itself.

A heavy weight is then placed on top of the tube, forcing it down further into the ground. This ’’dig and weight” process is continued until solid rock is penetrated.

Concrete is then poured into the tube to form the foundation for the flyover.

/The remaining ••••••••

Friday, Juno 29, 1973

- 10 -

The remaining portion of the flyover, the western section, will pass through the multi-storey car park and continue for 2,000 feet to the reclamation near the Yau Ma Tei typhoon shelter where it will join the Tong Ui Road extension now under construction.

A separate contract for this section will be called early next year

-------0---------.

/11

Friday, June 29, 1973

INSTITUTE FOR SOCIAL WORK TRAINING NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS *********

Applications are now being accepted by the Institute for Social Work Training for admission to its first course for the academic year 1973 to 197^.

The two year full-time non-university course will lead to a Certificate in Social Work.

Giving details of admission requirements today, the Principal of the Institute, Mr. L.B; MacQuarrie, said applicants must be at least 19 years of age.

’^reference will be given to those aged 21 or over, and those who have acquired some previous work experience though not necessarily in the social welfare field,” he said.

The minimum academic requirement is possession of a Hong Kong Certificate of Education and applicants should be able to read and write Chinese. Candidates will be required to pass an entrance examination.

,5The mature or older candidate who does not hold any of the necessary academic qualifications will be required to prove his ability to undertake the course. All candidates will be expected to have the personal qualities necessary for social work and the final selection will be by interview,” Mr. MacQuarrie said.

Details for admission are advertised in some newspapers today.

/Application .......

Friday, June 29, 1973

- 12 -

Application forms can be obtained from the Institute for Social Work Training at 44, Oi Kwan Road, Wanchai and the Hong Kong Council of Social Service, Anne Black Red Cross Building, Harcourt Road. The forms should be completed and returned to the Institute by August 1.

The Institute, which will operate initially under the Social Welfare Department, is one of the major proposals in the plan for developing social welfare services in the next five years.

-------0--------

/13

I

Friday, June 29, 1973

- 13 -

HEW LIST OF CHARITABLE INSTITUTIONS AND TRUSTS PUBLISHED

A revised list of charitable institutions and trusts which havef as at May J1 this year, been recognised as being exempt from tax, is published in a supplement to today’s gazette.

The new list supersedes all others published previously.

Anyone who makes donations to any of the 2,000-odd charitable institutions or trusts on the list may claim tax relief, under section 88 of the Inland Revenue Ordinance.

Donations made to charitable institutions or trusts not included in the list may also qualify for relief if the particular institution or trust produces evidence to the Commissioner of Inland Revenue that it meets the requirements of this section of the ordinance.

The usual evidence required is a copy of the written constitution or trust deed.

Claims for tax relief may be made when completing return forms required for profit tax, salaries tax or personal assessment, and should be supported by an official receipt issued by the institution or trust.

Relief vrill only be given when the total approved charitable donations amount to #100 or more in a year.

-------0---------

/14

Friday, June 29, 1973

- 14 -

TYPHOON PRECAUTIONS: STEPS TO TAKE $***A***»*A

Weather conditions are becoming favourable for the formation of tropical cyclones and the Director of the Royal Observatory, Mr. Gordon Bell, today stresses that it is necessary to take precautions as soon as possible.

Fastenings on doors and windows should be checked to make sure

that they are working properly. Drains should be cleared of obstructions and checked for damage, and emergency stocks of food, candles, torches and first-aid equipment should also be at hand.

Those who have special responsibilities should now ensure that all their instructions and relevant telephone numbers are up-to-date and that any equipment they need is in good order.

Some of the warning signals have been renumbered this year to make then simpler to understand. The signals now employed are:

* No. 1 - This is the "standby signal". The hoisting of this signal does not warn of the onset of high winds ceid it should be possible for most normal activities to continue while it is up. However people should be prepared to take appropriate action as soon as the No. 3 signal is hoisted.

* No. 3 - This is a definite warning of strong winds; that is winds of 22 to 33 knots.

No. 8 There are four No. 8 signals — 8NW, 8SW, 8NE

and 8SE — which give positive warning of gale or storm force winds from the direction indicated. The No. 8 signals cover a wide range of wind speeds, from 34 to 63 knots.

/♦ Nos. 9 & 10 ........

Friday, June 29, 1973

- 15 -

* Nos. 9 & 10 - These two signals imply that the centre of a severe tropical storm or typhoon will come very close to Hong Kong. When this happens the direction of the wind can be expected to change very quickly,

lir. Bell warned that it is not possible to predict the future path or intensity of tropical cyclones with certainty.

Although- the errors of 24-hour forecast positions in recent years have boon on average less than 100 miles it is nevertheless still possible for a tropical cyclone occasionally to move in an unexpected direction, or at a different speed, or to intensify or weaken more rapidly than forecast, A small change in the distance of the nearest approach of the centre can also make a tremendous difference to its effects on Hong Kong, he said.

The public should therefore listen to weather broadcasts to keep abreast of developments and should not relax precautions until all si gnals are lowered,

When No. .8, 9 or 10 signal is displayed, special weather bulletins are prepared, every hour and broadcast at two minutes before the hour and at half past the hour throughout the day and night.

These bulletins give the latest' information on the progress of the storm and the position of its centre.

Residents.are strongly advised not to set out for long pleasure trips in small boats and not to leave on camping or walking holidays to remote parts of the New Territories when the 6’tahdby signal, No. 1, is hoisted.

/All schools

Friday, June 29, 1973

16

All schools are closed automatically when number 8, 9 or 10 signal is hoisted and the Director of Education may make a public announcement about closing schools even when No. 3 is hoisted, if conditions are expected to deteriorate.

The government and many large concerns permit staff not required for duty to return home or to stay at home whenever number 8, 9 or 10 signal is hoisted.

If anyone wishes to know which signal is hoisted, he should telephone the Secretariat for Home Affairs at telephone 5-456381 and not the Royal Observatory. In case special notification is required every time signals are changed, the Telephone Company can provide the service for a nominal charge.

Details of the warning signals are printed in the front of every telephone directory and on special cards issued by the Royal Observatory.

These cards also contain advice on precautions to be taken and are available free of charge from the enquiry counters of City District Offices, the Information Services Department in Beaconsfield House, the Government Printer and from the Royal Observatory.

For newcomers or those who would like more information, a booklet entitled "Typhoon" is available in English and in Chinese at three dollars a copy from the Government Printer and the Royal Observatory.

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/17........

Friday, June 29, 1973

- 17 -

COMPENSATION SCHEME INTRODUCED TO MEET PUBLIC DEMAND

********

The scheme to compensate victims of violent crimes was introduced because the people of Hong Kong wanted it.

This was stated today by Mr. Stephen Chau, Principal Social Welfare Officer (Accident Compensation), who is also Secretary to the Compensation Boards.

Speaking at the monthly meeting of the City District Office, Kowloon City, he said that before the scheme came into operation, the need for having compensation from the government for victims of crimes of violence had been repeatedly advocated in the press and by local groups. In other words, the scheme represented the wish of the people.

Because of these comments, he explained, a working party was appointed to study the matter resulting in the scheme being introduced on May 2? this year.

"The scheme is a permanent measure under the developing social security system of Hong Kong for the protection of victims of violent crimes against undue financial loss as a result of injuries, disability and fatality."

It came into effect at an appropriate time as it coincided with the current anti-crime campaign, but, he stressed that it was not a by-product of the campaign.

"It is contributory to crime fighting in the sense that people who are accidentally injured as a result of fighting, .resisting, or assisting in the prevention of crime are compensated.

/"It is ......

4

Friday, June 29, 1973

- 18 -

"It is a public scheme of non-contributory social insurance as necessary as other social security provisions,” he said.

The scheme is administered by two boards - the Criminal Injuries Compensation Board and the Law Enforcement Injuries Compensation Board -comprising members of the community, including solicitors and barristers who have the competence to determine each application according to its merits from the social and legal points of view.

The procedure for applying is very simple. All an applicant has to do is to get a form from any police station, city district office or district office of the New Territories Administration.

Mr• Chau said that while there would not be any ,rbureaucratic delay” in the processing of an application, some time was usually required for the applicant or the Secretary to the Boards to obtain an accurate medical- report. This report was needed in order to understand and assess how the victim was injured or disabled and in what way he should be compensated.

Awards to fatal cases can be paid out within a very short tine after the receipt of an application which is considered eligible by the compensation board. »• ?

- - . - 0 -------

Please time; ff.jO p.m

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Saturday, June 30, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No.

Concession train fares for students announced •••••••...... 1

New passenger ferry services from Shaukiwan to Sam Ka Tsuen and Kwun Tong.............................................. 2

Two sections of the Immigration Department will be moving into now premises over the weekend •••••••.....•........... 3

Motor vehicles will be prohibited from picking up or setting down passengers in the Tsim Sha Tsui Star Ferry concourse.. 4

Exhibition of stamp designs marking the Centenary of the Universal Postal Union in the G.P.O. ...................... 5

Life-saving course for boys from the 0 Pui Shan Home and Kwun Tong Hostel .••••••................................... 6

Officers of the Auxiliary Medical Services conclude two-day summer comp in Sai Kung.................................... 7

Two squash courts in Victoria Park will close for renovation ........................................................... 8

Opening of fieh pond in Tai Ah Chau........................ 9

There will be an issue of the D.I.B. tomorrow.............. 9

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Saturday, June JO, 1973

REDUCED TRAIN FARES FOR STUDENTS

*******

A half-fare concession will be granted to students travelling third class on scheduled trains between Kowloon and the New Territories as from Tuesday (July J),

Announcing this today, a spokesman for the Kowloon-Canton Railway said the reduced fares were to encourage young people from urban and rural areas to take part in activities organised outside their districts during the summer vacation.

The concession fares will be effective until August J1 but will not apply on Saturdays, Sundays or public holidays, and may be withdrawn at any time.

Only return tickets, valid for the date of issue, will be sold and no refund will be made in respect of the unused return portion of a ticket under any circumstances.

Students will be required to produce documents to show that they are full-time students when buying tickets or on the request of train inspectors.

Those found travelling beyond the stations for which their concession tickets were sold will be required to pay half-fare for that portion of the journey for which they do not hold tickets, in addition to a JO per cent surcharge•

Students found travelling in first or second class coaches on concession tickets will have to pay the full fare of the higher class, plus a JO per cent surcharge. In this case, however, the third class half-fare which they have paid will be deducted.

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/2........

Saturday, June 30, 1973

- 2 -

NEW TIMETABLES FOR FERRY SERVICES

*********

Two new passenger ferry services run by the Hong Kong and Yaumati Ferry Company will come into operation at noon on Monday (July 2) following the completion of new piers at Shaukivzan and San Ka Tsuen.

The new service between Shaukiwan and Kwun Tong will run froui 6.07 a.m. to 11.35 p.m. daily at 13-minute intervals. Fares vzill be 20 cents for first class and 10 cents for second class.

A flat fare of 20 cents will be charged on the new Shaukiwan-Sam Ka Tsuen service which vzill operate at 13-minute intervals bctvzeen 6.06 a.m. and 11.30 p.m. daily.

'.?he timetables of five other existing routes have also been adjusted to improve services.

From tomorrow (Sunday), the frequency of the Kwun Tong-Central service vzill be increased to 13-minutes between 7 a.m. and 7.43 p.m. on weekdays. On Saturdays, the last ferry vzill leave at 1.43 p.m.

Ferry services between North Point and Kwun Tong, North Point and Kowloon City, and North Point and Hung Hom vzill be operated at 12-minute intervals, while the frequency of the Central-Tai Kok Tsui route vzill be changed from the present 12 minutes to 20 minutes between 10.06 p.m. and midnight.

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Saturday, June JO, 1973

- 3 -

BETTER IMMIGRATION FACILITIES FOR CHINESE VISITORS

********

The Immigration Department’s Chinese (Visitors) Section and the Macau Visit Section will be moving at the weekend into new and enlarged premises on the 12th floor of International Building.

This is another step by the department to provide better services to the public.

At present the Chinese (Visitors) Section and the Macau Section are situated on the 14th and 11th floors respectively.

The new office of the two merged sections will open for business at 8*45 a.m* on Tuesday (July 3)•

Since the Macau Visit Section will become part of the Chinese (Visitors) Section, applicants wishing to obtain permits issued to Macau residents for visits to Hong Kong should therefore call at the new office after Saturday (June 30).

A new Overseas Visa Section will then be set up on the 11th floor of International Building on Tuesday (July 3)•

The new section will be responsible for the transaction of immigration business presently dealt with by the Aliens, United Kingdom and Commonwealth countries, Chinese, and British Passport sections.

As from Tuesday, applicants wishing to obtain entry certificates or visas to the United Kingdom and other commonwealth countries are advised to call at the new Overseas Visas Section.

/A spokesman .......

Saturday, June JO, 1973

A spokesman for the Immigration Department said that the object of setting up the new section was to centralize the processing of all applications.

"It is for the convenience of the public and for the sake of administrative officency,” he said.

trThe new moves will not only provide a much larger public waiting area but also more office and records space for the staff on both the 12th and 14th floors,n the spokesman added.

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NEW TRAFFIC ARRANGEMENTS AT STAR FERRY CONCOURSE

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The Transport Department announced today that no motor vehicles, other than franchised buses, will be permitted to pick up or set down passengers or goods at the edge of the carriageway at the Star Ferry concourse in Tsiin Sha Tsui.

The restriction will come into effect at 10 a.m. on Tuesday (July J) and will apply between the hours of 7. JO a.m. and midnight.

A spokesman said the new arrangement was to improve traffic circulation at the concourse.

Traffic signs will be posted to indicate the restricted area.

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Saturday, June JO, 1973

- 5 -

EXHIBITION OF STAMP DESIGNS • / • * . % •

A four-day exhibition of special stamp designs commemorating the Centenary of the Universal Postal Union will be held in the General Post Office next week.

The stamps have been designed by both local and overseas artists, including students from the Hong Kong Polytechnic, based on a central feature of a U.P.U. emblem of the world encircled by people.

The Postmaster General will select a design to be issued at the end of next year.

The public are welcome to attend the exhibition which will be open daily from Tuesday (July 3) between 8 a.m. and 4 p.m. on the first floor landing of the General Post Office building in Pedder Street.

The Hong Kong Post Office has been a member of the Universal Postal Union for 96 years.

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/6.......

Saturday, June 30, 1973

- 6 -

LIFE-SAVING COURSE FOR BOYS IN S.W.D. CARE

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The Hong Kong Life Guard Club in conjunction with the South China Homing Post have arranged a course in life-saving for 30 boys of the 0 Pui Shan Boys Home and the Kwun Tong Hostel.

Altogether 14 instructing sessions will be held in the teaching pool of the Kwun Tong Swimming Pool from 8 to 10 p.m. every Sunday, between July and September.

The sponsors will provide the instructors and necessary equipment.

A brief ceremony will be held at the swimming pool at 8 p.m. tomorrow (Sunday) to mark the start of the course. Mr. Mak Wing-hong, Principal Social Welfare Officer (Correctional Institutions) and Mrs. Kan Law Shui-lin, Chairman of the Women Division, the Hong Kong Life Guard Club, will address the gathering.

Note to Editors: Yom are invited to cover the opening of this

life-saving course. The Kwun Tong Swimming Pool is situated in Tsui Ping Road, Kwun Tong, Kowloon.

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/7.........

Saturday, June 30, 1973

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AUXILIARY MEDICAL SERVICE SUMMER CAMP

»*»*».*,

Five hundred and fifty officers of the Auxiliary Medical Service attended the AMS annual suruner camp in the Sai Kung area this week.

The camp was held in the grounds of the Sung Tsun Middle School, and AMS members attending came from districts in North Kowloon and the New .. >• 7»«r ‘

Territories.

A highlight of the two^day programme was the opening parade, inspected by the Rev. Father A. Lamberton!f Supervisor of the Sung Tsun Middle School, who described the AMS as "a society in miniature, with different levels of control over a large membership, comprising volunteers from all walks of life.11

Activities on the first day included practical first aid demonstrations, followed by a variety show.

On the second day, an early morning parade was followed by squad and stretcher drills. Later, members split up into groups for life-saving training, hiking, reconnaissance and route-finding, and other exercises.

Before the camp broke up, Dr. Raymond Mok, Deputy Controller of the AMS for Kowloon and the New Territories, praised senior officers for successfully organising this year’s programme.

Dr. Mok also thanked the Rev. Father Lambertoni for making the Sung Tsun Middle School available for the annual function. At the end of August, he said, another group of AMS officers, numbering 500 from the southern districts of the Kowloon peninsula, would hold another camp in the same school grounds.

Saturday, June 30, 1973

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SQUASH COURTS TO BE RENOVATED

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The two public squash courts in Victoria Park will be closed

for about two weeks early next month* ♦

The temporary closure is.to facilitate.work on renovating the

courts which are regularly maintained to keep up standards.

In order to reduce the inconvenience to squash players, the Urban

Services Department has taken steps, to ensure that renovation work will be • •

carried out alternately so that one court would be available to those who

want to use it

Saturday, June JO, 1973

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ARMY HELPS VILLAGERS BUILD FISH POND t »«»*»***

A fish pond on Tai Ah Chau, a small island to the south of Lanteu Island, will be officially opened on Tuesday (July J).

The pond, with an area of about 15,000 square feet, has been built by the villagers of the island with the help of the 68 Gurkha Field Squadron and Headquarters 51 Infantry Brigade of the British Forces in conjunction with the District Office, Islands.

Brigadier P.F.A. Sibbald; Mr. Mayer Ng, District Officer, Islands; Mr. Cheung Shu-yau, Chairman of the South Lantau Rural Committee; end Mr. Ng Shin^-yau, village representative of Tai Ah Chau will jointly officiate at the ceremony.

Note to Editors: You are invited to send a representative to

cover the ceremony, which will be held at J. JO p.ra. The launch "Sir Cecil Clementi" will leave the Marine Department Pier in Central at 12 noon to take the press to Tai Ah Chau. Mr. To Kwok-sing from the District Office, Islands will be present to assist the press. Lunch will be served on board.

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SUNDAY D.I.B.

Noto to Editors: There will be an issue of the Daily Information

Bulletin tomorrow (Sunday). Copies will be available for collection from the G.I.S. news room on the sixth floor of Beaconsfield House at 2.JO p.m.

Release time: 2 .JO p.m.

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