Daily Information Bulletin - 1970s - 1973 - JAN - ENG

 r*RH 7 4000091

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Tuesday, January 2, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No,

A massive rural low-cost housing scheme is to be launched this year ............................................•.....• 1

New Year’s victims will be offered public housing ••• 3

The Kennedy Town Youth Centre, run by the Y.W.C.A., is to be expanded with a grant from the Lotteries Fund ••••••••••• 4

This Year’s polio immunisation campaign has started ........... 5

The Chuk Yuen Children’s Reception Centre helps abandoned and wandering children .......................    ••••••••••• 6

A group of officers from the Secretariat for Home Affairs is going to Singapore and Malaysia for a two-week visit......... 8

There was a drop in the incidence of typhoid fever in November ............................................................... 9

Sheung Shui tannery operators are allowed temporary stay subject

to dealinos and conditions................................     10

Buildings involved in the fire on New year’s Eve have been declared dangerous ..................•......................   12

Issued bv Government Information Serve*. BeaeonsfieW Hous., Hone Kong. Tel: 6-233191'

Tuesday, January 2, 1973

- 1 -

MASSIVE RURAL LOW-COST HOUSING SCHEME

10,000 People In Outlying Island To Be Housed First

About 80,000 squatters and fishermen in the New Territories are expected to be offered public housing when Government launches its rural low-cost housing scheme this year.

More than 10,000 people living in shanty fishing villages in Cheung Chau, Peng Chau and Tai 0 will be involved in the initial phase of the housing project.

Five rural low-cost housing estates are to be built on the three islands — three in different locations in Cheung Chau and one each in Peng Chau and Tai 0.

The Cheung Chau estates will accommodate about 5,000 people. The estates in Peng Chau and Tai 0 will house some 2,000 and 3,000 people respectively.

To suit the geographical features of the islands, two-storey buildings will be built in the estates which will share a similar pattern of construction.

The flats, designed to be self-contained, will seek to fulfil the present standards adhered to in government low-cost housing estates of providing a living space of 35 square feet per head.

The capacities of the flats will range from four-person to eightperson units.

The District Officer, Islands, Mr. Mayer Ng, said today that a nucleus of supporting services would be provided in the estates.

/”We have ...........

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Tuesday, January 2, 1973

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We have considered providing in the estates such facilities as clinics, schools, welfare centres, children’s playgrounds, markets, cafes and workshops, providing employment to the residents,1’ Mr. Ng said.

He pointed out that the estates would be constructed in stages and several sites for these estates had been earmarked.

He disclosed that housing project was expected to start in March this year when the first 30 living units would be built in Peng Chau.

’’Boat squatters and others,” Mr. Ng went on, ’’will be moved from the existing shanty fishing villages to the estates in stages.”

He said that the rural housing scheme would be implemented in such places as Tai Po, Yuen Long and Sai Kung in the New Territories in due course.

’’This series of projects,” he said, ’’reflects the Government1 s determination to improve the living conditions of the rural population, apart from bringing about a face-lift in the New Territories and the various outlying islands.”

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Tuesday, January 2, 1973

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NEV/ YEAR'S EVE FIRE VICTIMS OFFERED HOUSING

Choice Of Three Estates Given

**«*»*»**

More than 400 people whose homes were affected by the fire on New Year's Eve will be offered public housing.

The fire gutted six pre-war tenement buildings at Nos. 79-89 Queen's Road West.

A spokesman for the Resettlement Department said today that the homeless will be given a choice of three estates.

Those who wish to remain on Hong Kong Island will be offered public housing in the Wong Chuk Hang Government Low Cost Housing Estate. However, they will have to wait until early March as new units are not immediately available.

Temporary accommodation will be available at the Department's transit centres.

The spokesman added that for those who wish to go to*. Kowjoon, immediate accommodation is available in Kwai Chung Government Low Cost Housing Estate and Lam Tim Resettlement Estate.

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Tuesday, January 2, 1975

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KENNEDY TOWN YOUTH CENTRE TO BE EXPANDED With Grant From Lotteries Fund

A grant of 391,578 from the Lotteries Fund has been made to the Young Women’s Christian Association to provide more space for its youth centre in Kennedy Town.

The centre, located on the roof of Kwun Lun Lau, Lung Wah Street, is operated by the Y.W.C.A. in conjunction with the Hong Kong Federation of Youth Group to provide activities for children, young men and women.

The two organisations plan to make use of the adjoining roof-top to provide additi onal space for the Centre for its various activities and study rooms.

A child-care service will be operated with the assistance of the Kwun Lun Lau Residents Association.

The cost of equipping and fitting out the new centre is estimated at $111,678.

The Hong Kong Housing Society will contribute 320,000 for renovation purposes•

The project is expected to be completed by mid-1973-

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Tuesday, January 2, 1973

- 5 -

1973 POLIO IMMUNISATION CAMPAIGN

First Phase To Be Carried Out This Month

***««**«*

The first phase of the 1973 polio immunisation campaign organized by the Medical and Health Department will be carried out during the month of January while the second phase will take place in March.

Polio immunisation has been available since 19&3 and has virtually eliminated poliomyelitis from Hong Kong*

In 1962 before the introduction of polio vaccine, 3&3 cases with 52 deaths were recorded while in 1972 only five cases with no deaths were

*' « notified.

Despite the greatly improved situation, polio can still pose a threat to the community and any child who has not yet been immunised should take this opportunity to receive the vaccine. ... ■

Polio vaccine, which is free of charge, is available at all Maternity and Child Health Centres, Inoculation Ports and Out-Patients Departments.

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It must be emphasised that two doses of vaccine are required with a two-month interval between each dose. One dose of polio vaccine produces no immunity.

Polio vaccine is very easy to take. For infants drops of the vaccine are put into the mouth, while with older children the vaccine is given on a lump of sugar. .

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Tuesday, January 2, 1973

6 -

CHUK YUEN CHILDREN’S RECEPTION CENTRE

SWD’s Role In Providing Succour For Abandoned And Wandering

*»***«*»*

Abandoned, wandering, and other children under eight in need of care and protection are received at the Social Welfare Department’s Chuk Yuen Reception Centre, where appropriate arrangements are made for their future.

At the end of November , 19T2, there were 101 children in residence at th$ Centre. Care is offered on a temporary basis, normally not exceeding six months,

Eight of these children were under six months, nine under one year, 1J under two, 35 between two and four, 21 between four and six, 13 between six and eight, and two just over eight years.

Commenting on these figures, Mrs. Chen Liu Mu-lan, Senior Principal Social Welfare Officer and head of the Family Services Division, says there were more children at the Centre than usual at the end of last year because admission ”is not refused for urgent cases, but the total is not indicative of any trend.” In her view, the inflow is matched by normal discharges constantly going on.

The Centre performs a useful service because children with backgrounds are given a shelter there. The police refer abandoned and wandering children directly to it, while other cases are referred by other departments^ and voluntary agencies.

/Then........ •. • •

Tuesday, January 2, 1972

Then professional social workers try by various means to study

the social circumstances of all cases to enable plans to be made for their future.

"The happiest solution for most is reunion with their farriln an

after they have had to part with them temporarily as a result of the latter's hospitalisation, imprisonment, or for some other reason,” says Mrs. Chen.

For the finally abandoned, the Centre provides help through the

activities of adoption workers who do their best to get them placed, either locally or overseas.

Transfer

For those for whom adoption is not readily available and who

require lon^-term care, arrangements are made for their transfer to a children’s home. Where it is considered beneficial, there is further family care for some.

A medical officer from the Medical and Health Department visits

the Centre two mornings a week to examine new arrivals and treat the sick. The paediatric specialist of the Queen Elizabeth Hospital calls once a month for advice on special cases. Necessary immunisations are provided.

The Centre was completed in January 1964 with funds donated by the United States Government as a contribution to mark the World Refugee Year.

"The Social Welfare Department provides full welfare services offering possible solutions to problems faced by families or individuals with unwanted children," says Mrs. Chen.

"I urge them to approach our district offices or family services centres to discuss their problems before taking action they might later regret."

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Tuesday, January 2, 1973

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C.D.O. GROUP TO VISIT SINGAPORE AND MALAYSIA

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A group of ten officers from the Secretariat for Home Affairs, including three women, will leave Hong Kong for Singapore and Malaysia on January 4, 1973 on a two-week study tour.

During their trip the party will visit various government departments and will meet representatives of local organisations.

The visiting party will comprise the following: City District Commissioner ( Kowloon), Mr. James So; City District Officer (Western), Mr. Rafael Hui; two Assistant City District Officers, Messrs. Dicken Yang and Y.K. Wong and six Executive Officers, Mr. K. Leung, Mr. K.M.

Li, Mr. Davie Au-yeung, Miss Betty Chan, Mrs. Winnie Wong and Mrs. Angeline Chiu.

The party will return to Hong Kong on January 19*

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Tuesday, January 2, 1973

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HEALTH REPORT FOR NOVEMBER

Drop In Incidence Of Typhoid Fever

**««****«

Notifications on the incidence of typhoid fever dropped from 38 cases in October last year to 22 in November, according to the health report for the latter month released by the Medical and Health Department today•

On the other hand* the incidence of bacillary dysentery rose from 28 to 47.

A total of 734 cases of infectious diseases was notified during November, and deaths from these diseases amounted to 109 — one from poliomyelitis, and 108 from tuberculosis*

There were no eases of cerebrospinal meningitis or diphtheria, and no appreciable variation in the incidence of other notifiable infectious diseases.

During November, Hong Kong remained free from cholera and other quarantinable diseases.

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Tuesday, January 2, 1973

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SHEUNG SHUT TANNERY OPERATORS FORM CONSORTIUM Deadlines And Conditions Set For Temporary Stay ********

Tlie tannery operators in the Sheung Shui area who had not previously deposited land exchange entitlements in the designated offensive trades zone in Kwai Chung have now all done so as a consortium.

A Government spokesman said today that these tannery operators will be permitted to continue operating in their present locations provided they satisfy a series of deadlines for the planning, construction and completion of their new factory in Kwai Chung and for the demolition of their existing tanneries.

He recalled that the original deadline for the depositing of land exchange entitlements had been extended by Government to allow these tannery operators sufficient time to form a consortium and obtain • .1 • the necessary financial backing.

”It would be unduly harsh now to force them to close down and go out of business with the consequent loss of a number of jobs,” he said.

All tannery operators who are now being allowed to remain temporarily in the Sheung Shui area will be subject to four conditions designed to minimise the problems of pollution. The conditions are:-

1. All waste matter and refuse have to be stored in proper containers to prevent the emission of noxious or injurious effluents pending disposal;

/the occupier ......

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Tuesday, January 2, 1973

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2. the occupier must satisfy the Director of Urban Services in regard to how and where all solid trade waste are disposed;

J. any part of the premises fronting a stream or watercourse must be set back a reasonable distance; and

4. the entire premises must be satisfactorily fenced in.

The land on which the new factories in Kwai Chung are to

be built will become available from April or May next and the factories should be completed within two years.

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Tuesday, January 2, 1973

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BUILDINGS INVOLVED IN FIRE DECLARED DANGEROUS

**t^*^)j1t*

The Building Authority today declared Nos. 79-89 Queen’s Road West, Nos. 1-5 Tsung Sau Lane West, and No. 2 Tsung Sau Lane East to be in a dangerous condition.

No. 91 Queen’s Road West, No. 7 Tsung Sau Lane West, and No. 4 Tsung Sau Lane East were declared liable to become dangerous.

In a statement issued to-J^y। the Principal Government Bull di ng Surveyor said that these 3 and 4 storey pre-war buildings were inspected subsequent to a fire which resulted in the collapse of Nos. 81-87 Queen’s Road West and such damage to the remaining buildings that there is a risk of further collapses occurring.

Most of these buildings require immediate d molition but some reassessment will be made in due course although it is expected that the remainder are unlikely to be capable of retention.

Emergency Closure Orders were granted at Victoria District Court at 2.30 p.m. today.

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Rei ease time; 6.3Q p.m.

DAILY INFORMATOIUJULEHN

CONTENTS

Page No,

A Securities Advisory Council is to be set up....................... 1

A Report on sewage discharge into Hong Kong waters is published .. 5

Proceedings in today’s Legco meeting have been recorded ••••••.••• 6

Plans for a community centre complex in Wan Chai have been announced......................................................... . 7

There are no plans for a permanent exhibition site ................. 8

Some 200,000 square feet of land is available for industrial development in Castle Peak  ..............................•••••••••• 9

Residents of the Hong Ning Road licensed area will move to Lam Tin Estate soon..................................................... 10

The possibility of building a car park at Aberdeen is being studied............................................................. 11

Suggestions have been made to ease the shortage of eating places for office workers in Central ...................................... 12

New copyright law gives greater protection to literary, musical and dramatic works ................................................. 1J

The Government is considering legislation on safety standards for household equipment............................................. 16

New Hong Kong-Macau terminal is under consideration.......... 18

The Financial Secretary speaks on the Government’s transport policy over the next two decades ................................... 20

Seven new bills have been introduced into Legco.........*.......... 23

There has been a marked increase in enrolment in the School Medical Service .................................................... 24

Water supply in Mong Kok and Wong Tai Sin will be cut on Friday and Saturday.........................................•••••••••...... 23

N.T. hawkers are urged to obtain a licence within this month....... 26

Limited driving tests for goods vehicles and minibuses and to be resumed shortly..................................................... 27

% The public are urged to help fight harbour pollution .............. 29

Itsued by Gowiment Information Sarvioc, Be-icomfiuM Home. Hong Kong. T.I: 5-233181’

Wednesday, January 3, 1973

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SECURITIES ADVISORY COUNCIL TO BE FORMED To Help Curb Undesirable Practices In Exchanges *********

The Government will establish a Securities Advisory Council and create a post of Commissioner for Securities to help the stock exchanges curb questionable practices.

Announcing this at the Legislative Council this afternoon, the Financial Secretary, the Hon. C.P. Haddon-Cave, said that the Advisory Council would bc set up on an administrative basis, subject to the voting of the necessary funds by the Finance Committee.

The Government’s decision,he said, had been taken ”to anticipate the enactment of legislation providing for a statutory Securities Council and Commissioner for Securities.”

The Advisory Council would consist of seven members, of whom one would be an independent Chairman.

Four would be unofficial members representing various sectors of the business community and the remaining two would be members of the public service, the Commissioner for Securities and the Registrar General.

The appointment of these members, Mr. Haddon-Cave said, was likely to be made by the Governor within the next few days.

The Financial Secretary pointed out that over the last 12 months, both turnover and prices at the four stock exchanges in Hong Kong had risen to new and unprecedented heights.

/’’But, perhaps.............

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"But, perhaps partly as a result of this very high level of activity, various undesirable practices have grown up. These relate for example, to the frequent use of placements of securities on the exchanges instead of public offers, listing procedures, undue influencing of prices and non-recording of transactions.

"None of these practices is in the general interest of the investing public and cannot, therefore, be viewed with equanimity."

In relation to the Companies (Amendment) Bill 1972, he continued, further legislation arising from the recommendations of the Companies Law Revision Committee was now being drafted.

Supervisory Body

One of the Bills involved, the Securities Bill, would cover all aspects of trading securities and would provide for the establishment of a supervisory body, to be called the Securities Council, and for the creation of the post of Commissioner for Securities.

The Securities Council’s main concern would be to supervise the implementation of all parts of the Securities Bill.

"This will include the creation of a Federation of Stock Exchanges, the registration of dealers and investment advisers, trading in securities outside the stock exchanges, the prevention of false markets, and the keeping and auditing of accounts.

"The Council will also be empowered to take up with the stock exchanges, underwriters, financial institutions acting as issuing houses and other organisations and persons involved in trading in securities, any matters which, in its view, appear to give rise to concern and which call for authoritiative rulings.

/"In addition, ......• •••

Wednesday, January J, 1975

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"In addition, the Council will deal with a range of problems arising from the implementation of other bills which are now being drafted dealing with takeover bids and the regulation of mutual funds and unit trusts which are on sale within Hong Kong."

Mr. Haddon-Cave went on to say that the preparation of the Securities Bill was well in hand but "it is unlikely that the Bill can be finalised before the end of March at the earliest.

"However, in present conditions, it would not be prudent to wait until the enactment of the Bill before taking action to provide some more authoritative guidance and help to those responsible for managing the stock exchanges and other institutions in the field of trading in securities."

Statutory

The Government had thus decided to anticipate the enactment of legislation providing for a statutory Securities Council and Commissioner of Securities by establishing now, on an administrative basis, the Securities Advisory Council and creating the Commissioner’s post.

As neither the Advisory Council nor the Commissioner will have any statutory powers until and unless the Securities Bill is enacted, for mal terms of references are not proposed.

But even so, the Financial Secretary said he was convinced that it would give the Adivsory Council considerable influences from the outset since the introduction of statutory powers was envisaged.

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Wednesday, January 3, 1973

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"And I doubt whether anyone concerned will wish to treat its advice lightly. The immediate establishment of a Securities Advisory Council and the appointment of a Commissioner for Securities will mean that useful experience will be acquired and a working organisation created before the Securities Bill is enacted.

"The Securities Advisory Council's successor body^The SecuritixssCouncil, itself should thus be enabled to be fully effective in the exercise of its powers almost as soon as the Bill is enacted," he -added.

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Wednesday, January 3, 1973

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PROBE INTO SEWAGE DISCHARGE INTO H.K. WATERS

Report On Marine Investigations Tabled

♦«*«*«***

Marine investigations into the effects of sewage discharge into Hong Kong waters show that conditions are generally good but that there are some trouble spots.

These trouble spots include the shallow waters off West Kowloon between Lai Chi Kok and Yau Ma Tei and just-off the shore of the townships of Sha Tin and Tai Po.«,

The report on the investigations, tabled in Legislative Council today, was prepared by Messrs J.D. & D.M. Watson, Consulting Engineers, with the help of the Drainage Works Division of the Civil Engineering Office, Public Works Department.

Compiled after a two-year study, the report will assist the Public Works Department in planning future sewage disposal facilities which will not increase the pollution of the sea above tolerable limits.

As a result of the findings, the Public Works Department’s views on the form of sewage treatment to be adopted at Castle Peak and Sha Tin Nev; Towns have now been finalised.

A submarine outfall with diffusers discharging into the tidal stream is proposed for Castle Peak while full treatment will be provided in Sha Tin before sewage is discharged into the more sheltered waters of Tide Cove.

/The report ••••••

Wednesday, January 3» 1973

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The report is now available to the public from the Government Publications Centre at 55 per copy.

Meanwhile, the consulting engineers are undertaking a separate detailed investigation to study alternative methods of treating and disposing of sewage from the West Kowloon area and to recommend and implement a solution^

LEGCO PROCEEDINGS RECORDED

Note to Editors: The proceedings in today*s Legislative

Council meeting have been recorded. You are welcome to consult the tapes at the Press Room, Government Information Services.

Wednesday, January 1973

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COMMUNITY CENTRE FOR WAN CHAI

Buildings In Southern Playground To Be Redeveloped

*******

The Children’s Playground Association has formed an ad hoc committee to examine in detail a proposal to redevelop the War Memorial and other buildings in Southern Playground into a community centre complex.

This was disclosed by the Director of Social Welfare, the Hon.

F.K. Li, at the Legislative Council today in reply to a question from Mrs. Ellen Li Shu-pui.

Mrs. Li asked what progress had been made regarding the possibility of redeveloping the playground.

Mr. Li said the President of the Association had proposed the redevelopment scheme to Government last May.

The preliminary plan envisaged ’’the construction of a high block to provide accommodation for welfare and youth organisations and a low block for a stadium,” costing S10 million and S13 million respectively.

The scheme would affect the buildings presently occupied by the Family Planning Association, the Violet Peel Polyclinic, a public latrine and bath house.

Both the Medical and Health Department and the Urban Services Department had indicated their willingness to co-operate with the Association, Mr. Li said.

The Government had recently informed the Association of its support in principle of the proposed project, subject to the examination of certain details including the financial arrangements to meet both the capital and recurrent costs.

The Association’s ad hoc Committee, Mr. Li added, had met twice to study the proposal in greater detail.

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Wednesday, January 3, 1973

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NO PLANS FOR PERMANENT EXHIBITION SITE Future Stadium In Hung Hon Will Be Suitable

The Government has no plans at present to provide a permanent exhibition site for trade exhibitions, the Director of Public Works, the Hon. J.J. Robson, said today.

He told the Legislative Council that in view of the acute shortage of land in Hong Kong "it may be very difficult to justify the permanent sterilisation of a large open area for this purpose.”

Mr. Robson was replying to a question raised by the Hon. P.C. Woo who wanted to know whether a permanent exhibition site would be made available for trade displays such as the Chinese Manufacturers’ Association’s annual exhibition.

The Director said he understood that there had already been some discussions with the C.M.A. about such possible sites in the New Territories.

However, the indoor stadium to be built at Hung Hom by 1976 would provide a suitable venue for such exhibitions to be held there at an appropriate fee, he added.

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Wednesday, January 3, 1973

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LAND FOR INDUSTRIAL USE IN N.T.

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About 200,000 square feet of land is now available for industrial development in Tuen Muen (Castle Peak) and more may be provided should the need arise.

Announcing details of available industrial land in the Nev/ Territories, the District Commissioner, New Territories, the Hon. D.C. Bray, told the Legislative Council today that a tentative sales programme had been drawn up for a six-month period from April 1 to September JO this year.

This included some five industrial sites in area 12 of Tuen Mun New Town of between 10 and 15,000 square feet, with the possibility of one site of over 100,000 square feet being made available. ,

Mr. Bray explained that Castle Peak and Sha Tin were not the principal areas available for industrial development and there was no pressure for industrial sites in Castle Peak.

"But if this developed we could offer more," he said. .

With regards to Sha Tin, Mr. Bray said that industrial land there could be made available around March 1975-, at the earliest, when some 1J acres were expected to be ready,

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Wednesday, January 1973

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RESIDENTS OF LICENSED AREA TO MOVE TO LAM TIN ESTATE

4*********

The Government now intends to begin moving the residents of Sections 4,5 ord 6 of the Hong Ning Road licensed area to Lam Tin Estate in the middle of next month#

The Secretary for Housing, the Hon. I.M. Lightbody, told the Legislative Council today that an assurance was ’given in July last year that the intention was to elear the area, housing some 2,400 people, towards the end of the year for its development as a playground.

"Unfortunately, the clearance has had to be delayed on two counts," he said.

Firstlyt the accommodation earmarked for these people had to be allocated to over 2,000 fire victims from Tai Hom Village recently; such disaster victims are of course at the top of the housing priority list.

Secondly, the completion dates of a number of blocks have fallen behind schedule, and they will not now be available until February.

Replying to a question by the Hon. R.H. Lobo, Mr. Lightbody gave a warning, that the intention to resettle the residents of the Hong Ning Road licensed area "could again be frustrated if we are faced with any more unforeseen emergencies, su«h as squatter area fires, in the meantime."

r,The immediately homeless must be given top priority," he added.

Wednesday, January 3* 1973 - 11 -

CAR PARK AT ABERDEEN

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The Government is looking into the possibility of incorporating a suitable site for a car park within a private development at Aberdeen.

Speaking in the Legislative Council today, the Director of

Public Works, the Hon. J.J. Robson, said tentative plans had been submitted for the redevelopment of a very large lot at Aberdeen by a private developer.

But he said it was too early to say whether negotiations could be successfully concluded with the developer so that about 1,000 parking spaces could be provided.

Mr. Robson recalled that a site at Aberdeen was originally earmarked for the building of a market and it was hoped that several floors of parking could have been economically incorporated within the building.

It was found, however, that the site was too small for this purpose.

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Wednesday, January 3, 1973

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DECENTRALISATION OF BUSINESS ACTIVITY SUGGESTED

As One Solution To Meal Problem In Central

*********

The Director of Urban Services, the Hon, D.R.W. Alexander, today suggested a ’’decentralisation of business activity” as one of the possible solutions to ease the acute shortage of restaurants and eating places in the Central area.

The establishment of more self-service type cafes and restaurants, and the provision by employers of canteens and, possibly, lunch vouchers, were other likely alternatives, he said.

Mre Alexander made the remarks in the Legislative Council today while replying to a question from the Hon* James Wu.

Mr. Wu asked whether the Government would consider providing space in Central for ’’economy cafeterias” and ”brought-out meals” as a basic solution to the illegal caterers problem and to help the many thousands of office workers.

Mr. Alexander said that the Government could consider the suggestion for providing space for ”brought-out” meals ’’but other aspects of this whole problem were still being examined by the Urban Council.”

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GREATER COPYRIGHT PROTECTION FOR WORKS

Under U.K. Act And New Bill

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Owners of copyright in literary, musical and dramatic works will be afforded greater protection under the United Kingdom Copyright Act 1956 and under the Copyright Bill 1973, the Attorney General, the Hon. D.T.R. Roberts, said today.

He gave the assurance when moving the second reading of the now Bill in the Legislative Council this afternoon.

The 1956 Copyright Act was applied to Hong Kong as from December 12 last year but the new Bill seeks to introduce a number of supplementary provisions to make the Act fully effective to meet Hong Kong’s needs.

The Attorney General explained that the Act obliged the prosecution to prove that a person charged with possession of an infringing copy of a work for the purpose of trade, knew that the article was an infringing copy.

"However, copyright infringement is so widespread in Hong Kong that it is often virtually impossible to prove such knowledge," he said.

Under the new Bill, a person will have to prove that he did not Iznow that an infringing copy of a work in his possession for the purpose of trade was an infringing copy.

Mr. Roberts suggested this should not be difficult for an innocent person to prove.

He added: "It is necessary for us to take vigorous action to stamp out the trade in pirated records and books which could be so damaging to our commercial reputation abroad."

/To make........

Wednesday, January 1973

- 14 -

To make it easier to prosecute successfully where the copyright owner is not in Hong Kong, the Bill requires sworn statements (affidavits) to be produced in court as evidence to the ownership of the copyright.

The Attorney General said provisions were also made to extend the time within which a prosecution might be undertaken from six months to throe years from the date of the offence, or one year from its discovery, whichever was the later.

He said this was considered necessary "since experience has shown that such offences are often not detected in Hong Kong until long after they were committed."

A number of other clauses in the Bill give the police and other authorised officers power to investigate suspected pirating of copyright.

Search Warrant

However, a search of domestic premises will only be permitted under a search warrant issued by a magistrate or an Assistant Director of Commerce and Industry.

The Attorney General said the Bill also aimed at applying the United Kingdom Copyright Act to local broadcasters , namely Radio Hong Kong, Hong Kong Commercial Radio and H.K.T.V.B.

At present, he said, there was no diffusion service of sound or television broadcasts in Hong Kong since R.T.V. originated all its television programmes.

/However, ......

Wednesday, January 1973

- 15 -

However, Mr. Roberts said that since it was possible that such a diffusion service may be introduced, the Bill reproduced a provision in the U.K. Copyright Act to deal with this.

’’Its effect is that the person diffusing the programme is deemed to have a licence to do so from the owner of the copyright in the work being broadcast,” said Mr. Roberts.

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Wednesday, January 3, 1973

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SAFETY STANDARDS FOR HOUSEHOLD APPLIANCES

Legislation Being Considered

*********

The Government is currently considering legislation on safety standards for household equipment and appliances.

The Secretary for Information, the Hon. J. Cater, told the Legislative Council today that whatever the outcome of these deliberations, he believed that ’’public education in such matters is important.”

He was replying to Mrs. Joyce Symons.

He said some years ago, the Government issued some useful pamphlets about safety in the home. These were now being revised and improved and would include advice on the safe use of home appliances.

Mr. Cater said the pamphlets would be issued in conjunction with appropriate warning announcements over the Government’s broadcasting services.

Mr. Cater said: ”It seems to me that this is only part, albeit an important part of, a much larger problem.

’’There are many dangers in the home; from open fires, from kerosene stoves, from electrical equipment, and other household appliances, and regrettably as Hong Kong’s householders become more affluent and more mechanised, these dangers may well increase.

"Elsewhere, much difficulty has been found in legislating for, and policing, safety standards for household equipment and appliances. But the Government is, nevertheless, currently considering the matter.”

/Mr. Cater

Wednesday, January 3, 1973

- 17 -

Mr. Cater referred the five tragic and fatal accidents this winter connected with people using gas water heaters in bathrooms which were not properly ventilated.

“The Hong Kong and China Gas Company is naturally very concerned over these serious incidents, but it has emphasised that, usually in such cases, accidents occur because of lack of proper ventilation and not because of faults in the appliances themselves.11

Mr. Cater said the Company had run campaigns in the press, issued warning notices with consumers’ accountst and attached warning plaques to heaters using town gas.

However, he gave an assurance that warnings on the misuse of gas water heaters would form an important part of the Government’s campaign on safe use of home appliances.

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/18..........

Wednesday, January 1973

- 18 -

NEW H.K.-MACAU TERMINAL BEING CONSIDERED Present Wharf To Be Improved ********

The possible need for a new terminal to handle steamers, hydrofoils and hovercraft serving Hong Kong and Macau is under active consideration by a number of Government departments concerned.

The Financial Secretary, the Hon. C.P. Haddon-Cave, said this at the Legislative Council this afternoon in reply to a question from the Hon. Dr. S.Y. Chung who asked for a Government announcement on the practicability of building a new terminal and also improving the existing facilities.

From a marine point of view, Mr. Haddon-Cave said a site at the western end of Hong Kong Island for the proposed new terminal would be preferable.

’’But this would involve reclamation and a greatly expanded road system, which again would require extensive reclamation. Yet reprovisioning at the present site would present major problems because space is limited and existing ferry activities would be disrupted.

"If we are to proceed, therefore, the first step will be to seek the inclusion of an item in Category B of the Public Works Programme to allow for a detailed and comprehensive feasibility study to be carried out,5’ he said.

On plans to improve the existing Macau Ferry Wharf, Mr. Haddon-Cave said the work would be carried out in two stages.

/Stage I.......

Wednesday, January 3i 1973

- 19 ~

Stage I would include an extension to the covered way from the Arrival/Departure Hall to the hydrofoil waiting area and the removal of various offices on the landward side of the Hall, providing an area of about 16,000 sq. ft. for passengers waiting to enter the terminal.

A wall on the seaward side of the Arrival/Departure Hall would also be removed to facilitate passenger access to the Immigration Department processing desks.

The plans for Stage I included the re-arrangement of various offices and the provision of additional office space in order to facilitate a more rapid flow of passengers through the terminal.

The work is expected to start in July and be completed early next year.

’’Stage II generally provides for a further expansion of office accommodation, as well as changing and toilet facilities and the establishment of a canteen in the premises now occupied by the Transport Office/1 he said.

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/20

Wednesday, January 5, 1973

- 20 -

OVERALL TRANSPORT POLICY FOR 70’s AND 8O’s Bill Will Improve Traffic Situation * * * * * * * *

The Financial Secretary, the Hon. C.P. Haddon-Cave t today cited three elements which he considered vital for Government’s overall transport policy for the Seventies and Eighties.

These are:

* the expansion of Hong Kong’s network of roads and rail and water links.

* the improvement of public transport facilities, and

* the optimisation of use of road space.

In moving the second reading of the Road Traffic (Amendment) (No. 2) Bill 1973 in the Legislative Council, Mr. Haddon-Cave stressed: ”In the increasingly crowded conditions on Hong Kong, it is becoming more and more necessary for a high and courteous standard of driving to be maintained at all times and for the perpetrators of traffic offences to be brought to justice.” He added the Government hoped that the new provisions contained in the Bill would go some way towards improving the situation in this respect.

The Financial Secretary said the element concerning the optimisation of use of road space involved three aspects.

’’First, the restraint of private transport so as to accord priority to those vehicles which are the most efficient passenger carriers in relation to road use.

/’’Secondly, ..........

Wednesday, January 3, 1973

- 21 -

"Secondly, the policing of the road worthiness of all vehicles on the roads so as to minimise the risk of mechanical failures and, therefore, interruption to traffic flows.

"Thirdly, the supervision of drivers so as to ensure that high driving standards are observed and, if they are not, to detect and prosecute offenders," he said.

Mr. Haddon-Cave explained that the Bill was concerned with optimising the use of road space as well as being concerned with safeguarding life.

Furnishing Of Particulars

Besides enabling regulations to be made for the compulsory wearing of crash helmets by motorcyclists and their pillion passengers, the Bill also removes certain difficulties being experienced by the police in enforcing existing regulations regarding the furnishing of particulars by drivers at the time of an accident involving damage or injury.

The Bill repeals and replaces the two relevant sections in the Ordinance with wider and simpler provisions, and seeks to extend to three months the present statutory time limit of 14 days within which the police can require particulars to be given of the driver of the vehicle.

Under the Bill, a person will be required to supply to the police his name, address, driving licence number and his relationship (if any) to the person driving a motor vehicle at the time of an alleged offence.

If the demand for such particulars are made by means of a notice, a signed written statement giving the required particulars must be furnished to a specified, police officer within 21 days after the date of notice.

/Failure

Wednesday, January J, 1973

- 22 -

Failure to comply with such a demand will be an offence carrying a maximum fine of $2,000 and six months imprisonment.

The Bill also provides that such a signed statement given by an accused person will be admissible against that person as priina facie evidence that the accused was the driver of the vehicle at the time of the alleged offence.

Formerly, such a statement was only admissible if it were made and signed by the registered owner of the vehicle and it was the owner who was accused of the alleged offence.

On the introduction of legislation to make the wearing of crash helmets compulsory for motorcyclists and their passengers, the Financial Secretary said this was considered necessary because recently "the number of serious, motorcycle accidents has continued to increase.”

Further evidence, he added, had been accumulated ”to show that fatalities are largely caused by head injuries and that the absence of a crash helmet is thus a major factor involved.”

Mr. Haddon-Cave said the Government was also considering other measures to improve the safety of those using the roads, such as the compulsory wearing of safety belts by those travelling in passenger cars.

V ■ • t . I ’ ■ ' <

t ’ ■ • • c ■ . . .

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/23

... . .. ...... . ■ ■..

Wednesday, January 3, 1973

- 23 -

SEVEN BILLS INTRODUCED INTO LEGCO

********

The Road Traffic (Amendment) (No. 2) Bill 1972 passed its committee stage and third reading after a further debate in Legislative Council this afternoon and became law.

Seven bills had their first and second readings, but debate on them was adjourned.

They were the Urban Council (Amendment) Bill 1973» the Copyright

Bill 1973; the Television (Amendment) Bill 1973; the Inland Revenue (Amendment) Bill 1973; the Rating Bill 1973; the Road Traffic (Amendment) (Ho. 2) Bill 1973 and the Import and Export (Amendment) Bill 1973*

Debate on the Workmen’s Compensation (Amendment) Bill 1973 was resumed.

The Accounts for the Lotteries Fund for 1971-72 and a report on marine investigation into sewage discharges were also tabled in the Council this afternoon.

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/2^..........

Wednesday, January 3, 1973

- 24 - -

SCHOOL MEDICAL SERVICE INCREASE

90 Per Cent Jump In Enrolment Announced

**«*«***«

Enrolment in the School Medical Service stood at 68,837 on December 31, 1972, compared with 37,389 on the same date the previous year — representing a 90 per cent increase.

The scheme was revised on October 1, 1972, to bring it more in line with the Government’s policy of providing nine years of aided education.

The revision meant that pupils in kindergartens were excluded, and participation limited to pupils in primary schools, and secondary schools up to Form III.

A special provision permitted pupils already participating in the scheme, even those in Form V, to continue, if they wished.

Commenting on the increase, a spokesman for the School Medical Service Board says there are a number of reasons for ’’this gratifying jump.”

In his view, ’’the obvious one is that more parents are coming to believe that it is useful to have their children in a medical scheme which allows for an unlimited number of visits to a doctor, and medicine free of charge, all for $5 a year.”

The School Medical Service is a scheme designed to provide economical medical treatment among normally healthy children. It is voluntary, and participating doctors are private medical practitioners. They receive 325 a child a year — 35 from the participant’s contribution, and 320 from the Government.

/Specialist .....• •••

Wednesday, January 3, 1973

- 25 -

Specialist treatment is not provided, but cases requiring the services of a specialist are referred by the attending doctor to the Government’s specialist clinics.

The spokesman regrets that at present, ’’only one-third of all registered schools participate.” It is the hope of the Board that ’’more and more school principals, who have the responsibility for choosing a doctor from among those practising near their establishments, will come to realise that there is, for them, little administrative work attached to the distribution of participation cards.”

He explains that enrolment is simple, and not restricted to any given date. Pupils may join ut any time of the year, and qualify for participation in the scheme for 12 months from the date of enrolment.

Additionally, pupils in registered schools wishing to join the scheme although their schools are not participating in it, may call at the Board’s office in Lee Gardens, Hysan Avenue, for a participation card. It will cost them #5.

------0---------

WATER INTERRUPTION

***«»***«

Water supply to a number of premises in Mong Kok and Wong Tai Sin, Kowloon, will be interrupted for five hours from 1 a.m. to 6 a.m. on Friday (January 5) and Saturday (January 6) respectively to facilitate leakage tests in the areas.

The area to be affected on Friday is bounded by Prince Edward Road, Nathan Road, Mong Kok Road, Shanghai Street, Bute Street and Tong Mei Road.

Premises to be affected on Saturday are in Wang Tau Hom Resettlement Estate Block 1-13 and Yan Oi San Chuen.

_______0--------- /26....................

Wednesday, January 3, 1973

- 26 -

LAST CHANCE TO OBTAIN NEV/ PEDLAR LICENCES N.T. Hawkers Asked To Apply This Month Xi*******

All bona fide itinerary hawkers trading in the New Territories are urged to obtain a pedlar licence or to renew expired licences within this month.

A spokesman for the Urban Services Department said that after January J1, 1973, no new pedlar licences will be issued, but valid licences will be eligible for annual renewal on their expiry dates as usual.

New Territories pedlar hawker licences will entitle the holders to trade only on an itinerary basis in the New Territories.

These licences can be obtained from the District Offices in Tsuen Wan, Yuen Long and Tai Po, and the post offices in Sai Kung, Cheung Chau, Tai 0, Peng Chau and Mui Wo*

The applicant should bring along two photographs and pay a licence fee of 810.

It is proposed to introduce shortly new regulations under which hawking without a licence will lead to mandatory forfeiture of goods and equipment.

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/27.........


Wednesday, January 3» 1973

- 27 -

DRIVING TESTS FOR LORRI'JS TO BE RESUMED

Within Next Four Weeks

********

Limited driving tests for goods vehicles and certain categories of public and private omnibuses are expected to be resumed within the next four weeks, the Financial Secretary, the Hon. C.P. Haddon-Cave, said this afternoon.

These tests have been suspended since October 9 last year as a measure taken by the Transport Department to concentrate its efforts on an accelerated programme of testing for licences to drive private cars.

Other measures taken by the Department as from September 11 were the employment of volunteer civil servants to conduct tests in the evenings, at week-ends and on public holidays and the combination of the intermediate and final road tests into one.

The Financial Secretary, in reply to-Mrs. Ellen Li, said that it was hoped that these measures would, within a limited period of time, eliminate the "enormous backlog" of tests for licences to drive private cars.

"Indeed," he said "as a result of the accelerated programme, the number of appointments for road tests per day has risen from some 350 to 900." He added that "the waiting time between the written test and the combined road test has fallen from a year to less than three months, although the actual number of aspirant drivers waiting to take their road tests is about the same as before at 60,000 and so is the number of tests which

have to bo conducted."

/"An.........


Wednesday, January 5i 1973

- 28 -

An average of 40 per cent of candidates get through on their first attempt.

The Financial Secretary said it had been intended, once the backlog of applicants for licences to drive private cars had been dealt with, to start testing applicants again for other categories of vehicle.

"But things have not turned out quite as we "had hoped," he said. • - 9

The crash programme of tests had enabled most of those in the original backlog to be cleared,

But it had also encouraged so many applicants, to come forward for the written test that there was now a backlog of applicants for this test of no less than 75,000 compared with 54,000 at the end of August.

Delay

"As a result, there is a delay of 10 months in Hong Kong and 14 months in Kowloon for the written test," the Financial Secretary said.

In view of the situation, Mr. Haddon-Cave said, plans were now being put in hand to run down the emergency testing programme for licences to drive private cars and, accordingly, to resume limited testing for the categories of vehicle which had been halted since last October. ,

"It is hoped that tests for these types, of vehicle can be started again within the next four weeks," he added.

The Financial Secretary said since it had proved impossible to meet the unhindered demand for driving tests, urgent consideration was now being given to measures designed to reduce the numbers of applicants for such tost•

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/29

Wednesday, January 3, 1973

- 29 -

PUBLIC CALLED ON TO TACKLE HARBOUR POLLUTION Anti-Pollution Measures In Shelters Outlined ********

The Colonial Secretary, Sir Hugh Norman-Walker, today urged the public to continue to tackle with "vigour and determination" the problem of harbour pollution, specially in- typhoon shelters.

Sir Hugh made the appeal at the Legislative Council today when he answered a question from the Hon. H.J.C. Browne on the problem of dealing with pollution in typhoon shelters.

Outlining the various measures undertaken, Sir Hugh said the Marine Department’s efforts had so far been concentrated on the two main harbour shelters at Yau Ma Tei and Causeway Bay, and in"the Aberdeen typhoon shelter.

Last July, a limited beach-to-beach refuse collection and general scavenging service in Yau Ma Tei and Causeway Bay typhpop shelters was introduced -There was also a general scavenging servi oe at Aberdeen.

"The intention was to try not only to prevent refuse drifting into the harbour and on to beaches, but also to reduce health hazards and damage to propellors and engine intakes of small crafto"

In the Yau Ma Tei shelter, Sir Hugh said ten-gallon refuse containers on large stationary Tassels would soon be provided at strategic locations on a trial basis.

To deal with the problem in other typhoon shelters, and with known "black spots" in the harbour area, the Harbour Scavenging Fleet’s present strength would, from this month, be doubled to 24 sampans and eight mechanised cargo boats.

/In addition, ........

Wednesday, January 3, 1973

- 30 -

In addition, refuse collection in shelters such as Aldrich Bay and the North Kowloon Camber would receive more concentrated attention, he said.

The Government, Sir Hugh continued, was also making every effort to educate the floating population and those involved in trade activities near the waterfront about pollution prevention.

He stressed that it was essential to dissuade then from dumping rubbish indiscriminately into the waters. The Director of Marine and some of his senior officers had obtained useful co-operation and assistance in this task from local associations visited during the Clean Hong Kong campaign.

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Release Time: 8.^0 p.m

RM 7 40000S1

GIS

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Thursday, January 4, 1975

CONTENTS

Page No,

Provisional trade figures for November have been announced ............................................................... 1

Kwai Chung is to have a swimming pool complex.................  2

The Government plans to build a ferry berth in Kwun Tong for a new vehicular ferry service o....................••••«•».• 3

1973 is the centenary anniversary of the commencement of births and deaths registration in. Hnng Kong ................   4

Three Crown land lets will be put up for sale later this month o .............................. 5

A dispute in a Kwun Tong wig factory has been settled •••••• 6

A building in Elgin Street has been declared dangerous ........ 7

Quarantine restrictions have been imposed against two ports in Indonesia and Indi a on account of cholera 8

Issued by Government Information Services. Beaconsfield House. Hong Kong. Tel: 5-233191 ’

Thursday, January 4, 1973

- 1 -

PROVISIONAL TRADE FIGURES FOR NOVEMBER 1972

Exports Show Increase Of 13-9 Per Cent

*«*«**«**

The value of Hong Kong’s domestic exports for November, 1972 was 31,343 million, which represents an increase of $164 million or 13.9 per cent over November, 1971.

The Census and Statistics Department today published the provisional figures for Hong Kong’s external trade during November, 1972.

At $1,919 million, the value of imports shows an increase of $134 million or 7-5 per cent while the value of re-exports at $4l6 million shows a rise of $80 million or 23.7 per cent when compared with November last year.

A spokesman of the Commerce and Industry Department said that during the three-month period from September to November 1972, domestic exports totalled 34,317 million, imports 35,721 million and re-exports 31,203 million.

Compared with the corresponding period in the previous year, these figures represented increases of 16.3 per cent, 10.7 per cent and 25 per cent respectively.

Figures for the eleven-month period from January to November show increases over the same period in 1971 of 10.9 per cent for domestic exports, 6.8 per cent for imports and 20.6 per cent for re-exports.

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/2.........

Thursday, January 4, 1973

2 -

PARK AND SWIMMING POOL COMPLEX FOR KWAI CHUNG

Work To Begin In February

»*»»*»«*

The fast developing town of Kwai Chung will have a new park complete with a swimming pool complex, children’s playground and sittin^-out areas.

The park is to be built on a 258,000 sq.ft, site near the Kwai Fong Low Cost Housing Estate at an estimated cost of over 35 million.

The main attraction in the park is expected to be the swimming pool complex to be built on a design similar to the pools at Morse Park and Loi Cheng Uk. It can accommodate 5»000 swimmers.

The complex will consist of a standard pool and a secondary pool, both measuring 50 meters by 21 meters. But the secondary pool will be slightly shallower than the standard one.

Also included in the complex will be a diving pool, three training pools, a children’s pool and a paddling pool.

A two-storey main building will house the general offices, changing rooms, toilet facilities, a first aid room, spectator stands, and a cafe and soda foundtain.

Other features of the park will be children’s play areas, a rest pavilion, flower beds, turfing and sitting-out areas.

/There •••••••

Thursday, January 4, 1973

- 3 -

There will be a separate building housing the staff dormitory, and paricing spaces for 46 cars.

Funds for the projects have been donated by the Royal Hong Kong Jockey Club.

Piling work on the site has been completed, and construction work is expected to begin next month and completed in the middle of 1974.

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VEHICULAR FERRY SERVICE BETWEEN KWUN TONG AND NORTH POINT

Ferry Berth To Be Built In Kwun Tong

The Government intends to build a ferry berth in Kwun Tong for a new vehicular ferry service between Kwun Tong and North Point.

The proposed berth will be situated at the Kwun Tong seawall, alongside the breakwater currently under construction.

This follows the Government’s approval of an application by the

Hong Kong and Yaumati Ferry Company to operate the service, which is expected to improve the present traffic congestion in Kwun Tong.

A Notification, to be published tomorrow in the Gazette, fully describes the boundaries of the area of seabed that will be affected by the project.

Those objecting to the proposed work or having any claims of private right in the matter should submit such objections or claims in writing to the Director of Public Works within two months of the date of Notification.

The Notification, both in English and Chinese, can also be seen on Notice Boards posted near the site.

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A.........

Thursday, January 4, 1973

CENTENARY ANNIVERSARY OF BIRTHS & DEATHS REGISTRATION

*********

January 1, 1973 was the centenary anniversary of the commencement of births and deaths registration in Hong Kong.

In drawing attention to this the Registrar General, Mr. W. Hume, noted that the first Ordinance to provide for the registration of births and deaths in the Colony was enacted on July 25, 1872 a nd came into force on January 1, 1873»

Prior to this, Mr. Hume said, the only records relating to births and deaths were the Registers of Baptisms and Burials kept by churches.

In 18739 the numbers of births and deaths registered were 1,796 and 2,754 respectively, as compared with 79,053 aid 21,145 in 1972.

Mr. Hume cautioned, however, that in comparing these figures account must be taken of the fact that whereas the more recent figures are believed to be virtually complete, those for 1873 are less accurate, even though the 1872 Ordinance provided a penalty of 325 for failure to register births or deaths within 60 days.

According to the census of December 1, 1872 the total population of Hong Kong on that date was 121,985 as compared with an estimated population of 4,0931500 on December 1, 1972.

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/5.........

Thursday, January 4, 1973

- 5 -

THREE CROWN LAND LOTS UP FOR SALE

Total Upset Price Close To 37 Million

*******

Three lots of Crown land will be put up for sale by auction on Friday, January 26, 1973 at 2.30 p.m. in the Lecture Room on the 8th floor of the City Hall.

They have a total upset price of nearly 37 million.

One of the lots is for private residential use while the others are for non-industrial purposes.

Their particulars are as follows:

* Argyle Street, Kowloon

Kowloon Inland Lot No. 10220

16,000 sq. ft.

for private residential purposes

Upset Price - 55,800,000

* Nos. 289-293, Shanghai Street, Kowloon

Kowloon Inland Lot No. 10120 (with existing buildings) 2,231 sq. ft.

for non-industrial purposes

Upset Price - 3700,000

* Nos. 279-281 Shanghai Street, Kowloon

Kowloon Inland Lot No. 10131 (with existing buildings) 1,351 sq. ft.

for non-industrial purposes

Upset Price - 3400,000

Thursday, January 4, 1973

- 6 -

Full particulars and conditions of sale may be obtained from and sale plans inspected at the Public Enquiry Sub-office, Central Government Offices (West Wing), Ground Floor, Hong Kong and at the Crown Lands and Survey Office, Kowloon Government Offices, No. 405, Nathan Road, 10th floor, Kowloon.

-------0---------

DISPUTE IN WIG FACTORY SETTLED

********

With the help of the Labour Department, an amicable settlement has been reached in the dispute in the Fair Tress Limited in Kwun Tong over the termination of the employment of 68 workers.

Officers of the Labour Relations Service of the. Labour Department had actively mediated between the parties involved. Six conciliation meetings were held at the Labour Department.

Final agreement was reached and signed by the two parties in the presence of a labour officer of the Labour Relations Service in Kwun Tong yesterday (January 3)*

The workers concerned will receive from their employer on January 9 a sum of ^44,000 as arrears of wages, holidays pay, payment in lieu of notice of termination and special allowance in recognition of the workers’ service with the factory.

- - 0 - -

/7

Thursday, January 4, 1975

- 7 -

BUILDING DECLARED DANGEROUS

*********

The Building Authority today declared the front portion of No. 44, Elgin Street, Hong Kong Island, to be in a dangerous condition.

In a statement issued this morning, the Principal Government Building Surveyor said that the front portion of this pre-war building comprises two riding floors over access passageway to the main premises and a timber breastsummer supporting a wall has decayed to such an extent that there is a risk of collapse.

In addition, fractures in the walls and defective roof timbers were observed.

Notice of intention to apply for a Closure Order in Victoria District Court at 9.50 a.m. on February 15,1975 was posted today.

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/8...........

Thursday, January 4, 1973

- 8 -

QUARANTINE restrictions

*$«*»****

The Port Health Authority announced today that quarantine restrictions have been imposed against arrivals from Tandjungkarang-Telukbetung (port) in Indonesia and Cochin (port) in India because of cholera.

Similar restrictions have been imposed on arrivals from Delhi (excluding airport) in India on account of smallpox.

Meanwhile, quarantine restrictions imposed against arrivals from Bahrain (excluding airport) Delhi (excluding airport) because of cholera, and Kandahar (airport) in Afghanistan because of smallpox have been removed.

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Release Time: 6.15 P«M.

'RM 7 4000091

I

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Friday, January 5, 1975

CONTENTS

Page Nc.

The Government pavilion at the C.M.A. fair has proved to be a great success • ••••....................................... 1

Private cars have increased sharply in the past few years •• 2

The Polcfulam Hoad flyover will be opened tomorrow •••••••••• 4

A total of 45 building plans were approved in November ...... 5

The Government plans to reclaim land at the Aberdeen Channel for boatyards • ............................................. 6

Land in Chai Wan is to be sold for industrial use •••••••••• 7

Figures for the anti-diphtheria campaign have been announced .................. 7 Nev/ traffic arrangements in Kowloon Tong and Mong Kok have been announced ....................................  • •.... 8

The Italian Foreign Minister lunches at Government House ••• 9

Issued by Governor InformMlor. Serv,c«*. B-wmsrteM Hom., Hong Kong. Tel: 6-233’. 91'

Friday, January 5> 1973

- 1 -

RECORD ATTENDANCE AT GOV’T PAVILION

More Visitors Expected Before C.M.A. Fair Closes

*********

The Government pavilion at the Chinese Manufacturers’ Association Exhibition has proved to be a tremendous success as reflected in the record attendance figures and comments and questions raised about the various models displayed on Government’s major plans for the future.

Up to last night (January 4), an estimated 1,300,000 people had been to the pavilion — the highest number ever — and an estimated 100,000 more are expected to visit it before the Exhibition closes next Monday.

The pavilion has acheived another distinction — a silver cup was awarded to it for being one of the cleanest within the exhibition compound.

As in previous years, a big attraction, especially to children, is the permanent cinema in the centre of the pavilion showing films of general interest about Hong Kong.

Visitors are also showing keen interest in the models of future housing projects which illustrate the Government’s plans in this field over the next ten years.

In support of the current Fire Prevention Campaign, each visitor to the pavilion is handed a leaflet listing some simple rules to help prevent fires.

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Friday, January 5i 1973

2

RAPID INCREASE IN PRIVATE CARS

Close To 120,000 Registered At End Of November

**********

The number of private cars has shown a sharp increase in the past few years and now constitutes about two thirds of the total number of cars registered.

According to the Transport Department, there were 119,412 registered private cars at the end of November last year, an increase of more than 14,000 over November, 1971.

Among all types of vehicles, the number of private cars has been increasing at the fastest rate. The year 1%9 saw an average monthly net increase of 930 private cars, bringing its total number to about 80,000 at the end of the year.

In 1970 and 1971» the average monthly increase had jumped to about 1,000 private cars.

For the eleven months up to November last year, the monthly increase had again jumped to about 1,200 private cars, and the rate was particularly high in the second half of the year.

To buy a new private car, one has to pay a First Registration Tax which is 10 per cent of the car value and a 15 per cent Commonwealth Preference Tax which is levied on all vehicles originating from outside the Commonwealth.

/However, ........

Friday, January 5, 1973

- 3 -

However, goods vehicles, taxis, public light buses and omnibuses are exempted from the First Registration Tax.

For the 1971-72 financial year, total revenue collected from licence fees, Commonwealth Preference Tax, First Registration Tax and other fees and charges amounted to about 3118 million.

For the first eight months of the current financial year (April to November), the total revenue collected from these sources totalled about 388.4 million. This reflects the rapid increase in all types of vehicles.

The increase in motor vehicles has also brought about a corresponding rise in Government expenditure on roads.

For the current financial year, non-recurrent expenditure of the Highways Office, Public Works Department, which covers the building of new roads, is estimated at 3113 million.

This represents an increase of 328 million over the revised estimates of the previous financial year.

Recurrent expenditure, which includes roads maintenance costs, is estimated at 33*1 million, an increase of 37 million over the approved estimates of the previous financial year.

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A..........

Friday, January 5, 1973

- 4 -

POKFULAM ROAD FLYOVER TO BE OPENED TOMORROW

To Improve Traffic Flow In Area

*********

The one-way flyover at the junction of Pokfulam Road and Bonham Road will be opened to vehicular traffic from 10 a.m. tomorrow (Saturday, January 6.)

The Principal Government Highway Engineer, Mr. W.C. Bell, will cut a ribbon and declare open the flyover which serves only eastbound vehicles from Pokfulam Road to Bonham Road.

After the opening ceremony tomorrow, traffic wishing to turn right from Pokfulam Road into Bonham Road must do so via the flyover, which should be approached in the nearside lane.

Eastbound buses on Routes 3» 4 Express, 23 and 103 will use the flyover on all journeys.

Appropriate traffic signs will be erected to guide motorists.

The flyover is part of a shceme to ease the traffic congestion at the junction of Pokfulam,Hill and Bonham Roads.

Note to Editors: You are cordially invited to a send a

reporter and/or photographer to cover the opening ceremony which begins at 9*50 a.m. tomorrow (Saturday, January 6) at the entrance to the flyover near the Chiu Sheung Middle School. Members of the press are advised to arrive at the flyover five minutes earlier. A G.I.S. officer, Mr. William Lam, will be present to give assistance.

-------0---------

/5.........

Friday, January 5, 1973

- 5 -

BUILDING PLaNS APPROVED IN NOVEMBER

A golf and gymnasium building in Caroline Hill Road for the South China Atheletic Association is among a total of 45 building plans approved by the Building Authority during November last year.

Also on the list is a 29-storey commercial building in Hennessy Road and another commercial building of 27 storeys in Leighton Road.

Twenty-one of the plans approved are on Hong Kong Island, nine in Kowloon, seven in New Kowloon and eight in the New Territories.

These figures represent a drop of 54 plans compared to the previous month when 79 plans were approved. They also represent a drop of more than 50 per cent compared to the same month in 1971 when 107 plans were approved.

In the same month of November last year, 65 buildings were certified for occupation. The declared total cost for these buildings is about 3140 million which almost doubles October’s total of 378.2 million.

In addition, the Building Authority had also approved the demolition of 35 blocks of building — 19 on Hong Kong Island, eight in Kowloon and eight in New Kowloon.

Friday, January 5? 1973

- 6 -

LAND TO BE RECLAIMED FOR BOATYARDS

Part Of Aberdeen Reclamation Scheme

***»*»«*

The Government plans to reclaim an area of more than nine acres in Po Chong Wan at the Aberdeen Channel to provide a number of sites for boatyards, timber storage as well as a seamen’s training centre.

On completion, this area will form part of the Aberdeen Reclamation Stage II Scheme.

It has been so planned that interference in the present activities of the existing boat building and repairing industry will be kept to a minimum.

The extent of the proposed reclamation is described in detail in a Notification published in the Government Gazette today.

People having objection to the proposal or any claim of private right should submit such objections and/or claims in writing to the Director of Public Works within two months from the date of the Notification.

The Notice (both in English and Chinese) can be seen on notice boards posted near the site.

0

/7.........

Friday, January 5, 1975

7^-

LAND IN CHAI WAN TO BE SOLD FOR INDUSTRIAL USE

«**«****«

The Government proposes to sell a plot of land of about 8,000 sq. ft. in Chai Wan which can be used for industrial, godown or bulk oil storage purposes.

The land, the Chai Wan Marine Lot No. 1, will be sold by public tender for a term of 75 years, renewable for a further term of 75 years.

The purchaser will be permitted to construct a pier along the sea

frontage.

A Notice published in the Government Gazette today under the Foreshores

and Sea Bed Ordinance calls upon people having objections to the granting of such a lease or any claims of private right in the matter, to submit them in writing to the Director of Public Works within two months of the date of the Notice.

The Notification, both in English and Chinese, can also be seen on Notice Boards posted near the site.

------0----------

ANTI-DIPHTHERIA AND TETANUS CAMPAIGN

Figures For Final Week Announced

During the week ending on December 50, 1972, a total of 7,959 doses

of the combined anti-diphtheria and tetanus vaccine was administered, according to statistics released today by the Medical and Health Department.

Of these, 9^5 doses were administered on the Island, 6,062 in Kowloon, and 952 in the New Territories.

In the 12 weeks since this routine campaign began on October 9, 1972, a grand total of 211,021 doses has been administered. The campaign ended on December 50, 1972.

- - 0 -

/8

Friday, January 5, 1973

- 8 -

TRAFFIC ARRANGEMENTS IN KOWLOON TONG aND MONG KOK

*♦»*»♦«**

A series of new traffic arrangements will be imposed in Kowloon Tong and Mong Kok to facilitate road and drainage works, the Transport Department announced today.

Beginning at 8 a.m. tomorrow (Saturday), Hereford Road at its junction v/ith Waterloo Road will be closed to traffic for a period of six weeks. It will be re-opened at 7 p«m. on Friday, February 16.

Traffic flow between these two roads will be diverted through Durham Road and Cambridge Road.

With effect from 10 a.m. on Tuesday (January 8), Fife Street between Reclamation Street and Shanghai Street will be temporarily closed to through traffic for about two months.

At the sane time Fife Street between Portland Street and Shanghai Street will be re-opened to through traffic.

Appropriate traffic signs will be posted to guide motorists.

/9.........

Friday, January 5i 1973

- 9 -

ITALIAN FOREIGN MINISTER LUNCHES AT GOVERNMENT HOUSE

The Italian Foreign Minister, Mr. Guiseppe Medici, who is passing through Hong Kong en route to China, today (Friday) lunched at Government House as the guest of the Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose.

The lunch lasted about an hour and was attended by senior

Italian officials accompanying Mr. Medici on his trip.

Mr. Medici and his party arrived in Hong Kong last night and is due to leave for China tomorrow (Saturday).

Note to Editors: Copies of a photograph showing the Governor

and Mr. Medici together in front of Government House are distributed separately in the press boxes at G.I.S. this evening.

Release time: ?.00 p.m.

PRH 7 4000091

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Saturday, January 6, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No*

Five distinguished members of the community and two civil servants have been appointed to the Securities Advisory Council ..........................................................  1

More secondary and technical schools are being built in Hong

Kong  ....................................................... • • • • 5

A multi-million-dollar contract for the construction of the second stage of the Airport tunnel road has been awarded to a local engineering company .....................................  10

Public co-operation needed to stamp out mosquito breeding •••••• 12

A team of the Registration of Persons Department will operate in Shek Pai Wan Estate next week for the convenience of residents there...............................................     13

A 30-mile speed limit will be imposed on part of Prince Edward Road with effect from Tuesday...................................   1^

Senior Clerk of the B,0.0. retires after 33 years* service ••••• 15

Government accounts for October, 1972 show a S91 million surplus • ...................................................      16

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong. Tel: 5-233191

Saturday, January 6, 1972

SAC MEMBERSHIP ANNOUNCED

*******

The Governor has made the following appointments to the Securities Advisory Council, the establishment of which was announced by the Financial Secretary in the Legislative Council on 3rd January, 1975*

Chairman:

Mr* Kan Yuet-hing, F. I.B., J.P.

Members:

Mr. Pao Yue-kong, J.P.

Mr. Poon Wing-cheung, LL.B. Hons (London), F.A.S.A., F.C.I.S-

Mr. M.G.R. Sandberg, J.P.

Mr. Wong Chung-hin, MA, LL.B. (Cantab)

The Registrar General - Mr. Wt Hume, J.P.

The Commissioner for Securities.

It is intended that Mr. J.B. Selwyn should be appointed to the new post of Commissioner of Securities as soon as it has been created. He has been concerned since January 1972 with the preparation of legislation arising from the Report of the Companies Law Revision Committee, and was formerly Adviser to the Bank of England.

Powerful Advisory Body

Commenting on the appointments to the Council which have now been made and are listed above the Financial Secretary said:-

/”I am •••••••••

Saturday, January 6, 1972

- 2 -

"I am pleased that it has been possible to assemble a list of such distinguished names to serve on the Council. All of them are extremely l.nowledgeable in their own fields and together they will constitute a very powerful body of advice within the field of activity of the Securities Advisory Council”.

”Ihe fact that such able and experienced men have agreed to serve on the Council” the Financial Secretary concluded, ’’should be taken as a mark not only of their own public spirit but also of Government’s determination to ensure that trading in stocks and shares and other securities in Hong Kong is conducted in a manner best suited to the interests of the investing public as a whole”.

Securities Bill

In his statement to the Legislative Council on 3rd January, 1973, Financial Secretary explained that, as part of the legislation arising from the recommendations of the Companies Lav/ Revision Committee, a Bill, to be called the Securities Bill, was being drafted to cover all aspects of trading in securities. The Bill would also provide for the establishment of a statutory body to be called the Securities Council and for the creation of a post in the public service of Commissioner for Securities.

The duties of the Securities Council will be laid down in the Bill and will include, to use the Financial Secretary’s words, ’’the creation of a Federation of Stock Exchanges, the registration of dealers and investment advisers, trading in securities outside the stock exchanges, the prevention of false markets, and the keeping and auditing of accounts. The Council will alsc /be empowered

Saturday, January 6, 1972

- 3 -

be empowered to take up with the stock exchanges, underwriters, financial institutions acting as issuing houses and other organisations and persons involved in trading in securities any matters which, in its view, appear to give rise to concern and which call for authoritative rulings. In addition, the Council will deal with a range of problems arising fScom the implementation of other bills which are now being drafted to deal with takeover bids and the regulation of mutual funds and unit trusts which are on sale within Hong Kong.”

Authoritative Guidance

The Financial Secretary went on to explain that the drafting of this Bill was complicated and that it would not be ready for some months but that "it would not be prudent to wait until the enactment of the BLU before talcing action to provide some more authoritative guidance and help to those responsible for managing the stock exchanges and other institutions in the field, of trading in securities”. The Government had therefore decided to establish now, on an administrative basis, a Securities Advisory Council and a post of Commissioner for Securities.

The Financial Secretary added that, as neither the Securities Advisory Council nor the Commissioner of Securities would, for the time being at least, have statutory powers, the Council would not have any formal terms of reference. But he was convinced that ”the knowledge that the introduction of statutory powers is envisaged will give the Securities Advisory Council considerable influence from the outset”.

/As regards .......

Saturday, January 6, 1972

As regards the composition of the Securities Advisory Council, the Financial Secretary explained that it would consist of seven members of whom one would be an independent chairman, four would be unofficial members representing various sectors of the business community and two would be members of the public service, namely, the Registrar General and the Commissioner for Securities.

Note to Editors:

• Biographical notes

Hr. Kan Yuet-hing, F.I.B., J.P. - . .

Former Chief Manager, Bank of East Asia Ltd.

Director - Oriental Investment Co,, Ltd.; Bank of East Aisa Ltd.; Bank of East Asia (Nominees) Ltd.; Associated Bankers Insurance Co. Ltd,; East Asia Finance Co. Ltd.; Redder American Investment Co. Ltd,; Ka Wah Bank Ltd,; Goldfield Realty, "Ltd.

Mr. Pao Yue-kong, J.P. -

Governing Director, World Wide (Shipping) Ltd. .

Director - Hongkong & Shanghai Banking Corporation; Wheelock Marden & Co.

Ltd.; Wheelock Marden & Stewart Ltd.; Hang Seng Bank Ltd.; Hutchison International Ltd.; Inchcape Far East Ltd.; A.S. Watson & Co. Ltd.;

Chairman - Eastern Asia Navigation Co. Ltd.

Mr. Poon Wing-cheung, LL.B- Hons (London), F.A.S.A., F.C.I.S. -

Principal, Poon & Co.; Deputy Chairman of the Accountants Working Party in connection with the Professional Accountants Ordiaance 1972; Chairman, Advisory’Panel for the Department of Accountancy of the Hong Kong Polytechnic; Past Chairman of the Society of

Australian Accountants (Hong Kong Gfoup); Past'*Chairman of the Society of Chinese Accountants and Auditors.

Mr. M.G.R. Sandberg, J.P. - .

General Manager and Director of Hongkong & Shanghai Banking Corporation.

Chairman - Exchange Banks Association; Hong Kong Export Credit Insurance Corporation Advisory Board;

Member - Banking Advisory Committee; Labour Advisory Board; Trade and Industry Advisory Board; Mass Transit Steering Group; H.K. Trade Development Council.

/Director - .......

Saturdayt January 6, 1972

4A

Director - Butterfield and Swire (HK) Ltd; Taikoo Dockyard & Engineering

Co. Hong Kong Ltd.; Catbay Pacific Airways Ltd.; Cross Harbour Tunnel Co., Ltd.; Hongkong Building and Loan Agency Ltd.; and other companies.

Mr. Wong Chun-hin, M.A., LL.B. (Cantab) -

Partner, P.C. Woo and Co. ; Member of Companies Lav/ Revision Committee; Member of Board of Review constituted under Inland Revenue Ordinance; Committee member of the Law Society.

- - 0 - -

/5

Saturday, Januray 6, 1973

- 5 -

DEVELOPMENT OF EDUCATION IN HONG KONG

«*.«*«#**

More secondary and technical schools are being built in Hong Kong. By the autumn of this year it is expected that 24 secondary aided schools will be completed, thus increasing the number of places which Government will be able to buy to achieve the present interim target of three years postprimary education for 50 per cent of all children in the 12-14 year age group.

This was stated today by the Director of Education, Mr. J. Canning, when he referred to the tremendous advances made in secondary education.

Mr. Canning announced that in addition two secondary technical government schools would be opened this year.

ITThis is in the line with the proposition advanced by His Excellency in his speech to Legislative Council last October that the main thrust of our educational effort must be in secondary and technical education,” the Director said.

He reaffirmed that it was Government’s ultimate objective to provide three years secondary education for all in the 12-14 age group.

”The target is to provide 98,000 additional assisted or subsidised secondary places by 1976,” Mr. Canning said.

In answer to press questions on recent criticism on various aspects of education, Mr. Canning said: ”1 respect the right to criticise. It is only natural as education affects so many people - pupils, teachers, parents and guardians. Don’t forget that more than 1,000,000 pupils are enrolled in schools of all kinds and everybody in Hong Kong is interested in education.

i

Saturday, January 6, 1973

- 6 -

,TI would be surprised if there were no criticism at all. In fact, I would be worried. However, let me assure you it is the intention that our education service should be as big as we can make it and as good as we can make it. It will be the job of the re-constituted Board of Education and my department to achieve this as expeditiously as possible."

The Director pointed out that "we have achieved the aim of providing free primary education for all children and we are making considerable advances in post-secondary education."

On the development programme for subsidised pre-vocational schools, Mr. Canning said that it was planned to increase the number of places in these schools from the present 11,000 to JO,000 by the end of the decade.

He said: "We are very keen on these schools as they provide primary school leavers with the opportunity to prepare themselves for skilled occupation-When they complete the three-year courses in these schools they will make ideal apprentices with opportunities to progress to become craftsmen or technicians by further training.

"The future regarding apprentice training is encouraging. Some time ago only Government, the utility companies, the dockyards and other large Western firms had fully developed apprenticeship schemes. Nowadays more and more of our manufacturing industries are becoming appreciative of the value of well organised apprenticeship schemes. This is where our technical institute plays its part by providing technical training either full-time or block release, part-time day-release, part-time evening and other short courses.

/rTMembers of

Saturday, Janurary 6, 1973

- 7 -

’Members of the Industrial Training Advisory Committee are fully appreciative of the work done in the present Morrison Hill Technical Institute which has close links with industry and commerce, as well as the Apprenticeship Training Unit of the Labour Department.”

Apart from the existing technical institute, two others are to be established by 1975 at Kwai Chung and Kwun Tong. The provision of further technical institutes is under active consideration.

On special education, Mr. Canning said that the second five-year development plan was approved last August.

At present, there are J1 special schools for some 4t000 blind* deaf, physically handicapped, mentally handicapped and maladjusted children*

"We are planning to provide 1*4-, *100 additional Government or aided * • ’ » ' • • • places for handicapped children,” the Director said.

Commenting on criticism about the Secondary Schools Entrance Examination, Mr. Canning said that it was devised to select pupils for entry into secondary schools.

He sard’ v ^y much afraid however that in a situation where

there are insufficient places for all pupils to proceed up the educational ladder, a measure of selectivity has to be imposed.

”Even in the tremendously expanded secondary education system which is envisaged with some 40 per cent of our primary pupils progressing to five-year courses and the remaining 60 per cent to three year courses some form of selection will still be necessary and a public examination held by my department with advice and help from heads of secondary schools remains the fairest method of selection.

/’•The alternative

Saturday, January 6, 1973

- 8 -

"The alternative is for pupils to sit a whole multiplicity of entrance examinations held by individual schools and this would clearly be even more undesirable. The proposed increase of secondary provision will however take much of the heat out of this examination and this will be to the benefit of all concerned, I take a keen personal interest in this examination and it has proved possible in recent years to reduce somewhat the complexity of the questions asked. This process will continue. It is my intention that this pxnmjnation will be as fair as is humanly, possible and will be so graded that excessive crammi ng. and -coaching will not be necessary J’

Referring to the Hong^ Kong^-ertjJjxate - of ^Education- Examination, the Director said steps were being taken to hold a joint examination where subjects gould be taken either in English or in Chinese. "The first joint examination will take place in 197^ wheiL all question papers will, be standardised/’ My, Canning said.

Since 1972, the Hong Kong Certificate of Education Examination (English) and the Hong Kong Certificate of Education Examination (Chinese) have been conducted by one and the same Hong Kong Certificate of Education Board, Mr. Cann-ing said there was a danger that the Chinese Certificate might be thought to be inferior to the Certificate of Education (English). This was certainly not the case.

Next year, both certificates would be known as the Hong Kong Certificate of Education,

On curriculum development, Mr. Canning said two Senior Education Officers were involved in planning a well balanced curriculum for primary and secondary schools.

/Curriculum

Saturday, January 6, 1973

- 9 -

Curriculum and subject committees comprising heads and teachers of non-Government schools also play an important part in curriculum development.

To cope with the expansion of post-primary education, a phased programme of expansion in teacher training had been worked out, Mr. Canning said.

The intake into the full time and part-time courses of the three Colleges of Education had been increased by 360 for September 1972 and further increases in intake would be effected in future.

-------0---------

Saturday, January 6, 1973

- 10 -

AIRPORT TUNNEL CONTRACT AWARDW

To Be Signed On Monday ♦ * * ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

A local engineering company has been awarded a multi-miHion-dollar contract for the construction of the second stage of the Hong Kong Airport tunnel road*

The contract for the construction of this main section of the tunnel, worth about 356*5 million, has been awarded to the Paul Lee Engineering Company Limited.

The Government has accepted the tender through their consulting engineers, Scott Wilson Kirkpatrick & Partners, who designed and are supervising the construction of the tunnel.

This tunnel forms part of an additional road connection between Kowloon and Kwun Tong.

Work is in hand to improve the existing Prince Edward/Kwun Tong Roads connection but even after these improvements have been completed it will not be adequate at the end of this decade.

As there is no other land available where a relief road could be constructed the Government decided to build a dual two-lane tunnel under the airport runway at its northern end, continuing under the apron area and terminating at the newly reclaimed land in Kowloon Bay.

Work on the first stage involving the construction of a section of the tunnel under the future Airport Link Taxiway is now well advanced.

/The principal .........

?

Saturday, January 6, 1973

- 11 -

The principal works to be carried out under the second stage consist mainly of the construction of a 2,580-foot tunnel and 47,000 square yards of aircraft pavements above and adjacent to the tunnel works.

The tunnel will be a reinforced concrete box section divided into two vehicular tubes and ventilation ducts. Each vehicular tube will accommodate a two-lane carriageway with a width of 22 feet and a vertical clearance of 16 feet 9 inches.

The construction of the tunnel will be by the cut-and-cover method. • • t

The work is so phased that airport operations can continue without interruption.

Night Work

A government spokesman said it will be necessary to work at night but every effort will be made to keep the noise level down to a minimum. In fact, the contractor will be required to use sound-reduced equipment.

The tunnel is being constructed now so that the full length of the extended runway can be put into operation by early 1975•

The contract will be signed on Monday (January 8) and Mr. J.R. Whitak^**

Director of Engineering Development, will sign on behalf of Government.

Tenders for the ventilation and administrative buildings, and the supply and installation of electrical and mechanical equipment will be called later in the year.

Construction of the east and west interchanges will be carried out later.

Note to Editors: You are invited to send a reporter and/or

photographer to cover the contract signing, which will be held at 11 a.m. on Monday in the Conference Room, Public Works Department, on the 7th floor, Murray Building, Garden Road.

/12..........

- - 0 -

Saturday, January 6, 1975

- 12 -

PUBLIC URGED TO STaMP OUT MOSQUITO BREEDING «•»******«

The Urban Services Department today called for public co-operation in eliminating mosquito nuisance by regularly checking for possible breeding places and destroying them.

A spokesman for the department gave a warning that the maximum penalty for allowing the breeding of mosquitoes was J5,000.

Recently* two construction companies were fined 8500 each on summonses for allowing mosquito breeding at their building sites in Tai Hang Tung and To Kwa Wan, "As mosquitoes can only breed in stagnant water, people are urged to keep a sharp lookout in the vicinity of their homes and places of work for possible breeding grounds,” the spokesman said.

Mosquito breeding can be checked if all possible water containers such as empty tins, bottles and large receptacles are either constantly emptied or properly protected.

Saturday, January 6, 1972

- 13 -

REGISTRATION TEAM TO OPERATE IN SHEK PAI WAN ESTATE Residents Urged To Make Use Of Facilities *******

The Commissioner of Registration announced today that a team from the Registration of Persons Department will conduct registrations at the Shek Pai Wan Resettlement Estate Office from Monday, January 8, 1973 to Saturday, January 1J.

Business hours will be from 9*30 a.m. to 4.JO p.m. from Monday to Friday and from 9«3O a.m. to 12.JO p.m. on Saturday.

The visit will enable parents or guardians to register their children from six to 17 years of age for juvenile identity cards4 and young people 17 years of age and over and holding juvenile identity cards, to register for adult identity cards.

People living in the area are reminded of their responsibility to register themselves and their children for identity cards and to report to the Registration of Persons Department any changes of employment or residential address, nationality or marital status or any other particulars which have changed since registering for their identity cards.

Children between six and 17 years of age who have Hong Kong birth certificates or valid travel documents need not attend for registration, but children who do not have birth certificates or valid travel documents, must accompany their parents or guardians when registering*

Parents or guardians must produce both their (i.e. husband and wife) identity cards for inspection when registering juveniles.

/On registering

Saturday, January 6, 1972

- 14 -

On registering for adult cards, young people 17 years of age and over must surrender their juvenile identity cards and produce the identity cards of both their parents or guardians under whom they are registered, and a Hong Kong birth certificate or evidence of their residence in Hong Kong during the past two years.

People who do not possess any of the above mentioned documents must register at the Registration of Persons Branch Office in the Causeway Bay Magistracy, Electric Road, Hong Kong, at Canton Road Government Offices, Yau Ma Tei, Kowloon or at Far East Bank Building, Ground floor, Castle Peak Road, Tsuen Wan, New Territories,

-------0---------

SPEED LIMIT ON PRINCE EDWARD ROAD

**$«**«

The Transport Department announced today that the section of Prince Edward Road between King Tai Street and Choi Hung Estate will be made a restricted road, with a speed limit of JO miles per hour.

This restriction, effective from Tuesday (January 9), is imposed while road works are in progress in Prince Edward Road,

Appropriate traffic signs will be erected to guide motorists.

-------o---------

/15 ..........

Saturday, January 6, 1973

- 15 -

SENIOR CLERK RETIRING FROM B.O.O.

After Over 30 -Years’ Service

$*««*****

A senior clerk in the Buildings Ordinance Office will be retiring after serving in the Public Works Department for over 33 years.

He is Mr. Lui Chi-chiu, M.B.E., and to mark his retirement he will

be presented with a memento by Mr. E.H. Rowley, Principal Government Building Surveyor, on behalf of his colleagues.

Mr. Lui joined the government as a clerk in 19^0, and in 1967, after a series of promotions, he reached the rank of Special Class Clerk, which was regraded to Senior Clerk in 1968.

During his period of employment, Mr. Lui had worked in the Buildings

Ordinance Office for more than 23 years since he was posted there in 1950.

Mr. Lui was awarded the M.B.E. (H) in June, 1972.

He joined the Auxiliary Police Force in 19^8 and played an active part until he retired in 1969. He was appointed an Honorary Superintendent on his retirement.

Mr. Lui will be going on leave prior to retirement on January 9, 1973.

Note to Eiditors: You are invited to send a reporter

and/or photographer to have the presentation ceremony covered. It will be held on January 8, 1973 at 9.30 a.m. on 10th floor, Murray Building.

- - 0 - -

Saturday, January 6, 1972

- 16 -

A 891 MILLION SURPLUS FOR OCTOBER «»*«**«

The Government accounts for the month of October 1972 show a surplus of 391 million compared with a surplus of $15 million in October 1971.

This brings Hong Kong’s total surplus to $87 million for the first seven months of this financial year.

The total revenue for the month was $368 million, $95 millinn more than in October 1971.

The total revenue for the first seven months of the financial year was $2,036 million, $425 million more than the same period in the previous year.

Expenditure amounted to $277 million, an increase of $20 million over the same month in 1971.

This brings the total expenditure for the first seven months of the financial year to $1,949 million, which was $416 million more than the same period in 1971•

-------0---------

Release time: 2.45 p.m.

PRH 7 4000091

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Monday, January 8, 1975

CONTENTS

Page No*

Proposals have been put forward to fight land and sea pollution..................................................... 1

Many records were broken at the Companies Registry in 1972 .............................................................. 4

Hong Kong’s first heated swimming pool in Morrison Hill is proving to be very popular................................... 6

For the first time, a Lunar New Year fair will be held at

Tai Po this year .......................................... $

New traffic arrangements will be introduced in Conduit Road this week..................................................

A new G.I.S. film on English teaching has been made with the help of students ........................................ 10

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong. Tel: 5-233191

Monday, January 8, 1973

PROPOSALS TO COMBAT LAND AND SEA POLLUTION

In First Report Of EPCOM

*********

The Advisory Committee on Environmental Pollution on Land and

Water has put forward a number of proposals to the Government to combat land and sea pollution in Hong Kong.

The proposals are contained in the Committee’s first report which is now being considered by various Government departments concerned with environmental pollution.

The report gives a broad description of land and water pollution in Hong Kong and the Committee feels that the most important steps to be taken at this stage are:

* that top priority be given to the cleanliness and environment of urban areas and a planned programme to instill a greater sense of social responsibility regarding litter and refuse.

* that a detailed examination be made of the effectiveness of existing legislation and the Government machinery for its enforcement.

* that a reappraisal of land use policy and control in the New Territories be made in relation to pollution activities, including the keeping of pigs and poultry, and an effective collection service be established throughout all parts of the New Territories.

/* that a

Monday, January 8, 1975

- 2 -

* that a crash programme be implemented throughout Hong Kong for the provision of off-street refuse collection points and that the possibility of requiring developers of new multi-storey buildings to construct refuse shutes and refuse chambers, especially in newly planned areas, be examined in detail.

* that legislation be enacted to control trade effluents and pollution of Hong Kong waters by oil, and

that a comprehensive policy regarding offensive trades be implemented, and that the establishment of a regular marine monitoring service be examined.

Commenting on the report, a Government spokesman said today (Monday) that progress had already been made by Government departments in the implementation of some of the proposals.

"New draft legislation to control oil pollution has already been published, and drafting in respect of legislation to control trade effluent is far advanced," he said.

"Moreover," he added, "the impetus engendered by the Clean

Hong Kong Campaign can be extended to other forms of pollution."

The spokesman said the various Government departments concerned would be "critically examining" the Committee’s recommendations and an official statement was expected to be made in due course.

The committee was appointed in November 1971 to review the state of the environment as regards land and water pollution, and to advise the Governor on measures to control pollution.

/It is .....

Monday, January 8, 1973

- 3 -

It is intended to publish the report in both English and Chinese for public information but anyone who wishes to have an advance stencilled copy may apply to the Buildings and Lands Branch, Colonial Secretariat, Central Government Offices, Main Wing, Lower Albert Road, Hong Kong.

Note to Editors: A press Conference will be held by Mr. H.M.G.

Forsgate, chairman of EPCOM, tomorrow (Tuesday) at 10 a.m. in the G.I.S. theatre, Beaconsfield House,’ 3th floor. Also present will be Mr. H.D. Stead, Principal Government Civil Engineer, and Mr. G. Barnes, Secretary of EPCOM. You are cordially invited to send a reporter and/or photographer to cover the conference.

-------0---------

Monday, January 8, 1973

- 4 -

RECORD NUMBER OF NEW COMPANIES INCORPORATED

Busy Year At Companies Registry

**********

The high level of business activity in 1972 was reflected in the operations of the Companies Registry, where many records were again broken.

The Registrar General, Mr. W. Hume, announced today that 4,810 new companies were incorporated in 1972 with nominal capitals totalling over $5i55$ million, both figures being the highest ever recorded for any year,

The rate of increase in the number and size of companies in recent years can be guaged by comparing the figures for 1968, when the number of new companies incorporated was 1,675 with nominal capitals of nearly 5540 million.

Thus in a period of only four years, the number of new companies incorporated has almost trebled, while the nominal capitals have increased more than ten times.

Mr. Hume added that in addition to the huge nominal capitals of the new companies, existing companies increased their capitals by more than 510,458 million, an increase of 218 per cent over the previous record of 33,291 million in 1971.

Of the companies incorporated in 1972 (with the 1971 figures in brackets), 1,262 (999) were import and export companies; 844 (676) were land investment companies, and 668 (290) were finance companies.

/Apart •••••.

Monday, January 8, 1973

- 5 -

Apart from the incorporation of new companies, the work of the Companies Registry in 1972 also increased in other respects.

A total of 106 companies were converted from private to public companies in 1972, compared with 1^ in 1971•

In the post*war years prior to 1971 very few companies issued prospectuses.

Offers of shares to the public only became common in Hong Kong in 19711 and in that year about 15 prospectuses were registered.

In 1972 the number of prospectuses registered rose to 101, 93 by local companies and eight by companies incorporated overseas.

Documents received for filing during the year totalled 67,632, or 18 per cent more than in 1971, and the number of company files inspected by the public rose by 25 per cent to 68,726.

The revenue collected during the year reached 533 million, which was 321.2 million or 179 per cent, above the previous year’s 311.8 mil lion.

At the end of the year, there were 26,067 companies on the Register compared with 21,622 at the end of 1971* In addition, there were 852 foreign companies registered, as against 765 previously.

w - - * 0 •------

/6..........

Monday, January 8, 1972

- 6 -

HEATED SWIMMING POOL PROVES POPULAR DURING WINTER

Over 680 Use Pool Every Day

*««*«•**«*

Hong Kong,s first heated swimming pool in Morrison Hill is proving to be very popular since its official opening on November 1 last year. Attendance at the swimming pool complex for the first two months since its opening totalled about 42,000, an average of over 680 a day.

• On December JO last y£ar, which was the coldest day this winter with a minimum temperature of 8,8 degrees Celsius,' attendance at the heated pool still reached J15* This included 4-7 Children.

On January 2, the coldest day this year with a minimum temperature of 9*7 degrees Celsius, a total of JOJ people went to the pool to enjoy the hot water. This included 12 J' children.'

The Morrison Hill all-weather swimming pool complex is one of the best-equipped in Hong Kong and its water temperature can be adjusted with the rise and fall of the air temperature.

During the coldest days-this winter, water temperature was maintained at about 28 degrees Celsius, which is very close to the international standard of 26.7 degrees Celsius for indoor swimming pools.

Temperature inside' the whole-swimming pool complex is also kept at 29 degrees Celsius, which is slightly higher than the water temperature.

/The heated ••..•

4

Monday, January 8, 1975

7

The heated swimming pool complex, the first of its kind in Hong Kong, includes a 50^ metre by 21 metre pool built to Olympic competition standards, a paddling pool for children and an outdoor one for youngsters.

The depth of the heated pool ranges from 4)4 feet to 6# feet.

All other Government swimming pools in Victoria Park, Kowloon Tsai, Morse Park, Kwun Tong and Lei Cheng Uk have been closed on December 1 for three months. The Morrison Hill heated pool is the only one remaining open during the winter to serve year-round swimmers.

The heated pools are open for three periods every day — from 7 to 11 a.m.; from 12 noon to 5 p»m.; and from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m.

Admission is 70 cents for adults and 40 cents for children.

-------0---------

/8.........

Monday, January 8, 1972

- 8 -

LUNAR NEW YEAR FAIRS IN N.T.

Tai Po To Have A Fair For The First Time

**«»«**

For the first time, the Urban Services Department is holding a

Lunar New Year fair in Tai Po, New Territories, this year.

The fair will take place from January 27 to February 3.

During the same period, Lunar New Year fairs will also be held, as in previous years, in Tsuen Wan and Yuen Long. ♦

The sites of the fairs will be situated at the following places:

Tsuen Wan: Sha Tsui Road Playground

Tai Po: Tai Po Government Playground

Yuen Long: On Ling Road, Yuen Long Town

Therd will be 25^ stalls in Tsuen Wan; 150 stalls in Tai Po and 153 stalls in Yuen Long.

A spokesman for the Urban Services Department said all sites would be allocated through open ballot to flower growers in the New Territories and to small traders selling permissible dry commodities.

^Temporary hawker licence of 825 each will be issued to successful applicants who will be responsible for the erection of stall structures and the connection of electricity.”

No specific contractors have been nominated or authorised for such works.

Ballot tickets will be available from January 8 to 17 between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. upon application in person and on payment of 85 at the following centres:

/Tsuen Wan - ••••••..

Monday, January 8, 1972

- 9 -

Tsuen Wan - Tsuen Wan Hawkers and Market Office, Chartered Bank Building, Tai Ho Road, 2nd floor, Tsuen Wan.

Tai Po - Taipo Hawkers and Ma.rket Office, Ting Kok Building, Ting Kok Road, Tai Po Market.

Yuen Long - Yuen Long Hawkers and Market Office, Yuen Long District Office, third floor, Yuen Long.

No ballot tickets will be issued after January 17.

Those who have obtained the tickets should fill in the necessary particulars and return the ticket with two photographs to the issuing office on January 18 or 19 for registration.

On being registered, they will be invited to the open ballot which will be held on January 22, 23 and 24 respectively in Tsuen Wan, Tax Po and Yuen Leng.

-------0--------

NEW TRAFFIC ARRANGEMENTS IN CONDUIT ROAD

Conduit Road'between House No. 28-5$ will become two-way from 10 a.m. on Thursday to improve traffic circulation.

Motor vehicles with unladen weights exceeding two tons will be prohibited in the easterly direction along this section of Conduit Road because the read, is not wide and strong enough, a Transport Department • • spokesman said.

Appropriate signs will be posted to guide motorists.

-------o--------

/10 .........

Monday, January 8, 1972

- 10 -

NEV/ G.I.S. FILM ON ENGLISH TEA-HING

Miss Diana Kwong and her class of nine-year-old students from Hill Road Primary School, Pokfulam, will tomorrow (Tuesday) be seeing for the first time the film they helped the Government Information Services make recently.

This film, "Teaching English As A Second Language In Primary Schoolst" which was made for G.I.S. by Farkas Productions, shows a new approachin teaching a second language. . . .,

Although the principles upon which this method is based are universally accepted, this 15-minute film differs from films of a similar nature in that it shows a complete lesson, rather than confining itself to aspects of language teaching.

Other films have shown teachers giving instruction in their own mother-tongue, but in this film a large class of Chinese pupils are shown being taught English by a Chinese teacher.

The film will be used not only in Hong Kong, but it is expected that it will be used all over the world in countries where English is taught as a second language.

*******

Note to Editors: You are cordially invited to watch this ,

new G.I.S. production with the students at 11:00 a»mt tomorrow on the 5th floor, G.I.S., Beaconsfield House*

. ... ...

Release Time; 6.50 p.m

-----0-----

PRH 7 4000091

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Monday, January 8, 1975

CONTENTS

Page No*

Proposals have been put forward to fight land and sea pollution..................................................... 1

Many records were broken at the Companies Registry in 1972 .............................................................. 4

Hong Kong’s first heated swimming pool in Morrison Hill is proving to be very popular................................... 6

For the first time, a Lunar New Year fair will be held at

Tai Po this year .......................................... $

New traffic arrangements will be introduced in Conduit Road this week..................................................

A new G.I.S. film on English teaching has been made with the help of students ........................................ 10

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong. Tel: 5-233191

Monday, January 8, 1973

PROPOSALS TO COMBAT LAND AND SEA POLLUTION

In First Report Of EPCOM

*********

The Advisory Committee on Environmental Pollution on Land and

Water has put forward a number of proposals to the Government to combat land and sea pollution in Hong Kong.

The proposals are contained in the Committee’s first report which is now being considered by various Government departments concerned with environmental pollution.

The report gives a broad description of land and water pollution in Hong Kong and the Committee feels that the most important steps to be taken at this stage are:

* that top priority be given to the cleanliness and environment of urban areas and a planned programme to instill a greater sense of social responsibility regarding litter and refuse.

* that a detailed examination be made of the effectiveness of existing legislation and the Government machinery for its enforcement.

* that a reappraisal of land use policy and control in the New Territories be made in relation to pollution activities, including the keeping of pigs and poultry, and an effective collection service be established throughout all parts of the New Territories.

/* that a

Monday, January 8, 1975

- 2 -

* that a crash programme be implemented throughout Hong Kong for the provision of off-street refuse collection points and that the possibility of requiring developers of new multi-storey buildings to construct refuse shutes and refuse chambers, especially in newly planned areas, be examined in detail.

* that legislation be enacted to control trade effluents and pollution of Hong Kong waters by oil, and

that a comprehensive policy regarding offensive trades be implemented, and that the establishment of a regular marine monitoring service be examined.

Commenting on the report, a Government spokesman said today (Monday) that progress had already been made by Government departments in the implementation of some of the proposals.

"New draft legislation to control oil pollution has already been published, and drafting in respect of legislation to control trade effluent is far advanced," he said.

"Moreover," he added, "the impetus engendered by the Clean

Hong Kong Campaign can be extended to other forms of pollution."

The spokesman said the various Government departments concerned would be "critically examining" the Committee’s recommendations and an official statement was expected to be made in due course.

The committee was appointed in November 1971 to review the state of the environment as regards land and water pollution, and to advise the Governor on measures to control pollution.

/It is .....

Monday, January 8, 1973

- 3 -

It is intended to publish the report in both English and Chinese for public information but anyone who wishes to have an advance stencilled copy may apply to the Buildings and Lands Branch, Colonial Secretariat, Central Government Offices, Main Wing, Lower Albert Road, Hong Kong.

Note to Editors: A press Conference will be held by Mr. H.M.G.

Forsgate, chairman of EPCOM, tomorrow (Tuesday) at 10 a.m. in the G.I.S. theatre, Beaconsfield House,’ 3th floor. Also present will be Mr. H.D. Stead, Principal Government Civil Engineer, and Mr. G. Barnes, Secretary of EPCOM. You are cordially invited to send a reporter and/or photographer to cover the conference.

-------0---------

Monday, January 8, 1973

- 4 -

RECORD NUMBER OF NEW COMPANIES INCORPORATED

Busy Year At Companies Registry

**********

The high level of business activity in 1972 was reflected in the operations of the Companies Registry, where many records were again broken.

The Registrar General, Mr. W. Hume, announced today that 4,810 new companies were incorporated in 1972 with nominal capitals totalling over $5i55$ million, both figures being the highest ever recorded for any year,

The rate of increase in the number and size of companies in recent years can be guaged by comparing the figures for 1968, when the number of new companies incorporated was 1,675 with nominal capitals of nearly 5540 million.

Thus in a period of only four years, the number of new companies incorporated has almost trebled, while the nominal capitals have increased more than ten times.

Mr. Hume added that in addition to the huge nominal capitals of the new companies, existing companies increased their capitals by more than 510,458 million, an increase of 218 per cent over the previous record of 33,291 million in 1971.

Of the companies incorporated in 1972 (with the 1971 figures in brackets), 1,262 (999) were import and export companies; 844 (676) were land investment companies, and 668 (290) were finance companies.

/Apart •••••.

Monday, January 8, 1973

- 5 -

Apart from the incorporation of new companies, the work of the Companies Registry in 1972 also increased in other respects.

A total of 106 companies were converted from private to public companies in 1972, compared with 1^ in 1971•

In the post*war years prior to 1971 very few companies issued prospectuses.

Offers of shares to the public only became common in Hong Kong in 19711 and in that year about 15 prospectuses were registered.

In 1972 the number of prospectuses registered rose to 101, 93 by local companies and eight by companies incorporated overseas.

Documents received for filing during the year totalled 67,632, or 18 per cent more than in 1971, and the number of company files inspected by the public rose by 25 per cent to 68,726.

The revenue collected during the year reached 533 million, which was 321.2 million or 179 per cent, above the previous year’s 311.8 mil lion.

At the end of the year, there were 26,067 companies on the Register compared with 21,622 at the end of 1971* In addition, there were 852 foreign companies registered, as against 765 previously.

w - - * 0 •------

/6..........

Monday, January 8, 1972

- 6 -

HEATED SWIMMING POOL PROVES POPULAR DURING WINTER

Over 680 Use Pool Every Day

*««*«•**«*

Hong Kong,s first heated swimming pool in Morrison Hill is proving to be very popular since its official opening on November 1 last year. Attendance at the swimming pool complex for the first two months since its opening totalled about 42,000, an average of over 680 a day.

• On December JO last y£ar, which was the coldest day this winter with a minimum temperature of 8,8 degrees Celsius,' attendance at the heated pool still reached J15* This included 4-7 Children.

On January 2, the coldest day this year with a minimum temperature of 9*7 degrees Celsius, a total of JOJ people went to the pool to enjoy the hot water. This included 12 J' children.'

The Morrison Hill all-weather swimming pool complex is one of the best-equipped in Hong Kong and its water temperature can be adjusted with the rise and fall of the air temperature.

During the coldest days-this winter, water temperature was maintained at about 28 degrees Celsius, which is very close to the international standard of 26.7 degrees Celsius for indoor swimming pools.

Temperature inside' the whole-swimming pool complex is also kept at 29 degrees Celsius, which is slightly higher than the water temperature.

/The heated ••..•

4

Monday, January 8, 1975

7

The heated swimming pool complex, the first of its kind in Hong Kong, includes a 50^ metre by 21 metre pool built to Olympic competition standards, a paddling pool for children and an outdoor one for youngsters.

The depth of the heated pool ranges from 4)4 feet to 6# feet.

All other Government swimming pools in Victoria Park, Kowloon Tsai, Morse Park, Kwun Tong and Lei Cheng Uk have been closed on December 1 for three months. The Morrison Hill heated pool is the only one remaining open during the winter to serve year-round swimmers.

The heated pools are open for three periods every day — from 7 to 11 a.m.; from 12 noon to 5 p»m.; and from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m.

Admission is 70 cents for adults and 40 cents for children.

-------0---------

/8.........

Monday, January 8, 1972

- 8 -

LUNAR NEW YEAR FAIRS IN N.T.

Tai Po To Have A Fair For The First Time

**«»«**

For the first time, the Urban Services Department is holding a

Lunar New Year fair in Tai Po, New Territories, this year.

The fair will take place from January 27 to February 3.

During the same period, Lunar New Year fairs will also be held, as in previous years, in Tsuen Wan and Yuen Long. ♦

The sites of the fairs will be situated at the following places:

Tsuen Wan: Sha Tsui Road Playground

Tai Po: Tai Po Government Playground

Yuen Long: On Ling Road, Yuen Long Town

Therd will be 25^ stalls in Tsuen Wan; 150 stalls in Tai Po and 153 stalls in Yuen Long.

A spokesman for the Urban Services Department said all sites would be allocated through open ballot to flower growers in the New Territories and to small traders selling permissible dry commodities.

^Temporary hawker licence of 825 each will be issued to successful applicants who will be responsible for the erection of stall structures and the connection of electricity.”

No specific contractors have been nominated or authorised for such works.

Ballot tickets will be available from January 8 to 17 between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. upon application in person and on payment of 85 at the following centres:

/Tsuen Wan - ••••••..

Monday, January 8, 1972

- 9 -

Tsuen Wan - Tsuen Wan Hawkers and Market Office, Chartered Bank Building, Tai Ho Road, 2nd floor, Tsuen Wan.

Tai Po - Taipo Hawkers and Ma.rket Office, Ting Kok Building, Ting Kok Road, Tai Po Market.

Yuen Long - Yuen Long Hawkers and Market Office, Yuen Long District Office, third floor, Yuen Long.

No ballot tickets will be issued after January 17.

Those who have obtained the tickets should fill in the necessary particulars and return the ticket with two photographs to the issuing office on January 18 or 19 for registration.

On being registered, they will be invited to the open ballot which will be held on January 22, 23 and 24 respectively in Tsuen Wan, Tax Po and Yuen Leng.

-------0--------

NEW TRAFFIC ARRANGEMENTS IN CONDUIT ROAD

Conduit Road'between House No. 28-5$ will become two-way from 10 a.m. on Thursday to improve traffic circulation.

Motor vehicles with unladen weights exceeding two tons will be prohibited in the easterly direction along this section of Conduit Road because the read, is not wide and strong enough, a Transport Department • • spokesman said.

Appropriate signs will be posted to guide motorists.

-------o--------

/10 .........

Monday, January 8, 1972

- 10 -

NEV/ G.I.S. FILM ON ENGLISH TEA-HING

Miss Diana Kwong and her class of nine-year-old students from Hill Road Primary School, Pokfulam, will tomorrow (Tuesday) be seeing for the first time the film they helped the Government Information Services make recently.

This film, "Teaching English As A Second Language In Primary Schoolst" which was made for G.I.S. by Farkas Productions, shows a new approachin teaching a second language. . . .,

Although the principles upon which this method is based are universally accepted, this 15-minute film differs from films of a similar nature in that it shows a complete lesson, rather than confining itself to aspects of language teaching.

Other films have shown teachers giving instruction in their own mother-tongue, but in this film a large class of Chinese pupils are shown being taught English by a Chinese teacher.

The film will be used not only in Hong Kong, but it is expected that it will be used all over the world in countries where English is taught as a second language.

*******

Note to Editors: You are cordially invited to watch this ,

new G.I.S. production with the students at 11:00 a»mt tomorrow on the 5th floor, G.I.S., Beaconsfield House*

. ... ...

Release Time; 6.50 p.m

-----0-----

PRH 7 4000091

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Tuesday, January 9, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No,

HKU Child Development Survey is being extended to study effects of malnutrition in young children................• 1

Mobile registration teams proving popular with residents in outlying areas ........................••••••••..........• •• 4

Noted cellist to give recital in the City Hall this Saturday .............................................................. 6

Water cuts in Tsim Sha Tsui ............... 7

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong. Tel: 5-233191

Tuesday, January 9, 1973

- 1 -

ABRUPT WEANING SLOWS DOWN CHILD DEVELOPMENT

Survey Extended To Study Malnutrition «**«*«***

Abrupt weaning and the subsequent replacement of milk by an inadequate and imbalanced diet partly explains the slowing down of Hong Kong Chinese children’s development, both physical and mental, in the first two years of their childhood.,

This was stated today by the Supervisor of the Child Development Survey, undertaken by the Paediatric Department of the University of Hong Kong and financed, among others, by the Government lotteries Fund.

The Child Development Survey was launched in 19^7 with the aim of studying the growth and development of 7^2 new-born Chinese babies in Hong Kong*

The survey has now been extended for another three years in an effort to exaj^ne the effect of malnutrition and ch i? d-* rearing practices »

on general scholastic performance of children between the ages of five and eight.

A total of Mi? five-and-a-half year old. children, representing a fair cross-section of Hong Kong, are currently under observation at the Child Development Centre.

The Supervisor pointed cut that so far there was no obvious indication of any adverse effect of malnutrition on the children’s intellectual capacity, but the analysis of the results beyond the first year had not yet been completed.

/On malnutrition •••••

i

Tuesday, January 9, 1973

- 2 -

On malnutrition during the weaning stage, she said that Chinese mothers tended to wean their of f-spring nilk on to solids too rapidly, thinking that by replacing congee for milk their children will be ’•stronger”.

She saidJ "These children of four to six months of age are unable to digest and absorb adequately what is offered in the way of solids,

"Milk, which is most valuable to a growing child, should be given in adequate amounts until at least three years”.

She described this state of malnutrition as an outcome of ignorance and misconception on the part of mothers rather than poverty alone.

Retardation Of Growth

She further pointed out that the retardation of growth around the weaning period could also be attributed to the overcrowding of Hong Kong which made children more liable to contract infections early in life.

,wThe general picture in the first two years in the lives of many of the children was one of irritability, lethargy and a lack of interest in their surroundings. The muscles in their limbs became soft and flabby,” she added.

On the impact of environment on children’s behaviour, children who live in a confined space tend to be inhibited and shy in their overall performance•

The common practice is to keep young children in their homes all day, not only because it is customary to do this, but also because of the difficulties of using lifts, and sometimes many flights of stairs in tall buildings, in order to take them outside.

/”Pre-school

Tuesday, January 9,

1973

- 3 -

”Pre-school children should ideally be brought outside every day into the open air and sunshine to give them more exercise and to reduce the incidence of infectious disease,” she added.

Turning to the effect of schooling on children, she deplored what she called the over-emphasis on the children’s imitative ability and visual memory and the unnecessary amount of homework often given at the kindergarten level which might unfavourably affect the children’s personality and psychological make-up.

”Too strict a regimen imposed on young children will only result in the submergence of their natural childhood”, she added, ” and inhibit the development of initiative, imagination and creative ability”.

Meanwhile, the total contribution of the Government Lotteries Fund to the Survey has now totalled more than 3750,000.

It is hoped that the further findings of the survey will go a long way towards benefiting the Government and all bodies concerned with child welfare and care in Hong Kong.

-------0---------

A...........

Tuesday, January % 1973

- 4 -

MOBILE REGISTRATION TEAM POPULAR

*********

The mobile registration team of the Registration of Persons Department has proved to be very popular among residents of the New Territories, the outlying islands, and various housing estates in the urban areas•

In the past nine months, the mobile registration team in the New Territories handled 12,075 applications for juvenile identity cards and 151751 applications for adult identity cards. This included 597 applications for adult identity cards and 2,650 applications for juvenile identity cards received from residents of outlying islands.

The mobile registration team in the urban areas registered 750 people for adult identity cards and 6,7^5 children for juvenile identity cards during the same period.

A spokesman for the Registration of Persons Department said today: ”Members of the public have shown that they appreciate the services provided by the mobile registration teams, and the cooperation of local kaifong associations and rural -committees in the New Territories is particularly encouraging.”

The length of a mobile registration team’s stay in one place depends on the needs of the local population, but generally ranges from a few days to one week. Its work is divided into two parts — the registration of applicants and the distribution of documents after processing.

/The spokesman

Tuesday, January 9, 1973

- 5 -

The spokesman stressed that the mobile registration teams were provided solely for the convenience of the public. He pointed out that to register a child for a juvenile identity card, one only has to produce his birth certificate and the identity card of the parent or guardian.

f,A child should change his juvenile identity card for an adult identity card within JO days after reaching the age of 17/’ he said. "The fee for this is only 31.”

He added that people who failed to register for identity cords within the proper period would only bring unnecessary inconvenience to themselves.

0

* r

Tuesday, January 9, 1973 - 6 -

CELLO RECITAL AT CITY HALL *******

An accomplished ce.llist, Richard Markson, who is a new arrival to the music department of the Chung Chi College, Chinese University, will give a recital at City Hall Concert Hall on Saturday, January 13, at 8 pan*

Richard Markson began studying the cello at an early age. At 12 he was admitted to the Paris Conservatoire, where he studied cello with the famous French master, Tortelier for six years. During his stay in the Conservatoire he won many awards.

After leaving Paris, he has also had lessons with the world-renowned cellist Pierre Fournier.

He has given many successful recitals throughout the country, and has performed in Israel and Switzerland. His London debut at Wigmore Hall in 1970 was acclaimed by both critics and the audience.

Richard Markson’s recital will be presented by the Urban Council here. On Saturday, he will play works by Valentini, Schubert, Shulamit Ran, Beethoven, Watson and Brahms and will be accompanied by his colleague, David Gwilt, music lecturer at the Chung Chi College, at the piano.

• • • • • •

Tickets at 31 (student tickets), 32 and 33 are available daily from

10 a.m. at the City Hall Box Office.

-------0---------

/7..........

Tuesday, January 9, 1973

- 7 -

WATER INTERRUPTION IN TSIM SHA TSUI

$*****»«

Water supply to a number of premises in Tsim Sha Tsui will be interrupted for five hours from 1 a.m. to 6 a.m. on Thursday (January 11) and Saturday (January 1J)•

The temporary stoppage is to enable the Waterworks Office to carry out a leakage test.

The area affected on Thursday is bounded by Nathan Road, Cameron Road, Chatham Road and Mody Road.

The area affected on Saturday is bounded by Kimberly Road, Observatory Road, Chatham Road, Cameron Road and Nathan Road.

-------0----------

Release time: 6

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Wednesday, January 10, 1975

CONTENTS

Page No,

The Governor pays a visit to Mei Foo Sun Chuen .............. 1

The number of public assistance cases continues to show increase •••••••..........••••••••.............................. 3

Dr. Choa gives talk on medical facilities in Hong Kong ••••• 5

The number of fire calls has decreased since the introduction of the Fire Danger Warning System........................... 6

The Post Office annual children’s party will be held on Sunday.........................  ,.............a................ $

The Labour Department offers assistance to the Watson Estates fire victims .......................................... ^0

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Wednesday, January 10, 1973

GOVERNOR TOURS MEI FOO SUN CHUEN

At Invitation Of Management Of The Estate

*«*«**«*

The Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, today visited the Mei Foo Sun Chuen in Lai Chi Kok — one of the largest private housing projects in Hong Kong

Sir Murray, who has shown great interest in Hong Kong’s housing problems, toured the estate at the invitation of Mei Foo Investments Limited, which is responsible for the management of the buildings.

The Governor announced last October a ten-year housing programme to build, with contribution from the private sector, sufficient permanent self-contained accommodation in a reasonable environment for every person in Hong Kong.

At Mei Foo Sun Chuen, Sir Murray was shown a model of the estate, and briefed on the history and the present status of the project by Mr. R.R. Kendall Managing Director.

Mr. Kendall told the Governor of the project organisation, the legal agreements and obligations upon which the project is founded.

Mr. A.J.C. Haddon, General Manager, outlined the nature of the project, the planning concepts of Mei Foo, and the method by which continuous monitoring of the design and construction operation is maintained by officers directly representing the equity participants.

Sir Murray then toured the estate and saw for himself the facilities there. These include function rooms for social activities, a community centre under construction, a children’s playground, a market and some recently finished flats.

z^Jote to Editors; •••••••••

Wednesday, January 10, 1975

- 2 -

Note to Editors: Copies of a photograph showing the

Governor at Mei Foo Sun Chuen are distributed separately in the G.I.S. press boxes.

Wednesday, January 10, 1973

- 3 -

PUBLIC ASSISTANCE SCHEME

December Figures Show Continuing Expansion

*««**«***

The total number of active cases in the public assistance scheme reached 17,728 at the end of December last year.

New applications received during the month totalled 960, and cases reactivated numbered 133* At the same tine, 90S cases were closed.

Cash payments during December totalled 32.6 million, bringing to 334.3 mjllion the grand total spent so far since the expanded scheme was implemented on April 1, 1971*

In addition to public assistance, Mr. Tsau Tqor-yan, Senior Principal Social Welfare Officer and head of the Public Assistance Division, says during December, divisional officers responded to four emergencies produced by fires.

As a result, 697 families were registered for emergency aid, and 3,629 people making up these families received hot food, blankets, cooking utensils, and so on.

During December, the 17th field unit of the Public Assistance Division was set up in the Sau Mau Ping Resettlement Estate to serve residents in the Sau Mau Ping and Kwun Tong areas.

/It is .......

Wednesday, January 10, 1973

-fe-

lt is proposed, according to present plans, that there will be eventually 20 field units attached to the Public Assistance Division to handle the growing caseload.

Note to Editors: Representatives of the Press, radio, and

TV are invited to visit the Public Assistance Division’s Mongkok Field Unit, 17th floor, and the Yau Ma Tei Field Unit, 18th floor, in the Kowloon Government Offices Building, Nathan Road, at 10:J0 a.m. on Wednesday, January 17, 1973*

They will see public assistance cases being processed, and a number of recipients receiving cash across the counter in the Kowloon Central Post Office on the ground floor of the Building. Photographs will be possible. In addition, they will be invited to tour the Payments Control Section of the Social Welfare Department, also in the same building.

In attendance will be Mr. Tsau, and Mr. Lu Yu-hua, Principal Social Welfare Officer (Operations). Both will be available to answer questions on public assistance. The tour is intended to help familiarise members of the Press, radio and TV with the operational side of the public assistance scheme.

-------0---------

/5.........

Wednesday, January 10, 1973

- 5 -

MEDICAL FACILITIES IN HONG KONG Dr. Choa Gives Illustrated Talk To Rotary Club *«»«*****»

Medical facilities in Hong Kong are continuing to grow in proportion to the needs of the population, and the services already provided match with the best anywhere in the world.

Dr. G.H. Choa, Director of Medical and Health Services, told members of the Rotary Club of Kowloon West this today during the course of an illustrated talk.

In a 20-r.iinute show of coloured film slides, Dr. Choa took Rotarians on a capsule tour of the medical and health establishments in Hong Kong, visiting not only hospitals already in operation, but also the exteriors of hospitals only recently completed, such as the Siu Lam Hospital in Tai Lam, and the Princess Margaret Hospital, in Lai Chi Kok, to be opened in 197^-

Radiological services, mental health services, physiotherapy, the Institute of Pathology, the Flying Doctor service, Port health, the Auxiliary Medical Services, and even the forensic museum in the Police headquarters, all formed part of Dr. Choa’s wide ranging travelogue.

In a running commentary, he emphasised that the medical services in Hong Kong, as the pictures showed, were not static but were growing as the needs of the population grew.

He pointed to some of the sophisticated equipment shown as evidence of the Government’s determination to provide Hong Kong with the best and the latest in the medical and health fields.

Wednesday, January 10, 1975

- 6 -

FIRE DANGER WARNING SYSTEM IS SHOWING EFFECT

Greater Awareness Leads To Drop In Fire Calls * * * ♦ * ♦ ★

The number of fire calls in Hong Kong has dropped by almost a thousand and estimated fire losses have fallen by 320 million in the three months since, the introduction of the new Fire Danger Warning System, the Chief Fire Officer^ Mr. F. Jackson, said today.

’•Of course a major reason for the drop in calls has been the higher humidity during the. final months of the past year compared with the same period of 1971* But we are convinced that public awareness of the higher fire danger during the winter months has contributed to the fall in the number of fires,” he said.

”For instance in December, when the average humidity was the same as for the previous December, there were 679 fires compared to 7^9 in 1971» and fire loss was estimated at $400,000, compared with $2.6 million.

”It’s quite a change to see any downward trend at all in the havoc wrought by fire in Hong Kong each year, and it does show that an awareness of the danger, and attempts to prevent fires, can work.

”We know this is just a small step, but it is a step in the right direction, and we hope it is just the beginning.”

Mr. Jackson said the fire figures for the last three months illustrated the relationship between falling humidity and rising fire danger — which was the basis of the new Fire Danger Warning System.

/There were

Wednesday, January 10, 1973

- 7 -

There were 1,845 fires in the period, compared with 1,581 in the previous three months, when humidity was higher. In 1971, there had been 2,736 fires in the October-December period, compared with 1,481 in the three months from July to September.

And in November 19719 when the average humidity had been 58 per cent — which would mean a ’’red” fire danger period under the new system — there had been 1,158 fire calls, against 564 last November, when the humidity averaged 76 per cent.

Despite the fall in the number of fires, there was no. reason for complacency, he said. In the three months to December, 26. people had died and 598 had been injured in fires, compared with 15 killed and 149 injured in the previous three months.

Fire Risk

Mr. Jackson reminded the public that Hong Kong was now in the middle of its most dangerous fire risk period. He stressed that the risk of an outbreak now was greater than at any other time during the year, and that any outbreak now would spread with such speed that it could be out of control before help arrived.

"A few simple precautions can stop nearly all fires before they start,” he said.

’’Just make sure you don’t overload or tamper with any electrical fitting or appliance. Store inflammable liquids or gases well away from heat or flames and take great care with cooking or heating appliances using such fuels.

/"Keep ........

Wednesday, January 10, 1973

- 8 -

,rKeep matches out of the reach of children, and always make sure cigarettes, matches, joss sticks and so forth are properly extinguished.

”Newspapers, old clothing, cardboard cartons and other rubbish should never be allowed to accumulate, and you should always have two escape routes from your premises clear of any obstruction at all times.

••And finally, should you see a fire, however small, dial 999 immediately.

Don’t assume someone else will.

”If everybody takes these steps now^ we will have fewer fires, fewer injuries, and fewer deaths.

’’Remember, everyone owes it to his family to keep it safe.”

-------0---F

/9........

Wednesday, January 10, 1973

- 9 -

POST OFFICE ANNUAL CHILDREN’S PARTY

*********

The Post Office Recreation Club’s Annual Children’s Party will be held at Club Grounds, Caroline Hill, Causeway Bay, on Sunday (January 14) commencing at 1.00 p.m.

About 1,000 children of Post Office employees will attend.

Amusement stalls, games, stage shows and refreshments will be provided*

Both the staff and their children are looking forward to this function as a timely event after the busy Christmas period.

Entertainment will be provided by guest artistes of Radio Hong Kong, RTV and TVB.

The Drum Band of the New Method College and Band of the Hong Kong Sea Cadet Corps will give performances at the party.

By kind permission of the British Army Land Forces Headquarters in Hong Kongfdonkeys have been made available for the entertainment of the children.

Prizes for the lucky draw will be presented by Mrs. M. Addi, wife of the Postmaster General,

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/10..........

5

t Wednesday, January 10, 1973

- 10 -

HELP OFFERED TO WATSON ESTATE FIRE VICTIMS

*******

In connection with yesterday’s fire at Watson Estate, a spokesman of the Labour Department said that the Workmen’s Compensation Unit of the Department would offer assistance to those injured or dependants of those who died as a result of the accident to obtain Workmen’s Compensation.

* He stressed that all manual workers irrespective of their earnings

and all non-manual workers earning 51,500 or less a month are entitled to Compensation under the Ordinance if they suffered injury by accident arising out of and in the course of employment.

He also reminded the employers concerned of their obligations to notify the Labour Department on prescribed forms of any injury to their workers within seven days after the accident and to make periodical payments to the injured workers on their normal pay-days during the period of incapacity.

Finally, he invited employers, injured workmen and dependants of victims to obtain further information about their respective obligations and entitlements under the Workmen’s Compensation Ordinance from the following offices of the Workmen’s Compensation Unit of the Labour Department:-

* New Rodney Building,

Ground floor,

Queensway,

Hong Kong. (5-249081 Ext.. 97)

* Canton Road Government Offices, • -

5th floor,

Canton Road, Kowloon. (5-669014) (5-688856) (5-688626)

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Release Time: 6.50 p.m.

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Thursday, January 11, 1973

CONTENTS

Page Iio.

The Governor presents design awards at a Government House ceremony ......................................................... 1

The Schools Dance Festival starts on March 5 ....................  4

A group of disabled trainees from social welfare centres will take part in the Community Chest’s ’’Walk for a Million"....... 5

Public is warned against damage to protected plants .............. 6

Lore members of the Social Welfare Department are asked to join the department’s credit union..................................... 7

Figures for the anti-polio campaign have been announced........ 8

The Tsuen Wan road safety campaign ends on Saturday .............  8

Parents are asked to register their children for identity cards • • • .................................................      9

A Fire Services passing-out parade will be held on Saturday ... 10

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Thursday, January 11, 1973

BETTER PRODUCT DESIGN MELiNS HIGHER PROFITS Govern Speaks At Design Award Presentation **********

The Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, said this evening that better industrial design meant ”higher profits and fuller order books.”

He was speaking at the presentation of the Governor’s Award for Hong Kong Design at Government House.

The design competition was organised by the Federation of Hong Kong Industries.

Sir Murray said: ’"Traditionally Hong Kong has manufactured goods to the specifications of buyers elsewhere. Now we are being made conscious of a need to manufacture goods to designs which are our own/’

”With the need the talen to meet it has emerged rapidly. The standard of this year’s entries indicates how fast this talent has matured,” he added.

There were 67 entries this year.

The Governor’s Award was won by Ampex Ferrotec Ltd. for their automatic stack-array tester.

Sir Hurray congratulated the company and their designers for their ’’consistently high performance” in the field of electronic testing equipment •

Turning to winners of the other awards, he said their products were ”a clear indication of what Hong Kong can achieve” and hoped that ”their efforts will stimulate further local research and development in the design field.” /The Governor ............................................................

Thursday, January 11, 1973

- 2 -

The Governor also expressed the hope that the new legislation for protection of copyright would further induce Hong Kong manufacturers to develop and improve the design of their products.

He said that ’’fear of imitation has led to secrecy between rival manufacturers.”

He hoped that the new law would lessen these anxieties.

”By taking the wraps off their products, our manufacturers will not only widen market prospects on their home ground but stand to profit by mutual experience and example/’ the Governor added.

Industrial Design Lead

In his speech, Mr. T.K. Ann, Chairman of the Federation of Hong Kong Industries, said Hong Kong today had an industrial design lead over its closest competitors.

"This lead we must nurture and widen primarily, of course, so that we can retain and enhance our share of world markets but, also, so that we can contribute to the improvement in the quality of life of people everywhere, ” he said.

Mr. Ann praised the standard of design this year.

He said the improvement in design quality compared with previous years was very noticeable and the margin between the highest and the lowest was narrower this year than it had ever been.

/All.......

Thursday, January 11, 1973

- 3 -

/ill award-winning companies were presented their prizes by the Governor.

Note to Editors: Copies of the full text of the Governor’s

speech are contained in a supplement to the Daily Information Bulletin which is distributed separately in the press boxes, Government Information Services, this (Thursday) evening.

Copies of the full text of Mr. T.K. Ann’s speech and press releases prepared by the Federation of Hong Kong Industries are also distributed in the press boxes.

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Thursday, January 11, 1973

- 4 -

SCHOOLS DANCE FESTIVAL STARTS ON MARCH 5

Events To Be Held In Three Centres

********

The 9th Schools Dance Festival, organised by the Education Department’s Physical Education Section in conjunction with the Hong Kong Schools Sports Association and the New Territories Schools Sports Association, will begin on March 5> 1973*

Entry from schools will close on Monday (January 15)• Schools entering the Festival are asked to forward their entry forms and fees to Mrs. Eleanor Lee, Education Department, Kowloon Sub-Office, Kowloon Government Offices, 7th floor, Nathan Road.

The eleven-day annual Festival will be held at three competing centres — one each on Hong Kong Island, Kowloon and the New Territories.

The centres are: Clementi Middle School in Fortress Hill Road, North Point; Methodist Wa Ying College in Sheung Wo Street, Ho Man Tin; Heung Yee Kuk Yuen Long District Secondary School in Kuk Yuk Road, Yuen Long.

There will be a special event for handicapped children.

A trophy will be awarded to the winner and special banners to schools in second and third places in each section of the competition.

Each competing school will be awarded a souvenir pennant. A certificate of merit will be presented to the team which scores 80 per cent or more in any section of the competition.

Presentation of prizes and special performances by winners will take place in May.

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/5.........

Thursday, January 11, 1973

- 5 -

WALK FOR A MILLION

Disabled Trainees From SWD Centres Taking Part

********

About 50 disabled trainees at rehabilitation centres run by the Social Welfare Department have spontaneously offered to take part in the "Walk for a Million" in aid of the Community Chest on Sunday (January 14).

"It is a very courageous gesture, and displays a true community spirit," comments Mr. T.P. Khoo, Senior Principal Social Welfare Officer and head of the Rehabilitation Division.

The group will begin the walk from Austin Park on the Peak, ending it at the Army Sports Ground in Soo Kun Poo, with the exercise starting at 9 a.m. Rehabilitation officers, including a nurse, will accompany the walkers along the nine-mile route to see that all is well.

The trainees are aged between 14 and 21, and both sexes are represented in the group. The disabilities include weakened limbs as a result of poliomyelitis, epilepsy, post-polio paralysis, and mental retardation. Three are wheelchair cases.

Mr. Khoo says he is particularly impressed by the fact that the decision to join the walk has come from the trainees themselves.

"Indeed, my officers were extremely gratified at such a reaction, and they are now looking for appropriate sponsors," he comments. He believes the trainees deserve to be encouraged.

In his view, their walk "will not only help the Community Chest, but will also give them confidence in their ability to participate in civic events alongside the able-bodied." -----------------------------------0----------

/6..........

Thursday, January 11, 1973

- 6 -

PUBLIC WARNED AGAINST DAMAGE TO PROTECTED PLANTS

««**»***

The Agriculture and Fisheries Department today warned the public not to pick or damage Lunar New Year flowers and other types of plants grown on Crown land.

Damage to the Lunar New Year flower ”Tiu Chung” and other seasonal flowers such as orchids and azalias is usually very serious at this time of the year, a spokesman said.

It is an offence under the Forestry Ordinance to cut, burn or otherwise damage vegetation on Crown land. Offenders are liable to a fine of 82,000 and one year’s imprisonment.

The unlawful sale or possession of protected plants and flowers is an offence liable to a fine of 3250.

Warning posters, in Chinese and English, are being put up in all public notice boards, and plantation areas in the New Territories.

-------0---------

/?..........

Thursday, January 11, 1973

- 7 -

SOCIAL WELFARE DEPARTMEIfT CRI2DIT UNION

President Reports Satisfactory Position

M********

Mr. Kwok Ka-chi, President of the Social Welfare Department Credit Union, said today membership of the Union stood at 225, with the number of shares totalling 310,030.

He told the first annual general meeting at the Lady Trench Training Centre that the position was not unsatisfactory, but he hoped more members of the department would join the Union, and so advance the cause for which it had been formed.

He said during the first year, 3$ applications for loans had been approved, mainly for improving personal living standards and meeting immediate needs.

Mr. Thomas C.Y. Lee, Deputy Director, addressed the gathering. He paid tribute to the outgoing committee, endorsing the view of the president that more members of the department should join the Union.

He described the Union as a significant movement. It was "neither for profit, nor for relief — but truly for service."

Mr. Lee also presented prizes to departmental Credit Union members who had introduced the biggest number of new members to the Union and the largest number of shares during the membership drive.

They included Mr. Chan Ming, Mr. Lau Chi-yan, Miss Tong Sam-tat, and Hr. Wong Keung-chiu.

The meeting ended with an entertainment programme, a "lucky draw" by Mr. K.S. Hardy, Chairman of the Joint Staff Consultative Council, and refreshments.

Thursday, January 11, 1973

ANTI-POLIO CAMPAIGN 1973

Figures For First Ten Days Released

********

During the first ten days of the 1973 anti-poliomyelitis campaign

ending on January 6, a total of 5? 220 doses of the vaccine was administered, according to figures released by the Medical and Health Department today*

The campaign this year is being organised in two phases* The first began on December 28, 1972,_ continuing until February 2, 1973-

The second phase is due to begin in March.

During the campaign, vaccine is available free at all government

general clinics and maternal and child health centres.

- - 0 - -

TSUEN WAN ROAD SAFETY CAMPAIGN ENDS ON SATURDAY

*******

Note to Editors:

The closing ceremony of the Tsuen Wan

Road Safety campaign will be held on Saturday (January 15) at 3 p.m. at the Sha Tsui Road Playground in Tsuen 'Van.

The District Officer, Tsuen Wan, Mr. J.S. Warren, will officiate at the ceremony.

There will be presentation of prizes to winners of various competitions during the campaign and also road safety demonstrations.

You are invited to send a reporter and/or photographer to cover the ceremony.

- - 0 - -

/9

I

Thursday, January 11, 1973

REGISTERING FOR IDENTITY CARDS

Sic******

The Commissioner of Registration today reminded parents and guardians of their responsibility to register their children for juvenile type identity cards on attaining the age of six.

He also reminded young people in possession of juvenile identity cards to register for their adult identity cards within a month of reaching 1?.

British and Foreign Passport holders are obliged under law to register for identity cards if they intend to stay in Hong Kong for at least four months.

The Commissioner also drew the attention of people who have moved house, changed jobs, got married or returned from abroad recently that they are required to notify him so that their records could be up-dated.

Specially designed forms for-this purpose are available from post offices, City District Offices and*District Offices in the New Territories. The forms can be sent post free although changes may also be reported by letter, if so desired.

Members of the public, whenever in doubt about registration, should write, telephone or visit the Hong Kong Branch Office in Causeway Bay Magistracy, Electric Road, Tel. No. H-704696, the Kowloon Branch Office in Canton Road Government Offices, Yaumati, Tel. No. K-687352^, the Tsuen Wan Branch Office in the Far East Bank Building, Castle Peak Road, Tel. No. N.T.-233587 or the San Po Kong Sub-Office in San Po Kong Government Offices, San Po Kong, Tel. No. K-224513. ------------------------------------0--------- /10......................................................................

Thursday, January 11, 1975

'j

- 10 -

FIRE SERVICES PASSING-OUT PARADE

********

A passing-out parade of Fire Services officers and firemen will be held on Saturday (January 13) at 10.15 a.m. at the Fire Services Training School at Pat Heung, New Territories-.

The reviewing officer will be Mr. A.E.H. Wood, Director of Fire

Services.

The total parade strength will be over 150 officers and men, including six Assistant Station Officers, 45 Senior Firemen (Control), and 57 Operational Firemen.

The parade and inspection will be followed by a display of

Fire Services equipment and drills.

Note to Editors: You are cordially invited to send a reporter

and/or photographer to have the parade covered. Transport will be provided. It will leave the Canton Road Fire Station for the School at 9 a.m. on Saturday.

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Release tine; 7 >00

PR 33 4000035

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

SUPPLEMENT

Thursday, January 11, 1973

PRESENTATION CF GOVERNOR’S AWARD FOR HONG KONG DESIGN Full Text Of Governor’s Speech ♦ * Jr ♦ * Hr Jr W ♦ *

The Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, today presented award to winners in the ’’Governor’s Award for Hong Kong Design 1973” competition at a ceremony in Government House.

The following is the full text of the Governor’s speech at the ceremony: ....................................... .

"Traditionally Hong Kong has manufactured goods to the specifications of buyers elsewhere. Now we are being made conscious of a need to manufacture goods to designs which are our own.

"With the need the talent to meet it has emerged rapidly. The standard of this year’s entries indicates how fast this talent has matured.

”1 am sure that this annual presentation organised by the Federation of Hong Kong Industries has done much to stimulate awareness of, and interest in, this trend towards improving design standards.

"But in industry there is no substitute for the profit motive. Awards for good design may be a source of pride, but the real reward for good design should be customer appeal.

/"The urgent ......

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House. Hong Kong. Tel: 5-233191

Thursday, January 11, 1973

- 2 -

”The urgent message for our manufacturers today is that better design means higher profits and fuller order books. I take it that we are here to help to drive that message home, as well as to congratulate all concerned on the results of this annual competition.

’The greater sophistication of this year’s entries is well demonstrated by the product which has won the Governor’s Award. The automatic stack/array tester submitted by Ampex Ferrotec Ltd. is a highly complicated piece of equipment - so advanced in fact that the judges had to ask a group of experts to evaluate its performance and potential•

Revolutionary Concepts

’Tarticularly pleasing is the fact that this product was custom-made to meet precise local requirements. The team of young engineers involved spent many months in research and development before producing a saleable product. The equipment employs new and revolutionary concepts of testing, and costs one tenth the price of conventional equipment. A number of sales have already been negotiated and others are pending.

’’Ampex Ferrotec1 s designers also won for the company the South China Morning Post Award for the product showing the greatest originality of thought. This was another sophisticated piece of testing equipment, and I recall that the company won an award last year for electronic testing equipment. My congratulations to Ampex Ferrotec and to their designers for their consistently high performance in this field.

/”! must ••••••

Thursday, January 11, 1973

- 3 -

11 I must also congratulate the winners of the other awards. Their products are a clear indication of what Hong Kong can achieve, and I hope their efforts will stimulate further local research and development in the design field.

r,I understand that the Federation of Hong Kong Industries will bring an expert design consultant to Hong Kong in order to assist the Design Council and Centre in improving the services offered to industry. This project has been organised through the United Nations Industrial Development Organisation, and is supported by your Government.

Copyright Protection

’’Ultimately, however, it is up to industry itself to develop and improve the design of Hong Kong products. I hope that our manufacturers will derive further inducement for this from the new legislation for protection of copyright.

”The range of our export products on public view in the local market has for long represented only the proverbial tip of the iceberg, and not necessarily the best bit either because fear of imitation has led to secrecy between rival manufacturers.

”1 hope the new legislation will lessen these anxieties. By talcing the wraps off their products, our manufacturers will not only widen market prospects on their home ground but stand to profit by mutual experience and example. Like their counterparts in Japan, they can discover that the lesson of competition is not to imitate but to go one better.”

Thursday, January 11, 1973

- 4 -

”In conclusion a word on a slightly different topic. We are all becoming increasingly concerned at the frenzy of dealings on the Stock Exchange. Hong Kong has grown to be one of the great trading centres of the world on the basis of courageous and prudent investment for profit in mercantile services, manufacture and real estate. It is such investment that has provided employment for our population.

"I welcome the emergence in Hong Kong of sophisticated financial services, including a greatly expanded capital market. But it v/ould be highly injurious to our economy if the search for profit became deflected from production and concentrated on Stock Exchange dealings; or worse that the folly of such dealings was allowed to undermine the" financial stability of productive undertakings.

’To-day the Financial Secretary has been in touch with the Stock Exchanges. If necessary, Government will have to intervene to reduce the volume of transactions to more realistic levels. But it would be much better if the speculators themselves showed more prudence, or in default of that if all the institutions concerned insisted, as I think they could, that the market was restored to more rational dealings.

"Reverting to the high standard we are here to honour, I believe imagination, industrial courage and foresight, that have produced these designs, are typical of those healthy and highly productive characteristics on which Hong Kong’s prosperity is based.

"I now have pleasure in calling on the representative of Anpex Ferrotec to step forward to receive the trophy.”

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Release Time; 7.00 p.m.

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Friday, January 12, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No.

Wider powers are proposed for preventive service officers to act against drug offenders .................................... 1

Efforts will be stepped up to stamp out overcharging by shops at the airport ................................................... 2

A new polyclinic will be built in East Kowloon.................... 4

Princess Margaret Road is to be widened .........................  5

Lunar New Year’s Day is a statutory holiday for industrial workers ...................................................•. •. 6

More Immigration staff have been laid on to handle re-entry permit applications for the Lunar New Year period................  7

Hong Kong will be able to see a penumbral eclipse of the moon later this month .............................................• 8

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Friday, January 12, 1973

- 1 -

WIDER PQ7ERS FOR PREVENTIVE SERVICE OFFICERS PROPOSED

New Measure Against Drug Offenders

**********

The Government proposes to give officers of the Preventive Service wider powers as yet another measure to act against drug offenders.

For this purpose, the Dangerous Drugs (Amendment) Bill 1973 will soon be put forward to the Legislative Council.

xhe Bill seeks to provide an officer not below the rank of Revenue Inspector with such powers as requiring a suspect to have his finger nails pared and his hands washed so that the nails and water can be analysed.

It will also enable the officer to require the suspect to give a specimen of his handwriting for comparison purposes.

Explaining the proposed legislation, a Government spokesman said that such powers had already been conferred on police officers not below the rani; of inspector under section 5k of the Dangerous Drugs Ordinance (Chapter 1j&).

Although the responsibility for the enforcement of the ordinance rested mainly with the police, he said the Preventive Service also played an important role in this task.

”In order to enable the Preventive Service officers operate more effectively, it is considered desirable to accord them the same powers under section 5^ as their police counterparts.”

The spokesman added that this would have the advantages of speeding up the process of investigation and in reducing the number of witnesses who might be required to give evidence in any subsequent court proceedings.

Friday, January 12, 1973

- 2 -

TIGHTER CONTROL OVER PRICES AT AIRPORT SHOPS Serious View To Be Taken Of Overcharging *********

The Director of Civil Aviation is to be given wider powers to control prices of goods sold by shops in the airport terminal building in order to prevent overcharging.

A spokesman for the department warned today that in future ”a serious view” would be taken of such incidents and may result in the termination of the tenancy of any shop guilty of overcharging.

He gave the warning when calling for tenders for 29 shop spaces in the passenger terminal building.

The shop spaces are to be let for a period of three years and are intended for the sale of such goods as radio and photographic equipment, jewellery, publications, Chinese arts and crafts, pharmaceuticals and tobacco, among others.

There are also spaces for money changers and the sale of insurance.

The spokesman said that while prospective tenderers could judge the value of the accommodation by observing the volume of business presently conducted, ’’this does not indicate the level of increases which can be expected over the period of the agreement.”

He po?.nted out that about 9^ per cent of the tourists visiting Hong Kong each year arrived by air and the number was steadily increasing.

/"Forecasts ••••••

Friday, January 12, 1973

- 3 -

"Forecasts of traffic growth," he said, "show that over the

next five years the present daily average of 7,000 arriving and departing passengers is expected to increase by approximately 15 per cent a year to over 11,000 passengers per day by the end of 1975

These figures, he added, excluded direct transit passengers

who currently averaged 1,000 a day. "A similar increase is expected in

the number of these passengers."

In addition, an estimated 19,000 people visit the terminal building each day in the course of their work or to greet or say farewell to their friends, he said.

The spokesman explained that increases of this magnitude required "extensive modifications" to the terminal building and some of the areas for which tenders were now invited might require repositioning.

The tender documents require the shops to be operated on a

24-hour basis except when a reduction is approved by the Director.

The Closing date for tenders is noon February 2.

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A...........

Friday, January 12, 1975

- 4 -

POLYCLINIC FOR EAST KOWLOON

Construction Work To Begin Shortly

*******

A polyclinic is to be built shortly in the eastern part of Kowloon to serve residents in the area.

The Kowloon East Polyclinic, situated at Hammer Hill Road opposite the Hong Kong School for the Deaf, will be built on an 80,000 square foot site.

Construction will be carried out in two stages.

Work on Stage I, comprising a maternal and child health centre, a chest clinic and general out-patient facilities, is expected to begin in the middle of next year and completed in 1975.

Site formation works will start in early March and take about six months to complete,

A spokesman for the Medical and Health Department said: ’’The construction cost of this stage amounts to about S3 *5 million. It is met by a donation from the Royal Hong Kong Jockey Club.”

The second stage of the polyclinic, to be built at a later date, consists mainly of a dental clinic and specialist facilities.

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/5

Friday, January 12, 1973

- 5 -

PRINCESS MaRGARET ROAD TO BE WIDENED

To Cope With Increasing Traffic

*********

The section of Princess Margaret Road between the old Ho Man Tin Hill Road and Sheung Hing Street is to be widened shortly to cope with the larger volume of traffic brought about by the Cross Harbour Tunnel•

Work is expected to begin next month and will take about a year to complete.

It involves the construction of one additional lane to each side of the present two-lane dual carriageways.

Footways of 12 feet wide will also be provided on both sides of the road.

A spokesman for the Public Works Department said that Princess Margaret Road is an important primary distributor and will fulfill this function to an even greater extent with the Cross Harbour Tunnel already in use.

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/6..........

Friday, January 12, 1973

- 6 -

STATUTORY HOLIDAYS FOR INDUSTRIAL WORKERS

During Lunar New Year

*********

The Commissioner of Labour, Mr. Paul Tsui, to-day reminded employers that the Lunar New Year’s Day and the following day are statutory holidays for industrial workers.

This year, the Lunar New Year’s Day and the second day of Lunar New Year fall on February J and 4.

With few exceptions, Mr. Tsui said all manual workers in industrial undertakings paid on a monthly, daily or piece-rate basis must be given two holidays on these two days.

Non-manual workers in industrial undertakings earning not more than >?700 a month would have the same right.

/□i employer should grant a female worker, or a worker who is a young person, another holiday on February 5 if the statutory holiday on February k falls on a scheduled rest day of the worker.

Tlie two paid holidays are among the six statutory holidays in a year to which industrial workers are entitled under the Industrial Employment (Holidays with Pay and Sickness Allowance) Ordinance.

The other four statutory holidays are:

* Ching Ming Festival;

* Tuen Ng (Dragon Boat) Festival;

* The day following the Chinese Mid-Autumn Festival; and

* Chinese Winter Solstice Festival.

/To qualify ......

Friday, January 12, 1973

- 7 -

To qualify for the two paid holidays for the Lunar New Year, which are in addition to the compulsory four rest days a month under the Employment Ordinance, a worker must have worked at least 180 days during a period of 12 months, and at least 20 days in the 28 days preceding February 3*

-------0---------

MORE STAFF TO HANDLE RE-ENTRY PERMIT APPLICATIONS

For Lunar New Year Period

******** *♦

The Immigration Department has increased its staff to cope with the expected large number of people applying for re-entry permits for the Lunar New Year period.

Announcing this today, the Director of Inmigration, Mr. W.E. Collard, said many local residents usually spent the Lunar New Year in Macau or China with their relatives.

More than 350^000 people went to these two places last year and he predicted that the figure for this year would likely be higher.

In order to cope with the anticipated increase, more staff has been put at the various branch offices.

Mr. Collard said the present strength would be adequate. However, he would keep the situation under close watch and might extend the working hours if necessary.

He added that he had already instructed his staff to process all applications everyday before they could go off.

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/8..........

Friday, January 12, 1973

- 8 -

PENUMBRAL ECLIPSE OF MOO]

A penumbral eclipse of the moon will be visible in Hong Kong on January 19, provided that weather conditions are favourable.

With a penumbral eclipse, the moon does not enter the complete shadow of the earth and the light reflected by the moon is not totally obscured.

"There will only be a slight decrease in the brightness of the moon during the eclipse and this may be difficult to detect by the naked eye," a Royal Observatory spokesman said.

Details of the eclipse are given below

Hong Kong Standard Time

Moonrise in Hong Kong January 18 5*28 p.m.

Sunset in Hong Kong January 18 6.02 p.m.

Moon enters perthmbra January 19 3.17 a.m.

Middle of the eclipse January 19 5.17 a.m.

Sunrise in Hong Kong January 19 7.05 a.m.

Moonset in Hong Kong January 19 7.08 a.m.

Moon leaves penumbra January 19 7.17 a.m.

Release Time: 6.30 P.M.

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PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Saturday, January 13, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No,

The need for compassion is an important ingredient in any successful fireman ........................... 1

Areas for picking up and setting down passengers at the Star Ferry Concourse in Hong Kong are to be changed ................ 4

A registration of persons team will visit Wong Chuk Hang next week.................................................. 5

A passing-out parade of Immigration officers will be held on Tuesday  .................................................. 6

Water supply will be cut in Sha Tau Kok on Tuesday.......... 7

There will be an issue of the D.I.B. tomorrow.......•........ 7

Move by the stock exchanges to close for trading on two afternoons next week is called sensible by the Financial

Secretary .........................................  ....... 8

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Saturday, January 13, 1975

1

SUCCESSFUL FIREMEN MUST HAVE COMPASSION Fire Chief Speaks At Passing-Out Parade ***********

The Director of Fire Services, Mr. A.E.H, Wood, today emphasised that a very important ingredient in any successful fireman was "the need for compassion."

He said that "this compassion, when coupled with the qualities of sincerity, determination, self-discipline and dedication will result in a successful fireman with pride of service and personal achievement." Mr. Wood was speaking at the passing-out parade of officers and firemen at the Fire Services Training School at Pat Heung in the New Territories this (Saturday) morning.

He said that Hong Kong’s Fire Services was "second to none" and that its future reputation would depend on the conduct of each firernnf individually and collectively.

The following is the full text of Mr. Wood’s speech:

"The vigorous progress, growth and development of the community in which we live necessitates that in common with all other agencies, our Service keeps in step with this rapid expansion by constantly reviewing techniques, operations and organisation and a vital element of all current activities and advanced planning is the need to ensure that properly trained young men are available to enable our Service to continue to meet its legal and moral responsibilities to the public.

/"The majority •••••••

Saturday, January 1J, 1973

- 2 -

”The majority of you on parade today have now successfully completed your initial training which will have equipped you with the basic requirements of your chosen calling and prepared you to take your place at the side of your colleagues already in the operational field* ,rYou will very shortly commence to gain the experience which no amount of training can give you and you will very quickly learn that the opportunities to gain this experience are only too frequent in our community.

Challenges

”In the years that lie ahead you will continue to acquire knowledge which will further enhance your ability to meet and conquer the many challenges which will, inevitably, arise, and I am confident that in time each of you will not only maintain but will also enhance the reputation of the entire Service and, further more, add your contribution, to the field of fire protection and prevention.

,fYou will very quickly find that in the course of your duties you will be attending a great variety of incidents, and the majority of these incidents will bring you into direct contact with persons in distress and difficulty.

nI therefore wish to emphasise that you must never forget that a very important ingredient in any successful Fireman is the need for compassion and this compassion, when coupled with the qualities of sincerity, determination, self—discipline and dedication will result in a successful Fireman with pride of Service and personal achievement.

/f,You are......

Saturday, January 13, 1973

,fYou are all members of a Service which, with pride and humility,

I consider is second to none and the reputation our Service currently enjoys will depend on the conduct of each and everyone of you, individually and collectively.

r,In the eyes of the public, you represent the entire Service

and from what I have seen of you today, I feel sure that you will all merit the esteem of the public during the course of your career.

finally, I warmly congratulate the Commandant, Training School v'

staff and all of you on parade aox uhe splendid turn-out and bearing. ,fMy best wishes to you all I”

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A

Saturday, January 1}, 1973

- 4 -

TAXI RANKS AT THE STAR FERRY CONCOURSE

Picking Up And Setting Down Areas To Be Swapped

*********

The picking up and setting down areas for passengers at the Star Ferry concourse in Hong Kong will be reversed later this month, the Commissioner for Transport announced today.

With one-way traffic routing at the concourse, it is illogical that the setting down area should at present be sited beyond the main picking up area.

This means that, having dropped his passenger, a taxi must travel round in a large circle before he can return empty to the picking up area.

It would make more sense to swap over the two areas, so that a taxi first drops his passenger and then goes on empty to the picking up area ahead.

On Monday (January 15), work will start on carrying out the changes to queue railings and signs,and will be completed a week later.

■i-axis will then discharge on the western side of the concourse beside the subway and pick up passengers in front of the pier.

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/5..........

Saturday, January 131 1973

- 3 -

REGISTRATION OF PERSONS TEAM TO VISIT WONG CHUK HANG Residents Urged To Make Use Of Facilities ♦ * * * * * * ♦

The Commissioner of Registration announced today that a team from the Registration of Persons Department will conduct registrations at the Wong Chuk Hang Government Low Cost Estate Office from Monday (January 15), to Friday (January 19)•

Business hours will be from 9*30 a.m. to 4.30 p.m. on such dates.

The visit will enable parents or guardians to register their children from six to 17 years of age for juvenile identity cards.

Young people 17 years of age and over and holding juvenile identity cards, can register for adult identity cards.

People living in the area are reminded of their responsibility to register themselves and their children for identity cards.

They must report to the Registration of Persons Department any changes of employment or residential address, nationality or marital status or any other particulars which have changed since registering for their identity cards.

Children between six and 17 years of age who have Hong Kong Birth Certificates or valid travel documents need not attend for registration, but children who do not have Birth Certificates or valid travel documents, must accompany their parents or guardians when registering.

Parents or guardians must produce both their (i.e. husband and wife) identity cards for inspection when registering juveniles.

/On registering .......

Saturday, January 13, 1973

- 6 -

On registering for adult cards, young people 17 years of age and over must surrender their juvenile identity cards and produce the identity cards of both their parents or guardians under whom they are registered, and a Hong Kong Birth Certificate or evidence of their residence in Hong Kong during the past two years.

People who do not possess any of these documents must register at the Registration of Persons Branch Office in the Causeway Bay Magistracy, Electric Road, Hong Kong, at Canton Road Government Offices, Yau Ma Tei, Kowloon or at Far East Bank Building, Ground floor, Castle Peak Road, Tsuen Wan, New Territories.

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PASSING-OUT PARADE OF IMMIGRATION OFFICERS

Twenty-one Immigration Assistants, including eight women, will take part in a passing-out parade to be held on Tuesday (January 16) at the Royal Hong Kong Regiment Parade Ground in Happy Valley.

Mr. Lo Tak-shing, Urban Councillor, will inspect the parade and present awards to the top recruits.

Note to Editors: The parade will be held at 9*30 a.m.

You are invited to send a reporter and/or photographer to cover it.

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/7..........

Saturday, January 13, 1973

- 7 -

WATER INTERRUPTION

*******

Water supply to a number of premises in Sha Tau Kok will be interrupted for eight hours from 10 p.m. on Tuesday (January 16) to 6 a.m. the next morning.

The temporary water stoppage is to enable the Waterworks Office to make connections at Sha Tau Kok Road near Queen’s Hill Camp, Ma Mei Ha and Loi Tung Tsuen.

The area to be affected are premises and villages along Sha Tau Kok Road between Queen’s Hill Camp and to the east of Sha Tau Kok Market (including Kong Ha Village) , and Ping Che Road between Sha Tau Kok Road and Ta Ku Ling Police Station.

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SUNDAY D.I.B.

Note to Editors:

There will be an issue of the Daily Information

Bulletin tomorrow (Sunday). Copies will be available

for collection in the G.I.S. press room after 3 p.m.

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/8.........

Saturday, January 13, 1973

- 8 -

EXCHANGES TO CLOSE FOR TWO AFTERNOONS NEXT WEEK Financial Secretary Says Move Is Sensible ********

Commenting on the statement by the Chairman of the four stock exchanges today that "further to our announcement dated 11th January that trading will cease on Wednesday afternoons until further notice, we have now decided that due to the inability of stock-brokers to clear their accumulated back-log, the stock exchanges will also close for trading on Monday and Friday afternoons next week only, in order to clear this accumulation of paper-work," the Financial Secretary said:

"I think this is a very sensible move because the volume of turnover recently has made it extremely difficult for stock-brokers to observe the delivery arrangements stipulated by the stock exchanges’ own rules. These two extra half day holidays should enable stock-brokers to catch up."

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Release Time: 2.30 p.m.

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Sunday, January 14, 1973

- 1 • *

* LAST SQUATTER CLEARANCE IN LUNG CHEUNG ROAD

To Make Way For Road Improvement Project

**«»«***

The last squatter clearance connected with the Lung Cheung Road Extension project will take place on Tuesday (January 16) at Yuen Ling Village, Diamond Hill.

Some 400 families comprising more than 1,880 people are involved

in this clearance. About 330 huts will be demolished in the four-day operation.

The squatters have been given resettlement in Lam Tin or Sau Mau Ping estates. On top of the resettlement, cultivators, ahd shop operators have been given cash compensation totalling more than 5400,000.

Forty-five shop operators have also been allocated units in the Department’s flatted factories in Kwun Tong*

Of the 400 families, some 376 of them have already moved to their new homes, and the remaining 24 are expected to follow soon.

There are also 6? unauthorised families staying in the clearance area. They have been allocated sites in the Department’s licensed area to build their own huts.

A Resettlement Department spokesman emphasised today (Sunday) that no one would be made homeless as a result of Tuesday’s clearance.

/Under .........

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Sunday, January 14, 1973

- 2 -

Under the Kowloon Foothills Road Corridor Scheme, Lung Cheung Road will be widened to provide two lanes in each direction, and all existing intersections will be replaced by flyovers.

Work is well under way on some of the eleven separate projects forming the 8140 million scheme.

When the highway is completed in 1975, the entire route across the northern part of Kowloon will merge with the Kwai Chung Coastal Road.

This will complete the important traffic route linking San Po Kong and Kwun Tong in the east, 'and Kwai Chung and Tsuen Wan in the west.

Note to Editors: An aerial photograph showing the Lung

Cheung road extension is available for collection from the G.I.S..press room.

Sunday, January 11!-, 1973

- 3 -

CONNAUGHT ROAD WIDENING PROJECT NEARING COMPLETION

*******

Work on the widening of Connaught Road Central from Edinburgh Place to Rumsey Street is nearing completion.

The final phase of the widening work is now being carried out in front of the Fire Brigade Building.

The widened road, a part of the Connaught Road Improvement Scheme, will provide two 44-foot-wide carriageways with four lanes each, with a central turfed divider along the entire length of the road.

Also included in the Scheme is an elevated walkway system which will enable pedestrians to travel more quickly and safely in the Central District.

The system will run above the northern footpath of Connaught Road Central between Pedder Street and Gilman Street. Its eastern end will link up with another footbridge network being built by the Hong Kong Land & Investment Co.

Note to Editors: Copies of a photograph showing the

stretch of Connaught Road Central from the Realty Building to Rumsey Street are available for collection in the G.I.S. press room.

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Release Time: 3>00 p.m

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Monday, January 151 1975

CONTENTS

Page No.

Public comments on the draft white paper on social welfare are

being considered...........................................      1

The number of registered marriages hit a new record last year ........................................................    3

The Lunar New Year stamps will go on sale on January 25 ••• • 5

Office bearers of a recreational committee in Wong Tai Sin will be sworn in tomorrow ...................................    7

Certain buildings in Sham Shui Po will be without water on Thursday.......................................................  7

The Latour Department has expressed concern over the reported loss of jobs by workers of a factory in the fire-ravaged

Watson1 s Estate • ..........................................    8

A code of guidance on traffic discipline has been distributed to public light bus operators .................................. 9

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Monday, January 15, 1973

- 1 -

DRAFT VJHITE PAPER ON SOCIAL WELFARE

Social Welfare Planning Committee Considers Public Comments

********

Preparation of the draft white paper on social welfare in the years ahead and its accompanying five-year plan as "a joint exercise between the Government and the private sector" was generally endorsed by the public, according to a breakdown of comments received.

The draft white paper was tabled in the Legislative Council on October 18, 1972, and a foreword invited members of the public to submit their views to the Social Welfare Planning Committee.

In response to this invitation, Mr. F.K. Li, Director of Social Welfare and Chairman of the Committee, said today 167 comments had been received, including eight letters from government departments, 27 from various kaifong associations, 18 from voluntary agencies, 15 from the universities, colleges and schools, and 46 from indjvi duals.

There was a general welcome for the draft white paper, which was recognised as the "most obvious sign that social welfare had come of age in Hong Kong," and which was "most explicitly seen in the fact that the Government accepted ultimate responsibility for the provision of satisfactory social welfare services."

Many comments were received on the proposed disability and infirmity allowance scheme. There was unanimous support for a non-means tested scheme. Some people felt that to define the infirm as over 75 was too high a limit, and the majority of these criticisms suggested 70 instead.

/The intention

Monday, January 15i 1973

- 2 -

The intention of the Government to extend its provision of social security was well received, and one comment was that this showed the people that their taxes were being spent "in a good and wise way."

Mr. Li said the role of volunteers in the provision of social welfare services had received considerable comment. Many correspondents felt the use of volunteers should be enlarged to include working youths, students,

the retired — in fact that volunteers should come from all areas of society.

The concept of the volunteer as a contributing member of the community

was stressed in a number of letters. It was suggested that there was “a

need to re-examine the uses to which volunteers are put." The volunteers ought to be grouped more closely according to their interests and skills, and they should "serve where possible in the districts where they live.”

Volunteer Service

Training of volunteers also generated much comment, and training centres were proposed. Areas recommended for the expansion of volunteer service included work camps, hospitals, prison visiting, visiting and assisting the disabled and the elderly, and youth organisations.

Mr. Li said most correspondents had approved the proposals on the expansion of community services. Some had given them priority because of the impact they would make on keeping social order within the community.

More open spaces and sports facilities were urged, and some critics insisted that activities in centres must be carefully planned and researched because "it would be useless to have good buildings without conducting good programmes within them."

Other comments received ' zrered the field of family welfare services, financing, training, research, statistics, and evaluation.

The Social Welfare Planning Committee met recently to consider these comments, and to decide how they should best be reflected in the white paper.

- - C - -

I

Monday, January 15, 1975

- 5 -•

RECORD NUMBER OF REGISTERED MARRIAGES IN 1972

City Hall Registry Remains Most Popular

*******

The number of marriages registered in 1972 reached a new record total of 27,264, being 560 more than the previous record of 26,904 in 1971, the Registrar General, Mr. W. Hume, announced today.

These figures apply to all marriages in 1972, which was the first full year in which marriages might be contracted only in accordance with the Marriage Ordinance.

While this no doubt influenced the figures for the year, another influence was the fact that the early part of the year (up to February 14) fell within the preceding lunar year, which was a particularly auspicious year with two First Days of Spring (Lap Chun) according to the lunar calendar.

The current lunar year is a blind year, that is to say, a year in which there is no First Day of Spring.

"The record total of registered marriages included 2,795 marriages between parties already previously married in other ways as compared with 4,076 marriages of this category in 1971*

"The marked decrease in the number of these ’remarriage1 cases is due to the impact of the post-registration provisions of the Marriage Reform Ordinance gradually tapering off.

"Excluding these ’remarriages’, the total number of registered marriages actually increased by 2,641 from 22,828 in 1971 to 24,469 in 1972," Mr. Hume added.

/There was .........

Monday, January 15, 1973

- 4 -

There was a slight decrease in the number of church marriages in 1972, the total being 2,258 as compared with 2,599 in 1971.

However, most of the registered marriages were, as usual, celebrated at the marriage registries, the total of such marriages reaching a new record of 25,006, an increase of 501 over the 1971 figure.

In the Nev/ Territories, registered marriages increased significantly

with a total of 2,945 marriages celebrated, up by 501 or 20 per cent as compared with 2,444 in 1971•

There are now four full-time registries and 14 part-time registries operating in the New Territories.

Most Popular

The two principal marriage registries at the City Hall and the Kowloon Government Offices remained the most popular registries with 44 per cent of all marriages celebrated there.

Another popular registry was the Sung Wong Toi Registry, where 3,454 marriages took place during the year.

The new marriage registry opened at San Po Kong on June 26, 1972 has also proved to be very popular, with a total of 1,118 marriages celebrated by the end of the year.

The City Hall Marriage Registry continued to operate on Sunday

mornings during the year, and a total of 564 Sunday morning marriages were performed.

In many cases, Sunday was chosen because it happened to be a lucky

day according to the Chinese calendar; in others simply because of convenience for work or other reasons.

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/5

Monday, January 15, 1973

- 5 -

NEW STAMPS TC MARK YEAR OF OX

On Sale From January 25

*********

Two special stamps to mark the coming Lunar Nev/ Year, the Year of the Ox, will be on sale at all post offices from January 25-

The stamps, in denominations of 10 cents and 31.30, are the seventh in the series of Lunar New Year stamps.

Special first day covers will also be on sale at the post offices at 20 cents each from Wednesday, January .17*

Members of the public are advised to obtain their requirements early to avoid disappointment.

Advance orders for servicing of first day covers will be accepted at the General Post Office, Pedder Street; Kowloon Central Post Office, Nathan Road; and Tsim Sha Tsui Post-Office, Salisbury Road.

For this service, addressed first day covers must be handed in together with an order form and a remittance to cover the cost. The charge will be 31.50 per cover which includes the cost of two stamps together with a service fee of 10 cents.

The covers must be fully addressed by the applicant, and not less than ten covers will be accepted with each order.

The order forms will be available at the General Post Office, Kowloon Central Post Office and Tsim Sha Tsui Post Office on Wednesday (January 17)•

/Any person ••••••

Monday, January 15, 1973

- 6 -

Any person ordering serviced covers addressed to a local destination may collect them on January 26 from the office where the order was placed.

Covers addressed overseas will be sent by ordinary post, surface mail, unless sufficient stamps are affixed to cover airmail and/or registration charges.

The latest acceptance date for advance orders of serviced covers will be noon January 22.

A service will be provided on January 25 at all post offices whereby First Day covers will be accepted over the counter, impressed with the normal post office date stamp and handed back to the person presenting then.

No time type will appear in the postmark. The special conditions for this service are:-

* only articles bearing an indication that they are

•First Day Covers’ will be so treated;

* the articles must be addressed to a local address;

* the articles must not bear any other cancellation; and

* no registered items will be processed by this method.

Special posting boxes will also be available at the General Post Office, Kowloon Central Post Office and Tsim Sha Tsui Post Office on January 25 for those who wish to have their first day covers carefully handr-postmarked before despatch to the address on the cover.

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/7.........

Monday, January 15, 1973

- 7 -

OFFICE BEARERS OF RECREaTION/Jj COMMITTEE TO BE SWORN IN

**********

The office bearers of the 5th Executive Committee of the Cultural and Recreational Committee of the Wong Tai Sin Community Centre will be inaugurated at a ceremony to be held at the Community Centre tomorrow (Tuesday, January 16).

The Cultural and Recreational Committee is formed by more than 60 member schools in the Wong Tai Sin District.

Its functions, carried out by the Executive Committee, are to promote cultural and recreational activities for children and youth in the district.

Note to Editors: You are welcome to have the event covered.

The inauguration ceremony will be held at 5 p.m. tomorrow.

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INTERRUPTION OF WaTER SUPPLY

**********

Water supply to certain buildings in Sham Shui Po will be turned

off for five hours from 1 a.m. on Thursday (January 18) to enable Waterworks

Office staff to carry out a leakage test in the vicinity.

The area to be affected is bounded by Kweilin Street, Tung Chau

Street, Kiu Kiang Street and Lai Chi Kok Road.

0 - -

/8

Monday, January 15, 1973

- 8 -

LABOUR DEPARTMINT CONCERNED OVER WORKERS’ "LOSS OF JOBS0

Following Watson’s Estate Fire

********

The Labour Department today expressed concern over newspaper reports that more than *+00 workers of the Taylor Radio Service at Watson’s Estate had lost their jobs due to the recent fire and that certain injured workers and dependants of victims were doubtful of their chances for compensation.

A spokesman for the Department said: "The services of two specific units within the department are available to render these workers assistance. They are the Local Employment Service and the Workmen’s Compensation Unit.

"Any worker who is unemployed as a result of the fire is invited to register with the Local Employment Service at any one of its five branch offices.

"Every effort will then be made to introduce him to suitable alternative employment. All he needs to bring is one passport size photograph and his identity card."

As far as workmen’s compensation was concerned, the spokesman stressed that all manual workers irrespective of their earnings and all non-manual workers earning $1,500 or less a month were entitled to compensation under the Workmen’s Compensation Ordinance if they suffered injury by accident arising out of and in the course of employment.

"Any injured worker who through injury is away from work for more than three days or who suffers partial permanent incapacity or the dependant of a victim who has doubts about his entitlement to compensation is advised.to get in touch with the Workmen’s Compensation Unit", he emphasised.

The nearest Branch offices of the Local Employment Service, Tel. 5-2^9081 Ext. 70 and 77 and the Workmen’s Compensation Unit, Tel. 5-249081 Ext. 97 are located in New Rodney Block, 99, Queensway, Ground floor, Hong Kong.

Monday, January 15, 1973

- 9 -

CODE ON TRAFFIC LANE DISCIPLINE

For Public Light Bus Operators

*******

A code of guidance on traffic lane discipline has been circulated to public light bus operators by the Transport Department.

"There have been recurrent complaints against public light bus driving habits and the code of guidance was drawn up with the purpose of improving driving techniques,” a Transport Department spokesman said.

Copies of the code were given to the operators at a recent meeting

with the Department.

The spokesman hoped that there would be better driving techniques and consideration for other road users in future among the public light bus operators.

The code, drawn up in consultation with the Police Traffic Branch, covers 10 essential points:

White lines on the road guide, warn and give orders.

Do not cross double white lines in the middle of the road, unless you need to get in or out of premises, are ordered to cross the lines by a policeman, or to avoid an obstruction.

Keep between the traffic lane markings - the short broken white lines which divide the road into lanes. Keep in the left-hand lane unless you are going to over-take, turn right, or pass parked vehicles.

* Do not wander from lane to lane. If you need to move into another lane, first use your mirror. If it is safe to move over, signal before doing so. Make sure you will not force another driver to swerve or slow down.

When approaching

Monday, January 15> 1973

- 10

* When approaching junctions, obey any lane indication arrows narked on the road.

In a traffic hold-up, do not try to "jump the queue" by cutting into another lane, or by overtaking the vehicles waiting in front of you.

* On a three-lane dual carriageway, you may stay in the middle lane where there are slower vehicles in the inside lane, but you should return to the inside lane when you have overtaken them. The outside lane is for overtaking only. If you use it, move back into the middle lane and then into the inside lane as soon as you can, but without cutting in.

* In one-way streets, choose the correct lane for your exit as soon as you can. Never change lanes, suddenly unless road markings indicate otherwise; choose the left-hand lane when going to the left and the right hand lane when going to the right. Remember - other vehicles could be passing on both sides.

* Do not overtake unless you are sure it is safe for yourself and other road users. Before you start to overtake, make sure that the road is clear far enough ahead and behind. Use your mirror. Signal before you start to move out.

* To summarise good lane driving, remember the sequence: MIRROR - SIGNAL - MANOEUVRE.

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Release time: 6.45 p.m.

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Tuesday, January 16, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No*

Ming Tak Bank creditors will receive their first dividend payments before the Lunar New Year..............................

Hong Kong’s birth rate rises for the first time in nearly 10 years ..........................................................

Assizes opening ceremony on Thursday............................

Feasibility study being conducted on proposed Aberdeen Tunnel... 7

More sports facilities being provided for Cheung Chau residents _ ................................................................  8

Registration of Trade Unions .....................................

Roundup of December’s weather ..................................

Last squatter clearance to make way for Lung Cheung Road project

Death sentence commuted.................................

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Tuesday, January 16, 1973

- 1 -

FIRST DIVIDIND TO MING TAK BANK CREDITORS Arrangements For Payment Completed ********

Arrangements for the payment of a first dividend to creditors of the Ming Tak Bank have now been finalised, Mr. W. Hume, the Official Receiver and Trustee, announced today.

Mr. Hume recalled that in his latest circular letter to creditors dated November 30* 1972 he said that he proposed to pay a first dividend of not less than 20 per cent to all unsecured creditors before the next Chinese New Year provided the necessary arrangements could be made in time.

’•Creditors will be pleased to learn”, Mr. Hume said, ’’that it will in fact be possible to pay a dividend of 23 per cent.”

’’However, although almost all depositors will be paid before Chinese New Year, it will unfortunately not be possible to pay some other creditors until about the end of February,” he added.

Mr. Hume explained that the creditors who will be paid before Chinese New Year are those depositors, whether on current, savings, deposit, fixed deposit or other account, who can produce their account books or deposit receipts (except for a comparatively small number to whom it has been necessary to send proofs of debt for completion), and also the holders of gift coupons who can produce the coupons.

The dates and times of payment will be notified in the Government Gazette and advertised in the public notices columns of several newspapers on Friday, January 19«

/Arrangements,

Tuesday, January 16, 1973

- 2 -

Arrangements, he said, will be made for paying other creditors after Chinese New Year. A separate notice regarding these arrangements will be published later.

Mr. Hume explained that each depositor and gift coupon holder should attend on the appropriate day and time for his account, bringing with him his Identity Card, Pass-Book, Deposit Receipt, Bank Statement, gift coupon, or other evidence of his claim, and also his signature chop, if he uses one.

If anyone has lost or mislaid his Pass-Book, Deposit Receipt or gift coupon he should NOT attend. Arrangements for dealing with such cases will be published later.

Authorised Representative

If a depositor or gift coupon holder is unable to attend in person, he can authorise payment to his representative by completing a form of Authority for Payment of Dividend.

Copies of the form will be available during normal office hours from today onwards at the Official Receiver’s Office, Sutherland House, 10th floor, 3 Chater Road, and at the Registrar General’s Department, Central Government Offices, West Wing, 6th floor.

Arrangements for payment to depositors or holders of gift coupons who are unable to attend in person or by duly authorised representative at the specified dates and times for their accounts will be announced later.

Creditors are strongly advised to have nothing to do with any unauthorised person, and in particular NOT to hand over their documents to anyone other than the authorised staff inside the offices referred to above.

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/3.........

Tuesday, January 16, 1973

- 3 -

DOWNWARD TRRID IN BIRTHS REVERSED

1972 Figure Shows Rise For The First Time Since 1963

********

The total number of births registered in 1972 was 79,053, a slight increase over the 1971 figure of 76,818.

This was revealed today by the Registrar General, Mr. W. Hume.

Although the increase was only 2,255, or about 5 per cent up on the 1971 figure, it was significant in that it reversed the downward trend • • noted in each year since 1963, when a record figure of 115,263 births was registered.

A total of 19,910 births was registered on Hong Kong Island, 48,35^ %

in Kowloon and 10,789 in the New Territories, being 4.46 per cent up, 3*65 per cent up and 2.86 per cent down respectively as compared with the preceding year.

The crude birth rate also rose to 19.39 per thousand of population as compared with 18.99 in 1971 and 19-65 in 1970. This is the first increase since i960, when the rate was 37-1-

In issuing these figures, Mr. Hume emphasized that they were in respect of registered births only.

There were always a number of births every year which were not registered by the parents at the time, with the result that while the figures for registered births show trends, they do not give a completely accurate picture.

The total registered births comprised 77,076 Chinese (39,731 male and 37j3^5 female) and 1,977 non-Chinese (1,04-9 male and 928 female).

/The number

Tuesday, January 16, 1973

- 4 -

The number of deaths registered in 1972 was 21,145, an increase of 892 as compared with 1971. The crude death rate was also slightly up at 5.19 per thousand of population, compared with 5.01 for 1971•

Of the total deaths, 20,857 (11,709 male and 9,146 female and 2 unknown sex) were Chinese and 288 (201 male and 87 female) were non-Chinese.

The number of deaths of infants under one year of age was 1,j80 or 17.46 per thousand registered births as against 1,410 or 18.36 per thousand registered births in 1971 •

The number of deaths of infants under one week of age was 740 or 9*36 per thousand registered births as against 722 or 9*40 per thousand registered births in 1971•

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Tuesday, January 16, 1973

- 5 -

CEREMONIAL OPENING OF THE ASSIZES

Church Services, Speeches, Guard Of Honour

********

The first Assizes of the Supreme Court for this year will be held on Thursday, January 18. Following the practice of previous years, there will be two church services, one in St. John’s Cathedral and the other in St. Joseph’s Church, Garden Road.

’ The service in St. John’s Cathedral will begin at 9-30 a.m. during which there will be a sermon by the Rev. Hedley Bunton.

In St. Joseph’s Church the service will consist of a Mass starting at 9*30 a.m* which will be celebrated by the Most Reverend Bishop Francis Hsu, • •

and the sermon will be preached by Rev. Fr. M. McLoughlin, S.J.

Both church services are open to members of the public.

After the two church services, which should conclude at about 10.10 a.m • • there will be an inspection by the Chief Justice of a Guard of Honour. The ♦

Guard will take up a position on Chater Road between the Supreme Court building and the Cenotaph, and will be supplied by this year by the 1st Battalion, 2nd (ICED) Gurkha Rifles accompanied by the Staff Band of the Brigade of Gurkhas (2nd Gurkha Rifles)• . .

After the inspection the Chief Justice and others will proceed into Court where addresses will be delivered.

/Note to Editors: ..........

9

Tuesday, January 16, 1973

- 6 -

PRESS ARRANGEMENTS

*******

Note to Editors; The first Assizes of the Supreme

Court for this year will be held on Thursday, January 18.

Press representatives covering the ceremony at the Cenotaph are asked to assemble at Chater Road outside the northeast corner of the Supreme Court Building not later than 10 a.m.

Officers from the Government Information Services will be on hand to assist them.

There will be limited space for reporters in the central court room and no photographs will be allowed within the court buildings.

Copies of the Chief Justice’s speech, in English and Chinese, will be available for collection from the Press Room, Government Information Services, after the ceremony.

-------0 - - * *

I

•i*

Tuesday, January 16, 1973

- 7 -

ABERDEEN TUNNEL FEASIBILITY STUDY Consultants’ Report Expected In May ********

The Government is studying the feasibility of building a road tunnel linking Happy Valley and Wong Chuk Hang.

The need for a high-capacity north-south road link, proposed by the Long Term Road Study, has become apparent as a result of the rapid housing and industrial development in the Aberdeen and Wah Fu areas and the increasing degree of recreational interest in the southern coast of Hong Kong Island.

The study is being carried out by consulting engineers who are expected to submit their report to the Government in May.

The report will include suggested alignments, structural details, proposed construction methods, and an estimate of the cost of both the tunnel and the necessary road connections at either end.

A spokesman for the Public Works Department said: "The brief to the consultants calls for the provision of dual two-lane carriageways, connecting in the north to the Cross Harbour Tunnel and Waterfront Road; via an extension to the Canal Road Flyover, and in the south to the existing Wong Chuk Hang Road by means of a grade separated interchange• " "As part of the Consultants’ investigations a detailed ground investigation contract has been let and is now underway," he added.

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/8.........

Tuesday, January 16, 1973

- 8 .

MORE SPORTS FACILITIES FOR CHEUNG CHAU RESIDENTS

*«***•»*«*

A fully equipped recreation ground will be built in Cheung Chau this Summer to supply additional sports facilities for the residents of the island.

A mini-soccer pitch, a basketball/volleyball court, a 300-meter running track, jump pits and a children’s playground are included in the scheme.

All these facilities will be provided with floodlighting to enable maximum usage at all hours.

Mobile spectator stands will be used in the ground so that they can be moved to whichever field is in use. There is also a permanent stand at the basketball/volleyball court.

Situated in a valley, the site is bounded by Sports Road, Kwun Yam Wan Road, Fa Peng Road and an access, road.

All existing plants on the construction site will be retained to preserve the natural surroundings.

Estimated to cost about 32 million, the recreation ground is due for completion in 1974.

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/9........

Tuesday, January 16, 1973

- 9 -

REGISTRATION OF TRADE ONIONS

**«»«***«

There were 335 registered trade unions in Hong Kong at the end of last year#

Of these, 277 were employees1 unions,46 employers’ unions and 12 mixed unions.

According to statistics issued by the Registrar of Trade Unions, three employees’ unions were removed from and one was added to the register kept by the department during the last quarter of 1972.

The three trade unions removed from the register were the Hong Kong Cross-Harbour Tunnel Workers General Union, the Society of Civil Servants, Ministry of Defence Section, Hong Kong Branch, and the Association of Government Supervisors and Radio Officers. The one added to the register was the Hong Kong and Kowloon Electronics Industry Employees’ General Union.

Four applications for registration were also received during the quarter.

The Registrar reported that in the same period, 57 applications for registration of alterations of rules by trade unions were approved and four employees’ unions and two employers’ associations were warned for failing to submit their applications for registration of alterations to their rules within the statutory period of 30 days.

--------0---------

/10.........

Tuesday, January 16, 1973

- 10 -

LAST MONTH’S WEATHER WAS FaIRLY NORMAL Christmas Was Warmer Than Usual

Apart from being slightly more cloudy than usual, December 1972 was a fairly normal month, according to the Royal Observatory.

At the beginning of the month, the south China coastal areas were under the influence of a continental northeasterly airstream and the weather in Hong Kong was generally sunny and dry.

Temperatures during the first two days were slightly below normal; but as the northeasterly airstream weakened, winds in Hong Kong turned to easterly and much warmer weather was experienced.

From December 4 to 7, the daily mean temperature was above 20°C, while the highest temperature of the month, 25*2°C, was recorded on December 7•

However, a cold front passed south across Hong Kong the same evening and resulted in slightly cooler weather the next day.

Fine and mild conditions prevailed in Hong Kong from December 9 to 11.

Meanwhile the seasonal continental anticyclone north of the Tibetan Plateau intensified and spread southeastwards.

A marked surge of the winter monsoon reached Hong Kong during the morning of December 12 and necessitated the hoisting of the Strong Monsoon Signal at 4.30 a.m.

Strong gusty northerly winds persisted until the next morning when the Strong Monsoon Signal was lowered at 11.10 a.m.

/During •••••

Tuesday, January 16, 1973

During the display of the Signal the following maximum gusts were recorded

Royal Observatory Hong Kong Airport 33 knots 43 knots

Cape Collinson 48 knots

Cheung Chau' Island 53 knots

Waglan Island 46 knots

Tate’s Cairn 56 knots

Some rain fell on December 12 and the weather remained dull and cold during the next two days.

Milder and more humid weather was experienced from December 15 to 19.

An easterly surge arrived on December 20 bringing some rain, and the weather continued cloudy with patches of light rain until the morning of December 22•

The weather during the Christmas holidays was mainly fine with sunny periods every day and was relatively warmer than usual.

On December 27 a cold front formed across south China and moved southwards as the anticyclone over northwest China intensified rapidly.

The cold front passed through Hong Kong on December 28, causing a sharp fall in temperature. The minimum temperature of the month, 8.8°C, was recorded on the early morning of December 30.

The Strong Monsoon Signal was again displayed from 3-10 a.m. on December 29 to 6.00 a.m. on December 30- The weather remained overcast until the end of the month.

During the month four tropical cyclones were reported over the western Pacific, the South China Sea and the Bay of Bengal.

/Typhoon

Tuesday, January 16, 1973

- 12 -

Typhoon SALLY moved west-northwestwards across Malaysia on December 4 and a tropical storm over the Bay of Bengal affected southern India on December 5*

Typhoon THERESE moved across the southern Philippines on a northwesterly track on December 4 and crossed the coast of South Vietnam on December 10.

Tropical Storm VIOLET formed over the Pacific near the Marshall Islands on December 12 and dissipated in the vicinity of the Caroline Islands seven days later.

No aircraft were diverted due to weather during the month. No thunderstorm or heavy rain warnings were issued^ Fire hazard warnings were issued as follows

December 1-2 Red

December 2-5 December 5-7 December 7-9 December 12-14 December 14-18 December 19-20 December 2^-J1 Yellow Yellow Red Red Yellow Yellow Yellow The month’s

Tuesday, January 16, 1973

The month’s figures and departures from normal were:

Sunshine 133-6 hours; 39-0 hours below normal

Rainfall 15-0 mm; 9-9 mm below normal

Cloudiness 66% 11% above normal

Relative Humidity 72%; 2% above normal

Mean Maxioun Temperature 2O.8°C; 0.7°C above normal

Mean Temperature 17.8°C; 0.5°C above normal

Mean Minimum Temperature 15.5°C; 0.6°C above normal

Mean Dew Point 12.4°Cj 0.5°C above normal

Total Evaporation 109-3 mm; 17-6 mm below normal

Maximum Tempera ture^olL-25-2°C was recorded on December 7.

Minimum Temperature of 3.8°C was recorded on December 30.

0-------

Tuesday, January 16, 1973

- 14 -

LAST SQUATTER CLEARANCE IN LUNG CHEUNG ROAD

********

The last squatter clearance connected with the Lung Cheung Road extension scheme started today at Yuen Ling Village, Diamond Hill.

The 1,880 people involved in the clearance have all moved to their new homes in Lam Tin or Sau Mau Ping Estate.

V

Of the 330 huts, about 100 were demolished today. It is expected that another three days will be required to pull down the rest.

Forty-five shop operators have been allocated units in resettlement flatted factories in Kwun Tong. Apart from resettlement, the shop operators and cultivators were given cash compensation, totalling more than $400,000.

A Resettlement Department spokesman today stressed that no one would be made homeless as a result of the clearance.

Work is well underway on some of the eleven separate projects forming the $140 million Lung Cheung Road extension scheme.

When the highway is completed in 1975» the entire route across the northern part of Kowloon will merge with the Kwai Chung Coastal Road.

-------0---------

DEATH SENTENCE COMMUTED

*******

The Governor, after taking into consideration the advice of the Executive Council, has decided that the death sentence passed on September 21, 1972 on Lai Kuen should be commuted to a term of 15 years imprisonment.

Lai Kuen was found guilty of the murder of Mui Suk-fung.

-------0---------

Release time: 7*00 p.m.

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Wednesday, January 17, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No,

The Financial Secretary speaks on the stock market and its effect on Hong Kong’s economy............................ 1

Information is to be collected before new legislation to control nurseries is implemented .....................• 3

Proceedings in Legco have been recorded ................. 4

Responsibilities of architects and building contractors have been outlined ........................................... 5

Professional driving test examiners will be recruited within the next few months ..................................... 6

The Director of Audit’s report is tabled in Legco today . 6

People affected by the Western District Urban Renewal Scheme have taken up public housing............................  7

The Government is asked to give concession to owners of prewar buildings in rate payment ............................• 8

Proposed law to reduce road accidents wins support....• 12

Legislation giving the Government power to take over land in private streets is being drafted • •••...............    15

Copyright Bill wins support from Unofficials in Legco.. 16

Three bills were passed in Legco today ................. ^8

The Governor opens new Mercury House ................... 19

More students are to take party in this year’s School Gymnastic Competitions.......................................      21

Warning has been issued to shipowners about the handling of boiler safety valves .................................

Unofficial Legislative Councillors call for an extension of the retirement age for civil servants....................... 24

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Wednesday, January 17, 1973

- 1 -

CONFIDENCE EXPRESSED IN HONG KONG’S ECONOMY Financial Secretary Speaks On The Stock Market **********

The Government has complete confidence in the underlying strength of all sectors of Hong Kong’s economy and of the great majority of public companies.

The Financial Secretary, the Hon. C.P. Haddon-Cave, said this in the Legislative Council today in reply to a question from the Hon. James Wu.

Mr. Wu had asked for a Government statement on the effects that the phenomenal rise in shares and real-estate prices would have on the cost of living, prices, wages, industries and the economy as a whole.

Mr. Haddon-Cave said the continuing strength and further development of Hong Kong’s economy was not helped — indeed was put at risk — by the existence of conditions and practices on the stock exchanges which inhibited the orderly marketing of shares.

He also commented on recent actions by the Government following the flurry of activity on the stock market last week.

Neither the Government nor the managements of the stock exchanges took, or had taken, a view as to what was the ’’right” or ’’proper” level of prices. ”We have been concerned with a more fundamental aspect, namely, the working of the market mechanism. have been concerned to see that the market mechanism works - and is allowed to work - correctly without artificial stimulants.”

/Mr. Haddon-Cave .....

Wednesday, January 17, 1973

- 2 -

Mr. Haddon-Cave stressed that the Government was solely concerned to see that orderly marketing conditions prevail; and not disorderly conditions which distort the forces of supply and demand based on rational considerations.

nIt is true that the stock market is a market," he said. "But it is a market in paper and if the velocity of circulation of that paper becomes such that it begins to be traded without regard to its underlying worth then the conditions necessary for the conduct of an orderly market are no longer present."

Orderly Marketing Conditions

The situation that had developed by the middle of last week placed in jeopardy the possibility of orderly marketing conditions prevailing, he said.

"Orderly marketing conditions continue to be our objective and I am sure the decision by the stock exchanges, acting in concert, to limit trading hours this week by closing for three half days and to close every Wednesday afternoon for the time being will assist towards this objective in the short term.

"Likewise, I am sure that the Securities Advisory Council, which is now holding its first meeting, will be concerned to suggest reform.s in trading practices designed to secure this objective in the longer term," Mr. Haddon-Cave said.

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/3..........

Wednesday, January 17, 1973

- 3 -

PROGRESS ON STEPS TO CONTROL NURSERIES

Mr. Li Tells Council Of Consultations Now Going On

******««**

The Hon. Li Fook-kow, Director of Social Welfare, said today steps were being taken to find out how many privately-run profit-making nurseries and centres existed in Hong Kong, and how many children were in their care.

He told the Legislative Council this information was necessary before he could estimate what sort of staff would be required for the implementation of proposed legislation to control such nurseries.

Of the non-profit-making nurseries and day-care centres and creches, he said they number 11}. The majority were sponsored by welfare organisations, and assisted by the Government.

Mr. Li was replying to a question by the Hon. Mrs. Mary Wong Wing-cheung who had asked for a progress report on a statement last August by Mr. G.T. Rowe, the former Director of Social Welfare, that urgent consideration was being given to the setting up of machinery to control all residential and day nurseries.

He assured Mrs. Wong that there had been "no loss of momentum," and that for the last six months, the Social Welfare Department had had consultations with various government departments, including the Education, Medical and Health, Fire Services, and Public Works departments, on the minimum standards of health and safety considered necessary in residential and day care centres for children.

/There were

Wednesday, January 1?» 197>

- 4 -

There were already a number of qualified child care officers in the Social Welfare Department, and suitable officers were being sent for overseas training in child care ”in order to build up a competent and qualified inspectorate.”

In addition, the provision of adequate facilities for the training of nursery workers was also being actively considered.

Mr. Li said the Lady Trench Training Centre was at present providing a one—year full-time pre-service training course in nursery work for prospective nursery workers, and short but intensive courses for the staff of non-profit-making nurseries.

As proposed in the five-year plan, all these courses would be considerably expanded.

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LEGCO PROCEEDINGS RECORDED

**********

Note to Editors: The proceedings in today’s Legislative Council

meeting have been recorded. You are welcome to consult the tapes at the Press Room, Government Information Services.

0 - -

Wednesday, January 17, 1973

RESPONSIBILITIES OF ARCHITECT AND CONTRACTOR OUTLINED

*********

The appointed authorised architect and registered contractor

are responsible for providing the necessary supervision to ensure that builders comply with the standards of building materials laid down in the Building Regulations.

The Director of Public Works, the Hon. J.J. Robson, said this

today when replying to a question raised in the Legislative Council by the Hon. Wilfred Wong.

nIn this connection,” he said, ”it remains the responsibility of

the authorised architect and registered contractor to arrange the carrying out of the tests and to ensure that the samples being so tested are truly representative of the materials used on the site.”

Mr. Robson said that in each case where high-grade concrete

was used, the Building Authority required the examination of concrete cubes at all stages of construction Work.

These cubes would also have to be tested by an independent laboratory.

In all cases, he added, samples of steel reinforcement used in construction work had to undergo a full range of tests by an independent testing laboratory.

The Director also pointed out that under recently revised

legislation architects and contractors who allowed the use of defective

building materials were liable to a fine of .£50,000 and two years’ imprisoncmont•

0 - -

/6

Wednesday, January 17» 1973

- 6 -

PROFESSIONAL DRIVING TEST EXAMINERS TO BE RECRUITED

♦*♦ ♦♦♦*

Recruitment of professional driving test examiners will start within the next three or four months, the Financial Secretary, the Eon. C.P. Haddon-Cave, told the Legislative Council today.

He said that selected volunteer civil servants were now being used to conduct driving tests after office hours on weekdays and at weekends and holidays under a temporary accelerated programme.

’’The number of these examiners varies," he said, "but it is usually about 120."

During normal office hours, he went on, driving test examinations on the road are carried out by 35 Government officers.

Thirty of these were Executive Officers who were temporarily posted to these duties in August last year, "pending the creation of a new grade of specialised officers." he said.

--------0---------

DIRECTOR OF AUDIT’S REPORT

*t«H>*«*

Note to Editors! The Director of Audit’s Report and Certificate on the Accounts of the Hong Kong Government for the year ended liarch 31, 1972 was tabled in the Legislative Council this (Wednesday) afternoon. Copies of the report will be distributed in the Press boxes, G.I.S. this evening.

This report should be read together with the comments by the Finance Branch of the Colonial Secretariat, copies of which will also be distributed in the Press boxes, in order that criticisms raised may be read in their proper perspective.

- - 0 -

/7

Wednesday, January 17, 1973

- 7 -

2,300 PEOPLE AFFECTED BY RENEWAL SCHEME HAVE TAKEN UP PUBLIC HOUSING

*******

M total of 369 families, comprising 2,300 people, affected by the Western District Urban Renewal Scheme, have accepted public housing and 209 families or 1,300 people have already moved in.

In reply to a question by the Hon. Wilfred Wong at today1s meeting of the Legislative Council, the Secretary for Housing, Mr. I.M. Lightbody, said that a further 125 families comprising 700 people declined the offer of public housing.

He said the renewal scheme, involving some 1,800 families, or 12,000 people, was ’’definitely to go ahead as originally conceived.”

”This leaves,” he added, ’’some 1,300 families, or about 9j000 persons, still to be offered rehousing as and when Government acquires their properties for clearance.”

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/8.........

Wednesday, January 17 ? 1973

- 8 -

OWNER OF PREWAR BUILDINGS SHOULD HAVE CONCESSION IN RATES Debate Resumes On Rating Bill ********

The Hon. P.C. Woo today urged the Government not to deprive the owners of prewar premises of the two per cent concession in the payment of rates•

Speaking at the resumed debate on the Rating Bill 1973 in the

Legislative Council, Mr. Woo said the existing rateable value was 17 per cent whereas under the Bill the rateable value was reduced to 15 pen cent.

However, he said the two per cent reduction was not available to owners of prewar buildings, as the Commissioner of Rating and Valuation now made new assessments of these premises by increasing their rateable values to almost the same as before, that is, no reduction was made.

The Commissioner increased the rateable values of these premises although the rents had not been increased and could not be increased as the rents were controlled by the Landlord and Tenant Ordinance.

"In my opinion such assessment can be challenged in a Court of Law in that it cannot be shown that the rental has been increased recently and, therefore- the assessment of the Commissioner is wrong.”

Mr. Woo also suggested that these prewar buildings should be decontrolled under this ordinance.

The Government should amend the ordinance to the effect that once the landlord had recovered possession from the tenant, the premises should not be subject to the provisions of the ordinance.

/This, .........

Wednesday, January 17, 1973

- 9 -

This, he said, would save the expenses of the landlord and the tenant in applying to the Tenancy Tribunal if he re-let the premises, after recovering possession of the building, to a new tenant at the market rental for a term of not exceeding five years.

This would also save the time of the Tenancy Tribunal and other administrative expenses.

On post war domestic premises which were now subject to the control of the Rent Increases (Domestic Premises) Control Ordinance, Mr. Woo said it would seem unfair to increase their rateable value while their rent was still controlled by the ordinance.

Actual Rent

He added that it was only ’’fair and reasonable” that the rateable value of such buildings should be assessed at the actual rent received by the landlord and not on the rent which he might have received if the premises were not under control.

Also commenting on this Bill was the Hon. Dr. S.Y. Chung who said that the current valuation list was assessed in accordance with market rents in 1968, almost five years ago.

The rateable values of these new buildings constructed in the intervening years were, however, based on market rents at the time when they were assessed.

Consequently, this practice had created some serious unfair and unjust burden on tenants and, particularly, owner - occupiers of new buildings constructed after 19^8•

/There are

Wednesday, January 17, 1975

- 10 -

There are many instances in which two similar neighbouring buildings are paying totally different rates.

,rIn future, if there is any delay by the Commissioner to update the valuation list in line with increased rental values,- the assessment of rateable values of newly constructed buildings will be based on the market rents prevailing at the time when the current valuation list was prepared.

"Thus, ratepayers for new buildings will not have to bear an undue proportion of the rate burden, as the honourable Financial Secretary sai d two weeks ago, even if rents continue to arise.

"On the other hand, in the unlikely event, if rents go the other direction and fall, I presume rate payers for new buildings will then have to bear an undue proportion of rate burden," he said.

On the maximum five per cent surcharge on non payment at specified date, Dr. Chung renewed a proposal which the Financial Secretary had turned down earlier.

"A two-step penalty could be equally effective and simple on the one hand but less harsh on ratepayers on the other.

"In other words, Government could, for example, impose a two per cent surcharge for payment overdue.within the first two weeks and five per cent surcharge after two weeks," Dr. Chung said.

In reply, the Financial Secretary, the Hon. C.P. Haddon-Cave, said that regarding the valuation of premises subject to the landlord and Tenant Ordinance, the two per cent concession on the rate charge was, a concession to mitigate the effect of the revaluation on the community as a whole and it was not intended as a special concession for this particular class of ratepayer.

/The Bill, .........

Wednesday, January 17, 1973

- 11 -

The Bill, he said, provided the necessary safeguards for ratepayers, and any person who objected to his rateable value had a right of appeal to the District Court against the assessment by the Commissioner of Rating and Valuation.

"This is a matter which, I think, we must leave to the Courts to decide."

If a concession was to be made to the owners of pre-war premises it should be effected by amendment of the ordinance and not through the rating system.

In regard to the exclusion of such premises from the ordinance, Mr. Haddon-Cave said proposals on this point had been made and were being actively considered by the Government together with other proposals concerning this legislation.

The Financial Secretary agreed with Dr. Chung that, because of the present definition of rateable value, there were disparities in values between premises included in the list prepared in 1968 and those assessed to rates since then.

Clause 7 of the Bill would prevent this situation from occurring in the future.

On the question of surcharge for late payment, Mr. Haddon-Cave said the initial surcharge would have to be sufficiently high to ensure that payments were not deliberately delayed in order that the money could be utilised elsewhere

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/12..........

Wednesday, January 17, 1973

- 12 -

SUPPORT FOR NEW LAWS TO CUT DOWN ON ROAD ACCIDENTS

Traffic Situation Described As Serious

********

Strong support was voiced in the Legislative Council today for proposed new legislation designed to reduce traffic accidents and safeguard road users.

Speaking during the resumed debate on the Road Traffic (Amendment) (No. 2) Bill 1973, the Hon. Szeto Wai said: "Traffic congestion and traffic accidents in Hong Kong have reached such a serious state, more effective measures of detection and deterrent penalties are imperative to cope with the situation."

He said he and his unofficial colleagues in general supported the Bill which would make it compulsory for motorcyclists and,their pillion passengers to wear crash helmets.

Mr. Szeto noted that fatalities among motorcyclists and their passengers had increased by 26 per cent last year while the growth rate of motorcycles and scooters already outstripped that of the fast-growing private cars.

"These statistics," he stressed, "justify the legislation for compulsory wearing of protective headgears for motorcyclists and their passengers, notwithstanding the opposition of those enthusiasts defending personal freedom."

He noted that general regulations already required civil servants, when on Government business, to wear crash helmets when riding motorcycles.

/Referring ••••••••

Wednesday, January 17, 1975

- 13 -

Referring to other measures being considered by Government to protect the safety of road users, Mr. Szeto said he hoped that next in line would be legislation for the fitting of safety belts in all private cars*

If necessary, he added, the wearing of safety belts should be made compulsory as is the case in some overseas countries.

Mr. Szeto suggested that on-street parking should be curtailed to essential needs so as to facilitate traffic flow but added that this could only be achieved if considerably more off-street parking facilities vzere available.

”1 consider that a review is long overdue of Government’s existing outdated and ostrich-like policy of building multi-storey car parks in commuter areas only,” he said.

While he agreed that restraints on private oar ownership, universal inspection of vehicles and enforcement of traffic regulations were important to achieve maximum use of Hong Kong’s limited road space, Mr. Szeto felt that many extraneous obstructions on the roads must be removed.

”These include the multitudes of hawkers who should be confined to off-street bazaars, and the many motor-repair shops whose polluting operations should not be allowed to obstruct road space.”

The Hon. Oswald Cheung also spoke in support of the Bill and suggested that it may also be desirable to make it compulsory for drivers and passengers to use seat belts.

In reply, the Financial Secretary, the Hon. C.P. Haddon-Cave, said he entirely agreed with the view that the reduction of on-street parking, and its replacement by off-street parking facilities, was an important aspect of making the most efficient use of road space.

/But he .........

Wednesday, January 17 ? 1973

- 14 -

But he added that he could not agree ’’that this should be to the extent of providing so much off-street parking that the number of cars seeking to use the roads grows even faster.”

The Financial Secretary conceded that there was a shortage of off-street car-parking spaces within and on the outskirts of the central business areas, but said the Government was widening its definition of ’’commuter areas” to take in more districts where people go to work in large numbers.

There were two projects in Category A of the Public Works Programme, he said, providing for 1,300 spaces at Murray Road and Yau Ma Tei, and four projects in Category B providing for 4,700 spaces at Kwun Tong Ferry Pior, Causeway Bay Magistracy, Tsuen Wan Ferry Concourse and Garden Road.

”When these six projects are completed the number of car parking spaces in Government multi-storey car parks alone will be 9>6OO,”.he said.

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/15..........

Wednesday, January 17, 1973

- 15 -

SUBRENTING PRIVATE STREET LAND TO THE CROWN Mew Law In Advanced Stage Of Drafting

The Government may, in future, obtain possession of any land in the private streets where there is no obligation under the lease for the owner to surrender the land to the Government.

Disclosing this at the Legislative Council today, the Director of Public Works, the Hon. J.J. Robson, said legislation giving the Government this power ”is now in an advanced stage of drafting.”

He was replying to a question by the Hon. T.K. Ann whether any progress was being made in vesting private streets in the Crown, now that the Crown Land Ordinance had been enacted.

The Crown Land Ordinance 1972 and associated Regulations, which became effective on October 1, 1972, provide for Government taking over private streets where there is provision in the lease that the lessee shall, when required, surrender the land needed for this purpose.

Mr. Robson said: "There are about 300 private streets in the Colony and checking the Lease Conditions of all the lots fronting these streets to see whether they contain such provision will be a lengthy task.”

’Tirst priority,” he said, ”has therefore been accorded to 16 roads which are used as traffic thoroughfares so that, wherever the Lease Conditions permit, early action can be taken to obtain surrender of the land occupied by the road.”

He added it was planned to deal next with roads now so blocked by hawkers or parked cars that fire appliances could not get access to buildings and fire hazards had been created.

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/16

Wednesday, January 171 1973

- 16 -

NEED FOR ORIGINAL DESIGNS STRESSED Unofficials Support Copyright Bill *******

Dr. S.Y. Chung said today that in view of Hong Kong’s fast-rising cost of production, manufacturers would have to depend more and more on original and innovated designs to maintain their competitiveness in the world markets.

"Unfortunately," he said, "the lack of adequate protection against local infringement of designs has hampered the movement on promotion of industrial design and design competition in Hong Kong."

Dr. Chung was speaking in support of the Copyright Bill 1973 in the Legislative Council.

As Chairman of the Hong Kong Industrial Design Council, he mentioned one important change in Hong Kong’s manufacturing industries which, he said, seems to be less well known.

Dr. Chung said: "In the past, we were basically producing products to the designs, specifications and brands provided by our customers. There was little emphasis on product development and design in Hong Kong."

But today, he said, there were increasing number of industrial companies which produced products of their own designs, specifications and brands and which had their own departments of development and design.

Referring to the bill, Dr. Chung said he particularly supported the ’’teeth" provided in it which put the burden on the defendant to prove his innocence and gives senior police officers and authorised officers of the Commerce and Industry Department very wide powers of investigation of suspected offences.

/However, ......

Wednesday, January 17» 1973

- 17 -

However, he suggested that the maximum term of imprisonment stipulated in the Bill be increased from six to 12 months for a second or subsequent offence as the light sentence term seemed contrary to the intention of the Bill.

In reply, the Attorney General, Mr. D.T.E. Roberts said he had no objection to amending the bill as proposed by Dr. Chung.

Speaking in support of the bill, Mr. T.K. Ann hoped that with its introduction, local talent would from now on ’’have no fear of their brain child being pirated from or after the day of its birth”.

’’Like the need to protect Hong Kong designs from being copied, so is there the need to afford protection to Hong Kong’s reputation as a manufacturing centre, against local infringement of right of others’ artistic authorship in foreign countries,” Mr. Ann added.

0 - -

/18

Wednesday, January 17, 1973

- 18 -

THREE BILLS PASSED IN LEGCO

*******

Three bills passed their committee stage and third readings in Legislative Council this afternoon and became law.

They were the Urban Council (Amendment) Bill 1973; the Workmen!s Compensation (Amendment) Bill 1973; and the Import and Export (Amendment) Bill 1973.

Five bills had their first and second readings. They were the Evidence (Amendment) Bill 1973; the Administration of Justice (Miscellaneous Amendments) Bill 1973; the Merchant Shipping (Amendment) Bill 1973; the Merchant Shipping (Recruiting of Seamen) (Amendment) Bill 1973; and the Dangerous Drugs (Amendment) Bill 1973* Debate on them was adjourned.

Debate was resumed on the second readings of the Urban Council (Amendment) Bill 1973; the Copyright Bill 1973; the Inland Revenue (Amendment) Bill 1973; the Rating Bill 1973; the Road Traffic (Amendment) (No. 2) Bill 1973; and the Import and Export (Amendment) Bill 1973*

Two sessional papers were also tabled in the Council. They were the Director of Audit’s Report and Certificate on the Accounts of the Hong Kong Government for the year ended March 31, 1972; and the Despatch dated January 9, 1973 to the Secretary of State on the Report by the Director of Audit for the year ended March 31, 1972.

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/19.........

Wednesday, January 17, 1973

- 19 -

GOVERNOR OPENS NEW MERCURY HOUSE New «C. & W. Premises Called A Monument To Enterprise * * ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

The Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, today officially opened New Mercury House in Gloucester Road where the Cable and Wireless Company’s new premises are located.

He described the building as ’’ a monument to the enterprise and expertise" of the company and welcomed it as a pledge of the company’s determination to continue to provide good communications for Hong Kong.

Following is the full text of the Governor’s speech at the opening ceremony:

”1 am most honoured that you have asked me to open New Mercury House.

”1 have listened with awe to your description of its contents.

I have watched it take shape and wondered what mysteries it contains. It is, I realise, a monument to the enterprise., and expertise of your company.

’’You have told us something of the marvels of this building, I should like to add one striking item. The services enable computers in Hong Kong to ’’talk” to computers in other countries, and thus exchange information at a rate no human could imitate. This is indeed knocking on the edge of science fiction.

/’’It also..........

Wednesday, January 17, 1973

- 20 -

”It also illustrates the high technical qualifications that your staff will require. I do thank you for your Company’s donation of scholarships to the polytechnic, which is as generous as it is far-sighted. It is for the polytechnic to service industry, and it is for industry to encourage the polytechnic to do so.

”Hong Kong is a great centre of commerce, finance and tourism and must have good communications, These Cable and Wireless provide today. I welcome this building and all it contains as a pledge of your company’s determination to continue to provide good communications in the tomorrow of Hong Kong’s expanding economy and the multiplicity of communications which it will demand,

"Sir, I congratulate you on the enterprise contained in this building Nev; Mercury House, and on the services which it will bring to Hong Kong, and I have the greatest pleasure in declaring it open.”

/21

Wednesday, January 17, 1973

- 21 -

MORE STUDENTS TO TAKE PART IN 3CH00L GYMNASTIC COMPETITIONS * **»»**«

Hore schoolboys and girls will participate in this year’s Inter-School Gymnastic Competitions for secondary and primary schools throughout Hong Kong.

The annual competitions,to be held in March and April, are jointly organised by the Education Department and the Hong Kong and the New Territories Schools Sports Associations.

Forty-six teams from 19 schools have entered this year’s Annual Gymnastic Competition for Secondary Schools.

Events will include floor, horse, horizontalbars, paralledbars, and rebound tumbling for boys and floor, horse, unevenbars, balance-beam and rebound tumbling for girls.

There are more than 100 students taking part in individual events*

The competition will be held on April 4 and 6.

This year’s Inter-School gymnastic Competition for primary schools is to take place on March 22 and }0.

A total of 33 teams including ten girls* teams, have entered for the competition.

This competition will be divided into three areas — Hong Kong Island, Kowloon and the New Territories.

The first, second and third teams of each area will be eligible to participate in the overall championship.

/A spokesman

Wednesday, January 17, 1973

- 22 -

A spokesman for the Physical Education Section said today that not very many schools were taking part in the competitions.

Perhaps one of the reasons was the expensiveness of gymnastic equipment.

However, he said it was encouraging to note that so many students from secondary schools were going to compete in individual events which were introduced this year to raise young people’s interest in gymnastics.

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/23

Wednesday, January 17, 1973

- 23 -

BOILER SAFETY VALVES SHOULD BE HANDLED BY SKILLED STAFF

Warning Issued To Shipowners

The handling of boiler safety valves should be done by skilled and experienced personnel under the close supervision of ship officers.

The Director of Marine, Mr. A. Fletcher, today issued this reminder to shipowners, shipyard managers and others concerned with such work.

He cited a recent case where the setting of boiler safety valves after overhaul was left in the hands of relatively unskilled personnel employed by shore contractors.

"Their actions were insufficiently supervised by the ship’s officers.

"As a result, too high a pressure was developed in the boiler which failed instantaneously ejecting several tons of boiler water and steam into the engine room.

"This and the resulting flying debris caused the death of four persons, injuries to numerous others and considerable material damage to the ship," Mr. Fletcher said.

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/24.........

Wednesday, January 17, 1973

- 24 -

UNOFFICIALS CALL FOR EXTENSION OF RETIREMENT AGE

Present 55-Year Limit Called Outdated

***********

Unofficial Members of the Legislative Council today tabled a notion calling for an extension of the retirement age for civil servants from 55 to 60 years. Five Members spoke in support of the motion with all of them sharing the view that the present compulsory retirement age was outdated and constituted a loss to the public service in terms of expertise and talent.

In moving the motion, the Hon. Wilfred Wong noted that in most South-East Asian countries the retirement age for civil servants varied from 60 to 65, while Hong Kong still retained the 55-year limit established years ago at a time when it was considered a "hardship area,” The overwhelming majority of public servants, he said, favoured an extension in the maiximum age with an option to retire at 55 j but some younger staff felt this might block their chances of earlier promotion.

Mr. Wong pointed out, however, that a later retirement age would also apply to the younger staff and said that "if they look ahead a few years, on the grounds of security it is a proposal which would be fair all round."

The Hon. P.C. Woo urged the Government to make a decision on the issue and expressed the opinion that the change would not cost "much more." He added: "Conceivably it could be even less."

Mr. Woo made it clear that no change was proposed in the retirement age for members of the disciplined services and senior members of the Judiciary or that of officers recruited on contract terms of appointment.

/He said .......

Wednesday, January 17, 1973

- 25 -

He said the proposed extension would not interfere with the current arrangements for those who wished to retire early, nor would it result "in the retention of deadwood."

"What it will do," he stressed, "is to strengthen many cadres of the civi 1 service vzith seasoned, mature and experienced officers with whose talents the community can ill afford .to dispense at the young age of 55«n

He added that a later retirement age would also help to reduce the number of vacancies in the civil service.

Research

Mr. Woo continued that research conducted by the UMELCO Office clearly showed that the average life span in Hong Kong was rapidly rising and Government pensioners were also living longer.

Expandnng on this point, the Hon. Mrs. Mary W.C. Wong told the CnunrJ 1 that many private and government organisations had found they were malting payments to increasing numbers of retired people over much longer periods than ever before.

"As a result their financial estimates and reserves were getting out of line," she said.

Mrs. Wong emphasized that before a conclusion was reached on the issue, consideration must be given to the younger officers who would be affected if the proposal was implemented.

/"If the

Wednesday, January 17» 1975

- 26 -

”If the retirement age is to be extended,” she said, "so must % procedure for promotion be correspondingly adjusted.”

* She suggested that promotion should be based on ’’quality of performance as against length of service.”

The Hon. Wilson Wang warned that as long as 55 remained the age of compulsory retirement, many civil servants would plan ahead for their post*retirement period, and this might affect their working efficiency.

The fact that many retired officers had gone to work for private firms, he said, showed that they were still fully capable of ’’meeting challenge and competition,”

Expatriate Officers

As regards expatriate officers, Mr. Wang said they were ’’unfamiliar” with the local situation when they first arrived and consequently might not be capable of contributing fully to their work.

”By the time they have familiarised themselves with the surroundings many expatriates soon find themselves retiring and leaving Hong Kong,” he asserted.

This had created doubts in the ipinds of the public as to whether expatriates were truly working towards the welfare of Hong Kong, Mr. Wang, said adding: ”It is high time to remedy the situation by extending the retiring age for civil servants.”

/The Hon. H.J.C. Browne •

Wednesday, January 17, 1973

- 27 -

The Hon. H.J.C. Browne stressed the urgency for a change and said the present retiring age of 55 His out of step with the practice in the private secotr.”

In moving for the adjournment of the debate, the Colonial Secretary, Sir Hugh Norman—Walker, said the issue had been the subject of consultation between the Government and the Staff Side of the Senior Civil Service Council for a considerable time.

He said ”a joint and unanimous proposal” had only last week been received from the three staff associations and this would be placed before the Governor-in-Council very shortly.

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Release time: 8.30 p.m.

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Thursday, January 18, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No, The green light has been given for the Institute for Social Work Training .................................................... q

The Consumer Price Index for last month was the same for the previous month • ••...........................................   4

Public are urged to keep common parts of buildings clean • ••• 5

Figures for accidents on building sites have been revealed •• 6

The Berlin Radio Symphony Orchestra is to perform here •••••• ?

Residents in Tai Kok Tsui will be without water for four hours on Saturday .................................................... g

Volunteers from several social groups are to donate blood • •• 9

Governor and Lady MacLehose go to Japan next week for ship launching «...............................................     -|0

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Thursday, January 18, 1973

- 1 -

INSTITUTE FOR SOCIAL WORK TRAINING

Green Light For First Of White Paper’s Major Proposals

*********

The Finance Committee of the Legislative Council last night approved the financial implications of the Social Welfare Department’s Institute for Social Work Training — so giving the green light to the first of the major proposals in the draft white paper on social welfare development.

The Institute is expected to receive its first students in September this year, and the period between now and then will be devoted to recruiting a Principal and staff, the design and preparation of courses, and the selection of students.

Mr. T.S. Heppell, Assistant Director (General), Social Welfare Department, today welcomed the Government’s decision.

’’There has been a general welcome for the proposal in the white paper to establish an Institute,”he said. ’"What we have to concentrate on now is making sure that it will be ready on time.

”We have, a tight timetable to keep to, and all those involved will have to work fast.

’’But the implementation of the other white paper proposals requires trained workers, so that it is all the more important that we achieve what we arc setting out to do.”

Overall responsibility for the Institute rests with the Director of Social Welfare, assisted by the Advisory Committee on Social Work Training. The Principal will become an ex officio member of the Committee.

/The Committee ••••••

Thursday, January 18, 1973

- 2 -

The Committee had itself recommended to the Government establishment of the Institute, as had also Dame Eileen Younghusband, the British authority on social work training, and Dr. Irving Spergel, a United Nations consultant on youth work. The proposal had the full support of the Hong Kong Council of Social Service.

The Institute is to be initially housed in the Lady Trench Training Centre in Wan Chai. This is a four-storey building already occupied, but not fully utilised, by the Training Section of the Social Welfare Department.

It is capable of being expanded, if necessary, by a further two floors.

Field Operations

The aim of the Institute is to train mid-level social workers for field operations who do not have university qualifications. The type of student envisaged is one holding a Hong Kong Certificate of Education, and preferably someone who has some working experience — not necessarily in the social welfare field.

It will start with an intake of between 35 and 50 students a year, going on to an eventual ceiling of 75-100 a year, so providing a total of 150-200 full-time students in two-year courses.

Thursday, January 18, 1973

- 3 -

It is estimated that the initial operating costs of the Institute will be about 3400,000 a year, rising to $800,000 a year for 150-200 students. Students will pay an annual fee of 3400, the same as for colleges of education.

But establishment of the Institute in the Lady Trench Training Centre will not interfere with the normal work of the Training Section in the same building, whose staff development and allied in-service training will continue as usual.

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Thursday, January 18, 1973

- 4 -

CONSUMER PRICE INDEX FOR LAST MONTH

Increase In Index For Food Shown

********

The General Consumer Price Index (Sept. 63/Aug. 64 = 100) for December 1972 was 143, the same as that for the previous month.

There was a decrease of two points in the index for food.

On the other hand, an increase of two points was recorded in the index for durable goods while increases of one point each were recorded in the index for alcoholic drink and tobacco and the index for miscellaneous goods.

Movements in the indexes for other sections of commodity and service were insignificant.

Compared with the previous month, the average retail prices of fresh vegetables and fresh water fish dropped.

On the other hand, there were increases in the average retail prices of rice, salt water fish, beef, pork, dried sea products, poultry and eggs.

For non-food items, the higher prices for furniture caused the index for durable goods to move upwards.

The revision of the prices of some cigarettes also pushed the index for alcoholic drink and tobacco up.

The Modified Consumer Price Index for December 1972 was 147, the same as that for the previous month, and 13 points higher than that for the corresponding month in 1971-

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/5.......

Thursday, January 18, 1975

- 5 -

CLEANLINESS IN COMMON P/iRTS OF BUILDINGS

Responsibilities Of Occupants

**********

Members of the public are urged to clean up and maintain the common parts of their buildings in a tidy condition during their customary clean up operations in their flats before Lunar New Year.

The appeal was made by the Urban Services Department which has launched a two-week publicity campaign on cleanliness in multi-storey buildings.

The campaign, which began early this weeki is now in full swing.

A spokesman for the Department said: ,fIt is a highly commentable custom to clean up our dwellings before Lunar New Year, but under the new litter law tenants should also take good care of the common parts of their buildings.”

The spokesman pointed out that corridors, staircases, roofs, yardst light-wells, car-parts, awnings and canopies were common parts of a building.

’•Depositing unwanted articles in the common parts of a building,” he said, ’’provides harbourages for rats and cockroaches and is liable to a maximum fine of $2,000 under the Public Cleansing and Prevention of Nuisance By-laws.”

Unwanted articles should be delivered to the nearest junk collection point of the Urban Services Department for disposal. Addresses of these collection points can be obtained from the City District Offices.

During the campaign, posters will be sent out to various multi-storey buildings and slogans will be broadcast from U.S.D. vans.

Thursday, January 18, 1973

- 6 -

ACCIDENTS ON BUILDING CONSTRUCTION SITES Four Killed And Over 200 Injured Last Month «*«««**«

A total of 267 workers were injured and four killed in December, 1972 on building construction and sites of civil engineering construction, according to reports received by the Labour Department.

Of this 52 vzere the result of ’’falling objects” of which two were fatal.

Mr. A.H. Carter, the Industrial Safety Training Officer of the

Labour Department, said: ”0ver the last nine months, six people have died and over 468 have been injured as the result of being struck by falling objects ranging from nuts and bolts to a plank.”

He said: ”Many of these accidents could have been avoided if proper working platforms had been provided together with suitable receptacles to store small items and tools. Larger items should have been safely secured.”

Mr. Carter stressed that poor housekeeping was an obvious contributory factor to accidents involving falling objects. Debris, scrap items and the like should never be thrown to the ground, but instead they should be lowered in properly constructed containers or by means of a chute.

•H?he wearing of a safety helmet would certainly reduce the severity of the injury sustained by the worker in the event of an accident,” he continued.

”Management and workers should work together to achieve safe working conditions with a view to reducing the number of accidents,” he added.

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/7........

Thursday, January 18, 1973

- 7 -

BERLIN ORCHESTRA TO PERFORM IN HONG KONG

Concerts Organised By Urban Council And Goethe Institute

***»*»«*♦*

The Berlin Radio Symphony Orchestra, on its first 1973 Asian tour, will give two concerts under its famed conductor, Lorin Maazel, tomorrow (Friday) and on Saturday (Jan. 20) at 8 p.m. at the City Hall Concert Hall.

The concerts here have been arranged jointly by the Urban Council and the Goethe Institute.

Prior to Hong Kong, the orchestra has performed in major Asian cities including Teheran, Bombay, New Delhi, Calcutta and Singapore.

After their concerts at the weekend, they will fly to Japan where they will continue their tour and give the rest of their programme there before returning home.

The Orchestra, comprising over 100 members, was first founded in 1946-47. Most of the performers came from the previous Berlin State Opera House.

When in 1949 the Hungarian-born conductor Ferenc Fricsay took over the baton, he immediately greatly improved the standard of the orchestra and launched it into the distinguished list of world-famous orchestras•

Fricsay died in 19^3 and in 196 5 Lorin Maazel took over as the musical director and has remained in the post till now.

/Tomorrow •••••••

Thursday, January 18, 1973

- 8 -

Tomorrow, the orchestra will play a Beethoven-programme, and on Saturday, a varied programme of works by Brahms, Debussy and Strauss.

Featuring as soloist in Beethoven’ Piano Concerto No. 4 in the first performance will be Israeli Margalit, a well-known pianist who is also the conductor’s wife.

Tickets are priced at 33 (for students), 315, 325 and 840. Only a small portion of the 340 tickets are still available for the second evening and may be obtained at the City Hall Box Office.

Note to Editors: You are cordially invited to cover the

arrival of the Berlin Radio Symphony Orchestra at the Kai Tak Airport today (Thursday) at 5*15 p»m. The orchestra will arrive on a special flight No. AF 4609 of the Air France from Singapore at 4.50 p.m.

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INTERRUPTION OF WATER SUPPLY

***********

There will be no water supply to the buildings bounded by Tung Chau Street, Tong Mei Road, Fuk Tsuen Street and Walnut Street in Tai Kok Tsui between 1 a.m. and 5 a.m. on Saturday (January 20).

The stoppage is to enable Waterworks Office staff to carry out a leakage test in the area.

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...... /9.........

Thursday, January 18, 1973

- 9 -

VOLUNTEERS FROM SOCIAL GROUPS TO GIVE BLOOD *««***«

A blood donation campaign has been organised by the Yau Ma Tei District Community Work Office.

Twenty volunteers from several social service groups sponsored by the Work Office will give blood at the Tsim Sha Tsui Kai Fong Welfare Association on Saturday (January 20)•

Also giving blood will be Mr. Yeung Wai-tsang, District Community Officer (Yau Ma Tei)•

In another community project, a good-will visit to residents of the Cheshire Home in Chung Hom Kok Road has been organised by the Western District Community Work Office.

Thirty volunteers from the Chun Yee Club will take part in this visit on Sunday (January 21).

The Cheshire Home was founded in 19&1 for the aged and chronically ill.

During the visit, the volunteers will play records of Chinese opera songs and distribute gifts to the old people.

* * * X< * * *

Note to Editors: The blood donation will take place

in the Tsim Sha Tsui Kai Fong Welfare Association at 3.00 p.m. on Saturday.

The party visiting Cheshire Home in Chung Hom Kok Road the following day will arrive there at about 9»3O a.m.

You are invited to send a reporter and/or photographer to cover both events.

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Thursday, January 18, 1975

- 10 -

GOVERNOR AND LADY MACLEHOSE GO TO JAPAN For Launching Of Tanker

The Governor and Lady MacLehose will leave for Japan on January 25 for the launching ceremony of a tanker, "World Victoria", owned by the World Maritime Bahamas Ltd.

They will travel by a JAL flight which leaves at 8 a.m. and arrives in Sasebo later that day.

On the following morning, Lady MacLehose will officiate at the launching ceremony of the new vessel — a 220,826-ton super tanker built by the Sasebo Heavy Industries Co. Ltd.

After the ceremony, in the afternoon, Sir Murray and Lady MacLehose will fly to Tokyo, where they will stay with the British Ambassador to Japan, Sir Frederick Warner.

On January 25 Sir Murray will take the opportunity to renew some old contacts and pay calls before returning to Hong Kong the same evening, arriving at 10.45 p-m.

The Colonial Secretary, Sir Hugh Norman-Walker, will act as Deputy Governor during Sir Murray’s absence.

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Release time7 <00 P •m.

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Friday, January 19, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No*

Bills pave way for new Urban Council .............................  1

Courts are to be set up to deal exclusively with young offenders ................................................................... 4

The Urban Renewal Pilot Scheme moves one step forward •••••••••• 5

A new town being developed in Castle Peak will be known as ”Tuen

Mun” • ......................................................       6

Hong Kong will attend an ECAFE meeting in Bangkok next week .... 7

The Government is to woo high-technology industry to Hong Kong.. 8

The revised development plan for Chai Wan has been published ... 11

The Workmen’s Compensation (Amendment) Ordinance 1973 comes into force ........................................................     14

A permanent vehicular access will be provided to the maintenance area of Hong Kong Airport .........................••••........... 15

Hong Kong needs informed leadership in education ••••••••......... 16

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

J

Friday, January 19, 1973

- 1 -

BILLS PAVE WAY FOR RECONSTITUTED URBAN COUNCIL

New Functions And Financial Autonomy For Mew Body *******

Two Bills designed to implement the proposals in the Urban Council White Paper for the reconstitution of the Council as an incorporated body with some new functions and substantial financial autonomy will soon be introduced into the Legislative Council.

The Bills, published in today’s Gazette for general information, are the Urban Council Bill 1973 and the Public Health and Urban Services (Amendment) Bill 1973.

The objects of the Urban Council Bill are:-

* to provide for the repeal of the present ordinance;

* to make provision for the incorporation of the Council; and

* to define its powers and functions, membership and procedure, its accounting procedures and financial powers.

One part of the Bill provides for the incorporation and constitution of the Urban Council. The Council will be a body corporate with perpetual succession and will have the usual powers of bodies corporate to enter into contracts.

The Bill provides that the Council shall consist of 12 elected members and 12 members appointed by the Governor. The reconstituted council will not include any ex-officio members.

Another part of the Bill lays down general rules'applicable to both elected and appointed members including disqualification from membership, acceptance of office and resignation. These provisions are re-enacted with only minor changes.

/The Bill ........


Friday, January 19j 1973

- 2 -

The Bill also governs the position of the Chairman of the Council.

The standing committee of the whole Council may elect as Chairman a person who is not a member of the Council.

It stipulates that there shall be an election for Chairman and Vice-Chairman in every year in which there is an ordinary election of members.

The Bill lists functions and the range of permissible activities carried on by the Council at present and also sets out additional powers which the Council as a corporation may exercise.

Future Relationship

The future relationship between the Council, the Director of Urban Services end the Urban Services Department is also defined in the Bill.

The Director of Urban Services will no longer be a member of the reconstituted Council but he will become its chief executive officer.

The Council will discharge its functions through the U.S.D., but the department will remain a department of the Government and be under the control of the Director of Urban Services.

The Council will be required to make financial by-laws to cover . ’ i'

certain matters which are necessary in view of the Council’s financial autonomy.

The Council will also be required to prepare annual statements of revenue and expenditure and of assets and liabilities.

The Council is empowered to raise loans against its assets and revenues for the purpose of funding capital expenditures or for re-funding previous loans raised for that purpose.

It will also be able to borrow temporarily such sums of money as may be necessary to meet any obligations or to fulfil any functions imposed on it by statute and any surplus funds in such investments as may be approved by the Financial Secretary.

/The Governor, .....

Friday, January 19, 1973

- 3 -

The Governor, after consultation with the Council, can give general directions as to the discharge of its functions and the remedy of any failure by it to discharge any obligation or fulfil any statutory duty.

The objects of the second Bill, the Public Health and Urban Services (Amendment) Bill 1973, are twofold.

The first is to implement the proposals in the White Paper to expand certain powers and functions of the Urban Council, and the second to consolidate into the principal ordinance and to widen in scope provisions which have been contained in five separate ordinances.

The White Paper recommended that the Urban Council, as reconstituted in accordance with proposals suggested, should assume its new powers and functions from April 1, this year and this Bill so provides .

The five ordinances to be consolidated into the principal ordinance are the Hong Kong Stadium Ordinance (Cap. 270), the Library Ordinance (Cap. 1^5), the Museums Ordinance (Cap. 230), the City Hall Ordinance (Cap. 328) and the Cremation Ordinance (Cap. 133)-

-------0---------

A....

Friday, January 19, 1973

- 4 -

GREATER POWER FOR COURTS TO DEAL WITH YOUNG OFFENDERS

Juvenile Courts To Be Set Up

********

A bill aimed at improving the procedure of juvenile courts and offering greater protection to young offenders and expanding the court’s powers of dealing with them, is to be introduced into the Legislative Council shortly.

The Juvenile Offenders (Amendment) Bill 1973 gives effect to recommendations made by a Working Party set up by the Chief Justice in 19&8 to examine the existing arrangements for dealing with juvenile offenders.

If the bill is passed, juvenile courts to be presided over by magistrates appointed by the Chief Justice exclusively for that purpose will be set up.

One of the main provisions of the bill is that the minimum age of crimi nal responsibility will be raised from seven to 10 years.

Another provision of the bill is that a juvenile court, when determining the method of dealing with an offender, may choose to take the advice of two persons selected by it from a Juvenile Courts Advisory Panel appointed by the Chief Justice.

The members of the panel will be appointed because of their knowledge of and experience in dealing with young people.

The bill also provides, among other things, that the parent or guardian of a juvenile offender is required to attend at all stages of proceedings, unless the court orders otherwise.

The main recommendations, made by the Working Party and accepted by the Chief Justice, include the setting up of two juvenile courts — one in Hong Kong and another in Kowloon — and the appointment of one or, if necessary, two permanent magistrates who will deal exclusively with all juvenile cases.

-------0 -------- /5..................

Friday, January 19, 1973

- 5 -

URBAN RENEWAL SCHEME MOVES FORWARD First Demolition Contract Will Be Let *******

The Urban Renewal Pilot Scheme in Western District advanced a major step today with the calling of tenders for the first demolition contract for properties within the scheme area.

Official notification for tenders is published in today’s Gazette with a stipulation that tenders must be submitted before noon on February 9.

The properties to be demolished are Nos. 9, 11 and 13 Sai Street and Nos. 11 and 13 Tung Street.

The sites will be mainly used in connection with the widening and reconstruction of Lower Lascar Row and for the provision of bath houses and latrines, as part of the proposed overall redevelopraent of the area.

The properties were acquired partly by negotiation and partly by resumption under the Crown Lands Resumption Ordinance.

A Government spokesman said today that of the tenants and occupiers offered alternative accommodation in accordance with Government policy, 62 per cent accepted the offer.

The others made their own arrangements for alternative accommodation, he said.

He added: ’’Following further acquisitions, demolition of additional properties will take place this year with a view to commencing reconstruction works in connection with Lower Lascar Row towards the end of the year.” /6.................................................................

o - -

Friday, January 19, 1973

- 6 -

NEW TOWN TO BE KNOW AS TUjEK MUN

Housing And Other Facilities To Be Provided There

********

As part of Government’s plan to provide more and better housing, with its full complement of services, industry and amenities, a new town is being developed in that part of the New Territories commonly known as "Castle Peak" in English and "Tsing Shan" in Chinese.

Both these names are of recent origin. It is not however widely known that the low lying district at the foot of the mountain is known locally as "Tuen Mun". The name "Castle Peak" and the Chinese name "Tsing Shan" are properly confined to the mountain overlooking the area.

The name "Tuen Mun" is believed by some historians to originate from early Sung times when it is thought that a garrison was stationed in the vicinity.

This garrison was needed to portect merchant sailing vessels from the pirates who were active along this coast at that time. The word "tuen" means a garrison and the word "mun" in this case means a channel, probably the one between the mainland and Lantau Island.

Having three names for one and the same place has in the past caused some confusion. On the initiative of the Tuen Mun Rural Committee it has been decided that the New Town at present known as the Castle Peak Nev/ Town will now be called Tuen Mun New Town.

It is not proposed to change the popularly known English and Chinese names of the mountain, the well known hospital or Castle Peak Town Lots .

/However, ........

Friday, January 19, 1973

- 7 -

However, district Government institutions and facilities such as the divisional police or fire stations now being planned will be known as Tuen Mun Police Station or Tuen Mun Fire Station.

Other local facilities will also be given traditional local names wherever possible.

-------0---------

HONG KONG ATTENDS ECAFE MEETING IN BANGKOK

*******

Mr. P.K.C. Wong, Assistant Director of Commerce and Industry, has left for Bangkok to attend the 16th session of the ECAFE Committee on Trade to be held from January 22 to 30, 1973.

Another member of the Hong Kong delegation, Mrs. S. Yuen will leave for Bangkok on January 24.

At the meeting, the Hong Kong delegation will review Hong Kong’s trade and trade policy during 1972. The agenda also includes items on export credit insurance, shipping, the ECAFE Trade Promotion Centre and other matters of regional and international trading interest.

-------0----------

/8........

Friday, January 19, 1973

- 8 -

GOVERNMENT TO WOO HIGH-TECHNOLOGY INDUSTRY

Land On Tsing Yi Offered For Automotive Industry

**********

The Government this weekend will launch an international advertising campaign aimed at wooing high-technology industry to Hong Kong.

The campaign will invite tenders to buy about five acres of land set aside for the establishment of a factory to produce automotive components and assemblies, including internal combustion engines.

The five-acre site, located in the south-eastern corner of Tsing

Yi Island in the New Territories, is the first made available by the Government specifically for the automotive industry.

More land is expected to be sold on a restricted use basis for other high-technology industries later.

The restricted use land scheme serves four aims. It:

* Creates interest among firms that cannot utilise high-rise buildings to establish themselves in Hong Kong;

* Diversifies a consumer products-dominated economy by attracting more sophisticated and more productive industry;

* Brings higher technology and, with it, spin-offs in terms of new skills and new job opportunities for the work-force; and

* Puts Hong Kong’s meagre land resources to the most productive use.

About two acres of the Tsing Yi Island site being put up for sale already have been reclaimed from the sea.

/Reclamation

Friday, January 19, 1973

- 9 -

Reclamation of the remaining three acres will be the responsibility of the successful tenderer.

A sea wall also will have to be built to the satisfaction of the Public Works Department.

Advertisements offering the sale of the site will be placed in newspapers in Common Market countries, the United States, Australia, Japan and Hongkong*

Tenders will be accepted in Hongkong between February 15 and

March 15.

The successful tenderer is expected to be able to take possession of the site early in April.

Future Development

The government’s decision to sell the land will pave the way for the planned future development of Tsing Yi Island.

The island, a predominantly rural area and home to about 3,500 people, has been earmarked as a future industrial centre with an ultimate population of about 80,000.

The population of the neighbouring industrial towns of Tsuen

Wan and Kwai Chung is expected to increase from 525»OOO people to 580,000 in the next three years.

Much of the labour force required for industries that establish themselves on Tsing Yi Island will come from Tsuen Wan and Kwai Chung.

/Spearheading ••••••

Friday, January 19, 1973

- 10 -

Spearheading the development of Tsing Yi Island is an 3l8 m11 ion bridge being built across the 2,000 ft. wide Rambler Channel that separates it from the mainland.

Work on the bridge, undertaken by six major companies operating on the island, is expected to be finished next December.

The bridge is not the only transportation factor that will play a significant role in the development of Tsing Yi.

The island offers easy access for shipping and is within half a mile of the new container terminal complex at Kwai Chung.

-------0---------

/11

Friday, January 19, 1973

- 11

REVISED DEVELOPMENT PLAN FOR CHAI WAN Industrial Complex To Be Created ********

A revised draft outline development plan of Chai Wan has been prepared by the Town Planning Board for submission to the Governor-in-Council for approval.

The new plan, covering an area of 9^5 acres, aims at developing Chai Wan into a self-contained township with all the necessary residential, industrial, commercial, recreational and community facilities to serve an estimated future population of 160,000.

A total of 79.4 acres of land have been reserved for industrial purposes, with the aim of creating an industrial complex which will not only provide employment opportunities for the people living in Chai Wan, but also for the eastern part of Hong Kong Island.

With the exception of the existing industrial area at Hong Man Street and Lee Chung Street, future industrial development will be concentrated on the eastern part of the proposed reclamation.

Sites have also been reserved for a sheltered cargo handling basin, a large cargo working area, and a container freight station on the reclamation.

Altogether 95.3 acres of land have been earmarked for residential purposes in Chai Wan. This includes the existing resettlement estates and two further estates to be located on the reclamation and at the cottage estate area of Epworth Village respectively.

/Other sites ........

Friday, January 19j 1973

- 12 -

Other sites have also been reserved for a Housing Society estate or a project of a similar nature, and for flats for the higher income groups to cater for a variety of housing needs that are likely to be required.

Land earmarked for government, institutional and community uses totalled 99*5 acres or 18 per cent of the planning area.

A civic centre, which will include a library, exhibition and community hall, government offices and estate welfare accommodation, is proposed on the site of the existing typhoon shelter.

Hospital

Other proposed community facilities include a hospital, schools, a fire station, two markets, two bus termini, a multi-storey car park and a sewage treatment plant.

A large open space has been zoned to provide a break between the government housing estates to the southeast and the proposed commercial/residential and government, institutional and community zone to the northwest which will be accessible from all directions.

Various local open spaces have also been reserved to provide as far as possible an even distribution of such uses within the area.

A four-acre site on the south-eastern part is intended for an outdoor swimming pool complex which will serve not only Chai V/an, but also Shau Kei Wan.

Other proposals under the new draft plan include extensions to the Cape Collinson Cemetery and Crematorium (including the Columbarium) and a funeral parlour to the north of Cape Collinson Road.

As for communications, a high capacity road will connect Shau Kei V/an with Chai Wan along the northern coast-line, follows the existing alignment of Wan Tsui Road and link up with Tai Tam via a road tunnel commencing near the cemeteries.

/Two stations .......

Friday, January 19, 1973

- 13 -

Two stations for the proposed underground railway have also been included. The revised plan, which is to supersede the previous plan, aims at providing a statutory land use pattern and major road framework within which the use and development of land may be legally controlled.

The implementation of the planning proposals, as far as public works are concerned, will require the voting of funds by the Legislative Council.

It will be exhibited for public inspection from today (Friday, January 19) for a period of two months at the Public Enquiry Service, Central Government Offices (West Wing), Hong Kong; the Crown Lands and Survey Office, Kowloon Government Offices, 405, Nathan Road, 10th floor; and the City District Office, Chai Wan, Hing Wah Resettlement Estate, Block 2, Chai Wan.

In a public notice, the Chairman of the Town Planning Board draws the attention of the public to Section 6 of the Town Planning Ordjnances Persons affected by the new outline zoning plan may send to the Secretary of the Town Planning Board within two months a written statement of their objections to anything appearing on the new plan and propose amendments to remove the objections.

Copies of the draft plan and explanatory statement are also available at the Crown Lands and Survey Office, 19th floor, Murray Building Hong Kong at $3.00 each uncoloured and 525*00 each coloured.

- - 0 - -

/14

Friday, January 19, 1973

- 14 -

WRIHEN’S COIiPENSATION (AMENDMENT) ORDINANCE 1973

*******

The Workmen’s Compensation (Amendment) Ordinance 1973, which becomes effective today (January 19), will bring the percentages of loss of earning capacity for certain categories of injuries in the First Schedule of the principal Ordinance more in line with international standards.

Commenting on the amendment ordinance, Mr. David Lin, Assistant Commissioner of Labour, said: ’’Experience in the administration of the ordinance revealed that the First Schedule does not deal adequately with certain cases involving the loss of more than one finger. ’’The amendment ensures that the aggregate percentages for the loss of individual fingers involving the index, middle, ring and little fingers will be the same as the percentage for the loss of all these four fingers at one time. This will facilitate medical assessment of injuries to fingers.

’’The percentage for the loss of a toe, other than the great toe, will be raised to 2 percent if more than one toe is lost; for loss of hearing of one ear, the percentage will be raised to 20 percent and for total loss of hearing to 70 percent.

’’The Accident Insurance Association of Hong Kong, which has been consulted, considers that there is no need to increase insurance premia after the increased benefits are incorporated into the Workmen’s Compensation Ordinance.” -------------------------------0----------

/15........

Friday, January 19, 1973

- 15 -

GRADE SEPARATED ACCESS TO AIRPORT MAINTENANCE AREA

*******

A grade separated interchange will be built shortly in Prince Edward Road adjacent to the R.A.F. quarters to provide a permanent vehicular access to the maintenance area of Hong Kong Airport.

The project consists of the building of a flyover to provide a 24-foot-wide carriageway over Prince Edward Road, a length of roadway at ground level and associated drainage works.

The flyover, about 1200 feet long, will provide a grade-separated access into and from the airport maintenance area for eastbound traffic in Prince Edward Road. The ground level roadway, about 800 feet longt will serve as an access for westbound traffic.

Work is expected to start next month.

On completion in about hay, 1974, the interchange will also help ease the traffic flow in Prince Edward Road between Choi Hung Road and Clearwater Bay Road.

/16

Friday, January 19, 1973

- 16 -

HONG KONG NEEDS WELL INFORMED LEADERSHIP IN EDUCATION

Pupils Urged To Repay Debt To Hong Kong

**********

The importance of vocal and well informed leadership in education in Hong Kong was stressed by the Deputy Director of Education (Administration), Mr. C.J.G. Lowe, this evening when he spoke at the annual prize-giving ceremony at St. Paul’s Co-Educational College.

Mr. Lowe told pupils to maintain their interest in education, ’’join the pressure groups, take part in the world of education, keep an eye on the civil servants, influence your friends, join management committees.”

Mr. Lowe reminded the boys and girls of the school that they and their school were generously subsidised by the people of Hong Kong.

”Hong Kong and the Community have done well for you. Never forget your debt to Hong Kong and to its people.

”Try to repay it and what better means than by concentrating your adult interests on the problems of education,” he said.

The Deputy Director also spoke about a problem which was crucial for the future of education. The problem was how to develop from an elitist secondary system into a worthwhile mass system.

He pointed out that if more and more pupils were merely allowed to struggle up the long educational path and if the path was not changed ”the cut-throat competition would become worse.

/”If we........

Friday, January 19, 1973

- 17 -

,rIf we broaden and smooth out the path too much it will become valueless for social advancement, parents will say this is a second best and all real quality will go,

nIt is a difficult problem but it is essential for school like yours to keep in touch with this major problem so that they can guide and advise* They must not turn their back and become totally divorced from this educational crisis.”

Speaking about examinations, Mr. Lowe said: "One of the saddest developments affecting education is the hypnotic effect and tyranny of examinations.

Examinations

"We must force ourselves to consider examinations as the slaves of education and they should never never become the masters. They exist to measure in a very rough and ready way achievement in education. They are not education. Here they are becoming our masters. Here far too often the examination is being taught not the subject, and even worse exams and tests are becoming a teaching method.

"This is disastrous and schools must be more determined to despise examinations at any rate in Forms I - V and they must encourage pupils and parents in the same attitude. It is the mark of a confident school. This dees not mean less work. Indeed more original, less exam oriented answers should get better results."

/Paying .......

Friday, January 19, 1973

- 18 -

Paying tribute to teachers, the Deputy Director said that Hong Kong was indeed extremely lucky to have so many well educated, dedicated, hard-working teachers temperamentally suited for teaching.

Note to Editors; Copies of the full text of Mr. Lowe’s speech are distributed separately in the Press Boxes, Government Information Services, this evening.

-------0---------

Release time: 7*30 P«m.

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Saturday, January 20, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No,

Hong Kong’s estimated population figure shows a slight increase ..................................................... 1

Grantham maintenance grants now available to needy students ........................................................... 2

Road closure for Yuen Long Lunar New Year Fair..........• 3

The dump area in Sai Kung is to be enlarged............ 4

Immigration Dept, to open new branch office in Western •••• 5

Review of last year’s weather ............................. 6

G.P.O.’s Parcel Delivery Office moves to new premises ..... 9

There will be an issue of the D.I.B. tomorrow.............. 9

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Saturday, January 20, 1973

- 1 -

SLIGHT INCREASE IN POPULATION

Estimated 4.1 Million At End Of Last Year

*******

The estimated population at the end of December 1972 was 4,105,500, the Commissioner for Census and Statistics said today.

This is an increase of 59»1OO over the estimated figure for December 1971•

The relatively small increase in population is attributable to a negative balance of migration of 19,100 over the period.

The number of births during 1972 was 80,544, slightly greater than in 1971 (79»684). The crude birth rate for 1972 was 19.7 per thousand, the same as in 1971.

The total number of deaths in 1972 was 22,155 compared to 20,286 in 1971j and the crude death rate is thus slightly higher at 5.4 per thousand.

The rate of natural increase of the population for 1972 (the excess of birth over deaths in 1972 expressed as a percentage of the 1971 end-year population)was 1.45 percent.

These figures are based upon events occurring rather than upon registrations made and therefore differ slightly from those released by the Registrar-General.

-------0---------

/2..........

Saturday , January 20, 1973

- 2 -

GRANTHAM MAINTENANCE GRANTS FOR NEEDY STUDENTS

Applications Should Be Sent In Before February 28

«**,****«

A limited number of Grantham Maintenance Grants for the second-half of the 1972-73 academic year, to be awarded by the Grantham Scholarships Fund Committee are now available to students.

Applications are invited from those pursuing courses in secondary schoolsj the technical college or technical institute, the Baptist College and the two Universities.

The overriding criterion for awards of the grants will be financial needs.

They are intended for those who did not initially qualify for either a Grantham Scholarship or a Grantham Bursary because they were financially less needy, but who now require cash assistance due to an adverse change in the financial circumstances of their family.

Intending applicants should note that these awards will normally not be made to a student holding a scholarship or receiving any form of financial assistance other than interest-free loan or the remission of fees.

Students who have applied for Grantham Scholarships/Bursaries need not re-apply.

Application forms will be obtainable from the Secretariat for Home Affairs on the ninth floor of International Building, No 141 Des Voeux Road Central, Hong Kong from January 29, 1973*

/Completed

Saturday, January 20, 1973

- 3 -

Completed forms, together with a sworn and stamped statutory declaration of family circumstances signed by the parent or guardian, should be returned through the head of the applicant’s school to the Secretariat on or before February 28, 1973» Late applications will not be accepted.

-------0---------

ROAD CLOSURE FOR YUEN LONG NEW YEAR FAIR

*********

The section of Ning Road between Ma Miu Road and Tai Kiu Road, Yuen Long, will be closed to vehicular traffic for the Lunar Nev/ Year Fair to be held there, the Transport Department said today.

The closure will last from Wednesday, January 24, to Sunday, February 4.

Kik Yeung Tsuen Road which crosses into On Ning Road will also be restricted to through-traffic.

Appropriate traffic signs will be posted to guide motorists.

-------0---------

/4.........

Saturday, January 20, 1973

- 4 -

DUIIP AREA IN SAI KUNG TO BE ENLARGED * ♦ * * ♦ * ♦

The area of the spoil dump at Pak Tam Chung, Sai Kung, is to be extended from 4.7 acres, as originally planned, to 7-2 acres.

The spoil dump is used for depositing surplus material arising from tunnelling operations connected with the High Island Water Scheme.

Apart from providing sites for recreational or institutional uses, the reclaimed land will be used for a pipeline crossing associated with the main tunnel system as well as a vehicular access road to a tunnel portal.

The construction cost of the 23-mile tunnel system, which ranges from six feet to 13 feet in diameter, is S3 million.

A notification under the Public Reclamations and Works Ordinance in the Government Gazette today fully describes the boundaries of the proposed spoil dump.

It stipulates that all persons having any objection to the proposed reclamation or any claims of private right in the matter should submit such objections or claims in writing to the Director of Public Works within two months of the date of Notification.

The Notification, both in English and Chinese, can also be seen on Notice Board posted near the site.

-------0---------

/5..........

Saturday, January 20, 1973

- 5 -

NEW EMIGRATION BRANCH OFFICE IN -ZESTERN

*******

The inmigration Department will open a new branch office in Kennedy Town this summer for the convenience of residents of the Western District.

The Kennedy Town branch office, the first to be set up in the district, is located on the ground floor of Luen Gay Apartments in Davis Street.

With a total area of about 2,000 sq. ft., it will house a public waiting area, working counters, a general office, rooms for the staff and lavatories, The office area will be fully air-conditioned in all seasons.

Like all other Immigration Department branch offices, it will handle applications for travel documents such as re-entry permits, certificates of identity and passports.

The fitting out of the office will begin in the middle of March and will take about three months to complete.

------0---------

/6..........

Saturday, January 20, 1975

- 6 -

LAST YEAR’S WEATHER MUCH WETTER THAN USUAL

Widespread Damage Caused By June Rainstorm

*********

Hong Kong, like many countries in Asia, suffered from widespread flooding and landslides in 1972 as a result of heavy rain.

"The heavy rainstorm in June, which caused disastrous landslides and the collapse? of multi-storey buildings, will probably be long remembered,” the Royal Observatory says in its review of the year’s weather.

During these tragic incidents, over 100 people were killed and thousands were left homeless.

It all started on June 14 when a very active trough of low pressure moved slowly southwards across south China an$ the weather in Hong Kong deteriorated rapidly on the day of the Dragon Boat Festival, June 15.

During the next three days, continuous heavy rain with frequent thunderstorms, reminiscent of the rainstorms of June 1966, were experienced and the maximum hourly rainfall of 98«7 mm. recorded on June 18 was close to the record value of 108.2 mm set in 1966.

It was the first time in the recorded history of the Royal Observatory that rainfall in excess of 200 mm. fell in three consecutive days.

Thunderstorms and heavy rain warnings were issued and renewed almost continuously from June 15 to 18.

During this period, widespread flooding and serious traffic disruption were reported in nearly all parts of Hong Kong and the excessive rainfall resulted in the disastrous landslides at Sau Mau Ping and the collapse of buildings at Kotewall Road and Po Shan Road on June 18.

/The year

Saturday, January 20, 1973

- 7 -

The year as a whole was slightly warmer, less cloudy but much wetter than usual.

It was the 4th wettest year since 1884, and the annual rainfall was more than JO percent higher than normal.

Five tropical cyclones affected Hong Kong during the year, but only one, Typhoon ’’Pamela”, came sufficiently close to cause gales.

Apart from being slightly sunnier than usual, the weather during January was fairly normal. Although there was measurable rain on only three days, the total rainfall during the month was about 50 percent above average.

A very intense cold front passed through Hong Kong on February 4, and caused the air temperature to fall during the following five days. The minimum temperature recorded at the Royal Observatory on February 9 was J.8 degrees Celsius, which was the third lowest temperature ever recorded in February.

March was exceptionally fine and dry and several new records were established.

The mean cloudiness of 49 percent and the mean relative humidity of 73 percent were the lowest while the total sunshine of 188.6 hours was the highest ever recorded for the month. The monthly rainfall was also the second lowest on record for March.

April was a cloudy month with fog reported on several occasions. However, the foggy spells during the month were generally short-lived and did not seriously interrupt the air and sea traffic.

/The rainy .••••

Saturday, January 20, 1973

- 8 -

The rainy season started in early May when a trough of low pressure in the South China Sea brought moist air to Hong Kong.

Rain was recorded on 27 days of the month with the total rainfall amounting to more than twice the normal value.

In July, strong winds were experienced in Hong Kong during the passage of Typhoon “Susan”.

Since records began in 1884, “Susan” was the first tropical cyclone which has remained within 200 miles of Hong Kong for more than 5 days*

August was wet with rainfall about 50 percent above normal.

September was warm and the mean monthly pressure of 1011.3 mb was the highest on record for the month.

October was much drier than usual and the total rainfall for the month was 65 percent below normal.

A Yellow Fire Warning was issued on October 21, when the relative humidity dropped below 65 percent. This was the first warning issued since the introduction of the new Fire Warning System on October 9.

In November, Typhoon “Pamela” became the sixth tropical cyclone to affect Hong Kong since records began in 1884.

Cloudy conditions with periods of rain persisted through the middle of November. Fire danger warnings were issued on six occasions.

December was slightly cloudier than usual. There were several outbreaks of cold dry northerly air during the month, alternating with periods of v/arm and relatively humid weather.

• - — 0--------

/9..........

Saturday, January 20, 1973

- 9 -

PARCEL DELIVERY OFFICE MOVES TO NEW PREMISES

*««*****«

The Post Office’s Parcel Delivery Office presently housed on the Central Reclamation adjacent to the Star Ferry Pier will be closed from today (Saturday) after business hours.

Beginning on Monday (January 22), the delivery office will operate in new premises located on Connaught Road Central opposite the G.P.O.

The new office, together with two others completed early last year, forms a parcel complex.

It is designed to concentrate all parcel handling works in the one area and to further improve the parcel counter services to the public until the new G.P.O. is completed.

A Post Office spokesman said any inconvenience to the public caused by the removal was regretted.

-------0----------

SUNDAY D.I.B.

* ♦ ♦ * * ♦ * ♦ ♦ ♦

Note to Editors: There will be an issue of the Daily Information

Bulletin tomorrow (Sunday)• Copies will be available for collection in the G.I.S. Press room after 3 p.m.

Release time: 2.30 p.m.

-------0---------

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Sunday, January 21, 1973

H.K. ECONOMY IN HEALTHY STaTE

Increase In Profit Tax Yields Shown In 1971-72

*********

Increased yields in profits tax from corporations during 1971-72 clearly demonstrated the ’’generally healthy state” of Hong Kong’s economy, the Commissioner of Inland Revenue, Mr. F.E. Rainbow, said in his latest annual report.

He disclosed that the total revenue collected from profits tax in 1971-72 was 3612.8 million, compared with 3504.7 million in the previous year.

Net profits tax charged on 16,277 corporations and unincorporated business was 3629-5 million as against 3505-7 million from 15,111 similar establishments a year ago.

The net tax assessed on the corporations alone in 1971-72 was 3527-2 million, an increase of 25-5 per cent over 1970-71, and nearly two and a half times the level of six years ago, Mr. Rainbow said.

The largest single contributor to profits from corporations was the distribution trades, including wholesale, retail, and import and export. They accounted for almost 24 per cent of the total tax assessed.

The manufacturing trades as a whole contributed 22 per cent of the total tax assessed.

Hotels, restaurants and places of amusements recorded a ’’quite remarkable increase” in tax assessed at a total of 345-7 million. It achieved an increase of nearly 60 per cent from 1970-71-

/It would ..

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong. Tel: 5-233191

Sunday, January 21» 1973

- 2 -

It would seem that "Hong Kong remains a great attraction to the overseas tourist" although competition from other tourist centres in South East Asia was increasing, Mr. Rainbow pointed out.

He said that the substantial increase in yield from that source is also "indicative of the improved living standards of the average Hong Kong citizen who is increasingly more able to divert some part of his income to recreation and enjoyment."

Another outstanding increase came from finance and investment institutions with 892 million profits tax assessed, against 355-6 million in 1970-71 • The figure represented an increase of 65 per cent over the previous year.

Banks showed an increase from 355 million to 349.6 million, or up 42 per cent from 1970-71.

Referring to unincorporated businesses, Mr. Rainbow said that they too produced a "substantial increase" as the net profits tax amounted to 3102.5 million in 1971-72, up 21 per cent over 1970-71.

-------0---------

/3..........

9

V

r ' -'w ' • . * -

Sunday, January 21, 1973

- 3 -

RATS 1-IAX INFEST DOMESTIC BUILDINGS After Big Clean Up

•' • ,a'i .

Rats -may invade and infest domestic buildings as their usual harbourages among unwanted articles in lanes and other public places have been cleared during the recent clean-up operations.

A spokesman for the Urban Services Department, who issued this warning, said that rat nuisance was likely to occur if food and harbourage were present in domestic buildings.

He urged members of the public to prevent possible rat menace by taking a few simple precautionary measures, such as putting all kitchen waste and food remnants in dust-bin and emptying pet dishes into a dust-bin before going to bed.

Cereals, flour and sugar, he added, should be stored in metal or earthware containers while other types of food should be put in refrigerators, metal tins or glass jars.

All unwanted articles should be removed to the nearest U.S.D.

junk collection point for disposal.

The spokesman pointed out that gnawing marks on woodwork and soap and rat droppings were signs of rat infestation.

A....

- - 0 - -

Sunday, January 21, 1973

- 4 -

FIRST BLOCK OF HO IM' TIN ESTATE READY FOR OCCUPATION

Nearby Ci Man Estate Is Taking Shape

*******

The latest government low-cost housing project - the Ho Nan

Tin Estate - is nearly completed and the first of the estate*s eight blocks is now ready for occupation.

Housing Authority staff are finalising arrangements for letting the first 370 flats to applicants at the end of this month.

The other seven blocks, containing another 3»7OO flats, will be ready in a few months.

On completion, the estate will be able to accommodate about 26,300 people.

It will have marketing, shopping and communal facilities, in addition to schools and kindergartens.

Not far from the estate another scheme which will provide low-cost housing to more than ^6,000 people is taking shape.

The first blocks of the huge Housing Authority estate - the

Oi Man Estate - will be ready for occupation at the end of this year or early next year.

Its 12 housing blocks, ranging from seven to 22 storeys high, will provide about 6,200 much needed flats for Hong Kong’s middle-income group.

Like the Ho iian Tin Estate, Oi Man Estate will have the marketing, shopping and other facilities.

A bus terminus will be built in the estate to serve its residents.

o

Note to Editors: An aerial, photograph showing the two estates is available for collection from the G.I.S. press room.

Release time: J .00 p«m.

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Monday, January 22, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No.

Attorney General announces two-week arms amnesty.............• •••• 1

Thousands find work through help of Local Employment Service •••• 4

Compensation for victims of crime of violence ..................   6

More than 8,000,000 people entered or left Hong Kong last year •• 7

Students invited to see courts in action......................... 8

Anti-poliomyelitis campaign continues...........................   9

Cholera quarantine restrictions against certain arrivals ......... 9

A new jury list has been posted ............................• • • • • 10

Water cuts in Peak area........................................   10

Kat 0 residents to get electricity supply ....................... 11

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5'233191

Monday, January 22, 1973

1

TWO-WEEK AKMS AMNESTY ANNOUNCED

Immunity For Those Handing In Explosives, Offensive Weapons * ** 4c * * * * * *

From midnight January 26 until midnight February 10, 1973, there will be an amnesty in respect of all arms and ammunition, explosive substances, fire-crackers and offensive weapons which are reported to the Police or handed in at any Police station.

The Attorney General announced this amnesty today.

The terms of the immunity conferred by this amnesty are that a person will not be subject to prosecution in respect of the possession of any arms or ammunition, explosive substance, fire-cracker or offensive weapon handed in by him to a Police station or recovered by the Police as a result of information given by him.

This immunity does not extend to criminal offences in which such arms, etc. have played a part; for example, a person surrendering a revolver will not be prosecuted for his unlawful possession but will remain liable to prosecution for any offence he has committed with it, such as a robbery.

The Attorney General commented that during 1972 there were numerous cases of firearms and other weapons being used to commit serious crime. These included 25 reported cases of robbery with firearms (as compared with 14 in 1971), and 84 reported cases of illegal possession of arms and ammunition (as compared with 56 in 1971)•

/The law .....

Monday, January 22, 1973

2

The law relating to the legal possession of arms is both concise and strict.

Before a licence is granted, the prospective licensee has to convince the licensing authority that the weapon is required for a legitimate purpose and that the arrangements for the storage of such arms are sufficient to ensure their security.

Furthermore, the licensee is subject to restrictions as to how, when and where the weapon may be used.

There are two main reasons for the strict licensing laws, firstly to prevent arms from falling into the hands of persons who wish to use them for an unlawful purpose, and secondly, to ensure the protection of ordinary citizens from unnecessary injury.

The term "arms", as referred to in the Arms and Ammunition Ordinance (Chapter 2^8), includes -

(a) every firearm of any description;

(b) every air gun; and every other kind of gun from which any shot, bullet or other missile can be discharged;

(c) every sword, cutlass, spear, pike, bayonet, dagger, fighting iron, flick knife, gravity knife or other deadly weapon;

(d) every part of any such firearm gun or deadly weapon;

(e) any gun, pistol or other propelling or releasing instrument or mechansim, from which any shell cartridge, bomb, grenade or projectile, containing any gas or chemical, could be discharged.

/By section 4 • ••••

Monday, January 22, 1973 i

* - -3 -I

By section 4 of the same Ordinance, no person shall, except

4 under and in accordance with a licence issued for this purpose under the Ordinance, carry or have in his possession or under his control any arms or ammunition.

(Certain special classes of person such as Her Majesty’s Armed

Forces, the Police Force and ships and aircraft of war, are exempt from this requirement).

The maximum penalties for contravention of the law are a fine of two thousand dollars and imprisonment for three years on summary conviction and imprisonment for life on conviction on indictment.

Fuller details of the amnesty will appear in the press later.

It is hoped that anyone who has unlicensed arms or ammunition or any explosives or fireworks in his possession will take this opportunity to put himself within the law.

He will also, by handing them in, be doing a service to the community at large by putting them out of the reach of those persons who might use them for criminal activities.

----- 0 - ’------•' ’ -

A...........

Monday, January 22, 1973

- 4 -

4800 PEOPLE HELPED TO OBTAIN WORK By Local Employment Service

*********

The Local Employment Service of the Labour Department helped place 4,841 people in employment in 1972. It registered 28,503 job seekers and received 10,031 ordered vacancies.

The figures represented increases of 52 per cent, 73 per cent and 42 per cent over those for 1971•

The sizable increase in placement may be attributed to the fact that more employers are now making use of the Local Employment Service as a result of personal visits by its officers.

In the fourth quarter of 1972, the Local Employment Service registered 5,300 job-seekers and introduced 4,631 of them to employers for selection interview.

Of these, 1,222 were successfully placed in employment. This represents an increase of 16 per cent over the number of people placed by the Local Employment Service during the corresponding quarter of 1971*

Of the 1,222 people placed in employment during the last quarter, 322 were placed in industry, 481 in commerce, 265 in Government Service, 11 in public utilities and 43 in other establishments.

Six of the-successful applicants received an initial salary of 31,000 or more a month; 395 started work at monthly salaries of 3500 -3999; 710 at 3300 - 3499 and 11 at below 3300.

/Currently, •••••

Monday, January 22, 1973

- 5 -

Currently, there are 5i^96 job-seekers registered with the Service, varying from the young and inexperienced, to experienced and qualified persons looking for better employment.

The Service has on its books 578 vacancies, ranging from executives to office boys in commerce, engineers to general workers in industry and artisans to messengers in the civil service.

The Local Employment Service provides free facilities to assist employers and job-seekers alike.

Job-seekers are invited to register personally at any branch of the Service, bringing with them their identity card and a passportsize photograph.

Employers with vacancies which they wish to fill are invited to contact any office of the Service.

For the convenience of employers and job-seekers who might have difficulty in approaching the Local Employment Service during regular office hours, its Hong Kong Office at the New Rodney Block and Kowloon Office at Canton Road Government Offices now remain open during-the lunch hour from 1.00 p.m. to 2<00 p.m.

-------0---------

/6.........

Monday, January 22, 1973

COMPENSATION FOR VICTHS OF CRIMES OF VIOLENCE

lit******

The Director of Social Welfare, Mr. F.K. Li, will present cheques totalling 317,500 as compensation to tv7o members of the public, in recognition of public-spirited conduct.

The recipients are Mr. Cheung Kam-fai and the family of the late Mr. Ng Shung-por.

The. decision to make these awards was announced by Mr. G.R. Sneath, the Acting Attorney General, in the Legislative Council on Wednesday, December 15, and Mr. Li will now present the cheques on the Government’s behalf.

It will be recalled that Mr. Cheung, 20, was injured last August after joining a chase for an armed robber. As a result, he received injuries to his chest and cheek. He will receive 3500.

The late Mr. Ng died in a struggle last January with three armed robbers who had intruded into his home.

His dependents will receive 317,000.

Note to Editors: The presentation ceremony will be held in the Social Welfare Department conference room at 4 p.m. tomorrow (Tuesday).

Iou are cordially invited to have the occasion covered. Mr. Li will make a short speech before the presentation, and the ceremony will end with tea.

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/7.........

Monday, January 22, 1973

- 7 -

MOVEMENTS OF PEOPLE IN 1972

******

More than eight million people moved in and out of Hong Kong last year, the Immigration Department said today.

This represents an increase of 27»19 per cent, compared with the figures for 1971.

According to provisional figures, 3,988,938 people were recorded as having legally arrived in Hong Kong last year.

In addition, there were 4,023,980 departures, making a total of 8,012,918 authorised movements (excluding transients and persons refused permission to land).

In 19719 the respective arrival and departure figures were 3,148,949 and 3,150,934, making a total of 6,299,883.

A spokesman for the Immigration Department said there was also a 62.46 per cent increase in traffic over the land border at Lo Wu.

Sea travellers receiving immigration clearance during last year totalled 3,8339694 (mainly on the Hong Kong — Macau run), and air travellers 2,727,982.

The figures for 1971 were 3,220,537 and 2,187,328 respectively.

-------0---------

Monday, January 22, 1973

- 8 -

STUDENT GROUPS TO SEE COURTS IN ACTION

*******

Secondary students will be able to visit the law courts and see for themselves the judicial process in Kong Kong under a scheme proposed by the Judiciary.

In a letter to all school heads, the Supreme Court Registrar has invited them to organise student groups among the senior forms to attend at a convenient court, receive a talk from a Magistrate or court officer in English or Cantonese, and subsequently watch a court in session.

A spokesman for the Judiciary said the Chief Justice desired that the young people should be given more opportunity to become better acquainted with the administration of justice in the courts•

Occassionally in the past, he said groups of students had visited the Supreme Court and, after being given a short talk on judicial procedure, had attended one or more of the courts to observe trials in progress.

Subsequent comments by both students and teachers had clearly indicated that this practice was of considerable value and greatly appreciated.

The spokesman also pointed out that, in fact, almost without exception, the courts were open to the public at all times, and groups need not be organised.

’’But this organised student scheme promises to be an excellent way of introducing young people to the judicial system. It is hoped it will create in then a continuing interest in the judicial process,” he added

Monday, January 22, 1973

- 9 -

ANTI-POLIOMYELITIS CAMPAIGN 1973

********

During the week ending on January 13, 1973, a total of 7,657 doses of the anti-poliomyelitis vaccine was administered, according to figures released by the Medical and Health Department today.

The 1973 Anti-Poliomyelitis Campaign began on December 28, 1972, and will continue until February 2, 1973*

The second phase is due to begin in March.

Of the 7,657 doses administered in the second week of the campaign, 1,192 doses were administered on the Island, 3,669 doses in Kowloon, and 2,796 in the New Territories.

Since the campaign began on December 28, 1972, the total number of doses administered amounted to 12,877.

The vaccine is available free at all government general clinics and maternal and child health centres.

-------0---------

CHOLERA QUARANTINE RESTRICTIONS

*******

The Port Health Authority announced today that quarantine restrictions have been imposed against arrivals from Sabang (Port) in Indonesia because of cholera.

Meanwhile, quarantine restrictions imposed against arrivals from •

Visakhapatnam (Port) in India because of cholera have been removed.

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/10 ........

Monday, January 22, 1973

- 10

JURY LIST TO BE POSTED «*«*!«**

Mr. J.G. Wilson, the Acting Registrar of the Supreme Court, announced today that a further list of common jurors was posted on the Notice Board near the lift inside the south-west entrance to the Supreme Court Building today (Monday)•

This list will remain posted for 14 days during which any person may apply by notice in writing to the Registrar requiring that his name or the name of some other person be posted or removed upon cause duly assigned in such notice.

The Registrar shall in his discretion, post or remove such name accordingly and shall if necessary alter the List.

-------0---------

WATER INTERRUPTION

*******

Water supply to a number of premises in the Peak area will be interrupted for eight hours from 10 p.m. on Tuesday (January 2?) to 6 a.m. the next morning.

The temporary stoppage is to enable the Waterworks Office to make connection to a fresh water main at Pollock’s Path.

The premises to be affected include No. 6 in Lloyd Path, No. 4 Findlay Path, Nos. 8-36 and 19-37 in Severn Road and Nos. 8-28 and 17-51 in Barker Road.

-------0---------

/11

Monday, January 22, 1973

- 11 -

ELECTRICITY SUPPLY FOR KAT 0 RESIDENTS

*******

Some 4,000 residents of Kat 0 Island are to get electricity supply from the China Light and Power Co. Ltd. on Wednesday (January 24) following a ’’switch-on” ceremony to be officiated by Mr. D.C. Bray, District Commissioner, New TerritoM.es.

The ceremony will take place at 11.JO a.m.

It will be attended by, among others, Sir Sidney Gordon, Unofficial Member of the Executive Council; Mr. Horace Kadoorie, Director of the China Light and Power Company and Messrs. H.S. Grewal and A.N. Savage, out-going and in-ooming District Officer, Taipo.

At present, Kat 0 Island, situated east of Sha Tau Kok, gets its electricity from a privately-operated power generating plant.

The new arrangement has been made possible by the China Light and Power Co. Ltd. which laid a submarine power cable linking the island with the New Territories.

It is hoped that the general livelihood of the residents on Kat 0 Island will be improved with the supply of electricity.

***«*»«

Note to Editors: Reporters and/or photographers assigned

to cover the ”switch-onn ceremony are asked to assemble at the Tsim Sha Tsui Sub-Pool (behind the Post Office) at 7*50 a.m.

From there they will be taken by van (AMJ274) to Tai Po Kau Ferry Pier where a launch will be waiting to ferry them to Kat 0 Island.

Lunch and refreshments will be provided.

Release time:

7.00 p.m.

-------0---------

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Tuesday, January 23, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No.

Work on raising the dams at the Plover Cove Reservoir is nearing completion ..........................................   1

The Director of Social Welfare appeals for public co-operation in the fight against crime ..................................   3

The Probation and Corrections Divisions of the Social Welfare

Department is to hold its first Open Day this week............. 5

Kitchen refuse may be a health hazard ......................... 8

A number of rest gardens will be opened in the Tai Hang Tung Resettlement Estate ......................................      9

A public dump for building debris will be open in Central District next week .....................................       10

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong. Tel: 5-233191

Tuesday, January 2J, 1973

EXTENSION WORK AT PLOVER COVE NEAPING COMPLETION Dams Being Raised To Increase Capacity *******

Ninety per cent of the current extension work at the Plover Cove Reservoir to boost its storage capacity by some 13,500 million gallons has now been completed.

The whole project, costing more than $32 million, is expected to be completed in April as the construction work has progressed according to schedule.

And what remains to be done after that is to wait for the rainy season to come.

The extension work was started in June 1970, and it was planned to take advantage of the summer rains this year.

With the completion of this project, Hong Kong’s total water storage capacity will be increased from 54,000 million gallons to 67,500 million gallons.

This, together with the High Island Water Scheme which will have a storage capacity of 60,000 million gallons when completed, and the Castle Peal: desalination plant, which should be able to produce 40 million gallons of fresh water per day by 1976, represent three positive steps taken by the Government to meet Hong Kong’s increasing demand for fresh water in the seventies.

The Plover Cove extension work involves the raising of the main and two subsidiary dams by 12 feet, the construction of a small saddle dam at the Tai Lei Tuk peninsula, and the installation of 64 concrete syphons on the existing spillway.

/Commenting .....

Tuesday , January 2J, 1973

- 2 -

Commenting on the progress of the works, a spokesman for the project said the dams and the syphons are now nearing completion.

At the main dam, the deposition of rip rap (large rocks) and the final repositioning of the wave wall blocks are well underway.

The installation of syphons on the spillway is also progressing well#

The two subsidiary (North and South) dams have been completed except for some road surfacing and turfing work.

Work at the saddle dam has been finished.

-------0---------

Tuesday, January 23, 1973

- 3 -

APPEAL FOR PUBLIC CO-OPERATION AGAINST CRIME Comments By Director of Social Welfare At Unusual Ceremony *********

Mr. F.K. Li, Director of Social Welfare, today appealed for public co-operation in the Government’s efforts to prevent crimes of violence.

He was speaking at a ceremony in Lee Gardens attended by Mr. Cheung Kam-fai and dependents of the late Mr. Ng Shung-por who received special cash awards as a mark of appreciation for courageous and public-spirited conduct.

Mr. Li said when their cases were reported in the Press much sympathy was aroused. Mr. Cheung and the late Mr. Ng were examples of brave residents who were not afraid to do their share in helping the authorities fight crime.

’’Everyone is proud of them,” Mr. Li said, ’’and today, the Hong Kong Government wishes to show its gratitude to Mr. Cheung and the family of Mr. Ng.”

He then presented special cash awards of $500 to Mr. Cheung and $17,000 to the family of the late Mr. Ng.

Hr. Li said the prosperity of Hong Kong depended on the combined efforts of the Government and the people to prevent crime. The authorities and voluntary agencies were deeply concerned over the increase in crime, and steps were being taken to see that peace and order could be made secure for all.

/"It is

Tuesday, January 25, 1973

- 4 -

f,It is in this sense that the ceremony today has significance,"

Mr. Li commented, "Without the co-operation of the people, all measures that are taken will not be fully effective. Co-operation is essential."

Notice of the special award was made by Mr. G.R. Sneath, Acting Attorney General, in the Legislative Council on Wednesday, December 13, 1972.

Under Section 95 of the Interpretation Ordinance, the Legislative Council may award compensation to any person injured while carrying out a moral duty to assist in the prevention of crime.

w w • - 0 -------

Tuesday, January 23, 1973

- 5 -

FIRST OPIM DAY OF PROBATION SERVICE

Chief Justice To Attend Ceremony At SWD’s Begonia Road Home

**«***««

Sir Ivo Rigby, the Chief Justice, will officiate at the first Open Day of the Social Welfare Department’s Probation and Corrections Division at the Begonia Road Boys’ Home on Thursday (January 23)-

On this Open Day, for the first time, all probation, offices and five S.W.D. correctional institutions are joining together to mount.a single show. The show, which will continue beyond the Open Day itself in other localities, is aimed at familiarising the public with the aims and objectives of probation and correctional work.

The five institutions are the Begonia Road Boys’ Home, the 0 Pui Shan Boys* Home, the Castle Peak Boys’ Home, the Ma Tau Wei Girls’ Home and the Kwun Tong Hostel.

Sir Ivo will see in the hall of the Begonia Road Boys’ Home an exhibition depicting visually life in all S.W.D. correctional institutions.

There will be photographs, charts and other material, showing the trainees at work, at play, and engaged in projects that will have a bearing on their occupations after their discharge.

In addition, a Cantonese film, made recently by Radio Hong Kong Television for its drama series ’’Under the Lion Rock”, will be re-screened. It shows how a probation officer helps prevent a teenage boy from going astray.

Two well-known television personalities, Tsang Kong and Wong Suk-yee, star in the film. Professional divisional officers assisted in the preparation of the script.

/Visitors ••••••••

Tuesday, January 23, 1973

- 6 -

Visitors to the Open Day will also be able to manipulate an interesting device, a kind of ’quiz machine,’ which will test the level of their understanding in probation and corrections work.

Also on display will be various handicrafts made by trainees following instructions in technical classes. Items include carpentry work, tailoring, art work, and products conceived and executed as a result of a special interest, or a hobby.

The entire exhibition will be displayed in four localities at different times after the Open Day for the convenience of the public.

It will be shown at the Begonia Road Boys* Home on January 26-27;

at the Lady Trench Training Centre on February 8-10; at the Yuen Long Town

Hall on February 13-^7, and at the Wong Tai Sin Community Centre on February 22-24.

Honest Appraisal

Mr. Anthony Chan, Superintendent of the Begonia Road Boys* Home, will welcome visitors in groups, and arrangements for their reception can be made by telephoning Mr. Chan at 3-800300. A guide will be provided for a group visit.

Commenting on the significance of the Open Day, Mr. S.M. Lee, Senior Principal Social Welfare Officer and head of the Probation and Corrections Division, says an honest appraisal of the material assembled will enable a visitor to gain a proper idea of the work of the probation service.

’*1 hope the show we are mounting will enable our work to be seen in proper perspective.”

The success of probation can be seen from statistics on probation cases in the year beginning on April 1, 1971, and ending on March 31, 1972. Cases brought up in that time totalled 2,378, and of these, 2,182 were completed. Of the lot, 1,463 were successful.

*******

/Note to Editors: ...........

Tuesday, January 23, 1973

- 7 -

Note to Editors; You are invited to have the open

day at the Begonia Road Boys’ Home covered. The ceremony begins at 3 p.m. on Thursday (January 25)• Arrangements can be made separately with the TV and radio stations for a preview of the exhibition before that time. Please contact the Social Welfare Department’s Principal Information Officer directly, telephone number 5-787784.

-------0---------

/8........

Tuesday, January 2J, 1973

- 8 -

KITCHEN REFUSE MAY BE HEALTH HAZARD

******;«**

Kitchen refuse and food remnants if not disposed of properly, may constitute a health hazard because they attract flies, cockroaches and rats.

A spokesman for the Urban Services Department said that all kitchen refuse should be wrapped in plastic bags or with several layers of newspaper before being put into the dust-bin.

"This is much more hygienic," he said.

Collection of refuse will also be an easier task for both caretakers and U.S.D. workers.

The spokesman pointed out that under the new litter laws every flat occupant must provide and use a proper dust-bin for refuse; the use of a basket or open swill bucket was prohibited.

"Posters advocating this practice are being sent out to the management committees of all multi-storey buildings," he added.

-------0---------

/9.........

Tuesday, January 23, 1973

- 9 -

REST GARDENS FDR TAI HANG TUNG ESTATE ***********

Residents of the Tai Hang Tung Resettlement Estate will have additional sitting out areas when a number of rest gardens are opened tomorrow (January 24).

Situated at Blocks 3, 4, 5 and 6 of the estate, these rest gardens will provide more recreational spaces for the residents during their leisure hours*

The ribbon-cutting ceremony will be jointly officiated tomorrow afternoon by Mr. Henry Wong, Urban Councillor, and Mr. Cheng Chung-ming, Chairman of the Estate’s Kaifong Welfare Association.

After the ceremony, the guests will be conducted on a tour of the rest gardens.

Note to Editors: You are cordially invited to send a reporter

and/or photographer to cover the opening ceremony. It will be held in the rest garden between Block 4 and 5 at 3 p.m.

-------0---------

/10.........

Tuesday, January 23, 1973

- 10 -

PUBLIC DUi'IP TO BE OPENED IN CENTRAL For Depositing Selected Building Debris *******

The Director of Public Works, Mr. J.J. Robson, announced today that the public dump at Central Reclamation Stage V will be opened for the dumping of selected building debris as from Monday, January 29, 1973.

He stressed that only holders of valid dumping permits for Hong Kong Island would be permitted to use this dump.

The entrance to the dump is about 150 feet to the west of Queen’s Street.

The public dump forms part of the Central. Reclamation Stage V which will, upon completion, provide more than 15 acres of much needed land.

Construction of a seawall to the west of the Macau Ferry Wharf, which will facilitate later reclamation works, is already well underway.

The finished reclamation will be used for widening Connaught Road West and Connaught Road Central as well as for building development and open spaces.

About 60,000 square feet of land will, be reserved for a temporary cargo-handling area*

Meanwhile, the public dumps at Chai V/an and Sandy Bay Reclamations will also remain open.

But these dumps might be closed at any time without notice, the Director added.

- - 0 - -

:eleaue time:7*00 P*m,

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Wednesday, January 24, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No.

The Governor speaks on trade between Hong Kong and Japan .......... 1

The Defence Secretary, Lord Carrington, is due here tomorrow for a three-day visit.............................................. 4

Exhibition of Chinese paper cuttings will be held on Friday ....... 5

Rapid advances have been made in containerisation in Hong Kong .. 6

Three lots of Crown land are to be sold next month ................ 8

Initial response to the payment of the first dividend to Ming Tak Bank creditors is disappointing ............................... 9

Two Supplies Supervisors are retiring ............................ 10

Residents of certain buildings in Tai Po will be without water on Friday night...............................................     10

The Resettlement Department pushes ahead with its programme to make the estates a better place to live in........................ 11

A new system of testing applicants for taxi driving licences is to be introduced next month ......................................... 12

The Governor’s Deputy sends message of sympathy on Mr. Johnson’s death .............................................• ••........... 1?

Labour Department helps settle dispute at knitting factory ....... 14

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Wednesday, January 24, 1973

CALL TO JAPAN TO END DISCRIMINATION AGAINST H.K. GOODS Governor Speaks On H.K, — Japan Trade in Sasebo *******

The Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, today called for a more favourable balance of trade between Hong Kong and Japan and appealed to the Japanese Government to end its ’’discrimination'*' against certain Hong Kong products.

’’The trading and economic links between Japan and Hong Kong,” he warned, ’’may become strained if they are too one-sided. •’

The Governor was speaking in the Japanese port, Sasebo, on the occasion of the christening of the World Maritime Bahamas Ltd’s latest tanker ’’World Victoria” by Lady MacLehose.

The 220,852-ton super tanker was built by the Sasebo Heavy Industries Co. Ltd.

In his address, Sir Murray referred to the United Nations Generalised Preferences for developing countries and to the so-called Hong Kong Exceptions List which excludes 9& items of Hong Kong products from preference in the Japanese market.

This exclusion does not apply to Hong Kong’s major trading rivals in Asia.

Sir Murray said he was not asking for special favours for Hong Kong ’’but only that we should not be discriminated against as compared with our close competitors.”

He pointed out that Japanese goods made up one-quarter of Hong Kong’s exports while only 1/33 of our products went to Japan.

/;’In such.....

Wednesday, January 24, 1973

- 2 -

"In such circumstances discrimination could provoke resentment," he said•

Referring to the growing demand in Hong Kong for Japanese goods such as refrigerators, television sets and motorcars, the Governor noted that last year Japanese exports to Hong Kong amounted to some US S88O million.

However, he added that trade in the reverse direction had not been so dramatic and amounted to US 384 million during the same period.

"Through our Trade Development Council office in Tokyo and the rigour of our exporters we are trying to correct this," he said.

Sir Murray stressed that there were many Hong Kong products which could sell well in Japan to the satisfaction of consumers and without damage to Japanese manufacturers.

Much goodwill, he said, could be generated if Hong Kong products were allowed to improve their performance in Japan.

The Governor also pointed out that Japanese business had been taking an increasingly large stake in the economy of Hong Kong, and Japan was now second only to the United States as a source of overseas industrial investment.

In addition, Japanese firms had recently obtained several of the major government contracts including the Kaitak airport runway extension and the new desalting plant to increase water supplies.

These two contracts alone were worth US 378 million.

The Governor said he was also aware of considerable Japanese interest in the possibility of constructing an underground railway the

cost of which was expected to be over US 31,000 million

/Sir Murray

Wednesday, January 2k, 1973

- 3 -

Sir Murray said it was difficult to realise how great an influence Rong Kong had on trade because of its small size.

But in fact its visible foreign trade was 2/3 that of Australia and L-l/3 times bigger than that of India as well as being the twenty-first largest trading unit in the world, ho said.

Apart from visible trade, he went on, Hong Kong also generated an extraordinary amount of business activity which did not show in its trade figures.

Citing one example, the Governor said that in the last decade Hong Kong residents ordered more than 20 million tons of shipping from Japan "and by 19^2 they may place orders for another 30 million tons."

The Governor spoke optimistically about the future in view of the normalisation of international relationships and the relaxation of tension in the region coupled with the increase in world trade, and invited Japanese enterprise to share in the expected growth of Hong Kong's trade.

"But we hope also," he added, "that Hong Kong exporters will be able to feel more confident about their possibilities in the Japanese market, so that the friendly commerce between Hong Kong and Japan may develop in mutual profit and harmony in the years ahead.

note to Editors: Copies of the full text of the Governor's speech will be available for collection in the G.I.S. press boxes this evening.

-------0-------• -

A...........

Wednesday, January 24, 1973

LORD CARRINGTON DUE TOMORROW FOR 3-DAY VISIT

To Hold Talks And Visit Army Units

********

The Secretary of State for Defence, Lord Carrington, will arrive in Hong Kong at 7-30 p.m. tomorrow night (Thursday) by R.A.F. Flight No. Ascot 1100.

Lord Carrington is at present touring British units in the Far East and Australiasia.

During his three-day visit to Hong Kong, he will be staying at Government House.

The Minister is accompanied by Lady Carrington and senior military and civilian officials from the Ministry of Defence and the Foreign and Commonwealth Office.

On Friday, Lord Carrington will meet the Commander British Forces and visit army units in the New Territories.

The following morning, he will hold talks with the Governor, the Commander British Forces and other Government officials.

Later, at 10.45 a.m. (Saturday) he will hold a Press Conference at Beaconsfield House before paying a visit to H.M.S. Tamar.

The Minister and Lady Carrington will leave for Wellington from R.A.F. Kai Tak at 8 a.m. on Sunday.

******** • •• • ..... • • Note to Editors: Lord Carrington and his party will be met

on arrival by Lieutenant-General Sir Richard Ward, Commander British Forces, at R.A.F. Kai Tak.

/There will .........

Wednesday, January 24, 1973

- 5 -

There will be no press conference at the airport. However, members of the press who wish to take pictures of his arrival should be at the main guard room, R.A.F. Kai Tak not later than 7*10 p.m. tomorrow (Thursday). A G.I.S. and a J.S.P.R.S. officer will be there to assist the press.

• * *

-------------------------o---------

EXHIBITION OF CHINESE PAPER CUTS

About 300 exquisite Chinese paper-cuttings will be on show at the City Museum and Art Gallery in a special exhibition opening on Friday, January 26.

This group of paper-cuttings are selected from the Museum Collection.

They form a good representation of a popular folk art which, made with simple tools and material, are full of life arid simplicity and reflect the industrious life and sentiments of the peasantry.

The paper-cuts are from various districts of China and show distinct regional features and styles. These vary from the simple and rustic examples from the Northern provinces to the elegant and complex ones from the South.

The exhibition is a special contribution by the City Museum in celebration of the Lunar New Year, and will be on display until February 18.

-------0---------

/6.........

Wednesday, January 2^, 197J

6 -

RAPID ADVANCES IN CONTAINERISATION IN HONG KONG

New Berth At Kwai Chung To Be Opened By Governor «**«**«

Hong Kong has been forging ahead with containerisation during the past three years. The first large-scale container complex at Kwai Chung is developing rapidly.

last September the 59i889~ton containership, the Tokyo Bay, arrived in harbour and unloaded the first container at the Kwai Chung Container Terminal. This marked a new chapter in containerisation in Hong Kong.

Since then, the tonnage of goods arriving in containers has risen considerably and the number of containers handled at the Kwai Chung terminal has increased by four times. It now handles 860 a day.

The terminal complex will have three berths when fully developed. All of them will be able to accommodate vessels drawing 40 feet upwards and 950 feet in length.

Berth No. 1, which is operated by the Modern Terminals Limited, will be officially opened by the Governor, Sir iiurray NacLehose on Saturday (January 27).

Berth No. 2 and No. 3 are being built by a Japanese and an American consortium respectively.

Container handling in Hong Kong has been developing very quickly in the last few years.

/Early ......

Wednesday, January 24, 1973

- 7 -

Early in 1969, the number of containers handled each month was about 1,000. The number tripled in the following year and in 1971, it rose to as high as nearly 7,000. Last year, the average monthly figure went up to a peak of 11,700.

In 1970, when container handling facilities was first taking shape, the number of containers that arrived in Hong Kong was 63,000 and the number that departed was 58,750. The number of containers discharged in Hong Kong was 23,500 and the number loaded 16,900.

These figures were almost doubled in the following year and last year’s figures were three or four times those of 1970.

-------0---------

CRIME PREVENTION CAMPAIGN

*******

Note to Editors: A feature article issued in connection with a two-week Crime Prevention Campaign over the Lunar New Year is being distributed separately in the G.I.S. press boxes this evening.

-------0---------

/8..........

Wednesday, January 2^, 1973

- 8 -

LAND FOR PRIVATE RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT

Public Auction Next Month »**««*«

Three lots of Crown land for private residential development will be offered for sale at a public auction in the City Hall next month.

All three lots, located in Kowloon’s ‘’Broadcast City,” have a total upset price of over 321 million.

The biggest lot, situated at the junction of Broadcast Drive and Fessenden Road, occupies an area of about 19,000 sq. ft. and has an upset price of 312 million.

The second lot is adjacent to the first. It measures about 12,330 sq. ft. and the upset price is 33»7 million.

The last lot is located at the junction of Marconi Road and Broadcast Drive with an area of 1*1,730 sq. ft. The upset price is 36 million.

The auction will take place on February 23 at 2.30 p.m. in the City Hall Lecture Room, 8th Floor.

Full particulars and conditions of sale may be obtained from and sales plans inspected at the Public Enquiry Sub-office, Central Government Offices (West Wing), Ground Floor, Hong Kong, and at the Crown Lands and Survey Office, Kowloon Government Offices, *+03 Nathan Road, 10th floor, Kowloon.

- - 0 - -

/9

Wednesday, January 24, 1975

- 9 -

PAYMENT OF FIRST DIVIDEND TO MING TAK CREDITORS Initial Response Very Disappointing

*««**«***

The Official Receiver, Mr. W. Hume, said today that the initial response of creditors to the 25 per cent dividend payment was very disappointing.

Ke said that "out of about 600 creditors who were eligible to receive payment during the first two days of the payment programme, only 90 came forward.

"This is very much below expectation even allowing for the possibility that many creditors may have emigrated since 1965• ”

Mr. Hume reminded creditors that full details of the payment programme were published in English and Chinese newspapers last Friday (January 19)•

Copies can still be obtained from the Official Receiver’s Office at either Central Government Offices, West Wing, 6th floor, Ice House Street, or Sutherland House, 10th floor, No. 5 Chater Road.

He urged all creditors to ascertain the date and place of payment appropriate to their accounts and to come along and collect the money that is due to them.

-------0---------

/10.........

Wednesday, January 24, 1973

- 10 -

TWO SUPPLIES SUPERVISORS GOING ON RETIRE!SNT *******

Two Supplies Supervisors of the Government Supplies Department will be retiring shortly after 25 years in government service.

They are Mr. Andrew Tsang, Supplies Supervisor, I and Mr. Li Wing-hoi, Supplies Supervisor, II.

To mark their retirement, the Director of Government Supplies, Mr. F.J. Young, will present farewell gifts to them on behalf of their friends and colleagues at a brief ceremony to be held at the departmental headquarters on Friday (January 26).

Note to Editors; You are invited to have the event covered. The presentation will be held at 4 p.m. on Friday in the main building of the Government Supplies Department in Oil Street, North Point.

-------0---------

WATER INTERRUPTION

*******

Water supply to a number of premises in Tai Po will be interrupted for eight hours from 10 p.m. on Friday (January 26).

The temporary stoppage is to enable the Waterworks Office to repair a valve near Tai Po Tau Pumping Station at 16# mile stone, Tai Po Road, New Territories.

Affected will be premises between 14# mile stone, Tai Po Road, Tsung Tsai Yuen and Tai Po Tau Pumping Station.

-------0---------

/11

Wednesday, January 24, 1973

MORE TREES AND PLANTS FOR RESETTLEMENT ESTATES

82 Million To Be Spent Over Next Two Years

*********

The Resettlement Department is to continue its programme to beautify the estates so as to improve the living environment of the residents.

Outlining details of the programme, the department’s Senior Maintenance Surveyor, Mr. Douglas Stewart, said today that some 82 nri 11 i cm would be spent on landscaping and tree planting in the estates over the next two years.

He was speaking at the opening of a new rest garden in Tai Hang Tung Estate.

In the past 12 months, he said, more than 8600,000 had been spent on tree planting and landscaping in the older estates and there had been little need to replant as a result of damage.

He felt that one of the basic necessities of mankind was ’’communication

with nature,” and it was wrong that children should grow up in concrete jungles devoid of trees.

”1 have found that when children get used to trees and plants they will not damage them," he added.

After large public areas in resettlement estates were cleared of hawkers and other obstructions, he said, the land would be used for the benefit of the tenants.

Mr. Henry Wong, an Urban Councillor, and Mr. Cheung Chung-ming, chairman

of the Tai Hang Tung Kaifong Association, both cut the ribbon to mark the official opening of the rest garden.

They also called on tenants of the estates to give their support to protecting the growth of the plants, especially during the early stages of planting.

0 -

/12

Wednesday, January 24, 1973

- 12 -

TESTS FOR TAXI DRIVING LICENCES

Nev; System To Be Introduced Next Month t

*********

A new system would be introduced on February 8 for testing applicants for driving licences for taxis and public cars, the Commissioner for Transport announced today.

Under the new system,JO to 40 applicants at a time will be given examination papers with questions relating to the Highway Code, regulations on taxis and public cars, and locations and routes in Hong Kong and Kowloon.

They will be asked to place a mark beside multiple-choice answers in the paper.

Explaining the new system, the Commissioner said: "The objects of the change are to increase the rate of testing applicants for these licences so as to meet the demand arising from the issue of new taxi licences by tender, and also to improve the standard of these drivers."

The present test is a purely oral one and consists of ten questions about routes and locations in Hong Kong and Kowloon.

It requires one examining officer to test each applicant and is too slow. Neither does it provide a comprehensive range of questions covering matters directly related to the operation of taxis and public cars.

Candidates with appointments for tests before February 7 will not be affected by the new system. Those who have appointments after that date have already been informed of their new examination dates.

0 - -

/13

Wednesday, January 24, 1973

- 13 -

MESSAGE OF SYMPATHY OVER MR. JOHNSON’S DEATH

**********

The Governor’s Deputy, Sir Hugh Norman-Walker, today sent a message of condolence to the American Consul-General, Mr. David L* Osborn, on the death of Mr. Lyndon Johnson.

Sir Hugh said: ”1 wish to express my sincere sympathy to you and the people of the United States of America on the death of Mr. Lyndon Johnson.

”Mr. Johnson bore heavy responsibility with distinction at a very difficult period in history.”

Wednesday, January 24, 1973

- 14 -

LABOUR DISPUTE SETTLED

********

The Labour Department has helped settle a dispute involving 140 employees of a Kwun Tong knitting factory over severance pay.

• The factory, the Spartan Knitters Ltd., terminated the service of all its monthly, daily and piece-rated workers on January 16.

Subsequently the Labour Relations Service of the department arranged a series of conciliation meetings for the parties concerned at its Kwun Tong Branch Office.

Two agreements were ultimately drawn up last Sunday and Monday.

Under these agreements, the monthly-paid employees will receive an annual bonus and an ex-gratia severance pay proportional to their length of service.

The daily and piece-rated workers will each receive a month’s wage in lieu of notice and flat-rate ex-gratia severance pay.

Payment to the workers, totalling about 380,000, will be made at the factory on January JO.

-------0---------

Release time: 7*00

PR 39 4000035

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

SUPPLEMENT

Wednesday, January 24, 1973

GOVERNOR ON HONG KONG-JAPAN TRADE On Occasion Of Launching Of Tanker In Sasebo ********

The Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, today spoke on trade between Hong Kong and Japan on the occasion of the launching of the tanker, "World Victoria," in Sasebo, Japan.

The following is the full text of the Governor’s speech:

"I .would first -like to thank Mr. Pao and President Nakamura for the honour they have done my wife in invitiYig her to name ’The World Victoria1 • It is a great pleasure that Mayor Oshima of Osaka and Mayor Tsuji of Sasebo are able to be present. This occasion is made the more delightful for my wife and myself because of the presence of so many distinguished friends from Hong Kong, several of whom play a major part in Hong Kong’s commercial relations with Japan.

"The ship is a tribute on the one hand to the enterprise of World Maritime Bahamas and its constituent bodies - mainly the Hongkong and Shanghai BanlcLng Corporation and World-Wide Shipping, and on the other to the skill of the Sasebo Heavy Industries Company. It is yet a further example of what can be achieved when the businessmen of Hong Kong and Japan collaborate. I would like to solicit your attention for a few minutes for this theme of commercial collaboration between Japan and Hong Kong, even if it takes us temporarily away from the ship.

/"Because ••••••

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House. Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Wednesday, January 24, 1973

- 2 -

"Because Hong Kong is so small it is hard to realise how great an influence it has on trade- Its visible foreign trade for instance, is 2/3 that of Australia and 1 1/3 times bigger than that of India and it is the 21st largest trading unit in the world.

"Quite apart from visible trade it generates an extraordinary amount of business activity which does not shovz in its trade figures. To take an example; in the last ten years Hong Kong residents have placed in Japan orders for over 20 million tons of shipping, and by 1982 they may place orders for another 30 million tons. Excluding shipping, last year the trade between Japan and Hong Kong approached USS 1,000 million# Increasing Demand

"The industry of Hong Kong has developed rapidly and the quality of its products has steadily improved. This has produced an increasing demand for more sophisticated capital equipment and for semi-processed industrial materials. This demand Japan has been able to meet to our mutual benefit. In addition, the steady growth of the economy and the rising standard of living of the people of Hong Kong have produced a rising demand for such Japanese products as cameras, refrigerators, television sets and motor cars. In 1972 Japanese exports to Hong Kong amounted to about US3 880 million.

"Trade in the reverse direction from Hong Kong to Japan has not been so dramatic, and amounted last year to US$ 84 million. Through our Trade Development Council office in Tokyo and the rigour of our exporters we are trying to correct this. There are many Hong Kong products which could sell well in Japan to the satisfaction of consumers and without damage to Japanese manufacturers.

/"In this •••••

Wednesday, January 24, 1975

- 3 -

"In this connection I was very glad to know that the Government of Japan has recently introduced a number of measures designed to promote imports, including reductions in certain tariffs and the removal of quantitative imports restrictions on other products- We in Hong Kong welcome these moves, which, if I might say so, are typical of the wisdom of Japanese economic administration. If they allow Hong Kong exports to improve their performance in Japan they will also improve that highly fragile commodity good-will.

Special Plea

"This brings me to the question of United Nations Generalised Preferences for Developing Countries. Here I must make a special plea to the Japanese Government to end the discrimination against Hong Kong involved in the so-called Hong Kong Exceptions List. This is a special list of 96 items in respect of which Hong Kong alone among developing countries is excluded from preference in the Japanese market. I am not asking for special favours for Hong Kong but only that we should not be discriminated against as compared with our close competitors. The trading and economic links between Japan and Hong Kong may become strained if they are too one-sided. One-quarter of Hong Kong’s imports come from Japan, one-thirty-third of our exports go to Japan - in such circumstances discrimination could provoke resentment.

/"Many

Wednesday, January 24, 1973

- 4 -

"Many Japanese tourists visit Hong Kong. About 400,000 came last year, and I hope they enjoyed themselves. They were extremely welcome. Over one million tourists visited Hong Kong last year, and I greatly enjoyed receiving the millionth. By some strange co-incidence she was a remarkably pretty girl. We are expecting many Japanese to come to the International Arts Festival in Hong Kong in February and March at which some of the most famous artists in the world of music and ballet and drama will be performing, including your own New Japanese Philharmonic Orchestra. The Hong Kong Tourist Office in Tokyo has all the details about this and anything else in Hong Kong.

Large Stake

"Apart from these developments in trade and tourism Japanese business has been taking an increasingly large stake in the economy of Hong Kong. Japan is now second only to the United States as a source of overseas industrial investment. In.addition Japanese firms have recently obtained several of the major government contracts. These have included the extension .of the runway to the airport, and a new desalting plant to increase water supplies - the latter far the biggest plant of its kind in the world. These two contracts alone were worth US$78 million, and I am aware of considerable Japanese interest in the possibility of constructing an underground railway, for which the figure, at 1971 prices, is expected to be over US$1,100 million.

/"We from •••••••••

Wednesday, January 24, 1973

- 5 -

"We from Hong Kong would respectfully bring to the attention of Japanese businessmen our hopes for an increase in Hong Kong’s exports to Japan•

"Wise decisions by wise men have brought about a normalisation of international relationships and a relaxation of tension in this area# World trade is on the up-turn. In Hong Kong these are taken to be solid bases for optimism, and our businessmen expect steady growth in the years ahead. Wc hope that Japanese enterprise will share in this growth and have profit from it. But we hope also that Hong Kong exporters will be able to feel more confident about their possibilities in the Japanese market, so that the friendly commerce between Japan and Hong Kong may develop in mutual profit and harmony in the years ahead.

"This brings me back to his first example of profitable and harmonious collaboration between Japan and Hong Kong - *The World Victoria* . We are hero to do honour to her birth, the birth of a great ship, built in a famous Japanese yard to the order of a famous Hong Kong owner. We wish her a long and successful life that will bring credit to her builders and profit to her owners and happiness to all who sail in her. "

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Release time: 6.30 n.m.

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Thursday, January 25, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No.

The new Board of Education has been announced ................. 1

The Government is buying more and more of its supplies from local firms ................................................

Provisional trade figures for last month have been released ............................................................... 5

Support for day nurseries is to be increased................... 6

A new access road to Princess Margaret Hospital is to be built •.••••••••.............................................   7

Tom Jones will perform in Hong Kong next month................  8

This year’s Urban Council Flower Show will be held in March ............................................................... 9

The Chief Justice has spoken about young offenders and the probation service ........................................... 10

The rice import quota for the first quarter of this year has been increased to meet greater demand ....................... 12

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Thursday, January 25, 1975

- 1

NEW BOARD OF EDUCATION

Mr. P.C. Woo Appointed Chairman

*******

The Governor has appointed Mr. P.C. Woo, Senior Unofficial Member

of Legislative Council, to be Chairman of the reconstituted Board of Educat?on.

The Vice Chairman is Mr. J. Canning, Director of Education.

Other members are:

Dr. Rayson Lisung Huang,

Vice Chancellor of the University of Hong Kong, or his representative;

Dr. Li Choh-ming,

Vice Chancellor of the Chinese University of Hong Kong, or his representative;

Mr. C.L. Old,

Director of the Hong Kong Polytechnic, or his representative;

Mr. R.H. Lobo,

Unofficial Member of Legislative Council;

Mrs. Joyce Symons,

Unofficial Member of Legislative Council and

Headmistress of the Diocesan Girls’ School.

Mr. P.G. Williams,

Unofficial Member of Legislative Council;

Ri^it Rev. Gilbert Baker,

Bishop of Hong Kong, or his representative;

Most Rev. Francis Hsu, .

Roman Catholic Bishop of Hong Kong;

Rev. Peter Wong or his representative,

Church of Christ in China, Hong Kong Council;

/tar. Jack...............

Thursday, January 25, 1975

Mr. Jack C. Tang, Member of the Textiles Advisory Board and a member of the Board of Governors of the Hong Kong Polytechnic; and

Mr. Liu Yun-sum, Chairman of the Sheung Shui Rural Committee and Supervisor of the Fung Kai Public School, Sheung Shui.

Secretary: Mr. G.G. Oakes, Secretary of the Education Department.

Last October the Governor stated in Legislative Council that during the rest of the 70’s the main aim of our educational effort must be in secondary and technical education.

At the same time he emphasised the vital role of the Board of Education in advising on how this might best be achieved particularly as regards the acceptability of a degree of bi-sessionalism in the Government and aided sector.

Sir Murray MacLehose also referred to the need for the Board of Education to take a new look at Hong Kong’s educational and examination system.

The Governor hoped that this task would be completed by the Board within six to eight months.

The terms of reference for a remit on secondary education to the

Board of Education are as follows:

Having regard to the Government’s objective of providing three years secondary education for all in the 12-1*+ year age group and doubling the percentage of places in the secondary schools for the full 5-year course leading to a Certificate of Education examination, to consider:-(1) any changes that should be introduced into the present type of secondary education offered;

(2) the proportion of academic to vocational secondary education appropriate in the circumstances of Hong Kong;

/(5) any .........

Thursday, January 25, 1973

- 3 -

(3) any changes in the present examination system that should be introduced;

(4) the time scale in which it would be practical and desirable to implement the Government’s policy, with particular reference to:

(a) the expansion of facilities for the training of teachers;

(b) the secondary school building programme in the urban areas, new towns and New Territories;

(c) the degree of bisessionalism that the Board considers appropriate in both the short and long term in secondary schools and teacher training colleges;

(5) to what extent in the circumstances of Hong Kong secondary education should be provided free of charge.

The Board of Education is expected to furnish a report after completing its deliberations.

Commenting on the appointments, the Director of Education, Mr. Canning

said: ”1 am very pleased that Mr. P.C. Woo has accepted the Chairmanship of the Board.

”1 will be submitting papers to the Board to help them in this very

important work and I have every confidence that the Board will be able to

submit a report to the Governor within the time stated.”

The Chairman of the Board, Mr. Woo, said: "It is indeed an honour

to be appointed Chairman of this important Board.

"I am glad that the Director of Education, Mr. Canning, will soon be putting forward his proposals to the Board for consideration.

”1 hope to call a meeting of the Board shortly.”

/The Colonial ......

Thursday, January 25, 1973

- 4 -

The Colonial Secretary, Sir Hugh Norman-Walker, has sent letters of appreciation, on behalf of the Governor, to all retiring members of the former Board of Education,

Sir Hugh conveyed the Governor’s sincere appreciation of their valuable services on the Board over the past years and thanked them for all the time and effort they had personally devoted to its deliberations.

He said these deliberations had ’’contributed substantially to the progress of education in Hong Kong.”

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BULK OF GOVERNMENT SUPPLIES FROM LOCAL FIRMS

********

The government is buying more and more of its supplies from Hong Kong firms.

In the 1971-72 financial year, goods purchased locally amounted to 3114.6 million, representing about 75 per cent of the total expenditure of 3150 million on supplies.

This compares with 60 per cent in 1969-70, and 70 per cent in 1970-71•

The orders included miscellaneous items ranging from furniture, textiles and stationery to all sorts of office equipment.

A spokesman for the government supplies department explained that goods supplied locally were more readily available and usually more economical.

The Government also buys from about 20 other countries through Crown Agents in London, Washington, Sydney and Tokyo.

One source of supplies is China, where pharmaceuticals and bamboo wares are purchased.

At the end of 1972, the Supplies Department had in stock over 80,000 items worth about 338 million.

Thursday, January 25, 1973

- 5 -

PROVISIONAL TRADE FIGURES FOR DECEI4BER

Increases In Exports And Imports Shown

*»««***

The value of domestic exports for last month, amounting to $1,213 million, represents an increase of $114 million or 10.3 per cent over the same month in 1971•

The value of imports, according to provisional trade figures published by the Census and Statistics Department today, was $1,980 million, an increase of $255 million or 14.8 per cent.

For re-exports, the figure stood at $391 million which is a rise of $98 million or 33*3 per cent when compared with December, 1971.

A spokesman for the Commerce and Industry Department said that during the three-month period from October to December, 1972, domestic exports totalled $4,044 million, imports $5,798 million and re-exports $1,201 million.

Compared with the corresponding period in the previous year, these figures represent increases of 13*5 per cent, 10.1 per cent and 24.1 per cent respectively.

Figures for the whole of last year show increases over the same period in 1971 of 10.9 per cent for domestic exports, 7.4 per cent for imports and 21.7 per cent for re-exports.

The much improved figures for the second half of the year were most gratifying, the spokesman said.

"Increases in imports and exports indicated that commerce and industry had substantially recovered from the slow down in trade experienced earlier in the year.

"The re-export trade during the year also showed encouraging growth and significant improvement with the increase of nearly 22 per cent over 1971," he said. .........

Thursday, January 25, 1973

- 6 -

INCREASE IN SUPPORT FOR DAY NURSERIES Government’s Contribution Doubles From $20 to 340 Per Child *********

With effect from April 1, the Government’s contribution for services in supported day nurseries will, on the average, be doubled from $20 to $4O a month per child.

Mr. F.K. Li, Director of Social Welfare, says a recommendation to this effect, recently made to the Government by the Social Y/elfare Advisory Committee, has now been approved by the Finance Committee of the Legislative Council.

Since May 1, 1971, the Government’s contribution has been $20 a month per child. The assumed the average cost per child at a nursery to be $60 a month, met $20 from the Government, $20 from the voluntary agency running the nursery, and 320 from fees. In other words, the Government bore one-third of the cost.

Mr. Li explains that the Social Welfare Advisory Committee, of which he is chairman ex officio, had for some time ’’been concerned that this formula of bearing one-third of the cost per child has not provided a sufficient, or realistic, measure of Government support.”

The Committee had therefore advised the Government that since approved costs had now risen to an average of $80 per child per month, and this increase ’’could not, in most cases, be borne either by the agencies or from fees,” the average Government contribution per child per month should be doubled from $20 to $40 — with the present formula for apportioning the total cost revised to $40 for the Government, $20 for the agency, and $20 from fees.

/’’In other.....

Thursday, January 25, 1975

- 7 -

"In other words, ” Mr. Li says, "this means increasing the Government’s support per child per month, on the average, from one-third to one-half«”

About 5j000 children attend supported non-profit-making day nurseries, and the Government subvention for the financial year 1973-7^-will total approximately 82.5 million.

-------0---------

NEW ACCESS ROAD TO PRINCESS MARGARET HOSPITAL

*********

A new road will soon be built in the Kwai Chung area to provide access from Kwai Chung Road to the new Princess Margaret Hospital in Lai Chi Kok.

The 5^-foot-wide road, linking Ha Kwai Chung and Lai Chi Kok, will run along the existing terraces to the northeast of Kwai Chung Road.

Site formation for the road and a 12-foot-wide footpath has been completed.

The surfacing of the 5,-200-foot carriageway and drainage work . ■i. . . *

are expected to begin in March and will take about 18 months to complete.

Referring to the surfacing of the footpath, a spokesman for

the Public Works Department said that it would be carried out later in conjunction with development in the area.

-------0---------

/8.........

Thursday, January 251 1973

- 8 -

TOM JONES IN HONG KONG

*******

Tom Jones fans in Hong Kong will have an opportunity to see and listen to the world-renowned singer at a giant open-air concert to be held at the Government Stadium next month.

The "Tom Jones in Hong Kong" show, to be staged jointly by the

Urban Council and the Fee Lun Radio Service (T.W.), will take place on

Sunday (February 25) at 8.JO p.m.

The two-hour performance is being organised because of the great success of several similar musical shows held in previous years.

Performing with the singer will be his 4O-piece band.

A spokesman for the Urban Services Department said: "A total

of 32,000 tickets, ranging in price from 310 to 3200 each, will be on sale, and we are expecting a full house this time."

He added that a sum of at least 320,000 from the proceeds of the

show would be donated to the Community Chest.

********

Note to Editors: A press conference for the show will

be held at the Banquet Suite, Section 2, first floor, Excelsior Hotel, Causeway Bay, tomorrow (Friday) at 3 p.m.

- - - - 0----------

/9.........

Thursday, January 25, 1973

- 9 -

URBAN COUNCIL ANNUAL FLOUER SHOW

***********

The Sixth Urban Council Annual Flower Show will be held from March 23 to 25 in the Memorial Garden and the Exhibition Hall of the City Hall.

There will be six competitive section: cut flowers, pot plants, orchids, bonsai type plants, floral arrangements and floral arrangements by children.

There will be separate classes in each section, and cash prizes will be awarded to the first three winners in each class.

Trophies and cash prizes will be awarded to the winners of each section. The Urban Council Trophy will be awarded to the best exhibit in the show.

Entry forms and conditions of the Show can be obtained from the Public Enquiry Counter, Central Government Offices, West Wing, Ground Floor, Hong Kong* They ar© also available from the Government Publications Centre, Star Ferry Concourse, Hong Kong or from the Kowloon Park Office, Haiphong Road, Kowloon.

The closing date for entries is March 13->

-------0---------

/10..........

Thursday, January 25, 1973

10 -

THE VALUE OF THE PROBATION SERVICE

Chief Justice Says Probation Does Significant Work

**********

When there is a chance that probation, and not a prison sentence, will help to reform a young offender, ”it is surely the best way of trying to save potential victims from being wronged in the future.’*

This, said Sir Ivo Rigby, the Chief Justice, was ’’even more important than helping the offender himself.”

He was speaking today at the first joint Open Day of the Social Welfare Department’s probation service and correctional institutions in the Begonia Road Boys’ Home.

Sir Ivo said the occasion gave him the opportunity to make some ’’general observations on punishment and sentencing” as he saw it.

He had no doubt the public was understandably concerned over the increase in crimes of violence by young persons, and he supported heavy prison sentences in appropriate cases, even when offenders were young and doing wrong for the first time.

’^Manslaughter, robbery with violence, and in particular, repeated and successive acts of rape of a young girl by a gang of hooligans, are all offences that require severe and exemplary punishment,” he said.

”It is a fact, even though the public may not be aware of it, that heavy sentences are no rarity in the courts.”

In his view, sentences should protect the public, show disapproval to the offender, deter him from offending again, deter others, reform the offender and ensure that crime did not pay. But many of the problems of sentencing were insoluble.

/There were

Thursday, January 25, 1975

- 11 -

There were cases where what the offender deserved was one thing, and what was most likely to prevent him fron doing it again was another thing.

Prison meant shutting him up with other criminals. If this confirmed the offender in a life of crime, it was the very reverse of the probation service which sought both to keep him out of trouble and protect the public.

Sir Ivo disagreed with the views of some people who wrote letters to the press saying that to reform the offender was ”a soft:’ alternative to protecting the public. Instead, it was ’’the very best way of protecting the public.”

He recalled that during the last three years, he had had some opportunity of seeing the work of the Probation and Corrections Division of the Social Welfare Department, and he was convinced its dedicated officers were playing ”a large and significant role" in helping problem children who had committed some offence, and who, if unchecked and unrestrained, and all too often neglected, were likely to get into further trouble.

Rehabilitation Of Offenders

He commended these officers, and he assured them of the ’’support, trust and confidence of the Judiciary.”

Sir Ivo and Lady Rigby were welcomed by Mr. F.K. Li, Director of Social Welfare; Miss Annie Chan, Assistant Director (Social Work); and Mr. S.M. Lee, Senior Principal Social Welfare Officer and head of the Probation and Corrections Division.

In a short speech, Mr. Li said the general objective of the probation and correctional services should be the protection of society through the rehabilitation of offenders.

’’The interests of the community are best met by eliminating future delinquency on the part of the offender,” he commented. ”The rehabilitation of the individual is best accomplished by restoring him to a full and rewarding role in the community.”

-------o--------- /12.........

Thursday, January 25, 1973

- 12 -

INCREASE IN RICE IMPORT QUOTA

*******

The Commerce and Industry Department has announced an increase in the rice import quota for the first three months of this year.

The increase amounts to 6,600 metric tons or Th per cent of the basic quarterly quota.

Commenting on the increase, a spokesman for the Department said the cooler weather had produced an increased demand for rice.

’’The quota increase authorised will also serve to stem rising prices and has taken into account rice supplies presently available on overseas markets,” he said.

The spokesman added that the current supply position was good and importers should have no difficulty in importing the additional amount.

Nevertheless, the Department would continue to keep a careful watch over developments.

-------0---------

Release Time: 7.00 p.m.

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Friday, January 26, 1975

CONTENTS

Page No*

The Prisons chief speaks on crime, prisons and the community ................................................................ 1

A comprehensive census of industrial production is to be undertaken ...................................................   3

The revised long term development plan for Aberdeen has been published ••••••••••••••........................................ 5

The Government proposes to build a cattle quarantine depot on Tsing Yi «.••••••...........................................  7

Six Lunar New Year fairs are to be held this year  ............. 8

Sheung Shui is to have a public enquiry centre.................. 8

Special train services will be operated over the Lunar New

Year .........................................................   9

Lord Carrington visits Army troops in Hong Kong •••••......  • 10

A car and coach park is to be built at a popular picnic spot in the New Territories .......................................  11

The Information Secretary speaks calls for greater public expression on government affairs............................... 12

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Friday, January 26, 1973

- 1 -

PRISONS SERVICES TO BE FURTHER IMPROVED

Commissioner Speaks On Crime, Prisons And Public

«*»«*«*

Hong Kong’s prison services are being reviewed with the aim of improving them further so that they can meet the demands of the future.

This was revealed today by the Commissioner of Prisons, Mr. Tom Garner, at a luncheon meeting of the Hong Kong Association of Pharmaceutical Industry.

Mr. Garner said that while research into crime was still in its infancy, his department had not been complacent and had come to grips with the problem of compiling sufficient statistical data ”which will be meaningful in the years ahead.”

In reviewing the planning of programmes for prisoners, he said, his department had set a course which called for a review of prison industries and its vocational training and after-care programmes.

He added: ”V7e intend to review our nursing of sick prisoners and train more staff as nursing auxiliaries.”

It was also planned, he went on, to send more prison staff abroad for further training and to gain wider experience.

One officer was already undergoing a 12 month course at Coleg Harlech in Wales and another was studying physical education at Carnegie College in Leeds, he said.

Mr. Garner stressed that prison staff must be of high calibre with humanitarian ideals and of good education to meet the challenging task of dealing with all types of offenders.

/ To provide .....

Friday, January 26, 1973

- 2 -

To provide for this, he said, a 12-month training course had been initiated for new recruits last year in the Staff Training Institute.

’’During training we try for as many all-rounders as possible,” he said.

The present daily population of prisoners and inmates in the institutions administered by the Prisons Department, he said, was a little over 6,100.

Of these, 1,581 were being followed up in the department’s after-care programme.

Mr. Garner described crime as ”a sickness of society''' and stressed that the public had a great role to play in helping to find a cure. "The community has to play an important part which cannot be delegated to the Government,” he said. ’’The community can actively work in the field of crime prevention.”

He said there was a need for a close examination of community standards. This need was underscored by the amount of crime stemming from dishonesty, protection rackets, gambling, drug addiction, greed, selfishness and an inability to control one’s temper.

The problem which caused the most concern in Hong Kong today, he said, was that of dealing with offenders in the 16 to 25 group "in

which it appears that the peak incidence of crime, particularly crimes of violence, occurs."

The Commissioner said the community could also take a greater interest in the welfare of prisoners by supporting the Discharged Prisoners’ Aid Society and the Prisoners’ Welfare Fund managed by the Prison Service.

The news media too, he added, could consider giving equal value to the prevention of crime and reformation of offenders as they gave to the reporting of crime.

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/ 3......

Friday, January 26, 1973

- 3 -

1973 INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION CENSUS Amending Bill To Pave Way For Survey *******

Amending legislation is being introduced to pave the way for a comprehensive census to be undertaken of industrial production.

This relates to the year 1973-

The census will be the first of its kind in Hong Kong and aims at collecting information about employment, labour cost, materials and products, local sales and exports, investment expenditure and stocks of fixed assets.

The Commissioner for Census and Statistics, Mr. K./.J. Topley, said today the industrial statistics collected would provide ’’a deeper understanding” of Hong Kong’s manufacturing sector to local manufacturers, overseas buyers, research agencies and intending investors.

’’The industrial statistics are also required for purposes of industrial development, Government policy-making and trade negotiations,” he added.

Before the census can be taken, certain changes have to be made in the existing Ordinance. This is the object of the Census (Amendment) Bill 1973, published in today’s Gazette for general information.

At present, the Governor-in-Council, when directing that a census be taken, can only order the specific date on which it is to be held.

/The Bill, .....

Friday, January 26, 1973

The Bill, however, enables the Governor-in-Council to specify

a census period because the data to be sought in the Industrial Production Census will relate to a period of one year rather than a specific date.

The Bill also removes a provision in the Principal Ordinance

which prevents the Commissioner from taking a census in such a way that any member of the public incurs expense as a result.

Provisions are also made to make it easier for questionnaire

forms to be completed and collected, as well as extending the powers of census officers to visit premises to complete questionnaire forms.

Mr. Topley explained that the Industrial Production Census would be carried out by a small number of trained full-time census supervisors.

’’They will visit most of the 10,000-odd establishments to be enumerated and discuss the questionnaire forms with the management,” he said.

He added that there would be a specific period within which

the forms must be completed and returned, but supervisors from the department would assist managements in filling in the forms whenever necessary.

The managements would have an option either to return the

completed forms to the Census and Statistics Department or to have them collected by census supervisors, said Mr. Topley.

- - 0 - -

/5

Friday, January 26, 1973

- 5 -

LONG TERM DEVELOPMENT OF ABERDEEN Bridge, Stadium And Road Tunnel Planned *«*«»****

The Town Planning Board has amended a revised draft plan for the long term development of Aberdeen and the neighbouring island of Ap Lei Chau.

The Board considers that the previous draft plan should be amended in a number of respects, partly to meet objections and partly to take account of other necessary changes in requirements.

The amendments include a re-positioning of the bridge linking the mainland and Ap Lei Chau to give a 50 ft. clearance above high water level and a larger working harbour.

The road pattern in Aberdeen and Ap Lei Chau has also been modified, partly due to the realignment of the bridge, increasing the total area required for the major roads in the district.

There has also been a revision and increase in the areas zoned for Government, institution and community uses, largely at the expense of the Green Belt zoning but other zones are also affected.

The areas zoned for other specified uses have been increased and include an additional cargo handling area along the breakwater at the western end of Shek Pai Wan.

In the same vicinity there is also an increase in the special industrial zoning which is intended to cater for the needs of the fishing industry.

The amended draft plan published in today’s Gazette will be on display for three weeks until February 15 at the Public Enquiry Centre, Central Government Offices (West Wing); Crown Lands and Survey Office, Kowloon Government Offices; and the Western and Aberdeen City District Offices.

/In.........

Friday, January 26, 1973

- 6 -

In addition, the planning boundary for Aberdeen and Ap Lei Chau has also been extended to include part of the Wong Chuk Hang Valley.

This adds some 46 acres to the area covered by the plan, and includes about 10 acres west of Shouson Hill Road for residential purposes. It also includes about 19 acres for Government, institution and community uses, the major part of which is reserved for a possible future stadium.

The remaining acreage is taken up with the main road junction and approach road for the proposed Aberdeen tunnel and Green Belt zoning.

The extension area is displayed separately for a longer period of two months, until March 25*

Any person affected by the amendment and extension plans may inform the Board of his objection to anything appealing in the plans by writing to the Secretary of the Town Planning Board, c/o Public Works Department, Hong Kong.

He must set out the reasons for his objection, and any proposals of alteration if the objection would be removed by such alteration to the plan.

Copies of the plans are available at the Crown Lands & Survey Office, 19th floor, Murray Building, Hong Kong, at 55*00 for each uncoloured copy and $25 for each coloured one.

-------0---------

Friday, January 26, 1973

- 7 -

PROPOSED CATTLE QUARANTINE DEPOT ON TSING YI ISLAND

*******

The Government proposed to build a modern cattle quarantine depot at the south-east corner of Tsing Yi Island.

The depot, when completed, will handle all cattle entering Hong Kong in the foreseeable future.

Berth facilities for both cattle ships and lighters will be provided as a part of the project.

The existing lairages at Kennedy Town and Ma Tau Kok, which at present inconvenience the people living nearby will be closed.

The boundaries within which a pier and/or a reclamation is to be constructed are fully described in a Notification in today’s Gazette.

The Notification calls upon people having objections to the proposed lairage or any claims of private right in the matter, to submit them in writing to the Director of Public ’Yorks within two months of the date of the Notice.

The Notification, in both English and Chinese, can also be seen on Notice Boards posted near the site.

-------0---------

/8..........

Friday, January 26, 1973

- 8 -

SIX NEW YEAR FAIRS TO BE HELD THROUGHOUT HONG KONG »$«****«»*

Six Lunar New Year fairs will be held throughout Hong Kong this year — one on the Island, two in Kowloon and three in the New Territories.

They are sponsored by the Urban Services Department.

In Victoria Park, the largest fair will have 581 stalls and the two in Kowloon, at Cheung Sha Wan Playground and Choi Hung Playground, will have 499 and 261 stalls respectively.

In the New Territories, the Tsuen Wan New Year fair will have 250 stalls while the Tai Po fair and the Yuen Long fair will each accommodate 150 stalls.

As is customary, flowers, potted plants and a great variety of Lunar New Year sundries will be on sale at the fairs.

Stall holders will be permitted to put up their goods for sale from Saturday (January 27). The fairs will last up to New Year’s Eve.

-------0---------

PUBLIC ENQUIRY CENTRE FOR SHEUNG SHUI

***********

The Tai Po District Office is to set up a public enquiry centre in Sheung Shui.

Work to fit-out the centre, situated at No. 24 San Fung Avenue, will begin in about two month.

When it is opened in the middle of this year, the centre will handle all kinds of enquiries from the public concerning the Tai Po District Office.

A spokesman for the Tai Po District Office said: "The centre is specially set up for Sheung Shui residents and we hope that they will make good use of it."

--------0--------- /9.....................

Friday, January 26, 1973

- 9 -

SPECIAL TRAINS DURING LUNAR NEW YEAR

********

Special train services will be operated between February J and 6, the period of the Lunar New Year.

Many of these trains will run from Tsim Sha Tsui to Sha Tin or Tai Po Market only. None of them will pick up passengers at the Mong Kok Station.

Season or monthly ticket holders will be permitted to board these trains without extra charges. Additional special trains will be put into service in the late evenings if traffic warrants.

A spokesman for the Kowloon—Canton Railway today advised the public that trains going up to the New Territories would probably be full between 6 a.m. and J p.m. Those returning to Kowloon were expected to be packed between J p.m. and 9 p.m.

-----0-----

/10..........

Friday, January 26, 1973

- 10 -

DEFENCE SECRETARY VISITS TROOPS

*********

Lord Carrington, currently in Hong Kong as part of a world tour, spent today (Friday) visiting British Service units and meeting service personnel in the New Territories and Kowloon.

After calling at Headquarters British Forces, he flew by helicopter from Harcourt Road to the New Territories where he spent some time visiting border locations before lunching with the Army ac Sek Kong.

He spent the afternoon with the Royal Air Force and, tomorrow morning (Saturday) will visit and lunch in HMS Tamar after giving a press conference.

Lord Carrington leaves Hong Kong early on Sunday morning for

New Zealand. • •

Note to Editors: Lord Carrington will hold a press conference

at 10.4J a.m. tomorrow (Saturday) at the Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, fifth floor.

You are invited to send a reporter and/or photographer.

Lord Carrington will leave Hong Kong from Kai Tak (civilian airport) and not R.A.F. Kai Tak at 8 a.m. on Sunday.

Members of the press who wish to take pictures of his departure should be at Kai Tak not later than 7*30 a.m. A G.I.S. officer will be there to assist the press.

-------0---------

/11

Friday, January 26, 1973

- 11 -

CAR PARK FOR PICNIC SPOT IN N.T. ♦ *****

An open car and coach park is to be built shortly at the 18/a milestone, Castle Peak Road, Nev/ Territories.

It will accommodate 1j8 private cars and 14 coaches and will also provide spaces for motorcycles.

A bus-bay has been incorporated into the parking layout.

A spokesman for the Public Works Department said that the beach at the 181/? milestone, Castle Peak Road and nearby beaches were becoming more and more popular each year.

"The provision of a car park at this location," he said, "will not only improve parking facilities in the area but also alleviate traffic congestion along this section of Castle Peak Road during weekends and holidays in the summer months."

Construction of the car park is expected to begin in March and will take about six months to complete.

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/12........

Friday, January 26, 1975

- 12 -

GREATER PUBLIC EXPRESSION ON GOVERNMENT AFFAIRS

Call From Information Secretary

*«**4**t

The Secretary for Information, Mr. Jack Cater, this evening called for more public expression on government affairs so that the Government could gain a better insight of the desires and aspirations of the people of Hong Kong. 'i •

Addressing the 1973 inauguration dinner of the Hong Kong Junior Chamber of Commerce, Mr. Cater said: "There must be a reaching out of hands from both sides."

"From the administration, a new apprais-JL of public interest in, and concern for, their affairs. And from the public, an effort to overcome any suspicion and demonstrate their interest and concern in their community’s affairs."

Mr. Cater said the public’s attitude towards the process of government had changed "significantly" in recent y^ars, and the affairs of the Government "are coming in for much closer scrutiny oy those who are governed."

He welcomed this trend and felt that it should be encouraged.

While he was aware that it would not te easy to change traditions and inhibitions, especially among the older generation, he noted with pleasure that young people were more willing to speak their minds.

Mr. Cater said: "We need more such straight talk, for that way lies greater understanding."

He pledged to foster this through the machinery of the Information Secretariat which, he said, was responsible not only to inform the public of Government affairs but also to tell the Government what the people wanted.

"Our aim must be to develop the individual abilities and stimulate the joint efforts of young people for the purpose of improving social and spiritual well-being and create greater understanding," he said.

-------0---------

Release Time: 7.30 p.m.

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Saturday, January 27, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No.

The Governor opens the first of three new berths at the Kwai Chung container terminal .......................................... 1

A long-term study of Hong Kong’s air transport system is under consideration....................................................

A new van has been added to the Social Welfare Department’s mobile library service .........................................

A Registration of Persons team will visit Wah Fu Estate next week............................................................

Six government clinics will remain open during Nev/ Year holidays *«♦.•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• 6

Anti-polio campaign figures have been published ................... 6

Winners of Industrial Safety Poster Contest have been announced ...................................................................... 7

Scheme on shirt exports to Denmark has been extended .............. 8

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Saturday, January 27, 1973

- 1 -

GOVERNOR OPENS NEW CONTAINER BERTH

*«**#**«

The new berths at the Kwai Chung container terminal complex ensure that in the age of the sea-borne container Hong Kong can continue to offer cargo facilities second to none in the world, the Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose said today.

He was speaking at the official opening of the Modern Terminals Ltd. container berth this morning.

The following is the full text of the Governor’s speech:

”Mr. Lygo, Ladies and Gentlemen:

”1 am most honoured to have been asked to officiate at this ceremony today.

’’This is to celebrate the official opening of the first of the three container berths, of which the other two will also be fully operational later this year. By the end of 1973 the whole complex will be capable of handling up to 300,000 containers - or over 4 million tons of cargo a year.

”You, Sir, have paid generous tributes to all concerned with this project. I am delighted to have this opportunity of adding my congratulations. Businessmen, engineers, officials and artisans have worked together and in an incredibly short space of time have totally changed not only the landscape but the economic possibilities of this port.

/”For over •••••••

Saturday, January 27। 1973

- 2 -

"For over a century the high reputation of this port has been based on traditional methods of cargo handling, and I am sure that these systems will continue to prosper. But these new berths at Kwai Chung ensure that in•the age of the sea-borne container Hong Kong can continue to offer cargo facilities second to none in the world - with all that that implies for the prosperity of this city and the industries on which that prosperity is based.

"I now have pleasure in declaring open the Modem Terminals Limited container berth.”

-------0---------

SUNDAY D.I.B.

«*«»***

Note to Editors: There will be an issue of the Daily

Information Bulletin tomorrow (Sunday). Copies, in English and Chinese, will be available for collection in the G.I.S. press room from 3 p.m.

/3.........

Saturday, January 27, 1975

CONSULTANTS TO UNDERTAKE LONG-TERM STUDY

Of Hong Kong’s Air Transport System

*****«««

The Government is currently considering the appointment of a firm

of consultants to undertake a long-term planning study of Hong Kong’s air transport system.

The Finance Committee of the Legislative Council has approved in

principle about $6 million for this project, which is expected to take 15 months to complete.

A spokesman for the Civil Aviation Department said that subject to

A «

allocation of funds a contract would be signed early this year..

The firm’s main concerns will be as follows:

* To examine, against the background of what would be the probable unconstrained growth in air traffic and technological developments, the adequacy or otherwise of existing or planned future facilities; and

If this showed that the system would eventually

become overloaded, to determine what course of action should be adopted in the best overall interests of Hong Kong. -

The spokesman pointed out that studies undertaken by the Director

of Civil Aviation had shown that a number of factors would eventually limit the ability of the air transport system to cope with the predicted traffic demand, and that the situation would likely become critical by 1980.

As a result, the Director recommended last^year that a comprehensive

investigation should be undertaken with a view to determining Hong Kong’s future needs for air services and the extent of the development of the air transport system required to meet those needs.

- - 0 -

A

Saturday, January 27» 1973

- 4 -

INCREASE IN MOBILE LIBRARY

Third Van Joins Social Welfare Department Rural Fleet *****««■ *• .

The Social Welfare Department’s mobile library service in the New Territories has just been increased by the addition of a new van.

It joins a fleet of two other vans, but is moire modern, bigger, and better equipped than its counterparts.

All three are operated by the Library and Rural Mobile Service Unit of the Group and Community Work Division. Their task is to bring the pleasures of reading and recreation to young people in remote'areas;

This involves weekly calls at 54 ’’stations” where books may be borrowed or consulted and read on the spot.

The travelling libraries have a stock of 24,000 books, periodicals and magazines. Young readers are encouraged to browse through the 1,000 or so carried on each trip when the vans stop in their localities on regular circuits.

Mr. Wong Pak-chuen, Officer in charge, says the lending service covers 8,854 readers, made up mostly of village students.

Since the new van joined the fleet, an average of 850 people a day, have made use of its facilities.

- - - - e -------

Saturday, January 27, 1975

- 5 -

MOBILE REGISTRATION TEAM TO VISIT WAH FU ESTATE

*»»*«*»*

A Registration of Persons team will be stationed at the Wah Fu Estate Post Office next week to register adults and children for identity-cards.

The team will work from 9*30 a.m. to 4*30 p*m. daily between Monday (January 28) and Friday (February 2) •

Children who do not have birth certificates or valid travel documents must be accompanied by their parents or guardians who must produce their own identity cards.

Young people of 17 or over must surrender their juvenile identity cards and produce their birth certificates or evidence of their residence in Hong Kong. Their parents’ identity cards must also be produced.

Those who do not possess any of these documents must register at the branch offices of the Registration of Persons Department.

/6........

Saturday, January 27, 1975

SIX CLINICS OPEN DURING HOLIDAYS

***«*««,

Six Government out-patient clinics will remain open between 9 a.m. and 1 p.m. during the Lunar New Year holidays on February 5 and 6.

The ones on Hong Kong Island are the Violet Peel Polyclinic in Wan Chai and the Royal Hong Kong Jockey Club Clinic in Shau Kei Wan.

The ones in Kowloon are the Royal Hong Kong Jockey Club Clinic in Kwun Tong, the Royal Hong Kong Jockey Club Clinic in Yau Ma Tei, the Robert Black Health Centre in San Po Kong and the Lady Trench Polyclinic in Tsuen Wan.

All other Government out-patient clinics and evening clinics will be closed during the holiday period.

-------0---------

ANTI-POLIO CAMPAIGN 1973

Figures For Third Week Released

During the week ending on January 20, 1973, a total of 7,281 doses

of the anti-poliomyelitis vaccine was administered, according to figures released by the Medical and Health Department today.

Of these, 3,138 doses were administered on the Island, 3,220 in Kowloon and 2,981 in the New Territories.

Since the latest anti-poliomyelitis campaign began on December 28 last year, the total number of doses administered amounted to 20,158. This phase of the 1973 campaign will end on February 2, 1973*

The vaccine is available free at all government general clinics and maternal and child health centres.

- - 0 - -

/7

Saturday, January 27, 1973

- 7 -

INDUSTRIAL SAFETY POSTER CONTEST

Labour Commissioner To Give Prizes On Tuesday

*******

Mr. Paul Tsui, Commissioner of Labour, will present prizes to the winners of the Industrial Safety Poster Competition on Tuesday (January 30)•

The ceremony will take place in the Industrial Safety Training Centre of the Labour Department at Canton Road Government Offices Building, 3rd floor, at 4.00 p.m.

This year’s first prize goes to Mr. Ma Wai Kit, a student of the

Po Leung Kok C.F.A. No. 1 College.

The winners of the second and third prizes are Miss Lui Kit Ching of Clementi Middle School and Mr. Lee Wing Cheong of Po Leung Kok C.F.A. No. 1 College•

Consolation prizes will be awarded to Miss Chu Sau Ying of the Kwun Tong Vocational Training Centre, Miss Chan Han Ying and Miss Fung Siu Ling of Clementi Middle School, Mr. Chung Wai Cheung and Mr. Lau Kin Tong of the Jockey Club Technical School and Mr. Ho Kam Wah of Po Leung Kok C.F.A. No. 1 College.

Note to Editors: You are cordially invited to send a

reporter/photographer to cover the presentation ceremony. ...

-------0--------- /8........................................

Saturday, January 27, 1973

- 8 -

EXPORTS OF TEXTILES TO DENMARK

********

The export authorisation scheme covering the export to Denmark of cotton and man-made fibre shirts not subject to restraint has been extended into 1973, the Director of Commerce and Industry announced today.

The scheme has been operated by the Commerce and Industry Department since February last year.

A notice on this will be sent to trade associations and companies shortly.

Advance copies of this notice can be obtained from the receptionist on the ground floor of the Fire Brigade Building or by contacting the following officers of the Department:

Mr. H.T.W. Lau — Assistant Trade Officer

Tel. No. 5-430719

Mr. C.K. Ng — Industry Tel. No. Assistant 5-446789

Mr. H.K. Kwok — Industry Tel. No. Assistant 5-446789

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Release Time: 2.30 p.m.

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Sunday, January 28, 1973

KOWLOON BAY DEVELOPOTIT Land For Light Industry Reserved *******

An area of about 320 acres has been reclaimed in Kowloon Bay as part of the Kowloon Bay Development Scheme.

The land is intended for light industrial and storage purposes. It will also be used for a sewage treatment plant, institutional and community facilities, open spaces and commercial purposes.

Extensive drainage and nullah works will also be carried out in the area as part of the development of the air cargo complex at Kai Tak and the airport tunnel road.

The works to be carried out include the extension of the Kai Tak Mullah and the construction of drains.

The cost of the extension works is estimated at $28.3 million.

-----0----------

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Sunday, January 28, 1975

- 2 -

OPENING OF PEAK POST OFFICE

*******

Mr. M. Addi, the Postmaster General, will open a new post office in the Upper Peak Tram Terminal Building on Wednesday (January 31 )•

The Peak Post Office will deal with all kinds of post office business, except the acceptance of insured letters and boxes.

Two stamp machines have been installed so that 10-cent and 50-cent stamps will be available on a 24-hour basis.

The business hours will be from 9«00 a.m. to 1.00 p.m. and 2.15 p*m. to 5»00 p.m. on weekdays, and from 9*00 a.m. to 1.00 p.m. on Saturday.

A spokesman for the Post Office said: "The opening of the Peak Post

Office is a further stage in the development programme of the Post Office and should be of considerable benefit to the residents in the Peak area.”

The Peak Post Office will bring the total number of post offices to 64, including a mobile post office in the New Territories.

Note to Editors: You are invited to send a reporter

and/or photographer to cover the opening of the new post office in the Upper Peak Tram Terminal Building at 10.00 a.m. on Wednesday.

-------0---------

Release Time: 3»Q0 p.m.

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Monday, January 29, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No.

A multi-storey car park is planned for Kai Tak Airport .......................................................... 1

Hong Kong will attend a meeting of the Asian Industrial Development Council in Bangkok this week.................... 3

Warn clothing will be distributed to the poor in Sai Kung tomorrow ...................................................

One bottle of brandy can be brought into Hong Kong from Macau free of duty during Lunar New Year holidays ........ 4

The Governor tours Central and Wan Chai to see progress in cleaning up flLap Sap” spots .............................. 5

Training in the printing industry is to be improved ...... 7

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5'233191

Monday, January 29, 1973

- 1

MULTI-STOREY CAR PARK FOR AIRPORT

Improvements Other Facilities Planned

*********

A new multi-storey car park capable of accomodating 1,600 cars will play an important role in the current expansion and future development of Hong Kong International Airport.

The increasing air traffic has led to a bigger demand for paricing facilities at the airport.

’’This is specially so with the opening of the cross-harbour tunnel and the increased number of chartered flights to the United Kingdom,3 a spokesman for the Civil Aviation Department said.

”More people are bringing their cars to the airport to see their friends off or to meet them,” he added.

The existing open-air park in front of the airport terminal building provides space for only about 350 cars while the new one can accommodate more than four times that number.

Phase 2 of the Kai Tak Terminal Building Modifications Stage IV project provides for the construction of a ”vehicular deck” at the first floor level above the existing car park. This deck will then be surmounted by the whole multi-storey car park.

The construction of the new car park will be divided into two stages. The first half, providing 800 parking spaces, is to be completed during Phase 2 while the other half will be constructed during Phase 3»

/Besides ••••••

Monday, January 29, 1973

- 2 -

Besides the work for the multi-storey complex, the Phase 2 work will also involve the planning of vehicular ramps to and from Prince Edward Road. Construction of these ramps will considerably improve the access to the terminal building from the external road system.

This phase of the project, costing about 345 million, will also see a re-arrangement and improvement of the facilities for arriving passengers '' jJ - 1- J.. • • •, •••■_■ ----- • ii i_>

and people meeting passengers.

This will include the expansion of the present arrival hall by absorbing the section of road space outside the hall.

Phase Two

The building work of Phase 2 is to start in the middle of this

year, and is scheduled for completion in 1975 when Phase 1 and 2 of Stage IV modifications should be completed.

A specialised study of the baggage handling system for arriving and departing baggage is currently being undertaken by a consultant firm, for inclusion in Phase J of the Stage IV modifications to the airport.

The consultants, now examining the type of system best suited for the airport, are expected to have finalised their report by March.

The overall Stage IV project, including Phase 3, will increase the airport terminal building’s passenger handling capability to just

-J J-v -.. a

short of 4,000 passengers an hour. ■

Monday, January 29, 1973

- 3 -

HONG KONG TO ATTEND INDUSTRIAL MEETING

Mr. R. Porter, Assistant Director of Commerce and Industry, vh 11 represent Hong Kong at the eighth session of the Asian Industrial Development Council (A.I.D.C.),

The meeting is to be held under the auspices of the* Economic Commission for Asia and the Far East (E.C.A.F.E.).

Mr. Porter will be accompanied by Mr. W.Y.H. Kwok, Trade Officer of the Commerce and Industry Department.

The meeting will be held in Bangkok from February 1 to 7.

It will consider reports prepared by various fact-finding missions on possible areas of co-ordination among E.C.A.F.E. countries in some of the key industries of the region.

The Council will also consider a report on investment promotion and the transfer of technology to developing E.C.A.F.E. countries.

Other subjects concerning industrial standards and industrial research will also be discussed.

Mr. Porter and Mr. Kwok will leave for Bangkok on Wednesday (January 51) by flight CX 701, E.T.D. 1605 hours.

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A...........

Monday, January 29, 1973

- 4 -

WARM CLOTHES FOR POOR «**»**«

Cotton quilts and warm clothing will be distributed to the poor and needy in Sai Kung tomorrow (Tuesday) as a good-will gesture over the Lunar New Year.

The Chiu Chow Merchants Mutual Assistance Society has donated 300 cotton pullovers for this purpose, and the quilts have been contributed by an anonymous donor.

Distributions will be held at the Sai Kung Rural Committee in the morning, and at the Hang Hau Rural Committee in the afternoon. *******,

Note to Editors: You are cordially invited to send a

reporter and/or photographer to have the distributions covered. Transportation will be provided. A van will leave the King Fuk Street entrance of the San Po Kong Government Offices at 9 a.m.

- - - - 0--------

DUTY FREE BRANDY FROM MACAU

Passengers arriving from Macau may bring into Hong Kong free of duty one bottle of Portuguese brandy containing not more than one litre on February 4 and 5, the two days after Lunar New Year Day.

Announcing this today, the Director of Commerce and Industry said that this was in lieu of the customary one quart bottle of grape wine at present allowed• -----------------------------------0 --------

/3..........

Monday, January 29, 1973

- 5 -

GOVERNOR TOURS CENTRAL AND WAN CHAI

To See Progress In Cleaning Up Hong Kong

*********

The Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose spent this (Monday) afternoon touring the back streets in Central and Wan Chai districts to see for hir.iself some of the progress made in cleaning up Hong Kong.

He was accompanied throughout his visit by the Secretary for Home Affairs, Mr. D.C.C. Luddington, and the City District Commissioner (Hong Kong), Mr. David T.K. .Wong.

The Governor first arrived at the junction of Old Bailey Street and Staunton Street.

The party then proceeded to George’s Lane where they saw a piece of Crown land which had been for years a notorious dumping site. However, the site was cleared and fenced off last December during the Clean Hong Kong campaign*

On his way to George’s Lane, the Governor stopped and chatted with a woman passer-by and asked her whether the place looked much better than before. She agreed.

The Governor later walked to Kwong Hon Terrace. There he saw 14 tenement buiLdings that lie within the Urban Renewal Scheme area.

At Wa In Fong, he saw a cleansing exercise being carried out by some 40 volunteers and members of the Central (South-West) Clean Hong Kong Area Committee under the supervision of the Committee Chairman, Mr. Tang Siu-kei.

/They .......

Monday, January 29, 1973

- 6 -

They whitewashed some huts which had been there for over 20 years and were in a dilapidated state.

Sir Murray also saw a private site at the junction of Wa In Fong East and Shing Wong Street. The site had been vacant and used for dumping for a number of years.

The Governor then inspected some back-lane squatter huts in Wing Lee Street. These huts had been given a new look by a team of volunteers, who repainted them as a Clean Hong Kong exercise.

From there, Sir Murray drove to Star Street in Wan Chai. On arrival, he was greeted by the Chairman of Wanchai West Clean Hong Kong Area Committee, Mr. Lee Wan-yuen.

The party inspected refuse and junk collection points in the area.

The Governor saw about JO student volunteer workers re-paint a public latrine in Schooner Street.

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/7.......

Monday, January 29, 1973

- 7 -

GOVERNMENT ACT TO IMPROVE TRAINING

In The Printing Industry

**»*««*«

The Government will soon set up a temporary workshop in Caine Lane to provide complementary technical education for printing apprentices.

Disclosing this today, Mr. Alex S.C. Wu, Chairman of the Printing Industrial Committee of the Industrial Training Advisory Committee, said that this was an interim measure pending the establishment of a printing department in 1975 in the Kwun Tong Technical Institute.

”The industry will need about 1,200 new craftsmen annually to sustain expansion and cover wastage,” he said.

This, he added, was brought out in a manpower survey conducted by the Printing Industrial Committee way back in 19&9-

,’The need is not only to train the numbers required but also to train to a higher standard than ever before,” said Mr. Wu.

,fWe will only be able to take full advantage of sophisticated printing machinery, to increase productivity, to raise our standard of printing and to maintain our ability to compete when we have craftsmen trained to western standards.”

Mr. Wu said that proper training facilities in the printing industry were almost non-existent.

/It was .....

Monday, January 29, 1973

- 8 -

It was to remedy this dangerous situation that the Industrial Committee recommended to the printing industry to start training apprentices along the lines of a scheme proposed by the Senior Training Officer (Apprenticeship) of the Labour Department.

The Government was urged to provide the necessary complementary technical education for apprentices.

"All employers in the printing industry have a responsibility to train to meet the needs of the industry"^ he stressed.

The proposed apprenticeship scheme has the backing of the Printing Industrial Committee and the Hong Kong Printers’ Association, and, in a broader context, the support of the Chinese Manufacturers* Association, the Federation of Hong Kong Industries and the Hong Kong General Chamber of Commerce.

Mr. Wu added that as a result of a meeting between employers of printing firms and the Senior Training Officer (Apprenticeship) held last July, a number of firms had either started training or re-organised their training along the lines of the proposed scheme.

As part of his committee’s efforts to get proper training started on an industry-wide basis, letters have been sent to these and other employers inviting them to similar meetings on either February 28 or March 14 to discuss the details of the proposed apprenticeship scheme. The meetings will also discuss the various means to resolve the difficulties which employers may encourter in implementing it.

Any interested firm which has not received a letter should contact the Industrial Training Unit of the Labour Department at Telephone Number 5-249081 Ext. 85 for details of the two meetings.

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Release time: 7«4g p.m.

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Tuesday, January 30, 1973

CONTENTS

Page No.

Steps are being taken to expand physical education in Hong Kong •. • 1

A manual outlining the minimum job standards in the machine shop and metal working trades has been published ................... 3

New traffic arrangements will be introduced in Caine Road this week  ...........................................................    4

The Government is employing a pollution survey ship for studies of sewage discharge ..............................................   5

Salaries tax assessed in the last financial year reached a new record ............................................................. 6

Commissioner of Labour presents prizes to winners of poster contest .................................................................... 7

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong. Tel: 5-233191

Tuesday, January y), 1973

1 -

EXPANSION OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION IN HONG KONG

Specialist Course For Teachers To Be Started

****«»«*

The Government is taking yet another step to expand physical education opportunities for students in Hong Kong.

A specialist course in physical education will be introduced from September this year at the Grantham College of Education.

Miss E.S. Mair, of the Education Departments Physical Education Section, said today that the course was the first of its kind in Hong Kong.

It was specially designed to train outstanding young teachers in schools and teacher trainees from the three Colleges of Education to become qualified teachers of physical education for Hong Kong’s secondary schools.

”The Government is trying to improve physical education in Hong

Kong through a third-year physical education training programme for teachers.”

Miss Mair said that initially about 15 men and 15 women who showed promise as teachers of physical education would be selected for the course, after completing two years at the Colleges of Education. •4

"This course will help train physical education teachers who will be qualified to teach up to the sixth forms and will be responsible for the organisation of physical education within the school,” she continued.

To provide facilities for the training programme, a multi-purpose games hall is being built at the Grantham College of Education. Construction is expected to be completed in August 1973*

/’’In the......

Tuesday, January JO, 1975

- 2 -

"In the past ten years, the extra-curricular, recreational and outdoor training aspects of the school physical training programme have been developed very quickly in most schools.

"Compared with the previous decade, physical education has moved a big step forward, in spite of the fact that there has been lack of facilities and trained teachers," Miss Mair said.

There are two schools sports associations responsible for organising inter-school sports.

Every year the Physical Education Section, in conjunction with the Schools Sports Association, holds three annual competitions — the Intern-School Gymnastics Competitions, the Inter-School Dance Festival and the Primary School Games Day.

From time to time overseas coaches are invited here with funds provided from the Sir David Trench Recreation Fund.

So far Hong Kong has had a coach for swimming, table tennis and badminton and expects to have an overseas coach for athletics, basketball and gymnastics during 1973*

Part of the coaching assignments are designed to provide advanced training for local physical education teachers.

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/3..........

Tuesday, January 30, 1975

- 3 -

MACHINE SHOP AND METAL WORKING TRADES

Manual On Minimum Job Standards Published

********

A manual setting out the minimum job standards and specifications for 22 principal jobs in the machine shop and metal working trades has been published and is now on sale at the Government Publications Centre, Star Ferry Concourse, Hong Kong.

This important publication, in English and Chinese, was prepared by the Machine Shop and Metal Working Industrial Committee of the Industrial Training Advisory Committee.

"The manual should play an important role in improving the quality of our future skilled manpower," a spokesman for the Committee said.

Generally the job standards aim at -

(i) establishing generally acceptable skill standards for the principal jobs in the trades;

(ii) providing guidelines for courses at technical institutions or vocational training centres;

(lii) helping managements in devising in-plant training programmes for apprentices and in determining the competency of a person, either a new or existing worker, for a particular job; and

(iv) standardising the nomenclature already used in the trades.

Specifically the job standards indicate the skills and knowledge which competent workers in the principal jobs should have. They also indicate the type of training and technical courses as well as the necessary educational background for entry into training if the workers are to be equipped with such skills and knowledge.

/The Machine

I

Tuesday, January 50, 1973

- 4 -

The Machine Shop and Metal Working Industrial Committee points out that the job standards have been pitched at such a level to allow existing standards to be raised to meet the requirements of modern technology.

It also recommends, among other things, that proper recognition should be given to those who have been trained to the specified standard.

It stresses that all employers in the trades will find the manual a useful book of reference.

-------0---------

NEW TRAFFIC ARRANGEMENTS

********

New traffic arrangements will be introduced in Caine Road this week to improve flow of the traffic.

From Thursday (February 1), westbound traffic on Caine Road will not be permitted to turn right into either Old Bailey Street or Elgin Street between 7-30 a.m. to 9-30 a.m. on weekdays. Sundays and public holidays are not included.

This arrangement is to improve the traffic flow at these road junctions during the morning rush hour.

In Kowloon, Cambridge Road between Durham Road and Lancashire Road will be made one-way southbound. Lancashire Road between Cambridge Road and Waterloo Road will be made one-way westbound.

The new arrangement, which will come into effect at 10 a*m. on Thursday, is to enable road improvement works to be carried put in Waterloo Road between Flint Road and York Road.

Appropriate traffic signs ’will be put up to guide motorists.

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/5.........

Tuesday, January 50, 1973

- 5 -

STUDIES OF SEWAGE DISCHARGE Pollution Survey Ship Employed **««***«

A pollution survey ship is being used by the Government for carrying out studies of sewage discharge into Hong Kong waters.

Mr. Tin Yuen-kwan, Engineer of the Drainage Works Division, Public Works Department, said that the studies involved the observation of current strength and direction, the measurement of water quality at fixed stations and ”float following” observation.

The last exercise takes the form of tracing the path of a float released at selected stages of the tide at a particular location.

The ship is also used in sampling water at various beaches, and in routine monitoring of water in Victoria Harbour, Tolo Harbour and Castle Peak Bay, as recommended by the Consultant Engineers in their report on Marine Investigation into Sewage Discharges.

Mr. Tin said that the ship , ’’Chop Yat”, is equipped with a small laboratory so that some of the water samples collected can be processed as soon as possible for the purpose of analysis.

”0ther samples are tested in the Drainage Works Division Laboratory in Farm Road Government Branch Offices,” he added.

’’The interpretation of the information collected will indicate the dispersion and dilution of sewage discharges and guide us in the planning of possible locations and designs of sewer outfalls and treatment facilities,” Mr. Tin said.

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/6........

Tuesday, January 50, 1973

- 6 -

SALARIES TAX HIT NEW HIGH IN 1971-72

Improved Conditions Of Service Reflected

********

Net salaries tax assessed in the last financial year amounted to a new record of $165.4 million as compared with the previous year’s record of $126.4 million.

This was stated by Mr. F.E. Rainbow, the Commissioner of Inland Revenue, in his 1971-72 Annual Report.

He said the increase represented 29*3 per cent over the previous year and was nearly three times the amount of tax assessed in 1966-67.

"The marked increase in net tax assessed clearly indicates the considerable increase in the level of emoluments paid to employees during the year," Mr. Rainbow said.

It also reflected the "improved conditions of service offered by employers in general as a result of favourable trading or other activities" mainly carried on in Hong Kong, he added.

During the year, a total of 47,123 people was assessed salaries tax.

The average charge per capita during the year was $2,233*

Mr. Rainbow said this was considerably higher than the average of $1,980 in 1970-71, "confirming the trend of recent years and indicative of the generally continuing rise in levels of remuneration".

The largest number (60.4%) of taxpayers fell within the income range of $1,000 to $3,000 per month.

A total of 2,627 taxpayers paid their salaries tax at the standard rate of 15 per cent on the total income less charitable donations but without any deduction for personal allowances.

This group was charged with $55-5 million or 4^.7 per cent of the 1971-72 Salaries Tax charged.

------0----------

/7.........

Tuesday, January 30, 1973

- 7 -

CONCERTED EFORTS TO REDUCE INDUSTRIAL ACCIDENTS

Labour Commissioner Appeals To Management And Workers

**«**««*

The Commissioner of Labour, Mr. Paul Tsui, today urged management, supervisors and employees alike to work and think as a team to prevent or reduce industrial accidents.

He was speaking at the presentation of prizes to the winners of the 5th Industrial Safety Poster Contest at the Industrial Safety Training Centre of the Labour Department.

Mr# Tsui said that industrial safety posters were one of the many means used to cut down on accidents.

••They serve to remind employees of some specific safety practice which lias been previously taught to them, or to remind them of some hazard to which they may lay themselves open,” he said.

”The most effective poster,” the Commissioner said, "loses its impact if it remains on display for lengthy periods. So a constant flow of new posters is required each year to fulfil t.iis requirement.”

The Labour Department issues 12 such posters every year and it is envisaged that this number will be increased in the future, Mr. Tsui added.

The poster contest was organised by the Labour Department in conjunction with the Education Department. It attracted nearly 200 entries and the past high standard of design has been maintained.

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Release time: 6.30 P»m»

PRH 7

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Wednesday, January J1t 1973

CONTENTS

Page No.

Television Amendment Bill is passed into law following a number of amendments ........................................ 1

The Government is considering conducting surveys on the handicapped.................................................

Grants totalling more than 84 million have been allocated from the Lotteries Fund ....................................... 6

The Waterworks Office is to have more staff to deal with complaints and enquiries ...................................... 7

The question of recurrent financial aid to Baptist College has been under discussion between the Education Department and the College .................................... 8

Site formation for the cattle quarantine station On Tsing Yi

Island is nearing completion ............................... 9

Noise nuisance caused by a stone-crushing plant in Chai Wan is to be curbed .............................................. 10

Nine bills become lav/ in today’s Legco meeting .......... 11

There will be no mail delivery on Sunday and next Tuesday •• 12

Concerts, operas and variety shows have been arranged by the Urban Council for February ................................. 13

A major announcement on social security is to be made tomorrow .............................................................. 13

The Urban Council Bill is introduced into Legco ............. 14

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Wednesday, January 31» 1973

- 1 -

UNOFFICIALS SUPPORT TELEVISION BILL

Proper Control Of TV Media Called For

*«*$*«**

The Hon. Wilson Wang told the Legislative Council today it was necessary to impose restraints on Hong Kong’s television media to ensure that it made the best use of its facilities to serve the public.

Speaking during the resumed debate on the Television (Amendment) Bill

19735 Mr. Wang warned that television, if allowed a completely free rein, could be both a public menace and a nuisance which could seduce, corrupt and interfere.

”0n the other hand, with a proper degree of control and with enlightened handling,” he added, ”it can be a cultural asset, virtually second to none.”

He felt it was therefore important that the Government be given the power and machinery to impose whatever controls might be necessary, and to encourage the television stations to produce programmes that would ”enrich, educate and entertain without undermining the very fabric of the community.”

In his opinion, the Bill enabled the introduction and maintenance of an increased number of television channels ”on a fair and competitive basis so that through healthy competition and cooperation the standard of production and the quality of programmes may be improved.”

The Bill introduced a number of changes to the Television Ordinance, particularly in respect of the composition of licensee companies and share holdings, the composition of the Television Advisory Board, the amount of permitted advertising time and rate of royalty.

/It passed .......

Wednesday, January 3% 1973

- 2 -

It passed its third and final reading in the Council with a number of amendments.

The Hon. P.C. Woo, who also spoke on the Bill» said that some of the amendments stemmed from submissions received by the UMELCO Office.

He indicated that some further amendments would be introduced at a later stage.

Mr. Woo stressed that the Bill, as amended, would definitely serve the public interest as well as ensure that the obligations to be borne by those commercial concerns which succeeded in obtaining a licence would be both ’’reasonable and equitable.”

Amendments

In reply, the Attorney General, the Hon. D.T.E. Roberts, explained that the amendments to the Bill were designed to clarify the law and to modify • •

some provisions which seemed impracticable and others which might bear ’’somewhat unfairly” on one or other of the licensees.

He agreed that the prime object of legislation dealing with television should be to ensure that ’’the public interest is best served by a highly influential medium of communication.”

But, he added, at the same time — within the limits necessarily imposed by the public interest, ’’the legislation should, so far as possible, preserve a fair balance between the various licensees operating television services.”

Mr. Roberts told Council that the Government was prepared to introduce suitable amendments to several clauses which had caused some concern to Unofficial Members.

/One of these

Wednesday, January J1, 1973

- 3 -

One of these concerned the provision enabling the Govemor-in-Council, when renewing a licence, to alter the terms under which the licensee was operating

The Attorney General said it had been argued that the Ordinance made no provision for notice to be given to the licensee of proposed changes and that these might substantially prejudice the operations and interests of the licensee company.

The Government was prepared however to put forward, in due course, an amending bill to provide for an appropriate period of notice to be given to a licensee when his licence was being considered for renewal*

He added that these amendments would not apply to the first renewal of TVB’s licence, which was expected to take place during the next few months*

Another amendment the Government was prepared to make, he said, would provide for an adequate period of notice to be given to any licensee affected by a change of frequency required by the Telecommunications Authority*

The amendment would also enable the licensee to make representations to the Authority and give him the right to appeal to the Govemor-in-Counci3. against the decision of the Authority.

-------0---------

A ........

Wednesday, January JI, 197J

- 4 -

SURVEYS ON HANDICAPPED BEING CONSIDERED

*******

The Government is considering two new surveys to obtain more information about the physically and mentally handicapped to assist in the forward planning of their welfare and medical facilities.

This was disclosed by the Financial Secretary, the Hon* C.P. Haddon-Cave, at the Legislative Council today in reply to a question from Mr. R.H. Lobo.

The first survey is to draw up a register of the disabled to provide full information about each handicapped person. ’’The second is to undertake a series of sample surveys to identify all handicapped persons and to describe their disabilities in detail,” he said.

Mr. Haddon-Cave said that the first survey, now being considered by the Census and Statistics and Social Welfare Departments, could be compiled over a period of time and should become fairly accurate in due course.

The second one, he continued, would be a :ilarge and complicated operation” requiring ’’very sophisticated sampling techniques” and ’’medically trained enumerators” adequately to describe the disabilities of all handicapped persons.

The Commissioner for Census and Statistics had been in consultation with the Director of Medical and Health Services on the possibility of conducting a pilot survey along these lines next year, he said.

/The Financial

Wednesday, January 31, 1973

- 5 -

The Financial Secretary added that a population census was not the best means of obtaining a complete enumeration of the handicapped. ”An attempt was made during the 1971 Census to obtain information, on a voluntary basis, on the physically and mentally handicapped,” he said.

Information was obtained on 14,588 handicapped persons but this had not covered ’’more than a proportion of all the handicapped, although the balance between the sexes, age groups and types of handicap was probably about right,” he added.

Wednesday, January J1, 1975

- 6 -

GRANTS FROM LOTTERIES FUND TOTAL 34 MILLION

*«>»*****:

Fifteen grants totalling nearly 34.4 million have been allocated from the Lotteries Fund to various social welfare organisations and voluntary agencies.

This was announced in the Legislative Council today by the Financial Secretary, the Hon. C.P. Haddon-Cave, when he moved a resolution to seek approval of the allocation.

He said that these grants had been recommended by the Social Welfare Advisory Committee.

Of the sum total, over 32 million will contribute towards the construction of a second residential centre of the Society of Boys1 Centres.

Six organisations will be carrying out experimental projects with the grants, including home help services and a training centre for mentally retarded children.

Other grants will be used in the purchase of equipment and renovation work.

The Financial Secretary said that with the allocation of these grants, the uncommitted balance in the Lotteries Fund would be brought to almost 31*7 million.

- - 0 - -

Wednesday, January 31, 1973

- 7 -

MORE STAFF FOR WATERWORKS OFFICE

To Deal With Complaints And Enquiries «*»**«**

More posts have been created in the Waterworks Office to cope with the increase in water complaints and enquiries from the public.

Replying .to a question from the Hon. P.G. Williams in the Legislative Council today, the Director of Public Works said that more than 6,000 letters of complaints or enquiries were outstanding at the Watervzorks Office at the end of 1972.

In 1971, about 48,000 enquiries or complaints were made and last year the figure increased to 71,000.

Mr. Robson said that additional posts in the Waterworks Consumer Accounting Division and Consumer Service, and a Public Relations Officer’s post had been created.

However, due to recruiting difficulties, the posts had not yet been filled. But Mr. Robson promised that "improvements will be made as soon as the staff situation improves."

At present, special arrangements to deal with the backlog of enquiries are being discussed by the Director of Water Supplies and the Colonial Secretariat.

-----_ 0 --------

Wednesday, January 311 1973

- 8 -

FINANCIAL AID TO BAPTIST COLLIDE

**««***$

The Education Department has been discussing the possibility of recurrent financial assistance with the H°ng Kong Baptist College in order to strengthen the college’s role in post-secondary education.

This was stated by the Director of Education, the Hon. J. Canning, x.i Legislative Council today in reply to a question from the Hon. Wilfred Wong.

Mr. Canning said that the question of assistance to the Baptist College had been under consideration for some time.

’’However there are many aspects which need to be examined in more detail before definite proposals can be formulated.

’•These include the need for expansion at the post-secondary level, the extent of Government support warranted having regard to our commitment in other fields of education and the most appropriate form of financial assistance,” he said.

Mr. Canning said that the present site of the college had been granted free by Government in 1958 and an interest free loan had been made available in 1970 to assist the college towards the construction of the assembly hall.

-------0 - - - -

/ 9.....

Wednesday, January J1, 1973

- 9 -

CATTLE LAIRAGES ON TSING YI ISLAND

«**«»****

Site formation for the cattle quarantine station on Tsing Yi Island is 90 per cent completed.

The Director of Public Works ^the Hon. J.J. Robson, said in the Legislative Council today that cattle lairages would be provided as part of the station.

He was replying to the Hon. Wilson Wang who had asked about the progress being made for the provision of cattle lairages on Tsing Yi Island.

Work had also started on the construction of a road linking the station to the new Tsing Yi Bridge.

Mr. Robson said: "It is hoped that the road and the bridge will be completed around the same time."

The sketch plans of the station also allow for marine access by way of a sea wall and a T-shaped jetty. But the plans had yet to be finalised pending a decision on the provision of quarters for the cattle traders staff, the Director said.

-------0---------

/ 10.......

Wednesday, January 31 j 1973

10 -

NOISE NUISANCE IN CHAI WAN TO BE CURBED

*********

The ocntractor operating the stone-crushing plant at Sui Man Road in Chai Wan will look into the possibility of providing sound barriers and other means of reducing noise nuisances to nearby residents#

This was stated by the Director of Public Works, the Hon. J.J. Robson, in Legislative Council today in reply to a question by the Hon. Wilfred Wong.

The plant is operated under a P.W.D. contract for the construction of the Hing VJah Resettlement Estate.

Mr. Robson said the main complaint seemed to be against the noise generated when loads of rock were dumped into the crushing plant, which is about 50 yards from the nearest building.

,rThe contractor will be directed to consider means of reducing this noise,11 he said.

But he added that it might be difficult to achieve ”any significant improvement” because of the open nature and topography of the site.

On the question of dust nuisances, Mr. Robson said that the contractor had already arranged for continuous watering by means of a sprinkler system and erected screens.

,rThese will be maintained for the duration of the crushing operations,” he added.

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/Il........

4

Wednesday, January 31, 1973

- 11 -

MINE BILLS BECOME LAW «*«*«»*

Nine bills passed their committee stage and third readings in Legislative Council this afternoon and became law.

They were the Copyright Bill 1973; the Evidence (Amendment) Bill 1973; the Television (Amendment) Bill 1973; the Inland Revenue (Amendment) Bill 1973; the Merchant Shipping (Amendment) Bill 1973; the Merchant Shipping (Recruiting of Seamen) (Amendment) Bill 1973; the Rating Bill 1973; the Road Traffic (Amendment) (No. 2) Bill 1973; and the Dangerous Drugs (Amendment) Bill 1973.

Six bills had their first and second readings.

They were the Urban Council’Bill 1973; the Juvenile Offenders (Amendment) Bill 1973; the Royal Hong Kong Regiment (Amendment) Bill 1973; the Royal Hong Kong Auxiliary Air Force (Amendment) Bill 1973; the Census (Amendment) Bill 1973; and the Public Health and Urban Services (Amendment) Bill 1973- Debate on them was adjourned.

Debate on the second readings of six other bills was resumed. They were the Administration of Justice (Miscellaneous Amendment^). Bill 1973; the Evidence (Amendment) Bill 1973; the Television (Amendment) Bill 1973; the Merchant Shipping (Amendment) Bill 1973; the Merchant Shipping (Recruiting of Seamen) (Amendment) Bill 1973; and the Dangerous Drugs (Amendment) Bill 1973•

Four sessional papers were tabled in the Council this afternoon.

They were the 1971-72 Departmental Reports by the Director of Agriculture and Fisheries,.the Commissioner of Police, and the Commissioner of Rating and Valuation.

The Hong Kong Narcotics Progress Report for 1971-72 was also tabled.

-------o -------- / 12 ....

A

t

Wednesday, January 31, 1975

- 12 -

LUNAR NEW YEAR POSTAL ARRANGE! ENTS

*******

There will be one postal delivery on Sunday (February 4-), the day after Lunar New Year’s Day, and Tuesday (February 6)•

All post offices will be closed during the holiday period

from February 3 to February

However, normal counter facilities will be available on

February 6 at 31 post offices throughout Hong Kong* These include the Central Post Office, the Tsim Sha Tsui Post Office and the Kowloon Central Post Office*

They will be open between 9 a.m. and 12 noon*

. • - • 0 •-------

LEGCO PROCEEDINGS RECORDED

*******

Note to Editors; The proceedings in today’s Legislative Council meeting have been recorded* You are welcome to consult the tapes in the Press Room, Government Information Services*

/ 13 ....

Wednesday, January 31, 1973

- 13 -

FREE SHOWS FOR FEBRUARY

*******

The Urban Council and the Urban Services Department have prepared a programme of free entertainment for next month.

The programme will include Cantonese band concerts, operas, variety shows and film shows. These will be held in various playgrounds throughout Hong Kong.

Each of the variety shows will begin with a lion dance and at the end of the performances, a lucky draw will be held.

Members of the public are welcome to attend. --------------------0----------

MAJOR ANNOUNCEMENT ON SOCIAL SECURITY

*******

Note to Editors: The Director of Social Welfare, Hr. F.K. Li, and the Assistant Director (General), Mr« T.S, Heppell, will hold a press conference in the 35 mm theatre of the Information Services Department, 5th floor, Beaconsfield House, at 11 a.m. on Thursday (February 1. 1973)•

They will announce details of a major development in social security in Hong Kong, and will answer questions from the mediat

Members of the press, radio and televisioiie are- invited^ to attend the press conference.

-------0 - v » v

..... / 14 .....*

Wednesday, January J1, 1973

- 14 -

URBAN COUNCIL BILL INTRODUCED Gives Substantial Financial Autonomy To Council . ********

The Urban Council Bill 1973 gives effect to one of the main recommendations in the White Paper on the Council that it should enjoy a ’’substantial degree of financial autonomy,” The Colonial Secretary, Sir Hugh NormaxU^alker said today. .

■ He was speaking in the Legislative Council this afternoon when he moved the second reading of the- bill.

The bill, he said, enables the Council to make its own financial by-laws, which will among other things specify the degree of financial authority delegated by the council to its committees and public officers.

”The Government has agreed to assist, the Urban- Council in drafting • •

the by-laws and we hope tq use as a guide the authority delegated to the Financial Secretary and the Deputy Financial Secretary,” he said.

The Colonial Secretary referred to a clause in the 13ill which provides that the GoVebhor shall consult the Urban Council before appointing its Secretary.

It also provides that the Governor should consult the Urban Council about the appointment of the most senior Directorate staff of the Urban Services Department. . i

Sir Hugh said that the Governor had agreed to write to the Chairman of the Urban Council confirming the Government’s acceptance of this policy as contained in the White Paper.*

/Sir Hugh

Wednesday, January 31, 1973

- 15 -

Sir Hugh expressed the hope that an amendment could soon be made to the law to provide for Urban Council members who speak only Chinese.

At present, candidates must be able to speak and read the English language before they can be elected to the Urban Council.

Sir Hugh said that this requirement must, for the time being, be retnjTied since ’’the necessary staff is not yet available to provide simultaneous interpretation at meetings of Urban Council Select Committees.

”Nor do we yet have the translators who would be needed to translate Urban Council papers for the use of members who do not read English.” he added.

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Release time: 7«3Q P»m.