Daily Information Bulletin - 1970s - 1973 - NOV - ENG

 PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Thursday, November 1, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No.

Police rank and file get higher pay.......................... 1

$50 pay rise for Model Scale 1'civil servants backdated to April 1, 1973 ...................• ........................ 2

Governor stresses importance of technical education........• • J

First day covers of special Royal Wedding stamps on sale tomorrow .......................................... 5

New legislation governing safe working standards in confined spaces now in force • ......•••••••»........•.............. 7

Registration of 11-year-olds for new type identity cards begins today ................................................ 9

Christmas and Nev/ Year visitors to China and Macau urged to obtain re-entry permits now.................................

Prisons Department autumn fair to be held on Saturday ...... 12

Another 20 special car numbers offered for sale.............. 13

Business hours at Des Voeux Road post office extended ...... 13

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Thursday, November 1, 1973

BIGGER PAY PACKETS FOR POLICE RANK AND FILE Starting Pay For Some Recruit Constables Increased to $1,025 ********

Higher pay scales for the police rank and file, comparable to those of skilled tradesmen in the private sector came into effect today (Thursday)•

The new salaries will be from $950 to $1,300 for Constables, $1,34-0 to $1,620 for Sergeants and $1,670 to $2,210 for Station Sergeants.

These represent increases of $210 to $240 for Constables; $280 to 3305 for Sergeants and $145 to $275 for Station Sergeants.

At the same time, a new starting pay educational qualification scheme is being introduced which will mean that a recruit Constable with three passes in the Certificate of Education will start at $1,025 per month.

The new pay rates are a result of a review by the Government Pay Investigation Unit which has introduced an arrangement whereby the pay of Constables is linked to that of skilled tradesmen in the private sector. The new procedure and the revised rates of pay have been agreed by the Finance Committee of the Legislative Council.

The extra cost of meeting the additional wage payments for the police rank and file will be about $40 million a year.

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Thursday, November 1, 1973

- 2

850 PAY RISE FOR BOTTOM SCALE GOVERNMENT SERVANTS Increase Backdated To April 1 ********

Some 40,000 male civil servants will receive a 550 monthly increase in take-home pay which will be back-dated to April 1 of this year.

The civil servants concerned are those in Model Scale 1, who range from cleaners, labourers and messengers to skilled tradesmen and junior foremen. Postmen and Assistant Postmen who are paid on a special scale will also receive this increase.

As part of the revised pay arrangements, the cost of living allowance being paid at April 1 this year has been incorporated into the basic pay scale and a new cost of living allowance table introduced.

The new basic pay scales are a result of a review by the Government Pay Investigation Unit which compared the April 1 pay and conditions of service in the civil service with April 1 pay and conditions of service of people in the private sector doing similar work. The new rates have been agreed by the Finance Committee of the Legislative Council.

The extra cost of meeting the additional wage payments for Model Scale 1 staff will be about 324 million a year. --------------------------------0_________

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Thursday, November 1, 1973

GOVERNOR UTOERLINES IMPORTANCE OF TECHNICAL EDUCATION

********

The government is committed to a vast expansion of technical education in Hong Kong, the Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, said today.

”1 feel sure that in committing ourselves to the large scale provision of this type of education we will be filling the gap felt by many parents and many young people, as well as by industry and commerce, and that we are mailing the soundest possible investment for the future,” he said.

Sir Murray was speaking at the first presentation of awards of the Hong Kong Polytechnic held in the City Hall.

He described technical education as ”a first class form of education in its own right,” and he believed that no parent in this modern age would consider that academic education conferred a higher status than technical education, or vice versa.

The Governor said he hoped to see a natural link developing between the pre-vocational schools, the secondary technical schools and the technical colleges, ’’with the Polytechnic at the apex.”

”1 am convinced that this new broad stream of technical education will greatly benefit our community in Hong Kong,” he said.

Referring to the proposed expansion programme for technical education, he said it was envisaged that one-fifth of the places in three-year secondary courses would be in pre-vocational schools, and one-third of those in five-year courses would be in secondary technical schools.

/In addition

Thursday, November 1, 1973

- 4 -

In addition, by 1977 new technical institutions would have been opened in Kwai Chung, Kwun Tong, Cheung Sha Wan and San Po Kong for some 6,000 full-time students.

Sir Murray was encouraged by the work being done to expand the Polytechnic to cater for 8,000 full-time and 20,000 part-time students by 1978, and assured the Board of the government’s total support.

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Thursday, November 1, 1973

- 5 -

SPECIAL STAMPS TO COMMEMORATE ROYAL WEDDING

First Day Covers On Sale Tomorrow

********

Two special stamps to commemorate the wedding of Princess Anne and Captain Mark Phillips will be on sale at all post offices on November 14.

The main feature of the stamps is a reproduction of a colour photograph taken at the Press reception on the announcement of the couple’s engagement. The stamps are in vertical format and will be issued in 50-cent and 32 denominations.

Special first day covers at 20 cents each will be put cn sale from tomorrow (November 2) at all post offices. The covers have been specially designed by the Information Services Department.

Members of the public are requested to obtain their requirements early to avoid disappointment.

Advanced orders for servicing of first day covers will be accepted at the General Post Office, Redder Street; Kowloon Central Post Office, Nathan Road; and Tsim Sha Tsui Post Office, Salisbury Road.

For this service, addressed first day covers must be handed in with an order form together with a remittance to cover the cost. The charge will be 32.60 per cover which includes the cost of two stamps together with a service fee of 10 cents.

The covers must be fully addressed by the applicant and not less than 10 covers will be accepted with each order.

The order forms will be available at the General Post Office, Kowloon Central Post Office and Tsim Sha Tsui Post Office on Friday(November 2).

/Any person

Thursday, November 1, 1973

- 6 -

Any person ordering serviced covers addressed to a local destination may collect them on November 15 from the office where the order was placed.

Covers addressed overseas will be sent forward by ordinary post, surface mail, unless sufficient stamps are affixed to cover airmail and/or registration charges.

The latest acceptance date for advance orders of serviced covers will be noon on November 8.

A service will be provided on November 14 (Wednesday) at al 1 post offices whereby first day covers will be accepted over the counter, impressed with the normal post office steel date stamp and handed back to the person presenting them.

No time type will appear in the postmark. The special conditions for the service are:-

* only articles bearing an indication that they are ’First Day Covers’ will be so treated.

* the articles must be addressed to a local address.

* the articles must not bear any other cancellation.

* no registered items will be processed by this method.

Special posting boxes will also be available at the General Post

Office, Kowloon Central Post Office and Tsim Sha Tsui Post Office on

November 14 for those who wish to have first day covers carefully hand-postmarked before despatch to the address on the cover.

Note to Editors: Copies of a photograph of the stamps are

boxed for collection.

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Thursday, November 1, 1973

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NEW INDUSTRIAL SAFETY REGULATIONS NCW IN FORCE

********

A set of new regulations to ensure greater safety for those required to work in confined spaces comes lnto effect today.

The regulations, entitled the Factories and Industrial Under*-takings (Confined Spaces) Regulations 1973» prescribe certain safety measures to be observed by both proprietors and workers.

The Assistant Commissioner of Labour, Mr. David Lin, said that working in confined spaces such as chambers, tanks , wells, vats pits, tunnels, pipes, flues, boilers and pressure receivers was hazardous because workers were known to have been overcome by dangerous fumes in such places.

Under the regulations, every confined space in an industrial undertaking , unless there are other exits, must be provided with a manhole of adequate size.

Anyone entering a confined space must be authorized by the proprietor and must wear an approved breathing apparatus. Where practicable, he should also wear a belt with a rope securely attached.

These requirements do not apply if a confined space has been certified safe for entry without breathing apparatus by the proprietor who, before malting such a certification, must take steps to test for, and to prevent, the presence of dangerous fumes.

/Proprietors .......

Thursday,-November 1, 1973

- 8 -

Proprietors are also required to keep a sufficient supply of approved breathing apparatus, suitable reviving apparatus, vessels containing oxygen, belts and ropes. These items must always be maintained in a satisfactory condition.

The regulations further stipulate that proprietors must not permit any person to enter or remain in any boiler-furnace or boiler-flue until it has been cooled by ventilation.

Contravention of the regulations will result in fines up to $2,000 for proprietors and $500 for any person other than proprietor.

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Thursday, November 1, 1973

- 9 -

DRIVE TO REGISTER 11-YEAR-OLDS BEGINS

New Juvenile Identity Card System Effective From Today

*********

Mobile teams from the Registration of Persons Department this morning began registering 11-year-old school children for the new type of juvenile identity card which came into effect today.

The two mobile teams will call at selected schools in both urban rural areas to facilitate the registration of children born between November 2, 1961 and November 1, 1962. It is estimated that there are about 120,000 in this group.

Today, the teams visited the Methodist School and Yaumati Kaifong Association’s Primary School in Kowloon and the Tai Po Government Primary School in the New Territories. A total of about 400 school children were registered.

A spokesman for the Registration of Persons Department explained that the visits were being made for the convenience of children attending school, thereby saving them the trouble of calling at the department’s offices.

He urged parents and guardians to make good use of the special facilities for their children so as to avoid congestion and delays at the department’s branch offices. • • •

Those who have returned their completed initial application for a new juvenile identity card on behalf of their children will be notified when and where to complete the registration formalities, the spokesman said.

/Children •••••••

Thursday, November 1, 1973

10 -

Children who call at the mobile registration centres are reminded that they must bring along their birth certificate and school documents such as ’student handbook" or ’school record card.*

"They should also bring with them their previous juvenile identity cards, if available," the spokesman said.

Parents and guardians should also produce their identity card at the time they call at the designated centre with their children.

Eleven-year-old children who are not attending school, should call at any of the department’s branch office or sub-office with their parent or guardians.

Four offices run by the department are situated at Causeway Bay Magistracy Building in Electric Road, Canton Road Government Offices in Yaumati, San Po Kong Government Offices at San Po Kong, and the Far East Building at Castle Peak Road in Tsuen Wan, New Territories.

The spokesman also urged all children between the ages of 11 and 17 who do not possess any juvenile identity cards to register for a card immediately.

Parents and guardians may seek advice at any of the offices of the department or call at their nearest City District Office or New Territories District Offices.

Note to Editors: Copies of two photographs of today’s visit

to the Methodist School in Kowloon are distributed separately in the press box this evening.

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/11

Thursday, November 1, 1973

- 11 -

NEW YEAR VISITORS TO CHINA AND MACAU

Urged To Apply For Re-entry Permits Now

People, who plan to travel to China or Macau over the Christmas and Chinese Nev; Year holidays, are urged to apply for their Hong Kong re-entry permits now.

In making the appeal, the Director of Immigration, Mr. W.E.

Collard, said that over 300,000 local residents visited China and Macau during the holidays last year, and the figure might well be much higher this year.

Mr. Collard pointed out that this was the best time to apply for re-entry permits as business in Immigration Department offices was relatively quiet.

Those who wait until January or early February, he warned, would face the inevitable delays.

Mr. Collard compared the advantages and disadvantages between a single and a multiple journey re-entry permit.

He said: ”A single journey re-entry permit, costing only $2, is valid for one journey to Macau or China and return to Hong Kong within six months of the date of issue.

”A multiple journey permit, costing 310, is valid for any number of journeys within five years from the date of issue.”

/Mr. Collard ..•••••

Thursday, November 1, 1973

- 12 -

Mr# Collard added that the multiple journey permit "is cheaper in the long run, and eliminates the need to queue, and to obtain fresh photographs and a document for every single journey."

Re-entry permits can be obtained now from all Immigration branch offices and from the mobile Immigration Office which calls daily at remoter parts of the New Territories.

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AUTUMN FAIR

*******

Note- to Editors: The annual Autumn Fair of the Prisons

Department Sports Association will be held on Saturday (November 3) at the football ground east of Stanley Prison.

The fair will be opened at 2 p.m. by Mrs. M.D.A. Clinton, wife of the Deputy Colonial Secretary. Music will be provided by the Police Band.

You are invited to have the event covered.

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Thursday, November 1, 1973

,fLUCKY" CAR NUMBERS FOR SALE

******* 4c

Twenty more special vehicle registration numbers will be put on sale by auction on Saturday (November 3) at the City Hall theatre, Low Block, at 11 a.m.

The numbers to be auctioned are:

665 915 1010 HK27 HK1188

HK6000 AA19 AA1111 AAJOOO AB90

AB23J2 AC8989 AK77 BC1 BC2

BC66 BC222 BC678 BC999 BC5555

Proceeds of the auction will go to the Government Lotteries Fund for charitable purposes.

Successful bidders at the auction will be required to pay in cash or cheque immediately after the bidding.

The vehicle registration mark will be assigned only to a vehicle which is registered in the name of the successful bidder within 12 months of the date of auction.

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POST OFFICE HOURS EXTENDED

*********

The opening hours of the Des Voeux Road Post Office will be extended from Monday (November 5)-

The new business hours will be from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. on weekdays and from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturdays.

Release time: 7.z<0 p.m.

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PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Friday, November 2, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No.

Moves to e::tend speedpost service to major cities in the United States •••»••••••........................................ 1

Civil Aviation Director to attend five-day conference in New Zealand . •....••••••....................................... 2

Four buildings in Wanchai to be demolished by February 1 ... 3

Importers and exporters reminded to lodge trade declarations .......................................................... 4

Office attendant retires after 28 years in government service......••••••..........................................

Fifty CAS members to receive Long Service medals............. 5

Three lots of industrial land in Chrung Sha Wan to be auctioned....................................................... 6

Governor tours Western District,...................••••••.••• 7

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Friday, November 2, 1973

GPO EXAMINES POSSIBLE SPEEDPOST SERVICE TO UNITED STATES *******

Hie Speedpost system introduced two months ago between Hong Kong and Britain has proved popular with businessmen and steps are now being taken to extend it to other countries, including the. United States.

At present 160 packages a month are being sent by speedpost

a fast door-to-door collection and delivery mail express service which guarantees the delivery of packages within the shortest possible time.

“Customers have expressed their satisfaction and have indicated the advantages gained by them,” a Post Office spokesman said today.

In view of the potential market for a speedpost service to the United States, steps had been taken to extend the system to that country, he added.

The Post Office, he said, was about to start tests, similar to

those previously conducted before establishing speedpost with the United Kingdom, to determine the reliability of such a service to the United States.

“The aim is to offer a service to the public before the end of

November,” he said. “Packages available at the General Post Office by 10 a.m. will be delivered to some 100 major cities throughout the United States by 3 p«m. the next day.”

Businessmen interested in such a service with the United States are invited to contact the General Post Office.

Correspondence is also taking place between Hong Kong postal administration and those of Australia, Canada, Singapore, Japan and Taiwan with a view to establishing similar services.

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Friday, November 2, 1973

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HONG KONG TO ATTEND CIVIL AVIATION CONFERENCE

******

The Director of Civil Aviation, Mr. R.E. Downing, will leave for New Zealand tomorrow (Saturday) to attend the 11th Annual Conference of Directors of Civil Aviation in Southeast Asia.

The meeting, which begins in Auckland on Monday (November 5)j will last five days.

At the conference, Mr. Downing will present three papers. They are: (1) Airport Expansion Problems At Hong Kong International Airport (2) Equipment Selection Techniques For Hong Kong Airport and (3) Helicopter Operations In The Hong Kong Environment.

The meeting will be attended by delegates from most countries in the Asia and Pacific area.

The United States, Britain and France will also send delegates /

as they have dependencies in the area.

International Air Transport Association (IATA) and International Civil Aviation Organisation will also be represented.

Mr. Downing is expected to return to Hong Kong next Saturday (November 10).

During his absence, Mr. B.D. Keep will act as Director of Civil Aviation.

/3.........

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Friday, November 2, 1973

- 3

DEMOLITION ORDERS ON FOUR WANCHAI BUILDINGS

***»**«»«

The Building Authority has issued notices requiring the demolition of four buildings in Wanchai by February 1.

The buildings are Nos. 5» 7, 9 and 11 Monmouth Terrace, which were closed in late August as being liable to become dangerous. It was stated at the time that demolition of these buildings, which stand above a slope on which a landslip occurred in June 1972, might become necessary.

A spokesman for the Buildings Ordinance Office said today: ”V/e have taken this decision reluctantly, and after allowing time for the owners to put forward any proposals to ensure the stability of these structures by providing additional support for the foundations.

;,Dut we have not received any such proposals, and now safety requirements oblige us to see that the buildings are demolished well in advance of next season’s rains. In setting the deadline, we have, of course, allowed as much time as possible for the work of demolition.”

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Friday, November 2, 1973

DECLARATION OF IMPORTS AND EXPORTS t*******♦

Importers and exporters are reminded that they must submit declarations on all imported and exported items within two weeks of importation and exportation.

They must also pay the appropriate- value assessment charges on the items within the prescribed 14-day period.

The Director of Commerce and Industry Department warned today that prosecutions would be initiated against those, who, without reasonable excuse, failed to lodge the necessary trade declarations.

Trade declarations submitted outside the 14-day period will be liable, without any further notice, to penalty charges which rise after two months to a maximum of 350 and $100 per declaration depending on the value of the articles specified.

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LABOUR OITICE ATTENDANT RETIRES

**********

The Commissioner of Labour, Mr. I.R. Price, today presented a gold shield to Hr. Tse Tung-tang, Office Attendant of the Labour Department, to mark his retirement after 14 years of service with the Government.

Mr. Tse joined the Labour Department as a messenger in 1959 after serving for 14 years in the former Royal Naval Dockyard. He was promoted to Office Attendant in 19&2.

During his service in the department, Mr. Tse has been regarded by all officers as an exceptionally reliable, conscientious and diligent worker. As a result he has been re-appointed by the government.

Hr. Tse is married with four children.

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Friday, November 2, 1973

- 5 -

PRESENTATION OF CAS LONG SERVICE MEDALS

******

Fifty members of the Civil Aid Services with a combined service record of 7&3 years will be awarded Civil Defence Long Service medals on Sunday (November 4).

The presentation will be made by Mr. P.C. Woo, Commissioner of the Civil Aid Services, at 11 a.m. at the C.A.S. Kowloon Training Centre, 204 Argyle Street.

The C.A.S. Long Service Medal is awarded to members who have completed 15 years of service.

Mr. Woo will also present the F.E. d’Almada Remedios Cup to the champion team of the annual C.A.S. footdrill competition. Four winning teams will compete in the finals. These are from Kowloon City Warden Zone, Kowloon Rescue Unit, Hong Kong Command Unit and from the Shau Kei Wan Warden Zone.

The panel of judges will consist of members of the Royal Hong Kong Regiment and the Royal Hong Kong Police Training School.

Note to Editors: You are invited to have the events covered.

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Friday, November 2, 1973 - 6 -

LAND SALE * *♦♦♦♦♦

Three lots of Crown land in Cheung Sha Wan with a total area of 44,610 square feet will be put up for auction in the City Hall later this month#

The lots are for industrial development and are located between Cheung Sha Wan Road and Lai Chi Kok Road.

The auction will start at 2.30 p»m. on November 30 in the City Hall Lecture Room on the 8th floor.

At the same time, another lot for non-industrial development will be offered for sale. This lot is situated at Tung Chau Street, Tai Kok Tsui, and measures about 1,300 square feet.

Sale plans and conditions of sale may be obtained from the Public Enquiry sub-office, Central Government Offices (West Wing), ground floor, Hong Kong, or from the Crown Lands and Survey Office, Kowloon Government Offices, Nathan Road, Kowloon.

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Friday, November 2, 1973

- 7 -

GOVERNOR VISITS WESTERN

*******

The Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, today asked Area Committee Chairmen for help in the coming Police Rank And File Recruitment Drive*

He was attending a meeting with members of the Western City District Committee to discuss problems and progress of the Fight Violent Crime Campaign.

Sir Murray said that the recruitment drive was to be a communitywide effort.

There will be JO Recruiting Centres compared to six in the last drive. They will be open all week including Saturdays and Sundays and will stay open until late in the evening. The City District Office and staff will help in guiding candidates with the application procedures.

In response to criticism that the policeman's pay was।too low, the Governor said, the pay scale of the rank and file had been considerably raised* He said the Government hoped not only tc draw more recruits but intended to get high-grade policemen in terms of education.

Sir Murray asked for each member of the committee to set himself a target of two to three young men with the right qualifications*

In answer to a question from the Area Committee Chairman from Sheung Wan about the general fear of reprisals for reporting crime the Governor said: “This is basically a ’paper tiger’. If people tried to put their fist through they will find that it goes straight through”, and he urged the public to make reports.

After the meeting the Governor visited Tung Hing Building in Sands Street where he was shown how an alarm-bell system in the building works.

Note to Editors: Copies of a photograph taken during the visit are

boxed for collection.

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Release time: 7»0Q p*m*

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Saturday, November 3? 1973

CONTENTS

Pago Mo.

Emphasis on tough physical training in courses for firemen recruits.................................................... 1

Issue of rent increase certificates must await enforcement of rent bill ..................  • • • ..............  • •.. J

Two additional bus routes in Now Territories ............... 4

Lady MacLohoso will visit two Community Chest agencies next week ........................................... 5

New typo rofv.se collection centre to be built in Causeway Bay......................................................... 7

Registration of private candidates for 1974 School Certificate

Exam.........  *............................................ 7

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Saturday, November 1975

- 1 -

RIGOROUS TRAINING FOR FIRE FIGHTERS

********

Hore than 1,100 officers and firemen have completed six-month initial training courses at the Fire Services Training School at Pat Heung since its opening five years ago.

According to a Fire Services spokesman, emphasis is put on tough physical training, which has become more and more important in the face of fast development of multi-storey buildings. Lectures are also given on many subjects including organisation and administration, building construction, electricity, fire prevention, chemistry, physics, and hydraulics. ’.Then operational availability permits ,experienced officers from various Fire commands are invited to give talks to the trainees, so that they nay learn from their experiences and benefit from the knowledge gained.

Cn completion cf this training programme, the probationary officers and firemen are posted to various fire stations, ready to apply the theoretical knowledge and training to the situations they will encounter during their day-to-day operational duties.

Besides these initial training courses, the school runs many other shorter and more specialised courses to train men in the use of sophistic?ted equipment. These include breathing apparatus, operating -drivii\>pumpst helicopter winches and first aid’courses. To date, more than 290 such short courses had been organised for firemen of various rani®.

Refresher courses are run for serving firemen to keep their professional knowledge abreast with the latest techniques in modern fire fighting. A total of 448 serving firemen have attended such courses during the past five years.

/Fire fighting ••••••

Saturday, November 3? 1973

2 -

Fire fighting training is not given to firemen alone and short training programmes are continuously organised by the school for staff of other government departments and private organisations. To date, more than 2,200 men from other departments like the Royal Hong Kong Police Force, Preventive Service, Public Works Department, Housing Department and the liedicol and Health Department have benefited from such training.

In addition, over 3,800 dockyard workers, ship crews, bank guards and factory workers employed by private organisations have also received such training, which last from two to four days.

Another 26 officers from the fire departments of other Asian countries - mainly Brunei and Thailand - have received training at the school, which has a reputation of being one of the most modern and progressive in Asia.

The training school, together with the New Territories District Headquarters, a fire station and an ambulance depot, occupies an eight-acre site on the slope of a hill along Fan Kam Road between Fanling and Sei: Kong.

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Saturday, November 3, 197?

- 3 -

RENT INCREASE CERTIFICATES

********

A spokesman for the Rating and Valuation Department said today that m the last two weeks, the department had received requests for certificates of rent increase under the provisions of the Landlord and Tenant’ (Consolidation) (Amendment) (No. 2) Bill 1973.

"ouch applications cannot be made until the proposed rent control legislation is passed by the Legislative Council,0 he explained.

He pointed out that the certificates for rent increase for post-war domestic premises, provided by the proposed legislation, can only be issued alter the legislation is enacted and it was net possible before that time to accept any application.

°4kS announced by the Secretary for Housing last Wednesday, due to a change in the timetable of the Bill’s passage through the Council, it will not come into force before the middle of next month

’’Application forms will be made available to the public, free of charge, as soon as the legislation is passed,” he added.

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Saturday, November 3, 1973

A

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ADDITICUAL BUS SERVICES IN NEW TERRITORIES

*»«•***

Two new bus services will be introduced in the New Territories from Monday (Neyenber 5) on an experimental basis.

The new services, to be operated by KMB, will be route 57 • .X

running fro:::’ tail Fau Shan to Pak Nai and route 58 - running from Lau Fau Shan to Sha Kiu (Tsim Bei Tsui).

A Transport Department spokesman said today that while these services were being introduced on an experimental basis they would continue as part of KHB’s scheduled services if there was sufficient public demand.

The new routes form part of the New Territories bus expansion scheme and follow closely on two routes introduced on October 11. These were route 58 and 59 which run from Un Long to Tai Tong, and from Tuen Hun New Town to Pale Kok respectively.

Full details of the timetables and fares for the new services will be posted at terminal points and published in press notices.

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Saturday, November J, 1973

- 5 -

VISITS TO COMMUNITY CHEST AGENCIES BY LADY MACLEHOSE

Lady MacLehose, President of the Community Cheat of Hong Kong, will begin another round of visits to member agencies on Tuesday morning (November 6).

She will be visiting the Red Cross John F. Kennedy Centre in Sandy Bay and the Wah. Hong Hostel for the Aged in Wah Fu Estate.

Miss Susan Hume, Social Scretary of Government House, and Ifr. Colin Morrison, Executive Director of the Chest, will accompany Lady MacLehose on the visits.

At the John F. Kennedy Centre, the party will be met by Mr. Run Run Shaw, President of the Hong Kong Red Cross, and Dr. B.M. Kotewall, Supervisor of the Centre.

The Centre is a residential school for handicapped children between the ages of four and 14, and is designed to house a maximum of 80 pupils — 60 resident and 20 day pupils. The number is expected to be increased to 110 by 1975«

Aside from individual special instructions, the pupils are encouraged to keep up wit topical events through news media and classroom discussions, and by attending exhibitions, live performances and cultural centres.

Transportation is provided for day pupils and for residential, pupils who return home during weekends and holidays.

/Next, the ......

. Saturday, November 3, 1975

- 6 -

Next, the party will visit the Wah Hong Hostel operated by the Hong Kong Christian Service, where Rev. William C. Tung, the Director, and Miss Linda Shek, the Supervisor, will guide the visitors on a tour of the premises.

The hostel is designed to provide non-institutional housing for independent and ambulatory elderly people of over 60 years. The maximum capacity is for 120.

The hostel occupies 3$ flats, of which 30 are for residents, four for common rooms, one as an office and one as staff quarters.

Note to Editors: Reporters and photographers are welcome

to cover the visits. Transport will be provided. Two nine-seater vans will be waiting at 10 a.m. on Tuesday at Queen’s Pier to take press representatives to the Centre. Miss Brigitta Wong, Administrative Assistant to the Chest, and a GIS officer will be on hand to assist them.

The John F. Kennedy Centre is located at

15 Sandy Bay Road, and the Wah Hong Hostel at Flats 217-23^ and 317-33^, Wah Hong House, 1st and 2nd floors, Wah Fu Estate.

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Saturday, November J, 1975

- 7 -

•NSW LOCK1 LAP SAP COLLECTION CENTRE

********

A new off-street refuse collection centre with a difference will shortly be built in Causeway Bay.

The new look lap sap collection centre - to be constructed at the junction of Paterson Street and Waterfront Road - will take on a green house look with colourful flowers decorating the roof.

The outer walls of the building will be tiled and adequate ventilation will be installed to dispel obnoxious smells.

Construction of the building, which will occupy about 27,000 square feet, is expected to begin in the middle of next month and should be completed in April next year.

It will replace the existing refuse collection point at Houston Sti'eet.

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HONG KONG CERTIFICATE OF EDUCATION EXAMINATION

*********

Registration of private candidates for the 197^ Hong Kong Certificate of Education Examination is now being conducted.

Applicants should bring along completed application forms when registering at either the Causeway Bay Sub-Treasury on the second floor of the Causeway Bay Magistracy Building, or at the Kowloon Sub-Treasury on the fourth floor of the Kowloon Government Offices.

Application forms are available at all City District Offices in urban areas and at District Offices in Tsuen Wan, Yuen Long and Tai Po in the New Territories.

Intending candidates are urged to register early to avoid a rush at the end of the registration period.

-------0----------

•el ease time: 2. y) P. m.

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Monday, November 1973

CONTENTS

Page No,

New estate in Chai Wan to house 16,000 people........• •...... 1

New Hong Kong Commercial Affairs Counsellor in Washington appointed «••••............••♦••••••••••.................... 2

Motorcyclists and pillion riders must wear approved safety helmets ............................................  „.......... j

Pokfulam Road to be widened to improve traffic flow........... 4

New traffic arrangements at Lion Rock Interchange.......... 5

Home safety hints at health education in Yuen Long............ 6

Two pre-war buildings in Aberdeen declared dangerous ......... 7

Revised closing date for X’mas mail to India and Khmer Republic ........................................................ ?

Labour Commissioner calls at textile factory............. 8

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong. Tel: 5-233191

Monday, November 5, 1975

NEW ESTATE TO HOUSE 16,000

******

A new public housing estate to provide homes for some 16,000 people is to be built in Chai Wan shortly. It will comprise three seven-storey and one 22-storey blocks.

Apart from recreational, welfare and other basic facilities essential for a self-contained community, there will be a market complex with more than 450 stalls, and a car park for about 500 cars.

The estate will also have two primary schools, a post office, a welfare building, and an administrative block, when it is completed in late 1976 or early 1977*

To enable piling and construction work to start, the site which partly falls within and partly outside the Chai Wan Licensed Area will have to be cleared.

A two-day clearance operation, starting tomorrow (Tuesday) has been drawn up. About 750 structures will be demolished to make way for the estate.

Site formation and piling work is expected to take place immediately afterwards.

More than 2,500 people living in the licensed area have been offered public housing at Iio Man Tin Estate. About 1,200 people squatting on the outskirts of the licensed area have also been offered new sites in the vicinity.

-------0---------

/2........

Monday, November 5, 1973

HONG KONG’S NEW MAN IN WASHINGTON

«««******

Mr. Alec Hermann, a member of the British Diplomatic Service, has been appointed Hong Kong’s Counsellor for Commercial Affairs in Washington.

He is already familiar with the post having held it previously from 1967, when it was created, until two years ago.

Hr. Hermann lias been Britain’s Consul General in Osaka since 1$?1. He will trice up his post at the British Embassy in Washington next month.

He is currently visiting Hong Kong to bring himself up-to-date with the commercial and industrial scene.

A programme arranged by the Commerce and Industry Department includes talks with government officials and representatives of trade and industry. Mr. Hermann will also be visiting local factories.

As Hong Kong’s "man on the spot” in Washington, he will be keeping a close eye on commercial relations with the United States, which is the biggest buyer of locally-manufactured products.

Jlote, to Jditqrs: Reporters and photographers are invited to

cover several factory visits by Mr. Hermann tomorrow (Tuesday) afternoon. Transport will be available at 2.15 p.m. sharp at the car park behind the Tsim Sha Tsui Post Office. The P.R.O. of the Commerce and Industry Department, Mr. Brian Hickman, will be on hand to assist media representatives.

Mr. Hermann will be visiting two factories in the Hung Hom area — Asia Industrial Development Co. Ltd., 3-5 San Ma Tau Street; and Motorola New Works Semi-Conductors (H.K.) Ltd., 41-J Ma Tau Wai Road, 11th floor.

--------0----------

. :• •r*’C * jC’’ "

Monday, November 5» 1973 .• r i ’..ns jl.-jr-I u'~ iki '-<• :ro cctrJ y.c? -'J

MOTORCYCLISTS REMINDED TO WEAR HELMETS

Io ok ov Ils. "■ / -'-i- ' o.ln,‘

. Lsoid’

Motorcyclists and their pillion riders who fail to wear crash

• i/t'i; • iC. 1’ •’> .17 rj7OT C '’•O-TIO helmets in future may be jailed for three months on first conviction.

-------0 - - - -

New regulations requiring the compulsory wearing of safety helmets of an appy9yedwstandard come into effect on January 1 next year. The new rules are laid down in the Road Traffic (Protective Equipment) Regulations 1973> which were approved by the Executive Council in June this year.

Motorcyclists and their pillion passengers who fail to put on safety helmets will be liable to a fine of 3500 and three months1 imprisonment on first conviction. The maximum penalty on second or subsequent convictions is a fine of 31,000 and six months’ jail.

Approved protective helemts are those bearing a mark applied by the manufacturer indicating compliance with the specifications in lo j ' :-v 11 r- • ; • ■. .T: vv- ;k.

British Standard 2001; 1869 and 2495; Japanese Industrial Standard JIS T 8155-1970; Australian Standard E 53-1968; American National Standards . • j .'.ro'x okc oono

Institute Z90.1-1966, Z90.1-1970 and Z90.1-1971; Institute Beige De Normalization BEMOR NBN 626; Deutsche Normen DIN 4848; French National Standard AFNOR NFS 72-501; or Dutch National Institute for Road Veliicles TNO. -----------------------------------0----------

A....

Monday, November 1975

■> - *+ -

WIDENING OF POKFULAM ROAD

**********

A section of Pokfulam Road will be widened shortly to improve traffic flow between Aberdeen and the urban areas.

The work will involve the widening of 1,400 feet of Pokfulam Road between Claymore Avenue and Pokfulam Reservoir Road. It will also include the construction of a reinforced concrete box culvert to convey the flow from an existing nullah.

Work is expected to begin in January next year and will take about 13 months to complete.

The widened road will provide a dual two-lane carriageway through Pokfulam Village with a central verge for the preservation of a number of trees.

Commenting on the project, a spokesman for the Public Worlds Department noted that Pokfulam Road was one of the main traffic routes linking Aberdeen with the urban areas.

Following the completion of Wah Fu Estate and further industrial and housing development at Aberdeen, he said, traffic volume on that road had substantially increased.

"The daily volume of traffic is now well above the capacity of this narrovz section,” he said. But this would be considerably improved once the road was widened.

-------0---------

/5..........

Monday, November 5, 1973.

- 5 -

LION ROCK INTERCHANGE - TRAFFIC CHANGES

**««*«*

New traffic arrangements will be introduced at the Lion Rock Interchange as from tomorrow (Tuesday).

A single lane over the completed flyover will be opened for traffic travelling south to Waterloo Road. Traffic wishing to turn right into Lung Cheung Road will be diverted via Cornwall Street.

Waterloo Road will also be re-opened to northbound tunnel traffic. Westbound traffic on Lung Cheung Road will have access to the tunnel by turning left into a loop road and thence via Waterloo Road.

As only one lane will be brought into use initially, heavy vehicles are advised to continue using the present route to the tunnel via Junction Road, Fung Mo Street, and Lung Cheung Road to avoid possible congestion.

At a later stage, the southern carriageway of Lung Cheung Road from Fung Mo Street, will also be opened for traffic, a spokesman for the Transport Department said.

Motorists are urged to observe the direction signs at the approaches to the interchange particularly tomorrow morning while these changes are being intorduced.

------ 0 -------- ■

Monday, November 1973

- 6 -

SUGGESTIONS ON HOME SAFETY

******

A four-day health education exhibition will be held in the Yuen Long Town Hall at the end of this month under the sponsorship of the Medical and Health Department.

The theme will be "Home Safety," and the show will stress personal and food hygiene. It will be opened to the public, and group visits by students from the Yuen Long area are planned.

The exhibition will be in Chinese. Items will include drawings, graphs, models — all designed for easy comprehension by an audience of young people and rural folk.

The show is being mounted by the department’s Health Education Unit, New Territories. It will open on November 27 and continue until November JO* The hours vail be from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. and from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. daily.

A similar exhibition last year was very successful. It placed the accent on nutrition, protection of the eyesight and how to prevent gastrointestinal diseases.

"The need for care to ensure safety at home is generally recognised," a spokesman said. "The exhibition will help to provide a number of useful hints in visual form."

Note to Editors: You are invited to have this exhibition covered.

-------0---------

Monday, November 5, 1973


- 7 -

?.-,r.'.rh * .

TWO PRE-WAR BUILDINGS CONDEMNED J

..... • h'j-' ■ -,-tl

The.Bui^Jing Authority today declared Nos. 170 and 172 Aberdeen Main Road to be in a dangerous condition.

The Principal Government Building Surveyor said these three-storey pre-war building were inspected following a detailed inspection of the adjoining buildings at Nos. 166 and 168 which were subsequently made subject to closure orders.

It was found that the reinforced concrete elements in Nos. 170 and 172 had deteriorated to such an extent that repair was impractical and there is a risk of failure leading to a collapse.

Notices of intention to apply for closure orders in Victoria District Court at $.30 a.m. on December 17 were posted today.

----0------

CHRISTMAS MAIL TO INDIA AND THE KHMER REPUBLIC ....

Tlie Post Office announced today that the latest dates of posting of sea mail for India and the Khmer Republic have been advanced to November 8.

0 - -

Monday, November 1973

- 8 -

MR. PRICE VISITS TEXTILE FACTORY

*******

The Commissioner of Labour, Mr. I.R. Price today spent the afternoon visiting Kowloon Textile Industries Ltd. at Sham Tseng, New Territories, to see at first hand current working conditions in Hong Kong’s textile industry.

He was accompanied by the Labour Department’s Principal Information Officer, Mr. Barry Walsh and the Labour Officer in charge of Industrial Undertakings, Mr. Stanislaus Tsao. The visit was the third of a series of monthly visits being made by Mr. Price to see at first liand various industries and their working conditions.

During this afternoon’s visit, Mr. Price showed particular interest in welfare facilities provided for the factory’s workers. He said he was pleased to note that in addition to a year-end bonus, transportation allowances and other benefits, the workers were provided with accommodation. Quarters for unmarried workers were rent free, and monthly rents for married quarters ranged from #30 - 545.

Hr. Price said Hong Kong workers were becoming increasingly concerned about the types of welfare facilities offered by management. High standard welfare facilities in a factory helped reduce labour turnover, fostered harmonious labour-management relationship and ultimately increased production.

”This

Mundayt November

- 9 -

’’This is the soit of investment that will definitely bring management a good return,” he said. ”A contented worker is a good producer#” Mr# Price pointed out that the Hong Kong worker was receiving increasingly improved conditions of employment under the Employment Ordinance which new included provisions for payment of wages, termination of contracts of employment, sickness allowance, holidays with pay, four rest days and maternity leave.

’’And we plan to continue revi si ng and adding to the ordinance from time to time to keep up with the changing needs,” he said#

«• '■-» ™ *■» 0 •• -• ••

Release time: 7$ 00 pcm<>.

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Tuesday, November 6, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No,

Government considering contingency plans to meet with possible oil shortage •••••••••••••••«.......................  1

Details of Ming Tak Bank final dividend payment announced.•• J

Special press arrangements for the Hong Kong Festival •••••• 5

Water interruption in Tsim Sha Tsui..........................  5

Traffic re-arrangements in'Central district..................  6

Graduation of physiotherapists from QEH training school .... 6

Mobile post office serving less populated rural areas ...... 7

Lion liock Tunnel Interchange partially opened ............... 8

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

J

Tuesday, November 6, 1973 - 1 -

MEASURES TO MEET POSSIBLE OIL SHORTAGE BEING CONSIDERED *******

Contingency plans including the possibility of control over oil supplies and distribution are being considered by the government should a world shortage develop as a result of the situation in the Middle East.

There is at the moment, no firm indication of how, or when, Hong Kong night be affected.

Consequently no decision has yet been taken on the form of control or the timing which might be necessary.

A government spokesman said this today when commenting on newspaper reports that major oil companies are considering the introduction of petrol rationing within the next two weeks.

He said that, through the Petrol and Oils Advisory Committee and other contacts, the government maintains constant touch with the situation. ”As far as we know, the oil companies have not announced plans for a general cut back in supplies in the immediate future”, he pointed out. At present, oil supplies to Hong Kong continue normally and there has been no decrease in supply compared with that before the recent war in the Middle East.

Excluding aviation and the bunkering of ships, Hong Kong’s daily oil consumption is between 8,000 and 9»000 long tons, and the current stocks represent, depending on the type of product, between 30 and 50 days consumption in general terms. Stocks change daily and it is impossible to be exact.

/The spokesman........

Tuesday, November 6, 1973

2 -

The spokesman said that if there was a drastic cutback in oil 4

deliveries, Hong Kong, in common with other parts of the world, would be affected in many ways. Cooking, electric supply to households and factories, supplies to aircraft, ships and vehicles, would all be affected to some degree.

nIf oil supplies drop and the situation warrants it, some control on local demand and supply will obviously have to be introduced in the interest of the community as a whole,”, he added.

Commenting on a report that some bus companies had issued instructions to their drivers to save fuel by cutting out the unnecessary idling of engines, the spokesman said that this was obviously a sensible measure. Many people could also help by avoiding unnecessary use of cars and lorries and by preventing wastage caused in various ways.

On the question of preventing profiteering and blackmarketing of petrol, the spokesman said that this possibility was not being overlooked.

Tuesday, November 6, 1973

- 3 -

SECOND W FINAL DIVIDEND TO MING TAK BANK CREDITORS ********

Arrangements for the payment of a second and final dividend to creditors of the Ming Tak Bank have now been finalised, Mr. W. Hume, the Official. Receiver and Trustee, announced today.

Mr. Kume recalled that in the formal notice to creditors which appeared in the Government Gazette and in various newspapers on September 11, 1973 it was proposed to pay a second and final dividend of not less than 75 per cent to all unsecured creditors.

“Creditors will be pleased to learn”, Mr. Hume said ’’that it will in fact be possible to pay a final dividend of 75 per cent plus interest from February 4, 19&5, the date of the Receiving Order, to November 11, 1973 at the rate of 8 per cent per annum on all debts proved and admitted.-’ This payment, together with the first dividend of 25 per cent already paid earlier this year, will mean that creditors will have admitted claims paid in full with interest.

The dates and times of payment will be notified in the Government Gazette on Friday, November 9, 1973, and advertised in the public notices column of several English and Chinese language newspapers on November 7, 0 and 9-Payment Procedure

Hr. Hume added that each depositor and gift coupon holder should attend at the Official Receiver’s Office on the. appropriate day and time for his dividend, bringing with him his identity card, pass-book, deposit receipt, gift coupon, or other evidence of his claim, and also his signature chop,if he uses one. If anyone lias lost his pass-book,or deposit receipt, hd should-immcdi.itely ’

/report ..•••••

Tuesday, November 6, 1973

report his loss at the Official Receiver’s Office, Sutherland House, 10th KLoor, 3 Chater Road, Hong Kong.

If a depositor or gift coupon holder is unable to attend in person, he can authorise payment to his representative by completing a form of Authority for Payment of Dividend. Copies of the form are available during normal office hours from today onwards at the Official Receiver’s Office.

Creditors who have filed separate proofs of debts and whose proofs have been admitted are being notified separately of the dates and times for collection of their dividends.

A Warning

Creditors are strongly advised to have nothing to do with any unauthorised person, and in particular NOT to hand over their documents to anyone other than the authorised staff inside the Official Receiver’s Office.

Note to Editors: Copies of a press notice giving details of

arrangements for paying the dividend are distributed separately in the Press Boxes, Government Information Services, this evening.

0 -------

75.........

Tuesday, November 6, 1973

- 5 -

PRESS ARRANGEMENTS FOR HONG KONG FESTIVAL

««*****»

Note _t_o_ Editors: The Festival of Hong Kong, which will be

held from November 23 to December 2, will be the largest ever held in Hong Kong. As in previous Festivals, the programme consists of a wide variety of events and wherever possible special facilities will be provided for the news and broadcasting media.

A briefing will be held in the 35 theatre at the G.I.S. at 4.30 p.m. tomorrow (Wednesday) when the press arrangements for the Festival will be discussed. Suggestions from members of the press on improving facilities will be welcomed.

-------0---------

TEMPORARY WATER CUT

* * 4 * * ♦ ♦ ♦

Water supply to a number of premises in Tsim Sha Tsui will be interrupted for five hours as from 1 a.n. on Friday (November 9) to enable a test for leakage to be carried out.

The area affected is bounded by Nathan Road, Carnarvon Road, Hanoi Road, Hart Road, Chatham Road and Cameron Road.

0 - -

Tuesday, November 6, 1975

6 -

TRAFFIC CHANGES IN CENTRAL

********

New traffic arrangements will be introduced in a number of streets in Central on Thursday (November 8) to improve traffic flow in the area.

i

With effect from 10 a.n. that day, sections of Rumsey Street and Hillier Street between Des Voeux Road Central and Connaught Road Central will be re-routed to one-way northbound traffic.

Man Wah Lane will be re-routed to one-way southbound traffic. Tunnel bus No. 104 will run via Man Wah Lane instead of Rumsey Street.

Traffic signs will be posted to guide motorists.

-------0---------

GRADUATION OF PHYSIOTHERAPISTS

********

A presentation of certificates to the eighth group of students to graduate from the Physiotherapy Training School at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital will be held on Thursday (November 8).

The ceremony will start at 3*15 p.m. in the Physiotherapy Departments gymnasium.

Professor A.R. Hodgson will address the gathering and present certificates.

Note to Editors: Representatives from the Press, Radio and TV

stations are invited to attend and cover the occasion. Light refreshments will be served.

-------0---------

/7.........

Tuesday, November 6, 1973

- 7 -

POSTAL SERVICES IN OUTLYING AREAS

*********

Special postal facilities are provided by the Post Office in less populated rural areas for the convenience of residents.

A mobile post office calls regularly at smaller towns and remoter villages and temporary postal centres are set up at fairs, agricultural, shows and other large gatherings. . .. ..

”The purpose of the mobile post office is to serve rapidly developing rural areas until the need to set up regular post offices in such areas is justified,a Post Office spokesman explained.

The mobile post office is a 25-cwt Ford van which provides all the counter facilities of an ordinary post office, including the sale of stamps, postal stationery, the sale and encashment of postal orders, acceptance and payment of money orders and the acceptance of registered articles.

A post box for ordinary postal items is also provided.

The mobile post office is manned by a driver and a postal clerk.

They work from Monday to Friday from 8.30 a.m. to 4.15 p.m., travelling through towns and villages at Ping Shan, Hung Shui Kiu, Lam Tei, Tuen Mun, Kwu Tung and San Wai, among others.

Postage stamps are also available from many licensed stamp vendors and the Post Office issues licences freely to anyone prepared to sell • • • • stamps.

Note to Editors: Copies of a picture of the mobile post

office are boxed for collection.

-------0---------

Tuesday, November 6, 1973

- 8 -

LION ROCK INTERCHANGE PARTIALLY OPENED

******

The Lion Rock Interchange at the junction of Waterloo Road and Lung Cheung Road was partially opened to traffic today.

The 07•2 million interchange is the first of 11 new interchanges along the Lung Cheung/Taipo/Ching Cheung Road Route to be brought into operation*

It will be finished entirely by the middle of next month with the completion of the circular bridge structure on the south-eastern side of the flyover,

Commenting on the partial opening of the Lion Rock Interchange, a spokesman for the Public Works Department said that the traffic in the area would be improved considerably, especially on weekends.

The Lion Rock Interchange, which has been designed and supervised by Maunsell Consultants Asia, is part of a major road improvement scheme between Kwun Tong and Kwai Chung along the Kowloon Foothills.

These interchanges have been designed to permit unimpeded traffic flow along the route and to eliminate conflicting traffic movements at the major intersections.

-------0---------

Release time: /.DO p.m.

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Wednesday, November 7j 1973

CONTENTS

Page No, Remembrance Day ceremonies to be held this Sunday ••••••••••• 1

Attractive Christmas aerogrammes on sale soon «•••••••••••••• 4

New Assistant Director of Social Welfare assumes duty ••■•••• 5

Director of Medical and Health Services speaks on development of medical services in the next decade........................ 6

Annual sports day for Kowloon Hospital staff ................. 8

Closure of public piers • •••................................. 9

Lecture by Director of Education on proposed expansion of secondary school education ................................... 10

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Wednesday, November 7, 1973

- 1 -

REl-iEMBRANCE DAY CEREMONIES

********

Special Remembrance Day ceremonies will be held throughout Kong Kong on Sunday (November 11) in honour of those who died during the two world wars.

The main memorial service will take place at the Cenotaph in Statue Square.

Among those attending will be the Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose;

the Colonial Secretary, Mr. D.T.E. Roberts; the three Service Commanders led by the Commander, British Forces, Lt. General Sir Richard Ward; the Chief Justice, members of the Executive and Legislative Councils, the Chairman of the Commanding Officers’ Committee, a representative of the Merchant Navy, Commonwealth Commissioners, the Doyen of the Consular Corps and representatives of the British Legion and ex-servicemen’s associations.

Two honour guards will be provided by the Royal Hong Kong Regiment (The Volunteers) and the First Battalion The Black Watch. The Band of the Royal hong Kong Regiment and the Pipers from the Black Watch will be in attendance •

There will be four Cenotaph sentries, one each from the Royal Navy, the Royal Air Force, the Army and the Royal Hong Kong Regiment.

The ceremony will begin with the arrival of the Governor at 10.^8 a .m. Following the playing of the National Anthem and the sounding of the Last Post, a two-minute silence will be observed at 11 a.m. The beginning and ending will be marked by the firing of a gun from H.M.S. Tamar.

/During this ........

Wednesday, November 7, 1973

- 2 ~

During this period , all shipowners, shipmasters and people in charge of small craft are requested to co-operate in reducing to the minimum the sounding of whistles, horns or sirens in the vicinity of the Cenotaph.

After the ceremony at the Cenotaph, the Governor will attend a Remembrance Day service in St. John’s Cathedral.

Members of the public and all service officers, apart from those officially invited, who wish to lay wreaths at the Cenotaph may do so after the Service departments have moved away from the Statue Square area.

Prior to the Cenotaph uriuute, a short ceremony will be held at 10 a.m. at the Chinese War Memorial in the Botanic Gardens. There, the Governor and the Commander, British Forces, will lay wreaths. They will be followed by the Colonial Secretary, the Secretary for Home Affairs and Chinese Unofficial Members of the Executive- Legislative and Urban Councils.

At Sek Kong, units of the 48 Gurkha units will be taking part in a Drumhead Service outside 3* . X?r,in’s Cur ch >

During the ceremony, which begins at 11 a.ku, music will be provided by the Brigade of Gurkha St^t’fo

At Stanley, the annual service of remembrance will be held at the Stanley Club at 10.45 a.m. After the service, wreaths will be laid on the graves of the fallen in Stanley Military Cemetery. The Band of the Cape Colliwn Training Centre will be in attendance.

/Note to Editors

Wednesday, November 7> 1973

- 3 -

Note to Editors: For the Cenotaph,ceremony, there will be

limited accommodation for nev/spaper reporters and photographers at the western end of the first floor balcony of the Supreme Court.

There will be no special Press position within the Statue Square perimeter.

For their part, Press representatives are requested to observe the solemnity of the occasion, and not talk unnecessarily during the service, particularly during the two-minute silence.

Newspapers wishing to station representatives on the Supreme Court balcony, should supply their names to the Duty Officers, Government Information Services, by noon on Friday (November 9)*

In view of the limited space available on the Supreme Court balcony, it may be necessary to restrict accommodation to photographers only. Special lapel badges will be issued on Friday afternoon.

G.I.S. officer, Mr. Ben Fu, will be on hand to assist Press representatives.

• Chinese War Memorial Ceremony:

Editors are advised that Press reporters and photographers will not be allowed inside the rope cordon around the Chinese War Memorial in the Botanic Gardens.

Press representatives will stand either on .the east or west side of the rope cordon. They will not be able to stand on the south side of the Memorial Arch.

/Press .......

Wednesday, November 7> 1973

- 4

Press representatives are particularly requested, in view of the limited accommodation, to observe the direction of police officers on duty.

Service at Stanley

The Press are invited to cover the service, but photographers will not be allowed to take pictures inside the Club during the service. However, they are welcome to take pictures at the wreath-laying ceremony at the cemetery.

Service, at Sek Kongr

The Press are welcome to cover the ceremony, which starts at 11 a.m.

-------0---------

CHRISTMAS AEROGRAMMES

********

Christmas pictorial aerogrammes will be on sale at all post offices from November 12.

The aerogrammes, designed by a Government artist, will be available in two attractive varieties — one depicting Father Christmas with a small boy and the other a Chinese festive scene.

A spokesman for the Post Office said today that these aerogrammes were a convenient and inexpensive way of sending Christmas greetings abroad, ^ley combine both a personal letter and a greeting and can be 4 posted to any part of the world as first class airmail for only 50 cents,n he said. ----------------------------------0---------

/5........

Wednesdayt November 7, 1973

- 5 -

NEW ASSISTANT DIRECTOR (GENERAL) OF SOCIAL WELFARE ******

Mr* Frederick Clark, a Principal in the Department of Health and Social Security in Britain, has arrived in Hong Kong to take up the post of Assistant Director (General) in the Social Welfare Department from today*

He is on temporary transfer to the Hong Kong Government for a period of two and a half years and replaces Mr. Strachan Heppell who returned to Britain on July 18 this year.

During his time here., Mr. Heppell was responsible for advising on and carrying through the implementation of the public assistance and disability and infirmity allowance schemes which th© department now operates through its Social Security Division.

Mr...Clark, who is L£ and single, has been working in the policy division of the Department of Health and Social. Security since 1969 and has considerable experience in dealing with public assistance.

In the Social Welfare Department, he will be responsible for the administration of the social security schemes as well as planning, research and departmental training.

Q 0 O O O C O

Wednesday, November 7j 1973

— 6 -

MEDICAL DEVELOPMENT IN NEXT DECADE

Dr. Choa Tells Rotarians Of Major Projects Envisaged

******

Dr. G»H. Choa, Director of Medical and Health Services, said today Hong Kong could look forward with confidence to a phased development of medical services in the next ten years consistent with the population’s growth.

Ke made this point at a luncheon talk to members of the Rotary Club of Hong Kong Island East in the Lee Gardens Hotel.

Dr. Choa discussed the major aspects of the recently-published report of the Medical Development Advisory Committee, and supplemented his remarlcs with film slides of the Medical and Health Department carryi ng out its various responsibilities.

Dr. Choa said the new target of 5.5 hospital beds per 1,000 population would be achieved by 19$3 not only by building four new government hospitals, but also by further development of assisted hospitals such as those in the Tung Wah group and the Caritas Medical Centre.

In addition, new clinics were being planned for Lam Tin, Ngau Tau Kok, Lei Muk Shue and Ha Kwai Chung. He envisaged other clinics being incorporated in plans with regard to new towns, and the redeveloping and reprovisioning of old clinics, such as the Violet Peel Polyclinic.

Dr. Choa noted that day beds had been recommended for psychiatric, geriatric and non-acute general cases for the new clinics, in addition to, or instead of, maternity beds because the time had come to take account of the needs of an ageing population.

/He described .......

Wednesday, November 7, 1973

He described how the proposed regionalisation of the hospital and clinic services would work.

In the eastern district of Hong Kong Island, for example, patients from the Shau Kei Wan general clinic would be referred to the nearest specialist clinic, the Violet Peel, and after that either to the district hospital — in this case the Tung Wah Eastern, in Sookunpoo — or the regional hospital, the Queen Mary. The hospital would depend on the nature and condition of the illness.

It should also be possible for a patient to be transferred from a district to a regional hospital if specialist treatment was required, or vice versa from a regional to a district hospital for convalescence following the end of the acute phase of an illness.

Dr. Choa made it plain that the problem of staff to meet these developments would be serious, illustrating the point with a number of significant figures.

"It is hoped that we shall have 100 more doctors a year in addition to the present output of 150 by 1983/* he said. "In the Government sector, the number of nurses in the establishment by 1983 estimated at 6,000 general and 1,600 psychiatric nurses."

To train them, a third general nurses training school should be set up, and a second psychiatric nurses training school was already in the planning stage.

Dr. Choa referred to the proposals to establish a dental nurses training school, a school children’s dental clinic, and the need for Hong Kong to train its own dentists.

/"To give •••••••

Wednesday, November 7> 1973

- 8 -

”To give you some idea,” he said, ”if we start producing an output of 80 dentists in 1980, we shall have one dentist per 6,000 population by 1987.”

The talk concluded with brief references to plans in regard to family planning, drug addiction and rehabilitation.

Dr. Choa is an honorary member of the Club.

-------0----------

KOWLOON HOSPITAL ANNUAL SPORTS MEETING

Director of Medical and Health Services To Present Trophies

*****

The seventh annual athletic meeting of the Kowloon Hospital will be hold at the sports ground of the hospital, Argyle Street, on Sunday (November 11).

The whole-day event is part of the staff welfare programme sponsored by the hospital’s sports committee.

Dr. G.H. Choa, Director of Medical and Health Services, will present trophies to winners.

Note to Editors: You are invited to have the meeting covered.

It will begin at 10.3>0 a.m., and the presentation of trophies will be at 4 p.m.

-------0 - -

/9........

Wednesday, November 7, 1973

- 9 -

CLOSURE OF PUBLIC PIERS

******

Queen’s Pier will be closed to marine traffic from 8.JO a. in. to 10 a.n. next Wednesday (November 14) when the Commander, British Forces, Lt. General Sir Richard Ward, leaves Hong Kong to take up a senior post in the United Kingdom.

On the other side of the harbour, the Kwun Tong Public Pier will be closed to marine traffic between 10 a.m. and 10.JO a.m. so that Sir Richard nay disembark there on his way to Kai Tak Airport.

On Tuesday (November 1J), the day before Sir Richard’s departure, Queen’s Pier will also be closed for one and a half hours starting from 8.JO p.m. for a rehearsal.

Coxswains and operators of small craft who normally use Queen’s Pier during the periods of closure are advised to use Blake Pier instead.

Those wishing to use Kwun Tong Public Pier during the half-hour closure period are advised to use alternative landing facilities nearby.

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/10........

Wednesday, November 7, 1973

- 10 -

DIRECTOR OF EDUCATION TO ADDRESS CHINESE UNIVERSITY STUDENTS

********

The Director of Education, Mr. J. Canning, will address about 200 students and staff of the School of Education of the Chinese University of Hong Kong at Ma Liu Shui, New Territories, on Friday (November 9) evening.

Mr. Canning will speak on the recommendations of the Board of Education on the proposed expansion of secondary school education in Hong Kong over the next decade.

This will be followed by a discussion.

The Jecture and discussion will last about two hours.

Note to Editors: You are invited to send a representative to cover

the lecture which begins at 6 p.m. on November 9 in Room 6'1'1 in the sixth teaching block of Chung Chi College, Chinese University of Hong Kong.

On arrival, press representatives are requested to contact Mr. Y.S. Hsia or Dr. David-K.C. Kan in Room 112 in the first teaching block of Chung Chi College. This teaching block is opposite the Chung Chi administration block.

-------0---------

Release time: 7_»3Q

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Thursday, November 8, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No.

Revised loan scheme to promote industrial development •••••• 1

Government seeks public views on film censorship ........... 4

Mr. D.J.C. Jones appointed acting Secretary for Economic Services.................................................... 7

No delay in processing occupation permit applications • • • • • 8

Children and youth services of SWD extended to rural villages ............................................................ 10

Water interruption in Western District • •••................

No shortage of oil at present ............• •••............. 12

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Thursday, November 8, 1973

- 1 -

MODIFIED LOAN SCHEME TO STIMULATE INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT

*******

A modified loan scheme open to the vast majority of manufacturing concerns in Hong Kong was announced to-day (Thursday, November 8) by the Commerce and Industry Department.

The aim of the scheme is to stimulate industrial development by making loans available to buy new machinery and equipment.

,:We have taken a fresh look at the original terms of the Loans for Small Industry scheme, and modified procedures will come into immediate effect,” said Hr. Roy Porter, Assistant Director (Industry).

"The changes which have been made are quite minor but it is hoped that they will nevertheless provide some new incentive to industrial concerns to seek funds for modernising their factories, increasing their efficiency and boosting their productive capacity."

The revised scheme has been drawn up on the advice of Loans for Small Industry Committee and after consultation with the Trade and Industry Advisory Board.

It is open to factories employing not more than 200 workers and having not more than 81 million in proprietors’ funds.

This means in effect that 97 per cent of Hong Kong’s industrial undertakings, of which there are more than 22,000, will be able to apply for loans.

The minimum loan amount has been lowered to 830,000 to meet the needs of smaller factories which require less expensive equipment and machinery.

*v

The upper loan limit remains unchanged at 8250,000.

/The range.......•

Thursday, November 8, 1973

- 2 -

The range of manufacturing concerns eligible to seek loans has been extended by raising the upper limit of applicants’ funds from 8600,000 to 81 million.

It is believed that the scheme has also been made more attractive to the smaller firms by introducing a sliding scale of charges for the feasibility studies conducted by the Hong Kong Productivity Centre to evaluate the merit of loan applications.

The charges now range from 3300 for loans between 830,000 and 850,000 to 81,000 for loans of more than 8100,000.

Less strict requirements concerning the production of audited accounts have also been introduced.

Mr. Porter said that, although the need for a feasibility study had come under fire in the past, it was the only practical way of determining the soundness of loan applications, in view of the fact that no collateral security is required.

He stressed that the study was designed to protect applicants from embarking on projects which were likely to lose them money, and to ensure that they obtained the most suitable equipment available for their specific needs.

Another reason for it was to avoid exposing the participating banks to undue risks. This applied equally to public funds, since the Government is committed to underwriting 50 per cent of any losses.

Mr. Porter commented: ’’The sliding scale of charges is far from being excessive. They are well below what it would cost if a firm of private consultants was engaged to do the job.”

/Re pointed .......

Thursday, November 8, 1973

- 3 -

He pointed out that, even if a loan application proved unsuccessful, the feasibility study provided’managements with a critical appraisal of their operations, exposing weak points that could be corrected to achieve greater efficiency.

’’The modifications to the scheme are of a relatively minor nature,” stressed Hr. Porter, "but we believe they have made it more attractive to local industries, and it’s up to them now to take advantage of it."

"It is our hope that they will, because there is a great need for our industrial firms to up-date their manufacturing techniques in order to stay ahead of their competitors in world markets."

Details of how the loan scheme works are being mailed direct by the Commerce and Industry Department to industrial concerns.

The majority of Hong Kong’s banks are participating in the scheme. Further information can be obtained from them, or from the Commerce and Industry Department’s industrial development branch.

Note to Editors: Copies of a booklet on Loans For Small Industry,

in Chinese and English, will be distributed separately • in G.I.S. press boxes this evening.

Requests for interviews or further information should be made to Mr. Brian Hickman, Public Relations Officer, Commerce and Industry Department, Telephone 5-257749.

-------o---------

A....

Thursday, November 8, 1973

PUBLIC VIEWS SOUGHT ON FILM CENSORSHIP

******

The Government is seeking views from the public on the acceptable standard of nude and violent films.

To this effect, the censors have, in conjunction with a professional firm of survey research exponents, started an original series of discussion groups amongst members of the public to try and establish if there is a consensus of opinion on film censorship.

These opinions may subsequently give the censors guidance in interpreting the Film Censorship Codes in the future.

Disclosing this at the luncheon meeting of Y’s Men’s Club today, the Commissioner for Television and Films, Mr. Nigel Watt, said the discussion groups comprised both men and women from various age groups.

Referring to the discussions, he said they aimed at finding out what the majority of the people thought about their public entertainment and what they felt about censorship in general.

He said: ’’These and many other questions will be dealt with during these professionally-conducted and impartial discussions."

It is hoped that some useful patterns on some difficult points, such as whether more critical standards should be applied or not to films being seen by the family in the home through television medium, may emerge when the results are analysed.

From the results of these exchanges a questionaire will be produced and on some of the broader issues a sample public opinion poll will be taken.

4 • • *

/Mr. Watt .......

Thursday, November 8, 1973

- 5 -

Mr. Watt expressed the hope that this important exercise would be concluded and a report published early next year.

The Commissioner criticised what he called the twin ogres of cheap sex and sickening violence and maiming which ’’pervade the public entertainment screens of the world today”.

’’The world,” he said, ’’must take responsibility for the terrible misuse of men’s inventive genius which has given us the great communication gifts of the cinema and television.”

”And Hong Kong must take its share of the blame since now the jaded palates of world 'audiences are turning to Hong Kong-made Kung Fu films for fresh emotional stimulus — films exported in a form which would not pass the censors here.”

He urged producers to research public taste more carefully in future before embarking on lavish productions with ’’debased themes” in the hope of reaping big returns.

Turning to television, Mr. Watt said its influence was ’’very great indeed”. And he was disturbed by the fact that some of the more undesirable ’permissive’ films of the late sixties and early seventies are now finding their way on to the television circuits and are circulated to mass audiences in the privacy of their homes whether they like them or not.

On film censorship, Mr. Watt said: ”It is difficult enough to write a code of practice but it is even more difficult to draw the practical lines separating the acceptable and the unacceptable.

/”In this •••••••

Thursday, November 8, 1973

- 6 -

"In this respect, the members of the panel of Film Censors exercise groat humility. They are ordinary people, like you and me, simply trying to reflect a majority public reaction to some of these borderline sequences.5’

He pointed out that the censors were not setting themselves up as arbiters of private morals.

’’They are solely concerned with public standards in entertainment,” he added.

Note to Editors: Copies of the full text of Mr. Watt’s speech will

be distributed separately in G.I.S. press boxes this evening.

- - 0 - -

Thursday, November 8, 1973

- 7 -

SECRETARY FOR ECONOMIC SERVICES APPOINTED

******

Mi’. Derek J.C. Jones has been appointed acting Secretary for Economic Services and will assume his duties later this month when he returns from leave.

His appointment completes the list of secretary posts recommended in the McKinsey report.

Before coming to Hong Kong, Mr. Jones worked in the Cabinet Office, the Foreign Office and the Colonial Office in the United Kingdom from 1950 to 1967.

Between 1967 and 1971, in Geneva, he was a member of the British Mission to GATT with special responsibility for Hong Kong affairs.

He transferred to Hong Kong in 1971, and has since worked in the Economics Branch of the Colonial Secretariat as Deputy Economic Secretary. ♦ *

Mr. Jones, 46, is married with four children.

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Thursday, November 8, 1973

- 8 -

MO BELAY IN PROCESSING OCCUPATION PERMIT APPLICATIONS

t**4t«**»« • t

The Principal Government Building Surveyor, Mr. Jack Stean, today refuted a reported observation made in the Full Court on Tuesday to the effect that delays in processing building applications within Public Works Department were "leaving the door open for corruption11.

Mr. Stean was referring to newspaper reports of a case heard in the Full Court, in which the Crown applied for leave to review a sentence imposed in a lower court on a building sub-contractor convicted of attempting to bribe a public officer.

In increasing the penalty from a fine of $500 to a fine of $2,000, plus a nine-month prison sentence suspended for two years, the Court was quoted as saying: •’If the P.W.D. continue to allow delays when granting occupation permits, they leave the door open for corruption1'.

Mr. Stean said today: "In view of this statement, I feel I must publicly deny that there was any delay whatsoever in processing this particular application for an occupation permit. The application was received by the Buildings Ordinance Office on August 29, 1973$ the inspection was carried out by a Building Surveyor and his assistant on September 4 and the application was formally rejected on September 10 -well within the required 14-day statutory period.

/"Furthermore, .......

Thursday, November 8, 1973

- 9 -

’’Furthermore, there was no delay when it came to handling the subsequent re—application, which resulted in the occupation permit being granted, on October again within the requisite statutory period.

”1 also wish to state that while there have been occasions when the processing of occupation permit applications has been delayed over the statutory period, such delays have in the vast majority of cases been due solely to incomplete applications by authorized architects and I accordingly deny that the door is left open for corruption by the Public Works Department, as implied.”

-------0---------

/10.......

Thursday, November 8, 1973

- 10 -

EXTENSION GF CHILDREN AND YOUTH SERVICES TO RURAL VILLAGES

Tlie Mobile Library Service operated by the Group and Community Work Division of the Social Welfare Department, has been re-organized and renamed the Library and Rural Mobile Services Unit.

’’The prevailing feature of the re-organization is the setting up of a mobile children and youth service team for rural villages,” said Mr. Wong Pak-chuen, Officer-in-charge of the Unit.

"This re-organization is in line with the Five-Year Plan for Social Welfare development in Hong Kong," he said.

As a result of the re-organization, two types of service are now being provided by the Unit.

Tlie first is the library service for which a total of 27 direct and 15 indirect library stations, spread all over the New Territories, have been established. They are served by two large mobile library varaT Tlie monthly attendance and book circulation at these stations are approximately 7,000 and 10,000 respectively.

The children and youth service is the second branch of the Unit.

Its programme covers direct recreational services, entertainment parties and assistance in the formation of self-programming groups.

At present, this branch provides services at Tuen Mun,Castle Peak Housing Estate, So Kwan Wat, Tai Lam Chung in the Castle Peak district and Lam Tsuen in the Tai Po district.

/For the ••••••

Thursday, November 8, 1975

- 11

For the coming six months, its operational area will be expanded to cover 26 villages and areas in Castle Peak, Yuen Long, Fanling, Tai Pot Shatin and Sai Kung.

Two upcoming special activities by the service team are planned for next week and the beginning of next month.

On Monday, November 12, a"Children’s Friendship Day" has been organized for young people in Lara Tsuen district.

On Saturday, December 1, a games rally for 1,500 children will be held at the Tai Po playground as part of the Festival of Hong Kong celebrations.

_______0_________

WATER CUT

Water supply to a number of premises near the Western Market will be interrupted for eight hours starting from 10 p.m. Saturday (November 10).

The temporary stoppage will enable work to be carried out to connect fresh water mains in the area. ””

The affected buildings are No. 8-16 Connaught Road Jest, No. 1-51 and Ho. 2-52, New Market Street, No. 1-25 and No. 2-18, Tung Loi Lane, No. 1-9 On Tai Street, No. 114-144, Wing Lok Street and the Sheung Wan Post Office and the Western Market North Block.

-------0--------- /12..............................

1

.. *

Thursday, November 8, 1973

- 12 -

NO SHORTAGE OF OIL AT PRESENT

********

Commenting on reports that some dealers were withholding supplies of petroleum products such as kerosene and that some members of the public were hoarding and stockpiling, a Government spokesman said:

"There is no shortage of oil in Hong Kong at the present time.

Stocks are normal and, as yet, there has been no interruption of deliveries."

He repeated the Government’s previous advice to the community that it was obviously prudent for everyone to avoid waste and unnecessary consumption.

"We have had reports that some people are using cans and containers which are not specially designed for the storage of inflammable liquids," he said.

"This could easily result in a serious fire and endanger not only the hoarders but their neighbours’ lives and property as well."

-------0---------

Release time: 7.30 p.m.

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Friday, November 9, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No.

Full rates to be paid for unoccupied domestic units from next year ••••»•••.....•................................    . 1

Hiu Kv/ong Street re-opened..................................... 2

Biggest-ever careers exhibition to be staged later this month...........*•»•••• ..n.••.....................•...........  J

Employment agencies must obtain a licence................  • 6

"Hot-line" for queries on modified loan scheme to small industries • • • ...••••••••..........................    • •. 7

Seventh inter-institution sports meet on Sunday ••••••••••••• 8

Temporary closure of Wyndham Street ......................... 10

New arrangements for Public Light Buses to reduce congestion in Central ..................................................   11

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Friday, November % 1975

1 -

MEASURES TO DISCOURAGE HOARDING OF DOMESTIC PREMISES

O.vners Of Unoccupied Units To Pay Full Rates

********

As from next year, owners of domestic premises will not be able to claim a refund of rates when the premises are unoccupied.

At the same tine, vacant domestic units in new buildings completed after January 1, 197^ will be assessed to rates after three clear months from the day of issuance of occupation permits instead of six months as at present.

These are some of the proposed changes set out in the Rating (Amendment) Bill 1975» published in today’s Gazette.

Under the amending Bill, vacant domestic premises within a new building certified for occupation on or after January 1 next year will not be assessed to rates until three months following the issue of the occupation certificate.

If the premises are occupied earlier, however, they will be assessed to rates from the first day of the month following occupation.

Commenting on the nevz Bill, the Acting Commissioner of Rating and Valuation, Hr. T.F. Edwards, explained that at present a refund amounting to half of the rates paid was made on all unoccupied premises.

The nevz measures, he said,, were being introduced to encourage owners to put their vacant premises back on the market as soon as possible and to encourage the early occupation of new buildings.

/Mr. Edwards ........

Friday, November % 1973

- 2 -

Mr. Edwards said: ,fThe measures are closely linked to the new rent control legislation and are aimed at obtaining the best possible use of the existing supply of domestic accommodation.”

He emphasized that the revised legislation was a deterrent measure in that ::it discourages the hoarding of domestic premises for capital appreciation or for excessively high rents.”

Mr. Edwards pointed out that unoccupied non-domestic premises would not be affected by the new measure and would continue to enjoy a refund of half the amount paid.

ITIn addition, the free rates period of six months for this type of premises in newly completed buildings remains unchanged,” he added.

-------0 --------

HIU KWONG STREET RE-OPENED

******

The section of Hiu Kwong Street between Block No. 13 and No. 17» Sau Mau Ping Estate, is now re-opened to traffic following the completion of repair work to the embankment of Hiu Kwong Street near Sau Lai Street.

-------0---------

Friday, November % 1973

- 3 -z HONG KONG’S BIGGEST-EVER CAREERS EXHIBITION

To Be Staged On Wanchai Reclamation «**»*!*«

The Youth Employment Advisory Service of the Labour Department is to stage Hong Kong’s biggest-ever Careers Exhibition as a major feature of this year’s Festival of Hong Kong.

The Commissioner of Labour, Mr. I.R. Price, said today the exhibition - to be staged by the Service - would be more than twice the size of last year’s pilot effort by the department in the City Hall .

’•Last year’s exhibition, which only lasted for a couple of days, showed that there is a tremendous demand for an exhibition of this kind,” he said.

’We received a very good response at last year’s exhibition. Since then v/e have received a flood of requests from students, teachers, parents, and leaders of commerce and industry for a further exhibition.” Mr. Price said this year’s enlarged exhibition would occupy half of the CHA pavilion on the Wanchai Reclamation during the period of the Festival of Hong Kong. It would be officially opened at J.00 p.m. on Friday, November 23 by the Vice-Chancellor of the University of Hong Kong, Dr. Rayson Huang, and would be open from 10.00 a.m. to 7.00 p.m. every day until Sunday, December 2.

’•This year v/e have some 30 participants showing jobs in a wide range of spheres, covering industry, commerce and government. All in all, there will be some 100 jobs shown,” he said.

/”Young people •••••«

Friday, November 9, 1973

- 4 -

,rYoung people will be told about entry qualifications, salary and promotion prospects, further training possibilities and detaila of the sort of work available in various fields. And there will be a wealth of literature to take away and study afterwards.

”1110 exhibition is aimed primarily at those nearing the end of their secondary school life," Mr. Price said, "but the information available will be of great value to all students older.

"The choice of a career is probably one of the most important that any young man or woman will ever be called on to make," he said.

"If it is a choice made wisely, after careful thought and after taking expert advice, it can lead to life-long satisfaction and fulfilment. If the choice is taken hurriedly, and without giving proper thought to the job to which the young person is best fitted, it can mean that lie or she will be discontented and unhappy - all their life."

Mr. Price said the exhibition was a major extension of the services offered by the Labour Department’s Youth Employment Advisory Service, which disseminates Careers Information and advice to school students through talks and seminars.

In the academic year 1972-73, officers of the Service had delivered 417 talks in 117 schools reaching 23,400 students.

The Service had also distributed to students free of charge some 44,000 pamphlets on various careers opportunities in Hong Kong.

/Mr. Price

Friday, November % 1973

- 5 -

Mr. Price said that a large number of Hong Kong’s leading schools had been invited to visit the exhibition in school groups.

’•This is, of course, an ideal way to see the exhibition,” • • Ui- ■

he said. They can be met by officers of the Youth Employment Advisory Service and briefed before being given a conducted tour.

’’Any other school or youth organisation, which also wishes to visit the exhibition in a group can contact the Service by ringing 5-282523 to make arrangements,” he said.

’•This is an exhibition which no student, parent, teacher - or, indeed, any employer - should miss,” said Mr. Price.

”Nov7here else in Hong Kong at any time will there be available to our young people, such a wide range of careers information. ”

-------0---------

/6

Friday, November 9, 1975

- 6 -

LICENCE FOR EMPLOYMENT AGENCIES ******

Employment agencies in Hong Kong are required to obtain a licence from the Commissioner of Labour under the Employment (Amendment) Ordinance 1973 which will come into effect on January 1 next year.

The operative date of the legislation was published in the Gazette today.

The Assistant Commissioner of Labour, Mr. Lao Mou-chi, said today every employment agency, unless specifically excluded from the legislation or exempted by the Commissioner, must obtain a licence.

An employment agency which deals with both local and overseas employment has to obtain separate licences.

’’Failure to obtain a licence shall be an offence and the operator of the agency shall be liable on conviction to a fine of S5i000."

Mr. Lao said circular letters had already been sent to all known employment agencies to give them sufficient notice to comply with the law, and each had been given a* tfopy *of the Guide to the Employment Agency Regulations.

’’All employment agencies are advised to complete their licencing requirements before the effective date,” he said.

-------0----------

Friday, November 9» 1973

- 7 -

’’HOT-LINE” FOR LOANS TO INDUSTRY INQUIRIES

******

A telephone 1’hot-line” has been opened by the Commerce and Industry Department to deal with queries about the modified loan scheme for industrial firms in Hong Kong.

The number to ring is 5-258894. Inquiries will be handled by officers in the Department’s Industrial Development Branch who can speak both English and Chinese.

The terms of the original Loans for Small Industry scheme have been modified to make it more attractive to local manufacturing concerns.

The aim is to stimulate industrial development by making Joans available to buy new machinery and equipment.

Thirty local banks participating in the scheme have been sent explanatory booklets and application forms for use by interested applicants.

Fact sheets about the scheme have also been sent to more than 20,000 registered industrial concerns.

The scheme is open to factories employing not more than 200 workers and having not more than $1 million in proprietors’ funds.

This means in effect that 97 per cent of all Hong Kong’s manufacturing concerns are eligible to apply for loans to improve their performance.

-----------------

/8........

Friday, November 91 1973

- 8 -r SEVENTH INTER-INSTITUTION SPORTS MEET 1973

* ♦ * ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ *

The seventh inter-institution sports meet for boys and girls in institutions, run by the Social Welfare Department and voluntary organisations, will be held on Sunday (November 11) at the Boundary Street Public Sports Ground in Kowloon.

Some 200 competitors from seven institutions will be participating in the various field and track events and invitation races. Besides the participants another 600 boys and girls will be there as spectators.

The institutions taking part in this sports meet are the Castle Peak Boys1 Home, the Begonia Road Boys* Home, the 0 Pui Shan Boys1 Horae, the Ma Tau Wei Girls1 Home and the Kwun Tong Hostel, all of which are run by the Social Welfare Department. The others are the Society for Boys Centres and the Hong Kong Juvenile Care Centre, both voluntary •organisations.

This sports meet is being sponsored by Mr. Lau Wong-fat, Chairman of the Tuen Mun Rural Committee, who is this year’s President of the Executive Committee responsible for arranging the prograr-le. Members of the Committee comprise representatives from the participating institutions as well as senior officers of the Probation and Corrections Division of the Social Welfare Department under which its institutions are operated.

On Sunday, the morning will be $evoted to the opening ceremony and the heats of the track event. The finals and invitation races followed by a band performance, mass drill and the presentation of prizes will take place in the afternoon;

/Guests invited ...•••

Friday, November % 1973

- 9 -

Guests invited for the occasion include members of the Judiciary, Police, Fire Services and City District Officials, the Hong Kong Boy Scouts Association, • academic authorities of the Hong Kong University and Chinese University, Kaifong leaders, social workers, educationalists and Justices of the Peace.

The inter*-institution sports meet was initiated in 19^1 by a group of magistrates who donated a challenge cup for the occasion.

”The objective was to bring together all the boys and girls under the care of the institutions for a day of sports to develop among them a sense of healthy competition, physical well-being and mutual under-9 9

standing,” said Mr. Leung Kai-wah, Secretary of the Executive Committee, who is also the Superintendent of the Kwun Tong Hostel.

Since then, Mr. Leung said, there has been a zealous support and encourageaont from all sectors of the community, among them judges, magistrates, social reformers and educationalists. This sports meet is now held biennially.

Note to Editors: You are cordially invited to cover the above

sports meet on Sunday, November 11, at the Boundary Street Playground.

The programme for the day is as follows:

9.00 - 9*30 a.m. Opening Ceremony

9.30-12.30 Heats

2.00 - 4.00 p.m. Final track events and invitation races

4.00 - 4.45 p.m. Obstacle race and performances

4.45 - 5.15 p.m. Prize-giving

-------0 ------- /10..................

Friday, November 9i 1973

- 10 -

TEMPORARY CLOSURE OF WYNDHAM STREET

********

A section of Wyndham Street between On Lan Street and Queen’s

Road Central will be closed to all traffic from 1.50 p.m. to about

9.45 p.m. on Sunday (November 11).

The temporary closure will enable the Hong Kong Electric Co. Ltd. to move a 42-ton transformer from On Lan Street to Tin Chong Street.

Only vehicles seeking access Ito Wellington Street will be permitted to enter Wyndham Street during this period.

All other traffic will be diverted east into Lower Albert Road.

Motorists are advised that due to the weight of the load, the transporting vehicle is extremely slow and will require about 15 minutes to cross Queen’s Road Central from Wyndham Street into Pedder Street.

East and westbound traffic flow along Queen’s Road Central will therefore be stopped for approximately 15 minutes from about 8.45 p.m. on that day.

Appropriate signs will be in position to assist motorists.

-------0---------

Friday, November 9, 1975

- 11 -

NEW ARRANGEMEIITS FOR P.L.B. OPERATIONS IN CENTRAL To Reduce Traffic Congestion ******

A new traffic management scheme for public light buses aimed at improving traffic flow in Central District will be introduced early next month.

The intorduction of this scheme comes after careful study by staff of the PWD Highways Office, Police Traffic Branch and Transport Department.

Under the new scheme, the movement of PLBs and the points where they may pick up or set down passengers, are kept as far as possible outside the congested Central District, but not so far out as to cause problems for passengers.

The main difficulty has been to find big enough sites in the right places. At peak hours on weekdays, about 700 PLBs an hour depart from Central for Wan Chai, North Point and Shau Kei Wan, while nearly 400 PLBs an hour depart in the other direction for Pok Fu Lam, Wah Fu and Aberdeen.

A three-stage scheme will start early next month with new PLB stands for picking up passengers on the reclamation at Rumsey Street; at the eastern end of the area in front of the Vehicular ferry terminal; and at the eastern end of the Central Bus Station, with pedestrian access by the existing overhead footbridge to and from Central.

Further stands for westbound PLBs will also be set up in Stanley Street and Wellington Street.

/At the .......

Friday, November 9? 1973

- 12 -

At the same time, the entry of PLBs into certain streets will be banned completely, end PLBs will be prohibited from picking up/setting down passengers in other streets although they may travel along them without stopping.

"This scheme must not be thought of as new restrictions on PLBs," the spokesman said.

"It’s really a re-arrangement of facilities so as to reduce traffic congestion in Central and to let both PLBs and the travelling public know exactly where they may stop and board east and westbound PLBs.

"The scheme does not reduce the number of PLBs operating from Central nor does it make life more difficult for intending PLB passengers. We don’t claim the scheme to be ideal and there are bound to be complaints. But it’s the best that can be done with the space available.”

PLB operators were informed of the proposals at a meeting this afternoon, and liaison with other interested parties arranged through the good offices of the City District Officer (Central).

Details of the dates for putting the stages into operation and of road restrictions will be promulgated in the next few weeks.

-------0---------

Release time:~_7,>A3. p_»rn«

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Saturday, November 10, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No«

Two special committees being set up to deal with oil problems..........................................••••••••• T

Water interruption in Central District ...................... 2

Britain to fight discrimination against Hong Kong in E.E.C. 5

Number of industrial undertakings in Hong Kong............. 5

New quarry in Kowloon to be developed soon • ................ 6

Lam Tsuen Children Friendship Day.......................... 7

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Saturday, November 10, 1973

TWO SPECIAL COIUilTTEES BEING SET UP TO DEAL WITH OIL PROBLEMS

' Director Of Oil Supplies Appointed

Two special committees are being established and a Director of Oil Supplies has been appointed to deal with problems which may result from any shortage of oil and petroleum products in Hong Kong.

Announcing this today a government spokesman said that these committees would include senior government officers and representatives of oil companies.

He stressed that there was no. shortage of oil in Hong Kong at the moment. Stocks were normal and, as yet, there had been no interruption of deliveries.

An Oil Policy Committee has been established at a high level in Government and is headed by the Deputy Colonial Secretary, Mr. Michael Clinton. Members include the Secretaries for Environment and Security and the Deputy Economic Secretary, the Director of Commerce and Industry, and representatives of oil companies in Hong Kong. The Oil Policy Committee will decide on essentail priorities and will meet as required.

Mr. R. Porter, Assistant Director of Commerce and Industry, has been appointed Director of Oil Supplies and will be a member of the Oil Policy Committee. He will be Chairman of the Oil Distribution Committee which is charged initially with preparing plans for the introduction of such controls as may beoome necessary. This committee will be served by a full time staff of Government officers.

/°I emphasise........

Saturday, November 10, 1973

- 2 -

"I emphasise once again," the. spokesman said, "that there is no shortage of oil at present and it is not in the interests of the community for people to hoard stocks or for dealers to hold back supplies in the hope of a price rise."

He reiterated that the temporary storage of inflammable items in cans and containers not specially designed for the purpose constituted a serious fire risk. "This could easily result in serious fires and endanger not only the hoarders themselves but also the lives and property of their neighbours."

Note to Editors; Copies of a photograph and biographical details of Mr. Roy Porter will be distributed in the Press boxes later this afternoon.

- - - - 0--------

, WATER CUT

Water supply to a number of premises in Central District will be

turned off'for eight hours starting from 10 p.m. on Monday (November 12).

The temporary stoppage is to enable Waterworks Office staff to

connect.fresh water mains at Wyndham Street near Arbuthnot Road.

The premises affected are No. 30-56 and No. 31-79 Wyndham Street;

No. 1 Lower Albert Road, including St. Paul’s College; and No. 2 Lower

Albert Road, including the Dairy Farm depot.

-------0---------

Saturday, November 10, 1973

- 3 -

BRITAIN TO FIGHT DISCRIMINATION

AGAINST HONG KONG IN E.E.C.

***!***

Discrimination against Hong Kong’s textile and footwear exports in the European Economic Community’s generalised scheme of preferences is ”no longer acceptable,” Mr. Anthony Royle, Parliamentary Under Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, has told the House of Commons.

He said the British Government intends to ’’press resolutely” for the inclusion of Hong Kong*s textiles and footwear in the scheme from 1975 onwards•

Mr. Royle was replying to a question from Mr. Peter Hordern, M.P., who asked what action was being taken to remedy exclusion of Hong Kong’s textile and footwear exports, in view of the United Kingdom’s obligation to align with the E.E.C.’s generalised system of preferences on January 1 next year.

The full text of Mr. Royle’s reply, which was received by the Hong Kong Government today, is as follows:

”At a meeting of the Council of Ministers of the E.E.C. on November 6, my Right Honourable Friend, the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster (Mr. John Davie's, British Minister for European Affairs), made a strong statement on the position of Hong Kong.

”He said that during the enlargement negotiations in 1971 the Community had agreed to admit Hong Kong to its generalised system of preferences, subject to the exclusion of her textile and footwear exports.

/’’Our chief........

Saturday, November 10, 1973

- 4 -

”0ur chief negotiator at the time had agreed to this arrangement

but he had made it clear to the Community that it would be the United

Kingdom’s continuing concern to avoid discrimination against Hong Kong.

’’The arrangements agreed by our partners in 1971 may have seemed

to them not ungenerous. But an important consideration now was that since. 1971 the situation had changed to the detriment of Hong Kong and that the Philippines, Thailand and Yugoslavia, all of them serious competitors of Hong Kong, had become beneficiaries under the Community’s scheme in respect of cotton textiles.

”We had examined this matter carefully and had concluded that in

present circumstances it was no longer acceptable for discrimination to apply against Hong Kong.

”As this aspect of the scheme will remain unchanged for 1974, my

Right Honourable Friend has put his colleagues on notice that in the context of next year’s review we intend to press resolutely for the inclusion of Hong Kong’s textiles and footwear ih the scheme from 1975 onwards.”

- - 0 - -

/5

Saturday, November 10, 1973

- 5 -

NUIIBER OF H.K. INDUSTRIAL UNDERTAKINGS ******

The number of Industrial Undertakings in Hong Kong stood at 21,610 at the end of September, according to a survey just completed by the Census and Statistics Department.

The survey shows an increase of 656 factories over the number at the same time last year, but is 498 lower than the figure for the June quarter this year.

Employment in industry stood at 619,257 - an increase of 2,513 r •' over the September quarter last year and a drop of 5,850 on the June quarter Industrialists reported a total of 9,269 job vacancies - equivalent to 1.5 per cent of employment in industry. The main vacancies were in electronics (2,445), the garment industry (2,452), the plastics industry (711) and the metal products industry (535)•

There was increased employment in a number of industries, including cotton spinning and weaving - where employment went up by 2,020 - and the electronics industry - up by 1,444.

There were drops in the workforce of the woollen knitting industry (3,493)3 the plastics industry (5,646) and the wig-making industry (2,461).

-------0----------

/ 6.......

Saturday, November 10, 1975

- • 6 - -

NEW QUARRY IN KOVJLCON TO BE DEVELOPED SOON

******

Tenders will soon be invited for the development of a new quarry at Anderson Road north of Sau Mau Ping in Kowloon.

The new contract will emphasise that the quarry must be worked by modern methods of quarrying to ensure efficient production and safe working condition.

Provision will also be made for the successful contractor to continue working until the available reserves of stone are removed within the designated area.

Ihe contractor must also be responsible for landscaping the area when the extraction of stone is completed.

The whole operation is expected to take 10 years, although this period may be reduced if there is a large increase in the demand for quarry products.

The area that it is proposed to quarry lies north of Anderson Road and will adjoin the existing quarries in the district.

The proposed area incorporates several other quarry sites only one of which is now being worked. The quarry area has been designed and the works will be supervised by the Quarries section of the Civil Engineering Office, Public Works Department.

-------0---------

Saturday, November 10, 1973

- 7 -

LAM TSUEN CHILDREN FRIENDSHIP DAY

******

The Ngau Tau Kok Estate Community Work Office and Library and Rural Mobile Services Unit of the Social Welfare Department will hold a Children’s Friendship Day on Monday (November 12) at Lam Tsuen in Tai Po district.

This is one of their children and youth service programmes organized to entertain about 100 children aged from 10 to 12 from Lam Tsuen area.

The programme will consist of competitive games and will be run by members of the Youth Services Team and a self-programming group of the Ngau Tau Kok Estate Community Work Office.

’’This project is to give urban youth an opportunity to gain selfsatisfaction by providing voluntary service to village children to enable them to get to laiow children from a rural social background and to learn to organize joint projects co-operatively,” said Mr. Wong Pak-chuen, Officerin-charge of the Library and Rural Mobile Services Unit.

”It will also provide the children of Lam Tsuen with a day’s fun and a chance to make new friends,” he said.

-------0---------

Release time: 2.^0 p.m.

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Saturday, November 10, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No«

Two special committees being set up to deal with oil problems..........................................••••••••• T

Water interruption in Central District ...................... 2

Britain to fight discrimination against Hong Kong in E.E.C. 5

Number of industrial undertakings in Hong Kong............. 5

New quarry in Kowloon to be developed soon • ................ 6

Lam Tsuen Children Friendship Day.......................... 7

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Saturday, November 10, 1973

TWO SPECIAL COIUilTTEES BEING SET UP TO DEAL WITH OIL PROBLEMS

' Director Of Oil Supplies Appointed

Two special committees are being established and a Director of Oil Supplies has been appointed to deal with problems which may result from any shortage of oil and petroleum products in Hong Kong.

Announcing this today a government spokesman said that these committees would include senior government officers and representatives of oil companies.

He stressed that there was no. shortage of oil in Hong Kong at the moment. Stocks were normal and, as yet, there had been no interruption of deliveries.

An Oil Policy Committee has been established at a high level in Government and is headed by the Deputy Colonial Secretary, Mr. Michael Clinton. Members include the Secretaries for Environment and Security and the Deputy Economic Secretary, the Director of Commerce and Industry, and representatives of oil companies in Hong Kong. The Oil Policy Committee will decide on essentail priorities and will meet as required.

Mr. R. Porter, Assistant Director of Commerce and Industry, has been appointed Director of Oil Supplies and will be a member of the Oil Policy Committee. He will be Chairman of the Oil Distribution Committee which is charged initially with preparing plans for the introduction of such controls as may beoome necessary. This committee will be served by a full time staff of Government officers.

/°I emphasise........

Saturday, November 10, 1973

- 2 -

"I emphasise once again," the. spokesman said, "that there is no shortage of oil at present and it is not in the interests of the community for people to hoard stocks or for dealers to hold back supplies in the hope of a price rise."

He reiterated that the temporary storage of inflammable items in cans and containers not specially designed for the purpose constituted a serious fire risk. "This could easily result in serious fires and endanger not only the hoarders themselves but also the lives and property of their neighbours."

Note to Editors; Copies of a photograph and biographical details of Mr. Roy Porter will be distributed in the Press boxes later this afternoon.

- - - - 0--------

, WATER CUT

Water supply to a number of premises in Central District will be

turned off'for eight hours starting from 10 p.m. on Monday (November 12).

The temporary stoppage is to enable Waterworks Office staff to

connect.fresh water mains at Wyndham Street near Arbuthnot Road.

The premises affected are No. 30-56 and No. 31-79 Wyndham Street;

No. 1 Lower Albert Road, including St. Paul’s College; and No. 2 Lower

Albert Road, including the Dairy Farm depot.

-------0---------

Saturday, November 10, 1973

- 3 -

BRITAIN TO FIGHT DISCRIMINATION

AGAINST HONG KONG IN E.E.C.

***!***

Discrimination against Hong Kong’s textile and footwear exports in the European Economic Community’s generalised scheme of preferences is ”no longer acceptable,” Mr. Anthony Royle, Parliamentary Under Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, has told the House of Commons.

He said the British Government intends to ’’press resolutely” for the inclusion of Hong Kong*s textiles and footwear in the scheme from 1975 onwards•

Mr. Royle was replying to a question from Mr. Peter Hordern, M.P., who asked what action was being taken to remedy exclusion of Hong Kong’s textile and footwear exports, in view of the United Kingdom’s obligation to align with the E.E.C.’s generalised system of preferences on January 1 next year.

The full text of Mr. Royle’s reply, which was received by the Hong Kong Government today, is as follows:

”At a meeting of the Council of Ministers of the E.E.C. on November 6, my Right Honourable Friend, the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster (Mr. John Davie's, British Minister for European Affairs), made a strong statement on the position of Hong Kong.

”He said that during the enlargement negotiations in 1971 the Community had agreed to admit Hong Kong to its generalised system of preferences, subject to the exclusion of her textile and footwear exports.

/’’Our chief........

Saturday, November 10, 1973

- 4 -

”0ur chief negotiator at the time had agreed to this arrangement

but he had made it clear to the Community that it would be the United

Kingdom’s continuing concern to avoid discrimination against Hong Kong.

’’The arrangements agreed by our partners in 1971 may have seemed

to them not ungenerous. But an important consideration now was that since. 1971 the situation had changed to the detriment of Hong Kong and that the Philippines, Thailand and Yugoslavia, all of them serious competitors of Hong Kong, had become beneficiaries under the Community’s scheme in respect of cotton textiles.

”We had examined this matter carefully and had concluded that in

present circumstances it was no longer acceptable for discrimination to apply against Hong Kong.

”As this aspect of the scheme will remain unchanged for 1974, my

Right Honourable Friend has put his colleagues on notice that in the context of next year’s review we intend to press resolutely for the inclusion of Hong Kong’s textiles and footwear ih the scheme from 1975 onwards.”

- - 0 - -

/5

Saturday, November 10, 1973

- 5 -

NUIIBER OF H.K. INDUSTRIAL UNDERTAKINGS ******

The number of Industrial Undertakings in Hong Kong stood at 21,610 at the end of September, according to a survey just completed by the Census and Statistics Department.

The survey shows an increase of 656 factories over the number at the same time last year, but is 498 lower than the figure for the June quarter this year.

Employment in industry stood at 619,257 - an increase of 2,513 r •' over the September quarter last year and a drop of 5,850 on the June quarter Industrialists reported a total of 9,269 job vacancies - equivalent to 1.5 per cent of employment in industry. The main vacancies were in electronics (2,445), the garment industry (2,452), the plastics industry (711) and the metal products industry (535)•

There was increased employment in a number of industries, including cotton spinning and weaving - where employment went up by 2,020 - and the electronics industry - up by 1,444.

There were drops in the workforce of the woollen knitting industry (3,493)3 the plastics industry (5,646) and the wig-making industry (2,461).

-------0----------

/ 6.......

Saturday, November 10, 1975

- • 6 - -

NEW QUARRY IN KOVJLCON TO BE DEVELOPED SOON

******

Tenders will soon be invited for the development of a new quarry at Anderson Road north of Sau Mau Ping in Kowloon.

The new contract will emphasise that the quarry must be worked by modern methods of quarrying to ensure efficient production and safe working condition.

Provision will also be made for the successful contractor to continue working until the available reserves of stone are removed within the designated area.

Ihe contractor must also be responsible for landscaping the area when the extraction of stone is completed.

The whole operation is expected to take 10 years, although this period may be reduced if there is a large increase in the demand for quarry products.

The area that it is proposed to quarry lies north of Anderson Road and will adjoin the existing quarries in the district.

The proposed area incorporates several other quarry sites only one of which is now being worked. The quarry area has been designed and the works will be supervised by the Quarries section of the Civil Engineering Office, Public Works Department.

-------0---------

Saturday, November 10, 1973

- 7 -

LAM TSUEN CHILDREN FRIENDSHIP DAY

******

The Ngau Tau Kok Estate Community Work Office and Library and Rural Mobile Services Unit of the Social Welfare Department will hold a Children’s Friendship Day on Monday (November 12) at Lam Tsuen in Tai Po district.

This is one of their children and youth service programmes organized to entertain about 100 children aged from 10 to 12 from Lam Tsuen area.

The programme will consist of competitive games and will be run by members of the Youth Services Team and a self-programming group of the Ngau Tau Kok Estate Community Work Office.

’’This project is to give urban youth an opportunity to gain selfsatisfaction by providing voluntary service to village children to enable them to get to laiow children from a rural social background and to learn to organize joint projects co-operatively,” said Mr. Wong Pak-chuen, Officerin-charge of the Library and Rural Mobile Services Unit.

”It will also provide the children of Lam Tsuen with a day’s fun and a chance to make new friends,” he said.

-------0---------

Release time: 2.^0 p.m.

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Monday, November 12, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No.

Compensation for squatter factories involved in clearances.• 1

Administration building for Lok On Pai desalting plant nears completion •.•••••••••••«•••••••••••••••••••••••••••• 3

Medical and Health Department talcing part in careers exhibition  ............................................... 5

Temporary traffic re-arrangement in Central...........••••• 7

Lady MacLehose to visit Community Chest member agency in Chai Wan 8

New government appointment ...............................• 9

Education green paper in popular demand •••••••.......••••• 10

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5’233191

Monday, November 12, 1973

- 1 -

COMPENSATION FOR SQUATTER FACTORIES ********

Ihe Housing Authority is preparing to spend millions of dollars to compensate owners of squatter .factories that have to be cleared for development# This is to help them re-establish their business in the private sector.

Under the old policy, owners of surveyed industrial undertakings were offered units in Housing Authority flatted factories.

From now on the new policy which is more generous and flexible will allnw ex-gratia compensation of $20 per square foot - calculated on the differential between Housing Authority Factory Rent and those in the open market. To minimise hardship for small operators with premises under 300 square feet, a minimum of $6,000 will be paid.

The new policy has been adopted because of a severe shortage of Housing Authority flatted factory units brought about by the increase in the major development projects including the 10-year housing programme and the Mass Transit Railway. It is estimated that in the next two years 2,800 flatted factory units of 256 square feet will be needed to reprovision operators displaced by scheduled clearances.

Another factor behind the change is the large number of operators whose trades are unsuitable for Housing Authority flatted factories, and who re-assign their units rather than change trade. A problem has also arisen because of the large number of operators requiring single units. Because of the design of the factory building, only a limited number of these can be allocated.

/In future.........

Monday, November 12, 1973

- 2 -

In future clearances, cash compensation will be offered to those who qualify but, if flatted factory space is available, owners of small undertakings of 50 to 3,000 square feet will have the option of applying for a unit, or units, instead. But no change of trade or assignments will be allowed.

If all eligible undertakings opt for cash, it is estimated that it will cost the government S3 million to cover the rest of this year’s commitment, and a probable S9 million in 197/+-75*

Mr. David Weeks, Administrative Officer (Clearance) of Housing Department, said the amount of cash compensation had been computed on the basis of capitalizing the subsidy element in the differential between government and commercial factory rents.

,rTt is necessary to change our policy at this time because although there is a shortage of Housing Authority units, there is a good supply of suitable premises in the private sector, and we must press on with our clearances. Emilies living in small workshops will continue to be offered public housing”, he said.

-------0---------

/3........

Monday, November 12, 1973

- 3 -

DESALTING PLANT ADMINISTRATION BUILDING READY SOON

********

The administration building for the sea-water desalting plant at Lok On Pai, in the New Territories is nearing completion and is expected to be ready for occupation in about four months.

The four-storey building, which stands at the waterfront near the Castle Peak Hotel, will contain the main control room for the desalting plant as well as offices, a laboratory, storage of records and a canteen. Also housed in the building will be the main workshops and workshop stores for maintenance of the plant.

In the meantime, work on other parts of the desalting plant is going ahead at full speed.

Foundation work of the auxiliary plant building and boiler houses is almost completed. These structures will house six turbo-generators and six boilers respectively.

The base for one of the six evaporators, which will work in conjunction with the boilers, has also been completed.

In addition, site formation work for fuel storage tanks and the product water treatment house is well in progress.

The fuel jetty, where tankers will off-load fuel oil for the plant, is half done and should be completed in about a month.

/The sea-water •••••••

Monday, November 12, 1973

- 4 -

The sea-water desalting plant, on completion, will be the largest of its kind in the world with an output of 40 million gallons of fresh water a day. The biggest plant of this type now is the one in Kuwait which has a daily production of five million gallons.

The Eong Kong desalting plant will consist of six units each complete with its steam boiler, evaporator and associated ancillaries.

"The first unit,” the Chief Resident Engineer, Mr. J.L. McDermont of th* Public Works Department, said "is expected to be operational at the end of October next year with a daily production of 6-2/5 million gallons of fresh water. The remaining units will come into operation thereafter at three-monthly intervals."

The desalting plant is expected to become fully operational in January 19?6 when some 200 engineers and technicians will be required to carry out processing and maintenance work.

The fresh water produced by the plant will be pumped under pressure to the existing Tai Lam Chung Reservoir through steel pipelines and a mile-long tunnel, which are being built.

Note to Editors: Copies of a photograph of the administration

building are boxed for collection.

Monday, November 12, 1975

- 5 -

NURSING AS A CAREER

Medical And Health Department Taking Part In Exhibition

******

The Medical and Health Department is taking up two stalls in the Careers Exhibition opening in the Wanchai reclamation later this month to draw attention to the rewards of nursing as a profession.

One stall will deal with general nursing, and the other with psychiatric nursing.

In the general nursing stall, there will be demonstrations throughout the day of a nurse at work by the bedside of a patient. She will be seen taking care of him, and attending to his needs.

In the psychiatric nursing stall, a model of the new Princess Margaret Hospital will be on display. This hospital is composed of two wings -the general and the psychiatric, with 1,300 beds in each wing.

The general wing is expected to open in the latter part of next year, and the psychiatric wing by 1978. The model gives an accurate impression of what the completed project will look like.

The complex includes the third nursing school proposed by the Medical Development Advisory Committee in its recently-published report. The present two schools are in the Queen Mary and Queen Elizabeth hospitals.

A model of a human brain will also be displayed in the psychiatric nursing stall, as well as photographs relating to psychiatric nursing now being carried out in hospitals such as the Castle Peak Hospital.

/One section .......

Monday, November 12, 1973

- 6 -

One section of the combined stalls will be reserved for the screening of two film-slide shows throughout the day entitled respectively "Life of a general, nurse" and "Life of a psychiatric nurse." The audience will see these nurses at work, during their studies, and in their free time.

Literature describing the nursing profession and career prospects will be available £ree on application at either stall.

-------0---------

/7........

Monday, November 12, 1973

TRAFFIC RE-ARRANGEMENTS IN CENTRAL

********

Temporary traffic restrictions will be imposed at Edinburgh Plaoe and Queen1s Pier in Central district tomorrow and Wednesday morning.

The special arrangements are to facilitate a ceremonial parade in Edinburgh Place to mark the departure of His Excellency, the Commander British Forces, Sir Richard Ward and Lady Ward.

The parade will be held at 9 a.m. on Wednesday (November 14), and a rehearsal is to be held the day before.

With effect from 8.30 a.m. on the two days, vehicular access to Edinburgh Place East and Queen’s Pier from Connaught Road Central will be prohibited, with the exception of flag cars, labelled cars and official cars entering H.M.S. Tamar.

Peale public light buses will be admitted, but they will be

directed to a temporary bus stand at the slip road east of the City Hall multi-storey car park.

The public light bus stand in Edinburgh Place adjacent to the west gate of H.M.S, Tamar, will be temporarily suspended.

The arrangements are expected to last until about 10 a.m., and appropriate traffic signs will be posted to guide motorists.

At the same time, no learner driver will be allowed to use Sau Nga Road in Kwun Tong as from 10 a.m. tomorrow (Tuesday).

A spokesman for the Transport Department explained that the restriction was necessary because Sau Nga Road was the main access to the new United Christian Hospital.

- - 0 - -

/8

Monday, November 12, 1973

~ 8 -

LADY MACLEHOSE TO VISIT LOTS BRIGADE

********

Lady MacLehose, President of the Community Chest of Hong Kong, mil be visiting the Hong Kong Council of Boys’ Brigade in Chai Wan tomorrow (Tuesday) evening.

The Boys' Brigade aims at promoting the spirit of discipline? obedience and self-respect among boys between the ages of eight and 19 •

On arrival, Lady MacLehose will be met by Mr. K.C. Thornton, President of the Brigade and Rev Li Ping-kwong, the Chairman, who will take her on a tour of the premises.

A review of officers and boys of the 3rd company of the Brigade will take place at the parade ground on the roof, and the company will then demonstrate their skill in drills, gymnastics and group activities.

Lady MacLehose will be accompanied on the visit by Miss Susan Hume, Social Secretary of Government House, and Mr. Colin Morrison, Executive Director of the Chesc.

Note to Editors: You are invited to cover the visit. Transport

will be provided. A nine-seater van will be waiting at Battery Path outside the Victoria District Court at 7*30 p.m<» to take the Press to Chai Wan. Miss Brigitta Wong, Administrative Assistant to the Chest will be on hand to assist Press representatives.

The Hong Kong Council of Boys' Brigade is located at the Epworth Village Community Centre, Epworth Village, Chai Wan.

------0--------- /9....................

Monday, November 12, 1973

- 9 -

NEW GOVERNMENT APPOINTMENT

********

Mr. L.M. Davies, C.M.G., O.B.E., will be arriving in Hong Kong shortly to take up appointment as an Administrative Officer.

An experienced administrator, Mr. Davies is 51 years of age and has been in the Colonial Service since 19^. He has spent much of his career in the Western Pacific, having been Financial Secretary of the Western Pacific High Commission from 1962 to 1965 and Chief Secretary from 1965 to 1970.

He was appointed Deputy Governor of the Bahamas in 1970, where he served until the territory’s recent independence.

Hr. Davies, who is a widower, will carry out a familiarisation programme on his arrival, and will initially be attached to the Environment Branch of the Colonial Secretariat.

-------0---------

/10 .......

Monday, November 12, 1973

- 10 -

MANY COPIZS OF GREEN PAPER ON EDUCATION GIVEN AWAY

********

’We are very pleased to hear that teachers are anxious to obtain copies of the report of the Board of Education on the proposed expansion of secondary school education in Hong Kong over the next decade,” a spokesman for the Education Department said today.

He added: ”This is very encouraging indeed as teachers are naturally concerned with education in Hong Kong. We hope that after studying the report they will send their comments or suggestions in writing to G.P.0. box 1899, Hong Kong, before the end of the year.”

The spokesman said that Chinese and English copies of the report were still available free of charge from the Education Department’s Information and Public Relations Section, Lee Gardens, Third floor, Hong Kong; the Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, 5th floor, Hong Kong and Chinese copies from the Home Affairs Department’s Information Division, International Building, 9th floor, Hong Kong.

Ever since the publication of the Green Paper, the Education Department lias been dealing with individual requests for copies from teachers and educational organisations.

For example, last Friday, 2,000 copies in Chinese and 50 in English were given to the Chinese University of Hong Kong where the Director of Education, Mr. J. Canning, gave a lecture on the Board’s recommendations to students and staff of the School of Education and answered questions.

The spokesman pointed out that there were more Chinese copies left to meet individual requests than there were English copies.

-------0---------

Release time:

7.00 p.m.

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Tuesday, November 1J, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No.

Appointment of Commission of Inquiry into oil spillage at Aplichau...................................................

Review on oil situation in Hong Kong • •••................. 2 Pre-war building in Wanchai declared dangerous ••••••••••••• J Three streets in Kwun Tong to be routed one-way .......... J Art and craft refresher courses for in-service teachers .... 4 Seven Unofficial Members of Legco to speak tomorrow........ 5 Another 20 ’’lucky” car numbers to be auctioned •..•••.•••••• 6 Export of restrained textiles to the Enlarged E.E.C........... 7 Retirement of Interpreter/Translator Class I ................. 9 Financial Secretary speaks on Hong Kong’s economic growth • • 9

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Tuesday, November 1J, 1973

APPOIIITMENT OF COMMISSION OF INQUIRY

*******

A three-member commission of inquiry has today been appointed by the Governor in Council to enquire into the escape of oil from a storage tank at the Shell Oil Installation at Aplichau last Thursday night.

The Chairman of the Commission is Mr. W.S. Collier, District Judge. The other two members are Professor S. MacKey O.B.E., J.P., and Mr. Alex S.C. Wu, O.B.E, Mr. Collier and Prof. MacKey have both agreed to serve on the Commission; a telegram has been sent to Mr. Alex Wu, who is at present out of the Colony, inviting him to serve.

The Commission of Inquiry has been appointed under the Commissions of Inquiry Ordinance (Cap. 86) and its terms of reference are as follows:

"To enquire into the circumstances in which a storage tank at the Shell Oil Installation at Aplichau fractured, during the night of 8th/ 9th November, 19731 to ascertain how oil escaped from that tank into the sea, in spite of the various safety devices provided, and to make recommendations to the Governor for the prevention of similar accidents in the future.”

The Commission is required to submit its report to the Governor by January 3% 197^.

-------0---------

•?

Tuesday, November 13, 1973

2

OIL SITUATION IN HONG KONG RLVI^VED

********

The Oil Distribution Committee comprising government officers and representatives of the oil companies met for two hours this morning under the chairmanahip of Mr. Roy Porter.

Tha Committee reviewed the oil situation in Hong Kong and carried out a preliminary examination into ways in which distribution would best be carried out should the supply of oil and petroleum products be seriously

reduced..

The Committee initiated a number of research projects associated with distrj bn tian and consumption and of details of users of oil and petroleum products^ It requested the oil companies to provide data to assist with these research projects.

Measures which would help to counter any black-market activities and profiteering were considered in the event that a system of controls had to be enforced.

A further meeting of the Committee is likely later this week.

-------0----------

Tuesday, November 15, 1973

- 3 -

PRE-WAR BUILDING IN WANCHAI CONDEMNED ******

The Building Authority today declared No. 5$ Gloucester Road, Wanchai, to be in a dangerous condition.

In a statement, the Principal Government Building Surveyor said the four-storey pre-war building had been under observation since 19^8.

’’Despite some earlier repair the reinforced concrete, particularly to the kitchen block, has continued to deteriorate to such an extent that it has reached a condition at which repair cannot be satisfactorily carried out,” he said.

It is considered that there is a risk of injury to the occupants and ultimately possible failure of some members which could lead to a collapse•

Notice of intention to apply for a closure order in Victoria District Court was posted today. Hearing will start at 9*30 a*nu on December 19.

-------0---------

NEW TRAFFIC ARRANGEMENT IN KWUN TCNG ♦ • ♦♦♦♦

New traffic arrangements vzill be introduced in Kwun Tong on Thursday (November 15) to improve traffic flow in the area.

With effect from 10 a.m. on that day, three streets will be routed one-way. They are Shui Ning Street from Shu— Wo Street to Wan Hon Street? Wan Hon Street from Shui Ning Street co Shui Wo Street; and Ka Lok Street from Shui Ning Street to Shui Wo Street,

Appropriate traffic signs will be erected to guide motorists.

Tuesday, November 13, 1973

4

REFRESHER COURSES FOR IN-SERVICE TEACHERS

***«»**#*

The Education Department’s Cultural Crafts Centre has so far arranged 23 refresher courses for more than 500 in-service teachers during the current academic year.

The courses include art and craft, basic design, modern trends in needlework, a general introduction to textiles, pottery-making and demonstrations by renowned artists.

A spokesman for the Education Department said today : "Some of the courses have already started while others will begin during the next few months."

He pointed out that during the past two academic years more than 1,200 primary and secondary school teachers attended 63 courses run by the Centre•

Apart from some of the courses already mentioned, other courses taken by the teachers included creative drawing, screen-printing, woodwork, metalwork, puppetry and Chinese art.

The spokesman said: "The number of teachers attending the courses is encouraging and indicate that such centres can make a positive contribution to education in Hong Kong."

-------0---------

/5.........

Tuesday, November 13, 1973

- 5 -

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL MEETING

Seven more Unofficial Members of the Legislative Council will speak tomorrow (Wednesday) afternoon on a motion of thanks for the Governor’s address to the Council’s new session.

They are Mr. Wilson Wang, Mr. Q.W. Lee, Mr. Oswald Cheung, Mr. P.G. Williams, Mr. James Wu, Mr. Hilton Cheong-Leen and Mr. Li Fookr*wo.

Mr. Wang will be speaking in Cantonese.

Six other Unofficial Members spoke on the same motion at the last meeting on October 31.

Officials will reply on November 28 and 29*

Seven bills will receive their first and second reading tomorrow.

They are the Miscellaneous Amendments (Powers of the Governor in Council) Bill 1973, the Supplementary Appropriation (1972-73) Bill 1973, the Hating (Amendment) Bill 1973, the Government Lotteries (Amendment and Validation) Bill 1973, the Interpretation and General Clauses (Amendment) Bill 1973, the Betting Duty (Amendment) Bill 1973 and the Railways (Amendment) Bill 1973.

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/6.........

Tuesday, November 13, 1973

AUCTION OF "LUCKY" CAR NUMBERS

Another 20 special car registration numbers will be put up for auction this Saturday (November 17) at the City Hall theatre, Low Block, at 10 a.m.

The numbers to be put on sale are:

5Q5O 2100 AB 15 BD 19 3060

BD 666 HK 121 AE 6 576 AD3366

BD 333 HK 818 BD 1 AE 20 HK6789

BD 777 AA6600 BD 2 AD 800 BD 88

Proceeds of the auction will go to the Government Lotteries

Fund for charitable purposes.

Successful bidders at the auction will be required to pay in cash or cheque immediately after the bidding.

The vehicle registration mark will be assigned only to a vehicle which is registered in the name of the successful bidder within 12 months of the date of auction.

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/7........

Tuesday, November 13, 1975

- 7 -

EXPORT OF RESTRAINED TEXTILES TO THE ENLARGED E.E.C.

**•*»$*

The Director of Commerce and Industry, Mr. D.H. Jordan, today issued a number of Notices to Exporters announcing the implementation of 1973/74 ’’Free Quota” Export Authorization Scheme for export of restrained textiles to the Enlarged European Economic Community.

The notices are:

Series 1 (Britain) No. 15/73 Export of Restrained Textiles

to the United Kingdom

Series 3 (E.E.C.) No. 32/73 - Export of Restrained Polyester/ Cotton Garments to the Federal

Republic of Germany

Series 3 (E.E.C.) No. 33/73 - Export of Restrained Cotton

Textiles to the E.E.C. (Six)

Series 3 (E.E.C.) No. 34/75 - Export of Restrained Shirts to

Denmark

Details of the Scheme, which came into effect yesterday (Monday), are contained in the notices.

Trade associations and companies on the Commerce and Industry Department's mailing lists for Notice to Exporters Series 1 (Britain) or Series 3 (E.E.C. ’Six’) will receive copies of these Notices shortly.

Persons who wish to seek advance notice to their contents are invited to obtain copies of these Notices from the Receptionist on the ground floor of the Department at Connaught Road Central, or to contact any of the following officers of the Commerce and Industry Departments-

/Mr. D.T.H. Lee

Tuesday, November 13, 1973

- 8 -

Mr. D,

Mr. H,

Mr. K,

Mr. R

Mr. Y, Mr. W.

Mr. T, Mr. S.

T.H. Lee - Assistant Trade Officer ) Tel. No. 5-430719 )

K. Kwok - Industry Assistant ) United Kingdom &

Tel. No. 5-446789 ) Denmark

0. Wong - Industry Assistant )

Tel. No. 5-446789 )

,K.L. Ho - Assistant Trade Officer )

Tel. No. 5-229777 )

H. Law - Industry Assistant ) Federal Republic

Tel. No. 5-228513 ) of Germany

,H. Cheung - Industry Assistant )

Tel. No. 5-448134 )

S.K. Chan

Y. Chiu

- Assistant Trade Officer )

Tel. No. 5-225308 ) France, Italy

- Industry Assistant ) & the Benelux

Tel. No. 5-228513 )

Tuesday, November 13, 1973

- 9 -

RETIREMENT OF INTERPRETER/TRANSLATOR CLASS I

********

\ Hr. ./ong Ming-chee, an InterpreterAranslator, Class I in the Registrar General’s Department, will go on pre-retirement leave later this week after 24 years’ service in the Government.

To mark the occasion, Mr. P.C. Dowson, Assistant Registrar General, will present Mr. Wong with a farewell gift tomorrow (November 14).

The presentation will be held at the Departmental Conference Roomt 1Jth floor, Central Government Offices (West Wing).

Note to Editors: You are invited to send a reporter and/or

photographer to cover the presentation ceremony. It will take place at the Departmental Conference Room, 13th floor, Central Government Offices (West Wing) at 4*30 p.m. tomorrow.

-------0---------

F.S. SPEAKS ON HONG KONG’S ECONOMIC GROWTH

*******

Note to Editors: The Financial Secretary, Mr. C.P. Haddon-Cave,

spoke on ”Hong Kong’s Economic Growth: the Next Stage” at the Conference on Managers in a Changing Hong Kong Environment at the City Hall this (Tuesday) afternoon* Full text of his speech will be distributed separately in G.I.S. press boxes this evening.

-------0---------

Release time: 7*'-0 P>ni

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Wednesday, November 14, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No.

Measures to reduce school drop-outs as a means of combatting

crime ......••••••••••••..................................     1

Price controls may result in shortages and black markets • • 4

Immediate action to chock rising food prices urged........• • 7

Need for government to show concern for the people through practical measures ............•••.••••••••••••••••••••••.•• 10

Heartening response to the School Medical Service scheme • • 15

Proposal to sell industrial land direct to prevent inflation of prices •••••••........................................... 18

Procedure of Lotteries Fund allocations to be streamlined.. 20

Another ’’Meet the Media11 session tomorrow .................  21

Tribute to Mr. Cater ......................................    22

The Princess Anne thanks Hong Kong for wedding present •••• 24

Marine fish safe for consumption ..........................    25

Speed limit imposed on a section of Clear Water Bay Road • • 25

Bills passed in Legislative Council........................    26

Recordings of Legco proceedings.....................•......... 26

Development of the Nev; Territories is vital ................  27

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Wednesday, November 14, 1973

- 1 -

TO REDUCE DROP-OUTS FROM SCHOOL

Problems Must Be Attacked At The Root

******

The Hon. Wilson T.S< Wang today proposed that efforts be made to either cut down speedily the number of children who dropped out of school before reaching the age of 14, or to take special care of them.

He told the Legislative Council that unless this was done, it would be wishful thinking to combat crime merely by inflicting heavy sentences on them, the effect of which would merely be similar to ’’cutting off a hydra’s head.”

Mr. Wang began his speech with the typical story of a primary school drop-out who later became a member of a street gang.

At the end of his story, Mr. Wang said: ”Now he (the school drop-out) was frightened and at the crossroads. While he was at the moment of self-searching, he would probably ask himself: ’Who and What has put me in such a hopeless situation?’

”But how many people would give an honest answer to this question? As a matter of fact, instead of pondering over the question, we had better admit candidly that at present there are many, many children who are facing the same fate,” Mr. Wang said.

He pointed out that the recently published report on the causes of crime revealed that the increase in crime rate in the 14-30 age group was the heaviest between 19^8 and 1972. Among these offenders, 83 per cent had never received secondary education.

/’’Undeniably • .....

Wednesday, November 14, 1973

- 2 -

"Undeniably we have to increase places in junior secondary schools as quickly as possible if we want to attack the problems at the roots,"

But expedient measures should also be taken at the same time, and Mr. Wang suggested the following:

* Abolition of the practice of non-repetition in classes: Pupils under 14 who have failed in the Secondary School Entrance Examination should be given the chance to repeat in their class and the same for backward studencs in all other classes. This should reduce the number of pupils who have to drop out and should also relieve children from being over-pressured with lessons harder than they could tackle.

* Counselling service for children: Such a service can be accommodated in community centres or in City District Offices, with their functions being to render counselling to parents on problems arising from their children dropping out from school under the age of 14, and to help and advise these children on taking up some suitable occupation.

l/ * Modification of the Labour Ordinance which forbids the employment of children under 14: Provided that these children work under well supervised condition, such as limited working hours and good health and safety precautionary measures, they should be allowed to work with every possible assistance by the Government.

/* To increase •••••••

Wednesday, November 14, 1973

5

* To increase the number of children’s recreation grounds: They should be well distributed over various districts, and full use of each ground should be made,

* Caretakers or instructors at all playgrounds: They should put all children’s activities under ‘ • proper guidance. At present, it is precisely the lack of such provision that has caused these grounds to be encroached upon by bad elements, and to become the hot beds for the spread of all kinds of crime and for criminal dealings and gang war.

Commenting on the report by the Board of Education, Mr. Wang said he was greatly disappointed in the proposed target that it would take ten years to provide only 80 per cent of places up to Junior III.

He al no felt that a scheme, outlined in the Green Paper on education, to increase the output of trained teachers to 400 annually was ’’too conservative.”

”1 believe that it should be doubled up both in the number and in speed, so that it would not hinder any future developments.

’’Judging by Hong Kong’s capacity for development and creativity in the past and by its financial and human resources at the present, the question is surely not whether we can do it but whether we really want to do it,” he added.

- - 0 ------

A.....

Wednesday, November 14, 1973

_ 4 -

PRICE CONTROLS MAY RESULT IN SHORTAGES

**«*«»>»

Price controls are unlikely to be of much help to counter the high eost of living and will result in shortages and black markets, the Hon. P.G. Williams said in Legislative Council today.

"Indeed, in my view, it is the marketing skill and initiative of the Kong businessman which will bring down prices by seeking out new pupplies and bringing them to market," he added.

He thought it was justifiable, however, that the government took action when there was monopoly and restricted supply, as in the utility field and rents.

He pointed out that Hong Kong would have a period of sharply rising wages to meet rising prices, but he was not over-much worried about imported inflation.

"This may affect our competitive position, but imported inflation reflects a general world inflation and our relative position may not be greatly changed.

,,There is another side to the coin. Inflation is change and I believe that we have the ability to take advantage of change quicker than others," he explained.

"Also, the present world inflation is a consequence of sustained world demand for consumer goods and here lies assurance of an outlet for our products," he added.

/Mr. Williams.........

Wednesday, November 14, 1973

- 5 -

Mr. Williams was concerned, however, about internally generated inflation. He warned that the enormous plans for public works and high building activity in the private sector would put a great strain on the labour force• • . t

This would, he thought, result in more competition for labour in the construction industry and even higher wages, and labour would be attracted from other industries, who in turn would have to raise wages to retain their workers.

Mr. Williams said he would like to hear the government’s views on the sufficiency of labour resources for the rest of this decade.

In the case of the small businessmen who were often worst hit by inflation and shortages of materials, many of them might go out of business.

”®iis might be taken as a sign of recession but it may also be a hard but natural economic process resulting in larger and stronger business units,” he said.

Mr. Wi 11iams was optimistic on the whole that the economy of Hong Kong would continue to prosper because competitors in less developed nations did not have the advanced and growing industrial and commercial base and infrastructure Hong Kong had, and Hong Kong’s technological and commercial skills were unrivalled. Besides there was not a comparable level of investment and a stronger currency.

On other matters raised by the Governor in his opening address to the Council, Mr. Wi 11iaps supported the establishment of a Council for Recreation and Sport and hoped that it would improve the organisation of sport in Hong Kong.

/”I believe .......

Wednesday, November 14, 1973

- 6 -

”1 believe that organised competitive sport can stimulate in our young people a pride of location and a pride of place which will be of great importance,” he said.

He agreed with the government’s cautious approach to the problem of gambling and proposed that the off-course betting offices might be used for community purposes, such as for paying utility bills, when betting was not taking place.

Wednesday, November 14, 1973

IMMEDIATE ACTION TO CHECK RISING FOOD PRICES URGED

********

The Hon. Li Fook-wo today called for the setting up of some form of government machinery to supervise prices of essential foodstuffs which directly affect the livelihood of the people.

Speaking at the Legislative Council, Mr. Li heartily endorsed the views of his fellow Councillors on the question of high cost of living and inflation.

”l/e seem to agree unanimously that immediate and remedial action should be taken," he said: "Admitting that Hong Kong cannot insulate itself from mounting inflationary pressures from the rest of the world, perhaps some method of self-help may be found.

,;It would assure the members of the community a great deal if Government could make a statement that it will do something to stop spiralling prices before this problem undermines our aim of prosperity with social progress," Mr. Li said.

Touching on the banking system in Hong Kong, Mr. Li quoted statistics of bank deposits in the past year and noted that the situation could be considered as satisfactory.

The percentage of bank loans and advances against deposits was

72.01 per cent at the end of 1972. This percentage had risen to 88.26 per cent at the end of September.

/"It appears ......

Wednesday, November 14, 1973

~ 8 -

,!It appears that this apparent high percentage of 88.26 per cent

♦ >

of loans against deposits represents a composite figure which does not really give a true picture of the loan/deposit ratio in the local banki ng system.

"I would ask for a statement to be made of the loan/deposit ratio for banlcs other than those whose head offices are overseas. In addition, I would urge that future statistics be published on an adjusted basis thus clarifying the true relationship between loans and deposits,” Mr. Li said.

However, he added that the increase in loans and advances made by banks did show that banks in Hong Kong were doing their pant in nrovi di ng the necessary credits available for business and industry in the expanding economy.

With reference to the Question of introducing legislation to regulate finance companies and other deposit-taking institutions, Mr. Li said he sincerely hoped that the time would scon come for the Government to make a decision in the interest of the public at large.

On education, he said he fully endorsed the proposed establishment

of a fourth college of education. "However, I feel that it is important to raise the standard of the Teachers’ Certificate.

”The quality of the teaching service, though adequate, should be improved, particularly having regard to the increasing requirements of secondary education.”

Mr. Li further suggested that the lower stipulated qualifications for •ntry to the teacher training colleges be up-graded to a more ’’realistic level.”

/Mr. Li .......

Wednesday, November 14, 1973

- 9 -

Mr. Li v/elcomed the setting up of a Council for Recreation and Sport under the Secretary for Home Affairs to co-ordinate the organisation of much-needed facilities for recreation, leisure and sport for the community. He felt that the Council should consider developing the island of Hay Ling Chau into a youth centre, training centre or holiday centre.

Referring to the Government’s participation in the work of family planning, he strongly urged the formulation of a long-advocated Government population policy to implement a family planning programme.

It was essential he said, that such a programme should co-ordinate all Government departments to embrace all phases of activities concerned with population growth.

Mr. Li propose that a Working Committee be formed to study the whole question of population and the most appropriate means of encouraging the reduction of future birth rates.

"I am sure that we all realise the implications of this population problem in terms of housing, health, education, social welfare and environment are serious indeed, and would have a basic effect on all of Government’s long term plans in these areas,” he said.

”The United Nations Organisation has designated 197^ as World Population Year in order to focus the attention of the world on this grave situation. Would it not be appropriate to observe that year by some positive action in Hong Kong?” he asked.

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/10........

Wednesday, November 14, 1973

- 10 -

NEED FCR GOVERNMENT TO SHCW CLEARLY IT CARES FOR THE PEOPLE Inflation, Rising Living Costs Considered To Be More Immediate Problems ********

The Hon. Hilton Cheong^-Leen today called on the Government to show through practical measures and through sincere and well-balanced declarations of intent that it really cared for the people.

”1 would suggest that the Administration’s image as a government with firm moral leadership has to come through even more clearly than it has in the past,” he said.

Hr. Cheong-Leen was speaking at the resumed debate on a motion of thanks for the Governor’s address at the Legislative Council.

He said the Government had to be pragmatic, flexible and adaptable in its plans and policies, but finely balanced by a sense of commitment, humanity and vision, if it is to retain the confidence and co-operation of the people.

Hong Kong,he said, was entering a different dimension of change and challenge, faced by inflation, industrial competition, environmental decline, crime, corruption, and the search of new moral standards by ”our youth of today.”

However, he said: ”We are at a point in history where through a combination of circumstances and enlightened leadership, we are better equipped than ever before within certain constraints to shape our economic future and guide our social destiny.”

/He pointed •«•••••

Wednesday, November 14, 1973

- 11 -

He pointed to a number of problems which called for attention.

Among these he first listed inflation and the rising living costs, since ’’they are regarded by most people as even more serious immediate problems in day-to-day living than crime, corruption, transport and housing.” ”Govcmment should consider setting up an Economic Development

Advisory Committee with all possible speed to foster economic growth, create employment and implement a balanced social policy,” he said.

One of the first items this Committee should press for — if set up — would be an overall land policy, particularly for industrial development in the New Territories.

He warned that Hong Kong would lose out if the government was not to straighten out its policies and make quick decisions on applications for land for industrial development.

Referring to the need for stabilising prices of essential foodstuffs, Mr. Cheong-Loen pointed out that a pragmatic approach in providing regular supplies and efficient distribution of the commodity — as had been done successfully with rice — was required.

He said it was true that in the case of vegetables, fish and fresh meat, it was not possible to keep a three-month reserve supply as for rice, and that world prices of imported essential foodstuffs could not be controlled by the Hong Kong Government.

But it was within the power of the Government to regulate to some extent rampant speculation and profiteering on the local prices of essential

commodities the added

Wednesday, November 1^, 1973

- 12 -

He urged the Government to make a statement on the practicability of regulating, under existing circumstances, local prices of essential foodstuffs and to clarify whether a special committee or committees ought to be set up for the purpose.

Moving on to the field of housing, Mr. Cheong-Leen brought up the feasibility of selling Housing Authority flats to families in the middle income groups.

"A pilot home-ownership scheme will on the one hand enable the Housing Authority to generate a faster cash-flow in order to build more public housing.

"On the other hand, this scheme should represent a clear indication to the public that the Government is committed to encouraging home-ownership on the part of our middle-income groups, thus strengthening the sense of community identity and civic responsibility," he said.

Mr. Cheong-keen said he would like to see also a faster rate of replacing old Mark I and II resettlement estates which at the present rate of rebuilding could take 10 years or more to house the 500,000 people affected.

He expressed the hope that the government would be able to say how soon a minimum of 50 square feet living space per person could be provided during the current 10-year housing programme.

/He also

Wednesday, November 14, 1973

13

He also hoped that the government would soon announce, as part of its housing programme, how it was to re-accommodate the 17,000 small factories or workshops in domestic premises in urban areas.

On the work of the Buildings Oruinance Office, Mr. Cheong-Leen social it was known that due to staff shortages and pressure of work, only those unauthorised alterations or additions to buildings which were a danger to life or a fire risk were being dealt with.

"This means that there is a large backlog of complaints of unauthorised works which contravene building regal ations and some of which are a serious nuisance to other tenants but which do not represent a life or fire risk,” he said.

He stressed that a start should be made now in dealing at least with the more serious of these complaints and requested the Secretary for the Environment to give an assurance that the problem would be tackled with some urgency.

Turning to the need for a sense of community belonging and responsibility, which had been fostered by the Clean Hong Kong and Fight Violent Crime Campaigns, Mr. Cheong- en said he would like the Department of Home Affairs to study the possibility of setting up meetings of district leaders on a more formal basis by way of District Consulative Committees.

He proposed that these meeting should be held regularly and should be given greater publicity and recognition within the district.

/'The Unofficial.....

Wednesday, November 14, 1975

- 14 -

The Unofficial Members, he said, should be appointed formally for a fixed period of at least one year and the Official Members should include representatives of key departments.

Later, he said, when non-English-speaking persons could sit on the Urban Council, the more experienced and capable of the district committee members could have the chance to serve on the Urban Council.

On the problem of corruption, Mr. Cheong-Leen said this bred on inefficiency, poor internal organization, deliberately created administrative delays, hastily drafted legislation, and ignorance and greed on the part of the public.

He said changes could not be brought about simply by enacting harsh legislation, and the causes of corruption could not be eliminated only with the setting up of an independent Anti-Corruption Commission.

,TIt also involves the active cooperation and the right attitudes on the part of all citizens who share the vision of a more just society,” he said.

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/15.......

Wednesday, November 14, 1975

- 15 -

SCHOOL MEDICAL SERVICE SCHEME

Participating Pupils Now Number More Than 70,750

Children taking part in the School Medical Service during the academic year 1972/75 totalled 70,758, according to the annual report of the School Medical Service Board tabled in the Legislative Council today.

The children came from 700 schools throughout the Colony, and were looked after by 181 doctors.

Of the total figure of participating pupils, J2,306 were under eight years of age, 16,824 were under 10, 16,210 under 12, and 5^418 older than 12.

Under the terms of the revised scheme which went into effect on • <

October 1, 1972, pupils in kindergartens were excluded, and participation is now limited to pupils in primary schools, and secondary schools up to Form III. The revision brought the scheme into line with the Government’s policy of providing nine years of aided education.

The School Medical Service provides economical medical treatment among normally healthy children. It is voluntary, and participating doctors * .4 -

are private medical practitioners. They receive $25 a thild a year — $5 from the child, and $20 from the Government.

The Service is subvented by the Government. On an enrolment of 70,758 at $20 a head, and taking into account administrative expenses, the cost to the Government is now $1.6 million a year.

/The report

Wednesday, November 14, 1975

- 16 -

The report describes the present enrolment as "heartening," but at the same time regrets that the figure represents "less than 10 per cent of all those eligible."

"Many theories for the apparent lack of interest have been put forward, but the one most to the point is that fewer than a third of all eligible private schools make it possible for their pupils to enrol," a spokesman for the Board said.

He felt that to deny children the opportunity of economical medical treatment, even by default, seemed hard to justify.

The spokesman emphasised that even though the revised scheme excluded kindergarten children and pupils in the upper forms of secondary schools, there were still "more than a million children eligible for participation, 750,000 of whom are in primary classes."

He said the present scheme offered the normally healthy child economical medical treatment under one doctor chosen by the participating school because of the vicinity of his clinic. The child was given a full physical examination upon entry, and "any number of consultations a year, with free medicine, for a premium of less than 50 cents a month."

"This surely represents a sound and practical proposition. It is doubtful, for instance, whether the average child does not need a doctor at least twice a year, either for medication or the early dia^iosis of less obvious ailments," he commented.

/The spokesman •••••••

Wednesday, November 14, 1973

- 17 -

The spokesman explained that enrolment was simple, and not restricted to any given date. Pupils could join at any time of the year, and qualify for participation in the scheme for 12 months from the date of entry.

In addition, pupils in registered schools wishing to join the scheme even though their schools were not participating, could call at the Board’s offire in Lee Gardens, Hysan Avenue, for a participation card. It would root them S3-

The Board’s chairman is Dr. Sir Albert Rodrigues. Members include Mr. Wilson T.S. Wang, Mr. N.W.H. Macleod, Mr. R.M. Cameron, Dr. Sylvia Chui, Dr. Peter C.Y. Lee, Dr. L.K. Ding, Dr. B.M.F. Kotewall, Dr. Lau Ong-ui, Dr. Ling Ke-dieh, Dr. Dhun Ruttonjee, Mr. Shum Choi-sang, Mrs. Joyce Symons, Mr. Wong Kwok-fong, and Dr. Woo Pak-foo.

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/18........

Wednesday, November 14, 1975

- 18 -

GOVERNMENT URGED TO SELL INDUSTRIAL LAND DIRECT TO USERS

To Prevent Inflation Of Costs

*****41**

The Hon. James M.H. Wu today urged the Government to sell or rent now industrial land direct to the user to provide security and to prevent inflation of costs. . ....

Speaking at the Legislative Council, he said this would not w make landlords the "undeserving beneficiary of advance." . «

He noted that Hong Kong was still plagued with the indecision of supplying suitable land at economic prices for projects to be set up. in the best public interest, while its competing neighbours had been rapidly broadening their industrial base.

"I am therefore very glad to know, Sir, that you are receptive of the idea of ’industrial parks’ we have pursued for specific landintensive supporting industries and can only request that the plan be implemented with the greatest urgency to boost up our present reduced production, and more important, to provide job opportunities for the hundreds of thousands that are to be housed in the New Territories.

"Again, we must remind ourselves that a high level of production constitute the keystone of effective economic security, upon which all our plans depend," he said.

Earlier, Mr. Wu said that for the first time in its industrial history, Hong Kong textiles and footwear would begin to lose its Commonwealth Preference, and exchange its former favourable position with such competitors as South Korea and the Philippines as from Januray next year.

/In addition,

Wednesday, November 14, 1973

- 19 -

In addition, Hong Kong manufacturers would now have to pay, as a result of recent changes and shortages in materials supply, to JO per cent more for plastics, steel and other materials than their counterparts in other producing countries.

However, despite these and other difficulties, he said there was still plenty of opportunities for selling to these countries.

But he stressed that the products would have to be of high quality and sophisticated design, made only possible with advance technology and a much broader based industry support involving a higher extent of manufacturing and perhaps even the secondary processing of primary materials to feed the industrial needs.

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/20........

Wednesday, November,14, 1973

- 20 -

ALLOCATION OF GRANTS AND LOANS FROM LOTTERIES FUND

Procedure To Be Streamlined

********

Present procedure for allocating grants and loans from the Lotteries Fund will be streamlined to enable future applications to be dealt with more speedily.

The Financial Secretary, the Hon. C.P. Haddon-Cave, told the Legislative Council this today when he spoke on the second reading of the Government Lotteries (Amendment and Validation) Bill 1973.

Under the Bill, the requirement that every grant and loan shall be subject to the prior approval by resolution of the Council would be deleted, leaving the Financial Secretary as the final authority for approving allocations from the Fund.

However, Mr. Haddon-Cave proposed in turn to delegate this power to the Director of Social Welfare, acting on the advice of the Social Welfare Advisory Committee, and subject to certain conditions.

Allocations which do not satisfy these conditions, such as those involving exceptionally large sums or having substantial recurrent implications, would require his approval.

The Financial Secretary said he was confident that these changes would enable applications for allocations from the Lotteries Fund to be dealt with considerably faster than hitherto.

/Another ......

Wednesday, November 14/1973

- 21 -

Another object of the Bill is to enable rules to be made authorising the postponement of the drawing of a lottery during a typhoon.

It would also bring the law into line with the existing practice of keeping accounts of the Lotteries Fund, and make formal provision for the accounts of the Fund to be audited by the Director of Audit.

In addition, he said certain appropriations made in the past would be validated under this Bill.

In the past, some allocations from the Fund were made to social welfare services which had not been approved by the Governor under the Government Lotteries Ordinance, while other allocations were made without the prior consent of the Legislative Council under the Ordinance.

-------o----------

MEET THE MEDIA

Note to Editors: A ”Meet the Media” session will be held tomorrow

(Thursday) at 3 p*m. in the G.I.S. 35 mm theatre, 5th floor, Beaconsfield House.

Attending the meeting will be the new Secretary for Home Affairs, Mr. D.C. Bray.

You are invited to send a reporter and photographer to cover tomorrow’s session. Television representatives are requested to have their equipment set up before the start of the meeting.

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/22

Wednesday, November 14, 1973

- 22 -

TRIBUTE TO MR. CATER - • ■ >

The Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, today thanked Mr. Jack Cater, for all the work he had put into the Legislative Council’s affairs in various capacities over many years.

? Mr. Cater, formerly the Secretary for Home Affairs, is Hong

. I

Kong’s now Commissioner for Anti-Corruption.

In his valedictory speech, the Governor offered the Council’s support and good wishes in his new appointment.

”U/e know the size of the problem he is to tackle, and the deep roots it has in our society: if it is to be killed and not just pruned it will require the devoted, imaginative and carefully directed work of many people over a considerable period, and the positive support and cooperation of all honest men and women.” he said.

Sir Murray added that the Government was determined that the problem should now be tackled along lines very different to those in the past.

”The condition for success is nothing short of a quiet revolution in our Society.

”To achieve this is Mr. Cater’s task. I know he is not daunted by the difficulties. They can and have been overcome elsewhere. I believe they can be overcome here.

/The Hon

Wednesday, November 14, 1975

- 23 -

The Hon. P.C. Woo, on behalf of his Unofficial colleagues, paid special tribute to the services which Mr. Cater had rendered to Hong Kong in the past.

\ * •

He recalled that when Hong Kong was passing through dark days "he gave us strong and fearless leadership."

"Thereafter he has been at the forefront of the vital movement towards community involvement.

"He is one of those few men who is almost universally admired and trusted, for he combines the common touch with the wisdom of statesmanship — not an easy combination."

Mr. Woo assured Mr. Cater and his staff of all possible support from the Unofficial Members of the Council.

He was sure that Mr. Cater would have the co-operation of the public at large.

’We do not underestimate the difficulties which will face him, but we are confident that there will be results," Mr. Woo said.

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/24.........

Wednesday, November 14, 1975

- 24 -

THE PRINCESS ANNE THANKS HK FOR WEDDING PRESENT

******

Hie Princess Anne has expressed her sincere thanks and appreciation to the Government and people of Hong Kong for their wedding present.

In a personal letter to the Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, the Princess thanked Hong Kong "very warmly indeed for the two beautiful small rugs and the lovely larger carpet."

She said "Captain Phillips and I much look forward to using these earpets in our new home, and for me personally they will always be a very happy reminder of my first visit to Hong Kong."

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Wednesday, November 14, 1973

1

| — 25 -

MARINE FISH SAFE FOR CONSUMPTION

******

A spokesman for the Agriculture and Fisheries Department said today that the average daily landings of fresh marine fish sold through the Fish Marketing Organisation are in the region of 3,500 piculs.

Ninety-nine per cent of this fresh marine fish is caught by trawlers, liners, gill netters and purse seiners, operating within a range of 400 miles of Hong Kong.

The commonest species of marine fish consumed locally are: Golden Biread, Horse Head, YeLLow Croaker, Mud Garoupa, Garoupa, Ginkgo Fish, Snapper, White Pomfret, Hair Tail, Macao Sole, Head Grunt, Conger Pike, Red Sea Bream and White Herring.

The spokesman said that the eating of fresh marine fish caught in those fishing grounds poses no danger whatever to the public health as the waters are un-polluted.

-------0---------

SPEED LIMIT ON CLEAR WATER BAY ROAD

******

Speed restriction will be imposed on a section of Clear Water Bay Road in Kwun Tong, starting from Friday (November 16).

A spokesman for the Transport Department said that with effect from 10 a.m. on that day, vehicles travelling along the section of Clear Water Bay Road which runs through Tai Po Tsai Village should not exceed the speed of 30 miles per hour.

Appropriate road signs will be posted to guide motorists.

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/26........

Wednesday, November 14, 1973

- 26 -

BILLS PASSED

******

Five bills passed their committee stage and third reading in the Legislative Council meeting today and became law.

They were the Motor Vehicle Insurance (Third Party Risks) (Amendment) Bill 1973, the Telecommunication (Amendment) (No. 2) Bill 1973, the Education Scholarships Fund (Amendment) Bill 1973, the Landlord and Tenant (Consolidation) (Amendment) Bill 1973 and the Community Relief Trust Fund (Amendment) Bill 1973.

Seven other bills had their first and second reading.

In addition, three sessional papers were tabled. They were the Annual Report of the School Medical Service Board for the year ended 31st March 1973, the Annual Report by the Registrar of Trade Unions for tne year 1972—73 and the Annual Report by the General Manager, Rail way for the year 1972-73*

-------0---------

LEGCO PROCEEDINGS RECORDED

********

Note..to Editors: The proceedings in today’s Legislative Council

meeting have been recorded. You are welcome to consult uhe tapes in the Press Room, Government Information Services.

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/27........

Wednesday,, November 14, 197?

- 27 -

NEV TERRITORIES DEVELOPMENT VITAL TO HONG KONG

******

The Hon. Q.W. Lee today spoke at length about development in the New Territories.

Speaking at the Legislative Council, he said that the development of the Nev/ Territories was vital to the development of Hong Kong as a whole.

He stressed: ’’The Government foresees the need of developing the New Territories but the delay of such development is mainly attributable to the indecisive land policy J’

He recalled that as early as 1950? the Government had already announced its intention to develop and to make full use of the New Territories and since then, policies for resumption or surrender of land have been established.

”However, such policies are not only complicated but have also been changed so frequently that it has cuased overall confusion, interruption and particularly undue delay, sometimes giving rise to corruption.”

Mr. Lee made two points for early consideration by the government. One was the need for a revised formula for land resumption which would take into account the development value of land as distinct from its current value for agricultural purposes, when assessing the rate of compensation.

The other proposal was for the setting up of a permanent land tribunal which would be more efficient than the present system of appointing individual land compensation boards.

Wednesday, November 14, 1973

- 28 -

This, he thought, should be just as much necessary for the impending developments in town, particularly the underground railway project, as it was for the New Territories.

He stressed the need for keeping good relationships between the government and the indigenous people o^ the New Territories, for experience had shown the usefulness of working in liaison with existing organisation such as the Heung Yee Kuk and the Rural. Committees.

"If is also clearly shown how unwise it is for unilateral action to bo falcon by government departments in town without adequate prior consultation or without due weight being given to the views of the District Commissioner of New Territories/1 he said.

As a means to improve the situation, he urged the government to upgrade the post of the District Commissioner so that he could be in a position to talk on equal terms with the new Secretaries.

Mr. Lee praised the civil service in his speech, which he said, would have "quite unavoidably a few grey patches in the enormous establishment of 109,000."

."But occasional criticism of i"/)ffr.cienr.y and corruption cannot eclipse the birghtness of our civil servants, the majority of whom are clean and devoted to their duty," he said.

lie also asked that more people, and where possible, the younger generation, be enlisted to serve the various councils, boards, committees and organisations.

"Human resources are not limited if the best use is made of thein . The question is, as a member of this Council said, ’How to tap these resources,1 "no said.

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Release time: 9*00 p«.m.

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Thursdayt November 15 j 1973

CONTENTS

Page No,

Safety standards for quarry workers raised • •••.......... 1

New member for Commission of Inquiry into oil leakage at

Aplichau ••.•••••,•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• 2

Tour of oil affected areas by members of the Commission of

Inquiry ••••••••••.................................    • •••• J

Pre-war buildings in Western District declared dangerous.... 4

Assistant Smoke Inspector awarded diploma in air pollution control .................................................... 5

Former addicts join anti-drug fight — as entertainers ...... 6

Passing-out parade for Revenue officers ••••••••....... 7

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Thursday, November 15, 1973

- 1 -

SAFETY STANDARDS FOR QUARRY WORKERS RAISED

MM**

New regulations under the Factories and Industrial Undertakengs Ordinance have been introduced to raise safety standards in Hong Kong’s quarries.

The Quarries (Safety)(Amendment) Regulations, made by the Commissioner of Labour on October 12, 1973, were yesterday approved by resolution in the Legislative Council.

The Secretary for Social Services, Mr. F.K. Li, said that since the enactment of the original regulations four years ago, 10 of the 14 fatal accidents recorded in quarries had resulted fi*om falls. In seven of the accidents, the workers had not been secured by safety ropes. Tn another case, the safety'rope had broken.

As a result, the present amending regulations were introduced to offer a gre&tdr degree of safety to workers operating at a height on the face or top of quarries. The new regulations required a quarry proprietor to provide each of his workers with a safety harness, which the worker had to wear, and a safety rope, one end of which must be securely attached to the safety harness and the other to an anchorage.

nThe regulations also impose a duty on a quarry supervisor to inspect anchorages, safety harnesses, ropes and helmets, and mechanical equipment,1’ said Mr. Li.

A supervisor was also responsible for ensuring that no person should use such equipment until it had been put into safe and efficient wnrkn ng order.

/’’The regulation •••••••

Thursday, November 15, 1973

- 2 -

"The regulations will become effective on January 1, 197^* This will give quarry proprietors sufficient time to take steps to meet their new obligations,” Mr* Li said*

-------0---------

NEW MEMBER FOR COMMISSION OF INQUIRY

Mr* Alex Wu is away from Hong Kong at present and is therefore unable to serve on the three-man commission of inquiry into the recent oil leakage at Aplichau.

Mr* Peter P.K. Ng, Urban Councillor, J.P., has been appointed to serve on the commission in Mr. Wu’s place. 4

The other two members of the commission are Mr. W.S. Collier, District Judge, (Chairman) and Professor S. MacKey, O.B.E., J.P.

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Wednesday, November 15, 1975

- 3 -

TOUR OF OIL AFFECTED AREAS

By Members Of Commission Of Inquiry

******

The Commission of Inquiry into the recent oil leakage at Aplichau went on a preliminary inspection tour of the oil affected areas this morning.

Hie members took the chance to familiarise themselves with the problem and to ascertain the course of their inquiry.

Mr. V/.S. Collier, District Judge (Chairman), and Professor S. MacKey (Member), were accompanied on the tour by an officer of the Marine Department and Mr. M. Williams of Shell Company who explained the measures taken to cope with the escaped oil.

Hiey were first taken by a launch to Picnic Bay where oil booms were rigged round marine fish breeding cages by the shore.

The party then went to St. George’s Bay where oil slicks and emulsified oil could still be seen along the coast, although it appeared that the oil patches had cleared up considerably.

Government launches and hired boats could be seen in these places and off Aplichau applying emulsifiers or using water jets to disperse emul si fieri oil.

At Aplichau, the two members of the Commission inspected the fracture in Mo. 7 storage tank from which the oil leaked out.

They were shown round by Shell’s Operations Manager, Mr. W. Jervis, and an inspector of the company, Mr. K. Bradbourne. They were also briefed on structural aspects of the tank, the circumstances of the oil leakage and subsequent action.

Mote to Editors; Copies of a photograph taken during the tour of the Shell Oil Installation at Aplichau will be distributed separately in G.I.S. press boxes this evening.

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Thursday, November 15, 1973

- 4 -

PRE47AR BUILDINGS IN WESTERN DISTRICT DECLARED DANGEROUS . *«*«»****

The Building Authority today declared No. 20 Tsung Sau Lane West to be in a dangerous condition and No. 18 Tsung Sau Lane West liable to become dangerous.

In a statement, the Principal Government Building Surveyor said that these three-storey pre-war buildings were inspected as part of a planned survey in the area.

During the inspection, it was discovered that there was badly defective brickwork, which could collapse, in the kitchen block of No. 20 Tsung Sau Lane West together with decayed timbers and defective reinforced concrete.

It is further considered that No. 18 Tsung Sau Lane West is liable to become dangerous during or after the demolition of house No. 20 and also house No. 16 which is already subject to a Closure Order.

Notices of intention of apply for Closure Orders in Victoria District Court was posted today. Hearing will start at 9.30 a.m. on December 17.

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/5

Thursday, November 15 j 1975

- 5 -

DIPLOMA IN AIR POLLUTION CONTROL

Success For Assistant Smoke Inspector Of Labour Department

*««***«

Mr. Leung Yiu-sing, Assistant Smoke Inspector of the Labour Department, has passed an examination in air pollution control held in Hong Kong in September this year, and been awarded a diploma of the Royal Society of Health.

This was the second examination to be held by the Society, the first being in March, when three candidates passed.

Hie examination included two written papers and an oral test.

The syllabus covered a wide range of topics, including fuel technology, air pollution control and administration, and the general effect of pollution.

Mr. K. Higginson, Smoke Abatement Adviser of the Air Pollution Control Unit of the Labour Department, said the inspectors awarded diplomas had been working in his unit, and had acquired intensive theoretical and practical training.

Smoke inspectors are responsible for the monitoring work associated with air pollution.

Their duties include giving free and constructive advice to fuel users on the efficient use of fuel, and the reduction of smoke emission from their plants. They also have the duty to enforce the provisions of the Clean Air Ordinance and Regulations.

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/6.......

Thursday,November 15, 1973

6

FARMER ADDICTS JOIN AhTI-DRUG FIGHT -AS ENTERTAINERS **********

Former opium and heroin addicts will give the Keep Hong Kong Drug-Free Campaign a boost on Saturday (November 17) when they stage a free variety show in Tsuen Wan,

The two-hour show, featuring Alumni Association members of the Society for the Aid and Rehabilitation of Drug Addicts (SARDA), will get under way at 8 p. m. in the Sha Tsui Road Sports Ground, next to the Princess Alexandra Community Centre.

The programme for the show, sponsored by the Tsuen Wan Anti-Narcotics Action Group, an ad hoc sub-committee of the Action Committee Against Narcotics, includes lion dances, Mandarin vocalists, kung fu demonstrations, a lucky draw and plays aimed at educating people about the dangers of drug addiction.

Many official guests have been invited to see the show. They include the Tsuen Wan District Officer, Mr. J. S. Warren; the chairman of the Tsuen Wan Rural Committee, Mr. Chan Po-fong; the Tsuen Wan Police Divisional Superintendent, Mr. W. J. Rober s; the Education Department’s Senior Education Officer, Mr. David Leung; the Assistant Superintendent of SARDA, Mr. William Tang; the Warden of the Princess Alexandra Community Centre, Mr, Alexander Fung; and the chairman of the Federation of Societies in Tsuen Wan, Mr. Wong Tak-yan.

During the evening, pennants of appreciation will be presented to service organisations, voluntary agencies and government departments involved in a special pilot scheme being held in Tsuen Wan as part of the three-month Keep Hong Kong Drug-Free Campaign.

The scheme has.......

Thursday,November 15, 1973

7

The scheme has been specially designed to educate people in the 12| to 25 years of age group.

It features a special survey aimed at assessing the community’s knowledge about dangerous drugs.

Information gathered in the survey, which is being carried out by market research teams, will be used by the Action Committee Against Narcotics to formulate plans for major campaigns in the future.

--------0---------

PASSING CUT PARADE

Mote to Editors: Fifty-five officers of the Preventive Service

will take part in a passing-out parade on Saturday (November 17) at the Marine Deck of the East Arm, New Government Pier.

They comprise 18 Probationary Revenue Inspectors and 37 Probationary Assistant Revenue Officers.

Mr. P.K.C. Wong, Assistant Director of the Commerce and Industry Department, will take the salute.

You are invited to cover the ceremony which will begin at 10 a.m.

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Release tlmo:

i PRH

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Friday, November 16, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No.

Oil Distribution Committee reviews progress on action plans •• 1

Temporary office accommodation in Shatin for the New Territories Development Department ............................. 2

Improvement of water supply to Chai Wan area.................. J

Po Leung Kuk to widen its scope of charitable services ••••••• 4

Inspection of the St. John Ambulance Brigade by the Governor.• 6 Three lots of Crown Land to be auctioned next month • •••........ 7

Flatted factory units in Kwun Tong recovered ................. 8

Temporary closure of Wyndham Street........................... 9

Wider power for Cross Harbour Tunnel officers ................ 10

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong. Tel: 5-233191

Friday, November 16, 1973

1

OIL DISTRIBUTION COMMITTEE

Reviews Progress On Action Plans

*********

The Oil Distribution Committee, chaired by Mr. Roy Porterf met this morning to review progress on action plans initiated at its previous meeting last Tuesday ( November 1J).

The Committee examined all those sectors of the community which used fuel and petroleum products. The importance of the sectors in relation to the essential livelihood of Hong Kong was discussed to identify areas where economies can be made with the minimum of disruption and inconvenience.

The Committee also examined the stock situation and noted that it remained normal and that further deliveries of different products were scheduled to arrive over the next few weeks.

Nevertheless with the uncertainty of the oil situation in the world, the Committee decided to recommend to the Oil Policy Committee that it would be prudent to make some economies in the near future. Such economics would be directed towards cutting out waste and reducing demands for electricity.

The drafting of legislation to provide the Government with powers to deal with a possible shortage continues as a matter of urgency.

Representatives of the oil companies stated that they have already been resisting pressures to supply quantities of bunkering fuel oils and aviation fuels. They will continue to regulate deliveries in order to maintain stocks in Hong Kong to meet normal needs.

Discussions and consultation will now take place with representatives and experts from the fields of public transport, industry and the public utilities.

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/2........

Friday, November 16, 1973

- 2 -

TEMPORARY OFFICE ACCOMMODATION

For New Territories Development Department

*******

The New Territories Administration will shortly set up an operations centre in Sha Tin for easy management of the development of the new town.

The centre will be staffed by three separate sections —- a new district office and two project management teams.

It will, help to implement at a faster pace government plans to house more people in public estates in ■’’he new town.

One of the project teams moving into the office centre will be responsible for the new town’s planning, programming and co-ordination work. It will be headed by a project manager.

The other team, headed by a Government Engineer, will deal with development in rural areas in all parts of the New Territories in addition to Sha Tin,

The new District Office, housed under the same roof, will provide the necessary administrative facilities both during and after the completion of town projects.

The office itself will be situated in Tung Lo Wan by the side of the Sha Tin Police Station.

The building will be constructed to standards designed for permanent use and is located in a convenient position for integration into future permanent government offices.

/It will .......

Fr?.day, November 16, 1973

- 3 -

It will have three-storeys providing about 20,000 square feet of usable office space.

Hie project teams will be accommodated on the top floor and staff of the new District Office will work on the ground floor. Professional agencies engaged on new town works will be located on the first floor.

Site formation for the building is in progress and it is expected that construction will begin in January and be completed some time in August next year.

-------0 --------

IMPROVEMENT OF WATER SUPPLY TO CHAI WAN

*******

Work will begin shortly on a fresh water pumping station to improve water supply to the Quarry Bay, Shaukiwan and Chai Wan areas.

The now pumping station, to be located on Chai Wan Road, will be able to handle a reliable output of 2.5 million gallons of water a day.

It will meet rising demands in the district where there has been rapid domestic and industrial developmenta

Construction of the station will start next month and will be completed a year later.

As part of the improvement project, modification work on the existing distribution system, including the laying of new steel mains, will be carried out to cope with the increased supply of water.

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A...........

Friday, November 16, 1973

- 4 -

SCOPE OF PO LEUNG KUK WIDENED

********

A Bill will soon be introduced into the Legislative Council to repeal and replace the existing Po Leung Kuk Incorporation Ordinance with a new one which will reflect more accurately the current functions of the Kuk.

Known as the Po Leung Kuk Bill 1973, it will also amend the Kuk’s constitution, enabling its scope of charitable services to be widened.

The Bill, published in today’s Gazette, is being modelled along the lines of the Tung Wah Group of Hospitals Ordinance which replaced the former Tung Wah Hospital Ordinance in February 1971.

The amended constitution, which forms the schedule of the Rill, makes provisions for matters of the Kuk to be administered by a board which is to be constituted in a manner different from that provided under the existing ordinance.

The schedule of the Bill stipulates that an Advisory Board shall be formed to advise the Kuk’s directors on any matter affecting the Kuk or its administration.

It provides that the Secretary for Home Affairs shall be the Chairman of the Advisory Board, and that the Director of Social Welfare, an unofficial Chinese member of the Executive Council and another from the Legislative Council shall also be ex-officio members of the Board.

/Under the •••••••

Friday, November 16, 1973

- 5 -

Under the Bill, the main object of the Kuk is still to provide and maintain a temporary home for women and children who are in need of care and protection until proper provision is made for their marriage, adoption or settlement in life.

In addition, the Kuk will be able to provide vocational training for women and children in its care, to establish homes and nurseries, schools and other educational institutions in Hong Kong.

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Friday, November 16, 1973

- 6 -

GOVERNOR TO INSPECT ST. JOHN AMBULANCE BRIGADE

The Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, will make his annual inspection of the St. John Ambulance Brigade on Sunday, November 18, at the South China Athletic Association Stadium in Caroline Hill.

Some 2,200 members representing various divisions of the Brigade will take part in the parade.

Mr. Wong Yanr-sing, Area Commissioner of the St. John Ambulance Brigade, will be the parade commander.

During the cexcmcny, trcZiiee will be presented by the Governor to winners of various first-aid competitions held by the Brigade during the year* Sir Murray will also.address the parade.

The band of the Royal Hong Kong Police will, be attendance.

• j • v < » o a e Note to Editors? You are invited to have the parade covered.

It will start at 9 a»mc on Sunday. Officers of the Brigade will be present to assist the Press.

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/7........

Friday, November 16, 1973

- 7 -

CROWN LAND SALE

******

Hiree lots of Crown land on Hong Kong Island and in Kowloon will be put up for sale in the middle of next month.

Hie biggest lot is located at Black’s Link on Hong Kong Island. It has an area of 38,000 square feet, and has been allocated for private residential purposes.

A second lot, also on the Island, is located at Chai Wan Road and is for non-industrial purposes.

The lot in Kowloon is situated between Cheung Sha Wan Road and Lai Chi Kok Road, and is reserved for industrial and/or go-down or open storage purposes.

Hie auction will take place at 2.30 p.m. on December 14 in the City Hall lecture room on the 8th floor of the High Block.

Full particulars and conditions of sale may be obtained from and sale plans inspected at the Public Enquiry Sub-office, Central Government Offices (West Wing), Hong Kong, or at the Crown Lands and Survey Office, Kowloon Government Offices, Nathan Road, Kowloon.

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/8.........

Friday, November 16, 1973

- 8 -

FLATTED FACTORY UNITS IN KWUN TONG RECOVERED

*»*##»*♦

The Housing Authority today (Friday) took action to recover a total of 105 flatted factory units in Kwun Tong Estate and no resistance was encountered.

All but two of the 27 operators involved had already vacated their premises before hand. Housing Department staff on the job needed only to seal up the two units that had not been surrendered.

The factory units, involved in this morning’s recovery action, were granted to the operators on a month-to-month basis in 1968- when there was a surplus.

In 1970j government took steps to recover them. However the move was strongly opposed by the operators who subsequently started off a round of petitions.

The deadline was extended several times and a final warning letter was issued in August this year giving yesterday (November 15) as the date by which they must vacate.

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/9........

Friday, November 16, 1973

- 9 -

TEMPORARY CLOSURE OF WYNDHAM STREET

* ******

A section of Wyndham Street between On Lan Street and Queen’s

Road Central will be closed to all traffic from 7*50 a.m. to about 6*45 p.m. on Sunday (November 18) and the same period again on Sunday (November 25)•

Announcing this today, a spokesman for the Transport Department said the temporary closure is to enable the Hong Kong Electric Co. Ltd. te move a 42-ton transformer from On Lan Street to Tin Chong Street.

Only vehicles seeking access to Wellington Street will be permitted to enter Wyndham Street during this period.

All other traffic will be diverted east into Lower Albert Road.

Motorists are advised that due to the weight of the load, the transporting vehicle is extremely slow and will require about 15 minutes to cross Queen’s Road Central from Wyndham Street into Pedder Street.

East and westbound traffic flow along Queen’s Road Central will therefore be stopped for about 15 minutes from about 6 p.m. on those two days.

Appropriate signs will be in position to assist motorists.

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/10........

Friday, November 16, 1973

10 -

V/IDER P0.7ER FOR CROSS HARBOUR TUNNEL OFFICERS

**«*$$*

A Bill, aimed at strengthening the existing legislation relating to offences against the Cross Harbour Tunnel By-Laws committed by motorists in the tunnel area, will be introduced into the Legislative Council shortly.

Published in the Gazette today, it is known as the Cross Harbour Tunnel (Amendment) Bill 1973*

The new Bill seeks to introduce provisions similar to those in *’ Section 29 of the Road Traffic Ordinance in order to enable tunnel officers to demand personal particulars of offending drivers-

it will require any person to furnish to a tunnel officer, on demand made within three months after the date of an alleged offence, the name, address and driving licence number of the person driving the vehicle at the time of the offence.

Failure to comply with this requirement may lead, upon conviction, to a fine of 52,000 and six months’ imprisonment.

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Release time: 6.4$ p.m.

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Saturday, November 17, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No.

Television transmission tests being carried out by Rediffusion

Television Limited • ••••.................................... 1

Director of Royal Observatory to attend Typhoon Committee meeting in Bangkok • •••..................................... 2

Victims of Kowloon Bay fire given assistance................. 3

Health education exhibition to be staged in Sai Kung next week ••••••••••••.................................  ••••••••• 4

New traffic arrangements in Mongkok ......................... 5

Sunday D.I.B...... ••••••....................... 6

Compensation for fish losses................................. 6

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Saturday, November 17, 1S>73

TELEVISION TRANSMISSION TESTS

********

For the past ten days Rediffusion Television Limited, who were recently granted the franchise for a second wireless television service in Hong Kong, have been carrying out test transmissions from Temple Kill in the New Territories.

These tests arc being monitored by the staff of the Telecommunications Authority and initial results are encouraging. The object of the tests is to ensure that there is no disruption to the existing services of Television Broadcasts Limited.

spokesman for the telecommunications Authority said: :iThe test will continue for at least another 12 days andf if these are satisfactory, commercial transmissions in Chinese will commence next month.”

At the moment only the main transmitter is operating and the test card on Channel 25, in most cases, can only be received in the main urban areas which also receive the main transmitter channels 21 and 25 of Television Broadcasts Limited.

If viewers have any comments on reception conditions of existing services in their area these might be useful to the engineers of the Telecommunications Authority and callers are kindly asked to telephone 5-255191, extension 218, between 5 p«m. and midnight.

Th© spokesman said: ’’Subject to the satisfactory completion of the tests, Rediffusion Television will start Chinese language transmissions on December 1 and their English service is expected to open in April 197^• Every effort is being made by all concerned to facilitate the introduction of both new services as quickly as possible.”

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Saturday, November 17, 1973

- 2 -

BANGKOK MEETING ON TYPHOONS

To Be Attended By Director of Royal Observatory

*********

The Director of Royal Observatory, Mr. G.J. Bell, will be leaving Hong Kong tomorrow (Sunday) to attend the annual session of the Typhoon Committee to be held in Bangkok next week.

He will be accompanied by Dr. P.C. Chin, Senior Scientific Officer of the Royal Observatory.

The meeting, to consider action to improve typhoon warning systems in the southwest Pacific area, is a joint E.C.A.F.E. (Economic Commission for Asia and the Far East) and W.M.O. (World Meteorological Organisation) project.

Representatives from more than 18 countries and United Nations agencies will be attending the meeting which begins on Monday (November 19)•

The main topics to be discussed at the eight-day meeting will be the implementation of basic observational and telecommunication facilities in this region, exchange of meteorological information amongst member countries and plans on joint research studies on typhoons.

Measures on community preparedness and disaster prevention will also be discussed.

-______0_________

/3........

Saturday, November 17, 1973

- 3 -

VICTIM OF I'n/LW-N BAY FIRE GIVEN ASSISTANCE

*«**«*«**

The Housing Department is doing everything it can to help the victims of the fire at Kowloon Bay Licensed Area on Thursday night.

A spokesman for the Department said it was the Department’s policy that no one genuinely homeless would be left unattended to.

All fire victims who lived legally in surveyed huts will be re-housed in public housing estates as soon as their identity has been established.

Those living in unsurveyed illegal huts in the Licensed Area will bo allowed to rebuild their homes on a nearby site once the land has been levelled.

Grants from the Community Relief Trust Fund administered by the Social Welfare Department will be distributed to them possibly next week to enable them to do this.

In the meantime, the Department has opened a number of estate welfare centres for the victims for temporary stay.

Nearly 200 of them are taking temporary shelter at the Caritas Centre at Ngau Tau Kok and another 100 at the Welfare Centre at Sau Mau Ping Estate. Others are staying with friends and relatives.

Meanwhile, investigation and identification of the victims is continuing.

”We will be able to proceed with the distribution of the grant and allocation of rehousing accommodation once the survey is completed,” tho spokesman added.

In last Thursday’s fire, more than 280 structures were destroyed and nearly 400 families comprising about 1,400 people have been registered with the department.

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A.........

Saturday, November 17, 1973

- 4 -

HEALTH EDUCATION EXHIBITION

Saikung Community Centre Show To Emphasise Hygiene

*********

The Medical and Health Department's Health Education Unit will put on a four^day exhibition in the Saikung Community Centre beginning on Tuesday, November 20.

The emphasis will be on home care and personal and environmental hygiene, and the message will be conveyed by means of drawings, graphs, charts, photographs and cartoons.

Literature on how to avoid domestic accidents by remembering basic rules will be distributed during the show.

The aim of the Health Education Unit, which is attached to the department’s New Territories office, is to mount exhibitions for the benefit of rural folk, especially country children. Items making up the shows are conceived and arranged for easy comprehension.

The Saikung show will provide useful suggestions on how attention to personal and enviromiesbal hygiene contributes not only to a cleaner neighbourhood, but also a healthier and happier life for all.

It is the first of two exhibitions being organised by the Unit this month. The second, based on the same theme, will be in the Yuen Long Town Hall beginning on November 27•

Note to Editors: You are invited to have the exhibition covered.

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/5........

e

Saturday, November 17, 1973.

- 5 -

NEW TRAFFIC ARRANGEMENTS IN MONGKOK

**********

New traffic arrangements will be introduced in Mongkok, Kowloon, as from Monday (November 19).

Starting from 8 a.m. on that day, the section of Tong Mi Road between Nelson Street and Cherry Street will be re-routed one way southbound.

Vehicles will turn left into Nelson Street. The U-turn at the junction of Tong Mi Road and Nelson Street will be prohibited.

A spokesman for the Transport Department said that the temporary re-routing, which will last about six months, is necessary to facilitate road and drainage works.

Appropriate directional signs will be posted to guide motorists.

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/6..........

Saturday? November 17? 1973

- 6 -

SUNDAY D.I.B.

*******

Note to Editors: There will be an issue of the Daily Information

Bulletin tomorrow (Sunday). Copies will be available in the G.I.S. Press Room, 6th floor, Beaconsfield House at 3 p«m.

-------0----------

COfiPENSATION FOR FISH LOSSES

********

Government today confirmed that arrangements would be made to compensate the fish farmers in Picnic Bay (So Kwu Wan) whose fish losses were caused by the recent oil spill from Ap Lei Chau.

Officers of the Agriculture • and Fisheries Department were appraising the effects of the oil spill on the sifh.

lielease time: 2.30 p.m.

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Sunday, November 18, 1973

^GGVSK'JOR PAYS TRIBUIE TO ST. JOHN AMBULANCE BRIGADE

*********

The Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, today paid tribute to the St. Jolin Ambulance Brigade whose members rendered almost 100,000 man hours last year at public occasions alone.

Speaking at the annual parade of the Brigade at the South China Athletic Association Stadium in Caroline Hill, Sir Murray said: "This demand for your services will increase, as people have more time to spend on recreation and leisure.”

The following is the full text of the Governor’s speech:

:;It is a great honour for me today to review the St. Jolin Ambulance Brigade for the first time.

} *

”The Brigade has a world-wide reputation for dedicated service.

In Hong Kong, its work has been of immense value to the community.

"I understand that the Brigade put in almost 100,000 man hours during 1972 at public occasions alone and this was out of the free time of members.

’This demand for your services will increase, as people have more time to spend on recreation and leisure.

/"The ........

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong. Tel: 5-233191

Sunday, November 18, 1973

T,The strength of the Brigade, including the Cadets, is steadily

increasing. The growth, together with the regular training your car^ybut each year,ensures that the Brigade is equipped to help those who need you services. "You all have a most useful role to play in Hong Kong and I

know that the work you do is appreciated by everyone.

"I congratulate you today on your excellent turn out and

wish you all every success."

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OFFICE REMOVAL

********

The Board of Review (Inland Revenue Ordinance) will operate

from its new office at D* Aguilar Place, Rooms 702—705, 7th floor, 7Di'guil.nrStrect, Hong Kong, as from tomorrow (Monday).

The telephone number for the Clerk to the Board of Review is 5-251970.

0 - -

Release time: 2>5P

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Monday, November 19, 1975

CONTENTS

Page No<

New sites for Kowloon Bay fire victims ready soon.........• 1

Research paper on ETV by British education expert.......... 2

Bilingual glossary of legal terms completed •••••••••••••••« 3

Warning on bogus Labour Department officers soliciting money ..........................................................  5

Stamps marking Hong Kong Festival on sale this Friday •••••• 6

October a relatively dry month .................................  8

Visit by three directors of World Health Organisation...... 9

Labour Relations Service helps settle 33^ labour disputes .. 10

EPCOM members tour sites of controlled refuse tipping .......... 11

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Monday, November 1% *1975

NEW SITES FOR KOWLOON BAY FERE VICTIMS READY SOON ********

Housing Department men worked through the weekend and are still battling to prepare a new site near Kowloon Bay to accommodate victims of last week’s squatter fire at Ngau Tau Kok licensed area.

It is hoped that the site will be ready next week to allow genuine fire victims to build new homes.

Meanwhile, Housing Department officials are busy processing records to establish those who are eligible for public housing or licensed area sites.

Some families, representing 1,800 people, have been registered so far. Personal processing will be made on Wednesday from 9*30 a.m. at the new Ngau Tau Kok police station in Kowloon Bay.

Mr. Brian Coak, officer in charge of Squatter Control, said one adult member from eaoh family should attend the processing bringing with them their identity cards, Social Welfare Emergency Relief cards, and any other documents to substantiate their claim.

Genuine fire victims who are not entitled to direct public housing will get a new licensed area site and a grant from the Community Relief Trust Fund plus cash for re-equipment.

Mr. Coak said one difficulty faced by the Housing Department was in sifting out imposters who appeared on the site after the fire in the hope of claiming a cash grant from the fund, public housing or a re-site to which they were not entitled.

/"This is .......

Monday, November 1% 1973

- 2 -

"This is something we have to watch closely for we are concerned that there may be many imposters who are attempting to get something to whioh they are not entitled," he said.

While essential processing is going on, all victims have been offered temporary accommodation at several nearby welfare centres and storage space for their possessions has been made available.

Mr. Coak said many people were refusing to take advantage of services and facilities that were being offered.

"A handful of agitators are persuading people to stay on the fire site in an effort to force the government in giving public housing which many of them are not entitled," he added.

Meanwhile, a Social Welfare .Department spokesman denied that

only one blanket had been issued to each family. "Each individual was • • f •

given a blanket, plus pots, chopst_cks, toothbrush, bowls, soap and towels in addition to two cooked meals a day," he said.

. _------o-------. -

RESEARCH PAPER ON HONG KONG ETV

$«***«**

Mr. Sandy Edington, Director of Information and Research of the Centre for Educational Development Overseas, London, will arrive in Hong Kong on Eriday (November 2J) for a one-week visit.

Mr. Edington is doing a research paper with Educational Television in Hong Kong as a case study on the use of new media in education.

The paper will be presented at the next Conmonwealth Ministers of Education Conference to be held in Jamaica next year.

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/3........

Monday, November 19, 1973

- 3 -

IMPORTANT BILINGUAL GLOSSARY OF APPLIED LEGAL TERMS COMPLETED *******

The Chinese University of Hong Kong has completed an English-Chinese Glossary of Applied Legal Terms after a year’s concentrated effort.

The Glossary contains more than 19,000 English words and over 29,000 entries of Chinese translations. The work represents the first major effort of its kind.

The government, in implementing its policy to promote the wider use of the Chinese language in official business, invited the Chinese University in November last year to compile and translate a glossary of legal terms.

Receiving the manucripts from the university’s Vice-Chancellor, Dr. C.II. Li, the Colonial Secretary, Mr. D.T.E. Roberts, offered his “warmest congratulations on a first-class job.”

”It seems to be remarkably comprehensive and should prove of in-estimablo value to all those who are obliged to translate technical legal terms,“ he said.

Lr. Roberts, who was formerly the Attorney General, was impressed by the fact that '’such a tremendous work could possibly have been completed in such a short period.1’

The preparation of this glossary followed a careful study of the principle of coverage. As finally adopted, the terms derived from the Government Ordinances and basic legal vocabulary form the ’CORE’.

The ’First Radius’ extends to subject categories and technical terminology while the ’Second Radius’ include contectual words and frequently used phrases.

/The field .......

Monday, November 19, *1973

The iLe/.a of x*e<? earch extended iron Lie Chinese law bocks, regional publications in Asia t-_ glossaries of the United Nations.

In this way, a total of over 19,000 English words were admitted*

And in accordance vith a rl v : if’.catioi cf '0 categories of.usage, the Chinese trarsl.at. totalled over 29,009 entries«

The glossary also has four appendices givhg the titles of the Government Ordinances, the Civil and Miscellaneous Lists, geographical names, weights and measures, in both Chinese and English.

The university, in order to carry out this important assignment, worked closely with th ■■■ Chinese Language Broich of the Department for Home Affairs.

Besides setting cp. a. favoring I.they invited a panel of

12 well-known legal experts. and g -.‘Cxa'-l b; to tjirve as Advisors to read the manuscripts and to r.;>L r.uiunr thu;; contributing to the glossary their scholarship ir.d a-: -..lity*

Uit assistance rc.u ‘.ar 7 quao-tero xr^ide and outside of the Government was gei •.orou.?*1 y enabling ohe glco.-.ary project to be completed

in a short time of 12 m*jnths<>

The glossary piVolL-hcd >diould prove to be a valuable tool and reference for translators not c;.J-y . Hong Kong but all Chinese—English bilingual communities throughout Lie w-rld.

The Chinese University has r'Uggesfod /hat the copyright of the English-Chinese ’Glossary cf ? 1 L< g•?.! Terms should be retained by the

Government.

.. _ - 0 .. _ „ -

Monday, November 19, 1973

- 5 -

LABOUR DEPARTMENT WARNS AGAINST IMPOSTORS

******

The Assistant Commissioner of Labour, Mr. David Lin today warned factory proprietors to be on their guard against bogus Labour Department Officers who sought money for advertisement in a departmental publication -Guide to Workmen’s Compensation Legislation.

Mr. Lin said recently proprietors had complained to the department that a man who claimed to be a member of the Labour Department had sought money for that purpose.

"No Labour Department Officer is authorized to solicit money for any purpose whatsoever”, he stressed.

Mr. Lin advised that any proprietor who was approached by anyone purporting to be a member of the Labour Department should immediately report the matter either to the nearest police station or the Senior Labour Officer (Industry) at Tel : 3-688842.

The Guide to Workmen’s Compensation Legislation, he pointed out, is available* free of charge at the offices of the Labour Department.

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/6.......

Monday, November 19, 1973

- 6 -

FESTIVAL STAMPS ON SALE THIS FRIDAY

*********

Three special postage stamps to commemorate the Festival of Hong Kong will go on sale at all post offices from Friday (November 2?)•

Sir Yuet-keung Kan, Chairman of the Steering Committee of the Festival of Hong Kong, will buy the first set at the General Post Office at 8 a.m. on Friday.

The stamps, of 10 cents, 50 cents and S1 denominations, were designed by Mr. Kan Tai-keung, a local artist and art director of a commercial design organization, and were printed by Bradury Willcinson and Company Limited using the lithographic process.

Each of the stamps features a stylised version of a Chinese character made up of festival symbols. Together the ciiaracters on the three stamps represent ’Festival of Hong Kong.’

Special first day covers, also designed by Mr. Kan, have been produced and are on sale at all post offices at 20 cents each.

Advance orders for serving the covers are accepted at the General Post Office in Pedder Street, the Kowloon Central Post Office in Nathan ♦

Road and the Tsim Sha Tsui Post Office in Salisbury Road.

For this service, addressed first day covers must be handed in with an order form together with a remittance to cover the cost.

The order forms are available at the three post offices and the charge will be $1.70 a cover which includes the cost of one 31, one 5O-ccnt and one 1O-cent stamp, and a service fee of 10 cents.

/In order •••••••

Monday, November 19, 1973

- 7 -

In order to allow enough space for putting the stamps, the lettering of the address on the covers should be positioned properly and kept fairly small. The address must be in full and no fewer than 10 covers will be accepted with each order.

Serviced covers written to a local address may be collected on Saturday (November 24) from the office where the order was placed.

Covers addressed overseas will be sent forward by ordinary surface mail, unless there are sufficient stamps to cover airmail or registration charges.

The closing time for accepting advance orders will be noon on Wednesday (November 21).

The Post Office will also be accepting first day covers on Friday at counters at all post offices.

Tlie covers will be impressed with the normal post office steel date stamp and/landed back to the person presenting them. No time type however will appear in the post mark.

The articles should bear an indication that they are first day covers and must be addressed to a local address. They must not bear any other cancellation and must not be registered items.

Special posting boxes will also be available at the three post offices on Friday for those who wish to have first day covers carefully hand-postmarked before despatch to the address on the cover.

Note to Editors: Photographs of the commemorative stamps will

be boxed for collection this evening.

0 - -

Monday, November 19, 1973

- 8 -

OCTOBER WEATHER ROUNDUP

********

Last month’s weather was much drier than usual with only 4,7 mm of rainfall recorded during the month, the Royal Observatory reported today.

The relative humidity for the month fell to a minimum of 21 per cent on October 28 — the lowest on record for October. This value has been equalled once before in October 19&8.

One rod and five yellow fire danger warnings were issued during the month. No thunderstorm or heavy rain warnings were issued and no aircraft were diverted on account of the weather.

Total sunshine during October amounted to 184.1 hours, representing 34.8 hours below normal. Total rainfall at 4.7 mm was 94.5 mm below normal<•

A maximum temperature of J2.0 degrees Celsius was recorded on October 4, and a minimum temperature of 18.5 degrees Celsius on October 28 and 29-,

Note to Editors: A full report on last month’s weather prepared

by the Royal Observatory will be boxed for collection this evening.

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• ' /9...........

: i • *. . ■ ■


Monday, November 19j 1975

- 9 -

VISIT BY DIRECTOR GENERAL OF W.H.O.

******

Three directors of the World Health Organisation, who were on their way back to Manila after a visit to China, had informal talks last weekend with the Director of Medical and Health Services, Dr. G.H. Choa, on matters of mutual interest.

They were Dr. H.T. Mahler, Director General of WHO; Dr. Francisco J. Dy, Director of WHO’s Western Pacific Region, and Dr. S. Flache, Director of Health Services of WHO’s Western Pacific Region.

The group arrived by train from China on Saturday and left on the following day.

They were seen off at the airport by Dr. Choa and Professor P.H. Tang, of the Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, University of Hong Kong.

During their stay, they were entertained by Dr. Choa.

- - - - 0 - — -

Monday, November 19, 1975

- 10 -

L.R.S. HELPS SETTLE 334 LABOUR DISPUTES

*******

The Labour Relations Service of the Labour Department helped settle 334 of the 434 industrial disputes last month.

Of the remaining cases, 83 were referred to the Labour Tribunal, seven to the Legal Aid Department and one to the District Court. The rest were either withdrawn by the applicants or settled by direct negotiation.

The head of the Labour Relations Service, Mr. T.F. Tsui, said as a result of agreements reached, 738 employees received a total of 8626,458 as outstanding wages, payment in lieu of notice, statutory holiday pay, bonuses, severance pay and other ex-gratia payments.

’’Officers of the Service also handled 1,577 consultations and enquiries about labour laws, industrial relations and personnel management,” Mr. Tsui said.

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Monday, November 19, 1973

- 11 -

EPCOM MEMBERS VISIT CONTROLLED TIPPING SITES

******

Members of the Advisory Committee on Environmental Pollution •n Land and Water (EPCOM) today visited the biggest controlled refuse tip at Gin Drinkers Bay and four other sites to see for themselves how refuse is disposed of without causing pollution.

These five controlled tips at various locations in the New Territories will form some 8? acres of new land for development as open space after they are filled with a total of three million tons of refuse in addition to other covering material.

Controlled tipping consists essentially of the spreading and compaction of refuse in layers which provide a better environmental condition than dumping.

Each layer is daily covered with inert material as tipping proceeds to seal off all working faces at the dump. This obviates noxious smells and facilitates the control of vermin and the elimination of health hazards.

The visiting party comprised Mr. H.M.G. Forsgate, Chairman of the *

Committee, Mr. Leung Lai-yuen, Mr. Tang Ying-ki, Mr. R.N. Rayne and other members from government departments.

Mr. J.L. Marden, Chairman of the Advisory Committee on Air Pollution, al no joined the party and took the opportunity to familiarise himself with the works carried out by sanitary and inoffensive methods.

They were accompanied by Mr. L.M. Davies, Deputy Secretary for the Environment (Pollution), and representatives from the Environment Branch, Colonial Secretariat.

/Officers from .......

Monday, November 191 1973

12 -

Officers from the Public Works Department, Urban Services Department and various District Offices of the New Territories Administration briefed the members of the party in different spots during the five-hour tour* N.T.A.,

Mr. I.F.C. Macpherson, Deputy District Commissioner,Ar. R. Oblitas,

Deputy Director of the Urban Services Department, Mr. J.M Riddell-Swan, Deputy Director of Agriculture and Fisheries Department, Dr. S.H. Lee, Deputy Director of Medical and Health Services, and Mr. H.D. Stead, Director of Engineering Development also joined the visit.

At Gin Drinkers Bay Reclamation in Kwai Chung — formerly a refuse dump — they saw the progress work on the controlled tip where operation had started and where work is carried out rounl the clock seven days a week.

This controlled tip will take about two more years to form a total of 47 acres of new land as its intake capacity is well over two million tons of refuse other than covering material.

The members also gained information on the problem at the proposed sites for controlled tipping at Crown Ridge and Chau Tau where objections have been launched by villagers over sanitary conditions.

They also inspected controlled tipping sites at Shuen Wan off Ting

Kok Road, Taipo and Ngau Tam Mei in Yuen Long. Both sites were previously • •••** ** used as refuse dumps but have been converted into controlled tips to provide * bettor environmental conditions.

Summing up the visiting party’s impression, Mr. H.M.G. Forsgate, Chairman of the EPCOM, said he was greatly impressed by the great improvement of environmental conditions in various controlled refuse tips since the committee was formed two years agco

Note to Editors: Copies of a photograph of the visit are boxed for •

collectione -------------------0---------

Release time: 7«P-Q

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Tuesday, November 20, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No*

Oil companies asked to conserve oil stocks............• ••• 1

Preliminary hearing to inquire into oil spillage............... 2

October Consumer Price Index drops four points ................ 3

Official opening of Sheng Kung Hui Lady MacLehose Centre • • 4

Traffic re-arrangement in Kowloon • •••......................   5

Lady MacLehose to visit Leprosy Mission this Thursday .... 6

Outing and fun fair for Sau Mau Ping residents ................ 7

Labour dispute settled with Labour Relations Service help .....................• •••••»<>•...•••...................  8

Export of cotton yarns and fabrics to U.S.A. .............. 9

Hong Kong industrialists warned against complacency......... 10

Prime Minister to visit Chin?. r-d Hong Kong ...... 11

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Tuesday, November 20, 1973

- 1 -

OIL COMPANIES ASKED TO CONSERVE OIL STOCKS

*******

The government has asked oil companies to implement specific measures to help conserve Hong Kong’s oil stocks.

In a letter to the six oil companies, the Deputy Colonial Secretary and Chairman of the Oil Policy Committee, Mr. M.D.A Clinton, said it seems probable that there will be a reduction in the amount of oil delivered to Hong Kong during the coming months.

Among the measures to be adopted at this stage, is the maintenance of adequate bunker stocks so that essential supplies are available for ships calling at Hong Kong .

To allow for this, Mr. Clinton has asked that the amount of bunker oil for ships should now be determined by the future supply situation.

If replacements are not forthcoming, deliveries should be reduced to enable the ship only to reach the next bunkering port.

At the same time, the oil companies have been asked to refrain, where possible, from providing higher grades of bunker oil than is necessary for any ship.

In a second measure to reduce the consumption of oil products, Mr. Clinton lias requested the companies to limit strictly the amount of aviation fuel provided to aircraft. This should be limited to the amount normally required to cover the route over which the aircraft is flying, but with regard to the availability of fuel at the next landing point.

Hr. Clinton stressed, however, that in no case would supplies be so restricted as to endanger the safety of the aircraft.

He emphasised that although stocks are at present normal, further measures may be needed to conserve supplies during the coming weeks.

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/2........

Tuesday, November 20, 1973

- 2 -

PRELI14INARY HEARING ON OIL SPILLAGE

**»**«»«**

The Commission appointed to enquire into the oil spillage from the Shell Oil Company’s installation at Aplichau will hold a preliminary hearing at the Legislative Council Chamber next Tuesday (November 27) to enable persons interested, and who wish to appear at the enquiry, to indicate their interest.

The hearing proper will commence on December 4 at the Legislative Council Chamber.

Persons who may be interested may contact Counsel for the Commission, Mr. A .J. Corrigan, Senior Crown Counsel, at the Legal Department.

The Commission’s terms of reference are:

* To enquire into the circumstances in which a storage tank at the Shell Oil Installation at Aplichau fractured during the night of the 8th/9th November, 1973-

* To ascertain how oil escaped from that tank into the sea in spite of the various safety devices provided, and

* To malce recommendations to the Governor for the prevention of similar accidents in future.

It is pointed out that, accordingly, the question of pollution caused by the oil, any damage resulting therefrom, and the steps taken to remove the spilled oil are outside the terms of reference of the Commission.

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/?........

Tuesday, November 20, 1973

3

OCTOBER G.C.P.I. SHCWS FOUR-POINT DECREASE

2? Per Cent Drop In Average Retail Price Of Fresh Vegetables

*«******>»$

The General Consumer Price Index for October 1973 was 177 - four points (or 2.2 per cent) lower than that for the previous month. This was due mainly to a drop of 10 points in the index for foodstuffs.

On the other hand, the index for durable goods advanced by five points, and that for services by four points.

Increases of one point each were also recorded in the index for fuel and light and the index for clothing and footwear. Movements in the indexes for other sections of commodity were insignificant.

Compared with September, a substantial drop of 27 per cent was recorded in the average retail price of fresh vegetables as a result of considerable improvement in local supplies as well as imports.

Decreases were also recorded in the average retail prices of beef and poultry. However, there were increases in the average retail prices of rice, salt water fish and ffesh water fish.

As to non-food items, the index for ”Education, including the purchase of text books” also rose as a result of an increase in private school fees and in prices of text books, based on a regular annual survey conducted recently.

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A.........

Tuesday, November 20, 1973

- 4 -

SHENG KUNG HUI LADY MACLEHOSE CENTRE OPENED

******

Lady MacLehose today officially opened the Sheng Kung Hui Lady MacLehose Centre in North Kwai Chung — the first institution in Hong Kong to be named after her.

The Centre, of which Lady MacLehose is Honorary Patron, aims at serving youths living in nearby housing estates and young industrial workers in the area. It began services in June this year and has a preset membership of 1,400.

Speaking at the opening ceremony, Lady MacLehose noted that the Centre was the first of its kind in Kwai Chung and she was confident that it would "stand out amongst others that are planned for the area."

Kwai Chung, she said, was expanding in every way and by 1976 the population would be around half a million.

"In an industrial community such as this, it is important to have centres to which people can go for recreational purposes. It is also true that we need schools, hospitals and a good communication system," she stressed.

Referring to the many services, including community and youth work, provided by the Sheng Kung Hui in the diocese of Hong Kong and Macau, Lady MacLehose said: "This Centre will be for ever more a reminder of the determination and enthusiasm of the church’s will to help in thia particular field."

/She said........ •

Tuesday, November 20, 1973

5

She said she realised that the completion of the building had meant a great deal of work for many people who had seen the need to provide a meeting place where friends and neighbours could get together.

"What we see today is the happy result of this work. Tomorrow we shall see it contributing to the life of the community of Kwai Chung, *’ she added.

After the opening ceremony Lady MacLehose was shown round the building by the Rev. Lawrence Cheung, Director of the Centre.

Note to Editors; Copies of the full text of Lady MacLehose*s speech are boxed for collection together with a picture of the opening ceremony.

-------0----------

TRAFFIC RE-ARRANGEMENT

******

On Tin Street south of Ping Tin Street in Kowloon will be

routed one-way in a clockwise direction as from 10 a.m. on Friday (November 23) ? a Transport Department spokesman announced today.

Traffic signs will be posted to guide motorists.

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/6........

Tuesday, November 20, 1973

6 -

VISIT TO LEPROSY MISSION BY LADY MACLEHOSE

**#*«***♦

Lady MacLehose, President of the Community Chest of Hong Kong, will be visiting the Leprosy Mission on Hay Ling Chau on Thursday (November 22) t • to see at first hand the work being carried out there.

The main object of the Leprosy Mission, one of the Chest’s member agencies, is to minister to the physical and mental needs of sufferers from leprosy, to assist in their rehabilitation and to work towards the eradication of leprosy.

On arrival, Lady MacLehose will be met by Mr. A.D. Waudby, Secretary of the Mission; Mr. Ho Sau-wing, Administrative Superintendent; and Dr. Cheung Kwanr-seng, Medical Officer-in-charge.

She will tour the buildings at Kwo Lo Wan - the area adjacent to the pier - and inspect the patients at work. She will then call at the medical centre, the physiotherapy and, pccupational therapy departments, the church and recreational centre and the handicraft workshop.

Lady MacLehose will.be accompanied on the visit by”Miss Susan Hume, Social Secretary of Government House; Dr. S.H. Lee, Assistant Director of Medical and Health Services; and Mr. Colin Morrison, Executive Director of the Chest.

Note to Editors: You are invited to send reporters and

photographers to cover the visit. However, photographers are requested to avoid taking full view pictures of the patients. ,r,x .

Transport will be provided. A launch, ”Ling Hong No.2”, will be waiting at Queen’s Pier at 9 a.m. on Thursday to take Press representatives to Hay Ling' Chau. On arrival, vans from the Leprosy Mission will take the Press to the main valley.

At about 1.1.15 a.m., the ,TLing Hong No. 2” will take reporters to Peng Chau, where they can board passenger ferries back to Hong Kong.

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/7........

Tuesday, November 20, 1975

DAY OF FUN FOR SAU MAU PING RESIDENTS

The Social Welfare Department’s two Community Work Offices in

Sau Mau Ping Estate, Kowloon, have arranged a day of fun for the young and old on Sunday (November 25) in conjunction with various voluntary welfare agencies and groups in the area.

The first function, planned by the Community Work Office in Sau Mau Ping South is a morning outing for 100 elderly people over the age of 60.

Biey will be taken on a visit to Kowloon Park to see the creative structural design exhibition, Young People’s World, organised as part of the ^festival of Hong Kong.

A team of JO youth volunteers and nurses will escort the group on the tour, which has been arranged as part of the promotional activities for the welfare of the elderly.

In the afternoon, the Community Work Office in Sau Mau Ping Central will be holding a fun fair for 1,000 children. This will be at the Estate Welfare Building from 2 to 5 p.m.

Money raised at the fair will be used to provide entertainment for elderly people in the area.

- - 0 - -

Tuesday, November 20, 1973

- 8 -

LABOUR DISPUTE SETTLED

********

The dispute involving the management and nine workers of the Arvin (UK) Ltd, has been settled.

The dispute arose over the stoppage of work by 350 workers on November 11. The nine workers were dismissed for alleged misconduct within the factory.

The Labour Relations Service of the Labour Department stepped in soon after the dispute broke out. Two conciliation meetings were subsequently hold in the San Po Kong office of the Service where the parties to the dispute finally reached agreement.

Under the agreement, the dismissed workers today each received one month wages in lieu of notice and a pro-rata yeai^end bonus. The total amount involved is in the region of S6,000.

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/9.......

i

Tuesday, November 20, 1973 - 9 -

EXPORT OF COTTON YARNS AND FABRICS TO THE UNITED STATES «*«**«*

The Director of Commerce and Industry, Mr. D.H. Jordan, today announced the implementation of an export authorization scheme for exports to the United States of cotton yarns and fabrics outside the normal quota control arrangements.

Mr. Jordan said: ’’The American Government has offered Hong Kong and other countries with which the United States has bilateral cotton textile agreements,import into the United States outside quota of cotton yarns and fabrics of an amount equal to five per cent of the aggregate level of the US/Hong Kong cotton textile agreement. This amounts to about 26 million square yards.

’’Export under this offer can be in any or more categories in the ootton yarn and fabric group,” he said.

Full details of the export authorization scheme are set out in a Notice to Esqjorters: Series 2 (U.S.A.) No. which was issued today.

Trade associations and companies on the Commerce and Industry Department’s mailing list for Notice to Exporters: Series 2 will receive copies of the relevant Notice shortly.

Anyone wishing to seek further information is invited to contact the following officers of the Commerce and Industry Department

Miss C.M.Y. Chung - Assistant Trade Officer

Tel. No. 5-257791

Mr. Y.K. Tong - Industry Assistant Tel. No. 5-239625 -------------------0---------

/10.........

Tuesday, November 20, 1973

- 10 -

INDUSTRIALISTS WARNED AGAINST COMPLACENCY

******* • x . • • • * Mr. T.K, Ann, Chairman of the newly set up Hong Kong.Training

Council, today urged industrialists to continue striving for improvements instead of being content with past achievements.

Speaking at the Council’s first meeting, held this afternoon in the Urban Council Chamber, Mr. Ann said that while Hong Kong had succeeded in the first phase of its "industrial evolution” with an almost total absence of planning in industrial training and education, there was no room for complacency.

He pointed out that labour costs in Hong Kong were no longer low and the only way for Hong Kong’s industries to remain-,competitive was to become more and more sophisticated.

Biis called for products of better quality and higher productivity which, demanded in turn better trained technicians and craftsmen to plan and produce them, he said.

Industrialists could cnly plan for the future with confidence and invest in their business when they were reasonably sure that technical manpower of a quality able to meet new demands was readily available, Mr. Ann said. • ’ *

’’Moreover, when this happens, foreign investments in the way of high technology which we desperately want to attract at the present stage of our development will be forthcoming,” he added.

/fae saw.......

Tuesday, November 20, 1973

- 11 -

He saw the task of the Training Council as helping to ensure that Hong Kong would continue to have "a healthy and competitive industry, a virile commerce and efficient services, capable of surviving in an increasingly complex and sophisticated situation."

He emphasised: "To achieve our objective, we must have comprehensive manpower planning which relates the manpower requirements of these sectors •f the economy, now and in the future, to the throughputs of our educational system from secondary through to tertiary."

He hoped that by having senior government representatives on the Executive Committee of the Council, its recommendations would be processed without undue and unreasonable delay.

Note to Editors: The full text of Mr. Ann’s speech is boxed for

collection.

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WIL 8 P.M.

PRIME MINISTER’S VISIT

********

The Prime Minister is to pay an official visit to China, from 4th to 12th January, 1974, at the invitation of the People’s Republic of China.

He will come to Hong Kong after leaving China; the details of his visit here will be announced later.

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Release time: 7*4^ p.m.

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Wednesday, November 21, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No, China to supply more Kerosene and diesel oil to Hong Kong •••• 1

Public warned against storing excessive fuel in homes •••••••• 2

Hong Kong’s two-way trade in textiles emphasised ••••••••••••• 4

Industrialists urged to step up productivity ••••••••••••«••«• 6

New irrigation system for villagers of Sha Kok Mei •......• •••• 8

Shipmasters urged to take extra care during the Festival harbour procession ••••••••«,*••.......•••••••••••••••••,••••,• 9

Three pre-war buildings in Central declared dangerous •••••••• 10 Temporary disruption of electricity supply in Homantin area • • 11 $400,000 from Community Relief Trust Fund for Kowloon Bay fire victims • ••*....................................    • •••..... 12

Processing of new sites for Kowloon Bay fire victims starts • • 13

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Wednesday, November 21, 1973

- 1 -

HONG KONG TO RECEIVE MORE OIL FROM CHINA ***«**»•

China is to ship more kerosene and diesel oil to Hong Krng.

Announcing this today, a government spokesman said that the government had been informed by the Far East Overseas Oil Co. (FEOSO) that a shipment of 5,500 tons of light diesel oil from China arrived in Hong Kong today (Wednesday). This was additional to FEOSO’s normal sales, a shipment of about 5,500 tons having already arrived earlier this month.

The spokesman went on to say that FEOSO had indicated that they planned to increase imports of kerosene and light diesel oil from China.

Commenting on these developments, the Deputy Colonial Secretary and Chairman of the Oils Policy Committee, Mr. Michael Clinton, said that these additional shipments from China were in response to discussions which he had held recently with FEOSO.

”We are most grateful that China has been able to help out the people of Hong Kong in this way, These imports from China should help to minimine any difficulties that might arise later.”

Wednesday, November 21, 1973

2 -

WAKIIHG AGAINST STORAGE OF KEROSENE AND LP GAS IN HOMES . * 5^ *

♦ * # * * * * ft

Mr. A.J. Jones, Assistant Cheif Fire Officer of the Fire Prevention Bureau, today appealed to members of the public not to store kerosene and liquefied petroleum gas any more than normally needed at home.

He also warned that petrol should not be stored at home under any circumstances.

Mr. Jones made ijiis urgent plea when commenting on the stepped-up action by officers of the bureau in making special inspection of provision stores and dangerous goods dealers in connection vzith the fire prevention campaign.

He said officers of the bureau had visited a number of premises . 9' .

and made more than 15 seizures of dangerous goods during the past three days after receiving reports of instances of excessive or unauthorised storage.

Last (Tuesday) night 800 pounds of liquid petroleum gas, 100 gallons of kerosene, and >0 gallons of petrol were seized in a single operation in Hennessy Road.

The purpose of carrying out these seizures was to ensure public ■ I •*

safety in accordance with the statutory requirements.

nAt this time, when people are tending to act irrationally and irresponsibly and store or accumulate excessive quantities of dangerous goods above the exempted quantities or in excess of their licensed quantity, we must wisure that they do not pose a completely unnecessary and irresponsible hazard or danger to the remainder of the community> c,Mr. Jones said.

/He emphasised •••••.

Wednesday, November 21, 1975

- 3 -

He emphasised that the increased tempo of inspection would be naintained.

In order to make the campaign a success, public co-operation was of the greatest importance, he said.

"I hope people will not be so foolish to expose themselves to unnecessary danger by storing excessive kerosene or L.P. gas at home/1 he added.

---------------------------------0---------- t -

Wednesday, November 21, 1973

- 4 -

HONG KONG’S TWO-WAY TRADE IN TEXTILES EMPHASISED

Xofc******* ♦ *

The Director of Commerce and Industry, Mr. David Jordan, today deplored the inaccurate categorisation into ’exporting1 and ’importing1 • ‘ rj countries and emphasised that Hong Kong was an open market — not just a source of supply.

While Hong Kong was usually thought of as an exporting country,

A., he said, it in fact was an importing and exporting market like most countries.

Mr. Jordan was speaking at the opening of the Textile Institute’s first Asian Conference at the City Hall which is being attended by about 250 delegates from 24 countries.

Hong Kong’s exports of textile products were worth over 7,600 million Hong Kong dollars in 1972, but in the same year our texts 1 e imports totalled about 5,000 million Hong Kong dollars, he said.

’’And just as the value of our exports is going up again this year, so is the value of our imports.” he added. ”Hong Kong is a market -and an open one at’ that - not just a source of supply.”

Hr. Jordan drew attention to the emphasis put in international discussions on ’disruptive’ imports from ’low-cost supplies.’

He said it was a bit ironic to find that the developed countries are themselves the principal manufacturers and exporters both of textiles and clothing, and that by far the greater proportion of the world’s textile trade is conducted by the developed countries among themselves.

/In 1970, ........

Wednesday, November 21, 1973

- 5 -

In 1970, the developed countries exported - mostly to each ♦ other - over IpjOOO million U.S. dollars’ worth of textiles and clothing, while the developing countries’ total exports were worth only J,800 million,

Mr. Jordan said’ that Hong Kong’s fax—sighted industrialists have always recognised that in order to stay competitive, they have to move quickly in response to new ideas, new technology, new fibres and new markets.

Installation of the most modem equipment available, he added, had helped the Hong Kong industry to maintain, and in some cases improve, its competitive position in world markets, r

Although Hong Kong was opposed to trade restrictions in any form, we have learned to be pragmatic and realistic.

”\/o have many times demonstrated our willingness to discuss mutual trade problems with any country, and the records show that we have been prepared to accept restrictions where there has appeared to be reasonable

economic justification,” Mr. Jordan said.

”But we have also sometimes had to accept restrictions where no real justification for them existed.”

Note to Editors:

Copies of the full text of Mr. Jordan’s speech

are boxed for collection.

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/6..........

Wednesday, November 21, 1973

- 6 -

INDUSTRIALISTS URGED TO STEP UP PRODUCTIVITY

**********

The Commissioner of Labour, Mr. I.R. Price, today urged Hong Kong industrial, experts to look to increased productivity as one means of improving the community’s quality of life.

"Productivity is not an end in itself,” he said. ”It is only part of the pursuit of greater efficiency and of overall social goals, such as a better working environment in the broadest possible sense.

"By this I mean greater safety at work, improved ’working conditions, reduction in environmental working hazards, reduction of work monotony and an increase in real wages.”

Mr. Price was delivering the inaugural address at an Industrial Relations Seminar in Hong Kong sponsored by the International Labour Organisation and NORAD — the Norwegian Agency for International Development.

The tv/o-day seminar is being attended by representatives of management, unions, and the government, and experts from universities and other educational bodies.

The seminar will discuss effective management and labour relations in the context of productivity.

Hr. Price told the seminar he hoped it would also take as one of its aims the more specific definition of the social benefits which cculd be achieved by greater productivity.

"I suggest that it is only when this important step has been taken that it. is possible, by tripartite discussions of the kind to be held during this seminar, to enhance greater productivity consciousness among employers and management, workers and unions, and in government.

/”I have

Wednesday, November 21, 1973

7

"I have no doubt at all that a better productivity consciousness can be achieved through better communication — that is, joint consultation between management and workers — and through better workers1 education and greater interest by responsible trade union leaders.”

Mr. Price said that to some it might come as a surprise to see the International Labour Organisation extending its activities beyond working conditions, legislation and labour—management relations to include the subject of productivity.

But, he said, such an attitude, ’’would overlook the fact that the constitution of the International Labour Organisation requires it to examine and consider all international, economic and financial policies and measures in the light of the fundamental.criterion - as set out in the Declaration of Philadelphia - that all such policies and measures must be judged by their contribution to enable ’all human beings irrespective of race, creed or sex to pursue both their material well-being and their spiritual development in conditions of freedom and dignity, of economic security and equal opportunity.’

’•Therefore, there is nothing at all peculiar in the International Labour Organisation’s tripartite dialogue — that is, embracing employers, workers and governments - now branching out into matters of productivity.”

Note to Editors: Copies of the full text of Mr. Price’s

speech are boxed for collection.

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/8.........

Wednesday, November 21, 1973

- 8 -

SAI KUNG VILLAGERS GET NEW IRRIGATION SYSTEM »»«*«******

A complex system of irrigation channels and diversion weirs has been built in the valleys behind Sha Kok Mei near Sai Kung to provide better irrigation facilities for villagers in the area.

The project, which cost more than 9600,000, is part of a 97 mill inn scheme to improve irrigation facilities in the cultivated areas affected by the High Island Water Scheme.

The work was necessary to ensure that the long-term effects of the tapping of water did not adversely affect normal water supplies for domestic and agricultural use in- the area.a spokesman for the New Territories Administration explained today.

In planning the project, he said allowance had to be made to take into account not only the current consumption for irrigating the 16$ acres of cultivated land in the valley, but also possible future and more intensive cropping which would need increased supplies.

"This necessitated a distribution system which will not only make more efficient use of the water available, but will ensure that only water surplus to requirements is syphoned off to the intakes of the new reservoir." Altogether, 10,000 feet of concrete irrigation channels and 11 diversion weirs were built.

Representatives of the 2,700 Sha Kok Mei villagers have expressed their satisfaction with the scheme.

Note to editors: Copies of a photograph of one of the diversion

.weirs constructed in the Sha Kok Mei Valley are boxed for collection.

Wednesday, November 21, 1973

- 9 -

SHIPS ALERTED for harbour procession

*********

Tho Marine Department today advised all ships to watch out for vessels participating in the Hong Kong Festival Floating Procession this Sunday (November 25) •

Shipmasters, harbour pilots and coxswains of local craft navigating in the harbour should proceed with caution and give every practicable consideration to the participating vessels, a spokesman for the department said.

The procession, which starts at 11 a.m. on Sunday, will comprise a tot^l of 40 craft of various types and decorations, sailing at three to four knots.

They will start from Yaumatei Typhoon Shelter and proceed along the Ocean Terminal, Tsim Sha Tsui, Hunghom, North Point', Wanchai, Central and West. Point before reaching the final stop in Aberdeen Harbour.

On tho way, after passing the point off Hunghom, the vessels will turn right across.the harbour to North Point and will sail round Buoy Al off Central at about 1 p.m. before moving on to West Point.

■The procession is expected to last five hours and should end at about 4 p.m. - . ’*

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/10 .........

Wednesday, November 21, 1973

10

DANGEROUS BUILDINGS

******

Three pre-war buildings in Central District were today declared to be in a dangerous condition by the Building Authority,

They are located at Nos. 24 and 26 Hillier Street and No. 6A Burd Street. At the same time, No. 51 Jervois Street was declared liable to become dangerous.

In a statement, the Principal Government Building Surveyor said these buildings were inspected as part of a comprehensive survey in the area following a complaint,

’’Bulges and fractures in the load bearing blue brick walls were observed in Nos. 24 and 26 Hillier Street and 6A Burd Street, and it• ~is considered that there is a risk of failure leading to a collapse. In addition, a considerable amount of seriously defective timber to floors was noted,” he said.

He added that there were indications of movement to the brickwork at the rear of No. 51 Jervois Street and there was a danger of failure during or after the demolition of No. 6A Burd Street.

Notices of intention to apply for closure orders were posted on the buildings today. The applications will be heard in Victoria District Court on December 19 at 9-30 a.m.

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Wednesday, November 21, 1973

11

TEMPORARY DISRUPTION OF ELECTRICITY SUPPLY ««««***

Motorists are advised that the traffic light signal at the junction of Iffylie Street and Princess Margaret Road in Kowloon will be out of service due to a temporary disruption of electricity supply in King’s Park from midnight tonight to 5 a.m. tomorrow (Thursday).

R?om midnight tomorrow to 3 a.m. on Friday, the traffic light signals at the junction of San Lau Street and Chatham Road; and at the Chatham Road/Wuhu Street junction will also be out of service.

In all cases, police officers will be on hand to direct traffic.

Ihe street lighting will also be affected in the general area of Fat Kwong Street from Ma Tau Wai Road to Sheung Shing Street and Shansi Street to Yan Fung Street.

Motorists are warned to exercise care in this area.

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/12.........

Wednesday, November 21, 1973

12 -

3400,000 FROM COlHiUNITY RELIEF TRUST FUND FOR KOWLOON BAY FIRE VICTIMS

«**»****«

The Social Welfare Department has made available a sum of 3400,000 from the Community Relief Trust Fund for victims of the Kowloon Bay fire

to build now homos. This money will be distributed to them through tho Housing Department.

Moanwhile, the City District Office, Kwun Tong, today distributed 320 per head to the victims from the Fat Choy Fund to help them meett-any urgent need of cash.

The Social Welfare Department is still supplying two rnegls daily to the victims.

The Department has also arranged with the Medical and Health -

Department to supply milk powder for babies under one year old.

Following is a list of the total number of relief articles issued

to the victims by the Social Welfare Department since the outbreak of the fire on Thursday night:

Cooking pots: 465

bowls 1,747

chopsticks: 1,747 pairs

blankets: 1,802

clothing: 5 bales

towels: 1,747

soap: 1,747 cakes

tooth brushes 1,747 0 /1?

Wednesday, November 21, 1975

13 -

SITE IDENTIFICATION EXERCISE FOR FIRE VICTIMS

A site identification process to determine the eligibility of the people who lost their hones in the squatter fire at Kowloon Bay last Thursday night was carried out smoothly today (Wednesday).

Representatives of 429 families out of more than 480 originally registered with the Housing Department turned up at the site for the exercise, although all families were invited to attend.

They were led to the site and asked to show exactly where their huts had stood.

The process was the initial step taken to weed out impostors who registered as fire victims in the hope of claiming public housing or cash grants’ to which they are not entitled.

A spokesman for the Housing Department said so far more than 50 families, or about 300 people, originally registered as fire victims have been sifted out as false claimants as a result of today’s exercise.

Immediately after the site identification, a note was given to family representatives calling on them to turn up at the squatter control office at Kowloon Bay or at Tung Tau Estate on Friday for further processing.

The spokesman said the information collected today would be checked carefully against the department’s records to see whether they tallied.

He reiterated that all genuine fire victims would be given either public housing or resited accommodation, depending on their eligibility.

/Cash

Wednesday, November 21, 1973

Cash grants from the community relief trust fund to enable them to rebuild and re-equip their homes will be distributed to them as soon as their eligibility has been determined.

Meanwhile, staff of the Housing Department are still working round the clock preparing a site nearby to take in the victims.

It is hoped that they can start building their new homes next week.

The livelihood of fire victims will not be affected as the new site is in the same area as the one devastated by the fire.

The spokesman repeated his appeal to the fire victims to make use of the temporary accommodation facilities available to them.

He said: 11 We have opened seven temporary centres but only about

300 people are staying at three of them. The others still remain unoccupied." The centres are the Caritas Centre at Ngau Tau Kok; the Welfare

Centre at Sau Mau Ping, South and Central; at Lam Tin Estate; the Kwun r

Tong Community Centre? Yau Tong Kaifong Association; and Cha Kwo Ling

Kaifong Association.

Release time:

. . ? .7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Thursday, November 22, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No.

Public urged to avoid undue wastage of kerosene and electricity*.............................••••••••••......... 1

Basis for rehousing disaster victims clarified •••••••...... 4

Careers ezchibition opens tomorrow at the Wanchai reclamation ............................................................ 5

Temporary post office at City Hall during Festival period.. 6

Traffic arrangements in Statue Square this Saturday ........ 6

Special trains to Fanling on Sunday for air display ........ 7

No licence required for importing coffee.................. 8

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

1

Thursday, November 22, 1973

PUBLIC URGED TO AVOID UNDUE WASTE OF ELECTRICITY AND FUEL

Simple Guidelines For Economising Outlined

*******

An appeal to the public to economise and avoid the wasteful use of electricity and petroleum products was made today (Thursday, 22nd November).

Mr. Roy Porter, Chairman of the Cil Distribution Committee, said that with the uncertainty of the oil situation in the world, it is prudent for us to take steps now to avoid wasting’ fuel.

He asked everyone in Hong Kong, residents, all those in industry and commerce, government service, and public concerns and utilities, to co-operate in measures to avoid waste and unnecessary consumption, particularly of electricity.

"We aim to reduce consumption by 10-1% immediately," he said. We all tend to be wasteful users of electricity and petrol and a reduction of this percentage would not greatly inconvenience many of us.

"By cutting down now on the amount of electricity and fuel we are consuming," he confined, "we can help to save ourselves fuel problems later should supplies drop."

Mr. Porter reaffirmed that there is no shortage of oil in Hong Kong. Stocks remain normal but we capnot rule out the possibility of a reduction of 10-1% in our supplies over the next month or two.

"There is ptill -plenty of kerosene in Hong Kong", Mr. Porter stressed, "and additional supplies expected from China should ensure that stocks are maintained at a high level. We do not therefore expect any shortages of this fuel," he added.

/On ........

Thursday, November 1?77 - 2 -*

On recent reports that some people were storing excessive amounts of oil, Mr. Porter said that hoarding was absolutely unnecessary and extremely dangerous. "The Fire Services Department is already taking action against offenders" Mr. Porter said, "and will continue to prosecute people who hoard excessive amounts of fuel/’

Mr. Porter said that industry and commerce in Hong Kong had indicated that they would give their full co-operation in achieving a saving in electricity. Most consider that a saving of 10-15% can be achieved without disrupting production. The Government has given assurances that industry will be given high priority for supplies and that Jobs will not be jeopardized.

The Government will set a lead in economising. Instructions are being issued to all Heads of Government Departments:

to appoint an officer to be responsible for supervising and co-ordinating all economy measures;

to restrict use of government transport by their staff for essential journeys;

to encourage staff to go about their work by public transport;

to keep lighting in offices to a minimum and to switch off lights whenever sunlight is sufficient for work; to switch off air-conditioners and only to use ventilation when essential;

to stop all flood-lighting on all government buildings.

There are many simple and easy ways by which householders, commercial firms and factories and workshops can help without seriously affecting convenience and comfort. For example:

By householders

Switching on lights only when necessary.

Replacing high-power bulbs with low-power ones. Economising with air-conditioners, washing machines, heaters, TV, vacuum cleaners and other electric appliances.

/Limiting

Thursday, Nover?',:

5

Limiting the use of electric or gas cookers and geysers. By commercial firns

Switching on neon lights later in the evening and turning them off earlier than at present.

Keeping lighting to a minimum; switching off lighting during lunch hours and whenever sunlight is sufficient for staffs to work.

Switching off display lighting in shop windows. Economising with air-conditioners and heaters. By factories and workshops

Keeping lighting to the minimum essential for production and safety.

Turning off lights, fans and machine motors when not required.

For motorists

Cutting cut unnecessary journeys and reducing pleasure trips.

Using public transport whenever possible.

Sharing cars when travelling to and from work.

A....

Thursday, November 22, 1973

- 4 -

POLICY REGARDING REHOUSING OF DISASTER VICTIMS CLARIFIED

««*«**«

The Housing Department today explained the policy which is the basis for deciding whether victims of fires or natural disasters in squatter areas are eligible for public housing or a site in a Licensed Area.

A spokesman said there had been a number of enquiries about the matter since last Thursday’s fire in Kowloon Bay.

Establishing eligibility, he said, was often a complicated business, but generally speaking public housing was offered to people who were living in structures recorded during the 1964 general survey or who had Licensed Area permits.

Illegal squatters who were genuine victims of a fire were offered new sites in a Licensed Area. Most of the Kowloon Bay disaster people fell into this category.

The spokesman said that confusion often arose after a big blaze when impostors mingled with fire victims in the hope of getting a new site or cash relief.

When this sort of situation arose it was necessary to conduct a site identity exercise like the one on Wednesday so that genuine cases could point out on the ground where their former homes had stood. In this way many impostors were weeded out.

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/5........

Thursday, November 22, 1973

5 -

CAREERS EXHIBITION OPENS TOMORROW ♦ *♦♦A

Note to Editors; Careers *7^ the Labour Department’s second annual Careers Exhibition begins tomorrow (Friday) in the Chinese Manufacturers* Association pavilion at the CMA Fair Ground.

The Vice-Chancellor of the University of Hong Kong, Dr. Rayson Huang, will officially open the exhibit5.on at 3.00 p.r.. An introductory speech will be given by the Commissioner of Labour, Mr. I.R. Price.

The Exhibition - by far the largest of its kind ever held in Hong Kong - occupies about 15,000 square feet of the Exhibition Pavilion. A total of some 30 exhibitors from the industrial, commercial and government sectors will show comprehensive information on well over 100 different careers, using models, films, working machinery, and a huge range of other display materials.

Careers ’7^ - which resulted from the very strong response by students, teachers, parents and employers to the first exhibition of the Labour Department’s Youth Employment Advisory Service in the City Hall late last year - will be open every day from 10.00 in the morning to 7® 00 in the evening until Sunday, December 2.

Reporters and photographers are welcome to cover the event. Refreshments will be serve afterwards.

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Thursday, November 22, 1973

- 6 -

TEMPORARY FESTIVAL POST OFFICE

A temporary post office will be set up in the City Hall Exhibition Hall during the Festival of Hong Kong Stamps Exhibition to be held from November 24 to December 2.

Business hours will be from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. daily, including Sundays. Post office business will be confined to the sales of postage stamps and the acceptance of registered articles.

A ”hand back” service will also be provided whereby commemorative covers bearing local addresses will be accepted over the post office counter, date-stamped immediately and handed back to the person presenting them.

-------0--------- • r - :-

TRAFFIC ARRANGEMENTS IN STATUE SQUARE * * * * * *

In connection with Hong Kong Festival activities in Statue Square on Saturday (November 24), the Chater Road ’pedestrian precinct* will be closed to vehicular traffic at J p.m. instead of 7 p.m.

Chater Road will be closed to all vehicular traffic between the Mandarin Hotel and Jackson Road from 3 p<*m. on Saturday to midnight on Sunday.

- - 0 - -

/7

Thursday, November 22, 1973

- 7 -

SPECIAL TRAINS FOR AIR SHO//

**«»**»«

Special passenger trains have been arranged to run between Kowloon and Fanling this Sunday (November 25) to enable the public to attend the air display at Sek Kong Airfield.

Four special up-trains will leave Kowloon at 9-49 a.m., 1.1.17 a.m*, 12.26 p.m..and 3.38 p.m. They will pick up passengers en route at the Mong Kok, Sha Tin, University, Tai Po Kau and Tai Po Market stations.

Two other up-trains will leave Kowloon at 4.26 p.m. and 5*3$ p.m., but they will not be picking up passengers en route.

Six down-trains will leave Fanling at 11.06 a.m., 12.36 p.m., 1.47 p.m., 4.52 p.m., 5 p.m. and 6.26 p.m., and they will be stopping at the various stations en route.

Additional passenger trains will also run in the evening if traffic warrants.

The air display at Sek Kong is one of the programmes of the Festival of Hong Kong, and is scheduled to begin at 11 a.m. on Sunday.

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/8........

Thursday, November 22, 1973

- 8 -

COFFEE IMPORTS LICENCE NO LONGER NECESSARY

Coffee importers need no longer apply for import licences to cover coffee imports into Hong Kong, Mr. M.D. Sargant, Assistant Director of Commerce and Industry announced today.

The Import (Coffee) Regulations, he explained, had been revoked on the advice of the Executive Council in view of recent modifications to the International Coffee Agreement.

Mr. Sargant reminded coffee exporters, however, that export licences were still required for processed coffee - namely roasted and soluble coffee - for health and safety purposes, under the Import and Export (General) Regulations.

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Release time: 7*00 p.m.

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Friday, November 23, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No,

The Governor opens 1973 Festival of Hong Kong................... 1

Improvement works at Shuen Wan refuse dump ••••••»•«•••••••••• 2

Japanese marine ecology expert here to assess pollution damage from

Apleichau oil spillage .......................•................  3

Renovation of picnic facilities on the Peak • .................. 4

Students urged to exercise discretion in choice of career •••• 5

New specialist clinic to be built in Wanchai.................... 8

Regulations to update the operation of food businesses.......• 9

Modular markets to be built in Lam Tin Estate •••«••••«••••••• 10

New Territories Commissioner calls for community effort towards social progress  ...........................................    11

Revised rate for rebuilding grants for Kowloon Bay fire victims  ...................................................    12

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Friday, November 2J , 1973

- 1 -

GOVERNOR INAUGURATES THIRD HONG KONG FESTIVAL

*********

• The Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, this evening extended a personal invitation to everyone in Hong Kong to join in the fun of this year’s festival activities.

Speaking at the official opening of the festival at the Hong Kong Stadium, Sir Murray noted that the tremendous variety and scope of this year’s programme placed it amongst the largest of its kind in the world.

”It is a programme for everyone, no one has been forgotten,” he said.

"The Festival, and the youth of Hong Kong, who play such a prominent part in it, demonstrate the zest and drive of Hong Kong’s people — the zest and drive which have made Hong Kong the greatest city which it is.”

Hong Kong, the Governor went on, was the hardest working community he knew. ”But we also have a capacity for fun and enjoyment — that is our secret strength...So this Festival is for fun. Let everyone enjoy it.”

Sir Murray thanked Sir Yuet-keung Kan, head of the Steering Committee, and all those who had helped organise the Festival, for their efforts.

In his address, Sir Yuet-keung said that this year’s festival promised to be an even greater success in terms of community involvement, as well as more gay, festive and enjoyable.

/More than •••••••••

Friday, November 23, 1973

- 2 -

More than 750 events had been arranged, he said, providing

an extremely wide and varied range of entertainment for all groups of people — including the old, the young and the physically handicapped as well as people in outlying districts.

Note to Editors: Copies of the full text of the Governor’s

speech are distributed separately as a special supplement together with Sir Yuet-keung’s address.

-------0---------

NEV/ TERRITORIES REFUSE DUMP BEING IMPROVED

**«***»***

The final phase of a project to tidy up the Shuen Wan refuse

dump off Ting Kok Road near Taipo will be launched next year.

The work will involve construction of a rubble mound to contain

the refuse dump so as to eliminate the possibility of refuse escaping into the sea and causing marine pollution.

When completed in early 1975, the rubble mound, which will cover

an area of 2,100 square feet, will be suitable for recreational development.

At present, improvements at the refuse dump are made by blanlmeting over the dump with earth and instituting a regular maintenance cycle.

The rubble mound project has been designed by the Port Works

Division of the Public Works Department which will supervise the work.

-------0----------

Friday, November 25, 1973

- 3 -

JAPANESE MARINE ECOLOGY EXPERT ARRIVES

To Study Damages To Marine Life Caused By Apleichau Oil Spillage *«*****»»

Tlie government has invited a Japanese marine ecology expert to assess the damages done to marine life as a result of the recent oil spillage from the Apleichau Shell installation.

The expert, Dr. Hiroshi Tokuda, is a Professor of the Tokyo University, who has played a leading role in advising the Japanese Government regarding the impact of marine pollution on the local fishing industry.

Dr. Tokuda arrived this afternoon and was met at the airport by the Director of Protocol, Brig. R.G. Lewthwaite. He was immediately briefed by the staff of the Environment Branch and the Agriculture and Fisheries Department on the oil spillage incident.

Announcing the arrival of Dr. Tokuda, a government spokesman said: "Dr. Tokuda’s job will be to assess what, if any, damage to marine life is attributable to the oil spillage off Apleichau from the Shell installation on November 8, 1973* His studies will also include the possible tainting of fish, mollusks and Crustacea.

”He will be acting as the government’s independent advisor and report his findings direct to the government.”

During his stay here, Dr. Tokuda will be working closely with the Director of Agriculture and Fisheries and arrangements have already been made for him to examine the species of fishes affected by the oil spillage.

/"The swift ......

Friday, November 23, 1973

- 4 -

"The swift commissioning of Dr, Tokuda for the study, an internationally well known marine biologist, demonstrates the government’s concern over the possible damages done to fishes and marine life by the oil spillage," the spokesman added.

Dr. Tokuda will also work in close liaison with Dr. M. Spooner, the British expert from the Marine Biological Association Laboratories, hired by the Shell Company to assess the damages done to marine life by the spillage and any related long-term implications.

Note to Editors: Copies of a photograph of Dr. Tokuda will

be boxed for collection this evening.

-------0---------

POPULAR PICNIC AREA TO BE IMPROVED

««****»

The Pinewood picnic area at the old gun post in Hatton Road • a popular spot in the Peak area for weekend picnickers — is to be improved in about three months’ time.

The improvement work will involve the renovation of seven of the old sheds to serve as shelters, and the provision of six barbecue pits at various spots on the site.

The work is expected to begin in January next year, taking two months to complete.

Invitation to tender for the project is gazetted today.

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/5........

Friday, November 23, 1973

- 5 -

CAREERS EXHIBITION OPENS

Schools Urged To Stress Guidance On Careers

********

The Vice-Chancellor of the Hong Kong University, Dr. Rayson Huang, today called on Hong Kong schools to place greater emphasis on careers advice and guidance.

’’Schools should not only provide an education, but should also help mould the character of young people”, he said.

"Do not merely concentrate on teaching the ’three Rs1 ,”he urged teachers. "Encourage your students to broaden their interests, because the broader the base, the easier it is to build a career.”

Dr, Huang was officially opening Careers ’7^+, the second annual careers exhibition staged by the Labour Department’s Youth Employment Advisory Service. The exhibition - the largest of its kind ever held in Hong Kong - will be open from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. every day until December 2, in the Chinese Manufacturers’ Association pavilion at the CMA Fair Ground.

Dr. Huang said : ’’Greater emphasis should be given to careers advice and guidance.

"And a careers master’s teaching load should be adjusted to enable him to devote adequate time to his very important task.”

Dr. Huang said that schools should make careers information easily available, and not lock'it up in the school'library or teachers’ room - as often happened.

/He urged....... •

Friday, November 23, 1973

-fi-

He urged schools to allow time for their students to attend careers seminars and exhibitions, visit work places to see actual working conditions, and encourage careers talks.

"Do not grudge the time spent on these various activities,” he said, "because education means little if, on completion of his studies, a student finds that he is ill-prepared for life — one aspect of which is earning a living.”

Dr. Huang warned young people to take great care in choosing a career. ”A lifetime’s happiness and prosperity can depend upon this choice,” he told students from the Ng Wah College and the Precious Blood Middle School who were among the officially-invited guests at the opening. 3h© two schools were invited because they were the first to respond to the Labour Department’s invitation to schools to arrange visits to the exhibition.

Dr. Huang said: ”A wise choice, taken after careful thought, can mean satisfaction and recognition, and a sense of fulfilment which will affect one’s outlook and life.

”An unwise choice will be followed by discontent and boredom which will blight a lifetime.

"And the loss then is not only the individual’s; it is society’s. It is a waste of human material — a loss the more sad because it cowl ri have been avoided.”

In his introductory speech, the Commissioner of Labour, Mr. I.R. Price, said it was estimated that the total number of secondary school students coming on to the labour market each year was now over 30,000.

/”I hope .......

0

Friday, November 23, 1973

- 7 -

”1 hope that every young person in Hong Kong who is about to embark on a career will visit this exhibition,” said Mr. Price, ’’because nowhere else is such a variety of careers information so readily accessible.

"No young person, no parent, no teacher, should miss the opportunity provided by this exhibition.

’’The exhibitors cover a wide spectrum of employment opportunities, ranging from industry and commerce to government and the service industries.

”In addition to models, film and photographic displays, actual demonstrations and equipment, there is a wealth of written information which can be taken away and studied.”

Mr. Prioe urged any school or youth group which had not yet arranged a visit to the exhibition to do so by contacting the Youth Employment Advisory Service of the Labour Department.

Note to Editors: Copies of the full text of Dr. Huang’s and

Mr. Price’s speeches are boxed for collection.

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/8........

Friday, November 23, 1973

- 8 -

NEW SPECIALIST CLINIC FOR WAN CHAI

********

A modern eight-storey specialist clinic, the Tang Chi Ngong Specialist Clinic, is to be built in January next year on a site in Wanchai next to the Tang Shiu Kin Hospital.

When completed in the middle of 1975? it will replace the specialist out-patient facilities now available in the Violet Peel Polyclinic, which is expected to be closed down in 1976 for redevelopment in connection with plans now under consideration by the Childrens Playground Association for the area of the Southern Playground.

The Tang Chi Ngong Specialist Clinic will be an out-patient clinic with the largest number of consulting rooms among the new government clinics proposed over the next few years.

There will be 21 consulting rooms compared with the nine consulting rooms in the present Violet Peel Polyclinic. Facilities will include an operating theatre for minor surgery.

The building is to be provided with a car park. Each floor is being designed to accommodate a particular type of specialist service such as ear, nose and throat on one floor, dermatology on another, maternal and child health service on another, and so on.

Half of the cost of construction is being met by Sir Shiu-kin Tang, after vThosc father, the late Tang Chi Ngong, the clinic is being named. The government will meet the remainder of the expenses, and recurrent costs.

The clinic could eventually form part of the regionalisation of medical and health services proposed by the Medical Development Advisory Committee in its recently-published report.

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/9.........

Friday, November 23, 1973

- 9 -

FOOD SELLING MACHINES - A BUSINESS

«*«****«*

Nev; measures to bring health regulations up-to-date for the running of food business in the New Territories will be introduced from February 1 next year.

The new measures, contained in the Food Business (New Territories) (Amendment) Regulations 1973, are published in today’s gazette.

Under the amending regulations, the operation of food vending machines will be considered a food business and the health authorities will be provided with powers to prosecute the owner of an unlicensed business when its operator cannot be located.

At the same time, the regulations discontinue the need to license shops which sell fruit or Vegetables, and introduce a simplified system to calculate the minimum kitchen area required for restaurants of different sizes.

S5nri 1 nr amendments to the Food Business By-laws, which apply to the urban areas, are expected to be made in the near future.

Commenting on the new regulations today, a spokesman for the Urban Services Department explained that a coin-operated food vending machine was now considered a food business and required a pennit because it was necessary to maintain high standards of hygiene to safeguard public health. There has also been an increasing number of such machines being used to sell food.

On the other hand, the spokesman pointed out, it was no longer necessary to license fresh provision shops selling fruit or vegetables, except cut fruit and fresh fruit juice, because there was now little risk to public health from their sale.

/On the ......

Friday, November 23, 1973

- 10 -

On the minimum requirement for kitchen areas in restaurants, the overall restaurant floor area rather than the seating area will be taken as a basis for calculation.

The previous system, hov/ever, will continue to be applied to those restaurants licensed before February next year, unless alterations to the kitchen or seating accommodation are made after that date.

-------0---------

MARKET FACILITIES FOR LAM TIN RESIDENTS

********

Three modular markets will be completed in July next year to serve about 35,000 people of the Lam Tin Estate in Kwun Tong.

The markets will have a total of 30 stalls for selling meat, fish or poultry, 16 for cooked food, and 138 for vegetable and fruit.

Costing more than #1 million to build, the markets are located on open grounds between Blocks 16 and 24 of the Estate.

Work is expected to start in January next year.

Details of tenders for the project are published in today’s gazette.

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/11

Friday, November 23, 1973

- 11 -

EPROVING HONG KONG - EVERYONE’S RESPONSIBILITY

*******

The District Commissioner, Nev; Territories, Mr. D. Akers-Jones today called on members of the public, regardless of age, to take the initiative in improving our society and making Hong Kong a better place to live in.

Speaking at the second speech day of the Heung Yee Kuk, Yuen Long District Secondary School, Mr. Akers-Jones emphasised that "no act, however small, is unimportant” in working towards this goal.

He urged the students to follow the examples of their principal and teachers, and ’’when the opportunity comes work for the good of the community."

All of us, young and old, can serve the community "in the effort to clean Hong Kong and to improve our society, serving the community and as a result, making Hong Kong a better place in which we all live," Mr. Akers-Jones said.

He commended the staff and students of the school on the high standard they had achieved in the diort period that the school had been opened, and thanked the founders - members of the Heung Yee Kuk and the Board of Management - who devoted much time, energy and money in making the school a reality thereby adding to the educational facilities in Yuen Long.

Note to Editors: Copies of the full text of Mr. Akers-Jones’

speech are boxed for collection.

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Friday, November 23, 1973

- 12 -

KG7LOON BAY FIRE VICTIMS TO GET HIGHER GRANTS

*********

The Housing Department is to increase the rebuilding allowance for those made homeless in fires and natural disasters who are not eligible for direct public housing, and the first people to benefit will be the victims of last week’s squatter fire at Kowloon Bay.

In the past re-accommodation grants of $1,000 had been paid out of the Emergency Relief Fund (formerly the Community Relief Trust Fund) to each family who were genuine disaster victims but were not entitled to public housing. For families with more than five members there was an extra $200 for each additional head. The new rate will be a basic $1,250 - an increase of 25 per cent - with $250 for each additional head over five.

Most of the victims of last week’s squatter fire will be allocated sites in a new Licensed Area being made ready nearby. They will use the grant to rebuild their homes.

Mr. K. Topley, Director of Social Welfare and chairman of the Emergency Relief Fund Committee, said today(Friday) that the new rate was based on a realistic re-assessment of current prices of building materials. <

”It is only just,” he said, ’’that victims should be able to meet the prices of wood an tin sheeting when they come to rebuild.”

Housing Department staff will work through the weekend to process claims for the Fund allowance. Payments will be made next Tuesday.

/Representatives ••••••

Friday, November 2J, 1973

- 13 -

Representatives of more than 350 families today turned up at the Squatter Control Office at Tung Tau Estate and at the Kowloon Bay Licenoed Area Office to have their claims processed. A number of cl Aims are still being investigated.

A spokesman for the Housing Department said more than 100 fand 1Ses comprising about 500 people have been weeded out as imposters as a result of Wednesdays site identification and today’s processing.

’’Apart from this, we have also been successful in checkjng out nearly 100 overclaiming cases,” he said. "These families overclaimed in order to get a bigger site and receive more cash grant/1

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Release time: 7*^5

PR 39 4000035

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

SUPPLEMENT

Friday, November 23, 1973

GOVERNOR OPENS THIRD .FESTIVAL OF HONG KONG *********

Following is the full text of Sir Murray’s speech at the opening ceremony:

Sir Yuet-keung, Members of Organising Committees, Ladies and Gentlemen.

The tremendous variety and scope of the 1973 Festival programme places it amongst the largest of its kind in the world. It is a programme for everyone, no one has been forgotten. The Festival, and the youth of Hong Kong, who play such a prominent part in it, demonstrate the zest and drive of Hong Kong’s people - the zest and drive which have made Hong Kong,the great city which it is.

On behalf of the community I thank you Sir Yuet-keung, as head of the Steering Committee, together with your committees, and the Services, Government departments, firms, organisations and countless individuals who have given so much of their time and effort to organise this third festival. I congratulate you and them on what has been prepared for us.

i'/e in Heng Kong are the hardest working community I know, our success depends on it. But we also have a capacity for fun and enjoyment -that is our secret strength. Once we had little time or money for it, now we have a little more. So this Festival is for fun. Let everyone enjoy it.

I take great pleasure in declaring open the 1973 Festival of Hong Kong.

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House. Hong Kong. Tel: 5-233191

Friday, November 23, 1973

- 2 - ' ’ '

TIIIG YEAR’S FESTIVAL BRIGHTEST EVEH — SIR YUET-KEUNG

««♦*****

The following is the full text of Sir Yuet-keung Kan's address at the opening ceremony:

Your Excellency, Lady MacLehose, Ladies and Gentlemen:-

llay I bid you a most hearty welcome on the happy occasion of the opening of this, the Third Festival of Hong Kong.

Two years ago Your Excellency’s first public engagement after being sworn in was the opening cf the Second Festival of Hong Kong, a festive occasion which provided a most auspicious beginning to your term of office here.

This year’s Festival promises not only to be even more gay, festive and enjoyable, but also to be an even greater success in terms of community involvement. More than 750 events have been arranged, providing an extremely wide and varied range of entertainment for all groups of people in this Colony, including the old, the young and the physically handicapped as well as people in outlying districts.

It is therefore with great pleasure that I now ask Your Excellency to declare the 1973 Festival of Hong Kong open.

-------o---------

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Saturday, November 24, 1973

CONTENTS

Page Ne,

Picnic Bay fish farmers receive advance payments for fish

losses due to oil spillage • • •..............................  1

New road to be built in Lai Chi Kok to improve traffic flow .....................................................      2

Hong Kong youth show greater social consciousness ............. 3

Watchman to receive cash award for bravery in preventing crime • • • .................................................   4

Traffic re-arrangements in Kowloon............................. 5

Export of restrained textiles to Canada . •.................... 6

Eight Hong Kong scholarship holders studying in British universities..................• •.............................. 7

Private and public omnibuses must pass inspection before they can be re-licensed.....................................    8

Labour Relations Service helps settle industrial dispute 9

Government departments implement electricity saving 10

measures ...................•......•.................  .

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

r

Saturday, Novembei* 24, 1973

1

FISH FARMERS RECEIVE ADVANCE PAYMENTS FOR LOSSES .DUE TO OIL SPILLAGE *******

Advanced payments were made by the government to fish farmers in Picnic Bay today for losses of fish suffered by them following the oil spillage at Ap Lei Chau two weeks ago.

Announcing this, a spokesman for the New Territories Administration said that the fish farmers in Picnic Bay were accustomed to selling their fish daily and they had suffered an immediate loss of income after the spillage. Some 50 piculs of fish had died in the period up to November 20, 1973.

"Although it is considered that the government is under no obligation to make any payments in respect of the oil spillage, it has been decided to make these payments to relieve the hardship which has occurred,1’ he said.

The advanced payments are being made by the District Officer

. . ■ “‘"I ■ - ' ■

Island against losses established by the Agriculture and Fisheries Department in conjunction with staff -of the District Office. "Ihe fish farmers are being paid the market price for the fish lost," the spokesman continued, " and the payment will help to tide them over a difficult period."

Meanwhile, investigations by experts in marine ecology are continuing into the immediate effects and long term implications of the oil spillage on the marine life in the area.

Note to Editors: Copies of a photograph of the distribution of payments

are boxed for collection.

0 - -

.’tni -c-i f'X

I

Saturday, November 24, 1973 «•. •• —• •— •* •—

• \

- 2 -

NEW LAI CHI KOK BEACH ROAD

*«**»«*

A new road will be built early next year at Lai Chi Kok in Kowloon to improve traffic flow in the area.

The road, provisionally named the New Lai Chi Kok Beach Road, will be approximately 1,400 feet long, and will lead from the existing .• r

Lai Chi Kok Beach Road to Lai Wan Road, running along the north-eastern boundary of the Mei Foo Sun Chuen Stages V and VI.

A 44-foot wide concrete carriageway will be constructed to accommodate two-way traffic, and 12-foot footpaths will be provided on both sides of the road.

Modifications are to be carried out at the junction of the new road and Lai-Chi Kok Beach Road to improve traffic movement.

In future, traffic from Kowloon to Lai Chi Kok Beach and the Lai Chi Kok Amusement Park will be able to move along Lai Chi Kok Road, turn under the ramp loading to the Lai Chi Kok Bridge, then into the new road passing to the north of Mei Foo Sun Chuen and thence into Lai Wan Road.

When the new road is ready, the section of the present Lai Chi Kok Beach Road between Lai Wan Road and the bridge ramp will be converted into a one-way road running eastward.

Tenders are now being invited and construction of the new road is expected to begin in January next year, and will take about 12 months to complete•

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ft

Saturday, November 24, 1973

- 3 -

HONG KONG YOUTH SHOW GREATER SOCIAL AWARENESS m#***

The Director of Social Welfare, Mr. K.W.J. Topley, today said Hong Kong’s youth were becoming more socially aware as evidenced in the rich and deep expression of the structural designs entered in the Young People’s World creative design exhibition at Kowloon Park.

’’Youth today are regarded as a most important group in society,” he said. ”We should assist them to become involved in community af fa-i and to render their services to the community.”

Mr. Topley was speaking at the opening of the exhibition.which was organised by the Youth Work Unit of the Social Welfare Department as part of the Festival of Hong Kong.

The theme of the exhibition is ’social consciousness of young people and their expectation towards society,’ and features JO exhibits reflecting the thoughts of the participants.

Mr. Topley said this year the results were extremely good. He added: ”1 hope that youth are not viewing this as an outlet only but for real action of improvement and betterment of society. With the support and contribution from young people, Hong Kong will certainly benefit a lot.”

Note to Editors: Copies of the full text of Mr. Topley’s speech

are boxed for col-lection.

- - - - 0--------

/4 ..

Saturday, November 24, 1973

WATCHMAN TO RECEIVE $6,300 FOR BRAVERY

* * ♦ ♦ * * * ♦

Note to Editors: The Director of Social Welfare, Mr. K.W.J.

Topley, will present a cheque for $6,500 to Mr. Chan Leung at 12 noon on Tuesday (November 27)* The presentation ceremony will be held in the conference' room of the Social Welfare Department at Lee Gardens, 4th floor, Hysan Avenue, Hong Kong.

This sum was approved by the Legislative Council as an award to Mr. Chan as compensation for injuries he sustained in preventing a crime.

Mr. Chan is employed as a watchman, by fruit stall owners in Shek Lung Street, Yau Ma Tei.

' On the evening of November 12 this year, while on patrol he prevented a man from robbing four woman hawkers and received a chopper wound on his left shoulder for which he had to spend a week in hospital.

You are cordially invited to cover the presentation ceremony.

-------0---------

o > o c o a o

Saturday , November 24, 1973

- 5 -

TRAFFIC RE-ARRANGEMENTS IN KOWLOON

»*«**»***

New traffic arrangements will be introduced at the Hung Hom end of the cross-harbour tunnel as from Monday (November 26) in order to avoid the risk of accidents in the tunnel approaches.

Under the changes, no vehicles will be allowed to turn right ■ in the approach road to the Hung Hom entrance of the tunnel into Yuk Choi Road.

Northbound vehicles coming from Hong Kong Island through the tunnel will have access by way of the slip road from the tunnel approaches to Yuk Choi Road, while all other vehicles will have access via Chatham Road.

Meanwhile in Kwun Tong, the road between blocks 1 and 2 of the Kwuntong flatted factory estate will be re-routed one-way in a clockwise direction as from 10 a.m. on Tuesday (November 27).

At the same time, Bute Street between Portland Street and Nathan Road will be re-routed one-way to eastbound traffic.

Traffic signs will be posted to guide motorists.

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• /€>.......

Saturday, November 24, 1973

- 6

EXPORT OF RESTRAINED TEXTILES TO CANADA

******

The Director of Commerce and Industry today announced the implementation of an export authorisation scheme to make available to the trade free yardage in the cotton terry towels, blouses and trousers categories for export to Canada during the textile year ending September 30* 1974*

All applications received by December 6 will be considered together and approved on a proportionate basis, if necessary. Any balances remaining thereafter will be made available on a first-come-* first-served basis, the Director said.

Details of the scheme and the quantities available for application are set out in notice to exporters which will be issued on Monday (November 26).

Trade associations and companies on the department’s mailing list will receive copies of the notice shortly.

Anyone wishing to seek further information is invited to contact either of the following officers of the Department:-

Mr* D.L.S. Ip - Assistant Trade Officer Tel. No. 5-247317

Mr* C.S.K. Do - Industry Assistant ' • Tel. No. 5-445666

Saturday, November 24, 1973

- 7 -

EIGHT HONG KONG SCHOLARSHIP AWARD-HOLDERS Study At Universities In Britain

********

A teacher, a university demonstrator, a shift supervisor of a dyeing works, two university tutors and three doctors from Hong Kong are among 600 award-holders studying at universities in Britain under the Commonwealth Scholarship and Fellowship Plan in the current academic year.

The Hong Kong award-holders have been selected by the Commonwealth Scholarship Commission in the United Kingdom from among those nominated as . candidates by the local Commonwealth Scholarships Selection Committee.

The eight award-holders from Hong Kong are Mr. Yuen Shu-wah, Mr. Ho Chun-chak, Mr. Chu Kwong-yung, Mr. Alfred Lin !To-yuke, Mr. Stephen Wong Siu-lun, Dr. Patrick Chan Ki-wing, Dr. Ko Sai-cheong and Dr. Ronald Paul Ng.

Mr. Yuen, a teacher in Ying Wa College, is studying Chemical Engineering at the University College of Swansea; Mr. Ho, a demonstrator in the Department of Mathematics, University of Hong Kong, is studying Computer Science at the University of Birmingham; and Mr. Chu, shift Supervisor of the China Ityeing Works Ltd., is studying Colour Chemistry at the University of Leeds.

Hr. L^n, a tutor in the History Department, University of Hong Kong, is studying Chinese History at the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London.

Mr. V/ong, a part-time tutor in the Sociology Department, Chinese University of Hong Kong, is studying Sociology at St. Edmund Hall, Oxford.

/Dr. Chan, •••«••

Saturday, November 24, 1973

- 3 -

Dr. Chan, Lecturer in Surgery, University of Hong Kong, is studying Surgery at the University of Glasgow; Dr. Ko, Registrar, University Medical Unit, Queen Mary Hospital, is studying Paediatrics at the University of London while Dr. Ng, Clinical Lecturer, University Department of Medicine, University of Hong Kong, is studying Medicine at the University College Hospital Medical School, London.

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INSPECTIONS OF PUBLIC AND PRIVATE OMNIBUSES

*«««***

The Transport Department announced today that, with effect from January 1 next year,no application for relicensing of any public or private omnibus will be entertained unless the vehicle has passed an inspection made by a Motor Vehicle Inspector of the department.

Inspections of all omnibuses are carried out at the Motor Vehicle Inspection Centre, Long Yuet Street, To Kwa Wan, Kowloon.

Ormers of public and private omnibuses are requested to book early for an inspection either by telephone (3-644555) or in person.

They are reminded that it is the responsibility of the vehicle owner to ensure that an inspection is made before the expiry of the current licence.

-----... 0--------

/9........

Saturday, November 24, 1973

- 9 -

LABOUR DISPUTE SETTLID

»»•***«**

Hie dispute involving the Hip Shing Timber Company Limited and 30 of its workers following a phased close-down of the timber processing section has been amicably settled by the Labour Department.

The dispute broke out on November 6 over the question of long service bonus.

Officers of the Labour Relations Service of the Labour Department stepped in soon after direct negotiation between the management and the retrenched workers reached a deadlock. Three conciliation meetings were subsequently held in the Tsuen Wan Office of the Service where the pairties to the dispute finally reached an agreement.

Under the agreement, the retrenched workers yesterday (Friday) each received one month*s wages in lieu of notice, year-end bonus equivalent to one month's wages, long service bonus at 22 days’ wages per year’s service, and ex-gratia payment of about 15 days’ wages. The total amount involved was in the region of $14O,COO.

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/10........

Saturday, November 24, 1973

- 10 -

GOVEPJUGNT DEPARTMENTS IMPLEMENT FUEL SAVING MEASURES

******

All government departments are now taking steps to conserve electricity as part of a concerted effort to reduce consumption by up to 15 per cent as a precautionary measure due to the uncertainty in the world oil situation.

Vfliile fuel stoclzs at present are normal, the Chairman of the Oil Policy Committee, Mr. M.D.A. Clinton, has impressed on department heads the prudency of voluntary restraints now as a matter of precaution.

’’This order of cutback does not in our judgement warrant instituting specific rationing schemes but, as a matter of prudence, we are devising contingency plans and some mandatory controls may eventually have to be imposed if voluntary restraint does not come up to expectations or if the supply situation deteriorates,” he said.

It was aimed, he said, to achieve a reduction of 15 per cent across the board in every department. The emphasis was on electricity as this was derived from fuel oil which was most likely to be restricted and which was essential to industry and could not be hoarded.

However, savings could also be made on petrol and light diesel oil, Mr. Clinton pointed out, and he requested department heads to consider whatever suitable measures without impairing the efficiency of departments or imposing undue hardship on staff.

The Oil Distribution Committee had examined the situation in the light of the expected cutback and had roughly determined priorities for the maintenance of fuel supplies, said Mr. Clinton.

/These

Saturday, November 24, 1973

- 11 -

These included essential services, the manufacturing industry, and public transport services. ’’There are many more complex aspects of these priorities,” he added, ” and these will be determined in consultation with departments over the weeks ahead.11

IIr• Clinton has requested department heads to inform him 'within the next two weeks of the economies they intended introducing or had already introduced.

In due course, he added, the Director of Oil Supplies would be asking department heads to forward returns showing the actual quantities of electricity and oil products saved.

Note to Editors: Copies of Mr. Clinton’s picture are boxed.

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Release time: 4.00 p.m.

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Monday, November 26, 1973

CONTENTS

Page Neu

Shipmasters must report bunker fuel stock on entering Hong Kong......................................................  • 1

Temporary water interruption in Fanling..........•.....•••••• 2

Major roadworks at Canton and Jordan roads to begin soon • 3

New homes for Shaukiwan fire victims • • • ..................... 5

A-level Classical Chinese to be dropped from GCE after 1975 • 6

Pre-war building at Des Voeux Road West declared dangerous •• 7

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5’233191

Monday, November 26, 1973

- 1 "

SHIPMASTERS MUST REPORT BUNKER FUELS

********

Ships entering Hong Kong will be required to inform the Marine Department of their bunker fuel position from this Thursday (November 29)• In a notice issued by the department today, a spokesman said that masters of vessels would have to state the quantity and type of bunker fuel for both the main and auxiliary engines on board.

They would also have to report on the estimated consumption of fuels while here, the estimated consumption to the next port of call and such further information which might be required by the Director of Marine.

’^Besides", the spokesman added, "if the shipmaster wants to take on board main or auxiliary bunkers while in Hong Kong, he will have to declare in addition the name of the bunker fuels supplier and the quantities he requires.::

Introduction of these new measures follow an announcement on conservation of oil stocks by the Deputy Colonial Secretary and Chairman of the Oil Policy Committee, Mr. M.D.A. Clinton last week.

In the announcement, Mr. Clinton had asked that the amount of bunker oil for ships should now be determined by the future supply situation, as a measure to maintain adequate stocks so that essential supplies could be available for ships calling at Hong Kong.

The requirement of ships to report on their fuel position is made by the Director of Marine under Regulation 4 of the Merchant Shipping (Control of Ports) Regulations, which gives him such powers.

/Owners or

Monday, November 26, 1973

- 2 -

Owners or agents of ships may provisionally submit the information on behalf of their shipmasters, prior to the arrival of the ships.

However their statements will have to be confirmed by the masters immediately upon their arrival.

Forms for supplying the information are available at the Entry and Clearance Office of the Marine Department at Rumsey Street Multi-Storey Carpark, 10th floor, Hong Kong.

-------0---------

WATER CUT

*******

Water supply to a number of premises in Fanling, New Territories, will be interrupted for eight hours starting from 10 p.m. on Thursday (November 29)•

The temporary stoppage is to facilitate fire hydrant installation work in the area by Waterworks Office staff.

All premises at On Lok Tsuen will be affected, including Shung Him Tong Tsuen and Au Wai Lam Laundry, Fanling.

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Monday, November 26, 1973

- 3 -

MAJOR KCWLOON ROAD PROJECTS TO BEGIN SOON

*»**«#***

Work on two major road projects in Kowloon — the Canton Road Duplication and the Jordan Road Intersection and Ferry Concourse — is expected to start in January. Tenders for the two projects are about to be invited.

Together with the Tong Mi Road Extension, they will form part of an improved road system that will run along the western side of Kowloon from Tsim Sha Tsui to Lai Chi Kok.

They will also provide an alternative route for motorists when Nathan Road is partly closed to vehicular traffic during the construction of the Mass Transit Railway Stations.

The new road running alongside Canton Road will be about 2,200 feet in length. It will start from the Canton Road Fire Station in the north, cut across the south-western corner of Kowloon Park, the eastern portion of the existing Container Freight Station, and pass to the east of the Tsim Sha Tsui Police Station main building before joining Salisbury Road near Ashley Road.

The project, which also includes the construction of a J60-foot elevated road over Haiphong Road, will take about 20 months to complete.

Stage I of the Jordan Road Intersection and Ferry Concourse will include the re-alignment of the central divider and resurfacing of sections of Jordan Road (from Ferry Street to Battery Street) and Ferry Street (from Man Yuen Street to Jordan Road).

> /The project, ...........

Monday, November 26, 1973

The project, which will take about 11 months to complete, also includes realignment of Canton Road (Canton Road Government Offices to Ferry Street), and modifications to the Jordan Road Bus Terminus.

At the same time, tenders are also about to be invited for nine single-storey semi-permanent buildings to be built inside the existing Tsim Sha Tsui Police Station Compound.

They are to provide barrack accommodation and canteen and laundry facilities for marine and police rank and file officers, who are affected by the Canton Road Duplication project.

Construction of these buildings will begin towards the end of next month and will take about five months to complete.

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Monday, November 26, 1975

- 5 -

SHAUKIWAN FIRE VICTIMS OFFERED RE-HOUSING

More than 50 people who lost their homes in the squatter fire in Shaukiwan last Saturday morning will get either public housing or resite accommodation.

Six huts were destroyed in the early morning fire and 15 families, comprising 71 people, were registered with the Social Welfare Department for emergency relief.

A routine site identification was conducted by Housing Department staff several hours after the outbreak of the fire and blankets and cooking utensils were distributed to the victims on the spot.

Further checks against the records kept by the Housing Department showed that four families, comprising 14 people, have alternative accommodation and are not in need of re-housing facilities.

Today, nine families consisting of 45 people were helped by staff of the Squatters Control Office (Hong Kong) to fill in applications for licensed area sites.

These families will be informed as soon as possible the location of the site where they could rebuild their huts. The other cases are still being investigated.

A spokesman for the Housing Department said that cash grants from the Emergency Relief Fund will be distributed to them as soon as final processing has been completed.

. Each family of five1 members or under will get $1,250 rebuilding allowance, and 3250 will be paid to each additional head over five.

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/6........

Monday, November 26, 1973

- 6 -

GCZ A-LEVEL CLASSICAL CHINESE EXAM TO BE DROPPED

Uie London University Entrance and School Examinations Council has informed the Education Department of its decision to discontinue the overseas G.C.E. Advanced Level Classical Chinese Examination after 1975*

MA major factor contributing to this decision has been the difficulty of obtaining sufficient suitable markers to cope with the big entry that this subject has attracted from Hong Kong," a spokesman for the Education Department said today.

He added that this decision had been taken with reluctance by the Council which at the request of the Education Department had delayed taking this step as long as possible.

He recalled that this year’s result of the London G.C.E. A-level Classical Chinese examination were delayed several weeks because of marking difficulties.

In a letter to principals of secondary schools informing them of the London University’s decision, the Assistant Director of Education (Examinations) told them that they would be able to enter candidates for A-level Classical Chinese for the examinations to be held next June and in June 1975»

London University has no intention at present to discontinue the overseas Ordinary Level examination in Chinese.

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/7.........

Monday, November 26, 1973

- 7 -

DANGEROUS BUILDING

»*»**«*«

A four-storey pre-war building at No. 257 Des Voeux Road West was today declared to be in a dangerous condition by the Building Authority.

Tlie Principal Government Building Surveyor said a detailed investigation of the building had been made after the demolition of the verandah which had been the subject of an emergency closure order.

Indications of further defects were noted during the investigation, he said. 1 ’Removal of plaster exposed crushed and fractured brickwork which was considered to be in such a condition that there is a risk of failure leading to collapse.”

The reinforced concrete portions of the building, he added, were also in poor condition.

ITotice of intention to apply for a closure order was posted on the building today. The application will be heard in Victoria District Court at 9-30 a.m. on January 2.

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Release time: 7.00 p«m.

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Tuesday, November 27, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No.

Streamlined ACAN to become sole advisory channel against drug abuse ••••••••....................................... 1

Simple guidelines for industry on fuel conservation ...... 4

Rebuilding grants paid to Kowloon Bay fire victims.......... 6

Kaifong and rural leaders urged to help recruit more policemen.........•••.••• .. •••••••••••.•..••.......•••••• 7

The Governor stresses the importance of extra-curricular activities ............................................... 9

Record number of disabled persons applied for jobs last month ................................. 11

Traffic arrangements in Eastern to facilitate transfer of heavy transformer........................................ 12

Two pre-war buildings in Lai Chi Kok declared dangerous •• 1?

Another 20 “lucky” car numbers for sale •••••••«.......... 14

Senior Marine Officer obtains fellowship for cargo handling course........................................... 15

Legislative Council meeting tomorrow and Thursday ........ 16

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong. Tel: 5-233191

Tuesday, November 27, 1975

- 1 -

NEW GOVERNMENT MACHINERY TO CURB DRUG PROBLEM

Streamlined A CAN takes on advisory role next January 1

A streamlined Action Committee Against Narcotics (ACAN) on January 1 will become the government’s sole channel of advice on all policy matters relating to the drive against drug abuse and drug trafficking.

Announcing this today, the Commissioner for Narcotics, Mr. N. G. Rolph, said that the move was part of the intensified anti-drug measures outlined by the Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, in his annual review of Hong Kong affairs in the Legislative Council last October 17.

Mr. Rolph said that for its new advisory role, membership of ACAN would be cut from 20 to 12.

He said the 12-member committee would be made up of seven senior government officials and five community leaders.

The seven officials are: The Secretary for Security; the Director of Medical and Health Services; the Director of Commerce and Industry, in his capacity as Commissioner of the Preventive Service; the Commissioner of Police; the Director of Social Welfare; the Commissioner of Prisons; and the Commissioner for Narcotics.

The five community leaders are: The senior Unofficial Member of the Executive Council, Sir Albert Rodrigues (chairman); an Unofficial Member of the Legislative Council, Mrs. C. J. Symons; and three individuals specially appointed by the Governor — the Director of the Lutheran World Federation, the Rev. K. L. Stumpf; the secretary of

/the Society.......

Tuesday, November 27, 1973

- 2 -

the Society for the Aid and Rehabilitation of Drug Addicts, Mr. Brook Bernacchi; and the Director of the Hong Kong Council of Social Service, Mr. Hui Yin-fat.

Mr. Rolph said A CAN’S terms of reference would be strengthened to enable it to:

. Advise the Governor on policies to be adopted to interdict illicit traffic in dangerous drugs into and through Hong Kong and to keep these policies under regular review;

. Advise the Governor on measures necessary to eradicate drug abuse from the community;

. Be the channel for advice to the Governor on the appropriate allocation of resources to ensure the implementation of government policies;

. Ensure co-ordination and co-operation between government departments and voluntary agencies working towards the implementation of these policies and to enlist public support for them;

. Keep under review programmes and projects undertaken by government and voluntary agencies to ensure that they are effective;

. Draw the attention of government to policies, programmes, projects, laws and procedures it feels should be changed to implement government policies more effectively; and

. Advise on any matter referred to it by government, or from any other appropriate source that may be concerned either directly or indirectly with the implementation of government policies.

/Mr. Rolph.........

Tuesday, November 27, 1973

- 3 -

Mr. Rolph said these wider terms of reference would allow the new A CAN to take over the work previously carried out by a group formed 14 years ago, the Narcotics Advisory Committee.

Asa result, this group had now been disbanded.

The Commissioner for Narcotics also revealed plans to give the Medical and Health Department overall responsibility for drug addiction treatment and research.

He said a Narcotics and Drugs Administration Division would be set up within the department.

Its task would be to implement and supervise all treatment and rehabilitation programmes approved by the government.

The division also would be responsible for studying and developing new therapeutic techniques.

Hacking up these far-reaching measures, Mr. Rolph said, would be a Narcotics Secretariat responsible to the Secretary for Security.

This new secretariat, headed by the Commissioner for Narcotics, would service A CAN and monitor the implementation of government policies and decisions.

It also would co-ordinate government and non-government activities, implement policies aimed at combatting problems associated with the illicit drug trade and initiate proposals for ACAN’s consideration.

The secretariat’s other responsibilities would include the international aspects of the illicit drug trade, legal procedures, education and publicity, community involvement, and liaison with voluntary agencies and the Narcotics and Drugs Administration Division of the Medical and Health Department.

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A.........

Tuesday, November 27, 1973

- 4 -

APPEAL TO INDUSTRY TO SAVE FUEL

********

•• ri ■

Hong Kong’s industrial concerns - of which there are more than 22,000 - were urged to-day to appoint a senior member of their staff to supervise fuel-saving measures.

In a circular to factory managements, the Director of Oil Supplies, Mr. Roy Porter, appealed for their co-operation to avoid any wasteful and unnecessary consumption of electricity, fuel and other oil products.

He stressed that Hong Kong’s oil supply situation was under daily review and so far stocks remained normal and there has been no interruption of deliveries.

"But in view of the uncertainty of the oil situation in the world, it is prudent for us in Hong Kong to take steps now to economise so that we make the best use of our stocks and our future supplies,” he added.

Mr. Porter said there were many simple and easy measures which industrial concerns could take to save fuel without seriously affecting production, convenience or comfort.

He suggested the following ways to save electricity:

* Switch on lights only when necessary

* Keep lighting to the minimum essential for production

•;and. safety ' . "h

* Switch off lights during lunch or tea breaks and as noi': T soon as possible after work

: • - . ' f • ' i p i ’ - ’ ‘ •. .f'

* Lower lamps from ceilings to increase intensity of illumination at the same time replacing bulbs with others of a lower wattage

/* Switch

Tuesday, November 27, 1975

- 5 -

* Switch off all induction motors powering such machines as power presses and lathes when the machines are not in use

* Economise with air-conditioners, fans and heaters in factory offices

Mr. Porter also listed the following ways to save fuel:

Increase efficiency of boilers and furnaces

* Do not over or under lubricate machines

* Oil leakages from machines should be remedied immediately

* Goods vehicles should be used as efficiently and economically as possible through careful planning of journeys

* Factory buses should start journeys only when fully loaded

* Private car owners should try to use public transport instead

Mr. Porter said that any electricity and fuel saving by factories would help contribute to the efficient use of our existing oil stocks.

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/6.........

Tuesday, November 27, 1973

- 6 -

IIALF-A-MILLION PAY-OUT FOK FIRE VICTIMS

*******

Nearly $500,000 was paid out today (Tuesday) from the Emergency Relief Sffifft Fund to victims of the recent fire at Kowloon Bay Licensed Area.

Cash grants are given to genuine fire victims to help them build and equip their homes at a nearby Licensed Area site.

A total of 306 families collected the allowances from the Squatter Control Office at Tung Tau Estate. Each received at least $1,330. The new basic re-accommodation grant for each family-up to five members - is $1,250.

An extra $250 was paid for each additional family member. In addition every one got a re-equipment grant of $80.

The total paid out today amounted to $487,930.

Meanwhile, officers and men of the Housing Department are still busily engaged in preparing a site next to the fire scene for the victims to rebuild their huts.

Work is almost complete and the area should be ready in the next day or two.

Family representatives have been told to go to the Kovzloon Bay Licensed Area Office on Thursday and Friday for site allocation. They can then build their huts.

A spokesman for the Housing Department said there were sti11 about 50 cases in-hand pending further investigation.

’These will be dealt., with as quickly as possible,” he added.

Note to Editors: Copies of a photograph of the pay-out are boxed for collection.

Tuesday, November 27, 1973

- 7 -

CALL TO KAIFONG AND KUK LEADERS TO HELP IN POLICE RECRUITMENT DRIVE »**•*«

The Secretary for Home Affairs, Mr. D.C. Bray, has urged all kaifong and rural leaders to help in the current police recruitment drive.

The appeal is contained in a letter to Kaifong chairmen, chairmen of District Committees, Area Committees, the Heung Yee Kuk, Rural Committees and Chambers of Commerce in the New Territories.

Mr. Bray said that in order to walk the streets free of worry about crime, "we must have more policemen”.

"As a result of a community-wide effort,” he added, "there are now 37 recruiting centres located in Hong Kong, Kowloon and the New Territories."

All these centres are on business seven days a week and, depending on the specific needs of areas, operate well into the evening. "It is the biggest recruitment effort we have ever had."

Referring to police life, Mr. Bray noted that it was an exciting one for young men and women of the right sort.

He pointed out that the salary for police constables had recently been increased to about $1,000 a month and secondary school graduates could get even more.

Although Hong Kong now probably had the best paid police force in Asia, the Secretary for Home Affairs said: "We are, however, faced with a very high problem: we have to recruit some 1,000 police constables.”

/Based on

Tuesday, November 2?, 1973

- 8 -

Based on past experience, it takes six firm applications to yield one recruit to the police force.

’’This means we have to aim at getting some 6,000 firm applications to join the police force during our current recruitment drive,” said Mr. Bray.

At the time of the Census, Hong Kong Island had 25.30 per cent of the population, Kowloon 18.19 per cent and New Kowloon 37*5& per cent.

As the New Territories had one-sixth of the population, the

Heung Yee Kuk, Rural Committees and Chambers of Commerce in the New

Territories have been asked to raise 1,000 firm applications. * < /

Based on the 1971 population, Mr. Bray suggested 1,600j 1,100 and 2,300 as the targets for firm applications for Hong Kong, Kowloon and New Kowloon respectively.

He said it was most gratifying that kaifong and rural bodies had come forward to give their support to the recruitment campaign, and he hoped that they would continue to play their part in the drive.

Mr. Bray invited kaifong and rural leaders to telephone him on 5-95A93 or Mr. Christopher Wong, who is helping him, on 5-95710 should they have any difficulties or suggestions to make.

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/9..........

Tuesday, November 27, 1973

- 9 -

EXTRA CURRICULAR ACTIVITIES IMPORTANT - SAYS SIR MURRAY ******

Die Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, has stressed the importance of extra curricular activities and active student participation in the coninunity life of Hong Kong in the course of educating young people.

In a speech delivered on the Governor’s behalf by the Director of Education, Mr. J. Canning, at the annual speech day of the King George V School, Sir Murray noted that it was an essential feature for a successful school to develop a thriving corporate existence.

"Young minds are not developed, character moulded and healthy attitudes to life implanted through academic studies alone. A good school has to offer a much wider range of experience and challenge then can be provided for within the four walls of a classroom." < *

Dils, he said, could only be done through the establishment of a comprehensive range of what are normally termed extra-curricular activities.

Through these, young people could learn what it was to co-operate with others, assume responsibilities, discover potentialities for leadership and what it meant to accept commitment to activities and interests which went beyond the satisfaction of merely personal wishes.

Die Governor noted that these extra-curricular activities were largely responsible for the creation of the life of a school. "It is also through them that much mutual understanding and respect can be established between pupils, teachers, and parents," he added.

/Sir Murray........

Tuesday, November 27, 1973

- 10 -

Sir Murray described the growing participation by school students in community projects and campaigns as ” a most gratifying and encouraging development J1

’’Ihere is, I am convinced, much you can learn from active participation in the community life of Hong Kong. There is much, I am equally sure, you can give to it,” he said.

Lady MacLehose later presented prizes and awards to the students after Mr. Canning delivered the Governor’s speech.

Note to Editors? Copies of the full text of the Governor’s speech are boxed for collection.

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/11

Tuesday, Nqvember 2?, 1975

- 11 -

EMPLOYMENT OF DISABLED PERSONS

*********

Applications for job assistance from disabled persons reached an all-time high last month when the Job Placement Unit of the Social Welfare Department received 58 referrals for employment assistance.

"Placement officers encountered difficulties however in finding jobs for disabled persons because vacancies suitable for them were fewer and in some cases, .immediately filled by able-bodied persons," said Mr.. Chan Shiu-wing, officer-in-charge of the Unit.

Despite this, the Unit successfully assisted 30 disabled persons to obtain jobs in open employment.

Also to create better job opportunities for them, he said the

Chinese network of Radio Hong Kong and Commercial Radio have been broadcasting slogans from early October.

"Since then, telephone enquiries for hiring disabled persons were received almost daily. Some offered rather low wages but most offered reasonable remuneration," said Mr. Chan.

Those found jobs in October comprised eight blind, 12 crippled, five deaf and dumb, three cured mentally ill and two mentally retarded.

Five blind trainees were selected and employed by Winpull Fishing Accessories Co. Ltd. after they had completed the specific training course on knotting fishing hooks at Wong Tai Sin Blind Welfare Centre.

Other disabled persons were employed as machine sewing workers, telephone operators, repair assistant, messenger, assemblers, apprentices and general factory workers.

-------0---------

/12

Tuesday, November 2?, 1973

- 12 -

HEAVY TRANSFORMER TO BE MOVED

*******

Motorists are advised to avoid certain roads in the Eastern and North Point areas between 1 a.m. and 6 a.m. on Thursday (November 29), During that period, the Hong Kong Electric Company will be moving a 42-ton transformer from its power station at Wong Nei Chung Gap to the North Point Power Station in Tin Chong Street.

The transformer will pass Wong Nei Chung Gap Road, Stubbs Read, Queen’s Road East, Morrison Hill Road, Tin Lok Lane, Hennessy Road, Yee Wo Street, Causeway Road, King’s Road, Tin Chong Street and Java Road before reaching its destination.

The Commissioner for Transport said that due to the weight of the load, the transporting vehicle will be extremely slow and therefore, it will be to the advantage of motorists to avoid the route.

--------0--------

/13........

Tuesday, November 27, 1973

- 13 -

TWO PRE-WAR BUILDINGS IN KOWLOON CONDEMNED

*********

The Building Authority today declared Nos. 39^ and 396, Lai Chi Kok Road in Kowloon to be in a dangerous condition.

These four-storey pre-war buildings are constructed with load bearing brick walls supporting reinforced concrete floors and a framed reinforced concrete kitchen block.

In a statement, the Principal Government Building Surveyor said extensive spalling of the concrete and corrosion of the steel reinforcement in the kitchen blocks indicates that there is a risk of failure leading to collapse.

Many other areas of spalling were also noted, he added.

Notices of intention to apply for closure orders in Kowloon District Court at 9*30 a.m. on January 2 were posted today.

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/14........

Tuesday, November 27, 1973

- 14 -

’•LUCKY- CAR NUMBERS FOR SALE

******

Another 20 "lucky” car number plates will be put up for auction this Saturday (December 1) at 10 a.m. in the City Hall Theatre, The numbers are:

702 1911 5000 HK1331 HK7117

HK9191 AA2332 AA3113 AA3555 AB 81

AB 101 AB 456 AR 7 AR 18 AR 23

AR 39 AR 55 AR 66 AR 300 AR 800

Proceeds of the auction will be paid to the Government Lotteries Fund for charitable purposes.

Successful bidders at the auction will be required to pay in cash or cheque immediately after the bidding.

The vehicle registration mark will be assigned only to a vehicle which is registered in the name of the successful bidder within 12 months of the date of auction.

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Tuesday, November 27? 1973

- 15 -

U.II. FELLOWSHIP FOR MR. MILWARD

*******

Mr. G.A. Milward, Senior Marine Officer (Planning) of the Marine Department has been granted a Fellowship to attend a United Nations Development Programme Seminar on cargo handling to be held in Singapore from December J to 13.

The Seminar, organised by the United Nations Development Organisation, is designed for senior management personnel with responsibilities for port operation and the speedy turnround of ships in port. Methods of idenrxi'ying i-nc out c.Lenecks to efficient movement of goods over the wharf will be discussed.

During Mr. Milward’s absence, Mr* J.V. Mitchell, Marine Officer (Planning) will be responsible for press relations. His telephone number is 5-^50181 ext. 219.

- 0 - -

Tuesday, November 27, 1973

- 16 -

REPLIES BY OFFICIAL MEMBERS OF LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL

*«**«**«*

Note to Editors: Five Official Members of the Legislative

Council will tomorrow reply to points raised by their Unofficial Colleagues during the debate on the motion of thanks for the Governor’s address.

They are the Secretary for Social Services, the Hon. Li Fook-kow; the Director of Commerce and Industry, the Hon. D.H. Jordan; the Secretary for Housing, the Hon. I.M. Lightbody; the Director of Education, the Hon. J. Canning, and the Director of Medical and Health Services, the Hon. G.H. Choa.

Six other Officials will reply on Thursday (November 29)• --------------------0---------

Release time: 8.00 p.m.

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Wednesday, November 28, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No.

Social security allowances and day nursery’s subventions to be increased..............................................   1

Rice control scheme effective in checking profiteering •••• J

Public housing to be built at a faster pace................ 9

Temporary college for training secondary technical teachers • • • • •..........................................   14

Medical and Health Department assumes active role in fighting drug addiction....................................    21

Hong Kong will continue to press for equal treatment in the EEC........................................................... 24

Tax exemption rate of interest raised to four per cent •••• 26

New measures to ease shortage of first aid personnel in industry .................................................     27

Unofficials of Legco support legalisation of off-course betting .........•••••••••••••••.••...................••••• 29

Firemen to receive long service medals ....................... JO

Multi-million dollar contract for Kwai Chung incinerator •• J1

Bills passed in Legislative Council........................... J2

Six more Official Members to speak in the Legislative Council tomorrow .....................»......................  J2

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Wednesday, November 28, 1973

INCREASES HI SOCIAL SECURITY ALLOWANCES AND DAY NURSERY’S SUBVENTIONS ****»#**»*»

The scale of payments for public assistance and disability and infirmity allowances are to be increased by a further 21 per cent from January 1, 1974.

Also, subventions to non-profit-making day nurseries are being increased to $?65 for the current financial year and to #80 for 1974/75.

These increases were announced in the Legialatnw Council today -by the Secretary for Social Services, the Hon. F.K. Li, who was replying to points on social welfare raised at earlier sessions by unofficial members.

Hr. Li said both these payments were kept under constant review and the rates of assistance had already been increased by 11 per cent in July this year. Mr. Li said probably the most significant feature of the Five Year Plan implemented in this first year was the Disability and Infirmity Allowance Scheme.

"Under this scheme non-contributory, flat-rate allowances are paid without a means test to the elderly infirm and the severely disabled. This is a now departure in the field of social security and one that is specifically suited to the special needs and circumstances of Hong Kong. It has proved an immediate success,” he said.

By the end of last month, there were 40,000 applications of which over 31,000 are already receiving payments. He said investigations of the remainder is proceeding as quickly as possible and payments in all cases will have retrospective effect to the date of application.

Wednesday, November 28, 1975

2

Turning to the provision of day care nurseries for children, Mr. Li said this field was a good example in which both government and the voluntary sector work together.

At present, there are 66 non-profit-making day nurseries providing about 7,100 places. Of these, 47 with a total capacity of 5,700 places are subvented.

To meet the increasing demand for places, Mr. Li said, the Five Year Plan prpposes that 1,000 additional day care places each year should be provided.

trIt is important to ensure that there are enough places and that acceptable standards are maintained," he said.

Mr. Li said the increase approved for this current year and the one for 1974/75 include an element for the improvement of standards which vary considerably from one nursery to another.

"In this context, we are well on with the drafting of legislation to require all day care and residential centres for children under the age of six to register with the Social Welfare Department and to require the centres to comply with certain minimum standards relating to accommodation , health, and safety measures, staffing, programmes of activity and other measures designed to ensure adequate standards of supervision."

Turning to the uncertainty among some agencies about the part they are to play and the amount of government assistance, available to them, Hr. Li said the role of the voluntary sector has been clearly established in the White Paper and the Five Year Plan.

/He said .••••

Wednesday, November 28, 1973

- 3 -

He said a one-line-vote for social welfare subventions is to be introduced in the year 197^/75 which would mean that the allocation of subventions to individual voluntary agencies will become the responsibility of the Director of Social Welfare acting on the advice of the Social Welfare Advisory Committee. The procedures for allocation of grants from the Lotteries Fund will also be improved.

Mr. Li said with the establishment of the overall policy and strategy for social welfare in the White Paper and the Five Year Plan and with the implementation of projects proceeding satisfactorily, it is now possible to focus attention on particular areas of difficulty which •• require interdepartmental co-ordination.

One such area, he said, concerns the future needs of the elderly on which a working party had recently published a report.

He said a number of valuable comments had been received revealing a great degree of support for action in this field over a wide front and when these had all been digested, the government would be able to bring forward firm proposals about the future provision of services in this field.

Another area in which co-ordination was necessary, he said, was the rehabilitation of the disabled.

Mr- Li said much preliminary consultative work had already been undertaken between government departments and voluntary agencies in this field. The Ad Hoc Working Group on Rehabilitation has produced a very useful working paper summarising a 1*rge number of concepts and recommendations discussed by representatives of the government and the Hong Kong Council of Social Service.

/This paper, ......

Wednesday, November 28, 1973

- 4 -

This paper, he said, is not intended for publication but to provide a basis for a more co-ordinated approach to future planning.

On this basis, he said, it will be sent to heads of departments providing rehabilitation services, members of the Social Welfare Planning Committee and the Hong Kong Council of Social Service.

Hr. Li said he would also pursue further with the Financial Secretary the proposal that a unit should be formed to study possible projects that would be of interest to those considering donations for the benefit of the community so that information and advice can be given quickly. •

0---------

/5........

Wednesday, November 28, 1973

- 5 -

PRICE CHECKS ON RICE TO CONTINUE No Evidence of Significant Profiteering »**«»***«

Outside the main producing countries, Hong Kong enjoys the cheapest rice in Asia, the Director of Commerce and Industry, Mr. David Jordan, said at today's Legislative Council meeting.

At present, he added, prices are running 15 to 20 per cent below Singapore levels.

Mr. Jordan said that through the rice control scheme a continuing close watch is maintained over both wholesale and retail prices.

"I am satisfied that prices generally at retail level are commensurate with import costs, legitimate trade expenses and the quality of rice on offer, and there is no evidence of significant profiteering,” he said.

"There is, of course, scope for blending rice of different qualities, and values nay vary from one shop to another. But this is a traditional trade practice and the consumer is able to buy selectively."

Mr. Jordan gave an assurance that price checking operations will continue and stressed that speculative trading in rice will not be tolerated.

Referring to the suggestion that a similar control scheme might be extended to other vital supplies, he pointed out that it was a stock-piling scheme which was restrictive on trade in normal times. "It would not be suitable for example for fresh foods," he said.

In a wide-ranging review of the Commerce and Industry Department’s work in other fields, Mr. Jordan dwelt on developments in industrial land policy, investment in industrial operations, commercial relations and the activities of the Preventive Service and the Trade Investigation Branch. /He said •••...

Wednesday, November 28, 1973

- 6 -

He said the department had been much involved in the formulation of proposals for making industrial land available for sale on a restricted user basis in order to encourage the establishment of technologically-advanced industries which could not, by their nature, be based in high rise buildings.

There was now a framework of policy within which particular applications for land could be granted on a restricted user basis for the development of industry ’’that will expand our industrial base, increase our skills, broaden our overseas markets and help to secure supplies of essential raw materials for our export industries.”

Mr. Jordan said that several projects had been considered recently by the Executive Council, and it was hoped to announce shortly that one or two major investments have been secured for Hong Kong.

But he emphasised that the development of Hong Kong’s industry and trade was undoubtedly due primarily to the energy, resourcefulness and willingness to invest in the future shown by our own manufacturers and businessmen.

’While we welcome investment from overseas, it is indeed a fact that the bulk of the nearly JOO factories in Hong Kong in which there is an overseas interest are joint ventures between Hong Kong induatrial.jata and their overseas partners,” he said.

Mr. Jordan said that the diversification of industry had been urged for many years, and the modification of industrial land policy should assist in this process.

/He added: .......

Wednesday, November 28, 1973

- 7 -

He added: t:The qualities of initiative, energy and willingness to learn so characteristic of our commerce and industry and the stimulation of competition in a free trade environment have been responsible for the most dramatic and sustained industrial and export growth seen anywhere in the world during the last two decades.”

During this time, Mr. Jordan said, our domestic exports have increased from under $500 million in 1952 to over $15,000 million in 1972. This growth had continued in the present year, despite various difficulties.

On commercial relations, he said the principal concern had been with restrictions on trade in textiles and garments and with the various generalised preference schemes established by many of the developed countries.

,fIn some cases we have had to accept new restrictions but in others we have been able to persuade our trading partners that the restrictions should be relaxed,” he added.

Hr. Jordan said that Hong Kong has taken an active part in the GATT textile negotiations which are intended to produce by the end of this year a new international arrangement on trade in textiles of all fibres -cotton, wool and man-made.

"Our principal concern in this is to try and ensure that the new arrangement lays down more stringent conditions for restrictions than are applied under the existing Cotton Textiles Arrangement,” he said.

Announcing that he would be leaving for London this evening on his way to Geneva for the final round cr the GATT textile negotiations, Mr. Jordan said that he would be seeing British Government officials to continue the dialogue on EEC preferences and textiles policy.

/Mr. Jordan •••••.

Wednesday, November 28, 1973

- 8 -

Mr. Jordan said that it was proposed to expand and develop the anti-narcotics work of the Preventive Service, of which he is Commissioner, and its command structure is being strengthened.

Tlie Service, he added, had taken on responsibility for of f i ci al action in enforcement of the Copyright Ordinance, and it was intended to take positive action in the near future against the more flagrant and damaging cases of copyright malpractice.

He said that the department’s Trade Investigation Branch had shared responsibility with the Police for prosecuting offences against the Merchandise Marks Ordinance. It had recently been agreed that the department should relieve the police of this responsibility.

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/9........

Wednesday, November 28, 1973

- 9 -

CONTRACT CUIS SPEED UP PUBLIC HOUSING

*««*««*

Work was progressing today on 13 public housing contracts which will provide homes for 153,000 people and plans are well in hand to let more than 40 other contracts within the next two years to build housing for another 500,000, the Hon. Ian Lightbody, Secretary for Housing, said today.

He told the Legislative Council that earlier completion dates had been negotiated for some contracts due to be finished in 18 months or so.

"In this way," he went on, "the completion date for a number of blocks at Lei Hui: Shu Estate has been advanced by six months, that is * the contract time has been reduced from 30 to 24 months. At Hing Wah Estate, the building period has been cut by eight months and at Oi Man Estate by up to six months. This will cost money of course, but extra outlay should be largely recouped by earlier rental incomes."

Mr. Lightbody said that the Housing Authority had considered selling, rather than renting some domestic units, but it was decided that this was not the time to introduce the scheme and it had been shelved.

The Authority, said Mr. Lightbody, was conscious of the need to concentrate on baking a bigger cake to achieve its housing target rather than to argue about the division of the present small cake. This called for a substantial reinforcement of the Housing Department and for the > /creation of ...........................................................

Wednesday, November 28, 1975

10

creation of new machinery for inter-departmental co-ordination and cooperation. in developing the new towns.

Die Construction Branch of the Department had 11 professional and 17 technical posts in April when the new department was set up. Die establishment had now been expanded to 47 professional and 69 technical posts* Recruitment was going on satisfactorily and by the end of December there would be 39 professionals and 27 technicians in post.

Locking ahead, Mr. Lightbody said that the Housing Authority was conscious that it? could not rely on traditional building methods if it was to achieve its housing target in time,and it was anxious to encourage contractors• to employ more modem methods involving a much greater use of craneage and equipment as well as a certain amount of protons ting.

He revealed that the British Trade Commission in Hong Kong is now planning a visit here next spring by a group of British contractors so they decide for themselves whether they would wish to participate in the building programme.

Mr. Lightbody said that since the Housing Authority started life in April this year it had settled down to the task of implementing the massive housing programme and to managing 51 estates with about 1,700,000 tenants•

It had reviewed management policy in some areas and had introduced higher income eligibility limits for waiting list applicants to compensate for the fall in money values.

/f,This ensures • • • • •

Wednesday, November 28, 1973

- 11 -

"This ensures that the sort of family for which public housing was intended when the original limits were set will continue to be eligible,11 he said.

Mr. Lightbody said that even at this early stage in the programme, there was a temptation to ask whether we could meet our targets by 1983. "The public housing programme does not stand alone,” he said, ”it is part of a very large corporate effort involving many other departments of the government, and time must be allowed for the necessary planning to be done and groundwork to be laid.” An essential first stage was the setting up of Public V/orlcs Department teams in each New Town under a Project Manager,,

Mr. Lightbody went on: ”Some of the timing assumptions on which the 10-year housing programme rests will no doubt change in some degree as New Town development plans are further refined, but taking the 10-year period as a whole we have grounds today for expressing confidence that we have not been set (or set ourselves) an impossible task.”

He said the Authority hoped to raise standards on new public housing estates to avoid creating buildings that would qualify for the ”slum” label in 10 or 15 years’ time. Provided additional loan funds were made available, public housing would in future be allocated at 50 square foot a head instead of at the present rate of 55 square feet.

Mr. Lightbody emphasised that no assumptions could be made at this stage as to the final outcome of the approach which the Authority would now make to the government for additional lean funds needed to implement this decision. At the same time, the Authority would have to look closely at its own cash-flow position to see if it could reduce its need for loan funds.

/He said .......

Wednesday. November 28, 1973

12

He said that improvements would be made to future units. Each would have a self-contained kitchen, and more would be built with two separate bedrooms.

Turning to the squatter problem, Mr.Lightbody said that the general shortage of housing and high rent levels had led to an increasing amount of illegal squatting. Families, if found to be genuinely homeless,were offered space in a Licensed Area, and there had been great pressure in recent months on the available areas.

The Housing Department had established several new Licensed Areas for about 9,000 people over the earlier part of this year, and areas would be developed for about 20,000 people by May 1974. The situation would be carefully watched to ensure that the department could respond to legitimate needs.

Mr. Lightbody said that as part of its contribution to the 10-year housing programme, the Hong Kong Housing Society intended to acquire urban sites now occupied by dilapidated old properties and redevelop them, and the government was prepared to use resumption powers to ensure that the Society acquired the sites.

Speaking of the private sector, Mr. Lightbody said it was making a major contribution and this year, 30,000 private dwelling units would have been built.

lie went on: "I am confident that private developers will recognise the growing demand that must develop for their flats as Hong Kong fanri 11as come to rate housing space higher in their priorities and in their pattern of expenditure.”

/To accelerate •••••

Wednesday, November 28, 1975

13 -

To accelerate the process of good management and to provide more scope for the self-help instincts of tenants in private multi-storey buildings, the Home Affairs Department and the New Territories Administration have fostered the growth of Mutual Aid Committees since June this year, said Mr. Lightbody. ”These are a simple form of organisation of owners and occupiers and they can be set up with the minimum of formalities. In the short space of five months, about 1,000 such Committees have been set up and 195 are in various stages of formation.”

Mrt Lightbody said there would inevitably be buildings -where the necessary self-help instinct, and desire to improve matters would be lacking, and it might well be necessary for the government to enact legislation compelling owners to set up management committees or to appoint an administrator to look after sub-standard buildings.

‘*This proposition is being studied with a view to formulating practical proposals for the compulsory management of multi-storeyed buildings, whore such compulsion proves to be necessary,” he said.

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Wednesday, November 28, 1975

- 14 -

TEMPORARY COLLEGE FOR TRAINING TECHNICAL TEACHERS

Large Numbers To Be Trained

******

A temporary College of Education for training technical teachers will commence operations in September 197^ in the Morrison Hill Primary Sahool.

Announcing this in Legislative Council this afternoon, the - t • •

Director of Education, Mr. J. Canning said that approval was given recently for the financial commitment involved in reprovisioning the school for this purpose.

”This represents an important step forward and one which will, I am sure, be welcomed by the public,” Mr. Canning said.

He pointed out that much of the expansion, in secondary education outlined in the Green Paper would be in the secondary technical field.

”This will necessitate training a very large number of technical teachers, certainly more than the present facilities at the Morrison Hill Technical Institute can hope to produce.”

The Director reported that enrolments at the other Colleges of Education had continued to rise. In September 1975 enrolments for full-time courses were 1,378 compared with 1,227 last year and for part-time courses were 1,666 compared with 1,278.

’Tull-time courses,”Mr. Canning said, ”are being revised to provide a greater emphasis on preparation for teaching at secondary level and the quality of training is also being reviewed.”

/Replying to .......

Wednesday, November 28, 1973

- 15 -

Replying to some specific points raised by Unofficial Members earlier in the debate on the Governor’s speech, Mr. Canning said Mr. Wilson V/ang was quite correct when he said that teacher training was a pre-requisite for the implementation of all educational developments.

Mr. Wang’s remarks would certainly be borne in mind when the White Paper was being drafted.

The Director then answered a point raised by Mr. Li Fook-wo regarding entry qualifications for the Colleges of Education.

’’The stipulated qualifications for entry are, in fact, qualifications for application for entry,” said Mr. Canning.

’’These are deliberately kept at a minimally acceptable level in order to cast the recruitment net as widely as possible, and in order not to miss the suitable candidate whose purely academic qualification may be slightly lower than that of others with higher ’paper’ qualifications but who may be equally suited to the teaching profession.

”In practical terms, it has been found possible to raise the level of qualification for application in September 1973 while preserving this desirable flexibility, and it is anticipated that, as general educational standards in Kong Kong rise, it should be possible to make progressive further increases in qualification for application.”

Technical Education

On technical, education, Mr. Canning said: ’’Steady progress has been made during the year in the field of technical education”.

/The expansion .......

Wednesday, November 28, 1973

- 16 -

The expansion of the existing technical institute at Morrison Hill by the addition of a sixth floor on the workshop block commenced earlier this month, while the first two of the new technical institutes at Kwai Chung and Kwun Tong would come into operation in September 1975*

Planning work for the third new technical institute at Cheung Sha Wan "is well advanced and is scheduled for completion in 1976. The fourth, to be at San Po Kong, is also being planned and should be opened about a year later,” he added#

Secondary Schools

Mr. Canning reported that 22 new secondary school projects were completed during the past year. When fully developed these projects would provide some 21,000 additional places.

Referring to the new targets for secondary education expansion proposed by the Board of Education, Mr. Canning said tnat Mr. Wilson Wang "seems to have mis-read the Board’s interim target which was to provide places for 80 per cent of the relevant age group by 19&1 or within eight years.”

A new code of aid was introduced during the year for all government aided secondary schools.

”This new code of aid has unified the older codes of aid for grant and subsidised secondary schools and means increased government subventions. T!Uniform staffing and salary structures for all government and aided secondary schools have now been introduced,” he said.

/The Director .......

Wednesday, November 28, 1975

- 17 -

2he Director was sure that these measures would raise the standards of all secondary schools in the public sector and help to achieve the improvement of the quality of education in these schools.

Primary Education

Turning to primary education, Mr, Canning noted that the expansion of educational television, the conversion of selected government primary schools into unisessional operation and the greater use of experimeiftation with teaching projects were steps taken to improve quality in primary ‘ education in the past year.

Emphasis at the primary level, he said, was upon improvements in quality since free primary education for all who require it was already an accomplished fact.

’’Among the pilot experimental schemes is the integrated teaching in six government, subsidised and private primary schools. The object of the experiment is to attempt to move away from standard classroom teaching to a more pupil-centred informal approach.

In his view, primary education ”is the foundation on which all other forms of education stand and we cannot be complacent if our system is to be sufficiently flexible to meet the future needs of our society.”

Referring to the Secondary School Entrance Examination, the Director said the Board of Education stressed the need to minimise its undesirable effects and to widen the basis for the selective allocation to secondary schools.

/Noting that •••••••

Wednesday, November 28, 1973

- 18 -

Noting that 47.5 per cent of children sitting for the examination this year were allocated secondary school places compared with 44.2 per cent last year, Mr. Canning said he agreed with the Board and could not see how the examination could be dispensed with in the foreseeable future, as the fairest method of selection for secondary school places.

"Steps have been taken to make papers of the examination progressively easier, however, so that the excessive cramming and coaching which many children have to undergo during the final year of their primary education solely directed towards this examination, will be rendered unnecessary.

"While this is so I ciu not rule out the possibility that factors other than performance in the S.S.E.E. might become components in the selection process.

"Assessment of pupils’ ability by schools is an obvious choice of ■ ♦ /

a factor which might be used in this way. These matters will, I am sure, continue to engage the attention of the Board," the Director said.

In reply to a point raised by Mr. Wilscn Wang on whether pupils in primary schools who have difficulty in keeping up with their studies could be allowed to repeat classes, Mr. Canning said that repetition was already allowed, within certain limits, in primary schools.

"Pupils are allowed seven years to complete the six-year course at the discretion of the school concerned in classes Primary 1 to Primary 5. Repetition is not allowed in Primary 6 nor are pupils allowed to take the Secondary Schools Entrance Examination a second time," Mr. Canning said.

/He pointed .......

t /

Wednesday, November 28, 197J

- 19 -

He pointed out that if wholesale repetition were al l owed pupils might, if they were not fully satisfied with their al 1 neat5on, wish to repeat Primary 6 in the hope of securing a higher place in the order of merit•

’’This to the extent it was allowed would delay pupils in Primary J awaiting promotion their ohance of taking the examination in their du© turn^ Repercussions of this would affect the whole primary school system,” he added.

Combined School Certificate

Mr. Canning told Council that ” a quiet revolution has taken place in recent years in our examination at the school certificate level.” Candidates, he said, would have the option, under certain safegurads, of taking the examination in English or Chinese.

”Next year will witness the first examination of the new, combined Hong Kong Certificate of Education; the first step in.a three—year process aimed at achieving complete identity of syllabuses and question papers, irrespective of the language medium which the candidate may choose to use.”

He was sure that this advance would prove to be very much in the best interests of both the candidates and the community.

Special Education

On special education, Mr. Canning said ten new special schools for handicapped children would open next year. Thirty additional special classes in government primary schools and 22 special classes in aided primary schools opened in September this year.

/’’This is •••••••

Wednesday, November 28, 1973

- 20 -

’’This is the first time that voluntary organisations which are well established in the field of ordinary education have provided special education classes in their schools,” he added.

The general aim of special education, he went on, was to provide those unfortunate children suffering from some disability of mind or body, the education necessary to develop them as well-adjusted individuals capable of leading a wholly or partially self-supporting life.

’’Teacher training for special education, diagnostic and remedial services, and the availability of places in both special schools and special classes in ordinary schools are all in the process of expansion in accordance with the five-year development plan for Special Education approved by Honourable Members last year.”

This plan, Mr. Canning said, would provide an additional 4,000 places for severely handicapped children in special classes in ord i nary schools.

In conclusion, Mr. Canning said that although the past year ’’has given further evidence of real and positive advance in the scope and the quality of the education services provided at public expense there is no complacency in my department.”

He emphasised that ’’much needs to be done if we are to satisfy in full the needs and aspirations of our community. This we shall strive to do. It is my belief that the recently published report of the Board of Education provides a sound basis for further planning in the secondary field and that the White Paper which will result from public discussion and further deliberations will provide us with a programme for expansion in the secondary field which the children of our community need and deserve.”

- - 0 - -

/21

4

Wednesday, November 28, 1973

- 21 -

ACTIVE HOLE FOR MEDICAL AND HEALTH DEPT. IN DRUG FIGHT Dr. Choa Says Methadone Pilot Study Will Yield Far-Reaching Results ********

The Director of Medical and Health Services^Dr. the Hon. G.H. Choa, today assured the Legislative Council that his department would play an ■ "active role" from now on in the treatment of drug addiction in Hong Kong.

In anticipation of further responsibilities, he proposed to set up a separate division within the department to deal with narcotics and drug administration, including the organisation of treatment and research.

The division would be headed by an officer not only familiar with the drug problem, but also experienced in health administration, supported by specialist staff, including a statistician.

Dr. Choa was confident that the department’s three-year pilot study on methadone maintenance would have "far-reaching results" that would greatly influence thinking on what future action should be taken in Hong Kong.

The study was aimed at two main objectives:

* To determine the extent to which an out-patient scheme of methadone maintenance was acceptable to addicts.

* To find out among those attending regularly whether it would be possible eventually to withdraw the substitute methadone so that finally they could be entirely weaned off all drugs.

Dr. Choa said the scheme had begun well, with the 550 volunteers originally planned for three years already exceeded in less than a year, and provisions approved for another 1,000 volunteers in the next two years.

/He described .......

Wednesday, November 28, 1973

- 22 -

Ho described as "encouraging0 a tendency already noted that the majority of those dropping out did so because of a lack of motivation rather than a difficulty experienced in medical or social rehabilitation.

Dr. Choa took some time to explain that the New Territories and outlying islands did not lack a casualty service, because a system of transport by helicopter existed to convey urgent cases with the utmost speed to major hospitals in Hong Kong and Kowloon, where there were facilities for their total care.

He felt that these facilities — embracing staff, special surgical equipment, laboratory and X-ray services — should be provided in urban hospitals so as to serve the maximum number of people in densely—populated areas, since they could not be duplicated everywhere.

Dr. Choa said the report of the Medical Development Advisory Committee recommended that the accident service be reorganised, and the New Territories and outlying islands were included in this plan.

Once implemented, it would introduce improvements to the pi*esent service by providing for rescue, first-aid and transport at the site of accidents, and a number of accident centres distributer on a geographic basis — with designated accident centres receiving the more severe, and accident centres the less serious cases.

In another reference to the report of the Medical Development Advisory Committee, Dr. Choa drew the attention of the Council to the proposal for the regionalisation of hospital and clinic services on a geographical basis.

/Regionalisation ••••••

4

Wednesday, November 28, 1973 - 23 -

Regionalisation meant that if a patient had to "go all the way,” he would first attend a general clinic, would then be referred to a specialist clinic, and subsequently, depending on the condition and nature of his illness, admitted either to a district or a regional hospital.

There was a further bi-directional flow of patients between a district and a regional hospital. Patients requiring more sophisticated treatment would be referred from a district to a regional hospital, while patients already past the acute stage of their illness could be transferred from the regional to the district hospital for convalescence.

’With such a plan, all beds in government and assisted hospitals will be used to the maximum,” Dr. Choa emphasised.

Anot'.er advantage was that each region could be administered as an individual unit by an officer based in a regional office, and not in the headquarters of the department. This formed part of the streamlining of the administration of the medical and health services which he intended to introduce so as effectively implement the recommendations of the 10-year development plan.

Of family planning, Dr. Choa said he had in mind the creation of a division in the department for family health services, headed by an officer with experience of all aspects of family planning and maternal a.nd child health.

The ultimate aim of the recent integration of family planning within the department’s maternal and child health service was to enable "all those who wish to practise family planning, and relieve themselves of the burden of excessive child bearing, to do so conveniently and efficiently at a clinic nearest to their homes."

-------o---------- /?4 ......

Wednesday, November 28, 1973

- 24 -

PRESSURE FCR EQUAL TREATMENT IN EEC TO CONTINUE

* Mt * ♦ ♦ * ♦

An assurance that pressure will be maintained to secure equal treatment for Hong Kong’s textile and footwear exports in the EEC’s generalised preference scheme was given at today’s Legislative Council meeting by the Director of Commerce and Industry, Mr. David Jordan.

In reply to a question from Mr. T.K. Ann, he said that the British Government had made very clear to the other member states of the European Economic Community that it regards discrimination against Hong Kong as no longer acceptable.

'*1 am very well aware of the dissatisfaction with the present situation among Hong Kong textile and footwear manufacturers and exporters,” Mr. Jordan said.

”l7e shall continue to press not for special treatment but for equal treatment for Hong Kong with the object of seeking this discrimination removed by 1975•”

Mr. Jordan said that the British Government had reached the conclusion that it would not have been able to get agreement on the inclusion of Hong Kong’s textiles and footwear in the scheme for 1974.

"However strongly we may feel about this issue — and we have made it clear in London that we do feel very strongly about it — I think we must admit that it must be left to Her Majesty’s Government to decide the tactics of the operation,” he added.

/"That is ••••..

4

Wednesday, November 28, 1973

- 25 -

’That is not to say that we shall not continue to press our views and to nut forward any further representations we may receive from the industrial and trading interests in Hong Kong that are affected by this situation.:z

Mr. Jordan said that, although it may seem cold comfort to the textile and footwear industries, there were other aspects of the scheme that are from Hong Kong’s point of view to be improved in 197^* The average quota levels would be increased by some 40 per cent, and there will be a reduction in the number of commodities subject to the tariff quota system.

One of these, locks and padlocks, involved significant Hong Kong trade.

In addition, the individual country cut-off points within the tariff quotas have been raised from 20 to JO per cent for 14 items, and seven of these are of particular significance to Hong Kong in trade terms.

These include travel goods, imitation jewellery, primary cells and batteries, portable electric lamps, radio receivers and parts, tape recorders and vacuum flasks.

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/26........

Wednesday, November 28, 1973

- 26 -

TAX EXEl-IPT RATE OU INTEREST RAISED TO FOUR PER CENT

*******

The Legislative Council today approved a resolution to further increase the tax exemption rate of interest from three-and-a-half per cent to four per cent.

In moving the motion, the Financial Secretary, the Hon. C.P. Haddon-Cave, noted that the tax exempt rate was last changed in 1968 when it was raised to three-and-a-half per cent from three per cent.

"Because of the general rise in interest rates there is a good case for a further concession, given the practical link between the exempt rate and that paid on saving accounts," he said.

He pointed otit that there were two increases in the banks* interest rates during August, and it was felt that small savers should receive some benefit from the higher rates without too much delay.

"The banks all raised their interest on accounts to four per cent on September 1 and it is logical that this rate should be allowed to continue until further notice," he added.

The Financial Secretary explained that under the proviso to Section 28 of the Inland Revenue Ordinance, no tax was charged on any interest paid, or payable, by the government or a bank which accrued at a rate not exceeding three-and-a-half per cent.

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/27.......

i

Wednesday, November 28, 1973

- 27 -

UK/ MEASURES TC EASE SHORTAGE OF "FIRST AIDERS”

**********

The Legislative Council today voted in favour of new measures aimed at bringing quick relief to the shortage of trained first aid personnel in Hong Kong industry.

In putting forward new regulations made by the Commissioner of Labour on November 2, the Secretary for Social Services, Mr. F.K. Li, pointed out that the number of "first aiders" in industry was now more than 30 per cent below strength, and the situation would get much worse in May next year when laws would come into force requiring first—aiders on building sites.

The new regulations give the Commissioner of Labour the power to recognise a wider range of qualifications for first aid personnel, making it easier for industry to recruit the trained workers needed.

The regulations also enable the Commissioner of Labour to give recognition to persons who are trained in first aid by the Auxiliary Medical Service, the Civil Aid Services and other such bodies.

Formerly the definition "first aiders" only referred to those who were either registered nurses or trained by the St. Jolin1 s Ambulance Association.

The Secretary for Social Services, Mr. F.K. Li, told the Legislative Council today that the regulations made provision for first aid facilities in registable workplaces, and required that the first aid boxes be in the control of a team of responsible persons, including at least one trained person for every 100 workers.

/The total ......

Wednesday, November 28, 1973

- 28 -

The total number of first aiders required to work in local industry was estimated at more than 3,000. "But there are at present only about 2,000 trained by the St. John’s Ambulance ..ssociation, and a very small number of registered nurses working in factories," said Mr. Li.

This shortfall would become even more acute when the Construction Site (Safety) Regulations become effective on May 1, 197^- Then another 2,000 first aiders would be required for construction sites alone.

The new regulations are one of a series planned by the Labour Department to improve safety measures in industry.

At the same time, the Legislative Council also approved a number of minor changes to legislation dealing with the employment of women and young persons in industry, to make clear beyond doubt the intention of the law.

The alterations to the Factories and Industrial Undertakings (Amendment) Regulations made by the Commissioner of Labour on November 5 involve no changes in principle.

Mr. Li explained that, among other things, the amendment regulations clarified that the employment of women and young persons on more than six days in any week was prohibited.

"Women and young persons are also prohibited from being employed on their rest days as well as outside the fixed period of employment except for permissible overtime,” he said. "No proprietor is allowed to require or permit them to work during their mandatory intervals for rest or meals."

The amendment regulations permit a proprietor to change the rest day of women and young persons in one week, and then revert to the original rest day in the week immediately following without seeking permission from the Commissioner of Labour.

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/29........


Wednesday, November 28, 1973

- 29 -

STRONG SUPPORT FOR LEGALISING OFF-COURSE BETTING ******

Unofficial members of the Legislative Council have expressed strong support for the government’s decision to permit the Royal Hong Kong Jockey Club to operate off-course betting on horse races.

Speaking on behalf of his unofficial colleagues on the Betting Duty (Amendment) Bill 1973, the Hon. Szeto Wai described the move as •’sensible” and said it was an anomaly that off-course betting should remain illegal vixen betting at the race course was legal.

Unless and until some proper method was devised of legalising off^course betting, the present illegal betting would continue, he said.

”1 agree therefore — and my unofficial colleagues go along with me — that the provisions of this Bill represent a sensible approach to the problem by providing proper facilities whereby all those who wish to place a bet on the horses can do so under properly supervised conditions.”

Mr. Szeto felt that the majority of the community were not opposed to taking this sensible step which, after all, did no more than reoognise the facts of the situation.

Furthermore, he added, the Bill did not seek to introduce any new form of gambling.

The Bill will enable the Jockey Club to conduct off-course totalizator or pari-mutual betting on horse races organised by the Club.

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/30........

** Wednesday, November 28, 1973

- 30 -

■l LONG SERVICE MEDALS FOR FIREMEN

***♦*«♦

The Director of Fire Services, Mr. A.E.H. Wood, will present

Long Service Medals to 163 regular and Auxiliary members of the Fire Services tomorrow (Thursday).

The presentation ceremony, which will begin at 10 a.m., will be held at the Tsim Sha Tsui Fire Station, Canton Road.

The recipients comprise 147 regular members who will receive

the Colonial Fire Services Long Service Medal and 16 Auxiliary members who will receive the Civil Defence Long Service Medal.

Note to Editors: You are invited to send a reporter and/

or photographer to cover the presentation at the Tsim Sha Tsui Fire Station, Canton Road, on Thursday (November 29) at 10 a.m.

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/31

Wednesday, November 28, 1973

- 31 -

KWAI CHUNG INCINERATION PLANT CONTRACT

*******

Note to Editors: A 861.5 million contract will be signed

tomorrow (Thursday) for the supply and installation of plant and equipment for the Kwai Chung incineration plant which, when operational, will be able to dispose of at least 900 tons of municipal refuse a day.

Mr. J.A. Wallace, Principal Government Electrical and Mechanical Engineer, will sign the contract on behalf of the government. Signing on behalf of the Company which has been awarded the contract will be Mr. J.W. Ashley, a Director of the Power Plant Division of Clarke Chapman-John Thompson Ltd. of England.

Representatives of the media will be welcome to cover the signing. It will take place at 12 noon in the offices of P,W.D.’s Electrical and Mechanical Office in Caroline Hill Road, 9th floor. There will be an opportunity to ask questions about the project.

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Wednesday, November 28, 1973

- 32 -

BILLS PASSED «♦*#***

Six Bills completed their passage in the Legislative Council today and became law.

They were: the Government Lotteries (Amendment and Validation)

Bill 1973; the Supplementary Appropriation (1972-73) Bill“1973; the

District Court (Amendment) (No. 2) Bill 1973; the Interpretation and General Clauses (Amendment) Bill 1973; the Betting Duty (Amendment) Bill 1973; and the Railways (Amendment) Bill 1973*

Three other Bills — the Cross-Harbour Tunnel (Amendment) Bill; the Law Revision (Miscellaneous Amendments) Bill; and the Po Leung Kuk Bill, received their first and second readings.

Four annual departmental reports were tabled. These were by the Conmiissioner of Inland Revenue, the Director of Broadcasting, the Cownifisioner for Resettlement and the Registrar General.

-------0---------

LEGCO DEBATE CONTINUES TOMORROW

********

Six more Official Members will speak at the Legislative Council meeting tomorrow 'in reply to points raised by their Unofficial colleagues during the debate on the notion of thanks for the Governor’s opening address cn October 17.

They are: Mr. J.J. Robson, Secretary for the Environment; Mr. D. Akers-Jones, District Commissioner, New Territories; Mr. A.S. Robertson, Director of Public Works; Mr. D.C. Bray, Secretary for Home Affairs; Mr>' C.P. Haddon-Cave, Financial Secretary and Mr. :D.T.E. Roberts, Colonial Secretary.

Five Official Members spoke at today’s meeting.

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-.elease time: o.pO p.m.

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Thursday, November 29, 1975

CONTENTS

Pago. mN,*z

Consumer advisory service established to give an authoritative guide to wholesale prices and supplies of certain basic food

items •••••••••...........................................  . . 1

Anti-corruption legislation to be strengthened.........••••••• 6

New measures to expand public transport services ...........•

The Secretary for Home Affairs outlines initiatives for establishing a more open government..........................  14

More land to be made available to private developers.......•.. 17

Mr. Bray to chair the new Council for Recreation and Sport ... 25

Agreement reached on the form of a proposed permanent Land Tribunal...................................................... 25

The Financial Secretary speaks on future trends .............. 27

The Governor and Lady MacLehose to visit Macao next week ••••• JO

Water interruption in Sham Shui Po..........................   JO

New sites allocated to Kowloon Bay fire victims ............• •• J1

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Thursday, November 29, 1973

- 1 -

CONSUMER ADVISORY SERVICE ESTABLISHED

*******

The Financial Secretary, the Hon. C.P. Haddon-Cave,announced today the setting up of a Consumer Advisory Service to give an authoritative guide to wholesale prices and supplies of certain basic commodities.

This daily service will come into immediate effect and the first details of prices and supplies will be issued to the press this afternoon by Government Information Services.

The ennmodities covered will be rice, marine fish, vegetables and pork.

Mr. Haddon-Cave told the Legislative Council that with experience in interpreting changes in this information, the housewife would be able to see mearly for herself whether retail margins were reasonable.

But if she felt that the prices were not reasonable she should make her views Iznown in no uncertain terms; "the economic power of the housewife can be quite devastating," he stressed.

The guide will be compiled from information supplied by the Agriculture and Fisheries Department and the Commerce and Industry Department.

In announcing the Consumer Advisory Service, the Financial Secretary said he was not convinced that profiteering was taking place on anything like the scale that has been implied. But he was prepared to accept that there was potential scope for profiteering in certain circumstances,"such as when panic buying ensues on the basis of some rumour to the effect that a commodity is in short supply."

He felt that it could be of assistance to consumers to have some authoritative guide as to the availability of certain foodstuffs and their price ranges. ----------------------------------0---------

/2..........

Thursday, November 29, 1973

- 2 -

Note to Editors: The first guide to wholesale market

prices and supplies of four basic food items — rice, marine fish, vegetables and pork — is issued in today’s Daily Information Bulletin. A daily guide will be issued in the D.IJB, everyday.

It is hoped that you will publish the list daily as a guide to-housewives as to the a Wii J-abiltty of certain foodstuffs and their price ranges.

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Thursday, November 29j 1973

- 3 -

CONSUMER ADVISORY SERVICE

Daily Guide To Wholesale Market Prices And Supplies

***♦

The following prices were realised today (Thursday) at sales

under the Rise Control Scheme and at the Vegetable Marketing Organise tian

Wholesale Market and the Fish Marketing Organisation Wholesale Market at

Cheung Sha Wan, Kowloon:

Supplies And Wholesale Prices of Rice

Grade Availability of Supply Wholesale Price (8/catty)

China Rice „ .. - old crop See Mew - new crop GooC •* ♦ Average 1.64 1.72

S.C.Jien old crop Good; 1.58

Chu Cho Good 1.22

10-15# Brokens A1 Super Extra Good • Good- 1r50 1.45

A1 Super Good' 1.22

Whole Glutinous Scarce 1.52

U.S, Rice Good 1.62

Supplies And Wholesale Prices of MarineFish

Species Availability of Supply Wholesale Price (8/catty)

High Low Average

Golden Thread Limited 5.0 3.8 4.0

Big-Eyes Limited 2.8 1.7 2.1

Squid Limited 5-5 3.0 4.5

Hair-Tails Good ■ 3.0 2.0 2.4

.... /Lizard Fishes •«•••

Thursday, November 29, 1973

Availability Wholesale Price

Species of Supply (8/cat ■ty)

High Low Average

Lizard Pishes Good 3.2 1.8 2.5

Croakers Good 2.4 1.2 1.6

C onger-Pike- Eel s Limited 2.9 2.5 2.7

Melon Coat Good 2.5 1.7 2.0

Breams Limited 5-5 4.2 4.5

Yellow Belly Limited 1.8 0.8 1.5

Mackerels Limited 5.0 5.0 4.0

Red Goat Fish Good 1.9 1.0 1.5

Fork-Tail Good 2.2 1.2 1.6

Horse-Head Scarce 6.0 4.5 5.0

Melon Seed Limited 5.0 2.0 2.7

Pomfrets Scarce 8.0 5.8 7.0

Garoupas Scarce 7.5 6.0 7.2

Yellow Croaker.- Limited 6.5 2.6 4.4

Supplies And Wholesale Prices of

Locally Produced Vegetables

T^rpe Availability of Supply Wholesale Price (S/catty)

High Low Average

Flowering cabbage Limited 1.60 0.70 1.00

White cabbage Good 0.30 0.15 0.25

Chinese Lettuce Good 0.50 0.20 0.30

Chinese Kale Limited 0.80 0.40 0.55

Spring onion Limited 1.20 0.50 0.70

/Spinach

Thursday, November 29, 1973

- 5 -

Availability Wholesale Price

of Supply (S/catty)

^tOW Average

Spinach Limited 1.20 0.50 0.70

Water cress Good 1.10 0.40 0.60

Leaf mustard cabbage Scarce 0.60 0.20 o.4o

Tomato Scarce 2.^0 1.60 2.00

Supplies And Wholesale Prices of Pork (Live weight)

Availability of Supply

Pork

Good

Wholesale Price (per picul) (Average)

285

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/6.......

Thursday, November 29, 1973

- 6 -

ANTI-CORRUPTION LEGISLATION BEING STRENGTHENED

Tough new penalties will shortly be introduced against corruption to give stronger legal backing to the government’s all-out drive to eradicate graft.

The new measures are being incorporated in draft legislation now being prepared which will implement most of the recommendations in Sir Alastair Blair—Kerr’s Second Report. ....

They will include, among others:

* A maximum penalty of seven years’ imprisonment for an offence under Section 10 of the Prevention of Bribery Ordinance, as against the present maximum of three years.

* Provision to enable a court to make a forfeiture award in favour of the Crown against a person convicted under Section 10, in relation to those monetary resources or property of which the accused failed to explain his possession satisfactorily to the court.

* New machinery to prevent banks and other institutions from dealing with the assets of a person under investigation, and

* Inspection and investigation of any bank account operated by a government servant.

In outlining the proposed new measures, the Colonial Secretary, the Hon. D.T.E. Roberts, told the Legislative Council that careful thought /was .......................................................

Thursday, November 29, 1973

- 7 -

was also being given to the recommendation to make it an offence to fail to comply with a notice issued under Section 14 requiring a suspect to submit information to the Anti-Corruption Commission headed by Mr. Jack Cater.

”1 believe that these amendments will make the Prevention of Bribery Ordinance a more effective instrument in dealing with corruption than it is at present,” Mr. Roberts said.

The new Commission, he added, had a formidable task. ”It must not lack the proper legal support.” The Bill will be introduced in the Legislative Council early next year.

Useful Talks

Mr. Roberts told Council that useful talks had taken place between the Secretary for the Civil Service and the three Staff Associations concerning Sir Alastair’s proposals to change the Colonial Regulations so as to make it easier to remove government servants against whom no conviction for corruption could be obtained because of insufficient evidence.

While the associations were concerned that honest officers should be protected against possible victimisation or injustice, they had taken ”a most reasonable and responsible attitude towards the proposals which have been put to them.”

The Colonial Secretary hoped that a formula could be reached which would be acceptable to everyone concerned.

On the Anti-Corruption Commission, Mr. Roberts said it was too early to say precisely what form it would take, but generally it was proposed that it should comprise three main divisions:

/* An Operation .......

Thursday, November 29, 1975

- 8 -

* An Operations Division, responsible for the investigation and prosecution of offences.

* A Preventive and Administrative Division to deal with the prevention of corruption, principally by advice or the adoption of procedures which are likely to reduce the opportunities for corruption;-and

* A Community Relations Division to involve the public in the fight against corruption through education, publicity and by influencing public opinion.

The Ordinance under which the Commission will be formally constituted, he went on, will place the Commission directly under the control and direction of the Governor.

’’Ihese measures should make it clear that the Commissioner and ■ ' . r..! •’

his staff are intended to be free from the departmental and inter-departmental

pressures to which members of the public service may be liable and are in fact independent of the government, though subject to the control of the Governor.

. ■ . f-

”In this way we wish to demonstrate yet again, that the government

means to tackle corruption relentlessly.11

Mr. Roberts said the term of service of the Commission’s officers would also be subject to the Governor’s approval, and it was intended that these terms should be kept roughly in line with those of the public service.

In order to preserve the rights to pensions and gratuities of

those public servants serving with the Commission, steps would have to be taken to ensure that their career prospects did not suffer, he said.

/Turning •••••••

Thursday, November 29? 1975

- 9 -

Turning to the Labour Tribunal, the Colonial Secretary announced that the Legislative Council would be asked in due course to approve its establishment as a permanent part of the judicial structure*

Hie tribunal, which was initially set up until the end of 1975i has proved very popular during the six months it has been in operation dealing with 563 cases — far more than originally estimated and about twice the rate at which wage cases were dealt with by the District Court in recent years*

,rIt is therefore apparent, from the figures alone, that the tribunal has succeeded in obtaining the confidence of the public and that those with claims within its jurisdiction are very willing to resort to it,” Mr* Roberts said.

Presiding Officer

It was likely, he added, that the increasing work load of the tribunal would necessitate the appointment of an additional presiding officer in the near future as well as additional premises.

Referring to criticism that the government was out of touch with public opinion, the Colonial Secretary said such criticism did not take proper account’ of the comprehensive network of over 100 advisory bodies on which civil servants and members of the public sat together to formu*! ate advice on most matters of major importance.

These committees, he said, served as a useful bridge between the government and the people but he conceded that too many of them had common memberships• He felt that the field from which advice and assistance was /sought ........................................................

Thursday, November 29 > 1973

- 10 -

sought should be widened and made more representative. In this regard the desirability of enlisting some of the younger members of the community would particularly be borne in mind.

The Colonial Secretary spoke at some length on the public service and its re-organisation and noted that the changes introduced on the advice of the McKinsey team of consultants would help improve the overall efficiency of the government.

There were yet weaknesses to be overcome and these were being < *

tackled, he said, but there was equally much to be said for the strength and enterprise of the civil service and the police force, both of which compare very favourably with others elsewhere.

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Thursday, November 29, 1973

- 11 -

NEW MEASURES TO IMPROVE PUBLIC TRANSPORT Restraints Likely On Private Cars And PLBs ###*#**#

A number of measures aimed at expanding the public transport services in Hong Kong were put forward today by the Secretary for the Environment, the Hon. J.J. Robson.

He told the Legislative Council that this expansion would almost certainly have to be associated with restraints on the growth of private transport; the phasing out of public light buses as a substitute for double-decker buses and allocating to them their more proper role of providing feeder services to the main routes; the proper use of taxis; and the "suppression of pak pais”.

Mr. Robson said traffic and transport probably created the greatest problems of modem living.

’*The effect of motor vehicles on both urban and rural life, and the facilities which have to be provided to meet their insatiable demands, is almost overwhelming.

"This situation must be brought under control."

He said it was not intended to prescribe routes and fares for each of the public light bus routes, but instead, Hong Kong would be divided into a number of zones with a standard fare for each. ,fThe time and circumstances under which higher fares may be charged will also be laid down and enforced by the police.”

/However, ......

Thursday, November 29, 1973

12 -

However, Mr. Robson said if experience indicated that prosecution was no real deterrent to overcharging by public light bus and taxi drivers, "it will be necessary to consider more drastic measures such as administrative powers to suspend the vehicle licence after a conviction for overcharging."

The Secretary for the Environment reiterated that a green paper on transport was being prepared which would outline the government’s thinking on the overall transport policy for Hong Kong.

He pointed out that although the construction of the underground railway was the "greatest single project which will transform our transport patterns" it must be remembered that, on present indications, even when it is built there will be a need for far more surface transport than exist now.

Fixed Penalties

"A very close watch will havj to be kept on its planning and control to ensure that good progress is not achieved at the expense of widespread traffic congestion or disruption of utility companies’ services - most of which run under our roads."

Mr. Robson hoped that the recently formed Road Safety Council would have an impact on the behaviour of both pedestrians and motorists, but their efforts would need to be backed by tougher legislation. This should provide fixed penalties for moving traffic offences such as jumping the lights, and failing to give way at a pedestrian crossing.

Coupled with this scheme should be a driver demerit system which could lead to a motorist having his licence suspended.

"These various methods," he said, "should be very effective in making motorists more law-abiding and the road safer for all."

/Turning to

Thursday, November 29, 1973

- 13 -

Turning to the subject of pollution, Mr. Robson said that the demand for land for special industries, including applications for petroleum refinery and petrochemical projects, had highlighted the need for a comprehensive system for the control of pollution arising from industry.

. He added that the two environmental feasibility studies of specific proposals for petroleum-cum-chemical industries have emphasised that these industries are generally acceptable in Hong Kong at the sites proposedt ”but only provided that there is full control at the design stage of their plants _and that there is comprehensive legislation and an effective authority to control the environmental standards set.”

Mr. Robson’s wide-ranging speech touched on a number of other important issues. Among the main points were:

* a revision of the Colony outline Plan to incorporate not only the land use standards used in the preparation of the present plan but also to match it with a time scale and to relate land use both to the development of other resources and to economic feasibility;

* expanding the very limited planning controls contained in the Town Planning Ordinance. As the law now stands, there is no statutory planning control over any part of Hong Kong not covered by the statutory outline zoning plans, while the restrictions created by the zoning plans within the planned areas may be too inflexible;

an interim report dealing with the feasibility and economic sense of a bridge to Lantau Island is now being considered by the Director of Public Works; and

* more staff becoming available to push ahead with the programme for the recreational development of the countryside.

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/14........

Thursday, November 29, 1973

- 14 -

TOWARDS A MORE OPEN GOVERNMENT

Hie Secretary for Home Affairs, the Hone D.C. Bray, today outlined three main initiatives for establishing a ’’more open government11 to keep pace with a community which is developing a new sense of purpose.

Speaking in the Legislative Council, he said the three initiatives required the government to ’’let the people know what we are thinking; to make it easier for people to formulate and present their views; and to make sure that these expressions of opinion are taken into account."

These were necessary in response to social change in Hong Kong which seemed to be emerging as "one of the most dramatic developments of the early seventies".

"Our older society, prized loose from its stable clan structure, was made up of individuals more concerned with material well-being than social awareness," he said.

It had only recently become clear that the most important change in society was not its increasing wealth, nor its increasing expectations of government performance, but "its new sense of purpose".

"The new society no longer expects everything ' be done for it by a paternalistic government. It is a society on the move, prepared to act on social issues with the same vigour that the old refugee society displayed in the pursuit of private prosperity."

Turning to the first initiative, Mr. Bray said that green papers, reports of advisory bodies and findings of consultants were frequently /published ..........................................................

Thursday, November 29, 1973

- 15 -

published before decisions were taken. But "more informal methods of airing ideas and proposals could be developed and I should like to give further thought to this".

Obviously there were limitations, such as the budget, but he said he would like to think that the government could air more proposals involving a choice of courses open to it so that there was an opportunity to shape policy more closely to public aspirations.

Mr. Bray said that on the second point there was already a basic structure which enabled people to formulate and present their views, including a broad range of advisory bodies which were capable of further sophistication.

Grass Roots

However, he said he was more concerned with the far wider network of committees that had been reinforced during the clean Hong Kong and fight crime campaigns. These are the City District Committees, the Area Committees and the "grass roots organisations of over 1,000 Mutual Aid Committees."

In the New Territories there are the Rural Committees and the village organisations.

Many of the town organisations were quite new, "but I certainly hope they will provide the means whereby people can put forward their views on anything they like."

As well, proposals to strengthen the government’s opinion gathering methods were now being drawn up.

/On the .......

Thursday, November 29, 1973

- 16 -

On the third initiative, the Secretary for Home Affairs said the responsibility for taking public opinion into account "rests with all officials and unofficials concerned with policy decisions. In addition, a special responsibility rests on the holder of my post to ensure that public opinion is presented and considered at all levels.”

Mr. Bray emphasised: "The new society is anxious to deal with social problems itself. We shall respond by involving the community more in decisions affecting its everyday life."

Dealing with the crime problem, he said the government should be encouraged by greater public confidence. Last winter people were beginning to stay off the streets at night, to keep their children at home, and walk in fear of attack.

"This is not the case today. Reports from City District Offices, opinion surveys, and police contacts all reflect a strengthening of public confidence in lav/ and order.

,THowever,"he added, "we still have far too many robberies and other violent crimes; and the police must be given the men to deal with them."

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/17.......

Thursday, November 29, 1973

- 17 -

MORE LAND TO BE MADE AVAILABLE TO -PRIVATE DEVELOPERS

*********

The Director of Public Works, the Hon. A.S. Robertson, today forecast -that about 11 acres of land in the Kowloon foothills will be set aside for private development and should be on the market by the middle of next year.

He told, the Legislative Council that consultants were now investigating the possibilities of development of land in this area and in the Sai Kung Peninsula and on Lantao. 5

Although none of these investigations had been completed, Mr. Robertson predicted that a bridge to Lantao would prove to be feasible<

He said that it would permit consideration to be given to development of parts of north east Lantao for industrial and residential purposes, without being incompatible with the use of the south and west of the Island for recreational development. ”It remains to be seen whether north east Lantao should be developed in this way.”

He added: ’’The overall plan for recreational development of Lantao and the Sai Kung Peninsula will reveal specific opportunities for the government to enlist the aid of the private sector to take part in this development, under conditions attractive to both parties.

,rIf the Lyemun bridge is feasible, and the investigations we are undertaking will answer that question by early next year, it will remain to be seen how and when a bridge would fit into the traffic needs of Kowloon and Hong Kong; and our Comprehensive Transport Study will answer that question.”

/Mr. Robertson

Thursday, November 29, 1973

- 18 -

Mr. Robertson then went on to describe some of the major activities of his department.

On water, he said: "The long-term plans for augmenting our water resources have borne fruit in another — the sixth successive — year of continuous supply. In the past six years we have distributed more water than in the previous 18 years.

’’This year saw the completion of the works to increase the capacity of Plover Cove reservoir to 50,000 million gallons -which is by itself-three times the total storage capacity of all of our reservoirs 10 years ago."

Desalter

In the meantime work was continuing apace on the Lok On Pai desalter — still the largest in the world — and a valuable source of 40 million gallons per day which will gradually come on stream in 1975* This will be followed closely by the High Island Reservoir Scheme which will add another 70 million gallons per day during the period 197&-78• Mr. Robertson said while he was happy that his department was on top of the problem of providing water resources, he was less happy about its ability to provide the standard of service which the 600,000 paying customers of the Waterworks Office should have.

’’This is, in part, due to an inadequate accounting and billing system which creaks and groans while barely achieving its accounting task, but fails completely to yield information essential to deal with customer queries and complaints," he said.

/The Public

Thursday, November 29, 1973

- 19 -

The Public Works Department, as a whole, he went on, was the subject of a special study on the uses which it should be making of computers.

He was sure that an important outcome of this study would be the computerisation of the Waterworks accounts, and this would be a great relief to the Waterworks Office and its customers.

On problems facing the Buildings Ordinance Office, Mr. Robertson said it was apparent that no ordinary measures could reduce the backlog of work that had built up following last year’s catastrophic rainstorms., or even keep pace with the inflow of new work.

Allegations

This was particularly so since the heavy rainstorms had shown that the Buildings Ordinance Office must scrutinize more closely all plans for development in hilly areas and scrutinize also the actual activities on the ground, he said.

Mr. Robertson also referred to allegations of P.W.D. failing to take action against illegal building modifications.

In reply, he said: ’The intensive programme of action this year against the owners of one group of new buildings on King’s Road has shown clearly that it is completely impractical to extend such action generally because of the enormous staff effort involved to achieve even a temporary improvement.

/’’Some additional • •••»

Thursday, November 29, 1973

- 20 -

’’Some additional posts have been approved recently for the Buildings Ordinance Office and we will do what we can with these, but I hope that we will also be provided with adequate legal and administrative means of tackling this problem.”

Mr. Robertson gave an assurance that once the office was given thist its staff would get down to the problem ”with a will • ”

Referring to the New Territories Development Department, which was farmed as a result of the Government’s new, accelerated 10^-year housing programme, he said he was happy to say that ’’the impact of this new organisation has already been felt.”

Land

”In Sha Tin, already there are about 80 acres of formed land and within the period 1975 to 1978 there will be another 640 acres. Much of this land will clearly be required for publie housing, but there should also be 150 acres for private housing.

”0f more immediate interest, however, will be a plan to all ow private developers to participate in the formation of land in the Sha Tin area. ”

The New Territories Development, Mr. Robertson said, had identified an opportunity to invite private developers to excavate hillside and reclaim a large area of seabed on the southeast side of Sha Tin.

”The developer will retain about 48 acres of the land so formed which he may develop for private residential purposes; the remainder of the land will be returned to the government to be used to promote the speedier development of Sha Tin Town. These areas are additional to the 640 acres I have mentioned before,” he said.

/Mr. Robertson

Thursday, November 29, 1973

- 21 -

Mr. Robertson then listed some of the successes in the transport battle. Ue said the extension to Kai Tak Runway would be completed early next year and the new railways terminus at Hung Hom in mid-1975*

In addition, double-tracking and station improvements between Kowloon and Tai Po are being planned to come into effect when required by the traffic demands of Sha Tin New Town and beyond.

The Port Works Office continues to provide facilities to improve inter-urban and inters island travel.

Turning to the work of the Highways Office, he said: ”Last year 56 major highway schemes were completed and there are at present 35 more in the course of construction. The forecast expenditure on highways in the next five years is $2,700 million, compared with $350 million in the past five years.”

Delays

Mr. Robertson also briefly described the work of the Office of Director of Mass Transit Studies.

Irlf all goes according to plan, work will begin next year on a number of sites between Kowloon Bay and Shek Kip Mei and will spread progressively down Nathan Road,” he added.

Referring to alleged delays of some items of Public Works, Mr. Robertson said: ”Delays apparently do occur; they occur before a project begins because it may not be so evident to all, that the project is necessary or desirable; they may appear to occur during the construction stages of a project because the project is immensely more complicated than is apparent to the superficial observer; they may actually occur because all the staff of the Public Works Department, its consultants and contractors are human.

/,TBut these •••••

Thursday, November 29} 1973

- 22 -

f,But these same people will be ’getting with it’ to the tune of §1,000 million — which is the estimated cost of the Public Works Non-lie current Programme this year. And, given just a little encouragement I am sure that they will rise to the increasing demands that the community will have to place on them in the future-”

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Thursday, November 29, *1975

- 23 -

COUNCIL FOR RECREATION AND SPORT ESTABLISHED

******

The government today took a major step in the development ef facilities to meet the leisure time needs of young people with the setting up of a Council for Recreation and Sport.

The Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, today approved the appointment of the council under the chairmanship of the Secretary for Home Affairs*

The official members will be the Secretary for Social Services4 the Secretary for the Environment, the Director of Urban Services and the *

Deputy Financial Secretary. The unofficial members are Mr, A. de 0, Sales« Mr. K.C. Thorton, Mr. H.C. Ma, Mr. F.K. Hu and Mr. Wong Chung-cheun.

The unofficial members have been chosen for their wide experience in sport and physical recreation and in dealing with the needs of young people•

The terms of reference of the Council are to ensure that facilities for recreation and sport in both the urban and rural areas are expanded, consistent with resources available, that their use is maximised and that facilities and services are provided appropriate to meet the leisure-time needs of young people. To do this, the council will:

advise on how facilities for both recreation and sport may be expanded and to make recommendations on government expenditure on such facilities;

* advise on how the use of such facilities may be maximised;

/* advise on .......

Thursday, November 29, 1973

- 24 -

* advise on how the supervision of recreation and sport by voluntary and government agencies can be improved and expanded;

* be the channel for advice to government on financial assistance to amateur sport;

* make recommendations to government on any special T * services and facilities required to meet the leisure-• time needs of young people;

, *. keep under review needs in these fields and progress

made in meeting them and to issue an annual report; and j

establish a special secretariat under the supervision of the Secretary for Home Affairs..

In his address at the opening of the new session of the Legislative Council on October 17, the Governor said that the council would bring together a high-level group of people with the special experience of the public and private organisations controlling the main recreational facilities and services in existence.

The Council will also include within its purview the five-year programme of recreational development and nature conservation which was announced last year. The programme is now passing from the planning stage to actual construction.

---0 - -

Thursday, November 29, 1973

- 25 -

AGREEMENT ON PERMANENT LAND TRIBUNAL

*******

Broad agreement has been reached with several government departments on the form of a proposed permanent Land Tribunal, the Nev/ Territories District Commissioner, the Hon. D. Akers—Jones, said today*

Making his debut as District Commissioner at the Legislative Council* he said such a Tribunal would avoid the need to convene separate Compensation Boards for each resumption of land.

It would also be able to deal with compensation claims arisj ng from the alteration of streets and foreshore reclamation.

”From an organisational standpoint it has many advantages and when properly established, it would deal with claims much more expeditiously than at present. I hope this improved system will meet general commendation and support,” Mr. Akers-Jones said.

He pointed out that the Governor, in his speech to the Council on October 17, had agreed that the rates of compensation offered in cases of resumption would be adjusted to reflect the market value in the areas concerned.

This change, he said, would remove a long standing grievance.

Mr. Akers-Jones described as ’’extremely valuable” the regnl.a.r meetings which he and his staff had with the Heung Yee Kuk, Rural Committees, Village Representatives and local organisations.

"However, these contacts need extending and, in addition to the traditional links, I will be examining ways and means of involving the citizens of the new towns more closely in the management of their own

affairs and environment.”

/On slum

Thursday, November 2% 1973

- 26 -

On slum clearance in rural areas, he proposed, in addition to examining what could be done about clearing up some of the mess, to examine the present policies to see whether they were realistic for the vast areas of land in private ownership outside planned areas of government development.

Referring to a suggestion from the Hon. Li Fook-wo to turn Hei . Ling Chau into a recreational area, he said the decision to resite the explosives depot on the island was taken after a careful exanri na.ti on of the amount of land which would be sterilised by the depot, the competing use for land at various locations and the physical requirements for siting a depot.

However, Mr. Akers—Jones said he had asked the departments concerned to consider once again if it was essential to make use of the island for this purpose and, if no alternative site could be found, to ensure that everything was done to minimise the effect on the rest of the island.

He pointed out that any undue delay in moving the depot from Green Island was unacceptable because of public safety, and also because additional explosives storage was urgently required for public works and the underground railway.

Mr. Akers-Jones went on to say that the increasing tempo of oliange and development would give rise to many more difficult decisions and matters of judgement involving the New Territories.

’This will mean sacrifice, some places of beauty will disappear, others will be brought for the first time within easy reach of the people.

”It is a process in which the great issues affecting the happiness and well-being of the people of Hong Kong as a whole must not be lost to sight and be obscured by sectional interests; we must keep our eyes on the main objectives,” be added.

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/27........

Thursday, November 2% 1973

- 27 -

FINANCIAL SECRETARY SPEAKS ON FUTURE TRENDS

*******

Hie Financial Secretary, the Hon. C.P. Haddon-Cave, said that the world-wide increases in fuel prices should not result in any "erosion of our external competitiveness".

Speaking in the Legislative Council this afternoon, he said Hong Kong had a very strong currency which "puts us in a very favourable position by comparison with other countries when it comes to meeting pressures towards higher import costs — whether fuel or anything else."

He said the exchange rate of the Hong Kong dollar had appreciated by three-and-one-third per cent so far this year in "terms of a trade-weighted average of major currencies".

"A strong currency also works to our advantage in the export field; and if this leads to increased money incomes, it is easier for us to meet such increases in consumer prices as do occur."

Mr. Haddon-Cave went on: "All things considered, then, I am very hopeful not only that the rate of increase of consumer prices wild, be slower next year, but also that the rate of growth of our real incomes will be higher."

As regards the effect of higher prices for diesel oil on the cost of public transport, the Financial Secretary said he did not consider that increased fuel costs would require any fare increases for some time to come.

Although oil costs represented about 12 per cent of total operating costs in the case of buses, the companies were at present in a strong financial position.

/Mr. Haddon-Cave ........

Thursday, November 29, 1973

- 28 -

Mr. Haddon-Cave said it was very difficult to speak ”with any great certainty about the future course of fuel prices.” However, household expenditure on kerosene and liquefied petroleum gas currently accounted for only about one-and-a-half per cent of total household expenditure•

Even if total expenditure on electricity was included, instead of simply its fuel oil cost component, the figure would rise to only three per cent.

On future supplies of rice, Mr. Haddon-Cave said the view is widely held that world wide rice yields in 197^ will be an all-time

record.

’^?he increase in the price of rice alone this year, on a seasonally adjusted basis, accounted for something like a quarter of the overall increase in the General Consumer Price Index,” he added.

The fact that rice was likely to be more plentiful in the near future was, in itself, likely to have a ’’profoundly stabilising effect on the rate at which consumer prices increase.”

On the question of fish supplies, the Financial Secretary said tliat to restrict exports of fish, at this time, would have only a marginal effect on supplies, ”and it could well damage the longer term interests of the fishing industry.”

i:But,” he added,” I can see there is a potential weakness in the Fish Marketing Ordinance in the sense that the Director of Agriculture and Fisheries lias no powers to control exports.”

Mr. Haddon-Cave said he intended to introduce an amendment to the ordinance ”at an early date” to provide for a licensing system in case it should ever prove necessary to restrict exports.

/Dealing •.•••

Thursday, November 29, 1973

- 29 -

Dealing with the retail price rises generally, the Financial Secretary said that long before they became a matter of public concern t the Economic Branch of the Secretariat and the Consumer Price Index and Trade Research Sections of the Census and Statistics Department were monitoring the situation.

Thp data which has now been assembled is not only wide»rangingt but also now extends back over several years. , Mr* Haddon—Cave said: ”Our aim is to ensure that we are constantly aware of what is happening in the prices fieldt why it is happening and^what effect it is having on the community.”

Tho Economic Branch and the Census and Statistics Department make use of a whole range of information and expert advice including the Agriculture and Fisheries Department, the Commerce and Industry Department and the Urban Services Department.

lie said Legislative Council members who had suggested the establishment of an economic advisory committee or a price stabi 1 i sat ion board were not directly associated with this monitoring machinery.

However, he added ,rI think it would be very useful if they were because they could then satisfy themselves that government officers are sensitive to what is happening around them, and I think there would be merit in the appropriate UNELCO group periodically meeting.them to be briefed, and we would welcome their suggestions as to useful lines of enquiry.” --------------------------------0----------

/JO.......

4

Thursday, November 295 1973

- 30 -

SIR MURRAY TO VISIT MACAO

******* •

The Governor and Lady MacLehose will pay an informal visit to Macao next week as guests of the Governor of Macao and Madame Nobre de Carvalho.

, They will travel to Macao by hydrofoil on the morning «f Wednesday (December 5) and will spend the day visiting places of interest in Macao. In the evening they will attend a dinner at the Governor’s residence. »

On Thursday (December 6), Sir Murray and Lady MacLehose will pay a visit to Taipa and Coloane Islands before returning to Hong Kong in the early afternoon.

The Governor and Lady MacLehose will be accompanied by the Aide-de-Camp, Mr. P.A. Barkley and the Political Adviser, Mr. R.J. Stratton.

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WATER CUT

******

Water supply to a number of premises in Sham Shui Po will be interrupted for five hours from 1 a.m. on Saturday (December 1) to enable a test for leakage to be carried out in the area.

The area affected is bounded by Nam Cheong Street, Lai Chi Kok Road, Kweilin Street and Tung Chau Street.

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Z51.......

Thursday, November 29, 1973

- 31 -

NEW SITES ALLOCATED TO KO'..LOON BAY FIRE VICTIMS

******

More than two thirds of the Kowloon Bay fire victims eligible for re—site accommodation were today allocated sites in a newly formed Licensed Area nearby.

They are among more than 300 families who lost their homes in the squatter fire at Kowloon Bay two weeks ago.

In today1s site allocation, a total of 228 families compri sing 859 people were given sites. The exercise will continue tomorrow for the remaining 76 eligible families.

Those already allocated sites are allowed to put up their huts at any time they wish.

Cash grants of not less than $1,330 for each family were distributed on Tuesday to help them rebuild and re—equip their new homes. Ihe total pay-out from the Emergency Relief Fund amounted to nearly $300,000.

A spokesman for the Housing Department said all the families were originally illegal squatters living in the Licensed Area.

11 All those weeded out in the site identification and further processing carried out by the department were imposters, and were not genuine fire victims”, he said.

Some 72 families comprising 399 people were found to be imposters. The department is still investigating the circumstances of 45 other families.

/The spokesman

Thursday, November 29, 1973

- 32 -

The spokesman said more than S130,000 would have fallen into

the wrong hands if these people had not been checked out.

”In addition, these people would have been given the much ■

needed Licensed Area sites, thus depriving those who are in genuine need

of them”, he added.

• •

Note to Editors: Copies of a photograph showing the site

allocation are distributed separately in the

Press Boxes this evening. *

-------0 - -

Italease time: 10.30 p.m

IGISI |««g|

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Friday, November JO, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No.

Allowance for 50,00C civil servants announced •••••«••••••••< 1

Hong Kong’s external trade continues to flourish ............. \2

Tourist trade urged to co-operate in fuel conservation move . 4

August accounts show $105 million deficit ....................... 5

Questionnaire on rent survey for selected group of tenants • • 6

Employment and vacancies survey of non-industrial trades and services • • • • •............................................... 7

Service of first Rediffusion TV transmitter proves satisfactory • •»• •.........................................     8

Temporary suspension of parking spaces in Wanchai ............... 9

Clearance exercise at Lower Wong Tai Sin Estate ................ 10

New two-storey annex to be built at Radio Hong Kong............. 11

Sham Shui Po Youth Centre celebrates ninth anniversary......• 12

Daily guide to wholesale prices and supplies of basic food commodities ..............................................       13

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong. Tel: 5-233191

Friday, November 30, 1973

- 1 -

ALLOWANCE FOK 50,000 CIVIL SERVANTS *********

Some 50,000 civil servants on the master pay scale and the disciplined scales will receive an allowance from December 1.

The allowance in the male scale range from $73 a month to $200 a month and will be included in the December pay packets. They will not be back-dated. Apprentices will receive between $35 and $75 a month.

The allowance extends to officers on salaries up to approxnmatel y $4,000 a month. It does not apply to staff on the MOD 1 scale, matnly labourers and skilled tradesmen, who already receive $73 a month cost of living allowance under the scheme which provides a changing allowance relating to Consumer Price Index movements.

A Government spokesman said today that the decision was made because of the difficulties experienced by staff in the lower income groups who had been most affected by the rise in the cost of living since April. It also recognises the movement of pay rates in the private sector.

Consideration is also being given to increasing pensions for similar reasons.

The allowance was approved by the Finance Committee of the legislative Council at its meeting yesterday (Thursday).

The spokesman emphasised that government's policy in reviewing pay and allowances takes into account changes in private sector pay rates and cost of living movements.

The cost of this allowance for the remaining four months of the current financial year will be about $25 mill ion.

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Friday, November 30, 1975

- 2 -

TRADE BOOM CONTINUES

Hong Kong’s external trade continued to expand curing the month of October with the total value of domestic exports climbing to 81,900 million —- a 8412 million or 27.7 per cent rise over October 1972»

At the same time, the value of imports increased by 58.3 per cent and re-exports by 89*4 per cent over the same month last year, according to provisional trade figures released by the Census and Statistics Department.

Commenting on these figures, Mr. M.D. Sargant, Assistant Director of Commerce and Industry, said that during the three-month period - August to October - domestic exports increased by 31»5 per cent over the same period last year, imports by 43.8 per cent and re-exports by 87.6 per cent.

The period January to October 1973, which is more indicative of trade trends, showed increases of 22.8 per cent for domestic products, 2o.2 per cent for imports, and 58.8 per cent for re-exports over the same ten-month period last year.

Note to Editors» A statistical table of October’s prnvistonal trade figures is given below with comparative tables.

MERCHANDISE : Domestic Exports : 81,900 mill-inn

Imports : 83,003 million

Re-exports : 8 746 million

/COMPARATIVE .......

Friday, November JO, 1973

3 -

COMPARATIVE FIGURES

October October Increase or

„ 1973 1972 decrease

t 8 Mn. S Mn. 8 Mn. %

Domestic Exports 1,900 1,488 + 412 + 27.7

Imports 3,003 1,897 + 1,106 + 58.3

Re-exports 746 394 + 352 + 89.4

Aug.-Oct. Aug.-Oct. Increase or

_ 1973 197?- decrease

8 Mn. 8 Mn. 8 Mn. %

Domestic Exports 5,766 4,391 + 1,375 + 31.3

Imports 8,192 5,697 + 2,495 + 43.8

Re-exports 2,171 1,158 + 1,014 + 87.6 •1

Jan.-Oct. Jan.-Oct. Increase or

, 1973 . . 1972 decrease

8 Mn. 8 Mn. 8 Mn. %

Domestic Exports 15,580 12,689 + 2,891 + 22.8

Imports 22,899 17,865 + 5,034 + 28.2

Re-exports 5,249 3,348 + 1,901 + 56.8

Friday, November 30, 1973

- 4 -

TOURIST TRADE ASKED TO CONSERVE FUEL

*******

In response to the government’s appeal to the public to reduce industrial and domestic consumption of fuel and electricity, the Hong Kong Tourist Association has written to hotels, travel agents, tour operators and others in the tourist trade, requesting them to co-operate.

The Association is also conducting a questionnaire survey on the fuel requirement of the tourist industry so that a report can be made to the government if and when the situation warrants oil controls or other restrictive measures.

The survey also aims at finding out how the tourist trade can help cut down the consumption rate and by how much.

Meanwhile, a government spokesman re-iterated today that there is no shortage of oil in Hong Kong at the present time. But he urged industry and the public to keep consumption rates to the minimum as a matter of prudence.

The government has called for a voluntary cutback on electricity consumption of up to 15 per cent in view of the uncertainty in the world oil situation. Government departments have already adopted power and fuel saving measures.

-------o---------

/5.......

Friday, November 30, 1973

- 5 -

5105 MILLION DEFICIT RECORDED

*********

The government accounts for the month of August 1973 show a deficit: of 51O6 million compared with a deficit of $16 million in August last year.

This has resulted in a total deficit of $105 million for the first five months of this financial year.

Total revenue for the month at $275 million was $23 million more than in August 1972. The total revenue for the first five months of the financial year was $1,657 million - $294 million more than the same period last year.

Expenditure amounted to $3^1 million, an increase of $113 million over the same month last year.

This brings the total expenditure for the first five months of the financial year to $1,7$3 million - $3^2 million more than the same period last year.

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/6........

Friday, November JO, 1973

- 6 -

RENT SURVEY - TENANTS URGED TO CO-OPERATE < *******

A selected group of some J,JOO tenants will shortly be receiving a questionnaire on their rent situation from the Rating and Valuation Department•

The information they provide will be used to compile rental movements for the department’s Annual Property Review.

The Acting Commissioner for Rating and Valuation, Mr. T.F.

Edwards explained that the reason for collecting information through a questionnaire this year, rather than by personal calls, was to save time and effort and to avoid bothering tenants with such balls.

"The questionnaire is not a statutory form, and once the statistical information has been recorded, the forms will be destroyed,” he emphasised.

He said that the collection and analysis of information asked by questionnaire was of considerable importance to the government and he hoped that tenants would co-operate by completing all questions fully and accurately and returning them as quickly as possible.

The questionnaire has only five simple questions and may be answered in either Chinese or English.

It may be returned to the department in the pre-addressed envelope enclosed with the questionnaire, which requires no postage stamp.

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/7........

Friday, November 30, 1973

- 7 -

SURVEY OF NON-INDUSTRIAL EMPLOYMENT AND VACANCIES

*********

The Census and Statistics Department is again conducting a survey of employment and vacancies in selected non-industrial trades and services.

The survey covers import and export businesses, restaurants and hotels, banlcs, insurance, air and water transport and related services, education services, medical and health services, cinemas, advertising companies, solicitor’s firms, accounting and auditing firms and department stores.

• Printed employment return cards were sent out last week to managements of all known establishments in these trades and services.

They were requested to report on employment and vacancies as on November 30? *1973 and to return the cards to the Census and Statistics Department on or before December 4.

A spokesman of the Census and Statistics Department appealed to all recipients for co-operation in filling the cards fully and accurately and returning them promptly in the reply-paid envelopes provided.

’’During the last survey responses from managements were most encouraging and I look forward to the same degree of cooperation in this survey/’he said.

The spokesman stressed that the information provided on the cards would be kept strictly confidential and only statistical summaries would be released to the public.

r,The cards will be destroyed under supervision when all the relevant information is extracted and summarised/’he added.

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/8........

Friday, November 30, 1973

- 8 -

TELEVISION TRANSMISSION TESTS

******

Hie Telecommunications Authority today thanked those members of the public who have telephoned in reports of reception conditions in their area during the period when Rediffusion Television, the licensee for the second broadcast television service, has been carrying out test transmissions on channel 23 from their main transmitter at Temple Hill, The Telephone Reporting centre, which was organised to record viewer’s comments, has been in operation each evening for the past twelve days and details have been examined in conjunction with the other engineering checks which have been taking place.

The present assessment of the situation is that the new service from the first of the main transmitters is satisfactory and that Rediffusion Television will be in a position to introduce their Chinese Language broadcasts as from tomorrow (Saturday). The English language service is expected to be available to viewers in April, 197*+•

The Telecommunications Authority has emphasized two points:

First, because Rediffusion broadcasts are initially restricted to a main transmitter only, satisfactory reception of the new service will be, most probably, in those areas which already receive a good signal from Television Broadcasts main transmitters on channels 21 and 25, that is generally in the harbour area. Rediffusion’s service should, therefore, initially reach between 60 per cent and 70 per cent of television viewers. The subsidiary transmitters serving the outlying districts will be brought into service during the next few months and further announcements will be made as each of these comes into operation.

/Second .......

Friday, November JO, 1973

- 9 -

Second, it is important that for satisfactory reception of all television services it is necessary that receiving sets should be properly aligned and equipped with suitable aerials. Many of the complaints which were investigated by the technical staff of the Postmaster General’s office indicated that the faults complained of were caused by incorrect installations or in those receivers which had not been adequately maintained. Viewers are therefore recommended to obtain the advice of a reputable television engineering service or their retailer if they encounter any difficulties in reception.

The temporary Telephone Reporting centre is now closed and all further communications should be in writing to the Telecommunications Authority, c/o General Post Office, Hong Kong.

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TEMPORARY SUSPENSION OP PARKING SPACES IN WANCHAI *******

Parking meters along the north side of Johnston Road between Luard Read and O’Brien Road will be temporarily suspended from midnight tomorrow (Saturday) to midnight on December 7•

The temporary suspension is to facilitate trench works. Traffic signs%will be posted to guide motorists.

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/10

Friday, November JO, 1973

- 10 -

CLEAN-UP AT WONG TAI SIN ESTATE

******

An environmental improvement exercise was carried out at Lower Wong Tai Sin Estate today to tidy up the public housing estate where more than 75j000 people live.

About 80 illegal hawker stalls and other structures at the side of Block 11 and the area west of Ching Tak Street were demolished in the operation.

Most of the hawkers have been re-sited into properly marked out stalls at the open courtyard of Block 11. A few others will be allocated sites near Blocks 26 and 27 when the area is cleared.

A spokesman for the Housing Department said that apart from giving the estate a better and tidier appearance, the exercise had also helped clear a site needed for the Mass Transit Railway project.

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/11 ........

Friday, November 30, 1973

- 11 -

NEW BUILDING FOR RADIO HONG KONG

Office and storage facilities at Radio Hong Kong in Broadcast Drive will be expanded next year with the construction of an annex.

The two-storey annex will be built on the existing podium

• * • . * •

adjacent to Broadcasting House. Seventeen offices will be provided in

9 1

the annex which will have a total floor area of about 2,500 square feet.

The design and structure of the annex will be similar to that

of Broadcasting House. The rooms on the ground and lower ground floors of Broadcasting House are to be converted into store roons for television equipment.

Security gate kiosks will be erected at the entrance and exit to the premises.

. • •- • Tenders are now being invited for the construction work. Work

is expected to begin in January next year, and will take about six months to complete.

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Friday, November JO, 1973

- 12 -

YOUTH CENTRE’S ANNIVERSARY

********

The Social Welfare Department’s Youth Centre in Sham Shui Po f will hold a variety show tomorrow (Saturday) night to celebrate its

/ ninth anniversary. It will begin at 8.1J p.m.

To start off the celebrations, a short ceremony will be held

at which Mr. Kwok Ka-chi, Senior Principal Social Welfare Officer of

the department’s Group and Community Division; Mr. Chan Hon-kwong, City

District Officer, Sham Shui Po; and Mr. K.H. Lomas, Divisional Superintendent,

Sham Shui Po Division, Royal Hong Kong Police, will officiate.

There will also be a presentation of certificates to volunteers

and those who have attended training courses organised by the centre

as part of its regular programmes for youth. j

The variety show will consist of a Chinese lion dance, folk

singing, a Chinese Classical music concert and other performances by the centre’s youth groups.

Note to Editors: You are welcome to cover the function.

The address of the Sham Shui Po Youth Centre is

88 Yu Chau Street, first floor.

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/13........

Friday, November 30, 1975

- 13 -

CONSUMER ADVISORY SERVICE

Daily Guide To Wholesale Market Prices And Supplies

The following prices were realised today (Friday) at sales under the Rice Control Scheme and at the Vegetable Marketing Organisation Wholesale Market and the Fish Marketing Organisation Wholesale Market at Cheung Sha Wan, Kowloon:

Supplies And Whlesale Prices of Rice

Availability Wholesale Price

Grado of Supply (3/catty)

China Rice Average

See Mew" old crop Good 1.64

- new crop 1.72

S.C. Jienrold crop Good 1.58

Po Ngai Good 1.42

Chu Cho Good 1.22

Thai Rice

100$ Whole Good 1.52

10-15% Brokens Good 1.50

A1 Super Extra Good 1.45

A1 Super Good 1.37

Whole Glutinous Scarce 1.52

U.S. Rice Good 1.62

Supplies And Wholesale Price of Marine Fish

Species Availability Wholesale Price

of Supply (S/catty)

High Low Average

Golden Thread Limited

5.80 2.80 3.80

Big-Eyes Good 2.60 0.80 1.80

/Squid ••••••

Friday, November 30, 1973

- 14 -

Species Availability of Supply Wholesale Price (3/catty)

High Low Average

Squid Limited 5.50 -1.60 4.00

Hair-Tails Go ou 2.70 1.50 2.00

Lizard Fishes Good 3.50 1.00 2.30

Croakers Good 2.40 0.60 1.60

Conger- Pike-Eels Limited 2.90 1.80 2.40

Melon Coat Good 2.80 1.30 1.80

Breams Limited 5.20 3.50 4.40

Yellow Belly Limited 1.45 0.60 1.10

Mackerels Limited 5.50 3.00 4.50

Red Goat Fish Good 2.45 O.65 1.80

Fork-Tail Good 1.70 1.00 1.50

Horse-Head Scarce 5.00 4.20 4.50

Melon Seed Limited 3-00 1.80 2.50

Pomfrets Scarce 9.00 7.50 8.50

Garoupas Scarce 7-20 6.50 7,00

Yellow Croaker Limited 6.50 3.40 4.50 Supplies And Wholesale Prices of Locally Produced Vegetables

Type Availability of Supply Wholesale Price □Lg/catty.) High Low Average

Flowering cabbage Normal 1.60 0.70 1.20

White cabbage Good 0.40 0.10 0.25 /Chinese .....

Friday, November 30» 1973

- 13 -

Availability Wholesale Price

to of Supply High (3/catty)

Low Average

Chinese lettuce Good 0.50 0.15 0.35

Chinese kale Normal 0.80 0.30 0.50

Spring onion Limited 1.20 0.40 0.80

Spinach Limited 1.20 0.50 0.80

Water cross Normal 1.10 0.30 0.70

Leaf mustard cabbage Scarce 0.50 0.15 0.35

Tomato Scarce 2.40 1.60 2.00

Supplies And Wholesale Prices of Pork (Live weight)

Pork

Availability of Supply

Good

Wh0W^ice (Average) 285

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Release time: 7.30 p.m.