Daily Information Bulletin - 1970s - 1973 - FEB - ENG

 PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

THURSDAY, February 1, 1973

CONTENTS

The Security Advisory Council has made recommendations on brokerage fees, placements, public offers and stock exchange membership........................................... 1

The Government is calling tenders for another 1,000 taxi licences ...................................................    4

The disability and infirmity allowance scheme has been approved • «...............................................     5

A police vehicle pound is to be built in Ho Man Tin •••••••• 7

The City Hall Low Block will remain open during the Lunar New Year holidays ............................................  8

Taxi drivers are warned against overcharging .................  9

The Governor tours Kowloon in connection with the Clean Hong Kong Campaign ..........................................  10

Labour Department helps settled factory disputes ............. 12

A new fire station is to be built at the Kai Tak Airport ••• 1J

The issue of export licences for certain textile products to Germany has been suspended.............................• •••• 14

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Thursday, February 1, 1973

- 1 -

SECURITIES ADVISORY COUNCIL PROPOSALS On Brokerage Fees, Placements, Stock Exchange Membership

The Securities Advisory Council held their second meeting yesterday and submitted recommendations to the Financial Secretary which he approved* The Commissioner for Securities met the Chairmen of the four stock exchanges this morning and conveyed these proposals to them.

Brokerage Fees

The Council considers that it is advisable to have a recognized system of brokerage rates applicable to all exchanges. The Chairmen were therefore requested to agree on a common brokerage system, and to submit within a month the details of such a scheme to the Council for approval, together with details of how the stock exchanges intend ro enforce the scheme among their members. The minimum brokerage rate will be # per cent, with a minimum amount of S25» Rebates will be allowable only to authorized clerks, authorized dealers and licensed banks,

Placements

The method of introducing a company to a stock exchange, known as a placement (or placing) is reasonable and acceptable in certain circumstances and with proper administrative arrangements. However, the use of this method in Hong Kong in recent months has been much criticized, and the Securities Advisory Council intend to carry out a study in the near future.

In the meantime, the Chairmen of the Exchanges were asked that placements should comply with the following:

(a) that for assets amounting to at least 50 per cent of the issued capital there should be available accounts covering not less than three preceding years;

/(b) that

Thursday, February 1, 1973

(b) that the proportion of the equity placed should vary according to the paid up capital as follows:

Paid up capital Minimum proportion of

equity to be placed

Up to $20 m. 45#

$20 m. up to $25 m. 40#

$25 m. up to $50 m. 35#

$50 m. up to $55 m. 3C#

over $55 m« 25#

Where arrangements for a placement are at such an advanced stage that the draft prospectus has already been received and approved by the appropriate listing Committee, the S.A.C. will be prepared to consider the case if supporting evidence is submitted forthwith.

Where a proportion of the shares in a placement is reserved for employees, the exchanges will stipulate as one of the provisions for listing that the company shall provide the Commissioner for Securities within 14 working days of the opening of dealings with a list giving the name of each member of the staff who hao been alloted shares, the number of such shares, his private address, the capacity in which he is working for the company and the number of years of service with the company.

Public Offers

Where it is stated in a prospectus relating to a public offer that a proportion of the shares will be reserved for employees the procedure will be as for a placement.

The Chairmen were further requested to see that no part of a public offer should be set aside as a placement; but this requirement need not apply where prospectuses have already been printed.

/Stock

Thursday, February 1, 1973

- 3 -

Stock Exchanges Membership etc.

The Chairmen were asked to submit to the Commissioner before February 28 a list of members as on January J1, 1973 giving for each member:

(a) his name, and aliases, if any;

(b) the date on which he became a member of the exchange;

(c) the name and principal address of his firm;

(d) the address of any branch or subsidiary office through which his firm regularily deals in securities;

(e) a list of his representatives (as defined below) as on January J1, 1973, giving for each representative

(i) his name, and aliases, if any;

(ii) the address at which he normally carries on the business of trading in securities;

(iii) the method by which he is remunerated;

(iv) his length of service with the member.

(A representative means a person in the direct employment of, or acting for, or by arrangement with a member of a stock exchange, and who performs for that member any of the functions of a dealer in securities (other than work ordinarily performed by an accountant, clerk or cashier) whether his remuneration is by way of salary, wages, commission or otherwise).

The Chairmen were also requested not to allow any increase in the number of members pending a further statement from the Council (due allowance being made for those cases where membership is in the final stages of being granted); and to advise the Commissioner whenever a seat changes hands.

After a friendly and constructive discussion there was mutual agreement on all the points raised, and the Chairmen assured the Commissioner of their continuing co-operation.

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A..........

Thursday, February 1, 1973

- 4 -

GOVERNMENT OFFERS ANOTHER 1,000 TAXI LICENCES

To Meet Demand Of Travelling Public

********

The Government has invited tenders to register 1,000 more Hong Kong and Kowloon taxis.

The exact number of taxis for each side of the harbour will depend on the analysis of the tenders received.

Only new vehicles will be accepted for registration under these tenders This offer will bring the total number of taxis registered to 4,756.

In the last offer, a total of 3,772 tenders were received and the average premium offered for a Hong Kong taxi licence was 8111,813 and 8110,167 for a Kowloon one.

An applicant can tender for one or more taxis but he has to deposit with the Accountant General a sum of 82,500 for each of the taxis included in his tender. The deposit will be returned to the tenderer if his bid fails.

Forms of tender and further particulars can be obtained from the Transport Department Headquarters at Blake Block, Queensway or from either of the Transport Department’s Licensing Offices on the Rumsey Street Reclamation and in Pui Ching Road, Kowloon.

The tender closes at 12 noon on February 23, 1973*

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/5 ........

Thursday, February 1, 1975

- 5 -

DISABILITY AND INFIRMITY ALLOWANCE SCHEME APPROVED Entirely New Development Of Social Security In Hong Kong From April 1 *»**««*«

From April 1 this year, allowances for the severely disabled and the elderly infirm will be paid — without a means test — to those qualifying.

From that date, residents qualifying as severely disabled, or who are 75 and over, will be eligible for one of these allowances, regardless of other income, or financial resources.

The severe disability allowance will be 3110 a month, with the qualifying conditions limited to the claimant’s having lived in Hong Kong for at least one year, and not being in residential care, such as a hnspitai or a nursing home.

A severely disabled person is defined as a resident severely physically injured, or blind, or suffering from a severe physically or mentally disabl-i ng condition.

The infirmity allowance will be half the rate of the disability allowance, or 355 a month. It will go to any resident of 75 or over, calculated by Western reckoning, with the qualifying conditions limited to the claimant’s having lived in Hong Kong for at least five years, not being in residential care at a hospital or a home for the aged, and not receiving a severe disability allowance•

The cost of the scheme is estimated at between 350 and 3^0 nri 11 i on a year. The allowances will be in addition to public assistance, so that residents already receiving public assistance, and who qualify either as severely disabled, or aged 75 and over, will receive the full benefits of the scheme.

/Implementation •••••••

Thursday, February 1, 1973

- 6 -

Implementation of the scheme after approval last night by the Finance Committee of the Legislative Council marks a major step forward in the progress towards a social security system tailored to meet Hong Kong’s own needs.

While the scheme adopts some of the features of social security schemes elsewhere, it is, in effect, a ”home-grown” product, with no exact equivalent.

It implements another major proposal in the draft white paper on

social welfare development in Hong Kong, and the decision not to have a means test is a direct and positive response to the wishes of the community.

In his address to the Legislative Council on October 18, 1972, the

Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, asked for views on whether the allowances should be paid without a means test.

The answer, in the Legislative Council, in the press, and from the community at large in letters to the Social Welfare Department, was unanimously in favour of no means test.

Three Examples

An illustration of what the severe disability allowance means is the example of a blind person. If he is receiving $1J5 a month from public assistance — $110 plus $25 for rent — he will get another $110 a month for his severe disability, bringing his monthly income up from April 1 from $135 to $2^5•

A second illustration relates to a person who has lost, say, two legs, but can still work from a wheelchair and is earning $200 a month. The earnings exclude him from public assistance, but not from the new scheme, so that his income from April 1 will be $200 plus $110, a total of $310*

* A widow of 76 in poor health, but not severely disabled, living with her son and his family is not eligible for public assistance because her son’s income is above the public assistance level. But under the new scheme, she will get $55 a month as an infirmity allowance.

/It is ..........

Thursday, February 1, 1973

- 7- -

It is expected that, in the long run, between 30,000 and 40,000 residents in both categories will benefit from the scheme. A publicity campaign will be launched to draw their attention to the scheme’s existence.

The scheme will be operated by the Social Welfare Department. Details will be available later about how to claim, and how the claim will be decided.

It may not be possible to process all claims before April 1, but delayed payment on any claim made between now and then will be back-dated to April 1.

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POLICE VEHICLE POUND TO BE BUILT IN HO MAN TIN

* * « « * « ♦ *

A new Police vehicle pound will be built in Ho Man Tin to replace the existing one at Kai Tak Airport which will be demolished to make way for a multi-storey carpark.

It will be located at the junction of Fat Kwong Street and Sheung Shing Street and will serve as a centre for the detention of cars involved in accidents or in defective condition.

The vehicle pound will have space for about 260 cars.

Construction work will begin in March and take about six months to complete.

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/8.......

Thursday, February 1, 1973

- 8 -

CITY HALL LOT BLOCK OPEN OVER HOLIDAYS

**********

The Low Block of the City Hall, the City Hall Restaurant, the Gavotte Restaurant and the Memorial Garden will remain open during the Lunar New Year holidays from February } to 6,

All public libraries, the Kowloon Park Study Room, the City Museum and Art Gallery and the Lei Cheng Uk Museum will be closed between February 3 and 5-

On February 6, the libraries at the City Hall, Yau Ma Tei, Waterloo Road, and Ping Shek will be open from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. while the library in Aberdeen will be open from 1 p.m. to 5 p*n. The City Hall Museum and Art Gallery will be open from 1 p.m. to 6 p.m.

On Lunar New Year’s Eve, February 2, all libraries and the City Museum and Art Gallery will be closed at 5 p*m. instead of 8 p.m. and 6 p.m. respectively.

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/9........

Thursday, February 1, 1973

- 9 -

TAXI DRIVERS WARNED ON OVERCHARGING

*«*««***

Taxi drivers are reminded not to overcharge fares during the Lunar New Year period.

A spokesman for the Transport Department said today there were reports during last Lunar New Year that taxi drivers demanded "lucky money" from passengers.

Under the law, any person who commits such an offence will, in the case of first conviction, be liable to a fine of 3500 and three months’ imprisonment.

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/10

Thursday, February 1, 1973

- 10 -

GOVERNOR VISITS VARIOUS DISTRICTS OF KOWLOON

In Connection With Clean Hong Kong Campaign

*******

The Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, walked through busy and crowded streets in various parts of Kowloon this (Thursday) afternoon to see for himself the results of the Clean Hong Kong Campaign.

It was the second such tour undertaken by Sir Murray this week# The

first took place on Monday when he paid a visit to Central and Wan Chai district

on the island.

During his tour today, the Governor visited San Po Kong, Kowloon City,

Mong Kok and Yau Ma Tei. He showed keen interest in the state of cleanliness in

these areas before and after the launching of the drive to clean up Hong Kong.

In the course of his tour, Sir Murray also chatted with some of the residents to find out their opinion on the success of the drive.

The Governor, accompanied by Mr. J.M. Rowlands, Deputy Secretary for Home Affairs, began his tour in San Po Kong.

On arrival there, he was met by the City District Commissioner (Kowloon), Mr. James So, members of the San Po Kong Area Committee and other Government officers.

Sir Murray then proceeded to Yin Hing Street where he saw a piece of redeveloped Crown land. The site, which was previously used illegally as a dumping ground for junk and refuse, has now been turned into a turfed area.

His next stop was Ngan Hon Street, Kowloon City, where the Governor, accompanied by members of the Hok Yuen and Tai Wan Yuen Area Committees, saw the general environment in private streets.

/Continuing ........

Thursday, February 1, 1973

- 11 -

Continuing his tour, the Governor drove to the busy area of Mong Kok. There he was met by members of the Mong Kok South Area Committee and Government officers.

The party inspected a refuse collection point near a hawker and cooked food stall area at the junction of Soy Street and Sai Yee Street.

The last stop of the day was the Yau Ma Tei Market in Kansu Street.

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/12 ........

Thursday, February 1, 1973

- 12

SPEEDY SETTLEMENT OF LABOUR DISPUTES

********

With the approach of Lunar New Year, officers of the Labour Relations Service of the Labour Department are making every effort to bring outstanding labour disputes to a speedy and mutually satisfactory settlement.

At the Kowloon Weaving and Dyeing Mill (19&9) Ltd. in San Po Kong, workers approached the Labour Department for assistance on January 29 in their claim for severance pay.

Three conciliation meetings were subsequently arranged for the management and workers’ representatives at the office of the Labour Relations Service at San Po Kong.

Agreement was reached on January 30- Payment of H32,000 was made to 85 piece and daily-rated female workers on the following day.

At the Fortune Wigs Manufacturing Co. Ltd., in To Kwa Wan, the Labour Relations Service helped more than 250 workers recover a total of $93,000 as arrears of wages earlier this month.

At the Tenta Electronics Ltd. in San Po Kong, with the help of the Labour Relations Service, 100 workers of the factory recovered their arrears of wages for the first half of January 1973.

Final payment was made at the office of the Labour Relations Service at San Po Kong on January 30. The total amount paid out was $23,000.

In the meantime the Legal Aid Department is helping workers of the Fortune Wigs Manufacturing Co. Ltd. and the Tenta Electronics Ltd. in their claims for year-end double pay and wages in lieu of notice.

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/ 13...........

Thursday, February 1, 1973

13

NEW AIRPORT FIRE STATION

********

A new fire station is to be built at Kai Tak Airport shortly to replace the existing one which came into operation 14 years ago.

Costing more than $254 million to build, the station will be in Kowloon Bay within the southern boundary of the airport.

A government spokesman said that it was necessary to resite the present station to the west of the runway because it would be cut off from the rest of the airport by construction works on the airport tunnel road*

A feature of the two-storey station is that its central portion will be column-free so as to provide maximum space for fire appliances.

The spokesman pointed out that since the present station camo into operation in 1959 the number of aircraft movements on the runway had trippled and that of helicopter movements had increased by 16 times.

Construction of the new station is expected to begin in March and will take about seven months to complete.

- - 0 - -

/l4

Thursday, February 1, 1973

- 14 -

RESTRAINT ON EXPORTS OF CERTAIN TEXTILE PRODUCTS To Federal Republic Of Germany ********

The Commerce and Industry Department has, with immediate effect, temporarily suspended the issue of export licences to cover the shipment of certain woven polyester/cotton textile products to the Federal Republic of Germany.

The Director of Commerce and Industry announced today that this suspension covers woven garments containing both cotton and polyester where (a) the cotton content is 50 per cent or less, and (b) polyester comprises 50 per cent or more of the fibres other than cotton.

In both cases the percentages are measured by the weight of the fibre content.

The Director said that this action had been taken with the advice of the Textiles Advisory Board to enable the Department to introduce, as soon as possible, certain export control arrangements.

These arrangements were designed to remove the uncertainties which at present exist with regard to trade in these products with Germany.

The over-riding objective of this move is the maintenance of stable conditions for, and the orderly development of trade between Hong Kong and the Federal Republic of Germany.

He added details of the new export control arrangements will be announced shortly.

/The Department •••••••

Thursday, February 1, 1973

- 15 -

The Department of Commerce and Industry is in the process of inviting shippers to submit to the Department complete schedules of their exports of such garments during the 18 months’ period from July 1, 1971 to December J1, 1972.

Returns should reach the Department before 4 p.m. on February 16, 1973

Details are contained in a notice to exporters and trade associations and companies on the Commerce and Industry Department’s mailing list will receive copies of the notice shortly.

Copies are also available from the Receptionist Counter on the Ground floor of the Fire Brigade Building.

Further information can be obtained from the following officer of the Commerce and Industry Department:

Mr. S.S. Tam - Assistant Trade Officer

Tel. No. >437122

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Release Time: 8.00 p.m

PRH 7 4000091

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Friday, February 2, 1975

CONTENTS

Page No.

The new Housing Bill is published today ....................... 1

The Secretary for Home Affairs sends New Year greetings to people of Hong Kong...............*..........................   5

The prize-giving ceremony for fishermen will be held on

Sunday .....................................................

A Registration of Persons team will visit Sai Kung next week ............................................................... 5

Three footbridges will be built in Kwai Chung soon......... • • 5

The Urban Services Department launches "Operation Kung Hei” to usher in the New Year......................................  6

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong. Tel: 5-233191

Friday, February 2, 1973

- 1 -

NEW AUTHORITY TO HAVE OVERALL CHARGE FOR HOUSING

Housing Bill 1973 Published

*******

Legislation is being introduced to create a reconstituted Housing Authority with overall responsibility for overseeing the massive 10-year public housing drive in Hong Kong.

Under the Housing Bill 1973, published in today’s Gazette, the new Authority will assume the roles of the existing Housing Authority, the Urban Council, the Urban Services Department’s Housing Division, the Resettlement Department and the Housing Board from April 1 this year.

For the first time, there will be one single body charged with implementing the Government’s plan to build homes for 1.8 million people in a decade.

This will achieve the Government’s stated aim of streamlining the work of the various agencies which have in the past been responsible for different aspects of public housing in Hong Kong.

The Housing Authority will operate through a new Housing Department which will act as the Authority’s administrative arm in building and managing all types of public housing estates.

/In addition

Friday, February 2, 1973

- 2 -

In addition to its executive responsibility for estates, the new Housing Authority will advise the Governor on all housing policy matters.

Its members will all be appointed by the Governor and will comprise up to 13 unofficial members (of which 8 will be Urban Councillors) and up to 6 official members. The Secretary for Housing will be the chairman.

The Authority will have the power to co-opt non-r.iembers to,serve on its select committees.

The Bill repeals both the Housing Ordinance and the Resettlement Ordinance. The work of the Housing Board, which was set up in 1963 to advise on general housing policy, will also be taken over by the new Authority.

Existing tenancies and licences created under these two ordinances will continue, and property vested in the present Eong I'.ong Housing Authority and authorities under the Resettlement Ordinance will be transferred to the new Housing Authority.

It is intended to retain the financial arrangements under which the present Housing Authority operates, but the reconstituted Authority will have to present its programme annually to the Governor and it will be able to borrow from the Government or from other sources approved by the Governor.

Among other things, the Bill removes the role of the Commissioner for Resettlement as a statutory authority for clearing land and transfers this role to the new Authority.

/The Bill

Friday, February 2, 1975

- 3 -

The Bill empowers the Authority to determine which categories of people should be eligible for public housing but these decisions will require approval.

Other parts of the Bill deal with the control of the Authority’s estates and prescribe offences and penalties.

The Housing Authority will be able to make its own by-laws which will be subject to the approval of the Legislative Council. ------------------------------------0----------

■5

NEW YEAR MESSAGE FROM S.H.A.

*»»*«** e

The Secretary for Home Affairs, Mr. D.C.C. Luddington, today sent his best wishes to the people of Hong Kong for the Lun^.Hew Year.

In his message, he said: ”On the threshold of the New Year,

I should like to send to all in Hong Kong my best wishes for the Hew Year.

’’During the past year efforts .from all circles on community work have been more intensive and fruitful than ever before and .1 am grateful to all for the contribution they have made and I am sure will continue to make.

’’With spring bringing with it a fresh and auspicious start for the New Year, I wish all Peace,. Happiness an<l Long Life in the New Year.”

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Friday, February 2, 1973

- 4 -

FISHERMEN TO RECEIVE PRIZES ON SUNDAY

The traditional prize-giving ceremony for fishermen, arranged by the Fish Marketing Organisation, ‘will be held on Sunday (February 4) at the Cheung Sha Wan Wholesale Fish Market in Fat Cheung Street, Kowloon.

The Director of Agriculture and Fisheries, Mr. E.H. Nichols, will address fishermen and guests.

Mrs. Nichols will present certificates and prizes to 19 fishermen who have rendered meritorious service in the saving of lives at sea.

Prizes will also be presented to 40 other fishermen who have landed the largest value of marine fish during the past year.

Long service medals will be awarded to 5$ members of the Fish Marketing Organisation who have each completed 25 years of service in the Organisation.

After the presentation, guests will be entertained by a lion dance.

Note to Editors: The prize-giving ceremony will begin at

12 noon on Sunday (February 4). You are cordially invited to cover the ceremony.


/ 5.....

Friday, February 2, 1973

- 5 -

MOBILE REGISTRATION TEAM TO VISIT SAI KUNG

********

A Registration of Persons team will visit the Sai Kung and Hang Hau after the Lunar New Year holidays to register adults and children for identity cards.

The team will work from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily between February 7 and 16.

It will be stationed at Tseng Lan Shu on February 7, Tai Po Tsai on February 8, and Wah Nam Sam Yuk School on February 9»

It will move to Hang Hau-Rural Committee Office on February 12, Ho Chung Village Office on February 13, and Tso Wo Hang Field Office on February 14. The team will be stationed at,Sai Kung Rural Committee Office between February 15 and 16.

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THREE FOOTBRIDGES TO BE BUILT IN KWAI CHUNG

********

Three pedestrian footbridges will shortly be built in Kwai Chung Road.

Two of the footbridges will link Kwai Fong and Kwai Hing low cost housing estates on one side of the road with a large industrial area on the other side.

The third will be built at a point about mid-way between the two estates.

Ramps will be provided on two of the footbridges for the passage of bicycles and handcarts.

Work on the project is expected to begin in March and take about

twelve months to complete.

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Friday, February 2, 1973

- 6 -

’•OPERATION KUNG HEI” TO USHER IN NEW YEAR

«**««***

The Urban Council and the Urban Services Department will usher in the Year of the Ox with ’^Operation Kung Hei”, a series of performances of traditional Chinese dances, singing and acrobatic displays.

These performances will take place in playgrounds throughout Hong Kong.

Three performances will be given in the New Territories on Sunday, February 4 (at Tai Wai Playground, Sha Tin, at 9 a.m. at Luen Wo Market Playground, Fan Ling at 1 p.m. and at Yuen Long Resettlement Estate Playground at 4 p.m.).

They will be repeated for people living on Hong Kong Island on

Monday, February 5 (at Chai Wan Recreation Ground at 10 a.m., at Chater Road in the Central at 1.30 p.m. and at Shek Pai Wan Resettlement Estate Recreation Ground at 4 p.m.).

Kowloon residents can enjoy the performances on Tuesday, February 6 (at MacPherson Playground at 10 a.m., at Cheung Sha Wan Road playground at 1 p.m. and at Wan Tau Hom Resettlement Estate Recreation Ground at 3*30 p.m.).

Packets of ’’Lucky Money” will be handed out to children attending the shows.

The troupe of performers will go from one playground to another in a convoy of gaily-decorated floats.

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Release time: 2.30 p.m.

PRH 7 4000091

I

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Wednesday, February 7, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No.

The Labour Department helped solve more than 70 per cent of last year’s labour problems ................................. 1

A temporary centre is to be set up in Tai Po for the collection of water charges .............................................   j

The S.H.A. dealt with more than one million enquiries last year.........................................................• • 4

The first phase of the anti-polio campaign has ended ........... 5

Three streets in Mong Kok will be re-opened to traffic on Friday........................................;................. 5

The former Chancellor of the Exchequer, the Rt. Hon. James

Callaghan, is due in Hong Kong tomorrow......................» 6

Licensing arrangements for restrained textile exports to Norway have been announced ....................................  7

Independent candidates are urged to stand for Urbco election... 8

Issued by Government Information Services. Beaconsfield House. Hong Kong. Tel: 5-233191

Wednesday, February 7, 1975

OVER 70 PER CENT OF LABOUR DISPUTES SOLVED

Record Amount Paid Out To Workers Last Year

********

The Labour Relations Service of the Labour Department dealt with 4,524 labour problems in 1972 and helped solve 3,275 or 72.4 per cent of them.

The remainder were referred to the courts and the Legal Aid Department•

The five branch offices of the Labour Relations Service handled some 19,040 inquiries and consultations about personnel management and labour laws. Advice given by the Service prevented many disputes from arising or deteriorating.

Mr. Tsui Tim-fook, Senior Labour Officer in charge of the Labour Relations Division, said that a record 37,924,990 was paid out by managements to 11,876 employees in disputes settled with the help of the department. This averaged 3667 per employee.

,rThis amount is a combination of money due to workers under the law and ex-gratia payments,” he said.

,rYet it does not take into account the large sums of long service benefits received by workers of two large shipyards in November following the settlement by the parties themselves of their differences over the • • question of the merger of yard operations,” he added.

The Labour Relations Service itself functions as an independent and neutral party to help employers and employees resolve their differences#

/”But, .......

Wednesday, February 7, 1973

- 2 -

"But," Mr. Tsui continued, "Where a breach of a provision of the Employment Ordinance is discovered by an officer of the Service concerning payment of wages and other sums due under a contract of employment, he warns the offending party and seeks an early remedy in the interests of the aggrieved party.

"At the same time, the officer advises the aggrieved party on what legal steps it may take in default of a settlement."

During the year, an employer in the woollen knitting industry was prosecuted by the Labour Department under the Employment Ordinance for continuing the contracts of employment of his workers without believing on reasonable grounds that he would be able to pay sill wages earned by the workers•

Prosecuted

The directors of alimited liability restaurant in liquidation were prosecuted under the same ordinance for failure to pay wages due to employees within the statutory limit of seven days.

In both cases a further ground for prosecution was that the employer had contravened the provisions of the ordinance wilfully and without reasonable excuse.

Mr. Tsui advised employers that in the interests of harmonious labour relations, they should familiarise themselves with the Employment Ordinance. In particular, they should familiarise themselves with those provisions concerning payment of wages because under present living conditions workers cannot afford to have payment of wages delayed.

/It is .....

Wednesday, February 7, 1973

It is equally important for workers to be conversant with not only their rights but also their obligations under the Employment Ordinance.

Employees and employers are welcome to make enquiries at any of the five branch offices of the Labour Relations Service or to obtain a copy of the concise or comprehensive guide to the ordinance.

”Where wages are owing to an employee, the earlier he seeks advice from the Service, the greater are the chances of recovery,*’ Mr. Tsui emphasised.

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COLLECTION CENTRE FOR WATER CHARGES

*********

The Tai Po District Office will set up a temporary collection centre at the Sha Tin Rural Committee office on Monday (February 12) for the collection of water charges for the third period of 1972 (August to December).

The hours of business will be from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Residents of the Sha Tin District are invited to use the facilities.

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A...........

Wednesday, February 7, 1973

- 4 -

S.H.A. DEALT WITH ONE MILLION ENQUIRIES LAST YEAR *********

Nearly 1.4 million enquiries and cases were handled by the Secretariat for Home Affairs in 1972.

This shows an increase of 15.5 per cent over the 1971 figure.

The enquiries were dealt with by the 19 Public Enquiry Centres, and the two Tenancy Inquiry Bureaux.

The subjects most frequently touched on were problems related to housing, rent control and tenancy. Most of the enquiries concerned the Rating and Valuation (99,391), the Urban Services (79,785), the Education (79,009) and the Immigration (56,664) Departments, and the Judiciary (78,793)*

The number of miscellaneous Government application forms distributed through the Public Enquiry Centres totalled 556,797* Most of these forms were applications for entry to the two technical institutes and for Government posts and Government housing estates•

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/5........

Wednesday, February 7, 1973

- 5 -

ANTI-POLIOMYELITIS CAMPAIGN 1973

Figures For Fourth Week Released

•«««***«

During the week ending on January 27, 1973, a total of 4,997 doses of the anti-poliomyelitis vaccine was administered, according to figures released by the Medical and Health Department today.

Of these, 1,126 doses were administered on the Island, 2,908 in Kowloon, and 9 63 in the New Territories.

Since the latest anti-poliomyelitis campaign began on December 28 last year, the total number of doses administered amounted to 25,155- The first phase of the 1973 campaign has now ended. The second phase begins in Marche

But the vaccine remains available free at all government general clinics and maternal and child health centres.

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STREETS TO BE REOPENED ♦ * *♦♦♦»*

Three streets in Mong Kok will be re-opened to vehicular traffic from 10 a.m. on February 9 (Friday).

They are Fife Street (between Reclamation Street and Shanghai Street), Nelson Street (between Reclamation Street and Shanghai Street) and Shantung Street (between Portland Street and Shanghai Street)•

A spokesman for the Transport Department said that the streets had been closed to facilitate road works.

Appropriate signs will be posted to guide motorists.

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/6.........

Wednesday, February 7, 1973

- 6 -

LABOUR PARTY DELEGATION DUE

*«***#**» ♦

A three-man Labour Party delegation will arrive from London

tomorrow for a three-day visit to Hong Kong. The party is at the

beginning of a thrce-week fact-finding tour of some South-east Asian ♦ countries.

The delegation is led by the Rt. Hon. James Callaghan, MP,

a former Chancellor of the Exchequer. The other two are Mr. Ian Mikardo,

MP, and Mr. Tom McNally.

They will meet the Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, senior government officials and community leaders.

During their stay, they will also visit the Resettlement

Department and will have talks with officials of the Trade Development

Council.

Note to Editors; The delegation will arrive by BA 926 at

1.10 p.ra. on Thursday, February 8, there will be no press conference on their arrival. But facilities will be provided for press photographer who should assemble at the airport V.I.P. room at 12.50 p.m. Officers from the G.I.S. will be present to give assistance.

The party will leave by CI 817 for Saigon on Saturday, February 10. A press conference will be held at the airport V.I.P. room at 9-30 a.m. before their departure.

-------0---------

Wednesday, February 7, 1973

- 7 -

EXPORT OF TEXTILES TO NORWAY

*********

The Director of Commerce and Industry today announced details licensing arrangements for restrained textiles to Norway for the period ending February 28, when the current textiles agreement between Hong Kong and Norway expires.

The Director also announced details of the operation of the yea2>-end special shipment scheme.

Trade associations and companies in the Commerce and Industry Department’s mailing list will receive copies of a notice on this.

Copies can also be obtained from the receptionist counter on the ground floor of the Fire Brigade Building.

Further enquiries can be directed to Mr. C.L. Li, Industry Assistant, at Tel. No. 5-247315.

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/8...........

Wednesday, February 7j 1973

- 8 -

CALL TO INDEPENDENT CANDIDATES

To Stand For Urbco Election

*******

The Returning Officer of the Urban Council Election, Mr. Donald Tsang, today urged independent candidates to come forward and stand for the election next month.

Mr. Tsang made the appeal when he announced details of the nomination procedures.

He said seven vacancies will occur on April 1. If more than seven valid nominations were received, an election will be held on March 7•

"So far”, he said, ’’there are sufficient indications that there will be a contested election.”

The Reform Club, Mr. Tsang said, is understood to have put up seven candidates and the Civic Association five candidates.

However, he added that no independent candidate has yet applied for the nomination papers.

Nominations for the seven seats can be submitted to Room 624, Colonial Secretariat, Central Government Offices (East Wing) during office hours. The closing date is Thursday, February 15*

The basic qualifications for a candidate are a good knowledge of English, and he or she must be registered as an elector.

Mr. Tsang pointed out that the English-speaking requirement is necessary at present because the Government does not have the staff for simultaneous interpretations at meetings of the Urban Council select committees.

/There

Wednesday, February 7, 1973

- 9 -

There are also not enough translators to translate the council papers for members who do not read English•

However, it is hoped that the Government will soon be able to introduce an amendment to the law to provide for Council members who speak only Cantonese.

The Returning Officer also reminded those taking part in the election in any capacity to acquaint themselves with the Corrupt and Illegal Practices Ordinance•

He drew special attention to the provisions relating to the publication and the distribution of election material and the use of transportation for the free conveyance of electors-

For further enquiries, Mr. Tsang can be contacted at 5-955^-•

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Release Time: 6.j>0 p.m.

PRH 7 4000091

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Thursday, February 8, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No.

A new Consumer Price Index will be compiled by the Census and Statistics Department • • • • .......................  . 1

A Commissioning Unit will soon be set up for the new Princess Margaret Hospital .......................................... 3

A manual setting out the minimum job standards for jobs in the knitting industry has been published................... 4

Seventy-four buildings were certified for occupation by the Building Authority last December ........................... 5

The Government today started a detailed survey of illegal structures in a number of buildings in Quarry Bay •••••••••• 6

Hong Kong people in Britain are urged to use facilities offered by the Hong Kong Government Office in London................ 7

A guide to the Labour Tribunal has been prepared by the Labour Department ................................................. 8

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong. Tel: 5-233191

Thursday, February 8, 1973

NEW CONSUMER PRICE INDEX

Household Survey To Pave Way

********

A new Consumer Price Index which can better reflect the current cost of living in Hong Kong will be compiled by the Census and Statistics Department•

In order to revise and improve the present Index, a spokesman for the department said, a new Household Expenditure Survey had already started early last month.

The findings of the survey would enable the department to work out the new Index.

He pointed out that the existing Consumer Price Index, comprising the General C.P.I. and the Modified C.P.I., was based on a survey conducted ten years ago.

Since then, the spokesman said, a great deal of changes had taken place in the life pattern and living condition of the population.

’’There have been changes in the variety of consumer goods available and in consumer preferences which now have a definite influence on the pattern of consumer expenditure.

’’Consumer expenditure on food items is taking on a different picture over the years,” he explained.

’’Consumption of rice has shown a steady .decline while that of other food items has increased.

/"There is •••••*•

Thursday, February 8, 1973

- 2 -

"There is also a distinct shift from the use of firewood and kerosine to the use of liquefied petroleum gas.

"As mass-produced goods improve in quality, there is a growing market for ready-made clothes and durables like television sets, refrigerators and furniture.

f*The introduction of minibuses and cross-harbour tunnel buses also affects the expenditure pattern of the population.

"In addition, more than a million people are now accommodated in ’ the public housing.

Patterns

"Such changes in the living and consumption patterns in recent years will have a significant bearing on the new Consumer Price Index.

"And the purpose of compiling the new Index is to gain an insight into the current living conditions in Hongkong," he added.

The hew survey covers 3,600 randomly selected households whose monthly expenditure ranges from 3400 to 53,000.

The participating households, living op Hong Kong Island, Kowloon and the Tsuen Wan township, had been given survey forms to record every item of their daily expenditure.

They had been asked to itemised any amount they spend each day and to maintain the record for one calendar month, the spokesman said.

W. - - - 0 ------

/3..........

Thursday, February 8, 1973

- 3 -

COMMISSIONING UNIT FOR NEW HOSPITAL

Three-Man Team To Be Set Up For Princess Margaret Hospital

*««*«*«,•*

A Commissioning Unit will soon be formed for the new Princess Margaret Hospital in Lai Chi Kok.

Members of the Commissioning Unit are Dr. J.K. Craig> Medical Administrator; Mr. R.E. Coles, Senior Hospital Secretary; and Miss E. Gregory, Senior Nursing Officer Class I.

Mr. A.E. Starling, Chief Hospital Secretary, who has been involved with the detailed planning of the project, will continue to work with the Unit.

It is expected that the first stage of the Hospital, which consists of a 1,JOO-bed general and infectious diseases hospital, and staff quarters and other services, will be completed early in 197^-

At first, the Unit will be responsible for preparing the specifications and the requisitioning of all the necessary hospital equipment and supplies, finalising staff requirements, and working out general administrative details involved in the operation of the hospital.

The Unit will work from the Headquarters of the Medical and Health Department at the outset, and will move to the new hospital as soon as office accommodation is available there.

After the building work is completed, it is expected that it will take some six months to commission the hospital, and the target date for opening will therefore be towards the end of 197^-

-------0 --------

A...........

Thursday, February 8, 1973

- 4 -

JOBS IN KNITTING AND KNITWEAR FINISHING

Minimum Standards Set Out In Manual

*******

A manual setting out the minimum job standards and specifications for 20 principal jobs in the knitting and knitwear finishing branch of the textile industry has been published and is now available on sale at the Government Publications Centre, Star Ferry Concourse, Hong Kong.

This publication, in English and Chinese, was the last of a series of six such manuals prepared by the Textile Industrial Committee of the Industrial Training Advisory Committee.

The other five manuals had been on sale to the public for some time.

’’The manual should play an important role in improving the quality of our future skilled manpower", a spokesman for the Committee said.

Generally the job standards aim at -

* establishing generally acceptable skill standards for the principal jobs in the knitting and knitwear finishing branch of the textile industry;

* providing guidelines for courses at technical institutions or vocational training centres;

* helping managements to devise in-plant training programmes and in determining the competency of a person, either a new or existing worker, for a particular job; and

* standardising the nomenclature already used in the knitting and knitwear finishing branch of the textile industry.

/Speci fi cally........

Thursday, February 8, 1973

- 5 -

Specifically the job standards indicate the skills and knowledge which competent workers in the principal jobs should have.

They also specify the type of training and technical courses as well as the necessary educational background for entry into training if the workers are to be equipped with such skills and knowledge.

The Textile Industrial Committee points out that the job standards will be reviewed periodically to meet the requirements of advancing technology.

It also recommends, among other things, that proper recognition should be given to those who have been trained to the specified standard.

It stresses that all employers in the industry, who are trainingconscious, would find the manual a useful reference.

-------0---------

BUILDING STATISTICS FOR DECEMBER

********

A ^^storey building in Paterson Street, Causeway Bay, with a cinema on the ground floor was among 7k buildings which were certified for occupation by the Building Authority in December last year.

The declared total construction cost of these buildings was more than $180 million.

During the month, the Building Authority approved k2 plans for new buildings•

It gave permission for work to start on kJ building sites and approved the demolition of 91 buildings, including 16 which had already been declared dangerous.

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/6..........

Thursday, February 8, 1973

- 6 -

ILLEGAL STRUCTURES IN QUARRY BAY BUILDINGS

P.W.D. And Fire Services Start Detailed Survey

ft********

Officers of the Buildings Ordinance Office and the Fire Services Department today began a detailed survey of the extensive unauthorised works and alterations in five buildings in Quarry Bay.

The survey, lasting several months, aims at finding out the nature and the number of illegal structures at Hoi King, Hoi Sang, Fook Chong, Yik Chong and Yik Fat Buildings at Nos. 1026 - 1048 King’s Road.

The survey followed a number of small fires and complaints by members of the public and occupants of the buil d~i ngs.

Since then, a spokesman for the Building Ordinance Office said the authorities discovered many illegal alternations constituting a danger to residents and a fire and health hazard* This practice showed that some residents displayed a total disregard of building regulations.

"The Government intends to rectify the situation, in the first instance, by serving statutory notices requiring the reinstatement of the buildings to their former condition," he said.

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/7.........

Thursday, February 8, 1973

- 7 -

HONG KONG PEOPLE IN BRITAIN URGED TO USE FACILITIES

Offered By H.K. Government Office In London

*««**«**

The Hong Kong Commissioner, Mr. A.M.J. Wright, has expressed the hope that the Hong Kong Chinese community in Britain would'make full use of the facilities offered by the Hong Kong Government Office in London.

He said this at a reception at the Government Office on Tuesday (February 6) marking the Year of the Ox. About 100 Chinese guests attended.

Mr. Wright said that the new and larger office building was a reflection of the growth of the work of all sections of the Government Office.

The Commissioner congratulated the community for its successful

New Year festivities in Gerrard Street on Sunday (February 4), which attracted large crowds of Londoners and achieved wide publicity in the press and on television.

"The publicity which you gained from the celebrations has been most favourable and will further enhance the reputation of Hong Kong people in Britain,” Mr. Wrigrt said.

Guests at the reception came from all over Britain — some came from as far as Scotland. ...

-6-----

/8..........

Thursday, February 8, 1975

- 8 -

GUIDE TO THE LABOUR TRIBUNAL

****»*•«

The Labour Department has prepared in English and Chinese a simple guide to the Labour Tribunal which starts operation on March 1, 1975 as part of the Judiciary.

A spokesman of the Labour Department said: ”This simple guide explains to employers and employees what the Tribunal will do, the types of claims it will hear, the types of claims it cannot hear, and how and where claims can be made.”

The guide, which also explains in simple terms the procedures to be followed, can be obtained free of charge from any branch office of the Labour Department and from City District Offices.

-------0---------

PRESS CONFERENCE BY FORMER CHANCELLOR OF EXCHEQUER

*******

Note to Editors: The Rt. Hon. James Callaghan, MP, a

former Chancellor of the Exchequer, who arrived in Hong Kong today, will hold a press conference in the G.I.S. theatre at 5«50 p-m. tomorrow (Friday) and not (repeat not) at the airport on Saturday at 9-30 a.m. as previously announced.

Mr. Ian Mikardo, MP, and Mr. Tom McNally, will also be present at the press conference.

Release Time: 7«00

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PRH 7 4000091

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Friday, February 9, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No.

Tenders have been invited for new television licences ....... 1

A new sewer is to be built in Tung Lo Wan Road............... 2

The Education Department has taken steps to make the papers of the Secondary School Entrance Examination easier ••••••• 3

The Labour Department and the Fire Services are organising a series of fire prevention courses for industrial workers ............................................................... 5

People are asked to collect unclaimed identity cards ••••••• 6

Temporary traffic diversion will be introduced at the junction of Nathan Road and Argyle Street over the weekend.............. 7

Quarantine restrictions imposed against arrivals from Kandahar, Afghanistan on account of smallpox have been lifted.......... 7

A new land exchange scheme for the New Territories has been announced ••••••••••••••....................................... 8

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong. Tel: 5-233191

Friday, February 9, 1973

- 1 -

TENDERS OPEN FOR NEW TELEVISION LICENCES

•«*«*««

Tenders have been invited for the issue of licences to establish and operate two additional wireless television companies in Hong Kong.

A notice announcing this has appeared in the Government Gazette fc

today.

It is intended that one of the stations will operate two programme services, one in Chinese and one in English and the other will operate a single programme service in Chinese.

The tender period for both licences will be three months and tenders will close at 12 noon on Friday, May 11, 1973-

Tender documents which include an application form, a draft licence, a copy of the Television Ordinance, details of Programme, Advertising and Technical Standards and notes for the guidance of applicants can be obtained from the Secretary, Television Authority, 24th floor, International Building, Des Voeux Road Central, Hong Kong at a cost of HK&3O per set.

Commenting on the notice, the Television Authority, Mr. Nigel Watt, pointed out that it is Government’s firm policy, as stated on a number of occasions, to introduce competitive television as quickly as possible.

However, it has always been recognised that some degree of phasing in the coming on air of the two new companies will be necessary to enable working tests in the congested frequency band to be carried out with the main transmitters of the second, dual-service licensee before the final allocation of frequencies for the third licensee and his operating date can be confirmed.

/It was ........

Friday, February 9, 1975

- 2 -

It was the earlier intention to have a longer tender period for the third station but it is now felt that the policy of maximum speed, subject to adequate time being allowed for final technical adjustments, can be met more effectively by a common tender period with a deferment on the operating date of the third licence - which will be kept as short as possible.

Mr. Watt concluded: ftIt is difficult to estimate accurately as to when the two new services might be operating because at this stage there are so many unknown factors.

"However, it is reasonable to assume that by the end of 1975, and hopefully earlier, the Hong Kong public should have a choice of five channels of television - three in Chinese and two in English."

-------0---------

NEW SEWER TO BE BUILT IN TUNG LO WAN ROAD

*******

A larger sewer will be built along Tung Lo Wan Road to replace the existing one to cope with the development of the Lai Tak Tsuen housing project.

A spokesman for the Public Works Department said the existing sewer is too small to provide adequate drainage facility for the big low-cost housing estate built by the Housing Society.

Work on the sewer is expected to begin in April and will take six months to complete.

Construction of the Lai Tak Tsuen project has just started. The first phase of the $3$ million estate is expected to be ready by the middle of 1974*

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6 ..........

Friday* February 9* 1975

“ 3 ~

EASIER ENTRANCE EXAMINATION PAPERS

To Ease Off Pressure On Pupils «***«**»

The Education Department has taken steps since 1971 to make the papers of the Secondary School Entrance Examination progressively easier, the Deputy Director of Education (Professional), Mr. N.M. Ho, said today. "This innovation, together with the steady expansion of secondary education, is expected to ease off the pressure exerted on pupils,11 Mr. Ho told the Rotary Club of Hong Kong Island West.

He was speaking on some problems concerning primary education mainly from the parent’s point of view.

In the last few years, the Education Department had taken positive steps to improve the quality of the S.S.E.E.

Most of the questions set were of the objective type, and machine-marked multiple choice questions had been introduced on a large scale to improve further the accuracy of the selection procedure for secondary education.

Mr. Ho advised parents whose children were about to sit the S.S.E.E. to be most careful not to reveal to them any extreme anxiety they might feel about this critical point in their children’s career.

Such over-anxiety, he said, might ’’actually make them so nervous on the great day that they fail to do themselves justice.”

On special coaching for the entrance examination, Mr. Ho cautioned parents that the danger again was over-pressure, with the result that their children did not have adequate time for fresh air, exercise and sleep.

/Dealing ........

Friday, February % 1973

- 4 -

Dealing with homework, Mr. Ho said parents should recognise that some homework should go with school work, though an excessive amount should not be set by teachers.

Because most homes did not have a quiet room, which was essential for satisfactory work, the Deputy Director urged parents to sacrifice the wireless and television for an hour or so.

This, would not only help concentration but it would be a demonstration to children of the genuine belief, of parents in the importance of the work.

Mr. Ho warned parentis never to do their children’s homework but to show them the method of working.

On improving the memory of children, Mr. Ho said parents could help best by ensuring that the child understood the general drift of thought or the inter-connection of facts in a lesson. This was, he added, far better than merely hearing, for example, a poem recited or asking questions on small points.

He said: ”In some school subjects where there is much memorising to do, the intelligent child with poor ’rote memories’ will not at first do himself justice. The thing to do is to appeal to his interest as far as possible.

"Even if his specific rote memory for things both heard and seen is weak, his intelligence will later find ways of compensating for these to a large extent."

Note to Editors: Copies of the full text of Mr. Ho’s

speech in Chinese and English are distributed separately in the Press Boxes, Government Information Services, this evening.

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Z5 ..........

Friday, February 9, 1973

5

FIRE PREVENTION COURSES TO COMBAT FIRE HAZARD «#«******

The Industrial Safety Training Centre of the Labour Department, in conjunction with the Fire Services Department, is organising 28 one-day fire prevention courses for industrial workers.

The main purpose of the courses is to provide participants with basic.knowledge of fire prevention and fire fighting, industrial housekeeping, safe storage and the handling of inflammable liquid and other highly combustible materials.

Each course concludes wirn a demonstration of various fire extinguishers•

Mr. A.H. Carter, Industrial Safety Training Officer of the Labour Department, said: "Forty-three similar courses were organised last year and I was appalled at the poor response. Of over 20,000 registered and recorded industrial undertakings, only 68 or 0.3^ per cent had sent their staff to attend these courses."

"Safety training is one of the most effective means to prevent or reduce industrial accidents and it is a pity that the majority of employers do not appreciate the value of these training courses."

Mr. Carter went on to say that in 1972 direct fire losses exceeded 3100 million.

,fMany fires would not have developed had they been dealt with proopty by trained personnel," he remarked.

-------0---------

Friday, February 9> 1973

- 6 -

PEOPLE ASKED TO COLLECT LOST I.D. CARDS

Unclaimed Cards Will Be Cancelled After 3 Months

******* **

The Commissioner of Registration today appealed to people who had lost their Hong Kong identity cards to come forward and collect them.

Lists containing the names of the unclaimed cards can be inspected at all City District Offices in the urban areas and District Offices in the New Territories•

Owners of lost cards can coxiect them in person at the Registration of Persons Office on the 4th floor of the Causeway Bay Magistracy Building.

If they are not collected after a period of three months, the identity cards will be cancelled.

The Commissioner emphasised that if people notified his office of the changes of previously registered particulars, it would be much easier for lost identity cards to be returned to their owners.

All unclaimed cards in the period from July 3 to September 30» 1972, will be cancelled on February 10, 1973.

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Friday, February % 1973

" 7 “

TEMPORARY TRAFFIC DIVERSION AT ROAD JUNCTION «*«**««**

Eastbound traffic on Argyle Street will be prohibited from turning left into Nathan Road between 5 p«m. tomorrow (Saturday) and 3 p»Ek on Sunday.

Traffic will be diverted via Portland Street and Fife Street.

The temporary arrangement is necessary because of construction work in Nathan Road.

Appropriate traffic signs will be posted to indicate the temporary diversion and police will be present to guide motorists•

-------0---------

QUARANTINE RESTRICTIONS

**««»*•***

The Port Health Authority announced today that the quarantine restrictions imposed against arrivals from Kandahar (airport), Afghanistan, on account of smallpox, have now been removed.

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Friday, February 9» 1973

- 8 -

NEW LAND EXCHANGE SCHEME FOR N.T. ANNOUNCED

********

A new land exchange scheme has been approved to allow for private development in certain areas in the New Territories not covered by outline zoning plans.

This was announced today by the District Commissioner, N.T., Mr. Denis Bray, in an address to the Heung Yee Kuk during his annual New Year call on them.

The new scheme oiAginares from proposals put forward by the Heung Yee Kuk to relieve frustrations felt by owners of land in areas planned for eventual development but where development could not yet be accommodated.

In these areas., said Mr. Bray, land owners would not be able to pay a development premium and build precisely on land they now own.

This method of development had been tried and was slow.

It also meant chat the benefit to be derived from new town development would depend heavily on whether a man’s land was planned for a park or a tenement building.

Compensation, he added, had to be averaged over a large area.

Mr. Bray emphasized that compensation paid for land required for public housing or town centres ’’should not depend on the zoning of the particular land concerned.”

”This is logi??l nd fair but ?*. does mean that we cannot agree that owners of agricultural land in strategic positions should be allowed to develop these areas on payment of a premium.”

/Under the

Friday, February 9, 1973

- 9 -

Under the new arrangements, the Government will accept the surrender of land with vacant possession in what is to be known as Special Acquisition Areas, in exchange for grants of land in places which can be developed without the provision by the Government of such services as sewage disposal or water mains.

The Special Acquisition Areas will include all land within the boundaries of outline zoning plans for Tsuen Wan, Kwai Chung,and Tsing Yi Island? Tuen Mun and Sha Tin.

The only exception will be areas zoned for green belts, but land designated for country parks will be included and will be eligible for exchange.

Guiding Rules

Seven guiding rules are set out under which the scheme will

operate• These are:

* Land will be exchanged on a foot for foot, or value for value, basis but the area of land granted will not exceed the area surrendered.

* Land will only be granted in exchange in areas acceptable to the District Commissioner but the areas will not include an area covered by an outline zoning plan (approved or draft), an approved layout plan or an area designated or likely to be designated as a Special Acquisition Area.

* The applicant will be required to find suitable land to be granted in exchange. He should enquire early on whether or not an area under consideration would be acceptable•

The applicant

Friday, February % 1973

- 10 -

* The applicant can apply for the new grant lot to be in either agricultural or building status.

* A premium will be payable if the value of the new lot to be granted exceeds the value of the land to be surrendered.

* The new grant lot will be subject to development and such other conditions as are deemed appropriate for the locality.

* The applicant must give vacant possession free from incumbrances of the land to be surrendered.

In his address, Mr. Bray stressed that the Government was anxious to build and make way for building of towns as fast as was possible.

Development

,fWe do not want to frustrate development where it can take place in a socially acceptable manner, but we will not allow individual land owners to put up buildings which will be intolerable to those who wi11 live in and around them,” he said.

While he did not believe that the new arrangements for land exchanges would produce much development, the Commissioner felt that the scheme would provide ”an outlet for land owners who are prepared to play the game according to these rules.”

There were places in the New Territories where private development could be accommodated, he said, and where the developers could provide the necessary services themselves.

/He explained ••••••••

Friday, February 9, 1973

- 11 -

He explained that when the Government was ready to act in new towns, it would resume the land with fair compensation to land owners, provide resettlement for anyone living on it, pay compensation to farmers, pig breeders and others, before moving in.

Looking back over 1972, Mr. Bray noted that the year had seen considerable progress in the New Territories and he envisaged that even more could be accomplished in the year ahead by way of more public housing and villages, improved communications, recreation facilities and possibly holiday resorts complete with hotels and weekend bungalows.

”A strong Government initiative is going to be required,” he stressed, ”but success will only follow a combined effort by the people of the area and their government.”

Impact

But the predominant influence in the new towns, Mr. Bray went on, would be the impact of the Government’s stated aim to provide housing for every family over the next 10 years.

Public housing by itself, however, was not enought to create new towns, he added.

’’Quite apart from the social and commercial services needed for the new population we must provide for industrial development and privately built housing.”

He said the enterprise and capital were available for this and private enterprise building would be welcomed once sufficient progress had been made in planning and the provision of the basic engineering services like water supplies, communications and sewage disposal.

/’’To achieve

Friday, February 9, 1973

12 “

. I** I'

"To achieve all this will require careful planning as well as development at a breakneck speed,” he said. ,fThe crunch will come in the mid-Seventies."

During the period 197^78, he said, the target population for

Tsuen Wan should go up by about 300,000 while in Sha Tin there should be a tenfold population increase from 26,000 to 233iOOO.

"The Tuen Mun explosion follows a little later, but even there a five fold increase from 38,000 to 190,000 is in this period the sort of thing we should aim for."

Already the basic ingredients for the redevelopment of new towns and population centres in the accessible parts of the rural areas were beginning to emerge, he went on.

Nev/ Estates

Seven new estates were in the planning and he estimated that between 20 and 30 more small estates would be needed over the next ten years.

Two new villages were also being examined with a view towards permanent village development.

With regard to the problem of resettling small scale industries which had been cleared from the urban areas but were not acceptable in resettlement factories, the Commissioner said a "new initiative" was needed to cope with this problem.

Land tenure would also have to be looked at and the problems of pollution arising from present methods of disposing of agricultural waste — particularly from pigs and chickens — would have to be tackled.

/Mr. Bray .........

Friday, February 9, 1973

- 13 "

Mr. Bray suggested that plans should be drawn up for good privately built rural housing where people could either live with space round them or build holiday homes.

’’This type of development is much in demand,” he said,” ”Therc is land for it but not yet the planning or services.”

Turning to the remote countryside, the Commissioner said these parts were fast becoming a popular recreation area for those living in the urban areas.

Some areas were to be turned into countryparks, he said, but he felt that some others should not be developed at all but would need conservation, litter cleansing and fire protection.

In other areas the building of hotels and weekend bungalows would be encouraged.

”Particular attention is being given to the comprehensive planned resort development of two major areas of Lan Tau Island and the Sai Kung Peninsula,” he added.

-------0---------

Release Time: 7»QQ p.m.

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Saturday, February 10, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No,

Applications for the post of Principal of the new Institute for Social Work Training are invited.................. 1

Work on the approach roads to the Tsing Yi Island Bridge is progressing smoothly ......................................

The Deputy Director of Education says gardening and vegetable planting are of good educational value.....................

The Applications Office of the Housing Authority is to be closed for two weeks.......................................

A postman retires after 3^ years of service ...............

Plantation Road is to be re-routed one-way................. 7

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Saturday, February 10, 1973

- 1 -

PRINCIPAL FOR SOCIAL WORK INSTITUTE Further Step In Implementing White Paper Proposal ********

An advertisement in the major newspapers today invites applications for the post of Principal of the new Institute for Social Work Training, one of the major proposals in the draft white paper on social welfare.

Mr- T.S. Heppell, Assistant Director (General), Social Welfare Department, says the hope is that a number of suitable candidates in Hong Kong will come forward.

With the Institute expected to be functioning in the Lady Trench Training Centre, Wanchai, at the start of the new academic year this September, it will be necessary for the Principal to take up his appointment as soon as practicable.

The advertisement lists his qualifications as follows: he must be at least J5 years of age, have a degree in social sciences and be in possession of a master’s degree, or an equivalent, or a higher qualification, in social work obtained at an approved university.

He should have wide experience in general social service administration at a senior level and some knowledge of teaching, or wide experience in teaching with some knowledge of general social services administration.

His salary will go from $5,940 to $6,490 a month, by two increments, and he will be appointed, if under 45, on probationary terms for two years, after which he, or she, will be eligible for consideration for confirmation to the permanent and pensionable establishment.

Saturday, February 10, 1973

- 2 -

An alternative is appointment on contract for two and a half years in the first instance, with a gratuity on satisfactory completion of the contract period amounting to 25 per cent of the gross salary earned. A local appointee over the age of 45, or any expatriate appointee, would be awarded contract terms.

The Principal will play a major role in bringing the Institute into being. He will be responsible for

* Preparing and directing all the Institute’s programmes, including training in field work practice.

* General administration of the Institute.

* Taking up the chairmanship of the Institute’s Academic Board, and the direction of its policies.

* Liaison with the universities, other educational institutions, government departments, and other organisations operating in the social services field.

The first meeting of the Academic Board was held in the Lady Trench Training Centre last week, with Mr. Thomas C.Y. Lee, Deputy Director of Social Welfare, as acting chairman in the absence of the Principal.

The Board discussed among other matters, its own terms of reference and composition, the timetable for establishing the Institute, and the appointment of the Principal.

Present members of the Board include representatives of the two universities, the Hong Kong Council of Social Service, the Hong Kong Social Workers Association, the Advisory Committee on Social Work Training, and the Social Welfare Department.

The Board has responsibility for all educational mattears at the Institute• -----------------------------------0----------

ft..........

Saturday, February 10, 1973

- 3 -

MULTI-MILLION-DOLLAR APPROACH ROADS FOR TSING YI ISLAND BRIDGE

*********

Work is progressing smoothly on the 2)k-mile long network of approach roads to the Tsing Yi Island Bridge which will link the island with Kowloon at Kwai Chung.

The project, costing about S11 million, is being carried out in three stages, scheduled for completion early next year.

The first one involving the building of an embankment on Tsing Yi Island has already been completed.

Work is now progressing on the second stage which covers the formation of the approach roads and an overpays on the Kwai Chung side of the bridge. V

This is expected to be completed in about July.

The last stage includes drainage, slope protection and road surfacing works.

It has been planned that the roadwork should be completed simultaneously with the Tsing Yi Island bridge which is being built by a private consortium under government licence.

The whole scheme will greatly help to accelerate industralisation of Tsing Yi Island.

-------0---------

A...........

Saturday, February 10, 1973

- 4 -

PERSEVERANCE AND CO-OPERATION

In Extra-Curricular Activities

*«*«»***

Gardening and vegetable planting by pupils are extra-curricular activities of very good educational value, the Deputy Director of Education (Administration), Mr. C.J.G. Lowe, said this afternoon at the Ling Ying Public School.

Such activities, he said, were truly educative in the wider sense of the word as well as creative.

Mr. Lowe, who presented prizes to some of the winners of the schools’ gardens, children’s art and vegetable planting competitions, said that pupils’ participation in these competitions gave them an opportunity to carry out practical work and experience in nature study.

The Deputy Director told pupils that the preservation of their environment through gardening and looking after the countryside were positive methods of ensuring that Hong Kong was kept tidy and as attractive as possible.

Mr. Lowe reminded the audience that each and everyone of them had a responsibility in the continuous campaign to ’’Keep Hong Kong Clean”.

The Education Department was very anxious to ensure that the Keep H.K. Clean Campaign was a success and had worked hard to encourage schools and pupils to play a full part.

The response from schools and pupils had been good and he was most grateful for it.

He thanked all those concerned in taking part in the campaign and hoped pupils would work hard to maintain the high standards achieved.

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/5..........

Saturday, February 10, 1973

- 5 -

TEMPORARY CLOSURE OF HOUSING AUTHORITY APPLICATIONS OFFICE *********

The Hong Kong Housing Authority announced today that its Applications Office will be closed for two weeks beginning on Thursday, February 15*

The temporary closure is to facilitate the removal to a new office at No. 10, Middle Road, ground floor, which will be in operation on March 1.

During this period, no new applications can be registered and no correspondence concerning existing applications can be dealt with.

Meanwhile applicants and the public are requested to co-operate by refraining from writing to P.O. Box 9192 Kowloon, and from calling at the Applications section in person, or by telephone, during the period of removal.

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/6.........

Saturday, February 10, 1973

- 6 -

POSTMAN RETIRES AFTER YEARS OF SERVICE

*»««»*«*

A postman, Mr. Luk Hong-kin, will be retiring on Monday (February 12) after more than years of service with the post office.

To mark his retirement, his colleagues had contributed towards a memento which will be presented to him in a ceremony at the Kowloon Central Post Office.

Mr. Li Yun-gun, Senior Controller of Post (Traffic), will be presenting the gift to Mr. Luk.

Note to Editors: You are cordially invited to send a reporter

and/or photographer to have the presentation ceremony covered. It will be held on February 12 at 1.55 p.m.

/7..........

Saturday, February 10, 1973

- 7 -

PLANTATION RDAD TO BE ONE-WAY

«**««*«

A section of Plantation Road will be made one-way from west to east next week.

This will be effective from 10 a.m. on Monday (February 12).

This section of Plantation Road is between Barker Road (near the

Barker Road Peak Tram Station) and Findlay Road.

Appropriate traffic signs will be placed to guide motorists.

-------0---------

Release time: 2.30 p»m.

c.ti . j I"-/ i ri’ .■ ■■

: -is -ill h 'f.f-ctiv: .’’roir 1 . . M’-.-'Y Q

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; t*. • A. .. '• ’ ) I -'J-

PRH 7 '*

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Monday, February 12, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No.

Simulators are to be used on an experimental basis to teach and test learner drivers ....................................   1

The first training course for Industrial Safety Officers opened today ......................................................    2

Certain premises in Sai Kung Hui will be without water on

Wednesday night •••••••••.....••••••••••••••..................  3

January figures of Public Assistance Scheme show continuing increase 4

New traffic arrangements announced for Tsuen Wan >••••••••«• 5

The United Nations Secretary General arrives tomorrow en route to Japan ••••••••»•••«• •••••• 6

The Labour Department helped settle more than 70 per cent of last year’s labour disputes ..........................• ••• 7

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Monday, February 12, 1973

- 1 -

NEV/ SCHEME TO TEACH DRIVING

Simulator To Be Introduced On Experimental Basis

********

The Government has agreed in principle to try out a ’’link trainer system’1 for training and testing learner drivers#

Announcing this today, a spokesman for the Transport Department said that tenders would soon be called for in the Government Gazette for the installation of the necessary equipment*

He said that under the trial system, the learner driver would learn the basic fundamentals of driving inside a simulated car with a screen in front showing road conditions.

”The driver will be trained in the use of various controls, recognition of traffic signs, and normal reactions to different traffic situations,” he said. ’’Any mistakes made will be automatically detected.”

The intermediate tests of the learner driver would be undertaken on the machine after a certain period of training.

After passing the test, the driver would still have to take actual driving lessons on the roads before undergoing a final road test.

The spokesman said that this ’’link trainer system” would save a lot of time and money for the learner driver by greatly reducing the amount of time required to learn to drive up to intermediate standard.

”It will also reduce congestion on the roads by keeping the large number of learner drivers away from them”, he added.

But he stressed that the final decision on whether this system would eventually become part of the normal driving tuition would depend on the results of the trial.

Monday, February 12, 1973

- 2 -

TRAINING COURSE FOR INDUSTRIAL SAFETY OFFICERS

First Of Its Kind In Hong Kong

**,«**«*

The Industrial Safety Training Centre of the Labour Department today launched its first six-week training course for Industrial Safety Officers.

The course - the first of its kind, to be held in Hong Kong *• covers all aspects of accident prevention and .safety management.

According to Mr. A.H. Carter, Industrial Safety Training Officer of the Labour Department, the course is the most ambitious one ever organised by the Department.

Of the 16 participants, 12 are from private companies while the remaining four are from. Government departments.

Mr. Carter stressed that Safety Officers could play an important role in helping to prevent and reduce industrial accidents.

He outlined the general duties of a safety officer as follows:

(a) to advise management on industrial safety and accident prevention;

(b) to detect and remove unsafe working conditions and practices;

(c) to draw up safety training programmes in conjunction with the Labour Department and

(d) to ensure that sufficiently trained first aid, rescue and fire-fighting teams were always available.

/In addition

Monday, February 12, 1973

- 3 -

In addition to the training course for Industrial Safety Officers, the Labour Department’s Industrial Safety Training Centre also runs other basic and advanced training courses.

Those who wish to have further details should make enquiries to officers of the Centre at Telephone Nos. 3-661438 and 3-664270 during office hours.

Note to Editors: Copies of a speech given by Mr. Chan Siu-tung,

Senior Labour Officer, at the opening of the Industrial Safety Training Course will be issued separately in the G.I.S. Press boxes this evening.

-------0---------

WATER INTERRUPTION

»***«»«***

Water supply to a number of premises in Sai Kung Hui, including

Sai Kung Police Station, will be interrupted for eight hours from 10 p.m.

on Wednesday (February 14) to 6 a.m. the next morning.

The temporary stoppage is to allow the Waterworks Office to install a flow meter at Hiram’s Highway near Sai Kung Town.

0--------

Monday, February 12, 1973

- 4 -

PUBLIC ASSISTANCE SCHEME

January Figures Show Continuing Expansion

********

The total number of active cases in the public assistance scheme reached 18,105 at the end of January.

Nevz applications received during the month totalled 902, and cases reactivated numbered 1^6. At the same time, 669 cases were closed.

Cash payments during January totalled 32.78 million, bringing to 337-08 million, the grand total spent so far since the expanded scheme was implemented on April 1, 1971-

In addition to public assistance, Mr. Tsau Tsor-yan, Senior Principal Social Welfare Officer and head of the Public Assistance Division, said today that during January, divisional officers had responded to 13 emergencies caused by fires and closure orders.

As a result, 304 families had registered for emergency aid, consisting of 1,3^1 persons. They received hot food, blankets, cooking utensils, dry rations, and so on.

Mr. Tsau expected that during February, the 18th field unit of the Public Assistance Division would be set up in the TungTau Resettlement Estate to serve residents in the area.

It is proposed, according to present plans, that there will eventually be 20 field units attached to the Public Assistance Division to handle the growing caseload.

-------0---------

/5.........

Monday, February 12, 1973

- 5

NEV/ TRAFFIC ARRANGEMENTS IN TSUEN WAN

*******

Certain traffic arrangements will come into effect in Tsuen Wan as

from 10 a.m. on Wednesday (February 14) to improve traffic circulation in the area#

The changes are as follows:

* Chung On Street between Castle Peak Road and Sha Tsui Road will be re-routed one-way southwards towards Sha Tsui Road.

* Chuen Lung Street, between Sha Tsui Road and the first road junction to the north, and between Hoi Pa Street and Tsuen Wan Market Street, will be opened for two-way traffic. Chuen Lung Street north of Tsuen Wan Market Street will be re-routed one-way northwards towards Shui Wo Street.

* Hoi Pa Street between Chung On Street and Chuen Lung Street will be re-routed one-way westwards towards Chuen Lung Street.

* Shui Wo Street between Chuen Lung Street and Chung On Street will be re-routed one-way eastwards towards Chung On Street.

A spokesman for the Transport Department said traffic signs will be posted to guide motorists.

- - 0----------

/6.........

Monday, February 12, 1973

6 -

ARRIVAL OF U.N. SECRETARY GENERAL

********

Note to Editors: The United Nations Secretary General, Dr- Kurt

Waldheim, will be passing through Hong Kong tomorrow (Tuesday) en route to Japan. He will arrive by air from Bangkok at 11.JO a.m. and depart for Tokyo at 15*20.

Dr. Waldheim will not give a Press conference during his short stop-over but arrangements have been made for Press cameramen to photograph his arrival and departure at Kai Tak.

Press photographers should meet outside the VIP room in the Terminal Building not later than twenty minutes before arrival and departure time. A GIS officer will be present to assist.

Because of aircraft arrival times it is not possible for one photographer to cover the arrival of both Dr. Waldheim and Dr. Kissinger.

-------0--------

/7...........

Monday, February 12, 1973

- 7 -

MOST LABOUR DISPUTES SETTLED AMICABLY

With Help From Labour Department

***«««**

The Labour Department’s Labour Relations Service last year resolved well over 70 per cent of the ^,500 disputes it handled, the Deputy Commissioner of Labour, Mr. Ian Price, said today.

And by timely advice and the use of their good offices, its representatives were able to prevent many more disputes from arising in the first place, he added.

Mr. Price was speaking at the weekly meeting of the New Territories Rotary Club.

He stressed that officers of the service had achieved their successes of the past year not by arbitrating in disputes between employers and employees7 but by conciliation - by helping management and workers to bridge the gap between their positions, and thus arrive at a friendly settlement.

Mr. Price said that despite the growth and success of the Labour Relations Service, many people still did not seem to clearly understand its role in conciliation.

Employers and workers often expected the conciliator to support them in whatever stand they took. The public and the press also often seemed to think that the conciliator had the power of an arbitrator - that is the power to impose a ruling on the parties to the dispute.

/’’The conciliator.......

Monday, February 12, 1975

- 8 -

”The conciliator does not himself settle the dispute,” Mr. Price explained. ”He merely attempts to advise and persuade an employer and his workers to settle what is THEIR dispute.

’’And a conciliator does not possess legal powers. He is only armed with his personality, prestige, personal skill, practical experience, perseverance and patience.”

Mr. Price said that with the backing of the Labour Tribunal which will start work next month, he expected the number of management-worker disputes to be settled by conciliation would become even higher.

The presence of the Tribunal, he added, would strengthen the hands of the department’s conciliation officers, and complement their work.

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Release Time: 7.00 p.m.

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Tuesday, February 13, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No,

The Governor says it is the prime responsibility of his administration to prevent crime and ensure the safety of the people ............................................................ 1

Details of how the disability and infirmity allowance scheme operate have been announced ...................................... 4

Tai Po will have a new youth centre this summer...................  6

A slight increase in industrial employment was shown in the last quarter of 1972 .................................................   7

The Malaysian Commission in Hong Kong will take over Malaysia immigration matters ............................................... 8

Three Waterworks foremen are to receive awards..................... 9

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Tuesday, February 151 1975

GCVERNM5TJT IS DETERMINED TO CURB CRIME

Governor Calls For Everyone’s Full Co-operation

The Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, today reasserted the Government’s determination to tackle the problem of prevailing crime in Hong Kong.

Speaking at a luncheon meeting of the Rotary Club of Hong Kong in the Mandarin Hotel, he also reiterated that members of the public must, at the same time, play their part by assisting the police.

Sir Murray stressed that the onus of crime prevention rested upon the Government. ”It is a prime responsibility of this, and any administration, to ensure the safety of its population.”

He said some crime prevention measures had already been implemented while others were now being formulated. ”1 know the Judiciary stands ready to play its constitutional part.”

The Governor pointed out that violent crime had grown rather later in Hong Kong than in most other great cities of the world.

But in the last four years, it had grown much faster, and its effect on the dense population had been much more disturbing.

’’Some people tell me that an increase in crime is something that must be accepted as a fact of life in this part of the 20th Century,” Sir Murray said. ’•This I utterly reject.”

”It may be so elsewhere, but it need not be so and will not be so in Hong Kong,” he added.

The police force, he said, was somewhat under strength.

/”0ne of •••••••••

Tuesday, February 15, 1975

- 2 -

"One of the long-term remedies is to put this right, and also to improve the quality of the force through the better conditions now being offered, and by pre-service training in a police cadet school to open this year.11

However, it takes time to recruit and train a regular policeman and for this reason, during the interim period, Sir Murray had earlier called for a massive increase in the strength of the auxiliary police.

The Governor said that he and the Commissioner of Police had agreed that very considerable operation involved in the selection and training of young volunteers for the auxiliary police must now be treated as a matter of top priority.

More Police Presence

By the middle of this year. Sir Murray predicted that they should be available for action to help the trained and expert regular force.

"This will give us more muscle, more police presence and more enthusiasm^

He went on to say that a group of officials under the Secretary for Home Affairs had been working hard on details of crime prevention that would involve efforts by both the Government and the public.

"Fairly soon now it should be possible to go to district committees and subsequently to area committees and discuss what the Government believes members of the public can do, and do safely, to help the police, hinder the criminal, and make life safer for themselves, their families and neighbours."

In order to achieve the necessary impact of reversing the criminal trend, the Governor emphasised that everyone’s full and active co-oporation would be necessary.

/More..........

Tuesday, February 13 j 1973

- 3 -

More and more people had already helped the police by raising a hue and cry when they saw a crime committed.

’*11116 healthy and spontaneous response of the public must be helped and canalised along safe lines, and expanded and localised and systematised in many ways, and this is what will be done.”

Sir Murray also touched on other problems in Hong Kong.

He said there was a general acceptance of the need for long term programmes for housing, education and the social services, and a further long term programme for the medical and health services ’would be added this year.

”In these fields that affect the whole population so directly, we must plan as long as we can, plan as high as we can, and plan up to but within the means at our disposal.”

Sir Murray expressed confidence that Hong Kong would be able to achieve these targets.

”We have, of course, in Hong Kong very substantial resources of money and production, of services and expertise, and of human ingenuity and resilience.”

Community spirit, he added, was another resource which could help achieve these targets.

Note to Editors: Copies of the full text of the Governor’s

speech are contained in a supplement to today’s Daily Information Bulletin.

A.....

-----0-----

Tuesday, February 13, 1973

- 4 -

DISABILITY AND INFIRMITY ALLOWANCE SCHEME

Details Given Of How Scheme Will Work

********

People who are entitled to an allowance under the new disability and infirmity allowance scheme will receive payments for six months at a time, provided there are no changes in circumstances.

"In most cases, the allowance will be renewed every six months, so that in practice it will provide a permanent source of income," Hr. T.S. Heppell, Assistant Director (General)f Social Welfare Department said today.

He was commenting on details of the scheme announced on February 1• The scheme itself comes into operation on April 1.

The payments will be made by the Social Welfare Department. Recipients will receive order books which are renewable every six months.

The orders can be cashed each month one at a time at the nearest Post or Treasury office. If the recipient cannot make the journey himself, he can send an authorised representative.

Mr. Heppell explained that there would be some circumstances in which eligibilities for an allowance would cease, for example, where a recipient went into residential care, or where a disabled person was no longer regarded as severely disabled.

He defined the severely disabled as people who had-lost the use of two limbs, or both hands, or all the fingers and both thumbs, or both feet, or eyesight to such an extent as to make even unsighted work impossible.

/The definition.......

Tuesday, February 13, 1973

- 5 -

The definition also covered residents who were totally paralysed, or so injured as to be bedridden or totally disabled, as well as those who were victims of a disabling physical or mental condition of comparable severity or which meant that constant attendance was required.

"It will be the responsibility of the Director of Medical and Health Services to certify to the Social Welfare Department that an applicant for the severe disability allowance is severely disabled, and administrative machinery will be provided for simple and speedy processing,” Mr. Heppell said.

But eligibility for an infirmity allowance would not involve the Medical and Health Department, and the decision would be a matter for the Social Welfare Department.

Mr. Heppell said an announcement would be soon made about how applications for an allowance should be handled and when they should be sent in. Details of this would be widely publicised.

He stressed that while it would not be possible to process all applications immediately, any delayed payments would be backdated to the day of application.

-------0---------

/6.........

Tuesday, February 12, 1975

- 6 -

NEW YOUTH CENTRE FOR TAI PO

*»c****«**

Young people in Tai Po will have a new youth centre this summer.

The Hong Kong Federation of Youth Groups will be building the two-storey centre at a site next to the Tai Po public playground.

Lions International will meet the capital cost of the building. A grant of $41,000 from the Lotteries Fund and local contributions will help towards the cost of equipment and fitting-out works.

The new centre will provide conference rooms, assembly halls and library facilities. Plans are also in hand to offer courses in judo, tailoring, cookery, photography and folk dancing.

A spokesman for the Federation said that construction will soon begin on the centre, which is designed to accommodate some 500 members, with the target date set in July or August this year.

The Federation is at present operating a youth centre in Tai Po in temporary premises, but the lease is expiring this month.

The new site, with an area of over 3f000 square feet, has been granted on a Crown Land permit at an annual nominal fee of $1.

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Tuesday, February 13, 1973

- 7 -

SLIGHT INCREASE IN INDUSTRIAL EMPL0Y14ENT

*******

Industrial employment showed a slight increase in the fourth quarter of 1972 compared with the previous quarter.

The Commissioner of Labour, Mr. Paul Tsui, disclosed this today when he announced the results of the latest quarterly employment survey.

In that quarter, industrial employment increased marginally by 2,9^0 to reach a total of 619,684.

The number of industrial undertakings on Labour Department records increased by 432 to 21,336.

"Employment expanded in electronics, (+2,395), cotton spinning and weaving (+967) and metal products industries (+840) but dropped in woollen knitting (-2,292), wigs (-1,272) and plastic flowers (-1,157)♦

Mr. Tsui observed that one of the four largest industries, in terms of employment, remained the manufacture of textiles and made-up textile goods (264,089).

The other three were plastic products (72,124), electrical machinery, apparatus, appliances and supplies (62,405), and fabricated metal products other than machinery (49,690).

A total of 19,822 vacancies was reported by industry. This represented an increase of 981 places over the previous quarter.

Most of the vacancies occurred in garments (5,790), electronics (4,297), plastics (1,75*0, metal products (1,3W and cotton spinning and weaving (1,139) •

/"The performance ......

Tuesday, February 1J, 1975

- 8 -

"The performance of individual industries varied during 1972,” commented Mr. Tsui. "For instance, there were job increases of 9i345 in garments, 8,148 in electronics, 3,840 in metal products and 3,174 in the plastics industry."

Certain industries recorded a drop in employment such as wigs (-10,463), cotton spinning and weaving (-4,102) and woollen knitting (-3»334).

-------0---------

IMMIGRATION FACILITIES FOR MALAYSIA

*********

The Malaysian Commission in Hong Kong will on Thursday (February 15) assume responsibility for Malaysia immigration matters previously exercised by the Immigration Department.

This was announced today by the Director of Immigration, Mr. V/.E.

Collard*

The Malaysian Commission is on the 25th floor, Permanent Comfort Building^ No. 74-77 Connaught Road Central.

/9.......

Tuesday, February 15, 1973

- 9 -

WATERWORKS FOREMEN TO RECEIVE AWARDS

********

Three foremen of the Waterworks Office have been awarded the 1972

W.K. Kirkwood Awards for outstanding services.

They are Mr. Chan Kam-hing, Mr. Ho Lin, and Mr. Wong Chi.

They will each receive a gold medal from the Director of Water Supplies,

Mr. W.T. Knight, at a New Year Party for about 2,000 children of Waterworks staff on Sunday (February 18).

The three men have been with the Waterworks Office for over 10 years.

The Kirkwood Awards were founded in 19&7 by a number of textile and engineering firms in memory of the late Mr. W.K. Kirkwood, a former engineer of the Waterworks Office.

The award is made annually to officers of the rank of Foreman Class III and below (Scale I staff), who have during the previous year shown themselves to be worthy of special recognition on the basis of general merit.

********

Note to Editors: You are cordially invited to have the

party and the presentation of awards covered. The party will begin at 1 p.m. at Wah Yan College, Waterloo Road, Kowloon. The presentation will take place at 2. JO p.m.

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Release time:, _7..QQ p.m.

1000035 P.R. 33

HONG KONG GOVERNMENT

NFORMATION

SERVICES

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

SUPPLEMENT

Tuesday, February 13, 1973

SPEECH BY GOVERNOR AT ROTARY CLUB

*«*«**«*

The following is the full text of a speech by the Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, at a luncheon meeting of the Rotary Club of Hong Kong at the Mandarin Hotel today (Tuesday):

”1 am most grateful for this invitation to lunch with the Rotary Club of Hong Kong,

nI of course welcome this opportunity to speak to so responsible a group which comprises many of Hong Kong’s most influential people, and which does so much for the community as a whole.

”1 thought the best way I could spend the time would be to pick up some of the points I made in my speech to the Legislative Council last October and comment on them.

”You may remember that the principal points covered were new programmes for housing, education and social services, and the paramount importance of maintaining the prosperity of our economy, and personal safety and ease of mind for our population.

’’There is general acceptance of the need for long term programmes for housing, education and the social services, and a further long term programme for the medical and health services will be added this year. In these fields that affect the whole population so directly, we must plan as long as we can, plan as high as we can, and plan up to but within the means at our disposal.

/’’You are .....

Tuesday, February 13, 1973

- 2 -

”You are businessmen and taxpayers, and you may well say ’this is all very well, but can we really pay for it?’. No doubt the Financial Secretary will be speaking about this when he opens his budget, but the short answer is ’Yes, certainly on present assumptions and on present projections’. All this really means is that provided our economy and consequently our revenue continues to expand as we expect it to, the targets are realistic,

’’Let me put this rather differently. Hong Kong’s industrialisation and prosperity have been achieved against tremendous odds. The phenomenon has certainly surprised the world, but it may also, a little, have surprised us, the people of Hong Kong. To some extent our thinking may have been affected in the past by a prudent doubt as to whether this prosperity would last. I have no doubt that we should plan on the assumption of continued prosperity. I am sure that this is what a responsible group like yourselves and the people of Hong Kong would wish your Government to do, and I am sure that it is the right way to keep prosperous.

Community Spirit

”1 am always impatient of pessimists.

”We have of course in Heng Kong very substantial resources of money and production, of services and expertise, and of human ingenuity and resilience. Recent months have shown that we also have another resource - community spirit. It has always been apparent in the extraordinarily wide participation in charitable enterprises and in times of emergency or disaster. But in the campaign to clean Hong Kong it has emerged as a force which stood ready to assist in dealing with a large and intractible community problem; and it has achieved striking results. Great credit for the result is due to the organising committee, the Cleansing Department- the Information Services and the area /committees, ••••••

Tuesday, February 13, 1975

- 3 -

committees, and in these last weeks I have tried to visit some of those concerned to congratulate them. Nevertheless they would be the first to agree that it was the response of the public that turned the day.

HI attach great importance to the results achieved because they nay show a way in which some other problems may be tackled. Some things can only be achieved by a partnership in which the Government works out what can be done and then enlists the co-operation and participation of the whole community in doing them.

”1 spoke earlier of safety and ease of mind for our population being something of paramount importance. I believe that at this moment these are things which many people do not have. It is our clear duty and obligation to restore them. Crime, violent crime has grown rather later in Hong Kong than in most of the other great cities of the world, but in the last four years it has grown much faster, and its effect on our closely packed population has been much more disturbing.

Crime Prevention

flWe are confronted by a few people, who. have spread fear in our society. And they are products of that society; reminders of the fact that shortcomings need to be remedied if we produce such people.

"I addressed our Legislative Council on the social measures this government is working to achieve, including measures to benefit young people. While I advocate them on their own merits, I hope that they may help to remedy the conditions which - if some of our sociologists are to be believed -breed crime.

’’But in the short term, as I Baid then, we must look to other methods.

/"I want ......

Tuesday, February 13, 1973

,fI want to make it clear here that the onus of crime prevention rests upon the Government. It is a prime responsibility of this, and any administration, to ensure the safety of its population.

"As you know some measures have already been implemented, and I elaborated on those in the Legislative Chamber and the Attorney General has since annnounced others. Others are now being formulated. I know the Judiciary stands ready to play its constitutional part.

"But the brunt of the fight against crime is being borne with courage and devotion and considerable success by the regular police force, and it is on this professional force that we principally depend. It is somewhat under strength. One of the long-term remedies is to put this right, and also to improve the quality of the force through the better conditions now being offered, and by pre-service training in a police cadet school to open this year. We will push on with all this. But it takes time to recruit and train a regular; the process cannot be cut or skimped and meanwhile the problem of crime cannot wait.

Massive Increase

"It is for this reason that I called for a massive increase in the strength of the auxiliary police. The response of our young men has been magnificent. Clearly they see an opportunity to serve and wish to take it. The Commissioner and I are agreed that the very considerable operation involved in the selection and training of these young volunteers must now be treated as a matter of top priority, and that by the middle of the year they should be available for action to help our trained and expert regular force. This win give us more muscle, more police presence, and more enthusiasm.

/"I also •••••

Tuesday, February 13, 1973

- 5 -

"I also hope that this citizens’ constabulary will help to bridge such psychological gaps as exist between the regular police and the people they protect, and encourage more communication and confidence between police and public.

"Some people tell me that an increase in crime is something that must be accepted as a fact of life in this part of the 20th Century. This I utterly reject. It may be so elsewhere, but it need not be so and will not be so in Hong Kong. Time after time our community has been faced with apparently insuperable problems whether economic, political or created by nature. Time after time it has shown it can surmount them. When faced with a real challenge Hong Kong has a rare instinct and ability for combining to do what is necessary. I believe it will do so again in this instance, but it is up to the Government to show the way.

Active Co-operation

"A group of officials under the Secretary for Home Affairs has been working hard on the details. Fairly soon now it should be possible to go to district committees and subsequently to area committees and discuss what the Government believes members of the public Can do, and do, safely, to help the police, hinder the criminal, and make life safer for themselves, their families and neighbours. The regular and auxiliary police can be relied on to play the main part. But to achieve the necessary impact to reverse this criminal trend everyone’s full and active co-operation will be necessary. Already more and more people are helping the police by raising a hue and cry when they see a crime committed, and having the satisfaction of seeing the criminal caught as a result. This healthy and spontaneous

response

Tuesday, February 1J, 1973

- 6 -

response of the public must be helped and canalised along safe lines, and expanded and localised and systematised in many ways, and this is what will be done. It was Edmund Burke, 200 years ago, who said ’If evil is to prevail, all that is necessary is that good men should do nothing’. I am confident that in Hong Kong good men can be relied on to do a great deal: I am confident that together we shall succeed.’1

0 - -

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Wednesday, February 14, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No.

The go-ahead has been given for the Mass Transit Hail way system ...•••••••••............................................ *1

The report on teachers* pay has been published ••••••••••••• 5

The Housing Bill symbolises Hong Kong*s hopes and ambitions for better housing •••••••••.•••..............................   8

Wide publicity will be given to the new disability allowance scheme •«••••••••••••........................................ 10

New bill provides for automatic statutory renewal of leases.. 11

Unofficials support Urban Council Bill .......................  12

The Colonial Secretary speaks on rent control ................. 14

Five bills become law .......................................   15

The Commissioner for Prisons is going to Japan for a seminar on reforms of criminals....................................     16

Two N.T. schools will receive prizes they won in a painting exhibition......••••••••......................................  17

Three buildings in Kowloon City have been declared dangerous ............................................................... 18

Guidelines for film censors are being reviewed ••••*•••••••• 19

Urban Council rates should be sufficient to meet expenditure, says the Financial Secretary ................................   22

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Wednesday, February 14, 1973

- 1 -

GO-AHEAD FOR MASS TRANSIT RAILWAY

Government To Build First Four Stages Immediately

A firm decision has been taken to go ahead with the massive multimillion-dollar Mass Transit Railway system.

Announcing this today, the Financial Secretary, the Hon. C.P. Haddon-Cave, told the Legislative Council: ’’The Government has decided to proceed immediately with constructing the first four of the nine stages of the full system.”

”To this end, preparatory engineering design work, soil investigation and so on are already on hand.”

The Financial Secretary also stated that:

* There would have to be a body responsible for implementing the project.

* An independent public corporation would have to be established by law to operate and maintain the system after construction.

* Further consultations were necessary to determine the best approach of contracting for the project.

The final decision to proceed with the giant project followed the findings of the Steering Group — set up to investigate the best means of financing, tendering for and operating the system — that it should be possible to raise the capital required for constructing the full Mass Transit Railway.

Mr. Haddon-Cave told the Council the Steering Group had concluded that the necessary capital could come from a combination of sources on terms ’’which, by present indications, are likely to be acceptable.”

/’’This conclusion, ......

Wednesday, February 1^, 1973

- 2 -

’’This conclusion, in turn, has strengthened the Government’s belief that the system would be financially viable, in the sense that a sufficient cash flow would be generated to enable the capital cost and accumulated interest to be repaid from the revenue from fares and other sources, over a given period of years,” he said.

But whatever arrangements were made to finance, construct and equip the Mass Transit Railway, he went on, a special body would be needed to implement the project.

Government Supervision

Mr. Haddon-Cave said an entity would also be required to operate and maintain the system after it was constructed, but in this respect the sheer size and nature of the project had created requirements which were in a way ’’conflicting.”

He explained that on the one hand the system would need to be operated on commercial lines if its financial viability was to be assured.

”0n the other hand, the magnitude of the capital requirement, the length of the construction period, and the important role which the system will have to play in the Government’s overall transport policy in the 1980s, all point to a greater degree of Government supervision and control than has hitherto been applied to public utility undertakings in Hong Kong,” he said.

With regard to these factors, it had been decided that the operation of the Mass Transit Railway should be entrusted to a public corporation established under special Ordinance.

/’’This corporation.......

Wednesday, February 14, 1973

- 3 -

"This corporation is to be independent of the Government — in the sense that it will not be a government department — but will, at least initially, be owned entirely by the Government," he stressed.

The capital structure of the corporation, he said, would of necessity have "a very high loan gearing" but the Government intended to take an equity position in the form of a cash subscription, land and expenditure so far charged to public revenue.

"Later on, the public might well be invited to subscribe further equity capital," he added.

Contracting

On the question of contracting, the Financial Secretary said no confident decision could be made at this stage as to whether to award a single contract for the entire project, or whether to split the project into a number of contracts, letting each one separately by international competitive tender with the financing arrangements being handled by a group of merchant bankers specially retained for the purpose.

This, he explained, was because not enough information was available on the prices and credit terms likely to be available from the various consortia which had put up single-contract proposals.

Further consultations with several consortia, he said, were necessary before a decision could be reached.

The Financial Secretary emphasized that both approaches were "equally feasible" and said the fact that further consultations would be held with certain consortia "does not indicate a preference for the single-contract approach."

/far. Haddon-Cave •••••••

Wednesday, February 14, 1973

- 4 -

Mr. Haddon-Cave informed the Council that 21 companies and consortia had already submitted preliminary proposals for the financing, construction, equipment and even the operation of the mass transit railway.

These included financial, engineering and other interests in Hong Kong and seven major industrial countries.

In addition, nearly 30 others had expressed an interest or offered assistance in one way or another for the project.

"This widespread international interest in the-project means that we can look forward to true international competition for the contract or contracts for the construction and equipment of the Mass Transit Railway," he said.

He described the decision to go ahead with the project as an important one which ultimately would affect every member of the community.

He assured the Council that every effort would be made to ensure that the planning and coordination of the project would be undertaken effectively, and to ensure that appropriate arrangements would be made in time for the financing, construction and equipment of the system.

Above all, he added, every step would be taken to ensure that the railway would be constructed with the minimum possible degree of disruption axid inconvenience to the ordinary life of the community.

-------0---------

/5.........

Wednesday, February 1^, 1973

- 5 -

REPORT ON TEACHERS* PAY PUBLISHED

Scale Of 81,175 - 81,750 Recommended For Certificated Masters

*******«**

A scale of 81,175 - 81,750 has been recommended by the Working Group appointed, under the chairmanship of Mr. J.C. Morgan, to consider salaries for certificated masters.

The former salary scale for the grade was 81,044 - 81,598. The Government offered to raise this to 31,175 - 81,750, but the staff side maintained that the appropriate scale should be set at 31,250 - 81,950.

The matter was referred to the Working Group, after lengthy discussions had proved inconclusive in the Senior Civil Service Council.

In its report, published today, the Working Group has also recommended an "extra-scale”, applicable to long-serving teachers who for one reason or another do not continue to have normal promotion prospects, or who prefer not to accept the additional responsibility which goes with promotion.

Such teachers, once over the age of 30, and with at least five years service at the top of the new scale, would receive three further increments over a period of years to a maximum of 81,975-

Following publication of the report, comments received from interested parties in the next four weeks will be considered by the Govexument before any decisions are taken on the Working Group’s recommendations. It is likely that in the implementation of the proposals, the five-year period recommended would be backdated to April 1, 1971-

/The Working

Wednesday, February 14, 1973

- 6 -

The Working Group, reconvened from the 1971 Salaries Commission, was appointed by the Governor last October, following the breakdown of consultations in the Senior Civil Service Council on the question of an appropriate scale for the rank of certificated master.

Pending completion of the Working Group’s report, and without prejudice to any recommendations it might make, the Government implemented an interim scale of 31,100 - 31,750 last November, backdated to April 1, 1971* In recommending 31,175 for the new starting salary, compared with 31,044 in the original scale, the Working Group considered factors such as the academic qualifications required for entry into a teacher training college, the length of the training course, the duties and level of responsibility on appointment and working conditions.

Readjustment

These factors were compared with those of certain other occupations in the public service.

Should higher academic qualifications be required in future for ejitry into teacher training colleges, the group has proposed that the Government should consider readjustment of the star-ting salary for certificated masters.

With regard to the maximum point of the salary scale, the Group noted particularly the substantial number of teachers who reach the top of the scale by the age of 35, and remain there for the rest of their career.

The Group appreciated that many of these are married women who, for reasons of family responsibilities, do not seek more demanding posts on promotion* but prefer to remain as classroom teachers in a morning or afternoon primary school.

/The Group ••••••

Wednesday, February 14, 1973

- 7 -

The Group proposes that such teachers should be given an "extra-scale1^ over the normal salary scale for certificated masters.

This extra scale provides for an increment of 373 per month to those who have reached the age of JO, and have served five years at the top of the scale. Two further increments of $75 per month would follow at intervals of three years.

In addition, the Group confirmed that the present arrangements should continue, whereby workshop instructors enter the certificated rxister’s scale two points above the minimum, in recognition of their longer period of training and experience.

The Working Group also considered a workshop instructors’ claim for a longer scale, or a "through scale" into the assistant master rank. On this question it commented: "We understand that a scheme for providing promotion prospects, on a functional basis, is under consideration, and without committing ourselves in this instance to a detailed recommendation, we support it".

The existing structure provides for two ranks on a functional basis, of workshop instructors II and I, with the latter scale being the same as that of assistant master.

• - • * 0 -------

/8

Wednesday, February 14, 1973

- 8 -

HOUSING BILL SYMBOLISES HOPES FOR BETTER HOUSING

Essential First Step To New Targets

*******

The Housing Bill 1973, designed to create a new, streamlined Housing Authority, "symbolises all our hopes and ambitions for better housing for the people of Hong Kong," the Secretary for Housing, the Hon. I.M. Lightbody, said today.

In introducing the bill into the Legislative Council, he said that the bill reflected the conviction that Hong Kong’s housing problem required "a concentrated attack" and "the formulation of sound policies to govern the allocation of available public housing."

Mr. Lightbody described the bill as an "essential first step" on the road leading to the fulfilment of the new public housing targets which the Governor disclosed at the opening of the Legislative Council session last October.

The Bill, if passed, will vest in the new Housing Authority the powers and functions now exercised by the Housing Board, the present Housing Authority, the Urban Council and the Commissioner for Resettlement.

Referring to the financial aspects of the-bill, Mr. Lightbody said a very important provision required the new Authority to ensure that the .revenue accruing to it from its estates was sufficient to meet its recurrent expenditure on its estates.

"This Authority will take over-existing Housing Authority and Low Cost Housing estates, which meet this injunction; but it will also take over all existing resettlement estates where revenue fails by a wide margin to cover outgoings," he said.

/Mr. Lightbody .......

Wednesday, February 1^, 1973

- 9 -

Mr. Lightbody said that this deficit would have to be covered temporarily by grants from general revenue, ”but the new Authority will have to consider how this unsatisfactory state of affairs should be put right.”

The Authority’s squatter control and squatter clearance activities would be financed by outright grants from general revenue.

Mr. Lightbody said that the new Authority would have to keep the Government continually informed on its forward spending plans because of the Authority’s heavy demands on general revenue for its large building programme.

Building Programme

This was to ensure that the earliest notice could be given to the Authority of any cut-back in funds, which could have ’’the most serious consequences for its housing programme.

Mr. Lightbody added that ”we must make sure that time is never lost in the ten-year building programme.”

The bill proposes a maximum of 20 seats on the new Housing Authority, of which up to 13 are to be occupied by unofficial members.

Of these unofficial seats, eight are to be filled by members of the Urban Council appointed on a personal basis.

Mr. Lightbody said this provision reflected the long experience of Urban Councillors in public housing affairs and their continuing interest in this field of endeavour.

”To ensure the necessary departmental involvement in and commitment to the Authority’s endeavours, the bill proposes an official membership of six, with the Secretary for Housing as Chairman,” he said. All members are to be appointed by the Governor.

/’’It is..........

Wednesday, February 1^, 1973

- 10 -

”It is necessary to reconcile a suitably widely-based membership with the need to keep the Authority’s size down to manageable proportions, in the interests of speed and efficiency,” he added,

-------0---------

WIDE PUBLICITY FOR DISABILITY AND INFIRMITY ALLOWANCE SCHEME

********

All publicity measures will be used to baring home to those in need the message that the Government's nevz severe disability and infirmity allowance scheme is to be operative from April 1 this year.

The Hon. F.K. Li, Director of Social Welfare, gave the Legislative Council this assurance today in reply to the Hon. Mrs. Mary Wong Wing-cheung, who had asked if the Government would publish a pamphlet in the two languages describing the conditions of eligibility in detail.

Mr. Li said publicity measures being contemplated included the press, radio, television, and possibly cinema advertising, all taken to ensure that the scope of the scheme became known to those who might benefit from it.

In addition, the Social Welfare Department was arranging for 30,000 copies of a Chinese leaflet to be printed - with the first consignment expected to be ready in two weeks.

The English leaflet, intended mostly for those working in the social welfare field, would be textually longer, and so would not be ready until later in March. Two thousand copies would be printed in-itjal 1 y.

”As with similar leaflets on the public assistance scheme,” Mr. Li said, "they will be distributed widely through all Government departments which have frequent dealings with the public, and through the volunteer social welfare agencies.” -----------------------------------0----------

/11 .........

Wednesday, February 14, 1973

- 11 -

AUTOMATIC STATUTORY RENEWAL OF RENEWABLE LEASES

**»»*«»»*#

A bill providing for the automatic statutory renewal of all renewable leases will be introduced into the Legislative Council next month, the Attorney General, the Hon. D.T.E. Roberts, said today.

The bill will enable the Government "to meet its obligations to the lessees and to deal with the problems which arise when lessees are unable to exercise an option to renew."

The Attorney General, replying to the Hon. Wilfred Wong in the Legislative Council, said it would be "impracticable" for the Government to renew individually the 5»000 leases which would be due for renewal at the end of June this year.

Under the Renewable Crown Leases (Statutory Renewal) Bill, Mr. Roberts said, leases would be renewed on substantially the same terms as were contained in the proviso for renewal in the existing leases.

The legislation would not affect the concessions relating to the reassessment of Crown Rents, he added.

-------0----------

/12..........

Wednesday, February 14, 1973

- 12 -

UNOFFICIALS SUPPORT URBAN COUNCIL BILL

More Powers For Council Welcomed

*********

The Hon. Wilfred Wong today welcomed the Urban Council Bill 1973 which provides for the reconstitution of the Urban Council with a substantial degree of financial autonomy.

Speaking in the resumed debate on the bill in the Legislative Council this afternoon, Mr. Wong said that he was pleased that "the Urban Council would be able to exercise more powers and perform further duties."

He described as "most significant" a provision contained in the Bill which gives the Council virtual financial autonomy.

This means that the Council will, in future, prepare its own budget and thus will have closer coordination between estimates and expenditure.

Mr. Wong said it was noteworthy that in future a member of the Urban Council would be required to declare his pecuniary interest in any proposed contract or other matter under consideration.

,rThis is in line with the requirements for the members of other councils," he said.

Another-improvement in the bill, he added, was that the Urban Council standing orders would no longer be subject to approval by the Legislative Council.

/Speaking........

Wednesday, February 14, 1973

13

Speaking on the same bill, the Hon. P.C. Woo called on the Government to scrap as soon as possible the English-speaking requirement for Urban Council members so as to enable people who speak only Chinese to take part in the Council’s affairs.

Mr. Woo, while welcoming the provisions contained in the Bill, said it was unfortunate that the atmosphere of goodwill had been spoiled at this particular time by the exclusion of certain candidates for the coming Urban Council elections because of an inadequate standard of English.

He recalled the explanation given last month by the Colonial Secretary that the English-speaking requirement had to be retained for the time due to the shortage of qualified translators to translate the large numbers of Urban Council papers which members were required to study.

"But I would urge Government to overcome this problem at the earliest possible date," he stressed.

Mr. Woo noted that the Colonial Secretary had promised an amendment to the language requirement and said he looked forward to the time when this could come about.

------ 0---------

LEGCO PROCEEDINGS ON TAPE

****««**«

Note to Editors: Proceedings in today’s Legislative Council meeting

have been recorded. You are welcome to consult the tapes in the G.I.S. press room.

-------0---------

/14........

Wednesday, February 14, 1973

- 14 -

RENT CONTROLS FOR MIDDLE INCOME GROUP ACCOMODATION »****»*«

The Government will keep in mind opinions expressed by a number of Legislative Councillors that permanent arrangements should be made to prevent "excessive rent increases", when it makes rent control proposals fcr the future.

The Colonial Secretary, Sir Hugh Norman Walker, said this in the Legislative Council today when he replied to a question by the Hon. Mrs. Mary Wong.

Sir Hugh said there were now estimated to be about 250,000 families with monthly incomes between 31,000 and 33,000.

He said that at present about 175,000 tenancies were subject to one or the other form of control under the existing legislation.

"Moreover," the Colonial Secretary said, "some of these families of course live in public housing whilst others own flats."

-------0 - ------

/15.........

Wednesday, February 1zf, 1973

- 15 -

FIVE BILLS PASSED

*****

Five bills passed their committee stage and third reading in Legislative Council this afternoon and became law.

They are the Administration of Justice (Miscellaneous) Bill, the Juvenile Offenders (Amendment) Bill, the Royal Hong Kong Regiment (Amendment) Bill, the Royal Hong Kong Auxiliary Air Force (Amendment) Bill and the Census (Amendment) Bill.

Debate was resumed on the second reading of the Urban Council Bill 1973, and the Public Health and Urban Services (Amendment) Bill 1973*

The Housing Bill 1973 had its first and second readings, and debate on it was adjourned.

The Report of the Working Group of the 1971 Salaries Commission, together with five sessional papers, was tabled.

The five sessional papers were the 1971/72 annual reports by the Director of Royal Observatory, the Commissioner of Registration of Persons, the Commissioner for Labour and the Director of Fire Services, and the Report on the Administration of the Fire Services Welfare Fund for the year ended March 31, 1972.

-------0 --------

/16..........

Wednesday, February 14, 1973

- 16 -

PRISONS CHIEF TO ATTEND SEMINAR IN JAPAN

*******

The Commissioner of Prisons Mr. T.G. Garner, will leave for Japan on Friday (February 16) to attend a seminar in Tokyo on reforms of criminals.

Mr. Garner has been invited by the United Nations Asia and Far East Institute for the Prevention of Crime and Treatment of Offenders in the capacity of a visiting expert.

He is to assist the Faculty members of the Institute in the running of a seminar course for senior officials from the region.

The course will be held from February 16 to March 2j.

The purpose of this seminar is to provide participants with an opportunity for studying and discussing the various problems involved in the reform of criminal justice administration in the light of economic and social changes, new crime problems and technological developments.

The main emphasis will be on the practical aspects of criminal justice in the region.

Proposed reforms or recent changes in the countries from which participants come will be of special interest. t

The course is specially designed and intended for those in policy-making positions.

Among the countries taking part will be Afghanistan, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Nepal, Republic of Korea, Singapore, Sri Lanka, South Vietnam and Thailand.

-------0---------

/17..........

Wednesday, February 1^, 1973

- 17 -

2 N.T. SCHOOLS TO RECEIVE FIRST PRIZES At Painting Exhibition

********

The prize winners of the painting competition among primary and secondary pupils sponsored by Indian Independence 25th Anniversary Committee will receive their prizes in the main concourse of the Ocean Terminal on Friday afternoon at the opening of a three-day exhibition of the best entries.

The Director of Education, Mr. J. Canning, will preside at the ceremony and Mrs. M.G.R. Sandberg, wife of the General Manager of the Hong Kong Branch of the Hongkong and Shanghai Banking Corporation, will distribute the prizes.

Eighty schools took part in the contest. The 1,171 entries included oil paintings, water colour, crayons, prints, and sketches. About 200 of these have been selected for the exhibition.

The winning entries were selected by a panel of seven judges, including Mr. Canning, Mr. John Warner, Curator of the City Museum and Art Gallery, and Mr. Liu Kao-chung, Director of the Department of Fine Art of the New Asia College.

The first, second and third prize winners in both the primary and secondary groups will receive $1,000, $500 and $250 respectively.

The first prize in the primary group was won by Miss Wong Kwai-sun and Miss Lui Wai-chun of the Hoh Fuk Tong School in Castle Peak while a group of pupils in the Yuen Long Lutheran Middle School took the first prize in the secondary section.

Note to Editors: You are invited to have the opening of

the exhibition and the prize-giving ceremony covered on February 16 at 5»3O p.m.

-------0---------

/18......................................

Wednesday, February 1^, 1973

- 18 -

BUILDINGS DECLARED DANGEROUS

********

Three buildings in Kowloon City, Nos. 6, 8, and 10 Shing Lung Street, were today (Wednesday) declared liable to become dangerous by the Building Authority.

The Principal Government Building Surveyor said in a statement this morning that these pre-war buildings were inspected following a fire resulting in damage to Nos. 12, 14 and 16 Shing Lung Street. These buildings have already been closed and are awaiting demolition.

Investigations showed that the party walls of these buildings are in an unsatisfactory condition. There is a risk of collapse during or after the demolition of the adjoining buildings.

Notices of intention to apply for Closure Orders in Kowloon District Court at 9-30 a.m. on March 15, 1973 were posted today.

0

/19........

Wednesday, February 14, 1973

- 19 -

GUIDELINES FOR FILM CENSORSHIP UNDER REVIEW $»«******

The general guiding principles of the Panel of Film Censors are to bo reviewed, the Secretary for Home Affairs, the Hon. D.C.C. Luddington, told the Legislative Council today.

Speaking at the end of an adjournment debate on "Reduction of Violence on the Screen," he said the Commissioner for Television and Films had also been instructed to consider how best the Censors and the Board of Review could be kept aware of the public’s attitude towards violence shown in local cinemas.

Three Members had earlier called for a review of the guidelines in an attempt to reduce violence shown in Hong Kong cinemas.

The Hon. H.J.C. Browne felt there was a relationship between the increase in violence among young people and the "horrible films" being screened locally.

Although such films were labelled "Not Suitable For Children," he said, this was not a valid argument to justify their showing.

He cited a recent film, "Macbeth," as an example of pictures containing horrifying scenes of violence.

"Because it involved stabbing by a knife it was, I felt, totally unsuitable for Hong Kong," he said.

Cleaning up the screen, he added, would make cinemas once again "places of entertainment•"

/The second

Wednesday, February 14, 1973

The second speaker, Mr. Wilfred Wong, stressed that when violence is over-emphasised, ,fit sets in motion a de-civilising process which results in retrogression.”

Human beings, said Mr. Wong, tended to behave in accordance with the patterns of behaviour of others, and such behaviour tended to respond in proportion to impulses created by others, whether in person or on the stage or on the screen.

The Hon. Mrs. Joyce Symons also called for the review of the Codes of Practice under the terms of the Television Ordinance in addition to a revision of the censors’ guidelines.

One-Sided View

She felt that films and television programmes featuring violence offered a one-sided view of life, in plying that all co flict had to be resolved by force.

”The danger lies less in imitation than in acceptance of violence as manly and inevitable.

”It is not a matter of simple economics to allow freedom of enterprise when the minds of our younger citizens are at stake.

”We know that some films are banned and others cut, but the net result is still too many films depicting violence as a way of life,” she said.

Mrs. Symons said she was looking forward to the proposed campaign on the reduction of crime and suggested that ”our relfections this afternoon are but a fore-runner of a concerted movement that affects us all.”

/In reply .......

Wednesday, February 14, 1975

- 21 -

In reply, Mr. Luddington said the concern expressed over the extent to which violence forms part of films provided for entertainment in Hong Kong was shared by many, including the Chief Film Censor and his colleagues.

Hov/ever, he wondered whether there was as close a relationship between the portrayal of violence in the cinemas and the prevalence of violent crime in Hong Kong.

He assured the Council that he had given serious thought to the need for stricter censorship not only in respect of television and films but in other areas as well in the light that this might help reduce serious crime.

Caution

’•This is however a realm in which one must move with caution because Hong Kong cannot afford either to be out of touch with the rest of the world, or to have a lot of bored people,” he added.

”Thus if Government attempted to cut out all violence in films, public entertainment might be very severely reduced, for there are virtually no films made for the Hong Kong market alone.”

Mr. Luddington emphasised that the Censor’s role was primarily a ’’negative one,” and the censor was in no way responsible for the material put before him.

He agreed, however, that the purpose of censorship was positive in that it encouraged the production of films which would entertain rather than corrupt.

”Our task,” he added, ”is to maintain acceptable public standards without unreasonably infringing the private rights of the individual.”

Wednesday, February 14, 1973

22 -

HEW FINANCIAL ARRANGEMENTS FOR URBAN COUNCIL. ANNOUNCED

********

The Government will put the Urban Council in a healthy financial position for the next two or three years under the new financial arrangements.

The Financial Secretary, the Hon. C.P. Haddon-Cave stressed this

in the Legislative Council today when he moved a motion that under the

Rating Ordinance 1973, the General Rates should be nine per cent and the Urban Council Rates six per cent of the rateable value of every tenement.

He said the Urban Council White Paper recommended that the Council’s yate would be calculated initially from estimates of net expenditure in the year preceding the introduction of the new arrangements.

Briefly, he explained, the calculation of the Council’s initial

rate was based on the following main elements:

* The personal emoluments of the Urban Services Department staff;

* The annual recurrent expenditure and other charges of the department;

* Special expenditure:

* Cost of services provided by other Government departments ; and

* Expenditure by the Council on capital works.

These five elements would, for the year 1973-74, result in a

gross expenditure of about 8240 million. Deducting the estimated fee income of 835 million, this would reach a net expenditure of 3205 million.

The Financial Secretary pointed out that the estimated yield from a 15 per cent rate in the coming fiscal year in the urban area was 351& million.

1

/And the.........

Wednesday, February 14, 1973

- 2? -

And the share of the Council's six per cent rate would be more than adequate to meet the net expenditure figure, he added.

Commenting on criticisms from certain members of the Urban Council, Mr. Haddon-Cave said the financial autonomy given to the Council "has been not only scrupulously fair but also, in particular areas, manifestly generous."

He explained that, for instance, in assessing the salary bill payable by the Council for the U.S-.D. staff, the Government had used the full establishment of the department rather than the actual or probable strength.

Capital Works

This alone had made a difference of at least 86 million to the benefit of the Council.

On financing the Council’s capital works programme, he said the Government had offered to complete, as a charge to General Revenue, all Urban Council items in Categories A, D and E of the Public Works Programme.

The total cost for these extra public works commitment would amount to Z25 million •

In addition, he said the Government would continue to be responsible for such larger and more technical projects as abattoirs, stadia, museums and oivic centres.

/He also

Wednesday, February 14, 1973

- 24 -

He also promised the Council that, in the event of any error in the calculation or any unforeseen developments which should have been taken into account in launching the Council, he would seek the agreement of the Legislative Council for the provision of appropriate financial assistance —■ either by way of an adjustment in the rate or by way of a grant.

Further more, he added that the Government would pay the Council an initial "pump-priming grant or dowry” for spending on capital or recurrent items.

This sum would be subject to the approval of the Finance Committee of the Legislative Council.

-------0---------

Release time: 9«Q0 p.m.

4000035 P.R. 33

HONG KONG GOVERNMENT

NFORMATION

SERVICES

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

SUPPLEMENT

Wednesday, February 14, 1975

STATEMENT BY FINANCIAL SECRETARY * * ♦

The Hong hong dollar has been revalued in relation to the U.S. dollar, so that its present gold parity will remain unchanged.

Announcing this decision by Government, the Financial Secretary-, Mr. C.P. Haddon-Cave, said that the new central rate between the Hong hong dollar and the U.S. dollar will be HK^5.O85O = USs#1. The upper and lower limits within which the foreign exchange market can operate will be HK^4.9706 and HK&5.1994. ’’This fully reflects the ten percent devaluation of the U.o. dollar announced yesterday” he added.

Commenting on the decision, Mr. Haddon-Cave said, “Following a careful and detailed consideration of all the factors involved, we have come to the conclusion that there is no justification for, and no real advantage in, any devaluation of the Hong Kong dollar.

"This is also the view that has been taken of their own currencies by most Western European countries and by Malaysia and Singapore. In addition, the Japanese yen is floating upwards and has already effectively revalued against all other currencies and by more than ten percent against the U.S. dollar" he said.

/’’These •...

Wednesday, February 14, 19^3

- 2 -

’’These moves have all been made in a concerted effort to bring more order into the international monetary system and to set the scene for the opening of a new round of multilateral trade negotiations in the autumn.

"As an important trading centre Hong Kong must also play its part in this stabilising process from which we can in turn expect to receive significant benefits” Mr. Haddon-Cave added.

Turning to the effects of these developments on Hong Kong’s own trading position, the Financial Secretary said that, although the prices of our imports from Japan can be expected to rise to some extent this should be offset by cheaper imports from the United States and perhaps a few other countries. "Our export position should not be seriously affected" he said, "particularly since there will be no change in our exchange rates with most Western European countries, which together make up a growth area for our trade. It will be more difficult to sell to the United States but, as these new arrangements are intended to correct the large deficit in the U.S. balance of payments, most countries will be similarly affected. Furthermore, textiles account for over 4Q/> of our exports to this market and these are, in any event, limited by quota", hr. Haddon-Cave said.

"Generally speaking" he said, "Hong Kong should continue to maintain a strong trading position."

Commenting on the effects of the decision on the general level of prices within Hong Kong the Financial Secretary said, "As we estimate that the net effect on our import prices

/is......

t

Wednesday, February 14, 1973

- 3 -

is likely to be neutral there should be no increase in our cost of living as a result of these moves. In particular, we do not think there will be any increase in the prices of our substantial imports of food and consumer goods from China.

"This was one of the major factors influencing the decision today" he said.

Concluding, the Financial Secretary said: "We have a fully employed economy and our national income is growing at a rate which demonstrates the underlying strength of the Hong Kong dollar. Continuing economic progress can best be achieved in conditions of stability both internally and in the international trading environment in which we operate. I have no doubt, therefore, the decision we have taken toda:/ is the correct one."

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PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Thursday, February 15? 1973

CONTENTS

Page No.

Record number of vehicles used the Lion Rock Tunnel during the Lunar New Year..........•....•........................ 1

Two lots of Crown land in Kowloon will be sold by auction next month ............................................... 2

Construction of the last link in the seawall for the Tong Mi Road extension project will begin in April............. 3

The Lotteries Fund has granted $240,000 to the Scout Association for a training Centre ........................ 4

Three buildings in Western District have been declared dangerous ........................... 5

A number of new traffic arrangements for both sides of the harbour are announced ..........................*......... 6

The 1973 anti-smallpox campaign is entering its second week today .................................................... 6

Twelve nominations have been accepted for next month’s Urban Council election ..................................

The Governor paid surprise visit to police stations ...... 8

Quarantine restrictions have been announced by the Port Health Authority ......................................... 9

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Thursday, February 15, 1973

- 1 -

LION ROCK TUITIEL TRAFFIC SET NEW RECORD

During Lunar New Year

The total number of vehicles passing through the Lion Rock Tunnel during the Lunar New Year has set a new record.

According to statistics released by the Transport Department, a total of 69,^5 vehicles passed through the tunnel during the four-day holiday period.

The highest daily record was set on February 5 when 21,673 vehicles passed through the toll booths.

The previous daily record of 20,967 vehicles was set on the third day of the last Lunar New Year (February 17, 1972).

The usage of the Lion Rock Tunnel, which operates on a round-the-clock basis, has been increasing steadily since its opening at the end of 19&7»

Traffic has been increasing at the rate of about 20 per cent per annum — from an initial daily average of approximately 5,000 vehicles to about 11,500 now during weekdays and over 15,000 during weekends and public holidays.

The Lion Rock Tunnel Road was originally built to relieve congestion on the old Tai Po Road, linking Kowloon and the eastern part of the New Territories-

But with the rapid development of the New Territories, especially Sha Tin, traffic congestion is still experienced on both roads during peak hours.

Traffic volume on Tai Po Road has now risen to a level which is even higher than that before the opening of the tunnel.

/The Government ........

Thursday, February 15, 1973

- 2 -

The Government has therefore decided to construct a second Lion Rock Tunnel Road, similar to the existing one, to cope with the even higher volume of traffic expected as Sha Tin develops.

It will be built parallel to and on the western side of the present tunnel, with entry and exit points close to the existing portals. ’.Then completed, each tunnel will be used for dual-carriageway one-way traffic.

Drilling work has already begun earlier this year and the new tunnel is expected to be open within the next 3 to 4 years.

-------0---------

LAND SALES NEXT MONTH

*******

Two lots of Crown land situated in Kowloon’s "Broadcasting City" will be offered for sale at a public auction in the City Hall next month.

Both lots, located off Broadcast Drive, are for private residential development and have a combined upset price of 319 million.

The auction will take place at 2.30 p.m. on March 16 in the City Hall Lecture Room.

Full particulars and conditions of sale may be obtained from the Public Enquiry Sub-office, Central Government Offices, West Wing, ground floor, and at the Crown Lands and Survey Office, Kowloon Government Offices, No. 405 Nathan Road, 10th floor.

Sale plans can be inspected at these offices.

-------0---------

/3.........................................

Thursday, February 15♦ 1973

- 3 -

TONG MI ROhD RECLAMATION PROJECT

Last Link In Seawall To Be Built Soon

*♦*♦*♦♦♦♦*

The last link in the seawall for the Tong Mi Road extension and reclamation scheme will be built in April.

The seawall, measuring over 1,000 feet, will be built at the northeastern comer of Yau Ma Tei Typhoon Shelter. It will link the seawall opposite Oak Street with the one off Shan Tung Street.

Work is expected to be completed in nine months.

On completion of the seawall, an area of 23-2 acres of land will be reclaimed to provide for cargo-handling areas, public open spaces and major roadworks.

The reclamation will enable Tong Mi Road to be extended to form part of a major waterfront route linking Tsim Sha Tsui with Tsuen Wan.

The new coastal road is expected to relieve the traffic situation in Nathan Road.

-------0---------

A.....

Thursday, February 1f>, 1973

- 4 -

SCOUT ASSOCIATION TO SET UP TRAINING CENTRE

With Grant From Lotteries Fund

*******

A capital grant of 3240,000 has been allocated from the Lotteries Fund to assist the Scout Association in setting up a Training Centre at Tung Tsz, Plover Cove, in the New Territories.

The Association has already obtained Government agreement to the allocation of a site there•

Under the project, three buildings and three huts previously occupied by staff employed on the Plover Cove Water Scheme will be converted into dormitories to provide overnight accommodation and camping facilities for 700 young people.

A large assembly hall is now under construction and a jetty will be built towards the end of the year.

The project started in 1971 and will be completed next year.

The total cost of the project is 3280,000, of which 340,000 has already been spent on initial site preparation.

-------0---------

/5.........


Thursday, February 15, 1973

- 5 -

BUILDINGS DECLARED DANGEROUS

* * ♦ * * ♦ ♦ ♦ * *

The Building Authority today declared No. 68 Des Voeux Road

West to be in a dangerous condition and Nos. 66 and 70 Des Voeux Road • •

West liable to become dangerous.

In a statement issued this morning, the Principal Government Building Surveyor said that these foui>-storey pre-war buildings were inspected following a complaint.

It was revealed that the roof of No. 68 Des Voeux Road West was in a dangerous condition and liable to collapse.

In addition brickwork to the load bearing walls is fractured and there is evidence of decay in the floor joists.

No. 66 Des Voeux Road West shares a common staircase with No. 68.

Taking into account defects in the floors and walls, No. 66 will be liable to become dangerous during or after the demolition of No. 68.

On the other side, the party wall between No. 68 and 70 is extensively fractured and there will be risk of collapse during or after the demolition of No. 68.

Notices of intention to apply for closure orders in Victoria District Court at 9«3O a.m. on March 23» 1973 were posted today.

-------0---------

/6.........

Thursday, February 151 1973

- 6 -

NEW TRAFFIC ARRANGEMENTS

********

The Transport Department today announced a series of new traffic arrangements on both sides of the harbour.

From 10 a.m. on Saturday (February 17), the loop road joining Yuk Choi Road, Hung Hom, will be made one-way southbound to facilitate vehicular access to the Hong Kong Polytechnic.

Parking at Wan Chai Ferry Pier will be suspended from 9-30 a.m. on Saturday for about three days for the re-arrangement of parking spaces.

Sing Woo Crescent in Happy Valley will be made one-way southbound from 10 a.m. on Tuesday (February 20)•

Appropriate signs will be put up to guide motorists.

-------0---------

ANTI-SMALLPOX CAMPAIGN ENTERING SECOND WEEK

*♦♦*♦*♦♦

The 1973 anti-smallpox campaign is entering its second week today.

In the first week, a total of 2,532 doses of vaccine was administered — 74 on the Island, 2,217 in Kowloon, and 261 in the Nev; Territories.

A spokesman for the Medical and Health Department said the three-week campaign aimed at vaccinating as many members of the public as possible against smallpox.

The drive lasting until February 24, is also intended to keep up the community’s immunity to the disease.

Free vaccinations are available at all government clinics and inoculation centres.

-------0---------

Thursday, February 15, 197J

TWELVE CANDIDATES TO STAND FOR THE COMING

Urban Council Election Next Month

*********

Twelve nominations have been accepted for the Urban Council elections in March.

The Returning Officer, Mr. Donald Tsang, announced this at 5 this evening at the end of the nomination periodo

The nominations accepted included two candidates who, in the tests for proficiency in the English language conducted by the testing authority, had failed to reach the standard of English normally required of a juror.

These were Mr. Lai Shiu-lam, of the Hong Kong Reform Club, and Mr. Choi Kwok-ching, of the Hongkong Civic Association.

The Returning Officer, being satisfied that their standard of

English is sufficient to enable them to. make a reasonable contribution to the affairs of the Council, exercised his discretion and accepted their nominations*

He took into account the fact that it is intended that Urban Council sessions are to become fully bilingual as soon as adequate translation facilities are available; this should be within a year.

The full list of nominations is as follows:

HONGKONG CIVIC ASSOCIATION THE HONG KONG REFORM CLUB

1. CHAN Peter Chi-kwan 1. Bernacchi Brook A, OBE, QC, JP

2. CHCW Wai-hung, Edmund 2. TSIN Sai-nin

3. WONG Henry 3. Bernacchi Patricia S.

4. CHOI Kwok-ching 4. HU Hung-1ick, Henry

5. Sansan Teh-chi CHING 5. LAI Shiu-lam

6. WONG Pun-cheuk

7. YOUNG C.P.

— — — - 0 - - /8

Thursdayi February 15, 1973

- 8 -

GOVERNOR PAID SURPRISE VISIT TO POLICE STATIONS

*******

The Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, paid a surprise visit this afternoon to Hong Kong Island District Police Headquarters and to Western Police Station.

He showed particular interest in the whole procedure of crime reporting and how members of the public reported crime to the police.

Accompanied by the Commissioner of Police, Mr. C.P. Sutcliffe, the Governor first visited Hong Kong Island District Headquarters, where he inspected the 999 emergency control room and the Traffic Office.

Later the Governor went to the Western Police Station, where he was met by the Divisional Superintendent, Mr. L. Power.

Again, Sir Murray was keenly interested in the crime reporting system, and the procedures which are in use.

He wished to see for himself some of the day-to-day problems with which the police have to deal.

He visited the Criminal Investigation Office before being given a. final briefing on police matters by Assistant Divisional Superintendent, Mr. D.T. Emmett.

-------0----------

/9...........

Thursday, February 15» *1973

- 9 -

QUARANTINE RESTRICTIONS IMPOSED

»****•»«

The Port Health Authority announced today that quarantine restrictions have been imposed against arrivals from Singapore (Port and Airport), on account of cholera.

At the same time, quarantine restrictions imposed against arrivals from Quetta (Airport), Pakistan, on account of smallpox have been removed.

-------0---------

Release Time: 7*30 p.m.

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Friday, February 16, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No,

Restrictions on drinking during late hours are lifted ••••••• 1

More teacher training facilities are to be provided ••••••••• 3

A list of plans prepared by the Town Planning Board has been published ••••*•••••••......................................... 4

The new law on company prospectuses will come into force on March 1 ••••••................................................. 5

The Governor is to be the first President of the Polytechnic ............................................................... 6

New regulations giving the Commissioner for Transport power to cancel a driving test form are published.................... 7

Certain areas in Central will be without water tomorrow night.......................................................... 7

More than 300 labour problems were settled last month with the help of the Labour Department...........o...................... 8

Temporary traffic diversion will be introduced at the junction of Nathan Road and Argyle Street tomorrow..................... 9

The Commerce and Industry Department has suspended issuing export licences for certain textile products to Norway ••••••• 10

The Governor tours Chai Wan • ................................ 11

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Friday, February 16, 1973

- 1 -

RESTRICTIONS ON DRINKING AT L^TE HOURS LIFTED Situation To Be Reviewed After One Year ««*»*«*•*

The Government will abolish the restrictions on drinking during late hours with effect from today.

However, a Government spokesman said the situation would bo reviewed after 12 months•

Nev; regulationstmaking abolition of these restrictions possible, are published in the Gazette today for general information.

Under existing regulations* the public can only legally purchase and consume liquor between 8 aame and 2 a.m. on premises licensed by the Liquor Licensing Boards

In addition, licensed hotels and private clubs may sell liquor at any time to bona fide residents and members respectively.

The new regulations will enable members of the public to buy and drink liquor at any time of the day or night.

This means that owners of establishments selling liquor can determine their own opening hours.

Explaining the new measures* a spokesman said: ’’During 1971, there was an increase in the number of applications for club liquor licences where the sole purpose of the club appeared to be evading licensing hours and controls on entertainment* /’’These clubs .........................................................

Friday, February 16, 1973

2 -

f,These clubs are not subject to the usual regulations governing hygiene and safety, and their control presents the Police with a difficult and time-consuming task.

"By abolishing the licensing hours the number of th$se clubs is lilcely to be reduced thereby reducing the burden of administrative work borne by the police," ,

Commenting on a possible increase in late night noise and disturbance after the enforcement of the pew regulations, he said the Police already had the powers to maintain pe$c$ and quiet between 11 and 6 a.m.

Friday, February 16, 1973

- 3 -

MORE TEACHER TRAINING FACILITIES TO BE PROVIDED

Old Northcote College Building To Get Face Lift

The Old Northcote Teacher Training College building centrally sited at Bonham Road is to be renovated to provide more teacher training facilities.

The building had been occupied previously by the United College of The Chinese University. - *

After renovation, it will be used by the Northcote College of Education to run a number of courses for in-service secondary school teachers.

These courses are designed to equip them as qualified teachers.

This is in line with the new post primary education policy which aims at providing, with Government assistance, three more years of aided education.

A spokesman for the Education Department said: ”In May last year the Finance Committee approved an expansion of the existing teacher education programme designed to provide 2,000 additional non-graduate qua!ified teachers by September 1976 to meet the urgent demand for qualified secondary school teachers.

,rThe demand is due mainly to the increase in secondary school places as a result of the implementation of the new post primary education policy,11 he said.

/The building .........

Friday, February 16, 1973

The building will provide 10 lecture/tutorial rooms, six classrooms for the teaching of special sciences, a library, a language laboratory, an assembly hall and offices for administrative and teaching staff.

A language teaching centre is also to be set up.

The renovation project is expected to start in the middle of March and will take about three-andwa-half months to complete.

It is expected that the building will be ready for use in September, ----------------------------------0 • . - •

LIST OF TOWN PLANS PUBLISHED

*»*«»*»*»

A list of plans prepared by the Town Planning Board was published in today’s Government Gazette for general information.

The plans, in three categories, include approved plans, approved plans referred back to the Town Planning Board for amendment or replacement, and draft plans exhibited by the Board for public inspection.

Certified copies of the approved plans are available for inspection without charge at the Land Office, Central Government Offices (West Wing).

Printed copies of the approved plans may also be purchased from the Crown Lands and Survey Office, Murray Building, Garden Road* Hong Kong or from the Government Publications Centre, Star Ferry Concourse, Hong Kong.

-------0 . w w .

Friday, February 16, 1973

- 5 -

LAW ON COMPANY PROSPECTUSES

Effective On March 1

********

The Registrar of Companies, Mr. W. Hume, drew attention today to

the notification in the Gazette that the Companies (Amendment) Ordinance 1972

will come into operation on March 1, 1973-

’’One of the effects of the commencement of the Ordinance”, said

Mr. Hume, ”is that no prospectus may be issued on or after March 1 unless the prospectus has been registered in the Companies Registry.

”The Ordinance, however, gives the Registrar of Companies power to

refuse to register a prospectus if it does not comply in all respects with

the Ordinance or contains any information likely to mislead.”

Mr. Hume said that, subject to certain conditions being satisfied, it was hoped to clear a draft prospectus within a few days of its receipt in the Companies Registry.

The conditions were:

(1) that three copies of the draft are presented in complete form, including accounts and valuation reports, although not necessarily including the final price or anticipated price/earnings ratio;

(2) that the draft is presented in an easily readable form;

(3) that any comments made by the Registrar are accepted by the parties concerned;

(4) that the Chinese text is accurate and does not require a great deal of alteration; and

(5) that there is an even flow of draft prospectuses into the Companies Registry not exceeding three per week.

/Mr. Hume ... <

Friday, February 16, 1973

- 6 -

Mr. Hume stressed that condition (5) is most important, and that if the flow of draft prospectuses is uneven or excessive, there are certain to be delays.

’Draft prospectuses received by the Companies Registry”, said Mr. Hume, ”will be given serial numbers and will be examined in strict numerical order.

”A draft will, however, lose its priority if it requires substantial alteration or if a second draft has to be prepared.”

-------0---------

GOVERNOR TO BE FIRST PRESIDENT OF POLYTECHNIC

*******

The Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, has accepted an invitation by the Board of Governors of the Polytechnic to become its first President.

Announcing this, the Board Chairman, Dr. S.Y. Chung, said the Governor’s association with the Polytechnic in this way would give an added measure of prestige to the Polytechnic itself and perhaps more importantly, to the students enrolled there.

”This is a welcome development,” Dr. Chung said, ”in keeping with the general intention to upgrade the status of technical education in Hong Kong.”

-------0----------

Friday, February 16, 1973

- 7 -

NEW REGULATIONS ON DRIVING TESTS

*********

The Governor in Council has made new regulations enabling the Commissioner for Transport to cancel a driving test form and refund the application fee to a candidate.

The regulations, known as the Road Traffic (Driving Licences) (Amendment) Regulations 1973» are published in today’s Government Gazette.

The regulations provide the Commissioner with such powers if he is satisfied that the candidate has been unable to attend for the test because it has been cancelled at short notice by the Commissioner or because of other circumstances beyond his control.

The regulations also provide the Commissioner with authority to cancel a test form if he considers that it would be contrary to the public interest to issue to the applicant the class of driving licence applied for and that the applicant is ineligible to obtain, or is disqualified from obtaining, a licence.

-------0---------

WATER INTERRUPTION

*********

Water supply to certain areas in Central will be interrupted for eight hours from 10 p.m. tomorrow (Saturday).

This is to allow a fresh water connection to be made in Connaught Road Central at the junction of Man Wan Lane and Cleverly Street.

Premises affected are: Nos. 92-121, Connaught Road Central, Nos. 197-247, Des Voeux Road Central, the Shun Tak Shipping Co., Ltd., the Hong Kong Macau Hydrafoil Co., Ltd., the Far East Hydrofoil Co., and the Immigration Department.

-------o--------- /8........

Friday, February 16, 1973

- 8 -

350 LABOUR PROBLEMS SETTLED LAST MONTH With Help Of Labour Relations Service

The Labour Relations Service of the Labour Department helped employers and employees settle 350 labour problems in January*

As a result of agreements reached, 1,584 employees received a total of 3779,360.

Of this total, 68.5 per cent were paid by employers as outstanding wages, payment in lieu of notice, and statutory holiday pay.

Also included were other payments of a contractual nature under either the Employment Ordinance or the Industrial Employment (Holidays with Pay and Sickness Allowance) Ordinance.

The remaining 31*5 per cent or 324-5,216.45 were paid, apart from legal entitlements, as severance pay and other ex gratia payments to employees.

Fresh nominal claims made by employees in the same month amounted to 31,410,017*

Officers of various district branches of the Labour Relations Service also handled 1,954 consultations and enquiries about labour laws, industrial relations and personnel managements

They visited 11 establishments to help employers introduce joint consultative machinery to strengthen communication between labour and managements

-------0 --------

/9.........

Friday, February 16, 1973

- 9 -

TRAFFIC DIVERSION IN MONG KOK

********

Temporary traffic diversion will be introduced at the junction of Nathan Road and Argyle Street tomorrow (Saturday) afternoon.

Eastbound traffic on Argyle Street will be prohibited from turning left into Nathan Road as from 5 p*m. tomorrow.

This arrangement will continue until } p.m. on February 20 (Tuesday).

During this period, traffic will be diverted via Portland Street and Fife Street.

A spokesman for the Transport Department said that the temporary diversion was to facilitate construction work in Nathan Road.

Appropriate traffic signs will be put up and Police will be on hand to guide motorists.

-------0---------

/10..........

*

Friday, February 16, 1973 - 10 -

EXPORT OF CERTAIN TEXTILES TO NORWAY

««**«***

The Director of Commerce and Industry has announced that, at the request of the Norwegian Government, the Department has suspended with immediate effect, issuing further export licences for the following textile products for export to Norway:

H.K. Export

Classification Description

No. _____

841 163 Dress shirts, not knitted or

crocheted, wholly or mainly of cotton

A Notice to Exporters will be issued later calling for returns from shippers for the following items:

H.K. Export

Classification Description

No.

ex 841 117 Slacks, jeans and trousers (except

shorts), not knitted or crocheted, wholly or mainly of cotton, men’s and boys’ wear.

841 739 Blouses and jumpers, not knitted or

crocheted, wholly or mainly of discontinuous synthetic fibres, not embroidered, women’s and girls’ wear.

841 163 Dress shirts, not knitted or

crocheted, wholly or mainly of cotton.

Trade associations and companies on the Commerce and Industry Department’s

mailing list for Notice to Exporters, Series 6 will receive copies of the Notice shortly.

Further enquiries can be directed to Mr. C.L. Li, Industry Assistant,

on Tel. No. 5-247315. ------------------------------------0---------- /11 ....................

Friday, February 16, 1973

- 11 -

GOVERNOR TOURS CHAI WAN

Visits Park, Anchorage And Resettlement Blocks

**«»*»*»

The Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, this afternoon paid a two-hour familiarisation visit to Chai Wan to see the development in the area.

He saw some of the problems facing the Government and the progress made as a result of the Clean Hong Kong Campaign.

Accompanied by Mr. David T.K. Wong, City District Commissioner (Hong Kong), the Governor began his visit by touring the north-western part of the reclamation.

He then proceeded to the central part of the reclamation to visit the Chai Wan Park which was developed in 1970 after the clearance of some 50 squatter huts.

Sir Murray also visited the Chai Wan anchorage.

The 85 squatter boats mooring there will be affected by reclamation work in the middle of this year.

However, these people will get public housing while 2,000 others will be accommodated in the new licensed area on the outer edge of the reclamation.

Sir Murray visited some of the resettlement blocks. He went up to the roof of one of the blocks where he had a panoramic view of the area.

Mr. J.M. Wigglesworth, Chief Planning Officer, Public Works Department, who was present there, briefed him on the overall development in the district.

/This ........

Friday, February 16, 1973

- 12 -

This includes the plan to build an outdoor swimming pool complex to serve the increasing population of Chai Wan, Shau Kei Wan and Quarry Bay.

Before the visit ended, the Governor had a bird’s eye view of fling Wah Estate Stage II from the roof of a private multi-storey building.

Work on this stage, capable of accommodating about 26,000 people, is expected to be completed in 197^-75•

Hing Wah Estate Stage I was completed two years ago.

-------0---------

Release Time: 7.00 p.m.

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Saturday, February 177 1973

CONTENTS

Page No*

The Government is to take over the Fanling Hospital............ 1

Four newly completed fire stations are now in full operation... 2

An animal pound is to be built in Pokfulam ................•••• 3

A number of bathing sheds in New Territories beaches will be made available to the public ..................................... 4

A Registration of Persons team will visit Stanley next week ••• 5

The Urban Council’s ’’Safety Town” at Sau Mau Ping is proving popular with schools ...........................................   6

Starting next week, minibuses will be banned from picking up passengers in a section of Shaukiwan Road......................... 8

Statement by the Financial Secretary.............................. 9

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Saturday, February 17, 1973

“ 1 “

GOVERNMENT TO TAKE OVER FANLING HOSPITAL

From Lutheran World Federation On April 1

**********

On April 1, the Government will take over the 5^-bed Fanling Hospital at present administered by the Lutheran World Federation.

The Hospital was opened in 19&O by the Federation, and built with funds provided by the Royal Hong Kong Jockey Club and from the United States of America.

Commenting on the move, the Director of the Federation in Hong Kong, the Reverend Karl Stumpf said today: ”The Fanling Hospital came into being in the Nev/ Territories 12 years ago when there was a shortage of medical facilities in that area.

’’Those were difficult years for Hong Kong, and the Federation v/as happy to contribute to the general welfare.

:rNow that these difficulties are happily over, and the original aims have been fulfilled, we feel the time has come for the Government to assume the Federation’s responsibility in this area of service, bearing in mind the need for continuing development which, financially, the Federation believes Hong Kong can now carry out on its own.”

Commenting on the take-over, Dr. G.H. Choa, Director of Medical and Health Services, said: ”It is proposed to develop the Fanling Hospital on the same lines as the Pok Oi Hospital.

”We will make use of it as a district hospital for Fanling and Sheung Shui. VJe will also increase its staff so as to main ain a 24-hour duty roster, and we plan to hold specialist clinics besides the general out-patient clinics.”

The Hospital at present deals with about 100 out-patients a day.

- - 0 - -

/2

Saturday, February 17, 1975

- 2 -

FOUR NEW FIRE STATIONS FULLY OPERATIONAL

More Are Being Planned

*********

Four new fire stations, which were completed towards the end of last year, are now in full operation.

They are in Fanling, Cheung Sha Wan, King’s Park (Yau Ma Tei) and Kwai Chung.

Two more stations in Yau Tong and Chung Hom Kok are expected to go into operation soon following their completion later this month.

With the completion of these two new stations, Hong Kong will have a total of 37 fire stations — 13 on Hong Kong Island, 12 in Kowloon and 12 in the New Territories.

Some 10 others are being planned.

Meanwhile, work on the new Airport Fire Station, which is to replace the existing one, will begin shortly.

It is expected to be completed in November.

The resiting of the present station is necessary because it would be cut off from the rest of the airport by construction works on the airport tunnel road.

A spokesman for the Fire Services Department said today that all these new fire stations formed part of an expansion plan designed to reduce to six minutes the interval between the raising of an alarm and the arrival of fire engines at the scene anywhere.

/The spokesman ••••••••

Saturday, February 17, 1973

- 3 -

The spokesman recalled that fire losses during the last financial year proved to be the costliest in the history of Hong Kong.

Two hundred and fifty people died and more than 1,400 others were injured in fires and other emergencies during that period.

Direct financial losses from fires amounted to over 385 million.

ANIMAL POUND IN POKFULAM

»*«•*****

The Government is to build an animal pound in Pokfulam to increase existing quarantine accommodation and to provide better facilities to deal with stray animals.

The new pound will replace the existing kennels in Kennedy Town, and will be situated in a site off Victoria Road.

It will have four single-storey blocks providing 60 kennels for various types of animals.

Work is expected to begin next April and will take about eight months to complete.

A.........

Saturday, February 17» 1973

- 4 -

BATHING SHEDS IN N.T. BEACHES

To Be Made Available To Public

****♦««

Fifty-two bathing sheds on beaches along Castle Peak Road in the New Territories will be made available to the public through a bal l nt next month.

Comprising 42 private bathing sheds and 10 club sheds, these will be allocated to the public on permit from April T*to March 31 next year.

The ballot will be held on March 9 in the Lecture Room on the 4th floor of the Urban Services Department’s Sai Yee Street Depot in Kowloon.

Ballot application forms, costing $10 each, may be obtained either in person or by letter from the U.S.D. Pay Office at Central Government Offices, West Wing, 13th floor, Hong Kong, from February 19 to 23.

Completed application forms must be returned to the Assistant Secretary (New Territories) of the Urban Services Department, on or before March 2.

Following the ballot, a list of the successful applicants will be published in the press.

Further information may be obtained by telephoning 3-942597 during office hours.

-------0---------

Saturday, February 17, 1973

- 5 -

•» REGISTRATION TEAM TO VISIT STANLEY ********

A mobile team from the Registration of Persons Department will be stationed at the Stanley Kai Fong Welfare Association Office next week.

It will be there from Wednesday (February 21) to Saturday (February 24).

Business hours will be from 9*30 a.m. to 4.30 p.m. between Wednesday and Friday and from 9*30 a.m. to 12.30 p.m. on Saturday.

During the four-day visit, parents can register their children for juvenile identity cards.

Young people 17 and over and holding juvenile identity cards can register for adult identity cards.

Children between six and 17 who have Hong Kong Birth Certificates or valid travel documents nerd not attend for registration.

When registering their children, parents must produce their own identity cards for inspection.

Young people registering for adult identity cards must surrender their juvenile identity cards. They must at the same time produce their parents’ identity cards, a Hong Kong Birth Certificate or evidence of their residence in Hong Kong during the past two years.

Those who Jo not possess any of these documents must register at the Registration of Persons Branch Office in the Causeway Bay Magistracy.

They can also do so at the Canton Road Government Offices in Kowloon or at the Far East Bank Building, ground floor, in Tsuen Wan.

/6........

- - 0 - -

Saturday, February 17, 1973

- 6 -

GREAT DEMAND BY SCHOOLS TO USE ’’SAFETY TOWN” * For Road Safety Courses **««*«*

The Urban Council’s ’’Safety Town” at Sau Mau Ping will again be full of primary school pupils when it re-opens on Monday to educate children in all aspects of road safety.

”The town is fully booked up until the end of March,” a spokesman • • • •

for the Education Department said today. ”Many schools have applied for the use of the ’town* following a recent circular issued by our department. We expect to receive many more applications in the next few months before the summer holidays.”

Some 2,700 pupils from 19 schools will be using the ’’town” from February 19 to March 9»

There are two one-hour sessions each morning and another two sessions in the afternoon from Monday to Friday.

The Kowloon Junior School has taken over 12 morning sessions from February 19 to 26 while the Holy Angels Canossian P.M. School has booked 12 afternoon sessions from February 27 to March 6. The other 17 schools have each booked one or two sessions during the first 15-day period.

Children attending the- courses at the ’’town” are given a 15-minute lecture on road safety by two officers of the Royal Hong Kong Police. The pupils are then taken on an observation tour and take part in group activity on bicycles, tricycles and pedal cars followed by a discussion and review on road safety.

/The ’’town” .•••••••

Saturdayj February 17t 1973

- 7 -

The ’’town” has streets intersecting one another at right angles, a roundabout, zebra crossings, a major road junction, traffic lights, traffic signs and pavements.

In 1972, when the ’’town” was open from March 1 to June 29, more than

11,hOO children from 125 schools used the facilities there.

The ’’town”* which was planned by the Urban Council in conjunction with the Police and the Road Safety Association, was officially opened in 1970.

- • - - 0--------

SUNDAY D.I.B.

*******

Note to Editors: There will be an issue of the Daily

Information Bulletin tomorrow (Sunday). Copies of this edition will be available for collection from the G.I.S. press room at 3 p-m.

/8.........

Saturday, February 17, 1973

- 8 -

BAN ON. MINIBUSES IN SHAU KEI WAN

**#$*«*«

Public light buses will be prohibited from picking up or setting down passengers on a section of Shaukiwan Road from JO a.m. on Tuesday (February 20).

This section of road lies between Nam On Lane and Aldrich Street.

Announcing this today, a spokesman for the Transport Department said that the restriction was necessary to improve traffic flow along Shaukiwan Road.

At the same time, the tram stop outside No. ?65 Shaukiwan Road will be resited westward to outside No. 3^3 Shaukiwan Road.

-------0---------

/9..........

Saturday, February 17, 1973

STATEMENT BY THE FINANCIAL SECRETARY

*******

The following is a statement issued by the Financial Secretary,

Mr. C.P. Haddon-Cave, today (Saturday):

,fI have seen reports in the press that a fifth stock exchange is about to be opened.

"The Government’s attitude to the formation of any more stock exchanges in Hong Kong was clearly explained in my statement to the Legislative Council on 15th November, 1972 when I said:

The Government cannot at present prevent the establishment of any more stock exchanges in Hong Kong. The fact is no statutory powers exist to forbid the formation and operation of stock exchanges, but only to withhold recognition under Section 2A of the Companies Ordinance.

Under the Bill dealing with securities, which I hope to introduce into this Council within a few months, only those stock exchanges approved by the Financial Secretary will be allowed to operate in Hong Kong after the Bill goes into force. I intend to approve only those which are recognised for the purposes of Section 2A of the Companies Ordinance. It follows that any exchange which is not recognised cannot continue to operate; and any new stock exchange which may be established between now and the date of the enactment of the Securities Bill will not be recognised. In other words, it is our intention to restrict the number of exchanges allowed to operate and this will be coupled with a system of registration of all dealers.

”1 would reiterate now that the Government’s position and intentions on this matter have not changed in any way since I made that statement. In other words, any new stock exchange established between now and the enactment of the Securities Bill will be required to cease operations at that time.”

-----0------

Release Time; p.m.

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Sunday, February 18, 1973

INITIAL WORK ON NEW G.P.O. TO START SOON

Better Postal Facilities To Be Provided

Preliminary work on the new General Post Office on the Central reclamation, including the building of a high-level promenade, will begin shortly.

Piling will start in April while the actual construction for the new building is expected to begin early next year.

The whole G.P.O. project is scheduled for completion at the end of 1975 to further improve postal services in Hong Kong.

The promenadestretching about 300 feet along the waterfront, will serve to link the Star Ferry to an elevated walkway which is to be built by a private land developer. ,

When completed by the end of this year, the promenade will provide direct access from several high-rise buildings in Central to the ferry concourse through the elevated walkway.

The promenade, forming Stage I of the new G.P.O. development plan, will also be connected to the new Post Office building.

Commenting on the improved facilities, a spokesman for the Post

Office said the new building would have 15,000 Post Office Boxes.

The existing G.P.O. building has only about 6,700 P.O. Boxes.

/Better •••••••••

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Sunday, February 18, 1973

- 2 -

Better counter facilities and an increase in mechanical aid would enable the Post Office to handle a larger volume of mail in a shorter time, he said.

The spokesman pointed out that the existing 62-year-old G.P.O. building was too old for large-scale mechanisation.

However, extensive mechanisation would be employed in the new one, with the British Post Office providing expert advice on the mechanisation requi rement S•

More newspaper and parcel sorting machines, chain conveyors, chutes and storage slides for bags would be installed to facilitate the flow of mail inside the building.

More public counter space for the purchase of stamps and spacious working area for mail and parcel sorting would be available, he said.

There would also be ample room for administration offices in the five-storey new G.P.O. building, which will have a total floor area of more than 150,000 sq. ft. — about 37,800 sq. ft. more than the present G.P.O.

-------0---------

WATER CUT IN WAN CHAI

*******

A number of premises in Wan Chai will be without water for five hours on Tuesday (February 20) starting from 1 a.m. This is to allow the Waterworks Office to carry out a leakage test.

Affected premises include those within the area ’bound ' b? Str--the south side of Johnston Road, the noi th side of Queer ' Road. uast, and Lee Tung Street. ------------------------------------0---------

Release Time; 3 <00

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Monday, February 1% 1973

CONTENTS

Page No.

Botanic Gardens is taking on a new look •••••••*•......... •. • • 1

The Hon. H.J.C. Browne has been appointed temporary to Exco ................................................................ 2

The Consumer Price Index for last month increased by one point over the previous month ..................................... 3

Two short courses on printing will be held at the Morrison Hill Technical Institute next month •••••••..............• ••• 4

A youth project competition has been announced ................  5

Prizes for winners of an anti-Narcotics poster design competition will be given out on Wednesday...................... 7

Holders of the Colonial Police Medal may now use the letters C.P.M. after their names ••••................................ 8

A number of premises in Kowloon City will be without water on Thursday •••••.................................................. 8

A labour dispute at a major construction site of the High Island Water Scheme lias been settled •••••••................    9

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Monday, February 1% 1973

- 1 -

NEW LOOK FOR BOTANIC GARDENS

More Species Of flowers And Plants Added

**********

Botanic Gardens* which attracts thousands of visitors on weekends and holidays, is putting on a new and more colourful look*

Constant improvements are being made by the Urban Services Department to the Garden and since last April, various species of flowers and plants have been grown to provide added attractions to holiday-makers.

A large lawn round the modernised fountain in the centre of the Garden has been turned into a flower bed for roses and seasonal flowers.

The roses, imported from Australia and Holland, are of different varieties and colours.

A Bauhinia section, a Camellia centre, and a Magnolia centre have been set up round the aviary.

There are over JO Magnolia of six different species. The flowers, imported from Australia, had to be grown first in a nursery bed and then transplanted.

A bamboo section, containing seven species of bamboo shoot, has been added near the entrance facing Upper Albert Road.

Over 20 species of palm trees from Singapore have also been planted in the Garden. • • • • *

/It is ......

Monday, February 19, 1973

- 2 -

It is expected that a Rock Garden, a shrub section and a conifer section will be completed this year.

Azalea, with attractive, colours of violet, purple and white, will be grown on the slopes round the garden. The flowers, blooming in March and April, will add a wealth of colours to the area.

The Urban Services Department is looking for area species of flowers and plants. There are also plans to extend the zoo and the aviary by building more cages for animals and birds.

•------0---------

EXCO APPOINTMENT

*******

The Hon. H.J.C. Browne has been appointed temporarily to the Executive Council with effect from February 16 during the absence of the Hon. G.R. Ross.

t

- - _ - 0--------

/3.........

Monday, February 19, 1973

- 3 -

CONSUMER PRICE INDEX FOR LAST MONTH

I

I

Higher Prices For Food, Clothing And Services

********

The General Consumer Price Index (Sept. 63/Aug. 64 = 100) for

January 1973 was 144, one point higher than that for the previous month*

There were increases of one point each in the indexes for foodstuffs, clothing and footwear, miscellaneous goods, and transport and vehicles*

An increase of three points was recorded in the index for fuel and light, while an increase of four points was recorded in the index for services*

Movements in the indexes for other sections of eommodity were insignificant.

Compared with the previous month, there were increases in the average retail prices of fresh water fish, salt water fish, other fish, rice, pork, beef, poultry, edible oil and fresh fruits.

On the other hand, the average retail prices of fresh vegetables and eggs dropped*

For non-food items, higher prices for kerosene and liquefied petroleum gas caused the index for fuel and light to move upwards.

The index for services also went up mainly as a result of increased charges for hairdressing on the approach of the Lunar New Year.

The Modified Consumer Price Index for January 1973 was 148, one point higher than that for the previous month, and nine points higher than that for the corresponding month in 1972*

-------* 0-------

/4.........

Monday, February 19, 1973

- 4 -

SHORT COURSES ON PRINTING

*******

The Morrison Hill Technical Institute, in collaboration with the Hong Kong Printers’ Association, will conduct two short courses on printing beginning in the middle of March.

’’This is to meet the demand from the local printing industry for better and more sophisticated techniques”, a spokesman for the Education Department said today.

These courses, the first of their kind, are known as the Basic Printing Technology and Offset Printing Instructors Tran ni ng respectively. They will be held at the Morrison Hill Technical Institute Annex in Can ne Lane on a part-time day-release basis.

Participants must be sponsored and released by their employers to attend classes one morning each week for twelve weeks.

The fees for each course are $20, payable in advance by one instalment.

Further details may be obtained from the Hong Kong Printers1 Association, No. 48, Johnston Road, First Floor, Wanchai (Tel. >275050) or from the Morrison Hill Technical Institute at No. 6, Oi Kwan Road, Wan Chai, Hong Kong (Tel. 5-745321)

Meanwhile, the Education Department is planning to set up a Department of Printing at the Kwun Tong Technical Institute which is due to open in September 1975•

Day and evening classes on printing will be held at this new institute.

-------0---------

/5.........

Monday, February 19, 1973

- 5 -

YOUTH PROJECT COMPETITION

Young People Invited To Contribute To Unusual Exhibition

********

Mr. Stephen Law Chi-kin, Senior Principal Social Welfare Officer and chairman of the Organising Committee, announced today the start of an unusual competition among young people between 13 and 25 to test their awareness of the meaning of social welfare.

The competition is being organised by the Social Welfare Department in co-operation with the Education Department and the Hong Kong Council of Social Service.

The aim is to invite groups from voluntary agencies, schools, and institutions to choose any aspect of social welfare services in Hong Kong covered by the recently-published white paper, and then to interpret it in an attractive and significant way.

"Let us say a group representing a school in the Western district chooses blind welfare as their theme,” Mr. Law said. ”They will then have to devise an exhibit measuring seven feet by seven feet illustrating in an essay, and accompanying charts, pictures, slogans, models, and so on, what the theme means to them.

”It is hoped that in this way, participants will not only involve themselves, by association, with social welfare work in Hong Kong, but also contribute towards a better community understanding and appreciation of these services.”

/Fifty of ......

Monday, February 1% 1973

- 6 -

Fifty of the best entries will be displayed in the main concourse of the Ocean Terminal between May 18 and 20, and participants contributing the top 1? will receive as prizes educational or recreational equipment worth 33,000.

The first prize will be such equipment worth 31,000, the second 3600, and the third 3400. Ten consolation prizes will be equipment worth 3100 each.

The prizes are being arranged by the Hong Kong Council of Social Service.

The Education Department is helping to circulate both the conditions of entry and application forms among all schools.

A qualification is that each entry must be the joint effort of a group of at least five members, and so acknowledged by a responsible officer.

The first step is for the group to inform the Social Welfare Department’s Youth Work Unit, Kowloon Government Offices Building, Nathan Road, before April 6, of its choice of theme and plan of approach.

”This is necessary,” Mr. Law explained, ”in case too many groups choose the same theme. The Unit will then be able to make an alternative suggestion.” Eventually a panel of judges will consider all the entries, and the best will be mounted for display in the Ocean Terminal.

- - 0

/7........

Monday, February 19» 1973

PRIZES FOR ANTI-NARCOTICS POSTER DESIGN WINTIERS

***********

Note _to_ Editors:, Winners of the Anti-Narcotics Poster Design Competition will receive their prizes at a ceremony to be held at the 35 mm theatre of G.I.S. on the 5th floor of Beaconsfield House on Wednesday (February 21). The ceremony will begin at 2.30 p.m.

A total of 16 boys and girls will receive their awards from Rev. K.L. Stumpf, Chairman of the Education and Publicity Sub-Committee of the Action Committee Against Narcotics, which sponsored the competition. Their entries were chosen as being the best from among the 328 designs submitted in the competition.

Entrants were required to depict the beautiful aspects of life in contrast to the misery of drug addiction.

Details of the winners and their posters will be available at the ceremony.

You are cordially invited to send a reporter and/or photographer to cover the presentation of prizes.

--------0-----------

/8..........

Monday, February 1% 1973

- 8 -

COLONIAL POLICE MEDAL

»»**»»»**

Recipients of the Colonial Police Medal may now use the letters C.P.II. after their names.

They may do so on all occasions when the use of such letters is customary•

This applies to members of the Royal Hong Kong Police Force and the Fire Services who have been awarded the medal either for gallantry or for meritorious service.

The Queen has approved an amendment to the Royal Warrant governing the Colonial Police Medal.

-------0 --------

WATER INTERRUPTION

**»«««***

A number of premises in Kowloon City will be without water for five hours on Thursday (February 22) starting from 1 a.m.

This is to allow the Waterworks Office to carry out a leakage test.

Affected premises are within the area bounded by Prince Edward Road, Nga Tsin Long Road, Nga Tsin Wai Road and Ta Ku Ling Road.

-------0---------

/9...........

Monday, February 19, 1973

- 9 -

LABOUR DISPUTE AT HIGH ISLAND SITE SETTLED

With Help Of Labour Relations Service

*******

With the help of the Labour Relations Service of the Labour Department1 an amicable settlement has been reached in a labour dispute involving some 350 workers at one of the main construction sites of the High Island Water Scheme.

The dispute broke out on February 12 when workers of Vianini S.P.A. stopped work and demanded better terms of employment.

Direct negotiations reached a deadlock and two days later the Labour Department intervened.

Officers of the Labour Relations Service travelled 18 miles to the construction site on two consecutive days and conducted a series of separate discussions and joint meetings with the parties concerned.

Final agreement was reached last Thursday (February 15)•

A new scheme of working hours for daily rated workers and a revised wage rate were introduced. Workers will be given a 15-minute tea break in the morning and in the afternoon.

The revised wage rate amounts to a 25 per cent wage increase over the old wage rate, which was somewhat below the market rate.

Workers in turn promised to raise their efficiency and productivity.

”The agreement was reached in an atmosphere of mutual understanding and co-operation which will benefit both the management and the workers in the long run,” a Labour Department spokesman said.

/Vianini S.P.A.

Monday, February 19, 1973

- 10 -

Vianini S.P.A. is the contractor of a $460 million project to build dams for the High Island Reservoir.

The company employs a range of modern heavy construction equipment and the total labour force is expected to be increased to 1,000 by the end of the year.

-------0---------

Release Time: 7*00 p.m.

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Tuesday, February 20, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No.

Policemen and firemen are recognised for bravery in the Jumbo

Restaurant fire.......••••••••...............................   1

Motorists are warned against overtaking inside the Lion Rock

Tunnel ...........•.....................••••••................. 4

Government information teams bring news to villagers in remote places • .•••..••••••••••••<• c •..................  •••••••• 6

The first ,rMeet the Media” session will be held this week •• 8

About 300 graduating nurses will receive certificates on

Thursday •••••••••••............•••••••••••.......•.....• •••• 9

Lady MacLehose is to visit two Community Chest agencies this week ........• ••••.....................................      10

The Labour Department has published a booklet on strikes and the law .....................................................  11

Labour Officer says management has moral responsibility to provide a safe working place for employees .......•••••••••»• 12

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Tuesday, February 20, 1973

- 1 -

Embargo note to Editors: The following announcement is being

made simultaneously in London tonight. Publication is permitted in Hong Kong newspapers tomorrow (Wednesday) morning but no news agencies or overseas radio transmissions of the announcement may carry the information without the embargo qualification.

The news may be broadcast from 7 a.m. onwards over the local radio and TV stations tomorrow.

On no account should the recipients be contacted for interviews or for information relative to his career or be approached in any way in connection with the award before this has been publicly announced.

AWARDS TO POLICEMEN AND FIREMEN FOK BRAVERY IN JUMBO FIRE

Two Civilians Honoured For Helping Police * *******♦»»»»

Ten members of the Royal Hong Kong Police Force and the Fire

Services have been given awards in recognition of the part they played in rescuing a number of people from the Jumbo Floating Restaurant fire in Aberdeen in October 1971*

Police Inspector James Hogg Bruce and Fireman Choi Chor were awarded the George Medal.

/The other

Tuesday, February 20, 1973

- 2 -

The other eight received the Queen’s Commendation for Brave Conduct. They are Police Constables Lui Chiu-kwan, Leung Shing-chau, Tam Wai—hung and Chan Shing-yuk; Station Officer Lo Shiu-kuen and Assistant Station Officer Pun Wai-cheung, both from the Fire Services, and Firemen Chan Shing-tak and Wong Shiu-hung.

Two members of the public, Mr. Lau Kam-yan and Mr. Tse Yuen-chi, also received the Queen’s Commendations for Brave Conduct.

The awards were in connection with an armed robbery at the Wan Chai branch of the Hong Kong and Shanghai Bank on March 17, 1971•

Rescue

On the day of the Jumbo Restaurant fire, Inspector Bruce was off duty and was driving in Aberdeen when he saw dense smoke coming from the harbour.

He immediately dialed 999 and then telephoned the Inspectors’ Mess in Aberdeen to alert other off duty officers.

He went immediately to the scene and, after encouraging boat crews nearby to help in rescue work, commandeered a speedboat to get to the blaze.

However, the heat was so intense from a distance of 50 yards that he had to enter the water and swim to the fiercely burning hull.

He did this three times, rescuing five people in all despite the heat and the danger from explosions. His task was made more hazardous by survivors holding on to him and struggling while being rescued.

Police Constable Lui dived fully clothed into the water to rescue a badly injured man. He later drove injured people to hospital in a Police landrover.

/Police .......

V

Tuesday, February 20, 1973

- 3 -

Police Constables Leung, Tam and Chan were members of the crew of a launch and used life buoys to pick up survivors from the vicinity of the burning restaurant. They also jumped into the water to save between them 25 people.

The five fire officers and men were stationed at the Aberdeen Fire Station at the time of the fire.

On receiving the fire alarm, they raced to the Aberdeen waterfront and took a motorised oaopan out.

However, the boat broke down while approaching the scene; all of them took off their uniforms, dived into the water and swam to the side of the burning ship to rescue people.

Despite the intense heat and numerous explosions, the firemen displayed gallantry of the highest order in complete disregard to their own safety.

-------0---------

Tuesday, February 20, 1973

WARNING AGAINST OVERTAKING OR SPEEDING

Inside Lion Rock Tunnel

********

The Superintendent of the Lion Rock Tunnel, Mr. F.W. May, today reminded motorists that there should be strictly no overtaking or speeding inside the tunnel.

He said that besides being against tunnel regulations, such senseless acts had often led to serious accidents.

For the first ten months of the current financial year (April 1972 to January 1973), there was a total of 153 accidents within the tunnel area, with about 25 per cent of them happening inside the tunnel itself.

Eighteen of these accidents involved injuries to 26 people, he added.

Mr. May stressed that many of the accidents were obviously caused by speeding or carelessness.

Citing one example, he said that a car stopping at the tunnel toll booth to pay fees was rammed into from behind by a speeding car.

’’Such accidents could obviously have been avoided if more care had been taken”, he said.

Mr. May- said that the tunnel control staff had been paying close attention to motorists who violate tunnel regulations.

Some 100 court summonses and 40 written notices had been issued to motorists by the control staff during the first ten months of the current financial year.

/"On top ••••••••

Tuesday, February 20, 1973

" 5 -

"On top of this, many verbal warnings of various kinds had been given every day to motorists who violated less serious regulations " he added.

Mr. May went on to say that an average of 30 vehicle breakdowns occurred inside the tunnel every month causing severe traffic congestion. "Some of these breakdowns were due to mechanical faults but others, caused by such reasons as the running out of petrol, could again have been avoided if more eare had been exercised," he added.

- _ • 0 --------

SPORTS MEET OF TECHNICAL SCHOOLS

♦*********

Note to Editors: The joint annual sports meet of four technical

schools will take place tomorrow (Wednesday) afternoon at the Hong Kong Government Stadium.

The schools are the Kowloon Technical School, Shau Kei Wan Technical School, the Ho Tung Technical School for Girls and the Lung Cheung Technical School.

The Deputy Director of-Education (Administration), Mr. C.J.G. Lowe, will address the meet and present the trophies.

You are invited to send a reporter and/or photographer to cover the presentation, which begins at 4.15 p.m.

-----' - 0--------

/6.........

Tuesday, February 20, 1973

- 6 -

CIVILIAN INFORMATION TEAMS BRING NEWS TO VILLAGERS

***«*!»»**

Almost every day after office hours, two government toons set out by landrovers for the more remote villages in the New Territories.

Villagers - young and old alike - are all smiles when they see them. They know they can look forward to an evening of entertainment.

These teams are from the Civilian Information Team, a unit operated by the Government Information Services in conjunction with the New Territories Administration. They were set up in June 1971 and have been operating continuously since then.

The main function of the C.I.T. is to bring news and entertainment to New Territories villagers directly by means of film shows, slides, tape recordings and reading material of special interest to them.

In addition, the teams supplement the liaison work of the New Territories Administration, the Police and the Army.

The areas which the teams visit are mainly those which do not enjoy regular access to news through the visual and printed media.

A spokesman of the C.I.T. said today: "Villagers in these areas seldom leave the place where they live. They have either little or no opportunity to visit the cinemas and are chosen for visits because television reception is poor in their homes."

"To help them, we often install a communal television set where better reception is possible," he said.

/At present, ..........

Tuesday, February 20, 1973

- 7 -

At present, the C.I.T. has two sub-units, called teams, each of which has the equipment to run a completely mobile filn/information programme. This includes a number of coloured documentary, feature and educational films.

”Hong Kong Today*1 produced by the Government Information Services and Rediffusion’s ’Hong Kong Focus” are available for showing to the villagers.

During the past 18 months, more than 480 film shows have been given in 320 different villages.

”The general reaction towards these shows is very good,” the spokesman commented.

”It has been noticed on many occasions that even people from other villages come to enjoy the evening’s programme.”

There are still a few areas which have not yet been visited by the C.I.T.

”This is because the New Territories occupy an area of over

360 square miles with more than 230 outlying islands,” the spokesman explained.

Some of the villages are totally inaccessible by road which means that the teams have to travel by launch or helicopter.

In view of the encouraging response fzom the villagers, plans are already in hand to add two more teams to the Civil Information Team unit in the forthcoming year.

-------0---------

/8.........

Tuesday, February 20, 1973

- 8 -

FIRST "IZ3ET THE MEDIA" SESSION

*******

An open press conference has been arranged for members of the press this week so that they can meet senior Government officers.

We hope to make this the first of a series of "Meet the Media" sessions where newsmen will have the chance to question senior Government officers about the work of their departments.

This week’s session will be concerned with social services. It will be on the record end T.V. and radio coverage facilities will be provided.

The meeting will be held on Friday (February 23) at 12.15 p.m.

The officers attending will be the Principal Assistant Colonial Secretary, Social Services Branch, Mr. P.B. Williams; the Director of Social Welfare, lir, F.K. Li; the Director of Medical and Health, Dr. G.H. Choa; the Commissioner of Labour, Mr. Paul Tsui; and the Director of Education, Mr, J. Canning.

In the past newsmen have said that it is not always easy for them to make direct contact with department heads. We hope that these sessions will provide the opportunity to put this right.

Note to Editors: You are cordially invited to send a reporter and/or photographer to cover the press conference, which will be held in the G.I.S. 35 mm Theatre on the 5th floor of Beaconsfield House.

0 -

Tuesday, February 20, 1973

PRESENTATION OF CERTIFICATES

J12 Graduating From Government Hospitals’ Schools Of Nursing

Three hundred and twelve graduates from the schools of nursing

attached to government hospitals will receive certificates at a ceremony in the City Hall Concert Hall at 11 a.m. on Thursday, February 22.

Lady Rodrigues will present the certificates.

An audience of 1,000 will be welcomed by Dr. G.H. Choa, Director

of Medical and Health Services, after which Miss K.J. Veevers, Principal Nursing Officer, will present her annual report.

After the presentation of certificates, Sir Albert Rodrigues, Senior Unofficial Member of the Executive Council, will address the Graduates.

The Concert Hall ceremony will end with a presentation of bouquets to Lady Rodrigues and Mrs. Choa.

Graduates and guests will then proceed to the Exhibition Hall for group photographs, and tea.


Note to Editors:

You are invited to have the ceremony covered

Your representatives should be in the Concert Hal1 by 10.45 a.m. Photographers are requested to apply to the Government Information Services, Sth floor, Beaconsfield House, for badges for admission to the Concert Hall. It is requested that photographers refrain from obstructing the return of graduates from the stage to their seats in the auditorium, and not. to mount the stage for close-ups. Copies of the list of graduates, the Principal Nursing Officer’s report, and Sir Albert’s speech, will be distributed in the Press boxes, Government Information Services, in the evening of February 22. They will also be available for collection from 11 a.m. on that day.

0 - -

/10

Tuesday, February 20, 1975

- 10 -

LADY MACLEHOSE TO VISIT COMMUNITY CHEST AGENCIES

*******

Lady MacLehose, President of the Community Chest of Hong Kong, will visit another two member agencies of the Chest in Wan Chai and North Point on Thursday to see for herself the activities of the agencies.

She already visited three such member agencies in November last year.

The two agencies she will visit on Thursday are the Hong Kong Social Therapy Centre of the Discharged Prisoners* Aid Society in Wan Chai, and the North Point Youth Centre of the Hong Kong Federation of Youth Groups.

Lady MacLehose will be accompanied on the visits by her Social Secretary, Miss Jennifer Boyle, and the Executive Director of the Community Chest, Mr. Colin W. Morrison.

Note to Editors: You are cordially invited to send a

reporter and/or photographer to cover the visits. Transport will be provided. Press Representatives are requested to assemble at the Central Government Offices Open Car Park NOT LATER than 5.15 p.m. on Thursday. ......

Mr. Dennis Leung of the Government Information Services will be present to assist the Press.

Lady MacLehose is scheduled to arrive at the Hong Kong Social Therapy Centre of the Discharged Prisoners* Aid Society, City Mansion, Flats ”G” and »»H”, 10th and 11th floors, Nos. 144-149 Gloucester Road, at 6 p.m.

She will arrive at the North Point Youth Centre situated at the Assembly Hall,Housing Authority Estate, Java Road, at about 6.40 p.m.

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/11 .........

Tuesday, February 20, 1973

- 11 -

BOOKLET ON STRIKES AND THE LAW

********

The Labour Department has recently prepared a booklet in English and Chinese describing in non-legal language the law on strikes, strikers . and lockouts.

This booklet which does not touch upon the legal position of trade unions when they become involved in strikes, should be of particular interest to employers, workers and trade unionists, and ia being distributed free of charge•

It is also available from the Labour Department headquarters, Lee Gardens, Causeway Bay, Hong Kong (telephone no. 5-778271 ext. 75)•

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/12........

S

Tuesday, February 20, 1973

- 12 -

MANAGEMENT HAS LEGAL AND MORAL RESPONSIBILITY

To Provide Safe Work Place For Employees

********

The Industrial Safety Training Officer of the Labour Department, Mr. A.H. Carter, today told a meeting of some of Hong Kong’s top management executives that they had a legal and moral responsibility to provide a safe place for their employees to work.

Too often, he said, both management and workers seemed to regard accidents as something which ’’just happened”.

’’This widely-held belief is false and must be dispelled,” he said.

”Every accident has a cause or a series of causes.

’’Therefore it is logical to assume that there must be a remedy or remedies.

”In general, all industrial accidents result from unsafe physical conditions or unsafe acts by an individual.”

Mr. Carter was addressing today’s luncheon meeting at the Mandarin Hotel of the Personnel Management Club of Hong Kong, an offspring of the Hong Kong Management Association.

Mr. Carter told the executives that last year 121 industrial workers were killed, and 18,992 accidents involving bodily injuries were reported to the Labour Department.

If occupational accidents in spheres outside of industrial undertakings were included in the figure, it leapt to 296 deaths and 29,3^3 accidents involving bodily injuries.

/Mr. Carter ••••...•

Tuesday, February 20, 1973

- 13 -

Mr. Carter stressed that an employer had a legal responsibility to provide a safe working place for his employees. He said that it was only by implementing various safety measures that the number of industrial accidents could be reduced.

’’Top management involvement is essential if any accident prevention programme is to succeed,” he said.

Mr. Carter also stressed the importance of the role of the foreman or supervisor in the promotion of industrial safety.

”He is the vital figure in production,” he said, ’’and he is in the best position to detect such things as deterioration of machine guarding, floor surface and other items which if unattended may lead to accidents.

- 0 - e. • -

Release Time; 7.30 p.m.

PRH 7 4000091

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Wednesday, February 21, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No,

Two new indoor games centres are to be built — one on each side of the harbour ••••••................................. 1

The Governor pays tribute to the Po Leung Kuk for its role in providing better education to the Hong Kong people ......... J

More than 30,000 Poll Cards specially designed for the coming

Urban Council election have been posted to voters •••••••••« 5

Twenty disabled trainees under the care of the Social Welfare Department have been given jobs last month ............... 6

Widening of the Wong Nei Chong Gap Road is now 90 per cent complete ...................................................... 7

Two buildings in Lai Chi Kok have been declared dangerous ............................................................... 8

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Wednesday, February 21, 1975

TWO NEW INDOOR GAMES CENTRES FOR HONG KONG

One Is Expected To Be Completed Soon

Two indoor games centres have been included in the Public Works Programme to provide more sports and entertainment facilities for the community. One of them is expected to be completed shortly.

A spokesman for the Public Works Department said the projects were the San Po Kong Indoor Games Hall and the Morrision Hill Indoor Games Centre.

The San Po Kong Indoor Games Hall, now under construction within the Kai Tak East Playground, is expected to be completed in April this year.

The «J1.1 million games hall will have a floor space of about 11,000 square feet. It will be 25 feet high, with large ventilation openings along the upper parts of both sides of the building.

,rThe hall is intended for basketball, badminton, and volleyball games, but non-sports functions such as Chinese operas and variety shows can be staged there,” the spokesman said.

It will have a maximun seating capacity of 1,000.

On Hong Kong Island a site has been reserved for the Morrison Hill Indoor Games Centre.

The Centre will be housed in a seven- or eight-storey building, the spokesman said.

/The first ••••••

Wednesday, February 21, 1973

2 -

The first floor will be designed as an arena for table tennis matches.

It can also be used for volleyball, badminton and other games.

The ground floor will be used for car parking purposes.

The upper floors will be used for sports training. Dormitories will be provided for local and overseas sports teams undergoing intensive training there.

Wednesday, February 21, 1975

- 5 -

GOVERNOR PAYS TRIBUTE TO PO LEUNG KUK

When He Opens New Kuk School In Kowloon

********

The Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, today paid high tribute to the Po Leung Kuk for its role in providing better education for the people in Hong Kong.

Speaking at the opening of the Po Leung Kuk C.F.A. No. 1 College in Tsz Wan Shan, Sir Murray said the new school marked ’’the expansion of the Kuk into the secondary field.”

This move, he added, was in line with the Government’s policy of expanding secondary education so as to double the number of places in five-year secondary courses at Government and aided schools, and to provide places for all children in the 12-14 age group.

The following is the full text of the Governor’s speech:

”Mr. Chan, Mr. Lim, Mr. Cheng, Ladies and Gentlemen, Boys and Girls:

”The Po Leung Kuk is a famous institution with a fine record of public service.

”In the past, its educational activities have ranged from kindergarten through primary to the pre-vocational level. This new and well equipped school, which I am about to open, marks the expansion of the Kuk into the secondary field.

’•This move accords with your Government’s policy of expanding secondary education so as to double the number .of places in five-year secondary courses at government and aided schools and to provide places for all children in the 12-14 age group.

/”We aim

Wednesday, February 21, 1973

- 4 -

"We aim to achieve these new goals, as we have done for goals now achieved, in partnership with voluntary agencies. I realise it may not be easy for them to raise their share of the capital involved, just as it may not be easy for the Government to play their part either. But working in partnership and working with the determination these goals demand, I am convinced the resources are well within our means and that we will succeed.

"For this new college the site has been granted free, and the Government has provided 80 per cent of the cost of building and equipping the school, while the Kuk has raised the remaining 20 per cent. A major part of the annual recurrent costs will of course be met by Government.

"As an illustration of the success achieved by this type of partnership, it is worth noting that in the last three years, in Tsz Wan Shan alone, four new subsidized secondary schools have been completed, each of 24 classrooms or more. I expect that yet another will be opened this coming September.

"As you know, it will be the policy and the task of the new unified Housing Authority to ensure that future estates are built complete, with all the facilities needed to provide a proper life for the residents, including, of course, secondary schools.

"To the Po Leung Kuk Committee Fellowship Association, to the School Building Committee and particularly to Mr. Lim Yiong-lin, and to all those who have contributed one way or another towards the building of the school, I extend my heartiest congratulations, they are all playing their part in providing better education for the people of this great city.

"Finally, I wish every success now and in the future to those who study and teach in this school."

Wednesday, February 21, 1973

- 5 -

POLL CARDS FOR URBAN COUNCIL ELECTION * « * * * * * * * *

A total of J1,284 Poll Cards specially designed to facilitate the speedy issue of ballot papers to voters on Urban Council Election Day on March 7 (Wednesday) are in the post today. Each card bears the voter’s electoral number, his name and the name and the address of the polling station at which he is registered to vote.

The Registration Officer today emphasised that it was important for intending voters to produce their poll card -as well as their identity card at the proper polling station in order to vote with the minimum of delay.

He added: "If an elector is unable to produce his poll card on Election Day, he is still entitled to vote if his name appears on the Final Register and he is able to identify himself to the satisfaction of the Presiding Officer.”

If some voters have changed their addresses since the Final Register was compiled and have not notified the Registration Officer, it is probable that their poll cards will. be. returned to the Registration of Persons Office as ’’undeliverable”. .

Any person who has been registered as an elector and who has not received his poll card within three days, is advised to contact Mr. ilok V/ah-ho of the Registration of Persons Head Office on Tel. No. 3-70^393 to ascertain whether his card has been returned by the Post Office as ’’undeliverable•• - ' ” - - 0 ---

/6......

Wednesday, February 21, 1973


6 -

EMPLOYMENT OF THE DISABLED

20 Take Up Positions In "Open" Employment Last Month

**********

Twenty disabled trainees in the care of the Social Welfare Department took up positions in "open" employment during January, according to figures released today by the Job Placement Unit.

"Open" in this context is competitive employment in industry and commercial firms, as distinct from the "sheltered" employment available in departmental workshops.

Of the 20, eight were crippled, six deaf, five formerly mentally ill, and one mentally retarded.

They were found jobs in various categories. One became an office boy; another worked as a cashier. Two were engaged as telephone operators, and one as a typist. Others were employed as general factory workers, scavengers, sewers and packers. .

Mr. Chan Shiu-wing, Officer in charge, said January’s placements were rather fewer than usual because of the approach of -the Lunar New Year. Prospective employers had preferred to await the conclusion of the holidays before taking on new staff.

Note to Editors: Members of the press, radio and TV are invited to

tour the Job Placement Unit, in the World Rehabilitation Fund Day Centre, on Friday, February 2? to see how trainees are made ready for placement. Press representatives will also be able to see training facilities at the Centre, and call on a factory where a number of disabled are working. Transport will be provided. Government vans AM5OO8 and AMJ201 will await the Press in the Tsim Sha Tsui sub pool at 10 a.m. Departmental officers will be on hand to assist the Press.

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4

Wednesday, February 21, 1973

- 7 -

WONG NEI CHUNG GAP ROAD WIDENED

**«***«***

Traffic flow in Wong Nei Chung Gap Road will be much improved when an additional lane for up-hill traffic is opened in about May this year.

Work on widening the road to provide the additional lane and a six-foot pedestrian path on both sides is now 90 per cent complete.

About 2,400 feet of the roadway running up hill from its junction with Tai Hang Road have been widened by 14 feet. In addition, a number of dangerous bends have been eliminated.

When the improvement work is completed, vehicular traffic will be able to move faster and safer along Wong Nei Chung Gap Road, which is the main link to the southern part of Hong Kong Island.

At present, more than ten per cent of the traffic using this road are goods vehicles. Coupled with the steep gradient, traffic on the road often moves at a very slow pace.

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/8..........

Wednesday, February 21, 1973

- 8 -

BUILDINGS DECLARED DANGEROUS

*******

The Building Authority today declared Nos. 176 and 178 Lai Chi Kok Road, Kowloon to be in a dangerous condition.

In a statement issued this morning, the Principal Government Building Surveyor said that these four-storey pre-war buildings were inspected in conjunction with adjoining building following a complaint from a member of the public.

It was found that in addition to severe fracturing of brick walls caused by settlement of the kitchen block, the timber staircase in No. 178 was in such a condition that there is danger of collapse.

Considerable deterioration of timber and in reinforced concrete parts of the building was also observed.

The severe fractures in the brickwork adjacent to the kitchen block were also observed in No. 176, indicating the risk of a collapse.

Accordingly, notices of intention to apply for closure orders in Kowloon District Court at 9*30 a.m. on March 26, 1973 were posted today.

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Release Time: 7*00 p.m.

PRH 7 4000091 %

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Thursday, February 22, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No,

Joint consultations and comments have led to some changes in the final version of the white paper on social welfare ••••• 1

The Public Assistance Division of the Social Welfare Department is to be renamed................................  .............. J

A survey is being conducted on the profitability and operating characteristic of the taxi trade ............................... 4

Procedures of the coming Urban Council election are announced

................................................................... 6

Fewer local residents went to China during the Lunar New Year ................................................................... 8

The Principal of Wandsworth Technical College, Mr. K.G.

Lavender, is on a three-week visit to Hong Kong................. 9

The Deputy Director of Education left for England to attend an educational seminar ....................................     10

Parties for staff members and their families of two government departments are being organised...............................  11

Water supply to a number of premises in Wan Chai will be interrupted .................................................   12

Quarantine restrictions have been imposed against arrivals from Merauke (Port) on account of cholera...................... 12

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong. Tel: 5-233191

Thursday, February 22, 1973

- 1 -

FINAL VERSION OF SOCIAL WELFARE WHITE PAPER Consultative Process Produces Better Document ***********

Joint consultations between the Social Welfare Department and voluntary agencies, and comments from the community at large, have led to some changes in the final versions of the white paper on social welfare in Hong Kong, and its accompanying five-year plan.

The Secretary of the Social Welfare Planning Committee, Mr. Ian Strachan, says both documents have been revised as a result of comments received, and both are expected to be sent to the Colonial Secretariat by the end of this month, for an examination of financial implications, and the Executive Council soon after.

"More than 200 comments have been received on the draft white paper, and the Committee has considered them all,” Mr. Strachan explains.

,fThe draft was tabled at the opening session of the Legislative Council last autumn, and the Committee lost no time after that in seeking the opinions of the public to help prepare the final text.”

In his view, this consultative process has produced ”a better white paper,” and the document in its ultimate form ’’can fairly be said to reflect the views of the Hong Kong community as a whole.”

/In the ••••••

J*

Thursday, February 22, 1973

- 2 -

In the meantime, important details of four outstanding policy issues are being resolved within the Government. They are:-

* The Institute for Social Work Training.

* The Severe Disability and Infirmity Allowance Scheme.

* The Community Youth Officer Scheme.

* Community Centres and children and youth services.

Of the four, the first two have already been approved by the Government•

While the white paper was published last October as a draft — '•’S' . ' .

a new departure for a Government document in Hong Kong — its accompanying

9

five-year plan was, instead, circulated to the voluntary agencies on a confidential basis, since some of the policies had not, at that time, been endorsed by the Government as a whole.

But Mr. Strachan says the Social Welfare Planning Committee and the Social Welfare Advisory Committee are now putting final touches to the five-year plan ”in the light of comments received from the agencies and the Hong Kong Social Workers Association.”

He expects both documents to be published in their final forms early in the new financial year. ■> • ••

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t

Thursday, February 22, 1973

- 3 -

EXPANSION OF SOCIAL WELFARE DEPARTMENT

Public Assistance Division To Be Renamed Social Security Division

The Public Assistance Division of the Social Welfare Department will be renamed the Social Security Division on March 1.

At the same time, the field units of the division will be known as social security field units. There will be 18 such field units by the end of this month.

Mr. Tsau Tsor-yan, Senior Principal Social Welfare Officer, at present head of the Public Assistance Division, will remain in charge of the expanded Social Security Division.

••The change in name,” he explains, ”is the result of the division’s added responsibilities in view of the implementation of the severe disability and infirmity allowance scheme.

”As the same division will administer the new scheme, it is fitting that its name should be seen to accord with the expanded scope of its activities.”

The 18 field units will process applications both for public assistance and the severe disability and infirmity allowance.

A widespread publicity campaign is about to be launched to inform the eligible about how to apply for the new allowances.

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A.........

Thursday, February 22, 1973

SURVEY ON OPERATING COSTS AND PROFITABILITY OF TAXIS

IN HONG KONG

* * * * * * * * ♦

The Research and Development Section of the Transport Department has been conducting a survey on the profitability and operating characteristic of the taxi trade.

The survey, covering about a fifth of the 3,400 odd taxi fleet in January, aims at determining the operating costs and profitability of both Hong Kong and Kowloon taxis to see whether fares should be raised, as suggested by taxi operators, and possibly a common tariff introduced.

The first part of the survey included questionnaire interviews with taxi drivers and owners on the fixed and variable costs of taxi operation in order to assess the overall return on capital assets employed.

The difference in profit obtained by Hong Kong taxis and Kowloon taxis together with profit levels between individual owners and large taxi firms will also be established.

The second part of the survey involved an examination of taxi meters to find out the number of daily trips, passengers carried, average length of journey and dead mileage/idle time.

This enables a determination of the efficiency of present taxi operation and the degree of utilisation.

The field work, which began on January 8,has now been completed.

The results are now being analysed and interpreted, and it is hoped that the findings will be submitted to the Transport Advisory Committee.

/The Transport ••••••

Thursday, February 22, 1973

- 5 -

The Transport Department carries out many surveys on all aspects of transport including studies of the Cross Harbour and ordinary bus services, public light buses, illegal transport, utilisation of the Kowloon-Canton Railway, transport and parking facilities in housing estates and ferry services.

Besides these surveys, the department from time to time carries out investigations into special cases brought to its attention, such as on-the-spot observations on overcrowding on buses and trams, removal of obstruction on public transport routes, over charging by taxis and utilisation of on-street parking facilities,

The findings of these surveys are useful in drawing up future transport policies and deciding priorities for the efficient use of road and kerbside sj^ace.

They are also valuable in determining the level of service of public transport companies and planning future services.

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/6........

Thursday, February 22, 1973

- 6 -

PROCEDURES FOR URBAN COUNCIL ELECTION ANNOUNCED

A staff of 360 will supervise the coming Urban Council elections on March 7, with the majority of them to be employed on vote counting, which will begin at 9 p»m. in the City Hall.

The Returning Officer, Mr. Donald Tsang, said this while announcing in tomorrow’s (Friday) Gazette the particulars of polling procedure.

He said that the 10 polling stations - four on Hong Kong Island and six in Kowloon - will be open from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m.

The electors eligible to vote are those whose names appear in the Electoral Register, which came into force on January 15.

They are requested to vote at the polling station designated for them on the poll card.

They will not be allowed to vote at a polling station other than the one designated.

Electors, who may vote for seven candidates only, should identify themselves at the polling stations by producing their identity card or some other positive means of identification, such as a passport, driving licence or identity card issued by one of the Auxiliary Defence Services.

The production of a poll card, on its own, will not be accepted as sufficient evidence of identity.

Poll cards will be mailed to all registered electors before the election. These will help the polling station staff to trace the elector’s name in the Register, thus speeding up the issue of ballot papers.

/Mr. Tsang

Thursday, February 22, 1973

- 7 -

Mr. Tsang pointed out that there are heavy penalties for impersonation at polling stations.

Electors are forbidden to talk to other voters, take photographs or display posters while in the polling station.

They are also forbidden to remove any ballot paper, marked or unmarked, from a polling station, or to deposit in the ballot box any paper other than the ballot paper provided by the poll clerk.

Members of the public will not be admitted to the vote count in the exhibition hall of the City Hall. The result will be declared as soon as counting is finished.

The polling stations on Hong Kong Island will be located at: City Hall exhibition hall; King’s College, 63A Bonham Road; Hennessy Road Government Primary School, 169 Thomson Road; and North Point Government Primary School, 888 King’s Road.

The polling stations in Kowloon will be located at: Kowloon Public Pier, alongside the east wing of the Star Ferry Terminal; Queen Elizabeth School, 152 Sai Yee Street; Kowloon Technical School, 332 Cheung Sha Wan Road; Perth Street Government Primary School, 6 Perth Street; San Po Kong Government Primary School, 17 Tseuk Luk Street; and Kwun Tong Government Primary School, 2^0 Ngau Tau Kok Road.

0

Thursday, February 22, 1973

- 8 -

LESS RESIDENTS VISITING CHINA DURING LUNAR NEW YEAR

**********

The number of Hong Kong residents going to China during the Lunar New Year period this year dropped by about five per cent compared with last year.

A total of 138,203 local residents crossed into China by way of Lowu between January 28 and February 12, compared with 146,532 in the equivaltent period in 1972.

Another 110,735 people returned from China during this period, making a total of 248,933 people travelling to and from China.

A spokesman for the Immigration Department said today that traffic over the border started to build up towards the end of January.

The highest number of passengers departing for China in any one day during this period was registered on the New Year Day (February 3) when 18,830 people were cleared by the immigration staff.

nAs the holiday came to an end, travellers began to return in substantial numbers,” the spokesman said.

On February 11, 18,252 people entered Hong Kong - the highest number of incoming passenger5 dealt with in a single day during this period.

Traffic between Hong Kong and Macao during the New Year period showed an increase of about eight per cent over last year.

Altogether, 246,575 passengers were cleared at the Macao Ferry Terminal —— 119,721 for Macao and 126,854 from Macao, compared with a total of 227,317 in 1972.

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/9.........

*

Thursday, February 22, 1973

- 9 -

PRE-VOCATIONAL AND SECONDARY TECHNICAL EDUCATION

Adviser Frs*n London On J-Week Visit

4* VW**

The Principal of Wandsworth Technical College, Mr. K.G. Lavender, is now on a visit to pre-vocational and secondary technical schools in Hong Kong.

His visit is sponsored by the British Council at the request of the Director of Education*

Mr. Lavender will be looking at technical education as a whole, and will advise on pre-vocational and secondary technical curricula, staffing, equipment, administration and the links between secondary technical as well as pre-vocational schools with the Polytechnic and the Technical Institute.

He will make a report on the development of pre-vocational and secondary technical schools to the Director of Education.

During his three-week stay i ere, Mr. Lavender ./ill also be visiting various industrial establishments.

Mr. Lavender arrived in Hong Kong on February 17, and will be returning to London on March 10.

Note to Editors: Mr. Lavender will meet the Press on

March 7 in the Conference Room of the Education

Department, Lee Gardens, J/F, at 3 p^m. You are invited to send a representative to cover the press conference.

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/10.........

Thursday, February 22, 1973

- 10 -

SEMINAR IN ENGLAND ON PROBLEMS OF EDUCATIONAL PLANNING

Deputy Director Of Education Taking Part In Talks

**********

The Deputy Director of Education (Professional), Mr. N.M. Ho left Hong Kong last night for England to attend a seminar on the "Problems of Educational Planning."

The seminar, organized by the Institute of Development Studies at the University of Sussex, will be attended by a number of senior persons concerned with educational planning in other countries.

The seminar begins on February 25 and will last until March 30.

During the seminar, participants will take a fresh look at the educational world. The seminar’s emphasis will be on primary and secondary education.

Topics to be discussed include the goals of the educational system, the school and the occupational structure, the school and rural development, the moulding of values, education in its social framework and planning.

In addition, participants will have an opportunity to go into greater technical depth on projection of numbers and costs, the costeffectiveness of educational expenditure, curriculum content in primary education and educational selection and testing.

After attending the seminar, Mr. Ho will visit colleges of education, teaching centres and adult education centres within the Inner London Education Authority with which the Education Department has established a special relationship.

Thursday, February 22, 1973

- 11 -

FUN FAIR AND CHILDRIN’S PARTY

********

Staff of two Government departments and their families will be enjoying themselves this Sunday (February 2J) at social functions arranged by their departmental welfare associations.

The Marine Department will be holding its first fun fair at the Merchant Navy Sports Ground in Chatham Road.

The fair will start off with a lion dance and a raffle draw.

Guests can then enjoy a karate demonstration, film shows and band concerts.

There will also be game stalls providing entertainment for all ages.

For staff members of the Government Supplies Department there will be an annual children’s party on Sunday in the department’s compound at Oil Street, North Point.

The programmes will include train and merry-go-round rides, magic shows, cartoons and band music.

About 700 children are expected to attend the party.

*******

Note to Editors: You are cordially invited to send a

reporter and/or photographer to cover the two parties. The fun fair will last from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.; and the children’s party will start at 1.30 p.m.

- - 0 -

/12

Thursday, February 22, 1973

WATER CUT

******

A number of premises in Wan Chai will be without water for five hours on Saturday starting from 1 a.m.

This is to allow the Waterworks Office to carry out a leakage

test

Premises affected are within the area bounded by Queen’s Road

East, Lee Tung Street, the south side of Johnston Road and Anton Street,

0 - -

QUARANTINE RESTRICTIONS IMPOSED

********

The Port Health Authority announced today that quarantine restrictions

have been imposed against arrivals from Merauke (Port), Indonesia, on account of cholera.

At the same time, quarantine restrictions imposed against arrivals

from Peshawar (excluding Airport), Pakistan, on account of smallpox have been removed.

- - 0 -

Release Time: 7.0Q p.m.

PRH 7 4000091

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Friday, February 23, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No.

A new bill will be introduced into the Legislative Council next week to curb the proliferation of stock exchanges ............ 1

This year’s budget day falls on next Wednesday .................... 2

Mr. M.A.R. Kerries is retiring as Chairman of the University and Polytechnic Grants Committee.......> •...........................   3

The Lotteries Fund has granted $2 million towards the costs of a new centre for under-privileged boys .............................. 5

The Jordan Nallah at Ngau Tau Kok is to be extended ............... 6

Denmark has agreed to proposals by Hong Kong concerning the Danish Generalised System of Preference.................................   7

Older Mark I and II resettlement blocks are to be cleaned later this month........«•........<,..•••••.............................  8

January, 1973, was slightly warmer and more cloudy than usual ... 9

More than 55,000 doses have already been administered during the anti-smallpox campaign ........................................... 11

The Tsuen Wan District Officer will take part in Sunday’s Walk for a Million ........................................•............... 12

The Kwun Tong Community Centre is to celebrate its ninth anniversary on Sunday.......................................................   15

The Fanling Fire Station will be opened tomorrow.................  1^

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Friday, February 23, 1973

1 -

INTERIM MEASURE TO CURB PROLIFERATION OF STOCK EXCHANGES

New Bill In Legco Next Week

**********

A bill, designed as an interim measure to curb the proliferation of stock exchanges in Hong Kong, is to be introduced into the Legislative Council next Wednesday.

The bill will have the effect of preventing the establishment of any stock exchange other than those which have already been recognised under the Companies Ordinance.

If the bill is passed, it will be an offence for any person to establish or operate a stock market unless it is the stock market of a recognized stock exchange.

This offence is punishable with a fine of up to 5200,000 and, in the case of a continuing offence, a further fine not exceeding 35,000 a day.

The bill will also make it an offence, punishable by a fine not exceeding 320,000 for a dealer in securities to transact a dealing in securities at any stock market other than one being operated by or with the authority of a recognized stock exchange.

In addition, the bill will empower a magistrate to order the closure of premises in which such an offence is alleged to have been committed.

If any person is convicted of such an offence, the court will have the power to order that the premises be locked and secured for a period of one to three months.

Any person who enters the premises in contravention of the order without authority is liable to a fine of up to 320,000.

-------O--------- /2........................

Friday, February 23, 1973

- 2

BUDGET DAY NEXT WEDNESDAY

********

Hong Kong’s Budget Day this year falls on Wednesday, February 28, when the Appropriation Bill 1973 will be introduced into the Legislative Council.

The proceedings will start at 2.30 p.m. during which the Financial Secretary, the Hon. C.P. Haddon-Cave, will move the section reading of the Bill and outline the main features of estimated revenue and expenditure for the coming financial year beginning April 1, 1973*

The estimated heads of expenditure will be set out in the schedule of the Appropriation Bill to be published on February 28.

The debate on the second reading will be adjourned and resumed on Wednesday, March 14, and Thursday, March 15, when Unofficial Members will speak.

The debate will be resumed on Wednesday, March 28, when the Official Members will reply to points raised by their Unofficial colleagues.

The Council will then consider the Bill in committee stage, to be followed by the formal third reading of the Appropriation Bill ♦

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ft........

Friday, February 23, 1973

- 3 -

CHAIRMAN OF UNIVERSITY/POLYTECHNIC GRANTS COMMITTEE RETIRES «**»****»

It was announced today that Mr. M.A.R. Kerries, is retiring as Chairman of the University and Polytechnic Grants Committee at the end of this year.

He will be succeeded by Sir Sydney Gordon, who joins the Committee on July 1.

Mr. Harries became the Committee's first Chairman when he was appointed to the post by the Governor in 19&5 when he was Chairman and Managing Director of Jardine Matheson.

The Committee comprises both local and overseas members, most of whom are eminent academics.

Its function is to keep the development of the two universities under constant review, advise the Government on their financial needs for running costs and capital cost and allocate the funds agreed by the Government.

In April 1972, the scope of the Committee was extended to include the newly formed Hong Kong Polytechnic, and the membership was enlarged.

During the eight years of Mr. Heries* chairmanship the Committee has instituted several new developments and has had general oversight of a very large building programme, comprising not only the new Chinese University but also a considerable extension to the University of Hong Kong.

At the same time it has played a large part in proposing and then helping to develop the idea of a Polytechnic in Hong Kong.

/An official ........

Friday, February 25, 1973 * - 4 -

An official spokesman said that under Mr. Kerries’ guidance there has been a ’silent revolution’ in higher education in Hong Kong.

As stated in the Committee’s latest report, the area of tertiary level education in Hong Kong could stand comparison with that of any similar community in the world.

”The Committee itself acknowledges the help it has received from the Government and the institutions concerned,” the spokesman added.

’’But the Government believes Mr. Kerries’ outstanding chairmanship of an able and hardworking Committee has been the deciding factor. We owe him a groat deal.”

Commenting upon his decision to relinquish the chairmanship, Mr. Kerries said today: ”Looking to the future in Hong Kong, the universities and the Polytechnic, in my view, will continue to play an essential role in maintaining and enriching standards of life in a community where too often materialistic matters might otherwise take priority over all else.”

Mr. Herries left Hong Kong in June 1970 to become Chairman of Mathesons in London.

He lias continued as a non-executive Director of Jardine Matheson and maintains connections with Hong Kong as Chairman of the Hong Kong Association in London.

Sir Sydney Gordon, who succeeds Mr. Herries, is a member of Executive Council and Chairman of Sir Elly Kadoorie Continuation.

He lias had close contact with both universities for some time, as Chairman of the Universities Joint Salaries Committee and as a Council member of the Chinese University of Hong Kong.

But he will be giving up these posts when he takes over as Chairman of the UPGC. ’ * /5..................................................................

Friday, February 25, 1973

- 5 -

32 MILLION GRANT TO NEW CINTRE Catering 160 Under-Privileged Boys ********

The Government has granted a piece of land and more than 32 mi Ilion from the Lotteries Fund to the Society of Boys’ Centres to build a second centre in Shamshuipo for under-privileged boys.

The new centre is intended to provide a home for boys from eight to 16 years of age who are potential delinquents and are deprived of normal parental care, or who are otherwise in need of care and protection^

The total cost of the project is estimated at about 32.6 million-

The Society has raised $490,000 and the balance will be met by the Lotteries Fund.

In addition, the Government is also considering a recommendation to offer assistance towards the new centre’s recurrent expenditure.

Situated on a site of 49,000 sq. ft. in Comw 11 Street, the centre will have hostel accommodation for 160 inmates. Part of the centre has also been designed as a school with pre-vocational training, gymnastics and other facilities.

Construction of the four-storey building began last month and is expected to be completed in September this year.

An Executive Councillor, Sir Yuet-keung Kan, will perform a foundationlaying ceremony for the new building on March 9.

The Society is, at present, running a centre in Shing Tak Street, To Kwa Wan, with similar hostel and school facilities for 140 boys from destitute families and others with some behaviour problems.

/Besides

a

Friday, February 23, 1973

- 6 -

Besides providing a home for those taken as boarders, it is a place where they can experience communal life while at work or at play. They can also learn a simple trade as well as the general civic responsibilities.

The Society’s another hostel in Un Chau Street, Shamshuipo, serves as an annex of the Shing Tak Street Centre.

It caters for 40 under-privileged boys who all attend regular schools outside and return to the hostel after school.

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EXTIMSION OF THE JORDAN NULLAH

Part Of Kowloon Bay Development

**«««**

The Jordan Nullah at Ngau Tau Kok, immediately west of Kwun Tong Road, is to be extended shortly.

The work involves the construction of about 1,100 feet of a quadruple box culvert in reinforced concrete.

The project is part of the proposed Kowloon Bay Development plan which includes the eventual reclamation of 336 acres of land for light industrial, commercial and storage usages.

Work is expected to be completed in about 15 months1 time. On completion of the culvert, the reclaimed area will be developed into a Mass Transit Depot.

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/7.........

Friday, February 23, 1973

7

DINMARK AGREES TO PROPOSALS CONCERNING Generalised System Of Preference *******

The Director of Commerce and Industry, Mr. D.H. Jordan, today announced that the Danish authorities had agreed to the arrangements proposed by Hong Kong in respect of the certification and other administrative procedures involved in obtaining the benefits of the Danish Generalised System of Preference

The Commerce and Industry Department has now started to accept applications for Certificates of Origin (Forms A), which are required for exports of products under claim to preferential duties on entry into Denmark.

The Generalised System of Preference was introduced by Denmark on January 1, 1972, and Hong Kong has been included as a beneficiary with effect from January 31, 1973-

Most manufactured products excluding textiles and footwear from Hong Kong will be allowed entry into Denmark free of duty.

Certain agricultural products will also be allowed entry into Denmark at reduced rates of duty.

The origin criteria under the Danish scheme are very similar to those of the E.E.C. scheme.

Full details of the method of applying for the certificates of origin are included in a circular to the trade which the department will issue shortly.

Meanwhile, Mr. Jordan had also issued a notice to exporters calling for shippers returns for the period February 1, 1972 to January 31, 1973, for the following items: slacks, jeans and trousers, blouses and jumpers to Norway.

0 -

/8.........

Friday, February 23, 1973

- 8 -

BWCK-BY-BLOCK CLEANSING OPERATION In Mark I And II Resettlement Blocks *******

The Resettlement Department is to mount another block-by-block cleansing operation later this month®

The first such operation was started late last year in connection with the Clean Hong Kong Campaign.

This latest operation which will concentrate on the older Mark I and Mark II blocks will be third in the series. Its aim is to give the older estates a thorough washing and c?_eansing before the approach of the hot weather.

A spokesman for the Resettlement Department said today that special attention will be paid to this operation because it is intended to make it a regular feature of the management of these 2*K) Mark I and II blocks.

The operation will start cn Monday, February 26, at Tai Wor Hau Resettlement Estate where tenants will be asked to clean their own flats and throw away whatever articles they do not want.

All the junk and unwanted art:? cles will be taken away and all the courtyards will be washed6

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/9.........

Friday, February 23, 1973

- 9 -

REPORT ON THE WEATHER OF JANUARY, 1973

***««*«*

January 1973 was slightly warmer and more cloudy than usual. The rainfall for the month was above average with a total of 57-8 mm against a normal value of 31 «7 mm.

The month started with an intense anticyclone over north China and a cold front moving south towards the south China coast. The cold front passed through Hong Kong late on January 1.

The Strong Monsoon Signal was hoisted at 10.05 p.m., and winds were generally fresh to strong overnight.

The temperature fell to 9*7°C on the morning of January 2, the lowest temperature recorded during the month. During the day winds moderated and the Strong Monsoon Signal was lowered at 2.10 p.m.

For the next few days Hong Kong was under the influence of a dry northerly airstream and Red Five Danger Warnings were issued from January 2 to 4.

On January 5 an anticyclone moved eastwards across the Yellow Sea and winds became easterly over Kch ■. The relative humidity increased, and there were light rain patches during the next 2 days.

The Strong Monsoon Signal vzas hoisted between 1.30 a.m. and 6.20 a.m. on January 7 to warn strong easterly winds in Colony waters.

On January 8, the humidity fell and Yellow Fire Danger Warnings were issued during the next two days.

There was some rain on January 11 but the following 5 days were mainly fine and sunny.

/Meanwhile

Friday, February 23, 1973

- 10

Meanwhile the anticyclone over China had been intensifying, and on January 17 a cold front moved south through Hong Kong causing the temperature to fall from a maximum of 21.8°C on January 16 to a minimum of 13«0°C the following night.

For the next 6 days a succession of upper air disturbances affected the south China coast and the bulk of the month*s rainfall occurred during this period.

On January 24, winds freshened from the east as a result of the intensification of the winter monsoon and the Strong Monsoon Signal was hoisted between 3*45 a.m. and 7*30 a.m. on January 25*

During the remainder of the month, a drier northeasterly airstream affected the south China coast and conditions became fine with almost continuous sunshine on the last two days,

As the humidity was low, Yellow Fire Danger Warnings were issued on these two days.

The month's figures and departures from normal were:-

Sunshine 100.9 hours ; 44.5 hours below normal

Rainfall 57*8 mm ; 26.1 mm above normal

Cloudiness 76# ; 12# above normal

Relative Humidity 7^ ; 3% above normal

Mean Maximum Temperature 18.6°C ; 0.4°C above normal

Mean Temperature 16.O°C ; 0.6°C above normal

/^4ean Minimum ,...  • • •

Friday, February 23, 1973

- 11 -

Mean Minimum Temperature 1^.0°C ; 0.7°C above normal

Mean Dew Point 12.0°C ; 0.9°C above normal

Total Evaporation 85.6 mm ; 3^»$ mm below normal

Maximum Temperature of 21.8°C was recorded on January 16.

Minimum Temperature of 9*7°C was recorded on January 2.

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ANTI-SMALLPOX VACCINATION CAMPAIGN

More Than 55,000 ^oses Already Administered

*******

During the second week of the current Anti-Smallpox Vaccination Campaign ending on February 17, a total of 52,523 doses of the vaccine was administered.

Of these, 391 doses were administered on the Island, 47,832 in Kowloon, and 4,374 in the New Territories.

"Since the three-week campaign began on February 7, the grand total of doses administered has now reached 55,075,” a spokesman for the Medical and Health Department said today.

The campaign will end on February 28.

Free vaccine is available at all hospitals and general out-patient clinics.

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/12

Friday, February 23, 1973

- 12 -

DISTRICT OFFICER TO TAKE PART IN N.T. WALK FOR A MILLION

The Tsuen Wan District Officer, Mr. John. Warren, is all set to lead ♦ the New Territories assault on Sunday’s Walk for a Million.

With the support of the three Rural Committees in the Tsuen Wan *

District, the Tsuen Wan Chamber of Commerce and the Tsuen Wan Rotary Club, Mr. Warren is already backed to the tune of 37,000 before he even leaves the I

starting grid. *

Starting with him from the District Office Recreation Club is a team of five girls and five other staff plus more than ten individual entries from members of his staff.

The walk will climax the District Office’s fund-raising drive on behalf of the Community Chest which, it is anticipated, will raise 320,000.

Already the District Office has organised a number of function including a Lunar New Year party and a charity football match to add to the Chest’s coffers*

Among rural leaders taking part in Sunday’s walk will be the Chairman i of the Tsuen Wan Rural Committee, Mr. Chan Po-fong, who has been guaranteed

much support from both District Office staff and the Tsuen Wan public. »

A spokesman of the District Office said: ’’All of us in the New

Territories Administration realise the value of active support for the Community Chest.”

”We think it is very much worthwhile to give up some of our own time in order to assist those of us in Hong Kong who are not as fortunate as others J’

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/13..........

Friday, February 23, 1973

- 13 -

KV/UN TONG COMMUNITY CENTRE ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATIONS 4c******

Fun and games are the orders of the day when the Kwun Tong Community Centre celebrates its ninth anniversary with a fun fair and a folk song evening session on Sunday (February 25) •

Twenty game stalls will be set up in the open court of the Centre to provide entertainment for all ages.

About 2,000 children from Kwun Tong and the neighbouring areas are expected to join in the fun.

Colourful balloons will be released to mark the occasion.

Mr. Law Chi-kin, Senior Principal Social Welfare Officer of the Group and Community Works Division, will present souvenirs to volunteer workers of the Centre in recognition of their dedicated service.

Mrs. Kwan Ko Siu-wah, an Urban Councillor, and Mr. Wong King-tong, Warden of the Centre, will address the gathering.

Another attraction in the programme is the Folk-song Evening which begins at 8 p.m.

About 500 young people will assemble in the Hall and join in the singing of popular folk numbers.

Note to Editors: You are cordially invited to send a reporter

and/or photographer to cover the celebration ceremony. The fun fair starts at 2.50 p.mf in the Centre.

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Friday, February 23, 1973

- 14 -

OPENING OF NEW FIRE STATION IN FAN LING

««*«*****

The District Commissioner, New Territories, will open the Fanling Fire Station at 10.30 a.m. tomorrow (Saturday).

The new station serves as an additional link to cater for the increasing demand for fire fighting and prevention in the New Territories.

Ideally situated at the Fanling Crossroads, the station can also provide prompt reinforcement to Yuen Long, Sheung Shui and Tai Po.

Besides dormitory accommodation for on-duty firemen, the station provides 45 quarters for officers and their families.

Note to Editors: You are cordially invited to send a reporter

and/or photographer to cover the opening ceremony.

Release time:. _7_.3O P»m,

PRH 7

IgisI hmm

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Saturday, February 24, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No.

Labour Tribunal is to be operative from March 1 ................ 1

The new Deputy Director of Education (Technical) has arrived to assume his post ............................................. 2

There will be an issue of the D.I.B. tomorrow................... 3

Applications for Sir Robert Black scholarships are being invited ......................................................   4

Mobile identity card registration teams will move into Chai Wan and Sha Tau Kok next week ................................   5

A grant of 84<A,OOO has been allocated to the Boys' and Girls'

Association ....................*............................... 6

Contemporary French tapestries are now on display at City Museum and Art Gallery.......................................... 7

A series of free film shows has been arranged for the public next month • ••«................................................ 8

Water supply in Shau Kei Wan area is to be interrupted on

Monday ...................................................       9

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

£ "V

Saturday, February 24, 1973

- 1 -

LABOUR TRIBUNAL CCMES INTO OPERATION ON MARCH 1

»**«»**»*«*

The Labour Tribunal, which aims at providing a quick, inexpensive and informal method of settling certain types of disputes between workers and employers, will come into operation next Thursday.

It will be presided by Mr. Michael K.C. Wong, a former Senior

Crown Counsel.

The Labour Tribunal will be part of the Judiciary.

It will deal mostly with claims by individual workers against employers for money due either under a contract of employment, the Employment Ordinance or other laws named in the Ordinance.

However, it will not have power to deal or interfere with industrial disputes, strikes, lock-outs or negotiations between employers and groups of workers or trade unions.

These matters will still be solved by normal conciliation procedures with the help of the Labour Relations Service of the Labour Department.

A spokesman for the Labour Department said the Tribunal, which starts receiving applications from 9 a.m. on March 1, would in no way supersede the Labour Relations Service.

"It will infact be complementary to it and should strengthen the hands of the department’s conciliation officers,” he added.

A simple guide explaining to employers and employees the function of the Tribunal can be obtained free of charge from any branch office of the Labour Department and from City District Offices.

Any person who wants to make enquiries or seek further information may Gall at the Tribunal at Permanent Comfort Building, Nos. 74-77 Connaught Road Central, first floor, or telephone H-436666.

Saturday, February 24, 1973

- 2 -

DEPUTY DIRECTOR OF EDUCATION (TECHNICAL)

********

Mr. Andrew James Kingwell has taken up his appointment as Deputy Director of Education (Technical).

He arrived in Hong Kong on February 22 with his wife.

Mr. Kingwell, who is 60, has held a variety of posts in the technical field.

Before coming to Hong Kong, Mr. Kingwell was the Principal of

Filton Technical College in Gloucestershire. He joined the College as its first Principal in i960 when it was opened with six classrooms and one workshop building with a total teaching staff of six.

Mr. Kingwell was responsible for the College’s rapid expansion and since 1964 the College had been developed on two sites nearly a mile apart with seven departments with a teaching staff of 120 full-time teachers.

Early in his career, Mr. Kingwell was technical director and works manager of a west London automobile firm. He then became a lecturer in engineering subjects at the Battersea Polytechnic after which he joined the Kingston Junior Technical School and the Twickenham College of Technology.

Mr. Kingwell then went to Cyprus where he served as Principal of the Apprentices Training College and Technical Adviser to the Chief Education Officer.

During his stay of nine years in Cyprus, Mr. Kingwell developed courses suited to the needs of industry. He was also engaged in the planning and establishment of a full Technical Institute, including the equipment and layout of laboratories, drawing offices and workshops.

/After .........

Saturday, February 24, 1973

- 3 -

After leaving Cyprus, Mr. Kingwell was responsible for, among other things, the development of engineering and science courses at Kingsway College in London. He then became Principal of Filton Technical College.

Apart from his interests in all aspects of education, Mr. Kingwell was an active member of the Stinchcombe Hill Golf Club, Gloucestershire, the Thornbury Rotary Club and Bridge Club. Formerly he was also interested in sailing and riding.

Note to Editors: Copies of a photograph of Mr. Kingwell

are distributed separately in the Press Boxes, Government Information Services, this afternoon.

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A D.I.B. ISSUE TOMORROW

Mote to Editors: There will be an issue of the Daily

Information Bulletin tomorrow (Sunday) which will be available for collection at 3 p.m. at the G.I.S. Press Room.

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A

Saturday, February 24, 1973

- 4 -

SIR ROBERT BLACK SCHOLARSHIPS

Applications Invited

********

Young people of exceptional merit can now apply for the scholarships and training grants offered by the Sir Robert Black Trust Fund for the year 1973/7^.

The awards are to be made in the form of once-and-for-all grants which may or may not cover all expenses required for the respective programmes for the recipients.

The awards are intended for postgraduate studies or research, and training programmes such as attachments and study tours, either locally or overseas.

The primary aim of these awards is to provide opportunities for those who have demonstrated their potential to serve the community through the qualities of personal leadership to develop their initiative and character.

Candidates are required to propose their own programmes of study or training. They should have resided in Hong Kong for at least five years.

Recipients of awards are required to return and reside in Hong Kong for at least three years.

Application forms and other particulars concerning these scholarships and grants are obtainable from the Secretariat for Home Affairs, International Building, 9th floor, 141 Des Voeux Road Central, Hong Kong.

The closing date for application is April 14, 1973*

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/5.........

Saturday, February 24, 1974

- 5 -

REGISTRATION TEAMS TO OPERATE IN N.T.

Residents Urged To Make Use of Facilities Provided

«m**m*««

Teams from the Registration of Persons Department will next week conduct registration at the Chai Wan Resettlement Estate Office and the Sha Tau Kok Government School for the convenience of residents in the area.

Business hours at the Chai Wan Estate Office will be from 9»3O a.m. to 4.J0 p.m* on Monday (February 26) to Friday (March 2) and from 9*30 a.m. to 12.J0 p.m. on Saturday (March 3)• At Sha Tau Kok, the hours will be between 9 a.m. and 5 P»m. on Monday and Tuesday (February 26 , 27).

The visits will enable parents or guardians to register their children from six to seventeen years of age for juvenile Identity Cards, and young persons 17 years of age and over and holding juvenile Identity Cards, to register for adult Identity Cards.

All persons living in the area are reminded of their responsibility to register themselves and their children for Identity Cards, and to report to the Registration of Persons Department any changes of employment or residential address, nationality or marital status or any other particulars which have changed since registering for their Identity Cards.

Children between six and seventeen years of age who have Hong Kong Birth Certificates or valid travel documents need not attend for registration, but children who do not have Birth Certificates or valid travel documents, must accompany their parents or guardians when registering.

Parents or guardians must produce both their (i.e. husband and wife) Identity Cards for inspection when registering juveniles.

/On registering •*•••••

Saturday, February 24, 1975

- 6 -

On registering for adult cards, young persons 17 years of age and over must surrender their juvenile Identity Cards and produce the Identity Cards of both their parents or guardians under whom they are registered, and a Hong Kong Birth Certificate or evidence of their residence in Hong Kong during the past two years.

Persons who do not possess any of the above mentioned documents must register at the Registration of Persons Branch Office in the Causeway Bay Magistracy, Electric Road, Hong Kong, at Canton Road Government Offices, Yaumati, Kowloon or at Far East Bank Building, Ground floor, Castle Peak Road, Tsuen Wan, New Territories.

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LOTTERIES FUND GRANT FOR CLUB AND LIBRARIES

**********

A capital grant of 3404,000 has been allocated from the Lotteries Fund to the Boys’ and Girls’ Clubs’ Association towards the cost of alterations, furniture and equipment for its new clubs and libraries.

The continued expansion of the Association’s facilities is part of its development plan which, with the full support and approval by the Social Welfare Department, aims at providing up to six new clubs and libraries each year.

The money has been earmarked for the Association’s Kwai Fong Children’s Centre, the Ko Chiu Road Club/Library and the Wong Chuk Hang Club/Library.

The Kwai Fong complex, which includes a club, library and craft centre, was opened last month.

The Ko Chiu Road Club/Library is expected to be ready in June this year.

/7........

0 - -

Saturday, February 24, 1973

- 7 -

EXHIBITION OF CONTEMPORARY FRENCH TAPESTRIES

An exhibition of contemporary French tapestries, featuring works by some of the best known French artists of today, can now be seen at the City Museum and Art Gallery.

Presented jointly by the Urban Council and the Peter Stuyvesant Foundation as a special contribution to the Hong Kong Arts Festival, the exhibition will remain on view until March 25.

On display are 28 colourful and powerfully decorative tapestries designed by prominent French modern artists including several pieces of Lurcat and significant works by Le Corbusier, Prassinos, Dora Robert Singier, Wogensky, and Saint-Saens among others.

Some of the pieces on display are very large, measuring nine by ten feet in width.

All the exhibits were selected from the Peter Stuyvesant Foundation’s collection of modern French tapestries which is one of the most comprehesnive in the world.

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/8.........

Saturday, February 24, 1973 •

- 8 -

FREE URBAN COUNCIL FILM AND VARIETY SHOWS

Programme For Mar^h

»***»*-*

The Urban Council and the Urban Services Department have organised a series of free film shows for the entertainment of the general public during the month of March, 1973*

Films will be shown in various playgrounds in the urban areas and the New Territories from 7>30 p.m. to about 9*00 p.m.

Details of the dates and places where the film shows will be held are as follows:

Date Place

March 2, Friday Recreation ground, Yue Kwong Road, Shek Pai Wan Resettlement Estate, Hong Kong.

March Monday King’s Road Playground, King’s Road, North Point, Hong Kong.

March 7, ’Wednesday Recreation ground, Chai Wan Road, Chai Wan Resettlement Estate, Hong Kong.

March 9i Friday Anchor Street Playground, Tai Kok Tsui, Kowloon,

March 12, Monday Recreation ground, Tak Tin Street, Lam Tin Resettlement Estate, Kwun Tong, Kowloon.

March 16, Friday Recreation ground, Sau Lai Street, Sau Mau Ping Resettlement Estate, Kwun Tong, Kowloon.

March 19» Monday Morse Park Open-air Theatre, Wong Tai Sin, Kowloon.

March 23, Friday Recreation ground, Sheung Tak Street, Wong Tai Sin Resettlement Estate, Kowloon.

March 26, Monday Tai Wo Hau Park, Castle Peak Road, Tsuen Wan, New Territories.

March 30, Friday Tai Wai Playground, Tai Wai, Sha Tin, New Territories.

/A series

Saturday, February 24, 1973

- 9 -

A series of three open-air variety shows has been arranged for the month•

The shows will begin at 7.30 p.m. and last about two and a half hours Admission is free and all members of the public are welcome to attend The shows will be held on the following dates and places:

Date Place

March 7, Wednesday Blake Garden, Po Hing Fong,

Central District, Hong Kong.

March 14, Wednesday Morse Park Open-air Theatre,

Wong Tai Sin, Kowloon.

March 21, Wednesday, Lok Shan Road Playground, To Kwa Wan,

Kowloon. -------0---------

WATER INTERRUPTION

***«««*

Water supply to certain areas in Shau Kei Wan will be interrupted for eight hours on Monday (February 26) night starting from 10 p.m.

This is to allow work to be carried out on connecting a six-inch fire hydrant to an eight-inch fresh water main at Shing On Street.

The affected areas are Shing On Village, Holy Cross Path Village, Sai Wan Ho Village, Wang Hang Village, Ma Shan Village, Holy Cross School, Nos. 15-29 and Nos. 2-28, Tai Shek Street, Nos. 121-145, Sai Wan Ho Street, Nos. 7-35 and Nos. 8-46, Shing On Street.

-------0---------

Release time: 2,30 p.m.

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Sunday, February 25, 1973

MORE MULTI-STOREY CAR PARKS TO MEET GROWING DEMAND

More Government multi-storey car parks are either under construction or being planned to provide more parking spaces to meet the growing demand for such facilities.

A new multi-storey car park is being built in Murray Road and is expected to be completed at the end of June this year.

The new building, providing another 900 much needed parking spaces, will be the fifth multi-storey car park in the Central District.

The other four are located at Rumsey Street, Star Ferry, City Hall and Garden Road.

So far, work on nine of the twelve storeys of the new Murray Road car park have been completed.

The ground, mezzanine, ninth and tenth floors will be used for government offices. The first to eighth floors will be used for car parking. Meanwhile, work on the extension of the Yau Ma Tei car park is to start in the middle of the year.

The 11-storey extension, to be sited adjacent to the present car park, will provide 401 more parking spaces on eight floors.

Office accommodation is planned for the ground, mezzanine and the two uppermost floors.

An elevated roadway will be constructed to pass through the new building at the second and third floors levels.

/It forms ••••••

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Sunday, February 25, 1973

- 2 -

It forms a section of the elevated road planned as part of the West Kowloon Corridor Scheme.

It is also hoped that, in conjunction with the new Cheung Sha Wan Wholesale Market project, multi-storey parking can be provided for both lorries and cars.

In addition, 2,000 spaces have been planned for an office block, to be named Murray Building II, which will be built between Garden Road and Cotton Tree Drive.

The existing six Government multi-storey car parks are providing 3,600 parking spaces. With the completion of these projects, the number of parking spaces available will nearly be doubled.

Plans are also ir. hand to build multi-storey car parks at the Causeway Bay Magistracy (900 spaces), Kwun Tong Ferry Pier (900 spaces) and Tsuen Wan Ferry Pier (900 spaces ).

A combined market-car park may also be built in Mong Kok Road-Fa Yuen Street.

There are also a number of tentative proposals under consideration for the development of multi-storey car parks either by Government or by private developers.

These may take a variety of forms ranging from independent parking buildings to combined market/car perks and combined petrol filling stations/ garages/car parks.

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Release time: ^>•00 p.rn.

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Monday, February 26, 1975

CONTENTS

Page No.

Closed circuit television to control traffic at the Lion Rock Tunnel is being considered ................................... 1

Site formation of the new Ap Lei Chau Resettlement Estate is expected to begin in April .........•.......................... 3

Recruitment procedures for Prisons staff are being streamlined .............................................................. 5

The Governor says the Arts Festival is adding ”a new quality and a new dimension1’ to Hong Kong ........................... 7

The Marine Department has reprinted a booklet, ’’Safety Afloat,” for pleasure craft owners.......• •.........•................. 9

Figures of accidents at construction sites during January are released ......•.............................................. 10

A youth workers’ seminar on ’’Social Work and School Education” will be held on Wednesday ...............•.................... 11

An identity card registration team will move into Takuling in the New Territories.....................................     a 12

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Monday, February 26, 1973

- 1 -

GOVERNMENT CONSIDERING THE INSTALLATION OF

Closed Circuit TV Iri Lion Rock Tunnel

The Government is considering the feasibility of installing various new equipment at the Lion Rock Tunnel to improve administration and control of traffic. • -

Among these are the installation of a Closed circuit television system and the purchase of a more powerful towing vehicle' to deal with break-downs and other emergencies. -

A spokesman for the Transport Department said that closed circuit television had been widely used by tunnel authorities all over the world, mainly for ensuring safe traffic bjr keeping everything under continuous surveillance.

"It will also enable the tunnel control staff to find out the exact nature of all break-downs and accidents quickly and to send the right kind of rescue vehicle to the scene at once," he -said*

He said that at present, the control staff inside the administration building would not know about an accident or break-down until someone reported it or until traffic began to pile up inside the tunnel.

"This wastes a lot of time and the resulting congestion inside the tunnel often prevents the rescue vehicle from getting to the scene quickly," he added.

The spokesman said that closed circuit television would also ensure a much smoother flow of traffic through the tunnel.

/"If cameras

Monday, February 26, 1975

2 -

"If cameras are located on the approach roads, for example, when the tunnel supervisor sees on the television that an unusually large number of cars are coming towards the tunnel, he can open more toll booths in advance so that motorists will not be unduly delayed," he said.

The television system will have the added advantage of enabling control staff to spot law-breaking motorists so that tunnel regulations can be enforced more effectively.

This should indirectly lead to a reduction in the number of accidents.

On the purchase of a more powerful towing vehicle, the spokesman said that in order to avoid congestion, it was essential to remove quickly heavy lorries which broke down inside the tunnel.

"It is particularly needed because of the increasing number of heavy lorries passing through the tunnel in connection with the development going on in Sha Tin," he added,

- - • r 0

Monday, February 26, 1973

- 3 -

SITE FORMATION FOR AP LEI CHAU ESTATE TO BEGIN IN APRIL

Housing For 21,600 People By 1976

*********

Site formation work for the Ap Lei Chau Resettlement Estate is to begin next April for completion in October 1975* However, in order to enable residents to take up accommodation earlier, construction of the estate will start when the site is half formed.

Situated on the north of the islet, the 349 million estate will provide 3,084 flats for more than 21,600 boat people and residents of licensed areas in Aberdeen.

It will comprise four 20-storey and two seven-storey blocks.

Of the latest Mark VII design, which is the approved standard for all Government low cost housing estates, every flat in the new estate will have its own cooking and toilet facilities.

The whole estate will have additional space for recreation purposes and amenities.

There will be two primary schools each with 24 classrooms, a kindergarten, a clinic, and a combined welfare and community hall.

Residents will also be served by a modular market, two restaurants and three cafes, a post office and a bank.

An integral part Of *the estate is a central incinerator with three unitst each capable of disposing one ton of refuse in an hour.

A flyover and a short road will be built to link the estate with the existing main road.

/Although

Monday, February 26, 1973

- 4 -

Although plans for a bridge linking Ap Lei Chau and Aberdeen are under consideration, there is at present no road access to the islet.

For this reason, the existing ferry service will have to be diverted on to a new route between the Tin Wan reclamation and the northern end of block 3 of the estate.

A new fire station has been proposed on the islet. But, as an added precaution, special arrangements have been incorporated to ensure speedy transportation of additional fire fighting appliances during emergency to supplement the station’s facilities.

These include the widening of the western breakwater of the Aberdeen Harbour and the construction of a boat-house at the end of the breakwater.

The boat-house will be able to accommodate a bat-wing-barge capable of ferrying appliances. The barge, costing 31 millionfcan also be used for other purposes elsewhere in Hong Kong.

In normal circumstances, the widened breakwater will be avail able for cargo handling.

The whole estate is expected to be completed in 1976.

-------0---------

/5........

Monday, February 26, 1973

- 5 -

PRISONS STAFF RECRUITMENT PROCEDURES STREAMLINED

Day-To-Day Terms Within Three Weeks

**«$«**«

Recruitment procedures are being streamlined in the current drive to get more young people to join the prisons service.

A successful candidate for the post of Assistant Officer Class II can now be engaged on day-to-day terms at full pay within three weeks of his posting the application form.

Candidates are required to have a minimum of primary six education. The starting salary will be from $570, but those who possess a Certificate of Education may join at a higher entry point.

Under the present Commissioner of Prisons, Mr. T.G. Gamer, the prisons service is offering better than ever promotion prospects to young people of good calibre.

Vacancies in the upper grades are generally filled by officers who start from the bottom rank.

The modern prisons service lays emphasis on a more progressive penal policy.

Men and women in the service must not only be confident in discharging custodial aspect of their duties for the protection of the community, but must also be ready to play an effective part in the treatment and reformation of the offenders.

/At present, .......

Monday, February 26, 1973

- 6 -

At present, institutions administered by the Prisons Department in Hong Kong have a daily prison/inmate population of a little over 6,100 with 1,581 persons being followed up in the department’s after-care programme.

To prepare them for their work, all new recruits of the prisons service are required to undergo a six-month induction training course in the Prisons Department.

Once in the prisons service, staff•members can enjoy all benefits provided for civil servants, including housing, free medical treatment and holidays.

There are also other departmental benefits such as welfare funds, staff clubs and free sports facilities.

-----0-----

Monday, February 26, 1973

- 7 -

ARTS FESTIVAL ADDING NEW QUALITY AND NEW DIMENSION TO HONG KONG

*******

The Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, said tonight that the Hong Kong Arts Festival "could add a new quality and a new dimension to our city.”

He was speaking at the opening of the Arts Festival at 8 p.m. in the City Hall.

He commended several organisations for their work in planning this festival, including the Hong Kong Arts Festival Society and the Hong Kong Tourist Association.

The festival, he said, was the product of their "imagination and devotion and hard work."

The following is the full text of the Governor’s speech:-

"Sir Kenneth Ping-fan Fung, Ladies and Gentlemen:

"It gives me the greatest pleasure to welcome you all, visitors and residents alike, to this new venture, the Hong Kong Arts Festival.

"It could contribute something quite new to this great city. We are rightly known for our port and our manufactuies, our hotels and restaurants and the scenic beauty that surround us, but not so far for the arts.

"The Festival is the product of the imagination and devotion and hard work of many people, but particularly the Hong Kong Arts Festival Society and its committee under the Chairmanship of Sir Kenneth Ping-fan Fung.

"They have been backed by the fair-sighted generosity of the tourist industry. I mention in particular the Hong Kong Hotels Association, the Hong Kong Tourist Association and the British Overseas Airways Corporation.

/"It is

0

Monday, February 26, 1973

- 8 -

"It is they and their members, with the assistance of many other companies and individuals, who have made this Festival possible.

’’Finally I must mention Mr. Ian Hunter, who has waved his wand to assemble the artists, set the scene and organise for us for this month a variety and wealth of artistic talent rarely equalled anywhere.

"It is typical of Hong Kong that through donations of many kinds, over 12,000 seats are being made available to students and others to ensure that enjoyment of this Festival is spread as widely as possible.

”1 am pleased that this distinguished orchestra which, as it were, opens the Festival, comes from the country which heads the list of visitors to Hong Kong.

"And now let us be done with speech-making and enjoy the entertainment. Those of us who have seen this idea, this enterprise, grow, are justifiably excited.

"It could add a new quality and a new dimension to our city. We fondly wish it success.

"For this to be assured we have only to enjoy to the full the music and ballet and drama and all that this Festival offers.

"This, Ladies and Gentlemen, I most sincerely hope you all will do.

"I wish you all a very happy and memorable month, and I declare open this first Hong Kong Arts Festival."

-------0---------

/9..........

Monday, February 26, 1973

- 9 -

BOOKLET ON "SAFETY AFLOAT"

The Marine Department’s booklet,"Safety Afloat", which is intended for pleasure craft owners or potential owners, has been reprinted and copies are available free of charge from the department at 102 Connaught Road, Central.

Any member of the public who is an owner, operates or intends to own or operate a pleasure craft in Hong Kong waters should obtain a copy of this booklet and also a copy of the Merchant Shipping (Pl easure Vessels) Regulations available at Government Publications Centres.

An additional appendix has been added, drawing attention to the dangers of carrying petrol and other inflammable, liquids on vessels.

Any inquiries concerning pleasure craft should be directed to the Small Craft Licensing Section of the Marine Department.

-------0 --------

/10........

Monday, February 26, 1973

10

ACCIDENTS AT BUILDING SITES IN JANUARY

***»*«*•

A total of 33^ workers were injured and one killed on building construction and sites of civil engineering construction during last month, according to reports received by the Labour Department.

Of this number, 70 were the result of stepping on or striking against objects. The fatal accident was the result of being struck by a falling object.

"Stepping on or striking against objects is one of the prevailing causes of industrial accidents 8aid Mr. A.H. Carter, Industrial Safety Training Officer of the Labour Department. -

"This type of accident has resulted in 643 injuries over the past ten months• ...

"Many of these accidents could have. been avoided if a higher standard of housekeeping had been enforced by management.

"Waste materials as well as protruding .nails from odd pieces of timber should be removed from the sites, and raw materials should be stacked in an orderly and safe manner," he stressed.

Mr. Carter went on to say that in addition to the physical steps that should be taken to reduce accidents, the training and education of employees at all level to become hazard-conscious is of the utmost importance flThis is particularly true with accidents where the human element plays a prominent role.

,rYou can never physically prevent people from stepping on or striking against objects but by training and education you can make them aware of the tragic results." he added.

0 - -

/11

Monday, February 26, 1973

- 11 -

SECOND YOUTH WORKERS* SEMINAR ON ’’Social Work And School Education” ********

The Wong Tai Sin Community Centre of the Social Welfare Department will hold a second youth workers’ seminar on Wednesday, February 28.

The first seminar on ”Deviant Behaviour of Youngsters in Resettlement Estates” was held last December and attended by local school headmasters, priests and social workers.

”It attracted such excellent response that further seminars are thought to be very useful to social workers and school teachers dealing with youth problems,” a spokesman for the S.W.D. said.

Organised with the co-operation of the Calvary Church Social Service Centre and the Federation of Youth Group, the coming seminar is entitled ’’Social Work and School Education”.

”We hope this function will throw light on better understanding of the present situation of social work agencies and schools in developing youngsters,” the spokesman commented.

The seminar will start off with talks by representatives of the Hong Kong Council of Social Service and the Christian Children’s Fund Institute, followed by group discussions, group reports and evaluation.

All youth workers, volunteers in social work and interested people in Wong Tai Sin may apply to attend.

Application forms are obtainable from the Community Centre at No. 104, Ching Tak Street, Kowloon.

Note to Editors: You are invited to have the seminar covered.

It will be held at the Wong Tai Sin Community Centre between 2 and 5.15 p.m. on Wednesday, February 28.

-------0---------

/12.........

Monday, February 26, 1973

- 12 -

IDENTITY CARD REGISTRATION TEAM TO OPERATE IN TAKULING

************

The Commissioner of Registration announced today that a team from the Registration of Persons Department will conduct registrations at the Taki rH ng Rural Committee Office from Wednesday (February 28) to Thursday (March 1).

Business hours will be from 9.00 a.m. to 5*00 p«m«

The visit will enable parents or guardians to register their nhi 1 dren from six to seventeen years of age for juvenile identity cards.

Young persons 17 years of age and over and holding juvenile identity cards, can register for adult identity cards.

People living in the area are reminded of their responsibility to register themselves and their children for identity cards.

They must report to the Registration of Persons Department any changes of employment or residential address, nationality or marital status or any other particulars which have changed since registering for their identity cards.

-------0---------

Release time: 7»3Q P»m«

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Tuesday, February 27, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No.

The Public Records Office will move into the new Murray Road car park in October .................................. 1

A variety show has been organised for residents of Sha

Tau Kok ...............................................

There will be live broadcast of the Budget session by radio and television tomorrow .........................

Water supply in Kowloon City and Western District will be interrupted ........................................

Mr. Woo Sun is to receive a Certificate of Commendation for rescuing two brothers in a fire ......................  5

The Shek Kip Hei Public Assistance Unit is moving into a new address .........................................

The wife of the Director of Social Welfare is to make a series of weekly visits to voluntary welfare agencies during the next two months • •..........................

Rice dealers has boon urged to restrain their prices .

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5'233191

Tuesday, February 27, 1973

- 1 -

PUBLIC RECORDS OFFICE liOVING INTO NEW PREMISES

The Public Records Office will be moving into new premises in the Murray Road multi-storey car park building this October.

This Office provides a centralised service in the selection and preservation of government archives, or permanently valuable public records.

These archives and public records are kept for official reference and, under approved conditions, for private research.

Mr. A. I. Diamond, the Archivist in charge, said that work on the compilation of material had been progressing smoothly since the Office opened in July last year.

His staff had compiled over 1,000 feet of public records, from various government departments, and it is estimated that there will be a stock of nearly 5,000 feet by 197^•

These measurements refer to the footage of shelving occupied by records stored in standard cartons lodged in mobile storage bays mounted on rails for space economy and easy access.

’’Sometimes we have to locate a certain document within ten minutes,1’ Mr. Diamond said, ;:but our finding aids are such that we are able to do this without much difficulty.”

There is also a supply of photographs, including an interesting collection obtained from the Royal Hong Kong Regiment (The Volunteers) depicting manoeuvres, buildings, equipment and personnel.

/For the .....

Tuesday, February 27, 1973

- 2 -

For the sake of economy, they often purchase microfilm copies of the documents during a brief visit.

The Public Records Office will be moving into the ground and mezzanine floors of the new Murray Road car park.

Storage space in the new premises is expected to be about 20,000 feet.

-------0---------

VARIETY SHOP IN SHA TAU KOK

I

*******

A variety show has been organised for residents of the Sha Tau Kok area tomorrow (Wednesday) night in the Sha Tau Kok Government School to celebrate the Lunar Nev/ Year.

The two-hour programme will include oriental dance, folk song, lion dance and a band concert by the Tai Kwong Middle School.

The show is jointly organised by the Fanling Rotary

Youth Centre of the Social Welfare Department and the Sha Tau Kok

Adult Education and Recreation Centre of the Education Department.

Note to Editors: You are cordially invited to send a reporter and/or photographer to cover the event. The show will begin at 7 p.m.

-------0---------

Tuesday, February 27, 1973

- 3 -

LIVE RADIC COVERAGE OF BUDGET SESSIONS

Financial Secretary To Go On Air For Short Budget Talk

***$«* Me

There will be live radio coverage on '/ednesday when the Financial Secretary, the Mon. C.P. Haddon-Cave, presents his budget t proposals to the Legislative Council,

For the first time, in addition to the English Services, the Chinese Services of Radio Hong Kong will broadcast the session live through simultaneous translation, starting at 2.30 p.m.

The Financial Secretary will go on radio and television on Wednesday evening to give a short talk on the Budget.

Tliis can be heard in Radio Hong Kong’s ’’Topics PH” at 6.10 p.m.; in Commercial Radio’s News Bulletin at 6 p.m. and on TVB and RTV at ?.3O p.m.

ilr. Lau Uah-sum, Assistant Financial Secretary, will give a similar talk in Chinese.

He can be heard at 7 p.m. on ’’Topical Events” of Radio Hong Kong’s Chinese Service, at 6.03 p.m. on ’’Topical Events” of Commercial Radio’s Chinese Service, and on TVB and RTV at 7-55 P-m. and 10.15 p.m. respectively.

Highlights and excerpts from the Budget Day session will be carried in the regular news services of the television and radio stations.

HK-TVB will screen extracts during news broadcasts at 7 p.m. and 7.30 p.m. on their English and Chinese Channels respectively.

/RTV......

Tuesday, February 27, 1973

- 4 -<

RTV will do the same in their Chinese and English Services at 7 and 9 P»n.

In addition, they will run a repeat broadcast in their 11 a.m. morning news the following day.

The remaining Budget sessions on iiarch 14, 15 and 28 will also be covered live by the English and Chinese services of Radio Hong Kong.

Again, all radio and television stations will broadcast highlights of the budget debates in their regular news services.

WATER CUT ♦ ♦♦♦

A number of premises in the Western District and Kowloon City will be without water for five hours from 1 a.m. on March 1.

This is to allow work on a leakage test to be carried out.

The premises affected in the Western District are bounded by Smithfield to Queen’s Road West, and Belcher’s Street to Praya.

The premises affected in Kowloon City are bounded by Prince Edward Road* Junction Road* Carpenter Road and Nga Tsin

Long Road

Tuesday, February 27, 1973

- 5 -

RESCUED T' 0 BOYS IN FIRE

Bravery Recognised «»**«*♦

A public-spirited citizen, Mr. Woo Sun, will be presented with a Certificate of Commendation by the Fire Services Department on Friday (March 2) for his bravery in rescuing two children in a fire on New Year’s Day.

Mr. uoo, a resident of the Kwai Chung Resettlement Estate, was painting his flat on January 1 when he heard shouts for help from a neighbouring flat.

He immediately rushed to the scene and rescued two brothers, Ng Kam-wah and Kam-fai, from the burning flat.

In the course of rescuring the brothers, Mr. Woo incurred bums on his feet, and was rushed to hospital for treatment.

The Chief Fire Officer, N.T. Command, Nr. F. Jackson, will present the Certificate to Mr. ’Joo in a ceremony to be held at 12 noon in the Kwai Chung Public Enquiry Service Centre.

Mr. ’Joo, 45 years old, works as a sound-recorder in a film studio.

Note to Editors: You are cordially invited to send a reporter and/or photographer to cover the presentation ceremony. The Centre is located at Block 26 of the Kwai Chung Resettlement Estate.

-------0--------

Tuesday, February 27, 1973

- 6 -

SHEK KIP MEI PUBLIC ASSISTANCE UNIT Operating In New Premises ********

The Shek Kip Mei Public Assistance Unit of the Social Welfare Department will be operating from a new address at 2j54, Tai Po Road, ground floor from tomorrow (Wednesday).

The unit’s telephone numbers are 3-708613, 3-708462 and 3-709095*

Until now the unit has been temporarily accommodated at 88 Yu Chau Street, ground floor, in the same premises as the Sham Shui Po Public Assistance Unit, which will continue to operate from that address.

At its new office in Tai Po Road, the Shek Kip Mei Unit will be more conveniently located for serving the needs of people living in the areas of Shek Kip Mei, Pak Tin, Tai Wo Ping, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon Chai, Tai Hang Tung and Tai Hang Sai..

-------0---------

Tuesday, February 27, 1975

- 7 -

VISITS TO VOLUNTARY AGENCIES BY WIFE OF

DIRECTOR OF SOCIAL WELFARE ««»*«**

Mrs. Li Fook-kow, wife of the Director of Social Welfare, will be making a ’series of weekly visits to centres operated by voluntary social welfare agencies during the next two months.

The visits will start on Thursday। March 1, when Mrs. Li will go to Western District for a tour of the Ling Yuet Sin Infants’ Home and the Women’s Welfare Club Nursery, both of which are subvented by Government.

She will be accompanied by Mrs. Cynthia Lee Young, Principal Social Welfare Officer of the estern District Office of the Social Welfare Department.

Mrs. Li will arrive at the Ling Yuet Sin Infants’ Home, 5*+ Pokfulam Road, at 10:10 a.m.

She will be met by the superintendent, Mother Ginglietta Tomasetto, and spend 50 minutes touring the home, which is operated by Sisters of the Canossian Convent.

It provides short-term accommodation for a maximum of 60 infants from birth up to the age of six, and a day nursery for 80 children between the ages of three and six.

At 11:15 a.m. lirs. Li will arrive at the Women’s Welfare Club Nursery, 60 Bridges Street, where she will be met by the president of the Club, lirs. Cheung Young Tai-fun, and two other officials.

She will spend 50 minutes touring the nursery which provides day care services for 160 children aged from two to six.

Note to Editors: You are invited to send a reporter/photographer to cover Mrs. Li’s visits.

-------0---------

Tuesday, February 27, 1973

- 8 -

RICE DEALERS URGED TO RESTRAIN THEIR PRICES

Prices Dropping Today

The Director of Commerce and Industry, Mr. D.H. Jordan, has called on rice dealers to exercise their influence to restrain their prices and remove supply uncertainties.

He made the appeal yesterday (Monday) in a meeting with rice importers and representatives of wholesalers.

The meeting followed recent increases in the price of rice and some public uncertainty regarding the adequacy of supplies.

Mr. Jordan reviewed the supply and stock position and indicated that there did not seem to him to be an economic basis for the present level of prices.

There was also no substance to any suggestion that rice was in short supply on the local market.

A spokesman for the Commerce and Industry Department said today that current stocks in Hong Kong exceeded two months supply.

lie stressed that the stocks were, in fact, higher than at this time last year.

“It is gratifying to note that auction prices this morning were substantially lower than yesterday’s.

"Thai rice 100 per cent whole dropped from *>136 per picul to $109, and South China Jien from $131 to 3121.

"It is expected that prices will ease further within the next few days."

-------0---------

Release Time: 6.30 P.I..

PRH 7

|GIS| |O^|

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

(PARE I)

Wednesday, February 28, 1973

COIITSNTS

Page No.

A number of tax reform and tax relief proposals have been made by the’Financial Secretary.......••••••.........•........ 1

The duty on fuel oil will b$ abolished with effect from tomorrow •••••••••••...........• •...•*••••••••••••.......... 4

The rate of duty on-alcoholic .liquors of over -78 degrees proof has gone up ....................•••••••••••••••••••.• 5

Several concessions on stamp duties have been proposed by the Financial' Secretary •*••••••.....•....................... 6

Learner drivers will have to pay more for a provisional driving licence •••••••......................................  8

The Financial Secretary has estimated a drop in Hong Kong’s overseas reserves at the end of this financial year........ 10

Most of this year’s surplus will be used for setting up a special Mass Transit Fund •••••••••••.•••••.................  12

Hong Kong is to have four more technical institutes ...... 13

Surplus for 1972-73 is the largest ever experienced •••••• 14

The Financial Secretary predicts that rent increases should slow down this year •••••••...................................18

The Gross Domestic Product in 1973 is expected to increase by about 17 per cent  ...................................... -19

The Government is exaciining ways to slow down the rise in the money supply  ............................................... 21

/Total ....

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Page No.

Total revenue of about 84,700 million is forecast for the coming financial year ••••••••••••••••••••••••»•••••••••«. 24

The methods of administering social welfare subventions are under review by the Government ....................... 28

Spending on medical services is forecast to be about 10 per cent of total expenditure in 1973-74 ..................... 30

The Government is to spend more on social welfare in the new fiscal year......•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••.......• 31

The Police Force is to be strengthened •••••••••••........ 32

The Government intends to maintain the trend of substantial annual increases in total estimated expenditure .......... 33

The Government’s ten-year housing plan is expected to cost over 88,000 million....................................... 36

Recurrent revenue for the next few years is expected to rise at a fast rate ••••••••••••••.......................9 yj

The budget proposals on salary tax would result in a net cost to the revenue of over 315 nri 115 nr> ............38

Duty on contract notes will be doubled as from tomorrow •• 42

Wednesday, February 28, 1973

- 1 -

TAX RELIEF FOR WAGE EARNERS

Personal allowance To Be Raised from $7,000 to $10,000

Higher Duty On Shares Transactions

*********

A number of tax reform and tax relief proposals were made by the

Financial Secretary, the Hon. C.P. Haddon-Cave, this afternoon when he presented his budget to the Legislative Council.

He also announced increases in ad valorem duty on contract notes in respect of share transactions and in fees for driving test application forms and driving licences.

The tax reforms concern salaries tax, duty on bulk imports of alcoholic liquors and stamp duty on jobbing transactions.

The proposed tax reforms on salaries are:

* An increase in the personal allowance from $7,000 to $10,000;

* An increase in the wife’s allowance from $7,000 to $10,000;

An increase in the allowance for the first child from $2,000 to $3,000 and of the maximum allowance for children from $9»5OO to $10,500;

* An alteration of the schedular rates of tax so that, upon the first platform of $10,000 of net chargeable income, tax at five per cent is payable and upon each of the next four platforms of $10,000 a further five per cent. On net chargeable income over $50,000 a rate of 50 per cent will apply with the standard rate of 15 per cent applying on gross income less expenses and charitable donations ;

/* Conccllation .......

Wednesday, February 28, 1973

- 2 -

* Cancellation of lower income relief and the selective allowances for working wives, dependent parents and life assurance.

* Extension of child relief to parents of children of any age not employable because of mental or physical incapacity and for whom medical certificates are produced.

As his second proposal for tax reform, Mr. Haddon-Cave announced new increased rates of duty on bulk imports of alcoholic liquors.

With effect from g p.m. today, the rates of duty per degree applicable over 78° proof to be 98 cents in the case of liquor of Hong Kong and Commonwealth origin and $1.08 in the case of liquor of non-Commonwealth origin.

The third proposal for tax reform concerns stamp duty on contract notes in respect of purchases and sales by a broker on his own account when he is, in effect, performing a jobbing function.

The Financial Secretary proposed that transactions designed to accommodate the market should be exempt from stamp duty.

He proposed that the Stamp Ordinance be amended accordingly and regulations made to define and control these transactions with effect from April 1 or as soon as possible thereafter.

The proposed tax reliefs are:

Abolition of the duty on table waters.

Abolition of the duty of 10 cents per gallon on furnace oil used in the manufacture of electricity and gas.

Raising the values of properties on which stamp duty less than the standard rate may be charged,

/* Abolition

Wednesday, February 28, 1973

- 3 -

Abolition of the stamp duty on receipts.

Abolition of minor stamp duties on a miscellany of documents, such as Bills of Lading, Affidavits, Hire Purchase etc.

* Abolition of the tax on admission charges to cinemas.

Subject to approval, nil these proposals will come into effect on April 1 this year.

The Financial Secretary announced a 100 per cent increase in the rate of ad valorem duty on contract notes in respect of share transactions.

The rate will go up from 20 cents to 40 cents for cach note or from 40 cents to 80 cents for each transaction.

The increased rate of duty will .be applicable to all transactions entered into from tomorrow.

To this end, the Governor signed an order under the Public Revenue Protection Ordinance this morning.

Mr. Haddon-Cave also announced increases in fees for driving test application forms and driving licences.

The fee for the application form would be raised from $20 to $150 and for a provisional licence from $40 to $100.

At the same tijne, the fee for a driving licence would be raised from $10 to $50.

The Financial Secretary said that the net effect of his budget proposals was to increase the difference of $313 million between the printed revenue estimates and the Draft Estimates of Expenditure by $201 million to $514 million.

This, he said, represented "the surplus I am actually budgetting for."

Wednesday, February 28, 1973

FUEL OIL DUTY TO BE ABOLISHED

Big Savings For Household And Industrial users

********

The duty of 10 cents per gallon on furnace oil used in the manufacture of electricity and gas will be abolished with effect from tomorrow (Thursday).

This was one of the proposals made by the Financial Secretary, the

Hon. C.P. Haddon-Cave, in his Budget speech in the Legislative Council this afternoon*

Mr* Haddon-Cave said the abolition of the duty on furnace oil would reduce revenue by 345 million.

This compared with 316.2 million in 1972-73 when duties on a wide range of hydrocarbon oils were abolished.

As a result of the abolition of the duty on fuel oil, the saving in electricity bills would vary as follows:

* In the case of Hong Kong Electric, from 31 in the case of a small domestic consumer using 120 units at a monthly bill of 321 (4.8 per cent) to 33*800 in the case of a bulk consumer using 500*000 units at a monthly bill of 345,500 (8.7 per cent).

* In the case of China Light and Power, from 31 in the case of a small domestic consumer using 120 units at a monthly bill of 320 (5 per cent) to 340,000 in the case of bulk consumer using 5*000,000 units at a monthly bill of 3288,000 (13»9 per cent).

* Finally, in the case of the Gas Company, as its tariff does not include a fuel variation clause, increases in the cost of fuel oil over the past year have been fully absorbed by the company.

,rIt is, therefore, not envisaged that any reduction in the charge to consumers will arise as a result of the abolition of fuel oil duty,” the Financial Secretary said.

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/5...........

Wednesday, February 28, 1973

- 5 -

INCREASE IN DUTY ON ALCOHOLIC LIQUORS

*******

The rate of duty on alcoholic liquors of over 78 degrees proof has been increased as from today.

An order under the Public Revenue Protection Ordinance providing for such an incarease was signed by the Governor this morning.

The new rates for liquors of over 78 degrees proof will be 96 cents in the case of liquor of Hong Kong and Commonwealth origin and 31.08 in the case of liquor of non-Commonwealth origin.

The effect of the increases will vary from a few cents to 39 cents per bottle, except for some particularly strong liquors for which the increases will be much higher.

This was disclosed by the Financial Secretary, the Hon. C.P. Haddon-Cave, when he proposed tax reform on duty on imports of alcoholic liquors in bulk.

He recalled that in 19^2 the rates of duty on whisky, brandy and other spirituous liquors of 78 degrees proof were increased, but the rates of duty above this strength remained, by an oversight, unchanged.

"Liquor importers have recently realised that, as a result they can pay less duty per bottle by importing high proof liquor and watering it down to lower proof levels," the Financial Secretary said.

’■There is thus a small but quite unjustifiable potential loss of revenue." Mr. Haddon-Cave also proposed that the duty on certain non-alcoholic beverages, known as table waters, should be abolished from April 1 next.

The cost to the revenue of this abolition will be about 310.5 million.

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/6.........

Wednesday, February 28, 1975

- 6 -

STAMP DUTY CONCESSIONS PROPOSED BY FINANCIAL SECRETARY Relief For Buyers Of Low Value Properties **********

Several concessions on stamp duties, including those charged on the purchase of low valued properties and on various documents, were proposed by the Financial Secretary, the Hon. C.P. Haddon-Cave, in his Budget speech today.

To encourage home ownership, properties between $75,000 and $150,000 would be liable to only one per cent of the two per cent standard Stamp Duty rate with effect from April 1•

This would bring about 8? per cent of all current sales of low value properties into the ambit of the concession, and cost the Government $22.5 million in revenue.

Citing an example, the Financial Secretary said that a buyer of a flat selling today for $70,000 would pay only the nominal duty of $20 instead of $1,*O0, while a person buying a flat for $1*10,000 would pay $1,400 instead of $2,800.

He recalled that in 19&7'the standard rate of two per cent was waived for properties of $20,000, and halved for properties of $20,000 or over but under $*0,000.

With higher property prices this concession has become largely inoperative and yet, by and large, the purchasers of these properties are in the same lower income range as before, albeit with higher incomes,” he said.

He added that whereas 76 per cent of properties on the market in 1967 were priced at $*0,000 or less only 2.3 per cent were priced at this amount last year.

/The Financial •••••

Wednesday, February 28, 1973

- 7

The Financial Secretary also proposed to abolish the imposition of stamp duties on a miscellany of documents which were "irksome” to both the public and the Stamp Office.

Elsewhere, he said, stamp duty was no longer levied on many of these documents and their removal from the Schedule to the Stamp Ordinance would constitute a loss of about $4 million annually in Government revenue.

The documents concerned are: Bill of Lading, Shippers Books (Chinese), Charter Party, Policies of Insurance, Affidavit, Agreement or any Memorandum of Agreement, Agreement or Contract for Hire Purchase, Attested Copy, Godown Warrant, Letter of Hypothecation, Notarial Act and Note of Protest.

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/*.........

Wednesday, February 23, 1973

- 8 -

HIGHER COSTS FOR OBTAINING DRIVING LICENCES

Measures To Reduce Applications To Manageable Numbers

*******

The Financial Secretary, the Hon. C.P. Haddon-Cave, today announced proposals to increase the fees for obtaining a provisional driving licence in an attempt to reduce the large number of applications.

Speaking at the Budget session, he also proposed that the fee for a driving licence should be raised from 210 to ”a more realistic figure of 350* ”

He pointed out that there were now 417,000 holders of driving licences with a waiting list of 75^000 applicants, and more coming forward at a rate of 6,000 a month.

The Transport Department had tried to solve the backlog problem by accelerating the testing programme. However, the efforts only succeeded in making matters worse.

nSo we must resort to fiscal measures and I propose that the fee for the application form should be raised from 320 to 3150, and for a provisional licence from 34-0 to 3100. These increases should reduce applications to manageable numbers*”

Many applicants would, no doubt, hope to purchase, in due course, a vehicle and the first step in this process was to obtain a driving licence.

The proposed increase of the annual fee for a driving licence from 310 to 350 should assist in deterring them from the first step which would eventual1y lead to increased road congestion.

/”An increase

Wednesday, February 28, 1973

- 9 -

"An increase in the annual fee may also help to persuade some existing drivers not to renew their licences. There are, after all, more than twice as many drivers as there are vehicles.

"So the total cost of becoming a licensed driver will be 2J00 as opposed to 870 at present.

,fThe revenue will benefit by about S38 million from these several increases in 1973-74 after allowing for the hoped for deterrent effect."

. w - - 0--------

/10.........

Wednesday, February 28, 1973

- 10 -

HONG KONG’S OVERSEAS RESERVES Financial Position Weakened By External Factors . ********♦ ♦

The Financial Secretary, the Hon. C.P. Haddon-Cave, today estimated that Hong Kong’s fiscal reserves at the end of this, financial year would amount to 32,831 million, a drop of 3998 million on the position at March 31, 1972. '

Presenting his Budget to the Legislative Council, he noted that 3500 nii.ll ion for the Mass Transit Fund was to be charged against this year’s revenue.

The estimate of Hong Kong’s fiscal reserves, Mr. Haddon-Cave said, represented 64 per cent of estimated expenditure in 1973/74 or 61 per cent of the unspent balance of approved Public Works Non-Recurrent projects.

”1 do not regard these much reduced percentages with composure,” he added.

The Financial Secretary said that ’’external factors beyond our control” weakened Hong Kong’s financial position during 1972.

Hong Kong’s fiscal reserves at April 1, 1972 amounted to 33,829 million, of which about 31,100 million was held with bankers in Hong Kong and the balance was held abroad, mainly in sterling investments and formed part of Hong Kong’s overseas reserves.

The Financial Secretary said that ’’the gilt edged market weakened in the middle of 1972 and prices have not yet recovered to the relatively high levels ruling at the end of March.”

/This general

Wednesday, February 28, 1973

- 11 -

This general hardening of interest rates in London, he said, meant that there would be, if the market did not improve before then, a book loss of about $190 million compared with a gain of 372 million last year.

Mr. Haddon-Cave said that ”a much more serious factor” was the floating of sterling.

The resultant changes in the foreign exchange value of the Hong Kong dollar had caused an additional reduction of 3295 million in the book value of Hong Kong’s investments.

Moreover, the free surplus of 3913 million in the Exchange Fund, which was taken into account in estimating Hong Kong’s total fiscal reserve position at March J1, 1972, had been ”wiped out,” the Financial Secretary said.

This was because of the weakness of the gilt edged market and the obligation to make compensation payments to the banks under the Exchange Fund Guarantee Scheme’ for the losses in Hong Kong dnl 1 ar terms they incurred on their sterling investments.

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/12..........

• <

Wednesday, February 28, 1973

• ‘ - 12 -

SPECIAL FUND FOR MASS TRANSIT RAILWAY

* * * * 4> ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ *

Most of this year’s surplus is to be used for setting up a special Mass Transit Fund*

In his Budget speech today the Financial Secretary, the Hon. C.P. Haddon-Cave, said he would ask the Finance Committee next month to appropriate 3500 million of the 1972/73 surplus under a new special expenditure subhead relating to the mass transit underground railway project.

If approved, this sum would be credited to a special fund established by resolution of the Legislative Council and be used for capital investment in the Mass Transit Railway Corporation, Mr..Haddon-Cave said.

He said that although the capitalisation of the Corporation would have a high loan gearing, it was intended that the capital element should consist of about 31,500 million in the form of cash.

Of this amount, he added, perhaps two-thirds would be subscribed by the Government during the years of construction of the first four stages of the mass transit scheme and the other one—third by the private sector later on.

”The Government’s total equity position would also include expenditure incurred on the scheme to date and the value of Crown land assigned to the Corporation,” he said.

Mr. Haddon-Cave explained that until the fund was exhausted and .7^ disappeared from the Colony’s Statement of Assets and Liabilities, ’’interest on on the matching balances would accrue to General Revenue as would any cash dividends from the equity investment in the Mass Transit Railway Corporation”.

The proposal, if approved by the Finance Committee, would have the effect of reducing the revised estimated surplus of 3722 million to 3222 rrillion, or more realistically, to 3400 million based on the prediction that the surplus might reach 3900 million.

------0---------- /15......................

Wednesday, February 28, 1973

- 13 -

EXPANSION OF EDUCATION

********

Four more technical institutes are to be built in Hong Kong and the capacity of the Polytechnic will be expanded to meet the approved targets.

This was stated by the Financial Secretary, the Hon. C.P. Haddon-Cave, when outlining future spending on education during his Budget speech.

A further revision for the targets for secondary education, he added, was also being considered.

Expenditure involved in a revised programme of secondary education had not yet been determined, ne said, but he tentatively estimated that to achieve places for all in the 12-14 age group and for 40 per cent in the 15-16 age group would involve additional spending of 3500 million.

When fully realised, he added, a further 3130 million at present day prices would have to be added to the annually recurrent bill for education.

He noted that in 1962/63 spending on education represented 14 per cent of total expenditure. By 1972/73, the proportion had increased to 19 per cent and was estimated to remain at that level for 1973/74.

"The factors contributing to this startling change are universal and free primary education, and the establishment of a second university and of the Polytechnic," he explained.

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Wednesday, February 28, 1973

- 14 -

3900 MILLION SURPLUS PREDICTED

Largest Ever Experienced

********

The budgetted surplus of 347 million for the 1972/73 financial year has turned into a 3722 million surplus, and the final figure is likely to be even higher.

Reporting this during his Budget speech today, the Financial Secretary, the Hon. C.P. Haddon-Cave, said; "In absolute terms this is the largest surplus ever experienced, but as a percentage of total revenue (16 per cent) it is the lowest since 1968/69.’’

He predicted that on the basis of daily receipts and payments recorded by the Treasury up to a few days ago the actual surplus was likely to be nearer to 3900 million — representing 19 per cent of total revenue, or slightly above the average of the three years ending 1971/72.

At the same time, the Financial Secretary announced that he would ask the Finance Committee next month to appropriate 3500 million of this year’s surplus to a special fund from which withdrawals would be made for capital investment in the Mass Transit Railway Corporation.

Mr. Haddon-Cave said that if this proposal was approved it would have the effect of reducing this year’s surplus to 3400 million, on the basis that the final surplus would amount to 3900 million.

/Reviewing •••••»••

Wednesday, February 28, 1973

- 15 -

I t

Reviewing revenue and expenditure in 1972/73i the Financial Secretary said that although the revenue estimate of 33^704 million took account of the several tax concessions and the increased charges for off-street parking, he had noted at the time that the expenditure estimate of 33»657 million excluded known commitments to be met in that financial year.

These commitments, he said, amounted to some 3176 million in respect of pay adjustments for the civil service and subvented organisations and the revised scheme of public assistance.

f,Thus, theoretically, I was budgetting for a deficit of 8129 million, but I did not seriously consider this to be a likely outcome,11 he adaed.

Revenue

The revised estimate of revenue for the current year at 84,588 million, he went on, represented a 30 per cent increase on actual revenue in 1971/72, the highest rate of increase since 1949/50.

He gave a number of reasons for the increase.

Taking first recurrent revenue, of which the revised estimate at 83j876 million was 3456 million higher than the original estimate, he said that most of this increase stemmed from higher revenue from stamp duty, earnings and profits taxes, and from fees, receipts and reimbursements.

Revenue from stamp duty would exceed the original estimate by at least 3330 million, due largely to the persistently large volume of transactions on the stock exchanges; that from earnings and profits taxes was expected to bring in 838 million more than originally estimated; while the revised estimate for fees, receipts and reimbursements would probably exceed the original estimate by 34? million, of which 322 million was due to greater activity in the Companies Registry.

/The Financial .........

Wednesday, February 28, 1973

- 16 -

The Financial Secretary said revenue from licences for drivers and vehicles had also been under-estimated by 510 million, interest earnings by 312 million and airport revenue by 313 million.

As regards capital revenue, the revised estimate was put at 3712 million, 8428 million higher than the original estimate.

Of this increase, 3278 million was accounted for by the very high prices realised at this year’s land sales and another 3122 million was unexpectedly received as a result of two lease-holders settling outstanding instalments on lots bought in earlier years in order to avoid interest payments.

Another Sl8 million was due to a higher than expected yield from estate duty.

Government Spending

On Government spending, the Financial Secretary said that the rate of growth of expenditure was such that, for the third consecutive year, actual expenditure was likely to exceed the original estimate.

The revised expenditure was estimated to be 3209 million more than the original estimate.

This was partly accounted for by the cost of implementing the recommendations of the 1971 Salaries Commission and of introducing revised rates for public assistance; and partly by a certain amount of unforeseen expenditure arising, for example, from the June rainstorms.

The Financial Secretary stressed that additional expenditure during the year had not been restricted on purely financial grounds.

/Supplementary ........

Wednesday, February 28, 1973

- 17 *

Supplementary provisions, approved up to February 19, amounted to 3525 million, bringing the total provision for the year to 34,182 million — an increase of 14 per cent on the original estimate.

f,The difference between this figure and the revised estimate of 33,866 million is the inevitable result of the time lag between authorising expenditure and expenditure actually taking place/1 he said*

Another offsetting factor, he added, had been the level of expenditure on Public Works Non-Recurrent which was likely to be 375 million less than the original estimate, mainly because progress on major waterworks projects had not been up to expectation.

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/18

Wednesday, February 28, 1973

- 18 -

RENT INCREASES EXPECTED TO SLOW DOWN ........

Rent increases in both domestic and industrial premises should slow * down this year as a result of a more rapid supply of new accommodation becoming available, the Financial Secretary, the Hon. C.P. Haddon-Cave, predicted in his Budget speech today.

This, he said, could be seen in the case of industrial rents where the average increase in 1972 was less than 3# per cent due to a good supply of additional floor space becoming available during the year..

While there had been no easing of rent levels last year in the case of private domestic accommodation, Mr. Haddon-Cave strongly believed that the level of rents in this sector "should at least stabilise0 in the course of this year.

The prospect for 1973» he said, was for 30,000 domestic units to be completed, as compared with 20,000 last year and 12,000 in 1971*

Conceding that rents had not been anything like as stable as other prices, Mr. Haddon-Cave said this had resulted from a shortage of accommodation in relation to demand.

In this respect, he added, Hong Kong was still suffering from the slowing down of construction activity in the late Sixties which stemmed from the events of 1965-67.

He stressed, however: "From now on, new accommodation will be coming onto the market at a more rapid rate and this should lead to a slowing down of rent increases."

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IS

Wednesday, February 28, 1973

17 PER CENT RISE IN G.D.P. PREDICTED

*******

The Financial Secretary, the Hon. Philip Haddon-Cave, today predicted that the Gross Domestic Product in 1973 would, as in last year, increase by about 17 per cent to nearly 327,000 million.

Speaking in his budget speech, he said this was based on the predictions that:

* the value of domestic exports will increase by about 10 per cent, total exports by 13 per cent and imports by 8 per cent (rather more than the 7 per cent experienced in 1972)o

* gross domestic capital formation will increase by 23 per cent to nearly 37,000 million; this will be about 25 per cent of the predicted G.D.P. or roughly similar to 1971 and 1972 and a much healthier proportion than the average of 18 per cent in the previous three years 1968-70, and

* private and Government consumption expenditure will both increase by about 11 per cent.

Referring to the prediction he made in his last year’s budget speech,

Mr. Haddonr-Cave said he was not optimistic enough when he predicted that the Gross Domestic Product would increase in 1972 by about 10 per cent (in money terms), about the same as in 1971*

The Census and Statistics Department’s provisional estimate for

G.D.P. in 1972, he added, was just short of 323,000 million, a 17 per cent increase on 1971•

Imports grew by only 7 per cent, but domestic exports grew at the same rate as in 1971 (11 per cent) and so did total exports (13 per cent) and fixed capital formation grew by 17 per cent.

/Moreover, ......•

Wednesday, February 28, 1973

_ 70 _

Moreover, the levels of activity in the finance and services sectors rose substantially.

The Financial Secretary disclosed that the Census and Statistics Department was at present doing further work on the estimates of G.D.P. for the years 1966-72.

This is aimed at establishing the ’’real rate of growth11 which has been achieved.

Among the papers laid before the Legislative Council today was one on technical study of the Gross Domestic Product for the six years 1966-71.

Also tabled was a booklet entitled Economic Background to the 1973-7^ Budget dealing mainly with the period 1966-72 in terms of the overall performance of the econony, foreign trade, investment , employment and money and prices.

Mr. Haddon-Cave referred to the booklet as ’’something of an experiment” and he welcomed suggestions for its improvement.

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••

Wednesday, February 28, 1973

- 21 -

WAYS TO CURB RISE IN MONEY SUPPLY EXAMINED

Increase In Deposit Rates Welcomed

**********

The Financial Secretary is currently examining ways to slow down the rise in the money supply to help ease "the pressure on the property and stock markets".in Hong Kong.

In his Budget speech in the Legislative Council today, the Hon. C.P. Haddon-Cave said that a slow-down might be encouraged within the framework of "Hong Kong’s normal monetary arrangements."

In this context, he welcomed the recent announcement by the Exchange Banks’ Association of an increase in deposit rates and in the rate for loans against shares.

Reviewing events in the monetary sector in the last 12 months, the Financial Secretary said that the money supply rose by much more than the Gross Domestic Product.

The factors lying behind this were complex, he said, but the most important were the floating of sterling last June and the linking of the Hong Kong dollar to the U.S. dollar.

"One of the consequences of these two related developments was that large balances which would, hitherto, have.been invested overseas were retained in Hong Kong," Mr. Haddon-Cave said.

The banks increased their lending by 50 per cent to 317,700 million and the proportion of their loans and advances to deposits increased from 63 per cent at the end of 197*1 to as much as 72 per cent at the end of 1972 on a much higher level of deposits.

...... /Specified ••••••••

Wednesday, February 28, 1973

- 22 -

Specified liquid assets as a percentage of total deposits fell from 53 per cent to 46 per cent, but this was still well above the statutory minimum of 25 per cent.

A substantial proportion of the increase in advances of 85»900 million was for trading on the stock exchanges and to finance land and real estate transactions.

”Partly as a result of this expansion of bank credit, prices of shares and property have been driven up to very high levels,” the Financial Secretary said.

Referring to ’’the somewhat frenetic activity” on the stock exchanges and in the real estate market, Mr. Haddon-Cave said this had not had ”a great deal of effect on the normal workings of the economy.”

Good Performance'

The consumer price index increased by five per cent in 1972, only 1^ per cent more than in 1971» the same as the increase in 1969 and one per cent less than in 1970.

Mr. Haddon-Cave described this as a ’’good performance” as consumer prices were heavily influenced by imports, especially food imports — and considering that it took place over a period that saw the Smithsonian settlement of exchange rates and the floating of sterling.

He added a word of caution.

While he could see no evidence that the manufacturing or any other sector of the economy was being hindered by a shortage of credit facilities, he would not wish to sound ’’complacent about the implications of some aspects of present trends for the longer term growth prospects of the economy.”

/On the

Wednesday, February 28, 1972

- 23 -

On the question of Hong Kong’s foreign exchange position and reserves, the Financial Secretary said that Hong Kong ”must maintain large , international reserves as a cushion against possible trouble and, so far as is possible, we should spread our risks.”

The past 15 months or so had shown that ’’the only practicable alternative home for the greater part of Hong Kong’s overseas reserves, the U.S. dollar, is as vulnerable to currency uncertainties as is sterling.”

The Financial Secretary said that the high interest rates on the investment of Hong Kong*s reserves ”are only paid because of the greater risks of inflation and of changes in exchange rates than was the case in the past.”

”So,” he added, ”to that extent, our reserves were artificially inflated before the floating of sterling by the high interest rates that they had earned over the four and a half years since the devaluation of sterling in November 1967-”

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/24.........

Wednesday, February 28, 1973

- 24 -

REVENUE ESTIMATES FOR 1973/74

Lower Land Sales Anticipated

********

The Financial Secretary, the Hon. C.P. Haddon-Cave, today forecast total revenue in the coming financial year starting April 1 would amount to 84,722 million, an increase of three per cent over the revised estimate for 197V73.

He stressed that he was not under-estimating revenue and explained that the apparently small growth was due to the vagaries of yield from items of capital revenue.

He estimated capital revenue for the new fiscal year at 2447 million which, although 57 per cent higher than the original’ estimate for 1972/73, was 37 per cent less than the likely result for the current year.

The reduction, he explained, was due firstly to the unexpected revenue boost in 1972/73 of 8122 million in respect of settlement of outstanding instalments of land premia.

"Secondly, because of clearance difficulties and the priority which must be given to the Mass Transit Railway and the Housing Authority, uncertainty surrounds the amount of land likely to be available for sale during 1973/74,” he added.

Present indications, he went on, were that, in the urban area, about 175,000 square feet of non-industrial land and 80,000 square feet of industrial land would be offered for sale during the first half of the year.

/This compared .......

*

Wednesday, February 28, 1975

- 25 -

This compared with 253»000 square feet of non-industrial land and 114,000 square feet of industrial land sold this year.

In the New Territories, about 485,000 square feet of non-industrial land and 315 $000 square feet of industrial land would be put up for sale during the first half of the year, compared with 123,000 square feet of non-industrial land and 90,000 square feet of industrial land sold this year.

,rHowever, the outlook is not all that bleak,” the Financial Secretary said.

He said that over the next two years the land to be made available in the lay-out areas in the New Territories by exchanges would be about two to three acres for non-industrial use and 20 acres for industrial use.

The land sale programme in the new towns at Shatin and Castle Peak, he said, would depend on three factors:

* On the progress of the respective road link; with Kowloon via the second Lion Rock Tunnel and the improved Castle Peak Road, both of which are in the Public Works Programme,

* On the vast programme of public housing, which must provide for the work force for industries moving to new towns, and

On the practicability of forming land and providing the necessary services.

The Financial Secretary said that ultimately a total of 290 acres of land for private residential and commercial development ,170 acres for industrial use would be available at Shatin, and 170 acres and 200 acres respectively in r . the Castle Peak area.

/As from

Wednesday, February 28, 1973

- 26 -

As from 1975, about 40 acres would be available for sale or exchanges on Tsing Yi. Of this, 10 acres would be for residential and commercial development and JO acres for industrial use*

"In due course, more land will also be available for sale in Pokfulam and Aberdeen," he added.

But the timing of sales, he said, must depend on the new link between the widened Pokfulam Road and Connaught Road West, and on the Aberdeen lunnel. Both projects are currently in the investigation stage.

Recurrent Revenue

Tnrrn ng to recurrent revenue, the Financial Secretary estimated a yield of 34,275 mill inn, 10 per cent more than the likely out-turn for the current year. The increase might have been 15 per cent if the Urban Council was not being financed independently through the new Urban Rate and if rents from resettlement and low-cost housing were not now being credited to the Housing Authority.

As regards earnings and profits taxes, the Financial Secretary forecast an increase of 3215 million on the revised estimate for 1972/75. This represented an increase of 20 per cent which was in line with the estimate of 17 per cent for the growth of the Gross Domestic Product in 1972.

Two other substantial increases in relative terms were in respect of revenue from the airport and from water charges.

Mr. Haddon-Cave said that although the increase for the coming financial year was not particularly dramatic, "income from interest on investment at s/248 mi 111on will continue to be significant at six per cent of recurrent revenue."

/Referring

Wednesday, February 28, 1973

- 27 -

deferring to stamp duty, the Financial Secretary stressed that he had not assumed that the yield from stamp duty on contract notes would continue at the exceptionally high levels of recent months.

He noted that the monthly turn-over in stamp duty more than doubled from J4f5OO million in the six months ending September 1972 to $10,000 million in the five months ending February this year.

"Perhaps I should have assumed continuing buoyancy at this level," he said, "but I haven’t."

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/28..........

Wednesday, February 28, 1973

- 28 -

SOCIAL WELFARE SUBVENTIONS * •' < Methods Of Administration Under Review ********

The growing importance 1$^ subventions, coupled with comments of the Director of Audit, has caused the Government to review the methods of administering them.

The Financial Secretary, the Hon. C.P. Haddon-Cave said this in his Budget speech at the Legislative Council this afternoon.

An inter-departmental working party, he said, has examined medical subventions and the Director of Medical and Health has introduced administrative improvements in consequence.

nSo as to improve the level of assistance, we have also changed the way in which hospitals subvented on a cost-per-bed basis are assisted as explained in the Memorandum Note on Head 76 Subventions: Medical.11

In the coming year, he said the working party will be looking at social welfare subventions and, if time permits, education subventions in the context of the unified code of aid as introduced for the coming academic year.

Mr. Haddon-Cave said he had also been concerned at the amount of work involved in processing social welfare subventions by the Social Welfare Department, by the Social Welfare Advisory Committee and by the Finance Branch of the Secretariat.

,fI have put forward proposals for changing present procedures to my Honourable friend, the Director of Social Welfare.

/"These

Wednesday, February 28, 1973

- 29 -

f,These proposal a should reduce the amount of work involved and I hope to be able to put them to Finance Committee during the year with a view to introducing them in time for the Draft Estimates for 1974-75

Mr. Haddon-Cave went on to say that the total provision of 3737 million required for subventions in the new fiscal year represents an increase of <.88 million, or 14 per cent, over the revised estimate for'the current year.

’•Nearly a quarter of annually recurrent expenditure goes to assist non-Govemment bodies to provide services of various kinds including universities, schools, hospitals and other social services, and economic Services including the Productivity Centre, the Trade Development Council and the Tourist Association,M . • he said. *

•-----0---------

• •

/50.........

* «

Wednesday, February 28, 1973

- 30 -

SPENDING CW MEDICAL SERVICES

*******

Expenditure on medical and health services is forecast to be about

10 per cent of total expenditure in 1973-74•

The Financial Secretary, the Hon. C.P. Haddon-Cave, made this

estimate based on the fact that ”we are now close to achieving our target • •

of 4.25 beds for every 1,000 persons-!’

This forecast allows for the "revised policy on hospital subventions”

and for the ’’consequentially higher level of. expenditure on such subventions.”

* ’*■ c •

Mr. Haddon-Cave said: ”To make maximum use of subsidised beds under

the new arrangements, it will be necessary to raise fees in Government hospitals

nearer to those to be charged in subvented_ hospitals.”

The Director of Medical and Health Services, he added, would be

putting forward his proposals to this end during the year.

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/31

Wednesday, February 28, 1973

- 31 -

GOVERNMENT SPENDS MORE ON SOCIAL WELFARE

Government spending on the new disability and infirmity allowances will amount to 312 million in the new fiscal year, the Financial Secretary, the Hon. C.P. Haddon-Cave, said today.

Speaking on the Budget, he said that expenditure on social welfare in 1973/74 was up slightly, amounting to 2.4 per cent of total expenditure•

In 1962/63, the percentage was 1.J. This went up to 2.3 per cent in 1972/73 due to the general increase in the Government’s activity in the field of social welfare, including the introduction of public assistance and legal aid, and increased subventions to voluntary organisations•

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/52

Wednesday, February 28, 1973

- 32 -

POLICE FORCE TO BE STRENGTHENED

**********

Expenditure on law and order is estimated to account for 8.6 per cent of total expenditure in 1973-74•

This was disclosed today by the Financial Secretary, the Hon.

Philip Haddon-Cave, in his budget speech in the Legislative Council.

Expenditure on the regular Police Force, he said, would be ’•appreciably higher” when the present vacancies were filled.

He added that ”a further $20 million will be required in 1973-74 for the recently approved additional duty allowances, provision for which has not been included in the Draft Estimates.”

The Financial Secretary said $13 million would also be required for a radio network for patrol officers and certain operational units to increase the effectiveness of the present strength of the Force.

If the Force were fully up to strength, and with the additional expenditure, he added,spending on law and order would amount to about 10 per cent of total expenditure in 1973-74.

-------0---------

/33..........

Wednesday, February 28, 1973

- 33 -

SUBSTANTIAL YEARLY INCREASES IN EXPENDITURE

Trend To Be Maintained

********

The Government intends to maintain the trend of substantial annual increases in total estimated expenditure since 1969-70, the Financial Secretary, the Hon. C.P. Haddon-Cave, said today.

In his budget speech in the Legislative Council today, he said: ”We can still afford to do so without modifying our fiscal policies with all the risks that that would entail for the maintenance of a high growth rate of the economy.”

Mr. Haddon-Cave said the total estimated expenditure of $4,409 million for the new financial year amounted to an increase of 21 per cent over the original estimate for 1972-73 or 14 per cent over the revised estimate.

Referring to the recurrent account, the Financial Secretary said that recurrent expenditure provided for in 1973-74 was 71 per cent of estimated revenue.

He was ”hopeful that we are hitting our aim of keeping 30 per cent of recurrent revenue available for capital expenditure.”

Two elements had been removed from the Draft Estimates for 1973-74, Mr. Haddon-Cave said.

The first was the provision for expenditure on Annually Recurrent Other Charges for the Urban Services Department other than for its New Territories Division.

/He estimated .......

Wednesday, February 28, 1973

- 34 -

He estimated that fThad the Urban Council not been financing its own expenditure in 1973-74 from the new Urban Rate, an additional $17 million would have to be added in.”

The second element was $22 million in recurrent expenditure on resettlement and low cost housing, now to be financed largely from the Development Loan Fund as a result of broadening the scope of the Housing Authority.

The Financial Secretary said the staff for the Urban Services Department and the new Housing Department, as executive arms of the Urban Council and the Housing Authority, would be on the establishment of the.public service and paid fiom General revenue.

Capital Account

"Provisions for their salaries is thus included in the Estimates, against reimbursements,” he added.

Mr. Haddon-Cave said that the two main elements in the increase in recurrent expenditure for 1973-74, were civil service emoluments and recurrent subventions, including grants to the universities and the Polytechnic.

Turning to the capital account, the Financial Secretary said that at $1,369 million, the estimated capital expenditure for 1973-74 was $244 million higher than the revised estimate for 1972-73.

This, he said, "is getting close to the guideline figure I have in mind for annual capital expenditure in the mid - and late 70s.

At April 1, this year, Mr. Haddon-Cave said, the outstanding balance on approved expenditure for Public Works Non-Becurrent was likely to be $4,615 million.

/Of this

1

Wednesday, February 28, 1973

- 35 -

Of this commitment, 31,050 million was required for expenditure during the year.

The largest increase in absolute terms was in waterworks items as a result of delayed payments on the High Island Water Scheme and expenditure on the single-purpose desalter.

In relative terms, the greatest increase was in Public Works Non*Recurrentt Headquarters,

This was largely due to greater expenditure on compensation for surrenders and resumptions of land in connection with the Mass Transit Railway and the urban renewal and improvement schemes.

The Financial Secretary said the outstanding balance on other capital expenditure at April 1, 1973 was likely to be 3668 million.

-------0---------

Wednesday, February 28, 1973

- 36 -

GOVERNMENT TEN-YEAR HOUSING PLAN Expected To Cost Over $8,000 Million **********

The Financial Secretary, the Hon. C.P. Haddon-Cave, said today that expenditure on public housing in 1973-7^ was estimated to increase to 6.7 per cent of the total.

This compares with 5-8 per cent in 1972-73, which on the face of it appears to be assuming a less important place in expenditure when compared with 11.5 per cent in 1962-6?.

In his budget speech, Mr. Haddon-Cave explained that ’’this is because the Hnufn ng Authority had used income from rents from its estates to finance capital works without such expenditure passing through the Colony accounts.”

’’And if we add back the expenditure of the Housing Authority on capital works financed from its own sources, total capital expenditure on housing was $139 million in 1962-6?, is likely to be $2?8 million in 1972-73 and is estimated to be $350 million in 1973-7^,” he said.

The Financial Secretary referred to the Governor’s speech at the opening of the current session of the Legislative Council.

Sir Murray said then that the total requirement for public housing, in addition to the contribution of the private sector, would involve housing a further 1.8 million people over the next 10 years.

’’This requirement,” Mr. Haddon-Cave said, "has now been approved as a basis for planning and development."

He estimated that the capital cost of housing this number of people at $8,500 million at today’s prices.

-------0---------

/57.........

. ...... •. * i

Wednesday, February 28, 1973 - 37 -

RECURRENT REVENUE FORECAST TO RISE AT FAST RATE m******

The Financial Secretary, the Hon. C.P. Haddon-Cave, predicted today that the recurrent revenue for the next few years would increase at a ’’sufficient fast rate” of 12 to 15 per cent, to finance total expenditure, including the deficit on capital account.

Presenting his Budget to the Legislative Council, he said: ”But I could easily ba wrong, so let us maintain a strong fiscal reserve position.”

Speaking on the revenue trends, he said that last year Hong ।

Kong was dependent on direct taxation.

’’This trend has inevitably been upset this year by the substantial increase in the yield from indirect taxation through stamp duties.”

But stamp duty apart, among the various other sources of indirect taxation, income from rates becomes less significant with the removal of the yield from the Urban Hate.

”And the proportion of the yield from excise duties to the whole continues to fall as a result of relieving from duty last year variour hydrocarbon oils with a bearing on industrial costs and on the cost of living.

”1 am less satisfied with trends is respect of revenue other than from taxation. The relative significance of revenue from licences and other fees is decl-i n~i ng,

”Much greater attention will have to be paid during the next fi nanc-i al year to bringing them into line with present day costs.”

In the longer term, Mr. Haddon-Cave said he would like to see the balance between direct and indirect taxation, on the one hand, and all other recurrent revenue, on the other, around 65 • 35.

Wednesday, February 28, 1973

- 38 ..

PROPOSED REFORMS IN SALARIES TAX

Personal Allowance To Go Up To $10,000

Abolition Of Special Allowances For Working Wives * ♦ * * « ♦ *

The budget proposals on salary tax, including an increase in the personal allowance from $7,000 to $10,000, would result in a net cost to the revenue of $1J«5 million.

Speaking in the Legislative Council, the Financial Secretary, the Hon. C.P. Haddon-Cave, said the proposals were "designed to afford relief on grounds of equity to some members of the salaries tax paying and personal assessment class and to simplify tax administration."

He said the relief accorded by the reduction in revenue would vary as between taxpayers in different income groups and in different family circumstances

The Commissioner of Inland Revenue, he said, would publish shortly a series of illustrative tables.

Referring to the raising of the personal allowance, the Financial Secretary said this "would be more effective in that it would relieve the burden of many more married taxpayers. "

Moreover, it "would result in a saving of administrative time and effort."

Turning to the proposal to adjust the point at which the standard rate of 15 per cent on gross income applied to a gross income of $70,000 with tax of $10,500, Mr. Haddon-Cave said that simplicity suggested five platforms.

/These .........

Wednesday, February 28, 197 J

- 39 -

These would be of 3*10,000 each with tax intervals of five per cent rising to 25 per cent on the fifth platform and JO per cent on net chargeable income above 350,000.

This proposal, Mr. Haddon-Cave said, satisfied the criterion that ’’with a low standard rate of tax there is no case for a slow rate of progress up to the standard rate.”

The number of platforms before the JO per cent rate applies is reduced from 11 to 5 and the below standard rate platforms from five to two.

”So a measure of reform would be achieved, without departing too much from the present curve of incidence," he added.

Working Wife Allowance

Turning to the working wife allowance, the Financial Secretary said that "the wife who cannot work should have the same benefits as the wife who can."

He proposed that the basic allowance for a wife in al 1 cases be increased to 310,000 and that the special extra allowance for a working wife be cancelled.

One small effect of the new proposals, the Financial Secretary said, was that the widow or widower with dependent children at the levels of income where the lower income relief presently applied would be slightly worse off at certain levels of income.

To avoid this, he proposed that the allowance for the first child be increased from 32,000 to 3J,000.

/The Financial .•••••••

Wednesday, February 28, 1973

- 40 -

The Financial Secretary estimated the cost to the 197^-7^- revenue • • •*. • of the new allowances, the new platforms of net chargeable income and schedular rates and the consequential extension of the period of effectiveness of allowances to be 821 million.

There was therefore, he said, "ample margin of extra relief" to cover the withdrawal of the dependent parent’s relief and deductions for life insurance and similar payments.

As regards the dependent parent’s relief, he said experience showed that the risk of abuse and the cost of administering this allowance did not justify its continuance.

Estimated savings in a full year would be about 32.5 million.

Life Insurance

On deductions for life insurance and similar expenditure, Fir. Haddon-Cave saw "no reason why this particular form of thrift or personal expenditure should attract relief, particularly with the increased al 1,owances now proposed."

Savings in a full year would be about 8J million.

Arguing the case for abolishing the present four selective allowances, the Financial Secretary said that if these further proposals for new allowances and new schedular rates were accepted, most taxpayers would eventually have received "two successive reductions of tax."

He described as "quite justified" the loss of unwarranted selective allowances in a situation where there was no real case for an overall reduction of taxation.

/Finally, ........•

Wednesday, February 28, 1973

- 41 -

Finally, the Financial Secretary referred to a suggestion made by the Hon. Oswald Cheung that parents of adult children who were not employable because of a handicap should be granted a form of tax relief.

nTo be consistent with all I have said about selective allowances in a low tax structure, this suggestion can only be considered in the context of child reliefhe said.

Accordingly, he proposed relief for parents of incapacitated children maintained by them irrespective of age.

-------0---------

/4?.........

Wednesday, February 28, 1973

- 42 -

DUTY ON CONTRACT NOTES TO BE DOUBLED

New Rate Effective From Tomorrow

****«»*«*

i The present rate of ad valorem duty on contract notes in respect of share\ transactions will be increased by 100 per cent as from tomorrow (Thursday)•

An order to this effect was signei by the Governor this morning under the Public Revenue protection Ordinance,the Financial Secretary, the Hon. C.P. Haddon-Cave, told the Legislative Council when presenting his Budget proposals today.

Mr. Haddon-Cave considered that the move would help to somewhat restore the balance of the system between direct and indirect taxes.

He also advanced two other arguments for the increase.

’Tirst,” he said, ’’there are a number of active investors buying and selling in the various exchanges who are on the borderline between dealing for profit and investing funds earned or acquired from other sources.”

Mr. Haddon-Cave felt that ’la higher rate of stamp duty on notes covering their transactions represents a fair way of creaming off something extra from them for the revenue.”

In addition, he said, the Commissioner of Inland Revenue was being given staff to make enquiries into the activities of habitual dealers.

These enquiries would aim at establishing that the dealers ’’are carrying on business or adventures in the nature of trade, thereby banging their rewards into charge for profits tax.”

/Secondly, .......

Wednesday, February 28, 1973

- 4j -

Stecondly, the Financial Secretary said, he did not consider that, in the present circumstances, it was either necessary or prudent to budget for other than a substantial surplus.

Mr. Haddon-Cave estimated that the extra yield from a doubling of the rate of stamp duty levied on contract notes would be 8J00 million.

This, he said, would more than offset the cost of the tax reforms and reliefs he had proposed.

He did not believe, however, that the new rate would have more than ”a slight effect” on the market.

But he sounded a note of warning that the Government was ready to take further steps if necessary to cope with any untonard situation in the market.

He added: ’’The Government will be prepared to seek emergency powers to raise the rate of duty on contract notes immediately to cope with any further situation that looked dangerous, if the Securities Advisory Council recommended this as part of a package of short-term cooling measures.”

-------0---------

Release time: 10.00 p.m

PRH

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Wednesday, February 28, 1973

(Part II)

Contents

Page No.

A 3300 million surplus is forecast for new financial year •••••••••• 1

Big increases in spending in social services are shown in draft estimates .....................................................  .... 3

Hore money is to be used in all services over the next four fiscal years..................................................................  6

Expert points to need for wider appreciation of child development.•• 8

A seminar on social services will be held this week in Ngau Tau Kok.................................................................... 10

Three bills become law................................................  11

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Wednesday, February 28, 1973

1

SURPLUS C'F OVER 3300 MILLION FORECAST FOR 1975/74

Biggest Share Of Revenue From Direct Taxes

*********

A surplus of more than 3300 million is forecast in the draft Estimates of Revenue and Expenditure for the 1973-74 financial year.

The total revenue for the coming financial year is estimated at 34,722 million, an increase of 31,018 million over the original estimate for the current year.

The estimated revenue as compared with the estimated expenditure of 34,409 million, indicates a surplus of 3313 million for 1973-74.

The largest share of the Government’s revenue in 1973-74 will come from direct taxation on earnings and profits which is expected to raise 31,265 million or about 27 per cent of the total.

This represents an increase of 3253 million on the original estimate of 31,012 million for 1972-73-

Other major items in the Revenue Estimates are listed below with the original estimates for 1972-73 given in brackets.

* Duties on hydrocarbon oils, liquor, tobacco

and table waters • • • 3490 million (3457 million)

* Stamp Duties • • • 3460 million (3190 million)

* Rates ... 3336 million (3384 million)

* Land Sales • • • 3323 million (3225 million)

* Water Revenue • • • 3187 million (3167 million)

* Post Office Revenue ... 3174 million (3168 million)

* Airport ... 3160 million (3116 million)

/Interest

Wednesday, February 28, 1973

- 2 -

Interest on Hong Kong’s investments — the surpluses of previous years - is expected to bring in 8248 million, an increase of more than 826 million over the original estimate for the current year.

The balance making up the 1973-74 estimated total revenue comes from many different sources, including: Licences and Franchises at 8220 million; Fees of Court or Office, which covers mainly payments for services provided by Government departments, at 8524 million; Motor Vehicles Taxes at 855 million; the Kowloon-Canton Railway at 824 million; and contributions towards particular projects (such as schools, clinics, playgrounds and swimming pools) at 810 million.

Analysis of the figures in the draft Estimates of Revenue and Expenditure shows that revenue sources are listed under three main groups* (Note: see Appendix IV of draft Estimates page 848).

They are:

* Direct Taxes ... 81,290 million or 27 per cent

of total revenue

* Indirect Taxes ... 81,594 million or 54 per cent of total revenue

* Other Revenue, including • • • Reimbursements, Contributions and Loan Repayments ... 81,838 million or 39 per cent of total revenue. • • •

------- 0 -------

/3..........

Wednesday, February 28, 1973

- 3 -

INCREASED SPENDING ON SOCIAL SERVICES'

Total Expenditure In 1973-74 Estimated At 34,409 Million

****tM*4

Big increases in spending on education, housing and other social services for the people of Hong Kong are shown in the 1973-74 draft Estimates of Revenue and Expenditure tabled in the Legislative Council today.

Compared with the 1972-73 financial year, expenditure on the Social Services group shows an increase of over 24 per cent.

At 81,651 million, it accounts for the biggest portion (38 per cent) of the total expenditure and includes:

* Education at 8817 million (368j million)

* Medical and Health at 3442 million (8375 million)

* Housing at 8278 million (3192 million)

* Social Welfare at 3102 million (S67 million)

Labour - at 312 million (811 million)

(Note: The figure given in brackets represents the original estimated expenduture for 1972-73)*

The total spending for the next financial year amounts to a record 34,409 million. This represents an increase of about 20 per cent as compared with the current year and is more than three times the actual expenditure ten years ago.

This money will also be spent on four main groups of services other than Social Services.

Compared with 1972-73> a 22 per cent increase is shown in the spending on Community Services, the second largest amount after Social Services.

/This ......

Wednesday, February 28, 1973

This group, at 31,206 million or 27 per cent of total expenditure, includes:

* Water supply at 34^0 million (34^9 million)

* Transport, roads and civil engineering at 3486 million (3304 million)

* Amenities and related services at 3208 million (3195 million)

* Fire Services at 362 million <350 million)

Spending on General Services, the third largest group, accounts for 3706 million or 16 per cent of the total expenditure. This group includes:

* S385 million for law and order (3345 million)

* 3126 million for defence (3133 million)

* 398 million for administration (378 million)

* 372 million for revenue collection and financial control (359 million)

325 million for public relations (321 million)

Economic Services, at 34 J1 million, accounts for 10 per cent of the total expenditure. This group includes:

* 3182 million for communications (3144 million)

* 3112 million for airport and harbour services (3107 million)

* 395 million for other economic services (S83 million)

* 327 million for primary products (326 million)

315 million for commerce and industry (314 million)

/Common ••••••••

Wednesday, February 28, 1975

- 5 -

Common Supporting Services amounts to 3220 million, which is

5 per cent of the total expenditure. This includes:

* 3153 million for the Architectural and Electrical and Mechanical Engineering Offices of the Public Works Department (3139 million)

* 331 million for Government launches and the Government Dockyard (332 million)

* 321 million for Government printing (317 million)

* 315 million for Government supplies (314 million)

Other expenditure which cannot be allocated to any of these groups

amounts to 3196 million or 4 per cent of the total expenditure and includes:

Pensions and gratuities at 3100 million (382 million)

* Government quarters at 358 million (324 million)

* Passages, telephones, telegrams, etc., at 334 million (322 million)

* Public debt repayments at 34 million (32 million)

Wednesday, February 28, 1973

- 6 -

MORE MONEY FOR ALL SERVICES OVER NEXT FOUR YEARS Spending For 1973-74 Shows Three-Fold Rise Over Past 10 Years titM*****

More public funds are to be channelled into community, social, economic, general and supporting services over the next four fiscal years, accourding to future Budget forecasts contained in the 1973-74 draft Estimates.

In the coming financial year, total estimated spending will pass the 34,000 million mark for the first time and it is envisaged that the 35,000 million mark will be exceeded a year later.

The estimated expenditure for 1973-74 is 34,409 million. This represents an increase of about 300 per cent over the past ten years.

For 1974-75, a 35,080 million expenditure bill is forecast - up 3671 million over the 1973-74 estimate. The forecast for 1975-76 is 35,459 million and that for 1976-77 is put at 35,551 million - 31,142 million more than the estimate for the coming financial year.

The forecast is based on Government departments* forecast of expenditure adjusted, where necessary, in the light of other factors affecting the probable rate of development and the financial resources which are likely to become available.

The forecast is divided into recurrent expenditure and capital expenditure as follows:

Recurrent Expenditure

1973-A o.»oQoo»oo«..eo....<?.ooo'>.9.«o.oc. 33,039 million

197^75 •••co»oa«o«e.oo.o<>«6So..33,447 million 1975-76   .............................. 33,749 million

^976—77 34• 072 million

/Capital •••••

Wednesday, February 28, 1973

- 7 -

Capital Expenditure 1975-74...................................  31,369 million

1974-75 ••••••••.......................... 81,632 million

1975-76 •••••••••......................... 31,710 million

1976-77 .................................. 31,479 million

Capital expenditure in the three years of the forecast is likely to be substantially higher as more items are added to the Public Works Programme.

Total annual expenditure for the 15 years from 1962-63 to 1976-77 is as follows:-

1962-63 .................................. 31,113 million

196>-64 .................................. 31,295 million

1964-65..................• ••••...........-31,441 million

1965-66 ................................... 31,769 million

1966-67 ................................... 31,806 million

1967-68 •••••••..........................     31,766 million

1968-69 ................................... 31,873 million

1969-70 ................................... 32,032 million

1970-71 ................................... 32,452 million

1971-72 32,901 million

1972-73 ••••••••.•.......................    33,866 million

1975-74 ................................... 34,409 million

1974-75 .................................    35,080 million

1975-76 «••••••••••....................... 35,459 million

1976-77 ..................................   35,551 million

Copies of the draft Estimates are on sale, at 360 each, at the Government Publications Centre at the Star Ferry Concourse.

--------C ---------

/8.......

Wednesday, February 28, 1975

- 8 -

NEED FOR WIDER Al-PRECIATION OF CHILD DEVELOPMENT

Views of Expert On Developmental Paediatrics

There is a basic need in Hong Kong for a much wider appreciation of child development, and the realisation that the problems of handicapped children require the attention of professional services and careful scientific analysis.

Dr. Kenneth L. Holt, Director of the Wolfson Centre and the Department of Developmental Paediatrics, Institute of Child Health, University of London, said this today before returning to Britain at the end of a four-v/eek stay.

He came here under the auspices of the British Council and at the invitation of Dr. G.H. Choa, Director of Medical and Health Services, to advise the Medical and Health Department on matters concerned with the assessment of physically and mentally handicapped children.

During his stay, he visited many institutions provided for such children, and held discussions with experts at the Social Welfare, Education, and i.edical and Health Departments.

In addition, ho saw a number of individuals working with the disabled young in the voluntary sector.

’’Everyone has been exceptionally helpful,” Dr. Holt said. "I am impressed with the progress achieved by the Government and the voluntary agencies during a decade of great expansion. But I am also impressed by the developments which seem to be still required.

/”A sympathetic •••••

Wednesday, February 28, 1975

- 9 -

”A sympathetic approach to the problem of handicapped children, by itself, is not sufficient.”

In his view, the services had reached a stage where they were beginning to require a comprehensive programme for early identification of particular handicaps so that treatment could begin early to enable the severe effects of disability to be avoided.

"I think there is a need to set up child development assessment services, and this will require the training of staff in order to achieve a high standard of work/1 he said.

-------0 ~ *

/10........

Wednesday, February 28, 1973

- 10 -

SEMINAR ON SOCIAL SERVICES IN NGAU TAU KOK

*******

Social services in the Ngau Tau Kok district will be discussed at a seminar at the Caritas Ngau Tau Kok Centre on Friday and Saturday (liarch 2 and 3).

The seminar has been jointly organised by the Ngau Tau Kok Estate Community Office of the Social Welfare Department, the Kwun Tong City District Office and the Caritas Ngau Tau Kok Centre.

The first session will take place between 2 and 5 p.m.

on Friday when there will l^e _a panel discussion on future development in the district, public assistance and emergency relief, child care, family planning, community nursing and the rehabilitation of drug addicts and mentally handicapped children.

Saturday’s session, from 900 a.m. to 12 noon, will feature a panel discussion on social work in the school, youth and community fields.

Note to Editors: You are invited to send a representative to cover this seminar.

-------0---------

/11

Wednesday, February 28, 1973

- 11 -

THREE BILLS PASSED INTO LAW

Eight Sessional Papers Tabled In Legco *******

Three bills — the Urban Council Bill 1973? the Stock Exchange Control Bill 19731 and the Public Health and Urban Services (Amendment) Bill 1973 — completed their Committee Stage and third readings and were passed into law at this afternoon’s Legislative Council meeting.

The Housing Bill 1973 was read the second time and debate on it was resumed.

Eight sessional papers were tabled in the Council. They are: Hong Kong 1973: A Review of 1972, the Annual Report of the Li Po Chun Charitable Trust Fund for the period September 1, 1971 to August J1, 1972, the Report of University and Polytechnic Grants Committee of Hong Kong July 1970 to June 1972, the Annual Summary by the Director of Education for the year 1971/72, the Annual Report by the Director of public Works for the year 1971/72, the Report of the Establishment Sub—Committee of Finance Committee for the year 1972/73, the Report of the Public Works Sub-Committee of Finance Committee (1972 Reviews leading to the 1973/7^ Programme), and the Draft Estimates of Revenue and Expenditure with Explanatory Memoranda for the year ending March J1, 197^•

--------0----------

Release Time: 10,00 p,m.

PRH

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Wednesday, February 28, 1973

(Part II)

Contents

Page No.

A 3300 million surplus is forecast for new financial year •••••••••• 1

Big increases in spending in social services are shown in draft estimates .....................................................  .... 3

Hore money is to be used in all services over the next four fiscal years..................................................................  6

Expert points to need for wider appreciation of child development.•• 8

A seminar on social services will be held this week in Ngau Tau Kok.................................................................... 10

Three bills become law................................................  11

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Wednesday, February 28, 1973

1

SURPLUS C'F OVER 3300 MILLION FORECAST FOR 1975/74

Biggest Share Of Revenue From Direct Taxes

*********

A surplus of more than 3300 million is forecast in the draft Estimates of Revenue and Expenditure for the 1973-74 financial year.

The total revenue for the coming financial year is estimated at 34,722 million, an increase of 31,018 million over the original estimate for the current year.

The estimated revenue as compared with the estimated expenditure of 34,409 million, indicates a surplus of 3313 million for 1973-74.

The largest share of the Government’s revenue in 1973-74 will come from direct taxation on earnings and profits which is expected to raise 31,265 million or about 27 per cent of the total.

This represents an increase of 3253 million on the original estimate of 31,012 million for 1972-73-

Other major items in the Revenue Estimates are listed below with the original estimates for 1972-73 given in brackets.

* Duties on hydrocarbon oils, liquor, tobacco

and table waters • • • 3490 million (3457 million)

* Stamp Duties • • • 3460 million (3190 million)

* Rates ... 3336 million (3384 million)

* Land Sales • • • 3323 million (3225 million)

* Water Revenue • • • 3187 million (3167 million)

* Post Office Revenue ... 3174 million (3168 million)

* Airport ... 3160 million (3116 million)

/Interest

Wednesday, February 28, 1973

- 2 -

Interest on Hong Kong’s investments — the surpluses of previous years - is expected to bring in 8248 million, an increase of more than 826 million over the original estimate for the current year.

The balance making up the 1973-74 estimated total revenue comes from many different sources, including: Licences and Franchises at 8220 million; Fees of Court or Office, which covers mainly payments for services provided by Government departments, at 8524 million; Motor Vehicles Taxes at 855 million; the Kowloon-Canton Railway at 824 million; and contributions towards particular projects (such as schools, clinics, playgrounds and swimming pools) at 810 million.

Analysis of the figures in the draft Estimates of Revenue and Expenditure shows that revenue sources are listed under three main groups* (Note: see Appendix IV of draft Estimates page 848).

They are:

* Direct Taxes ... 81,290 million or 27 per cent

of total revenue

* Indirect Taxes ... 81,594 million or 54 per cent of total revenue

* Other Revenue, including • • • Reimbursements, Contributions and Loan Repayments ... 81,838 million or 39 per cent of total revenue. • • •

------- 0 -------

/3..........

Wednesday, February 28, 1973

- 3 -

INCREASED SPENDING ON SOCIAL SERVICES'

Total Expenditure In 1973-74 Estimated At 34,409 Million

****tM*4

Big increases in spending on education, housing and other social services for the people of Hong Kong are shown in the 1973-74 draft Estimates of Revenue and Expenditure tabled in the Legislative Council today.

Compared with the 1972-73 financial year, expenditure on the Social Services group shows an increase of over 24 per cent.

At 81,651 million, it accounts for the biggest portion (38 per cent) of the total expenditure and includes:

* Education at 8817 million (368j million)

* Medical and Health at 3442 million (8375 million)

* Housing at 8278 million (3192 million)

* Social Welfare at 3102 million (S67 million)

Labour - at 312 million (811 million)

(Note: The figure given in brackets represents the original estimated expenduture for 1972-73)*

The total spending for the next financial year amounts to a record 34,409 million. This represents an increase of about 20 per cent as compared with the current year and is more than three times the actual expenditure ten years ago.

This money will also be spent on four main groups of services other than Social Services.

Compared with 1972-73> a 22 per cent increase is shown in the spending on Community Services, the second largest amount after Social Services.

/This ......

Wednesday, February 28, 1973

This group, at 31,206 million or 27 per cent of total expenditure, includes:

* Water supply at 34^0 million (34^9 million)

* Transport, roads and civil engineering at 3486 million (3304 million)

* Amenities and related services at 3208 million (3195 million)

* Fire Services at 362 million <350 million)

Spending on General Services, the third largest group, accounts for 3706 million or 16 per cent of the total expenditure. This group includes:

* S385 million for law and order (3345 million)

* 3126 million for defence (3133 million)

* 398 million for administration (378 million)

* 372 million for revenue collection and financial control (359 million)

325 million for public relations (321 million)

Economic Services, at 34 J1 million, accounts for 10 per cent of the total expenditure. This group includes:

* 3182 million for communications (3144 million)

* 3112 million for airport and harbour services (3107 million)

* 395 million for other economic services (S83 million)

* 327 million for primary products (326 million)

315 million for commerce and industry (314 million)

/Common ••••••••

Wednesday, February 28, 1975

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Common Supporting Services amounts to 3220 million, which is

5 per cent of the total expenditure. This includes:

* 3153 million for the Architectural and Electrical and Mechanical Engineering Offices of the Public Works Department (3139 million)

* 331 million for Government launches and the Government Dockyard (332 million)

* 321 million for Government printing (317 million)

* 315 million for Government supplies (314 million)

Other expenditure which cannot be allocated to any of these groups

amounts to 3196 million or 4 per cent of the total expenditure and includes:

Pensions and gratuities at 3100 million (382 million)

* Government quarters at 358 million (324 million)

* Passages, telephones, telegrams, etc., at 334 million (322 million)

* Public debt repayments at 34 million (32 million)

Wednesday, February 28, 1973

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MORE MONEY FOR ALL SERVICES OVER NEXT FOUR YEARS Spending For 1973-74 Shows Three-Fold Rise Over Past 10 Years titM*****

More public funds are to be channelled into community, social, economic, general and supporting services over the next four fiscal years, accourding to future Budget forecasts contained in the 1973-74 draft Estimates.

In the coming financial year, total estimated spending will pass the 34,000 million mark for the first time and it is envisaged that the 35,000 million mark will be exceeded a year later.

The estimated expenditure for 1973-74 is 34,409 million. This represents an increase of about 300 per cent over the past ten years.

For 1974-75, a 35,080 million expenditure bill is forecast - up 3671 million over the 1973-74 estimate. The forecast for 1975-76 is 35,459 million and that for 1976-77 is put at 35,551 million - 31,142 million more than the estimate for the coming financial year.

The forecast is based on Government departments* forecast of expenditure adjusted, where necessary, in the light of other factors affecting the probable rate of development and the financial resources which are likely to become available.

The forecast is divided into recurrent expenditure and capital expenditure as follows:

Recurrent Expenditure

1973-A o.»oQoo»oo«..eo....<?.ooo'>.9.«o.oc. 33,039 million

197^75 •••co»oa«o«e.oo.o<>«6So..33,447 million 1975-76   .............................. 33,749 million

^976—77 34• 072 million

/Capital •••••

Wednesday, February 28, 1973

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Capital Expenditure 1975-74...................................  31,369 million

1974-75 ••••••••.......................... 81,632 million

1975-76 •••••••••......................... 31,710 million

1976-77 .................................. 31,479 million

Capital expenditure in the three years of the forecast is likely to be substantially higher as more items are added to the Public Works Programme.

Total annual expenditure for the 15 years from 1962-63 to 1976-77 is as follows:-

1962-63 .................................. 31,113 million

196>-64 .................................. 31,295 million

1964-65..................• ••••...........-31,441 million

1965-66 ................................... 31,769 million

1966-67 ................................... 31,806 million

1967-68 •••••••..........................     31,766 million

1968-69 ................................... 31,873 million

1969-70 ................................... 32,032 million

1970-71 ................................... 32,452 million

1971-72 32,901 million

1972-73 ••••••••.•.......................    33,866 million

1975-74 ................................... 34,409 million

1974-75 .................................    35,080 million

1975-76 «••••••••••....................... 35,459 million

1976-77 ..................................   35,551 million

Copies of the draft Estimates are on sale, at 360 each, at the Government Publications Centre at the Star Ferry Concourse.

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Wednesday, February 28, 1975

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NEED FOR WIDER Al-PRECIATION OF CHILD DEVELOPMENT

Views of Expert On Developmental Paediatrics

There is a basic need in Hong Kong for a much wider appreciation of child development, and the realisation that the problems of handicapped children require the attention of professional services and careful scientific analysis.

Dr. Kenneth L. Holt, Director of the Wolfson Centre and the Department of Developmental Paediatrics, Institute of Child Health, University of London, said this today before returning to Britain at the end of a four-v/eek stay.

He came here under the auspices of the British Council and at the invitation of Dr. G.H. Choa, Director of Medical and Health Services, to advise the Medical and Health Department on matters concerned with the assessment of physically and mentally handicapped children.

During his stay, he visited many institutions provided for such children, and held discussions with experts at the Social Welfare, Education, and i.edical and Health Departments.

In addition, ho saw a number of individuals working with the disabled young in the voluntary sector.

’’Everyone has been exceptionally helpful,” Dr. Holt said. "I am impressed with the progress achieved by the Government and the voluntary agencies during a decade of great expansion. But I am also impressed by the developments which seem to be still required.

/”A sympathetic •••••

Wednesday, February 28, 1975

- 9 -

”A sympathetic approach to the problem of handicapped children, by itself, is not sufficient.”

In his view, the services had reached a stage where they were beginning to require a comprehensive programme for early identification of particular handicaps so that treatment could begin early to enable the severe effects of disability to be avoided.

"I think there is a need to set up child development assessment services, and this will require the training of staff in order to achieve a high standard of work/1 he said.

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/10........

Wednesday, February 28, 1973

- 10 -

SEMINAR ON SOCIAL SERVICES IN NGAU TAU KOK

*******

Social services in the Ngau Tau Kok district will be discussed at a seminar at the Caritas Ngau Tau Kok Centre on Friday and Saturday (liarch 2 and 3).

The seminar has been jointly organised by the Ngau Tau Kok Estate Community Office of the Social Welfare Department, the Kwun Tong City District Office and the Caritas Ngau Tau Kok Centre.

The first session will take place between 2 and 5 p.m.

on Friday when there will l^e _a panel discussion on future development in the district, public assistance and emergency relief, child care, family planning, community nursing and the rehabilitation of drug addicts and mentally handicapped children.

Saturday’s session, from 900 a.m. to 12 noon, will feature a panel discussion on social work in the school, youth and community fields.

Note to Editors: You are invited to send a representative to cover this seminar.

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/11

Wednesday, February 28, 1973

- 11 -

THREE BILLS PASSED INTO LAW

Eight Sessional Papers Tabled In Legco *******

Three bills — the Urban Council Bill 1973? the Stock Exchange Control Bill 19731 and the Public Health and Urban Services (Amendment) Bill 1973 — completed their Committee Stage and third readings and were passed into law at this afternoon’s Legislative Council meeting.

The Housing Bill 1973 was read the second time and debate on it was resumed.

Eight sessional papers were tabled in the Council. They are: Hong Kong 1973: A Review of 1972, the Annual Report of the Li Po Chun Charitable Trust Fund for the period September 1, 1971 to August J1, 1972, the Report of University and Polytechnic Grants Committee of Hong Kong July 1970 to June 1972, the Annual Summary by the Director of Education for the year 1971/72, the Annual Report by the Director of public Works for the year 1971/72, the Report of the Establishment Sub—Committee of Finance Committee for the year 1972/73, the Report of the Public Works Sub-Committee of Finance Committee (1972 Reviews leading to the 1973/7^ Programme), and the Draft Estimates of Revenue and Expenditure with Explanatory Memoranda for the year ending March J1, 197^•

Release Time: 10,00 p,m.

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