Daily Information Bulletin - 1970s - 1972 - MAY - ENG

 P.R.H. 7 (REVISED) 4000091

INFORMATION

SERVICES

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Monday, May 1, 1972

ADMINISTRATORS AMONG PROFESSIONALS

Director Of Social Welfare Opens First-Ever Seminar

********

The Hon. G.T. Rowe, Director of Social Welfare, said today even professional social workers and specialists must still learn to be administrators and managers — because they could not shift from one role to the other ’’just like that."

He was speaking to 26 senior social workers at the start of an eight-day seminar in Lee Gardens on social welfare management — the first of its kind in Hong Kcng.

In the audience was Mr. F. Lee Siew-kwong, the Director of Social Welfare in Singapore, who had come especially to participate in the seminar and "to share with us his very considerable management experience in government generally, and in social welfare in particular."

Mr. Rowe said management was "a complex business," and how far it could be taught, in an academic sense, or how far it had to be learned by practical experience was "a matter of opinion."

But he thought there was general agreement that one of the most effective ways of improving management performance was to bring together those who were doing a management job "to consider, analyse, and discuss how the job should best be done."

/Mr. Rowe .......

Monday, May 1, 1972

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Mr. Rowe described the role being played in the social welfare field by those participating in the seminar — both inside and outside the Government — as of "crucial importance", because social welfare services were expanding in Hong Kong, and expanding fast.

"New tasks and responsibilities are being taken on, both by the Government and the voluntary sector," he explained. "In practical terms, the responsibility for ensuring that these services are implemented properly, and their effectiveness monitored properly, rests very substantially on you."

Management Skills

He stressed for the benefit of officers from his own Department that with the existence of an adequate management structure at the top — which they could reasonably aim at reaching — they should realise the importance of developing management skills as well as professional skills, because the former were going to become "at least as important as the latter".

Mr. Rowe thanked the Government Training Division and the Extra-Mural Department of the Chinese University for the "generous and ready co-operation" that had made the seminar possible.

Mr. T.C. Lai, Head of the Extra-Mural Department of the Chinese University, also spoke at the opening ceremony. In the chair for today was Mr. Perry Siu, of the Extra-Mural Department, Chinese University. The seminar will continue for the rest of the week, and will end next Monday.

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Monday, May 1, 1972

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ORGANISING RECREATIONAL ACTIVITIES

First Of Series Of Training Courses For Young People

********

The Group Work Unit of the Social Welfare Department’s Wong Tai Sin Community Centre announced today that the first of a series of training courses for young volunteers on organising recreational activities would be held in six weeks.

Mr. Basil Leung, Warden of the Centre, invited applications for seats at the course from young people of 17 and above with a general education up to the level of secondary school.

The cost will be S3 a person, excluding expenses to be incurred during a practical camp. The course will continue from June 10 to July 1, on every Saturday evening between 7.30 and 10 o’clock. An outdoor practical camp will be held at a site in the Nev/ Territories on June 17 and 18. Other sessions will be at the Centre.

Application forms are available at the Centre, 104 Ching Tak Street, Wong Tai Sin Resettlement Estate. The course will include theories and their application with regard to recreational leadership. There will be opportunities to organise a camp and related outdoor activities.

The method will cover group and panel discussions, talks, study circles, and demonstrations followed by actual practice.

Mr. Leung said: ’’The idea is to equip young people with the necessary knowledge and techniques for organising and carrying out indoor and outdoor activities, especially among poor children without costly and sophisticated playthings, or opportunities.

”We hope that from this course a number of volunteers will emerge to help with the coming summer programme.”

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A.........

Monday, May 1, 1972

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FOUR OPEN-AIR VARIETY SHOWS

For Month Of May

The Urban Council and Urban Services Department are presenting a series of four open-air variety shows in various districts in May this year*

All are to begin at 8 p,m. and last for about two and a half hours Admission is free and all members of the public are welcome to attend.

On each occasion* a lion dance is expected to launch the programme It is to be performed by the local people of the districts.

There will be a lucky draw at the end of each performance* using the serial numbers of the free admission tickets. The prizes, consisting of toys and useful articles, will be drawn by committee members of the local kaifong association.

The variety shows will be held on the following dates and places:

May 1 Ma Wan Playground, Tsuen Wan

9 Morse Park Open-air Theatre

16 MaePherson Playground

30 King George V Memorial Park (Hong Kong)

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/5.......

Monday, May 1, 1972

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GOVERNOR TO OFFICIALLY OPEN Li Cheng Uk Swimming Pool On Wednesday *******

The Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, will officially open the Li Cheng Uk Swimming Pool on Wednesday, May 3, 1972 at 3.JO p.m.

The Li Cheng Uk Swimming Pool is situated in Kwong Lee Road near the North Kowloon Magistracy and the Sheung Lee Uk Gardens.

The swimming complex was already open to public use on October 1, last year. Since then, it has been serving the residents of the densely populated districts of Sham Shui Po, Cheung Sha Wan and Lai Chi Kok.

The Royal Hong Kong Jockey Club has donated more than 35*8 million towards the cost of the project.

The Li Cheng Uk Swimming Pool Complex consists of two large 50-metre pools, a 35-foot diving pool equipped with one three-metre and two one-metre springboards, three teaching pools each of 60 feet by 40 feet in size, a children’s pool and a paddling pool.

The pool has room for 5»000 swimmers at any one time.

The main building consists of changing and toilet rooms, a refreshment cafe, and a spectator stand seating 800 people.

The Li Cheng Uk Swimming Pool Complex is the fifth built in Hong Kong.

The other four are the Victoria Park, Kowloon Tsai, Morse Park and Kwun Tong pools, which have been very popular since their opening.

Note to Editors: You are invited to send a reporter and/or photographer to have the ceremony covered. It will begin at 3.30 p.m. on Wednesday, May 3* Transport will be provided. Two 9-seater vans will await press representatives at 2.00 p.m. at the Government car sub-pool behind the Tsim Sha Tsui Post Office. The vehicles will leave at 2.15 p.m. sharp. G.I.S. officers will be on hand to give assistance

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Monday, May 1, 1972

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TWO BOUNDARY ROADS TO BE BUILT

At Eastern Sides Of Un Long Town

*******

Two boundary roads will be built shortly at the eastern side of Un Long Town in the New Territories to improve communications for further development of the township.

The two roads will run along the north-eastern and southeastern boundary of Un Long, linking up various sites soon to be developed into residential and industrial areas.

The Northeast boundary road will start from the eastern end of the Un Long Main Road Roundabout, run along the open nullph and eventually link up with Tai Kiu Road.

The Southeast boundary road will start from Fung Cheung Road, link up with the roundabout and end at Tai Tong Road.

The new roads, when completed, will have a total length of 2,300 feet. Both will have a 34-foot wide carriageway with two 13-foot wide footpaths.

At the same time, about 4,000 feet of stormwater drains and sewers will be laid to improve the drainage system of the area.

Construction is expected to begin in June this year, and should take about 12 months to complete.

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/ 7 ...

Monday, May 1, 1972

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LABOUR RELATIONS SERVICE HELPS SETTLE

972 Disputes In First Quarter Of 1972

**»«»«*

During the first quarter of 1972, the Labour Relations Service of the Labour Department helped settle 972 disputes out of a total of 1,365, a settlement rate of 71-2 per cent.

Mr. T.F. Tsui, Senior Labour Officer in charge of the Labour Relations Division, said: "This rate is high considering the fact that all cases brought to the Service were dealt with."

As a result of settlements reached a total of S3*039*075 was paid to 5*253 workers as arrears of wages, payment in lieu of notice under the Employment Ordinance or as ex gratia severance pay.

Most labour problems arose out of disagreement over wage rates, changes in conditions of employment, dismissals, prolonged lay-off on redundancy and insolvency of the employer or simply mutual mi sunders tanding•

The 15 strikes which occurred during the quarter accounted for a total loss of 6,658 man-days compared with the quarterly average of 5*501 for 1971/72.

In settling practically all of the ^0 big labour disputes which occurred during the quarter, Mr. Tsui said, "Officers of the Labour Relations Service conducted a total of 82 joint meetings of an average duration of 2$ hours each and made 37 visits to the sites of these disputes."

"In addition, the Service responded to 5*230 consultations and enquiries initiated by workers and employers. Officers of the Service visited 29 industrial and commercial establishments to encourage managements

to introduce joint consultations," he said

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I

Monday, May 1, 1972

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PRIZE MONEY OF GOVERNMENT LOTTERIES

Over #1.2 Million Held In 1970 And 1971 Still Unclaimed !*******

More than $1.2 million of prize money of the Government lotteries held in 1970 and 1971 are still unclaimed.

Under the Government Lotteries (Amendment) Ordinance, 1967# any prize money, unclaimed two years after the publication of the winning numbers in the Government Gazette, will be credited to the Lotteries Fund for social welfare purposes.

The Chairman of the Government Lotteries Management Committee, Mr. Alex S.C. Wu, today drew the attention of the public to the provision of the law.

”In his own interests, anyone who has not yet checked their lottery tickets which fall within these two years should do so without any further delay,” Mr. Wu said.

A full list of winning lottery numbers is available for inspection at the office of the Royal Hong Kong Jockey Club at the Star Ferry concourse on Hong Kong Island.

So far, a total of more than $3*5 million of unclaimed prize money has been forfeited to the Lotteries Fund.

Release Time: 6.45 p.m

P.R.H. 7 (REVISED) 4000001

INFORMATION

SERVICES

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Tuesday, May 2, 1972

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

Visits Aberdeen And Ap Lei Chau

«**«*♦**

His Excellency the Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, spent about three hours thio afternoon seeing for himself the industrial and other development in the Aberdeen and Ap Lei Chau area.

During his extensive tour, the Governor inspected market facilities, shipyards, road projects and a 199-yeaj>-old temple. He also took a sampan ride among the odd fishing and squatter boats, floating restaurants and pleasure craft in Aberdeen harbour.

Sir Murray was accompanied on the visit by the City District Commissioner (Hong Kong), Mr. David T.K. Wong; the Director of Lands & Survey, Mr. R.C. Clarke; and the City District Officer (Western), Mr. Rafael Hui.

He started the tour by going up to the roof of a Shek Pai Wan Resettlement Estate block, where, from a vantage point overlooking the entire area, he was briefed on the general planning of development in Aberdeen.

Later, he proceeded by jeep to the old Aberdeen market* He saw the usual marketing activities as he walked through the crowded area and chatted with stall holders and shoppers. The market was built more than 60 years ago and plans are now on hand for its reprovisioning.

/Continuing .....

Tuesday, May 2, 1972

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Continuing the tour, the Governor walked to the waterfront and inspected the private reclamation at Shek Pai Wan, which will be used for private development.

Sir Murray then boarded the sampan for Ap Lei Chau, where at the London Pier, he was met on arrival by the Chief Estate Surveyort Mr« J.D. Johnston.

From the pier, the Governor went to inspect the site for the first resettlement estate on the island, which has a population of about 11,000. The estate will have six blocks with a total of 3,425 units, capable of housing about 21,600 people.

Joint Project

He walked down the main street of Ap Lei Chau to a sitting-out area under construction at the Ap Lei Chau Kaifong Primary School. The sittin^-out area is a joint Army — City District Office project.

From there, he saw the wreckage of the Jumbo floating restaurant, the site for a possible second resettlement estate, and the proposed site for a bridge connection with the mainland.

From the sitting-out area, Sir Murray walked along the foreshore to see some of the shipyards and marine engine shops.

Be then stopped at the Hung Shing Temple. Built in 1773» it is one of the oldest temples in Hong Kong.

The Governor returned to Aberdeen by ferry and then drove through the industrial area in Aberdeen and the Wong Chuk Hang Low Cost Housing Estate.

/Before .....

Tuesday, May 2, 1972

- 3 -

Before concluding his tour, the Governor stopped at Wong Chuk Hang Path from where he had a look at the road extension and the proposed tunnel connection with Wanchai area. The road extension project is designed to ease traffic congestion in Western District, providing an easy link between Wong Chuk Hang and Wong Nai Chung Gap.

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WATER INTERRUPTION

********

Water supply to an area in Tai Hang will be interrupted for five hours from 1 a.m. to 6 a.m. on Thursday, May 4, to enable a leakage test to be carried out by the Waterworks Office.

Premises affected include Nos. 13-55 and 3$-7O Tai Hang Road, Nos. 3-12 Fuk Kwan Ave., Nos. 1-16 Li Kwan Ave. and Nos. 9-12 Chun Fai Terrace .

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A

Tuesday, May 2, 1972

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C.A.S. COMBINED SERVICES EXERCISE

To Practise Inter-Service Co-operation, Liaison

The Civil Aid Services will hold a large-scale exercise on Sunshine Island on Sunday to practise inter-service co-operation and liaison in the event of an earthquake and tidal wave hitting Hong Kong.

Exercise "Holocaust" will involve practice in rescue, first aid and evacuation of casualties by land, sea and air by men of the C.A.S. Command Units, Warden Service, Rescue Units and Pay and Records Unit.

Other services taking part will include the Army, the Royal Navy, the Royal Air Force and the Royal Hong Kong Auxiliary Air Force, the Fire Services and the Auxiliary Fire Services, the Marine Department and the Royal Hong Kong Auxiliary Police (Marine)and the Auxiliary Medical Service.

In addition to supplying manpower, the services will also provide equipment such as helicopters, landing craft, fast launches and assault boats•

The exercise is set against a background of simulated incidents: the Sunshine Island has been severely damaged by a typhoon and a tidal wave and a ship, struck by the tidal wave, had capsized and sunk just off the coast of the Island. More than 300 victims, including local inhabitants and crew and passengers of wrecked ships and crashed planes, have been killed, injured or trapped.

/Highlights ......

Tuesday, May 2, 1972

- 5 -

Highlights of the exercise will be demonstrations on rescue and evacuation by helicopters and fast launches of marooned casualties, conventional rescue of casualties up and down rocky cliffsides, air dropping of C.A.S. Rescue Unit personnel and use of army assault boats to remove casualties.

The Commander, British Forces, Lt.-Gen. Sir Richard Ward, the Commodore-in-Charge, Hong Kong, Commodore R.E.S. Wykes-Sneyd and the Commodore, Royal Air Force, Hong Kong, Air Commodore C.L. Godwin will watch the exercise.

The Director of Medical and Health Services, Dr. G.H. Choa, the Defence Secretary, Mr. G.P. Lloyd, and the Director of Fire Services, Mr. A.E.H. Wood, accompanied by the C.A.S. Commissioner, Mr. P.C. Woo and the Deputy Commissioner, Mr. R.H. Lobo, will also be present.

Note to Editors: You are invited to have the exercise covered.

A boat provided by the Marine Department will leave the Hong Kong Central Government Pier (east of the Hong Kong and Macao Ferry Pier) for Sunshine Island at 8.45 a.m. sharp on Sunday.

Press representatives covering the exercise are requested to report to the C.A.S. Liaison Officer, Mr. D.W. Luke, before 8.55 a.m.

The boat will leave Sunshine Island at about 12.45 p.m. for the Central Government Pier.

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Tuesday, May 2, 1972

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LADY MACLEHOSE OPENS ST. PAUL'S SCHOOL IN LAM TIN *********

Lady MacLehose said today that providing a fine new school situated in an area where the need is great ”is yet another example of what can be achieved by the collaboration between Government and a private sponsoring body.”

Lady MacLehose was speaking at the opening ceremony of St. Paul’s School at Lam Tin this afternoon.

She said that Hong Kong was now able to provide free primary education for all and a great expansion was taking place with the aim of providing secondary education for all who sought it.

The following is the full text of her speech:

”0n my return to Hong Kong in November of last year one of the first things I did was to come and see my former head-mistress• Owing to the traffic congestion I arrived in this enormous housing estate very late During that frustrating drive I realised what a lot of development had taken place since I was last in Hong Kong.

”1 was very happy to learn that as long ago as 1966 the Order of St. Paul de Chartres foresaw the need for schools in the new housing developments, and asked for a site. While this is the newest venture of the order in Hong Kong, I should like to pay my tribute to all the sisters have achieved in Hong Kong particularly in the field of education, since they first came here in 1848.

/"Hong Kong •••••

Tuesday, May 2, 1972

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”Hong Kong is now able to provide free primary education for all: the objective has now moved on to the provision of secondary education for all who seek it, and a great expansion is taking place. This fine new school is one more step towards this provision. Situated in an area where the need is great it is yet another example of what can be achieved by collaboration between Government and a private sponsoring body. I should like to congratulate all those concerned in this project - the planners, the buildrs, the departments concerned and the providers of funds both Government and private.

•When I came to see Sister Rose Mary she asked if I would open the school - *You see we’ve been keeping it for you.’ Well of course I feel very honoured that the Order should hold up the official opening of the school for me. So now, after it has proved itself for nearly a whole school year, I would say that it has already got off to a good start and is now well down the straight.

”1 have very great pleasure in declaring it open, and running on well. To those who teach and study here - best of luck.”

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Tuesday, May 2, 1972

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PLAYGROUND AND SITTING-OUT AREA

To Be Built On Old Ngau Tau Kok Market

********

A large playground and sitting-out area will be constructed on the site of the old Ngau Tau Kok Market at the junction of Chun Wah Street and Ngau Tau Kok Road to improve the environment and to provide more and better recreational facilities to residents living in the crowded Jordan Valley Resettlement Estate.

Tenders for this project, covering an area of 9»2OO square feet, are expected to be called shortly.

The old Ngau Tau Kok Market is no longer serving its purpose following the opening in March of a new market built by government nearby at a cost of 8580,000.

The new market, covering an area of 28,000 feet, was built in accordance with the laid down policy of the Urban Council to improve stage by stage the marketing facilities in urban areas, especially in those densely-populated resettlement estates.

The former lessees of the old market have already been allocated stalls in the new market and licensed hawkers who had pitches in the vicinity of the old market were similarly allocated pitches in the new market.

The area immediately adjacent to the old market is at present occupied by 66 illegal structures. In a recent survey jointly carried out by the Urban Services and Resettlement Departments, it was found that 24 of these structures were being used for domestic and storage purposes, 29 for domestic and hawking purposes and the remaining 13 as hawking stalls.

/Notices .......

Tuesday, May 2, 1972

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Notices will be served to the occupants of these illegal structures tomorrow (Wednesday) by the two departments concerned to the effect that they are required to move out by June 1 to make way for the construction of the playground and sitting-out areas.

The occupants of five of the squatter huts are found to have already been allocated with rooms in resettlement estates. The others will be offered accommodation in a licensed area if they are genuinely homeless•

A spokesman for the Urban Services Department to-day said that anyone found genuinely trading in the old market as a hawker would be given a site if he or an immediate member of his family has not yet been allocated one.

Hawker Stalls

Of the owners of the illegal hawker stalls, 29 of them will be offered sites in the new market. These hawkers have been invited to take part in a ballot for the allocation of new sites on May 17 at the Hawker Record Office, SQi Yee Street, Mongkok.

For those who feel that they are entitled to sites in the new market but are not given such an offer are asked to go to the Jordan Valley Resettlement Estate Office on May 18 for an interview. An interview board jointly set up by representatives of the Resettlement Department, the Urban Services Department and the City District Office, Kwun Tong, will be there to hear their claims and investigate into these individual cases.

/The .....

Tuesday, May 2, 1972

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The spokesman said that with the rapid development in the Ngau Tau Kok and Jordan Valley areas, traffic along Chun Wah Road, which is the only main road leading to the Jordan Valley Resettlement Estate, is increasing every day.

Many complaints have been received from residents in the estate that illegal structures have extended and occupied the pavement and part of the roadway, forcing school children to walk on the carriageway, thus endangering their life, he added.

The spokesman pointed out that removal of illegal hawkers will also increase the viability of the new market and is in line with the policy of the Urban Council to provide proper marketing facilities to the people.

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Tuesday, May 2, 1972

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TIN HAU FESTIVAL AT JOSS HOUSE BAY

Warning Against Overloading Of Vessels

********

The Marine Department today warned that during the Tin Hau Festival on Saturday (May 6) any vessels found to be overloaded at Joss House Bay will be turned back, and the owner or operator may be subsequently prosecuted-

A department spokesman said no vessels would be permitted to berth alongside the piers or pontoons at Joss House Bay other than for the purpose of embarking or disembarking of passengers.

He said that Marine Department and Marine Police launches would be stationed near Lei Yue Mun to check on all vessels.

"All persons visiting Joss House Bay on this day are enjoined to co-operate with Marine Department and Marine Police personnel in the interest of their own safety and the safety of others.

’Marine Department and Marine Police personnel will be on hand to direct and control small craft,” he said.

The spokesman said the Army would materially assist the festival •elebrations this year by supplying an additional landing pontoon at Joss House Bay. This pontoon would be restricted to embarking onlye after about 11.00 a.m. on that day.

He also reminded members of the public that the last ferry to Joss House Bay on that day will leave Wanchai before noon.

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Tuesday, May 2, 1972

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WORK STARTS ON EXHULING ILLEGAL GRAVES

In Castle Peak District

*******

The Urban Services Department began work yesterday on exhuming illegal graves in the area of Tseng Tau Tsuen in the Castle Peak District.

Further exhumation of illegal graves will be carried out as from May 8 in the general area of Shek Kok Tsui to Tsing Shan Tsuen.

A spokesman for the Yuen Long District Office said that advance notice of the exhumation has been posted on the graves for some months.

He reminded people that it is an offence under the Public Health and Urban Services Ordinance (Cap 132) to deposit, bury or scatter the ashes of any human remains other than in a gazetted cemetery.

The spokesman pointed out that offenders are liable to prosecution and a fine of 1,000 and six months’ imprisonment.

The areas in which graves are now being exhumed fall within the lay-out for Castle Peak New Town. The exhumed remains will be reburied at Sandy Ridge cemetery.

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Tuesday, May 2, 1972

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NEW GOVERNMENT KENNELS AT POKFULAM

Ready For Use Next Year

**«**««»

Quarantine facilities for animals will be provided for the first time on Hong Kong Island when the new Government kennels at Pokfulam Road are ready for use early next year.

The new kennels will supplement the existing quarantine facilities at Sung Wong Toi Government Kennels in Kowloon end replace the ones at Kennedy Town. The Kennedy Town kennels do not have quarantine facilities*

The Pokfulam Kennels will have ten units for animals and pets imported from overseas, 20 units for biter dogs, 20 for stray dogs and ten pig and poultry pens.

It will also have a diesel incinerator for the disposal of animals carcasses and office and living accommodations.

The Kennedy Town Kennels will be closed after the Pokfulam Kennels have been put into use.

A^ ..«•••

Tuesday, May 2, 1972

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SEAWALL FOUNDATION FOR CENTRAL RECLAMATION

Construction Work To Start Soon

********

Work will start shortly on the construction of a seawall foundation for Central Reclamation Stage V situated to the west of the Macau Ferry Wharf.

It forms part of a reclamation project which will provide a site for a sewage screening plant, an area for the widening of Connaught Road West and Connaught Road Central and land for building development and open space.

In addition, about 60,000 square feet of the new reclamation will be allocated as a temporary cargo handling area.

Work on the construction of the seawall foundation is expected to commence in June, 1972 and will take about two years to complete.

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Release time: 7»3O P»m»

.H. 7 (REVISED!

4000091

INFORMATION SERVICES

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

bednesday, May 3, 1972

TIN HAU FESTIVAL PROCESSION IN YUEN LONG

C.B.F. To Attend

******

The Commander British Forces, Lt.-Gen. Sir Richard bard, and Lady /.'ard will be among 3,000 guests invited to watch the annual procession in Yuen Long on Saturday to celebrate Tin Hau Festival in honour of the Goddess of Heaven.

The two-hour procession, which begins at noon, will feature altars to honour local gods, dragon, lion and unicorn dances and stilt walkers.

The procession will wind from the Eastern Bus Terminus, along the southern lane of the main road, to the stadium where the celebration will be held.

Local dignitaries, Heung Yee Kuk Councillors and senior Government officials have also been invited to the function.

Tin Hau is believed by fishermen to have full control over the

sea and is the patron saint of boat people and those whose professions depend upon the sea.

/The celebration ••••

Wednesday, Nay 5, 1972

2 -

The celebration in Yuen Long is sponsored by the Shap Pat Heung Tin Hau Festival Organising Committee assisted by the Yuen Long District Office.

Note to Editors: We have been asked by the Shap Pat Heung Tin Hau Festival Organising Committee to issue press badges for the event on their behalf. The badges are available for collection at the press room, Government Information Services.

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DISPUTE INVOLVING REDUNDANT WORKERS SETTLED

*******

Six workers were redundant as a result of termination of the contract for service of Shing Kee Company by the Wimpy Asphalt Limited, a sub-contractor of the Trans-Harbour Contractors Limited.

Two meetings were held in the Labour Department with prompt attendance and co-operation from the parties concerned.

A settlement was reached on May 1 by which the workers received an

ex-gratia payment of $1,565 in addition to >>2,886.20 in arrears of wages.

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Wednesday, May 3, 1972

5

CHA KWO LING RESIDENTS SUFFER HARDSHIP

Because Of Stoppage Of Ferry Call

******

The stoppage of the passenger ferry service calling at Cha Kwo Ling is causing hardship to residents there, a Transport Department spokesman said today.

He said the Transport and Marine Department sympathised with residents of Cha Kwo Ling but had no legal powers to force the ferry operator to resume his service.

•’Instead, attempts are being made to see whether the Kowloon Motor Bus Company and motor-boat operators would be prepared to run temporary services over the festival period," he added.

The suspended ferry service, which ran between Shau Kei Wan and Kwun Tong via Cha Kwo Ling, was operated under a monthly licence issued by the Director of Marine.

The spokesman said that three weeks ago, the operator gave notice that he proposed to suspend the service in order to repair the pier at Cha Kwo Ling.

"Despite the efforts of the Transport and Marine Departments to persuade the operator to make temporary use of another nearby pier or to do the repairs after the last ferry in the evening, he has nonetheless stopped the service for the last three weeks.

••The repairs have now been completed but the ferry company shows no signs of resuming the service.

"Local Cha Kwo Ling residents are inconvenienced, and particularly upset because the ferry stoppage threatens to reduce the number of visitors to their annual opera held from May 5 to 12 in connection with the Tin Hau Festival," the spokesman said.

Wednesday, May 3, 1972

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FLYOVER AND ASSOCIATED ROADS

At Gin Drinkers Bay Reclamation

*******

Work will begin shortly on the construction of a flyover and about 1,400 feet of associated roads adjacent to Pillar Island in the Gin Drinkers Bay Reclamation area.

This forms part of an overall project to provide suitable approach roads from Kwei Chung Road to the new Tsing Yi Bridge, which is at present being constructed by a private consortium under Government licence.

The flyover is about 200 feet long, and will form part of a main interchange to be built in future.

The finished carriageway, both for the flyover and the associated roads, will be 24 feet wide with six-foot-wide footpaths.

Work is expected to begin in June this year and should take about 11 months to complete.

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Wednesday, May 3, 1972

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WATER SUPPLY INTERRUPTION

Affects Shau Kei /an

*****

Water supply to a large area in Shau Kei Wan will be stopped for five hours from 1 a.m. to 6 a.m. on Friday, Nay 5, to enable a leakage test to be carried out by the Waterworks Office.

The area is bounded by Shaukiwan Road, from Tai Cheong Street to Sun Sing Street, Sai Wan Ho Street including Tai Foo Street, Tai Lok Street, Tai Ning Street, Shing On Street, Tai On Street, Shing On Village and Hing Man Street.

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BAND CONCERTS ♦ *♦♦♦

The Royal Air Force Southern Band will perform at two open-air band concerts organised by the Urban Council on Sunday, May 7«

One of the concerts will be held at Kowloon Park from 10 a.m. to 11.30 a.m. and the other at Statue Square Garden from 3 p.m. to 4.30 p.m.

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Wednesday, May 3, 1972

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ANTI-LITTER DAY AT SAU MAU PING

Voluntary Effort By 1,000 Students On May 5

««»«**«*

One thousand students from schools and organisations in the Sau Mau Ping area have chosen Friday, May 5, as the anti-litter day for the Sau Mau Ping Resettlement Estate.

On that day, they will go out in groups of 40 not only to give the area a general clean-up, but also to persuade residents in the multistorey blocks to stop littering the neighbourhood.

The persuasion will take the form of door-to-door appeals, and the chief line of argument will be that resettlement estates will be as healthy, and as pleasant, only in so far as the residents themselves are determined that they should be.

The one-day drive is being organised by the Social Welfare Department’s Sau Mau Ping Central and South Estate Community District Offices.

Thireteen organisations and schools in the area are participating, including the Sau Mau Ping Estate Office of the Resettlement Department.

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Wednesday, May 3, 1972

- 7 -

OVER 4,000 JOB-SEEKERS REGISTERED By Local Employment Service ********

In the first quarter of 1972, the Local Employment Service of the Labour Department registered 4,646 job-seekers and introduced 3,498 of them to employers for selection interviews.

Of these, 773 were successfully placed in employment.

This represents an increase of 41 percent over the number of people helped by the Service to find work during the corresponding quarter of 1971.

Of the 773 people placed in employment, 309 were placed in commerce, 233 in industry, 133 in Government service, 30 in public utilities and 68 in other establishments.

Six of these successful applicants received an initial salary of between 8800 and Si,000 a month; 6 started work at salaries of S700 -8799; 27 at S600 - S699; 56 at S500 - 3599; 327 at 3400 - 3499; 308 at 8300 - 8399; and 43 at less than 8300 a month.

Of the 233 people placed in industry, 13 were apprentices who were helped by the Apprenticeship Training Unit of the Labour Department to enter into modern apprenticeship schemes.

Currently, there are 4,029 job-seekers registered with the Service, varying from the young and inexperienced, to experienced and qualified people seeking better prospects.

The Service has on its books 957 vacancies, ranging from executive to office boy in commerce, engineer to general worker in industry and artisan to messenger in Government.

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Release time; 6.30 p.m.

P.R.H. 7 (REVISED) 4000091

INFORMATION

SERVICES

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Thursday, May 4, 1972

ADMISSION TO GOVERNMENT PRIMARY SCHOOLS

Applications Invited

*******

Applications are now invited for admission to Primary 1 in Government primary schools, including Police primary schools, in Hong Kong, Kowloon and the New Territories for the school year 1972/73*

Application is open to children who are fully six years old and under eight years by western reckoning on September 1, this year.

A spokesman for the Education Department said that application forms could be obtained from all Government primary schools from Monday, May 8, to Saturday, May 20.

"If birth certificates are available, they should be produced at the time application forms are obtained," he added.

All completed forms should be returned, on or before Thursday, May 25, to the school named as the first choice on the form.

"Children will normally be admitted to schools which serve the district in which they live according to the zoning system used in previous years unless the places in a particular school have all been taken up.

/"Care will .....

Thursday, May 4, 1972

- 2 -

"Care will be taken so that children from the same family are not separated," the spokesman stressed.

Parents or guardians are therefore requested to co-operate by filling up all the particulars asked for in the application form.

"False entries or the submission of more than one application in respect of the same child will result in disqualification," the spokesman warned.

The selected candidates will be informed by letter on or before Friday, June 2J. They will be interviewed at the schools concerned on a date specified by the headmaster of the school.

The application forms are free and no entrance fee will be charged for admission to any government school.

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/ 3 ....

Thursday, Hay 4, 1972

- 3 -

PRISONS DEPARTMENT DETERI INED TO STOP DRUG FLOW

New System Adopted For Persons Remanded

*******

The Prisons Department is determined to stamp out the smuggling of heroin and other dangerous drugs into its institutions , the Commissioner of Prisons, Inr. T.G. Garner, said today.

He said that from May 1 a new procedure was adopted whereby all persons remanded for suitability reports under the Drugs Addiction Treatment Centres Ordinance are remanded at the Tai Lam Addiction Treatment Centre instead of at the Victoria Reception Centre.

The Commissioner pointed out that his Department was well aware of cases in which people remanded in the Victoria Reception Centre carried drugs which escaped detection mainly because of the large number of people admitted to the Centre.

"Under the new system, these people are subjected to very thorough searches and close surveillance by experienced staff at Tai Lam because of the small number of admissions there," he said.

’’The new system has produced excellent results," Hr. Garner said. "Two cases have already been reported since the new procedure was introduced on Monday."

"Suspected dangerous drugs were found in the last two days because of prompt action taken by staff at Tai Lam Treatment Centre," he added.

In one case, 27 grammes of suspected heroin and some suspected opium pills and a sum of $250 were discovered.following a thorough search of the dormitory. In the other, some 13 grammes of suspected heroin were found on the

remanded persons.

/"There

Thursday, May 4, 1972

- 4 -

"There is no question of Tai Lam Treatment Centre staff being involved in the smuggling of drugs," l-ir. Gamer said.

He emphasised that the persons remanded under the Drug Addiction Treatment Centres Ordinance are entirely different from inmates undergoing rehabilitation at the Treatment Centre.

The cases are now being investigated by the Police.

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Thursday, May 4, 1972

- 5 -

TEMPORARY MOTOR BOAT AND BUS SERVICES

For Cha Kwo Ling Villagers From May 5 To hay 12

*******

The Transport Department announced today that, in conjunction with the Marine Department, arrangements had been made with a motor boat company to provide a temporary service from Shau Kei Wan to Cha Kwo Ling over the period of Tin Hau Festival from tomorrow (May 5) to May 12.

The Kowloon Motor Bus Company has also agreed to run a shuttle service between Kwun Tong Ferry Pier and Cha Kwo Ling during the same period.

A department spokesman said these arrangements were intended to overcome the difficulties of Cha Kwo Ling villagers arising from the recent stoppage of the private passenger ferry service between Shau Kei Wan and Kwun Tong via Cha Kwo Ling.

’’Two vessels, each carrying 50 to 70 persons, will operate a service between 6 a.m. and midnight at a 15-minute frequency, with a flat fare of 50 cents per person,” he said.

The bus fare to be charged will also be 50 cents per person. The shuttle service will operate between 7 a.m. and 10.20 p.in. at 20-minute intervals.

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Thursday, May 4, 1972

- 6 -

VOCATIONAL TRAINING EXHIBITION

SWD Joining Several Organisations In Week-Long Show

*******

The Second Vocational Training Exhibition to be mounted by the Hong Kong Council of Social Service will open next week at the Kei Heep Secondary Modern School in Wong Tai Sin.

The exhibition will last from May 8 to May 14. It will open daily from 10.30 a.m. until 9*30 p.m.

’’The idea is to give members of the general public a better appreciation of the aims and objects of vocational training,” says Mr. Ray L. Sadler, chairman of the Exhibition.

”By showing the range of training opportunities available for the young, we hope to help them decide on right careers.

”0ur message is also addressed to prospective employers, because correct training contributes to skilled work, and industry here needs skilled workmen.”

A special feature of this year’s exhibition will be a fashion show to be presented in the grounds of the Kei Heep Secondary Modern School, with the spotlight falling on garments conceived and tailored by trainees in design and tailoring classes in some of the participating centres.

Mr. Sadler says the first such exhibition in the Ocean Terminal in 1969 attracted an audience of about 60,000, and he is sure this year’s show will be- ’’equally successful, if not more so.”

/The Social •••••

Thursday, May 4, 1972

- ? -

The Social .’Welfare Department, the Labour Department, and the Education Department are taking part, with the first showing aspects of its vocational training programme among the handicapped, the second concentrating on its youth employment service, apprenticeship training, and industrial safety, and the third on liaison between secondary schools and industry for job opportunities among school leavers.

Besides government departments, other participating organisations include the Holy Carpenter Practical Training Centre, the Morrison Hill Technical Institute, the Practical Training Centre of the Churches, the Kwun Tong Vocational Training Centre, the Caritas St. Francis Pre-vocational School, the St. Godfrey Pre-Vocational School and the St. Basil Secondary Modern School.

Stands to be maintained by the organisations will illustrate aspects of work relating to auto mechanics; air-conditioning; the maintenance • t

of diesel engines; hotel services; radio, television and photography;

electrical trades; printing; woodwork; metalwork; watch repairing; tailoring; clothing design; and handicrafts.

The SWD stall will include demonstrations of trainees at work on machines for lock-stitching and knitting. There will also be photographs relating to the training of the disabled in radio and TV repairs, machine sewing, mechanics, printing, carpentry and domestic help.

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/8........

Thursday, May 4, 1972

- 8 -

REGIONAL ELECTIONS OF SPECIAL COUNCILLORS

For The 20th Tern Of Heung Yee Kuk

#«****«*

The 19th Term of the Heung Yee Kuk - the statutory advisory body to Government on all matters affecting the New Territories - will cease to hold office on May 31, 1972, and regional elections to fill 21 seats of Special Councillors for the 20th Term will be held on Monday, May 8.

Eighty-two electors, consisting of the Chairmen and Vice-Chairmen of all Rural Committees and the 11 Unofficial New Territories Justices of the Peace, will be eligible to vote for the candidates in their respective electoral districts.

There are seven seats for each of the three Electoral Districts in Tai Po, Yuen Long and Southern (which comprises the administrative districts of Sai Kung, Islands, and Tsuen Wan). There are altogether 27 candidates, 10 for the Southern District, 10 for Tai Po District and seven for Yuen Long District.

The Returning Officer for these elections is the Hon. D.C. Bray, District Commissioner, New Territories, who will be assisted by staff of the New Territories Administration.

The elections will be held in accordance with a procedure prescribed in the First Schedule to the Heung Yee Kuk Ordinance, Chapter 109 in the Laws of Hong Kong. Electors will vote for their candidates by secret ballot.

/The elections •••••

Thursday, May 4, 1972

- 9 -

The elections will be held on Monday, May 8, at the New Territories

Administration Headquarters, North Kowloon Magistracy Building, Fourth

Floor, Tai Po Road, Kowloon, at:-

(a) 9.00 a.m. Southern District (comprising Sai Kung, Islands and Tsuen Wan Districts)

(b) ll.JO a.m. Tai Po District

The Yuen Long District election originally scheduled for 3 P«m.

will not be held because the number of approved candidates is equal to the number of vacancies in the district following the withdrawal of one of the candidates. The Returning Officer has declared the remaining candidates as duly elected.

Each election is expected to last about one hour. The results of

the elections will be announced by the Returning Officer immediately after the votes have been checked and counted.

The procedure for the elections will be explained by the Returning

Officer before voting takes place. Electors are reminded to arrive on time.

Members of the public will not be admitted to the election room.

Admission will be restricted to election officials, candidates, electors and members of the Press.

Note to Editors: Admission of press reporters to the election room at the New Territories Administration Headquarters on Monday, May 8, will be by special lapel badges issued at the entrance to the election room. Press representatives should wear these badges throughout the proceedings for identification.

It will NOT be possible to admit Press Photographers into the election room during the polling and counting of votes but there are no objections to photographs being taken outside the election room when the proceedings are over.

Mr. H.F. Chui of the Government Information Services Department will be present to assist the press.

Thursday, May 4, 1972

- 10

QUARTERLY SURVEY SHOWS

More Factories, Fewer Workers

********

The Commissioner of Labour, Mr. Paul Tsui, announced to-day that the quarterly survey conducted by his department in March this year shows that compared with the previous quarter, registered and recorded industrial undertakings have increased by 72 to 19,474.

However, the number of employees has decreased by 6,812 to 598,535• The main decreases were 4,887 in wigs, 3,481 in cotton spinning and weaving, 1,151 in woollen knitting and 1,130 in ship building and repairing.

Employment in garments continued to expand and showed an increase of 2,719* The manufacture of plastic flowers also recorded a rise of 1,032 employees.

The three largest industries, from an employment point of view, remained the manufacture of textiles and textile made-up goods with 257,245 employees, the plastics industry with 69,406 employees, and the manufacture of electrical machinery, apparatus, appliances, and supplies with 52,090 employees.

In the same survey conducted on a voluntary basis, 21,159 vacancies were reported over a wide range of industries, an increase of 3,600 over the previous quarter’s figure. The largest number of vacancies occured in:-Number of Industry Reported Vacancies

electronics 4,991

garments 4,522

plastics 2,885

metal products 1,508

cotton spinning and weaving 1,146

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/11 .....

Thursday, May 4, 1972

11

WATER SUPPLY INTERRUPTION

********

Water supply to an area in Tai Kok Tsui will be turned off for five hours from 1 a*m. on Saturday, May 6, to enable the Waterworks Office to carry out a leakage test in the vicinity.

The area to be affected is bounded by Tai Kok Tsui Road, Fuk Lee Road* the seafront, Chung Wui Street* Larch Street, Walnut Street, Tung Chau Street, Maple Street and Sycamore Street.

« < * * 0 * • «• *

Release time: 7*00 ptm,

P.R.H. 7 (REVISED) 4000091

B1MMI

INFORMATION

SERV CEO

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN


Saturday, May 6, 1972

POLITICAL ADVISER LEAVING HONG KONG

To Become Deputy High Commissioner In Ottawa

Mr. R.J. Stratton To Succeed Mr. A.F. Maddocks

*******

The Political Adviser, Hr. Arthur haddocks, who has been on secondment to the Kong Long Government from the British Diplomatic Service since June 1968, is leaving Hong Kong on May 9 on re-assignment.

He will be spending some time on leave in England before talcing up his new appointment as Deputy High Commissioner and Minister Commercial in Ottawa.

Mr. Maddocks will be succeeded as Political Adviser in Hong

Kong by Mr. R.J. Stratton who is at present Head of the United Nations Department of the Foreign and Commonwealth Office in London.

Er. Stratton is expected to arrive in Hong Kong in July this year.

During the interim, Mr. C.J. Howells, assistant Political Adviser, will act as Political Adviser.

Note t>. Editors: The following biographical notes are provided for

editorial use:

Er._ Richard James STRATTON

Head of United Nations Department 1971-72; Imperial Defence College 1970; bom 16.7.2^; H.l . Forces 19^3-^6;

/Foreign ....

Saturday, May 6, 1972

- 2 -

Foreign Office 1947-48; Third Secretary, Rio de Janeiro 1948-50; Foreign Office 1951-53; Second Secretary, .Tokyo 1953; First Secretary, Seoul 1953-55; Private Secretary to Parliamentary Under-Secretary, Foreign Office 1955-58; First Secretary, Bonn 1958-60; Abidjan 1960-62; Foreign Office 1962; Private Secretary to Minister without Portfolio, Foreign Office 1963-64; Private Secretary to Minister of State for Foreign Affairs 1964-66; Counsellor and Head of Chancery, Rawalpindi 1966-69.

Mr. Arthur Frederick MADDOCKS

Political Adviser Kong Kong since June 1968; born 20.5*22; H.M. Forces 1942-46; Third Secretary, Washington 1946; Foreign Office 1949; Bonn 1951; First Secretary (Economic), Bangkok 1955; Paris (U.K. Delegation to the Organisation for European Economic Co-operation (C.E.E.C.)) 1958; Foreign Office I960; Counsellor and Deputy Head of United Kingdom Delegation to the European Communities, Brussels 1964—68; married 1945 Margaret Jean Crawford Holt (2 sons born 1948 and 1962; one daughter bom in 1946).

Mr. Christopher John HOWELLS

Assistant Political Adviser, Hong Kong since December 1969; bom 2.5.33; Foreign Office 1958-59; Hong Kong 1959-60; Third Secretary, Peking 1960-62; Foreign Office 1962-64; Second later First Secretary, Vienna 1965-66; Foreign Office 1966-67; Seconded to Ministry of Defence 1967-69; married 1959 Janet Mackenzie Hayes (two sons bom 1961 and 1966; one daughter bom in 1962).

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/ 3 ...

Saturday, May 6, 1972

- 5 -

SEA'./ALL AT CHAI WAN

Work To Start In July

Construction of a section of seawall about 1,500 feet long i

at Chai Wan is expected to begin in July this year.

The seawall, when completed, will protect the adjacent area which is at present being reclaimed.

The reclamation is urgently needed for industrial development and resettlement purposes.

The seawall will also form part of the future cargo-handling basin and facilitate sea transportation of goods and materials to and from Chai -Wan.

The construction work will take about 18 months to complete.

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Saturday, May 6, 1972

- 4 -

TRAINING OF THE DISABLED

S.W.D.’s Contribution To Exhibition

**********

Some of the services provided by the Social Welfare Department to help integrate the disabled back into the community as contributing members will be underlined at the Vocational Training Exhibition in the Kei Heep Secondary Modern School which the Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, will open on Monday.

Mr. Ku Choon-keong, Social Welfare Officer representing the Department on the exhibition’s Organising Committee, says the SWD’s contribution consists of a ’’practical introduction to the Department’s vocational training among the handicapped.”

The SWD stall will include demonstrations of trainees at work on machines for lock-stitching and knitting. There will also be photographs relating to the training of the disabled in radio and TV repairs, machine sewing,mechanics, printing, carpentry and domestic science.

The exhibition will last from May 8 to May 14. It will open each morning at 10:30 a.m. and will continue until 9*30 p.m. An attendance of 60,000 is expected, at least 20,000 of whom will be children from primary schools coming on ’’conducted tours” of the site.

The exhibition is the second to be organised by the Vocational Training Committee of the Hong Kong Council of Social Service, designed ”to give members of the general public a better appreciation of the aims and objects of vocational training.”

/"By.......

Saturday, May 6, 1972

nBy showing the range of training opportunities available for the young, we hope to help them decide on right careers. Our message is also addressed to prospective employers, because correct training contributes to skilled work, and industry in Hong Kong needs skilled workmen,” Mr. Ku says.

------0----------

NEW BUS TERMINUS

At Wong Chuk Hang Low Cost Housing Estate

*********

Residents of the Wong Chuk Hang Low Cost Housing Estate will soon have a proper bus terminus.

Work on the terminus is expected to start in June this year.

The works mainly involve the construction of re-inforced concrete slab, footpath and ancillary drainage works for a bus terminus. About 800 feet of Nam Long Shan Road will also be reali gned.

This terminus, when completed, will replace the existing temporary on-street bus terminus in the car park situated on the south-western side of Block H of the estate.

Construction work will take about eight months to complete.

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/6.......

Saturday, May 6, 1972

VEHICLE LICENCES CAN BE RENEWED

At Kowloon Office Of Transport Department

*******

Beginning on Monday, May 8, members of the public can renew vehicle licences at the Kowloon Branch office of the Transport Department in Pin Ching Road,

The Commissioner for Transport announced this today (Saturday).

Up to the present, it has only been possible to apply for or renew a driving licence at the Kowloon Office, vehicle licences being dealt with at the Hong Kong Branch Office.

Under the new arrangement, members of the public con also effect transfer of vehicle ownership, report changes of vehicle particulars and obtain the issue of duplicate vehicle registration books and licences at the Kowloon Office.

However, new registrations will not be dealt with in Kowloon and any one wishing to register a vehicle for the first time should go to the Hong Kong Office in Rumsey Street.

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D.I.B. ON SUNDAY

********

^°te to editors; There will be an issue of the Daily Information Bulletin tomorrow (Sunday). Copies will be available for collection in the G.I.S. Press Room at 3 p.m.

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/7.........

Saturday, May 6, 1972

- 7 -

’ MORE TRAFFIC SIGNS ON HARCOURT ROAD

To Improve Traffic Flow

*******

In an effort to improve traffic conditions on the westbound carriageway of Harcourt Road adjacent to the New Dockyard Open Air Car Park, additional traffic signs will be erected on Monday, May 8, the Transport Department announced today.

Motorists are asked to follow the explicit directions on the traffic signs and thereby improve lane discipline.

o Saturday, May 6, 1972.

- o -

H.K. MAN-MADE FIBRE KNIT FABRICS

EMBARGO IMPOSED BY U.S.

**«**»*«»•

The United States Government has imposed an embargo on imports from Hong Kong of man-made fibre knit fabrics.

Indirect reports received by the Commerce and Industry Department indicate that the embargo was imposed from midnight Washington time on Friday, May 5.

"It affects goods on the way and those still awaiting clearance from Customs warehouses in the United States,0 a Department spokesman said.

Commenting on the situation, the Director of Commerce and Industry, Mr. Jack Cater, said he deplored the disruptive nature of the American action. '

”1 am particularly dismayed,0 Mr. Cater said, ’’because the embargo has been suddenly imposed despite the fact that we actually have a team in Washington discussing a technical problem concerning the trade in these fabrics. The consultations are still continuing and I find it very disturbing that the U.S. Government should have resorted to such tactics.’1

Man-made fibre knit fabrics have been subject to export restraint since October 1971* A Commerce and Industry Department spokesman said the volume of trade involved in the disputed area is roughly 7.5 million square yards, or about 5*5 per cent of expected total Hong Kong fabrio exports to the United States in the current year.

The Commerce and Industry Department is seeking full details of the American action and will inform the trade as soon as possible.

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Release time: ^.00 ff.m

P.R.H. 7 (REVISED) 4000091

C® 11

INFORMATION SERVICES

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Sunday, May 7, 1972

SUNSHINE SYMBOL FOR

Summer Youth Programme

********

An eye-catching symbol has been created to promote the 1972 Summer Youth Activities Programme which is due to be launched in July.

The symbol sets a gay tone by featuring a smiling face, edged round with rays of sunshine.

It will appear in bright orange and yellow colours on posters which are being produced to publicise summer youth activities.

The design of the symbol is being circulated to participating organisations. It is hoped that it will be used on T-shirts, leaflets, stickers and in other publicity material.

It is the first time that the summer youth programme has had its own identifying emblem, and the intention is that it should become a permanent feature which is used every year.

A spokesman of the Central Co-ordinating Committee said: "In the past we have found that many young people were not aware they were participating in a colony-wide programme of activities. We feel that the use of this new symbol will give the programme a distinctive identity, and develop a greater feeling of unity among those who are participating."

Sunday, May 7, 1972

- 2 -

A comprehensive programme for this summer is being worked out by various organisations and government departments concerned with youth and their recreation activities.

The Central Co-ordinating Committee for Summer Youth Programme which consists of representatives from the Hong Kong Council of Social Service, all district co-ordinating committees and various government departments have been holding regular meetings to discuss the progress of the programme.

It is expected that about one million young people will have the opportunity of taking part in the programme. They will have a great variety of activities to choose from e.g. camps, cultural activities, interest groups, sports and games, trips and visits.

The spokesman said: ’’We hope that more people - not only young people but also adults - will participate in this year’s programme, because they will not only have an enjoyable time but may al.so acquire new skills and gain experience in group living.”

Note to Editors: A photograph showing the symbol is available for collection in the Press Room, Government Information Services.

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Release time: 3.00 p.m.

P.R.H. 7 (REVISED) 4000091

INFORMATION

SERVICES

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Monday, May 8, 1972

INTRINSIC MERIT OF TECHNICAL EDUCATION Government's Task To Provide Facilities *«***««

His Excellency the Governor, Sir Eurrr.y JacLehose, said today that parents and young people in Hong Kong must be persuaded of ’’the intrinsic merit and social acceptability” of a technical education.

Sir Murray was speaking at the Kei Heep Secondary Modern School in ong Tai Sin where he opened the Vocational Training Exhibition this morning.

The Governor said the government’s task in the field of technical education was to provide the facilities.

"This we are determined to do at all levels from pre-vocational schools, through technical institutes right up to polytechnic,” he said.

f‘But,” he continued, ’’there is another task which Government alone cannot perform. That is to persuade parents and young people alike of the intrinsic merit and social acceptability of education which has a technical rather than an academic bias”.

Sir Murray said that they should see this form of education as -highly desirable in itself and not as a second best.”

/He called ....

Monday, May 8, 1972

2

He called on both industry and society to encourage young people

and their parents to make this mental adjustment, which had proved so

beneficial in most industrially advanced countries.

Note to Editors; The full text of the Governor’s speech is contained in a supplement to today’s Daily Information Bulletin.

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NEW KWAI CHUNG INCINERATOR

Site Formation To Be Completed By End Of 1973

**«**««

Planning of the new Kwai Chung incinerator is now at an advanced stage.

The incinerator, capable of disposing refuse at a rate of about 900 tons per day, is expected to be operational by 1976.

Tenders are being invited for the formation of a site for the new incinerator, immediately to the north of Pillar Island in the Rambler Channel•

A large part of the site is to be reclaimed from the sea and about 900 feet of seawall has to be constructed to contain the fill.

In conjunction with the site formation, about 300 feet of cargo handling strip will be formed at the southern end of the Rambler Channel Typhoon Shelter.

Work will begin in July and should be completed towards the end of next year.

Construction of the incinerator proper will start as soon as the site has been formed. ---------------------------------0---------

/ 3......

Monday, May 8, 1972

- 3 -

SITE FORMATION FOR DESALTING PLANT All Works Expected To Be Completed Next Year «*«*««*

Site formation works for Hong Kong’s desalting plant, the largest of its kind in the world, will begin next month.

The $450 million desalter, which will have a daily output of 40 million gallons, will be sited at Star Quarry near the 17 milestone on Castle Peale Road.

The works include cutting back the existing cliff faces and reclaiming an area of the seabed.

In addition, two miles of roadworks will be built. About a quarter of a mile of pipeline will be laid to feed the desalted water from the plant into Tai Lam Chung Reservoir. This will form part of the supply system.

Intake works will be constructed to draw in fresh sea water to the plant. The heavy brine will be discharged through an outfall stretching about a mile on the seabed.

Marine works will involve putting up a fuel jetty to enable oil tankers of up to 5,000 tons to berth alongside. A dock will be erected for unloading the heavy plant.

”It is expected that all these works will be completed by the end of 1973 so that the first of the desalter’s six units can start production by mid-1974,” a spokesman for the Public Works Department said.

He added that all the units should be fully operative by the end of 1975-

/’’The site

Monday, May 8, 1972

- 4 -

"The site for the plant has been determined on technical grounds/' the spokesman explained. "It is near clean sea water and Tai Lara Chung Reservoir, making both obtaining raw water and distributing the product water economical."

He recalled that Government announced in May last year it had embarked on a 20-million-per-day desalting plant to add to Hong Kong’s water resources.

In January this year, however, Government decided to double the capacity of the desalter when it became clear that demand for water was continuing to grow at such a rate that conventional reservoir sources alone were no longer adequate.

The spokesman pointed out that site formation works were to start only shortly after the Board of Directors of the Asian Development Bank had formally approved last month a loan of HK^120 million (US$21.50 million) to the Hong Kong Government to help bring forward this colossal water project.

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/ 5 ...

Monday, May 8, 1972

- 5

BRITISH TRCUPE TO PERFOK 1 AT CITY HALL

Arranged By The Urban Council

*******

The Royal Lyceum Theatre Company of Edinburgh, under the auspices of the Urban Council and the British Council, will give four performances at the City Hall Concert Hall during their coming tour to the East.

The Company, which was first opened in 188?, will present two plays from their repertory.

The first play, to be performed at 8 p.m. on Thursday, May 11, and Friday, May 12, is John Barton*s adaptation of scenes from three historical plays of Shakespeare - Henry IV Parts 1 and 2, and Henry V.

This adaptation, entitled "WHEN THOU ART KING11, depicts Shakespeare*s most famous comic character, that "fat rogue" Falstaff, and his hilarious escapades with his drinking companion the young Prince Hal (Prince of Wales, and the future King Henry V) in the taverns of Cheapside.

The second play, a modem one, "THE BIRTHDAY PARTY" by Harold Pinter, will be performed on Saturday, Nay 15, and Sunday, May 1^, at 8 p.m.

Britain’s young proletarian dramatist, Pinter writes moving allegories about the underprivileged.

He began as an actor, and is a product of the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art and the Central School of Speech and Drama. Both Shakespeare and Pinter represent, therefore, the actor-dramatist tradition of the English stage•

/"The Birthday

Monday, May 8, 1972

- 6 -

"The Birthday Party”, produced in 196^, was Pinter's first London success. It started that series of baffling and ambiguous situation plays which critics have now labelled the "Comedy of Menance".

The performances should be of special interest to students and the upper forms of schools. Tickets at 31 (students only), 35» 310 and 315 are available daily at the City Hall Box Office from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.

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Monday, May 8, 1972

- 7 -

NEW WATER SUPPLY SCHEME AT TAI 0 Inauguration Ceremony On Wednesday *******

Mr. Kan Chung-hing, Chairman of the Tai 0 Rural Committee, and Mr. A.S. Robertson, Director of Water Supplies will start up the pumps to inaugurate the new $1.5 million water supply scheme to Tai 0 on Lantao Island. The opening ceremony takes place at Shek Pik Reservoir on Wednesday, May 10.

The scheme is the latest step in Government plans to bring water supply to rural communities to the same high standards of reliability and quality as is enjoyed in the urban areas.

With the completion of the scheme, Tai 0 will get a fully treated water supply and will be able to draw on the resources of the main Shek Pik Reservoir as well as the small dam at Yi 0.

Note to Editors: You are invited to send a reporter and/or photographer to cover the ceremony, which starts at 11 a.m. Transport will bo provided. A Marine launch will leave Queen’s Pier in Central at 9*00 a.m. on Wednesday, May 10. On arrival at Silver Hine Bay, motor transport will be available to take press representatives to the^Shek Pik Reservoir. After the ceremony, the Marine launch will leave Silver Mine Bay at about 12.15 p.m. and arrive back in Hong Kong around 1.30 p.m. Officers of the Waterworks Office will be on hand to assist the press.

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/ 8.....

Monday, May 8, 1972

- 8 -

RETIRING COMMISSIONER OF INLAND REVENUE

Due To Leave On Wednesday

*»***«»*

The retiring Commissioner of Inland Revenue, Mr. A.D. Duffy, is due to leave Hong Kong on Wednesday, May 10, after more than years of service in Hong Kong.

Mr. Duffy joined the Hong Kong Government in 19^8 as an Assessor in the Inland Revenue Department. He acted on a number of occasions as Chief Assessor and Assistant Commissioner.

He was appointed Assistant Commissioner in 1959, and became Commissioner in 1963.

As previously announced, Mr. Duffy will te succeeded by the Deputy Commissioner, Mr. F.E. Rainbow.

Note to Editors: A photograph of Mr. Duffy is distributed separately in your press boxes this evening.

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Release time: 6.30 p.m.

/ 4000035 P.R. 33

HONG KONG GOVERNMENT

NFORMATION

SERVICES

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

SUPPLEMENT

Monday, May 8, 1972

OPENING OF VOCATIONAL TRAINING EXHIBITION

Speech by H.E. Governor

»$*«****

The following is the full text of a speech given by His Excellency the Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, at the opening of the Vocational Training Exhibition at the Kei Heep Secondary Modern School, Wong Tai Sin, today (Monday, May 8): "Ladies and Gentlemen,

We have heard from Mrs. Wong of the progress made since the first exhibition three years ago.

"In these years Hong Kong’s industrial activities have diversified and fresh demands for trained personnel and fresh opportunities for those with the necessary training have been created.

"I wonder how many parents have registered this new development.

I wonder how many still plan the education of their children as if our community and its economic needs and opportunities had remained unchanged over the past 50 years.

"The facts are that one-quarter of a million students are in grammar schools and only about 10,000 in technical and vocational programmes. I am sure that all of us here are in agreement that this imbalance must be corrected.

/"Government’s

Monday, May 8, 1972

- 2 -

"Government’s task is to provide the facilities. This we are determined to do at all levels from pre-vocational schools, through technical institutes right up to the polytechnic.

"To achieve this the Education Department must build schools and institutes, train and recruit the teachers and plan the curicula; the

y . .. ''••V •'> i : ‘ '

Polytechnic Board must bring that institution into commission as soon as possible. The Labour Department must organise more apprenticeship training schemes. All this must of course be done in the closest collaboration with industry in which the future of our young people lies. "

Task

"But there is another task which Government alone cannot perform. That is to persuade parents and young people alike of the intrinsic merit and social acceptability of education which has a technical rather than an academic bias. They should see this form of education as highly desirable in itself and not as a second best.

"It is not only that we need young people trained in practical skills - though Hong Kong would greatly benefit from this. But I think many young people would develop more quickly and with greater satisfaction if they adopted the disciplines of the skilled craftsman as technician rather than those of a scholar, and saw this as a respectable and desirable vocation in life.

/"Both .....

1

Monday, May 8, 1972

- 3 -

"Both industry and society must encourage young people and their parents to make this mental adjustment, which has proved so beneficial in most industrially advanced countries.

”1 am sure that all of us here today are aware of the need for this mental adjustment to go hand in hand with the development of the quality and quantity of our technical training and education to which they are now committed. This exhibition plays a valuable part in this process, and I hope that your efforts will stimulate interest among industrialists, teachers, parents and students.

,fI now have great pleasure In declaring open the Vocational Training Exhibition 1972"

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Release time: 12.00 NOON

4009035 P.R. 33

HONG KONG GOVERNMENT

NFORMATION

SERVICES

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

SUPPLEMENT

Monday, May 8, 1972

OPENING OF VOCATIONAL TRAINING EXHIBITION

Speech by H.E. Governor

**«»*«**

The following is the full text of a speech given by His Excellency the Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, at the opening of the Vocational Training Exhibition at the Kei Heep Secondary Modern School, Wong Tai Sin, today (Monday, May 8): ’’Ladies and Gentlemen,

We have heard from Mrs. Wong of the progress made since the first exhibition three years ago.

"In these years Hong Kong’s industrial activities have diversified and fresh demands for trained personnel and fresh opportunities for those with the necessary training have been created.

"I wonder how many parents have registered this new development. I wonder how many still plan the education of their children as if our community and its economic needs and opportunities had remained unchanged over the past 50 years.

"The facts are that one-quarter of a million students are in grammar schools and only, about 10,000 in technical and vocational programmes. I am sure that all of us here are in agreement that this imbalance must be corrected.

/"Government•s

Monday, May 8, 1972

- 2 -

"Government’s task is to provide the facilities. This we are determined to do at all levels from pre-vocational schools, through technical institutes right up to the polytechnic.

"To achieve this the Education Department must build schools and institutes, train and recruit the teachers and plan the curicula; the Polytechnic Board must bring that institution into commission as soon as possible. The Labour Department must organise more apprenticeship training schemes. All this must of course be done in the closest collaboration with industry in which the future of our young people lies.

Task

"But there is another task which Government alone cannot perform.

That is to persuade parents and young people alike of the intrinsic merit and social acceptability of education which has a technical rather than an academic bias. They should see this form of education as highly desirable in itself and not as a second best.

"It is not only that we need young people trained in practical skills -though Hong Kong would greatly benefit from this. But I think many young people would develop more quickly and with greater satisfaction if they adopted the disciplines of the skilled craftsman as technician rather than those of a scholar, and saw this as a respectable and desirable vocation in life.

■/"Both .....

Monday, May 8, 1972

- 3 -

"Both industry and society must encourage young people and their parents to make this mental adjustment, which has proved so beneficial in most industrially advanced countries.

"I am sure that all of us here today are aware of the need for this mental adjustment to go hand in hand with the development of the quality and quantity of our technical training and education to which they are now committed. This exhibition plays a valuable part in this process, and I hope that your efforts will stimulate interest among industrialists, teachers parents and students.

"I now have great pleasure In declaring open the Vocational Training Exhibition 1972"

-----0------

Release time: 12.00 NOON

P.R.H. 7 (REVISED) 4000091

Tuesday, May 9» 1972

GOVERNMENT ENGAGES MANAGEMENT CONSULTANTS Three-Man Team Due Here This Month

The rapid expansion of Hong Kong over recent years has resulted in a spectacular increase in Government business and responsibilities. The Government is short of experienced manpower to meet these responsibilities, and has decided to engage a well known firm of management consultants to assess whether the Government is making the most productive use of its presently available expertise and experience.

Commenting on this decision a Government spokesman said: "It will be recalled that the Colonial Secretary, speaking in Legislative Council recently, said that it is difficult to expand the experienced ranks of Government with the necessary experience. It is expected that this survey will enable better use to be made of Government’s limited staff resources. It should ensure that these resources, particularly experienced manpower, are best deployed in the process of reaching decisions and in implementing such decisions quickly and effectively.”

This review will be undertaken by Messrs. McKinsey & Company, a firm of international repute in the management consultant field. These consultants have prepared reports on many large public organisations in many countries, including for instance the Bank of England.

/One of

Tuesday, May 9, 1972

- 2 -

One of their detailed assignments will be to strike a balance between the distribution of decision making manpower between the Central Secretariat and Departments.

A team of three consultants is expected to arrive towards the end of this month, and will carry out their assignment under the direction of Dr. A.C. Copisarow, a Vice-President of the Company, who visited Hong Kong recently.

It is expected that it will take the team about six months to complete its recommendations. It will thereafter remain for a further three months to assist Government in the implementation of any agreed proposals.

Note to Editors: A photograph of Dr. A.C. Copisarow is distributed separately in the press boxes, G.I.S.

0 -------

Tuesday, May 9, 1972

- 3 -

LAI CHI KOK BEACH CLOSED

Swimmers Warned Not To Take Dip

*******

A spokesmen for the Urban Services Department today warned swimmers not to enter the water at Lai Chi Kok beach.

It is now dangerous to swim in Lai Chi Kok as all life-saving, first-aid and other facilities have been withdrawn from the beach, he said.

’’Government has to close this beach because the water there has been found to be unfit for swimming," he added.

If the public want to take a dip during the summer, they can now go to the Li Cheng Uk Swimming Pool which was officially opened by the Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, on May J.

The Li Cheng Uk Swimming Complex is situated in Kwong Lee Road near the North Kowloon Magistracy and the Sheung Lee Uk Garden.

The swimming complex was opened to the public in October • • • • •

last year. Since then, it has been very popular with the residents of the densely populated districts of Sham Shui Po, Cheung Sha Wan and

t '

Lai Chi Kok.

"If the public still prefer to go to the beaches, they are advised to go to the ones along Castle Peak Road in Tsuen Wan,” the • • • spokesman said.

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A..........

Tuesday, May 9, 1972

- 4 -

SAU MAU PING (SOUTH) ESTATE WELFARE BUILDING

Formal Opening Ceremony On May 11

*****«»#

The new Sau Mau Ping (South) Estate Welfare Building will be opened at a ceremony in the Sau Mau Ping Resettlement Estate on Thursday, May 11 at 4 p.n*

The programme has been organised by the Sau Mau Ping (South) Estate Welfare Building Management Committee, which includes representatives from the Social Welfare Department’s Estate Community Work Office, the Y.M.C.A., the United Christian Hospital, and the Gospel Preaching Group of Overseas Chinese Christians.

Guests attending the ceremony will include Mr. Thomas C.Y. Lee, Deputy Director of Social Welfare; Mr. Peter Chan Chi-kwan, Urban Councillor; Mr. Lain Chik—ho, Chairman of the Board of Directors of the United Christian Hospital; Mr. Lee Yiu-bor, of the Gospel Preaching Group of Overseas Chinese Christians; Mr. Wong Ping-lai, President of the Chinese Y.M.C.A., Hong Kong; Mrs. Wong Chan-siu, permanent president of the Sau Mau Ping Kaifong Advancement Association; and Mr. Leung Sai-chuen, Resettlement Officer, Sau Mau Ping Resettlement Estate (South).

Mr. Lee will begin the proceedings with opening remarks, to be followed by a vote of thanks by Mr. Alan Liu, Chairman of the Sau Mau Ping (South) Estate Welfare Building Management Committee.

/All the ......

Tuesday, May 9, 1972

- 5 -

All the participating officials will then jointly cut the ribbon to symbolise the formal opening of the building, and then the programme will continue with a Northern Chinese Lion Dance by the Social Welfare Department’s Sham Shui Po Youth Centre, followed by a selection of music by the school band of the Bernard College, and a parade by the band of the St. Bonaventure Primary School (A.M.).

The building is to house a number of organisations interested in the provisioning of social services, including the Social Welfare Department, the Y.M.C.A, and other voluntary organisations and Christian bodies.

Note to Editors: You are invited to have the ceremony covered.

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/6.......

Tuesday, May 9, 1972

- 6 -

DETERMINED EFFORT TO STOP DRUG FLOW

New System Adopted By Prisons Department Paying Off *******

A total of eleven persons, about one tenth of all those to be admitted last night into Tai Lam Addiction Treatment Centre and Victoria Reception Centre, were arrested for allegedly trying to smuggle varying quantities of suspected heroin into the prisons.

The drugs were concealed within their persons on admission but were detected by prisons staff using an improved searching procedure recently introduced. . .

Since the beginning of this, month.,, all persons remanded for suitability reports under the Drugs Addiction Treatment Centres Ordinance are remanded at the Tai Lam Addiction Treatment Centre.

This new arrangement has helped to relieve the pressure on the Victoria Reception Centre and therefore enable an improved system of search to be implemented.

During the eight days since then, including last night’s find, a total of eighteen cases of alleged drug smuggling by prisoners on admission were detected, and a similar number of people arrested.

Commenting on the drugs find last night, the Commissioner of Prisons, Mr. T.G. Gamer, pointed to the revealing fact that only one of the ten persons arrested at Victoria Reception Centre was on a dangerous drugs charge.

The others were charged with theft, burglary, assault, and loitering.

/’’It........

Tuesday, May 9» 1972

- 7 -

"It has become clear that the drugs which circulated in prisons were mainly brought in by prisoners, and the number of staff involved is very small,” Mr. Garner said.

’’However, due to the devious ways by which the drugs have been coming into the institutions, it has led to the mistaken belief that all these drugs were brought in by prisons staff. This, we now know, is not true,” he added.

Mr. Garner said the initial results of his determined effort to prevent dangerous drugs getting into the Department’s institutions are obviously proving successful, and the long-term benefits should be rewarding.

-------0---------

TWO OFFICERS RETIRE FROM SERVICE

In The Labour And Mines Departments

*4c«*****

In his dual capacity as Commissioner of Labour and Commissioner of Mines, Mr. Paul Tsui presented retirement gifts to two officers, one from the Labour Department and one from the Mines Department today (Tuesday).

Mr. H.M. Munro, Principal Surveyor in the Pressure Equipment Unit of the Labour Department, retired after 18 years of service in the Government and Mr. Ho Kou, Depot Attendant of Mines Department, retired after 25 years of service.

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/8.........

Tuesday, May 9, 1972

- 8 -

APPEAL FOP VOLUNTEERS

For Summer Youth Programme *♦♦♦ ****

More than 30,000 volunteers are needed to assist with the extensive programme of activities planned for young people in Hong Kong this summer.

An appeal for these volunteers was made today by Mrs. Mary Wong Wing»cheung, an organising official, who said that the colony’s annual programme may well be the biggest of its kind in South-East Asia.

She said that about one million young people - a quarter of Hong Kong’s population - are expected to be provided with some form of entertainment and recreation this summer.

’’Various organisations and government departments concerned with recreation activities for young people are mapping out a comprehensive programme,” she added.

’’The operation of such a programme of activities depends very much on young people taking part not only as participants, but also as leaders or helpers. The success of this type of venture depends on the active participation and co-operation of volunteers.”

Mrs. Wong is Chairman of Hong Kong Council of Social Service, Chairman of Heep Hong Club for Handicapped Cnildren and Chairman of the Association of Volunteers for Service.

/She........

Tuesday, May 9, 1972

- 9 -

She said that procedure to register as a helper or leader is quite simple. Anyone who is sixteen years and over may join as a helper or leader. Applications should be directed to any of the ten City District Offices, local youth agencies, District Offices in New Territories and Social Welfare Department Community Centres.

Volunteers may also register at the office of the Hong Kong Council of Social Service at Red Cross Building, 2nd floor., Harcourt Road or the Association of Volunteers for Service at 104, Ridley House, No. 2, Upper Albert Road, Hong Kong.

Volunteer workers are required to help in such activities as running recreation clubs and centres, study and training courses, physical activities, camps and other service projects.

The programme of summer activities is being jointly organised by the member agencies of the Division of Children and Youth of the Hong Kong Council of Social Service, Schools, voluntary organisations, the Armed Services and many government departments.

Programmes are offered on a colony-wide basis and on a district level, where activities are being co-ordinated by District Youth and Recreation Co-ordinating Committees.

Mrs. Wong commented: ’The summer activities are to provide young people with healthy recreation and opportunities to take part in group activities during the summer holidays. The activities will also help to develop their skills and interest and spirit in community service and experience in group living.

/"Another .......

Tuesday, May 9, 1972

10

"Another essential element in the success of the summer programme is the involvement of the community. Not only young people but also adults with special skills and resources should give their support and personal attention to this programme."

Note to Editors:

For interviews in connection with registration of volunteer helpers, please contact Mrs. Wong at Wang Kee Building, 11th floor, Nos. J4-J7» Connaught Rd. Central or on telephone H-238141 tomorrow (Wednesday).

0 - -

Tuesday, May 9, 1972

- 11 -

BUILDING DECLARED DANGEROUS

No. 16 Wa In Fong West

*******

The Building Authority today declared No. 16 Wa In Fong West to be in a dangerous condition and ordered demolition.

In a statement issued this morning, the Principal Government Building Surveyor said that this three-storey pre-war building was inspected following a report from another Government Department.

It was found that the brickwork of the main flank wall, adjoining '.7a In Fong East is badly eroded, bulged and fractured and there were signs of movement in the walls of the kitchen block.

As there is a risk of collapse, notice of intention to apply for a Closure Order in Victoria District Court at 9-30 a.m. on May 31 was posted today.

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Release Time: 6.4^ p.m.

P.R.H. 7 (REVISED) 4000091

G® M®

INFORMATION

SERVICES

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

(Part I)

Wednesday, May 10, 1972

CROWN RENTS ON RENEWABLE CROWN LEASES

Motion Carried In Legislative Council Meeting

********

A motion dealing with Crown rents on renewable Crown leases was carried in today’s (Wednesday) Legislative Council meeting.

The motion that ”in view of the public concern and objections to the present policy of assessing Crown rents on renewable Crown leases, this Council would welcome a thorough review by Government of its policy” was moved by the Hon. Oswald Cheung.

Six other Unofficial Members spoke in support of the motion. They were the Hon. Wilfred Wong, Dr. the Hon. S.Y. Chung, the Hon. T.K. Ann, the Hon. G.M.B. Salmon, the Hon. P.C. Woo and the Hon. Szeto Wai.

Two Official Members — the Colonial Secretary, the Hon. Sir Hugh Norman-Walker; and the Financial Secretary, the Hon. C.P. Haddon-Cave — also supported the motion.

- - 0 --------

Wednesday, May 10, 1972

- 2 -

FULL MARKET VALUE ASSESSMENT Wrong In Principle And Practice *******

The Hon. Wilfred Wong today urged the Government to reconsider, for economic and social reasons, the present "empirical” formula of assessing Crown rents.

He said that for the Government to charge what the market could bear was "wrong in principle and practice.”

He was speaking at the Legislative Council in support of a motion by the Hon. Oswald Cheung that the Council would welcome a thorough review by Government of its policy.

Mr. Wong said: "It might have been tenable in the hey day of pure laissez-faire for a Carnegie, a Rockefeller to charge what the traffic can bear. It should not be the case with Government in this day and age.”

He said that inflation must and can be restrained, otherwise the effect on rents and hence the cost of living would be disastrous in pricing Hong Kong out of the world market.

He pointed out that the existing formula which contains 5 per cent compound interest over 75 years increases the original figure of the rent by four times. The formula which he favoured for Crown rents for leases renewable for both 75 years and for a shorter term was l/75th of the value of the land, without charging any interest at all.

This, he said, would be in the interest of stabilizing the cost

of living and of the present lease-holders

/Mr. Wong

Wednesday, May 10, 1972

- 3 -

Hr, '.Vong said the purpose of reassessing Crown rents upon expiry

of renewable Crown leases were two-fold: first, to bring Crown rents to a more realistic level in line with market conditions, and, secondly, to derive a higher revenue from them.

tfUnder ordinary conditions, this step would be the normal procedure in the financial administration of a government. However, every one is now aware of the abnormal inflation in land values in recent years.”

As the price of land affects rent, which is an important component in the cost of living, it would be injudicious for Government to adopt a formula which raises the Crown rents to too high a level, he said.

"If we do not control rent or at least Crown rent, which we can, we will find that we will face the problem of controlling another factor of production which is more tedious and almost impossible."

He said many of the leases concerned were industrial lots, and already some industrialists had become disillusioned with the high land price policy of Government and they had moved their factories elsewhere.

"If this policy is allowed to continue, the ill effects on our economy should be obvious," he said.

Mr. Wong pointed out that the present lease holders were generally not the original lease holders — many were recent ones and owned small lots for the purpose of their own living.

He cited several examples, where the share for a flat owner of the new Crown rent, on renewal of the Crown lease, would amount to more per annum than the total annual rental income.

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A..........

Wednesday, May 10, 1972

- 4 -

DR. HON. S.Y. CHUNG ON CROWN RENTS

Moral And Social Need For Reconsideration

********

Dr, the Hon. S.Y. Chung said today the renewable Crown lease issue was a "delicate and cogent" problem and warned that if not properly handled by Government, it could lead to confrontation between people and Government to the detriment of the whole community.

"It is more than economical, it is moral and social, and above all, the confidence of the people on Government," he said.

He was speaking in the Legislative Council in support of a motion by the Hon. Oswald Cheung calling on Government to review its present policy of assessing Crown rents on renewable Crown leases.

Dr. Chung said: "I do hope that Government will not under-estimate the gravity aid seriousness of this issue."

He said he was inclined to agree with some others that on Crown rents, Government was acting "unilaterally and unsympathetically" and that the present formula was "unreasonable, far too excessive, and contrary to public understanding."

He cited two cases in which two similar lots of land at Kwun Tong were bought in public auctions in 1963.

In one case the purchaser has to pay twenty instalments of $30,600 until 1982 and then retains the lot free of further payments until 1997* In the second case the purchaser has to pay twenty instalments of $46,600 but will have to pay a very much higher Crown rent upon renewal of the lease in 1983.

/At the

Wednesday, May 10, 1972

- 5 -

At the time of public auction, he said, Government had failed to inform the potential purchasers fully and clearly that the new Crown rent would be assessed in a totally different manner as compared to that for the present one.

There was no indication whatsoever that there are two completely different types of Crown rent as contained in the printed version of the Particulars and Conditions of Sales, he said.

"Since Government has failed to do so, the public were then misled • - • . , • . I

into the belief that the new Crown rent would be evaluated in a similar manner as the present Crown rent and hence the premiums offered by the bidders were based on this misunderstanding."

Dr. Chung said he felt, as many people did, that Government owed these leaseholders a great deal of moral obligation.

On market price or scarcity value of land, Dr. Chung said it is subject to extreme fluctuations even within a period of a few weeks and is therefore open to dispute.

"What justification can Government make to demonstrate to the satisfaction of leaseholders that its assessments on capital value are fair and realistic?" he asked.

Dr. Chung also challenged the Government on its public announcement that the five per cent interest rate was in itself a substantial concession on the part of Government made to those holders of renewable leases.

/tie said •••••••••

•7

Wednesday, May 10, 1972

- 6 -

He said Government was already accepting five per cent interest rate for payment of premium by instalments from those successful bidders of new lots of land.

”1 fully support the view of my Honourable colleague, Mr. P.O. Woo, in that there must be a substantial distinction between a person who does not own the land he is buying and a person who is already in possession of that land which he seeks to renew by virtue of the option he holds,” he said.

-------0---------

Wednesday, May 10, 1972

- 7 -

ADVERSE CHAIN REACTICN FROM EXISTING CRO^N RENTS POLICY Manufacturers’ Burden Should Be Alleviated

**#**««

The Hon. T.K. Ann said today that the effects from the existing Crown rents policy could forebode a chain reaction of cut-throat competition, insolvency, unemployment, labour disputes and social unrest.

Ke was speaking in support of the motion to call for a review of the Crown rents policy at the Crown Rents Debate at the Legislative Council.

Mr. Ann feared that the existing policy, which was intended to benefit the whole community, could ’’boomerang to the detriment of all.”

He said that the present policy on renewable leases had been the subject of a recent study conducted jointly by the Hong Kong General Chamber of Commerce and the Federation of Hong Kong Industries, with the assistance of information provided by the Crown Lands Office. The survey had shown that the present policy would impose a burden on the manufacturers which was both too heavy and too sudden for them to bear.

The study, Mr. Ann pointed out involved exclusively factories operating in self-owned premises. If showed that the revised Crown rents, when related to sales turnover of the respective factories, averaged 2.4 per cent.

”It can be seen then that the increased Crown rents, on the average, will mean that the manufacturers concerned must either increase their sale prices by 2.4 per cent, or must reduce their profit accordingly, so as to pay for the increased Crown rent.

/’’With

Wednesday, May 10, 1972

- 8 -

"With the slowdown in exports and keen overseas competition, as a direct result of economic depression in our main markets, it is unlikely that they will be able to pass on this increased cost to their customers/1 he added.

On the other hand, in view of the average small margin of profit of 4.73 per cent in terms of sales turnover, a figure arrived at for the year 1969/1970, it was unrealistic to assume that industry could absorb such an immensely increased burden.

"Chopping 2.4 per cent from 4.73 per cent is in reality amounting to a cut in the profit to the extent of more than 50 per cent, not to speak of the effect that continuously rising labour costs will have on profit margin,” Mr. Ann said.

"Appropriate steps should be taken to alleviate the heavy and sudden burden on those manufacturers who are, unfortunately, caught in this dilemma, and thus ensure our economic stability," he suggested.

It had been stated publicly by a government official that the high cost of land had been deterring many foreign companies from setting up promising new industries in Hong Kong because they could not bear the high land costs.

frNow our existing industries are being threatened by the Crown rents policy.

’’Industry must not be allowed to be stifled inadvertently; it must be allowed to continue its growth so that it will continue to provide employment, especially for the large numbers of young people emerging from our schools,” Mr. Ann stressed.

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/9........

Wednesday, May 10, 1972

- 9 -

HON. G.M.B. SALMON CRITICISES CRCWN RENTS POLICY Inflation Should He Contained, Not Aggravated *********

The Hon. G.M.B. Salmon today described the present Crown rent policy as a "policy of inflation" and suggested the Government must contribute towards containing rather than aggravating inflation.

He was speaking in the Legislative Council in support of a motion by the Hon. Oswald Cheung that the Council would welcome a thorough review by the Government of its present policy of assessing Crown rents on renewable Crown leases.

"If Government’s Crown rent policy was to soak only the rich, it might have some support in certain quarters," he said.

But this is not the policy, he said. It is one to hit not only the big industrialist and the big property owner, but also the small factory owner, the small flat owner as well as tenants of affected properties whose rents will go up.

Mr. Salmon said "I am, and we must all be, very concerned if manufacturers1 essential contribution to our well-being is threatened."

He said every one who was concerned agreed that a major modification of Government policy was needed. -

As far as he knew, he said, it had not yet been disclosed what the anticipated extra revenue from Crown rents in 1973 and over the next few years would-be-under the existing policy and he saw n.o reason why this information should be withheld from the public.

/He continued:

/

Wednesday, May 10, 1972

- 10 -

He continued: ”1 think we should all know the sort of sums we are talking about, and the effect on revenue, any modicication that has been suggested and that Government in their wisdom may introduce, would have on forward revenue projections and financial planning.”

Mr. Salmon brought up a point of detail on a Government leaflet concerning those cases where a new Crown lease, for one reason or anotherj could only be issued by the Colonial Treasurer Incorporated in respect of a property held in co-ownership by a number of owners.

’There is an actual case, I am informed, of a block of 650 flats, and if just one of these 650 owners is absent or for some reason cannot formally apply for ’Legal Option Renewal’, then all are dealt with by Colonial Treasurer Incorporated.

’’But I see there will be an administrative fee of no less than 31,000 for each assignment ... and this does seem too heavy for people who really cannot afford 31,000,” he said.

Mr. Salmon hopes this flat fee will be reconsidered.

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Wednesday, May 10, 1972

- 11 -

GOVERNMENT URGED TO RECONSIDER CROW RENT POLICY Fair And Reasonable Method Of Computation *******

The Hon. P.C. Woo today strongly urged Government to reconsider its policy and to adopt a fair and reasonable method of computation of Crown rent for the holders of renewable Crown leases.

He was speaking in the Legislative Council in support of a motion by the Hon* Oswald Cheung that Government make a thorough review of its existing Crown rents policy.

Referring to the case of Chang Lan Sheng Appellant and the Attorney General - Respondent, Mr. Woo said the judgment of the Privy Council in that case had only limited connection with the ’’problem under consideration by this Council today."

The problem was what would be a fair and reasonable manner in which to reassess Crown rent on those Crown leases which are due to expire within the next few years and which provide for renewal in the hands of the existing lessee.

At the trial, the appellant had claimed that the use of the words "fair and reasonable rental” in a proviso to the lease had indicated an intention that the standard should be something other than the full market value and4 since the proviso had been evidently intended to confer a benefit on the lessee, that it should be lower than the full market value, he said.

/Although

Wednesday, May 10, 1972

12

Although their Lordships had disagreed with the contention that a reasonable rent must of necessity be something different from the full market rent, Mr. Woo pointed out, it was extremely important to note that, in saying that the two things need not necessarily be something different, their Lordships had made it equally plain that the two things need not necessarily be the same.

Their Lordships had said: "It must be obvious that whether a full market rent is ’reasonable1 or ’fair1 depends upon the nature and condition of the market."

NEW CASE

Should a new case be brought before the Privy Council, the Appellant would be able to show without any difficulty at all that the nature and condition of the market in Hong Kong today was grossly abnormal; so much so that the market rent could not possibly be regarded as fair and reasonable, he said.

Mr• Woo stressed that the market was one in which prices were forced up to extremely high levels by shortage of land — the commodity which was being auctioned -- and the value was not a fair and reasonable value but was a "greatly inflated scarcity" value.

Each case had to be judged on its own merits and it might well be contended by a future litigant that the true market value had been inflated by circumstances, he added.

These circumstances could be the boom in the conditions in Hong Kong at the time, land speculation, or even the very system adopted by the Government of "selling" leases might have caused the rents to be "highly unreasonable" when based upon the market arrived at by competition at land auctions, Hr. Woo pointed out.

/"Whether ....

Wednesday, May 10, 1972

- 13 -

"Whether or not that scarcity value should be charged to a person who does not already have a lease of the land in question but who is prepared to pay the inflated price — prepared to pay whatever the price may be in order to obtain the land — is one question."

"But, Sir, a completely different question is whether that same inflated scarcity value should be charged to a person who already has a lease of the land in question and furthermore is entitled to a renewal of that lease.

"This is a most important distinction to make, that is, between the person who does not own the land he is buying and the person in whose possession it already is by virtue of his holding a renewable Crown lease," he said.

FORMULA

Mr. Woo pointed out that the formula for assessing Crown rent for the latter should not be the same as for the former.

"If it is, then what is the benefit of having in one’s lease a proviso providing for renewal for a further term at a fair and reasonable rent?"

The renewal clause, in such circumstances, meant nothing and was valueless, he said.

It was a burden because it required the lessee, if he was to hold on to his property, to pay in order to retain that property the same full inflated scarcity value as was paid for land coming up for auction for the first time, he added.

/"I cannot

Wednesday, May 10, 1972

- 14 -

ffI cannot believe that the intention of the Crown is to place the two categories of purchaser in the same position,” he said.

So far as a sitting lessee was concerned, he should be able to renew his lease not at a scarcity value but at such a fair and reasonable rent as would apply if, for example, there had been an unlimited supply of land available for purchase, or at any rate a supply reasonably in balance with the demands.

This would be quite a different value from the scarcity value in the present market in Hong Kong. Such a market is not a true open market but is more like a black market such as exists in food in times of crisis or war,” he added.

Examples

Examples had been furnished to UMELCO of cases where the revised Crown rents will exceed the amount received by the landlord from protected tenants whose rental payments are controlled. If such a case were taken to the Privy Council, could their Lordships be expected to rule that the Crown rent is fair and reasonable?

”1 would be surprised indeed if the Attorney General or any member of the legal profession were to advise under such circumstances that the revised Crown rent computed on the present basis is fair and reasonable” Mr. Woo said.

-------0---------

A5.........

Wednesday, May 10, 1972

- 15 -

HON SZETO WAI SPEAKS FOR THE SMALL C0i4MCX< MAN Urges Crown Rents Be Related To Rateable Value *******

The Hon. Szeto Wai said today that to the average man the present method of reassessing Crown rents on renewable leases was either a case of inconsistency of Government policy or that of lack of clarity in the terms of the original lease.

He was adding his voice to the general concern expressed by other Unofficial Members who had earlier spoken on the motion to review the present policy of reassessing Crown rents.

”It remains for me to plead the case of the small common men who undoubtedly form a greater bulk of the people being called upon to shoulder the colossal burden and hardship," he said.

He explained that he had in mind the old-age pensioners, the widows, the working men, etc. who had spent most of their life-long savings in purchasing a humble small flat in one of the multi-storey, multi-unit post-war developments, hoping to live out their lives happily and securely* This group of people scarcely suspected that they would be called upon to face the demand of a staggering reassessed Crown rent — a sum in most cases beyond their conjecture not to mention their reach, he added.

He explained that prior to the publication of Government’s Consolidated Statement concerning the terms and conditions for renewal of these leases, oven a legal mind could have been misled by the original conditions which, to all intents and purposes, conveyed that the lease could be renewed at expiry without payment of premium or fine but at a Crown rent for the second period to be fairly and impartially fixed by the Director of Public Works as the fair and reasonable rental value of the ground at the date of renewal.

/Over ••••••

Wednesday, May 10, 1972

- 16 -

Over 4,000 lots and sections of lots in New Kowloon alone would

fall due for renewal in 1973. These cover residential ,commercial/residential and industrial uses.

Mr. Szeto Wai estimated that probably 100,000 units in which hundreds

of thousands of people live would be affected by the renewal policy.

”In most cases the developers had made their profits and moved on

to bigger profits, leaving the small owner-occupier to face the devastating re-assessed Crown rent."

The position of such a person was aggravated if he was still paying for his property by means of instalment payments covering the capital cost plus interest, he added.

He said it was more justifiable to reassess Crown rent as a proportion of rateable value of the property which includes elements on the land and the buildings on it.

Such-a method was less arbitrary and more equitable compared with

the-present policy, he stressed.

Its merits are:

1) Rating is a continuous and rational process; it will iron out the volatility of the real estate market which is one of the objections to the present policy of re-assessment based on rising market land values.

2) Crown rent will be directly related to the income that can be derived from the land at the time of renewal and thus avoid hardship that would otherwise be created by unfairly re-assessed Crown rent which may exceed the existing rent roll.

3) Factors such as appreciation, enhancement of values due to economic development of locality, lease restrictions, rent control, etc. are reflected in rating and hence would also be reflected in the Crown rent.

-------O---------

A7.........

Wednesday, May 10, 1972

- 17 -

MOTION ON EXISTING CROWN RENT POLICY

By Hon. Oswald Cheung

********

The Hon. Oswald Cheung said today no one inside or outside the Government could say, at present with any facility, what a moderate or reasonable Crown rent was for any particular property.

The reason was, he pointed put, that the Government had failed to revise Crown rents at moderate rates continuously, in the way that rates had been constantly revalued and revised.

He was speaking in the Legislative Council while moving a motion that ”in view of the public concern and objections to the present policy of assessing Crown rents on renewable Crown leases, this Council would welcome a thorough review by Government of its policy.”

He said: ’’Had Government done with Crown rents what they had done with rates, it would have been possible to say at any given time what such reasonable Crown rent would be with reasonable accuracy.”

It would have been preferable for Government to have maintained a continuous reappraisal, he added.

’’Sometime after 1910 when the Crown decided to auction a particular lot, it did not carry out the process of assessing what a proper moderate Crown rent of it should be”, he pointed out.

Now the Government, in order to work out what a fair reassessed Crown rent should be, has to start working backwards. It starts with what the market value of the land is on the basis that the Crown lessee pays a nominal rent.

/The Government .........

Wednesday, May 10, 1972

- 18 -

The Government determines this capital value by ascertaining from recent market transactions what other purchasers have paid for similar sites as vzell as by forming a judgment on this data, and uses a five per cent interest rate for converting the capital value so ascertained into annual payments.

Five per cent is a fair and proper long term rate of interest; there is a case for saying it should be 4%; but Mr. Cheung said he was not disposed to argue it should be a lesser rate. On the other hand, there was nothing "concessionary" about that rate, as certain Government spokesmen have tried to make out.

Full Market Rent

By this process, Mr. Cheung said the Government is reassessing Crown rents at the full market rent and not at a fair and reasonable rent without fine or premium.

"With the utmost respect to those in Government who have devised that policy, I would submit, that just as those who advocate adoption of Zone Crown Rents (nominal rents) have gone to one extreme, the Crown has gone to the other extreme. Neither school of thought is correct."

A fair and reasonable rent without fine or premium is one which avoids extremes. It is somewhere in between a nominal rent and a full market rent. It was a phrase perfectly well understood at the turn of the century when it was introduced into renewable leases. It was perfectly well understood because for 50 years before that the Crown rent on land auctioned had been reserved at rather less than half the full market rent, leaving the other half to be taken by way of a premium. This was done expressly on the instructions of the Secretary of State, who ordered that "moderate" crown rents be reserved. And "moderate" means to avoid extremes, somewhere near the middle, the same thing, as a "fair and reasonable rent".

/That

Wednesday, May 10, 1972

- 19 -

That a moderate rent of this order of size was reserved, rather less than half the market rent, is patent from an examination of the Gazette notices advertising auctions of Crown land. Unfortunately this very important fact was not placed before our Courts here nor before the Privy Council in the case that went on appeal there. On the contrary, their Lordships were told that since 1850 only nominal Crown rents, or Zone Crown rents had been reserved. In the circumstances it was understandable that the Courts came to the conclusions they did. It was even more understandable because the Crown Lessee had submitted an argument that the reassessed Crown rent should be the Zone Crown rent, a nominal rent.

Renewal

He suggested that, generally, Crown rents on renewal ought to be about 40% of the full market rent.

"It may be that, to make allowance for the difficulty of assessing what the market value of a piece of land is and for fluctuations in market value with the forces of supply and demand, it would be fairer to use a range of 25# to 55% rather than a flat 40%," he said.

For converting the capital value into annual payments, Mr. Cheung said 5% interest rate was as much as Government ought to use.

He suggested that for Crown leases renewable for 75 years, the annual payments of Crown rent should be not more than 1.89% of the capital value in a normal market; about 1%% in an overheated market; and about 2#% in a depressed market.

In other words, on a piece of land valued, without buildings, in a normal market at 8100,000, the reassessed Crown rent should be about $1,900 per annum. The Crown at present reassesses it at $4,900 per annum. That is S3,000 too much. .

Wednesday, May 10, 1972

- 20 -

When the market is overheated, and land values unnaturally high, so that the same piece of land might be valued at $150,000, the appropriate rate should be 1}4%, or again, roughly $1,575.

In a depressed market, like that of 1967» when the same piece of land might be valued at $70,000, the appropriate rate should be 2^%, or again, roughly $1,900.

Again using a 5% interest rate, the annual payments for a 24 year Crown lease should be something like 2$% of the premium in a normal market, per year, he said.

The premium on a 24 year lease is less than one for a 75 year lease, probably about two thirds. The same considerations about an overheated market and a depressed market ought to be applied to them.

Sites

Speaking of the category of sites on which pre-war buildings stand, with the rents controlled at the low levels allowed by the Landlord and Tenant Ordinance, Mr. Cheung said they require very special treatment.

’’The Government., which in the public interest severely limits the rents, ought to increase the Crown rents only by an amount commensurate with the increases allowed by the Landlord and Tenant Ordinance until the buildings are demolished and the property re-developed,” he said.

As regards the category of sites on which post war buildings stand, though very much underdeveloped, he said ’’some concession, unquantified as yet, is made.”

”It would be right to come to some specific formula in terms of discount in any review of this whole question,” he added.

--------0---------

/21.........

Wednesday, May 10, 1972

- 21 -

LAND — HONG KONG’S ONE NATURAL RESOURCE

Adequate Payment Should Be Made For Its Exclusive Use

Hong Kong has very little land and the terms on which it is transferred to and retained in private hands must be carefully protected.

The Financial Secretary, the Hon. C.P. Haddon-Cave stated this today in the Legislative Council. He was replying to points raised by Unofficial Members on a motion to have the present policy of assessing Crown rents on renewable Crown leases reviewed,

"This has been recognised by the Government and, I believe, by the people of Hong Kong for many years," he said.

Anything concerning land — Hong Kong’s one natural resource — concerned everyone, he added.

Government and the community as a whole are all concerned that those who are’granted exclusive rights over Hong Kong’s limited resources of land should develop their lots in such a way as to maximise their economic value.

”V/e are also concerned that they should pay the community adequately for the benefits conferred upon them by such exclusive use."

The level of payments made by private interests for the exclusive use of land was, therefore, a matter which concerned the community as a whole, he said.

/It.......

Wednesday, May 10, 1972

- 22 -

It had always been a cardinal principle of policy that when a Crown lease expires at least a proportion of the increment of value since the lease had been originally granted should accrue to the public purse for public purposes, he added.

The Financial Secretary pointed out that the existing policy had been applied since the first lease had been renewed in 19^8 and had been the subject of particular consideration over the past ten years because of the number of leases falling due for renewal in 1973-

Consideration had been given to working out ways and means whereby the straightforward application of the policy could be varied to meet the particular circumstances of particular groups of owners of leases, ho said.

Problems

Honourable Members had stressed the problems of these owners, and rightly so.

"But I must say here and now that it is not part of Government policy to diminish those rights or to confiscate them in any way," the Financial Secretary said.

Various methods were available to land owners for renewal of their leases because the problems referred to by Honourable Members had been recognised

Land owners generally formed a comparatively wealthy segment of the community and had by and large, done very well in Hong Kong in recent years.

"It is this segment of the community, which includes, the large property companies, which stands to gain most if the present policy on renewal is changed in the way proposed by honourable Members. • • * V

/"And .......

Wednesday, May 10, 1972

"And it is the public interest, the wider interest of the community as a whole, which would be prejudiced by such a change,” the Financial Secretary said.

He explained that the practice of selling land for development by private enterprise on 75-year renewable Crown leases started in 1988.

It had been decided then that the leases should be such as to give the lease owners the option of renewal and yet reserve to the public purse the future enhanced value of the land, he added.

Yet the method of renewal left a large share of the enhanced value of the land with the lessees# Because of the low assumed rate of interest used in calculating the renewal rent over ^0 per cent of the enhanced value at the time of the renewal was left with the owner.

Balance

"This is fair and just and reasonable and had been accepted as such by the highest judicial tribunal in the Commonwealth. This rate which is essentially a concessionary rate, strikes a balance between the public interest, on the one hand, and the legitimate needs and aspirations of landowners, on the other,” he said.

”And let it be stressed that the nature of an option is that the person in whose favour the option is conceived, in this case the Crown lessee, is not obliged to take it up,” he added.

However, out of 79 lots or sections the leases of which expired in 1972, the owners of 51 had so far accepted renewal on the terms offered to them and none had refused, he pointed out.

..... /Presumably •••••.•

Wednesday, May 10, 1972

- 24 -

Presumably this was because all had recognised that whatever rent might be charged by the Government upon renewal, it would be much less than the rent that would be charged by a private landlord for the same or similar premises, he said.

Owners had also been given the choice of renewing early and paying in a lump sum, or paying over the terra of the lease or renewing on the basis of the existing development and paying a rent of about 30 per cent of actual income from the property, he added.

Although there were a considerable number of leases due for renewal ♦ in 1973> they represented only a fraction of the total number of properties in the Colony, the Financial Secretary said.

Leases

He pointed out that among the leases due for renewal in 1973 there were none on Hong Kong Island, none in Kowloon, a group of 2,900 lots comprising some SfOOO properties in New Kowloon, and about 90 lots in the whole of the New Territories.

For that reason alone the increased rents landowners had to pay on renewal could not be passed on to tenants to a greater extent than was permitted by market forces, for they could not exercise a great deal of influence on the general level of rents, he said.

Excluding about 290,000 old schedule lots in the New Territories which were in no way affected, the leases subject to renewal in 1973 represented a mere seven and a half per cent of all other lots in the Colony.

/The........

Wednesday, May 10, 1972

- 25 -

The Financial Secretary pointed out that there were four salient points to bear in mind as regards the main groups concerned, namely, industrial tenants, domestic tenants, owner-occupiers and owners.

Tenants, both industrial and domestic, where not benefitting from controlled rents would pay the same market rents to their landlords irrespective of what their landlords had to pay by way of renewal of Crown rents, he said.

Less than 200 industrial properties were being affected by the renewals scheduled for 1973 and therefore he found it impossible to foresee the widespread repercussions on the industrial economy predicted by so many commentators even if rents for the factories in those properties could rise above market levels.

Occupiers

Owner occupiers, like other lease owners, could renew at a rent that need never be more than one third of the market rent of the flat or factory. In many instances, where fully developed property was concerned it would be as low as one fifth or one sixth of the rent that the flat or factory would command in the market.

On renewal owners were being granted a further period during which they would have the exclusive use of the lots they occupied and it was only reasonable that they should pay for the privilege, the Financial Secretary said Furthermore, under the existing policy they were in a far better financial position than owners of non-renewable leases, or purchasers of Crown land at auctions, he added.

/The .........

Wednesday, May 10, 1972

- 26 -

The latter would pay, in a lump sum or by instalments including interestt the full market value of the land, he explained.

Owners of 75-year non-renewable leases had to pay the full market value of the land for the regrant of their lots and where they chose to pay by instalments they were charged 10 per cent interest.

By contrast, owners of renewable leases retain the whole value of the buildings on the land, plus over 50 per cent of the value of the land itself.

’’Further concessions to this group of landowners would inevitably lead to demands for similar concessions from other categories of landowners -and the whole economic basis of our carefully thought-out land policy would be seriously undermined,” he said.

Revenue

The anticipated revenue from the renewal of Crown leases had been allowed for since the year 1973-7^ first came within the scope of the annual five years forecasts of revenue and expenditure in 1969-70.

The fiscal or expenditure implications or both would have to be faced if the sums involved amounting to some 3150 million in 1973-7^ rising to 3200 million a year by 1975-76 were to be diminished in any way, he said.

"Yet it would be quite unrealistic to suppose that any necessary adjustments to the revenue earning power of other levies or to expenditure plans could be arranged in a way which was equitable in terms of the general public interest,” he said.

/The fact ••••••

Wednesday, May 10, 1972

- 27 -

The fact was that lease owners would bo, by any change in long standing policy, beneficially treated, he added.

”Let us not imagine that those lease owners who are also landlords will pass the benefits of any such change on their tenants."

Landlords would, in general, continue to charge their tenants the highest rents the tenants wore willing to pay and the law permittodj regardless of the rents that the landlords were paying to the Crown, the Financial Secretary said.

’’Sir, subject to these remarks» I support the motion," he concluded.

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/28........

Wednesday, May 10, 1972

- 28 -

SUBSTANTIAL INCREASES IN CROWN RENT JUSTIFIED

Public Interest Must Be Considered

*********

The Colonial Secretary, the Hon. Sir Hugh Norman-Walker, said today that for its part, Government had to consider the public interest as well as the private interests of the 5i000 or so leaseholders involved.

He was speaking in the Legislative Council on a motion to have the present policy of assessing Crown rents on renewable Crown leases reviewed.

As a general proposition very substantial increases in Crown rent on the renewal of Crown leases were justified, he said.

This would ensure that part of the enhanced value of property at the time renewal took place accrued to the body of taxpayers as a whole, and not only to a tiny proportion of them, he added.

It was true, he said, that there would always be exceptions to this general principle to meet the problems of particular groups of owners.

He cited land on which there was property subject to rent control, or land which its owner was for one reason or another not able to develop to the fullest extent.

Other matters had emerged which might require a particular solution, he added.

’*But those leaseholders who arc not in these special categories, and they are the vast majority, must expect to pay for the renewal of the lease of their property,” Sir Hugh said.

/The payment ......

Wednesday, May 10, 1972

- 29 -

The payment would be unpopular with lessees and they had nothing to lose in pressing their objections on any grounds and through any channel, he added.

"But this does not mean that those objections are necessarily or all justified," he said.

Sir Hugh pointed out that leaseholders whose leases were nearing the expiry date had enjoyed those leases for a great number of years and had profited from them.

At the same time, the value of land had grown over the years as a result of the efforts of all those who had contributed to Hong Kong’s increased prosperity, he said.

Only Reasonable

"In these circumstances it is only reasonable to insist that leaseholders should pay a part of the increased value for the benefit of renewal of their leases for a further term," Sir Hugh said.

There might be disagreement about the proportion they had to pay but there could be none on the principle that they should pay, he stressed.

Government was satisfied on the question of principle and moreover that it was legally entitled to charge a renewal rent calculated by the present method.

"The question now before us is whether it is reasonable to exercise this right to the extent to which it is now being exercised; whether increases of this order can be absorbed in a single jump; and whether the general level is too high.

/"These .........

Wednesday, May 10, 1972

- 30 -

"These are matters, which, as I have said, will be given further thought and upon which the advice of Executive Council will be sought," he said.

In the light of this debate and the many suggestions made, Government would now reconsider its policies from two angles — first, their initial impact and second, from the point of view of the eventual level, Sir Hugh said.

Some had held that the values in 1973 would be unrepresentatively high.

"Myself I admit to confidence in the maintenance of land values in the Colony, but arguments have been adduced indicating that at the point of time we are discussing such values could not be regarded as representat ive•

Consider Deeply

"These are matters which as I say we will consider very deeply,'1 he said.

The Colonial Secretary asked Honourable Members to bear in mind that the various methods of reducing renewal rents in favour of which they had been arguing would result in very substantial reductions in the forecasts of revenue on which present planning was based.

He explained that it was from the provisions of those forecasts that the many suggestions for improvements they had made at the time of the budget debate had to be paid, and on which Hong Kong’s social and other development schemes depended.

/He pointed

Wednesday, May 10, 1972

- 31 -

He pointed out that any reduction in revenue from this source might require to be made good from another — even though a different group of .jeontributors to revenue might be involved.

f’In other words I ask them to remember that the dilemma of choice which Government has to face between the interests of the community as a whole and those of the leaseholders is a practical one which cannot be ignored even in such a stimulating debate."

"Sir, I support the motion," he concluded.

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Release Time: 10.30 p.m.

P.R.H. 7 (REVISED) 4000091

INFORMATION SERVICES

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

(Part II)

Wednesday, May 10, 1972

HONG KONG’S RESERVES AND U.K. STERLING GUARANTEE

Statement By Financial Secretary On Discussions In U.K.

The Financial Secretary, the Hon. C.P. Haddon-Cave, said today the minimum sterling proportion of Hong Kong’s total official external reserves is now 89 per cent as opposed to the 99 per cent nri gi nal1y applicable.

He said he had ascertained during his recent visit to London that the Hong Kong Government could take advantage of this right to diversify into other currencies or bonds denominated in non-sterling terms without restriction as to timing or the currencies and bonds to be selected.

He was speaking in the Legislative Council in reply to the Hon. Wilfred Wong who had asked him to make a statement on his recent discussions in London concerning the Colony’s reserves and the U.K. sterling guarantee.

Mr. Haddon-Cave explained that the main purpose of his visit to London was to clarify certain aspects of the 10 per cent diversification facility, in respect of reserves, offered to Hong Kong and other members of the sterling area last September.

/The question •••••••

Wednesday, May 10, 1972

- 2 -

The question now to be decided is whether and, if so, how this facility should be shared between Government and the banks, to which about 46 per cent of eligible sterling assets are attributable, he said.

He said that for Government owned assets to be diversified in effect by 20 per cent or thereabouts would appear to be equitable and in the public interest, but he proposed to consult the banks at the earliest possible opportunity to ascertain their views before putting forward to the Governor any final recommendation.

As regards the sterling guarantee itself, the Financial Secretary said this relates to the sterling U.S. dollar parity in force in 1968, and it would thus be implemented at US$2.40, in other words, on the terms on which it was originally negotiated.

’’The agreement as it stands at present expires in September 1973$ and my personal view is that moves ought to be put in hand in good time to renegotiate the Sterling Guarantee Agreements for a further period effective from September 1973 or earlier, and naturally I would expect the 4 terms of these new arrangements to reflect present day and not 1968 realities.”

-------------------------------0 -------- »

/3..........

Wednesday, May 10, 1972

- 3 -

GOVERNMENT’S FLATTED FACTORIES

Design Economical In Land Use

********

The basic philosophy behind the design of Government’s flatted factories is to tailor the supply of the factory accommodation to match the number and type of squatter/permittee factories which are to be cleared.

This was stated by the Director of Public Works, the Hon. J.J. Robson, in reply to a question by Dr. the Hon. S.Y. Chung in the Legislative Council today.

Dr. Chung had asked: ’’Will Government explain the reasons for limiting resettlement flatted factory buildings to five storeys high and ensure a more economical use of valuable land in future development?”

In reply, Mr. Robson said: ”In 19&3, the number of storeys in resettlement flatted factories was increased from five to seven in order to cater for an increasing demand for factory space arising from clearance operations.”

He explained that the original five-storey factories were H-shaped, with factory units placed back-to-back in the two wings and with access from external balconies.

The later seven-storey factories, he continued, were rectangular in shape, having a depth which would provide three working units with areas a little larger than the original units.

’’This design is economical in the use of land,” Mr. Robson pointed • • • t • • •

out, ’’and in this context it would be wrong to confuse the optimum’development which can take place on a given area of land with the maximum permitted under the Buildings Ordinance.”

/He added: .......

Wednesday, May 10, 1972

- 4 -

He added: ’’From experience gained in the operation of these factories, any increase in height above seven storeys is considered impracticable unless the site is large enough to provide much greater ground-level working areas suitable for vehicular parking, loading and unloading and the delivery of materials to and from the individual factory units in the block.”

-------0---------

"JUMBO” FLOATDIG RESTAURANT FIRE ENQUIRY

Report To Be Published In Two Weeks

********

The report of the enquiry into the ’’Jumbo” floating restaurant fire in Aberdeen last October will be published in two weeks’ time*

This was announced in the Legislative Council today by the Colonial Secretary, the Hon. Sir Hugh Norman-Walker.

”The Report of the Commission of Enquiry into the fire on the "Jumbo” Restaurant at Aberdeen will be laid on the table of this Council on May 24, that is to say the next meeting of this Council will be published both in Chinese and in English on the same day.”

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Wednesday, May 10, 1972

- 5 -

CONNAUGHT ROAD CENTRAL FROM EDINBURGH PLACE TO RUMSEY STREET Widening Work About 60 Per Cent Complete ********

The Director of Public Works, the Hon. J.J. Robson, said today work on the widening of Connaught Road Central from Edinburgh Place to Rumsey Street was now about 60 per cent complete and all road works should be finished by mid-1973*

He was speaking in the Legislative Council in reply to the Hon.

Szeto Wai who had asked about the progress in the improvement of that section of Connaught Road Central, and when the grade-separated pedestrian crossing facilities in that road section would be put in hand.

Mr. Szeto had also asked: ’’How will these facilities fit in with the recent scheme to improve traffic in Central District with particular reference to franchised bus and Public Light Bus stops?”

Mr. Robson said the new bus concourse situated to the east of the present one would be ready by September this year, and this would allow widening work on that section of Connaught Road in front of Vehicular Ferry Pier to be put in hand for completion by early next year.

”The extension of the Star Ferry Subway across Edinburgh Place to link up with the Star Ferry car park is also included in this project and will be completed by August of this year.”

He said three footbridges were to be provided across Connaught Road Central. The first, to the east of Pedder Street between Union House and the new Connaught Centre, is being provided by the Hong Kong Land Co. Ltd, and should be completed towards the end of this year.

/The second

Wednesday, May 10, 1972

- 6 -

The second footbridge is situated outside the Fire Brigade Building, and the third to the east of Gilman Street near the International Building.

"Streets (Alteration) Ordinance procedure for these footbridges is being put in hand and assuming no objections are received work could commence towards the end of 1972 for completion by the end of 1973»n he said.

In addition to these, he said, two further bridges are planned, one crossing Pedder Street linking the General Post Office and Union House, and the other one crossing the new road being built to the west of Connaught Road.

Bridges

"Both of these bridges will link up with the bridge being provided by Hong Kong Lands and will be ready at the same time," he said.

Mr. Robson reiterated that the recent traffic measures to combat increasing congestion in Central represented an interim stage for improvement to traffic generally as completion of the Connaught Road widening scheme would provide a marked increase in road capacity.

"This should allow through traffic to have a much smoother passage and syphon off a large proportion of the traffic now using Queen’s and Des Voeux Roads Central. This in turn should improve the flow of traffic in the area, particularly in Des Voeux Road Central, to the benefit of public transport using that route."

By that time, a review of stopping facilities for both franchised buses and public light buses will have been undertaken, he added.

He repeated his recent warning that it might also being necessary to place restrictions on kerb side activities at certain times of the day.

- •----0---------

/7.........

Wednesday, May 10, 1972

- 7 -

DETAILS OF CHANGE IN BASIS OF SALARIES TikX ASSESSMENT

Has Yet To Be Worked Out — Mr. Haddon-Cave

**««**$

The Financial Secretary, the Hon. C.P. Haddon-Cave, said today details of the change in the basis of assessing salaries tax proposed by him in his Budget speech had yet to be worked out, embodied in legislation and put to the Legislative Council for enactment.

He was speaking in the Legislative Council in reply to the Hon. G.M.B. Salmon who had asked whether, under the Financial Secretary’s proposals, deductions for premiums for life assurance and charitable donations would be allowed for the current year ending March JI, 1973*

Mr. Haddon-Cave said both the income and the deductible allowances for the year ending March JI, 1973 would not be used as the basis of a final assessment to tax in respect of the first year after transition, namely 197 J-7^•

”In that year, provisional tax will be calculated with reference to income earned in 1972-73 and deductible allowances based on the circumstances of the taxpayer in that year.

’’But his final assessment will be based on the actual income earned in 197>-7^ and the deductions for which he is eligible in that year,” he said.

In other words, he said, so far as the great majority of taxpayers who are in continuing employment are concerned, they will be assessed to tax in 1972-73 on the present preceding year basis_using 1971-72 figures.

In 1973-7^, they will bo finally assessed on the basis of 197^-7^ figures of both income and deductible allowances, he added.

”In each of these years of assessment, the Commissioner of Inland Revenue will still be concerned with one year’s income and one year’s deductions only ”

/8.........

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Wednesday, May 10, 1972

- 8 -

NATURE CONSERVATION FOR N.T. AND H.K. ISLAND

The Finance Committee of Legislative Council will soon be asked to approve funds for recreational development and nature conservation in the New Territories and on Hong Kong Island.

The Colonial Secretary, the Hon., Sir Hugh Norman-Walker, said ’ combined proposals of the two advisory committees would shortly be submitted to the Finance Committee.

He said the Committee would be invited to consider the financial implications of the two programmes9 These involved approximately $25 million in capital expenditure over five years and a recurrent commitment of about million per annum, which was subject to re-assessment and review#

The Colonial Secretary was replying to a question by the Hon. H.J.C. Browne, who had asked if any decisions had been made "on the recommendations of the Advisory Committees for Recreational Development and Nature Conservation for the New Territories and for Hong Kong Island, and if so what action is proposed?1’

0 -

/9..........

Wednesday, May 10, 1972

- 9 -

D4PR0VEMENTS TO MACAU FERRY WHARF

Work On Stage I To Start At Year End

*******

Work on stage I of improvements to the terminal building at the Macau Ferry Wharf is expected to begin at the end of the year and to be completed within about nine months*

The Financial Secretary, the Hon. C.P. Haddon-Cave, said this in the Legislative Council today when he replied to the Hon. H.J.C. Browne, who had asked about Government’s plans for improving the facilities for passengers at the Macau Ferry Wharf.

Mr. Haddon-Cave said Stage II generally provides for an expansion of office accommodation, changing and toilet facilities and for the establishment of canteens in the premises presently occupied by the Transport Office.

’’However, these premises will not be vacated until July 1973 at the earliest,” he added.

The Financial Secretary said: ”In addition to the comprehensive plans for solving the present overcrowding problems in the terminal, the departments concerned are considering the problems of traffic congestion outside the terminal building.’1

The measures being considered include improving the traffic arrangements in the vicinity, the demolition of the public latrine which obstructs access to the terminal and the re-location of the metered parking spaces fronting the Arrival/Departure Hall to make way for a taxi rank.

Other measures include the demolition of the recently vacated Waterfront Police Station and Revenue Station to permit lorry access to the Wharf and the reservation of an area in the vicinity of the ticket offices for use by tourist buses.

ZLO.........

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Wednesday, May 10, 1972

10 -

SPRING PROGRAMME FOR THOUSANDS Entertainment Of Young In Sheung Shui, Fanling, Sha Tau Kok, Ta Ku Ling ********

Thousands of young people in the New Territories districts of Sheung Shui, Fanling, Sha Tau Kok and Ta Ku Ling are being entertained in a ■special. Spring Programme organised by the Social Welfare Department*s Sheung Shui Social Centre.

The programme began on May 1 and is due to end on May 13 with a variety show and a prize-giving ceremony in the Shek Wu Hui Playground, Sheung Shui, beginning at 7 p»m.

Mr. Chen Siu-jeung, Assistant District Officer, Tai Po, will officiate at a ribbon-cutting ceremony, and Mr. Tang Yan, Senior Education Officer, will distribute prizes to winners of the quiz competition.

Mr» Kwok Ka-chi, Principal Social Welfare Officer, Group and Community Work Division, will present prizes to the winners of the Painting Competition. The Reverend Peter Wong, General Secretary of the Church of Christ in China, will do the same for winners of the Calligraphy Competition, Mr. S.J. Flower, Senior Superintendent of Police, Frontier Division, for winners of the Story-Telling Competition, and Mr. Lau Yam-man, Chairman of the Kik 0 Community Centre, for winners of the New Year Greeting Card Competition.

The four chairmen of the four district rural committees will present volunteer workers in the programme with suitable banners.

Mr. Lam Ping-kuen, Officer in Charge of the Sheung Shui Social Centre, says: "The Spring Programme was organised to provide a healthy recreational •* • • -

and cultural outlet for children in the four districts.

/"The opportunity ......

V/ednesdayt May 10, 1972

- 11 -

"The opportunity was provided to involve district leaders in an enterprise that has meaning for the young people and themselves#

"Remote villages were brought into the programme. We had great support from everyone, and there is unanimous agreement that we must do more of this." ----------------------------------0----------

COURT ORDER AGAINST PARENT

Might Be Useful Deterrent Against Juvenile Crime

********

The Attorney General, the Hon. D.T.E. Roberts, said today he agreed that there were cases in which an order against a parent under section 10 of the Juvenile Offenders Ordinance might serve as a useful deterrent.

He was replying in today’s Legislative Council meeting to the Hon. Wilson Wang, who asked whether the Attorney General would take steps through prosecuting officers to invite the Courts, in cases where such action would be an effective measure for combatting juvenile crime, to make orders under this section on the parent or guardian of a child or young person.

These orders would be for the payment of a fine, damages or costs or requiring the parent or guardian to give security for good behaviour.

Mr. Roberts said: "I will accordingly ask prosecuting officers to suggest to the courts that they should consider making use of this section in appropriate circumstances."

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/12........

Wednesday, May 10, 1972

- 12 -

VISIT BY P0 LEUNG KUK DIRECTORS Annual Event At Social Welfare Department ♦ ******* •»

Mr. Chan Kang-fout, Chairman of the Board of Directors of the Po Leung Kuk, accompanied by nine committee members, maintained an annual tradition by calling at the Social Welfare Department today.

The party was received by the Hon. G.T. Rowe, Director of Social Welfare; Mr. Thomas C.Y. Lee, Deputy Director; Miss Annie Chan, Assistant Director (Social Work); and Mr. T.P. Khoo, Senior Principal Social Welfare Officer and head of the Family Services Division.

During a discussion, Mr. Chan praised the close and amicable relationship existing between the Department and the Kuk. He referred to the impending construction of a five-storey welfare building, for which the Government had approved half of the cost, or $900,000, and he hoped the Department would consider some additional form of capital grant to help with interior partitioning and equipment.

Mr. Rowe said the Government, through the Department, had always given favourable consideration to the Kuk’s financial needs, and would continue to do so.

The visit ended with a group photograph and tea.

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Wednesday, May 10, 1972

- 13 -

REPLY TO PETITION FROM HONG KONG FEDERATION OF STUDENTS

««****«

An answer has been sent today to the Hong Kong Federation of Students in reply to the petition which they delivered to Government House yesterday.

In the letter of reply, the Private Secretary to the Governor said:

"His Excellency has read your petition of May 9 about your wish to hold a peaceful demonstration on May 13 over the transfer of the Senkaku Islands.

ffHe is ready to authorise permission for such a demonstration provided you hold it in an orderly way, and he notes that this is your intention. But the demonstration must be held somewhere that does not inconvenience the rest of the community, and that does not make a breach of the peace likely.

’’The Government has ruled that the Central area, including Edinburgh Place which you mention, is unsuitable for demonstrations, and permission is never given for demonstrations in it. The Commissioner of Police has pointed this out to you. His Excellency has reconsidered this policy and is satisfied that it is right and should be upheld, and that no exception should be made for you or for anyone else. He emphasises that this policy has nothing to do with the object of a demonstration whether Government sympathises with it or not. His Excellency wishes you to understand the reasons behind this. Central is a crowded area, Edinburgh Place itself lies between two of the busiest streets in Hong Kong. Not only would a demonstration there cause disruption of pedestrian

/and vehicular ......

Wednesday, May 10, 1972

- 14 -

and vehicular traffic, and in consequence be of great inconvenience to the public, but in such a crowded place you could not guarantee that what you commendably intend to be a peaceful demonstration would not become a brawl. Moreover, you should realise that if permission were granted in this case, it would be difficult to refuse others.

’’The Military parades, Festivals and Garden Parties to which you refer are entertainment offered by Government. It is surprising that you should think them comparable to a demonstration by a private group whose stated object is to express anger.

Demonstration

”If, therefore, you do not want to call off the demonstration you should consider the Commissioner’s reasonable suggestion that you should instead apply to hold it in Victoria Park or one of the other places in Hong Kong designated for demonstrations and public meetings. In doing so you would be showing good sense and responsible citizenship.

’’With regard to your proposal to hold a large procession through the streets to the two Consulates General, His Excellency points out that the same arguments apply. The streets are already far too crowded, especially in the middle of a Saturday. The Commissioner has told you that he cannot allow such a procession, but has told you that instead he would have no objection to small groups visiting the Consulates General to hand in petitions, travelling there either on foot or by bus. This would be perfectly compatible with your object.”

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Wednesday, May 10, 1972

- 15 -

LARGE INCREASE IN OCCUPATIONAL ACCIDENTS

Due To New Reporting System

*******

The Commissioner of Labour, the Hon. Paul Tsui, said today a new reporting system together with a wider coverage of the Workmen’s Compensation Ordinance were jointly responsible for the seemingly large increase in the number of occupational accidents reported in 1969.

This conclusion will become more apparent when the number of occupational accidents reported during 1971 is available for comparison with the 1970 figures, he said.

He was speaking in the Legislative Council in reply to a question by Dr. the Hon. S.Y. Chung.

Dr. Chung had asked: ”In the light of the rapidly rising number of occupational accidents reported under the Workmen’s Compensation Ordinance during the year 1970 (from 1,301 cases in January to 3,3^9 in December 1970), will Government explain:

(a) how far the 1970 figures reflect a real increase in the number of occupational accidents and how far they are the result of defects in the pre-October 19&9 reporting system;

(b) what steps Government is taking to educate employers and in particular the work force in matters of industrial safety and to what extent is Government spending financially on the promotion of industrial safety; and

(c) the respective number of employers and employees who in 1970 were reached by the activities of the Industrial Safety Training Centre?”

/far. Tsui

Wednesday, May 10, 1972

- 16 -

Mr. Tsui said that under the system of reporting occupational accidents introduced during the last quarter of 1969, nurses at the four major hospitals help by notifying his department of all such accidents.

"Of the total of 24,610 accidents for 1970, 19»571 were of a very minor nature involving only a few days off from work. A further 2,023 were slightly more serious involving permanent disability varying from one to five per cent. Many of these would have previously gone unnoticed and unreported," he explained.

The coverage of the Workmen’s Compensation- Ordinance was widened by the implementation of an amendment on January 1, 1970, by raising the wage ceiling of non-manual workers from $700 to $1,500 a month and by covering for the first time domestic servants, agricultural workers and certain other categories of employees previously excluded, he said.

On steps taken by Government to educate employers in matters of industrial safety, Mr. Tsui said the Industrial Safety Training Centre conducts industrial safety training courses, makes available films, prepares and issues posters.

Officers of his department also give T.V. interviews on industrial safety and related matters, he added, and safety training and education also forms an integral part of the curriculum at technical institutions and vocational training centres.

As regards the amount of money Government spends on promoting industrial safety, he said this expenditure, both direct and indirect, amounted to almost $5 million in 1971-72, and that for 1972-73 is estimated to be of a similar order.

/Mr. Tsui said

Wednesday, May 10, 1972

- 17 -

Mr. Tsui said it was not possible to state how many employers and employees were reached by the activities of the Industrial Safety Training Centre#

"Of those attending course, some came from large factories, others from small ones. Some supervisors on completion of their training will have applied their newly acquired knowledge to many workers. Others will have done nothing.”

The Commissioner of Labour pointed out that although carelessness by workers causes many accidents, many employers remain regrettably apathetic to accident prevention.

“Many employers seem to consider that industrial safety is not their concern but solely that of Government. This, of course, is not so. Accident prevention should be an integral part of good management,” he said.

He told the Council that his department would continue to do all it could to extend the influence of these procedures for the benefit of workmen and employers alike.

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/18.........

Wednesday, May 10, 1972

- 18 -

PROCEEDINGS RECORDED

**«**««**

Note to Editors: Proceedings of today’s Legislative Council meeting have been recorded. You are welcome to consult the recording.

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TOO BILLS PASSED IN LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL

After Committee Stage And Third Beading

**********

Two bills passed their committee stage and third readings in the Legislative Council today and became law.

They are the Adoption (Amendment ) Bill 1972 and the Chit-Fund Businesses (Prohibition) Bill 1972.

Four other bills had their first and second readings. They are the Criminal Procedure (Amendment ) (n0. 2) Bill 1972, the University of Hong Kong (Amendment) Bill 1972, the Pharmacy and Poisons (Amendment) Bill 1972, and the Legal Practitioners (Amendment) Bill 1972.

Debate on the Matrimonial Causes (Amendment) (No. 2) Bill 1972 was resumed.

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Release time: 10.00 p.m.

. 7 (REVISED) 4000091

INFORMATION

SERVICES

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Thursday, May 11, 1972

RECREATIONAL development and nature conservation

Advisory Committee Submits Report

*********

The first interim report of the Hong Kong Island Advisory Committoe for Recreational Development and Nature Conservation covering the period, November 1970 to December 1971, has now been submitted to Government, the Chairman, Mr. R.C. Clarke, stated today.

This Committee was appointed in November 1970 to advise on schemes for the recreational use and conservation of the countryside and to prepare a 5-year programme for this purpose.

It was set up under the chairmanship of Director of Lands & Survey and has representatives from the University of Hong Kong, Tourist Association, the Hong Kong Council of Social Service and the Urban Council as well as other Government officers.

In March 1971 the Committee submitted its first 5-year programme together with an estimate of cost. It has subsequently supported this with further details.

It is understood that those recommendations arc still being studied and it is hoped that funds will be made available in the not too distant future.

/The main

Thursday, May 11, 1972

2 -

The main activities of the Committee have been concerned with the formulation of proposals for providing better access into the countryside of Hong Kong Island so as to enable fuller use of the area to be made whilst at the same time enabling better management and control of the various areas to be exercised by the authorities to protect the countryside against vandalism.

The committee considers it essential that additional management centres be established both to protect the countryside from fire and erosion and to provide scavenging and general warden services.

It is proposed that these be placed under the control of the Agriculture & Fisheries Department.

Nature Education

One proposal of the Committee is to establish a Nature Education Trail between Tai Tam Gap and Big Wave Bay, Shek 0 along which special arrangements will be made to point out interesting aspects of the natural environment including the local geology, flora and fauna.

It is expected that this will have general appeal. The idea has yet to be developed fully but will receive priority consideration once funds are available.

The Committee feels unable to make any real progress on the ground until the level of funds to be made available is known.

Nevertheless it is continuing its examination of the things that can be done once funds are available.

It is also studying management and additional legislative arrangements which may be required together with the staff necessary to give effect to the Committee’s proposals.

It is the Committee’s intention to issue periodical statements of progress.

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/5.........

Thursday, May 11, 1972

- 3 -

NG ON-ROAD PARKING SPACES FOR INDIVIDUALS

Requests Will Not Be Considered

**«»»*»•*

No requests by individuals for the exclusive use of on-road parking spaces outside their promises would be considered, the Transport Department announced today.

A spokesman said that the department frequently received requests from persons in schools, shops, factories, godowns and blocks of flats for special allocation of on-road car parking spaces outside the premises.

’’All these requests have to be refused because, whereas, there are legal powers to reserve parking spaces for certain categories of vehicle, there are no powers to reserve spaces specially for the vehicles of certain people,” he added.

The spokesman stressed that the Department was always willing to consider requests for the designation of kerbside spaces for loading/unloading of commercial vehicles and for the parking of various categories of vehicles provided those spaces could be used by any vehicle of the right category.

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Thursday, May 11, 1972

- 4 -

INTERNATIONAL ART EXHIBITION

At City Museum And Art Gallery

********

An international art exhibition which circulates in the Far East has arrived in Hong Kong and is now being shown at the City Museum and Art Gallery under the sponsorship of the Urban Council.

The exhibition is organised by the International Society of Plastic and Audio-Visual Arts (ISPAA) which was first founded in Japan around 1962.

Later branch associations were established in Korea, Taiwan, Singapore, Malaysia, Thailand, Brazil, Switzerland, Okinawa, and Hong Kong.

The purpose of the Society is to promote cultural interchange in the visual arts among as many countries as possible.

ISPAA has organised nine exhibitions of the same nature in the past, and this is their tenth exhibition which was first shown in Singapore last October and was subsequently in Kuala Lumpur and Bangkok.

All the exhibits are works of the ISPAA members of the various participating countries or localities.

Sixty-six pieces of paintings, prints and sculptures make up the present exhibition.

Among these, there are five from Brazil, thirteen from Japan, sixteen from Korea, seven from Malaysia, seven from Singapore, four from Taiwan, four from Thailand, and ten by Hong Kong artists.

The exhibition will remain open until May 28. Afterwards, it will travel to Taiwan, Korea, and Japan.

Thursday, May 11, 1972

- 5 -

VISIT BY TUBERCULOSIS SPECIALIST J ■

Continuing Interest In Hong Kong Of Medical Research Council

*«*«*«»«

Dr« Wallace Fox, Director of the Tuberculosis and Chest Diseases Unit of Britain’s Medical Research Council, has just concluded a week’s visit to the Medical and Health Department for routine consultations on tuberculosis control.

The visit is part of the five-year tuberculosis research project agreement jointly concluded in 19&7 between the Government of Hong Kong and the Medical Research Council, and recently renewed for another five years# ”A happy and close working relationship has been built up over the years,” Dr. Fox said before he left, ’’and the results of the joint studies are now becoming available. They have already had a considerable impact on the methods of treatment in Hong Kong.”

During Dr. Fox’s latest visit, he had discussions at the Department’s headquarters with Dr. the Hon. G.H. Choa, Director of Medical and Health Services, and other doctors.

But most of his time was spent with staff of institutions concerned with the control and treatment of tuberculosis in Hong Kong. He looked at the latest developments in the Colony’s fight against the disease, and was satisfied with progress. This had reached the point where an almost 100 per cent cure could be guaranteed — provided the patient co-operated to the full, and underwent the prescribed treatment.

/He was

Thursday, May 11, 1972

- 6 -

He was particularly interested in the fact that it seemed likely that Hong Kong could soon overcome one of the major drawbacks still existing in the treatment of tuberculosis — namely, its long duration.

He approved final details of a project beginning next month involving a special study designed to shorten the current duration of treatment for new cases of tuberculosis. Taking part in the study are the Chest Service of the Medical and Health Department, the Hong Kong Anti-Tuberculosis and Thoracic Diseases Association, the Haven of Hope Sanatorium, and the Medical Research Council.

"Bearing in mind that more and more patients are treated on an out-patient basis, this shortening of treatment, if successful, will mean a breakthrough of major proportions," Dr. Fox said.

"Not only will the treatment of tuberculosis in Hong Kong be revolutionised, but it will be short and relatively inexpensive."

Dr. Fox’s visit will be followed by further visits by staff of the Medical Research Council to ensure that close and continuous consultations be maintained on this project, and the possible implementation of its findings in the improvement in the control and treatment of tuberculosis in Hong Kong.

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/7........

Thursday, May 11, 1972

- 7 -

PREVENTION OF ENTERIC DISEASES CAMPAIGN

«*«»****

The Urban Council will launch a one-month campaign on prevention of enteric diseases from tomorrow (Friday).

The aim of the campaign is both to raise the alertness of the public towards the danger of enteric diseases and to improve the standard of hygiene in the preparation of food.

********

Note to editors: Dr. M.H. Huang, Chairman of the Urban

Council’s Environmental Hygiene Select Committee, will hold a press conference in Wong Tai Sin Community Centre in Shing Tak Street at 2.30 p.m. tomorrow to publicise the campaign.

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MORSE PARK POOL TO HOLD SWIMMING GALA

Will Be Closed To Public On Saturday

********

The Morse Park Swimming Pool Complex will be closed to the public

this Saturday (May 13) from 2 p.m. to 7 p.m*

The Hong Kong Amateur Swimming Association will be holding its

Age Group Sv/imming Gala during that period.

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/8........

Thursday, May 11, 1972

- 8 -

TOUGH ACTION AGAINST ’’SPACE GRABBERS”

Heavy Fines On Conviction * * X' * ♦ ♦ *

The Resettlement Department is taking tougher action against “space grabbers” in its estates.

In recent months many convictions have been secured in the courts against hawkers and shop tenants in resettlement estates who persist in taking up more space than has been allocated to them.

“Such selfishness on the part of shopkeepers and hawkers must be discouraged," a spokesman for the Resettlement Department said.

He added- that- not only do they deprive the tenants of open space, which is already so scarce, they cause serious obstruction and make cleansing difficult if not impossible.

The spokesman said that in a recent case at Wong Tai Sin, where a rattan shop had taken over a large area of about JOO sq. ft. outside the shop, the shopkeeper was convicted and fined $J,000. In addition he was bound over in the sum of #2,000.

“Such prosecutions will continue in increasing numbers until hawkers and shopkeepers recognise that they must co-operate or face the consequences.”

Recent clean-up campaigns in the estates have done a lot to give back the open spaces around the blocks to the domestic tenants, but a number of stall hawkers and shopkeepers refuse to keep within their boundaries and have had to be prosecuted.

/’’Prosecution •••••••

Thursday, May 11, 1972

- 9 -

"Prosecution seems to be the only effective deterrent when offenders persist in this way,” the spokesman said.

He added that in Lei Cheng Uk estate, six hawkers in the cleaned-up area occupying resited stalls were fined sums ranging up to 3500 for storing goods outside the stall area.

In other estates, prosecution against shopkeepers who were storing their goods outside the shop ranged up to 3600.

The same problems have arisen in resettlement factories and during April alone J3 successful prosecutions were taken against factory tenants who were causing obstruction by leaving raw material, or finished goods, outside their factories in the public spaces.

In these cases, fines ranged up to 32,500.

«***»»**

Note to editors: A photograph illustrating this item

is boxed separately this evening.

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/10.........

Thursday, May 11, 1972

- 10

BUILDINGS DECLARED DANGEROUS

Nos. 32 & 34 Tai Ping Shan Street '*******

The Building Authority today declared Nos. 32 and 34 Tai Ping Shan Street Hong Kong to be in a dangerous condition and ordered demolition.

In a statement issued this morning, the Principal Government Building Surveyor said that these four-storey pre-war buildings, which share a common staircase, were inspected as a result of a report from another Government Department.

It was found that the brackets supporting the front projecting balconies are extensively decayed and, being beyond repair, should be removed.

However there are fractures in the brickwork of the front main wall and although not showing signs of recent movement, these are such that demolition or removal of the balconies could not be safely carried out.

In addition there is a large fracture in the party wall near the junction with the rear main wall which shows signs of recent movement.

Notices of intention to apply for Closure Orders in Victoria District Court at 9*30 a.m. on June 22 were posted today.

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/Il ...

Thursday, May 11, 1972

- 11 -

PROPER CO-ORDINATION OF SOCIAL WELFARE SERVICES Significance Of Second Estate Welfare Building In Sau Mau Ping *******

Mr. Thomas C.Y. Lee, Deputy Director of Social Welfare, said to-day with the growing complexity and sophistication of Hong Kong’s problems, it was only through the proper co-ordination and location of government and voluntary services that residents could have their needs met promptly.

He was speaking at the formal opening of the Sau Mau Ping (South) Estate ./elfare Building, the second in the area. It houses a number of government and voluntary agencies, all working together ’’under the same roof in the provision of co-ordinated welfare services.”

Mr. Lee noted that with the new building, there were now six estate welfare buildings, and three more were being planned. In all of them, welfare services were being made possible as "an integrated whole.”

The concept of a multi-purpose building providing a variety of services in a housing estate was unique to Hong Kong, and had proved successful in Lam Tin, Shek Lei, Ngau Tau Kok and Tsz Wan Shan, but Mr. Lee understood that other cities in the region were interested in Hong Kong’s example and might take the idea up.

Guests attending the ceremony included Mr. Peter Chan Chi-kwan, the Urban Councillor; Mr. Lam Chik-ho, Chairman of the Board of Directors of the United Christian Hospital; Mr. Lee Yiu-bor, of the Gospel Preaching Group of Overseas Chinese Christians; Mr. Wong Ping-lai, President of

/the Chinese ••••

Thursday, May 11, 1972

- 12 -

the Chinese YMCA; Mrs. Wong Chan-siu, Permanent President of the Sau Mau Ping Kaifong elfare Advancement Association; and Mr. Leung Sai-chuen, Resettlement Officer, Sau Mau Ping Resettlement Estate (South) Mr. Lee referred to the nursery, youth, health and community services in the building being made available by government departments and various agencies. He had every confidence they would be used to the maximum benefit of the estate’s residents.

Of the Social Welfare Department’s Estate Community Work Office he said it would work with the local community and the agencies within the building "to encourage the development of community groups and volunteer services, help residents identify their needs, and co-operate so that appropriate, action could be taken for community betterment.”

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/ 13 ....

Thursday, May 11, 1972

- 13 -

FOUR SUPPLIES OFFICERS RETIRING

Director To Present Farewell Gifts

********

Four officers of the Government Supplies Department who have a total of more than 150 years of service are retiring shortly.

They are Mr. Ho Poon-kan, Senior Supplies Officer, Mr. Chu Sheung-yee, and Mr. Lai Tat-ki, Supplies Supervisor Class II, and Mr. Wong Kwong-sin, Supplies Assistant.

To mark their retirement, the Director of Government Supplies, Mi*. F.J. Young, will present farewell gifts to them on behalf of their friends and colleagues on Friday.

*#4t**#**

Note to editors: You are welcome to have the presentation

covered.

It will be held at 4.30 p.m. on Friday, May 12, at the Recreation Club on the top floor of the Government Supplies Department in Oil Street, North Point.

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/14 ........

Thursday, May 11, 1972

- 14 -

THREE MEMBERS OF PUBLIC TO BE COMMENDED

For Efforts To Put Out Fire

** *

Mr. H.T.J. Hutchins, the Chief Fire Officer, Hong Kong and Marine, will present Director of Fire Services commendation certificates and a small monetary award, to three members of the public tomorrow (Friday).

The presentation will take place at Shau Kei Wan Fire Station at 4 p.m.

The certificates will be presented to Mr. Chan Kwai Fong and

Miss Chan Yuk Chun for their efforts in trying to extinguish a fire which occurred at Chai Wan Resettlement Estate on December 8 last year.

An award will also be made to the widow of Mr. Leung Kwok Shun who died from burns he received at this fire.

Note to editors; You arc welcome to have the presentation

covered.

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/15.........

Thursday, May 11, 1972

- 15 -

INDUSTRIAL SAFETY AND ACCIDENT PREVENTION

Employers Urged To Adopt Positive Attitude

*««»*«*•

The Industrial Safety Training Officer of tho Labour Department, Mr. A.H. Carter today urged employers to adopt a positive attitude towards accident prevention and advocated joint efforts by workers, managements and the Labour Department in the war against industrial accidents.

He appealed to industrialists to take full advantage of the free training facilities provided by the Centre, and called upon top managements to "formally adopt a safety policy and implement it within their respective companies" in order to maintain adequate protection for their employees.

In October, 1971i Mr. Carter had sent 1,500 circulars to proprietors of industrial undertakings and factories where woodworking machinery was installed, offering them free training facilities for their workers.

"Only 51 employers responded," he added.

A similar letter sent to companies where power presses were in use, produced an even poorer result, he said.

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Thursday, May 11, 1972

- 16 -

THUNDERSTORM AND SQUALLY SHOWERS HIT HONG KONG Landslides, Flood And Blocked Roads

Various government departments swung into action early today to clear roads, move traffic and give assistance to hundreds of people affected by the heavy downpour which lashed the Colony last night and early this morning.

Up to 5 p«m. today,most of the roads on Hong Kong Island, Kowloon and the Nev/ Territories had been cleared.

On Hong Kong Island, only Deep Water Bay Road outside House Nos. 28 and 79 was blocked.

In Kowloon, seven roads are still partially blocked. They are in Wong Tai Sin, Mongkok and Shan Shui Po.

In the New Territories, only 19# milestone, Castle Peak Road was partially blocked — by an uprooted tree.

Numerous minor landslides and widespread flooding caused by the heavy rain brought havoc to many parts of the Colony this morning.

In the urban areas, traffic was affected as vehicles moved through flooded streets at snail’s pace. Many cars broke down and were stranded in knee-deep water, adding to the traffic chaos.

Most of the landslides reported were of a minor nature, but some roads were blocked. No casualties were reported.

Several house collapses were also reported.

/At first •••••••

Thursday, May 11, 1972

- 17 -

At first light this morning, Public Works Department workers were out in force to clear away mud and rocks blocking roads while firemen had a busy time answering calls for help from people stranded in the rainstorm.

Teams of Resettlement Department staff were sent out to squatter and licenced areas to check on the situation.

Damage was reported not serious.

Resettlement and Social Welfare Departments have registered hundreds of flood victims and have given them relief articles and if necessary, temporary shelter.

Over 1,000 flood victims in the Kowloon Walled City were registered by the Social Welfare Department and given relief.

At Sai Tau Village, where serious flooding occurred this morning, 38 people were led to safety by firemen.

At the height of the rainstorm early this morning, a fourth-alarm fire broke out at Hill Road, Western District, adding to the work of the firemen.

Late this afternoon, six bodies - that of four adults and two children had been found on the second floor of the building. They were removed to the public mortuary. Six people are still unaccounted for.

Train services were disrupted early this morning when water and mud blocked the second of the main line south of the Beacon Hill Tunnel.

Shuttle services were operated between Lowu and Shatin for several hours before normal services were resumed.

A total of 16*+. 6 m.m. of rain was recorded by the Royal Observatory between midnight last night and midday today. Yesterday, 116.5 m.m. of rain fell.

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Release Time: 8.00 p.m.

P.R.H. 7 (REVISED) 4000091

SERVICES

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Friday, May 12, 1972

UNIVERSITY AND POLYTECHNIC GRANTS COMMITTEE

Five More Members Appointed

********

Five more people have been appointed to serve as Members of the University and Polytechnic Grants Committee.

Sir Kenneth Pin#-fan Fung, Member of Executive Council, and Mr.

Y.K. Pao of World-Wide (Shipping) Ltd., are two extra local Members while the new overseas Members are Sir Eric Richardson, an engineer and until recently the Director of the Polytechnic of Central London; Mr. James McHugh, former Head of York College of Commerce; and Dr. R.L. Werner, Director of the New South Wales Institute of Technology.

These appointments by the Governor, published in today’s Gazette, follow approval by Government of the Final Report of the Polytechnic Planning Comriittce who recommended that the Hong Kong Polytechnic should be financed through the University Grants Committee and that this Committee should bo expanded to cope with the task.

The new title of this Committee is the University and Polytechnic Grants Committee. Its terms of reference have been modified to include the Polytechnic as well as the Universities.

/The new ••••••

Friday, May 12, 1972

- 2 -

The new terms of reference are:

To koop under review, in the light of the community’s needst * the facilities for university and polytechnic education in Hong Kong;

* such plans for the development of the Universities and Polytechnic as may be required from time to time;

* the financial needs of university and polytechnic education;

* and to advise Government on the application of such funds as may be approved by the Legislative for university and polytechnic education.

The expanded Committee has 16 members. They are: Mr. M.A.R.

Herries (Chairman); Mr. T.K. Ann (Deputy Chairman); Professor Sir Melville Arnott; Professor N.S. Bayliss, Chairman, Murdoch University Planning Board, Western Australia; Mr. Oswald Cheung, Member of Legislative Council; Professor D. Daiches, School of English and American Studies, University of Sussex;

Sir Kenneth Pin^-fan Fung, Member of Executive Council; Dr. M.R. Gavin, Principal, Chelsea College of Science and Technology; Mr. R.C. Griffiths, Director, Inter-University Council for Higher Education Overseas; Dr. A.G. Lehmann, Managing Director, Linguaphone Institute; Mr. James McHugh, former Head of York College of Commerce; Mr. Y.K, Pao, World-Wide Shipping Ltd.; Sir Eric Richardson,formerdirector Central Polytechnic of London; Mr. Eric Udal, Legal Adviser, Hong Kong and Shanghai Banking Corporation; Dr. R.L. Werner, Director, New South Wales Institute of Technology; and Professor M.J. Wise, Professor of Geography, The London School of Economics and Political Science.

Air. Herries •••••

Friday, May 12, 1972

- 3 -

Mr. Herries and seven of the overseas Members will be in Hong Kong from May 14 to May 20 to make an initial assessment of Polytechnic requirements. They will meet the Polytechnic Board, members of the Polytechnic, including Mr. C.L. Old, the Director Polytechnic, and Hung Hom Technical College staff as well as a number of other concerned in the Polytechnic.

The Secretary of the U.P.G.C., Mr. S.F. Bailey, said: ”The programme is a very full one. All being well we expect the Chairman to be able to give the Polytechnic Board the Committee’s general guidance by May 22. As soon as possible after that we hope to be able to advise the Government confidentially what the initial financial requirements seem to be. Negotiations on this may take a little while but we know the Government is as anxious as anyone to sec the Polytechnic start up.

Pioneering Step

"The formation of the University and Polytechnic Grants Committee is regarded by many educationists outside Hong Kong as a pioneering step and that it was reported in The Times Higher Education Supplement as an item of some interest."

The deliberate alliance of a non-University institution such as the Polytechnic with the system of financing previously reserved for universities put Hong Kong, he thought, ahead of the United Kingdom in some ways.

"It is not just that we are hoping to avoid their mistakes although of course we are trying to do that, but rather that we are actually giving them an example to follow. It is a considerable task but I think we can do it," Mr. Bailey said.

Note to Editors: Copies of the Final Report of the Polytechnic Planning Committee are distributed separately in the Press Boxes, . . Government Information Services, this evening.

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/4..........

Friday, May 12, 1972

- 4 -

MODEL CONTRACT FOR DOMESTIC SERVANTS

********

In response to public demand, the Labour Department has prepared a simple model contract for the employment of domestic servants*

Announcing this today, the Labour Department spokesman said: ”The comprehensive provisions of this model contract are compatible with local conditions and satisfy the requirements of labour law."

This model contract, with English and Chinese versions, should prove useful to households employing domestic servants. It is hoped that adoption of this model contract would have a stabilising effect on the employer and employee relationships in domestic service.

"Gestetnered copies of this model contract are available fi*ee of charge from all branch offices of the Labour Relations Service of the Labour Department,” he said.

’’Parties who wish to go to the Labour Department to sign a contract in the presence of an officer of the Labour Relations Service may contact the officer in charge to arrange for an appointment. But this is not compulsory,” he added.

The addresses of the five offices of the Labour Relations Service are:-

Labour Relations Service (Hong Kong)

New Rodney Building

99 Queensway

Hong Kong

Tel.: H-249081 Ext. 62

/Labour ........

Friday, May 12, 1972

- 5 -

Labour Relations Service (Kowloon East) and Labour Relations Service (Kowloon West) San Po Kong Government Offices

Ground floor

692 Prince Edward Road

Kowloon

Tel.: K-239626 for Kowloon East

K-240909 for Kowloon West

Labour Relations Service (Kwun Tong)

Kwun Tong District Branch Office Building Second floor

Kwun Tong

Tel.: K-429904

Labour Relations Service (Tsuen Wan)

Chartered Bank Building

Third floor

Sha Tsui Road

Tsuen Wan

Tel.: NT-217003

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/6.........

Friday, May 12, 1972

- 6

FEAST FOR THE ELDERLY

Unusual Gesture By Housewives Of Resettlement Block

********

Housewives of Block Seven in the Wong Tai Sin Resettlement Estate have taken the unusual step of forming themselves into an ad hoc committee to provide a feast for 60 elderly in the area to mark Mother’s Day on Sunday, May 14*

The committee is headed by Mrs. Yeung Wong Ming-chu, and her 14 colleagues are all housewives with rooms in the block.

They have accepted responsibility for the cost of the dinner, to comprise a festive course of nine dishes. With other housewives to help them, they are planning refinements in the menu to accord with the age of their guests.

No dish will be served, for example, that might prove indigestible, and seasoning will take into account only conservative taste.

The dinner was conceived by the housewives themselves as their contribution to the Wong Tai Sin Community Centre’s "Project Concern for the Aged."

The housewives were encouraged by the Centre’s staff, who made available the Centre’s main hall as the venue for the feast. Trainees at the Social Welfare Department’s Ma Tau Wei Girls’ Home will entertain the elderly guests with a variety show during the dinner, and the evening will end with a distribution of prizes and souvenirs.

/"This ........

Jfriday, »4ay 12, 1972

- 7 -

’’This is only a start,” says Mrs. Yeung. ”We housewives in the block, and in the estate generally, are determined to do more for our elderly friends.”

*******

Note to editors: The housewives of Block Seven have asked

the Warden of the Social Welfare Department’s Wong Tai Sin Community Centre to invite members of the Press, radio and TV to attend the dinner and to cover the function which begins at 7«3O p.m. -------------------_ 0---------

NEW CLINIC FOR TSZ WAN SHAN

********

A new standard urban clinic and maternity home will shortly be constructed in the densely populated area of Tsz Wan Shan.

This is yet another part of the massive development programme being undertaken by the Medical and Health Department.

The project covers an area of over 26,000 square feet. It is situated to the west of Sheung Fung Street, just next to the Resettlement Department Staff Quarters at Tsz Wan Shan.

It will consist of a general out-patient department, a dispensary, a laboratory/utility room, consulting rooms, waiting rooms and demonstration rooms. A 24-bed maternity ward will be located on the top floor of the three-storey building.

On completion, the new clinic and maternity home should prove particularly convenient for the local tenants.

Construction is expected to begin in July this year and should take about twelve months to complete.

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/8..........

Friday, May 12, 1972

- 8 -

NEW BILL TO FOLLOW CLOSELY PROVISIONS OF

(United Kingdom) Matrimonial Proceedings And Property Act 1970

********

A new bill to bring the existing law in line with that in the

United Kingdom in respect of matrimonial proceedings and property is published in today’s Government Gazette for general information.

The Matrimonial Proceedings and Property Bill 1972 follows closely the provisions of the (United Kingdom) Matrimonial Proceedings and Property Act 1970. It will be introduced into the Legislative Council shortly.

The Bill amends and extends Parts VI and VII of the Matrimonial

Causes Ordinance which provide for ancillary relief in matrimonial proceedings and the protection and education of children.

The main changes proposed by the Bill are as follows:

* It gives the court power to order either the husband or the wife to maintain the other spouse or the children of the family;

* It provides for wider powers to be given to the court to order transfer of property by one spouse to another on dissolution of marriage, annulment or judicial separation;

* It sots out the principles upon which a court is to act in making orders for financial provision for spouses and children;

* It provides for all orders for periodical payments to come to an end on the remarriage of the party in whose favour the order was made; and

/* It

Friday, May 12, 1972

- 9 -

* It abolishes the old common law right to claim restitution of conjugal rights.

The Bill also adds new provisions to the Intestates1 Estates

Ordinance (1 of 1971) and the Married Persons Status Ordinance (27 of 1971)*

The effect of the new provisions will be as follows:

* To deprive a judicially separated spouse of any right to succeed on the intestacy of the other spouse;

* To enable application to be made after the termination of the marriage on questions between spouses as to the ownership of property;

* To provide that one spouse’s substantial contribution to the improvement of the marital property entitles him or her to a share, or a greater share, in that property; and

* To abolish the wife’s common law agency of necessity.

The Bill, if passed into law, will come into operation on July 1,

1972, the same date of commencement as that of the Matrimonial Causes (Amendment) (No. 2) Bill 1972, with which some of its provisions are linked.

Friday, May 12, 1972

- 10 -

FIVE LOTS OF CRG7JN LAND

To Be Auctioned On Friday, May 26

*******

Five lots of Crown land will be put up for sale by auction on Friday, May 26, at 2. JO p.m. in the Lecture Room on the 8th floor of the City Hall.

The five lots are for non-industrial purposes.

Their particulars are as follows:

(1) Nos. 11 & 1J, Tak Cheong Lane, Kowloon.

Kowloon Lot No. 10121 (with existing buildings)

Area: 1,711 sq. ft. For Non-Industrial Purposes Upset Price - 3j6O,OOO

(2) Mo. 1J4, Portland Street, Kowloon.

Kowloon Inland Lot No. 1012J (with existing building) Area: 6J7 sq. ft.

For Non-Industrial Purposes.

Upset Price - 3100,000

(J) No. 120, Portland Street, Kowloon.

Kowloon Inland Lot No. 10124 (with existing building) Area: 675 sq. ft.

For Mon-Industrial Purposes Upset Price - 4-100,000

(4) No. 14, Reclamation Street, Kowloon.

Kowloon Inland Lot No. 10125 (with existing building) Area: 676 sq.ft.

For Non-Industrial Purposes.

Upset Price - 3200,000

/(5) ....

Friday, May 12, 1972

- 11 -

(5) No. 288, Reclamation Street, Kowloon Kowloon Inland Lot No. 10142 (with existing building) Area: 726 sq. ft.

For Non-Industrial Lot Purposes Upset Price - 4110,000

Full particulars and Conditions of Sale may be obtained from and Sale Plans inspected at the Public Enquiry Sub-office, Central Government Offices (West Wing), Ground Floor, Hong Kong and at the Crown T^nds and Survey Office, Kowloon Government Offices, No. 405, Nathan Road, 10th floor, Kowloon.

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MORE WORKING SPACE FOR G.P.O.

Third Hangar To Be Built

*******

More temporary working space will be added to the existing General Post Office when a third hangar is to be built on the Central Reclamation.

The new hangar, which will be of similar design to the ones already under construction on the reclamation, is a large steel structure and has a floor area of 12,000 square feet.

A covered concourse, measuring 2,800 square feet, will also be constructed at the same time. On completion, it will be used as a public waiting space.

Work on the project will begin shortly and is expected to be completed • * «

in November this year.

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/12.........

Friday, May 12, 1972

- 12 -

TWO MORE ANCHORAGES

For Quarantine Purposes And Dangerous Goods

********

Two more anchorages are provided for shipping under the Merchant Shipping (Control of Ports) (Amendment) (no. 3) Regulations 1972.

The regulations published in today’s Gazette, were made by the Governor in Council in exercise of the powers conferred by section 70 of the Merchant Shipping Ordinance.

The anchorages are the Kellett Bank Quarantine and the Rocky Harbour Dangerous Goods Anchorages.

A Government spokesman said today the additional quarantine anchorage was required because the Western Quarantine Anchorage had been temporarily closed following the wreck of the ’Seawise University’ at its western end.

The additional dangerous goods anchorages would serve ocean-going vessels which import explosives for use in connection with the High Island Water Scheme, he added.

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/15.........

Friday, May 12, 1972

- 13 -

PROVISIONAL ANTIQUITIES ADVISORY BOARD

To Consider Antiquities And Monuments Ordinance «*«***«* .

A Provisional Antiquities Advisory Board has-been appointed by the Governor to consider in detail the practical implications of the Antiquities and Monuments Ordinance before it is put into force. The Board consists of the Secretary for Home Affairs, or his Deputy, as Chairman; and the District Commissioner, New Territories, or his representative, as Vice-Chairman.

It also has two official and five unofficial members. They are: the Director of Urban Services, or his representative; the Director of Public Works’ representative; Dr. S.M. Bard; Mr. Chan Pak-yip; Professor Lo Hsiang Lin; Dr. C.J. Peng; and Mr. James Watt.

The terms of reference of the Board, as announced in the Government Gazette today, are:

1. to make recommendations on the appointment of an executive secretary to the Board; • •

2. to consider the practical implications of administering the Antiquities and Monuments Ordinance 1971, including:-(a) the need for regulations under Section 22;

(b) the requirements for staff during the first year after the legislation is implemented;

(c) the need for special instructions to the existing staff of Government Departments;

(d) the need for co-operation with voluntary bodies in the field;

/and to ••••••••

Friday, May 12, 1972

- 14 -

and to recommend to the Chairman what action should be taken in these matters;

5. to recommend to the Governor a date on which the Antiquities and Monuments Ordinance 1971 should come into operation; and

4. to advise the Chairman of any antiquities which should be the subject of early study in order of priority.

A Government spokesman said today: "The Antiquities and Monuments Ordinance was passed into law in December 1971*

"The purpose of the Ordinance is to establish control over archaeological discoveries in Hong Kong and to ensure that items of historical interest are preserved for the enjoyment of the community.

"After the commencement of the Ordinance all relics discovered in Hong Kong will belong to the Government, although in practice it would retain only those objects of interest to the public for display in local museums." *******

Note to editors: The following are the short biographical

notes of the five unofficial members:

Dr. S.M. Bard - an expert member of the

Hong Kong Archaeological Society.

Mr. Chan Pak-yip - Chairman of the South Lamma

Rural Committee and a current Vice-Chairman of the Heung Yee Kuk.

Professor Lo Hsiang Lin - retired professor of Chinese at the Hong Kong University.

Dr. C.J. Peng - Senior Lecturer, Geography

and Geology Department, Hong Kong University.

Mr. James Watt - Curator of the Art Gallery,

Chinese University of Hong Kong.

Friday, May 12, 1972

- 15 -

FIRST GOVERNMENT LOTTERY THIS YEAR

Tickets On Sale

********

Tickets for the first Government lottery this year, the 47th in the series will be on sale this Monday, May 15.

The winning numbers will be drawn three weeks later on Saturday, June at 10 a.m. in the City Hall Concert Hall.

Tickets are still at $2 each. They may be bought at The Hong Kong and Shanghai Bank, the Chartered Bank, the Dao Heng Bank, the Hang Seng Bank, the Overseas Trust Bank, the Hong Kong Chinese Bank, the Kwong On Bank, the Liu Chong Hing Bank, the Shanghai Commercial Bank, the Wing On Bank, the Bank of East Asia, the Mercantile Bank, the Hong Kong Industrial and Commercial Bank, the Commercial Bank of Hong Kong, the Wing Lung Bank, and ferry piers of the Hong Kong and Yaumati Co.

As in the past, there will be 56 prizes and for every 1,000 tickets sold, one special prize of 3100.

The first prize will amount to 50 per cent of the total proceeds, and each of the five second prizes will amount to two per cent. There will be 50 prizes each worth 0.3 per cent of the total proceeds.

A special three digit number will be drawn and every ticket which has this number as its last three digits will win a special prize.

The winning numbers will be published in an extraordinary issue of the Government Gazette on June 5, and the prizes will have to be claimed within two years from that day.

/Prizes •••••••

Friday, May 12, 1972

16

Prizes unclaimed after the expiry of that period will be forfeited and credited to the Lotteries Fund for social welfare purposes, *******

Noto to editors:

The Government Lotteries Management

Committee will hold a press conference on Monday, May 15* at 1 p.m. at the City Hall Restaurant, when details of the 47th Government lottery will be announced.

You are cordially invited to have the conference covered.

- - 0 - -

/17

Friday, May 12, 1972

- 17 -

RADIO HONG KONG TO BROADCAST STEREO SERVICE For Experimental Period Of One Week «***«*»*

Radio Hong Kong will broadcast an experimental stereo service from Wednesday, May 24 to Wednesday, May 31 from 10 a.m. to 11 p.m. each day.

Giving details of the scheme today, Mr. Ian Kingsley, Deputy Director of Broadcasting, said the stereo service, which will be additional to Radio Hong Kong’s normal output will consist of both English and Chinese programme material. It will be broadcast on the F.M. frequency of 9^.0 MHz.

The transmitters which will be used are part of Radio Hong Kong’s outside broadcast equipment and have been adapted in order to carry stereo programmes.

Because they will be transmitting from Broadcasting house, reception should be reasonably satisfactory in the Kowloon area and the north side of Hong Kong Island, but difficulties may be encountered in those areas which are screened from Broadcast Drive.

Broadcast time will be more or less evenly divided betv/een the English and Chinese programmes. The English Service will open with two hours of light music between 10 a.m. and 12 noon each day, followed by two hours of Chinese music. The hour between 2 and 3 p.m. will be devoted to drama and music from the English Service and from 3 to 4 p.m. there will be modern Chinese music. The period from 4 to 7 p.m. will be devoted to the English Service including both light and serious music sessions, and between 7 and 10 p.m. there will be more Chinese music. Between 10 p.m. and 11 p.m. each day programmes will alternate between Chinese and English output.

/Although .......

Friday, May 12, 1972

I

i

- 18 -?

Although the emphasis of the stereo programmes will be on music , listeners will also be able to hear a number of specially produced spoken word programmes both documentary and drama. Further information about the programmes will be available in the press.

Mr. Kingsley said that Radio Hong Kong would very much value information concerning reception conditions from listeners who are able -to receive the stereo service and would be grateful for any letters which listeners may care to post to P.O. Box K-200.

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/19..........

Friday, May 12, 1972

THE GOVERNOR VISITS KWUN TONG

First Of HK’s Satellite Towns

*********

His Excellency the Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, was given an insight today into the general development in the first of Hong Kong’s satellite industrial towns at Kwun Tong.

He toured the bustling town for about two hours and looked at problems confronting industrial growth, hawkers and transportation. He also inspected resettlement accommodation and recreational facilities in the area.

Kwun Tong cane into existence in 1954 and now has a population of over 490,000. Some 1,500 factories operate in the district providing employment for about 100,000 people.

Sir Murray was accompanied on the tour by the City District Commissioner (Kowloon), Mr. James So; the Director of Lands & Survey, Mr. R.C. Clarke; and the City District Officer (Kwun Tong), Mr. Jack So.

The Governor and party first arrived at the Jordan Valley Service Reservoir, from where they had a bird’s eye view of the whole area.

Afterwards, they drove to On Tak Road in Ngau Tau Kok. On their way, they had a glimpse of the Ngau Tau Kok Cottage Area, the Jordan Valley Resettlement Estate, the flatted factory buildings, and the new Jordan Valley market which was opened recently.

From On Tak Road, Sir Murray walked across Ngau Tau Kok Road to

Kwun Tong Road, passing through the crowded playground next to Block 7 of the Ngau Tau Kok Resettlement Estate.

/As they .....

Friday, May 12, 1972

- 20 -

As he strode along, he saw the general conditions in the estate as well as the problems caused by hawker stalls and litter.

Continuing the tour, he went by car to the waterfront at Hoi Bun Road, where he watched labourers loading and unloading cargo from junks moored alongside the shore.

In addition, he inspected the new Kwun Ton^-North Point Ferry Pier, which was opened earlier this year. It serves to ease the movement of the 22 million passengers using the ferry service each year.

Later, the Governor walked through the industrial area which comprises 88 acres with about 1,500 factories and a working population of over 90,000*

At Yue Man Square, he strode through a public thoroughfare on the ground level of a building to Yuet Wah Street Playground. During the tour, he was shown the problems caused by shortage of marketing and catering factilities.

Afterwards, the Governor and party drove along Lei Yue Mun Road and Ko Chiu Road. On their way, they saw some of the recreational and community facilities in Kwun Tong, which included the Kwun Tong Sports Ground and the new Swimming Pool Complex.

The swimming pool complex, opened in July last year, consists of two 5^EK?tre pools, a diving pool, three teaching pools and a paddling pool, capable of accommodating 5,000 people at a time.

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Release time:8.00 p.m

i

P.R.H. 7 (REVISED) 40000®!

ME WE

INFORMATION

SERVICES

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Saturday, May 13, 1972

TREE PLANTING CEREMONY IN LaM TIN ESTATE Joint Effort By Social Welfare Department And Voluntary Agencies ********

School children in the Lam Tin Resettlement Estate will join young people from other organizations in the area in a tree planting ceremony on Saturday, May 20.

The idea is to beautify the surroundings of the estate so as to improve living conditions generally, and help create a better image for the area as a whole.

The project is the brain child of the Lam Tin Estate Community Work Office of the Social Welfare Department, in co-operation with the Lam Tin Administrative Office of the Resettlement Department. Also associating themselves with the project are the Lam Tin Children’s Centre of the Boys’ and Girls’ Clubs Association and the Lam Tin Youth Centre of the Hong Kong Federation of Youth Groups.

The Agriculture and Fisheries Department is making available young trees for planting and officers from the Department will be on hand to provide technical advice. The Department will also be available from time to time after the planting has taken place to see that the young trees are tended properly, r

/Already .....

Saturday, May 13, 1972

- 2 -

Already posters have appeared in the estate, designed by the sponsors, and drawing attention to the need to keep the area green if the environment is to be enjoyed by the inhabitants generally and by the young people in particular.

A spokesman for the Lam Tin Estate Community Work Office says the joint project "provides an opportunity for local welfare agencies, schools, and government departments concerned to make a joint effort not only to promote a community spirit, but also to give the residents of the estate a sense of belonging."

Population Increasing

At present, Lam Tin houses more than 50,000, and the population is rapidly increasing. To serve this community, there are seven primary schools, two secondary schools, and one estate building.

The estate building houses a number of welfare agencies, including a Po Leung Kuk nursery, a children’s centre and library for the Boys’ and Girls1 Clubs Association, and a youth centre for the Hong Kong Federation of Youth Groups. In addition, the Family Planning Association is represented, also the Yan Oi Clinic of the Gospel Preaching Groups of Overseas Chinese Christians, and a centre for the Family Services Division and a field unit for the Public Assistance Division of the Social Welfare Department.

The Lam Tin Estate Community Work Office began servicing the estate in January this year. Its work includes co-ordinating the activities of the welfare agencies, raising the standard of service through mutual planing, and stimulating and improving the welfare of the community through co-operation between government and voluntary agencies.

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/3......

Saturday, May 13, 1972

- 3 -

PREVENTION OF ENTERIC DISEASES CAMPAIGN

Organised By The Urban Council

* * 4c * ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

The Urban Council and Urban Services Department’s month-long campaign on the prevention of enteric diseases is underway.

The campaign is being held in view of the approaching of the summer season when such diseases are most prevalent. It also aims at raising tiie alertness of the public towards the danger of enteric diseases as well as at improving the standard of hygiene in the preparation of food.

Enteric diseases include cholera, dysenteries, typhoid fevers and food poisoning. Of these, cholera is well known for its acute nature and is dangerous, so as typhoid and dysenteries if medical treatment is not given in time.

Food poisoning, which is quite common in Hong Kong, however, is rarely fatal. But it usually involves a large number of people simultaneously and therefore always arouses a lot of confusion and alarm.

A spokesman for the Urban Services Department pointed out that enteric diseases attack all age groups.

’’Among the 438 cases of typhoid reported last year, more than half of the patients were youngsters aged between 10 and 24,” he said. ”0f the 609 cases of dysentery, 40 per cent were children under the age of five.”

Although Hong Kong has been free from cholera since 19^9» the spokesman warned that it can be introduced into Hong Kong quite easily since this disease is always present in certain countries in Southeast Asia.

/Enteric ......

Saturday, May 13, 1972

Enteric diseases occur all the year round but it is more prevalent in sunnier as the high air temperature favours the growth of germs and propagation of flies which help to spread the germs.

These germs are discharged with the excretal matters of patients or carriers of these diseases and then conveyed to our food and drinks by the hands of food handlers who may harbour the germs or through fly contaimination•

"As enteric diseases are mainly caused by ingestion of unclean food and drinks," the spokesman said, "hygienic food handling, particularly washing of hands before handling food, is the most effective preventive measure against these diseases."

During the campaign period, Government will make use of all possible ways to impart to the public the rules of food and environmental hygiene.

"Although Government is doing whatever it can to control the outbreak of enteric diseases, members of the public should also play their own part by taking special precautionary measures againsts these diseases," the spokesman added.

Saturday, May 13, 1972

- 5 -

LABOUR DEPJ^RTMENT’S LABOUR RELATIONS SERVICE

Helped Settle 249 Labour Problems In April

*******

The Labour Relations Service of the Labour Department helped employers and employees settle 249 labour problems in April.

As a result of agreement reached,' 537 employees received a total of 2286,429.

Of this, 2187,538 was paid by employers as outstanding wages, payment in lieu of notice, statutory holiday pay and bonuses of a contractual nature under the Employment Ordinance and the Industrial Employment (Holidays with Pay and Sickness Allowance) Ordinance respectively.

The remaining 298,891 was paid, apart from the legal entitlements, as severance pay and other ex gratia payments to the employees. Fresh nominal claims made by employees in the same month amounted to 2834,465-

Officers of various district offices of the Labour Relations Service also handled 1,392 consultations and enquiries about labour laws, industrial relations and personnel management.

They visited nine establishments 'to help employers introduce joint consultative machinery to strengthen communication between labour and management.

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/6......

Saturday, May 13, 1972

- 6

HEALTH EDUCATION EXHIBITION

Foui>-Day Show In Yuen Long’s Town Hall

The Medical and Health Department will put on a Health Education Exhibition in the Yuen Long Town Hall between May 16 and 19, both days inclusive, from 10 a.m. to 4.30 p.m. daily.

The exhibition will comprise 22 panels illustrating through cartoons, figures, and diagrams, a number of themes that the department wants emphasized at this time among the young.

There will be panels on nutrition, the protection of the eyesight, and the prevention of gastric-intestinal diseases.

The series on the eye-sight, for example, will illustrate defects in the focusing of the eye, the cause of myopia, and how myopia can be prevented.

The Health Education Unit of the department has contacted the Education Department, the Police, and the District Offices in the New Territories about this exhibition in the hope of attracting an audience of school children and young people, generally, in the area.

An attendance of between 7,000 and 10,000 is expected. Sone of the schools will be sending along groups of pupils in tours. Certain teachers are organising essay competitions in connection with the panels.

The Health Education Exhibition is the work of the department’s Health Education Unit. It tours the Nev/ Territories regularly.

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/7.......

Saturday, May 13, 1972

- 7 -

CASTLE PEAK ROAD IMPROVEMENT SCHEME

Second Stage To Begin In August

*«$«***

Work will soon begin on the second stage of the improvement scheme of Castle Peak Road from Castle Peak to Ping Shan.

The first stage of this scheme, designed to improve traffic flow, consisted of widening this four and a half mile stretch of road, and converting it into a two-lane carriageway. This stage was completed in October, 1970.

The second stage involves the widening of the other half of this road into a two-lane carriageway. This stage also includes the reconstruction of Lam Tei Road.

Lam Tei Road will be widened to 32 feet, with a 20-foot carriageway and footpaths on either side.

The junction of Lam Tei Road and Castle Peak Road will also be resited about 1,100 feet north of its existing location to improve the flow of traffic.

When this part of the improvement scheme is completed, the length of Castle Peak Road from Castle Peak to Yuen Long, which is about six miles, will have an overall width of 100 feet. It will consist of a 48-foot dual two-lane carriageway together with cycle tracks and footpaths on either side.

Work is expected to begin in August this year, and should take about 30,months to complete.

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/8..........

Saturday, May 13, 1972

- 8 -

LISTS OF FOUND IDENTITY CARDS

On Display At C.D.O.’s And Kai Fong Associations

*******

Members of the public who have lost their identity cards and have not yet reclaimed them may call at City District Offices or Kai Fong Associations where lists of found' identity cards are on display*

Owners can then call in person at the registration head office on the 4th floor of the Causeway Bay Magistracy to collect their cards*

Announcing this today, a spokesman for the Registration of Persons Office reminded the public to report any changes in their registered particulars.

In this way, it would be much easier for lost identity cards to be returned to their owners.

Found identity cards unclaimed within 3 months would be cancelled.

A few hundred of these cards are now waiting for collection by their owners*

- 0

/9..........

Saturday, May 13, 1972

- 9 -

RAILWAY BRIDGE ACROSS WATERLOO ROAD

To Be Overhauled From May 15

*********

The Kowloon-Canton Railway announced today that Railway Bridge No. 4 across Waterloo Road is scheduled to be overhauled from Monday, May 15, for a period of about one and a half month.

A K.C.R. spokesman said certain work would have to be carried out at night because scheduled railway services had to be maintained.

He expressed regrets at causing possible noise nuisance to the nearby residents but said every endeavour will be made to keep the amount of night work and its noise level to the minimum.

-------0---------

FERRY SERVICE TO CHA KWO LING

*******

The temporary ferry service between Shau Kei Wan and Cha Kwo Ling will be continued after May 12.

A Transport Department spokesman said that the motorboat company operating this service had agreed to continue the operation between 6 a*m. and 10 at a 30 minute frequency, with a flat fare of 30 cents per person*

The special KMB shuttle service between Kwun Tong and Cha Kwo Ling will however be discontinued after the Tin Hau Festival period (i.e. after May 12) because of the lack of demand.

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/10..........

Saturday, May 13, 1972

- 10

GRANTS FROM COMMUNITY RELIEF TRUST FUND

Nearly 300 Applications From Farmers Approved

The Agriculture and Fisheries Department has investigated and approved the first 273 applications from farmers for rehabilitation grants from the Community Relief Trust Fund.

A spokesman for the Department said work on assessing farm damage and registering losses was continuing.

-------0---------

SUNDAY D.I.B.

*********

Note to Editors: There will be an issue of the Daily Information Bulletin tomorrow (Sunday). Copies will be available for collection at 3 p*m. at the G.I.S. Press Room, 6th floor, Beaconsfield House.

-------0---------

Saturday, May 13, 1972

- 11 -

U.S. TRADE EMBARGO ON FABRICS Statement By Commerce And Industry Department «*«**#**

The statement by a U.S. Consular official on the U.S. tra.de embargo on certain fabrics, which was printed in yesterday’s South China Morning Post, contains certain inaccuracies and omissions.

This was stated by a spokesman for the Commerce and Industry Department.

”We would not normally choose to try to argue such a technical problem in public. Our previous press statement on this subject was made simply in response to the U.S. announcement of the imposition of an embargo. But although the consultations in Washington have not yet been completed, we feel it is necessary to set the record straight at this time.”

The U.S. Consultate spokesman maintained that Hong Kong had never sought or obtained mutual agreement for the method by which it controlled and reported exports of the fabrics in question. He also said the need for this precondition was recognised by both sides and was the basis on which the cotton agreement was already operating.

The Commerce and Industry Department denies the accuracy of this statement. During the six years the cotton agreement had been operating no such mutual agreements had been sought or required. And it had been explicitly agreed between the two sides in October 1971 that the same practices would be applied to the new man-made fibre restraints as had been applied under the cotton agreement.

/’’Contrary

Saturday, May 13, 1972

- 12 -

’’Contrary to the U.S. contention, this justifies the conclusion that Hong Kong did not misinterpret the understanding”.

The allegation that the U.S. did not know until late in i4arch that Hong Kong had authorised exports in the disputed category of 22 million square yards is ’’something of a distortion of the facts,” the spokesman said. By mid-February the U.S. had been explicitly informed that over 19 million square yards had been authorised. They did not, however, react until mid-March, for reasons that cannot be established; and then in April they asked the Hong Kong Government to suspend exports. This request was denied because to do so would have destroyed the integrity of the Hong Kong control system and broken faith with shippers who had learned to rely upon it.

”We felt, furthermore, that potential shipments of 22 million square yards, while significant to Hong Kong could not pose a major threat to a U.S. industry which had, in 1971, produced 8,000 million square yards of the same fabric” the spokesman added.

As regards the U.S. statement that the imposition of the embargo on May 5 should have been anticipated if discussions then being held went on beyond that date, the Hong Kong view remains that such action while a compromise is still being sought is not what might normally be expected.

The discussions, which have continued for the past week in Washington D.C., have not yet been concluded.

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Release Time: 3*00 p.m.

P.R.H. 7 (REVISED) 4000091

INFORMATION

SERVICES

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Sunday, May 14, 1972

THE WEATHER OF APRIL, 1972 Normal Rainfall And Air Temperature *******

Following the driest March since 1884, April 1972 was a near normal month with regard to rainfall and also air temperature.

However, the mean cloudiness, 84 per cent, was 4 per cent above average; and, despite the fact that sunshine was recorded during twenty-five days in the month, the total duration of sunshine, 80 hours, was only about two-thirds of the normal figure for April.

The first day of the month was overcast with some light rain. The Strong Monsoon Signal, the Black Ball, was hoisted from 10 p.m. on April 1 to 2.10 p.m. on April 2 and the weather in Hong Kong was relatively cool under the influence of the strong monsoon surge.

During the next three days until April 5 the skies remained cloudy to overcast and there were periods of drizzle. Some heavy showers occurred on the morning of April 6.

The weather was brighter with temperature returning to normal on April 7; but a cold surge arrived that night and brought thunderstorms and some heavy rain. The Royal Observatory issued a thunderstorm and heavy rain warning at 6.JO p.m. that evening.

/Cooler.......• •

Sunday, May 14, 1972

- 2 -

Cooler and much drier weather was experienced during the next two days with the minimum temperature of the month, 14.5°C, recorded on April 9.

From April 10 to April 14, the temperatures rose slowly as wind? turned to easterly. Increasingly wanner and moist er air reached Hong Kong during this period while the weather remained cloudy with some light rain and drizzle patches. Mist and fog occurred on the morning of April 15 but they soon lifted and there were no interruptions to air or sea traffic.

From April 16 to 21 it was fine and warm with prevail 5 ng southerly winds. The maximum temperature of the month, 5O.4°C, was recorded on April 19.

On April 20, a trough formed across central China and moved slowly southwards. A weak cold surge reached the south China coast in the afternoon of April 21. The weather in Hong Kong became cloudy and slightly cooler and remained so from April 22 to 26 with some rain recorded on Apri1 24.

The weather was fine during the next two days, but the passage of an active trough of low pressure on April 29 caused some heavy showers. The last day of the month was sunny and it was hot during the afternoon with a maximum temperature of 30.1°C.

There were no tropical cyclones over the western north Pacific or the South China Sea, and there were no aircraft diversions from Hong Kong during the month. No fire hazard warnings were issued.

/The month’s ••••••••

Sunday, May 14, 1972

- 3 -

The month’s figures and departures from normal were:-

Sunshine 80.0 hours; 34.6 hours below normal

Rainfall 13^.8 mm; 1.0 mm below normal

Cloudiness 8^; 4% above normal

Relative Humidity 82%; 3# below normal

Mean Maximum Temperature 24.5°C; 0.6°C above normal

Mean Temperature 21.5°C; 0.2°C above normal

Mean Minimum Temperature 19.7°C; 0.2°C above normal

Mean Dev/ Point 18.2°C; 0.6°C below normal

Total Evaporation 119*4 mm; 5.1 mm below normal

Maximum Temperature of 3O.4°C was recorded on April 19*

Minimum Temperature of 14.5°C was recorded on April 9«

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/4..........

Sunday, May 14, 1972

- 4 -

EXPANSION OF HARBOUR CLEANSING FLEET

For Better Refuse Collection

********

The Marine Department is to expand the existing harbour cleansing fleet in order to provide better refuse collection services in typhoon shelters and in the harbour-

The department will provide a boat-to-boat refuse collection service within the Yau Ma Tei and Causeway Bay Typhoon shelters, a general scavenging service within the port of Aberdeen, and a free ship-to-ship refuse collection service in the harbour for a trial period of six months.

A department spokesman said the existing harbour cleansing service for the whole of Victoria Harbour came into operation in October 1964, and is provided by a fleet of four mechanised cargo boats and 12 sampans.

In typhoon shelters, he said, refuse dumping by boat people constitutes a source of harbour pollution affecting not only the shelters but, because of the action of wind and tides, also the entire Victoria harbour area.

’’The only feasible method of inducing the boat people to dispose of their refuse in a hygienic manner is the introduction of a boat-to-boat refuse collection service,” he said.

The collection sampans will bo stationed permanently in the shelters and will operate to a fixed schedule. At lease five sampans, each with a crew of three men, will be required to provide the service at Yau Ma Tei and Causeway Bay typhoon shelters.

/For the

Sunday, May 14, 1972

- 5 -

For the Port of Aberdeen, the spokesman said, the same refuse collection service is not considered practical as it is doubtful whether a population comprising mainly of constantly moving fishing vessels could be educated to make full use of such a service.

The scavenging fleet in Aberdeen will consist of one mechanised cargo boat and six sampans with the cargo boat acting as a ’’mothership” for the sampans and transporting the refuse to the disposal sites on shore. It would also be used to remove large pieces of timber, log, etc. which cannot be handled by the sampans.

’’The effectiveness of these services will be reviewed after a trial period of 12 months to determine whether they should continue, or whether the arrangements should be adjusted in the light of experience.”

The spokesman said the free refuse collection service for ships in the Victoria harbour will be limited to the collection of domestic refuse which is usually buoyant and the main cause of the pollution emanating from ships.

’’The disposal of commercial refuse has always been the responsibility of ship owners and their agents, and it is intended that it should remain so.”

Two motor cargo boats similar to those employed on harbour cleansing will be required. Each of these vessels will have a capacity to hold some 100 x 22 - gallon drums.

”It is estimated that the craft can call on approximately 28 ships per day collecting an average of three drums of domestic refuse from each ship. The service will be operated on a selective basis, taking into consideration the vessels’ length of stay in and reports received from Port Health officers." ---------------------------------0--------- Release, Time: 3*00 P«m.

P.R.H. 7 (REVISED) 400000)

INFORMATION

SERVICES

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Monday, May 15, 1972

WEST KOWLOON CORRIDOR, STAGE I

Elevated Road From Gascoigne Road To Tong Mi Road

*******

The Public Works Department is proposing to construct the first stage of the West Kowloon Corridor scheme, which when completed will provide a new major road route, serving to distribute traffic in the urban areas of Western Kowloon and connecting these areas with Tsuen Wan/Kwai Chung to the north.

forks for a new sea wall and reclamation in Yau Ma Tei Typhoon Anchorage are already in progress.

It is now proposed to proceed with the roadworks by providing an elevated road from Gascoigne Road near the junction with Wylie Road, along Gascoigne Road and Kansu Street to the reclamation in Yau Ma Tei Typhoon Anchorage near Tung Kun Street.

The proposed elevated road will form a direct connection for the vehicular cross harbour tunnel with the proposed Tong Mi Road extension through the Yau Ma Tei Typhoon Anchorage.

With the introduction of this new road route running parallel with Kathan Road it is expected that the present traffic congestion in the area will be eased considerably.

/The project

Monday, May 15, 1972

- 2 -

The project will entail widening of certain sections of Gascoigne Road and Kansu Street, and necessitate temporary traffic diversion and re-routing during construction. Some land resumption is essential for the construction of the elevated road.

An announcement in the Government Gazette giving notice of an order to be made under the Streets (Alteration) Ordinance for these projects has been made.

The closing date for objection will be June 12, 1972 and any claims for compensation shall be made by July 12, 1972.

i:ote to Editors: Copies of a sketch plan of the area affected are attached to today’s bulletin.

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/ 3.....

Monday, May 15, 1972

- 3 -

REGISTRATION OF FACTORIES

Booklet Gives Reasons

*««***«

Since January this year, a campaign has been conducted by the Labour Department to encourage proprietors of registrable workplaces to come forward and apply for registration if they have not already done so.

The Commissioner of Labour, Mr. Paul Tsui said today that a six-month period of grace would be granted.

After that period which will expire on July 12, he stressed that more effective measures would be employed to help enforce the law.

Subsequently, an open letter was written to chairmen of more than 650 Trade Organisations, Clansmen Association, Landlords and Tenants Association, bringing the matter to their attention.

In that letter, it was mentioned that a simplified booklet on the subject was being prepaired.

This simplified booklet, in both Chinese and English, has now been printed. It is entitled "Why you should (and how you can) register your factory".

Copies of this booklet are being sent to organisations and associations concerned. Proprietors and persons planning to have their workplaces registered may also obtain copies from any of the offices of the Labour Department.

-----0-----

Monday, May 15, 1972

- 4 -

FREE FILM SHOW ORGANISED

For Sha Tau Kok Residents

«•««««*

The Urban Services Department has organised a free film show for the residents of Sha Tau Kok in the New Territories on May 18,

The film show will be held at Sha Tau Kok Government Secondary School at 8 p.m,

A Chinese feature film - ,fFamous Swordswoman ’Tin Kiu’ - and a cartoon will be screened.

The Urban Services Department announced that it has decided to cancel the Chinese Band Concert and Opera scheduled to be held at Shek Pai Wan resettlement playground on May 19-

Instead, the performance will now be staged at Sha Tau Kok Government Secondary School on the same date.

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Monday, May 15, 1972

- 5 -

NEW LOCK AT NEEDS OF ELDERLY Working Party Seeks Views On What Services Should Be Provided ********

The Government has decided to examine in depth the future needs of the elderly, and has appointed a working party of officials and unofficials to do this.

The working party is chaired by Mr. T.S. Heppell, Social Welfare Department, and comprises Mr. G.N. Mulloy, Secretariat for Home Affairs; Mr. A.P. Richardson, Urban Services Department; Dr. S.H. Lee, Medical and Health Department; Mr. B.V. Williams, Census and Statistics Department? the Rev. Paul Webb, Hong Kong Council of Social Service; the Rev. Sister Collette, Little Sisters of the Poor; Miss Joan Gray, the Nethersole Hospital; Mrs. Lee Wai-ngan, St. James Settlement; and Mrs. L.F. Goodstadt (Secretary), Social Welfare Department.

Other Government Departments with an interest in the elderly will also be involved as necessary.

The working party’s terms of reference are to identify the needs of the elderly, assess their future demands on social services, and recommend how these demands should be met, taking into account other competitive claims on Government and voluntary resources.

It has already started work, and will aim, not at preparing lengthy reports but at producing practical suggestions which can be incorporated, as appropriate, into departmental plans for early implementation.

/’’In.........

Monday, May 15, 1972

6 -

”In this way", says Mr. Heppell, "we believe we can make a contribution more quickly and more effectively".

The working party has decided that the term "elderly" will cover all persons aged 60 and above.

Information from the 1971 census shows -that 7.^ per cent of the population fall into this category, or 293,273 residents. A decade earlier, the total was 151,592.

With the general improvement of health services and nutrition, the working party expects the number of old persons in the population to continue rising steadily.

Working Party

But before the working party can put forward proposals, it has to bring together, collate and analyse existing information and experience on the needs of the elderly in Hong Kong.

Although members between them already have a fairly wide range of experience in this field, the working party is anxious to take into account all different points of view, and interested organizations and i ndi vi.dnnl 5 are invited to express their views to it,

,fWe want to make the best use we can of the experience and knowledge of people in Hong Kong," Mr. Heppell explains. "Already I have been approached by someone who knows about running clubs for the elderly and who is very willing to share her experience with the working party.

/" I am .....

Monday, May 15, 1972

- 7 -

"I am sure we can learn much from people like this with practical knowledge, which they can write to us about or come to discuss with us".

Individuals or organizations who would like to give their views to the working party should get in touch with the Secretary, Mrs. L.F. Goodstadt, at the Social Welfare Department Headquarters, Lee Gardens, Hong Kong (Telephone: H-768782).

"By doing so," Mr. Heppell says, "they, too, can contribute towards developing better services for the elderly".

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/8.......

Monday, May 15, 1972

... 8 -

GOVERNOR TO OFFICIATE AT LOTTERY DM

On June 3 At The City Hall

^C*******

The Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, has accepted an invitation from the Government Lotteries Management Committee to officiate at the draw of the ^7th Government Lottery, the first one this year, on June 3 at the City Hall Concert Hall.

Lady MacLehose has also agreed to present souvenirs to organisations which have helped boost the sales of Lottery tickets.

This was stated today by the Chairman of the Government Lotteries Management Committee, Mr. Alex S.C. 7'u, when he announced details of the 47th Government Lottery at a Press conference at the City Hall Restaurant.

Mr. Wu said the fact that the Governor and Lady MacLehose have accepted his Committee’s invitation reflects their support and deep concern for the promotion of Hong Kong’s social welfare.

”As•people are aware, proceeds of Government Lotteries are used to finance social welfare and community service projects by voluntary welfare agencies and community organisations,” he said.

To date, he said, allocations totalling about $29 million have been made out of the Government Lotteries Fund to more than 80 welfare agencies and community organisations for various social welfare services.

/These ••••••

Monday, May 15» 1972

- 9 -

These services include children’s and youth’s activities, nurseries and creches, vocational training and education, rehabilitation and services for the handicapped,ex-drug addicts and ex-prisoners, and services for the aged, he added*

This year, Mr. Wu said, his Committee has plans for nine Government Lotteries. ”There may be more,” he added.

”Tickets for the first this year, still at $2 each, go on sale as from today, and the winning tickets will be drawn on June 5 at the City Hall Concert Hall at 10 a.m.

’’After that, draws for the other Government Lotteries for the year will take place at two weeks’ interval.”

Four Organisations

He said four organisations — Radio Hong Kong, Commercial Radio, HK-TVB, and RTV — have agreed to undertake publicity work for the Lotteries, with Radio Hong Kong responsible for this year’s first Lottery.

Radio Hong Kong has arranged for the draw on June 3 to be followed by a Cantonese opera show, ’’Fisherman’s Daughter”, to entertain the spectators. The show will be performed by members of the Lung Cheung Dramatic Troupe.

”In addition, our Committee, in conjunction with the Information Services Department, have prepared a booklet designed to promote better understanding among members of the public towards the aims of Government Lotteries and the usage of Government Lotteries Fund,” he said.

/Copies

Monday, May 15, 1972

- 10 -

Copies of this booklet will be distributed freely to the public at places where Government Lottery tickets are on sale, he added.

At the Press conference, Mr. Wu presented to Press representatives three new members of his Committee: Mr. David Wu; Mr. "Michael Leung, Assistant Financial Secretary,Colonial Secretariat; and Mr. A.J. Bryan, Principal Treasury Accountant (Main Accounts Branch), Treasury.

-------0---------

NEW TAI TAM GAP TRAINING CENTRE

Becomes Operational Today

*********

The new Tai Tam Gap Training Centre at the junction of Shek 0 Road and Cape Collinson Road became operational today.

The centre occupies an area of 165,000 square feet and was built at a cost of $2.8 million.

It has accommodation for 150 training centre inmates and 40 training centre remands.

The now centre will provide educational and vocational training similar to other training centres under the control of the Prisons Department•

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Monday, May 15, 1972

programme of free entertainment

Organised By The Urban Council

*******

The Urban Council and Urban Services Department have arranged a varied programme of entertainment for the public.

These programmes range from football matches to Chinese band concerts and operas.

Details of the programmes are as follows:

Time Event Place

May 16 8 pm - 10.30 pm Variety Show MacPherson Playground

May 17 8 pm - 10.30 pm Chinese Band Concert & Opera it

May 17 6 pm - 7 pm Miniature Football Match Victoria Park

May 17 7 pm - 8 pm ii ii

May 18 6 pm - 7 pm ti Southern Playground

May 18 7 pm - 8 pm 1! it

May 18 8 pm - 9.50 pm Film Show Sha Tau Kok (NT)

May 19 8 pm - 9.30 pm 1! Tsz Wan Shan Central Playground

May 19 8 pm - 10.30 pm Chinese Band Concert & Opera Sha Tau Kok (NT)

May 19 6 pm - 7 pm Miniature Football Match Southern Playground

May May 19 19 7 6 pm -pm - 8 pm 7 pn ii li ii Victoria Park No. 1

May 19 7 pm - 8 pm ii ii

May 21 12 noon - 2 pm Band Concert Victoria Park

May 21 2 pm - 4 pm ii Morse Park Open-air Theatre

0 As

Monday, May 15? 1972

- 12 -

WORKERS SHOULD KNOW ABOUT LABOUR LEGISLATION

Education To Overcome Ignorance Of The Law

********

Mr. Paul Tsui, Commissioner of Labour, called upon workers to know about labour legislation in order to understand the socio-economic environment in which they live.

This was said today (May 15)in his opening address at a seminar on Workers* Education and Trade Union Leadership Training organized by the Department of Extra-Mural Studies, University of Hong Kong.

He said, "Whatever action we take should be within the bounds of the legislative framework. If one feels that the legislation does not adequately protect his interests, then he can try to change and improve it by constitutional means."

Mr. Tsui said, ,fMany workers have failed to claim what is theirs by statutory right because they are not aware of that right

Citing a recent case in which workers in a factory had not been given a holiday pay for the past two years, though they were qualified and therefore entitled to it, Mr. Tsui said, "Unless the workers bring it to the notice of the Labour Department, it is not possible for the Labour Department to help each worker get his due."

Referring to the inter-relationship between labour and management, Mr. Tsui said, "Trade unions leadership training can help develop well-organized trade unions to conduct effective bargaining which will result in collective agreements covering such items as wages, including time and piece rates, and incentive payments, hours of work, rest periods, shift work and over-time, holidays, sick leave, discipline and retirement gratuities.

/In.......

Monday, May 15, 1972

- 13 -

’In addition, there should be procedural rules to cover such matters as grievances.”

Mr. Tsui said, **The organisation of workers* education and trade union leadership is not the prerogative of any one institution or group of institutions.

**The universities and post-secondary colleges can offer courses and run seminar like this one. The Labour Department can explain the provisions of the law through talks and the publication of guides and the trade unions themselves can run their own classes.**

He emphasized that negotiation and bargaining processes required skills which could only be acquired through experience and developed by means of practice.

A Labour Department spokesman said that 24 guides to legislation and other pamphlets on labour matters had been published by the department and 38,000 were distributed last year.

In addition, 570 talks and lectures were given by officers of the department in 1971* Subject matters covered by these talks included industrial safety, labour relations, industrial health, labour statistics, industrial training, employment services, employment of women and young persons in industry, workmen’s compensation and others.

More than 190 radio talks and television interviews had also been given by officers of the department, he added.

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ZL4........

Monday, May 15, 1972

- 14 -

PREVENTION OF ENTERIC DISEASES CAMPAIGN Dysentery - An Infectious Disease

Dysentery is an infectious disease transmitted through food and drinks. The disease occurs at all ages but children under the age of 10 years are more susceptible.

Dysentery is caused by germs passed out with the excreta of patients and carriers of the disease. The /Terms infect food and water supply through unhygienic food handling, flies and poor sanitation.

Vegetables and shellfish may also carry these germs because of fertilizer and water pollution. Man becomes infected when contaminated food and drinks are swallowed.

Diarrhoea with abdominal pain and fever are the main symptoms of dysentery. Samll quantities of stool containing blood and mucus are passed at a time. The desire to defaecate is almost constant and the patient strains with little or no result.

"With proper treatment, this disease can be cured in a few days, though it is sometimes quite dangerous to infants and aged people if treatment is delayed»"an Urban Services Department spokesman said

today in connection with the current "Prevention of Enteric Diseases Campaign".

/"Self .....

Monday, May 15, 1972

- 15 -

"Self administration of patent medicine may arrest the symptoms but will occasionally turn a patient into a carrier who continues to pass out dysentery germs and infect his own family and other members of the publiche added.

Immunization against dysentery is not available.

Basic sanitation and food hygiene are the only effective measures to prevent dysentery. The rules to be observed are:-

a) Wash hands properly before food and after visiting toilets. Mothers should see that the children’s hands are washed before eating.

b) Keep food under cover to prevent fly contamination. Utensils should be washed thoroughly and kept under cover. Special attention should be paid to the sterilization of feed apparatus for infants.

c) Exposed cooked food and titbits sold by hawkers are highly dangerous.

d) Boil all drinking water. Store drinking water in clean, covered containers.

e) Put food wastes and refuse in proper dust-bin. Keep the bin covered to prevent fly attraction.

f) Seek early medical advice when suffering from diarrhoea.

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Monday, May 15, 1972

- 16 -

BOAT OWNER COMMENDED FOR GALLANT ACTION Initiative Stops Fire From Spreading ********

The Assistant Director of Marine, Mr. E.J. Bower will present

Mr. Ng Hing-fook with a Certificate of Commendation on May 16 for his > ■ gallant and public-spirited action in fighting a ship fire.

Mr. Ng is the owner of the nChoi Kee No. 2” waterboat. At about midnight on April 2, he spotted a fire in a nearby unoccupied sampan in the Yaumati Typhoon Shelter. The fire was spreading to three other sampans moored alongside.

Mr. Ng promptly extinguished the fire by himself with two water >

hoses in about twenty minutes.

********

Note to editors: You are invited to have the presentation

covered. It will be held on Tuesday, May 16 at 5 p.m. in the Senior Staff Canteen, 5th floor, Government Dockyard, 595 Canton Road, Kowloon.

- - 0 - -

Monday, May 15» 1972

- 17 -

SURFACING OF SHUNG SHUN STREET

To Cope With Increased Traffic

********

The final surfacing of Shung Shun Street and Cha Kwo Ling Road (from Shung Shun Street to Ko Chiu Road) is expected to start in July this year*

The final surfacing is designed to cope with the increased volume of vehicular traffic proceeding onto the newly developed sites of the Sam Ka Tsuen area*

The work consists of laying five-and-a-half inches of bitumen coated materials on the existing roads. The roads were originally constructed with temporary surfacing materials, pending development of the area*

The work should take about five months to complete.

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Release time? ?«5Q P«m.

TUNG KUN ST

ChEUNG shui st.

PUBLIC SQUARE

MARKET

UNDER construction

P.R.H. 7 (REVISED) 4000091



INFORMATION

SERVICES

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Tuesday, May 16, 1972

KEEP OFF AREAS IN DANGER OF FLOODS

Warning To Picnickers

********

Picnickers to the New Territories are strongly advised to keep off areas which are subject to possible invasion of sudden torrents and floods during heavy rain.

A spokesman for the District Office, Sai Kung, today noted that several serious fatal accidents occurred recently in these areas.

"With the on-set of the rainy season, it is expected that many areas in the Now Territories would be subject to similar invasion of sudden torrents and floods," he said.

These areas are normally associated with stream courses running down valleys and low-lying areas.

These water courses could become sudden torrents after a heavy downpour and wash away people and property in their course.

The spokesman said: "These situations are especially dangerous for tourists and visitors who often do not possess a thorough knowledge of the geographical situation of the areas they are visiting."

He said areas in Sai Kung which were likely to be subject to this kind of danger included the valleys and water courses in the villages of Tseng Lan Shue, Tseung Kwan 0, Tai Long and Sai Wan. *

"These areas," he said, "are by no means exhaustive, and it is often

difficult to predict where exactly these sudden torrents might occur."

Tuesday, May 16, 1972

- 2 -

FOOD HYGIENE SURE METHOD OF PREVENTING TYPHOID Prevention Of Enteric Diseases Campaign ********

Typhoid fever is an infectious disease transmitted through food and drinks. Among the four hundred odd cases of typhoid fever last year, more than half of the patients were youngsters between the age of 10 and 24 years.

An Urban Services Department spokesman said today this in connection with the present ’’Prevention of Enteric Diseases Campaign”.

Typhoid germs are found in the excreta of typhoid patients or carriers. Food may become infected through the hands of a patient or carrier during food preparation, and by the filthy feet of faecal-feeding flies. Poor sanitation may also cause the germs to infect water supply.

Typhoid fever starts with a fever accompanied by headache, pain in the limbs, chills, and shivering. Some patients may complain of nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea or constipation. A rose colour rash usually appears on the trunk in the second week of the illness.

With modern treatment, the disease can be controlled in several days followed by a gradual recovery. Bleeding or even perforation of the intestines are the dangerous complication of this disease.

Food hygiene is a sure method of preventing typhoid. The following precautionary measures are listed for the attention of the public

a) Boil all drinking water. Store drinking water in a clean container with cover.

b) Protect food and utensils from fly contamination.

Avoid buying exposed cooked food, titbits, cut—fruit in the street.

..... /c) Put all..........

Tuesday, May 16, 1972

- 3 -

c) Put all food waste and refuse into a proper dust bin to avoid fly attraction.

d) Wash hands properly before food and after visiting toilets.

e) Seek early medical treatment and sterilize the soiled linen of patients suffering from typhoid fever.

Typhoid can be prevented by anti-typhoid inoculations obtainable

in all government clinics, hospitals and vaccination centres free of charge.

-------0---------

WATER SUPPLY - WONG TAI SIN

***#**»»

Water supply to a number of premises in Wong Tai Sin will be interrupted for five hours from 1 a.m. on Thursday, May 18, 1972.

The temporary water stoppage is to enable the Waterworks Office to carry out a leakage test.

The area which will be affected is bounded by Lung Cheung Road, Sheung Tak Street and Tung Tau Tsuen Road.

-------0---------

A....

Tuesday, May 16, 1972

- 4 -

BUILDINGS DECLARED DANGEROUS .

Nos. 42 And 44 First Street, Hong Kong

********

The Building Authority today declared No. 44 First Street to be in a dangerous condition and No. 42 First Street liable to become dangerous and ordered demolition.

In a statement issued this morning the Principal Government Building Surveyor said that these prewar buildings were inspected following a report from another Department.

No. 44 First Street is three storeys and access to the upper floors is by means of a staircase from the ground floor of No. 42, now a single storey building.

No. 42 appears to have been originally a three storey building but the upper floors were demolished during or prior to the war - there is no record of such demolition.

There are severe fractures in the exposed party wall at first and second floor levels and the brickwork of the rear wall of the kitchen block is bulged over the laneway. In addition much of the structural timber is decayed and in a defective condition and there is a risk of collapse.

Due to a fracture in the brick arch of the front wall, No. 42 is liable to become dangerous during or after the demolition of No. 44.

Notices of intention to apply for Closure Orders in Victoria District Court at 9.30 a.m. on June 29, 1972 were posted today.

-------0---------

/5.........

Tuesday, May 16, 1972

- 5 -

MOTHERS’ DAY’S CELEBRATION IN TSZ WAN SHAN Joint Effort Of SWD And Local Organisations ********

Winners of a Mothers’ Day Card Design and Essay Competition organised by the Tsz Wan Shun Community Work Office of the Social Welfare Department received their prizes at a ceremony in the assembly hall of the Hoep Woh College, Tsz Wan Shan, today.

Guests attending included Mr. Kwok Ka-chi, Principal Social Welfare Officer, Group and Community Work Division; Mr. Wong Yeung—kwan, Wong Tai Sin Assistant City District Officer; Mr. Chan Fook-hing, Sub-Divisional Inspector of the Tsz Wan Shan Police Post; and Brigadier Lau To-sun, Divisional Officer of the Salvation Army.

Mr. Choi Jun, President of the Tsz Wan Shan District Mothers’ Day Celebration Committee, began the proceedings with opening remarks, followed by Mr. Lau Hon—tong, Chairman of the Committee, who proposed a vote of thanks.

The Mothers’ Day Card Design and Essay Competition was intended as a recreational activity to mark Mothers* Day among local residents, and to promote a co-operative spirit among district organisations interested in welfare work.

More than 300 entries were received, the best response enjoyed so far in connection with any event organised in the district. Students from 29 primary schools and four secondary schools in the Tsz Wan Shan estate took part, and all the entries were of a high standard.

/Organi sat ions

Tuesday, May 16, 1972

- 6 -

Organisations joining the Social Welfare Department’s Tsz Wan Shan Estate Community Work Office in the programme included the Tsz Wan Shan Kaifong Welfare Association, Our Lady Of Maryknoll Hospital, the Tsz Wan Shan Youth Centre, the Evangel Youth Centre, the Zion Youth Centro, the Tsz Wan Shan Library, and the Tsz Wan Shan Salvation Army Corps Centro.

--------------------------G--------- *

• •

CUARANTINE RESTRICTIONS IMPOSED

* *******

The Port Health Authority announced today that quarantine restrictions have been imposed against arrivals from Scrong (port) and hanokwari (port), Indonesia, on account of cholera.

- - 0 -

/7.........

Tuesday, May 16, 1972

- 7 -

HEALTH EXHIBITION BY SCHOOL CHILDREN

Prize-Giving Ceremony At City Hall Tomorrow

********

Fifteen prize-winning schools will put up a six-day health exhibition at the City Hall Exhibition Hall tomorrow (Wednesday).

The exhibition will be on five themes: (1) How to keep our beaches and picnic spots clean, (2) How to prevent accidents in swimming, (3) How to prevent accidents in schools, (4) How to prevent mosquito breeding at home, and (5) How to prevent and destroy rats at home#

The exhibition is being held in connection with a Health Education Project Competition organised jointly by the Urban Council and Urban Services Department and the Education Department for secondary schools in Hong Kong.

Dr. Denny M.H. Huang, Chairman of the Environmental Hygiene Select Committee of the Urban Council will officiate at the prize-giving ceremony at the Exhibition Hall tomorrow.

Prize-winners for this year’s competition are as follows:

First Prize (31,500): St. Francis Canossian College

Group Winner Prize (3500 each): St. Paul’s School (Lam Tin)

Y.M.C.A., Hioe Tjo Yoeung College

Second Prize (3300 each): Chuen Yuen College

Heep Woh College

New Method College (Science Section) Tsuen Wan Government Secondary School Shau Kei Wan Government Secondary School

/Consolation .........

Tuesday, May 16, 1972

- 8 -

Consolation Prize ($200 each): Ming Yin College

New Method College (Arts Section) Pak Kau English School

Sacred Heart Canossian College

St. Paul’s Co-educational College (Chinese Section)

St. Paul’s Co-educational College (English Section)

Ying Wah Girls’ School

The exhibition will be open to the public from 3*30 p»m. tomorrow

till Monday, May 22. Admission is free.

********

Note to editors: You are invited to send a reporter

and/or photographer to cover the prize-giving ceremony, which starts at 2.30 p.m. tomorrow*

-------0---------

/9..........

Tuesday, May 16, 1972

- 9 -

NO CHANGE IN SPEED LIMIT

On Cotton Tree Drive And Garden Road

**♦*♦♦*

The speed limit on Cotton Tree Drive and Garden Road remains at JO miles per hour, a Transport Department spokesman said today. The decision was made in a recent review following suggestions that the present speed limit on these roads might be raised.

The spokesman said: "A detailed study by the Public Works Department (Highways Office), the Police Traffic Branch and the Transport Department indicated that it is inadvisable to raise the speed limit.”

Garden Road and Cotton Tree Drive are district distributor roads which have been designed to serve adjacent development and to collect and distribute traffic from and to the numerous roads serving the Peak and Mid-Levels residential areas.

To serve these purposes, the spokesman said, Cotton Tree Drive which is only half a mile in length and routed one-way uphill, has no less than 1J points of access.

Fifty percent of the vehicles using this road quite properly have to weave from one lane to another as they enter or leave the road.

”To allow vehicles to travel faster through this heavy volume of weaving traffic would substantially increase the risk of accidents,” the spokesman added.

/The half .........

Tuesday, Flay 16, 1972

- 10 -

* The half mile of Garden Road, most of which is routed one-way downhill, has two sets of traffic lights at the Upper and Lower Albert Road junctions to provide a break in the Garden Road traffic for joining traffic from roads on both sides and for pedestrian movements#

Although the main and the joining traffic is therefore segregated, there are still a number of weaving movements made by traffic on this downhill stretch#

The spokesman said: ”It would be inadvisable to encourage motorists to travel faster on these short stretches of roads bearing in mind the stopping distance required, especially in wet weather.”

The possibility, he said, of revising speed limits on other roads was being considered.

But no changes in speed limit were likely to be introduced in the near future since construction works are still in progress on most of the roads for which an increase in the speed limit was being considered, the spokesman added. t

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Release Time: 6.^5 p.m.

P.R.H. 7 (REVISED) 4000091

INFORMATION

SERVICES

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Wednesday, May 17, 1972

FMKWGFN CV RELIEF FUND

To Be Financed Direct From Government Revenue

*«««****

The Community Relief Trust Fund is to be renamed the Emergency Relief Fund and will in future be financed direct from Government revenue*

Oi Friday, May 19,the terms of office of all members of the Fund Raising Committee of the Community Relief Trust Fund will expire, and it is not proposed to renew any of these appointments as the Fund Raising Committee will cease to exist.

These developments were announced today (Wednesday) by the Hon.

G.T. Rowe, Director of Social Welfare, and ex-officio Trustee of the Community Relief Trust Fund and chairman of the Fund Raising Committee. Members of the Committee have been informed of these changes.

Mr. Rowe explained that the Fund had, in the past, been financed to a considerable extent from public donations, but a number of recent developments had led him to consider it necessary to have a more certain and readily available source of income.

Among the developments, he listed the introduction of the expanded public assistance scheme, with the Government’s acceptance of one form of public assistance in case of need.

/He also

Wednesday, May 17, 1972

- 2 -

He also referred to increasing standards and costs of living which necessitated an upward revision of relief payments, which in turn resulted in expanding the commitment of the Fund.

In his view, the extensive and expensive devastation caused by last year’s Typhoon Rose made it essential for funds in very large amounts to be immediately available.

’’After very careful consideration,” Mr. Rowe said, ’’the Government has now accepted my recommendation that the Community Relief Trust Fund shall in future be financed as and when required direct from Government revenue.”

In consequence, while public donations would continue at all times to be welcomed, it would in future be neither necessary nor appropriate to make public appeals for funds.

The official efforts of a Fund Raising Committee in the changed financial situation would no longer need to be provided.

Mr. Rowe recalled that in the past it had been a great relief to him to know that a Fund Raising Committee of high calibre had always been ready to move into action when required, and he thanked members for their willingness to serve the public on that committee,

-------0---------

Wednesday, May 17, 1972

- 3 -

11TH ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION

Assistant Director Of SWD To Officiate At Tsan Yuk Social Centre

********

Miss Annie Chan, Assistant Director (Social Work), Social Welfare Department, will preside at a ceremony in the Tsan Yuk Social Centre on Friday, May 19, to mark the Centre’s 11th anniversary.

She will be welcomed by Mrs. Henrietta Chen, Warden, and will distribute certificates of appreciation to volunteers assisting in the Centre’s programmes of the last few months.

Also taking part in the ceremony will be Mrs. Soo Hung-nin, wife of the Medical Superintendent of Tsan Yuk Hospital. She will distribute prizes to the winners of a recent Baby-Care Contest. Mrs. Peter Choy, Executive Director of the Family Welfare Society, will then present souvenirs to the judges of the same contest.

The ceremony will conclude with a representative of the Centre’s membership proposing a vote of thanks.

In connection with the anniversary, there will be a display of photographs and handicrafts by members.

The Tsan Yuk Social Centre is one of the community and social centres maintained by the Group and Community Work Division of the Social Welfare Department in Western Street, Sai Ying Pun.

It aims at helping groups and communities in the district to form themselves into cohesive units so as to stimulate a sense of civic and community responsibility. It encourages the active participation of district residents in the organisation and execution of projects designed to improve general life in the area.

/At present, ••••..•

Wednesday, May 17, 1972

- 4 -

At present, there are 12 club groups attached to the Centre and 12 interest groups•

The Centre maintains a library stocked with more than 20,000 books aimed at youthful readership. There are rooms available for students to study and do their homework. The Centre also houses a blind welfare centre where instructions are provided in braille covering Chinese, English, arithmetic and general handicraft. Blind members also receive instructions in mobility, personal care, individual skills and take part in recreational activities.

Mentally-retarded children are looked after in a special training centre set up for them. This provides social training, academic work, pre-vocational training, and physical training.

The Centre is also concerned with family welfare, and to this end it has encouraged the setting up of a voluntary agency within its aegis entitled the Hong Kong Family Welfare Society, aimed at relieving distress among families in the district by providing case-work services, group counselling, and domestic help.

********

Note to editors: You are invited to have the anniversary

celebration covered. It begins at 3 p«m. in the Centre on Friday, May 19*

-------0---------

/5.........

Wednesday, May 17, 1972

- 5 -

REGISTRATION TEAM TO VISIT SOUTH LAMMA ISLAND Residents Urged To Make Use Of Facilities Provided »*«•**«**

The Commissioner of Registration announced today that a team from the Registration of Persons Department will conduct registration at the South Lam Rural Committee office on Tuesday, May 23, 1972.

Business hours will be from 10.30 a.m. to 3-30 p.m.

The visits will enable (i) parents or guardians to register their children from six to seventeen years of age for juvenile Identity Cards (ii) young persons 17 years of age and over and holding juvenile Identity Cards, to register for adult Identity Cards.

All persons living in the area are reminded of their responsibility (i) to register themselves and their children for Identity Cards and (ii) to report to the Registration of Persons Department any changes of employments or residential addresses, nationality or marital status or any other particulars which have changed since registering for their Identity Cards.

Children between six and seventeen years of age who have Hong Kong Birth Certificates or valid travel documents need not attend for registration, but children who do not have Birth Certificates or valid travel documents, must accompany their parents or guardians when registering.

Parents or guardians must produce both their (i.e. husband and wife) Identity Cards for inspection when registering juveniles.

/On.......

Wednesday, May 17» 1972

- 6 -

On registering for adult cards, young persons 17 years of age and over must surrender their juvenile Identity Cards and produce (i) the Identity Cards of both their parents or guardians under whom they are registered, and (ii) a Hong Kong Birth Certificate or evidence of their residence in Hong Kong during the past two years.

Persons who do not possess any of the above mentioned documents must register at the Registration of Persons Branch Office in the Causeway Bay Magistracy, Electric Road, Hong Kong or at Canton Road Government Offices, Yaumati, Kowloon.

-------0----------

/7.........

Wednesday, May 17, 1972

- 7- -

LOCAL PIANIST TO PLAY AT CITY HALL

**«»«*»*

Miss Nancy Loo, a local pianist will give a recital, under the auspices of the Urban Council, at 8 p.m. tomorrow (Thursday, May 18)at the City Hall Concert Hall.

After this concert, she will leave Hong Kong for further studies in Paris.

Miss Loo studied with Mrs. Betty Drown in Hong Kong until 19&5 when she left for the United States. She entered the Juilliard School as a scholarship student.

Before going to the United States, she was a frequent winner in the Hong Kong Schools Music Festivals.

While in the United States, she won the Piano Section of the

Aspen Music Festival in 19&5-

Then in 19^6, she won the concerto competition in Juilliard in which she played Saint-Saens Second Concerto in G Minor with the Jin 11iard Orchestra. Moreover, she was a finalist in the Concert Artists Guild Auditions. She received her master degree in 1971*

Tomorrow night, Miss Loo will play four sonatas by Haydn, Beethoven, Prokofieff and Chopin.

Tickets at Si only are available at the City Hall Box Office daily from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.

-------0---------

/8.........

Wednesday, May 17, 1972

- 8 -

PREVENTION AGAINST FOOD POISONING

Good Eating Habits Suggested

*********

Food poisoning, very common in the summer months, can be prevented

by hygienic food handling and good eating habits, an Urban Services Department spokesman said today.

The spokesman was speaking in connection with the Prevention of

Enteric Diseases Campaign, which is now in full swing.

He suggested the following points essential for prevention:

a) Wash hands before preparing food and cover wounds with water-proof dressings. Do Not cough or sneeze near food.

b) Wash and cook food thoroughly and serve while it is still hot. Cold dishes should be consumed immediately after preparation.

c) Refrigeration retards growth of germs. Food pending service and left-overs should be refrigerated promptly.

d) If a wire gauze cupboard is used for storage of cooked food or left-overs, the cupboard should be put in a well ventilated place away from heat to avoid unnecessary exposure of food to warm temperature. Never store left-overs in cooking pot placed in the kitchen.

e) Re-cook all left-overs before eating.

f) Tinned food, after opening, should be removed from the tin and consumed immediately. Never store left-over tinned food in its own tin and make sure to re-cook it before consumption.

• ' - - /The......

i

Wednesday, May 17, 1972

9 -

The spokesman said many agents like, poisonous fish, metals and chemicals could cause food poisoning, but germs were the most common cause.

Food poisoning germs are found in the septic wounds of the human body and in the nose and throat of a person suffering from septic sore throat-

These germs are introduced into food through unhygienic handling methods.

Some food poisoning germs are present in the intestines of food animals and poultry, and meat may become infected during the process of slaughtering and dressing of the carcases.

Food Poisoning Germs

Once introduced in food, the food poisoning germs grow very rapidly, particularly in warm temperature.

During their growth some germs may also secrete a toxin. Both the germs and their toxins can casue poisoning if swallowed with the infected food.

Food poisoning germs do not putrefy food and it is impossible to tell whether food is contaminated by food poisoning germs or not.

Moist and lukewarm cooked food stored in room temperature for a few hours is the usual responsible agent for most of the outbreaks of food poisoning ■ in Hong Kong.

/Sudden •••••••••

Wednesday, May 17, 1972

- 10 -

Sudden abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting and diarrhoea are the main symptoms.

Fever may sometimes develop. They may be of any severity from a slight gastric upset to a severe toxic prostrating illness.

This illness usually involves a large group of persons simultaneously though it is rarely a fatal disease.

-------0---------

MEDICAL hND HE^JuTH STATISTICS

For Week Ended April 22

*******

Statistics released by the Medical and Health Department for the week ended April 22 are as follows: -

Notifications of infectious cases (previous week's figures in brackets) - total 250 (200); amoebiasis - one (one); bacillary dysentery -five (eleven); chickenpox - 31 (32); enteric fever (typhoid) - nine (12); leprosy - two (nil); measles - 30 (27); ophthalmia neonatorum - two (nil); and tuberculosis - 170 (116).

Births - total registered 1,237; 280 on Hong Kong Island, 785 in Kowloon and 172 in the New Territories, r

Deaths - 424 from all causes; 118 on Hong Kong Island, 296 in Kowloon and ten in the New Territories.

-------0---------

Release Time: 6.45 p.m.

.R.H. 7 (REVISED) 4000001

INFORMATION

SERVICES

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Thursday, Play 18, 1972

SECOND MANPOV/ER SURVEY OF THE PLASTICS INDUSTRY Information Used For Meaningful Planning ********

The Plastics Industrial Committee, one of the ten associated industrial committees of the Industrial Training Advisory Committee, will be conducting, with the assistance of the Labour Department, a second manpower survey of the plastics industry during the period June 1 to 21, 1972.

The first manpower survey was conducted from August 18 to September 2, 1967? in which 99 per cent of the factories covered in the survey willingly supplied the information required.

The Plastics Industrial Committee has subsequently compiled and analysed the statistical information obtained and published its findings and recommendations in a manpower survey report, which has been available in both English and Chinese at the Government Publications Centre at the Star Ferry Concourse since February 18, 197O»

The committee is pleased to learn that Government has already implemented some of the recommendations.

At the time of the first manpower survey, manpower statistics in the Labour Department showed that in September 1967, the total labour force was 51and the total number of registered and recorded factories was 1,5^2*

... /In December ..........

Thursday, May 18, 1972

- 2

In December 1971 however, the corresponding figures had risen to 59»021 manual workers and 3,019 registered and recorded factories. In view of these changes, the Plastics Industrial Committee has decided to conduct a second manpower survey to up-date the data on training requirements and to make new recommendations when necessary, to Government and industry in the light of new statistical information.

The information required from employers in this survey will include (i) The number of workers at present employed;

(ii) The number of workers at present under training;

(iii) The number of existing vacancies;

(iv) A forecast of the total number of workers required by June 1973.

The information collected would be handled in strict confidence and would be published only in the form of statistical summaries without reference to any individual factory, a Labour Department spokesman said.

"As such information is vital to the work of the Plastics Industrial Committee if it is to draw up meaningful plans to meet the training needs of the industry, employers are requested to provide accurate answers to the questionnaire," he added.

Owing to the size of the industry, it was not possible to include all plastics factories. So, a random stratified sampling method has been adopted to select 4^0 factories to be covered, he said.

/An explanatory ........

Thursday, May 18, 1972

- 3 -

An explanatory letter in English and Chinese, together with the questionnaire was sent on May 18, 1972 to selected factories. If on receipt of the questionnaire, an employer has any queries, he is requested to contact the Labour Statistics and Surveys Unit of the Labour Department by telephoning H-778271 Ext. 3 to 4.

During the period of the survey, on a date to be arranged previously by appointment, a survey interviewing officer of the Labour Department will call at each of those factories.

He will answer queries, assist in the completion of the questionnaire if necessary, and collect one copy for processing.

”It is sincerely hoped that employers in the plastics industry will co-operate in this survey and thus assure success equal to, if not better than, the first manpower survey,” the spokesman said*

A.....

-------0---------

Thursday, May 18, 1972

- 4 -

NEW VACCINE INSTITUTE

Handing Over Ceremony In Early July

********

The Medical and Health Department’s new institute for the production of human vaccines, in Victoria Road, Pok Fu Lam, will be handed over to Dr. the Hon. G.H. Choa, Director of Medical and Health Services, by Mr. C.R.J. Donnithome, Director of Building Development, at a ceremony on July 6.

The institute will not only serve the needs of the people of Hong Kong, by producing vaccines to combat infectious diseases such as plague, cholera, typhoid, rabies and small pox, but, because of the facilities provided, will also make vaccines available for export to other countries in the region in times of emergency.

It comprises four blocks in an area of approximately 45,000 square feet. The main block, three storeys high, contains 10 laboratories, offices and other service rooms, linked to a two-storey animal house on the ground and first-floor levels.

Within the animal house, small animals such as monkeys, rabbits, guinea pigs, mice, and fowl are kept. There is a full range of facilities for experiments and research connected with the production of vaccines — ineluding an operating theatre equipped for the dissection of animal bodies.

Large animals such as horses, buffaloes and sheep, are housed in pens and stalls in a fan-shaped building especially designed to provide comfortable conditions for them, with adequate lighting and ventilation.

/When

Thursday, May 18, 1972

- 5 -

When animal carcases have served the purpose of protecting the lives of human beings, they are destroyed by burning in an incinerator on the site.

The new institute will replace the existing vaccine institute in Caine Lane built in 1905 and now considered obsolete.

It cannot cope, for example, with sudden demands for large quantities of vaccine in the event of an epidemic breaking out in Hong Kong — against which reserved storage of vaccines beyond a certain quantity is not practical because vaccines such as those for smallpox, plague and cholera have only a limited storage life.

In May 1958, a replacement institute was first considered, and in 1965, a site was found at Shek Pai Wan Road in Pok Fu Lam, but it was abandoned because it would interfere with a proposed road-widening scheme.

The alternative site in Victoria Road was made available subsequently, and construction of the buildings began in February 1971, the whole complex taking 16 months to complete — mainly because progress of the work was set back following damage caused by last year’s Typhoon Rose.

-------0---------

/6.........

Thursday, May 18, 1972

- 6 -

PREVENTION OF ENTERIC DISEASES CAMPAIGN

Cholera Can Kill Infected In A Few Hours

********

Hong Kong has been free from cholera for about four years but an outbreak is always possible as this disease is constantly present in some South-east Asian countries.

A spokesman of the Urban Services Department said this today in connection with the current Prevention of Enteric Diseases Campaign.

Cholera is an acute and dangerous infectious disease which can kill a patient in a few hours.

Sudden severe vomiting and diarrhoea are the main symptoms of cholera. The stool is watery, pale yellow or whitish in colour and so is the vonitus. The diarrhoea of cholera is not accompanied by severe abdominal pain, and nausea is always absent. If prompt medical treatment is not given, a patient may die in a matter of hours due to rapid loss of body fluid.

Cholera is caused by cholera germs - the cholera vibrios which are passed out with the stool and vomitus of the patient. Food, stored water and well water may be infected with the vibrios through dirty hands, flies and poor sanitation. Man is infected by taking contaminated food and drinks.

Inoculation against cholera is available. To prevent cholera, good sanitation and food hygiene are essential.

/Members •••••

Thursday, May 18, 1972

- 7 -

Members of the public are advised to take the following precautionary measures:

i) Boil all stored water before drinking.

ii) Cook all food thoroughly.

iii) Cover all food to prevent fly contamination.

iv) Prevent fly attraction by putting all refuse and food waste in a proper dust-bin. Keep the bin covered.

v) Wash hands properly before food and after toilet*

vi) Avoid buying cut fruit, exposed cooked food, cold drinks and titbits in the street.

vii) Seek medical advice immediately when suffering from vomiting and diarrhoea. For cholera, every minute counts.

-------0----------

WATER SUPPLY INTERRUPTION

********

Water supply to a number of premises in Tai Po will be interrupted for five hours from 1 a.m. on May 20, 1972.

The temporary water stoppage is to enable the Waterworks Office to carry out a leakage test.

The area which will be affected is bounded by Kwong Fuk Road, Pak Shing Street, the Kowloon Canton Railway and Po Heung Street.

Thursday, May 18, 1972

- 8 -

BUILDING DECLARED DANGERS US

No. 37 Second Street, Hong Kong Island

*«*«**«

The Building Authority today declared No. 37 Second Street to be in a dangerous condition and ordered its demolition.

In a statement issued this morning, the Principal Government Building Surveyor said that this two storey over basement prewar building was inspected in the course of routine investigation when it was found that the brickwork of the rear main wall and of the walls of the kitchen block were badly eroded and fractured.

Also many of the structural timbers of the first floor and of the kitchen roof were noted to be decayed and on the point of failure, he said.

As there is a risk of collapse, notice of intention to apply for a Closure Order in Victoria District Court at 9-JO a.m. on June 29, 1972, was posted today.

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/9.......

Thursday, May 18, 1972

- 9 -

TWO YOUTH LEADERSHIP CAMPS Organised By Army And S.W.D. ********

The Army, with the assistance of the Social Welfare Department, is again organizing two youth leadership camps for youth leaders this summer.

These camps, aimed at raising the standard of youth leadership in outdoor activities, will provide good opportunities for leaders and potential leaders of youth agencies and friendship groups to receive practical training and to learn a variety of leadership skills.

"It is hoped that the participants will be able to improve their leadership skills and in turn benefit other youths of the community,” an S.W.D. spokesman said.

Each of these residential camps will last twelve days and the medium of instruction will be English.

Training programmes will include hill walking, canoeing, life-saving, first-aid, rock climbing, map reading and various kinds of physical activities.

The camps will be held at Sai Kung respectively from June 26 to July 7 and from July 10 to July 21.

Applications are invited from all young men and women, who are between the ages of 17 and 30. They must be physically fit and capable of swimming 50 metres and possess a good command of the English language.

Each applicant will be invited to attend a short interview and a medical test.

/Fees for ........

Thursday, May 18, 1972

- 10 -

Fees for the whole camp will be $50*

Application forms are obtainable at the Youth Work Unit of the Social Welfare Department on the ninth floor of Causeway Bay Magistracy Building, Hong Kong, and at the department’s Kowloon Office at Kowloon Government Offices Building, 405 Nathan Road.

Enquiries can be made to the Unit on Telephone: H-712467, H-705516, or K-884111, Ext. 334.

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TEMPORARY CLOSURE OF SWIMMING POOL

*********

The main pool and the spectator stand in the Morse Park Swimming Pool Complex will be closed to the public from 8 a.m. to 11.45 a.m. on Saturday, May 20, 1972.

During the temporary closure, weekly time-trial races will be held by the Education Department and the Hong Kong Amateur Swimming Association.

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Release time: 6.4g p.m.

P.R.H. 7 (REVISED) 4000091

INFORMATION

SERVICES

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Friday, May 19, 1972

CROSS HARBOUR TUNNEL TOLLS

Published In Today’s Gazette

»«»*****

A list of the tolls fixed by the Cross Harbour Tunnel Company, Limited, and approved by the Governor in Council, is published in Legal

Supplement No. 2 to the Government Gazette today.

The tolls are:

Category 1 Motorcycles (over 50 c,c.) .............$ 2.00

Category 2 Private Cars, Public Cars, Taxis .......$ 5*00

Category 5 Public and Private Light Buses ••.••••••$ 8.00

Category 4 Goods Vehicles of an unladen weight

not exceeding 40 cwt.....................810.00

Category 5 Goods Vehicles of an unladen weight not exceeding 100 cwt.................................  $15.00

Category 6 Goods Vehicles of an unladen weight exceeding 100 cwt....................................•..820.00

Category 7 Public and private single-decker omnibuses • •••.........................•••••••••......• «#10.00

Category 8 Public and private double-decker omnibuses ..............................................$15.00

Category 9 Each additional axle in excess

These toll charges, considered and endorsed by

Committee, were announced at a press conference earlier

Mr. John Marden, Chairman of Wheelock Marden. -----------------------------------O-----------

of two...# 5.00

the Transport Advisory

this morning by

Friday, May 19, 1972

- 2 -

WONG CHUK HANG ROAD WIDENING

To Improve Traffic In Aberdeen

*«**«**«

The Public Works Department proposes to improve traffic conditions in Aberdeen by improving the road through Aberdeen in stages.

Due to rapid development of Aberdeen, traffic generated in the area has greatly increased.

The proposed improvement consists of the widening of the section of Wong Chuk Hang Road between the Aberdeen Technical School and the Aberdeen Fire Station to provide a dual three lane carriageway road.

A foot-bridge is also to be provided at its junction with Nam Long Shan Road.

The proposed works will involve alterations to the alignment, width and levels of the existing Wong Chuk Hang Road.

Notice of the proposed undertaking is published in today’s Government Gazette. The closing date for objections will be June 19» 1972 and any claims for compensation shall be made by July 19, 1972.

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QUARANTINE RESTRICTIONS

.*.«»***

The Port Health Authorities announced today that quarantine restrictions have been imposed against arrivals from Singapore (port and airport) on account of cholera.

Friday, May 19, 1972

- 3 -

CAR AND COACH PARK PL/iNNED AT CASTLE PEAK ROAD

To Relieve Traffic Congestion *«*««***

Government plans to build a car and coach park at 18# milestone, Castle Peak Road, to ease the difficult traffic conditions experienced on nearby roads during recent summers.

The public car park will provide space for about 140 cars and 14 coaches and will be built on a site to be resumed.

The 9^,119-square-foot site is not under cultivation and no permanent structures or building land are affected. No one will be made homeless.

Resumption of the land for the car park has been ordered by the Governor in Council under the Crown Lands Resumption Ordinance and a notice is published in today’s Gazette.

Commenting on this project, a Government spokesman said the proposal to resume the land for the car park was necessary because the facility was greatly needed in the area.

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A....

Friday, May 1% 1972

- 4 -

LAW DRAFTSMAN TO RETIRE

A.G. Presents Souvenir To Mr. McKeon

*««*$****

Mr. J.F. McKeon,Principal Crown Councel (Law Draftsman), is shortly to retire from Government after 18 years overseas service. He was today presented with an inscribed silver tray by the Attorney General on behalf of Mr. McKeon’s colleagues in the Attorney General’s Chambers.

Mr. McKeon was called to the Irish Bar in 1942 and in 1954 was appointed a professional officer in the Attorney General’s Department in the Federation of Rhodesia and Nyasaland.

In 1961 he was promoted to Parliamentary Draftsman. In 1962 he was transferred as Legal Draftsman to Northern Rhodesia where he acted as Solicitor General in 1964.

He transferred to Hong Kong later in august 1964 as Crown Counsel and in 1965 he served as a magistrate for six months.

He then returned to the Legal Department and was promoted to Assistant Principal Crown Counsel in 1966 and to Principal Crown Counsel (Law Draftsman) in October 1967*

Mr. McKeon and his wife will leave Hong Kong on June 1 on preretirement leave. However, before he finally retures to Dublin, he is taking a temporary law drafting appointment in the Bahamas.

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/5........

Friday, May 19, 1972

- 5 -

WORK TO BEGIN ON BUS TERMINAL FACILITIES

At Kwun Tong Ferry Concourse

*********

A single storey building with canteen, lavatory, store-room and office facilities will be constructed at the Kwun Tong Ferry Concourse.

The 800-square-foot building forms part of the development of the Kwun Tong Combined Ferry Concourse Scheme and will be used by Kowloon Motor Bus conductors and regulators.

Work is expected to start next month and will be completed in four months.

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TRAFFIC RE-ROUTING IN UNNAMED ROAD

********

The Transport Department announced today that traffic on the unnamed road linking Bowen Road and Kennedy Road near Monmouth Terrace will be re-routed one-way from Bowen Road to Kennedy Road with effect from 10 a.m. on May 22, 1972 to reduce the vehicle/pedestrian conflict on this narrow road.

Appropriate signs will be placed to guide motorists.

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/6..........

Friday, May 19 > 1972

- 6 -

TRAFFIC RE-ROUTING IN YUE KWONG ROAD

Shek Pai Wan Resettlement Estate

********

The Transport Department announced today that with effect from 10 a.m on Monday, May 22, 1972, to improve traffic circulation, Yue Kwong Road which encircles Shek Pai Wan Resettlement Estate will be re-routed one-way in a counter-clockwise direction.

Appropriate signs will be erected to guide motorists*

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Release time: 6.^0 p.ru

P.R.H. 7 (REVISED) 4000091

INFORMATION

SERVICES

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Saturday, May 20, 1972

• SECOND EXHIBITION SHCWING MAPS AND PLANS OF HONG KONG

To Be Held From May 23 to May 28

M4****«»

A second exhibition showing a wide range of maps and plans of Hong Kong now available to the public at little cost will be held later this month at the main concourse, Ocean Terminal, Kowloon.

The first one took place in February last year at the City Hall and has proved popular. Both exhibitions are organised by the Crown Lands & Survey Office of the Public Works Department.

The Hon. Szeto Wai will officially open the second exhibition on May 22 at 5 p*m. The exhibition will be opened to the public from May 2J to May 28 between 10 a.m. and 7 p.m. each day.

Admission will be free, and pamphlets giving details about the exhibits will be distributed free at the exhibition hall.

Some of the maps on display have only been first published recently, in dual language - English and Chinese - a spokesman of the Crown Lands & Survey Office said.

’"These maps are very attractive and have been proved extremely popular. A selection of early maps owned by the University of Hong Kong, City Hall Museum and the Crown Lands & Survey Office will be on display.

/’•These, ••••••

Saturday, May 20, 1972

- 2 -

,rThese, together with the current maps and plans, illustrate the fascinating changes and immense development which have taken place in the . ।

history of Hong Kongi” he said.

The spokesman said a section of the exhibition will be devoted to the illustration of modern cartographic techniques now being employed by the Crown Lands & Syrvey Office in map production.

Various maps specially designed for tourists, geologists, picnickers, navigators, etc. will be exhibited, he added.

f,There will also be an introduction to a survey camera, newly acquired by our office, with photographs showing how this valuable piece of equipment is used for mapping,” the spokesman said.

Some of the popular maps on display at the exhibition will be on sale at the exhibition hall.

***,*«*«**

Note to Editors: You are cordially invited to have the opening ceremony of the exhibition covered.

Copies of the pamphlet giving details about the exhibitions are distributed separately in the G.I.S. Press Boxes this evening.

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Saturday, May 20, 1972

- 3 -

REGISTRATION TEAM TO OPERATE IN OUTLYING ISLAND Residents Urged To Make Use Of Facilities ********

The Commissioner of Registration announced today that a team from the Registration of Persons Department will conduct registrations at •the North Lamma Rural Committee Office fi*om Wednesday, May 24 to Friday, May 26. Business hours will be from 10.30 a.m. to 3.30 p.m. on these three days.

The visits will enable (i) parents or guardians to register their children from six to seventeen years of age for juvenile Identity Cards (ii) young persons 17 years of age and over and holding juvenile Identity Cards, to register for adult Identity Cards.

All persons living in the area are reminded of their responsibility (i) to register themselves and their children for Identity Cards and (ii) to report to the Registration of Persons Department any changes of employments or residential addresses, nationality or marital status or any other particulars which have changed since registering for their Identity Cards.

Children between six and seventeen years of age who have Hong Kong Birth Certificates or valid travel documents need not attend for registration, but children who do not have Birth Certificates or valid travel documents, must accompany their parents or guardians when registering.

Parents or guardians must produce bbth their (i.e. husband and wife) Identity Cards for inspection when registering juveniles.

/On registering .......

Saturday, May 20, 1972

- 4 -

On registering for adult cards, young persons 17 years of age and over must surrender their juvenile Identity Cards and produce (i) the Identity Cards of both their parents or guardians under whom they are registered, and (ii) a Hong Kong Birth Certificate or evidence of their residence in Hong Kong during the past two years.

Persons who do not possess any of the above mentioned documents must register at the Registration of Persons Branch Office in the Causeway Bay Magistracy, Electric Road, Hong Kong or at Canton Road Government Offices, Yaumati, Kowloon.

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SHEUNG SHUI BIRTH AND MARRIAGE REGISTRY

«****»#*

A new combined Birth and Marriage Registry will be opened on Monday, May 22, in the Sheung Shui District.

It will replace the existing part-time birth and marriage registry at the Sheung Shui Rural Committee Office.

From that date, notices of marriage will be given and marriage ceremonies will be performed at the new Registry which includes a suitably decorated marriage room.

The new Registry will also provide full facilities for the registration of births.

The Registry, at No. 26, San Fung Avenue, ground floor, will be open to the public from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on week-days and 10 a.m. to 12 noon on Saturdays.

The Registry’s telephone is NT-903774.

- - 0 - -

/5

Saturday, May 20, 1972

- 5 -

VARIED PROGRAMME FOR PUBLIC ENTERTAINMENT

Organised By Urban Council And U.S.D.

The Urban Council and Urban Services Department have arranged a varied programme for public entertainment for the last ten days in May.

The programme ranges from football matches and roller skating display to Chinese band concert and opera.

Details of the programme are as follows:

Time Event ■Location

22nd 8 pra - 9.30 pm Film Show Lam Tin Resettlement

Estate Playground

22nd 6 pn - 7 pro Miniature Football Southern Playground

Match

22nd 7 pro - 8 pm 11 it

23rd 6 pm - 7 pro it it

23rd 7 pro - 8 pm It tt

23rd 6 pm - 7 pro II Victoria Park

23rd 7 pro - 8 pm It tt

24th 8 pm - 9-30 pm Film Show Shek Lei Resettlement

Estate Playground (NT)

24th 6 pm - 7 pro Miniature Football Victoria Park

Match

24th 7 pro - 8 pm ti 11

25th 6 pm - 7 pro it ti

23th 7 pro - 8 pm 11 it

26th 8 pm - 9 •30 pm Film Show Luen Wo Market Playground

(NT)

/6..........

.. 2 ♦ » Saturday, May 20, 1972

• Time - 6 - - * Event Location

26th 8 pm - 9*30 pm Roller Skating Display King’s Road Play- । ground

27th 8 pm - 11 pm Youth Dance Central Government Offices Canteen

28th 3 pm - 4.30 pm Afternoon Entertainment t -i -H. - 0 Pedestrian Precinct - Chater Road

28th 1 pm - 3 pm Band Concert Statue Square Garden

29th 8 pm - 9*30 pm Film Show 11 King George Vth Memorial Park (HK)

30th 8 pm - 10.30 pm Variety Show fi । , ■ «r_’<s I

31st 8 pm - 10.30 pm Chinese Band Concert & Opera 1; • 1 If 1 !

*4 Ji - •*’ ’ • £ 1 0 r /7 ........

■'■ ’ •' i'

•9

Saturday, May 20, 1972

- 7 -

CITY HALL MARKS 10TH ANNIVERSARY

Photographic Contest And Exhibition To Be Held

***««*«*

The City Hall is organising a photographic contest and exhibition to celebrate its 10th anniversary.

The theme is irHong Kong - the Changing Scene”.

Each entrant may submit up to 24 prints for the contest. Photographs, in colour or black and white, which best illustrate the theme will be awarded medals and certificates.

The panel of judges will be made up of the presidents of the five leading photographic societies.

Entries will close on June 28 and the exhibition will open on

July 13.

Those who wish to enter the contest can write to the following address:

Hong Kong - The Changing Scene,

City Museum and Art Gallery,

City Hall, Hong Kong.

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/8.........

Saturday, May 20, 1972

- 8 -

OVER 140,000 TICKETS SOLD

For First Government Lottery This Year

********

Up to noon today, 144,000 tickets had been sold for the first Government lottery this year.

The winning numbers will be drawn two weeks from today in the City Hall Concert Hall.

The Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, will officiate at the draw and Lady MacLehose will present souvenirs to organisations which have helped boost ticket sales.

Tickets, at $2 each, are on sale at various banks and ferry piers of the Hong Kong and Yaumati Company.

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D.I.B. ON SUNDAY .

***** ** *

Note, to editors: There will be an issue of the Daily

Information Bulletin tomorrow (Sunday). Copies of the D.I.B. can be collected from the G.I.S, Press Room at 3 p»m. tomorrow.

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Release Time:2* JO p.m.

P.R.H. 7 (REVISED) 4000001

fflffl® w®


INFORMATION

SERVICES

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Sunday, May 21, 1972

PREVENTION OF ENTERIC DISELiSES Simple Rules To Follow

Enteric diseases are caused by ingestion of food or drinks contaminated by germs of these diseases, a spokesman for the Urban Services Department said today.

He said this in connection with the current Prevention of Enteric Diseases Campaign.

"These germs are usually of human origin and are conveyed to food and drinks through dirty hands, flies and polluted water," he added•

Vegetables with nightsoil as fertilizer, shell-fish collected in polluted water or meat from infected animals may also carry germs of these diseases.

"Enteric diseases can be prevented by following some very simple rules," the spokesman said.

/These arez .......

Sunday, May 21, 1972

- 2 -

These arc:

(a) Keeping hands clean: Only clean hands can produce clean food. V/aeh hands with soap and water to remove germs after visiting toilet or attending children in lavatory. Wash hands before preparing food and eating too. Wounds on human body may contain germs which cause food poisoning. Cover up wounds on hands with water-proof dressings to protect food from contamination by these germs.

(b) Protection of food and utensils from flies: flies feed on excreta and their bodies are covered with filth and germs. Flies contaminate food when they feed on it. Keep food and drinks under wire-gauze cover or, better still in refrigerator to exclude flies. Utensils, particularly milk bottles and feeding equipment for infants, should be similarly protected.

Food waste and food remnants attract flies. Put them in sealed plastic bags or wrap them up with several layers of newspaper before disposing into dust-bin. This will cut down smell and prevent fly attraction at home. Keep dust-bin covered at all times. Cooked food, titbits and cut-fruits exposed for sale by hawkers are always dangerous due to fly and dust contamination. Avoid buying this kind of food.

(c) Protection of water supply from pollution: Water supplied by Government is safe to use. However, if buckets, dipper or rubber hoses are used for storing or drawing water, they may contaminate the water• Therefore water should bo drawn directly from the taps but it is always better to boil water before drinking.

/(d)

Sunday, May 21, 1972

- 3 -

(d) Food hygiene: Wash food thoroughly and cook food adequately to remove and destroy germs* Consume food as soon as possible after preparation to avoid multiplication of germs. All left-overs should be re-cooked before eating. Any suspected unsound food should be rejected.

(e) Immuni zation: Cholera and typhoid may be prevented by immunization. Inoculations are obtainable free of charge in Government vaccination centres, clinics and hospitals. However, it has been found that anti-cholera inoculation is not entirely effective and it is therefore still essential to pay special attention to food hygiene in order to prevent this dangerous disease.

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A....

Sunday, May 21, 1972

- 4 -

PROMENADE TO BE BUILT IN NORTH POINT

Squatter Huts To Be Cleared

*******

A striio of land on the hillside below Tin Hau Temple Road, North Point, is to be cleared of squatter structures this week for the construction of a promenade.

The strip will also serve as a much needed “lung” for the area which has a population of about 130,000 with only six acres of open space.

The promenade will be about 1,000 feet long and 200 feet across. It will be turfed and will have benches as well as a small children’s playground at one end.

Construction will start right after the clearance and is expected to take about three months to complete.

More than 100 structures, most of them used as pig sties will have to be cleared.

A spokesman for the Resettlement Department said that 23 families were living in huts there.

They have been offered resettlement or, if they do not qualify, space in licensed areas to rebuild their huts.

An ex gratia payment of more than $45,000 has been made to 14 pig breeders. Fine others do not qualify because of the fact that they are newcomers.

The promenade is expected to be well used as the area around it is a favourite place for strollers.

Apart from the illegality, the pig breeders have been a constant source of complaints from residents living in the vicinity.

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Release Time: 3*00 p.m.

P.R.H. 7 (REVISED) 4000091

W® 11

INFORMATION SERVICES

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Monday, May 22, 1972

HOSPITAL FOR MENTALLY-RETARDED PATTENTS

Sir Kenneth To Open Siu Lam Hospital In Late June

********

The Hon. Sir Kenneth Ping-fan Fung, Executive Councillor, will open the new Siu Lam Hospital for mentally-defective patients near Tai Lam Chung in the Castle Peak district of the New Territories at a ceremony on June 28.

The hospital is a manifestation of the Government’s growing concern for the treatment and care of mentally-retarded children. Its extended capacity will enable more such children to be placed under hospital care, according to the recommendations of the Hilliard Report.

The report stated that mentally-retarded children should be classified and treated under three categories:- Those capable of receiving instructions to be looked after by the Education Department in special schools; those incapable of benefiting from special schools but still able to accept some form of training to be looked after by the Social Welfare Department; and the most severely retarded to be the responsibility of the Medical and Health Department.

The admission of patients will begin early in July. It will be on a phased basis to enable both the staff and the patients to settle down in this new environment. The hospital is expected to be fully occupied before the end of the year.

/Siu Lam ........

Monday, May 22, 1972

2

Siu Lam occupies an area of about 1.5 acres on the hills adjacent to Tai Lam Valley and over-looking the sea. The building complex comprises four blocks — the hospital itself, and quarters for the nursing and other staff.

The hospital will provide accommodation for 200 mentally-retarded patients, and will be arranged in two units of four dormitory wings, each wing enclosing a rectangular patio.

These enclosing courtyards will provide ”play areas” for children and will enable easy supervision by the nursing staff.

The two wings of the L-shaped dormitories are linked by ’’service knuckles” which contain the kitchens, toilets, store rooms, and other utility facilities required to serve the 50 beds of each of the two dormitory wings.

In addition, there will be a sick bed section, provision for occupational therapy, a classroom, and a waiting hall and offices.

Accommodation for the nursing staff will be in a separate two-storey block. Another three-storey block for nursing auxiliaries is also provided. Quarters for the junior staff are arranged separately.

The hospital was made possible by a generous donation from the Royal Hong Kong Jockey Club of $6,213»000. The Government is responsible for furniture and equipment and will also meet running costs.

Architects for the project were Spence Robinson of Broadwood Road, Happy Valley, Hong Kong.

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/3...........

Monday, May 22, 1972

- 3 -

PLACEMENT OF THE DISABLED

26 Engaged By Various Organisations During April

*«*«*«**

Twenty six disabled were found jobs in April through the service of the Social Welfare Department’s Liaison and Placement Unit.

Of the 26, six were young blind men between 18 and 22 who were taken on by an industrial organisation as assemblers at the rate of #10.50 a day.

One young blind man aged 24 was engaged by the Medical and Health Department as telephone operator for the new Siu Lam Hospital on a pay of #600 a month.

The Cosmos International Garment Manufacturing Company Limited engaged nine disabled during the month for a variety of tasks including packing, sewing, and office cleaning, on salaries varying from #9 a day, to piece rate, and #200 a month.

A crippled young man of 26 was engaged by J. & L. Miao Limited as a night watchman on $400 a month, and a former TB patient was taken on by Carter Semi-Conductor Limited as a messenger clerk at #310 a month.

The Alliance Printing and Sewing Company Limited took on a middle-aged crippled man as a watchman at #370 a month.

There were other successful placements in the Texwood Garment Factory, the International Dress Corporation, and Chiap Hua Clocks and Watches* Limited.

/Mr, Paul Leung, ••••••

Monday, May 22, 1972

- 4 -

Mr. Paul Leung, officer in charge of the Unit, says the nine disabled engaged in April by the Cosmos International Garment Manufacturing Company Limited reflects the factory’s continuing interest in this field. Since the factory’s first contact with the Unit in September 1969, it has employed 4j disabled, 30 of whom are still with the factory and are happy with their work.

’’The management hopes that we will continue to supply them with trained workers, and to make placement easier, it has even provided training material to the World Rehabilitation Fund Day Centre so that our trainees wishing to join this factory will find it easier to move from practice to actual work,” Mr. Leung says.

’’This is co-operation brought to a very high level of enlightenment, and I hope it is the forerunner of similar gestures by other industrial organisations in Hong Kong.”

He is particularly pleased that the management maintains close contact with the unit regarding problems arising out of its engagement of the individual disabled, and he would also like to see this practice duplicated.

0 - -

Monday, May 22, 1972

- 5 -

OUTWARD BOUND SCHOOL GRADUATION CEREMONY

Lady MacLehose To Present Certificates

********

Lady MacLehose will present certificates and badges this week to

40 girls who have completed a training course of 26 days at the Outward Bound School of Hong Kong.

The course, first of its kind for girls designed to build up

confidence in the trainees and develop the potential of leadership among them, includes such activities as canoeing, rope-climbing, excursions, sailing and camping.

The presentation ceremony will take place on Wednesday, May 24, at the Outward Bound School premises at Tai Mong Tsai, Sai Kung.

After presenting the certificates and badges, Lady MacLehose will address the gathering. Later, she will meet the girls informally, inspect the school and meet members of the staff.

The girls, aged between 15 and 50, were sponsored for the course by

Jardine, Matheson & Co., Siber Hegner, China‘Light & Power Co., Boys’ and Girls’ Clubs Association, Telephone Co., Hong Kong & Shanghai Bank, Dodwell & Co., police, Census & Statistics Department, Immigration Department, Social Welfare Department, Secretariat for Home Affairs, Colonial Secretariat, and scholarships.

******

Note to editors:

You are cordially invited to send a reporter

and/or photographer to attend the presentation ceremony,

which will start at 10 a.m. on Wednesday, May 24.

/6

- - 0 - -

Monday, May 22, 1972

- 6 -

RETIREMENT OF MEDICAL SUPERINTENDENT

Public Service Of 22 Years

********

Dr. Yue Man-young, Principal Medical and Health Officer, will retire on August 4 after serving the public of Hong Kong for more than 22 years.

He is at present Medical Superintendent of Queen Elizabeth Hospital.

To mark the occasion, a tea party will be held in his honour in the Hospital’s staff canteen on Friday, May 26, beginning at p.m.

During the party, Dr. the Hon. G.H. Choa, Director of Medical and Health’Services, will present Dr. Yue with a memento on behalf of friends and colleagues in the Department.

********

Note to editors: You are invited to have the presentation

ceremony covered.

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Monday, May 22, 1972

- 7 -

OPERATION OF PUBLIC LIGHT BUSES

Castle Peak Road, Tsuen Wan Section, N.T.

********

The Transport Department today advised drivers of public light buses that with effect from 10 a.m. on May 25, 1972, picking up and setting down of passengers will be prohibited along two sections of the Kowloon bound carriageway of Castle Peak Road at Tsuen Wan:-

* From west of Chai Wan Kok Street junction to east of Route Twisk junction.

* From west of Tai Ho Road junction to east of Shing Mun Road junction.

Picking up and setting down of passengers may be carried out on the sections of service road running alongside Castle Peak Road.

Appropriate signs will be placed for the guidance of public light bus drivers.

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/8..........

Monday, May 22, 1972

- 8 -« ADVENTURE WEEKEND CAMPS FOR TSUEN WAN YOUTHS

Organised By District Office, Tsuen Wan *********

The District Office, Tsuen Wan, in conjunction with the 48

Gurkha Infantry Brigade, and a number of interested Government departments organised the third of their ’adventure weekend* camps at Sek Kong over the weekend.

A total of 18 youths from Tsuen Wan, aged between 14 and 18, took part in a series of activities designed to develop their initiative and self reliance and give them an exciting weekend away from their normal entertainment•

Selected from a wide variety of backgrounds, the youths represent a cross-section of Tsuen Wan people. A spokesman for the District Office said that the idea behind the scheme was to give ordinary youths a look behind the scenes not only at the Army and Government but also, perhaps, at themselves.

During the two days the youths had the opportunity to strip and assemble a 105 on Pack Howitzer ride on an armoured car and play various sports with tho soldiers of 4 Battery 47 Light Regiment Royal Artillery.

Despite the heavy rain on the first day, which caused the cancellation of some of the outdoor activities, their enthusiasm was not dampened and all enjoyed a welcome break from their regular routine.

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/9.........

P.R.H. 7 (REVISED) 4000091

ffiME

INFORMATION

SERVICES

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN


Tuesday, May 23, 1972

TSAN YUK HOSPITAL’S GOLDEN JUBILEE

Governor To Unveil Plaque At Commemorative Ceremony

*******

The Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, will unveil a plaque in the Lecture Hall of the Tsan Yuk Hospital on Thursday, May 251 to mark the Hospital’s Golden Jubilee.

Sir Murray will be received at the Hospital by Dr. the Hon. G.H. Choa, Director of Medical and Health Services; Professor Daphne Chun, Chairman, and members of the Jubilee Organising Committee.

The ceremony will begin with an opening speech by Professor Chun, followed by a message from the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists to be delivered by its Vice-President, Professor Stanley Clayton.

Professor Gordon King, Emeritus Professor of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Hong Kong, will then recount a brief history of the Hospital, and the Governor will speak, unveiling the plaque afterwards.

Guests will then tour the Hospital building and take tea in the Outpatient Department on the ground floor.

Golden Jubilee celebrations will include a public lecture by Professor Clayton in the Lecture Hall earlier in the day on "Fifty Years of Obstetric Progress." In the evening, there will be a Chinese dinner for guests, past and present members, and students and staff of the Hospital. The latter will provide a variety show.

/The Tsan

Tuesday, May 23, 1972

- 2 -

The Tsan Yuk Hospital was opened in 1922 with the main object of providing a much-needed maternity service, and establishing a training school for midWives, using Chinese as the language of instruction.

It is serving the public today by selectively booking maternity cases ’with complications, and cases that may be potentially abnormal-

It also accepts for treatment emergency complicated obstetrical cases that are referred from government or private maternity homes in Hong i.

Kong, the out-lying islands, and from the Tung ah Eastern and Tung Wah hospitals.

The Hospital is a training centre for medical students, midwives and also post-graduate students.

The idea for a separate maternity hospital and midwifery training school was first suggested by Dr. Alice Hickling to the Chinese Public Dispensary Committee.

When this was accepted and Tsan Yuk materialised, the Hospital opened in ./estem Street with 30 beds, and a staff consisting of the Medical Officer in charge and Matron, two nurses, six student midwives and five amahs — a total of 15.

In 1922, there were 436 admissions. This grew to 1,000 within the first five years, and to a peak of 7,000 in latter years.

By this time, there were 85 obstetrical beds with a staff of 90, and the demand necessitated a rapid turnover of patients. So it became clear that the Hospital needed to expand, and in 1952, the Royal Hong Kong Jockey Club donated -.>3,570,000 for the building of the new Hospital.

• • • /Her Royal......

Tuesday, May 23, 1972

- 3 -

Her Royal Highness the late Princess Marina, Duchess of Kent, laid the foundation stone in October, 1952, and Sir Alexander Grantham, the then Governor, opened the new Hospital in 1955* In 19^7, an extension on the 7th floor was completed. It is now used as quarters and offices for the medical staff.

Mote to Editors: You are invited to have the Golden Jubilee Formal Celebration covered. The Governor will arrive before 3 p.m. It is hoped that your staff will be in position before then. An officer from the Information Services Department will be on hand to assist members of the Press, radio and T.V.

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WATER SUPPLY - WONG TAI SIN

Water supply to a number of resettlement blocks in the Tung Tau

Tsuen Resettlement Estate, 'Jong Tai Sin, will be turned off for five hours between 1 a.m. and 6 a.m. on Thursday.

Residents living in Block No. 5 and Block Nos. 14 to 20 of the estate will be affected by the interruption.

The temporary stoppage is to allow the Waterworks Office to carry out a leakage test in the area.

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Tuesday, May 23, 1972

- 4 -

CONSUMER PRICE INDEX FOR APRIL

Same As In March

*****

The General Consumer Price Index (September 63/August 64 = 100) for April 1972 was 135, the same as that for the previous month.

There was a decrease of two points in the index for food. On the other hand, an increase of eight points was recorded in the index for housing.

The index for the section of clothing and footwear also advanced by one point. Movements in the indexes for other sections of commodity and service were insignificant.

Compared with the previous month, average retail prices fell for fresh water fish, beef, fresh fruits and eggs. On the other hand, salt water fish, live poultry and fresh vegetables were priced higher.

The housing index was raised eight points mainly as a result of a rise in rents of some Housing Authority Estates and adjustments made to the index of rent for private post-war built dwellings.

The Modified C.P.I. for April 1972 was 136, the same as that for the previous month and eight points higher than that for the corresponding month in the previous year.

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/ 5 ....

Tuesday, May 2J, 1972

- 5 -

URBAN COUNCIL PRESENTS YOUTH DANCE

Two Pop-groups To Perform

*******

The Urban Council will present another Youth Dance in the staff restaurant on the 7th floor of the Central Government Offices, West Wing, on Saturday.

The Dance will start at 8 p.m. and is expected to last for about three hours.

The Urban Council’s Entertainment Officer said today that he had engaged two very popular Hong Kong groups to perform at the party. The highlight of the evening will be a lucky draw which will take place at the end of the party.

Tickets at 4,1.50 will be on sale at the Low Block Lobby Theatre Booking Office of the City Hall from 10 a.m. daily.

------0----------

•<UARAI7TIN3 RESTRICTIONS IbiPCSED

*******

The Port Health Authorities announced today that quarantine restrictions have been imposed against arrivals from Lucknow (airport), India on account of cholera.

------ 0-----------

Tuesday, May 23, 1972

- 6 -

LUNG CHEUNG DRAMATIC TROUPE PRESENTS OPERA

At City Hall Concert Hall

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦

The Radio Hong Kong Lung Cheung Dramatic Troupe will present a Cantonese opera on Saturday, June 3, at 10 a.m. in the City Hall Concert Hall.

The performance will be after the Governor has drawn the winning numbers for the first Government lottery this year.

The opera is entitled *‘Yue Ka Lok” which translated means ,fThe Happy Fisherfolk”.

Admission to the performance is free. Tickets are available on the first come first served basis to anyone by request in writing to Radi o Hong Kong, P.O. Box K-200.

The envelope should be marked "Government Lottery", and a fully stamped and self-addressed envelope should also be enclosed.

Owing to the limited capacity of the City Hall Concert Hall , one ticket only will be issued to each person who writes in.

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/7.......

Tuesday, May 23, 1972

- 7 -

ILLEGAL DEMONSTRATION IN CENTRAL DISTRICT ON MAY 13

Attorney General Decides Not To Prosecute

********

The Attorney General has decided not to prosecute any of the people who took part in the illegal demonstration in the Central District on May 13*

The Hon. D.T.E. Roberts emphasised this afternoon that the decision • • • 3

did not mean that persons flouting the law in a similar manner in the future could expect to be treated so leniently.

Mr. Roberts said: "The fact that an offence has been committed does not necessarily mean war prosecution will inevitably follow. In this particular case, I do not think the public interest would be best served by prosecution."

The Attorney General said the decision was entirely his - not one taken either by the Police or the Government.

He explained: "As Attorney General, I am in sole control of all prosecutions and the decision whether or not to pursue a particular case is entirely mine, not that of the Commissioner of Police nor of the Government."

Mr. Roberts said he had consulted other Government departments before making his decision. "It is normal for me, before a decision is taken on a prosecution which has wide implications to consult Government departments-and officials and other persons whom I think may be able to tender useful advice to me."

Explaining the reasons for deciding not to prosecute, the Attorney

General said: "This was a demonstration which was beyond any doubt totally illegal. On the other hand, we were very fortunate in that no trouble arose during the course of the demonstration.

/"The youngsters ........

Tuesday, May 23, 1972

- 8 -

’’The youngsters who took part in it have had their publicity. To prosecute them would be to give them a further prominence and importance which I do not think they deserve.

’’They have already caused substantial inconvenience and very considerable expense and I think that in these particular circumstances the right thing to do is to forget about it and not to take any further action against them." - z 1 • 1

Mr. Roberts had high praise for the Police who, he stressed, ’’handled the whole situation quite superbly.”

Decision

He did not think his decision not to prosecute would encourage students to try to use the Central District for future demonstrations. He pointed out that public meetings in Hong Kong were controlled for very good reasons.

”In a crowded city like ours, the disruption to normal life is considerable and the danger of an explosion and disorder is very, very great indeed. This applies whatever the cause - whether it is a good one or a bad one."

There was no trouble in the May 13 demonstration for two main reasons, Mr. Roberts pointed out. Firstly, the situation was handled by the Police "with the greatest tact and skill." Secondly, a very large number of students "showed their good sense" by staying away from the demonstration.

As a result, the demonstration was very small compared with what its organisers had claimed for it.

/The Attorney ••••••••

Tuesday, May 23» 1972

- 9 -

The Attorney General then sounded a note of warning to those who might try to flout the law by holding illegal demonstrations in the future.

”1 would like to make it very clear indeed that the course which has been taken must not be regarded as a precedent.

"If illegal demonstrations take place in the future, the Police may very well break them up immediately and arrest those responsible and subsequently those taking part will be charged in front of the courts.”

Mr. Roberts said the decision not to prosecute on this particular occasion should not be taken as a ’’sign of weakness.”

’’Indeed, I think it should be taken as a sign of strength because it is only a strong administration which is fully confident in its own ability to deal with public demonstrations if it has to, that can afford to take the line which is being, and has been, taken in this particular case*”

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Release Time: 6.30 p.m.

P.R.H. 7 (REVISED) 4000091

M® M®

INFORMATION

SERVICES

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Wednesday, May 24, 1972

"JUMBO" FLOATING RESTAURANT FIRS

Findings Of Commission Of Inquiry ««****«

The fire on the "Jumbo" floating restaurant at Aberdeen last October was started as the result of electric welding in the aquarium section of the vessel.

This is the finding of the Commission of Inquiry appointed by the Governor to investigate the fire and to make such recommendations arising therefrom as it may deem appropriate.

The Commission says the "immediate spread of the fire was due to the easily ignitable and inflammable nature of the material used and the presence of large areas of wet paint."

The Commission’s 32-page renort was tabled in the Legislative Council this (Wednesday) afternoon by the Colonial Secretary, the Hon. Sir Hugh Norman-Walker.

The fire broke out on the vessel on October 30 last year. The floating restaurant was then under construction in Aberdeen harbour. Thirty-four people, including four children, lost their lives and 42 others were injured in the fire.

Tlie Commission heard evidence from 90 witnesses, looked at 61 documentary or other exhibits and considered the submissions of Counsel for the interested parties.

/On its ••.

Wednesday, May 24, 1972

- 2 -

On its finding on the cause of the fire, the Commission has this to say: ”V/e have no doubt that the fire was started by arcing and molten metal globules falling from an electric welding electrode holder in the false ceiling at the after end of the aquarium ......•

By reason of the nature of the material and the semi-darkness in which that area must have been shrouded, it is not beyond the bounds of possibility that the fire smouldered unobserved for several hours before it finally burst into flames.”

The Commission says the responsibility for the outbreak of the fire must lie with those actually welding, the person by whom they were employed and the Chung Wah Shipbuilding and Engineering Company.

Extra Precautions

In the view of the Commission the Chung Wah Company and the owners, the Aberdeen Restaurant Enterprises Ltd., should ’’both have taken extra precautions against fire in view of the large amount of unprotected but highly inflammable decorative material throughout the Jumbo. The owners should have provided temporary but adequate warning, fire fighting and rescue facilities as well as radio or telephonic communication with the shore.’1

Other principal conclusions and recommendations of the Commission are:

* the fire was remarkable for its intensity and the rapidity with which it engulfed the whole of the Jumbo;

* many survivors owe their lives to the actions of members of the Royal Hong Kong Police and the Fire Services Department and of private individuals;

* the Ambulance Service responded efficiently to the emergency;

/* the .....

Wednesday, May 2*+, 1972

- 3 -

* the fireboats tackled the blaze as quickly and capably as they were able, but it may be that the stationing of one small fireboat in Aberdeen Harbour is not sufficient in present conditions;

* the Jumbo was consumed entirely except for the basic hull and superstructure;

* if completed and used as intended the Jumbo would have presented a risk to life in the case of fire.

On the rapid spread of the fire to the remainder of the vessel, the Commission says this was caused by the open plan design coupled with the chimney effect of the central staircase complex, the highly inflammable decorative material lining the inside and outside of the Jumbo, the indiscriminate distribution of dangerous goods and other combustible material, and the uninsulated steel construction of the hull and superstructure.

Fire Alarm System

Commenting on the loss of life, the Commission says this may be attributed to the lack of an adequate fire alarm system, the rapid spread of the fire, and the lack of safe escape routes.

On the question of criminal liability, the Commission makes this observation: “We have deliberately refrained from any attempt to apportion the responsibility between the parties we have just mentioned or to determine their civil liabilities to each other, to their respective workmen or to third parties. These are matters which should, if necessary, be properly left to the regular courts of law. We have considered, only to reject - apart from matters within the Dangerous Goods Ordinance -the question of criminal liability. The acts and the commissions were negligent. They caused death. But in no instance do we think they reached that high degree of negligence or recklessness that is necessary to bring them within the realm of manslaughter.”

/On the ....

'./ednesday, May 24, 1972

- 4 -

On the question of supervisory powers over work carried out on vessels or other floating objects in Colony waters, the finding of the Commission is that there is considerable doubt as to how far the jurisdiction and powers of the Fire Services, Marine and Labour Departments extend to matters of industrial safety in undertakings located on water.

The not result, the Commission notes, was that no Government department took action with regard to the conditions existing on the Jumbo.

The Commission believes ”it is desirable that some Government Departments should clearly bo made responsible to take an overall interest in work proceeding on vessels outside a registered shipyard” and that ’’such interest should extend generally to the safety of working conditions exnd practices and the precautions to be taken against fire and means of escape•”

Responsibility

The Commission recommends that the Director of Marine should be given overall responsibility for the safety of working conditions on ships and floating structures building or under repair or renovation in the waters of the Colony.

The Commission is satisfied that such matters would be most conveniently dealt with by the Marine Department, and recommends that legislation be passed to give the Director of Marine the appropriate powers of enforcement.

/With regards

Wednesday, May 24, 1972

- 5 -

With regards to the Marine Department, the Commission further recommends:

* the department remains the sole authority for the inspection and licensing of floating restaurants and similar undertakings under the Merchant Shipping Ordinance;

* but it should take into consideration the requirements imposed by the Fire Services Department upon restaurants on land;

that further consideration should be given to floating restaurants currently conducting business in the Colony;

* that more reliable ways to test new materials should be sought; and

that the Merchant Shipping Ordinance should be amended to remove doubt.

The Commission also recommends that consideration be given to

publicising the provisions of the Dangerous Goods Ordinance and the possible dangers of some new and untried materials.

Note to Editors: The three-member Commission of Inquiry was appointed by the Governor on November 9i 1971 under the Commissions of Inquiry Ordinance (Cap. 86). The Chairman was Mr. Derek Cons, District Judge, and the other two members were Mr. Raymond Y.K. Kan, an architect, and Mr. S.C. Johnson, Principal Surveyor with Lloyds Register of Shipping in Hong Kong. The Secretary to the Commission was Mr. M.S. Roberts, a Senior Executive Officer.

Copies of the Commission’s report, printed in English and Chinese, are distributed separately in the Press Boxes.

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Wednesday, May 2^, 1972

- 6 -

INDUSTRIALISTS RESPONSIBLE FOR TRADE WASTE DISPOSAL Director Of Urban Services Tells Council *******

The Director of Urban Services, the Hon. D.R.W. Alexander, said today the responsibility for disposing of trade waste had to remain with the individual industrialist.

He was replying in the Legislative Council to Dr. the Hon. S.Y. Chung who had asked: ”In order to help the ’Keep Hong Kong Clean Campaign’ will Government consider providing services to dispose of industrial waste and refuse from factories situated in urban areas?”

Mr. Alexander pointed out that one of the aims of the forthcoming . i campaign was to ensure that industrialists provided themselves with proper ways and moans of disposing of their waste.

’’There is no doubt in my mind that if I were to take up my Honourable Friend’s suggestion, I would merely bo giving the Cleansing Division of my Department an additional burden which it could not shoulder and which, far from helping the ’Keep Hong Kong Clean’ Campaign, would make it even more difficult,” he added.

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Wednesday, May 24, 1972

- 7 -

CLOSING LAI CHI KOK BAY TO PUBLIC SWIMMING

Will Deprive Public Of Its Use For Other Recreations

*******

The proposal to close the Lai Chi Kok Bay beach to public swimming was considered and rejected since it would deprive the public of the use of the beach for other recreational purposes such as boating and picnicking.

This was stated today by the Director of Urban Services, the

Hon. D.R.7. Alexander, in the Legislative Council in reply to the Hon. Szeto Wai.

Mr. Szeto had asked: "In view of the badly polluted sea-water at Lai Chi Kok Bay, would Government consider closing the beach there to public bathing?”

Mr. Alexander said the final solution to the problem lies in the eventual reclamation of the Bay, which has been zoned for reclamation and open space development in the Cutline Development Plan for Lai Chi Kok.

He said swimming at Lai Chi Kok Bay had for long been a matter of grave concern to the Urban Council. 1 ith the recent opening of Lei Cheng Uk Swimming Pool, the Bay was degazetted as a public bathing beach with effect from February 4 this year.

"All life saving services were withdrawn; notices advising members of the public not to swim there were put up on the beach; and my department also again warned the public through both the Press and radio of the danger of swimming in the Bay,” he said.

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/ 8 ....

Wednesday, May 2A, 1972

- 8 -

ACCOUNTANT GENERAL TO CONDUCT SURVEY On Setting Up Of More Sub-Treasuries In Kowloon *******

The Financial Secretary, the Hon. C.P. Haddon-Cave, said today the Accountant General will conduct a survey over the next few months to find out if there is sufficient demand to justify the cost of setting up one or more additional sub-Treasurics in Kowloon.

The survey, he said, will be conducted with the help of the Secretariat for Home Affairs and the Commissioner of Census and Statistics.

He was speaking in the Legislative Council in reply to the

Hon. H.J.C. Browne, who had asked whether Government would take corrective measures to reduce waiting times for members of the public who visit the Kowloon Sub-Treasury to pay their bills.

Mr. Haddon-Cave said that, however, even if additional offices were opened, it would not be possible to reduce the waiting time at due date periods to what could be regarded as reasonable.

The reason is that many people leave payments to the last few days before they arc due, while others who pay by cheque still prefer to attend in person rather than use the post, he added.

However, he said, in the past few years, waiting times at the Kowloon Sub-Treasury have been reduced as a result of a campaign carried out by the Accountant General with the help of the Information Services Department to persuade people who have banking accounts to pay their bills by post.

/ "It is

Wednesday, May 24, 1972

- 9 -

"It is true that there is still congestion at the Kowloon SubTreasury, as well as at the two cash offices on Hong Kong Island. Usually this occurs during the last few days of each quarterly rating period, that is, at the end of April, July, October and January.”

The Financial Secretary said that the first three months in 1972 were unusually busy periods owing to the large backlog of water bills issued for payment in these months.

"This backlog was accumulated during the second half of 1971 following the introduction of the revised water charges and of the free units which slowed down substantially the rate at which water bills could be issued," he explained.

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KENNEDY TOWN JOCKEY CLUB CLINIC

Full-Time Maternal And Child Health Service Provided

*«**«*»

The Director of Medical and Health Services, Dr. the Hon. Gerald Choa, said today one doctor was posted to the general out-patients clinic of the Kennedy Town Jockey Club Clinic.

He was replying to the Hon. Wilfred Wong who had asked: "Will Government state how many doctors are in attendance at the Kennedy Town Jockey Club Clinic and whether it is necessary to post additional doctors there?"

Dr. Choa said that the clinic also provided a full-time maternal and child health service and there were times when two doctors were in attendance.

tfIf in the summer months the attendance figure rises, another doctor will be posted there," he said.

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/ 10 ....

Wednesday, May 24, 1972

- 10 -

RESETTLEMENT ESTATES STAFF UNDER INSTRUCTIONS

To Encourage People To Report Crime To Police

*******

The Commissioner for Resettlement, the Hon. I.M. Lightbody, said today when crime in an estate was reported to estates staff, they were under instructions to encourage the person to make a report to the Police.

He was replying in the Legislative Council to the Hon. Oswald Cheung.

Mr. Cheung had asked: ’’Have any departmental standing instructions been promulgated by the Commissioner for Resettlement on the action to be taken by his staff concerning: (a) Reports on crime made by residents of resettlement estates to his staff; (b) criminal activities of which his staff have actual knowledge?”

Mr. Lightbody added that more often than not the individual declines to report to the Police.

In such event, the estate staff would try to get the complainant’s name and address, and the complaint, and inform the station, he said.

"Where estates staff personally witness a crime in an estate, they are under instructions to make a report to the Police.”

"It is however very exceptional for this situation to arise," he said.

In reply to another question by the Hon. Oswald Cheung, the Commissioner said no record was kept in the Resettlement Department of the number of crimes reported by tenants to estates staff.

/”The

Wednesday, May 24, 1972

- 11 -

"The maintenance of statistics on crime in estates, as elsewhere, is a matter for the Police, and they do in fact keep very detailed statistics on this subject,” he added.

Mr. Cheung had asked: ”How many reports of crime were made by residents of resettlement estates to staff of the Resettlement Department in 1971 and how many of these were forwarded to the police?”

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INTERRUPTION OF WATER SUPPLY * » ♦ * * * * *

Water supply to an area in the Western District will be turned off for eight hours starting from 10 p.m. on Friday, May 26 to al low work to be carried out on connecting a fresh water main at the junction of Hi 1.1 Road and Des Voeux Road West.

The affected area includes premises in Des Voeux Road West, Hill Road, Queen’s Road West and Whitty Street.

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Wednesday, May 24, 1972

- 12 -

CONSTANT LIAISON AT DIVISIONAL LEVEL

Between Estates Staff And Police

The Commissioner for Resettlement, the Hon. I.M. Lightbody, said today there was constant liaison at Divisional- level between his estates staff and Police.

"In addition we are supplied with regular Police reports on triad and gang activities in the estates,” he added.

He was replying in the Legislative Council to the Hon. Oswald Cheung who had asked: "Will Government indicate the extent of consultation between the Commissioner for Resettlement and the Commissioner of Police on the maintenance of law and order in the resettlement estates?"

Mr. Lightbody said there was frequent consultation on practical ways and means of discouraging criminal activities, such as by cutting off access to roofs and meter rooms which were popular venue for gangs.

"The very layout of our estates does however tend to make life easy for the criminal; there are a vast number of entrances and exits to the blocks; there are too many secluded rear courtyards or public open spaces between the back of the blocks and the adjoining hillside," he added.

He pointed out that the various floors of the multi-storeyed blocks were essentially layered streets, where there were few pedestrians by day and not much of a Police presence.

/’•To me • • • • •

Wednesday, May 24, 1972

- 13 -

"To me it is a constant surprise that there was not more crime in the estates, considering the very sparse Police presence in them," he said.

Because of manpower problems, 50,000-person estate could have as little as three beats in it, and visitors to the estates frequently commented on the absence of Police, he added.

"I have recently made a comprehensive report to the Commissioner of Police on various ways in which the Force could help to improve the situation in these crowded estates," he said.

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A4...

Wednesday, May 24, 1972

-IR-

RESOLUTION TO EXTEND OPERATION OF TWO SECTIONS Of The Inland Revenue Ordinance

The Financial Secretary, the Hon. C.P. Haddon-Cave, today moved a resolution in the Legislative Council to extend the operation of two sections which had been added to the Inland Revenue Ordinance in 1969*

Section 51A and Section 51B which are due to expire on June 19 this year are designed to assist in the investigation of tax evasion.

Section 51A gives the Commissioner of Inland Revenue the power to require a statement of assets and liabilities from a person, if he is of the opinion that the person has made, without reasonable excuse an incorrect return or supplied false information with a view to understating his assessable income or profits.

Section 51B empowers a magistrate to issue a search warrant on application by the Commissioner or an authorised officer, if he is satisfied that a person has not submitted a return when required by the Commissioner, or that a person has made an incorrect return or supplied false information with the intention of evading tax.

Moving the resolution, the Financial Secretary said when those two sections had been first proposed, it had been generally felt that an excessive and arbitrary use of those powers might be detrimental to the business community.

The two sections had been given, therefore, a statutory life of three years in the first instance, with a proviso that they could be extended by resolution of the Legislative Council at the end of that period.

/"I am ••••••••

Wednesday, May 24, 1972

- 15 -

”1 am advised by the Commissioner of Inland Revenue that these two sections have proved to be most useful and effective,” he said.

He pointed out that over the first two and a half years of their operation, notices under section 51A had been served on 13 occasions and 12 had been complied with without objection.

Apart from those cases, tax payers in 88 other cases had co-operated in returning statements of assets and liability without the Commissioner having resort to formal notices, he added.

The powers contained in section 51B had so far been used on two occasions and the searches had been carried out with the minimum of disruption of business, he said.

”1 consider that those two sections have been well tested and the Government proposes that they should become permanent provisions of the Inland Revenue Ordinance. To this end a bill will shortly be introduced into this Council.

”However, as the law stands at present, these sections are due to expire on June 19, 1972. Accordingly, this resolution seeks to extend the operation of these two sections until October 1 this year,” he said.

A6.....

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Wednesday, May 2*+, 1972

- 16 -

AUXILIARY DEFENCE FORCES PAY BEING EXAMINED Equal Pay For Women Under Consideration *«**««*

The question of the levels of pay and allowances in the Auxiliary Police and other Defence Forces generally had been the subject of examination in recent weeks.

The Colonial Secretary, the Hon. Sir Hugh Norman-Walker said this today in the Legislative Council in reply to the Hon. P.C. Woo.

Mr. Woo had asked: ’’Will Government introduce equal pay for women in the auxiliary and essential services?”

Sir Hugh added it was hoped in the near future to put recommendation first to the Executive Council and then to the Finance Committee of the Legislative Council.

The position of women members of those Forces in the pay structure was one of the matters which had been under consideration in that context and the general proposals would include recommendations on that aspect, he said.

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Wednesday, May 24, 1972

THREE-YEAR AIDED POST-PRIMARY EDUCATION

Position To Be Reviewed Next Year

*******

The Director of Education, the Hon. J. Canning, said today he intended to review the position in 1973 about the provision of three-year aided post-primary education for children in the 12-14 years age group.

This review, he said, would enable Government to set a date for achieving its ultimate aim of providing such education for all children in this age-group.

Mr. Canning was speaking in the Legislative Council in reply to the Hon. T.K. Ann who had asked Government to give the target date by which every child in the 12-14 age group would be assured of three years of assisted education.

Mr. Ann had also asked Government to give its anticipated percentage increase by the end of the next five years in the -number of children in the 12-16 age group (currently 18 per cent) who would be provided with five years of assisted secondary education leading to a Certificate of Education.

The Director said that as a first step towards achieving the ultimate aim of providing three years post-primary education for all children in the 12-14 years age group, it was intended to provide places for 50 per cent of this age group by 1976.

"On the basis of the 1971 Census, the number of places required by 1976 is about 157,000. About 79,100 places have already been provided in 1971-72 and it is hoped to provide a further 51,000 places in 1972-73*•••,” he said.

/This .......

r

Wednesday, May 24, 1972

- 18 -

I «* • Si

This would leave a likely commitment of about 46,900 places by the end of 1972-73, he added.

Mr. Canning said that although satisfactory progress had been made towards achieving this interim aim, it was not possible to give, at this stage, a date by which the ultimate aim could be achieved.

On assisted secondary education leading to a Certificate of Education, he said the anticipated percentage increase in the number of Forms I-V places from September 1971 to 1976 was about 35 per cent.

He said the approved policy for the expansion of secondary education in the public sector provided for 18-20 per cent of the children in the 12-16 age group to have five years of assisted secondary education leading to a Certificate of Education.

"On the basis of the 1971 Census, the number of Forms I-V places required to reach the approved target by 1976 will be approximately 95,300.

"In September 1971, there were approximately 70,300 places for

Forms I-V in Government and aided schools, representing 14.7 per cent of the 12-16 age group at that time," he said.

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A9........

Wednesday, May 24, 1972

- 19 -

MODIFICATIONS TO POLICY ON RENEWAL OF CROWN RENT Announced Today In Legislative Council ********

The Colonial Secretary, the Hon. Sir Hugh Norman-Walker, announced today in the Legislative Council a number of modifications to the policy on renewal of Crown rent.

The modifications would be of benefit to the holders of renewable Crown leases, he added.

He said that in proposing the modifications he had had in mind three objectives:

* To reduce the overall burden of renewal;

* To cushion the impact of the increases which even after reduction will be necessary; and

* To minimize or eliminate cases of hardship.

The Colonial Secretary explained that the first of those modifications was that the general level of all renewal rents assessed in accordance with the provisions of the Crown Lease would in effect be reduced by 20 per cent from the first half-yearly payment after today.

That reduction would also be applied in the case of leases yet to be renewed and would result in the reduction of the rate of interest used in the calculation from five per cent to four per cent, he said.

In addition to that reduction in the level of renewal rents it had been decided, so as to reduce even further the impact of that modified rent, to introduce the renewal rents by gradual stages over a period of five years from 1973t he added.

/That would ••••••••

Wednesday, May 24, 1972

- 20 -

That would be effected by charging only 50 per cent of the reduced rent due in 1973 and thereafter increasing by annual stages of 10 per cent until 1978 the full modified rent would become payable.

That concession would also af'fect those people who had renewed their leases in the five years prior to June 30, 1973, he said*

He explained that the reassessed rent payable after June 30, 1973 for leasee renewed up to five years prior to that date would be reduced by the appropriate percentage on a similar basis according to the year of renewal.

Lease

If a lessee had renewed his lease in say 1970 he would after June 30, 1973 get the benefit of the last two stages of the concession, that was to say, the reduced rent payable would be further reduced by 20 per cent for his first year’s payment after June 30, 1973, and by 10 per cent after June 30, 1974, but not thereafter further reduced, the Colonial Secretary cited.

He pointed out that particular consideration had been given to pre-war rent controlled properties.

In those cases the existing Crown rent would be payable just so long as the property remained subject to tenancies the rents of which were controlled under the Landlord and Tenant Ordinance.

When that ceased to be the case lessees would begin to pay the modified Crown rent as assessed at the date of renewal, he added.

He pointed out that a similar cor ; >ssion would be available to lessees with under—developed property who renewed their leases on the basis of existing > use and development. t * % • • 4

/In those ........

Wednesday, May 24, 1972

- 21 -

In those cases, the lessee would have the option of having his full renewal rent assessed at the date of renewal and of paying that rent at the time of redevelopment instead of paying a modification premium, he added*

The Colonial Secretary informed the Council that certain other changes in policy which were of lesser importance than those he had just mentioned had also been formulated.

Full details of those and an explanatory statement of the new policy would be issued as soon as possible, he added.

He concluded by saying that the modifications to the policy in respect of renewable leases would involve a very substantial reduction in revenue in the ensuing years and he could only repeat what he had said in the previous debate that any reduction in revenue from that source might have to be made good from another.

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/22..........

Wednesday, hay 24, 1972

- 22 -

NEED TO STRENGTHEN LAW ON INSURANCE

Greater Protection For Public

■.l.v . j . / . ' •. „ f. , .(4 t . .-A -> . . I'- ■

********

Financial requirements in some of the ordinances relating to insurance will be strengthened soon to provide greater protection to the public.

The Financial Secretary, the Hon, C.P. Haddon-Cave told Legislative Council today that recent investigations had shown a need for strengthening the law at an early date.

He said a draft Bill was being prepared for submission to Executive Council. This would propose substantial increases in the present requirements as to the deposits, paid-up capital and solvency margins.

”It is intended that these provisions will take effect from today (May 24),” Mr. Haddon-Cave said.

The Financial Secretary was replying to a question from Sir Yuet-keung Kan who had asked whether Government intended to amend present legislation dealing with insurance companies and, in particular, to revise the financial requirements to be met.

The Government, he said, also intended to undertake later this year a review of the whole field of insurance legislation. A law officer, v/ho is at present on leave in the United Kingdom, would be spending some time in the Insurance and Companies Division of the Department of Trade and Industry in • - < -4

preparation for this review.

/Mr. Haddon Cave .......

Wednesday, May 24, 1972

- 23 -

Mr. Haddon Cave said: ’’The review will include an assessment of the financial requirements to be met by all insurance companies, but the interim provisions I have just announced will not affect Companies now carrying on insurance business in Hong Kong and who already comply with the existing : 1 . . • • • - : provisions.’’

He said that existing insurance companies would be well advised to . »'L. consider strengthening their financial position now, so that they could • r ' ?;• -■ . • ; V •? •. i •. -' • , »•-

comply more easily with the financial requirements eventually decided upon. . * » • • i •

For these provisions, he added, these requirements would apply to all companies no matter when they commence business.

-------------o-----------------

•. j ‘.'1 i

t'.-k*’> <■'•* J i.

a • ' ‘j’ft :n’» ■ ft •{ d

/24..........

I

Wednesday, May 24, 1972

- 24 -

TRAFFIC ACCIDENTS IN LION ROCK TUNNEL

• *| 4

Need For Better Recovery Equipment z ’ ’. . . - ' * ■ " ««**««««

Government is now examining the need for more powerful recovery equipment to speed up the removal of heavy vehicles in case of traffic accidents inside the Lion Rock Tunnel.

The Financial Secretary, the Hon. C.P. Haddon-Cave, stated this today in the Legislative Council in reply to a question by the Hon. Szeto Wai.

Mr. Szeto had asked: *Would Government state whether there have been delays in clearing vehicles involved in a collision inside the Lion Rock Tunnel and evacuating the persons injured and, if so, what steps are being taken to ensure that these delays do not recur?”

Mr. Haddon-Cave said that where accidents involving heavy vehicles occurred in the Tunnel, there were sometimes unavoidable delays in moving such vehicles from the Tunnel because of their size and the practical difficulties involved in shifting them in a confined space.

He told the Council that the Commissioner for Transport was conscious that every effort must be made by his Tunnel staff to avoid delays in clearing vehicles involved in a collision inside the Tunnel and evacuating injured persons•

"The operational instruction dealing with vehicle accidents in the Lion Rock Tunnel provides for the application of immediate first aid treatment to injured persons, and, if necessary, conveying them to hospital for further medical treatment as expeditiously as possible; and for the speedy clearance of damaged vehicles from the tunnel do that traffic flow is not impeded.”

/As regards •••••

Wednesday, May 24, 1972

- 25 -

As regards possible delays in evacuating injured persons, Mr. Haddon-Cave said Mr. Szeto was probably referring to an accident which occurred at 4.10 p.m. on May 1 in which a private bus collided with a private car.

He said preliminary investigations showed that Kowloon Ambulance Control received a call at 4.19 p»m. and that the injured were collected and booked into hospital by 5 P*m. The tunnel re-opened to traffic at 4.58 p.m.’

The unexplained delay of nine minutes between the time the accident was logged in the Tunnel Control Centre and the time a call for an ambulance was logged at Ambulance Control was now the subject of a department enquiry, he said.

Wednesday, May 24, 1972

- 26 -

GROUND LEVEL PARKING AND HAWKER BAZAAR

To Be Provided In San Po Kong Site

********

The Director of Public Works, the Hon. J.J. Robson, said today the site which lies between Yin Hing and Shung Ling Streets at San Po Kong would simply be used to provide ground level parking for cars and a hawker bazaar including cooked food stalls.

He said this would be subject to the inclusion of an appropriate item in the Public Works Programme.

He was speaking in the Legislative Council in reply to Dr. the

Hon. S.Y. Chung who had asked: "Referring to a question on November 18, 1970» is Government in a position to report its findings about maximum use of a site at San Po Kong for providing space for cooked food stalls?"

Mr. Robson said the original intention was to sell the site for development as a multi-storey car park with a sale condition that space would be made available on the ground floor for use, at least in part, as a hawker bazaar including cooked food stalls.

,rHowever, recent discussions with the Director of Fire Services have indicated that any multi-storey building exceeding a height of three storeys would result in an unacceptable fire risk since the site in question is surrounded by multi-storey residential buildings and has only limited vehicle access."

Accordingly,- he said, it was now intended to abandon for the time being the idea of selling the site for a multi-storey car park.

"It is possible that at a later stage, the site could be developed to a maximum of three storeys so as to provide additional facilities of the same type," he said.

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/27..........

Wednesday, May 24, 1972

- 27 -

COMMISSION OF INQUIRY INTO ’’JUMBO” FIRE Recommendations Accepted In Principle With One Exception ******** ’

Government has accepted in principle, with one exception, the recommendations of the Commission of Inquiry into the ’’Jumbo” fire subject to approval of their financial implications by the Legislative Council’s Finance Committee once these have been worked out.

This was stated today by the Colonial Secretary, the Hon. Sir Hugh Norman-Walker, at the Legislative Council in a statement on the Report of the Commission of Inquiry into last October’s fire on the ”Jumbo” floating restaurant at Aberdeen.

Sir Hugh said the exception, in paragraph 110 (xviii), was put forward by the Commission only as an alternative to one of the other recommendations which had been accepted, and the fact that it had not been accepted was of no significance.

He pointed out that the Report did not apportion responsibility between the parties mentioned, nor did it attempt to determine their civil liabilities since the Commission thought that these were matters which should be left to the regular Courts of Law.

One of the recommendations accepted, he said, was that the Director of Marine be given overall responsibility for the supervision of working conditions on ships and floating structures being built, repaired or renovated in Colony waters and that he be given suitable powers of enforcement.

/The Commission •»•••••

Wednesday1 May 24, 1972

* - 28 -

The Commission had made this recommendation in order to resolve doubts over the respective powers and duties of the Government departments concerned, he added.

He said the inspection of industrial undertakings of this kind outside registered dockyards was likely to be expensive, and it would take some little time to provide the necessary staff.

Sir Hugh drew attention to a paragraph of the Report in which the Commission emphasized that, in making their recommendations, they did not wish to detract in any way from the primary responsibility that the law imposed on those in actual charge of the work, that is, the shipbuilder, ship-repairer or contractor. r

Adequacy

Other recommendations made by the Commission include a review of the adequacy of the single fire boat now stationed at Aberdeen, the provision of improved laboratory facilities for the testing of new 'materials used in construction work and wider facilities for the provisions of the Dangerous Goods Ordinance, and the possible danger of some new and untried materials.

He said plans already drawn up would cover the first two of these recommendations and the third would also be followed up.

As regards the safety of floating restaurants generally, Sir Hugh said, the Commission had noted that some of these restaurants had been in operation for many years and appeared to have clear fire records, and that it might well be that none of them currently posed any undue fire risk.

However, he said, the Commission had made one recommendation, which had been accepted, that the Marine Department should continue to be the authority for the inspection and licensing of these restaurants, but that, when issuing or renewing certificates for them, the department should take into account the requirements that the Fire Services Department would consider necessary for restaurants on land.

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Wednesday, May 24, 1972

- 29 -

NOT IN THE PUBLIC INTEREST: SAYS SIR HUGH

To Require Policemen To Remain Against Their Will

*******

The Colonial Secretary, the Hon. Sir Hugh Norman-talker, said today it would not be in the public interest to require existing police personnel to remain in the Force against their will.

He was replying in the Legislative Council to the Hon. Wilfred Wong.

Mr. Wong had asked: "Is Government prepared to direct immediately that uniformed Police personnel should be retained for three years beyond the normal retiring age, subject to medical fitness, so as to alleviate the serious shortage of experienced men, both rank and file’ and officers?"

Sir Hugh added that some applied to extend their service beyond the normal retiring age.

When considering their applications, the present need to alleviate the serious shortage of both rank and file and officers would certainly be very much in mind, he said.

In reply to a question by the Hon. Q.W. Lee, Sir Hugh said the position of ex-police officers still in occupation of departmental quarters had been examined as a result of a recent petition to His Excellency the Governor.

• Proposals had been formulated which would shortly be laid before the Governor in Council, he added.

/Mr. Lee Had

Wednesday, May 24, 1972

- JO -

Mr. Lee had asked: "Will Government take appropriate measures to prevent policemen and other rank and file disciplined staff housed in departmental quarters, especially those whose duties require them to be so • . ■ • ■.

accommodated, from becoming homeless when the time comes for them to leave those quarters upon retirement?”

Replying to yet another question by the Hon. P.O. Woo, the Colonial Secretary said the Commissioner of Police had a Working Party examining the question of utilising civilian personnel not only in the traffic branch but in other branches of the Police Force.

He added that the Commissioner would make recommendations to him when the Working Party’s findings were submitted.

The Hon. P.C. Woo had asked: ”Are there any duties performed by the uniformed personnel of the Police Traffic Branch which could be performed by civilians? If so, will Government recruit additional civilian staff and release uniformed personnel for proper Police duties?”

- - 0-----------

Wednesday, May 24, 1972

- 31 -

, FOUR BILLS PASSED IN LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL

After Committee Stage And Third Reading

****»«*«

Four bills passed their committee stage and third readings in Legislative Council this afternoon and became law.

They were the University of Hong Kong (Amendment) Bill 1972;

the Pharmacy and Poisons (Amendment) Bill 1972; the Legal Practitioners 0

(Amendment) Bill 1972, and the Matrimonial Causes (Amendment) (No. 2) Bill 1972.

The Matrimonial Proceedings and Property Bill 1972 had its first and second readings, and debate resumed on the Criminal Procedure (Amendment) (No. 2) Bill 1972.

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RECORDING OF LEGCO PROCEEDINGS

Available For Listening

«»**«««*

Note to Editors: Proceedings of this afternoon’s‘Legislative Council meeting have been recorded.

You are welcome to consult the tapes at the G.I.S. Press Room.

-------o---------

/32..........

Wednesday, May 24, 1972

- 32 -

OUTWARD BOUND SCHOOL PRESENTATION CEREMONY Lady MacLehose Addresses 40 ”Pioneers” ««***«**

Lady MacLehose said today that in recent years, women had achieved some remarkable feats of daring and endurance.

She cited the examples of Nicolette Milnes-Walker sailing the • ■ ■ < ■

Atlantic alone last year, Sylvia Cook rowing for 12 months across the Pacific, and Japanese women climbing in the Himalayas.

She was speaking at a presentation ceremony of certificates and badges to 40 girls who had completed a training course of 26 days at the Outward Bound School of Hong Kong.

Lady MacLehose described the girls as ’’pioneers” because they were the first group of young women to undertake an Outward Bound Course in Hong Kong.

The following is the full text of Lady MacLehose1s speech at the presentation ceremony

”1 feel slightly diffident today addressing 40 pioneers, for pioneers you certainly are as the first group of young women to undertake an Outward Bound Course here in Hong Kong.

’’When the idea of running a women’s course was first proposed, it was thought that not more than 20 volunteers would apply. The young women of Hong Kong are to be congratulated since 40, double the estimated number, signed on. This is indeed encouraging for al 1 concerned, promotors, sponsors and participants.

/”You have ........

Wednesday, May 24, 1972

- 33 -

’’You have I understand, completed virtually the same course during your 26 days here, as the boys do, and this will have meant that you will have had to forego many of the comforts and luxuries of everyday life. You will also have been subjected to the discipline and rules that are necessary when a group of people live or work together.

’’Whilst I am sure you all now feel - and rightly so - confident of being capable of tackling any situation that may arise, I hope your desire to equal, if not go one better than the men, will not make you lose any of your feminine charm. Indeed you all look attractive and well turned-out, in spite, I am sure, of having to miss visits to your hairdresser or manicurist or dressmaker during the last few weeks.

”It is true, and very commendable that in recent years women have achieved some remarkable feats of daring and endurance. For example Nicolette Milnes-Walker sailed the Atlantic alone last year; Sylvia Cook rowed for twelve months across the Pacific. Then there are the tremendous successes experienced by Japanese women climbing in the Himalayas.

’’Doubtless, despite the recent bad weather, with these examples, and the experience gained from some of the tasks you have been given on this course, your pioneering instincts will have been.so encouraged that you now feel fit in both body and spirit to climb every mountain or sail any sea.

’’However, as a wife and mother, I would remind you of an old Danish saying, that the quickest way to a man’s heart is through his stomach - and I hope that you are all as efficient with your cooking pots as you are with a coil of rope or in a boat. Then indeed your husbands and families when you have them, will have all the luck.”

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/34.........

Wednesday, May 24, 1972

- 34 -

COOKED-FOOD BAZAAR FOR WESTERN

*******

A vacant piece of land 2,000 square feet in area, adjacent to Heung Hing Lane in the Western District, will soon be developed into a cooked-food bazaar.

A spokesman for the Urban Services Department said today Heung Hing Lane is accessible for pedestrians only from Bonham Strand West and Queen’s Road West.

When developed, it will accommodate about twelve stalls.

The whole area will be given a three-inch concrete cement paving. Surface drainage and water supply will also be provided.

Food-stall owners who have obtained licences to operate in the bazaar will build their own stall covers.

The purpose of this project is to enable the Urban Services Department to have better control over cooked-food bazaars.

Construction is expected to begin in early July and should take about two months to complete.

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Release Time: 8>3Q p.m

P.R.H. 7 (REVISED) 4000091

INFORMATION

SERVICES

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Thursday, May 25, 1972

CHEUNG CHAU BUN FESTIVAL

Governor And Lady MacLehose To '.'atch Grand Parade

*******

The Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, and Lady MacLehose, will visit Cheung Chau on Saturday, May 27, to watch the annual Bun Festival’s grand parade.

They will be met on arrival at Cheung Chau by the District Officer, Islands, Mr. Mayer Ng, and his Liaison Officers, Mr. Willie 'Vong and Mr. David Ip.

Chairman of the Cheung Chau Rural Committee, hr. Chau Li-ping, Director of the Festival Organising Committee, Mr. Fung Pak-tai, and other officials of the Rural Committee and the Organising Committee will be presented to the Governor.

The Bun Festival, commonly known as "Ta Chiu", is one of Hong Kong’s most colourful annual pageants. It begins on May 25 and will last until May 28.

The Festival is held by the islanders to placate the avenging spirits of people tortured and murdered by pirates on the island many decades ago.

During the celebrations, the inhabitants of Cheung Chau may eat only vegetarian food.

/As it is •••••

Thursday, May 25, 1972

- 2 -

As it is a festival of gods and spirits, all the principal idols from the nine temples on the island will be assembled beside the bun towers. After the procession, the idols will be returned to their temples.

This year, the main procession will take place on Saturday, May 27. It will be repeated the next day, that is on Sunday, May 28, so that more visitors may have the opportunity to see this colourful event.

From May 24 to May 28, there will be performance of Cantonese Opera nightly. The "Ta Chiu” religious ceremony will be held at noon on May 26.

On May 26, at 3 p.m., the District Officer, Islands, Mr. Mayer Ng, will perform the eye-dotting ceremonies for unicorns and lions in the forecourt of the Pak Tei Temple.

The traditional bun tower "scramble" will take place near the

Pak Tei Temple at midnight on May 27.

Note to Editors: The Cheung Chau Rural Committee is making all the arrangements for Press coverage of the parade.

The Governor and Lady MacLehose will arrive at Cheung Chau at 2.50 p.m. on Saturday, May 27-

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Thursday, May 25, 1972

- 3 -

ACCIDENTS GN BUILDING CONSTRUCTION SITES

*»»*♦*»

In April, 3^k) workers were injured and five killed while working on building construction sites, according to reports received by the Labour Department.

Of this number, 71 were injured and two killed because of falling objects.

A spokesman of the department said: ’’Injuries and deaths caused by falling objects are the direct results of unsafe acts of the individual and poor standards of housekeeping.”

He explained that an object could not become a ’’falling object” unless it was placed in an unsafe position.

In preventing objects from falling, he said, ’’all people concerned must ensure that all tools, materials and in fact anything which could cause an injury to persons working at a lower level are safely placed, stored and used. Accumulations of rubbish, debris, discarded planks, reinforcing bars, piles of sand, etc must be avoided.”

He emphasized that ”a tidy site with a high standard of housekeeping is not only a safer but is also a more efficient place of work.”

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Thursday, May 25, 1972

- 4 -

'..'ATER INTERRUPTION IN CENTRAL AND TSIM SHA TSUI

*******

Water supply to a number of premises in Central and in the Tsim Sha Tsui area of Kowloon will be turned off for five hours between 1 a.m. and 6 a.iiu on Saturday.

In Central, the area affected is bounded by Morrison Street, Sutherland Street, Queen’s Road 'Jest, fing Lok Street and South Side of Des Voeux Road West.

In Kowloon, premises to be affected by the interruption are in the area bounded by Austin Road, Chatham Road, Kimberley Road.

and Nathan Road.

The temporary stoppage is to allow the Waterworks Office to carry out a leakage test in the area.

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MRS. BO’.'.-E TO VISIT THE KWAI CHUNG GIRLS’ HOME 4 '

*******

Note to Editors: Mrs. G.T. Rowe, wife of the Director of Social Welfare, will visit the Kwai Chung Girls’ Home, at No. 1A, Lei Mok Road, Kwai Chung, New Territories, on Friday, May 26 at 10.30 a.m. She will be accompanied by Mrs. Dang Chow Sik-wan, Principal Social Welfare Officer (Children and Women)• The Home is run by the Salvation Army in Hong Kong. It was closed in January 1965 but opened again on October 5i 1971, at the request of the Social Welfare Department. It accommodates girls in need of care and protection, and it also rehabilitates girls with behaviour and other problems. The maximum capacity of the home is 50-A subvention of $180,000 was recommended for the 1972/73 general expenses. You are invited to have the visit covered and your news team should arrive by 10.13 a.m. ---------------------------------------0----------- / 5...................................................................................

Thursday, May 25, 1972

- 5 -

PRESS CONFERENCE ON URBAN RENEWAL PLAN

*******

bote to editors: The Chairman of the Town Planning Board,

the Hon. J.J. Robson, Director of Public ’7orksf will give a press conference at 10.30 a.m. tomorrow (Friday) in connection with an Urban Renewal District Outline Zoning Plan.

You are invited to send a reporter and/or photographer to cover the conference which will be held in the G.I.S. 35 ram theatre on the fifth floor of Beaconsfield House.

Also present at the conference will be Mr. J.’7. Chambers, Assistant Colonial Secretary, Building and Lands Branch, Mr. A.F. Meyers, Government Town Planner, Mr. Chau Cham-son, Chief Planning Officer, Mr. A.E. Millington, Secretary of the Town Planning Board, and Mr. B.C. Allen, Senior Estate Surveyor.

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Thursday, May 25, 1972

6 -

ADVANCES IN MEDICAL CARE OVER LAST FEW DECADES Mortality Rate In Hong Kong Declining «««*****

The Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, said today the declining mortality rate in Hong Kong underlined the extraordinary advances made in medical care over the last few decades*

He was speaking at the Golden Jubilee ceremony of the Tsan Yuk Hospital. In the ceremony, he unveiled a plaque to commemorate what he described as an ’’important milestone” in the history of the hospital.

Sir Murray said: "We now have oyer 16,000 hospital beds compared with less than 2,000 in the 1930’s.”

He said the annual death rate per 1,000 had reduced from 21 to five over 50 years. The infant mortality rate has reduced from 350 per 1,000 in the 194O’s to 18 per 1,000 in the 1970’s. The maternal and peri-natal mortality rates have dropped considerably to their present levels of 1.4 per 10,000 and 16.6 per 1,000.

’’These figures portray a remarkable development in our med 5 cal services and in the health of our community. But they also underline the valuable contribution made by the Tsan Yuk Hospital, which has trained a great majority of our doctors and midwives engaged in obstetric care,” he said.

The following is the full text of the Governor’s speech at the Golden Jubilee ceremony of the Tsan Yuk Hospital:

/"Listening

Thursday, May 25, 1972

- 7 -

’’Listening to Professor King and Professor Chun recount the fifty-year history of the Tsan Yuk Hospital, I am struck by the way this institution has responded to the far-reaching changes in our community.

’’Fifty years is not a span of time beyond our conception. Indeed it falls within the lifetime of many of us here, as we can see from the presence today of the hospital’s first Matron, Miss Leung.

’’But in that period the pattern of life in Hong Kong has altered 1

almost as radically as the practice of medicine itself.

Pace

’’The Tsan Yuk Hospital has done more than keep pace with these changes. It has also been responsible, to a large extent, for educating the community to adopt enlightened new social attitudes towards maternity and child care.

”It has earned the trust and confidence of its patients and taught them to accept ideas often diametrically opposed to any they had previously held. And it has done this so quietly, with such sympathy and understanding, • * as to leave us unaware of the revolution that has taken place.

’’The declining mortality rate which Professor Chun has quoted underlines the extraordinary advances made in medical care over the last few decades. We now have over 16,000 hospital beds compared with less than 2,000 in the 1930* e.

’’The annual death rate per thousand has reduced from 21 to 5 over 50 years. The infant mortality rate has reduced from 350 per thousand in the 194O’s to 18 per thousand in the 1970’s. The maternal and peri-natal mortality rates have dropped considerably to their present levels of 1.4 per 10,000 and 16.6 per 1,000.

/’’These figures.......

Thursday, May 25, 1972

- 8 -

’’These figures portray a remarkable development in our medical services and in the health of our community. But they also underline the valuable contribution made by the Tsan Yuk Hospital, which has trained a t

great majority of our doctors and midwives engaged in obstetric care.

”In common with other sectors of the public service, the hospital %

has had to face increasing pressure on its facilities due to the rapid expansion of the population. It is a tribute to all concerned that not only has it coped successfully with the many and varied problems that inevitably arise in such circumstances, but in doing so it has ensured that standards have not been compromised. Rather, its services to patients have been steadily expanded and improved.

”In order to meet growing demands, the hospital has increased its capacity to 250 beds, and it is hoped to make available an additional 100 beds by converting the present residential quarters when these are vacated for removal to other premises.

’’Before unveiling the plaque commemorating this important milestone in the history of Tsan Yuk Hospital, I would like to express my warmest thanks to all those who have been associated with the administration and operation of the hospital and whose dedication and hard work have contributed so much to the impressive progress it has achieved. May I also take this opportunity to wish the hospital continuing success in the future.”

-------0 - - - -

/9..........

Thursday, May 25, 1972

- 9 -

TRAINING FC-R KINDERGjlRTEN TEACHERS

Two-Year Course Organised By Education Department

********

A part-time in-service training course has been organised by the Education Department for practising kindergarten teachers who are professionally untrained and applications are now being invited.

The training course will be spread over two years and the medium of instruction will be Cantonese.

Not more than 50 candidates may be admitted to the course, which starts in October this year.

The course covers subjects ranging from principles and practice of kindergarten education to art and handicraft.

A spokesman for the Education Department said the teachers, on satisfactorily passing the final examination, would be awarded the status of ‘'Qualified Kindergarten Teacher”.

They would be eligible for admission ‘to the Department’s Register of Teacher if they have five years’ approved teaching experience in Hong Kong schools.

Application forms way be obtained from the Education Department Headquarters, Lee Gardens, Hysan Avenue and the Department’s Kowloon Sub-office, Kowloon Central Post Office Building, Nathan Road.

“• ••- 4

-----•- o--------

Thursday, May 25, 1972

- 10 -

NEW ROAD IN NIM WAN To Be Opened By C.B.F. On Tuesday *«$*»**

A two-mile-long new road linking the isolated village of Nim Wan in Deep Bay with the existing access road leading to Lau Fau Shan, Yuen Long, will be opened on Tuesday, May 30* The Commander British Forces, Lt. General Sir Richard Ward will officiate at the ceremony.

The new road, built by the Army, will greatly facilitate the travelling of villagers in Nim Wan and the transport of their agricultural produce for sale in the urban areas.

The construction of this new road is one of the many valuable services constantly provided by the Army to the villagers in various parts of the New Territories.

These services include the building of new roads in remote areas, the installation of generators and TV sets to provide lighting and entertainment to the villagers, the construction of playgrounds and resting places and the showing of films in villages.

The new road is to be named ’’Charlton Road” after the young project officer of the 33rd Field Squadron Royal Engineers, a unit of Britain’s Strategic Command, who was responsible for the planning of the operation.

Over 200 men from this Squadron have contributed to the construction of the road which took them just about three months to complete. The road is eight feet wide with a two-foot verge on either side. In addition, a 120-foot-long span bridge and 15 culverts, varying from 25 feet to 70 feet in length, were built to safeguard the road against Hong Kong’s rainy season.

/Materials

Thursday, May 25, 1972

- 11 -

Materials for the work were supplied by the District Office, Yuen

Long, which also made the project possible by the resumption of certain agricultural land. Over 850,000 compensation were paid to the owners.

Apart from building the road, men of the 53rd Field Squadron have laid a two-mile-long water pipe up the hillside, and Nim Wan, in addition to getting the new road, has its own water supply.

At the ceremony on Tuesday, the Commander British Forces will cut the ribbon to open the road, unveil a plaque naming the road ’’Charlton Road”, and plant two trees by the side of the 120-foot span bridge to commemorate the occasion.

Mr. Lau Wong-fat, Chairman of the Tuen Mun Rural Committee, will then present to Sir Richard a silver plate as a souvenir.

Mr. Tang Chai-on, Chairman of the Ha Tsuen Rural Committee, will present a banner to Major John Benham Cresswell, the Squadron Commander, in appreciation of the work done by the Engineers.

After the ceremony, the party will walk across the bridge, preceded by a traditional lion dance provided by the villagers.

*******

Note to editors: You are invited to send a reporter and/or

photographer to cover the opening ceremony. For the convenience of press representatives covering the event, transport will be provided. In order to facilitate the making of transport arrangements, please telephone the G.I.S. Duty Officer (Tel. H-253191 Ext. 240 or 250), before 12 noon tomorrow (Friday) and give him the names of your representatives covering the event.

Press representatives going to Nim Wan on May 50 are requested to assemble at the Kowloon sub-pool at the back of the Tsim Sha Tsui Post Office not later than 11.20 a.m.

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/12.........

Thursday, May 25, 1972

- 12

CONCERN SHOWN FOR ELDERLY PEOPLE

In Tai Hang Tung

*******

A Preparatory Committee made up of residents in the Tai Hang Tung area has been formed to arouse more district interest in the well-being of the elderly.

The Committee’s aim is to launch a continuous series of projects, including 'outdoor parties, social gatherings, visits and other activities so that old people in Tai Hang Tung will not feel abandoned to their own devices.

To help raise funds to achieve its aim, the Committee has arranged, by permission of the Tai Hang Tung Community Centre’s Cantonese Opera Club, to stage the popular opera, Purple Flower, in the Centre on Saturday, May 27, at 8 p.m.

So as to involve as many Tai Hang Tung residents as possible, performers as well as production staff will be mostly from the district. Music will be provided by the Yin Won Amateur Music Study Society.

Admission prices will be on three levels, 810, 85 and S3, and — as a result of enterprise on the part of the Committee —— are al ready on sale in the district in restaurants, tea houses, and popular shops.

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Release time: 6.45 p.m.

P.R.H. 7 (REVISED) 4000001

ME 11


INFORMATION

SERVICES

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Friday, May 26, 1972

OUTLINE ZONING PLAN FOR URBAN RENEWAL DISTRICT

In Central And Western

********

The Governor-in-Council has approved an amended draft outline zoning plan prepared by the Town Planning Board for an Urban Renewal District covering some 280 acres in the Western and Central districts of Hong Kong Island. It is published in the Gazette today.

The object of the plan is to provide a statutory land use pattern within which improvements to the physical environment may be achieved for a planned population of about 200,000.

A number of sites throughout the District are to be acquired for community uses, including schools, hawker bazaars, pedestrian ways and open space. Tenants living in buildings which are acquired for these purposes will be offered accommodation in Government housing estates; in addition compensation will be paid to tenants of pre-war rent-controlled property.

The majority of the sites chosen for acquisition face onto narrow lanes and internal courtyards. Redevelopment for other purposes would result in poor natural lighting and ventilation standards for the buildings. Access to the buildings for servicing and for fire-fighting appliances would also be inadequate.

/The Town.........

Friday, May 26, 1972

- 2 -

The Town Planning Board considered 22 objections to the draft plan, and to an amendment, after exhibition for public inspection in 1970 and 1971 respectively. Certain amendments were proposed by the Board to meet some of the objections. These are included in the plan now approved by the Governor-in-Council.

An area of about 88 acres in the north of the District is zoned for either commercial or residential development or a combination of both. It is considered that the smaller lots in this area could be amalgamated to provide larger sites for comprehensive development.

Residential Use

About 59 acres is zoned solely for residential use and includes private open spaces and small community buildings, such as schools.

Government, institution and community zones take up JI acres, including land now occupied by existing schools, hospitals and other government and institutional uses.

Provision is also made within this zoning for an additional market site. There are four existing retail markets within the District boundaries but an additional one may be necessary to meet the future needs of the community.

An area of 6.8 acres is also zoned as reserve sites for primary schools, hawker bazaars and other miscellaneous government uses.

/Open space •••••

Friday, May 26, 1972

- 3 -

Open space in the area will increase, from 5«3 acres to 13»3 acres. The additional 8 acres is distributed so as to provide centres of recreation within walking distance of most of the residential and commercial/residential zones in the District.

An area of about 6 acres to the west of the district is zoned for industrial use. Most of the sites face the waterfront on Connaught Road West. The waterfront sites have been developed mainly for godowns.

Despite the trend towards containerisation,it is believed that these godowns will still be needed, particularly for the trade with China.

Redeveloped

However, it is also intended that these sites should be permitted to be redeveloped for factories if required. There is a number of industrial establishments scattered throughout the District, some in tenement buildings. These should be encouraged to redevelop in more suitable locations where good road access and other facilities could be provided. This would enable residential and commercial/residential zones to be consolidated with uses more' compatible with their functions.

A’ further 4 acres at the western end of the District, between Connaught Road West and Des Voeux Road West, is zoned for commercial/ residential/warehousing uses. ’Thile a combination of all three uses will be permitted it is considered that the lots fronting onto Des Voeux Road West are more appropriate for commercial/residential development and the lots facing the waterfront are more appropriate for warehousing development.

Copies of the approved plan, LH 3/52, together with an explanatory statement, are available for sale at 33 each uncoloured and 325 each coloured, from Crown Lands & Survey Office, 19th floor, Murray Building, Hong Kong.

Fridayj May 26, 1972

- 4 -

HEUNG YEE KUK MAIN ELECTIONS ON MAY 29

At Office Premises At Taipo

*******

The Heung Yee Kuk will hold its main elections of Chairman, two Vice-Chairmen, and 15 Ordinary Members of the Executive Committee for the 20th Term at its office premises in Taipo on Monday, Nay 29•

The Kuk is the statutory advisory body to the Government on all matters affecting the New Territories.

The elections will be held by secret ballot and will be conducted in accordance with the procedures laid down in the Heung Yee Kuk Ordinance.

The Returning Officer for the elections will be the District Commissioner, Nev/ Territories, the Hon. D.C. Bray.

The election of 15 Ordinary Members of the Executive Committee will take place at 9*30 a.m. The 68 candidates consist of the 21 Special Councillors elected on May 8, and 47 Vice-Chairmen of Rural Committees.

The electorate is the Full Council of the Heung Yee Kuk, which comprises the 21 Special Councillors, 74 Hural Committee Chairmen and Vice-Chairmen, and 11 New Territories Unofficial Justices of the Peace (three of them are concurrently Rural Committee Chairman).

In the afternoon, starting at 2.30 p.m., three separate elections will be held to decide on who will be the Chairman and the Vice-Chairmen of the 20th Term of the Kuk.

As in the case of that morning’s election, the electorate will be the Full Council of the Heung Yee Kuk, while the candidates will be the 50 members of the Executive Committee.

/The first

Friday, May 26, 1972

- 5 -

The first election will be for the office of the Chairman. The second will be for the office of the first Vice-Chairman. He will be elected from among members of the Executive Committee who do not belong to the same electoral district as the newly elected Chairman.

The third election will be for the office of the second Vice-Chairman. The candidates are those members of the Executive Committee who do not belong to the same electoral districts as the newly elected Chairman and the first Vice-Chairman.

Members of the public will not be admitted to the election rooms. Admission will be limited to the election officials, councillors of the Heung Yee Kuk and the Press.

Note to Editors: Admission of the Press to the Heung Yee Kuk

office premises at 8, Shung Tak Street, Taipo, on May 29 will be by special lapel badges to be issued at the entrance to the Kuk on production of visiting cards issued by your organisation.

It will not be possible to admit photographers to the polling and counting of votes, but photographs can be taken outside the election rooms when these proceedings are over.

Miss Doris Au, of the Government Information Services, will assist the Press.

Copies of a list of Heung Yee Kuk councillors are distributed separately in the G.I.S. Press Boxes this evening.

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Friday, May 26, 1972

- 6 -

NEW SIGNS FOR PEDESTRIAN CROSSINGS Offence To Jay Walk *******

Nev/ regulations v/erc approved recently by the Governor-in-Council to provide for a new type of traffic light signal to control the movement of pedestrians across the road. These new signals are known as the "Standing/A/alking Man" signals and some existing signal controlled crossings already have been fitted with the "Standing/Walking Man" aspects.

At present, the signals show only a red standing man when it is unsafe to cross the road and a green walking man when it is safe to cross the road.

When the signals have been altered to conform with the new regulations, they will show a standing man illuminated by a steady red ligit when pedestrians must not cross the road, a walking man illuminated by a steady green light v/hon it is safe to start crossing the road and a flashing green light when pedestrians should not start to cross the road and when those already on the crossing should hurry to the opposite side.

It will take some time to obtain and install the new equipment to alter the signals but when this work is completed, a further announcement will be made and the now regulations will become fully effective. It will then bo an offence for a pedestrian to start crossing the road at a signal controlled crossing except when the walking man is illuminated by a steady green light and it will be an offence for a pedestrian to cross the road within 45 ft. of a signal controlled crossing.

Pedestrians should always take care when crossing the road and wherever possible cross at approved crossing points and they should remember that, although the new regulations will not be fully effective for a few months, it always has been nd still is an offence to Jay Walk. ------------------------------------0 --------

/ 7 ....

Friday, May 26, 1972

- 7 -

NEW DIRECTOR OF LANDS AND SURVEY

Mr. W.L.T. Crunden Succeeds Mr. R.C. Clarke

*******

The Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs has approved the promotion of Mr. W.L.T. Crunden, the Principal Government Land Agent, to succeed Mr. R.C. Clarke, the Director of Lands and Survey of the Public Works Department.

Mr. Clarke is due to go on leave early next month prior to retirement after more than 25 years of service in Hong Kong.

To mark his retirement, the Director of Public Works, Mr. J.J. Robson, will present a souvenir to him on behalf of his friends and colleagues on Monday, May 29•

Mr. Crunden, who is 51 years of age, was first appointed as an Estate Surveyor in the Public Works Department in 1952.

He was promoted in 1966 to Principal Assistant Superintendent of Crown Lands and Survey. This post was restyled as Principal Government Land Agent in 1970.

Mr. Clarke first joined the Government as a Land Surveyor in 19^+6. He was appointed Assistant Superintendent of Crown Lands and Survey in 1957, Principal Assistant Superintendent in 19&5 and Superintendent about a year later. He was acting Director of Public Works between August sind December in 1970.

Apart from the public service, Mr. Clarke also plays an active role in social services. He is the Hon. Treasurer and Chairman of Finance

/Committee •••••

Friday, May 26, 1972

- 8 -

Committee, Diocesan Boys’ School; Vice President of the Children’s

Playground Association; and Past Chairman of the Hong Kong Branch, R.I.C.S.

Mr. Clarke represented Hmg Kong at the ECaFE Seminars on

a number of occasions between 1955 and 1967•

Note to Editors: ' The presentation ceremony of a souvenir to Mr. Clarke will take place at 4.45 p.m. on Monday at the Department’s conference room, 21st floor, Murray Building, Hong Kong.

You are cordially invited to send a reporter and/or photographer to have the event covered.

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USE OF CERTAIN POSTAGE STAMPS AND DIES

Has Been Discontinued

*******

The Postmaster General announced today that the use of certain issues of Hong Kong postage stamps and dies had been discontinued and that they would not be lawful stamps and dies for denoting the payment of postage as from December 51, 1972.

These issues of stamps and dies are the Chinese New Year Commemorative issue (1967) - 10 cents and $1.50; and the SEACCM Cable Commemorative issue -31.50.

Holders of these postage stamps are advised that the stamps may bo exchanged for the current issue if they are returned to the Postmaster General before July 1, 1973.

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Friday, May 26, 1972

- 9 -

RAILWAY UNDERBRIDGZ AT FO TAN, SHA TIN

Site Formation Begins Soon

Work will soon begin on the site formation of an industrial area and the construction of a railway underbridge at Fo Tan, Sha Tin.

These works are part of Stage One of the Sha Tin New Town development and, when completed, will provide about 10 acres of land for industrial development•

The site for the industrial area will be formed by filling the existing low-lying areas on the west side of the railway embankment. Filling materials will be taken from a hill in the vicinity.

A new 18-foot concrete underbridge will be constructed through the railway embankment about 100 feet to the north of the existing underbridge. This new underbridge will cater for the additional traffic flow anticipated to generate from the industrial area.

Ancillary works will also be carried out. These include the construction of large stormwater drains and a pump house to drain the two underbridges.

Construction is expected to begin in July, and will take about 20 months to complete.

- - 0----------

/10 ........

Friday, May 26, 1972

- 10 -

KWAI CHUNG GIRLS’ HOME

Visit By Wife Of Director Of Social Welfare

********

Mrs. G.T. Rowe, wife of the Director of Social Welfare, spent more than an hour today visiting the Kwai Chung Girls’ Hone in Kwai Chung, New Territories, maintained by the Salvation Army.

She was accompanied by Mrs. Dang Chow Sik-wan, Principal Social Welfare Officer (Children and Women).

Mrs. Rowe and Mrs. Dang were received at the home by Brigadier E. Bilton, the Superintendent, who introduced them to members of the staff and showed them around.

The Salvation Army in Hong Kong is a branch of the International Salvation Army with headquarters in London. It began work in Hong Kong in 1930 with the opening of a home for delinquent girls in rented premises in Kowloon, later moved to Kwai Chung.

This girls’ home was closed in January 1965 and the trainees were transferred to the Ma Tau Wei Girls’ Home. It was re-opened on October 5> 1971, at the request of the Social Welfare Department to accommodate girls in need of care and protection, and to rehabilitate others with behaviour and other problems.

The maximum capacity of the home is 50* The girls range in age from 12 to 18 and the maximum length of stay is two years. All cases are referred for admission either by the Social Welfare Department or by the court. The Department provides casework service to the girls until they have settled down, and afterwards, such services are continued by the caseworker of the home.

The home received a grant of 380,000 from the Lotteries Fund for the capital cost of renovation. A subvention of $180,000 was recommended for 1972/73 for general expenses.

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/11 ........

I

Friday, May 26, 1972

- 11 -

RETIREMENT OF MEDICAL OFFICER

Praise For Dr. Yue On Loyal Service To Hong Kong

4 4******

Senior members of the staff of the Medical and Health Department gathered in the canteen of Queen Elizabeth Hospital today to bid farewell to Dr. M.Y. Yue on the eve of his retirement from the Civil Service after serving the public of Hong Kong for more than 22 years.

Dr. the Hon. G.H. Choa, Director of Medical and Health Services, presented Dr. Yue with an electronic calculator as a retirement gift purchased with contributions from friends and colleagues in the department. Though small, the Director said the gift carried with it the best wishes of all his colleagues.

Dr. Yue was first appointed in 1950- He spent the first few years as a Medical and Health Officer in the Tai Po Jockey Club Clinic, but for the greater part of his career he was the Medical Superintendent of many major hospitals in Hong Kong, including the Lai Chi Kok, the Tung Wah Group, the Kowloon, the Queen Mary and the Queen Elizabeth hospitals.

He was promoted Medical and Health Officer in 1953, and in 1959 became Senior Medical and Health Officer. In 1963, he was made a Principal Medical and Health Officer.

Dr. Choa described Dr. Yue as na kind and diplomatic administrator” who had commanded the respect of all his colleagues and subordinates.

/His.......

Friday, May 26, 1972

- 12 -

He activities had not been confined only to the department. At one time, he was chairman of the Parent-Teacher Association of the Tai Po Government School, and is still honourary advisor to the Tsimshatsui District Kaifong Welfare Association.

In 19^7, he was praised for excellent work during the disturbances, and in recognition of his loyal service to the people of Hong Kong, he was awarded a merit trip to Britain in 1968.

On retirement, he will undertake private practice in the Tai Po Market area for a few years before joining his children in the United States.

Note to Editors: Copies of the full text of Dr. Choa’s speech in Chinese and English are being distributed in the Press boxes, Government Information Services, later today.

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Friday, May 26, 1972

- 13 -

SALE OF CROWN LAND AT CITY HALL

Five Lots Up For Auction

»«*«****

Five lots of Crown land will be put up for sale by public auction

on Friday, June 16, at 2.30 p.m. in the Lecture Room on the 8th floor of

the City Hall.

Of the lots, three are for non-industrial purposes, one for supermarket and non-industrial (excluding residential use) purposes and one for private residential purposes.

Their particulars are as follows:

(1) Rural Building Lot No. 916, at the junction of Guilford Road and Watford Road, Hong Kong Area: 12,500 square feet Upset Price: 81,000,000.00

For Supermarket and non-industrial (excluding residential use) purposes.

(2) Rural Building Lot No. 929, off Chung Hom Kok Road, Hong Kong

Area: 22,000 square feet

Upset Price: 8660,000.00 For Private- residential purposes

(3) Kowloon Inland Lot No. 10145, at No. 9 Cheong Lok Street, Kowloon

Area: 764 square feet

Upset Price: 3225,000.00 For non-industrial purposes

(4) Kowloon Inland Lot No. 10146, at No. 26 Battery Street, Kowloon

Area: 673 square feet

Upset Price: 8180,000.00 For non-industrial purposes

(5) Kowloon Inland Lot No. 10118 (with existing building), at No. 463 Shanghai Street, Kowloon

Area: 707 square feet

Upset Price: 3180,000.00 For non-industrial purposes

Full particulars and Conditions of Sale may be obtained from and sale

plans inspected at the Public Enquiry Sub-office, Central Government Offices

(West Wing), Ground Floor, Hong Kong, and at the Crown Lands and Survey Office, Kowloon Government Offices, No. 405 Nathan Road, 10th floor, Kowloon.

Friday, May 26, 1972

- 14 -

NEV/ CONCEPT IN TREATMENT OF YOUNG OFFENDERS

At Sha Tsui Detention Centre On Lantao

At*******

A new concept in treatment of young offenders will be provided at the Sha Tsui Detention Centre on Lantao Island.

The new institution — the first of its kind in Hong Kong — will • . । * * have accommodation for 100 young offenders aged between 14 and 21.

It will occupy the site and buildings of the former Shek Pik Training Centre.

Today’s Gazette announces the appointment of this centre and its opening on June 1 this year.-

It will be recalled that the Colonial Secretary, the Hon. Sir Hugh Norman-Walker, told the Legislative Council in October, last year that such a detention centre was designed to give a ’’short, sharp shock”.

The Commissioner of Prisons, Mr. T.G. Garner, said: ”The regime of the detention centre will at all times be brisk and firm with strong emphasis on hardwork.

’’The programme is designed to-induce in young offenders a sense of responsibility as citizens, a sense of pride in themselves, an awareness of their neglected abilities and to teach them how to live with people and respect the rights of others,” he added.

Such detention centres, he said, woiild be most effective against young offenders who had never had any previous institutional experience.

”It is hoped that this institution will significantly help in reforming those who are sent there and deterring them from criminal activity he added.

/Young ........

fi

Friday, May 26, 1972

- 15 -

Young offenders will be placed in the centre for periods of one month to six months. On release, they will be put under supervision for a period of six months.

‘‘In the short time they are detained, the aim is to change their previous behaviour pattern. The staff will try to know and understand each detainee and to prepare him for a life in the community, instil in him an appreciation of some of the disciplines that a community is bound to impose on members,:i Mr. Garner explained.

’•The highest possible standard of discipline and behaviour will always be insisted upon. Good behaviour and manners are musts,” Mr. Garner stated.

Stiff punishment can be meted out for breaches of the centre’s miles. This could include punishment of caning.

Every detainee will be closely watched and studied. He will know that every programme carried out or order given will be supervised with keenness and interest. This will make him aware of his own responsibility in this direction. Throughout the period of detention, the detainee will be counselled either individually or collectively by members of the staff.

Mr. Garner said: "The objective of all staff serving at a detention centre is to help each and every detainee to learn respect for the law and to see that none of them will go back to his old ways.” *

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/16

Friday, May 26, 1972

- 16 -

HONG KONG IN THE MAKING

Maps Exhibition In Ocean Terminal

The whole history of Hong Kong’s development can be glimpsed at the maps exhibition currently being held in the Ocean Terminal.

The oldest map on exhibition — an impressionistic sketch of the Sun On County (Kwangtung) drawn in 1819 by a Ching official — hardly shows Hong Kong among the myriad of coastal islands.

Kowloon peninsula, with its busy traffic and skyscrapers as the present generation knows it, was described in a i860 map as ”an area of barren hills”.

A telling story unravels behind a ”map of the Sun-On District” drawn in 1866, ’’from actual observations made by an Italian missionary of the propaganda, in the course of his professional labours during a period of four years.”

The map surprisingly appears very accurate. Included in the topographical details, as can be expected, are Roman Catholic chapels. Not so expected to those who are accustomed to the convenience of trains and planes, are the markings for ’’pass through the mountains”.

Another illustration of the tremendous development Hong Kong has come through can be found in a map of the Central District in 1911«

Some of the buildings still remain but many others have been pulled down and redeveloped in modern styles, though some of their names are still retained.

/The map ........

Friday, May 26, 1972

- 17 -%

The map was drawn by a firm of engineering contractors which had its offices and works in Kowloon City Road. Its telephone number was only K21.

One map of New Kowloon — comparatively recent, being drawn in 1937 — has only the barest details. The names of Kwun Tong and Tsuen Wan are not even on it.

Another old map of Kowloon has names of streets, but few people would have known that Nathan Road was formerly Robinson Road.

Maps produced now by the Crown Lands and Survey Office of course shows Robinson Road on Hong Kong Island.

An eight sheet map of Hong Kong and Kowloon at a scale of 1:10,000 shows very clear topographical details, and names on part of the map are in both Chinese and English.

A placard by its side in the exhibition hall at the Ocean Terminal says that the whole urban area of the map will be bilingual in the next six to 12 months.

Also on exhibition are special maps, such as the best-selling ’tourist map’ and a ’countryside’ map series. A large mosaic of aerial photographs of Hong Kong towers above the other exhibits and a plastic relief map made by vacuum forming of vinyl plastic sheets is remarkable for its modern touch.

There are also photographs and illustrations of modern cartographic methods, including scribing, photo-printing and survey by aerial camera.

The exhibition was opened last Tuesday and will be closed this Sunday (May 28). Opening hours are from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Admittance is free.

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Release Time: 7«3Q p.m.

VICTORIA HARBOUR

SKETCH PLAN SHOWING OUTLINE ZONING FOR

URBAN RENEWAL DISTRICT

LH 3/S2

P.R.H. 7 (REVISED) 4000091

INFORMATION

SHIVICES

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Saturday, May 27, 1972

TYPHOON PRECAUTIONARY MEASURES * ' * ft

Vessel Operators Advised «««*****

The Marine Department today advised vessel operators to take special precautionary measures during the typhoon season.

In particular, the spokesman of the Marine Department drew the attention of owners, agents, charterers and masters of vessels to a publication entitled ’Shipmasters Guide - Part I - Tropical Cyclones Affecting Hong Kong Waters’.

”It is available on request and free of charge at the Information Counter of the Marine Department," he said, "it lists general precautions that should be observed."

At present, the following moorings are approved for use as special class typhoon moorings:-• <

(i) "A" Class special typhoon moorings for vessels not exceeding 600 feet in length:

A-4 to A-40, A-4J and A-45

(ii) "B" Class special typhoon moorings for vessels not exceeding 370 feet in length:

B-5 to B-9, B-ll to B-22, B-25 and B-26

The spokesman said: "The annual overhaul and maintenance of harbour moorings may require this list to be amended without notice, but up-to-date information as to the moorings approved for use as special class typhoon moorings may be obtained from the Port Control Office."

/The Marine .......

Saturday, May 27, 1972

2

The Marine Department advised masters of vessels equipped with V.H.F. radio to maintain a listening watch on Channel 12 during the approach or passage of a tropical cyclone as pertinent information might be broadcast from time to time by the Marine Department Port Communication Centre.

"Vessels not equipped with V.H.F. radio should maintain normal radio watches and listen also to weather broadcasts from the local radio or television stations," the spokesman added.

In the past, it had been found that many vessels had not been adequately manned during periods when local storm signals had been hoisted, and such inadequate manning had posed a danger to other vessels using the port at the time.

The spokesman then warned masters, owners, agents and charterers of vessels that any ship while within the waters of Hong Kong should have on board at all time such number of crew as was capable of carrying out all duties which might reasonably be required to ensure the safety of the ship.

- - 0 - -

Saturday, May 27, 1972

REGISTRATION TEAM TO OPERATE IN THE NEW TERRITORIES

Residents Urged To Make Use Of Facilities Provided

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦

The Commissioner of Registration announced today that a team from the Registration of Persons Department will conduct registration at the Yuen Long Resettlement Estate, Yuen Long Kai Fong Association Office from Thursday, June 1, 1972 to Thursday, June 8, 1972* Business hours will be from 9.00 a.m. to 5*00 p.m. on Mondays to Fridays and from 9.00 a.m. to 1.00 p.m. on Saturdays.

The visits will enable (i) parents or guardians to register their children from six to seventeen years of age for juvenile Identity Cards (ii) young persons 17 years of age and over and holding juvenile Identity Cards, to register for adult Identity Cards.

All persons living in the area are reminded of their responsibility (i) to register themselves and their children for Identity Cards and (ii) to report to the Registration of Persons Department any changes of employments or residential addresses, nationality or marital'status or any other particulars which have changed since registering for their Identity Cards.

Children between six and seventeen years of age who have Hong'Kong Birth Certificates or valid travel documents need not attend for registration, but children who do not have Birth Certificates or valid travel documents, must accompany their parents or guardians when registering.•

Parents or guardians must produce both their (i.e. husband and wife) Identity Cards for inspection when registering juveniles.

/On registering .......

I

Saturday, May 27, 1972

- 4 -

On registering for adult cards, young persons 17 years of age and over must surrender their juvenile Identity Cards and produce (i) the Identity Cards of both their parents or guardians under whom they are registered, and (ii) a Hong Kong Birth Certificate or evidence of their residence in Hong Kong during the past two years.

Persons who do not possess any of the above mentioned documents must register at the Registration of Persons Branch Office in the Causeway Bay Magistracy, Electric Road, Hong Kong or at Canton Road Government Offices, Yaumati, Kowloon. . ...

--------0--------

TAI PO TOW SQUARE

Tenders Being Called For

A large piece of land in the heart of the newly developed part of Tai Po, New Territories, will be turned into a town square where people can spend their leisure hours.

Situated to the south of Kwong Fuk Road, Tai Po, the site measures over 22,000 square feet.

A number of concrete benches and raised circular flower beds as well as a Chinese-style shelter will be constructed in the area.

In the centre of the square, there will be a fountain which will be ♦

illuminated with coloured lights during the evenings.

Tenders are being called for the project which should take about five months to complete.

------------------------------------------0----------------------------------------- ..........................................-/5.........................

Saturday, May 27, 1972

- 5 -

MR. ANTHONY ROYLE TO VISIT PEKING

Brief Transit In Hong Kong

********

The Under Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, Mr. Anthony Royle, will transit Hong Kong on his way to Peking on May }0. He will be at Kai Tak Airport for only about an hour and a half.

According to present plans, Mr. Royle will spend the night of June 6 in Hong Kong on his return journey, leaving for the United Kingdom on the afternoon of June 7*

Mr. Royle will be travelling by RAF VC-10.

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TICKET SALE ENTERS LAST WEEK

For 47th Government Lottery

*******

The sale of tickets for the first Government Lottery this year will enter its last week as from Monday (May 29)• The draw takes place at the City Hall on Saturday, June J.

From May 29 to June 2, tickets will be on sale at the Club premises at Star Ferry Reclamation, Hong Kong; Hang Seng Bank Building, Hong Kong; and at Nathan Road, Kowloon, between 8 a.m. and 9 p.m., a three hour extension.

At the Club premises at King’s Road, North Point; . D’Aguilar Street, Hong Kong; Star Ferry Pier, Tsim Sha Tsui; Wuhu Street, Hung Hom; Belcher’s Street, Kennedy Town; and Passenger Ferry Terminus, North Point, tickets will be on sale from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m.

- - 0--------

/6..........

Saturday, May 27, 1972

- 6 -

MEDICAL AND HEALTH STATISTICS For Week Ended May 6 ********

Statistics released by the Medical and Health Department for the week ended May 6 are as follows:

Noticications of infectious cases (previous week’s figures in brackets):- total: 205 cases - amoebiasis - 1 (1); bacillary dysentery - 8 (4); cerebrospinal meningitis & meningococcal infections 1 (nil); chickenpox - 25 (19); enteric fever (typhoid) - 17 (13); leprosy -1 (1); measles - 25 (25);'ophthalmia neonatorum - 2 (nil); tuberculosis -123 (187); and whooping cough - 2 (nil).

Births registered - 1,427: 328 on Hong Kong Island; 897 in Kowloon and 202 in the New Territories.

Deaths from all causes - 350: 104 on Hong Kong Island; 195 in Kowloon and 51 in the New Territories.

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ISSUE OF SUNDAY D.I.B. ft ft ft ft ft ft ft

Note to editors: There will be an issue of the Sunday

D.I.B. tomorrow. Copies of the D.I.B. wi11 available for collection tomorrow $t 3 p.m. at the G.I.S. Press Room, sixth floor, Beaconsfield house. • - T -------------------0---------

Release time: 2.00 p.rn.

P.R.H. 7 (REVISED) 4000001

INFORMATION

SERVICES

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Sunday, May 28, 1972

MORRISON HILL INDOOR GAMES CENTRE

Facilities For Table Tennis Matches

Hong Kong will have many more facilities for sport and recreation in a few years time, if present plans materialise.

Planned new projects will provide centres for games and matches on both sides of the harbour and will enable the public to enjoy the excitement of major competitions in fully equipped arenas.

The latest project to be included in the Public Works Programme is the Morrison Hill Indoor Games Centre.

This will be a multi-storey building including an arena for table tennis matches, but so designed as to be used for other indoor games, such as volley ball and badminton.

No centre has yet been provided by the Government for table tennis which is one of Hong Kong’s most popular sports.

The Morrison Hill Games Centre will have several floors for training purposes, changing rooms and dormitory accommodation for visiting teams and home teams undergoing intensive training and coaching.

In Kowloon, work has already started on the Indoor Games Hall at San Po Kong. This has a floor space of 11,000 square feet, is 25 feet high with five—foot high openings along the length of both sides for ventilation.

/The hall .......

Sunday, May 28, 1972

2

The hall will be ideal for basketball and badminton and can also be used as an indoor theatre for gymnastic shows and operas and many other functions.

Two other major projects are in the pipeline for Kowloon, subject to approval of funds for the buildings when design work is completed, these are the Indoor Stadium at Hung Hom and a Football Stadium at Ho Man Tin.

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RESETTLEMENT DEPARTI'iENT ’ S NEW TRANSIT CENTRE

At Kwok Shiu Road, Kwai Chung

********

The Resettlement Department’s newest and largest transit centre at

Kwok Shiu Road, Kwai Chung, will be officially opened on May 29 (Monday) by the Principal Assistant Colonial Secretary (Lands), Mr. David Akers-Jones.

The centre, built at a cost of $200,000, will give temporary accommodation to people who might be made homeless because of fire, typhoons or other natural disasters.

Inside the centre, there is separate accommodation for men and women and a large play-area for children.

Modern toilets, bathrooms, kitchens and laundry facilities are also provided.

Although they are not allowed to take in heavy furniture, they may store them in a store-room provided for such a purpose.

The occupant’s stay in the centre is limited to only one month pending re—occupation of their former homes or provisions of alternate accommodation by Government. *♦*♦♦**

Note to editors: The opening ceremony will begin at 3.30 p.m. on Monday (May 29). Mr. Akers-Jones will give a short address to the gathering. You are cordially invited to send a reporter and/or photographer to cover the event.

Refreshments will be served after the ceremony.

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Release Time: 3.00 p.m.

P.R.H. 7 (REVISED) 4000091

INFORMATION

SERVICES

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Monday, May 29, 1972

PLEA FOR INCREASED AMOUNT OF FUTURE DONATIONS

To Community Chest Of Hong Kong

Lady MacLehose said today she hoped many more firms and individuals might consider increasing the amount of their donations in the next campaign of the Community Chest of Hong Kong.

j . ...

She was speaking, in her capacity as the President of the Chest, at the third annual general meeting of the Chest at the Mandarin Hotel.

• -2?' - * ■ ......

Referring to the fact that deductions might be claimed on Salaries or Income Tax Returns in respect of charitable donations,, Lady MacLehose said whilst some donors kindly increased their donations in anticipation of this relief, it was perhaps disappointing that relatively so few did so.

She pointed out that the matters of increasing the amount of future donations to charity, and of still further widening the base of the number of donors to the Chest, were justified by two facts.

Firstly, she said, the number of the Chest’s Member Agencies had increased from 43 to 60 and then to 64 over the years.

’’Secondly, the annual needs of the Chest’s Member Agencies, after a most careful study of their requests, have risen, respectively, over the total of the previous year by 30 per cent, then by 12 per cent and then by 17 per cent or, to summarize, the allocations to the Member Agencies for the 1972-73 year, are 70 per cent higher than the allocations were when the chest started.”

/Lady .......

Monday, May 29, 1972

- 2 -

Lady MacLehose said that the third and fourth campaigns of the Chest, as recorded in the Annual Report, successfully exceeded their goals and it was also pleasing to note that the estimated numbers of donors had increased each year.

"Indeed, in the third campaign, over 300,000 persons and firms gave, while in the recent appeal, the number increased dramatically to nearly 600,000," she said.

She expressed her profound appreciation to everyone who had in any way whatsoever contributed time or money to the success of the Community Chest’s campaign.

***** . r 1 '

Note to editors: The full text of Lady MacLehose’s speech

is contained in a supplement to today’s Daily Information Bulletin.

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Monday, May 29, 1972

ARRIVAL OF MR. ANTHONY ROYLE

********

Note to Editors: The R.A.F. VC 10 aircraft, in which the Under

Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs and Mrs. Royle are travelling, will land at Kai Tak at 8.25 a.m. tomorrow.

Mr. Royle will not be holding a press conference on his arrival tomorrow morning. Arrangements will be made for Mr. Royle to meet the press on his return to Hong Kong.

There will be no press facilities on the tarmac. Official photographs showing Mr. and Mrs. Royle being greeted by His Excellency the Governor will be issued by the Government Information Services later in the morning.

After landing at Kai Tak, Mr. and Mrs. Royle will proceed by helicopter to Harcourt Road, where they will proceed by car to Government House for breakfast with H.E. the Governor and Lady MacLehose. Photographic facilities will be available at the Harcourt Road Helicopter Landing Pad and photographers are requested to assemble at Harcourt Road at 8.15 a.m. sharp. G.I.S. Liaison officers will be present•

The R.A.F. VC 10 will take off from Kai Tak for the journey to Peking at 11 a.m. Lady MacLehose will be present at Kai Tak to see Mr. and Mrs. Royle off. Official G.I.S. photographs will also be issued as soon as possible.

Mr. and Mrs. Royle are accompanied on the visit to China by:-

Mr. Adam Butler, MP - Parliamentary Private Secretary

Mr. R.M. Evans, Head of Far Eastern Department Foreign & Commonwealth Office

Mr. D.B.C. Logan - Private Secretary.

0 - -

A

Monday, May 29, 1972

SHELTER FOR PIER ON LAMMA ISLAND

! r,S . •. . ..

*******

Villagers and visitors of Yung Shue Wan on Lamma Island will soon • I : I

be provided with a shelter and sitting facilities when they use the public pier.

Tenders are now being invited for the construction of a reinforced concrete cover for the pier.

The pier is located a long way from the village proper and there is at present no shelter on the way to it. ■

Construction work is expected to commence in August this year and will take about four months to complete.

-------0----------

WATER INTERRUPTION IN CENTRAL

********

Water supply to a number of premises in the Central District on

Hong Kong Island will be turned off.for.five hours between 1 a.m. and 6 a.m.

on Wednesday, May J1.

Premises which will be affected by the interruption are in the area bounded by Pottinger Street, Queen’s Road Central, Queen Victoria Street, Des Voeux Road Central, Wing Wo Street and the Seafront.

The temporary stoppage is to allow the Waterworks Office to carry out a leakage test in the area.

Monday, May 29, 1972

- 5 -

VOLUNTEERS CELEBRATE 118TH ANNIVERSARY

Governor Attends Dinner

********

The Governort Sir Murray MacLehose, will be attending the Foundation Day Dinner of the Royal Hong Kong Regiment (The Volunteers) tomorrow evening in the Officers’ Mess at Beaconsfield House.

The dinner marks the ll^th Anniversary of the Regiment which was formed on May 30, 1854, as the Hong Kong Volunteer Corps, with 99 basic members•

Sir Murray will be met on arrival at Beaconsfield House at 8.15 P*m* by the Commanding Officer, Lt. Col. J. Chapman, and the Regimental Sergeant Major R.A. Frei.

Earlier in the afternoon, Sir Murray will inspect a Guard mounted by men of the Regiment at Government House.

Among other distinguished guests at the dinner will be the Commander British Forces, Lt. Gen. Sir Richard Ward, and the Colonial Secretary, the Hon. Sir Hugh Norman-Walker.

Note to Editors: The Governor will be inspecting the Guard at 2.15 p*m* You are cordially invited to cover this event and Sir Murray’s arrival at Beaconsfield House.

Captain D.A.M. Le Sueur of the Regiment will meet members of the press at the entrance to Government House at 2.00 p.m.

. . . -------0---------

/6.........

Monday, May 29, 1972

6 -

BRITISH TRADE AND INDUSTRY SECRETARY TO VISIT JAPAN

Brief Transit In Hong Kong

********

The Secretary of State for Trade and Industry, the Rt. Hon. John Davies, will make a brief stop of one hour in Hong Kong on his way to Tokyo tomorrow (Tuesday)•

He will be accompanied by Mrs. Davies and a party of four.

Mr. and Mrs. Davies will be met by the Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose.

Note to Editors:

Shortly after their arrival, Mr. and Mrs. Davies and their party will board two helicopters for a tour of the harbour area, time and weather permitting.

After the tour, Mr. Davies will be available for a brief meeting with press representatives in the V,I.P. press conference at the airport at about p.m.

Mr. Davies and his party are due to arrive on board flight BA 812, E.T.A. 5 p«.m, and will take off on board flight BA 910, E.T.D. 6 p.m.

Press representatives covering their arrival and departure are requested to assemble in the Press Room at the airport by 4.30 p.m. tomorrow.

/7.......

Monday, May 29, 1972

* . - 7 -

GOVERNOR SENDS MESSAGE OF CONDOLENCE TO QUEEN

At Sad News Of The Death Of The Duke Of Windsor

********

The Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose has sent a message of condolence to the Queen expressing the sorrow and deep sympathy of the people of Hong Kong at the sad news of the death of her uncle.

In a message to the Secretary of State, the Governor said: "I would be grateful if you will convey to Her Majesty the Queen the sorrow and deep sympathy of the people of Hong Kong at the sad news of the death of His Royal Highness the Duke of Windsor.”

A condolence book will be opened at Government House during the period of lying in state - Friday, June 2 from 9»5O a.m. to 4.JO p.in« and Saturday, June J from 9«3O a.m. to 1 p.m.

A memorial service will be held at St. John’s Cathedral at noon on Monday, June J. Details of the service will be announced when they are finalised.

As a sign of mourning flags are flying at half mast at all Government buildings in Hong Kong. They will be flown at half mast until sunset on the day of the funeral, June 5.

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/8..........

Monday, May 29, 1972

- 8 -

NEV/ IMMIGRATION BRANCH OFFICES PLANNED

For Convenience Of The Public

««*«***

The Immigration Department will be setting up a branch office in Mong Kok sometime in July this year to augment its present facilities.

Plans are to set up another branch office in Kwun Tong, following the opening of the Mong Kok office, before the end of the year.

There will be a further office in the Western District on Hong

Kong Island next year and the next on the list will be in Shaukiwan.

Those new branches are necessary to cope with increased demand for travelling documents, for it has been estimated that the department’s work in issuing these documents has increased by *+0 per cent since 19^9 • • • • • •

The well-distributed offices will also be readily accessible and will remove congestion at the present offices and save travelling time by the public. >

There are at present eight Immigration offices, three of which are on Hong Kong Island and three in Kowloon.

Of the two in the New Territories, the one in Tsuen Wan was *

only opened in September, 1970.

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Monday, May 29, 1972

- 9 -

TRAFFIC ARRANGEMENT IN CARPENTER ROAD

********

The Transport Department announced today that with effect fi*om 10 a.m. on Thursday, June 1, the traffic routing of Carpenter Road between Junction Road and Fuk Lo Tsuen Road in Kowloon City will be changed from one-way eastbound to two-way.

The new arrangement is intended to improve traffic circulation in the area.

Appropriate traffic signs will be positioned to guide motorists.

-------0---------

Release time: 6.45 p.m.

4000035 P.R. 33

HONG KONG GOVERNMENT

NFORMATION

SERVICES

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

SUPPLEMENT

Monday, May 29, 1972

LADY MACLEHOSE SPEAKS AT COMMUNITY CHEST ANNUAL MEETING

**«*««*

The following is the full text of Lady MacLehose’s speech at the third annual general meeting of the Community Chest of Hong Kong today (Monday):

,fI am delighted to welcome you to this the third Annual General Meeting of the Corporation of the Community Chest of Hong Kong.

"Although this is the third such meeting, the period covered by the Annual Report and Accounts, in your hands, deals with the results of both the third, and the whole of the fourth campaigns. In future years each Annual Report will cover just one campaign.

,rNot only does this Report record that the third and fourth campaigns successfully exceeded their goals, but also it is most pleasing to note that the estimated numbers of donors have increased each year. Indeed, in the third campaign, over 500,000 persons and firms gave, while in the recent appeal, the number increased dramatically to nearly 600,000.

"I want to pay tribute to my predecessor, Lady Trench, and for all she did to further the work of the Chest. In her Presidential Address to the two previous Annual General Meetings, Lady Trench referred to the tremendous importance of building up reserves. This is to ensure that the Chest will be in a position, should circumstances outside its control so dictate in future years, to meet the needs of its Member Agencies -

/whether ••••

Monday, May 29, 1972

- 2 -

whether because of a temporary economic exigency, or an increase in the number of Member Agencies, or because of the rising costs of those Agencies along with a general rise in costs in Hong Kong in general. I need hardly remind ourselves that, as the Report indicates, the present Member Agencies touch the lives in one way or another of over one million of our people. It is, therefore, with pleasure that the Chest received a further specific donation of 500,000 dollars, to raise to 7 million dollars the Stuart Taylor Williamson Endowment Fund, the income from which, under a Trust Deed, is available for the approved allocations to Member Agencies. The Annual Report expresses the hope that other philanthropically minded parsons will follow this splendid example, and so arrange for endowments to be made to the Chest, either in their life time, or by bequest under their wills.

Donations

’’Another matter touched on in the Report is the fact that deductions may be claimed on Salaries or Income Tax Returns in respect of charitable donations. Whilst a number of donors kindly increased their donations in anticipation of this relief, it is perhaps disappointing that relatively so few did so. I hope that many more firms and individuals may consider increasing their donations in the next campaign of the Chest.

’’The matters I have raised of increasing the amount of future donations to charity, and of still further widening the base of the number of donors to the Community Chest, are justified by the facts that, firstly, the number of the Chest’s Member Agencies has increased from 4-3 to 60 and then to 64 over the years. Secondly, the annual needs of the Chest’s Member Agencies, after a most careful study of their requests, have risen,

/respectively

Monday, May 29, 1972

- 3 -

respectively, over the total of the previous year by }C%, then by 12% and then by 17% or, to summarize, the allocations to the Member Agencies for the 1972/73 year, are 7C% higher than the allocations were when the Chest started.

!II would like now to acknowledge my sincere personal thanks to the Board, the Executive Committee and the other Committees for all the hard work and wise counsel they have freely given for the success of this huge community effort.

"In conclusion, to everyone who has in any way whatsoever contributed time or money to the success of the Community Chest’s Campaign - including large and small donors alike - including those walkers, their sponsors, the voluntary officials of various organisations, firms, media and Government officials involved in the huge and highly rewarding community-based ’ alks for a Million’, I express my profound appreciation. It is surely true to say that the Community Chest is a permanent and beneficial institution of Hong Kong."

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Release time: 6.00 p.m.

P.R.H. 7 (REVISED) 4000091

INFORMATION SERVICES

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Tuesday, May 30, 1972

PROVISIONAL TRADE FIGURES FOR APRIL Exports Show Slight Increase «**«**«*

The value of Hong Kong’s domestic exports for April was 81,076 million which represents an increase of 86 million or 0.5 per cent over April 1971.

At 81t?4j million, the value of imports shows a decrease of 826 million or 1.5 per cent while the value of re-exports at 8261 million shows a slight drop of 80.2 million or 0.06 per cent when compared with April of last year.

A spokesman of the Commerce and Industry Department said today that during the three-month period from February to April 1972, domestic exports totalled 83,240 million, imports 84,986 million and re-exports 8848 million.

Compared with the corresponding period in the previous year, these figures represented an increase of 6.8 per cent, a drop of 1.5 per cent and a rise of 8.2 per cent respectively.

Figures for the four-month period January to April show increases over the same period in 1971 of 10.3 per cent for domestic exports, 0.4 per cent for imports and 14.5 per cent for re-exports.

The following provisional figures for April have been released by the Census and Statistics Department:-

/MERCHANDISE: ........

Tuesday, May 30, 1972

2 -

MERCHANDISE: Domestic Exports: $1,076 million

Imports Re-exports : 8197^3 million : 8 261 million

COMPARATIVE FIGURES April 1972 $ Million April 1971 8 Million Increase or • decrease

8 Million Per Cent

Domestic Exports 1,076 1,070 + 6 + 0.5

Imports 1,74? 1,768 - 26 - 1.5

Re-exports 261 261 - 0.2 - 0.06

Feb.-April 1972 Feb.-April 1971 Increase or decrease

$ Million $ Million $ Million Per Cent

Domestic Exports 3,240 3,034 + 205 + 6.8

Imports 4,986 5,061 - 76 - 1.5

Re-exports 848 784 + 65 + 8.2

Jan.-April ■,-1972. Jan.-April u 1971 Increase or decrease

8 Million 5 Million $ Million Per Cent

Domestic Exports 4,386 3,977 + 410 + 10.3

Imports 6,517 6,494 + 23 + 0.4

Re-exports 1,136 992 + 144 + 14.5

- 0 --------

Tuesday, May 30» 1972

- 3 -

A CAREER WITH THE SOCIAL WELFARE DEPARTMENT Welfare Supervisors’ Role In Correctional Institutions

About 50 officers of the grade of Welfare Supervisor are now working in the Probation and Corrections Division of the Social Welfare Department — and all find the job rewarding in a special way.

Satisfaction comes from the realisation that in addition to financial gain, there is the knowledge that one is helping to reconcile delinquents to society so that a second chance becomes possible for most.

Mr. Mak Wing-hong, Principal Social Welfare Officer (Correctional Institutions), says when the next advertisement for Welfare Supervisors takes place to staff the Division’s institutions, he hopes a description of the duties and satisfactions implicit in their task will lead to the enrolment of ideal recruits.

He explains that the job is a challenge, and applicants who are interested merely because it is a more attractive financial proposition than a clerkship, are the wrong applicants.

”In this field, as indeed in social welfare work in general, it is one’s personal contribution to the betterment of society that should impel an applicant,” he says.

A posting in the Division puts the Welfare Supervisor in direct touch with youthful elements of Hong Kong’s society who, for many reasons, have rebelled against authority and fallen foul of the law.

In a moment of sometimes cruel reality, these young people find themselves suddenly separated from their homes, temporarily dispossessed of freedom, and placed in institutions where impersonal regimes must put general welfare higher than the comforts of the individual.

/It is

Tuesday, May 30, 1972

- 4 -

It is in these circumstances that the Welfare Supervisor receives his challenge, for institutional discipline is as humane or as harsh as he makes it.

This is so because he represents, in essence, the direct link between the delinquent and the world outside to which the youth will one day return, and the corrective processes which he implements leading to the boy’s restoration, depending on the officer’s devotion to his work, can be either inspiring or damaging.

It is his philosophical outlook and the norm of the social conscience that transform the task from being merely another job into a genuinely beneficial community service.

Dedicated

The dedicated Welfare Supervisor disregards his own personal likes and dislikes so that in time he comes to react spontaneously to the general wishes of the boys themselves in matters relating, for example, to athletic and cultural activities.

Programmes for enjoyment are conceived in the spirit of general well-being, reinforced by the Welfare Supervisor’s maturity and responsibility But when the proceedings are underway, he is not detached, aloof, withdrawn, but rather very much a part of the corporate whole.

"When such an attitude of mind takes hold of an officer, and he begins to live for his charges, a subtle transformation takes place within the delinquent,” Mr. Mak says.

/’’The boy,

Tuesday, May 30, 1972

- 5 -

“The boy, or the girl — for the Division maintains a home for girls at Ma Tau Wei — begins to feel wanted. He sees that society has a place for him because someone cares. It is the beginning of the ’new leaf’ about which the public hears as a household phrase again and again, — which in institutions for the delinquent are turned over with real significance."

Mr. Mak believes applicants to the post must ask themselves if they possess certain requisite qualities, under four heads, and he lists them as:-

* Maturity and integrity.

* Patience, understanding, sympathy.

* Accurate judgement and impartiality.

* Zeal and devotion to duty.

“If young men and women in Hong Kong possess these characteristics, if they want a reasonable pay, with opportunities for advancement, and the ultimate satisfaction that comes from service to one’s fellowmen, then they should consider this job in the Social Welfare Department when the time comes," he suggests.

The salary begins at $875 a month, and goes on to 31,400 after six increments. Applicants must be between 25 and 35 and must possess a Hong Kong school certificate, with a credit in English if the examination is taken in Chinese. Applicants require some experience of teaching in classrooms and should have the ability to organise and conduct indoor and outdoor recreational activities. In addition, they must have some knowledge of first aid. If they are women, the applicants should also know something about domestic science.

Prospects occur for promotion, and Mr. Mak recalls cases of Welfare Supervisors v/ho have gone on to become superintendents of homes• -----------------------------------O--------- / 6 ....

Tuesday, May 30, 1972

- 6 -

EMPLOYMENT AND VACANCIES IN NON-INDUSTRIAL SECTOR

Survey By Labour Department

*«*«**«

Since November 1968, the Labour Department has been conducting, at half-yearly intervals, surveys of employment and vacancies in the private non-industrial sector covering hotels, restaurants, education and medical services.

These surveys now include boarding houses, import and export businesses, air, ocean and harbour transport and related services, banks and money changers, insurance, and theatres and cinemas.

On May 24, 1972, printed employment return cards were sent to managements of all known establishments in these trades and services with a request that particulars of employment and vacancies as on May 31, 1972 be entered on the cards.

Completed cards should be returned to the Labour Department not later than June 1972.

A Labour Department spokesman said that he hoped that all recipients would fill in these cards fully and accurately and return them promptly in the reply-paid envelopes provided.

"In the last survey, the extent of co-operation from managements was most encouraging," he said.

Managements are assured that the information provided on these cards is kept strictly confidential and is used only for the preparation of statistical information.

The cards are subsequently destroyed under supervision when all the relevant information has been extracted and incorporated in statistical summaries and tables from which individual establishments cannot be identified. -----------------------------------0---------

/ 7 ....

Tuesday, May 30, 1972

- 7 -

BUILDINGS IN QUEEN’S ROAD CENTRAL

Declared Dangerous

»*««***«

The Building Authority today declared No. 202 Queen’s Road Central to be in a dangerous condition and No. 204 Queen’s Road Central liable to become dangerous and ordered demolition.

In a statement issued this morning, the Principal Government Building Surveyor said that these four storey pre-war buildings have been under observation for some time following the demolition of adjacent buildings.

During a recent inspection new crushing of the brickwork of the front verandah pier at first floor level was noted and fractures in the load bearing brickwork of the party wall, adjoining the site of No. 200 Queen’s Road Central, and in the rear main wall showed signs of worsening.

Although the building is shored it is considered that there is a risk of collapse.

The party wall between Nos. 202 and 204 Queen’s Road Central is fractured in several places and it is felt that No. 204 is liable to become dangerous during or after demolition of No. 202.

Notices of intention to apply for Closure Orders in Victoria District Court at 9.J0 a.m. on July 12, 1972 were posted today.

0--------

/8.........

Tuesday, May 30, 1972

- 8 -

BEST APPRENTICE IN GOVERNMENT WORKSHOPS

Presentation Of ’’Brown Cup” Tomorrow

««**«**

This year’s winner of the ’’Brown Cup” for the best apprentice in

Government Workshops is Mr. Tang Wai-keung of the Waterworks Office.

Mr. J.M. Pettigrew, Government Water Engineer (Mechanical & Electrical), will present the Cup to Mr. Tang tomorrow (Wednesday) afternoon.

The ’’Brown Cup” is awarded to an apprentice in Government Workshops, who makes the best progress in any year either in practical and/or student class

The Cup was donated by Mr. J.C. Brown, who served as a Chief Electrical

and Mechanical Engineer of the Public Works Department between 19^ and 1959*

Mr. Tang started his apprenticeship in November, 19&7• His practical work has been of consistently high standard throughout his apprenticeship.

His technical education has also been consistent and in the latest mid-term examination he was first in his class.

At tomorrow’s ceremony, the official signing of indentures of 28 apprentices will also take place.

«**«*«•*

Note to editors: You are invited to send a reporter and/or

photographer to cover the ceremony which will take place at 3*00 p.m. tomorrow at the Cinema Room, Civil Aid Services Building, Caroline Hill Road, Hong Kong.

-------0 - -

/9.........

Tuesday, May 30, 1972

- 9 -

69 BUILDING PLANS APPROVED IN APRIL Another 45 Certified For Occupation »t«**«**

The Building Authority approved 69 new building plans of all types in April and certified 45 completed buildings for occupation.

Of the plans approved, 21 were on Hong Kong Island, 13 in Kowloon, and 35 in the New Territories.

Buildings certified for occupation included eleven for domestic use 12 for non-domestic and 22 for combined domestic and non-domestic purposes.

In addition, the Building Authority approved the demolition of 92 buildings — 47 on Hong Kong Island, 29 in Kowloon, 15 in New Kowloon and one in the New Territories.

Lists giving brief particulars of all buildings concerned may be inspected at the Public Enquiry Service on the ground floor of the Central Government Offices, West Wing.

-------0---------

/10........

Tuesday, May 30, 1972

- 10 -

MA TAU WEI GIRLS’ HOME Replacement Site In Ho Man Tin For 150 * *******

Urgent measures are being undertaken to expedite construction of the Social Welfare Department’s new girls’ home in Ho Man Tin to replace the existing home in Ma Tau Wei.

Mrs. Chen Liu Mu-lan, Senior Principal Social Welfare Officer and head of the Probation and Corrections Division, says the new home will have accommodation for 150 girls, and will be large enough to accommodate, with ease, the number of girls presently referred to the Department by the courts and the Police.

The home in Ma Tau Wei was built some years ago to house 70 girls. On various occasions, the total being accommodated has exceeded 70, but the maximum has never been more than 80.

Mrs. Chen explains that when pressure for accommodation becomes great because of a sudden inflow of cases from the Police, it is customary for the Superintendent of the Home to give up her quarters. This happens when more girls than usual are sent to Ma Tau Wei for temporary shelter, or on remand for minor offences.

In a day or two, when they leave, the pressure eases, and the total number of girls being accommodated returns to 65 or so.

Girls on probation remain for periods not longer than one year.

Another category of girls comprise those sent by the police to Ma Tau Wei for care and protection, and at present there are 5$ of them.

/’’This.........

Tuesday, May 30, 1972

- 11 -

"This Department is entirely conscious of the need for a new and larger home,” Mrs. Chen says. "We have been in contact with other departments about this for some time.

"We are doing everything to expedite the Ho Man Tin plan, but other departments are also involved."

Accommodation pressure at Ma Tau Wei has never been allowed to interfere either with the corrective processes or the physical and mental well-being of the girls.

The staff take particular care to meet the occasions of sudden inflow, and adequate facilities are always found. The former accept personal inconveniences so that the standards of general welfare can be sustained.

"Indeed, the staff are to be complimented for their efforts," Mrs.

Chen comments.

She says temporary alternative accommodation has been considered for some girls, who will move over to a hostel maintained by a voluntary organisation, along with appropriate staff.

-------0---------

Tuesday, May 30, 1972

- 12 -

ENROLLED ASSISTANT NURSE

Time Limit For Registration Without Examination Extended

##4>****

Practising nurses who want to register without an examination to become Enrolled Assistant Nurses have now until the end of the year to do so.

Announcing this today, lir. J. Flinn, Secretary of the Nursing Board, said the seven-month extension would assist those who had been insufficiently informed about the issue by their hospitals, and who could therefore not get their applications to the Board on time.

Enrolment without examination within the new time limit is open to any person who satisfies the Nursing Board that he, or she:-

* has attained the age of 20.

* is of good character.

* has completed a course of training acceptable to the Board.

* has been engaged in nursing work and duties during the three years before applying for enrolment.

’’Enrolment is designed to give these nurses a status which at present they do not have,” Mr. Flinn emphasised. ”It is definitely not a denigration.”

He assured nurses on these four points

* The Nursing Board is not forcing anyone to apply for enrolment who do not wish to do so.

* If they do not enrol, they will still be allowed to practise nursing without breaking the law.

* The Nursing Board cannot stipulate what salaries private hospitals should pay their staff, as this is entirely a matter for the hospitals.

* After enrolment, nurses can still apply for registration, and the Board will consider such applications on their merits. But even if they do not enrol, they can still apply for registration

/Giving ...

Tuesday, May JO, 1972

- 13 -

Giving the background to the issue, Mr. Flinn recalled that a Working Party on Nurse Education and Training was appointed by the Nursing Board in May 19&5 to consider the whole field of nurse education and training and to make recommendations.

The Working Party first met in June 1965, and submitted its final report to the Nursing Board in February 1967.

Included in the report was a recommendation that a second grade of nurse be introduced. This second grade, to be called ’’Enrolled Assistant Nurse,” would comprise nurses who had followed the two-year course now offered by the Government and other hospitals.

The Nursing Board agreed that this second grade should be introduced, and the necessary legislation was enacted in April 1970 when the Nurses Registration Ordinance and subsidiary legislation were amended.

At that time, it was appreciated that there was a considerable number of nurses working in Hong Kong whose qualifications were not acceptable to the Nursing Board for registration. There is still no objection to their continuing to practise.

Mr. Flinn said it was eventually proposed to introduce an amendment to the ordinance to drop the word ’’assistant” from the term ‘‘Enrolled Assistant Norse."

-------0---------

/ 14......

Tuesday, May JO, 1972

- 14 -

OVER $2 MILLION MADE AVAILABLE THIS YEAR To Meet Expenses Of Summer Youth Programme ********

More than 82 million have been made available this year to provide youths in Hong Kong with a bright and meaningful summer.

Government and the Royal Hong Kong Jockey Club have set aside $1.2 million and 8973*79^ respectively to meet the expenses of the Summer Youth Programme. The sum exceeds that of last year by 8321,527*

This year’s summer youth programme will last throughout the summer with various educational and reeleacional activities including camping, trips, visits, variety shows, painting and photography.

During the last few months, various organisations and government departments concerned with youths and their recreation have been working quietly behind the scene to work out bigger and better programme of activities for the youths this summer.

Major organisers of this years’ summer programme include hundreds of schools, the member-agencies of the Division of Children and Youth of the Hong Kong Council of Social Service, the Education Department, the Social Welfare Department, the Urban Council and Urban Services Department, the Secretariat for Home Affairs and the New Territories Administration.

In addition, the Armed Forces, kaifongs, community groups, churches, private clubs, business firms and individual families continue to pledge their support and many actually involve themselves in organising activities for young people.

/The Hong

Tuesday, May JO, 1972

- 15 -

The Hong Kong Council of Social Service will receive #200,000 of government allocation, and the Urban Services Department will get #150,000. An amount of #1J1,000 will be given to the Education Department of which #26,000 are to be used exclusively on the Learn-to-Swim Campaign.

The Social Welfare Department will receive #55O»OOO of which #150,000 will be spent on programmes directly organised by the department while the rest will be equally divided between district groups and subvented youth agencies.

The remaining #400,000 are to be spent on the temporary employment scheme under which university and post-secondary school students are employed by government during the summer holidays.

The government allocation represents direct expenditure on the summer youth programme and does not include any staff and administration costs or overall subvention to voluntary agencies.

Of the Jockey Club grants, about #420,000 will be given to the member agencies of the Hong Kong Council of Social Service, #327,000 to schools through the Education Department, #185,000 to the Social Welfare Department for district activities and #33,000 to the Armed Forces for the running of youth leadership camps.

An extra sum of #8,000 has been made available to the Association of Volunteers for Service for the employment of temporary clerical staff and the purchase of stationery.

The Association is responsible for this year’s overall co-ordination of recruiting volunteers with the hope that more young people will join the programme as helpers or leaders.

-------O---------

/16.........

Tuesday, May JO, 1972

- 16 -

INTERRUPTION OF WATER SUPPLY IN HAPPY VALLEY

*******

Water supply to an area in Happy Valley will be interrupted for five hours from 1 a.m. to 6 a.m. this Thursday, June 1.

The Waterworks Office will carry out leakage tests during that period.

The area is bounded by the east side of Shan Kwong Road, Wongneichung Road, Blue Pool Road, Holly Road, Hawthorn Road, Sing Woo Road and Tsui Man Street. It also includes Mui Hing Street and Kwai Fong Street.

-------0---------

Release Time: 7.00 p.m.

P.R.H. 7 (REVISED) 4000001

INFORMATION

SERVICES

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Wednesday, May 31» 1972

GOVERNMENT AHEAD IN APPRENTICESHIP TRAINING More Trainees This Year

Government is steaming ahead with a modern apprenticeship scheme and by far has become the largest employer of apprentices under training in Hong Kong.

At the present count, there are 378 apprentices in various departments and plans are to increase this number to 520 within this financial year.

The apprentice training scheme was started in 1969- It was the first properly organised scheme for training craft and technical apprentices to meet the needs of expanding industry.

Theoretical and practical training are both emphasized* Tho apprentice first joins the Government Apprentices Training Practice Shopi and on completion of basic training are sent to work in various Government Departments.

They have to attend the Morrison Hill Technical School one day a week during working hours, and attend classes two evenings a week for theoretical training.

Craft apprentices are trained for four years. They are taught such trades as fitting, welding, turning, auto and diesel repair, sheet • — • MM* • • metal work, and various electrical trades.

/Technical

Wednesday, May 31, 1972

- 2 -

Technical apprentices are trained for five years• They receive theoretical and practical training in subjects like Workshop Techniques, v Engineering Science and Applied Mathematics.

On completion of their courses, technical apprentices will work at a level between that of the professional engineer and the craftsman.

The Public Works Department Superintendent of Apprentices, Mr.

E.M. Laishley, disclosed that there were plans to construct a four-storey apprentice training workshop at the Electrical and Mechanical Office at Caroline Hill, to anticipate future training requirements.

Technical Apprentices

This project, already in Category A of the Public Works Programme, will replace the present workship in the former Whitfield Barracks in Kowloon.

Prospective technical apprentices must be between 16 and 18 years of age and have completed form five. They have to pass a qualifying examination at form V level and an interview. They should also be medically fit

Those who want to be craft apprentices must be between 14 and 15, and have completed primary six. They also have to take appropriate qualifying examinations.

Both craft and technical apprentices receive pay from Government during their period of training.

/One of ••••••

Wednesday, May JI, 1972

- 3 -

One of the technical apprentices, Mr. Ko Kam Fai, was accepted by the University of Hong Kong last year in the Second Year B.Sc. (Engineering) Degree Course.

Mr. Ko also won the Brown Cup, a trophy given to the best apprentice in a year, in 1969-70.

The Brown Cup winner this year is Mr. Tang Wai Keung of the Waterworks Office.

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PRESS BADGES FOR GOVERNMENT LOTTERY DRAW ON SATURDAY

********

Note to Editors: We have been asked by the Government Lotteries Management Committee to issue Press badges on their behalf for the occasion of the draw of the 4?th Government Lottery.

The badges will be available at the Press Room, G.I.S., as from Thursday (June 1).

The Lottery will be drawn at 10 a.m. on Saturday (June J) at the City Hall Theatre by the Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose.

Lady MacLehose will present souvenirs to Commercial Radio, H.K.-T.V.B., R.T.V., Radio Hong Kong, and the Government Information Services.

You are cordially invited to cover the event.

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A....

Wednesday, May J1t 1972

OFFICIAL OPENING OF NEV/ SHAU KEI WAN MARKET

By Mr. James Wu On June 2

********

Mr. James M.H. Wu, an Urban Councillor, will officially open the new Shau Kei Wan Market at a ceremony to be held at 3.00 p.m. on Friday, June 2, 1972.

The new market at the junction of Shau Kei Wan Main Street East and Kam Wah Street occupies a site of 10,800 square feet. It replaces the old market which was built in 1893 and demolished in June 1970.

Constructed at a cost tv*o million dollars, the new building has two marketing floors containing 10 meat stalls, 12 fish stalls, five poultry stalls, one ice stall and 60 mini-stalls for the sale Of fruit, vegetables and other hawker commodities.

The purpose of the mini-stalls is to provide custom-built accommodation within the market building for hawkers who previously traded from wooden stalls in an open air bazaar or on the streets.

The market building also houses Government offices, including a new Eastern Health Office. There is a spacious covered play area on the second i • floor, and an open play area on the roof.

A bridge at second floor level links the market with the adjacent Hong Kong Housing Society Estate, Ming Wah Dai Ha, thus giving the residents of the estate convenient access to the market.

The business hours of the market are from 6.00 a.m. to 8.00 p.m. daily. During these hours the covered and open play areas will also be open.

The temporary market at Factory Street which provided marketing facilities during the construction of the new market has been demolished.

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/5........

Wednesday, May 31, 1972

- 5 -

INTER-INSTITUTIONAL SONG CONTEST

Programme To Promote Cultural Interest

*******

About 200 trainees in correctional institutions maintained by the Social Welfare Department and voluntary organisations will take part in an inter-institutional song contest at the 0 Pui Shan Boys’ Home at 2.00 p.m. on Friday, June 2.

The contest is sponsored by Miss Annie Chan Suet-man, Assistant Director (Social Work), of the Social Welfare Department.

Participants will come from the Begonia Road Boys’ Home, the Castle Peak Boys’ Home, the Ma Tau Wei Girls* Home, the Kwun Tong Hostel, the 0 Pui Shan Boys* Home, and also from the Juvenile Care Centre and the Society of Boys’ Centres.

Popular Chinese folk songs have been selected for the contest, and participants will compete in solo numbers as well as in choirs.

Adjudicators for the contest will be Miss Josephine Chan Suet-ching and Mrs. Chen Liu Mu-lan, Senior Principal Social Welfare Officer and head of the Probation and Corrections Division.

Mr. Mak Wing-hong, Principal Social Welfare Officer (Correctional Institutions), said today the main aim of the contest was to promote interest in cultural activities, to develop an appreciation of music among the trainees, and to discover ’’hidden talent” among them, so that future leisure could be properly employed.

/”I hope •••••

Wednesday, May 31, 1972

”1 hope that through such activities, trainees in the various

institutions will come to appreciate the meaning of a cultural approach to leisure and the choice of hobbies,” he said. ’’The contest will also help to promote a working spirit and a sense of co-operation among correctional institutions.”

Mr. Mak invited members of the public to attend the contest

because their presence would encourage the trainees and staff in the propagation of such activities in the future.

Mote to Editors: You are invited to attend the contest. It begins

at 2.00 p.m. in the 0 Pui Shan Boys' Home, Kau Wa Kang, Kowloon.

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INTERRUPTION OF WATER SUPPLY

Wong Tai Sin Area

Water supply to an area of Wong Tai Sin will be interrupted for

five hours from 1 a.m. to 6 a.m. on Friday, June 2.

The Waterworks Office will carry out a leakage test during that

period

The area is bounded by Lung Cheung Road, Sheung Tak Street and Tung Tau Tsuen Road.

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Wednesday, May 31, 1972

- 7 -

HEALTH REQUIREMENTS BETWEEN HONG KONG AND MACAU

Cholera, Smallpox Certificates Unnecessary From June 1

*«»«**«

Requirements for valid vaccination certificates against either cholera or smallpox will be unnecessary for travellers between Hong Kong and Macau, and vice versa, from June 1 this year.

The agreement is based on Article 98 of the International Health Regulations and will remain effective while the two territories continue to be uninfected with either cholera or smallpox.

Article 98 of the International Health Regulations allows for the conclusion of special treaty or arrangement "between two or more States having certain interests in common owing to their health, geographical, social or economical conditions".

Dr. the Hon. G.H. Choa, Director of Medical and Health Services, said today should either of the two territories become infected then restrictions would be re-imposed five days after the notification of the first case.

He explained that five days had been decided upon for administrative convenience, and then appropriate re-imposed health documents would be required of travellers from the infected area, depending on the discovery of a case of cholera, or smallpox, or both.

Dr. Choa said the Hong Kong and Macau governments had already notified the World Health Organization of this agreement. Similar international agreements under Article 98 of the International Health Regulations had been entered into by the Council of Europe countries, and also between Singapore and Malaysia.

/The Macau

Wednesday, May 31, 1972

- 8 -

The Macau Ferry Wharf Facilitation Committee is being advised by the Chief Port Health Officer of the terms of this agreement. The Port Health Office at the wharf will be retained.

Travellers are reminded that when required a valid Certificate means one which complies with the International Health Regulation (19&9)•

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SIR HUGH NORMAN-WALKER GOES ON LEAVE

Mr. M.D.A. Clinton To Act As Colonial Secretary

*******

The Colonial Secretary, the Hon. Sir Hugh Norman-Walker, leaves Hong Kong tomorrow (Thursday) for leave in Britain. He will return to Hong Kong on August 2.

During Sir Hugh’s absence, Mr. M.D.A. Clinton will act as Colonial Secretary. Mr. G.P. Lloyd, Defence Secretary, will be Acting Deputy Colonial Secretary.

Note to Editors: Sir Hugh leaves Kai Tak Airport by BOAC Flight

BA 919 at 9.30 p.m. He will not hold a press conference.

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Wednesday, May J1, 1972

- 9 -

TEMPORARY CLOSURE OF POOLS

At Victoria Park And Morse Park Swimming Pool Complexes

»*****«$

The Victoria Park Swimming pool will be closed to the public

when the following school/organisation will be holding its Swimming Gala:-

School/Organisation Date Time

* Wellington College June 1, 1972 8 a.m. - 12 noon

* Caine College June 2, 1972 8 a.m. - 12 noon

* Caine College June 8, 1972 8 a.m. — 12 noon

The main pool and spectator stand in the Morse Park Swimming pool complex will also be closed to the public when the following school/ organisation will be holding its Swimming Gala:-

School/Organisaticn Date Time

♦ Beacon Hill School June 2, 1972 9 a.m. - 12 noon

* Public Works Department June 4, 1972 5 p.m. - 9 p.m.

* Weekly Time-Trial Races June 10, 1972 8 a.m. - 11:45 p.m,

organised by Mr. G. Dowsley, The Education Department and The Hong Kong Amateur Swimming Association

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/1O..........

Wednesday, May 31, 1972

- 10 -

STATUTORY HOLIDAY FOR INDUSTRIAL WORKERS

On Day Of Dragon Boat Festival

The Commissioner of Labour, Mr. Paul Tsui, today reminded employers that Thursday, June 15, 1972, the day of the Tuen Ng (Dragon Boat) Festival, is one of the six statutory holidays to which industrial workers are entitled under the Industrial Employment (Holidays with Pay and Sickness Allowance) Ordinance.

With few exceptions, all manual workers in industrial undertakings paid on a monthly, daily, or piece-rate basis must be given a holiday on June 15.

Non-manual workers in industrial undertakings earning not more than $700 a month have the same right.

To qualify for this paid holiday, which is in addition to the compulsory four rest-days a month, a worker must have worked at least 180 days during a period of 12 months, and at least 20 days in the 28 days preceding June 15.

A worker who does not qualify must also be given a holiday but has no statutory entitlement to be paid although an employer may voluntarily agree to pay him.

An employer may grant a holiday on another day instead of June 15, but he must do so within 60 days after that date and must post a notice of his intention at least 48 hours in advance.

/An employer •••

Wednesday, May 51» 1972

- 11 -

An employer who grants more than six paid holidays a year is still required to comply with the ordinance, but, by agreement with a worker, he is allowed to designate one of the paid holidays as substitute for the statutory holiday on June 15*

A worker or employer who is in doubt about his rights or obligations regarding statutory holidays or holiday pay may obtain the advice of the Senior Labour Inspector in-charge of the Women and Young Persons Unit at various branch offices of the Labour Department.

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COMMISSION OF INQUIRY INTO "JUMBO” FIRE

Copies Of Report On Sale

**«•**«

Copies of the Report of the Commission of Inquiry into last October’s fire on the ’’Jumbo” floating restaurant at Aberdeen are now on sale at $5*00 each at the Government Publications Centre at Star Ferry Concourse, Central, and at the Government Printing Department, North Point.

The Report was tabled in the Legislative Council meeting last Wednesday, (May 24).

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/ 12 ...

Wednesday, May J1, 1972

- 12 -

BOTANIC GARDENS ZOO

Proposals For Phased Expansion Approved

*******

Mr, A. de 0. Sales, Chairman of the Recreation and Amenities Select Committee of Urban Council, announced today that his Committee had approved proposals for a phased expansion of the Wild Mammals Exhibit in the Botanic Gardens.

The detailed plans for this expansion, drawn up by the Curator of Mammals, Mr. J.D. Romer, include two phases.

Phase 1 is to reprovision all of the existing cages by the building of technically well-designed enclosures, attractively laid out to facilitate viewing, and of adequate size for breeding groups of animals to increase both the educational and conservation value of the exhibits.

There will be seven separate enclosures, two of them double to accommodate two or more similar species.

’’Not only will it be possible to establish larger (and consequently more attractive) breeding groups of the animals already exhibited, but also to exhibit several additional species,” said Mr. Sales.

He said it is not yet known how soon the work will commence, but this first phase of the expansion might take two years to complete.

Phase 2 is to provide a special enclosure with a view to establishing a small breeding group of Orang-utans. Mr. Sales said his Committee had approved the preparation of technical plans for this project.

*******

Note to editors: Copies of a sketch plan on the phased expansion

of the Botanic Gardens Zoo are distributed separately in the G.I.S. Press Boxes this evening.

Wednesday, May 31, 1972

- 13 -

DIRECTOR OF BROADCASTING ANNOUNCES

Stereo FM To Continue On Limited Scale

********

The Director of Broadcasting, Mr. Donald Brooks, announced today that in view of the public response to the stereo FM demonstration transmissions, he would continue these on a limited scale until such time as full stereo coverage of the Colony could be achieved.

,rWe have received", said Mr. Brooks, ,fhundreds of telephone calls at Broadcasting House, and very many letters, all indicating that stereo is popular and much wanted.

"As a result, I propose to broadcast the nightly FM Music Service on both monaural FM on 91 M/Hz and in stereo on 96 M/Hz from now on.

"Listeners will, however, have to realsie that with the limited power of 100 watts ERP available, the service can only be received within the harbour basin area.

"Programme material available.will be mainly in stereo, but will also contain some monaural items, but the fact that whatever is available in stereo, will be broadcast in stereo, will, I hope, give satisfaction to listeners with stereo equipment. I hope it will not be too long before we can provide a Colony-wide FM stereo service," he said.

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SALE OF 47TH GOVERNMENT LOTTERY TICKETS

***t*.*t«*i*r

A total of 5159000 tickets for the 47th Government Lottery has been sold up to 5 p*nu today.

The draw will take place at 10 a.m. on Saturday (June 3)•

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Release time: 6.45 p.n

PRESS RELEASE

Wednesday, May 31, 1972.

ONLY TWO WEEKS LEFT

FOR NEV/ VOTERS TO REGISTER.

The final phase of an intensive four-month drive to register new voters for next year’s Urban Council elections starts tomorrow (Thursday, June 1).

Registration of new voters closes in a fortnight’s time on June 14.

The Commissioner of Registration, Mr. J.V.G. Mitchell, stressed that unless people register now they will not have another opportunity to do so for another two years.

New posters are being displayed in English and Chinese informing people where electoral registration forms can be o' tained. Radio and television announcements will also be used, and Post Office mail deliveries will be franked with the slogan ’’Urbco Voters Register Now.”

Electoral registration forms can be obtained from

any of the following places

Kiosks in Statue Square and near Oce~n Terminal

Hong Kong Island Star Ferry Concourse

City District Offices

iS K

/2.

Help run your city Register as Electors

- 2 -

* Post Office Inquiry Counters

* Registration of Persons Offices

* Urban Council Ward Offices

District Offices in the New Territories

* Eaifong and Rural Committee Offices

People on the current roll of electors who have so far failed to re-register are being sent Sexennial Notices of Inquiry for the second time.

These are accompanied by a personal letter signed by the Commissioner of Registration, reminding people that if they fail to re-register they will lose the opportunity of voting in the next Urban Council elections. The closing date for returning the forms is June 50.

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