Daily Information Bulletin - 1970s - 1972 - JUN - ENG

 P.R.H. 7 (REVISED) 4000091

INFORMATION SERVICES

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Thursday, June 1, 1972

FRANCHISE AWARDED BY GOVERNOR-IN-COUNCIL To Operate Passenger Ferry Services

The Transport Department announced today that the Governor-in-Council had awarded a franchise to the Hongkong and Yaumati Ferry Co. to operate passenger ferry services between Shau Kei Wan/Kwun Tong and Shau Kei Wan/Sam Ka Tsuen.

For this purpose, the Company would build a new pier at Shau Kei

Wan and would start the new services in October after completion of the pier.

In the meantime, with the agreement of the Marine Department, the Company will run a temporary service between Shau Kei Wan (Ah Kung Ngam) and Sam Ka Tsuen from about mid-June, between 6.15 a.m. and 9*15 P*m* at a 20 minute frequency and a fare of 20 cents.

The landing facilities at both ends will necessarily be of a temporary nature until the new piers are ready in October.

Until the Yaumati Ferry Company is ready to take over in October, the Rymo Motorboat Company under a Marine Department licence will continue to provide a temporary passenger service between the Hing Man Street pier (Shau Kei Wan) and the public pier at Kwun Tong.

This service will operate from 6 a.m. to midnight at a frequency of 7 - 10 minutes, with a flat fare of 30 cents.

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Thursday, June 1, 1972

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EXHIBITION OF CONTEMPORARY HONG KONG ART At City Hall Art Gallery ***«***##

An exhibition of contemporary Hong Kong art will be on show at the City Hall Art Gallery as from tomorrow (Friday).

The exhibition, entitled ’’Art Nov/ Hong Kong” v/as the first exhibition of its kind sent abroad by the City Museum & Art Gallery and it has recently returned to Hong Kong.

”It was first held at the Commonwealth Institute Art Gallery in London exactly a year ago, and subsequently it travelled to Edinburgh, Manchester and Bristol,” a spokesman of the City Museum & Art Gallery said The exhibition, he added, had proved a great success in the United Kingdom.

About 64 paintings, prints and sculpture by Hong Kong artists selected from the City Museum & Art Gallery’s permanent collection made up this exhibition.

”It represents a cross-section of Hong Kong art as v/e see it today, but at the same time, it illustrates the evolution of a unique ’Hong Kong Style’ which is the product of East-West cultural interfusion,” the spokesman said.

Three folios containing colour reproductions of the exhibits have been specially published for the exhibition. These folios are for sale at the City Museum 8c Art Gallery at 52.50 each.

The exhibition will remain open to the public until June 18.

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/3........

Thursday, June 1, 1972

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UNIVERSITY VOLUNTARY WORKERS

Nine Youthful Helpers For Disabled On Two-Day Outing

Nine volunteers from the Hong Kong University and the Chinese University of Hong Kong helped out last weekend at an outing for 25 disabled residents of the Social Welfare Department’s Aberdeen Rehabilitation Centre.

The outing took place in the YMCA’s Wu Kwa Sha Youth Village, and was designed to give as much pleasure as possible to the participants by introducing a new scene and a break from routines.

The disabled taking part were made up of several age groups. Some were teenagers, others young men and women. All reside at the Centre and are either disabled or mentally retarded. It was a new experience for most.

Mr. Tsau Tsor-yan, Principal Social Welfare Officer (Rehabilitation), today commended the volunteers from the two universities. He praised their dedication, enthusiasm, and efforts that had brought much joy to handicapped lives.

’’Rather more than just enjoyment followed as a result,” he commented. ’’The outing gave a moral uplift to the participants- The Department is especially happy when volunteers join us on occasions like this.”

The time was spent in indoor and outdoor activities. There were games, contests, fishing, hikes in the countryside, music, and periods devoted entirely to happy chatter.

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A.........

Thursday, June 1, 1972

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PLASTICS INDUSTRIAL COMMITTEE CONDUCTS

Second Manpower Survey Of The Plastics Industry

*******

The Plastics Industrial Committee, one of the 10 associated industrial committees of the Industrial Training Advisory Committee, will conduct, with the assistance of the Labour Department, a second manpower survey of the plastics industry during the period from today to June 21, 1972.

<

The first manpower survey was conducted from August 18, to September 2, 1967, in which 99# of the factories covered in the survey willingly supplied the information required.

The Plastics Industrial Committee has subsequently compiled and analysed the statistical information obtained and published its findings and recommendations in a manpower survey report, which has been available in both English and Chinese at the Government Publications Centre at the Star Ferry Concourse since February 18, 1970.

The committee is pleased to learn that Government has already implemented some of the recommendations.

At the time of the first manpower survey, manpower statistics in the Labour Department showed that in September 1967, the total labour force was 51,556 and the total number of registered and recorded factories was 1,5^2.

In December 1971, however, the corresponding figures had risen to 59,021 manual workers and 5,019 registered and recorded factories.

/In view .....

Thursday, June 1, 1972

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In view of these changes, the Plastics Industrial Committee has decided to conduct a second manpower survey to up-date the data on training requirements and to make new recommendations when necessary, to Government and industry in the light of new statistical information.

The information required from employers in this survey will include:-

(i) The number of workers at present employed;

(ii) The number of workers at present under training;

(iii) The number of existing vacancies;

(iv) A forecast of the total number of workers required

by June 1973•

The information collected will be handled in strict confidence and will be published only in the form of statistical summaries without reference to any individual factory.

As such information is vital to the work of the Plastics Industrial Committee if it is to draw up meaningful plans to meet the training needs of the industry, employers are requested to provide accurate answers to the questionnaire.

Owing to the size of the industry, it is not possible to include all plastics factories. So, a random stratified sampling method has been adopted to select 4^0 factories to be .covered.

An explanatory letter in English and Chinese, together with the questionnaire has been sent to selected factories.

/If on

Thursdayi June 1, 1972

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If on receipt of the questionnaire, an employer has any queries, he is requested to contact the Labour Statistics and Surveys Unit of the Labour Department by telephoning H-778271 Ext. 3 to 4.

During the period of the survey, on a date to be arranged previously by appointment, a survey interviewing officer of the Labour Department will call at each of these factories.

He will answer queries, assist in the completion of the questionnaire if necessary, and collect one copy for processing.

It is sincerely hoped that employers in the plastics industry will co-operate in this survey and thus assure success equal to, if not better than, the first manpower survey.

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PASSING-OUT PARADE ON SATURDAY

At Fire Services Training School

Commodore R.E.S. Wykes-Sneyd will take the salute in a passing-out

parade at the Fire Services Training School at Pat Heung on Saturday, June 3*

The parade, the biggest ever held by the Fire Services, will comprise 130 firemen and fire officers in seven squads.

A display of the Fire Services* equipment and fire drills will also take place after the ceremony.

Note to Editors: You are invited to have the event covered.

It will start at 10.15 a.m. on Saturday, June 3* The Fire Services Training School is situated at Fan Kam Road, Pat Heung, New Territories.

Thursday, June 1, 1972

BUILDING DECLARED DANGEROUS

At Jervois Street, Hong Kong

*********

The Building Authority today declared No, 67 Jervois Street Hong Kong to be in a dangerous condition and ordered demolition.

In a statement issued this morning, the Principal Government Building Surveyor said that this four storey pre-war building has been under observation for three years following the demolition under order of the rear kitchen block.

Fractures in the brickwork of the rear main wall show signs of recent movement and the continuing deterioration of roof and floor joists gives rise to the possibility of a collapse.

Notice of intention to apply for a Closure Order in Victoria District Court at 9*30 a.m. on July 12, 1972 was posted today.

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LEI CHENG UK SWIMMING POOL

To Be Closed For Swimming Gala

********

The main and diving pools and the spectator stand in the Lei Cheng Uk Swimming Pool will be closed to the public for periods of time on June 3 (Saturday), June 8 (Thursday) and June 10 (Saturday).

On Saturday (June 3) from 8 a.m. to 11.45 a.m., the pools will be used for races*

On Thursday (June 8) from 9 a.m. to 2 p*m., and on Saturday (June 10) from 9 a.m. to 5 p*m., the pools will be used by the Kowloon Technical School and The Boys’ and Girls’ Clubs Association respectively for their swimming gala.

Thursday, June 1, 1972

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FACILITY FOR URGENT CONSULTATION Concerning Labour And Management Problems ********

The Labour Department is providing urgent consultation facility for the. managements and workers in certain areas in Kowloon.

The facility is being provided for those managements and workers in Tsim Sha Tsui, Yau Ma Tei, Sham Shui Po, Tai Kok Tsui, Lai Chi Kok, part of Hung Hom to the south of Ngan Hon Street, To Kwa Wan Road, Chatham Road, Sun Lau Street, Shun Yung Street and Yan Fung Street.

As from today (June 1), they may contact the Labour Officer in charge of the Labour Relations Service (Kowloon West) at Telephone No. K-889OO1 for urgent consultations and advice concerning labour and management problems.

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Thursday, June 1, 1972

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WATER SUPPLY INTERRUPTION

For Certain Premises In Shaukiwan Area

********

Water supply to a number of premises in Shaukiwan on Hong Kong Island will be turned off for eight hours starting at 10 p.m. tomorrow (June 2).

The temporary stoppage is to enable the Waterworks staff to fix up fresh water mains in the area.

Affected premises will include 15-55 and 50-48 Shaukiwan Road, 185-193 and 164-174 Sai Wan Ho Street, Shaukiwan Police Station, Tai Lok House, western portion of Tai On Building, Quarry Bay Marine Lot No. 2 and No* 15 (Ship Yard Lane), and all buildings in Tai Cheong, Tai Hong and Tai Foo streets.

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656,000 LOTTERY TICKETS SOLD

Draw On Saturday

********

A total of 656,000 tickets of the 47th Government Lottery have been sold up to 5 p»m. today (Thursday).

The draw’ of the lottery will be held at the City Hall Concert Hall at 10 a.m. on Saturday.

The Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, will draw the first prize and Lady MacLehose will present souvenir to the Colony’s radio and television stations and the Government Information Services.

Tickets of the lottery at $2 each are on sale at the Royal Hong Kong Jockey Club and its branch offices up to 9 p.m. tomorrow (Friday).

/10........

Thursday, June 1, 1972

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PRESENT CONSUMER PRICE INDEX

To Be Completely Revised

********

The present Consumer Price Index will be completely revised in order to. increase its accuracy and its capacity to reflect current conditions.

This was said today by Mr. K.W.J. Topley,. the Commissioner of Census and Statistics.

”It was proposed to conduct a larger and more detailed Continuous Household Expenditure Survey which will provide material for an annual or biennial revision of the index,” he said.

Mr. Topley said that an estimate of the gross domestic product for Hong Kong was also being calculated based on data from various sources.

He said that advice on the future development of economic and social statistics was now given to Government by the Statistics Advisory Board.

’’This Board was set up in March this year and it comprises representatives of the government, private sector and academic field,” he added.•

The Department publishes a Monthly Digest of Statistics, which summarises all available data on social and economic life of Hong Kong in the fields of climate, population, industrial employment and wages, production, trade, transport and communications, prices and price indexes., money and finance, building and cons timet ion, and tourism.

/’’During........

Thursday, June 1, 1972

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’’During the past five years,” Mr. Topley said,’’the major tasks of the Department have been the setting up of statistical systems in the major departments of government, and the taking of the 1971 Population and Housing Census. The first results of this latter operation will be published shortly and more reports will follow during the year.”

’’The other major part of the Department activities is directed to a detailed monthly analysis of Hong Kong’s external trade,” he added.

Statistics are published monthly in two volumes: one for imports and the other for exports and re-exports. The analysis of trade statistics is released to research organisations, trade commissions, consulates, banking and commercial houses and other interested parties in the form of a monthly report entitled ”Hong Kong External Trade”.

A comprehensive review of Hong Kong’s overseas trade is also published annually.

’’Production statistics have been collected in a Census of Manufacturing Estbalishments held in 1971. The initial findings of which will appear in the April issue of the Monthly Digest of Statistics.

”A detailed Census of Industrial Production will be taken for 1973

Mr. Topley said.

In commenting on other social statistics prepared by Government, Mr. Topley said: ’’The number of employees and vacancies in all registered industrial establishments are collected and published quarterly by the Labour Department.

’’Employment in certain non-industrial establishments, and wage rates and hours of work in 21 selected industries are collected and published half-yearly.”

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Thursday, June 1, 1972

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VISIT TO KOWLOON TSAI

To Inspect Squatter Area

********

The Commissioner for Resettlement, Mr. I.M. Lightbody, and the Principal

Highways Engineer, Mr. Gordon Sapste.ad paid a two-hour visit today to Kowloon Tsai to inspect the squatter area following the heavy downpours which affected many huts.

The Resettlement Department had earlier conducted a survey to decide which families were likely to be in danger if such downpours were repeated.

As a result of this survey undertaken jointly with the Public Works Department, resettlement was offered to over 900 people in the area.

Today’s on-the-spot study by Mr. Lightbody and Mr. Sapstead confirmed i Idr.r-. .-j ;

the correctness of the original decision to offer resettlement to the 900 people.

In addition, as a result of this survey, another five or six families at the northern end of the valley will be offered resettlement.

The Public Works Department will now undertake a detailed survey of ground levels to possible flood levels .in the southern area, and the results will be available in about four days.

The decision will then be taken on whether or not any other families would be likely to be exposed to danger in the event of. further heavy rain in this area.

*♦♦♦ ** **

Note to editors: A photograph showing Mr. Lightbody and

Mr. Sapstead on this morning’s visit is available for collection in the Press Room, Government Information Services this (Thursday) evening.

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Release Time: 7.00 p.m.

PRESS RELEASE" “ ”

WOEFUL RESPONSE TO CALL FOR NEW VOTERS

The Commissioner of Registration, Mr. J.V.G. Mitchell, said today (June 1) that up to the present "a mere handful of 4,115 people” have responded to the call to register as new electors for next year’s Urban Council Elections.

He described this number as "woefully small".

Since the campaign for election has been given much publicity at regular intervals in the press, over the radio and also over the television channels, it cannot be said that people do not know about registering, Mr. Mitchell said*

He made these comments during a talk on the various aspects of the work of the Registration of Persons Department at the luncheon meeting of the Y’s Men Club.

Mr. Mitchell stressed that, with only another two weeks to go before the registration cycle closes, he has absolutely no doubt that the new register would contain less names than the current one, unless there is a massive response to register from all eligible parties.

For the current registration drive, it was estimated that between 550,000 and 400,000 residents could register as new electors under one or more of the 25 categories of the Urban Council Franchise.

Publicity on this has been done by means of poster

displays and talks to various clubs and civic organisations

Help run your city Register as Electors

/2

2

he said.

In addition, the Secretary for Home Affairs has helped by distributing 600 letters to Clansman’s and District Associations and to the Chairmen of Multi—Storey Buildings Incorporated Owners Associations, urging their members to register as electors.

The Director of Education has also assisted in sending out 5,500 letters to Supervisors and Headmasters of various schools to urge their staff to register.

Moreover, letters have also been sent to the 10,950 people who have failed so far to respond to the Sexennial Inquiry letters sent to them last February.

Querying the reason for apathy,-Mr. Mitchell asked: ’’Are people in Hong Kong less civic conscious than they ought to be, and content to let things be or is it that the Urban Council lacks sufficient authority and people i want wider representation?”

He urged people to ponder over the question: ’’What about the Council when it assumes greater authority next year - will it not be worthwhile supporting?”

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P.R.H. 7 (REVISED) 400000)

INFORMATION

SERVICES

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Friday, June 2, 1972

CONDITIONS BECOMING FAVOURABLE FOR FORMATION OF TYPHOONS Be Prepared For Tropical Cyclones - Mr. Gordon Bell ********

The Director, Royal Observatory, Mr. Gordon Bell, today said that conditions were now becoming favourable for the formation of typhoons.

He reminded everyone that at any time from now to the end of November tropical cyclones may cause destructive winds, landslides and severe flooding in Hong Kong.

Community preparedness is the keynote-for-minimizing the damage, injuries and loss of life which can result from these storms. ■••• 4 • tf

Those who have special responsibilities when the Colony is affected by tropical cyclones should check now that their standing orders and relevant telephone numbers are up-to-date and that any special equipment they need is in good order.

Door locks and window fasteners should now be examined to ensure that they are in good order> Drains should be cleared of obstructions and checked for damage.

Emergency stocks of food, candles, torches and first aid equipment should now be obtained.

Boat owners, if they have not already done so, should make arrangements for the safety of their craft and should cheek that their moorings are in good

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condition and adequate for their boats.

/People .......

Friday, June 2, 1972

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People who are not familiar with the meaning of Hong Kong's tropical cyclone warning signals or what precautions they should take when these signals are displayed should obtain copies of explanation cards in English or Chinese.

On these multi-colour cards is printed a map and description of the warning system and advice on precautions.

They can be obtained free of charge at the enquiry counters of City District Offices, Information Services Department at Beaconsfield House, the Royal Observatory Headquarters in Nathan Road, Government Printer Publications Centre, Star Ferry Concourse, Hong Kong, and at the Printing Department in Java Road,.North Point.

No Changes

There will be no changes to the signal system until 1973 so that the cards issued during the last two years are still valid for this year.

For those who would like more.information about the warning system and tropical cyclones themselves, there is a booklet entitled ’’Typhoon1’ which is available in English and Chinese at 33.00 a copy from the last three of the addresses given above.

Mr. Bell emphasised that the Stand By Signal, No. 1, is a ’’wait and watch” signal only. The display of this signal is to advise that a tropical cyclone alert is in force in the Colony and that everyone should be aware of this and ready to take appropriate action as soon as warnings of strong winds are given.

The hoisting of the Stand By No. 1 signal itself does not warn the onset of high winds, and it should be possible to continue normally with most activities.

/Operators

Friday, June 2, 1972

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Operators of lighters and other craft who have ready access to typhoon shelters should therefore ensure that their instructions and agreements permit -these craft to continue to operate in locations where they will be able to' reach shelter soon after the hoisting of the Strong Wind Signal, No. 3, which gives positive warning of strong winds.

People are strongly advised not to set out for long pleasure trips in small boats nor to leave on camping or walking holidays to remote parts of the* New Territories when the Stand By Signal, No. 1, is hoisted.

Mr. Bell reminded people that the four Gale: or Storm Signals, Nos. 6,

7 and 8, are equally significant as to wind strength and that a higher number does not indicate a higher wind speed.

Full Precautions

Full precautions against the worst conditions should be completed as soon as possible after one of these four signals is hoisted.

When Signal No. 5 or above is first hoisted the frequency of local tropical cyclone warning bulletins will be increased.

These bulletins, which contain all the available information about the tropical cyclone, will then be broadcast at 2 minutes before each hour and at half-past each hour throughout the 24 hours.

Anyone without easy access to radio, television or RediffUsion may telephone the Headquarters Information Centre of Secretariat for Home Affairs » - .* (Tel. No. Hw456381) for information about these signals.

If it is considered likely that Signal No. 5 or higher will be hoisted during the hours when the broadcasting stations are normally closed then announcements will be made about additional hours of broadeasting.

............................................... /It is not ••••••••

Friday, June 2, 1972

It is not possible to predict the future path or intensity of tropical cyclones with certainty. Although the errors of 24 hour-forecast positions in recent years have been on average less than 100 miles, it is nevertheless still possible for a 'tropical cyclone occasionally to move in an unexpected direction or at a different speed or to intensify or weaken more rapidly than forecast.

The public should therefore listen to weather broadcasts to keep abreast

of developments and should not relax precautions until all signals are lowered.

The following information -has been agreed with the authorities concerned ■ and is issued for guidance

(1) The harbour ferry services stop when the state of sea tide or wind makes operations unsafe, this usually happens a few hours after hoisting Signal No. 5 or above, but exceptionally, if the piers become exposed to sea and wind, ferry services may cease even while Signal No. 3 is hoisted. Announcements indicating the probable time when services will stop will be made over radio, Rediffusion and television channels.

(2) The cross-harbour tunnel will be closed to traffic while the Increasing Gale or Storm Signal,- No. 9j or the Hurricane Signal, No. 10 is displayed. This restriction will be removed when the tunnel is finally completed in September this year.

(3) On the hoisting of Signal No. 5 or above Government and some other major employers may permit staff not " required for duty to return home. Those at home are not required to report for duty unless specifically required. Staff are expected to return to normal working schedules as soon as - the tropical cyclone has passed and public transport services have resumed.

(4) On the hoisting.of Signal Nn. 5 or above all schools should close. In the absence of special broadcast instructions to the contrary, schools function normally until a tropical cyclone warning signal higher’ than * No. 3 is hoisted. If schools are in session when the No. 1 or Nd. 3 signal-is hoisted then, depending oh conditions, the Director of Education may make a public •announcement advising the immediate closure of schools.

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Friday, June 2, 1972

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QUEEN’S BIRTHDAY HONOURS

Services Of Many Recognised

*********

Note to Editors: The services of many Hong Kong residents

are recognised in the Queen's Birthday Honours List to be published tomorrow (Saturday).

They include community leaders, civil servants and members of the military services.

A list of recipients of the honours is contained in a special supplement to today’s (Friday) Daily Information Bulletin, copies of which are distributed in the Press Boxes, Government Information Services along with the military list.

The announcement regarding the Honours List is being made simultaneously in London at 233$ hours G.M.T. today, June 2.

Publication is permitted in Hong Kong newspapers tomorrow (Saturday) morning, but no news agency or overseas radio transmission of the announcement may carry the information without the embargo qualification.

The news may be broadcast from 7 a.m. onwards over the local radio and television stations tomorrow.

On NO account should any of the recipients of Honours be contacted for interviews or for information relative to their careers or be approached in any way in connection with their awards before these have been publicly announced.

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Friday, June 2, 1972

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INLAND REVENUE (AMENDMENT) (NO. 2) BILL 1972

********

An amending bill to confirm as a permanent feature of the law certain powers introduced in 1969 on a trial basis in combating tax evasion, as well as to reinforce these powers, will be introduced into the Legislative Council shortly.

The Inland Revenue (Amendment) (No. 2) Bill 1972, published in today’s Government Gazette for general information, also seeks to implement some residual minor recommendations of the Inland Revenue Ordinance Review Committee.

The Bill proposes to give permanent effect to the operation of two sections — Sections 51A and 51B — which had been added to the principal Ordinance in 1969 for the purpose of facilitating the detection of tax evasion

Section 51A empowers the Commissioner of Inland Revenue to require a statement of assets and liabilities from a person, if he opines that the person has made, without reasonable excuse an incorrect return or supplied false information with a view to understating his assessable income or profits

Section 51B empowers a magistrate to issue a search warrant on application by the Commissioner or an authorised officer, if he is satisfied that a person has not submitted a return when required by the Commissioner, or that a person has made an incorrect return or supplied false information with the intention of evading tax.

A Government spokesman said that these two sections had been well tested during their trial period and that they had proved to be most useful and effective.

/The Bill ........

Friday, June 2, 1972

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The Bill seeks to provide the Board of Review with the required authority to:-

* Allow a person who has appealed to the Board to withdraw his appeal before it is heard:

* On the application of an appellant who is not in Hong Kong, hear his appeal in his absence and to admit, for this purpose, a written submission from the appellant; and

* Dismiss an appeal where the appellant fails to attend.

• r

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OPEN SPACE WITH RECREATIONAL FACILITIES

At Junction Of Ngau Tau Kok And Chun Wah Roads

*»«*««

An open space for the public with recreational facilities will soon

be constructed at the junction of Ngau Tau Kok Road and Chun Wah Road in Kowloon.

The project is to develop the existing flat corner site beside the nullah into an open space.

The whole area will be paved to form a junior basketball court and a recreation area with park benches, and flower beds will also be provided.

The whole open space will be fenced off with low walls.

Construction work is expected to commence next month and will take about three months to complete.

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Friday, June 2, 1972

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WORK TO IMPROVE FACILITIES

At Lion Rock Park

*******

Construction work to improve facilities of the Lion Rock Park, a popular recreation spot, will start soon.

The Lion Rock Park is visited by a large number of the public on weekends and holidays* However, the existing toilet facilities are inadequate and there is no shelter from the sun.

The project involves the construction of a pavilion at a position overlooking the Kowloon Peninsula, a number of barbecue pits in the more secluded areas of the Park and a four-seater latrine near the existing car park.

Furthermore, for safety reasons, a number of concrete bollards are to be put in the vicinity of the existing car park to separate vehicles from the pedestrian area of the Park.

Construction work of the project is expected to start in July this year and will take about four months to complete.

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Friday, June 2, 1972

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BUILDINGS AT CANTON ROAD

Kitchen Block Declared Dangerous

********

The Building Authority today declared the joint kitchen block of Nos. 118o and 1182 Canton Road,Kowloon ,to be in a dangerous condition, and ordered demolition of the first and second floors.

In a statement issued this morning the Principal Government Building Surveyor said that these three storey pre-war buildings were the subject of routine inspection when elements of the reinforced concrete structure were found to show signs of deterioration.

Further investigation and opening up of portions of the structure revealed that parts of the concrete framing of the joint kitchen block are in such a state of deterioration to be considered beyond repair.

It is intended that repairs to the main building will be carried out under order.

Notice of intention to apply for Closure Orders in respect of the first and second floors of the joint kitchen block in Kowloon District Court at 9«3O a.m. on July 18, 1972, was posted today.

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Friday, June 2, 1972

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COMMONWEALTH DAY MESSAGE

fYom Her Majesty The Queen

********

Note to Editors: Saturday, June 3, 1972 is being observed as

Commonwealth Day, The following Commonwealth Day message from the Queen is embargoed until 12 midnight tonight (Friday), and must not appear in newspapers or be broadcast before then.

The Queen, in her Commonwealth Day message this year, says she believes that people in the Commonwealth are held together chiefly by "a sense of community and the opportunity given for service within it*"

Commonwealth Day tomorrow, June 3, is observed every year in Britain and a number of Commonwealth countries. It is also Her Majesty’s official birthday.

Referring to the special quality of the Commonwealth, the Queen said there was "no aspect of our lives" which was not touched and helped by its varied network of day to day exchanges,

"Every one of our peoples has something to give and something to receive," she added.

The Hon, Sir Douglas Clague is the Honorary Representative of the

Royal Commonwealth Society.

The following is the full text of Her Majesty’s Commonwealth Day message

is a good thing, on Commonwealth Day, to ask ourselves how much we know, or can remember, about the Commonwealth; which countries belong, where they are, how big or small they are, and what their people are like*

/"We find .......

Friday, June 2, 1972

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"We find that there are nearly 70 separate territories, of which over thirty are independent countries, spread over every continent and ocean. It may come as a surprise to some that their people add up to nearly a quarter of the population of the world.

"It is important too, to think what it is that people find in the Commonwealth which makes them choose to belong to it. There are many historical reasons, but I believe they are held together chiefly by a sense of community and the opportunity given for service within it.

"During my recent visit to South East Asia, I was deeply impressed to meet so many people from other parts of the Commonwealth contributing their own special skills and experience to the impressive development which is taking place there. And the same thing is happening in every part of our community.

"This is its special quality. There is no aspect of our lives which is not touched and helped by its varied network of day to day exchanges. Every one of our peoples has something to give and something to receive.

"It is my hope that everybody to whom this message comes, young and old, will stop and look at the Commonwealth in this way and realize what a fortunate thing it is that we all belong together."

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Friday, June 2, 1972

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TRAMWAY (AMENDMENT) (NO. 2) BILL 1972

Seeks To Provide For A Flat Tram Fare Of 20 Cents

********

A bill seeking to abolish the distinction between first and third class tram passengers and to provide for a fixed tram fare of 20 cents is published in today’s Government Gazette for general information.

The Tramway (Amendment) (No. 2) Bill 1972 which has been carefully considered by the Transport Advisory Committee and Government, will be introduced in Legislative Council by the Financial Secretary on June 9 7 when it will receive its first and second readings.

A Government spokesman said: "It is anticipated that the Financial Secretary will make a comprehensive speech at the Legislative Council meeting on tram and bus services on Hong Kong Island."

If approved at its third reading on June 21, the proposed flat fare of 2Q. cents will become effective on July 1, 1972.

The spokesman said: "It is unlikely that the 10-cent fare for children under twelve would be changed."

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Friday, June 2, 1972

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MEMORIAL SERVICE AT ST. JOHN’S CATHEDRAL ON MONDAY For His Late Royal Highness, The Duke Of Windsor

A Memorial Service will be held for His late Royal Highness, the Duke of Windsor, on Monday, June 5, at 12 noon in St. John’s Cathedral.

His Excellency the Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, will give the Address, and His Excellency the Commander British Forces, Sir Richard Erskine Ward, will read the Lesson.

Parking space at the Cathedral will be available only for flag cars.

Those attending the Service should wear dark suits and black or dark ties, and are requested to be seated by 11.55 a.m.

Flags will continue to be flown at half-mast on Government Buildings until sunset on Monday, June 5, and court mourning will end at midnight on that day.

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Friday, June 2, 1972

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ASSISTANT COMMISSIONER OF LABOUR

Visits Toys Factory

*******

Mr, David L^n, Assistant Commissioner of Labour, spent more than two hours today (Friday) touring the various parts of Tyco (Hong Kong) limited in Kwai Chung.

He was accompanied during the visit by Mr. Karl Mueller, Managing Director of Tyco, and Mr. Houdini Ho, a Labour Officer.

!lTyco is the first industrial establishment in Hong Kong which has been given special permission to employ women and young persons on a five-day week. These workers are working only 45 hours in a week.

nI am visiting the factory in order to gain first-hand knowledge of the reaction to the new system from the workers in the establishment," said Mr. Lin.

The factory, which occupies the whole of the Rida Industrial Building in Kwai Chung, employs a workforce of over 600, and manufactures metal and plastic toy race-cars and tracks.

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/15

Friday, June 2, 1972

- 15 -

RECLAMATION PROPOSED AT ALDRICH BAY

To Provide Land For Boat-Building Industry

«•***««*

Government proposes to reclaim about 5«3 acres of foreshore • • and seabed off Aldrich Street in Shau Kei Wan.

The reclaimed land will provide a number of sites for use

• • •••••' as boat-building yards.

It has been planned that interference to the activities of the existing boat-building yards in Aldrich Bay will be kept to a minimum while reclamation is in progress.

Details of the proposed reclamation are given in a notice in today’s Gazette. — • • •

This notice, in both English and Chinese, will be posted on a notice board on the site.

Anyone who has objections to the proposal or claims of • 1 • private right should submit such objections or claims in writing to the Director of Public Works within two months as from today.

......... A6...............................................

Friday, June 2, 1972

- 16 -

SENIOR CLERK OF LEGAL DEPARTMENT

Retiring After 2? Years Service With Government

*******

Mr. Lee Hon-kwong, Senior Clerk of the Legal Department, is retiring shortly after 25 years service with Government.

To mark the occasion, Mr. D.T.E. Roberts, the Attorney General, presented Mr. Lee with a souvenir - a camera • on behalf of his colleagues at noon today (Friday).

The presentation ceremony took place at the library of the Attorney General*s Chamber where Mr. Lee has been the librarian for the last 12 Mr* Lee first joined the civil service as an interpreter with Royal H.K. Police Force in 19^7* He remained with the Force until’1959 he was transferred to the Agriculture and Fisheries Department.

In 1960, Mr, Lee was transferred to the Legal Department and was appointed the librarian. He was promoted to Senior Clerk in 19&7.

A photograph of Mr. Lee is now hung in the library of the Attorney General’s Chamber to commemorate hie long and treasured service.

/17 ..........

yearsa

the

when

Friday, June 2, 1972

- 17 -

DEPUTY COMMISSIONER OF LABOUR TO ATTEND

International Conference In Geneva

***»*««

The Deputy Commissioner of Labour, Mr. I.R. Price, will leave for Geneva tomorrow (Saturday) to attend the 57th International Labour Conference as an adviser to the U.K. Government delegation.

Items for discussion, of interest to Hong Kong, include minimum age for employment, social repercussions of new methods of cargo handling (docks), and labour and social implications of automation and other technological developments.

After the conference, Mr. Price will be spending a few days* leave in Switzerland.

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EXECUTIVE COUNCIL

Temporary Appointment

*•**«*»

The Hon. H.J.C. Browne has been appointed temporarily to the Executive

Council with effect from yesterday (June 1) during the absence of the Hon.

Sir Douglas Clague.

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/18

Friday, June 2, 1972

- 18 -

HONG KONG GOVERNMENT ACCOUNTS

For March 1972 * • • • •

The Hong Kong Government accounts for the month of March 1972 show a deficit of S1OO.48 million, compared with a deficit of 312.85 million in March 1971•

This brought the surplus for the financial year 1971-72 to 3639.91 million against a surplus of $618.67 million for 1970-71*

Total revenue for the month at 3261.99 million was 35*72 million-less than in March 1971* Expenditure amounted to 3362.4? milliont an increase of 381.91 million over the same month last year.

- _ - _ 0______-

Release time: 7«3Q

400^035 P.R. 33

HONG KONG GOVERNMENT

NFORMATION

SERVICES

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

SUPPLEMENT

Friday, June 2, 1972

EMBARGOED NEWS ITEM -

NOTE TO EDITORS OF NE’JSPAPERS

NEWS AGENCIES, BROADCASTING STATIONS

The following announcement regarding the Queen’s Birthday Honours List is being made simultaneously in London at 2530 hours G.M.T. on June 2.

Publication is permitted in Hong Kong newspapers tomorrow (Saturday) morning, but no news agency or overseas radio transmission of the announcement may carry the information without the embargo qualification.

The news may be broadcast from 7 a.m. onwards over the local radio and television stations tomorrow.

On NO account should any of the recipients of Honours be contacted for interviews or for information relative to their careers or be approached in any way in connection with their awards before these have been publicly announced•

«*««***

HONG KONG RECIPIENTS OF QUEEN’S BIRTHDAY HONOURS

Kt. (Knight Bachelor)

The Honourable John Anthony Holt Saunders, C.3.E., D.S.O., M.C., J.P.

Mr. Saunders was Chairman and Chief Manager of the Hong Kong and Shanghai Banking Corporation from 1964 until his retirement in March this year. His retirement marked the end of a 35-year career with the Bank, including 10 years as its Chief Executive.

/Mr. Saunders .....

Friday, June 2, 1972

- 2 -

Mr. Saunders held numerous public positions in Hong Kong, including membership of the Executive Council, the Exchange Fund Advisory Committee, the Sir Robert Black Trust Fund Committee and the General Committee of the Hong Kong General Chamber of Commerce. He was Treasurer of the University of Hong Kong and was appointed a Justice of the Peace in 1955.

As Chairman of the Royal Hong Kong Jockey Club, he had closely identified himself with the promotion of sporting and welfare activities for the community. He played a large part in the Club’s sponsorship of the Oceanarium project, professional racing and the projected development of a second race course at Sha Tin.

He was awarded the Military Cross in 19^, the D.S.O. in 19^5 and the C.B.E. in 1970.

C.B.E. (Commander Order of the British Empire)

Dr. the Honourable Gerald Hugh Choa, J.p.

Dr. Choa, the Director of Medical and Health Services, entered the Hong Kong Government as a Medical Specialist 16 years ago. He was promoted to Senior Specialist (Medicine) in 196?.

He joined the Medical Headquarters administrative team as Deputy Director of Medical and Health Services in 19&7 and was appointed Director three years later.

Dr. Choa is a member of Legislative Council and Controller of the Auxiliary Medical Service.

/C.B.E.

Friday, June 2, 1972

- 5 -

C.B.E.(Commander Order of the British Empire)

The Honourable James Jeavons Robson, J.P.

Mr. Robson, Director of Public Works, has been with the Hong Kong Government for more than 26 years.

He was appointed Assistant Director of Public Works in 1958, Deputy Director in 19&1 and Director in 19&9-

Mr. Robson is a Member of the Legislative Council, the Urban Council, the Port Committee, the Housing Board, and the Transport Advisory Committee.

He is also the Chairman of the Town Planning Board and Vice-Chairman of the Housing Authority.

O.B.E. (Officer Order of the British Empire)

Miss Pauline Chan

Miss Chan is the Permanent Governing Director of W. Haking Industries (Mechanics & Optics) Ltd. and concurrently Managing Director of the Haking Group of Companies.

She was bom in Hong Kong and graduated from the University of Hong Kong. She has devoted herself to the development of many lines of industries in Hong Kong for over 25 years and is recognized as a prominent industrialist.

Miss Chan has participated on many occasions in social welfare and educational training activities. At present, she sits on the Trade and Industry Advisory Board and was recently invited by the Hong Kong Trade Development Council as an official Hong Kong delegate to the Industrial Symposium in Sweden.

Friday, June 2, 1972

- 4 -

O.B.E. (Officer Order of the British Empire)

Mr. Kenneth William Forrow,J.P.

Mr. Forrow, the Deputy Accountant General, has been engaged in work of an accounting nature for most of his service in Hong Kong.

He joined the General Post Office in 1952 as a Learner. He transferred to the Botanical and Forestry Department in 193*+ and to the Senior Clerical and Accounting staff two years later.

On the outbreak of hostilities in Hong Kong in 19^+1, he was mobilised into the Air Arm of the Volunteer Defence Corps and later was a prisoner of war.

After the war he was admitted to the Executive Grade in which he reached the rank of Senior Executive Officer Class I.

In I960, on the formation of the Treasury Accountant Grade, he was promoted to Senior Treasury Accountant and was advanced to rank of Principal Treasury Accountant in 1966. He was appointed Deputy Accountant General in 1970.

O.B.E. (Officer Order of the British Empire)

Mr. Daniel Lam See-hin, J.P.

Mr. Lam, a leading manufacturer, has played an important part in Hong Kong’s industrial progress and in the promotion of trade.

He was a member of the Trade and Industry Advisory Board from 1961 to 1965 and was re-appointed to it in 1969- A founder member of the Trade Development Council, he represented Hong Kong at a number of overseas trade fairs and in 1965 led the Hong Kong delegation to an E.C.A.F.E. conference in Bangkok,.

/He is .....

Friday, June 2, 1972

- 5 -

He is a member of the Advisory Board of the Hong Kong Export Credit Insurance Corporation.

Mr. Lam was an appointed member of the Urban Council between 1965 and 1968 and was a provisional member of the Legislative Council in 1967.

He served on many committees and working parties.

O.B.E, (Officer Order of the British Empire)

Mr. Donald Liao Poon-huai, J.P.

Mr. Liao is the Commissioner for Housing and is responsible for carrying out the policies of the Housing Authority, a statutory corporation subvented by the Government.

The Housing Authority now houses some 200,000 people in its estates. The Authority also manages Government Low-Cost Housing Estates for another 190,000 people.

Mr. Liao first joined the Housing Division of the Urban Services Department 12 years ago and was appointed Commissioner in 1968.

He is a member of the Town Planning Board and the Housing Board and has served on other Government working parties.

O.B.E. (Officer Order of the British Empire)

Mr. Edward Eewitt iiichols, J.P.

Mr. Nichols came to Hong Kong in 1959 as Assistant Director of Agriculture and Fisheries after serving in Sierra Leone. Ho became Director in 1966.

/He has

Friday, June 2, 1972

- 6 -

He has attended a number of overseas conferences and has served either as a member or chairman of numerous committees, including the Committee for Scientific Co-ordination, the Hong Kong Productivity Council, the Marketing Advisory Board, the Fish Marketing Advisory Board, the Advisory Committee for Recreational Development and Nature Conservation of the Countryside and the Advisory Cormnittee on Environmental Pollution on Land and Water.

O.B.E. (Officer Order of the British Empire)

Mr. Thomas Russell Thomson, J.P.

After war service as a Wing Commander in the Royal Air Force, Mr. Thomson joined the Colonial Service in 1952 and served in East Africa and Kenya before taking up his post as Deputy Director of Civil Aviation in Hong Kong in 19&5• He became Director of Civil Aviation three years later.

Mr. Thomson has participated in numerous talks concerning air services agreements as Hong Kong’s representative on U.K. delegations#

He is the Chairman of the Aviation Advisory Board.

O.B.E.(H) (Officer Order of the British Empire)(Honorary)

Mr. Lee Jung-sen

Mr. Lee is Managing Director of a number of firms in Hong Kong, including Duro Industries Ltd., Lee Hysan Estate Co., Ltd., Hong Kong Aircraft Engineering Co., Ltd. and Hong Kong Tube and Metal Products Co., Ltd.

He has served on a number of important Government Committees and missions and is currently a member of the Aviation Advisory Board, the Standing Committee on Superscale Salaries and the Housing Board.

Mr. Lee hrs served on the Council of The Chinese University of Hong Kong since 1965.

/O.B.E.(H) ......

Friday, June 2, 1972

- 7 -

O.B.E. (H) (Officer Order of the British Empire) (Honorary) Mr. Ting Hsiung-chao

Mr. Ting is the Chairman and Permanent Managing Director of Kader Industrial Co., Ltd.

Since he came to Hong Kong in 19^7, he has served on the committees of a number of industrial, charitable and welfare associations and has devoted time and money to many charitable projects.

I.S.O. (Companion of Imperial Service Order)

Mr. lu Kau-yu

Mr. lu, an Interpreter/Translator Class II with the Royal Hong Kong Police Force, retired recently after more than 55 years’ service in Government.

For the past twelve years he had been attached to the Triad Societies Bureau.

Mr. lu has made considerable contribution to the book "Triads in Hong Kong", which is now an authoritative work on Triad Societies. I.S.O. (Companion of Imperial Service Order)

Mr. David Nye Willis

Mr. Willis, at present acting as Deputy Director of Information Services, has held the post of Chief Information Officer in the Information Services Department since 1965* Educated at the Diocesan Boys School, he matriculated in 1936 with Honours and a number of distinctions. He joined the Hong Kong Government in 1937 as a member of the Senior Clerical and Accounting Staff and served in a number of departments. After the war, Mr. Willis resigned from the Public Service and worked for five years for Reuters. He rejoined the Government in 1952 as an Assistant Press Officer

in the Information Services Department.

/In 1957

Friday, June 2, 1972

- 8 -

In 1957 Mr. Willis attended th General Staff Training Course for Information Officers in the United Kingdom. He was promoted Senior Information Officer in 19591 and acted as Principal Information Officer and Chief Press Officer in 1962. He was promoted to the substantive post of Chief Press Officer in the following year. Since then, he has acted as Deputy Director on a number of occasions and as Director on two occasions.

In 1969, Mr. Willis was appointed Publicity Adviser to the Co-ordinator of the 1969 Festival of Hong Kong. He was appointed Royal Visit Press Officer to Her Royal Highness The Princess Anne for her visit to Hong Kong in October 1971• He is a member of the Public Relations Committee of the Community Chest of Hong Kong, and had previously served on the Action Committee against Narcotics for six years under the chairmanship of the Hon. Sir A?.bert Rodrigues. M.B.E. (Member Order of the British Empire)

Mr. Philip Ip Wan-tsung

Mr. Ip is an Executive Officer (Local) with the Composite Ordnance Depot in Hong Kong. He joined the Ordnance Service in 1958 and has served continuously with them. (For details, please see the military list issued separately by the Joint Service Public Relations Staff.) M.B.S. (Member Order of the British Empire)

Miss Lau Yuen-cheuk

Miss Lau retired from the Education Department in September last year after more than JO years of service in the field of education.

/She began

Friday, June 2, 1972

- 9 -

She began her teaching career at St. Mary’s School in 1939. She joined the Education Department in 1953 as an Assistant Education Officer and became an Education Officer a year later. She was appointed a member of the Board of Examiners in I960. In the same year, she was granted study leave to undertake a programme of attachments and visits to technical schools and institutions in U.K.

Appointed Senior Education Officer in 1966, she served as Principal of Homantin Government Middle School. Later she became Principal of the Ho Tung Technical School for Girls, where she remained until her retirement.

M.B.E. (Member Order of the British Empire)

Mr. Lui Fook-hong

Mr. Lui has been very active in community service over the past 18 years. He is the Chairman of the Kowloon City District Kaifong Association and has played a leading part in the affairs of the district. He was a Director of the Po Leung Kuk and also a former Director of Tung V/ah Group of Hospitals. He was Chairman of the District Co-ordinating Committee, Festival of Hong Kong, 1969.

M.B.E. (Member Order of the British Empire)

Mr. Wong Ki-lim

Mr. Wong is a well known figure in the local sporting circle. For the past 30 years he has been a leading member of the Hong Kong South China Athletic Association and served as Chairman of the Hong Kong Amateur Athletic Association between 1967 and 1969* Before the Pacific War, he was a leading football player and represented Hong Kong in various regional games.

/Mr• Wong

Friday, Jane 2, 1972

- 10 -

Mr. Wong who is now a Liaison Officer, Class I, in the Secretariat for Home Affairs, has devoted much of his spare time to the promotion of sports and Chinese arts.

i-i.E.Z. (Member Order of the British Empire)

Mr. Stephen V/ong Yuen-cheong

Mr. Wong is the second Vice-Chairman of the Tai Po Rural Committee.

He has been very active in promoting the welfare of the residents of Tai Po and is particularly keen in organising youth activities and scout movements. Mr. Wong had been Chairman of the Tai Po Rural Committee for two consecutive terms.

M.B.E. (Member Order of the British Empire)

MX Yue Kam-kau

Mr. Yue joined the Waterworks Office in 1951 as an Assistant Waterworks Inspector. In I960 he was promoted to Inspector Class II and six years later to Inspector Class I.

M.B.E. (H) (Member Order of the British Empire) (Honorary)

Mr. Ho Cheung-yau

Mr. Ho, a respected and accomplished football player, represented Hong Kong many times in international matches, including the Olympic and Asian Games. He was appointed captain of the Hong Kong team on a number of occasions. He was chosen ’’Footballer of the Year’1 several times in contests organised by the Hong Kong Football Association and other organisations.

Mr. Ho retired from the game in 1968 and is now a marine tele-

communications officer.

Friday, June 2, 1972

- 11 -

M.B.E.(H) (Member Order of the British Empire) (Honorary)

Mr. Lui Chi-chiu

Mr. Lui, a Senior Clerk, has been with the Government for 32 years. He entered government service in 19^0 as a Clerk. In 1967, when he was promoted to Senior Clerk, he was put in charge of the Dangerous Buildings Division Registry.

Mr. Lui served in the Auxiliary Police for 30 years, and retired from the force three years ago with the rank of Superintendent. BADGE OF HONOUR

Mr. Chan Cheok-ping

Mr. Chan has been very active in community service during the past twelve years. He has served in a number of Chinese traditional welfare organisations, including the Lok Sin Tong Benevolent Society. He was instrumental in the founding of a secondary school by the Chiu Chow Community in Hong Kong.

Mr. Chan Po-fong

Mr. Chan has been Village Representative of Sam Tung Uk since 1959. He was elected Chairman of the Tsuen ’Jan Rural Committee for 1970-72. He was very active in the 19&9 District Summer Youth Programme and was Chairman of the 1970 and 1971 Programmes. He was Chairman of the Tsuen Wan District Steering Committee for the Festival of Hong Kong 1971* Mr. Ko Hok

Mr. Ko v/as instrumental in the formation of the Sek Kong Vegetable Marketing Co-operative Society and has served as its Chairman since 1961. He has been Honorary Secretary o-f the Tak Keng Po Agricultural Credit

/Co-operative .....

Friday, June 2, 1972

- 12 -

Co-operative Society since 1961. In 1962 he was elected Committee Member of the Federation of Vegetable Marketing Co-operative Societies, which represents some 50 per cent of all farms in Hong Kong. Since then, he has served the Federation as Vice-Chairman and Chairman.

Mr. Leung Chok-woon

Mr. Leung has contributed much to the Kaifong movement over the last 20 years. He is one of the pioneers of the Shau Kei Wan Kaifong Association.

Mr. Wong Chung-chuen

Mr. Wong is a leader of the Chiu Chow Community in Yuen Long and is the founder and present chairman of the Chiu Chow Clansmen Association. He is a Director of the Yuen Long Public Middle School and Vice-President of the Yuen Long Chamber of Commerce. He has been active in promoting sporting activities for the young people in Yuen Long. He has held responsible posts in many social organisations in the district, including the Pok Oi Hospital and the New Territories Rotary Club.

Mr. Wong Hok-yee

Mr. Wong has been the Chairman of the Tuen Mun Meat Merchants Association since he founded it in 1962. He was a Director of the Pok Oi Hospital and was elected Chairman of the Board of Directors in 1970. He is a former Chairman of the Tuen Mun Sports Association and is now holding the post of Vice-President. In 1967, he became the Vice-President of Hunghom, Homantin and King’s Park District Boy Scouts Association and Hononary Treasurer of the Yuen Long Branch Association of the New Territories Girl Guides Association. He was also the sponsor of the Duke of Edinburgh’s Award Scheme as well as the Yuen Long Summer Youth Programmes.

Friday, June 2, 1972

- -

B.S.M. (Military) - (British Empire Medal)

Staff Sergeant Tse Ting-yau

Staff Sergeant Tse has completed 22 years service with the British Army. He has spent his whole career in pack transport. (For details, please see the military list issued separately by the Joint Service Public delations Staff).

B.S.M. (British Empire Modal)

Mr. Leung Kui

Mr. Leung had a long service with the Government. He began his career as a labourer in the Education Department in 1930 and was promoted to Office Attendant in 193?• He retired in December last year after having completed over 41 years* service.

Q.P.M. (Queen*s Police Medal)

Mr. Peter Fitzroy Godbcr, C.P.M.

Mr. Godber joined the Royal Hong Kong Police Force in 1952 as a Sub-Inspector. Since then, he has served in a series of responsible positions, rising to his present rank of Chief Superintendent in 19$9« In 1966, he was given the command of the Police Tactical Unit. More recently, he was Chief Staff Officer, Traffic, and was responsible for the introduction of the Fixed Penalty System for traffic offences.

He was awarded the Colonial Police Medal in 1968.

Q.P.M. (Queen*s Police Medal)

Mr. Henry Lin Hsing Chih, C.P.M., J.P.

Mr. Lin is a Senior Superintendent of Police. He joined the Royal Hong Kong Police Force in 19^9 as a Sub-Inspector. He was promoted to Assistant Superintendent in 1959 and Senior Superintendent in 19&9*

/He has •••••

Friday, June 2, 1972

- 14 -

He has acted as Chief Superintendent on a number of occasions.

During his career, Mr. Lin has attended a number of police training courses overseas, including the International Police Academy Course in Washington in 1970.

He was awarded the Colonial Police Medal in 1968.

C.P.M. (Colonial Police Medal)

Mr. Paul Chan Cheuk-kci

Mr. Chan joined the Royal Hong Kong Police Force as a SubInspector in 1947 and was promoted to Inspector three years later. He rose to the rank of Senior Inspector in 1964 and since then has held a number of responsible posts in the Criminal Investigation Department. He was awarded the Colonial Police Long Service Medal in 1965*

Mr. Chan Yuen-cheung

Mr. Chan joined the Royal Hong Kong Police Force as a SubInspector in 1945 and advanced to the rank of Inspector in 1950. He has served in the Special Branch for the past 18 years. He was awarded the Colonial Police Long Service Medal in 1963.

Mr. Leslie Clark

Mr. Clark is a Senior Inspector of Police (Auxiliary)• In 1956, he joined the Special Constabulary, which was later absorbed into the Royal Hong Kong Auxiliary Police Force.

He was awarded a Commendation by the Commissioner of Police in 1968.

Sergeant Manawar Hussain

Sergeant Hussain first joined the Royal Hong Kong Police Force in 1941. He rejoined the force after the Japanese Occupation. He was among a small team of instructors selected to train Pakistani recruits in 1962.

Sergeant Hussain was awarded the Colonial Police Long Service Medal in 1959 and the First Clasp to the C.P.L.S.M. in 1966.

/Mr. John ...

Friday, June 2, 1972

- 15 -

Mr. John Ronaldson Johnston

Mr. Johnston joined the Royal Hong Kong Police Force as a Sub-Inspector in 1955. He was promoted to Assistant Superintendent in 1965 and Superintendent three years later. He joined the Special Branch in 1966 and has since commanded a number of operational sections.

Mr. William McIntyre Ross

Mr. Ross joined the Royal Hong Kong Police Force as a SubInspector in 1954. He was promoted to the rank of Assistant Superintendent in 1965 and Superintendent three years later.

For the past three and a half years he has commanded an AntiCorruption Branch Section.

Mr. Charles Smith

Mr. Smith joined the Royal Hong Kong Police Force as a Sub-Inspector in 1955. He rose to the rank of Senior Inspector in 1961 and Chief Inspector in 1969* He has acted as Assistant Superintendent.

Mr. Matthew Taylor

Mr. Taylor, a Superintendent of Police, has served in the Special Branch, Criminal Investigation Department and Uniform Branch of the Force. Since May last year, he has been a Staff Officer in Police Headquarters. He joined the Royal Hong Kong Police Force in 1950 as a Sub-Inspector. He became Superintendent in 1967.

Mr. Herbert James Woodthorpe

Mr. Woodthorpe joined the Royal Hong Kong Auxiliary Police Force in 1958 and is now an Assistant Superintendent of Police (Auxiliary).

Over the years, he has served continuously in the Auxiliary Marine Police and is currently the Divisional Superintendent of Police, Harbour Division, Auxiliary.

/C.P.M.(Fire)

4

Friday, June 2, 1972

- 16 -

•C.P.M, (Fire) (Colonial Police Medal) (Fire)

Mr. Gordon Poore

Mr. Doore is a Senior Divisional Officer in the Fire Services Department. He joined the Department as a Station Officer in 1959* Three years later, he was promoted to Assistant Division Officer. He became Senior Fire Officer, Class II in 19&5 and Senior Fire Officer, Class I in 1968. He attained his present rank two years ago.

Mr. Fung Chi-sang

Mr. Fung is a Principal Fireman. He has been with the Fire Services Department for 25 years.

Nr. Fung Shun

Mr. Fung, a Senior Fireman, joined the Fire Services Department over 50 years ago. He has been in charge of a rural fire station in recent years.

Mr. Montague Kingdom

Mr. Kingdom, who joined the Fire Services Department in I960, is a Senior Divisional Officer. Over a recent period of five years, he was in command of the Department’s Supplies, Transport and Workshops Division.

Mr. Siu Sang

Mr. Siu joined the Fire Services Department as a Fireman Driver in 1948. He rose to his present rank of Senior Fireman three years ago.

Mr. Yau Tat-fung

Mr. Yau is an Assistant Divisional Officer with the Fire Services Department. He joined the Department more than 20 years ago.

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P.R.H. 7 (REVISED) 4000091

INFORMATION

SERVICES

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Saturday June 3, 1972

GOVERNOR DRAWS FIRST PRIZE

Of 47th Government Lottery

His Excellency the Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, said today that whether a subscriber to the Government lottery wins or not, he and the community are gainers, and so "in the Lotteries Fund one bets on a certainty."

The Governor was speaking at the City Hall this morning when he drew the first prize of the 47th Government Lottery.

He said: "If you subscribe and do not win, your money goes through the Lotteries Fund to social welfare, and so you become a public benefactor which is a very nice thing to be," Sir Murray said.

"If you win, well you and that perhaps is even nicer, but of course all your friends are encouraged by your win to subscribe themselves, and try their own luck, and thus you will be making more public benefactors," he said.

The following is the full text of the Governor’s speech:

"My wife and I are happy to be present at this 10th Anniversary of the Government Lottery.

"I am not surprised the lottery is so popular. The position appears to me to be something like this. If you subscribe and do not win your money goes through the Lotteries Fund to social welfare,

/and so

Saturday, June 3, 1972

- 2 -

and so you become a public benefactor which is a very nice thing to be. If you win, well you win and that perhaps is even nicer, but of course all your friends are encouraged by your win to subscribe themselves, and try their own luck, and thus you will be making more public benefactors. Either way you and the community are gainers. So in the Lotteries Fund one bets on a certainty, which is why I subscribe myself.

••The projects helped by the Lotteries Fund range from nurseries to vocational training and from rehabilitation for the handicapped to care for the aged. Over 140 projects, all recommended by the Social Welfare Advisory Committee have benefited in the past five years. This represents a very significant contribution to the social welfare services in Hong Kong.

’’Considerable planning and organisation goes into these lotteries, their success has depended on the hard work and initiative of successive members of the Management Committee, unofficial and official members alike, and I should like to take this opportunity to thank them all for devoting so much of their time and experience to this excellent cause.

”Finally I should like to congratulate the public on their growing support for what I suggest to everyone is the best bet in town.

”It now gives me great pleasure to draw the first prize of the 4?th Government Lottery.”

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Saturday, June 1972

- 3 -

NEW MARKET FOR SHEK TONG TSUI

Existing Market To Be Demolished In August

A new market will be built shortly in Shek Tong Tsui in the Western District to replace the present small single-storey market block in Hill Road.

The market will accommodate some 70 vegetable, fish, meat and poultry stalls on the ground and first floors. The main entrance to the market and the loading areas will be on the lower ground floor.

Part of the rooftop of the market building will be used as a children’s playground and part of it will be occupied by a raised block housing a Hawker Control Force office and quarters for market management staff.

Demolition of the existing market block is expected to begin in August and the new market should be ready in about a year.

All hawkers now trading there will be moved to sites in South Lane to enable work to begin.

--------o-----------

Saturday, June 5» 1972

- 4 -

SEAWALL TO BE BUILT WEST OF MACAU FERRY WHARF To Enable Further Reclamation To Be Carried Out *******

A seawall will be built shortly to the west of the Macau Ferry Wharf to enable further reclamation to be carried out in the Central.

The seawall forms part of the Central Reclamation Stage V, which will, upon completion, provide more than 15 acres of much needed land.

It will be used for widening Connaught Road West and Connaught Road Central as well as building development and open space.

About 60,000 square feet of the land will be reserved for a public temporary cargo-handling area.

Construction of the seawall is expected to begin next month and should take about three and a half years to complete.

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/ 5.....

Saturday, June 3, 1972

- 5 -

PRINCESS ALEXANDRA COMMUNITY CENTRE

Celebration Of 11th Anniversary In Tsuen Wan

*********

The Social Welfare Department’s Princess Alexandra Community Centre marks its 11th anniversary this month, and to commemorate the event, a number of celebrations are planned involving residents in the Tsuen Wan - Kwai Chung area.

The Centre’s membership comes mostly from the industrial township, and its facilities are patronised by thousands of young people in the two districts, including both students and factory workers.

”In these circumstances,” says Mr. Lam Kwok-wan, Warden, ”it is fitting that anniversary celebrations have been designed to secure maximum membership participation.”

The first item in the week-long programme is an exhibition of Chinese paintings, from June 5 to 10, in the Centre’s hall. Fifty paintings will be on view, contributed by members of the Chinese Painting Group.

The show will be opened by Mr. Chan Po Fong, Chairman of the Tsuen Wan Rural Committee, at 3 p.m. on June 5. The Group wi11 give demonstrations of their technique in the evening of June 7»

On June 11, works produced by the Centre’s crocheting, knitting and handicraft groups will be displayed in the gymnasium. On the same day, a fun fair -for -2,-000 will be held in the playground between 2 and 5 p«m.

/Organised •••••••

Saturday, June 3? 1972

- 6 -

Organised by the Centre’s Group Representatives’ Council, the fair will be opened by Mr. So Cherk Ming, Chairman of the Tsuen Wan District Youth Recreation Co-ordinating Committee, assisted by Mr. Hui Tim, Supervisor of the Tsuen Wan Chamber of Commerce; Mr. Chan Po Fong, Chairman of the Tsuen Wan Rural Committee; and Mr. Wong Kai Fu, President of the Federation of Societies in the Tsuen Wan district.

At 8 p.m. on June 11, Mr. W.A. Wilson, Magistrate of the Tsuen Wan Magistracy, and Mr. Kwok Ka Chi, Principal Social Welfare Officer, Group and Community Work Division, will jointly officiate at the opening of a variety show for 400 in the Centre’s hall.

Taking part in the show will be members of the Tae Kwon Do, Social Dance, Folk Song, Modern Dance, Folk Dance, and Body Building groups attached to the Centre. By invitation, the choir of the YMCA, and drama groups of the YWCA will present a series of items.

The anniversary celebrations will end with a youth ball for 200 members on the same evening.

Note to Editors; You arc invited to have all the•items in the anniversary celebrations covered.

/7..........

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Saturday, June 3, 1972

- 7 -

ENGLISH COMPOSITION PAPERS NOT TO BE RESET Investigations Into Alleged Irregularities Completed

Students who took part in this year’s Certificate of Education (English) examinations will not be asked to sit for their English composition papers again.

Announcing this decision to-day (Saturday), an Education Department spokesman said that allegations had been made that some students had been given model composition on two topics resembling those Actually set in the;examination. ’ -

Investigations into :these alleged irregularities had revealed that a number of students .had in-fact made use of these model compositions.

The number of students affected is .very samll indeed compared with the total number of candidates, the vast majority of whom have handed in original" work. It has therefore been decided not to reset the examination.

Candidates who have submitted orginal work will be assessed in the normal way and will in no way be affected by this incident. Those compositions resembling the model- essays are -being scrutinised separately and the results of the scrutiny will be passed to the Board of examination for a final decision on each case.

• ••••• ••

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Saturday, June 3» 1972

- 8 -

MEDICAL AND HEALTH STATISTICS For Week Ended May 13

Statistics released by the Medical and Health Department for the week ended May 1? arc as follows;^

Notifications of infectious cases (previous week’s figures in brackets): total: 13$ cases v amoebiasis * 1 (1); bacillary dysentery • 8 (8); cerebrospinal meningitis and meningococcal infections • nil (1); chickenpox « 9 (25); enteric fever (typhoid) • 9 (17); leprosy « 1 (1)| measles » 27 (25); ophthalmia neonatorum v 3 (2)| scarlet fever * 1 (nil); tuberculosis « 98 (123); and whooping cough « 1 (2),

Birth registered * 1,166: 320 on Hong Kong Island; 69^ in Kowloon and 152 in the New Territories.

Deaths from all causes * 351 • 101 on Hong Kong Island; 221 in

Kowloon and 29 in the New Territories

Saturday, June J, 1972

- 9 -

LABOUR DISPUTE SETTLED

********

With the help of the Labour Department, an amicable settlement has been reached in a labour dispute in the Nan Fung Woollen Mills Limited in Kwai Chung. » •

The dispute arose from the cessation of operation of the company which employed some 190 workers.

An agreement was reached by direct negotiation between the management and workers on May JI, 1972.

Under this agreement, the workers have received a total sum of more than 8155,000 including wages in lieu of notice, year end bonus and long service bonus.

Officers of the Labour Relations Service (Tsuen Wan) had paid five visits to the establishment and had offered advice to both parties throughout their direct negotiation.

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Saturday, June 3, 1972

- 10 -

EXPORT OF RESTRAINED COTTON TEXTILES

To The United Kingdom

*********

The Director of Commerce and Industry today informed all Hong Kong exporters and manufacturers that he has issued: Notice to Exporters, Series 1 (Britain), No. 11/72, announcing the commencement on 1st June, 1972 of Phase II of the 1972 Swing Scheme for exports of restrained cotton textiles to the United Kingdom.

Copies of the Notice have been sent to trade associations and companies on the department’s mailing list for Notice to Exporters: Serios 1 (Britain).

Copies are also obtainable at the Department’s Textiles Licensing Office on 2nd floor, Fire Brigade Building, Hong Kong.

D.I.B. ON SUNDAY

*********

Note to Editors: There will be an issue of the Daily Information Bulletin tomorrow (Sunday). Copies of the D.I.B. will be available fof collection in the G.I.S. press room at 3 p.m.

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Saturday, June 3, 1972

11 -

TICKET NO. 7155^0 WINS $446,400

Results Of 47th Government Lottery

********

Holder of ticket No. 7155^0 is richer by $446,400 today by winning the first prize of the 47th Government Lottery.

The winning numbers were drawn this morning in the City Hall Concert Hall by the Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose.

Ticket Nos. 207585, 595037, 568728, 602149 and 722780 won the second prize and each is worth $29,760. • t

The three-digit number drawn for the special prize was 590. Holders of 744 tickets ending with this number won $100 each.

After the draw of the first prize, Lady MacLehose presented souvenirs to the Colony's radio and television stations and Government Information Services.

A bouquet was later presented to Lady MacLehose by a four-year-old girl, Ho Pui-kwan, of the Social Welfare Department’s Children’s Reception Centre at Chuk Yuen.

The following is ; a list of the winning numbers for the 50 third

prizes each worth 84,464: -

605 3949 1865S 1 37843 54760 79896 118369 140509

144889 148233 149393 149559 194992 197778 219775

227605 257755 278556 301737 320581 328259 335553

354252 345730 373498 393548 421351 432994 433375

438104 459718 476408 478635 497288 504857 555500

568494 585401 640674 641011 678717 688196 692546

695925 718340 724982 734298 734785 742604 0 743665

Saturday, June 3» 1972

- 12 -

KOWLOON TSAI RESIDENTS VISIT RESETTLEMENT DEPARTMENT

To Discuss Flood Threats

********

A Resettlement Department spokesman said today that the Department is well aware that many families in the Kowloon Tsai area are worried about the possible danger to them from any further floods and landslides.

He said that over 900 people from this area have already been offered resettlement as a result of the danger from the recent flood.

This followed a meeting between the Assistant Commissioner of Resettlement, Mr. J. Black, and four representatives of the residents who came up to the Department this (Saturday) morning.

During the meeting, the representative asked the Department to give resettlement to the other 100 residents who are still living in the area.

It was explained to them that whether or not the Department will offer these 100 people resettlement will depend on the outcome of the detailed survey of the low-lying areas which is now being carried out by the Public Works Department.

The survey is to ascertain which huts must be cleared and should be finished by June 8.

The spokesman said that Government was determined that no one will be left in a dangerous position in this area, and the requirement is to determine which huts, if any more are in danger.

He said that those who have not been offered resettlement and who wish to move from the area regardless of the outcome of the current survey, will be given alternative sites in the Department’s licenced areas.

Cash from the Emergency Relief Fund will also be given to those whose furniture were damaged in the recent flood.

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Release time; 3 >00 P«m,

P.R.H. 7 (REVISED) 4000091

INFORMATION SERVICES

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Sunday, June 4, 1972

48TH GOVERNMENT LOTTERY

Tickets Now On Sale

*********

Tickets for the second Government lottery this year, the 48th in the series, are now on sale.

The tickets, at 32 each, can be brought at all Royal Hong Kong Jockey Club selling booths and at 14 ferry piers of the Hong Kong and Yaumati Ferry Company.

They are also obtainable from the head offices and branches of the following banks: The Hong Kong and Shanghai Bank, the Chartered Bank, the Dao Heng Bank, the Hang Seng Bank, the Hong Kong Chinese Bank, the Kwong On Bank, the Liu Chong Hing Bank, the Overseas Trust Bank, the Shanghai Commercial Bank, the Wing On Bank, the Bank of East Asia, the Mercantile Bank, the Hong Kong Industrial and Commercial Bank, the Commercial Bank of Hong Kong and the Wing Lung Bank.

The draw for the winning numbers will take place in the City Hall theatre at 10 a.m. on Saturday, June 17, 1972.

As usual, there will be a total of $6 prizes and a number of special prizes. The first prize will amount to JO per cent of the total proceeds, and each of the five second prizes will amount to two per cent. There will be a further JO prizes, each of 0.3 per cent of the total proceeds.

/A number .

Sunday, June 4, 1972

A number of special prizes, each of 3100, will be paid to holders of tickets the last three digits of which correspond to a special number to be drawn.

Note to Editors: The Government Lotteries Management Committee will hold a news conference at 1 p.m> on Monday, June at the City Hall Restaurant, when details of the 48th Government lottery will be announced.

You are cordially invited to have the conference covered.

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Sunday, June 4, 1972

- 3 -

NEV/ LAUNDRY FOR MEDICAL DEPARTMENT

Under Construction In Chai Wan

*********

A new laundry for the Medical and Health Department is now under construction in Chai Wan to cope with the rapidly expanding hospital services.

The new laundry building is situated on a slope at Chai Wan Road in the vicinity of the Chai Wan Cottage Area.

The building site, with an area of 3$,000 square feet, was a squatter area with 90 cottages and huts housing about 600 people. Prior to construction work, these squatters had been resettled to estates in Ngau Tau Kok and Sau Mau Ping.

Built along the same lines as a factory, this new two-storey building has a floor area of over 40,000 square feet. The ground floor comprises an engine room and store rooms. On the upper floors are the laundry, the receiving and despatch office and general offices.

Cars and trucks can go up to the upper floor via a slipway. Its capacity is equivalent to that of the Queen Elizabeth Hospital laundry. It can handle about one million pounds hospital clothing per month, including the clothing of patients and the uniforms of hospital staff.

The estimated cost of this laundry building is 38,290,000, of which about one—third is allotted to the provision of equipment.

Construction work began early last year, and is expected to be completed in October this year.

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Release time: 3.00 p.m.

P.R.H. 7 (REVISED) 4000091

M® M®

INFORMATION

SERVICES

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Monday, June 5, 1972

PURCHASE OF 8^0 ADDITIONAL TV RECEIVERS

Government To Spend $1 Million Thia Year

*********

Government is to spend one million dollars this year towards the purchase of 850 additional television receivers for primary schools.

The sets will receive Educational Television programmes for about 100,000 fourth-year primary school pupils in the basic subjects of Chinese, English, Mathematics and Social Studies.

The receivers will be supplied to government and aided schools and will be shared by both morning and afternoon sessions.

A spokesman of the Education Department said: "Educational Television is intended to vitalise education and to provide a means whereby interesting new techniques, new methods and new materials can be introduced from a central source direct into classrooms without an enormous t i

time-lag." .

LTV broadcasts commenced in September last year with the opening of the ETV Centre in Kowloon. Since then, programmes on Chinese, English, Mathematics and Social Studies have been relayed daily during school hours by RTV and HKTVB.

....... /"Last year, .....•

Monday, June 5» 1972

- 2 -9

’•Last year, 1,000 television receivers were purchased and four ETV series were produced every week and repeated 15 times with a total of 60 transmissions weekly for about 100,000 children at Primary Three level in government, aided and private schools," the spokesman said.

"Similar series in the four basic subject areas for Primary-Four chdrer> are now being prepared for this year, and it is intended also to repeat last year’s programmes for Primary Three," he added.

Government intends to purchase additional lots of receivers to complete ETV coverage of all children in Primary classes Three to Six.

"With the experience gained in primary schools, it should be possible to extend the ETV service to secondary and other level of education, subject to the availability of funds," he commented.

"ETV has been rated highly by schools. The project is achieving its planned objectives in improving the quality of education in schools, in bringing the skills of relatively few specialist teachers to many, in supplementing our education system in vital areas and complementing it in others, and in bringing the resources of the technological 20th Century into our classrooms/1 the spokesman said.

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Monday, June 5, 1972

- 3 -

SELECTIVE PLACEMENT CO-ORDINATORS

SWD Official Returns Krom Course In Singapore

********

Mr. Ho Po-wing, Assistant Social Welfare Officer attached to the Social Welfare Department’s Liaison and Placement Unit, has returned from a one-month course in Singapore for Selective Placement Co-ordinators arranged by the American Foundation for Overseas Blind/Far East Regional Office*

The term ’’Selective Placement Co-ordinator” is the Foundation’s term for what is known in Hong Kong as a Placement Officer.

The Course was held under the direction of Major D.R* Bridges, Director of the AFOB/FERO, and conducted by Dr. Hilde Groth, of the University of Southern California, Institute of Aerospace Safety and Management*

Along with Mr. Ho, other social workers invited to attend included placement officers from several Southeast Asian Countries.

The month was spent identifying and analysing suitable employment opportunities for the visually handicapped with different educational backgrounds and training. Jobs identified ranged from unskilled labour through to managerial and professional positions.

Mr* Ho and his colleagues learned that such opportunities existed in government service, in industry, commerce, and service-oriented organjsatJnns>

The course explored in depth the significance of meetings between liaison officers and staff managers. It defined the responsibilities of such officers both to the trained disabled and to their prospective employers*

/There

VHIHI*

Monday, June 5i 1972

- 4 -

There were lengthy sessions on such aspects as the disabled trainee’s personal particulars, for example his biographical record, aspirations and pertinent medical progress; an assessment of his potential employability; and his preparation for competitive employment.

The value of a one-year follow-up study on the trainee’s performance at the job was looked into. Mr. Ho and his colleagues discussed the usefulness of weekly supervisory evaluations for two months after a placement, followed by structured evaluative interviews both with the trainee and his employers.

.Throughout•the course, the end of the day was not the end of the day’s work, because participants were given ’’homework" in the form of written job descriptions,•written reports, evaluation reports on simulated cases, and the compilation of projects.

"I found the-course stimulating and instructive," says Mr. Ho. "It will be very useful to me in my work to apply some of the theories and processes that have been so scientifically defined."

Mr. T.P. Khoo, Senior Principal Social Welfare Officer and head of the Family Services Division, thanked AFOB/FERO for inviting Hong Kong to join the Course. ' * -

In his opinion, Mr. Ho’s presence at the course, made possible by a travel grant from AFOB/FERO, ^underlines the Hong Kong Government’s continuing effort to improve the placement techniques of the Department’s Liaison and Placement Unit, and to align this with more diversified training facilities."

/5........

Monday, June 5i 1972

- 5 -

EXPORTS OF RESTRAINED TEXTILES TO SWEDEN AND NORWAY Notices To Exporters Issued ♦ * * * * * *

The Director of Commerce and Industry today informed Hong Kong manufacturers and exporters that he had issued Notices to Exporters, Series 6, Nos. 7/72, 8/72, 9/72 and 10/72 regarding exports of restrained textiles to Norway and Sweden.

Notices to Exporters, Series 6, (Europe, other than Britain and the European Economic Community), Nos. 7/72 and 8/72 concern:

* Licensing arrangements for exports to Norway of textile items under quota restraint at the end of the second period of the current textile agreement with Norway, i.e. November 1, 1971 - June 30, 1972; and

* The introduction of a special shipment scheme for the balances of quota remaining uncommitted as at June 14, 1972.

Notices to Exporters, Series 6, (Europe, other than Britain and the European Economic Community), Nos. 9/72 and 10/72 concern:

* Licensing arrangements for exports to Sweden of textile items under quota restraint or export authorisations at the end of the current textile agreement with Sweden, i.e. July 1, 1971 -June 30, 1972; and

* The introduction of a special shipment scheme for the balances of quota remaining uncommitted as at June 14, 1972.

Trade associations and companies on the Commerce and Industry Department’s mailing list for Notices to Exporters, Series 6, will receive copies of the above Notices shortly, but persons who wish to seek advance notice of the contents are invited to contact the following officers of the Commerce and Industry Department:

Mr. H.T.W. Lau - Assistant Trade Officer

Tel. No. H-229777

Mr. A.R. Swinton - Industry Assistant Tel. No. H-247315 ------------------------0---------

Monday, June 5i 1972

- 6 -

PLEASURE GROUND FOR KWUN TONG Construction Work To Start This Month ««*«***

The many thousands of people, both young and old, living in the Kwun Tong industrial area, will soon have another pleasure ground.

Government plans to build a 2.6 acres playground in the heart of Kwun Tong. It will be named the Tsun Yip Street Playground.

The project will provide a rest garden, a children’s playground, a games area for recreational activities, a changing and toilet block and a kiosk.

The games area will consist of two mini-soccer pitches, a basketball court, a basketball-cum-volleyball court and a roller skating rink which: will be flood-lit at night.

The park area will also be lit to street lighting standard to enable it to remain opened to the public even after dark.

Construction work is expected to start this month and will take about 18 months to complete.

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x • ' . ' ' ' •

■ / 7

Monday, June 5, 1972

- 7 -

TWO ACCESS RAMPS TO BE BUILT To Link Hung Hom Railway Terminus With Major Roads

*«*«*«*

Two access ramps are to be constructed shortly to link the future railway terminus in Hung Hom with major roads in the area.

One of them will connect Gillies Avenue to a high-level road to be constructed on the podium above the new railway terminus.

It will be about 800 feet long and 40 feet wide with a 34-foot-wide carriageway for two-way traffic.

The other ramp will join the Cross Harbour Tunnel Road connections with the podium.

It will be about 200 feet long and 23 feet wide with an 18-footwide carriageway for one-way traffic.

Construction work will begin in August and is expected to be completed in about 18 months.

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Monday, June 5, 1972

- 8 -

BUILDINGS AT STONE NULLAH LANE

Declared Dangerous

*******

The Building Authority today declared Nos. 75, 75 and 77, Stone Nullah Lane, Hong Kong, to be in a dangerous condition and ordered demolition.

In a statement issued this morning, the Principal Government Building Surveyor said that these four-storey pre-war buildings were inspected following a report from another Department, when it was found that the framing of the reinforced concrete structure was in an advanced state of deterioration and considered to be beyond reasonable repair.

Apart from the danger of partial collapse, parts of the concrete work were seen to be loose and liable to fall, causing risk of injury to the occupants.

Notices of intention to apply for Closure Orders in Victoria District Court at 9*50 a.m. on July 19, 1972 were posted today.

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Monday, June 5, 1972

- 9 -

MEMORIAL SERVICE HELD TODAY

For His Late Royal Highness, The Duke Of Windsor

*******

A Memorial Service was held today for His late Royal Highness, the Duke of Windsor, at 12 noon in St. John’s Cathedral.

His Excellency the Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, gave the Address, and His Excellency the Commander British Forces, Sir Richard Erskine Ward, read the Lesson.

Flags continued to be flown at half-mast on Government Buildings until sunset today (Monday),and court mourning will end at midnight tonight.

Mote to Editors: The full text of the Governor’s Address at the

Memorial Service is contained in a Supplement to today’s Daily Information Bulletin.

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Monday, June 1972

- 10 -

FOUR R.T.V. ARTISTES TO DRAW WINNING TICKETS Of The 48th Government Lottery

********

Four R.T.V, artistes will rotate the drums to draw the winning tickets of the 48th Government Lottery on Saturday, June 17, 1972 at the City Hall Theatre.

They are Miss Tang Pik-wan, Miss Nam Hung, Mr. Cheng Kwan-min and Mr. Wu Fung. The draw will start at 10 a.m.

This was announced today by Mr. Chau Kai-yin, a member of the Government Lotteries Management Committee, at a Press conference held at the City Hall Restaurant.

The four R.T.V. artistes, together with Mr. Alex Wu, Chairman of the Management Committee, and other members of the Management Committee, attended the conference.

Tickets for the 48th Government Lottery — the second this year — are now on sale at $2 each.

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Monday, June 5* 1972

- 11 -

MR. ANTHONY ROYLE

********

Note to Editors; The Under Secretary of State for Foreign

and Commonwealth Affairs, Mr. Anthony Royle, will arrive back in Hong Kong tomorrow (Tuesday) night after his visit to China.

Mr. Royle will hold a press conference in the Airport VIP Room at 6 p.m. on Wednesday, June 7* prior to his departure for London.

Press representatives attending this press conference are requested to assemble in the Kai Tak Airport VIP Press Conference Room NOT LATER THAN 5.30 p.m. Admission of press representatives, who must be properly accredited, will be by means of lapel badges which will be issued by GIS staff members before the press conference starts. The Press Conference Room will be lit for filming and photography and the use of flash will therefore not be permitted.

The RAF VC 10, on which Mr. and Mrs. Royle are travelling, will touch down at Kai Tak Airport at 8.35 p«m. tomorrow. They will be greeted by H.E. the Governor, and Mr. and Mrs. Royle will stay overnight at Government House as the guests of the Governor and Lady MacLehose.

Mr. Royle will not meet the press on arrival and there will not be any facilities for photographs on the tarmac. Official arrival pictures taken by GIS photographers will be available for collection from the GIS Press Room at about 10.15 p.m. tomorrow.

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Release time: 6.30 p.m.

H LJ


PROPOSED PLAYGROUND AT TSUN YIP STREET KWUN TONG

& # J

4000035 P.R. 33

HONG KONG GOVERNMENT

NFORMATION

SERVICES

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

SUPPLEMENT

Monday, June 5, 1972

MEMORIAL SERVICE FOR DUKE OF WINDSOR

Address By H.E. Governor

********

The following is the full text of the address by His Excellency the Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, at the Memorial Service for His late Royal Highness, the Duke of Windsor, today:

’•Today we pay our last tribute to His Royal Highness the late Duke of Windsor, formerly His Majesty King Edward the Eighth, formerly /

His Royal Highness the Prince of Wales. A figure of controversy, but a figure dearly regarded by the British People.

’’Faced with a choice between an Empire and domestic happiness, he chose domestic happiness. This choice and decision will in themselves assure him a special niche in history, and the sympathetic regard of future generations.

’’But on this occasion let us look back beyond the drama and controversy of those days in 1936 to the long period during which his star shone and he held the admiration, affection and hopes of the British peoples.

”He had the misfortune to be born to play his major part on the royal stage in the period between the two World Wars. It was a period in which century-old assumptions were breaking down, and new ones had not yet clearly emerged to take their place. A period crippled by the loss

/of........

Monday, June 5? 1972

- 2 -

of a generation in war, distracted by the frustration and misery of world economic slump, and threatened by the rise of Fascist and Communist dictatorships in Europe. A period of desperate difficulty for those, like him, to whom people looked for a lead.

• "But in spite of this, this was the period of his legend and the time when his star shone so brightly. The time when, as we now see he threw his weight on the side of much that- mattered most, and against much that we now see was out-of-date or irrelevant.

t "Abroad, by his tours and by his style, he demonstrated the

role the Royal Family could play as a link between peoples as well as between governments. We remember how he visited Hong Kong. Those were the days when he was known as Britain’s first Ambassador, and Britain’s best salesman.”

Common Touch

"At home he had a common touch. He tried to identify himself with the economic and social realities and needs of those times, and by doing so to insist they were not forgotten. He did this by personal interest and personal contact at all levels, and, let us not forget, by a programme of activities that called for immense expenditure of physical and nervous energy•

"And in these roles, and by temperament, he rejected much of the formality and many of the conventions of the Court and Society of those days.

"So these were the courses he set himself; this was why his star shone so brightly; this is the legend that will be his. It is surely one that is sympathetic to us in Hong Kong, who in totally different circumstances,

/have ........

5

>

Monday, June 5, 1972

- 5 -

have also to confront and solve great social and economic needs, without precedents and with only humanity and our determination to guide us.

"But he was Prince of Wales and King in a disjointed age, an age of confusion, and he was a product of it, and we know the dramatic and agonising sequel. Now that the drama and the anguish of his abdication have passed into history we can see that his decision was clear-cut, taken in the way he believed the needs of the country required, and taken and lived-out with dignity.

"We know that the Monarchy was unimpaired; we know that it has steadily gained in strength and in the affections and respect of the British peoples; we know that the social and economic attitudes towards which he reached, have long been accepted.

" He knew these things too. This knowledge, his domestic happiness and the affection of the British people he had with him in the long years of retirement that followed. The consolation of these things he had with him when he died."

Release time: 6.30 p«m<

0

P.R.H. 7 (REVISED) 4000091

INFORMATION

SERVICES

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Tuesday, June 6, 1972

TEACHER TRAINING PROGRAMME TO BE EXPANDED

2,000 More Qualified Teachers By 1976

********

Hong Kong is to expand its existing training programme for non-graduate teachers to meet the rising demand for trained teachers and to raise the quality of teaching in schools.

Finance Committee has approved in principle proposals which aim to produce, by 1976, a further 2,000 qualified teachers. Of this total, 1,500 would be competent to teach in lower secondary forms.

These will be additional to the present programme, which produces approximately 1,000 trained teachers per year.

An Education Department spokesman said today that the Department was concerned with improving the quality of teaching in government and aided schools.

At present, he said, there are 1,000 ’’permitted teachers” in aided schools who do not meet the requirements of the Education Ordinance to become registered teachers.

’’They are permitted to teach, but are not basically qualified to do so,” he added.

The spokesman said it was necessary to enable these permitted teachers to become qualified teachers.

/Under ........

Tuesday, June 6, 1972

- 2 -

Under the expansion programme, they are to become qualified teachers at the rate of about 200 a year.

Since their training takes two years, this would mean that 600 ’’permitted teachers" could qualify by 1976 and the remainder by 1978.

The spokesman said: "The aim is that any additional teachers required in primary schools in the public sector should be qualified and not permitted teachers."

The three Colleges of Education are capable of very limited expansion.

To provide for the intake of 2,000 students, accommodation will have to be found for the expansion of part-time courses.

To this end, the old Northcote College of Education buildings at Bonham Road, which have been vacated by the United College of The Chinese University of Hong Kong, should now revert to their original role.

Additional accommodation will be available in Kowloon when Sir Robert Black College moves from its existing premises at Hung Hom to permanent new accommodation at Piper’s Hill.

"These buildings should provide sufficient accommodation," the spokesman said, "but if an inadequate number of unqualified teachers offer themselves for in-service training, it will be necessary to consider an expansion of full-time training courses."

Tuesday, June 6, 1972

- 3 -

DRAGON BOAT FESTIVAL ON JUNE 15 Governor To Watch Yau Ma Tei Boat Races ***********

The Dragon Boat Festival, one of the main holidays on the lunar calendar, falls this year on Thursday, June 15, and thousands will mark it with traditional boat races and displays.

The festival is observed annually on the fifth day of the fifth moon on the lunar calendar to commemorate the death of Chu Yuan, a famous Chinese statesman who lived 2,500 years ago.

As is customary on the day, there will be celebrations in almost every seaside village or fishing community, but the major ones will be in Yau Ma Tei* Tai Po and Chai Wan.

The Yau Ma Tei festivities will be held inside the typhoon shelter, with His Excellency the Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, as the guest of honour.

Altogether 25 teams, including four women’s teams, will take part in the competition which will start at 1 p.m. and last about four hours.

At the end of the races, Sir Murray will present banners to the winning teams*

In Tai Po, The Commander British Forces, Lt.-Gen. Sir Richard

Ward, will attend the races which will commence at 10 a.m.

Over JO teams will compete in separate heats« Non-fisherman teams will include five from the Army, one from the Police , one from the District Office* Tai Po, and others representing various organisations in the District*

/On Hong

Tuesday, June 6, 1972

On Hong Kong Island, the main dragon boat races will take place in Chai Wan. The races will be held in two sessions, but the climax will be in the afternoon, starting at 3

The Commodore-in-Charge, Hong Kong, Commodore R.E.S. Wykes-Sneyd and the City District Officer, Eastern, Mr. T.H. Barma, will be the guests of honour. They will distribute prizes to the winners after the racese

-------0---------

DON’T GIVE MONEY TO INMATES

Visitors To Prisons Told

*********

People visiting relatives in prison institutions are advised today that inmates do not need money and they should not therefore give money to them on visits.

A Prisons Department spokesman said that prison services are financed entirely from public funds and under the Prison rules inmates are prohibited from being in possession of money whilst serving their sentences.

The spokesman urged residents to report to the Commissioner of Prisons or his deputy, or the anti-corruption branch* cases where they are approached for money by anybody when they visit their relatives in prisons,

A leaflet to this effect has been prepared by the Department and copies are being distributed to visitors.

O -

Tuesday, June 6, 1972

- 5 -

VOLUNTEERS FOR SUMMER YOUTH PROGRAMME Posters To Publicise Recruitment ********

Work has started to recruit volunteers to help run this year’s summer youth programme.

A colourful and attractive poster to publicise the recruitment has been printed and will be widely distributed to various organisations for display purposes.

The poster aims at urging young people to make good use of their spare time to help run the various activities under this year’s summer youth programme.

The places where they may register or obtain information are listed on the poster. These are City District Offices, District Offices in the New Territories, Social Welfare Department’s Community Centres, the Hong Kong Council of Social Service and the Association of Volunteers for Service*

Registration procedure is very simple, and anyone over the age of sixteen may apply.

’’Last summer, more than 20,000 youngsters came forward to help run the various activities. Since more people are expected to take part in this year’s summer programme, we hope that more youths will join as helpers or leaders,” a spokesman for the Association of Volunteers for Service said today (Tuesday). . ,

The Association is responsible for this year’s overall co-ordination of recruiting volunteers.

/Volunteer *

*

Tuesday, June 6, 1972

- 6 -

Volunteer workers are required to help in such activities as running camps, service projects, training and study courses and recreation centres etc "By working as a volunteer in the summer youth programme, I obtain valuable experience in organising activities, serve other people of my age and at the same time enjoy myself. I hope that more youngsters will take part in this worthy cause," said a registered volunteer.

*«*«««*

Note to editors: Copies of photographs of the poster are

distributed separately in the press boxes at the Government Information Services this (Tuesday) evening.

QUARANTINE RESTRICTIONS

Quarantine restrictions have been imposed against arrivals from Delhi (excluding airport), India, on account of cholera, the Port Health Authorities announced today (Tuesday).

•■ i* • -* • ' *

' - • • • -----o------

Tuesday, June 6, 1972

- 7 -

BUILDING IN SHANGHAI STREET DECLARED DANGEROUS

*««»*»**

The Building Authority today declared two four-storey pre-war buildings at Nos. 693 and 693A Shanghai Street, Kowloon to be in a dangerous condition.

In a statement issued this morning, the Principal Government Building Surveyor said that in the course of routine inspection the reinforced concrete framing, floors and roofs of these buildings were found to show signs of deterioration.

The owner was ordered to remove all loose material and open-up portions of the structure for investigation and on compliance with this order it was found that the deterioration was in an advanced stage and beyond reasonable repair.

Notices of intention to apply for Closure Orders in Kowloon District Court at 9*30 a.m. on July 19, 1972 were posted today.

0--------

/8...........

Tuesday, June 6, 1972

- 8 -

DR. CHOA TO ADDRESS LIONS CLUB

********

Note to Editors: Dr. the Hon. G.H. Choa will address members of the Lion Clubs at a joint luncheon in the Peninsula Hotel tomorrow, Wednesday, June 7, at 1 p.m. His subject will be ’The Medical and Health Department and the Public,” and he will take the occasion to reply to a number of recent criticisms of his Department. The Lions Club have agreed that members of the Press radio and TV be invited to attend the meeting to cover the speech. An Information Officer will be on hand to assist the Press.

-------0---------

Release Time: 7.00 p.m.

PRESS RELEASE

SPEECH ON THE "KEEP HONG KONG CLEAN" CAMPAIGN

GIVEN BY MR. II.Ll.G. FGRLGATE AT THE ROTARY CLUB OF HONGKONG LUNCHEON on Tuesday, 6th June 1972

Gentlemen

I am most grateful to have been given this opportunity to address such a representative and influential assembly, in my capacity as Vice Chairman of the Urban Council Environmental Hygiene Select Committee, on a subject currently dear to all our hearts — and eyes - and noses - the problem of pollution by litter in Hong Kong, and what is being done about it, and, in particular, the "Keep Hong Kong Clean" Campaign scheduled to begin on 1st November this year.

In recent years, concern amounting sometimes to

obsession with pollution and the quality of the environment, has become fashionable. Everywhere, politicians are using these terms as popular political platforms, and many commerejal firms are gearing themselves and their products to these attitudes. The more cynical minded or heedless among us tend to dismiss this concern as a vogue which, as with all earthly things, will pass. But I hope that on this score they could not be more wrong (unless, of course, they are so cynical as to mean that in their passing, they will take mankind also!), and, fortunately, in Hong Kong, many right-minded people are seriously, even desperately, concerned about what the staid London Times recently called: "humanity running, lemming-like, to the brink of ecocatastrophe".

It is with/

I Help run your city Register as Electors

- 2 -

It is with this background that in autumn 1970 the Deputy Colonial Secretary convened a meeting of the several senior officials responsible for the state of cleanliness in Hong Kong, to express the Government’s concern at the growing filth, and to plan measures to combat the situation. This concern was reflected in the Governor’s speech at the opening of the LegCo session in October 1970, when he deprecated the increasing dirtiness all round, and advocated '’something of a sustained and co-ordinated effort in this field, attacking the problem on all fronts”, promising his support if the Urban Council, as the Authority basically responsible, felt able to initiate some major move in the field.

Environmental Pollution

I think it might also be appropriate to mention here something about the new Committee which has been established, and which I am privileged to chair, to look into the longer term form of Environmental Pollution. Up till now the Committee has been principally concerned with analysis of the problems of pollution and their control, but this analysis is being prepared with a view to the preparation of a series of reports throughout the next two year's, which will contain recommendations on legislation and on public expenditure to protect our environment. I have no doubt that these recommendations, if they are implemented, will force a change of attitude among our polluters, and I would strongly advise anyone who now depends for his living on the release

of his/...

- 5 -

of his wastes on the environment to look hard at his present methods, so that the enforcement of higher standards will not involve too severe an adjustment. For the prevention of pollution is not a game, it is the biggest insurance policy which we can take out for posterity.

To its credit, the Environmental Hygiene Select Committee, which, as its name suggests, is the part of the Urban Council charged with maintaining the cleanliness of the city, took up this challenge and invited Legislative Councillors and very senior representatives of all the Government Departments concerned, to form a Campaign Committee for the purpose of planning and executing a major campaign against litter. This Committee now has two Legislative Councillors, three Urban Councillors (one of then myself), and thirteen Deputy or Assistant Heads of Department.

Obviously, a fulltime Co-ordinator was necessary to pursue the decisions taken by this Campaign Committee, and with effect from June 1971, the Government made a Senior Executive Officer available for this purpose. Fortunately, there was ample experience and documentation of the supremely successful 1968 ’’Keep Singapore Clean” Campaign r to guide the Hong Kong planners, and, although the Governmental attitudes and priorities are quite different in both places, the basic elements of success in such a campaign were acknowledged to be common.

I shall not/>»<

A -

I shall not go into minute details of the long, mostly fruitful, discussions already held by the Campaign Committee and its Working Groups dealing with such inter-related subjects as education, community organisation, multi-storey buildings, industrial/commercial involvement, publicity, programming, legislation, and, of course, budgeting/finance. These have already studied the ways in which the campaign . , i

can be pursued in their particular fields, and have mapped out broad guidelines to achieve the campaign aim - to attain and maintain the cleanliness and litter-free condition of our streets, public areas and the communal parts of buildings.

Now, this aim may seem to some people as a typically half-hearted way of tackling environmental pollution, but to those who think so I must point out that this is an anti-litter campaign, aimed at creating in the public mind an awareness of litter, a mood of censure against litter bugs, and gradual inculcation of good litter habits. The other appalling aspects of pollution are being, or will be, dealt with separately by other strong committees, but litter is one of the greatest single contributors to this modern horror, and the earliest possible action is necessary. Accumulations of'litter block drains, they block streams, they hinder proper cleansing, and lead in turn to a sort of public malaise which countenances the dumping of more and larger objects, such as obsolete furniture, cars, etc.

The almost/...

- 5 -

The almost universal adage about never fouling one’s own nest is recognised and practised by the great majority of our people in their own homes. But what do they do outside these homes? They dump litter from windows, from back doors, from their shops, from their cars, whenever the impulse takes them, to the extent that 540 tons of litter and refuse are swept up daily from Hong Kong's streets, at an annual cost of over million - more than half the annual cleansing bill! If this anit-litter campaign is not mounted soon, and maintained thereafter, the situation can only worsen, and will cost infinitely more to rectify the longer that we wait to start it. In other words, the authorities must start running now to catch up, and must keep running thereafter even to keep abreast of the problem, until the campaign - initiated efforts in education and persuasion start to produce their own results.

It will perhaps assist you to get a clearer picture of this forthcoming campaign if I describe the general approach, detailing some of the means whereby we hope to recruit assistance from the broad mass of the community, and to shame the remainder into better litter habits. The campaign proper will last throughout November, during which there will take place a massive ’’spring clean” in all the high rise buildings, in streets, in public places, and the communal parts of buildings. This will be carried out section by section in each district in accordance with a timetable well publicised beforehand and great emphasis will be/..•

- 6 -

will be laid on the removal of clogging junk and refuse from around people’s homes. In the months prior to this campaign, anti-litter squads under the leadership of legally authorised Litter hardens, will be making door-to-door visits, passing out explanatory leaflets, advising and cajoling in methods of litter disposal, and leaving nobody in any doubt over the consequences of illegal dumping. This advisory role will be continued during the campaign month when massive publicity will be given to the aims and objects of the campaign, with particular emphasis on creating a mood of public censure against litter offenders who spoil others’ environment. During the campaign, it is hoped that community groups such as Kaifongs and rural committees will be assisting to create the necessary mood of public censure. Youth groups and even religious bodies have also pledged their assistance, and, although precise details have yet to be worked out, the intention will be to harness the youth and vigor of students, Scouts, Guides and the numerous other similar organisations to assist physically in the clean-up, to show by example that they are concerned with improving their environment. In Britain this has been done by issuing special, easily recognisable shirts to young people, and channelling their enthusiasm for a good cause into such jobs as the cleaning of parks and benches, sweeping of streets of ugly rubbish dumps. This type of approach was found to have an infinitely greater impact than a whole series of posters or static displays which have only limited appeal.

As I have/

- 7 -

As I have said, exact details are yet to be worked out, but a proposal is now maturing to form groups of area volunteers who, perhaps dressed in special T-shirts and wearing distinctive arm bands, would go around ostentatiously picking up litter in public and shaming those responsible for dropping it. This type of action brings home the lesson that if litter is dropped indiscriminately, someone, somewhere, has to pick it up, and usually the public purse has to pay.

Already there have been pledges of support from responsible and forward-thinking bodies and firms, and if we can convince the business community that what we intend to do cannot be anything but good for Hong Kong, then the support we get from the private sector will be substantial. The nurturing of this support is a task for the Industrial/Commercial ’working Group.

People have said to me that it is pointless to try to stop the existing indiscriminate dumping of litter and that the anti-litter campaign, whilst admirable in its aim, will have only impermanent results. This defeatist attitude conveniently ignores the lesson that Singapore has taught the world, and continues to teach. Mo-one in his right mi^d would try to change an entire social attitude within a month or even a year, but with sustained efforts and first-class, well-shafted publicity over an appreciable period, the Campaign Committee considers it possible to change a thoughtless, uncaring populace into

one wholly/...

8 -

one wholly conscious of its own living environment and anxious to maintain or improve the standard of that environment. It is also intended to introduce new legislation, firm but fair, for dealing with the type of offender to whom reason and the public good are unimportant, and to back this legislation, it is intended to introduce anti-litter squads headed by Litter Wardens, whose principal object will be to catch or deter litter offenders.

Such a campaign, however, could not even hope to get off the ground without a massive publicity effort utilising all the media, hammering home the undesirability of living amidst litter, and conditioning public attitudes to enthusiastic support for anti-litter measures, even in the toughest, least tractable districts. The combined efforts of the community groups, the support in cash and kind of the industrial/commercial sector, the considerable resources of Government in the fields of housing, education, publicity and public cleansing, and a determination to succeed on the part of all concerned, can perhaps confound the defeatists, amaze the cynics, and straighten the spines of all Hong Kong’s citizens with the beginnings of civic pride. I hope that when that time comes, and a general appeal is made for assistance in combatting our litter problem, you will be 100% behind our efforts. There may be no thanks, except from posterity.

Finally, let me quote an excerpt from a lecture on

Land Pollution/...

- 9 -

Land Pollution by Sir Frank Fraser Darling, D Sc, Ph D, LLD, FRSE, delivered to the Royal Society in London in March 1971• Sir Frank, who is also a member of the Royal Commission on Environmental Pollution, said:-

”How far can we call the intentional and careless dumping of unwanted hardware and litter pollution of the land? I would be prepared to call it such, for although it carnot be compared with the persistence and diffusion of organo-chlorine pesticides and their possible dangers to health, there are direct dangers to human health in derelict motor cars, refrigerators, mattresses, and what not. Discarded paint cans have caused death to mary cattle in the course of history. Further, litter creates a disturbed environment to which many of us are not insensitive. The random dumping which we have seen increase so markedly in these twenty-five years causes appreciable stress. Derelict land is far too common in a country as heavily populated as we are. Come into London fmm any direction on an hour’s journey and instead of reading the paper, count the odd bits, often quite large, of dead, ugly, derelict land. This is shameful. I would call it visual contamination of the land, a manifestation of pollution we could easi change. There have been brave attempts in the Black Country, in South Wales, and in Durham, to creat plantations and natural scrub in derelict areas. There have been chemical obstacles to doinft this, but if all I hear is true, the main check to growth is vandalism, pollution of the land by people, pollution arising from an attitude of mind. This is hardest of all to bear, for somehow the beam must be in our own eye.”

How truly/...

10 -

How truly the words apply to present-day Hong Kong.

I know that Rotary in Hong Kong, with its main objective of "Service”, will do all it can to help in this campaign. One positive way will be to exercise your civic rights and register as a voter in the next year’s Urban Council Elections. I am an Appointed Member and am not therefore plugging for myself, but my elected colleagues on the Council, with whom appointed members work in close and generally amicable concert in Committee, need and deserve the support of voters to help encourage them in their work on the Council. If you have listened to my talk, you must agree it is no mean task. The closing date for new voters to register is 14th June and reregistrations, JOth June 1972.

President George and Fellow Rotarians, thank you very

much indeed for your invitation and attention.

P.R.H. 7 (REVISED)

4000001

M® Kffll

■■

INFORMATION

SERVICES

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

(Part I)

V/ednesday, June 7, 1972

EMBARGOED NOTE TO EDITORS:

The following news item MUST

NOT be published or broadcast

until after 2.35 when

the Financial Secretary makes the statement in Legislative Council.

DECISION TAKEN IN PRINCIPLE ON MASS TRANSIT RAILWAY

Financial Secretary Says Scheme To Proceed Subject To Satisfactory Financing & Tender Arrangements ********

A decision has been taken, in principle, to proceed with the construction of the full Mass Transit Railway subject to satisfactory arrangements being made for financing it and for letting contracts.

This was stated by the Financial Secretary, the Hon. C.P. Haddon-Cave in the Legislative Council this (Wednesday) afternoon in reply to a question by the Senior Unofficial Member, the Hon. Sir Yuet-keung Kan.

Mr. Haddon-Cave told Council that the financing problem - costing over 86,000 million at mid-1970 prices - was closely linked with two other problems, namely, the form of tendering and the letting of contracts and the most appropriate operational arrangements.

He said: "These issues will have to be looked at separately but, eventually, they need to be brought together in a coherent scheme for the financing, construction and operation of the system.”

/To........

Wednesday, June 7, 1972

- 2 -

To work out the best methods of resolving these three problems, with a view to assembling a "package” on the basis of which a final decision could be taken whether or not to go ahead, a small Steering Group had been established under his chairmanship.

"This Group will go fully into all the possibilities of financing, constructing and operating the mass transit railway, including consultations with financial interests and groups of construction companies and manufacturers of equipment which may come forward with ideas.

"It has already held its first meeting and is under direction to complete its work and to present its findings to Executive Council within six months.

Willingness

"The Steering Group will be greatly assisted by the ready willingness of our bankers - the Hong Kong Bank - to assist us in exploring the various ways and means of raising non-Government finance and a senior official of the Bank has beeh appointed to serve on the Group."

The Financial Secretary said that concurrently with this work, and subject to the provision of funds by the Finance Committee, the Consulting Engineers would be re-engaged and instructed to push ahead as rapidly as possible with all the necessary detailed route investigations, preparation of designs and the drawing up of contract documents for the first two stages of the railway.

This is the line starting at Choi Hung, linking the resettlement estates of Wong Tai Sin, Lok Fu and Shek Kip Mei with the Nathan Road Corridor and then running under the harbour to the central business district of Hong Kong to terminate at Western Market.

/Additional •••••••

Wednesday, June 7, 1972

- 3 -

Additional surveys and extensive ground investigations would also be undertaken by firms of specialist consultants and contractors as a matter of urgency, as this would be an essential prerequisite to the preparation of detailed designs for the civil engineering works.

It was also intended to accelerate work on certain associated public works, such as the reclamation of the area at Kowloon Bay intended for the mass transit maintenance depots and the construction of relief roads, to ensure they were phased in with the railway construction programme.

Legislation

The Financial Secretary said work would be started on drafting legislation to provide for the compulsory acquisition of property, where this was unavoidable, the alteration of streets and the compensation of those people whose property would be interfered with in the course of construction.

’’The preparation of this and other enabling legilsation will be supervised by the Steering Group, which will also keep a watching brief on the consultants’ activities and the progress of the ground investigations and the various associated works I have just mentioned,” Mr. Haddon-Cave said.

He explained that certain essential pre-construction work was being undertaken now so that no time would have been lost should the financial explorations prove successful and a firm decision was taken later on this year to proceed with construction.

Mr. Haddon-Cave said a decision on whether to go ahead definitely with the construction of the railways would be taken before the end of this year in the light of the findings of the Steering Group as to whether firm possibilities exist of raising the requisite finance on reasonable terms.

/’’If it.......

* u

Wednesday, June 7, 1972

- 4 -

”If it is favourable, every effort will be made to start construction early in 1974. If it is not favourable, either because the finance is not available in sufficient quantities and on appropriate terms or because the cost turns out to be inordinately high or both, all work on the project will cease and it will not be proceeded with further”.

The Financial Secretary said the Government in taking a firm decision, in principle, to proceed with the mass transit railway was conscious of the size of the task, in physical as well as financial terms, it had set itself.

The complete system would take many years to build, though the first stage would be operational within 3# years from the time construction begins and the second stage 15 months later.

System

On the basis of mid-1970 prices, the system was estimated to cost 86,000 million, including accumulated interest over the construction period, or just over 85^000 million after ploughing back the revenue earned after the opening of the early stages.

Mr. Haddon-Cave pointed out, however, that construction costs were rising and could be expected to rise further. He said: ”It is bound to be higher and, indeed, according to our calculations, the net capital requirement could be considerably higher than this depending on the assumptions made as regards cost escalation and hence of average costs over the whole construction period.”

The Financial Secretary said the Government believed that a substantial sum of public money could be committed to assist in financing the project, that the system could be constru ^ed without undue disruption, and that the system was economically viable.

/He said ........

Wednesday, June 7, 1972

- 5 -

He said it was clear that an enormous sum of money would have to be raised. There was a need therefore to find out whether sufficient outside capital finance could be obtained on appropriate terms as regards interest rates and repayment arrangements.

"Clearly, it is incumbent on Government to be very sure of all the financial aspects of the project before committing the community to such tremendous expenditure. In particular, we must not put either our ability to finance our other commitments or our liquidity or our fiscal policies at risk," Mr. Haddon-Cave said.

’.Yarning

The Financial Secretary ended his statement with a note of warning. He said: "If in the end it does not prove possible to build the mass transit railway, I must make it clear that the measures needed to ensure that people can continue to get to and from work and for goods to continue moving will need to be more and more severe as time goes on.

"They will certainly not be popular and will be greatly criticised by some. Yet they will be necessary in the general interest if Hong Kong is to continue to function as a viable community in the years to come."

Mr. Haddon-Cave said it was to avoid having to introduce such severe measures that Government had taken a decision in principle to build the mass transit railway and he assured Council that every effort would be made to resolve the financial problems involved.

The following is the full text of the Financial Secretary’s statement:-

/"The short

Wednesday, June 7, 1972

- 6 -

’’The short answers to my honourable Friend’s questions are: (1) yes, a decision has been taken; and (2) it is that the construction of the full Mass Transit Railway will be proceeded with subject to satisfactory arrangements being made for financing it and for letting contracts. But these are short answers, Sir, to two deceptively simple questions and I think I should explain in some detail - before my honourable Friend asks me to do so - precisely what they mean.

’’First of all the Government has decided, after the most careful consideration that, if the demand for movement in Hong Kong in the late seventies and thereafter is to be satisfied, the surface public transport system must be augmented, if at all possible, by an underground mass transit railway. The alternative would seem to be an unacceptable degree of congestion of the road network - unacceptable in both economic and social terms. But, as I stressed in both the Budget Speech and in my speech winding up the budget debate, the addition of a mass transit railway must be coupled with the •< expansion and improvement of the road network, with a programme designed to * / increase the carrying capacity, efficiency and comfort of surface public transport facilities and with policies designed to optimise the use of available road space. This is because a mass transit railway cannot, on its own, constitute a solution to our emerging transport problem; and, in particular, it will not mean that our road network can be left free for unlimited use by personalised forms of transport. This will be so even when the road network has been fully dveloped in accordance with the Long Term Road Study. Present plans provide for expenditure on road reconstruction and development of $1,800 million spread over the eight years ending 1979/80 and, undoubtedly, this amount

/will .......

Wednesday, June 7, 1972

will have to be increased as the programme is updated. The fact is that the mass transit railway when fully completed will cater for only one third of public passenger journeys that people are expected to make by the mid-1980s (about 2/z million journeys out of a total of million) although, admittedly, it will carry about half of all passengers in the more densely populated areas where the railway will run. In doing so, efficiently and swiftly, it will enable us to maintain that degree of mobility of people and goods vehicles without which our economic and social life would be endangered*

Good Chance

’’Secondly, the Government has decided that there is a good chance that three of the four questions I posed in my winding up speech in the budget debate, and which I said had to be answered before a decision could be taken whether or not to go ahead - the Government has decided that three of these four questions can be answered affirmatively. That is to say, we believe, first, that a substantial sum of public money can be committed to assist in financing the project; secondly, that the railway can be constructed without undue disruption; and thirdly, that the system can be operated in such a way as to generate a sufficient cash flow to service the investment and cover operating costs. So the way is now clear to see whether an affirmative answer can be given to the fourth question, namely, whether sufficient outside capital finance can be obtained on appropriate terms as regards interest rates and repayment arrangements. To some extent the possibility of raising finance will depend on how much finance has to be found. On the basis of mid-1970 prices, we reckon that the minimum net capital requirement will be 55,000 million.

/But

Wednesday, June 7, 1972

- 8 -

But it is bound to be higher and, indeed, according to our calculations, the net capital requirement could be considerably higher than this depending on the assumptions made as regards cost escalation and hence of average costs over the whole construction period (and we can do no more than make certain assumptions until tenders are invited and contracts let). The net capital requirement will be less than total capital expenditure, including interest on the accumulated debt, because revenue from fares on the initial stages, as , ' * ’ ' '' ■ ■ they are opened, will start to flow in from early 1977 onwards and these will provide some offset from that year on.

Financing Problem

"The financing problem is closely linked with two other problems, namely, (1) the form of tendering and the letting of contracts and (2) the most appropriate operational arrangements. These issues will have to be looked at separately but, eventually, they will need to be brought together in a coherent scheme for the financing, construction and operation of the system.

"To work out the best methods of resolving these three problems with a view to assembling a package on the basis of which a final decision can be taken whether or not to go ahead - that is to say, whether it is possible to go ahead - a small Steering Group has been established under my chairmanship. This Group will go fully into all the possibilities of financing, constructing and operating the Mass Transit Railway, including consultations with financial interests and groups of construction companies and manufacturers of equipment which may come forward with ideas. It has already held its first meeting and is under direction to complete its work and to present its findings to Executive Council within six months. The Steering Group will be greatly assisted by the

... /ready •••••••

Wednesday, June 7, ^972

- 9 -

ready willingness of our bankers - the Hong Kong Bank - to assist us in exploring the various ways and means of raising non-Government finance and a senior official of the Bank has been appointed to serve on the Group.

11 Concurrently with this work, and subject to the provision of funds by the Finance Committee, the Consulting Engineers are to be re-engaged and will be instructed to push ahead as rapidly as possible with all the necessary detailed route investigations, preparation of designs and the drawing up of contract documents for the first two stages of the railway, that is, a line commencing at Choi Hung, linking the Resettlement Estates of Wong Tai Sin, Lok Fu and Shek Kip Mei with the Nathan Road Corridor and then running under the harbour to the central business district of Hong Kong to terminate at Western Market.

Surveys

’’Additional surveys and extensive ground investigations will also be undertaken by firms of specialist consultants and contractors as a matter of urgency, as this will be an essential prerequisite to the preparation of detailed designs for the civil engineering works.

”It is also intended to accelerate work on certain associated public works, such as the reclamation of the area at Kowloon Bay intended for the Mass Transit maintenance depots and the construction of relief roads, to ensure that they are phased in with the Mass Transit construction programme.

’’Finally, work will be started on drafting legislation to provide for the compulsory acquisition of property (where this is unavoidable), the alteration of streets and the compensation of those people whose property will be interfered with in the course of construction. The preparation of this and other enabling legislation will be supervised by the Steering Group, which will also keep a watching brief on the consultants’ activities and the progress of the ground investigations and the various associated works I have just mentioned.

/’’In other........

Wednesday, June 7» 1972

- 10 -

"In other words, Sir, certain essential pre-construction work is being undertaken now so that no time will have been lost should the financial explorations prove successful and a firm decision is taken later on this year to proceed with construction.

"As I have said, such an eventual decision on whether to go ahead definitely with the construction of the railway will be taken in the light of the findings of the Steering Group as to whether firm possibilities exist of raising the requisite finance on reasonable terms. This decision will be taken before the end of this year and, if it is favourable, every effort will be made to start construction early in 197^• If* it is not favourable, either because the finance is not available in sufficient quantities and on appropriate terms or because the cost turns out to be inordinately high or both, all work on the project will cease and it will not be proceeded with further.

"Sir, while the Government has taken a firm decision, in principle, to proceed with the Mass Transit Railway and has every intention of exploring all possible sources of finance, we are conscious of the size of the task - in physical as well as financial terms - we have set ourselves. The complete system will take many years to build, though the first stage will be operational within years from the time construction begins and the second stage 15 months later. We are confident that it is a feasible project to construct, that being capital intensive it will not make excessive demands on the labour force in the construction industry and that it is the best system of all the alternatives examined. But at mid-1970 prices it is estimated to cost over $6,000 million, including accumulated interest over the construction period - or, as I said

/earlier, ........

Wednesday, June 7, 1972

- 11 -

earlier, just over $5»OOO million after ploughing back the revenue earned after the dpening of the early stages. Construction costs are, however, rising and can be expected to rise further, so the actual cost will probably be much greater than'this. Clearly, an enormous sum of money will have to be raised. And then there is the problem of ensuring that the system is financially viable in the sense that the capital cost and accumulated interest can be repaid from the revenue from fares and other sources over a given period of years,

’’Clearly, it is incumbent on Government to be very sure of all the financial aspects of the project before committing the community to such tremendous expenditure. In particular, we must not put either our ability

tdJfinance dur other commitments or our liquidity or our fiscal policies at risk

• , y - j Jjy1 .

Viable Community

’’Sir, if in the end, it does not prove possible to build tfie Mass Transit-Railway, •-I must make it clear that the measures needed to ensure that people can continue to get to and from work and for goods to continue moving will need to be more and more severe as time goes on. They will certainly not be popular and will be greatly criticised by some. Yet they will be necessary in the general interest if Hong Kong is to continue to function as a viable community in * the years to come. It is because the Government would like to

avoid having to introduce such severe measures that it has taken a decision

in principle to build the Mass Transit Railway and I can assure honourable

Members thc^t every effort will be made to resolve the financial problems in vol vod - ”

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-t-v —' /12.........................................

*

Wednesday, June 7, 1972

- 12 -

MASS TRANSIT RAILWAY STEERING GROUP

O******

As announced by the Financial Secretary in Legislative Council this afternoon, the Governor has established a small Steering Group to investigate the best methods of financing, tendering for, and operating the Mass Transit Railway, The Group is to submit its findings to Executive Council by November this year.

The membership of the Steering Group comprises:

Financial Secretary (Chairman)

• Director of Public Works

Commissioner for Transport

Accountant General

Deputy Economic Secretary

together with a senior member of the Hong Kong & Shanghai Banking Corpo>atioxu The Steering Group will co-opt representatives of the Consultants (I)|eeman Fox & Partners) to attend its discussions.

The terms of reference of the Steering Group are as follows;

(1) To consider and advise on the best means of financing, letting contracts for and operating a Mass Transit Railway for Hong Kong on the basis of the system proposed by the Consultants,

(2) To consider, in particular, any proposals submitted by outside bodies for financing and/or constructs ng and/or operating the system.

(3) To receive progress reports from the Consultants on the preparation of detailed designs and the drawing up of tender documents for the first two stages of the system, as well as on the further survey work and ground investigations being undertaken,

(4) To supervise the drawing up of drafting instructions for legislation required for the construction and operation of the Mass Transit Railway.

/13 .......

- - 0 - -

Wednesday, June 7, 1972

- 15 -

HONG KONG MASS TRANSIT FURTHER STUDIES FINAL REPORT And Abstract From Report — On Sale Tomorrow ********

A four-volume set of the Further Studies Final Report on Hong Kong Mass Transit as well as an Abstract from the Report will be on sale tomorrow (Thursday) at the Government Publications Centre, Star Ferry Concourse, on Hong Kong Island.

The full set, in English, consists of Further Studies Final Report, Volume 1; Further Studies Final Report, Volume 2, Appendices; Further Studies, Volume }A, (Route Plans - Kong Kow Line, Kwun Tong Branch, Tsuen Wan Branch); Further Studies, Volume 3>B, (Route Plans -East Kowloon Line, Island Line); and Further Studies, Volume 4, General Drawings•

Volumes 1 and 2 cost 820 per copy, and Volumes 3A, 5B and 4, 810 per copy. The bilingual Abstract from the Further Studies Final Report can be obtained at 82.50.

0 - -

Wednesday, June 7, 1972

- 14 -

MASS TRANSIT RAILWAY

*******

Note to Editors: The Financial Secretary announced in Legislative

Council today Government’s decision, in principle, to proceed with the construction of the Mass Transit Railway subject to satisfactory arrangements being made for financing it and for letting contracts.

The Hon. J.J. Robson, Director of Public Works, will hold a press conference in the G.I.S. theatre at 5.30 p.m. tomorrow (Thursday) at which he will answer questions on the mass transit system. Also present at the press conference will be Mr. A.H. Wilkins, Government Highway Engineer, Mass Transit; Mr. G.J. Bentley, Government Land Surveyor; Mr. B.K. Yu, Assistant Engineer, Mass Transit; and Mr. C.R. Coulson, Resident Partner, Freeman Fox & Partners (Far East)•

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Release Time: 8.00 p.m

P.R.H. 7 (REVISED) 4000091

INFORMATION

SERVICES

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

(Part II)

Wednesday, June 7» 1972

MEASURES TO RECTIFY C.M.B.'S FINANCIAL POSITION Fare Revision And Royalty Abolition ««*****«

Five measures,including a revision of fares, were announced in the Legislative Council today to rectify the financial position of the China Motor Bus Company to allow it to continue to. operate "an adequate, efficient and viable bus service" on Hong Kong Island.

The measures were announced by the Financial Secretary, the Hon. C.P. Haddon-Cave, when he moved a motion that no royalty shall be paid by the C.M.B. for the yearly period beginning on July 1, 1971 and ending on June JO, 1972.

The measures were:

* The rate of royalty payable by the company should be . set at nil for its financial year 1971/72.

* Finance Committee is to be asked to approve the

• • ■ -» payment to the Company, on a once-for-all basis, of 84.329 million before tax, by way of compensation for losses arising from the regularisation of public light buses.

/* The Governor

Wednesday, June 7, 1972

2

* The Governor in Council has approved a revision of the fare structure involving

- a flat 20 cent fare for the Company’s Lower Level Routes with the elimination of the 10-cent section fare. ?

- flat fares of 20 cents or 30 cents on the Company’s Hill Climbing Routes and the elimination of section fares.

- an upward revision of the full fare on three of the Company’s suburban routes and the retention of section fares on all these routes, but with upward adjustments.

* The Company has decided to abolish adult monthly tickets.

* Concessionary fares for students are to be retained, but in a modified form and partly at public expense.

The Financial Secretary said the revised fare structure is to come

into effect on July 1 next.

He described C.M.B.’s current financial position as "no better

than.that of K.M.B. before the recent fare revision — and all the indications

are that it will continue to deteriorate.”

He attributed this to steadily rising operating costs, falling total

revenue as the result of the fall in the number of passengers, and increased cost of operation per passenger for the same reason.

Mr. Haddon-Cave said C.M.B.*s exclusive franchise ceased to exist with

the regularisation of public light buses in 1969•

In the following year, the Company was particularly hard hit because

the number of public light buses operating on the Island increased by eight times.

’’Furthermore,” the Financial Secretary said, "with the development

of housing estates in Chai Wan, Wah Fu and Aberdeen, the Company has had to

provide additional suburban services which have, by and large, not been profitable.”

/He said .........

Wednesday, June 7, 1972

- 3 -

He said three steps had been taken so far to ameliorate the position These included the reduction and elimination of the payment of royalty, the abolition of certain concessions to members of the armed forces and Government uniformed personnel travelling on C.M.B. buses, and the recognition that Government had a moral obligation to compensate the two franchised bus companies for any losses they suffered as a result of the breach of their franchises arising from the regularisation of public light *■ . ... -buses.

The Financial Secretary described these three measures together as ’’piecemeal and short term remedies” to the C.M.B.’s financial position.

t Long Term Solution

•’The only long term solution,” he said, ’’lies in revising the present fares to a realistic level.”

Giving the rationale of the fare variations, he said the flat fare of 20 cents on the Lower Level Routes would coincide with an increase from 10 to 20 cents on the lower deck of trams.

’’Thus there will be no encouragement to passengers to switch from C.M.B. to the Tramways or vice versa on these routes,” he added<

Referring to the Hill Climbing Routes, the Financial Secretary said the introduction of a flat fare of 30 or 20 cents would facilitate the introduction of further one-man-operated buses.

’’This,” he said, “will reduce operating costs.”

As regards Suburban Routes, the fares are to be increased in order to reflect more realistically operating costs on these routes, which are on I ♦ V the whole, not at present profitable.

/Referring

Wednesday, June 7. 1972

- 4 -

Referring to student monthly tickets, the Financial Secretary said that the cost would be increased from 36 to 318.

Subject to Finance Committee’s approval, he said, it was proposed that the cost per ticket to the parents should be increased from 36 to 39. with the remaining 39 being paid by Government to the Company in the form of a subsidy to the student.

In his statement, the Financial Secretary said the number of passengers carried by C.M.B. in 1970/71 was 180.6 million as against 199*4 million in 1969/70.

This is a reduction of 18.8 million or 9*4 percent.

"In 1971-72 the number of passengers is expected to be about 177.1 million," he said.

With the present fare structure and concessionary fares, C.M.B. anticipated a net loss of 32.325 million in the year 1972/73. Mr. Haddon-Cave said.

With the charges proposed, he said, the Company would earn a profit of about 34.8 million after tax, yielding a return of about 14 percent on assets employed.

- - - - 0--------

Wednesday, June 7, 1972

- 5 -

FARE INCREASE FOR C.M.B. "INEVITABLE" If It Is To Remain Viable — Mr. Szeto Wai

The Hon. Szeto Wai said today that an increase in fares for the China Motor Bus Company (CMB) was "inevitable" if the company was to

• remain viable which a public transport undertaking must.

He said that CMB, being a labour-intensive transport industry, could not escape the considerable stress resulting from increasing wages and costs, and had now reached its ultimate strain.

He was speaking in the Legislative Council on the motion that no royalty shall be paid by the China Motor Bus Company for the yearly period beginning on July 1, 1971, and ending on June 30, 1972.

Mr. Szeto said that in order to save the Company from its deteriorating financial position and to make public transport operation viable, the Transport Advisory Committee endorsed the proposal of fare revision after careful study.

The Committee’s endorsement, he said, was made on the condition that the level of royalty be considered in the light of the accuracy of the Company's profit and loss forecasts when compared with its audited accounts for each year in question.

"In other words, royalty should be retained as a regulator in the event of excessive profits," he said.

/As regards ••••••

Wednesday, June 7, 1972

r. - 6 -

As regards compensation to CMB as a result of the regularisation of public light buses, he said that to base compensation wholly on the loss of passengers that the Company would otherwise have carried had it not been for the regularisation of public light buses, was both "illogical" and "unjustified".

He contended that the public light buses and their predecessors, the illegal mini-buses, before September 19&9» were created as a result of inadequate and inefficient public transport services that existed before that date.

Obligations

"Franchise obligations are meant to be observed by Government on the one hand and the Company on the other, and failure on either party must be clearly recognised."

Mr. Szeto said he could not see the validity of a moral obligation on the part of Government.

"The Commissioner for Transport should be empowered and required to exercise closer supervision than there was hitherto on bus companies’ organisation, their operation, their bus scheduling, their maintenance services to ensure the safety of their passengers and the public and the training and discipline of their bus crews.

"Above all, Government must make it obligatory for bus companies to produce for the examination and approval by Government their annual programmes of service expansion and replacement of delapidated buses and all other matters relevant to their organisations as provided in their respective Ordinances," he said.

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Wednesday, June 7, 1972

- 7 -

NO PAYMIMT OF ROYALTY BY TRAMWAYS FOR 1972

Resolution Approved By Legislative Council

*******

The Legislative Council this afternoon approved a resolution

to abolish the payment of royalty by the Hong Kong Tramways Limited for the calendar year commencing on January 1, 1972.

The rate of royalty prescribed in the Tramway Ordinance is

per cent of net profits.

Moving the resolution, the Financial Secretary, Mr. C.P. Haddon-Cave said that after the elimination of royalty, the return on assets employed in 1971 was about 12.7 per cent.

But on the same basis, and with royalty eliminated, the forecast returns for 1972 and 1973 were expected to fall to about 7«1 per cent and 2.7 per cent .respectively.

He said the company’s current financial position had been deteriorating because of rising operating costs and the loss of passengers due to competition from public light buses.

In 1970, the trams carried 158.5 million passengers, and in

1971 they carried some two million lees.

’’But present indications are that the numbers are still falling, due not only to competition from buses and public light buses operating along the same routes, but also to the slowing down of the tram service as a result of traffic congestion at peak hours,” Mr. Haddon-Cave said.

/"At present

Wednesday, June 7, 1972

- 8 -

"At present levels of fares this falling off in numbers of passengers can only means steadily declining revenue for the Tramways in the face, as I have said, of steadily increasing costs. As a result profits will continue to fall until, before very long, the operation will begin to run into the red."

The Financial Secretary said it was clear, in these circumstances, that measures must be taken to improve the company*s financial position if it was to continue to perform efficiently its proper role in the overall public transport system on Hong Kong Island.

He pointed out that the elimination of royalty and the abolition of statutory concessions to members of the armed forces and Government uniformed personnel travelling on trams would still not be sufficient to prevent a further deterioration of the company’s financial position.

The pincers of rising costs and falling revenue could only be prised open by a general fare adjustment, he said.

Various courses v/ere examined by both the Government and the Transport Advisory Committee in the light of their possible consequences for passengers as well as for the company’s finances. The only viable course seemed to be the abolition of the present two-class fare structure by introducing a single 20-cent flat fare.

"On top of the increased revenue this would bring in, it would have the additional merit of increasing operational efficiency and flexibility," Mr. Haddon-Cave said. "Furthermore, the social attitudes that led to the establishment of a two-class fare structure on the Tramways as long ago as 1911 are obviously outdated."

/The Financial ••

Wednesday, June 7, 1972

- 9 -

The Financial Secretary said the company also intended to abolish a non-statutory concession providing for all students over the age of twelve to travel for ten cents. However, in line with similar concessions already introduced for students travelling on the buses, it was proposed to continue this concession and for the second half of the fare to be made up from public funds. The Finance Committee would be invited to approve the necessary funds in the near future.

With elimination of the royalty, the Tramways’ income will be $22 million in 1972, $25.4 million in 1973 and $25.4 million in 1974. This will enable the company to make a return on its assets employed of somewhat over eleven per cent in 1972, and of about 16# per cent in 1973 and 12# per cent in 1974.

’’These figures, taken one with another, are I believe modest. They certainly do not indicate any tremendous increase in profitability for the Tramways as a result of the proposed changes, which are appropriate to the situation and no more. I hope that they will be understood and accepted as such by the public at large," Mr. Haddon-Cave said.

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/ 10 ....

Wednesday, June 7, 1972

- 10 -

ABOLITION OF SECOND CLASS FARE ON TRAMS

Described As Reasonable And Modest

*********

The Hon. Szeto Wai today described as "reasonable and modest" the proposal to abolish the Tramways Company’s second-class fare structure and to introduce a flat fare of 20 cents.

He was speaking in the Legislative Council in support of a motion that no royalty shall be paid by Hong Kong Tramways Limited for the calendar year commencing on January 1, 1972.

Mr. Szeto said the fare proposal should not cause any hardship because for years the lower deck tram fare must have been "one of the cheapest in the world if not the world’s cheapest."

He said to remove class distinction was "sensible not only for simplicity of fare structure but also for sociological reasons."

To maintain class distinction, he said, must be considered "anachronistic" in the context of today’s social attitude.

Mr. Szeto, referring to royalty paid by the Tramways Company, said it was incompatible in these days of rising operating costs with fares remaining unchanged for more than twenty years.

He described as "anachronistic" statutory concessions to members of the armed forces and Government uniformed personnel.

/Mr. Szeto ••••••

Wednesday, June 7, 1972

- 11 -

Mr. Szeto said the tramcars carried almost one third of the public transport passengers on the Island.

To eliminate them at this moment required, doubling the Island’s franchised bus capacities and would inevitably create a problem of providing sufficient kerb space for bus stops, he added.

Mr. Szeto said: "The role played by the tramcars in our existing public transport system must therefore be recognised and to make their operation commercially viable is essential before we have a better alternative such as a rapid mass transit."

A2......

Wednesday, June 7, 1972

- 12 -

FINAL REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL TRAINING ADVISORY COMMITTEE Detailed Examination Now Almost Completed **«*«*«

Detailed examination of the Final Report of the Industrial Training Advisory Committee is now almost completed, and it is hoped that firm recommendations for the setting up of a permanent Industrial Training Council can be submitted to the Governor in Council soon.

The Commissioner of Labour, the Hon. Paul Tsui, stated this today in the Legislative Council in reply to Dr. the Hon. S.Y. Chung.

Dr. Chung had asked: ”Is Government in a position to state its view on the establishment of a Hong Kong Industrial Training Council as proposed by the Industrial Training Advisory Committee in its final report submitted two years ago, and, if not, when is Government likely to come to a decision on this important matter?*’

Mr. Tsui told the Council that Government was at one with the Advisory Committee in that it fully realised the importance of the matter.

He said that ”a reorganized industrial training complex along the lines as indicated in the ITAC Final Report should go a long way to solve the many problems which confront us in the field of industrial training, provided that we are careful to ensure we establish the right machinery to achieve the results we all desire.”

"Because of this need for care, we have been examining all aspects of the matter in detail," he added.

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A3.........

Wednesday, June 7, 1972

- 13 -

RAPID BUSINESS GROTH AT WATERWORKS OFFICE

Additional Accounting Staff To Be Recruited

********

Government hopes that some of the posts approved earlier this year for additional accounting staff to help to expand and update the accounting systems used in the Waterworks Office can be filled soon.

Further staff proposals are under consideration by Government and still more are under preparation in the Waterworks Office.

The Director of Public Works, the Hon. J.J. Robson, stated this today in the Legislative Council in reply to the Hon. Wilfred Wong.

Mr. Wong had asked: ,fWill Government take urgent steps to reinforce the staff of the Waterworks Office so as to enable complaints to be dealt with speedily; and will Government also state how long it is likely to take to dispose of outstanding complaints which have not yet been dealt with?"

Mr. Robson said demands on the accounting side of the Waterworks Office activities had grown rapidly since 19&5 when the policy was introduced to encourage individual flats and establishments in a building to have separate meters.

"To deal, with this expansion of business, it has been necessary to work extensive overtime, and it is proposed shortly to extend the period between the issue of successive bills from three months to four months."

/However, •••«•••

Wednesday, June 7, 1972

- 14 -

However, he pointed out that additional staff was not felt to be the full answer. A proposal to make use of computers on the lines employed by the power companies is under consideration, he said, and when approved, it will take two or three years to implement completely a new accounting « system*

Mr. Robson said that complaints to the Waterworks Office were in general about the water bills issued, and had probably risen faster than new accounts.

In the meantime, he said, the existing staff of the Waterworks

Office was doing all it could with its restricted facilities to provide as good a service as it could to the public.

"By working overtime, the existing back-log of enquiries is being reduced but until the additional staff and facilities I have referred to are available, I am afraid that the service, which the public should perhaps expect to receive, cannot be provided.”

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A3........

Wednesday, June 7, 1972

- 15 -

QUICK OFFER OF GOVERNMENT HOUSING For Occupants Of Condemned Buildings *******

The Director of Public Works, the Hon. J.J. Robson, said today that when a building was condemned, the occupants were registered and offered government housing within a few days.

This applied to all who could show that they were either genuine tenants or roof-top or other squatters who were registered in the 196U Survey, he added.

Mr. Robson was speaking in this afternoon’s Legislative Council meeting in reply to a question by the Hon. Wilfred Wong.

Mr. Wong had asked Government to ensure that the domestic tenants of a condemned building were informed, before the condemnation notice was issued or publicised, of their position in regard to alternative accommodation, in particular whether they would be accommodated in government low cost housing or resettlement estates, resite areas or transit camps.

Mr. Robson said that usually accommodation in government housing was ready on or before the date the closure order became effective.

It was only in emergency cases, where sufficient notice could not be given, that temporary accommodation in transit camps was offered until suitable accommodation could be allocated, he said.

’’Persons who cannot show they are genuine tenants or registered squatters are offered space in a resite area.”

He said that when a building was to be closed, the posting on the premises of the Building Authority’s notice of intention was accompanied by registration of the tenants, and whenever possible, allowed an appropriate period of grace for the occupants to remain in the building.

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A6..........

Wednesday, June 7, 1972

- 16 -

ROAD REPAIRS AVOIDED DURING PEAK HOURS

Authority Sought To Do Night Work

*«*«**«

The Director of Public Works, the Hon. J.J. Robson, said today it was the present arrangement to ensure that minor repairs to heavily used roads were avoided, as far as practicable, during peak hours.

However, he added, it was becoming more and more difficult to implement this arrangement due to the general build-up of traffic in Hong Kong’s road network.

He was replying in the Legislative Council to the Hon. Szeto Wai who had asked: ’’Will Government review the existing arrangements for effecting minor repairs to roads which are heavily used by vehicles (such as Queensway) to ensure that such repairs are, so far as practicable, avoided during peak hours?”

Mr. Robson explained that the volume of traffic on the city streets was now such that the hourly traffic volume remained high throughout daylight hours and, in some locations, only dropped to a low level very late at night.

Under these traffic conditions, he said, decisions had to be taken on which section of the community was to be inconvenienced - the road user if work was carried out during the day, or the resident if night work was resorted to.

”It is also relevant that work at night is more difficult to carry out, more expensive and because it sounds infinitely more noisy than during the day, possibly more objectionable but to a lesser number of people.”

/However,

Wednesday, June 7, 1972

- 17 -

However, from the situation he had described, he said ever increasing night work was inevitable. ।

Mr. Robson said he had asked for an amendment to the Summary Offences Ordinance to enable him to authorise night work of short duration when he was satisfied that this was necessary because of tidal, traffic or emergency conditions.

"If granted, these powers will, I am afraid, bring with them the responsibility for ensuring that night work is carried out as quietly as possible.

"This will be done, but even so, I am afraid that it will not be possible to so reduce the noise level as to make night work unobjectionable to residents living nearby and on these occasions, I hope it will be remembered that work would not be talcing place at night if it was considered feasible to carry it out during the day," he said.

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A8......

Wednesday, June 7, 1972

- 18 -

* 4 V.

CROSS-HARBOUR TUNNEL BY-LAWS 1972 Approved In Legislative Council

A motion that the Cross-Harbour Tunnel By-laws 1972 made by the Cross-Harbour Tunnel Company Limited be approved, was carried in today’s Legislative Council meeting.

Moving the motion, the Financial Secretary, the Hon, C.P. Haddon-Cave, told the Council that these by-laws generally seek to regulate the manner and behaviour of drivers who will be using the Cross—Harbour Tunnel#

’’They al so define the powers of tunnel officers in the event of a contravention of the by-la^s or of an accident in the tunnel area,” he said.

For instance, he said, by-law 8 limits the speed of vehicles in the tunnel to a maximum of 40 m.p.h.; by-law 9 prohibits drivers from changing lanes in the tunnel unless, authorised to do so by a traffic signal or a tunnel officer; and by-law 13 requires slow moving vehicles to use the left hand lanes. ’’Under by-laws 19-21, certain vehicles such as bicycles, those driven by learner drivers and unroadworthy vehicles are prohibited from using the tunnel, while by-law 16 provides for the towing away or removal of vehicles which are causing an obstruction.”

The Financial Secretary also told the Council that by-law 4 confers exemption from the requirements of certain by-laws to certain public service vehicles, such as fire engines, ambulances and police vehicles.

********

Note to editors: Copies of the Cross-Harbour Tunnel By-laws

1972 are distributed separately in the G.I.S. Press Boxes this evening.

Copies of a speech by Dr. S.Y. Chung in support of the motion are also distributed separately. ----------------------0---------- /19........................................................

Wednesday, June 7, 1972

- 19 -

ABOUT 1,450 PLACES FOR ENTRY TO FORM ONE

In Secondary Modern Schools In Coming Academic Year «*««****

The Director of Education, the Hori. J. Canning, said today the number of places for entry to Form I in secondary modern schools in the 1972-73 academic year would be about the same as at present - about 1,450.

He estimated that the number of applicants in September this year would be in excess of 8,000.

He was replying in the Legislative Council to Dr. the Hon. S.Y. Chung who had asked for the number of places available and the number of applicants for such places in secondary modern schools each year for the past two years.

Dr. Chung had also asked the Government to give its estimate of the number of places available and the number of applicants for such places in the coming academic year 1972-73*

Mr. Canning said there were now five secondary modern schools with a total of 3,680 places. For the academic year beginning September 1970, there were over 4,700 applicants, and for the 1971-72 academic year, there were over 7?6OO applicants, he said.

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/20........

Wednesday, June 7, 1972

- 20 -

STAMP DUTY FOR CONVEYANCES ON SALES OF PROPERTIES

Government To Consider Raising Concessionary Values *******

Government will consider, without commitment and not just at the present time, raising the concessionary values of properties in respect of stamp duty for conveyances on sales of properties.

This was stated today by the Financial Secretary, the Hon. C.P. Haddon-Cave, in reply to the Hon. Q.W. Lee in the Legislative Council.

Mr. Lee had asked: "As it is now five years since stamp duty for conveyances on sales of properties was amended to give concessions to attract stamp duty of only £20 for properties of £20,000 or below and only 1 per cent between £20,000 and £40,000 as against the standard rate of 2 per cent ad valorem, and in view of the fact that property values are now worth much more, will the Government consider raising these concessionary values to a more realistic level of say £50,000 and £100,000 respectively so as to attain the original object of encouraging home ownership and give some relief from this kind of Stamp Duty for the cheaper kind of flats?"

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/21........

Wednesday, June 7, 1972

- 21 -

PILE DRIVING BETWEEN 11 P.M. AND 6 A.M.

Already An Offence If Noise Annoys Person

********

The Attorney General, the Hon. D.T.E. Roberts, said today it was already an offence to carry out pile driving between 11 p.m. and 6 a«m* if this caused sufficient noise to disturb or interfere with public tranquility or to annoy any person.

He was speaking in the Legislative Council in reply to a question by the Hon. Sir Yuet-keung had asked: "Will Government take steps, if necessary by legislation, (a) to ensure that pile driving which creates a noise of such intensity as to be a danger to health can be stopped immediately; (b) to ensure that persons responsible for pile driving are required to take such steps as are feasible to silence or reduce the noise from pile drivers; (c) to restrict the hours for pile driving; (d) to provide relief from pile driving noise on public holidays?"

Mr. Roberts said that Government would consider whether any further extension of the present restrictions in the manner suggested by Sir Yuet^keung was desirable.

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/22

Wednesday, June 7, 1972

- 22 -

PARKING CHARGES TO BE INCREASED

Study Shows Monthly Loss In Government Car Parks

A meticulous re-examination by Government of the costs and revenue of each of the six Government multi-storey car parks has shown an overall monthly loss of 362*50 per parking space.

The Financial Secretary, the Hon. C.P. Haddon-Cave, said this today in the Legislative Council in a statement on car parking charges.

He said the Governor-in-Council had now made the necessary regulations to implement the Budget proposals he made on March 1 this year to increase charges for the use of Government multi-storey and open air car parks.

The Road Traffic (Parking and Waiting) (Amendment) Regulations 1972 provides for the following new rates of parking charges to come into force from July 1 this year:-

* Monthly tickets to be increased from 3120 to 3200;

* Full hourly rate to be increased from 60 cents to 31 with a minimum charge of 32 instead of 31.50;’

* Hourly rate in off peak periods to be increased from

40 cents to 50 cents, with the minimum charge remaining at 31;

* Open air car parking charges to be increased from 31.50 to 32.50 per half day.

As regards parking meters, the Financial Secretary said the number of spaces available for parking on street was bound to be reduced, and the policy was gradually to extend other charging to all those remaining.

/Meters ...

Wednesday, June 7, 1972

- 23 -

Meters might also be installed to regulate parking in some of the more built up areas in the New Territories, he added.

"In addition, new meters will be installed in areas where the demand for parking is clearly exceptionally high and the existing meters so displaced will be moved to other areas being metered for the first time.

"Over and above this, as from July 1, a start will be made to extend meter charging to midnight and to include Sundays and public holidays."

The following is the full text of the Financial Secretary’s statement on car parking charges:-

"Honourable Members will recall that in the Budget Speech on 1st March this year I proposed increased charges for the use of Government multi-storey and open air car parks.

"I also indicated that consideration was being given to extending the numbers of parking meters as well as the hours of operation of meters and to charge different rates in each area according to demand.

’’In my speech winding up the budget debate on 29th March I indicated that, in view of the reluctance of honourable Members to accept the case for these new charges, their introduction would be deferred for a month or two to give more time for reflection.

"Sir, in the intervening period the Government has conducted a meticulous re-examination of the costs and revenue of each of the six government multi-storey car parks and this has confirmed that, at present

/rates of ••••••

Wednesday, June 7, 1972

- 24 -

rates of charging, the revenue collected in each of them is far from sufficient to cover costs. In each case annual costs have been calculated on the basis approved by the Governor in Council in 1966.

l!First, annual capital charges to cover land and buildings have been worked out: for land, on the basis of a 15 year lease renewable for a further 12 years and, for buildings, on the basis of historical costs amortised over 25 years.

"Secondly, from these charges are deducted rents from other users of the structures, such as the telephone exchange in Garden Road.

"Finally, to this adjusted figure for capital charges is added annual recurrent charges such as staff costs, maintenance, stores and electricity.

"Total costs on this basis for all six car parks in the year ending 51st March 1972 came to about 39,150,000, while revenue for the usage of these car parks totalled about 36,450,000.

"There was thus an overall deficit of about 42,700,000 in that year. Breaking dovzn these figures into costs and revenue per parking space per month in each of the six car parks produces the following monthly losses per space:

Star Ferry, Garden Road

& Rumsey St. each

City Hall

Middle Road

Yau Ma Ti

"The overall monthly loss per space works out at 362.50.

3 54 )

ftnpL } Average for Hong

7 Kong Island 360.00

3 58 )

) Average for Kowloon

3 85 ) 366.50

/"This means •••••

Wednesday, June 7, 1972

- 25 -

’’This means that to cover actual costs of these car parks total revenue would need to be increased by about 42% above current levels. The new rates I suggested in my Budget Speech would, on the basis of no change in current usage, increase revenue by rather more than 50%. But, if there were some deterrence, the increase would be somewhat less.

’’The Governor in Council has now made the necessary regulations to implement the budget proposals and the Road Traffic (Parking and Waiting) (Amendment) Regulations 1972 provide for the new rates of charging to come into force from 1st July: monthly tickets are to be increased from #120 to 5200; the full hourly rate is to be increased from 60 cents to 31 with a minimum charge of Z2 instead of 51.50; and the hourly rate in off peak periods is to be increased from 40 cents to 50 cents, with the minimum charge remaining at 31.

”As a consequence of these increased charges, charges for open air car parks are to be increased from 31.50 to 52.50 per half day and the Road Traffic (Temporary Car Parks) Regulations have been appropriately amended.

"Now as regards parking meters: as I indicated in the Budget Speech, there are at present 7,000 metered spaces as compared with 18,000 free on-street parking spaces.

’’With the continuing increase in the volume of traffic, the number of spaces available for parking on street is bound to be reduced and the policy is gradually to extend meter charging to all those remaining; and meters may also be installed to regulate parking in some of the more built up areas in the New Territories.

/’’In addition, •••••

Wednesday, June 7, 1972

- 26 -

"In addition, new meters will be installed in areas where the demand for parking is clearly exceptionally high and the existing meters so displaced will be moved to other areas being metered for the first time. All this will take some months to achieve but, eventually, there will bo a hierarchy of charges for metered spaces depending on demand.

"Over and above this, as from 1st July a start will be made to extend meter charging to midnight and to include Sundays and public holidays. The reason for this is that the demand for parking in many areas is very often just as high, or even higher, during these periods as during daylight hours on weekdays.

"The Road Traffic (Parking and Waiting) (Amendment) Regulations 1972, to which I have just referred give effect to those new charges and extended hours of operation.

"Sir, the role which parking charges should ultimately play in a policy seeking to optimise the use of road space seems to me to be inevitable for, despite our vast road reconstruction and development programme, road space will always bo a scarce resource; and it is surely significant that parking charges are used as a weapon in the armoury of traffic control in most, if not all, large cities with traffic problems.

"Meanwhile, as the present charges in Hong Kong do not even recover historical costs and recurrent expenses, I am sure there will be agreement that the general taxpayer should not be required to continue to subsidise car owners in this way."

-----0------

Wednesday, June 7, 1972

- 27 -

BILL GIVEN THIRD READING

********

The Criminal Procedure (Amendment) (No. 2) Bill 1972 passed its committee stage and third reading in the Legislative Council this afternoon and became lav/.

Six bills had their first and second readings. They were the Evidence (Amendment) Bill 1972, the Interpretation and General Clauses (Amendment) Bill 1972, the Judicial Proceedings (Adjournment During Gale Warnings) (Amendment) Bill 1972, the Pensions (Amendment) Bill 1972, the Inland Revenue (Amendment) (No. 2) Bill 1972, and the Tramway (Amendment) (No. 2) Bill 1972.

Debate resumed on the Matrimonial Proceedings and Property Bill 1972

- - 0-------

LEGCO PROCEEDINGS RECORDED

*******

Note to editors: Proceedings in today’s Legislative Council

have been recorded. You are welcome to consult the tape in the G.I.S. press room.

Wednesday, June 7, 1972

- 28 -

MEDICAL AND HEALTH DEPARTMENT AND PUBLIC

Dr. Choa Replies To Critics In Lions Club Address

*******

Dr. the Hon. G.H. Choa, Director of Medical and Health Services, repeated today that disciplinary action would be taken against all government hospital staff at any level found guilty of rudeness or corruption.

”1 will make further efforts to stamp out all these offences which have given us such a bad name,” he told a luncheon meeting of the Lions Clubs. ’’Boxes will be re-introduced in every government hospital and clinic, and people can lodge their suggestions and complaints in them. They can, of course, continue to write to me directly, us I personally see all such letters.”

But he warned that anonymous letters would be ignored, since it was ’’only fair that people who write should identify themselves by giving us their genuine names and addresses.”

In a wide-ranging speech covering a number of points brought up in recent criticisms of the Department, Dr. Choa said the Department had taken several measures to assure patients on entering government hospitals that no payment was to be made for any service such as the " use of bedpans, the filling of thermos flasks, and so on.

There were notices in every ward and clinic informing the public not to tip the staff. It was known that the practice continued to prevail, and he reminded the public that offering a gratuity in itself encouraged .this type of abuse.

/On hospital »•••••

Wednesday, June 7, 1972

- 29 -

On hospital charges, he said people had to pay only Si to attend a government clinic, and 32 a day in a general ward in hospital. These charges covered everything — medicine, laboratory tests, x-ray examinations, and any form of treatment, for example, surgery, radiotherapy and physiotherapy, and — in the case of in-patients — their diet.

"Attendance at maternal and child health clinics and chest clinics is free, while hospital treatment for infectious diseases, including tuberculosis and leprosy, and most psychiatric cases, is also free. If the patient cannot afford even 31 or 32, these charges are either reduced, or waived,” he emphasised.

The only payment left for the patient to make were charges for medicine bottles, or certain kinds of surgical appliances, such as corsets and crutches, which the Department either made or bought for them.

In the circumstances, it was not true that unless amahs and ward orderlies were paid extra, the implication was that patients did not get any service. Complaints on this head, accompanied by details such as the name of the offender, the date end time, would produce action — and patients who felt themselves victimised while they remained in hospital, should not regard the matter closed once they were discharged.

Dr. Choa also made these points:-

* Parity of salary for staff of government-assisted hospitals was now being considered — but it was not the case that those who worked in government-assisted hospitals should receive less than their counterparts in government hospitals, but rather that they should not receive better terms. Critics should realise that if there were differences in leave allowances, contributions to pension schemes and

/charges

Wednesday, June 7, 1972

- 30 -

charges for quarters, then these conditions should be brought into line with those of the Government before parity could be attained.

* Salary differentials between grades must be understood as a principle by which staff were graded differently according to their entry qualifications, periods of training and occupation, and so on. Many demands for improved salaries based on comparisons with other grades failed to take these differences into proper account. The Department was always safeguarding the interests of its staff, and never failed to recommend improvements to conditions of service when they were justified.

* The number of vacancies for doctors in the Department included posts for future expansion and leave reserve, and did not mean that so many posts in the existing services were unfilled.

* It was inevitable that a number of doctors, sooner or later, left the Government for private practice. Only those who went on full-pay study leave should be bound to serve the Government for three years after their return. All graduates wishing to spend any length of time with the Department to gain further experience would be welcomed, since this would better prepare them for private practice.

* Registration in Hong Kong of doctors trained abroad v/as determined by the principle of reciprocity fixed, not by the Medical and Health Department, but by the Medical Council, an independent body. It had nothing to do either with politics or nationality, but was related to many valid reasons, the most valid being the difference in standards of practice and conceptions of medical ethics in different countries.

/On the •.•••

Wedensday, June 7, 1972

- 31 -

On the last point Dr. Choa said the Medical Council in Hong

Kong followed closely the practice of the General Medical Council in the United Kingdom.

He understood that before Britain joined the European

Economic Community, the GMC might have to take another look at the reciprocity list, and ”we could also take the opportunity to ro-consider ours.1*

Note to Editors: Copies of the full text of Dr. Choa’s address, in Chinese and English, are distributed separately in the Press boxes, Government Information Services, later this evening.

----0------

WATER INTERRUPTION IN KOWLOON CITY

*******

Water supply to a number of premises in the Kowloon City area will be turned off for five hours between 1 a.m. and 6 a.m. on Friday, June 9*

During this period, the Waterworks Office will carry out a leakage test, f

Premises which will be affected by the interruption are in the area bounded by La Salle Road, Hereford Road, York Road, Kowloon Canton Railway, Cornwall Street, Waterloo Road and Junction Road.

-------0---------

/32........

Wednesday, June 7» 1972

- 32 -

SUPPLY OF POULTRY FEEDING FOR LOCAL FARMERS

Now Available At Retail Sale

«*«**«**

A stabilized animal and poultry feeding, commonly known as the meat-and-bone meal, is now available at retail sale from the Urban Services Department.

Local fanners may henceforth have an ample supply from the.

Kennedy Town Abattoir as the By-Products Plant of this Abattoir has stepped up the rate of production, an Urban Services Department spokesman said today.

The meat-and-bone meal, containing high percentage of proteins, fats and minerals, is generally well-known to local poultry breeders.

When the production was small in the past, the spokesman said, the supply was only obtainable through the Agriculture and Fisheries Department on a quota system.

nFor the benefits of local poultry breeders, the supply is now released for the first time on an unlimited retail basis ex store from the By-Products Plant in Kennedy Town Abattoir or from the Livestock Breeding Centre of Agriculture and Fisheries Department in Castle Peak.”

The meal, packed in gunny bag, has a typical composition of

• -h •

64 per cent of proteins, 11 per cent of fat and 6 per cent of phosphate and is sold at the retailed selling price of $45 per picul (133 lbs. net).

-------0---------

Release time: 8.30 p.m.

P.R.H. 7 (REVISED) 40000®!

M® M®

INFORMATION

SERVICES

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Thursday, June 8, 1972

MASS TRANSIT RAILWAY

Statement By D.P.W. At Press Conference

********

At yesterday’s meeting of the Legislative Council, the Financial Secretary announced that Government had decided that the surface public transport system must be augmented , if at all possible, by a Mass Transit Railway and that investigations be carried out and the design of the railway be prepared as a matter of urgency.

• • •• > • • Speaking at a press conference today (Thursday), the Director

of Public Works, the Hon. J.J. Robson, said that the railway system to be adopted was similar to the Preferred System recommended in the Hong Kong Mass Transit Further. Studies Financial Report prepared by the Consulting Engineers.

The following is the full text of Mr. Robson’s statement:

”The final report and the abstract, both of which are on sale to the public as from today, contain the estimated costs and revenues of the System based on prices prevailing in mid-1970 but exclude all engineering fees and expenditures and administration and financing costs.

’’Since this report was completed, the alignment of all routes has been studied, amended and accurately defined by the Public Works Department and an additional station to serve the extensive new development in the Taikoo area has been added to the system.

/’•The .....

Thursday, June 8, 1972

- 2 -

"The Consulting Engineers are to be re-engaged as soon as possible to commence the final design of all aspects of the railway so that, in the event of Government taking a decision at the end of the year to proceed with the construction of the railway, no time will have been lost.

"Their work, which will concentrate on the first two stages of the system, will include a re-examination of the rolling stock design and the train control system to be used and, in particular, a re-evaluation of coach materials and design, air-conditioning, thyristor control and regenerative braking systems.

Ground Investigations

"Also, the method and design of construction of the underground tunnels, stations and other structures will be reconsidered in the light of the information gained from the ground investigations and with a view to creating the minimum social disturbance during construction.

"Until now, the alignment of all routes has been expressed in British Imperial units on Imperial scale plans. The Mass Transit Railway routes have now to be accurately surveyed and the plans will be prepared to a metric scale in order that the whole system can be designed in metric units.

"To provide the necessary information to enable the design of the civil engineering structures to proceed, extensive ground investigations will be carried out. This work comprises a large number of bore-holes, trial pits etc. together with the comprehensive testing and analysis of soil samples.

"The

Thursday, June 8, 1972

- 3 -

,rThe Public Works Department with an appropriately increased staff will continue to administer the Mass Transit Railway project through this stage in its development and will also co-ordinate all other works, both public and private, which are affected by or associated with the project.

”In particular and wherever possible, it is intended to make relief road capacity available on alternative routes before consturuction of the railway is due to commence in a given section of road and, to this end, various P.W.D. road and other projects such as the move of the K.C.R. Tsim Sha Tsui station to Hung Hom will be accelerated. A close check is being maintained on all private developments to ensure that they will have minimal effect on the railway when the latter is constructed.”

Thursday, June 8, 1972

- 4 -

CONSIDER EMPLOYEES’ SAFETY IN TYPHOONS

Labour Department’s Advice To Employers

**«*««**

Although owners of factories and commercial firms are not bound by law to follow any particular procedures during a typhoon, they are advised to act in a common-sense way in the interests of the safety of their employees.

This was stated by a Labour Department spokesman today who said that during typhoon seasons in past years, many factory owners and employees had phoned asking for information and advice.

He said: ’’They were told to consider the factor of safety both in the factories and while travelling to and from work. Many ferry and public transport systems stop running before an approaching storm reaches its peak.”

’’Many firms send their workers home when signal number five or a higher number is hoisted. Others do not insist on workers returning to work when such a signal is hoisted or when interruption of ferry services and public road transport services is imminent.”

He added: ”It would avoid confusion if firms published their own regulations so that employees clearly know what they are expected to do when storm warnings are issued. In a few cases, firms which have special emergency responsibilities may want their employees to report for duty during a typhoon.”

As a final advice, he said: ”It is important for both management and employees to reach an agreement on the payment of wages under various circumstances during a typhoon.”

-------0---------

/5.........

Thursday, June 8, 1972

- 5 -

WATER STOPPAGE IN HUNG HOM AND NORTH POINT

*«»«**«

Water supply to a number of premises at Hung Hom in Kowloon will be turned off for five hours starting from 1 a.m. on Saturday, June 10.

The temporary stoppage is to enable Waterworks Office staff to carry out a leakage test.

Buildings within the area bounded by Pau Chung Street, the Seafront, Ma Hang Chung, To Kwa Wan, Ma Tau Kok and Lok Shan Roads will be affected.

On Hong Kong Island, a number of buildings at North Point will also have their water supply turned off for five hours starting from 1 a.m. tomorrow (Friday).

This will allow Waterworks Office staff to carry out a leakage test for waste detection.

The affected area is bounded by nos. 170-218 Electric Road, Boat Street, south side of King’s Road from Mercury Street to Shu Kuk Street, including Kam Ping Street, Peacock Road, Ming Yuen Western Street, Fort Street, Kin Wah Street, Ching Wah Street, North View Street, Cheung Hong Street, Fortress Hill Road, Chung On Terrace, Comfort Terrace and the north side of Tin Hau Temple Road.

-------0---------

/ 6 ....

Thursday, June 8, 1972

- 6 -

SPECIAL TRAINS FOR DRAGON BOAT RACES

To Run Between Kowloon And Tai Po

,««****

The Kowloon-Canton Railway will lay on special trains on Thursday, June 15, for people going to the Dragon Boat races in Tai Po, New Territories.

These trains will run only between Kowloon and Tai Po and will pick up passengers en route.

There will be eight special trains from Kowloon to Tai Po on that day - at 7.59 a.m., 8.58 a.m., 9.49 a.m., 10.57 a.m., 12.05 p.m., 1.11 p.m., 2.07 p.m. and 2.35 p.m.

From Tai Po Market,ten special trains will leave at 8.51 a.m., 9.59 a.m., 10.46 a.m., 11.54 a.m., 1.06 p.m., I.56 p.m., 3.05 p.m., 3.24 p.m., 4.31 p.m. and 5*27 p.m.

A spokesman for the Kowloon-Canton Railway said today (Thursday) that additional special trains would also run in the late evening if traffic warranted.

- 0 - -

Thursday, June 8, 1972

- 7 -

STUDY ROOM PROVES POPULAR

The popularity of the Students’ Study Room in Kowloon Park, run by the Urban Council, has clearly demonstrated that there is a genuine need for such facilities, especially during and around examination periods, a spokesman for the Urban Services Department said today. ♦ •

The Study Room was opened in November 1970 as a pilot scheme to assess the extent of the need for such facilities in Hong Kong. • • • «

Experience gained in the operation of this Study Room and other Students’ Reading Rooms in the Urban Council Public Libraries, has convinced the Urban Council’s Culture Affairs Select Committee that its provision in this direction falls short of the total provision which is ideally required.

The Select Committee is fully aware that a large number of organisations are providing similar service and believes that many more would wish to do the same when given suitable advice in respect of the day-to-day operation of such a service.

”In view of this,” the spokesman said, ’’the Select’ Committee~ is prepared to share its experience with any organisations or institutions who feel that such advice would be of benefit to them.”

’’Interested parties are welcome to contact the Senior Librarian, Urban Council Public Libraries, City Hall,” he added.

-------0---------

/ 8 ....

Thursday, June 8, 19?2

- 8 -

PRESS CONFERENCE

*******

Note to Editors: Dr. A.C. Copisarow, Vice President of Messrs. McKinsey & Company, the firm of management consultants engaged by Government, will hold a press conference in the G.I.S. theatre on the fifth floor of Beaconsfield House at 2,30 p»nu tomorrow (Friday), Dr. Copisarow will also be available for interviews by representatives of radio and television stations.

You are cordially invited to send a reporter and/or photographer to cover the conference.

Release time: 6.00 p.m.

P.R.H. 7 (REVISED) 4000091

Ml»

INFORMATION

SERVICES

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Friday, June % 1972

FIRST STEP TO STRENGTHEN ANTI-LITTER LAWS

Wider Powers Proposed

For Dealing With Rubbish On Canopies

As a first step to strengthen the anti-litter laws in readiness for the forthcoming "Keep Hong Kong Clean" campaign, an amending bill dealing with the problem of rubbish on canopies of premises will be introduced into the Legislative Council shortly.

Commenting on this, Mr. Wong Man-yui, Assistant Director (Cleansing), Urban Services Department, said that further amendments for dealing with other types of litter offences would soon be ready for submission.

"Stronger legislation is considered essential for the effective control of the litter problem," he added.

The Public Health and Urban Services (Amendment) Bill 1972, published in today’s Government Gazette for general information, empowers the authorities to serve a notice on an occupier of premises requiring him to remove refuse on a canopy of the premises.

If an occupier fails to comply with the notice he commits an offence, for which a maximum fine of $500 is prescribed, and a fine of $20 for each day the offence continues.

/Where •••••••

Friday, June 9, 1972

2 -

Where the authorities consider that refuse on a canopy is or may become dangerous to health or persons, constitutes a nuisance or is unsightly, they are empowered to serve a notice on the occupier or owner of the premises requiring him to remove the canopy.

The authorities are given the power to remove a canopy and recover the expenses incurred if the person on whom a notice has been served fails to comply with it.

There is provision for a person upon whom a notice to remove a canopy has been served to appeal to the Governor.

Canopy

The term "canopy" is defined in the law as any shade, shelter or other structure not carrying a floor load which either projects from a wall of a building and is cantilevered or supported by brackets, posts or other means, or is erected on any building or in or over any open space adjacent to or on a building and is supported by posts or other means.

A Government spokesman said that the presence of rubbish on canopies often constituted a nuisance in law, and in some cases it was also a health risk.

At present, he said, nuisances are dealt with under sections 12 and 127 of the principal ordiance but it is considered that the powers conferred by these two sections are inadequate to deal with the problem of rubbish which accumulates on canopies.

' /"Much •••••••

Friday, June 9, 1972

- 3 -

"Much time is taken in obtaining a court order and it is necessary to show that the presence of the rubbish on a canopy falls within section 12*” he said.

“Unfortunately, the prosecution of an owner of premises does not deter other occupiers from allowing rubbish to accumulate on canopies.”

Friday, June 9, 1972

- 4 -

DOMESTIC CHORES FOR THE ELDERLY

■■Truly Fine” Gesture By Group Of Young Volunteers

*»«*«***

A group of 20 young volunteers from the Social Welfare Department’s Wong Tai Sin Community Centre will this Sunday give up their holiday to do domestic chores for elderly residents of St Joseph’s Home for the Aged.

Acting on their own spontaneously, and without prompting, these volunteers from the Centre’s Cid People Service Team and Service Group will spend the day mopping floors in the Home, washing windows, preparing and serving lunch, and laundering personal linen.

Mr. Basil Leung, Warden, describes the gesture as ’’truly finet” representing not only an extension of recent community efforts to improve the general lot of the elderly, but also bringing it to the ’’individual and very personal level.”

”It is one thing to contribute money to a cause, and quite another to take up the broom and the laundry basket, and do these chores happily and willingly for a total stranger, with absolutely no thought of financial gain,” he says.

At the end of the visit to the Home, the volunteers will distribute food parcels among the eldeyly^donated by the Wong Tai Sin District Committee on Welfare Services for the Aged, and the Centre’s Council of Memberst

Note to Editors: You are invited to have the visit covered. It begins at 11 a.m.

w w _ _ 0 -------

/5.........

Friday, June 9, 1972

- 5 -

NSV BILL SEEKS TO AUTHORISE RAISING OF LOANS From Asian Development Bank For Specific Projects *4>4c**4t4i4t

A new bill to enable Government to raise loans from the Asian Development Bank for specific projects will be introduced into the Legislative Council shortly.

The Loans (Asian Development Bank) Bill 1972 will initially authorise Government to obtain a US$21.5 million loan from the Bank for the construction of Hong Kong’s 40 million gallons daily desalting plant near Castle Peak.

The Bill, published in today’s Government Gazette for general information, also seeks to enable further loans to be authorised by Legislative Council resolutions adding further items to the Schedules to the Bill.

It makes provision for the amounts which may be borrowed, and for the purposes of such borrowings to be specified in the First Schedule. Any agreement concluded under this provision is to be laid before the Legislative Council as soon as practicable.

The Bill also empowers Government to issue such bonds, promissory notes and other instruments as may be necessary to give effect to a loan agreement.

It provides for the appropriation and application of money borrowed and also charges repayment on the general revenues and assets of the Colony.

Another provision made by the Bill enables expenditure made in connection with a project for which moneys are borrowed to be met first from general revenues of the Colony pending reimbursement from the loan funds.

-------0----------

/6.......

Friday, June 9, 1972

- 6 -

LIFE SAVING AND RESUSCITATION

AMS Film Making Impression On Thousands Of Pupils

An Auxiliary Medical Service film, ’’Pulse Of Life,” is making the rounds of schools to show pupils the latest life-saving methods developed by internationally-recognised medical researchers.

It has the recommendation of the Director of Medical and Health Services and the Director of Education, and headmasters interested in having it screened in their schools can arrange a booking through the Education Department.

A demonstration follows the screening, with AMS staff showing methods of resuscitation on a ”Resusci Annie.” The film and the demonstration together last about an hour.

Seventy schools have so far requested a booking, and thousands of young people have already seen the film and the demonstration.

”This is a very satisfactory response,” comments Mr. G.F. Doggett, Medical Defence Staff Officer, Auxiliary Medical Service, ’’and timely, too, considering that we are well on to the swimming season, and some advice on life-saving can prevent tragedies on beaches and in swimming pools.

”As many schools as possible should arrange for bookings before they break up for the holidays.”

The film was made in the United States. The commentary is in English, but Cantonese instructors provide a simultaneous translation.

/’’Pulse Of • • • • •

Friday, June 9, 1972

- 7 -

’’Pulse Of Life” introduces mouth-to-mouth breathing and external heart compression. It emphasises the importance of distinguishing between unconsciousness and cardiac arrest.

It presents procedures for treating a resuscitation emergency until the victim recovers, or medical help is available.

It dramatically reveals real-life situations where these methods are crucial to the saving of a life, and it encourages the viewer to take time to learn and practise these new life-saving methods.

• < • .. •

-------0----------

• • * • •'/.

Friday, June 9, 1972

- 8 -

NEW MOBILE POST OFFICE IN N.T.

*********

The Post Office is to introduce a mobile Post Office to serve the Clearwater Bay area.

It will start service on Monday, June 12, initially on a threemonth trial basis and thereafter depending upon the success of the trial* ,fThis is the second mobile office serving the smaller communities in the New Territories and is intended to meet the needs of growing communities until the area justifies regular post offices,” a Post Office

• •• •• • « •• spokesman said.

Mobile Post Office No. 2 will make daily (Monday to Friday) visits

as follows:-

Location Arrival Time Departure Time

(l)*’ Tseng Lan Shue 10.45 a.m. 11.15 a.m.

(2) Taipo Tsai 11.25 a.m. 11.55 a.m.

(3) Hang Hau 12.05 p.m. 12.40 p.m.

(4) Mang Kung Uk 1.45 p.m. 2.15

(5) Sheung Yeung 2,20 p.m. 2.50 p.m.

(6) Nam Wai 3,05 p.m. 3.30 p.m.

(7) Ho Chung 3.35 P.m. 4.15 p.m.

(8) Pak Sha Wan 4.20 p.m. 4.50 p.m.

The classes of business to be transacted covers the sale of postage stamps, postal stationery and receipt stamps, the sale and encashment of British Postal Orders, the acceptance and payment of money orders and the acceptance of registered articles and parcels.

A posting box is provided for ordinary posted items.

Friday, June 9, 1972

- 9 -

CASTLE PEAK ROAD THROUGH CASTLE PEAK

Reconstruction Work To Start Soon

««*»***

Work will start shortly on the reconstruction of the Castle Peak Road through Castle Peak betv/een San Hui and Fu Tei to provide better transportation facilities in the area.

The work will consist of the construction of about one mile of dual carriageway, with cycle tracks, from near the Government clinic at San Hui to just beyond the Fu Tei Road junction.

When completed, this project, together with another shortly to be put in hand to the north of the Fu Tei Road junction, will provide an unbroken length of dual carriageway from Castle Peak to Yuen Long.

“This will be of great benefit to both these communities," a Government spokesman said.

Work is expected to start in August this year and should be completed by about April in 197^.

'While the work is in hand, the spokesman said, there will be some interference to traffic involving temporary diversions, but this will be kept to a minimum.

’ All approaches to existing properties on both sides of the new road will be reconstructed so as to maintain access to these properties," he said.

Some roads and drainage works will also be carried out east and west of the San Hui River Channel to provide access and drainage facilities for about 16 acres of industrial and residential land, forming part of the Castle Peak New Town.

/The project

Friday, June 9, 1972

- 10 -

The project has been designed by, and its construction will be supervised by, the Development and Airport Division of the Civil Engineering Office, Public Works Department.

-------0---------

TAX RELIEF FOR CHARITABLE DONATIONS

Revised List Of Charitable Institution Published

*******

A revised list of charitable institutions and trusts which have, as at May 31 this year, been recognised as being exempt from tax is published today in a Supplement to the Gazette.

It supersedes all previous lists.

Last year, the Inland Revenue Ordinance was amended to provide tax relief for persons who make donations to any charitable institution or trust of a public character which is exempt from tax under Section 88 of the Ordinance.

-------0---------

/ 11.......

Friday, June 9, 1972

- 11 -

TEMPORARY STEEL FLYOVER IN PRINCE ED'aRD ROAD To Ease Congestion During Work On Interchange *******

Work will begin on Tuesday, June 15, on the foundations for a temporary steel flyover to be erected along Prince Edward Road crossing over Waterloo Road.

The flyover, the first of its kind in Hong Kong, is being built to ease traffic congestion at ground level during the construction later this year of Hong Kong’s first multi-level interchange at the junctions of Waterloo Road with Prince Edward Road and Boundary Street.

During work on the foundations for the steel flyover, some restriction of traffic lanes along Prince Edward Road in the vicinity of the junction with Waterloo Road will be necessary.

Delays to traffic are expected, especially during rush hours.

Motorists are strongly advised to use alternative routes and to avoid, whenever possible, using this section of Prince Edward Road during this period.

The steel superstructure for the temporary flyover is presently being fabricated in Japan and shipment of the steelwork will commence towards the end of July.

It is planned to erect the steel superstructure of the flyover at the end of August, over the long weekend, and details regarding temporary road closures and traffic diversions will be announced later.

- - 0 -

Friday, June % 1972

- 12 -

SIX LOTS OF CROWN LAND

To Be Auctioned On Friday, June 30

********

Six lots of Crown land will be put up for sale by auction on Friday, June JO at 2.JO p.m. in the Lecture Room on the 8th floor of the City Hall.

Of the six lots, four are for non-industrial purposes and the other two for residential purposes.

Their particulars are as follows:

1. KUNG LOK ROAD, KWUN TONG

KWUN TONG INLAND LOT NO. 652

97,000 SQ. PT.

For PRIVATE RESIDENTAL Purpose Upset Price - 84,000,000

2. 289 - 29J SHANGHAI STREET, KOWLOON

KOWLOON INLAND LOT NO. 10120 (with existing buildings)

2,2J1 SQ. IT

For NON-INDUSTRIAL Purposes

Upset Price - 8550,000

J. 167 & 169 SHANGHAI STREET, KOWLOON

KOWLOON INLAND LOT NO. 10126 (with existing buildings) 1,535 SQ. PT.

For NON-INDUSTRIAL Purposes

Upset Price - 8j8O,OOO

4. 18 CHUN WING STREET, KOWLOON

KOWLOON INLAND LOT NO. IOT56 (with existing building)

659 SQ. FT.

For NON-INDUSTRIAL Purposes

Upset Price - 8150,000

/5...........

Friday, June 9, 1972

- 13 -

5. 26 & 28 PARKES STREET, KOWLOON KCWLOON INLAND LOT NO. 10157 (with existing buildings) 1,785 SQ. FT.

For NON-INDUSTRIAL Purposes Upset Price - 3j8O,OOO

6. BROADCAST DRIVE, KOWLOON NEW KOWLOON INLAND LOT NO. 54jO 17,710 SQ FT.

For PRIVATE RESIDENTIAL Purposes Upset Price - 32,500,000

Full particulars and Conditions of Sale may be obtained from and Sale Flans inspected at the Public Enquiry Sub-office, Central Government Offices (West Wing), Ground Floor, Hong Kong and Crown Lands & Survey Office, Kowloon Government Offices, 405, Nathan Road, 10th floor, Kowloon.

-------0_________

Friday, June 9, 1972

SPECIAL REVIEW ARTICLE

In Monthly Digest Of Statistics For April

********

The April 1972 issue of the Hong Kong Monthly Digest of Statistics published today, Friday, June 9, contains an article on Hong Kong’s manufacturing industry.

The article, with six statistical tables, presents some preliminary results of the first Census of Manufacturing Establishments of Hong Kong which covered the whole of the manufacturing sector and was held during July and August 1971•

A total of 26,149 establishments classified into 22 industry groups completed the census questionnaire.

The article analyses how employment and sales in the manufacturing sector of Hong Kong are concentrated in certain industries, in establishments of certain sizes, in certain districts and in certain types of premises and ownership.

The article shows that in 1971 the textile and wearing apparel groups dominated the manufacturing industry, accounting for 4-5.2 per cent of total employment and 47.7 per cent of total sales.

On the basis of employment size, some 80 per cent of total employment was concentrated in 20 per cent of the total establishments. In terms of sales, over 80 per cent of total sales was concentrated in 11 per cent of the total establishments.

The article also analyses the pattern of geographic concentration and types of premises in which establishments were located.

Additional information on these subjects can be obtained from the Census and Statistics Department and from the report to be published at a later date.

-------0---------

AS.......

Friday, June % 1972

- 15 -

FLOODED TAI HANG TUNG SQUATTERS

To Be Offered Public Housing

«««******

Over 1,800 squatters living in the low lying southern portion of the Tai Hang Tung Valley are now to be offered public housing.

This decision was announced today by the Resettlement Department following further engineering studies by the Public Works Department of the risk of landslide and flooding in the valley.

Nine hundred squatters living in the more northern part of the Valley were offered public housing immediately after the May rains and are already starting to move into the Shek Li Resettlement Estate.

A spokesman for the Resettlement Department said: ’’Additional protective work has been completed by the Public Works Department higher up the borrow-area, but there is still a remote possibility of further heavy landslides in the event of very heavy rains.”

Not Uncommon

"Although the rainfall on the 3rd and 20th May was very heavy, storms of this nature are not uncommon and could happen again at any time," he added.

"We are not prepared to risk danger to the inhabitants in this low-lying area which could result from servere flooding, possibly made worse by large quantities of soil being washed down," he said.

"In the light of the additional information contained in this technical report, the Resettlement Department has decided that it would be wrong to leave these families in the area."

-------0---------

Release time: 6. JO p.m.

P.R.H. 7 (REVISED) 4000091

1® GM

INFORMATION

SERVICES

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Saturday, June 10, 1972

EXPANSION FOR ABERDEEN REHABILITATION CENTRE

Financial Commitment Approved

**«**#«*

The Social Welfare Department is to expand the capacity in the mentally-retarded children’s section of its Aberdeen Rehabilitation Centre to help cope with the waiting list.

The Centre presently houses 90 mentally-retarded children requiring residential care, and 86 are on the waiting list.

The capacity in the Centre’s children’s section will be increased by 50 places, which should be sufficient to cope with the waiting list, having regard to the number of children who can be discharged in the foreseeable future.

The Finance Committee of the Legislative Council has approved the financial commitment involved in the expansion, which will involve converting some of the existing buildings into a training block, classrooms, and dormitories, together with the provision of recreational space and additional staff.

The capital cost of the conversion has been estimated at $455»OOO, with recurrent costs of $413,000 annually.

At the same time, the Finance Committee has accepted the financial commitment of setting up a ’’Place of Refuge” in the Centre as a special small unit.

/Six.........

Saturday, June 10, 1972

- 2 -

Six institutions have been designated ’’places of refuge” under the Protection of Women and Juveniles Ordinance for the care, protection, and social rehabilitation of children, particularly teenage girls.

But no facility has been provided for the intensive training and care of delinquent children who are mentally defective and aggressive.

As a result, some of these retarded children who come before the Courts, and who have an unsuitable home environment, have at present to be placed in correctional institutions.

Because of their low intelligence, they are not able to fit into the more normal training programme, and their behaviour poses a serious threat to discipline.

The Director of Social Welfare considers it more appropriate for these children to be placed in a special ’’place of refuge” where they will be cared for and trained, and it is this unit that will be set up at the ARC, to provide accommodation for 15-

The capital cost has been estimated at 855>OOO, with recurrent costs amounting to about $114,000 a year.

The two projects have been included in Category E of the Public Works Programme. They will be dealt with separately, and it is expected that the first tender will be invited at the end of July.

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Saturday, June 10, 1972

- 3 -

FIRE PREVENTION COURSES FOR INDUSTRY Nominations Invited From Trade Associations *******

The Industrial Safety Training Centre of the Labour Department, in conjunction with the Fire Services Department, is to organise a series of one-day ’’fire prevention courses” for foremen and supervisors in industry*

Letters advising industry of these facilities and inviting nominations have been issued to over .50 trade associations representing approximately 10,000 individual member firms.

The purpose of the course is to provide selected personnel from industry with an adequate knowledge of basic fire prevention and fire fighting*

This knowledge can lead to higher standards of fire prevention, thereby, reducing the risk of outbreaks of fire.

It will also enable suitably trained personnel to make a practical and immediate attack on an outbreak which could prevent a major fire from developing.

These courses are being offered free of charge and will be held on Mondays and Fridays from July 17 to September 29* These courses will be in Cantonese and each will be limited to a maximum of 25 people.

A spokesman of the Labour Department said: ’’Nominations will be registered on a first-come-first-served basis. They can be made either in-writing, or by telephone, to the Industrial Safety Training Centre, Labour Department, Kowloon Regional Office, 593 Canton Road, Kowloon, Tel. K-664270.”

-------0---------

/ 4 ....

Saturday, June 10, 1972

- 4 --

REGISTRATION TEAM TO OPERATE IN THE NEW TERRITORIES Residents Urged To Make Use Of Facilities Provided *******

The Commissioner of Registration announced today that a team from the Registration of Persons Department will conduct registrations at the Tai Po Rural Committee Office from Monday,June 12 to Friday, June 23, 1972.

Business hours will be from 9*00 a.m. to p.m. on Mondays to Fridays and from 9*00 a.m. to 1.00 p.m. on Saturdays.

The visits will enable (i) parents or guardians to register their children from six to seventeen years of age for juvenile Identity Cards (ii) young persons 17 years of age and over and holding juvenile Identity Cards, to register for adult Identity Cards.

All persons living in the area are reminded of their responsibility (i) to register themselves and their children for Identity Cards and (ii) to report to the Registration of Persons Department any changes of employments or residential addresses, nationality or marital status or any other particulars which have changed since registering for their Identity Cards•

Children between six and seventeen years of age who have Hong Kong Birth Certificates or valid travel documents need not attend for registration, but children who do not have Birth Certificates or valid travel documents, must accompany their parents or guardians when registering.

/Parents •••• •

Saturday, June 10, 1972

- 5 -

Parents or guardians must produce both their (i.e. husband and wife) Identity Cards for inspection when registering juveniles.

On registering for adult cards, young persons 17 years of • «r

age and over must surrender their juvenile Identity Cards and produce

(i) the Identity Cards of both their parents or guardians under whom

they are registered, and (ii) a Hong Kong Birth Certificate or evidence

*

of their residence in Hong Kong during the past two years.

Persons who do not possess any of the above mentioned documents must register at the Registration of Persons Branch Office in the Causeway Bay Magistracy, Electric Road, Hong Kong or at 'Canton Road Government Offices, Yaumati, Kowloon.

-------0---------

/6.........

Saturday, June 10, 1972

- 6 -

RETIREMENT OF CONTROLLER OF POSTS

*******

Mr. Mak Sik-luen, Controller of Posts, will retire from Government service tomorrow, June 11, after more than 37 years with the Post Office.

To mark the occasion, the Postmaster General, Mr. M. Addi, will present a gift to Mr. Mak on behalf of his friends and colleagues on Monday, June 12, at the Sorting Office, General Post Office, Hong Kong.

Note to Editors: You are cordially invited to send a reporter

and/or photographer to cover the presentation ceremony, which will take place at 1.55 P»o. on Monday.

--------0----------

TEMPORARY CLOSURE OF RAMBLER CHANNEL

To All Marine Traffic On June 12

*******

Rambler Channel will be closed to all marine traffic between

• • • • • • •

the hours of 8.00 a.m. and 5* *00 p.m. on Monday, June 12.

The Channel is being closed to allow the laying of a submarine cable and it will be necessary for wire ropes to run the extreme width of the Channel.

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/7.......

Saturday, June 10, 1972

- 7 -

EXPORTS OF SHIRTS TO CANADA

Announcement By Commerce And Industry Department

*******

A new system of control regarding export of shirts to Canada will be implemented following the expiry on September 30 this year of the present restraint arrangements.

Under the new system, only 77 per cent of the present level of restricted trade will be subject to export control.

In addition, there will be a quantity of shirts subject to import control in Canada, and Canadian importers will be able, within this quantity, to import from Hong Kong or elsewhere.

Announcing this today, the Commerce and Industry Department said that this arrangement was the result of discussions recently held with Canadian officials.

In 1971 Canada announced the replacement of previous export

control arrangements for shirts by several countries with a system of import•control in Canada.

But Hong Kong, as a result of an export control agreement vaIid until September 1972, was temporarily the exception to that treatment.

For the current year Canadian importers are restricted to importing certain amounts, the ’’country reserves”, from particular countries while the balance of th% Canadian global limit on shirt imports is in a free-for-all pool. Since Hong Kong shirts did not fall within this system, however, they could not be.imported against this pool.

.... /The Canadian ••••

Saturday, June 10, 1972

- 8 -

The Canadian Government, in a recent Notice to Importers, stated that strong representations had been received from several countries to the effect that they should be permitted to continue to allocate export licences to their exporters up to the limit of their respective country reserves.

The Canadian Government says it has been concluded that the requests for restoration of export control on country reserves were reasonable, subject to certain conditions.

Commenting on the new arrangementsfa Commerce and Industry Department spokesman said that while Hong Kong would only have about 77 percent of its present shirt quota guaranteed for the next quota yeart the opportunity to compete in the free-for-all pool could result in substantially increased exports.

"It is all a matter of quality and competitiveness", the spokesman said. "We do not like the idea of any kind of import controlt because it deprives our exporters of the commercial advantage of holding the quota and forces down prices. But, under th’is mixed system, at least we have a chance to increase the volume of our exports of shirts to Canadat"

The Textiles Advisory Board will be consulted shortly on control arrangements for the coming year and an early announcement will be made.


/ 9.....

Saturday, June 10, 1972

- 9 -

280,000 TICKETS OF 48TH GOVERNMENT LOTTERY

Sold Up To 12 Noon Today

A total of 280,000 tickets of the 48th Government Lottery, the second this year, have been sold up to 12 noon today (Saturday)*

The draw of the winning tickets will take place next Saturday

(June 17) at 10 a.mt at the City Hall theatre*

• • 9 v 0 * •

Release Time; 2r3>0 ptmt

P.R.H. 7 (REVISED) 4000091

INFORMATION

SERVICES

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Monday, June 12, 1972

PUBLIC OPINION SURVEY BY POST OFFICE To Gauge Needs Of Business Community ********

The Post Office announced today that a Public Opinion Survey will be conducted among the business community in the coming months.

The object of the survey is to get a better understanding of the requirements of its business customers and to collect valuable opinion for the guidance of the future development of postal services•

About 2,000 firms and organisations have been selected through random sampling, and these will be visited by university students employed by the Post Office during the vacation.

A letter together with a copy of the questionnaire will shortly be sent to the selected organizations giving advanced information.

The Post Office believes that the result derived from this survey would be beneficial to the business community as well as the Post Office and therefore would appreciate the cooperation of the firms concerned.

-------0---------

/2.........

Monday, June 12, 1972

- 2 -

SWIMMING PARTIES PLANNED FOR SUMMER Over 15,000 Children Expected To Attend **«*»«*« ■ •

More than 15,000 children from various districts and resettlement estates on both sides of the harbour will be entertained in swimming parties jointly organised by the South China Morning Post Group of Newspapers this summer.

In conjunction with the Urban Services Department, the Hongkong Life Guard Club, the Secretariat for Home Affair, the South China Morning Post Group has planned 18 swimming parties which will be held at pools and beaches.

The first swimming party will be held on Saturday, June 17 at the Kowloon Tsai Swimming Pool for 1,200 children from Wong Tai Sin, San Po Kong, and Kowloon City.

Mr. A. de 0. Sales, Chairman of the Recreation and Amenities Select Committee of the Urban Council, will attend and officiate at the opening ceremony.

A demonstration on swimming and lifesaving will be given by member of the Hongkong Life Guard Club.

The first beach party of the year will take place on Tuesday, July 18 at Repulse Bay for JOO children from Chaiwan and eastern district on the island. The Army Transport will provide trucks to take the children to the beach.

According to the Chairman of the Organising Committee, Mr. Y.S. Wong of the Urban Services Department, children entertained at the swimming parties will also be given cakes and drinks.

/At each

Monday, June 12, 1972

- 3 -

At each party, a luck draw will be organised and winner will get prizes The swimming parties jointly organised by the South China Morning

Post Group of Newspapers, now coming into the fourth year, have provided recreational activities for thousand of children in Hongkong during the summer school holiday.

-------0----------

SWIMMING POOLS TO BE CLOSED

*******

The Lei Cheng Uk swimming pool complex will be closed to the public between 8 a.m. and noon on Wednesday, June 14, to enable Ming Yin College to hold its swimming party.

At the same time, the Victoria Park swimming pool will also be closed at the following time for private swimming galas

Date Time School/Organisation

June 14 8 a.m. - noon Sacred Heart Canossian College

June 16 8 a.m. - noon Kung Lee College

June 17 8.30 a.m. -12.30 p.m. Urban Council

Secretariat for Home Affairs

The Hong Kong Life Guard Club

South China Morning Post

-------0----------

A....

Monday, June 12, 1972

- 4 -

COMPETITION ON SENSE OF ALERTNESS

Elderly In Kowloon Districts In Unusual Project

*******

The elderly aged 60 and above in Kowloon Tsai or Shek Kip Mei will take part in an unusual competition on Friday, June 16, in the Social Welfare Department’s Tai Hang Tung Community Centre when they compete for prizes on the continuing alertness of their different senses*

The competition is being sub-divided so that participants will be invited to excel, not necessarily in general awareness, but in each of these separate categories of sensitivity: - the eye, the ear, the mouth, the nose, and the hand*

The eye competition will determine awareness of sight assessment of the weight, height, or quantity of selected object. Determination of the ear’s working will require participants to distinguish between the sounds of different objects to identify them.

The taste of different foods, and their identification, will make up the mouth competition, and the same technique will be applied, with modifications, to see what extent the nose and the sense of touch are still functioning.

The competition is being organised by the Old People’s Service Team and the Kwan Lok Club, both attached to the Centre. It forms part of the Centre’s continuing series of programmes designed to associate the young with projects involving the aged as an expression of community concern.

Prizes will comprise hampers filled with food especially selected for the palates of the elderly,

/Entries ........

Monday, June 12, 1972

- 5 -

Entries are being limited to 100 because the organisers have no previous experience of the complexities of such a varied competition, and prefer to use this occasion as a guideline for the future.

But if more than 100 applications are received, the young organisers intend to hold a second test in due course, using the experience thus acquired to improve procedures.

Applications are being received at the Centre, and the competition will be held in the Assembly Hall at 7*^5 p*m* on June 16.

*******

Note to editors: You are invited to have the competition

covered.

-------0---------

UNOFFICIAL EXECUTIVE COUNCILLOR

Temporary Appointment

********

Dr. the Hon. S.Y. Chung has been appointed temporarily to the Executive Council with effect from June 9» 1972, during the absence of the Hon. Sir Kenneth Ping-fan Fung.

-------0---------

/6.........

Monday, June 12, 1972

- 6 -

CONSULTATIONS WITH SWEDISH GOVERNMENT

On Exports Of Certain Garments

********

The Director of Commerce and Industry announced today that following the conclusion of consultations in Stockholm on May 31* 1972, between the Hong Kong and Swedish Government delegations, it has been decided that the export of woven shirts of cotton to Sweden should be restrained in the period from July 1, 1972 to June 30, 1973«

In order to facilitate the issue of individual quotas, a Notice to Exporters requesting shipment returns for these items has been issued, he said.

He added that exports of woven shirts of cotton to Sweden are currently under the control of an Export Authorisation Scheme which will continue until June 14, 1972.

Agreement on other items of garment exports to Sweden have also been reached between the Hong Kong and Swedish governments.

Details of the control arrangements for exports of such items will be released to the trade within the next few days.

-------0---------

/7........

Monday, June 12, 1972

- 7 -

DRAGO?-: BOAT FESTIVAL

Gesture By Young Members Of Auxiliary Medical Service

*******

Young members of the Auxiliary Medical Service will pay a social visit to old people at the Cheshire Home in Chung Hom Kok on Dragon Boat Day, June 15, as a gesture to mark the Festival.

"It’s entirely voluntary, and deserves to be commended," says Mr. G.F. Doggett, Medical Defence Staff Officer, Auxiliary Medical Service, "because for the participants it means giving up a major portion of their holiday."

The volunteers plan to stay two hours at the Home. They have devised a programme designed to entertain the old folks with "a bit of the old and a bit of the new."

First of all, they plan to stage a Lion Dance, so pleasing the traditionalists among the residents. In the forefront will be AMS life savers, "cavorting on land for a change."

This will be followed by an Angel Dance, by AMS junior leaders. Performers will present this classical routine in costumes loaned by the Sacred Heart School in Caine Road.

The last item will reflect modern times, with the Combo Group of the AMS Band taking the limelight in an album of "hit" tunes starring "pop" singers.

There will be a distribution of light refreshment, interspersed with friendly chatter between the visitors and the elderly folk.

/"The volunteers.••••

Monday, June 12, 1972

- 8 -

"The volunteers want to bring a little sunshine into these retired and quiet lives, and I think the programme sets out to do this admirably," Mr. Doggett comments.

Note to Editors: You are invited to have the visit covered. It

takes place between 1 and J p.m. in the Cheshire Home on Thursday, June 15 •

-------0---------

MARINE DEPARTMENT CLOSED ON JUNE 15

*******

The Marine Department will be closed on Thursday, June 15, which is a general holiday, with the exception of three offices.

The Port Control Office, the Entry and Clearance Office and the Marine Licensing Office will remain open from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m.

-------0---------

/9.........

Monday, June 12, 1972

- 9 -

HEALTH EDUCATION EXHIBITION

Four-Day Show At Sheung Shui From Tomorrow

********

A Health Education Exhibition will be held by the Medical and Health Department in the Sheung Shui area for four days beginning from tomorrow.

The exhibition will be on display in the Sheung Shui Pok Ngar Shan Fong from 10 a.m. to 4.30 p.m. daily, with a one-hour interval for lunch.

Intended mainly for students in the Sheung Shui district, the exhibition will comprise 22 boards, made up of diagrams and illustrations depicting elements of health hygiene in cartoon form so as to make them easily understood by the young.

The boards will give an idea about how to protect the eyesight, what makes nutrition valuable, and how to prevent gastro-intestinal diseases*

Schools in the area have been advised about the exhibition, and arrangements have been concluded for classroom tours.

Release time: 6.j0 P«m

-----0------

P.R.H. 7 (REVISED) 4000091

WE »


INFORMATION

SERVICES

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Tuesday, June 13, 1972

PART OF HO MAN TIN HILL ROAD TO BE CLOSED

South End To Be Extended To Wylie Road

«***«**«

The Public Works Department is proposing to close to vehicular traffic the part of Ho Man Tin Hill Road between No. 19 Ho Man Tin Hill Road and Princess Margaret Road.

This section of Ho Man Tin Hill Road is at present steep and barely adequate for two lanes of traffic.

Moreover its junction with the high capacity Princess Margaret Road constitutes a serious traffic hazard, especially when the Cross Harbour Tunnel is completed and traffic on Princess Margaret Road increases substantially.

In order to provide a much more satisfactory road access for the developments in the Ho Man Tin Hill Road area, works are in hand for extending the southern end of Ho Man Tin Hill Road and bridging over the existing tracks of the Kowloon-Canton Railway to form a new junction with Wylie Road.

Works are scheduled to complete next month, by which time it is proposed to effect the permanent closure to vehicular traffic of that section of Ho Man Tin Hill Road.

An announcement has been made in the Government Gazette giving notice of an order to be made under the Streets (Alteration) Ordinance for this proposal•

The closing date for objection will be July 9, 1972 and any claims for compensation should be made by August 9> 1972.

-------O---------

/2 ........

Tuesday, June 13, 1972

- 2 -

TRAINING COURSE FOR VOLUNTEERS

SWD Project In Wong Tai Sin To Improve Understanding

**«»**•*

The Social Welfare Department’s Wong Tai Sin Community Centre will conduct a training course for young volunteers to help them for improved leadership in connection with this year’s summer programme for more than a million youngsters.

The course proper will take place at the Centre between July 11 and 13, with a practice and demonstration weekend camp on July 16, but applications must be filled and returned to Room 313A, Wong Tai Sin Community Centre, before June 23* There will be a charge of 86 an applicant.

In the latter part of June, volunteers who have been accepted for the course will be invited to participate in a series of recreational activities designed to familiarise them with leadership techniques.

The course proper in July will emphasise youth-work theories and the socio-psychology inherent in social work. The idea is to make clear to the volunteers that leadership involves more than merely a willingness to lead.

They will learn that in addition to enthusiasm, they need an insight into the workings of human relationships, so as to extract the best, the most enjoyable, and the most wholesome flrom the interaction of individuals within groups.

-------0---------

/3........

Tuesday, June 13, 1972

- 3 -

QUARTERLY SURVEY BY LABOUR DEPARTMENT Of Employment And Vacancies In Industry *******

One of the Labour Department’s regular surveys of employment and vacancies in industry now in progress is in respect of the second quarter of 1972.

Printed employment return cards were sent on June 9jto the management oil registered and recorded industrial establishments with a request that they accurately provide the information sought as at June 14, and return the card to the Labour Department on or before June 19. The cards are printed in Chinese and English.

From the information provided by these surveys, the numbers of persons employed and of vacancies in each of the main industries in Hong Kong are calculated.

The resulting statistics provide information about trends in employment over the years, both in particular industries and in general.

It is hoped that all managements which have received these cards will ensure that they are fully and accurately completed, and promptly returned in the reply-paid envelopes provided.

The co-operation of managements in responding to the last survey resulted in complete coverage for all industrial establishments employing over 200 people while for those employing 50 to 200 people, the response rate was 96 per cent. However, the overall response rate was 67 per cent.

/This could ••••••••

Tuesday, June 1J, 1972

- 4 -

This could be further improved if all establishments, particularly the smaller ones, would respond promptly to the survey.

The information provided on these cards is kept strictly confidential and is used only for the preparation of statistical information, and not for the enforcement of labour legislation.

The cards are destroyed under supervision when all the relevant information has been extracted and incorporated in statistical summaries and tables.

-------0---------

THE GOVERNOR CONGRATULATES LAWN BOWLS TEAM

For Winning Gold Medal For Hong Kong

********

His Excellency the Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, has sent a congratulatory telegram to the Hong Kong lawn bowls team on their success in winning the gold medal in the World Lawn Bowls Championship in Worthing, England.

The telegram reads: "From Governor of Hong Kong to the team,personal from Sir Murray MacLehose: ’Heartiest congratulations for winning the World Lawn Bowls Championship gold medal’.”

-------0---------

/5........

Tuesday, June 13, 1972

- 5 -

NO MAIL DELIVERY ON THURSDAY

City Hall Low Block Open As Usual

*******

There will be no delivery of nail and all post offices will be closed on Thursday, June 15, which is a general holiday.

At the City Hall, the Low Block, including the City Hall Restaurant and the Gavotte Restaurant and the Memorial Garden, will remain open as usual.

The City Hall Library and the Waterloo Road Branch Library will be closed but the Students’ Reading Room will remain open from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.

The Yau Ma Tei and Aberdeen-Pokfulam Branch Libraries will be open from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. and the Kowloon Park Students* Study Room from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m.

The City Museum and Art Gallery will be closed as is usual on all Thursdays and the Lei Cheng Uk Museum will be open from 12 noon to 7 p.m.

/6.........

Tuesday, June 13, 1972

6 -

DRAGON BOAT RACING AREAS

Small Craft Operators Asked To Look Out

«*«**«**

The Director of Marine, Mr. A. Fletcher, today advised operators, coxswains and owners of small craft to take note of areas where Dragon Boat races would be held on Thursday, June 15-

Races will be held at Chai Wan, where an area adjacent to the reclamation will be reserved and will be delineated by buoys.

Races will also be held at Yau Ma Tei typhoon shelter, where the southern entrance will be partially closed.

The approach to the eastern fairway of the shelter will be closed from the south, but access to cargo working areas may be made from the northern end.

Elsewhere, there will be races at Tai Po off the causeway at Yuen Chau Tsai,at Tsuen Wan off the main praya, at Stanley off Stanley Main Beach, and off Tung Chau Street at Sham Shui Po.

-------0----------

/7........

Tuesday, June 1J, 1972

- 7 -

SWIMMING SAFETY CAMPAIGN ’’Spectacular” On Repulse Bay Beach On Sunday *******

As part of its continuing campaign to emphasise the importance of swimming safety, the government is organising a ’’Sunday Spectacular of Entertainment” to be held on Repulse Bay Beach on Sunday morning (June 18) beginning at 10.45 a.m.

Highlights of the programme include Hong Kong’s Olympic swimmer, Ronnie Wong Man-chiu jumping from a helicopter into the water at Repulse Bay and then swimming ashore to demonstrate the freestyle; a helicopter rescue of a boy who gets into difficulties; and a demonstration of safety in small boats by the Hong Kong Sea Cadet Corps.

As the grand finale two of HK-TVB*s most popular stars, Miss Au Kar-wai and Mr. Ho Sou-sun, both good swimmers, will take part in a sketch which ends with them being rescued by Urban Services life-guards.

As an added attraction, one of Hong Kong’s top pop groups, the Loosers, will be on hand to get the show under way playing the latest pop music sounds.

The Royal Navy’s mine-hunter, HMS Beachampton, will also be anchored offshore to provide additional rescue facilities, and will take the sea cadets to the beach.

Although entertainment will be the main feature of the programme, the underlying lesson is the necessity for sensible safety precautions when swimming.

/Ronnie Wong .......•

Tuesday, June 13, 1972

- 8 -

Ronnie Wong will assist with the distribution of special swimming safety leaflets which contain useful points on how to avoid accidents in the water.

The main aims of this year’s campaign are to encourage swimmers to use guarded beaches and to observe three basic rules if they get into difficulties -don’t panic, float on their back or tread water, and wave one arm to attract the attention of the life guards.

*******

Note to editors: You are welcome to send a reporter and/or

photographer to cover the event, which will be held in the central part of the beach. If the weather is unfavourable, you are advised to contact the G.I.S. duty officer to see if the programme will go ahead as planned.

-------0---------

Release Time: 7*30 p.m.

.■p.R.H. 7 (REVISED)

4000001

INFORMATION

SERVICES

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Wednesday, June 14, 1972

PIPERS HILL AND TAI WOR PING INTERCHANGES Part Of Scheme To Link Up East And West Kowloon *«**««**

Work is expected to start next month on a multi-million-dollar road project which forms part of a scheme to provide a high quality highway across the top of the Kowloon peninsula between the industrial areas in the east and west.

The project consists of two interchanges at Pipers Hill and Tai Wor Ping and the design allows for an expected increase in traffic generated in Sha Tin.

The Pipers Hill interchange will have two single-lane flyovers each 18 feet wide, to be built at the junction of Tai Po Road with Ching Cheung Road.

The first flyover is to enable northbound traffic on Tai Po Road and Lung Cheung Road to cross the junction. A footway is to be provided on it to enable pedestrians to cross the main route in safety.

The second flyover, over the first one, will enable westbound traffic from the north to cross the junction.

All other traffic movements will be via ground-level slip roads

/When

Wednesday, June 14, 1972

- 2 -

When completed in 20 months, the Pipers Hill interchange will permit uninterrupted traffic flow on the main route at the Lung Cheung Road/Ching Cheung Road junction.

Work on the Tai Wor Ping interchange is expected to start in

September. It will include the re-alignment and regrading of the existing

Lung Cheung Road and Tai Po Road.

The entire road project is expected to be completed in June 1974.

Note to Editors: Copies of a photograph showing the model of the Pipers Hill interchange are distributed separately in the G.I.S. press boxes this evening.

-------0---------

QUARANTINE RESTRICTIONS

********

The Port Health Authorities announced today that quarantine restrictions have been imposed against arrivals from Quetta (airport), Pakistan, on account of smallpox.

Meanwhile, quarantine restrictions imposed against arrivals from

Kabul (airport), Afghanistan, on account of smallpox have been removed.

-------0---------

/3.........

Wednesday, June 14, 1972

- 3 -

LABOUR RELATIONS SERVICE HELPED Settle 245 Labour Problems In May *******

The Labour Relations Service of the Labour Department helped employers and employees settle 245 labour problems in May.

As a result of agreement reached, 599 employees received a total of $375,340.

Of this $255,709 was paid by employers as outstanding wages, payment in lieu of notice, statutory holiday pay and bonuses of a contractual nature under the Employment Ordinance and the Industrial Employment (Holidays with Pay and Sickness Allowance) Ordinance respectively.

The remaining $119,631 was paid, apart from the legal entitlements, as severance pay and other ex gratia payments to the employees. Fresh nominal claims made by employees in the same month amounted to $1,008,741.

Officers of various district offices of the Labour Relations Service also handled 1,498 consultations and enquiries about labour laws, industrial relations and personnel management. They visited eight establishments to help employers introduce joint consultative machinery to strengthen communication between labour and management.

-------0---------

A..........

Wednesday, June 1^, 1972

NEW TYPE OF OIL BOOMS

For Fight Against Pollution

***4t**ifr*

The Marine Department maintains a stock of 500 feet of a new type of oil booms to protect vital areas like typhoon shelters, beaches and water fronts, and to fight oil leakages from ships.

Oil booms are floating barriers used to confine oil slicks to a particular area, so that a team can move in with emulsifiers or other equipment to tackle the pollution.

A spokesman for the Marine Department said that the oil booms, bought in April last year, belonged to one of the latest models used in combatting oil pollution.

Made of black rubber, these oil booms are three feet in height. When floating on water, about one foot of the boom is visible, with the rest submerged under water.

Owing to their weight, at least two launches and 20 men are required in setting up these booms. They weigh 670 pounds per 100 feet*

These booms can be affected by choppy seas and strong currents, when the oil may escape confinement by the movement of the water*

"In view of their limitations, it is intended that only a limited supply of oil booms will be kept for use in emergencies," the spokesman said.

- - 0 - -

Wednesday, June 14, 1972

- 5 -

GOVERNOR TO ATTEND C.A.S. DINNER

********

His Excellency the Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, will be the principal guest at a dinner to be given by officers of the Civil Aid Services on Friday (June 16) evening.

The dinner will be held at the Royal Hong Kong Jockey Club Restaurant in Happy Valley.

On arrival, Sir Murray will be met by the C.A.S. Commissioner, Dr. the Hon. P.C. Woo, and the Acting Chief Staff Officer, Mr. Chan Chui>-ying.

The Police Silver Band will be playing during the dinner.

Note to Editors: You are invited to have the dinner covered. It will be held at the restaurant on the 5th floor of the Royal Hong Kong Jockey Club, Happy Valley and will start at 8.JO p.m. The Governor is expected to arrive at 8.15 p.m.

A G.I.S. officer will be on hand to give assistance.

-------0---------

/6.........

Wednesday, June 14, 1972

- 6

EXHIBITIONS AT CITY MUSEUM AND ART GALLERY

***«*«*«*

Two exhibitions are now being held at the City Museum and Art Gallery.

One of these is the "Sketches of Hong Kong". It consists of 28 drawings by Charles D. Hoeppner, an American artist who lived in Hong Kong four years ago.

The drawings vividly portray Hong Kong, its buildings, people, streets, beaches, and the countryside.

The exhibition will remain on view till July 5«

The other exhibition is the "Art Now Hong Kong" which has recently returned to Hong Kong after a tour of four cities in the United Kingdom.

It consists of 64 paintings, prints, and sculpture selected from the City Museum’s permanent collection.

The exhibition which was originally scheduled to close on June 18, is now extended until July 2.

The City Museum’s film programme of the month features a JO-minute colour film entitled "Why Man Creates", showing man’s progress from the primitive state to high sophistication through art. The director of the film. Js Saul Bass, a well-known American designer.

Two shows will be held in the Lecture Room North on Tuesday, June 20,at 3 p.m. and Friday, June 30, at 6 p.m.

Free tickets will be available at the Museum’s reception counter one hour before each show.

0 - -

Wednesday, June 14, 1972

- 7 -

RICE IMPORT QUOTA

The Commerce and Industry Department announced today that the rice import for the third quarter of 1972 had been provisionally fixed at 85,800 metric tons (i.e. 97^ per cent of the basic quota of 881000 metric tons)*

A spokesman of the Department said that rice consumption is usually lower them average in the third quarter of the year because of the warm weather. The slight reduction in the quota takes account of these circumstances.

As usual, the Department will keep development in the rice trade under close review, and may issue a supplementary quota during the quarter should circumstances so warrant, the sopokesman said.

In the five months of this year, Hong Kong imported approximately 156,200 metric tons of rice. Of this amount, Thailand supplied 66 per cent and China 27 per cent. The remainder came mainly from Australia and Burma.

-------0-------

/8 ........

Wednesday, June 14, 1972

- 8 -

FACT SHEET ON FIRE SERVICES

*******

Hong Kong’s Fire Services Department is “the second largest in the Commonwealth and one of the best equipped."

This is stated in a new fact sheet on the Fire Services.

It says that "in 1868, after a series of disastrous fires, Hong Kong’s first fire brigade was formed under the command of a police magistrate. It was an integral part of the police force, with a strength of 66."

The fact sheet is the latest in a series produced by the Government Information Services to offer "instant information" on different aspects of Hong Kong.

Together with the new fact sheet, revised copies of two others, "Hong Kong’s Medical & Health Services" and "Hong Kong’s Preventive Service" have also been published.

Each of these is designed to provide essential facts on a particular subject, and is tailored to the requirements of businessmen, journalists and research workers from abroad who require more specific information but have no time to search for it in more comprehensive works of reference.

The fact sheets are produced in both English and Chinese and, wherever necessary, revised on an annual basis to keep them up-to-datet

• • •

Note to editors: Copies of the fact sheets are distributed

separately in the G.I.S. press boxes this evening.

0 -

/9

Wednesday, June 14, 1972

- 9 -

EMPLOYMENT OF THE DISABLED

32 Found Jobs In May By Placement Unit «*«*«**

Thirty-two disabled were found various jobs during May by the Social Welfare Department’s Liaison and Placement Unit.

Of the total, 12 were crippled, seven blind, six recovered mental patients, three retarded, three deaf, and one formerly seriously ill.

Most have been found suitable work in industry — as sewers, packers, apprentices, messengers, labourers, and kitchen helpers. Two blind were engaged as telephone operators, one by the Agriculture and Fisheries Department, and the other by the Haven of Hope Sanatorium.

Commenting on the May figures, Mr. Paul Leung, Liaison and Placement Officer, says more industrialists ’’have become aware of the ability of trained disabled to contribute successfully to the manning of their factories.”

But he regrets it is "still difficult to place the more severely disabled, for example, wheelchair cases, largely due to problems such as transportation, factory design, and lack of space for wheelchair movement.”

Mr. Leung describes the disabled who cannot use their legs because of paralysis as "intelligent people whose other faculties are in no way hampered by their inability to move without assistance."

He feels the industrial community should make an effort to overcome problems related to mobility, because "wheelchair cases make good workers, with an enormous productivity potential. They are eager to contribute reciprocally to the benefit of people who benefit them." --------------------------------0----------

/ 10 ....

Wednesday, June 14, 1972

- 10 -

DEVELOPMENT OF COUNTRYSIDE FOR RECREATION PURPOSES Government Accepts Plans Large Stretches Of Countryside To Be Opened Up *******

Large stretches of countryside in the New Territories and on Hong Kong Island are to be opened up and developed for recreational purposes.

This is one of the recommendations contained in the Five-Year Recreational Development Programmes which Government has accepted in principle.

Announcing this today (Wednesday), a Government spokesman said that facilities provided under these two programmes will add considerably to the recreational opportunities of large numbers of people and represent a practical use of our land resources.

It is estimated that the cost of the two programmes will be approximately $53 million in capital expenditure and 35 million per year in recurrent expenditure when they are fully implemented.

Nev/ Territories

The main feature of the New Territories Five-Year Recreational Development Programme is to develop a number of Country Parks.

These parks will be sited in places easily accessible from urban areas and provided with various facilities for the use of large numbers of visitors.

Initially, four Country Parks, each with an area of two square miles, will be set up at Shing Mun, Lion Rock, Pak Sha Wan, and Pak Fu Tin. In each of them the following will be provided

/(a) surfaced .........

Wednesday, June 14, 1972

11 -

(a) surfaced tracks for service vehicles and fire engines;

(b) surfaced and unsurfaced foot tracks;

(c) barbecue pits, shelters, seats, benches and tables;

(d) pavilions with toilet facilities;

(e) refuse bins;

(f) water supplies; and

(g) a park management centre with appropriate staff*

Picnic places, barbecue pits, toilets, etc* will also be provided

in the 40 square miles recreational area surrounding the Country Parks*

The Agriculture and Fisheries Department will be responsible for managing

the Country Parks and the recreational areas.

Staff members of the Department will keep these places clean and

take steps to prevent fire, soil erosion, littering, destruction of vegetation

and pollution of water catchments.

Hong Kong Island

The Hong Kong Island Five-Year Recreational Development Programme

adopts a similar approach to that of the New Territories Programme, It consists of three main elements

(a) a system of tracks and footpaths based on the existing network;

(b) picnic spots in the more popular and accessible areas at Quarry Bay, Tai Tam, Shek 0 Road, Birch Hill, Pokfulam, Mount Davis and Wong Nei Chung, They will be provided with barbecue pits, tables and benches, toilets, pavilions and litter bins; and

(c) two management centres initially*

/These

Wednesday, June 14, 1972

- 12 -

These two development programmes have been submitted, respectively, by the District Commissioner, New Territories and the Director of Public Works, and represent the first recommendations of the New Territories and Hong Kong Island Advisory Committees for Recreational Development and Nature Conservation.

-------0---------

EXPORT OF RESTRAINED TEXTILES TO SWEDEN

********

The Director of Commerce and Industry today issued a Notice to Exporters on the export oi res ciu-aieo. textiles to Sweden.

i

The Notice covers (a) liberalisation of export of certain garments

* •

to Sweden, (b) 1972-73 control arrangements to June 30, 1973, and (c) introduction of export authorisation scheme.

Trade associations and companies on the Commerce and Industry Department's mailing list for Notice to Exporters (Series 6) will receive copies of the notice shortly.

People who wish to seek advance notice of its contents are invited to contact the following officers of the Department:

Mr. H.T.W. Lau - Assistant Trade Officer

Tel. No. H-229777

Mr. A.R. Swinton * Industry Assistant

Tel. No. H-247315

-------0---------

Release time: 6.30 p»m.

P.R.H. 7 (REVISED) 4000091

INFORMATION

SERVICES

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN


Friday, June 16, 1972

TELEVISION IN THE SEVENTIES

Television Authority Speaks On Future Of Television In Hong Kong *******

Hong Kong television viewers can expect even better programmes and a wider choice of channels within the next two or three years.

Mr. Nigel Watt, the Television Authority, made this forecast when he addressed the luncheon meeting of the Rotary Club of Kowloon, North, in the Hong Kong Hotel today (Friday).

Speaking on ,lTelevision in the Seventies,” he said families in the future would have a choice of five television channels reaching into their homes by wireless transmission — three Chinese and two English programmes.

Mr. Watt said a working party comprising the Television Advisory Board and other Government officers last year completed a thorough review of broadcasting policy to determine whether there was room for further expansion and whether in fact more expansion was desirable.

Three stations with five channels between them was considered a maximum in the field of entertainment television at this stage. Also it was not thought from the financial point of view that any further television channels beyond this number could be supported at the present time.

Mr. Watt recalled that a survey of the available frequencies revealed it was just possible to establish in theory a maximum of six channels of television in one language or the other.

”It was felt that one new licence, to cover one additional programme service in Chinese and one in English was essential,” Mr. Watt said. ,fThe reason behind this decision was that it was considered necessary to have competition for wireless television in both languages if high programme standards were to be maintained.”

/It was.....

Friday, June 16, 1972

- 2 -

It was believed, he added, that two channels of English programmes, which cater to smaller audiences, was the maximum competition which Hong Kong could support commercially now or in the future, if the licensees were to maintain their economic viability.

The Chinese language programmes, because of the larger audiences, could however support more competition and the committee calculated that by 1975 a third single channel offering Chinese programmes only would be economically viable within the context of the available revenues from commercial advertising.

Mr. Watt said: ,rHong Kong is enjoying a fast rising standard of living and more and more people are buying television sets. As television continues to expand, manufacturers and promoters must of necessity increase their advertising budgets if they are not to lose customers to competitors who do use television as a medium for promoting their products or services.”

Restriction On Advertising Time

Speaking of the restriction on advertising time on wireless television, Mr. Watt said it had been accepted that when two or more wireless stations are on the air the present restriction of seven minutes in the hour would be increased to ten minutes, but without increasing the overall ten per cent standard. This would provide more advertising time at peak viewing hours and should help the effective distribution of advertising revenues between the three stations.

He said it was Government’s policy that as television was primarily a medium of entertainment it was preferable to allow commercial interests to provide this entertainment under the close supervision and control of a Television Authority rather than to commit public funds for the establishment of a Government television station but to use the money in social services and housing.

It was recognised that television, as a means of public information, was of the utmost importance. Hong Kong was unique in that while it did not have a non-commercial or government television station it had laid down statutory requirements on television stations to provide air time for public service broadcasts.

/At present.•••

Friday, June 16, 1972

- 5-

At present TVB is required to provide Government with up to one hour of transmission time per day up to a maximum of seven hours per week. In addition, it is also required to provide four hours for the broadcasting of schools television. These requirements would apply to each licensee in the future except that public service programmes may be varied up to one and a half hours per day within the seven-hour weekly maximum which is unchanged. Spread between three stations this will give a total of 15 hours of television per day for schools and public service broadcasts.

Mr* Watt then went on to explain the work and functions of the Television Authority. Television stations, he said, must comply with the statutory requirements of the Television Ordinance and the three Codes of Practice covering programme, advertising and technical standards•

He said television exerted a very powerful influence on the community, and in Hong Kong as a medium for entertainment, information and education it reached a great number of persons of all ages in the privacy of their homes. Great care therefore must be exercised in the selection of programmes by the television stations and to assist them certain rules had been laid down as broad guidelines.

Comprehensive Rules

’’There are fairly comprehensive rules about violence, especially as it relates to children and young people. Conflict is a major element in drama but violence for its own sake is not permitted simply because it attracts or secures the attention of certain types of audiences. There are also rules relating to religious rites, marriage, drug addiction — to mention only a few.”

Mr. Watt said there were strict rules relating to medical advertisements and to advertisements directed towards children or in which children appear. All advertisements intended for television, he pointed out, were subject to censorship by the Panel of Film Censors.

What will the coming changes mean for the Hong Kong viewer? Firstly, with a marked increase in the choice of programmes freely available it was almost certain that the number of viewers would increase, particularly with the cost of television sets getting cheaper. Secondly, colour television which was a dream only a few years ago, is now a reality and with prices falling still further more colour television will be within the reach of many more people.

/Mr. Watt....

Friday, June 16, 1972

- 4 -

Mr. Watt said: ”With controlled competition such as envisaged by the new policy I think we can only see an improvement in the programmes offered as stations vie with each other to capture the maximum audience. So the Hong Kong viewer is going to have not only more programmes but possibly even better ones to choose from in the years ahead.”

Note to Editors: Copies of the full text of Mr. Watt’s speech are distributed separately in the G.I.S. press boxes this evening.

-------0 --------

Friday, June 16, 1972

- 5 -

MEDICAL EXAMINATIONS FOR 250 AGED

Three Organisations Sponsor Wong Tai Sin Project

*******

Two hundred and fifty elderly folk, all over 60 and one 98, will take part in a health competition in Our Lady of Maryknoll Hospital on June 17 and 24, between l.JO and 5 p.m.

The competition is in the form of medical examinations of the contestants to test their blood pressure, heart, lungs, teeth, ears, eyes, nose, and general physical strength.

Health certificates will be issued after the examinations for those who ’’qualify,” supplemented with follow-up check-ups.

The competition is being sponsored by the Social Welfare Department’s Wong Tai Sin Cormnunity Centre, with the support and co-operation of the Tsz Wan Shan Kaifong Association and Our Lady of Maryknoll Hospital.

It forms part of the Wong Tai Sin District Committee on Welfare Services’ programme for the aged. Volunteers attending the examinations to help out will come from the Wong Tai Sin Community Centre’s Old People Service Team.

Mr. Choi Jun, President of the Committee on Welfare Services for the Aged, has donated $1,500 towards expenses.

Note to Editors: yOu are invited to have the examinations covered.

-------0---------

/ 6 ....

Friday, June 16, 1972

- 6 -

ANTI-LITTER AMENDMENT BILL

Provision For Stringent New Regulations

********

An amending bill giving authority for stringent new anti-litter regulations to be made in readiness for the ”Keep Hong Kong Clean” Campaign will be introduced into the Legislative Council shortly.

The Public Health and Urban Services (Amendment) (No. 2) Bill, 1972, published in today’s Government Gazette for general information, proposes to amend the principal ordinance.

This would enable regulations to be made for the control of litter, the cleansing of promises and other places, and the prevention of nuisances or danger to health or person arising from refuse or other matter anywhere in Hong Kong.

It also provides for control over the employment of children in the removal or disposal of refuse.

Subject to the bill being passed into law, the Urban Council will be empowered to strengthen its anti-litter by-laws, and similar regulations for the New Territories will be made.

The bill seeks to amend the principal ordinance to empower the authorities to serve a notice requiring the removal of refuse and cleaning of the area in which refuse is found.

This notice may be served on the owner of the refuse, the person responsible for putting it there or the occupier of the place where it is found.

/If the

Friday, June 16, 1972

- 7 -

If the person on whom the notice is served fails to comply with it, he would be guilty of an offence, and the authorities may remove the refuse and dispose of it.

A maximum fine of Si,000 is prescribed and a fine of S50 for each day the offence continues.

The recipient of the notice may also be ordered by the court to pay the expenses incurred by the authorities in removing and destroying or disposing of the refuse, or cleaning the area where it was found.

Cleansing Operations

Another amendment to the principal ordinance would permit a written notice to be attached to any article obstructing cleansing operations, requiring its removal in not less than 24 hours.

If this notice is not complied with, or if the obstruction recurs within the period specified in the notice, the article can be carried away by the authorities and detained without further notice.

A further amendment to the principal ordinance would empower an authorised public officer to require any person alleged to have committed an offence against the anti-litter regulations to give his correct name and address and produce evidence of these particulars. The public officer would have the power to arrest any person failing to do ao.

The authorities would also be empowered, if they think fit, to publish in any newspaper the details of any conviction for an offence against the regulations.

0 - -

Friday, June 16, 1972

- 8 -

RESUMPTION OF PROPERTIES FOR URBAN RENEWAL PILOT SCHEME

*******

The ninth batch of resumption notices on land required for the implementation of the Urban Renewal Pilot Scheme on Hong Kong Island were served today. The notices affected seven tenanted pre-war buildings at Nos. 6, 7» 10, 11 and 12 Fat Hing Street.

A detailed plan of the lots affected by the resumption notices is on display at the Western District Office at 2O5A Des Voeux Road West, the Crown Lands & Survey Office, 17th floor, Murray Building, and at the Western District Kai Fong Association premises at Possession Point.

A Compensation Board will be appointed under Section 6 of the Crown Lands Resumption Ordinance to determine the amount of compensation to be paid for all interests in the land resumed.

As was the case when properties were previously gazetted for resumption for Urban Renewal, the domestic occupants of the buildings will be offered some form of public housing according to suitability and availability when they are required to move.

Friday, June 16, 1972

- 9 -

POKFULAM ROAD TO BE WIDENED

To Ease Traffic Flow To Wah Fu Estate And Aberdeen

*«*»*«**

Plans on improving Pokfulam Road, which carries increasing traffic due to the rapid development of the Aberdeen area and Wah Fu Estate, are being realised.

Certain sections of the road have been widened and it is intended to continue the improvement in stages.

The next stage is aimed at improving traffic on the section of the road between its junction with Mount Davis Road and Queen Mary Hospital•

The widened Pokfulam Road will provide a four-lane carriageway with footways on both sides.

The proposed works will involve alterations to the alignment, width and levels of the existing Pokfulam Road, and an announcement in the Government Gazette giving notice of an order to be made under the Streets (Alteration) Ordinance for this project is made today.

The closing date for objections will be July 16, 1972 and any claims for compensation should be made by August 16, 1972.

-------0---------

AO...........

Friday, June 16, 1972

- 10 -

NURSES REGISTRATION ORDINANCE

Amending Bill Takes Account Of New Situation

«**«***«

A Bill amending the Nurses Registration Ordinance so as to remove the word ’’Assistant’* from the term ”Enrolled Assistant Nurse” was published in the Gazette today for public information.

The Bill also seeks to legalise the decision reached by the

Government recently to extend until December JI, 1972, the time limit during which nurses who have already completed a course of training acceptable to the Nursing Board, and who have been engaged in bona fide duties, may be enrolled without an examination.

It will be recalled that a Working Party set up in 19$5 had recommended that a new grade of nurse he introduced. At the time the Nurses Registration Ordinance was enacted in 1970, provision was made for the enrolment of this type of nurse by June 1, 1972, without an examination.

As the latter date neared a few weeks ago, it became apparent from complaints received from these nurses that they had been under certain misapprehensions, and so, to give time for these to be dispelled, it was considered desirable to extend the time limit.

Commenting on the amendments, Mr. J. FLinn, Secretary to the Nursing Board, said the extension of seven months for registration without an examination meant the Government ’’recognised the need to give these nurses more time.”

/But........

Friday, June 16, 1972

- 11 -

But this meant having to introduce an amendment to the principal ordinance, and accordingly the opportunity was taken also to revise the term ’’Enrolled Assistant Nurse” so as to drop the word ’’Assistant” — which had also occasioned some misunderstanding.

’•These changes make a considerable difference to the situation, because they go a long way to meet the objections that have been raised,” Mr. ELinn said.

GOVERNOR EXPRESSES SYMPATHY

For Families Of Those Killed In Air Crashes

*******

The Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, in a message from Government House today said that he was greatly distressed to learn of the two air disasters which took place on June and 15 and of the suffering they have caused in Hong Kong.

His deepest sympathy and that of Lady MacLehose went out to the families of those who had been bereaved as a result of these tragic accidents.

-------0---------

/12.........

Friday, June 16, 1972

- 12 -

COX’S ROAD TO BE RECONSTRUCTED

«•***»*

Work is to begin in August this year on the reconstruction of 950 feet of carriageway in Cox’s Road, Tsim Sha Tsui.

The carriageway will be rebuilt in eight-inch reinforced concrete slab. Concrete footpath will also be provided on each side*

In addition, opportunity will be taken to enlarge the existing stormwater drain and sewer.

While work is in progress, traffic in Cox’s Road will be routed from two-way to one-way northbound.

Work is expected to take about four months to complete.

-------0---------

HONG KONG GOVERNMENT ACCOUNTS FOR APRIL, 1972

**«*«»«

The Hong Kong Government accounts for the month of April 1972 show a surplus of 811.86 million, compared with a surplus of 845.69 million in April last year.

Total revenue for the month at 8261.18 million was 825*95 million more than in April 1971- Expenditure amounted to 8249.52 million, an increase of 857-78 million over the same month last year.

-------0---------

Release Time: 6.45 p.m,

P.R. 33

HONG KONG GOVERNMENT

NFORMATION

SERVICES

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

SUPPLEMENT

Friday, June 16, 1972 TELEVISION IN THE SEVENTIES

Full Text Of Speech By Mr. Watt, Television Authority *******

The following is the full text of the speech on television in the Seventies" by Mr, N.J.V, Watt# Television Authority, to the Rotary Club of Kowloon, North, in the Hong Kong Hotel today (Friday): Gentlemen,

Before the end of this decade, indeed within the next two or three years, you and your families will have a choice of five television channels coming into your homes by wireless transmission. There will be three Chinese and two English programmes instead of the present one Chinese and one English wireless television channel.

What has brought about this change?

Why five channels? Why not four or six or even ten?

What is this going to mean for Hong Kong viewers?

These are some of the questions that I will attempt to answer in the time available to me.

Although I have entitled my talk “Television in the Seventies" I think it is necessary to sketch in for you some of the history of the development of television in Hong Kong. As far back as 1955 Rediffusion had been experimenting with wired television and in 1957 was granted an exclusive franchise for the diffusion of television by wire. Interest had also been shown at this time by Rediffusion and others in the establishment of wireless television but it was considered by many at that time that it was not technically possible due to the topographical features of the Colony.

However by 19&3 interest was again shown in the operation of wireless television services and there had been in the meantime technological advances which made such a proposition more feasible.

/It was also....

z

♦ Friday, June 16, 1972 - 2 -

It was also considered that competition for Rediffusion — at that time the sole television operator — was desirable and in 1965 one licence for a wireless television station was offered by public tender. Such was the interest in this new station that eight tenders were received and in 19&7 the licence was awarded to Television Broadcasts Ltd. who commenced broadcasting on a limited scale from the main transmitter at Temple Hill in November of that year.

Television Broadcasts’ licence granted them a monopoly of wireless television for a period of five years and in that time there had been a tremendous increase in the interest shown in television both by the viewing public and by advertisers.

Since 19$7 TVB has activated nine subsidiary transmitters thereby enabling its programmes to be received in most of the more populous areas. One year after TVB started broadcasting,’ it was estimated that there were a total of 107,000 sets capable of receiving wireless television. By the end of 1971 this figure had risen to over 500,000 and latest estimates put the figure at close on 600,000 of which it is thought that over 13,000 are capable of receiving colour transmissions. This means that approximately 95*7 per cent of the population over 12 years of age are able to view wireless television in their homes.

Medium For Advertising

At the same time television, as a medium for advertising, had been growing more effective as evidenced by the rise in the cost of advertising on wireless television. When broadcasting commenced in 19^7 the cost of 30 seconds of advertising at prime time on the Jade Channel was #36O* The current rate for the same 30 second time slot is }1,99O.

So you can see that, in step with television growing in popularity as a means of entertainment, it has at the same time become a widely accepted medium for commercial advertising which is fortunate since without such support the station could not remain viable. The exclusive part of TVB’s licence, as I said, expires in November this year. Rediffusion’s 15-year wired T.V. franchise is also due to expire in April of next year. A thorough review of broadcasting policy in general was therefore necessary to determine whether there was room for further expansion and whether in fact more expansion was desirable.

/It seemed...

Friday, June 16, 1972

- 3 -

It seemed likely from the outset that wireless television, because of its ability to reach a greater proportion of the population by broadcast means than was possible by subscription television, would eventually outstrip its wired competitor in terms of numbers of viewers# The only question was how long this growth would take. In fact it has happened very quickly indeed. Now the sole wireless T.V. operator, introduced initially as competitor to wired television, is in need of competition itself from other wireless television licensees.

In December 1970 a working party comprising the Television Advisory Board and other Government officers was set up to consider these and other related problems. It completed its report nine months later having held over 40 meetings covering all aspects of television and sound broadcasting and including some sessions at which the views of the existing licensees were heard.

Number Of Channels

There arose the question of how many channels were desirable. Obviously the number of channels is limited by technical factors such as the limited number of frequencies available for allocation and the fact that each service requires one main transmitter with ten or more subsidiary transmitters operating on different frequencies to enable the service to reach all parts of the Colony. A survey of the available frequencies revealed that it was just possible to establish in theory a maximum of six channels of television in one language or the other. How were these service frequencies to be used? Firstly, it was felt that one new licence, to cover one additional programme service in Chinese and one in English was essential. The reason behind this decision was that it was considered necessary to have competition for wireless television in both languages if high programme standards were to be maintained. The English language programmes cater to smellier audiences than the Chinese programmes and it was considered that two channels of English programmes was the maximum competition which Hong Kong could support commercially now or in the future — if the licensees were to maintain their economic viability. The Chinese language programmes, because of the larger audiences, could however support more competition and the committee calculated that by 1975 a third single channel offering Chinese programmes only would be economically viable within the context of the available revenues from commercial advertising. Hong Kong is enjoying a fast rising standard

/of living....

Friday, June 16, 1972

- 4 -

of living and more and more people are buying television sets. As television continues to expand, manufacturers and promoters must of necessity increase their advertising budgets if they are not to lose customers to competitors who do use television as a medium for promoting their products or services. At present advertising time on wireless television is restricted to seven minutes per hour subject to an overall maximum of ten per cent of the total transmission time. Rediffusion’s wired service, on the other hand, is not controlled so rigidly by the terms of its licence as is HK-TVB and the station may insert any amount of advertising material in any one hour provided it does not exceed the ten per cent overall maximum. In practice Rediffusion has often broadcast over ten minutes of advertising per hour and on occasions hns had as much as 16 or 17 minutes in the hour, without complaint from the public. It has been accepted therefore that when there are two or more wireless television stations on the air the present restriction of seven minutes in the hour will be increased to ten minutes (without increasing the overall ten per cent standard). This will provide more advertising time at peak viewing hours and should help the effective distribution of advertising revenues between the three stations.

Special Services Additionally, Government has stated that the applicants for this third licence may if they wish offer special services such as subscription television (although the tender will not be conditional on this). These special services will be considered concurrently with other tenders received.

A service which in part provides subscription television free of advertising would not be operating in full competition for total advertising with the two other licensees since the station would not be wholly dependent on commercial advertising for its revenue. It could however provide a welcome medium for home studies, vocational training or other desirable programmes for minority audiences.

It is not considered from the financial point of view that any further television channels can be supported at the present time.

In 1965 Government’s policy was that as television is primarily a medium of entertainment it was preferable to allow commercial interests to provide this entertainment under the close supervision and control of a Television Authority rather than to commit public funds in the order of S20 million per year (funds which could be used to greater advantage in other fields of social services and housing) for the establishment of a Government television station.

/however.••••

Friday, June 16, 1972

- 5 -

However, it is recognised that television, as a means of public information, is of the utmost importance. Hong Kong is therefore unique in that while it does not have a non-commercial or Government television station it does lay down statutory requirements on the television stations to provide air time for public service broadcasts.

At present TVB is required to provide Government with up to one hour of transmission time per day (seven hours per week) for public service programmes produced by Government’s Programme Unit, Radio Hong Kong Television, and in addition it also is required to provide four hours for the broadcasting of schools television. The recommendations of the working party which have been accepted were that these requirements will apply to each licensee in the future except that public service programmes may be extended up to one and a half hours per day within these limits. This will allow Government a total of approximately 15 hours of television per day on three stations, somewhat more transmission time than one might normally expect from a Government television station.

Technical Developments

The sixth channel has therefore been reserved to meet possible future technical developments and Hong Kong’s future needs, not necessarily in the field of television. In any event three stations with five channels between them is considered the maximum in the field of entertainment television at this stage and in the foreseeable future.

It could be argued that the third channel will have some commercial advantage over the other two in that it will not have to support the costs of an English service with an inevitably poor commercial return. The apparent advantage, will, I think, to a very large extent be outweighed by the fact that the single service station will still be required to provide to Government the same amount of air time for educational and public service programmes (five hours per day on its only channel) which the other operators will, in many cases, be able to screen on their less productive English channels.

I referred earlier to the close supervision and control of the Television Authority. It might be useful here to give you some idea of what this control entails. As Television Authority I am responsible for the administration of the Television Ordinance and for compliance by licensees with the terms of the Ordinance, the

/subsidiary •••••

Friday, June 16, 1972

- 6 -

subsidiary legislation and the three Codes of Practice. To assist me I have a Television Advisory Board, of which I am the Chairman, comprising two public officers and two, soon to be three, members of the public. The Television Advisory Board is responsible for advising me in the exercise of my functions, submitting proposals and recommendations to the Governor in Council with regard to technical, programme and advertising standards and also with respect to the renewal or revocation of licences. In addition the Board conducts inquiries into any matters referred to it by the Governor in Council, or by myself, and publishes reports on the progress of television.

Television Secretariat

In addition to the Television Advisory Board I have within the Information Services Department a small Television Secretariat comprising a secretary and a team of monitors. The monitors are responsible for viewing all programmes, in particular those programmes which are transmitted live, with a view to ensuring that they comply with the statutory requirements of the Ordinance and the Codes of Practice. Daily reports from the monitors are circulated to members of the Television Advisory Board and any infringements are brought to the attention of the company. All filmed material to be shown on television is subject to censorship by the Panel of Film Censors.

I don’t know whether any of you here are familiar with the Codes of Practice published by me under the Television Ordinance. TheYe are in fact three codes, the first covering programme standards, the second dealing with advertising standards and the last technical standards. The technical standards do not, I think, concern the man in the street but the other two codes do. Wherever television has been established it has exerted a very powerful influence on the community. In Hong Kong as a medium for entertainment, information and education it reaches a great number of persons of all ages in the privacy of their homes. Great care must therefore be exercised in the selection of programmes by the television stations and to assist them we have laid down certain rules as broad guidelines.

There arc fairly comprehensive rules about violence, especially as it relates to children and young people. Conflict is a major element in drama but violence for its own sake is not permitted simply because it attracts or secures the attention of certain types of audiences. There are also rules relating to religious rites, * \ marriage, drug addiction — to mention only a few.

/The advertising

Friday, June 16, 1972

7

The advertising codes contain strict rules relating to medical advertisements and to advertisements directed towards children or in which children appear. Other rules cover advertisements for fire arms, debentures, banks, and money lenders, etc. All advertisements intended for television are also subject to censorship by the Panel of Film Censors. However, during the period November, 1968 to December, 1970 only 29 advertisements, out of a total of 1,805 viewed, were not approved for television.

And now I come to my last point — what is it going to mean for Hong Kong viewers. Firstly, with a marked increase in the choice of programmes freely available it is almost certain that the number of viewers will increase. Television sets which in 19&7 were a large capital outlay for any household are getting cheaper every year and now one can purchase a compact portable set for under 3400. Secondly, colour television which was a dream only a few years ago, is now a reality and one can buy a colour set now for about 31,600. These prices will fall still further bringing colour television within the reach of many more viewers. Lastly, with controlled competition such as envisaged by this new policy I think we can only see an improvement in the programmes offered as stations vie with each other to capture the maximum audience. So the Hong Kong viewer is going to have not only more programmes but possibly even better ones to choose from in the years ahead.

Thank you.

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Release Time; 1 p.m.

P.R.H. 7 (REVISED! 4000091

INFORMATION SERVICES

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Sunday, June 18, 1972

THIRD GOVERNMENT LOTTERY THIS YEAR

Tickets Now On Sale

««****«

Tickets for the third Government lottery this year, the 49th in the series, are now on sale. <

The tickets, still at $2 each, are on sale at all Royal Hong Kong Jockey Club selling booths and at ferry piers of the Hong Kong and Yaumati Ferry Company.

They can also be bought at the head offices and branches of the Hong Kong and Shanghai Bank, the Chartered Bank, the Dao Heng Bank, the Hang Seng Bank, the Hong Kong Chinese Bank, the Kwong On Bank, the Overseas Trust Bank, the Shanghai Commercial Bank, the Wing On Bank, the Bank of East Asia, the Hong Kong Industrial and Commercial Bank, the Mercantile Bank, the Liu Chong Hing Bank, the Commercial Bank of Hong Kong, the Wing Lung Bank, and the Ngau Kee Money Changers.

Winning numbers will be drawn at the Royal Hong Kong Jockey Club Race Course, Happy Valley, at 10 a.m. on Saturday (July 1).

As in the past, there will be a total of $6 prizes and a number of special prizes. The first prize will comprise 30 per cent of the total proceeds. Five second prizes will each make up 2 per cent. There will also be 50 third prizes, each of 0.5 per cent.

/A number

Sunday, June 18, 1972

- 2 -

A number of special prizes, each of 3100, will be paid to holders of tickets the last three digits of which correspond to a spec? a.l number to be drawn.

Note to Editors: The Government Lotteries Management Committee will hold a news conference at 1 p.m. on Monday, June 19, at the City Hall Restaurant, when details of the 49th Government lottery will be announced.

You are cordially invited to have the conference covered.

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/3........

Sunday, June 18, 1972

- 3 -

THE SUCCESS OF PROBATION

How Treatment And Counselling Saved One Boy

*««*«***

Social Welfare Department probation officers are encouraged by the success of one of their colleagues attached to the South Kowloon Magistracy who was able to persuade one boy to return to the right path after the drug habit had twice taken hold of him.

They feel the case deserves to be reported, not because it has ended finally in success, but because there is one ingredient in the case that makes the boy untypical.

It is that he actively helped in his own cure.

"He is not the only victim of circumstances that collectively induced him to go wrong,” says Mr. Lee Sun-man, Principal Social Welfare Officer (Probation Services), "but it is possible that a wider knowledge of the ultimate decision taken by the boy himself, at a critical moment in his lifef will induce others similarly placed to do the same.”

Mr. Lee says the ’’ultimate decision” was the boy’s willingness to spend five months in Shek Kwu Chau for treatment, after he had already been before the court and was on a year’s probation, but had begun once again to revert to drugs.

Persistent counselling had managed to imprint Shek Kwu Chau on the boy’s mind as a hope, not a degradation — and this is the kind of ’’breakthrough” Mr. Lee believes probation officers want to see become more commonplace.

/The boy

Sunday, June 18, 1972

- 4 -

The boy is the third child in a working-class family of nine.

The father’s earnings as a barber, and the mother’s in a paper factory, are supplemented by wages brought home by other working members of the family, with the result that there has been, for some time now, sufficient money for a fairly decent living in two resettlement units converted into one.

The boy was sent to school at about eight, but family members were so engrossed in their own affairs that it was scarcely noticed how often he played truant,

The first shock arrived when he was dismissed from Primary V, and the second came when it was realised that he had cultivated disreputable company. He was introduced to a job as an apprentice welder by an elder brother, at $17 a day, but he was so far gone in extravagance and drugs that this money was not enough.

Money He later told the probation officer that at this time he needed 512 a day for opium alone. Absence of money, added to a growing need for the drug, brought along a crisis at the factory, and he was fired. This in turn made his family turn against him. and eventually he stole from his father, and ran away, giving the ’’old man” a grudge against him.

Life became for the boy a one-night stand with friends, with pickpocketing the only source of income. Eventually he was arrested and brought before the court. The probation officer recommended treatment at Shek Kwu Chau, but as the boy did not show signs of drug dependence during the remand period, he was placed on probation for one year instead.

/He could ••••••

Sunday, June 18, 1972

- 5 -

He could not adjust easily to the requirements of probation, because the family, particularly the father, tended to regard him as the black sheep* Lack of understanding at home sent him into the streets for comfort, and once here, he soon moved back to the old haunts, the old acquaintances, and in time took up opium again.

At this stage, the probation officer became insistent, taking special pains to keep in close touch with the boy, and his family, to prevent a lapse into serious crime, with its damaging consequences.

Battle

The big battle was to reconcile the family and the boy, for this involved mutual concessions, and each was suspicious of the other. It took time, but this battle was ultimately won, and the next hurdle was to make the boy see that unless he was willing to go to Shek Kwu Chau to rid himself of the habit, he would be addicted to drugs for life.

First there was obstinacy, and then indecision, but at last resistance was overcome. The boy had to wait five months for admission* Shek Kwu Chau turned out to be far from the repressive prison he had imagined it to be, and humane treatment turned him into a young man eager to turn over a new leaf.

He stayed at Shek Kwu Chau for five months, neither always a model trainee, nor completely above the desire to engage in a puff. But when he left, he knew that if he was really to make good, he had to cut the past away from him, like a complete surgical operation to remove gangrene.

/Mr. Lee

Sunday, June 18, 1972

- 6 -

Mr. Lee concludes the story.

’The boy,” he says, ,fwas so cheerful on his return, so changed, that his family happily accepted him back. He returned to welding on the prompting of his brother, and now earns 3j8 a day. He worked at the job until his probation period was over, and by all accounts is still at it. Only one snag remains his relationship with his father. But I am convinced it will not drive him back to opium.

”What is encouraging is that probation works, and so does Shek Kwu Chau,”


Release time: 3*00 p.m,

.R.H. 7 (REVISED) 4000091

INFORMATION

SERVICES

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Tuesday, June 20, 1972

THE QUEEN EXPRESSES SYMPATHY FOR FLOOD VICTIMS Messages Of Condolence From U.K. Ministers *»««****

Her Majesty the Queen has sent a message to the Governor expressing sincere sympathy to the relatives of those who lost their lives in the disastrous landslides in Hong Kong.

In her cable, the Queen said: ”1 was extremely sorry to hear about the flood disaster. My husband and I send our sincere sympathy to the relatives of those who lost their lives.”

Messages of sympathy have also been received from the Foreign Secretary, Sir Alec Douglas-Home, and the Under-Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, Mr. Anthony Royle, in London.

Both telegrams were received by the Governor this morning.

In his message, Sir Alec said: ”1 am greatly distressed to learn of the considerable loss of life and damage as a result of the recent heavy rains. Please convey my deepest sympathy and that of Her Majesty’s Government to the bereaved, injured and homeless.”

Mr. Royle’s cable reads: ”1 was deeply shocked to hear of the terrible disaster which has struck Hong Kong. I extend my deepest sympathy to all those who have suffered injury, and my condolences to those whose families have suffered bereavement.”

- - 0 - -

/2

Tuesday, June 20, 1972

- 2

FOREIGN SECRETARY SPEAKS ABOUT HONG KONG

*******

The British Foreign Secretary, Sir Alec Douglas-Home, said last night (Monday) that he was in touch with the Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, about an immediate contribution to Hong Kong’s relief fund following the serious flooding over the weekend<»

Sir Alec, who was speaking as guest of honour at the Hong Kong Association’s Dragon Boat Dinner in London, said the banquet was inevitably overshadowed by the floods which had brought death and destruction.

Turning to Britain’s entry into the European Economic Community, the Foreign Secretary said his Government well understood the concern expressed by Hong Kong about the future, including the assimilation under the community’s system of generalised preferences.

He added: ”In particular of course there is the immensely important question of Hong Kong’s exports to Britain of textile products and clothing, and I wish to take this opportunity to convince you that Her Majesty’s Government really does appreciate the problems involved. There is no easy way out, but we are determined that Hong Kong’s interests shall not be neglected.”

Sir Alec said his Government had initiated discussions with the Commission in Brussels on Hong Kong’s cotton textile quota levels for 1973 and would naturally keep in close contact with the Hong Kong Government.

He said for the long term, Britain was working with its partners in the Common Market towards a unified policy on textiles.

/Sir Alec ........

Tuesday, June 20, 1972

- 3 -

Sir Alec went on: ”Hong Kong’s adaptability, ingenuity and industry have enabled her to overcome earlier challenges and turn them to her own advantage. Certainly, increased prosperity resulting from the enlargement of Europe will lead to an increased market potential there. For Hong Kong this means increasing opportunities for expansion of exports.”

-------0---------

EXTENSION OF BUSINESS HOURS

At Sha Tin And Tsz Wan Shan Post Offices

««**«**

The Post Office announced today that the Sha Tin Post Office has extended its business hours and is now open continuously from 9 a.m* to 5 p*m. Mondays to Saturdays without closing between 1 p.m. and 2 p.m..

Similarly, the Tsz Wan Shan Post Office is now open from 9 a.m. to 5 p«m» from Monday to Friday, and from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturday.

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A....

Tuesday, June 20, 1972

- 4 -

ANOTHER PUBLIC ASSISTANCE FIELD UNIT TO OPEN

********

The 14th Public Assistance Field Unit, to serve applicants for public assistance in another Kcwloon district, will be opened tomorrow (June 21).

It is the Shek Kip Mei Field Unit, and will be located temporarily in the premises of the Sham Shui Po Field Unit until its own building is ready in about six weeks.

The Shek Kip Mei Unit will take over from the Sham Shui Po Field Unit all cases the latter is presently handling in Shek Kip Mei, Pak Tin and Tai Wor Ping.

It will also take over from the Mong Kok Field Unit the latter’s cases in Kowloon Tong, Kowloon Tsai, Tai Hang Tung and Tai Hang Sai.

Mr. Chou Ting-hsun, Senior Principal Social Welfare Officer and head of the Public Assistance Division, says setting up of the 14th Field Unit has become urgent because of ”a steadily rising caseload.”

”Not only has the earlier target figure of 15,000 been reached and passed,” he explains, ”but there are indications that pressure will increase, instead of diminishing.”

It is divisional policy, subject to funds being available, to provide a separate field unit for every 1,000 cases, and on this basis, the 15th field unit is already being planned.

Mr. Chou says the total caseload on May 51 was 14,8?6, and $16 million has been spent since the expanded public scheme became fully operational on April 1, 1971.

Following the announcement of improved payments from April 1 this year, more than 1,000 new applications have been received each month.

- - - - 0--------

/5..........

Tuesday, June 20, 1972

- 5 -

SHARP INCREASE IN C.P.I. FOR MAY

********

The General Consumer Price Index for May 1972 was 1^8, five points higher than that for the previous month.

The rise was due mainly to an increase of 10 points in the index for food*

There was also an increase of one point each in the indexes for alcoholic drink, and for miscellaneous goods. Movements in the indexes for other sections were insignificant.

The average retail price of fresh vegetables rose sharply as a result of unfavourable weather conditions.

Higher retail prices were also recorded for bread and cakes, salt water fish, fresh water fish, live poultry, dried beans and fresh fruits. Some restaurants also put up their menu prices. On the other hand, retail prices of other fish, pork, beef and eggs were priced lower.

The Modified Consumer Price Index for May 1972 was 142, six points higher than that for the previous month, and 12 points higher than that for the corresponding month in 1971*

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/6.........

Tuesday, June 20, 1972

- 6 -

NEW LOOK FOR STANLEY PRISON CHAPEL

Serving Prisoner Redecorates Interior

** ******

The interior of the Stanley Prison chapel has been completely redecorated by a serving prisoner.

The man who gave the chapel a new look is 48-year-old Aurelio Spacholtz, an Italian.

He is one of the three prisoners who escaped from the Chi Ma Wan Prison on Lantau Island on August 10, 1970. All three were recaptured about nine days later.

Mr. Spacholtz began the work in early January this year, with materials supplied by the Prisons Department.

The interior of the chapel now has oval-shaped murals featuring the crucifixion and resurrection of Jesus Christ. These have been done in multi* colours against the grey-white walls of the sanctuary.

A spokesman for the Prisons Department said: ’’The chief motive behind this project is basically two-fold: to utilise Mr. Spacholtz’s skill in the best possible way and to allow him to practise his trade while in prison.” Before he came to Hong Kong, Mr. Spacholtz was an architect.

Previously he had carried out a similar task at the Victoria Reception Centre’s chapel.

Mr. Spacholtz, who is to return to Rome after his release in October this year, expressed his gratitude to the Commissioner of Prisons, Mr. T.G. Garner, for giving him an opportunity to put his ideas into reality.

/The Stanley ••••..

Tuesday, June 20, 1972

- 7 -

The Stanley Prison chapel was opened some 16 years ago. Services are

held there every Sunday by the Prison’s chaplain. Attendance at services is entirely voluntary.

*******

Note to editors:

Copies of a photograph showing the

redecorated interior of the Stanley Prison chapel are distributed separately in the G.I.S. press boxes this evening.

- - 0 - -

/8

Tuesday, June 20, 1972

- 8 -

ELECTRICAL APPLIANCES MANPOWER SURVEY

A second manpower survey of the electrical apparatus and appliances industry is to be held from July 3 to July 22 to up-date information on training requirements and to make new recommendations, where necessary, to the government and industry.

The survey will be conducted by the Electrical Apparatus and Appliances Industrial Committee, one of the 10 associated industrial committees of the Industrial Training Advisory Committee, with assistance from the Labour Department.

The first manpower survey was held in December 1968 and the committee subsequently published its findings and recommendations in September last year. At the time of the first survey there were 16,637 manual workers in the industry and 203 factories or firms registered or recorded with the Labour Department, excluding electrical wiring contractors. In March, 1972 the corresponding figures were 19,520 and 330, and in view of these changes it was decided to conduct the second manpower survey*

The information required from employers will include the number of workers employed at present; the number of workers receiving training; the number of vacancies; and a forecast of the total number of workers required by July 1973*

/The

Tuesday, June 20, 1972

- 9 -

The information collected will be handled in the strictest confidence and will be published only in statistical summaries without reference to any individual factory or firm.

Because of the size of the industry, a random stratified sampling method has been adopted to select 450 premises to be covered. An explanatory letter in English and Chinese, together with the questionnaire has now been sent to the selected firms.

If an employer has any queries he is asked to contact the Labour Statistics and Surveys Unit of the Labour Department, telephone number H-778271 ext. 5 or 4.

Tuesday, June 20, 1972

- 10 -

HONG KONG’S RESERVOIRS RECEIVE INTERNATIONAL ATTENTION

The Chief Engineer (Construction) of the Public Works Department, Mr. Li Hin-wing said today the construction of reservoirs in Hong Kong had attracted international attention and earned international praise.

Speaking at a luncheon meeting of the Rotary Club of Kowloon

East at the Peninsula Hotel, he said two of the projects currently receiving worldwide attention were the High Island scheme on the Sai Kung Peninsula and the desalination plant near Castle Peak. Work on both schemes is already well under way.

Mr. Li added: "The days of looking up to Heaven for rain should become a thing of the past.”

In the distribution of water, he said, the Government had adopted the use of computers and this had helped solve a rather complicated matter.

’’Professional staff are employed to deal with the recording of the daily storage. Information on water consumption in various districts, together with the record of rainfall as forecast by the Royal Observatory are fed into a computer to obtain the best results.

”The use of computers is a must nowadays, if water is to be distributed most economically,” Mr. Li said.

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Tuesday, June 20, 1972

- 11 -

SPEECH THERAPY SCHOLARSHIP

Government is inviting applications for a Scholarship in Speech Therapy from young persons aged between 18 and 26•

The scholarship, tenable in Australia, is for a three-year course leading to a Diploma of the College of Speech Therapists. It includes passage and a substantial allowance to meet essential expenses.

Applicants should be born in Hong Kong or have resided in Hong Kong for not less than seven years. They should speak fluent English and Cantonese with the correct consonant and vowel sounds. Knowledge of other Chinese dialects will be an advantage.

Application forms and further details are obtainable from the Government Training Division (Tel. H-767201), Lee Gardens, second floor, Causeway Bay. Completed forms, in quadruplicate, should be returned to the Division before July 7, 1972.

-----0------

Tuesday, June 20, 1972

- 12 -

FLOOD AFFECTED BUILDINGS CLOSED

*«****««

The Building Authority has obtained closure orders for a total of eight buildings in the Peak and Mid-Levels districts following the torrential rains during the weekend.

The buildings affected in the Peak area are: 60 Plantation Road, 62 Plantation Road, 3 Severn Road, and 22 Barker Road. In the Mid-Levels the buildings are: 21 Po Shan Road, 47 and 51 Conduit Road, and 56 Kotewall Road, blocks one and two.

In each case the closure orders will be removed as soon as it is practicable and safe to do so.

Mo. 60 Plantation Road is being closed because the earth around a large boulder immediately above it has become loose and the boulder is in danger of slipping down onto the building. The other three buildings are being closed because of the possibility of further land slips.

All other buildings in this area and in the Mid-Level District around the Po Shan Road landslip have been inspected and are considered safe for occupation. However the area will be kept under constant review.

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A3........

Tuesday, June 20, 1972

- 13 -

EXPORT OF RESTRAINED TEXTILES TO NORWAY AND SWEDEN

»*****»*

The Director of Commerce and Industry today issued a number of Notices to Exporters on the subject of export of restrained textiles to Norway and Sweden.

Two of the Notices cover the balances of quota remaining available for export to Norway and Sweden under two Special Shipment Schemes to be introduced on Thursday (June 22)•

Another two Notices deal with quota control arrangements for the export of restrained textiles to Norway from the beginning of next month to the end of this year, and the continuation of the current Export Authorisation Scheme until the end of 1972.

Trade associations and companies on the Commerce and Industry Department’s mailing list for Notice to Exporters, Series 6 (Europe, other than Britain and the European Economic Community) will shortly receive copies of the Notices.

Persons who wish to have advance notice of contents are invited to contact the following officers of the Commerce and Industry Department.

Mr. H.T.W. Lau - Assistant Trade Officer

Tel. No. H-229777

Mr. A.R. Swinton - Industry Assistant

Tel. No. H-247315

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/V*........

Tuesday, June 20, 1972

- 14 -

RELIEF WORK CONTINUES FOR STORM VICTIMS

**«»•**«*

A full-scale operation by various Government departments is now underway for the rehabilitation and relief of rainstorm victims.

An inter-departmental working party has been set up to help family members of rainstorm victims in Kwun Tong, especially in funeral arrangements•

The working party comprises representatives of the Secretariat for Home Affairs, the Social Welfare Department, the Medical and Health Department and the Urban Services Department.

Its office is in the Social Welfare Department’s Kwun Tong Community Centre, at 8, Tsui Ping Road.

The City District Officer (Kwun Tong), Mr. Jack So, said today the group would begin assisting family members of the victims to identify the bodies, to look for burial sites and to claim funeral expenses from the Social Welfare Department.

Staff of the Resettlement Department are working at full speed on the provision of direct resettlement for 900 people living in the Sau Mau Ping licensed area, including the 200 survivors of last Sunday’s mudslide there, in the nearby Sau Mau Ping Resettlement Estate.

The department has also decided to rehouse the 500 people who were evacuated from the licensed area in Sam Kar Tsuen because of possible landslides there.

/’’It is

Tuesday, June 20, 1972

- 15 -

”It is expected that they will be able to move into their new homes either today or tomorrow,” a department spokesman said.

Officers of the Social Welfare Department have begun investigations among victims of the thunderstorm to see what aid can be given to them within the terms of the Community Relief Trust Fund administered by the Director of Social Welfare as Trustee.

A spokesman for the department said members of the public wishing to donate to the Fund should make their cheques payable to the Community Relief Trust Fund and address them to the Director of Social Welfare

Distribution Of Funds

Of the 82 million available in the Fund for immediate allocation by ’the Director, 81 million is expected to go to the Agriculture and Fisheries Department to help residents suffering losses of life, stock, crops and pond fish.

An allocation of 8200,000 has already been made to the New Territories Administration to assist people in the New Territories.

The Public Assistance Division of the Social Welfare Department is using the Fund for burial grants and cash allowances to families who have lost their chief bread-winners. It is also being used to help victims who have lost their homes, and to repair dwellings damaged by the thunderstorm.

Up to four o’clock this afternoon, a total of 8100,320 had been received from members of the public for the Community Relief Trust Fund.

Tuesday, June 20, 1972

- 16 -9

In connection with the multiple house collapse in Po Shan, Conduit and Kotewall Roads on Hong Kong Island, the City District Officer (Western) lias set up an information unit at the garage of No. 6 Kotewall Road to receive information or reports.

The City District Officer, Mr. Rafael Hui, today advised occupants of the affected premises to report to the unit on their present whereabouts or whether any members of their family are missing. Similar reports may also be made to the Western police station.

Searching Debris

Throughout the day some 600 men from the army, police, fire services, civil aid and auxiliary medical services worked at the Kwun Tong landslide in an effort to recover more bodies and any possible survivors. Public Works Department and Resettlement Department personnel were also at the scene clearing rocks and debris with the aid of bulldozers and lorries.

At the Kotewall Road slip more than 100 people continued to sift through the debris of collapsed buildings in search of survivors.

Up to 6 p.m. today (Tuesday), 90 people had died as a result of the rainstorm, 166 were listed as missing and 120 were injured.

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A7.........

Tuesday, June 20, 1972

- 17 -

P.W.D. ENGINEER CHECKING Sizeable Licensed Areas And Squatter Areas *********

Checks on potentially dangerous squatter and licensed areas have been carried out for a number of years but an experienced Public Works Department engineer is now carrying out further checks on all sizeable licensed areas and squatter areas, which were affected during the recent rainstorms. Many areas will have to be checked in detail and the engineer’s report will then be studied in the Resettlement Department to allow a decision on what needs to be done.

The engineer has already reported on a number of these areas, and as a result a total of 3,000 persons are being offered public housing. Some of the families from the Sau Mau Ping Licensed Area have already been admitted to Sau Mau Ping Estate.

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/18........

Tuesday, June 20, 1972

- 18 -

MAYOR OF OSAKA SENDS MESSAGE OF SYMPATHY TO GOVERNOR ««*****«

The Mayor of Osaka in Japan, Mr. Yasushi Oshima, has sent a message to the Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose expressing sympathy for the bereaved families of landslide victims.

The message reads: "I was shocked to learn of the catastrophic landslides which took the lives of so many innocent people in your territory and would like to extend through you on behalf of the citizens of Osaka our deepest condolence and sympathies to the bereaved families of the victims and wounded and I further wish the fast recovery of the diaster stricken people and area.”

Release time: 8.^0 pem«

4000035 P.R. 33

HONG KONG GOVERNMENT

^INFORMATION SERVICES —-

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

SUPPLEMENT

Tuesday, June 20, 1972

COMMISSION OF INQUIRY INTO RAINSTORM DISASTERS

The Governor in Council has tonight ordered a Commission of

Inquiry into the recent disasters, with particular regard to Sau Mau Ping and Po Shan Road,

The terras of reference of the Commission are:

”To inquire into the circumstances in which disasters causing loss of life occurred during the rainstorms between the 16th and 18th June 1972 with particular regard to those at Sau Mau Ping and Po Shan Road, and to report to the Governor•

’’And also to raake recoranendations to the Governor as to how such disasters may be avoided in the circumstances of Hong Kong and its climate.’1

The composition of the Commission of Inquiry will be announced

late:

Hearings are expected to be heard in public but under the Ordinance it will be a matter for the Commission to decide.

Any recommendations which are made by the Commission are likely to be made public in due course.

Release Time: 8.j>0 p,m

P.R.H. 7 (REVISED! 4000001

INFORMATION

SERVICES

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Wednesday, June 21, 1972

PRAISE FOR PUBLIC RESPONSE TO RAINSTORM DISASTER ********

The Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, today paid tribute to the response of the regular and emergency services, the Army as well as members of the public to the ’’natural disaster that has struck us.”

Speaking in the Legislative Council, he expressed sympathy to all those who had lost relatives or homes or livelihood.

Sir Yuet-keung Kan, speaking on behalf of the Unofficials, paid a warm tribute to ’’all those who took part in the arduous and dangerous rescue operations.”

The Acting Colonial Secretary, Mr. M.D.A. Clinton, speaking on behalf of Official Members, expressed their ’’deepest sympathy to those who have suffered from these disasters.”

In his speech, the Governor said:

”Uppermost in all our minds is the natural disaster that has struck us, and I think it would be the wish of Honourable Members that I open this session by offering the sympathy of this Council to all those who have lost relatives or homes or livelihood. Our very sincere condolences go out to them in what they are suffering.

’’Secondly, this Council’s high tribute is due to the response of the regular and emergency services and the Array. In terms of speed and determination, and physical endurance and,where it is called for, sheer couragef it is a proud story. And let us not forget it’s one that is continuing v/hile we meet. I am sure we can count on them to finish the job as they have started it.

/’•Thirdly, ......

Wednesday, June 21, 1972

- 2 -

’’Thirdly, there is the response of the public. Most have helped in whatever way was practicable. Some have given money, some food, some clothing, and others have done what they could to refresh those engaged in the work of rescue, or to shelter families or friends who have lost their homes. And much of this practical help in kind has come from the resettlement and low-cost housing estates in the disaster area.

"To this, too, I am sure that the Council would like to pay its tribute. It is such actions which make a community.

"To do what is right to alleviate suffering and hardship money will be needed. That concerns the Finer.?? Committee of this Council, and as usual I am sure Honourable Members will do whatever needs to be done.

’’The cause of all this was a major natural disaster. A lethal and practically unprecedented combination of up to 40" of rain in four days, following 35” in the previous six weeks. But we must find out exactly what it was that produced the catastrophe in these specific areas and what the circumstances were that resulted in loss of life, in each case, and whether there is not something that we can do to make sure that it does not happen again. I hope therefore that the decision to set up a commission of enquiry quickly, will commend itself to this Council.

"One word in conclusion. These days have shown again what we in this community can do in time of emergency, in terms of action and in terms of solidarity. Can we tackle with the same vigour and solidarity the long term problems which are so great? I believe that with vigorous government and the support of this Council and community we can.

”1 believe this is what every one hopes we will do.”

/Sir Yuet-keung Kan, .....

Wednesday, June 21, 1972

- 3 -

Sir Yuet-keung Kan, said:

’’Your Excellency, may I on behalf of the Unofficial Members of this council also express the deepest and most sincere sympathy for all those who have been so tragically affected by the disaster that had occurred last weekend • I will also like to tender a warm tribute to the Fire Services, the armed forces,the Public Ibrks Department and government contractors, the Police, the emergency services and indeed all those who took part in the arduous and dangerous rescue operations.

"So, once again we may with good cause be proud of the selfless spirit and untiring efforts of so many members of this community in time of crisis. I feel sure that those who have suffered had gained comfort from the help and sympathy generously extended to them and in particular from the message of sympathy from Her Majesty the Queen, the deep concern you yourself, Sir, have shown and your assurance that no effort or resources will be spared by Government in tackling the tremendous problem involved#

”In so doing, Sir, I think I can speak on behalf of my Unofficial colleagues that you can rely on the full support of this Council and its Finance Committee.

’’Finally, I would say that we welcome the decision to have a commission of inquiry investigate the circumstances in which the disasters occurred and make recommendations as to how such disasters may be avoided in the future. A thorough-going full-scale effort must be made to prevent the recurrence of tragedies of this kind and a commission of inquiry is an excellent starting point. « Mr. Clinton said:

’’Sir, on behalf of my Official colleagues on this Council, I would also like to express our deepest sympathy to those who have suffered from these disasters ------------------------------------0---------

A...........

Wednesday, June 21, 1972

- 4 -

THUNDERSTORM RELIEF CONTINUES

*******

Victims of the thunderstorm so far registered with the Social Welfare Department are to receive immediately 3200 cash each as an ex gratia payment from the Community Relief Trust Fund.

The payment is to those living in Kwun Tong and other areas, including Hong Kong Island, whose homes have been destroyed.

The Director of Social Welfare, as Trustee of the Community Relief Trust Fund said today the payments recognised the particularly severe suffering caused in these areas by the series of landslides.

"They in no way affect Other payments allowed victims of the disaster, such ac the 3500 burial grants and the 36,000 grants for families on the death of the chief bread-winner," he said.

Thirty-two families received burial grants from the Fund beginning today. Other burial grants will be made as soon as possible. Several families are being considered for the 36,000 grants and payment will begin immediately after investigation.

The Director said contributions from members of the public were being received, and there would be daily statements after 4 p.m. on the total collected, as well as the allocations made from the Fund.

He urged various organisations collecting donations for the thunderstorm victims to send the money to the Fund so that it could be put to the best use on a co-ordinated basis.

So far, the chief allocation from the Fund has been 31 million to the Agriculture and Fisheries Department for the relief of farmers suffering severe losses in livestock, crops, pond fish, dwellings and equipment.

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/5..........

Wednesday, June 21, 1972

- 5

EXAMINATION OF BUILDING SITES BY ARCHITECTS

********

The Building Authority today (Wednesday) again requested authorised architects to carefully examine all sites under their control and ensure that all safety measures necessary are taken.

A spokesman for the authority said they should immediately report any serious situation to the Buildings Ordinance Office.

In the meantime, the whole staff of the Office is committed to emergency duties. The spokesman said that there is bound to be some delay in dealing with applications currently lodged with the Office.

He appealed to all authorised architects to refrain from enquiring about the progress of these applications and from submitting further applications at this time. They would resume dealing with these applications as soon as possible.

0 -

/6........

Wednesday, June 21, 1972

- 6 -

LEGAL AID AVAILABLE TO DISASTER VICTIMS

********

Victims and their dependents who have suffered from the disasters caused by the recent rainstorms are already receiving assistance from the Government and charitable organisations to tide them over their immediate problems. More assistance will be forthcoming.

In addition, a Government spokesman today (Wednesday) reminded members of the public that victims and their dependents can apply for Legal Aid at the Legal Aid Department situated in Victoria District Court Building, Battery Path, Hong Kong, at any time during office hours -and outside office hours, by appointment by telephoning H-253862.

Any person who thinks he has a claim against any person or persons (including the Government) should make application to the Legal Aid Department. All applicants will be given advice, and where any valid legal claims appear to exist they will be given further advice and help to obtain compensation.

The Legal Aid Department was established by the Government five years ago to provide the machinery to help all needy litigants who have not sufficient assets to pay the costs and fees of Legal Practitioners to obtain justice in their claims.

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/7........

Wednesday, June 21, 1972

- 7 -

EXCHANGE FUND BORROWING POWERS INCREASED

*****««»

The Legislative Council today adopted a motion which increases the borrowing powers of the Exchange Fund to 37,000 million. The previous increase to 36,000 million was made in November last year.

The Financial Secretary, the Hon. C.P. Haddon-Cave, told the Council that the increased borrowing powers had been needed to bring the sterling assets of the Hong Kong banks under the umbrella of the United Kingdom sterling guarantee arrangement.

He said that during the seven months since the limit of the Fund’s borrowing powers was fixed, the amount of bank controlled sterling assets covered by the guarantee arrangement had increased from £325•? million (34,737.45 million) to £402.2 million (35,850.2 million). It therefore followed that the Exchange Fund could only borrow the equivalent of £10.3 million before the present limit on its borrowing powers was reached.

Mr. Haddon-Cave said that this balance would not last more than about three weeks at the rate of increase experienced so far this month.

He said the extent to which the additional borrowing powers would have to be used and over what period would depend on a number of fairly unpredictable factors, the main one being the buoyancy of Hong Kong’s current balance of payments position.

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/8........

Wednesday, June 21, 1972

- 8 -

FREE PRIMARY EDUCATION FOR HANDICAPPED CHILDREN

•*««*«*

The Director of Education, the Hon. J. Canning said today that detailed plans are being made to provide free primary education for handicapped children.

He told the Legislative Council that these would cover necessary increases in the present level of subsidies, to take effect from September 1, 1971.

Proposals should soon be submitted to the Finance Committee of Legislative Council.

Mr. Canning was replying to the Hon. H.J.C. Browne who had asked whether Government had made any decision on the introduction of free primary education for handicapped children and, if so, from what date would it become effective.

-----0-----

/9.......

Wednesday, June 21, 1972

- 9 -

MOTOR VEHICLE INSPECTIONS

«*«**,**

The Government is considering a proposal to set up a semiautomatic vehicle inspection centre to cope with the regular inspection of all motor vehicles.

The Financial Secretary, the Hon. C.P. Haddon-Cave, who

was replying to a question raised by the Hon. Szeto Wai in the Legislative Council, said at present there was no statutory requirement that motor vehicles should be inspected on a regular basis. But in the interest of road safety, powers should be sought to enforce such regular inspections.

Mr. Szeto had asked whether the Government would consider the installation of automatic testing equipment in its existing vehicle inspection centres to speed up testing and enable compulsory periodic inspection of all motor vehicles.

Mr. Haddon-Cave said that as it was physically impossible to expand the existing centres, consideration was being given to the setting up of a new centre, possibly a semi-automatic inspection centre.

-------0---------

AO

Wednesday, June 21, 1972

- 10 -

CIVILIAN PARKING METER ATTENDANTS

*««*«***

A Working Party set up last year to examine the question of utilising civilian personnel in the Traffic Branch, and other branches of the police force, is expected to make its report later this year.

The Acting Colonial Secretary, the Hon, M.D.A. Clinton, said the Commissioner of Police had not yet received the findings of the Working Party but when he did, he would submit recommendations. At present it was conducting a thorough post by post examination.

He pointed out that some two years ago when the idea of traffic wardens, or more specifically parking meter attendants, was exaimined at official level, the proposal did not find much favour.

He said: ’The position may now be rather different, and we all share the concern that suitable ways of overcoming the Force’s present shortage of men be quickly found; and this is very much in mind.”

Mr. Clinton was replying in Legislative Council to a question by Mr, P.C, Woo concerning the implementation of a scheme of traffic wardens who could undertake some of the duties performed by the traffic police.

Wednesday, June 21, 1972

- 11 -

MEDICAL GRADUATES TO FILL VACANCIES

********

Medical graduates from the University of Hong Kong are expected to fill most of the posts for new hospital projects and other vacancies occurring in the Medical and Health Department due to retirement and resignation over the next few years.

The Director of Medical and Health Services, Dr. the Hon. G.H. Choa, told the Legislative Council today that 78 new medical graduates were expected to join his department as Medical and Health Officers on July 1.

Replying to a quesoxOii vhe Hon. Wilfred Wong, he said that at June 17 there were 181 vacancies for doctors in the department, including 50 for the new Lai Chi Kok Hospital and another 50 as leave reserves.

Dr. Choa added: ”1 would like to emphasise once more that our figure includes an element for the future and leave reserve purposes and does not represent the actual number of existing operational posts unfilled.11

Earlier Mr. Wong had asked how many vacancies existed for doctors in the civil service and whether the number was likely to increase when the two new hospitals at Lai Chi Kok were fully operational. He also asked what steps were being taken to counteract the shortage.

The Director said the new Lai Chi Kok Hospital would now be planned and administered as one large complex consisting of a general wing and a psychiatric wing, instead of two separate hospitals.

The general wing would have an establishment of 121 posts and these would start being filled from about the middle of 197^* Fifty of these posts had been added to the present total establishment so that the department could train medical officers as they became available.

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Wednesday, June 21, 1972

- 12 -

TRIBUTE TO ASIAN BANK LEADER

********

The Financial Secretary, the Hon. Philip Haddon-Cave, this afternoon paid tribute to the President of the Asian Development Bank, Mr* Takeshi Watanabe of Japan who has just resigned his post because of ill health.

He told the Legislative Council that the devotion with which Mr. Watanabe had discharged his onerous task of guiding the bank through its formative years and establishing for it a sound reputation — and the success which he had achieved — could hardly be over emphasised.

Mr. Haddon-Cave added: ‘’If his health permits, it is the Hong Kong Government’s wish to welcome Mr. Watanabe here to perform the signing ceremony for our first loan agreement before his retirement takes effect.”

Moving the second roading of the Loans (Asian Development Bank) Bill, the Financial Secretary said that although the immediate purpose of the legislation was to authorise the loan for the desalting plant, it had been drafted in such a way that any further loans, which might be negotiated with the bank, would not require the enactment of further ordinances. Instead they could be authorised by resolutions of the Legislative Council.

The loan for the desalting plant is to be made available in various currencies equivalent to a total of US$21.5 million, and will be used to finance a substantial proportion of the foreign exchange cost of the ^tO-million-gallon-a-day desalter.

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A3........

Wednesday, June 21, 1972

-IG-

NORE STAFF FOR REGISTRATION OF PERSONS DEPARTMENT ««*««**

Arrangements are being made to settle immediately a request by the Commissioner of Registration of Persons for more staff to deal with applications for certificates of registered particulars.

This was stated today by the Acting Colonial Secretary, the Hon. M.D.A. Clinton, in the Legislative Council in reply to the Hon. P.C. Woo, who had asked whether the Government would take steps to expedite dealing with the backlog of such applications.

Mr. Clinton said the Commissioner asked for additional staff in November last year. In the meantime, he added, there had been over-long argument as to the number of reinforcements.

”1 am arranging for his request to be settled at once,” he said.

At present, Mr. Clinton said, the backlog of applications for certificates of registered particulars stands at 1,792.

-------o---------

Wednesday, June 21, 1972

- 14 -

SUBVENTIONS FOR NON-PROFIT DAY NURSERIES? «*«***«**

The Social Welfare Advisory Committee will consider the question of financial assistance for non-profit making day nurseries run by voluntary agencies at its meeting early next month.

Proposals will be made to the Finance Committee of the Legislative Council as soon as possible after the meeting.

The Acting Colonial Secretary, Mr. M.D.A. Clinton, told the Legislative Council this afternoon that the government was aware of the need to provide additional social welfare subventions to these nurseries to meet increases in operational costs, to improve standards and to extend facilities.

He said the Social Welfare Department, in consultation with the Hong Kong Council of Social Service had been reviewing the level of assistance considered appropriate.

Mr. Clinton was replying to a question by Mr. P.C. Woo who had asked whether the government would consider increased subventions to these organisations in view of the rapid rise in operational costs.

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As.........

Wednesday, June 21, 1972

- 15 -

DELAY IN INTRODUCING ACCOUNTANTS BILL

The Financial Secretary, the Hon. C.P. Haddon-Cave, today attributed the delay in introducing the Accountants Bill into the Legislative Council to ’’technical difficulties over the translation and use of the terms ’accountant’ and ’practising accountant* in Chinese.”

The Hon. H.J.C. Browne had asked when legislation would be introduced for the Hong Kong Society of Accountants.

The Financial Secretary said: ”We are at present trying to sort out these difficulties, in conjunction with the working party of practising accountants.”

Ho hoped that it would be possible to find ”a reasonable solution acceptable to all” and that the Bill could be referred to the Executive Council for advice as to whether it should be introduced into the Legislative Council in the very near future.

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/16.......

Wednesday, June 21, 1972

- 16 -

FIRST CENSUS REPORT PUBLISHED

*«*«**«*

The first detailed report of the 1971 population and housing census has been published and is now on sale.

The publication entitled ’Census Basic Tables* was prepared by computer from the questionnaires completed by census enumerators and gives detailed information on the persons and households recorded during the census.

In an introduction, the Commissioner for Census and Statistics, Mr. K.W.J. Topley, says the aim is to make it possible for important attributes of the population measured by the census to be seen and compared within 20 tables. These include its size and distribution by age and sex, educational attainments, languages spoken and the fertility of women.

Tho methods by which the census was carried out and more detailed analysis of the results will be discussed in further reports to be published later in the year.

A booklet in English and Chinese showing the main results of the census in coloured diagrams and charts will also be published soon.

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Wednesday, June 21, 1972

- 17 -

BOGUS LABOUR DEPARTMENT OFFICIALS

********

The Assistant Commissioner of Labour, Mr. David Lin Hou-fu, today warned the proprietors of factories to be on their guard against people claiming to be Labour Department officers.

In the past few weeks several proprietors had complained that a man who said he was a Labour Department official had sought money for advertisements in a departmental publication.

Mr. Lin said: "No Labour Department officer is authorized to solicit money for any purpose whatsoever and no publication issued by the Department carries any advertisement."

He urged any proprietor who is asked for money by anyone purporting to be a member of the Labour Department to report the matter immediately, either to the nearest police station or to the Senior Labour Officer (Industry), telephone number K-688842.

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A8......

Wednesday, June 21, 1972

- 18 -

LABOUR DISPUTE SETTLED

********

One-hundred-and-thirty workers of the Eiling Engineering Company Limited have received $170,000 in outstanding wages with the help of the Labour Relations Service.

The dispute was effectively resolved because the workers made an early report to the Labour Department when the management of the shipyard company was unable to pay wages for the month of May.

A joint meeting was held in the Labour Relations Service (Hong Kong) and a visit was made by an officer to the shipyard resulting in the settlement.

-----0---------

RE-ROUTING OF THOMSON ROAD

********

The Transport Department announced today that with effect from 10 a*m. on Friday (June 23), the section of Thomson Road between Homing Road and Johnston Road, Wan Chai will be re-routed one-way from west to east.

The re-routing has been made in connection with the installation of a new set of traffic lights in the vicinity.

Appropriate traffic signs will be set up to guide motorists.

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A9......

Wednesday, June 21, 1972

- 19 -

LEGISLATION ON COMMUNITY SERVICE ORDERS

********

The Attorney General, the Hon. D.T.E. Roberts, said today that it would be wise to study how legislation empowering the Courts in England to make Community Service Orders worked before deciding whether it was desirable to make similar provision in Hong Kong.

The Attorney General was replying in the Legislative Council to the Hon. Wilson Wang, who asked: ’’Will Government introduce legislation to enable the Courts of the Colony to make Community Service Orders whenever such an order is considered to be a penalty appropriate to an offence or the offender?”

Mr. Roberts said the English bill was introduced into Parliament last year, but he had not been able to find out if it had been enacted.

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PASSING OUT PARADE

*******

A member of the Legislative Council, Mr. Oswald Cheung, will take the salute at the passing out parade of 15 Assistant Immigration Officers and nine Immigration Assistants on Friday (June 23).

The parade will be held at the Royal Hong Kong Regiment parade ground in Sports Road, Happy Valley, starting at 9*30 a.m.

*******

Note to editors: You are cordially invited to send a

reporter and/or photographer to have the event covered.

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/20..........

Wednesday, June 21, 1972

- 20 -

WONG TAI SIN COMMUNITY CENTRE

Celebrations To Mark 12th Anniversary

***««*«

The Social Welfare Department’s Wong Tai Sin Community Centre will mark its 12th anniversary tomorrow (Thursday) with a programme designed to please all ages. The centre looks after the cultural and recreational needs of thousands of residents in the area, both young and old.

The main celebration ceremony will be at the centre tomorrow. A highlight will be a variety show which will throw the spotlight on the talents of members of the community centre. The show will feature a Chinese folk song, an Oriental dance, a harmonica solo, Chinese music and an excerpt from a well-known Cantonese opera.

There will also be a presentation of volunteer awards by elected Urban Councillor, Mr. Peter C.K. Chan, and other awards to different members for their enthusiasm in community service by the centre’s Warden, Mr. Basil Leung.

A second variety show is planned for Friday (June 23) to include drama, boxing,karate, judo and guitar music. The celebrations will end on Sunday (June 25) with a beach party at Cafeteria Bay, New Territories.

*******

Note to editors: You are invited to have all these

anniversary celebrations covered. The variety shows begin at 8 p.m., the barbecue 1.30 p.m. to 9 p*m.

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/21.......

Wednesday, June 21, 1972

- 21 -

SEVEN BILLS PASSED IN LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL

«««*«****

Seven bills passed their committee stage and third readings in Legislative Council this afternoon and became law.

They were the Evidence (Amendment) Bill 1972; the Interpretation

and General Clauses (Amendment) Bill 1972; the Judicial Proceedings (Adjournment During Gale Warnings) (Amendment) Bill 1972; the Pensions (Amendment) Bill 1972; the Matrimonial Proceedings and Property Bill 1972;

the Inland Revenue (Amendment) (No. 2) Bill 1972, and the Tramway (Amendment) (No. 2) Bill 1972.

Debate resumed on the second reading of the Tramway (Amendment) (No. 2) Bill 1972.

Two other Bills had their first and second readings. They were the Loans (Asian Development Bank) Bill 1972, and the Public Health and Urban Services (Amendment) Bill 1972.

The Nurses Registration (Amendment) Bill 1972 had its first reading and debate on the second reading was adjourned.

-------0---------

LEGCO MEETING PROCEEDINGS

«**«***«*

Note to Editors: Proceedings of this afternoon’s Legislative Council meeting have been recorded. You are welcome to listen to the tapes at the Press Room, G.I.S.

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/22.........

Wednesday, June 21, 1972

- 22 -

EMERGENCY RESCUE OPERATIONS EXPLAINED ««*«***

A pre-determined emergency plan for carrying out rescue operations is put into immediate action whenever a natural disaster or major fire occurs in Hong Kong.

Explaining this today, a Fire Services spokesman said that the plan had enabled prompt action to be taken to initiate rescue measures at the scene of the landslide disasters at Kotewall Road and the Sau Mau Ping resite area Kwun Tong.

Under the emergency plan, the most senior fire officer to arrive at the scene, whatever his rank, takes command of operations, and assesses the seriousness of the situation.

When a disaster alarm is necessary, the Director of Fire Services or his deputy take over control of rescue operations, and obtains whatever assistance is necessary from other organisations, such as Police, military, various government departments and auxiliary services.

All rescue units come under Fire Services control, which maintains a mobile command unit at the scene.

The Fire Services spokesman said that, at the scene of a disaster, it was quite natural for onlookers to form the opinion that not enough was being done to carry out rescue operations.

/"This

Wednesday, June 21, 1972

- 23 -

,fThis is because people are looking at the situation with inexperienced eyes, and they do not appreciate that any resuce work must proceed with care to prevent further injury being caused to any potential survivors,” he added.

Conditions at the scene dictated the number of rescue workers who could be in action at any one time, and others had to be kept standing by to relieve them, or to operate any special equipment that may be needed.

”Our aim is always to save as many lives as possible, and this has been the main consideration throughout the present rescue operations,” the spokesman said.

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/24........

Wednesday, June 21, 1972

- 24 -

POLLUTION PROBLEMS OF OIL REFINERY

********

The Hon. K.S. Lo said today that Larama Island should ideally be reserved for residential and recreational use, as it was close to Hong Kong and could be reached by ferry in less than 15 minutes*

He was speaking in an adjournment debate in the Legislative Council on the matter of a proposed oil refinery at Lamma Island*

Mr. Lo said:

"Apart from its scenic views and abundance of beaches it has provided a valuable ground for local archaeologists.

"It is probably the only island of any size where the future overflow of population from Hong Kong Island itself can be contained."

For this reason Mr. Lo urged that Government should examine all the implications very carefully before deciding whether to allow an oil refinery to be set up on Lamma Island. It was a well-known fact that the nuisance of an oil refinery is far greater than that of any other industry*

Government should therefore pass all the necessary legislation for the control of air and water pollution before it grants the licence, he said. It sb pill d also make certain that it has the practical means of enforcing those regulations*

Mr. Lo said that the main pollution problems were caused by smell, smoke, sulphur dioxide and liquid waste discharge.

/"All crude •••••••

Wednesday, June 21, 1972

- 25 -

’’All crude oil smells,” he said. The smell from oil refineries was the biggest air pollution problem. If set up on Lamma, the south side of Hong Kong from the Peak down to Pokfulam and Deep Water Bay would be affected by this obnoxious odour. This would cause complaints from the residents and would also downgrade the property values.

Mr. Lo said liquid waste discharge contained various minerals which would poison marine life in the waters surrounding the plant. Poisoned fish could poison the people who ate them. It was therefore necessary to insist upon controls for the disposal of the effluent.

It had been stated that an oil refinery will bring economic benefits to Hong Kong. Mr. Lo wanted Government to state how much labour would be employed and how much revenue would be received. ”How would this revenue weigh against the potential revenue which would be gained from selling the land for private residential development?” he asked.

Although an oil refinery might be of benefit to Hong Kong in the event of the disruption of oil supplies from overseas it could also invite outside trouble.

Finally Mr. Lo queried whether the oil refinery could not more suitably be located on Tsing Yi Island where permission had already been given for one oil refinery. The water at Tsing Yi Island was deeper although the site formation work would be more expensive. ’’Should we sacrifice public interest for the sake of saving some capital expenditure for a private oil company?” Mr. Lo asked.

/’’Since •••••••

Wednesday, June 21, 1972

- 26 -

’’Since a decision of this nature will have grave consequences and wide impact for the life of the future generation I request Government to give it its most careful consideration,” he said.

’’Every citizen has the right to enjoy his home without being subjected to nuisance,” Mr. Lo concluded. Government should therefore exercise the utmost care and legislate in advance to protect the citizen’s basic rights under the common law.

-------0---------

PRESS CONFERENCE ON REuENT RAINSTORM DISASTERS

*««*M***

Note to editors: The Director of Fire Services, Mr. A.E.H. Wood

will hold a press conference tomorrow on the subject of the recent rainstorm disasters.

The press conference will take place at 3 p»m. in the G.I.S. 16 mm Theatre, Beaconsfield House, 5th floor.

Mr. Yeap Kwok-hung, Principal Staff Officer of the Fire Services Department, will be present to answer questions in Chinese.

You are invited to send a reporter and/or photographer to attend the press conference.

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/27..........

Wednesday, June 21, 1972

- 27 -

BENEFITS FROM OIL REFINERY

*«**«*«**

The District Commissioner, New Territories, the Hon. D.C. Bray, said today that an oil refinery would represent ”a very large capital investment - and a corresponding demonstration of confidence - in Hong Kong by a major international company.”

Mr. Bray was speaking in an adjournment debate in the Legislative Council on the matter of a proposed oil refinery at Lamma Island raised by the Hon. K.S. Lo.

He said an oil refinery could bring benefits to Hong Kong, both in the form of direct revenue, if it was decided to make a levy on aspects of the refinery operation, and indirect spin-off benefits such as the repair of tankers serving the refinery.

There was also the question of the reserve supply of fuel which would become available, he said.

There was a need, he said, for Hong Kong to safeguard against any interruption in normal supplies and ”an oil refinery would be of very real assistance in enabling us to keep such stocks.”

Mr. Bray said that pollution, provided certain things were done, did not prohibit the construction of an oil refinery.

The District Commissioner said it was possible to build a modern oil refinery to environmental standards which were better than the overall Colony standards in respect of air pollution and water pollution caused by effluent from the refinery itself.

/However,

Wednesday, June 21, 1972

- 28 -

However, he said, to ensure this depended first on setting design standards for the construction of the refinery which reduced air and water pollution to negligible levels.

To do this would be expensive, he said, "but oil companies these days are extremely sensitive to environmental considerations and it is of course also in their interests to ensure that as little crude oil or vapour as possible escapes from the refinery."

Secondly, he said, it was of the greatest importance that the management of the refinery, once it was built, was at all times pollution conscious so that the highest standards were maintained, both by the refinery operators and tanker captains.

,!What is more difficult to guard against is an accidental spillage of oil at the wharf when tankers are off-loading crude oil or the product carriers are loading product,” Mr. Bray said.

This could happen however carefully designed and operated the refinery was, he said.

"It is essential," he said, "to have the latest and most effective large-scale ready-use equipment constantly available to contain any such spillage•”

-------0---------

/29......

Wednesday, June 21, 1972

- 29 -

TUNG WAH MEDICAL STAFF TO GET SAME SALARY SCALES

AS GOVERNMENT DOCTORS, NURSES

Doctors, nurses and other medical staff of the Tung Wah Group of Hospitals are to get the same pay as their counterparts in Government service.

The Government announced tonight that it has accepted, in principle, the application of equal salary scales for the staff of the Medical Section of the Tung Wah Group of Hospitals.

The Finance Committee of the Legislative Council had earlier this afternoon accepted the financial implications of the increased salaries, which will be back-dated to April 1 this year.

The financial commitment is expected to be in the order of 38/2 million a year.

The Government decision on equal salary scales for the medical staff of the Tung Wah Group of Hospitals follows a comprehensive study of comparative qualifications and responsibilities of staff in the Group’s hospitals with those of similar staff in Government service.

Release Time: 9*00 p.m

- - 0 - -

P.R.H. 7 (REVISED) 4000091

INFORMATION

SERVICES

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Thursday, June 22, 1972

HEALTH PRECAUTIONS FOLLOWING THUNDERSTORM

• •

The Director of Medical and Health Services, Dr. G.H. Choa, today ♦ urged members of the public to take all possible health precautions to safeguard themselves against the danger of infection as a result of damage following the recent thunderstorm.

He warned that many wells and storage tanks had probably been affected by last week’s excessive rainfall. Some pipelines had also been temporarily disrupted by landslides, and receding flood waters had left residues.

Dr. Choa added: "In normal circumstances, water from kitchen taps is pure and safe enough to drink without boiling. But in the extraordinary situation facing large sections on both sides of the harbour at present, I must advise all households to take every precaution possible.”

He said officers of the department were keeping under constant review areas hit by landslides in Kwun Tong, Chai Wan, Ma Shan and Kotewall Road, and so far there was no danger to general health arising out of matter rotting under the rubble.

However the danger from rat and fly breeding existed, and for this reason residents in these areas should exercise extra care. He urged sightseers not to visit devastated areas out of morbid curiosity.

/Dr. Choa .........

Thursday, June 22, 1972

- 2 -

Dr. Choa repeated several warnings given earlier at the start of the hot weather on the importance of personal hygiene as the most effective way of preventing the outbreak or spread of infectious diseases such as dysentery and cholera.

’’The thunderstorm has given these warnings additional urgency,” he said.

The Director advised residents to keep themselves and their surroundings clean, and not to use food or water that had been exposed to contaminatnnnF Any suspect water should be boiled before drinking.

He urged that hands be washed after visits to the toilet. Food should not be exposed to flies, and food that had been so exposed, should not be eaten.

Dr. Choa said: ”1 must emphasise that these precautions have validity at all times, but particularly now when Hong Kong, as a whole, is recovering from one of the worst natural disasters in its history.”

’’This Department needs the co-operation of the public if it is to succeed in its task of keeping Hong Kong healthy, and containing any infectious disease should it break out.”

-------0 --------

Thursday, June 22, 1972

- 3 -

MAIL DELIVERIES AFFECTED ««*«***

The Post Office announces that at present it is not possible to deliver mail to premises which have either been vacated or are inaccessible becaxxse of the recent landslides.

People affected are advised to notify the Post Office with regard to any re-direction of mail.- Cards are available for this at all Post Offices and mail may be re-directed free of charge for any period up to three months.

However, as a special measure, people can collect their mail from their appropriate delivery office on production of proof of identity.

If'anyone is doubtful where the mail can be collected or has any other difficulty in regard to this matter he should telephone the Enquiry Bureau of the General Post Office on H-247116 or 2ji7117 between 9 a.m. and 5 p«nu

-------0---------

FEES FC-R ENGLISH-SPEAKING SCHOOLS

*******

Parents of children at English-speaking schools will be given a term’s notice of the new fee increases.

These increases will now be introduced on January 1, 1973•

Announcing this, a Government spokesman said today that the Report of the Select Committee of dhe Legislative Council, appointed to consider the cost of operating English-speaking schools, was tabled in the Council on April 26,

•’Its full implications are being studied with a view to deciding on new fees,”

....... .......0---------

A...........

Thursday, June 22, 1972

INCENTIVE PAYMENTS INCREASED

lit*******

A number of disabled people presently looked after by the Social Welfare Department in its sheltered workshops are to receive an increase in "incentive" payments from 31.50 to 32.50 a day.

The increase, benefitting about 260 people, will be back-dated

•to April 1, this year.

"Incentive" payments are intended to encourage the. disabled to earn a living by their own effort in the sheltered workshops, instead bf relying entirely on public assistance or resorting to begging.

In presenting his case to the Finance Committee of the Legislative Council’ for an increase in payments, the Director of Social Welfare said the 31*50 daily rate had proved insufficient as an incentive because the actual attendance at the sheltered workshops was only 260 as against the capacity of 525*

Of those who attend the workshops, the majority earn an average of 350 a month excluding incentive payments, or 390 including incentive payments. The increase enables them to earn about 3115 a month.

The additional expenditure arising from the increase is about 397*500 a year if the sheltered workshops are full, or about 378*000 on the basis of the present attendance.

/5.........

Thursday, June 22, 1972

- 5 -

ENTRIES CLOSING FOR EXHIBITION

*******

Entries for a special photographic exhibition at the City Museum and Art Gallery will close on Wednesday (June 28).

The exhibition, "The Changing Scene", is part of the celebrations marking the 10th anniversary of the City Hall.

Photographs taken during the past 25 years depicting trades, development and construction, customs and life in general are welcome.

Entries will be selected by the heads of five leading local photographic societies and the successful ones will be exhibited at the Exhibition Hall, City Hall between July 14 and August 12.

-------0---------

NEV/ BIRTHS AND MARRIAGE REGISTRY AT SAN PO KONG *******

A new Births and Marriage Registry at San Po Kong will open on Monday (June 26).

The Marriage Registry will serve residents in the Wong Tai Sin/San Po Kong area, and services of the Births Registry will be available to residents living to the east of the railtrack in New Kowloon.

The registry has two well-decorated ceremony halls, a makeup room for

brides and bridesmaids, and a spacious and furnished public area.

Thursday, June 22, 1972

- 6 -

STUDENT GROUPS TO INSPECT WELFARE FACILITIES ********

The Social Welfare Department has invited five student organisations to spend a few hours this summer inspecting departmental facilities for the young, the mentally-retarded and the disabled.

Invitations have been issued to the Hong Kong University Students’ Union, the Chinese University Students’ Union, the Baptist College Students’ Union, the Hong Kong Federation of Students, and the Federation of Catholic Students.

The invitation says that as sorte of the students plan a career in social welfare, it is useful that they be given an opportunity to see for themselves the Department’s staff in action in various fields.

Four or five tours are planned between the end of June and the end of August, and it will be possible to arrange transport for between 20 and JO at a time. Each tour is expected to take in three or four institutions.

-------0---------

Thursday, June 22, 1972

CLEAN-UP BY SCHOOL CHILDREN

********

More than 200 primary school children from the Wong Tai Sin area will take part in a clean-up of litter in Lam Tsuen, Tai Po, during a picnic tomorrow (Friday).

The clean-up has been organised by the Wong Tai Sin Community Centre’s Cultural and Recreational Committee. The Warden, Mr. Basil Leung, says the occasion, with its combination of recreation and instruction, amounts to ”a kind of social education.”

He believes it will not only create the setting for healthy outdoor activity, but will also induce among the participants a sense of civic responsibility by directly involving them in keeping the countryside clean and green.

The children will be divided into groups led by teachers. During the outing they will be encouraged to pick up litter left by other picnickers, using equipment made available for the day by the Urban Services Department’s office in Tai Po.

********

Note to editors: You are invited to have the clean-up and

picnic covered. Transportation will be available at the Wong Tai Sin Community Centre in the Wong Tai Sin Resettlement Estate, on June 23, at. 9*30 a.m.


Thursday, June 22, 1972

- 8 -

CROWN LAND AUCTION

********

Three lots of Crown land will be put up for sale by public auction on Friday (July 14) at 2.30 p.m. in the Lecture Room on the 8th floor of the City Hall.

All lots are for private residential purposes. They are:

(1) Shau Kei Wan Inland Lot No. 765 at Wai Hang Street, Shau Kei Wan, Hong Kong Area: 2,153 square feet Upset Price: 8300j000

(2) New Kowloon Inland Lot No. 5^51 at Feesenden

Road, Kowloon

Area: 20,310 square feet Upset Price: 82,800,000

(3) New Kowloon Inland Lot No. 5^61 at Hong Lee Road, Kwun Tong

Area: 107,300 square feet

Upset Price: 85»OOO,OOO

Full particulars and the conditions of sale may be obtained at the Public Enquiry Sub-office, Central Government Offices (West Wing), Ground Floor, Hong Kong and at the Crown Lands & Survey Office, Kowloon Government Offices,'405, Nathan Road, 10th floor, Kowloon.

-------0 - - - -

/9.........

Thursday, June 22, 1972

- 9 -

GOVERNOR BECOMES BLOOD DONOR IN HONG KONG

********

The Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, today gave his first pint of blood in Hong Kong.

Sir Murray, a regular blood donor during his other postings, arrived at the Red Cross Blood Collection Centre at sbout 9.15 a.m. and was welcomed by Mr. Anthony Yue Tung-bick, Branch Officer and Miss S. Clarke, Secretary of the Centre.

The Administrative Secretary at Government House, Mr. G.A. Higginson, and Mr. Cheung Tin-loy, a domestic assistant at Government House, who accompanied the Governor, also gave blood during the visit.

********

Note to editors: A photograph showing the Governor giving

his pint of blood at the Centre is distributed separately in the G.I.S. press boxes.

-------0---------

TEMPORARY STOPPAGE OF WATER SUPPLY IN TAI PO

********

The water supply to an area in Tai Po will be turned off on Saturday morning (June 24) from 1 a.m. to 6 a.m. to enable leakage tests to be carried out.

The area affected is bounded by Plover Cove Road, Tung Cheung Street and Kwong Fuk Road.

-------0---------

/1O........

Thursday, June 22, 1972

- 10 -

NO PROPOSED RENT CONTROL FOR BUSINESS PREMISES

*******

The Government is not proposing to introduce any form of rent control for business premises at present.

This is contained in a letter from Mr. Akers-Jones writing on behalf of the Colonial Secretary to the Chairman of the Reform Club, Mr. Brook Bernacchi. It is in reply to the recent Reform Club petition to the Governor on the subject of Rent Restriction and Protection from Eviction especially of Business and Factory Premises.

Mr. Akers-Jones said that the degree of rent increases in business premises does not warrant interference with the free market economy of Hong Kong, nor do the estimates of the supply of new accommodation during the next two years indicate that this will be necessary.

Rent increases in business premises are not a major cause of inflation; the reverse is more likely to be true, he said.

,rYour petition states that the value of the Hong Kong dollar is at present unstable and that Hong Kong itself is going through a period of inflation hitherto unknown in peace time. However, the facts do not bear out this contention.:t

Externally, he explained, the stability of the Hong Kong dollar has been well maintained because of Hong Kong’s strong balance of payments position. The Hong Kong dollar, in fact, was upvalued against the United States dollar in line with Sterling in the recent realignment of currencies.

/Internally, ........

Thursday, June 22, 1972

- 11 -

Internally, there has been some inflation in recent years, the general consumer price index having risen by about 30 per cent over the last seven years and the modified consumer price index by about 35 per cent over the same period* "Inflation is however a world-wide problem and Hong Kong’s performance in this regard is better than that of most industrial countries during this period. It must also be recognised that incomes, including wages, have in general risen substantially faster than prices and that the standard of living of the community has therefore improve considerably.

"The petition also implies that the recent rise in commercial and industrial rents is the major cause of inflation and states that in order to reduce inflation it is necessary to control these rents. This statement seems to be based upon a misunderstanding of the current economic situation.

"The state of Hong Kong’s economy is determined primarily by external influences, namely the demand for our exports in overseas markets and the prices of imported products, neither of which is under our control.

"In recent years there has been a very substantial rise in our exports, and this has led to increased demands on productive capacity and a shortage of labour, one consequence of which has been substantial increases in the wages of most workers. At the same time import prices have increased considerably.

"These are the two factors which have been mainly responsible for inflation in Hong Kong. Higher rents have therefore been a result rather than a cause of inflation."

/Mr. Akers-Jones.........

Thursday, June 22, 1972

- 12 -

Mr. Akers-Jones said the argument that high shop rents are having an adverse effect on the tourist trade also cannot be substantiated. t "The total number of visitors in 1971 was 907,295 and although this

was 2.2 per cent less than in 1970 (an exceptional year because of Expo ’70 in Japan) it represents an increase of 18.6 per cent over the 1969 figure," he pointed out.

Referring to another suggestion in the petition that rents for business and factory premises have increased from four to 10 times during the past two years. Mr. Akers-Jones said this is not borne out by the facts. The statistics prepared by the Commissioner of Rating and Valuation and published recently in his 1972 Property Review show that the rental index for shops in the metropolitan area rose over the three-year period from 1968 to 1971 from 100.00 to 129*62 (136.18 for Kowloon only). For flatted factories the rental index over the same period rose from 100.00 to 156.69, the highest increases being in Tsuen Wan where the index in 1971 was 187.64. Average rents for office accommodation of all grades rose from S1.27 per square foot in 1968 to 82.66 in 1971 - an increase of slightly over 100 per cent.

Referring to the fact that post-war domestic premises were subject to rent increase control in the early sixties and again since 1970, but post-war non—domestic premises have never been subject to any controls, apart from the Tenancy (Notice of Termination) Ordinance, which’ provides for six months1 notice to quit, Mr. Akers-Jones said that the situation with regard to business premises is however quite different.

/"Not ........

Thursday, June 22, 1972

- 15 -

"Not only is there no question of people being made homeless because of inability to pay increased rents, but the imposition of any form of rent or rent increase control would represent a degree of interference with the interplay of economic forces which would be unacceptable in the free market economy of Hong Kong, and would amount to favouring one group of entrepreneurs (the shopkeepers and factory operators) against another (the building owners),” he said.

”In addition, the estimates of the amount of new non-domestic accommodation expected to become available during 1972 and 1973i as published in the Property Review 1972, indicate that we are moving into a period of much improved supply, when pressure on business rents is expected to ease*"

Mr. Akers-Jones said that proposals have been made from time to time for some form of legislation which, while not controlling rents of business premises, would ensure security of tenure of such premises at a full market rent and such legislation may be introduced at a later date.

"It should be pointed out, however, that a system of this kind would not be intended to restrain rents below the market level."

/14

Thursday, June 22, 1972

- 14 -

CROSS-HARBOUR BUS ROUTES

*********

Passengers travelling on the new cross-harbour bus routes will be charged 31 each irrespective of the distance travelled. The fare will include the toll fee.

The Commissioner for Transport, Mr. B.D. Wilson, said this afternoon that the Kowloon Motor Bus and the China Motor Bus Companies would operate joint services on three routes linking Kowloon and Hong Kong Island via the tunnel.

The routes are: Kwun Tong to Kennedy Town via Choi Hung, Hung Hom, and Central: Lai Chi Kok to Shau Kei Wan via Mong Kok, Yau Ma Tei, and North Point: and Kowloon Tong (Wang Tau Hom) to Pokfield Road via Yau Ma Tei, Central and Mid-Levels.

All routes will serve Causeway Bay. When necessary short-working journeys will also be operated between Choi Hung and Central; Mong Kok and North Point; and between Yau Ma Tei and Central to meet traffic requirements, Mr. Wilson said that a total of 80 new double deck buses will be allocated by the two companies to operate the routes and each will show its destination in white characters on a red background.

The services, on a limited stop basis , will operate between 7 a.m. and 8 p.m. During peak hours the frequency on each route will be six minutes and at all other times 10 minutes, subject to duplication.

These facilities are to be provided on a trial basis for six months and will then be reviewed in the light of operating experience.

Full details of the exact routes, stopping places and timing will be published shortly and exhibited at main terminals.

-------0-------- -

/15

Thursday, June 22, 1972

- 15 -

CLOSURE ORDERS BY BUILDING AUTHORITY

The Building Authority has applied for closure orders on a number of buildings following the recent rainstorm.

Up to and including today (June 22), the buildings involved are:

10, 12, 14, 16, 21, Po Shan Road

4?, 51t 53> 55$ Conduit Road

36, Kotewall Road, Blocks 1 and 2

60, 62, Plantation Road

22A, B, C and 31 Barker Road

24, Tin Hau Temple Road

17, 19$ 21. Babington Path

130, 134, 136, Kennedy Road

21, Seymour Road

3, Severn Road

8, Shiu Fai Terrace (Blocks A - F)

2, 4, Bullock Lane

12, 13, 14, Lan Kwai Fong

33« 35$ 371 39$ Wun Sha Street

226, 228, Queen’s Road Central

IA and IB, Shouson Hill Road East

11, Shouson Hill Road East (Blocks E • J) 6 houses

39* Shouson Hill Road, Block A.

Occupiers of these premises may call at the Tenancy Inquiry Bureau (Hong Kong), Secretariat for Home Affairs* International Building* Des Voeux Road Central for information regarding the effect that these closures will have on their rights as tenants.

They may also telephone HU+52845 or H-452802*


A6.....

Thursday, June 22, 1972

- 16 -•• %

CONTINUING RELIEF FOR RAINSTORM VICTIMS

********

About 6,000 victims of the thunderstorm whose homes or huts were substantially damaged by floods are to receive immediately an ex gratia payment of $50 each from the Community Relief Trust Fund.

Announcing this today, the Director of Social Welfare, the Fund Trustee, said the payment would mean, in effect, that an average family of five members would receive $250, with the cash outlay under this head totalling abo’ut $300,000. ♦

The payment brings relief to a category of thunderstorm victims not covered by yesterday’s decision to allow ex gratia grants of $200 each from the Fund for people whose homes had been destroyed by the disaster.

About 800 people registered with the Social Welfare Department fall into yesterday’s category.

Urgent administrative measures have been taken, and payments can be collected from noon tomorrow(Friday)at the following localities on both sides of the • •

harbour:- ....

* Tai Hang Tung Community Centre;

* Wong Tai Sin Community Centre;

Kwun Tong Community Centre; J

* Eastern District Office, Social Welfare Department, Causeway Bay.

’’These ex gratia payments, amounting to about $500,000,” the Director , said, ’’take into account numerous.contributions.flowing into the Fund as a result of public sympathy and generosity. The general wish is that the money go immediately to relieve hardship * ■■ -

* /Assistance .......

Thursday, June 22, 1972

- 17 -

Assistance from the Fund under other heads include 8500 burial grants, and 86,000 grants for families on the death of the chief bread-winner.

Contributions to the Fund from members of the public received today reached 8357,374.80, bringing the total received since the thunderstorm began to 8772,342.80.

Meanwhile, the Agriculture and Fisheries Department, up to 9 a.m. this morning, has registered a total of 4,920 applications for relief from farmers who have suffered losses in livestock, crops and poultry.

Of these 4,920, the department has investigated 1,822 applications and has approved relief cash totalling 8218,695 for payment to farmers.

On the resettlement of rainstorm victims, a Resettlement Department spokesman said today that since Tuesday, more than 1,500 people affected by the Sau Mau Ping landslide had moved into their homes at the Sau Mau Ping Resettlement Estate.

The department is working at full speed on resettling the 600 people in Sam Kar Tsuen who had been evacuated from their homes because of possible landslide there.

The New Territories Administration has paid out more than 836,000 for the relief of people in the New Territories whose homes or huts have been damaged in the rainstorm.

The payment is to enable these people to meet the costs of repairing their homes.

The New Territories Administration has so far registered some 860 applications for relief of which 158 have been approved, and the rest are under investigation. Of the approved applications, payment has been made in 52 cases. -----------------------------------0--------- /18.....................................................................

Thursday, June 22, 1972

- 18 -

IMMEDIATE STEPS BEING TAKEN TO REDUCE HEALTH HAZARDS IN DISASTER AREAS

The two major disaster areas in Sau Mau Ping and Kotewall Road are now becoming a health hazard.

The areas were visited this afternoon by the Director of Medical and Health Services, Dr. G.H. Choa, the Director of Public Works, Mr. J.J. Robson, and the Director of Fire Services, Mr. A.E.H. Wood, who inspected the progress of the rescue work taking place.

The Director of Medical and Health Services said tonight that there was no further hope of anyone being alive under the debris in these areas.

”1 regret we must give up hope of finding any more survivors. Normally, a person buried under these circumstances may survive for about two days or three days at the very most. After about four days, there is no likelihood of any life remaining.

"During my visit to Sau Ming Ping and Kotewall Road, a strong odour in these areas was most apparent and, under the circumstances, it is not surprising that they have become something of a health hazard. We are now tackling the problem of disinfecting the areas."

Following very careful consideration and in the light of this assessment by Dr. Choa, it has been decided that the task must now be to clear these areas as quickly as possible to prevent any health hazard from developing further.

Starting tomorrow morning, therefore, the Public Works Department will move in earth-moving equipment to speed up the clearance work. It is hoped this will out the clearance time by about ten days, thereby minimizing the health risks.

/During •••••••

Thursday, June 22, 1972

- 19 -

During the visit to the two areas today, the Director of Public Works, Mr. Robson said that with these new arrangements it would take a further week to complete the removal of the large quantity of earth and debris at Sau Mau Ping, but to reinstate the damaged slope above the area would take longer.

He also said that it will take about 14 days to clear Conduit Road but the clearance and other works at Po Shan Road with every effort being made will still take considerably longer.

-------0---------

MEMBERS OF COMMISSION OF INQUIRY NAMED

«***««**

The membership of the Commission of Inquiry appointed by the Governor to inquire into the recent rainstorm disasters was announced this (Thursday) afternoon.

The Chiarman of the Commission is District Judge T.L. Yang and the two members are Professor S. Mackey, Professor of Civil Engineering at the University of Hong Kong, and Mr. Eric Cumine, an Authorised Architect, who is a partner of Eric Cumine and Associates.

The Secretary to the Commission is Mr. Mo Yiu-chor of the Colonial ♦

Secretariat.

-------0---------

/20.........

Thursday, June 22, 1972

- 20 -MID-LEVELS RESIDENTS OF DANGEROUS BUILDINGS Allowed To Return To Collect Belongings ft******

Special arrangements have been made to enable people to collect personal possessions from their homes in the mid-levels area which have been closed for safety reasons.

They will be allowed to enter at their own risk under police supervision at staggered intervals during tomorrow, Friday, June 23, and Saturday, June 24.

The items people will be allowed to collect are limited to small personal effects and valuables which can easily be carried.

Police barriers will be set up to ensure that only bona-fide residents are allowed entry.

They will be required to bring proof of their identity and residence. No agents will be allowed.

Permission for entry is liable to be withdrawn if this becomes necessary for safety or any other reasons.

Entry times are as follows

Tomorrow, Friday, June 23: 10 and 16 Po Shan Mansions between 9 a.m. and 2 p.m.; 12 and 14 Po Shan Mansions between 2 p.m. to 7 p*m.; 53 and 55 Conduit Road between 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.; 17, Babington Path between 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.; 19 and 21 Babington Path between 2 p.m. to 7 p.m.

Saturday, June 24: Emerald Gardens, 36 Kotewall Road, block 2 between 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.; block 1 at the same address between 2 p.m. and 7 p.m.; Skyline Mansions, 51 Conduit Road, between 2 p.m. to 7 p.m.; Mirror Marina, 47 Conduit Road between 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Peopee whose homes have been closed in other areas can inquire whether entry will be permitted by contacting the Buildings Ordinance Office of the Public Works Department, telephone No. H-251111, Ext. 2324.

-------0---------

Release Time: 9.00 p.m.

P.R.H. 7 (REVISED! 4000091

INFORMATION

SERVICES

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Friday, June 2J, 1972

ALTERNATIVE ROUTE TO KWUN TONG

********

A multi-million dollar project is in hand for the construction of an alternative route to Kwun Tong Road to form part of the North East Kowloon Corridor.

This duplication of Kwun Tong Road will relieve present congestion and provide for anticipated traffic increase.

The dual-two-lane road will be an extension of Wai Yip Street and runs parallel and just to the west of, Kwun Tong Road. It then joins Kwun Tong Road about mid-way between Clearwater Bay Road and Ngau Tau Kok Road.

The junction of the new road with Kwun Tong Road will have a grade-separated interchange to allow both eastbound and westbound traffic to merge with and diverge from the main Kwun Tong Road traffic.

The section of Kwun Tong Road between this junction and the Clearwater Bay Road junction will be widened from six to 12 lanes.

A pedestrain bridge near St. Joseph’s Anglo-Chinese School will permit safe-crossing of the Road.

The design of the project has allowed for future improvements to adjacent road junctions, including those at Ngau Tau Kok Road and planned development roads on the Kowloon Bay Reclamation.

The design of the flyover at the Wai Yip Street Extension junction has also taken into account future requirements for the Mass Transit Kowloon Bay Station and a nearby maintenance depot.

The entire project is expected to be completed early in 1975.

/2.........

0 - -

Friday, June 23, 1972

- 2 -

GOVERNMENT GRANT FOR HONG KONG OLYMPIC TEAM

********

The Government is to give an outright grant of $901000 to help » finance the participation of a Hong Kong team in the Olympic Games in West Germany later this year.

The grant will go to the Amateur Sports Federation and Olympic Committee which had applied for financial assistance following an invitation to take part in the Games.

The Games will be held in Munich from August 26 to September 6.

The Hong Kong team will comprise some 17 competitors and two officials of the Olympic Committee. The sports in which the competitors will take part are fencing, judo, shooting, swimming and yachting.

The total cost of sending the team to Munich is estimated at more than $170,000.

The government’s grant of $90,000 is in line with previous decisions to give financial assistance to the Federation and Olympic Committee towards the cost of Hong Kong participating in the Olympic Games.

-------0---------

/3........

Friday, une 23? 1972

- 3 -

PEDESTRIAN SUBWAYS NEAR YAU MA TEI TYPHOON SHELTER

*******

Work will start shortly on the construction of pedestrian subways and drainage works in the reclamation in Yau Ma Tei Typhoon Anchorage to provide easier and safer pedestrian crossing of Tong Mi Road.

The work will involve the construction of two pedestrian subways off Tung Kun Street and Dundas Street, and about 1,750 feet of stormwater drains.

The project forms part of the Tong Mi Road Extension Scheme, which when completed, will become a major road linking Kowloon South with Tsuen Wan in the New Territories.

Construction work is expected to start in August this year and should take about 14 months to complete.

-------0---------

TRAINING SCHOOL FOR PREVENTIVE SERVICE

********

The construction of the first permanent training school for the Preventive Service at Tai Lam Chung in the New Territories will begin in August this year.

The school will mainly consist of a three-storey office and classroom block and a four storey residential block able to accommodate 113 trainees. Quarters for senior and junior staff will also be provided in three separate blocks.

A single storey gymnasium attached to the main residential building will also serve as a multi-purpose hall.

The project is estimated to cost more than S5 mi Ilion*

-------0---------

A..........

Friday, Tune 23, 1972

- 4 -

SQUATTERS GIVEN ACCOMMODATION

*******

About 60 squatters staying at the open playground of the Kwun Tong Community Centre will now be moved to the Sau Mau Ping Welfare building where they will be given proper covered shelter and relief grants.

These squatters were originally living at the Sai Cho Wan squatter area in Kwun Tong.

During the rainstorm, they were taken to the Kwun Tong Community Centre where they were temporarily accommodated on the open playground because the Centre was already fully occupied by survivors of the Sau Mau Ping landslide.

This morning these squatters complained about their open-air accommodation and staff of the Resettlement Department, after interviewing them, decided that they be given covered accommodation immediately.

After moving into the Sau Mau Ping Welfare building, these squatters will be given cash, blankets, cooking utensils and other relief measures.

A Public Works Department engineer will visit their squatter area on Monday to see whether or not the area is dangerous. If so, the Resettlement Department will offer resettlement to these squatters.

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/5........

Friday, June 23, 1972

- 5 -

PARK IMPROVEMENTS

*******

The Government is to undertake several projects to provide new rest areas and to improve existing ones.

A new sitting-out area of about 3,000 square feet will be built around an old shrine at the junction of Tung Lo Wan Boad and Tai Hang Road. It will be lined with flower beds and contain several garden benches.

At the same time, some 3,000 feet of concrete footpaths will be laid in the Tin Hau Temple Road Park as part of the development of the 23-acre park.

The existing network of footpaths, a favourite walk for residents of the North Point area, will also be renovated. This will enable flowers and trees to be planted, while two areas of land next to the footpath will be turfed and swings and benches added.

Work will also begin next month on refreshment kiosks in five parks on both sides of the harbour. They will be at Fat Kwong Street Garden, Willow Street Playground and Oxford Road Playground in Kowloon and Victoria Peak Garden and Blake Garden on Hong Kong Island.

/6.......

Friday, June 25 j 1972

- 6 -

CHAI WAN CARGO HANDLING AREA

**«««***

The Government is planning to construct a cargo handling basin in Chai Wan to meet the demands of industrial development in the area.

When completed the basin would facilitate the transportation of raw material or finished products to and from Chai Wan by sea. At present only land transportation can be used.

As part of the scheme a breakwater would have to be constructed to protect the basin from rough seas so that it could be used throughout the year.

A notice in the Government Gazette today outlines the area that would be affected by the construction of the breakwater. It calls on people who have objections or any claims of loss of private right to submit their objections or claims in writing to the Director of Public Works within two months from the date of the Gazette Notice.

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Friday, June 2J, 1972

- 7 -

BILL SEEKS GREATER CONTROL OVER CEMETERIES *******

An amending bill which seeks to give the authorities greater control over the management of private cemeteries was published in today’s gazette.

If enacted, the Public Health and Urban Services (Amendment) (No. J) Bill 1972 would enable regulations to be made prescribing or providing for the depth and size of graves and vaults, as well as burial fees.

Another amendment would allow a charge to be made for permission to exhume human remains, whether in private or public cemeteries or elsewhere.

The bill, which will be introduced into the Legislative Council shortly, also empowers the authorities to make regulations in respect of other matters which they consider necessary for the proper regulation and control of public and private cemeteries.

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/8.........

Friday, June 231 1972

- 8 -

ADDITIONAL EMERGENCY ENQUIRY CENTRE

********

An Emergency Enquiry Centre has been set up to co-ordinate answers to enquiries connected with the recent disasters, including matters relating to property that arise out of them.

The telephone numbers are H-95288, H-95388 and H-95^+88. The Centre will open tomorrow (Saturday) morning at 10 a.m. and will remain open daily, including Sundays, thereafter from 10 a.m. to 7 p*m. until further notice.

The Centre has a dual function: To co-ordinate answers to questions which cannot by answered by existing enquiry offices; and to receive enquiries direct from members of the public.

The Centre will not replace existing Government offices to which the public are already accustomed to addressing queries. These are: The Tenancy Enquiry Bureau, the Buildings Ordinance Office, the Enquiry Centre at Western Police Station, the Legal Aid Office, the City District Offices and the Public Enquiry Centres.

Friday, June 23, 1972

- 9 -

OCEAN TERMINAL CAR PARK BY-LAWS APPROVED

********

By-laws regulating the parking of vehicles in the Ocean Terminal Car Park have been approved for the Hong Kong and Kowloon Wharf and Godown Co. Ltd. by the Governor in Council.

The by-laws, published in today’s gazette, are modelled on the Road Traffic (Parking and Waiting) Regulations which cover vehicles using government multi-storey car parks.

A vehicle which has been abandoned or allowed to wait in contravention of the by-laws may be removed by the company, which owns and controls the car park.

The vehicle may be recovered by its owner if a removal charge and a storage charge are paid, or if it is released by order of court. Other actions may be taken if the owner does not claim it within a set period.

Other by-laws prohibit lorries and public light buses from using the car park, and set out the obligations of drivers using the" park, and the duties of the park attendants.

On conviction, a maximum penalty of $500 is prescribed for breach of some of the by-laws.

-------0---------

AO........

Friday, June 23, 1972

- 10 -

INAUGURATION OF KUK’S 20TH TERM

********

The inauguration of the Heung Yee Kuk’s 20th Term will be held in the City Hall Concert Hall on Monday, June 26, at 10.15 a.m.

The Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, will witness the oath-taking and will present certificates of office to the councillors whose two-year term of office began on June 1, 1972.

The Kuk is the Government’s statutory advisory body on New Territories’ affairs.

*********

Note to editors: You are invited to cover the inauguration

ceremony on Monday. The Heung Yee Kuk will issue special badges for this purpose, and they can be collected from the Press Room, Government Information Services, tomorrow (Saturday). No press representatives will be admitted without them.

The left balcony will be reserved for television camera teams and photographers who are advised to bring telephoto lens. Two rows of seats on the left of the auditorium fronting the stage have been set aside for reporters. Press representatives should be in place by 10.00 a.m. G.I.S. officers will be there to assist them.

Friday, June 23, 1972

- 11 -

COMMISSION OF INQUIRY BEGINS

PUBLIC HEARINGS ON WEDNESDAY

*****«*«»

The Commission of Inquiry appointed to investigate the recent rainstorm disasters, announced today that its public hearings will begin at 10.30 a.m. on Wednesday (June 28).

They will be held in the Lecture Roon North, City Hall High Block, 8th Floor.

In the meantime, any person who feels that he can give useful information on the subject of the inquiry is invited to communicate at once with the Secretary of the Commission, Mr. Mo Yiu-chor, whose address is Secretary, Commission of Inquiry, Central Government Offices (East Wing), Hong Kong (Telephone No. H-95312).

All that is necessary, at this stage, is a letter in either English or Chinese, giving the writer’s name and address and a brief summary of the information he can give. Arrangements will be made for a further statement to be taken if necessary by the Commission’s counsel. The Commission will then decide whether the deponent should be called to give oral evidence before them.

All evidence given before the Commission will be absolutely privileged, and no witness will be liable to any suit or other civil proceeding in respect of such evidence.

The Commission held a private meeting today, and this afternoon made preliminary visits to the disaster areas at Sau Mau Ping and Po Shan Road.

•------0 • - - w

/12..........

Friday, June 23, 1972

- 12 -

ANOTHER SUB-TREASURY IN KOWLOON?

********

The Government is now considering opening another Sub-Treasury in Kowloon.

However, before any decision is reached, a sample survey will be conducted in July, August and September to see if there is adequate demand for additional Treasury facilities.

The survey, organized by the Secretariat for Home Affairs, the Census and Statistics Department and the Treasury, is to be carried out with the assistance of undergraduates of the University of Hong Kong.

The survey will require the co-operation of the public who are paying their rates, water charges, etc. at the Kowloon Sub^Treasury on the 4th floor of Kowloon Government Offices, 405 Nathan Road.

- - - - 0 -------

Release Time? 7.00 p.m.

P.R.H. 7 (REVISED! 4000091

M® M®

■■

INFORMATION

SERVICES

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Saturday , June 24 , 1972

LOW-COST HOUSING FOR RETIRING JUNIOR GOVERNMENT SERVANTS

********

The Governor-in-Council has approved a plan for the housing of retiring junior Government servants who have been required, for operational reasons, to live in Government quarters throughout most of their careers.

This new scheme applies to all junior Government officers now living in departmental quarters because of the nature of their work.

The majority of those benefitting from the new arrangements are retiring rank and file members of the Royal Hong Kong Police Force and members of the other disciplined services.

This will include those policemen and pensioners who have been unable to find suitable alternative accommodation and are therefore still occupying Government quarters.

Such officers, provided their pensions do not exceed 3950 a month, are now eligible for accommodation in Government low-cost housing estates.

For the future, they will be able to apply for such housing two years in advance of their retirement date.

If they are allocated Government low-cost flats before they actually retire, they will be permitted to give up their departmental quarters in order to enable them to move into any Government low-cost flats allocated to them.

/A Government

Saturday, June 24, 1972

- 2 -

A Government spokesman said today the extension of eligibility for Government low-cost housing now makes it possible to offer low-cost housing to each eligible officer as he retires.

’•However, I must make it clear that it will not always be possible to offer accommodation in low-cost estates of choice. ”

Legal Action

"If the officer does not accept an offer and he fails to vacate his quarters as directed, legal action will be taken to ensure that such quarters are made available to house serving officers for whom they are intended,11

The Government spokesman explained that junior officers now living in departmental quarters, because of the nature of their jobs, face certain difficulties when they retire.

"Unlike other Government servants on similar salaries, they are not eligible, whilst in service, for Government low-cost housing under the 15 per cent quota, introduced in 1961. • ■

,fNor are they eligible for co-operative schemes or the Government-built local officers’ housing schemes.

"On retirement, they are also not eligible for the 15 per cent quota of Government low-cost housing which is at present confined to serving officers.

/’•If........

Saturday, June 24, 1972

- 3 -

”If they apply for housing as members of the public, it is very unlikely, because of the long waiting list, that they will be given a flat on or near the date of their retirement, even assuming that they are in every other respect eligible.”

Since the start of the scheme to reserve 15 per cent of the domestic accommodation under the Government low-cost housing building programme for Government staff in 1961, some 4,116 flats have been allocated to Government servants under this scheme.

More Flats

By the middle of next year, with the completion of more low-cost estates, a total of 4,000 flats is expected to be available within the 15 per cent quota.

The spokesman said: ”At present, priority for the 15 per cent quota depends entirely on length of service. In order that serving officer are not put at a distinct disadvantage, they will continue to be given priority over pensioners.

”As the 15 per cent quota has not been fully taken up, there should be no difficulty in the foreseeable future in offering accommodation to all pensioners in this category who apply, although their choice will be strictly limited to what is available.”

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A..........

Saturday, June 24, 1972

- 4 -

WEATHER FOR MAY

May 1972 was much wetter than normal. During the month there were only four days on which no rainfall was recorded at the Royal Observatory.

The month’s total rainfall of 654.5 mm was more than twice the normal value for May.

On May 1, a trough of low pressure lay from west to east across the south China coast and unsettled weather with occasional showers and scattered thunderstorms affected the Colony during the first 5 days of the month.

The trough weakened late on May 5 and the weather improved with sunny intervals during the next two days.

From May 6 onwards, several troughs formed and affected south China and the northern part of the.South China Sea; and conditions were often unsettled with occasional heavy showers and widespread thunderstorms.

On May 10 and 11, a trough near the south China coast became very active. Enhanced by the passage of an upper-air disturbance, it gave rise to heavy squally showers and.violent thunderstorms over the Colony.

During these two days a total of 525 mm of rainfall was recorded at the Royal Observatory, and this accounted for about half the total rainfall for the month.

The heavy downpour on May 10 and 11 caused landslides, widespread flooding and disruption to traffic on a number of roads.

/Early ........

Saturday, June 24, 1972

- 5 -

Early on the morning of May 11, the maximum gusts recorded during the squally showers were 81 knots at the King’s Park Meteorological Station, 75 knots at Tate’s Cairn, 57 knots at the Airport Meteorological Office and 48 knots at the Royal Observatory.

Although showers fell on almost every day from May 6 until May 319 sunny intervals occurred during May 13-16, 26-27 and 29-31.

During the month 6 aircraft were diverted due to adverse weather conditions.

Thunderstorm or heavy rain warnings were issued on 20 occasions.

The month’s figures and departures from normal were:

Sunshine Rainfall Cloudiness

Relative Humidity

Mean Maximum Temperature

Mean Temperature

Mean Minimum Temperature Mean Dew Point

Total Evaporation

116.3 hours; 39•8 hours below normal

65^.5 nun; 361.8 mm above normal

82 %; 6% above normal

89 fy 4% above normal

27.8 °C; normgl

25-0 °C; 0.2 qC below normal

23.0 °C; 0.3 QC below normal

23.0 °C; 0.6 C above normal

136.3 mm; 33*4 mm below normal

The maximum temperature of 32.0 °C was

recorded on May 30, and

the minimum temperature of 20.2 °C was recorded on May 11.

0--------

/6........

Saturday, June 24, 1972

- 6 -

CLEARWAY HOURS EXTENDED

*******

The Transport Department is to extend the operating hours of special clearway zones in parts of Kowloon in an effort to improve traffic flow during peak periods.

With effect from Tuesday (June 27)9 the daily clearway hours in Shanghai Street and Reclamation Street, between Mong Kok and Public Square Street, will be extended by two and a half hours.

The new operating times will be between 7*30 a.m. and 10 a.m. and between 3 p.m. and 7 p.m. This means that the morning clearway times are being increased by half-an-hour and the afternoon by two hours.

All motor vehicles, except franchised buses, will be prohibited from stopping to pick up or set down passengers and to load or unload goods during the clearway hours. Appropriate traffic signs will be erected to indicate the revised times.

L

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/7.........

Saturday, June 24, 1972

- 7 -

1972 AGRICULTURAL SHOW

*******

The Agriculture and Fisheries Department is organising an Agricultural Show this year to provide an opportunity for people to see the latest developments on Hong Kong’s farming scene.

The Show.aims at introducing to farmers new techniques in both crop and livestock husbandry as well as stimulating public interest in farming industry and conservation of the countryside! • •

Like the previous one held in 1965i it will take place on the airstrip at Sek Kong, between December 8 and December 11*

The Agriculture and Fisheries Department today invites applications from those commercial firms who wish to exhibit at the Show but who have not yet applied for stands.

These firms may contact the Show Secretary, Mr. A.M. Height, of the department at 5931 Canton Road, 12th floor, Kowloon (Tel. K-688111 Ext. 92).

On display at the Show will be exhibits staged by the Agriculture and Fisheries Department, Vegetable Marketing Organisation and commercial firms. Some other government departments will also be showing aspects of the services they provide to the public in general, and to the rural community in particular.

In connection with the Show, a number of competitions for farmers are being held in many types of livestock and crops, and the winners will be awarded ’challenge cups and trophies.

An entpytninment programme, which includes cooking demonstrations and performances by dog teams ffrom the Police and Army, is also planned for visitors.

The 1965 Agricultural Show attracted about 100,000 visitors. It is expected that the attendance this year will top 150,000. • ----

Saturday, June 24, 1972

- 8 -

SPECIAL CONCERT FOR CITY HALL ANNIVERSARY

*******

Twelve leading local instrumentalists will play for the City Hall in two of the gala concerts being held as part of its tenth anniversary celebrations next month.

The performers include four violinists, five pianists, one flautist, one horn-player and one harpsichordist.

The programme for the two concerts will cover a wide range of works from Chinese contemporary to classical European; from French impressionists to local compositions.

Among the players are Moya Rea, Arrigo Foa, Lim Kek-han, Virginia Sun and David Gwilt.

Tickets for the two concerts, on Friday and Saturday (July 21 and 22) are available daily from 12 noon to 9 p»m« at the City Hall Box Office at J1, Z2 and S3*

• • w - 0--------

32 YEARS WITH POST OFFICE REWARDED

*******

Mr. Chan Ka-cheuk, Senior Postal Officer, will retire from the Government service on Monday (June 26) after more than 32 years of service with the Post Office.

To mark the occasion, the Deputy Postmaster General, Mr. D.J.K. Bamford, will present a gift to Mr. Chan on behalf of his friends and colleagues on Monday .....................................................

at the Air Mails Centre, Kai Tak Airport.

*******

Note to Editors: You are cordially invited to send a reporter

and/or photographer to cover the presentation ceremony which will take place at 1.55 p*m.

/9.........

- - 0 - -

Saturday, June 24, 1972

- 9 -

291,000 LOTTERY TICKETS SOLD SO FAR

********

Four Commercial Radio artistes will help sell tickets of the 49th Government Lottery - this year’s third - at the Royal Hong Kong Jockey Club selling booth outside the Star Ferry pier, Hong Kong side, on Monday, June 26.

They are Miss Wang Fong-ling, Miss Winnie Yu, Mr. Fung Chin-ping and Mr. Stephen Yung. They will sell the tickets from 12.45 p.m. to 1.15 p.m

Up to noon today, 291,000 tickets of the 49th Government Lottery had been sold.

Winning numbers will be drawn by the four artistes at the Royal Hong Kong Jockey Club Race Course, Happy Valley, at 10 a.m. on Saturday (July 1)

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QUARANTINE RESTRICTIONS

*********

The Port Health Authorities announced today that quarantine restrictions have been imposed against arrivals from Belitung (P), Indonesia because of cholera.

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Release time: 2.50 p.m.

4000035 P.R. 33

HONG KONG GOVERNMENT

NFORMATION

SERVICES

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

SUPPLEMENT

Monday, June 26, 1972

INAUGURATION OF 24TH TERM OF HEUNG YEE KUK

*««**««*

The following is the full text of the speech made by the Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose at the above ceremony:

"I am very happy to take part in the Inauguration Ceremony of the 20th Term of the Heung Yee Kuk. Since my visit to the Kuk last December, I have had a chance to visit several districts, and to meet some local Rural Committee Chairman and to see for myself what is happening in the New Territories.

"I welcome this opportunity to meet all of you once again and, and I emphasize this, to reiterate my interest in New Territories affairs.

"First of all, I would like to offer my sympathy to all those in the New Territories who have sufferred in the recent rains. They are very much all in our thoughts. I know any thing that government can do to alleviate their suffering will be done. But today I do not want to look back to the recent disaster but forward to the future problems in the New Territories as a whole.

"In your speech, Mr. Chan, you mentioned the importance of equal emphasis for rural and urabn areas. I would like to assure you that your government now accepts the principle that so far as is practicable services should be spread evenly throughout the whole of Hong Kong.

/"As I see .......

Monday, June 26, 1972

- 2 -

”As I see it the New Territories are composed of three parts with quite different characteristics. Firstly, there are the new towns that have been built, such as Tsuen Wan and Kwai Chung, and those which will be built, such as Tuen Mun and Shatin. Next there are the large areas of low-lying land, once rice fields, now mixed agriculture but often with their conglomeration of huts, makeshift dwellings and small scale industry which have proliferated in recent years. Finally there is the undeveloped country-side such as the Sai Kung and Sha Tau Kok peninsulas, the magnificent area around Tai Mo Shan, Shing Mun and Tai Lam Chung, and, of course, the island of Lantau.

"When anyone talks of the New Territories it is my experience that they are seldom thinking of all three of these parts.

"With regard to the new towns, our object is that in future they should be built as complete units, self-sufficient as to places of employment and housing and also as to medical, educational and other services, and with the amenities and environment that will make them agreeable places to live in and will attract inhabitants from the over-densely populated parts of Hong Kong, particularly, I hope, young couples. Together with-the necessary communications system - which is a prerequisite. These are the conditions which will ensure the most rapid growth and the greatest contentment. The principles of building new towns are well understood by planners in Hong Kong, as the world over, and it is simply a question of applying them here within the resources available.

"Then there is the question of the rural sprawl over the low-lying land, often engulfing old-established villages, with its attendant problem of inadequate water, lighting and sanitation and of pollution - in short of rural

/slums.........

Monday, June 26, 1972

- 3 -

slums. This strikes me as perhaps the most difficult problem of the New Territories because in each individual case it is a question of degree as to what is tolerable and what is not. Here we must listen carefully to the advice of the Heung Yee Kuk; but I am sure that Small Government Housing Estates of which seven have already been approved in principle for the Nev/ Territories, will play a considerable part in ameliorating this problem, as will also the concept of New Villages now being investigated, for instance, in the Tai Po District. I should like to assure the Kuk that we recognise this as a problem which must not be ignored.

’’Finally there are the mountains, beaches and the truly rural areas. These are becoming less and less areas of the traditional and picturesque village life based on the cultivation of rice. The inhabitants have largely left them for more remunerative work in Hong Kong or the United Kingdom. But they are more and more becoming areas of week-end recreation. For my part I unreservedly welcome this new development and I hope I have the support of the Kuk in this.

’’This function of the New Territories will grow with the steady rise of living standards and increase in leisure time of the urban population. I suggest that for these areas our object must be firstly to ensure that they are accessible to holiday-makers and secondly, that people unaccustomed to the countryside do not destroy it through ignorance, or through lack of the necessary installations and supervision. Provided these conditions are met, and the recreational use of these areas develops in an orderly way, I believe that, thirdly, these areas could form the basis for a useful ancillary of the growing tourist industry of Hong Kong; if Government provided the necessary communications, as I think it must do in any case.

/’’You,

Monday, June 24, 1972

- 4 -

,rYou, Mr. Chan and the two Vice-Chairmen are to be congratulated on your re-election with such strong support. I am also glad to learn that the work of the Kuk is to be spread among 14 sub-committees dealing with subjects ranging from education and health to urban services and tourism. I very much welcome this specialisation and assure you that your Government looks forward to benefiting from the advice they will give.

”1 have read with interest an account of the Kuk’s discussions with the District Commissioner on small house development and hope to consult Executive Council shortly on amendments to those legal and policy provisions which may call for revision, as Mr. Chan has suggested.

’’The next two years will be exciting and challenging ones for the New Territories. I am confident that with the joint resolution of the 20th Term of the Heung Yee Kuk and your Government they will be years of stability and prosperity.”

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Release Time: 11.00 a.m.

P.R.H. 7 (REVISED) 400009)

INFORMATION

SERVICES

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Tuesday, June 27, 1972

TEMPORARY RATE EXEMPTIONS

For Buildings Officially Closed By Rainstorms

*******

Owners of all buildings or flats which are uninhabitable as a result of official closure orders following the recent rainstorms are not required to pay any rates until further notice.

The Commissioner of Rating and Valuation, Mr. R.A. Fry, said today these properties comprise 300 flats in the Mid-Levels, the Peak, and in Wun Sha Street, Tai Hang, and in Kowloon.

They also include the collapsed or damaged buildings at No. 11

Kotewall Road, Nos. j8 to 40 Kotewall Road, No. 21 Po Shan Road and No. 2 Bullock Lane, Wan Chai.

Mr. Fry said the assessments for rates for the third quarter for all these properties have been cancelled with effect from July 1.

"However", he said, "due to computerised distribution of rate demands, many of these notices have already been posted. Owners of officially closed buildings should ignore these demands."

"The Rating and Valuation Department will shortly be sending out notices of cancellation of rates assessments. Ratepayers affected should not be worried if they do not receive these notices."

■ • • /"Owners.........

Tuesday, June 27, 1972

- 2 -

’’Owners of closed buildings are advised to note that when closure orders are lifted, their premises will be re-assessed for rates from the first day of the month following the removal of the closure orders.”

Occupiers of flats in the Mid-Levels district, who moved out of their premises recently although their buildings were not affected by closure orders, are liable for payment of rates. Mr. Fry pointed out that he has no authority to cancel the assessments. Rates demand notes are now being sent to existing addresses.

The Commissioner added: ’’Any ratepayer wishing to claim a refund of rates on account of vacancy may do so by giving me due notice in writing not later than July 15* It is important to note that rates cannot be refunded unless they are paid on time during July and the premises have been vacant for an entire month.

”A flat will be considered vacant only where it is entirely clear of personal belongings and furniture.”

Ratepayers of such premises who wish to apply for a refund, or who may have any enquiries concerning the refund procedure, should telephone H-249021 and ask to speak to the Officer-in-charge of the Refund of Rates Section of the Rating and Valuation Department. Explanatory leaflets on rates refund procedure are available.

Ratepayers who have not yet received demand notes for rates for the third quarter of this year are asked to enquire at the Treasury in Ice House Street*

, ... /Lists ........

Tuesday, June 27, 1972

- 3 -

Lists of cancelled assessments can be inspected at the following places: Rating and Valuation Department, No. 1, Garden Road.

The Treasury and all Sub-Treasuries

City District Offices and Public Enquiry Centres.

The Western Police Station Enquiry Centre.

Owners of closed buildings requiring further information regarding the payment of rates should contact Mr. Lo Yau-cheuk, the Area Valuer in charge of the Mid-Levels district. His telephone is H-249021 Extensions 59 and 64.

Mr. M.P.W. Tristram, Superintending Valuer in charge of Hong Kong Island, will also be available to answer enquiries. His telephone number is H-249021 Extension 5$.

-------0---------

DEATH SET7TENCE COMMUTED

*******

The Governor, after taking into consideration the advice of the Executive Council, has decided that the death sentence passed on August 231 ^971 on Chau Kam-cheung should be commuted to a term of 25 years imprisonment® Chau Kam-cheung was found guilty of the murder of Wong Pik-wan.

0 ----

A......

Tuesday, June 27, 1972

- 4 -

SAFETY PROCEDURES FOR SHIPBREAKING

»«**««

A new set of safety procedures recommended for the ship breaking industry in Hong Kong has been drawn up by three Government departments -Marine,Labour and Fire Services.

Known as ’’Guide to Safety Practice for the Shipbreaking Industry” it was formally handed over to representatives of the industry by Mr. A.J. Lack, Principal Marine Officer.

Mr. Lack said the purpose of the guide was to draw attention to particular dangers inherent in the work of shipbreaking for the benefit of the workers and all others concerned.

He said it was designed to help owners of vessels to prepare their own safety instructions. They were advised that whilst applying the recommendations, due regard should be paid to the relevant safety regulations and the statutory requirements of the Hong Kong Government.

Mr. Lack added: ’’There is a need for guidance in this field, particularly for foremen as they are responsible not only to management but also to employees.”

”It is hoped that managements will post the guide in offices and that b ' foremen and workers will keep it at their places of work,” he said.

It was impossible for the guide to cover every conceivable situation, but it was very comprehensive and included subjects concerning procedures recommended for safe practice on vessels being prepared for or under demolition.

Mr. Lack stressed that it was now up to management in the shipbreaking industry to train their workers to reasonable standards of safety.

/In this

Tuesday, June 27, 1972

- 5 -

In this respect, he noted that the Labour Department had offered facilities for the training of supervisors in industrial safety practices and the Fire Services Department also had run courses on fire prevention.

”It is sincerely hoped that all concerned in the shipbreaking industry will take advantage of these training and instruction courses.

"We look forward to receiving from the industry recommendations based on their experience for inclusion in future editions of the guide. It must also be noted that in the absence of legislation, the use of the guide is purely voluntary,” Mr. Lack said.

- 0 ------

QUEENSWAY TO BE REALIGNED

***««*«

The Public Works Department is proposing to widen and realign the whole of Queensway and parts of Murray Road and Queen’s Road East. •

The project is to eliminate the double bend at Queensway near the Naval Terrace. This bend of 122 degrees has .a very high accident rate.

The improvement scheme also includes the construction of a footbridge across Queensway.

An announcement has been made in the Government Gazette and anyone objecting to the proposal should do so*by July 23. Claims for compensation should be made by August 23 • % • • • •

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/6........

Tuesday, June 27, 1972

- 6 -

PARKING METER CHARGES

»******■

Higher rates for parking meters, announced recently by the Financial Secretary, are not likely to come into force until later this year, and the changes will not be applied simultaneously to all existing meters*

The revised rates will be charged when new meters calibrated to the higher rates begin to arrive and are progressively installed.

In the mean time, the existing rates-and hours of operation remain in force.

The Commissioner for Transport, Mr. B.D. Wilson, said today that as new meters arrive and as existing ones are converted, the metal plates on the meters, outlining the rates and hours of operation, will be changed to make the position clear.

As there are likely to be meters with differing rates and hours of operation', motorists should examine the metal plates carefully before using the meters.

’ Apart from higher charges, the Executive Council has approved the extension of meter hours up till midnight, and the operation of meters on Sundays and public holidays.

/T.......

Tuesday, June 27, 1972

- 7 -

URBAN COUNCIL SWIMMING COURSES

****»*»»

Special swimming courses are being organised this summer at public swimming pools managed by the Urban Council.

The Hong Kong Amateur Swimming Association and the Education Department are both assisting with the project in which there will be both a beginners course and an intermediate course.

The aim of the beginners course is to teach non-swimmers the basic movements in swimming and breathing. The intermediate course is a continuation of this programme and is designed to improve the learner’s techniques and to teach him personal survival in the water.

The swimming courses, the first ever organised by the Recreation and Amenities Select Committe of the Urban Council, are mainly for office and factory workers and children who do not have the opportunity to undertake swimming with their schools.

Classes will be given only on week-day evenings and at weekends.

Two series of courses will be provided, each lasting for five weeks.

The first series will begin on July 10 and will be held at the Lei Cheng Uk, Kowloon Tsai and Kwun Tong swimming pools. Fees range from 32 for children under 14 to 310 for adults over 18.

Application forms are available from all public swimming pools and City District Offices in Kowloon and these should be completed and returned to either of the three swimming pool offices by Monday, July 3*

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/8........

Tuesday, June 27, 1972

- 8 -

HOLIDAY ARRANGEMENTS - POSTAL, CITY HALL

*******

There will be no mail deliveries on Saturday (July 1) and all post offices will be closed because of the public holiday*

The City Hall Low Block, including the two restaurants and the

Memorial Garden will remain open as usual.

The City Hall Library and the branch libraries at Yau Ma Tei, Waterloo

Road and Aberdeen/Pok Fu Lam will be open from 9 a*m* to 1 p.m. The Kowloon Park Students* Study Room will be closed.

The City Museum and Art Gallery will be open from 1 p.m. to 6 p.m.

and the Lei Cheng Uk Museum from 12 noon - 7 p.m. ------------------------------------0----------

SIU LAM HOSPITAL OPENING

****** *

Note to editors: The Siu Lam Hospital for severe mental

patients will be formally opened by Sir Kenneth Fung Ping-fan, in Tai Lam Valley at 4 p.m. tomorrow.

It is the first hospital of its kind built with a grant of $5.7 million from the Royal Hong Kong Jockey Club.

Members of the press, radio and television are invited to have the ceremony covered. Transport will be provided. A 14-seater AM2126 will leave Kowloon sub-pool behind the Tsim Sha Tsui Post Office at 2.45 p.m. sharp. A G.I.S. man will accompany the reporters.

Tuesday, June 27, 1972

- 9 -

PIPELINE FOR DESALINATION PLANT

***»**««

The Government plans to construct a tunnel and pipelines in the Yuen Long District in association with the proposed desalting plant near the 17 milestone, Castle Peak Road.

An area at each entrance of the tunnel with be required for ancillary works, including the construction of an access road.

The pipeline will be capable of carrying 60 million gallons of water a day from the plant to the Tai Lam Chung Reservoir.

About square feet of private agricultural land will be affected by the project.

Resumption of the land has been ordered by the Governor in Council under the Crown Lands Resumption Ordinance, and a notice has been published in the Government Gazette.

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P.R.H. 7 (REVISED) 40000®!

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INFORMATION SERVICES

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Wednesday, June 28, 1972

HONG KONG’S DOMESTIC EXPORTS INCREASE

*******

*

Hong Kong’s domestic exports for May were valued at 31,277 million -an increase of $79 million or 6.6 per cent over May last year.

Provisional trade figures released today (Wednesday) by the Census and Statistics Department show that imports increased by $94 million or 5*3 per cent to $1,867 million. Re-exports valued at 3329 million rose by $27 million or 9*1 per cent compared with May, 1971*

A spokesman of the Commerce and Industry Department said that during the three-month period of March to May 1972, domestic exports total!ed $3,409 million, imports $5,284 million and re-exports $896 million. Compared with the corresponding period in the previous year, these figures represented an increase of 4,4 per cent, 1.3 per cent and 10.3 per cent respectively.

Figures for the 5-month period, January to May, show increases over the same period in 1971 of 9«5 per cent for domestic exports, 1.4 per cent for imports and 13•2 per cent for re-exports.

Provisional figures for May are as follows:

MERCHANDISE: Domestic Exports: $1,277 million

Imports : $1,867 million

Re-exports : $ 329 million

Wednesday, June 28, 1972

- 2

COMPARATIVE FIGURES:

Domestic Exports

Imports

Re-exports

Domestic Exports

Imports

Re-exports

Domestic Exports

Imports

Re-exports

May 1972 May 1971 Increase or decrease

$ Million 1,277 1,867 329 March - May 1972 $ Million 3 Million Per Cent + 6.6 + 5.3 + 9.1 or decrease

1,198 1,773 302 March - May 1971 + 79 + 94

+ 27 Increase

3 Million 3 Million 3 Million Per Cent

3,409 3,266 + 14} + 4.4

5,284 5,217 + 67 + 1.3

896 812 + 84 + 10.3

Jan. - May Jan. - May

1972 1971 Increase or decrease

$ Million 3 Million 3 Million Per Cent

5,663 5,174 + 489 + 9.5

8,383 8,267 + 116 + 1.4

1,465 1,294 + 171 + 13.2

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/3.........

Wednesday, June 28, 1972

- 3 -

LOAN SCHEME FOR SMALL INDUSTRIES ********

The Loans for Small Industry Scheme, announced in the budget earlier this year, will come into operation on July 3 for a trial period of three years.

An Assistant Director of Commerce and Industry, Mr. R. Porter, said this afternoon that small-scale industry in Hong Kong would benefit from the introduction of the scheme, which would provide a new source of loan capital for the purchase of equipment leading ultimately to increased productivity.

"All manufacturing companies employing less than 200 workers and in which the proprietors have invested not more than HK36OO,OOO can take advantage of the Scheme." Mr. Porter said.

"All that a small-scale industrialist need to do is to complete an application form, available from all licensed banks or the Loans for Small Industry Branch, and submit it to a bank of his own choice together with an audited balance sheet and profit and loss account in respect of his company’s previous three years of operation and a cheque for HK®l,000 made payable to the Hong Kong Productivity Centre. The rest will be done by the Loans for Small Industry Branch in collaboration with the bank and the Hong Kong Productivity Centre."

/Loans

Wednesday, June 28, 1972

- 4 -

Loans will normally be for not less than HK$50,000 or more than HKS25O,OOO. Repayment periods will be from three to five years.

Normal repayment of principal and payment of interest will be made in equal monthly instalments commencing within 90 days of the installation of the machinery purchased with the loan.

Interest will be charged on the loans at the bank’s prime lending rate, currently seven per cent per annum, plus another two per cent.

The scheme was based on recommendations of the Loans for Small Industry Committee of the Trade and Industry Advisory Board. It will be administered by the newly created Loans for Small Industry Branch of the Commerce and Industry Department.

Feasibility Studies

The total amount of loan capital required by the scheme will be provided by the banks. The corner-stone principles are the acceptance by Government of 50 per cent of the risk of every loan granted and the provision to participating banks of detailed and unbiased feasibility studies conducted by the Hong Kong Productivity Centre.

Mr• Porter added that all banks registered in Hong Kong can participate in the scheme and their initial reaction has been favourable.

Elaborating on the feasibility studies to be carried out by the Productivity Centre, Mr. Porter explained that these were necessary because the criteria for making these loans were somewhat outside normal banking practice. Loans would be approved largely on the basis of assessments of companies’ technical capabilities and the feasibility of the projects for which the loans were required.

/’•This

Wednesday, June 28, 1972

- 5 -

’•This would require the service of highly qualified engineers and other professional people which banks do not normally employ. If the assessments were left to the banks themselves they would, as a matier of normal commercial prudence, have no alternative but to refuse the loan applications,0 Mr. Porter said.

It was estimated that the average cost to the Productivity Centre of each feasibility study would be HK83fOOO. However, both the Loans for Small Industry Committee and the Trade and Industry Advisory Board realised that an initial, charge of would be too high for the Scheme -to

have any chance of success.

A compromise was therefore reached whereby the cost would be recovered by an initial payment of HK31,000 plus a charge of one per cent per annum on the amount loaned, to be paid to the Productivity Centre. Mr. Porter said both the Committee and the Board realised that an initial payment of HK31tOOO would be unpopular, but felt that this was the best payment system which could be devised, and probably the only one which would be in any way acceptable to all those concerned with the Scheme.

’ To successful applicants the charge would represent only a small increase in the cost of the loan, equivalent to 0.67 per cent to 0.08 per cent per annum depending on the size of the loan and the period over which it was granted. Unsuccessful applicants would receive a copy of the Productivity Centre’s report which would prove most valuable to them.

/Mr. Porter

Wednesday, June 28, 1972

- 6 -

Mr. Porter believed that they would be well worth the money even if the full cost were charged, let alone the very heavily subsidised price proposed.

Full details of the procedures are contained in a booklet obtainable at all licensed banks and from the Loans for Small Industry Branch, Room 513 Tung Ying Building, 100 Nathan Road, Kowloon.

Note to Editors: Any questions you may have about this scheme will be answered by Mr. R. Porter (H-236509) or Mr. Peter Kiang (K-67O73M.

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/7

Wednesday, June 28, 1972

........ HjBfflsojIoqa eHT\

REOCCUPATION OF UNDAMAGED BUILDINGS SOON

**$«*«*

The Director of Public Works, Mr. J.J. Robson, said today that it should be possible to reoccupy many of the undamaged buildings in the Po Shan Road and Kotewall Road areas within the next seven days.

Electricity will have been re-connected to most of the buildings by this evening and full water supplies should be available within three days. Gas and telephone connections will take longer but the Gas Company is making arrangements for emergency bottled gas supplies if required.

.... Access to these properties by way of Conduit and Kotewall Roads is the major problem but this should be solved by the middle of next week. Some traffic restrictions may be necessary after that date but full details will be announced when residents are advised which buildings can be re-occupied.

The Public Works Department has now completed the diversion of the main storm water channels, which run through the area of land slip,and drainage channels have been constructed above it to divert as much water as possible away from the area.

Work is continuing on the clearance of the collapsed building but this is a slow process because of the difficulties of access and the tangle of reinforcing bars which have to be cut individually with oxy-acetylene burners before the concrete rubble can be cleared. Simultaneously, clearance work is going on in Kotewall and Conduit Roads.

/Late ..••••••

Wednesday, June 28, 1972

- 8 -

Late yesterday the Acting Colonial Secretary, Mr. M.D.A. Clinton, met the Director of Public Works at the site in order to inspect the work for himself. He said that he was satisfied with the progress that was being made under the extremely difficult conditions. During his visit he met civil engineers and soil specialists and discussed with them their proposals for the permanent restoration of the area.

Full Details

The following is a more detailed statement of the work being undertaken * • . • • ••> . , * • . ’ *

by the ’Waterworks Office and the utility companies

Water - The Water Authority is making alternative supply arrangements which should improve supply to premises in Po Shan Road and Kotewall Road within the next three days.

The premises affected include No. 24 and 30 Po Shan Road and Alpine Court and Belmont Court in No. 10 and 12 Kotewall Road. Half of Alpine Court is already receiving supply.

Electricity - Barring additional technical problems, the Hong Kong Electric Company hopes to restore general supply to the Po Shan Road area "as far as possible" by tonight.

The company is trying to restore supplies to No. 15 Kotewall Road, parts of Hong Kong University and Nos. 4-6 and 10-16 Po Shan Road.

Gas - A qx>kesman for the Hong Kong and China Gas Company said that the company is prepared to supply bottled gas and a "hot plate" to residents of the affected area.

/The spokesman ••«••••

Wednesday, June 28, 1972

- 9 -

The spokesman said that the following premises are now without gas supply

Nos. 10, 12, 14, 1.6, 21, 24 and 30 Po Shan Road.

Nos. 47, 49, 5% 53 and 55 Conduit Road.

Nos. 12-36 Kotewall Road.

Nos. 17, 19 and 21 Babington Path.

Sir Robert Black Hall (Residence) and Old Halls in University Path.

No decision has been taken on re-laying damaged gas mains in the area because the mains have been covered by the landslide and workers cannot get through to them at the present time.

Telephones - Workers of the Telephone Company are also trying to get damaged lines in the whole of Hong Kong repaired as soon as possible, and they are already making good progress in their repair work.

Given dry weather, a company spokesman said, it was hoped that damaged lines could be repaired and services restored ’’quite soon”.

However, the spokesman pointed out that at this stage it was still not possible to state precisely which lines in particular areas could be restored by a given date.

He requested subscribers to be patient and assured them that the company had not spared any effort in trying to get all damaged lines restored as early as possible. I • • >

He said priority in repair work was given first to essential services, then to commercial undertakings and residential properties.

/Note to editors: ........

Wednesday, June 28, 1972

-10 -

Note to editors: The Director of Public Works will be at

the site tomorrow (Thursday) at 4 p.m. and will brief press representatives on progress to date and proposed future developments in the area.

They will also be taken on a tour of the area and in view of the conditions there press representatives are advised to wear suitable clothes and footwear.

Newspapers, radio and television stations and other news media wishing to be present are asked to telephone the Duty Officer, G.I.S. and give the names of their representatives.

Those attending the briefing and tour are requested to meet Mr. J.H. Evans of the G.I.S. at 41 Conduit Road (Realty Garden) by 3.45 p.m.

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/11 ’......

Wednesday, June 28, 1972

- 11 -

OPENING OF SIU LAM HOSPITAL

********

The Hon. Sir Kenneth Ping-fan Fung, retiring Executive Councillor, said today the Siu Lam Hospital for the severely mentally retarded — the first of its kind in Hong Kong — was ”a significant step forward in the provisioning of social services for all.”

• • He was speaking at the formal opening of the 200-bed Hospital in Tai Lam Valley.

It was built with a S5«7 million grant from the Royal Hong

Kong Jockey Club and is the direct result of a recommendation by Dr. L.T. Hilliard in I960 that the severely mentally retarded, mainly among children, be hospitalised.

’’Services for the treatment and rehabilitation of the mentally subnormal in Hong Kong are limited,” Sir Kenneth said.

"Before Siu Lam was contracted, there was no properly planned medical institution created exclusively for the medical care of the severely retarded. It was for this reason that the Royal Hong Kong Jockey Club had seen fit to accord the project a high degree of priority.’!

He praised the Government for taking the view that ’’the time had come for all members of the community, even the most disadvantaged, to be brought into the fold to enjoy the benefits of an improved economy and general prosperity.”

He felt the Government’s acceptance of ’’the permanent commitment implicit in the Hospital’s recurring costs” also deserved recognition.

/"All .......

Wednesday, June 28, 1972

- 12 -

"All of us here," he recalled, "are sadly aware how, because of other pressures and the relative urgency of other problems, these unfortunates were formerly left to die. Today, they are hospitalised."

For this reason, it gave him great pleasure to declare Siu Lam open, and he did so in the conviction that it would play a "key role in the treatment of the severely mentally ill in our midst .......

The conscience of a progressive Hong Kong requires that we do all we can for them."

Speaking earlier at the same ceremony, Dr. the Hon. G.H. Choa, birector of Medical and Health Services, said Siu Lam would be receiving its 200 patients in phases, to enable both the patients and the staff to adjust themselves to their new environment.

The first group would be coming from the Tung Wah Hospital, and the Po Leung Kuk, and they would be arriving in July. Other cases would be admitted on the recommendation of an assessment team.

He thanked the Royal Hong Kong Jockey Club for making Siu Lam possible, and he recalled that in the last 20 years, no less than 19 government projects in the medical and health field had been completed with ‘donations from the Club, amounting in total to nearly $20 million.

Dr. Choa described Siu Lam Hospital as "a special case," and its opening was "a manifestation of the Government’s recognition of its obligation to the most unfortunate section of the community." r

/He had ••••••

Wednesday, June 28, 1972

- 13 - 5

He had a special word of appreciation for the Sisters of St. Paul des Chartres who had offered to serve at Siu Lam.

”1 am fully conscious of the public service and humanity behind the offer,” he said, ”and I will certainly consider it once all administrative difficulties in the initial stage, what I call teething troubles, are ironed out.”

Dr. Choa thanked Sir Kenneth for honouring the occasion with his presence, particularly as this was one of Sir Kenneth’s last public engagements as an Executive Councillor before his retirement on July 1.

Note to Editors: Copies of the full texts of Sir Kenneth’s and Dr. Choa’s speeches, in Chinese and English, are distributed separately in the Press boxes, Government Information Services, later today.

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Wednesday, June 28, 1972

- 14 -

THE MISSING SECOND

The usual six-pip time signals from the Royal Observatory will not be broadcast at nine o’clock this Saturday morning (July 1). But they will be resumed 15 minutes later at 9*15 a.m.

A spokesman for the Royal Observatory said today this was to enable a correction to be applied which would result in an apparent delay of one second to the resumed time service signals.

The need to set the clock back by one second arises because world-wide time standards are now based on the atomic time scale. This provides a more precise and uniform second than that derived from the rate of rotation of the earth measured by astronomical means.

The spokesman said the time service in Hong Kong had been maintained by reference to the atomic scale since January 1 this year.

One day on the astronomical time scale is, on the average, three-thousandths of a second longer than the day on the atomic time scale.

’’However, it has been internationally agreed that the two times should never differ significantly and that periodic adjustments of the whole second would be made to the time shown by those clocks using or being maintained by reference to the atomic time scale,” he said.

By the end of June, the difference will be almost six-tenths of a second and the first of these adjustments is to be made at 9 a.m. on July 1, 1972.

”This correction of one second, called a leap-second, is analogous to 29th February in a leap year, which everyone is familiar,” the spokesman added,

/15..........

0 - -

Wednesday, June 28, 1972

- 15 -

SAFETY PRECAUTIONS ON BUILDING SITES

********

Seven workers were killed and 385 injured in May while working on building construction sites, according to reports received by the Labour Department.

Of this number, three were killed and 65 injured due to accidental falls.

Mr. A.H. Carter, the Industrial Safety Training Officer stressed that falling from heights could be prevented by the erection and use of safe working platforms together with a proper means of access to them.

1fThe use of temporary and makeshift working platforms must be avoided/1 he added.

Mr. Carter said that if adequate barriers or fences were used to cover or enclose openings in floors and excavations then many of the injuries sustained by the workers could have been avoided.

11To reduce the number of accidents, there is a need for management and workers to work as a team on each construction site,11 he added.

• •

J

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A6.........

Wednesday, June 28, 1972

- 16 -

DENTAL HEALTH WEEK

*#*««**

The Hong Kong Dental Society will be holding a Dental Health Week - the seventh to be organised - from July 7 to 12 this year.

During this period, there will be an exhibition of the most-up-to-date dental health education materials and dental products at the Ocean Terminal.

In addition, the Society will also sponsor a poster competition for children of all primary and secondary schools in Hong Kong.

The competition, with the theme ’’Better teeth, Better health”, is divided into two groups - the Senior Group for secondary schools and the Junior Group for primary schools.

There will be cash prizes for the first three winning entries in each section. Consolation prizes will also be awarded to other successful entries.

Note to Editors: The Hong Kong Dental Society will be holding a press conference at 3 p.m. on Monday, July 3, at the Jade Emperor Hoorn, Hong Kong Hotel, Kowloon.

You are cordially invited to send a reporter and/or photographer to cover the event.

A7........

Wednesday, June 28, 1972

- 17 -

HEALTH EXHIBITION IN LAM TIN ESTATE «***««***

A three-day health exhibition opens today in the Lam Tin Estate Community Work Office of the Social Welfare Department in Kowloon.

It is aimed at drawing the attention of estate residents, especially children, to the need for personal cleanliness and sanitation as a safeguard against catching or spreading, contagious diseases in crowded communities.

The exhibits, provided by the Education Service of the Medical and Health Department, include photographs, charts and coloured cartoons The exhibition continues from 3 p.m. to 9 p*ra. today, and from 10 a.m« to 9 p.nu on the two other days.

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/18 ........

Wednesday, June 28, 1972

- 18 -

SUMMER YOUTH CONFERENCE

«»»*»*«*

Note to Editors: The Central coordinating Committee of the Summer Youth Activities Programme will hold a press conference to announce this year’s overall programme at 3 p.m. on Friday (June 30) at the 35 num. theatre of Government Information Services, 5th floor, Beaconsfield House.

Attending this conference will be Mr. Peter Williams, Chairman of the Committee, Mr. Stephen Law of the Social Welfare Department and representatives of various organisations involved in the programme.

Young people participating in the programme will also be present.

You are cordially invited to have this conference covered•

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Release•Time: 7«15

P.R.H. 7 (REVISED) 4000091

INFORMATION

SERVICES

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Thursday, June 29, 1972

MR. N. G. ROLPH APPOINTED COMMISSIONER FOR NARCOTICS

********

The Government today announced the appointment of Mr. Norman G. Rolph, Deputy Commissioner of Police, as Hong Kong’s first Commissioner for Narcotics.

Mr. Rolph will assume his new duties in August, 1972.

He has lived and worked on Hong Kong Island, in Kowloon and in the New Territories during his many years in Hong Kong and has a wide and extensive knowledge of the complex drug and crime problems.

Mr. Rolph will work in the Secretariat for Home Affairs and will be responsible to the Secretary for Home Affairs. In general terms he will have an overall co-ordinating role concerning the activities of every Government Department and the various Voluntary Agencies involved in the fight against the illicit drug traffic in all its forms, including the rehabilitation of drug addicts.

A Government spokesman said today: ’’Government fully recognises that the attainment of these aims will be no easy matter and will be of a long term nature given the scope and size of the problems to be faced. By its appointment of a Commissioner who will be able to devote his full time to these matters, Government has shown it is determined that the serious criminal and social problems connected with dangerous drugs will be tackled with the utmost vigour.”

/Mr. Rolph ••••••

Thursday, June 29, 1972

- 2 -

Mr. Rolph who has been in Hong Kong since January 19^6 is well known to the community both in his official capacity and also as a former Commissioner of the St. John Ambulance Brigade.

He is an Officer of the Most Venerable Order of St. John and holds the Queen1s Police Medal for Distinguished Service and the Colonial Polios Medal for Meritorious Service. He is the Founder President of the Rotary Club of Tsuen Wan, now the Rotary Club of Kowloon North. For over 15 years, he was a member of the Board of Examiners in the Chinese language.

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Thursday, June 29, 1972

- 3 -

POLLUTION CONTROL SURVEYS

*******

Two major surveys to help formulate the policy for the control of pollution have been arranged by the Advisory Committee on Environmental Pollution of Land and Water (EPCOM).

The first survey, which is being carried out by Hong Kong University students on vacation, covers all the domestic refuse, sewage and animal and industrial waste in Hung Shui Kiu, Yuen Long district and another selected area in Fan Ling.

During the past week the students have been visiting every house and structure within the survey area, compiling information sheets which will show every type of waste being produced and the way in which it is disposed.

This survey will greatly assist the Government in planning the infrastructure of services and measures necessary to control pollution in the areas concerned. It will also provide a guideline for the planning of services throughout the New Territories.

The second survey covers industries producing liquid effluents. At the end of the month questionnaires will be sent to 150 selected factories and businesses. These forms will be completed with the assistance of the Trade Investigation Division of the Commerce and Industry Department.

The survey is required by the Industrial Effluents sub-committee of EPCOM for the preparation of legislation to' control industrial effluents, which is presently under consideration.

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A.........

Thursday, June 29, 1972

BETTER LOW-COST HOUSING ESTATES

*******

Funds have been approved by the Finance Committee for the construction of two new Low Cost Housing Estates; one at Lek Yuen, Sha Tin and the other at Lei Muk Shu, Kwai Chung.

Although these estates have been planned on the usual basis of 35 square feet for each adult, they will include many more facilities for day to day life than has been the case up to now.

Work on the Lek Yuen estate, estimated to cost over $$3 million, is to begin later this year. It will be built on an area of 23 acres of reclaimed land at Sha Tin.

The estate is part of the Sha Tin New Town development and is designed to accommodate 23,000 people. The original plan was to provide housing for some 30,000 people, but with new design features, the population density has been reduced.

A further site at Sha Tin has already been earmarked to provide a second estate to accommodate 20,000 people. But as part of the government’s aim not to allow the total amount of housing it provides fall below the demand, long term plans envisage another three estates in the area, providing housing for 110,000 people.

In addition to the usual domestic and welfare facilities, the estate will have an air-conditioned shopping centre, with department stores, a post office, a bank and a restaurant.

/This type .........

I

Thursday, June 29, 1972

- 5 -i

This type of building will allow more shopping facilities to be provided for the people in the estate and in Sha Tin and may well prove an added attraction to visitors. A market planned for the estate is to be designed in such a way that the roof can be converted into a fish market at weekends and on holidays.

Another new feature is a workshop area which will be provided below the shopping centre and this will effectively seal off the noise and dirt from the domestic accommodation.

Normally only kindergarten and primary schools are included in the construction of an estate, but at Lek Yuen a secondary school is to be built by the Government. The benefits here are twofold: Secondary schooling facilities will be available to the people in the estate from the outset; and the school can be designed as an integral part of the estate. The success of this point depends to a large extent on the availability of a sponsor to run the school.

Parking

There are also plans to build a covered car park. On-street parking may be regulated by parking meters, but there should be adequate space for the estate residents as well as visitors.

Welfare and recreational facilities will be on the normal scale, but the estate will be planned with additional space which can be used for local kaifong and community activities, and on which a temporary mat-shed can be • ’ ' r *

erected when required.

In conjunction with the new town development, a second road tunnel is planned through Lion Rock and there are plans for double tracking the railway line to Sha Tin. Both bus and mini-bus terminals will be built at the estate.

/The new ••••••••

Thursday, June 29 f 1972

- 6 -

The new project at Lei Muk Shu, Kwai Chung, is actually the third and final stage of the Lei Muk Shu Low Cost Housing Estate, and is planned on a similar basis to that of the Lek Yuen estate. It will accommodate 18,000 people, a decrease of 3,600 from the original estimate.

As in Lek Yuen, there will be a commercial centre with a department store and a restaurant. The building will be constructed to allow individual shopkeepers to instal their own air-conditioners.

Because three adjacent sites have already been allocated for secondary schools, and these will be sufficient to meet the demands of the area, no secondary schools are included in the plans«

Market and workshop facilities will largely follow those at Sha Tin, and there are also plans for an underground car park for 170 vehicles. This, together with metered on-street parking, will provide a total of spaces. Bus and public light bus services will operate to and from the estate.

The project is estimated to cost 375 million and work will begin in the near future.

In addition to these two Lew Cost Housing projects there are several other estates in the Public Works Programme. The planning and treatment will vary according to the location of each estate, but the overriding theme will be to provide a range of facilities and buildings which will enable a self-contained community to be formed.


Thursday, June 29, 1972

OPENING OF TIN HAU TEMPLE, TAI 0

*******

A double celebration is to take place at Tai 0 on Lantau Island tomorrow. The 260th anniversary of the Tin Hau Temple at San Tsuen will also be marked by the official opening of the reconstructed temple.

The temple was repaired at a cost of about 870,000. It is one of the two oldest temples in Tai 0 and has considerable historical significance to the fishing community there.

A spokesman for the District Office, Islands said that as the local villagers attached great importance to the temple they had raised, despite their meagre income, some 812,000 towards its repairs. 858,000 was granted by the Chinese Temples Committee.

Tomorrow, Mr. Chau Li-ping, a member of the Chinese Temples Committee and Mr. Mayer Ng Chak-lam, District Officer, islands will jointly officiate- at the ceremony.

Note to Editors:

You are- invited to send a reporter and/or photographer to cover the ceremony. Press representatives are* -requested to take the 9»3O a.m. Hong Kong & Yaumati Ferry from Hong Kong to Mui Wo. A special bus has been arranged______

at Mui Wo at 10.30 a.m. to take them to the Temple. Lunch will be provided by the Tai 0 Rural Committee.

0--------

/8.......

Thursday, June 29, 1972

- 8 -

MEDICAL EXAMINATIONS FOR ELDERLY

*******

As part of a plan to improve welfare services for the agedf about 200 elderly residents in the Sau Mau Ping area are to be given free medical examinations to see if they need particular attention or treatment#

The examinations will take place on three afternoons in July * the 4tht 5th and 6th between 3 p.m. and 5 p«m. On the afternoon of July 6 a lecture will be given about medical care and health of the aged and this will be followed by a group discussion involving the residents who have had the examination.

The project has been organised by the Sau Mau Ping (South) Estate Community Work Office of the Social Welfare Department with the co-operation and support of the United Christian Hospital Sau Mau Ping Community Health Centre, The medical examinations and discussions will both take place

in the Sau Mau Ping (South) Estate Welfare Building, . . r • • - • —

Note to Editors: You are invited to have the medical examinations on July 4 covered. The Sau Mau Ping (South) Estate Community Work Office is located within the Sau Mau Ping Resettlement Estate.

/9 •••»•»

Thursday, June 29, 1972

- 9 -

ADULT EDUCATION COURSES

**»*««*«

School teachers and workers wishing to further their studies can do so in a series of courses to be run by the Adult Education Section of the Education Department during the 1972/73 session.

These courses are the Evening Institute, the Evening School of Higher Chinese Studies and Adult Education and Recreation Centres.

They include elementary to senior levels of English studies; primary to secondary courses leading to the Hong Kong Certificate of Education; postsecondary studies and teachers’ courses in art, music and other subjects.

Apart from general recreational activities, the Adult Education and Recreation Centres offer short courses on a variety of subjects such as folk dancing, Mandarin, Chinese boxing, photography etc.

Fees for the courses vary from 35 per course to 3160 per annum. No fees are charged for the courses run by the Adult Education and Recreation Centres Application forms for enrolment for any of the courses can be obtained free of charge between July J and 15» No entry fees are required.

For further details please contact the Adult Education Section, Kowloon Government Offices, Tel: K-884111.

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/10.........

Thursday, June 29, 1972

- 10 -

MONTHLY HEALTH REPORT

******

One-hundred-and-thirteen people died of notifiable infectious diseases during May. They were among the 915 notifications of such diseases recorded by the Medical and Health Department.

However, a spokesman for the department said Hong Kong had remained ftee from cholera and other quarantinable diseases during the month.

In the previous month - April - the Medical and Health Department recorded a total of 9$2 notifications and 103 deaths.

’’Compared with April,” the spokesman said, ’’there was no significant variation in the number of notifications of the intestinal group of infectious diseases, such as bacillary dysentery and typhoid fever.”

In May, the number of chickenpox notifications dropped to 60 from 104 in April. During the month, there were three cases of cerebrospinal meningitis notified, but no case of diphtheria,polio-myelitis or puerperal fever was recorded ’’There was no appreciable variation in the incidence of other infectious diseases,” the spokesman added.

/11

Thursday, June 29, 1972

- 11 -

NEW KWUN TONG-BUS TERMINUS ♦ ***

A new bus terminus at the Kwun Tong Ferry Concourse serving seven Kowloon Motor Bus routes will be opened on Saturday, July 1 at 10 a.m.

The terminus is a part of the S3 million Kwun Tong Ferry Concourse, which is designed to complement the new Kwun Tong Ferry Pier opened earlier this year.

The seven bus routes are Nos, 5B, HD, 1JB, 1JC, 15Bt 40 and 14B.

The concourse also provides a taxi stand, a temporary car park and a public light bus terminus.

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Release time: 7>00 p»m»

P.R.H. 7 (REVISED) 40000&1

ME 11

INFORMATION SERVICES

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Friday, June 30, 1972

APPOINTMENTS TO EXECUTIVE AND LEGISLATIVE COUNCILS

**«*«*«*

The membership of the Legislative Council is being enlarged by the appointment of two additional members — one official and one unofficial. This brings the total, including the Governor and four ex-officio members, to 28.

The increase follows an announcement that the Queen has approved the amendment of the Royal Instructions allowing for the additional nominati nns w

The official seat is to be filled by the Director of Social Welfare, Mr. G.T. Rowe, and the unofficial seat by Mr. R.H. Lobo. Mr. Rowe's term is for one year and Mr. Lobo’s for two.

In addition three vacancies are to be filled by Mrs. C.J. Symons, Mr. James Wu Man-hon and Mr. P.G. Williams.

On the Executive Council four new appointments have been made. They are Mr. P.C. Woo, Mr. Szeto Wai, Dr. S.Y. Chung and Mr. G.R. Ross.

The following is the complete membership list of the two councils which takes effect from tomorrow (July 1):-

THE EXECUTIVE COUNCIL

Nominated Official Member

The Hon. G.T. Rowe, C.B.E., J.P., the Director of

Social Welfare has been appointed for a further period of one year.

/Unofficial Members ••••••

Friday, June JO, 1972

2

Unofficial Members

The Honourable Sir Albert Rodrigues, C.B.E., E.D., J.P., The Honourable Sir Douglas Clague, C.B.E., M.C., Q.P.M., T.D., J.P.,

The Honourable Sir Sidney Gordon, C.B.E., J.P., and The Honourable Sir Yuet-keung Kan, C.B.E., J.P., have been re-appointed for a further period of two years* The Honourable Woo Pak-chuen, O.B.E., J.P., The Honourable Szeto Wai, O.B.E., J.P.

The Honourable G.R. Ross, O.B.E., J.P., have been appointed for a period of one year. Dr. the Honourable Chung Sze-yuen, O.B.E., J.P. has been appointed for a period of two years.

THE LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL

Nominated Official Members

Eight nominated official Members of the Legislative Council have been re-appointed for two years. They are:-The Honourable D.R.V/. Alexander, C.B.E., J.P.

The Honourable J.J. Robson, C.B.E., J.P.

The Honourable J. Canning, J.P.

Dr. the Honourable G.H. Choa, C.B.E., J.P.

The Honourable J. Cater, M.B.E., J.P.

The Honourable D.C. Bray, J.P.

The Honourable Paul Tsui Ka-cheung, O.B.E., J.P.

The Honourable I.M. Lightbody, J.P.

/Unofficial Members

Friday, June 30, 1972

- 3 -

Unofficial Members

Five nominated Unofficial Members have been re-appointed for a further one year. They are:-

The Honourable Woo Pak-chuen, O.B.E., J.P.

The Honourable Szeto Wai, O.B.E., J.P.

The Honourable Wilfred Wong Sien-bing, O.B.E., J.P.

The Honourable Mrs. Ellen Li Shu-pui, O.B.E., J.P.

The Honourable H.J.C. Browne, O.B.E., J.P., and five have been re-appointed for a further two years. They are:-

Dr. the Honourable Chung Sze-yuen, O.B.E., J.P.

The Honourable Wilson Wang Tze-sam, O.B.E., J.P.

The Honourable Lee Quo-wei, O.B.E., J.P.

The Honourable Oswald Victor Cheung, O.B.E., Q.C., J.P.

The Honourable Ann Tse-kai, O.B.E., J.P.

Three vacancies have been created by the retirement of the Honourable Sir Yuet-keung Kan, C.B.E., J.P., Mr. G.M.B. Salmon, J.P., and Mr. Lo Kwee-seong, J.P.

These have been filled by the appointment of:-

The Honourable Mrs. C.J. Symons, O.B.E., J.P.

The Honourable James Wu Man-hon, J.P.

for a period of two years, and

The Honourable P.G. Williams, J.P., who has been nominated for a period of one year.

/The additional

Friday, June 30, 1972

The additional seats created by the amendment to the Royal Instructions will be filled by The Honourable G.T. Rowe, C.B.E., J.P., who has been appointed to the Official seat for a period of one year, and The Honourable R.H. Lobo, C.B.E., J.P., who has been appointed to fill the Unofficial seat for a period of two years.

The five ex-officio Members of the Executive Council and the four ex-officio Members of the Legislative Council remain unchanged. The Governor presides over the Executive Council and is President and Member of the Legislative Council.

The ex-officio Members of both councils are the Colonial Secretary, the Attorney General, the Secretary for Home Affairs and the Financial Secretary. The Commander British Forces is a Member of the Executive Council.

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/5.........

Friday, June JO, 1972

- 5 -

SIR KENNETH FUNG PING-FAN HONOURED

********

The Queen has approved the retention, within Hong Kong, of the title ’’Honourable” by Sir Kenneth Ping-fan FUNG, C.B.E., J.P. on his retirement from the Executive Council tomorrow.

Sir Kenneth served on the Urban Council from 1951 to 19&0, the Legislative Council from 1959 to 19&5, and the Executive Council from 1962 to 1972. He was appointed as a J.P. in 1952, was awarded the O.B.E. in 1959, the C.B.E. in 19$5» and was made a Knight Bachelor in 1971.

He has rendered distinguished service to Hong Kong in many capacities, in particular as Chairman of the Chinese Language Committee, Chairman of the St. John Council of Hong Kong, and Commissioner of the

St. John Ambulance Brigade

Friday, June 30, 1972

- 6

SYSTEM OF TWO TAXI ZONES TO CONTINUE

«*«»****

The Governor-in-Council has accepted the advice of the Transport Advisory Committee that the present system of two taxi zones - Hong Kong Island and Kowloon - with different fares should be continued after the opening of the cross-harbour tunnel.

The retention of the zoning system means that taxis may not ply for hire outside their own zone, and that any taxi hired for a crossharbour journey may not pick up passengers on the other side of the harbour for the return trip.

The Governoi>-in-Council has also decided that, with immediate effect, a taxi crossing the harbour by vehicular ferry may make a surcharge of 815 in addition to the fare shwon on the meter. This surcharge is intended to cover the cross-harbour fares payable to the ferry company for both the onward and return trips, as well as an element for returning empty*

Taxis crossing the harbour by the cross-harbour tunnel, when it comes into operation, may make a surcharge equal to twice the appropriate tunnel toll plus 85• As the toll announced by the Tunnel Company is 85 per trip for a taxi, the surcharge will, in effect, also come to 815*

The rates of surcharge are laid down in the Road Traffic (Taxis, Public Omnibuses, Public Light Buses and Public Cars)(Amendment)(No. 2) Regulations 1972 published in today’s Government Gazette.

/Commenting ••••••••

Friday, June 30, 1972

- 7 -

Commenting on the decision, Mr. Szeto Wai, Chairman of the Transport Advisory Committee, said it could be argued that a continuation of the taxi zoning system with different fares would be illogical, since the tunnel would provide a road link across the harbour.

However, he said, it was essential that the opening of the tunnel should not upset the transport patterns of the two geographical areas, and it must be of particular concern that a balanced and adequate taxi service should continue to be provided on both sides of the harbour.

"The T.A.C. has considered the matter thoroughly and has come to the firm conclusion that the balance of advantage would lie in the continuance of the present zoning system.

,fThe Committee feels that if zoning of taxis were abolished and there were a uniform fare, taxis would normally tend to be drawn to Kowloon away from Hong Kong Island, except on special occasions such as race days,” he added.

The T.A.C. had considered the feasibility of suspending the present zoning system for a trial period after the opening of the tunnel, and had advised against it.

Mr. Szeto said: "It was felt that, if zoning was temporarily suspended, there would be the same tidal flow of taxis to the more profitable side of the harbour. It might be difficult thereafter to re-introduce zoning should this become necessary."

/The T.A.C.

Friday, June 50, 1972

- 8 -

The T.A.C. had also advised against a suggestion that a certain number of taxis be licensed for operation on both sides of the harbour.

’’Such an arrangement would confuse passengers, especially if a different fare structure were introduced for this third category of taxis. It might also lead to irregularities by some operators of zoned taxis, such as deliberately giving the public the impression that their taxis are unzoned.

’’Furthermore, any taxis licensed for operation on both sides of the harbour would constitute a privileged group, and the tender prices offered for such licences would naturally take account of this. It might then prove difficult to remove the privilege if it were later felt advisable to do so.

”In short, the Committee considered that all taxis should either be zoned or not zoned, and that any intermediate or temporary expedient would not be workable”, Mr. Szeto said.

Friday, June JO, 1972

- 9 -

’•HONG KONG NEEDS LEARNED PEOPLE”

The Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, said today Hong Kong desperately needs learned people of all ages.

Speaking at the foundation-stone laying ceremony of New Asia College at the Chinese University in Sha Tin, he said Hong Kong already had plenty of enthusiasm, plenty of enterprise, plenty of hard work, commercial instinct, even compassion.

”But to turn it into the place we want it to be, and to obtain the resources to do this, we need the help, at all levels of people with the skills and knowledge and comprehension that can only be acquired from a basis of learning: the sort of learning that can be acquired here,” he said.

Sir Murray continued: ’’And what a lot there is for such people to do in Hong Kong and how short we are of them, whether in industry, the professions, business, the places of teaching or Government.”

However, he pointed out that learning must also be an end in itself, and he rejected the sausage machine concept of a university whose only object was to turn out types in short supply.

’•Learning and knowledge for its own sake is what gives a university inspiration authority and repute and gives it the ability to command the respect of those who learn in it.

’’And if the pursuit of learning for its own sake involves some people wanting to push doors marked ’’pull” or walk up escalators that are going down, I suggest that this may be regarded with a benevolent eye - within reason,” he said.

Note to Editors: The full text of Sir Murray’s speech at the foundation-stone laying ceremony of New Asia College is contained in a Supplement to today's Daily Information Bulletin.

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/10

Friday, June 30, 1972

10 -

BILL ON CRIMINAL DAMAGE TO PROPERTY

*******

The Government is taking steps to modernise and simplify the law governing offences of damage to property.

Published in today’s Gazette is the Crimes (Amendment) Bill 1972, which is based on the 1971 United Kingdom Criminal Damage Act. This act gave effect to the recommendations of the English Law Commission and since Hong Kong law on criminal damage to property has, in most respects, been the same as the English law, the English Act is being adopted.

The bill creates one basic offence to cover the whole field of damage to another’s property without lawful excuse. Such features as the means used, the nature of the property, etc., are subsidiary matters which may be relevant to the sentence imposed by the trial judge.

The maximum penalty for the simple offence of destroying or damaging another’s property is 10 years’ imprisonment. If the offence is committed by use of fire or if any property is destroyed or damaged with intent to endanger the life of another, the maximum penalty is life imprisonment.

It is an offence to threaten, or to posses anything with intent, to destroy property. The maximum penalty for this offence is 10 years’ imprisonment. ”Property” is widely defined to include all tangible property except the flowers and foliage of wild plants. However, other legislation makes it an offence to sell or possess certain types of flowers or plants and to pluck or damage flowers and leaves of trees.

/All the

Friday, June 30, 1972

All the offences under the bill will be triable by a magistrate,

though if the facts of any offence warrant, a charge under the bill may be tried either by the Supreme Court or the District Court.

The bill also gives power to any court to order a person convicted of

an offence to pay compensation to a person who suffers personal injury or loss of or damage to his property, or both, as a result of the offence. There is no limit placed in the case of the Supreme Court or the District Court, but a magistrate may award compensation only up to S3»000. Similar powers already exist, though the present maximum which can be awarded by a magistrate is only $500.

The bill repeals and replaces the Malicious Damage Ordinance and the

provisions relating to criminal damage to property in the various other Ordinances listed in the Schedule to the Bill. The common law offence of arson is abolished and replaced by the statutory offence in the bill.

The bill will be introduced into the Legislative Council on July 5

However, it will not be brought into operation until a date to be appointed by the Governor by notice in the gazette. The Government intends that there should be an interval of about 3 months between its enactment and its coming into operation to enable the courts, the police and the legal practitioners to familiarise themselves with the changes in the law made by the bill.

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/12

Friday, June 30» 1972

- 12 -

LANDSLIDE DISASTER: WORKMEN’S COMPENSATION

********

Workmen’s compensation will be paid to injured workers and dependants of deceased workmen in connection with the recent landslide disasters at Sau Mau Ping and Po Shan Road.

A spokesman for the Labour Department said today that if the accidents resulted in the death of or personal injury to a workman in the course of his employment, he or his dependants would be entitled to the compensation.

Enquiries on this matter can be made at the Workmen’s Compensation Unit of the Labour Department at either New Rodney Building, Ground Floor, Queensway, Hong Kong (Tel. H-249081) or at the Canton Road Government Offices, Fifth Floor, Canton Road, Kowloon (Tel. K-669014, K-688856 or K-688626).

/13........

Friday, June 30, 1972

REHABILITATION CENTRE FOR EX-MENTAL PATIENTS

********

A new hostel in Castle Peak for former mental patients will be opened tomorrow (Saturday) by Mrs. D.C. Bray, wife of the District Commissioner, New Territories.

The hostel is named after Mr. Woodman Lo, the founder chairman of the New Life Farm Committee, which has been active in rehabilitating ex-patients of Castle Peak Hospital for the past four years.

The hostel, capable of taking 20 people, has been built by residents of the Farm with financial assistance from the Tai Ping Shan Lions Club.

It will provide a suitable environment in which ex-mental patients can obtain guidance and learn to develop regular work habits which will eventually enable them to find outside employment.

At the same ceremony, a car will be presented to the farm by the Rotary Club of the New Territories.

Note to editors: The ceremony will take place at 4 p.m.

at the New Life Farm, situated immediately behind Castle Peak Hospital, 21 Milestone, Castle Peak Road. You are cordially invited to send a photographer and/or reporter to cover the event.

Friday, June 30, 1972

- 14 -

SOCIAL WORKER CERTIFICATES PRESENTED

********

The Assistant Director (General) of the Social Welfare Department, Mr# T.S. Heppell, today presented certificates to 52 in-service social workers on completion of three training courses at the Lady Trench Training Centre.

In a brief address preceding the distribution, Mr. Heppell said he was sure that for the participants, the main objectives of the courses had been achieved.

These were to give them a general idea of the philosophy behind social work, and to enable them to acquire certain basic skills likely to be of service to them in their careers.

He recalled that with the expansion of social welfare services in Hong Kong in the last decade, his department and many voluntary agencies had been compelled to employ a large number of workers, without full professional training, to cope with the growing demand for services.

Courses such as the three that had just been completed were intended to train workers, and for this reason participants were already employed full-time, aged 21 and above, with at least six months of practical experience in the welfare field.

From 1962 to 1970, the Social Welfare Department’s Training Section trained 513 workers in these courses.

From September 1971 to the end of June this year, 110 social workers participated.

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/15.........

Friday, June JO, 1972

- 15 -

JETTY FOR CHEUNG CHAU

********

Work will begin shortly on the construction of a jetty at Sai Wan on Cheung Chau Island to provide safe embarking and disembarking facilities for villagers and picnickers.

The jetty, when completed, will also provide protection against bad weather for small fishing craft mooring in the bay.

Sai Wan, at the extreme south-western end of Cheung Chau Island, is the centre of three fishermen’s resettlement villages and a popular picnic spot*

Villagers and picnickers at present visiting Sai Wan by sampans have to land at nearby rocks, which is often hazardous, particularly in bad weather.

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/16........

Friday, June JO, 1972

- 16 -

INTERNATIONAL CO-OPERATIVE DAY CELEBRATIONS

********

Note to editors:

Over 400 Members of the total Co-operative Movement, mainly farmers and fishermen, will be celebrating International Co-operative Day at a Chinese dinner party tomorrow evening (Saturday, July 1) commencing at 7 p*m* in the •Good Dates’ Restaurant at 86, Waterloo Road, First floor, Kowloon.

Mr. J.M. Riddell-Swan, the acting Director of Agriculture and Fisheries, will address the gathering and will officiate at the distribution of prizes. English and Chinese version copies of Mr. Riddell-Swan’s speech will be handed to reporters present at the Celebration party; copies will also be available for collection from the GIS press room after the event.

At the request of the Celebration Committee, Radio Hong Kong has arranged for a band and three popular singers to be present to provide entertainment.

The press, radio and TV services are cordially invited both to cover the evening’s events and to join the dinner party.

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/17........

Friday, June 30, 1972

- 17 -

GOVERNOR RECEIVES FLOOD RELIEF CHEQUES

*«**«*♦*

The very large amounts of money raised for flood victims in separate appeals by Hong Kong’s two television stations were formally handed over to the Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose by representatives of the two companies at Government House today (Friday),

Sir Murray received the two cheques on behalf of the Community Relief Trust Fund.

The cheques were presented to the Governor by Mr. Harold Lee, Chairman of the Board of Directors of Television Broadcasts Limited, and Mr* Don Gale, Director and General Manager (Broadcasting), Rediffusion (Hong Kong) Ltd.

The following is the full text of the Governor’s speech at Government House today:

’’These huge cheques represent a unique expression of the Community sense of the people of Hong Kong when confronted with the suffering that the recent disasters caused.

’’The response of the public to the appeal of the Television companies is a most heart-warming episode; and I may say it comes as no surprise to those of us who know how much is done by so many people in less dramatic circumstances

”1 will give these cheques to the Community Relief Trust Fund, and they will enable the Management Committee to relieve suffering on the sort of scale we would all wish:

/”I would

Friday, June 30, 1972

18

”1 would like to thank both television companies and their staff and

artists for this generous impulse which has been such a spectacular success in giving practical form to the wish of all of us to help the victims of this natural disaster. Congratulations to you both on an imaginative job very well done."

Note to editors:

A picture showing the Governor thanking

Mr. Harold Lee and Mr. Don Gale at the presentation ceremony and the speech by Mr. Lee have been put in your press box for collection.

- - 0 - -

ISSUE OF D.I.B

Note to editors:

There will be issues of the Daily

Information Bulletin tomorrow (Saturday, July 1) and Sunday (July 2). They will be available for collection after 3 p*m. on the respective days.

0 - -

/19

Friday, June 30, 1972

- 19 -

GOVERNOR’S MESSAGE ON SUMMER YOUTH PROGRAMME

*«**«***«

The Chairman of the Central Co-ordinating Committee for Youth Recreation, Mr. Peter Williams, said today it was hoped that some 900,000 young people could be catered for in this year’s summer youth activities programme•

Speaking at a press conference he said almost #1 million had been donated by the Royal Hong Kong Jockey Club, and another 91 million came from public funds.

"We have no doubt that the spending of this sum is of great significance not only for the young people themselves, but for Hong Kong as a whole," he said.

Mr. Williams said the summer programme was the result of months of preparation and it was hoped that all young people will at least know about it even if they cannot for some reason or other participate in it.

"If they are not sure what activities there are and how to join in, the simplest thing to do is to ask their teachers if they are at school or to approach the nearest City District Office if they are working."

Earlier in his speech, Mr. Williams read out a special message from the Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose.

The following is the full text of the Governor’s message

/"This ......

Friday, June 30, 1972

- 20 -

"This year’s Summer Youth Programme has just got off to an early start: the first event actually took place at Tsuen Wan on 25th June with a Fun Fair organized by the Tsuen Wan District Youth Recreation Co-ordinating Committee* This will now be followed by a wide range of activities of interest to all throughout the summer months until the end of August.

"During this period some 900,000 young people are expected to join in the activities which have been organized by a wide cross-section of our Community. Some 30,000 volunteers are involved in planning and running the events and programmes. I look forward to seeing some of these in action for myself.

"Over the past months much hard work has been put into the planning of this 1972 Programme by people from many organisations and walks of life* And of course the Royal Hong Kong Jockey Club’s most generous financial support has again enabled the programmes to be so varied and extensive.

"I would like to express my thanks to you all and, in particular, to wish all the young people taking part the maximum benefit and enjoyment."

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Release time: 8.15 P*m.

MS P.R. 13

HONG KONG GOVERNMENT

NFORMATION

SERVICES

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

SUPPLEMENT

Friday, June 30, 1972

GOVERNOR LAYS FOUNDATION STONE

**»»,,*«

The following is the full text of the Governor’s speech at the foundation stone laying ceremony of New Asia College today (Friday) June 30;

"When President Mei asked me to officiate on this very happy occasion I accepted with alacrity. I like coming to the Chinese University in any case, and this is a great day in the consolidation of the University as well as in the life of New Asia College.

"Might I say what a happy coincidence it is that makes it possible for Mr, Addis, the British Ambassador in Peking, to be present.

"New Asia has come a long way since it started in 19^9 with a few students in a flat in Kowloon. On its second site in Farm Road it steadily expanded. Nov/ it is about to take its rightful and final place with United and Chung Chi on this University campus. I do wish to congratulate President Mei on this extraordinary progress.

"And may I say that the College does not seem to me to have lost by being last, as it has still obtained a superb site. With such a view to look at its members will need to concentrate to keep their eyes on their books.

"I must pay my tribute to the planning committees, the architects, and the contractors. Also, as your Chancellor, I feel we should commend the Government and the tax-payer who are paying the entire cost of the five major buildings to be built here.

/"As a

Friday, June JO, 1972

- 2 -

”As a hardened Civil Servant I have a weakness for making lists. One of my lists is of things in Hong Kong which are not only fairly good, but which are absolutely good and can stand up to comparisons with anywhere in the world. High on this list is the construction and the concept of this Chinese University of Hong Kong. A magnificent idea, a magnificent site, and splendidly executed under Dr. Li’s leadership.

”What purpose do we want it to serve.

”For my part I want it to serve two causes: that of Learning and that of Hong Kong.

”Hong Kong desperately needs learned people of all ages. We have already plenty of enthusiasm, plenty of enterprise, plenty of hard work, commercial instinct, even compassion. But to turn Hong Kong into the place we want it to be, and to obtain the resources to do this, we need the help, at all levels of people with the skills and knowledge and comprehension that can only be acquired from a basis of learning: the sort of learning that can be acquired here.

’’And what a lot there is for such people to do in Hong Kong and how short we are of them, whether in industry, the professions, business, the places of teaching or Government.

”But learning must also be an end in itself. I reject the sausage machine concept of a University whose only object is to turn out types in short supply. Learning and knowledge for its own sake is what gives a university inspiration,authority and repute and gives it the ability to command the respect of those who learn in it.

/’’And if

Friday, June 30, 1972

- 3 -

"And if the pursuit of learning for its own sake involves some people wanting to push doors marked "pull" or walk up escalators that are going down, I suggest that this may be regarded with a benevolent eye - within reason.

"In laying this foundation stone I initiate the final event of the construction and consolidation of this University. The arrival of New Asia College on the Campus will enable it to make its own creative and distinctive contribution. But it will also facilitate the necessary pooling of resources within the whole University, including the coordination of administrative functions, and the integration of academic programmes.

"Both as Chancellor and Governor it is of this University -completed by the arrival of New Asia College - that I think today, of the great contribution it can make to the world of letters, and of the contribution it can make to our Hong Kong where so much has been accomplished against such odds, and where so much remains to be done - and can be done with the help of the learning and the wisdom that only higher education can give."

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Release time 5*00 p.m.