Daily Information Bulletin - 1970s - 1972 - OCT - ENG

 PRH 7 4000091

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Sunday, October 1, 1972

MORE SPECIALISTS FOR EDUCATION DEPARTMENT

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Five newly trained specialists have returned from the United Kingdom to reinforce the Special Education Section of the Education Department.

This brings the number of specialists in the Section to JL.

Seven others, still undergoing training in Britain, are due to return to Hong Kong in another year or so.

Of the five new staff members, two are trained in the education of the educationally subnormal, one in the education of maladjusted children, one in the education of the blind and one in speech therapy.

The expansion of the Special Education Section is part of the Government’s five-year development plan for special education.

The majority of people approaching this Section for help are school teachers and parents of children with problems. Others are referred by the Social Welfare Department, the Medical and Health Department, general practitioners and voluntary welfare agencies.

Mrs. Grace Yung, an educational psychologist, interviews on an average between 70 and 90 children a month. These are children v/ith learning difficulties or behaviour problems.

/’•When ......

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong. Tel: 5-233191

Sunday, October 1, 1972

- 2 -

"When a child is referred to us for help, we first interview him together with his parents. Then we give him an intelligence test followed by a series of psychological tests until we arrive at the root of the problem," she says.

"We aim to help the child so that he can be accepted as an equal member of the community. We assess him according to his age, intelligence and ability to receive education and refer him to one of the special schools depending on his difficulties, or to a special class in an ordinary school where he can benefit from schooling in an ordinary environment."

Another aspect of the diagnostic services of the Special Education Section is provided by the Speech and Hearing Centre.

About 5,000 primary one pupils in government schools are given screening tests each year to detect and identify hearing impairments and to provide correct treatment and appropriate training at an early age.

Ten per cent of the children given screening tests are found to be in need of therapeutic treatment.

Part of the audiologist’s work is to diagnose the type and degree of hearing loss of the children. He then places them in suitable schools for education.

Students suffering from minor hearing impairments are placed in special classes for the partially-hearing in ordinary schools where they receive special tutorial help from teachers. At the same time, they undergo medical treatment or use hearing aids.

Once they can follow ordinary class teaching. They are transferred to ordinary classes.

/The Government •••••••

Sunday, October 1, 1972

- 3 -

The Government Lotteries Fund has made it possible for hearing aids to be provided free to children in need of them.

Every year, the Special Education Section conducts speech screening tests for primary three pupils of government primary schools. About 4,000 pupils are screened and 300 are given remedial therapy each year.

Teachers are given basic knowledge about pupils with minor speech defects and children with more serious speech and language problems are referred to the Speech and Hearing Centre for special training.

An educational counsellor is always on hand to assist the specialists in winning the understanding and co-operation of the parents and teachers, without which rapid improvement would not be made.

Not only primary school pupils receive the benefit of services provided by the Special Education Section. Among the list of people presently under the care of the specialists are a number of secondary students.

When the Hong Kong Certificate of Education Examinations are held, a special centre is set up for students with difficulties. There they are given special arrangements based on recommendations given by the specialists after consideration of their difficulties.

A common aspect in the work of all the specialists in the Special Education Section is the help they give in teacher training.

Besides operating one-year in-service courses in special education, they also conduct seminars and short courses for teachers in ordinary schools and student teachers at the three colleges of education.

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Sunday, October 1, 1972

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- 4 -

MOSQUITO NUISANCE MAY DEVELOP

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The recent downpour of rain may trigger off a widespread mosquito nuisance, a spokesman for the Urban Services Department warned today#

He pointed out that mosquitoes breed only in stagnant water -clean or otherwise - regardless of the environment.

People are urged to keep a sharp lookout for stagnant water in the vicinity of their own home for possible breeding places.

In built-up areas the most favourite breeding places are discarded receptacles such as tins and bottles. Choked surface drains and uncovered water tanks are also common breeding grounds.

The neglected places can be located and destroyed or removed.

The Urban Services Department gives the following advice:

pay special attention to open areas, such as roofs, balconies, verandahs,canopies and yards;

remove all empty tins and bottles and turn large receptacles up side down; and

cover up water tanks and* clear all rain water outlets to prevent blockages.

The Government has been doing what it can to control large-scale breeding places, such as streams, pools, ponds, building sites and vacant land t the spokesman said.

The control of small breeding places in and around domestic buildings is, however, just as important.

Everyone can help to remove the nuisance, by regularly checking for possible breeding places and destroying them, the spokesman added.

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Release Time: 3.00 p.m.

PRH 7 4000091

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Monday, October 2, 1972

MORE PEOPLE ELIGIBLE FOR LEGAL AID

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More people are qualified for legal aid following recent amendments to the Means Test for Civil Legal Aid Cases.

The amendments, which came into force on September 1, increase the limits below which a person becomes eligible for legal aid.

On the question of income, the Director of Legal Aid, Mr. O’Reilly Mayne, said the ceiling limit of income per month has been raised from 3500 to 3700 per month.

The Legal Aid Department also makes generous allowances in respect of all dependents of the applicant and it does not take into account the amount of rents and rates payable in respect of his dwelling house.

Accordingly, he said, people with incomes very much more than 3700 per month may well be eligible for legal aid.

Referring to capital, Mr. O’Reilly Mayne said, the disposable income of 33,000 has now been increased to 3^,000.

He said the first 320,000 of the value of an applicant’s interest in his dwelling house after deduction of encumbrances were not counted.

Also not counted was the value of his household furniture and effects, personal clothing, tools and implements of trade.

/in addition, .....

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong. Tel: 5-233191

Monday, October 2, 1972

- 2 -

In addition, Mr. O’Reilly Mayne said the Legal Aid Department makes an allowance of $1,500 in respect of each dependent of the applicant.

This means that people with a lot more capital than $4,000 could also qualify for legal aid.

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AIR PARCEL SERVICE TO SEYCHELLES

**,««,*»*

The Post Office has introduced a twice weekly air parcel service to the Seychelles.

Parcels will be accepted for posting under the same general conditions as for surface parcels to the Seychelles and conveyed on direct flights from Hong Kong on Thursdays and Sundays.

The postage rate will be $6.00 for each % lb. of weight.

I

Monday, October 2, 1972

- 3 -

NEW ROAD BETWEEN TSUEN WAN AND CASTLE PEAK

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Ground investigation work is to begin shortly along the proposed new road linking the satellite towns of Tsuen Wan and Castle Peak.

This work, which is expected to start this month, will take about five months to complete.

The new nine-mile road, to be constructed in two stages, is being planned in connection with the development of Castle Peak New Town.

At present, the Government is studying in detail recommendations made by the consulting engineers on the alignment of the first stage of the project.

It has been planned that the new road will first have a 33-foot-wide carriageway which will be operated initially as a two-way road. But the design standards chosen for speed and gradients are such that the road will provide a high capacity link between the two towns.

To maintain this high capacity, access will be strictly limited along the entire length of the road and interchanges will only be provided at Tsuen Wan, Sham Tseng, Tai Lam Chung and Castle Peak.

On completion of the whole project, the road will consist of dual three-lane carriageways. It will be of motorway standard with all interchanges grade separated and hard shoulders provided for each carriageway to accommodate break downs and other emergency stoppages.

Subject to the government's decision to proceed with the scheme, it is hoped that the initial plan of providing the 33-foot-wide canriageway can • • •• -*•' •

begin next year.

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A

Monday, October 2, 1972

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JAPANESE SCHOLARSHIP OPEN TO HONG KONG STUDENTS ♦ * ♦ ♦ ♦ * ♦ ♦ ♦

The Japanese Government is offering a Mombushu Scholarship to Form Lower Six students and those who have matriculated in Hong Kong, to study Japanese language at the Tokyo University of Foreign Studies.

The candidates must be aged between 18 and 25-

The aim of the programme is to give opportunities to foreign students wishing to attend a Japanese university, and promoting international exchange in education and culture.

The scholarship is tenable for five years, during which time the recipient will receive 47,000 yen a month. He will also be provided with passages to and from Japan, field study allowances and accommodation.

The recipient must be able to arrive in Japan between October 1 and October 10, 1973» or the scholarship may be cancelled.

On arrival, he will be given a one-year course on the Japanese language and other courses preparing him for university studies. All classes will be conducted in Japanese.

Application forms and further particulars can be obtained from the Overseas Students and Scholarships Section of the Education Department, Lee Gardens, 3rd floor, Hong Kong.

Completed forms and relevant documents must be returned to the Education Department on or before October 7, 1972.

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75.........

Monday, October 2, 1972

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ARRIVAL OF TECHNICAL EDUCATION EXPERT

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A British expert on technical education, Mr. J.W. Gailer, will arrive in Hong Kong tomorrow (Tuesday) evening to carry out a general survey of Hong Kong’s technical education.

During his five day visit, Mr. Gailer will meet the Director of Education, Mr. J. Canning and the Assistant Director of Education (Technical), Mr. N.E. Barnes, and discuss with them the planning of technical institutes.

He will also hold talks with the Director of the Polytechnic, Mr. C.L. Old, on the general staffing and*development aspects of the Polytechnic.

Mr. Gailer was in Hong Kong during 1966-67, when he carried out an investigation of local technical education, and a report was submitted to the government in March, 1967* He has a special interest in the education of technicians at craft level.

Mr. Gailer, who is Adviser on Technical Education for the Council for Technical Education and Training for Overseas Countries, is currently in Korea.

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/6.......

Monday, October 2, 1972

- 6 -

VISIT BY MRS. ROWE TO ST. JAMES' SETTLEMENT

**#«**«*«

Mrs. G.T. Rowe, wife of the Director of Social Welfare, spent more than an hour this morning visiting the St. James* Settlement in Kennedy Road.

She was accompanied by the Principal Social Welfare Officer, West Kowloon District Office, Mrs. Evelyn Doe. They we ire met at the Settlement by Mrs. Lee Wai-ngan, the Warden.

The Settlement is run by the Church Body of the Chinese Anglican Church, and the Right Reverend Gilbert Baker, the Bishop of Hong Kong and Macau, is the Chairman of its Executive Committee.

It has been receiving a government subvention for many years, and the sum approved for the current financial year is S33O,OOO.

The Settlement was inaugurated at the end of 19^9 to provide recreational, literacy, and practical training facilities for children in the Wan Chai district. From a small beginning, it was extended as the need arose and funds became available.

The workshops were completed in 19^1, the main building in 1963, and the Stone Nullah Centre in 1969.

The objectives of the Settlement are to establish and run a centre to provide social service and practical training for the neighbourhood, to make possible training for people interested in social work, and to consider ways of promoting the welfare of the neighbourhood.

Activities include a day nursery, a children’s play centre, clubs for boys and girls, youth clubs, clubs for mothers, a dental clinic, a club for old people and a library.

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/7

Monday, October 2, 1972

- 7 -

FINES IMPOSED ON OPERATORS OF UNLICENSED FOOD BUSINESSES

*»**«**«*

The Urban Services Department today reiterated its determination to clamp down on unlicensed food businesses in urban areas to safeguard public health•

A spokesman said the department would continue to request the court to impose daily fines on illegal food business operators as a deterrent against this public health hazard.

He cited two recent cases in which the court imposed a daily fine, in addition to a lump-sum fine, on the convicted operator.

In one case, the offender was fined $800 for failing to comply with a court order to close down his illegal restaurant, and another #100 for running the business without a licence. In addition, the court imposed a daily fine of #5 for 40 days.

The other offender was fined $250 for running an illegal restaurant, plus a daily fine of $5 for 71 days. He was also fined $150 for failing to keep the food room clean.

The spokesman said that in order to discourage the continuous operation of unlicensed food business, it was necessary to impose heavy fines which really hurt the pockets of the offenders.

The Food Business By-laws stipulate that anyone found guilty of an offence under these by-laws is liable to a maximum fine of $2,000 and three months imprisonment.

If the offence is a continous one, the offender is liable, in addition to the fixed penalty, to a fine of $50 for each day during which the illegal business is found operating.

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Monday, October 2, 1972

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TRAFFIC ARRANGEMENTS FOR INSIGNIA PRESENTATION

«**«***»*

Metered parking facilities in Upper and Lower Albert Roads and the slip road to the south of the American Consulate will be suspended from 9«JO a.m. to 1 p.m. on Wednesday (October 4).

This is one of the special traffic arrangements being made for guests at the presentation of insignia ceremony at Government House.

All cars carrying guests may enter Government House by the main gate. Those bearing G.H. Labels may park in the forecourt or tennis courts as directed, or return at 11.40 a.m. to pick up the guests.

Vehicles bearing Blue Labels must exit at the east gate and park at the above mentioned parking spaces.

All cars parked inside Government House should leave by the east gate.

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Release time; 7»QQ P«m>

PRH 7 4000091

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Tuesday, October 3, 1972

REHOUSING FOR HIGH ISLAND VILLAGERS

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Preparations for the rehousing of villagers who will be affected by the High Island Water Scheme are now under way.

The District Officer, Sai Kung and his staff are contacting the 90 odd families individually, explaining the implications of the terms of removal in detail and discussing any special problems which the removal from the reservoir area may bring. At the same time they are verifying the status of the family and each of its members.

This follows the completion of discussions between the District Officer and representatives of the villagers at a meeting last Saturday (September JO).

During the talks, the District Officer answered a few remaining questions put by the villagers to clarify the removal terms which the government has finally worked out after more than a year of discussions.

The terms distinguish between two basic groups of villagers.

The biggest of these groups consists of 70 out of the 90 odd families affected who have existed in three villages in the Lan Nai Wan area, near the western dam site, for several generations.

The remaining 1J or so families are from Sha Tsui, near the eastern dam site, who moved there comparatively recently from their original village, Long Ke, which is situated outside the reservoir area.

/The Lan Nai •••••

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Tuesday, October 5i 1972

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The Lan Nai Wan people will have no chance of continuing village life in future and expanding their village in the normal way as all their village land will be submerged by the reservoir.

The Sha Tsui people, however, will be able to continue village life even after the completion of the reservoir, as they may move back to their original village, Long Ke. Furthermore, the High Island Water Scheme is likely to leave Long Ke much more accessible.

Under the terms for removal the villagers of both groups will be treated the same in most respects but, since the water scheme will spell the end of village life for one group but not the other, some distinction between their removal terms is clearly justified.

All the families affected will be provided with flats in rehousing blocks at Sai Kung town to replace not only accommodation lost in the reservoir but also to some extent means of livelihood lost. The 15 or so Sha Tsui families will between them receive more than 40 flats.

In addition, a cash allowance of 310,000 will be paid by the Government for every flat or shop unit to cover the cost of fitting out and decorating.

The basic difference between the terms of the two groups is that while the Lan Nai Wan families fjlll receive ground floor shop uni roughly one per family, in addition to their flats, the Sha Tsui families will only receive flats.

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Tuesday, October J, 1972

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RUN ON TRANSPORT DEPT. FOR TAXI TENDER FORMS

*********

The Transport Department has handed out more than 18,000 tender forms since it was announced last Friday that 350 new taxi licences will be issued.

The demand has, in fact, been so heavy that the department has virtually run out of forms, prompting an appeal to prospective tenderers not to apply for them until Friday (October 6).

A spokesman for the Transport Department gave an assurance that the staff would be working at full speed to produce a further supply by then.

’’Those who still haven’t obtained the forms need not panic as they still have plenty of time after October 6 to submit their tenders,” the spokesman said.

’’The tender does not close until Friday, October 20.”

Due to the heavy demand, only one copy of the form will be issued to each applicant.

The spokesman warned eager tenderers not to obtain forms from anybody other than from the department’s offices nor to pay anyone for them.

’’The forms are all free of charge,” he said.

If they v^ere. asked to pay, they should report this to the Transport Department headquarters.

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4

CANCELLATION OF CERTAIN DRIVING TESTS

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Driving tests which were to have been held from October 9 for all goods vehicles, public light buses, and public and private omnibuses - except those of the two public bus companies - have been cancelled.

In announcing this today, a spokesman for the Transport Department apologised for any inconvenience caused to candidates. He explained that the cancellations were due to the current shortage of staff.

However, new appointments will be arranged and candidates will be notified of the revised dates by letter.

At the same time, the spokesman said it may not be possible for some driving tests set before October 9 to be conducted on schedule. This would affect candidates for licences for the above vehicles as well as motor cycles.

Any candidate who may be affected will also be informed of new appointments.

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/5........

Tuesday, October 3, 1972

BRITISH AWARD FOR DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC WORKS

*********

The Director of Public Works, Mr. J.J. Robson, has been awarded a Telford Premium by the British Institution of Civil Engineers (I.C.E.) for a paper he submitted on "Overall Planning in Hong Kong".

The 36-page article, which deals with, among other things, housing, road, traffic and transportation, was presented to the Conference on Civil Engineering Problems Overseas in London in June last year.

As its name implies, the bi-annual conference is designed to study these problems.

Telford Premiums were instituted following a bequest made by

Mr. Thomas Telford, the first President of the I.C.E. In addition to the premium, which is worth £50, Mr. Robson will receive a certificate.

The Director of Public Works began his article with a description of the barrenness of Hong Kong when it was proclaimed a British Colony in 1841.

He then recalled how Hong Kong has been transformed since the war from an entrepot port to an overcrowded manufacturing community, and the influx of refugees whose presence had given rise to problems such as housing, schools and hospitals.

Referring to housing, Mr. Robson said the Government began a resettlement building programme following a disastrous squatter fire in 1953 in which 53*000 people lost their homes.

In addition, the Government has financed two other programmes for providing accommodation for residents living in overcrowded and unsatisfactory conditions.

/To date, ........

Tuesday, October 3, 1972

- 6 -

To date, there are about 1,620,000 people or *+0 per cent of the population living in government-aided housing of one sort or another.

The construction programme for the period mentioned in the paper of April 1, 1969 to March 31, 1975 was resettlement housing for 300,000 people and low cost housing for 290,000 people. The latest programme for April 1, 1971 to March 31, 1977 is to provide government housing for 875,000 people.

On Transport, Mr. Robson said it became apparent in early 19&5 that there was a need for a detailed study of public mass transport, and a preliminary study was put in hand by a Transport Survey Unit headed by staff from the British Roads Research Laboratory.

He added that the Government then contracted with Freeman Fox, Wilbur Smith and Associates to undertake the detailed study necessary to formulate a functional plan for mass transportation based on demands anticipated in 1986.

The Hong Kong Mass Transport Study was thereafter carried out in conjunction with the Public Works Department Transport Survey Unit which, after investigating existing public transport facilities, development plans and travel characteristics, assessed travel desires and the traffic volumes for that year.

Mr. Robson said: ”An analysis of these volumes by the consultants showed that Hong Kong’s transportation requirements could best be met by a 40-mile (later recommended to be reduced to 32/a-mile) mass transit standard gauge underground railway comprising four separate lines, in combination with a complete surface network of public service vehicles.’1

/The system, •.•.•

Tuesday, October J, 1972

- 7 -

The system, it was predicted, would carry 2*5 million passengers a day, representing about one-third of Hong Kong’s public transport trips.

Turning to the water situation, Mr. Robson described how the first waterworks scheme at Pokfulam was designed for an estimated population of 90,000, but by the time the first section was completed it was already outdated as the population had reached 125,000.

”In spite of the best endeavours of its engineers this has been the history of the waterworks ever since: a succession of crises caused by demand outstripping supply,” he said.

In conclusion, the Director says ’’the important point is that all planning is made on the basis of private enterprise playing its part without coercion and dictated only by the law of the market. It is the Author’s view that, in the light of Hong Kong’s development throughout its history, this system works”.

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/8........

Tuesday, October J, 1972

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CO-OPERATION, THE KEYNOTE OF LOCAL PUBLIC WORKS IN THE NEW TERRITORIES |**»**«*

Villagers in the New Territories, with the help of the Governmen and the Anny, have accomplished hundreds of local public works projects which contribute to their daily requirements.

Last year the Government allocated a sum of nearly million to facilitate these projects, either in the issuing of construction materials or in the appointment of building contractors.

Nearly JO per cent of the total number of projects undertaken in Tai Po were related to traffic, including van tracks, footpaths and bridges. :j

Other projects included drainage channels, rain shelters, playgrounds and minor seawalls.

The largest project in Yuen Long was the Sik Po Tsuen playground Constructed on a site of JJ,000 square feet, the playground is equipped with a min-soccer pitch, a children’s playground and a rest area.

During the year, the Sai Kung area received public works funds amounting to' *^0,000\ almost double that..received ^n-1970-7'1 •

With the help of the Army, Navy, various organisations and student bodies, the local villagers extended the Hang Hau Pier and installed generators in five villages.

/Villagers .......

Tuesday, October 3, 1972

- 9 -

Villagers of Tsuen Wan district completed the building of pathways, van tracks, water supply pipelines, village offices, rain shelters, village squares and benches with material provided by the District Office.

On the Islands, great improvements were achieved through the efforts of the villagers with the support of the Army and donations from abroad.

The 3^ Field Squadron of the Royal Engineers were specially flown out from England, and in their three-month stay they completed the extension of a village pier, the electrification of the Pak Mong, Ngau Kwu Long and Tai Ho villages in North Lantau, and the building of a playground.

A third CARE village housing 40 needy fishing families was built in Sai Wan on Cheung Chau. Building costs of the village was met by donations from abroad, the villagers themselves and the Local public works funds.

Other major projects include the strengthening of the dyke at Ham Tin on South Lantau, and the reinstatement of the seawalls at Pak Wan on Peng Chau and at San Hing Street on Cheung Chau.

/10........

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Tuesday, October 3» 1972

- 10 -

SOCIAL WELFARE AT AGRICULTURAL SHOW ********* *•

The Social Welfare Department stall at this year’s Agricultural Show will stress the theme of departmental services and facilities in the New Territories.

The department will be among eight others taking part in the Show.

The group will be joined by about ^0 commercial organisations, making a total participation of about 40.

The Social Welfare Department’s contribution will be in two parts.

One is a stall where items produced by trainees at various homes / ■

and centres will be on display, along with photographs illustrating departmental activities such as family services, rehabilitation, public assistance, and probation and corrections.

The latest mobile library to operate in the New Territories will form a separate display. The Group and Community Work Division maintains such vehicles, and their task is to bring simple books and the pleasures of reading to the young in remote rural areas.’

Together, the two exhibits will convey the message that the department is as active in promoting social welfare among the needy in the country as in the town.

The Agricultural Show, from December 8-11, will be held on the

Sek Kong Airstrip. It will be officially opened by the Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose.

The last show was held in 1969-

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Tuesday, October 3, 1972

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NEW ROAD FOR SHAU KEI WAN

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The Government is to build a new road adjoining a large building development site near the junction of Shau Kei Wan Road and Chai Wan Road.

The new road will be 600 feet long, and the carriageway will vary in width from 24 to 32 feet. An eight-foot wide concrete footpath will be laid on either side of the road.

Ancillary drainage work will be carried out and a section of the Aldrich Street nullah will be culverted in conjunction with the roadwork.

Construction work for the entire project, estimated to cost about $380,000, is expected to start in November and be completed within seven months.

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PRESENTATION OF INSIGNIA

*********

Note to Editors: The Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose will

present insignia to 43 members of the community at a ceremony at Government House tomorrow at 11.30 a.m. Copies of a list of recipients and citations will be available for collection from the G.I.S. press room at 11.30 a.m. tomorrow. No press photographers other than those provided with special passes will be admitted to Government House. Press representatives assigned to cover the ceremony are requested to assemble at the guard room of Government House not later than 11 a.m. G.I.S. officers will be on hand to give assistance. Newspapers not receiving passes will be able to obtain photographs by making arrangements for the supply of prints in the ordinary way with Cambridge Wong’s Studio, China Building, 1st floor, Hong Kong, H-2378o8.

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Release time: 7»QQ P*m

PRH 7 4000091

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Wednesday, October 4, 1972

LEGAL REPRESENTATION FOR RAINSTORM VICTIMS

The Government has provided funds to enable rainstorm victims to be represented by a lawyer at the hearings of the Commission of Inquiry into the June rainstorm disasters.

Legal aid has already been offered to all victims in connection with any legal claims they may think they have against any person or persons# including the Government.

Announcing the decision today a government spokesman said: ’’Although the new provision is outside the scope of the normal legal aid schemef it was thought appropriate to give this to any victim who is implicated or concerned in the subject matter of the inquiry and who meets the scheme’s criteria.

”This would help to dispel the misunderstanding of some victims that there is selectivity and weighting of evidence in favour of those people or organisations who are legally represented,” he said.

He pointed out that this is particularly so9 now that the Commission is considering expert evidence on the cause of the landslides and evidence from private contractors and architects who had been concerned with the building works, including site formation in the Po Shan Road area.

/Meanwhile, ••••••

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong. Tel: 5-233191

Wednesday, October 4, 1972

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• ■

Meanwhile, the Director of Legal Aid, Mr. D.O’R. Mayne, announced that Mr. Charles Ching had been appointed to represent victims, on both sides of the harbour.

He added that Mr. Ching should be able to represent others affected by the rainstorms except those who have separate interests, thus requiring separate representation.

Any rainstorm victims who need legal assistance, are asked to contact the Legal Aid Department on H-2J1973 or H-253862.

The appointment of Mr. Ching will in no way interfere with the duties of the counsel assisting the Commission who is responsible for . i. . •

seeing that all relevant evidence is brought before it.

The hearings resumed today and were adjourned to Monday ; ’r

(October 9) after formal production of statements and reports from expert witnesses , contractors and architects.

Wednesday, October 4, 1972

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TREMENDOUS GROWTH OF HK’S LIGHT INDUSTRIES IN LAST DECADE

*********

Hong Kong’s light industries have shown a tremendous growth during the past decade। with the value of domestic exports jumping by a spectacular 310,883 million from 196O’s 32,867 million to last year’s 313,750 million.

The total work force engaged in these industries has more than doubled during the same period, rising from 224,400 to 564,370.

And the number of factories is yet another proof of the phenomenal growth, soaring to 18,612 last year which is over three times more than the 5,346 in 196,0.

This rapid industrial development has already given rise to new townships such as Tsuen Wan, Kwai Chung, Kwun Tong and San Po Kong.

The industries, which have developed in scope, scale and sophistication, are those whose products have been able to withstand international competition without subsidy or protection, and those which are geared to servicing the manufacture of such products.

Skills in marketing techniques, plus highly developed banking, insurance and shipping systems inherited from the historical‘entrepot era, have advanced the development of manufacturing industries which are the mainstay of the economy.

Among those industries which have displayed dramatic growth are the electrodes, -plastics, wigs, and watch and clock (including metal watch bands) industries.

/The electronics •••••••

Wednesday, October 4, 1972

- 4 -

The electronics industry has developed most rapidly in recent years. Starting with two factories assembling transistor radios from wholly imported parts late in 1959, there are now 281 factories, manufacturing transistor radios, TV sets and parts, computer memory systems and electronic components.

, Latest, additions to the list are the manufacture of pre-packaged* electronic modules and desk calculating machines.

The manufacture of transistor raidos is the largest sector of the industry. However, other sectors have been gaining in importance, in particular computer parts and TV sets and parts. u . .

In the plastics industry, novelties, dolls and toys, many of which are of excellent design and quality, account for much of the industry’s production.

Many overseas manufacturers co-operate with local firms to manufacture toys in Hong Kong under licensing agreements.

The production of plastic flowers and fruits is significant and exports were valued at $355 million in 1971.

Many of Hong Kong's 5,019 plastics factories are equipped with up-to-date machinery, many of the injection and extrusion machines being manufactured in Hong Kong. Dies and moulds are made locally and are also exported worldwide.

The wig industry was started in 1964 and has prospered until-recently when it suffered a decline* in part at least as a result ©f the economic recession in America — its major market.

/However, •••.•••••

Wednesday, October 4, 1972

- 5 -

However, it remains a sizeable industry, employing some 15,000 workers, with exports in 1971 valued at $527 million.

The production of watches and clocks in Hong Kong has improved significantly both in quality and quantity, and the products have taken foothold in foreign markets.

Although foreign manufacturers supply most of the movement parts, Hong Kong has gained a good reputation for the quality of its watches, clock cases and product designs.

The export of watches and clocks, as well as parts, was valued at $17 million in 1960, and jumped to over $265 million last year.

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/6............

■V

Wednesday, October 4, 1972

- 6 -

LONDON OFFICE MOVES TO MAYFAIR **********

After 11 years in Pall Mall, the London Office of the Hong Kong Government is moving to new premises at 6 Grafton Street, an area which has been described as the heart of the banking and commercial district of Mayfair.

The move will be made on Friday, October 1J.

The new office has a usable floor area of about 13,575 square feet.

At first the London Office will occupy about 9»000 square feet with the surplus space available for future expansion. In the meantime it will be let on short lease to suitable sub-tenants.

As well as housing all the existing sections of the London Office -administration, commercial relations, Chinese liaison, students, government training, and information - the new office will have an enlarged library and, for the first time, a public reading room.

A reception room will be reserved for use of members of the Executive and Legislative Councils, senior government officers and members of trade and other officially-sponsored Hong Kong delegations who are in London.

The house at No. 6 Grafton Street has historical associations. It is mentioned in George Clinch’s ”Mayfair and Belgravia”, where he speaks of ”Lord Henniker’s house, No. 6 Grafton Street, containing a room expressly built for the purpose of entertaining George IV”.

This room,which has been restored to its original condition, will be used as the conference room of the new Hong Kong Government Office.

Note to Editors: Photographs of the new London Office will be distributed separately in the G.I.S. Press Boxes this evening.

-------o--------- /7 .........

Wednesday, October 4, 1972

PARTIAL RE-OPENING OF CHING CHEUNG ROAD

**********

Ching Cheung Road, an important link in the existing road network along the Kowloon foothills, will be partially re—opened to traffic from 7 a.m. on Friday (October 6)

Extensive repairs have been undertaken by the Public Works Department since the road was first closed more than three months ago as a result of the June rainstorms-

However, a spokesman for the Transport Department said today that only one-way traffic would be permitted along Ching Cheung Road at this stage. It would have to be closed again at 8 p.m. each evening for further repairs and then re-open at 7 a.m. the following day.

This arrangement will continue in force until the restoration work is completed.

To guide motorists, appropriate signs will be erected and ♦’ . • • .... traffic lights installed near the Cheung Sha Wan Catholic Cemetery.

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/8..........

Wednesday, October 4, 1972

- 8 -

PRESENTATION OF INSIGNIA

* * ****** *

Forty-three people today received their insignia from the Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, at a special presentation ceremony at Government House.

The recipients were decorated by the Queen either in her Birthday Honours or in the New Year Honours.

The insignia included two C.B.E.’s, six O.B.E’s, three I.S.O.’q and 10 M.B.E.’s.

The gathering was reminded of the brave act of the late Dr. Lu Chung-ling, who disregarding his own safety, warned residents about a fire in the building in which he lived, until he was overcome by heat and smoke.

Although eventually rescued he did not recover consciousness and died.

Dr. Lu was posthumously awarded the Queen’s Commendation for his heroism, and his widow, Mrs. Lu today received the insignia.

Note to Editors: The citations for 28 of the awards and the

Tull list of names are issued separately as a supplement to today’s Daily Information Bulletin.

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/9..........

Wednesday, October 4, 1972

- 9 -

CASTLE PEAK SEWAGE SYSTEM SCHEME COMPLETED

****>*«»«**

The final phase of an overall sewage system to serve the initial development of Castle Peak New Town — the Pak Kok pumping station — will be officially opened on Friday (October 6).

The station is part of stage 1A of the development and will provide screening and disposal facilities for the new town as well as neighbouring areas.

Among the first to benefit will be the 5»000 residents of the Castle Peak Resettlement Estate, but when stage I of the new town is completed it will serve the projected population of 58,000.

The sewage system consists of the pumping station, screening-plant, an 800-foot submarine outfall at Pak Kok Tsui on the west coast of Castle Peak Bay, and staff quarters.

The cost of the scheme is 32.1 million.

The Chairman of the Advisory Committee on Environmental Pollution on Land and Water, Mr. H.M.G. Forsgate, will officiate at the ribbon-cutting and plaque unveiling ceremony at 11 a.m. The Director of Engineering Development, Mr. J.R. Whitaker will also be present.

Note to Editors: You are invited to send a reporter and/or photographer to have the opening ceremony covered. Transportation will be provided at 9*15 a.m. at the metered car'park beside the Tsim Sha Tsui Post Office. Two nine-seater vans, AU 568 and AP 8959» will take the Press to the Pak Kok station. Two Public Works Department officers, Mr. Leung Ming-lam and Mr. Cheung Koon-lam will be on hand to assist the Press.

/10 ,.......

Wednesday-^_0<rtober-4, ^972

- 10 -

URBAN COUNCIL ENTERTAINMENT PROGRAMME /

**♦*♦♦*♦♦

The Urban Council will be putting on more than 20 entertainment shows for residents in various estates and districts throughout Hong Kong during the remainder of this month.

The shows range from band concerts and Chinese operas to variety and film shows and are to be held mostly in the evenings.

On Saturday, October 21, there will be an open air folk concert at the Boundary Street Stadium from 7«3O to 10.JO p.m. and some 7*000 youngsters are expected to join in the fun.

The feature film for this month is a Chinese film called "The Armed Escort- was a Woman".

Admission to all the shows is free.

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WATER INTERRUPTION IN TSZ WAN SHAN

*********

Water supply to a number of premises in Tsz Wan Shan, Kowloon, will be turned off for five hours from 1 a.m. on Friday (October 6) to enable the Waterworks Office to carry out a leakage test.

The area affected is bounded by Tsz Wan Shan Road, Lok Wah Street, Ning Wah Street, Fung Wah Street, including Blocks to 53 Tsz Wan Shan Resettlement Estate.

-------O---------

Release Timet 7 <00 p.m

♦000035

P.R. 33

HONG KONG GOVERNMENT

NFORMATION

SERVICES

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

SUPPLEMENT

Wednesday, October 4, 1972

PRESENTATION OF INSIGNIA

*********

The following is the citation for 28 of the awards at today’s presentation of insignia ceremony at Government House DR. THE HON. G.H. CHOA, CBE

Dr. Choa joined the Medical and Health Department in 19%» and has been Director of Medical and Health Services since 1970. His service has been of high distinction, and as Head of a large and expanding department with heavy responsibilities to the community he has won universal respect and admiration for his professional ability and his qualities of sound judgment and unruffled leadership.

THE HON. J.J. ROBSON, CBE

Mr. Robson has been in the Public Works Department since 1946, and its Director for J years. This large and important department has a vast range of responsibilities, and during the last three years has undergone unprecedented expansion. Mr. Robson has successfully directed the expanded programme of his department and with his powers of leadership and professional ability has rendered great service to Hong Kong.

/Miss Chan

Wednesday, October 4, 1972

- 2 -

MISS PAULINE CHAN, OBE

Miss Chan entered the business field in Hong Kong in 194-5} and • since then she has become an expert in industrial production processes, factory organisation, worker training and personnel control. Miss Chan has proved herself an outstanding industrialist, and has made a significant contribution to the economy of Hong Kong. MH. DANIEL LAM SEE-HIN, OBE

Mr. Lam has been an appointed member of the Urban Council and has given good service to the community through his work on advisory boards and on the Trade Development Council. His commonsense and wide experience of industry .have been of great benefit to Hong Kong. MH. DONALD LIAO POON-HUAI, OBE

Mr. Liao joined the Housing Division of the Urban Services Department in I960, and became Commissioner for Housing in 1968. As Commissioner he has been responsible for housing some 39OjOOO people. The attractive lay-out and high standard of management of Housing Authority estates are due to Mr. Liao’s professional skill and enthusiasm. MH. BRIAN SUART, OBE

Mr. Suart has worked for Cable and Wireless Limited for over 27 years. During his career he has served in many parts of the world -usually in the East or Far East. He returned to Hong Kong for the second time as Manager in 1964 and was appointed General Manager in 1966. In this position Mr. Suart has done much to improve telecommunication facilities both for Hong Kong and in the South-East Asian area as a whole, and has thus rendered valuable service to Hong Kong.

/Mr. Lee .......

Wednesday, October 4, 1972

- 3 -

MR. LEE JUNG-SEN, OBE (HONORARY)

Mr. Lee has contributed greatly to the economic development of Hong Kong by his participation in a number of important industrial concerns. His advice and knowledge have been of great benefit on many Government bodies and on the Council of the Chinese University of Hong Kong MR. TING HSIUNG-CHAO, OBE (HONORARY)

Mr. Ting is the largest toy manufacturer in Hong Kong with markets in every corner of the world. He has for many years devoted time and money to charitable projects. His hard work, skill and enterprise have set an example for all and he has contributed to both the well-being and the economy of Hong Kong.

MR. IU KAU-YU, ISO

Mr. lu joined Government service in 193$, and has served with the Royal Hong Kong Police since 1945- During this time he served in various formations but for the past 12 years he has been attached to the Triad Societies Bureau where his work was of an exceptionally high standard. He has set an example of hard and conscientious work, and loyalty to his colleagues.

MR. J.D. MCGREGOR, ISO

Mr. McGregor has shown an immense capacity for work and enthusiasm and leadership during his 16 years service in the Commerce and Industry Department. His high standards and personal qualities have benefited not only the department, but also the economy of Hong Kong. He has shown the same competence and drive in voluntary work for the less fortunate members of the community.

/Mr. D.N. WILLIS, ......

Wednesday, October 1972

MP. D.N. WILLIS, ISO

Mr* Willis has given exemplary service to the Hong Kong Government over a period of 19 years in the Information Services Department. His sound journalistic experience and his ability of work accurately and quickly under pressure have provided a fine example to his staff and contributed greatly to the professional standards of the information services. CAPTAIN A. NORRIS, MBE (MILITARY)

Captain Norris has been Quartermaster in 1st Battalion The Black Watch since January 19^6, displaying notable loyalty and devotion to duty. When acting as Families Officer while the Battalion was in Northern Ireland, Captain Norris performed his duties with tireless dedication and tact, contributing to the high morale of the Battalion and their fami 1 i as t MR. PHILIP IP WAISTS UNG, MBE

Mr. Ip started employment with the Ordnance Service in 1938, and except for the war years, has remained in it ever since. He is at present Officer in Charge of Control and Accounts, a most arduous post. He has undertaken much useful voluntary work and is much respected by all who come in contact with him.

MISS LAU YUEN-CHEUK, MBE

Miss Lau joined the Education Department in 1953 and proved herself to be a teacher of outstanding calibre and high intellectual ability. She served with distinction as principal of important Government schools, for girls, and in addition gave invaluable assistance to examination boards and to the work of the Chinese Civil Servants Association and the staff side Consultative Council.

/MR. LUI

Wednesday, October 1972

- 5 -

MP. LUI FOOK-HCNG, MBE

Mr. Lui has been very active in community service, and particularly in connection with the Po Leung Kuk , the Tung Wah Group of Hospitals and Kowloon City District Kaifong Association. He is a much respected community leader who is highly regarded for his honest and upright character and leadership.

MR. WONG KI-LIM, MBE

Mr. Wong has served the Colony well in many fields. He was distinguished athlete and soccer player and represented Hong Kong abroad before joining Government service. He has served the Government loyally and efficiently for over 20 years. He has done much to share his many skills and enthusiasms with the young people of Hong Kong.

MR. YUE KAM-KAU, MBE

Mr. Yue served in the Waterworks Office of the Public Works Department for 20 years, reaching the rank of Inspector in 1966. Throughout his service he was loyal, hard working and enthusiastic, and his services during water emergencies have been invaluable. On his retirement Mr. Yue was appointed Waterworks Welfare Officer and his mature outlook, sense of responsibility and experience stand him in good stead.

MR. FONG CHUN-PING, MBE (HONORARY)

Mr. Fong joined Government service in 1939- He has worked in the Hong Kong Island Police District Headquarters since 19^7, always maintining a high standard in the performance of his duties and taking a close interest in the training and guidance of his staff. Mr. Fong is highly respected by all who have worked with him.

/MR. HO ........

Wednesday, October 4, 1972

- 6 -

MR. HO CHEUNG-YAU, M£E (HONORARY)

Mr. Ho is a most accomplished and respected footballer and has represented Hong Kong in overseas teams 16 times in the past 20 years. Throughout his years as a player he showed outstanding skill, excellent sportsmanship and exemplary leadership, and he is universally respected as a sportsman and personality in Hong Kong.

MR. LUI CHI-CHIU, MBE

Mr. Lui has worked with loyalty and distinction for the Government for over JO years, rising to a position of considerable responsibility. He has had a distinguished record with the Auxiliary Police, serving for some JO years and reaching the lank of Superintendent.

MR. WONG KWOK^WAH, MBE (HONORARY)

Mr. Wong has set a fine example during his over JO years of Government service, and commands great respect and esteem from his colleagues and members of the public. He has recently specialised in land work in the New Territories Administration and performs his duties with accuracy and ski11-MR. CHAN CHEOK-PING, Badge of Honour

Mr. Chan has been active in community service for the past 12 years. He has served in various Chinese traditional welfare organisations, particiilarly in the Lok Sin Tong Benevolent Society, and was instrumental in founding a secondary school for this Society and another by the Chiu Chow community in Hong Kong.

/MR. CHAN ......

Wednesday, October 4, 1972

- 7 -

MH. CHAN PO-FONG, Badge of Honour

Mr. Chan has been Village Representative of Sam Tung Uk since 1959, and was Chairman of the Tsuen Wan Rural Committee for 1970/72. He is most active in community and youth activities and much of the success of the District Summer Youth Programmes and the 1971 Tsuen Wan programme for the Festival of Hong Kong is due to his enthusiasm and ability.

, Badge of Honour

Mr. Ko has rendered valuable service to the development of Hong Kong’s agriculture in general and in particular has interested himself in the small vegetable tradesman and the advancement of the co-operative movement. He was instrumental in the formation of the Sek Kong Vegetable Marketing Co-operative Society and has served as an officer of that Society and of the Federation of Vegetable Marketing Co-operative Societies, showing outstanding tact and leadership.

MR. LEUNG CHOK-V7OCN, Badge of Honour

Mr. Leung is a kaifong leader and one of the pioneers of the Shau Kei Wan Kaifong Association. He has devoted enthusiasm and energy to the movement for the last 20 years as an outspoken local leader and is highly respected by all.

MR. WONG CHUNG-CHUEN, Badge of Honour

Mr. Wong is a respected leader of the Chiu Chow Community in the Yuen Long District. He has interested himself in youth work and sports in that area, as well as such local institutions as the Pok Oi Hospital, the Yuen Long Chamber of Commerce, Public Middle School and Town Hall Nixon Library.

/MR. WONG ......

Wednesday, October 4, 1972

- 8 -

MR. WONG HOK-YEE, Badge of Honour

Mr. Wong has a long and distinguished record of service to the community of Yeun Long. He was elected Chairman of the Board of Directors of the Pok Oi Hospital in 1970 and had a most successful term of office. Mr. Wong has also interested himself in youth work, particularly in connection with the Scouts, the Guides, Duke of Edinburgh’s Award Scheme and the Summer Youth Programmes.

DR. CHUNG-LING LU - POSTHUMOUS AWARD OF QUEEN'S COMMENDATION ______ ____

During a fire in the ten-storey building in which he lived

Dr. Lu left his flat and warned other residents from the 10th to 2nd floors of their danger. He continued to rouse the occupants until overcome by heat and smoke. Although eventually rescued he did not recover consciousness and died.

Dr. Lu was a man of mature years and a doctor of medicine and knew well the danger in the course he took; yet with complete disregard for his personal safety he continued until he reached the point in the building, nearest the fire. His heroism undoubtedly saved the lives of some of the seventy-two residents who were rescued from the building.

'' /9

Wednesday, October 4, 1972

PRESENTATION OF INSIGNIA, OCTOBER 4, 1972

Recipients

Dr. the Hon. G.H. Choa, CBE

Hon. J.J. Robson, CBE

Miss P. Chan, OBE

Mr. Daniel Lam Sce-hin, OBE

Mr. Donald Liao Poon-huai, OBE

Mr. B. Suart, OBE

Mr. Lee Jung-sen, OBE (HONORARY)

Mr. Ting Hsuing-chao, OBE (HONORARY)

Mr. lu Kau-yu, ISO

Mr* J.D. McGregor, ISO

Mr. D.N. ’Willis, ISO

Captain A. Norris, MBE (MILITARY)

Mr. Philip Ip Wan-tsung, MBE

Miss Lau Yuen-cheuk, MBE

Mr. Lui Fook-hong, MBE

Supporters

Hon. Sir Albert Rodrigues, CBS

Sir Shiu-kin Tang, CBE

Mr. W.T. Grimsdale, CBE

Mr. D. Fraser, CBE

Dr. Lawrence Kadoorie, CBE

Dr. the Hon. Chung Sze-yuen, OBE

Hon. Ann Tse-kai, OBE

Hon. Wilson Wang Tze-sam, OBE

Hon. D.R.W. Alexander, CBE

Hon. Szeto Wai, OBE

Professor S.Y. King, OBE

Hon. R.H. Lobo, OBE

Dr. R.C. Lee, CBE

Hon. Lee Quo-wei,OBE

Hon. Sir Sik-nin Chau, CBE

Hon. Sir Kenneth Ping-fan Fung, CBE

Mr. Tsang For-pui, ISO.

Mr. Chung Yiu-kei, ISO

Mr. J.V.G. Mitchell, ISO

Mr. Chung Yiu-kei, ISO

Mr. Chan Kam-yuen, MBE

Mr. Cheng Chong-kee, MBE

Miss B. Kotewall, MBE

Mr. T.C. Cheng, OBE

Hon. Sir Sik-nin Chau, CBE

Sir Shiu-kin Tang, CBE

/Mr. Wong ••••!

Wednesday, October 4, 1972

- 10

Mr. Wong Ki-lim, MBE

Mr. Yue Kam-kau, MBE

Mr. Fong Chun-ping, MBE (HONORARY)

Mr. Ho Cheung-yau, MBE (HONORARY)

MR. Lui Chi-chiu, MBE (HONORARY)

Mr. Wong Kwok-wah, MBE (HONORARY)

Mr. Chan Cheok-ping, B of H

Mr. Chan Po-fong, B of H

Mr. Ko Hok, B of H

Mr. Leung Chok-woon, B of H

Mr. Wong Chung-chuen, B of H

Mr. Wong Hok-yce, B of H

Mr. Tse Yue-chuen, OBE

Mr. Shum Choi-sang, MBE

Mr. Cheng Chong-kee, MBE

Mr. Chan Kam-yuen, MBE

Mr. Lo Yu-hung, MBE

Mr. Liang Nai-kuang, MBE

Mr. Liu Lit-mo, MBE

Mr. Tse Yue-chuen, OBE

Mr. Li Chuen, MBE’

Mr. Chan Hon-yin, MBE

Mr. Lo Cho-^chi, MBE

Mr. Cheung Shui-wing, MBE

Hon. Woo Pak-chuen, OBE

Hon. Lee Quo-wei, OBE

Hon. Wilfred Wong Sien-bing, OBE

Dr. the Hon. Chung Sze-yuon, OBE

Hon. Wilfred Wong Sien-bing, OBE

Hon. Ann Tse-kai, OBE

Hon. Lee Quo-wei, OBE

Hon. Wilson Wang Tze-sam, OBE

Hon. Wilson Wang Tze-sam, OBE

Hon. Ann Tse-kai, OBE

Hon. Woo Pak-chuen, OBE

Hon. Lee Quo-wei, OBE

MRS. LU CHUNGwLING, Posthumous award of Queen’s Commendation for Brave Conduct to Dr. Lu Chung-Ling.

/MR. DENNIS .......

Wednesday, October 4, 1972

- 11 -

MR. DENNIS JOHN COOPER, British Empire Medal (Military)

STAFF SERGEANT TSE TING-YAU, British Empire Medal (Military)

MR. CHIANG LEE-SHING, British Empire Medal

MR. IP WIN&-HONG, British Empire Medal

MR. LEUNG JIM-KEOI, British Empire Medal

MR. LEUNG KUI, British Empire Medal

MR. LEUNG SEK-KWAN, British Empire Medal

MR. LI NAM, British Empire Medal

MR. TAM LAM, British Empire Medal

MR. LESLIE CLARK, Colonial Police Medal for Meritorious Service

MR. GORDON DOORE, Colonial Fire Brigades Medal for Meritorious Service

MR. FUNG CHI-SANG, Colonial Fire Brigades Medal for Meritorious Service

MR. FUNG SHUN, Colonial Fire Brigades Medal for Meritorious Service

MR. MONTAGUE KINGDOM, Colonial Fire Brigades Medal for Meritorious Service

MR. SIU SANG, Colonial Fire Brigades Medal for Meritorious Service

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Release time 12 NOON

PRH 7 4000091

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Thursday, October 1972

ANOTHER LINK IN KOWLOON FOOTHILLS CORRIDOR

*««*«****

Work on another phase of the Kowloon Foothills Road Corridor is expected to start next month.

This involves the extension of Lung Cheung Road from the Po Kong Interchange, presently under construction, to its intersection with Hammer Hill Road at the Choi Hung Estate.

It will be in the form of a new 2,000-foot-long three-J.ane road with sewers and stormwater drains.

A temporary footbridge at Social Avenue will be built over the new road so that easy access to Social Avenue for pedestrians can be maintained.

Subject to the implementation and timing of the Mass Transit Railway, an additional two lane temporary carriageway may also be provided.

If the railway is completed, additional traffic lanes will be built and the final scheme will comprise a dual three-lane highway.

The present work, costing about $4.3 million, will take some 13 months to complete..

The Kowloon Foothills Road Corridor is an important traffic route which on completion will link Kwai Chung and Tsuen Wan in the west with San Po Kong and Kwun Tong in the east and Sha Tin in the north, via the Lion Rock Tunnel.

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/2.......

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Thursday, October 5, 1972

- 2 -

JOB STANDARDS FOR TWO INDUSTRIES OUTLINED IN NEW PUBLICATIONS

*********

Another two publications sotting out the minimum standards and specifications for the main jobs in the building and civil engineering industry and the silk weaving and finishing branch of the textile industry will go on sale tomorrow.

The booklets outline the skills and knowledge which competent workers in the principal trades should have, the type of training and technical education necessary and the' educational qualifications needed for entry.

The job standards aim at establishing acceptable standards of skill for the main jobs in each of the industries; guidelines for technical courses; serving as reference material for managements in devising training programmes for workers; and standardising the general nomenclature already in use in the two industries.

The publications, in English and Chinese, have been prepared by the respective committees of the Industrial Training Advisory Committee. They will be available at the Government Publications Centre, Star Ferry Concourse on Hong Kong Island.

_______0 -________

■'? *. • .» ■ . r < -■ *

/?........

Thursday, October 5» 1972

- 3 -

INTER-INSTITUTIONAL DRAMA COMPETITION

*******

Stars of TV and well-known drama critics and directors will adjudicate at a day-long drama competition among trainees of the Social Welfare Department at the Kwun Tong Community Centre tomorrow (Friday).

The adjudicating panel includes Cheng Tze-tun, Chan Wing-keung, Chan Chun-wah, and Lai Kwok-bun.

All are celebrities in local TV and drama circles, and all are volunteering their time as a contribution to community welfare. They will spend nine hours watching groups of trainees on the stage, and then award prizes for the best performances. •;:----

Institutions taking part include the Begonia Road Boys1 Home, the Castle Peak Boys’ Home, the Kwun Tong Hostel, the Ma Tau Wei Girls’ Home, the 0 Pui Shan Boys’ Home, the Juvenile Care Centre and the Society of Boys’ Centres. The last two are not departmental institutions but voluntary agencies.

Participating teams have been spending some time selecting a suitable play, arranging suitable costumes, and studying their lines.

Their efforts will be judged on the quality of performances, intelligent teamwork, and technical competence with regard to stage management, lighting, make-up, and so on.

Mr. Mak Wing-hong, Principal Social Welfare Officer in charge of correctional institutions says: ’’The aim of this function is to stimulate an interest in the creative arts, and raise the cultural level among the trainees in our care.”

/He thanked .......

Thursday, October 5» 1972

He thanked the adjudicators for agreeing to spend a whole day at the task.

In the audience will be City District Officers, district leaders, and police and probation officers. The public who wish to attend will be welcomed.

Prizes have been made possible through Mr. Maurice P.K. Wong,

President of the Hong Kong Juvenile Care Centre.

Their distribution by Mrs. Chen Liu Mu-lan, Senior Principal Social

Welfare Officer and head of the Probation and Corrections Division, at the end of the day will bring the competition to a close.

*«*»«***

Note to Editors: You are invited to cover the competition.

TV representatives are requested to cover the competition rather than the closing ceremony, as some of the plays to be presented are colourful. The series will run from 9 a.m. to 6-p.m. at the Kwun Tong Community Centre on Friday, October 6.

-------0---------

ANTI-MEASLES CAMPAIGN ENTERS FINAL WEEK

********

More than 1,200 doses of vaccine were administered during the eighth week of the Medical and Health Department’s current anti-measles campaign.

The campaign, which began on August 8, has another week to go.

Of the total, 227 doses were administered to children on the Island, 5^2 in Kowloon, and 454 in the New Territoriesa

These doses brought the overall total of children immunised during the campaign so far to 11,885.

After the campaign, anti-measles vaccine will be routinely available at all government maternal and child health centreso

-------o--------- /5.....................

Thursday, October 5, 1972

- 5 -

PREVENTIVE SERVICE QUARTERS TO BE OPENED

********

The Acting Director of Commerce and Industry, Mr. J.D. McGregor, will officially open the Preventive Service Bank and File Married Quarters in Hung Hom tomorrow (October 6).

Situated at No. 7, Ko Shan Road, the quarters will provide self-contained flats for some 230 families in two separate blocks of 12 and 14 storeys.

The opening ceremony will be attended by about 100 guests, including senior officers of the Commerce and Industry. Department, the City District Office (Kowloon City) and Kaifong leaders.

In a separate ceremony to be held on Central Reclamation on the Island on Saturday (October 7) Mr. McGregor will take the salute at a passing out parade of 45 newly recruited Assistant Revenue Officers who have successfully completed an induction course.

Note to Editors: You are invited to send a reporter and/or

photographer to cover the two ceremonies. The official opening of the Ko Shan Road Married Quarters will take place at 3 p*m. tomorrow (October 6). The passing-out parade will take place at 10 a.m. on Saturday (October 7) at the east arm of the New Government Pier on Central Reclamation, Hong Kong.

-------0---------

/6........

Thursday, October 5, 1972

- 6 -

REPAIRS TO SLIP ROAD ON COTTON TREE DRIVE

*********

The slip road from Cotton Tree Drive to Kennedy Road will be closed to motorists from 6 p.m. on Saturday (October 7) to 4 p.m. Sunday (October 8) for repair work.

Motorists wishing to gain access to Kennedy Road from Cotton Tree Drive should travel via Macdonnell Road.

Appropriate signs will be placed to guide motorists.

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Release time:, 6*3Q p«m«

PRH 7 4000091

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Friday, October 6, 1972

GOVERNMENT PLANS STUDY OF ENVIRONMENTAL

EFFECTS OF AN OIL REFINERY

********

The Government announced today that it will not start to process the Shell Company of Hong Kong’s enquiry regarding the possible establishment of an oil refinery, unless satisfied by independent consultants that three important environmental aspects of life in Hong Kong can be safeguarded.

The proposed site for the refinery is north-east Lamma Island.

The spokesman said the Government must be convinced that there will be no material damage to, or pollution of:

(a) marine life and the fishing industry;

(b) conditions of living for residents in Hong Kong which, of course, includes Lamma Island;

(c) recreational facilities in south Hong Kong and the rest of Lamma Island.

”As there is considerable public uncertainty and anxiety on these points, it is necessary to establish whether satisfactory safeguards can be assured he said.

To do this the Government will appoint the consultants forthwith to advise on (i) what levels of control over the distribution of effluent into the sea and air and over spillage, are both desirable and practicable; and (ii) what the effect is likely to be on each of the three fields outlined above if such controls are enforced.

/The spokesman •••••••

n

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong. Tel: 5-233191

Friday, October 6, 1972

- 2 -

The spokesman made it clear that the Government would make its final decision in the light of the consultants’ report and the ability of the operating company, if it builds the refinery, to meet the necessary conditions.

Meanwhile, discussions will begin on the other considerations involved.

The first stage of the project under examination by Shell would involve the construction of a 200,000 barrel-a-day (10 million tons a year) refinery for completion in 1979-80.

All the crude storage tanks would be in caverns beneath the existing landscape, but the refinery plant and product storage would be on formed and reclaimed land. The proposed lease area covers about 410 acres.

Hong Kong’s total requirement for petroleum products is at present in the order of 90,000 barrels-a-day Wz million tons a year) and is forecast to increase at an annual rate of approximately 9 per cent.

Shell has indicated that products not drawn from a refinery to meet the needs of the local market would be exported to a number of destinations, primarily in the Far East.

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/3...........

Friday, October 6, 1972

- 3 -

LEGISLATION TO TIGHTEN CONTROL OVER ISSUE OF COMPANY PROSPECTUSES

*********

The first of a number of bills giving effect to the recommendations contained in the First Report of the Companies Law Revision Committee was published today.

Commenting on the bill, the Companies (Amendment) Bill 1972, a government spokesman said its principal aim was to tighten control over prospectuses issued in Hong Kong by companies, whether local or foreign, ••When the bill is enacted," the spokesman said, "the law of Hong Kong will be brought generally into line, as far as prospectuses are concerned, with the Companies Act 19^8 in Great Britain, but with the addition of most of the recommendations in the Jenkins Committee Report of 1962'. As yet, these have not teen incorporated into British legislation."

The main features of the bill include the following:

(1) More information will have to be supplied in prospectuses than has been the practice.

(2) Prospectuses must be published in Chinese as well as in English.

(3) Prospectuses will have to contain a notice advising potential investors, if they are in any doubt, to consult a professional adviser.

(4) In order to give potential investors an opportunity to digest the information in a prospectus and seek professional advice if they wish, at least two days must elapse between the issue of a prospectus and the opening of the subscription lists.

/(5) Criminal

Friday, October 6, 1972

(5) Criminal sanctions and civil liability will attach to anyone responsible for mis-statements in prospectuses, including experts, such as valuers, who have consented to its issue.

(6) The Registrar of Companies will be empowered to refuse to register prospectuses that do not comply with the statutory requirements, or contain information likely to mislead, but he will not be responsible for the contents of a prospectus. If the Registrar refuses to register a prospectus, the shares to which

... , , it relates may.not be offered,.to the public.

The maximum penalty imposed ynder the proposed new legislation covers the. issuing of prospectuses containing untrue statements.

Any person who authorises the issue of such a prospectus will be liable on conviction on indictment to a fine of 550.,000 and to imprisonment for two years; or. on summary conviction to a fine of 310,000 and imprisonment for six months.

The spokesman added that a number of other bills dealing with aspects

of the First Report of the Companies Law Revision Committee, which dealt with the protection of investors, are now being prepared.

Friday, October 6, 1972

- 5 -

INCREASED FARES FOR PEAK TRAM

******»»#

People travelling on the Peak Tram will be paying increased fares from the beginning of next month.

The full fare for an adult will be increased from 60 cents to $1 and the section fare from 40 cents to 50 cents. Children under the age of 12 will have to pay 50 cents for a journey.

This is the first revision of the fare structure since 19^6.

Existing charges for carrying small animals and parcels will be dropped and the trams will no longer carry freight except small parcels carried by passengers.

In line with other public transport companies, servicemen will also have to pay fares and the concessionary fares for domestic servants and labourers will be withdrawn.

Adult monthly tickets, as with the bus companies, are abolished; although student tickets are to be retained and will cost $25 each for the full distance and $17 to May Road. The old charges were $15 and $10.

The increase in fares are related to the Peak Tram Company’s financial position, which has shown a deteriorating trend, and an increase of some 25 per cent in operating costs over last year.

It is expected that traffic and revenue will increase following the opening of the Peak Tower Restaurant, although there are no accurate estimates and the increases will have to be set against the additional cost of extending the tram service to 1 a.m.

. .. . /The Government.........

Friday, October 6, 1972

- 6 -

The Government also considered remitting the permit fee charged to the company, which in some ways is comparable to the royalties paid by the two bus companies and the Hongkong Tramways Limited.

This fee, however, unlike the royalty payments, is charged for the use of the Crown land over which the tramway is constructed. As an alternative to remitting it, a bill will be introduced to Legislative Council with a proposal to fix a levy of $25,000 for the year 1972.

As for the future, the Legislative Council will be given power, if the bill is passed, to amend by resolution the rate of permit fee payable either generally or for any particular year.

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FIRE CLOSES MORSE PARK POOL

********

The Morse Park Swimming Pool Complex in Kowloon will be temporarily closed because of damage caused by a small fire in the main switch-room on Monday (October 2).

Repair work is now in progress, and it is hoped that the pools can be re-opened in about two weeks.

Bookings accepted through the Urban Services Department and the Education Department for the two-week period have been transferred to other swimming pools.

However, the second annual swimming gala of the Tsuen Wan District, scheduled to be held at Morse Park on Sunday (October 8) has been postponed until further notice. -----------------------------------0---------

Friday, October 6, 1972

- 7 -

NEW LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL SESSION TO OPEN ON OCTOBER 18 «***«**«

The Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, will give a full review of Hong Kong affairs at the opening of the new Legislative Council session on Wednesday, October 18 at 2.J0 p.m.

It will be the first formal opening for Sir Murray since he became Governor last November.

The afternoons of Wednesday, November 1, and Thursday, November 2f have been set aside for unofficial members to speak to a motion of thanks for the Governor’s address. This gives the members an opportunity to speak on any matters of public interest.

Official members will reply on Wednesday, November 15 and, if necessary, on Friday, November 17.

Apart from the Governor’s address, there will be other business during the opening session on the 18th. This will include first and second readings of bills and the tabling of subsidiary legislation.

The last session of the Legislative Council ended on August JO.

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/8.........

FridayOctober-6, 1972

- 8 -

VISIT OF PRINCESS ALEXANDRA

*********

Her Royal Highness Princess Alexandra will see various aspects of life in Hong Kong during her six-day official visit later this month.

The Princess, accompanied by her husband, the Hon. Angus Ogilvy, will arrive by Royal Air Force aircraft on Saturday, October 21,- and will remain here until Thursday, October 26.

They will stay at Government House as the guests of the Governor an4 Lady MacLehose.

During her stay, she will visit a number of social welfare and medical institutions, see rehabilitation work among handicapped children and meet young people involved in welfare and recreational activities and other community work such as the ’’Keep Hong Kong Clean” Campaign.

The Princess will also attend a number of police engagements in her capacity as Honorary Commandant-General of the Royal Hong Kong Police and the Royal Hong Kong Auxiliary Police.

About two hours after her arrival in Hong Kong, Princess Alexandra will drive from Government House to Hung Hom through the cross-harbour tunnel and unveil a plaque outside the administration building of the tunnel company to mark the completion of the project.

In the evening of Sunday, October 22, she will attend a Beating of Retreat ceremony by the Band of the Royal Hong Kong Police at the Police Training School in Aberdeen.

/The following •••••••••

Friday, October 6, 1972

- 9 -

The following morning, Princess Alexandra will unveil a plaque at a building under construction at police headquarters to mark her visit there. She will then visit the Arsenal Street rank and file married quarters and the police primary school. From there, she will leave for Wanchai police station.

In the afternoon, the Princess, accompanied by Mr. Ogilvy, will open the British Industrial Exhibition in Wanchai.

On the morning of Tuesday, October 24, she will see some of the work being done by voluntary welfare agencies for the blind and the handicapped during visits to the Ebenezer School and Home for the Blind in Pokfulam and the Princess Alexandra Red Cross Residential School in Kwun Tong.

In the afternoon, she will visit the Morse Park swimming pool complex in Kowloon to see for herself some aspects of the recreational activities-.....

organised for young people in Hong Kong. This will include demonstrations by members of the Royal Life Saving Society and the Hong Kong Sea School.

From Morse Park, she will drive to Stone Nullah Lane in Wan Chai to watch cleaning operations connected with the ’’Clean Hong Kong” campaign, which will then be in full swing.

In the evening, she will attend a review of the Royal Hong Kong Police and Royal Hong Kong Auxiliary Police at the Hong Kong Stadium. She will address the parade and present medals to a number of officers.

Another busy day awaits the Princess on Wednesday, October 25* She will open the new South Kwai Chung Jockey Club Polyclinic and visit the Manhattan Garments Factory in Tsuen Wan where she will meet and see young women at work. She will also visit Tsuen Wan’s Community Centre which is named after her.

/In the ...........

Friday, October 6, 1972

- 10 -

In the evening, the Princess and Mr. Ogilvy will attend the Royal Hong Kong Auxiliary Police Force Dinner and Ball at the Hilton Hotel, accompanied by the Governor and Lady MacLehose.

The Royal visitors will fly home the following day.

Note to Editors: Details of the press arrangements for

Princess Alexandra’s visit will be announced in a few days* time.

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FIRE WARNING SYSTEM ♦ * * ♦

Note to Editors: For the first time in Hong Kong, a fire

danger warning system, aimed at making people aware of fire risk, will be introduced next week.

The launching of the new warning system coincides with the approach of the dry season.

To introduce the scheme, a press conference to be chaired by the Director of Fire Services, Mr. A.E.H. Wood, will be held at the Government Information Services Department on Monday (October 9)•

Also present will be the Director of the Royal Observatory, Mr. G.J. Bell, and the Senior Forestry Officer, Mr. P.A. Daley.

You are invited to send a reporter and/or photographer to cover the press conference which will be held in the 35 nun Theatre, Government Information Services Department, 5th Floor, Beaconsfield House, on Monday, October 9, at 3 p*m.

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Friday, October 6, 1972

- 11 -

SLAUGHTERING CHARGES AT GOVERNMENT ABATTOIRS

********

The hours for pig slaughtering at the two abattoirs will Soon be extended to meet the demand for fresh pork supply earlier in the morning.

Night shift work for the slaughtering will be introduced at the Cheung Sha Wan Abattoir in Kowloon as from November 1. • • •

On the same date on Hong Kong Island, pig slaughtering at the

.-’o V . • - r.

Kennedy Town Abattoir will be advanced by one and half hours from 7 a.nu to 5*30 a.m.

An increase in the slaughtering fees is proposed to cover operating costs, while the Government is embarking on a long-term plan to improve and expand the services provided by the abattoirs.

Fresh pork consumption in Hong Kong has increased year after year. This is reflected in the number of pigs slaughtered in the two abattoirs, which has risen from about 1,808,000 heads in 19$9-70 to nearly 2,500,000 in 1971-72.

To cope with this increase, major improvements for the Cheung Sha Wan Abattoir will be implemented shortly, including further mechanisation and the installation of a third dressing line.

Improvements to lighting and ventilation in the pig slaughterhall have been made to meet the night shift scheme. One of the two existing dressing lines is being closed for renovation and overhauling.

/Work.......

Friday, October 6, 1972

- 12 -

Work on the installation of the third dressing line, estimated to cost Si<5 million, including equipment will start as soon as renovation of the existing lines is completed.

In the past, the two abattoirs have been operating at a loss* The annual, deficit on both abattoirs was about 38 million in 1971-72. The expenditure for the year was 326,406,753 against revenue of 318,8^4,371•

The capital cost for the abattoirs at the end of March this year was about $61 million, consisting of land — $7,200,000, building cost •» 339,800,452 and equipment - 313,793>279•

To provide for a far better service by the abattoirs, the Government has proposed to increase as from November 1 the charge for slaughtering pigs at Cheung Sha Wan from 36 to 39 per head without delivery for those slaughtered before 8 a.m. each day.

However, the charge for those slaughtered after 8 a.m. will be 35 per head as against 36 at present, but excluding delivery.

At Kennedy Town, the charge will be 36 per head without delivery for those slaughtered before 8 a.m., and 37 per head with delivery, for those slaughtered after 8 a.m.

This is the first time since 1968 that changes have been made to the slaughtering fees.

/A spokesman

Friday, October 6, 1972

- 13 -

A spokesman for the Urban Services Department said today that the change in the charge for night shift slaughtering is insignificant to the consumer and is compensated by a better servic'e to be introudced in the interest of the meat trade and the public alike - the earlier supply of meat to meet the demand of the morning market. Assuming the average dressed weight of a pig to be 100 catties, the change in cbst, less ■than.10 cents per catty, is marginal.

Besides, staff working on night shift will be paid a special wage rate in addition to their normal salary.•

The proposals for the fee changes have been endorsed by the Abattoirs and Markets Select Committee of the Urban Council and the Standing Committee of the Whole Council. Amendments will be made by the Urban Council to the laws in connection with the changes and are expected to be tabled in the Legislative Council towards the end of this month. . No change in the charge for cattle slaughtering is proposed for

•the time being.

• 0 - - -' -

Friday, October 6, 1972

- 14 -

SWIMMING POOL COMPLEX AT KWAI CHUNG

********

Piling work on the first sea-water swimming pool in Hong Kong is underway at Kwai Chung.

The pools, to be built on a 250,000 square-foot site between Kwai Chung Road and Kwai Shing Government Low Cost Housing Estate, are expected to be completed in 197^»

There will be two 50-metre pools, a 35-foot square diving pool, equipped with springboards, three teaching and children’s pools, one paddling pool and one children’s water play area.

One of the 50-metre pools will be built to competition standards with a grandstand alongside to seat 800 spectators at swimming galas and sports events*

The pools, capable of taking 5»0Q0 swimmers at one time, will serve an eventual population of more than 800,000 people.

They will take up the greater part of the site. The rest of the area is planned for a cafeteria, a rest garden with trees, flowers and a pavilion. Changing rooms, showers and lavatories are provided in a building next to the pools. In addition, there will be parking space for cars.

A spokesman for the Public Works Department said tenders will shortly be cal 1 ed for the supply and installation of three filtration plants for the swimming pool complex.

Each unit will consist of pressure sand filters, water circulating pumps, chemical dosing equipment, chlorinators and water distribution pipe work and fittings.

/The work ........

Friday, October 6, 1972

- 15 -

The work will cost about 51.4 million.

The spokesman said the total pool capacity is 920,000 gallons.

In order to maintain the swimming pool water in a clear, sterile state, he added, water in the pools has to be recirculated through the filtration system once every four to six hours.

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RAINSTORM ROADS TO BE RE-OPENED

********

Sections of Shan Kwong Road in Happy Valley and Robinson Road in MidLevels, which had been closed due to rainstorm damage, will be re-opened to traffic tomorrow (Saturday) and October 10 respectively.

The section of Shan Kwong Road to be re-opened lies between King Kwong Street and Yik Yam Street, and had been closed since September 24.

Bus stops in King Kwong Street for routes 1, 19 and 5A will also become operational tomorrow.

The section of Robinson Road between the junction with Park Road and the access road to No. 105 Robinson Road had been closed since the June rainstorms.

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Release time: 7*30 p.m.

PRH 7 >000091

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Saturday, October 7, 1972

CROSS HARBOUR TUNNEL COMMEMORATIVE STAMP ISSUE *******

A special $1 stamp to mark the official opening of the cross-harbour tunnel will be placed on sale at all post offices on Friday, October 20, 1972#

The issue of the stamp is timed to coincide with the visit of Her

Royal Highness Princess Alexandra who will participate in ceremonies marking •• the final completion of the tunnel project.

The stamp is in horizontal format. The final artwork was prepared by Mr. Gordon Drummond from a painting supplied by Robert Matthew, Johson-Marshall & Partners, the architects for the Cross Harbour Tunnel Co. Ltd.

Special First Day Covers, featuring a design by Mr. Kan Tai-keung, a Hong Kong artist, will be on sale at all post offices as from Wednesday, October 11, 1972 at 20 cents each.

The public are asked to obtain their requirements early to avoid disappointment*

Advance orders for servicing of First Day Covers will be accepted at the General Post Office, Pedder Street; Kowloon Central Post Office, Nathan Road; and Tsim Sha Tsui Post Office, Salisbury Road.

For this service, addressed First Day Covers must be handed in with ■ ■ -

an order form together with a remittance to cover the cost.

/The charge • •....

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Saturday, October 7, 1972

2 -

The charge will be $1.10 per cover, including the cost of one $1 stamp and a service fee of 10 centsQ

The covers must be fully addressed by the applicant and not less than 10 covers will be accepted with each order.

The order forms will be available at the General Post Office, Kowloon Central Post Office and Tsim Sha Tsui Post Office on Wednesday, October 11, 1972.

Any person ordering serviced covers addressed to a local destination may collect them on October 21, 1972 from the office where the order was placed.

Covers addressed overseas will be sent forward by ordinary post, surface mail, unless sufficient stamps are affixed to cover airmail and/or registration charges.

The latest acceptance date for advance orders of serviced covers will be 12 noon on Tuesday, October 17, 1972.

A service will be provided on Friday, October 20, 1972, at all post • offices, where First Day Covers will be accepted over the counter, impressed with the normal post office steel date stamp and handed back to the person presenting them. No time type will appear in the postmark. •

The special conditions for this service are:-

* Only articles bearing an indication that they are ’’First Day Covers” will be so treated;

* The articles must be addressed to a local address;

* ' The articles must not bear any other cancellation; and

* No registered ftems will be processed by this method.

Special posting boxes will also be available at the General Post Office, Kowloon Central Post ‘Office and Tsim Sha Tsui Post Office on October 20, 1972 for those wishing to have First Day Covers carefully hand-postmarked before despatch • • • • a a • to the address on the cover.

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Saturday, October 7, 1972

- 3 -

CONVERSION AND EXPANSION PLANS FOR LEI CHENG UK TOMB MUSEUM

«***««**«

The Lei Cheng Uk Tomb Museum will be converted into a modern museum with a dual function of displaying the tomb finds to the best advantage and of holding small-scale exhibitions.

The existing caretaker’s quarters will also be turned into an additional display gallery.

To be renamed the Lei Cheng Uk Branch of the Hong Kong City Museum and Art Gallery, the museum will provide facilities for regular small-scale exhibitions of paintings, sculptures and photographs.

Work will involve the repainting in more suitable colours of the museum’s external and internal walls. The entrances and exits will be improved.

The existing display cases will be replaced with types similar to those used in the City Museum. In the display areas, suitable lighting and air-conditioning will be installed.

Conversion and expansion plans are now in hand and the project is expected to be completed by next summer.

A Government spokesman said that since the Lei Cheng Uk Tomb Museum was opened in 1957, the attendance figures had declined. .

He explained this was possibly due to the static display of the tomb finds which offered little variety of interest.

In view of this, the spokesman said, the Museum and Art Gallery Select Committee of the Urban Council has recommended the improvement and expansion of the display facilities in the museum in order to revive public interest and to make the maximum use of the available space.

-------0--------- /4.......................

Saturday, October 7, 1972

AMENITY PROJECTS FOR KOWLOON CITY AND SAN PO KONG

*********

Prince Edward Road and the area near the Kai Tak Airport will take on a new look when more amenity projects for the areas are completed by the middle of next year.

Sitting out areas will be built outside the existing Sung Wong Toi Garden and at the bus stops in Prince Edward Road outside the airport.

Amenity planting areas at San Po Kong will be extended and flower beds will also be constructed along Prince Edward Road.

The projects from the final stages of amenity treatment at the Kowloon City and San Po Kong Interchanges.

Work will start towards the end of this year, and will take about six months to complete.

-----0------

ISSUE OF SUNDAY D.I.B.

*********

Note to Editors:

There will be an issue of the Daily Information

Bulletin tomorrow (Sunday). Copies of the Sunday D.I.B. will be available for collection from 3 p.m. tomorrow at the G.I.S. Press Room, sixth floor, Beaconsfield House.

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Saturday, October 7, 1972

- 5 -

CAREERS TALKS FOR SECONDARY SCHOOL STUDENTS

********

A series of 10 careers talks are being held for secondary school students in the Aberdeen area to provide them with information on various careers.

They are jointly sponsored by the Youth Employment Advisory

• I

Service of the Labour Department and the City District Office (Western) and will end on October 18.

The talks give students insight into job opportunities in Hong Kong, careers in government service, technician apprenticeship, tourist and hotel industries, seagoing opportunities, electronic data processing, industrial jobs and advertising and commercial art.

They are being held on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays from

3 p.m. to 5 p*m. at the Aberdeen Technical School.

Although the talks are primarily for Aberdeen students, others wishing to attend are welcome. . .

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/6.............

Saturday, October 7, 1972

- 6 -

ABERDEEN REHABILITATION CENTRE

**********

Note to Editors: Mrs. G.T. Rowe, wife of the Director of

Social Welfare, will visit the Aberdeen Rehabilitation Centre, in Welfare Road, Wong Chuk Hang, Aberdeen, on Monday, October 9, at 10:15 a-.m. She will be accompanied by Mrs. Evelyn Doe, Principal Social Welfare Officer. The Centre is a government institution, run by the Social Welfare Department, and supported out of public funds. Its main purpose is to provide social and vocational rehabilitation for the disabled. Priority in admission is given to those who can be prepared for, and who have reasonable prospects of securing and retaining, suitable employment. The Centre has a total area of about 188,000 square feet. It was completed early in 1964< It was the first government rehabilitation centre providing various facilities for the disabled. You are invited to have the visit covered, and your news team should arrive at the Centre by 10 a.m.

----0------

Saturday, October 7, 1972

FINANCIAL SECRETARY RETURNS ON SUNDAY

****»»*<*

Note to Editors: The Financial Secretary, Mr. C.P. Haddon-

Cave, who has been in Washington and London for talks on monetary and other matters, will be returning to Hong Kong tomorrow (Sunday) afternoon.

Mr. Haddon-Cave is coming back on flight BA8O2, E.T.A. 3 p.m. October 8.

The Financial Secretary will give a press conference shortly after his arrival. Press, radio and television representatives covering the event are requested to assemble in the V.I.P. Press conference Room at Kai Tak at 2.45 p.m.

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Release time: 2.30 p.m.

PRH 7 4000091

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Sunday, October 8, 1972

SIMULTANEOUS INTERPRETATION FOR LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL

Final preparations for introducing simultaneous interpretation to Hong Kong are being made and the system will soon be used in the Legislative Council.

It will be the first time simultaneous interpretation between English and Cantonese will be used anywhere in the world and marks an important stage in the use of Chinese in official business in Hong Kong.

The person mainly responsible for introducing the system, the Chief Interpreter, Mr. Y.P. Cheng, is enthusiastic about the challenge he is facing.

He says simultaneous interpretation will be introduced in the Urban Council as well in the near future so that members of the public who are less conversant in English may take more interest in the proceedings of the two councils.

The use of Chinese in the Legislative and Urban Councils and in other governmental committees was one of the important recommendations submitted by the Chinese Language Committee and was accepted by the Government in May last year.

Mr. Cheng later came to Hong Kong from England to assume the job of Chief Interpreter, and started to make preparations for introducing simultaneous interpretation to Legislative Council meetings.

/Mr. Cheng ••••••••••

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong. Tel: 5-233191

Sunday, October 8, 1972

- 2 -

Mr. Cheng pointed out that the standard of interpretation may not be ideal in the early stages. However, he hoped that improvement would come with more experience.

”To do a good job, not only is it necessary to have suitable interpretation equipment, it is also necessary to have qualified interpreters," Mr. Cheng said.

"The Government has already employed a number of part-time interpreters who have been going through some intensive training in the past few months." According to Mr. Cheng, simultaneous interpretation may be basically similar to other translation work, but its demand on the work of the interpreter is different.

In ordinary translation, there is always time enough for thinking or for consulting reference books, and a chance to touch up the translated work.

A simultaneous interpreter, however, has to be able to interpret a apeech rapidly and accurately the moment it is being delivered. This requires volubility and an unperturbed but fast mind.

They must, of course, also be expert in the two languages to be interpreted and be familiar with the idioms and technical terms of the languages.

On the other hand, their efficiency may be lowered if a speech is spoken with a heavy accent or too quickly.

Good interpreters are difficult to find and the fees paid by the Government are set according to the standards laid down by the International Association of Conference Interpreters (Association Internationale des Interpretes de Conference) in Geneva.

/Part-time ........

Sunday, October 8, 1972

- 3 -

Part-time simultaneous interpreters will be paid $550 for each sitting when working in a team of three and $5&0 when working in a team of two.

To accommodate them at Legislative Council, an interpretation booth and an electronic interpretation sound system have already been installed in the chambers.

Communication between the floor and the booth is possible, so that, for example, the interpreter can signal to a councillor to speak slower, and any councillor may follow the interpretation of a speech by listening through pre-installed earphones.

Members of the public attending the meetings will be provided with a miniature receiver. When they plug on the earphones they will be able to listen to the interpretation without interfering with the proceedings around them.

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Sunday, October 8, 1972

NOTICE OF MOVE ««t******

With effect from October 10, 1972, the offices of The Television Authority, The Secretary to The Panel of Film Censors, The Secretary, Television Authority and Chief Film Censor will be located at the Secretariat for Home Affairs, 24th floor, International Building, 141 Des Voeux Road, Central.

Telephone Numbers are:-

Commissioner for Television and Films H-457&17

Secretary, Television Authority H-458309

Chief Film Censor ' H-458363

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Release time: 3«0Q

PRH 7 4000091

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

• Monday, October 9, 1972

NEW FIRE WARNING SYSTEM INTRODUCED

********* - . y

. ' :k- ■ -T

A fire danger warning system, aimed at making people aware of fire risk, came into effect today.

Introducing the new system, a Government spokesman said that

experts at the Royal Observatory and the Fare Services Department will keep a close check on weather conditions affecting fire danger and issue appropriate warnings to the public.

The fire warning is divided into two classes.

1. A YELLCW fire danger warning will be issued to warn the public that everything which will burn is dried out, and the risk of fire is greatly increased. Any outbreak will spread rapidly. More than twice the normal number of fires can be expected.

2. A RED fire danger warning will be issued when the situation is worse and the danger is extreme. By this stage both urban and country areas will be tinder-dry, and the merest •* • spark will start a blaze which will spread with lightning speed. It could be completely out of control before help arrives. More than five times the normal number of fires r ’

can be expected. Every possible precaution should be taken

These warnings will be publicised on all television and radio weather bulletins as well as all newspaper weather forecasts. » > b ,

/They ......

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong. Tel: 5-233191

Monday, October 9, 1972

- 2 -

They will also be displayed at all major ferry terminals, Fire Services and other major public buildings and by announcements or displays at a number of public places such as cinemas.

The spokesman said the new system should be treated with as great a respect as Hong Kong’s tropical cyclone warning signals.

The threat of death and damage by fire is at least as great as the danger posed by a typhoon. The risk is particularly strong because of the big concentration of population and buildings.

He said the most important weather condition which has a direct bearing on fires is the humidity level.

During the autumn and winter months, the humidity in Hong Kong falls off sharply and everything that will bum — indoors or outdoors •— dries out.

The situation is aggravated by the number of dry days and the amount of sunshine at the time.

In these circumstances, a fire will start very easily.

The spokesman compared the fire risk in the hot and cold months.

In the summer months, he said, when the average humidity is normally above 80 per cent, the Fire Services Department puts out an average of 240 fires a month.

In the winter, when the average humidity falls to 65 per cent, they will be called to some 750 fires. .

/As the

Monday, October 9, 1972

- 3 -

As the humidity drops further, the incidence of fire increases sharply and a 58 per cent reading is quite often accompanied by about 1,200 fires•

The spokesman said: ”Every year, thousands of serious fires break out in Hong Kong, Every year, fires kill — in the 1971-72 year, 250 people died. And every year, tens of millions of dollars worth of property are destroyed by fire.”

Virtually all of this could be easily avoided. All fires are caused by carelessness or neglect. Simple precautions can prevent any outbreak of fire in your home or where you work,” he added.

The spokesman urged the public to dial 999 and ask for the Fire Services whenever they see a fire or suspect there is a fire.

Should they want free advice on fire protection for their property, or are worried about dangers at their home or work, he said, they should contact the Fire Prevention Bureau Enquiries Centre or get in touch with any fire station. The service is available at any hour of the day or night, every day of the year.

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A....

Monday, October 9, 1972

- 4 -

FURTHER DEVELOPMENT AT 01 MAN ESTATE

*********

Roads, drainage facilities and a new bus terminus will be added to three low cost housing blocks now being built at the Oi Man Estate in Ho Man Tin.

The estate, set on a 21-acre’site overlooking Princess Margaret Road, will provide accommodation for some 4$,000 people on completion in 1975-

It is the tenth estate to be built by the Housing Authority and its second largest.

A feature of the road system, which will serve the occupants of the 2000 units planned in phase one, is the way they join various service roads at the rear of the shop premises.

A three-lane bus terminus will also be built in the heart of the estate.

Some 15,000 people are expected to move into Oi Man at the end of next year, when phase one is completed.

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Monday, October 9, 1972

- 5 -

REWARD FOB RAINSTORM BRAVERY

*********

A staff member of the Urban Services Department will be rewarded this week for his bravery in rescuing six people from drowning in Ham Tin Village, Tsuen Wan, during the June rainstorms.

Mr. Chan Sum, a foreman class III, will receive a watch from the Tsuen Wan Rural Committee in a brief ceremony on Wednesday (October 11).

On June 17 this year, six people were trapped inside a building flooded by heavy rains in the low lying Ham Tin Village. Mr. Chan Sum showed a total disregard for his own safety and swam to their rescue.

The presentation will be made by Mr. Chan Po-fong, chairman of the rural committee and chairman of the urban services sub-committee of the Heung Yee Kuk, at the rural committee office in Tsuen Wan.

The ceremony will also be attended by Mr. David Lan, Assistant

Director of Urban Services (New Territories)•

Mote to Editors: The presentation ceremony will take

place at 11 a.m. on Wednesday at the Tsuen Wan Rural Committee office at 277, Sha Tsui Road, first floor, Tsuen Wan. You are cordially invited to have the event covered.

Monday, October 9, 1972

- 6 -

MRS. ROWE VISITS ABERDEEN REHABILITATION CENTRE »**»*«**«

Mrs. G.T. Rowe, wife of the Director of Social Welfare,.continuing her visits to welfare agencies, spent more than an hour this morning visiting the Aberdeen Rehabilitation Centre in Wong Chuk Hang.

She was again accompanied by Mrs. Evelyn Doe, Principal Social Welfare Officer, West Kowloon District Office. They were shown around the centre by the Superintendent, Mr. Ku Choon-keong.

The centre is a government institution run by the Social Welfare Department and supported out oi puoiic funds.

It has a total area of about 188,000 sq. feet, located in a rural setting, and is the first government rehabilitation centre to provide ’ i various facilities for the disabled. It was completed in 19&+-

Its main purpose is to make possible social and vocational rehabilitation, with particular emphasis on vocational training. Efforts are made to adjust the residents to their disability and to encourage them to pass on from the role of dependent individuals to that of independent productive workers.

The Centre consists of 11 blocks of two to three-storey concrete buildings, five of which are used as dormitories, two as staff quarters, two for training, one for administration offices and a clinic and one for the kitchen and dining hall.

The maximum capacity is MO, with the orthopaedically-disabled comprising the largest group.

/The other ........

Monday, October 9, 1972

- 7 -

The other categories of disabled include the blind, the deaf, cured leprosy patients, non-active victims of tuberculosis, discharged mental patients, and the mentally retarded.

A centre for mentally retarded children, although housed in separate blocks with its own classrooms, accommodation and dining facilities is also under the direct supervision of the superintendent.

-------0---------..

SUMMER TIME ENDS ON OCTOBER 22

*$**«*$**

Summer time in Hong Kong will officially end at 3.30 a.m. on Sunday, October 22, when the clock will be put back one hour.

Summer time came into force on April 16. Its observance in Hong Kong is regulated by the Interpretation and General Clauses Ordinance.

-------0---------

/8........

Monday, October 9> 1972

- 8 -

WEEKLY MEDICAL AND HEALTH STATISTICS

Statistics released today by the Medical and Health Department for the week ending on September 23, 1972 are as follows:-

Notifications of infectious cases (previous week’s figures in brackets) — total 218 (170); bacillary dysentery — 7 (11); chickenpox — 4 (1); tuberculosis — 187 (147); diphtheria — 1 (nil); enteric fever (typhoid) — 9 (8); leprosy — 2 (nil); measles — 3 (1); ophthalmia neonatorum — 3 (2); poliomyelitis — 1 (nil); and puerperal fever — 1 (nil).

* Births — total registered 139$; 394 on Hong Kong Island, 833 in Kowloon, and 169 in the New Territories.

* Deaths — 380 from all causes; 81 on the Island, 284 in Kowloon and 15 in the New Territories.

-------0---------

VISIT OF PRINCESS ALEXANDRA

Note to Editors; Details of the press arrangements for the visit of Princess Alexandra are contained in a Supplement to the Daily Information Bulletin. Copies of the Supplement are distributed separately in the Press Boxes this (Monday) evening.

--------0----------

Release Time: 6.30 p»m,

4000035 P.R. 33

HONG KONG GOVERNMENT

NFORMATION

SERVICES

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

SUPPLEMENT

Monday, October 9, 1972

VISIT OF H.R.H, PRINCESS ALEXANDRA

AND THE HON. ANGUS OGILVY

Press Arrangements

Press arrangements for the visit of Her Royal Highness Princess Alexandra and the Hon. Angus Ogilvy, from October 21 to October 26, have now been completed.

Wherever possible, open Press facilities will be provided, but where space is limited a pool system will have to be operated for photographers. This will apply particularly at functions which take place inside buildings. When this is necessary, G.I.S. will undertake the photography and all photographs will be freely available to all news media. Use of Flashlights

Editors are advised that the use of flashlights should be avoided wherever possible. Flashlights must never be used closer than twelve to fifteen feet from Her Royal Highness. For most outdoor functions, the use of fast film will give adequate results.

Every effort has been made to avoid imposing restrictions on the number of reporters attending any function but, if the number of pressmen attending any given function exceeds manageable proportions, the Information Services Department reserves the right to limit the numbers.

/Accreditation

Monday, October 9, 1972

- 2 -

Accreditation *

All members of the Press (which, for the purpose of the Princess1 visit includes reporters, photographers, newsreel cameramen, broadcast commentators) will be accredited for the visit. Identification of press representatives will be by means of coloured lapel badges. The appropriate lapel badge for each individual function must be worn. This is to assist in the identification of Press representatives and to ensure that they receive every possible facility to carry out their work. Transport

For most official functions, the Information Services Department will provide transport which will be clearly identified. To enable Press parties to arrive at appointed destinations in good time, the departure times will be strictly observed and transport will not wait for late arrivals•

For convenience, press transport for Kowloon and New Territories functions will leave from Kowloon Public Pier and return to the same placce Transport on Hong Kong Island will leave from Queen’s Pier and return there afterwards. Application Forms

Application forms for the different functions of the visit are attached. Editors are advised to complete these forms and return them to the Visit Press Officer, Information Services Department, Beaconsfield House, top floor, Queen’s Road Central by 12 noon on Saturday, October 14, 1972.

Editors are also advised to retain the summary of press arrangements and the set of sketch plans enclosed for briefing their reporters and photographers assigned to cover the various engagements. Further copies of these Press arrangement summaries and sketch plans are available from the

Press Room on the sixth floor of Beaconsfield House.

3

Summary of Press Arrangements (subject to changes in timings, etc.)

Serial No. Date Function Time Press Arrangements

1 Saturday, Arrival at Kai Tak 10.30 a.m. OPEN PRESS

October 21

2 ii Arrival at Queen’s Pier 11.05 a.m. OPEN PRESS

-11.15 a.m.

3 II Cross Harbour Tunnel, 12.40 p.m. OPEN PRESS

Unreiling of Plaque -12.50 p.m.

4 II Cross Harbour Tunnel 12.55 P.m. NO PRESS

Reception/Buffet Lunch - 2.00 p.m.

5 11 * • Fanling Lodge 2.15 p«m. NO PRESS

-■ 6 Sunday, P.T.S. Aberdeen, 6.10 p.m. • - OPEN PRESS-—

October 22 • • Beating of Retreat -7.10 p.m. • • • - ** Ok

7 It • •• Government House Dinner 8.30 p.m. NO PRESS

8 Monday, Police Headquarters, 10.50 a.m. OPEN PRESS

October 23 Unveil plaque at new -11.30 a.m.

• • building

9 ii Arsenal Street Rank and 11.31 a.m. NO PRESS

• • File Married Quarters -11.40 a.m.

10 ti Police Primary School 11.40 a.m. OPEN PRESS

-12.00 p.m.

11 ii Wan Chai Police Station 12.03 p.m. NO PRESS

-12.25 p.m.'

12 ii Government House Lunch 1.00 p.m. . NO PRESS

13 it • # British Industrial 3.00 p.m. OPEN PRESS

a . • Exhibition -4.30 p.m.

14 11 Dinner with Police 8.30 p.m. NO PRESS

. - Gazetted Officers -10.30 p.m.

• - . - /4

Serial No. Date Function Time Press Arrangements

——-

15 Tuesday, October 24 Ebenezer School & Home for the Blind 11.00 a.m. -11.30 a.m. OPEN PRESS

16 "if”'.I. H.K.U. Sports Ground • 11.35 a.m» r.:: -open-‘press

17 ii t Princess Alexandra Red Cross Residential School 11.45 a.m.' -12.15 p.m. OPEN PRESS

18 ii Government House Lunch 1.00 p.m. NO PRESS

19 ii • 4 Morse Park Swimming Pools 2.50 p.m. -3.35 p.m. OPEN PRESS

20 II • • • ”Keep Hong Kong Clean” Campaign, Wan Chai 3*50 p.m. -4.05 p.m. OPEN PRESS

21 II • • Police Review at Government Stadium 6.00 p.m. -7.15 p.m. OPEN PRESS

22 Wednesday, October 25 CBF Luncheon Party, ' Flagstaff House 1.00 p.m. -2.45 p.m. NO PRESS

2? ii • • South Kwai Chung Jockey Club Polyclinic 2.55 p.m. -3.30 p.m. OPEN PRESS

24 ii . Manhattan Garments Factory 3.35 p.m. -4.05 p.m. - OPEN PRESS

25 ii • Princess Alexandra Community Centre 4.15 p.m. -4.50 p.m. OPEN PRESS

26 II . . Royal Hong Kong Auxiliary Police Dinner and Ball 8.40 p.m. •11.30 p.m. NO PRESS

27 Thursday, October 26. Government House Lunch 1.00 p.m. NO PRESS

28 « . . • • Queen’s Pier Departure 2.20 p.m. -2.25 p.m. ” OPEN PRESS

29 II * • • 9 Review of Marine Police launches 2.25 p.m. —2.50 p.m. OPEN PRESS

; — . . ... . It Kai Tak Departure 2^55-p.m. -3.00 p.m. .0P® PRESS- -

Note: Full details of press arrangements follow:

5

VISIT OF H.R.H, PRINCESS ALEXANDRA AND THE HON, ANGUS OGILVY Schedule Of Press Arrangements

Saturday, October 21st, 1972

KAI TAK ARRIVAL - 10,30 a.m.

Press representatives should assemble outside the Press Room in the Kai Tak Airport Terminal Building NOT LATER THAN 9*45 a.m. They will be met by G.I.S. liaison officers and conducted to the Press positions (see Sketch Plan).

There will be three Press positions at the airport. Position "A" is reserved for photographers and cine-cameramen using hand-held cameras. Reporters will be in Position ”B” which may also be used by photographers and cine-cameramen. Position ”C”, on the roof of the western passenger finger, is reserved for radio and television commentators and cine-cameramen using cameras on tripods.

NOTE; All the Press positions are static, and it will not be possible for Press representatives to move from one position to another.

QUEEN'S PIER ARRIVAL - 11,05 a.m.

Press representatives are requested to be in position NOT LATER THAN 10.40 a.m. (see Sketch Plan of Queen’s Pier and concourse for Press positions).

Position ”A” is a tiered stand for photographers and those using handheld cine-cameras. From this position they can photograph Princess Alexandra ascending the steps on arrival at Queen’s Pier on board the ’’Lady llaurine”. Position ”B” is a general position for reporters, photographers and broadcasters. H.R.H. may also be photographed inspecting the Guard of Honour from this position.

/Position "C" •......

6

Position ”C” is an additional general position for reporters,broadcasters, photographers, and cine-cameramen using hand-held cameras to cover arrival of launch at Queen’s Pier.

Position ”D”, on the flank of the Guard of Honour, is reserved for photographers and those using hand-held cine-cameras. This position is the main one for photographing the inspection of the Guard of Honour.

Position ”E”, on the City Hall elevated walk, is reserved primarily for photographers and newsreel teams using cameras with tripods. Reporters may also use this position.

NOTE: All the Press positions are static, and it will not be possible for Press representatives to move from one position to another.

CROSS-HARBOUR TUNNEL COMPANY, HUNG HOM - 12.^ p.m, to 12.50 p.m*

After a short rest at Government House, Princess Alexandra and Mr. Ogilvy will drive through the cross-harbour tunnel to the Company’s Administration Building at Hung Hom, There she will unveil a plaque to mark completion of the construction of the cross-harbour tunnel.

OPEN PRESS facilities will be provided outside the Administration Building where the unveiling ceremony takes place. The Press position is shown on Sketch Plan. It is regretted that Press representatives will not be able to cover H.R.H.’s tour of the building and the reception that follows. Photographs taken by the official photographer will be issued later through the Information Services Department. Press representatives to be in position by 12*15

- 7 -Sunday, October 22nd, 1972

BEATING OF RETREAT, ABERDEEN - 6.30 p.m. to 7,10 p,m.

Her Royal Highness will carry out her first engagement as Honorary Commandant General of the Royal Hong Kong Police when she attends the ceremonial _     — ....M>«~*  • • •

Beating of Retreat at the Police Training School in Aberdeen.

OPEN PRESS facilities will be available. Editors are asked to note that the ceremony will be held in darkness or semi-darkness and that the use of flashlights will not be permitted. Also, because of the nature of the ceremony the Press position will have to be sited outside the perimeter of the parade ground and at some distance from the official dais. However, photographers will be able to photograph H.R.H. being greeted on arrival and of H.R.H. being pippd back to her car at the end of the ceremony,.. Flash will be allowed for these photographs only.

Transport will, be provided by the R.H.K.P. The Press bus will leave Police Headquarters, Arsenal Street at 5-20 p.m. and will return to Police Headquarters after the ceremony.

Monday, October 23rd, 1972 ' *

POLICE HEADQUARTERS, ARSENAL'STREET - 10.30 a.m, to 12,00 p.m.

Princess Alexandra will visit the Police Headquarters at Arsenal Street on Monday morning. To commemorate the visit, H.R.H. will unveil a plaque at the extension building now under construction. Following this, she will visit the Arsenal Street Rank and File Married Quarters and will be invited to meet one of the families. H.R.H. will also visit the Police Primary School.

OPEN PRESS facilities will be provided at the unveiling of the plaque and for the visit to the school. Due to limited space, Press representatives will not be able to enter the flat in the Married Quarters. Pool reporting and photography will be undertaken by official team. A pool report of her visit to the flat will be issued on the G.I.S. teleprinter and official pictures will be available as coon as possible afterwards.

/Press .......

8

Press representatives should assemble at the Arsenal Street entrance to the Police Headquarters by 10.30 a.m.

WANCHAI POLICE STATION - 12,03 p.m. to 12.23 P«m.

The short visit takes place inside the building and it is regretted there is not enough room for the Press to be present. Photographs taken by the official photographer will be freely available from the Government Information Services.

BRITISH INDUSTRIAL EXHIBITION - 3.00 p.m. to 4.30 p.m.

Accredited Press representatives must be in position by 2*30 p«m.

There will be two.Press positions (see Sketch Plan) - one for photographers and the other.for reporters. Photographers ONLY will be escorted into the exhibition building to cover H.R.H.’s tour of the exhibition stands. Photographers are reminded that they must remain at a distance of at least 15 feet from H.R.H. They are asked to cooperate by moving off quickly when requested to do so by the marshallers. This arrangement may have to be cancelled if the number of photographers exceeds manageable proportions.

Tuesdayt October 24th, 1972

EBENEZER SCHOOL, POK FU LAM - 11.00 a.m. to 11.30 a.m.

During the half-hour visit, Princess Alexandra will see various activities of the school. Arrangements have been made to enable the Press to cover the demonstrations by the pupils and other activities on the ground floor, i.e. the swimming pool and the kindergarten. It will not be possible for photographers to operate in the class-rooms. Photographs taken by the official photographer will be freely available from the Government Information Services.

/Official •<••••••

9

Official transport will be provided. The Press bus will leave Queen’s Pier at 9*45 a.m.

UNIVERSITY SPORTS GROUND - 11.35 a.m.

From the Ebenezer School, Her Royal Highness will drive to the Hong Kong University Sports Ground to board a helicopter for her next engagement at Kwun Tong. At the Sports Ground, H.R.H. will meet the Director of Physical Education and a number of students before boarding the helicopter.

OPEN PRESS facilities will be provided. Due to the time factor and parking difficulties at the school, it will not be possible for the Press party from the Ebenezer School to follow H.R.H. to the Sports Ground. Transport will be available at Queen’s Pier to take the Press to Pok Fu Lam. The bus will leave from the Pier at 10.30 a.m.

PRINCESS ALEXANDRA RED GROSS SCHOOL - 11.43 a.m. to 12.13 a»m.

OPEN PRESS facilities. Transport will be provided. The Press bus will leave the Kowloon Public Pier at 10.15 a.m. and return to Tsim Sha Tsui at about 1 p.m.

At the school, reporters and photographers will have to operate at the main entrance and in the courtyard where the children will be taking part in games, watched by Her Royal Highness. It will not be possible for photographers to operate inside the building.

/10

10

MORSE PARK SWIMMING POOLS - 2.50 to 5*3r' p.nu

OPEN PRESS facilities. Reporters will be seated in the Covered Stand as shown by ”C” on the Sketch Plan. There will be two positions for photographers, marked ”A” and ”B” on the plane These are static positions-. It will not be possible for photographers to move from one position to the other* After watching a demonstration of life saving techniques in the Main Pool, Princess A3exandra will tour the pools to see other activities. It may be possible, after H.R.H. has walked past the Press position, to take photographers to a point near the children’s pool behind the spectators’ stand to cover that section of the Princess’ tour.

Official transport will be provided. The Press bus will leave the Kowloon Public Pier at 1.45 p.m. and return to the Pier at about 4.50 p.m.

STONE NULLAH LANE, WAN CHAI - 5*50 P*m. to 4.05 p.m.

On her return to Government House from Morse Park, Princess Alexandra will drive through Wan Chai ,and watch, cleaning operations in progress.there as part of the ’’Keep Hong Kong Clean” Campaign. H.R.H. will visit Stone Nullah Lane and several other streets ?n the. area^

OPEN PRESS facilities for reporters and photographers will be available along the streets, but no Pressmen will be allowed to follow. H.R.H. should she decide to enter any building along the route. In this event, pool reporting and photography will be carried out by G.I.S. staff. The pool report and official photographs will be freely available to all news media.

Press representatives should assemble.at.the junction of Stone Nullah Lane and Queen’s Road East at 5*30 p.m.

/11

11

POLICE REVIEW, GOVERNMENT STADIUM - 6.00 p.m. to 7,1$ p.m.

Accredited Press reporters, photographers, newsreel cameramen and broadcasters are asked to be in position by $.30 p.m. (see Sketch Plan for Press positions).

Reporters will be seated in Position ”B” in the mainstand (Stand 28) of the stadium.

Photographers and cine-cameramen will be in position nA” on the concrete road by the side of the dais. Admission to this Press position will be limited and not more than one photographers’ badge will be issued to any single newspaper or news organisation. Prom this position, photographers will be able to obtain pictures of H.R.H. taking the salute, the presentation of .medals and the presentation of a gift to H.R.H. by the Commissioner of Police, as well as the march past. Photographers will be restricted to this position and telephoto lenses for photographs of H.R.H. inspecting the parade will be required.

Wednesday, October 25th, 1972

SOUTH KWAI CHUNG JOCKEY CLUB POLYCLINIC - 2.$$ p.m. to 5.50 p.m.

Her Royal Highness will be travelling by helicopter to Kwai Chung to open the Polyolinic there. Transport will be provided to take the Press to Kwai Chung. The Press bus will leave from Kowloon Public Pier at 1.15 p*m.

OPEN PRESS facilities will be provided for the opening ceremony in the forecourt facing the main entrance to the Polyclinic,

It will not be possible for the Press to be inside the bin7ding during H.R.H.’s tour of the Polyclinic. Official photographs taken by the G.I.S. will be issued later.

/12.........

12

* . J." 4 ......

MANHATTAN GARMENTS FACTORY, TSUEN WAN - 3.35 p.m. to 4.05 p.m.

1

After leaving the South Kwai Chung Polyclinic, Princess Alexandra will proceed by car to the Manhattan Garments Factory in Kwai Cheung Street, Tsuen Wan. She will visit various departments of the factory and meet some of women workers. OPEN PRESS facilities will be provided.

Coverage of this function will be handled by the Press party at the Polyclinic. The Press bus will leave immediately after the opening ceremony and go direct to Kwai Cheung Street to await the arrival of the Royal party. After the factory visit, the Press will be taken back to Kowloon Public Pier.

THE PRINCESS ALEXANDRA COMMUNITY CENTRE - 4.15 p.m. to 4.50 p.m.

Before leaving Tsuen Wan, Princess Alexandra will pay a visit to the Community Centre which is named after her.

Coverage of this visit presents certain problems because of the narrow corridors on the upper floors. Arrangements, however, have been made for OPEN PRESS facilities at the main entrance and assembly hall on the ground floor and the activity rooms on the third floor. The Press will be taken up to the third floor by the stairs opposite to the one to be used by H.R.H.

Her Royal Highness will be invited to sign the visitors’ book outside the main entrance. A press position will be set up in the forecourt for those wishing to take pictures of H.R.H. signing the book.

Official transport will be provided. The Press bus will leave the Kowloon Public Pier at 2.45 p.m.

/13.........

13

ROYAL HONG KONG AUXILIARY ^OLICE DINNER AND BALL - 8.40 p.m.

Her Royal Highness will dine with the Royal Hong Kong Auxiliary Police and attend the Ball. This is a private function and no Press facilities will be provided.

Thursday, October 26th, 1972

QUEEN'S PIER DEPARTURE - 2.20 p.m. to 2.25

On arrival at Queen's Pier, Her Royal Highness will say goodbye to a number of people assembled inside Queen's Pier. Uiere will be no inspection of Guard of Honour. Press arrangements are similar to those for the arrival except that Position. "D". will not be formed.. (s$e Sketch Plan).

As the "Lady Maurine" leaves Queen's Pier for Kai Tak, escorted by Police launches, a 21-gun salute will be fired by H.M.S. Tamar, and in the Hung Hom Fairway H.R.H. will review two squadrons of Marine Police launches.

All Press representatives must be in position by 2 p.m.

REVIEW OF MARINE POLICE LAUNCHES - 2.30 p.m.

On her way to Kai Tak, H.R.H. will review two squadrons of Marine Police Launches in the Hung Hom Fairway. Arrangements have been made to take Press representatives out to the Hung Hom Fairway in Marine Department Launch No. 18 to cover the review. Space on the launch, howevertis limited and in the event of nominations exceeding the vessel's capacity, priority will have to be given to photographers, cine-cameramen and commentators doing live broadcasts, with G.I.S. undertaking the Pool reporting.

Embarkation point will be Blake Pier and Press representatives MUST BE on board the launch by 1.45 p.m. at the latest.

/14.........

14

KAI TAK AIRPORT DEPARTURE - 2.^5 p.m.

Press arrangements will be similar to those for the arrival. There will be a photographic position on the tarmac near the aircraft steps while reporters will be accommodated in a position alongside the apron access road. Television and newsreel teams using cameras on tripods will be able to use the roof of the western passengertfinger, (see Sketch Plan)*

WORTANT NOTE;

Attached is an application form. Please complete this and return it to the Visit Press Officer, G.I.S. by 12 noon, October 14, 1972 at the latest.

-------0--------

VISIT OF H.R.H. PRINCESS ALEXANDRA AND THE HON, ANGUS OGILVY

October 21-26, 1972

********

Application Form For Lapel Badges

TO: Visit Press Officer, Information Services Department Beaconsfield House, Queen’s Road Central, Hong Kong.

We wish to nominate the following representatives to cover the visit

of H.R.H. Princess Alexandra and the Hon. Angus Ogilvy between October 21

and 26, 1972s

KAI TAK ARRIVAL

Position A (for photographers and cine-cameramen using hand-held cameras)

Position B (for reporters & photographers)

Position C (for radio commentators & cine-cameramen using cameras on tripods)

QUEEN'S PIER ARRIVAL

Position A (for photographers & cine-cameramen)

Position B (for reporters, photographers and radio commentators)

Position C (for photographers)

Position D (for photographers and cine-cameramen using hand-held cameras)

Position E (for reporters, photographers and newsreel teams)

2

CROSS HARBOUR TUNNEL

Report er________________________________________________________________

Photographer ____________________________________________________________

Radio/Television_________________________________________________________

POLICE TRAINING SCHOOL, ABERDEEN

Reporter ________________________________________________________________

Phot ographer ___________________________________________________________

Radio/Television __________________________________________________ _ r

POLICE HEADQUARTERS NEW BUILDING


Report er _________________________________________________________________

Photographer ________________________, ____

Radio/Television ________________________________________________________

BRITISH INDUSTRIAL EXHIBITION


Reporter ________________________________________________________________

Photograph er ___________________________________________________________

Radio/Television ________________________________________________________

EBENEZER SCHOOL AND HOME FOR THE BLIND /<?

Reporter ______________________________,

Photographer _____________________________________________________________

Radio/Television______________________________ . ______________________

H.K.U. SPORTS GROUND

Report er_________________________________________________________________

Photographer _____________________________________________________________

Rad io/Televis ion _______________________________________________________

5

PRINCESS ALEXANDRA RED CROSS RESIDENTIAL SCHOOL

KWUN TONG

Report er ________________________________________________________________

Photographer _____________________________________________________________

Radio/Televis ion ________________________________________________________

PARK SWIMMING POOLS

Position A (for photographers and cine-cameramen using hand-held cameras)

Position B (for photographers and cine-cameramen using hand-held cameras)

Position C (Reporters)

POLICE REVIEW AT GOVERNMENT STADIUM l£)

Report er __________________________________

Photographer

Radio/Televis ion ___________________________

SOUTH KWAI CHUNG JOCKEY CLUB POLYCLINIC

Report er ,

Photographer __________________________________

Radio/Television ,

MANHATTAN GARMENTS FACTORY


Report er _ _________

Photographer ______________________.___________

Radio/Television ____________________________.

PRINCESS ALEXANDRA COMMUNITY CENTRE

Report er ____________________________________ _ __________________________

Photograph er ___________________________________________________________

Radio/Television

QUEEN'S PIER DEPARTURE


Position A (for photographers & cine-cameramen)

Position B (for reporters, photographers & radio commentators)

Position C (for photographers)

Position E (for reporters, photographers and newsreel teams)

MARINE POLICE LAUNCHES REVIEW

Reporter__________________________________________________________________

Photographer~

Radio/Televis ion_________________________ . _

KAI TAK DEPARTURE

Position A (for photographers and cine--cameramen using hand-held cameras)

Position B (for reporters)

Position C (for radio commentators and cine-cameramen using cameras on tripods)

Capacity on newspaper, news agency, etc...............• ••......

Date: .........................

VISIT OP H.R.H. PRINCESS ALEXANDRA

i. ft &

1 ARRIVAL AT KAI TAK

A 4

21st October, 1972


APRON ACCESS ROAD

ROOF

TERRACE (f)Q

INNES TAXIWAY

WEST GATE

-Tl-.^X .-.-l-l-l-l-

VIP ROOM |

VIST? OF PRINCESS ALEXANDRA

VISIT OF H.R.H. PRINCESS ALEXANDRA if a it 4 BRITISH INDUSTRIAL EXrTPITIGN

2Jrd October, 1972

FLEMING ROAD

VISIT 0? H.R.H. PBIHCBSS ALEXANDRA « 1 if 4 EBENEZER SCHOOL AND HOME FOR THE BLIND

'<•’ I S i 1 it 24th October, 1972


VISIT OF H.R.H. PRINCESS ALEXANDRA

VISIT OF H.R.H. PRINCESS ALEXANDRA

H> i. $ &

ROYAL HpNCL KUKG Jf^-JCE REVIEW

PRH 7 4000091

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Tuesday, October 10, 1972

FACSIMILE SERVICE TO BE INTRODUCED FOR CHINESE NEWSPAPERS

*********

A new facsimile service is to be introduced by the Government Information Services to transmit news items quickly and directly to Chinese newspaper offices.

With the service it will take less than six minutes for a press release written on foolscap-size paper to be transmitted to a receiver at the newspaper press room.

At present Chinese newspapers, along with the many other subscribers, have to rely on the G.I.S. teleprinter service which, of course, can only send out items in English. Chinese versions of the items have to be stencilled and then collected in person at the end of the day, wasting time and manpower.

The only alternative for an editor to meet the dead line is to allocate staff to translate the English teleprinter copies.

The facsimile service to be provided is not new. It was started several year ago by G.I.S. on an experimental basis with one receiveif in the radio news section at Radio Hong Kong and another to several Chinese newspapers in rotation, to demonstrate the usefulness of the machine.

/The ...*••••

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong. Tel: 5-233191

Tuesday, October 10, 1972

- 2 -

The experiment proved successful, and since then a new development has eliminated the costly sensitised paper which had to be used in the earlier machines, thus making them almost as cheap to operate as teleprinters.

To introduce the facsimile service, the Government Information Services is calling tenders for a new transmitter capable of handling a maximum of 20 receivers.

The service is expected to become operational in about six months. Initially about 10 Chinese newspapers will benefit from the service.

-------0---------

QUARANTINE RESTRICTIONS IMPOSED

**********

Quarantine restrictions have been imposed against arrivals from the Indonesian port of Bengkulu.

The Port Health Authority announced today that the restrictions follow reports of cholera from the port.

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/3.........

Tuesday, October 10, 1972

- 3 -

POOR RESULTS FROM ANTI-MEASLES CAMPAIGN

, A total of 12,895 children were protected against measles during

the nine weeks of the 1972 anti-measles vaccination campaign which has just ended.

Announcing this today, the Director of Medical and Health Services, Dr. G.H. Choa, commented: ”1 consider such a result extremely poor, bearing in mind all the measures we took during the campaign to draw the attention of parents to the need for anti-measles vaccination — not only for their children, but also to prevent an outbreak of the disease in Hong Kong.”

He said that although the campaign itself was over, and the special mobile vaccine facilities and door-to-door visits to resettlement estates had ended, anti-measles vaccinations were still routinely available at all government maternal and child health centres.

In the ninth and last week of the campaign, a total of 1,010 doses of the vaccine was administered. Of these, 187 were administered to children on the Island, 503 in Kowloon, and 520 in the New Territories.

The campaign began on August 8.

The incidence of measles has tended to fall into a distinct biennial pattern, with a rash of the disease breaking out on alternate winters and springs. Free anti-measles vaccine has been made available since December 1967.

/The last

Tuesday, October 10, 1972

The last epidemic of the disease occurred in the winter-spring of 1966-67. The incidence and mortality have since remained low, due "at least in part, to the immunisation campaigns which are now on a year-round basis."

"But," Dr. Choa said, "parents who disregard our repeated warnings should not be complacent. Susceptible children should be immunised as soon as possible.

"It is not true that measles is inevitable. The disease can, and should, be prevented."

. - - - 0 -------

EXECUTIVE COUNCIL

*********

Mr. G.M.B. Saloon, ceased to be a temporary Unofficial Member of the Executive Council, from yesterday (October 9) following the return to Hong Kong of Mr. G.R. Ross.

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/5..........

Tuesday, October 10, 1972

- 5 -

NEW MARKET FOR WESTERN DISTRICT

»$***$**«

A new five-storey market building providing modern and convenient market facilities in Western District on Hong Kong Island, is being built in Shek Tong Tsui.

The new market will replace the former small single-storey block in Hill Road which was pulled down recently.

Specially designed to suit the sloping conditions in Hill Road, the market will be equipped with an elevator to facilitate the handling of goods•

It will accommodate some 70 vegetable, meat, fish and poultry stalls on the ground and first floors. The main entrance and loading areas will be on the lower ground floor.

A section of the rooftop, covering about 5,600 square feet, will be used as a children’s playground. It will offer a variety of recreational facilities including table tennis.

Another section will be occupied by a raised block housing Hawker Control Force offices and quarters for market management staff.

The entire project, eosting S1.7 million, is expected to be completed by October, next year.

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Tuesday, October 10, 1972

- 6 -

PUBLIC ASSISTANCE SCHEME CONTINUES TO EXPAND ♦ ♦»***¥*♦

The total number of active cases in the Public Assistance Scheme reached 16,678 at the end of September.

New applications received during the month totalled 9$9> including 35 referred from voluntary agencies. Cases reactivated during the month numbered 128, and at the same time, 630 were closed.

Cash payments during September totalled 32.5 million, bringing to $26 million the amount spent so far since the expanded scheme was implemented on April 1, 1971•

The head of the Public Assistance Scheme, Mr. Tsau Tsor-yan, says the figures indicate that more people in need now realise the scheme exists for their benefit.

Individuals without income who qualify get a minimum of 3110 a month. To this can be added a rent allowance, and necessary travelling expenses, and if justified, up to 3100 a month for extra diet.

A family of five without income can get about 3^30 a month.

Fifteen field units have been set up in various districts to handle applications and the sixteenth, to serve the Castle Peak area, is being planned.

Applicants do not have to call personally at the field unit nearest their home. If they write giving their address, they will be visited by representatives from the Social Welfare Department. • • • • • • • -----------------------------------0---------

/7.......

Tuesday, October 10, 1972

- 7 -

FIRST DAY COVERS FOR TUNNEL STAMP ON SALE TOMORROW

First day covers for the forthcoming issue of the postage stamp commemorating the opening of the cross-harbour tunnel will go on sale from tomorrow (Wednesday) at all post offices. They will cost 20 cents.

The first day covers feature a design by Mr. Kan Tai-keung, a

Hong Kong artist. 9.:

The public is urged to obtain their covers early to avoid disappointment.

The special S1 stamp will be on sale from October 20.-? Its issue is timed to coincide with the visit of Princess Alexandra.

Shortly after her arrival in Hong Kong, the Princess will drive through the tunnel and unveil a plaque marking the completion of the project.

• • • • • • •

Note to Editors: Photographs of the first- day cover with

a 31 stamp attached are distributed separately in the GIS press boxes this evening.

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/8 .

- w

Tuesday, October 10, 1972

- 8 -

TEXTILE EXPORTS TO BRITAIN «««******

The Commerce and Industry Department has announced that normal licensing for exports of woven polyester/cotton textiles to Britain will be resumed as soon as possible.

This foilnwa the announcement on Sunday that the export of these items had been temporarily suspended from Saturday, October 7•

No further application for textile licences for woven polyester/ cotton fabrics, made*ups and garments for shipment to.Britain are being accepted and the issue of licences already received by the department are being withheld until further notice,

Polyester/cotton textiles should include any fabric containing both cotton and polyester where (a) the cotton content is 50 per cent or less, and (b) polyester comprises 50 per cent or more of the fibres other than cotton. In both conditions, the percentages are measured by weight*

Copies of the notice have been issued to exporters and manufacturers, and they are also available from the department *s Textile Licensing Office on the second floor, Fire Brigade Building, Hong Kong.

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Release Time: 6»3O Pym,

PRH 7 4000091

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Wednesday, October 11, 1972

GENERAL INCREASE IN RATES INDICATED

*******

Over 300,000 individual assessments will be included in the new valuation list which will come into effect on April 1, 1973* It will replace the current one which has been in use since April 1, 19&9«

The Commissioner of Rating and Valuation, Mr. R.A. Ery, said this today when confinning that work on the valuation side of the new list was up to schedule and that notices of valuation would be sent out to ratepayers by post in early December.

Rateable values are based on letting values and certain trends are already apparent from an analysis of a cross section of assessments on the new list.

Rentals have increased considerably over the past four years, whilst rateable values have remained unaltered. A re-adjustment of the rateable values is therefore long overdue.

A general increase of about 40 per cent in rateable values is indicated, but it is emphasised that increases vary greatly*

Some premises in areas, like the Central and Peak Districts on Hong Kong Island, and Tsim Sha Tsui in Kowloon, will come in for increases which are considerably higher than the average.

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5'233191

Wednesday, October 11, 1972

2

Mr. Fry said that ratepayers have, over the past four years, benefitted fj?om a lower level of rateable values than would otherwise have prevailed and they have therefore saved on their quarterly rates bill.

Last March, the Government anticipated the higher revenue which will result from the revaluation and said that rates charges are likely to be reduced from 17 per cent per annum to 15 per cent per annum in the urban areas. Thus, for the majority of ratepayers, the effect of higher rateable values will be cushioned to some extent.

The existing charges in the New Territories are already lower, and will remain at 11 per cent.

There is, of course, provision for lower percentage charges where a mains water supply is not available or where the supply of water is unfiltered The Commissioner added: "Ratepayers will naturally be anxious to know how these increases will affect them, but figures have yet to be completed and the final list prepared. Full details cannot be disclosed until December when the Notices of Valuation are sent out.”

Regular review of the Valuation List is necessary in order to relate rateable values to current rental levels and to ensure that the changing pattern of rentals is reflected in the Valuation List. This ensures general uniformity and is fairer to ratepayers, he said.

Mr. Fry said it had not been possible to revise the Valuation List earlier than the current year because of his department’s extra responsibility in administering the Rent Increases (Domestic Premises) Control Ordinance.

/Commenting

Wednesday, October 11, 1972

- 3 -

Commenting on the announcement, a government spokesman gave figures to illustrate the average increase in rates that would be paid by the ratepayer each month once the new charges are adopted in April next year*

For tenement floors, the average monthly increase will be between S3 and $6; small flats about $15; medium flats about $40; and large flats about $90 per month.

These figures are based on the reassessment and the anticipated reduction of two per cent in the rates charges.

-------0---------

WATERWORKS QUARTERS FOR CHEUNG CHAU

********

Waterworks Office staff permanently stationed on Cheung Chau will soon have new living quarters for themselves and their families.

The resident staff are responsible for operating and maintaining the mains water distribution systemt and to deal with house service matters and faults.

To improve their services, a new depot will be built in the central area of Praya Street. This three-storey depot will consist of quarters for both single and married staffj an office and a store.

The store will provide adequate space for the storage of pipes and other fittings required for maintenance and house services.

Construction work has just begun and the project will take about six months to complete.

-------o---------

A...........

Wednesday, October 11, 1972

- U -

822 MILLION SUPERMARKET SITE TO BE AUCTIONED

********♦

A site earmarked for use as a supermarket and shopping centre in Kowloon Tong will be put on sale at the upset price of 822.5 million.

The site, with an area of 55»000 square feet, is located at Junction Road, near Broadcast Drive.

It is one of six pieces of land totalling about 160,000 square feet to be offered for sale at the next Crown Land auction at the City Hall at 2,50 p.m. -on Friday, November 3* All sites, apart from that reserved for the supermarket, are for private residential purposes.

The upset prices range from 81 million to 322.5 million.

Three sites are situated in Watford Road on the Peak, and the other two are in Fessenden Road and Marconi Road in the Broadcast Drive area.

Meanwhile, a piece of industrial.land, in the New Territories will be up for sale by auction at the Princess Alexandra Community Centre, Tsuen Wan, at 11 a.m. on Monday, October 30.

The land, occupying about 90.,000 square feet, is situated between Kwok Shui Road and Yau Ma Hom Road in Kwai Chung. Its upset price is 33-6 million.

-----_ 0 - - - -

/5........

Wednesday, October 11, 1972

- 5 -

EXTRA TRAIN SERVICES FOR FESTIVAL

*********

Special train services between Tsim Sha Tsui and Wo Hop Shek Cemetery in Fanling, will be provided on Sunday (October 15) and Monday during the Chung Yeung Festival.

There will be 11 additional up trains and a similar number of down trains on each of these days.

A spokesman for the Kowloon Canton Railway said today that all the special trains and the normal trains operating between 8 a.m. and 3 would not pick up passengers at the Mong Kok station.

All passengers for these trains are requested to go to the Tsim Sha Tsui station.

The spokesman said that special train services would be arranged . for late in the evenings if the traffic demands.

He added that all up trains from Kowloon to the New Territories would probably be full from 6 a.m. to J p.m. and similarly with the down trains from 3 p.m. to 9 p.m.

Wednesday, October 11, 1972

- 6 -

SEMINAR TO DISCUSS FUTURE ROLE OF YOUTH REPRESENTATIVE COUNCIL

41*******

The Youth Representative Council of the Social Welfare Department has organised a weekend seminar to discuss the organisation and role of the council in an effort to facilitate better functioning in the future.

The seminar programmes will include talks by social welfare officers and group discussions.

The council is a joint organisation of youth members of the eight community, social and youth centres of the Social Welfare Department.

Its aims and functions are to co-ordinate and facilitate communication among members of the various centres to promote co-operation and to foster mutual understanding.

Among other things, the council explores the real needs of the young people so that projects and activities can be designed to meet these needs.

The seminar will be held this weekend at the Church of Christ in China

near the University of Hong Kong.

********

Note to Editors: You are invited to cover the seminar. The

Church of Christ in China is in Morrison House, No. 5i Hatton Road (near the University of Hong Kong). The seminar will be held on October 14 between 2 p.m. and 5 p.m., and on October 15 between 9 a.m. and 5 P*m«

/7........

Wednesday, October 11, 1972

SHEK KIP MEI REHOUSING PROJECT

«««*««•**

Note to Editors: A press conference will be held at

3 ptm, tomorrow (Thursday) at the Shek Kip Mei Rehousing Operation Office at the Shek Kip Mei/ Pak Tin Administration Building, Nam Cheong Street, Kowloon, when the Deputy Commissioner for Resettlement, Mr. John Walden, will announce the launching of the Resettlement Department's major project to rehouse the tenants of the Shek Kip Mei estate.

Representatives of the press and broadcasting stations are invited to attend. Refreshments will be served after the conference.

Three vans (AM2O9^» AM2O9& and AM23O5) will be available to take representatives to the Shek Kip Mei Rehousing Operation Office. The vans will leave the Kowloon sub-pool behind the Tsim Sha Tsui Post Office at 2.15 p.m. A Resettlement Department respresentative, Mr. H.L. Ko will be present.

-----0------

Wednesday, October 11, 1972

- 8 -

EXPORT OF RESTRAINED TEXTILES TO NORWAY

****$«*$

The Director of Commerce and Industry announced today he has issued a Notice to Exporters regarding Phase II of the swing arrangements for export of restrained textiles to Norway in the extended restraint period from July 1, 1972 to December 31, 1972.

Trade associations and companies on the CommeTce and Industry Departments mailing list for the Notice to Exporters, Series 6 (Europe, other than Britain and the European Economic Community) No. 23/72, will receive copies of the Notice shortly.

However, people who wish to seek advance notice of its content are invited to contact the following officers of the Commerce and Industry Department:

Mr. A.R. Swinton - Industry Assistant Tel. No.: H-247315

Mrs. L.M. Yam - Licensing Assistant (Swing & Transfer) Tel. No. H-223219

Release Time; • 7*00 p.m.

PRH 7' 4000091

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Thursday, October 12, 1972

MAJOR REHOUSING SCHEME FOR SHEK KIP MEI ,*«*«****

The first stage of the Shek Kip Mei rehousing scheme began today and residents of the first six blocks are being given an opportunity to apply for their new homes at nearby Pak Tin Estate.

The $80-raillion rehousing operation is to bring about radical improvements in the living condition of the 62,000 people living in this old and overcrowded estate.

The Shek Kip Mei rehousing scheme is the first step in a bigger programme to improve the homes of half a million people living in over 200 old blocks of Mark I and II design.

In announcing the scheme, the Deputy Commissioner for Resettlement, Mr. John Walden said that after months of careful planning and preparation, the department is now ready to embark on the physical task of putting the project into reality.

It has set up a special Rehousing Unit in connection with the multi-million dollar project.

An Enquiry Centre has also been built at Block 6, which is right in the centre of Shek Kip Mei, to provide convenient consultation services to the tenants. It opens from 8.JO a.m. to 9*00 p.m. on weekdays and from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Sundays and public holidays.

/tinder this .........

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong. Tel: 5-233191

Thursday, October 12, 1972

- 2 -

Under this conversion scheme, some blocks will be demolished to make way for the construction of a new commercial centre and a new road to serve the estate’s tenants.

Other blocks will be renovated to provide self-contained living units. After the conversion, the units will be twice as big as the present rooms and each will have its own kitchen, toilet and private balcony as well as mains water supply.

A commercial centre will accommodate shops, restaurants, schools and a car park.

To enable the redevelopment and improvement works to be carried out, the blocks will have to be vacated and for this purpose the Government has built accommodation in the nearby Pak Tin Estate to accommodate the tenants who have to move out.

The Pak Tin Estate, which is only 300 yards from Shek Kip Mei, is a new housing estate. Rooms are bigger than those of the old resettlement estates and are provided with their own water, toilets, private balcony and cooking space. Rents for the Pak Tin flats are:-

329 for a 3-person flat,

338 for a 4-person flat,

35^ for a 5-to 6-person flat, and

368 for a 7-person flat.

The estate will be managed by staff of the Housing Authority and has all the amenities of a modern community centre. It has two primary schools, which are already in operation, a reading hall, football fields, a children’s playground and ample open space.

/Tenants of .. .*....

Thursday, October 12, 1972

- 3 -

Tenants of Pak Tin will also be served by shops, restaurants and a small commercial complex. They will have easy access to public transport as buses and public light buses pass through the area.

The whole rehousing operation will be implemented in five stages. The first phase involves rehousing residents of blocks 23 to 28 of Shek Kip Mei estate followed by the renovation of the buildings.

Staff of the Resettlement Department Rehousing Unit have written to the tenants to advise them of the detailed arrangements on how they will be housed, and will be supplementing this with personal calls on the tenants.

The various government departments, such as Social Welfare, Education, Labour, Secretariat for Home Affairs and Urban Services, will be available to help families who may have personal problems arising from the move. Particular attention is being paid to the needs of handicapped people.

A workshop block is being built nearby for tenants who now operate workshop trades so that these workshops no longer cause a nuisance to the domestic tenants. Alternative trading space will be offered to shop tenants. They will shortly be given details of the reprovisioning arrangements when the time comes for them to move.

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A............

Thursday, October 12, 1972

MORE FUNDS FOR NEEDY UNIVERSITY STUDENTS «*»«*»**

Extra funds totalling more than $7.1 million have been approved by the Government for its financial assistance scheme to aid needy university students in the current academic year 1972-73•

The additional funds amount to an extra $918,000 for grants and an extra $6,250,000 for loans, bringing the total funds for the year to $3,780,000 in grants and $9,827,500 in loans.

The extra money is needed mainly because the two universities have many more poor students than had been expected in 19&9 when the scheme started. Increases in the cost of living since then have also played a part#

The Government scheme of grants and loans for students is operated by the Joint Universities Committee on Student Finance.

Early this year, figures showed that in 1971-72, 59 per cent of the total student body at both universities needed some assistance in paying tuition fees and certain unavoidable expenses, and full assistance for living expenses.

This meant that increases of about 32 per cent in grant funds and about 200 per cent in loan funds were needed.

The Committee has therefore proposed a method of calculating funds on a yearly basis which would match them with reasonable accuracy to a realistic assessment of student needs. The proposal has been approved.

/Commenting ••••••

Thursday, October 12, 1972

- 5 -

Commenting on the changes, the Committee Chairman, Mr. S.F. Bailey, said:- ”The new system means that the major reason for a student finance scheme can continue to be met.”

”No student offered a place at one of the universities will have to turn it down for lack of money. I believe Government’s foresight and commonsense in backing this should be recognised,” he said.

Mr. Bailey pointed out that a majority of university students were now the children of comparatively poor people and had reached the university of their choice through hard work and ability.

Representatives of both the University of Hong Kong and the Chinese University expressed satisfaction with the proposals.

They believed it could fairly be said that the Government was meeting the highest standards which it could properly be asked in Hong Kong in respect of financial aid for university students.

A Government spokesman said he agreed that the amount of money required for the scheme would vary from year to year, depending upon the resources available to students.

He said the important point was that the very considerable sums spent on financing universities should not be wasted because of financial difficulties experienced by students.

”This could at one time have happened all too easily, either because an outstanding student was unable to afford to go to a university at all or because having got to a university, he or she had to spend so much time and effort in earning money to do it that their studies suffered accordingly.

/’*The present ••••••

Thursday, October 12, 1972

- 6 -

"The present scheme should completely overcome this problem,” the spokesman said.

Under the scheme, grants made each year are used to pay tuition fees and certain unavoidable expenses such as books, while loans are for the students’ living expenses.

Note to Editors: Copies of a press release on the above subject

issued by the Joint Universities Committee on Student Finance are distributed separately in the G.I.S. press boxes this evening.

-------0 --------

Thursday, October 12, 1972

- 7 -

IMPROVED WATER SUPPLY FOR TSING YI ISLAND

**«**»*«*

Work will begin soon on connecting the fresh water mains in the Kwai Chung area to the water supply system on Tsing Yi Island to improve the supply to people living on the island.

The project will involve the laying of some 5,000 feet of 15-inch diameter mains from the junction of Texaco Road and Gin Drinkers Bay Road in Kwai Chung to the Tsing Yi Bridge, now under construction.

The new water supply will become operative only after the completion of the bridge which links Tsing Yi and Kwai Chung, and along which the mains will run.

The project, costing about Sj20,000, will be the second phase of a plan to improve the water supply to Tsing Yi — the first was the recent installation of a number of public stand-pipes.

The work is expected to be completed in May, next year.

-------0---------

QUARANTINE RESTRICTIONS LIFTED

««**«****

The Port Health Authority has lifted quarantine restrictions imposed against arrivals from Saigon and the port of Danang in South Vietnam and Phnom Penh (port and airport) the capital of the Khmer Republic.

The restrictions had earlier been imposed because of an outbreak of plague.

However, quarantine restrictions are still in force on arrivals from the port of Saigon because of cholera.

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/8.........

Thursday, October 12, 1972

- 8 -

RECONSTRUCTION OF ROADS IN NORTH POINT

*********

Four sections of roads in North Point are to be rebuilt to cope with the greater volume of traffic in the area.

The roads to be improved are Tong Shui Road, between Java Road and ICing’s Road (western half); Power Street; Electric Road, between Whitfield Road and Wing Hing Street; and North Point Road between Java Road and King’s Road.

A total length of about 1,400 feet of these roads, which are in a deteriorating condition, will be rebuilt in reinforced concrete.

The work is expected to begin next month and take about six months to complete.

Appropriate traffic signs and notices will be arranged in conjunction with the works.

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/9..........

Thursday, October 12, 1972

- 9 -

OPENING OF SAU MAU PING C.D.O. SUB-OFFICE

*********

The Sau Mau Ping Sub-office of the City District Office (Kwun Tong) will be officially opened on Saturday, October 14.

Mr. J.M. Rowlands, the Deputy Secretary for Home Affairs and five citizens living or working in Sau Mau Ping will perform the ribbon cutting ceremony.

This sub-office is situated at Block 28, Sau Mau Ping Resettlement Estate, Sau Ming Road, virtually in the middle of the estate which at present houses more than 110,000 people.

One of the aims of the Secretariat for Home Affairs, since the introduction of the C.D.O. scheme, is that services will as far as possible reach the doorsteps of the people.

Administratively, the Sau Mau Ping Sub-office is part of the C.D.O. (Kwun Tong). The officer in charge of this new sub-office is Mr. Chiu Shing-kin, an experienced liaison officer who has also been appointed a Commissioner for Oaths.

Mr. Jack C.K. So, the City District Officer (Kwun Tong) pointed out that residents of Sau Mau Ping Resettlement Estate can in future make statutory declarations and obtain the full range of C.D.O. services at this sub-office.

Note to Editors: The opening ceremony will take place

at 11 a.m. and will be officiated by Mr. J.M. Rowlands, Dr. Tung Fei-lok, Mr. Kwan Shu-kei, Mr. Ma Hon-chin, Mrs. Lee Ming-wun and Miss Kung Lai-wah. You are invited to send a reporter and/or photographer to cover the event.

-------0--------- /10 ......................

Thursday, October 12, 1972

- 10 -

PASSING OUT PARADE FOR CIVIL AID SERVICES «**««****

One hundred and fifty recruits of the Civil Aid Services will take part in a passing out parade to be held on Sunday (October 15) at the C.A.S. Kowloon Training Centre.

The recruits have just completed a series of basic training in first-aid, light rescue, warden duties and other general training.

The Commander of the Royal Air Force, Hong Kong, Air Commodore C.L. Godwin, will inspect and address the parade and take the salute.

He will also distribute special certificates to the three top recruits and present Civil Defence Long Service Medals to 19 officers and members of the Services.

The C.A.S. Footdrill Final Competition will be held immediately after the parade.

Note to Editors:

You are invited to send a reporter

and/or photographer to cover the event which

begins at 10 a.m. The C.A.S. Kowloon Training

Centre is at 204 Argyle Street.

-------0---------

Release Time: 7*00 p.m.

PRH 7 4000091

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Friday, October 1J, 1972

ADMINISTRATION BUILDING FOR DESALINATION PLANT

*********

Work will begin towards the end of this year on the construction of the administration building for the sea-water desalting plant at Castle Peak.

The plant, situated at Lok On Pai near the 17 milestone Castle Peak Road, will have a daily output of 40 million gallons of fresh water.

The administration building will contain the main control room for the desalting plant as well as the offices, laboratory, storage of records and canteen. In addition, the building will house the main workshops and workshop stores for maintenance of the plant.

A start is expected to be made on the building in December and it should be completed towards the end of 1973*

The sea-water desalting plant, when completed, will be the largest of its kind in the world. It consists of six units each complete with its steam boiler, evaporator and associated ancillaries.

The first of these units is expected to be operational by mid-197^-with each, of the remaining units coming into operation thereafter at three-monthly intervals.

The Government has been recruiting a number of engineers for the supervision of the construction work and the operation and maintenance of the plant when it is completed.

When the desalting plant becomes fully operational, it will require about 200 engineers and technicians to carry out processing and maintenance work.

------0------

/2.......

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong. Tel: 5-233191

Friday, October 13, 1972

- 2 -

SIMULTANEOUS INTERPRETATION IN LEGCO ON WEDNESDAY

***********

Simultaneous interpretation will be introduced into the Legislative Council on Wednesday (October 18) at the opening of the council’s 1972-73 session.

As from that date, members of the council may use either English or Chinese in council proceedings.

In a notice published in today’s Gazette, the Governor has appointed October 18 as the date on which the provisions of Standing Order No. 2 of the Legislative Council shall come into effect.

Standing Order No. 2 provides that a member may address the council in either English or Cantonese.

Arrangements are being made for members of the public who wish to attend the opening meeting.

Due to the limited number of seats available in the Council Chamber, any member of the public wishing to be certain of a seat on that date should reserve one by telephoning the Councils Office (Tel. H-95260) during office hours before next Wednesday.

Simultaneous interpretation receivers will be issued, on a ’’first come, first served” basis, to those who wish to use them in the council meeting.

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/3.........

Friday, October 13, 1972

- 3 -

GOVERNMENT ACCOUNTS SHOW DEFICIT FOR FIRST FIVE MONTHS

The Hong Kong Government accounts for the month of August 1972 show a deficit of 315.5 million compared with a deficit of 310.4 million in August last year.

This has resulted in a total deficit of 317*8 million for the first five months of this financial year. In the past three years, the accounts have been in surplus at the end of the first five months.

r.: •

Total revenue for the month at 3252.4 million was 366.4 million more than in August 1971- The total revenue for the first five months of the financial year at 31,365 million was 3258 million more than the same period last year.

Expenditure amounted to 3268 million, an increase of 371*6 million over the same months last year. This brings the total expenditure for the first five months of the financial year to 31,381 million, which was 3326 million more than the same period last year.

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Friday, October 13, 1972

- 4 -

POWER TO DECLARE POLL VOID

********

A bill, seeking to empower the presiding officer of a polling station to declare the poll at his station void in certain circumstances, was published in the Government Gazette today.

' The bill , entitled the Urban Council (Amendment) (No. 2) Bill 1972, will be introduced into the Legislative Council shortly.

If enacted, it will confer authority on the Governor in Council to make regulations giving the presiding officer this power.

This is considered necessary following an incident in the Urban Council Election last year when one of the polling stations in Kowloon was burgled on the night before the election.

During that incident, the store in which the ballot papers were kept was ransacked# However, the ballot papers and other election documents were left intact and in their original seals.

- ~ - - 0 -------

/5

Friday, October 1J, 1972

- 5 -

CONFUSION ON PAYMENT OF BILLS OF EXCHANGE TO BE ELIMINATED

*********

Amending legislation to bring into accord with current international practice the method of calculating the due date of payment on bills of exchange not payable on demand, will be introduced into the Legislative Council shortly.

The Bills of Exchange (Amendment) Bill 1972 seeks to abolish the three ’’days of grace” presently allowed to be added to the date of payment of a bill of exchange not payable on demand.

It also provides for all bills of exchange due payable on a date which is a general holiday to be payable on the succeeding business day.

A Government spokesman said the practice of calculating the due date of payment on bills of exchange, drawn other than on demand, varies from bank to bank.

The bill aims at eliminating this confusion as well as clearing up the anomaly whereby a bill falling due on a general holiday is in some cases payable on the preceding business day and in others on the succeeding business day.

The bill is published in today’s Government Gazette for general information.

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/6.......

Friday, October 1J, 1972

- 6 -

HIGHER RATES FOR MAIL TO PAKISTAN

*********

Mail sent from Hong Kong to Pakistan will be charged more as from next Monday (October 16) following the abolition of preferential Commonwealth postage rates to Pakistan. I

Announcing this today, a spokesman for the Post Office said that surface mail to Pakistan will be charged at the non-Commonwealth rates of 50 cents for the first ounce for letters and 50 cents for postcards.

Under the existing preferential system, surface letters are charged 50 cents for the first ounce and postcards 25 cents.

The change has been made following Pakistan’s recent withdrawal from the Commonwealth.

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Friday, October 13, 1972

- 7 -

GOOD START TO SHEK KIP MIE REHOUSING PROGRAMME

Hundreds of residents at the Shek Kip Mei resettlement estate today responded favourably to a scheme for re-housing them at the more confortable Pak Tin Estate.

They queued up at the Pak Tin Estate administrative office this (Friday) morning, either to submit their applications for new flats or to seek assistance from the staff to fill in their forms.

A spokesman for the Resettlement Department described the launching of the Shek Kip Mei Rehousing Scheme as ”an encouraging start.”

The number of application forms received by mid-afternoon stood at over 300.

”We seem to be in business in a big way,” said Mr. John Walden, Deputy Commissioner for Resettlement, who is overseeing the operation of the Shek Kip Mei Rehousing Scheme.

”We knew that tenants in the old Shek Kip Mei Resettlement Estate, who have been living in an over-crowded condition for years, are anxious to have their living condition improved, but we really didn’t expect quite such a favourable reaction.

’’Because of this, we are now going to keep the Shek Kip Mei Rehousing Operation Unit open throughout the coming weekend, including Monday, for the convenience of those who may not be able to come up to the office during weekdays.” The opening hours will be from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily.

/The two........

Friday, October 13, 1972

- 8 -

The two sample rooms located on the third floor of Block 7 of Pak Tin Estate will also remain open to tenants on these days.

The Shek Kip Mei Rehousing Scheme is a major task by the Government to bring about significant improvements in the living condition of the 62,000 people of the old and congested estate.

The first phase of the $80 million rehousing operation involves the evacuation of some 11,000 tenants from Blocks 23 to 28 of the estate.

They are being offered larger and better accommodation at Pak Tin Estate which is only a "stone’s throw" from their present living place.

Friday, October 13, 1972

- 9 -

HISTORICAL ENGRAVINGS AND OIL PAINTINGS ON SHOW **********

A rare set of 18th century engravings on Emperor Chien Lung’s military achievements are being, exhibited at the City Museum and Art • *

Gallery.

The 16 engravings were made from original drawings by Josef Castiglione and other Jesuit .artiste-priest^. They describe battles and and military scenes of Chien Lung’s conquests of Sungaria, and are full of interesting minute detail. »■

The original drawings commissioned by the Ehiperor were engraved in Paris at the Academie des Beaux Arts. One hundred sets were sent back to Peking, and only a few remained^in Paris._

The set on display is a rare recent addition to the museum collection.

At the same .time, more than 60 historical paintings will be displayed in the Art Gallery. These represent a selection from the Ho Tung, Chater and Law, and Sayer collections on Sino-British contacts in the 18th and 19th centuries.

They are particularly interesting for their connections with Hong Kong, Macau and Canton and several other Chinese ports.

The exhibitions close on November 26.

-------0---------

AO.......

Friday, October 13, 1972

- 10 -

LABOUR DISPUTE SETTLED

********

About 400 workers of Artloon Enterprises Limited, a wig factory in Tsuen Want will be paid a total of $300,000 in wages and severance pay

The payments are being made from today (Friday) until next Thursday (°ctober 19),

This follows the settlement of a labour dispute between the management and workers over the issue of wages and severance pay.

With the help of the Labour Department, an agreement was reached last Wednesday (October 11).

•------0

Friday, October 13, 1972

- 11 -

PRE-WAR BUILDING DECLARED DANGEROUS **«***»»*

A three-storey pre-war building located at 30, Elgin Street in Central District on Hong Kong Island was declared dangerous today by the Building Authority.

The Principal Government Building Surveyor said today that recent demolition of the adjoining building had revealed several fractures in the brickwork of the load bearing party wall. At the same time there is evidence of extensive decay in the timber work of the floors and roof of the kitchen block.

As there is a possibility of collapse, he added, notice of intention to apply for a closure order in Victoria Court at 9*30 a.m. on November 29 was posted today.

Release Time: 7*2° P»m«

-----0-----

PRH 7 4000091

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Saturday, October 14, 1972

LANDSLIDE BUILDINGS TO REOPEN

*********

Four buildings in the Mid-Levels area, closed by the June landslides, are expected to be ready for reoccupation in about one week’s time.

The buildings are:- Block II Emerald Gardens JG Kotewall Road; Mirror Marina 47 Conduit Road; 53 Conduit Road; and 55 Conduit Road.

The Building Authority said that the closure of these buildings will be lifted as soon as certain works and precautionary tests have been completed, and once the authorised architects, appointed to check on the properties, have indicated that they are structurally stable and habitable.

Today’s announcement follows the completion of the details of the remedial works to be carried out in the area. A spokesman for the Public Works Department said their possible effect on the buildings around the perimeter of the work site is now more fully appreciated and this, coupled with the virtual end of the year’s wet season, makes it possible for a full review of all closed buildings in the area in consultation with the owners and their architects.

He also announced that Kotewall Road had now been resurfaced and would be opened to traffic on Tuesday (October 17)•

/In a..........

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Saturday, October 14, 1972

- 2 -

In a review of other affected properties in the area, the spokesman said that in the case of Blocks A and B, Po Shan Mansions 10-16 Po Shan Road, the arrangements will take a little longer. But if the reports of the authorised architects are satisfactory these buildings could be reoccupied in less than one month.

The House at 21 Po Shan Road, and Skyline Mansion at 51 Conduit Road must remain closed until major structural repairs are completed and the hillside between these two properties has been made safe.

Proposals have been submitted to the Buildings Ordinance Office for the repair of Block I Eknerald Gardens and this building will also remain closed until the work has been completed satisfactorily.

However, the extent of the damage to the four apartment blocks at 125 Robinson Road as a result of the landslide has not yet been fully ascertained.

The authorised architect is investigating the stability of the structure and retaining walls and proposals for repair work are expected to be submitted to the Buildings Ordinance Office shortly.

Building work on phase II of Skyline Mansion at 49A Conduit Road can also recommence as soon as slope stabilising works within the site and arrangements for access have been completed.

The P.W.D. spokesman said that a government contractor was about to start on the permanent remedial works in the Po Shan Road/Conduit Road area and these are scheduled to be substantially completed before the start of the next wet season.

/"These works •••••••

Saturday, October 14, 1972

3

,:These works are essential to make the area safe”, he added

Over 170,000 cubic yards

of earth and rock will be excavated from

the hillside and part of this will

be used to construct an earth embankment

130 feet high between Conduit Road

and Po Shan Road

- - 0 - -

A

Saturday, October 14, 1972

- 4 -

WEEK-LONG ANTI DRUG CAMPAIGN FOR TSUEN WAN * * * ♦ ♦ ♦ * * ♦

An Anti Drug Campaign will be held for the first time in the Tsuen Wan District from October 19 to 25 to disseminate information about drugs and drug addiction.

The main feature of the campaign will be an exhibition displaying photos, charts, posters, samples of various kinds of drugs and drug-taking instruments.

The exhibition will be held in the hall of the Princess Alexandra Community Centre daily from 10 a,m. to 9 p.m.

During the week, four film shows will be held in housing and resettlement estates in the Tsuen Wan area. Talks will be given by senior officers.from various sponsoring organisations and departments in three secondary schools in the Tsuen Wan District.

Initiated by the Princess Alexandra Community Centre, the campaign is jointly organised by SARDA, the Royal Hong Kong Police Force, the Commerce and Industry Department, the Tsuen Wan Rural Committee, the Federation of Societies in Tsuen Wan District, and various welfare and kaifong associations in Tsuen Wan.

To mark the start of the Campaign, an opening ceremony will be held in the community centre next Wednesday (October 18) at 8p.m., to be followed by an anti-drug variety show.

Note to Editors: You are invited to send a reporter and/or

photographer to cover the opening ceremony of the Campaign Week.

-----0 -

/5..........

Saturday, October 14, 1972

- 5 -

PREMIERE PERFORMANCE OF CHINESE OPERA

*********

The Urban Council will present a premiere performance of the

Chinese opera Tien Ku, or The Sweet Girl, at the City Hall Concert Hall next Saturday (October 21)•

The opera, first published in Peking in 1962, was based on a Chinese folk-lore in the Shansi Province.

The story tells how a native girl fought against the mountain devil to get water for her village. She lost both her sight and her voice as a result of her duel with the devil, but her valour was praised by the people of the village.

On October 21, 14 numbers from the opera arranged by the local composer, Doming Lam, will be sung for the first time in Hong Kong.

Performing in the concert are Barbara Fei (soprano), Lin Siang-yuen (tenor) and Chan Kung-sang (bass-baritone), who are all well-known singers in Hong Kong. They will be accompanied at the piano by Nancy Loo.

In addition to the opera, Barbara Fei, Lin Siang-yuen and Chan

Kung-sang will each sing a group of Chinese folksongs and Nancy Loo will play two pieces by Doming Lam.

Tickets at 31 (for students), S2 and 33 are available:daily from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. at the City Hall Box Office.

Note to Editors: You are invited to a press conference

arranged by the performers in conjunction with the Urban Council on Tuesday (October 17) from 5*50 p.m. to 7»3O p.m. in the Salisbury Boom, First Floor, Peninsula Hotel where several pieces of the opera will be performed.

-------0--------- /6.......................

Saturday, October 14, 1972

- 6 -

NEW TRAFFIC ARRANGEMENTS

*********

The Transport Department has announced that as from 10 a.m. on Wednesday (October 18), public light buses will not be permitted to pick up or set down passengers in the section of Shanghai Street between Mong Kok Road and Fife Street.

This is to enable road works in that area to be carried out.

The works will last for about six months.

Also from the same time and day, Fife Street (between Hong Lok Street and Shanghai Street), Nelson Street (between Portland Street and Shanghai Street), and Shangtung Street (between Reclamation Street and Shanghai Street) will be closed to through traffic for about two months for the same purpose.

Appropriate traffic signs will be erected to indicate the restricted area for public light buses and to guide motorists.

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/?............

Saturday, October 1^, 1972

- 7 -

WEEKLY MEDICAL AND HEALTH STATISTICS

*********

Statistics released today by the Medical and Health Department for the week ended on September 50 are as follows

* Notifications of infectious cases (previous week’s figures in brackets) — total 157 (218); amoebiasis — two (nil); bacillary dysentery — 12 (seven); chickenpox — one (four); tuberculosis — 126 (18?); diphtheria — nil (one); enteric fever (typhoid) — ten (nine); enteric fever (paratyphoid) — one (nil); leprosy — nil (two); measles — one (three); ophthalmia neonatorum — one (three); poliomyelitis — nil (one); malaria (fresh case) — two (nil), and puerperal fever — one (1).

* Births — total registered 1,742; 427 on Hong Kong Island, 1,10? in Kowloon, and 212 in the New Territories.

* Deaths — 482 from all causes; 176 on the Island, 286 in Kowloon and 20 in the New Territories.

-------0---------

ISSUE OF D.I.B. ON MONDAY

*********

Note to Editors: There wil'l be an issue of the Daily

Information Bulletin on Monday (October 16). A special supplement will also be issued on the same day.

-------0---------

Release time: 2.30 p.m

PRHJ 4000091

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Monday, October 16, 1972

HIGH CONVICTION RATE RECORDED BY TARGET COMMITTEE ON CORRUPTION

*********

Forty-nine of the 69 people taken to court in connection with allegations of corruption during 1971 were members of the public, according to the Target Committee on Corruption in its review of the progress made last year.

Of the remaining 20, seven were police officers and 13 from other government departments.

These court cases resulted in 59 convictions and 10 acquittals.

The Target Committee said: ’Experience shows that the majority of corruption cases involve members of the public offering government servants bribes for services rather than solicitation by a government servant.” Urging members of the public to report corruption, the Target Committee reminded them that ’’they do not have to pay ’tea money’ or any other illegal charges for services to which they are entitled.”

The Target Committee said that 1971 was another record year as far as reports, investigations, arrests and convictions in connection with corruption were concerned, particularly the high conviction rate of 85*5 per cent which reflected an increase of some 15 per cent over 1970.

The Committee noted that more people - a total of 207 - were taken to court in connection with corruption during the three years 19&9 to 1971 than in the previous six years, 196? to 1968, put together when the total was 1?8

/During ....

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Monday, October 16, 1972

- 2 -

During the three-year period 146 were convicted compared with 90 convictions in the preceding six years.

The Target Committee said the year 1971 was marked by a number of innovations in the field of anti-corruption. By far the most important was the new Prevention of Bribery Ordinance which came into force on May 14, 1971.

In conjunction with the new ordinance was the appointment of a newly constituted Target Committee which included unofficials and members of the Government as well as the police.

Serving on the Target Committee are two well-known residents -Mr. Kenneth Ching-kan Lo, Colony Scout Commissioner and a member of the Television Advisory Board, and Professor S. Mackey, Professor of Civil Engineering, University of Hong Kong.

The Professor succeeded Mr. W.H. Henderson, Managing Director of the Shell Company of Hong Kong Limited, who was originally appointed to the new Target Committee.

The other members of the Committee are a Deputy Commissioner of Police (Chairman), the Director of Criminal Investigation, a Principal Crown Counsel, the Director of Audit and a representative of the Establishment Secretary.

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/3........

Monday, October 16, 1972

- 3 -

WATER INTERRUPTION IN NORTH POINT

***********

Water supply to a number of premises in North Point on Hong

Kong Island will be provisionally turned off for five hours from 1 a.m on Wednesday (October 18)

This will allow the Waterworks Office to carry out a night leakage test.

The area affected is bounded by Fook Yum Street; Oil Street; Electric Road from Boat Street to Java Road; Java Road to North Point Road; and the northern side of King’s Road from Boat Street to Tong Shui Road.

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BIOGRAPHY OF PRINCESS ALEXANDRA

Note to Editors: A biography of Princess Alexandra and

her husband, Mr. Angus Ogilvy, with photographs, are being issued as a supplement to today’s Daily Information Bulletin. The couple will be arriving in Hong Kong on Saturday (October 21).

Release time: 3 *00 p.m.

--------0----------

SOOOOJS P.R. 33

HONG KONG GOVERNMENT

NFORMATION

SERVICES

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

SUPPLEMENT

Monday, October 16, 1972

H.R.H. PRINCESS ALEXANDRA, THE HON. MRS. ANGUS OGILVY, G.C.V.O.

*********

Her Royal Highness Princess Alexandra was born on Christmas Day 1936 j second child of Prince George and Princess Marina, the Duke and Duchess of Kent. Her last name commemorates her birthday: she was christened Alexandra Helen Elizabeth Olga Christabel.

Princess Alexandra was five years old when her father was killed in a flying accident on active service during the second world war. She and her two brothers were brought up by their mother at Coppins, their country home in the Buckinghamshire village of Iver; later she was a pupil at Heathfield, a girls’ boarding school at Ascot — first British princess to be given a normal school career. In the winter of 1953-5^ she went to Paris, where she stayed with the family of M. Ie Comte de Paris, attended a finishing school and studied French and music.

After her return home Her Royal Highness began to undertake official engagements, took a short nursing course at the Great Ormond Street (London) Hospital for Sick Children, and accompanied her mother on two overseas tours, to Canada (195^) and to Latin America (1959)• In 1959> on the occasion of Her Majesty the Queen’s Canadian tour, the Princess was appointed for the first time a Counsellor of State.

/The same

Monday, October 16, 1972

- 2 -

The same year saw her first official overseas visit alone, undertaken at the early age of 22, when she visited Australia to attend the Queensland centenary celebrations and toured New South Wales and Victoria. The following year she was the Queen’s special representative at the Nigerian independence celebrations. Since then Her Royal Highness has carried out many overseas tours. On all her travels, she has won the hearts of the peoples she has visited by her radiant personality, her gracious dignity on formal occasions and her spontaneous and happy enjoyment of the hospitality she lias received.

On later occasions she has been accompanied by her husband. Princess Alexandra became engaged in November 1962 to the Hon. Angus Ogilvy, second son of the Earl of Airlie; the wedding took place in Westminster Abbey on 24 April 19&3• Their son James Ogilvy (James Robert Bruce) was bom on 29 February 1964, and their daughter Marina (Marina Victoria Alexandra) on 31 July 1966.

Her Royal Highness is associated cis President or Patron with a great number of organisations. Many of these are concerned with young people; for instance, she is Patron of the Junior Red Cross in Britain, Canada and Australia (she is Vice-President of the British Red Cross Society) and of the Twentieth-Century Group of the Royal Over-Seas League. Her early interest in nursing continues in her appointments as Patron and Air Chief Commandant of Princess Mary’s Royal Air Force Nursing Service, as Patron of Queen Alexandra’s Royal Naval Nursing Service, and as President of the institution which bears her own name, Alexandra Day — founded by Queen Alexandra to raise money for hospitals and similar purposes by the sale of roses. She is also associated with work for the blind (President of the Royal Commonwealth Society. .the Blind and Patron of the Guide Dogs for the Blind Association) and with many other medical and welfare organisations.

/The Princess ••••••

Monday, October 16, 1972

- 3 -

The Princess is fond of outdoor recreations, likes swimming, ski-ing and above all riding; she shares the love of her cousin the Queen for horses. She is an accomplished dancer. Tall and slim, she is strikingly like her beautiful mother.

HRH has received honorary doctorates of Laws from Queensland and Hong Kong Universities, and is an Honorary Follow of the Faculty of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow, of the Faculty of Anaesthetists of the Royal College of Surgeons (England) and of the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists. She has also regimental connections, as Colonel-in-Chief of the 3rd Militia Battalion, The Queen’s Own Rifles of Canada, Colonel-in-Chief of the 17/21 Lancers, Deputy Colonel-in-Chief of The Light Infantry, Honorary Colonel of the North Irish Horse (T), and Honorary Commandant of the Women’s Royal Australian Naval Service.

She was created GCVO in December I960, and she has been appointed to the leading Orders of many of the countries she has visited.

OVERSEAS VISITS MADE BY H.R.H. PRINCESS ALEXANDRA

1953-54 FRANCE Lived in Paris where she stayed with the family of the Co^te pariS| attending a finishing school and studying French and music.

1954 CANADA USA and Accompanied her mother, the Duchess of Kent, on her tour of Canada and the USA in August and September.

1956 MEDITERRANEAN Accompanied the Queen and the Duke of Edinburgh on a Mediterranean cruise in March.

/1959........

Monday, October 16, 1972

1959 SOUTH AMERICA Accompanied the Duchess of Kent on her tour of Latin America, visiting Mexico, Peru, Chile and Brazil in February and March.

1959 AUSTRALIA THAILAND CAMBODIA INDIA, IRAN and TURKEY Visited Queensland for its centenary celebrations which began on 18th August. The Princess visited 22 cities and towns in Queensland and afterwards visited other parts of Australia. On the return journey paid short visits to Thailand and Cambodia and made brief stops at Delhi, Tehran and Istanbul arriving back in London on 7 October. This was the Princess’s first Commonwealth tour alone.

i960 FEDERAL REPUBLIC OF GERMANY As Colonel-in-Chief The Queen’s Own Rifles of Canada, visited the 2nd Battalion in Germany for the regiment’s centenary celebrations in July.

i960 NIGERIA Three weeks’ visit as the Queen’s special representative at the independence celebrations of the Federation of Nigeria from 1 October.

1961 FAR EAST Six weeks’ tour of the Far East in November and December. After a private visit to Vancouver, official visits to Honolulu, Wake Island, Hong Kong, where the University was celebrating its 50th anniversary, Japan and Burma. Also visited Thailand privately, returning via Aden and Tripoli in December.

1962 NETHERLANDS Visited the Netherlands, with Princess Marina, for the silver wedding celebrations of Queen Juliana and Prince Bernhard from 1 to 3 May.

1962 SWEDEN Visited Sweden in May to open the British Trade Fair in Stockholm.

1962 GRKECE Visited Greece to be a bridesmaid at the marriage of Princess Sophia and Don Juan Carlos of Spain on 14 May.

1963 SPAIN Visited Spain, with Mr. Angus Ogilvey, in May after her marriage.

1965 FRANCE Visited Paris in May.

A 965

Monday, October 16, 1972

- 5 -

1965

JAPAN

HONG KONG

IRAN and

JORDAN

1966

NETHERLANDS

1967

BURMA

HONG KONG AUSTRALIA CANADA SWEDEN

UNITED STATES and CANADA

1967

SWEDEN

USA and CANADA

1968

SWEDEN

Accompanied by Mr. Angus Ogilvy, visited Tokyo to attend the British Exhibition in September. They spent ten days in Japan sightseeing and were entertained by the Emperor Hirohito and other members of the Japanese Royal family as well as the Prime Minister. They also visited Hong Kong for a weekend, Tehran for five days as guests of the Shah of Iran and Amman for three days as guests of King Hussein of Jordan. They also visited Jerusalem and Malta. The'tour lasted from 16 September to 9 October.

Visited Amsterdam with her husband and her mother Princess Marina of Kent, to attend the wedding on 10 March of Princess Beatrix to Herr Class von Amberg; Princess Alexandra was one of the witnesses to the marriage.

Visit to Burma in February with Mr. Angus Ogilvy, at invitation of Burmese Head of State, General Ne Win, followed by visit to Hong Kong and private visit to Australia as guests of Prime Minister. Official visit with Mr. Angus Ogilvy to Canada May-June, during which the Princess opened the British Columbia international trade fair and made extensive tour including Yukon and Northwest Territories.

Visit to Sweden in September to open British Petroleum’s new refinery at Gothenburg on 12 September.

Visit to North America in October, beginning with stay in United States — first official visit of HRH to United States. During her stay she opened the British fortnight at the Neimanr-Marcus store in Dallas. She and Mr. Ogilvy then went to Canada to carry out engagements in connection with British Week in Toronto.

Opened British Week in Stockholm in September.

A 969

Monday, October 16, 1972

6 -

1969

SINGAPORE

KENYA, SWAZILAND, MALAGASY and MAURITIUS

AUSTRIA

Represented the Queen in August during 150th anniversary celebrations of founding of modern Singapore.

After a brief stay in Nairobi, visited Swaziland in September with Mr. Ogilvy for the first anniversary of the country’s independence. Visited the Malagasy Republic and paid a three-day visit to Mauritius.

Visited Vienna and opened British Week on 10 October.

1970

1971

SWEDEN

USA

ARGENTINA

NEW ZEALAND

USA

Visited Gothenburg in June to name a tanker built for the World Wide Shipping Group at Gotaverken A/B.

Visited USA to open the new British Overseas Airways Corporation passenger terminal at the Kennedy Airport, New York, in September. In November opened British Industrial Exhibition, of which HRH was patron, in Buenos Aires.

Visit to New Zealand in April with Mr. Ogilvy, for centenary celebrations of Auckland, also visiting Napier for three days and Wellington briefly.

To inaugurate British Trade Week in San Francisco in September, afterwards visiting Los Angeles for two days.

Princess

Alexandra has also

made numerous visits to relations in Europe.

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PRH 7 4000091

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Tuesday, October 17, 1972

. . . I. .1 ' • . r.'

MR. LI F00K-K0W TO BE DIRECTOR OF SOCIAL WELFARE *»«*****«

Mr. Li Fook-kow, Deputy Secretary for Home Affairs, is to be appointed Director of Social Welfare.

He succeeds Mr. G.T. Rowe who is going on pre-retirement leave in November. Mr. Li,.one of the most senior administrateve officers in the Government, is at present Deputy Secretary for Home Affairs, a post he has held for two years.

Mr. Li joined the civil service in 195^ and during his service he has held many important posts including those of Deputy Commissioner of Labour in I960; Assistant Establishment Officer in 1963; Deputy Financial Secretary in 1967; Establishment Officer in 1968; Deputy Director of Commerce and Industry in 1970.

He attended the Administration Staff College, -in 1963 and the Imperial Defence College in 1969.

Note to Editors: Mr. Li will see the press, radio & TV in his office

at the Secretariat for Home Affairs at noon tomorrow (Wednesday)•

------0-------

/2......

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong. Tel: 5-233191

Tuesday, October 17, 1972

- 2 -

MANPOWER SURVEY FOR THE CLOTHING INDUSTRY

*«»**»*«*

The Clothing Industrial Committee will be conducting a second manpower survey of the clothing industry next month.

The survey will be made with the assistance of the Labour Department The committee is one of the 10 associated industrial committees of the Industrial Training Advisory Committee.

The survey aims at seeking such information as the number of workers at present employed, the number of workers now under training, the number of existing vacancies, and a forecast of the total number of workers required by November, 1975•

Because of the size of the industry, a random stratified sampling method has been adopted to select 620 factories to be covered in the survey.

The information collected will be handled in strict confidence and will be published only in the form of statistical summaries without reference to any individual factory.

Such information is vital to the work of the Clothing Industrial Committee, and if meaningful plans are to be drawn up to meet the training needs of the industry, employers whose factories have been selected for the survey are requested to provide accurate answers to the questionnaires aont to them.

/Together

Tuesday, October 17, 1972

- 3 -

Together with the questionnaire forms, explanatory letters in English and Chinese were also sent to selected factories.

If an employer has any queries after receiving the questionnaire, he is requested to contact the Labour Statistics and Surveys Unit of the Labour Department by telephoning 5-778271, Ext. 3 or 4.

During the period of the survey, an interviewing officer of the department will call at each of these factories on a date to be arranged previously by appointment.

He will, if required, answer queries, assist in the completion of the questionnaire, and will collect one copy for processing.

It is hoped that employers in the clothing industry will co-operate in this survey and thus assure success equal to, if not better than, the first manpower survey.

The first survey was conducted from March 20 to March JL, 19$9j in which 97 per cent of the factories covered in the survey willingly supplied the information required.

The Clothing Industrial Committee has subsequently analysed and compiled the statistical information obtained, and published its findings and recommendations in a manpower survey report. Some of the recommendations have already been implemented.

At the

Tuesday, October 17, 1972

- 4 -

At the time of the first survey, statistics showed that in March 19&9, the total manual labour force was 116,040 and the tobal number of registered and recorded factories was 2,170.

In June, 1972, however, the corresponding figures had risen to 148,512 and 4,19? respectively. In view of these changes, it has been decided to conduct a second manpower survey to up-date the data on training requirements and to make new recommendations, where necessary, to the Government and industry in the light of new statistical information.

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DANGEROUS BUILDING ON HONG KONG ISLAND

********

The Building Authority today declared No. 2 Pound Lane on Hong Kong Island to be in a dangerous condition and ordered demolition.

ihe Principal Government Building Surveyor said that in the course of routine inspections it was found that the structural timbers of the floors and roof of the three storey pre-war building were extensively decayed. There were also fractures in the brickwork of the front ina.iT) wall.

Because it is considered that the building could collapse*notice of intention to apply for a closure order in Victoria District Court at 9*30 a.m. on November 29 was posted today.

0 - -

Tuesday, October 17, 1972

- 5 -

SHEK KIP MEI REHOUSING SCHEME

*********

Response from tenants involved in the first phase of the Shek Kip Mei Rehousing Scheme has continued to be favourable.

The Shek Kip Mei Rehousing Operation Unit, which was kept open during the long weekend, received a total of 395 applications for flats in Pak Tin Estate over this period.

This brings the running total to 1,398 and represents more than two-thirds of the total number of applications which the Resettlement Department sent out to householders of domestic flats in Shek Kip Mei Resettlement Estate.

The Enquiry Centre of the estate has also been well used.

During the past two days the centre dealt with 220 enquiries from domestic tenants and about 40 from shopkeepers, workshop owners and others.

The Housing Authority is expected to carry out its first interviews with applicants for flats in Pak Tin within the next two days.

The first tenancy is expected to be offered shortly.

Commenting on a newspaper report that several tenants have raised some points of doubt and worries about their own situation, a spokesman for the Resettlement Department said that his department and the Government as a whole were most willing to help them solve their problems.

"They should state their difficulties in the application form which will be carefully studied," he said.

"Assistance in one form or another will be given to those in need by the Social Welfare Department, the Labour Department, the Education Department as well as other government departments."

/6..........

o - -

Tuesday, October 17, 1972

- 6 -

RENEWAL OE CROWN LEASES

********

A comprehensive statement of the terms of renewal for renewable Crown leases was issued by the Government today.

A Government spokesman said that the statement explains the application of the various modifications to the policy which were announced in the Legislative Council by the Colonial Secretary on May 24 this year.

Copies of the statement are available at City District Offices, Government Information Counters and have been sent to firms of solicitors and can also be obtained from the Crown Lands and Survey Office.

-------0 --------

EXECUTIVE COUNCIL CHANGES

*********

Mr. LEE Quo-wei, an Unofficial Member of the Legislative Council, ceased to be temporary Unofficial Member of the Executive Council, with effect from October 14, 1972, on the return to Hong Kong of Sir Yuet-keung KAN.

-------0---------

/7

Tuesday, October 17, 1972

“ 7 ’

JOBS FOUND FOR 21 DISABLED PEOPLE DURING SEPTEMBER

***«»**«*

Twenty-one disabled people were assisted by the Social Welfare Department’s Liaison and Placement Unit into commercially-competitive jobs during September.

The group included 10 physically handicapped and two slightly mentally retarded people.

They were accepted into ’’open” industry — as opposed to sheltered workshops — as unskilled and semi-skilled workers, watchmen, packers, lift operators, and assemblers.

One industrial organisation, Cosmos International Garment Manufacturing Limited, employed six of the disabled people.

The Lever Shirt Garment Weaving Factory took on a group of five, as sewing machine operators and the Urban Services Department took on a young man as a labourer for the Central Market.

Mr. Chan Shiu-wing, acting Officer-in-charge of- the Unit, today urged enlightened employers in Hong Kong to follow the example in England where the tendency is to engage disabled for operating lifts and looking after car parks.

He hopes the hotel industry will consider reserving such posts for these disabled in the future, and he commends the YMCA International House for engaging a crippled young man last month to operate a lift in the building.

-------0 - • - -

/8..........

Tuesday, October 17, 1972

- 8 -

SEPTEMBER’S WEATHER

*********

September 1972 was warmer than usual. The mean maximum temperature of 31•0°C was the sixth highest on record for the month.

The atmospheric pressure was higher than normal during most of the month and the mean monthly value of 1011.J mb was the highest on record for September.

On the first three days of the month a ridge of high pressure from the Pacific anticyclone covered the south China coast and the weather was fine apart from a few isolated showers.

From September 4 onwards, an anti-cyclone dominated China and mainly fine and sunny weather persisted in Hong Kong during the next two weeks.

Scattered showers and thunderstorms developed on September 19 when an upper-air disturbance affected Hong Kong. The weather became fine on the following two dayst but occasional showers and isolated thunderstorms occurred again on the 22nd.

On September 24, a cold front moved southwards across the south China coast causing periods of heavy rain and thunderstorms. The weather became cooler during the following two days and the minimum temperature of the month, 22.8°Ct was recorded on the 25th.

On the evening of September 28, a trough of low pressure passed through the south China coast, bringing scattered thunderstorms. Some showers were also experienced on the 29th. The weather, however, improved with some sunny intervals on the last day of the month.

/During ........

Tuesday, October 17» 1972

9 -

During September, six tropical cyclones were reported over the western Pacific and South China Sea but none affected Hong Kong.

Severe Tropical Storms Elsie and Flossie passed to the south of Hong Kong on a westerly course and crossed the coast of Vietnam near Danang. They weakened into low pressure areas over land but intensified into tropical storms again after they moved into the Bay of Bengal.

There were no aircraft diversions and no strong monsoon signal was hoisted during the month.

Three thunderstorm warnings and one thunderstorm and heavy rain t warning were issued.

The month’s figures and departures from normal were:

Sunshine 202.2 hours 4.7 hours above normal . _.y—*

Rainfall 259-7 mm » 59.1 mm below normal

Cloudiness 57 % » 4% below normal

Relative Humidity 80 % » 1% above normal

Mean Maximum Temperature J1.0°C 1.2°C above normal

Mean Temperature 27.7°C 5 0.6°C above normal

Mean Minimum Temperature ro o° » 0.8°C above normal

Mean Dew Point 25.9°C > 0.8°C above normal

Total Evaporation 156.6 mm ? 15.0 mm below normal

Maximum Temperature of 53-^°C was recorded on September 14.

Minimum Temperature of 22.8°C was recorded on September 25.

-----0----------

Tuesday, October 17, 1972

- 10 -

ACCIDENT PREVENTION ON SHIPS

*********

The Deputy Commissioner of Labour, Mr. I.R. Price, has spoken about the importance of accident prevention on board ships.

Addressing the passing-out ceremony of the World-Wide Sea Training School at the City Hall today, he said: "Accidents do not occur. They are caused either by failure of machinery or by temporary carelessness, or a deviation from established practices and procedures."

During the past two years, he said, there were 448 accidents involving Hong Kong seamen and the payment of workmen’s compensation amounting to over $4 rrril1 ~i on ,

Mr» Price said that few people knew that the Labour Department participated actively in a number of committees dealing with the recruiting, training and conditions of employment of Hong Kong seamen.

He noted that the World-Wide Sea Training School, established in 1966, had five training courses of varying duration for stewards, engine-room staff, junior staff, deck apprentices and officer cadets.

He was pleased to observe that the course syllabuses gave much importance to accident prevention, fire precautions and instruction on safety matters.

During the ceremony, some 70 cadets who had successfully completed their training in seamanship, basic navigation and engineering received their certificates. ______________0

Release time: 7.00,.p.»_mt

PRH 7 4000091

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Wednesday, October 18, 1972

MASSIVE 10-YEAR HOUSING PROGRAMME PROPOSED BY GOVERNMENT

*********

The Government has drawn up a 10 year plan with the aim of building, with the contribution of the private sector, sufficient permanent self-contained accommodation in a reasonable environment for every person in Hong Kong*

This was announced by the Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, when he reviewed the affairs of Hong Kong at the opening of the new Legislative Council session today<

Such a target, if achieved, would lead to the virtual disappearance of squatter areas and the elimination of overcrowding and sharing in both private and public housing-

It would also provide accommodation for those who have to be- • rehoused because of dovelopmer* schemes and other situations where housing is offered to the homeless or unfortunate, and keep pace with tho natural expansion of the population.

At the same time, Sir Murray disclosed that the Government, from April 1 next year, proposes to vest in an expanded Housing Authority, all the powers and functions that are presently fragmented in the public housing sphere. That is to say those of the Housing Board, the Urban Council and Commissioner for Resettlement under the Resettlement Ordinance, and the Housing Authority under the Housing Ordinance.

/Associated »•••••

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong. Tel: 5-233191

4

Wednesday, October 18, 1972

- 2 -

Associated with this single Authority a new unified Housing Department will be established to plan, administer and build - in co-operation with the Public Works Department - all public housing in Hong Kong.

It will also take over all duties previously carried out by the Resettlement Department and the staff of the Housing Authority.

The Governor said the inadequacy and scarcity of housing and the harsh situations that result from it is one of the major and most constant sources of friction and unhappiness between the Government and the people.

fTIt offends alike our humanity, our civic pride, our political good sense”। he said.

In spite of the achievement in housing 1.6 million people at low rents in government housing estates, in getting rid of squatter areas and replacing most of the aging and dilapidated pre-war tenement property in the process of private development, the problem still remains.

Some 300,000 people still live in squatter huts or temporary housing. Many units in resettlement estates are badly overcrowded and it is estimated that a further 310,000 people would need rehousing, if all of those in shared private flats and tenements are to have a self-contained home.

Sir Murray said the total requirement for public housing during the 10 years, in addition to the contribution of the private sector which would be vital, is to house 1.8 million people.

The total cost of developing sites and building housing for this number of people at present day prices would amount to the formidable sum of $3i3^ million.

/While........

Wednesday, October 18, 1972

- 3 -

While the search for new sites in the urban areas will continue, the bulk of the new housing must be provided in the new towns in the New Territories, if environmental standards are to improve.

,fFor such a programme to succeed and to be acceptable to the potential inhabitants two things seem to me to be essential,” the Governor said

First, there must be good communications with the old urban areas.

Secondly, the housing in the new towns must be accompanied by a full ration of what is essential to modern life. These include medical and educational facilities, parks and playgrounds, police stations, markets and so on.

Moreover there must be work and sites for private and commercial development.

The Governor said that apart from this, housing was also needed for about JO,000 people in the rural areas and smaller towns in the New Territories.

This will include public housing in places such as Tai 0 on Lantau Island where nothing of this sort has ever been done before.

To carry out such a programme a massive administrative and professional effort will be required. In addition, a high degree of efficiency will be essential in the planning, construction and management of housing under the new programme.

Sir Murray pointed out that the different authorities, boards, organisations and departments operating in this field do "not make the most efficient use of our resources”.

/"Indeed”, .......

Wednesday, October 18, 1972

’’Indeed”, he added, ”it is apparent that in the past the housing programme as a whole has suffered from the absence of unified control and administration.”

To give the new programme support and thrust it demands, it is proposed to make a fresh start with the creation of the new Housing Department^

The Governor added: ,fUnder the proposed new arrangements the Housing Authority will assume responsibilities which are quite new, colony* wide eind of vastly greater financial .significance. There will have to be some adjustment and widening of unofficial membership to reflect this new situation.

”Room will also have to be made for officials to be members in order to achieve the necessary interdepartmental co-ordination. On the other hand there is obviously a limit to the size of a body that will be capable of giving the necessary direction with the necessary speed.”

However, the Governor emphasised that Urban Councillors should have the biggest single group in the new authority because of their experience in housing matters.

"Urban Councillors have done fine work as members of the Housing Authority of which they and indeed all of us in Hong Kong have every right to be proud. But in the new situation I do not think it will be practical, or even appropriate, that all 24 councillors should have places on the new authority.”

0 -------

/5.........

Wednesday, October 18, 1972

- 5 -

EDUCATION IN THE ’70s - SECONDARY AND TECHNICAL

*t**«*o

The Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, today spoke of Hong Kong’s educational development and outlined Government’s improvement and expansion plans for the various stages of education.

He said the main thrust of educational effort during the rest of the ’70s must be in secondary and technical education.

At the same time, he added, increased secondary education carries with it the necessity of correspondingly increasing facilities in the tertiary education field.

The Governor was speaking at the opening of the 1972-75 session of the Legislative Council.

On primary education, he said now that the objective of free primary education for all has been achieved, Government will endeavour to improve the quality of the education made available.

As regards secondary education, Sir Murray said: ”We are well on the way to achieving the present interim target of three years post-primary education for 50 per cent of all children in the 12-14 year age group.”

Government now proposes to address itself to the absolute objective of providing this education for all children in the age group, he said.

In recent months, he said, the Education Department and the Colonial Secretariat have worked hard on the practicabilities and implications of such a change in objectives.

/The Governor

Wednesday, October 18, 1972

- 6 -

The Governor said that the size of the operation must not be underrated. It requires the provision of 184,000 assisted places in Forms 1-31 in addition to those now available. The figure would include about 20,000 extra places in pre-vocational schools, and a big increase in the number of places in government secondary technical schools.

Another recommendation is to double the percentage of places in secondary schools for the full five-year course leading to a Certificate of Education examination.

This would require 55,000 places in Forms 4 and 5, additional to those now available. A substantial increase in the number of places in government secondary technical schools is also planned.

Sir Murray said that, in addition, it is also hoped to provide five additional technical institutes by 1980, of which two should open in 1975* In order to staff this expansion with teachers, he said the output of the three existing Colleges of Education would be increased by 2,000 by 1976, and, thereafter, the construction of a fourth College or other means would be necessary.

The Governor said if council members favoured the proposal of full provision of places for the 12-14 year age group, the opportunity should be seized to bring professional and public, as well as official, opinion to bear on the type of secondary education which should be aimed at in the new and less restricted circumstances, including the question of what examination system would be appropriate and what curricula.

He proposed to ask the Board of Education to advise him on these important issues as soon as possible, and, as a basis for its deliberations, to submit to it the detailed plans which the Education Department has already drawn up. /’’Amongst................................................................

Wednesday, October 18, 1972

- 7 -

"Amongst other things, it would be valuable to have its advice on the speed at which it is practicable to plan to achieve this target*

"Connected with this is the extent to which they consider bisessionalism appropriate as a permanent or interim measure. I might add that it is the view of the Government that an element of bisessionalism is essential if rapid progress is to be made," he said.

Their view would also be valuable on the extent to which it is necessary to expand assisted places to all in the 12-14 year age group, he added*

On tertiary education, Sir Murray said its demand in Hong Kong far outstrips existing facilities, and steps to increase these have been taken.

He said plans are now in hand to raise the number of university places from 6,000 in 1974 to 8,400 by 1978.

"This total is unlikely to be sufficient for our needs beyond the late ’70s and in the ’80s, and we are therefore already considering ways in which university education in Hong Kong can be further extended*"

However, he said, the major expansion in tertiary education will be achieved by the new Polytechnic, and he had every hope that it would achieve its target of 8,000 full-time and 20,000 part-time students by 1978*

Together with the expansion of the universities, this will mean that by 1978, tertiary education facilities in Hong Kong will have been at least trebled, he said.

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/8.........

Wednesday, October 18, 1972

- 8 -

NEW MEASURES ANNOUNCED TO COMBAT CRIME

********

Z- f<r-: v " ' : *' ; ' •• v ‘

Plans are under way to radically change the concept of the auxiliary police from an emergency force to a permanent part-time constabulary to help combat crime.

The Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, told Legislative Council today that the auxiliaries would still be available to give ’’the good service in an emergency that it has given in the past.” But in normal times it was I proposed to deploy it in its new role on a neighbourhood basis, so that men would go on the beat near the area in which they live, and which they know.

”In this way we hope that the auxiliaries will not only be a standing citizen’s volunteer army in the fight against crime, but will form an invaluable link between the inhabitants of their own neighbourhoods, and the regular police force,” he said.

The Governor said that legislation will soon be ready to provide for substantial increases in the pay for the police auxiliaries and if this is approved an immediate recruiting campaign will be launched.

Speaking at the opening of the 1972-73 session, Sir Murray said the strongest deterrent to the criminal lies in an efficient, numerous and visible police force in the streets, working in collaboration with a public that gives it all the support in its power.

He said he was well aware of the Councillors’ concern at the growth of crime, and that their concern was well founded.

/Over the.......

Wednesday, October 18, 1972

- 9 -

Over the past four years key crime had increased by 40 per cent and violent crimes — murder, manslaughter, serious assaults and robbery by 135 per cent — and that the proportion of young people committing these crimes had steadily increased.

Sir Murray said that the Royal Hong Kong Police Force is one s of the finest in the world, but it is at present well under strength.

nIt is obviously essential that every man avail able should be on the beat,11 he said.

The Commissioner of Police has undertaken a far-reaching review to devise means of releasing trained policemen from work which could just as well be done by civilians, so that police officers can spend their time on law enforcement. This should soon show results, he added.

With regard to punishment, the Governor said that two major changes have been introduced. The first is the right of the crown to appeal to the Supreme Court against sentences it considers inadequate. The second is the establishment, in response to the Chief Justice’s proposalt of a Detention Centre for young people. This new form of punishment for young offenders has been designed to be short but rather sharp.

Sir Murray also mentioned that a police school to provide two years training for 600 young people in the 16 to 18 age group intending to enter the Force would be shortly set up.

/However, •••••

Wednesday, October 18, 1972

- 10 -

However, in view of the urgency of the situation it was not intended to wait for several years until the school could open on its permanent site. Instead, he said, it was planned to start it next year, in temporary quarters, catering for about 300 boys.

He hoped it could be quickly expanded to provide for even more recruits.

The Governor stressed that the causes for the crime increase

were just as complex and baffling in Hong Kong as they were in other great cities in the world, and it would be foolish to expect a quick or easy cure.

,fBut what I have said will at least have shown you that on this issue your government is in the ring and with its sleeves rolled up. It has adopted new. tactics in the past year, of which I have only mentioned some, and will now introduce others which I hope will commend themselves to you as both practical and imaginative•”

. Sir Murray assured the Councillors that the Government would continue to experiment with new measures or to reinforce old ones11 until this creeping fear is mastered.n

-------0---------

Wednesday, October 18, 1972

- 11 -

INSTITUTE FOR SOCIAL WORK TRAINING ANNOUNCED

********

The Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, announced today that an Institute for Social Work Training is to be set up in the Lady Trench Training Centre, and the first students will be admitted next year.

He told the Legislative Council that this Institute would provide two-year courses leading to a diploma or certificate in social work, and would be open alike to those proposing to enter government service or to work in the voluntary sector.

The Lady Trench Centre was already providing in-service training for both government and voluntary agency workers, and it was desirable that the new Institute should be under the same roof so that the Centre could function as the “power house of training and ideas for the development of social welfare work in Hong Kong.”

Hong Kong, he said, had been well served by the social work departments of the two universities, but there was now a great need for training below the university level to cope with comprehensive plans for the expansion of social welfare in the immediate future.

And this could not be achieved without a corps of trained professionals to carry it out.

Sir Murray said the days were over when social welfare in Hong Kong could be regarded as emergency service.

“If social welfare is to play its part in our much more sophisticated and economically advanced community, expertise and professionalism will be ...... • ! increasingly necessary/’ he commented.,

/lie then............

Wednesday, October 18, 1972

- 12 -

He then referred to comprehensive proposals for the orderly development of social welfare during the remainder of the 1970s being tabled as a draft white paper in the Legislative Council today.

The Governor described the white paper as a ’’draft” only because not al1 its proposal a had yet been accepted by the Government, but he considered it a ’’most valuable document,” with the proposals representing a ’’practical concensus of informed and experienced social welfare opinion on both the philosophy and the details of a carefully phased expansion programme.”

The proposals cover four main areas of development, with the first two .concerned with help in cash and the second two with help by service.

Sir Murray was sure members of the Council would want to look at details of the implication closely, but he hoped that with their support, the white paper would ’’breathe new life into the social welfare services, and new hope into those who benefit from them.”

The proposals include

* In addition to the public assistance scheme already in operation, ’’vulnerable groups” such as the severely disabled and the elderly infirm should receive cash assistance without a means test, in other words, a regular monthly grant on proof of disability. If successful, such cash assistance should later be extended to the chronically sick or widowed mothers with young children.

/• Provision ........

Wednesday, October 13, 1972

* Provision of facilities for the disabled, so that there may be comprehensive services to meet their known needs in the field of training, employment and housing, particularly so as to help them to be independent and self-supporting members of the community.-

Care of the elderly. Some were already benefiting from the public assisrance scheme, and others would • receive the proposed additional disability allowance, but the object of further services would enable them to remain in the community as long as possible, and could be described as "care within the community."

Extension of the existing limited network or community and social centres operated by the Social Welfare Department to cover the whole of Hong Kong. In this connection, considerable expansion of social and recreational facilities, through the voluntary agencies, was also envisaged.

-------0----------

Wednesday, October 18, 1972

- 14 -

GOVERNOR HAS CONFIDENCE IN H.K.’s TRADING PROSPECTS

*********

The Governort Sir Murray MacLehose, said today he had confidence in Hong Kongfs trading prospects both in the immediate future and in the longer termsand that his morod was therefore "one of optimism".

He told the Legislative Council at the opening of its new session that if he was correct in his confidence, people could be si mil arl y confident of the growth rate of investment in Hong Kong and of yields from taxes, "So I am hopeful that the recurrent and capital revenue avail able to us over the rest of this decade will be sufficient to enable us to finance a steady expansion of our services and the works programmes necessary to the development and stability of this community," he said. Sir Murray pointed out that tensions in the Western Pacific had been reduced by a statesmanship which would be in Hong Kong’s interest.

Anglo-Chinese relations are now once more on a stable and friendly basis and this too is to Hong Kong’s advantage, he added.

"For the rest, we have good hopes of an expansion in world trade; we have drawn up plans for improving the condition of our population, and there is a fair prospect of our having the means to carry them out within a reasonable- time-span."

The Governor explained that the maintenance of a high rate of economic expansion was one of the two prerequisites of the very nonti nuance of the community.

/He said: "It

Wednesday, October 18, 1972

- 15 -

■ He said: "It is on this that our prospects for social progress depend, because the yield from our tax system must be sufficient to finance the public services, and in large measure at least, our capital works programmes•”

Despite the external trade influences over which Hong Kong had little or no control, the Governor stressed that the rules of the G.A.T.T., which had governed the international trading system over the past 20 years, had served Hong Kong’s interest well.

’’The gradual easing of restrictions on trade which they have brought • •

about over this period has led to an enormous expansion of world trade, and with it of our own exports.

"With this experience behind us, I think it is right for us to look to the hopeful signs for the future. And I submit that there are at least two significant grounds for hope," he said.

In the first place, he said, the major industrial countries have agreed on a new initiative in trade policy next year under the auspices of the G.A.T.T. and, at the same time, the newly constituted Committee of Twenty of the International Monetary Fund will be working on the reform of the international monetary system.

Secondly, and of more immediate relevance, there are now signs of renewed though moderate expansion of business activity in North America, where 45 per cent of Hong Kong’s exports go, and Western Europe which is expected to lead to an acceleration of the growth of world trade in 1975, he said.

/In planning

Wednesday, October 18, 1972

- 16 -

In planning for Hong Kong’s development over the next decade, the Governor said "let us set ourselves targets which we think right and which we can justify and let us plan for these, but at the same time, it would be wrong to get irrevocably locked into them however desirable they may be.”

He explained this is because in the final analysis, Hong Kong’s competitive position in export markets, and the rate of investment in the Colony’s industries must always have priority. It is on these that all else depends, he added,

- - - - 0 -------

Wednesday, October 18, 1972

- 17 -

HEAD OF LABOUR TRIBUNAL NAMED

*********

The man who will be the Presiding Officer of Hong Kong’s first Labour Tribunal is Mr. Michael K,C. Wong, a former Senior Crown Counsel.

The Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, told Legislative Council today that the Tribunal will come into operation on March 1 next year* The Labour Tribunal which is part of the Judiciary, will operate from offices on the 1st floor of Permanent Comfort Building 7^-77 Connaught Road, Central. The site was chosen because it is conveniently near bus stations and the ferry.

Mr. Wong will first spend a month with the Labour Department familiarising himself with certain aspects of its work and will later visit the Department of Legal Aid and various sections of the Judiciary.

The Labour Tribunal Ordinance, passed by the Legislative Council in March this year seeks to provide a quick, cheap and informal method of settling certain types of disputes between workers and employers.

It will deal mostly with claims by individual workers against employers for money due either under a contract of employment, the Employment Ordinance or other laws named in the Ordinance.

It will not have power to deal or interfere with industrial disputes, strikes,- lock-outs or negotiations between employers and groups of workers or trade unions. These matters will still be solved by normal conciliation procedures with the help of the Labour Relations Service of the Labour Department.

/binder the ..........

Wednesday, October 18, 1972

- 18 -

Under the new Ordinance a claim should be heard within 30 days from the date it is filed unless the parties involved agree otherwise. Usually a claim will reach the Tribunal only if conciliation has been tried and has proved ineffective.

Mr. Wong, who is 36, is married and has four children. He studied law at Liverpool and the Middle Temple in the United Kingdom and returned to Hong Kong as a barrister in 1962. He was appointed a Crown Counsel in 1966.

Commenting on his new post, Mr. Wong said, ”1 am pleased to be appointed and I am looking forward to this challenging and interesting job. There is much for me to study in the field of labour and working conditions in Hong Kong before the Tribunal starts operating next year.”

When he has completed his familiarisation visits, Mr. Wong will supervise the organisation and setting up of the Tribunal.

tTI would like to assure those who are likely to come before the Tribunal that they will get a fair and impartial hearing and will receive polite and attentive treatment from staff,” he said.

-------0---------

A 9...

Wednesday, October 18, 1972

- 19 -

PLANS FOR A SCHOOL DENTAL HEALTH PROGRAMME

** *******

A ’’school dental health programme” to provide children with routine check-ups and simple conservative treatment is being considered by the Government.

Announcing this in his review of Hong Kong affairs in the Legislative Council today, the Governor, said initially the programme ’’might cover all children entering Primary One class in a given year.”

It could gradually be extended to cover all children in the primary school age group, and later, ”in the light of experience, we might consider extending it for both post-primary and pre-primary school children.”

Sir Murray said to provide such a service, it would be necessary to set up a school for training the dental nurses required to support and supplement the professional work of the limited numbei' of qualified dentists in Hong Kong.

He expected to put specific proposals for such a school to the Executive Council soon. In addition, he hoped the Council would also be asked in the near future to consider plans for the direct participation of the Medical and Health Department in family planning.

The Governor explained that since the mid-fifties, the Government had supported family planning mainly by subventions to the Family Planning Association and the Catholic Marriage Advisory Council.

During the past decade, the decline in Hong Kong’s birth rate had been ’’significant.” It had fallen from 40 per 1,000 of the population in 1962 to 19*^ per 1,000 of the population in 1971*

/But it .........

Wednesday, October 18, 1972

- 20 -

But it was clearly in the interest of the public and family health, having regard to the pressure generated by people on services such as housing and education, that ’’the blessing of children should be bestowed at a rate which is planned and not profligate.”

He commended the two associations for their fine work, but there was a limit to the extent on which the Government could impose on their members.

On the availability of hospital beds, the Governor said he was confident that by 1973/74, at the end of the 10-year period of the 19^4 white paper on medical and health development, the proportion of 4.25 hospital beds for 1,000 of the population would be achieved.

-------0---------

/21

Wednesday, October 18, 1972

- 21 -

YOUTH PROGRAMME PRAISED «**«***«*

Hong Kong’s youth programme was praised by the Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, today during the opening of the 1972-73 session of the Legislative Council.

However, he said, recreational facilities were obviously inadequate and he suggested that the Government had a special obligation to develop nearby rural areas for recreation.

Sir Murray said some of the things that are done for young people are "really excellent". It is estimated that at any one time, recreational activities are provided for more than one million young people.

"If I might say so, I think its excellence lies in it having been developed to meet the specific needs of Hong Kong, and not copied from elsewhere."

As regards the provision of more formal recreational facilities such as football and basketball pitches and playing grounds, the Governor said it "falls short of what we would wish".

Some of these facilities, he said, are equal to or surpass in quality anything else in the world - for instance the new swimming pool complexes.

"But the need is also for quantity, and I do not think that anyone will claim that this is yet adequate, admirably though the Urban Council administers its 644 recreational facilities and 272 playgrounds."

Not unnaturally, he said, Government has tended to implement first those parts of the town plans which relate to the "basics" such as housing, industry, roads, government and private offices.

/However, ..........

Wednesday, October 18, 1972

- 22 -

However, he said he hoped progress can now be pushed with redressing the balance between the "basics" and those things like playgrounds and recreational areas that make life pleasanter for everyone and particularly for young people.

The Governor said that, although space for recreation in the urban areas is restricted by population density and the value and scarcity of land, Hong Kong has an advantage of magnificient areas of mountain, beach and island very close to the centres of population.

"Granted the shortage of space for recreation in the city itself, I suggest that we therefore have a special obligation to develop for recreation those adjacent rural areas, to make tham accessible, and to take all possible measures to ensure that their amenities are enhanced and not destroyed," he said.

He said a start has now been made with positive action along these lines by accepting the five-year capital works programme of the two Committees for Recreational Development and Nature Conservation in the New Territories and Hong Kong Island.

Basically, he said, these programmes provide for the phased construction of minor roads on Hong Kong Island to provide access for maintenance vehicles and more facilties including picnic spots.

"In the New Territories, the programme provides for the construction of a number of country parks to enable more intensive use to be made of selected areas of particular attraction."

Referring to the pollution problem, Sir Murray said the Advisory Committee on Environmental Pollution, set up in 1971, will be making its first report shortly.

/"We already .........

Wednesday, October 18, 1972

- 2? -

”We already face serious pollution in some streams in the New Territories and in parts of the harbour, and the danger of a rapid advance in pollution is very much present in all our minds.

"In the light of the committee’s report, the Government will take a hard look at the problem, and at the need for legislation and the means to prise this flight from such holds as it already has and to prevent it contaminating our enviornment,” he said.

------0----------

PASSING-OUT PARADE OF IMMIGRATION OFFICERS

««*****«*

Eleven Assistant Immigration Officers, including two women, will take part in a passing-out parade to be held on Friday (October 20) at the Royal Hong Kong Regiment Parade Ground in Happy Valley.

Legislative Councillor, Mr. P.C. Woo, will inspect and address the parade and take the salute. He will also present awards to the top recruits.

Note to Editors: The parade will be held at 9-50 a.m.

You are invited to send a report and/or photographer to cover the occasion.

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Wednesday, October 18, 1972

- 24 -

HONG KONG'S NARCOTICS SUPPLIES FROM THAILAND

*********

The Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, said today that as far as Hong Kong is concerned, the source'of narcotics is "wholly or very nearly r/holly dependent on supplies from Thailand.”

Speaking on the drug problem at the opening of the new Legislative Council session, the Governor, said that the work done in Hong Kong against narcotics trafficking has been acknowledged to be second to none in the world

The prevalence of narcotics here has kept us in the front line of a world war against narcotics trafficking, which was being stepped up through the initiative mainly of the United Nations and the United States.

"The problem of a high addiction rate remains, together with its obviously close relationship to some types of crime,” he continued.

It has not increased nor has it reduced in spite of devoted work by many men and women in different branches of the public service and in the voluntary organisations.

The Governor said that Hong Kong’s Commissioner for Narcotics, who is in charge of internal co-ordination and overseas liaison, is already reviewing treatment and rehabilitation methods, including preliminary experiments in methadone maintenance.

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/25

Wednesday, October 18, 1972

- 25 -

SOCIAL SECURITY IN HONG KONG

*********

The Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, said today the-first call on the Government should be to provide free, or almost free, houses, schools, hospitals, and welfare services, leaving for later — as resources become available — the lowering of payments by those benefiting and who are able to pay.

He made this point in the Legislative Council during his address on Hong Kong affairs when touching on social security.

Though Hong Kong had not codified social security into a comprehensive system, in effect an extensive system of aid based on the principle of assistance for those in need already existed here.

“There is nothing else quite like it anywhere in the world,” the Governor said. ”It is something characteristic of, and unique to Hong Kong, something we may be proud of, and something on which we may build with confidence.”

He ejqalained that social welfare was already being administered on a large scale, and plans for the future were extensive.

In the field of medical services, no one need now pay more than a small fee for treatment either at a clinic or in hospital. Fees were already being remitted for the needy.

/The educational

Wednesday, October 18, 1972

- 26 -

The educational system provided free primary education and nobody was deprived of secondary or university education because of lack of means.

In addition, Sir Murray pointed to the provision of low-rent government housing on a scale unknown elsewhere in the -world for those with low incomes.

Taken collectively, these measures meant that the .people of Hong Kong were in a fair way towards having provisions enabling them and their children to live secure in the knowledge that they would be protected from the worst effects of adversity.

On the question of payment for these services, the Government’s attitude was that these needs should be provided ”as cheaply as possible, as our means allow.”

If the choice was between having the infrastructure end of providing them free, or almost free, the Governor was sure the people of Hong Kong would want the Government to provide the houses and the schools first.

This, he told the Council, related to Hong Kong’s present state of development and the population today, which was predominantly young and active.

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Wednesday, October 18, 1972

- 27 -

FOUR BILLS PASSED FIRST AND SECOND READINGS

********

Four bills passed their first and second readings in the opening sitting of the new Legislative Council session this afternoon.

They are the Urban Council (Amendment) (No. 2) Bill 1972, the Television (Amendment) Bill 1972, the Peak Tramway (Amendment) Bill 1972, and the Bills of Exchange (Amendment) Bill 1972.

Debate on a motion to thank the Governor for his opening address was adjourned.

Among a number of motions passed by the Council this afternoon was one approving supplementary provisions for the quarter ended March 51, 1972.

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/28........

Wednesday, October 18, 1972

- 28 -

BRITISH EXPERT ARRIVES FOR LEPROSY CONSULTATIONS

*********

Dr. Stanley Browne, Medical Consultant at the London headquarters of the Leprosy Mission, has arrived in Hong Kong for consultation with the Medical and Health Department on the leprosy programme, both now and in the future•

His visit is part of a tour of East Asia and he is spending five days in Hong Kong as a guest of the Mission*s Hong Kong Auxiliary before leaving for Seoul.

His Hong Kong programme includes an address at the annual general meeting of the Hong Kong Auxiliary of The Leprosy Mission in the hall of the Union Church at 5:30 p.m. tomorrow (October 19)-

On Friday he is also giving an open lecture to medical students and general practitioners on the public health aspects of leprosy work at 5:30 p.m. in the Hong Kong University Lecture Theatre, Li Shu Fan Building.

Dr. Browne will spend this weekend at the leprosarium on Hei Ling Chau, which he has visited a number of times in the past, assisting the officers • • • < there with the selection of patients who could benefit from treatment with new drugs as they became available.

On one of his earlier visits to Hong Kong, he took part in discussions with senior members of the Medical and Health Department and Professor Olaf Skinsnes on the modern scientific discoveries about leprosy.

As a result of these talks, the policy on segregation of patients under treatment was revised — probably the first step along the path which has led to the present running down of the Hei Ling Chau leprosarium.

/The general ••••••••

Wednesday, October 18, 1972

- 29 -

The general pattern throughout the world is to integrate leprosy treatment into normal medical services, as it is now thought that admission of patients into a leprosarium, as distinct from a general hospital, makes subsequent rehabilitation and integration into the community more difficult.

The leprosarium at Hei Ling Chau became operational on August 6, 195*1, with the arrival of the first group of patients, Between 1958 and 19^4, it was fully occupied, with a waiting list.

Originally planned for J4O patients, Hei Ling Chau is presently housing fewer than 180, in accordance with plans for its gradual phasing out.

By 1974, it is estimated that fewer than 80 patients will still be needing continued institutional care, and others only out-patient service.

For the 80, the Medical and Health Department plans to make available a special unit in the infectious diseases block of the new Princess Margaret Hospital in Lai Chi Kok, which is expected to be opened in 1974. There will be ample facilities for separating patients with different types of infection.

Note to Editors: You are invited to attend a Press conference

at the Medical and Health Department headquarters at 2.JO p.m. tomorrow, Thursday (October 19) when Dr. Browne will be available to answer questions.

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/50.........

7001b

Wednesday, October 18, 1972

- 30 -

MORE SEAMEN REGISTERED WITH S.R.O.

********

A total of 72,823 seamen was registered with the Seamen’s Recruiting Office at the end of last month, according to statistics released by the Marine Department.

Of these, 28,462 were included in Part I of the register. These seamen had either been to sea during the past two years, or had had pre-sea training or acceptable shore experience.

There were 16,137 new entrants to the shipping industry who did not have pre-sea training or acceptable shore experience.

Another 28,224 seamen were included in Part IV, which comprises those who have been transferred from Part I in order to have their names listed with one of a number of licensed crew departments in shipping companies.

During the month, 358 seamen who had registered with the Recruiting Office were selected and engaged on foreign-going ships.

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Release time: 9.00 p.m.

PR 33

0035

DAILY INFORMATION

Wednes

SUPPLEMENT

VISIT OF H.R.H, PRINCESS ALEXANDRA, G.C.V.O., AND THE HON, ANGUS OGILVY

Details Of Official Programme

*****

Her Royal Highness and the Honourable Jingus Ogilvy will be accompanied by the following:

The Honourable Lady Rowley

Miss M.L. Ashby, M.V.O.

Group Captain B.E. de longh, R.A.F.

Inspector C.S. Keith • *

Visit Director, Brigadier R.G. Lewthwaite,.

M.C., Director of Protocol

Honorary Aido-de-Camp, Mr, C.G. Cumings, Royal Hong Kong Police

Visit Press Officer, Mr. O.B. Talip, Principal Information Officer

Helicopter Pilot, Squadron Leader W. Wilson, R.A.F.

Throughout the visit of Her Royal Highness, the guard at Government

House will be mounted by the Royal Hong Kong Police.

SATURDAY, 21 st October, 1972

Arrive At Kai Tak

10J0 On leaving the aircraft, Her Royal Highness and Mr. Ogilvy will be greeted by His Excellency the Governor, Sir Murray MucLehose, K.C.M.G., M.B.E., and Lady MacLehose, at the foot of the steps. H.E. will then present his A.D.C., Mr. A.J. Ferrige, Royal Hong Kong Police, and the honorary Aide-de-Camp to H.R.H., followed by:

/2 ....

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House. Hong Kong. Tel: 5-233191

Wednesday, October 18, 1972

2

The Commander British Forces (H.E. Lieutenant General Sir Richard Ward, K.C.B., D.S.O., M.C.) and Lady Ward

The Commander Royal Air Force (Air Commodore C.L. Godwin, A.F.C.) and Mrs* Godwin The Commissioner of Police (Mr. CcP. Sutcliffe, C.B.E., Q.P.M.) and Mrs. Sutcliffe

The Acting Director of Civil Aviation (Mr. R.E. Downing) and Mrs. Downing

The Airport Acting General Manager (Mr. M.A. Funk) and Mrs. Funk

The Senior Assistant Commissioner of Police, Kowloon (Mr. E.P. Grace, Q.P.M.) and Mrs. Grace

H.R.H. will then proceed to the first car, accompanied by H.E. Mr. Ogilvy will enter the second car with Lady MacLehose In the event of rain, H.R.H,. and Mr. Ogilvy will be welcomed at the aircraft by H.E. and Lady MacLehose, then proceed by car to the small VIP room. Those to be presented will be assembled in the large VIP room to which H.E. will conduct H.R.H. and Mr. Ogilvy when they are ready.

1055 Leave for Promontory Pierc

1038 At Promontory Pier, H.E. will present the Acting Director of Marine (Mr. M.J. Alexander) and Mrs. Alexander. H.R.H. and Mr. Ogilvy will board ’’The Lady Maurine”.

1040 Leave Promontory Pier for Queen’s Pier. ’’The Lady Maurine” will be escorted by H.M.S. Beachampton and H.M.S. Yarnton. H.R.H. will acknowledge salutes from the fore-deck of ’’The

Lady Maurine”. 21 Gun Salute will be fired by H.M.S. Tamar

Wednesday, October 18, 1972

- 3 -

Arrive at Queen’s Pier

1105 H.E. will leave "The Lady Maurine" first to assist H.R.H. ashore,to be followed by the Commissioner of Police, Lady MacLehose and Mr* Ogilvy* H.R.H. will be escorted to the Saluting dais by the Commissioner of Police.

The Guard of Honour found by the Royal Hong Kong Police will give a Royal Salute and the Band will play the first six bars of the National Anthem.

The Guard Commander (Mr* R.W. Smith, Superintendent of Police) will report his Guard to H.R.H* who will theii* inspect the Guard, accompanied by the Commissioner of Police and the Guard Commander.

After inspecting the Guard of Honour, H.R.H. accompanied by the Commissioner of Police will return to Queen’s Pier where she will be received by H.E., who will present:

The Chief Justice, the Hon. Sir Ivo Rigby and Lady Rigby The Colonial Secretary, Sir Hugh Wmaix-JJfolker, K.C.M.G., O*B,E.

The Deputy Commander Land Forces, Major General E.J.S. Burnett, D.S.O., O.B.E*, M.C. and . > Mrs. Burnett

The Commodore-in-Charge Hong Kong,' Commodore J.K. Stevens, and Mrs. Stevens

The Bishop of Hong Kong, the Rt. Rev. Bishop Gilbert Baker and Mrs. Baker

The Roman Catholic Bishop of Hong Kong, the Most Rev. Bishop Francis Hsu

The Hon. Sir Albert Rodrigues, C.B.E., E.D. (Senior Unofficial Member, Executive Council) and ... Lady Rodrigues

A.......

Wednesday, October 18, 1972

- 4 -

The Hon. Sir Yuet-keung Kan, C.B.E. (Senior Chinese Unofficial Member, Executive Council) and Lady Kan

The Hon. Woo Pak-chuen, O.B.E. (Senior Unofficial Member, Legislative Council) and Mrs. Woo

The Doyen of the Consular Corps, Mr. Carl C:son •Kjellberg, Consul-General of Sweden, and Mrs. Kjellberg

After the presentations, H.R.H. and Mr. Ogilvy will enter

the rars, accompanied by H.E. and Lady MacLehose and will

drive to Government House.

Arrive at Government House

1120 On arrival at Government House, H.E. will present:

The Visit Director, Brigadier R.G. Lewthwaite, M.C.

The Visit Press Officer, Mr. O.B. Talip

The Administrative Secretary, Mr. G.A. Higginson

The Social Secretary, Miss J.M. Boyle

Hie Housekeeper, Miss N. Vincent

1230 H.R.H. and Mr. Ogilvy will leave Government House fcr

the Cross-Harbour Tunnel Company Administration Building.

Arrive at the Cross-Harbour Tunnel Company Administration Building____________________

1240 H.R.H. will be received by the Chairman of The Cross-Harbour

Tunnel Company, Mr. J.L, Marden, who will present:

The Deputy Chairman, the Hon. Sir Douglas Clague, C.B.E., M.C., Q.P.M., T.D.

The Tunnel Manager, Mr. A. McFarlin

/Mr. Marden

Wednesday, October 18, 1972

5 -

Mr. Marden will escort H.R.H. through the building to the dais, where the first six bars of the National Anthem will be played by the band of the 2nd King Edward Vil’s Own Gurkha Rifles.

H.R.H. will unveil a plaque on the outside of the Administration Building. After touring part of the Administration Building, H.R.H. will join about 200 guests for a buffet lunch on the 5th floor.

1^+00 H.R.H. and Mr. Ogilvy will leave the Cross-Harbour Tunnel Administration Building and board a helicopter for Fanling. ...

Arrive at Fanling

1410 Arrive at Fanling Lodge. Remainder of day free.

/6

Wednesday, October 18, 1972

SUNDAY,

- 6 -

22nd OCTOBER, 1972

Morning No engagements*

1530 H.R.H. and Mr. Ogilvy will leave Fanling by helicopter.

15^0 On arrival at Harcourt Road, H.R.H. will be met by her

Aide-de-Camp

1545 Arrive at Government House.

1810 H.R.H. and Mr. Ogilvy will leave Government House accompanied by H.E. and Lady MacLehose for Aberdeen via Wongneichung Gap.

Police Training School • »

1850 On arrival at the Royal Heng Kong Police Training School, H.R.H. and Mr. Ogilvy will be received by the Commissioner of Police who will present Mr. D.G. Lloyd, Commandant of the Police Training School. The Commissioner of Police will escort H.R.H. to her seat. Mr. Ogilvy will be escorted to his seat by the Deputy Commissioner of Police, Administration. Mr. B.F. Slevin, Q.P.M., and H.E, and Lady MacLehose by the Deputy Commissioner of Police, Operations, Mr. C.J.R. Dawson, Q.P.M. The first six bars of the National Anthem will be played. The Bands of the Royal Hong Kong Police will then Beat Retreat.

1910 At the conclusion of the Beating of Retreat, the Commissioner of Police will escort H.R.H., H.E. and those in attendance to their cars, and the party will leave for Government House* 1930 Arrive at Government House.

2030 Dinner Party at Government House#

/7......

Wednesday, October 18, 1972

- 7 -

MONDAY, 2grd OCTOBER, 1972

1045 H.R.H. will leave Government House for Royal Hong Kong Police Headquarters, Arsenal Street, accompanied by Lady Rowley.

1050 On arrival, H.R.H. will be received by the Commissioner of Police who will escort her to the Conference Room on the 5th floor, where he will present the following officers: Deputy Commissioner of Police, Administration, Mr. B.F. Slevin, Q.P.M.

Deputy Commissioner of Police, Operations, Mr. C.J.R., Dawson, Q.P.M.

Director of Criminal Investigation, Mr. J.B. Lees, Q.P.M.

Director of Special Branch, Mr. R.A.J. Richardson, Q.P.M.

Senior Assistant Commissioner of Police, Establishment and General, Mr. A.J. Schouten, Q.P.M.

Assistant Cotmiissioner of Police, Operations, Mr. P.T. Moor

Police Civil Secretary, Mr. G.T. Barnes

Chief Police Information Officer, Mr. J.D. Slimming Senior Superintendent of Police, Planning and Research, Mr. J.H. Harris

After leaving the Conference Room, H.R.H. will be escorted by the Commissioner to the Stage III building of Police Headquarters, which is now under cdnstruction, where she will be invited to unveil a plaque.

H.R.H. will then visit the Arsenal Street Rank and File Married Quarters and the Police Primary School.

/8......

Wednesday, October 18, 1972

- 8 -

1200 H.R.H. will leave Royal Hong Kong Police Headquarters for..-. Wanchai Police Station.

Wanchai Police Station

120J H.R.H. will arrive at Wanchai Police Station where the Commissioner will present:

Divisional Superintendent Wanchai, Mr. Cheng Hon-kuen Divisional Superintendent Wanchai (Auxiliary),

Mr. G. Hyder

H.R.H. Will tour Wanchai Police Station, visiting the Women Police Office, the Report Room and the office of the Divisional Detective Inspector.

t225 Leave Wanchai Police Station for Government House.

42JO Arrive at Government House,

1300 Lunch at Government House.

1455 H.R.H. will leave Government House accompanied by Mr. Ogilvy for the British Industrial Exhibition at Wanchai.

British Industrial Exhibition

1500 Arrive at the British Industrial Exhibition where H.R.H. will be received by the British Senior Trade Commissioner, Mr. T.W. Aston, C.M.G. and Mrs. Aston, who will present:

A representative of the British Overseas Trade Board The Chairman, Hong Kong Trade Advisory Group, Mr. G. Hamm The Chairman, Hong Kong Trade Development Council, The

Hon. Sir Yuet-keung Kan, C.B.E., and Lady Kan

/9...... >

Wednesday, October 18, 1972

9

The Honorary President of the Federation of Hong Kong Industries, the Hon. Sir Sik-nin Chau, C.B.E.

The Director of Commerce and Industry, the Hon. D.H. Jordan, M.B.E., and Mrs. Jordan

The Chairman, Federation of Hong Kong Industries, The Hon. T.K. Ann, O.B.E. and Mrs. Ann

The President, Chinese Manufacturers’ Association, Dr. C.W. Chuang

The Executive Director, Hong Kong Trade Development Council, Mr. T.D. Sorby, and Mrs. Sorby

The Director, Fairs and Promotions Branch, Department of Trade and Industry, Mr. W.T. Pearce

The British Trade Commissioner (China Trade), Mr. J.R.H. Walker

The British Senior Trade Commissioner will invite H.R.H. to declare the Exhibition open.

After opening the Exhibition, H.R.H. and Mr. Ogilvy will tour the Exhibition stands.

1630 H.R.H. and Mr. Ogilvy will leave the British Industrial Exhibition for Government House.

.1635 Arrive at Government House.

2025 Leave Government House for Royal Hong Kong Police Headquarters, Arsenal Street.

Dinner in Gazetted Officers’ Mess

2030 H.R.H. and Mr. Ogilvy will be received at Police Headquarters by the Commissioner of Police, who will present the President of the Mess Committee, Mr. J.W. Browett, Assistant Commissioner of Police.

The Commissioner and the President of the Mess Committee will escort H.R.H. and Mr. Ogilvy to the Gazetted Officers’ Mess, where they will dine. ■' •

as from H.R.H. and Mr. Ogilvy will return to Government House.

2230

/10......

Wednesday, October 18, 1972

- 10 -

TUESDAY, 24th OCTOBER, 1972

1050 H.R.H. will leave Government House for Pokfulam accompanied by Lady Rowley.

Ebenezer School and Home for the Blind

1100 Arrive at the Ebenezer School and Home for the Blind,

, , where H.R.H. will be received by the Director of Education,

the Hon. J. Canning who will present the Superintendent of the School, Mr. K.J. Marshall.

Mr. K.J. Marshall will present the following:

The School Principal, Mr. Joseph Wong Pang-fai

The Chairman of the Management Committee, Mrs. H. Minich

The Vice-Chairman (and Hildesheim Mission representative), The Rev. K.L. Stumpf, O.B.E.

The School Supervisor, Dr. K.Y. Chan

The Government Senior Education Officer in charge of Special Education, Miss J.E. Rowe, M.B.E.

The Social Welfare Department Adviser, Miss Stella Leung H.R.H. will tour the School and see the children at work.

1130 Leave the Ebenezer School and Home for the Blind.

1135 Arrive at the Hong Kong University Sports Ground, where

she will be received by the Director of Physical Education, Hong Kong University, Mr. W.K. Low.

<14O Board a helicopter for Kwun Tong.

Wednesday, October 18, 1972

Princess Alexandra-Red Cross Residential School

1145 On arrival at the Princess Alexandra Red Cross Residential School, Kwun Tong, H.R.H. will be received by the Deputy Director of Social Welfare, Mr, Thomas C.Y. Lee, who will present the President of the Hong Kong Branch of the British • • • •

Red Cross Society, Mr. Run Run Shaw.

Mr. Shaw will present the following:

The Deputy President and Chairman of the School Management Committee, Mr. T.C. Cheng, O.B.E.

The Director-of the>Hong Kong Red Cross, Mrs. Li Fook-kow

The School Supervisor, Mrs. S.W. Leung

The Superintendent and Matron, Miss Ko Po-shue

H.R.H. will tour the classrooms and residential

* accommodation.

1215 H.R.H. will enter the helicopter and take off for Harcourt

Road.

1220 Arrive at Harcourt Road.

1225 Arrive at Government House.

1300 Lunch at Government House.

1430 H.R.H. and Mr. Ogilvy will leave Government ‘House by car for

Morse Park.

Morse. Park Sydniming Pools^.Jl----

1450 H.R.H. and Mr. Ogilvy will arrive at the M.orse Park.Swimming Pools and will be received by the Director of Urban Services, the Hon. D.R.W. Alexander, C.B.E., who will present:

Wednesday, October 18, 1972

- 12 -

The Chairman of the Urban Services Recreation and

Amenities Select Committee, Mr. A. de 0. Sales, O.B.E.

The President of the Royal Life Saving Society (Hong Kong Branch), the Hon. Sir Kenneth Ping-fan Fung, C.B.E.

The Acting Senior Education Officer (Physical Education), Miss E.S. Mair

1455 H.R.H. will be escorted by the Director of Urban Services past a Guard of Honour formed by the Examiners of the Royal Life Saving Society (Hong Kong Branch) to the main pool, where the following will be presented:

The Inspector of Schools, Mr. R. Bird

The Superintendent, H.K. Sea School, Colonel F.A. Eustace, O.B.E.

The President, Hong Kong Life Guard Club, Mr. Chow Yau, M.B.E.

Vice-President, Hong Kong Life Guard Club, Mr. Kwong Kwok Lee

Vice-President, Hong Kong Life Guard Club, Dr. Chiu But York

Vice-President, Hong Kong Life Guard Club, Mr. Choi Jun Chairman, Hong Kong Life Guard Club, Mr. Francis Loo H.RtH. will see demonstrations by the Royal Life Saving Society (Heng Kong Branch) and the Hong Kong Sea School, and will tour the pools to see other activities.

1535 H.ReH, and Mr. Ogilvy will leave Morse Park Swimming Pools by

•ar and drive to Stone Nullah Lane, Wanchai.

"Keep Heng Kong Clean” Campaign

1550 On arrival at Stone Nullah Lane, H.R.H. will be received by the

•. Secretary for Home Affairs, the Hon. D.C.C. Luddington, who will present:

Wednesday, October 18, 1972

1605

1610

1750

1800

- 13 -

The Chairman of the ’’Keep Hong Kong Clean” Campaign Committee, Dr. Denny M.H. Huang

The Chairman of the Wanohai West Area Committee of the "Keep Hong Kong Clean” Campaign, Mr. Lee Wan-yuen, M.B.E.

The City District Commissioner, Mr. David T.K. Wong

The City District Officer Wanohai, Mr. G.N. Mulloy

H.R.H. will see cleaning operations in progress.

H.R.H. and Mrt Ogilvy will leave for Government House.

Arrive at Government House.

H.R.H. and Mr. Ogilvy will leave for the Hong Kong Government

Stadium.

Royal Hong Kong Police Review

H.R.H. and Mr. Ogilvy will arrive at the Government Stadium and be received by the Commissioner of Police and the Deputy Commissioner of Police, Administration. The Commissioner will escort H.R.H. to the saluting base and the Deputy Commissioner will escort Mr. Ogilvy to his seat.

The parade will give a Royal Salute and the first six bars of the National Anthem will be played.

H.R.H. will inspect the Parade from a landrover.

H.R.H. wall present medals.

The Commissioner of Police will present H.R.H. with a brooch in the form of the badge of the Royal Hong Kong Police, and H.R.H.

will address the Parade

Wednesday, October 18, 1972

- 14 -

The Parade will march and drive past H.R.H. followed by an advance in review order and a Royal Salute.

1915 H.R.H. and Mr. Ogilvy will leave for Government House accompanied by H.E. and Lady MacLehose.

1925 Arrive at Government House.

WEDNESDAY, 25th October, 1972

morning Private engagements during the morning.

1255 H.R.H. and Mr. Ogilvy will leave Government House by car for Flagstaff House.

1JOO H.R.H. and Mr. Ogilvy will attend a lunch party at Flagstaff House given by the Commander British Forces and Lady Ward.

1440 H.R.H. and Mr. Ogilvy will leave Flagstaff House for Harcourt Road.

1445 H.R.H. and Mr. Ogilvy will be received at the Harcourt Road helicopter pad by the Director of Protocol. H.R.H. and Mr. Ogilvy will enter the helicopter accompanied by the Director of Protocol and take off for Kwai Chung.

Wednesday, October 18, 1972

- 15 -

South Kwai Chung Jockey Club Polyclinic

1455 H.R.H. and Mr. Ogilvy will arrive at the Kwai Chung playground and be received by the District Commissioner, New Territories, the Hon. D.C. Bray, and will drive to the South Kwai Chung Jockey Club Polyclinic.

1500 ‘ H.R.H. will be received by the Director of Medical and Health Services, Dr. the Hon. G-.H. Choa, C.B.E., who will present: The Chairman of the Stewards of the Royal Hong Kong Jockey Club, the Hon. Sir Dodglas Clague, C.B.E., M.C., Q.P.M., T.D. . . • • The Deputy Director of Medical and Health Services (Health), Dr. J.K. Craig, M.B.E. . • The Deputy Director of Medical and Health Services (Medical), Dr. K.L. Thong

The Deputy Director of Public Works (Building Development), Mr. C.R.J-Donnithorne

The Assistant Director of Medical and Health.Services (Medical), Dr. K.F. Chan

The Chairman, Heung Yee Kuk, Mr; Chan Yat-son, M.B.E.

The Project Architect, Mr. Winston Leung

The Director of Medical and Health Services will escort H.R.H. to her seat on the dais, and Dr. Craig will.escort Mr. Ogilvy. The Director will invite H.R.H. to unveil a plaque and to declare the Polyclinic open.

H.R.H. will then tour the building, and members of the staff of the Medical and Health Department will be present.

1530 H.R.H. and Mr. Ogilvy will leave the South Kwai Chung Jockey Club Polyclinic for the Manhattan Garments Factory.

Wednesday, October 18, 1972

1535

1605

1615

- 16 -

Manhattan Garments Factory

H.R.H. and Mr. Ogilvy will arrive at the Manhattan Garments Factory, Kwai Cheung Street, Tsuen Wan and will be received by the Director of Commerce and Industry, the Hon. D.H. Jordan, M.B.E., who will present:

The Chairman of the Board, Mr. Francis Tien, M.B.E., who will then present the Directors:

Mrs. Francis Tien

Mr. Cha Chi Ming Mr. James Tien

H.R.H. and Mr. Ogilvy will tour the factory. *

H.R.H. and Mr. Ogilvy .'/ill leave by oar for the Princess Alexandra Community Centre.

The Princess Alexandra Community Centre

H.R.H. and Mr. -Ogilvy will arrive at the Princess Alexandra Community Centre, Tsuen Wan, and will be received by the Director of Social Welfare, the Hon. G.T. Rowe, C.B.E., • • • who will present:

Mr. Law Chi-kin, Senior Principal Social Welfare Officer Mr. Lam Kwok-wan, Warden of the Community Centre

Mr. Chan Po-fong, Chairman of the Tsuen Wan Rural Committee

H.R.H. and Mr. Ogilvy will tour the Centre, visiting the various sections organised by the Social Welfare Department, voluntary agencies and local organisations.

Wednesday, October 18, 1972

- 17 -

1650 Leave the Community Centre for the Yeung Uk Sports Ground, Tsuen Wan

1655 H.R.H. and Mr. Ogilvy will enter the helicopter and take off for Harcourt Road. • • •

1700 Arrive Harcourt Road.

1705 Arrive Government House,

t

2035 H.R.H. and Mr. Ogilvy, accompanied by H.E. and Lady MaeLehose, • ’ will leave Government House for the Hong Kong Hilton Hotel.

Royal Hang Kong Auxiliary Police Dinner and Ball

2040 H.R.H. and Mr. Ogilvy will be received by the Commandant Royal Hong Kong Auxiliary Police, the Hon. Sir Douglas Clague, C.B.E., M.C., Q.P.M., T.D., and Lady Clague.

The Commandant and Lady Clague will present a number of the Auxiliary Police and their wives before dinner.

2400 H.R.H. and Mr. Ogilvy will dine with the Royal Hong Kong Auxiliary Police and attend the Ball.

2330 -H.R.H. and Mr. Ogilvy, accompanied by H.E. and Lady MacLehose,

will leave the Hong Kong Hilton Hotel.

2335 Arrive at Government House.

/18......

Wednesday, October 18, 1972

- 18 -

THURSDAY, 26th OCTOBER, 1972

morning Private engagements. i -

1J00 Private lunch at Government House.

1415 H.R.H. and Mr. Ogilvy, accompanied by H.E. and Lady MacLehose will leave Government House for Queen’s Pier.

, • * Queen’s Pier ...

* , ■

1420 H.R.H. and Mr. Ogilvy will arrive at Queen’s Pier, where

H.E. will present the following to say fareweJLl:. ' . _ ii _ .. .....

The Assistant Commissioner of Police, Hong Kong Island, and Mrs. Browett ...

The Director of Special Branch, and Mrs. Richardson

Mrs. C.P. Sutcliffe

The Doyen of the Consular Corp’s, and Mrs. Kjellberg

The Hon. Woo Pak-chuen, O.B.E., and Mrs. Woo

The Hon. Sir Yuet-keung Kan, C.B.E., and Lady Kan

The Hon. Sir Albert Rodrigues, C.B.E., E.D., and Lady

?• Rodrigues .... *

The Roman Catholic Bishop of Hong Kong The Bishop of Hong Kong, and Mrs. Baker The Commodore-in-Charge Hong' Kong, and Mrs. Stevens The Deputy Commander Land Forces, and Mrs. Burnett

The Colonial Secretary :3

The Chief Justice Lady Ward

H.R.H. and Mr. Ogilvy will’ board’ ’’The Lady Maurine” accompanied by H.E. and Lady MacLehose.

1425 ’’The Lady Maurine” will leave for Promontory Pier. A 21-gun

' Salute will be fired from H.M.S. Tamar.

/19......

Wednesday, October 18, 1972

- 19 -

Review Of Marine Police Launches

During the passage H.R.H. will review Marine Police Launches of the Royal Hong Kong Police.

Airport

1450 On arrival at Promontory Pier, H.R.H. will be received by the Airport Acting G-eneral Manager, and will drive to the aircraft, led by the Airport Acting G-eneral Manager.

1455 The following will say farewell to H.R.H. and Mr. Ogilvy at the foot of the aircraft steps:

H.E. the Governor and Lady MacLehose

A.D.C. to H.E. the Governor and A.D.C. to H.R.H.

H.E. The Commander British Forces

The Commander Royal Air Force

The Commissioner of Police

The Director of Civil Aviation

The Airport Acting G-eneral Manager

The Senior Assistant Commissioner of Police, Kowloun The Director of Protocol (Visit Director)

1500 The aircraft doors close.

0

PRH 7 40000®!

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Thursday, October 19« 1972

COMPREHENSIVE WHITE PAPER ON SOCIAL WELFARE * * * « * * * *

The Government will bear the major portion of an estimated $725 million total expenditure on vastly-expanded social welfare during the remainder of the 1970s if all the proposals in the white paper on social policy, tabled in the Legislative Council yesterday, are finally implemented.

The Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, in a reference to the white paper in his review of Hong Kong affairs, said it was a draft only because not al1 of its proposals had yet been accepted, and he invited public comments before final decisions were taken.

The comprehensive nature of the proposals put forward make the white paper — and a five-year plan of implementation which is still to be published — the most important step forward in social welfare in the history of Hong Kong.

The two documents are the joint work of the Social Welfare Department, the Hong Kong Council of Social Service, and voluntary agencies, and represent the conclusions of all concerned — a significant partnership because only in this way is the real, and continuous, improvement in the quality of life of the people of Hong Kong possible.

*«‘

/The proposals ...........

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong. Tel: 5-233191

Thursday, October 19? 1972

- 2 -

. The proposals cover a balanced social security system, community development with emphasis on youth and the family, facilities for the disabled, aid to the elderly, rehabilitation of young offenders and probationers, and effective supporting services in training, planning, research and evaluation.

On social security, the white paper recommends emergency relief to victims of disasters, a means-tested public assistance scheme to guarantee .an acceptable level of income to those in the community who have the least money, and in particular, an outright regular monthly.payment — that is, without a means test — to assist the ’’most vulnerable groups” in the community.

With regard to the latter, the white paper proposes that the first groups to be helped without a means test should be the severely disabled and those over 75 years of age. Then, if the scheme is successful, it should be extended to other groups, such as widowed mothers with young children and the chronically sick.

On community development, the white paper wants facilities extended so that they become available to the population as a whole.

To this end it recommends a comprehensive network of community and social centres, and estate welfare buildings and community halls in all areas in the Colony.

It proposes the appointment of community and youth officers to coordinate community services in each of the 15 urban and rural districts, with community workers employed by voluntary agencies operating at the street, or block, level.

/Above all, ........

Thursday, October 19, 1972

- 3 -

Above all, the white paper recommends the doubling of children’s and youth centres now in existence, and the extent of their programmes and activities.

The immediate objective is to have one children’s and one youth centre for every 50,000 of the population. The longer-term aim is to have such centres for every 20,000 of the population.

On family welfare, the white paper seeks to improve the quality and scope of current activities so that assistance is readily available to any family in need of help. In particular, the proposals recommend control and improvement in the standards of care in children’s day care centres through legislation! inspection, advice, assistance and training.

Of the disabled, the white paper urges that every handicapped person be given assistance in pre-vocational training, or vocational training, or sheltered wo He. so that he, or she, has the opportunity to achieve and man n tan n a position of social and economic independence in the community.

The white paper recommends that the elderly be encouraged, by special services, to remain independent as long as possible. For those who need particular care, it proposes residences, where necessary, and services in the home, for example, help to keep the home clean, where practicable.

On probation and correctional services, the white paper recommends facilities that will enable the young offender to rehabilitate himself within the community.

Such a programme will need supporting services in the fields of training, planning, research and evaluation, The white paper accordingly recommends measures that will enable the objectives to be achieved as fully as possible.

/In particular, .........

Thursday, October 19, 1972

- 4. -

In particular, it recommends the setting up of. an institute for social work training below the university.level.

If approved, the total capital cost of the proposals in-the five-year period between 1973-78 would be approximately 350 million. The major proportion of this expenditure would fall on the Government. The recurrent cost to the Government would rise from about 3122 million a year in 1973 to 3155 million in 1978. The total expenditure over, the five years would be about 3725 million.

------ 0---------

NEW RURAL CLINIC AND MATERNITY HOME FOR-SHA TAV KOK

A new standard rural clinic and maternity home is to be built at Shek Chung Au, in Sha Tau Kok, New Territories. .

It is to replace the existing clinic within the closed area of Sha Tau Kok which is operating from rented premises and does not’ have maternity facilities.

The new clinic is to be located on a site opposite the existing Sha Tau Kok Police Station. It will rise to two storeys and will provide an out-patient clinic on the ground floor including a dispensary.

On the second floor, there will be a maternity ward with seven beds and a delivery room. There will also be quarters for a midwife, a nurse and minor staff.

Construction is expected.to start in December this year and the work will be completed in ten months.

-------0--------

/5..............

Thursday, October 19, 1972

- 5 -

LABOUR ADVISORY BOARD ELECTION

********

The Labour Department is to hold an election to choose two candidates for nomination as workers’ representatives to be-appointed by the Governor as members of the Labour Advisory Board for next year.

The election, to be held by secret ballot, will take place in the Industrial Safety Training Centre of the Labour Department’s Kowloon Regional Office on the third floor of the Canton Road Government Offices at 10 atm. on Saturday.

All registered workers1 trade unions are invited to take part in the election. .... ........

The Secretary of the Board, Mrs. Soo Mok Sau-ha, said: ’’Any registered workers’ trade union wishing to vote may send a representative to attend the election.”

The representative must be in possession of a letter of authorisation from the Executive Committee of his union and should also carry a copy of a circular letter of October 10, 1972 from the Labour Department on the subject.

• Mrs. Soo said that I1* candidates have been nominated to stand for election and a list of these candidates has been sent to all workers’ trade unions for information.

The Labour Advisory Board is composed of four employers* representatives and four workers’ representatives with the Commissioner of Labour as chairman.

Two of the workers’ representatives are elected by registered trade unions and two are selected for appointment by the Governor.

• w 0 - ~ -

/6 ........

Thursday, October 19» 1972

TRAFFIC RE-ROUTING AT TWO SECTIONS OF ROADS IN KOWLOON

New traffic arrangements will be introduced at two sections of

roads in Kowloon from 10 a.m. on Saturday (October 21) to improve the traffic flow.

The section of Wing Lung Street between Shun Ning Road and Po On Road in Shamshuipo is to be re-routed one-way towards Po On Road.

The section of Dundas Street between Canton Road and Shanghai Street will be re-routed one-way eastbound.

Appropriate traffic signs will be erected to guide motorists.

------0----------

COMMEMORATIVE POSTAGE STAMP ON SALE TOMORROW ’

*O******

Members of the public are reminded today that the new $1 postage

stamp to commemorate the opening of the cross harbour tunnel will be on sale tomorrow (Friday) at all post offices. ♦

Chairman of the Cross Harbour Tunnel Company Ltd.. Mr. J.L. Marden,

will purchase the first stamp at the General Post Office, Pedder- Street, at 8 a.m, tomorrow.

•Note to Editors:

You are welcome to have the event

covered

- 0

/7

Thursday, October 19, 1972

- 7 -

SAU MAU PING WELFARE BUILDING TO CELEBRATE THIRD ANNIVERSARY *«*«***«»

A series of festivities to mark the third anniversary of the Sau Mau Ping (Central) Estate Welfare Building will be held in its. premises tomorrow.

Apart from its celebrative role, the function.is designed to publicise the services rendered by the seven member agencies of the Welfare Building so that the local residents can make maximum use of the services available.

The programmes.will comprise an opening speech by the Rev. Anderson of the Ping Ngon Youth and Service Centre. Aft§r that, seven resident • representatives of each agency will officiate at the ceremony.

Highlight of the evening will be an open-air fun fair at ttye_ building’s car park and a film show on family planning, public health and cartoon in the hall.

More than 1,000 local residents are ^expected .to share the fun at the free occasion *

Note to Editors: You are welcome to have the .ceremony

covered. It will start at 8 p.m. tomorrow evening.

-------0----------

/8...........

Thursday, October 19, 1972

- 8 -

FIRST GROUP UNDER REHOUSING SCHEME BEING INTERVIEWED

*»****»«

The first group of tenants involved in the Shek Kip Mei Rehousing Scheme is expected to move into their new homes in Pak Tin Estate on November 1, this year.

Officers of the Housing Authority today (Thursday) began their first interviews with individual applicants at the Pak Tin Estate Office.

These families will be offered tenaney at the Estate next Tuesday if they are found to be meeting the requirements of the Housing Authority.

The Housing Manager of Pak Tin Estate, Mr. Fung Tung, said that the idea of an interview was to find cut the applicants’ family circumstances and their individual needs to ascertain their suitability for tenancy.

"It has been planned for my staff to conduct some 80 interviews daily," he said.

"Taking interviews this way with the 1,800 families involved in the present phase of the Shek Kip Mei Rehousing Scheme can be completed in about one month and the last family tan move into the estate before the end of the year." One of the first householders interviewed this morning was Mrs. Lau

Wing Fat of Block 26 of Shek Kip Mei Resettlement Estate.

Mrs, Lau, mother of six sons and one daughter, said she was glad that she could now move into a larger and better flat.

"Although the rent for Pak Tin is higher, it is considered reasonable and within our means as six of my children are working," Mrs. Lau said.

/Mrs. Lau’s ........

Thursday, October 1% 1972

- 9 -

Mrs. Lau’s sons and daughter are working in garment factories. Mrs# Lau has applied for a flat for four people and another for five.

She said she had applied for a low-cost housing flat two years ago but was not successful.

nI am glad that I can now get one so near to my present living place/’ Mrs# Lau said.

The Shek Kip Mei Rehousing Operation Office has received a total of 1#720 applications for flats at Pak Tin since the rehousing scheme was put into full swing one week ago.

The number represents just over 9^ of the total number of application forms the Resettlement Department has sent out to tenants involved in the scheme.

- 0 -------

/10 .........

Thursday, October 19, 1972

- 10 -

OBLIGATIONS AND ENTITLEMENTS OF PEOPLE INVOLVED IN RECENT INCIDENT

********

The Labour Department today drew the attention of employers, injured workers and depenc nts of victims involved in the recent gas explosion incident in Causeway Bay area to their respective obligations and entitlements under the Workmen’s Compensation Ordinance.

A department spokesman said officers of the department’s Workmen’s Compensation Unit were helping dependants of the deceased fireman and salesgirl and those injured in the accident to obtain workmen’s compensation.

He stressed that all non-manual workers earning 31,500 or less a month and all manual workers irrespective of their earnings are entitled to compensation under the Workmen’s Compensation Ordinance if they suffered injury by accident arising out of and in the course of employment.

He added that the employers concerned should notify the department on prescribed forms of any injury to their workers within seven days after the accident and that they should make periodical payments to the injured workers on their normal pay-days during the period of temporary incapacity.

He pointed out that employers, injured workmen and dependants of victims’can obtain further information about their respective obligations and entitlements under the Workmen’s Compensation Ordinance from the following offices of the Workmen’s Compensation Unit of the Labour Department:-

* New Rodney Building, Ground floor, Queensway, Hong Kong. (H-249081 ext. 97)

* Canton Road Government Offices, 5th floor, Canton Road, Kowloon. (K-669014) (K-688856) (K-688626).

-------0---------

Ai.........

Thursday, October 19, 1972

- 11 -

CLOSURE ORDERS ON TWO CONDUIT ROAD BUILDINGS TO BE RAISED

********

The Building Authority announced today that the closure orders on Nos. 53 & 55 Ccnduit Road were to be raised tomorrow (Friday).

In a statement issued this afternoon» the Principal Government Building Surveyor said he was now satisfied that these two buildings, which were closed mainly as a precautionary measure following the landslide in the Po Shan/Conduit Road area in June, were no longer threatened and therefore notices of the expiry of the order were posted on the premises today.

-----0----------

Release time: 7 ♦00 p.m.

PRH 7 4000091

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Friday, October 20, 1972

PROPOSED DETERRENTS AGAINST MALPRACTICE IN BUILDING WORKS

An amending bill to provide effective deterrents in the interest of public safety against malpractice in, or irresponsible supervision of, building works, will be introduced into the Legislative Council shortly.

The Buildings (Amendment) (No.2) Bill 1972 also seeks to empower the Building Authority to take positive aetion to remedy dangerous or potentially dangerous situations arising out of various forms of building works,

If enacted, the bill will increase the maximum fine which may be imposed on a person for certain offences under the Building Ordinance from $2,000 to 35OtOOO,

In addition, it will empower the Building Authority to order a person responsible for the carrying out of building works which are dangerous or potentially dangerous, to remedy the situation.

If such an order is not complied with, the Building Authority will have the power to cause the necessary work to be carried out and recover the cost of the work.

The amending legislation also provides that an authorised architect or registered contractor directly concerned with any building works, who authorises or permits any such works to become dangerous will be guilty of an offence and will be liable on conviction to a penalty of $50,000 and to • • • • • imprisonment for two years.

/Anyone who ••••••

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong. Tel: 5-233191

Friday, October 20, 1972

- 2 -

Anyone who fails to. comply with the order to remedy the situation may, in addition, be fined up to S10,000 for each day that the failure to comply continues.

Another provision proposes to remove the suspension of the operation of a section of the principal Ordinance relating to the issue of occupation permits and temporary.occupation permits.

The suspension was introduced as an emergency measure by the Buildings (Amendment). Ordinance 1972.

A government spokesman said it is considered that the former heavy commitments upon the staff of the Buildings Ordinance Office have now eased sufficiently in order to remove this restriction.

Another proposal is that the period relating to the approval of plans be extended from 28 days to 60 days.

This measure is being introduced to protect the public, as building plans are now so complicated that they require very detailed consideration.

The government spokesman said there is no practical or safe way to simplify the checking of submissions.

He added that this is particularly true in the structural field, where checking is already restricted to points of principle and spot checks of calculations.

This extension will apply only to approval of plans and not to consent to commence work or to the issue of occupation permit.

/3.......

0

Friday, October 20, 1972

- 3 -

H.R.H. PRINCESS ALEXANDRA ARRIVING TOMORROW

*«*«*»***

Her Royal Highness Princess Alexandra will fly into Hong Kong tomorrow (Saturday) morning to begin a six-day official visit here.

The Royal Air Force aircraft taking the Princess and her husband, the Hon. Angus Ogilvy, to Hong Kong will touch down at Kai Tak Airport at 10.J0 a.m.

The Princess is no stranger to Hong Kong — she has been here several times before. She paid her first official visit to Hong Kong in November 1961.

The Royal Couple will be greeted at the airport by the Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, and Lady MacLehose.

As the party crosses the harbour from Kai Tak Airport to Government House, the Princess will be greeted by a 21-gun salute by H.M.S. Tamar.

At a welcoming ceremony at Queen’s Pier, the Princess will inspect a guard of honour and will be presented to local dignitaries.

At about 12.30 p.m., Her Royal Highness and Mr. Ogilvy will leave Government House for a drive through the cross-harbour tunnel.

She will unveil a plaque outside the tunnel company’s Administration Building to mark her visit to the tunnel. The ceremony will be attended by about 200 distinguished members of the community and people connected with the tunnel.

/After a

Friday, October 20, 1972

- 4 -

After a buffet lunch in the Administration Building, the Royal visitors will take a helicopter flight to Fanling Lodge for a quiet weekend there.

Note to Editors: Full details of tomorrow’s programme

are distributed separately in your press boxes this evening.

-------0--------

/5........

Friday, October 20, 1972

- 5 -

ACCIDENTS ON BUILDING CONSTRUCTION SITES

•*****«»*

Artificial lighting should be provided where natural lighting in buildings under construction is inadequate.

Mr. A.H, Carter, the Industrial Safety Training Officer of the Labour Department, said this would enable workers to see where they were going and serve as a safety precaution on building sites.

In September, four workers were killed and 524 injured while working on building construction sites. Of this number, 70 were the result of accidental falls.

Mr. Carter said: "The number of workers injured by falling from height could be substantially reduced if higher standards were employed in the construction of safer working platforms and means of access."

"Many of the falls which occur on the level would not happen if good housekeeping were maintained."

He continued: "Materials should be neatly stacked, rubbish, debris and unwanted material removed from the site at regular intervals. They must not be allowed to accumulate in untidy stacks and piles."

All excavations should be fenced as should be all openings in floors and lift shafts to prevent workers from falling into them, he added.

-------0---------

/6.........

Friday, October 20, 1972

- 6 -

MRS. ROWE COMPLETES SERIES OF VISITS TO WELFARE INSTITUTIONS

**********

Mrs. G.T. Rowe, wife of the Director of Social Welfare, today completed her series of visits to welfare institutions with, a call at the St. Joseph’s Home for the Aged in Clear Water Bay Road, Ngau Chi Wan.

Mrs. Rowe chose that her last call before leaving Hong Kong on the retirement of her husband as Director of Social Welfare should be at the Home of the Aged because this was the Home she saw in 19^7 after her first arrival in Hong Kong.

She was accompanied on her visit by Mrs. Evelyn Doe, Principal Social Welfare Officer.

The Home is one of two run by the Little Sisters of the Poor for the aged of both sexes over 60, irrespective of nationality or creed. At present there are about 400 old people in the Home.

The series of visits by Mrs. Rowe began in 19&9 and had since continued intermittantly.

Mrs. Rowe yesterday also visited the Kowloon Women’s Welfare Club Nursery in Kowloon City.

The Club was founded in 1955 by 12 ladies under the chairmanship of the headmistress of the Pooi To Middle School to help solve the problem of child care for working parents. The Nursery provides day care services for 65 children between the ages of two and six. Fees charged for each child is $30 a month.

-------0---------

/7.........

Friday, October 20, 1972

- 7 -

DECKING OF NULLAH AT AIRPORT

********

A section of the Kai Tak Nullah will be decked and surfaced for the construction of roads and parking areas as part of the development and modernisation of the Hong Kong Airport.

The decked nullah will form a culvert for the construction of roads and parking areas which will assist in the movement of passengers, baggage and aircraft on the aircraft parking apron.

When the work on the apron services complex is completed, there will be direct access from the new parking areas to the main apron via the decked nullah.

The concrete decking to the nullah will be constructed with precast beams on piled foundations to withstand heavy aircraft tractor loads.

Work on this project is expected to begin in December this year and will take about 12 months to complete.

-------0 --------

SUMMER TIME ENDS ON OCTOBER 22

*********

Summer time in Hong Kong this year will officially end at 3»3O a.m. on Sunday (October 22).

Residents are reminded that before going to bed tomorrow. (October 21) evening, they should not forget to put their clocks and watches back one hour.

Summer time came into force on April 16. Its observance in Hong Kong is regulated by the Interpretation and General Clauses Ordinance.

-------0---------

/8 ..........

Friday, October 20, 1972

- 8 -

HOUSING DEVELOPMENT FOR N.T. RESIDENTS

**********

Another half a million people will be housed in Tsuen Wan on the slopes above the town centre, in Kwai Chung and on Tsing Yi in the next ten years.

In round numbers, half a million people will also be housed in Sha Tin and the same number in Tuen Mun at the same time.

This was stated today by Mr. D.C. Bray, District Commissioner, New Territories, at a luncheon meeting of the North Kowloon Rotary Club.

He said this housing provision will have to be made "if we are to get through the ten-year housing programme the Governor announced last Wednesday"•

The New Territories Administration would improve the quality of the environment and the housing and aim to provide 35 square feet of living space a head, each family with its own self-contained home in a simple but balanced urban environment,he said.

Mr. Bray pointed out that the overwhelming number of animals and the amount of their wastes contribute a mammouth problem in the New Territories.

nIn the north-west plains, the output of human and animal wastes measured in human terms is equivalent to the output of over a mi 11 i nn human beings — and it all goes down our so-called stream courses without any trace of sewage treatment.

/"Consultants

Friday, October 20, 1972

- 9 -

"Consultants have been briefed to come up with the answer to stream pollution but the cost is going to be monstrous," he added.

Mr• Bray said more and more people are now going out into the countryside for fun. However, he added the most welcome invasion of the countryside means that it must be prepared for litter, fires and erosion.

"So we plan country parks not only to give pleasure to those who will use them but also to lure people in^o areas where barbecue pits have been built, paths paved and looked after, and where wardens keep an eye out for forest fires," he said.

He said the Sai Kung peninsula and Lantao could be places developed with major resort facilities.

-------0---------

; y • P

AO..........

Friday, October 20, 1972

- 10

CONSUMER PRICE INDEX FOR SEPTEMBER

********

The General Consumer Price Index for September 1972 was 14j, one point higher than that for the previous month.

This was due mainly to an increase of three points in the index for food. Rises of one point each were recorded in the index for miscellaneous goods and the index for services.

Movements in the indexes for other sections of commodity were insignificant.

Prices of fresh vegetables went up as a result of a further drop in local supplies and supplies from China. Increases were also recorded in the average retail prices of rice and bread and cakes.

On the other hand, the average retail prices of fresh water fish, salt water fish, beef, poultry and fresh fruits dropped.

The Modified Consumer Price Index for September 1972 was 148, two points higher than that for the previous month, and ten points higher than that for the corresponding month in 1971.

0--------

Release Time: 7.00 p.m.

PRH 7 4000001

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Saturday, October 21, 1972

PRINCESS UNVEILS PLAQUE AT CROSS-HARBOUR TUNNEL Project Symbolises Stature Of New Hong Kong *««««***«

Her Royal Highness Princess Alexandra said today (Saturday)•that the cross-harbour tunnel qymbolised the stature of the new Hong Kong.

She was speaking at the Cross-Harbour Tunnel Company where she unveiled a plaque outside the AdministThtibh* Building to commemorate the completion of what she described as a ’’bold and successful venture.” . ---

The Chairman of the Cross-Harbour Tunnel Company, Mr. J.L. Marden, t I *

presented to the Princess, as a memento of the occasion, a silver cigarette box containing gold, silver and bronze commemorative medallions.

Addressing the gathering, Princess Alexandra said: ”We are both of us particularly pleased to be back in Hong Kong for today’s ceremony, for we realize full well that the building of the Cross-Harbour Tunnel is an important and significant milestone in the history of Hong Kong.

”To-have completed such a vast project in the short space of three years is a truly remarkable feat in itself, but this undertaking signifies very much more than the construction of a quick and convenient means of crossing the harbour.

/”Not only ..........

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong. Tel: 5-233191

Saturday, October 21, 1972

- 2 -

"Not only does it mean the union of the two halves of this great city, so that the seat of Government and commerce is nov/ joined by road to the industrial and residential areas and to the New Territories, but, being an enterprise which is both very imaginative and very sophisticated, it symbolises the stature of the new Hong Kong, which is today one of the major commercial, financial and tourist centres of the world.

irI feel very privileged that you have asked me to unveil this plaque which commemorates the completion of such a bold and successful venture."

Note to Editors: Copies of the text of Mr. J.L. Marden’s

speech are distributed separately in the Press Boxes, G.I.S,

- - - - 0--------

Saturday, October 21, 1972

APPRENTICESHIP TRAINING MAKES PROGRESS

*********

Progress made by the Apprenticeship Training Unit of the Labour

Department has been encouraging so far, according to Mr. H.R. Knight, Senior Training Officer (Apprenticeship).

This summer, he said, 750 suitably qualified school-leavers took up technician and craft apprenticeships.

Of this number 625 became apprentices to firms in the major industries while 125 took up training in government departments.

Of those in industry, 150 took up technician and 475 craft apprenticeships, an increase of 50a over last year’s figure. Of them 425 were placed through the efforts of the Labour Department.

During the year, another 42 firms started proper apprentice

training along the lines of the apprenticeship scheme proposed by the Apprenticeship Unit of the Labour Department. The total number of firms now running the scheme stands at 122, representing all the ten major industries.

The proposed apprenticeship scheme has the support of the Chinese

Manufacturers* Association, the Federation of Hong Kong Industries, the Hong Kong General Chamber of Commerce as well as a number of the major trade organisations.

However, Mr. Knight said there is no room for complacency.

”We still have a long way to go before we can claim that sufficient

numbers of technicians and craftsmen are being trained to satisfy industry’s needs. The numbers being trained certainly pale against the estimated annual demand of about 2900 technicians and 9700 craftsmen,” he said.

- - 0 - -

A

Saturday, October 21, 1972

- 4 -

ANTI-DIPHTHERIA AND TETANUS CAMPAIGN

*********

A Colony-wide drive is being carried out by the Medical and Health Department to protect Hong Kong’s children against the dangerous diseases of diphtheria and tetanus.

The campaign has begun about two weeks ago and free inoculations are avialable at all government maternal and child health centres, clinics, hospitals and at fixed inoculation centres.

In addition, mobile teams are visiting schools, nurseries, resettlement estates and villages in the rural area.

The campaign, lasting until the end of this year, has become an annual drive since 1959» aimed at eradicating the diseases.

A spokesman for the Medical and Health Department said this time of the year used to be the diphtheria season in the past.

Although it is no longer the case following determined efforts by the department, the spokesman stressed that it is still advisable for children to get immunised against the disease as early as possible.

Note to Editors: Copies of lists of centres where

diphtheria and tetanus injections are available free of charge are distributed separately in the G.I.S. Press Boxes this afternoon.

-------0 - -

/5........

Saturday, October 21, 1972

- 5 -

KOREAN VIOLINIST TO PLAY IN HONG KONG

*********

A talented young Korean violinist, Kim Bok Soo, will give a recital at the City Hall Concert Hall on Wednesday, October 25 at 8 p.m.

The recital is jointly presented by the Urban Council and the Korean Consulate General.

Bom in Seoul, Korea, in 1951, he started to play the violin at the age of six studying under Chung Yung Gap and Lee Tae Hon.

He has won first prize in five national competitions. He was acclaimed the finest musician and awarded the gold medal in the South Korean Revolutionary Festival.

Critics in Seoul have remarked: "In this young violinist, one finds great dexterity in his technique and playing. There is clarity in his tone which combines with his tremendous vitality and sensitivity to give out great warmth in feeling."

On Wednesday, Kim Bok Soo will play two sonatas by Beethoven and Mozart and other items by Biriot and Wieniawski. He will be accompanied by Nancy Loo at the piano.

Tickets at $1 (students only), $5 and 55 are available at the City Hall Box Office from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. daily.

-------0---------

/6........

Saturday, October 21, 1972

- 6 -

QUIET DAY FOR PRINCESS TOMORROW

***♦**♦*

Her Royal Highness Princess Alexandra will have a quiet day tomorrow (Sunday) — the first full day of her visit to Hong Kong.

Her only public engagement will be at the Police Training School, where she will attend a Beating the Retreat ceremony in the evening.

This will be the first of a number of police engagements she will attend in her capacity as Honorary Commandant-General of the Royal Hong Kong Police and the Royal Hong Kong Auxiliary Police.

Her Royal Highness and her husband, the Hon. Angus Ogilvy, will drive to Aberdeen, accompanied by the Governor and Lady MacLehose.

The ceremony will begin at 6.JO p.m. and last about half an hour.

********

Note to Editors: Copies of tomorrow’s detailed programme for

Princess Alexandra’s visit are distributed separately in the press boxes this evening.

-------0---------

/7........

Saturday, October 21, 1972

BEATING RETREAT AT P.T.S. - PRESS TRANSPORT

********

Note to Editors: Press representatives covering the Beating

of Retreat ceremony at the Police Training School are reminded that transport will be provided by the Royal Hong Kong Police to take them to Aberdeen. The Press buses will leave Police Headquarters, Arsenal Street at 5-20 p.m. sharp. After the ceremony, the buses will return to Police Headquarters.

Those making their own way to the P.T.S. are asked to note that they must be in position by 6.00 p.m-.

-------0---------

Saturday, October 21, 1972

- 8 -

STOP FOR APPLICATIONS FOR TAXI DRIVING LICENCES

*******

The Transport Department has announced that it is reluctantly forced to stop accepting applications for taxi driving licences from Monday, October 25 From August 1 to the present, over 1,400 of these licences have been issued and there are 8,000 applications pending*

A department spokesman said as it will take over a year to process this waiting list and as there are more than enough licensed taxi drivers to meet demand, there is no point in continuing to accept applications•

An announcement will be made when applications can be accepted again, he added*

-------0---------

ISSUE OF SUNDAY D.I.B.

Note to Editors; There will be an issue of the Daily

Information Bulletin, both in Chinese and English, tomorrow (Sunday),

The Sunday D. I.B. will be available for collection as from 3 p.m. at the G.I.S. press room, sixth floor, Beaconsfield House.

-------0---------

/9.........

Saturday, October 21, 1972

- 9 -

GETTING GOVERNMENT’S MESSAGE ACROSS TO YOUTH

One Of Greatest Challenges Of His New Job — Mr. Jack Cater

*!*«*««

The Secretary for Information, Mr. Jack Cater, said today he considered getting the government’s message across to the youth of Hong Kong to be one of the greatest challenges of his new job.

Mr. Cater was officially opening a new $123,000 extension to the Salvation Army’s Home for boys at Shaukiwan.

He said: ”As Secretary for Information, it is my task to see that the people of Hong Kong are kept informed of the government’s policies and achievements.

”As so much of our population is young, obviously we are going to be spending much of our time talking to youth.

”1 regard this question of getting the government’s message across to the youth of Hong Kong as one of the greatest challenges of my new job.

’’After all,” he said, ’’the discontent of youth is often aimed at the Establishment, so it would be surprising if the government did not attract a great deal of it.”

In his Speech Mr. Cater stressed the importance which he felt should be placed on dealing with Hong Kong’s youth.

”In Hong Kong, more possibly than in any other place in the world, the future is in the hands of our youth, for Hong Kong is a city of young people.

’’Sixty per cent of our population in under 30 years of age. Even more startling is the fact that now almost half the population is teenage or younger

/’’One........

Saturday, October 21, 1972

- 10 -

"One cannot contemplate these figures without a sense of excitement at the promise for the future implied by the energy and drive of these youthful millions.

’’But if that energy is not properly harnessed, it could do tremendous ' >

harm. For example, an increasing percentage of Hong Kong’s crime is being committed by people under the age of 25.”

’’But, of course, these crimes are committed by a very small percentage of our young people; the vast majority of Hong Kong’s young people are honest, industrious, and have an integrity of which the community of Hong Kong caibe justly proud.”

Mr. Cater criticised people who took the easy course of making blanket criticisms of Hong Kong’s youth. He said Hong Kong’s young people were one of its greatest assets, and were as good as or better than young people in any other part of the world.

He said the so-called ’’generation gap” was an age-old problem and one that was experienced all over the world. ’’But, in Hong Kong, it has special significance at this stage of our development,” he said.

’’Unlike many of the older generations, our young people of today were either born here or were very young when they came to Hong Kong.

•’They have, therefore, every right to think of Hong Kong as their home, and to expect to be involved in the future development of this community.

”So we must not allow a gap to grow between us and the younger generation

”We need to understand the hopes and desires of youth in order that we can communicate with them.”

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/11.........

Saturday, October 21, 1972

- 11 -

TRAFFIC ARRANGEMENT - POK MAN STREET

********

The Transport Department has made new traffic arrangement for the section of Pok Man Street between Kok Cheung Street extension and House No. 22, Pok Man Street, which is at present routed one way.

As from 10 a.m. on Tuesday, October 24, 1972, the section will be re-routed two-way to improve local traffic circulation.

Appropriate traffic signs will be posted to guide motorists.

-------0---------

RESULTS OF LABOUR ADVISORY BOARD ELECTION

«*«***«**

At an election held at the Labour Department’s Kowloon Regional Office this morning Mr. Lee Shing-chu of Hong Kong Stevedores Union (Chap Yin), and Mr. Leung Tat-shing of U.S.D. Kowloon Workers General Union, were elected as workers’ representatives to be appointed by the Governor as members of the Labour Advisory Board for the year 1973.

The election was supervised by officers of the Labour Department.

The Labour Advisory Board is composed of four employers’ representatives and four workers’ representatives with the Commissioner of Labour as chairman.

Two of the workers’ representatives are elected by registered trade unions of workers and two are selected for appointment by His Excellency the Governor.

-------0---------

Release Time: 2.3Q P«m

PRH 7 4000091

FK|[iw] GIS| h«|

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Sunday, October 22, 1972

PRINCESS TO OPEN BRITISH INDUSTRIAL EXHIBITION TOMORROW • * ¥ i

Her Royal Highness Princess Alexandra will tomorrow (Monday) open the first British Industrial Exhibition ever to be held in Hong Kong.

The Princess, accompanied by her husband, the Hon. Angus Ogilvy, will arrive at the Exhibition ground on the Wanchai reclamation at 3 p.m.

She will be greeted by the Senior British Trade Commissioner, Mr.

T.W. Aston, and industrial and trade leaders in Hong Kong. ..

There are 60 stands of varying sizes, displaying a wide variety of

British industrial products and services.

The Princess will make a tour of the stands after she has declared the exhibition open.

Earlier in the day, the Princess will pay a visit to Police Headquarters in Arsenal Street, where she will meet senior Police officials.

She will unveil a plague at a newly-completed extension to Police Headquarters.

After the unveiling ceremony, she will go to the Arsenal Street Rank and File Married Quarters where she will visit one of the families living there.

From there, she will proceed to the Police Primary School on the ground floor where she will visit the classrooms and see children at play.

She will conclude her police visit by touring Wanchai Police Station, where she will meet officers and rank and file of the station.

*««*♦*****

/Note to Editors: ........

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong. Tel: 5-233191

Sunday, October 22, 1972

2 -

Note to Editors: Full details of the programme for the

Princess’ visit tomorrow (Monday) will be available for collection from 5 p.m. this afternoon at the G.I.S. Press Room, 6th floor, Beaconsfield House#

-------0---------

PRESS ARRANGEMENTS FOR TOMORROW

********

Note to Editors: H.R.H. Princess Alexandra will visit

Police Headquarters tomorrow morning and in the afternoon she will open the British Industrial Exhibition.

For the morning visit, Press representatives are asked to assemble at the Arsenal Street entrance to the Police Headquarters by 10.30 a.m. For the exhibition opening, they must be in position NOT LATER THAN 2.30 p.m. Photographers will be briefed regarding the tour of the exhibition stands.

-------0----------

Sunday, October 22, 1972

- 3. -

IMMIGRATION DEPARTMENT OFFERS TELEPHONE REQUEST SERVICE

,*»***»

The enquiries section of the Immigration Department has recently introduced a telephone request service for those too busy to call personally at their offices to obtain various kinds of application forms.

The service, which began a few weeks ago, is already showing signs of growing popularity with members of the public.

Previously, requests for various types of application forms had to be made personally by intending applicants or their friends or relatives.

By taking advantage of the easy communication link provided by the telephone, it is now possible for busy working people to have the forms they want mailed to their homes or offices, at no expense to themselves.

All they have to do is to reach for the telephone, call 5-^56065, ask for the enquiries section, and tell the enquiry officer their name and address and the form they have in mind.

The rest will be done by the staff of the department. It normally takes only a day or two for the forms to reach the address supplied by the applicant.

But a spokesman for the department warned those who wish to avail themselves of the service that they must tell the enquiry officer exactly and clearly what they want.

’’This is to avoid misunderstanding and the consequent delay and frustration,” he explained.

/He pointed .......

Sunday, October 22, 1972

- 4 -

He pointed out for example that application forms for the renewal of a passport are quite different from those for the replacement of a passport which has expired.

This new arrangement is part of a series of changes the department is making in an attempt to improve services to members of the public.

"Our ultimate aim is to make our service as simple, convenient and quick for the people as possible," the spokesman said.

The enquiries section, established in 1969, also provides as part of its daily routine a form filling service to those who find this undertaking forbidding.

At present, it is manned by six persons at the Immigration Department headquarters in International Building and by one person at each branch office.

-------0---------

Release Time: ^.00 p.m.

PRH 7 4000091

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Monday, October 23, 1972

PRINCESS ALEXANDRA OPENS BRITISH INDUSTRIAL EXHIBITION

*******

Her Royal Highness Princess Alexandra spoke of the industry and enterprise of the people of Hong Kong when she opened the British Industrie? Exhibition in Wanchai this (Monday) afternoon.

She said the people of Hong Kong had achieved much, not only in •-

building up one of the most successful economic structures in the modern world, but also in their determined efforts to improve the quality of life for all who live in this heavily populated area.

The Senior British Trade Commissioner, Mr. T.W. Aston said it was the first time that Britain had staged in Hong Kong an all British Exhibition in their own exhibition hall. He invited all the citizens of Hong Kong to come and see the exhibition.

After declaring open the Exhibition, the Princess spent more than au hour touring the exhibition stalls.

The following is the text of the Princess Alexandra’s speech:

”1 am pleased to have an opportunity to re-visit Hong Kong, and in the five years since I was last here I realize that a very great deal has beer done. The people of Hong Kong have always been noted for their industry enterprise, and they have achieved much, not only in building up one of the most successful economic structures in the modern world, but also in their determined efforts to improve the quality of life for all who live in thir heav

/populated

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong. Tel: 5-233191

Monday, October 23, 1972

- 2 -

populated area. New housing and schools, new factories and new offices have been or are being built, and I understand that plans have been made for many ambitious projects in the future.

’’British firms, including many of those exhibiting here today, have for long been closely connected with Hong Kong’s growth and development, and today’s Exhibition should be the means of continuing and strengthening that tradition of co-operation of which British industry is so proud. The Exhibition covers a very wide range of the most up-to-date goods and services, and I hope that it will prove to be a most useful and successful enterprise for all concerned.

’’Ladies and Gentlemen, it gives me much pleasure to declare open the British Industrial Exhibition?*

*»««****

Note to Editors: Copies of the text of Mr. Aston’s speech

are distributed separately in the Press Boxes, G.I.S.

-------0---------

Monday, October 2J, 1972

- 3 -

PRINCESS ALEXANDRA PAYS FIRST VISIT TO POLICE HEADQUARTERS AS HONORARY COMMANDANT GENERAL ********

Princess Alexandra, -who is Honorary Commandant General of the Royal Hong Kong Police, visited Police Headquarters this (Monday) morning*

To commemorate her first visit to the Headquarters, Her Royal Highness unveiled a plaque at the building now under construction as an extension to the headquarters complex.

Speaking at the unveiling ceremony, she said:

MI am always amazed nt the cfp°ed with which things can be done in Hong Kong. I understand that detailed planning for this great building was only started five years ago, that its actual construction began in July 1971« and that in less than a year the work will be finished, and Hong Kong will then surely possess one of the finest Police Headquarters in the world. *

’’All of you must be very aware that you are Members of a rapidly expanding Force. The new building will make room for many of your specialist branches, including a Criminal Investigation Department equipped with modern scientific and technical aids, and new or enlarged units to deal with the problems of violent crime, narcotics and corruption, and to provide protection and guidance for the youth of the community. It should do much to help you in your important work.

”To commemorate my first visit to the Headquarters, I have great pleasure in unveiling this plaque.”

- - 0 - -

A

Mdnday, October 23, 1972

THE HON. ANGUS OGILVY SEES CHILDREN PLAY AND WORK

The Hon. Angus Ogilvy, husband of H.R.H. Princess Alexandra, spent 45 minutes this morning seeing the activities and work of the Boys’ and Girls’ Clubs Association at the Wah Fu Children’s Centre.

The Boys’ and Girls* Clubs Association is one of the affiliated associations of the National Association of Youth Clubs in the United Kingdom of which Mr. Ogilvy is the President.

Accompanying him on the visit were Mr. Peter P.F. Chan, President of the Boys’ and Girls’ Clubs Association; Mr. W.I. Cheung, the Chairman, and Mrs. Gennie Lee, General Secretary.

On arrival at the Wah Fu Estate, Mr. Ogilvy stopped outside the Children’s Centre to watch a gymnastics display given by some 20 children of the Centre.

He then toured the two-storey centre which offers facilities in cookery, aft and craft, singing and dancing for children between 8 and 14 years of age.

At the cooking class, he saw children preparing ’’Dim Sum”.

He also watched children playing chess and joined several teenagers for a game of Chinese billiard (Hong Lok Kei).

During his whole tour, Mr. Ogilvy showed keen interest in children and their work, and on occasions stopped and talked to them.

/He was •••••

Monday, October 23» 1972

- 5 -

He was not only interested in the activities in the Centre but also the life of the people living in the Wah Fu Estate as a whole.

At the end of his visit to the Centre, Mr. Ogilvy was served with "Dim Sum” and sandwiches prepared by children attending the cooking class.

He was also presented with gifts, all handicraft, made by children of the Centre.

Before his departure, Mr. Ogilvy made an unscheduled visit to Wah Hong Kindergarten where he saw some 200 small children attending classes.

-------0---------

POSTMAN RETIRING AFTER OVER 31 YEARS1 SERVICE

***»**»»««

A postman, Mr. Cheung Wai, is retiring shortly after serving the Post Office for over 31 years.

To mark his retirement, Mr. Cheung will be presented with a souvenir by Mr. Li Yun-gun, Senior Controller of Posts (Traffic), on behalf of his colleagues on Wednesday (October 25).

The presentation ceremony will take place at 1.55 p.m. at the Sorting Office, General Post Office, Hong Kong.

Note to Editors: You are welcome to have the event covered.

--------0--------- /6......................................

Monday, October 23, 1972

- 6 -

HIGH SETTLEMENT RATE ACHIEVED IN INDUSTRIAL DISPUTES ♦ * ♦ ♦ ♦ * ♦ ♦ ♦

A settlement rate of 7^-9 per cent in industrial disputes has been achieved by the Labour Relations Service of the Labour Department during the third quarter of this year.

Of a total of 1,114 disputes, the Labour Relations Service helped settle 835 during the period.

"This rate is high considering the fact that all cases brought to the Service were taken up in the first instance irrespective of the rights and wrongs of the parties,” said Mr. T.F. Tsui, Senior Labour Officer in charge of the Labour Relations Division.

As a result of settlements reached, a total of $2,119,323 was paid to 2,^88 workers as arrears of wages, payment in lieu of notice under the Employment Ordinance or as ex-gratia severance pay.

Mr. Tsui said most labour problems arose out of disagreement over wage rates, changes in conditions of employment, dismissals, prolonged layoff on redundancy and insolvency of the employer or simply mutual misunderstanding .

The 10 strikes which occurred during the quarter accounted for a total loss of 19,103 man-days, including 18,325 man-days lost as a result of industrial actions in two major dockyards following the announcement by the managements of their intended merger.

/The disputes.............

Monday, October 25, 1972

- 7 -

The disputes in these companies, which arose from the question of retirement grant, have since been settled by the parties themselves.

In settling 22 of the 28 major labour disputes which occurred during the quarters, Mr. Tsui said, ’’Officers of the Labour Relations Service conducted a total of 51 joint meetings of an average duration of three hours each and made 22 visits to the sites of disputes.”

To ensure that there would be no undue delay in the payment of wages to workers affected, the officers made nine visits to sites of factory fires, he said.

In addition, he added, the Service responded to 4,861 consultations and enquires initiated by workers and employers.

’’Officers of the Service visited 52 industrial and commercial establishments to encourage managements to introduce joint consultative arrangements, to prepare written contracts of employment and to work out grievance procedures in order to preserve industrial harmony.”

-------0---------

/8.........

Monday, October 23, 1972

- 8 -

HEAVY OFFICIAL ENGAGEMENTS FOR PRINCESS TOMORROW

*******

Another heavy round of official engagements awaits Her Royal Highness Princess Alexandra tomorrow (Tuesday) — the fourth day of her official visit to Hong Kong.

She will visit two social welfare institutions in the morning.

Her first call will be at the Ebenezer School and Home for the Blind, in Pokfulam, where blind children between five and 14 are sent.

She will visit the School’s gymnasium, the housecraft room, classrooms and the kindergarten.

After the tour, she will fly by helicopter to Kwun Tong for a visit to the Red Cross Residential School which is named after her.

The School was set up ten years ago to provide primary education and residential care for physically-handicapped children.

Emphasis is placed on children taking part in as many normal activities as possible to prepare them for normal life after leaving the school. Extracurricular activities are varied and include picnics, scouting, camping and swimming.

The Princess will be shown round classrooms and dormitories and see children at work.

In the afternoon, the Princess, accompanied by her husband, the Hon. Angus Ogilvy, will travel through the cross-harbour tunnel to Wong Tai Sin for a visit to the Morse Park swimming pool complex.

/More ••••••••

Monday, October 23, 1972

- 9 -

More than 100 boys from the Hong Kong Sea School will put on lifesaving demonstrations for the Royal visitors. There will also be life-saving land drills by members of the Royal Life Saving Society.

From the pool side, the Princess will watch young children taking swimming lessons.

Returning to Hong Kong Island, Her Royal Highness will travel to V/anchai to take a personal look at the current ’’Clean Hong Kong11 campaign, which is now in full swing.

She• will walk through several ’’lap sap11 black spots in the area and see cleaning operations in progress.

The Princess’ last engagement of the day will be a Review of the Royal Hong Kong Police and Auxiliary Police Forces at the Government Stadium.

She will inspect the paracle from a landrover. During the hour-long ceremony, she will present medals to a number of police officers.

The Governor and Lady MacLehose will also attend the parade.

Note to Editors: Full details of tomorrow’s programme are

distributed separately in the press boxes this evening.

-------0---------

/10..........

Monday, October 23, 1972

- 10 -

N.T.A. ANNUAL DEPARTMENTAL REPORT PUBLISHED

******** K • ’ *

The Departmental Report by the District Commissioner, New Territories, for the year 1971-72 has been published.

The report gives a detailed accounts on the development in the New Territories, including the Lantau and some other small islands, during the last financial year.

Major development projects such as the Kwai Chung Container Port, Sha Tin and Castle Peak new town planning* High Island Water Scheme, Kwai Chung/Tsing Yi bridge and the recommended four country parks, are included in this 63-page report.

It also details the development plans in the voluntary agency sector, the provision of more school places, the low-cost housing programme and some other local public works items.

Copies of the report, at 88.50 each, can be purchased from the Government Publications Centre at the Star Ferry Concourse and various District Offices of the Nev/ Territories Administration.

------- 0 - • • w

Monday, October 23, 1972

- 11 -

VISITS TO FAMILIES INVOLVED IN REHOUSING SCHEME

*********

Officers of the Rehousing Unit of the Resettlement Department today began a door-to-door visit to some 110 families involved in the first phase of the Shek Kip Mei Rehousing Scheme who have not yet handed in their application for accommodation at Pak Tin Estate.

A spokesman for the Resettlement Department said that most cf these Jami lies might have some form of personal problem which had delayed them in making their application.

f,The purpose of the visit is to find out what their problems are and what form of assistance is needed," he said.

An earlier round of family visit made immediately following the announcement of the rehousing scheme had proved to be very successful.

Resettlement Department officers called on more than 1,800 families involved in the scheme and explained to them purpose of the project and what benefits they can get from it.

f,Most of the tenants visited showed appreciation of the officers1 effort and their untiring manner," the spokesman said.

"We believe that the co-operation and willingness displayed by the tenants is partly the result of these goodwill visits," he concluded. • • - • • •

The Rehousing Unit at Pak Tin Estate has so far received a total of 1,760 applications covering about 10,400 people.

i

This represents more than 95 per cent of the total number of aj^plication forms the Resettlement Department sent out to the 10,861 tenants of Blocks 23 to 28 of Shek Kip Mei resettlement estate.

-------0--------

/12.........

Monday, October 25, 1972

- 12 -

NEW PLAYGROUND FOR YUHI LONG VILLAGERS

!*«***»**

A 12,000 sq. ft. playground has been built for the benefit of the 3,000 people in Shui Tau and Shui Mei Villages in Yuen Long.

Situated next to the fish ponds in the Shui Mei Village, the playground has an excellent setting.

Its beauty and tranquility are further enhanced by a number of willow trees planted at the water-verge.

Park benches are placed under the shade of the trees for villagers to rest after work.

On the other hand, children in the village can enjoy themselves with the various types of playground equipment like swings, merry-go-round, rocking horse and see-saw.

This playground was completed at a total cost of 562,000.

-------0---------

/13.........

Monday, October 23, 1972

- 13 -

ANTI-DIPHTHERIA AND TETANUS CAMPAIGN

****»*$«

Figures released by the Medical and Health Department today show that a total of 19,876 doses of the combined anti-diphtheria and tetanus vaccine was administered during the first week of the current campaign against the two diseases.

The campaign began on October 9, and will continue until the end of the year.

Of the total, 959 doses were administered on the Island, 9,4^8 in Kowloon, and 9,459 in the New Territories.

The vaccine is available free at all government clinics.

-------0--------- ’■

WATER INTERRUPTION IN KOWLOON TONG

*******

Water supply to a number of premises in Kowloon Tong will be turned off temporarily for eight hours from 10’ p.fn‘.‘ tomorrow (October 24) to 6 a.m. the next day. . .

The Waterworks Office will carry out work on connecting fresh water mains at Beacon Hill and Lung Cheung Road during this period.

The premises affected are in Beacon Hill Road, Rhondda Road, Alnwick Road, Eastbourne Road, Ede Road north of Warwick Road, Pilgrims Way, Fessenden Road, Marconi Road and Broadcast Drive, including the Local Government Officers1 Housing Blocks.

-------0---------

/14.........

Monday, October 23, 1972

- 14 -

PRINCESS ALEXANDRA BRIEFED ON PROBLEMS OF POLICING

*********

Her Royal Highness Princess Alexandra was today briefed on the problems of policing Wanchai, one of the most densely populated areas on Hong Kong Island.

The briefing was given by Mr. H.K. Cheng, Divisional Superintendent, Wanchai, and Mr. A. Philip, the Assistant Divisional Superintendent, Wanchai, during the Princess* visit to the Wanchai Police Station shortly after noon today.

During her tour of the station, the Princess showed keen interest in the work of the C.I.D. and also the statue of Kwan Tai who is revered by all police detectives in Hong Kong.

The Princess also inspected the report room where she asked many questions about the types of reports received at the station.

Note to Editors: Copies of a photograph showing H.R.H.

Princess Alexandra during her visit to the Wanchai police station today are distributed separately in the G.I.S. Press Boxes this evening.

Monday, October 25, 1972

- 15 -

PRINCESS ALEXANDRA VISITS POLICEMEN’S FAMILIES

**«««»«**

Her Royal Highness Princess Alexandra paid a visit to Sgt. Leung Sung and his family at their home in the Arsenal Street rank and file married quarters this (Monday) morning.

Her Royal Highness made the visit shortly after unveiling a plaque at a building.now under construction as an extension to the police headquarters complex.

Sgt. Leung, who has been in the force for 19 years, introduced the Princess to his wife, Mrs. Leung Chan Po-chu, his two daughters, Wai-ching, 11, and Wai-ying, 10 and his nine-year-old son, Wai-yip.

Princess Alexandra asked Sgt. Leung how long he has been in the force and what were his present duties. She asked Mrs. Leung about her housework and the children’s education.

After the Princess left the flat, the children were asked how they felt at having met Her Royal Highness. They said that they were very nervous and excited and hoped that they could have an opportunity of meeting the Princess again.

Many of Sgt. Leung’s neighbours stood at the doorway of their homes to catch a glimpse of the Princess as she passed by them.

The Princess took the opportunity of making impromptu visits to a number of flats along the way. She asked the occupants many questions about their daily lives.

/The Princess • •.....

Monday, October 25, 1972

- 16 -

The Princess also stopped along the way to speak to children who had gathered along the corridor to see the Princess. They all expressed excitement at being able to speak to the Princess.

Note to Editors; Copies of photograph showing Princess

Alexandra during her visit to the policeman’s

family are distributed separately in the G.I.S. j

Press Boxes this evening.

/17...........

Monday, October 23, 1972

- 17 -

PRESS ARRANGEMENTS FOR PRINCESS’ ENGAGEMENTS TOMORROW

Note to Editors:

Her Royal Highness Princess Alexandra will visit the Ebenezer School in Pok Fu Lam tomorrow (Tuesday) morning. Official transport will be provided. The press bus will leave Queen’s Pier at 9*45

From the Ebenezer School, the Princess will drive to the Hong Kong University Sports Ground to board a helicopter for her next engagement at Kwun Tong. Due to the time factor and parking difficulties at the school, it will not be possible for the Press party from the Ebenezer School to follow her to the Sports Ground. Transport will be available at Queen’s Pier to take the Press to Pok Fu Lam. The bus will leave from the Pier at 10.30 a.m.

For Her Royal Highness’ visit to the Princess Alexandra Red Cross School, transport will be provided. The bus will depart from the Kowloon Public Pier at 10.15 a.m. and return to Tsim Sha Tsui about 1 p.ra.

In the afternoon, the Princess will pay a visit to the Morse Park Swimming Pool complex. Official transport will be provided. The bus will leave the Kowloon Public Pier at 1.45 p.m. and return to the Pier at about 4.30 p.m.

From Morse Park, the Princess will visit several streets in Wanchai and see cleansing operations connected with the ’’Clean Hong Kong” campaign. Press representatives should assemble at the junction of Stone Nullah Lane and Queen’s Road East at 3*30 p.m.

For the police review at the Government Stadium tomorrow evening, Press representatives should be in position by 5*30 p.m.

---------------------------------0--------- Release Times 7*30 p.m.

PRH 7 4000091

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Tuesday, October 24, 1972

ANNUAL POLICE REVIEW

Princess Proud To Be Connected With Force

********

Her Royal Highness Princess Alexandra received a brooch in the form of the badge of the Royal Hong Kong Police to mark her becoming the Honorary Commandant General of the Force this (Tuesday) evening.

The brooch was presented to the Princess by the Commissioner of Police, Mr. C.P. Sutcliffe, during the Annual Police Review at the Government Stadium.

Her Royal Highness was accompanied by her husband, the Hon. Angus Ogilvy.

The Review was attended by the Governor and Lady MacLehose.

Princess Alexandra inspected the 8^0 men on parade from a landrover and presented medals to 12 officers.

Addressing the men on parade, she said their reputation for courage, steadfastness and devotion to duty stood high not only in Hong Kong but also in the world, and told them she was proud to be connected with such a Force.

The following is the full text of Princess Alexandra’s speech:

"I am delighted to be with you today on the occasion of your Annual Review, and to have this opportunity of seeing representatives from every Division and Unit.

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

/”I would .......

Tuesday, October 24, 1972

- 2 -

"I would like, too, to tell you all how touched I am to receive from Hong Kong this beautiful brooch to mark my becoming your Honorary Commandant General, and I do thank everyone concerned for such a delightful present.

’’The Government has entrusted to you the task of keeping the peace in Hong Kong, and maintaining that stability and safety for all its citizens which the proper observance of law and order can achieve, and in carrying out this duty you deserve the support of every member of the community.

"It is a heavy responsibility for, like most other Police Forces (including those in the United Kingdom) you have to deal with many difficult problems in the complex society of the 1970’s, but it is a responsibility which I feel convinced has been placed in the right hands.

"I know that your reputation for courage, steadfastness and devotion to duty stands high in Hong Kong; I also know that it stands high in the world, • < *'

for men and women of your calibre are rare. I feel very proud to be connected

• with such a Force.”

-------0---------

Tuesday, October 24, 1972

- 3 -

GOVERNMENT TO CONDUCT 1973 CENSUS OF INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION

*********

Government is to conduct a comprehensive census of industrial production relating to the year 1973*

The census, first of its kind in Hong Kong, aims at collecting information about employment, labour cost, materials and products, local sales and exports, investment expenditure and stocks of fixed assets.

A spokesman of the Census and Statistics Department said today the time has come for Hong Kong to collect industrial statistics to enable local manufacturers, overseas buyers, research agencies and intending investors to have a thorough understanding of the manufacturing sector.

He said industrial statistics are also required for purposes of industrial development, Government policy-making and trade negotiations.

During the next few months, the department will carry out a series of consultative talks with local manufacturers.

The first has started this week with textile manufacturers to obtain their views on the suitability of questionnaires’ to be used for the 1973 census of industrial production.

The spokesman said that manufacturers would be advised by letter in advance before being approached for consultation.

Census Supervisors of the department who’ have recently completed intensive training will visit those manufacturers who have received a letter of notification. - - ......

/While .........

Tuesday, October 24, 1972

While on duty, they will carry with them a Government Identity Card, the spokesman said.

In July and August last year, a census of manufacturing establishments was taken, which enables a master list of factories to be compiled for the purpose of the 1975 census. <

-------o---------

MEDICAL SPECIALIST RETIRING AFTER 18 YEARS' SERVICE

********

Dr. R.J. Barnes, Specialist (Medicine) in the Medical and Health Department, is retiring after more than 18 years of service to the people of Hong Kong.

He first joined the Government as a Medical and Health Officer in 1954, becoming a Senior Medical and Health Officer five years later.

He was promoted to his present post in 1965*

Dr. Barnes and Mrs. Barnes will be honoured at a tea reception in the canteen of the Queen Elizabeth Hospital at 11 a.m. on lYiday, October 27, when friends and colleagues will bid them a happy retirement.

Dr. G.H. Choa, Director of Medical and Health Services, will take the occasion to present Dr. Barnes with a souvenir.

********

Note to Editors: You are invited to have the presentation

ceremony covered.

/5.........

Tuesday, October 24, 1972

- 5 -

PRINCESS TO OPEN POLYCLINIC IN KWAI CHUNG TOMORROW

* »**♦♦♦#*

Her Royal Highness Princess Alexandra will open a new polyclinic in South Kwai Chung when she spends the whole afternoon tomorrow (Wednesday) in the fast-developing Tsuen Wan/Kwai Chung industrial township.

She will visit a garment factory and the Community Centre which bears her name.

■ The South Kwai Chung Jockey Club Polyblinic, which the Princess will open, is the fourth Government clinic in the Tsuen Wan/Kwai Chung area.

Built with a $2.7 million donation from the Royal Hong Kong Jockey Club, the Polyclinic will provide essential medical and health services to the 300,000 residents living in the area.

Her Royal Highness will unveil a plaque to mark the opening of the polyclinic in a ceremony to be attended by people closely connected with the project.

Her next stop will be the Manhattan Garments Factory in Kwai Cheong Street, Tsuen Wan, where she will see for herself some aspects of one of Hong Kong’s most important manufacturing industries.

From there, she will go on to the Princess Alexandra Community Centre, which was named after her during her 19^1 official visit to Hong Kong.

The Centre is one of the six community or social centres run by the Social Welfare Department. It provides facilities for a number of welfare services and serves as a focal point for social, cultural, recreational and community activities.

/The Princess ........

Tuesday, October 24, 1972

- 6 -

The Princess will tour nurseries, libraries and other facilities organised by the Social Welfare Department and voluntary welfare agencies.

To conclude the day, Her Royal Highness and Mr. Ogilvy will attend the Royal Hong Kong Auxiliary Police Ball at the Hilton Hotel with the Governor and Lady MacLehose.

Note to Editors: Full details of tomorrow’s programme are

distributed separately in the press boxes this evening.

-------0---------

Tuesday, October 24, 1972

- 7 -

MEDICAL AND HEALTH STATISTICS

****■««*

Statistics released today by the Medical and Health Department for the week ended October 7 are as follows

* Notifications of infectious cases (previous weekrs figures in brackets) — total 185 (157); amoebiasis — nil (two); bacillary dysentery — seven (12); chickenpox — one (one); tuberculosis — 166 (126); diphtheria — nil (one); enteric fever (typhoid) — five(ten); enteric fever (paratyphoid) — nil (one); leprosy — three (nil); measles — nil (one); ophthalmia neonatorum — two (one); malaria — (fresh case) — nil (two); and puerperal fever — one (one).

* Births — total registered 1,755; 459 on Hong Kong Island, 1,060 in Kowloon, and 2J6 in the New Territories.

* Deaths — 556 from all causes; 151 on the Island, 206 in Kowloon and 19 in the New Territories.

-------0---------

REMOVAL OF DOG INOCULATION AND LICENSING CENTRE

The dog inoculation and licensing centre in V/aterloo Road, Kowloon Tong, vn 11 move to a new centre located opposite the Canton Road Government Offices at 593 Canton Road, Kowloon, as from 9 a.m. on Thursday (October 26).

The new centre will be open on Thursdays and Fridays from 9 a.m. to 12 noon, and 12.45 p.m. to 4.50 p.m., and on Saturdays from 9 a.m. to 11.50 a.m. It will be closed on public holidays.

-------0---------

/8.........

Tuesday, October 24, 1972

- 8 -

TOMORROW'S PRESS TRANSPORT ARRANGEMENTS

**********

Note to Editors:

Official transport will be provided for Press representatives covering tomorrow’s (Wednesday) visits by H.R.H. Princess Alexandra to South Kwai Chung Jockey Club Polyclinic* Manhattan Garments Factory in Tsuen Wan and the Princess Alexandra Community Centre.

For the polyclinic visit, the Press bus will leave from Kowloon Public Pier at 1.15 p«m. taking the Press to Kwai Chung.

Coverage of the visit to Manhattan Garments Factory will be handled by the Press party at the Polyclinic. The Press bus will leave immediately after the opening ceremony and go direct to Kwai Cheung Street to await the arrival of the Royal party. After the factory visit, the Press will be taken back to Kowloon Public Pier.

For the visit to the Princess Alexandra Community Centre, the Press bus will leave the Kowloon Public Pier at 2.45 p.m.

-------0 - - - -

•** j 1

/9........

Tuesday, October 24, 1972

- 9 -

FIFTY FAMILIES OFFERED TENANCY AT PAK TIN ESTATE TODAY * *«*♦♦♦**♦

Mr. and Mrs. Ng Po-wah today became the first tenants of Pak Tin Estate under the Shek Kip Mei Rehousing Scheme when they received the key to their flat this morning.

At a brief ceremony held at the door-step of their new home, they were presented with the key by Mr. Fung Tung, Housing Manager of the Estate.

The couple was among 50 families offered tenancy at the Estate today. Mr. Ng, a carpenter, and his family live at Block 23 of Shek Kip Mei Resettlement Estate.

Under the Rehousing Scheme, tenants of Blocks 23 and 28 are to be rehoused in Pak Tin. The vacated blocks will be converted and improved.

The Ng family will probably move into Pak Tin early next month soon after completing the decoration of their new home.

The family of eight have been offered a double letting at Block A of Pak Tin Estate at a monthly rental of 876.

Mrs. Ng said she was glad to be able to get a better and larger flat at the Estate in such a short time — only 20 days after the Rehousing Scheme was announced.

She said that at Shek Kip Mei, they were living in a very crowded condition. ”My daughters have to sleep in a cockloft and my sons either on the floor or in the corridor,” she said.

/”We have to...........

Tuesday, October 24, 1972

- 10 -

,fWe have to cook our meals in the corridor and in bad weather, things would be even worse; but all these will become things of the past,” she added.

However, the housewife said they were happy that they would be able to live in much better surrounding and ”we are looking forward to this.”

All 10,861 people involved in the present stage of the rehousing programme will be offered accommodation at Pak Tin Estate.

The Housing Manager of the Estate said about 80 tenancies would be offered daily from now on.

He estimated that at least 800 families - about half of them *

involved in the current stage of the rehousing scheme - would have already moved into Pak Tin by the end of this month.

-------0---------

/11 ...........

Tuesday, October 24, 1972

- 11 -

LICENSING OF NEW TAXIS

*********

The Transport Department announced today (Tuesday) that, in connection with the 350 taxi licences for which tenders have been called, only new (not secondhand) vehicles will be licensed.

A department spokesman said taxis cover a high daily mileage and it is unsatisfactory that they should start their life in Hong Kong in less than new mechanical condition.

Although secondhand taxis may pass an initial mechanical inspection by the Transport Department before licensing, the spokesman said, they are likely to deteriorate rapidly, with excessive exhaust smoke.

’’This measure will also apply to replacement vehicles in respect of existing taxi licences,” he added.

Release Time: 7.45 p.m.

PRH 7 4000091

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Wednesday, October 25, 1972

MR. I.M. LIGHTBODY TO BE APPOINTED SECRETARY FOR HOUSING

*******

Mr. I.M. Lightbody, the present Commissioner for Resettlement, is to be appointed Secretary for Housing and will take charge of the new Housing Department.

During his speech to the opening session of the Legislative Council, the Governor announced plans to streamline the organisation of departments responsible for public housing so that they would be better able to cope with the major task of building homes for 1.8 million people during the next 10 years.

”To give the programme support and thrust which it demands, we therefore propose to make a fresh start," the Governor said.

The new Housing Department, which will be established on April 1, '1973* will be responsible, in cooperation with the Public Works Department, for carrying through all aspects of this public housing programme in Hong Kong, including town planning, construction and the administration of the new Estates.

The department will therefore be able to provide all services required to implement the policy of the new Housing Authority which will shortly assume overall responsibility for public housing.

Air. Donald Liao, ........

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Wednesday, October 25, 1972

- 2 -

Mr. Donald Liao, the present Commissioner for Housing, will retain his present responsibilities until April, 1973» when he will assume a key position in the new conception of housing administration.

It is expected that Mr. Lightbody will shortly cease to be Commissioner for Resettlement so that he can concentrate on the necessary planning of the new Housing Authority and Department, and 'that Mr. J.C.C. Walden will temporarily take over the post of Commissioner for Resettlement.

-------0---------

/3........

Wednesday, October 25» 1972

- 3 -

PRINCESS ALEXANDRA OPENS POLYCLINIC AT KWAI CHUNG

Ideal Combination Of Community Effort

Her Royal Highness Princess Alexandra today opened the South Kwai Chung Jockey Club Polyclinic, near the industrial town of Tsuen Wan in the New Territories.

Speaking at the opening ceremony, the Princess said: "The provision of adequate medical services for the fast .growing city of Hong Kong seems to have been achieved in a remarkably competent way by the efforts of voluntary organisations, private individuals and the Government — surely the ideal combination for anything involving the well-being of every member of a community,"

The Director of Medical and Health Services, Dr. G.H. Choa spoke briefly on the need for such a polyclinic in the growing industrial town, referring in particular to some of the services that it would be providing*. He thanked the Royal Hong Kong Jockey Club for its generous donation towards construction of the polyclinic.

He then invited Her Royal Highness to unveil a plaque and to declare the polyclinic open.

The polyclinic is designed to serve the population in the rapidly developing Tsuen Wan*Kwai Chung township. The first stage, now completed, consists of a three*storey standard urban clinic and maternity home, and a two-storey chest clinic and chest X-ray centre.

/Stage II •••••••

Wednesday, October 25, 1972

- 4 -

Stage II will consist of a specialist clinic and a rehabilitation centre.

Capital cost of Stage I of the project, estimated at 82.7 million, was met by a donation of 82.7 million by the Royal Hong Kong Jockey Clubt with the Government paying for the furniture equipment and the annual cost of operating the polyclinic.

The following is the text of the speech by Her Royal Highness:

’The provision of adequate medical services for the fast growing city of Hong Kong seems to have been achieved in a remarkably competent way by the efforts of voluntary organizations, private individuals and the Government - surely the ideal combination for anything involving the well-being of every member of a community.

’•This Polyclinic, designed to serve the people of a very heavily populated area, has been to a large extent made possible by the generous donations of the Royal Hong Kong Jockey Club and is, I understand, the first stage in an ambitious project which will eventually provide specialist services for many men, women and children.

’’Great credit is due to all who have contributed towards the design and construction of this Medical Centre, and to the Government who helped so much by providing funds for the furniture and special equipment, and who will staff and run it.

’’All together, the final outcome is a Centre of which Hong Kong can be justly proud, and it therefore gives me the greatest pleasure to declare open the Tsuen Wan and Kwai Chung Jockey Club polylinic.”

-------0-----------

/5........

Wednesday, October 25, 1972

- 5 -

AIM OF THE TEN-YEAR HOUSING PROGRAMME

The aim of the housing programme announced by the Governor in the Legislative Council last week is to provide homes for enough people so that squatter huts will become a thing of the past, and to improve living conditions in the densely crowded urban areas and in public housing estates of today#

Homes for many hundreds of thousands are also required to clear land for development to meet emergencies and to provide for renewal and improvement of the old tenement areas of Hong Kong and Kowloon.

At the same time the population is growing so that the combined efforts of the public and the private sectors have to meet the need for homes for a 18*5 per cent increase in population over the ten-year period in addition to meeting these other objectives.

A government spokesman said: "It is hoped that this programme will eliminate the housing shortage which, despite the fact that 1.6 million people have already been housed in public housing estates, continues to be one of our remaining problems and, as the Governor had said, ’one of the continuing and major sources of friction between Government and the people.’"

To accomplish this programme, the Tsuen Wan conurbation, Shatin and Tuen Mun will each undergo immense changes and engineering development to provide land for homes for half a million more people in each of these towns•

/Not only ••••«•

Wednesday, October 25, 1972

- 6 -

Not only homes will be required. Roads to the new towns will be needed, and schools, clinics, police stations, welfare buildings, parks and playgrounds must be built and work provided if the towns are to be made pleasant and acceptable places to live in.

The spokesman said that the target figure had been arrived at by assessing the number of people who would require housing now to meet the main objectives.

This figure was 940,000, comprising 320,000 squatters or occuptants licensed areas, 60,000 occupants of cottage areas, 430,000 tenants of ‘ resettlement estates involved in renewal schemes or so over crov/ded that they need larger accommodation, 80,000 unsatisfactorily housed in some new Territories towns and marine population of 50,000 requiring rehousing ashorn, including boat squatters.

In addition, an allowance must also be made for those people who are at present adequately housed in Government housing, but who will become inadequately housed during the ten-year period because of population growth. This is expected to be 200,000.

Finally, an element for the expected shortfall in the private sector must be token into account.The total population in housing in the private sector on April 1, 1973 Is estimated to be 1,820,000 of whom 310,000 require rehousing if each household is to have a self-contained dwelling.

Taking into account the estimated 18.5 per cent population growth and the net gain of 500,000 spaces expected in the private sector over this ICUyear period, there is likely to be a shortfall of 148,000 spaces for which provision lias been made in the grand target of 1.8 million spaces.

This target is aimedprincipal^ at the urban areas but in addition rehousing for many thousands living in poor conditions in the New Territories will be needed.

/7.......

Wednesday, October 25, 1972

- 7 -

PRINCESS ALEXANDRA GOES SHOPPING *«***«$

H.R.H. Princess Alexandra, accompanied by her husband, the Hon. Angus Ogilvy, spent more than half an hour this morning shopping at the Welfare Handicrafts Shop at Salisbury Road, Kowloon.

The Royal couple were met at the shop by Mrs. S. Archer, Chairman of the Management Committee of Welfare Handicrafts; and Mrs. M. Taylor, the shop supervisor.

Looking radiant in a black and white printed dress with black handbag and matching shoes, the Princess showed keen interest in the products displayed in the shop.

The Royal couple were intrigued by the numerous attractive items of pewter products, soft toys, Chinese dolls, pyjamas and embroidered handbags. They fnnally bought a few pewter ash trays, pen holders and embroidered egg cosys.

Their visit attracted a big crowd outside the shop and tourists were seen busily taking out their cameras to take pictures of the Royal visitors.

When she stepped out from the shop, Princess Alexandra stopped to shake hands and say •hello’ to the on-lookers.

The Salisbury Road Welfare Handicrafts Shop was opened in June 1956 by a Management Committee appointed by the Hong Kong Council of Social Service.

The shop is a non-profit-making sales organisation designed to help member agencies of the Council to market goods made by people in need of aid. In return, the agencies help and train people who are socially and physically handicapped so that they may become self-supporting.

/There .........

Wednesday, October 25* ^972

There are four such Welfare Handicrafts shops in Hong Kong. About 800 people are helped by them each month.

********

Note to Editors: . Copies of a photograph showing the

Princess shopping are distributed in the G.I.S. Press Boxes this evening.

- - 0 -

TRAFFIC RE-ROUTING IN POTTINGER STREET

The section of Pottinger Street between Connaught' Road Central and

Des Voeux Road Central will be re-routed one-way from south to north from

10 a.m. on Friday (October 27)•

This will enable traffic on Queen’s Road Central and Des Voeux Road

Central to link directly with the newly widened part of Connaught Road Central

Appropriate signs will be placed to guide motorists«

- - 0 - -

/9

i

Wednesday, October 25, 1972

- 9 -

H.R.H. PRINCESS ALEXANDRA LEAVING TOMORROW

********

Her Royal Highness Princess Alexandra is leaving Hong Kong tomorrow (Thursday) at the end of a six-day official visit.

The Princess and her husband, the Hon. Angus Ogilvy, will be seen off at the airport by the Governor and Lady MacLehose, at about 3 p.m*

Earlier, at Queen’s Pier, the Royal couple will say good-bye to people of Hong Kong before boarding the "Lady Maurine" for the airport.

She will be greeted by a 21-gun salute as the "Lady Maurine" passes H.M.S. Tamar. In the Hung Hom Fairway, she will review two squadrons of Marine Police Launches.

Note to Editors: Full details of tomorrow’s programme are

distributed separately in the G.I.S. Press boxes this evening.

Wednesday, October 25, 1972

10

MORE JOB-SEEKERS HELPED FIND EMPLOYMENT

The Local Employment Service of the Labour Department registered 9,531 job-seekers and introduced 5,611 of them to employers for selection interviews in the third quarter of 1972.

Of these, 1,797 were successfully placed in employment, representing an increase of 106 per cent over the corresponding quarter of 1971 and an increase of 56 per cent over the second quarter of this year.

Of the 1,797 people placed in employment, 893 were placed in industry, 5°6 in commercet5O7 in Government service, 38 in the public utilities and 53 in other establishments.

Seven of the successful applicants received an initial salary of $1,000 or more; 519 started work at salaries of $500 - $999; 1108 at $300 - $499 and 5&3 at below $500.

Of the 893 people placed in industry, 425 were apprentices who were helped to enter into modern apprenticeship schemes by the Apprenticeship Training Unit of the Labour Department.

At present, there are 9,445 job-seekers registered with the Service, varying from the young and inexperienced, to experienced and qualified persons looking for better employment.

The Service has on its books 597 vacancies, ranging from executive to office boy in commerce, engineer to general worker in industry and artisan to messenger in the civil service.

/The Local

Wednesday, October 25, 1972

- 11 -

The Local Employment Service provides free facilities to assist employers and job-seekers alike.

Job-seekers are invited to register personally at any branch of the Service, bringing with them their identity card and a passport-size photograph.

Employers with vacancies which they wish to fill are invited to telephone any office of the Service at the following addresses

* New Rodney Building, 99, Queensway, Ground floor, Hong Kong. Tel. 5-249081 E. 70 & 77.

* Canton Road Government Offices, Fourth floor, Kowloon. Tel. >688131 & 3-675514.

* Post Office Building, First floor, Un Chau Street, Shamshuipo, Kowloon. Tel. 3-875837•

* Kwun Tong District Branch Office Building, Second floor, Tung Yan Street, Kwun Tong, Kowloon, Tel. >896539.

* Chartered Bank Building, Third floor, Sha Tsui Road, Tsuen Wan, New Territories. Tel. 12-216722.

-------0--------

/12..........

Wednesday, October 25, 1972

- 12 -

&

PRESS ARRANGEMENTS FOR PRINCESS’ DEPARTURE

I********

Note to Editors;

Her Royal Highness Princess Alexandra will be at Queen’s Pier tomorrow (Thursday) afternoon to say goodbye to a number of people assembled inside the pier.

For this occasion, press arrangements are similar to those for the arrival of the Princess at the same place last Saturday, except that Position ”D” will not be formed. All Press representatives should be in position by 2 p.m. All the Press positions are static, and it will not be possible for press representatives to move from one position to another.

For press coverage of Princess Alexandra’s departure at Kai Tak Airport, press arrangements will be similar to those for the arrival last Saturday. There will be a photographic position on the tarmac near the aircraft steps while reporters will be accommodated in a position alongside the apron access road.

Television and newsreel teams using cameras on tripods will be able to use the roof of the western passenger finger.

Press representatives are requested to assemble outside the Press Room in the Kai Tak Airport Terminal Building by 2.15 p.m.

• • » » • r •

-------o---------

/13..........

Wednesday, October 25» 1972

-IM-

PRESS CONFERENCE ON NEW PROGRAMME OF RADIO H.K. TV ********

Note to Editors: A Press conference will be held tomorrow

(Thursday) to announce a new programme of Radio Hong Kong Television.

The conference will take place at 10.30 a.m. at Studio I of Radio Hong Kong (Television), Broadcasting House, Broadcast Drive, Kowloon.

Representatives of the Press are cordially invited to attend. Transport will be provided. Press representatives are requested to assemble at the car park of the Tsim Sha Tsui Post Office at 10 a.m. tomorrow (Thursday) morning.

-------0---------

TEMPORARY WATER CHARGES COLLECTION CENTRE

»«««**«*

Temporary collecting centre will be set up by the Tai Po District

Office at Shatin for the collection of water charges for the third quarter of 1972.

The collection centre at Shatin will operate at the Shatin Rural

Committee Office on October 27 from 9»00 a.m. to 2.00 p.m.

Residents of the Shatin district are invited to use these facilities which are provided for their convenience.

-------0---------

/14

Wednesday, October 25, 1972

- 14 -

TEMPORARY WATER SUPPLY INTERRUPTION

*******

Water supply to a number of premises in Shek Kip Mei area will be turned off for five hours from 1 a.m. on Friday (October 27)*

The temporary water supply interruption is to enable works to be carried out on leakage test in the area.

The area to be affected is bounded by Nam Cheong Street, Wai Chi Street, Wor Chai Street, Tai Hang Tung Road and Tai Hang Sai Street, including Hong Kong Settlers Housing Corporation.

-------0----------

POSSIBLE BAN ON MIRROR WINDOWS IN CARS

*c*t**t*t*t*c*

The Commissioner for Transport announced today (Wednesday) that he intends to seek a change in the legislation so as to ban the use of mirror windows in motor vehicles.

He said this type of glass, although not prohibited under existing legislation, can reflect the sun and blind other drivers.

In view of the possibility of a legal ban on mirror windows, the Commissioner advised motorists not to install reflective material on their vehicle windows.

-------0----------

/15.........

Wednesday, October 25, 1972

- 15 -

APPLICATION FOR LEAVE TO ATTEND CONFERENCE

****«*»«

A Government spokesman today described as ’’far from accurate” certain remarks made during yesterday’s opening of the Public Services International (P.S.I.) Third Asian Regional Conference concerning the granting of leave to civil servants to attend the conference•

He said the Colonial Secretary had personally given instruction that any civil servants who applied for leave to attend the conference should be allowed to do so.

He was referring to the remarks* published in today's newspapers, which all Aged that civil servants had been prevented from attending the conference because of Government’s refusal to grant them special leave.

The spokesman explained that one of the Staff Associations affiliated to the P.S.I. applied in writing to the Establishment Secretary on October 11, 1972, for special leave for five of its members so that they could attend the conference from October 2^ to 26, 1972.

Other five staff associations submitted their applications to the head of the departments concerned at about the same time, he said.

”In accordance with the practice first laid down in May 1970 when the P«SVI* held a regional seminar in Hong Kong, the associations were notified well before the opening of the conference that officers could not be granted absence from duty but that they might apply for casual or vacation leave and that wherever possible, their applications would be approved.

”If it so happened that an officer did not have any leave credited to him, the associations were informed that such officers could apply for an advance of leave, and that their applications would be sympathetically considered,” he said.

In this connection, the spokesman said, it was grossly unfair to suggest that Government had in any way prevented members of Civil Service Staff Association from attending the P.S.I. conference. -----------------------------------0 • w - -

Release Time: 7.00 p. m.

PR*4 7 4000091

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Thursday, October 26, 1972

PRINCESS ALEXANDRA LEAVES «»*«***

Princess Alexandra and her husband, the Hon. Angus Ogilvy, left this afternoon at the end of a six-day official visit to Hong Kong.

Shortly after their departure, the Princess sent a message to the people of Hong Kong through the Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose.

The message read: ”0ur stay in Hong Kong has been a particularly happy one for us both, and we leave today with regret, but with so many happy memories.

”It has been a great pleasure for me to become acquainted with the members of the Police Forces of Hong Kong, with which I .am so proud to be connected, and in addition we have renewed old acquaintances and made so many new friends. We both of us wish Hong Kong and all her citizens good fortune in the years ahead.”

In reply, Sir Murray said: ’’All of us in Hong Kong are most grateful for your kind message. There is a saying, ’Happiness is a visit from a friend afar’. Thank you for visiting us and for your interest in all of us and our affairs, and for adding this touch of friendly happiness to the lives of so many here.

’’Please come again.”

-------0---------

/2..........

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Thursday, October 26, 1972

- 2 -

THE PRINCESS GOES SHOPPING * * * ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

Princess Alexandra this morning captured the hearts of more Hong Kong people when she mingled with the crowds during an early morning shopping expedition in one of the most densely populated areas on Hong Kong Island.

The Princess, in a carefree mood, strolled along Lyndhurst Street, Gage Street, Graham Street and Wellington Street - an area well known for its fresh fruit and vegetable stalls.

Accompanied by the Governor and Lady MacLehose and Mr. David T.K. Wong, the Hong Kong City District Commissioner, Princess Alexandra again demonstrated the charm which typified her six-day visit to Hong Kong., She stopped to chat with people in the streets and spent some time “shopping around” at the hawker stalls.

At Mr. Ng Ying’s stall, she bought a catty of white cabbage and later at the stall of Madam Lee Moon-king, the Princess bought four Chinese apples•

After the visit Mr. Ng said he could not express how happy he was to have a member of the Royal family shopping at his stall.

Madam Lee was equally excited about the visit and added "I’ll never forget this".

During the shopping expedition, Princess Alexandra was also attracted by bean curd on sale at another hawker stall and live chickens in a cage outside a meat shop.

/Earlier, ..........

Thursday, October 26, 1972

-3 -

Earlier, the Princess paid a brief visit to an embroidery shop in Lyndhurst Street, and bought a 100-year-old Ching Dynasty porcelain vase and a stone seal from a curio shop.

The whole shopping expedition, lasted for over half an hour, and the large crowds which gathered around the Royal visitor were obviously delighted with her friendly and informal approach to the people she met.

------0---------

A.....

Thursday, October 26, 1972

- 4 -

KOWLOON FOOTHILLS CORRIDOR - ANOTHER THREE PROJECTS

*«***««**

More than 328 million will be spent on road works to improve the traffic flow at three points in Kowloon.

The works form part of the 31^0-million Kowloon Foothills Road Corridor scheme which will, by 1975, provide a through road linking Kwun Tong and Kwai Chung via Lung Cheung Road.

The first of these road improvement works involves the widening and realignment of a section of Kwun Tong Road between the main entrance of R.A.F. Kai Tak and Choi Wan Road.

In addition to a footbridge across Kwun Tong Road, the proposed scheme includes an elevated roadway linking Kwun Tong Road and the future Wai Yip Street Extension.

The second project covers the building of an overpass, an underpass, two pedestrian footbridges and slip roads at the junction of Nam Cheong Street and Lung Cheung Road.

The existing roads will also be realigned and their widths altered.

The third project includes the construction of a two-lane single carriageway overpass and a pedestrian footbridge on Shatin Pass Road over Lung Cheung Road.

/Construction work •••••••

Thursday, October 26, 1972

- 5 -

Construction work on the three projects is expected to start during the first half of next year, taking about 18 months to two years to complete.

Any person objecting to the above undertakings should send his objection in writing to the Director of Public Works not later than November 20.

Claims for compensation must be submitted before December 20.

-------0---------

/6.........

Thursday, October 26, 1972

- 6 -

ARRAl'IGEMENTS FOR SHOP TENANTS IN THE SHEK KIP MEI REHOUSING SCHEME *********

Shop tenants of Blocks 23 to 28 Shek Kip Mei Resettlement Estate whose premises are affected by the first phase of the Shek Kip Mei Rehousing Scheme have been offered alternative trading space at Pak Tin Estate on a foot-for-foot basis.

Details of the offer were given to them by staff of the Resettlement Department and the Housing Authority at a briefing held at the Rehousing Operation Office at Pak Tin today.

A total of 48 shop tenants are affected in the current phase of the rehousing scheme.

They may apply for shopstalls, equivalent in size to their existing shops, at the commercial complex of Pak Tin estate. They may also join or pool their eligibility with other shop tenants for the much larger shop spaces at the estate.

No premium will be charged and the monthly rentals range from $60 for two small units to $300 for a large stall of 256 sq.ft in the commercial complex. In the estate the rents are from $550 a month for a shop of 497 sq. ft. to $850 a month for a shop of 666 sq. ft.

All tenants involved are free to apply for any of the shops or shopstalls earmarked for the present phase between now and the end of next month.

/An open ......

Thursday, October 26, 1972

- 7 -

An open ballot will be held if there is more than one application for a particular shop or shopstall.

Commenting on the foot-for-foot offer, a spokesman for the Resettlement Department said that this was being made so that the shopkeepers would be no worse off as a result of moving to Pak Tin.

Owing to the very large number of small shops in Shek Kip Mei, it is not possible to offer a large shop at Pak Tin to every shop tenant.

”In order not to cause any hardship, tenants are given ample time to think about their own arrangement before they are required to hand in their application and they will have several months to make preparations for their removal in early 19731” the spokesman said.

Thursday, October 26, 1972

- 8 -

WORLD REHABILITATION FUND DAY CENTRE OPEN DAY

********

Mrs. John Marden, wife of the chairman of the Wheelock Harden group of companies, will officiate at a ceremony marking the fourth anniversary and second ’’open day” of the World Rehabilitation Fund Day Centre tomorrow (Friday).

The Centre is one of the Social Welfare Department’s most up-to-date institutions designed to provide vocational assessment, training and sheltered work for the physically and mentally disabled.

It was built and equipped as the result of a donation from the World Rehabilitation Fund Incorporated of the United States. It opened in 19^8.

It has a total capacity of ?60 places, divided into 160 in pre-vocational training and 100 each in vocational training and sheltered work.

The Department’s Liaison and Placement Unit is located within the building and its staff has the responsibility for finding jobs for competent disabled after their training.

Trades taught include woodwork, metal work, tailoring and sewing, printing, mechanics, radio and TV repairs, machine-knitting, industrial machine-sewing, and general handicrafts. In the sheltered workshops, there are tasks both for the skilled and the unskilled.

’’The aim of this Centre,” says Mr. Ko Ki-chung, Superintendent, ”is to make available the opportunity for a type of training best suited to the potential of a particular disabled person so that he is not only adjusted to his handicap but also helped along the road to gainful employment and independence.”

/In the •••••......

Thursday, October 26, 1972

- 9 -

In the past four years, a total of 763 disabled were admitted into the Centre for training or sheltered work, and 221 were placed in "open” employments ।

At tomorrow’s ceremony, Mrs. Marden will present certificates of merit to 12 manufacturers as a recognition of their community spirit in engaging the largest number of disabled for their factories.

Many industrialists, commercial firms and government departments have also taken on the disabled for a variety of tasks.

"It is hoped," says Mr. Ko, "that these awards will stimulate other employers to do the same."

After the ceremony, the Centre will be opened to the public, from 11 a*mt to 12<J0 pem., and then again from 2 p.m. to 4.30 p.m. ♦*♦* *

Note to Editors: You are invited to have the opening

ceremony covered. This is to start at 10.30 a.m. The Centre is located at 487 Kwun Tong Road, junction of Tsui Ping Road, Kwun Tong.

-----0------

Thursday, October 26, 1972

- 10 -

HEALTH REPORT FOR SEPTEMBER

*******

The health report for September released today by the Medical and

Health Department showed a decline in the incidence of most infectious diseases compared with August.

Only in the incidence of bacillary dysentery was there a slight advance, against ?6 in August, but while in the latter month one death was recorded, in September no case of bacillary dysentery was fatal.

J k'i '

There were three ’’imported” cases of malaria, and two cases of poliomyelitis were notified.

The incidence of diphtheria was extremely low, with only one case • • * * • • • • • • • ■ • reported. There were no notifications of meningitis. • •

There was a reduction in the incidence of tuberculosis, from 690

in August to 673 last month. - .11/.. .....

Hong Kong remained free from cholera in September.

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Thursday, October 26, 1972

- 11 -

STAFF QUARTERS AND ADMINISTRATION BUILDING

FOR SHEK WU HUI SEWAGE SCHEME

The Government will build an administration building and staff quarters for the Shek Wu Hui pilot sewage treatment plant in the New Territories*

The scheme comprises a three-storey building with a workshop, offices and a laboratory on the ground floor, and junior staff quarters on the tipper floors.

Construction will begin next month and the project is expected to be completed in the middle of next year.

It will cost about $350,000.

The pilot sewage treatment plant, expected to be completed in 19?^, is designed to serve a population of 12,500 and can be modified to cope with a future population of 25,000.

-----0------

Thursday, October 26, 1972

- 12 -

OATH ADMINISTRATION SERVICE AT IMMIGRATION DEPARTMENT *********

More and more people are now making use of the oath administration service offered by the enquiries section of the Immigration Department headquarters•

Since its introduction in May last year, the average number of oaths administered has risen steadily from some 60 a month to well over 400.

This work is undertaken by the head of the enquiry section, an immigration officer who has been conferred with the authority of a Commissioner of Oaths.

The service makes it unnecessary for people who require a simple statutory declaration to go elsewhere for it, thus saving them a lot of time, f

Although it is primarily meant for people who require legal proof f . . . .

of particular items of information for their travel documents, statutory declarations are also issued for other related purposes.

"These are the people who find the location of our office near to their homes or place of work or who find it otherwise more convenient than the courts and city district offices," he explained.

"Of course, priority will be given to those who urgently require statutory declaration to prove the veracity of registered particulars about births, deaths, marriages and jobs."

-------0---------

Thursday, October 26, 1972

- 13 -

OPINING OF LAM TSUEN YOUTH CENTRE

»»«******

Young people in the Tai Po area will have more recreational facilities with the opening of the Lion’s Lam Tsuen Youth Centre on Saturday (October 28).

Officiating jointly at the ceremony will be Mr. H.G. Grewal, District Officer, Tai Po and Mr. Harold T. Wu, Deputy District Governor, District 303, Lions International.

The 3^000-square-foot single-storey centre is located near the Lam Tsuen Public School. It comprises a stage and auditorium, which can be used for gymnastics and indoor games, and a well-stocked reading room.

The total cost of the centre is $120,000. This was met by a substantial donation from the Lions International, District 303, and various contributions from the villagers of Lam Tsuen, the Taipo District Office and the Sir David Trench Recreation Fund.

Note to Editors: You are invited to have the opening

ceremony covered.

The ceremony will take place at 11.30 a.m.

Van AM 2132 will take the Press to and from Kowloon. It will leave the Tsim Sha Tsui subpool at 9*50 a.m. sharp.

-------0---------

Release Time: 7.30 p.m.

PRH 7 400009!

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Friday, October 27, 1972

BANKING LICENCE GRANTED TO BARCLAYS BANK

**«,****« .

The Governor in Council has granted a licence to Barclays Bank

International Limited to set up a branch in Hong Kong.

It is the first to be granted since the general moratorium on the issue of new licences came into effect in 19&5*

A government spokesman explained today that while the moratorium will continue,.an exception may be made, under certain circumstances, if an application is received from a bank incorporated outside Hong Kong.

The application may be granted if one, or both, of the following circumstances apply:- .

(a) Hong Kong has a significant export market in the country of incorporation of the applicant bank and there is at present no licensed bank in Hong Kong incorporated in that country;

(b) in the opinion of the Government, the licensing of the bank would add prestige and expand the facilities available to the public through the banking industry in Hong Kong.

The spokesman emphasised that these circumstances were subject

in all cases to two conditions.

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong. Tel: 5-233191

/Firstly........

Friday, October 27, 1972

- 2 -

Firstly that there must be reciprocity between Hong Kong and the country of incorporation of the applicant bank, with regard to the granting of banking licences; and secondly that only one office of the applicant bank may be established in Hong Kong.

Regarding locally incorporated banks, the spokesman said that the needs of the community seemed to be well served by the existing licensed banks and their expanding network.

"Only in exceptional circumstances would applications be considered for licences for new locally incorporated banks* The applicant would have to demonstrate, in addition to satisfying the normal requirements, that the new bank proposed would serve the interests of the community and enhance the facilities available to the public," he said.

-------0---------

Friday, October 27, 1972

- 3 -

WORKING GROUP ON CERTIFICATED MASTERS SALARY SCALES

*«»*«**

The head of the Working Group appointed to recommend an appropriate salary scale for certificated masters will arrive in Hong Kong next week and the first meeting will be held soon afterwards.

He is Mr. J.C. Morgan, who is the group’s chairman. The members are Mr. Li Fook-wo and Mr. Lo Kwee-seong.

In the meantime, it was announced today that people or organisations interested in making representations should send them in quadruplicate tp reach the Secretary not later than November 6. .

They should be addressed to the Secretary to the Working Group of the 1971 Salaries Commission, Central Government Offices, East Wing.

In making its recommendations, the Working Group is requested to have regard to (a) the principles and considerations set out in the 1971 Salaries Commission’s terms of reference; (b) the position reached in consultations about this matter in the Senior Civil Service Council; and (c) the acceptance by the Government of the principle that salary scales for teachers in government and aided schools should be the same.

In addition, members are invited to take into account any other factors » •

or information which has a bearing on the subject, including representations from the teaching profession and other interested parties.

Friday, October 27, 1972 -

- 4 -

APPEAL TO EMPLOYERS TO CONSIDER ENGAGING DISABLED «*****««

Employers in Hong Kong were today urged to take on the disabled as members of their staff.

The appeal came from Mrs. John Marden, the wife of a leading Hong Kong businessman during the second open day of the’ Social Welfare Departments World Rehabilitation Fund Day Centre in Kwun Tong.

She said the economic independence of the disabled was "a very necessary contribution to the whole process of rehabilitation,” and there could never be a surfeit of employers who were socially responsible.

Mrs Marden called for a greater realisation in Hong Kong of the need to see that ’’social rehabilitation went hand ih hand with economic rehabilitation,” because it was not enough merely to find work for the handicapped, and then ignore them.

During the ceremony, Mrs. Marden presented certificates of merit » / to 11 industrial establishments and one government department as tokens of ; ••• •' **■ appreciation for their continuous efforts in engaging the disabled following training at the Centre.

The 12 weret:Carter Semiconductor Ltd,, Leung Fat Garment Factory, Universal Knitting Company; Tung Mee Knitting Factory, Man Fung Knitting Factory, Florist Design'Corp. Ltd., Crocodile Garments Ltd., the Royal Hong Kong Police Force, Fairchild Semiconductor (HK) Ltd., Lever Shirt Garment Weaving B and D Factory Ltd.,"Swiss Plating Corp. Ltd., and Texwood (Jeans) Garment Factory.

/The Deputy ••••••

Friday, October 27, 1972

- 5 -

The Deputy Director of Social Welfare, Mr. Thomas C.Y. Lee, joined Mrs. Marden in congratulating the recipients of the certificates of merit for their public spirit, and he hoped these "trail blazers" would point the way to others.

"Indeed," he said, "it is considerate gestures such as theirs that encourage this Centre, and the disabled people it serves, to look to the future with confidence."

Mr. Lee described the proposals in the draft white paper on social welfare policy, recently tabled in the Legislative Council, as "serving to confirm the Government’s determination to provide adequate welfare services for the disabled in Hong Kong.

-------0---------

/6.........

Friday, October 27, 1972

. - 6 -

IMPROVED WATER SUPPLY TO THREE DISTRICTS IN THE NEW TERRITORIES

The Government is to spend about-$2 million on improving the water supply to several districts in the New Territories.

The project involves the construction of the Tai po Tau Treatment Works Extension.

The new treatment works, consisting of an additional clarifier and two rapid gravity filters, is designed to have a,capacity of six million gallons a day.

On completion, the entire Tai Po Tau Treatment Works will produce 12 million gallons of fully treated water a day to meet the increasing demand from the Sheung Shui, Fanling and Tai Po Districts.

The work is expected to begin in December and take about 12 months to complete.

-------- o-----

BUILDING IN CENTRAL DECLARED DaNGEROUS

*********

The Building Authority today declared No. 165 Hollywood Road to be in a dangerous condition and ordered demolition.

During routine inspection it was found that the brickwork of the main rear wall of this three-storey prewar building was badly bulged and eroded.

Fractures were also noted in the rear portion of the old party wall adjoining No. 165 Hollywood Road.

As there is a risk of collapse, a notice of intention to apply for a Closure Order in Victoria District Court at 9«3O a.m. on December 15, 1972 was posted today.

Friday, October 27, 1972

- 7 -

NEW HOAD BRIDGES IN THE NEW TERRITORIES «*«***«**

Two road bridges are to be built in the Tai Po District as part of a programme to provide better access to villages in the Nev/ Territories.

One of the bridges will be built at Luk Keng and will form part of the third and final stage of the overall Luk Keng to Tai Mei Tuk road scheme•

It will have a carriageway width of 20 feet with a footpath six feet wide on one side. -

The other project involves the re construction of the existing humped single-lane bridge at San Uk Tsuen on Sha Tau Kok Road.

It will be rebuilt to a width of 24 feet with two six-foot footpaths•

Work on both bridges is expected to begin in December for completion

a year later

Friday, October 27, 1972

- 8 -

MAGISTRATES BILL PUBLISHED

*******

A bill, seeking to extend from seven to 14 days the time which an application may be made to a magistrate to review his decision, was published in the Government Gazette today for information.

The Magistrates (Amendment) (No. 2) Bill 1972 will be introduced into the Legislative Council next Wednesday.

If enacted, it will also extend to 14 days the period within which a magistrate may, on his own initiative, review his own decision and in which

an application may be made to a magistrate to state a case.

A spokesman for the Judiciary said representations have been made that the existing period of seven days is too short.

He added that this also applies, if, as is usual, the record needs

to be considered by counsel or the solicitor for the defendant before deciding

whether or not to apply to the magistrate for a review of his decision

Friday, October 27, 1972

- 9 -

RETIREMENT OF DR. R.J. BARNES

***»«»**

Colleagues of Dr. R.J. Barnes, Specialist (Medicine) in the Medical and Health Department, presented him with a movie projector today on the occasion of his retirement after serving the department for more than 18 years.

The presentation was made by Dr. J.K. Craig, Deputy Director of Medical and Health (Health) on behalf of the Director and the department as a whole.

Dr. Craig referred to Dr. Barnes’ long career in the medical service, which began in 195^ when he was appointed a Medical Officer.

In 1958, he was promoted to Senior Medical Officer. In 1963, became Specialist (Medicine), and 1970, he was further promoted to the highest segment of the specialist grade, the post from which he was now retiring.

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/10......

Friday, October 27, 1972

- 10 -

SWISS FLAUTIST TO PLAY AT CITY HALL

********

Famous flautist Alexandre Magnin will give a recital, under the auspices of the Urban Council, next Tuesday October J1, at 8 p.m. at the City Hall Concert Hall.

At the piano will be Miss Nancy Loo.

He will also play Mozart’s D Major Concerto at the three concerts by the Hong Kong Philharmonic Orchestra on October 28 and 29•

Alexandre Magnin was born in Lausanne, Switzerland in 193&- He studied in Geneva with Andre Pepin, and at the age of twenty, received a first prize for virtuosity.

He then spent several years with Orchestre de la Suisse Romande, under the famed conductor Ernest Ansermet.

In 1961, he went to Zurich, as a soloist at the Opera House. He perfected his playing with Andre Jaunet, and in 1966 he was awarded the ”prix de snliste” by the Association of Swiss Musicians which enabled him to embark favourably upon the career as a soloist.

Alexandre Magnin has given numerous recital in Switzerland, France, Germany, Czekoslovakia, Portugal, Marocco and the Netherlands. He has performed with outstanding orchestras and many Swiss contemporary composers have dedicated works to him.

Tickets at the popular price of 31, 32 and S3, are available daily from 10 a.m. to 9 p«m. at the City Hall Box Office.

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Release Time: 7»00 p.m.

PRH 7 4000091

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Saturday, October 28, 1972

NEW ROLE FOR FORMER MISSIONS TO SEAMEN BUILDING

«*«**«***

The former Missions to Seamen building in Gloucester Road, made redundant when the Mariners’ Club opened in Kowloon a few years ago, is to be reopened in April 1973 as a residence for nurses.

It will house 210 student nurses and is to be called Harcourt House.

The first group of 70 will be housed in April and May next year. Another group of 70 will take up residence in October, and Harcourt House will be fully occupied by January 197^-

The nurses will work on a shift basis, so that each day there will be three shifts of 70 nurses travelling between Harcourt House and Queen Mary Hospital.

Normally, student nurses are provided with accommodation at the hospital in which they receive their training, but there are now insufficient quarters at the Queen Mary Hospital.

As there is no direct public transport service between Wanchai and the Queen Mary Hospital, a 50-seater bus will convey the nurses back and forth as a free service.

This is considered sufficient, but it may be necessary to supplement it with existing departmental transport for the day shift.

/Originally, .......

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Saturday, October 28, 1972

- 2 -

Originally, when the Missions to Seamen building closed following the opening of the Mariners1 Club in Tsim Sha Tsui, hostel accommodation for civil servants was in short supply, and plans were taken in hand to convert 70 rooms for single and married officers without children.

After work had begun, the Kowloon Service Flats were completed, and there was a general improvement in the availability of hotel accommodation for officers returning from, or going on, leave.

In these circumstances, it was considered more appropriate to reallocate the building so that it could help meet the urgent requirements of the Medical and Health Department for accommodation of student nurses in trai ni ng for current requirements and the staff needs for hospitals under construction.

Accommodation for 210 could be provided at the building with little alteration to the existing project.

Work is now proceeding, and the total cost of the conversion is estimated at about $2.5 million.

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/3...........

Saturday, October 28, 1972

- 3 -

UTILIZATION OF 1972 COTTON QUOTAS

**********

An Export Authorisation Scheme will come into operation on November 1, 1972 to enable companies holding 1972 cotton quotas to effect shipments of woven polyester cotton textiles to the United Kingdom for the period up to December 1, 1972.

The Director of Commerce and Industry has issued a Notice to Exporters, Series 1 (Britain), No. 20/72, regarding the operation of the Scheme.

Trade associations and companies on the Commerce and Industry Department’s mailing list for Notice to Exporters, Series 1 (Britain), will receive copies of the notice shortly.

Persons who wish to receive advance notice of the contents are invited to contact the following officers of the Commerce and Industry Department

Mr. H.T.W. Lau - Assistant Trade Officer Tel. No. H-430719

Mr. C.K. Ng - Industry Assistant Tel. No. H-446789 -------------------------0---------

• A........

Saturday, October 28, 1972

- 4 -

PRAISE FOR NEW POLYCLINIC

*********

Dr. P. Jeffrey Chapman, Senior Medical Officer, Medical Research Council in Britain, said the facilities and equipment at the new South Kwai Chung Jockey Club Polyclinic were ’’superb.”

He made this comment recently before returning to Britain at the end of a three-week private visit to Hong Kong, during which he conferred with senior officers of the Medical and Health Department.

The South Kwai Chung Jockey Club Polyclinic was opened by Her Royal Highness Princess Alexandra at a formal ceremony earlier this week.

It is a new establishment designed to serve the needs of the growing population of the Tsuen Wan and Kwai Chung townships. »

Britain’s Medical Research Council has been engaged for some years in a study with Hong Kong’s Medical and Health Department, the Anti-Tuberculosis and Thoracic Diseases Association and the Haven of Hope Sanatorium on ways and means of reducing the length of treatment of tuberculosis.

Dr. Chapman said his visit was not in connection with this programme, but from what he had seen of it, he thought ’’things were going extremely well.”

He had ’’nothing but praise” for the expanding medical and health services in Hong Kong, and he was particularly struck by the youth and enthusiasm of many medical officers in positions of authority he had met while here.

’’They reflect, I suppose, the general youth of the population, since they are a product of it,” he commented. ”It is quite impressive what a great deal of responsibility many of these officers have at what I would consider a relatively young age.”

/Dr. Chapman was .......

Saturday, October 28, 1C72

- 5 -

Dr. Chapman was here three years ago, and this was his second visit. He said in this short time so many changes had occurred that he "scarcely recognised the place."

He thought the new low-cost and resettlement estates were a "tremendous improvement" over the old-type blocks, and he saw much in the designs to praise.

He hoped residents would respond to the boon of these larger and more airy quarters by keeping their environment clean.

------- 0 ------- -v

U.S.D. STAFF’S CHILDREN TO RECEIVE SCHOLARSHIPS • * » * * * « * *

Sixty-five children of staff members of the Urban Services Department will be presented with the U.S.D. Schools Scholarships next week.

Mr. A.P. Richardson, Deputy Director of Urban Services and Chairman of the U.S.D. Schools Scholarship Fund Management Committee, will hand out the scholarships at a presentation ceremony on Monday (October 30).

The Scholarship Fund, which started with only 54,000 donated by the department staff 10 years ago, has now accumulated to more than 560,000. The assets of the fund have accrued mainly from raffles, variety shows, film shows and investment.

The presentation ceremony will take place at 5»3P p.m. on Monday at the Training Unit of the Urban Services Department on the roof of the Central Market, Des Voeux Road, Central.

Note to Editors: You are cordially invited to send a

reporter and/or photographer to cover the ceremony. --------------------0---------

6

Saturday, October 28, 1972

SHIP-BUILDING AND SHIP-REPAIRING SAFETY GUIDE

*********

Note to Editors:

The Marine Department has published

a guide setting out safe working practices in the shipbuilding and ship-repairing industries.

The guide has been prepared by a

working party which was set up last October following a number of fires and explosions in recent years on board ships either under construction or repairs.

To introduce the guide, a Press con- •

ference, to be chaired by the Deputy Director of Marine, Mr. R. Blacklock, will be held at the G.I.S. 35 ram Theatre on Monday, October 30.

Mr. Blacklock, Chairman of the Working

Party, will also take the opportunity to speak on Government’s response to recommendations made by the Commission of Inquiry investigating the fires on board the ’’Jumbo" floating restaurant and the "Seawise University".

Also present will be Mr.. B.S. Makhija,

Surveyor of Ships of the Marine Department, and a member of the working party.

You are invited to send a reporter and/or

photographer to-cover the Press conference which will be held in the 35 mm Theatre, Government Information Services Department, 5th Floor, Beaconsfield House, on Monday, October 30.

- - 0 -

/7

Saturday, October 28, 1972

OFF-STREET REFUSE COLLECTION CENTRE

Mt#**** *

A 1,400 square-foot off-street refuse collection centre is to be built in King Lam Street, Cheung Sha Wan, Kowloon, to take the pressure off kerb-side collection points.

It will be enclosed by seven-foot-high reinforced concrete walls on three sides with a concrete covered area at one end.

The provision of this type of off-street refuse collection point will relieve the use of heavily burdened kerb-side collection points by introducing trailer compounds for mobile trailers to collect refuse from an enclosed area.

Work on the collection centre is expected to begin by the middle of December and will take two months to complete. ----------------------------------0---------

TEMPORARY WATER SUPPLY STOPPAGE

*********

Water supply to a number of premises in Conduit Road, Mid-levels on Hong Kong Island will be turned off for eight hours as from 10 a.m. on Monday (October JO)•

This is to enable the Waterworks Office to replace a tee at Conduit Road.

The area to be affected is bounded by No. 7A-37 and 10^-158 Conduit Road.

-------0---------

Release time: 2.JO p.m.

PRH 7 4000091

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Monday, October 30, 1972

FURTHER MEASURES TO REDUCE ACCIDENTS

IN SHIPBUILDING AND SHIP-REPAIRING INDUSTRIES

,*,«*«**

The first volume of a guide, setting out safe working practices in the shipbuilding and ship-repairing industries has been published by the Marine Department.

It has been prepared by a working group comprising representatives from the Marine, Fire Services and Labour departments and shipping, shipbuilding and ship-repairing companies.

The working party was set up by the Director of Marine in September last year following a number of fires and explosions in recent years on board ships, either under construction or repair.

Volume 1 of the "Shipbuilding and Ship-repairing Safety Guide" deals mainly with "Fires and Explosions" and "Entry into Confined Spaces".

It is intended to furnish guidance to dockyards, contractors, shipowners, ship personnel, supervisors and others responsible for setting up safe working practices in the ship-building and ship-repairing industries.

Instructions for workers indicating in simple terms what they should or should not do are also included.

Introducing the guide today, the Acting Deputy Director of Marine, Mr. R. Blacklock, said the original intention was to publish all details about safety working practices in the industries in one full guide.

/As such a ..........

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong. Tel: 5-233191

Monday, October 30, 1972

- 2 -

As such a publication will have to take four more months to complete, the Marine Department has decided to publish Volume 1 of the guide immediately, as it covers the areas where most of the deaths have occurred.

A number of copies in stencilled form have been prepared for free issue to those directly involved in order to avoid delay.

Mr. Blacklock expressed the hope that the guidance provided will draw attention to the hazards involved in the shipbuilding and ship-repairing industries and how they may be overcome. • • ”

He said the recommendations in the Safety Guide are essentially of a general nature and are intended to provide a sound basis for preparation of instructions appropriate to the particular conditions and circumstances*

In the practical application of the broad principles of accident prevention, however, the human element is perhaps its most important aspect.

He thought that safety training at all levels and regular drills would go a long way towards resolving this problem.

Mr. Blacklock also referred to recommendations made by the Commission of Inquiry investigating the fire on board the ”Jumbo” floating restaurant in October last year.

One of the recommendations, he said, is to establish an Industrial Safety Division within the Marine Department to deal with safety of working conditions and practices and the precautions to be exercised on board ships.

This recommendation has been accepted by the Government.

/Mr. Blacklock,

Monday, October 30, 1972

- 3 -

Mr. Blacklock, who is also the Chairman of the working party, said: "Initially, it is proposed to set up a unit in the existing Ship Safety Division to deal with ocean-going ships undergoing major repairs in the stream." He added that a case for this unit has been submitted to the Government who is studying the implication of the ’’pilot” scheme.

Mr. Blacklock also disclosed that the Marine Court investigating the fire on board the ’’Seawise University” in January this year has endorsed the recommendations made by the ’’Jumbo” Commission. ----------------------------------0---------

ANTI-DIPHTHERIA AND TETANUS CAMPAIGN

«***««**

During the week ending on October 21, a total of 15,370 doses of the combined anti-diphtheria and tetanus vaccine was administered, according to statistics released today by the Medial and Health Department.

Of these, 9^8 doses were administered on Hong Kong Island, 6,469 in Kowloon, and 7,933 in the New Territories.

In the two weeks since the campaign began on October 9, a total of 35,246 doses has been administered.

The campaign will continue for the rest of the year. Free vaccine is available at all government maternal and child health centres and clinics.

-------0---------

A...........

Monday, October 30, 1972

- 4 -

FIRST ALL-WEATHER SWIMMING POOL TO OPEN

**********

The first multi-million dollar all-weather swimming pool oomplox at Morrison Hill will be officially opened by Sir Douglas (Hague, the Chairman of the Royal Hong Kong Jockey Club, tomorrow (October 31 )•

The Morrison Hill Complex is situated in Oi Kwan Road, Wan Chai, covering an area of about 2.5 acres. It will be opened to the public on Wednesday (November !)•

It consists of one enclosed and heated 50-metre pool, a paddling pool for children and another outdoor one for youngsters. It is capable of accommodating 1,200 swimmers at a time.

The 50~metre pool (50 m. x 21 m.) is built to Olympic competition standards with a grandstand and galleries for about 500 spectators.

The heated pool has a capacity of 380,000 gallons of water and its depth is from tyk feet to 6/2 feet. The water will be heated to a temperature of 24°C during the cold months from December to March.

An interior ventilation system for the whole complex has been installed for summer. Changing rooms, showers and lavatories are provided in the building.

The Royal Hong Kong Jockey Club has donated over S8 million to build and equip the complex, which was designed and its construction supervised, by Mr. Sam Lim, a private architect of Messrs, Leigh and Orange, Hong Kong.

The Morrison Hill Swimming Pool complex will be the sixth of its kind to be managed by the Urban Services Department, on behalf of the Urban Council.

/The other

Monday, October 30, 1972

- 5 -

The other five are the Victoria Park, Kowloon Tsui, Morse Park, Kwun Tong and Lei Cheng Uk swimming pools, which have all proved very popular in summer.

A spokesman for the department said admission fees for entry to the new pool on November 1 will be 40 cents for each person below the age of 14, and 70 cents for those above; but consideration is now being given to the level of charges to be levied during the winter months when the heating system will be in operation. The new fees will be announced later.

More heated swimming pools are being planned. The next one will be the district pool complex in Hung Hom.

Meanwhile the Urban Council has announced new opening and closing times for its swimming pool complexes from Wednesday (November 1).

The Morrison Hill pool will open from 7 a.m. to 11 a.m; 12 noon to 5 p«m.; and 6 p.m. to 10 p.m.

The Victoria Park, Morse Park, Kwun Tong and Lei Cheng Uk complexes from 7 a.m. to 12 noon; and 1 p.m. to 6 p.m.; and the Kowloon Tsai Pool from 7. JO a.m. to 11. JO a.m.; -and 1.J0 p.m. to J.JO p.m.

Note to Editors: You are invited to have the opening ceremony covered. The ceremony will take place at J.00 p.m. A G.I.S. officer will be on hand to assist the Press.

; . -------0---------

/6........

Monday, October 30, 1972

- 6 -

APPLICATIONS FOR SHOPS AT PAK TIN

*********

The first application for an alternative trading space in Pak Tin Estate has been received from one of the W+ shop tenants affected by the first phase of the Shek Kip Mei Rehousing Scheme.

A spokesamn for the rehousing operation office at Pak Tin, which handles such applications, said he expected that more would be forthcoming in the next few days,

”We have been receiving enquiries from a number of interested shop tenants about the reprovisioning offer,” he said.

The tenants have to vacate their premises in early 1973 to make way for the conversion work, but ample time has been given to them to make the necessary arrangements#

Referring to a newspaper report criticising details of the reprovisioning offer for shop owners, the spokesman refused the suggestion that the tenants were not getting a fair deal.

,TIn fact the reprovisioning offer has received the most careful consideration and thorough deliberation and it has been worked out to meet the best interests of the shop tenants,” he said.

The spokesman pointed out that it was essential to adopt the foot-for-foot basis in the reprovisioning offer because firstly shops in the Pak Tin Estate were much larger in area than those at Shek Kip Mei Resettlement Estate and secondly the number of shops at Pak Tin was much less.

Monday, October 30, 1972

- 7 -

"It is therefore not possible to offer shops at Pak Tin to every shop tenant at Shek Kip Mei,” he said.

As to the suggestion that the tenants be allowed to move back to their existing shops after the conversion of the block, the spokesman said this was not possible because the number of shops in the new Shek Kip Mei Estate will have to be reduced.

He said that the present number of small shops in the estate was so large that many of them were actually going out of business because of competition.

At Pak Tin, shop-keepers will be able to maintain their business at a satisfactory level because all the shops have been designated for specific trades and the number will be less. - -

Although the rentals at Pak Tin were slightly higher than those at Shek Kip Mei, they were only half or one third _of those in private tenements in the neighbourhood. In addition, no premium is charged.

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/8.........

Monday, October JO, 1972

- 8 -

APPLICATION FORMS FOR DRIVING AND VEHICLE LICENCES

*******

Applicants for driving licences and vehicle registrations are advised to obtain the relevant forms from City District Offices to avoid congestion at the two Licensing Offices of the Transport Department#

Making the appeal today, a spokesman for the department said the offices at Rumsey Street and Pui Ching Road had been heavily congested since the announcement of a ’’crash programme” to speed up driving tests.

He said the public could do much to relief this congestion and also save themselves time if they obtain the blank forms from the CDOfs firsrt before presenting them to the offices for completion of the licensing procedures*

Monday, October JO, 1972

- 9 -

EXHIBITION TO FEATURE WORKS BY LOCAL AND OVERSEAS CHINESE ARTISTS *********

Chinese artists from a number of countries have been invited to take part in an exhibition of contemporary prints being organised by the City Museum and Art Gallery.

The exhibition is open to all artists of Chinese nationality or descent, residing in or outside Hong Kong.

A number of entries have already been received from both local and overseas artists and the closing date will be next Saturday,(November 4).

All entries will be selected by a panel of judges, which include Mr. John Hadfield, head of the Design Department of the Hong Kong Polytechnic, Mr. Kwong Yeu-ting a well-known local painter and printmaker, and Dr. Li Chu-tsing, noted Chinese art historian and now visiting professor to the Chinese University of Hong Kong.

The exhibition will be held early next year.

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AO.....

Monday, October 30, 1972

- 10 -

IMPROVEMENTS TO KOWLOON POSTAL SORTING OFFICE

********

Work will begin soon on expanding and improving the facilities at the Kowloon Postal Sorting Office in Salisbury Road, Tsim Sha Tsui.

The work involves alterations to the main building to cope with increased parcel traffic and to deal with the problem of rat infestation and excessive heat.

Costing more than $440,000, the building will be extended to provide space for the public and a parcel acceptance section.

It is also intended to provide air-conditioning in the sorting office.

In addition, a transformer house will be built and a new 25—foot-wide run-in will be provided for container vehicles collecting and delivering parcels to the sorting office.

Since the peak period for outgoing parcels usually occurs between September and November, construction work has been timed to begin in early December and to be completed by August next year.

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Al......

Monday, October 30, 1972

- 11 -

IMPLEMENTATION OF SOCIAL WELFARE DEPARTMENT CENTRAL INDEX ********

Members of the public seeking registration at the Social Welfare Department for aid, emergency or otherwise, are advised that the central index system now operating requires identity card numbers and names of all members of an applicant’s family.

This system is a refinement of the previous requirement for the name and identity card number of the applicant alone.

Mr. Joseph Lee Chiu-ming, Deputy Secretary (Operations), explained that the additional information now being sought is intended to enable a central index system to be set up.

This index will be retained within the department’s Payments Control Section where payment records of all public assistance cases are centralised and audited.

”It will guard against duplicate claims for cash assistance, and will be available for reference by all units of the department,” Mr. Lee said.

At present there are 15 field units and it is theoretically possible^ in the absence of sufficient safeguards, for public money to be claimed by the same family from more than one unit. But the central index is intended to

• -'V . ... •. . • . -

prevent such duplication by means of these detailed cross references.

”1 urge applicants to bear in mind the new requirements, and to have ready the identity cards of all family members,” Mr. Lee stressed.

• % • • * ♦ • • -------------------------o---------

Monday, October JO, 1972

- 12 -

BUILDINGS DECLARED DANGEROUS «*«***«**

The Building Authority today declared No. 39 Sai Street in

Central District to be in a dangerous condition and No. 37 Sai Street । liable to become dangerous.

The Principal Government Building Surveyor said that both of these three storey pre-war buildings had been under observation for some years, during which time minor repairs have been carried out under order.

• •

Following a recent inspection it was noted that the brickwork of a main front wall pier of No. 39 Sai Street was badly bulged at the frist floor level and the ground floor pier immediately underneath fractured.

As there is the possibility of a local collapse, which would endanger the whole building, an order requiring demolition will be issued.

It is considered that due to fractures in the party wall, No. 37 Sai Street is liable to become dangerous during or after the demolition of No. 39.

Notices of intention to apply for closure orders in Victoria District Court at 9.30 a.m. on December 13, 1972 were posted today.

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- .. . ' r . . •* ■/. *’ 'j

fa..........

Monday, October 30» 1972

- 13 -

LADY MACLEHOSE VISITS WONG TAI SIN

*********

Note to Editors: Lady MacLehose will go to Block 25

of the Wong Tai Sin Resettlement Estate at 2*30 p.m. tomorrow (Tuesday) to visit the Save the Children Fund Wong Tai Sin Disabled Children’s Centre.

She is going to the Centre in her capacity as President of the Hong Kong Save the Children Fund Committee.

Lady MacLehose will be shown around the Centre by the Chairman of the Committee, Mrs. D. Newbiggin, and the Field Director* Miss P.J. Atkins.

You are invited to have the visit covered. Mr. D. Leung of the Government Information Services will be present to assist the press.

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Release time: 7+00

PRH 7 4000091

DAILY INFORMATION BULLETIN

Tuesday, October 31, 1972

DETAILS RELEASED ON TEXTILES AGREEMENT WITH BRITAIN

*******

The Director of Commerce and Industry, Mr. D.H. Jordan, today released details of the agreement which has been reached with the British Government on the future of Hong Kong’s exports of polyester cotton textiles to the United Kingdom.

This followed endorsement by the Governor in Council this morning of the arrangements which were negotiated by senior officials of the Commerce and Industry Department, with the assistance of the Textiles Advisory Board, in Hong Kong and London during August and September.

The agreement covers the 15 month period from October 1, 1972 to December 51, 1975 and relates principally to exports of fabrics, made-ups and garments of polyester/cotton blends (that is from fabrics in which polyester and cotton are blended together in proportions where the weight of polyester is equal to or greater than the weight of the cotton or any other fibre that might be present in the blend). Polyester cotton yarns are not covered by the agreement.

During the term of the agreement, the Hong Kong Government has agreed to limit exports of polyester/cotton textiles to approximately 95 million square yards with sub-limits on certain categories of goods to prevent undue concentration of shipments in particular items.

/Mr. Jordan ........

Issued by Government Information Services, Beaconsfield House, Hong Kong.Tel: 5-233191

Tuesday, October 311 1972

2 -

Mr. Jordan said that an important feature of the agreement had been the recognition by both sides of the fact that cotton and polyester/cotton goods were often acceptable substitutes for each other: in other words they tend to serve the same consumer market•

This principle had been translated into practice by combining the restraints on polyester/cotton with those which currently apply to exports of cotton textiles to the United Kingdom. As a result of this Hong Kong’s total quota for 1973 for restrained textiles (i.ee cotton and polyester/cotton) had been increased to approximately 277 million square yards, with various sub-limits on certain categories within this overall amount,

”In theory,” Mr, Jordan said, ’’this would mean that we could ship al1 277 million square yards as either cotton or polyester/cotton in 1973 • ’’However, in view of the particular difficulties of the United Kingdom industry at the present time, and after some pretty hard bargaining - in which of course the advice of our Textiles Advisory Board was especially valuable -we agreed that we would not ship up to the limits exclusively in either cotton or polyester/cotton.

’’These limitations are expressed as sub-limits on cotton and polyester/ cotton within the aggregate 277 million square yards and as a result of their application we can ship up to 250 million square yards of cotton and up to 90 million square yards of polyester/cotton in 1973j” he said.

Mr. Jordan pointed out that 250. million square yards of cotton represented a 50 million square yards increase on the present cotton quota limits, while the 90 million square yards of polyester/cotton which is available, roughly equates with Hong Kong’s exports in the year ending immediately before the start of the new restraints.

/However, . •....

Tuesday, October 3% 1972

- 3 - ‘

However, if either of these amounts was to be fully utilised, it would be necessary to ’’borrow” yardage from the other limit, thereby reducing the amount available for shipment within that limit. "This is an additional safeguard for the British industry that we have agreed to,” he said.

Mr. Jordan said he was sorry that it had been necessary to suspend export licensing without notice on October 7, and was aware that this had caused some hardship to many local exporters and manufacturers. However it had been possible to get the trade moving again on October 23 under the interim arrangements already announced to the trade, and the staff of the Commerce and Industry Department were working "round the clock" to introduce the definitive arrangements for the rest of this year and for 1973 and to allocate final quotas within the next two weeks.

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A....

Tuesday, October 31, 1972

- 4 -

NEW MARINE COURT TO INVESTIGATE "FATSHAN” SINKING ♦ *********

A new Marine Court has been appointed by the Governor to continue the investigation into the cause of the sinking of s.s. Fatshan during the passage of Typhoon Rose in August last year.

The new Court has been appointed because of a necessary change in the membership of the former Court which comprised Judge W.S. Collier as president, and Captain R.B. Weeks and Mr. Li Fook-hing as assessors.

The previous enquiry was adjourned while the possibility of salvage was examined. As a result of the delay, Captain Weeks is no longer available to serve.

In his place Captain Maurice Douglas Burbidge has been appointed an assessor of the new Marine Court, with Judge Collier as president and Mr. Li as the other assessor.

Captain Burbidge has consented to the new Court adopting the evidence already given before the former Court during its hearings from February 28 to March 6 this year, so that the witnesses who have given evidence will not have to be recalled to repeat it.

The new Marine Court will commence hearing on Friday (November 3) at 2.30 p.m. in Room 150, Central Government Offices, Main Wing, Central.

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Tuesday, October J1, 1972

- 5 -

BIG INCREASE IN DOMESTIC EXPORTS IN SEPTEMBER

********

Hong Kong’s domestic exports for September reached 81,486 million — an increase of 19 per cent or 8237 million compared with the corresponding month last year.

Commenting on the figures, a spokesman for the Census and Statistics Department said the rise occurred chiefly in the clothing and machinery sectors.

He said two factors had a bearing on the increase - monetary instability and dock and rail strikes around the months of June and July.

"These two factors made many exporters delay their normal shipments, resulting in unusually large quantities of goods being exported in September," he said.

At the same time, the value of imports jumped 16.8 per cent or 8274 million to 81,905 million. The value of re-exports also rose ?6.4 per cent or 3105 million to 3593 million over those of September last year.

During the three month period from July'td September this year, domestic exports totalled 84,214 million, imports 85^660 million and re-exports 81,134 million.

Compared with the corresponding figures last year, these show increases of 10.4 per cent 14,9 per cent and 31 per cent respectively. < f '

Figures for the 9*month period from January to September show increases over the same period last year of 10 per cent for domestic exports, 6.5 per cent for imports and 20.7 per cent for re-exports.

/The provisional .......

Tuesday, October ?1, 1972

- 6 -

The provisional figures for September are:

MERCHANDISE: Domestic Exports: $1,486 million

Imports : 81,905 million

Re-exports : 8 595 million

COMPARATIVE FIGURES:

September, 1972 S Million September, 1971 Increase or decrease

8 Million $ Million Per Cent

Domestic Exports 1,486 1,249 + 257 + 19.0

Imports 1,905 1,651 + 274 + 16.8

Re-exports 595 288 + 105 + 56.4

July-Sept. 1972 July-Sept. 1971 Increase or decrease

$ Million $ Million $ Million Per Cent

Domestic Exports 4,214 5,818 + 596 + 10.4

Imports 5,660 4,926 + 754 + 14.9

Re-exports 1,154 860 + 274 + 51.8

Jan.-Sept. 1972 Jan.-Sept. 1971 Increase < 3r decrease

$ Million $ Million $ Million Per Cent

Domestic Exports 11,201 10,187 + 1,014 + 10.0

Imports 15,968 14,994 + 974 + 6.5

Re-exports 2,954 2,447 " + 507 + 20.7

Tuesday, October JI, 1972

- 7 -

FINDINGS OF POST OFFICE PUBLIC OPINION SURVEY • ***»*»«*«

A large segment of the business community of Hong Kong finds the existing postal service generally satisfactory and efficient.

This is revealed in the findings of a public opinion survey conducted during July and August among the business sector by the Post Office.

Out of about 2,000 commercial firms interviewed, over 67 per cent considered the postal service they received satisfactory or better than before; 27 per cent regarded it fair; 2 per cent were dissatisfied, while the remaining 4 per cent offered no comment.

The establishments contacted ranged from banking to professional organisations, representing a wide cross-section of the business community.

A spokesman for the Post Office described the survey as an attempt to acquire a better insight into the needs of the commercial and business sector. The results would also help in the future planning and development of local postal services.

The survey stressed four aspects — the importance of the postal service; the attitude towards collection services and posting habits; opinions about postal delivery; and the attitude towards counter services.

Over one-third of the respondents considered the postal service much better than that of five years ago; J7 per cent found it similar while only J per cent thought it worse.

/Regarding

Tuesday, October JI, 1972

- 8 -

Regarding the times of delivery at their premises, over 81 per cent expressed satisfaction, 1J per cent gave no comment and 6 per cent favoured a change in the times.

Nearly 97 per cent considered the working attitude of their delivery postmen satisfactory or better. Twenty per cent described their delivery postmen as courteous.

On the times of posting, 71 per cent would not mind the system of posting before J p.m. for first delivery the next day and 59 per cent opted for the deadline of 12 noon for the same standard of service.

A fair level of criticism was levelled at the counter service. Nearly 40 per cent regarded the waiting time, particularly at registration and parcel counters, as unreasonable.

A similar degree of dissatisfaction applied to the counter staff. Thirty-seven per cent complained they did not receive courteous service although 6j per cent found the service satisfactory.

Commenting on the findings, the spokesman said: ”The Post Office is particularly concerned over the poor image of its counter services and this aspect will be given added emphasis in the new staff training programmes which are to be implemented.”

He added that the result of the survey was most encouraging and that various other comments offered by the respondents outside the context of the questionaires would be given due and thorough consideration.

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Tuesday, October 51, 1972

- 9 -

GOVERNMENT ASSISTANCE FOR MORE SPORTING EVENTS

A sum of 8160,OOO has been earmarked by the Government to promote sports in Hong Kong during the remaining part of the current financial year.

The money will be used to meet applications from various local sports associations for funds to help enable them to organise sports events in Hong Kong or to participate in overseas competitions.

Announcing this today, a Government spokesman said that an allocation committee, comprising representatives of the Finance and the Social Services Branches of the Colonial Secretariat, has been set up to consider such applications.

,hThe creation of a separate vote to be administered by the allocation committee is intended to expedite the processing of applications and to enable assistance to be given to more sporting events than in the past,” he added.

The spokesman pointed out that for many years financial assistance in the form of grants has been given to local sports associations.

All applications will be routed through the Education Department whose advice will be taken into account by the allocation committee.

/Each .......

Tuesday, October JI, 1972

- 10 -

Each application will be judged on its merits, but consideration will be given to such factors as the benefit to Hong Kong in the case of international sporting events, the degree of popularity in the case of local sporting activities and competitions, the reliability of the association and competing claims in relation to funds available.

Assistance in the form of block grants will not in normal circumstances exceed 50 per cent of the total estimated cost.

Organisations seeking financial assistance of this kind should address their applications giving full details to the Secretary, Sports Subvention Allocation Committee, Colonial Secretariat, Hong Kong.

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TRAFFIC ARRANGEMENTS

********

Restrictions on motor vehicles which have been in force since the June rainstorms on a section of Conduit Road will be lifted as from tomorrow (November 1).

This means that the road will be open to all traffic and not just for holders of special permits.

From 10 a.m. on Thursday (November 2) several streets in Kowloon Tong will be re-routed to improve local traffic circulation.

The section of Knight Street between Belfran Road and Boundary Street will be routed one-way northbound; all vehicles will be prohibited from making a right turn from Knight Street into Prince Edward Roadf and the section of Duke Street between Embankment Road and Knight Street will be routed one-way eastbound.

Traffic signs will be erected to guide motorists.

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Ai..........

Tuesday, October 31, 1972

- 11 -

AUXILIARY MEDICAL SERVICE HONOURS FIRE HERO

********

Officers and members of the Auxiliary Medical Service, Hong Kong Island, have collected 32,300 for presentation to the widow and family’of the late fireman, Wong Pong-wong, who died while on duty at the scend of the recent’department-store gas explosion.

A cheque for this sum will be presented by Mr. Watt Yiu-wah, Chief Supervisor AMS (HK Island), to Mr. A.E.H. Wood, Director of Fire Services, for transmission to Mrs. Wong at a ceremony in the Fire Services headquarters building tomorrow (November 1).

The idea for the donation came directly from officers and members of the AMS (HK Island), many of whom had helped firemen to give first-aid to the injured at the scene of the disaster.

"Some AMS members and their families were in the department store and witnessed the late Mr. Wong’s steadfast actions in endeavouring to get the public out of the store before the explosion,” said Mr. G.F. Doggett, Medical Defence Staff Officer, Auxiliary Medical Service.

"All AMS officers and members were greatly impressed by his devotion to duty and courage."

Note to Editors: # e You are invited to have the presentation ceremony covered. It will be held at 3*30 p.m. in Mr. Wood’s office, Fire Services Headquarters.

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/12........

Tuesday, October JI, 1972

- 12 -

UNOFFICIALS TO SPEAK IN LEGCO

********

Six Unofficial Members of Legislative Council will speak tomorrow (Wednesday) afternoon to a motion of thanks for the Governor’s address.

They are Mr. P.C. Woo, Mr. Wilfred S.B. Wong, Mrs. Ellen Li, Mr. Wilson T.S. Wang, Mr. H.J.C. Browne and Dr. S.Y. Chung.

Except for Mrs. Li, who will be speaking in Cantonese, the other five will deliver their speeches in English.

On Thursday, Mr, Q.W, Lee will speak in Cantonese while Mr. Oswald Cheung, Mr. T.K. Ann, Mr. R.H. Lobo, Mrs. Joyce Symons, Mr. P.G. Williams and Mr. James Wu will speak in English.

One Unofficial Member, Mr. Szeto Wai, will not be speaking as he is away from Hong Kong.

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Tuesday, October 319 1972

- 13 -

BUILDING PLANS APPROVED

*******

The Building Authority approved 110 new building plans of all types in September and certified 70 completed buildings for occupation.

Of the plans approved, 44 were on Hong Kong Island, 18 in Kowloon, 16 in New Kowloon and 32 in the Nev; Territories.

They included plans for a 24-storey commercial building at the junction of Harcourt Road and Murray Road; a 25-storey bank and office building in Nathan Road; and two 25-storey apartment/commercial buildings in Tsuen Wan and Yuen Long.

Buildings certified for occupation included seven for domestic use, 24 for non-domestic, and 39 for domestic and non-domestic purposes.

In addition, the Building Authority approved the demolition of 58 buildings — 35 on Hong Kong Island, 14 in Kowloon, seven in Nev/ Kowloon and two in the Nev/ Territories.

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/14.........

Tuesday, October J1, 1972

- 14 -

FOREIGN SECRETARY TO ARRIVE ON THURSDAY

**«*««*

The Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, Sir

Alec Douglas-Home, will arrive in Hong Kong by R.A.F. VC 10 from Peking on Thursday (November 2) and will leave on the following day. He will be accompanied by Lady Douglas-Home.

Sir Alec will be met on arrival at Kai Tak by the Governor and Lady MacLehose and the Political Adviser, Mr. R.J. Stratton.

The Foreign Secretary and Lady Douglas-Home will be the guests of the Governor and Lady MacLehose at Government House.

Sir Alec’s party will include Sir Denis Greenhill, Permanent Undersecretary of State, and Mr. K.M. Wilford, Assistant Under-Secretary of State.

During his visit, Sir Alec will have discussions with the Governor and Members of the Executive and Legislative Councils.

The Foreign Secretary will be meeting press, radio and television representatives before he leaves on November 3 to return to London.

PRESS ARRANGEMENTS

Note to Editors: Except for the Press Conference to be held

in Beaconsfield House at 2.20 p.m. on Friday, November 3, all photographers, TV and newsreel cameramen covering the visit will require special accreditation, which will be in the form of lapel badges.

/An application ........

Tuesday, October J1, 1972

- 15 -

An application form is attached. This should be completed and returned to the Press Officer, Information Services Department, NOT LATER THAN 1 p.m. on Wednesday, November 1. Press lapel badges will be ready for collection from the G.I.S. Press Room the same afternoon and the following morning.

The following summary of press arrangements is issued to assist editors in planning photographic coverage of the visit: Thursday, November 2, 1972 18?O hours Arrival at Kai Tak. Photographs only. There will be no press conference on arrival. Photographers and cameramen with hand-held cine cameras will be positioned by the side of the aircraft steps.

Friday, November 3< 1972

1420 hours Press Conference to be held in the G.I.S. Theatre to

1450 hours on the 5th floor of Beaconsfield House, (approx.)

1815 hours Board R.A.F. VC1O. The Foreign Secretary and Lady Douglas-Home will be seen off by the Governor and Lady MacLehcse and the Political Adviser, Mr. R.J. Stratton. No press conference. Photographers positions will be the same as for the arrival. Photographers covering the departure are requested to assemble outside the Airport Press Room NOT LATER THAN 1745 hours. They will be escorted into the Airport restricted area by GIS staff.

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Release Time: 8.00 p.m.

VISIT OF THE FOREIGN SECRETARY

November 2-3, 1972

*******

Application Form For Lapel Badges

*******

To: The Press Officer,

Information Services Department,

Beaconsfield House,

Queen’s Road, Central, HONG KONG.

We wish to nominate the following representatives to cover the visit of the Foreign Secretary, Sir Alec Douglas-Home, between November 2 and 3, 1972:

KAI TAK ARRIVAL (Nov. 2)

Position A (For photographers and cine-cameramen using hand-held cameras)

Position B (For photographers and cine-cameramen using cameras on tripods)

KAI TAK DEPARTURE (Nov. 3)

Position A (For photographers and cine-cameramen using hand-held cameras)

Position B (For photographers and cine-cameramen using cameras on tripods)

Signed................................

Capacity on newspapers, news agency, etc. __________

Date: ____________

Hong Kong.