Daily Information Bulletin - 1970s - 1973 - OCT - ENG

 PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Monday, October 1, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No.

Hong Kong’s exports continue to expand ................. 1

Governor calls for new Outline Zoning Plan for Shatin ..••• 3

Parents urged to help reduce the occurrence of measles • ••• 4

Sale of ’’Lucky” car numbers nears $2 million mark.......... 3

Special train services for Chung Yeung Festival............. 6

Prize—giving for winners of calligraphy and drawing contest .......................................................... 7 No mail delivery on Chung Yeung Festival day................ 7

Review of hospital visiting hours to avoid congestion ...... 8

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong. Tel: 5-233191

Monday, October 1, 1973

EXPOPTS CONTINUE TO RISE

******

The value of Hong Kong’s domestic exports in August showed a marked increase over that of the corresponding month last year.

According to provisional trade figures released today by the Census and Statistics Department, domestic exports in August were valued at $1,946 million -— an increase of $529 million or 57*3 per cent over August 1972.

The value of imports increased by $590 million or J1.1 per cent to $2,485 million.

The biggest increase — 85.5 per cent — was in re-exports which were worth 8687 million, a rise of $317 million over that of August last year.

Commenting on these figures, a spokesman for the Commerce and Industry Department said that during the three-month period, June to August 1973» figures show increases over the same period in 1972 of 28.8 per cent for domestic exports, 26.9 per cent for imports and 60.2 per cent for reexports.

Figures for the eight-month period, January to August 1973» show increases over the same period in 1972 of 21 per cent for domestic exports, 22.2 per cent for imports and 47 per cent for re-exports.

The provisional trade figures for August are given in the table below with comparative figures.

/MERCHANDISE........

Monday, October 1, 1975

2 -

MERCHAJ\DIS-j t COMPARATIVE FIGURES . Domestic Exports : $1,9^ million

Imports Re-exports : 32,485 million : $ 687 million

August August Increase or

. 197? 1972 decrease

# Mn. 8 Mn. 8 Mn. %

• Domestic Exports 1,946 1,41? + 529 + 37.3

Imports 2,485 1,895 + 590 + 31.1

Re-exports 68? 370 + 317 + 85.5

June-Aug. June-Aug. Increase or

. -19.73 - -. 1972 decrease

S Mn. 8 Mn. 8 Mn. %

Domestic Exports 5,220 4,052 +1,168 + 28.8

Imports 7,211 5,680 +1,530 + 26.9

Re-exports 1,755 1,096 + 659 + 60.2

• * June-Aug. June-Aug. Increase or

1973 1972 decrease

$ I-In. 8 Mn. 3 Mn. %

Domestic Exports 11,760 9,715 +2,045 + 21.0

Imports 17,192 14,063 +3,128 + 22.2

Re-exports 3,765 2,561 +1,204 + 47.0

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Monday, October 1, 1973

- 3 -

SHATIN ZONE PLAN TO BE REVISED

**«*«**»

The Outline Zoning Plan for Sha Tin has been referred back to the Town Planning Board for replacement by a new plan.

The move was ordered by the Governor on the advice of the Executive Council•

The original plan is out of date. It was based on the 19^1 Census which envisaged a population of 7*2 million in Hong Kong by 1986.

This would have necessitated a new town at Sha Tin for a population of 1 million, with parallel developments at Tsuen Wan/Kwai Chung and Tuen Mun.

However, the 1971 Census puts the 1986 population at million.

In view of this, the Council believes that the three new towns need not be planned for such large populations even though they will be the medium through which the bulk of the 1O-year housing target will have to be met.

It is therefore estimated that Shatin should be planned for a population of the order of 500,000 by 1986.

This provides an opportunity to create a better environment in accordance with improved standards for various community uses adopted since approval of the existing plan.

A new major feature in the new plan will be the race course at Sha Tin. This will necessitate additional reclamation and some of the areas at present in the Green Belt will probably be used as a source of fill for the reclamation.

The new plan will also have to take account of revised major road and possible future mass transit proposals, and a possible site for an army camp, -------------------------------0---------- /4......................

Monday, October 1, 1975

MARKED RISE IN MEASLES’ DEATHS

********

Five deaths from measles and 101 notifications of the same disease were recorded during August, according to the monthly health returns issued by the Medical and Health Department today.

The deaths brought the total of fatalities from this disease to 11 so far this year — already exceeding by two the total of nine recorded for the whole of 1972.

A spokesman for the department said the marked rise in deaths was ”unfortunate,” but he emphasised the need for parents of susceptible children between six months and five years to have them immunised.

He appealed for parental co-operation to prevent the outbreak of a measles’ epidemic in Hong Kong. The last epidemic was in 1966-67 when 1,0^5 children died.

Free measles vaccine is available throughout the year at all government maternity and child health centres.

In August, notifications of all communicable diseases totalled 878. Apart from the five deaths from measles, amoebiasis resulted in one other fatality, and tuberculosis 109, bringing the total for the month to 115.

There was no case of diphtheria. One case of cerebrospinal meningitis and one of poliomyelitis were reported. Typhoid fever accounted for 18 notifications.

Ho appreciable variation occurred in the notifications of other infectious diseases, and Hong Kong remained free from cholera and other quarantinable diseases in August.

Monday, October 1, 1973

- 3 -

"LUCKY" CAR NUMBERS RAISE 31.8 MILLION FOR CHARITY

********

More than $1.8 million has been raised so far for charity through the sale of "lucky" car numbers.

And it is hoped that the 32 million mark may be reached this Saturday (October 6) when another 20 of the special car registration plates will be put up for auction in the City Hall Theatre at 11 a.in.

Since the scheme started in August last year, 2p8 car numbers have boon sold at a total cost of 31,800,530. The highest amount paid for a single number (IIK 2) was $110,000.

Proceeds of the auctions go to the Government Lotteries Fund for charity purposes, after expenses have been deducted.

As before, successful bidders in Saturday’s auction will have to pay in cash or by cheque immediately after the bidding. The "lucky" numbers will be assigned only to a vehicle registered in the name of the successful, bidder within 12 months of the auction.

The latest registration plates to be auctioned are:

AZ 1 AZ 3 AZ 8 AZ 22 AZ 35

AZ 66 AZ 77 AZ 333 AZ 888 AZ 2222

AZ 5555 AZ 232? AZ 8989 AZ 6688 AZ 8000

AA 232 AA 33 AA 59 AA 818 AA 1000

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/6........

I

Monday, October 1, 1973 - 6 -

SPECIAL TRAINS FOR CHUNG YEUNG FESTIVAL

*******

Special passenger trains will run between Tsim Sha Tsui and V7o

Hop Shek in Fanling on Chung Yeung Festival (Thursday) for the convenience of visitors to the Wo Hop Shek Cemetery,

Eleven up-trains will leave Tsim Sha Tsui station for Wo Hop Shek between 6.15 a.m. and 3.21 p.m. on that day, and eleven down-trains wi 11 depart form Wo Hop Shek for Tsim Sha Tsui between 7.34 a.m. and 4,57 p.m.

A spokesman for the Kowloon—Canton Railway said that no passengers would be picked up at the Mongkok station between 8 a.m. and 3 p.m. on Thursday.

During this period, passengers who normally board at Mongkok station are asked to use the Tsim Sha Tsui station. Holders of season and monthly tickets will be permitted to board without extra charge.

Concession return tickets valid for the date of issue will be availaole at the Tsim Sha Tsui station on October 4 for journeys between Kowloon and V/o Hop Shek and between Kowloon and Lo Wu (Sandy Ridge Cemetery).

The spokesman said that special train services would be arranged in the late evening if this became necessary.

He added that all up—trains from Kowloon to the New Territories were expected to be full from 6 a.a. to 3 p.m., and similarly with the down-trains from 3 p.m. to 9 p.m.

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Monday, October 1, 197J

YOUIIG PEOPLE’S APT COMPETITION

******

Winners of the Children and Youth Calligraphy and Drawing Competition held in August will receive their prizes on Wednesday (October J).

The presentation ceremony will take place at 7.JO p.m. at the Boys* and Girls’ dubs Association in Lockhart Road, Wanchai. The winning entries will be displayed.

The competition was a joint project between the Boys’ and Girls’ Clubs Association, the Y.W.C.A. end the Western District Community Centre of Social Welfare Department.

It was divided into two sections - indoor and outdoor. More than 800 entries were received.

Officiating at the prize-giving ceremony will be Mrs. Gennie Lee, * • •

General Secretary, Boys’ and Girls’ Clubs Association; Mr. Au Kwong-oan, Principal Sboial Welfare Officer, Social Welfare Department; and Miss Agnes Ng, Chairman, Committee of Student and Youth Department, Young Women’s Christian Association.

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HOLIDAY POSTAL ARRANGEMENTS

******

The Postmaster General announced today that there will be no mail delivery on Thursday (October 4) which is a public holiday.

All post offices will be closed on that day for the Chung Yeung Festival.

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Monday, October 1, 1973

- 8 -

C0KG2STI0II AT GOVERNMENT HOSPITALS DURING VISITING HOURS »****«

Note to Editors: Members of the Press, radio and TV are invited

to attend a conference in the headquarters of the Medical and Health Department, Lee Gardens, at 11 a.m. tomorrow (Tuesday), at which Dr. K.F. Chan, Acting Deputy Director of Medical and Health Services (Medical), will review the regulations with regard to visiting hours at government hospitals, and suggest ways by which the public can help to reduce congestion.

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Italease time: 7<00 p.m.

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Tuesday, October 2t 1973

CONTENTS

Page No*

Another 305 acres to be reclaimed for multi-million-dollar Tuen Mun New Town development.......... 1

Governor commutes death sentence ............... 2

Hospital visitors urged to observe rules to avoid congestion .............................................................. 3

Aberdeen Social Security Field Unit moves to new address • * 4

Luk Keng Road widening project to pave way for road improvement scheme ....................................... 5

Guide to the use of simple trade documents ................ 6

Four buildings in Shaukiwan declared dangerous • ••.......• 7

Sheung Shui Public Enquiry Centre opens tomorrow ........• •• 8

Student conservation leaders to help prevent hill fires during Chung Yeung Festival  ........................  • ••• 9

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Tuesday, October 2, 1973

- 1 -

TUEH MUN- DEVELOPMENT ENTERS NEW PHASE

More Than 300 Acres To Be Reclaimed For New Town 4c *****

Another phase in the mammoth Tuen Mun New Town Development Scheme which is planned to house half a million people by 1983 will begin soon with the reclamation of a further 305 acres in Castle Peak Bay, Engineering works for this phase of development are estimated to amount to more than $200 million.

The proposed reclamation is located on the western side of Castle Peak Road at the section between Castle Peak Beach and Wong Ka Wai. • r

Some 120 acres of the reclaimed land will be for public housing and private residential/commercial development®. Land will also be provided for industry, waterfront and community facilities, utility services and open spaces.

The portion of the reclamation fronting Wong Ka Wai will provide a location for the establishment of a town centre comprising facilities to serve the nevz town’s eventual population of 500,000.

A typhoon shelter will be constructed in the bay to provide anchorage for the local fishermen, and the two arms of the shelter will provide additional land for development.

The eastern arm of the shelter will be developed to accommodate fish and vegetable markets and for possible government and industrial use.

/The reclamation

Tuesday, October 2, 1973

- 2 -

The reclamation project includes the construction of the outer seawall of the western arm. Provision will be made for its widening at a later date to provide sites for industries.

A 100-foot wide motorway will be built on the reclamation to replace a section of Castle Peak Road adjacent to the reclamation site. The new dual carriageway road will provide improved vehicular access to the New Town.

A primary distributor road will also be formed across the bay to provide a southern access to the industrial area west of the San Hui River channel, and to facilitate the laying of a trunk sewer.

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DEATH SENTENCE CCMI>IUTED

*********

The Governor, after taking into consideration the advice of t.ie executive Council, has decided that the death sentence passed on Mohabbat Hussain on April 9, 1973, should be commuted to a term of 15 years* imprisonment.

Hussain was found guilty of the murder of Mohammed Afzal.

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Tuesday, October 2, 1975

- 3 -

PUBLIC URGED TO HELP REDUCE CONGESTION DURING HOSPITAL VISITING HOURS ***********

Dr. K.F. Chan, acting Deputy Director of Medical and Health Services (Medical), today urged members of the press, radio and television to help the department persuade the public to observe regulations during visiting hours at government hospitals.

Ho told a press conference at departmental headquarters that congestion at the Queen Elizabeth and Queen Mary hospitals between 2 p.m. and 3 p*m* had reached a point he could only describe as "chaotic."

Every patient on admission was given a leaflet making clear that only two visitors at a time were allowed each patient in the general wards. This was for the convenience of all, since certain wards had as many as 40 beds each*

"This rule seems nowadays to be entirely disregarded,"' Dr. Chan said, "and when our staff tries to enforce it, they are accused of being rude."

He said the department objected to the presence of children amongst visitors. This was contrary to the rules, because children were more susceptible to the dangers of cross-infection than adults.

Dr. Chan referred to the problem of congestion at the two main government hospitals as "overwhelming." At the Queen Elizabeth Hospital more than 6,000 visitors blocked corridors and stairways everyday. At Queen Mary, more than 3,000 daily visitors did the same thing.

He hoped the media would help spread the message that the visiting hour had been deliberately chosen as the most convenient time — both for the patient and the caller — and that adherence to the rules would do much to relievo pressure.

/In reply •••••••

Tuesday, October 2, 1973

- 4 -

In reply to a question, he said in the case of direct family members, special permission could be sought for urgent visits outside the set hour. This was usually given.

He said the lift service in both hospitals was unnecessarily taxed by people who could easily walk up or down a floor or two. Consideration for others was vital. While there was no "ideal” duration for a hospital visit, he felt no person who was sick should be exposed to a friendly cal1 of concern lasting more than a few minutes.

trf/c can only do so much with our rules and regulations”, Dr. Chan said. "In the final analysis, this state of affairs can only be overcome with the cooperation of the public. I hope the media will help us to secure this cooperation.”

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NEW OFFICES FOR ABERDEEN SOCIAL SECURITY FIELD UNIT

*********

The Aberdeen Social Security Field Unit has moved to new premises in the centre of the town within easier access of its clients.

Since it was established in June, the Unit has had to share offices with another unit in Western District while its new offices on the 4th floor of 200 Aberdeen Main Street, were being outfitted. The telephone numbers are 5-520725, 5-520727, 5-520710 and 5-520715.

Its operational areas cover Aberdeen, Aplichau, Wong Chuk Hang, Shek Pai Wan, Wali Fu Estate and Po Toi Island.

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Tuesday, October 2, 1973

- 5 -

ROAD IMPROVEMENTS IN NEW TERRITORIES

********

Plans are in hand to improve Luk Keng Road in Sha Tau Kok which will form a crucial link in a road development programme in the area.

The road, which leads from Wu Shek Kok to Luk Keng, will be realigned while the carriageway will be widened from 10 feet to 22 feet and developed into a two-way through road with a five-foot footpath on one side of it.

At present the road has an uneven surface and many sharp bends, and accommodates only one-way traffic.

The widened road will eventually form a part of a circular route running through Tai Po, Tai Mei Tuk, Luk Keng and Fanling.

A government spokesman said it was considered advisable to improve the Luk Keng section at this early stage because once the ci rcul ar route was completed the volume of traffic in the area was expected to increase rapidly.

Reclamation work will be carried out in the Starling Inlet in connection with the widening project, and a bridge structure will be constructed along 1,000 feet of the foreshore to accommodate the widened road.

After the realignment, Luk Keng Road will be over one milp long.

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/6........

Tuesday, October 2, 1973

- 6 -

HOT TO USE SIMPLER TRADE DOCUMENTS

**«*»***«

A brochure entitled "How to Use Simpler Trade Documents" has been released by the Hong Kong Working Party on Simpler Trade Documents. This brochure is being published by the Hong Kong Trade Development Council for the Working Party.

The brochure attempts to bring all concerned as up to date as possible on the forms which are now available to Hong Kong exporters and otners to enable them to mechanise their paper work.

It includes specimens of various documents which have been aligned to the Hong Kong Standard Master Document. The work of the ad hoc Working Party on Simpler Trade Documents has now been taken over by the Hong Kong Trade Facilitation Committee.

Copies of the brochure, at 82.00 each, can be obtained from the Government Publications Centre, Star Ferry Concourse, Hong Kong or through the Chinese Manufacturers’ Association; the Federation of Hong Kong Industries; the Hong Kong Exporters’ Association; the Hong Kong General Cnombcr of Commerce; the Indian Chamber of Connierce, and the Marine Insurance Association of Hong Kong.

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Tuesday, October 2, 1973

- 7 -

FOUR PRE-WAR BUILDINGS IN SHAUKIWAN CONDEMNED

*******

The Building Authority today declared Nos. 2A, 91, and 9J Shaukiwan Main Street East to be in a dangerous condition and No. 95 liable to become dangerous.

In a statement, the Principal Government Building Surveyor said that No. 2A had been inspected after a collapse at the rear of an adjoining building.

The badly fractured front wall and extensive decay in the roof timbers revealed a possibility of collapse, he added.

Referring to Nos. 9*1 and 93* he said these two pre-war buildings were inspected as part of an extensive investigation in the area following a collapse which resulted in the closure of four buildings.

The timberwork in Nos. 91 &nd 93* was extensively decayed and parts of it were at the point of failure. This, coupled with poor and fractured brickwork, led to the conclusion that there was danger of collapse.

Although No. 95 was not in such a deteriorated condition, it was liable to become dangerous during or after the demolition of No. 93 and No. 97* for which an application for closure was already proposed.

Notices of intention to apply for closure orders for these four buildings were posted today. Hearing is scheduled to be held in Victoria District Court at 9.JO a.m. on October JO.

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/8........

Tuesday, October 2, 1973

- 8 -

SHEUNG SHOT PUBLIC ENQUIRY CENTRE

*********

The Tai Po District Office will open its first Public Enquiry-Centre in Sheung Shui tomorrow (Wednesday).

Officiating the opening ceremony will be the District Commissioner, N.T., Mr. D.C. Bray, and four prominent local residents, Messrs. Liu Yun-sum, Chan Yau-choi, Lau Yam-man and Pang Hang-yin.

The Centre is located at 24, San Fung Avenue, in the township of Shek Wu Hui, and will serve the people in Sheung Shui, Ta Kwu Ling and Fanling areas.

It will handle normal enquiries about government functions and assist in promoting government publicity campaigns.

Note to Editors: Reporters and photographers are welcome

to cover the opening ceremony. It will start at 11.30 a.m. Transport will be provided. A van (AM 2132) will be leaving from the Tsim Sha Tsui Sub-pool at 9-30 a.m.

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Tuesday, October 2, 1973

- 9 -

STUDENT CONSERVATION LEADERS IN FIRE WATCH

*******

During the celebration of the Chung Yeung festival on Thursday (October 4) large numbers of secondary school students will be assisting the Agriculture and Fisheries Department in the prevention of countryside hill fires.

Every year during the festival an enormous amount of damage is done to the countryside by fires, caused through negligence during rites at ancestral graves. At such times all the available regular forestry staff are deployed over as wide an area as possible, and the assistance of these volunteers will be. a great help.

Tho young volunteers will be stationed in the hills, each with a predetermined area to cover. When a family group arrives to worship at a grave, tho volunteer will join that group and advise them of the precautions to bo taken, and he will seek their co-operation to prevent the accidental starting of grass fires.

The volunteers will also act as fire lookouts, with the responsibility of reporting any outbreaks to the forestry fire-fighting staff.

Thirty-nine members of Conservancy Clubs from 14 secondary schools last summer attended two-week long residential Conservation Leadership Training Camps, organised jointly by the Agriculture and Fisheries Department and the Education Department.

Besides gaining a better understanding of environmental problems, they also acquired basic skills in practical conservation work, such as the detection and suppression of hill fires, and the planting and care of trees

Since the completion of those training courses, these leaders have been working to promote a feeling of conservation awareness among the other pupils in their respective schools.

Release Time;, _7>OQ,

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Wednesday, October J, 1973

CONTENTS

Pagfr No,

Hong Kong offers better job prospects for workers.......tttt 1

Boring tests to ascertain seabed conditions for Mass Transit system • •...........••••••••........................  3

Secretary for Security appointed to Legco....................  4

Yuen Long refuse dump to be developed into recreational area ........................................................  5

Four buildings on Hong Kong Island declared dangerous ••••• 6

Two Homantin lots offered for sale ..........................  7

There will be a DIB holiday issue tomorrow •••••••••••••••• 7

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Wednesday, October 3, 1973

1

HONG KONG OFFERS BETTER PROSPECTS FOR WORKERS

Fewer workers are going abroad to take up employment as a result of better job opportunities in Hong Kong.

This is highlighted in recent statistics which shows a steady decline in the numbers of Hong Kong workers seeking employment overseas.

During the one-year period from July 1, 1970 to June 30, 1971» 3,048 workers went overseas. This compares with 1,759 in 1971/72 and 1,438 in 1972/75.

This trend has been attributed to a continued demand locally for both skilled and unskilled workers as a result of the developing economy, for unless wages and conditions of employment offered are particularly attractive, Hong Kong workers are not inclined to seek employment overseas.

The Labour Department is responsible for protecting the interests of those workers who do go overseas.

Under the contracts for Overseas Employment Ordinance, all manual emigrant workers, except those in specifically excluded categories, must enter into written contracts with their prospective employers before leaving Hong Kong.

The Commissioner of Labour has authority to attest the contracts, which, among others', must provide .for a number of conditions to the advantage of the worker.

These include facilities for remitting money to his family of dependents in Hong Kong, compensation in case of death or injury arising out of and in the course of employment, compensation in case of incapacity due to occupational diseases, and repatriation to Hong Kong at the employers’ expense at the end of the contract.

/If the

Wednesday, October 1975

- 2 -

If the terms are unfair to the worker or do not adequately protect his interests, the Commissioner can under the contracts for Overseas Employment (Amendment) Ordinance refuse to attest the contract.

In the case of workers from overseas coming here to work, there is no discrimination against them once they have been engaged in employment, except for certain immigration restrictions.

These workers .are mostly skilled and are recruited from overseas to fill specific jobs, such as setting up new manufacturing industries, working for major public works projects and the training of local workers.

Recently a number? of workers from the Philippines came to Hong Kong as domestic servants under the sponsorship of their employers.

They have to enter into individual agreements approved by the Director of Immigration and in their case a guarantee of maintenance and repatriation is required. . t

There is no distinction between a local person and an immigrant, except .in residential status, and all workers in Hong Kong enjoy equal benefits and protection afforded them by legislation.

If they want to seek employment they can approach the Local Employment Service of the Labour Department which provides free assistance to all job seekers irrespective of sex, religion, nationality, or race.

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Wednesday, October 3, 1973

- 3 -

HARBOUR BORING TESTS FOR TUBE SYSTEM

********

Boring tests in connection with the construction of the Mass Transit Railway tunnel between Kowloon Point, Tsim Sha Tsui, and the western end of the Wan Chai Reclamation will begin on Saturday (October 6).

The main objective of the tests is to investigate the formation of seabed and the bed rock levels. This will give the necessary information for the design and construction of the tunnel.

The work, to be carried out from two staging rigs, will involve the drilling of 15 holes along the line of the tunnel. It will take about three months to complete.

To reduce marine traffic in the work areas, vessels arriving at or departing from Hong Kong should use the Western Approaches.

A notice to this effect has been issued by the Marine Department to shipmasters, owners, agents, charterers and pilots.

The notice stipulates that all vessels with a draught of not more than 28 feet should use the western entrance when arriving at or leaving from a berth in the western sector of the harbour.

For those entering port by way of Lei Yue Mun and intending to proceed to a berth in the western sector of the harbour without the assistance * 9

of a pilot, they will have to go by way of Lei Yue Mun, Tathong Channel, and the East or West Lamma Channel.

/Vessels •••••••••

Wednesday, October 3, 1973

- 4 -

Vessels arriving in Kowloon Bay with a draught in excess of 28 feet are advised to obtain the services of a pilot for movement through the Hung Hom Fairway.

To warn shipping, the staging rigs, craft and floating plant engaged in the operation will be painted in "DAYGLO" mandarin orange colour and the craft and floating plant will carry appropriate si gnals for vessels engaged on boring work.

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NEW APPOINTMENT TO LEGCO

********

The Secretary for Security, Mr. G.P. Lloyd, has been appointed an Official Member of the Legislative Council with effect from October 1, 1973 until June 30 next year.

In his capacity as Secretary for Security, he is responsible for * the co-ordination of policy and programmes covering external security, emergencies, internal law and order, immigation, prisons, narcotics and fire services.

Hr. Lloyd, who is 46, assumed his present post in June this year.

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Wednesday, October J, 1973

- 5 -

"LAP SAP" DUMP TO BE TURNED INTO RECREATIONAL AREA ******

Controlled tipping of refuse at Ngau Tara Mei in Yuen Long by systematic disposal of refuse without causing pollution hazard will begin shortly.

A spokesman for the Public Works Department said today that after the tip was closed, some 5*5 acres of new land would have been formed for development as open space for recreational use.

Referring to the formation works, the spokesman said it would be carried out by sanitary and inoffensive methods.

’’Controlled tipping consists essentially of the spreading and compaction of refuse in layers,” he explained.

’’Each layer will be covered with inert material as tipping proceeds to seal off all working faces daily at the dump to obviate noxious smells and to facilitate the control of vermin and to eliminate health as well as fire hazards.”

Covering material such as earth will be obatined from adjacent areas which will be excavated to form platforms.

Construction of access roads to the tip, drainage, and protective worlds required for the systematic disposal of refuse will begin in December and is expected to be completed by the end of next year.

The project has been designed by the Development and Airport Division of the Civil Engineering Office, Public Works Department. Construction works will also be supervised by the Division.

Wednesday, October 3, 1973

- 6 -

DANGEROUS BUILDINGS

*******

The Building Authority today declared two pre-war buildings in Aberdeen Main Road to be in a dangerous condition and two others in Wing Lok Street, Western District, liable to become dangerous.

The two buildings declared dangerous are Nos. 166 and 168 Aberdeen Main Road.

The Principal Government Building Surveyor said detailed inspection of the two buildings showed that the load bearing brick walls were fractured and there was extensive spalling of reinforced concrete portions, as well as severe corrosion to the reinforcement.

Timbers were generally in poor condition and those in the roof were so decayed that there was a danger of collapse, he said.

Notices of intention to apply for closure orders were posted on the buildings today. The applications will be heard in Victoria District Court at 9•■JO a.m. oh October 16.

Referring to the two pre-war buildings at Nos. 92 and 9^ Wing Lok Street, the Principal Government Building Surveyor said they were inspected after the emergency closure of No. 96.

"Evidence of settlement in the walls, coupled with defects in the light reinforced concrete frames, indicate that there is a risk of failure during or after the demolition of the adjoining buildings.”

In view of the danger of collapse of No. 98, applications will be made for the closure of Nos. 92 and 9^»

Notices of intention to apply for closure orders in Victoria District Court at 9«3O a.m. on October 17 were posted today.

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Wednesday, October 3, 1973

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RESIDENTIAL LAND FOK SALE

*******

Two lots of Crown land for private residential development will be put up for auction later this months

Both lots are located off Homantin Hill Road in Kowloon. One measures about 31,000 square feet and the other 34,500 square feet.

The auction will be held at 2.30 p.m. on October 26 in the City Hall lecture room, 8th floor.

Full particulars and conditions of sale may be obtained at the Public Enquiry Sub-Office, Central Government Offices (West Wing) , ground floor, Hong Kong, and at the Crown Lands and Survey Office, Kowloon Government Offices, 405 Nathan Road, 10th floor, Kowloon.

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DIB HOLIDAY ISSUE

******

Note to Editors: There will be an issue of the Daily Information

Bulletin tomorrow (Thursday) which is a public holiday. Copies will be available for collection at

1 p.m. from the GIS Press room, 6th floor, Beaconsfield House.

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Release time: 7«QQ p.m

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Thursday, October 4, 1973

NEIt7 COLONIAL SECRETARY IN SEARCH FOR SMUGGLED GOODS

*********

Preventive Service officers involved in a recent search operation for contraband goods on board a freighter were pleasantly surprised when unexpected reinforcement turned up to help look for hidden gold and dangerous drugs.

Led by none other than the new Colonial Secretary, Mr. Deny6 Roberts, the new arrivals promptly set about poking around in the most unlikely corners and niches of the ship’s engine room, apparently unaware of the heat and grime.

Their efforts went unrewarded, except for greasy hands and stained trousers, but no one appeared in the least bit disappointed.

The visit by Mr. Roberts was part of a familiarisation tour to see for himself some aspects of the work done by the Preventive Service.

Accompanying him were Mr. E.P. Ho, acting Commissioner of the Preventive Service, and Mr. J.D. McGregor, Deputy Commissioner.

The Colonial Secretary first called at the Preventive Service Headquarters at Rumsey Street where he was conducted on a tour of the building by Mr. R.V.L. Hatton, Assistant Commissioner, and shown recent hauls of confiscated goods.

These included over 65 kilos of gold seized during the past three months, large quantities of liquor, tobacco, marijuana, opium - and of all things 12 police batons.

/The highlight •••..

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Thursday, October 4, 1975

2 -

Tlie highlight of the tour was a search operation at sea for dangerous goods.. Before boarding the suspect freighter, the visitors - including the Colonial Secretary - had to be cleared at a check point like all others.

Mr. Roberts was then taken to the lower engine room where he was shown the use of gas masks and other gadgets for the operation.

He observed with keen interest the search of the cofferdam -the lowest depth of the ship and a most likely hide - and spent two hours with the searchers going throught many possible hiding places among the maze of the odd-shaped and odd-sized tanks and engines.

Hothing was found, but the experience was reward enough f°r both the Colonial Secretary and the search team.

Note to Editors: Copies of two photographs taken during the

search are boxed for collection.

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Thursday, October 4-, 1975

- 3 -

SOCIAL WELFARE DIRECTOR TO VISIT CHILDREN'S PROJECTS *****«»*«

The Director of Social Welfare, Mr. K.W.J. Topley, will be visiting two voluntary organisations tomorrow (Friday) afternoon to see some of their children’s programmes.

He will begin his tour by calling at the Kwai Fong Children’s Centre run by the Boys1 and Girls’ Clubs Association on the ground floor of Block 8, Kwai Fong Housing Estate in Tsuen Wan.

The Centre lias a membership of 587 children and is one of the Association’s 80 service units. Among its facilities are a library, a girls’ craft centre and an electrical workshop.

Opened in January this year, its programmes include group activities, interest groups and handicraft classes. The programmes are geared to provide young people with opportunities to discover and develop their personal resources of body and mind enabling them to become mature, creative and responsible.

After an hour there, Mr. Topley will call at the Shek Lei Playground to watch a play leadership scheme run by the Hong Kong Children’s Playground Association.

This project is one of nine similar ones which the Association operates in playgrounds in different areas of Hong Kong. The programmes include group activities, ball games, sports days, outings and so on.

/Play........

Thursday, October 4, 1973

- 4 -

Play leadership is an approach to work, with young persons in a playground in a f,low organised” and ”less structured” manner requiring the use of recreational and human relationship skills based on social work principles.

Mr. Topley will be escorted by Mr. Kwok Ka*chi, Senior Principal Social Welfare Officer (Group and Community Work).

Note to Editors: Reporters and photographers are welcomed

to cover Mr. Topley’s visit on Friday (October 5). Transport will be provided. Those wishing to make use of this facility should assemble at the Public Relations Unit of the Social Welfare Department, Room 528^(1), 5th floor, Lee Gardens (East entrance) at 1.30 p.m. that day.

0--------

/5.........

Thursday, October 4, 197J

- 5 -

HEW PLAYGROUND FOR ABERDEEN RESIDENTS

A temporary playground is to be built shortly by the Urban Council at the new Aberdeen market.

The playground will cover an area of about 23,000 square feet south of the existing market at the junction of Aberdeen Reservoir Road and Yue Kwong Road.

Aside from the regular playground amenities, it will have a dual purpose basket and volley ball court, a badminton court and a small children’s playground and a rest garden.

Construction work is expected to start early next month and should take about 60 days to complete.

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WATER INTERRUPTION

******

A number of premises in Chai Wan will be without water from 1 a.m. to 6 a.m. on Saturday (October 6) to enable Waterworks staff to carry out a leakage test in the district.

The area affected is bounded by Chai Wan Road, from Ah Kung Ngam Road to Wan Tsui Road, Lee Chung Street, Ning Foo Street, Cheung Lee Street, Kut Shing Street, Hong Man Street and Chai Wan Hill Resite Area Section A.

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Release time: 3*00 p.m.

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Friday, October 5» 1973

CONTENTS

Page No.

Government accounts for June show 393 mi]1inn deficit •••••• 1

Reclaimed land in the New Territories included in revised rating area ••.••••...........••••••.•••«••••.................   2

Queensway straightening project enters new phase ............... J

New Legco session opens on October 17......................      4

Improvement to dangerous slope at Kwai Shing estate •••••••• 4

Metricated mathematics syllabus for primary schools •••••••• 5

Section of Shek Pai Wan Road to be widened •••••••••......... 6

Shing Mun River training scheme nearing completion ............. 7

Three pre-war buildings in Shaukiwan declared dangerous •••• 8

Breathing apparatus manufacturers invited to apply for approval of their products ••••••......................,............. 9

Clearway restrictions in Yaumati to facilitate roadworks ... 10

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5^233191

1

Friday, October 5, 1973

- 1 --

RISE IN GOVERNMENT SPENDING

June Accounts Show 393 Million Deficit * * * * He * *

The government accounts for the month of June 1973 show a deficit of $93 raillion, compared with a deficit of 382 million in June last year.

This has resulted in a total surplus of $10 million for the first quarter of this financial year.

Total expenditure for the month amounted to 3358 million, an increase of 329 million over the same month last year.

This brings the total expenditure for the first quarter of the financial year to 3999 million—3159 million more than the same period last year.

Total revenue for the month was 3265 million, an increase of 318 million over June 1972. The total revenue for the first quarter of the financial year at 31,010 million was 3252 million more than the same period last year.

However, a government spokesman said that because of the substantial increase in revenue after June last year, revenue in 1973-74 was unlikely to continue at the present high level compared with revenue in 1972-73•

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/2........

Friday, October 5, 1973

2 -

NEW TERRITORIES RATING AREA REVISED

The section of the shore along Castle Peak Road and extending south to the northern boundary of New Kowloon is included within a revised rating area under an order made by the Governor in the gazette today.

This section of land was outside the boundary of the existing rating area because it had only recently been reclaimed from the sea.

The new rating area includes all present and anticipated future areas of reclaimed land.

It affects three container terminal lots at Kwai Chung and includes the island of Pei Pa Chau (Pearl Island) which has been linked to the mainland and developed as a holiday resort.

It also includes reclaimed areas in Kwai Chung which are likely to be leased and developed in due course.

All these areas enjoy the same kind of services provided by the government for the areas lying within the existing boundary, and they will be assessed for rates on the same basis.

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Friday, October 5, 1973

- 3 -

STRAIGHTENING OF QUEENSWAY BENDS

********

Road improvement works to eliminate the dangerous bends in Queensway near the Old Naval Dockyard will begin shortly.

This follows the demolition of the last 12 buildings standing in the way of the Queensway realignment scheme.

The road works will include the realignment and widening of the existing carriageway to a smooth six—lane dual carriageway.

When completed, traffic flow between Wan Chai and Central Districts will be greatly improved and the traffic hazard at the existing dangerous bends will be eliminated, a spokesman for the Public Works Department said.

Part of the project involves the construction of footpaths on both sides of the road. A footbridge will also be incorporated in the scheme to provide a safe walkway for pedestrians crossing this busy traffic route.

The spokesman said that it should be possible to bring the new carriageway into operation in mid-1975.

Th^ project has been designed by the Highways (H.K.) Division of the Highways Office, Public Works Department, which will also supervise the construction works.

- .. - _ o - - - -

A....

Friday, October 5i 1973

- 4 -

OPENING OF NEV/ LEGCO SESSION

*««***«,

The Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, will review the affairs of

Hong Kong on October 17, when the Legislative Council begins its 1973/74 session.

This will be the second time Sir Murray addresses the Council at the opening of a new session.

On the first occasion last year Sir Murray covered in his review the development of social services in Hong Kong and announced the 1O-year housing plan.

The debate on a motion of thanks to his address this year will be held on October 31 and November 14.

The Unofficials will speak on October 31 and if necessary the next day (November 1), while the Officials will reply on November 14. An additional day has also been reserved for the officials, should they need it.

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DANGEROUS HILL SLOPE AT KWAI CHUNG TC BE REMOVED

*********

Improvement work will soon be carried out on a rubble mound near the bus terminus at Kwai Shing Estate in the Kwai Chung area.

Public Works Department engineers believe that the slope is too steep and liable to collapse in the event of continuous heavy rain.

The improvement works will consist of cutting back the slope from the existing gradient of 60 degrees to about 45 degrees.

The work will be carried out within the next few months and should be completed before April next year, well before the summer rains.

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/5........

Friday, October 5, 1973

- 5 -

METRICATED MATHEMATICS SYLLABUS FOR PRIMARY SCHOOLS

*********

The Education Department has produced a second edition in English and Chinese of the Suggested Mathematics Syllabus for Primary Schools.

”This syllabus is now fully metricated, so that children will start to learn and think in metric units,” a spokesman for the department said today.

Basically the Systeme Internationale, which is universally used in scientific work, has been adopted.

’’However, some other metric terms, and some traditional Chinese and Imperial measures are retained where classroom convenience and common usage suggest their continued usefulness.

”The syllabus will form the basis of the mathematics papers of the Secondary Schools Entrance Examination from 1975/’ the spokesman said.

Comments on the syllabus from teachers and others are welcome and should be made to the Mathematics Inspectors of the Department’s Advisory Inspectorate.

Copies of the syllabus will be issued to primary schools shortly.

The syllabus at $1.50 each is available from the Government Publications Centre, Star Ferry Concourse, Hong Kong.

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Friday, October 5» 1973

- 6 -

ROAD tj.iproVFMENTS IN ABERDEEN

*******

A 4,OOO-foot section of Shek Pai Wan Road in Aberdeen near Wah Fu Estate is to be realigned and widened to improve traffic flow in the area.

The existing carriageway will be widened to a 44—foot dual two-lane road with footpaths on both sides.

The section to be improved is located between the junction of Shek Pai Wan Road, with Pokfulam/Victoria Roads and its junction with Tin Wan Hill Road.

A loop road and concrete underpass will be constructed at the junction with V/ah Fu Estate Road to improve through traffic flow on Shek Pai Wan Road by providing grade separated access to and from the estate.

A lookout area with parking facilities will be provided at a mid-way point on the improved section on a promontory which commands an excellent view seaward to Leona Island and beyond.

The traffic flow on Shek Pai Wan Road and Pokfulam Road has greatly increased due to the rapid development of Aberdeen area and the Wah Fu Estate.

Work on the improvement is expected to.begin towards the end of the year, and will take about two years to complete.

-------0 - - - -

/?........

Friday, October 5? 1973

~ 7 -

SHA TUI FLOOD CONTROL SCHEME ALMOST COMPLETE tm***

The Shing Mun River flood control scheme in Sha Tin to protect lowlying areas from flooding is nearing completion.

Work is expected to start later this year on the final stage of the project. Those works have been designed to protect the areas adjacent to the existing Tin Sam nullah in the small valley of the same name.

The nullah will be extended and part of its course, situated to the north of Che Kung Temple on the south bank of the Shing Mun River, will be reclaimed.

The course of the nullah will also be realigned and its banks lined with concrete for about 1,000 feet to join the Shing Mun River.

The flood control scheme has been carried out progressively in three stages. The overall plan was to deepen and wid n the river to increase its carrying capacity during periods of heavy rain, as well as to straighten its course to facilitate water flow and to construct solid embankments along t' .e ■ ■>. >

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.......... /8........

Friday, October 5s 1975

- 8 -

DANGEROUS BUILDINGS

******

The Building Authority today declared No. 89 Shaukiwan Main Street East on Hong Kong Island to be in a dangerous condition and Nos. 85 and 87 liable to become dangerous.

In a statement, the Principal Government Building Surveyor said that these three-storey pre-war buildings were re-assessed as part of an extensive investigation in the area subsequent to a collapse leading to the closure of four buildings*

"The condition of the timbers to the floors and roof of No. 89 is such that any further deterioration may lead to a collapse," he said.

In addition, movement of the flank wall resulting in fracturing and bulging of the brickwork made it apparent that there was a risk of failure.

"In both Iios. 85 and 87 the condition of the timbers is poor and togehter with poor brickwork which exhibits some defects, it is apparent that there is risk of failure during or after the demolition of the adjoining buildings."

Notices of intention to apply for closure orders in Victoria District Court at 9*50 a.m. on November 2 were posted today.

•------0---------

f

Friday, October 5, 1973

- 9 -

BREATHING APPARATUS MUST BE APPROVED

******

I

CDie Commissioner of Labour.today invited applications from manufacturers of breathing apparatus for approval of their equipment • ’ •• *• under the newly enacted Factories and Industrial Undertakings (Confined Spaces) Regulations 1973« * 4

The Regulations, which will come into effect on November 1, 1973, stipulate among other things, that any person entering a confined space must wear an approved breathing apparatus, unless the place has been certified safe by the proprietor. Proprietors are also required to keep I.

a sufficient supply of such approved equipment*.

Applications from manufacturers or -their local agents should be made in writing to the Commissioner, Labour Department, Canton Road Government Offices, ^th floor, Kowloon.

--------0---------

/10........

Friday, October 5» 1973 - 10 -

TRAFFIC RESTRICTIONS IN YAUMATI

*******

Clearway restrictions will be imposed on sections of Gascoigne Road and Jordan Road as from 7.30 a.m. on Sunday (October 7) to facilitate the construction of an elevated road linking Gascoigne Road and Tong Mi Road.

The restrictions will apply between 7«30 a.m. and 7 p*in. daily. During t.his period no motor vehicles, except franchised buses, will be allowed to pick up or set down passengers along the sections of Jordan Road between Gascoigne Road and Jordan Path, and Gascoigne Road between Wylie Road and Nathan Road.

The eastbound . bus stop for K.M.B. route Nos. 2B, 6C, 102 and 104 in Gascoigne Road will be resited about 200 feet westward outside the Kowloon Magistracy. The westbound bus stop will be placed next to the Diocesan Girls’ School.

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Release Tine; 6.^0

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Saturday, October 6, 1973.

CONTENTS

Page No.

Eight per cent increase in pensions announced ••••••••••..... 1

Report of inquiry commission into teachers pay dispute ready soon ....................................................... 2

New railway terminus at Hung Hom nearing completion ••••••••• 4

Social Welfare Director recommends tradition of neutral evaluation................................................... 5

Three-day camp at F/u Kai Sha for disabled children •••••••••• 7

Resumption of postal order service with Bangladesh .......... 8

Traffic re-arrangement in Central and Tsuen Wan ............. 9

Water interruption in Choi Hung Estate....................... 9

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Saturday, October 6, 1973

- 1 -

INCREASE IN PENSIONS

*******

Hie Government announced today that an eight per cent increase in pensions will be paid with effect from April 1 this year.

The increase will be granted to government pensioners whose first day of retirement was April 1, 1973 or earlier, and who have reached the age of 55 •

Pensioners who retired after April 1 will not be eligible for the increase but their pensions will be adjusted as necessary to take into account the recent government salary increase*

Widows and Orphans pensions which were in effect at April 1 this year will also be increased by eight per cent with effect from that date.

Those pensioners paid locally, who are eligible for the increased benefits, should receive them in their payments for November 1973* The arrears of benefits will be paid as soon as possible thereafter.

The increase in pensions will cost approximately 4.6 million dollars for the current financial year.

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/2........

Saturday, October 6, 1973

- 2 -

REPORT ON TEACHER PAY DISPUTE READY SOON

******

The special Comission appointed by the Governor to enquire into the teacher pay dispute earlier this year is now preparing its report and expects to submit it to the Governor later this month.

The Commission was set up in May this year to examine and report on the underlying causes of the Certificated Masters’ dispute and to suggest ways of preventing similar problems arising again.

It is chaired by Mr. T.K. Ann, with Dr. B.M. Kotewall and Dr. Rayson Huang as members.

/□.together, the Commission held 17 meetings and met a total of 45 people including 50 certificated masters, the principals of the Colleges of Education, the Chairman of the Grant Schools Council, representatives of the Association of Lecturers at College of Education, representatives of all village schools in the New Territories, and of the 1971 and 1972 Graduates of t.-ie three Colleges of Education, as well as the Deputy ComiTiissioner of Labour and the Assistant Commissioner (Administration).

They also met with the Joint Secretariat of 13 Hong Kong Educational Bodies which later handed in representations, and saw the Hong Kong Professional Teachers Union and the Government Schools Non-Graduate Teachers Union.

/In addition, ••••••»

Saturday, October 6, 1973

~ 3

In addition, the Commission held discussions with Mr. Li Fookhwo who was a member of the Working Group of the 1971 Salaries Commission; Mr. Jack Cater, Secretary for Home Affairs; Mr. C.J.G. Lowe, acting Director of Education; Mr. Yeung Kwong-siu, Assistant Director for t

Primary education; Mr. J.R. Allen, the former Registrar of Trade Unions; and the current Registrar, Mr. Tsang Tat-sing.

Lore recently the Commission interviewed the Establishment Secretary, Mr. R.G.B. Bridge, and had another meeting with the Director of Education, Mr. J. Canning.

The Commission1g terms of reference are: f

* To examine the underlying causes of the dispute which has arisen between the Certificated Masters in government, and aided-schocls and the government, including existing channels of communication and promotion prospects, and

♦ To on what measures,-apart from the"newly

announced salary scales, should be taken to obviate a recurrence of such a dispute affecting teachers employed in government and aided schools.

A

Saturday, October 6, 1973

- 4 -

HUNG HOM RAILWAY TERMINUS NEARS FINAL STAGE

******

The new railway terminus at Hung Hon will move a step nearer completion within the next three months when work starts on the final stage.

The work will involve construction of the terminal building, together with a multi-storey car park and a bus terminal. The three structures will be built on a 600,OOO-square-foot concrete podium whiah is now being erected over the railway tracks and platform.

The terminus building will be a single-storey structure but will have a mezzanine floor in some parts. It will accommodate a large station concourse with ticket booths, waiting areas, a V.I.P. room, shops, restaurants, rented offices and railway administration offices.

A seven-storey car park will be built on top of the terminus building. It will provide about 840 covered parking spaces and 215 open spaces.

The bus terminus will be situated on the podium itself. Within its concourse will be a total of seven parking bays and a number of covered pedestrian islands, in addition to a canteen and regulators’ office.

Buses proceeding to the terminus, which is one floor above ground level, will go up a flyover extending from Gillies Avenue.

The terminus building and the bus terminus are expected to be 4

completed in r.iid-1975, while the multi-storey car park is scheduled to be ready about four months later.

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Z5........

Saturday, October 6, 1973

- 5 -

HIE IIEBITS OF EVALUATION

******

We live in a world of projects and even the best of projects can go wrong because of unpredictable factors.

This is something we all must bear in mind in whatever we do, says Mr. K.W.J. Topley, Director of Social Welfare, because what should work in theory may turn out differently in pratice.

He said there is a very large number of variables to be identified.

,rYou can always miss out a variable or the principles of their interaction may be imperfectly understood or a dynamic factor can enter as when human beings hear about a prediction and determine to prove it false.

"So, when we make plans, we try to think of everything but we must not be surprised if things do not go quite as expected. Even if the plan works in a sense perfectly, we have to deal with the unintended effects of our actions."

Mr. Topley was speaking at the opening ceremony today of the 1973 Hong Kong Junior Chamber National Convention at the Kiangsu-Chekiang College.

He told the gathering it would be a very good idea then, because of uncertainty in human affairs, to evaluate the degree of success or failure of every project undertaken.

/He said •••••••

Saturday, October 6, 1973

- 6 -

He said this would show up what is going well and what is not going so well, thus giving an indication of where efforts should be concentrated.

"Some things must be mended or ended. So, one should end up by concentrating one’s resources on the things one does well. If you capitalise on your assets and dedicate your forces, you will make the maximum real impact.”

Mr. Topley said the Junior Chamber could make a great contribution if they could devise effective techniques to establish and maintain a tradition of dispassionate evaluation of worthwhile projects.

Note to Editors: Copies of the full text of Mr. Topley’s

speech (English only) are boxed for collection*

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/7 o o•a»

Saturday, October 6, 1973

- 7 -

THREE-DAY OUTING FOR HANDICAPPED CHILDREN

**********

A group of 243 disabled children are to be taken next week on a three-day outing for fun and games in the open air.

Tlie outing will be held at the Wu Kai Sha camp site in the

New Territories and has been arranged by the Rehabilitation Division of the Social Welfare Department. It will take place from October 9 to 11.

The group will comprise children with different types of disability such as physical handicaps, mental retardation and deafness. They are members of various clubs, children’s centres, and the work activities group of the department’s Aberdeen Rehabilitation Centre.

On hand to look after them will be 46 staff and volunteers including a nurse. The programme will include a variety of recreational activities and games.

Apart from a 82 registration fee, all other expenses such as for food, camping fees and transportation and so on will be met by the Social Welfare Department.

’This camp has been organised to give disabled children an opportunity to have some fun” said Mr. Y.K. Che, Officer-in-charge of the Deaf and Mental Welfare Unit. ”It is also a chance for them to experience the outdoor life and social activities through working And living with others.”

/Winners of

Saturday, October 6, 1973

~ 8 -

Winners of the various sporting events will receive prizes at a ceremony to be held at the camp site on Wednesday (October 10) afternoon. Miss Daphne Ho, a well-known personality in the field of rehabilitation in Hong Kong will present the prizes.

Note to Editors: Reporters and photographers are welcome

to cover the prize-giving ceremony on Wednesday. It will take place at the camp site from 3*30 to 4.30 p.m. However, to enable photographs to be taken of some of the sporting events, arrangements . have been made to take press representatives to

V/u Kai Sha in the morning. Lunch will be provided.

Those assigned to cover the occassion should assemble not later than 9*30 a.m., at the Kowloon Transport Sub-pool behind the Tsimshatsui Post Office where a van (AM 214}) will be waiting to transport them to the camp and back. -------------------0---------

MONEY ORDER SERVICE WITH BANGLADESH TO BE RESUMED

*********

The Postmaster General announced today that the Post Office Money Order service with Bangladesh will be resumed on October 15.

The maximum amount for a single order will be HK365O. The standard poundage charges will apply.

Post Office Money Order services with Bangladesh were suspended in January .Last year.

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/9........

Saturday, October 6, 1973

- 9 -

TRAFFIC CHANGES IN CENTRAL AND TSUEN WAN

*********

New traffic arrangements will be introduced in Central district and in Tsuen Wan, New Territories, on Tuesday (October 9) to improve traffic conditions in the two areas.

In Centred., the section of Cochrane Street between Stanley Street and Wellington Street will be re-routed one-way southbound as from 10 a.m. on that day.

At the same time, the section of Tsuen Wan Market Street between Chung On Street and Chuen Lung Street will be re-routed, one-way westwards from Chung On Street towards Chuen Lung Street.

Appropriate traffic signs will be posted to guide motorists.

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WATER CUT

*******

Water supply to Choi Hung Estate will be interrupted for five hours on Tuesday (October 9) starting from 1 a.ra.

The temporary stoppage is to facilitate a leakage test in the area.

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Release time:

PRH 1

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Monday, October 8, 1975

CONTENTS

PagtE Ne,

Commissioner of Labour gives top priority to industrial safety ..............................•••»,,••«,,,,,,,,,99vr 1

Water interruption in Causeway Bay ••••••••••••««••••••••<• 2

Simplification in export licensing procedure commended t,«* J

New centre in Shamshuipo for under-privileged boys •«••••'* 4

Mobile registration team to operate in Fanling •••«•••••>•• (

Section of Blue Pool Road re-opened 6

Issued by Government information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Monday, October 8, 1973

TOP PRIORITY GIVEN TO INDUSTRIAL SAFETY

**********

The Commissioner of Labour, Mr. I.R. Price, today expressed particular concern about the welfare and safety of workers and said industrial safety was "at the very top" of his priority list.

"I have new in the pipeline various safety regulations/’ he said. "These include such natters as cargo handling, lifting gear and appliances, amendments to the existing quarry safety regulations and cartridge-operated tools."

He emphasised that he was anxious to pass on with the making of these regulations as soon as possible.

Mr. Price made the remarks during an hour long visit to the Swiss Plating Corporations Ltd. in Kwun Tong to see at first hand the general worldng conditions in a plating factory and the effects of the Factories and Industrial Undertakings (Electrolytic Chromium Process) Regulations 1972. The regulations provide for the protection of the health of those engaged in dwomium plating.

The visit, the second of its kind, enabled the Commissioner to meet management and workers on the factory floor. He was shown in detail the measures adopted by the management to minimise the potential hazards associated with plating processes.

The main work room of the factory is air-conditioned and workers engaged in the plating process are required to wear protective clothing. All degreasing and plating tanks are provided with efficient exhaust systems. The factory is currently engaged in gold, copper and nickel plating.

/Mr. Price ........

Monday, October 8, 1975

2

Hr. Price said that although chromium plating in the factory was only at an experimental stage, the management had already implemented the necessary safety measures as required by the Electrolytic Chromium Process Regulations.

"This is what I call good management/1 he said.

• • ---------------------------------o---------

WATER CUT

******

Water supply to a number of premises and hotels in Causeway Bay will be interrupted for eight hours starting from 10 p.m. tomorrow (Tuesday) to enable a water mains connection to be made at Sugar Street.

All premises in Sugar Street will be affected, as well as the Roxy Theatre, Plaza Hotel,Alba Hotel and St. Francis Hotel. The temporary stoppage will also affect Nos. 9 to J1 Yee Woo Street; Victoria Park; Nos. 51 - 63 and Nos. 42 - 72 Paterson Street; Nos. 1-15 and Nos. 6-8 Cleveland Street; Nos. 6, 8, 9 and 11 Kingston Street, including Kingston Building; Marco Polo Mansion; and Victoria Park Mansion.

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I

Monday, October 8, 1973 - 3..-

CHANGE IN EXPORT LICENSING PROCEDURES ’’USEFUL”

******

The Chairman of the Hong Kong Trade Facilitation Committee., Mr. I.R. Tomlin, today described the decision by the Commerce and Industry Department to simplify certain trade procedures as ”a most useful improvement .n

He was referring to a recent announcement by the Department that, with effect from November 1, exporters would?no longer have to indicate the name of the carrier and the date of departure in applications for export licences before the licences were approved.

The decision on the change was made after the matter was referred to the Textile Advisory Board and Trade Facilitation Committee.

Mr. Tomlin said: ’’The change will eliminate the problems associated with the present system for amendments which is complicated and timeconsuming.”

He added that the TFC always welcomed constructive suggestions for the improvement and simplification of trade procedures and documents, and he invited businessmen to put their ideas forward.

This, he said, could be done through their trade associations or by contacting Mr. Henry Lau, Secretary of the TFC, at telephone No. 5-450965.

A....

Monday, October 8, 1973

- 4 -

NEW HOME FOR UNDER-PRIVILEGED BOYS

****»*»:*»

Young boys confronted with minor behaviour problems will be better catered for when the Chak Yan Centre in Shamshuipo opens early next year.

The four-storey complex — the second boys1 centre set up in Shamshuipo by the Society of Boys’ Centres — is being built under a substantial grant of about 32 million from the Lotteries Fund. The 49,000-square-foot site on which the centre is built was granted by the government.

• : The Society itself has raised 3490,000 towards meeting the cost of the project.

Located in Cornwall Street, the centre is intended as a home for boys from eight to 16 years of age who exhibit minor behaviour problems and are deprived of normal parental supervision, or who are otherwise in need of protection and care.

It is envisaged that the centre will provide hostel accommodation for 16O boys.

Facilities in the centre will comprise, among othersfa gymnasiuny' assembly hall, a playground, four classrooms, five pre-vocational training workshops, a library and a music room.

/There will ••••••■

Monday, October 8, 1973

There will be eight family units in the centre, each housing 20 boys. Every unit will be provided with a day-room which will serve us a place for rest, recreation and study. Provided in each family unit will be two bedrooms, a small pantry and bathroom.

Basic pre-vocational training together with formal educational instruction will be provided in the centre.

Pre-vocational training will comprise carpentry, basic repair skill in air-conditioning and simple electrical appliances, as well as metal work and sewing. Classes in both pre-vocational training and formal education will be operated on a bisessional basis to enable the boys to attend both on the same day.

Outlining the future functions of the centre, a spokesman for the Society of Boys’ Centres said it would provide a home for under-privileged boys as well as serve as a place where they could experience communal life while at work and at play.

:*They will also be able to pick up a simple trade as well as general civic responsibilities,” the spokesman added. Particular emphasis would be accorded to physical training, moral training and character moulding.

The spokesman described the setting up of the centre as ”a positive contribution” to the caring for under-privileged boys with minor behaviour problems.

Construction of the Chak Yan Centre, which commenced in January this year, is in an advanced stage and should be completed early next year.

At present, the Society runs two boys’ centres in Kowloon. The Shing Tai: Street Centre in To Kwa Wan provides home for 140 boys from destitute families and others with behaviour problems, while the Un Chau Street Centre in Shamshuipo caters for some 40 under-privileged boys who attend regular schools outside and return to the hostel after school.

------0---------

/5.........

Monday, October 8, 1973

- 6 -

REGISTRATION FACILITIES AT FANLING

*******

A team from the Registration of Persons Department will be operating for three days in the Fanling Rural Committee as from Wednesday (October 10).

Business hours will be from 9 a*m. to 5 p.m*

The visits will enable parents or guardians to register their children from six to 17 years of age for juvenile identity dards, and persons of 17 years and over to register for adult identity cards.

Children between six and 17 years of age who have Hong Kong birth certificates or valid travel documents need not attend for registration, but children who do not have such documents must accompany their parents or guardian when registering.

Residents are also reminded to report any changes in their registered particulars.

-------0---------

BLUE POOL ROAD RE-OPENED

*******

The section of Blue Pool Road below its junction with Tai Hang Road was re-opened to traffic at 10 a.m. today (Monday).

This section, about 550 feet in length, was closed on September 28 to enable emergency repair works to be carried out.

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Release time: 6.30 p.m.

PRH 1

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Monday, October 8, 1975

CONTENTS

PagtE Ne,

Commissioner of Labour gives top priority to industrial safety ..............................•••»,,••«,,,,,,,,,99vr 1

Water interruption in Causeway Bay ••••••••••••««••••••••<• 2

Simplification in export licensing procedure commended t,«* J

New centre in Shamshuipo for under-privileged boys •«••••'* 4

Mobile registration team to operate in Fanling •••«•••••>•• (

Section of Blue Pool Road re-opened 6

Issued by Government information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Monday, October 8, 1973

TOP PRIORITY GIVEN TO INDUSTRIAL SAFETY

**********

The Commissioner of Labour, Mr. I.R. Price, today expressed particular concern about the welfare and safety of workers and said industrial safety was "at the very top" of his priority list.

"I have new in the pipeline various safety regulations/’ he said. "These include such natters as cargo handling, lifting gear and appliances, amendments to the existing quarry safety regulations and cartridge-operated tools."

He emphasised that he was anxious to pass on with the making of these regulations as soon as possible.

Mr. Price made the remarks during an hour long visit to the Swiss Plating Corporations Ltd. in Kwun Tong to see at first hand the general worldng conditions in a plating factory and the effects of the Factories and Industrial Undertakings (Electrolytic Chromium Process) Regulations 1972. The regulations provide for the protection of the health of those engaged in dwomium plating.

The visit, the second of its kind, enabled the Commissioner to meet management and workers on the factory floor. He was shown in detail the measures adopted by the management to minimise the potential hazards associated with plating processes.

The main work room of the factory is air-conditioned and workers engaged in the plating process are required to wear protective clothing. All degreasing and plating tanks are provided with efficient exhaust systems. The factory is currently engaged in gold, copper and nickel plating.

/Mr. Price ........

Monday, October 8, 1975

2

Hr. Price said that although chromium plating in the factory was only at an experimental stage, the management had already implemented the necessary safety measures as required by the Electrolytic Chromium Process Regulations.

"This is what I call good management/1 he said.

• • ---------------------------------o---------

WATER CUT

******

Water supply to a number of premises and hotels in Causeway Bay will be interrupted for eight hours starting from 10 p.m. tomorrow (Tuesday) to enable a water mains connection to be made at Sugar Street.

All premises in Sugar Street will be affected, as well as the Roxy Theatre, Plaza Hotel,Alba Hotel and St. Francis Hotel. The temporary stoppage will also affect Nos. 9 to J1 Yee Woo Street; Victoria Park; Nos. 51 - 63 and Nos. 42 - 72 Paterson Street; Nos. 1-15 and Nos. 6-8 Cleveland Street; Nos. 6, 8, 9 and 11 Kingston Street, including Kingston Building; Marco Polo Mansion; and Victoria Park Mansion.

-------0---------

I

Monday, October 8, 1973 - 3..-

CHANGE IN EXPORT LICENSING PROCEDURES ’’USEFUL”

******

The Chairman of the Hong Kong Trade Facilitation Committee., Mr. I.R. Tomlin, today described the decision by the Commerce and Industry Department to simplify certain trade procedures as ”a most useful improvement .n

He was referring to a recent announcement by the Department that, with effect from November 1, exporters would?no longer have to indicate the name of the carrier and the date of departure in applications for export licences before the licences were approved.

The decision on the change was made after the matter was referred to the Textile Advisory Board and Trade Facilitation Committee.

Mr. Tomlin said: ’’The change will eliminate the problems associated with the present system for amendments which is complicated and timeconsuming.”

He added that the TFC always welcomed constructive suggestions for the improvement and simplification of trade procedures and documents, and he invited businessmen to put their ideas forward.

This, he said, could be done through their trade associations or by contacting Mr. Henry Lau, Secretary of the TFC, at telephone No. 5-450965.

A....

Monday, October 8, 1973

- 4 -

NEW HOME FOR UNDER-PRIVILEGED BOYS

****»*»:*»

Young boys confronted with minor behaviour problems will be better catered for when the Chak Yan Centre in Shamshuipo opens early next year.

The four-storey complex — the second boys1 centre set up in Shamshuipo by the Society of Boys’ Centres — is being built under a substantial grant of about 32 million from the Lotteries Fund. The 49,000-square-foot site on which the centre is built was granted by the government.

• : The Society itself has raised 3490,000 towards meeting the cost of the project.

Located in Cornwall Street, the centre is intended as a home for boys from eight to 16 years of age who exhibit minor behaviour problems and are deprived of normal parental supervision, or who are otherwise in need of protection and care.

It is envisaged that the centre will provide hostel accommodation for 16O boys.

Facilities in the centre will comprise, among othersfa gymnasiuny' assembly hall, a playground, four classrooms, five pre-vocational training workshops, a library and a music room.

/There will ••••••■

Monday, October 8, 1973

There will be eight family units in the centre, each housing 20 boys. Every unit will be provided with a day-room which will serve us a place for rest, recreation and study. Provided in each family unit will be two bedrooms, a small pantry and bathroom.

Basic pre-vocational training together with formal educational instruction will be provided in the centre.

Pre-vocational training will comprise carpentry, basic repair skill in air-conditioning and simple electrical appliances, as well as metal work and sewing. Classes in both pre-vocational training and formal education will be operated on a bisessional basis to enable the boys to attend both on the same day.

Outlining the future functions of the centre, a spokesman for the Society of Boys’ Centres said it would provide a home for under-privileged boys as well as serve as a place where they could experience communal life while at work and at play.

:*They will also be able to pick up a simple trade as well as general civic responsibilities,” the spokesman added. Particular emphasis would be accorded to physical training, moral training and character moulding.

The spokesman described the setting up of the centre as ”a positive contribution” to the caring for under-privileged boys with minor behaviour problems.

Construction of the Chak Yan Centre, which commenced in January this year, is in an advanced stage and should be completed early next year.

At present, the Society runs two boys’ centres in Kowloon. The Shing Tai: Street Centre in To Kwa Wan provides home for 140 boys from destitute families and others with behaviour problems, while the Un Chau Street Centre in Shamshuipo caters for some 40 under-privileged boys who attend regular schools outside and return to the hostel after school.

------0---------

/5.........

Monday, October 8, 1973

- 6 -

REGISTRATION FACILITIES AT FANLING

*******

A team from the Registration of Persons Department will be operating for three days in the Fanling Rural Committee as from Wednesday (October 10).

Business hours will be from 9 a*m. to 5 p.m*

The visits will enable parents or guardians to register their children from six to 17 years of age for juvenile identity dards, and persons of 17 years and over to register for adult identity cards.

Children between six and 17 years of age who have Hong Kong birth certificates or valid travel documents need not attend for registration, but children who do not have such documents must accompany their parents or guardian when registering.

Residents are also reminded to report any changes in their registered particulars.

-------0---------

BLUE POOL ROAD RE-OPENED

*******

The section of Blue Pool Road below its junction with Tai Hang Road was re-opened to traffic at 10 a.m. today (Monday).

This section, about 550 feet in length, was closed on September 28 to enable emergency repair works to be carried out.

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Release time: 6.30 p.m.

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Tuesday, October 9» 1973

CONTENTS

Page No.

Assistant Transport Commissioner warns of "drastic measures"

to improve transport system........•••••••••................. 1

Hong Kong residents who were decorated by the Queen will receive their insignia tomorrow ..........................    3

Tung Chung River training scheme enters final phase ......... 4

Additional passenger pier proposed for Kwun Tong ••••••••••• 5

Education Department Secretary retiring ..................... 6

Pre-war building in Connaught Road Central condemned ••••••• 7

Traffic re-arrangements in Yau Yat Chuen ...................  8

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Tuesday, October 9, 1973

- 1 -

TOUGH MEASURES TO IMPROVE TRANSPORT "INEVITABLE” «««******

Some "drastic measures” to restrict the use of private cars seem inevitable if Hong Kong is to have an efficient transport system, according to the Assistant Commissioner for Transport, Mr. P.F. Leeds.

:,Even with an underground railway,” he said, ”some two-thirds of all the passenger trips will have to be made by surface public transport.

therefore, measures will have to be taken to free the roads for buses and trams,he added.

Mr. Leeds was addressing a group of visiting transport experts -the Swiss Transport Museum Group - at the Hong Kong Hotel today.

In his talk, Mr. Leeds reviewed various problems facing Hong Kong over the past 20 years. These included over-population, refugees, resettlement, housing and industrial expansion.

Mr. Leeds said that the influx of refugees led to a large increase in population which, in turn, resulted in a heavy demand for public transport. ,:In 195*1 j the Kowloon Motor Bus Company with 180 buses carried 155*4 million passengers but by 1972 these figures had risen to 1,2?0 scheduled buses and 501.2 million passengers,” he said.

"The corresponding figures for the China Motor Bus Company were, in 1951, 151 buses and 46.1 million passengers and in 1972, 500 scheduled buses and 166.7 million passengers.”

/All other ••••••

Tuesday, October 9, 1973

- 2 -

All other transport undertakings, including the Kowloon-Canton Railway and the two major ferry companies, also recorded substantial increases in passenger traffic.

Other factors contributing to the new demands for transport included 'the rapid expansion of industry and the development of new towns in the Hew Territories.

To determine the lines along which future traffic patterns were likely to develop, Hr. Leeds said, a Passenger Transport Survey Unit was set up in 1964 with assistance from the British Road Research Laboratory.

j:The initial survey report was completed and published in 1966 and it was followed by two other important reports prepared by outside consultants, the Mass Transport Survey and the Long Term Road Study Report in which estimates were given of traffic demand up to 1986,n he said.

These reports provided the basis for the current programme of planning and development of Hong Kong!s internal communications.

In addition, a new study of future transportation requirements had just started and this would provide the guidance for the next 20 years or so.

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Tuesday, October 9j 1973

- 3 -

PRESENTATION OF INSIGNIA

*******

Note to Editors: Seventy-five Hong Kong residents who were decorated

by the Queen for services to the community will receive their insignia from the Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, at a presentation ceremony at Government House tomorrow (V/ednesday).

The insignia include one K.B.E., one C.M.G., three C.B.Ee’s, three O.B.E.’s, one I.S.O. and three M.B.E.fs.

Copies of a list of recipients and citations will be available for collection from the G.I.S. Press Room at 11 a.m. tomorrow.

No press photographer other than those provided with special loasses will be admitted to Government House.

Press representatives assigned to cover the ceremony are requested to assemble at the guard room of Government House not later than 11 a.m. G.I.S. officers will be on hand to assist them.

Newspapers not receiving passes will be able to obtain photographs by making arrangements for the supply of prints in the ordinary way with Mainland Studio (Branch), 44, Carnarvon Road, Kowloon, at Tel. 3-671755•

- - 0 - -

/4

Tuesday, October 9i 1973

- 4 -

FINAL PHASE OF LANTAU FLOOD CONTROL SCHEME

Work will start early next year on the final stage of the Tung Chung River training scheme on Lantau Island to protect lowlying areas from flooding during the wet season.

The project consists of straightening and increasing the carrying capacity of the downstream section of the river.

About 3,200 feet of the existing river bed, of which approximately 900 feet is under the high water mark, will be dredged and realigned with concrete walls on both sides.

It is estimated that the project will cost about 32.45 million and will take about 15 months to complete.

Three concrete bridges will also be constructed to provide safe and convenient crossing points for villagers living in the area.

The first stage of the river training scheme, which was completed in 1971, involved similar works at the upstream section of the river near Ma Wan Village. It has proved practical and effective in flood control and similar designs will be adopted for the final stage.

The works will be supervised by the Drainage Works Division of the Public Works Department.

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/5........

Tuesday, October 9, 1975

- 5 -

SECOND FERRY PIER PROPOSED FOR KWUN TONG

****«*»»

Design and investigation work are now in hand for the construction of an additional passenger ferry pier in Kwun Tong.

The proposed new pier is designed to help reduce increasing congestion at the existing Kwun Tong pier which has only two berths.

At present, over 60,000 passengers travel on the three ferry routes operating between Kwun Tong and North Point, Shaukiwan and Central every day.

The new pier is to be built about 230 feet to the east of the existing pier, and will have a covered area of about 4,000 square feet.

Initially, it is envisaged that the pier will have a single berth with mechanically operated lifts and ramps. Provision will be made for future extension to a full-scale, double-berth pier similar to the present Kwun Tong pier.

It is expected that the new pier will be commissioned in 1975*

-------0---------

/6........

Tuesday, October 9, 1973

EDUCATION DEPARTMENT’S SECRETARY RETIRING

********

Mr. George Oakes, Secretary of the Education Department, is retiring shortly.

He will be presented with a gift from his colleagues. The Director of Education, Mr. J. Canning, will make the presentation on Thursday (October 11).

Mr. Oakes was in the Army for seven years from 1939 to 1946 when he served in North Africa and Italy. After leaving the Array he joined the Foreign Service and was attached to the British Embassy in Paris and the British Legation in Budapest for a total period of four years.

In 1950 he took up an appointment in the East African Branch of the former Colonial Office, now known as the Foreign and Commonwealth Office.

His career in the Executive Grade began in October 1933 when he joined the Western Pacific High Commission, working hie way up to Office Superintendent in 1956.

Mr. Oakes was transferred to the Hong Kong Government in November 19^1 as an Executive Officer Class I. He was promoted to Senior Executive Officer Class II in 1963, to Senior Executive Officer Class I in 1966 and to his present rank of Chief Executive Officer in 1969.

Before joining the Education Department as Secretary in December 1969, Mr. Oakes served in the Social Welfare Department, the Trade Development Council and the Government Training Division.

/Mr. Oakes, •«••••

Tuesday, October 9» 1973

Mr. Oakes, who is JI, is dae to go on seven months pre-retirement

leave on October 24.

Note to Editors:- You are invited to have the presentation ceremony covered. It will be held at 11.JO a.m. on October 11 in the Education Department’s Conference Roon, Lee Gardens, 3rd floor, Hysan Avenue, Causeway Bay, Hong Kong.

-------0---------

PRE-WAR BUILDING IN CENTRAL DECLARED DANGEROUS

*»««****

The four-storey pre-war building at No. JO Connaught Road Central was today declared to be in a dangerous condition by the Building Authority.

The Principal Government Building Surveyor said this morning the building had been under observation for some time. Despite extensive shoring, he said, movement in the brick walls had occurred causing fractures and giving rise to a risk of failure and collapse. Extensive areas of timber decay had also been detected-, he- added.

Notice of intention to apply for a closure order was posted on '•b

the building today. The application will be heard in Victoria District

Court at 9.30 a.m. on November 7«

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/8........

Tuesday, October 9, 1973

- 8 -

TRAFFIC CHANGES IN YAU YAT CHUEN

********

New traffic arrangements will be introduced in Yau Yat Cliuen as from 10 a.rn. on Thursday (October 11) to improve traffic circulation in the district.

A number of roads will be ro»routed to one-way traffic under the new arrangements.

They are: Magnolia Road between Marigold Road and Dianthus Road; Marigold Road between Osmanthus Road and Magnolia Road; Cassia Road between Osmanthus Road and Begonia Road; Dianthus Road between Magnolia Road and Tat Chee Avenue; Peony Road between Tat Chee Avenue and Cassia Road; Wistaria Road between Peony Road and Begonia Road; Verbena Road between Peony Road and Begonia Road; and Begonia Road between Cassia Road and Tat Chee Avenue.

Appropriate traffic signs will be posted to guide motorists.

--------0 • - . »

Release Time: 7.00 •

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Wednesday, October 10, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No,

Construction of Tuen Mun Estate to begin in December ........... 1 Local residents receive insignia for community services •••••• 2 First clinic and maternity home in Tsz Wan Shan................. J Appointment of new commanding officer for the Volunteers ....... 4 New pier at Sai Kung to provide improved facilities ............ 5 Four lots of industrial land in Kowloon to be auctioned ........ 6 Apprentices of the Labour Department to receive certificates.• 6

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Wednesday, October 10, 1973

1

THEN MUN HOUSING PROJECT GETS OFF THE GROUND

******** t

Work on the new multi-million dollar housing estate at Tuen Mun, which will eventually accommodate 47,000 people, is to start in December.

The estate is part of the massive 10-year housing programme to provide self-contained public housing units for 1.5 million people -

The first 500-&00 units will be ready for occupation at the •• end of next year or early 1975, according to a Housing Department spokesman.

The first phase of the project involves construction of three 30-storey blocks and a seven-storey low block as well as three primary schools and kindergartens.

Other facilities to be provided in the first stage include a shopping area, a welfare hall and a restaurant.

The 30-storey blocks will be in cruciform or cross shape and have been so designed to leave more open space for residents.

Essential community facilities, including parking areas for 700 cars, shops and markets and recreation areas, will be located in a central position. Easy access will be provided by covered walkways leading from the residential blocks to the commercial and recreational centre of the estate.

Anot-ier feature of the estate is that vehicular and pedestrian traffic will be separated from each other so as to ensure better road safety.

When fully completed in 1977, the estate will have all amenities comparable

to a modem township, including a bus terminus, a post office, library, clinic, police post, ambulance depot and a workshop area which is to be completely separated from the domestic accommodation.

Wednesday, October 10, 1973

- 2 -

RESIDENTS RECEIVE INSIGNIA

********

Seventy-six Hong Kong residents who were honoured by the Queen for services to the community today received their insignia from the Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, at a presentation ceremony at Government House.

The insignia included one K.B.E., one C.M.G., three C.B.E.’s , three C.B.E.’s, one I.S.O. and three M.B.E.’s.

Ten people who took part in rescue operations last year at the

Po Shan Road landslide site received various kind of awards, including the George Medal, the British Empire Medal (Gallantry), the Colonial Police Medal (Gallantry) and the Queen’s Commendation for Brave Conduct.

Tvzo women, a man and a small boy were rescued from beneath rubble during the operations which lasted more than thirteen hours.

Throughout the operations, the rescuers displayed courage of a very high order and complete disregard for their own safety until the rescue was successful.

Note to Editors: The citations for 42 of the awards and the

full list of names are issued separately as a supplement to today’s Daily Information Bulletin.

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/3........

Wednesday, October 10, 1973

- 3 -

MOSE MEDICAL FACILITIES F03 TSZ WAN SHAN »**»«***

A new standard urban clinic and maternity home will soon operate in Tsz Wan Shan to serve residents in the area.

The project----the first of its kind in Tsz Wan Shan-----forms

part of the 10-year medical development programme being undertaken by the Medical and Health Department.

The three-storey-clinic is being built on a 26,000-square-foot site west of Sheung Fung Street, next to the Housing Department Staff Quarters.

Facilities in the clinic will comprise a general out-patient department, a child health centre and a 24-bed maternity home.

Also provided in the building will be a dispensary, a demonstration room, a laboratory, a minor operation room, consultation rooms and staff quarters, among others.

The out-pationt department will be on the ground floor while the second and top floors will provide respective accommodation for the child health centre and maternity home.

Commenting on the project, a spokesman for the Medical and Health Department said that as there was no maternity clinic in the Tsz Wan Shan Estate, the opening of the clinic was expected to go a long way towards meeting the needs of expectant mothers and the vast population in the area and its proximity.

Construction of the building, which started in July last, is nearing completion. It is expected to be fully operational by the end of this year.

The estimated cost of the project is $1.7 million.

-------0--------- /4.................

Wednesday, October 10, 1973

- 4 -

NEW C.O. FOK THE VOLUNTEERS

Me********

Lieutenant Colonel John Heywood today takes over the command of the Royal Hong Kong Regiment (The Volunteers) and becomes the fi^rst volunteer officer in 22 years to hold the top position.

To mark the occasion, he was given the keys to the Regimental Headquarters by the outgoing Commanding Officer, Lt. Col. J. Chapman, during a brief ceremony at the Regiment’s Happy Valley Headquarters.

The appointment of Col. Heywood was announced earlier this year by the Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose.

In the announcement, Sir Murray said the Regiment owed much to its C.O.’s from the regular army and in particular to Colonel Chapman for all that they had done.

He said he felt however that it must be greatly encouraging for all Volunteers to realise that potentially they had ’’the C.O.’s baton in their knapsacks.u

Colonel Heywood is an Assistant Director of Urban Services. He will be assisted in his regimental work by a Major from the regular army as second-in-command.

Note to_Editp_rs: Copies of a photograph showing Col. Heywood

being presented with the keys to the Regimental Headquarters, are boxed for collection.

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/5..........

Wednesday, October 10, 1973

- 5 -

NEW PUBLIC PIER AT SAI KUNG

********

A new public pier is to be built in Sai Kung to meet the increasing demand for landing facilities by local villagers and picnickers from urban areas.

It will be constructed on the eastern reclamation in front of Sai Kung Town.

The existing piers in Sai Kung Town are of simple design and are situated in shallow water. They are particularly overtaxed on holidays and market days.

The proposed new pier will serve villagers from remote areas travelling by sea to Sai Kung for marketing, and fishermen who come to sell their catch.

Landing facilities will be provided for holiday makers to the various beaches and islands for recreation and using Sai Kung as an embarkation point.

Police launches and motorboat ferries will also be able to berth at the new pier.

-------0 --------

/6...........

Wednesday, October 10, 1973

- 6 -

CROWN LAND SALE

Four lots of Crown land with a total area of 76,000 square feet will be put up for auction early next month.

The lots are located off Cheung Sha Wan Road in Kowloon and are for industrial and godown development. The largest measures about 32,500 square feet.

The auction will take place in the City Hall lecture room on November 9«

Full particulars and conditions of sale may be obtained from the Public Enquiry Sub-office, Central Government Offices (West Wing). Hong Kong, or from the Crown Lands and Survey Office, Kov/loon Government Offices, Nat".tan Road, Kowloon.

-------0---------

PRESENTATION OF CERTIFICATES

*********

Note to editors: Mr. F.K. Hu, Urban Councillor and senior Managing

Director of the Ryoden Electric Engineering Co. Ltd., wj 11 present certificates to four apprentices who have completed their training.

The presentation will take place at the Industrial Training Division of the Labour Department in New Rodney Block, Queensway, on Friday (October 12) at 11.00 a.m.

Reporters and photographers are invited to cover the occasion.

-------0---------

Release t irne: 6.>0 p. m.

PR 33 4000038

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

SUPPLEMENT

Wednesday, October 10, 1973

PRESENTATION OF INSIGNIA

The following is the citation for 42 of the awards at today’s presentation of insignia ceremony at, Government Houseiw

DR. LI CHCH-IIING, KBE

For exceptional services to Hong Kong in the field of education, and in particular for his wise and dynamic leadership of the Chinese University during its first ten years.

THE HOE. C.P. HADDON-CAVE, CMG

For outstanding services to Hong Kong, in the field of trade and industry, and latterly as Financial Secretary in most arduous times.

THE HON. J. CATER, CBE

For outstanding services to Hong Kong in many posts., in which ho has never failed to meet a chai 1 enge.

THE HON. G.R. ROSS, CBE

For outstanding services to Hong Kong in many fields of commerce, administration and social service, including the Executive and Legi si at 5y<? Councils and the Scouts Association.

THE HON. WOO PAK-CHUEN, CBE

For outstanding services to Hong Kong in many fields of law, administration and social service, including the Urban Council and Legislative and Executive Councils.

MR. C.J.R. DAWSON, OBE..........

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House. Hong Kong. Tel: 5-233191

Wednesday, October 10, 1973

- 2 -

MR. C.J.R, DAWSON; OBE

For loyal and resolute service in the Royal Hong Kong Police; and for the high standard of leadership he has shown.

MR. LAM KUN-SHING, OBE

For his contribution to the textile and garment industry in Hong Kong, and wise advice to the Government and industry.

MR. ALEX WU SHU-CHIH, OBE

For service to Hong Kong in many fields including social service and the Urban Council.

MR. M.M, SWAN, ISO

For long and devoted service to Hong Kong, culminating in his appointment as Head of the Executive Grade of the Civil Service.

MR. C.W. MORRISON, MBE

For his contribution to welfare services in Hong Kong as Director of the Church Service and of the Community Chest.

MR. J. TOWLSON,MBE

For distinguished service with the Foreign Service and particularly latterly in the promotion of British exports.

MR, TSANG HING-MING, MBE

For long and devoted services to the Government and to the fishing and farming communities of Hong Kong.

/MR. CHAN CHO-CHAK, ........

Wednesday, October 10, 1973

- 3 -

MR. CHAN CIIO-CHAK, Badge of Honour

For community service in the Kowloon City district including valuable help in the Keep Hong Kong Clean Campaign.

MR. CHAN HON-CHUNG, Badge of Honour

For community service through activities in the Kaifong movement and social, welfare projects.

MR. CHAN KWOKr-LBUNG, Badge of Honour

For community service in the Kowloon City District and leadership of the Tam Kung Building Owners Tenants Association.

MR. FUNG ??.K-CHOI, Badge of Honour

For community service for the betterment of the inhabitants of Cheung Chau.

MRS. ISMAIL KITCHELL, Badge of Honour

For community service and leadership of the Women’s Welfare

Club Eastern District.

MR. LAM HING-CHEUNG, Badge of Honour

For community service for the benefit of the inhabitants

of Ma Wan.

MR. LAU CHl-IlAH, Badge of Honour

For community service in the Mongkok District, and leadership in the Keep Hong Kong Clean Campaign.

MR. LEUNG HING-WAI, Badge of Honour

For community service in support of youth activities and the Keep Hong Kong Clean Campaign.

/Mr. ma sai-on, .........

Wednesday, October 10, 1973

- 4 -

MR. iiA SAD-ON, Badge of Honour

For community service in the Tai Po area.

MP, TSUI MUH-REI, Badge of Honour

For community service as Village Representative of Shek Pik Village.

MR, YAH KCW, Badge of Honour

For community services in youth and welfare work, the Festival of Hong Kong, and the Scout Movement.

MR, YEUNG YUNG-NIN, Badge of Honour

For community service in the Tai Hom district, and his wise advice and guidance over land problems.

GALLANTRY AWARDS FOR RESCUE OPERATIONS AT PO SHAN ROAD LANDSLIDE 1972 MR. LEUNG SEIU-KAY, GM SAPPER A.JL PROWSE, BEM (G) MR. NG KAMJEUNG, CPM (G) MR. KONG Kill )

MR. HUNG SUI-TO ) MR. LI CHUEN ) Queen’s Commendation for Brave Conduct

MR. CHEUNG SHU-SHING) MR. TSUI HIH-KWIN& ) MR. T.A. BERRECLOTH ) MR. G.S. SEIRRA )

During rescue operations at the disastrous landslide and 12-storey building oollapse at Kotewall Road in June 1972» rescue workers tunnel 1 <=»d under massive debris to reach and free a casualty. Rescue work was only possible in teams of two as it was necessary to dig in an unshored tunnel some 24 inches in diameter eventually extending some j5O feet.

/At the same

Wednesday, October 10, 1973

- 5 -

At the same time two women, a man and a small boy were rescued from beneath rubble which was precariously balanced and presented a danger to the life of the rescuers.

Those who led and took part in this work, which extended over a period of more than thirteen hours, well knew the extreme danger to themselves from further movement of the landslide and collapse of the tunnel. They displayed courage of a very high order and complete disregard for their own safety until the rescue was successful.

S. SGT. N« SMITH, Military Medal

For bravery in the field.

GALLANTRY AWARDS FOR RESCUES AT THE FIRE AT THE JUMBO FLOATING RESTAURANT IN 1971 MR. LESLIE BURTON MR. CHOY FUT-PO mr. cinu yu-ciup SERGEANT LUTI KAM-YAT MR. PETER MICHAEL MULLENS

MR, YAU SHOU—KIT (Colonial Police Medal for Gallantry)

On JOth October 1971 the Jumbo Floating Restaurant moored in Aberdeen Harbour caught fire and burnt fiercely, radiating such intense heat that approach in wooden vessels was hazardous and swimming in the heat area required courage and endurance. These 6 gentlemen - members of the Royal Hong Kong Police Force and the Fire Services Department, commandeered all available vessels. Displaying complete disregard for their own safety, they got as near to the Jumbo as possible and rescued many of the workers who had been on board, but who were swimming in the harbour or clinging to the vessel. Their actions were in the highest traditions of bravery and saved the lives of many.

v /POLICE CONSTABLE .......

Wednesday, October 10, 1975

6

POLICE CONSTABLE LUK KAU-LAU, CPU (G)

Police Constable Luk was on duty outside a bank during an armed robbery, and was threatened by one of the robbers who fled from the building carrying a revolver. In spite of the risk of injury, P.C approached the man, disarmed and arrested him, displaying bravery of the highest order.

Luk

/7

Wednesday, October 10, 1973.

PRESBITTATIGII OF UJSIGNIA, OCTOBER 10, 1973

Recipients

Dr. Li Choh-ming, K.B.E.

Hon. C.P. Haddon-Cave, C.Il.G.

Hon. J. Cater CBE. - *

Hon. G.R.-Ross, C.B.E.

Hon. Woo Pak-chuen, C.B.E.

Mr. C.J.R. .Dawson, O.B.E.

Mr. Lam Kun-shing, O.-B.E.

Mr. Alex Wu Shu-chih, -O.B.E.

Mr. M.M. Swan-, I.S.O.

Mr. C.W. Morrison, M.B.E.

Mr. J. Towlson, M.B.E.

Mr. Tsang Hing-ming, M.B.E.

Mr. Chan Cho-ch ak, B of H

Mr. Chan Hon-chung, B of II.

Mr. Chan Kwok-leung, B of II

Mr. Fung Pak-choi, B of II

Supporters

Mr. M.D4A. Clinton, C.M.G*, G.M. * Sir Ronald Holmes, C.M.G., C.B.E., M.C.

Hon. D.T.E. Roberts, C.B.E., Q.C.

Hon. Sir Yuet-keung Kan, C.B.E., J.P.

Hon...Sir Kenneth Ping-fan Fung, C.B.E;

Mr. R.C. Lee, C.B.E.

Hon. Sir Albert Rodrigues, C.B.E.

Hon. Sir Yuet-keung Kan, C.B.E.

Mr. R.T.M. Henry M.V.O., O;B.E., Q.P.M., C.P.M.

Mr. C.P. Sutcliffe, C.B.E., Q.P.M., C.P.M.

Hon. Sir Sik-nin Chau, C.B.E.

Hon. Ann Tse-kai, O.B.E.

Hon. Lee Quo-Wei, O.B.E.

Hon. Sir Yuet-keung Kan, C.B.E.

Mr. J.D. MacGregor, I.S.O.

Mr. Lam Po-hon, I.S.O.

Hon. Sir Kenneth Ping-fan Fung, C.B.E.

Hon. Sir Albert Rodrigues, C.B.E.

Professor S. Mackey, O.B.E.

Mr. D. Liao, O.B.E.

Mr. Lai Yuen-lung, M.B.E.

Mr. Tsang Chiu-yan, M.B.E.

Hon. Wilfred Wong Sien-bing, O.B.E.

Hon. Wilson Wang Tze-sam, O.B.E.

Hon. Wilson Wang Tze-sam, O.B.E.

Hon. Hilton Cheong-Leen, O.B.E.

Dr. the Hon. Chung Sze-yuen, O.B.E.

Hon. Hilton Cheong-leen, O.B.E.

Hon. Szeto • Wai, O.B.E.

Hon. Wilfred Wong Sien-bing, O.B.E.

/Mrs .......

Wednesday, October 10, 1973

- 8 -

Recipients

Mrs. I. Kitehell, B.of H

Mr. Lam Hing-cheung, B of E *

Mr. Lau Chi-man, B of II

Mr. Leung Hing-wai, B of K

Mr. Ma Sai»on, B of II

Mr. Tsui Mun-heitB of H

Mr. Yan Kow, B of H

Mr. Yeung Yung*nin, B of H

Supporters

Hon. Sir Yuet-keung Kan, C.B.E.

Hon. Woo Pak-chuen, C.B.E.

/

Hon. Lee Quo-wei, O.B.E.

Hon. Oswald Cheung, O.B.E., Q.C.

Hon. Wilson Wang Tze-sam, O.B.E.

Hon. Hilton Cheong-Leen, O.B.E.

Hon. Sir Yuet-keung Kan, C.B.E.

Hon. Lee Quo-wei, O.B.E.

Hon. Sir Yuet-keung Kan, C.B.E.

Hong Lee Quo-wei, O.B.E.

Hon. Ann Tse-kai, O.B.E.

Hon. Hilton Cheong-Leen, O.B.E.

Hon. Sir Kenneth Ping-fan Fung, C.B.E.

Hon. Szeto Wai, O.B.E.

Hon. Wilson Wang Tze-sam, O.B.E.

Hon. Hilton Cheong-Leen, O.B.E.

A®. LEUNG SHIU-KAY.........

Wednesday, October 10, 1973

- 9 -

MR. LEUNG SHTU-KAY - George Medal

MR. NG ICAM-HUNG - Colonial Police Medal for Gallantry

SAPP JR AIITIiOHY ROGER PROWSE - British Empire Medal for Gall antry

MR. TERRENCE ARTHUR BERRECLOTH — Queen’s Commendation for Brave Conduct

MR. CHEUNG SHU-SHING - Queen’s Commendation for Brave Conduct

MR. HUNG SUI-TO - Queen’s Commendation for Brave Conduct

MR. KONG KIM - Queen’s Commendation for Brave Conduct

MR. LI CHUEN - Queen’s Commendation for Brave Conduct

MR. GUY SANDERSON SHIRRA - Queen’s Commendation for Brave Conduct

MR. TSUI HIN-K'lUG - QucorJs Commendation for Brave Conduct

STAFF SERGEANT NORN-AA SMIT! - Military Medal

MR. LESLIE BURT01; & Colonial Police Medal for Gallantry

MR. CHOY FUT-PO - Colonial Police Medal for Gallantry

MR. CHIU YU-CHIP - Colonial Police Medal for Gallantry

SERGEANT LUN IC'U^YAT — Colonial Police Medal for Gallantry

MR. PETER MICHAEL MULLENS — Colonial Police Medal for Gall antry

MR. YAU SHOU-KIT — Colonial Police Medal for Gallantry

POLICE CONSTABLE LUK KAI—LAU — Colonial Police Medal for Gal 1 ant.ry

CHIEF POTTY OFFICER JULIAN MACRAE-CLIFTON - British Empire Medal (Military)

WARRANT OFFICER HASTBAHARDUR RAI — British Empire Medal (Mil i t.ary)

MR. CHEUNG YAT-WAH - British Empire Medal

Mr. GUN YUNG - British Empire Medal

/MR. WONG

Wednesday, October 10, 1973

- 10 -

MR. WONG HOWLING -British Empire Medal

SERGEANT ITU YUl^-TSUNG - British Empire Medal

MR. KONG HOI'^KIT - British Empire Medal

MR. KWAN LOK-SEE - British Empire Medal

MR. YUNG CHEN-TAI - British Empire Medal

MR. MICHAEL CLAFTON ILLINGWORTH - Queen1 s Police Medal for Distinguished Service

MR. GEORGE EDWARD CHADDERTON — Imperial Service Medal

MR. CHEUNG WOOD-HOI - Colonial Fire Brigades Medal for Meritorious Service

STATION SERGEANT CHI MIN-CHI - Colonial Police Medal for Meritorious Service

MR. JAMES WALKER CURRIE - Colonial Police Medal for Meritorious Service

MR. MICHAEL DAVIES - Colonial Police Medal for Meritorious Service

MR. LAM MAN-SAI - Colonial Fire Brigades Medal for Meritorious Service

MR. LEUNG TAK-YAN - Colonial Fire Brigades Medal for Meritorious Service

MR. ALFRED LUMB - Colonial Fire Brigades Medal for Meritorious Service

MR. MARK SUM - Colonial Fire Brigades Medal for Meritorious Service

MR. LAURENCE POWER Colonia?. Police Medal for Meritorious Service

MR. WILLIAM JOHN ROBERTS - Colonial Police Medal for Meritorious Service

MR. HARRY RONAN Colonial Police Medal for Meritorious Service

MR. SIU HIM - Colonial Fire Brigades Medal for Meritorious Service

MR. V/EI CIIUN-KI - Colonial Police Medal for Meritorious Service

MR. WOO WING - Colonial Police Medal for Meritorious Service

/MR. WILSON

Wednesday, October 10, 1973

- 11 -

MR. WILSON YOUNG WAI-HUEN - Colonial Police Medal for Meritorious Service

MR. LAM CHI-FUNG - Officer of the Most Venerable Order of St. John

MISS WONG WAI-HAN - Serving Sister of the Most Venerable Order of St. John

MR. CHAN KWONG-FOOK - Serving Brother of the Most Venerable Order of

St. John

DR. CHOY WAI-SHUEN - Serving Brother of the Most Venerable Order of

St. John

DR. KENNETH CONROD GOH - Serving Brother of the Most Venerable Order of

St. John

MR. LING KA-KIEH - Serving Brother of Most Venerable Order of St. John

MR. SUI KAM-PING - Serving Brother of the Most Venerable Order of

St. John

MR. LEUNG SHU-FAN - Serving Brother of the Most Venerable Order of

St. John

-----0---------

PRH

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Thursday, October 11, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No,

Second report of Sir Alastair’s Commission of Inquiry published ....................................................... 1

Secretary for Housing calls on employers to help staff acquire flats • • • • ..........................................•... • 2

First classes open at Social Work Training Institute......... 4

Temporary water stoppage in Tsim Sha Tsui........................ 4

City Hall exhibition of contemporary American tie-dye fabric creations........................................................ 5

Special shipment scheme regarding export of.restrained shirts to Canada •..................................................     6

New traffic arrangements in Tsim Sha Tsui ......................  6

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Thursday, October 11, 1973

- 1 -

SIR ALASTAIR’S SECOND REPORT PUBLISHED

*********

The second report of the Commission of Inquiry conducted by Sir Alastair Blair-Kerr is published today (Thursday).

Commenting on this report the Colonial Secretary, Mr. Denys Roberts, said: ’’Sir Alastair has produced a lucid, comprehensive awnration of corruption which goes into each aspect of the problem thoroughly and impartially.

”In spite of the complexity and legal nature of much of its subject matter, the report is written in language readily understood by the layman.

”It emerges clearly that corruption must be a matter of the utmost concern to all of us in Hong Kong, to private citizens and to civil servants equally. I am certain that the civil service as a whole is ready to play its part in taking vigorous and effective action against corruption.

”Tae report has been awaited with considerable interest, and no doubt it will stimulate much public discussion. Certainly we would welcome constructive comment.

”The Government entirely accepts the general objectives stated by Sir Alastair as being necessary to combat corruption more effectively. Of course, some of Sir Alastair’s proposals raise difficult questions of law and procedure, some of which will need careful consideration. It may therefore, be a little time before definite decisions on all his proposals can be reached.

"However, the Governor, in his address to the Legislative Council at the opening of the new session on Wednesday, 17th October, will announce the Government’s attitude towards the principal recommendations.”

0----

Thursday, October 11, 1973

- 2 -

EMPLOYERS CAN HELP STAFF BUY FLATS - HOUSING SECRETARY

*********

Mr* Ian Lightbody, Secretary for Housing, today (Thursday) encouraged employers to lend their staff money to make substantial dovznpayments to buy flats in the private sector.

Speaking at the Personnel Management Club luncheon, Mr. Lightbody said that years ago the government introduced a scheme in which employers could buy land from the government at one-third the market value to build accommodation for employees. A few big firms took advantage of this concession but, over the years, the scheme had virtually died, mainly because of the scarcity of suitable sites and their high value.

"Today if employers seek to assist their staff in any way to get a decent roof over their heads, some other approach is needed,” he said.

The Hong Kong Building and Loan Agency, he said, offered mortgage funds over a 12-year repayment period at 10 per cent interest. But land prices had shot up over the past year - although they had started to drift back - and building costs were now around $90 a square foot of floor space.

"Although the sale price of small flats has dropped by 20 to 25 por cent since the peak reached by the beginning of the year, the price will still be beyond the means of many lower middle-income families who are too well-off to be eligible for public housing and not sufficiently well-off to be able to fend for themselves in the private sector," ho said.

/Families ......

Thursday, October 11, 1973 i

- 3 -

Families with an income below S3,000 a month could at most al 1 oca te a third of its income to mortgage repayments, he added. But on a purchase price of, say, 3100,000, repayments would amount to 31,200 a month which was more than such a family could be expected to afford.

Mr. Lightbody suggested that a good employer could help his staff to narrow the gap and so bring a flat within his reach by assisting them to make substantial downpayments on concessionary terms with a longer repayment period and interest rates lower than 10 per cent.

"I can visualise that there could be problems to be overcome should it be necessary for the employer and employee to part company for some reason”. He went on.

TTIn this event it would seem that the employee must refund the outstanding capital sum to his employer, failing which the latter would recover the premises from the employee.- I am sure that all sorts of problems would emerge on closer inspection but it seems to me that these are matters which conscientious employers, seeking to retain the services of competent staff might well consider in their own interests”,said Mr. Lightbody.

0 - -

A

Thursday, October 11, 1973

-4-. j ■

INSTITUTE FOR SOCIAL WORK TRAINING BEGINS CLASSES

*********

The first classes at the recently established Institute for Social Work Training will begin on Monday (October 15)•

Fifty students have been selected to attend the courses in the first academic year. An orientation programme will be held on Monday morning for the new students to introduce them to the Institute.

A tea reception will also be held at 11 a.m. that day in the gymnasium of the Lady Trench Training Centre, 44 Oi Kwan Road, Wanchai, in which the Institute is housed.

At this reception, students will have an opportunity to meet the Director of Social Welfare, Mr. K.W.J. Topley, the Principal of the Institute, Mr. L.B. MacQuarrie, and members of the Institute’s staff and its Academic Board.

The official opening of the Institute will be held at a later date. Representatives of the press, radio and TV are welcome to attend the reception to meet the students.

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. t

WATER CUT

******

Water supply to a number of premises in Tsim Sha Tsui will be interrupted for' five hours as from 1 a.m. on Saturday (October 13) to facilitate a test for leakage in the district.

The area affected is bounded by Nathan Road, Kimberley Road and Carnarvon Road.

-------0--------- /5..................

Thursday, October 11, 1973

- 5 -

EXHIBITION OF CONTEMPORARY TIE-DYE CREATIONS

**********

An unusual exhibition of modern tie-dye creations will be hold at the City Museum and Art Gallery starting to-morrow (Friday) •

Entitled ”Fabric Vibrations”, the exhibition consists of 26 unique works by 10 contemporary American artists. They are the result of a combination of ancient tie-dye skills and modern synthetic matern als, producing a style of vibrating colours and patterns which relate directly to today’s youth culture — their music, their interest in the mystical and their life style.

Among the many attractive hangings and patterned garments on display are some three-dimensional structures. One such is called the ’Meditation Tent*' with a zipper to ensure complete peace and privacy, and another entitled the ’’Ceremonial Enclosure”, a tall free standing structure with a joyous pattern inviting one to enter its space.

The exhibition is organised by the Museum of Contemporary Crafts, New York, and tao Smithsonian Institution, Washington, and is jointly presented in Hong Kong by the Urban Council and the United States Information Service. It will remain on display at the City Museum and Art Gallery until October 28.

Note to Editors: You are invited to cover the opening of the

exhibition which will take place this (Thursday) afternoon at 6 p.m. in the City Museum and Art Gallery.

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/6.........

Thursday, October 11, 1973

- 6 -

EXPORT OS' SEfiiaAIHSD SHIRTS TO CANADA

*********

Tae Commerce and Industry Department today instituted, a special shipment scheme in respect of restrained shirts w Canada. It will operate until October 29, 1973•

Under the scheme, shirt quotas totalling 11,664 dozen will be made available to all applicants, whether or not they are quota holders, for shipment on or before October 31.

All applications received by Monday (October 1p) will be considered together and approved on a proportionate basis, if necessary. Any quantity remaining thereafter will be approved on a first—come first—served basis.

Anyone wishing to seek further information is invited to contact the following officers of the Commerce and Industry Department: Mr. D.L.S. Ip, Assistant Trade Officer, telephone 5-247317; Mr. C.K. Lai, Industry Assistant, telephone 5-445666,

• - - - 0.... - -

TRAlFJ ; CHANGE IN MIDDLE ROAD

********

Traffic along the section of Middle Road between Ashley Road and Hankow Road will be re-routed one-way westbound as from 10 a.m. on Saturday (October 13) to improve traffic circulation in the area. ' '

Appropriate traffic signs will be posted to guide motorists.

Release time: 6.30 p. m.

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Friday, October 12, 1973-

CONTENTS

Page No,

Hong Kong Training Council established to advise on training system.................. • •........................ 1

Householders show good response to transport survey .......... 3

Rent control exemption for certain pre-war premises .......... 5

Rise in parking charges at Kai Tak airport ........••••••• 6

Motorcyclists will be compelled to wear crash helmets as from January ••••••................................    • •• 7

Japanese youth group on goodwill mission to Hong Kong •••• 8

Ortnin postal services to Middle East suspended ••<,•••*• 10

Navigation beacons to be built in Tide Cove ••••••........... 11

Four apprentice lift mechanics complete training programme 12

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Friday, October 12, 1973

1

HOh'G KONG TRAINING COUNCIL MEMBERSHIP ********

Mr. T.k. Ann, Legislative Councillor,was today appointed by the Governor to head Hong Kong’s newly-created Training Council.

The Council is a permanent body to advise the government on measures necessary to ensure a comprehensive system of training geared to meet the developing needs of the industrial sector and, at a later stage, of the commercial and service sectors.

It was created as a result of the report of the Industrial

Training Advisory Committee whose appointment came to an end on December J1, 1972. Unofficial members of the Council, all of whom are prominent < •

figures in their respective professions, include Mr. James M.H. I7u, Mr. J.L. Boyer, Mr. S.L. Chen, Dr. Y.K. Ching, Dr. C.W. Chuang, Mr. Ho Sai-chu, Mr. Henry Keswick, Professor S.Y. King, Mr. Lee Shing-chu, Mr. Pang Chun-hoi, The Reverend K.L. Stumpf, Mr. Francis Y.H. Tien, and Mr. Geoffroy M.T. Yeh.

Official memoers include representatives from government departments which are specially concerned with training matters.

The new Chairman, Mr. T.K. Ann, said the Council’s first task was to appoint from its members an executive committee and to recommend to the government the appointment of a number of industrial training boards and functional committees.

/Each of ......

i

Friday, October 12, 1973

2 -

Each of the boards, he said, would cover a major industry in Hong Kong and would be responsible for the formulation and implementation of policies.

’’The executive committee, on the other hand, is to advise the Council on all proposals presented by the training boards and functional committees,” Mr. Ann said.

The Council would also look into the question of the required statutory power to enable it to function effectively.

’’The overall aim, of course, is to ensure that there will be sufficient qualified manpower to cope with the development of every sector of Hong Kong’s economy not only in size but in sophistication. This is vital to our economic and social well-being,” he said.

Er. Ann stressed that the ready availability of trained qanpower was the most important consideration to be taken into account when a foreign concern decided whether to invest in Hong Kong.

”i7e have reached a stage of industrial development when we should do our very best to attract foreign investment in the way of high technology industries,” he said.

The Council is expected to hold its first meeting next month. It will be serviced by the yet-to-be expanded Industrial Training Division of the Labour Department.

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/3.........

Friday, October 12, 1973

- 3 -

ENCOURAGING RESPONSE TO TRANSPORT SURVEY

*********

Public response to household interviews being conducted by the government to get detailed information about transport patterns indicates that Hong Kong citizens are displaying a higher degree of social consciousness and a greater sense of civic responsibility than communities in other parts of the world covered by similar surveys in the past.

:,The response so far has been very encouraging, and the information which the interviews have yielded will be of great value," a spokesman for Public Works Department’s Highways Office said today.

The series of household interviews, conducted by interviewers who call at residents’ homes, started on September 17 and is now about 20 per cent complete, with about two more months of the programme to run.

About 5j000 households have been visited to date.

A spokesman for Wilbur Smith and Associates, the consulting firm which lias been carrying out the interviews on the government’s behalf as part of the Comprehensive Transport Study, commented: "The rate of refusals-to-answer up to now stands at only 3.2 per cent. This is significantly better than the rates which we encountered at comparable stages of similar surveys in other areas - for example, in the United States, Britain and Australia."

He added that the consultants had high hopes that public participation would continue at this level during the remainder of the surveys.

"In particular, we hope for a similar co-operative response in our roadside interviews, which will start next week. Information from these interviews can play a vital part in rounding out our picture of transport patterns.”

/Motorists

Friday, October 12, 1973

- 4 -

Motorists using the harbour tunnel and vehicular ferries will be asked to give facts about their journeys and their travel habits. ”If the drivers we shall be questioning are as helpful as the householders have shown themselves to be, we shall be very pleased indeed,1’ said the spokesman.

’’Surveys like these are far more worthwhile and more interesting to conduct when the people get involved in them as a team effort along with us. That is why we have been very gratified by Hong Kong’s impressively adult and intelligent response.”

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/5..........

Friday, October 12, 1973

- 5 -

RENT CONTROL EXEMPTION FOR CERTAIN PRE-WAR PREMISES

********

Certain pre-war premises can be excluded from existing tenancy and rent controls provided the landlord and tenant enter into specific agreements to do so and these are endorsed by the Secretary for Home Affairs or approved by the Tenancy Tribunal.

The premises will remain exempt from control on expiry of the agreement.

An amending bill to achieve this effect is published in the Gazette today.

The new Landlord and Tenant (Consolidation) (Amendment) Bill proposes to amend two sections of Part I of the principal ordinance.

The first amendment is made under the section which provides for those cases where the tenant agrees to surrender or terminate his tenancy in exchange for compensation.

The second amendment provides for the exclusion of premises let for a fixed term not exceeding five years at a rent in excess of that permitted under the existing legislation.

Before the statutory bodies endorse or approve the agreements reached they must be satisfied that the tenant appreciates the implications of his action.

In both cases the provisions of the amending legislation apply only to those agreements made after the proposed ordinance has been enacted.

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/6.........

Friday, October 12, 1973

PARKING AT KAI TAK TO COST MORE

********

Motorists will have to pay more for parking at the Hong Kong International Airport as from November 1.

Mew regulations concerning the changes in the parking charges at the airport are published in today’s gazette.

Under the Hong Kong Airport (Traffic) (Amendment) Regulations 1973j the charges for the general public car parks are raised from 31 per hour to 32 for the first two hours and 32 per hour thereafter.

Charges for special car parks for hotel and travel agencies will

be raised from 3120 to 3260 per month for omnibus and from 390 to $200 per month for cars.

Tho new charges are in line with those levied at the multi-storey car paries operated by the Urban Services Department.

Commenting on the increases, a spokesman for the Civil Aviation Department said that parking fees at the airport were first assessed in November 19^2.

The rates for special car parks were raised in 1967, but the rate for public car parks has remained unchanged since 19$2.

”Tho present level of parking charges levied at the airport,” he said, :,is now insufficient to achieve the original purpose of regulating parking.”

"With the general increase in parking charges for the multi-storey

car paries managed by the U.S.D., the car parks at the airport are often used by motorists who have no business at the airport.”

0 - -

/7

Friday, October 12, 1973

- 7 -

CRASH HELMET LAW EFFECTIVE FROM JANUARY

*******

New regulations requiring motorcyclists and their pillion passengers to wear approved safety helmets will come into effect on January 1, 197^.

The new rules, laid down in the Road Traffic (Protective Equipment) Regulations 1973, were approved by the Executive Council in June this year.

As from January 1 next year, any motorcyclist or pillion rider who fails to wear an approved safety helmet will be liable to a maximum penalty of a '5500 fine and three months’ jail for the first offence. For repeaters, the maximum penalty is a fine of 31,000 and six months’ imprisonment.

The new regulations will not affect passengers sitting in a side car. Certain individuals, such as turbanned Sikhs, may also be exempted on application.

Approved protective helmets will be those bearing a mark applied by the manufacturer indicating compliance with the specifications in British standards 2001, 1869 or 2^95; Japanese industrial standard JIS 8lj5>-1970; Australian standard EJ3-1968; and American National Standard Institute Z90.1-1971.

Under the regulations only approved helmets may be sold, hired out, or displayed for sale or hiring. The Commissioner for Transport has discretion to approve other helmets provided they afford a degree of protection from injury equal to or greater than those which comply with the quoted standards.

Possession for sale or hire of an unapproved type of helmet may lead to a 31,000 fine and six months’ jail.

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Friday, October 12, 1973

- 8 -

JAPANESE YOUTH GROUP ON GOODWILL VISIT

********

A party of 460 working youth between the ages of 20 and 28 from Kanagawa Prefecture in Yokohama, Japan, will be arriving next Sunday (October 14) on a friendship visit to young people in Hong Kong.

They vzill be arriving on board a charter ship, the "Coral Princess11 which is expected to berth at the Ocean Terminal at 8 a.m.

This group is one of the largest ever to visit Hong Kong from Japan. Their trip is being sponsored by the Kanagawa Prefectural Government to develop a spirit of international co-operation through exchange of greetings, cultural activities and sports with young people in Hong Kong.

During their stay, the Japanese Consulate and the Japan Travel Agency will play host to the group while the Social Welfare Department is co-ordinating the programme for the Japanese youth to meet their local counterparts.

When the ship arrives, it will be greeted by an 80-menber scout band at the quayside as well as representatives from the Group and Community Work Division of the Social Welfare Department.

A varied programme has been arranged for Sunday afternoon when members of the group will meet more than 220 Hong Kong young people who are members of various youth agencies including the YWCA, the YMCA, the Hong Kong Federation of Youth Groups, the Social Welfare Department’s youth centres and institutions and students of the Chinese University and the Hong Kong University.

/The programme •••••..

Friday, October 12, 1973

- 9 -

The programme which will include sports and cultural activities is a joint effort with the Children’s Playground Association and will be held at the MacPherson Playground and Queen Elizabeth Youth Centre in Yim Po Fong Street, Kowloon.

To round off the day’s activities, a dinner will be held at the Miramar Hotel for all participants. The occasion will include items of entertainment by both groups. Miss Annie Chan, Assistant Director (Social Work ), will address the gathering.

On Monday morning (October 15) the leader of the Japanese youth group, Mr. Sakaru Higuchi, who is the Chief Manager of the CM1 dren and Youth Development Division of the Kanagawa Prefectural Government; and other staff, will pay a courteous call on the Director of Social V/elfare. Mr. K.W.J. Topley, at his office.

Note to Editors? You are invited to cover the various functions connected with this group’s activities in Hong Kong.

The "Coral Princess" arrives at the Ocean Terminal at 8 a.m. on Sunday (October 14).

The group activities at the MacPherson Playground and Queen Elizabeth Youth Centre will begin at 2.15 p.m. with short opening remarks by representatives from both the Social Welfare Department and the Japanese youth group. After that, the various activities will go on until 5 p.m.

/The dinner ••••...

Friday, October 12, 1973

- 10 -

The dinner will be held at the Banquet Room on the first floor of the Miramar Hotel and will begin at 6.30 p.m. Press representatives attending this function are also invited for dinner.

On Monday morning, Mr. Higuchi will call on the Director of Social 17el fare at 9*30 a.m. at his office in Lee Gardens, 4th floor, Hysan Avenue, Causeway Bay, Hong Kong. Press representatives are welcome to take photographs and should meet in the Public Relations Unit, Room 528a(1), 3th floor, Lee Gardens, Hysan Avenue at 9-15 a.m.

-------0 --------

MAIL SERVICES TO MIDDLE EAST

***««*««

In view of the war situation in the Middle East, the Post Office announces that airlines serving Egypt, Israel and Syria have changed their routing and in consequence airmail and air parcels for these countries cannot be accepted until further notice.

Considerable disruption to service mail is also likely and the public are advised not to post surface mail to the countries concerned for the time being.

-------0---------

/11 .......

Friday, October 12, 1973

- 11 -

MORE SHIPPING GUIDES AT TIDE COVE

*******

Three beacons are to be built in Tide Cove (Sha Tin Hoi) between Ma Liu Shui and Tai Shui Hang to provide better navigating facilities in the vicinity of a large reef which poses a hazard to ships in the area#

A government spokesman said today that marine traffic in the vicinity of the reef had steadily increased and this was likely to continue with the development of Sha Tin New Town.

The risk of ships hitting the reef had become greater, he added, because Ma Liu Shui had become a centre for beach pleasure craft, many of which ventured into the area of the reef thus making it more difficult for larger vessels to navigate.

He noted that more passenger ferries would also be navigating in the area when the present Ho Tung Lau-Ma On Shan ferry service called at Ma Liu Shui and Wu Kwai Sha later on.

A notice in today’s Gazette calls on anyone v/ho has objections to the proposed beacons or any claim of private right in the matter, to submit them in writing to the Director of Public Works within two months from now.

-------0 - - - -

/12

Friday, October 12, 1973

12 -

APPRENTICE LIFT MECHANICS COMPLETE TRAINING

*********

Four apprentice lift mechanics who have recently completed training at the Ryoden Electric Engineering Co. Ltd. to-day received their completion certificates from Mr. F.K. Hu, Urban Councillor and senior managing director of the company.

They were Mr. ’.Vong './ing-kay, Mr. Wu Kwok-wah, Mr. Yeung Chi-hung and Mr. Yiu Kwok-biu.

Speaking at the presentation ceremony at the office of the Industrial Training Division of the Labour Department, Mr. Hu said the apprentice training scheme proposed by the Labour Department had helped overcome the shortage of craftsmen in Hong Kong.

He told the apprentices that they form, in a real sense, part of a new generation of craftsmen trained in both theory and practice.

Giving the installation of a lift as an example, Mr. Hu said Hong Kong’s industrial development had reached a very sophisticated stage.

However, he said safety was also another aspect which had to be given top priority in the design and construction of the lift.

"It is therefore of utmost importance that the lift mechanics should equip themselves with high standard technical and theoretical knowledge," he said.

Hr. Hu pointed out that the apprentices training scheme provided the basis for young people to acquire such knowledge.

Also present at the ceremony were Mr. H.R. Knight, Senior Training Officer (Apprenticeship) of the Labour Department, and about 20 new apprentices and their parents. They were there to sign contracts of apprenticeship.

-------0----------

Release time: 7 <30 P«m.

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Saturday, October 1J, 1975

contents

Page No»

Certain waterworks access roads will be closed to the public to prevent accidents and pollution  ........••••••••• 1

Closure of Lion Rock Tunnel...........................• •••» 3

Road-safety campaign begins on Monday......• •.............. 4

Certificates for H.K.C.S.E. 1975 ready for collection....... 5

Note to Editors on car paricing charges 5

Chinese version of the Hawker By-Laws compiled for the benefit of hawkers •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• 6

Water interruption in Smithfield area • .......... 6

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Saturday, October 13, 1973

CLOSURE OF WATERWORKS ACCESS ROADS

TO PREVENT ACC TOMS AND POLLUTION

*******

A number of Waterworks and forestry access roads in the New Territories will be closed to the public as from Monday (October 15) in an effort to prevent accidents and pollution.

They are the loop road over Tai Lam Chung dam, the spur road from Hoi Pui Reservoir, the access road to Wong Nai Tun dam and catchwater, and part of the road which links Tai Lam Chung and Shek Kong.

Disclosing this today, a spokesman for the Public Works Department said that these roads were in no sense public roads. Under the Waterworks Ordinance, the road alongside the catchwater is part of "the Waterworlzs".

Turning to the road between Tai Lam Chung and Shek Kong, he said: "The road was not designed for a large volume of heavy traffic, and the wear and the tear is considerable.

"Apart from the road surface itself ., extensive damage to the catchwater linings has occurred from time to time."

In the event of an accident, he said, there was a risk that a car might fall into the catchwater, a risk increased because the road, being designed to allow quick working access to the catchment for Waterworks staff, is not protected by a parapet.

"Should this happen just prior to or during heavy rain, the catchwater may overflow with the possibility of serious damage to property, and of danger to those living below," the spokesman stressed.

/At the ......

Saturday- October 1973

At the same time, the use of the catchwater road by such a large number of people has created a litter and pollution problem.

For the same reasons, the present heavy use of the spur road to Hoi Pui dam and the road to Wong Nai Tun is similarly undesirable.

In view of all these preblems, the spokesman said it had been decided to close the loop road over Tai Lam Chung dam, the spur road from Hoi Pui to Ho Pui Reservoir and the access road to Wong Nai Tun dam and catchwater#

However, he pointed out that it was difficult to close all of the road between Tai Lam Chung and Shek Kong as local villagers had to , use part of it for access.

Because there was as yet no other satisfactory road access to Ho Pui Village, the part of this road from Shek Kong to Ho Pui would remain open at present, but a road barrier had been erected on the west side of Ho Pui Village..

At the Tai Lan Chung end of this road and in conjunction with the closure of the loop road over Tai Lam Chung dam, the Prisons Department has also decided to close a section of the road which runs through the Tai Lam Addiction Treatment Centre. The public use of this road about 10 years ago presented no problems to the Prisons Department but the increasing volume of traffic since that time has caused serious inconvenience •

This road also serves the Tai Lam Centre for Women, which is being converted into a medium security institution for young male of fendears, and for security reasons it is desirable that the adjacent areas be closed to the general public.

/This .n.••

Saturday, October 131 1973

- 3 -

This means that people will not be able to use the road as a short-cut between Castle Peak Road and Shek Kong.

- •*-- 0---------

LION ROCK TUNNEL CLOSURE

******

The Lion Rock Tunnel will be closed to all traffic between

1 a.m. and 5 a.m. on Tuesday (October 16).

Announcing this today, the Commissioner for Transport said the closure was necessary to permit essential maintenance work to be carried out in the tunnel.

Motorists who must travel during these hours are advised to use :. ,r Tai Po Road.

- - - - 0--------

A ..

Saturday, October 13» 1973

- 4 -

MASSIVE ROAD SAFETY CAMPAIGN BEGINS ON MONDAY

A six-week road safety campaign to educate the public on how to ’’Cross In Safety” will begin on Monday (October 15) •

The campaign will start with the introduction of a new six-point crossing code which will replace the JO-year-old kerb-drill..

The education phase of the campaign will last until November 24, after which there will be strict ground action by the police against jaywalkers, pedestrians who do not use crossings properly, and motorists who drive carelessly and dangerously.

Note to Editors: A "Meet The Media” session will be held in

the G.I.S. 35 mm theatre, Beaconsfield House on Monday (October 15) at 3.00 p.m.

Sitting on the panel will be the Hon. Szeto Wai, Chairman of the Transport Advisory Committee! Mr.

Richard Quine, Chief Staff Officer, Traffic Headquarters, and Mr. Wong Hing-wah, President of the Road Safety Association.

You are cordially invited to send a reporter and/or photographer to cover the event.

-------0----------

Saturday. October 13, 1975

- 5 -

CERTIFICATES FOR H.K.C.E.E. 1973

READY FOR COLLECTION

*******

Certificates of Hong Kong Certificate of Education Examination (Chinese & English) 1975 zre now ready for collection.

Private candidates vzho sat for the above examinations may co— I

llect their certificates from the Secretary’s office at Examinations

Division, Canton Road Government Offices, 393 Canton Road, 10th floor,

Kowloon, from Monday (October 15) to Saturday (October 20) both dates • >

inclusive, between 12 noon and 6 p.m.

They should bring along their letters of notification recently posted to them as well as their admission forms (or their Hong Kong Identity Cards plus their Individual Results Notices).

-------0---------

Note to Editors; In yesterday’s Daily Information Bulletin it was incorrectly stated that parking charges for the general public car parks at Kai Tak airport would be raised from $1 per hour to $2 for the first two hours and 32 per hour thereafter, as from November 1, 1973. Under the Hong Kong Airport (Traffic) (Amendment) Regulations 1975, published in Friday’s gazette, the charges are in fact revised from 50 cents to S1 per hour for the first two hours and S2 for every hour thereafter.

A correction to this effect was sent over the teleprinter at 2221 hours yesterday,

- - - - 0--------

/6........

Saturday, October 13, 1975

- 6 -

CHINESE VERSION OF HAWKER BY-LAWS ******

The Urban Council has compiled a Chinese version of the Hong Kong Hawker By-Laws, 1972, to enable the hawkers to have a better understanding of the lav/.

An Urban Council spokesman said today: ’’Hawkers should be treated fairly and special attention should be paid to make sure they do understand the by-laws*”

Copies of the Chinese version of Hawker By-Laws, 1972 can be obtained from the Hong Kong and Kowloon Hawker Records Offices at Causeway Bay Magistracy Building, 6th floor, and 148, Sai Yee Street, Mongkok, 2nd floor respectively at 31 each.

-------0---------

WATER CUT

****** .A.

Water supply to Smithfield and Pokfield Road areas will be interrupted for eigth hours from 10 p.m. on Monday (October 15).

The stoppage is to allow work to be carried out to connect ft 10-inch fresh water main at Pokfield Road near Smithfield.

The affected buildings are 12P-12T Smithfield and 25-JlO Pokfield Road.

-------0---------

Release time; 2.>0 pern.

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Monday, October 15, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No, Financial Secretary speaks about discriminatory constraints on trade ••••••••••••..•••............•••••........ 1

Speedy building method used in Tung Tau Tsuen Estate.. 2

Housing Secretary sees rise in living standards in estates •• 4

Visitors to City Museum and Art Gallery pass 40,000 mark .... 5

New clinic in Sha Tau Kok to include maternity facilities ••• 6

Labour dispute settled with the help of the Labour Department 7 Water cut in Fanling •••••........................... 7

First school day at Social Work Training Institute •••••••••• 8

Courtesy call on Chairman of the Urban Council .... 9

Leader of Japanese youth group visits Director of Social

Welfare •••••••....................................... 10

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Monday, October 15* 1973

- 1 -

DISCRUHNATORY CONSTRAINTS ON TRADE CAUSE FOR ANXIETY ******

The Ihnancial Secretary, Mr. C.P. Haddon-Cave, said today that Hong Kong has very real anxieties about discriminatory constraints'on trade.

He said: "We are worried about preferential tariff schemes which do not apply to all competitor countries alike and thereby give unfair advantages to some at the unwarranted expense of others."

Mr. Haddon-Cave was speaking at a luncheon meeting today, the opening day of the American Fortnight.

However, he believed that such difficulties as remain between the United States and Hong Kong could be overcome.

His confidence, the Financial Secretary said, stems in part ftom the fact that, there is, in political reality, no question of large countries dominating small countries in the sphere of international trade# "And, in any case, no country is truly independent in economic terms; instead there is a degree of inter-dependence and, in the case of the United States and Hong Kong, I would like to think that this interdependence has generated a fund of goodwill and of mutual trust and understanding which pervades ideas of self-interest," Mr. Haddon-Cave said.

Note to Editors: The full text of the Financial Secretary*s

speech will be distributed separately in the G.I.S» press boxes this evenings

------0----

/2........

Monday, October 15, 1973

- 2 -

HIGH-SPEED METHODS OF CONSTRUCTION

Employed In Government Housing Projects

**»«»***

Thanks to the effectiveness of new high-speed methods of construction, work on providing public housing at Tung Tau Tsuen Estate for 3»37O people is entering its final four-month phase ahead of schedule.

The project is the building of a new block of flats in Area D of the housing estate. The contract was awarded last November on the basis of a reduced contract period, cut by six months from 21 months to 15 months, which was offered by the successful tenderer and accepted by the Government.

This reduction was made possible by a combination of sophisticated quick-build methods, never fully employed in Hong Kong previously. The techniques include the use of pre-cast ceiling-and-floor bases and of steel shuttering to form the walls.

The contract has now progressed to a stage where this system has demonstrated a vast improvement over conventional construction methods both in timing and in quality, a spokesman for the Architectural Office of Public Works Department said today. ”It has not only proved its tremendous speed, but has also produced a much better standard of finish.”

The block, which consists of eight floors of housing above two storeys of shops, should be completed next February at a cost of about 56.4 million.

/Note........

Monday, October 15, 1973

- 3 -

Note to Editors: In view of the interest in such high-speed

construction methods, which can play a big part in helping to achieve the Government’s ten-year housing target, the Architectural Office is inviting all the media to send representatives to see the system in operation on Thursday (October 18) morning.

Transport will be available outside the reception area of Murray Building, Garden Road, at 9.45 a.m.; the demonstration facility, combined with a media conference, will begin on site at 10.30 a.m.

To get a good view from above of the construction scene, the. conference (at which much additional information will be available and at which questions will be welcome) will be held on an upper half-completed floor. While there will be no danger, we have been advised that anyone with a poor head for heights might find the location uncomfortable.

-------0---------

Monday, October 15? 1973

- 4 -

ESTATS FLATS FURNISHINGS REFLECT HIGHER LIVING STANDARDS ******

Anyone who wants first hand examples of the rising living standards in public housing estates, and in the community in general, should compare the interiors of flats there today with what they were ten years ago, said Mr. Ian Lightbody, Secretary for Housing, today (October 15)•

He was speaking at the opening of the Australian Carpet and Furniture display at the Australian Trade Commission show room in Connaught Centre.

Mr. Lightbody said that it could be hoped that the high-standard products on show there would, in•the years’to come, be found in some of Hong Kong’s public housing estates.

’’These developing tastes,” he said, ’’are increasingly well served by the widening range of attractive home furnishings and fittings now available in Hong Kong and I am sure that this range of products fi*om Australia will do much to expand and enrich that range.”

Mr. Lightbody pointed out that Housing Authority architects tried to inject as much variety as possible into the design and appearance of estates and their facilities.

He said: ”1 am sure this is no less true in the private housing sector but I think we would all admit that nowadays so many flats, even in the private sector, tend to look very similar to other flats that we know, and it is only by expressing one’s personality or preferences in the choice of furniture and fittings that one can make one’s own home a distinctive and personalised place.

/”It........

Monday, October 15, 1973

- 5 -

"It seems to me that Hong Kong families are developing greater taste and imagination in this respect and, more to the point, they can now afford to be a great deal more selective than in the past."

-------0---------

VISITORS TO CITY MUSEUM AND ART GALLERY

PASS 40,000 MARK

«»****

A total of. 4-1,922 people visited the City Museum and Art

Gallery in September — an increase of more than 100 per eent on attendance figures for the same month last year.

The main reason for the higher attendance was an exhibition of paintings, calligraphy seals and seal prints by the noted Chinese painter Ch’i Pai-shih.

--------0---------

Monday, October 15, 1973

- 6 -

NEW CLINIC IN SHA TAU KOK

Hl * * ♦ ♦ * ♦ ♦ ♦ • I •

The existing government clinic within the closed area of Sha

Tau Kok, New Territories, will soon be replaced by a new rural cl inic and maternity home.

Operating on rented premises, the.present out-patient clinic does not provide maternity facilities.

The two-storey new clinic is being built on a•17,000-square-foot site outside the closed area and opposite the Sha Tau Kok Police Station.

There will be an out-patient clinic on the ground floor, including two consulting rooms, a dispensary, a treatment and injection room, among others.

A seven-bed maternity ward, together with a delivery room and living quarters for the resident staff will be provided on the upper floor.

The new clinic is expected to bring better medical and, in particul.ar, maternity facilities to residents of Sha Tau Kok and its neighbouring areas*

At present, the Sha Tau Kok Clinic provides out-patient services on a sessional basis only and maternity cases are referred to the Shek Wu Hui Jockey Club Clinic for delivery.

Construction of the new clinic, which commenced in January, is expected to be completed by the end of this year. It should go into operation early next year.

The estimated cost of the project is $1.2 million.

0 - -

Monday, October 15, 1973

- 7 -

LABOUR DISPUTE SETTLED

******

A dispute involving 220 workers of the Technical Products Limited ( in receivership) has been amicably settled by the Labour Relations Service of the Labour Department.

The dispute broke out on October 8 over the question of >

severance pay.

Under an agreement reached on October 12, daily-rated and monthly-rated workers today each received 7 days1 and one month’s wages in lieu of notice respectively.

In addition, they each received two months’ wages as severance pay. The total amount involved is in the region of $330,000.

-------0---------

WATER INTERRUPTION IN FANLING

******

Water supply to a number of premises in Fanling in the New Territories will be interrupted for eight hours on Wednesday (October 17) starting from 10 p.m.

The stoppage will enable the Waterworks Office to connect a water main at Ko Po Bridge in Sha Tau Kok Road.

Premises affected by the water stoppage are situated along Sha Tau Kok Road between Queen’s Hill Camp and Sha Tau Kok Market, including those in Ping Che Road, and the Ta Kwu Ling Police Station.

-------0---------

/8..........

Monday, October 15, 1973

- 8 -

CLASSES BEGIN AT INSTITUTE FOR SOCIAL WORK TRAINING ********

The Institute for Social Work Training, one of the projects in the five-year plan for the development of welfare services in Hong Kong, officially began classes today (Monday).

Speaking at a brief welcoming ceremony for the students, Mr, K.V/.J. Topley, the Director of Social Welfare, n»id the occasion marked "the start of something that will have a very big influence on Hong Kong in the future,”

He said as the intake of students built up so would the corps of professionally trained social workers to form the.base on which social welfare services will be expanded.

He said while each school or institution had its own style, much depended on the students themselves and how they responded.

”We need to establish a new style in social work in Hong Kong and one way of doing this is through new people like yourselves,” he told the students.

Mr. Topley stressed that helping people is important and said they could achieve new standards through their training to deal with more difficult problems as -more demands are made of social workers.

In welcoming the students, Mr. L„B. MacQuarrie, Principal of the Institute, said many had made sacrifices such as giving up jobs to join .the Institute, but they would have the satisfaction of knowing they would become professionally trained social workers.

/The Institute. •••••»•

*

Monday, October 15? 1973

- 9 -

The Institute was set up following the recommendations of experts from Hong Kong and abroad, to provide a two-year certificate course in social work training•

It is at present housed in the Social Welfare Department’s Lady Trench Training Centre in Oi Kwan Road, Wanchai.

• • c • • • «

Ilote to Editors: Copies of a photograph taken at a reception

welcoming the students will be distributed separately in the G.I.S. press boxes this evening*

-------0---------

COURTESY CALL OF U.C. CHAIRMAN

**********

Mr. George Witchell, Travelling Commissioner from the British Boy Scouts Association headquarters, today paid a courtesy visit to Mr. A. de 0. Sales, Chairman of the Urban Council$at the City Hall.

Mr. Witchell holds the Silver Wolf Award, the highest in the Scout movement, for services of the most outstanding character.

He has served the Scout movement for more than 50 years.

-------0---------

Monday, October 151 1973

- 10 -

• • • * .

COURTESY CALL ON DIRECTOR OF SOCIAL WELFARE

******

A delegation from the Kanagawa youth group ’’Tomorrow’s Youth” which visited Hong Kong during the weekend to meet young people here in <•

a cultural exchange visit, today (Monday) paid a courtesy call on the Director of Social Welfare, Mr. K.W.J, Topley, before leaving for South Korea.

• * • •

The delegation was led by Mr. Sakaru Higuchi, Chief Manager of the Youth and Children’s Division of the Kanagawa Prefectural Government in Yokohama, who sponsored the trip for the 460 Japanese young men and women.

Mr. Higuchi said their meeting with the young people of Hong Kong in sports, cultural and social activities was very successful and thanked the Social Welfare Department for co-ordinating the exchange programme•

In reply, Hr. Topley said the visit was a step forward in developing international youth relationships and the name chosen for the group showed that the Kanagawa Prefectural Government was not only thinking of today’s youth but those of the future as well.

Mr. Higuchi also presented Mr. Topley with a replica of a helmet worn by ancient Japanese warriors on behalf of the Governor of Kanagawa Prefecture. In return, he received a banner from Mr. Topley.

Note to Editors: Copies of a photograph showing Mr. Higuchi

presenting the souvenir to Mr. Topley will be distributed separately in the G.I.S. press boxes this evening. --------------------0---------

Release time: 7.^5 p.m.

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Tuesday, October 16, 1973

CONTENTS

Page Mo

Six housing blocks ready for villagers affected by the High Island VVater Scheme .«•••••............................♦ .... 1

Urban Councillor appeals to expatriates for community involvement ••••••••••••••................................... 2

Water Interruption at Mid-levels ........................ 5

Hawkers in Chai Wan to be resited •••••.....••••••••••••••••• 4

Nov/ Measures taken by the Kowloon-Canton Railway............ 5

Hong Kong television producer represents Asia at seminar in Germany •.................................................... £

Allegations related to labour legislation refuted ........... 7

Summer tine ends on Sunday .................................. 10

New Legislative Council session begins tomorrow ••••••....... 11

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5'233191

Tuesday, October 16, 1973

1

SIX VILLAGE HOUSING BLOCKS READY

*******

Two wore new housing blocks built on the Sai Kung reclamation for the villagers, who will have to move from the area of the High Island Reservoir, are ?iow ready for occupation. A total of six blocks is now available.

These blocks, which comprise 176 flats and 44 shops are part of perhaps the most advanced public housing development yet in the New Territories. Eaoh flat lias all modem facilities - piped water, electricity, sewage disposal, proper kitchens, baths and toilets.

An amenity area which includes a basketball pitch, a skating rink, gardens and resting places is being built in a traffic-free precinct between the blocks.

An interesting design feature of the flats is that the ceiling height of 11 feet is considerably higher than in most of the modern private development This coupled v/ith a floor area of over 750 square feet per flat and splendid views across Port Shelter on one side and to Ma On Shan on the other is likely to lead to high rental returns for those families xvho choose to lease some of their property.

-------0---------

Tuesday, October 16, 1973

- 2 -

NEIXY-ARRIVED EXPATRIATES

URG1T) TO TAKE PART IN COMMUNITY AFFAIRS

******

Urban Coixncillor Hilton Cheong-leen today urged newly-arrived expatriates to involve themselves in community affairs and not become "entrapped in a narrow insular type of existence."

He said there were more than 100 service organisations to which expatriates truly interested in their new home could give their time and effort.

Mr. Cheong-leen, who is Vice Chairman of the Urban Council and has a long record of community service, was speaking at a Training Course for new arrivals in Hong Kong.

The course was arranged by the Hong Kong General Chamber of Commerce to give newly-arrived expatriate executives a fast insight into the ways of Hong Kong.

Mr. Cheong-leen cited Rotary, Lions, Junior Chamber, Round Table, Community Chest, the Jockey Club, Y.M.C.A., Y.W.C.A., S.P.C.A., Caritas and the Red Cross as among the 100-odd service organisations newcomers could join.

He said: "One trend we have noticed that is growing steadily is a sense of awareness and. greater willingness to be involved and to participate in community life by both local people and by expatriates from the United Kingdom or other countries."

/He said •••••••

Tuesday, October 16, 1973

- 3 -

He said this trend had the blessing of the Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, and was being encouraged by the Secretariat for Home Affairs, the Social Welfare Department, the Information Services Department and tho Urban Council.

On our economy, Mr. Cheong-leen said the Government’s so-called ’’laissez faire,: approach had now become a pragmatic one, since it was trying to react more sensitively and quickly to local economic aspirations and trends.

He pointed out that two recent big Government campaigns, to Keep Hong Kong Clean and to Fight Violent Crime, had succeeded because the public took an active role in both.

The latest ’’community weapon” was the setting up of Mutual Aid Committees aimed at instilling neighbourhood friendship, co-operation and group responsibility.

-------0---------

WATER CUT

******

Water supply to certain areas at Mid-levels will be interrupted for *

eight hours, starting from 10 p.m. tomorrow (Wednesday).

Tho stoppage is to enable the Waterworks Office to connect a six-inch fresh water main in Conduit Road near house No. 6.

The affected buildings are No. 1-14 Conduit Road and No. 5-25 Robinson Road.

-------0---------

A.........

Tuesday, October 16, 1973

HAWKERS IK CHAI WAN TO BE RESITED

******

The second phase of the tidy-up and hawker resiting operation at

Chai Wan Estate will be carried out tomorrow (Wednesday). Its aim is to improve th© living condition for the 55,000 tenants there and to give the estate a better appearance.

Nearly 200 illegal structures used as hawker stalls or storing places

near Block 16 and along the strip of land beside Blocks 17, 18 and 20 will be demolished in the -operation.

The area will be formed into a proper hawker bazaar after it has been resurfaced. Drains will also be provided to lead away sewage and foul water.

About 100 hawkers who have been trading in this area are being resitod temporarily at nearby open spaces.

They will move into the bazaar when work completes in about six weeks1 time.

Nr. Lo Chi Yuen, District Estate Manager (South) of the Housing Department said the success of such an operation depended greatly on the co-operation of the hawkers concerned.

He hoped that it would be given readily by them since the operation was planned for their benefit.

"They will have a better place to trade and will face less competition from pedlar hawkers when the proper hawker bazaar is opened,” he said.

The first phase of the tidy-up operation carried out in August was a complete success. Many of the hawkers involved in the operation demolished their stalls voluntarily.

- - 0 - -

/5

Tuesday, October 16, 1973

- 5 -

K.C.R. INTRODUCES NEW ARRANGEMENTS *******

The Kowloon-Canton Railway announced today that, with immediate effect, no tickets will be issued to first and second class passengers travelling from Tsirn Sha Tsui to Mongkok on certain up trains on weekdays,

A spokesman for K.C.R. said: "The measure, which is a temporary one, was taken in view of the large number of monthly and season ticket holders and passengers travelling to the New Territories on first and second class carriage on weekdays."

Affected by the new arrangement are Up Trains Nos. 22, 24 and 26, leaving Tsim Sha Tsui at 5*12 p.m., 5*34 p.m. and 6.46 p.m. respectively.

However, tickets will continue to be issued to first and second class passengers of these up trains on Saturdays and Public Holidays, when the trains are less crowded.

-------0---------

/6........

Tuesday, October 16, 1973

6

H.K. TELEVISION PRODUCER REPRESENTS ASIA AT SEMINAR IN GERMANY * 4c * 4c * *

A young and 'promising Hong Kong television producer is representing the whole of Asia at the Prix Jeunesse Days 1973 (Seminar) being held in Munich.

He is Ur. Wong Wah-kay, Programme Supervisor and producer of the Radio Hong Kong television series "Under Lion Rock" or "Sze Tsz Shan Ha".

Mr. Wong was nominated by the Asian Broadcasting Union for his wide knowledge in tackling family problem through television.

Commenting on the nomination, the Director of Broadcasting, Mr. Jame Hawthorne, said: "Thiis is of very great honour for Mr. Wong personally and is a recognition of the success of the Radio Hong Kong television series and of the way it has tackled family and community matters.

"Mr. Wong took part in a youth seminar at Shiraz (Iran) last year where he was regarded as a person with an outstanding contribution to make to Asian television."

The topic of the seminar, sponsored by the Prix Jeunesse Foundation, is "Child, Ihmily, Television".

The seminar, which began on Monday (October 15), will end on Thursday.

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/7..........

Tuesday, October 16, 1973

- 7 -

ALLEGATIONS RELATED TO LABOUR LEGISLATION REFUTED

*******

The Commissioner of Labour, Mr. I.R. Price, today accused what he called ”IIong Kong’s wailing Jeremiahs” of damaging Hong Kong’s overseas image and undermining local confidence.

’’These inaccurate prophets of doom, by repeated wild statements based on supposition, or uninformed interpretation or misrepresentation of easily-available facts, undermine local confidence, give joy to our trading competitors, and unnecessarily damage Hong Kong’s overseas image,” he said.

Mr. Price was speaking at today’s luncheon meeting of the Hong Kong Cotton Spinners Association.

He pointed out that in March this year, it was prophesied that Hong Kong faced a long, hot, strike-ridden summer.

’’Long-range forecasts have proven unreliable before,” he said, and added that so far this year — now into the autumn - the nine-month total for industrial disputes stood at 3,52^, just below that for the same period last year.

In the middle of the year, it had been alleged that 140,000 workers had been sacked as a result of the closure of factories.

’’But the truth was contained in the June survey of industrial employment” said Mr. Price. ’’This showed all-time records of more than 22,100 factories - an increase of 310 on the previous quarter - and 625,000 workers, an increase of 8f4C0”.

/In more........ •

Tuesday, October 16, 1973

- 8 ' -

In more recent reports, it had repeatedly been alleged that 36,000 children were illegally working in Hong Kong’s factories.

These allegations were apparently based on a revival of the 1971 Census report published more than a year ago. But a proper reading of the report showed that the 36,000 children referred to were in the 10-14 ago group of the table headed "economically-active population.” They included 19,000 1-^yoar olds, who may legally work in factories if they wished.

The under-f our teens, all but less than 2,000 of whom were 12 or 13 years old, could legally work anywhere except in factories and licensed promises -as messengers in offices, in agriculture and so forth. ’’And that is where the great number of them do work,” he said.

’’There is no doubt that some of them are working in factories* However, during our special campaigns to fight child employment this summer, 1,650 factories, specially selected for their tendency to employ children, were visited. But we found only 90 suspected offenders, employing 123 children -a far cry from the tens of thousands alleged,” he said.

Prosecutions would follow, he said, and later this year the task of getting sufficient evidence to prosecute would be made more simple by the introduction of new juvenile identity cards bearing a photograph and full name.

Also recently, there had been a rash of claims that wages in Hong Kong were low. But the fact was that the real wage index had risen by 59% since March 1964 - an average annual increase of 5«3%»

/This was •»••••.

Tuesday, October 16, 1973

-.9 -

Tills was an impressive increase by world standards, and had taken the Hong Kong worker’s average wage to a level which International Labour Organisation statistics showed was surpassed in the Far East only by Japan.

On top of this, virtually every worker outside the civil service received at least one month’s extra pay at Christman, and there were widespread fringe benefits such as subsidised meals and transport, free medical attention and good attendance and other bonuses.

Mr. Price flatly denied that Hong Kong’s labour legislation was lagging behind internationally accepted standards.

He said: ’’One method of measuring labour standards is to look at international labour conventions. Of these 28 have been applied to Hong Kong.

By way of comparison in Asia, Japan was one ahead with 29, Singapore had ratified 21, and Malaysia eight.

’’And in view of certain brick-bats which have been thrown at us recently, I might also mention that South Africa has ratified only 12 conventions, of which it subsequently denounced two.”

Mr. Price also refuted allegations that labour legislation was inadequately policed and rarely enforced. Ho said officers of the Labour Department strictly .enforced all labour legislation. Last year 5,870 employers were prosecuted for various offences and fines of over 51.5 million were imposed.

”In conclusion,” said Mr. Price, ”1 would like to say that most of the heat this sumer seems to have been generated by the false prophecies to which I have referred.

/”I hope.........

Tuesday, October 16, 1973

- 10 -

”1 hope that the facts which I have mentioned will show the importance of our not being misled by these false prophets, and of maintaining the well-* based economic confidence so important to Hong Kong’s continuing development*

-------0---------

SUMMER TIME ENDS ON SUNDAY

Clock To Be Put Back One Hour

Summer time in Hong Kong will officially end at 3»3O a.m. on Sunday,

October 21•

Residents are reminded that before going to bed on Saturday evening, October 20, they should not forget to put their clocks and watches back one hour.

Summer time came into force on April 22. Its observances in Hong Kong is regulated by the Interpretation and General Clauses Ordinance.

-------0---------

Tuesday, October 16, 1973

- 11 -

NEW LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL SESSION

Radio and T.V. Coverage

*»««****

The Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, will review Hong Kong’s affairs at the first sitting of the Legislative Council’s new session tomorrow (October 17)•

The first sitting will be followed by subsequent sittings on October 31, November 1, 14 and, if necessary, 15.

On October 31 and November 1 Unofficial Members will speak and on November 14 and possibly 15 Official Members will reply to the points raised by Unofficial Members.

The sittings will be covered by radio and television stations.

On October 17f the proceedings will be broadcast live over the English and Chinese networks of Radio Hong Kong as well as the Chinese channel of Commercial Radio.

For subsequent meetings, both channels of Radio Hong Kong will be carrying live broadcast.

Recorded excerpts and highlights of each of the meetings will be broadcast in the normal news broadcasts over the radio and television networlcs •

Release time: 7*45 p.m.

0--------

»

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Wednesday, October 17? 1973

CONTENTS

Page No«

Mr. Cater to head anew independent anti-corruption body....... 1

A special council to be set up to co-ordinate expansion of recreational facilities ...................................... 5

New measures against drug abuse outlined ..................... 8

Government’s determination to end housing shortage ........... 11

The future of Hong Kong’s economy described as encouraging ... 12

Two staff-members of the Greater London Council here to help re-organise Government machinery ............................. 17

Long terra transport policy essential......................... 18

Major medical targets of next decade outlined.................. 19

Secondary education targets may be achieved in ten years ..... 22

Government is to legalise off-course betting on horse racing • 25

District Commissioner, New Territories, to be given new status.......•••«•••.........  .••••••••••••.............. 26

Past year - a year of intense activity ....................... 28

Keep Hong Kong dean Campaign gives confidence to community to tackle problems of public interest ••••••••••••............... 29

New regulations on severance pay soon......................... 30

/2........

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Wednesday, October 171 1973

- 2 -

Page No*

Industrial land policy is to be revised *...................... 31

Sound start in fight against crime .............................33

The need for trained social workers being met.............. • • • • 37

Special allowance for Chairman of Urban Council ................39

Auction of special car numbers ..............................   41

Statement on nurses1 training •••••«•••••..........• • • •.... 42

Tsuen Wan Chinese chess tournament • .................  ...... 43

Election of Labour Advisory Board • • • •....•».......•......• 44

Comments by Head of Anti-Corruption Commission ....•........... 45

Wednesday, October 17, 1973

- 1 - \

MR. CATER TO HEAD NEW INDEPENDENT ANTI-CORRUPTION BODY Government Determined To Stamp Out Corruption

*********

An independent Anti-Corruption Commission will be set up with the double task of rooting out corruption and educating the public on the evils of graft*

Announcing this today, the Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, made it clear however that the decision — made on the advice of the Executive Council — did not in any way reflect on the ’’devoted work” of the present Anti-Corruption Branch and of the police force in general.

The new Commission is to be headed by Mr. Jack Cater, Secretary for Home Affairs, who has been specially released from his contract with the Telephone Company to enable him to undertake this new service to Hong Kong.

Ho will be assisted by Mr. John Prendergast, a former Director of the Special Branch of the Royal Heng Kong Police Force, who is appointed Director of Operations with immediate effect.

’U?he implications of these appointments will be apparent — the government means business," Sir Murray said.

"The calibre and experience of these men provide assurance that this is so None are better qualified to find out the truth and to set about carefully but inexorably eradicating this end mic disease."

In due course, the Governor said, one or two more officers from United Kingdom police forces with special experience in anti-corruption work would be appointed at different levels. But basically, it was for Hong Kong to put its own house in order "and I know very well we have the men and women both inside and outside the police force to do it.”

/Sir Murray ••••••

Wednesday, October 17, 1973

- 2 -

Sir Murray said the intention was that the independence of the Commissioner for Anti—Corruption should be established by his position being apart from the civil service in the same way as that of a judge• He would have access to the Governor at any time. ,fI need scarcely say that I will take a very close personal interest in the development of this commission.”

The Commissioner will have under him an operations unit and a rn vil or preventive section. The operations unit will in due course take over the functions of the present Anti-Corruption Branch.

Its staff will be selected by the Commissioner for Anti-Corruption and his Director of Operations,

The main task of che civil unit will be to educate the public as to the evils of corruption not only from the point of view of the receiver but n.1 so from that of the giver. It will also critically examine administrative procedures which lend themselves to corrupt practices.

I

Sir Murray emphasised 'hat the creation of an independent anti-corruption body was not meant as a criticism of the Force.

He added, however: ■rL believe that it is quite wrong, in the special, circumstances of Hon;' Kong, that the police, as a force, should carry the whole responsibility for action in this difficult and elusive field.”

In the past, he went cn, this responsibility had carried with if for many, the implication that the existence of corruption was the fault of the police.

nAs we all know it xs nothing of the sortc Outside the public service it is a widespread problem, and inside it corruption exists in several departments of which the police is only one.

’Moreover, I think the situation calls for an organisation, led by men of high rank and status, which can devote its whole time to the eradication of this evil,” Sir Murray said.

/A further

Wednesday, October 17, 1973

- 3 -

A further and ’’conclusive argument,” he added, was that public confidence was very much involved.

’•Clearly the public would have more confidence in a unit that was entirely independent and separate from any department of the government, including the police. ”

To combat corruption, the Governor said, good laws and good organisation were essential, ”but I put my trust principally in the services of sound men.”

He was certain that the service as a whole would accept that ’’grave situations cull for unusual measures, and that honest officers, the huge majority, have nothing to fear and indeed everything to gain.”

Turning to the recommendations of the Commission of Inquiry conducted by Sir Alastair Blair-Kerr, the Governor said the government generally accepted the objectives of the recommendations. They were being examined in detail in consultation with the Foreign and Commonwealth Office.

He hoped that legislation could be introduced shortly in the Legislative Council.

’Where appropriate, discussions with the main staff associations will be held as some of the changes suggested to civil service regulations will be controversial and staff associations will, rightly, seek to protect the interests of their members.”

The Governor had a special word of praise for Sir Alastair on the thorough and forthright way he had performed his task ’’with a minimum of soft soap and a maximum of objectivity.”

On the Godber affair, Sir Murray said it had highlighted the case for amending the Fugitive Offenders Act, as recommended by Sir Alastair.

/’•The........

Wednesday, October 17» 1973

- 4 -

”The requirement of double criminality is hard to understand in the case of a dependent territory such as Hong Kong,” he said. But he felt sure that it was not the British government’s intention in the Fugitive Offender: Act to frustrate the intention of laws approved by Her Majesty’s Government in Hong Kong.

*1 have represented to the Secretary of State the strong feelings on this subject here. This of course is not the only way to bring back Godber for trial. It remains for only one man to come forward and give conclusive evidence of a corrupt transaction,” Sir Murray stressed.

The Governor also noted with concern that corruption had done much to denigrate Hong Kong in the eyes of the world.

However, the problem of corruption was not confined to Hong Kong alone. ”We know of many cities and countries much worse and many no better in Europe, America and Asia, and which have not known the pressures under which we here have existed^” he said.

In Hong Kong, he pointed out, both reports of the Commission of Inquiry into the Godb?r case had been published in full because ,Tthe public had a right to know.”

But he wondered what the result would be if many governments, whether national or municipal, opened their most confidential files to impartial and expert scrutiny and published the results.

This the Hong Kong government had done because it realised that the only way to stop people calling Hong Kong corrupt was to eradicate corruption from our society. tJThis we are determined to do,” Sir Murray said.

O -

Wednesday, October 17, 1975

- 5 -

SPECIAL BODY TO CO-ORDINATE EXPANSION OF RECREATIONAL FACILITIES *********

A Council for Recreation and Sport is to be set up to give new impetus to the provision of more and better recreational facilities for the people of Hong Kong.

Tlie proposed Council will be headed by the Secretary for Home Affairs and will have its own secretariat so as to provide it with some administrative muscle. It will bring together a high-level group of persons with the special experience of the public and private organisations controlling the main recreational facilities and services in existence.

Outlining the functions of the Council, the Governor, Sir Murray MaoLehose, told the opening session of the Legislative Council that it would be the ’’chosen channel” for advising the government on recreational facilities, particularly on how to expand them and maximise their use, increase supervision of activities, and on the extent and direction of financial assistance to amateur sport.

”It will also make recommendations on any special services and facilities it considers necessary to meet the leisure time needs of young people."

He added: ”1 hope it may bring new purpose , new impetus and new thinlduig into what is being done in this field.”

The Governor hoped that the proposals would find favour with Legislative Council Members and that they would agree that ’’adequate funds should be made available to implement the council’s recommendations.”

/Sir Murray .......

Wednesday, October 17j 1973

- 6 -

Hie Council will also include within its purview the five-year Programme of Recreational Development and Nature Conservation, which was announced last year and which is now proceeding from the stage of planning to construction.

The Governor noted that facilities for recreation, leisure and sport "have taken on a new and urgent significance," as a result of rising standards of living and increased leisure time. They were no longer luxuries but essential parts of Hong Kong’s social infrastructure.

"It is therefore essential that properly equipped recreational areas be opened up in the mountains and beaches that surround the city, with proper road access, and staff to keep them clean and attractive and to help the public to do so, and thus ensure that everyone gets the maximum enjoyment out of them," he said.

"The mountains and the beaches are for the many what the golf course and the yacht are for the few. And if these magnificent natural facilities are to be enjoyed to the full and not to be destroyed by misuse, they must be catered for and administered just as much as, say, the playgrounds and swimming complexes in the urban areas."

/A comprehensive •••••••

Wednesday, October 17, 1973

A comprehensive planning study was now being conducted by consultants, he went on, to determine the best ways of utilising the rich recreational opportunities on Lantau Island and Saikung peninsula, in addition to the country parks and reserves already planned on Hong Kong Island, Tolo Harbour, Shing Mun, Lion Rock and Pak Sha Wan.

The consultants’ recommendations were expected in about a year’s time and should provide a framework for the development of major holiday centres for both residents and visitors.

The Governor said he attached great importance to this programme but ho warned that although recreational facilities in the old urban areas would be greatly expanded, ’’the sheer lack of space makes it likely that they will always fall short of what we would wish for so large a concentration of population.”

- - - - 0 --------

Wednesday, October 17, 1973

- 8 -

MAJOR NEW DRIVE AGAINST DRUG ABUSE

Sir Murray Outlines Further Preventive Measures

*********

A concerted new effort will be made to combat the scourge of narcotics on all fronts, with particular emphasis on the suppression of distribution and smuggling of drugs into Hong Kong and the cure of addicts to eradicate the demand.

In his opening address to the new Legislative Council session today, the Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, outlined some of the new measures to be taken and announced that a White Paper, embodying recommendations for action, would be published about the end of this year for public comment.

It had already been decided, he said, to place the organisation, coordination and control of the intensified effort in the hands of the Action Committee Against Narcotics (ACAN), which is to be revamped and given wider authority.

At the same time, the Governor announced that a special division would be set up within the Medical and Health Services with sole responsibility for drug addiction treatment and research. The division would pool expert opinion and authority to help guide ACAN.

The membership of the Action Committee, he said, would be stream!innd and its terms of reference strengthened to make it the only channel of advice to the government on all policy aspects of the drive against narcotics and drug addiction, including the allocation of resources to both government departments and voluntary agencies.

/Sir Albert . •....

Wednesday, October 17, 1973

- 9 -

Sir Albert Rodrigues, the present chairman of ACAN, would continue to preside over the re-constituted committee, the Governor said, as Sir Albert’s unparalleled experience, devotion and authority in this field clearly made him the man for the job.

The Commissioner for Narcotics will be a member of the committee and he and his staff will form the committee’s executive arm and provide it with the administrative muscle it has so far lacked.

Sir Murray also announced that a liaison officer would be seconded next month to the British Embassy in Bangkok, with the full approval of the Thai Government. The move follows visits by the Commissioner for Narcotics to Burma, Laos and Thailand earlier this year.

me Governor emphasised that in attempting to reduce aid eradicate the drug problem in Hong Kong, progress must be made in four separate but inter*-related fields.

Firstly, he said, international action was essential in the prevention of production and despatch of drugs to Hong Kong. "This relates to the Golden Triangle and Thailand, the country from which come nearly al 1 opium and opium derivatives consumed in Hong Kong."

secondly, international action was also required in the interception of shipment on the high seas, mostly by trawlers , to international waters off Hong Kong.

The other two v/ere the suppression of clandestine entry into Hong Kong and distribution to addicts by local criminals, and the eradication of demands by cure of addiction — both of which were directly, within Hong Kong’s jurisdiction.

/"As I

Wednesday, October 17, 1973

— 10 -

”As I see it we must now work to achieve progress on all four * • fronts, while making our major effort on those within our own jurisdiction/’

Sir Murray said.

It would do little good, he pointed out , to improve treatment of drug addiction in the face of an abundant and cheap supply of drugs.

"Nor would interruption of the sea-borne traffic have much effect

if abundance of production in the Golden Triangle and a strong demand in Hong Kong remained an open invitation to traffickers to bridge the gap.”

The Governor noted that much imaginative work had been done in

Hong Kong in the field of curing drug addiction by various organisations, including the Prisons Department, SAPDA, and the Discharged Prisoners’ Aid Society, among others.

”This work is second to none in the world and has received considerable international acclaim,” he said.

”But one must recognise that the problem persists on a very large scale and that if we are to make headway, much more will have to bo done in the future than has been possible in the past.”

The Governor laid great stress on the importance for any programme of eradication of having a form of treatment for addicts which could be applied en masse without long confinement in an institution.

”The pilot schemes now being conducted by the Department of Medical and Health Services, and by the Discharged Prisoners’ Aid society are therefore of critical importance,” he said.

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/TT........

Wednesday, October 17, 1973

- 11 -

HOUSING SHORTAGE MUST BE ELIMINATED - GOVERNOR

*******

The inadequacy and scarcity of housing in Hong Kong was today described by the Governor as "one of the major and most constant sources friction and unhappiness between the government and the population*’7 ,rIt is therefore vital that we press on with our target of self-contained homes for all in a reasonable environment, by the fiscal year 198?/83,u Sir Murray told the Legislative Council.

The only sure cure, he stressed, was to end the scarcity* The primary task of the new Housing Authority was to "build fast, to build well and above all to keep on building."

He said the Housing Authority and the Housing Department had inherited a "lean period" but they aimed to work up to a "plateau of production" in 1976/77 of new homes for 200,000 a year and to maintain this rate.

However, he pointed out that they had to do this without making excessive demands on the labour market.

The Governor said the Secretary for Housing would be speaking * • about this and other problems facing the new authority. "These include, depressingly, the need for resite areas to tide over the lean years the authority has inherited."

0 - -

Wednesday, October 17? 1973

- 12 -

FUTURE OF ECONOMY PROMISING

Rate Of Inflation In Hong Kong No Worse Than Elsewhere *******

The Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, today described the general picture of Hong Kong’s economy as an encouraging one which held ’’solid ground for hope” despite a further threat looming on the horizon,

”1 note that the steady stream rf merchant banks setting up in Hong Kong continues and this is a fair indication of international estimates of the importance and soundness of Hong Kong as a regional financial centre,” he told the opening session of the Legislative.Council.

He was also optimistic about ’’prospects of a more liberal attitude towards imports in Japan,” and he repeated a confident prediction by the Financial Secretary for a seven per cent annual growth rate, in real terms, of the Gross Domestic Product.

However, the Governor was concerned about Britain’s obligation to make its first move towards harmonisation with the common external tariff of the European Economic Community as from January 1 next year.

Under the accession arrangements, Hong Kong and its products face progressive discrimination from Britain in respect of textiles and footwear which would not be included in EEC generalised preferences.

On the other hand, the Governor said, this was the price paid by the negotiators to obtain EEC acceptance of Hong Kong’s inclusion in all other generalised preferences.

’’Nevertheless, we find this development a most disquieting one, and we have left Her Majesty’s Government in no doubt as to the strength of our feeling on this subject in Hong Kong.

/’We .......

Wednesday, October 17, 1973

"We regard this issue as an open one on which adjustments could and should be sought in the course of annual reviews,” he stressed.

Looking back over the year, the Governor noted that it had been one of exceptional difficulty for exporters, businessmen, bankers and developers who had been affected in varying degrees by the rise and fall of the stock market, the general world inflationary spiral, the international currency instability and the world-wide shortage of raw materials, among others.

"Against this background of so many difficulties it is encouraging that the value of our domestic exports alone in the first eight months of this year was 21 per cent up in value on the same eight months of 1972, and let us remember this is an export-led economy," Sir Murray said.

Even allowing for inflation of values, this was a significant result, and the fact that expansion should still have continued in the face of so many problems and uncertainties was in itself "remarkable”.

"This gives solid ground for hope that the ingenuity of our exporters and their labour force, the hard-headedness of our official negotiators, and the sheer demand for Hong Kong’s goods can continue to combine to ensure the expansion of our economy."

Referring to the rise in prices, the Governor said: "The plain fact of the matter is that the world is going through a particularly inflationary phase, and Hong Kong cannot insulate itself from it."

This world inflationary trend, he added, had coincided with a significant rise in the prices being charged for imported foodstuffs as a result of a combination of factors, including world grain shortages,ithe exceptional climatic conditions of this summer in Hong Kong and South China, and

/new pricing .......

Wednesday, October 17, 1973

new pricing policies which have brought the price of perishable foodstuffs in Hong Kong to levels comparable with prices elsewhere in the world.

"We must face the fact that those who sell us their goods are just as entitled to charge the going rate for them as we are entitled to do the same for our exports," he said.

He assured the Council, however, that the government would watch closely to see whether the prices of foodstuffs not subject to normal international competition get out of line with prices elsewhere.

Sir Murray said it was inevitable that the rise in prices would tend to put pressure on wages, but while it was true that the trend had increased sharply recently, a study of comparable figures elsewhere showed that up to May "the rate of inflation in Hong Kong was no worse that elsewhere — and I refer both to our competitors and our markets.”

The Governor added it should also be borne in mind that Hong Kong’s competitors had not been confronted with the same rise in prices of perishable foodstuffs due to local climatic conditions.

The main contribution the government could make towards containing inflationary trends, he went on, was through its social policies — cheap subsidised housing for these least able to afford commercial rents, and the control of rents themselves; free primary education and heavily subsidised secondary and tertiary education; social services and relief for the handicapped and destitute; and charges for medical care which are sc subsidised as to be almost free.

Apart from rising prices, the international currency instability had created many difficulties fur Hong Kong manufacturers and traders, particularly since much of Hong Kong’s trade was transacted in US dollars and in Sterling.

/It seemed .......

Wednesday, October 17, 1973

- 15 -

It seemed clear, Sir Murray said, that "uncertainties will continue for some time to come, and that there is nothing which we can do about it." However, there was every evidence of the Hong Kong dollar maintaining its strength, he added.

The Governor cited the world-wide general shortage of raw materials as another major problem local manufacturers had had to face, but he said he had been impressed by the tremendous efforts of Hong Kong exporters.

Trading and industrial organisations had also played "a most helpful role" in seeking out raw material sources, whilst the Commerce and Industry Department had assisted with official representations and co-ordination of effort.

On the stock market, the Governor said Hong Kong could look forward to "brighter days" with the advent of new legislation to protect investors, coupled with market values tearing a much more attractive price earnings ratio and with good prospects for growth in the economy.

He described the rise and fall of the market as "basically a very dangerous phenomenon" which had left deep scars, and he felt that in this instance "laissez-faire has produced excessive risks both fcr individuals and for Hong Kong."

Sir Murray was equally convinced, however, "that the introduction of disciplines having the force of law is an essential step on the road to full recovery."

While the rise and fall of the market was a temporary deterrent to overseas investors, he said, the fact that the economy was able to weather such a shock had made a very favourable impression. This was clear from what he had been told in the City of London and by visiting financiers.

/He thanked .......

Wednesday, October 17, 1973

- 16 -

He thanked the Securities Advisory Council under the chairmanship cf Mr. Y.H. Kan, and the Commissioner for Securities, Mr. J. Selwyn, for their efforts in drafting new legislation which is to be introduced in the Legislative Council shortly.

Sir Murray could add little on the problem of Hong Kong’s sterling holdings and the unilateral offer of a six-month guarantee announced by the British government aimed at stabilising the market.

"As a major holder the Hong Kong government of course has a very strong interest in the stability of sterling, and friendly exchanges continue with the Treasury about what we might do in our own and the general •interest,l; he said.

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/17

Wednesday, October 17, 1973

- 17 -

REFORM OF GOVERNMENT MACHINERY

««*«***

Two experienced staff-members of the Greater London Council have been seconded to the Hong Kong government to help promote expertise in the techniques of modern corporate management.

This follows the departure of the McKinsey team of management consultants and the re-organisation of the Colonial Secretariat into different policy and resource branches.

Their services will be helpful in developing and implementing a workable and reliable government management system based on the recommendations of the consultants and tailored to Hong Kong’s own evolving needs.

’’Such a system must embrace the assessment of our needs and the formulation of policies required to meet them,” the Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose said in his review.

”It will also entail the implementation of policies in the light of our resources of finance, manpower and land, and the monitoring of their effectiveness.”

These endeavours to strengthen the machinery and planning precesses of the government should not only facilitate the effective realisation of the government’s long-term plans, but should also "facilitate and expedite the mere mundane work of the government,” Sir Murray said,

-------0---------

/18........

Wednesday, October 17, 1973

- 18 -

LONG-TERM TRANSPORT POLICY ESSENTIAL

*******

The Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose said today that the Green Paper on transport will present ”a composition of restraints and improvements designed to keep Hong Kong on the move*.’.’

The paper, which is the basis for an overall transport policy, will be tabled in the Legislative Council shortly.

Sir Murray said he was sure members of the council would wish to consider and debate on the propositions in it. ’’Certainly a clear-cut long term policy is essential.”

On the mass transit system, the Governor said that even when it is completed ’’the bus will continue as the major public passenger carrier.”

”It is essential therefore that the quality of the bus services should be steadily improved to a point at which they are readily accepted, at least at peak times, as a satisfactory alternative to the car, taxi or public light bus.”

He added that discussions were being held with the bus companies on the best way of ensuring this.

Traffic and transport, Sir Murray said, were inter-cunnected with the problems of off-street parking and also to some extent with that of the use of street space by hawkers, and consequently with the progressive planning and provision of more adequate markets.

”It will be the responsible ty of the Secretary for Environment to ensure the composition and co-ordination of long term plans covering all these difficult inter-related issues.”

-------0---------

/19........

Wednesday, October 17, 1973

~ 19 -

EXPANSION OF MEDICAL FACILITIES

Governor Lists Major Medical Targets Of Next Decade

*******

The Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, said today that by 1983, Hong Kong would have 5-3 hospital beds per 1,000 of the population.

This ratio for the next decade — one of the recommendations of the Medical Development Advisory Committee — contrasted favourably with the 4.25 beds per 1,000 of the population set by the White Paper of 1964, a target that would be both reached and passed by next year.

The Governor described the new ratio as a ’’formidable” target, to be achieved at a time when the scale of development in other fields would be making ’’great demands on our resources.”

It would involve providing an additional 8,250 beds over and above the 5,^00 already in the pipeline, but Sir Murray said the government was obliged to consider carefully the various methods by which this target might be reached — not only by building more hospitals, but also ”by contriving the fullest use of beds already available in government and assisted hospitals.”

The Governor told the Legislative Council that Hong Kong was justly proud of its medical and health services for having, despite the high density of this community, been able to point to ’’consistently falling levels in the overall death rate, in infant and maternal mortality, and in the incidence of infectious diseases.”

With the end of the development period set out in the 1964 White Paper, Sir Murray said an experienced and authoritative Medical Development Advisory Committee under the chairmanship of Sir Albert Rodrigues had completed and submitted comprehensive plans for meeting the needs of the next ten years.

/The Committee .......

Wednesday, October 17? 1973

- 20

The Committee had suggested how Hong Kong should proceed to achieve a whole series of new targets, and what demands this would make in money and trained staff. More hospital beds was merely one of many recommendations.

The Committee’s report embodying these recommendations would be presented to the Legislative Council at its next meeting, and by early next year, after the plans had been carefully considered by the public, professional bodies and the government, a clear programme for development would be laid before the Executive and Legislative Councils.

The Governor said the report ’’warns us that by the end of the decade, we will need each year 100 more doctors than are being produced at present......

A dental school should be established so as to provide about 60 dentists each year from 1980 onwards, and we should be planning now a further training school capable of taking 150 to 200 nurses a year.”

Sir Murray described these recommendations as having ’’far-reaching implications” for Hong Kong’s universities, and involved ’’very considerable cost," but he emphasised that, in view of the time lag between planning any new medical training facilities ard completion of the training of the first students in them, the government would need "to think both fast and clearly.”

He thanked Sir Albert and the Committee for having reduced "a formidable mass of technical and administrative detail with admirable speed into a clear and valuable report,” upon which would be based the government’s medical and health services in the 1980s.

In a reference to family planning, the Governor noted that earlier this month the Medical and Health Department had begun to share with voluntary agencies responsibility for developing axid encouraging work in this field.

/Within .......

Wednesday, October 17, 1973

- 21 -

Within a year, the services presently run by the Family Planning Association in government clinics would become part of the government’s service, staffed by government officers, and supported and financed directly by the government•

"This will make it possible for the Family Planning Association and the •ther agencies to concentrate their efforts in the areas not otherwise served by government clinics,” he explained.

’’These measures are of great importance because all our efforts to improve the quality of life in Hong Kong could be frustrated by excessive natural increase, just as they could be by excessive immigration, and we face a significant increase in the size of the child-bearing group.”

The Governor bracketed the development of medical and health services along with long-term plans for housing, social welfare, and education as ’’four pillars on which the future well-being of our community can be built.”

Each year each projection would be ’’re-examined and rolled forward,” and the concern of the government must be, Sir Murray said, ”to ensure that the plans do not slip..... but are carried out with the vigour that the community demands.”

-------0---------

/22

Wednesday, October 17, 1973

- 22 -

SECONDARY EDUCATION TARGETS MAY BE ACHIEVED IN TEN’ YEARS Final Phased Plan To Se Published.In A White Paper *******

The reconstituted Board of Education has confirmed that the long-term plans for the expansion of secondary education in Hong Kong could be.achieved within a 10-year plan, that is by 19&4, the Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, told the opening session of the Legislative Council today.

The targets involve the provision of 184,000 additional assisted places in Forms 1 to 3 and 55»OOC additional places in Forms 4 and 5 so as to offer three years secondary education to all in the 12*14 age group, and to double the percentage in the full five-year course leading to a Certificate of Education.

The Board’s report,-the Governor said, ’’lays down an interim target of places for 80 per cent of the 12-14 year old age group by 1981.“

It recommended that one-fifth of the places in the three-year course should be in pre-vocational schools and that one-third of the places in the five-year course should be in secondary technical schools.

The report also recommended that to meet the necessary expansion in the teaching services a fourth College of Education should be established as soon as possible, if necessary in temporary accommodation.

The universities, the report said, should consider further expansion of their present facilities for graduate training in education.

Sir Murray said he was interested to see recent discussion nn the role of English in our schools. The Board, he said, ’’’has quite separately recommended that Chinese should become the usual medium of instruction for lower forms of secondary schools.

/’’In keeping.......

Wednesday, October 17 > 1973

- 23 -

"In keeping with this the Board also recommends that the early years of secondary education should as far as possible be based on a common core of instruction irrespective of the type of school,” the Governor said.

Regarding the invitation to the Board to advise on the extent to which secondary education should be free, Sir Murray said the Board concluded that ”in the present circumstances of Hong Kong there is no compelling need at present to provide free education in the lower secondary ranges for those able to pay the highly subsidized fees. The Board nevertheless recommended that the possibility of free education should be kept under regular review."

He said the Beard endorsed existing government policy that no child should be denied a place in a government or assisted secondary school on financial grounds.

The report concluded that within the present fee structure and fee remission scheme there was already adequate provision to ensure this aim.

The Governor was extremely grateful to the Board for the work dune by members. "It is most reassuring to have this corpus of expert opinion as a basis for planning the further expansion of secondary education."

The government, Sir Murray said, "propuses to follow a similar procedure with this report as with that on the five-year plan for Social Welfare last year. It will table the report in this Council forthwith as a Green Paper."

The public and interested bodies will be allowed an adequate period to comment after Councillors had expressed their views.

In the light of this discussion, the Governor said, "a White Paper will be submitted for consideration by the Executive and Legislative Councils embodying the final phased plan for reaching our targets.

/"I might .......

Wednesday, October 17, 1973

- 24 -

"I might add that in examining the Board’s targets and proposed timescale it will be our object to see if these could not be improved on.

I am sure that the Board would endorse this approach. I also hope that with these basic plans drafted the Board will be able to turn its attention to a thorough review of the examination system.”

On the provision of technical education, the Governor said ’’the capacity of Hong Kong to adapt rapidly to changing industrial and commercial conditions greatly depends on the programme of expansion of technical education.”

The present forecast is that in addition to Morrison Hill, technical institutes at Kwai Chung and Kwun Tong will be opened in September 1975? and at Cheung Sha Wan and San Po Kong in September 1976 and 1977 respectively.

He added: ”We will keep the need for further expansion under careful review. This may well be necessary but we would like to see the degree of support from both the public and industry before taking firm decisions.”

Referring to tertiary education, the Governor said the University and Polytechnic Grants Committee was discussing the universities’ plan for the forthcoming quadrennium covering the years 1974-78.

These plans, he said, should achieve an expansion in the two universities from a capacity of 6,000 to one of 8,400 at least by 1978.

The Polytechnic was making good progress towards its target of

8,000 full-time and 20,000 part-time students by 1978. ”In combination these measures provide for a tripling of facilities in tertiary education by 1978.”

-------0---------

/25........

Wednesday, October 17, 1973

- 25 -

OFF-COURSE BETTING ON HORSE RACING TO BE LEGALISED

*♦**»**

New legislation will be introduced to permit the Royal Hong Kong Jockey Club to extend its totalisator betting facilities to off-course betting on horse races in Hong Kong.

Announcing this today, the Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, made it clear however that the government proposed "to do no more than this at the moment.1*

The decision to make "only a limited move,” he told the Legislative Council, was made after the different views on existing gambling laws had been carefully weighed.

On the one hand, he said, the view had been expressed that present gambling laws "are tou restrictive, are unenforceable and should be relaxed," while on the ether there were those who sincerely believed that changes of this nature "would be harmful and that it would be wrong for the government to move too quickly to relax the present laws."

The decision follows recommendations by a Working Party, set up in May this year, to examine the extent to which off-course betting might be legalised. The Working Party submitted its recommendations to the government in August.

- - U

/26

Wednesday, October 17, 1973

- 26 -

NEW STATUS FOR N.T. DISTRICT COMMISSIONER

*******

The position and status of the District Commissioner of the New Territories is to be adjusted to ensure that the special requirements of the rural areas ’’receive the consideration they deserve.”

Disclosing this in the Legislative Council today, the Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, said an announcement would be made before the next District Commissioner takes over from Mr. D.C. Bray.

Sir Murray said he was conscious of the Council’s concern, which was reflected in the views of the Heung Yee Kuk, ’’that the government should be more even handed as between the urban areas and the New Territories in the programmes it undertakes.”

The large social programmes — housing, education, medical services and social welfare — he said, would benefit the New Territories as much as, if not more than the old urban areas and would contribute substantially to the standard of life and amenities in the Nev; Territories.

On present assessment, additional decent housing for some 2^0,000 was required in the New Territories. Planning of the necessary rural estates had already begun and, as an interim step, attention was being given to improving conditions in the rural areas wherever possible, the Governor said.

He cited as examples the two new housing estates opened this year at Cheung Chau and Sai Kung which were financed mainly by charitable donations from the U.S.A, and Canada; the new small-house policy introduced at the end of last year; the planned provision of over one thousand items of small public works over the next three years; and the doubling of cleansing and sanitation staff over the last three years.

/However, .......

Wednesday, October 17» 1973

- 27 -

However, the rural areas of the Mew Territories presented a special problem, the Governor said. ”In them, in particular, we are faced with the phenomenon of rural slums.”

He noted that their elimination involved ’’complex problems” because of the mix of small factories, pig, poultry and vegetable farms and residential huts that comprise them.

To find a solution, a pilot scheme was now being worked out for the development of such an area near Yuen Long, Sir Murray said.

-------0---------

/28

Wednesday, October 17, 1973

28

YEAR OF INTENSE ACTIVITY

*******

The Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, today described the year which followed his last review of the affairs of Hong Kong as "one of intense activity, and shot through with important and sometimes dramati# events However, the government — with the support of the Executive and Legislative Councils — had been constantly concerned not tc be diverted from the mainstream of the social policies outlined last year, he told the opening session of the Legislative Council.

"On no account have we been prepared to permit the pressing pre-occupations of today to divert us from long-term measures to achieve the essential conditions of an acceptable tomorrow."

This, the Governor said, was because he was convinced "that in many respects current conditions can only be accepted if the public knows that their government is seriously determined to improve them and within a reasonable timescale."

Sir Murray cited a long list of important events which had pre-occupied Hong Kong. These included: the rise and fall of the stock market; the sterling float and its effect on the value of Hong Kong’s reserves; the Clean Hong Kong Campaign; discrimination and the threat of discrimination against Hong Kong in generalised preference schemes; the fight against crime; the reprieve, on the advice of the Queen, of a convicted murderer against the overwhelming wishes of the majority of the population; and the Gcdber case, among others.

In order not to be diverted from the mainstream of cur social policies, the Governor said, long-term plans were required "to break finally the makeshift conditions forced on Hong Kong by the influx of population in the Fifties and Sixties."

-------0----------

/29 .......

Wednesday, October 17, 1973

- 29 -

CLEAN CAMPAIGN INSPIRED PUBLIC CONFIDENCE

The Keep Hong Kong Clean Campaign has helped the community gain confidence in its ability to tackle great problems of public interest through proper organisation and co—operation, the Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose said today.

In a special reference to the campaign, the Governor said its success was manifest and the only problem now "is to retain the ground gained."

"In the course of it, in the urban area, no less than 64 acres, 2.8 million square feet, comprising some 137 sites were transformed from rubbish dumps into gardens and play areas."

The "spring clean" had also brought improvements to parks, and resulted in the planting of many new trees and shrubs in public places.

"I am sure that in spite of the difficulties, Hong Kong can be both clean and green."

-------0---------

/30........

Wednesday, October 17» 1973

-30 -

NEW REGULATIONS ON SEVERANCE PaY SOON

*******

The government plans a major addition to the principal labour ordinance to provide for severance payments to workers whose services are terminated through no fault of their own.

This was revealed by the Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, in a brief comment on labour matters. The Secretary for Social Services would speak in detail later on. *

Sir Murray MacLehose noted that some progress had been made with industrial safety regulations, ’’but there is a long way to go and the rate of industrial accidents remains alarmingly high.”

The introduction of the Labour Tribunal, however, had proved to be an immediate success.

Sir Murray also expressed confidence in the recently established Hong Kong Training Council which ’’faces a major challenge” in continuing the valuable work started by the Industrial Training Advisory Committee.

-------0---------

/51........

Wednesday, October 17, 1973

- 31 -

INDUSTRIAL LAND POLICY TO BE REVISED

Moro Sites For Special Industries May Be Sold Soon ♦ * * * * * ♦ ♦ ♦

The government has re-examined its industrial land policy and has concluded tnat some revision may be desirable, the Governor, Sir Murray MacLehosc, announced today.

Addressing the opening session of the Legislative Council, he also revealed that more sites for special industries may soon be offered for sale on a restricted user basis, similar to the Tsing Yi Island site sold in April this year.

The shortage of land for private development was also apparent, the Governor added.

:,A determined search has therefore been made for large blocks of unformed land that could be made available quickly for private development,” he said, adding that the results would shortly be explained by the Secretary for Environment.

Sir Murray felt that there was not so much an absolute shortage of land ”as lack of access communications that make land attractive to developers/’

”It is against this background that we are pressing on with a second tunnel to Shatin and a motorway to Castle Peak, and both in due course will open up other substantial areas for development, as will the new bridge to Tsing Yi Island — in itself a monument to the far-sightedness of our entrepeneurs •:i

/Lantau

Wednesday, October 17, 197?

- 32 -

Lantau Island, the Governor said, was at present the greatest witouched land asset, and even if the bulk of the island were reserved for recreation purposes - as he thought it should - "there is ample room for badly needed additional sites for industry and residential developmenti"

It was against this background, he added, that the government was once more investigating the possibility of constructing a bridge.

He pointed out that if the standard of living of the community was to continue to rise, then the economy must continue to expand.

It was therefore important to ensure that it did not get stuck, either through lack of suitable land for development at reasonable prices, or through ,Tany failure of the system of competitive bidding for lots to attract particular types of new industry which would contribute to the expansion and diversification of our economy.11

-------0---------

/53........

Wednesday, October 17, 1973

- 33 -

SOUND START IN FIGHT AGAINST CRIME

*********

Hong Kong is getting to grips with the crime problem through concerted action by the government and the public on a very wide front during the past year, the Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, said today.

Addressing the new Legislative Council session, Sir Murray said that the methods chosen by the government in its fight against crime had secured the public’s cooperation and involvement on a scale and in a way that was quite new.

”Many people”, he said, ’’from all levels of society, have come forward to help, to organise and to give a lead in making their neighbourhood safer.”

’’Crime was once regarded as a problem for the police alone. It is now accepted as one for the community. There is a new and healthier spirit, new determination, new hope,” he added.

Outlining the past year’s action against crime, the Governor said that it had fallen under three main headings — to increase the numbers and offectiveness of police on the street; to change things done by the police to make them more helpful to the public; and to change things done by the public to make them more helpful to the police and to themselves.

A working group, appointed to study the root causes of crime, had produced an ’’illuminating interim report” which suggested that certain aspects of our social programmes and certain defects in them had more immediate relevance for the combatting of crime than others.

/These •••••••«

Wednesday, October 17, 1973

- 34 - ”

These suggestions are being carefully considered and "certainly it is reasonable to hope that the great programmes of improvement in housing, education and social welfare will all help over crime," he said.

But in the short term, he emphasised, we must rely heavily on deterrence — and the basic deterrent was the fear of detection. This could only be provided by a large and visible police presence.

Efforts towards this end started with a drive to expand the Auxiliaries as the quickest way of raising numbers. "Within a period of something like nine months," he said," the Auxiliaries have been increased from 3>500 to 7,000 trained men."

This was followed by a campaign to recruit regulars which yielded 400 acceptable recruits. This result, the Governor said, had been greatly prejudiced by the escape of Godber and the attendant publicity which ironi cal1y coincided with the recruitment drive.

A further recruitment campaign will be mounted later this year and "as a result the police still hope to be able to recruit in 1975 about half as many again as in 1972, that is to say about 1,200," he said.

But he emphasised that this was still not enough and said that every effort would be made to bring the regular police force up to strength.

"We have therefore been looking again urgently at police pay and conditions of service, and proposals will be made to Finance Committee in a fortnight’s time," Sir Murray said.

Ao gain .......

Wednesday, October 17, 1973

- 35 -

To gain more uniformed officers for the beat, a review has also been undertaken of police jobs which could be done by civilians. ’’This will be a gradual, long term process,” he said,” but two or JOO should have been gained in this way this year, and that process will continue.”

Another important step to increase police recruits was taken with the opening of the new Police Cadet School in temporary quarters in Fanling. Plans are also far advanced for the construction of the permanent school on Tdo Harbour. •

”TIiis is the beginning of a project of the greatest interestthe Governor said. ”Provided it develops along the right lines it could make a major contribution not only to the quantity but equally important, or even more important, to the quality of the young men joining the force.”

Turning to relations between police and the public, Sir Murray said steps had been taken *to make their facilities and procedures more convenient to the law-abiding public. ”Their reporting procedures were changed to be less time-consuming; the 999 call system was expanded; new police relations with the public via Area Committes were created; and the public’s views on current police practices sought and listened to,” he said.

The public has also played its part to make life for the criminal more difficult by organising itself, by increased security in the home and the shop, by reporting crime when seen, and by raising a hue and cry after criminals.

/’’This has

I

Wednesday, October 17, 1973

- 36 -

’’This has been done through the excellent work of the area and mutual aid committees, assisted by the City District Officers,” he said.

Sir Murray then went on to say that we can take encouragement from having made a sound start in our fight against crime. "Now everyone, government, polioe and public, must continue as they have started, must not be deflected, and we will prevail," he said.

-------0---------

Wednesday, October 17, 1973

- 37 -

MEETING THE NEED FOR TRAINED SOCIAL WORKERS

********

The Institute for Social Work Training has now been established and will provide the community with an increasing and badly needed supply of trained social workers, the Governor said today.

Speaking on social welfare in his address at the opening of the new Legislative Council session, Sir Murray MacLehose said he hoped the Institute would also have a major impact on the lines along which social work in Hong Kong develops.

nIt should be both a forcing house for new ideas, and a further forum for the analysis and exchange of practical experience.11

Sir Murray also made a special mention of community development and youth projects.

The Executive Council, he said, had approved, subject to the provision of funds by Finance Committee, a five year plan for the provision of 14 community centres and 89 community halls, youth centres and estate welfare centres.

These were aimed at bringing community facilities within the reach of all sectors of the community.

Also approved on the same terms, he said, was the provision of additional services involving the progressive appointment of a network of officers to promote community and youth activities in all districts in Hong Kong.

/“These schemos

Wednesday, October 17, 1973

- 38 -

f,These schemes could become of great importance. They can make a special contribution to a society as young as this. They touch an age group particularly vulnerable to criminal influence.

’Moreover, I believe that in the circumstances of Hong Kong provision of community facilities is an essential step on the road to responsible citizenship and civic sense,” he said.

On the five year plan itself, he said it had been published

together with a White Paper and both came into effect on April 1•

He said the public and the voluntary agencies had been given an opportunity to express their views on the plan and these were taken into account in the final White Paper which now embodies the plan.

Sir Murray said he was sure Members of the Council would agree that this process of consultation was the right way to handle plans of this sort.

He said the -mplementation of the plan had started well and it would be reviewed yearly to provide a constant five-year projection.

oeoo.o.o

Note to Editors: The full text of the Csvernor’s speech is

contained in a supplement to the Daily Information Bulletin.> Copies of the supplement are distributed separately in the G.I®S. press boxes®

- - - - 0---------

Z59 c•o

39

Wednesday, October 17, 1973

URBAN COUNCIL VOTES CHAIRMAN

______SPECIAL AJ.LOV.ANCE

Urban Councillors have agreed that the office of Chairman should carry a special allowance of $15,000 a month, to take effect from October 1 this year,

The purpose of the allowance is to ensure that financial considerations do not prevent any eligible member of the public from serving the community in this way.

This applies equally to people with small incomes who could not otherwise afford the expense and to successful professional or business people who could not otherwsie afford the time. In fact there are some occupations which just could not be carried on full-time by a Council Chairman.

Councillors therefore decided to pay a realistic allowance to a Chairman who necessarily must spend a large part of his or her working day on matters concerning the Urban Council, which has a budgeu of $266 million a year and a staff of nearly 15,000.

Another factor taken into account is that while the post is comparable with top-level Government jobs, the Chairmanship is non-pensionable and the allowance lasts only for the period served.

Also, the Chairmanship does not include housing or any of the other benefits enjoyed by senior Government servants-

For some time before the Council won financial autonomy the subject of a special allowance for the Chairman had been brought up by various Unofficial Members.

The change in the Council’s status in April this ’ year put heavier responsibilities on all Councillors, especially the Chairman.

Councillors are now fully responsible for policy-making over a wide range of public affairs which bear directly on the livelihoods and well-being of the general public.

In November last year, when the subject of an allowance was again raised, it was decided to defer a decision until six months after the new-look Urban Council took over Hong Kong’s civic affairs.

The question was raised by the senior Elected Councillor, Mr. B. Bernacchi, at the last meeting of the Finance Select Committee, on October 10.

The Chairman of the Council, Mr. A. de 0. Sales, left the Chamber before the item was debated. The Chairman of the Finance Select Committee, Mr. Hilton Cheong-leen, wgs in the chair.

/Mr. B. Bernaoahi

- 40

Wednesday, October 17, 1973

Mr. B. Bernacchi strongly advocated the payment of an allowance in view of the very great deal of work involved.

He added that as a principle the allowance should be made. Whether or not any holder of the office needed such payment for his livelihood was a separate matter.

Mr. Kenneth T.C. Lo agreed, saying that while Councillors could continue with their ordinary livelihoods ard personal affairs, the Chairman could not.

Mr. Tsin Sai-nin agreed and said he favoured a ’’realistic” figure.

The proposal, passed unanimously, then went before last Monday’s meeting of the Standing Committee of the Whole Council, where it was ratified unanimously.

-o-o-o-o-o-

BACKGROUND

The experience of the present Chairman of the Urban Council, Mr. A. de 0. Sales, gives an indication of the work-load of the office.

He spends at least three-quarters of his working day on Urban Council affairs.

From April 1 to the end of September he attended 9T official meetings of the Council, its select committees or the Housing Authority.

He also attended many other semi-official meetings and many Urban Council functions, ranging from presentations in the New Territories to attendances at performances at the City Hall.

He must read eight or nine Urban Council files a day, plus every Paper and every Minute dealt with by the Council’s 12 Select Committees and two other Committees.

Also his telephone rings regularly with callers wanting to discuss Urban Council business.

-o-o-o-o-o-

/41..

Wednesday, October 17, 1973

41 -

AUCTION OF SPECIAL CAR NUMBERS

*******

Twenty more ’’lucky” car numbers will be put up for auction at the City Hall Theatre this Saturday (October 20) at 11 a.m.

Proceeds from the sale will go to the Government Lotteries Fund for charitable purposes.

The twenty car numbers are: HK 777 • HK 808

1177 1600 1974

HK 900 XX 3223 XX 2772 xx 4567 AA 3636

AA 7799 BB 2 . BB 18 BB 19 I BB 20

BB 555 BB 888 BB 1 BB 3000 BB 9191

Successful bidders will have to pay, either in cash or by cheque

immediately after the bidding.

The numbers will be assigned only to vehicles registered in their names within 12 months from the date of auction.

-------0---------

WATER CUT

*******

Water supply to a number of buildings in Robinson Road will be interrupted for eight hours starting from 10 p.m. tomorrow (Thursday).

The stoppage is to allow Waterworks Office to connect fresh water mains in the area.

The affected premises are No. 3-53 and No. 10-60, Robinson Road.

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/42........

Wednesday, October 17,1973

- 42 -

STATEMENT ON NURSES’ TRAINING *******

The following statement was issued by the Government today!

”At the inquest on the death of Miss Alice Kwan the Jury added the following riders when they returned a verdict of suicide:

”(1) An enquiry should be held into the students:’ work-load paying particular attention to the following points:

(a) language problem, (b) time available for study, and (c) time available for recreation.

”(2) A review should be made of the teaching methods of students’ training tutors.

’’The Director of Medical & Health Services has written to the authorities in the United Kingdom renewing a request originally made in 1971 that a representative of the General Nursing Council for England and Wales should visit Hong Kong to inspect all General Nurse Training Schools in both Government and Government-assisted hospitals and advise the Nursing Board of Hong Kong on the methods of training student nurses. The Director, in his capacity as Chairman of the Hong Kong Nursing Board, previously made his request following the adoption in Hong Kong of comprehensive syllabus for nurse training devised by the General Nursing Council. However, an inspector of the General Nursing Council was not available at that time. The Director now regards this matter as having added urgency and hopes that his request will be met accordingly.” • • • • --------------------------------------o----------

/43........

Wednesday, October 17v 1973

- 45 -

TSUEN WAN- CHINESE CHESS TOURNAMENT «**«««

The monthly Chinese Chess Tournament organised by the Princess Alexandra Community Centre of Social Welfare Department in Tsuen Wan will be held again tomorrow (Thursday) evening.

Mr. Simon Ki of the Centre said that the chess torunanient held last month was very popular.

This time, two chess games will be held simultaneously to allow more chess players to join the tournament.

Prizes will be awarded to the winners in the tournament. *

Applications should be made to Group Work Unit, 2nd floor, Princess Alexandra Community Centre, Tai Ho Street, Tsuen Wan, New Territories or by telephone to 12-402786.

-------0---------

/44........

Wednesday, October 17j 1973

- 44 -

LABOUR ADVISORY BOARD

*******

This year’s Labour Advisory Board election will take place at the regional office of the Labour Department at New Rodney Block, Queensway,, at 10.00 a.m. tomorrow (October 18).

The Board is a non-statutory body which advises the Commissioner of 9 Labour on labour natters referred by him to the board, including legislation, and International Labour Organisation Conventions and Recommendations.

It is composed of four employers’ representatives and four workers’ representatives, with the Commissioner as Chairman.

Tv/o of the workers’ representatives are elected by registered trade unions and two are selected for appointment by the Governor.

The Secretary of the Board, Mrs. PUN WONG Tim-chuen, said today seven candidates had been nominated to stand for election and a list of these candidates had already been sent to all workers’ unions for information.

She said any registered workers’ trade union wishing to vote might send a representative to attend the election, which would be held by secret ballot.

’’The representative must bring with him a letter of authorisation from the Executive Committee of his union and a circular letter of October 3, 1973 from the Labour Department on the subject,” she said.

-------0---------

As.............

Wednesday, October 17, 1973

- -

can ENTS BY HEAD OF ANTI-CORRUPTION COMMISSION

****«*«*«

Commenting on his appointment as Head of the new independent AntiCorruption Commission this evening, Mr. J. Cater said.

,fI know that this new initiative by the Governor to set up an Anti-Corruption Commission will be very much welcomed by the people of Hong Kong.

’’And for my part I am delighted to have been asked to spearhead this new organisation.

!,I have no illusions. It is a mammoth task but it is a great challenge.

"It is not the sort of problem that can be solved overnight. It is going to be a long tough battle, and it will not be won without the wholehearted cooperation of everybodyf but I can assure you that I am determined to see this evil of corruption rooted out of our commuhity.

,TI am extremely fortunate to have John Prendergast as my Director of Operations - a man with a tremendous world wide reputation. He is known as a man who gets to the heart of a problem with the minimum of fuss. I worked with him before in the early ’60s, and I am very much looking forward to being with him again.

:'Uy team will be handpicked and will not only be civil servants.

I am going to pick the best possible men to tackle this task.11

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Release time: 10.00 p.ra.

RR 33 4000038

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

SUPPLEMENT

Wednesday, October 17« 1973

SPEECH BY HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR, SIR MURRAY MACLEHCSE AT THE LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL ON OCTOBER 17, 1973 *****:*****

Honourable Members,

Last year my address to some extent took the form of my first impressions of Hong Kong in the unfamiliar role of Governor.

The year that followed has been one of intense activity, and shot through with important and sometimes dramatic events. The rise and fall of the stock market; the sterling float and the effect on the value of our reserves; the cleaning of Hong Kong in a dramatic campaign; the reprieve, on the advice of Her Majesty’s Government of a convicted murderer against the express advice of the Govemor-in-Council and the wishes of the overwhelming majority of the population; the mounting of an intense effort to come to grips with the problem of rising crime; the move to prosecute Godber, and his escape and harsh light then thrown on the problem of corruption in Hong Kong; discrimination and the threat of discrimination against Hong Kong in generalised preference schemes; shortage of raw materials; disruptive changes in the parities of our major trading partners; sharp rises in prices of imported goods. I mention these as some, and only some, of the events that have pre-occupied us in an eventful year.

/In this

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House. Hong Kong. Tel: 5-233191

Wednesday, October 17, 1973

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In this succession of events it has been the duty of your Government with the support of Executive Council and Honourable Members, to direct things within its power as seemed best for the interests of Hong Kong, But it has been our constant concern not to be diverted from the mainstream of our social policies as outlined last year and endorsed by this Council.

These required the formulation of long-term plans to break finally the maizeshift conditions forced on Hong Kong by the influx of population in the f50s and f60s. This was not only because I believed such an approach to right in itself, and to accord with the advice of Honourable Members and the wishes of the public, but also because I was convinced that in many respects current conditions can only be accepted if the public knows that their Government is seriously determined to improve them and within a reasonable timescale. So on no account have we been prepared to permit the pressing pre-occupations of today to divert us from long term measures to achieve the essential conditions of an acceptable tomorrow.

It is with these long term measures that I start. Housing

First of all housing. Of all these social programmes it is the biggest. Everything that I have seen in the city and read at my desk during this second year in Hong Kong confirms my conclusion that the inadequacy and scarcity of housing, and all that this implies, and the harsh situations that result from it, is one of the major and most constant sources of friction and unhappiness between Government and the population. It also has implications for our twin problems of crime and corruption. It is therefore vital that we press on with our target of self-contained homes for all in a reasonable environment, by the fiscal year 1982/83.

/The new

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The new Housing Authority and Housing Department are addressing themselves to this gigantic task with enthusiasm and imagination. They have inherited a lean period, but they aim to work up to a plateau of production in 1976/77 of new homes for 200,000 a year and thereafter to maintain it. They must do this without making excessive demands on the labour market. Later in the debate the Secretary of Housing will be speaking about this and other problems facing the new Authority. These include, depressingly, the need for resite areas to tide over the lean years the Authority has inherited.

The Authority indeed faces many important problems of day to day administration. But we must never forget that nearly all are symptoms of the dominant disease - scarcity of housing. The only sure cure is therefore to end the scarcity .So the primary task of the Ne»- Authority and Housing Department must be to build fast, to build well and above all to keep on building.

Social Welfare

The new 5-year plan for social welfare, which I referred to last year, has been published together with a White Paper and both came into effect on 1st. April. The first draft was the product of a mixed working party of official members and of unofficial social workers. This was published as a green paper, and after the views of this Council had been taken an opportunity was provided for the public and the voluntary agencies to express their views on the plan. These were taken into account in the final White Paper which noxv embodies the plan. I recapitulate because I am sure that this process of consultation will commend itself to Honourable Members as the right way to handle plans of this sort.

/The plan ••••••

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The plan will now be reviewed each year so as to provide a constant 5-year projection. Implementation of the plan has started well. The Secretary for Social Services will be going into details later in the debate and I only wish to refer to one or two points. The new Institute for Social Work Training has now been established and opened last month. I do hope it will be dynamic. It will provide the community with an increasing and badly needed supply of trained social workers. But I hope that it will also have a major impact on the lines along which social work in Hong Kong develops. It should be both a forcing house for new ideas, and a further forum for the analysis and exchange of practical experience.

I should also like to make a special mention of Community Development and Youth projects. The Executive Council has approved, subject to the provision of funds by Finance Committee, a 5 year plan for the provision of 14 community centres and 89 community halls, youth centres and estate welfare centres aimed at bringing community facilities within the reach of all sectors of the community.

It has also approved, on the same terms, provision of additional services involving the progressive appointment of a network of officers to promote community and youth activities in all districts in Hong Kong* These schemes could become of great importance. They can make a special contribution to a society as young as this. They touch an age group particularly vulnerable to criminal influence. Moreover I believe that in the circumstances of Hong Kong provision of community facilities is an essential step on the road to responsible citizenship and civic sense.

/Education

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Education

I now turn to the third of the long-term plans announced last year, that for the expansion of secondary education. This was to address ourselves forthwith to the provision of 184,000 additional assisted places in forms 1-3 and 55»000 additional places in forms 4 - 5 so as to offer 3 years secondary education to all in the 12-14 year age group, and to double the percentage in the full 5-year course leading to a Certificate of Education, and thus take a major step towards reconciling educational facilities with the aspirations and needs of our community.

I asked the Board of Education to let me have their recommendations on the time-scale within which these targets could be achieved, and on any changes in the educational system which should be introduced. To undertake this task the Board of Education was reconstituted under the Chairmanship of the Hon. lir. P.C. Woo, and with a membership of great distinction and authority. I have seen the Board’s report and it is a most able and valuable document. It confirms that these targets could be achieved within a 10 year plan, that is to say, by 1984, and lays down an interim target of places for 30fc> of the 12 - 14 year age group by 1981. It recommends that 1/5 of the 3-year places should be in prevocational schools and that 1/3 of the places in the 5*year course should be in secondary technical schools. The Report also recommends that to meet the necessary expansion in the teaching services a fourth College of Education should be established as soon as possible, if necessary in temporary accommodation, and that the universities should consider further expansion of their present facilities for graduate training in education.

/I have

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I have been interested to see recent discussion on the role of English in our schools. The Board has quite separately recommended that Chinese should become the usual medium of instruction for lower forms of secondary schools. In keeping with this the Board also recommends that the early years of secondary education should as far as possible be based on a common core of instruction irrespective of the type of school.

As we have already achieved free primary education, the Board was invited to advise on the extent to which secondary education should be free, in the present circumstances of Hong Kong. The Board endorsed existing Government policy that no child should be denied a place in a Government or assisted secondary school on financial grounds, and concluded that within the present fee structure and fee-remission scheme there is adequate provision to ensure this aim, and that in the present circumstances of Hong Kong there is no compelling need at present to provide free education in the lower secondary ranges for those able to pay the highly subsidised fees. The Board nevertheless recommended that the possibility of free education should be kept under regular review.

I am extremely grateful to the Board for the work they have done.

Far be it from me to comment on it. It is most reassuring to have this corpus of expert opinion as a basis for planning the further expansion of secondary education. The Government proposes to follow a similar procedure with this report as with that on the 5-year Plan for Social Welfare last year. It will table the report in this Council forthwith as a Green Paper. After Honourable Members have expressed their views, an adequate period will be allowed for the

/public and ••••••

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public and interested bodies to comment. In the light of this discussion a White Paper will be submitted for consideration by the Executive and Legislative Councils embodying the final phased plan for reaching our targets. I might add that in examining the Board’s targets and proposed timescale it will be our object to see if these could not somehow be improved on. I am sure that the Board would endorse this approach. I also hope that with these basic plans drafted the Board will be able to turn its attention to a thorough review of the examination system.

The Director of Education will be giving details later in the debate of the progress made by his Department this year. Technical Education

I Icnow of the great interest of Honourable Members in the provision of technical education. It is a fine form of education in itself, and the capacity of Hong Kong to adapt to changing industrial and commercial conditions greatly depends on the programme of expansion of technical education. This has been pursued with considerable energy, and the present forecast is that in addition to Morrison Hill, technical institutes at Kwai Chung and* Kwun Tong will be opened In September *75, and at Cheung Sha Wan and San Po Kong in September *76 and *77 respectively. We will keep the need for further expansion under careful review. This may well be necessary but we would like to see the degree of support from both the public and industry before taking further firm decisions.

/I have

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I have little to add to what I said last year about tertiary education. The University and Polytechnic Grants Committee are currently discussing the universities’ plan for the forthcoming quadrennium covering the years 1974-78. These plans should achieve an expansion in the two universities from a capacity of 6,000 to one of 8,400 at least by 1978.

The Polytechnic is making good progress towards its target of 8,000 full time and 20,000 part-time students by 1978, and I would like to congratulate the Board and the staff of the Polytechnic on their success in launching this new venture. In combination these measures provide for a tripling of facilities in tertiary education by 1978.

Medical and Health Services

I turn now to our Medical and Health Services - services of which we are justly very proud. It is no small achievement in a high density community such as this to be able to point to the consistently falling levels in the overall death rate, in infant and maternal mortality and in the incidence of infectious diseases.

Since we are reaching the end of the 10-year period of development set out in the 1964 White Paper, the Department of Medical and Health Services drew up comprehensive plans for meeting the needs of the next ten years. We have followed the same procedure over these plans as with those for the expansion of secondary education. A Medical Development Advisory Committee with experienced and authoritative membership was set up under the chairmanship of Sir Albert Rodrigues. The Department’s plans were then submitted to it as a basis for recommendations as to what our targets should be for 1983j how we should proceed to achieve them, and what demands this

/would make

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would make in terms of money and trained personnel. The Committee has completed and submitted its report, and this will be laid before this Council at our next meeting as a green paper. The Committee’s recommendations and any views expressed on them by the public and professional bodies will be studied very carefully by the Government. In the light of tiiis consideration early next year we shall lay before the Executive Council and Legislative Council a firm programme for development over the course of the next ten years.

I have counted some twenty main recommendations in the report. I have time today to refer only to a few. Next year we shall reach and pass the target of 4.25 beds for one thousand population set in 1964. The Advisory Committee now recommend a new and higher target of 5*5 beds to each thousand members of the population by 1983- This would involve providing an additional 8,250 beds over and above the 3>000 already in the pipe line. That this is a formidable target neither the Committee nor the Government doubt, particularly at a time when the scale of development in other fields 11 be yanking great demands on our resources. Clearly we are obliged to consider with care the various possible methods by which the target may be reached, and we must decide quickly. We will need some more hospitals, but we will also have to contrive the fullest use of beds already available in Government and assisted hospitals•

The report warns us that by the end of the decade we will need each year 100 more doctors than are being produced at present; that a dental school should be established so as to provide about 60 dentists each year from 1980 onwards; and that we should be planning now a further training school capable of taking 150 to 200 student nurses a year. These recommendations /have far .............................................................

Wednesday, October 17? 1973

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have far reaching implications for our universities and involve very considerable cost. In view of the great time lag involved between planning any new medical training facilities and completion of the training of the first students in them, we will need to think both fast and clearly. On these matters the Government will want to take advice from the University and Polytechnic Grants Committee.

I am extremely grateful to Sir Albert Rodrigues and his committee. Like the Board of Education his Committee were confronted with a f omri da.hl e mass of technical and administrative detail, and with admirable speed were able to reduce this to a clear and valuable report. This will be the basis for our Medical and Health Services in the 80’s.

Apart from these important long term plans, the only other subject in the medical field I wish to mention is that of family planning. This month the Government begins to share with the voluntary agencies responsibility for developing and encouraging family planning. Over the next twelve months the services presently run by the Family Planning Association in Government clinics will become part of the Government service, staffed by Government officers and supported and financed directly by Government. This will make it possible for the Family Planning Association and the other agencies to concentrate their efforts in the areas not otherwise served by Government clinics. These measures are of great importance because all our efforts to improve the quality of life in Hong Kong could be frustrated by excessive natural increase, just as they could be by excessive 1mrrf gm hi on, and we face a significant increase in the size of the child-bearing age—group.

/The long-term

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The long-term plans for housing and social welfare are thus firmly established, and those for education and medical and health services are far advanced. Each year each projection will be re-examined and rolled forward, so that we will continue to have a clear long term view of what must be done. V/e thus now have four pillars on which the future well-being of our community can be built. The concern of Government must now be to ensure that the plans do not slip and that they are carried out with the vigour that the community demands.

Reform of the machinery of Government.

The elaboration of these plans across so wide a field, and more or less simultaneously , has placed a considerable strain on the ma chi nery of Government and I am indeed proud of the response of the public service to the challenge involved. I very much hope that the progressive implementation of the recommendations of the consultants, Messrs. McKinsey, to strengthen the machinery and planning processes of Government, will eliminate the need for any /-repetition of such a mammoth operation.

Since the consultants* departure the Colonial Secretariat has been re-organised into six Policy and two Resource Branches, the former being based on six groups of programmes, i.e. Economic Services, Environment, Home Affairs and Information, Housing, Security, and Social Services.

Now that seven of the eight Secretaries have been named, and are in post, our aim is to develop and implement a workable and reliable Government Management system based on the consultants’ recommendations, and tail nrefl to our own evolving requirements. Such a system must embrace the assessment of our needs and the formulation of policies required to meet therog it will also

/entail

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entail the implementation of policies m the light of our resources of finance, manpower and land, and the monitoring of their effectiveness.

To do all this,, we shall need to train and develop the expertise of our own staff in the techniques of modern corporate management and do so as quickly as possible. Tc assist in this we have secured the services, on secondment, of of the staff of the Greater London Council experienced in these techniques..

All these endeavours, which are now in hand, should facilitate the effective realisation of the fai>-reaching plans of which I have spoken today. But, just as important, they should facilitate and expedite the more mundane work of the Government.

With these major basic programmes and administrative reforms in hand, I believe the time has come to give an additional thrust in two main areas: the.first is recreation, leisure and sport; and the second is that broad complex of inter-related problems which might be described under the heading of traffic and transport, land policy end pollution.

Re creation, lei sure ana .sport .

With rising standards of living, and time available to bo spent on more than just a struggle for existence, facilities for recreation, leisure and sport have taken on a new and ur, -?nt significance. They are no longer luxuries but essential parts of our social infrastructure which, I suggest to you, we would neglect at our peril. 1 am conscious of the excellent work already being done by a wide variety of organisations, both Government, Government-aided and privately financed. But the machinery for a coordinated drive has hitherto been lacking.

/We will •••>•••

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V/e will therefore set up a Council for Recreation and Sport under the chairmanship of the Secretary for Home Affairs. This will bring together a high-level group of persons with the special experience of the public and private organisations controlling the main recreational facilities and services in existence. So as to make it effective and provide it with some administrative muscle it will be equipped with its own secretariat. It will be the chosen channel for advice to Government in this field. In particular it will advise on how to expand facilities, maximise their use, increase supervision of activities in them, and advise the Government on the oxtent and direction of financial assistance to amateur sport. <

It will also make recommendations on any special services and facilities it considers necessary to meet the leisure time needs of young people. I trust that those proposals will commend themselves to Honourable Members and that they will agree that adequate funds should be made available to implement the Council’s recommendations. I hope it may bring new purpose, new impetus and now thinking into what is being done in this field. • • 1

/The Ceuncil .......

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The Council will also include within its purview the ^-year Programme of Recreational Development and Nature Conservation, which was announced last year. This is now beginning to get into its stride, and to pass from the stage of planning to construction.

In addition to country parks and reserves already planned on Hong Kong Island, Tolo Harbour, Shing Mun, Lion Rock and Pak Sha Wan, two areas which are particularly rich in recreational opportunitnas are Lantau Island and the Saikung peninsula. To enable Government to decide how best to utilise these special opportunities a comprehensive planning study vzas commissioned from consultants and their recommendations are expected in about a year’s time. These plans should provide a framework for the development of major holiday centres for our own people and for visitors, as well as for the informal enjoyment of the countryside and beaches.

I attach great importance to this programme. Though recreational facilities in the old urban areas will be greatly expanded, the sheer lack of space maizes it likely that they will always fall short of what we would wish for so largo a concentration of population. It is therefore essential that properly equipped recreational areas be opened up in the mnuntajnn and beaches that surround the city, with proper road access, and staff to keep them clean and attractive and to help the public to do so, and thus ensure that everyone gets the maximum enjoyment out of them.

/To those •••••••

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To those of us who are urban in our habits this programme may seem peripheral but to my mind it is central. The mountains and the beaches are for the many what the golf course and the yacht are for the few. And if these magnificent natural facilities are to be' enjoyed to the full and not to be destroyed by misuse, they must be catered for and administered just as much as, say, the playgrounds and swimming complexes in the urban areas.

Traffic and Transport, Land Policy and Pollution

Another wide field to which we must now address ourselves with even greater effort - and I do not decry what has already been done and is being done - is that which might be described under the heading of Traffic, Transport, Land Policy and Pollution. They are inter-related and intractible subjects which are as hard to solve in Hong Kong as in any other of the great conurbations, and rendered more difficult by the great concentration of population and the limitations of space. I am sure that the drafting of sound and comprehensive policies will be greatly facilitated by the appointment of a single senior officer, the Secretary for Environment, to evolve and co-ordinate programmes. He is, I am satisfied, undaunted by this daunting responsibility. He will be outlining his approach himself at a later stage in this debate.

The most dramatic single item in this group of subject, though by no means necessarily the most important, is the mass transit project, which I confess I prefer to call the Underground Railway. The negotiation of the contract is in the hands of the Financial Secretary and the Steering Group under the direction of the Executive Council and I have nothing to add about the course of the negotiations today.

/Even when

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Even when the Underground Railway is completed the bus will continue as the major public passenger carrier. It is therefore essential that the quality of the bus service should be steadily improved to a point at which they are readily accepted, at least at peak times, as a satisfactory alternative to the car, taxi or public light bus. Discussions are being held with the bus companies on the best way of ensuring this.

As a basis for an overall transport policy, a green paper will be tabled shortly. The paper will present an overall transport policy, a composition of restraints and improvements designed to keep Hong Kong on the move. I am sure Honourable Members will wish to consider and debate on the propositions in it. Certainly a clear-cut long term policy is essential.

Traffic and transport are of course inter-connected with the problems of off-street parking and also to some extent with that of use of street space by hawkers, and consequently with the progressive planning and provision of more adequate markets.

It will be the responsibility of the Secretary for Environment to ensure the composition and coordination of long term plans covering all these difficult inter-related issues.

Land Policy

The Secretary for Environment will share responsibility with the Secretary for Economic Services for land policy. I think Honourable Members will agree that it is time we took a hard look at this. If the standard of living of our people is to continue to rise our economy must continue to expand. Vie must ensure it does not get stuck on a plateau, either through lack of

/suitable land

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suitable land for development at reasonable prices, or through any failure of the system of competitive bidding for lots to attract particular types of new industry which would contribute to the expansion and diversification of our economy.

The Government has been examining its industrial land policy and we conclude that some revision may be desirable.

You may recall that in December of last year I indicated that the Government had decided to make some sites available for special industries for sale on a restricted user basis. The first such site on Tsing Yi Island was sold in April of this year. Several other sites may be sold on this basis in the near future.

The shortage of land for private development is apparent. A determined search has therefore been made for large blocks of unformed land that could be made available quickly for private development. The Secretary for Environment will be explaining the results later in the debate.

For the rest there is not so much an absolute shortage of land as lack of access communications that make land attractive to developers. It is aga-inst this background that we are pressing on with a second tunnel to Shatin, and a motorway to Castle Peak, and both in due course will open up other substantial areas for development, as will the new bridge to Tsing Yi Island, in itself a monument to the far-sightedness of our entrepreneurs. But of course the greatest untouched land asset at present is Lantau. Even if, as I think should bo the case, the bulk of this large island were reserved for recreation purposes there is ample room for badly needed additional sites for industry and residential development. It is against this background that we arc once more investigating the possibility of constructing a bridge.

/Urban Council ••••••

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Urban Council

The now-style Urban Council has now been inaugurated under a now Ordinance and with full financial autonomy.

Might I say what a happy event this was for all of us, and how much we wish the Council success in its very important work. Keep Hong Kong Clean Campaign

I should like to say a separate and special word about the Keep Hong Kong Clean Campaign. It was the brain child and special responsibility of the Urban Council and the Urban Services Department, but in the end most departments of government, of course including the Police, were involved, as were very large numbers of the public. Its success was manifest. The streets became clean. 24,000 tons of the accumulated rubbish of decades was removed. In the course of it, in the urban area, no less thah 64 acres, 2.8 m. sq. ft., comprising some 137 sites were transformed from rubbish dumps into gardens and play areas. Hong Kong was the sweeter for the change. We have also all gained confidence in our ability to tackle great problems of community interest if only we organise ourselves properly and all pull together. Now our problem is to retain the ground gained.

I am delighted that this spring clean has been accompanied by great improvements to our parks, and by the planting of many new trees and shrubs in public places. I am sure that in spite of the difficulties Hong Kong can bo both clean and green.

Labour

This year I will say little myself about Labour matters, and thus leave the Secretary for Social Services to speak himself.

/Some progress ••••••

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Some progress has been made this year with industrial safety regulations, but there is a long way to go and the rate of industrial accidents remains alarmingly high.

The introduction of the Labour Tribunal, has proved an immediate success.

Tho principal piece of labour legislation we propose for this session is a major addition to the Ordinance to provide for severance payments to workers whose services are terminated through no fault of their own.

Before leaving the subject of labour, I would like to apologise for the delay in setting up the Hong Kong Training Council, to continue the valuable work started by its predecessor, tho Industrial Training Advisory Committee. The Council is now established and faces a major challenge.

I am sure that it will meet it.

New Territories

And now a word about the New Territories. I am conscious of the concern of some Honourable Members that the Government should be more even handed as between the urban areas and the New Territories in the programmes it undertakes. This concern reflects the views of the Heung Yee Kuk.

The large social programmes, housing, education, medical services and social welfare, will of course benefit the New Territories as much as, or even more tlian the old urban areas, and will contribute substantially to the standard of life and amenities in the New Territories.

/But the

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But the rural areas of the New Territories present a special problem. In them, in particular, we are faced with the phenomenon of rural slums. Their elimination involves complex problems because of the mix of small factories, pig, poultry and vegetable farms and residential huts that comprise them. A pilot scheme is now being worked out for the development of an area near Yuen Long.

Last year I mentioned that there wrs a requirement for better housing in the rural New Territories. What is needed on present assessments is, additional, decent housing for something like 250, (XX). Work on the planning of the necessary rural estates has started, but it will be one or two years before the first of them is ready for occupation. As an interim step, attention is being paid to improving the conditions in the rural areas wherever possible. Examples of these measures are the two new housing estates, financed mainly by charitable donations from U.S.A, and Canada, and opened this year at Cheung Chau and Sai Kung; the new small-house policy introduced at the end of last year; the planned provision of over a thousand items of small public works over the next three years: and the doubling of cleansing and sanitation staff over the last three years.

I should add that in reorganising the machinery of Government it was always accepted that once the new Secretaries were in position, it would be necessary to adjust the position and status of the District Commissioner to ensure that the special requirements of the Now Territories were to receive the consideration they deserved. We expect to make an announcement about this before Mr. Bray’s successor takes over.

Gambling ••••••••

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Gambling

There has been considerable public discussion about our present laws on gambling and the view has been expressed that these laws are too restrictive, are unenforceable, and should be relaxed. On the other hand, there are those who sincerely believe that changes of this nature would be harmful and that it would be wrong for Government to move too quickly to relax the present laws. Having considered both sides the Government has decided to make only a limited move. Legislation will be introduced to permit the Royal Hong Kong Jockey Club to extend its totalisator betting facilities on Hong Kong horse races to premises outside the Race course itself. We propose to do no more than this at the moment. Corruption

And now I come to the subject of corruption which has troubled us all so much in recent months, has been so much in the nows, and has done so much to denigrate Hong Kong in the eyes of the world.

I had been aware of suspicions of high level graft as well as of a certainty of extensive low level corruption. But I had also been impressed by the stringent provisions of the new Prevention of Bribery Ordinance.

I also was aware of the increasing efforts of the Anti-Corruption Branch of the police despite tremendous difficulties. It has of course been the practice in the United Kingdom and United Kingdom dependencies, that corruption, like other forms of crime, should be handled by the police, and that when a corrupt act is alleged against a policeman it should sti11 be investigated by policemen but from a different or a specialised unit.

/That has •••••••

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That has been the situation here, except that the Anti-Corruption Branch lias worked to the direction of a target committee largely civilian in composition. Though fully aware of the disquiet in many circles about corruption, and about the machinery we had here to deal with it, I wished time to see what results the branch could produce under the new legislation.

The escape of Chief Superintendent Godber was a shocking experience for all of us, extremely frustrating for the police who had worked so carefully and so secretly to bring him to court. There was great public disquiet about the circumstances of his escape, and this clearly called for an immediate and searching enquiry by a man of the highest calibre and public stature. But I thought that it was right to take this opportunity to charge the same man with reporting also on the workings of our anti-corruption laws and the machinery to enforce them, and thus provide an authoritative and dispassionate view of our situation as a basis for action. This has been done, and I should like to congratulate Sir Alastair Blair-Kerr on the thorough and forthright way he has performed this considerable public service, with a minimum of soft soap and a maximum of objectivity. Both his reports have been published in full. The public had a right to know, but in any case when something has gone wrong the air is usually soonest cleared by frank acknowledgement of the facts.

After Godber1s escape two things quickly became apparent. The first was that suspicion of corruption on a more extensive scale was bettersgrounded than I had personally realised. The second was that the men responsible for investigating and prosecuting corruption felt that in spite of the new tooth in the Prevention of Bribery Ordinance, they still lacked the legal weapons

/and to •••••••

Wednesday, October 17, 1973

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and to some extent other facilities necessary to get the results they and the public wanted and the situation required. These points have now been substantiated in Sir Alastair Blair-Kerr’s report.

This calls for new measures.

With regard to legal weapons, on the advice of the Executive Council, the Government generally accepts the objectives of Sir Alastair’s recommendations. They are being examined in detail in consultation vzith the Forei^i and Commonwealth Office, Clearly such drastic changes in established principles of law must be looked at very carefully indeed. We hope that legislation can be introduced shortly before Council. Where appropriate* discussions with the main staff associations will be held as some of the changes suggested to civil service regulations will be controversial and staff associations will, rigntly, seek to protect the interests of their members* But I am sure that the service as a whole will accept that grave situations coll for unusual measures, and that honest officers, the huge majority* have nothing to fear and indeed everything to gain.

Sir Alastair left open the question whether the unit to investigate corruption should continue to be part of the police or not. But he implied a personal preference for separation. It is no criticism of the police, or of the devoted work of the Anti^Corruption Branch, to say that I agree with him.

/I believe **••«.

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I believe that it is quite wrong, in the special circumstances of Hong Kong, that the police, as a force, should carry the whole responsibility for action in this difficult and elusive field. In the past this responsibility has carried with it for many, the implication that the existence of corruption was the fault of the police. As we all know it is nothing of the sort. Outside the public service it is a widespread social problem, and inside it corruption exists in several departments of which the police is only one. Moreover I think .the situation calls for an organization, led by men of high rank and status, which can devote its whole time to the eradication of this evil.

A further and conclusive argument is that public confidence is very much involved. Clearly the public would have more confidence in a unit that was entirely independent, and separate from any department of the Government, including the police.

’./e have therefore decided, on the advice of the Executive Council, to set up a separate Anti-Corruption Commission under a civilian Commissioner. My intention is that the latter’s independence should be established by his position being apart from the civil service in the same way as that of a judge or, say, the Chairman of the Public Services Commission.

He will have under him an operations ^nit and what I might cal 1 a .civil or preventive section. The operations unit will in due course take over the functions of the Anti-Corruption Branch of the police.

Its staff will be selected by the Commissioner for Anti-Corruption and his Director of Operations.

/Combatting •••••••

Wednesday, October 17, 1973

- 25 -

Combatting corruption will not just be a matter of investigation and prosecution. As Sir Alastair has pointed out, there is much history behind corruption in Hong Kong and deeply ingrained attitudes are involved. The Commissioner will therefore have a civil unit whose main task will lie in educating the public as to the evils of corruption not only from the point of view of the recipient but also from that of the giver. It ’ will also critically examine administrative procedures which lend themselves to corrupt practices.

To combat corruption, good laws and good organization are essential, but I put my trust principally in the services of sound men.

Tae Commissioner will be Mr. Cater, I hope his appointment will commend itself to Honourable Members. I believe him to be uniquely qualified to do the job. The Commissioner, like the Chairman of the Public Services Commission, will have access to the Governor whenever he wishes. I need scarcely say that I will take a very close personal interest in the development of this Commission.

Might I take this opportunity to say how intensely I appreciate the public spirit of the Telephone Company, and in particular of the Chairman, Dr. Lee, in releasing Mr. Cater from his contract, at very great inconvenience to themselves, to allow him to undertake this service to Hong Kong.

We have taken very careful advice from the Overseas Police Adviser to the Secretary of State and others on what outside help we should enlist to get the operations unit of the Commission off to a good start, and build it up into the higiily expert, effective and dedicated organization that it must be if it is to make headway. In the light of this advice we are appointing immediately Mr. John Prendergast to be Director of Operations. His record /as a................................................................

Wednesday, October 17, 1973

- 26 -

as a pdiceoan is one of unbroken success in many different situations, and he has the advantage of experience of Hong Kong between 19&0 and 1966 as Director Special Branch. In due course we will be appointing one or two more from United Kingdom police forces, at different levels, with special experience of anti-corruption work. But these are all the importations we have in mind. Basically it is for us in Hong Kong to put our own house in order, and I know very well we have the men and women both inside and outside the police force to do it.

The implication of these appointments will be apparent - the Government moans business.

The calibre and experience of these men provides assurance that this is so. None are better qualified to find out the truth, and to set about carefully but inexorably eradicating this endemic disease. I have no illusions that this will be anything but a slow, long, uphill process; but everything that energy, devotion and official backing can do to achieve results will be done.

I would like to add a few more words on this subject. We here in Hong Kong ’mow the strengths as well as the weaknesses of our community, our Government and our public services. When we criticise faults here, we do so to an audience well aware also of the strengths and achievements that make up the full picture of Hong Kong. But this is not so overseas. As this matter is developing, the people of many countries will soon believe that the only thing notable about Hong Kong is its corruption.

/We know •••••••

Wednesday, October 17, 1973

- 27 -

Wo know that Hong Kong is not alone in the world in facing a ♦

problem of corruption. We know of many cities and countries much worse and many no better in Europe, America, and Asia, and which have not known the pressures under which we here have existed. I wonder what the result would be if many governments whether national or municipal, opened their most confidential files to impartial and expert scrutiny and published the results? We have done this, because we realise that there is only one way to stop people calling Hong Kong corrupt, and that is to eradicate corruption from our society. This we are determined to do.

Fugitive Offenders Act

The Godber affair has highlighted the case for amendment of the Fugitive Offenders Act, as recommended by Sir Alastair Blairs-Kerr. The requirement of double criminality is hard to understand in the case of a dependent territory, such as Hong Kong,We feel sure it was not

HjhG«*d intention in the Fugitive Offenders Act to frustrate the intention of laws approved by H.M.G. in Hong Kong.

I have represented to the Secretary of State the strong feelings on tliis subject here. This, of course, is not the only way to bring back Godber for trial. It remains only for one man to come forward and give conclusive evidence of a corrupt transaction.

/Narcotics •••••••

Wednesday, October 17i 1973

- 28 -

Narcotics

Corruption in Hong Kong is a very old story. So is narcotics addiction . But the latter is a field in which devoted and imaginative work lias boon done in Hong Kong on a wide scale by many dedicated men and women. This work is second to none in the world and has received considerable international acclaim. But one must recognize that the problem persists on a very large scale and that if we are to make headway, much more will have to be done in the future than has been possible in the past.

In attempting to reduce and eradicate this problem there appear to us to be four separate but inter-related fields in which we must make progress•

First, prevention of production and despatch to Hong Kong. This relates to the Golden Triangle and Thailand, the country from which come nearly all opium and opium derivatives consumed in Hong Kong. This is for international action.

Secondly, interception of shipment over the high seas, mostly by trawler, to international waters off Hong Kong. This too is for international action.

Thirdly, suppression of clandestine entry into Hong Kong and distribution to addicts by local criminals. This lies within our direct jurisdiction.

Fourthly, the eradication of demand by cure of addiction. This too is within our jurisdiction.

/Action on

Wednesday, October 17, 197J

- 29 -

Action on any one of these fronts assists action on others. For instance, if shipments are intercepted and the price of the drug rises, it is a strong inducement to an addict to seek a cure- But equally failure on any front undermines success on others. Thus improved treatment of drug addiction could do littlo in tho face of an abundant and cheap supply of drugs. Nor would interruption of the seaborne-traffic have much effect if abundance of production in the Golden Triangle and a strong demand in Hong Kong remained an open invitation to traffickers to bridge the gap.

As I boo it we must now work to achieve progress on nil four fronts, while making our own major effort on those within our own jurisdiction.

I said last year that the first step towards the formulation of a coherent and forceful policy was the appointment of a single senior officer, the Commissioner for Narcotics, to coordinate all aspects of this problem which are handled by so many different government departments and voluntary agencies. Over the last year his work has largely been investigatory and preparatory, critically examining what is being done in each of these fields and with what results. This phase is nearly completed, and the threads are now being drawn together in recommendations for action which are progressively coming forward. When approved these will be embodied in a White Paper to be published about the end of this year.

One decision already taken is to second a Liaison Officer to the staff of H.*I. Ambassador at Bangkok, with of course the full agreement of the Tliai Government. He will take up his duties next month. This follows visits by the Commissioner to Burma, Laos and Thailand earlier this year*

/Another relates •••••••

Wednesday, October 17, 1973

- JO -

Another relates to the organisation, coordination and control of the intensified effort we have in mind. The Executive Council has decided that the controlling body should be the Action Committee against Narcotics, and that its membership should be streamlined for this purpose. Its Chairman will bo Sir Albert Rodrigues. His experience, devotion and authority in this field are unparalleled; he is clearly the man to preside. The terms of reference of the Committee will be strengthened to make it the sole channel of advice to the Government on all policy aspects of the drive against narcotics and narcotic addiction, including the allocation of resources to Government departments and voluntary agencies alike. The Commissioner for Narcotics will be a member of the Committee and he and his staff will form the Committee’s executive arm, and provide it with the administrative muscle it has lacked hitherto.

Most distinguished work has been done in the field of cure of drug addiction by the Prisons Department, and by various voluntary agencies subsidised by the Government, and in particular SARDA, the Discharged Prisoners1 Aid Society, and other agencies. Nevertheless, we feel that further progress and greater coordination in this field is essential, and that it is the responsibility of the Government to provide a sufficient pool of expertise and authority to give a lead and to advise the Committee on how this work can be pressed forward and coordinated.

It lias therefore been decided to place responsibility for Drug Addiction Treatment and Research firmly on the Department of Medncal and Health Services, and that a new Division be formed in the Department for

/this purpose

Wednesday, October 17, 1973

- 31 -

this purpose as soon as possible. I know that Dr. Gerald Choa eagerly accepts this new challenge.

I cannot sufficiently emphasise the inportance for any programme of eradication of having a form of treatment for addicts which can be applied en masse without long confinement in an institution. The pi 1 nt schemos now being conducted by the Department of Medical and Health Services, and by the Discharged Prisoners’ Aid Association are therefore of critical importance. Dr. Choa will be expanding on this later in the debate.

Crime

I spoke at some length last year of my deep concern about the growth of crime, particularly violent crime. During the year, action has been taken on a very wide front. One might say this action has fallen under three main headings: to increase the numbers and effectiveness of police on the street! to change things done by the police to make them more helpful to the public; to change things done by the public to make them more helpful to the police and to themselves.

There is still great doubt amongst real experts as to what the root causes of crime are. But a working group has produced an ilium noting interim report on facets of life in Hong Kong that probably contribute to crime, and we await its final report with great interest. These papers suggest that certain aspects of our social programmes and certain defects in them, have more immediate relevance for the combatting of crime than others. It is extremely valuable to have these critical areas pin-pointed and the implications will be very carefully considered. Certainly it is reasonable

/to hope .......

Wednesday, October 17, 1973

- 32 -

to hope that the great programmes of improvement in housing, education and social welfare will ail help over crime — though the programmes are justified on

their own merits. But in the short term we must rely very largely on deterrence and all experts are agreed that the basic deterrent is fear of detection. Few men commit crimes .which they know will be detected.

One of the key elements in deterrence is a large and visible police presence. One of our endeavours has therefore been to increase the number of police. The Government started by a drive to expand the Auxiliaries as the quickest way of raising numbers, and because of the vital role which the Auxiliaries could play as a link between the regular police and the neighbourhoods they serve. Within a period of something like 9 months the Auxiliaries have been increased from 3,500 to 7,000 trained men. This has been a magnificent effort by all concerned.

We subsequently conducted a campaign for the recruitment of regulars. This was done following the first action phase of the Fight Violent Crime campaign, and yielded 400 acceptable recruits. While this was substantially more than load been obtained for some time in a similar drive, I think it is fair to say that the result was greatly prejudiced by the escape of Godber and the attendant publicity, which ironically coincided with the recruitment drive. Certainly we had hoped to do better. We will be mounting a further drive later this year, and as a result the police still hope to be able to recruit in 1973 about half as many again as in 1972, that is to say about 1,200. But this is still not enough, and the shortfal 1 in recruitment and wastage from the ranks must not be allowed to continue. We have therefore been looking again urgently at police pay and conditions of

• • f J .•

/service, ••••••

Wednesday, October 17, 1973

- 33 -

service, and proposals will be made to Finance Committee in a fortnight’s time. One of the most significant single contributions that could be made to increasing the deterrence to crime that the regular police force provides would be to bring it up to strength. We will do our utmost to achieve this.

To gain more uniformed officers for the beat a review lias been undertalzen of jobs which could be done by civilians. This will be a gradual, long term process, but 2 or JOO should have been gained in this way this year, and that process will continue.

Finally, in this field of recruitment, I am glad to say that the new Police Cadet School has already opened in temporary quarters in Fanling, and that plans are far advanced for the construction of the permanent school on Tolo Harbour, which will house about 1200 cadets. This is the beginning of a project of the greatest interest. Provided it develops along the right linos it could make a major contribution not only to the quantity but equally important, or even more important, to the quality of the young men joining the force.

So much for recruitment.

V7ith regard to police/public relations, the Police took a radical new look at themselves to consider ways and means of making their facilities procedures more convenient to the law-abiding public at the point of contact, reporting procedures were changed to be less time-consuming; the 999 call system was expanded; new police relations with the public via Area Committees were created, and the public’s views on current police practices sought

/and listened •••.•

and

Their

Wednesday, October 171 1973

- 3* -

and listened to. It soon became apparent that the public was anxious for a rapid expansion of a permanent police presence in estates by the construction of new stations. Though some of these were in the pipeline the building programme could not meet these wishes overnight, so the system of reporting centres was greatly expanded. We now have 43, and they are being supplemented by mobile units equipped with radio stationed at fixed points.

The public for its part set about organising itself to make the life of the criminal more difficult in various ways. By increased security in the home and the shop and the residential block; by reporting crime when seen; and by raising a hue and cry after criminals. This has been done through the excellent work of area and mutual aid committees, assisted by the City District Officers. Might I say in parenthesis what an excellent system that of the C.D.O’s has come to be, and how constantly it proves its worth.

This was backed by a strong publicity campaign.

A very large element in what was done was a maximum effort by the regular police and the Auxiliaries to deter and arrest criminals and, though tactics necessarily change from time to time, this effort is continuing and will continue.

Five months is,of coursef too short a time for decisive or permanent results to be achieved. Moreover statistical analysis is confusing because the success of the campaign in encouraging people to report crimes they would not previously have done has distorted the statistics - as we always expected

/would be

Wednesday, October 17, 1973

- 35 -

would be the case. The Secretary for Home Affairs, as Chairman of the campaign Committee, will be going into details later in the debate.

But I can say here and now that from the reports received from a very wide variety of sources, I believe we are getting to grips with the problem. The methods chosen appear to have been ones the public understand and appreciate, and they have secured the public’s cooperation and involvement on a scale and in a way that is quite new. Many people, frco all levels of society, have come forward to help, to organise and to give a load in making their neighbourhood safer. With this civilian endeavour and sustained police effort, public confidence and ease of mind lias improved. Crime was once regarded as a problem for the police alone. It is now accepted as one for the community. There is a new and healthier spirit, new determination, new hope.

So far so good. We should not be dismayed by the length of ft

the road that we still have to travel. We always knew it would be long and hard. But wo can take encouragement from having made a sound start. Now everyone, Government, Police and public, must continue as they have started, must not be deflected, and we will prevail.

I shall continue to take the closest possible personal interest in this joint effort by police and public to reduce crime. Nothing touches so intimately the ease of mind and happiness of our community.

!

The Cconony

Finally a word about the state of our economy. It is on the success of this that our future development depends. I have said in the past that the aim of this Government was prosperity with social progress. Social progress can only be based on prosperity. What then is the state of our prosperity?

/It has

Wednesday, October 17, 1973

- 36 -

It has been a year of exceptional difficulty for our exporters, our business men, our bankers and developers. Let me remind you of a few.

The rise and fall of our stock market was a sad and basically very dangerous phenomenon which has left deep scars. It would have brought a less robust economy to its knees. There was an immediate loss of confidence in the market both local and international, and this is only gradually recovering, I think all investors are agreed that in this instance laissez-faire has produced excessive risks both for individuals and for Hong Kong, and I am sure that the introduction of disciplines having the force of law is an essential step on the road to full recovery.

I should like to express my thanks for the devoted work of the Securities Advisory Council under the very able chairmanship of Mr. Y.H. Kan, and also of Mr. Selwyn, the Commissioner for Securities. The draft legislation which is the fruit of their labours will be placed before this Council very shortly. No doubt Honourable Members will wish to look closely at the

details. It would be surprising if there were not room for improvement in

such massive drafts. But with the safeguards that legislation can provide

for investors and with market values bearing a much more attractive price

earnings ratio, and with good prospects for growth in the economy, I think we can look forward to brighter days ahead. It is clear from what has been said to me in the City of London and by visiting financiers, that while the phenomenon of the rise and fall was a temporary deterrent to overseas investors, the fact that the economy has been able to weather such a shock has made a very favourable impression.

/I note .......

Wednesday, October 'I?, 1973

- 37 -

I note that the steady stream of Merchant Banks setting up in Hong Kong continues and this is a fair indication of international estimates of the importance and soundness of Hong Kong as a regional financial centre.

But it is the rise in prices which is now causing most immediate concern to all of us. The plain fact of the matter is that the world is going through a particularly inflationary phase, and Hong Kong cannot insulate itself from it.

This world inflationary trend has coincided with a significant rise in the prices being charged for imported foodstuffs. This is partly a result of world grain shortages, partly the exceptional climatic conditions of this summer in Hong Kong and South China, and partly due to new pricing policies which have brought the price of perishable foodstuffs in Hong Kong to levels comparable with prices elsewhere in the world. We must face the fact that those who sell us their goods are just as entitled to charge the going rate for them as we are entitled to do the same for our exports.

In this situation we will of course watch closely to see whether the prices of foodstuffs not subject to normal international competition get out of line with prices elsewhere. We can eliminate artificial restrictions on the source of supply of food and this we have done in the case of rice. To some extent we can discourage exploitation of the uncertainties of the food market by excessive mark-up, and this too has been done in the case of rice. The rise in prices should encourage an increase in domestic supplies of produce and this in time may help. But basically, we are in the

/grip of

Wednesday, October 17, 1973

- 38 -%

grip of a world shortage of commodities and we can only hope that forecasts of the easing of this trend will prove correct.

The main contribution the Government can make towards containing inflationary trends is through its social policies: cheap subsidised housing for those least able to afford commercial rents, and the control of rents themselves; free primary education, and heavily subsidised secondary and tertiary education; social services and relief for the handicapped and destitute, and charges for medical care which are so subsidised as to be almost free•

Inevitably the rise in prices will tend to £ut pressure on wages. In considering the effect on our competitive position, what has happened elsewhere is relevant; and you will appreciate that our competitors have not been confronted with the same rise in prices of perishable foodstuffs due to climatic conditions that we have. It is true that the trend has sharply increased recently, but a study of comparable figures elsewhere shows that up to May, which is the last month for which we have a complete set, the rate of inflation in Hong Kong was no worse than elsewhere - and I refer both to our competitors and our markets. This is not at all to say that present prices here do not press hard upon the population, or that in the last months the comparative trend may not have been against us.

Apart from rising prices two other major problems have beset the economy during the past year. One has been international currency instability. This has created many difficulties for our manufacturers and traders, particularly sine’e so much of our trade has always been transacted in US dollars and sterling. I wish that it were possible for me to suggest that international currency stability is near at hand, but it seems clear

/that

Wednesday, October 17, 1973

- 39 -

that uncertainties will continue for some time to come, and that there is nothing which we can do about it. Meanwhile there is evidence of our own currency maintaining its strength.

Today I can add little on the problem of our sterling holdings and the unilateral offer of a 6-month guarantee announced by Her Majesty’s Government aimed at stabilising the market. As a major holder the Hong Kong Government of course has a very strong interest in the stability of sterling, and friendly exchanges continue with the Treasury about what we might do in our own and the general interest.

Another major problem for our manufacturers has been a world-wide general shortage of raw materials. I have been impressed by the tremendous efforts ma.de by our importers. The trading and industrial organisations also have played a most helpful role in seeking out raw material sources, whilst the Commerce and Industry Department has assisted with official representations and coordination of effort.

A further difficulty looms ahead in the obligation of the British Government, as from the 1st January, to make its first move towards harmonization with the common external tariff of the E.E.C. Under the accession arrangements, which involved the exclusion of textiles and footwear from Hong Kong in the extension to Hong Kong of E.E.C. generalised preferences this would involve progressive discrimination by Great Britain against Hong Kong in respect of these products. Of course the other side of this coin is that this was the price paid by the negotiators to obtain acceptance by the E.E.C. of Hong Kong*s inclusion in all other generalised preferences.

/Nevertheless

Wednesday, October 17, 1973

- 40 -

Nevertheless we find this development a most disquieting one, and we have left Her Majesty’s Government in no doubt as to the strength of our feeling on this subject in Hong Kong. We regard this issue as an open one on which adjustments could and should be sought in the course of annual reviews.

Against this background of so many difficulties it is encouraging that the value of our domestic exports alone in the first eight months of this year was 21% up in value on the same eight months of 1972, and let us remember that this is an export-led economy. Even allowing for inflation of values, it was a remarkable result. It would appear that real as the difficulties have been, they have affected different sectors in different ways and to different degrees. Some exporters have found their expansion slowed down by export restraints, for instance in the United States. Others have found increased opportunities in other markets or in other lines. Our business with the E.E.C. has substantially increased, and there are prospects of a more liberal attitude towards imports in Japan. Similarly, changes in international parities have brought loss in some markets, but opened up new opportunities in others. Making allowance for such shifting patterns of light and shade I find the general picture, the picture that affects Hong Kong as a whole, an encouraging one. It is remarkable that in the face of so many problems and uncertainties expansion should still have continued. This gives solid ground for hope that the ingenuity of our exporters and their labour force, the hard—headedness of our official negotiators, and the sheer demand for Hong Kong’s goods can continue to combine to ensure the expansion of our economy.

/And so, ••••••

i

Wednesday, October 17, 1973

- 41 -

And so, Honourable Members, it is on this cautiously bullish note that I end this year’s address. We have had our measure of problems, and not unnaturally it is these that have tended to hold public attention. But insofar as they have been economic Hong Kong has managed to hold its way through them and maintain its expansion. And for the future the Financial Secretary confidently predicts an annual growth rate of the Gross domestic product in real terms of 7# - a remarkable figure. Insofar as our problems have been social or administrative I have explained what we have done or intend to so, find have told you of such progress as has been made.

We all welcome the progressive relaxation of international tensions in tliis area, the product of realistic statesmanship. We welcome in particular the new relationship between the United Kingdom and China, and tho prospect of the Prine Minister’s visit to Peking in January.

If all these different portents hold up I am tolerably confident that the year ahead will be one of the prosperity and social progress to which your Government is committed.

-------0---------

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Thursday, October 18, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No.

Most TV sets will be able to receive wireless transmission without change in aerials......• • • •..........................  • 1

Survey on child-parent relationship.........• • •......••••••••••• 3

Industrial safety seminar for management representatives ........... 4

Labour Advisory Board elections.........................• • •...... 5

Section of Hay Road to re-open on Saturday • •..........5

Health report for September ....................................... 6

Four Urbco Members to meet Under-Secretary of State ............... 7

Entertainment for the elderly in Sau Mau Ping ••••••............... 8

Water interruption in Tsuen Wan.................................... 8

Mail delivery to Middle East disrupted............................. 9

Director of Fire Services attending Fire Chiefs’ conference in U.S.A.............................................................. 9

Additional passenger trains on Sundays and holidays................ 10

Traffic re-routing in Marsh Road................••••••••••••••••••» 11

Sanitary measures against arrivals from certain ports lifted ••••• 11

Press Conference tomorrow on new Bill.............................. 12

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Thursday, October 18, 1973

HOST TV SETS TO RECEIVE WIRELESS TRANSMISSION

About 70 per cent of all television viewers will be able to receive the existing wireless service and the two new stations when they come ”on air”, without change to their aerials or equipment, the Commissioner for Television and Films, Mr. N.J.V. Watt, said today.

Addressing a luncheon meeting of the Rotary Club of Hong Kong Island South, Mr. Watt said this was made possible because the government’s approved frequency plan had grouped the main transmitters of all three television stations together in Band IV — close to TVB’s existing main transmitter frequencies.

The outlying district transmitters of all stations were similarly grouped close together for ease of reception on a single aerial, he said, although inexpensive new aerials might have to be installed.

This was achieved after seven separate frequency plans had been carefully considered by the government with the help of specialised engineers from overseas.

f*Throughout, the guiding policy has been the convenience of the viewing public,” he stressed.

Mr. Watt said one problem brought about by this combined frequency plan was that TVB had to alter their secondary frequencies to provide- space for the other two stations, and the necessary equipment would take a few months to install.

/But the

*

e Thursday, October 18, 1973

- 2 -

But the government, together with the television companies, had found a means of bringing one of Rediffusion Television’s main transmitters on air before TVB clears the required channels.

As a result, Mr. Watt said, the Chinese language service of Rediffusion could expect to begin transmission this December. This would be followed by the opening of their English channel probably a few months later, while the third Chinese channel run by Commercial Television would come into operation in July 1975.

Turning to the question of wired television sets after Rediffusion Television closes down its wired services on November 1, Mr. Watt gave an assurance that all dual-purpose sets would be able to receive all the new wireless television transmissions,although sets previously used only for wired reception would have to be modified at a small cost.

He said Rediffusion Television had been importing only dual-purpose sets since 19$ 3 and ’’unless you have a ten year old wired set you have no real problem”.

Mr,. Watt added: ”If you are one of the very few who have the very old set (405 line only set) you will have to replace it with one capable of receiving wireless television signals on 625 lines in Bands IV and V, that is channels 21-59 on the tuning knob. ”

Note to Editors: Copies of the full text of Mr. Watt’s speech

(in English only) are boxed for collection.

-------0---------

/3..........

Thursday, October 18, 1973

- 3 -

STUDY ON CHILDREN’S ATTITUDES TOWARDS THEIR PARENTS

******

The Tai Hang Tung Community Centre is conducting a survey among children in the Tai Hang Tung Estate to find out what their attitudes are towards their parents.

Miss Lilian Wong, the Warden of the Centre, said the study would provide information on such matters as relationship between children and parents^ parental care and family educational backgrounds among others.

Sone 1,000 children or about ten per cent of the children population in the estate have been chosen for this study. The survey, through interviews in schools and welfare agencies in the district, is being carried out by a team of 30 youth volunteers.

The study including the analysis of data collected is expected to be completed by the end of this month.

Miss Wong said the need for such a study was apparent because the number of working parents in Hong Kong had greatly increased over the past ten years.

Because parents are working, they do not have enough time for their children who are left to themselves at home or to wander the streets, she said.

"While some mothers are not employed outside, they would still engage in home industries neglecting the care, love and concern for their children. Poor educational background and living environment also affect their roles as parents."

/Concern........

Thursday, October 18, 1973

- li -

Concern about this neglect has been voiced by educationalists., civic and kaifong leaders in the district, she added#

"The data and facts collected in this survey will help to throw some light on the behaviour, needs and other problems of these children# We will then be able to gear our programmes to help and guide them and their parents as well," Miss Wong said#

--------0---------

SAFETY SEMINAR

******

Note to Editors: The Commissioner of Labour, Mr. I.R# Price, will

officiate at the opening ceremony of the one-day safety seminar at the Mandarin Hotel tomorrow (Friday) from 9#3O a#m. to 5*00 p#m#

The seminar - organised by the Chinese Manufacturersf Association - will be attended by some 80 management representatives from 55 industrial establishments#

--------0---------

Thursday, October 18, 1973

- 5 -

LABOUR ADVISORY BOARD ELECTION

*********

Mr. Leung Tat-shing of Urban Services Department Kowloon Workers General Union and Mr. Lee Shing-chu of Hong Kong Stevedores Union (Chap Yin) v/ere today elected as workers* representatives to be appointed by the Governor as members of the Labour Advisory Board for the year 197^«

The election - held by secret ballot at the regional office of the Labour Department at New Rodney Block, Queensway - was supervised by officers of the Labour Department.

The Board is a non-statutory body to advise the Commissioner of Labour on such matters affecting labour, including legislation and International Labour Organisation Conventions and Recommendations. It is composed of four employers’ representatives and four workers’ representatives, with the Commissioner of Labour as Chairman.

Two of the workers’ representatives are elected by registered trade unions and two are selected for appointment by the Governor.

-------0---------

MAY ROAD RE-OPENING SHORTLY

*«***«*»«

The section of May Road, which was closed to vehicular traffic following a landslide early last month, will be re-opened to one-way westbound traffic on Saturday (October 20) at 7 a.m.

At the same time, Tregunter Path will also be re-routed back to one-way westbound traffic from May Road to Old Peak Road.

-------0---------

/6.........

Thursday, October 18, 1973

- 6 -

HEALTH REPORT FOR SEPTEMBER

******

There were 73 notifications of measles during September, but no deaths from the disease, according to monthly health returns issued by the Medical and Health Department today.

These figures contrast markedly with the statistics for August, when 101 cases of measles were recorded, and five deaths.

A spokesman for the department said the September measles’ position was “encouraging,” but he warned that there was ”no room for complacency, and any relaxation of vigilance could lead to an epidemic of the disease.”

He urged parents with susceptible children between six months and five years to have them immunised. Vaccine was free and available at al1 government maternity and.child health centres.

The latest statistics brought the total number of measles’ notifications to 602 so far this year, and 11 deaths. In 1972, there were 783 notifications and nine deaths.

Of the 81 deaths recorded during September, tuberculosis accounted for 79 aad typhoid fever for two.

There were two cases of scarlet fever, -one of meningococcal meningitis, 39 typhoid, one of paratyphoid, and 24 of bacillary dysentery. There were no reports of diphtheria or poliomyelitis.

During the month, Hong Kong remained free from cholera and other quarantinable diseases.

-------0---------

/7.........

Thursday, October 18, 1973

URBCO MEMBERS TO MEET MR. ROYLE

********

Four Urban Councillors will have lunch in London next Monday with Mr. Anthony Royle, Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs.

The Councillors, Mr. Henry H.L. Hu, Mr. Kenneth T.C.Lo, Dr. Denny Huang and Mr. Peter P.K. Ng, leave Hong Kong on Saturday (October 20) for a 10-day working visit to Britain.

Before lunching with Mr. Royle they will hold talks at the Commonwealth Office and call on Sir Duncan Watson, the Superintending Under-Secretary in charge of the Hong Kong and Indian Ocean Department of the Foreign and Commonwealth Office.

On Tuesday the Councillors will have talks with Sir Robin Vanderfelt, general secretary of the Commonwealth Parliamentary Association, and have lunch with the Royal Commonwealth Society.

In the afternoon they will make working visits to the Hong Kong Government Office and the Hong Kong Students* Centre, and later have dinner with the Hong Kong Commissioner, Mr. A.M.J. Vright.

During the following two days the Councillors will see the workings of the Greater London Council and the Hammersmith Borough Council, and inspect housing projects.

They will have lunch with the Anglo-Hong Kong Parliamentary Group and dinner with Sir Duncan Watson.

Next they will visit the Port of London Authority Headquarters and the Tilbury Container Terminal. After the weekend they will visit Bristol.

On Tuesday (October 30)» the four Councillors will be guests at the State Opening of Parliament. They leave the following day to return to Hong Kong.

-------o--------- /8..........

Thursday, October 18, 1973

- 8 -

SERVICES FOR THE ELDERLY IN SAU MAU PING *********

A dance party will be held at the Kwun Tong Community Centre on Saturday (October 20) to raise funds to finance entertainment programmes for elderly people in the Sau Mau Ping area.

The function has been organised by the Sau Mau Ping (South) Estate Community Work Office of the Social Welfare Department and other welfare agencies in the district.

One of the regular programmes min by the office for the elderly is a social gathering which takes place every Tuesday afternoon from J p.m. to 6 p.m. at the Estate Welfare Building. Activities at the gathering include games, tea parties, observational visits and picnics.

"These activities involve youth volunteers in long term service to help elderly people and also create a better working relationship among the local agencies," said Mr. Wong King-tong, Warden of Kwun Tong Community Centre•

-------0---------

WATER CUT

********

Water supply to a number of premises in Tsuen Wan will be interrupted for five hours, starting from 1 a.m. on Saturday (October 20) to facilitate a test for leakage in the area.

The area affected is bounded by Texaco Road, Tai Wo Hau Road, Tai Wo Hau Estate Blocks 1 and 12-20, and Asbury Methodist Cottage Area.

-------0---------

/9........................................

Thursday, October 18, 1973

- 9 -

MAIL SERVICES TO MIDDLE EAST DISRUPTED

*********

The Postmaster General announced today that it is no longer possible to accept surface letters and parcels to Egypt f Israel and Syria’ due to the disruption to shipping services to the Middle East.

He also warned that although mail for other countries in the Middle East will continue to be accepted, these may be subject to delay.

’’Since the shipping services scheduled to carry Christmas mail to the Middle East are affected, the published latest posting dates cannot be maintained,” he said.

- - - - 0--------

II.K. REPRESENTED AT FIRE CHIEFS’ CONFERENCE

**********

The Director of Fire Services, Mr. A.E.H. Wood, left today (Thursday) to attend the International Fire Chiefs’ Conference which is being held in Baltimore, U.S.A.

The annual meeting of this world wide body examines developments in fire prevention, fire protection and fire extinction. Experts from a variety of technical disciplines will also present papers on various subjects which are of interest to fire authorities throughout the world.

Mr. Wood will return next Sunday (October 28).

-------0---------

/10.........

Thursday, October 18, 1973

- 10 -

SPECIAL PASSENGER TRAINS CN SUNDAY

*********

The Kowloon-Canton Railway will operate special passenger train services on Sundays and public holidays as from this Sunday (October 21) to cope with an expected increase in commuters.

There will be five special up trains and a similar number of down trains — four of them plying between Kowloon and Tai Po Market and the other between Kowloon and the University.

Of the four up trains running between Kowloon and Tai Po Market, three will leave at 9*49 a.m., 10.57 a.m. and 12.05 p.m. They will pick up passengers en route. The other, which leaves at 3*39 p.m., will not pick up commuters on the way, neither will the special train leaving for the University at 5«31 p.m.

As for the down trains, four will leave Tai Po Market at 10.46 a.m., 11.54 a.m., 1.06 p.m. and 4.31 p.m. while the other will leave the University at 6.30 p.m.

The times for the special trains are subject to change without notice. Additional trains will also be provided in the late evening should circumstances warrant.

-------- 0 ------

/11

Thursday, October 18, 1973

- 11 -

TRAFFIC RE-ARRANGEMENTS IN WANCHAI

*******

Temporary traffic arrangements will be introduced in Wanchai for about one week to enable drainage work to be carried out in the area.

Starting from 10 a.m. tomorrow (Friday) the section of Marsh Road from Lockhart Road to Jaffe Road will be closed to north-bound traffic.

At the same tine, the west side of Marsh Road between Gloucester Road and Jaffe Road will be used for two-way traffic.

A passing bay will be provided in front of houses Mos. 7, 9 and 11, Marsh Road.

Appropriate traffic signs will be erected to guide motorists and pedestrians. --------------------------------------0--------- SANITARY MEASURES

*******

Sanitary measures imposed against arrivals from Bombay and fourteen Indonesian ports because of cholera have been withdrawn, the Port Health Authority announced today.

The Indonesian ports are Pontianak, Pasuruan, Samarinda, Sabang, 9 .. 9

Pangkalpintuig, Palembang, Pakanbaru, Merauke, Manokwari, Manado, Donggala, Djambi, Belitung, Balikpapan. --------------------------------------0---------

/12..........

Thursday, October 18, 1973

PRESS CONFERENCE ON NEW BILL

******

Note to Editors: The Acting Commissioner of Rating and Valuation,

ilr. T.F. Edwards will meet the press tomorrow (Friday) to explain the provisions of the new Landlord and Tenant (Consolidation) (Amendment) Bill.

The Bill will be published in the gazette tomorrow Press, radio and television representatives are requested to be in the G.I.S. 16 mm theatre on the 5th floor, Beaconsfield House not later than 3«3O p.m. for the press conference.

Release time: 7<30 p.m.

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Friday, October 19 j 1973

CONTENTS

Pago No*

All existing domestic premises protected under new rent control scheme •••••••••••.••............................. 1

Tighter controls on excessive emission of industrial waste •• 4

Children’s fair to be held in Tsuen Wan on Sunday............ 5

Appointment of Director of Home Affairs...................... 6

Management and workers urged to join government in preventing industrial accidents • ••....•••••»••••..................... 8

Private closed circuit television systems to be exempt from licensing..............••»•••*«••••«•••«•••••••••••••••••••••• 11

Immigration assistants reminded of their responsibilities ••• 14

Shopowners warned against false advertisement salesmen •••••• 15

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong. Tel: 5-233191

Friday, October 19, 1973

- 1 -

NEW RENT CONTROL SCHEME.

All Existing Post-War Flats Protected *********

All existing post-war domestic premises, regardless of their rateable value, are to be provided security of tenure up to the end of November 197$ •

At the same time, to encourage private developers to contribute as much as possible to the overall housing programme, tenancies in new buildings certified for occupation after the enactment of new control legislation will not be subject to control.

Certain other types of tenancies, such as those held from the Hong Kong Housing Authority, the Hong Kong Housing Society and the Hong Kong Model Housing Society, are also excluded.

Details of the new control legislation are set out in the Landlord and Tenant (Consolidation) (Amendment) (No»2) Bill, published in today’s gazette.

Under its provisions, landlords and tenants are free to negotiate any increase in rents by agreement at any time.

Otherwise the landlord is only permitted to increase the rent by a fair amount not exceeding 21 per cent one year after the last-increase or after the commencement of the tenancy if the premises are let before the enactment of the legislation; or two years from the date of tenancy if the premises are let after the enactment.

Such an increase will control the rent at the new figure for a period of two years, even if the period should extend beyond November 197o, after the legislation expires.

/The amount .......

Friday, October 19, 1973

2 -

The amount of increase, other than that privately agreed between the landlord and the tenantfwill be determined by the Commissioner of Rating and Valuation on application by the landlord for a certificate.

The increase will be the difference between the existing rent and the fair market rent divided by the factor five, but not exceeding 21 per cent of the existing rent.

For example:

(1) Fair Market Rent Existing Rent $900 per month excluding rates

$600 11 ft 11 If

Difference $300 4- 5 = $60 - — permitted increase

(2) Fair Market Rent Existing Rent Difference $1,400 per month 3600 " " $800 4- 5 = $160 excluding rates n n

But 21 per cent of the existing rent (3600) is 3126. The permitted increase is 8126.

The fair market rent will be that considered to be reasonable at the time, talcing all relevant rental information into consideration.

The landlord of premises not let on the date of enactment of the legislation will be able to negotiate freely a rent with his tenant. The rent of premises re-let after the enactment will however be limited to the fair market rent as assessed by the Commissioner.

For subtenants, the rate of rent increase will generally follow that paid by the principal tenant but again cannot exceed 21 per cent of the existing rent except by agreement.

/However, ......

Friday, October 19, 197J

- 3 -

However, the full amount of rates increase if any may be passed on to tenants and sub-tenants.

The landlord may apply to the District Court to repossess the premises if lie wants to house himself or his immediate family or if he intends to rebuild it.

3ut he will only be able to obtain possession for his own use if he has become the landlord before the legislation is enacted.

In such cases where the premises are to revert to the use of the landlord or his immediate family, the court must be satisfied that no greater hardship to the tenant would be caused by granting the application.

Once the premises have been regained, other than for rebuilding, the landlord will not be allowed to sell or let the premises within two years unless he has obtained the consent of the court.

Ilie former tenant can also recover compensation for loss or damage if he lias regained the premises by mis-representation or concealment of

X material facts.

The amending Bill, if passed, will replace the "rent freeze" legislation introduced last June and the provisions of the Rent Increases (Domestic Promises) Control Ordinance which has been incorporated as Part II of the principal ordinance.

-------0---------

A..........

Friday, October 19, 1973

TOUGHER CONTROLS OK SMOKE POLLUTION

*******^**

Hore stringent controls are to be exercised over the emission of dust or grit from industrial furnaces, ovens, flues and chimneys.

These are provided in a new set of regulations - the Clean Air (Restriction and Measurement of Smoke Emission) Regulations 1973 -published in today’s gazette. The regulations will come into effect on January 1, 197^-

The regulations will apply to all premises where liquid oil, solid fuel, gas, electricity or other fuels are used which give rise to the emission of dust, grit or smoke.

The Assistant Commissioner of Labour, Mr. David Lin explained that if grit and dust emitted from any industrial plant was found to be in excess of the statutory limits, the occupier would be liable to a fine of -?5,000 plus a daily fine of 550 if the offence continued.

"An occupier who is given 60 days notice will have to install specified sampling points on his premises to enable officers from the Labour Department to take samples of dust or grit and to measure the density of smoke,” he said.

,:The occupier will also have to ensure safe access to the sampling points and to keep them in good conditions.”

Section five of the regulations sets a fine of 55,000 for the use of liquid fuel with a viscosity exceeding 120 seconds Redwood No. 1, unless the occupier has obtained prior permission from the Commissioner of Labour.

/’•Permission

Friday, October 19, 1973

- 5 -*

• ’’Permission would only be granted if the Commissioner is satisfied that the use of such fuel would not result in the emission of dark smoke,” Mr. Lin said.

He added that most likely domestic premises and restaurants would not be affected by this particular section because the liquid fuels commonly used on such premises were kerosene, gas oil or diesel fuel oil, which had a viscosity well below 120 seconds Redwood No. 1.

-------0---------

FUN FAIR FOR TSUEN WAN CHILDREN

*********

A day of fun and games has been planned for hundreds of children in Tsuen Wan on Sunday (October 21) at the Social Welfare Department’s Princess Alexandra Community Centre.

The fair will be held under the auspices and on the initiative of the ChiJ dren Members Council - the co-ordinating body of all children groups of the Centre.

Mr. Alexander Fung, Warden of the Centre, said the children members had been given a free hand in organizing the programmes.

The fun fair will last from 2.50 to 5.30 p.m. in the afternoon.

Note to Editors: Reporters and photographers are welcome to

cover the function.

-------0---------

/6........

Friday, October 1% 1973

- 6 -

ERIC HO APPOINTED DIRECTOR OF HOME AFFAIRS *******

The appointment of Mr. E.P. Ho as Director of Home Affairs is announced in today’s government gazette.

He will head the Home Affairs Department, which includes the City District Offices.

The change in title of the Secretariat of Home Affairs follows the recent re—organisation of the Colonial Secretariat as a result of which the Secretary for Home Affairs now heads the Home Affairs and Information Branch of the Colonial Secretariat, but is no longer responsible for the everyday management of the department.

Mr. Ho has had a long and distinguished career in the public service, having served in a number of senior posts in various government departments. His last post was in the Commerce and Industry Department, where he recently acted as Director for some six months.

Born in Hong Kong, Mr. Ho received his early schooling in St. Joseph’s College until the outbreak of the war. In 19^+6, he won the government’s scholarship to the University of Hong Kong where be obtained a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1950*

On graduation, he was selected for training under the Colonial Welfare and Development Scheme and underwent three years’ training with the Board of Inland Revenue, London.

/He.........

Friday, October 1% 1973

- 7 -

He returned to Hong Kong in 195^ and joined the Inland Revenue Department as an Assessor• Since then he has served as Assistant Secretary of the then Secretariat for Chinese Affairs; Assistant Secretary, Colonial Secretariat; Assistant Financial Secretary; Assistant Director of the Agriculture and Fisheries Department; and Deputy Director of the Commerce and Industry Department.

-Q Editors: Copies of Mr. Ho’s photograph are distributed

separately in the GIS Press boxes.

-------0---------

Friday, October 19, 1973

- 3 -

ONE WORKER INJURED EVERY SEVEN MINUTES

EMPLOYERS URGED TO JOIN GOVT IN PREVENTING ACCIDENTS

*******

One person in Hong Kong is now being injured at work every seven or eight minutes throughout the working day, the Commissioner of Labour, Mr. I.R. Price, said today.

’’During the average working day, there will be some 80 such accidents, some horrifyingly severe-in-the-mutilation they will cause he said, ’’and almost certainly, one’will kill.”

Mr. Price was officially opening a one-day safety seminar organised by the Chinese Manufacturers Association and attended by 80 management representatives from 55 leading Hong.Kong firms.

He said this accident rate was taking an incalculable toll in human suffering, and leaving Hong Kong industry and commerce with a staggering damage bill each year-.

Last year, he said, people were killed and 29,350 injured at work. The total cost to management of the accidents was well over S200 million.

Mr. Price called on management and workers to form a united front with the government to fight to prevent accidents at work*

He said that in the past, the Labour Department had been fighting almost a lone battle in the field of industrial safety.

’’Employers, managers and workers have looked too much to intervention by government, and too little to their own interests, responsibilities and possible efforts,” he said.

/”The only *••••*

Friday, October 19, 1973

- 9 -

"The only way in which the accident rates can be reduced is for top management to take a closer interest in this important matter and to ensure that all levels of employees, supervisors and managers are properly instructed in accident prevention."

He emphasised that the promotion of safety was an important function of good management. "Accidents do not just happen," he said. "They are caused by unsafe acts." In fact 85 per cent of all so-calle.d "accidents” resulted from acts which could have been prevented.

Mr. Price said too few managers had seriously tried to assess the total problem of accidents in their firms, and to identify the underlying causes and quantify the costs.

Managements should concentrate on anticipating accidents and preventing them, rather than trying to cure the problem after an accident had happened. He said possible hazards should be analysed in detail, and suitable prevention methods and safety techniques worked out.

It was the government’s main responsibility to enact and enforce safety regulations. Seven special sets of safety regulations had been made in recent years, and another ten or so were now in the pipeline.

But employers should ensure safe working conditions were complied with, and employees should take an active interest in their own well-being by making full use of safety guards and safety precautions.

He pointed out that some of Hong Kong’s leading industr-ial isis had already acknowledged the importance of work safety in the job standards set by the Industrial Training Advisory Committee - forerunner of the recently-appointed Hong Kong Training Council.

/Of........

I

Friday, October 19, 1973

- 10 -

Of the 153 job standards prepared by the industrialists on its various committees,. 104 included requirements for safety knowledge.

Mr. Price praised the Chinese Manufacturers Association for its initiative in staging the safety seminar, and called on other manufacturing and employers’ associations to follow its lead.

The Commissioner announced that the government and industry were combining to stage Hong Kong’s first major industrial safety exhibition, to be held in the Chinese Manufacturers Association pavilion during this year’s CHA Fair from December 11 to January 8.

lrAs far as we can gather, this will be the first such exhibition in South-East Asia,” he said. The Labour Department was organising the exhibition with the help of the Commerce and Industry, Marine and Fire Services departments.

He said: ”It represents a wide-scale joint effort, with the backing of the C.M.A., other employers’ groups and organisations, individual employers large and small, insurance companies and leading shipping companies.

’’All these have contributed most generously to the cost of staging this large exhibition. This makes it even more of a ’first’ and a milestone in the history of safety in Hong Kong.”

He noted that many firms had lent their machinery for the exhibition, and some had even lent their staff to man the machinery.

”It is my sincere hope that this first combined attack on the problem of accidents at work will lead to an era of co-operation which will be of benefit to all — management, workers and government,” Mr. Price said.

Note to Editors: Copies of the full text of Mr. Price’s speech

are boxed for collection.

-------0---------

I

Friday, October 1% 1973 - 11 -

SECURITY CLOSED CIRCUIT TV SYSTEMS TO BE EXEMPT FROM LICENSING ******

A Bill to amend the Telecommunication Ordinance is published in the gazette today for public information.

Wie Bill will be tabled in the Legislative Council shortly and, if passed, will enable closed circuit television systems which are operated by persons for internal information or security purposes within their own premises to be owned and operated without a licence.

It will also provide exemption from licensing for persons operating such systems for private entertainment purposes in their own homes. None of these unlicensed systems will be permitted to carry paid commercial advertising.

Commenting on the Bill, the Television Authority, Mr. Nigel Watt, said today the amending legislation was needed because of the impending expiry on October 31 of the present monopoly wired television franchise which provides the legal framework for all existing closed circuit television installations in Hong Kong.

t 11 If the amending Bill is passed into law it is intended that

regulations will oe made to provide for the licensing of closed circuit television systems which extend beyond individual premises - for example a stock exchange information system or a security system linking up various offices in separate buildings.

’’These larger licensed systems”, Mr. Watt added, ’’will also be limited to an information or security use and will not be permitted to carry any entertainment material or any paid advertising.

/"However •••••••

Friday., October 19, 1973

*• 12 —

’’However^ it is intended that the regulations should permit the Telecommunications Authority to issue closed circuit television licences to enable hotels to screen entertainment films on television sets in the hotel guest rooms, subject to such films having passed censorship and subject to no paid commercial advertising being included in the programme,” he said.

It is expected that regulations will also be published at the same time to enable licences to be issued to operators of broadcast relay systems.

Commenting on this aspect, Mr. Watt said: ”It will be recalled that the government has already legislated to provide for the installation, without a licence, of communal television aerials on the roofs of single buildings, where cables do not have to cross public streets.”

Once this legislation becomes effective, these aerial distribution systems will require no licence although they will be liable to inspection by the Telecommunications Authority to ensure that they do not cause interference with other communication systems» Such systems will not be permitted to change the input frequency.

1’However, the proposed broadcast relay licences,” Mr. Watt explained, ”will permit licensees to connect up buildings for relay purposes and to convert the input frequencies to lower frequencies for the ease of transmission of signals along the longer cables in such systems.

/’’Broadcast •••••••

Friday, October 19, 1973

- 13 -

"Broadcast relay licensees will be obliged to provide subscribers with a simultaneous uninterrupted relay of the output of all wireless television stations in Hong Kong. They may also relay, if they so wish, the output of sound broadcasting stations. A relay licensee will be limited to the role of a distributor of other people’s programmes. He will not be allowed to carry anything other than these programmes along his cables and will not have any interest in programme origination or in the sale of advertising time,” Mr. Watt said.

It is intended that broadcast relay and closed circuit television licences will be available to all applicants who comply with the licensing conditions and a nominal annual fee to cover the administrative cost of licensing will be charged.

Meanwhile, development in all forms of cable communications are moving at a very fast pace in many parts of the world and a government working group has been established to examine these developments and to consider other possible future uses of cable communications in Hong Kong.

-------0---------

/14........

Friday, October 19, 1973

- 14 -

EMIGRATION ASSISTANTS TOLD TO WORK WITH CLEAR CONSCIENCE *********

Every civil servant must work for the community with a clear conscience to make Hong Kong "a clean city - not only superficially but also thoroughly,” Urban Councillor, Dr. Denny Huang said today.

Addressing immigration assistants at a passing-out parade this morning, Dr. Huang urged the graduating officers to be scrupulous about their words and manners when dealing with members of the public and overseas visitors.

Coldness and rudeness would affect not only the reputation of an individual but also that of the whole organisation and of the government, he said.

Dr, Huang impressed on the officers to retain their integrity and be impartial, courteous, and considerate "for such is the least attitude possessed by a civil servant."

Note to Editors: Copies of the full text of Dr. Huang’s

speech are boxed for collection.

-------0---------

Friday, October 19, 1973

- 15 -

WARNING ON SALE OF BOGUS ADVERTISING SPACE

*«**»»*

The Director of Fire Services today made it quite clear that no fire service personnel of any rank is authorised to solicit advertisement for any fire service publication.

He was commenting on reports that persons alleging to be Fire Service Officers were soliciting advertisements for ’fire service publications’ from factory and shop owners.

’’Any attempt to solicit such advertising should be reported at once either to the police or to the Fire Services Department,” he said.

--------0---------

Release Time: 7«A5

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Saturday, October 20, 1973

CONTENTS

Pape No,

Five-point increase recorded in Consumer Price Index for September .....................••••••....................... 1

Hong Kong’s wedding gift to Princess Anne .................. 2

Tickets for next Urban Council youth dance now on sale ..... 2

1973 is the wettest year in Hong Kong’s recorded history ... 3

New post office opening in North Point....................... 4

Traffic re-arrangements in Tsuen Wan •  .................... 5

Deadline for entries in creative structural design exhibition extended ................................................... 6

Winter time officially starts on Sunday •••••••••••••••••••• 6

Airmail services to Middle East resumes .................... 7

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Saturday, October 20, 1973

- 1 -

SEPTEMBER G.C.P.I. UP FIVE POINTS

*********

The General Consumer Price Index for September 1973 was 181 -five points higher than that for the previous month. This was due mainly to a rise of eight points in the index for foodstuffs.

An increase of four points was recorded in the index for clothing and footwear, while increases of one point each were recorded in the indexes for fuel and light, alcoholic drink and tobacco, miscellaneous goods, and services. Movements in the indexes for other sections of commodity were insignificant.

Compared with August, there were increases in the average retai1 prices of rice, bread and cakes,salt water fish, pork, other meat, poultry, fresh vegetables and eggs.

The excepti onally rainy weather experienced last month reduced considerably the volume of locally produced fresh vegetables.

As a result retail prices of fresh vegetables increased substantially and this was responsible for over two-fifths of the overall rise of five points in the General Consumer Price Index. On the other hand, the average retail prices of fresh water fish, beef and fresh fruits dropped.

A Census and Statistics Department spokesman said that food prices in particular vegetable prices generally reach their peak each year around this time.

As to non-food items, prices of clothing materials and also men’s, women’s and children’s items of clothing and footwear were raised, resulting in an increase in the index for this section of commodities.

/2.........

0 - -

Saturday, October 20, 1973

2 -

WEDDING PRESENT FOR PRINCESS ANNE * * * ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

Hong Kong’s wedding present to Her Royal Highness Princess Anne will be a locally manufactured carpet and a pair of matching rugs.

Announcing this today, a government spokesman said Buckingham Palace had advised that the Princess would be pleased to accept this gift from the people of Hong Kong.

The matching rugs have been dispatched to arrive in time for the wedding, which will take place on November 14. These will be followed by the carpet, designed according to a pattern selected by the Princess.

The estimated cost of 35,000 will be met from public funds.

-------C----------

URBCO YOUTH DANCE

4t«4‘4<*4c4‘*

The Urban Council will present another youth dance on October 27 in the staff restaurant of the Central Government Offices (West Wing), Lower Albert Road, from 8 p.m. to 11 p.m.

Two popular Hong Kong groups have been engaged to perform at the dance. The highlight of the party will be a lucky draw at the end of the occasion.

Tickets at 31.50 are now on sale at the City Hall Theatre Booking Office.

-------0---------

n

Saturday, October 20, 1973

- 3 -

1973 WETTEST YEAR ON RECORD

***«*««**

The abnormally high rainfall recorded last month has made the year 1973 the wettest year in the recorded history of Hong Kong.

It brought the rainfall total for the first nine months of the year to 3086.4 mm — which already exceeded the previous re cor'd annual rainfall of 3040.7 mm set in 1889.

According to the Royal Observatory, the total recorded rainfall last month was 476.0 mm — which was 197.2 mm or 70 per cent above normal -

During the month two tropical cyclones — severe tropical storm ’’Louise*’ and Typhoon ”Marge” — necessitated the hoisting of tropical cyclone warning signals. Although no strong winds were experienced in Hong Kong, 1’Marge” brought a total of 60.2 mm of rainfall between September 13 and 15•

The strong monsoon signal was also hoisted twice because of two surges of the winter monsoon towards the end of the month.

A total of 10 thunderstorms and heavy rain warnings was issued during the month and 10 aircraft were diverted due to adverse weather conditions.

A maximum temperature of 33 «0 degrees Celsius was recorded on September 12 and a minimum temperature of 22.8 degress Celsius on September 19.

Note to Editors: A full report by the Royal Observatory on the

weather of September 1973 is boxed for collection.

A...........

0 - -

Saturday, October 20, 1975

NEW POST OFFICE FOR NORTH POINT

********

The new Tsat Tsz Mui Post Office at Stanhope House, North Point, will be opened by Mr. Shum Choi-sang, Chairman of the Causeway Bay Kaifong Association at 10 a.m. on Monday (October 22).

It will offer the full range of postal services - except insured letters and boxes. Business hours will be from 9 a.m. to 5 on weekdays.

There are 550 Post Office Private Boxes installed at the new post office. An automatic 10-cent stamp selling machine and a pillar box have also been installed outside the main entrance to provide the necessary facilities outside office hours.

The new post office will take over the letter delivery services from the present King’s Road Post Office which has become overburdened due to the fast growth in the North Point area.

The King’s Road Post Office will continue to offer the usual counter services. From Monday, its business hours will be from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on weekdays, and 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturdays.

The new Tsat Tsz Mui Post Office will bring the total number of post offices to 67, including a mobile post office operating in the New Territories.

0---------

/5........

Saturday, October 20, 1973

- 5 -

TRAFFIC CHANGES IN TSUEN WAN ********

New traffic arrangements will be introduced next week in Tsuen Wan and Fung Wong Village in Kowloon to improve traffic circulationstarting from 10 a.m. on Monday (October 22), three streets in Tsuen Wan will be re-routed one-way. Kwan Mun Hau Street between Tak Wah Street and Tsuen Wan Market Street will only permit one-way traffic heading towards Tsuen Wan Market Street.

At the same time, Tsuen Wan Market Street between Kwan Mun Hau and Yan Chai Street will be opened to one-way traffic going to Yan Chai Street; while Yan Chai Street will only provide one-way access for traffic going towards Tak Wah Street.

Meanwhile on Tuesday (October 23), Wan Fung Street in Fung Wong Village will be re-routed one-way in a clockwise direction. The section of Ngan Fung Street north of Kam Fung Street will be routed one-way southbound, while its section south of Kam Fung Street will be routed one-way northbound•

Appropriate traffic signs will be set up to guide motorists.

-------0---------

/6.........

Saturday, October 20, 1975

- 6 -

ENTRY DEADLINE FOK DESIGN EXHIBITION EXTENDED

**********

The application deadline for the "Young People’s World” creative structural design exhibition is extended to November 7, the organisers announced today.

"This will enable more participants to join the exhibition," said Hr. Antonio Chu, Officer-in-charge of the Social Welfare Department’s Youth Work Unit which has organised the project.

The exhibition will take place from November 24 to December 1 at Kowloon Park during this year’s Festival of Hong Kong.

About 30 works will be selected for display. Prizes will be awarded to the four best designs and all participating groups will receive souvenirs.

Prospectus and application forms are obtainable at the Youth Work Unit at Room 908, Causeway Bay Magistracy Building, Causeway Bay, Hong Kong (Tel. 5-712467 and 5-70551$) or Kowloon Government Offices Building, 18th floor, 405 Nathan Road, Kowloon (Tel. >884111 ext. 331).

-------0---------

SUMMER TIME ENDS TOICRROW

****** 1* *

Summer time in Hong Kong will officially end at 3.30 a.m. tomorrow (Sunday)•

Residents are reminded th?t before going to bed this (Saturday) evening, they should set their clocks and watches back one hour.

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/7......................................

Saturday, October 20, 1973

- 7 -

RESUMPTION OF AIRMAIL services to middle east

*********

Airmail services to Egypt, Israel and Syria have been resumed, the Postmaster General announced today.

While there are no direct air services operating to these countries from Hong Kong, he said, it was possible to route airmails through intermediate countries# He warned, however, that delays in delivery may occur.

There is no change in the position regarding surface mail to Egypt, Israel and Syria. This will remain suspended until shipping services to these countries from Hong Kong are resumed.

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Release time: 2.

p.m.

PRH 7

FRlflUi IgisI kill

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Monday, October 22, 1975

CONTENTS

Pa^e No*

Special Assistant appointed to Anti-Corruption Commission •• 1

Diphtheria virtually eradicated in Hong Kong ......* 2

Twenty-three per cent increase in travel to and from Hong Kong •*••••••••••••................  ...................... 4

Special training for disabled people ..............* 5

Governor to open Yan Chai Hospital on Wednesday •••••••••••• 6

Labour Department helps settle 86j industrial disputes • • • • * 8

New handbook on social and economic trends published ••••••• 9

Three buildings in Central declared dangerous.• ••* 10

Temporary water stoppage in North Point......................   10

Radio quiz on general knowledge and current affairs •••••••• 11

RLshernen’s schools to hold joint graduation ceremony ......... 12

Winners of Children’s Museum Competition announced ••••••••• 1?

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Monday, October 22, 1975

- 1 -%r.

SPECIAL ASSISTANT TO ANTI-CORRUPTION COMMISSIONER APPOINTED «**«**»

Mr. Trevor Bedford, at present Deputy Secretary for Security in the Colonial Secretariat, has been appointed Special Assistant to the Commissioner for Anti-Corruption, Mr. Jack Cater.

He will head a special planning group set up to consider the organisation of the new Anti-Corruption Commission, it was announced today.

Mr. Bedford, 39? studied law at university. He joined the Hong Kong civil service in August 19&0 as an administrative officer, and has since held a number of responsible posts in various government departments.

He was District Officer of Taipo from 19&& to 1967. The following year he attended the Joint Services Staff College and on his return from leave was appointed Police Civil Secretary until 1972. Mr. Bedford recently returned from a year’s study at the Royal College of Defence Studies in London.

He was awarded the M.BJS. last year.

Note to Editors: Copies of Mr. Bedford’s photograph will be

available for collection in the G.I.S. Press boxes later this evening.

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/2........

Monday, October 22, 1973

- 2 -

DIPHTHERIA NCW ALMOST ERADICATED IN HONG KONG

Medical Spokesman Reports Success Thanks To Public Co-Operation

*********

Diphtheria, one of the main causes of death among children, lias virtually ceased to pose a threat to Hong Kong after years of concerted effort by the Medical and Health Department to eradicate it.

The last diphtheria case was recorded in September 1972 and since then none lias been reported.

Giving the reasons for the present effective control of the disease, a spokesman for the department said today this was the outcome of a preventive programme to which the public had responded well.

An anti-diphtheria campaign providing free inoculation lias been maintained in the last quarter of every year since 1959* In that year, a diphtheria epidemic had taken a toll of 116 deaths out of 2,087 notifications.

:rIt has taken Hong Kong 14 years to virtually eradicate diphtheria, and this is roughly the same time that it has taken other countries to do the same/1 the spokesman said.

Credit for the success should go to both the department for having left no stone unturned in the anti-diphtheria fight, and the general public, without whose acceptance of the need for inoculation the annual reminder drives would have made little headway.

The spokesman saw in Hong Kong’s battle against diphtheria a number of special features which made its success unusual by international standards.

/"Up till ........

Monday, October 22, 1973

- 3 -

"Up till recently each child who had a diphtheria shot received a specially wrapped sweet. These sweets were very popular with children and took away their fear of injections,"he explained.

The spokesman said the way in which the campaign was conducted was also unusual. Door-to-door visits were carried out in crowded tenement bloclLS, housing estates and squatter areas by inoculators and health visitors to ensure that infants and pre-school children were immunised.

In addition, mobile inoculation teams visited schools and other congregations of young people.

At times, medical staff and equipment were flown by helicopter to outlying islands and inaccessible spots to make certain that infants there were not left out of the general inoculation programme.

"There are currently 60 inoculators attached to various health offices. They also make up mobile inoculation teams which set up temporary inoculation posts in such places as street-corners," the spokesman said.

He emphasised that "no effort is spared to ensure that children in every part of Hong Kong are immunised against the disease."

But despite the successful containment of siphtheria in Hong Kong, he cautioned that there was no room for complacency or a relaxation of continuous measures against the disease, because "any failure to take preventive action can lead to its return."

He urged parents to get their children immunised during this year’s routine campaign now under way.

/Since these

Monday, October 22, 1973

- 4 -

Since these annual drives were begun in 1959, more than 10 million doses of anti-diphtheria vaccine — comprising first doses, second doses and boosters — had been administered.

’’Anti-diphtheria inoculation is available free throughout the year at all the department’s maternal and child health centres, inoculation centres and clinics. It is a service that parents should fully use. It exists for them,” the spokesman stressed.

-------0---------

RISE IN TRAVEL TO AND FROM HONG KONG

*********

More than 4.8 million travellers were cleared by the Immigration Department during the six-month period from April to September this year.

According to statistics released by the department today, a total of 4,821,114 people — 2,425,173 arriving in Hong Kong and 2,595,941 departing — passed through immigration clearance during those months#

This represents an increase of 25*86 per cent over the same period last year, when 1,951,273 arrivals and 1,940,991 departures, or a total of 5,892,264 clearances was recorded.

The figures do not include travellers on transit or people refused permission to enter Hong Kong.

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/5........

Monday, October 22, 1975

- 5 -

TRAINING THE DISABLED BEFORE EMPLOYMET

*********

The Job Placement Unit of the Social Welfare Department will arrange special training for disabled persons if any prospective employers wish to have them equipped with certain skills before employing them.

Mr. Chan Shiu-wing, Officer-in-charge of the Unit said today, whenever possible disabled persons are given some basic training, depending on disability, to prepare them for employment in factory jobs or other types of work such as telephone operators.

"But if some employers need people with specific skills and are willing to take in disabled persons, we will certainly help to arrange their training."

Citing an example, he said eight blind persons v/ere at present receiving training on knotting fishing hooks at Wong Tai Sin Blind Welfare Centre. ‘Tais was arranged by the Unit so that they will be employed by a factory making fishing accessories."

The firm, Winpull Fishing Accessories Co. Ltd., has already taken on four disabled persons - a mentally retarded girl , a cured TB patient and two formerly mentally ill persons.

These four v/ere among 28 whom the Unit had placed in jobs during September. They comprised seven cripples, four deaf, eight formerly mentally ill patients, six mentally retarded and three cured TB patients.

One was given a job as a storekeeper, one as an ironing worker, one as a telephone operator, one as a lift-operator, one as a watchman, one as a machine sewing worker, two as polishing workers, three as packers, eight as assemblers and nine as general workers.

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/6........

Monday, October 22, 1973

- 6 -

GOVERNOR TO OPEN YAN CHAI HOSPITAL

First Of Its Kind To Be Set Up By Industrialists

********

The Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, will open the new Yan Chai Hospital in Tsuen Wan on Wednesday (October 24).

This acute hospital is the first of its kind to be built in an expanding industrial area by the district’s own community leaders, and is designed to operate in close liaison with the facilities of the Medical and Heal.th Department.

It is already receiving patients. There are 100 beds, an outpatient clinic, an X-ray examination room and an operation theatre. Another 250 beds are likely to be added at a later stage.

The hospital is providing such services as general medicine, general surgery, obstetrics and paediatrics to residents of Tsuen Wan, Kwai Chung and nearby districts.

Specialist teams from the Medical and Health Department are expected to be sent to the hospital for specialist services in the future when the need for these facilities has been assessed.

Charges in the hospital are in line with government fees — 32 a day for in-patients in the general wards, a charge that includes medicine, ♦

laboratory examination and operation. Out-patients pay 31 a visit, which includes medicine. The operating cost of the hospital is mainly subvented by the government.

/Since .....

Monday, October 22, 1973

Since the hospital began operating on August 28 this year, it has appreciably supplemented medical facilities for district residents.

The hospital cost about $5*5 million of which the government contributed $1.7 million. The site was granted by the government while the Royal Hong Kong Jockey Club contributed $400,000 to meet part of the cost for furniture and equipment.

The rest of the cost was met by s group of Tsuen Wan community and industrial leaders, headed by Mr. Deacon Chiu, Chairman of the Board . of Directors of the hospital.

Note to Editors: The Board of Directors of Yan Chai Hospital

invite the media to attend the opening ceremony on Wednesday (October 24) at 11.30 a.m. at the hospital in Tsuen Wan, New Territories.

Reporters and photographers assigned to cover the ceremony are requested to assemble, not later than 10.15 a.m. at the coi-ner of Hankow Road (between the Peninsula Hotel and the YMCA) where a special bus, BB6O25, will be waiting to take them to the hospital.

A G.I.S. officer will be on hand to assist representatives of the media.

0--------

0.00000

Monday, October 22, 1973

- 8 -

LRS HELPS SETTLE 86? LABOUK DISPUTES

******

The Laboiu? Relations Service of the Labour Department helped /

settle 863 of the 1,201 disputes in the third quarter of this year. During the same period, 268 disputes were referred to the Labour Tribunal.

The remainder of the disputes were either withdrawn by the applicants or settled by direct negotiation.

The head of the Labour Relations Service, Mr. T,F. Tsui, said that as a result of agreements reached in meetings conducted by conciliation officers, 4,125 workers received a sum of $2,738,287 as arrears of wages, payment in lieu of notice, and ex-gratia severance pay.

’’Severance pay for the workers in the Gilda Fashions dispute alone accounted for $39O?OOO,” he said.

He noted that most labour disputes during the quarter had arisen out of disagreement over y/age rates, changes in conditions of employment, dismissals, prolonged lay-offs, insolvency on the part of the employers, or mutual misunderstanding.

In settling 21 of the 25 major labour disputes, he said, officers of the Service conducted a total of 92 lengthy joint meetings, and made 41 visits to the sites of disputes.

”In addition, they handled 4^766 consultations and enquiries from both workers and management,” he added.

- - - - 0---------

/9 •©•©•••

Monday, October 22, 1975

STATISTICAL GUIDE ON SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC TRENDS ♦ ******

The Census and Statistics Department has published a handbook • •

setting out in simple form certain statistics illustrating the main trends of social and economic development in Hong Kong during the five-year period 1960-1972.

Entitled Hong Kong Social and Economic Trends 1968-1972, it consists of 72 tables, with graphs, covering the main social and economic statistics most descriptive of Hong Kong with explanatory notes on sources and coverage at the end of the volume.

The last work of this kind was the compendium ,rHong Kong Statistics 1947-67’1 issued in 1969, and the new handbook should be read in conjunction with that publication.

A spokesman for the department said it was hoped to produce the handbook on an annual basis to provide an up-to-date picture of Hong Kong’s development.

The publication is now on sale at a copy at the Government Publications Centre at the Star Ferry Concourse, Hong Kong.

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/10........

Monday, October 22, 1973

- 10

THREE BUILDINGS IN CENTRAL CONDEMNED

********

The Building Authority today declared No. 16 Lan Kwai Fong and Nos. 58 and 60 D*Aguilar Street, Central, to be in a dangerous condition.

Referring to No. 16 Lan Kwai Fong, the Principal Government

Building Surveyor said that despite extensive shoring there was evidence of continuing movement in the load bearing brick walls. This was causing severe fractures and bulging of the brickwork which could lead to a collapse.

Nos. 58 and 60 D’Aguilar Street were inspected in conjunction with No. 16 Lan Kwai Fong, he said, and fractures and bulges in the brick walls indicate a risk of failure and possible collapse.

Notices of intention to apply for closure orders of these buildings were posted today. The application will be heard in Victoria District Court at 9*30 a.m. on November 7.

- - - - 0--------

WATER CUT IN NORTH POINT

********

Water supply to a number of premises in North Point will be interrupted for five hours, starting from 1 a.m. on Wednesday (October 24) to enable a test for night leakage in the area to be made.

The’area affected extends from House No. 865 to 1021, and from 992 to 1054 King’s Road and includes North Point Model Housing, Finnie Street, Hoi Tai Street, Hoi 'Wan Street, Tong Chong Street, Hoi Kwong Street, Pan Hoi Street, and lit. Parker Road.

--------0-----------

/11

Monday, October 22, 1975

- 11 -

QUIZ COMPETITION FOR YOUNG PEOPLE

Radio Hong Kong, in conjunction with the Social Welfare Department, has organized a weekly series of quiz programmes for young people in community and youth centres.

The first programme will be held tomorrow (Tuesday) evening at

Tai Hang Tung Community Centre to be followed by a second one on Thursday evening at the Kwun Tong Community Centre.

The two programmes will be broadcast over the station’s Chinese

Channel at 9»3O p.m. on Monday (October 29) and Monday (November 5) respectively, quiz programmes have been planned to arouse young people’s interest and social consciousness in general knowledge and current news,” said Hr. S.S. Yeung, Producer of Radio Hong Kong’s youth programmes.

Young people below the age of 25 can participate.

An Ai 1/FI4 portable radio will be awarded to the winner of each competition and all who answer three questions or more will receive $J0 as a consolation prize.

Representatives of the community centres will act as the judges of the competition.

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/12

Monday, October 22, 1973

- 12 -

GRADUATION CEREMONY FOR PUPILS OF FISHERMEN’S SCHOOLS

*********

One thousand children and 150 teachers from 14 schools operated

by the Fish Marketing Organisation will attend a joint graduation ceremony

on Wednesday (October 24) in the City Hall Concert Hall.

Mr. Wilfred S.B. Wong, an unofficial Member of the Legislative Council

will present certificates to graduates from Primary VI Classes, and to

Form III students of the F.M.O.’s Secondary Practical School at Aberdeen.

Prizes to pupils for "Excellent Application" will be presented

by Mrs. Wong.

This is the fourth time that the F.M.O. has brought together pupils from all its widely scattered district schools, to attend a single joint graduation ceremony.

Following the speeches and formal presentations, folk dances and other musical items will be performed by pupils of the F.M.O. schools.

Note to Editors:. Reporters and photographers are invited to cover this event. Seats will be reserved for press representatives. They are requested to take their seats by 11.15 a.m.

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/13........

Monday, October 22, 1973

- 13 -

CHILDREN'S MUSEUM COMPETITION WINNERS

******

The prize presentation of the Children’s Museum Competition wi11 be held in the City Museum and Art Gallery on Thursday (October 25).

Over 1t9OO children from 219 schools entered the competition.

The participants had to complete a questionnaire on the museum exhibition which covered the major art forms throughout the history of China.

The competition was the second of its kind organised by the Urban Council, and closed on September 30.

Note to Editors: A full list of the winners is distributed

separately in the G.I.S. Press boxes.

-------0----------

Release time: 7*50 p.m.

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Tuesday, October 23, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No«

S8OO million flyover programme to ease traffic congestion ••• 1

Work on final stage of Kwai Shing housing project starting soon ........••••«••••........  ••••••••••••••••••••• 3

New playground to be built in Pokfulam ••«••••••••••••••••••• 4

PWD Caroline Hill workshops will be extended •••••••••••••••• 5

Kaifongs urged to help promote Mutual Aid Committees ...  6

Housing Department clarifies interim agreement reached with shop tenants .............................................8

New public pier proposed for Sai Kung Town .............. 9

Free quotas for export of restrained textiles to Sweden available ..........«»•»•••«••••••••••••...• •......• 10

Surface mail services to Middle East countries resume .. 11

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Tuesday, October 23, 1973

- 1 -

* »

MORE FLYOVERS PLANNED TO IMPROVE TRAFFIC FLCW

SJoOO Million To Be Spent Over Next Five Years

*********

A stenped-up programme of flyover construction will give urban areas of Kong Kong an increasingly new look over the next few years and ease the pressure of traffic on many busy road intersections.

Plans are already in hand to build another 20 flyover and interchange complexes over the next five years, at an estimated cost of some S800 million.

The programme is part of a long-term effort to eliminate the worsening traffic bottlenecks brought about by the rapid increase in the number of vehicles.

Despite the introduction of various special traffic arrangements and the installation of traffic light signal controls, more radical measures are needed to combat congestion at some locations.

,JTIio best method to overcome the problem is to provide flyovers at intersections where the worst congestion occurs,” a spokesman for the Public Works Department said.

Over the past 12 years, 26 flyovers have been built at a cost of about Z1p0 million.

Thirteen more - including one on Hong Kong Island - are under construction.

Before the year ends, two interchanges will be completed. They are the Pillar Island Interchange and the Lion Rock Interchange.

/In the

Tuesday, October 2J, 1973

2

In the meantime, work on 12 other flyovers and interchanges is expected to begin within the next six months.

These include two grade separated junctions on Hong Kong Island -one at Garden Road/Magazine Gap Road/Robinson Road and the other at Garden Road/Queensway.

In Kowloon, four interchanges will be built at the intersections of Hammer Hill Road, Sha Tin Pass Road, Fung Mo Street and Nam Cheong Street to improve traffic flow in Lung Cheung Road.

The new Lai Chi Kok Hospital Interchange is also in an advanced stage of design and work should begin shortly.

Work is also expected to start within the next few months on the flyovers at Kwun Tong Road/Lai Yip Street; the West Kowloon Corridor from Gascoigne Road to Tong Mi Road; and the elevated road from Prince Edward Road to Lai Chi Kok Road.

The spokesman said: ’’Despite this volume of work, there is still no place for complacency, and we have further plans in the pipeline. In fact at the present moment 50 flyovers and interchanges - 12 on Hong Kong Island, 15 in Kowloon and three in the New Territories - are at various stages of planning and design.”

Another way of improving traffic conditions, he pointed out, could be achieved by segregating pedestrians and motorists.

In this regard, the spokesman said 67 pedestrian footbridges or subways had been opened for public use over the past 12 years and 68 new ones were included in the Public Works Programme.

Note to Editors: Copies of an aerial photograph showing the

Vanchai flyover complex are boxed for collection.

/3.........

0 - -

Tuesday, October 23, 1973 - 3 -

KI7AI SHING HOUSING PROJECT ENTERS FINAL STAGE

Construction work on the final stage of Kwai Shing Housing Estate in the New Territories to provide additional accommodation for another 12,000 people is to start early next year.

The housing project - one of the largest being built by the Public Works Department - is part of the government’s 10-year housing development programme and will house about 75,000 people when it is fully completed.

Work on the final phase of the project will involve, among others, the construction of five multi-storey domestic blocks — two 15-storey, two seven-storey and one 2z*-storey — providing 2,225 self-contained flats built at a scale of 55 square feet per individual. Each flat will have its own kitchen and toilet facilities.

A six-storey standard estate primary school as well as a kindergarten are to be included. These will be in addition to the four schools currently operating in Stage I of the estate and the two others being built in Stage II.

Parking facilities will be provided in a three-storey car park with just over 250 parking spaces. It is envisaged that covered car parking spaces in the estate will be provided at the ratio of one space to 10 families on a chargeable basis.

To maximise the use of open space, the roof deck of the car park is to be converted into a rest garden. An overall area of 2.6 acres is to be set aside for rest and recreational purposes. Sitting-out areas and recreational grounds wnII also be provided.

/Also ...••••

I

Tuesday, October 23, 1973

- 4 -

Also included in the final phase of the project is the construction of a single-storey modular market providing accommodation for some JO stalls.

Stage I of the estate was completed last year and provides homes for about J8,OOO tenants in nine multi-storey blocks.

Work on Stage II is in full swing and it is envisaged to house another 24,000 people. The final stage is due to commence in January next year and should be completed in mid-1976.

-------0---------

NEW PLAYGROUND FOR POKFULAM

******

Residents of Pokfulam district on Hong Kong Island will have their own public playground early next year.

The Urban Council has earmarked more than two acres of land to the north-east of the junction of Mount Davis Road and Pokfulam Road for the new playground.

There will be a miniature football pitch, two basketball and two volleyball courts, and a playground with specially designed games equipment for younger children.

A rest garden with a pavilion and the usual public toilet fanilities will also be provided.

All the games pitches will be floodlit at night while the garden and the children’s playground will have general park lighting.

Construction of the playground is expected to begin early in December and take about five months to complete.

/5.........

- - o - -

Tuesday, October 2J, 1973

- 5 -

EXTENSION TO CAROLINE HILL WORKSHOPS

********

Two new buildings will be added to the Public Works Department Caroline Hill V’orlzshops to provide extra space for the expansion of services and the training of apprentices.

The buildings will be constructed at the two ends of the existing workshops.

The main extension will be a five-storey building which will be used for holding practical courses to train apprentices on the job and for housing more workshops.

It will accommodate a number of offices, demonstration and instrument rooms, three classrooms, a machine shop, an allied trade shop, a fitting and engraving shop, mechanical plant and steam sections, a changing room with lockers and a canteen.

There will also be facilities for formal trade tests for apprentices and other craftsmen.

The other new building to be constructed will cover an area of 6,500 square feet in one storey.

The additional space in this building will provide more working area for the existing vehicle workshop.

The sites of the new buildings were previously occupied by temporary structures which have been demolished.

Construction of tho superstructure of the buildings is expected to begin in January next year and be completed in mid-1975*

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/6.........

Tuesday, October 23 j 1973

- 6 -

KAIFONGS URGED TO HELP PROMOTE MUTUAL AID COMMITTEES

*******

She Secretary for Home Affairs, Mr. Jack Cater, this evening appealed to Kaifong members to help form more mutual aid committees to further promote mutual help and good neighbourliness among residents of multi-storey buildings.

Kaifongs, he said, were in a good position to spread the gospel of mutual aid committees because of their experience in bringing people together to discuss their problems, their wide contacts with people from all walks of life, and their association facilities which could serve as meeting places.

Addressing a gathering of Kaifong leaders on the occasion of the 24th Kaifong Day, Mr. Cater felt sure that the nev/ concept of mutual aid committees could greatly improve the quality of life in Hong Kong.

Some 900 such committees had either been formed or were in the process of formation since June this year, he said.

”This is a very useful start but we must not forget that there are altogether some 10,000 buildings, all of which would benefit fi*om organisations of this kind.”

He said the Home Affairs Department had recruited 80 part-time oommunity organisers to visit these buildings and encourage the residents to form mutual aid committees. a

’’Clearly this small number of officers cannot hope to cover even a modest proportion of the buildings which still lack any form of organisation, and this is where we need your help,” he stressed.

/Mr. Cater .......

Tuesday, October 23, 1973

- 7 -

Mr. Cater went on to thank Kaifong members for their enthusiastic and active support of the Clean Hong Kong and Fight Violent Crime campaigns — particularly for the leading role they had played in arousing "community involvement” through the establishment of a network of City District and Area Committees.

The work of these Area Committees, he said, was very much in the spirit of good neighbourliness that had inspired the birth of the Kaifong movement, and ’’without the vital contribution of many of your leaders and members, the campaigns would not have succeeded as they have done.”

He referred to the Kaifong movement as an excellent example of how a traditional form of social organisation could be reorganised and revitalised to meet the needs of a very different society, and felt sure that their close linlcs with the government would continue and strengthen in future.

Note to Editors: Copies of the full text of Mr. Cater’s speech

are distributed separately in the GIS press boxes.

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/8........

Tuesday, October 23, 1973

8

I17TLRIM ARRANGEMENTS WITH SHOP TENANTS CLARIFIED

*********

A Housing Department spokesman today pointed out that there were certain inaccuracies in a newspaper report concerning a meeting held yesterday between officers of the department and shop representatives.

’^Phe shop tenants asked for a review of the present policy and in order to facilitate the commencement of further discussion on the tenancy agreement, the Housing Department agreed at the meeting to interim arrangements for outstanding assignment cases to be dealt with”, a spokesman said.

;jIt was agreed that until the terms of the new agreement had been worked out, such shop tenants are permitted to assign their shops by signing an agreement based on the previous conditions, but with the undent-standing that they would undertake to sign the new agreement when its terms have been agreed upon by both parties concerned.”

It is understood that comparatively only a small number of shop tenants are' affected by the temporary arrangements.

”It was also agreed at the meeting that further discussions should be held between shop representatives and the Housing Department on the terms of the shop tenancy agreement”, the spokesman said.

Iio date has yet been fixed for the next meeting but it was agreed that it should be held in a week or two.

The spokesman added that he hoped the temporary arrangement would help solve the present dispute and that a new shop agreement acceptable to both parties could be worked out in due course.

-------O---------

/9.........

Tuesday, October 2J, 1973

- 9 -

NEW PIER PLANNED AT SAI KUNG TOWN

*«***»t*

A new public pier is to be built at Sai Kung Town to meet the increasing need for landing facilities in the area.

The new pier will serve villagers from remote areas travelling by sea to market and fishermen bringing in their catches, as well as holiday makers <from urban areas going out to scenic spots and beaches at Sai Kung.

It will be built or. the eastern reclamation in front of the town and will be able to accommodate police launches and motorboat ferries.

The new pier will provide better landing facilities than the existing piers at Sai Kung Town which are small ones of simple design and situated in shallow waters.

Anyone who has objections to the proposed project or claims of private right may write to the Director of Public Works within two months.

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/10.......

Tuesday, October 23, 1973

- 10 -

EXPORT OF RESTRAINED TEXTILES TO SWEDEN

*******

An export authorisation scheme has been introduced to make availabia certain free quotas for export of restrained textiles to Sweden for the period ending June 30, 1974, the Director of Commerce and Industry, Mr. D.H. Jordani announced today.

At the same time, the department has also introduced a special Swing Scheme for the export of Group III (knitted briefs) to Sweden.

Applications for export authorisations and Group III swing applications are now accepted by the department with immediate effect.

Details of these arrangements will be sent to exporters tomorrow.

Anyone wishing to have advance information can get copies of the notices from the receptionist on the ground floor of the department at 46, Connaught Road Central, or can contact Mr. C.L. Li (Industry Assistant) at telephone No. 3-247315*

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/11

Tuesday, October 23, 1973

- 11 -

RESUMPTION OF POSTAL SERVICES TO MIDDLE EAST

******

The suspension on the posting of surface mail to Egypt, Israel and Syria has been lifted and all classes of mail for these countries will now be accepted again, the Postmaster General announced today.

However, he warned that the mail might be subject to delay sinoe shipping schedules had been interrupted by the Middle East war.

Airmail services to the affected countries resumed last Saturday (October 20).

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Release time: 7*^5

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Wednesday, October 24, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No.

Governor welcomes Yan Chai Hospital as an example of cooperation between the government and the community.............. 1

Water cut in Choi Hung Estate .................................. 2

Small house licences in the N.T. reach 1,000 mark......... 3

Traffic re-arrangements on Hong Kong Island and in Kowloon.. 5

Temporary closure . of three public swimming pools.............. 6

Governor visits Tsuen Wan and Tsing Yi Island •••••••••••••• 7

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Wednesday, October 24, 1975

GOVERNOR OPENS YAN CHAI HOSPITAL

The Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, today described the new Yan Chai Hospital in Tsuen Wan as "a splendid example of what can be achieved when the government and the community join forces in a common cause.”

He was speaking at the official opening of the hospital which is the first of its kind to be built in an expanding industrial area by the l district’s own community leaders, in conjunction with the government and the Royal Hong Kong Jockey Club.

Sir Murray said the hospital marked a step forward in the medical field. Its role, he added, would be doubly valuable because it would be possible to transfer patients from government medical institutions to the new hospital which would charge prices in line with government hospital fees. ”This means that no one need pay more than $1 as an out-patient or 52 as an in-patient,” the Governor said. "This is a most noteworthy step towards providing standardised low cost medical care for the growing population of Tsuen Wan and Kwai Chung.”

For the future, the Governor said that if the recommendations of the Rodrigues Report are implemented, general clinics would be provided at Kwai Chung and Lei Muk Shue during the next 10 years to supplement the South Kwai Chung Polyclinic and the Princess Margaret Hospital.

He added that more social facilities would be provided in the new towns now being planned as well as in Tsuen Wan and Kwai Chung to catch up with the expanding population in the area v/hich is expected to increase by 4-00,000 over the next decade.

/In his .......

Wednesday, October 24, 1973

- 2 -

In his address, the chairman of the Board of Directors of the Hospital, Mr. Deacon Chiu, said the opening of Yan Chai Hospital added a new page in the history of Tsuen Wan’s development.

”A hospital erected in the midst of this densely populated area not only lessens the financial burden of its inhabitants, but also helps to alleviate the sufferings which they experience physically and psychologically/1 he said.

Mr. Chiu thanked all those who had contributed to making the hospital a reality but stressed that continuous assistance would be needed to malce Yan Chai :,a real and lasting success.”

After the opening ceremony, Sir Murray, accompanied by Dr. G.H. Choa, Director of Medical and Health Services; Mr. D.C. Bray, District Commissioner, New Territories; and Mr. Chiu, toured the hospital building to see its modern installations.

Note to Editors: Copies of the full text of the Governor’s

speech are distributed in the G.I.S. Press boxes together with copies of Mr. Deacon Chiu’s address.

-------0---------

WATER CUT

******

Water supply to Choi Hung Estate in Kowloon will be interrupted for five hours starting from 1 a.m. on Friday (October 26).

The temporary stoppage is to enable a test for leakage to be made.

0 - -

Wednesday, October 24, 1973

- 3 -

1,OOOTH SMALL HOUSE LICENCE ISSUED

*****#««*

The 1,000th licence to build a small house in accordance with the New Territories Administration’s revised Small House Policy will be formally issued at a ceremony in the' Yuen Long Town Hall oh JEriday (October 26).

The II.T.A. Small House Policy, introduced in December 1972, has already considerably improved village housing in the New Territories. Approximately 1.5 million square feet of residential accommodation -equivalent to that in a small estate housing 20,000 people in the urban area -has become available under' the scheme.

The policy permits villagers to build, within the limits of two storeys and 700 square feet covered ground area, houses which are exempt from the Buildings Ordinance and do not therefore require expensive architectural plans.

To mark the occasion, the District Commissioner, N.T., Mr. D.C, Bray, will present the 1,000th applicant, Mr. Cheung Cho-fat, a villager of Sun Fung Wai, Tuen Hun, with a free building licence and household furniture worth $2,000.

Mr. Cheung, who is married with four school-aged children, first applied to the District Office, Yuen Long, just six weeks ago for permission to build a small house for his family. Approval came through late last week.

/At present

Wednesday, October 24, 1973

- 4 -

At present, the family lives in a mud brick single-storey structure in Sun Fung Wai* Mr. Cheung will use the furniture grant to buy desks for his children1^ study and other items to make his new house a more pleasant place to live in.

Note to Editors: You are invited to send a reporter and/or

photographer to cover the ceremony which will be held in the Yuen Long Town Hall at 3.00 p.m. on Friday (October 26). Official transport will be provided. Media representatives should meet Mr. Hanny Lee of N.T.A. at the sub-pool behind the Tsim Sha Tsui Post Office at 1.15 P*m.

Copies of a photograph of a typical "small house” built under the Small House Policy are boxed for collection this evening.

-------o---------

Wednesday, October 24, 1973

- 5 -

TRAFFIC RE-ARRANGEMENTS

*******

The closed section of Honiton Road between its junction with Babington Path and house No. 8 Babington Path will re-open to traffic as from 10 a*m* tomorrow (Thursday).

This follows the completion of remedial work for stabilising the embankment to make the road safe for vehicular traffic.

Meanwhile, new traffic arrangements will be introduced in two districts in Kowloon as from Friday to improve traffic flow in the areas.

In Mongkok, public light buses will no longer be allowed to pick up or set down passengers in the section of Bute Street between Nathan Road and Portland Street between 7 a.m. and midnight daily starting from Friday. .

The restrictive measure aims at reducing obstruction caused by public light buses to through traffic at the junction of Nathan Road with Bute Street.

At the same time, the section of Gillies Avenue between Winslow Street and the exit from Hung Hom Concourse will be re-routed to one-way northbound traffic, as a result of the completion of the access ramp to the Hung Hom Railway Terminus.

Traffic signs will be posted to gudie motorists.

-------0---------

/6.........

Wednesday, October 24, 1973

- 6 -

TEMPORARY CLOSURE OF SWIMMING POOLS

*******

Three swimming pools will be closed to the public for several hours for the rest of the week.

The Victoria Park Swimming Pool will be closed tomorrow between 11.45 a.m. and 6.15 p.m. and again on Friday between 12.45 p.m. and 6.15 p.ra. for the Hong Kong School Sports Association swimming gala. It will also be closed on Friday morning between 8.45 a.m. and 12.15 p.m. to enable the Morrison Hill Technical Institute to carry out its swimming competition.

The Kwun Tong Swimming Pool will also be closed on Friday from 7«4j a.m. to 12.15 p.m. and the Morrison Hill Swimming Pool between 5*45 p.m. and 10.15 p.m. for the swimming galas of the St. Paul's School (Lam Tin) and the Hong Kong University Scudent’s Union respectively.

On Saturday the Morrison Hill Swimming Pool will be closed from 8.45 a.m. to 12.15 p.m. and from 12.45 p.m. to 5.15 p.m. for the Hong Kong Federation of Students swimming gala.

------- o---------

/7..........

Wednesday, October 24, 1973

- 7 -

CRIME PROBLEM BEUIG TACKLED IN RIGHT WAY — GOVERNOR , ******* f *

The Governor, Sir Murray HacLehose, today said he was convinced that the problem of crime was being tackled along the right lines.

Speaking at an informal meeting with members of the Tsuen Wan Fight Violent Crime Campaign Co-ordination Committee during a visit to the district, Sir Murray said that while the groundwork in the fight against crime had been laid, the problem had not yet been solved.

i •

Since the start of the campaign, he said, there had been an overall /•

drop in crime in most areas and in general people were less frightened of crime. There was also'better co-operation between the police and the public.

He thanked the committee and the people of Tsuen Wan for their strong community spirit during the campaign and assured them that the government, with the support of the public, would carry on the drive until the problem was solved.

During his visit, the Governor was briefed on the past activities and future plans of the committee by its Vice-Chairman, Mr. So Cheuk-ming. He was also given details of police action.in the area during the "action phase" of the campaign by Sub-Divisional Inspector Lau Yan-to.

The Governor spent three hours touring various areas in the district to gain first hand information of its development and to meet rural leaders directly involved in its welfare.

/Accompanying

Wednesday, October 24, 1973

- 8 -

Accompanying him were Mr. D.C. Bray, District Commissioner, New Territories.and Mr* J.S. Warren, District Officer, Tsuen Wan.

After,the meeting, the .Governor proceeded to the Tsuen Wan District Office where Mr. F.E. Short, Project Manager of Tsuen Wan, explained to him general development proposals for the area.

Sir Hurray showed particular interest in future housing plans for two main areas in the district — the building of village resites in Tsuen Wan/Kwai Chung North and the building of public housing estates on Tsing Yi Island.

Later, Sir Murray boarded a helicopter for Tsing Yi Island where he was met by the Tsing Yi Rural Committee chairman-, Mr. Tang Lap—tai,* and given an on-the-spot briefing of proposed housing and roadworks development for the island. * ' * ’

He then went on to the tiny rural island of Ma Wan and held discussions with its Rural Committee members on plans to develop the island into a major holiday resort. The question of improved water supply facilities to the island was also raised.

Note to Editors: “ Copies of a photograph of the Governor’s visit to .the Tsuen Wan Fight Violent Crime Campaign Co-ordination Committee are boxed for collection.

-------0---------

Release time:, p.m.

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Thursday, October 25 f 1973

CONTENTS

Feasibility study on computerising certain Public Works

Department divisions •••«••••••••••••••••••••••«1

Local Employment Service finds jobs for 1,529 people 4

Temporary water charges collection centres in Sheung Shui and Fanling ......•....................  5

Radar station at Cheung Chau to provide aircraft navigational aidB ................................................. 5

Landscape garden with harbour view at Signal Hill.. 6

Two Treasury sections move to new address ...........  6

Medical Director visits hospitals and clinics on outlying islands ............................................   7

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Thursday, October 25, 1973 - 1 -I

PWD PLANNING WIDER USE OF COMPUTERS

******

A detailed study is being made into ways of computerising the operations of certain sections of the Public Works Department.

’’While the department already makes use of computer processes, particularly for engineering calculations, there is considerable opportunity to expand the use of computers over a wide range of activities in order to speed up the handling of the increasing volume of paper work, to improve methods of technological calculation and to increase overall efficiency,” a spokesman said today.

The study, which is being conducted by a team of consultants from Lowe Bingham Company, began in mid-June this year and is expected to be completed by February,

This work comprises the first stage of a two-part programme and is concerned mainly with preliminary investigations and identification of potential areas for computerisation over the next five years.

This will be followed by a second stage, which will involve the implementation of certain high priority projects, the spokesman said. It will also include the detailed study of problems of staffing and costing and will make recommendations on the department’s future developments and requirements.

’’The consultants have already investigated and identified a number of potential projects which could benefit from computerisation. Detailed recommendations and a description of their findings will shortly be submitted to the department for consideration,” he said.

/Of the .......

Thursday, October 25, 1973

- 2 -

Of the department’s non-technical activities, the need for computers appears greatest in the Waterworks Office whose clientele is as large, if not larger, than any other public utility undertaking in Hong Kong.

The spokesman said it was envisaged that computerisation would be applied to customer billing, the application and installation of water meters, and related statistical and administrative work.

"This will cut down the amount of time required for processing information to the public, thus avoiding delays, and reduce the heavy workload.”

On the engineering side, which impinges on many aspects of the department’s work, the consultants will be making recommendations on technological applications - that is. utilising computers to solve engineering problems.

Whether the work is in structural or mechanical and electrical engineering, the use of computers saves time and eliminates human errors in calculations, which are usually done by simpler instruments such as the slide-rule. The time saved can be used to present a wider range of design options, and thus improve the quality of technical design.

The consultants are also investigating the advantages of project management with computers for all sections of the Public Works Department.

In the Architectural Office, for example, where there can be at one time as many as 8,000 maintenance contracts, it is essential to keep an up-to-date schedule and accurate costing of the jobs being handled.

/The computer........ •

Thursday, October 25, 1973

- 3 -

The computer could be employed throughout all stages of work. Starting with the preparation of contracts, it would continue to receive feedback information on the progress of work until a project was completed.

Another major data processing system which has been under investigation for some time is the establishment of a land data system -the compilation with the help of a computer of relevant information on land lots all over Hong Kong.

"The information gathered would be invaluable for demographic and valuation work and would be available not only to the government but also to the public. In particular, the data system would be of benefit to those professionally concerned with land development,” the spokesman said.

The system would also be of service to a number of government departments which are occupied with land problems, such as the Land Office of the Registrar General’s Department, in addition to the Crown Lands and Survey Office and the Buildings Ordinance Office of the P.W.D.

-------0---------

A....

Thursday, October 25, 1973

- 4 -

L.E.S. FINDS JOBS FOR 1,529

*******

A total of 1,529 people were successfully placed in employment by the Local Employment Service of the Labour Department in the third quarter of this year.

Of these, 705 were placed in industry, 482 in commerce, 104 in the government service, 134 in the public utilities and 104 in other establishments, the head of the Employment Division, Mrs. SO WONG Mei-yee, said today.

"Among those placed in industry, 389 were apprentices who joined modern apprenticeship schemes with the help of the Apprenticeship Training Unit of the Labour Department,” she said.

At present, the service has 261 vacancies on its books. "These vacancies vary from executives to office boys in commerce, engineers to general workers in industry and artisans to messengers in the civil service," Mrs. So said.

The service provides free facilities to assist employers and jobseekers alike. Job-seekers are invited to register personally at any branch of the Service, bringing with them their identity cards and a photograph.

Employers with vacancies which they wish to fill are invited to telephone any office of the Service. (Tel. No. 5-282523 and 3-688131).

-------0---------

/5.........

Thursday, October 25, 1973

- 5 -

SPECIAL CENTRES FOR COLLECTION OF WATER CHARGES «******»«

Temporary collection centres will be set up by the Taino District Office at Sheung Shui and Fanling for the collection of water charges for the second period of 1973* %

The Sheung Shui collection centre will be located at the Sheung

Shui Public inquiry Centre at Shek Wu Hui and will operate on November 14 / i ’ • • -

and 15• The other will be at the Fanling Rural Committee Office at Luen Wo Hui and will operate on November 16.

Business hours will be from 9.00 a.m. to 1.00 p.m. at both centres•

Residents of the districts are urged to use these facilities which are specially provided for their convenience.

-------0---------

RADAR STATION AT CHEUNG CHAU

*«««««*#

A radar station to house navigational aids for guiding aircraft movements will be built on top of a hill at the northern end of Cheung Chau Island.

The station will comprise a dangerous goods store, a switch room, a fire-fighting room, a transformer room, a generator room and rooms for . 'O j ■

navigation equipment.

An area occupying some 6,000 square feet will be paved as pa.rt of the building project.

\lvr\i will start in December this year and will be completed in about 14 weeks. ----------------------------------0----------

.»••••••

Thursday, October 25, 1973

- 6 -

LOOKOUT GARDEN AT TSIM SHA TSUI * 4c * * ♦ * *

Work on a contour garden complete with walks, lookout platforms and shelters at Signal Hill (Black Head Hill), Taim Sha Tsui, will begin in mid-December.

It wi 11 be a well landscaped area covering about 2.75 acres north of the Middle Road Playground. Because of its altitude, the site commands a panoramic view of much of the harbour and Hong Kong Island.

As Signal Hill is one of the oldest and best-known signal stations of the Royal Observatory, the existing typhoon signal mast will remain.

Some of the existing buildings on the site will be converted into pavilions, stores, offices and toilets, while those in poor condition will be demolished.

It is expected that when construction is completed in March, the garden will, provide a popular lookout spot for local residents and tourists• ---------------------------------0----------

NEV/ ADDRESS FOR PENSIONS AND EDUCATION ALLOWANCES SECTION 4c ******

The Pensions Section and the Education Allowances Section of the Treasury will move to new premises at the New Sincere Building, 9th floor, 173 Des Voeux Road, Central, Hong Kong on October 28.

All enquiries after that date should be directed to the new address or through telephones Nos. 5“^1684, for Pensions Section, and 5~^S73^, for the Education Allowances Section.

-------0---------

/7...........

6

Thursday, October 25, 1973

7

ANNUAL VISIT TO ISLAND HOSPITALS, CLINICS

»«*****«

Dr. G.H. Choa, Director of Medical and Health Services, today visited a number of government hospitals and clinics on outlying islands in the course of an annual inspection.

Accompanied by Dr. Ronald Perry, Principal Medical Officer (New Territories), Mr. Arthur Starling, Chief Hospital Secretary, and Miss E.J. Gregory, Acting Chief Nursing Officer Princess Margaret Hospital, Dr. Choa spent the day looking over facilities on Peng Chau and Lantau Islands.

He visited in turn the clinic and maternity home on Peng Chau, the clinic and maternity home at Mui Wo, the South Lantau Hospital, and the Royal Hong Kong Jockey Club Clinic at Tai 0.

There were mothers, in-patients and out-patients at some of the clinics, and Dr. Choa spent some time discussing their illnesses with them.

Medical officers in charge took the opportunity to suggest changes either in routines or facilities, and Dr. Choa made a note of everything he heard.

The Medical and Health Department’s services to outlying areas include not only fully-staffed permanent hospitals and clinics, but also a floating clinic service and a ’’flying doctor” service on a weekly basis for residents in remote or inaccessible areas.

In addition, a helicopter service is available in emergencies.

-------0---------

Release time; 6.5.0 p*m.

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Friday, October 26, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No.

Higher postal rates for small packets to China........ ......... 1

Increase of JO per cent in exports value in September .........  2

Government accounts for July show 89•7 million deficit ......... 4

Mr. Donald Liao appointed Director of Housing •••••••........... 5

China will not accept used clothing sent to the country through the post......•..................•.•..••••••••••••••• 6

Advisory committee on stamp design established •••••••••••••• 7

Interest on tax reserve certificates raised to J.7 per cent • 8

New juvenile identity cards to be introduced next month • • •. • 10

More residential land in the N.T. through Small House Policy ....................................  ...........•••••• 1J

U.N. drug team arriving in Hong Kong on Sunday •••••••••••••• 14

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Friday, October 26, 1975

- 1 -

INCREASED POSTAL RATES FOR SMALL PACKETS TO CHINA

*******

Concessionary postal rates for small packets to China, which have been in force since 1962, will no longer apply with effect from December 1.

Announcing this today, a spokesman for the Post Office said that the new rates would be the same as for all other destinations.

He explained that under revised international postal regulations, any postal administration receiving considerably more mail than it sends in return is entitled to compensation for internal conveyance, sorting and delivery of the imbalance.

Since the amount of mail sent to the People’s Republic of China from Hong Kong greatly exceeds that received in return, payment is due to China for handling the excess. For the most part, this excess lies in small packet mail.

The rates to be introduced with effect from December 1 are as follows:

Weight not over Postage rate Old rate

4 oz. 50/ 50/

8 oz. 51.00 50/

1 lb. S1.60 80/

2 lb. $2.90 31.60

- - 0 - -

4

Friday, October 26, 1973

- 2 -

SEPTEMBER EXPORTS UP BY 30 PER CENT **********

The value of Hong Kong’s domestic exports for last month was 81,920 million - an increase of 8434 million or 29*2 per cent over the same month last year.

Compared with September 1972, the value of imports - at 82,705 million - was up by 8800 million or 42.0 per cent, while the value of re-exports increased by 8345 million or 87.7 per cent to 8738 million according to provisional figures released today by the Census and Statistics Department.

Commenting on the figures, Mr. M.D. Sargant, Assistant Director of Commerce and Industry, said that during the three—month period, July to September 1973j figures show increases over the same period in 1972 of 30-6 per cent for domestic exports, 33.1 per cent for imports and 74.3 per cent for re-exports.

For the period January to September 1973, the figures show 9 increases over the same period in 1972 of 22.1 per cent for domestic exports, 24.6 per cent for imports, and 52.4 per cent for re-exports.

A breakdown of the provisional figures for September is given below for easy reference:

MERCHANDISE : Domestic Exports : 81,920 million

Imports : 82,705 million

Re-exports : 738 mil1 ion

/COMPARATIVE FIGURES ......

Friday, October 26, 1973

- 3 -

COhPAPATIVE FIGURES

September • — September 1972 Increase or decrease

S bin. $ Mn. 3 Mn. %

Domestic Exports 1,920 1,486 + 434 + 29.2

Imports 2,705 1,905 + 800 + 42.0

Re-exports 738 393 + 345 + 87.7

July-Sept. July-Sept. Increase or

1973 " 1972 decrease

3 Mn. S Mn. 1 8 Mn. %

Domestic Exports 5,503 4,214 +1,289 + 30.6

Imports 7,533 5,660 +1,873 + 33.1

. ' '.r r-.:

Re-exports 1,976 1,134 + 842 + 74.3

• • ■ Jaru-wSept. Jan*-Sept. Increase or

1975 1972 decrease

,f 3 Mn. _ 8 Mn. 8 Mn. %

Domestic Exports 13,680 11,201 +2,479 +22.1

Imports 19,896 15,968 +3,928 + 24.6

Re-exports 4,503 2,954 +1,549 + 52.4

-------0 --------

Friday, October 26, 1973

- 4 -

JULY ACCOUNTS SHOW 39.7 MILLION DEFICIT **********

The government accounts for the month of July 1973 show a deficit of 39*7 million, compared with a surplus of S8l•1 million in July last year.

This has resulted in a total surplus of $0.6 million for the first four months of this financial year.

Total revenue for the month at 3372.2 million was 319*1 million more than in July 1972. The total revenue for the first four months of the financial year at 31,381.8 million was 3271.2 million more than the same period last year.

Total expenditure amounted 3381.8 million, an increase of $109.9 million over the same month last year.

This brings the total expenditure- for the first four months of the financial year to 31,381.3 million - 3268.4 million more than the same period last year.

- - - - 0--------

Friday, October 26, 1973

- 5 -

MR. LIAO APPOINTED DIRECTOR OF HOUSING

*********

New senior appointments in the Housing Department are announced in today’s (Friday) gazette.

Hr. Donald Liao becomes Director of Housing while Mr. J.C.C.Walden and Hr. F.J. Carroll become Deputy Directors.

These moves follow the recent re-organisation of the Colornal Secretariat as a result of which the Secretary for Housing now heads the Housing Branch of the Colonial Secretariat, but is no longer responsible for the day to day management of the department.

Hr. Liao has had a long association with public housing in Hong Kong. He joined the former Housing Authority as an architect in i960 and became the first local officer to be appointed to the post of Commissioner.

He was largely responsible for the development of Hong Kong’s biggest low-cost housing estate, Wah Fu near Aberdeen.

Hr. Liao, who is 43, is a member of the Town Planning Board and remains Vice Chairman of the Housing Authority.

Mr. Walden has served in a number of senior posts in the government, including Assistant Director of Commerce and Industry, Assistant Establishment Officer, Deputy Commissioner New Territories, Assistant Director of Urban Services, and Commissioner for Resettlement. He is 48.

Hr. Carroll, 47, worked in the Housing Division of the Urban Services Department for ten years. He took up the post of Housing Manager in 1962 and was promoted to Chief Housing Manager and later to Assistant Commissioner for Housing.

/Other ..••••••

Friday, October 26, 1973

- 6 -

Other Housing Department appointments gazetted today are:

Mr. Cheung Sing-Hoi (Housing Architect); Mr. D.I. McIntosh and Mr. E.R.

Husband (Assistant Directors of Housing).

Note to Editors: Photographs of Mr. Liao, Mr. Walden and

Mr. Carroll are boxed for collection.

-------0---------

CHINA WILL NOT ACCEPT USED CLOTHING THROUGH MAIL

******

The Post Office has been informed that the People’s Republic of China, intends to prohibit the importation, by post, of articles of used clothing and bedding.

The official communication received through the Universal Postel Union states that this decision has been taken to protect the health of the people and to avoid the introduction of contagious diseases.

The Post Office can, therefore, no longer accept any postal item known to contain these articles, and the public are warned that any postal item received in the People's Republic of China containing used clothing or bedding will be returned to the sender.

-------0---------

Friday, October 26, 1973

- 7 -

STAMP ADVISORY COMMITTEE SET UP

******

The Governor has approved the setting up of a non-statutory committee to provide advice and guidance on postage stamp design.

This results from a recommendation put forward by the Postmaster General on methods for improving the quality and design of Hong Kong’s »

postage stamps, and providing for a wider cross-section of public opinion to be obtained at.the design stage. The Chairman of the Committee is the Postmaster General.

Appointed to serve on the Committee for an initail period of three years are:-

The Hon. Szeto Wai, O.B.E., J.P.,

Mr. Christopher D1Almada e Castro, President of the Hong Kong Philatelic Society;

Mr. J.C.Y. Watt, Curator, Art Gallery, Chinese University of

Hong Kong;

Mr. Walter W.T. Yeung, J.P.,

Assistant Secretary for Home Affairs;

Mr. T.A. Birch,

Assistant Colonial Secretary, Home Affairs and Information Branch;

Mr. S.A. Hacker, Art Director,

Government Information Services.

The Committee will advise the Postmaster General on the designers to be invited to submit designs, the briefs according to which the desingers will work, the designs to be submitted for government approval and other related issues as the Postmaster General may refer to the Committee.

-------0--------- /8....................

Friday, October 26, 1975

- 8 -

HIGHER INTEREST ON TAX RESERVE CERTIFICATES

«***««***

The rate of interest payable on tax reserve certificates will be increased from 4.2 per cent to 5*7 per cent, tax free, as from next Thursday (November 1).

Commenting on this today, the Commissioner of Inland Revenue, Mr. F.E. Rainbow, explained that interest on tax reserve certificates was calculated in monthly steps and the new rate will be 47# cents per month for every 3100.

’Interest will be credited as before in respect of completed months between purchase and surrender in payment of tax,” he said. ”The new rate will be paid in respect of each month completed on or after November 1, 1973*,f

Citing an example, he said the interest on a 31,000 certificate bought on April 26, 1973 and surrendered in payment of tax on January J, 1974, would be calculated on the following basis:

April 26 to October 25, 1973

six complete months at 33*50 per month ... 321

October 26 to December 26, 1973 • •

two complete months at 34.75 per month ... 3, 9*?Q

Mr. Rainbow explained that interest is only credited when certificates are used to pay tax, and no interest is due where the principal value of a certificate, is repaid in cash. Interest also ceases to accrue after 3$ completed months without surrender for payment of tax.

, /A new.........

Friday, October 26, 1973

- 9 -

A new feature being introduced, he added, was the requirement to round up the total interest on all certificates used at any one time in payment of a tax demand to the nearest dollar.

J^his is done to avoid any complication taxpayers may have in deciding the exact amount of interest for set-off where calculations involve cents and half a cent.

lJIt is. to be noted that the adjustment is in respect of the total interest on certificates used and not in respect of the interest on each certificate used.”

An example of this rounding up is given below:-

E x a m p 1 e

The following certificates

(A) purchased 26th April 1973 $1,000

(B) purchased 27th July 1973 31,500

(C) purchased 28th November 1973 32,000

54,500

were submitted on account of a tax demand for 35,1^2 due on 10th February 1974.

Interest on (A) 6 months @ 33*50 821.00

5 months @ 34.75 31^.25 335.25

on (B) 5 months @ 35*25 815-75

3 months @ 37*125 821.375 337.125

on (C) 2 months @ 39*50 319.00

Interest 391*375

Demand note 35।1&2

Tax Deserve Certificates $4,500

Interest thereon 92 ^*592

Cash due 3_________57Q

» •

-------o-----------

/10.........

Friday, October 26, 1973

- 10 -

ITO LOOK IDENTITY CARDS FOR JUVENILES

******

A new type of juvenile identity cards will be introduced next Thursday (November 1) when the Registration of Persons (Amendment) Regulations 1973 come into effect.

The new cards will bear the holder’s photograph, full personal name in English and Chinese, date and place of birth and nationality -thereby malting it easier for holders to identify themselves when applying for jobs or for. schooling purposes.

Under the new regulations, the age of registering for a juvenile identity card is raised from six to 11 years, while that for re-registration for an adult identity card is revised from 17 to 18 years.

A spokesman for the Registration of Persons Department explained today that children between six anJ 10 years of age need no longer register for juvenile cards.

However, all 11-year-old children and those between 12 and 17 years who have not yet been registered for an identity card must be registered for the new identity cards.

Children aged 17 need no longer apply for adult identity cards, the spokesman said, but he emphasised that they must register for adult cards within >0 days of reaching the age of 18.

Tae spokesman said that in view of the very high number of children between the ages of 11 and 17 years, the provision of new juvenile identity cards would take some time to complete.

/Some .......

Friday, October 26, 1973

- 11 -

Some 120,000 children born between November 2, 19$ 1 and November 1, 1962 are required to register for the new type of juvenile identity card when the new scheme commences next Thursday.

"Children between the ages of 12 and 17 years who have not yet been registered for a card should do so immediately,” the spokesman said.

Representatives from the Registration of Persons Department are visiting schools to explain the new scheme and to distribute application forms to 11-year-old children.

The application forms should be completed by the children’s parents or guardians.

To facilitate registrations, parents or guardians are advised to

■■j attend with their children at a designated Registration of Persons Department’s Branch Office or Sub-Offioe.

Beginning from next week, two mobile teams f < om the department will also call on schools already visited to take photographs and thumb-prints ef the children and parents or guardians are requested to accompany their children to the registration centre to sign the application forms.

Parents or guardians wi 11 then be notified when and where to collect the new cards.

The new juvenile cards will be issued free of charge on first registration but 82 will be charged for a replacement as a result of loss, damage or defacement while 85 will be levied for amendments to prime registered particulars.

/”In view ••••••«

Friday, October 26, 1973

- 12 -

”In view of the special arrangements, parents and guardians are requested not to apply directly to the Registration of Persons Department office for the registration of their children/’ the spokesman said.

For those children who are not attending school, the parents or guardians should attend with their 11-year-old children at any of the department’s branch office or sub-offices.

Parents or guardians may seek advice, if they are still in doubt, at any of the Registration of Persons Department offices or call at their nearest City District offices or New Territories District offices.

Note to Editors: Photographs of the new juvenile identity cards

are boxed for collection.

-------0---------

/13.........

Friday, October 26, 1973

- 13 -

SMALL HOUSE POLICY HOOVES HOUSING STANDARDS IN N.T.

********

The New Territories Administration’s revised Small House Policy has made available 1.5 million square feet of private residential accommodation for New Territories people in less than a year.

This was stated today by the District Commissioner, New Territories, Mr. D.C. Bray, when he formally signed the 1,OOOth Building Licence to be issued under the scheme during a ceremony at the Yuen Long Town Hall.

At the same tine, a gift of furniture valued at 32,000 was presented to the licensee. The recipient, Mr. Cheung Cho-fat, is a villager of Sun Fung Wai in Tuen Mun.

He-will now be able to build a modern airy house, up to two storeys high and with a built-over area of up to 700 square feet in which his four school-aged children will have decent study facilities and plenty of space for play.

Mr. Bray also paid tribute to the excellent co-operation the N.T.A. had received from the Heung Yee Kuk in thrashing out the rules for the scheme which is specifically designed to improve the housing standards of the people of the rural New Territories.

Note to Editors: Copies of Mr. Bray’s full speech and photographs

of the handing-over ceremony will be boxed for collection this evening.

-------0---------

/14.........

Friday, October 26, 1973

1 Ji-

U.N. DRUG TEAM HERE SUNDAY

*******

A United Nations team that is studying ways to improve international cooperation to’fight drug trafficking in the Far East will arrive in Hong Kong on Sunday for a four-day visit.

The team, which consists of 10 members of the UN.N. Commission on Narcotic Drugs Ad Hoc Committee for the Far East Region, is making the visit as part of a month-long tour that will take it to eight Asian capitals.

The committee has already visited Bangkok, Colombo, Kuala Lumpur, Saigon and Vientiane.

During its Hong Kong visit, the committee will hold talks with government officials, including the Secretary for Security, Mr. G*P. Lloyd; the Commissioner for Narcotics, Mr. N.G. Rolph; the Commissioner of Police, Mr. C.P. Sutcliffe; and experts involved in the rehabilitation of drug addicts.

The committee is made up of representatives of six countries Australia, India, Thailand, Indonesia, Japan and Britain - and observers from the International Narcotics Control Board and Interpol. It is being led by Mr. J.T.O’Connor, the Assistant Comptroller of Customs and Excise in Canberra,Australia.

Other members of the committee include the British representative, the Assistant Secretary of State in the Home office, Mr. C.J. Train, and U.N. representative, Miss Betty Mount field. ....

Miss Mountfield is the Bangkok outposted officer for the U.N, Division of Narcotic Drugs in Geneva.

/The committee ......

Friday, October 26, 1973

- 15 -

The committee will leave Hong Kong on Wednesday, October 31, for Manila and Singapore.

Note to Editors: The Commissioner for Narcotics, Mr. N.G.

Rdph, will meet members of the U.N. Commission of Narcotic Drugs Ad Hoc Committee for the Far East when they arrive at Hong Kong International Airport on Royal Air Lao flight RY 410 at 1.45 p.m. on Sunday. Reporters and photographers will be given a chance to meet the chairman of the committee, Mr. T.G. O’Connor, and other representatives in the V.I.P. Room on the first Floor of the Airport Terminal at 2 p.m.

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Release time: 8.00 p.m

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Saturday, October 27, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No,

Hong Kong’s first controlled cargo handling basin being built at Wan Chai waterfront................................... 1

G.I.S. officer posted to Commerce and Industry Department •• 3

Members of the public warned against imposters selling advertising space in official publications ..................   4

Government Water Engineer retires after 22 years’ service with the Government ........................................... 5

Improvement of drainage systems........•....................... 6

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Saturday, October 27, 1973

- 1 -

FIRST CONTROLLED MARINE DEPARTMENT CARGO

HANDLING BASIN UNDER CONSTRUCTION

«««»***

Hong Kong’s first large scale cargo handling basin is now being built on the Wan Chai Reclamation while 10 other similar facilities are being planned or under constx-vction.

Disclosing this today, a spokesman for the Marine Department said that the cargo handling basins are bsing built to cater the future demand of the ever increasing conventional lighter cargo operations on the waterfronts up to the early 1980’s..

The spokesman said the Wan Chai Cargo Handling Basin was a pilot scheme which will provide comprehensive cargo handling facilities for vessels and vehicles. . .... .

It will include a canteen, toilets, shower facilities and public telephones for workers using the Basin. An administrative building and shroffs office will be located within the ccmpoun<|,

The Basin, tc be managed by the Marine Department,is located on the Wan Chai Reclamation east of the ferry pier concourse.

There will be a concrete apron adjacent to the whole length of seawall backed up by a 25-foot wide lorry parking strip. Apart from this, there will be a 35-foot wide carriageway within the Basin.

^Construction of road and drainage works on the site is now in full swing and it is expected to be completed in May next year,” the spokesman added.

/"Vehicles .......

Saturday, October 27, 1973

- 2 -

”Vehicles will be charged at an hourly rate for time spent in the Basin and day and night rates will differ,” the spokesman said.

However, no vehicle, or vessels will in general be al1 owed to occupy space at the Basin unless actually working cargo.

In Kwun Tong, a cargo handling basin will also be built on the waterfront at the extension of Hoi Bun Road to be run on similar lines to Wan Chai.

Sites for other cargo handling basins have been earmarked on the reclamation at Chai Wan, Shaukiwan, Western Reclamation, Kowloon Bay, Tong Mei Road in Tai Kok Tsui, Shamshuipo, Rambler Channel, Tsuen Wan and Castle Peak.

In the meantime, additional temporary public cargo handling areas will be allocated on the future reclamation in Central to the west of the Macau Perry Terminal and Shamshuipo to relieve the heavy congestion at the existing public cargo waterfronts on both sides of the harbour.

Last year, a total of 6.3 million deadweight tons of cargo was handled over all public cargo waterfronts.

About 2,000 port working craft, excluding small tugs for towing lighters, are now involved in traditional cargo operations within the port. Such craft include non-motorised steel lighters and motorised wooden cargo j units.

’’Comprehensive legislation is in its final stages which will give the Director of Marine control over designated areas of the waterfront which will be either enclaves similar to Wan Chai or more open public waterfronts,” the spokesman disclosed.

/"Other .......

Saturday, October 27Y 1973

- 3 -

’’Other waterfronts will then be excluded from cargo working activities,” he stressed.

’’The legislation will give control over vehicles, vessels and persons in such enclaves or areas and will enable the Director of Marine to remove anything causing obstruction, including any cargoes which are abandoned or causing obstruction,” the spokesman added.

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G.I.S. OFFICER POSTED TO COMMERCE AND INDUSTRY DEPARTMENT

******

Note to Editors: Mr. Brian Hickman, Principal Information

Officer, has been appointed Public Relations Officer to the Commerce and Industry Department. He is on secondment from the Government Information Services.

Mr. Hickman’s office is in Commerce and Industry Department headquarters at 46, Connaught Road Central, Hong Kong, and his telephone number is 5-2577^.

Saturday, October 27, 1973

- 4 -

WARNING AGAINST IMPOSTERS

******

Members of the public are warned against imposters selling advertising space in official publications of the Inland Revenue Department and soliciting funds for charities.

A spokesman for the department said today that reports were received from time to time of such people who claim to be officers of the department* "The department does not insert any advertisement in the information pamphlets it issues to-the public nor does it solicit funds for charities," he emphasized.

Under special circumstances, an officer of the department —- acting in his official capacity — may call personally to make enquiries or to deliver correspondence such as urgent demand notes for unpaid tax.

"However the officer who makes the delivery is not permitted to receive cash or cheques in settlement of the demand note.

"Payment must be made only to the listed official revenue collection centres," the spokesman added.

The officer must have both an identity card and a written authority, with his photograph, from the Commissioner of Inland Revenue issued specifically for the purpose.

"Any caller should be asked to produce these identification documents before entry," the spokesman stressed.

He added that if anyone had any doubt as to the caller’s request or intention the Deputy Cbmmissioner should be contacted immediately at telephone No. >-95270, or the Principal Tax Inspector at telephone No. 5-248001 extension 21.

/5 .......

- - 0 - -

Saturday, October 271 1973

I

- 5 -

GOVERNMENT WATER ENGINEER RETIRES

*«***««

Mr. J.M. Pettigrew, Government Water Engineer, is retiring

after 22 years1 service with the Government.

Mr. Pettigrew was first appointed as a Mechanical Engineer in November 1951* In 19&1 he was promoted to Senior Engineer, and agaiii to Chief Mechanical Engineer in 19&5* He was promoted to his present post in the following year.

To mark the occasion, Mr. A.S. Robertson, Director of Public Works;

and Mr. 17. T. Knight, Director of Water Supplies, will be presenting Mr.

Pettigrew with a gift on behalf of his colleagues in the Waterworks Office.

The presentation ceremony w.ill be held on Tuesday (October JO), the same day that Mr. Pettigrew is going on pre-retirement leave.

Note to Editors: The ceremony will be held at 4 p.m. on Tuesday

in the conference room of the Public Works Department ' on the 21st floor of Murray Building. You are cordially invited to send a reporter and/or photographer to cover the event.

Saturday, October 27, 1973

- 6 -•• . j

niPROVMZNT OF DRAINAGE SYSTEMS

»**«**«

Work to improve the drainage system and stability of the slopes

in the Shau Kei Wan Village areas is expected to begin next month.

• « > The work, which will take about 15 months to complete, involves

the construction of retaining walls and about 4,000 feet of stormwater I* * * **

drains#

On completion, the risk of flooding during the rainy season will

be greatly reduced.

Also to be improved is a stormwater drainage system near the • ' « « • »

Children’s Orthopaedic Hospital and Convalescent Home at Sandy Bay.

The improvement work will involve the replacement of the existing

stormwater drain by a 320-foot culvert.

The work, expected to begin in December, will take about six months

■ i

to complete. • • a • « Both projects have been designed by the Drainage Works Division

of the Civil Engineering Office of the Public. Works Department.

------0.---------

Release time: 2.30 p#m#

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Monday, October 2% 1973

CONTENTS

Page Nof

Report On proposed Lama refinery indicates no pollution damage to environment....................................... 1

Public Works Director to assume new post in Britain in January ...............................................  • ••• J

Learner drivers reminded not to use cross harbour tunnel ••• 5

95 building plans approved by Building Authority in September .................................................. 6

New jury list to be posted at Supreme Court................. 7

Duke of Edinburgh’s Awards for participants from correctional homes • •••••••••••»•••»•«•••••••••<•••••••••••••••••<>•••••• 8

Argentine heart specialist group to visit China ............ 9

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Monday, October 29, 1973

- 1 -

REFINERY REPORT ON SALE

Lamma Rural Leaders Urged To Study It Carefully

****««!*«

A shortened version of the Environmental Feasibility Study by Messrs. Cremer and Warner on the proposed Shell Refinery on Lamma Tsi and will be on sale from Wednesday (October 31) at #9.50 per copy.

The abridged report, in English and Chinese, contains a full description of the project as proposed by the Shell Company as well as the conclusions of the consultants on the environmental aspects of the refinery.

In very general terms, the consultants conclude that there should be no material pollution damage to the environment as a whole, provided adequate safeguards and standards are included in the design stage and provided an effective pattern of enforcement is introduced.

However, the consultants feel that the local impact of a major industrial plant on the rural setting of Lamma will change the nature of the island and the lives of local residents.

Copies of the report were presented to the village representatives of North Lamma at a meeting held on the island today by the District Officer who advised them to study it carefully.

There would be opportunities for them to discuss the report and the possible consequences of the refinery’s establishment, if approved, the District Officer said.

/He hoped •••••••

Monday, October 2% 1973

2

He hoped that now that the report was available, a more informed dialogue on the matter could be established between the government and the villagers.

Copies of the unabridged version of the report, which was too long and too technical to be published in full, have already been made available to the Press and to Unofficial members of the Executive and Legislative Councils and also to interested organisations including the Conservancy Association.

Also on sale on Wednesday will be the report of the government group which visited Singapore and Australia in 1971.

This report has been amended to exclude reference to expressions of opinion and other comment made to t ie group in confidence by people in the refineries and in the government departments which the group visited.

A government spokesman said today it was hoped that members of the public would themselves take advantage of the publication to inform themselves on this important issue.

He added it would not be possible to reach a decision on the refinery until further studies on the proposals to TOA Oil of Japan and the Textile Alliances Ltd. for a refinery and petrochemical complex — n_1 so on Lajnma Island - had been completed. • -

The reports are on sale at the Government Publication Centre,

Star Ferry Concourse, Hong Kong.

-------o---------

/3........

Monday, October 29,, 1973

- 3 -

PUBLIC WORKS DIRECTOR ASSUMES NEW POST IN BRITAIN

*«««***

Mr. A.S. Robertson, acting Director of Public Works is to become the Chief Executive of the Northumbrian Water Authority in England. He is expected to leave Hong Kong in January and will assume his new duties right away.

Mr. Robertson, who has been in the P.W.D. in Hong Kong for nearly 21 years, will be in charge of one of ten regional authorities which have been newly created to rationalise-the entire water industry in England and Wales.

The Northumbrian Water Authority is concerned with the counties of Northumberland and Durham and its responsibilities will include water supply, sewerage and sewage disposal, the control of rivers, land drainage, fisheries, and the recreational use of all waters in the area.

Mr. Robertson, 4?, joined the government as an engineer in 1953 and devoted many years of his early career to the Waterworks Office. He was appointed Government Water Engineer in 19^6 and Director of Water Supplies on returning from a course in desalination technology in 19&9* In November last year he was appointed Deputy Director of Public Works and became Acting Director in June this year.

Mr. Robertson has a Master of Engineering degree in desalination technology, an honours degree in mechanical and civil engineering, is a Fellow of the Institute of Civil Engineers, a Fellow of the Institute of Water Engineers and a member of the Institute of Structural Engineers.

/Commenting.........

Monday, October 29» 1973

- 4 -

Commenting on his new appointment, Mr. Robertson said that his training and experience in Hong Kong would stand him in good stead.

”We are used to doing things quickly and on a large scale here”, he said, ’’and we try to look at the whole picture. This is exactly what is needed in my new job.

"There is no place in the world like Hong Kong and my wife and

I will miss our friends here unless they are prepared to brave the climate of the north-east of England and visit us. However, I look forward to the challenge of my new job and to building up an organisation which wd be able to tackle its problems in good Hong Kong fashion.”

Note to Editors: Copies of Mr. Robertson’s photograph are

boxed for collection.

Monday, October 29, 1973

TUNNEL BAN ON LEARNER DRIVERS


Learner drivers are reminded tna^ they cannot use the cross harbour tunnel when engaged in driving lessons•

A spokesman for the Transport Department explained today that under the Cross Harbour Tunnel Ordinance learner drivers were prohibited to enter or remain in the tunnel area*

The reminder follows recent cases where learner drivers, in

particular motorcyclists, attempted to go through the tunnel. Appropriate traffic signs had been pos'cea on vie approach roads to indicate the restriction.

Meanwhile, special traffic arrangements will be imposed in Deep

Water Bay and Kowloon Tong on Wednesday (October 31). With effect from 10 a.m. on that day, no motor vehicles with unladen weights exceeding two tons will be allowed to use the section of Deep Water Bay Road between Nam Fung Road and Shouson Hill Road East. Drivers of such vehicles wishing to use the section of Deep V.'atc\. Bay Road must apply in writing to the Commissioner for Transport for a special permit.

At the same time, the section of Rutland Quadrant between Waterloo

Road and Stafford Road will be routed from two-way to one-way east-bound traffic.

The special arrangement is to facilitate road improvement works

at Waterloo Road between Flint Road and York Road.

Traffic signs will be posted in the areas to guide motorists.

- - 0 - -

/6

Monday, October 29, 1973

- 6

IE3W BUILDING PLAINS

*«***♦*

A total of 95 building plans were approved by the Buildings Ordinance Office in September this yearn

Most of these plans are for multi-storey combined apartment/ commercial buildings on Long Kong Island, in Kowloon and the New Territories - including five 2CK-storey blocks in Mei Foo Sun Cheun in Lai Chi Kok.

In the same month, 50 buildings were certified for occupation, including an additional container terminal and a maintenance shop building at the Kwai Chung Container Terminal.

Ihe total declared costs of these buildings exceeded $100 million.

In addition, 5$ building projects were cleared for work to begin, including a shipyard, a gas storage tank and buildings on Tsing Yi Island Approval was given for the demolition of fifty-nine buildings.

Among these were 20 dangerous buildings located in Shaukiwan Main Street East, Tsung Sau Lane West and Kat Hing Wai in Kam Tin, New Territories.

-------0---------

Monday, October 29, 1973

- 7 -

NEW JURY LIST TO BE POSTED

******

A further list of common jurors will be posted at the Supreme Court on Thursday (November 1), the Registrar of the Supreme Court, Mr. J.R. Oliver, announced today.

The list will be displayed near the lift inside the south-west entrance of the Supreme Court Building and will remain posted for 14 days.

During this period any person may apply in writing to the Registrar requiring that his name or the name of some other person be posted or removed. Specific reasons must be given.

The Registrar will add or remove the name at his discretion and alter the list if necessary.

-------0---------

/8........

Monday, October 29, 1973

- 8 -

DUKE OF EDINBURGH’S AWARD PRESENTATION CEREMONY

********

The Social Welfare Departments operating authority of the Duke

of Edinburgh1s Awardswill hold a presentation ceremony on Wednesday (October 31) at 0 Pui Shan Boys’ Home at 2.30 p.m.

Mr. Thomas C.Y. Lee, Deputy Director of Social Welfare, will officiate at the ceremony.

A total of ?4 members from four correctional institutions of

the department’s Probation and Corrections Division will receive awards.

They comprise 3^ members from Castle Peak Boys’ Home, 21 from

0 Pui Shan Boys’ Home, 13 from Ma Tan Wei Girls’ Home and seven from Begonia Road Boys’ Home.

All have undergone at least six months practical training on service, expeditions, interest design for living, and physical activities.

Guests invited include magistrates, civic and kaifong leaders, university authorities, probation officers and other senior departmental staff.

A first aid demonstration by award members will be held after the presentation ceremony.

Note to Editors: You are invited to cover the ceremony. Trans-

portation will be provided. Those who would like to make use of this facility should meet at the Public Relations Unit, Social Welfare Department, Room 528(A)(1), 5th floor, Lee Gardens, East Wing, at 1.30 p.m. on Wednesday.

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/9.......

Monday, October 29, 1973

- 9 -

ARGENTINE CARDIAC MISSION ARRIVES

*******

A group of Argentine heart specialists arrived in Hong Kong this afternoon on their way to China.

The mission, led by the Secretary for Public Health, Professor Domingo Liotta, was met at Kai Tak by Dr. H.S. Chan, Deputy Director of Medical and Health Services (Health), the Consul-General of the Argentine in Hong Kong, Senor Miguel de Martini, and Senora de Martini.

During their three-day stay in Hong Kong, the cardiologists will meet senior staff of the Medical and Health Department, the Hong Kong Cardiological Society and the Hong Kong Medical Association.

Hie visitors are anxious to participate in an exchange of knowledge, ideas and new methods for cardiac surgery, thoracic surgery, haemodynamic studies, extracoporeal circulation, anaesthesia, acute myocardial infarction and organization in cardiac surgery.

They will tour the Kowloon and Queen Elizabeth hospitals*

Members of the mission will attend a dinner in their honour tonight with the Hong Kong Medical Association acting as hosts.

To-morrow (Tuesday), Dr, G.H. Choa, Director of Medical and Health Services, will call on the leader of the delegation at the Furama Hotel, and present him with a memento on behalf of the Hong Kong Government.

The mission will leave for China on Wednesday on an official visit.

-------0---------

Rele/se time: 7.00 p.m.

PRH 7

(fkIIIw IgisI life

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Tuesday, October JO, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No.

New consultative system to stimulate public participation in policy-making process ••••••••••..............    1

Registration of companies passes JO,000 mark ......  J

New session of Legislative Council resumes tomorrow •••••••• 4

Accidents on construction sites claim six lives •••••••••••• 5

Companies interested in possible joint ventures with overseas f-irms asked to contact DC & I 6

Visiting U<N. drug experts to meet the Press tomorrow •••••• 7

# 9

Temporary water interruption in Western District ..  7

Motorists reminded to give precedence to emergency vehicles. 8

Governor remits mandatory sentence on 1^—year-old boy •••••• 9

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Tuesday, October 30, 1975

- 1 -

GREATER PUBLIC PARTICIPATION IN POLICY-MAKING PROCESS

********

A new consultative system is to be introduced shortly to encourage more members of the public to participate in the government’s policy-malting process.

Under the new procedure, future important government policy programmes will be published as a Green Paper for full public discussion before a decision is made. The decision will then take into account the opinion of the community.

This will enable members of the public to make known their views on government proposals before these are shaped into firm policy.

To a wide extent, the public is already being consulted on major issues and the new move will broaden this accepted practice.

There are at present about 120 advisory boards and committees on which views other than those of government officials are represented.

The representatives come from many walks of life — some of them are ordinary people, while others, because of their professions or businesses, are more knowledgeable in special subjects.

Draft legislation is also published in advance and commented on before it passes into law and White Papers are issued from time to time for public comment.

However this latter course is taken at a stage of the decision process when the proposals are about to be finalised. The publication of Green Papers will provide expanded scope for public involvement and consultation before proposals affecting the community are accepted and implemented.

/Commenting ••••••

Tuesday, October 30, 1973

« 2 -

Commenting on the new procedure, a government spokesman said public attitudes varied greatly according to social and economic status, educational background, and age range of different groups within the population.

"The use of the Green Paper procedure will provide a channel for the inflow of public opinion essential to sound policy planning," he said.

On some occasions, however, the new procedure may not be very practicable, as with Budget proposals and questions on which the advice of statutory bodies has been sought.

"Nevertheless, there are many issues on which public comment can be of great value to the government in formulating policy," the spokesman added.

He was confident that the process of public consultation would develop wider community involvement in the affairs of Hong Kong.

All government resources, especially the services of the Information Services Department and Radio E;..ag Kong will be utilised to publicise the Green Papers and to stimulate public discussion.

The methods to be employed will include radio discussions, "meet the media" sessions and public affairs programmes on television.

The Green Papers will be summarised in leaflet form to reach the widest readership.

Comments by the public wilx be collated and assessed, and will provide accurate and comprehensive data for the government’s policy-makers.

-------0 ---------

Tuesday, October 30, 1973

- 3 -

OVER 30,000 COMPANIES REGISTERED IN HONG KONG ttt*****

Another milestone was passed in the Companies Registry recently when the total number of companies on the register exceeded 30,000 for the first time.

Commenting on the rapid increase in the number of companies, the Registrar of Companies, Mr. V/. Hume said it had taken just over 100 years for the first 10,000 companies to be incorporated sxnce incorporation of companies in Hong Kong began in 1865.

The next 10,000 companies appeared on the register in the following five years — that is, from 1966 to 1971. "In little more than two years since 1971 the number of local companies incorporated has risen by 10,000 to a total of over JO,000," said Mr. Hume.

Every company on the register is obliged to file a variety of documents relating to its affairs, and the staff concerned often call at the Companies Registry to inspect the files. "It will be appreciated, therefore, that the Companies Registry is now much busier than it has ever been at any time in its history," Mr. Hume added.

The documents that a company has to file are set out in a booklet in both English and Chinese. These booklets are issued free of charge to all new companies and they are available at all times in the Companies Registry.

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Tuesday, October JO, 1975

- 4 -

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL MEETING ***♦♦**

Six Unofficial Members of the Legislative Council will speak tomorrow (Wednesday) afternoon on a motion of thanks for the Governor’s address to the Councils new session.

They are Hr. P.C. Woo, Hr. Szeto Wai, Dr, S.Y. Chung, Mr. Wilfred Wong, Mr. R.H. Lobo end Urs. Joyce Symons.

Die remaining Unofficial Members will speak on Wednesday, November 14.

Officials vzill reply on November 28 and 29.

Twenty sessional papers will be tabled in the Council tomorrow.

They include the Hong Kong Narcotics Progress Report for the year ending March 31, 1973; the Annual Report by the Director of Agriculture and Fisheries for the year 1972-73 and the Report of the Board of Education on the Proposed Expansion of Secondary School Education in Hong Kong over the next decade.

Seven bills will be read for the first and second time.

They are the Motor Vehicle Insurance (Third Party Risks) (Amendment) Bill 1973, the District Court (Amendment) (No. 2) Bill 1975? the Telecommunication (Amendment) (Ho. 2) Bill 1975, the Education Scholarships Fund (Amendment) Bill 1975> the Landlord and Tenant (Consolidation) (Amendment) Bill 1975? the Landlord and Tenant (Consolidation) (Amendment) (No. 2) Rill 1973 and the Community Relief Trust Fund (Amendment) Bill 1973-

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/5........

Tuesday, October JO, 197J

- 5 -

SIX DIE ON WORK SITES «#***«*

Six workers were killed and 3^7 injured last month in accidents on construction sites, according to figures released by the Labour Department.

The Industrial Safety Training Officer of the Labour Department, Mr. A.H. Carter, said today many of the accidents could have been avoided had both management and workers taken adequate steps to remove the hazards prevailing in the industry.

’’Effective accident prevention will never be achieved unless both management and workers are willing to join forces with the government to reduce the present high accident rate,” he stressed.

”In particular, management should take an active and positive role by not only complying with all legal requirements, but also by ensuring that their supervisors and workers receive proper safety training.”

The Industrial Safety Training Centre offers, free of charge, basic and advanced training courses to personnel in industry.

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/6........

Tuesday, October 30, 1975

- 6 -

OPPORTUNITIES FOR JOINT ENTERPRISE

*******

The Commerce and Industry Department is anxious to obtain more information on Hong Kong companies which might be interested in expanding their operations through enquiries from overseas.

”0f particular interest are companies engaged in the metal-based • • • • • • industries such as tool and die-making, electro-plating and anodizing, and general machining to fine tolerances,"a spokesman for the department said.

However, he added that more information and contacts were needed on other industries as well.

The Industrial Development Branch of the department has for many years encouraged investment in Hong Kong’s manufacturing industry.

It has received many enquiries, from overseas industrialists wishing to place sub-contracting orders or to enter into joint venture or licensing arrangements with local manufacturers,

Tiie spokesman said: ”5he enquirers, who come from a very wide range of industries, often ask for the names of Hong Kong factories which have the capacity and the capability to carry out particular manufacturing processes.” He added that very often these enquiries resulted in useful business.

Interested parties are invited to contact Mr. K.C. Kwong of the Industrial Development Branch at telephone No. 5-445656 who will be pleased to answer questions on this subject.

-------0---------

/7 c......

Tuesday, October 30« 1973

VISITING DRUG EXPERTS TO MEET PRESS


Note to Editors

-Hie chairman of the United Nations Commission

on Narcotic Drugs Ad Hoc Committee for the Far East Region, Mr. J.T. O’Connor, will discuss the outcome of his committee’s four-day fact-finding visit to Hong Kong at a press conference to be held in the 35 mm- Theatre, 5th floor, Beaconsfield House, at 9*45 a.m. tomorrow (October 31).

Die United Kingdom representative on the 10-member committee and Head of the Home Office Drugs Branch in London, Mr. C.J. Train, is expected to toko part in the Press conference along with tho Commissioner for Narcotics, Mr. N.G. Rolph.

You are invited to have the meeting covered.

- 0

WATER CUT

Water supply to a number of premises in Western District will be interrupted for eight hours starting from 10 p.m. tomorrow (Wednesday).

The temporary stoppage is to facilitate connection of a fresh water mains.

All premises in Kom U Street, In Kui Lane and Ko Shing Street will be affected, as well as Nos. 121-165, Queen’s Road West.

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/8

Tuesday, October 30, 1973

- 8 -

EMERGENCY VEHICLES NEED CLEAR WAY mm ••

Motorists are reminded that they should give way to emergency vehicles so these can get to their destinations as quickly as possible.

"Delay in getting to the scene of a fire, serious accident, or crime can result in unnecessary loss of life and property," a spokesman for the Transport Department said today.

Drivers must draw to the side of the road, and if necessary stop their cars, on hearing the sound of a gong, bell or siren indicating the approach of an emergency vehicle.

"By co-operating in this way, they can enable fire engines, ambulances and police vehicles to get through quickly," he added.

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Tuesday, October 30, 1973

- 9 -

REMISSION OF SENTENCE

He*##****

The Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, today remitted the sentence of a 14-year-old boy vzho was given a six months mandatory sentence for possessing an offensive weapon in a public place.

Tlie boy was aged 13 when he was first charged, but due to the illness of the magistrate who heard the case, he reached the age of 14 when the sentence was passed and the term of imprisonment was then mandatory.

He later made an appeal which was turned down.

The authority to grant the remission is given to the Governor under Article 15 of the Letters Patent which provides him with the prerogative of granting pardons and remitting fines or sentences.

The boy was due for release from prison with the normal maximum amount of remission sometime next month.

The Governor’s decision today will enable him to be released this evening.

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Release time: 7.00 p.m.

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Wednesday, October 31, 1973 • • • • •

CONTENTS

Page No.

Draft 10-year medical development plan tabled in Legislative

Council • •.....•••••••.•••«••........................ 1

Public comment invited on proposed expansion of medical services over the next decade •....................... 6

Board of Education’s report on proposed expansion of secondary school education «•••••••......................••••••• 7

Mr. P.C. Woo urges employers and the government to keep wages in line with salaries.....• •......................... 12

Special committees proposed to stabilise cost of living • ••• 15

Call for controls on rising food prices  ............• 19

Comprehensive plan for development of rural areas needed • •• 23

Call for direct Hong Kong representation in British Parliament •••••••••••••••••....•........................... 27

Stiffer laws suggested to control pornography •••••••••••••• 31

More students will receive scholarships under draft new legislation ••••••••••.........•...................... 35

Resident’s bravery in crime prevention recognised .... 3$

Import of certain cars may be prohibited under proposed new laws ••••«••••...........••••......................... 37

More detailed estimates of G.D.P. to be provided ••••••••••• 3$

Progress report on narcotics tabled in Legislative Council.. bO

/a.......

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

V

- 2 -

Page Ng

Rent control Bill will not spark off a rush for rent increases ..............................................................  42

Public comment on Board of Education’s report invited ••••••• 46

Seven Bills receive first and second readings •••*•••••••«••* 47

New Territories schools to hold sports day tomorrow ••••••••• 48

Temporary water interruption in Kowloon Tong ........ ....... 48

New tenancy agreement for estate shop tenants to be drafted*. 49

Wednesday, October J1, 1973

MEDICAL DEVELOPMENT IN THE NEXT DECADE

Fai>-Peaching Implications Of Draft New 10-Year Plan

***»»***»

Four new hospitals on the Island, Kowloon and the New Territories are recommended by the Medical Development Advisory Committee to cope with the anticipated medical needs of a population expected to be more than five million in the next decade.

The Committee, under the chairmanship of Sir Albert Rodrigues, was set up on March 27 this year to consider and advise on the development and phased implementation of medical and health services between now and 19o3» Its report, a comprehensive document with vast implications, was tabled in the Legislative Council today, and at the same time published for public information and comment.

By early next year, after the recommendations have been carefully considered, a clear programme of development is expected to be laid before the Executive and Legislative Councils.

Tiie four new hospitals, strategically located in areas of growing density, is one of a host of major recommendations embracing new training facilities for dentists and dental nurses, more training facilities for doctors, general and psychiatric nurses, more polyclinics and clinics,, and regionalisation of the hospital and clinic services — all costing million of dollars.

The proposed hospitals are a general hospital in East Kowloon, another general hospital at Shatin, a psychiatric hospital on Hong Kong Island, and a general hospital at Tuen Mun, near Castle Peak.

/The hospitals ••.••••

Wednesday, October 3% 1973

2 -

The hospitals will together provide 3,900 beds. Capital outlay will be about 3316 million, and recurrent costs 3105 million a year — at present prices.

The total number of new beds is, however, in the region of 8,000, which, added to those already in the pipeline in both government and assisted hospitals, will bring the figure to 27,500, or a ratio of 5.5 per 1,000 of the population.

The Committee divides hospital beds into two categories, acute and non-acute, and the report says more non-acute, or chronic beds, are required, not only for general cases, but also for psychiatric and geriatric cases — the latter in view of an ageing population.

Provision of "day beds"

There is a provision for what the Committee describes as "day beds" to accommodate mainly geriatric, psychiatric and chronic cases requiring minimum medical and nursir^ care. These beds, to be provided in new clinics, will be used for convalescent cases, or will serve as "half-way houses" for patients not requiring hospitalisation, but who are unfit to be left at home all the time.

Four clinics will be under construction at Ngau Tau Kok, Lam Tin, Lei Mui; Shue and Ma Kwai Chung, with facilities designed to meet the expected number of attendances. Future polyclinics will incorporate such special services as chest and psychiatric clinics, public health laboratories, physiotherapy and occupational therapy departments.

The regionalisation scheme is based on four regional hospitals, the Queen Mary, the Queen Elizabeth, the Princess Margaret in Lai Chi Kok, and the Kwong Wali, of the Tung Wah group.

/Regionalisation ••••••

Wednesday, October 31, 1973

- 3 -

Regionalisation means that patients are referred from general clinics, first to specialist clinics or polyclinics, and then, depending on the nature of the illness, to a district or the regional hospital. The difference between district and regional lies mainly in the specialist service available, hence the flow of patients from one to the other can also be bi-directional.

In calculating the future requirements of doctors in government service to staff hospitals, clinics, polyclinics and administrative offices planned for the next decade, the Committee believes more than 1,300 will be required, or 100 new doctors a year between 1983 and 1992.

The Committee says since it cannot be expected that the Government will be able to recruit these Cantonese-speaking doctors from abroad,”a local source of supply” able to produce them by 1982 is needed.

Training of Nurses

Concerning nurses, the Committee believes that the gap between requirements and supply will also increase substantially in the years to come, and for this reason, it recommends that a third general nurses training school be built, with a minimum capacity of an annual intake of 150 to supplement existing government training schools at the Queen Mary and the Queen Elizabeth hospitals.

As a first step towards giving dental care to school children, the Committee urges the construction of a dental nurses’ school and a school dental clinic. Proposals for both have already been prepared by the Medical and Health Department.

/The Committee

Wednesday, October J1, 1973

- 4 -

The Committee says it has considered the desirability of training dentists locally. While it has not attempted to fix a dentist-to-population ratio for the future, it agrees that plans should be made for a dental school, starting with a pre-clinical annual intake of at least 40, with an annual output of about 60 dentists from 1980 onwards. It estimates that there will be one dentist to 6,000 of the population by 1990.

Other Recommendations

The Committee’s report also makes these recommendations

♦ The accident services should be re-organised so that hospitals are given the roles of "accident centres" and "designated accident centres" within the regionalisation scheme. The Committee believes that with the rise of accidents as a result of rapid industrialisation, traffic congestion, fire hazards and natural disasters, only the successful application of preventive measures will reduce fatality and disablement.

* The experiment in community nursing now being carried out by voluntary agencies should be studied to see whether such a scheme is feasible within the framework of other social services necessary to augment a district nursing service.

* The results of the Medical and Health Department’s pilot methadone maintenance scheme should be considered ca.refi.il 1 y to determine whether an out-patient service should be instituted for the treatment of drug addicts. Such an out-patient service would require more clinic space, staff, and so on.

* With the Medical and Health Department’s assumption of direct responsibility for family planning, this aspect of the department’s work should proceed in conjunction with the expansion of its maternal and child health service•

/To make

Wednesday, October 3% 1973

- 5 -

* To make of the disabled better contributing members of society, rehabilitation work should be expanded by the provision of physiotherapy and occupational therapy departments in new polyclinics. More non-acute beds implies the recognition that some cases will require long-term hospitalisation, for example, paraplegic patients.

♦ With the Tung Wah group of hospitals joining government and assisted hospitals in the regionalisation scheme, the policy of free beds in the group’s hospitals should be revised so that the government fee of 32 a day inclusive in general wards be applicable to all hospitals within the scheme. The remission of fees for those unable to pay will continue to apply. General ward fees should be raised from 32 to S3 a day, and then to 35 a day within 18 months of the first raise, to take account of increasing costs. The infirmaries maintained by the Tung Wah group fcr chronic cases should continue to be free.

Note to Editors: Sir Albert Rodrigues, Chairman of the Medical

Development Advisory Committee, and Dr. G.H. Choa, Director of Medical and Health Services, and the Committee’s vice-chairman, will meet members of the Press, radio and TV to answer questions on the report at 9 a.m. on Thursday, November 1, (tomorrow) in the theatre of the Information Services Department, 5th floor, Beaconsfield House.

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Wednesday, October J1, 1973

- 6 -

1EDICAL DEVELOPMENT ADVISORY COMMITTEE REPORT Proposals For 10-Year Stretch Laid Before Legislative Council t*$**t**»*

The Ron. Director of Medical and Health Services, Dr. G.H. Choa, today introduced the report of the Medical Development Advisory Committee when it was tabled in the Legislative Council.

He said the report advised on a programme of improvement and expansion in the medical and health fields between now and 1982.

It covered the provision of hospital beds, fuller use of government and assisted hospitals, and the numbers of doctors, dentists, and nurses that would be required — identifying the constraints, in the way of staff shortages, that would affect the pace of expansion.

Dr. Choa told the Council that the conclusions and recommendations of the Committee, chaired by the Hon. Sir Albert Rodrigues, had not yet been accepted by the Government.

But they were being published so that the reactions of the community us a whole could be obtained and considered. He advised those wishing to express their views to do so before the end of December this year, and such comments would be "taken carefully into account by the Government before it announces its conclusions."

Dr. Choa explained that the report would be subject to an annual review "in the light of changes in circumstances, more refined data or statistics obtained, and any variation in priorities."

"In this way, we shall be able to keep well up to date on our plans emd programmes," he said.

Note to-Editors? A summary of the Medical Development Advisory Committee’s report is issued separately. Copies of the report, in English and Chinese, are being distributed in the Press boxes, Government Information Services, later this evening.

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Wednesday, October J1, 1973

- 7 -

BOARD OF EDUCATION’S RECOMMENDATIONS

Provision Of Secondary School Places Over Next 10 Years

********

The Board of Education strongly recommends that the principal objective for the proposed expansion of secondary school education in Hong Kong over the next decade should be the provision of three-year places for 100 per cent of children in the 12-14 age group and five-year school places for 40 per cent of those in the 12-16 age group.

In a letter to the Governor on submission of the Board’s Report, the Chairman, Mr. P.C. Woo said: ”1 believe this objective can be achieved by the end of 1934.”

Mr. Woo added: ”We have proposed in our Report that there should be an interim target, which would involve the provision by the end of 1981 of sufficient three-year places for 80 per cent of the 12-14 age group and sufficient five-year places for 36 per cent of the 12-16 age group.”

The Board believes that both these targets can be achieved so long as the proposed rate of building of schools can be maintained, and teacher training facilities in the colleges of education and universities can be expanded.

The Board’s Report, tabled in the Legislative Council this afternoon, recommends that ”it is educationally unsound to introduce bi-sessional operation and rotation into the non-academic sector particularly at a time when the main thrust of development must be made in that sector.”

It points out that the immediate advantages provided in terms of quantity are outweighed by the disadvantages of bi-sessional operation when it is viewed in a broader context.

/The Report ••••••

Wednesday, October J1, 1973

- 8 -

The Report emphasised that "quantitative targets involving the provision of increased places should not be achieved at the expense of the qualitative aims of Hong Kong’s education system.”

The Board also recommended that rotation was not considered acceptable because of the strains imposed upon staff of schools and the disruption of family life.

As regards "floating” classes, the Board said this arrangement already existed in standard Secondary Technical Schools. It was also used in existing Prevocational Schools.

On financing school buildings the Board noted that the Government’s declared policy was that expansion of education, wherever possible, would be in the aided sector.

It therefore recommended that the Government’s contribution to the capital costs of new building projects should be increased from 80 per cent to 90 per cent and exceptionally, to 100 per cent.

In the case of secondary technical and prevocational schools built in housing estates, the Board said financial assistance should also be given to the cost of furniture and equipping such schools.

The Board urged the Government to take practical steps to reduce the time taken to allocate sites for school projects.

On public examinations the Board recommended that every effort should be made to minimise the deleterious effects which these examinations had on pupils and their study programmes in Secondary Schools.

Efforts should also be made to generate among students, teachers and all concerned a better understanding of the functions of examining, and to improve methods of learning assessment.

/Tt stressed••••••

Wednesday, October 31, 1973

- 9 -

It stressed the heed to minimise the unaesirable effects of the Secondary School Entrance Examination on primary education and to widen the basis for selective allocation to secondary schools.

1!It is clear that for the next decade the elimination of a central ly administered system of allocation of places will not be possible,” the

Board said. Other main recommendations of the Board include the fol 1 own ng:

* Chinese should become the usual medium of instruction in the lower forms of secondary schools; every effort should be made to develop good textbooks for all subjects written in Chinese, to train teachers capable of instructing through the medium of Chinese and to adopt improved techniques of language teaching for both Chinese and English.

The Board said: f,We are nevertheless conscious of the need to maintain and improve standards in the teaching of English for those who will proceed beyond Form 3 level in preparation for continuing their education at the tertiary level.”

* In the present circumstances of Hong Kong there is no apparent justification for providing secondary education free of charge at Form 1-3 level since its introduction would result in public funds being used to provide free education for those of the community who can afford to pay fees, thus preventing such funds from being spent on other equally essential social needs of the community.

/* No child

0

Wednesday, October 3% 1975

- 10 -

* No child should be denied a Government, aided or assisted place in a secondary school because of the inability of his parents to pay the school fees. The Board urged the Government to examine present procedures to ensure that policy regarding fee remissions be carried into effect.

* The necessity for regular review of the position regarding free education in the light of changing circumstances, particularly when provision of three years of assisted post-primary education is achieved for all in the 12-14 age group.

’’Teacher education holds the key to educational improvement

in both quantitative and qualitative terms. We recognise that the supply of professionally trained teachers, including technical teachers, is a crucial factor in-the development programme," the Board said.

* A fourth College of Education should be established as soon as possible, in temporary accommodation in the first instance; it should also include facilities for the training of non-graduate technical teachers.

* The two Universities should give serious consideration to a greater expansion of their graduate teacher education facilities.

* A Technical Teacher Training Board should be established under the auspices of the Board of Education.

* Suitably constituted machinery should be established under the Board of Education to study, and sake recommendations on, all aspects of teacher education in Hong K^ng.

/* There should ••••••

i

Wednesday, October 51, 1975

- 11 -)

I

* There should be regular review of policy regarding teacher-class ratios, proportions of graduate to nongraduate teachers in secondary schools and professional training for graduate teachers.

* An immediate review, and regular discussion, of present Government policy relating to the supply and professional training of teachers.

The reconstituted Board held 14 meetings and made their recommendations after it had considered a total of 48 representations from educational and industrial organisations, school teachers, students, university lecturers and members of the public.

At the Board’s request, the Education Department prepared and submitted some 22 Papers on various topics for information and consideration. The Board also considered papers prepared by some of its members.

A foreword in the Board’s Report invites members of the public to send their suggestions or views to G.P.O. Box 1899, Hong Kong.

Copies of the Report are being sent to everyone who made representations to the Board. They are also being distributed to schools, Colleges of Education, universities, educational and civic organisations, kaifong associations, members of Executive, Legislative and Urban Councils as well as the mass media.

After distribution a limited number of copies in English and Chinese will be available for members of the public. These copies can be obtained free of charge from City District Offices.

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Wednesday, October 31, 1973

- 12 -

CONCERN OVER RISING LIVING COSTS

Employers Urged To Keep Wages In Line With Prices

*********

All employers, including the government, were today urged to do some ’’radical re-thinking” on the problem of rising living costs to keep wages and salaries in line with prices.

The appeal came from Mr. P.C. Woo, Senior Unofficial Member of the Legislative Council, while supporting a motion of thanks for the Governor’s opening address.

He noted with concern the alarming rise of 26.5 per cent in the general consumer price index daring the past nine months, and emphasised that for people in the lower income bracket - below $5,000 a month - it was not sufficient to make wage awards after price increases had taken place.

He recommended an early extension of the system of cost of living allowances as a flexible mechanism for adjusting income to living cost as and when the prices of essential goods shoot quickly upwards.

’UTiese .allowances, which are already in existence in the lowest sectors, should vary on a monthly basis with the cost of living and need not immediately be incorporated into basic salary,” he said.

An annual review would later form the basis of a decision on what portion of the inci eases awarded during the year should be permanently incorporated into basic salary, he added.

Mr. Woo pointed out that the community could not afford to underwrite the whole of the 26.5 per cent increase in living costs for all employees, but stressed that those in greatest need could wait no longer for immediate relief.

/This allowance •••••

Wednesday, October 31, 1973

- 13 -

This allowance system, he suggested, should take into account the needs of the individual — so that the percentage awards might well be greater at the lowest levels, with a sliding scale for allowances for those in the higher brackets.

He attributed the recent alarming increase in living costs to "imported inflation" and "unjustified profiteering" and urged the government to take at least "minimum steps" to tackle the problem.

This should include a full explanation of what the situation was and what steps could be taken to deal with it; a constant review and control of prices for essential commodities to curb unjustified profiteering; and a search for new sources of supplies designed to bring down prices*

Earlier, Mr. Woo thanked the Governor for his opening address to the Legislative Council two weeks ago. Mr. Woo described it as "one of the finest speeches ever made to this Council" and certainly "the most monumental"*

He said there had never before been such vigorous leadership at top government level, and it had proven in many spheres that the unchangeable could be changed and the unachievable achieved.

"Here then is an unparalleled opportunity for a new start, a new civic consciousness, a new morality," he said.

He emphasised, however, that it was now up to the community at large to respond. "The key is corporate involvement," he said. "This can lead us towards a corporate philosophy and a corporate identity."

/He also

Wednesday, October 31? 1973

- 14 -

He also suggested that ”we should put our fellow citizens and the good of Hong Kong before our personal considerations. This will in turn create a sense of corporate endeavour and identity”.

Mr. Woo went on to voice his support for the government’s decision to legalise off-course betting in Jockey Club premises. ’We are not introducing any new form of gambling here,” he emphasised. ’We merely aim if possible to replace an existing form of illegal gambling by a recognised form of legal gambling.”

On the subject of secondary education, he agreed that the examination system should be changed and this could be tackled once the plan for additional secondary school places had been approved.

Referring to the work of the UMELCO Office, Mr. Woo reported that their involvement in public complaints and representations had continued to expand and that the Unofficials had made a greatly increased contribution to Legislative Council work last year.

. ------o----------

/15........

Wednesday, October 3% 1973

- 15 -

SPECIAL COMMITTEES PROPOSED TO STABILISE COST OF LIVING Government Responsible For Controlling Inflation - Mr. Wong ****** 4c*

The Hon. Wilfred Wong today called for the setting up of two separate committees to study and work out ways of stabilising the general cost of living, and to regulate increasing prices of such essential, commodities as rice, vegetables and fish.

Spealdng in the Legislative Council debate, Mr. Wong said: ,fIt is to be noted that the rise in the prices of essential foodstuff accounts for almost half of the rise in the index of the cost of living."

He cited figures showing that the average price of middle grade rice and the cheapest vegetable and fish had conjunctively risen by 99 per cent in two years and were still rising.

To counter this, he suggested that an Essential Foodstuff Committee be set up with the following terms of reference:

* To ensure the continuity of present sources of supply of essential commodities

* To explore new sources of supply of essential foodstuffs, and

* To study and recommend the practicability of price control as a means of eliminating speculation in essential foodstuffs.

"In making a maximum attempt of stabilising the costs of essential foodstuff, we would cover half of the battle against inflation," Mr. Wong said.

i

There were lessons to be learned, he went on, and one could envisage the economic and social consequences of the creation of such a committee by the government.

/"After all, ......

Wednesday, October 31, 1973

- 16 -

’’After all, it is the duty of the government to control., inflation and to enter into the marketing activities of essential foodstuff so that at least the element of profiteering as against legitimate profit making can be eradicated.”

As he saw it, the basic cause of the worldwide problem of inflation was ’’disequilibrium between demand and supply of commodities.”

While inflation caused by the world price of the commodities could not be controlled, he said, inflation in the Hong Kong prices of essential foodstuff cotild be controlled to a considerable extent by "negotiations, planning, supply of facilities and bonuses or other methods of encouragement.”

Mr. Wong repeated a proposal he made in 1968 concerning the creation of an Economic Advisory Committee.

The functions of this Committee would be to:

* Study the structure of Hong Kong’s gross domestic product with a view to exploring additional sources of revenue without dampening entrepreneural incentives in commerce and industry.

* Study ways and means of stabilising the cost of living particularly as it relates tc labour costs, and with special reference to essential foodstuffs.

* Study and recommend measures toward making the Hong Kong dollar an independent currency and managing it conscientiously in order to avoid a possible crisis in the future , and

* To study and recommend economic policy for maintaining a high rate of growth of the Hong Kong economy.

/”This committee

Wednesday, October J1, 1973

- 17 -

’’This committee will rightly put economics in its proper place as the most important aspect of modern government," said Mr. Wong.

He emphasised that the proposed committee should cover not only the lon^-range plan for stabilising the cost of living "but also the short-term emergency plans for dealing with devaluation and revaluation of related currencies as it affects our economy and the most appropriate way of investing our reserves."

He added: ,fMore specifically the Economic Advisory Committee should study and recommend measures to stabilise the costs of living in general and the prices of rice, vegetables and fish in particular.

"It does not serve any useful purpose to keep saying that prices of staples have been stable," he stressed.

Mr. V/ong went on to say that just as food was the most important item in the cost of living, so land was the most important item amongst the factors of production.

In his view, the future of overcrowded Hong Kong lay in Lantau. "The development of Lantau which is bigger than Hong Kong will solve the land shortage problem for good," he said.

Aside from residential and recreational areas, it would provide industrial land at prices compatible with the development of industries and put Hong Kong on par with those in Malaysia, Taiwan, Korea and Indonesia, he said.

/Referring .......

Wednesday, October J1, 1973

- 18 -

deferring to plans for building a bridge from Castle Peak to Lantau Island, Mr. Wong told Council he had information that ”a very public spirited citizen is willing to make a substantial contribution toward the cost of that bridge.”

On other issues, Mr. Wong wanted to know the government’s decision on the question of extending the retirement age of civil servants to 60 years which the Council had endorsed in a motion nine months ago.

lie also favoured raising the eligibility income limit for low cost housing from $600 to $700, in the light of present incomes.

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/19........

Wednesday, October 3% 1973

- 19 -

FOOD PRICES MUST BE CONTROLLED - MRS. SYMONS

People '.lorried Over Govt’s Apparent Lack Of Concern

*********

The Hon. Mrs. Joyce Symons joined her Unofficial colleagues in urging the government to impose some form of control, even if on a temporary basis, to arrest skyrocketing prices of basic commodities.

’The great majority of our citizens are worried that the government does not seem worried about the sharp increase of food prices,” Mrs. Symons said.

’They are not confident that the government has done anything to curbfnot the prices at source which are beyond its jurisdiction, but the tremendous^profits demanded by our importers and traders.

’They cannot understand that once again, in a vital area of their lives, the government appears to indulge in that wretched out-dated policy of laissez-faire,” she said.

Mrs. Symons pointed out that the people were hopeful that the government would combat the scourge of rising prices following an appeal by a learned Professor of Economics and many practising economists to set up a ’’price stabilisation board” or an ’’essential commodity committee”.

However nothing seemed to have been done.

’’Quite soon, wages will spiral again, and the whole vicious circle is set in motion.”

On youth activities, Mrs. Symons expressed the hope that something along the lines of the summer youth activities could be arranged for the youngsters in the winter.

/’’There is •••••«.

Wednesday, October 3% 1973

- 20 -

"There is much opportunity in our glorious winter weather for our youthful population to enjoy were government able to organise a winter programme with the possible assistance of the Royal Hong Kong Jockey Club," she said.

She stressed that active planning could now be given to preparing school children for the correct use of such facilities, now that plans were going ahead to open up more picnic spots and areas undiscovered by the many.

She welcomed the promise of the government to pursue, undaunted, the massive programmes of expansion in housing, education, medical and other social services, and of new development of traffic and transport. She hoped to speak on some aspects of education in the next decade later.

Turning to the reorganisation of the government machinery, Mrs. Symons said: ’The government now wants to be business-like and efficient, instead of ponderous and impassive.”

The new Secretaries, she added, could open a new page in the history of Hong Kong, as they "re-organise the departments under their command.”

Mrs. Symons went on: "At all levels, their work will be watched with interest. In time, there should be fewer bottlenecks in the chain of command and with the morass of waiting removed, and the red tape cut away, those who have to deal with government, and who doesn’t, should find negotiations more readily handled and brought to a swift conclusion.

"In the past, when younger members of the community tried shortcuts to achieve their aims, the government chose to ignore them.

/’The many........

Wednesday, October J1, 1973

- 21 -

"The many avenues now open to the public should be further publicised. Young people remain unconvinced that there are channels open. The wind of change must blow more steadily here.”

On the link between Hong Kong and Britain, Mrs. Symons said there existed "strange weaknesses".

She gave inability to bring back Godber and the reprieve of Tsoi as examples which she described as "an absolute gift to those who decry our existence and who wish to wreck our achievements."

Mrs. Symons congratulated the Governor on setting up a separate Anti-Corruption Commission• t

She assured Sir Murray that the Commissioner, Mi'. Jack Cater, would be given "our fullest co-operation."

On the ways of combatting corruption, she said: "At the lov/est level, any public servant who deals with a member of the public should attempt daily to serve the person without delay or intimidation or a sense of superiority.

"At a higher level, the anxious businessman should not be encouraged to think that only ’tea-money’ can fortify a public servant to act quickly.

"Given the determination, much could be improved overnight by the mere exercise of self-discipline and a change of heart, not a detailed government directive."

Mrs. Symons concluded that the situation was that Hong Kong was at the cross-roads.

/"If we

Wednesday, October 31, 1973

”If we are sincere in our efforts that we want to clean Hong Kong of its vice, then we all have a part to play,” she said.

Mrs. Symons was convinced that the goal could be achieved by the joint efforts of the government and the people.

,fLet the world note that Hong Kong will try to conquer another adversary,” she said.

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Wednesday, October J1, 1973

- 23 -

DEVELOPMENT OF NSW TERRITORIES

Mr. Szeto Urges Bettei' Facilities For Rural Areas

********

A comprehensive development plan for the New Territories, making full provision for the essentials of community life, should be introduced as a matter of urgency, the Hon. Szeto Wai said today.

The development of the New Territories, he suggested, should not stop at the new towns but should be extended to other rural areas, and taken to the outlying islands.

!tIn all cases, infrastructures answering the essentials of a community life must be provided and in a suitable timescale hitherto out of step in the building of our new towns.”

He emphasised, however, that the development of the rural areas in the form of new townships for housing, industrial expansion and commercial activities must be accompanied with the development of the region1s natural environment to provide greater recreational outlets for a highly urbanised community.

"Much of our countryside has deteriorated due to long years of neglect, misuse and pollution. Such rural disasters must be eradicated and the countryside saved and preserved,” he stressed.

Speaking in support of a motion of thanks for the Governor’s address to the opening session of the Legislative Council, Mr. Szeto welcomed the recent establishment of a New Territories Development Department within the Public Works Department to deal with housing and associated development in the rural areas.

/Referring to .....

Wednesday, October 3% 1973

- 24 -

Referring to "the pressing need for recreational facilities," ho questioned whether there was any reason why the development of Ma Wan Island should not be accorded higher priority.

He noted that the island was zoned predominantly for recreational use and an approved zoning plan existed since 1969- As Ma Wan was literally a stepping stone from Tsing Yi to Lantau, its development appeared to him to be a prerequisite to that of Lantau.

Mr. Szeto referred to the many projects formulated by the two advisory committees for Recreation Development and Nature Conservation which should soon pass the planning stage to implementation, and expressed the hope tliat these projects would be given a high priority rating "as three years had elapsed since the committees were formed."

There was a danger, he added, that the plans might be interpreted by the public as another instance of "jam tomorrow."

In his view, the development of nearby islands for recreation purposes must bo considered as a long-term plan — Lantau, Lamma and Ma Wan.

Private enterprise, he went on, could play an important role in the development of the New Territories, and he called for more land to be made available in the new towns for better private housing development by pushing back the green belts adjoining them on hillsides.

Citing Sha Tin as an example, he felt the higher grounds on both sides of the valley were suitable for large scale private residential development of low density.

/Mr. Szeto ••••••

Wednesday, October J1, 197J

- 25 -

Mr. Szeto welcomed the government’s recent decision to al 1 nw large scale comprehensive private housing development on the Kowloon Foothills north of Lung Cheung Road. This was a departure from the ’’unsatisfactory established policy of piece-meal development,” he said, and would produce far more satisfactory results in the context of integral planning.

He was disappointed, however, that only one tract of the land there would be available in the near future after considerable time and consultancy fees had been spent. He also questioned when and in what form this land sale would take place and why consultancy services were necessary when ’’professional expertise” was available within the Public Works Department•

Referring to the deep-rooted problem of corruption, Mr. Szeto said the decision to set up an independent Anti-Corruption Commission had been a popular one.

To stamp out this evil, the root of the problem must be tackled by changing the attitude of the population. ”This can only be achieved in the long term through education and sustained publicity, perhaps most effectively by including the subject in our school curriculae.” Effective legislation, supported by vigorous investigations and relentless but just pursuance were also essential, he added.

In Mr. Szeto’s view, the language gap was another factor which encouraged corruption because advantage was often taken of non-English-speaking people not conversant with the law and government procedures.

/’’Corruption ••••••

Wednesday, October 1973

- 26 -

"Corruption will reduce when greater use is made of Chinese in government business,11 he said.

On housing, Mr. Szeto stressed that the only way the target of housing 1.8 million people in 10 years could be achieved was "through t a three-pronged attack on planning, administration and construction".

He felt there was considerable room for improvement in the local building industry — particularly in the coming years when it would need greater capacity and efficiency to cope with the housing programme and the mass transit system. He also asked for a report on the result of the Secretary for Housing’s recent visit to England in search of talents and improved methods of construction.

Commenting on conditions in early resettlement estates, he said many of them "have rapidly deteriorated into a new kind of slums breeding crimes and generating sociological problems."

He also pointed out that although the new standard of 33 sq.ft, per person being applied to all public housing was acknowledged by the public, it was doubtful whether this standard would still be adequate a decade from now in view of rising standards and expectations.

"Perhaps the new Housing Authority should now broaden its .foresight and consider increasing the present standard to, say, 50 square feet," he suggested. This, he believed, would be in line with the Governor’s directive — "to build well".

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/27........

Wednesday, October J1, 1973

- 27 -

CALL FOR DIRECT HONG KONG REPRESENTATION IN U.K. PARLIAMENT

***«♦♦»

The Hon. Dr. S.Y. Chung today called on the government to consider nominating prominent local residents for appointment as life peers in the House of Lords to speak on Hong Kong’s behalf.

”It is desirable that the Hong Kong case should be put directly and forcibly to the Ministers in H.M. Government for their consideration and that the people in Hong Kong should have direct access to the supreme bodies in H.M. Government to voice their approval or disapproval of H.M. Government’s policy on Hong Kong,” he said.

Speaking in the Legislative- Council debate, Dr. Chung said he understood that there were no constitutional difficulties for Hong Kong’s representation in the House of Lords, and he noted that the West Indies, before its independence, also had direct representation in the Upper House of Parliamentn

Recently, he said, matters concerning Hong Kong had been debated in Parliament without any direct participation from Hong Kong and problems and issues about Hong Kong had been raised in both Houses ’’without someone from Hong Kong to put them into proper perspective.”

Occasionally, he observed, there were cases of conflicting interest between the Hong Kong authorities and the British government.

Hong Kong was a Colony and government officials were basically members of the U.K. civil service and, strictly speaking, jvere under the directives of Whitehall, he added.

/'’Despite •••••••

Wednesday, October 31, 1973

- 28 -

"Despite all their good efforts, the voices of Hong Kong people are seldom heard within the U.K. Government,” he said, citing the guarantee on Hong Kong’s sterling reserves and the discrimination against Hong Kong in Britain’s own generalised preference scheme as just two examples.

Dr. Chung also felt that the current programme for inviting

Members of Parliament to visit Hong Kong should continue and be expanded#

Turning to inflation, Dr. Chung said he had not been able to come to a conclusion whether some form of price control similar to those in the United States and in Britain should be adopted or whether the present policy of minimum control and interference should be maintained.

Like his Unofficial colleagues, however, he did favour the formation of a committee of experts to look more deeply into anti-inflation measures.

"The important thing is to have sufficient expertise in the committee to devise some efficient and effective means for curbing the present rapid rate of inflation," he emphasised.

He hoped that the government would give urgent consideration to this in view of the alarming increase in the average general consumer prive index which was 26,5 per cent up in September this year compared to the same month last year.

Based on comparative figures, he said, the average annual rate of inflation for the whole of this year would probably be about 20 per cent, /

compared with about six per cent last year, four per cent in 1971 and seven per cent in 1970*

/The high.........

Wednesday, October 31, 1973

- 29 -

The high inflationary rate, Dr. Chung pointed out had created much concern particularly in export-oriented industries and among salary and wage earners.

Although the real wage index for September 1973 was yet to be published, he felt certain that it would show a reduction, for the first time, in real average wages for workers in manufacturing industries during the year.

Referring to the current labour dispute in the Cable and Wireless Limited, Dr. Cluing said that disputes of this kind — like those in other essential services such as electric?ty, telephone and public transport — could paralyse Hong Kong and cause "grave damages to our economy."

In view of this, he felt that in such cases involving a ’dispute of interest’ and which drag on without a settlement, there should be legislative power for the government to intervene and exercise "compulsory arbitration" as a matter of principle and for the sake of overall interests.

’’The interests of the people in Hong Kong as a whole are much more important than those of the employees in a company and chould be protected," he said.

While he appreciated that the conciliation section of the Labour Department was doing "a good job" in assisting and persuading disputing parties to iron out their differences, Dr. Chung felt that "there is a limit to the work of conciliation," if one or both disputing parties refused to be conciliated.

/"Providing .......

Wednesday, October 31 > 1973

- 30 -

"Providing the dispute does not occur in any essential services, I do not propose that the government should interfere unless it is a ’dispute of right1 and, in this case, we now have the Labour Tribunal which is empowered to handle and arbitrate disputes of right," he said.

Dr. Chung noted, however, that if the number of man-days lost through strikes and lockouts could be taken as a measure for assessing the harmony between employers and employees, then Hong Kong’s industrial relations ranked "among the best in the world."

He also welcomed the impending introduction of new legislation to provide severance payments to redundant workers and observed that all workers would be gratified by this.

There were few companies which provided for redundancy payments for manual workers he said, and he fully supported proposals to offer legal job protection to workers who had served a particular employer for a number of years and who might lose their jobs through no fault of their own.

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Z51 .......

Wednesday, October 31, 1973

- 31 -

CALL FOR TOUGHER ACTION AGAINST SMUT

Stricter Laws, Higher Penalties Needed - Mr. Lobo

**********

Another "strong man" with full powers and facilities is needed, to tackle the worsening problem of pornography, the Hon. R.H. Lobo suggested today.

"An alternative would be an independent committee with power to take restrictive and punitive action," he said.

Speaking in the Legislative Council debate, Mr. Lobo noted that many citizens were becoming more and more disturbed over the increasing immorality and indecency and there had been suggestions that the spread of pornography had influenced the increase in the crime rate.

"The existing law needs teeth to cope against obscenity and immorality," he stressed. "At present the law is neither clear nor effective and the penalties for immoral publications are not severe enough."

Mr. Lobo suggested that the Executive should have powers of confiscation and these powers should be widely used. Because of the lack of a single responsible body to deal with the problem and the lack of cooperation between government departments and welfare organisations, efforts to combat indecency had been "spasmodic, short-lived and limited in scope," he noted.

He emphasised that earnest and effective action was needed now unless Hong Kong was prepared to accept indecency as a way of life.

/Turning to ••••••

Wednesday, October 31, 1973

- 32 -

Turning to the subject of information, Mr. Lobo welcomed the process of consultation in the form of green papers on major proposals before policies are settled.

"This procedure does ensure that the public will be given an opportunity to offer comments and suggestions before final decisions are taken,” he said.

However, he felt that this procedure should be extended to cover controversial matters which affect the whole community, such as the recently announced Landlord and Tenant (Consolidation) (Amendment) Bill, so that public reaction could be gauged before and not after the announcement.

This would also minimise uncertainty and speculation among the public and dissatisfaction and resentment among the publicity media.

Mr. Lobo also suggested that certain "classified” papers could, at the appropriate time, be downgraded to information papers.

He asked for a review of the classification of official material so that more information on topics of public interest could be fed by departments to the publicity media.

This, he believed, would do a great deal for public awareness of local problems and boost community involvement in public affairs.

He also emphasised the importance of collecting and collating public opinion and feeding back these assessments to government departments. ”In particular, the views and aspirations of grass roots sectors should be ascertained.”

/On transport, •••••••

Wednesday, October 31, 1973

- 33 -

On transport, Mr. Lobo said he hoped the forthcoming green paper would set out detailed plans for improving the services of the two bus companies, for eliminating over-charging and other malpractices among taxi dri-vcrs, and for ensuring a better observance of the traffic code by motorists and pedestrians alike.

He proposed that Hong Kong should follow the practice observed in many parts of the world, whereby pedestrians on pavements walk on the right and divide themselves into two streams moving in opposite directions.

4 Commenting on the number of abandoned vehicles on the streets, he suggested that it should be made compulsory to report unlicensed vehicles and to deliver them to a particular place set aside by the government, or to a private scrap heap.

Mr. Lobo expressed great interest in the ten-year housing programme and asked that a statement be made on progress in building up the new Housing Department.

He pointed out that it would be some years before the housing prcblen could be solved, and suggested certain interim measures to tackle the problem of homelessness facing people evicted from buildings due to be re-developed.

Tliis would include the immediate provision of more resite areas and the improvement of living conditions in present resite areas. ,n.7e also need more transit camps where there are proper facilities for family life for those who are temporarily dispossessed,1' he added.

/On social •••••

Wednesday, October J1, 1975

On social welfare, Mr. Lobo urged the government to clear up certain doubts among some agencies which still lacked "a clear guidance on the role they should play and the amount of subsidy to be made available to them."

While Hong Kong had pioneered the first non-contributory allowance in the world for the infirm and the disabled, "the allowance requires urgent revision, in the light of rapidly mounting living costs," he said. "Levels of public assistance also need to be raised once again."

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/35.........

Wednesday, October 31, 1973

- 33 -

HORE STUDENTS TO RECEIVE SCHOLARSHIPS

******

The Director of Education, Mr. J. Canning this afternoon introduced amending legislation in the Legislative Council seeking to provide increased powers for the Education Scholarships Committee in the management of scholarships and in particular with regard to the number and conditions of awards.

In moving the second reading of the Education Scholarships Fund (Amendment) Bill 1973, Mr. Canning said that he had consulted all donors now alive ascertained that they had no objection to the Ordinance being amended. Debate on the second reading of the Bill was adjourned.

When the Bill is passed into law, the Trustee of the Fund, who is the Director of Education, will be empowered to use more flexibility in the disposal of excess of income and reserve funds in respect of the scholarships.

As a result, more students will be awarded scholarships under the Fund, a spokesman for the Education Department said.

He pointed out that the number of scholarships was expected to reach 99 during the current academic year compared with 77 in 1970/71-

The spokesman said that in 1973/7^- a total of 237 students would benefit from the scholarships compared with 19$ in 1970/71.

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/36........

Wednesday, October 5% 1973

- 36 -

BRAVE ACT IN CRIME PREVENTION RECOGNISED

*********

The government is to award $6,500 to a member of the public, who was injured while assisting in the prevention of a crime last year.

This was announced by the Attorney General, Mr. J.W.D. Hobley, at the Legislative Council this afternoon when he moved a resolution to grant an award of compensation to Mr. Chan Leung in recognition of his public spirited conduct.

Mr. Chan was attacked with a chopper in November last year when he went to the rescue of four ladies who were being molested by a man at a fruit stall, Mr. Hobley said. Mr. Chan was injured in the shoulder and now suffers from reduced mobility of his left arm. This has affected his earning capacity.

The award of $6,500, Mr. Hobley said, was to show the Council’s recognition of Mr. Chan-’s praiseworthy conduct and to compensate him for the financial loss he now suffers, r •

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/37.........

Wednesday, October J1, 1975

- 37 -

IMPORT OF CERTAIN CARS MAY BE PROHIBITED

Amending legislation is to be introduced to prohibit the import into Hong Kong of petro-driven vehicles which do not comply with the standard adopted by Common Market countries.

The Secretary for the Environment, the Hon. J.J. Robson, told Legislative Council today that these regulations will eventually help in reducing the emission of gaseous pollutants, in particular, carbon monoxide and unburnt hydrocarbons, by motor vehicles.

The amendments to the Road Traffic (Construction and Use) Regulations are in an advanced stage of processing and the Motor Traders Association is being consulted on the drafts.

Mr. Robson was replying to a question by the Hon. Hilton Qieong-Leen who wanted to know whether the government would introduce more stringent legislation to minimise air pollution by motor vehicles.

Mr. Robson said he was hopeful that new regulations would be submitted to the Executive Council for consideration in the near future.

Wednesday, October 31, 1973

- 38 -

MORE DETAILED ESTIMATES OF GROSS DOMESTIC PRODUCT

Expected To Be Ready Early In 1973

*********

The Financial Secretary, the Hon. Philip Haddon-Cave, said today that more detailed estimates of Gross Domestic Product for a number of years, using the income approach, are now being made.

It was hoped, he added, that the estimates would be available early in 1975*

By then, the result of the forthcoming Industrial Production Census, covering manufacturing, mining and quarrying and electricity, gas and water, would also be available.

He added that this would enable the Census and Statistics Department to calculate estimates of net output or value added by each sector of the economy.

Mr. Haddon-Cave was replying to a question by Mr. Wilfred Wong at the Legislative Council this afternoon.

He recalled that at the end of February this year, preliminary estimates of Gross Domestic Product based on expenditure for the years 1966 to 1971 were published for the first time.

These, he said, were accompanied by a report by an experienced national income statistician from the United Kingdom showing his independently prepared estimates, using the income approach, for the years 1970 and 1971 •

/The Financial ••••••

Wednesday, October J1, 1973

- 39 -

The Financial Secretary said: "The construction of a comprehensive set of National Income accounts using the expenditure, income and product approaches is a continuing task and one which will proceed pari passu with the steady development of the Census and Statistics Department."

He emphasised that this development largely depended on whether "we can recruit qualified staff into the public service."

However, Mr. Haddon-Cave added that the Government had been successful in this thanks largely to the enthusiastic efforts of successive Commissioners•

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Wednesday, October $1, 1973

REGISTRY BUILDING UP PICTURE OF DRUG ADDICTS ******

A Central Registry of Drug Addicts set up in 1972 is helping to build up a clear picture of the type of people who abuse narcotics in Hong Kong.

According to the 972-73 Hong Kong Narcotics Progress Report tabled in the Legislative Council today, data contained in 24,000 returns received from reporting agencies was fed into the registry during its first year in operation.

The report, compiled by the chairman of the Action Committee Against Narcotics, Sir Albert Rodrigues, says a preliminary tabulation based on 8,317 returns has produced characteristics which are probably broadly representative of the 80,000 to 100,000 addicts estimated to be in Hong Kong.

The tabulation, carried out in October, 1972, showed that the majority of addicts were males in the 20 to 29 and 40 to 49 years of age bracket.

About half of them were single, 40 per cent were married and 4.3 per cent were either divorced or separated.

More than half worked as craftsman, production process workers and labourers.

Of those who had been convicted of non-drug offences, almost half were involved in offences against property.

/The main .......

Wednesday, October 31, 1973

- 41 -

The main drug of addiction was heroin, smoked mainly by direct fume-inhaling or through cigarettes.

About half of the addicts had been addicted for less than 10 years, but 32 per cent had an addiction history stretching back 10 to 19 years.

About 70 per cent of the latter group had never received treatment, but 42 per cent of the former group had been treated once.

The report says arrangements are being made to feed all registry data into a computer so that annual tabulations can be produced quickly and accurately.

/42........

Wednesday, October 31 ? 1973

- 42 -

RENT BILL WILL MOT LEAD TO RUSH FOR INCREASES

Tenants Urged To Seek Advice Before Paying Higher Rents o*»**«*

The new rent Bill strikes a balance between the expectations of landlords and the pockets of tenants and provides a mechanism for on-going revisions of rents, the Secretary for Housing, the Hon. I. Lightbody said in Legislative Council today.

By excluding newly built premises, it also provides the necessary encouragement for greater efforts by private developers, he added.

Explaining the Landlord and Tenant (Consolidation) (Amendment) (No. 2) Bill, Hr. Lightbody said its duration was fixed at three years because the imbalance between supply and demand — which drove rents up — was unlikely to be corrected any sooner, especially as there was a rising demand for more house-space.

He recognised however that the remedy lay in building more houses rather than rent-regulation. The Housing Authority will make a substantial contribution through its 10-year programme, but much will depend on the private developers’ contribution.

This would require more positive action on providing larger land areas for private development he said, and this was underlined in the Governor’s recent address to the Council.

Under the new Bill, about 60,000 post-w r domestic tenancies which are not controlled by the 1970 legislation, together with those premises certified for occupation during the life of the ’’rent freeze" legislation introduced last June will now be brought under control.

/Mr. Lightbody ••••»•

Wednesday, October 31, 1973

- 43 -

Mr. Lightbody emphasized however that this gave no grounds for a distress call by landlords.

’The rents being paid for these previously exempt but currently frozen tenancies when they come under regulation will have been negotiated privately between landlord and tenant,” he said. *

He explained that premises with a rateable value of over 3150,000 — numbering about 4,000 at present — were now brought under control because their rents had "in many cases been pushed up to exorbitant levels, levels far beyond what any reasonable, or even unreasonable, landlord could expect.

"Excessively high rent levels are established which act as an irritant throughout the whole domestic housing sector,” he added.

He said the landlords again should have no complaints 'because' the flats would have come into the regulation system at more or less open market rents and they too could seek rent increases provided the present rents were below the fair market rent.

The new Bill also regulates existing tenancies which are the subject of fixed-term agreements because "we find the tenant, when the agreement expires, caught in a trap; he has been paying a market rent for his flat but is now exposed to demand for sudden and substantial increase," Mr. Lightbody said.

He recognised that it was a serious step to overrule such agreements which were a useful mechanism to enable landlords and tenants to agree on rents and tenure on their own.

/He added •••••

Wednesday, October J1, 1975

- 44 -

He added, however, that "there are overriding reasons of community interest which require this mechanism to be suspended for the three-year life of this Bill."

On the rents of currently controlled tenancies, Mr. Lightbody said that in some cases the rents were fixed when there was a plentiful supply of accommodation and they have been held back by previous rent control legislation.

The Bill would rectify this situation in a controlled way. The rate of increase, at one-fifth of the difference between the existing rent and the fair market rent at a two-yearly interval, would close the gap between regulated and fair market rent in about 10 years, if the proposed legislative control was extended beyond 197$, he said.

He noted that of the 160,000 tenancies controlled by the 1970 Ordinance, over 80 per cent of the landlords and tenants reached agreement on rent increases and did not inform or consult the Rating and Valuation Department.

"dearly the great majority of tenants use such legislation as a bargaining weapon and prefer to reach their own settlement with their landlords, and this is to be welcomed provided such bargains are freely reached," he said.

He also noted that a new provision of the Bill was the requirement for landlords to issue a receipt for every rent payment; the maximum penalty for failure to do so being a fine of $2,000.

/This was •••••••

Wednesday, October 31, 1973

- 45 -

This was necessary because most of the tenancies were on month-to-month terms, and in most cases no document changes hands. This v/as unsatisfactory from the tenant’s point of view.

Mr. Lightbody said he regarded the new provision as a first step which might later be reinforced by a requirement for the receipts to contain a simple statement of the tenant’s right and obligations.

He made it clear that contrary to some suggestions, the Bill would not trigger off a spate of rent increases unless the tenants fail to use the protection provided by the Bill.

He advised those who are faced with demands for rent increases not supported by a certificate to seek advice from the Rating and Valuation Department before agreeing to pay higher rents.

He also pointed out that the proposed Bill would not be enacted if passed on December 1 as earlier envisaged, due to changes in the timetable of its passage through the Legislative Council. It would not now come into force before December 15•

Referring to another rent Bill — the Landlord and Tenant (Consolidation) (Amendment) Bill which affects pre-war premises, Mr. Lightbody said two types of tenancies would be excluded from legislative control.

These were those premises for which the tenant enters into an agreement to return the premises to the landlord, in exchange for some consideration; and those premises for which the tenant chooses to contract out of the provisions of the Ordinance by signing an agreement, approved by the Tenancy Tribunal, for a fixed term not exceeding five years.

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/46........

Wednesday, October 31, 1973

- 46 -

PUBLIC COMMENT ON BOARD OF EDUCATION’S REPORT INVITED

********

A Chinese leaflet containing a summary of the Board of Education’s terms of reference and the Board’s main recommendations has been prepared jointly by the Education Department and the Government Information Services. A total of 100*000 copies of the leaflet have been printed by the Government Printer so that the widest possible circulation can be achieved. It is hoped that, this will encourage public discussion on the Board’s proposals for the expansion of secondary school education in Hong Kong over the next decade.

Apart from being distributed to schools, copies of the leaflet will be sent to civic organisations, kaifong associations, government departments (including City District Offices and the New Territories Administration), industrial and non-industrial undertakings as well as educational organisations.

Copies are also being given to newspapers, radio and television stations•

Like the foreword in the full version of the ’’Green Paper3, the leaflet invites members of the public to comment on the Board’s Report.

Anyone who wishes to do so can send suggestions or views to the Public Affairs Office (Education), G.P.O. Box 1899, Hong Kong, before the end of December 1973*

Note to Editors: Copies of the leaflet are distributed separately

in the Press Boxes, Government Information Services, this evening.

A7.........

- 0 -

Wednesday, October 31, 1973

- *7 -

SECOND READING OF BILLS *******

Seven bills had their first and second readings at the Legislative Council today.

They were the Motor Vehicle Insurance (Third Party Risks) (Amendment) Bill 1973, the District Court (Amendment) (No. 2) Bill 1973, the Telecommunication (Amendment) (No. 2) Bill 1973, the Education Scholarships Fund (Amendment) Bill 1973, the Landlord and Tenant (Consolidation) (Amendment) Bill 1973, the Landlord and Tenant (Consolidation) (Amendment) (No. 2) Bill 1973 and the Community Relief Trust Fund (Amendment) Bill 1973* • • In addition, twenty sessional papers were tabled. • • • • > ---------------------------------o---------

/48

Wednesday, October J1, 1973

- 48 -

SCHOOL SPORTS DAY r

To mark the Festival of Hong Kong, the Sai Kung and Hang Hau District Branch of the New Territories Schools Sports Association will hold its annual Sports Day tomorrow (Thursday).

About 500 participants from 22 schools in the district will compete in various events which will take place in the Sai Kung Public Playground.

The Chairman of the Hang Hau Rural Committee, Mr. Yau Kei and the Principal Inspector of the Education Department, Mr. M.C. Caswell, will address the gathering before the first event starts.

Prizes will be given to the winners by Urban Councillor, Mr. K.C. Choi, and the Chairman of Sai Kung Rural Committee, Mr. Lee Yun-sau.

Note to Editors: Ihe Sports Day will be held in the Sai Kung

Public Playground tomorrow (Thursday) from 9 a.m. to

4 p.m. You are invited to have the event covered.

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WATER CUT

*******

Water supply to a number of premises in Kowloon Tong will be interrupted for five hours starting from 1 a.m. on Friday (November 2).

The stoppage will enable a leakage test to be carried out in the area.

The area affected is bounded by Renfrew Road, Hereford Road, York Road, Kowloon Canton Railway, Cornwall Street and Waterloo Road.

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A9

Wednesday, October J1, 1973

- 49 -

NEW DRAFT AGREEI-IENT SOON FOR ESTATE SHOPS ««*****«

The Housing Department is to work out a new draft tenancy agreement for shopkeepers in its estates.

When tenancy terms arc reached which are acceptable to the Housing Authority and tenants, they will replace interim arrangements made, at the request of shopkeepers, since the dispute arose over the introduction of a long term agreement.

This was the result of a meeting yesterday (Wednesday) between representatives of Kaifongs, shopkeepers and Housing Department officers.

The draft agreement will form the basis for future negotiations between the two parties.

Yesterday’s meeting follows a promise by the Secretary for Housing last month that the Housing Authority would take a new look at the long term agreement originally proposed and subsequently c fczi’ede

Provisional arrangements agreed at an earlier meeting for outstanding shop assignment cases still stand. This means that until a new agreement has been worked out, some tenants may assign their shops by signing an agreement with the department based largely on the previous oonditions. But, they must undertake to sign the new agreement when its terms have been finalised.

A spokesman for the Housing Department reiterated at yesterday’s meeting that the intention behind the new shop tenancy agreement was simply to improve the general standard and management of the estates for the benefit of all living there.

/He assured

Wednesday, October J1, 1973

- 50 -

He assured the representatives that the authority had at no time intended to deprive people of their tenancy or their livelihood, but on the contrary, it has always been the sincere wish of the authority that an agreement more beneficial to both sides should be worked out,

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Release time:, p»m.