Sessional Papers - 1889

PAPERS LAID BEFORE THE LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL OF HONGKONG 1889

Table of Contents

1. Audit

Despatches Respecting the audit of the accounts of the Colony

2. Births and Deaths

Returns for 1888

3. Blue Book

Report for 1888

4. Botanical and afforestation Department

Report for 1888

5. Criminal Statistics

Returns for 1888

6. Education

Proposed Girls' School

7. Education

Reports for 1888

8. Finance Committee

Reports of Proceedings for 1889

9. Fire Brigade

Report for 1888

10. French and German Mail Steamers

Despatches Respecting

11. Gaol

Report for 1888

12. Harbour Master'S

Report for 1888

13. Hongkong

Governor's Report on the Conditions and Prospects of

14. Legislative Council

Proceedings for 1889

15. Medical Department

Report for 1888

16. Observatory

Report for 1888

17. Police

Report for 1888

18. Post office

Report for 1888

19. Public Works

Reports on Works Completed

20. Revenue and Expenditure

Statement for 1888

21. Salaries

Commissioners' Report on Salaries of Public officers

22. Special Jurors

Correspondence Respecting Fees

23. Storm Damages

Report on the Rainstorm Damages of 29th and 30th May, 1889

24. Storm Warnings

Correspondence Respecting

 

CIRCULAR.

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No. 21

89.

HONGKONG.

DESPATCHES RESPECTING THE AUDIT OF THE ACCOUNTS OF THE COLONY,

Presented to the Legislative Council, by Command of His Excellency the Governor.

(1.)

Secretary of State to Governor.

DOWNING STREET,

:

SIR,

18th September, 1888.

I have the honour to invite your attention to the arrangements at present in force for the audit of the accounts of the Colony under your administration.

2. This service is now performed, as in other Colonies, by a local Audit Depart- ment forming part of the ordinary civil establishment of the Colony, and under the general supervision of the Colonial Secretary and the Officer administering the Government of the Colony. The whole of the work of audit is thus carried on locally, and the immediate responsibility for seeing that the audit is adequate and properly performed devolves upon the Officer administering the Government.

3 I recognise with pleasure that the manner in which the work of audit is now done has, in most Colonies, greatly improved in recent years; but I have, never- theless, been led to the conclusion that the present system leaves much to be desired.

4. The small scale upon which the audit establishment of a single Colony must necessarily be fixed renders it difficult to secure a complete professional training for the subordinate officers of the department; whilst great difficulty has always been experienced in obtaining as Colonial Auditors men fully qualified by special technical preparation for the important duties of the position. The limited experience of each Audit Department tends to prevent the introduction of improved methods of accounting, or new expedients for preventing fraud; and the frequent changes caused by the leave system have in many Colonies been detrimental to the continuity of policy and of general principles of action which should govern an Audit Department. At the same time, the close personal relations in which the officers of the Colonial Audit Department necessarily stand to their colleagues in the other branches of the Colonial establishment is apt to be a source of embar- rassment in the official relations of the department, and a cause of weakness in its action. The relative positions of Auditor and Governor tend to create the same difficulty; and the necessarily supreme authority of the latter cannot fail to have some effect towards diminishing the independence and the control of the Auditor.

5. These causes, coupled with other circumstances, have not infrequently pre- vented a Colonial Audit Department from attaining that efficiency in checking financial irregularity which the importance of its function demands. The Governor has sometimes been unable to obtain from the Audit Department that valuable assistance in administration which an efficient and independent Auditor can supply; and this result is the more to be regretted because an Officer chosen to administer a Government can rarely possess the special training necessary to enable him to maintain a real supervision over the accounts of a Colony. At the same time, the

The Officer Administering the Government of

HONGKONG.

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maintenance by each Colony of a separate audit establishment, and the performance of all its work locally, often in an unhealthy climate, renders the cost of audit unnecessarily expensive, and this in itself tends to restrict the scope of the Audi- tor's operations, and the efficiency of his department.

6. Considerations of this nature led to the proposal in 1886 that, in the cases of the Gold Coast Colony and Lagos, the Comptroller and Auditor General in this country should be invited to undertake the whole work of audit, upon repayment by the Colonies of the actual cost. This plan has been in force, with the cordial co-operation of the respective Governors, since May 1887, and the results are such as to lead me to propose its adoption by other Colonies, including that under your administration.

7. Under this system the present officers of the Colonial Audit Department would cease to be connected with the Colonial establishment, and would become responsible to the Comptroller and Auditor General, under whose directions they would in future act. No difference would, however, be made in their emoluments, pensions, or other advantages, and they would be eligible for promotion to other audit posts, as opportunities occurred. The Officer administering the Government would be immediately relieved of all direct responsibility for audit, although the local Audit Department would continue to afford any financial information required; and I need hardly observe that the Governor's responsibility for the proper custody and expenditure of all public money will remain undiminished. It is contemplat- ed that a large portion of the mechanical work of audit, such as checking vouchers, &c., would gradually be transferred to London, where its performance by the highly trained staff of the Exchequer and Audit Department would doubtless result in economy and increased efficiency; and a beginning is about to be made to deal with the Gold Coast and Lagos vouchers in this manner. The local Audit Department, relieved of this laborious duty, would be able to devote increased attention to the audit of receipts, the inspection of the checks against loss and embezzlement, and the introduction or improvement of store accounts. As vacancies occurred it would be possible gradually to reduce the local staff with the transfer of work to London; and it appears probable that increased efficiency of the audit would eventually be secured without any increase of cost to the Colony.

8. In the case of Colonies in which Imperial garrisons or naval establishments exist, considerable economy will probably result from combining, as it is hoped may

be possible, the local audit of the Imperial with that of the Colonial establish- ments; and in the case of Colonies whose accounts are already transmitted to this country for audit, the whole expense and inconvenience caused by this duplicate audit will be avoided.

9. The wide experience and skilled staff of the Exchequer and Audit Department enables the Comptroller and Auditor General to give the Colonies the benefit of the most efficient audit at no great expense; whilst his complete independence, and absence of personal relations with the Colonial establishments, allows him to exercise, through the local Auditors acting under his directions, an absolutely impartial and continuous audit upon the general principles now well established. The trial of this arrangement at the Gold Coast and Lagos has shown that it may work without friction, and without causing unnecessary correspondence or delay.

10. An additional advantage (which has already been secured in many Colonies) is the complete separation of the functions of the Auditor and the Treasurer which it renders necessary and possible. The Colonial establishment being completely relieved of all participation in audit functions, it may be expected that the Treasurer will be able to exercise a more efficient control over the financial officers of the Government when assisted by the complete check afforded by an absolutely inde- pendent and impersonal Audit Department. It would, of course, be impossible to continue anywhere the anomalous system under which, in some Colonies, each voucher is submitted for the Auditor's approval before payment; but I do not wish to prescribe whether the approval of payments of sums due for duly authorised services should be given by the Treasurer or by the Colonial Secretary, a point upon which local usages may differ.

11. I request that you will communicate this Despatch to your Executive Council, and that you will lay it before the Legislative Council at an early opportunity. I can hardly doubt that the advantages of the proposal will commend themselves to your advisers as well as to yourself; and I need only add that the result of its experimental adoption at the Gold Coast and Lagos leads me greatly to desire its extension to other Colonies.

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12. It is probable that the change would require no fresh legislation, and would involve merely an alteration in the form of the item for audit now inserted in the estimates. On this point you will doubtless consult your law officer; and on receipt of your intimation that this has been done, further particulars will be sent to you as to the detailed arrangements to be made for carrying it experimentally into effect.

13. The cost of the supervision and other audit work to be performed by the Exchequer and Audit Department cannot be estimated until it is known in how many Colonies it may be possible to carry it out; but I should propose that the cost should be shared by the co-operating Colonies in proportion to their annual expenditures, and I have reason to believe that, thus divided, the burden upon each Colony would be inconsiderable, and likely to be exceeded by the savings which could shortly be made in the cost of the local staff.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient humble Servant,

(2.)

KNUTSFORD.

No. 114.

MY LORD,

Governor to Secretary of State.

GOVERNMENT HOUSE,

HONGKONG, 30th March, 1889.

I have the honour to acknowledge the receipt of Your Lordship's Circular Despatch of the 18th September last, in which my attention is invited to the arrangements at present in force for the Audit of the Accounts of the Colony under my administration.

2. This subject has been occupying my attention for some time, but the diffi- culties with which it is beset, and perhaps also my want of the necessary technical knowledge of the subject, have prevented me from arriving at any very definite conclusion.

3. I am informed that, up to 1870, there was an Imperial Audit of Hongkong Accounts. For some time previously, the necessity of a change had been occupy- ing the attention of both the Imperial and the Local Authorities; and, after a full discussion of the question, principally directed to the details of the system which was to be adopted here, the Earl of KIMBERLEY intimated to the Governor the final determination of the Colonial Office to substitute a Local for an Imperial Audit.

4. Since that time the various Treasury Instructions which have been issued have formed the basis on which the local audit administration has been carried on. Various changes and improvements have been made, and, so far as I can ascertain there has occurred nothing which furnishes me with any strong ground for urging upon the Legislative Council the expediency of a change. I am not insensible to the very cogent arguments of the Comptroller and Auditor General in favour of an audit which is independent of the Local Executive, and, if it were made clear to me that this object could only be attained by the proposed method, I should have less difficulty in advocating its adoption. I am, however, informed that the Imperial Audit, as formerly conducted, was attended here with disadvantages similar to those which I have myself noticed in other Colonies. Queries regarding accounts were sent out after the lapse of periods varying from many months to as much as two years, when changes in offices made explanation and correction by no means easy; and much time and correspondence were expended, more frequently over very minute details than with regard to important matters of system and principle. The clerical labour involved, and the printing and stationery required, were often much greater than the results justified, inasmuch as the irregularities that were discovered could have been checked more readily and more advantageously on the spot.

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5. Though speaking on the subject with much diffidence, I may say that one consideration which weighs with me is the disadvantage which attends any post- audit. Previously to 1884, the system of pre-audit prevailed here, under which no money was paid until accounts had been passed. At that time, Sir WM. MARSH being Auditor, considerations were pressed upon the Government, principally in connection with the Public Works Department, which resulted in a return to the system of post-audit, but I am not satisfied that the change has been beneficial. Indeed, before Your Lordship's Despatch had reached me, I had under my consi- deration the necessity of reverting to the pre-audit principle. No doubt, under the present system, the Head of a Department is responsible for overcharges, and, in most cases, these are so trifling that no difficulty in adjustment can arise, but in such Departments as the Surveyor General's and the Supreme Court, where very large sums of money are dealt with, it is obvious that overcharges and inaccuracies might prove very serious. And if this is so on the spot, the consequences would be much more serious if many months elapsed before the accounts could be finally adjusted.

6. I annex to this despatch a report on the subject by Mr. STEWART, Colonial Secretary and Auditor General, who is of opinion that on the whole, the local system, especially if changed to a pre-audit, would be more serviceable and more economical than an Imperial Audit.

7. Whether his views are correct or not I am scarcely in a position to form a judgment. For I have no means of estimating either the actual cost of the pro- posed change, or the probability of its being free from the objections which attended a similar system in the past. And I am moreover without information on another most important point, viz., as to the extent to which the evident à priori objections to the present system have in its practical working proved to be valid.

8. In order therefore that I may obtain more light on these points, I should be very glad if Your Lordship could see your way to adopt the following proposal:- That a trained Auditor should be sent out here, with instructions that, after making a full examination into the Colonial Accounts and the present system of auditing them, he should report to me as to the expediency or otherwise of the proposed change, as suggested by the actual facts which have come under his observation.

9. The expense of such a visit would, of course, be borne by the Colony, and the money would I think be well spent even if it produced merely satisfaction in the minds of all concerned as to the absence of any excessive evil in the actual working of a system which is, no doubt, theoretically so imperfect.

10. Such a visit, moreover, would serve to clear up another point as to which I am at present in doubt, viz., whether it would not be possible to obtain all the advantages of an Imperial Audit, without its disadvantages, by the pericdical visits of a similar officer who would be responsible only to Your Lordship or to the Im- perial Audit Department, and be entirely independent of the Local Executive (except perhaps as regards the duty of furnishing it with copies of his reports). A system similar to that suggested is in force in connection with several of the Local Banking Institutions, and I do not see at the moment any strong reason why it should not be adopted by the Government. As compared with audit in England it would certainly save much time, and I should think much money also, especially if the services of one officer were shared by several Colonies.

I have the honour to be,

The Right Honourable

My Lord,

Your Lordship's most obedient,

Lord KNUTSFORD, G.C.M.G.,

&C..

&c.,

&c.

humble Servant,

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

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(3.)

(Enclosure in 2.)

Report on the Secretary of State's Circular Despatch of the 18th September, 1888, regarding the present arrangements for the Audit of the Accounts of the Colony.

The Imperial Audit of Hongkong Accounts was discontinued in 1870.

2. In 1869, Governor Sir RICHARD MACDONNELL forwarded to the Secretary of State a representation from the Auditor General of the Colony (Mr. RENNIE), who pointed out that, since the passing of the Exchequer and Audit Department Act, 1866, it became a question whether it was any longer necesssary for Colonies defraying their own expenditure to send all their vouchers to England. He added that, in addition to other patent advantages, there would be a great saving of stationery, printing, and clerical work, if the then existing practice were discon- tinued.

3. The Secretary of State (Earl GRANVILLE) replied that the question had been under consideration in England, and requested a report as to the additional pre- cautions which should be taken to secure the efficiency of the local Audit "about to be relieved from Imperial supervision."

A

4. This was followed by a Despatch from the Earl of KIMBERLEY, intimating to the Governor the final determination of Her Majesty's Government to discon- tinue the Imperial Audit of Hongkong Accounts, and desiring the local Audit Officers to be guided in their duties by the Treasury Instructions of 1859. request was, at the same time, made for a report on the character and efficiency of the precautions taken to ensure that the local Audit should be conducted promptly, honestly, and searchingly, and without any interference on the part of the Executive."

5. A report was forwarded as requested, the Auditor General (Mr. GARDINER AUSTIN) stating that "it was impossible to have a closer investigation of the accounts, from initiation through all stages to completion." A minute detail was given of the examination to which all vouchers were subjected, and of the checks which were adopted to secure accuracy.

6. With reference to the Secretary of State's Circular Despatch of the 18th September last, calling attention to the arrangements at present in force for the Audit of the Accounts of the Colony, and proposing that the Comptroller and Auditor General in England should be invited to undertake the whole work of audit, upon repayment of the actual cost, I am of opinion that the proposal would not be without its advantages, and that, as its adoption appears at present to be intended only as an experiment, there could be little objection to its trial. At the same time, I think there are manifest advantages in retaining the local audit, and my reasons are these. In the first place, greater promptitude in checking over- charges is possible, than if all the accounts were forwarded to England, and action delayed until replies had been received Moreover the additional labour thrown upon local Departments by having to finish in duplicate all vouchers, contracts, tenders, powers of Attorney, letters of authority for appointments and increases of pay, &c., would involve a considerable increase of clerical labour; and I doubt whether the Public Works, Police, Medical, and Treasury Departments could do their work without an additional copying clerk each. The bulk of the monthly vouchers is at present very great; and, if it had to be doubled, it would be formidable.

7. I note, too, that the proposal does not embrace the audit of Revenue, the inspections of checks against loss and embezzlement, and of stores accounts. This points at once to the impossibility of reducing the local Audit Staff, and thereby saving expense.

8. I do not think that, under any circumstances, the present Audit Staff could be reduced. It consists of only four clerks: one for general supervision, registra- tion, and surprise audits; one for examining vouchers and keeping the Ledger;

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an Audit Examiner, who visits every Department once a month, and compares counterfoils of licences, fees, receipts, &c., with the Registers and the Collectors' Accounts; and a fourth who, in addition to the copying work of the Office, super- vises the numbering of the receipts and counterfoils of all the Departments, and takes charge of the stationery and printing.

9. Although under the proposed system a part of the work thus done would be saved, there would be no decrease in the amount of time required of the clerks, as the arrangement and classification of all the accounts, and the forwarding of all necessary authorities and vouchers would still rest with them, and entail no incon- siderable labour and responsibility. The omission of a single document would involve delay, and cause the Comptoller and Auditor General's Department much annoyance and inconvenience, and there must not be omitted the, sometimes, harassing correspondence, before certain items could be adjusted.

10. In the matter of cost the difference to the Colony would be considerable. The total expenses of the local Office amount to $5,000; but, if the cost of the new proposal, as the Secretary of State intimates, is to be shared by the co-operating Colonies in proportion to their annual expenditures, then a much larger sum will be required. Taking our annual expenditure, roughly, at $2,000,000, one per cent. would mean an addition of $20,000, and even a half per cent. would add $10,000 to the cost of our audit.

Hongkong, 10th March, 1889.

FREDERICK STEWART, Colonial Secretary and Auditor General.

!

(4.)

Secretary of State to Governor.

·

HONGKONG.

No. 189.

SIR,

DOWNING STREET,

4th October, 1889.

I have had under my consideration your despatch No. 114 of the 30th of March last, relating to the Audit of the Accounts of the Hongkong Government.

2. I am glad to learn that you had already been considering the arrangements now existing for the local Audit, and that you concur in my view that some altera- tion is required. I desire to say that, while I cannot regard the system as satisfactory, I have no wish to make any reflection upon the manner in which the Colonial Secretary has carried out his Audit work, and I have no reason to suppose that this has been inefficiently performed by the staff at his disposal. The multifarious and increasing duties falling upon the Colonial Secretary make it, however, clearly impossible that he should give to the Audit that continuous personal attention which the importance of the Hongkong finances now demands. I have accordingly felt no hesitation in coming to the conclusion that the time has arrived when a separate Auditor should be appointed, and looking to the fact that in no other Colony of the financial importance of Hongkong is it considered safe to dispense with such an officer, I feel little doubt that the Legislative Council will concur in my view.

3. I learn with some surprise that you are inclined to revert to the principle of pre-Audit, that is to say, the submission of all bills, &c., to the Auditor before payment. I regret that I am quite unable to agree in this view, which appears to me to rest upon a misapprehension of the proper functions of an Auditor. The system of pre-Audit, once widespread, has now been generally condemned, and I should strongly deprecate any approach to its adoption in Hongkong.

4. It is perhaps the union of the offices of Colonial Secretary and Auditor which has led you to look with favor upon pre-Audit, and I entirely concur in

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what I understand to be your opinion that every voucher should be thoroughly examined, checked and passed as correct before payment. This is, however, the function of the Head of the Department concerned, and the Colonial Treasurer, not that of the Auditor, whose business, in this respect, is merely to see that the duties of these Officers are properly fulfilled.

5. I feel it important that there should be no misunderstanding on this point. As described in the Model Financial Instructions enclosed in my Circular Despatch of the 25th of February last, every account presented for payment should be sigued by the Head of the Department concerned, as a certificate that the work has been properly performed; that the prices charged are according to contract, or are fair and reasonable; that the arithmetical computations are correct; and that the service has been duly authorised. If the form of voucher in use in Hong- kong does not explicitly state these requirements, I would suggest that it should be amended at the next opportunity. The Heads of Departments cannot properly be relieved from this obligation of certifying to the correctness of the vouchers of their several Departments, and it should be the duty of the Treasurer, or other Officer actually paying the money, to see that this certificate is properly given in all cases, and to detect any obvious errors or defects in the voucher. This practice affords the only adequate security against over-payments or fraud, and to rely upon the Auditor for this purpose cannot fail to weaken the security.

6. There will, however, be no objection to Heads of Departments in all cases of doubt, seeking the covering authority of the Colonial Secretary, or (through him) of the Governor; and this applies equally to the classification of items by the Treasurer, and to his preparation of returns, statements of account, etc.

7. In the absence of any proper system of check before payment, it is obvious that the smallest delay in the audit is fraught with danger, whereas if the system above described be fully carried out, a delay even of a few months in the detailed examination of the Vouchers becomes of less consequence.

8. This leads to the question of the supervision and control to be exercised over the Auditor. I am strongly of opinion that it is desirable in the case of Hongkong to accept the services of the Comptroller and Auditor General for this purpose, as described in my Circular despatch of the 18th of September 1888. The wide experience of the Exchequer and Audit Department enables it, by sug- gestions and criticisms, to ensure the maintenance of a high level of audit efficiency, while its conplete independence furnishes the best possible guarantee of a perfect audit. Once it has been decided to appoint a local Auditor, the question merely becomes one of convenience of administration, and I feel confident that the Legisla- tive Council will see the advantage of securing, in addition to the constant presence of the local Auditor himself, the benefit of the experience and supervision of the Exchequer and Audit Department.

9. The principles of Audit administration are so well settled, and the experi ence gained in other colonies is so conclusive, that I do not think it necessary to adopt your suggestion of sending an Audit expert to Hongkong for the purpose of advising the best course of action. Such a visit would necessarily be expensive, and it appears practically certain that the result would be the adoption of essentially the same course as is now proposed.

10. I think it right to refer, in conclusion, to the estimated cost of the proposed alteration. Whether the actual examination of vouchers should take place partially in the Local Auditor's office, or whether the vouchers should be sent direct to So- merset House, is a question which may be left to experience to settle, but if the latter course is adopted, the local Auditor will be enabled to devote himself entirely to the important duty of checking the receipts, examining the manner in which the books of the Colonial Government are kept, and maintaining a thorough system of Audit of cash balances and store accounts. If the work properly falling upon the Heads of Departments and Treasury is duly performed by them, and the examina- tion of vouchers is performed in London, I feel convinced that the total increase in expense would not exceed the salary of the local auditor, which would probably have to be $3,000 or $3,500 per annum. Whatever expense is involved by the connection with the Comptroller and Auditor General will almost certainly be met, as it has been elsewhere, by the possible reduction of the present staff of clerks, one of whom would at once be replaced by the Auditor himself. It must, moreover, not be overlooked that it may be found possible to arrange that the local

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Auditor should perform, on behalf of the Comptroller and Auditor General, certain Audit functions in connection with the War Office and Admiralty Departments, in which case the cost to the Colony might be reduced.

11. I request therefore that you will bring the matter before the Legislative Council at the earliest opportunity, pointing out the necessity, in which I under- stand you fully concur, of strengthening the Audit Staff by the appointment of a separate Auditor. Assuming that the advantages of pre-Audit are secured by the full examination of accounts before payment, as already described, I presume that you would feel less hesitation in laying before the Council in a favourable light the benefit of securing the co-operation and assistance of the Comptroller and Auditor General in connection with the new local Auditor, and I can hardly doubt that the Legislative Council will agree with the view which my experience confirms, that the proposal, while not in itself raising the charge for Audit, offers a prospect of ensuring and increasing its efficiency. If no strong objection is shown by the un-official members to the proposal, it would be well, should there be time, to place in the estimates for 1890, instead of the present items for the Audit Staff, a lump sum of, say, $9,000 for the aggregate expenses of the Audit, the details of which can be subsequently laid before the Council. On this being reported to me by telegraph, I will take steps to obtain the services of a com- petent Auditor without delay.

I have the honour to be,

Governor,

Sir G. W. DES VEUX, K.C.M.G.,

&c.

&c.,

Sir,

Your most obedient

humble Servant,

KNUTSFORD.

&c.

(5.)

Report by the Acting Colonial Secretary and Auditor General on the Secretary of State's Despatch No. 189 of 4th October 1889 on the proposed appointment of an independent Auditor for the Colony of Hongkong.

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR,

I have read with great regret this proposal to revive a cumbrous, expensive, and, in my opinion, ineffective system of auditing the Colonial accounts. It appears to me that it is not, even now, too late to make a strong protest against it, and I think such a protest should be made.

2. It is no doubt the case that the Colonial Secretary of this Colony has too much to do to maintain any very active supervision of details in the Audit Office. He can only, and that with difficulty, report on general questions, look into matters as they are brought before him, and decide doubtful points from time to time. The auditing of our Accounts has been kept up, in what I maintain to be a very respectable state of efficiency, by the services of a very able and efficient First Clerk, who, for all routine purposes, is the Auditor of the Colony.

3. There is therefore no objection, beyond the expense, to the introduction of a trained Auditor, independent of any Colonial Authority, and I may say that any system which would provide for a succession of such trained Auditors would be (except from the point of view of expense) a distinct advance. The question of a successor for Mr. DA SILVA, the First Clerk in question, has been weighing heavily on my mind, and I was going to propose that one of the Cadets now in Canton should be attached to the Audit Office as a learner, in the hope of training him for the duties of First Clerk in future.

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4. But when we come to the proposal that the Colonial Accounts are to be audited in London, I can only say that it is a reversion to the system which gave rise to so much reasonable objection before the year 1870, a reversion for which I fail to see any sufficient justification. The London Audit system was deliberately abandoned, after the fullest consideration, and it cannot be said that the Local Audit then introduced has not worked well and inexpensively. Many improvements have been suggested and carried out (especially by Sir W. MARSH) since the Audit Office was placed on its present footing. I myself have been able to suggest some such improvements, and I hope to suggest more.

I will venture to say that waste, dishonesty, and peculation have been made as difficult in this Colony as it is possible to make them.

5. If the scheme for the revival of an Imperial Audit be carried out, the old burden of having to make out pay sheets, vouchers, &c. in triplicate, will again be imposed on all the Departments. As the late Mr. STEWART pointed out, more clerical assistance will be necessary. But besides this, I would urge as strongly as I can, that all this clerical labour is not really Public Business at all, but a mere hindrance to Public Business, and too often a sheer waste of time. To illustrate what I mean by an example. The business of the Post Office is the transmission of correspon- dence. All time spent in arrangements for the drawing of salaries, in making out vouchers, and accounting for petty expenses, is, from a Postal point of view, time wasted. The ideal system would be that each officer (as in a Bank) should have a cheque for his salary handed him on the first of the month, without even having to sign a receipt for it. If the Department could have its contingent wants, repairs, lighting, petty expenses, &c., provided in the same automatic way, it would then be free to give its whole attention to its proper business. Of course I am aware that every Department must devote some time to subsidiary business, which does not contribute to its usefulness in its special line, but the object should be to mini- mise these inevitable hindrances, not to increase them.

6. The taxpayer is very little benefited by the fact that the Assistant Post- master General, or the First Clerk is at his desk explaining at some length why one pane of glass cost ten cents to replace, and another fifteen; or why it is neces- sary to burn an oil lamp at the foot of a dark staircase, though the rest of the building is lighted with gas. But he is benefited if the Officer, instead of spending time on these vexatious minutiæ, is diligently superintending the despatch of a mail, or planning or reporting on some scheme for the improvement of the Postal Service. Even if there had been some petty overcharge, and it were recovered (if it can be said to be recovered in view of the stationery and time expended) the benefit to the taxpayer is infinitesimal compared with that secured by an un- hampered performance of public duty.

7. For it is to microscopic points of the kind cited that an Auditor ten thou- sand miles away from the scene of expenditure must necessarily address himself. An Auditor at that distance seldom if ever finds out anything big, unless he detects some glaring error which would equally have been detected locally. A person who plans a system of fraud of course takes care to have everything in order on paper. And it is within the experience of everybody who knows any- thing about the subject that public money may be wasted to any extent, but so long as the waste is according to rule an Auditor at a distance will never find it out. I am not sure that the distant Audit system does not even lead to extrava- gance. I have known Officers refuse to substitute an economical method for an expensive one, because it would lead to an Audit Query and a long correspondence. The Audit Office, they said, was accustomed to sanction the higher amount, and would pass it, whereas any change would at once lead to enquiry.

8. I do not observe that the Imperial Audit in the cases of the Consular, Military, and Naval Services leads to more economy than is practised in this Colony. There is a good deal of what may be called expensive parsimony and niggardliness about all three services, and of course if money cannot be obtained it cannot be spent. But when funds are obtainable, they do not seem to me to be. expended with more care, in the services named above, than is exercised in this Colony. I think we secure as full a return for our expenditure as the Imperial Government, in any of its branches, is able to do.

9. Finally, I come to the question of expense. The late Dr. STEWART has shewn that no reduction of staff could be effected in the Audit Office itself if accounts are to be sent home, I should rather expect an increase. With great deference to the

314

Secretary of State, it cannot be supposed that an independent Auditor can be maintained here permanently on any such salary as $3,500 a year. A Committee of Civil Servants, appointed to consider the question of Salaries in connection with the decreased value of the dollar, has just proved to demonstration that a married Officer, in the position of the Head of a Department, cannot live here in the most moderate comfort on a less salary than $6,900 a year. The conclusions of this Committee are supported by the un-official members of Council and the most experienced residents here. It is both useless and undesirable to try to ignore un- deniable facts. We should be told, and told justly, that an Officer in the position of an independent Auditor must be a man of good education and of a certain social standing. He would either come out married or would marry here. And if we should attempt to establish such an Officer here on a less salary than is paid to other Heads of Departments (who have just proved that their present pay is not nearly sufficient) we should simply add one more to the (I am sorry to say) too long list of public servants who have come out here to find that they have been deluded, and whose paramount anxiety, from the time they make that unpleasant discovery, is how to obtain from the Government the bare means of living and of keeping out of debt. In relation to such cases an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.

10. The Colonial Secretary would of course require compensation if he were deprived of the small salary of $960 paid him for supervising the Audit Office. His total income is $7,200 a year. In the face of the Report to which I have alluded, it will perhaps not be argued that this is too much, even for the Secretarial work alone. Any idea of saving under this head may therefore be dismissed.

11. Nor do I think that an independent Auditor, responsible to the Imperial Government, but also with continual Colonial claims on his attention, would be able to audit Military or Naval accounts. Certainly he would not without an increase of staff. The total expense of the new arrangement would therefore be about as follows;

Audit Office, Staff

$6,488

Extra Copying clerks in, say, 6 departinents,

Salary of Auditor

at $480 each

Contribution to cost of Comptroller General's establishment, say about £200, or

6,900

} 2,880

1,300

$17,568

The increased expenditure in Stationery and Postage would bring this up to $18,000 and more.

12. Now a small extra expenditure would be well incurred in promoting efficiency. But I have endeavoured to show that an Imperial Audit is not neces- sarily a more efficient Audit, and in view of the satisfactory working of the present Department, I do not think that even the less objectionable scheme of a local Audit carried on by an independent Auditor (which, I admit, seems to promise some advantages) would justify so considerable an annual expenditure.

Hongkong, 14th November, 1889.

A. LISTER, Acting Colonial Secretary.

རྞ

315

(6.)

Minute by the Governor.

I fully concur in the views expressed by the Secretary of State on two points:-(1) as to the expediency of having a Local Auditor, apart from the Colonial Secretary, the proper duties of the latter Officer being now quite sufficient to fully occupy his time; and (2) as to the advantage of providing for another audit of accounts which is entirely independent of the local Government.

But as regards (1) the Local Auditor, I agree with Mr. LISTER that a salary of $3,000 to $3,500 is not nearly sufficient, as such an officer should in my opinion be one of the highest in the Government. And on the subject of (2) the independent audit, I much regret that I am unable to modify the view expressed by me in my despatch No. 114 of the 30th of March, that the return to the system of forwarding all accounts for Audit in England would be a costly mistake, and that the object desired might be obtained by other means, not only more cheaply but much more expeditiously and with more effective results.

While for this reason I trust that the Secretary of State may yet be inclined to alter his views, I do not feel justified in further postponing compliance with his instructions; and I therefore desire that there be placed on the Estimates a lump sum of $10,000 for Audit.,

22nd November, 1889.

G. WILLIAM DES VŒUX.

HONGKONG.

RETURNS OF BIRTHS AND DEATHS FOR THE YEAR 1888.

Presented to the Legislative Council, by Command of His Excellency the Governor. RETURNS OF BIRTHS AND DEATHS FOR THE YEAR 1888.

NO. 10

89.

DISTRICTS.

BRITISH AND FOREIGN COMMUNITY.

CHINESE.

GRAND TOTAL.

BIRTHS.

DEATHS.

BIRTHS.

DEATHS.

BIRTHS.

DEATHS.

Boys.

Girls. Total. Males. Females. Total. Boys.

Girls.

Total.

Males. Females.

Sex

Unknown.

Total.

Victoria,.......

98

91

189

191

57

248

672

508

1,180

2,700

1,976

4,679

1,369

4,927

Kaulung,

1

co

4

1

1

48

34

82

320

206

533

86

534

Shaukiwán,

:

:

69

50

119

163

108

271

119

271

Aberdeen,

28

26

54

139

101

1

241

54

241

Stanley,

TOTAL,...

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

22

12

34

36

25

61

34

61

99

94

193

192

57

249

839

630

1,469

3,358

2,416

11

5,785

1,662

6,034

DEATHS.

BRITISH AND FOREIGN COMMUNITY.

DEATHS IN PUBLIC INSTITUTIONS.

ESTIMATED POPULATION.

Annual Birth-Rate Annual Death-Rate

per 1,000 for the Year.

per 1,000 for the Year.

Males. Females. Total.

Europeans, exclusive of Portuguese,... 75

Of the Deaths in Victoria, there were in the-

British and Foreign Community,

10,692

18.05

23.28

Portuguese,

78

[

Italian Convent,

192

412

604

Indians, &c.,

46

Chinese,

....179,530

8.18

32.22

Asile de la Ste. Enfance,

187

313

500

...

Non-Residents,

50

Tung Wa Hospital,

1,073

366

1,439

Whole Population,.............

.*190,222

8.73

31.72

TOTAL,..

....... 249

TOTAL,.

1,452

1,091

2,543

* This does not include the moving population.

Registrar General's Office, Hongkong, 19th February, 1889.

J. H. STEWART LOCKHART, Registrar General.

159

160

RETURN SHOWING THE NUMBER OF DEATHS REGISTERED DURING THE

CAUSES.

BRITISH

AND

FOREIGN COMMUNITY.

CHINESE COMMUNITY. ·

VICTORIA DISTRICT.

DIVISION.

Civil.

Army.

Navy.

Sokonpo.

Bowrington.

Wantsai.

Hawan.

Sheungwan.

Chungwan.

Táip'ingshan.

Saiyingpun.

Shektongtsui.

Kennedytown

Harbour.

I.-Zymotic Diseases,.

III.-Local Diseases,.

125

19

II.-Constitutional Diseases,..

IV. Developmental Diseases,.

V.-Parasitic Diseases,

VI.-Violent Deaths,

VII.-Undiagnosed & Unknown,

11

53

7

4241

3

14

15

21

446

12

449 998 213

14

8 64

1

1

4

6

4

239 172

21

1

2

12

2

28

16

52

130

23

274

693

245

24

5112

6

5

8

1

1

11

1

4

10 1

5

:72

5

1

1

5

1

63

10

13

1

4

10

14

9

2

92

24

51

1

2 10

.

ALL CAUSES,...... 211

32

6 55

33

98

592

42

1,134 1,903 555

42

17 208

I.-Zymotic Diseases.

Acute, Throat Disease,

1

3

ลง

Diphtheria,

Dysentery,

10 2

4

Diarrhoea,

29

2 1

4

5

5

52

Cholera,

5

1

2

Cholera Nostras,.

Fever, Simple Continued,

2

2

20

Do., Intermittent,

2

la

7

6

10

11

Do., Remittent,

11* 10

3

1

52

A-AN!!

1

2

6

169

15

2

9

26 173 70

6

2

32

Ι

...

1

1

35

1

12

17

127

10

8

317

27

3

16

26

2

Do., Typhoid or Enteric,

Do., Typhus,

Do., Rheumatic,

པ་

56

1

1

29

1

20

36

297

60

2

2

...

2*

1

Small-pox,

Measles,

Whooping Cough,

Syphilis,

Septicæmia,

1

Tuberculosis,

1

Tabes Mesenterica,

2

Phthisis,

20

Beri-beri,

1

Leprosy,

Trismus Nascentium,

1

Cancer,

3f

Scrofula,

Erysipelas,

II. Constitutional Diseases.

Catarrh,

Marasinus,

Dropsy,

Anomia,

Debility,

Delirium Tremens,

Alcoholia,.

III.-Local Diseases.

Nervous System,--

Convulsions,

:

3c

ld

2€

1

...

2

1

9

9

2

...

...

280

298

3

1

2

1

2

:

1

1

1

3

5

4

220 19

172

Ι

2:

20

1 2 11

1

1

Paralysis,

9g

1

10

t-

7

19

41

5

123

219

95

3 1 25

1

1

1

Apoplexy,

1

1

3

7

1

21

Insanity,

...

Tetanus, (Lock Jaw),

1

2

1

11

23

10

...

2

1

...

...

Hemiplegia,...

1

1h

Epilepsy,

I

1

...

1

Insolatio,.

1

Inflammation of the Brain,

1

3

`4

...

Carried forward,.....153

223

3 24

25

46

499

23

829 1,441 344

21

11 104

a. And Debility.

b. 1 and Pneumonia..

c. I and Heart Disease, 1 and Beri-beri.

d. And Instrumental Labor.

2

1

YEAR ENDED THE 31sT DAY OF DECEMBER, 1888, AND THEIR CAUSES.

CHINESE COMMUNITY.

161

KAULUNG SHAUKIWAN ABERDEEN DISTRICT. DISTRICT. DISTRICT.

STANLEY

DISTRICT.

TOTAL AT THe Different ÅGE PERIODS.

77

7253 :0N

coco:: ~*

1

144

135

117

93

48

106

32

604

298

331

224

1,116

503 7

3,083

2

3

42

149

37

8

156

91

483

105

61

20

26

39

17

1

75

292 344

94

630

519

1

1,955

14

12

1

2

6

33

35

74

12

18

5

6

1

1

15

95

18

134

27

23

1

96

52

10

62

36

2

287

297 236 155

116

82 159

51

10

823

792

752

363

2,092 1,202

10

6,034

8885

8_::

Land

Population.

Boat

Population.

Land

Population.

Population. Boat

Land

Population.

Boat

Population.

Land

Population.

Boat

Population.

Under 1

Month.

Over 1 & under 12 Months.

Over 1 & under 5 Years.

Over 5 & under 15 Years.

Over 15 & un-

der 45 Years.

Over 45

Years.

Age Un-

known.

GRAND

TOTAL.

3

بسم

1

21

co

3

1

2

3

11

1

...

1

1

4

1

1

26

33

47

57

25

61

6

50

3

1

86

82

17

33

2

36

4

1

8

5

5

11

5

58

29

5

37

:: 2 = &:: Go

5

16

140

66

227

67

48

315

181

6.6

9

1

10

1

5

6

39

43

104

74

303

11

31

293

114

454

26

26

108

47

1*

245

1

6

7

2

2

1

1

14*

11

5

2

4

157 176

53

79

1

6*

476

1

2

1

1

3

4

174

4

28

10

17

...

2

3:0

the

1

1

1

1

17

4

23

1

20

8

29

1

1

1

1

8

588

5

594

4

1

1

1

10 12

5

2

2

1

40

145

1

2

3

1

1

1

::::

33

1

. 1

3

:

189

151

127

98

51.

109

36

e. 1 and Necrosis of Jaw.

f. 1 in Stomach.

:26

1

1

221

150

85

245

121

سر

1

3

2

5

11

1

1

1

260 306

35

:

601

3

4

11

20

20

1

21

75

8

85

2

2

2

3

1

1

3

1

3

2

10

721

718

676 270

1,306

615

7

4,313

7. 1 Plus Fever.

h. And Convulsions.

162

Sheungwan.

Chungwan.

Táip'ingshan.

Saiyingpun.

Shektongtsui.

Kennedytown.

Harbour.

829 1,441 344 21 11 104

RETURN SHOWING THE NUMBER OF DEATHS REGISTERED DURING THE

BRITISH

AND

FOREIGN COMMUMITY.

CHINESE COMMUNITY.

VICTORIA DISTRICT.

DIVISION.

CAUSES.

Sokonpo.

Bowrington.

Wantsai.

Civil.

Army.

Navy.

Hawan.

223

>

111 415

123 18 3

...

...

: : co:

880

80

17

5

31

58

::

08-

1

14

Brought forward,... 153 22

3 24 25

46 499

Local Diseases,-Contd.

Respiratory System,—

Bronchitis and Pneumonia,

12*1

1

2

2

1

1

Lung Disease, (Chronic),

Pleurisy,

Asthma,

Circulatory System,-

Heart Disease,

Aneurism,

Syncope,

Digestive System,-

Jaundice,

Peritonitis,

Hernia,

· 26

25

1 1

1

: : co

3

8

∞ : :

la

6

3

1

::

:::

::

...

...

...

...

:

...

:

::

|!!

1

2

1

...

::

Enteritis,

Intestinal Obstruction, Fistula in Ano, Urinary System,--

Stricture of Urethra, Stone in the Bladder,

Nephritis,

Retention of Urine,

Extravasation of Urine,

Uræmia,

Generative System,-

Menorrhagia,

Abortion,

Integuments, Bones & Joints,-

Gangrene of Foot,

Caries of Spine, ...

Abscess,

Ulcer,

Disease of Bones or Joints,

IV.-Developmental Diseases.

Child Birth,

Old Age,

Premature Birth,

Exposure and Privation of Breast

Milk,

V.-Parasitic Diseases.

co:

3

:

1

1

2c

1

...

1d

...

5g

A co:

3

4

...

:::

...

::

...

...

1

...

...

...

1

1

...

...

...

...

1

:-

...

...

1

...

1

...

::

::

::

::

::

::

1/

...

4

4

2i

21

1

2j

::

::

::

...

le

...

10

5

...

:::

1

:

:

:

:

:

4

1

1

5

5

7

1

1

1

:

...

:

::

:

....

:

...

1

1

:::

:

:.

:

:

:

:

:

:

11

1

2

1 2 30 30 1

...

2

7

1

1

...

1222

Worms,

:

VI.-Violent Deaths.

Strangulation,

1

Suicide,

3

1

1

Opium,.....

6

Accidental Injury,

1

2 1

3

34

Burning,

Drowning,

3

1

7

...

Wounds,

...

...

...

...

...

1

3

...

...

...

:

Gun-shot,

Rupture of Liver,

Asphyxia,

...

1

...

Do. of Spleen,

VII.-Undiagnosed & Unknown,.......

1

...

8

1

...

:

10

1

14

TOTAL,.......

211 32 6 55

33333

98

林尚

9

2

92

24

51*

1

2 10

592

42

1,134

1,903

555

42

17 208

a. And Diabetes.

b. 1 and Asthenia.

c. 1 and Hyperpyrexia.

d. And Pneumonia.

e. And Septicæmia.

Manslaughter,.

Eating Poisonous Fish,

Fracture of Spine,

Registrer Gener 1's Office. Hongkong, 19th February, 1889.

TOTAL AT THE DIFFERENT AGE PERIODS.

YEAR ENDED THE 31sT DAY OF DECEMBER, 1888, AND THEIR CAUSES,—Continued.

CHINESE COMMUNITY.

163

DISTRICT.

KAULUNG SHAUKIWAN ABERDEEN DISTRICT.

STANLEY

DISTRICT.

DISTRICT.

270 1,306 615

Land

Population.

Boat

Population.

Land

Population.

Boat

Population.

Population. Land

Boat

Population.

Land

Population.

Boat

Population.

Under 1

Month.

Over 1 & under 12 Months.

Over 1 & under

5 Years.

Over 5 & under] 15 Years.

Over 15 & un-

der 45 Years.

Over 45

Age

Years.

known.

Un-

189

151

127

52

42

2

98

51 109

36

16

9:

14

1

25

25

39

12

=

::

::

6

3

2

~2

12

2

10

:.

7 721

::

2

11

NO :

:

:

:

718

676

1

::

:

01 20

GRAND

TOTAL.

7

4,313

2

1

5

21

51

538

462

1,077

1

1

1

1

2

24

17

1*

42

1

1

1

21

1

4

1

1

1

3

~ ¦ ¦

2

~

1

1

::

...

1

:

30 10

:

:

T:

1

1

1

1

2

2

4

1

1

1

1

1

::

1

1

1

1

1

1

I

1

1

2

1

2

9

2

11

3

2

25

1

9

10

22

16

2

:

:

:

1

:

:

:

6

:

3833

33

35

35

::

:.

:

12

:

1

18

1

1

1

7

1

1

3

2

1

4

3

1

2

1

13

1

9

1

2

6

41

2229

9

15

12

58

1

2

3

7

15

2

27

1

1

1

1

122

1

1

2

2

2

2

2

:

1

1

...

1

1

:

1

27

23

2

1

3*

5

1

96

:

52

29

10

62

36

2*

287

297 236

155

116

82

159

51

10

823

792 752

363

2,092 1,202 10

6,034

f. with Beri-beri,

g. of the Liver.

7. of the Stomach.

2. 1 of the Liver.

j. 1 of the Leg and Disease of Brain.

J. H. STEWART LOCKHART,

n

...

164

DEATHS RATES IN DIFFERENT GROUPS OF AGES FOR THE YEAR 1888.

AGES.

BRITISH AND FOREIGN.

CHINESE.

Deaths.

Per cent. of whole.

Deaths.

Per cent. of whole.

Under 1 month,

13

5.22

810

14.00

Over 1 and under 12 months,

19

7.63

773

13.36

Over 1 year and under 5 years,

24

9.64

728

12.58

Over 5 and under 15 years,,

15

6.03

348

6.02

Over 15 and under 45 years,

137

55.02

1,955

33.80

Over 45 years,

39

15.66

1,163

20.10

Unknown, .....

2

.80

.14

Total,..

249

100,00

5,785

100.00

Registrar General's Office, 19th February, 1889.

J. H. STEWART LOCKHART,

Registrar General.

!

!

281

HONGKONG.

No. 19

REPORT ON THE BLUE BOOK AND DEPARTMENTAL REPORTS FOR 1888,

Presented to the Legislative Council, by Command of His Excellency the Governor.

1.-TAXATION.

There have been no changes under this head.

2.-REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE.

89.

The Revenue amounted to $2,582,723.81, or excluding premiums from Land Sales to $1,557,300.03; and the Expenditure amounted to $1,992,329.67, including Extraordinary Works; excluding these, to $1,461,459.64.

The Revenue and Expenditure for the past five years have been :-

Year.

Revenue.

1884,... $1,173,071.48

1885,.................

... 1,251,889.70

1886,. ... 1,367,977.74

1887,..

1,427,485.79

isss,..

1888,......... 1,557,300.03

Extraordinary Expenditure, including

Defensive Works.

Premiums from Land.

Ordinary Expenditure.

$19,695.00

$1,254,634.77

$340,763.62

66,658.50

1,146,103.15

475,147.24

34,731.59

1,195,236.81

825,624.84

155,238.02

1,278,181.68

744,820.38

160,688.64

1,461,459.64

530,870.03

3.-LOCAL REVENUES.

The Chinese inhabitants contributed in 1888, by voluntary assessment among them- selves, to the pay of the District Watchmen,

and received from the Government a grant-in-aid of.......

4. ASSETS AND LIABILITIES.

..$4,094.78 2,000.00

On the 31st December, 1888, the assets of the Colony exceeded its liabilities by...$360,649.76 (a) The surplus assets in :-

1884, were 1885,

""

In 1886, the liabilities exceeded the assets by. In 1887, the surplus assets were

$ 729,562.02

$ 427,692.42

$ 191,512.29

$ 631,374.08 (a).

No new loan has been raised.

5.-PUBLIC DEBT.

6.-MILITARY EXPENDITURE.

The Military Expenditure (inclusive of the Volunteer Corps) defrayed by the Colony during the last five years has been as follows:-

1884,

1885.

1886,..

Military Contribution, exclusive of

Defensive Works, and inclusive of Volunteer Corps.

$114,498.78

$117,337.00

$124,561.68

$128,815.63

.$134,594.68

Defensive Works.

$ 3,464.64

1887,

1888,...

$ 72,564.45 $217,901.45 $258,444.28 $ 62,115.90

(a.) A loan of £200,000 having been raised during 1887 to be paid off on the 1st of March, 1907. To provide for the repayment of this loan, a Sinking Fund of £7,072 was established.

J

282

7.-GOVERNMent Buildings.

Government House.

Government House was maintained in repair, and the Sanitary arrangements were satisfactory.

8.-PUBLIC WORKS.

The expenditure under this head was $25,102.14 for ordinary repairs to buildings, $51,518 for upkeep of the roads and streets; and $62,115.90 for Defensive Works.

9.-LEGISLATION.

+

The following Ordinances were passed during the year:-

No. 1.-An Ordinance entitled The Vaccination Ordinance, 1888.

No. 2.-An Ordinance entitled The Defences Sketching Prevention Ordinance, 1888.

No. 3.-An Ordinance to amend The Crown Remedies Ordinance, 1875.

No. 4.- An Ordinance for prohibiting the enclosure of Verandahs erected over Crown Lands. ▲

No. 5.-An Ordinance entitled The Official Signatures Fees Ordinance, 1888.

No. 6. An Ordinance for the naturalization of FRITZ ADOLPH FRICCIUS GROBIEN.

No. 7.-An Ordinance for the naturalization of HILLUNE LOO NGAWK otherwise Loo KIU

FUNG.

No. 8.-An Ordinance for the naturalization of LAI SHANG otherwise LAI CHEK Kün.

No. 9.-An Ordinance for the naturalization of LAI KIT otherwise LAI CHEUK.

No. 10.-An Ordinance to provide for the preservation of copies of Books printed in Hong-

kong, and for the registration of such Books.

No. 11.-An Ordinance entitled The Unclaimed Balances Ordinance, 1888.

No. 12. An Ordinance entitled The Vagrancy Ordinance, 1888.

No. 13.-An Ordinance entitled The Regulation of Chinese Ordinance, 1888.

No. 14. An Ordinance entitled The Trees Preservation Ordinance, 1888.

No. 15.-An Ordinance entitled The Rating Ordinance, 1888.

No. 16.-An Ordinance for the reservation of a European District in the City of Victoria. No. 17.-An Ordinance entitled The Coroner's abolition Ordinance, 1888.

No. 18.-An Ordinance entitled The French Mail Steamers Ordinance continuation Ordinance,

1888.

No. 19. An Ordinance entitled The German Mail Steamers Ordinance continuation Ordi-

.nance, 1888.

No. 20.-An Ordinance for the naturalization of JOHN WONG CHÜN otherwise. WONG YIU

SHANG.

No. 21.-An Ordinance for the naturalization of T'AM IU Ts'ün otherwise T'AM FUK-SIU. No. 22.-An Ordinance for the naturalization of LI Ó MI otherwise LI TÁI FUNG.

No. 23. An Ordinance to authorize in certain cases judicial investigations into the causes

of fire.

No. 24.-An Ordinance to authorize the Appropriation of a Supplementary Sum of One hundred and Ninety-four thousand Four hundred and Sixty-eight Dollars and Sixty-three Cents to defray the Charges of the Year 1887.

No. 25.-An Ordinance to apply a sum not exceeding One million Two hundred and Thirty- nine thousand Eight hundred and Ninety-seven Dollars to the Public Service of the Year 1889.

No. 26. An Ordinance entitled The European District Reservation Ordinance Amendment

Ordinance, 1888.

No. 27.-An Ordinance to amend Ordinance 9 of 1876.

No. 28.-An Ordinance for the naturalization of ELIAS ISAAC ELIAS otherwise ELIAS ISAAC -

ELIAS ZACHARIAH.

No. 29.-An Ordinance to amend Ordinance No. 15 of 1886.

10.-COUNCIL AND ASSEMBLIES.

283

Executive Council.-The Honourable H. E. WODEHOUSE, C.M.G., Acting Colonial Treasurer, was admitted a Member of the Executive Council, in the room of the Honourable ALFRED LISTER, absent on leave.

Legislative Council.-The Honourable H. E. WODEHOUSE, C.M.G., Acting Colonial Treasurer was admitted as a Member of the Legislative Council, in the room of the Honourable ALFRED LISTER, absent on leave.

The Honourable B. LAYTON was nominated by the Chamber of Commerce in the room of the

Honourable A. P. MACEWEN, absent on leave.

Sanitary Board. The Sanitary Board was re-constituted during the year under The Public Health Ordinance, 1887, with the Colonial Surgeon and the Captain Superintendent of Police as President and Vice-President, respectively.

Board of Examiners.--Mr. T. SERCOMBE SMITH, a Passed Cadet, was appointed Honorary Secretary to the Board.

Medical Board.-Dr. HARTIGAN returned to the Colony, and resumed the Secretaryship to the

Board.

11.-CIVIL ESTABLISHMENTS.

Sir G. WILLIAM DES VEUX was absent from the Colony, by permission, from the 7th to the 20th March, and again on the 26th November to the 18th December. On both occasions Mr. FREDERICK STEWART, the Colonial Secretary, administered the Government.

Judicial Sir GEORGE PHILIPPO, Kt., Chief Justice, retired on pension on the 5th October, 1888; and Mr. Justice RUSSELL, Puisne Julge, succeeded to the office of Chief Justice. Mr. Justice CLARKE, Chief Justice of Fiji, was appointed Puisne Judge.

Several changes occurred in various Departments, consequent upon Officers going on leave of

absence.

12.-OFFICERS WHO HAVE GIVEN SECURITY FOR THE DISCHArge of their Duties.

The validity of the sureties of the various Officers was duly enquired into at the end of every quarter, and found to be satisfactory.

13. PENSIONS.

The following Officers retired on pension during the year :-

Sir GEORGE PHILLIPPO, Kt., Chief Justice. HENRY GEORGE THOMSETT, R.N., C. M.G., Harbour Master. HO CHUK SHAN, Senior Master of Chinese, Central School. 1 European Police Constable.

1 Chinese Police Constable.

5 Indian Police Constables.

14.-EXPENDITURE OF THE ESTABLISHMENTS.

The amounts paid during the year on account of the Establishments were:-

Payments in Great Britain in Sterling money,... Payments in the Colony in Local Currency,

15.-FOREIGN CONSULS.

No new Consulates were established in the Colony during 1888.

16.-POPULATION.

The estimated population on the 31st December, 1888, was as follows:-

£28.814. 3s. 4d. $699,525.19

Males, Females,

...154,500 61,300

215,800

which is 2,849 more than the estimated population at the end of 1887.

The last census was taken in 1881, the population being then returned as 160,402, of which

115,369 were males, and 45,033 females.

The following is the mean estimated population for the last 8

years:-

Years. 1882,

Males.

Females.

Total.

.119,704

46,729

166,433

1883,

124,768

48,707

173,475

1884,

130,560

50,969

181,529

1885,

137,079

53,515

190,594

1886,

144,550

56,440

200,990

1887,

152,427

60,524

212,951

1888,

...154,500

61,300

215,800

:

284

The births and deaths for the last 5 years were as follows:-

Per 1,000 of mean Population.

Years.

Births.

Deaths.

Births.

Deaths.

1884,

1,551

4,311

8.54

23.74

1885,

.1,555

5,192

8.16

27.24

1886,

#086

1,557

5,100

7.74

25.37

1887,

.1,705

5,317

8.01

24.97

1888,

.1,662

6,034

7.70

27.96

17.-ECCLESIASTICAL ESTABLISHMENTS.

There were no changes in these Establishments, as compared with previous years.

18.-EDUCATION.

The total number of Schools subject to supervision by the Government amounted, in 1888, to 97, as compared with 94 in 1887 and 90 in 1886.

The total number of Scholars subject to Government supervision in the Government and Grant- in-aid Schools during the last 5 years was as follows: —

Years.

1884,

1885,

1886.

1887.

1888,..

Govt. ...1.978

Grant-in-aid.

Total.

3,907

6,885

.1,803

4,041

5,844

1,893

3,951

5,844

..1,814

4,160

5,974

...1,933

4,325

6,258

The total expenditure for these Schools for the last 5 years was as follows:--

1884,

1885,

1886,

1887,

1888,

$36,758.14

36,085.27

43,085.50

43,070.91

45,518.93

19.-EXCHANGE, MONEY, WEIGHTS AND MEASURES.

Exchange.

The rate of Exchange on 4 months' Bills on London fell from 3s. 24d. per dollar on the 3rd of January, to 2s. 117d. on the 19th May.

During the year it fluctuated between these two rates closing with 3s. 1d. in the latter end of December.

Currency.

The law affecting currency has remained unchanged.

Bank Notes.

The Bank Notes in circulation in Hongkong during the last 5 years, as furnished by the Managers of the respective Banks, were as follows:-

Years.

1884,.

1885,

1886.

1887,

1888,.

Average Amount. $4,114,787

4,080,071

4,368,705

5,052,473

5,759,875

Money Circulation.

Specie in Reserve.

$1,810,033

2,000,833

2,138,333

2,362,833

2,660,000

The approximate amount of Coin put into circulation up to 31st December, 1888, was as follows:

Hongkong Dollars and half Dollars struck at the Hongkong Mint,......$1,421,487 Hongkong Silver and Copper Subsidiary Coins (20, 10, and 5 cent

pieces; and 1 Cent and Mil pieces),

The importation of Copper Coin has been discontinued.

Weights and Measures.

$2,482,091

The Weights and Measures in use in the Colony are regulated by Ordinance 8 of 1885.

20.-IMPORTS AND EXPORTs.

285

There being no Custom House, it is not possible to furnish an account of all Imports and Exports but a record of Raw Opium imported and exported during 1888 has been kept, and is as follows:-

Imported, Exported,

17

71,512 chests. 71,139 7

40 ""

The fraction is explained by the fact that one broached chest was landed here containing 27 instead of 40 balls, and was exported in the same condition.

21.-SHIPPING.

Arrivals exclusive of Junks.

The total arrivals, exclusive of Junks, during the year 1888, amounted to 3,821 vessels and 4,536,442 tons, being 71,472 tons under the arrivals in 1887.

Junks.

23,958 Junks measuring 1,863,968 tons arrived in the Colony in 1888, as against 23,521 Junks and 1,793.923 tons in 1887, showing an increase of 437 Junks and 70,045 tons.

The total arrivals for the last 5 years were :—

EXCLUSIVE OF JUNKS.

Years. Number of Vessels. Tons. Number of Vessels.

JUNKS.

Tons.

GRAND TOTal. Number of Vessels.

Tons.

1884,...... 3,290

3,479,637

23,473 1,687,594

26,763 5,167,231

1885,...

3,428

3,866,709

23,674

1886,.

4,251

4,571,296

1887.

4,078

4,607,914

1888....... 3,821

22,971 23,521 1,793,923 27.599 4,536,442 23,958 1,863,968 27,779

1,797,222 1,752,868

27,102

5,663,931

27,222

6,324,164

6,401,837

6,400,410

Immigration and Emigration.

The following will show the number of Chinese who arrived in, and the number who departed from the Colony during the last 5 years:-

Years. 1884,

1885,

1886,

1887,

1888,

Arrived.

73,767

80,773

88,704

92,375

98,800

22.-AGRICULTURE.

Departed.

51,247

57,517

64,522

82,897

96,195

The lands of the Colony being limited and not favourable for agricultural purposes, there is no inducement for this industry here. The produce is quite nominal, and is for local consumption only.

23.-MANUFACTURES, &c. Manufactories.

No new Manufactories have been added to those already in existence.

Steam-Launches.

The total number of Steam-Launches built in the Colony in 1888, was 24, with a total tonnage of 1,655, as against 31 with a total tonnage of 2,872 in 1887. The total number of licensed Steam- Launches of all descriptions, in the Colony, in 1888, were:-

Licensed to carry passengers,

Private Launches,.

Colonial Government Launches,

War Department Launches,.

41

42

S

6

97

24.-GRANTS OF LAND.

The sales of land on lease during the last 5 years were:-

Years.

Total No. of Sales.

Total No. of Acres sold.

A.

R.

P.

1884,

76

25. 3. 81

1885,

145

28.

0.

0.

143

1886,

88

82.

2. 312

1887,

187

76. 0. 8

1888,

202

104. 0. 4/4/

286

25.-GAOLS AND PRISONERs.

On the 1st January, 1888, there were 576 prisoners in Victoria Gaol; 3,627 were admitted during the year, and 3,700 discharged; the total number of prisoners on the 31st December, 1888, was 503, of whom 51 were Europeans.

The daily average of prisoners was 531, as against 584 in the previous year.

The number of prisoners admitted into Gaol during the last five years was as follows:-

YEARS.

Men.

No. OF PRISONERS.

Women.

TOTAL.

Juveniles.

DAILY AVERAGE NUMBER IN PRISON.

1884,

3,670

168

185

4,023

552.00

1885,

3,327

147

136

3,610

530.00

1886,

4,278

173

149

4,600

674.00

1887, 1888,

4,012

149

147

4,308

584.00

3,390

98

139

3,627

531.00

26. CRIMINAL STATISTICS.

Supreme Court.

The following is a Return of cases tried at the Supreme Court during the last five years:

POSTPONED.

1884,

1885,

1886,

1887,

1888,

CHARGES ABANDONED.

Number Number

YEARS.

of Cases.

of

Convicted. Acquitted.

Persons.

Number of Number of

Cases.

Persons.

No. of Cases.

No. of Persons.

68

101

65

91

147

103

75

107

59

94

155

82

101

186

99

22285

20

8

16

...

16

22

20

16

27

1

1

36

17

26

1

8

47.

28

40

Total,...

429

696

408

145

85

131

2

9

Average of 5 years,

85巷

139

813

29

17

261

315

14

Do.

ending 1883,

1114

165

112

381

9/3/

142

338

co

1

Police Magistrates' Court.

The Cases before the Police Magistrates during the last 5 years were as follows:--

CASES HOW DISPOSED OF.

Total No. Total No.

YEARS.

of

Cases.

of Prisoners.

Convicted and Punished.

Dis- charged.

Committed Committed

for pending Trial.

Orders.

Ordered Punished

to Find Security.

for False Tes-

timony.

Un-

decided.

1884,

14,065

15,935

12,836

2,562

103

38

281

8

107

1885,

10,281

11,901

8,800 2,446

161

14

456

6

18

1886,

14,611

16,647

12,923 2,388

159

5

969

35

168

1887,

12,015

13,458

10,679 2,779

167

32

463

14

48

1888,

11,647 13,309

9,932 2,849

174

109

192

3

50

Total,.......

Average of 5 years,

Do.

ending 1883,

62,619

12,523.8

8,106.0

71,250

14,250.0

55,170 13,024

764

198

2,361

66

391

11,034.0 2,604.8

152.8

39.6

472.2

13.2

78.2

9,775.4

6,977.0 2,165.2

200.0

22.8

305.4

27.2

77.8

Marine Magistrate's Court.

The Cases before the Marine Magistrate's Court during the last 5 years were as follows:-

DEFENDANTS HOW DISPOSED OF.

287

YEARS.

Number of

Number of

Forfei-

To be dis-

Com-

Cases.

Defend- Impri-

Fined.

ture Repri-

Sent back to

charged

Dis-

mitted

ants.

soned.

of

mauded.

from missed.

for

Duty.

Pay.

Ship.

Trial.

1884,

78

169

85

32

11

1885,

111

221

136

47

14

1886,

58

87

43

24

6

1887,

90

152

47

37

6

1888,

70

167

66

38

12222

9

3

28

1

21

1

11

15

3

23

53

1

5

Total,...

407

796

377

178

39

28

79

7

88

Average of last 5 years,

81.4

159.2

75.4

35.6

7.8

5.6

15.8

1.4

17.6

Do. ending 1883,...

85.6

166.0

66.8

33.0

13.2

5.8

18.0

2.0

26.8

Police.

The Cases brought under the notice of the Police during the last 5 years were as follows:--

SERIOUS OFFENCES.

MINOR OFFENCES.

YEARS.

Number of

Convicted.

Cases.

Discharged.

Number of Cases.

Convicted.

Discharged.

1884,

1885,

1886,

1887,

1888,

2,652

1,297

560

7,551

4,743

1,102

2,466

1,298

561

4,309

3,707

757

2,500

1,389

472

6,336

6,457

672

2,577

1,234

565

5,904

6,310

1,214

2,436

1,116

556

5,678

5,772

1,105

Total,...

12,631

6,334

2,714

29,778

26,989

4,850

Average of 5 years,

2,526.2

1,266.8

542.8

5,955.6

5,397.8

970.0

Do. ending 1883,

2,359.2

1,312.4

473.4

4,291.2

3,794.6

869.0

27.-HOSPITALS, &C.

Civil Hospital.

The admissions to the Government Civil Hospital during the year were as follows, as compared with 1887.

1387.

1888.

Police,

619

657

Board of Trade,

103

153

Private paying Patients,

324

3.13

Government Servants,

147

159

Police Cases,

208

242

Destitutes,

255

248

1,656

1,772

The total admissions to the Hospital and Deaths during the last 5 years were as follows:-

Years.

1884,

1885,

1886,

1887,

1888,

Admissions.

Deaths.

1,354

50

1,510

76

1,623

79

1,656

89

1,772

80

:

288

The admissions from the Police Force and the number of Deaths for the past five years were as follows:-

Years.

1884,

1885,

1886,

1887,

1888,

Admissions.

486

495

602

619

657

Deaths.

7

9 (α.)

14 (b.)

9

15

The admissions of Europeans were, in 1887, 139, as compared with 147 in 1888; the Chinese were 187, in 1887, as compared with 231 in 1888; and the Indians were 293 in 1857, as compared with 279 in 1888.

Military Hospital.

The admissions from among the troops during the past 5 years were as follows:-

Years.

1884,

1885,

1886,

1887,

1888,

Admissions.

Deaths.

1,097

12

1,090

24 (c.)

1,607

9

1,749

14

1,485

21

Small-Pox Hospital.

The admissions during the past five years were as follows:-

Years.

1884,

1885,

1286,

1887,

1888,

Inquests.

Admissions.

7

14

11

65

99

The Inquests held during the past five years were as follows:--

1884,

1885,

1886,

1887,

1888,

82

..100

.120

....115

63

By Ordinance 17 of 1888, the Office of Coroner is abolished, and the duties thereof transferred to the Police Magistrates.

28.-CHARITABLE AND LITERARY INSTITUTIONS.

No fresh Institution was formed.

29.-RELIGIOUS. INSTITUTIONS.

No fresh Institution was formed.

COLONIAL SECRETARY'S OFFICE,

FREDERICK STEWART, Colonial Secretary.

HONGKONG, 30th August, 1889.

(a.) Only 5 of these died in Hospital, 1 died at his own residence, and 3 died whilst on leave. (b.) In Hospital.

(c.) 12 died of Cholera.

No. 17.

165

11

No. 89.

HONGKONG.

REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF THE BOTANICAL AND AFFORESTATION

DEPARTMENT FOR 1888.

Presented to the Legislative Council, by Command of His Excellency the Governor.

BOTANICAL AND AFFORESTATION DEPARTMENT,

HONGKONG, 5th April, 1889.

!

ì

SIR,-I have the honour to submit the Annual Report on the Progress and Condition of this Department for the year 1888.

ESTABLISHMENT.

As usual the changes amongst the workmen have been numerous, and they will, as may reasonably be expected, continue to be so while the men, after they have been with us long enough to learn their work somewhat, are able to secure higher wages elsewhere than are paid to them as garden labourers here. A few men who know some English and who would be able to acquire the names of plants cultivated are very much needed in the Gardens. It is easy to conceive the very great difficulty of successfully carrying on the routine work of a large garden without a single man, exclusive of one European, who knows the names of more than a score of plants in the Garden. This want renders the work of indicating plants, which must be done by personal visits to them when anything is required in order to point them out, a very considerable labour for those who have it to do. There is a very much felt want of more extensive and closer supervision of the multitudinous details in operations daily. carried on which it is impossible at present to apply. The unusual disadvantages under which horti- culture exists here necessitate much more careful and persistent management than in most other parts of the world, where nature and circumstances have been more generous in supplying favourable con- ditions and material at hand for the purposes of cultivation. As regards workmen I had hoped when I introduced a system of training apprentice boys that the staff would have been far more efficient by this time, but although the boys are useful merely as boys still we have not yet had very much benefit from them on the whole as trained workmen. The training the boys receive is of great advantage to themselves but their services when they are becoming valuable are secured by persons who remunerate them better than we can, therefore the apprentices naturally place their services in the highest market.

BOTANIC GARDENS.

The general condition of the Gardens was not so good as could have been desired during the year. The chief cause of this was the inadequate means, which, as I had reported, were crippled by additional demands being made on the vote which was not correspondingly increased. As economy had con- sequently to be exercised in some directions, it was arranged that the saving should be applied in such ways as would cause sacrifices of only a temporary character and which could be promptly remedied with increased means. The chief works which were thus allowed to be left unattended to were repairs to walks and regular mowing of some of the grass. Even this however caused for the time being a regretable appearance of disorder which was a new thing for the Hongkong Gardens which always up to the time had, I believe, the reputation of being extremely well kept.

We have had a good deal to contend with in thieves stealing saleable articles such as iron grates glass from sashes, &c., and in wanton mischief done in breaking plant labels by boys, besides plants being damaged and the arrangement in flower beds being disturbed by plant and flower stealers. In the latter case a severe example was made of two boys who were apprehended by the police. Since that time there has been immunity from mischief of the nature which they were punished for being guilty of. Some portions of the grass turf near where children congregate are in a chronic state of disorder caused by the children, which seem quite beyond the capacity of the police and amahs to manage, making use of them as playgrounds. It seems inevitable that this must be submitted to unless we could afford to fence off these places with light iron railings.

Al Fresco Fête.

The Fête which was again held in the Gardens caused some undesired disarrangements and damage, but fortunately the extra precautions taken to minimise damages had some good effect. Still, with the greatest precautions there is always, besides actual damages and disturbance, a great risk run which ought not to be accepted in any garden of the character of this one. It is, however, exceedingly satisfactory and reassuring to know that no more al fresco fêtes are to be permitted within the Gardens.

166

Thinning and Removal of Trees.

This work has now been completed so far as it will be required, for some years to come, with the exception of ordinary annual attentions which may be necessary. Although a large number of useless trees have been removed the Gardens still have a somewhat crowded appearance, but this is unavoidable where space is so limited.

Fern Houses.

The central portion which was temporarily fitted last year for the reception of a collection of ferns has now had the temporary arrangements replaced with permanent ones. New brickwork plant tables have been made, the floors cemented and drained and the roof has been completed and covered with split bamboo sun screens supported on iron pillars improvised from old 3-inch water pipes. The old houses have also had improvements made to them.

Potting Shed.

Adjoining the fern houses the old ever-dilapidated looking matshed has been replaced with a properly constructed brick and tile structure which has been very much needed for years, not only as a potting shed, but as a place where coolies may work under in wet weather when little good could be done at some of the out-door operations.

Deer Pens.

Last year a new house was provided for the animals here, and this year improvements have been continued by the erection of a new galvanized wire fence on iron supports which have taken the place of the perishable wooden posts that previously existed. The whole place has now not only a much neater appearance, but, besides painting, nothing will be required in the way of repairs for some years

to come.

Bear House.

The Siberian Bear has again given considerable trouble. He has made several attempts to pull his house down, on one occasion he succeeded in ripping the iron roof, and another time he made con- siderable progress in demolishing the brick walls. He also succeeded in squeezing to death the Siamese bear which had been his associate for the last two years. The house has been

The house has been very much strengthened, and there is now no fear of the bear being able to effect his escape. A small compartment has been added to the house to accommodate two specimens of Hongkong Badgers which were obtained while very young and successfully reared.

Herbaceous Plants.

Increased and improved accommodation being required for these advantage was taken of an oppor tunity to provide what was required by reducing the excessive width of the walk in the New Garden leading from the deer pen to Glenealy and making a new border on each side of it. The soil, which was exceedingly bad and wholly unfit for receiving herbaceous plants was removed to a suitable depth and replaced with better soil carried down from the hills. In this way we obtained borders 250 yards long, and of an average width of five feet into which the plants were placed in a suitable arrangement bringing orders together as far as practicable.

Shrubberies.

These were extended over the ground in which the herbaceous plants were growing before their removal to new quarters. The additional space was required for the accommodation of newly intro- duced plants from China and elsewhere. These plants were transferred to their new home as soon as it was ready for them.

Palm Plot.

A spare corner near the palm plot which was temporarily furnished with bamboos had the latter removed and the ground prepared and turfed over. Into this the palms newly introduced were planted

at once.

Mymphæas and other Aquatic Plants.

The cultivation of these in the Fountain basin has been improved and extended by the construction of brick-work for retaining soil below the surface of the water to take the place of the too small pots in which the plants had formerly to be grown, but still on account of the insufficient depth of water complete success in growing many aquatics cannot be attained.

Rockeries.

The new rockery at the north-east gate has been planted but it is not yet completely furnished on account of the small size of some of the plants which had to be used, the plants however are rapidly increasing in size and they will soon fill up bare places.

Amaryllis.

The different varieties have all been collected together and formed into a bed to themselves so that they can readily be compared and receive better attention than when scattered about.

8

167

:

Y

Star Anise.

In my Report for 1886 I stated that the small plants which had been obtained in 1883 had pro- duced flowers which had shown the plant to be referrable to Illicium cambodiense. However since then a plant which was sent to Kew has produced flowers and fruit in that establishment and that material has shown the plant to be of a species not before known and Sir JOSEPH DALTON HOOKER has given it the name of Illicium verum. In the July Number of the Botanical Magazine the plant was figured, and an interesting account which was prepared by Sir JOSEPH HOOKER accompanied the figure. As this is a question of considerable interest in the Far East I give, for the benefit of those to whom the Bota- nical Magazine is not accessible, the account as it appeared.

"The plant producing the true Star Anise of China is here for the first time figured and described. "For many years the fruit so called was supposed to be that of Illicium anisatum, Linn. (see Benth. "and Trimen, Med. Pl. vol. I. t. 10), the Skimmi of Japan, or of I. religiosum, Sieb-and Zucc. (Tab. "nost. 3965), supposed to be a native of China, but which is identical with . anisatum of Linnæus "and Loureiro. For an account of this plant, its history and characters, I must refer to Baillons "learned treatise, published in 1867, in his Adansonia (vol. viii. p. 1), and to papers by the late Dr. "HANCE and Dr. BRETSCHNEIDER in the China Review (vol. ix. p. 283, &c.) It suffices here to "observe that I. anisatum or religiosum are species with peduncles bracteate at the base, and long "spreading inner perianth-segments, and that they hence belong to a different section of the genus "from I. verum.”

"The first person to recognize the fact that neither I. anisatum of Linnæus or of Loureiro could "be the true Star Anise of China was Dr. BRETSCHNEIDER, then Medical Officer to the Russian Embassy "at Pekin, who drew attention to the fact that the Japanese plant was a reputed poison; and that this had "been confirmed by T. F. EYKMAN, who in a paper published in 1881 in the Mittheilung der Deutsche "Gesellschaft für Naturund Völkerkunde Ost-Asien (Heft xxiii. 23) had experimented with and given "the name of Skimine to the poison. But the first definite information regarding the true Star Anise "is contained in a letter addressed to me by the late Dr. HANCE in October, 1881, which contained "seeds of the true plant received that morning from Pakhoi in South China. And in the same year "Mr. FORD of the Hongkong Botanical Gardens sent to Kew, fruit and fragments of the leaves of the "true plant from Pakhoi. In his Report on the Hongkong Botanical Gardens for 1882, Mr. FORD states that Mr. KOPSCH, Commissioner of the Chinese Imperial Maritime Customs at Pakhoi, had "obtained for him a few seedlings of the true Star Anise, of which three had survived, and had attained "a height of nine feet in 1886, and flowered in the Botanical Gardens. He adds that they prove to "belong to an entirely different species from I. anisatum and all other described species. In 1883 “Mr. FORD Sent living plants to the Royal Gardens, Kew, which flowered in November, 1887, and it "is from one of these that the figure here given was drawn. In 1886 Mr. FORD sent dried specimens "from his nine feet high plant."

66

CC

"There are several species of the genus Illicium to which I. verum is more nearly allied than to "I. anisatum, all having globose flowers, but all differing from verum in the increased number of perianth-segments, stamens and carpels; these are the Indian I. Griffithii, H. f. and T., and I. "majus, H. f. and T., respectively from the Khasia Mountains in Eastern Bengal, and the mountains of Tenasserim, nd the I. cambodianum, HANCE (in Trimen's Jour. Bot. 1876, p. 240, I. cambogianum, "Pierre, Flore Forestière Cochin-Chine, t. 4). The latter, a broad-leaved species with long-peduncled "flowers, is a native of the Elephant Mountains in Cochin-China. From all these I. verum differs, not only in the number of parts of the flower, but as Mr. HOLMES (Conservator of the museum of the "Pharmaceutical Society) who has been so good as to examine them all for me, informs me, in taste of "foliage and fruit, by which alone he could distinguish them, and pronounce I. verum to be specifically

66

"distinct from all others."

((

((

With regard to Loureiro's I. anisatum from South China, under which he cites Linnæus and the Japanese Skimmi of Kampfer, it is altogether a doubtful plant. It is described as having yellow flowers, a six-leaved calyx, spreading corolla and thirty stamens, and hence cannot be I. verum.

"In his "Notes on Botanical questions connected with the export trade of China," printed at Pekin "1880, Dr. BRETSCHNEIDER calls attention to a Report by Mr. PIRY on the trade of Pakhoi for 1878-9, which contains interesting particulars regarding the Star Anise. Of this he says it is brought to that port for exportation from the province of Kuangsi viâ Kin-Chow, and that it is produced in two "districts, Lung-Chow on the borders of Annam, and Po-se in the West (or Canton) river close to

Yunnam."

(6

66

"The Star Anise was, according to Hanbury (Pharmacographia, ed. 2, p. 22), first brought to Europe by the voyager Candish about the year 1588, and first described by Clusius (Rarior Plant. "Hist. p. 202) in 1601 from fruits procured from London. It seems afterwards to have been imported "viâ Russia (and hence called Cardamomum siberiense, or Annis de Siberie), and was used by the "Dutch in the seventeenth century to flavour beverages. From China it is exported into Eastern "Turkestan under the name of Chinese fennel, and in China itself it is called Pa-Kio-nui hiang, or eight-horned Fennel; the fact being that though commonly compared with aniseed, the taste is really 'more like that of fennel; so that the name given it by Redi (Experimenta, p. 172) in 1675 was “Fœniculum sinensis. In China the Star Anise is employed as a condiment and as a spice, and it is "still used to flavour spirits in Germany, France (where it is the flavouring material of Anisette de Bordeaux) and Italy. In England, according to Hanbury, it is used only as a substitute for oil of anise."

66

168

"The propriety of giving the new name of verum to this interesting plant may be challenged on "the ground that the Linnæan one of anisatum should be retained for it. and another be adopted for "the Japanese plant so long supposed to be the origin of the Star Anise. The objections to this course

are twofold; the first is, that Linnæus (Sp. Plant. Ed. 3, p. 664) clearly describes this as his I. Y "anisatum, the Skimmi of Kæmpfer, and cites Kampfer's Amanitates for the same He, however, "adds, "Planta a me now visa, fide Kaempferi recepta, forte Anisum stellatum officinarum, quod adjectum "Tetraodonti ocellari ejus anget venenun." The italics are my own. The passage shows that Linnæus "is not answerable for the reference of the Star Anise to I. anisatum. The second objection is, that it "would require the adoption of another name for the old and well-known Japanese plant, for which "however, the synonym I. religiosum of Siebold and Zuccarini might be adopted."

The figure and account were also published in the Kew Bulletin.

Several other plants which had been introduced from these Gardens and which flowered in the Royal Gardens, Kew, during the year were figured and described in the Botanical Magazine. Amongst the rest was the interesting "lesser or Chinese Galangal" of commerce.

DISTRIBUTION AND INTERCHANGE OF PLANTS AND SEEDS.

The usual exchanges have been made with other establishments and individuals, 147 boxes, bags, and packets of seeds, weighing 16tbs., and 469 plants were received. 286 boxes, bags, and packets of seeds, weighing 140lbs., and 2542 plants were distributed.

The following were the principal recipients :-

Agri: Horticultural Society, Madras.

Alves, J. A.

Anderson, Colonel.

Armstrong, G., Manila.

Armstrong, J. M.

Atkinson, Dr. J. M.

Bain, G. M.

Ball, J. D.

Barton, J.

Botanic Gardens, British Guiana.

""

12

">

""

""

""

>>

""

>>

29

>>

13

Melbourne.

Saharanpur. Saigon. Singapore. Tasmania.

Townsville.

and Plantations, Adelaide-

South Australia.

Botanical Department, Jamaica.

Brown, H. G., Manila.

Cameron, Miss. B.

Chalmers, Rev. Dr.

Cook, Mrs.

Cundall, C. H., Manila.

Dennys, H. L.

Faber, Rev. E. Fisher, D. J. W.

Forest Department. Penang.

Gerlach, Dr.

Gourdin, A. O'D.

Government Civil Hospital.. Hance, Mrs.

Hongkong Dispensary.

Italian Convent.

Morrison, Dr., Newchwang.

Parlane, William.

Queensland Acclimatisation Society, Brisbane.

Romano, A. G.

Royal Botanic Gardens, Calcutta.

19

""

""

Ceylon.

97

>>

Kew, London.

""

Mauritius.

";

""

"

""

Royal.

Royal Botanic Gardens, Trinidad.

Royal Engineers Department.

Royal Palm Nurseries, U. S. A. Kyrie, Hon. P.

Russell, C.M.G., Hon. J.

Silva, J. M. A. da.

Stone-Cutters' Island Powder Depôt.

Taikoo Sugar Refinery.

Threlfall, F.L.S., William.

Thurston, K.C.M.G., H. E. Sir. J. B., Fiji.

Veitch & Sons, Messrs. J., London. Vernon, J. Y. V.

Williams, R.

The donors were as follow:- Agri: Horticultural Society, Madras. Armstrong, G., Manila.

Armstrong, J. M.

Awan.

Barton, J.

Botanic Gardens, Natal.

""

>>

>>

>>

>>

Saharanpur.

Singapore.

Townsville.

Botanical Department, Jamaica.

Choi Chee Bee.

Cook, Mrs.

Cundall, C. H., Manila.

Forest Department, Penang. French Convent. Gerlach, Dr.

Grossmann, C. F.

Hazeland, J. J.

Hongkong Dispensary.

Kennedy, D.

Lightwood, Mrs.

Morrison, Dr., Newchwang.

Norowjee, D.

Romano, A. G.

Royal Botanic Gardens, Calcutta.

>>

>>

:)

Ceylon.

*

19

""

Kew, London.

Mauritius.

Trinidad.

·,

>>

Royal Palm Nurseries, U. S. A.

Sampson, Theo., Canton. Wise, A. G.

·

SALE OF PLANTS AND TREES.

169

The work in this section continues to increase. The total number of plants and trees sold was nearly three times as many as during last year, the number was 3,317 and they realised $412,21. About half of the number sold were forest trees and the other half ornamental plants. There is a con- siderable regular demand for maiden-hair ferns, the demand so far as quantity goes is well met now, but the quality is not quite so good sometimes as I could wish it to be. For the desired improvement, however, extended and improved appliances for cultivation are required which I hope will be partly met this year by provisional arrangements.

HERBARIUM.

In my last year's report I had occasion to lament the want of more suitable accommodation. for keeping the collection of dried plants. I have now however the great satisfaction of expressing my appreciation of the better provision which has been made for keeping the plants and carrying on the works of the herbarium, which has made much greater progress than in any one previous year.

Amongst other work 1,192 specimens were mounted, labelled and incorporated. I anticipate that during the present year the remainder of the specimens which have been accumulating for some years will be satisfactorily disposed of and that then the work will be brought up to date.

The Rev. ERNST FABER has generously continued his kind donations of specimens collected by himself in Szchuen and in the neighbourhoods of Ningpo and Shanghai.

A collection of specimens of other Chinese plants has also been kindly presented by Mr. THISELTON T. DYER, Director of Kew Gardens.

To the Royal Gardens, Kew, we are also indebted as usual for valuable aid in information supplied on botanical subjects which could only be obtained from such a well equipped institution.

LIBRARY.

We are indebted to the Indian Forest Department and various Botanical Gardens, as nained below for Annual Reports which have been received. The following is the complete list of additions by presentation and purchase during the year:--

Botanical Magazine, 1888. Purchased. Catalogue des plants de Ichi Fou, Frauchet. do. Catalogue of plants, in the Agri: Hortic. So-

ciety's Gardens, Madras.

Comparative Anatomy of the Vegetable Organs of the Phanerogams and ferns. Purchased A. DE BARY.

Eunumerations plantarum quas in China boreali

Collegit Bunge. Purchased.

Eumeratio, Plantarum Zeylaniæ, Thwaites, Pur-

chased.

Flore Forestiere de la Cochin-Chine, Fasciles 8 to

11. Presented by Mrs. HANCE. Gardener's Chronicle, 1888. Purchased. Hooker's Icones Plantarum Parts I-IV Vol. VIII.

Presented by the Bentham. Trustees. Index Florae Sinensis, Part V. Presented by

the Royal Gardens, Kew.

Journal of Botany, 1888. Purchased. Journal of the China Branch of the Royal Asiatic

Society No. 5 Vol. XIII. 1887. Purchased. Notes, on Forest Management in Germany,

Brandis.

Origine des plants Cultivees 1 vol. A. de Can-

dolle, Purchased.

Outline of Classification and Special Morphology

of Plants-Goebel. Purchased.

Report, Adaptation of Russian and other fruits

to the United States.

Report, Agri: Horticultural Society, Madras 1887.

27

Botanic Gardens, and Plantations-Ade-

laide, South Australia, 1887. Report, Botanic Gardens, Trinidad, 1887.

"

"}

British Guiana, 1886

and 1887.

Report, Course of Instruction at the Forest

School, Dehra Dun in 1887-88.

Report, Forests Straits Settlements, 1887.

Fruit Resources of British Guiana. Government Botanical Gardens, Saha-

ranpur, 1888.

""

Report, Royal Botanic Gardens, Ceylon, 1887.

Condition of Tropical and Semi-Tropical

Fruits in the U. S. in 1887. Report, Queensland Acclimatisation Society, 1887. Sorghum, its Culture and uses by Dr. PETER

COLLIER.

Indian Forest Reports.

Forest Administration in Ajmere-Merwara, 1886

1887.

""

Forest Administration in British India, 1886-87.

in Andamans, 1886-87. in North-West Provinces,

1886-87.

""

Forest Administration in Punjab, 1886-87.

Survey Branch, 1886-87.

Review of Forest Administration in British India, 1886-87.

170

FORESTRY.

The return to regularity in the amount of the Annual Forestry vote has enabled the operations to be returned to something like what they were before 1886. The number of trees planted and reared for the past year was nearly as large as in 1884. The season on account of the very favourable rain- fall was an excellent one for planting and the results were exceedingly satisfactory. Planting com- menced on November 25th, 1887 and was completed on July 14th, 1888, but the heaviest portion of the work was finished by April 26th. The operations were conducted chiefly in the following locali- ties:

Western end of the City.

Mt. Davis.

Pokfulam.

Military Sanitarium.

Mt. Kellet.

Mt. Parker.

Quarry Bay. Wongneichung. Deep Water Bay. Tytam. Chai Wan. Kowloon.

The following are the kinds and numbers of trees planted, reared in situ, and reared from broad- cast sowing.

Pinus sinensis,

Y

in situ

""

"> broadcast

""

""

Tristanea conferta,

Camphor,

Bamboos,

*Ficus repens,

Miscellaneous,

379,621

.239,997

50,000

4,297

7,658

320

400

32

682,325

1

Broadcast sowing was repeated on a large area on the hills near Chaiwan; the seeds germinated well and the seedlings are now in a healthy and promising condition. Where the ground is suitable for this work this method of rearing trees is apparently the most economical and satisfactory one which can be adopted.

Tristanea Conferta.

Five years ago 800 trees of this species were planted, these thrived so well that, as I reported last year, a larger number was being reared. From this sowing we obtained upwards of 4,000 which were planted; they succeeded perfectly. Seeds were again collected from our own trees-which made us independent of foreign supplies-and sown, and 20,000 seedlings were prepared for planting during

the current year.

Experiments.

Between 20 and 30 newly introduced species of trees were planted for experimental purposes, it is too early to pronounce an opinion on their suitability for this soil and climate.

Thinning Plantations.

but

A considerable area of the older plantations has been thinned, and cleared of brushwood which was becoming undesirably abundant. The work was chiefly performed, under supervision, by the purchasers of the material which was thinned and cleared. The trees and brushwood which were sold realised $419.25 clear profit.

Grass Fires.

There has again been remarkable exemption from damage to trees by grass fires. The fire barriers have been maintained and some extensions made. A considerable number of fires began, but they were arrested or extinguished in all cases at an early stage of their existence either by the fire barriers, police, or our own staff, or by all resources combined.

The proposal which I made and to which His Excellency the Governor and the Captain Super- intendent of Police assented, that the out police stations should be provided with means for extinguishing grass fires when they occur in districts near to the stations, has worked most satisfactorily and I wish to here express my appreciation of the useful services which the Officers and men under them at the out stations have cheerfully rendered in many instances. Their prompt actions in telegraphing to me the existence of fires, and their own exertions in extinguishing them, have saved large numbers of trees from destruction.

* A creeper planted to cover bare walls.

171

There were in all 14 fires reported by the police and our own staff, only one of these spread over a large area, and that one was in an unplanted locality where nothing but grass was burnt, and where no fire barriers had been made.

Protective Service.

The Forest Guards have worked much better this year than they did in the previous one. Some changes in the men were made and the new ones are a decided improvement on their predecessors.

The number of cases brought to the Magistracy was 47, out of which 38 convictions were obtained. The fines imposed, which however were not paid in all cases, amounted to $73.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

The Honourable

THE COLONIAL SECRETARY,

&c.,

&c.,

&c.

CHARLES FORd,

Superintendent,

Botanical and Afforestation Department.

+

No. 73.

HONGKONG.

RETURNS OF SUPERIOR AND SUBORDINATE COURTS FOR 1888.

Presented to the Legislative Council, by Command of

His Excellency the Governor.

241

No. 14

89.

REGISTRY SUPREME COURT,

HONGKONG, 4th April, 1889.

SIR.—I have the honour to forward herewith the following Returns :-

1. Criminal Cases, &c.

Appeals, commenced and tried in 1888.

2. Civil cases commenced and tried in 1888. (a.) In Original Jurisdiction.

(b.) In Summary Jurisdiction.

3. Bankruptcy.

4. Admiralty.

5. Probate and Administration.

6. Revenue (Fees, &c.)

7. Proceeds paid into Treasury.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

To The Honourable

THE COLONIAL SECRETARY,

&c.,

&c.,

&c.

Your most obedient Servant,

ALFRED G. WISE,

Acting Registrar.

242.

RETURN of CRIMINAL CASES that have been brought under the COGNIZANCE of the Supreme Court, during the last Ten Years.

V

Number Number

Charges Abandoned.

Postponed.

YEAR.

of

of

Convicted. Acquitted.

Cases. Persons.

No. of Cases.

No. of Persons.

No. of Cases.

No. of Persons.

(b.) 1879,

148

202

135

54

11

13

1880,

91

160

120

34

6

6

1881,

105

154

111

39

1

4

(c.) 1882,

124

187

124

38

15

21

1

3

(d.) 1883,

91

126

70

26

14

28d

2

2

Total,..

559

829

560

191

47

72

3

5

1884,

68

101

65

20

1885,

91

147

103

(e.) 1886,

75

107

59

20

(f) 1887,

94

155

82

1888,

101

186

99

.47

22285

8

16

16

22

16

27e

36

17

26

28

40

:

Total,.......

429

696

408

145

85

131

2

9

Average of 1st}

Period, ...... £

1114

165

112

3813/20

9/3/

14%

1

Average of 2nd]

Period,

853

1391

813

29

17

261

כאוס

13

(b.) 1. Under offence of Breaking into a Dwelling House out of 9 prisoners, 6 only are accounted for, the remaining 3 must have been

acquitted, and have been posted accordingly.

2. Under Murder out of 3 prisoners, 2 only have been accounted for, the 3rd was probably acquitted.

3. Under Unlawfully giving false statement to Registrar General the prisoner, although convicted, does not appear under the bead-

ing, but the facts appear in a foot note on the Return.

(c.) In one case the recognizance estreated, this case is included in the total, but not in any other of the above headings.

(d.) In one case the recognizance estreated, and one prisoner committed suicide in the Gaol.

(e.) In one case the recognizance estreated.

(f.) In three cases the recognizances were estreated.

Registry Supreme Court, Hongkong, 1st April, 1889.

ALFRED G. WISE,

Acting Registrar.

INDICTMENTS and INFORMATIONS in the SUPREME COURT of HONGKONG, for the Year 1888.

Including Attempts and Conspiracies to commit the several offences.

Showing how the cases tried in the

Superior Courts ended.

(Each prisoner tried, counted as a separate case; where a large number of Prisoners have been convicted together, the fact is mentioned in a note.)

Manslaughter.

Attempt at murder.

Concealment of Birth.

Abortion.

Rape.

Unnatural Crimes.

Robbery with violence.

Other offences against the Person.

Offences against Property.

Miscellaneous offences.

Total.

Murder.

:

:

40

2

1

Judgment for the Crown,

99

2

Judgment for the Prisoner,

4TM

13

1

Prisoner found Insane,

Cases which fell through for want of prosecution or absence of accused, and cases thrown out by the Grand Jury (Attor- ney General),

Cases postponed, ............

:

:

:

:

:

8

2

57

30

GO

3

-

20

6

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:.

:

:

:

186

17

:

Registry Supreme Court, Hongkong, 1st April, 1889.

:

00

8

27

11

:

co

85

63

ALFRED G. WISE,

Acting Registrar.

Number of Cases.

Number of Persons.

RETURN of CRIMINAL CASES tried in the SUPREME COURT of HONGKONG, during the Year 1888.

SENTENCE.

243

CHARGES CABES

ABAN-

POST.

DOXED.

PONED.

CRIMES.

Convicted.

9

Assault with intent to commit an unnatural offence,.

1

1

Attempt at rape,.

Bribery,

4

16

1

::

+

1

...

4

1

1

1

2

1

1

Burglary and receiving stolen goods,

Conspiring with the intent to defraud,

Detaining,

Embezzlement,

Enticing away from the Colony for an unlawful

purpose,

Escape,

Feloniously, unlawfully and maliciously throwing a certain destructive substance with the intent to do grievous bodily harm,

Feloniously and unlawfully detaining a child, Feloniously breaking and entering a store with in-

tent to commit a felony,

Feloniously wounding with intent to do grievous

bodily harm,

Feloniously forging two tallies for the delivery of

goods,

Feloniously forging a certain cheque or order with

intent to defraud,

Intimidating witnesses,

Acquitted.

00

Death.

Death Recorded.

over one Year.

Hard Labour

Hard Labour one Year and under.

Number of Persons. Solitary Confinement,

Number of Persons." Privately Flogged,

No. of Cases.

No. of Persons.

No. of Cases.

No. of Persons.

*

:

::

wi

8

I

:

1

:

:

:

:

150

2

:

2

2:22:21

2:

wi

3

::

:

Kidnapping,..

1 1 3

Larceny,

Larceny of a draft,

14

Larceny from a Lighter,

13

13

Larceny and receiving stolen goods.......

Larceny and obtaining money under false pretences,.

1

1

Larceny and previous conviction,

1

1

1

1

Larceny of a Post Letter,

2

Larceny from dwelling house,

1 1

1

Manslaughter,

1

a3

15

Murder,

2

13

2

Obtaining money by false pretences,

2

Perjury,

3

19

Piracy,

11

11

Prison Breach,.

11

11

11

Robbery with violence,

Robbery from the person,

1

Unlawfully and fraudulently enticing away from the

Colony for the purpose of emigration,

2

Unlawfully being a member of the Triad Society,

1

~ :

1

1

Unlawfully and wilfully obstructing a constable in

the execution of his duty,

1

20 —

:

:

3

4

8

Unlawfully and by force detaining for the purpose

of sale,

6

:

:

1

1

Unlawfully taking away from the Colony for the

purpose of prostitution,

Unlawfully and maliciously administer a certain

noxious poison with intent to injure.........

:

1

2

3

:

:

:

:

1

...

410

:

:

73 148

99

69

47

Of 148 Persons only

146 were tried.

2 were not indicted, which are included under the

heading of charges abandoned,

Convicted,. Acquitted,.

2

Charges abandoned,

148 Persons.

86

11.

.99 .47

Total......

:

23

28

40

:

:

146 Persons.

40

186 Persons.

a. In one case 10 men were subsequently indicted for Prison Breach and convicted and in another case where two men were convicted and sentenced to death the sentence was commuted to imprisonment with hard labour for life.

Registry Supreme Court, Hongkong, 1st April, 1889.

ALFRED G. WISE, Acting Registrar.

COMPARATIVE TABLE showing the NUMBER of OFFENCES, APPREHENSIONS, CONVICTIONS, and ACQUITTALS for the last Four Years.

The Number of Convictions in the Superior Courts,-

1. For Offences against the Person,

2. For Offences against Property,

3. For other Offences,..

The Number of Persons Acquitted,-

In the Superior Courts,..

Registry Supreme Court, Hongkong, 1st April, 1889.

1885.

1886.

1887. 1888.

22

16

34

12

61

42

37

57

20

1

11

30

22

20

36

47

ALFRED G. WISE,

Acting Registrar.

244

1888.

APPEALS COMMENCED.

JUDGMENT.

No. of Cases.

Appellant.

5

No. of Cases.

5

3

Pending.

Respondent.

2

3 of these cases were from the Police Magistrates.

APPEALS TRIED.

1828.

JUDGMENT.

Appellant.

Pending.

Respondent.

3

2

Registry Supreme Court, Hongkong, 1st April, 1889.

1888.

CASES COMMENCED.

JUDGMENT.

Settled or

No.

Jurisdiction. of

Cases.

Debt and Damages.

withdrawn before Trial.

Plaintiff.

Defend- Nou-

ant.

Suit.

Struck out, Dismissed

and Lapsed Writs.

In Dependency.

ALFRED G. WISE, Acting Registrar.

TOTAL CASES TRIED.

Cases.

Debt and Damages recovered.

Original,

57 $192,009.33

8

:

2

41

8

$27,695.55

Summary,

1,311 $145,462.14

516

504

54

25

169

43

583

$71,008.46

1888.

CASES TRIED.

JUDGMENT.

Jurisdiction.

No. of Cases.

Debt and Damages.

Plaintiff. Defendant. Non-Suit.

Struck out, Dismissed & Lapsed Writs.

Debt and Damages.

Original,

16a

$161,680.10

11

10

5

2 $34,236.50

Summary,..

7716

$ 87,508.56

513

57

28

173

$73,594.10

a.

8 of these cases were pending on 31st December, 1887. b. 30 of these cases were pending on 31st December, 1887.

Registry Supreme Court, Hongkong, 1st April, 1889.

RETURN of ADMIRALTY CASES for 1888.

ALFRED G. WISE, Acting Registrar.

Year.

Entered.

Amount claimed.

Tried.

Judgment for Plaintiff.

Amount recovered.

Judgment for Defendant.

Pending

or

Discontinued.

1888,

4

$44,180.91

2

2

$9,349.12

Registry Vice-Admiralty Court, Hongkong, 1st April, 1889.

1

Settled out of Courts.

1

ALFRED G. WISE, Acting Registrar.

RETURN of all BANKRUPTCIES filed in the Supreme Court of Hongkong during the Year 1888.

245

Official

Name.

Date of Adjudication.

or

Petitioner.

Creditor's Assignee.

Debts in Schedule.

Assets.

Amount Total received amount

by

of Official debts Assignee. proved.

REMARKS.

$

$

Ma Shum.

1st Feb., 1888. Creditors

Official

356.30

3,059.99 No Schedule filed.

Ng Wai Chan.

3rd

Ma Sing alias Ma Oi Shi,

9th

1888. 1888. Bankrupt

Creditor

277.72

1,395.60 No Schedule filed.

36,303.84 141,972.26

2.66

12,603.29

Chu Shing Cheong alias Chu Chuk

Pang and Leung Yee Cheung,. Kwok Yuk Kai alias Kwok Máu

Fai.

22nd

1888.

**

6,615,97 3,121.10

347.35

4,503.37

Not proceeded with.

Hop, .

John William Croker,

Luiz Mariano Pinto,....

Leung Yung alias Peter Young,... 15th Mar., 1888.

Lam Ching Po,

Chan Sam Kwai alias Chan Kwai

Chang A Yeong,

Dhunjeebhoy Dorabjee..

Edgar Louis Heymans and Gas-

ton Louis Heymans,...

Frederick Hunerfauth,

Official

R:

8,199.88 3,270.97 2,147.78 30.00

328.75

649.10 1,469.64

Petition refused.

309.00

"

Not proceeded with.

5th July, 1888.

Official

34,991.03 29,406.44| 13,202.47 | 22,962.67

569.69

"

Not proceeded with.

2,058.75

959.00

453.30

118.00

9th Aug., 1888.

Official

12,097.52 3,333.55

7,882.15 2,260.77

7,234.49

161.15

Edith Laurence,

José Nepomuceno Larcina,..

Francisco Mamede Gonsalves..

15th Oct., 1888. | Creditors Official 23rd 1888. Bankrupt 22nd Dec., 1888.

2,166.37

4,685.64

Not proceeded with. Petition refused.

Not proceeded with. No Schedule filed.

1,143.18

་་

15,086.55

180.75 2,565.65

965.81

456.25

Total,

.3 123,310.04 189,667.47 18,942.39

59,985.85

Registry Supreme Court, Hongkong, 1st April, 1889.

ALFRED G. WISE, Acting Registrar.

RETURN of BANKRUPT and INTESTATE ESTATES and of all JUDICIAL DEPOSITS, paid into the Treasury, by the Registrar of the Supreme Court, during the Year ended 31st December, 1888.

DATE.

ESTATE, CAUSE OR ACCOUnt.

JUDICIAL INTESTATE BANKRUPT DEPOSITS. ESTATES. ESTATES.

TOTAL.

1888.

$

$

March 26 Buckow, Adolph, Unclaimed balance,

15.45

>>

""

Down, James

"

22

Roberts, Frank

Kwok Ting Sui,

وو

"

Smyth, James R.

Sept.

18 Speechly v. Webster,

Do.,

18.45

Do.,

2.25

Do.,

2.75

Do.,

10.26

Suit No., 167 of 1877,

4.22

Chan Yau v. Li Kam,

33

""

988 1877.

3.48

Poon Lai San v. Revena,

236 1878,...

1.50

27

Lo U v. S. R. Neate,

29

Cheung Kwong v. Yau Cheong,

27

وو

وو

وو

1061 1877,...

14.21

605 1874,.

1.32

Chui Pun v. Aitken,

99

22

547 1878,..

9.45

Cheung Kun & anr. v. Li Ling Shing,

881

99

21

1878,...

4.00

Lee Fat v. Australian S. N. Coy,

128

1879,...

14.00

23

}}

Dayoormell v. Bryant,

""

748 1879,...

16.00

A. F. Smith v. Ho Tai,

27

""

910 1879,...

4.34

Rajah Singh v. Abdool Khan,

504 1879,.

1.00

""

""

Lee Ahmoon v. Lou Man Po,

""

27

868 1879,... 16.13

Mak Sew Wan v. Hon Chong, U-kwan Cheong v. Klampermeyer,... Kwan Mi-ho v. W. M. B. Arthur,... Fong Wing Shan v. T. I. Bowler, Chan Leung-fu v. Wong Pung

>>

980 1879,...

8.75

240 1880,...

12.65

,,

471 1880,...

2.40

22

897

وو

,, 1880,...

.25

1056

1880,...

8.40

:

Sheong,

""

Yeung Fu v. Norman,

475

1981,...

3.25

Lam U-Lai v. Betts,..

589

1881,

28.50

"}

""

Chan Wa Hi v. Chung Wing,

750 1881,.

.20

>>

Suit Nos. 1009 to 1024, Balance of sale

1009/

1024 77

1881,.

10.39

Li Chi v. Ng Kam,

189 1881,...

1.34

"}

""

Suit No. 496, Balance of sale,

496 1882,

10.50

"

>>

Utter Singh . Mahomed,.

27.

""

245 1882,...

1.10

Suit No. 939 Tsang Achoy v. Hol

939

1882,...

9.23

Kam Moon, Balance of sale,..

""

**

Do.,

Chun Kwai v. Dare, Lui Pek-tsz v. Cheung Kau, Li Pat Hing v. Leong Yon,..... Wong Iu Chin . Yew Luk,.

Do., v. Man Kow, Do., v. Mok Yung, Wong Yiu Chew v. Tang Wing, v. Lee A-kee,..

1882,...

4.00

29

"

>>

618 1882,...

9.61

27

""

255 1883,

.99

649 1883,.

7.78

"2

">

656 1883,...

3.16

""

27

655 1883,...

6.92

""

""

338

""

""

1883,

8.00

653 1883,...

5.40

"}

22

Carried forward,..

232.47

49.16

246

RETURN of BANKRUPT and INTESTATE ESTATES and of all JUDICIAL DEPOSITS, paid into the Treasury, by the Registrar of the Supreme Court, during the Year ended 31st December, 1888,—Continued.

DATE.

1888.

ESTATE, CAUSE OR ACCOUNT,

Brought forward,....

JUDICIAL INTESTATE BANKRUPT DEPOSITS. ESTATES. ESTATES

TOTAL.

232.47

49.16

Do.,

Do.,

Do.,

Do.,

Do.,

Wong Tso Leong :-

Do.,

Lyall Still and Company:-

Unclaimed dividend due to Fussell and Company,

Balance,

Vaucher v. Blakeway:-

Unclaimed dividend due to Rosselet Dubied,................

Chow Ting:-

Do.,

Do.,

Do.,

Do.,

Do.,

Pouget Fils,

C. M. Mitrand,

E. Apian,

Ch. Houssier,

A. Debano,

Unclaimed dividend due to Cheung Man Hoi, (Claims $19,390) Balance undivided,..... W. von Pustau :-

Unclaimed dividend due to J. J. de Marcaida,

Captain von Trumbach,

W. Dodge and Company,. P. E. du Bois,...... Leo Jauvet,

Fubrigs Fabriken,.

Unclaimed dividend due to Chan a Kan,

Ng Shang,..

238.34

2.58

7.63

131.21

115.53

6.18

238.79

49.16

57.55

::

52.40

79.27

18.20

10.00

8.93

63.10

13.72

9.33

3.60

4.23

Do.,

Lai A-hing,

1.72

Do.,

Cheang A-fook,

15.20

Do.,

Leong A-pang,

3.69

Do.,

Chow Kong,

6.01

Do.,

Sun Chow Yee,.

2.93

Do.,

Yip A-kew,

6.83

Do.,

Wong Soi Son,

2.81

Do.,

Li Kon Chow

2.44

Do.,

Yip Tsun,

Do.,

Leong A-chai,

27.98

Do.,

Tsang Tsau I,

27.56

...

146.97

(Claims $43,428.91) Balance undivided,

Virgile Favre :-

204

Unclaimed dividend due to Nam Hing Loong...............

.83

Do.,

Yee Kee,

9.92

Do.,

Sui Kam,

2.78

Do.,

Vauchers Sœurs,

374.02

Vogel and Company, Consignment account,.

Choy Sing Nam, Balance in hand,...

Ho Yik Chi :-

Unclaimed dividend due to Chan Kwai,

50.18

22.05

31.50

Do.,

Do.,

Do.,

Do.,

Do.,

Wong Shing Shu,

Vogel and Kirchoff :-

Leung Lok Ting,

Wa On Shop, Canton,

Wing Cheung Shop, Canton,.. Lu Fuk Tai, Yaumati,

Unclaimed dividend due to Nam Hing Loong,..

(Claims $634,506.84) Balance undivided,

Poon Woon alias Poon Ping Shang:-

Unclaimed dividend due to Wong Shing, Balance,

Ho-ki, Balance in hand,...

Shek Hang Chuen :-

Unclaimed dividend due to On Chan Shop,

October 9 Deposits not available :-

Rhoda Singh, Unclaimed balance,

8.66

3.78

7.87

15.75.

.25

: :

::

68.79

4.64

Isharf Alli,

Do.,

Ho Sun,

Do.,

Christien Henricksen, Unclaimed balance,

Esekiel Balinzea,

Do.,

Sing Sun,

Do.,

TOTAL,

.13 37.62

9.31

:

17.97

2.75

5.00

5.01

.65

19.00

.$

232.47

99.54

2,004.01

2,336.02

ALFRED G. WISE,

Registry Supreme Court, Hongkong 1st April, 1889.

Acting Registrar,

247

CALENDAR OF PROBATES and ADMINISTRATIONS granted by the Supreme Court of HONGKONG during the Year 1888.

Value of

Date of Grant.

Name of Testator or Intestate.

Time and Place of Death.

Probate. Administration with Will annexed, or Administration.

Effects as

Name and Description of the Executor or Administrator.

set forth in the Commis- sion of Ap- praisement.

At Taiwan, Formosa,

21st Nov., 1886, England, 22nd Apr., 1887, |

Jan.

5 Claude Chamberlain,

"

6 William Davidson,

命多

9

Wong Shing Ip,

Cheung Chan.

10

Andreas Wilhelm August Wohl- H'kong,

ters,

18th May, 1887, 3rd Jan., 1888,

**

16 Morarbhai Vijbhukhandas,

Bombay,

Adm. with Will annexed. Adm. with Expl. of the Will annexed. Administration,

Probate,

12th Apr., 1884, | Adm. and Expl. of the Will and Codicil annexed,

Robert John Hastings, attorney of Wash-

ington Chamberlain. Thomas Henderson Whitehead and John Fowler, attornies of Frederick Mar- ton Hull,

Wong Tsak Nim, nephew of the deceased,

Andreas Mathias Valentin Schonemann and Frederich Heinrich Hohnke, the executors.

Hormusjce Merwanjee Mehta, attorney of Bai Dayakor. Power being re- served to make like grant to Nanabhai Haridas and Vybhunkhand as Bhi- kharidas the other executors named in the Will.

Sophia Maria Louisa Hauschild, widow

of the deceased.

Luiz Carlos do Rozario, one of the

executors,

$ 1,200.00

11,500.00 300.00

4,300.00

1

20 Louis Hauschild,.

26 Marcos Calisto do Rozario,

"

1

30 James Parker,

Feb. 10 Robert Percy Shewell.

20 | Fred. Ward Urquhart,

Mar.

Tang Lok,...

H'kong,

1 Chun Sung Pan alias Sung Pan | At Sea,

Yokohama, 20th Oct.. 1887, Administration,

Macao, 11th Feb., 1888, Probate,

England, 21st Dec., 1886, Administration,

Shanghai, 16th July, 1887,

Do..

H'kong,

27th Jan., 1888,

3rd June, 1887. 18th Jan., 1888.

400.00

1,660.00

200,000.00

Edward James Ackroyd, Official Admi-

nistrator,

136,00

Jules Marcitte Maria Arranges, as attor-

Chew..

1 Sham Piu..

Sam Chun

**

""

2

Chun-ka Ip alias Chun Yam Ip. At Sea.

9

??

Lau U Pak,

14

Chan Chün On,.

"

H'kong,

争得

14

Archibald Campbell,

H'kong,

11

14 Robert Bethon,

Do.,

Probate. Administration,

Village,

Probate, 1st Jan., 1888, 17th Jan., 1888, | Administration, Chek Hum Village.

Do.. 1st Feb., 1887, 20th Feb., 1888,

Probate.

7th Jan., 1888, Administration,

16th Dec., 1887,

Do.,

ney for Eugene Gabriel Vouillemont,. Finlay Urquhart, third brother of the

deceased,

400.00

Tang Tung Shang, sole exccutor.. Chun Tsün, brother of the deceased.

1,150.00 208.699.00

150.00

Sham Po, brother and sole executor.

450.00

| Chun Ng Shi, the first lawful wife....

Lau Yau Shan, brother of the deceased,...

400.00

8.000.00

Chau Tseung Fat and Chan Tseung Sham.

the executors,

400.00

Edward James Ackroyd, Official Admi-

nistrator,

270.00

Edward James Ackroyd, Official Admi-

nistrator,

26.87

20 Charles Wilson Murray.

20 Mary Bayne Murray,

23 Oliver Smith,

Kobe,

**

23 Ku Wa,

""

28 Henry Stead,

28 Thomas Lewellin Davies,

28

11

Maria Constancia da Costa, 28 José Antonio dos Remedios,

"

H'kong, 5th Feb., 1888,

H'kong, 31st Jan., 1888,

Singapore, 18th Feb., 1888,

H'kong. 8th Mar., 1888, H'kong, 7th Jan., 1888,

H'kong,

England, 15th Aug., 1873, Adm. with Expl.

of the Will annexed,

Edinburg, 23rd Aug., 1886. | Adm. with Expl.

of Trust Deed & Settlement & Codicil annexed, 1st Nov., 1887, Adm. with Copy

of the Will annexed, Probate,

John Bell-Irving, as attorney for William Lees and Frederick Lyon Playfair, the executors under the Trust Despo- sition and Settlement and Codicil of Mary Bayne Murray,

John Bell-Irving, as attorney for William Lees and Frederick John Playfair,

James Billington Coughtrie, as attorney

of Charles Sutton,.....

Ku Kam Pom and Ku Pak Tai, the exe-

cutors,......

100.00

200,000.00

Administration,

Edward James Ackroyd, Official Admi-

nistrator.

608.00

Do.,

Probate. Do..

Edward James Ackroyd, Official Admi-

nistrator,

1,500.00

Delfino Noronha, sole executor. l'aulina Antonia da Fonseca dos Reme- dios. Antonio dos Remedios, Antonio José da Fonseca, and Maximiano Antonio dos Remedios, the executrix and executors,

3,500.00

30,000.00

Apr. 11 Leong Ah Qui,.

>>

11 Leong A-hing,

***

11 Wong A-pat...

20 Mortimer Evelin Murray.

H'kong. Macao,

23 Tsang Sam alias Tsang Sam Lee, H'kong,

Singapore, 12th Nov., 1887, H'kong, 27th Feb., 1888,

1st Apr., 1888, 19th Jan., 1888, 2nd Feb., 1888,

Administration, Probate,

Administration, Do.. Probate,

Ho A-tsoi, husband of the deceased, Chun Kun Fook and Kwok A-kiu, exe-

10,000.00

cutor and executrix,...

2,500.00

| Lo Tai Hi, widow of the deceased,

4.000.00

Edward Thomas Bond.

32.811.00

Tsang Lup Yung and Tsang Lo Yung,

the executors,

20,000.00

23 Lai Po.

"

25

26 To Tin Cheong,

26 James Watt.........

""

H'kong. H'kong,

Scotland, 5th Apr.. 1887,

5th Feb., 1888, 12th Nov., 1887,

Adm. with Trust Disp. and Settle- ment annexed,

15

26 Mui Fuk Sui,

ceased,

26 Chan Ting Lap,

Lamma Island, San On

Probate,

Chan Ting Fu, brother of the deceased..

>>

"

30 William Ramsly Watts,.

District, 25th Jan., 1888, 13th Mar., 1888,

Do..

May

5 James Maxfield Walters.

Do.. Adm. with Will annexed.

Charles Coleman Cohen, Eric Georg, and

Sun Ning, 19th Oct., 1886, Administration, | Mui Hong Tsoi, the only son of the de-

Lai Chim, the executor,

To Chin Chan and Cheong Tai Yip,

900.00 45,000.00

Andrew Johnston, as attornies of Thomas Mitchell. Henry Watt, and Thomas Henry MacNeil..

6,200.00

1,000.00 500.00

F'kong,

England, 19th Sept., 1887, Adm. with Expl.

of the Will annexed. 21st Apr., 1888, | Administration, Wong Tsun Village,

Do.. 22nd Apr., 1888,

28th Mar., 1888,

5 Fung Tai Ho alias Fung Yü Yow, H'kong. 8 | Chung Fu,

"

10 Demetrio Antonio dos Remedios. H'kong,

Do.,

William Goulbourne and Daniel Edmund

Caldwell, the executors, John Silverlock, as attorney of Thomas Walters, Martin Rowlinson Walters, and George Ranking Walters. Ho Chung Shang, one of the executors.... Money and effects handed over to Tse A-tai, widow of the deceased, by order of the Acting Chief Justice, Agostinho Guilherme Romano, the admi-

nistrator,

8,000.00

1.200.00 4,000.00

14.00

65.783.00

248

May 10 George Randolph Clarke,

H'kong,

1st Apr., 1888.

17

10 Wong Luk Shing,

H'kong,

15th Aug., 1887,

10 Luk Chiu,....

H'kong,

28th Apr., 1888,

CALENDAR of PROBATES and ADMINISTRATIONS,—Continued.

Date of Grant

Name of Testator or Intestate.

Time and Place of Death.

Probate, Administration with Will annexed, or Administration.

Name and Description of the Executor or Administrator.

Alfred Gascoyne Wise, Official Adminis-

trator,

Wong Ki Cheong and Wong Sui Cheong.. Ip A-piu, the first lawful wife....

Value of Effects as set forth in the Commis- sion of Ap- praisement.

Administration,

$ 250.00

500.00

Do.,

250.00

Do.,

10 Montague Brace,

H'kong,

31st Jan., 1888,

Do..

Alfred Gascoyne Wise, Official Adminis-

trator.

170.00

11 Jeevandas Kalianjee,

India,

21st Nov., 1884,

Do..

Alfred Gascoyne Wise, Official Adminis-

""

trator,

90.00*

14 Lau Tsz Yuen alias Lau Chak Canton,

7th Dec.. 1885,

Do..

Lau Cheong Shi, the lawful widow,

6,400.00

";

Pin alias Lau Shing Ki Tong,

"

18

Eduljee Cawasjee Watcha,

Bombay,

28th Aug., 1884,

Do.,

Alfred Gascoyne Wise, Official Adminis-

trator,

200.00

18

Joanna Maria da Silva,

Macao,

6th Feb., 1888,

Do..

João Maria Antonio da Silva, nephew of

the deceased,

2,800.00

18 Euzebio Florentino de Souza,

H'kong,

5th May, 1888,

Do..

22

Eufronia Maria de Souza, widow of the

deceased.

1,530.00

22 Ng Han Pui,

Canton.

Sth Sept., 1887,

Adm. with Will

Ng Han Shing, elder brother of the de-

""

ceased,

28

Wun Hiu Seong.

Canton,

??

30

Tso Tai alias Wan Hing.

Canton,

""

30

Daniel da Costa,

3.

June 1 Wong Ching Ki,

H'kong,

Lam Tong, China,

18th Apr., 1888, 5th Mar., 1886, 9th May, 1888,

4 Tam A-choy,

H'kong,

6th Feb., 1888, 25th Jan., 1870,

5 Shaik Suffaid,

H'kong,

5

"

Peter Murphy,...............

H'kong.

22nd May, 1888,

21st May, 1888,

annexed, Probate, Do., Administration,

Adm. with Will annexed, Administration, de bonis non, Administration,

Wun Yuk Man, the sole executor,. Lo Tsz Chung, one of the executors, Alfred Gascoyne Wise, Official Adminis-

trator,

| Wong Tsun Ki, the eldest brother of the

deceased.

Tam Kwan Shi, otherwise Kwan Shuet...........

1.000.00

10,000.00

1,400.00

100.00

20,000,00 77,000.00

Alfred Gascoyne Wise, Official Adminis-

trator,

200.00

Do.,

Alfred Gascoyne Wise, Official Adminis-

trator,

100.00

20

Li Ping,

H'kong,

29th May, 1888,

Do.,

Yau U-kam, nephew of the deceased,.

40.00

"

20 Ching Ü,

H'kong,

1st June, 1888,

Do..

Ching Un Kai, the eldest son of the de-

"

ceased,

500.00

20 Christian Christian,

H'kong,

14th May. 1888,

Do.,

Alfred Gascoyne Wise, Official Adminis-

=

trator,

50.00

20 Wan Man.........

Hoi Chan Village,

114

July 3 Alexander Falconer,

H'kong,

10 Jean Nicolas Eugene Piron,

10 John Ashton,

H'kong,

9th Mar., 1888, 11th June, 1888,

23rd June, 1888,

Probate,

Do.,

Administration,

Wan Kwan Cheong and Wan Fuk Cheong,

the executors,

4,100.00

Isabella Ashworth Falconer, the execu-

trix,

2,430.00

Jacques Louis Maria Piron, brother of the

deceased,

5,018.00

Japan,

3rd Apr., 1887,

10 Mard Clayton Nickels,

*

13 Ho Shing To,

13 Adolf Tirnstein,

39

13 Samuel Creeland,

Japan, 16th May, 1888,

Canton, 22nd May, 1888,

H'kong, 10th June, 1888,

England,

Adm. with Expl. of the Will annexed, Do.,

Probate,

Alfred Bulmer Johnson, as attorney of

Ernest Ashton,

7,800.00

Bendyshe Layton, as attorney of Louise

Dearborn Nickels,

7,300.00

Ho Kwok Shi, Ho Wong Shi, and Ho

9th Jan., 1888,

"

13 Bomanjee Sorabjee Futtakia,

H'kong,

13 James Abernethy,

H'kong,

Do.,

Adm. and Copy of Probate of the Will annexed, 3rd July, 1888, | Administration,

18th June, 1888,

Tsun, the executrixes and executor,... 50,000.00 Oscar Wegener and Albert Jahries, the

executors,

50,000.00

Alfred Parker Stokes, as attorney of

George Tripp and Mary Tripp,

2,200.00

Dadabhoy Sorabjee Futtakia, brother of

the deceased,...

4.000.00

Do.,

Alfred Gascoyne Wise, Official Adminis-

trator,

400.00

Aug. 2 James Melarkey,

H'kong,

5th May, 1888,

Do.,

Alfred Gascoyne Wise, Official Adminis-

trator,

2,200.00

7 Arthur Gillingham,.

Lake Francis in the Pro-

Adm. with Expl. | Alfred Parker Stokes, as attorney of Ar-

vince of Manitoba,

of the Will

thur William Gillingham,

395.00

7 Antonio Manoel Braga,

H'kong,

""

19

7 Wong Kum Tsai,

H'kong,

8 William Young,

H'kong.

28th Aug., 1885. 30th June, 1888,

28th Nov., 1883,

Do., de bonis non, 21st July, 1888, Administration,

annexed, Administration,

João Vicente Braga, brother of the de-

ceased,

100.00

Chun A-yin otherwise Ho Ping Yau.

3,900.00

Alfred Gascoyne Wise. Official Adminis-

"

trator,

3,500.00

13 Albert Emile Vaucher,

H'kong,

>> 15 John Neilsen,

H'kong,

3rd Aug., 1888, 28th July, 1888,

Probate, Administration,

William Wotton, the executor,.

500.00

Alfred Gascoyne Wise, Official Adminis-

""

trator,

500.00

15 Lan Chow Chi,

Canton,

30th Nov., 1884,

Do.,

Lau Chu Sam, the only son of the de-

"

ceased,

2,600.00

+3

15 | Kong Chu Sow,

Canton,

1st Oct., 1883,

Do..

Kong Lai Chuen, the only son of the de-

ceased,

5,200.00

"J

15 Wong Ping,

Canton,

15th Nov., 1887,

Do.,

Wong Tsun Ki,

40,000.00

15 Wong Ah Ho alias Kwok Wong | H'kong,

20th June, 1888,

de bonis non, Probate,

Kwok Ying Qui, the sole executor,

10,000.00

Shi,

15 Ho Kwai,.

Macao,

6th June, 1888,

Do..

Wong Ping Fo alias Wong Shing and Yung

Hing Pong, the executors.

Power

being reserved to Ho Lin Shing, Ho Lin Wong, and Lin Fai, the other executors.

90,000.00

15 Tam Yut Sum..

""

"

27 Pang A-shing alius Pang A-

29

27 William Williams,

"

27 Futtay Singh,

sheng alias Pang Assing,

Lai Lok Village,

23rd July, 1888, Kwong Hoi, Sun Wing

District, 19th Aug., 1861,

H'kong, 30th June, 1888,

H'kong, 4th Aug., 1888,

Adm. with Will annexed, Administration, de bonis non,

Administration,

Do..

Tam Wing Tsz,

12,000.00

Pang Yuk Tseng,

Alfred Gascoyne Wise, Official Adminis-

trator,

1,100.00

Alfred Gascoyne Wise, Official Adminis-

trator,

100.00

:

<

?

Date of Grant.

CALENDAR of PROBATES and ADMINISTRATIONS, Continued.

Name of Testator or Intestate.

Time and Place- of Death.

Probate, Administration with Will annexed, or Administration.

Name and Description of the Executor or Administrator.

6th Aug., 1888, | Administration, | Alfred Gascoyne Wise, Official Adminis-

249

Value of Effects as set forth in the Commis- sion of Ap- praisement.

Aug. 27 Roderick Grant,

27 R. Ritter,

.........

H'kong:

trator,

$ 350.00

Hong,

29th July, 1888,

Do..

Alfred Gascoyne Wise, Official Adminis-

trator,

25.00

30 Jas. Edwin Howroyd,

30 Leandro F. Pereira,

H'kong, 26th Aug.. 1888,

H'kong, 14th Aug., 1888,

Do..

Alfred Gascoyne Wise, Official Adminis-

trator,

12,000.00

Do..

Alfred Gascoyne Wise. Official Adminis-

**

trator,

100.00

Sept. 4

Yau Leong Sin,

10 Ralph Hargraves,

Wong Pak, 25th Feb.. 1887, H'kong, 7th July, 1888,

Do..

Yau Leong Ku, the only surviving brother,

1,500.00

Do.,

Alfred Gascoyne Wise, Official Adminis-

trator,

7,000.00

13 Mak A-lung..

H'kong,

::

18 Fung Sham alias Fung Sing

Ming,

*

18 Yeong A-sam alias Tai Cheong,

:

20 Hugh McEwan, Junior,..................

23

Pun Hok Ying,

Oct.

1

Yip Chun Shan,

13th Aug., 1888, Macao, 25th Apr., 1888,

H'kong, 31st May, 1867,

England, 28th Oct., 1886,

H'kong, 12th Aug., 1888, Canton, 26th June, 1879,

Do.. Probate,

Probate with Will annexed, Administration,

Cheang A-kun. the widow and relict, Lo Cheuk Ki, the sole executor,

3,000.00

24,000.00

Lum Kiu, the widow and relict,

1,400.00

Lorenz Poesnecker, as attorney for Hugh

McEwan, Senior,

400.00

Do.. Do.,

Pun Wong Shi,..

1,400.00

Alfred Gascoyne Wise. Official Adminis-

1 Ho Lai Yau,.

H'kong,

21st Sept., 1888,

de bonis non, Probate,

trator,

Li Cheung, the sole executor..

400.00

6

Fung Chung alias Fang Fan Po.. Canton,

8

:

Peter Vestmann,

H'kong.

27th May, 1888, | Administration, 22nd Sept., 1988,

David Humphreys,

53,000.00

11

+1

Kwok A-yuk,

H'kong,

16th Aug., 1888,

+

11

Prosper Giquel otherwise Prosper France,

19th Feb., 1886,

Marie Giquel,

+

19 Li A-thong otherwise Maria Se- Macao,

bastiana das Dores,

*

19 Roza Maria de Carvalho,

26 Herbert Alan Banon,

Nov.

I

Lai Mui Shan,

2

**

Wo Sui Ching,

**

5

Yeung Sing Chin alias Yeung Üt H'kong,

20th June, 1888,

Shanghai, 3rd Feb., 1888,

Il'kong, 26th Sept., 1887,

Canton, 11th Sept., 1888, H'kong, 11th July, 1888, 27th June, 1888.

DO.,

Do.. Adm. with Expl. of the Will annexed, Probate,

Alfred Gascoyne Wise, Official Adminis-

trator,

9,000.00

Li Shing Ho, mother of the deceased,

1,000.00

Charles Chantrey Inchbald, as attorney

of Emile Marie Giquel,

8,160.00

Agostinho Guilherme Romano, the exe-

cutor,

2,800.00

Wo,

"

7 William Henry Dobson,

Shanghai, 26th Sept., 1888,|

14 Thomas Johnstone MacDonald. . Shanghai, 12th Sept., 1887,

14 Lee Sik Sam,

"

14 Choy Leong Shi,

17 João Joaquim dos Remedios,

H'kong. 8th Apr., 1885, Administration,

de bonis non, Canton, 18th Oct., 1888, Probate, H'kong, 30th July, 1878, | Administration,

de bonis non,

22 Fung Man alias Fung King Tong. H'kong;

H'kong,

}

Probate, Do..

William Wotton, as attorney of Edmundo

José de Couto and Honorato Jorge, Alfred Bulmer Johnson, as attorney of

Adelaide Francis Anne Banon, Lai Wong Shi, the widow and relict, Woo Lui Chuk, brother of the deceased,. Yeung A-chin and Yeung Yun Fat, the

executors,

Robert Carr, the lawful attorney of Bella

Dobson,

John Bell-Irving, the lawful attorney of William Bell MacDonald and Donald MacDonald, brothers of the said de- ceased,

Li A-cheung, the natural and lawful son..

Adm. with Will annexed, Administration,

Do.. Do.. Probate,

1,400.00

200.00 2,000.00 500.00

9,000.00

Administration,

Adm. with Will annexed,

100.00

Choy Chan, the sole executor,

7,900.00 400.00

46,000.00

| Agostinho Guilherme Romano,

300,000.00

30th Oct., 1888,

Fung Tsz Wing, the executor,

7,000.00

16th Sept., 1888,

Nam Hoi District,

2nd Oct., 1888,

Tai Leong. 2nd Oct.. 1888. 10th Juuc, 1886,

18th Nov., 1888,

Tsoi Lai Tong alias Tsoi Pou H'kong,

22

Iu Hi Leung,

Dec.

5 Chan Mo,

1?

5

Lo Ng Wan.............

"

6

Shan,

3

15 | Lai Chung,

20 James Madison Scudder,

"

31 George Tyson,.........

H'kong:

H'kong, 5th Dec., 1888, | Administration. | Alfred Gascoyne Wisc, Official Adminis-

Philadelphia, 8th Jan., 1881, |

In Cho Chin, the executor,

2,900.00

Do..

Chan Cheung Fong, the nephew and

executor,

18,000.00

Do.,

Wong Sun Nam, the executor, ..

2,000.00

Administration,

Alfred Gascoyne Wise, Official Adminis-

trator,.

Adm. with Will | Lai Shü, the only son of the deceased,.

annexed,

700.00

trator,

1,000.00

Adm. with Expl. | of the Will and Codicil annexed,

Charles Alexander Tomes, as attorney of Emily D. Tyson. William Endicott, Jr., and Henry Endicott,

1,500.00

Registry Supreme Court, Hongkong, 1st April, 1889.

ALFRED G. WISE,

Acting Registrar."

250

RETURN of all sums received as REVENUE in the Registry of the Supreme Court during the Year 1888.'

Original Jurisdiction,

Summary Jurisdiction,

.$ 2,561.50

3,542.68

Bankruptcy Jurisdiction, ....

Probate Jurisdiction,....

Official Administrator's Commission,

429.58

1,001.55

1,543.43

Official Assignce's Commission,.

1,568.53

Official Trustee's Commission,......

173.38

Appraiser's Fees,.

40.97

Sheriff's Fees,

158.50

Bailiff's Fees,

1,038.00

Interest on Deposit of surplus cash, .

Fees ou Distraints,

4,190.24 1,624.00

Registrar of Companies,....

2,385,06

+

$20,257.42

Land Office Fees,

5,288.00

A

$25,545.42

Registry Supreme Court, Hongkong, 1st April, 1889.

ALFRED G. WISE, Acting Registrar.

RETURN of all sums collected in the Registry of the Supreme Court for the Year 1888, and paid into the Treasury.

1888.

1887.

REGISTRAR.-Court Fees paid by Stamp, .

$ 7,157.53

$ 9,159.31

OFFICIAL ASSIGNEE.-5 per cent. on amounts encashed paid into the Treasury, OFFICIAL ADMINISTRATOR,

1,170.16

751.64

1,568.53

1,543.43

OFFICIAL TRUSTEE.-2 per cent. on amount of Trust on taking over up to $10,000 above $10,000 commission 1 per cent. on further amount, 1 per cent. commission income,

on

166.07

173.38

APPRAISER OF INTESTATE ESTATES.-2 per cent. ou Houses, Land, Goods, Furniture,

&c., 1 per cent. on cash, Banking Account or Shares,

87.62

40.97

BAILIFF,

SHERIFF,

REGISTRAR OF COMPANIES, .....

1,042.50

1,038.00

101.00

158.50

720.00

2,385.06

INTEREST on Registrar's balance at the Bank,

3,903.54

4,190.24

FINE AND FORFEITURES,

995.00

$16,095.06

$20,257.42

LAND OFFICE FEES,

4,366.00

5,288.00

$20,461.06

$25,545.42

DEPOSITS UNAVAILABLE.-Intestate Estates not claimed,

SUNDRY ESTATES.-Paid into the Treasury as Revenue of the Colony,

1,856.88

$99.54

$2,236.48

Registry Supreme Court, Hongkong, 1st April, 1889.

ALFRED G. WISE, Acting Registrar.

11,647

TOTAL

TOTAL NUMBER

NUMBER

OF

OF

PRISON-

CASES.

ERS.

(

Convicted

and

Punished.

Discharged.

Committed

for Trial at

the

Supreme

Court.

Committed

to Prison, or

Detained pending Orders |

of H. E. the

Governor.

To keep

the

Peace.

To be

of good

Beha- viour.

Witnesses preferring false Charge or giving

punished for

wilful false Testimony.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

AL. F.

M. F.

།ཚེ

F.

M.

F.

M.

Ꮧ .

M.

F.

13,309 9,700 232 2,704 145

168

98

11

106

11

71

4

3

48

2 12,898 411 3,930 284

112

291

10

308

182

TOTAL MALES. AND FEMALES,

18,809

ABSTRACT OF CASES under COGNIZANCE of the POLICE MAGISTRATES' COURT during the Year 1888.

CASES, HOW DISPOSED OF, AND THE NUMBER OF MALE AND FEMALE PRISONERS UNDER EACH HEAD.

Ordered to find Security.*

WRITS ISSUED BY THE POLICE MAGISTRATES DURING THE YEAR 1888.

Warrants.

* Consisting of Offenders not sentenced to Imprisonment.

251

Summons

for

Defendants.

suowung

for

of

Witnesses. Notices Re-hearing.

Arrest.

Distress.

Search.

For entering Gambling Houses.

Magis-

trates'

Orders.

T

5,070

TOTAL. [

?

* ༔ “ -

252

OFFENCE.

THE CASES CONSISTED OF:-

No. of

No. of CASES.

PRI-

SONERS.

OFFENCE.

No. of

No. of

CASES.

PRI-

SONERS.

Animals-Cruelty to..

Arms-Neglecting to furnish monthly return,

--Carrying without reasonable excuse,

Arson.

Assault-Causing grievous bodily harm,..

--Common,

33

33

6 Murder,

54

54

4

2

604

804

19

-Indecent,

6

6

"

22

-On Police in the Execution of their Duty, and

obstructing and resisting Police,

143

171

-With intent to rob,

1

3

Pardon),.

Bills-Posting,

Banishment-Returning after (see also Conditional

Birds-Breach of Ordinance for Preservation of,

Boats-Refusing to accept Hire when unemployed,

""

-Refusing to Stop when hailed by Police,.

-Covering number of,

Bonfires-Firing Crackers or making,

Breach of the Peace,

Bribery,

Buildings-Breach of Ordinance for,

Burglary,.

15

15

-Blowing Whistles..

Brought forward,..

5,023 6,437

4

18

Nuisances-Allowing Dirt and Filth to remain on Pre-

Malicious Injury to electric, &c. Telegraph. Master of Vessels plying withont certificate, Night-Found at. armed with Dangerous and Offensive Weapons, with Intent to break into Dwelling Houses,

Night-Found in Dwelling Houses by-with Intent to

commit Felony therein,

mises or in immediate Vicinity thereof, ---Blasting Stones to the danger of Persons

and Property, .

-Exposing Night-soil in the Streets in uncovered Buckets, and in open Boats

20

20

1

1

3

3

16

33

16

62

62

7

59

59

along the Praya,

"

Conditional Pardon-Breach of...

Contempt of Court,

Crimes Ordinance, Breach of Prevention of,

Cutting and Wounding with intent, &c.,

Dangerous Goods Ordinance-Breach of,

H. M.'s Army and Navy,

"

""

British Merchant Ships,

Burial of Chinese Corpse elsewhere than in a Cemetery,. Cattle-Slaughtering in a place other than one set apart

for the purpose,,

-Landing in a place not set apart for the

Chairs and Vehicles-Breach of Ordinance for Street,..

Child Stealing,

Child-Desertion of,

Chinese-Territory-Crimes and Offences committed in....

Coin-Offences relating to,

Contagious Diseases' Ordinance-Offences against

595

595

34

9

13

44

3

5

"

purpose,...

2

2

17

157

177

**

16

X

-Hanging wet Clothes, &c., to dry over

178

178

Public Ways...

-Keeping Pigs, &c., without a Licence,

19

19

-Latrine,

-Neglecting to clean out Dust Bins, and

throwing Rubbish, &c., into the Streets,

-Neglecting to provide Dust. Boxes, -Obeying Calls of Nature in the Streets,

-Regulations-Breach of...

--Rough Dressing, &c. of Granite in or near

a Public place,

-Throwing Rubbish into the Harbour or on

13

13

491

491

56

56

78

78

11

11

2

97

97

the Beach,

-Beating Drums, Blowing Horns, &c.. --Exploding Dynamite,

15

15

-Ringing Door Bells,

2

2

12

12. Obscene Pictures exposing for sale,

2

1

1

Obstruction of Navigation..

307

307

11

15

Dangerous and Offensive Trades-Carrying on,

Desertion from Foreign Ships,

4

of Roads and Streets, &c., by Hawkers,

Chair Coolies and Shopkeepers..

1,252 1,337

14

14

of Wharves by Boat People.

98

96

11

11

45

45

8

--Aiding and abetting of Sailors and Soldiers,

Disorderly Behaviour-Drunkenness, Fighting, &c...........

Disorderly House-Keeping a,

Dogs-Allowing unmuzzled ferocious, to be at large, &c.,

1

660

1,093

Licence,

1

1

Passes Chinese out at Night without,

12

12

-Stealing,

Domestic Servants-Misconduct as,..

Drugs-Administering,

Embezzlement,

3.

3

47

47

3

10

Piracy.

6

6

Escape of Prisoners from Gaol,

1

1

""

"

from Custody of Police,

"

from Chain Gang,

Excise Officer assuming name, &c.,

2

2

14

14

Opium-Breach of Ordinance for Preparation and Sale

of prepared,

Passage-Obtaining surepticiously a.......

Passengers-Carrying in Excess of that allowed by

Pawnbrokers-Breach of Ordinance for..

Perjury, (see also Preferring false Charge and giving (

wilful false Testimony),

Police-Assuming Name, Designation, &c., of Constable of,

- Rescuing Prisoners from Custody of,

-Constables-Misconduct as,

--Arms, clothing, accoutrements, &c., Constables

518

535

2

2

12

12

114

114

23

2

2

selling or making away with the,

Furious Driving,

Extortion, or Attempt to extort,.

False Charge-Preferring or giving wilful false evidence,

::

Pretences-obtaining Goods and Money by,

Felony-Accessory before the Fact to-Accessory

after the Fact to,

-Attempting to commit,

Fugitive Offenders' Act-Breach of,..

Gambling-Breach of Ordinance for Suppression of,.

in the Streets, treated as Obstruction of

Public Ways,

4

10

12

-Arms &c., unlawful possession of,

23

12

12

Rape..

33

39

Rating Ordinance-Breach of,..

1

Receiving Stolen Goods,,

13

22

1

Recognisances-Breach of..

19

19

27

27

Roads and Streets-Injury to..

10

10

3

3

Robbery From the Person,.

4

13

29

..

176

667

-On the Highways with Arms or with Violence, Rogues & Vagabonds-As Street Gamblers and Watch-

30

30

men to Gamblers,

402

402

j

**

Gaols-Breach of Ordinance for,

7

7

>:

Harbour Dredging at Anchorage for Ships of War in the, Hawkers, Licence, neglecting to hoist Licence board

10

10

-As suspicious Characters,. ---Wandering abroad and lodging

in the open air,

61

61

13

13

while hawking,

13

13

Hawkers, Licence, Sub-letting Stalls without permission

1

from Registrar General,

House Breaking,..

6

10

Householders and Servants-Breach of Ordinance, for )

Registration of,......

13

13

Indecent Exposure of Person by Bathing or otherwise, Į

and Lewdness,.

24

24

Larceny-Common.

780

886

Scavenging Contract-Breach of, Ships of war, Owner of boats plying for hire within 300 feet of, without a written permission of Harbour Master,

&c.-Neglecting to have a riding light on board, Ship or Boat, &c.,-Anchoring at prohibited place,. Shooting with intent to do Grievous Bodily Harm,

to prevent lawful apprehension, Ships, &c., Leaving Harbour during Prohibited hours.. Spirituous and fermented Liquors-Breach of Ordinance

8

183

183

-from Ships or Boats in the Harbour,..

15

18

for retail of,

""

-from the Person,

88

97

Seamen-Refusal of duty, by Merchant,

14

""

-in a Dwelling House.

16

23

Stamp Ordinance-Breach of,

""

-of Beasts or Birds, not the subject of Larceny

at Common Law,

Stones and other Missiles-Discharging to Danger of

Persons and Property,

--of Vegetables and Fruits from Gardens and)

Streams-Defiling,

**

11

12

enclosed places,

Streets-Noises by Hawkers, .

44

186

186

Larceny by Clerk,

1 Shoot-Attempt to at P. C.....

Malicious Injury to Property,

30

30

Seamen--Assaulting Mate,

Manslaughter,

Marine Store Dealers-Breach of Ordinance for, Markets' Ordinance-Breach of.

**

14 Seamen-Assaulting Master.

4

481

181

Small Pox.-Neglecting to report to the nearest Station, Seamen-Wilful disobedience of Command by,

Menaces-Demanding Moucy by...

11

24

Trees, &c.—Cutting and destroying.

Mendicancy,

241

241

Trespass on Crown Land,

commit.

Misdemeanor-Aiding and Abetting in-Attempting to

Carried forward.......

Triad Society,

2

23

76

76

495

495

25

25

គន

4

5,023 | 6,437

Carried forward,

9,747 11,306

..

.

253

OFFENCE.

Brought forward,.

Unlawful Possession of Property,.

of Trees, Shrubs, &c.,

Unlicensed-Coolie Lodging Houses,.

-Passage Broker,

No, of

PRI-

SONERS.

No. of

CASES,

9,747 11,306

256

16

OFFENCE.

Brought forward...........

324 Verandahs-Erected over Crown Lands, Enclosing, &c.,.

16 Vagrancy-Other than Chinese,

1 Watchmen-Misconduct as Private,

1,169 1,169 Weights and Measures-Breach of Ordinance for,

8 Women and Female Children-Breach of Ordinance for

protection of..... 3 Workmen-Intimidating,.

-Hawkers:

-Plying of Boats for Hire,

Unnatural Offence...

37

3)

37

Unwholesome Provisions-Exposing for Sale, or bring- )

38

38

ing into the Colony,.....

Carried forward.......

11,275 12,902

TOTAL.........

No. of CASES.

No. of

PRI- SONERS.

11.275 12,902

109 109

33

33

7

119

119

92

127

12

12

11,647, 13,300

Years.

Total Number of Cases.

Convicted and Punished.

Discharged.

Committed for Trial at Supreme

Court.

Magistracy, Hongkong, 12th January, 1889.

H. E. WODEHOUSE,

Police Magistrate, for the Police Magistrates.

ABSTRACT of CASES brought under COGNIZANCE at the POLICE MAGISTRATES' COURT during a period of Ten Years, from 1st January, 1879, to 31st December, 1888, inclusive.

CASES, HOW DISPOSED OF, AND THE NUMBER OF MALE AND FEMALE PRISONERS UNDER EACH HEAD.

Committed to Prison

or detained pending Orders of His Excellency the Governor.

To keep the Peace, to be of Good Beha- riour, and to answer

Ordered to find Security.

Punished for Preferring

Total

False Charge Undecided.

Number

or giving

of

False

Defendants.

any charge.

Testimony.

3

4

5

6

7

8

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

P.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

1879,

7,009

5,758 361

1,900

189

145

13

18

280

32

18

34

8,103

602

1880,

7,098

5,892 252

1,775 187

170

27

15

204

48

37

1881,

8,126

531

8,203

7,049

333 1,678

173

192

48

369

65

24

9,379

630

1882,

7,567

6,049 394

1,922

255

259

268

100

13

80

8,622

780

1883,

10,653 8,127 670

2,398

349

121

154

62

160

11,003 1,101

1884,

14,065 11,748 1,088

2,294

268

101

228

53

105

14,537 | 1,418

1885,

1886,

1887,...

1888,

10,281 7,951 849 14,611 12,081 12,015 10,354 325 11,647 9,700 232

2,188 258

159

357

99

18

10,690 1,211

842

2,198

190

157

869

100

168

15,510 1,137

2,620 159

158

28

4

411

52

48

13,633 549

2,704 145

168

1:

177

15

3

48

12,898 411

Grand Total for the 10 Years,

103,149 84,709 |5,346

21,677 2.173

1,630

134

287

25

3,262

626

169

33 747

33

112,481 8,370

Average of 1st

period of 5 years,

8,106.0

6,977 0

2,165 2

200.0

22.8

305.4

27.2

77.8

9,775.4

Average of 2nd

period of 5 years,

(2,523.8

11,034.0

2,6048

.152.8

39.6

472.2

13 2

78.2

14,250.0

*

Magistracy, Hongkong, 12th January, 1889.

H. E. WODEHOUSE,

Police Magistrate,

for the Police Magistrates.

MAGISTERIAL ENQUIRIES INTO DEATHS.

TABLE A.-RETURN OF ALL DEATHS REPORTED DURING THE YEAR, 1888.

Formal Enquiries held.

Buried without Formal Enquiries.

NATIONALITY.

Men. Women. Boys. Girls. Total. Men. Women. Boys. Girls.

Very much decomposed; Total.

sex not ascertainable.

Europeans and Americans, ... 6

Portuguese,

1

Japanese,

Indians and Malays,

1

Chinese,

Total,.........

38

43

52

Total for 1887,

84

10

:

:

10

10

14

6

3

:

1

:

1

:

1

53

90

29

136

109

375

3

63 93

32

137

109

382

|

7

115

68

75

73

18

245

254

TABLE B.-RETURN OF FORMAL ENQUIRIES DURING THE YEAR, 1888.

Europeans and Indi- Portu-

Japanese.

Chinese.

Americans.

ans. guese.

Total.

FINDING.

Wo-

Wo-

Wo-

Men.

Men. Men. Men.

Men.

Boys. Girls.

men.

men.

men.

1

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:.

1

1

Accidental death,.

Death was caused by fatty degeneration of the heart, accelerated by want of nourishment,....

Death by syncope occasioned by a shock brought on by the treatment received

at the hands of the men charged at the Police Court and their fokis,... Death from injuries received from a fall

from a house,

Death from suppression of urine occa-

sioned by Sporadic cholera,

Death from exhaustion occasioned by

Sporadic cholera,

Died from the effect of eating poisonous

fish,

Felo de se,

Found dead,

Found drowned,

Justifiable homicide by some person or

persons unknown,

Natural causes (in Gaol),.. Manslaughter,

Sporadic cholera,

Suicide in an unsound state of mind,. The deceased came to his death by fall- ing from the verandah of house No. 294, Queen's Road while attempting to escape from the arrest of the Police,

The Magistrate finds that the deceased died from rupture of the spleen and orders that Police Constable No. 729 be charged before the Magistrate with causing the death of the de- ceased,

:

:

:

:

÷

:

1

18

2

2

3

30

:

:

:

:

:

:::

:

1

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

1

:

:

1

:

1

1

2

1

:

:

:

:

3

:

1

:

N

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

1

1

:

!

1

1

1

2

1

2

4

1

3

Total,..

6

1

1

43

:

N

1

2

4242

:

:

1

1

5

3

63

Found on

Found in

Land.

TABLE C-RETURN OF BURIALS WITHOUT FORMAL ENQUIRIES DURING THE YEAR, 1888.

Reason why no Formal Enquiry

was held.

Europeans and Americans.

Men.

3

Women.

Boys. Men.

Portu-

Chinese.

guese.

Women.

Boys. Girls.

Women.

Women,

Malay. Very much

de- composed;

Total.

sex not ascertain-

able.

1

76

:

26

26

77

66

13

2

58

43

1

1

1

1

96

Known.

Un-

:

250

90

:

11

127

1

WI

Harbour.

known.

Known.

Un-

known.

4

110

16

34

76

1

50

:

1

Total..

3

1

90

29 136 109

1

1

11

382 94

186

17

85

No suspicious circumstances......

No evidence and/or decomposed

state of Body,

Post Mortem satisfactory,

Magistracy, Hongkong, 5th February, 1889.

1

H. E. WODEHOUSE, Police Magistrate.

A

1

101

No. 89.

3

HONGKONG.

THE EDUCATIONAL REPORT FOR 1888.

Presented to the Legislative Council, by Command of His Excellency the Governor.

EDUCATION DEPARTMENT, HONGKONG, 11th February, 1889. SIR,--I have the honour to present herewith the Annual Report on Education for the year 1888. 2. The total number of Educational Institutions of all descriptions, known to have been at work in the Colony of Hongkong during the year 1888, amounts to 206 Schools with a grand total of 8,717 scholars. More than three-fourths of the whole number of scholars, that is to say 6,728 scholars attended Schools (99 in number) subject to Government supervision and either established or aided by the Government in some form or other. The remainder, viz. 107 Schools with 1,989 scholars, are Private Institutions entirely independent of Government supervision and receiving no aid from public funds, unless it be that they are exempt from payment of rates and taxes.

3. Apart from the Police School with 369 scholars (viz. 17 Europeans, 163 Chinese and 189 Indians in irregular attendance) and the West-Point Reformatory, with 75 Chinese and 26 Portuguese scholars, both of which schools are exempt from the control of the Education Department, the total number of Schools, subject to supervision and annual examination by the Government, amounted, in the year 1888, to 97, as compared with 47 in the year 1878, and 16 in the year 1868. The total number of scholars enrolled in this same class of Schools during the year 1888, amounted to 6,258 scholars, as compared with 3,152 scholars in the year 1878, and 915 scholars in the year 1868. These comparisons appear to exhibit a satisfactory increase of Schools and scholars from decade to decade.

4. Applying the same comparison to the last three years, I find the number of Schools under the supervision and examination of the Education Department to have risen from 90 Schools in 1886, to 94 Schools in 1887, and to 97 Schools in 1888, whilst the number of scholars enrolled, in these same Schools, rose from 5,844 in 1886, to 5,974 in 1887, and to 6,258 in 1888. The steady annual increase thus observable during the last three years and progressing from an increase of merely 10 scholars in 1886. to an increase of 130 scholars in 1887, and to an increase of 284 scholars in 1888, is nothing to boast of, because it is in all probability but a poor comparison with a proportionately much greater an nual increase of the population, but still it is satisfactory in view of the decrease which occurred in 1885 and confirms the opinion I expressed in my last Annual Report that the current of educational development is beginning to recover its normal strength, which it had lost in consequence of the local disturbances connected with the Franco-Chinese war in 1884.

5. Referring to the 6,258 scholars who, as above mentioned, attended Schools under the super- vision of the Education Department, there were as many as 4,325 of these scholars attending Mission- ary Grant-in-Aid Schools where they received a Christian education, viz. 3,407 scholars in Protestant Schools and 918 scholars in Roman Catholic Schools. The Government Schools in the Colony were attended by 1,933 scholars, of whom 634 scholars received their instruction in the Government Central School, 932 scholars in the Government Schools in town and villages, and 367 scholars in the small Village Schools (organized by the natives and aided by the Government by a fixed monthly grant). Comparing the foregoing figures with those of the preceding year, it appears that there has been a slight increase of attendance amounting to 165 scholars in the case of the Grant-in-Aid Schools and to 119 scholars in the case of the Government Schools.

6. The expenses incurred by the Government during the year 1888, on account of education in general, amounted (including the expenses connected with the Government Scholarship, but excluding cost of new buildings) to a total of $45,518.93 (as compared with $43,070.91 in the year 1887) or $7.27 per scholar (as compared with $7.21 per scholar in 1887). These expenses were distributed as follows. The Government Central School, with 634 scholars, cost the Government in the year 1888 (exclusive of building expenses) $12.384.14 or $19.53 per head. The expenses of the other Govern- ment Schools (including the Aided Village Schools), attended by 1,299 scholars, amounted in the year 1888 to $10,511.18, or $8.08 per scholar, that is to say $7.01 per scholar in the Government Schools and $4.19 per scholar in the Aided Schools. On the Missionary Grant-in-Aid Schools, with 4,325 scholars, the Government have spent, for the year 1888, the sum of $16,847.35 or $3.89 per scholar.

A building grant of $300 given to the Basel Mission is also included in the general expenditure above mentioned. 7. The nature of the education given in the various Schools subject to supervision and examina- tion by the Education Department has not undergone any material change for many years past. Out of 97 Schools under Government in the year 1888, as many as 77 Schools, attended by 3,986 scholars (almost exclusively of Chinese parentage), gave a Chinese education, in the Chinese language, using either the Punti or Hakka dialect. Two Schools, attended by 110 scholars, gave a European educa- tion in the Chinese language, one using the Hakka and the other the, Punti dialect, and both com- bining the use of Chinese and of Romanized characters in reading and writing. There were further 3 Portuguese Schools, attended by 211 scholars of Portuguese parentage, who receive there a European education exclusively in the local variation of the Portuguese language, learning neither English nor

;

102

Chinese. Again there were 8 Anglo-Chinese Schools at work, giving to 1,158 Chinese scholars a European education in the English language (with or without Chinese teaching being given in addi- tion). Finally, there were 7 English Schools at work giving to 793 scholars of both sexes and of all nationalities a purely English education, exclusively in the English language.

8. It will be observed from the figures given in the foregoing paragraph that three-fifths of all the scholars in Schools receiving Government aid receive a non-English education, the teaching in the first of the five classes above enumerated being virtually that of the ordinary Chinese Village Schools, except that in all of them Geography, and in many also Arithmetic, is superadded, with the further addition of Christian religious teaching in the case of 44 out of these 77 Schools. Of course the fact that the vast majority of the residents of the Colony are Chinese, whose daily necessities do not abso- lutely require a knowledge of English, is sufficient to account for the preference given by the mass of the people to these non-English Schools. But the gratuitous character of the teaching given in these Schools, which are all free Schools for the special use of the poor. has also a great deal to do with the popularity of these non-English Schools. The fact that most of these Schools, being Missionary Grant-in-Aid Schools, combine Christian instruction with the study of Chinese classical lore, does not interfere with their popularity among the non-Christian section of the Chinese community, who unhe- sitatingly prefer a Christian Mission School to a secular Government School, even when the latter should be nearer at hand, provided that the former is considered to be superior in respect of Chinese classical teaching, or as regards method and discipline. The best classical teacher. be he teacher of a Mission School or of a Government School, invariably attracts the largest number of scholars. That it is best for their children to give them first a thorough grounding in Chinese classics, before they begin the study of English, has become the universal conviction of Chinese parents in Hongkong. These Schools act therefore systematically as feeders of the Anglo-Chinese and English Schools of the Colony and especially of the Government Central School.

9. The above mentioned Portuguese Schools,―with their 211 scholars, who receive there a European education in the local dialect of the Portuguese language, and learn neither English nor Chinese,-answer the same educational need, as the aforementioned Chinese Schools, viz., to enable every child first to learn to express thought and feeling correctly in the vernacular tongue, before attempting to acquire a foreign language. The Portuguese community are gradually, though but slowly, turning in the direction of recognizing this sound pedagogical principle which has been adopted several years ago by the Heads of the Roman Catholic Mission here, but the extent to which the parents of children accept and act upon this line of education is still very limited. Too many Portuguese parents, who speak Portuguese only, send their boys. when 6 years old, to an English School and insist upon their being hurried as quickly as possible through Standard after Standard, in order that they may the sooner get employ- ment as clerks and contribute towards the support of the family. The result in most cases is that the mental progress of such scholars is but superficial, that they become mere smatterers in English and, worst of all, such systematic hot-house training stunts not only the growth of the mental energies, but has often also the effect of a blight upon the higher moral perceptions. As the above mentioned Chinese Schools act as feeders to the Government Central School and kindred Institutions, so these Portuguese Schools are the natural Preparatory Schools for St. Joseph's College and the Italian Convent School.

10. Female education has, for some years past, been making steady, though very slow, progress in the Colony. This movement has been furthered, on the part of the Government, by establishing at the beginning of the year 1888 another Girls School intended to give Chinese girls an exclusively Chinese education. The BELILIOS Medal and Prize Fund. which, in the year under review, has been modified so as to encourage and promote education in Boys Schools as well as in Girls Schools, con- tinues to stimulate private efforts in the direction of female education. Nevertheless it is a patent fact that female education is still in a very backward condition in the Colony and there can be no reason- able doubt but that a vast majority of the 8,402 children in Hongkong who remain uneducated (see Table XVI) are girls. Of the 1,933 children enrolled in Government Schools during the

year 1888, there were 1,804 boys and 129 girls, that is to say the girls numbered only 6.67 per cent. of the whole number of children in Government Schools. In the Grant-in-Aid Schools the proportion of girls to boys has been better from the beginning and is gradually improving. In these Schools there were, in the year 1888, among a total of 4,325 children, 2,538 boys and 1,787 girls. In other words, in Grant- in-Aid Schools the girls numbered 41.31 per cent. of the whole of children enrolled, so that for any 6 boys in these Schools there were also 4 girls under instruction. A census of Chinese Private Schools taken by the Registrar General, during the year 1888, by means of the District Watchmen, shewed that there were, among 1,704 children in 83 Chinese Private Schools, 1,679 boys and 25 girls, the girls numbering only 1.46 per cent. of the children in attendance. So far as Roman Catholic girls are concerned, be they of native or foreign extraction, ample provision has been made, under the Grant- in-Aid Scheme, for a modicum of female education. As regards Protestant European girls, there are two small Private Schools which might be enlarged or added to. with or without the help of the Grant- in-Aid Scheme, if the demand for female education by this section of the community were not so small and not so hedged in with religious and social caste prejudices. As regards Chinese girls whose parents do not aim higher than giving their daughters a purely Chinese, that is non-English, education, the Grant-in-Aid Scheme is doing, or capable of doing if availed of, all that is needful. But there is absolutely no provision made by private efforts nor by Government for offering Chinese or other girls

103

a cheap, non-sectarian, English or Anglo-Chinese education. If it is the desire of the Government to promote in the Colony generally a knowledge of the English language and to put a European or at least an Anglo-Chinese education within the reach of all, we ought not to confine the efforts of the Government to giving to boys only an English or Anglo-Chinese education, but offer the same advant- ages, on the same conditions, to the girls who will be the mothers of future generations. What has hindered efforts in this direction hitherto, was chiefly the fear that the system of concubinage, the great bane of the social life of this Colony, would only be fostered by providing Chinese girls with an English or Anglo-Chinese education, But it seems to me that the duty of the Government to provide the means of education, where private effort is absent, should not be considered to apply to the moral classes of society only and leave the immoral ones without a higher class of education for fear that they might become still more immoral. As a matter of fact concubinage has all along flourished in Hongkong and will no doubt continue to flourish, whether Chinese girls receive an English or Chinese education or no education at all. If the education to be given to the girls here referred to has any moral effect at all, such effect will not be likely to encourage any immoral mode of life but rather the con- trary. It is vain to expect the Chinese residents to put forth any effort in the direction of promoting English or Anglo-Chinese female education. The leading Chinese whom I consulted, with the excep- tion of a few who received their education in the Straits Settlements, are decidedly inimical to any- thing of the sort, because they are the supporters of a system of polygamy which demands for its safety the greatest possible seclusion of females and which is endangered by the promotion of a system of English Public School education specially designed to invite the attendance of Chinese as well as Eurasian or European girls. Under these circumstances, seeing no prospect of private effort coming forward in this direction, I am of opinion that it is desirable that the Government should establish a Girls School, open to the daughters of all classes, whether Chinese or Indian or Eurasian or European, and giving, on condition of the payment of a small monthly fee, an elementary English education in the English language, with Chinese classical teaching to be added optionally (without extra fee).

11. The results of the annual examinations of the Schools under the supervision of the Education Department will be found detailed in the Tables (X-XV) appended to this Report, and, as far as the Government Central School is concerned, in the Report of its Headmaster. A few supplementary statistical details and general observations, regarding points brought out by the examination of the several classes of Schools, may, however, be of interest.

12. In the case of the Government Central School the result of the year's work has been tested as usual by means of a joint examination conducted by the Headmaster and myself. The general value of the year's work, as ascertained by this examination, will be found summarized in the Headmaster's separate Report. but I subjoin the usual Statistical Tables which indicate, in detail, the progress made in the year 1888 by the several divisions and classes of the School.

GOVERNMENT CENTRAL SCHOOL.-NUMBER OF BOYS PASSED IN EACH SUBJECT IN 1888.

Former Nos.

1888.

Total Examined.

|I.A................ 15 15 15 14 9

12

I.,

I.B....... 19 15 18 13 17 14 14 11 11 13 13

122

10 14 11 12 14 15 12 13 9 13 11 12

12 11 11 11 9 8

12

9

II.,

II.A.,

III...

II.B.,

60

36

36

888

35 33 28

IV.,

ני

V.,

VI.,.

VII.,

V

.9

VIII.,

VI.,..

73

IX.,.

X.,

XI.,.

0 0

22 + 0888

8¢ བ

25

* 2

18

III.A.,...

32 36 30

30 30

29

24

28 3329 25 32 29 29

24 27

III.B.,... 31 25 29 14 17 29

IV........ 56 54 54 43 34 54

38 38

38 35

32 38

33 31 32 29 23 27 28 16

69 71 64

283 2

8 N

2

62 66 60 | 70

* ~ ?

55

51

49 44

52

21

21 19

12

+ 8 8 No

8

25 32

:

:

:

:

:

28 88

32 34 29 32 35

338238

2 2 7 83

21 30 30 30 28

22 21

22

3238

888

30 18 29

17

2222232

28 28 27

51 32

222 223

21 27 21 24 18

44 51

33 32 36 36

1823

22 223

35

30 14

29

24 16

30

VII.,

VIII.A.,. 57

VIII.B.. 21❘ 20

38

19

Writing.

54

19

:

:

:

Total, 1888,...... 445 419 427 364 341 398 354 283 245 263 135 114 130 137 104

52 19

21

12

1887,......

384 375 372 325 292 338 351 281 233 230 103

48

82 88 54 45 18

:

:

:

:

...

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:.

:

:

...

...

:

:.

:.

I.,

II.,

III.,

104

1888.

GOVERNMENT CENTRAL SCHOOL-PERCENTAGE OF PASSES IN EACH SUBJECT IN 1888.

Grammar.

Geography.

Map Drawing.

Composition.

History.

Euclid,

Algebra.

Latin.

General

Intelligence.

Mensuration.

Shakespeare.

Trigonometry.

I.....

II.,

:

15 100.00 100.00 93.33 60.00 | 86.66|66.66|93.33|73.33| 80.00| 93.33|100.00|80.00 | 86.66|60.00|86,66|73.33 80.00 80

78.94 94.73 68.42 89.42 73,68| 73.68| 57.89 | 57.89 | 68.42 | 68.42 63.15 57.89 57.89 | 57.89 | 47.37 | 42.10 47.37

36 97.22 91.66 77.77 88.88 94.44 80.55 88.88 97.22 91.66 | 83.33| 50.00| 80.55| 97.22 | 83.33| 38.88

IA.,

ོརཿཙ

19

IB.,

IIA.,

III.,...

IV., IIIA.,

IIB.,...

V.,

•* ...

IIIB.,

31

93.33 93.33 93.33 90.00 100.00

67.74| 77.42| 58.07| 70.97

4.

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

36 88.88 100.00 83,33| 77.77| 91.66| 80,55| 69.44 88.88 80.55 80.55 47.22 | 88.88| 80.55| 66.66| 44.44

30 100.00 96.66 80.00 80.00| 90.00| 70.00 100.00 100.00 100.00

80.65 93.55 77.42 87.10 93.55 | 70.97 67.74 | 67.74 | 87.10

96.43 96.43 76.79 60.73 96.43 91.07 57.15 78.57 91.07

V.,...... 38 100.00 100.00 92,10 84.21 100.00 86.84 84.21 94.73 94.73

VIII., VI......

VI., ... IV.,

VII,

56

~ * ~ * * * * 8 8 8

IX.,

X.,

....

33 93.93 96.96 87.87 69.60 81.81 84.84 48.48 73.75 96.96

VII.,... 73 94.52 97.26 87.67 84.94 | 90.41 | 82.20 | 95.89

VIIIA., 57 96.49 89.47 85.96| 77.19| 91.23| 66,67

...

XI.,

'VIIIB, 21

95.23 100.00 100.00 90.47 57.15 90.47

:

:

÷

:

:..

...

...

:

:

:

...

Writing.

...

94.73

90.47

:

:

:

:

School, 1888,... 445 94.15 95.95 81.79 76.63 89.43| 79.55 77.11 83.00 | 89.45 80.89 | 68.26 | 77.84| 82.03 | 76.47 | 49.00|55.90 62.00 80

55

1887,... 384 97.65 96.87 84.63 76.04 88.02 91.40 89.49 90.30 89.14 93.63 69.57 74.54 80.00 78.26 65.22 64.25

GOVERNMENT CENTRAL SCHOOL.-CHINESE EXAMINATIONS. PERCENTAGE OF PASSES IN EACH SUBJECT, 1888.

I.,

II..........

III.,

IV.,

.....

V............

VI.,

Anglo-Chinese Class.

Division.

Total No. Examined.

Copy Writing.

Reading. Dictation.

Transla- Chinese

tion. Characters.

Total Percentage Passed.

10

100

90

11

100

82,-

88888

80

100

63

8888

100

100

6898

82

82

12

83

83

42

58

B

83

Chinese School.

Class.

Total No. Examined.

Essay.

Letter.

Prosody.

Total Percentage

Passed.

31

84

81

55

84

45

93

36

45

34

41

* 8 * ä 888

22

82

65

87

80

80

75

82

78

78

80

91

:.

88

:

88

888888

13. That the results of the year's work done in the Government Central School, is highly satis- factory, will be seen at a glance over the foregoing Tables. The papers done by the boys of Class I, A, reflect the highest credit on the School, especially in the subjects of History, Composition, Grammar and Dictation. Class III did a remarkably neat and praiseworthy work in Grammar, Geography, Map-drawing, Latin and English Reading. So also Class V distinguished itself particularly in Reading and in Translating from Chinese into English, and Class VIII, B, shewed excellent results in Reading and Dictation. But Class III, B, was a little weak in Euclid, Composition, Geography and Grammar

t

105

and Class I, C, displayed even more shortcomings in Grammar, Geography, Euclid, Algebra and Latin. The School as a whole, however, does not only maintain firmly its leading position among the Educational Institutions of the Colony, but is developing its educational resources steadily from year to Y year, by adding new subjects to its program. The subject of Latin which in the preceding year had been introduced in 3 classes was, during the year 1888, systematically taught in 5 classes. The substitution of Trigonometry for Mensuration, which is one of the new features of the year 1888, com- mends itself. So also the introduction of the study of an entire play of Shakespeare, in Class I, A, and I, B, is calculated to produce beneficial results, not merely because the methodical reading of a play of Shakespeare is an excellent means of curing that droning sing-song style of reading to which Chinese boys are specially addicted, but especially also because the substitution of a painstaking study of an entire play, for the superficial reading of disjecta membra poetæ, is calculated to develope a taste for the master pieces of English Literature. But in increasing thus the work of the higher classes of the Central School there is need to watch the tendency of such increase of school-work to impair the bodily health of the scholars. Such watchfulness will be specially called for in the case of Class III, B, which had four extra pensums (History, Composition, Euclid and Algebra) added in 1888 to its ordinary work. As to the Anglo-Chinese and Chinese classes of the Central School, the examinations have shewn as satisfactory results, as can be expected under the circumstances, and especially in view of the little time that can be spared in an English School for Chinese studies.

14. The Anglo-Chinese Schools, established by the Government many years ago at Saiyingpun, Wantsai, and in the villages at Yaumati, Wongnaichung and Stanley, received, in the year 1888, an addition to their number in the shape of an Anglo-Chinese School which was opened, at the request of the villagers, in Shaukiwan. This latest School, however, has not received proper support from the villagers who are hard to please and who desire separate teachers to be appointed for English and for Chinese teaching. The attendance at this School has been small and very irregular and consequently the results have been far from satisfactory, perhaps without any fault on the part of the teacher. At Yaumati also Anglo-Chinese teaching continues, year by year, to drag on a sluggish existence, there being among the villagers still very little appreciation of an English education. The Yaumati School has, however, a better future in prospect, for the boatmen and fishermen who hitherto constituted the residents of Yaumati, are gradually becoming outnumbered by town people and artizans from Hong- kong who are attracted to Yaumati by the lower rents charged there for house accommodation. If this change in the character of the population of Yaumati continues, we shall soon meet with a rapidly growing appreciation for and greater regularity of attendance at the Anglo-Chinese School. The other Anglo-Chinese Schools, those at Stanley and Wongnaichung, and especially the two Schools of Wantsai and Sayingpun are positively over-crowded, and months before a new school-year opens, the teachers of the latter two Schools are pestered with applications for admission which cannot be enter- tained for want of accommodation. The Anglo-Chinese Schools of Saiyingpun and Wantsai abso- lutely require enlarging, if they are at all to come up to the urgent demand, which has sprung up in these localities for Anglo-Chinese teaching. It is possible, however, that the opening of the new Victoria College may relieve the pressure which at present afflicts those two Schools. All these Anglo-Chinese Schools compete annually for the free-scholarships of the Government Central School and these competitions continue to prove, to the satisfaction of the Headmaster, the thoroughness and soundness of the English teaching given in these Schools.

15. Those Government Schools (including the Aided Schools in the villages), the teaching of which was formerly confined to giving a purely Chinese education, have displayed, in the year 1888, a praise- worthy effort in adding to the study of the Confucian Classics also the teaching of Arithmetic as well as Geography. Only a few schools, however, ventured to teach the European numerals (which most of the teachers have yet to learn themselves) and to make the children work out sums, in writing, according to European methods. But Mental Arithmetic, which all these Schools now teach with a will, has called forth the strongest approbation of the villagers and is now well established in popular favour, though formerly spoken against as a foreign innovation. What these Schools most needed was the introduction of a system of examination which requires the teacher to bring forward each boy, year after year, into a higher standard. So long as the education given in these Schools was confined to the Chinese Classics, in the case of which class-teaching is inapplicable, the progress of individual boys could only be measured by the number of books committed to memory, and by composition exercises in the case of the very few boys who stay in school for the number of years required for that. But now, since Geography teaching and Arithmetic have been introduced, which subjects admit of class- teaching, a rule has been made that every boy in the Government Schools who has entered his third school-year is required to pass, at the Annual Examinations, in the following subjects, viz. Schoolbook Committee's First Reader (in addition to memoriter repeating of Chinese Classics), Writing from Dic- tation 20 characters from First Reader, Mental Arithmetic (Addition and Subtraction), Geography (the eighteen Provinces). The subjects of the fourth school year are now, Repeating Chinese Classics, Antithetical Sentences, Schoolbook Committee's Second Reader, Writing from Dictation 30 characters from the same book, Mental Arithmetic (Addition, Subtraction and Multiplication), and Geography (the Chinese Empire). The subjects of the fifth school-year (unless the boys are, as usual in most cases, removed then to an Anglo-Chinese School) are Repeating Chinese Classics, Reading and Explaining Schoolbook Committee's Third Reader, Chinese Essay Writing, Writing from Dictation 40 characters

106

from the same book, Arithmetic (up to Division), and Geography (the two hemispheres). This arrangement has now brought the teaching of the Government Schools into conformity with the educa- tional system of the rest of the Colony, and the Aided Schools in the Villages are also having the same system applied to them step by step.

16. The Grant-in-Aid Schools in Class I have suffered, during the year 1888, far more than any other Class of Schools, from small-pox and fever, and also from the excessively high house rents and the consequent movement of the population. Though the total of children enrolled in all Schools has increased, individual Schools in the centre of the town have had their numbers materially reduced, while Schools in the outskirts of the town have profited. But in almost all cases the average of results, as ascertained by the examination, has been in respect of quality below the average of former years, and the number of children brought under examination has materially fallen off in the case of Schools in Class I, being only 1,533 in the year 1888, as compared with 1,696 in the year 1887, although the enrolment was higher. I subjoin a comparative Table, exhibiting the results of the working of the Revised Grant-in-Aid Scheme of 1883, so far as Schools in Class I are concerned, for whom that revision was specially intended.

TABLE shewing the EFFECTS of REVISION of SCHEME (1883) on SCHOOLS in CLASS I.

Number of Scholars examined in Schools

in Class I.

Amount earned by Passes (apart from Capitation Grant and Needle-work).

Standards.

1884.

1885.

1886. 1887.

1888.

1884.

1885. 1886. 1887.

1888.

$

$

$

76

128

271

372

279

146

160

462

654

558

4

II.,

557

739

652

639

752

2,124 2,052

2,496

2,464

3,008

III.

470

.446

474

487

336

2,208

2,196

2,184

2,100 2,286

IV.,

120

128

138

153

111

840

624

640

856. 888

V.,

26

26

44

33

31

230

210

320

250

150

VI.,

2

9

11

13

24

24

108

120

108

84

1,251 1,476 1,590 1,696 1,533 $5,572

$5,350 $6,222 $6,432

$6,432 $6,974

*

17. It is evident from the foregoing Tables that one aim of the Revision of the Scheme has been partially secured, viz., to encourage the teachers of these purely Chinese Schools to bring forward more children into the higher Standards. This has been attained, as far as Standard VI is concerned, and partially also in the case of Standard V, in both of which Standards the number of children brought under examination has pretty steadily increased from year to year. But after all, to bring only 45 out of 1,696 children, or 55 out of 1,533 children into these highest Standards, is not much to rejoice over. The movement in advance, in this respect, is principally due to the Girls Schools, boys being as a rule drafted off into Anglo-Chinese or English Schools after passing Standard III. It is further satisfactory to observe that the number of children brought forward in Standard I has steadily increased from year to year, but the number of children placed in Standard II (without previously passing through Standard I) is abnormally large, more especially in comparison with the excessively low numbers examined under Standard III. The cause of this objectionable tendency on the part of teachers, crowding as many children as possible into Standard II, to the neglect of Standards I and III, is that the Scheme allows, in the case of Standard II, copy writing to make up for failure in one of the other subjects. Many teachers have accordingly taken advantage of this means of passing children with ease through the examination in Standard II, and habitually crowd as many children as possible into this Standard, putting them through the Reading and Memoriter Repeating drill of one small book which it would be difficult to fail in, and giving the children a great deal of mechanical copywriting to do, which entails little effort on the part of the teacher, whilst Writing from Dictation is almost entirely neglected. By this means the teacher swells the amount of his bonus at the end of the year, at the expense of the real educational interests of the children which remain neglected. This defect in the Scheme can be obviated by abolishing the compensating power of Copywriting (or rather mechanical tracing) in the case of these Chinese Schools. There are other considerations which point in the direction of the advisability of revising the Code. The general tendency which has set in, during the last few years, to aim at a higher standard of education in all the different Classes of Grant-in-Aid Schools, both Chinese and English, needs and fully deserves support on the part of the Government. There is a general desire, for

I

107

instance, to include in the pensum of the Chinese Schools in Class I, which have hitherto been purely Chinese Schools, the teaching of Arithmetic as a Special Subject. There is also a desire, on the part of Managers and Teachers of English Schools, to have certain useful subjects included among the Special Subjects, such as Mensuration, Trigonometry, Freehand Drawing, etc., for which the present Scheme makes no allowance. As regards Building Grants also an alteration has been made in the Rules but not yet included in the Scheme. But all the revision that appears desirable affects only minor details and leaves untouched the leading features of our Grant-in-Aid Scheme, which

year by year continues to demonstrate its effectiveness by the increasing soundness and uniformity which is gradually pervading our whole educational system, and in the quiet power which it exercises in the direction of counteracting whatever drawbacks attend the local working of the Cambridge Local Exa- mination system, the healthful stimulus of which continues to produce good results.

18. As regards the other classes of Grant-in-Aid Schools, viz. those which give a European edu- cation, the results of the Annual Examinations are detailed in the Tables appended to this Report, and there are but a few general observations to be added. The unusual amount of sickness, which prevailed throughout the year, affected these Schools also, by diminishing regularity of attendance and conse- quently the quality of the results obtained at the examinations. Nevertheless the Boys Schools did, on the whole, very good work, and several Schools specially distinguished themselves this year by the uniformly excellent results obtained in both ordinary and special subjects. But the Girls Schools appear to be losing ground. Only one Girls School (Victoria English School) attempted special subjects (Algebra and Physical Geography) in the year 1888, whilst the Boys Schools are steadily progressing in this matter, both as regards the thoroughness of the teaching given and the shape of fresh variations judiciously introduced, in which respect the Grammatical Analysis and Book-keeping exercises of St. Joseph's College and the Animal Physiology papers of the Diocesan School stood out most prominently as meritorious examples.

19. The Needle-work Examination produced satisfactory results in the year 1888. Whilst the needle-work of the Italian Convent School stood hitherto unrivalled in neatness and artistic beauty of its work, there are now several other Schools which are coming pretty near the standard of the Convent School, even with respect to Chinese domestic needle-work. There is however some danger, in the commercial value which the needle-work that is being done in some Girls Schools has, viz., the danger of giving too much time to needle-work, such as pays the School directly, at the expense of the less remunerative training of the mind which benefits the scholar. There is indeed no necessity for Girls Schools to take up any Special Subjects such as Algebra, Astronomy, etc., but neither is there any good reason why girls should fail to master Vulgar and Decimal Fractions, and I would rather see less time given to embroidery and similar fancy needle-work and a little more attention paid to the ordinary subjects of the Grant-in-Aid Scheme.

20. I enclose the usual Tables (I. to XVI.), containing the Educational Statistics for the year 1888.

I have the honour to be,

The Honourable F. STEWART, LL.D.,

Colonial Secretary.

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

E. J. EITEL, M.A., PH. D.,

Inspector of Schools.

108

TABLE I.-NUMBER of SCHOLARS attending School subject to Government Supervision during 1888.

No.

Name of School.

1 American Board Mission, Bridges Street, (Boys),.

"

39

??

"

19

19

"

13

19

19

11

13

Aplichau,

Station Terrace, (Boys),. Hinglung Lane, (Boys),

Queen's Road West (Boys), Háwán (Girls),

Basel Mission, High Street (Girls),

"

Shamshuipò (Boys),

Shaukiwán (Boys),

Berlin Mission (Girls),

Central School,

C. M. S. St. Stephen's I. Division (Boys),

"

19

""

II.

14.

(Boys),

Lyndhurst Terrace (Boys),

Pottinger Street (Boys), Saiyingp'un (Boys),

St. Stephen's Baxter Memorial (Girls),. Lyndhurst Terrace (Girls).

Third Street (Girls),.

Yaumáti (Mixed),

Hunghòm (Boys),

""

(Girls),

Victoria Home and Orphanage (Girls), Diocesan Home and Orphanage (Boys), F. E. S. Bonham Road (Girls),

Hoktsui,

High Street (Girls),

Queen's Road (Girls),

Hollywood Road (Girls),

Pottinger Street (Girls), Stanley School (Girls),

Shaukiwán (Girls),.....

Hongkong Public School (Boys), Hunghom,

Little Hongkong,

L. M. S. Hollywood Road (Boys),

Wántsai (Boys),.

Yaumáti (Boys),

Shekt'ongtsui (Boys),

Saiyingp'un I. Division (Boys),

II.

Hunghòm (Boys),

"

Shekt'ongtsui (Girls),

Saiyingp'un (Girls),

Kau-ü-fong (Girls),

Ship Street (Girls),

(Boys),

Hollywood Road Chapel (Boys),

Lower Lascar Row (Girls),

10

11

12

13

14

15

17

16

17

"

18

"7

19

"1

20

19

21

29

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

29

19

30

31

32

33

Hokün,

34

35

36

37

38

"

39

19

40

"

41

42

"

43

"

44

19

45

99

46

"}

47

99

48

"

49

29

50

""

51

29

52

"

53

""

54

55

56

57

New Girls School,

58

59

60

61

62

63

??

64

"

65

66

"J

67

"}

68

"

69

""

English

""

70

"

་་

19

(Boys), (Girls).

71

Saiyingp'ún (English)

72

19

73

(Punti),.. (Hakka),

74

Sháiwán,

75

Shaukiwán,

76

Shekò,

77

78

13

(Girls),

79

Shéungwán (Boys),

St. Paul's College, Anglo-Chinese (Boys),

80

Stanley,

81

Taihang,

82

Táit'ámtuk,

83

Táiwongkung,.

85

84 Tanglungchau (Hakka),

86 Tòkwáwán (Eastern Village),.

(Punti),

87

"

(Western Village),.

$8

Ts'attszemúi,

Tanglungchau (Girls),

Táip'ingshan Chapel (Girls),

Aberdeen Street (Girls),

Wántsai (Girls), .

Staunton Street Upper School (Girls),

Mát'auch'ung,

Mongkok.....

New Village (Little Hongkong),

Pokfulam,

R. C. M. Cathedral School (Boys),

Bridges Street Chinese Poor School (Girls), Hollywood Road, Charitable School (Girls),

St. Joseph's College, Chinese Division (Boys),.

European Division (Boys),

"

Italian Convent (Girls),

Bridges Street Portuguese Poor School (Mixed), St. Francis Chapel, Portuguese School (Mixed), Victoria Portuguese School (Mixed),..

****

90

91

92

"J

89 Wantsai (English),

(Chinese),

Wesleyan Mission, Spring Gardens (Boys),

Wellington Street (Boys),

93

27

""

""

*1

(Girls),

94

Wongkoktsui,

95

96

Wongmákok, Wongnaich'ung:

97

Yaumáti,

Central School.

Native Native Grant-in- School

Schools Aid

Total.

(Govt.) (Aided). School.

77

...

...

...

77

74

74

83

83

...

48

48

31

54

54

82

82

...

34

...

...

...

28

***

634

...

105

...

82

111

172

..

66

64

56

21

...

125

...

...

...

***

10

***

13

...

26

...

...

31

***

165

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

14

26

49

6

13

...

494

102 *94

80

17

40

30

56

80

48

38

...

10

60

...

50

61

39

28

13

196

196

188

53

80

16

19

...

:ཚོ།

7.

47

...

33

38

60

50

***82 8 88-98

16

19

7

47

634

932

367

4,325

6,258

⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀⠀ : 288°EREG86¦ ¦ ¦ ¦ ¦ 8E8C==~=*=NCEZ8JER: : 8: :~~~~~~~~N~NOSAROJECÕ: ****: FLIN

29

28

634

105

82

111

72

.99

64

41

56

51

21

25

26

26

125

27

27

38

38

38

38

32

32

37

37

52

52.

32

32

10

13

66

26

31

165

117

117

73

73

90

90

108

108

114

114

82

82

27

67.

95

67

75

75

58

58

54

54

80

69

101

101

58

58.

14

26

49

6

13

46

59

...

47

...

111

111

191

191

...

184

184

115

115

***

37

59

...

62

54

102

80

17

40

...

30

56

...

80

58

48

109

TABLE II.—PROPORTION of SCHOLARS to POPULATION in the CITY of VICTORIA and in the VILLAGES in 1888.

CITY AND HARBOUR OF VICTORIA.

Population as estimated in 1887, about 181,900 souls (exclusive of Army and Navy).

CHILDREN IN SCHOOLS UNDER GOVERNMENT SUPERVISION, IN THE CITY OF VICTORIA.

1. American Board Mission, Bridges Street (Boys),

VILLAGES.

Population, including Boat: Population, as per Census of 188

CHILDREN IN SCHOOLS UNDER GOVERNMENT SUPERVISION, IN VILLAGES.

No. of Scholars.

No. of Scholars.

77

1. Aplichau,

54

2.

>

Station Terrace (Boys),

74

3.

3.

4.

5.

""

Hinglung Lane (Boys), Queen's Road West (Boys), Háwȧn (Girls),

83

48

5.

31

";

6.

6. Basel Mission, High Street (Girls),

82

7. Berlin Mission (Girls),..

8. Central School,

9. C. M. S., St. Stephen's I Division (Boys),

28

2. Basel Mission, Shamshuipò (Boys,).

Shaukiwan (Boys),

""

4. C. M. S., Hunghom (Boys),

""

Yaumáti (Mixed),

7. F. É. S., Shaukiwán (Girls),.

34

29

21

(Girls),

25

51

32

S.

634

""

Stanley (Girls),

52

9. Hoktsui,

10

105

10. Hokün,

13

10.

II

""

"

(Boys),

82

11.

""

Lyndhurst Terrace (Boys),

111

11. Hunghòm,

26

12.

11

Pottinger Street (Boys),

72

12. Little Hongkong,

31

13. L. M. S., Hunghòm Boys,

82

13.

"

Saiyingp'ún (Boys),...........

66

14.

14.

;;

St. Stephen's Baxter Memorial (Girls),

64.

"?

Shekt'ongtsui (Boys),

90

15.

15.

Lyndhurst Terrace (Girls),

41

**

"

(Girls),

27

16.

16.

11

Third Street (Girls),

56

"

17.

17.

"

20.

21.

22.

??

23.

Victoria Home and Orphanage (Girls),

18. Diocesan Home and Orphanage (Boys),

19. F. E. S., Bonham Road (Girls),

High Street (Girls),

Queen's Road (Girls), Hollywood Road (Girls), Pottinger Street (Girls),

24. Hongkong Public School (Boys),

25. L. M. S., Hollywood Road (Boys),

26

*

Tanglungchau (Girls), Yaumáti (Boys),

51

73

125

18. Mát'auch'ung,

14

27

19. Mongkok,

26

38

20. New Village (Little Hongkong),..

21. Pokfulam,...

13

38

32

22. Sháiwán,

17

23. Shaukiwán,

40

37

24. Shekò,

30

66

25. Stanley,.

48

165

26.

11

27.

""

Wántsai (Boys), Saiyingp'un I Division (Boys),

117

26. Taihang,

38

27. Táit'ámtuk,

10

108

28.

II

""

12

(Boys),

114

28. Tanglungchau (Hakka),

50

29.

29.

""

Saiyingp'un (Girls),

67

21

(Punti),

61

30.

""

Kau-ü-fong (Girls),

95

31.

31.

""

Ship Street (Girls),

67

""

32.

"

Hollywood Road Chapel (Boys),

75

30. T'òkwawan (Eastern Village),

32. Ts'attszemúi,

39

(Western Village),..

28

13

33.

Lower Lascar Row (Girls),..

58.

33. Wongkoktsui,

19

34.

"

T'áip'ingshan Chapel (Girls),..

80

34. Wongmákok,

7

35.

"

Aberdeen Street (Girls),

69

35. Wongnaich'ung,

47

36. Yaumáti,

33

36.

Wántsai (Girls),

101

37.

"

Staunton Street Upper School (Girls),

58

TOTAL,......

.1,246.

40.

27

41.

""

42.

""

43.

44.

"

45.

"

46.

37

47.

"

""

48. 49.

E?

""

50. Saiyingp'ún (English),.

38. New Girls School,...

39. R. C. M., Cathedral School (Boys),

Hollywood Road, Charitable School (Girls), St. Joseph's College, Chinese Division (Boys),

Italian Convent (Girls),..

Bridges Street, Portuguese School (Mixed), St. Francis Chapel, Portuguese School (Mixed), Victoria, Portuguese School (Mixed),..

49

46

Bridges Street, Poor School (Girls),

59

47

111

European,,

(Boys),

191

184

115

37

59

**

English

*

(Boys), (Girls),

102

51.

22

52.

""

54.

(Punti),

(Hakka),

(Girls),

58.

53. Shéungwán (Boys),

55. St. Paul's College, Anglo-Chinese (Boys),

56. Taiwongkung,

57. Wántsai (English),

(Chinese),

59. Wesleyan Mission, Spring Gardens (Boys),

196

60.

"

33

Wellington Street (Boys),

61.

:

39

(Girls),

*** * ***** & **

62

54

80

56

80

58

60

53

80

16

TOTAL,............... 5,012

TABLE III.-NUMBER of SCHOLARS at the GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS during 1888, and EXPENSES of each SCHOOL.

No.

Name of School.

1 Aplichau,

Boys. Girls.

Total.

Expense. No.

Name of School.

Boys. Girls. Total.

Expense.

54

2 Central School,

634

634

Hoktsui,

10

10

20. Stanley,

Brought forward,.. 54 $ 109.00 18 Shéungwán (Boys),

12,384.14 19

(Girls), 60.00

1,099

49 1,148

$15,065.00

56

56

306.00

80

80

799.00

48

48

324.64

4

Hokün,

5 | Hunghòm

13

13

60.00 21 Taibang,

38

38

50.00

26

26

60.00

22 Táit'ámtuk,

10

10

60.00

6 Little Hongkong,

7 Mát'auch'ung,

8 Mongkok,

9 New Girls School,

31

31

60.00

23 Táiwongkung,

60

60

...

329.00

14

14

61.00 24 Tanglungchau (Hakka),

50

50

120.00

26

26

60.00 25

49

49

669.90

26

(Punti), T'ókwáwán (Eastern Village),.

61

61

180.00

39

39

60.00

10 New Village (Little Hongkong)

9

9

60.00

11

Pokfulam,

13

13

27 28

(Western Village,)

28

28

60.00

12 Saiyingp'ún (English),

102

102

72.00 520.18 29 Wántsai (English),

Ts'attszemúi,

13

13

61.00

196

600.70

196

13

(Punti),

(94)

159.20 30

22

(Chinese),

(188)

301.00

14

(Hakka),

80

80

267.00

31 Wongkoktsui,

19

19

72.00

15 Sháiwán,

17

17

60.00

16 Shaukiwán,

40

40

32 Wongmákok,

272.08 33 Wongnaich'ung,

7

7

73.00

47

47

251.99

17 | Shekò,

30

30

130.50 34 Yaumáti,

33

33

389.94

Carried forward,.

1,099

49 1,148

15,065.00

TOTAL,

1,804 | 129

1,933 $19,103.27

110

TABLE IV.-AVERAGE EXPENSES of each SCHOLAR or STUDENT at the Government Schools during the Year 1888.

Expenditure,

GOVERNMENT CENTRAL SCHOOL.

GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS AND AIDED SCHOOLS.

Expenditure,

Add Inspector's Salary,

Chinese Writer's Salary,

""

Teacher's Salary,

Travelling Expenses,

$12,384.14

.$ 6,719.13

$3,000

384

120

288

No.

Total Expenditure for the year :-

Government Central School,

Government Schools and Aided Schools,

A.

Average Expenses calculated by the Enrolment.

1. Average Expense of each Scholar at Government Central School,

at other Government Schools, at Government Aided Schools,

Hai as

2.

3.

29

"

B.

.....

Average Expenses calculated by the average Daily Attendance.

1. Average Expense of each Scholar at Government Central School,

Aici ed

2.

>>

3.

39

"

at other Government Schools,

99

""

at Government Aided Schools,

3,792.00

$22,895.27

.$12,384.14 10,511.13

$19.53 7.01

4.19

..$26.48

7.65

4.92

TABLE V.-AVERAGE MONTHLY ENROLMENT and DAILY ATTENDANCE at the Government Schools for 1888.

Name of School.

Average Monthly Enrolment.

Average Daily Attendance.

12

Aplichau,..... Central School,

35.17

27.37

482.75

467.60

3

Hoktsui,

9.42

8.99

4

Hokün,

8.00

7.09

5

Hunghòm,

14.83

11.96

6

Little Hongkong,

24.75

23.56

7

Mát'auch'ung,

11.25

9.27

8

Mongkok,

13.42

13.10

9

New Girls School,

34.09

27.44

10

New Village (Little Hongkong),

8.67

6.94

11

Pokfulam,.

11.54

10.10

12

Sayingp'ún, (English),

69.00

66.03

13

""

(Punti),

36.91

31.98

14

""

(Hakka),

51.36

46.68

15

Sháiwán,

12.00

8.32

16

Shaukiwán,

27.40

25.09

17

Shekò,

26.90

19.41

18

Shéungwán (Boys),

36.42

32.18

19

99

(Girls),

40.83

34.62

20

Stanley,

41.25

37.01

21

Taihang,

28.70

24.30

22

Táit'ámtuk,

7.80

6.92

23

Táiwongkung,

29.50

25.64

24 Tanglungchau, (Hakka),

31.50

28.51

25

(Punti),

37.08

33.17

26

T'òkwáwán, (Eastern Village),

26.54

23.29

27

Western Village),

17.83

14.98

28

Ts'attszemúi,

10.18

7.90

29

Wántsai, (English),.

144.16

140.89

30

(Chinese),.

140.17

136.41

31

Wongkoktsui,

14.50

12.47

32

Wongmákok,

7.00

6.47

33

Wongnaich'ung,

32.50

29.28

34

Yaumáti,

21.91

20.34

1,545.33

1,425.26

"

No.

111

TABLE VI.-MAXIMUM and MINIMUM ENROLMENT and DAILY ATTENDANCE at the Government Schools during 1888.

Maximum Daily Minimum Daily

No.

Name of School.

Maximum Monthly Enrolment.

Minimum Monthly Enrolment.

Attendance

Attendance

(Monthly average). (Monthly average).

1

Aplichau,..

45

20

40.56

18.67

2

Central School,

536

384

511.56

366.79

3

Hoktsui,

10

9

10.00

8.29

Hokün,

10

7

8.35

6.31

5

Hunghom,

17

5

17.00

5.00

6

Little Hongkong,

28

23

28.00

20.83

7

Mát'auch'ung,

14

11

11.00

6.04

8

Mongkok,...

17

9

17.00

9.00

9

New Girls School,

41

20

33.85

19.33

10

New Village (Little Hongkong),

11

7

11.00

5.33

11

Pokfulam,

13

2

11.73

1.46

12

Saiyingp'un (English),

73

64

70.63

62.04

13

(Punti),

71

31

43.67

29.27

14

(Hakka),

62

14

59.39

11.22

15

Sháiwán,

15

9

10.82

5.08

16

Shaukiwán,

35

21

33.85

18.54

17

Sheko,

29

24

25.12

16.08

18

Shéungwán (Boys),

44

22

38.28

20.00

19

""

(Girls),

48

22

40.92

17.52

20

Stanley,

44

35

41.38

32.52

21

Taihang,

35

20

C

28.78

18.08

22

Tait'ámtuk,

10

7

8.22

4.17

23

Táiwongkung,

37

24

30.32

20.15

24

Tanglungchau (Hakka),

36

28

33.50

24.41

25

"

(Punti),

52

23

48.23

19.55

26

T'òkwáwán (Eastern Village),

- 31

19

27.69

16.36

27

(Western Village),

19

12

18.61

9.96

28

Ts'attszemúi,

11

7

9.89

7.00

29

Wántsai (English),

163

100

161.12

93.08

;

30

(Chinese),

158

99

156.12

91.28

31

Wongkoktsui,

16

10

14.50

9.58

32

Wongmákok,

77

7

7.00

5.72

33

34

Wongnaich'ung, Yaumáti,

37

28

33.48

26.29

26

16

24.29

15.15

.....

1,801

1,139

1,653.86

1,040.10

TABLE VII.-NUMBER of DAYS on which the GoVERNMENT SCHOOLS were taught during 1888.

Name of School.

School Days. No.

Name of School.

School Days.

1

Aplichau,

249

18

Shéungwán (Boys),.

240

2

Central School,

19

وو

(Girls),.

241

3

Hoktsui,

240

20

Stanley,

239

4

Hokün,

218

21

Taihang,

220

5

Hunghòm,

249

22

Táit'ámtuk,

221

6

Little Hongkong,.

246

23

Táiwongkung,

235

7

Mat'auch'ung,

247

24

Tanglungchau (Hakka),

238

8

Mongkok,

249

25

(Punti),

238

9

New Girls School,

213

26

Tokwáwán (Eastern Village),

248

10

New Village (Little Hongkong),.

229

27

""

(Western Village),

248

11

Pokfulam,.

239

28

Ts'attszemui,

243

12

Saiyingp'ún (English),

215

29.

Wántsai (English),

236

13

(Punti),

216

30

(Chinese),

236

14

J

(Hakka),

227

31

Wongkoktsui,

247

15

Sháiwán,

246

32

Wongmakok,

249

16

Sháukiwán,

217

33

Wongnaich'ung,

231

17

Shekò,

237

34

Yaumáti,

230

Total Enrolment for the Year.

112

TABLE VIII.-SUMMARY of ENROLMENT and ATTENDANCE at the GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS for the last Twenty-five Years.

Years.

Minimum Daily Attendance

Maximum Daily Attendance

Minimum Monthly Enrolment.

(Monthly Average).

(Monthly Average).

1864,

502

417

634

324

1865,

597

535

418

330

1866,

623

572

435

337

1867,

700

610

533

408

1868,

916

664

572

460

1869,

942

748

627

504

1870,

1.302

950

683

556

1871,

1,292

937

741

571

1872,

1,480

1,157

837

665

1873,

1,838

1,326

852

760

1874,

1,932

1,271

974

836

1875,

1,927

1,312

988

863

1876,

2,171

1,383

1,057

925

1877,

2,148

1,446

1,212

1,035

1878,

2,101

1,324

1,100

936

1879,

2,043

1,356

1,027

904

1880,

2,078

1,468

1,082

937

1881,

1,986

1,384

1,093

956

1882,

2,114

1,444

1,062

988

1883,

2,080

1,414

1,138

990

1884,

1,978

1,420

1,066

941

1885,

1,988

1,424

1,061

926

1886,

1,893

1,544

1,040

886

1887, 1888,

1,814

1,552

1,126

1,000

1,933

1,653

1,139

1,040

January,

February, March,

April,.

May,

June,

July,

August,

September,

October,....

November,..

December,

Number of Scholars.

TABLE IX.-ENROLMENT and ATTENDANCE at the CENTRAL SCHOOL during 1888.

Month.

Average Daily Attendance.

Number of Attendances.

Number of School Days.

390

5,135

14

366.79

384

768

2

384.00

536

12,789

25

511.56

528

8,976

18

498.67

519

11,594

24

483.08

503

10,855

23

471.96

492

12,185

26

468.65

472

2,762

6

460.33

509

8,167

17

480.41

501

12,249

26

471.12

489

11,792

26

453.54

470

9,810

22

445.91

Total,..

107,082

229

Total Number of ATTENDANCES during 1888,

Number of SCHOOL DAYS during 1888,

Average DAILY ATTENDANCE during 1888,

107,082 229 467.607

Total Number of SCHOLARS at this School during 1888,..

634

TABLE X.-GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS (CENTRAL SCHOOL excepted) arranged in the order of their efficiency.

Rank I.

Saiyingp'ún, English School. New Girls School, (Chinese). Wántsai, Chinese School.

Rank II,

Wántsai, English School. Stanley, Anglo-Chinese School. Wongnaich'ung, Anglo-Chinese School.

Yaumáti, Anglo-Chinese School.

Shaukiwán, Anglo-Chinese School.

Shéungwán, Chinese Boys School.

Taiwongkung, Chinese School.

Rank II,-Continued.

Saiyingp'ún, Chinese Hakka School. Tanglungchau, Chinese Hakka School. Tanglungchau, Chinese Punti School. Shekò, Chinese School.

Rank III.

Shéungwán, Chinese Girls School. Saiyingp'ún, Chinese School. Little Hongkong, Chinese School. Aplichau, Chinese School. Wongkoktsui, Chinese Hakka School. Tòkwáwán, East, Chinese School. Mongkok, Chinese Hakka School.

Rank III,-Continued.

Tsattszemúi, Chinese Hakka School. Hoktsui, Chinese Hakka School. Táihang, Chinese School. Pokfulam, Chinese School. Sháiwán, Chinese Hakka School. Hunghòm, Chinese Hakka School. Hokün, Chinese Hakka School. Tòkwáwán, West, Chinese Hakka

School.

Mát'auch'ung, Chinese Hakka School. Wongmákok, Chinese Hakka School. Táit'ámtuk, Chinese Hakka School. New Village (Little Hongkong)

Punti School.

TABLE XI-NUMBER of SCHOLARS attending Sehools receiving GRANTS-IN-AID (under the Provisions of the Scheme of 1883), Expenses incurred and amount of Grant gained by each, in 1888.

113

Class of

Name of School.

School.

Expenses Boys. Girls. Total. incurred in

1888.

Amount of Grant gained for 1888.

$ c.

I.

H

American Board Mission, Bridges Street (Boys),

77

77

288.00

299.26

"

""

دو

Station Terrace (Boys),

74

74

232.30

183.65

""

""

"

"

Hinglung Lane (Boys),.

83

83

279.00

278.59

""

""

""

""

""

"J

""

Queen's Road, West (Boys), Háwán (Girls),

48

48

287.00

196.32

31

31

139.79

"9

وو.

"9

-

""

""

39

""

">

""

29.

">

""

"

Third Street (Girls),

Yaumáti (Mixed),

"

II.

Basel Mission, Shamshuipó (Boys),..

Shaukiwán (Boys),

C. M. S. St. Stephen's I. Division (Boys),

""

Lyndhurst Terrace (Boys),

Pottinger Street (Boys),

Saiyingp'ún (Boys),

St. Stephen's Baxter Memorial (Girls),

Lyndhurst Terrace (Girls),

34

34

101.20

66.17

29

29

65.73

»

105

105

435.94

302.39

(Boys),.

82

82

381.76

154.96

111

111

371.05

292.37

72

72

314.65

187.08

66

66

266.99

217.29.

64

64

244.19

139.39

41

41

272.12

93.01

56

56

219.44

151.63

40

11

51

230.00

199.85

""

""

*9

""

"

"

"

""

"?

"

Wántsai (Boys),....

99..

""

Yaumáti (Boys),

"

"

Hunghòm (Boys),

""

(Girls),

Victoria Home and Orphanage (Girls),

F. E. S. Bonham Road (Girls),

""

High Street (Girls),

Queen's Road (Girls),

Hollywood Road (Girls),

Pottinger Street (Girls);

Stanley School (Girls),

Shaukiwán (Girls),

L. M. S. Hollywood Road (Boys),

Shekt'ongtsui (Boys),

Saiyingp'ún, I. Division (Boys),

II.

21

21

207.52

51.21

25

25

80.44.

26

26

86.10

27 27

496.50

131.21

38

38

218.00

76.62

38

38

207.50

153.96

32

32

195.50

80.30

37

37

247.00

149.36

52

52

168.00

196.06

32 32

187.00

111.86

165

165

777.22

499.73

117

117

928.51

404.94

73

73

534.20

230.18

90

90

478.84

293.69

108

108

808.15

402.64

""

(Boys)

114

114

667.09

328.66

"

"

Hunghòm (Boys),

82

82

931.01

211.00

Shek'tongtsui (Girls),

27

27

500.03

130.75

""

Saiyingp'ún (Girls),

67

67

408.04

207.39

Kau-ü-fong (Girls),

95

95

627.28

364.82

29

Ship Street (Girls),

67

67

350.07

225.66

Hollywood Road Chapel (Boys),

75

75

518.40

294.80

...

59

دو

Lower Lascar Row (Girls),

58

58

523.24

76.19

"9

Tanglungchau (Girls),

54

54

301.40

188.73

29

T'áip'ingshán Chapel (Girls),

80

80

434.75

188.17

""

Aberdeen Street (Girls),

69

69

482.32

182.02

Wántsai (Girls),.

101

101

510.52

401.78

""

29

"2

59

29

19

33

وو

99

Berlin Mission (Girls),

IV.

""

St. Paul's College, Anglo-Chinese (Boys),

دو

"

99

29

19

"

Italian Convent (Girls),

39.

Staunton Street, Upper School (Girls),

R. C. M. Cathedral School (Boys),

Bridges Street, Poor School (Girls),

Hollywood Road, Charitable School (Girls), Wesleyan Mission, Spring Gardens (Boys),

""

Wellington Street (Boys),

""

35

III. Basel Mission,' High Street (Girls),.

Diocesan Home and Orphanage (Boys),

Hongkong Public School (Boys),....

R. C. M. St. Joseph's College, Chinese Division (Boys),

Bridges Street, Poor School (Mixed),

58

58

474.22

269.65

...

46

46

267.00

94.92

...

59

59

504.00

221.91

::

47

47

235.88

8833

53

53

204.00

180.81

80

80

306.00

273.21

(Girls),

16

16

216.00

58.17

82

82

788.23

680.12

28

28

1,066.81

279.11

108

17 125

8,112.44

636.32

58

58

824.78

322.44

66

66

5,063.51

320.92

111

111

5,896.24

ĺ 707.80

""

European

(Boys),

191

191

1,521.04

184

184

2,744.14

• 601.01

60

55

115

944.00

686.75

"

St. Francis Chapel, Portuguese School (Mixed),.•*• Victoria, Portuguese School (Mixed),

17

20

37

708.00

201.45

"

"

English

"

(Boys)

28

20

39

59

1,107.00

279.95

62

62

4,351.30

""

""

""

""

37

(Girls),

54

54

{

350.38

209.76

2,538 1,787 | 4,325 $49,209.40 $16,847.35

114

TABLE XII.—ENROLMENT, ATTENDANCE and NUMBER of SCHOOL DAYS at the GRANT-IN-AID SCHOOLS during 1888.

Maxi- Mini-

mum

mum

mum

mum

No.

Name of School.

Monthly Monthly

Enrol- ment.

Enrol-

Daily

Daily Attend- Attend-

Average Average

Maxi- Mini- Average Daily Number

Monthly Attend-

Enrol-

Average

ance

of School

ment.

for the

Days.

ment.

ance.

ance.

Year.

1 American Board Mission, Bridges Street (Boys),

77

2

"

Station Terrace (Boys),

46

3

""

Hinglung Lane (Boys).

66

99

"

وو

6

7

""

8

9

"

10

""

4

5

99

Basel Mission, Shamshuipò (Boys),

Shaukiwán (Boys),.

C. M. S., St. Stephen's I. Division (Boys),

""

Lyndhurst Terrace (Boys),

Queen's Road, West

48

(Boys), Háwán (Girls),

31

34

*** * **

62

71.20

52.86 71.10

63.26

241

30

43.34

26.33 42.75

41.65

248

30

58.84

24.80 59.50

52.59

257

46

46.87

35.48

47.81

44.32

244

23

29.73

20.81

29.10 25.79

252

12

28.69

3.52

24.81

20.17

263

29

20

27.29

14.94

25.00 21.73

252

104

25

87.16

24.47

71.58

66.39

276

II.

(Boys),

59

34

55.00 32.90 46.75

42.96

266

90

56

85.00

55.33 70.16

68.37

265

11

""

Pottinger Street (Boys),

71

46

57.20

39.39

.57.90

49.08

234

12

Saiyingp'ún (Boys),

56

20

52.08 19.66

45.33

43.29

264

13

19

St. Stephen's Baxter Memorial (Girls),

42

22

39.96

21.16

32.33

29.39

271

14

>>

Lyndhurst Terrace (Girls),

24

9

22.00

7.00

20.25

19.01

273

15

"

Third Street (Girls),

30

5 27.24

5.00

25.33

23.63

279

16

>>

Yaumáti (Mixed),

51

14

44.50

13.33

40.90 37.85

246

17

"

Hunghòm (Boys),

17

10

16.52

8.09

14.83 13.21

267

18

(Girls),

25

10

18.44

6.13

21.10

16.44

248

19

Victoria Home and Orphanage (Girls),

26

7

24.91

6.50 15.60

14.10

249

20 F. E. S., Bonhamn Road (Girls),

25

20

23.41

17.70

22.36

21.21

250

21

""

High Street (Girls),

25

13

23.04

11.66

21.08

19.62

250

22

"

Queen's Road (Girls),

28

17

23.28

15.00

23.91

21.46

260

23

""

Hollywood Road (Girls),

29

7

22.42

3.33

23.81

19.80

248

24

""

Pottinger Street (Girls),..

37

26

33.64

24.30 30.60

28.36

238

25

و,

Stanley School (Girls),

38

26

36.91 20.75

34.00

30.06

258

26

Shaukiwán (Girls),

30

9

28.68

9.00

25.18

24.36

260

""

27 L. M. S., Hollywood Road (Boys),

112

71

111,59

66.72

101.75

95.73

250

28

59

Wántsai (Boys),

89

56

79.15

43.66

78.58 72.94

261

29

99

Yaumáti (Boys),

62

23

57.45

20.33

53.50 50.18

251

30

""

Shekt'ongtsui (Boys),

60

36

58.40 36.00

55.25

53.69

257

31

وو

Saiyingp'ún I. Division (Boys),

93

34

91.04 33.33

86.27

82.64

228

32

""

II.

""

(Boys),

80

50

67.08

38.33

71.16

60.66

257

33

Hunghòm (Boys),

58

35

55.34 29.55

46.00

43.00

248

34

Shekt'ongtsui (Girls),

24

13

23.68

13.00

22.63

21.25

256

35

Saiyingp'ún (Girls),

52

30

41.26

18.87

38.08

33.89

254

36

"2

Kau-ü-fong (Girls),.

67

45

61.80

36.00 60.90

55.82

276

37

Ship Street (Girls),..

43

20

39.07

19.20 37.00

32.66

276

38

Hollywood Road Chapel (Boys),

67

39

60.88 32.66

60.36 56.80

254

39

Lower Lascar Row (Girls),

35

17

31.81

15.96

25.16 22.69

274

40

""

Tanglungchau (Girls),

50

24

39.48

24.00

43.09 35.23

273

41

""

T'áip'ingshán Chapel (Girls),.

56

38

48.59 32.00

46.66 40.17

269

42

""

Aberdeen Street (Girls),.

39

28

36.14

27.22

34.55

32.02

279

43

"/

Wántsai (Girls),

73

39

63.80

32.00

63.25 56.78

279

44

25

Staunton Street, Upper School (Girls),

40

22

39.27

21.55 37.72 37.15

280

45 R. C. M., Cathedral School (Boys),

44

25

40.37

24.00 37.08 34.92

275

46

""

47

39

Bridges Street, Poor School (Girls), Hollywood Road, Charitable School

(Girls),

59

45

55.79

41.27 55.62

50.41

265

45

28

38.12

27.00 37.00 33.88

245

48 Wesleyan Mission, Spring Gardens (Boys),

52

27

48.81

22.33

44.90 40.81

261

49

99.

Wellington Street (Boys),

80

50

73.00

44.66 63.36 59.21

244

50

""

29

(Girls),

16

10

15.66

51 Basel Mission, High Street (Girls),

81

66

73.32

9.58 13.37 12.67 57.76 71.83 67.12

249

262

52 Berlin Mission, (Girls),

53 Diocesan Home and Orphanage (Boys),

54 St. Paul's College, Anglo-Chinese (Boys),

55 Hongkong Public School (Boys),

28

27 27.76 26.25 27.63

27.11

261

86

57

49

61

61

65 688 588

56 R. C. M., St. Joseph's College, Chinese Divi-

sion (Boys),..........................

111

28

29

47

89

78.11 53.00 74.41 46.08 56.20 40.28 55.09 50.92

109.50

68.82

247

25.15 43.58

42.44

249

228

86.66 100.50 99.80

215

57

St. Joseph's College, European Divi-

193

180

178.50 138.64 187.18

167.04

223

sion (Boys),...

58

""

Italian Convent (Girls),

166

59

"

60

""

"

Bridges Street, Poor School (Mixed),....

St. Francis Chapel, Portuguese School |

(Mixed),

Victoria, Portuguese School (Mixed),...

105

128 149.70 88 99.25

103.52 154.45 78.00 101.17

129.01

236

90.25

244

31

25

46

33

62

19

English

""

63

รร

(Boys)...... 43 (Girls),

48

28

21

25.00

37.21 23.33 39.58 31.95 39.68 17.00 31.83

16.71 28.16

21.45

284.

256

29.38

265

23

46.10 22.09 36.50

33.76

267

NAME OF SCHOOL.

Class of School.

No. of Scholars Pre-

sented.

No. of Scholars Exam-

ined.

Standard I.

Standard II..

Standard III.

Standard IV.

TABLE XIIL-RESULTS of the EXAMINATION of the GRANT-IN-AID SCHOOLS in 1888, under the provisions of the Scheme of 15th September, 1883.

Number of Scholars who No. of Scholars who Failed.

Passed.

Sums to which the School is entitled..

Standard V.

Standard VI.

Standard I.

Standard II.

Standard IIL

Standard IV.

Standard V.

Standard VI.

Total Passed.

Total Failed.

ance during School Year.

Average Daily Attend-

Standard I.

Standard II.

1.- American Board Mission, Bridges' Street (Boys),..

Station Terrace, (Boys), Hinglung Lane, (Boys),. Queen's Road West, (Boys), .

2.-

"

3.-

99

""

4.-

>

>>

Hawán, (Girls),

-Basel Mission, Shamshuipò, (Boys),

Shaukiwán, (Boys),.

c.'M. S. St. Stephen's I Division, (Boys), ...............................

II

"

"

Lyndhurst Terrace, (Boys),.

11.

"

Pottinger Street, (Boys), ...........................................................................................

12.-

92.

Saiyingp'ún (Boys),

13.-

"1

St. Stephen's Baxter Memorial, (Girls),

14.-

15.-

"

"3

16.-

14

17.-

19

18.-

19.-

Lyndhurst Terrace, (Girls),

Third Street, (Girls),.

Yaumáti, (Mixed), .............................................................................................

Hunghòm, (Boys),

"

(Girls),

Home and Orphanage, (Girls),

20.-F. É. S. Bonham Road, (Girls),

21.-

""

High Street, (Girls),.

22.-

"}

Queen's Road, (Girls),

23.-

>

Hollywood Road, (Girls),

24.-

Pottinger Street (Girls),

25.-

19

26.-

Shaukiwán, (Girls),.

27.

28.-

""

Wántsai, (Boys),

29.-

30.-

"}

Yaumáti, (Boys),

"

31.

""

32.

""

"

Stanley School, (Girls),..

L. M. S. Hollywood Road (Boys),

Shektongtsui (Boys),.

Saiyingp'ún I Division, (Boys),.

"

II

(Boys),

33.

"

Hunghom, (Boys),

34.

"

Shektongtsui, (Girls),

35.-

Saiyingp'ún (Girls),

36.-

Kau-ü-fong, (Girls),.

37.-

"

Ship Street, (Girls),

38.-

>>

Hollywood Road Chapel, (Boys),

39.-

Lower Lascar Row, (Girls), :

"

40.

41.~

"

Tanglungchau (Girls),

T'aipingshan Chapel, (Girls),

42.-

Aberdeen Street, (Girls),

43.

32

Wántsai, (Girls),

44.~

Staunton Street, Upper School (Girls),

45.-R. C. Mission, Cathedral School (Boys),

46.--

47.

Bridges Street Poor School, (Girls), Hollywood Road, Charitable Schools, (Girls), 48.-Wesleyan Mission, Spring Gardens, (Boys),

37 12 15

34 13 7 8 5

I

36

7 14

9

2

49.-

50.---

"

"}

""

Wellington Street (Boys),

I

47

4 20

13

6

(Girls),

10

4 6

51.-Basel Mission, High Street (Girls),

III

63 15 18

14

52.-Berlin Mission (Girls),

III

27

6

1 6

53.-Diocesan Home and Orphanage, (Boys),....

IV

50

9

12

54.-St. Paul's College Anglo-Chinese, (Boys),

IV

55.-Hongkong Public School, (Boys), .

IV

33

10 00

18 9

8 6

• 0 0 1 0 0

28 1

6

..

B

3

• co

3 1

56.—R. C. M., St. Joseph's College, Chinese Division (Boys),

IV

81

31

18 17 9

:: 8

3

..

22 19

1

3

1

1

57.-

11

""

"1

European,,

(Boys),

IV

121 110

15 20 29 20

12

7,

::

68.

59,-

"1

Italian Convent, (Girls),..

IV

47

16 11 9 4 8 1

11

60.-

61.-

""

"}

Bridges' Street, Portuguese School, (Mixed), St. Francis Chapel, Portuguese School, (Mixed),. Victoria, Portuguese School, (Mixed), .

IV

66 15 28 22

IV

17 6 2

IV

62.-

99

"

English

"

(Boys),.

IV

63.-

"

??

"

(Girls),

IV

29

6

18

28

9

9

48 1

4

21 ON.

1

10

8

3

2

18

1

I

I

8839827*88*8*=====°=RRZZR88PIE8JDA-RABNIAN¤¤------JN * * * - - *-** A Z

58

39 12

38

53

39

23

19

18

52

39

53.

41

38

22

17

21

31

10

15

6

17

18

20

14

21

27

23

80

71

44

54

76

56

37

19

31

54

11

32

54

100 14 15 10 1400 CRDOTTE ; :* ; ;*«COLO¤42::***OEI

23

35

14

11

15

6

8

7

28 12

10 11

19

17

21

4

16 13

11 G 3

4

12

22

8

6

6

7

6 9

7

11

16 5

8

25

32

53

18

3

27

23

3

25

6

5 8

10 9 9

16 12

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204682 00HMH : : :* :** ****@***wanas

5

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3

6

1

2

12

33 19 7 2 26 8 3

22 20

4

5

7

17

19

15

1

5

2

33 10 13 3

::::

38 12 16

26

6

13 4

55

10 20

9 9

38

p 16

8

6

29

12

9

::

::

10

2

3

3

2

3 1

3

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2

3

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1

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6

4

4

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:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::*:::::::::*

47

2

CHARLEROZERA-***=*=*NF88GFEKAON******3-55089002 * * * * 8 *8*8 2 2

63.26

41.65

52.59

44.32

10

25.79

12

20.17

3

21.73 16

66.39

15

42.96

6

68.37

14

.49.08

12

***NOQNUNO HA

156

92

2

140

2

12 112

43.29

8

29.39 22

19.01

8

23.63

4

37.85

1

13.21

16.44

18

14.10

5

21.21

8

19.62 10

21.46

19.80

12

28.36 12

2

30.06 14 24.36 32 95.73 16. 72.94 10 50.18 4

53.69

::::*224

8

82.64

60.66

48,00

21.25 12

33.89

20

55.82 22

2

32.66

6

16

56.80 14

7

5

22.69

35.23 20

2

10

40.17 24

• 10 00 00 CD144

..

32.02 12

5 56.78 20 80

3 37.15 10

8 34.92 24

6 50.41 24 60

33.88 26

40.81 11 56

59.21

*******g******88* :*2****88*=*=*=****CANINSJHO***** : ~ ~ * * * ****

86

44

24

32

28

40

76

84

64

24

16

48

32

24

24

20

36

44 36

20

100 192

132 114

104 48

120

212 108

6 108 138

6 100 30

20 48

36

64 72

36

68

20

52 18

64

52

6-1 48

36

BAAN INSS-¤¤**** ¦ ¦a :* :** *********°*22* :*** :**** :2° 2 2 2 2 2 2:

: 2

81

90

80

12

72

66

102

18

78

18

6

18

36

6

12

24

18

54

54

114

12

24

54

36

12

20

12

10

12

10

10

48

54

8 80

78

12.67

8

24

67.12 90 126

112

60

1

27.11 36

5 68.82

42.44

9 50.92 48

8

40

54

90

72 120

42

80

33* 60*

72

80

48

48

10

24*

75

6 99.80 186 144 170

..

100

167.04 90

208

31

#6

90.25

21.45

31.95 88

29.38

21

88.76

54 72

*: 88%

168

112

290

129.01 98 88 90

66*

42

112*

16

20 184

220

10 40

28

16

72 80

140

10

128*

* A 8: DOOXSERIP: 65D: : ONE; 5: SKÔ。: 86; SEC8: HP: R: : R: : .5: : R:::: Standard IV.

42

12*

20

::::::::@

:: : : : : : : :828 : : :22 : : : : : : : :

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8

21.00

Standard V.

: : | Standard VI.

Good.

Very

Good.

Needle Work.

63.26

299.26

74.81

224.45

41.65

183.65

45.91

137.74

52.59

278.59

69.64

208.95

44.32

196.32

49.08

147.24

28

9.00

25.79

139.79

34.94

104.85

20.17

66.17

16.54

49.63

21.73

65.73

16.43

49.30

66.39

302.39

75.59

226.80

42.96

154.96

38.74

116.22

68.37

292.37

73.09

219.28

49,08

187.08

46.77

140.31

43.29

217.29

54.52

162.97.

36

29.39

139.39

34.84

104.55

12.00

4

19.01

93.01

23.25

69.76

42

..

23.63

151.63

37.90

113.73

1

37.85

199.85

49.96

149.89

13.21

51.21

12.80

38.41

9.00

5

16.44

80.44

20.11

60.33

12

··

14.10

86.10

21.52

64.58

28

3.00

21.21

131.21

32.80

98.41

12

12.00

3

19.62

76.62

19.15

57.47.

13.50 7

21.46

153.96

38.49

115.47

13.50

1

19.80

80.30

20.07

60.23

12

12.00 7

28.36

149.36

37.34

112.02

50 6.00

30.06

196.06

49.01

147.05

22

10.50

24.36

111.86

27.96

83.90

95.73

499.73

124.93

374.80

72.94

404.94 101.23

303.71-

50.18

230,18

57.54

.172.64

53.69

293.69

73.42

220.27

82.64

402.64

100.66

301.98

60.66

328.66

82.16

246.50

..

43.00

211.00

52.75

158.25

16

7.80

6

21.25

130.75

32.68

98.07

10 22.50

11

33.89

207.39

51.84

155,55

50

6.00 25

55.82

364.82

91.20

273.62

12.00

3

32.66

225.66

56.41

169.25

56.80

••

294.80

78.70

221.10.

18

4.50

16.50

9

22.69

76.19

19.04

57.15

13

35.23

188.73

47.18

141.55.

24.00

8

40.17

188.17

47.04

141.13.

10

12.00 14

21.00 10

བལ་

32.02

182.02

45,50

136.52

56.78

401.78

100.44

301.34

34

22,50

6

37.15

269.65

67.41

202.24

34.9?

94.92

23.73

71.19

42

19.50

2

50.41

221.91

55.47

166.44

46

9.00 5

33.88

235.88

58.97

176.91

40.81

180.81

45.20

135.61

59.21

273.21

68.30

204.91

48 114

10.50

9.00

3

12.67

58.17

14.54

43.68

··

67 12

680.12

170.03

510.09

60 54

27.11

279.11

69.77

209.34

4

1.50

68.82

636.32 159.08

477.24

42.44

..

344.44

86.11

258.23

50.92

320.92

80.23

240.69

99.80

::

707.80

176.95

530.85

167.04

1,521.04

880.26

1,140.78

86 6.00

80 12.50

20

14

:::::::

129.01

90.25

601.01

150.25

450.70

686.75 171.68

515.07

21.45

201.45

50.86

151.00

31.95

279.95

69.98

209.97

29.88

350.38

87.59

262.79

83.76

209.70 52.44 157.32

Fair.

Capitation Grant.

Total Grant earned in

1888.

Amount due to

Teacher.

Amount due to

Manager.

24th January, 1889.

2,346

* Extra subject.

TOTAL,

$16,847.85 4,211.68 12,685.72

115

116

TABLE XIV-PERCENTAGE of SCHOLARS. who passed in the GRANT-IN-AID SCHOOLS during the last two Years.

No.

Name of School.

1888.

1887.

Increase.

Decrease.

1 American Board Mission, Bridges Street (Boys),

90.00

80:00

10.00

......

2

"

"

Station Terrace (Boys),

87.00

97.61

10.61

""

Hinglung Lane (Boys),

94.34

67.69

. 26.65

4

""

Queen's Road, West (Boys), .

82.05

74.57

7.48

5

Háwán (Girls),

78.26

6

7

""

8

9

Basel Mission, Sham-shui-pò (Boys),

C. M. S. St. Stephen's I Division (Boys),

II

57.89

80.00

22.11

Shaukiwán (Boys),

85.71

98.08

92.68

5.40

"

(Boys),

61.53

87.17

25.64

10

"

Lyndhurst Terrace (Boys),

88.67

98.43

9.76

11

Pottinger Street (Boys).....

80.48

83.33

2.85

12

99

Saiyingp'ún (Boys)

95.00

82.85

12.15

13

""

St. Stephen's Baxter Memorial (Girls)

95.45

88.88

6.57

14

99

Lyndhurst Terrace (Girls),

65.00

100.00

35.00

15

""

Third Street (Girls),

90.47

82.14..

8.33

16

Yaumáti (Mixed),

93.55

73.33

20.22

17

""

Hunghòm (Boys)

90.00

100.00

10.00

18

39.

Hunghòm (Girls),

100.00

19

""

Victoria Home and Orphanage (Girls),

100.00

20 F. E. S. Bonham Road (Girls),..

70.59

95.23

24.64

21

59

High Street (Girls),

55.55

100.00

44.45

22

Queen's Road (Girls),

100.00

74.07

25.93

23

Hollywood Road (Girls),

99.99

100.00

0.01

24

""

Pottinger Street (Girls),

100.00

96.00

4.00

25

""

26

Stanley School (Girls), Shaukiwán (Girls),

96.30

86.95

9.35

91.30

90.00

1.30

28

""

29

29

30

""

31

""

99

34

25

35

""

A

36

""

A

37

35

38

""

""

27 L. M. S. Hollywood Road (Boys),

32

Wantsái Boys),

Yaumáti (Boys),.......

Shektongtsui (Boys),

Saiyingp'ún I Division (Boys),

33 L. M. S. Hunghòm (Boys)

Shekt'ongtsui (Girls), Saiyingp'ún (Girls),

Kau-ü-fang (Girls),

Ship Street (Girls),

Hollywood Road Chapel (Boys)

96.25

97.36

1.11

92.95

.94.52

1.56

90.00

88.00

2.00

85.18

59.52

25.66

93.29

94.03

0.74

II

""

(Boys),

98.21

74.54

23.67

100.00

91.42

8.58

100.00

85.71

14.29

+

97.00

92.15

4.8.5

81.03

67.39

13.64

94,00

86.84

7.16

90.00

100.00

10.00

39

""

Lower Lascar Row (Girls),

53.33

86.66

23.33

40

Tanglungchau (Girls),

85.00

77.27

7.73

41

Taipingshan Chapel (Girls)

73.70

82.22

8.52

42

Aberdeen Street (Girls),

100.00

80.55

19.45

43

""

Wántsai (Girls),....

90.90

91.83

0.93

44

Staunton Street, Upper School (Girls),

90.10

92.30

2.20

45 R. C. M. Cathedral School (Boys),

72.41

84.00,

11:59

46

""

""

49

">

50

47

48 Wesleyan Mission, Spring Gardens (Boys),

""

29

Bridges Street, Poor School (Girls), Hollywood Road, Charitable School (Girls),

83.78

100.00

16.22

97.06

86.50

85.00

1.50

Wellington Street (Boys),..

91.48

91.66

0.16

""

"

(Boys),.

100.00

78.94

21.06

.51

Basel Mission, High Street (Girls),

100.00

100.00

52 Berlin Mission (Girls),

53 Diocesan Home and Orphanage (Boys),

81.48

88.88

7:40

.....

90.00

97.82

7.82

54 St. Paul's College, Anglo-Chinese (Boys), 55 Hongkong Public School (Boys),

92.10

90.62

1.48

72.72

96.96

24.24

56 R. C. M. St. Joseph's College, Chinese Division (Boys),

92.59

95.18

2.59

57

19

"

European

""

(Boys),

99.09

98.34

0.75

58.

""

Italian Convent (Girls),

93.61

93.67

0.06

59

""

Bridges Street, Poor School (Mixed),

91.04

93.33

2.29

3823

60

""

61

99

St. Francis Chapel, Portuguese School (Mixed), Victoria Portuguese School (Mixed),

100.00

100.00

96.55

97.22

0.67

62

English

25

63

"

""

(Boys), (Girls),

83.33

100.00

16.67

75.00

95.83

20.83

الجسم

TABLE XV.--PERCENTAGE of PASSES in the various subjects in which the GRANT-IN-AID SCHOOLS

were examined in 1888.

117

Clas s of

School.

Name of School.

Writing Reading. or Com- position.

mar.

Arith- Gram- Geogra- metic.

phy.

History.

Repeti- Expla- | Compo- tion. nation. sition.

I.

American Board Mission, Bridges Street (Boys),.....

94.82 46.55

100.00

96.55

""

31

"

""

??

Station Terrace (Boys), Hing-lung Lane (Boys),

94.73

73.68

50.00

100.00

100.00 100.00

50.00

100.00

94.34

77.86

100.00

100.00

100.00 100.00

??

"

Queen's Road West (Boys).

100.00

77.00

100.00

100.00

100.00 100.00

""

""

29

Háwán (Girls),

100.00

78.27

100.00

100.00

100.00

""

Basel Mission, Shamshuipò (Boys),

95.00

40.00

100.00

100.00

88.88

Failed

27

"

??

""

??

??

""

31

C. M. S., St. Stephen's I. Division (Boys),

II.

Lyndhurst Terrace (Boys),

Shaukiwán (Boys),

100.00

66.66

100.00

100.00

90.40

100.00

100.00

100.00 100.00

(Boys),

74.35 51.28

100.00

100.00

96.22

94.34

62.50

100.00

96.00

Failed

""

""

Pottinger Street (Boys),

92.70

50.00

80.00

97.56

100.00

Failed

""

Saiyingp'ún (Boys),.

100.00

90.00

100.00

100.00

100.00 100.00

St. Stephen's Baxter Memorial (Girls),

100.00,

90.90

100.00

100.00

100.00 100.00

93

Lyndhurst Terrace (Girls),

94.11 52.94

100.00

100.00 100.00

""

Third Street (Girls),

100.00

90.47

100.00

100.00 100.00

11

19

Yaumáti (Mixed),

100.00 64.51

100.00 100.00

100.00

Hunghòm (Boys),

100.00 80.00

100.00 100.00

""

(Girls),

100.00

86.66

100.00

31

Victoria Home and Orphanage (Girls),.

100.00

100.00

100.00

100.00 100.00 100.00

"

F. E. S., Bonham Road (Girls),

100.00

58.82

100.00

100.00 100.00

50.00

""

"1

11

མ མནམ མ ི་

High Street (Girls),

81.11

44.44

100.00

...

Queen's Road (Girls).

100.00

95.00

100.00

100.00 100.00

Hollywood Road (Girls),

100.00

57.14

100.00 100.00

??

""

"J

"

11

Pottinger Street (Girls),. Stanley School (Girls), Shaukiwán (Girls),

L. M. S., Hollywood Road (Boys),

",

Wántsai (Boys),

Yaumáti (Boys),..

Shekt'ongtsui (Boys),

Saiyingp'ún I. Division (Boys),

100.00

95.24

100.00

100.00 100.00

96.30

90.00

100.00

100.00

100.00

100.00

74.00

100.00

100.00

100.00

99.00

100.00

100.00

80.00

98.59 90.14

100.00

100.00 96.87 100.00

95.50 50.00

100.00

100.00

96.29

77.77

100.00

100.00 100.00 98.14 100.00 100.00

98.68

48.68

Failed

100.00

100.00

Failed

II.

33

重要

་.

"

(Boys),

100.00 98.30

100.00

100.00

100.00 100.00

""

.,

Hunghòm (Boys),

100.00

86.50.

100.00

100.00

100.00

**

Shekt'ongtsui (Girls),

100.00

100.00

100.00 100.00

11

"1

Saiyingp'ún, First Street (Girls),

100.00 97.00

100.00

"1

3"

Kau-ü-fong (Girls),

98.14

87.03

100.00

"

Ship Street (Girls).

100.00

97.00

83.33

100.00 100.00 100.00

100.00

100.00 100.00

100.00 100.00

""

"

Hollywood Road Chapel (Boys).

96.30

90.00

100.00

100.00

100.00

;)

Lower Lascar Row (Girls),

93.33

40.00

100.00

100.00 100.00

11

Tanglungchau (Girls),

90.90

94.00

100.00

100.00 100.00

"1

T'aipingshán Chapel (Girls),

97.37

66.00

100.00

100.00

100.00

100.00

";

Aberdeen Street (Girls),

100.00

96.15

100.00

100.00

100.00

Wántsai (Girls),

98.20

84.00

100.00

100.00

95.24 100.00

;;

"}

Staunton Street, Upper School (Girls),..

97.36

78.94

100.00

100.00 100.00

"

"

"

>7

""

Berlin Mission (Girls),

IV.

**

>>

R. C. M., Cathedral School (Boys),.

Bridges Street Poor School (Girls), Hollywood Road, Charitable School (Girls), Wesleyan Mission, Spring Gardens (Boys),

Wellington Street (Boys),

"

III. Basel Mission, High Street (Girls),..

Diocesan Home and Orphanage (Boys), St. Paul's College Anglo-Chinese (Boys), Hongkong Public School (Boys),

R.C.M., St. Joseph's College Chinese Division (Boys),

100.00

65.52

100.00

100.00 100.00 Failed

100.00

64.86

100.00

97.06

100.00

92.00 90.00

66.66

100.00

80.85

100.00

100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00

...

100.00

(Girls),

100.00

90.00

100.00

98.41

98.41 100.00

100.00 100.00

100.00 77.77 74.07

100.00 100.00

100.00 90.00 94.00 70.00

100.00 100.00

97.36 94.73

97.36

100.00

66.66

100.00

69.69

96.96

50.00 78.57 100.00

98.76

95.06

96.29

92.30 100.00

>>

""

>>

European (Boys),

יי

100.00 | 94.21

96.69 91.42 100.00

100.00

"

Italian Convent (Girls),

100.00

87.23

96.00 96.00

>>

Bridges Street, Poor School (Mixed),

100.00

95.50

82.00 100.00

""

St. Francis' Chapel, Portuguese Schl. (Mixed), Victoria, Portuguese School (Mixed),

19

""

""

English School (Boys),

"?

19

11

(Girls),

100.00 100.00 88.23 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 96.55 93.10 92.30 100.00 100.00 94.44 100.00 77.77 88.23 92.85 82.14 82.14 12.50 100.00

TABLE XVI.-NUMBER of UNEDUCATED CHILDREN in the Colony in 1888.

Number of Scholars (of local school-age) in the Colony in 1888 (about 9 per cent. of the

population), say

Number of Scholars attending Public Schools under Government in 1888,

Number of Scholars attending Private Schools in 1888,

Number of Uneducated Children in the Colony in 1888, about,

17,119

6,728

1,989

8,717

.........8,402

I

E. J. EITEL, M.A., PH. D.,

Inspector of Schools.

لم

119

No. 4

89.

HONGKONG.

ANNUAL REPORT OF THE HEAD MASTER OF THE GOVERNMENT CENTRAL SCHOOL FOR 1888.

Presented to the Legislative Council, by Command of His Excellency the Governor.

No. 7.

GOVERNMENT CENTRAL SCHOOL,

HONGKONG, 25th January, 1889.

SIR,-I have the honour to forward the Annual Report on this School for 1888.

1. The total number of boys on the Roll for the past year was 634. Owing to the School's being closed ten days before the usual Winter Vacation on account of the prevalence of Small-pox in the Colony, the School was only open for 229 days.

2. To illustrate the condition of the Schools during the last five years the following table is annexed:-

1884,

1885,

1886,

1887,

1888,

1884,

1885,

1886,

1887,

1888,

YEAR.

Total Number of Scholars.

Number of

Monthly Enrolment.

Average

Daily

School Days.

Attendance.

Maximum.

Minimum.

558

236

462

362

411

596

238

499

382

437

610

238

507

419

446

601

234

525

417

449

634

229

536

384

467

Number

Average

Percentage

of

School

Actual Nett

YEAR.

of

School Boys Examined.

Fees.

Passes.

Expenditure.

Expense of each Scholar per

Average Daily Attendance.

379

95.58

4,981

13,378.62

32.48

412

95.38

5,273

12,885.00

29.45

405

94.81

5,422

11,680 41

26.17

384

97.65

5,547

11,872.70

26.40

445

94.15

6,899

12,384.14

26.48

:

ANNUAL EXAMINATION.

3. The results of the English examination, as adjudged by me for prize purposes, are highly creditable, and in some cases, as in Classes IA, IIA, IIIA, V and VII deserve special commendation. The lower total percentage of passes, 94 as opposed to 97 last year, is perhaps chiefly attributable to the following causes; one English master has been wanting on the staff for six months, and one Chinese assistant has been further absent on sick leave for two months before the examination; the forced promotion of boys into classes for which they were not yet fitted, and the admission of others into classes for which they were not qualified, are two considerable factors in the same result, due to lack of accommodation consequent on the delay in the completion of Victoria College. Classes IB, IIIB, and VI proved the chief sufferers from these circumstances.

4. In 1883, when as Acting Inspector of Schools, I was associated with the present Colonial Secretary to draw up the Schedule for the Government Scholarships, in inserting the subjects, Latin, Shakespeare, Chemistry, &c. I was actuated by the hope that we should in a year or two of that time be in Victoria College, when I purposed introducing these as class subjects. As time passed however and the opening of that building seemed likely to be indefinitely deferred I could wait no longer; Latin was accordingly introduced in 1887 and Shakespeare and Trigonometry in 1888. In the past year, Latin (including Cæsar Book I in Class I) was taught with very gratifying results to 136 boys as against 69 boys last year. The papers on King John in Class IA were good, in the main, some six or eight would have passed in the Local Examinations. English History and Latin were added to the work of Class IIIA; and English History, Composition, Euclid and Algebra to that of Class IIIB.

120

5. In anticipation of the early transfer to Victoria College, several changes were made at the beginning of 1888. The school fees were, with the permission of His Excellency the Governor, raised from 12 dollars per annum, to 24 dollars for Class I. and 18 dollars for Classes II. and III. The whole Upper School was also exempted from the study of Chinese, to afford them opportunity for the preparation of the extra class subjects. To suit the arrangement of the new building, the style of the classes was altered throughout the school, as instead of eleven classes, there will be five classes sub- divided into three sections, while the three upper classes will consist of two sections each. In com- parative reference to past years this is liable to cause confusion, in the table therefore supplied to the Inspector of Schools, I have put a parallel column, containing the old numbers of the same classes.

STAFF.

6. In June last, the School suffered a severe loss through the sudden death from heart disease of the Second Master, Mr. ALEXANDER FALCONER, who had nearly completed twenty years of service. With a natural aptitude for the duties of his profession, aided by zealous application to such studies as should render his services the more valuable to the school, Mr. FALCONER had become a model Second Master. By his skilful and patient treatment of the various characters of his scholars Chinese and others, and by his devotion of time and labour to further the interests of the school, he afforded a sterling though unpretentious example to junior masters. Of his relations to myself I can speak in the heartiest terms, and his loyalty to the late Head Master, Dr. STEWART, is well known in the Colony. The term professor is not so generally used in English as in American schools, otherwise Mr. FALCONER might have accurately been termed the Professor of English Grammar and Composition, for his skill in imparting these subjects was unapproachable, and it will naturally take some time for his place to be, in this respect, adequately filled.* An In Memoriam article in the China Review bears testimony to his scholarship.

7. Mr. A. J. MAY, Senior Assistant Master, was appointed Second Master, and application was made to fill up the vacant Assistant Mastership. As however the new master has not yet arrived we have, as above stated, been for over six months shorthanded.

suc-

8. The staff of masters has sustained its established character for thoroughness and activity. The facts connected with each case justify me in particularising three masters. Mr. JAMESON SUC- ceeded in raising the boys of Class IIIA to such a degree, that in spite of their coming from lower classes than usual, and having extra subjects on their time-table, 100 p.c. passed intelligently. Mr. LUK-KING-FO obtained from Class V. (VII. last year) as good results as were obtained from Class V. last year, the examination papers in Arithmetic and Grammar being of very much the same standard. Mr. CHEUNG TSOI a pupil teacher, Acting Assistant, not only maintained good discipline in a class of 73 boys, but paid such judicious attention to the dull and idle boys, that his results in Reading, Dictation and Arithmetic were admirable.

CAMBRIDGE LOCAL EXAMINATIONS.

9. In December, 1887, we sent up six Junior candidates, four of these passed, viz.: Wong Fan, ABDOOL HOOSEN, HO MAN-YING and WAN TSUNG-IU, the two last being over the age of 17 could not receive University Certificates, but have been provided by the Local Committee with statements of their success in the Examination as recorded in the Tables published by the Syndicate. By private advice from the Secretary to the Syndicate, I am informed that WONG FAN was placed in the higher division of the Pass List and received the mark distinguished for Algebra and Geography, HooSEN obtaining the same mark for Arithmetic. Of our two Senior candidates one failed badly, the other CHEUNG TSOI was again checked in Scripture, passing in Old Testament, but failing in the Gospel.

OXFORD LOCAL EXAMINATIONS.

10. This examination was held in the Colony for the first time in July last. I introduced it as an experiment to afford our Pupil Teachers the opportunity of obtaining the quasi-degree of Associate in Arts. Six candidates were presented for the Senior examination. Three obtained certificates; WONG FAN, aged 16, and FRANCISCO HYNDMAN, aged 17, were declared Associates in Arts of the University of Oxford, but CHEUNG TSOI the third candidate being over 19 was not eligible for this further dis- tinction. We therefore now have two Pupil Teachers, shortly to become Chinese Assistants in the College, whose attainments have received the imprimatur of Oxford University.

11. To Victoria College, consisting of boys many of whom are older than is usually the case in schools, considerable advantages are offered by the Oxford practice which is to give pass certificates irrespective of age, to all candidates who satisfy the Examiners appointed by the Delegates; reserving on the other hand all distinctions to such as pass before they attain a certain limit of age, 16 for Juniors and 19 for Seniors. It is moreover interesting to observe from the results obtained by WONG FAN and CHEUNG TSoi in both examinations that the standard of the Oxford and Cambridge Local Exami- nations is identical; and further that the standard of excellence at this school corresponds with both, for CHEUNG TSOI was Morrison Scholar in 1887; WONG FAN in 1888; and ABDOOL HOOSEN, with HYNDMAN as proxime accessit, in 1889.

4.

121

Y

GOVERNMENT SCHOLARSHIP.

12. I was much disappointed at not being able to present any candidates for the Biennial Com- petition for the Government Scholarship. The three boys, who might have passed a creditable exam- ination, are naturally the three named above. Unfortunately however none of these was available; one being below the minimum of age; another wanting two or three months of the three years' School attendance required; and the father of the third objecting to his son's going to England.

CONCLUSION.

13. Nothing happens but the unexpected. It is therefore perhaps not a matter for surprise that the transfer to Victoria College has not yet been effected. It is however much to be regretted that owing to an unaccountable delay in the erection of the Latrines and Coolie Quarters, there seems at present little likelihood of the new Scholastic year being opened in the new building. The delay of a month or two in transferring the present boys, and admitting the new boys will have a tendency to mar the success of the school work of the year 1889.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

GEO. H. BATESON WRIGHT, M.A.,

Head Master.

The Honourable FREDERICK STEWART, LL.D.,

Colonial Secretary,

&c.,

&c.,

&c.

1888.

CENTRAL SCHOOL.

Number

Month.

of Scholars.

Number of Attendances.

Number of School Days.

Average Daily Attendance.

January, February, March, April, May,

June,

July,

390

5,135

14

366.79

384

768

2

384.00

536

12,789

25

511.56

528

8,976

18

498.67

519

11,594

24

483.08

503

10,855

23

471.96

492

12,185

26

468.65

August,

472

2,762

6

460.33

September,.

509

8,167

17

480.41

October,

501

12,249

26

471.12

November,

489

11,792

26

453.54

December,

470

9,810

22

445.91

Total,.

107,082

229

Total Number of ATTENDANCES during 1888,..

Number of SCHOOL DAYS during 1888,.

Average DAILY ATTENDANCE during 1888,

107,082

229

467,607

634

Total Number of SCHOLARS at this School during 1888,...

AVERAGE EXPENSE of each SCHOLAR at the Central School during, 1888.

Expenditure,

Deduct School Fees,

""

Rent of Quarters,

Amount refunded,".

39

Total Expenses of the School,.......

.$19,658.14

.$6,899

330

45

7,274.00

$12,384.14

Average Expenses of each Scholar per Number on Roll,

99

Average Daily Attendance,......

.$19.53

26.48

GEO. H. BATESON WRIGHT, M.A.,

Head Master.

.i

}

No.

275

HONGKONG.

GIRLS' SCHOOL.

Presented to the Legislative Council, by Command of His Excellency the Governor.

18 89.

No. 41.

SIR,

EDUCATION DEPARTMENT,

HONGKONG, 5th July, 1889.

I have the honour formally to recommend that the Government take steps to establish a Girls' School intended to give an English education to girls of all classes, on the principles of the present Government Central School (for boys) and that measures be taken at once to start such a School on 1st March, 1890.

2. In former Educational Reports and especially in my Report for 1888 (paragraph 10), I pointed out that a vast majority of the children in Hongkong who remain uneducated (over 8,000 in number) are girls, that female education as a whole is still in a very backward condition in the Colony, that a good deal has been done indeed to put a purely Chinese education within the reach of Chinese girls, that the Roman Catholic Missions are providing an English education for girls of their own denomination, but that hardly anything has hitherto been done for the girls of non-Catholic classes to offer them that sort of English or Anglo- Chinese education which during the last 25 years has been, with annually in- creasing liberality, provided for boys, by the Government Central School and by about a dozen similar institutions, and finally that there is no prospect of private effort coming forward to supply this pressing deficiency in the sphere of female education.

3. The girls for whose benefit I desire the Government to provide an English education may be said to belong principally to the very classes of people who send their boys to the Government Central School, that is to say Chinese (about 90 per cent.), European (about 4 per cent.), Indian (about 3 per cent.) and Eurasian (about 3 per cent.) Virtually, I may say, the girls whom I expect eventually to attend the proposed Government Girls' School are the sisters of the 600 boys now attending the Government Central School. Other classes may indeed send their daughters to the proposed School, but such an extra contingent will be an extremely small minority.

4. Among the objections raised against the plan of offering to girls, some 93 per cent. of whom are of Chinese or Eurasian extraction, an English education, it has been urged that the local system of concubinage would only be fostered by providing Chinese or Eurasian girls with an English education. This objection has hitherto had special weight with the public for the reason that the Ladies' Committee (under the late Bishop SMITH), which started the Diocesan Female Training School in 1862, found itself compelled in 1865 to close the School on the ground that almost every one of the girls, taught English in that School, became, on leaving school, the kept mistress of foreigners. But the circumstances surround- ing this Girls' School problem have undergone a very considerable alteration since 1865. In those days, the girls drifting into concubinage had no opportunity to learn that smattering of English colloquial which they require for their purposes, and consequently they crowded into the Diocesan School in 1862 which at that time could hardly get girls of any other class. At the present day there are numerous little evening Schools scattered over the Colony where these girls can learn what little English they require, whilst all existing Girls' Schools have as

The Honourable F. STEWART, LL.D.,

Colonial Secretary.

276

many applicants as they can accommodate, and public opinion is now strong enough in these Schools to frown out any open supporters of immorality. A second change, which has taken place with reference to this class of people, consists in the fact that Chinese girls are not now as formerly the only class furnishing concubines for foreigners, but are in fact now sinking into a minority as Japanese girls are crowding them out of favour. As regards the Eurasian girls, the offspring of these illicit connections, a most important change has of late taken place, in that these girls, who formerly used to become concubines in turn, are now commonly brought up respectably and married to Chinese husbands who themselves have received an English education in the local Boys' Schools. I am therefore convinced that there is not the slightest danger of the experience of Bishop SMITH's Committee of 1865 being repeated in the case of the proposed Government Girls' School. I have re- marked above that the girls whom I expect to attend the proposed School are, practically speaking, the sisters of the boys now attending the Government Central School, and I am certain that now-a-days hardly any of the boys of that School have sisters who are, or ever will be, the kept mistresses of foreigners.

5. Another plausible objection which has been raised against offering an English education to girls, the vast majority of whom are Chinese who never hear English spoken within their respective house-holds, is that such a foreign education is in their case uncalled for and useless. They do not want it,' I am told, and if they get it, they are no better off for it.'

<

That the English education which I desire the Government to offer to the public is urgently called for and will be eminently useful in the case of European, Indian and other non-Chinese and non-Catholic girls, who at present have practi- cally no School to go to, is, I believe, generally admitted but with the significant observation that the number of such girls is comparatively small. I admit that their number is small, but I plead that the smallness of the number is no reason why the Government, which makes such liberal provision for the equally small number of boys of the same classes, and provides the girls of Chinese aliens with a gratuitous Chinese education, should make no provision whatever to put an English education within the reach of the daughters of loyal English and Indian subjects of Her Majesty.

Now as to the allegation that in the case of the vast majority of Chinese girls in the Colony an English education is not wanted nor called for by the girls them- selves or their parents, I might demur to the statement and assert that a certain, though indeed limited, number of these people do call for an English education, and that the demand for it, though small at present, is sure to be called forth in steadily increasing force by the supply, but I prefer to let this argument be worked out by the future educational history of the Colony, and admit that, generally speaking, Chinese girls, their mothers, and in many cases their fathers also, do not call for English female education. But what else would you expect? In the case of education, the consumer never is the proper judge of the article he requires to be supplied with. The public opinion of a semi-civilized people cannot be accepted, in the matter of education, as the standard of what ought to be done. If the Chinese were left to themselves, their girls would, generally speaking, be left with- out education altogether, until such education becomes an effective means of earning a livelihood, and I freely admit that at present an English education does not put the same facilities for earning money in the way of a Chinese girl as it does for a Chinese boy. The money value of female education is at present next to nil. Well then, are we to force English education upon unwilling Chinese girls, or is there, apart from force, any prospect of their going in for it willingly? I do not propose the use of any force or compulsion whatever, but on the contrary I propose to admit to English tuition only those Chinese girls who have been attending an ordinary Chinese School for at least two or three years and who are willing to pay for their English tuition a reasonable proportion of the expenses involved. And the grounds for my firm expectation that this can be done are these. The Chinese,

like the natives of India, are perfectly ready to respond, with zeal and readiness, to an external impulse involving a radical change in their habits, provided only that they are assured of its beneficial tendency. This has been the universal experience of educationists in India and is amply testified to, in these very words, by the Report of the Indian Education Commission of 1883 (see, for instance, Chap. X, § 601). But we have had experience in Hongkong of a signal case in point. The idea of giving girls a school education, as a necessary part of their training for life, is entirely foreign to Chinese habits of thought, and was considered a mon-

А

+

:':

277

strosity by Chinese fathers and mothers, residing in Hongkong, but fifteen years ago. Nevertheless, in response to the offers and solicitations placed in their way by the Missionary Girls' Schools, set up in all parts of the Colony under the powerful stimulus of the Grant-in-Aid system, these Chinese fathers and mothers have now come to regard it as the right and proper thing that every Chinese mother, who can afford to provide the needful decent clothing and who can spare the domestic services of the child, should send her girl to a Grant-in-Aid or Government School for three or four years at least, to learn reading and writing in Chinese and plain sewing and to be trained in habits of order and discipline. Observing the gratuitous and beneficial character of the indigenous education offered in these Schools, these Chinese fathers and mothers have come to throw all their national prejudices against female education to the winds, and have become zealous supporters of Mission Schools in spite of the, to them objectionable, dose of Christian teaching which they have to submit to as a quid pro quo in consideration of their having to pay no school fees, and which they do submit to, often with bad grace, being conscious of exposing their children's minds to an influence, which, however weak they may deem it, is yet professedly hostile to their own religious beliefs.

Now what has been done in Hongkong to conquer native prejudice against female education generally, can likewise be done to overcome the present unwilling- ness to go in for English education in the case of native girls, especially as the Government will abstain from any interference with native religious beliefs.

But this brings me to the second question, as to whether any beneficial results will be derived from giving Chinese girls an English education. I have already remarked that the money value of such an education is, in the case of Chinese girls, next to nothing. So it is. But education has other beneficial results than merely improving the money-making capabilities of men or women, and the Chinese are as wide-awake to the importance of education as a factor in this modern high-pressure life of competition. There is, in the first instance, that quickening of the intellectual nature which is produced by exercising the mind in the ordinary subjects even of a Chinese education and which is a specially prominent result when a Chinese girl receives an English education. There is, in the second instance, the training and disciplining the minds of the children in habits of truthfulness, uprightness, woman- liness, and the mutual subordination of individual will and interest to the demands of the common weal, which is the sure result of a properly organized and disci- plined English Girls' School. Now these intellectual and moral influences of education work with the certainty of a law of nature. Wherever they are applied to female education, they have always produced, and are bound always to produce, their adequate result, which is an improvement in the social and political status of woman. Sociology has explained the reasons, but I am here merely concerned with the fact, that in every country of the world, where woman occupies a degraded position, the education of women is neglected. In China the education of men is systematically refined and essentially scholastic, whilst the education of women is systematically confined to what is domestically serviceable or sensually amusing. The natural consequence of this gap, existing in all but exceptional cases, between the education of men and women in China, is the reign of polygamy, a low state of morality among men, whilst women are bought and sold as the lawful goods and chattels of their owners. Now here in Hongkong, where for twenty-seven years the Government has annually spent ever increasing sums of money to give Chinese boys an English education, wondering all the time why this continuous teaching of English produces so little visible effect in the direction of spreading a knowledge of the English language in the Colony, and why in so many cases the giving of an English education to Chinese boys appears eventually to deteriorate rather than to improve their morals, the Government have, by excluding Chinese girls from the onward movement of English education in the Colony, systematically widened the gulf separating men and women, and, by leaving the men brought up with a knowledge of English to marry wives devoid of that knowledge, methodically prevented the spread of the English language in Chinese families. I do not mean to say that the deterioration in morals, which has been observed in Chinese youths who received an English education, is entirely or largely due to the neglect of giving Chinese girls also an English education. There are other causes at work with which I have nothing to do here. But what I mean to say is, that the giving of an English education to Chinese boys only, and not to girls likewise, has naturally contributed to deteriorate the relative position and moral influence of woman in the Chinese social organism as represented in Hongkong. I have repeatedly heard Chinese mothers, whose sons were educated at the Government Central School and subse-

278

quently sent to England or Scotland to finish their education, that their educa- tion gave them a contempt for un-educated Chinese women and that only in exceptional cases Chinese girls could be found who would be fit help-mates for them in domestic and conjugal respects.

6. In educational matters the case of Hongkong is on all fours with the case of India, and therefore the educational principles and methods, which in the course of the last thirty-five years have commended themselves as practically sound and beneficial to the Government of India, deserve every attention in shaping the edu- cational policy of the Hongkong Government. In 1854 the education of the whole people of India (excluding no one class) was definitely accepted as a State duty and the famous Despatch of 1854, which still forms the charter of Education in India, laid it down that " English is to be taught wherever there is a demand for it, but it is not to be substituted for the vernacular languages of the country." Ac- cordingly the Government of India not only established Departmental Schools for girls as well as for boys wherever there was the smallest demand for English teach- ing, but liberally aided and encouraged Missionary Societies in promoting public and private (Zenana) instruction, in English, given to native girls. Accordingly we find among the recommendations made, after the most careful and wide-reaching investigations, by the Indian Education-Commission, the following Resolution (§ 682, No. 1), "that female education be treated as a legitimate charge alike on Local, on Municipal, and on Provincial Funds, and receive special encouragement, and further (§ 682, No. 9) "that liberal aid be offered for the establishment, in suitable localities, of Girls' Schools in which English should be taught in addition to the vernacular."

>7

7. In view of the above considerations and encouraged by the Minute (on C.S.(). 393 of 1889) in which His Excellency the Governor stated, with reference to my last Annual Report, that he will be prepared to consider, in connection with the Estimates for 1890, my recommendations with regard to a Girls' School, I now beg formally to recommend that measures be taken at once with a view to start, on 1st March, 1890, a Government Girls' School, offering to girls of all nationalities an elementary English or Anglo-Chinese education on the principles of the Govern- ment Central School (now Victoria College). The details of the scheme will be subject to the special consideration of the Government, as they practically come to the surface hereafter, but the general outlines of the scheme now submitted for the approval of the Government are as follow.

8. As to House accommodation it is absolutely essential that the School be located in a central part of the town, because for various reasons Chinese girls could not be induced to go to school if the building were situated in an out-of-the- way locality. It is further essential for sanitary reasons that the School-house be of the European style of architecture. Eventually a building, specially to be de- signed for the purposes of a School, will have to be erected, but, to begin with, a house built in the European style and situated in a central part of the town might be utilized, until a proper School-building can be secured. The house to be rented for the present would also afford quarters for the Head-mistress, and her Assistant Teacher.

..

9. The Head-mistress should be obtained from England, under the approval of the Secretary of State. She should be a trained, certificated, unmarried English lady, not less than 22 and not over 28 years of age. She should possess experience in teaching, organizing or superintending elementary Girls' Schools, have a superior knowledge of needle-work and enjoy good health.

Her duties should be, to organize the proposed Girls' School with the aid of an Assistant Teacher and a Pupil Teacher, to instruct the upper classes of the English division of the School in the subjects of an ordinary English Middle Class School, to superintend the teaching to be given by the Assistant Teacher and Pupil Teacher in the lower classes of the English division, also to give general superintendence to the Chinese division of the School consisting of the already existing two Chinese Girls' Schools at present located in separate Chinese houses. Finally it should be a special duty incumbent on the Head-mistress, to assist the Inspector of Schools in the annual examinations of the needle-work done in the Grant-in-Aid Schools of the Colony.

The terms to be offered to such a Head-mistress should be as follow:-First- class passage paid to Hongkong, but no subsequent passage paid, unless the engagement terminate at or (through illness) before the end of three years; salary

!

279 to be 1,200 Mexican dollars per annum, payable monthly; quarters provided; twelve months' leave (if substitute can be found) at the end of six years' service, viz., 4 months on full pay and 8 months on half pay; study of Chinese language (colloquial only) to be obligatory, but teacher provided by Government and pro- gress tested by half-yearly examinations through examiners specially to be ap- pointed for the purpose by the Government. The Head-mistress should leave England in the first week of January, 1890, drawing half-pay from the day of leaving England and full pay from the day of her arrival in Hongkong.

10. The expenses involved in the above scheme and requiring special consi- deration in connection with the Estimates for 1890, are as under :-

Passage to Hongkong to be paid through Crown Agents,. Salary of Head-mistress, 1 month half pay ($50) and 2 months'

full pay @ $100,

House rent, 12 months @ $115.

Furniture for School rooms,.

School materials,

Salary of Assistant Teacher, 10 months @ $25,

Wages of coolie, 12 months @ $6,

Pupil Teacher, 10 months @ $5,..

ages of Scavenger 10 months @ $2,

W

Total estimated expenses,

..$ 400.00

$1,150.00 $ 1,380.00 .$ 100.00

$

50.00

250.00

50.00

72.00

20.00

$3,472.00

As I expect the School will, during the first year, have at least 50 scholars in the English Division, paying each $1 a month as School fees, I estimate that, in the 10 months, the school fees will amount to at least $400. In the Chinese Division I propose to charge no fees, according to previous custom.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

E. J. EITEL, M.A., Ph. D.,

Inspector of Schools.

}

J

No. 1.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 28th January, 1889.

59

:

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (FREDERICK STEWART), Chairman.

the Attorney General, (EDWARD LOUGHLIN O'MALLEY).

་་

י

2)

""

""

""

the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (HENRY ERNEST WODEHOUSE, C.M.G.).

the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE).

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (WALTER MEREDITH Deane).

the Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART). WONG SHING.

JOHN BELL-IRVING.

BENDYSHE LAYTON, (vice the Honourable ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN).

The Committee meet at the request of the Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 17th ultimo, having been taken and read, are confirmed.

(1.) Read the following Message from His Excellency the Governor :--

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

The Governor deems it his duty to draw the attention of the Council to the terrible famine in North China, with a view to the consideration whether some contribution in aid of the sufferers should not be made from the funds of this Colony. Similar calamities are un- fortunately only too common among the dense population of the neighbouring Empire; and sympathy is apt to be paralysed, or rather its manifestation checked, by their very magnitude, and the consequent hopelessness of affording relief at all proportionate to the enormous need for it. But if this consideration were allowed always to have weight, charity would be con- fined within exceedingly narrow limits, if not altogether extinguished. And the only questions really deserving to be considered, either by Governments or by individuals, in respect of any particular case of suffering is (1) whether it is one, in aid of which some portion of the means at disposal may be appropriately used, having regard to the many other objects deserving attention, and (2) whether in case of aid being afforded there is reasonable probability of its being properly and usefully applied.

As regards the first question, the position of a Government differs from that of an indi- vidual in this, that the former is not free to give play to sympathy, and must confine its action to a comparatively limited field. For the funds at its disposal being held as a trust, any application of them can be properly made only when, proportionately to its extent, it is beneficial directly or indirectly, to the contributing taxpayers, or when, though not materially beneficial to them, it is one which meets with their general concurrence.

After much consideration, the Governor has arrived at the conclusion that a reasonable contribution from the funds, of the Colony towards the aid of the sufferers by the present calamity would fulfil one and probably both of the above conditions. For such a token of sympathy would tend materially to promote and strengthen those friendly relations with China, which are so all-important to the prosperity of Hongkong; while, having regard to the exceptional magnitude of the present calamity on the one hand, and to the favourable condition of the Colonial finances on the other, there would probably be but one opinion in the Colony as to the expediency of such a contribution, if the second of the above questions can be answered satisfactorily, viz.: that as to the proper application of the contributed funds.

60

But happily on this point also there is a satisfactory reply. The papers which will be laid on the table show that the local authorities at Shanghai having, in the urgent need of their countrymen, made appeal for assistance, Europeans and Chinese have alike responded to it, and being drawn together by the bond of a common humanity are working in unison for the establishment of relief-agencies. When moreover regard is had to the number and names of those who are taking part in this movement, there can be no more opening for reasonable doubt that any aid afforded will be properly applied than that such aid is urgently required.

As to the amount of contribution, the Governor, all things considered, is of opinion that it should be at least ten thousand dollars. He therefore invites the Council to pass a vote for that amount; he proposes to remit this, or any other sum which may meet with the approval of the Council, to H.M.'s Consul-General at Shanghai, with the request that he and the other British Consular Officers stationed there will apportion the fund among the various relief agencies, without any regard to religious or denominational prejudices, in such a manner as, according to their joint discretion, may appear likely to do most good.

As no possible amount of contributions can afford substantial relief to all, or even to any large proportion, of the millions who are suffering from this calamity, the Governor hopes that the vote which he now proposes will not prove to be a check but will rather operate as a stimulus, to that private benevolence for which the community of Hongkong is so honour- ably known; and he trusts that here also as at Shanghai, Europeans and Chinese will exert themselves for an object which appeals alike, if not equally, to the sympathies of both.

By Command,

FREDERICK Stewart,

C.S.Q.

213 of 1889.

C.S.O.

275 of 1889.

C.S.O.

278 of 1889.

C.S.O.

277 of 1889.

€.5.0. 2227 of 1888.

C.S.O. 276 of 1889.

Government House, Hongkong, 28th January, 1889.

Read also the correspondence on the subject.

Colonial Secretary.

After some further explanation on the subject by the Colonial Secretary, the Committee unanimously recommend that the sum of $10,000 for this purpose, suggested by His Excellency the Governor, be voted.

(2.) Read the following Minute by His Excellency the Governor :—

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of $17,562, being balances of votes passed in 1888, which require to be re-voted, viz. :----

Furniture for Victoria College,

N

Home for Women and Girls rescued under Ordinance No. 9 of 1887,

New Streets at Kennedytown,

Lower Richmond Road,

Rainstorm damages during 1888,

896.00

3,955.00

6,700.00

3,750.00

2,261.00

$17,562.00

Government House, Hongkong, 28th January, 1889.

After explanation by the Surveyor General of the several items mentioned, the Committee

recommend that the respective sums be re-voted.

The Committee then adjourn sine die.

FREDERICK STEWART,

Chairman.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 25th February, 1889.

Read and confirmed on the 1st March, 1889.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

No. 2.

61

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG, On the 1st March, 1889.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (FREDERICK STEWART), Chairman.

the Acting Attorney General, (ANDREW JOHN LEACH).

C. 0. Desp. 224 of 1888.

C.S.O.

301 of 1889.

C.S.O.

155 of 1889,

12

""

19

37

"

""

""

the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (HENRY ERNEST WODEHOUSE, C.M.G.). the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE).

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (WALTER MEREDITH DEANE). PHINEAS RYRIE.

WONG SHING.

JOHN BELL-IRVING.

BENDYSHE LAYTON, (vice the Honourable ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN).

The Committee meet at the request of the Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 28th January last, having been taken as read, are confirmed.

Read the following Minutes by His Excellency the Governor :-

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

(1.)

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of Two thousand Dollars, to be vested in Trustees, for the benefit of the widow of the late V. C. PEREIRA, Assistant Turnkey, Victoria Gaol.

The Trustees will be empowered to pay the interest only upon this sum to the widow during her life; and upon her death, or re-marriage, to divide the principal among Mr. PEREIRA'S children.

Government House, Hongkong, 29th January, 1889.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

(2.)

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of Four hundred and Ninety-two Dollars, to defray cost of Praya surveys in front of the Naval Yard and Military Cantonments.

Government House, Hongkong, 2nd February, 1889.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

(3.)

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of One hundred and thirty-two Dollars, being the salaries of two scavengers for the new Market at Hunghòm, viz. :—

One Scavenger at $6 per month,

Do.

at $5

do.,

72.00

60.00

$ 132.00

This expenditure was not included in the Establishment of the Sanitary Department when the Board had under consideration the Estimates for 1889.

Government House, Hongkong, 4th February, 1889.

After explanation by the Colonial Secretary, the Committee recommend that the several sums be voted.

The Committee then adjourn sine die.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 7th March, 1889.

Read and confirmed on the 7th March, 1889.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

FREDERICK STEWART,

Chairman.

No. 3.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 7th March, 1889.

63

C.S.O.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (FREDERICK STEWART), Chairman.

358 of 1889.

*

"7

""

10

وو

the Acting Attorney General, (ANDREW JOHN LEACH).

the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (HENRY ERNEST WODEHOUSE, C.M.G.).

the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE).

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (WALTER MEREDITH DEANE).

PHINEAS RYRIE.

WONG SHING.

JOHN BELL-IRVING.

BENDYSHE LAYTON, (vice the Honourable ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN).

The Committee meet at the request of the Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 1st instant, having been taken as read, are confirmed.

Read the following Minute by His Excellency the Governor :-

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of One hundred and twenty $190. Dollars, as a compassionate allowance to the family of Mr. Ho TSUNG-CHI, late Chinese Writer

in the Registrar General's Department.

Government House, Hongkong, 5th March, 1889.

After explanation by the Colonial Secretary, the Committee recommend that the amount be voted.

The Committee then adjourn sine die.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 22nd March, 1889.

Read and confirmed on the 22nd March, 1889.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

FREDERICK STEWART,

Chairman.

:

;

No. 4.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 22nd March, 1889.

A

PRESENT:

65

C.S.O.

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (FREDERICK STEWART), Chairman.

633 of 1889.

"}

""

""

the Acting Attorney General, (ANDREW JOHN LEach).

the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (HENRY ERNEST WODEHOUSE, C.M.G.).

the Acting Registrar General, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES).

PHINEAS RYRIE,

WONG SHING.

"">

JOHN BELL-IRVING.

">

>>

""

BENDYSHE LAYTON, (vice the Honourable ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN).

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

The Committee meet at the request of the Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 7th instant, having been taken as read, are confirmed.

Read the following Minute by His Excellency the Governor :—

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of Four hundred and Seventy-two $472.58. Dollars and Fifty-eight Cents, as Personal Allowance to Mr. BRUCE SHEPHERD, Deputy Land

Officer, from the 18th March instant, at the rate of $600 per annum.

The expediency of this Vote will be explained in Finance Committee.

Government House, Hongkong, 21st March, 1889.

After explanation by the Colonial Secretary, the Committee recommend that the amount be voted.

The Committee then adjourn sine die.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 29th March, 1889.

Read and confirmed on the 29th March, 1889.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

FREDERICK STEWART, ·

Chairman.

:

No. 5.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 29th March, 1889.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (FREDERICK STEWART), Chairman.

""

the Acting Attorney General, (ANDREW JOHN LEACH).

67

C.S.O.

786 of 1889,

C.S.O. 785 of 1889.

2)

""

""

""

the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (HENRY ERNEST WODEHOUSE, C.M.G.).

the Acting Registrar General, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES).

PHINEAS RYRIE.

WONG SHING.

JOHN BELL-IRVING.

BENDYSHE LAYTON, (vice the Honourable ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN). CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

The Committee meet at the request of the Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 22nd ultimo, having been taken as read, are confirmed.

Read the following Minutes by His Excellency the Governor :-

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of Thirteen thousand Five hundred Dollars, for the completion of Victoria College, viz. :-

Balance of Contractor's accounts in connection with the building,

Extra works not included in the contract,

.$ 5,500.00

8,000.00

$13,500.00

C. O. Desp. No. 221 of

1887.

Government House, Hongkong, 28th March, 1889.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of Nine hundred and Eighty-eight 25th Nov., Dollars, and Thirty-nine Cents being a personal allowance to the Honourable J. M. PRICE, at the rate of $480 a year, as compensation for the undrawn fees on Crown Land sales, to which he was entitled, but has never drawn.

Government House, Hongkong, 28th March, 1889.

After explanation by the Colonial Secretary, the Committee recommend that these amounts be voted.

The Committee then adjourn sine die.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 12th April, 1889.

Read and confirmed on the 12th April, 1889.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

FREDERICK STEWART,

Chairman.

No. 6.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 18th April, 1889.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (FREDERICK STEWART), Chairman.

"}

the Acting Attorney General, (ANDREW JOHN LEACH).

""

the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (HENRY ERNEST WODEHOUSE, C.M.G.).

27

the Acting Registrar General, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES). WONG SHING.

69

C. O). Desp. 34 of 1889.

C.S.O.

895 of 1889.

"

""

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK, (vice the Honourable JOHN BELL-IRVING). CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

The Committee meet at the request of the Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, eld on the 29th ultimo, having been taken as read, are confirmed.

Read the following Minutes by His Excellency the Governor :—

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

(1.)

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of Six hundred Dollars, being an increase to the salary of the Director of the Observatory, from 1st January, 1889.

Government House, Hongkong, 13th April, 1889.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

(2.)

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of Two hundred and Fifty Dollars, for the construction of a verandah or balcony to the windows on the East front of the First Clerk's quarters at the Magistracy.

Government House, Hongkong, 13th April, 1889.

After explanation by the Colonial Secretary, the Committee recommend that these amounts be voted.

The Committee then adjourn sine die.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 26th April, 1889.

Read and confirmed on the 16th May, 1889.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

FREDERICK STEWART,

Chairman.

No. 7.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 16th May, 1889.

71

C.S.O.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (FREDERICK STEWART), Chairman.

the Acting Attorney General, (ANDREW JOHN LEACH).

1170 of 1889.

24

S

"

F

""

""

the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (HENRY ERNEST WODEHOUSE, C.M.G.). the Acting Registrar General, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES).

PHINEAS RYRIE.

WONG SHING.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

BENDYSHE LAYTON, (vice the Honourable ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN).

JAMES JOHNSTONE Keswick, (vice the Honourable JOHN BELL-IRVING).

The Committee meet at the request of the Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 18th ultimo, having been taken as read, are confirmed.

Read the following Minute by His Excellency the Governor :-

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of Three thousand and Four $5,100. hundred Dollars, for repairing damage caused to roads outside the City of Victoria by the

rainstorm of the 29th April last..

Government House, Hongkong, 9th May, 1889.

After explanation by the Colonial Secretary, the Committee recommend that this amount be voted.

The Committee then adjourn sine die.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 16th May, 1889.

Read and confirmed on the 27th May, 1889.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

FREDERICK STEWART,

Chairman.

No. 8.

73

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG, On the 27th May, 1889.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (FREDERICK STEWART), Chairman.

the Acting Attorney General, (ANDREW JOHN LEACH).

C.S.O. 588 of 1889.,

*7

the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (HENRY ERNEST WODEHOUSE. C.M.G.). the Acting Registrar General, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES). PHINEAS RYRIE.

WONG SHING.

BENDYSHE LAYTON, (vice the Honourable ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN). JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK, (vice the Honourable JoHN BELL-IRVING).

The Committee meet at the request of the Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 16th instant, having been taken as read, are confirmed.

Read the following Minute by His Excellency the Governor :-

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

:-

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of One thousand Seven hundred $1,772 and Seventy-two Dollars for the undermentioned expenses in connexion with the Fire Brigade :-

ESTABLISHMENT.

1 Assistant Engine Driver @ $12.00 per month, 8 months,

1 Stoker

1 Do.

1 Foreman

(a) 10.00 8.00

a 16.00

""

11

"

-S 96.00

80.00

64.00

128.00

"'

5 Firemen, European

@ 9.00

360.00

**

2

Do. Chinese

@

1.50

24.00

>>

}:

$752.00

Less amounts that will lapse in consequence of the above re-arrangement :- 30 Chinese Firemen @ $1.00 per month, 8 months,

6 Chinese Contingent @ $2.50

$240.00 120.00

""

""

360.00

Net increase,.

.$ 392.00

.$1,200.00 180.00

EXCLUSIVE OF ESTABLISHMENT.

Purchase of Steam Fire Engine belonging to the Volunteer Fire Brigade,.

Do. of 2. Hose Reels,

Total amount to be voted,.

$1.772.00

Owing to the disbandment of the Volunteer Fire Brigade, it is deemed expedient to purchase the engine and appliances which belonged to that body, and to appoint an additional staff to work it.

The Governor has approved a proposal of the Superintendent of the Fire Brigade for a reduction in the Chinese portion of the force which somewhat reduces the cost which would otherwise be incurred for this additional service.

Government House, Hongkong, 27th May, 1889.

After explanation by the Colonial Treasurer, the Committee recommend that this amount be voted.

The Committee then adjourn sine die.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 18th June, 1889.

Read and confirmed on the 18th June, 1889.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

FREDERICK STEWART,

Chairman.

No. 9.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 18th June, 1889.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (FREDERICK STEWART), Chairman.

the Acting Attorney General, (ANDREW JOHN LEACH).

"?

""

the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (HENRY ERNEST WODEHOUSE, C.M.G.). the Acting Registrar General, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES).

the Surveyor General, (SAMUEL BROWN).

PHINEAS RYRIE.

17

WONG SHING.

>"

75

C. O. Desp.

91 of 1889.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

BENDYSHE LAYTON, (vice the Honourable ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN).

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK, (vice the Honourable JOHN BELL-IRVING).

The Committee meet at the request of the Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 27th ultimo, having been taken as read, are confirmed.

Read the following Minute by His Excellency the Governor :-

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of £100, being a gratuity to the father of the late Police Constable STEPHEN Fox, a member of the Fire Brigade, who lost his life by the falling of a wall during the suppression of a fire in November, 1857.

Government House, Hongkong, 8th June, 1889.

After explanation by the Colonial Secretary, the Committee recommend that this amount be voted.

The Committee then adjourn sine die.

1

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 25th June, 1889.

Read and confirmed on the 20th November, 1889.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

A. LISTER,

Chairman.

سة

No. 10.

REPORT OF

OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 20th November, 1889.

77

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (A. LISTER), Chairman.

"2

the Acting Attorney General, (ANDREW JOHN LEACH).

""

the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (HENRY ERNEST WODEHOUSE, C.M.G.).

""

the Acting Registrar General, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES).

the Surveyor General, (SAMUEL BROWN).

PHINEAS RYRIE.

27

WONG SHING.

"

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

""

BENDYSHE LAYTON, (vice the Honourable ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN).

""

ABSENT:

C.S.O.

The Honourable JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK, (vice the Honourable JOHN BELL-IRVING).

1359 of 1889.

The Committee meet at the request of the Acting Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 18th June last, having been taken as read, are confirmed.

Read the following Minutes by His Excellency the Governor :-

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

(1.)

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of Eight hundred and Five Dollars for repairing damages caused to the Public Gardens by the rainstorm of the 29th and 30th May last.

Government House, Hongkong, 2nd July, 1889.

(2.)

C.S.O.

1988 of 1889.

C.S.O.

1027 of 1889.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of One thousand Dollars for concreting a portion of the walks in the Public Gardens.

This amount will be taken from the unexpended balance of $2,500, voted in the Estimates for Tree planting which has become available owing to the failure of the Contractor to complete his agreement.

Government House, Hongkong, 10th October, 1889.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

(3.)

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of One thousand and Two hundred Dollars as a supplementary vote to defray the cost of desks, bookcases, chairs, &c. for the Masters' rooms and Store-room of Victoria College, omitted from the supplementary vote passed on the 12th April, 1889.

Government House, Hongkong, 14th October, 1889.

78

(4.)

C.S.O.

1785 of 1989.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of Three hundred Dollars as an additional vote for Office Contingencies of the Colonial Treasurer.

The excess is principally caused by expenses incurred in re-numbering houses in the villages.

Government House, Hongkong, 14th October, 1889.

(5.)

C.S.O.

2269 of 1889.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of Sixteen thousand Dollars, as Supplementary votes, being for repairs to Government Buildings $8,000, and for Road and Street Contingencies $8,000, it being found necessary to put both roads and buildings into a condition of more permanent repair.

Government House, Hongkong, 14th October, 1889.

After explanation by the Acting Colonial Secretary of the several items, the Committee recommend that they be voted.

The Committee then adjourn sine die.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 27th November, 1889.

Read and confirmed on the 27th November, 1889.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

A. LISTER,

Chairman.

+

3

No. 11.

REPORT OF

OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 27th November, 1889.

PRESENT:

79

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (A. LISTER), Chairman. the Acting Attorney General, (ANDREW JOHN LEACH).

C.S.O. 1516 of 1889.

31

وو

})

the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (HENRY ERNEST WODEHOUSE, C.M.G.). the Acting Registrar General, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES). the Surveyor General, (SAMUEL BROWN).

PHINEAS RYRIE.

WONG SHING.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK, (vice the Honourable JOHN BELL-IRVING).

The Committee meet at the request of the Acting Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 20th instant, having been taken as read, are confirmed.

(1.) Read the following Minute by His Excellency the Governor :-

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of Five hundred and Five $505. Dollars to provide for certain expenses in connection with the Nursing Staff of Sisters in the

Civil Hospital, viz. :—

Rations for 5 Sisters at $15 each per month, for 5 months,.

Wages of a Cook, 5 months,

Do. of an Amah, 5 months,

Do. of 2 Coolies, 5 months,

$375.00

40.00

30.00

60.00

$505.00

C.S.O.

1679 of 1889.

Government House, Hongkong, 2nd July, 1889.

After explanation by the Acting Colonial Secretary, the Committee advise that the amount be voted.

(2.) Read the following Minute by His Excellency the Governor :- G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of Forty-one thousand Six hundred $41,617. and Seventeen Dollars for the completion of the Tytam Water Works.

This vote is required to cover the sum expended during this year, to complete the Tytam reservoir works, no provision having been made in the Estimates for the same."

Government House, Hongkong, 10th October, 1889.

After explanation by the Surveyor General, the Committee recommend that the amount be voted.

The Committee then adjourn sine die.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 4th December, 1889.

Read and confirmed on the 4th December, 1889.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

A. LISTER,

Chairman.

No. 12.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 4th December, 1889.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (A. LISTER), Chairman.

""

the Acting Attorney General, (ANDREW JOHN LEACH).

""

""

the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (HENRY Ernest WODEHOUSE, C.M.G.). the Captain Superintendent of Police, (WALTER MEREDITH DEANE).

81

9

"}

""

A

the Acting Registrar General, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES). the Surveyor General, (SAMUEL BROWN).

PHINEAS RYRIE.

WONG SHING.

ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK, (vice the Honourable JOHN BELL-IRVING).

The Committee meet at the request of the Acting Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 27th ultimo, having been taken as read are confirmed.

SUPPLEMENTARY ESTIMATES, 1888.-The Committee consider the Bill to authorise the Appropriation of a Supplementary Sum of Two hundred and Ninety-five thousand and Eighty-seven Dollars and Ninety-nine Cents to defray the Charges of the Year 1888.

The Committee recommend that the Bill be reported without amendment.

ESTIMATES, 1890.-Laid before the Committee the Bill entitled An Ordinance to apply a sum not exceeding One Million Two hundred and Ninety-two thousand, Eight hundred and Fifteen Dollars to the Public Service of the Year 1890.

next.

At the suggestion of Mr. RYRIE, the consideration of this Bill is postponed until Monday

The Committee is then adjourned until Monday, the 9th instant, at 3 P.M.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 14th December, 1889.

Read and confirmed on the 14th December, 1889.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

A. LISTER,

Chairman.

No. 13.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 9th December, 1889.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (A. LISTER), Chairman.

""

the Acting Attorney General, (ANDREW JOHN LEACH).

""

the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (HENRY ERNEST WODEHOUSE, C.M.G.). the Captain Superintendent of Police, (WALTER MEREDITH DEANE).

3

,,

""

the Acting Registrar General, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES). the Surveyor General, (SAMUEL BROWN).

83

""

"

PHINEAS RYRIE.

WONG SHING.

ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

The Committee meet pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 4th instant, are read and confirmed.

ESTIMATES, 1890.-Bill entitled-An Ordinance to apply a sum not exceeding One million Two hundred and Ninety-two thousand, Eight hundred and Fifteen Dollars to the Public Service of the Year 1890.

The Committee having considered this Bill, report progress.

The consideration of the item for the Surveyor General's Establishment is postponed.

The Committee also consider the other items mentioned in the Estimates, and recommend that the vote for Defences, under the heading of Extraordinary Public Works (p. 36) be reduced from $30,000 to $20,000, the balance remaining on this account not justifying a larger vote.

The Committee then adjourn sine die.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 14th December, 1889.

Read and confirmed on the 14th December, 1889.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

A. LISTER,

Chairman.

No. 14.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 14th December, 1889.

85

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (ALFRED LISTER), Chairman.

the Acting Attorney General, (ANDREW JOHN LEACH).

"".

25

""

the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (HENRY ERNEST WODEHOUSE, C.M.G.) the Captain Superintendent of Police, (Walter MEREDITH DEANE).

the Acting Registrar General, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES). the Surveyor General, (SAMUEL Brown).

PHINEAS RYRIE.

"

WONG SHING.

99

29

ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

The Committee meet at the request of the Acting Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 9th instant, are read and confirmed.

ESTIMATES, 1890.-Bill entitled-An Ordinance to apply a sum not exceeding One million Two hundred and Ninety-two thousand, Eight hundred and Fifteen Dollars to the Public Service of the Year 1890.

The Committee resume consideration of this Bill, and recommend that the same be reported as amended.

The Committee is then adjourned sine die.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 14th December, 1889.

Read and confirmed on the 14th December, 1889.

ARATHOON SETH, Clerk of Councils.

A. LISTER, Chairman.

123

No.

5

89.

HONGKONG,

REPORT OF THE ACTING SUPERINTENDENT OF FIRE BRIGADE FOR 1888.

Presented to the Legislative Council, by Command of His Excellency the Governor.

!

་་

A

No. 2.

FIRE BRIGADE DEPARTMENT,

HONGKONG, 9th January, 1889.

SIR,-I have the honour to submit the following report on the Government Fire Brigade for the year 1888.

Fires, &c.

1. During the year there were 137 fires and alarms of fires, as compared with 161 during the year 1887, and 112 during 1886.

2. The following table shews the number of, what may be termed, serious fires, at which the Brigade has been engaged each year, during the last ten years.

1888,

1887,

1886,

1885,

1884,

.45 fires.

1883,

.35

1882,

.11

1881,

>>

.11 .18

1880,

""

1879,

.11 fires.

8

8

9

";

17

7 ""

3. After making every allowance for the growth of the Colony and the more extensive use of kerosine oil, I am forced to the conclusion that, this enormous increase in the number of fires, during the last two years, is to be attributed in no small measure to the effects of "cheap Fire Insurance."

During the early part of 1887 a keen competition between some of the Insurance Companies was commenced resulting in a general reduction in the rates of premia and the acceptance of risks on the contents of Chinese houses becoming the rule, where it had previously been the exception.

4. In one case of suspected incendiarism, a charge was made at the instance of the Agent for the Straits Insurance Company which resulted in four Chinese (the master of the shop in which the fire occurred and three employes) being convicted at the September Criminal Sessions of the Supreme Court and each sentenced to two years' imprisonment with hard labour.

5. Several Magisterial enquiries into the cause of fires have been held under the provisions of the New Fire Enquiry Ordinance (Ord. No. 23 of 1888) since it came into force in October last, and although, so far, no prosecution has been instituted, I am of opinion that they have not been valueless.

It is quite possible the future will shew that although, except in rare cases, the evidence obtained in these enquiries will not take the case any further than the Police report, the very fact being known that in every case of fire the Police will take charge of the premises and that a public enquiry may be held, will have a good effect.

6. Several prosecutions have taken place under the New Verandah Ordinance (Ord. No. 4 of 1888) with, so far as the Fire Brigade is concerned, undoubted beneficial results. At numerous fires in the city it was found that not only was the action of the Brigade very much impeded by the verandahs being enclosed and fitted up with all kinds of partitions, but that the fires frequently spread in consequence of the combustible nature of their contents.

7. In five cases, during the year, the fire has been, unfortunately, attended with loss of life. In one case, a young Japanese woman met her death by the sudden collapse of one of the houses adjoining the premises where the fire occurred.

In the second case, two coolies were burned to death in a cock-loft in a carpenter's shop in which the fire originated.

In a third, the fire originated on the ground floor of a three-storeyed building, the staircase caught fire, and three persons lost their lives in attempting to escape through the flames.

In another, an old woman aged 79 years, who was very deaf, and who doubtless did not hear the alarm, was burned to death in a small room, partitioned off, in the top verandah of a three-storeyed

house.

And in the last, a woman with a child strapped at her back, had just escaped from the burning building into the street, when the child was struck on the head by a box that was thrown from an upper story and killed on the spot.

8. A serious accident occurred at the fire in Queen's Road West on the 18th May last, when a member of the Volunteer Fire Brigade (Mr. R. DIPPLE) was buried beneath the débris of a fallen verandah for a long time, before being discovered and released.

He escaped, however, without any serious injury.

..

124

9. The members of the Government Brigade have been particularly fortunate during the year, nothing more serious than a few rather rough falls, a few severe bruises or burns having befallen any of them.

Water Supply.

10. The supply of fresh water for fire extinguishing purposes remains, so far, as unsatisfactory as ever, but it is to be hoped, now that the Tytam water has reached Victoria, that before long this new supply will be available in all parts of the city, and that there will be at all times, a sufficient pressure in the mains, that when a fire occurs, the Brigade will be quite independent of the supply from the

harbour.

This, of course, refers more especially to the higher levels.

So long as the fires occur on the Queen's Road level, there is little difficulty in reaching them with sufficient salt water, but the difficulty increases in proportion as the higher levels have to be reached.

It is quite possible to have to use three engines to enable one to play on the fire.

11. The question of having separate fire mains, from which there is no draught for other purposes, is I think, one deserving the attention of the Government. At the same time, I am strongly of opinion that, even with an improved hydrant system on such high pressure mains as it would then be possible to have, it would not be practicable, having due regard to safety from fire, to dispense with the steam fire engines altogether, it might perhaps be possible to reduce their number.

12. It is a great advantage to have more than one means of fire extinction, as a fire might occur just at the time when the main is under repair, and in Hongkong, this is quite practicable, there being always an unlimited supply of salt water available.

The Brigade.

13. In consequence of the great increase in the number of fires, it was found impossible to main- tain an effective Brigade on the old scale of pay, and in September last, the very small force of seven- teen European firemen, was found to be five below its strength.

per cent.,

The Government thereupon decided to increase the salaries of the rank and file by 100 and also to augment the number of European firemen from seventeen to twenty-three, and to reduce the number of Chinese firemen from seventy-six to fifty.

This has proved to be a change in the right direction.

14. The European firemen had invariably been taken from the Police Force, but the Captain Superintendent of Police not being prepared to allow any more of his men to undertake these duties; an application was made to the Military Authorities and His Excellency the Lieut.-General Com- manding kindly approved of the appointment of six men from the garrison.

These military firemen are available for duty between 6 P.M. and 6 A.M., all the Police firemen are, as a rule, available between 6 A.M. and 6 P.M., but during the other twelve hours only half their number.

15. This arrangement has, so far, answered very well indeed, but I think the best means of maintaining the efficiency of the Brigade, and with advantage to the Colony in other respects, would unquestionably be, to keep the European Police at such a strength as would enable the Captain Superintendent to sanction the employment of a larger number of constables as firemen, as, when not engaged on Fire Brigade service, there is ample scope for their employment on Police duty.

16. The employment of Europeans as firemen, and firemen only, I think, is out of the question. 17. I enclose a report from Mr. WAGNER, the Acting Engineer, showing the present state of the engines.

They have worked well at the very unusual number of fires during the

This is a very year. creditable indeed to Mr. BREWER, the Engineer, Mr. WAGNER his locum tenens, and Mr. CAMPBELL, the Assistant Engineer.

18. I cannot recommend the purchase of another land steamer, until the result of the new water supply is known, and possibly the subsequent question of separate fire mains considered; but I think, a new floating engine would prove very serviceable, the present one is upwards of 20 years old, and cannot be expected to last much longer, and in the event of a break down, there is nothing to take its・・ place.

19. I also enclose a return of the fires and alarms of fire during the year.

20. Our thanks are due to the members of the Volunteer Brigades, both European and Chinese, for their valuable assistance, and in concluding this report I must bear testimony, to the very creditable manner in which both officers and men of the Government Brigade, have answered each call to duty.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

GEO. HORSPOOL, Actg. Supt. Fire Brigade.

+

The Honourable F. STEWART, LL.D.,

Colonial Secretary,

&c.,

&c.,

&c.

:

:

:

125

GOVERNMENT FIRE Brigade DEPARTMENT,

5th January, 1889.

SIR,-I have the honour to forward herewith a report on the state of the Government Fire Engines for the year ending 31st December, 1888.

Steamer No. 1 (Floating Engine) by Messrs. Merryweather & Co.

This engine has been 21 years in service. In September last, the Boiler was fitted with a new fire box, and the Launch received a general overhaul. The time occupied for these repairs, was 13 days. Since its overhaul, it has done good service, and has given every satisfaction.

During the year it was disabled once, for a period of 15 minutes, owing to the splitting of a suction valve. The Engine is in good working order.

Steamer No. 2 by Messrs. Merryweather & Co.

This engine has been 20 years in service. During the year, it has not been disabled at any fire. On one of the periodical trials it became totally disabled by the failure of one of the water cylinder The covers, which necessitated the laying up of the engine for 2 days for the fitting of a new cover. engine generates steam very slowly, is of obsolete type for land purposes, complicated in design, and very cumbersome to transport, owing to its great size and weight. It has done good service as an auxiliary, feeding the smaller and more powerful engines with water from the sea, but owing to its age and complexity, it cannot be relied upon to work effectively under full power for long periods.

The Fire-box is getting worn, and I would recommend a new one to be fitted during the ensuing year. The engine is in good working order.

Steamer No. 3 by Shand & Mason.

This engine is 9 years old. In November last, it was fitted with a new boiler of the most im- . proved type, and received a thorough overhaul. The time occupied for these repairs, was 10 days.

During the year the engine has not been disabled at any fire. It has done good service, and is now a valuable addition to the Brigade, and in good working order.

Steamer No. 4 by Shand & Mason.

This engine has been 6 years in service. During the year it has done very good service, has not been disabled at any fire, and is in excellent working order.

Steamer No. 5 by Shand & Mason.

This engine has been 2 years in service. It is of the most improved type, and the most powerful in the Brigade. During the year it has done very good service, has not been disabled, and is in excel- lent working order.

Manual Engines (9) in number, all in good working order.

During the year, in consequence of the unusual number of calls upon the Brigade, no engine has been specially laid up for overhaul. The engines will each require periodical overhauling during the ensuing year, in order to maintain their efficiency.

As the laying up of an engine seriously affects the strength of the Fire-extinguishing Appliances, and in view of the possibility of one of the engines engaged at a fire becoming disabled simultaneously, I respectfully suggest that an additional engine of improved type be supplied, and kept in reserve, available on such occasion, or when a fire of serious nature occurs at an elevation when two engines, (one feeding the other) are required to do the work of one.

The want of additional pumping power was painfully manifest during the fire which broke out in Lyndhurst Terrace on the 28th August last, when, on account of the elevation of the fire, it required five engines to perform the work of two.

The Assistant Engineer, and the Engine Drivers, have given every attention to their duties, and have always promptly attended to the calls upon the Fire Department.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

GEORGE HORSPool, Esq.,

Actg. Supt. Gov. Fire Brigade.

ARTHUR WAGNER, Engr. Govt. Fire Brigade.

FIRES AND ALARMS DURING THE YEAR 1888.

No. of

126

BUILDING

No.

DATE.

TIME.

SITUATION OF FIRE.

DESTROYED.

DAMAGE.

CAUSE.

REMARKS.

Wholly Partly.

1

2

1,

""

3

2,

4

Jan. 1,

5

""

""

""

ч

8

1.15 a.m.

8.40 p.m.

11.20 p.m.

5 a.m.

3 p.m.

1 a.m.

8 p.m.

Grass on the hill-side at Mount Gough,.. House No. 147, Queen's Road West,

...

1

2

Trifling

$500

Unknown.

Do.,

A deliberate attempt to set fire to the adjoin- ing house was detected.

Tung On Sugar Refinery shed at Mong Kok Tsui, Some clothing in House No. 360, Queen's Road Central,... Chimney of House No. 11, Cochrane Street,......

27

Unknown

Do.

$4

Accidental.

...

None

Unknown.

A curtain at No. 3 Tsu Lung Lane (top floor),. House No. 22, Cochrane Street (2nd floor),

$2

Accidental.

...

None

9

"

7 p.m.

Fire-wood at House No. 8, Gough Street (ground floor),... Chimney at Victoria Barracks,

Do.

Burning Joss paper.

Accidental.

Do.

Unknown.

10

11,

""

8.10 p.m.

Cook-room of House No. 19, I Wo Street,

Trifling

Do.

11

11,

"

9.30 p.m.

Matting at House No. 103, Bonham Strand (first floor), ·

None

Accidental.

12

14,

"

5. p.m.

Grass at Kai Lung. Wan,.

13

15,

"

10 p.m.

14

16,

7.50 a.m.

Some clothing at No. 223, Queen's Road East,. Cook-house of House No. 375, Queen's Road Central,

...

Unknown

$3

Trifling

Unknown,

A number of young trees destroyed.

Upsetting a kerosine lamp.

Unknown.

""

15

16,

8 a.m.

House No. 148, Bonham Strand West,

$60

"

16

17,

8 a.m.

House No. 77, Praya West,..

1

1

$700

Unknown,

17

19,

1 a.m.

Bags at house No. 19, Tsz Mi Lane,

None

Do.

...

""

* 18

20,

7.30 p.m.

Chimney of house No. 1, Gage Street,

Do.

Do.

19

21,

"

7 p.m.

House No. 15, Wing Shing Street,..

Do.

Incendiarism, .

20

26,

2.30 a.m.

21

28,

8.30 p.m.

Merchandise at No. 134, Bonham Strand West, House No. 93, Bonham Strand Central,.

$40

Unknown.

1

$5,500

Unknown,

By the last fire in house No. 375,| Insured in Messrs. Schellhass & Co. for Queen's Road Central.

Insured in Messrs. Schellhass & Co. for $5,000.

Kerosine was found on the staircase.

Ground floor was insured in Messrs. Norton & Co. for $2,000; First floor was in- sured in Messrs. Meyer & Co. for $2,500; Second floor was insured in Messrs. Schellhass & Co. for $1,000.

False alarm.

$7,000.

...

None

Do.

Do.,

Do.

...

...

Unknown

Accidental.

Trifling

Do.

1

...

1

$500

$200

None

1

$22,000

None

Do.

$35,000

Unknown,

Insured in Messrs. Turner & Co. for $1,000..

Firing crackers which set fire to The contents were not insured.

a mosquito curtain.

Carelessness with a lighted cigar. Unknown,

Bursting of a kerosine lamp. Unknown.

Do.,

Insured in Messrs. Adamson, Bell & Co. for $1,500.

Insured in the Lubeck Fire Insurance Office:

for $4,600.

8

...

Eastern District,

Matting at house No. 14, Possession Street,

Grass at No. 36, Wongneichung Village, House No. 151, Hollywood Road,

22

30,

11.35 p.m.

55

23

Feb.

1,

12.30 a.m.

24

5,

99

10 p.m.

A stack of grass at Hunghom,

25

10,

4 p.m.

26

10,

5.50 a.m.

27

12,

"

9.35 p.m.

House No. 7, Ship Street,

28

27,

29

29,

10.50 p.m.

""

31

32

88

30

3 p.m.

5. a.m.

""

March 5,

8,

12,

10 p.m.

Staircase of House No. 127, First Street, House No. 229, Queen's Road West,

House No. 141, Queen's Road East, Chimney of house No. 10, Cochrane Street, House No. 139, Queen's Road Central,

1

00:

...

Ai:

FIRES AND ALARMS DURING THE YEAR 1888,-Continued.

No. of

BUILDING

No.

DATE.

TIME.

SITUATION OF FIRE.

DESTROYED.

DAMAGE.

CAUSE.

REMARKS.

Wholly. Partly.

33 March 14,

9.20 p.m.

34

14,

"

8.05 p.m.

Bed quilt at House No. 191, Queen's Road Central,.. House No. 21, Centre Street,

I

Trifling

$9,000

Capsizing of a kerosine lamp. Unknown,

None

35

21,

"

9 p.m.

House No. 19, Eastern Street (first floor),.

Attempted arson, ...

36

21,

4.40 p.m.

""

37

""

22,

3.20 a.m.

38

22,

9.50 p.m.

""

39

25,

""

40

28,

11 p.m.

41 April 3,

42

House No. 14, Upper Lascar Row,.

3,

10.30 a.m.

Clothing at No. 9, Upper Station Street (first floor), House No. 3, Gilman Street, ....

Wood-work at No. 6, Gutzlaff Street,

House No. 8, Elgin Street,

Empty bags at House No. 6, Central Market,

Chimney of House No. 23, Shelly Street,

::

:..

::

Do.

Unknown.

...

Trifling

$5

...

43

3,

""

7.30 p.m.

House No. 201, Queen's Road West,

5

...

2

44

45

""

""

8,

8 p.m.

Clothing at House No. 87, Square Street,.

...

13,

3 a.m.

House No. 29, Graham Street,

:-

None

...

$2

Trifling

Careless use of matches.

None

Unknown.

$11,500

Bursting of a kerosine lamp,

...

Trifling

Accidental.

1

...

$400

Unknown,

Overheating of flue,

Unknown, Bursting of gas pipe. Accidental.

Insured in the Office of Messrs. Butterfield & Swire for $2,000.

This house was unoccupied and the door was broken.

This fire was extinguished by hand pumps only.

This fire was extinguished by extincteur.

....

Insured in Messrs. Sander & Co. for $1,500.

Houses on either side of the burning house subsequently collapsed killing one and more or less injuring several others. These houses were not insured.

46

15,

"

47

21,

""

3.30 a.m.

Joss paper at House No. 207, Upper Station Street, ..... Cook-house on top floor of House No. 4, McDonald Road,

British Kaulung.

...

...

Trifling

Do.

Accidental.

Unknown.

...

48

6:5

24,

4 a.m.

House No. 11, Chinese Street,

None

Incendiarism,

...

99

49

24,

8.50 p.m.

House No. 186, Wing Lok Street,

1

1

$4,000

Unknown,

50

27,

11.25 p.m.

House No. 89, Queen's Road West (second floor),

$200

...

51 May 11,

4.40 a.m.

52

12,

""

12.35 p.m.

House No. 81, Jervois Street (first floor),. House No. 9, Chinese Street (second floor),

1

2

1

...

$16,000

$400

53

18,

7.55 p.m.

House No. 55, Queen's Road West,

54

20,

House No.. 168, Wellington Street,

55

365

21,

11 a.m.

House No. 8, East Street (first floor),

56

27,

99

7.15 p.m.

House No. 378, Queen's Road West,

57 June

1,

6.15 p.m.

House No. 15, Ship Street,

58

5,

3.20 a.m.

Chimney of House No. 102, Jervois Street, .......

B

19

*

4

Do., Bursting of a kerosine lamp, Incendiarism,.

Unknown Unknown,

...

...

...

Trifling

None

Do.

...

$6

Upsetting of a kerosine lamp. Unknown.

Accidental, while worshipping. Unknown,

This house was unoccupied, bed quilt satur- ated with kerosine oil was found. Insured in Messrs. Siemssen & Co. for $3,400.

Insured in Messrs. Norton & Co. for $2,200. Insured in Messrs. Meyer & Co. for $11,000. This fire broke out in three distinct parts of

the floor, and there was a strong smell of kerosine. Insured in the South British Fire and Marine Insurance Office for $4,000.

Insured in the Straits Insurance Office for $4,500. (Mr. Dipple of the Volunteer Fire Brigade met with a serious accident.)

The Brigade turned out but not required to work.

...

None

Do.

127

..

FIRES AND ALARMS DURING THE YEAR 1888,—Continued.

No. of

128

BUILDING

No.

DATE.

TIME.

SITUATION OF FIRE.

DESTROYED.

DAMAGE.

CAUSE.

REMARKS.

Wholly. Partly.

2 882 88

59 June 11,

60

61

62

63

64

""

6.10 p.m.

7.05 p.m.

Chimney of House No. 19, Graham Street,

House No. 58, Wing Lok Street (second floor),

Curtain at House No. 49, Hollywood Road,

None

Unknown.

1

$300

Do.,

"

8,

****

""

13,

"

22,

1 a.m.

""

23,

6.10 a.m.

24,

3.35 a.m.

"3

65 July 6,

66

67

68

69

70

71

>>

10,

5,35 a.m.

6.15 p.m.

6.30 p.m.

Shavings in Cook-house of No. 24, Garden Lane,

11,

19,

,,

11.40 p.m.

House No. 7, Graham Street, ...

19,

""

21,

6:40 p.m.

House No. 339, Queen's Road Central,

"

29,

12.15 a.m.

House No. 114, Jervois Street,

??

4.20 p.m.

House No. 42, Queen's Road West,

Old mats at House No. 15, First Street (Basement floor),...

Trifling

Do.

28

. . .”

1

$500

1

$1,000

2

2

$25,000

Careless use of charcoal fire,

:.

:

Trifling

None

Accidental.

...

Falling of a kerosine lamp.. Accidental.

Careless use of charcoal fire

used for roasting ducks. Unknown, .....

Unknown, but very currently re- ported to have been the act of [an incendiarism.

Insured in the China Fire Insurance Com- pany for $28,000.

Insured in Messrs. Siemssen & Co. for $18,700.

Insured in Messrs. Sander & Co. for $3,000. A woman and two children burnt to death in attempting to escape.

Chimney of House No. 11, Beconsfield Arcade, Mattings and rattan at house No. 85, Bonham Strand West, House No. 138, Second Street,

Do.

Unknown.

Do.

Accidental.

...

1

11

$6,000.

Unknown,

Houses Nos. 6 and 8, Peel Street,

2

:

$20,000

Do.,

73

74

76

II 22 27IN

25,

"

7:35 p.m.

House No. 273, Queen's Road West,.

None

...

""

26, 11.25 p.m.

House No. 17, Jervois Street (first floor),

1

1

$10,000

27,

9.30 a.m.

House No. 19, Tank Lane (first floor),

1

$200

Burning Joss paper,

Falling of a kerosine lamp.

Bursting of a kerosine lamp,

The contents of this house were not insured. Two coolies burnt to death in a cock-loft. Insured in the China Fire Insurance Com- pany for $36,000.

Insured in Messrs. Sander & Co. for $11,000. The contents of this house were not insured.

75 Aug.

2,

floor),

3,

12 noon.

77

9,

4.45 p.m.

12.45 a.m.

Partition of cook-house of House No. 333, Queen's Rd. West, Table cover and curtain at house No. 41, Queen's Road

Wood shavings at House No. 27, Aberdeen Street (ground

None

Careless use of fire.

::

Trifling

Accidental.

Do.

Burning Joss paper.

...

West (first floor),

78

17,

10.30 p.m.

New house in Jubilee Street (second floor),

79

>>

19,

3.40 p.m.

House No. 86, Hollywood Road,.......

4

1

$14,000

ܗ:

2

$2,000

Careless use of fire, Incendiarism,.

The contents of this house were not insured. Insured in the Straits Fire Insurance Com-

pany for $1,000. The master of this shop and three of his employés were charged with arson, convicted of conspi-1 racy to defraud, and each of them sen- tenced to two years' imprisonment with hard labour.

888

80

*

21,

9.25 p.m.

Beams over the fire place in cook-house of house No. 22, Peei Street,

Trifling

Unknown.

81

23,

3 a.m.

House No. 149, Queen's Road West,

None

Attempted arson,

"

Four of the steps of the staircase leading to first floor were found to be saturated with kerosine oil.

FIRES AND ALARMS DURING THE YEAR 1888,-Continued.

No. OF

BUILDING

No.

DATE.

TIME.

SITUATION OF FIRE.

DESTROYED.

DAMAGE.

CAUSE.

REMARKS.

Wholly. Partly.

>>

89**

90

"

91

82 Aug. 26,

83-

84

""

85 Sept.

86

♡ 88000 80000

87

56

27,

28,

1.40 a.m.

1.45 a.m.

6.45 p.m.

3,

9,

1.50 a.m.

11.15 p.m.

""

13,

""

10, 12.45 a.m. 1.45 p.m.

15, 11.30

House No. 71, Wellington Street (top floor),

p.m.

Paper at house No. 3, Taipingshan Street, House No. 16, Second Street,.....

26,

10.40 p.m.

House No. 388, Queen's Road Central,

11

30,

3.30 a.m.

House No. 110, Queen's Road Central,

House No. 3, Gilman's Bazaar,

Saw Dust in a new lane at Pokfulam Road, House No. 18, Lyndhurst Terrace,.... House No. 3, Taipingshan Street (ground floor), Papers at house No. 321, Queen's Road Central,

...

:

Trifling

Carelessness with charcoal fire used for drying shoes.

.....

12

:::

None

4

$80,000

Accidental.

Unknown,

None

Bursting of a kerosine lamp.

...

Trifling

None

Carelessness with a lighted

candle.

Bursting of a kerosine lamp.

The contents of shop No. 18 were insured in Messrs. Russell & Co. for $800.

Do.

Accidental.

...

Do.

Unknowu.

1

1

$5,500

Carelessness with charcoal fire,....

1

$7,500

92

33

Insured in Messrs. Schellhass & Co. for $5,500.

Carelessness with a lighted candle, The contents of ground and first floor were

1

$500

$10,000

Accidental.

Unknown,

None

Do.

Do.

Trifling

None

Fall of a kerosine lamp. Accidental.

Accidental, while worshipping. Falling of a piece of burning firewood into some baskets.

Unknown.

insured in Messrs. Sander & Co. for $5,000, and those of 2nd floor in Messrs. Meyer & Co. for $2,500.

The contents of this shop were insured in Messrs. Siemssen & Co. for $27,500. This fire took place in the house adjoin- ing the one mentioned in No. 91, but to the best of the knowledge of the Brigade Officers who thoroughly inspected the premises before leaving the other fire, it is impossible, it could have been caused by that.

Insured in Messrs. Siemssen & Co. for $2,400. An old woman aged 79 years burnt to death in her room.

Insured in the Lubeck Fire Insurance Office for $9,000.

30,

8.30 a.m.

House No. 112, Queen's Road Central,

3

$27,000

Unknown,

"

96

""

97

""

98

"}

99

93 Oct.

94

95

** **n**

""

""

4,

4,

6,

8.30 a.m.

5.45 p.m.

12.25 p.m.

House No. 2, Chung Sau Lane, West, House No. 171, Queen's Road, West,

1 X

Mr. Bateman's house at the "Sunnyside,"

99

6,

5.30 a.m.

House No. 111, Second Street,

...

11,

11 p.m.

13,

2 a.m.

Clothes in house No. 193, Hollywood Road (first floor), Firewood at house No. 15, Albany Street, Wanchai,

...

...

...

...

14,

10.30 a.m.

House No. 37, High Street,

Do.

100

14,

101

102

* * *

15,

22,

#22

11.20 a.m.

5.30 p.m.

3.45 a.m.

Chimney of house No. 39, Pottinger Street,

Do.

A beam of cook-house of house No. 41, Hing Lung Street, House No. 114, Queen's Road Central,

Do.

Do.

...

1-

$8,000

Do.,

103

29,

"

104

29,

""

105

30,

""

29

7.04 p.m.

12 noon.

2.45 a.m.

A stack of grass on the hill-side above St. Francis Street,. House No. 217, Queen's Road West (first floor),

An old basket containing wood shavings at No. 113, Third Street.

None

Accidental,

...

...

-:

None

1

$3,000

Accidental.

Do.,

The contents of this house were insured in Messrs. Siemssen & Co. for $2,200.

129

FIRES AND ALARMS DURING THE YEAR 1888,-Continued.

No. of

No. DATE.

TIME.

106 Nov.

3,

6.20 p.m.

107

4,

8.30 p.m.

108

4,

11 p.m..

109

5,

11.30 a.m.

""

110

111

· 112

113

114

-- 115.

">

>>

8,

5.05 p.m.

8,

1.45 p.m.

9,

6 p.m.

9,

7 p.m.

11,

3.40 p.m.

House No. 53, East Street (first floor),

Clothing at house No. 76, Queen's Road East, Chimney of house No. 1, Station Street,

BUILDING

SITUATION OF FIRE.

DESTROYED.

DAMAGE.

CAUSE.

Wholly. Partly.

House No.-46, Praya Central (first floor),;

House No. 96, Wellington Street,

Chimney of house No. 332, Queen's Road Central, Paper and rags at house No. 4, Ng Kwai Fong, House No. 18, Albany Street, Wanchai, House No. 1, Chuk Hing Lane,

...

...

1

2

$8,000

Unknown,

...

None

Do.

Incendiarism,................

Unknown.

Trifling

Careless use of matches.

$100

Overheating of the flue.

...

Trifling

$3

...

1

}

""

11,

6.10 p.m.

116

15,

1.55 p.m.

Chimney of house No. 215, Hollywood Road, House No. 99, Queen's Road East,.......................

...

1

117

16,

6 a.m.

Old sugar baskets on "Q" Road, Shaukiwan,

118

17,

9.25 a.m.

119

17,

11.15 a.m.

House No. 103, Bonham Strand Central (second floor), House No. 39, Praya, Yaumati,

2

2

ܗ: : : :

1

:

120

17,

9 p.m.

A house in Aberdeen Village,

""

REMARKS.

130

Insured in Messrs. Turner & Co. for $2,000. A child was struck on the head by a box and killed.

Some gunpowder was exploded on the stair- case of this house.

None

$1,000

None

Falling of a kerosine lamp.

Careless use of fire.

Unknown.

Falling of a burning stove on The contents of this house were not insured

some shavings.

Unknown.

$800 Breaking of a kerosine lamp.

$30

$10,000

$1,800

$150

Unknown.

Do.,

Careless burning of sacrificial papers.

Accidental, a mosquito curtain coming in contact with a lighted lamp which placed near the bed.

Careless use of matches.

Accidental.

was

Insured in Messrs. Siemssen & Co. for $8,200.

The contents of this house were not insured.

Insured in Messrs. Siemssen & Co. for $20,700. This was a false alarm. It was supposed that the coolies who wished to get hire for drawing the Fire Engines, gave the alarm.

~::

2

$2,500

Unknown,

None

Do.,

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

...

...

Trifling.

Do.

...

$350

Do.

None

...

$200

None

...

Do.

• Do.

...

Trifling

1

$4,000

I

$15

Unknown.

Trifling

Accidental.

$30

121

18,

>>

122

19,

7.40 a.m.

29.

123-

"".

21,

124

22,

""

125

22,

'6.30 p.m.

126

23,

9.45 a.m.

127

25,

3.30 a.m.

Police stable in Pokfulam Road,

4.45 a.m.

4.50 a.m.

House No. 83, Jervois Street,

Wanchai Road,

A quantity of mat'bags, &c., left at the late fire in No. 103,

Bonham Strand.

Grass on hill-side above Bonham Road,

Chimney of house No. 65, Queen's Road West,

Papers at house No. 11, Lau U Lane (ground floor),

"9

128

31,

1 p.m.

""

A

129.

31,

4.45 p.m.

130 Dec. 2,

7.10 p.m.

131

2,

9.35 p.m.

""

132

9,

3.30 a.m.

"

133

17,

10 a.m.

134

21,

135

"

136

.-187

200

22,

6 p.m.

26,

6.25 p.m.

9.25 p.m. 29,12.30 a.m.

Chimney of house No. 87, Wellington Street, Chimney of house No. 8, West Street,

1

House No. 115, Praya West, .....................

...

A small matshed near the Race Course, Wongneichung, Clothing and mats in house No. 42, Taipingshan Street,... A small pleasure boat lying off the Wellington Barracks,...

Fire Brigade Department, Hongkong, 9th January, 1889.

House No. 21, Lyndhurst Terrace,

Matsheds near the Race Course, Wongneichung, Chimney of house No. 4, Jervois Street,

House No. 129, Wellington Street,

Unknown.

Breaking of a kerosine lamp,.. ....Insured in the Hongkong Fire Insurance

Unknown.

Unknown, reported bursting of

some bottles containing chemicals.

Company for $1,200.

A lighted lamp being placed too | Insured in Messrs. Scheele & Co. for $4,000. near to a wooden partition.

Exploding of a kerosine reading

lamp.

GEO HORSPOOL, Acting Superintendent, Fire Brigade.

}

153

9 No. 89.

No. 280.

Enslosure 1. C.S.O. 2075/88.

Enclosures 2 and 3.

C.S.O. 2075/88.

HONGKONG.

DESPATCHES RESPECTING THE FRENCH AND GERMAN MAIL STEAMERS.

Presented to the Legislative Council, by Command of His Excellency the Governor.

MY LORD,

(1.)

Governor of Hongkong to Secretary of State.

GOVERNMENT HOUSE, HONGKONG, 8th August, 1888.

I have the honour, at the request of the Hongkong General Chamber of Com- merce, to forward a Petition addressed to Her Most Gracious Majesty the Queen, with reference to the Ordinances of the Colony which grant to the French and German Mail Steamers the status and privileges of men-of-war.

2. I forward also two letters from the Chamber in connexion therewith.

3. I postpone, for the present, the comments which I intend to make upon the Petition, inasmuch as their nature will greatly depend on the result of a cor- respondence, which is now going on, with the Consul for France in this Colony on the subject of the enforcement of process issuing from the Local Courts.

The Right Honourable

!

The Lord KNUTSFORD, G.C.M.G.

To

HER MOST GRACIOUS MAJESTY

THE QUEEN.

I have, &c.,

(Signed,)

G. WILLIAM DES VŒUX.

Enclosure 1.

MOST HUMBLY AND RESPECTFULLY SHEWETH,

The Humble Petition of the Bankers, Merchants, Traders and others constituting the Chamber of Commerce of Your Majesty's Colony of Hongkong.

1. That since the year 1880, there has been annually passed by the Legislative Council of Hongkong, an Ordinance conferring upon the steamers of the Com- pagnie des Messageries Maritimes, employed by the French Post Office in carrying mails to and from this Colony, all the rights, privileges and immunities of vessels of

war.

2. That in 1886 and 1887 similar Ordinances, conferring like privileges and immunities on the steamers of the Norddeutscher Lloyd, subsidized by the Imperial Government of Germany for the conveyance of mails, were passed by the said Legislative Council.

3. That these ordinances have been passed year after year in spite of the repre- sentations and remonstrances of this Chamber, each year renewed, and against the protests and objections of the unofficial members of the said Legislative Council, and wholly by the authority of Your Majesty's Secretary of State for the Colonies and by the votes of the official members of Council.

154

4. That this year the said ordinances have been renewed for another

year, without regard to the protests of your Petitioners, or to the votes and opinions of the elected and other unofficial members of the Legislative Council, and simply in obedience to orders received from Your Majesty's said Secretary of State.

5. That these rights, immunities and privileges were first conferred on the steamers of the Compagnie des Messageries Maritimes in supposed compliance with certain provisions of a Postal Convention, entered into by Your Most Gracious Majesty with the then Government of France in September, 1856, by which, as it has been erroneously supposed and believed, Your Majesty became bound to grant to all French Mail steamers, in all ports and places in your Majesty's Dominions, the said rights, privileges and immunities.

6. That the same privileges and immunities have been extended by your Majesty to the German Mail steamers out of friendship and comity, but are dependent upon the existence and continuance of the said Postal Convention and of the supposed rights and privileges of the French Mail steamers thereunder, as appears from a despatch of your Majesty's Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs dated 26th April, 1886, to which Your Petitioners crave leave later on to refer.

7. Your Petitioners beg most humbly, and yet most forcibly, to represent to Your Most Gracious Majesty, that the said Postal Convention of September, 1856, does not bind Your Majesty's Government in any way to confer upon the steamers of the Compagnie des Messageries Maritimes, although subsidized by the French Govern- ment for the carriage of mails, any such rights, privileges and immunities as have been claimed for them under the said Convention, and as have been conferred upon them in this Colony.

8. That Article I of the said Convention provides solely for the establishment of special lines of steamers between the two ports of Calais and Dover, and for the ex- change of mail matter between the Post Office of Great Britain, and the Post Office of France by means of such steamers.

9. That Article II of the said Convention provides for the transmission of mail matter between other British and French Ports, either in packets specially maintained or subsidized by either Government for the purpose, or, by merchant vessels plying between the British and the French Ports.

10. That Article III of the said Convention shews clearly that the provisions of Article II are strictly limited to the ports of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland on the one side, and to the Ports of France and Algeria on the other, and do not extend, and were not intended to extend, to ports or places out of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, or to any place in Your Majesty's Indian or Colonial Dominions.

11. That Article V of the said Convention of 1856, under which alone the rights, privileges and immunities of the French Mail steamers are claimed, is strictly limited by the express words of that article to "packets employed by the British Post Office or by the French Post Office in execution of Articles I and II of the Convention," that is to say to packets and national vessels the property of Government, "or vessels chartered or subsidized by Government," running between Dover and Calais, or between ports in France or Algeria on the one side, and the ports of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland on the other, and does not include merchant vessels plying between these ports, although carrying mails, nor to packets, whether national vessels or vessels chartered or subsidized, running to other ports or places out of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland.

12. Your Petitioners most respectfully call Your Majesty's attention to Article VI of the said Convention, and point out to Your Majesty that the packets to be pri- vileged under Article V were not intended to carry cargo but only mails, and that it was as a special privilege conferred by that article that they were permitted to take and carry specie, gold and silver bullion, and passengers with their wearing apparel and luggage, and then only upon certain conditions.

13. The steamers of the Compagnie des Messageries Maritimes, upon which under peremptory instructions from Your Majesty's Secretary of State for the Colonies, the Legislative Council of Hongkong have by the votes of the official members, conferred the rights, immunities and privileges of men-of-war, under the assumed authority of that Convention, are merchant steamers, the property of a private company, and not of the French Government; they are not 'packets' in the sense of the Convention; they are trading, not between ports in France or Algeria, and

+

155

ports in the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, but between a French Port and Shanghai in the empire of China, and Yokohama in the empire of Japan as their terminal ports. They only call in at Hongkong on their way to and from the above terminal ports. They carry large quantities of merchandise on every voyage, competing successfully with the vessels of Your Majesty's subjects. They are not within Articles I and II of the Postal Convention of 1856, and they are, therefore, not within the scope of Article V, which is strictly limited in its application to "packets employed by the British Post Office or by the French Post Office in execution of Articles I and II of that Convention."

14. As regards the steamers of the Norddeutscher Lloyd's Company, on which similar rights and immunities have been by ordinance conferred, your Petitioners are aware that these privileges have not been claimed nor conceded under any convention, but as a matter of friendship and good will, at the request of the Imperial Government of Germany, but your Petitioners most respectfully submit to Your Majesty, that the rights given by the ordinances of which they now complain are far in excess of those asked for by the Imperial German Government in the memorandum, dated Berlin 24th February, 1886, submitted to Your Majesty's Minister of Foreign Affairs, and far in excess of those promised in the Foreign Office Despatch addressed to the German Ambassador, in reply, dated 26th April, 1886.

15. The Imperial German Government asked simply for immunity from process for German Criminals on board German Mail steamers in our ports, and Your Majesty's Government promised to give every possible privilege, provided that instructions should be given to German Consular Officers, Commanders and agents to give "all necessary facilities to the local authorities in relation to customs regulations and judicial process and not to claim or exercise the privilege in question to the detriment of public justice."

16. This implied that judicial process might still issue, but the ordinance that has been passed here in Hongkong, by conferring on German Mail steamers all the rights, privileges and immunities of men-of-war, puts them entirely and at once out- side and beyond the jurisdiction of our Courts, and prevents the Courts from even entertaining any application for process to issue under any circumstances.

17. French Mail steamers enjoy in like manner a complete immunity from legal process, and in cases in which American, Austrian, Italian or English Mail steamers would necessarily and properly be subject to arrest, detention or search, the German and French Mail steamers are needlessly exempted from the delay, the expense and the annoyance.

An English steamer may have been run down in the very harbour; an absconding debtor have intentionally taken refuge on board a vessel of the Messageries Maritimes; a heavy loss be entailed on the Colony by a breach of its excise laws, as in the opium case in 1879, and Your Majesty's subjects are in such cases deliberately deprived of their rights and remedies under a Convention which, as has already been pointed out, does not apply to this part of the world or to cargo- carrying steamers, and which Convention has never been sanctioned by your Majesty's Parliament in England and could not, as appears from the decision in the case of the Parlement Belge, be enforced in any part of the United Kingdom although especially applicable there.

18. Your Petitioners further most humbly point out to Your Majesty that in the self-governed colonies of Australia the Postal Convention of 1856 is not, and would not be recognized and enforced, that in Calcutta it appears to be unknown, that Your Majesty's loyal subjects in Singapore, Penang, Rangoon, Colombo, Madras and Kurrachee feel equally aggrieved with your Petitioners at the unusual privileges conferred on French and German Mail steamers, and concur with your Petitioners in their prayer; as appears from the letters from the Chambers of Commerce of these ports, which your Petitioners humbly crave leave to annex.

19. Your Petitioners humbly submit that this exemption from legal liabilities and restraints, this freedom from port regulations, not only confers upon the cargo- carrying steamers of the Messageries Maritimes and Norddeutscher Lloyd Companies, prestige and standing in the eyes of the Chinese, but so facilitates their business as to militate seriously against the interests of your Petitioners, as shipowers and carriers of cargo; and your Petitioners are informed and believe that no similar privileges and advantages, save and except exemption from seizure, are in French ports conferred on the steamers of the Peninsular and Oriental Steam Navigation Company, or on any other line of mail-carrying steamers subsidized by Your Majesty's Government. There is therefore no complete reciprocity.

156

20. In conclusion your Petitioners most humbly represent that the rights, privileges and immunities, conferred upon the French Mail steamers, and German Mail steamers, by the local ordinances, are entirely unwarranted by the Postal Con- vention of 1856, which they purport to carry into effect; that they may at any time seriously interfere with the administration of public justice in this Colony, and that they do in fact deprive Your Majesty's loyal and faithful subjects of their right to resort to Your Majesty's Courts in certain cases; that facilities are thus given to foreign traders which Your Majesty's subjects ought not to be called upon to give in these days of strong competition and bounty-fed-trade; and that the reasonable demands of the French and German Governments for certain privileges may be fully provided for, without conferring rights so extensive in their nature as those now granted.

And Your Petitioners therefore humbly pray,

That Your Majesty will be graciously pleased to disallow Ordinances No. 18 and No. 19 of 1888, passed by the Legislative Council of Hongkong on the 28th day of August 1888, copies of which are hereunto annexed.

On behalf of the Committee,

(Signed,)

P. RYRIE, Chairman.

SIR,

Enclosure 2.

Chairman, Chamber of Commerce to Colonial Secretary.

HONGKONG GENERAL CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, HONGKONG, 27th August, 1888.

The Chamber of Commerce of Hongkong has always protested against the rights and privileges conferred by Annual Ordinance on the French Mail steamers, and latterly on those of the German Mail steamers.

These Ordinances are, as appears from the published Agenda, to be introduced into the Legislative Council again to-morrow to be re-enacted for another year.

The Chamber begs to repeat its protest, but, as it is about to petition Her Most Gracious Majesty the QUEEN on the subject, will not now set out its reasons therefore. Furthermore these reasons are already well known to the Government. I have the honour to request that you will lay this letter before His Excellency the Governor at the earliest opportunity.

The Honourable F. STEWART, LL.D.,

Colonial Secretary.

I have, &c.,

(Signed,)

P. RYRIE, Chairman.

SIR,

Enclosure 3.

Chairman, Chamber of Commerce to Colonial Secretary.

HONGKONG GENERAL CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, HONGKONG, 24th September, 1888.

Referring to the Chamber's letter of the 27th ultimo, and to previous corres- pondence on the same subject, I have the honour, on behalf of the Committee of this Chamber, to enclose a Petition, in triplicate, addressed to Her Most Gracious Majesty The QUEEN, with reference to the Ordinances of the Colony granting to the steamers of the Messageries Maritimes and Norddeutscher Lloyd's Companies theStatus and Privileges of Men-of-War," and to request that His Excellency the Governor will be good enough to forward the same by the outgoing mail.

I have, &c.,

(Signed,)

P. RYRIE, Chairman.

The Honourable F. STEWART, LL.D.,

Colonial Secretary.

;

157

No. 308.

Enclosure.

C.S.O. 2187.

The Right Honourable

MY LORD,

(2.)

Governor of Hongkong to Secretary of State.

GOVERNMENT HOUSE,

HONGKONG, 5th November, 1888.

Referring to the 3rd paragraph of my Despatch, No. 280, of the 8th ultimo regarding the status of the French and German Mail Steamers, I have now the honour to forward the correspondence therein referred to.

2. As regards the incidents alleged to have taken place at the French Con- sulate and on board the Messageries Maritimes Steamer Natal, I am satisfied that the French Consul's version of the affair is strictly correct; and, if Monsieur VERLEYE had contented himself with rebutting the charges made against him, Your Lordship would not have been troubled with this correspondence. When, however, the Consul for France goes on to state his views of the privileges accorded to French Mail Steamers, and virtually makes it a matter for his discretion whether the

process of the Supreme Court of the Colony shall be served on the Messageries Maritimes Steamers or not, it is impossible for me to follow him in his contention.

3. In view of the fact that there is, I understand, no real reciprocity in this matter, it is humiliating enough that the exercise of the jurisdiction of our Courts within our own waters should be even nominally subject to the discretion of a Foreign Consul. But the case is taken entirely out of the region of sentiment, and involves substantial injury when the Consul claims to make real use of this dis- cretion, by discriminating between process as to what he will, and what he will not support, and plainly indicates as in the latter category, all such as does not happen to be in accordance with the Law of France.

4. Under the circumstances I venture to suggest, as worthy of enquiry and of the consideration of Her Majesty's Government the question :—

(1.) Whether the privilege of exterritoriality is in practice extended to

British Mail Steamers in Foreign Ports;

(2.) Even if it is, whether advantage from this privilege does not largely preponderate on the side of Foreign Powers and against Great Britain;

(3.) Whether it is in principle just that this privilege should be extended to vessels competing in respect of cargo and passengers with others which are without it; and

(4.) Even if the privilege must be maintained, whether it should not in the case of France be subject to an arrangement similar to that already made with Germany and described by Lord ROSEBERY in his despatch to Count HATZFELDT, dated 26th April, 1886, (copy of which was forwarded for the information of this Government in the Secretary of State's Despatch, No 82, of the 24th June, 1886.

I have, &c.,

(Signed,)

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

The Lord KNUTSFORD, G.C.M.G.

(3.)

No. 29.

MY LORD,

Governor of Hongkong to Secretary of State.

GOVERNMENT HOUSE, HONGKONG, 21st January, 1889.

With reference to my despatch, No. 308, of the 5th of November, and to pre- vious correspondence on the subject of the privilege of ex-territoriality granted to French and German Mail Steamers, I deem it right to bring to Your Lordship's notice an incident which has recently occurred here, and which, having given rise to some public indignation, was the subject of a question in the Legislative Council.

ww

158

Enclosure 1.

C.S.O. 83 of 1889.

Enclosures 2 and 3. C.S.O. 83/89.

2. On the 10th instant a warrant was issued from the Supreme Court of Hongkong for the arrest of one R. C. PASSMORE, a debtor, I believe, to a consider- able amount in this Colony, who had taken passage in, and was actually on board of the Messageries Maritimes Steam-ship Calédonien, then on the point of leaving the port. The Acting Registrar of the Supreme Court despatched a bailiff to the French Consul, with the Warrant, and a request in writing to facilitate its execu- tion, and accordingly the Consul endorsed the Warrant in the following terms:-

"Le porteur est autorisé à arrêter M. R. C. PASSMORE à bord du Paque-

"bôt poste Français Calédonien,

""

to which he subscribed his signature and affixed his official seal.

3. The bailiff thereupon proceeded to the French Mail Steamer, where he pre- sented himself to the Captain and producing the Warrant explained the cause of his presence on board. The Captain appears to have refused at first to permit the arrest; and when his attention was drawn to the Consul's endorsement upon the Warrant, he declared that it did not satisfy him, and required a written order authorizing him to allow Mr. PASSMORE'S removal. Finally, however, having communicated by letter with his Consul, who happened to be at the time on board a French man-of-war, he consented to the arrest being effected, and PASSMORE, accordingly, accompanied the bailiff on shore.

4. It turned out subsequently that the absconding debtor had sufficient funds with him for the payment of all his creditors, and the affair caused special indig- nation on account of a belief that he would have succeeded in escaping, and in thus- defrauding his creditors, but for the accidental presence in the harbour of a French Ship of War.

5. Though this belief has proved to be incorrect, the incident nevertheless serves to illustrate the extent to which the enforcement of law in our own waters is practically within the discretion of foreign shipmasters, and the anomaly of con- ceding the privilege of ships of war to vessels carrying passengers for hire.

6. I enclose copies of a letter from the Acting Registrar, reporting the occur- rence, and of its enclosures, together with certain minutes relating to this case.

I have, &c.,

The Right Honourable

(Signed,)

The Lord KNUTSFORD, G.C. M.G.

1

G. WILLIAM DES VOUX.

HONGKONG

(4.)

Secretary of State to Governor of Hongkong.

DOWNING STREET,

No. 57.

No. 308, of 5th Nov., 88.

12th March, 1889.

SIR,

I have the honour to acknowledge the receipt of your despatch, No. 280, of the 8th of October last, transmitting a Petition to the Queen from the Hongkong Chamber of Commerce, relative to the privileges enjoyed by Foreign Mail Steamers in British ports.

I request you to inform the petitioners that their petition was laid before Her Majesty, and that the question of these privileges is engaging the attention of Her Majesty's Government, and that a further communication will shortly be made to you on the subject.

I have at the same time to inform you that your despatches, noted in the No. 29, of 21st Junc, 89. margin, on the same subject, have been duly received and communicated to the

Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs.

Governor

SIR G. WILLIAM DES VEUX, K.C.M.G.,

&Co.

&...

&c.

I have, &c.,

(Signed,)

KNUTSFORD.

145

No.

89.

HONGKONG.

REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF VICTORIA GAOL FOR 1888.

Presented to the Legislative Council, by Command of His Excellency the Governor.

1

No. 20.

COLONIAL SECRETARY,

GAOL SUPERINTENDENT'S OFFICE,

HONGKONG, 21st January, 1889.

I beg to forward herewith Annual Statistical Return of Victoria Gaol for 1888.

2. I have in previous reports referred to the successful results achieved in England by the com- bination of deterrent and reformatory Prison discipline the number of crimes and the criminal class--as steadily decreasing there as the population increases. The condition of Hongkong is indeed as I have before observed very different from that of England in as much as the amount of crime and criminal population here is as much or more dependent on the prosperity or the reverse of neighbouring Chinese territory as on the administration of our criminal law and the deterrent and reformatory nature of our Prison administration. For these reasons a reduction in the numbers of criminals confined in gaol, is no more necessarily to be credited to a judicious deterrent and reformatory Prison discipline, than an increase is necessarily to be debited to laxity of Prison discipline.

3. But to whatever causes it may be due, it must be satisfactory to Government to know that the number of criminals confined in Gaol has been of late decreasing, while the population is known to be steadily increasing. From Return Y. 13 it will be observed that the daily average number of Prisoners confined in Victoria Gaol during 1888 is less than it has been for the last ten years. The daily average number in 1888 was 531, in the previous year 1887 it was 584. A very slight portion of this reduc- tion may be owing to the circumstance of Government having released a certain number of gamblers and unlicensed hawkers a few days before the expiration of their short sentences, but this difference would be very trifling, and if we compare the number of committals during these two years, nearly the same proportions are established in 1888, 3,627 persons were committed; in 1887 the number was 4,308.

4. The Ordinance under which Criminals who earn remission of portion of their sentence are now liable to be placed under Police supervision, cannot I believe fail to do much good. It has, however, as I am informed on enquiry, been too short a time in operation to give any reliable results. Many of these persons have, I understand, left the Colony, rather than remain under Police supervision- certainly no loss to the community-and it is satisfactory to know that none of the discharged Prisoners placed under Police supervision have returned to Gaol during the year.

Subordinate Staff.

5. The conduct of the subordinate Gaol staff during the year has been very satisfactory. These Officers have generally been zealous and painstaking, they have been judicious and forbearing in their intercourse with Prisoners, illicit dealings between Turnkeys and Prisoners, so frequent some years ago, have within the last two or three years as I believe entirely ceased. The low pay of most of the Gaol staff leads however to the result that constant changes are occurring, as able officers are constantly on the look-out for other and better paid employment and there are therefore always a large number of Probationers to be instructed in their duties. As it has been proposed in the Estimates of this year to increase the pay of the staff, it is hoped this evil will be diminished. It may be possible in time to obtain a certain number of Prison officials trained in English Prisons, who, like the Police would have to be engaged for a period of at least three

years. At present the Gaol Staff have all been trained and taught their duties in this Prison.

Prison Buildings.

6. These remain as formerly reported. The disadvantages of overcrowding in associated wards and of deficient space for workshops are obvious and have been reported on year by year, and I have annually repeated my opinion that the separate system is essential to efficient deterrent and reformatory Prison discipline.

146

4

Prisoners and their discipline.

7. The number of Prison offences continues large in comparison with those of English Prisons but their number is decreasing and much less than in previous years, and it is satisfactory to observe that the more serious offences have much diminished. During the year there have been 4,414 Prison offences to an average of 531 Prisoners giving a little over 8 offences for each Prisoner during the year; the lowest average attained for many years past. On the last day of the year 140 Prisoners had been free of Prison punishment for upwards of three months, among these 35 had been free of punishment for upwards of a year.

8. I append as usual Returns showing the number of punishments during the year for the most common offences. Similar Returns for the last three years being shown alongside for the sake of comparison.

9. During the year there were three cases of insubordination towards and assaults on officers of the Gaol (included in Return B.) a marked diminution of such offences as compared with previous years. The offenders were tried and awarded corporal punishment.

10. The risk of conspiracies and combinations among Prisoners, I have adverted to in former reports as always existing with a lot of criminals sleeping in association. As in previous years so during the last year we have had proof of this in two desperate attempts of large number to escape from chain gang. The stricter the Gaol discipline the more anxious Prisoners will be to try and effect an escape on the last occasion, on the 18th September those attempting to escape were re-captured, but unfortunately in the struggle the lives of one trustworthy warder and of two Prisoners were lost, while four other Prisoners were wounded but recovered. A full report of the circumstances was sub- mitted at the time.

Industrial Labour.

11. The Chain gang on Public Works has been working during the year with an average strength of 50 or 60 Prisoners-less than last year. I had to reduce one and sometimes two of the six gangs owing to scarcity of Officers many of whom were on the sick list during the year, the work was carried on at a considerable distance about three miles from the Gaol, the work done was not very satisfactory and has now been suspended. After the experience of the year I trust it will not be resumed until the introduction of the separate system.

12. As to other industrial work we are much hampered by want of space, having to utilize veran- dahs and passages as workshops. But the industries of Coir, yarn work, shoe-making and book-binding have been increased, I append the usual Returns of Gaol Industrial work.

MONTH.

(A.)

VICTORIA GAOL.

Return of Reports for talking, &c., in the years 1885, 1886, 1887 and 1888.

A. GORDON,

Superintendent.

1885.

1886.

1887.

Daily average number Daily average number Daily average number

in Prison, 530.

in Prison, 674.

in Prison, 584.

1888.

Daily average number in Prison, 531.

i

January,

February,

55

119

146

355

25

135

75

320

March,

44

248

97

362

April, May,

23

330

· 408

380

252

197

963

402

June,

362

298

918

296

July,

289

297

500

258

August,

344

232

530

225

L

September,

254

318

558

220

October,...

174

209

429

222

November,

148

183

184

328

'December,

162

93

113

277

Total,..

2,132

2,659

4,921

3,645

}

A. GORDON,

Superintendent.

147

(B.)

Return of Offences reported of Prisoners fighting with or assaulting each other, or Officers, for the years 1885, 1886, 1887 and 1888.

1885.

MONTH.

Daily average number

in Prison, 530.

1886.

Daily average number Daily average number Daily average number

in Prison, 674..

1887.

in Prison, 584.

1888.

in Prison, 531.

January,

28

14

21

14

February,

18

15

20

21

March,

18

17

11

19

April,....

29

32

29

11

May,

6

31

41

27

June,

22

19

33

19

July,

27

13

31

11

August,

13

13

39

8

September,

12

8

26

18

October,......

13

17

27

13

November,

8

9

18

5

December,....

: 10

10

19

Total,......

204

195

306

185

A. GORDON,

Superintendent.

(C.)

Return of Offences of Prisoners having Tobacco, for the years 1885, 1886, 1887 and 1888.

1885.

1886.

MONTH.

Daily average number Daily average number

iu Prison, 530.

in Prison, 674.

1887.

1888. Daily average number Daily average number

in Prison, 584.

in Prison, 531.

January,

74

28

14

74

February,

78

16

10

35

March,

82

· 14

20

48

April,

133

11

27

25

May,

106

7

39

61

June,

61

15

34

27

July,

52

9

57

34

August,

47

11

40

22

September,

17

31

58

30

October,.

23

17

71

35

November,.

15

30

32

34

December,

21

23

33

17

Total,....

709

212

435

442

A. GORDON,

Superintendent.

(D.)

Comparative Return of Prisoners confined in Victoria Gaol on the 31st December, 1886, 31st December, 1887 and 31st December, 1888.

CONVICTION.

1886.

1887.

1888.

1st,

2nd,

3rd,

4th,

5th,

6th,

7th,

8th,

9th,

10th,

414

436

367

62

30

43

35

34

35

27

15

13

24

20

16

18

15

13

15

10

4

10

10

8

1

1

3

3

3

1121

11th,

12th,

TOTAL,

612

576

503

A. GORDON,

Superintendent.

148

(E.)

ABSTRACT OF ACCOUNT OF INDUSTRIAL LABOUR, VICTORIA GAOL, FOR THE YEAR 1888.

Dr.

OAKUM.

Cr.

1888.

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1888,. $ 995.90

1888.

By Oakum sold during the

year,

$2,847.40

"

Cost of Paper Stuff purchased} 1,140.00

during the year,.......

Profit,

39

""

Oakum issued for Gaol Hospital use, Stock on hand, 31st December,

1888,-

7.50

906.41

Paper Stuff, 650 lbs. Oakum,

$ 17.41

3,400

170.00

""

187.41

Total,...

....$

3,042.31

Total,......

3,042.31

COIR YARN.

1888.

33

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1888,. $ 620.00

Cost of Material purchased during

1888.

320.04

""

the year,.

Profit,..

By Matting sold during the year,

Issue for Prison use during the

year,

$1,541.31

17.89

""

966.40

Stock on hand, 31st December,

1888,-

Total,......

$

1,906.44

RATTAN WORK.

Manufactured, ....$149.24 Material,..

198.00

347.24

Total,...... ..$ 1,906.44

1888.

""

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1888,.

Cost of Material purchased during

$ 39.04

138.60

1888.

the year,......

Profit,

By Chairs, Fenders, &c., sold during

the year,

$163.66

""

108.57

Articles made for Gaol use, Stock on hand, 31st December,

1888,-

Manufactured Articles, $97.45 Material,

21.10

1888.

""

Total,............$

286.21

NET MAKING.

Total,........

4.00

101.45

286.21

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1888,.

Cost of Material purchased during

the year,...................

Profit,.......

1888.

By Nets sold during the

$184.07

"

"7

year, Nets made for Gaol use, (value),....... Stock on hand, 31st December,

1888,-

$ 89.20

128.00

43.13

Material,.....

10.00

Total,......

227.20

Total,...$

227.20

1888.

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1888,.

""

Cost of Material purchased during t

the year,..

Profit,.....

GRASS MATTING.

$ 12.00

1888.

69.61

38.52

Total,..

120.13

18.51

89.25

......

By Issue for Prison use during the year,

Matting sold during the year, Stock on hand, 31st December,

1888,-

""

Manufactured, 40 yds., $5.60 Material,

12.37

Total,..........$

120.13

F

į

3

Dr.

1886.

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1888,.

Cost of Material purchased during

""

the year,..

1888.

WASHING.

1888.

$ 446.72

815.20

"

Profit,.......

Total,............$

1,261.92

SHOE-MAKING.

149

Cr.

By Value of Washing done during

the

year,

Prison Clothing, at

1 cent a piece,

Cash received for clothes washed,.

$1,245.30

10.22

6.40

Total,........ .$

1,261.92

Stock on hand, 31st December, }

1888,

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1888,.

Cost of Material purchased during

the year,......

Profit,............

$202.88 1888.

433.73

By Estimated value of Shoes supplied

to Prisoners, and Repairs, Two Issues--Summer and Winter Uniform Shoes, to Prison Offi-

$104.59

240.00

74.77

cers,

Sale to Prison Officers, &c.,

324.49

21

Stock on hand, 31st December,

""

1888,-

Material and value of new

Shoes,.......

42.30

F

Total,............$

711.38

Total,.....

711.38

1888.

99

PRINTING AND BOOK-BINDING.

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1888,.

Cost of Material purchased during

the year,...

Profit,...

17.47 1888.

By Estimated value of Printing done

for Public Offices during the

$

637.75

66.70

year, (155,575 forms),

Estimated value of Books bound

99

6.40

726.81

for Prison use,.

""

19

Cash received for Books bound,. Stock on hand, 31st December,

141.83

1888,-

Book-binding Material, &c.,

25.00

Total,...

..$

810.98

Total,...$

810.98

TAILORS' SHOP.

1888.

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1888,. $ 377.08

1888.

""

Cost of Material purchased during

the year,.

Profit,.....

1,547.08

159.62

1888.

Total,..

... $

2,083.78

To Value of Stock on hand, 1st Ja-

"9

nuary, 1888,

Cost of Material purchased during

the year,

Profit,......

By Estimated value of Prisoners' }

Clothing made during the year,

25

Work done for Officers, Police,

&c., and charged for,

$

873.24

235.00

Stock on hand, 31st December,

1888,-

Flannel, Serge, Canvas, &c.,

975.54

CARPENTERS' SHOP.

Total,..... ..$

2,083.78

$ 15.62

1888. By Value of Articles made for Gaol

use during the year,

$ 153.12

191.72

charged for,

24.33

1888,-

Work done for Officers and

Stock on hand, 31st December,

Material, Wood, &c.,...$ 5.00 Value of manufactured

62.81

Total.......

231.67

Articles,

Total,...

10.74

15.74

231.67

:

:

;

150

Dr.

TIN-SMITH'S SHOP.

Cr

1888.

To Value of Stock on hand, 1st Ja-l

1888.

nuary, 1888,

Cost of Material purchased during

the year,.

By Estimated value of Articles made Į

for Gaol use,

$28.16

$17.54

>>

Sale of Articles to Prison Officers, Stock on hand, 31st December,

1.41

99

1888,-

Profit,....

Total,............$

31.79

14.25

Value of Manufactured Į

Articles,

2.22

Total,..... .$

31.79

RECAPITULATION.

1888.

Coir Yarn,

Oakum,

Net-making,

$ 906.41 966.40

1888.

By Surplus,

43.13

Rattan Work,

108.57

Grass matting,

38.52

Washing,

815.20

Shoe-making,

74.77

Printing and Book-binding,

726.81

Tailoring,

159.62

Carpentering,

24.33

Tin Work,

14.25

To Profit,...

Total,....... ..$ 3,878.01

$3,878.01

$3,878.01

Total,...

3,878.01

Victoria Gaol Office, Hongkong, 21st January, 1889.

A. GORDON,

Superintendent.

No. 96.

..

213

13

89.

THE HARBOUR MASTER'S REPORT FOR 1888.

Presented to the Legislative Council, by Command of His Excellency the Governor.

No.

HARBOUR Department,

HONGKONG, 8th March, 1889.

SIR,-I have the honour to forward the following Annual Returns for this Department for the year ending 31st December, 1888.

I. Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels entered. II. Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels cleared.

III. Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels of each Nation entered. IV. Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels of each Nation cleared.

V. Total Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels entered at each Port. VI. Total Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels cleared at each Port. VII. Return of Junks entered from Macao.

VIII. Return of Junks cleared for Macao.

IX. Return of Junks entered at each Port from China and Formosa.

X. Return of Junks cleared at each Port for China and Formosa.

XI. Gross Total Number of Junks entered at each Port.

XII. Gross Total Number of Junks cleared at each Port.

XIII. Return of Junks (Local Trade) entered.

XIV. Return of Junks (Local Trade) cleared.

XV. Summary of Arrivals and Departures of all Vessels, and of all Chinese Passengers. XVI. Return of Vessels registered.

XVII. Return of Vessels struck off the Register.

XVIII. Amount of Fees received under Section 3 of Ordinance 8 of 1879.

XIX. Return of Chinese Passenger ships cleared by the Emigration Officer.

XX. Return of Vessels bringing Chinese Passengers to Hongkong from Places out of

China.

XXI. Return of Marine cases tried.

XXII. Diagram of Tonnage of Vessels entered.

XXIII. Return of the work performed by the Government Marine Surveyors.

XXIV. Return from Imports and Exports (Opium) Office.

SHIPPING.

2. The total trade of Hongkong for the year 1888 is represented by 63,967 vessels measuring 12,996,396 tons. (This is an advance of 174 vessels and 357,702 tons on the average for the previous

years, and is 359 vessels more, but 28,939 tons less than in 1887.)

3

3. This vast amount of trade is apportioned as follows:-

Number.

Tons.

Per Cent.

British, Foreign,

Junks in Foreign Trade,

5,121 6,474,343

or 49. 2,460 | 2,532,334 or 19. 47,567 3,703,707

or 29.

55,148 12,710,384

Junks in Local Trade,

8,819 286,012

or 2.

63,967 12,996,396

4. Compared with 1887. There has been a decrease of British tonnage amounting to 342.705 tons; and an increase of Foreign tonnage, exclusive of Junks, of 179,848 tons; also an increase of Junks, exclusive of local trade, of 143,781 tons, and a decrease in Junks employed in local trade of 9,863 tons.

214

5. The countries with which the decrease of British tonnage is most apparent are:-

Coast of China and Formosa,

Cochin-China,

190,977 tons. 123,894

""

Continent of Europe,....

.104,201

""

Australia,.

22,178

.""

6. The principal increase appears with the following countries :-

British Columbia,

Great Britain, Japan,

22,173 121,066

40,918 >>

37

7. The principal decrease, that with Coast of China and Formosa, may be partly accounted for by the fact that, during the year several steamers trading on the Coast, which were formerly under the British flag, were transferred to the German flag. The decrease under the heading of Continent of Europe is partly consequent on this trade being carried more in Foreign bottoms.

But it is more largely due to an alteration in the system of classification adopted in this Report. In former Reports, the vessels of the Peninsular and Oriental Company calling at Brindisi and Marseilles en route were classed under the heading of "Continent of Europe," while now they are classed under "Great Britain." With Australia, the decrease must be put down to the altered circumstances of trade con- sequent on the suppression of Chinese Emigration to the Australian Colonies.

8. During the year, 3,660 steamers arrived, being a daily average of over 10, 7 of which were "Ocean going." They represented a total tonnage of 4,416,000, over 68 per cent. of them were under the British flag.

9. The statistics show an increase in the Junk trade over last year, with the Coast of China and Formosa of 103,497 tons, and with Macao of 40,284 tons. There is a decrease however of 9,863 tons in the local trade.

10. On the 31st December there were 91 steam-launches in the Harbour, of these, 41 were licensed for the conveyance of passengers, 42 were privately owned, and 8 were the property of the Colonial Government. There were, in addition, 6 launches, the property of the War Department.

EMIGRATION.

11. During the year 1888, 96,195 Emigrants left Hongkong, of these, 72,744 (65,976 males, 5,109 females, and 1,659 children) were for the Straits Settlements; 18,275 (18,119 males, 95 females, and 61 children) were for San Francisco; 1,972 (1,942 males, 3 females, and 27 children) were for the Australian Colonies. Owing to the restrictions placed on Chinese Emigration by the various Govern- ments in the Australian Colonies, Emigration there has been practically stopped since the month of May, 1888.

12. The subject of abuses connected with Chinese Emigration has lately received much attention. That abuses do exist there can, I think, be little doubt, but I question much if they exist to the extent which some suppose. Frequent cases of so-called "kidnapping" are reported, but, except in the case of women or children, my impression is that in a large number of these reported cases, the so-called "kid- napped" coolie is a rogue, who, having agreed to emigrate and received a "bounty" for so doing, either escapes from the vessel as she is leaving the harbour, or gets some of his friends to report that he has been taken away against his will in the hopes that he may be taken out of the ship before leaving, or traced and sent back from the port for which he has sailed, in either case, if he is successful, he will be ready to try his game on again sooner or later. The jumping overboard of "kidnapped" coolies from out- ward bound Chinese passenger ships, of which a good deal was heard a short time ago is one of the symptoms of abuses in which I do not believe. It is a curious fact that few if any of these individuals are ever heard of after jumping overboard, though they are seen to be picked up by boats which appear to be waiting for them. It is more than probable, I think, that in nearly all these cases, could they be clearly traced, it would be found that this " "kidnapped one was really either a "Bounty Jumper or else a thief who had got on board surreptitiously and remained as long as he could, with a view of seeing what there was to be picked up, and who, having done all he could in the time at his disposal, cleared out by jumping overboard at a suitable spot where his friends would be waiting to pick him up in a boat.

""

""

13. Cases of forged contract passage tickets have come under my notice, also cases of Emigrants going on board after the medical inspection by the Health Officer and the issue of the Emigration Officer's Certificate. During the past year, on one occasion under the latter circumstances I detained the vessel until the number on board corresponded with the number passed by the Health Officer and certified to by me. A claim was made for compensation for this detention, but it was not persisted in. As one precaution against fraud, every ticket is now numbered as the owner passes before the Health Officer and Emigration Officer's Deputy on board. A further proposed

A further proposed precaution is to have the tickets printed on specially prepared paper in order that forgeries may be readily recognized, but no means adopted by the Government will prove wholly effectual, unless we have the active co-operation of the Agents or Charterers and the Master of the vessel towards the prevention of abuses.

14. The present system of the Emigrants going on board at any time after their passing at the Harbour Office and before the sailing of the vessel, and while the vessel is lying in the Roads, in a great measure open to the public,—since the officers and crew are so fully employed in their other

215

duties as to make it impracticable for them to attend to coolies coming and going-is conducive to abuses, and I think that the best remedy would be found in the establishment of a Government Emi- ▾gration Wharf alongside which vessels would take on board their Emigrants at the last moment before sailing, the wharf being closed to the public after the Health Officer and Emigration Officer had passed through the gates to go on board for the final inspection of the Emigrants, and the vessel leaving immediately after this inspection. This method would doubtless cause some little delay in getting the vessel off, and for that reason is open to objection, I think however that the evil would be more than compensated for by the good which would accrue.

REGISTRY OF SHIPPING.

15. Nine vessels were registered during the year and eight certificates of Registry were cancelled. It has been brought to my notice that inconvenience exists in the want of a simpler mode of Registry whereby small vessels British owned could obtain a "National Character," and be entitled to fly the British flag outside the waters of the Colony. This inconvenience can, I think, be removed under the Colonial Shipping Act 1868 (31 and 32 Vic. Cap. 129) which enables Regulations to be made providing for the issue to Vessels under 60 tons burden of terminable certificates of Registry under which the Vessel so long as the certificate is in force, is deemed a registered British vessel, and I am now preparing regulations to be submitted to His Excellency the Governor with this object in

view.

""

MARINE MAGISTRATE'S COURT.

"Refusal of

16. Seventy cases were heard in the Marine Magistrate's Court during the year. ""Insubordination duty,"

and "Absence without leave" were the principal offences in the case of ships, and "Leaving without clearance" and "Leaving during prohibited hours," in the case of Junks.

EXAMINATIONS FOR THE POSTS OF MASTERS, MATES AND ENGINEERS, UNDER SECTION 15 of

ORDINANCE No. 8 of 1879.

17. The following table will show the number of candidates examined for Certificates of Compe- tency, distinguishing those who were successful, and those who failed:-

Masters, First Mates, Only Mates,

Second Mates,

GRADE.

First Class Engineers,

Second Class Engineers,

PASSED. FAILED.

19

12

9239

3

43

3

20

19

: 60

3

39

3

MARINE COURTS UNDER SECTION 13 OF ORDINANCE No. 8 OF 1879.

18. The following Courts have been held during the year :—

1. On the 20th February, 1888. Inquiry as to the stranding of the British Steam-ship Ardgay, Official No. 88,869 of Aberdeen, a little to the North of Cape Batangan, on the 15th December, 1887. The Master's (ALEXANDER COOK) Certificate of Competency was suspended for three months.

2. On the 1st May, 1888. Inquiry as to the stranding of the British Steam-ship Ashington, Official No. 63,010 of South Shields, on the West Point of Hongkong Island in the Channel named on the Chart Sulphur Channel, on the night of the 20th April, 1888. The Master's (WALTER REYNELL) Certificate of Competency was returned to him.

3. On the 11th May, 1888. Inquiry as to the abandonment of the British ship Rock Terrace, Official No. 72,217 of St. John, New Brunswick, off the Island of Guam, on the 29th February, 1888. The Master's (STEPHEN BARNES ATKINSON) Certificate of Competency was suspended for six months, and that of the First Mate (AUGUSTUS HARRIS) was also suspended for six months.

4. On the 5th June, 1888. Inquiry respecting certain charges of misconduct brought against ROBERT LYLE, First Mate of the British Steam-ship Crusader, Official No. 63,856 of Glasgow, by JOHN OGSTON, Master of the said ship. The First Mate's Certificate of Competency was returned to him.

5. On the 24th October, 1888. Inquiry as to the death of HENRY WILKINS, A.B., of the British Steam-ship Ghazee, Official No. 87,678 of Rochester, who was washed overboard by a sea which swept the steamer's decks during the Typhoon encountered on the 29th September, 1888. The Master's (ARCHIBALD SCOTLAND) Certificate of Competency was returned to him.

216

SEAMEN.

19. 10,061 seamen were shipped and 10,807 were discharged at the shipping office and on board ships during the year.

MARINE SURVEYOR'S SUB-DEPARTMENT.

20. I append a Return showing the Surveys, &c., carried out in the Government Marine Surveyor's Branch. This Return illustrates the constantly increasing importance of that Branch of this Depart-

ment.

LIGHT HOUSES.

21. No special remarks are called for under this heading. The three Lighthouse Stations have been maintained during the year as usual, some minor changes taking place in the staff. The proposal to dispense with the red shades on the seaward face of the Green Island Light is under consideration, this plan, if adopted, will, in my opinion, increase the efficiency of the light.

GOVERNMENT GUNPOWDER DEPÔT.

22. On the 31st December, 1888, there was stored in the Magazine at Stone Cutter's Island, as under:

No. of Cases,

Approximate Weight.

&c.

tbs.

Gunpowder, Privately owned,

.99

Government owned,

336

19,070

632

63,200

Cartridges, Privately owned,

387

31,102

Government owned,

67

8,700

Dynamite, Gun-cotton, Fuze, &c., Pri-

149

4,890

vately owned,

Dynamite, Gun-cotton, Fuze, &c. Go-I

9

655

vernment owned,

Total,......

1,580

127,617

23. This is a smaller amount than has been in the Magazine for some years, probably owing to the fact of the market being glutted with the very large amount of explosive material which arrived during and immediately after the period of hostilities between France and China.

24. The Agents of Nobel's Explosives Company have during the past year established, with the permission of the Government, a private magazine for storing Dynamite, &c., at One Tree Island, thus relieving the Stone Cutters' Magazine of the storage. There is of course a corresponding loss to the Government of rent for storage, but there was no fit special place for keeping it at Stone Cutters, and on the whole I think the present arrangement the better of the two.

IMPORTS AND EXPORTS (OPIUM) OFFICE.

25. This is the first complete year of the establishment of this Branch, and I have to report that it is working satisfactorily. Monthly statistics are rendered, it will therefore not be necessary to go into details here, a table is added to this report which shows that the total amount of opium reported through the office during the year was as follows:-

Imported, Exported,

....

40

71,512 27 chests. .71,139 27

(Exclusive of through cargo.)

>>

The fraction 27 is explained by the fact that one "broached" chest was landed here containing 27 instead of 40 balls, and was exported in the same condition, 21,310 permits were issued from the office being 384 Landing, 10,958 Removal, 9,498 Export, and 470 to Chinese Customs hulk.

26. In addition to these, a Memo: of Exports for the day is sent for the convenience of the Chinese Customs' Commissioner to the Kowloon Customs' Office.

27. From the summary of Exports it appears that apart from the through cargo, Shanghai took from the Colony 37 per cent., viz., 26,673 chests, Canton came next with 16 per cent., and then Amoy and Swatow.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

The Honourable FREDERICK STEWART, LL.D.,

&C.

Colonial Secretary,

&c.,

&c.

R. MURRAY RUMSEY, R.N., Harbour Master, &c.

COUNTRIES WHENCE ARRIVED,

I.-NUMBER, TONNAGE, and CREWS of Vessels ENTERED at Ports in the Colony of Honghong from each Country in the Year 1888.

BRITISH.

FOREIGN.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels. Tons. Crews. Vessels. Tons. Crews, Vessels.

Tons.

Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

TOTAL.

IN BALLAST.

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

TOTAL.

Tons. Crews.

441

54,804 2,151

1,182 18

17

45 55,486 2,169) 3 1,251 30 171 34,586 1,171

...

1,251 30 47

17

81 5,774 204

55,555; 2,18|| 34,586 1,171} 5,774 204

1,182 18

48

17

56,737 2,199 34,586 1,171 8 5,774 204

6,388 181

:

:

V

:

333 10.

1,251 1,666,004 57,808 13,801 1,550,145 195,918 9,906 702,046 118,145 23,707 2,258,191 314,063 15,047 3,215,761 253,542 9,911|| 708,434 118,329 24,958 3,924,195 371,871 110 128,299 4,094| 107 97,249| 2,846|

14) 20,959 456 82 157,997 7,503|| 200) 317,343] 11,078] 16 18,449 428 91 126,256 7,377 47 50,705 1,796) 143 213,562 7,849 118 163,335 5,177 22 30,6231 904 26 31,976 1,168

:

107 97,249 2,846|| 217 225,548 6,940

82 157,997 7,503) 96 178,956 7,959)

217 225,548 6,940

96 178,956 7,959 216 335,792 11,501

138 176,961 9,173 261| 376,89713,026

1

286

22

400 427,219 16,660]

622

94,131 15,463

108

12,505 1,463

988

23

:

:

305

8

3035

8

362

18

8621

888

66

42,105 2,650 64

40,171| |2,182]

223

63 28,352 1,814

20

97,405 4,336||

1,402| 49 213

40,394 2,191 130 98,807 4,585 274

16 18,449 428 47. 50,705 1,796| 118 163,835 5,177 261 31,976 1,168 62,599||| 2,072||

333! 10 333 101 730 106,636 16,926 1,021| 521,064 32,101] 988 23 988 231

18 362 18 82,276 4,832

216 335.792 11,501| 138 176,961 9,178} 261| 376,897|13,026||

48

1

48

1

62,599 2,072

333

10

199 12,791 1,485 1,130 533,855 33,586

1

305

223

988 23

667

26

131

82,499 4,841

125,757 6,150,

1,402 49

276

127,159 6,199

7

:

13,855 556

13,855 556

7

13,855 556

7

1

685

15

2,049| 55 115 196,517 4,065||

4

2,667 55

1,989 37

42

37,482|||| 1,105]

42

1

120

9

1

23 49,630 1,782

31

60,581

2,363

1,974

23

32

C

8,846 247

143,999 5,170

55 112,185 4,168

2,578 3,255,069 120,138| 15,186 2,425,202 240,988 10,020 720,139 119,726 25,2068,145,341 860,712 17,750 5,671,425 860,878 10,029 728,985 119,978 27,7796,400,410 480,851

4,656 92

71 4,031 95

2,674 52

10

13,855 556

6,705

147

37,482 1,105|

157 143,999 6,170)

157

1201

120) 62,555 2,386 54 110,211 4,145|

1

9;

120

9

1,974 23

Australia and New Zealand,

British Columbia,.............

British North Borneo,..

Coast of China and Forinosa,.

Cochin-China,

Continent of Europe,

Great Britain,

India and Singapore,

Japan,

Java and other Islands in the Indian Archi-

pelago,

Labuan,

Macao.

Mauritius,

34,586 1,171 8 5,774 204

1,246 1,659,616 57,624| 110 128,299 4,094

::

141 20,059| 456 200 317,343 11,073] 91 126,256 7,377 143 213,562 7,849. 221 30,623| 604)

399 426,933 16,638]

...

66i 42,105 2,650

North Pacific,

Philippine Islands,

Ports in Hainan and Gulf of Tonquin,

Russia in Asia,..

Sandwich Islands,...

Siam,

South Pacific,

United States of America,

63)

28,352 1,814

:

1,364 40 115 106,517 4,065||

23

49,630 1,782

***

TOTAL,.

2,564 3,246,223 119,892]

217

II.-NUMBER, TONNAGE, and CREWS of Vessels CLEARED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong for each Country in the Year 1888.

TOTAL.

218

BRITISH.

FOREIGN.

COUNTRIES TO WHICH DEPARTED.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST,

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels.

Tons.

Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels. Tons.

Crews. Vessels.

Tons.

Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons.

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Crews. Vessels.

Tons.

Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Australia and New Zealand,.

British Columbia,

British North Borneo,

Cape of Good Hope,...

Coast of China and Formosa,

Cochin-China,

Continent of Europe,

Great Britain,

30

42,686 1,729|

1

762; 39

3,933

183

75 101 31 42,761

1,281 30

1,739

30

***

:

762 39

193

193

30

42,686 1,729) 1 955 47

75

10

81 5,214 213

3,933

183

1,387

32

1 1,387 32

1,387

32

1,432 1,871,337) 66,845]

27

27,518)

918

24 25,366 8831

71

82,379 2,542

1,459 1,898,855 67,763 16,498 1,852,570 236,128 6,863 95 107,745 3,425

83

72,687 2,414 51

2

1,691 41

321

59,061 3,825

32

...

...

India and Singapore,

Japan,

196 290,108 11,715

1,656 51

Java & other Islds. in the Indian Archipelago,

122 205,239 8,495]

3 8,2291 131

34

44,720 1,004

2 1,691 41 59,061 8,825 200 291,764 11,766 156 249,959 9,499|

42

98,647 5,815|

...

...

42 98,647 5,815

5,268 93

...

51 5,268 93

373,084 74,521 23,361 2,225,654 310,649 17,930 3,723,907 302,973 45,019 1,322| 134 117,906] 3,736| 107 98,253 3,297 44 100,338 5,856 64,329 3,918

6,890

122

42,761 1,739 955 47 1,281 80 81 5,214 213 1,387 32 400,602 75,439 24,820 4,124,509 378,412 127,398 3,864| 229 225,651] 7,161 44 100,338 5,856

311

31

37

37

61,329 3,918

87

118,715 4,131|

1,007 16

88

119,722 4,147

283

408,823 15,846]

2,663 67

288

411,486 15,913

80 181,554 5,299

84,006 2,557|

140 215,560| ,856

202

10,867 252

11

14,096 383

3,679

80

Korea,

636

22

5 3,679 80 636

336,793 13,794|| 3,229

94

128,726 3,561|

296

465,519 17,355

131

13

14,546

332

16

17,775 463

22

1

636 22

1

636] 22

Macao,

397 426,318 16,589

North Pacific,

1,489 391

4,739

289 22]

111

398

426,607 16,611

680

100,307 16,138:

44

7,291

8211

724

107,598 16,959

1,077

526,625 32,727

45

7,580

843 1,122

534,205 33,570

5 6,228 1501

287

9

2,449 61

3

2,736 70

3

1,776| 481

7,188

172

8,964 220

Philippine Islands,

191

12,770 585

10,819)

208 28

23,5891 793

301

21,115 841

,955 100)

351

26,070) 941

49)

33,885 1,426

14

15,774

308

63) 49,659 1,734

Ports in Hainan and Gulf of Tonquin,

64

31,466 1,862

536

24 651

32,002 1,886

208

98,470 4,792

946!

47

211

99,416 4,839

272 129,936 6,654|

4

1,482

71

276

131,418 6,725

Russia in Asia,...

31

2,393 66

3!

2,393 66

3

2,393] 66

2,393 66

Sandwich Islands,

Siam,......

31

1,667 43 80,207 1,057|

31

1,667 43

4

3,456

831

41

3,456) 83

5,123 126

5,123

126

9,284

218

39

83,491 1,275

251

18,870

602

117

31

25,461| 719

56

49,077 1,659

14

15,875

335

701

64,952 1,994

South America,

2

South Pacific,

::

་་་

1,576

31

1,576

31

120

་་

10

120

10

1

United States of America,

13

16.895) 463

13

...

16,395| 463

80

31,609)

566

301

34,609

566

1,576 31

120

51,004 1,029

2

1,576 31

10

1

43

120 10 51,004 1,029

TOTAL....

2,379|3,025,111|114,556||

169 194,163 5,390 2,548 3,219,274 119,946 17,780 2,561,087 277,026 7,041 529,663 79,664 24,821 3,090,700 336,690 20,159 5,586,148 391,582 7,210 723,826 85,054 27,369 6,809,974 476,636

219

III.-NUMBER, TONNAGE and CREWS of Vessels of each Nation ENTERED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong,

in the Year 1888.

ENTERED.

NATIONALITY

OF

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

VESSELS.

Vessels.

Tons.

Crews. Vessels. Tons.

Crews. Vessels.

Tons.

Crews.

American,

49

Austrian,

10

79,210 21,466

2,677

6

7,448

116

55

86,658

2,793

668

10

21,466

668

British,

2,564 | 3,246,223

119,892

9

8,846

247

2,573 | 3,255,069 | 120,139

Chinese,

152

194,630

7,619

2

1,603

73

154

196,233 7,692

Chinese Junks,

13,961

1,160,751190,809

9,997

703,217

119,272

23,958

1,863,968310,081

Danish,

81

32,258 1,777

1

223

82

32,481 1,786

Dutch,

28

35,698

1,464

28

...

35,698 1,464

French,

70

134,945

8,660

3

835

52

73

135,780

8,712

German,

693

617,190

21,187

11.

6,813

204

704

624,003

21,391

Hawaiian,

2

2,266

51

2

2,266

51

Italian,

18

25,437

1,050

18

25,437

1,050

Japanese,

37

51,704

1,916

37

51,704

1,916

Norwegian,

38

35,224

861

38

35,224

861

Russian,

11,705

597

6

11,705

597

Siamese,

4,149

145

4,149

145

3

Spanish,

33

18,569 1,505

33

18,569

1,505

TOTAL,........... 17,750 5,671,425 360,878 10,029

728,985119,973 27,779 6,400,410 480,851

IV.-NUMBER, TONNAGE and CREWS of Vessels of each Nation CLEARED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong,

in the Year 1888.

CLEARED.

NATIONALITY

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

OF

VESSELS.

Vessels. Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons.

Crews. Vessels.

Tons.

Crews.

American,

60

95,927

Austrian,

British,

Chinese,

Chinese Junks,

Danish,

Dutch,

10

21,466

3,236 651

3

2,591

44

63

10

2,379

3,025,111114,556

169

L

138

176,525 6,752

1

16,722 | 1,473,014 | 231,611

6,887

194,163 392 366,725

5,390 23 74,887

98,518 3,280 21,466 651 2,548 | 3,219,274 |119,946

139 23,609

176,917 6,775

1,839,739 | 306,498

77

30,297 1,679

1,538

46

79

31,835 1,725

21

28,990 1,243

5,274

174

27

34,264

1,417

French,

69 133,828

8,649

1,585

78

74

135,413

8,727

German,

590

518,317

19,132

85

85,364

2,265

675

603,681

21,397

Hawaiian,

3

2,819

.70

3

2,819

70

Italian,

16

23,569

1,205

2

1,868

32

18

25,437

1,237

Japanese,

3

3,045

140

33

46,244

1,673

36

49,289

1,813

Norwegian,

26

21,462

549

15

16,389

397

41

37,851

946

Russian,

5

9,965

471

5

9,965

471

Siamese,

4,149

151

1

701

18

9

4,850

169

Spanish,

32

17,664 1,487

1

992

27

33333

18,656

1,514

TOTAL,..

20,159 | 5,586,148

5,586,148 391,582 7,210 723,826 85,054 27,369 6,309,974 | 476,636

V.-TOTAL NUMBER, TONNAGE AND CREWS OF VESSELS ENTERED AT EACH PORT IN THE COLONY OF HONGKONG, IN THE YEAR 1888.

220

BRITISH.

FOREIGN.

TOTAL.

NAMES

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES,

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

OF PORTS.

Vls. Tons. Crews.

Vls.

Tons. Crews. Vis. Tons. Crews.

VIS.

Tons. Crews. Vls.

Tons. Crews. Vls.

Tons. Crews. Vis.

505

Aberdeen,

Hunghom,

206

23,918 5,386 726 12,049 1,562 612

Shaukiwán,.

3861

201

14,021 3,078 967 13,647 2,618

37,518 9,459 1,231 30,275 6,637| 818 61,117 9,671 1,853

65

Stanley,

Victoria,

Yaumáti,.

2,564 3,246,223 119,892

8,846 247 2,573 3,255,069 120,139 13,008 2,249,936 217,458 5,361 880 111,631 10,884 2,289

61,436 14,845| 505 42,324 8,199) 2061 75,138 12,749 386 4,044 673 266 17,691 3,291 201 450,839 63,356 18,369 2,700,775 280,814 15,572 136,346 29,930 3,169 247,977 40,814 880

...

Total,.

2,564 3,246,223|119,892|

8,846

37,518 9,459 1,231 30,275 6,637 818 61,117 9,671 1,353| 4,"44 673 2661 17,691 3,291 459,685 63,603 20,942 955,844 400,953 136,346 29,930 3,169 5,247,977|40,814

247 2,578 3,255,069,120,189 15,186 2,425,202 240,986 10,020 720,139 119,726, 25,206 3,145,341 360,712 17,750 5,671,125 360,878 10,029 728,985 119,578 27,779 6,400,410 480,851

Tons. Crews. Vls.

23,918| 5,386|| 726 12,049 1,562| 612 14,021 3,078| 967 13,647 2.618 65 5,496,159 337,350 5,370 111,631 10,884 2,289

Tons. Crews. Vls.

Tons. Crews.

61,436 14,845

42,324 8,199

75,138 12,749

VI.-TOTAL NUMBER, TONNAGE AND CREWS OF VESSELS CLEARED AT EACH PORT IN THE COLONY OF HONGKONG, IN THE YEAR 1888.

BRITISH.

FOREIGN.

TOTAL.

NAMES

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

OF PORTS.

Vls.

Tons. Crews,

Vls.

Tons. Crews. Vls. Tons. Crews. Vis.

Tons. Crews. Vls.

Aberdeen,

Hunghom,

Shaukiwán,.

Stanley,

Victoria,

...

2,379 8,025,111 114,556

Yaumáti,

7,813 1,865 988 20,564 2,411 459 803 50,011| 6,436|| 527 135 11,059 1,437| 131 169 194,163 5,390 2,548 3,219,274 119,946||15,226 2,378,767 252,401 2,904 1,057 97,823 12,476 2,032

243

316

Total,..

6,632 1,854| 266 17,691 3,291 474,096 31,508 2C,678 5,872,974 398,466 145,139 27,224 3,089| 242,962 39,700

2,379 8,025,111|114,556| 169 194,163 5,390 2,5483,219,274 119,946 17,780 2,561,087 277,026 7,041 529,663 79,664 24,821 3,099,7 30 356,690 20,159 5,586,148 391,582 7,210 723,826 85,054 27,369 6,309,974,476,636

Tons. Crews. Vls.

53,623 12,980) 1,231|| 20,077|| 5,448| 775 24,259 6,040j 1,330j| 6,632 1,854|| 266

Tons. Crews. Vis. Tons. Crews. Vls.

61,486 14,845|| 243 7,813 1,865 988 40,641 7,859] 316 20,564 2,411 459 74,270 12,476 8031 50,011|| 6,436|| 527 17,691| 3,291, 135 11,059 1,437 131 279,933 26,118 18,130 2,653,700 278,519 17,605 5,398,878 866,957 3,073 145,139 27,224 3,089)| 242,062|39,700|| 1,057| 97,823 12,476 2,032

Tons. Crews. VIS.

53,623 12,980 1,231| 20,077| 5,448| 775 24,259 6,040) 1,330|

Tons. Crews.

61,436 14,845

40,641 7,859

74,270 12,476

VII.-Total Number, Tonnage, Crews and Passengers of Junks ENTERED from Macao, during the Year

ending 31st December, 1888.

221

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels.

'Tons. Crews.

Passen- gers.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Victoria,

613 90,592 15,291

244

105

11,747 1,398

Passen-

gers.

146

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

l'asseu- gers.

718

102,339 16,689

390

Total,..

613 90,592 15,291

244

105

11,747

1,398

146

718 102,339 16,689

390

VIII.-Total Number, Tonnage, Crews and Passengers of Junks CLEARED for Macao, during the Year

ending 31st Decembe, 1888.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen- gers.

Victoria,

672

96,377 15,974

571

43

6,899

798

310

715

103,276 16,772

881

Total,... 672 96,377 15,974

571

43

6,899

798

310

715 103,276 16,772

881

IX.—Total Number, Tonnage, Crews and Passengers of Junks ENTERED at each Port in the Colony of Hongkong,

from Ports on the Coast of China and Formosa, during the Year ending 31st December, 1888.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

l'assen-

gers.

Vessels.

T'ons. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

l'assen-

gers.

Aberdeen,

505

23,918 5,386

16

726

Hunghom, ...

206

12,049

1,562

12

612

37,518 9,459 30,275 6,637

...

1,231

20

818

61,436 14,845 42,324

16

8,199

32

Shaukiwán,...

386

14,021

3,078

116

967

61,117

9,671

41

1,353

75 138

12,749

157

Stanley,

201

13,647

2,618

86

65

4,044

673

10

266

17,691

3,291

96

Victoria,

11,170

894,893 | 151,990 || 139,548

5,233

422,170

61,504

Yaumáti,.

880

111,631 10,884

88

2,289

136,346 29,930

47,913 99

16,403 3,169

1,317,063 213,494 | 187,461 ·

247,977 40,814

187

Total,... 13,348 | 1,070,159 | 175,518 | 139,866

9,892

691,470 117,874 48,083

23,240

1,761,629 293,392 | 187.949

X.-Total Number, Tonnage, Crews and Passengers of Junks CLEARED at each Port in the Colony of Hongkong,

for Ports on the Coast of China and Formosa, during the Year ending 31st December, 1888.

Cargo.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Vessels.

Tons.

Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Aberdeen,

243

7,813 1,865

95

988

55,623 12,980

Hunghòm.

316

20,564 2,411

8

459

20,077 5,448

Shaukiwán,..

803

50,011 6,436

105

527

24,259

6,040

45

10 1,231 11

775 1,330

61,436 14,845 40,641

105

7,859

19

74,270

12,476

150

Stanley,.

135

11,059 1,437

78

131

6,632

1,854

6

266

17,691 3,291

84

Victoria,

13,496

1,189,367

Yaumáti,

1,057

191,012 | 157,423 97,823 12,476

2,707

110,096

20,543 17,083

180

2,032

145,139 27,224 1,639

16,203 1,299,463 211,555

3,089 242,962 39,700 1,819

174,506

Total,... 16,050 | 1,376,637 1215,637 |157,889

6,844

359,826 74,089 18,794

22,894 | 1,736,463 289,726176,683

222

XI.-Gross Total Number, Tonnage, Crews and Passengers of Junks ENTERED at each Port in the Colony of Hongkong (exclusive of Local Trade), during the Year ending 31st December, 1888.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

'T'OTAL.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

l'assen- gers.

Vessels.

T'ons. Crews.

Passen- gers.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Aberdeen,

505

...

23,918 5,386

16

726

37,518 9,459

1,231

61,436

14,845

16

Hunghòm, ...

206

12,049

1,562

12

612

30,275

6,637

20

818

42,324

8,199

32

Shaukiwán,..

386

14,021 3,078

116

967

61,117

9,671

41

1,353

75,138

12,749

157

Stanley,

201

13,647 2,618

86

65

4,044

673

10

266

17,691

3,291

96

Victoria,

11,783

985,485 | 167,281 |139,792

5,338

433,917

62,902

48,059

17,121

1,419,402 | 230,183

187,851

Yaumáti,.

880

111,631 10,884

88

2,289

136,346 29,930

99

3,169

Total,..

13,961 | 1,160,751 |190,809 | 140,110 9,997

703,217 |119,272

48,229

247,977 40,814

23,958 1,863,968 |310,081

187

188,339

XII.-Gross Total Number, Tonnage, Crews and Passengers of Junks CLEARED at each Port in the Colony of Hongkong (exclusive of Local Trade), during the Year ending 31st December, 1888.

TOTAL.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

Vessels.

Tons.

Crews.

Passen- gers.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen- gers.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Passen-

gers.

Aberdeen,

243

7,813 1,865

95

988

53,623 12,980

10

1.231

61,436 14,845

105

Hunghòm,

316

20,564

2,411

8

459

20,077

5,448

11

775

40,641

7,859

19

Shaukiwán,...

803

50,011

6,436

105

527

24,259

6,040

45

1,330

74,270

12,476

150

Stanley,

135

11,059 1,437

78

131

6,632

1,854

6

266

17,691

3,291

84

Victoria,

14,168

1,285,744 206,986 157,994

2,750

116,995

21,341

17,393

16,918 | 1,402,739 |228,327

175,387

Yaumáti,..

1,057

97,823 12,476

180

2,032

145,139

27,224

1,639

3,089 242,962 39,700

1,819

Total,... 16,722 | 1,473,014 231,611158,460

6,887

366,725

74,887

19,104

23,609 | 1,839,739 |306,498

177,564

XIII.-Return of Junks ( Local Trade) ENTERED at the Port of Victoria from the Out-stations of the Island and the Villages in British Kaulung, during the Year ending 31st December, 1888.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Vessels. Tons.

Crews.

Passen- gers.

Passen-

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

gers.

Victoria,...... 2,847 90,431 30,339 2,947

1,477 45,585 14,546 3,681

4,324 136,016 44,885

6,628

Total,... 2,847 90,431 30,339 2,947 1,477

45,585 14,546 3,681 4,324

136,016 44,885

6,628

XIV. Return of Junks (Local Trade) CLEARED from the Port of Victoria for the Out-stations of the Island and the Villages in British Kaulung, during the Year ending 31st December, 1888.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels.

Tons.

Crews.

Passen- gers.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Passen-

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

gers.

Victoria,

......

2,156 59,913 19,220

5,447 2,339 90,083 27,127

861 4,495

149,996 46,347

6,308

Total,... 2,156

$9,913 19,220 5,447 2,339

90,083 27,127

861 4,495

149,996 46,347

6,308

223

XV.—SUMMARY.

FOREIGN TRADE.

NO. OF VESSELS.

TONS.

CREWS.

British Vessels entered with Cargoes,.

Do.

do. in Ballast,

2,564 9

3,246,223

8,846

119,892 247

Total,..

2,573

3,255,069

120,139

British Vessels cleared with Cargoes,

2,379

3,025,111

114,556

Do.

do. in Ballast,

169

194,163

5,390

Total,..

2,548

3,219,274

119,946

Total of all British Vessels entered and cleared,

5,121

6,474,343

240,085

Foreign Vessels entered with Cargoes,

15,186

2,425,202

240,986

Do.

do. in Ballast,...

10,020

720,139

119,726

Total,.......

25,206

3,145,341

360,712

Foreign Vessels cleared with Cargoes,

17,780

2,561,037

277,026

Do.

do. in Ballast,...

7,041

529,663

79,661

Total,.......

24,821

3,090,700

356,690

Total of all Foreign Vessels entered and cleared,...........

50,027

6,236,041

717,402

Total of all Vessels entered with Cargoes,

17,750

5,671,425

360,878

Do.

do.

in Ballast,

10,029

728,985

119,973

Total of all Vessels entered..................

27,779

-6,400,410

480,851

Total of all Vessels cleared with Cargoes,

20,159

5,586,148

391,582

Do.

do. in Ballast,

-7,210

723,826

85,054

Total of all Vessels cleared,

27,369

6,309,974

476,636

Total of all Vessels entered and cleared with Cargoes,

37,909

11,257,573

752,460

Do.

do.

do. in Ballast,.

17,239

1,452,811

205,027

Total of all Vessels engaged in Foreign Trade only, entered and cleared,

55,148

12,710,384

957,487

LOCAL TRADE.

Total of all Vessels entered,

Do.

4,324

136,016

14,885

cleared

4,495

149,996

46,347

Total of all Vessels engaged in Local Trade only, entered and cleared.

8,819

286,012

91,232

Total of all Vessels engaged in Foreign Trade only, entered and cleared,

Do.

do. in Local Trade only,

55,148

do.

Grand Total of all Vessels entered and cleared,

8,819

63,967

12,710,384 286,012

957,487

91,232

12,996,396

1,048,719

SUMMARY OF ALL CHINESE PASSENGERS.

NAMES OF PLACES.

From Ports other than in China or Japan,

Do.

in China and Japan,

Do.

in Macao,

Do.

in Villages of the Colony,

98,800

656,456

68,069

6,628

Total Arrivals,.....

829,953

Left for Ports other than in China or Japan,

96,195

Do.

in China and Japan,

656,391

Do.

in Macao,

57,020

Do.

in Villages of the Colony,

6,308

Total Departures,.....

$15,914

Excess of Arrivals over Departures,.

14,039

Grand Total of Arrivals and Departures,

1,645,867

224

XVI-RETURN of VESSELS REGISTERED at the Port of Hongkong, during the Year 1888.

Name of Vessel.

Official Number.

Regis- tered Tonnage.

Horse Power.

Rig:

Built of

Where built and when.

Remarks, &c.

Kitty,

85,926

802.90

Seagull, str.,

63,876

17.37 25

Adelaide, str.,..... 88,845

74.58 25

Barque Iron

Schooner

Schooner

Amsterdam, 1856.

Iron Rutherglen, Scotland, 1872. Foreign name Seagull.

Wood Hongkong, 1888.

Since transferred to Port

Darwin.

Normanhurst, str.,. 88,845

55.93 24

None

Wood Hongkong, 1888.

Hailoong, str.,...... 88,847

783.20 180

Schooner

Steel Leith, 1888.

Tarapaca,.....

45,387

494.84

General Grant, str. 88,848

Fook Ching, str.,.. 88,849

Barque

None

Schooner

Fame, str.,

30.60 10

76.69 24

19,498 140.49 74 None

Iron South Shields, 1857.

XVII.—RETURN of REGISTRIES of VESSELS cancelled at the Port of Hongkong, during the Year 1888.

Wood Liverpool, 1862.

Wood Whampoa, China, 1885.

Wood Hongkong, 1888.

Since cancelled by request

of the Owner.

Name of Vessel.

Official

Number.

Registered Tonnage.

Date of

Registry.

Horse Power.

Rig.

Built

of

Where built and when.

Reason of Cancellation.

Dicky, str.,

Dafila, str.,

Adelaide, str.,...

Fame, str.,

Chateaubriand,... 73,445

Ingeborg, str.,... 73,455

Chandernagor,... 73,459

88,841

68,501

88,845

19,498

General Grant, 88,848

117.08 1880 100 Sloop Iron South Shields, 1857.

408.67 1881

Barq. Wood St. Mals, 1868.

436.65 1883 80 Schr. Wood Gateborg, 1873.

687.18 1883

Barq. Wood Honfleur, France, 1865.

143.72 1886 30 Schr. Iron Kiel, 1883.

535.68 1887 99 Schr. Iron

74.58 1888 25 Schr. Wood

30.60 1888

10 None. Wood

Registered anew at this Port in conse- quence of alteration in Tonnage, &c.

Transferred to Shanghai.

Sold to Foreigners at Kobe, Japan.

Abandoned at sea.

Transferred to Sydney, N.S.W.

Sunderland, Durham, 1873. Sold to Foreigners.

str.,

Transferred to Port Darwin, N.S.W.

Registry cancelled by re-

quest of the Owner.

XVIII. AMOUNT of FEES received under the Merchant Shipping Act, 1855, and Section III. of Ordinance No. 8 of 1879 in the Harbour Department, during the Year 1888.

Hongkong, 1888.

Whampoa, China, 1885.

Matter or Duty in respect of which Fee taken.

Number.

Fee.

Amount.

Remarks, &c.

$

$

Certifying Desertion,

Copy from Registry Book,

Declaration of Ownership,

Endorsement of change of Master,

Endorsement of change of Ownership,

76

Ι

76

1

5

5

15

2

30

41

1

41

4

2

Endorsement of change in Tonnage,

1

2

2.

Granting Certificate of Imperial Registry,

9

15

135

Inspection of Registry,

10

5

1

5

Recording Mortgage of Ship,...................

2

10

Recording Discharge of Mortgage,

N

10

10

Recording Sale of Ship, .

со

8

10

5

40

Total,......

362

|

:

XIX. RETURN of CHINESE PASSENGER SHIPS cleared by the Emigration Officer, Hongkong, during the Year ending the 31st day of December, 1888.

225

No.

DATE CLEARED.

SHIP'S NAME.

TONS.

NATION-

ALITY

ADULTS.

CHILDREN.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHITHER BOUND.

TOTAL.

OF SHIP.

M.

F.

M.

F.

1 January 3 Mirzapore, str....

2

"

3 Arratoon Apear, str.

2,189 British 1,392

"

R. Harvey A. B. Mactavish

Straits Settlements

218

:

414

27

Port Darwin

179

ླབ་

59

11

3-

218

491

Thursday Island

1

32

3 Whampoa, str.

1,109

G. Fawcett

Cooktown

10

212

Townsville

1

Sydney

16

Straits Settlements

265

Port Darwin

115

4

5 Tartar, str.

1,604

D. S. Bailey

477

Sydney

54

Melbourne

J]

G

92

6

Cyclops, str.

1,403 !

H. Nish

Straits Settlements

140

140

7

""

Chi Yuen, str.

1,211

Chinese

C. R. Null

599

38

11

653

>"

10

Belgic, str.

2,695 British

W. H. Walker

San Francisco

269

4

9

282

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

>>

10

Geelong, str.

1,139

J. Thom

Straits Settlements

489

24

514

""

""

12 Tai Sang, str.

1,505

J

>

16

Glenorchy, str...

1,822

""

17

33

Bisagno, str..

18

25

Zambesi, str.

19

Deuteros, str.

1,499 Italian 1,565 British 1,198 German

T. L. Davies

F. Gedye

A. Tognasso E. Crew

540

88 31

15

674

145

:

:

145

""

169

35

209

""

405

27

441

L. Iwersen

383

397

39

Port Darwin

136

>"

20 Tsinan, str.

1,400 British

W. N. Allison

Sydney

83

273

Melbourne

50

Port Darwin

31

Cooktown

20

21 February 1

22

23

""

15

20 Tannadice, str. .....

1,408

16

20 | Glencoe, str......

""

17

21

City of Peking, str..

18

30 Telamon, str.

19

""

30

Patna, str.

12

31

Peshawur, str.

San Pablo, str.

>>

1

Kashgar, str.

1

Kutsang, str.

24

2"

Guthrie, str..

1,493

1,901

3,129 American 1,554 British 1,149 2,130

""

3,060 American 1,515 British

H. Craig

W. J. Geake H. C. Dearborn M. H. F. Jackson A. Sanders

Townsville

63

Brisbane

Sydney

24

Straits Settlements

354

San Francisco

200

22

384

205

Straits Settlements

155

155

566

31

607

"2

W. A. Wheler

211

211

""

E. C. Reed

San Francisco.

131

C. Gadd

Straits Settlements

532

7

:::

::

135

547

1,495

W. H. Jackson

386

59

10

31

458

25

Port Darwin

43

Cooktown

Townsville

80

N. Shannon

Rockhampton Brisbane Sydney

26

Melbourne

3

31

** * *2378* * *88 89

25

26

27

* A

6 Wyvern, str..

7 Stura, str.

7 Changsha, str.

""

10 Amphitrite, str.

29

30

10 Chi Yuen, str.

16 Arratoon Apear, str.

1,108 1,416 Italian

1,463 British

2,486 Austrian 1,211 Chinese 1,392 British

J. Brotherton

L. Lemesich C. R. Null J. G. Olifeut

Bangkok

80

80

:

G. B. De Marchi

Straits Settlements

160

170

Port Darwin

69

J. E. Williams

Sydney

76

162

Melbourne

15

Straits Settlements

39

10

401

42

22 Palinurus, str.

22 Oceanic, str

33

23 Celebes, str.

""

27 Moyune, str................

35

21

28 Wing Sang, str.

1,536 2,440 1,423 Dutch 1,714 British

1,517

T. S. Jackson

153

153

">

"

J. Metcalfe

San Francisco

57

J. C. Joon

Straits Settlements

125

00

137

J. S. Hogg

Sydney

72

1

8998502

55

40

42

57

76

Melbourne

3

:

d'A. de Ste. Croix Straits Settlements

455

10

29

36

29 | Bormida, str.

37

""

29 Bengal, str.

38

29.

29 Chingtu, str.

1,499 Italian 2,524 British 1,459

G. B. Daquino

330

16

၁၀

468

354

""

W. B. Andrews

120

120

""

39 March

40

22

3 City of Rio de Janeiro, str. 7 China, str.

2,275 American · 1,093 German

W. B. Seabury P. Haye

J. D. C. Arthur

Sydney Melbourne

San Francisco

20

35

15

214

217

Straits Settlements

651

651

607

"

Thursday Island

Cooktown

41

22

8 Tai Yuan, str.

1,459 British

A. Vardin

Townsville

665

Brisbane

Sydney

Melbourne

*** *** * 9858318 3

42

"

10 | Haiphong, str.

1,122

""

43

""

13 | Geelong, str.

1,139

H. C. A. Harris J. Thom

Straits Settlements

655

8

666

590

604

22

44

A

""

14 Gaelic, str.

2,691

W. G. Pearne

"3

45

46

14 | Titania, str.

14 Huntingdon, str..

2,011 Austrian

M. Garofolich

Honolulu San Francisco Straits Settlements

466

10

1,146

650

3

557 42

10

613

1,403 British

J. Brunstrom

605

23

643

47

ގ

14 Clyde, str..

2,236

E. M. Edmond

220

:

220

""

48

15 Parthia, str.

2,035

F. H. Wallace

Vancouver, B.C.

50

United States

166

49

""

16 Glenroy, str.

50

""

16 Pemptos, str.

"

17 Khiva, str.

52

""

19

Bisagno, str.

22

21 Tai Sang, str.

54

""

24 City of New York, str.

55

24 Devonhurst, str.

56

26 Catterthun, str.

1,411

1,541 | German 1,419 British 1,499 Italian 1,595 British

1,964 American 1,164 Dutch 1,406 British

R. Webster N. Johannsen E. Crew

Straits Settlements

345

1

492

11

23

515

20

13201

220

348

510

542

"2

A. Tognasso W. H. Jackson

684

696

17

706

16

808

22

R. R. Searle P. Houthoff

San Francisco

337

341

Straits Settlements

542

543

J. W. B. Darke

Sydney

46

62

Melbourne

16

Carried forward,........... 93,246

Carried forward,.

18,429

683

214

89 19,415

226

1

RETURN of CHINESE PASSENGER SHIPS cleared by the Emigration Officer, Hongkong,-( Continued).

No.

DATE CLEARED.

SHIP'S NAME.

TONS.

NATION-

ALITY OF SHIP.

ADULTS. CHILDREN.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHITHER FOUND.

TOTAL.

M.

F.

M.

F.

Brought forward,..........

93,246

Brought forward, |18,429|

683 214

89 19,415

Melbourne

64

3

Tasmania

New Zealand

105

57

March 26 Afghan, str....

1,439 British

G. Roy

Sydney

88

267

Brisbane

3

Townsville

1

Cooktown

*3 = ***:?88%

58

59

60

61 April

"""1

28 Ganges, str.

2,149

E. Stewart

Straits Settlements

214

>

214

31 Japan, str.

1,865

T. S. Gardner

"

828

31 Carisbrooke, str.

.973

R. Cass

29

678

3

Belgic, str.

2,695

W. H. Walker

San Francisco

6131

"

62

5 Kashgar, str.

63

64

65

66

67

5 Wyvern, str.

1,515 1,108

C. Gadd

Straits Settlements

874

,,

J. Brotherton

""

763

""

"7

7

Stura, str..

Celebes, str.

1,416 Italian 1,423 Dutch

L. Caboara

""

707

J. C. Joon

و,

672

259 23

:

22

27

12

10

29

Sydney

51

""

7

Tsinan, str.

1,460 British

W. N. Allison

Melbourne

72

724010 00 0 2 4

861

721

619

919

768

749

703

"

68

AA

10 Deccan, str.

2,022

""

10 Duburg, str.

921 | German

P. W. Case C. F. Bertelsen

Straits Settlements

199

357

""

11

129

199

374

Singapore

444

Townsville

69

Rockhampton

69

10 Menmuir, str.

1,247 British

P. Helms

Brisbane Sydney

499

27

$

Melbourne

15

71

REAR 2 22 2

70

11 Poseidon, str.

2,510 Austrian

S. Mersa

Straits Settlements

560

86

""

1

Glenfalloch, str.

1,419 British

R. Cormack

"

690

21

72

27

13

Wing Sang, str..

1,517

d'A. de Ste. Croix

""

600

57

20

022

661

734

684

73

14

29

Surat, str.................

1,676

J. L. Parfitt

=1

165

"

165

74

""

14

Dafila, str.

536

J. C. Nielsen

389

"3

389

Vancouver, B.C.

110

75

14 Abyssinia, str.

2,346

G. A. Lee

United States

112

وو

San Francisco

357

::

582

76

18 Arratoon Apcar, str.

77

""

19 Thibet, str.

1,392 1,671

""

J. G. Olifent G. W. Atkinson

Straits Settlements

752

25

486

24

78

20. City of Peking, str.

3,129 American

H. C. Dearborn

Honolulu

243

San Francisco

741

1831

1261

**

787

521

999

Cooktown

9

Townsville

9

Brisbane

79

""

21 Guthrie, str..

1,493 British

N. Shannon

Sydney

37

160

Melbourne

100

Adelaide

1

100

≈≈❀❀❀❀❀ ❀ ❀*35* * **85683

24

Venetia, str..

""

""

25 Pemptos, str.

"

27 Bormida, str.

"?

May

19

86

1,608

F. Cole

Straits Settlements

160

وو

160

2 Changsha, str.

28 Tanjore. str..

Benlawers, str.

2 Duburg, str..

2 | City of Peking, str.

1,541 German

1,499 Italian

1,403 British 1,513

""

921 Gerinan 1,966 American

1,463 British

A. Webster

J. T. Smith

N. Johannsen

804

>>

804

G. B. Daquino

598

87

29

7

10

702

F. Speck

477

19

"J

10

7

513

912

19

912

C. F. Bertelsen

566

""

566

San Francisco

7001

700

J. E. Williams

Sydney

15

Melbourne

124

141

2

وو

3 Tai Sang, str.

1,505

>>

""

4 Lombardy, sir..

1,571

W. H. Jackson C. F. Preston

Straits Settlements

693

107

762

""

"2

19

90

22

5 Teheran, str.............

1,670

19

F. H. Seymour

167

"

7 Propontis, str.

1,387

>>

G. Heasley

716

"

22

92

8 Devonhurst, str.

1,164 Dutch

P. Houthoff

543

37

15

57

62 25

14

17

831

13

795

:

167

51

747

566

Vancouver, B.C.

69

93

94

""

9 Zambesi, str.

1,565 British

J. R. Tiddy

San Francisco

422

576

United States

85

"

9 Falkenburg, str.

988 German

W. Dreyer

Straits Settlements

553

11

568

95

""

9 Deuteros, str.

96

9 Wyvern, str..

97

98

99

12

Khiva. str.

10 Oceanic, str..

10 Berenice, str.

1,198 1,108 British 2,440

1,707 Austrian 1,419 British

J. Metcalfe E. Perini E. Crew

L. Iwersen

542

"

18

564

J. Brotherton

Bangkok

85

85

San Francisco

1,061

1,061

Straits Settlements

449

113

13

727

22

22

12

Benlarig, str.

1,482

J. J. Freeman

557

"

""

16

+00 30

17

592

760

578

Vancouver, B.C.

68

101

15 Batavia, str...

1,662

W. H. Watton

"J

"J

102

""

15

Japan, str.

1,865

T. S. Gardner

San Francisco United States Straits Settlements

519

663

76

621

77

14

12

724

"2

103

16

""

Dafila, str.

536

J. C. Nielsen

3501

""

""

350

:

104

"

18

Menelaus, str.

105

19

18

Ancona, str.

106

"J

19

City of Rio de Janeiro, str.

1,300 1,888, 2,275 American

R. Nelson

693

""

""

22

6

722

W. J. Webber

179

179

**

W. B. Seabury

San Francisco

773

::

773

107

21

22 Bisagno, str.

1,499 Italian

A. Tognasso

Straits Settlements

662

52

108

"

26 Deccan, str.

2,022 British

P. W. Case

627

23

""

601

00 m

8

13

735

6

704

109

30 Gaelic, str.

110

"

30 Wing Sang, str.

2,691 1,517

W. G. Pearne

"

San Francisco d'A. de Ste. Croix] Straits Settlements

1,174

1,174

"

627 115 512

18

18

778

111

2

31 | Protos, str.

1,150 | German

C. Sorensen

:

7 Mauritius

582

65

5

112 June

1 Port Adelaide, str.

Vancouver, B.C.

85

1,783 British

F. West

San Francisco

613

528

113

6 Decima, str.

"

114

6

Benalder, str.

115

7 Deuteros, str.

52

116

"J

7 Celebes, str.

117

"

8 Wyvern, str.

118

""

9 Thibet, str.

119

"

9 City of New York, str.

Carried forward,.

· 965 | German 1,331 British 1,198 German 1,423 Dutch 1,108 British 1:671 1,964 American

97

P. Oestmann

Bangkok

72

73

R. W. Thomson L. Iwersen J. C. Joon J. Brotherton G. W. Atkinson T. P. Deering

Straits Settlements

782

441

::

782

;

441

637

52

6

555

13

211

""

30

027

118

703

581

249

192,134

San Francisco

Carried forward,...

697

:

697

2

53,322 1,916

533 259 56,030

1.

RETURN of CHINESE PASSENGER SHIPS cleared by the Emigration Officer, Hongkong,-(Continued).

CHILDREN.

227

No.

DATE CLEARED.

SHIP'S NAME.

Toxs.

NATION

ALITY OF SHIP.

ADULTS.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHITHER BOUND.

TOTAL.

M.

F. M. F.

Brought forward,..............| 192,134

120 June

12

Parthia, str.

2,035 British

F. Wallace

Brought forward, 53,322 1,916) 533 259 Vancouver, B.C. San Francisco

56,030

116

509

393

121

>>

12

Melpomene, str.

122

""

16

Nestor, str.

1,943 Austrian 1,269 British

A. Malusa

Straits Settlements

398 293

20

48

759

123

16

Venetia, str....

1,608

J. S. Thompson F. Cole

352

47

6

413

553

68

30

11

642

2.7

124

""

19 Falkenburg, str.

988

German

W. Dreyer

>>

71

405

10

3

419

125

20

Tai Sang, str.

1,505 British

W. H. Jackson

433

65

7

11

516

126

21

Belgic, str.

"

2,695

W. H. Walker

San Francisco

1,161

1,169

多多

127

23 Teheran, str.

1,670

C. Sams

Straits Settlements

165

"J

128

9

25 Aberdeen, str.

2,371

""

C. Taylor

Vancouver, B.C.

107

San Francisco

425

:::

165

532

129

28 Glenorchy, str..

1,822

>"

F. Gedye

Straits Settlements

243

248

130

28 Titan, str....

1.554

R. J. Brown

123

41

3

171

27

29

131

""

30

Japan. str.

1,865

21

132

30

Bormida, str.

1,499 Italian

133 July

3

City of Peking, str..

134

4

Kashgar, str.

3,129 American 1,555 British

T. S. Gardner

E. De Negri

659

72

12

13

756

515

37

5

562

H. C. Dearborn C. Gadd

San Francisco

943

949

Straits Settlements

771

49

834

135

39

4 Agamemnon str.

1,523

J. Wilding

440

24

468

""

136

7 Palinurus, str.

1,536

T. S. Jackson

153

J

""

:

153

137

7 Lombardy, str.

1,571

C. F. Preston

471

25

15

138

11

Arabic, str.

2,788

W. M. Smith

San Francisco

587

18

SA

504

609

22

139

""

11

Abyssinia, str.

2,346

G. A. Lee

Vancouver, B.C.

111

614

"

San Francisco

503

140

22

14

Wyvern, str..

1,108

J. Brotherton

Bangkok

41

41

141

14

"9

Wing Sang, str.

1,517

d'A. de Ste. Croix

Straits Settlements

648

82

15

J

142

143

144

17

Khiva, str.

1,419

E. Crew

856

40

"

">

19

19

Bisagno, str.

1,499 Italian

A. Tognasso

375

42

"}

19

""

City of Sydney, str.

145

21

Deccan, str.

1,966 American 2,022 British

D. E. Friele

San Francisco

309

P. W. Case

Straits Settlements

281

22

101833

764

914

7

00

432

:

316

308

27

146

22

26

Albany, str.

1,489

E. Porter

Vancouver, B C. San Francisco

8

592

584

147

28

Oceanic, str.

2,440

J. Metcalfe

1,040

14

3

1,061

32

148

31

Thibet, str.

1,671

G. W. Atkinson

Straits Settlements

203

34

243

149 August 3

Tai Sang, str.

1,505

W. H Jackson

5821

146

758

""

"

150

4

Diomed, str..

22

151

7

Venetia, str.

""

1,470 1,6018

"

W. B. Bigley

274

401

322

""

F. Cole

528

41

578

"

""

152

17

8

City of Rio de Janeiro, str.

2,275 American

W. Ward

San Francisco

614

620

153

""

8

Celebes, str.

1,423 Dutch

J. C. Joon

Straits Settlements

190

27

228

154

""

11

Stura, str.

155

"J

13

Sarpedon, str.

1,416 | Italian 1,592 British

L. Caboara

262

42

315

""

156

18 Gaelic, str.

157

""

18 Batavia, str.....

2,691

1,662

H. Chrimes W. G. Pearne

103

:

103

39

San Francisco

680

10

696

"g

W. H. Wation

Vancouver, B.C.

60

450

San Francisco

390

158

18

""

Telemachus, str.

1,421

H. Jones

Straits Settlements

142

142

159

18

"1

Maria Teresa, sir.

2,011 Austrian

G. Constanzo

457

94

14

160

22

Glaucus, str..

161

25 Stentor, str.

162

"

25 Dafila, str.

163

""

28

Lombardy, str.

164

28

Japan, str.

1,382 British 1,307 536 1,571 1,865

W. T. Hannah

£3

-12

**

574

98

""

""

S. Milligan

130

130

""

2

وو

165

29

City of New York, str.

27

1,964 American

J. C. Nielsen

C. F. Preston

T. S. Gardner

R. R. Searle

138

143

""

196

29

242

"J

227

71

16

318

"

Honolulu

368

509

San Francisco

127

166

29

Duke of Westminster, str.

""

2,427 British

W. Reynolds

Vancouver, B.C.

42

250

San Francisco

208

167

168

169 Sept.

"

64

30

Wing Sang, str.

25

31 Bormida, str.

170

22

171

"

172

""

8 Belgic, str.

173

8 Parthia, str.

""

174

8 Deccan, str.

175

11 Poseidon, str.

176

""

177

178

179

""

1 Kashgar, str.

5 Arratoon Apcar, str.

7 Devonhurst, str.

14 Benalder, str.

15 Teheran, str...

18 City of Peking, str..

18 Tai Sang, str.

1,517

1,499 Italian 1,555 British 1,392 1,164 Dutch 2,695 British 2,035/

2,022

22

2,510 | Austrian 1,331 British 1,670

""

3,129 American

F. Speck J. G. Olifent P. Houthoff W. H. Walker

F. H. Wallace

P. W. Case S. Mersa

d'A. de Ste. Croix] Straits Settlements

318

85

10

16

429

E. De Negri

144

173

55

150

164

"

362

414

""

"

336

390

San Francisco

172

175

Vancouver, B.C.

25

141

San Francisco Straits Settlements

114

185

349

===3

197

69

14

439

"J

R. W. Thomson C. Sams

240

240

""

292

42

10

349

32

1,505 British

W. B. Seabury W. H. Jackson

San Francisco

113

1

117

Straits Settlements

465

13

556

180

5

22 | Bisagno, str.

1,499 Italian

181

""

27 | Arabic, str.

2,788 British

182 Oct.

1 Thibet, str.

183

29

3 Menelaus, str.

184

37

5 Japan, str.

1,671 1,300 1.865

دو

A. Tognasso

W. M. Smith

G. W. Atkinson R. Nelson

314

34

359

Honolulu

176

354

San Francisco

160

2

:

Straits Settlements

297

41:

10

356

223

14

237

22

185

""

6

City of Sydney, str.

1,966

American

186

21

6 Abyssinia, str.

2,346 | British

G. B. Pallett D. E. Friele

G. A. Lee

263

43

318

San Francisco

25

25

Vancouver, B.C.

651

C6

San Francisco

}

187

6 Tetartos, str.

188

29

6 Venetia, str..

189

190

191

>>

15 Stura, str.

11 Glenogle, str.

11 Amphitrite, str.

1,578 German 1,608 British 2,000

2,486 Austrian 1.416 Italian

J. Petersen F. Cole W. E. Duke L. Lemesich

Straits Settlements

410

4433

93

11

3

107

292

11

::

307

"

379

65

14

462

""

L. Caboara

131

14

149

72

192

39

16 Wing Sang, str.

1,517 British

'A. de Ste. Croix}

403

50

13

478

"

193

""

17 Oceanic, str....

2,440

J. Metcalfe

San Francisco

46

47

29

194

19 Lombardy, str..

1,571

C. F. Preston

Straits Settlements

159

21

185

195 196

23 | Arritoon Apcar, str.

1,392

"

31

24 Hydaspes, str.

1,899

J. G. Olifent W. E. Thomson

534 94

12

654

22

120

120

>

197

""

25 Nestor, str.

1,269

198

""

25 Albany, str.

1,489

199

""

26 | Deuteros, str.

1,198 German

J. S. Thomson E. Porter L. Iwersen

126

126

לי

Vancouver, B.C. Straits Settlements

28

28

276

35

315

Carried forward,.......

333,985

Carried forward,..

|81,281 4,302) 828 678 87,089

228

RETURN of CHINESE PASSENGER SHIPS cleared by the Emigration Officer, Hongkong,—( Continued).

NATION-

ADULTS.

CHILDREN.

No.

DATE CLEARED.

SHIP'S NAME.

TONS.

ALITY

OF SHIP.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHITHER BOUND.

TOTAL.

M.

F. M. ·F.

Brought forward,

333,985

200 Oct.

31

Nerbudda, str.

1,948 British

T. E. Gillett

| Brought forward, .[81,281| 4,302|

Straits Settlements 370

828 678

87,089

12

6

3

391

201 Nov. 3

Deccan, str.

2,022

P. W. Case

333

50

389

"",

202

6

Tai Sang, str.

1,505

W. H. Jackson

550

86

21

667

203 204

""

7

Surat, str.

1,676

M. de Horne

72

"}

""

7

Gaelic, str.

2,691

W. G. Pearne

San Francisco

25

::

72

25

205

8

Bormida, str.

1,499 Italian

E. De Negri

Straits Settlements

127

22

155

231

16

206

9

Decima, str.

39

207

10

""

Elektra, str.

208

14

Palamed, str.

209

16 Devonhurst, str.

965 German

2,695 Austrian 1,536 British 1,164 Dutch

F. W. F. Breitung

403

Mauritius

150

P. Mersa

Straits Settlements

213 105

18

345

210

"

17 Cyclops, str..............................

1,403 British

C. Jackson

P. Houthoff H. Nish

223

3

3

230

373

24

3

405

86

86

35

211

21

Ravenna, str.

2,045

A. B. Daniell

106

106

212

21

Japan, str.

1,865

G. B. Pallett

340

101

13

""

213

"

22

Kashgar, str.

1,555

""

J. Jephson

237

31

*8

13

467

8 10

286

21

214

27

Laertes, str.

1,391

R. F. Scale

82

91

"

""

215

"

28

Belgic, str.

2,695

W. H. Walker

San Francisco

36

1

41

216

28

Bisagno, str...

1,499 Italian

A. Toquasso

Straits Settlements

432

217

"2

28

Wing Sang, str.

1,517 British

218 Dec.

5

Thames, str.

2,137

d'A. de Ste. Croix W. A. Seaton

191

ཆབུ

67

6

44

7

==

10

515

253

21

170

170

219

"

5

Orestes, str.

1,323

220

221

222

223

224

225

"

8

City of Peking, str..

3,129 American

8

"

Arratoon Apcar,

str.

1,392 British

"

11

Berenice, str.

13

Deuteros, str.

1,707 Austrian 1,198 German

J. Hutchinson W. B. Seabury J. G. Olifent F. Egger

165

13

3

182

San Francisco

20

:

1

23

Straits Settlements

459

(15

370

48

L. Iwersen

393

12

882

14

546

427

410

""

>

"2

19

Clyde, str...

2,236 British

W. D. Mudie

115

115

""

""

19

Tai Sang, str..

1,505

W. H. Jackson

652

112

12

797

""

17

226

"

21

Camorta, str.

1,855

A. Fyfe

259

270

""

""

227

22

Anchises, str.

1,304

""

W. P. Lapage

200

10

213

""

228

29

Stura, str........

1,416 Italian

L. Caboara

564

81

13

661

*

229

29 Glenartney, str.

1,400 British

W. Murray

229|

15

253

39

230

"

31 Nerbudda, str.

1,948

'T. E. Gillett

12

:

112

25

TOTAL TONS,

387,106

TOTAL PASSENGERS,

|89,166 5,239 944 846

96,195

SUMMARY.

To Adelaide, South Australia,

""

Bangkok, Siam,..

""

Brisbane, Queensland,

Cooktown,

Do.,

Honolulu, Sandwich Island,

:

29

Mauritius,

Melbourne,.

New Zealand,.

Port Darwin, South Australia,

Rockhampton, Queensland,.

San Francisco, U.S.A.,...

Straits Settlements,

""

""

Sydney,

""

Tasmania,

""

Thursday Island, Queensland,

""

Townsville, Queensland,.

.....

- 1

278

24

25

:

:

279

25

25

1,253

31

14

14

1,312

215

5

1

222

524

171

541

105

:

105

573

Co

581

7

7

18,119

95

47

14

18,275

65,976 5,109

842

817

72,744

659

663

2

2

19

19

439

442

944

949

r

TOTAL PASSENGERS,

|89,166 5,239||

944

846 96,195

United States of America, viâ Vancouver, British Columbia,

Vancouver, British Columbia,.....

XX-RETURN of VESSELS bringing CHINESE PASSENGERS to the Port of Victoria, Hongkong, from Places out of the Chinese Empire, during the Year ending the 31st day of December, 1888.

229

No.

DATE ARRIVED.

SHIP'S NAME.

TONS.

NATION- ALITY OF SHIP.

ADULTS.

CHILDREN.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHERE FROM.

TOTAL.

M.

F. M.

F

1 January 3 Neckar, str......

2

*

3 Hector, str.

3

3 Duburg, str.

1,870 German 1,590 British

921 German

Supmer Batt

Straits Settlements

232

232

207

220

"

Bertelsen

50

50

3 | Phra Chula Chom Klao, 8.

1,011 | British

Benson

Bangkok

83

83

Port Darwin

Thursday Island

Cooktown

9

3 Tsinan, str.

1,460

Allison

Townsville

12

128

Brisbane

Sydney

35

Melbourne

37

10

6789O

3 Abyssinia, str..

2.346

Lee

Vancouver, B.C.

120

4

123

3

130

5 Mogul, str.

1,827

Hudson

Straits Settlements

77

80

5 Bellona, str...

1,722 German

Haesloop

166

166

>>

6 Glencoe, str.

1,901 | British

Geake

200

10

6

216

"

7 Zambesi, str.

1,565

Crew

103

109

وو

*

11

7 Glenavon, str..

1,936

Jacobs

74

74

12

7 Mongkut, str.

859

Anderson

12

Bangkok

95

1

1

99

13

9 Agamemnon, str.

1,523

14

9 Camelot, str.

1,049

15

15

16

17

31

10

Tai Sang, str.

1,505

Wilding Daily Davies

Straits Settlements

120

120

150

150

312

10

10

3

325

"

"

10

City of Peking, str.

3,129 American

Dearborn

San Francisco

603

603

11

Phía Chom Klao, str:

1,012 British

Fowler

Bangkok

52

شدم

55

18

21

227832

19

20

"

11 Ballaarat, str.

11 Cheang Hock Kian, str.

11 Bisagno, str.

**

1,499 Italian

2,679

??

955

Ashdown

Straits Settlements

92

92

Blumenberg

215

215

19

Toquasso

63

63

+9

13 Titan, str.....

1,564 British

Brown

332

335

25

""

14 Carmarthenshire, str..

1,776

Dwyer

150

160

>

14 Pakshan, str..

835

Young

Bangkok

35

36

"

24

.""

16 | Amigo, str.

771 German

Hundervolt

Straits Settlements

296

300

Cooktown

Townsville

25

19

17 Tannadice, str.

1,408 British

Craig

Greymouth

53

Sydney

35

Melbourne

2

30

31

*NARCH

26

19 | Bellerophon, str..

1,396

27

,,

19 Glencarn, str.

1,409

28

22

19 Kong Beng, str.

862

29

>>

20 San Pablo, str.

3,059 American

Guthrie Brass Phillips Reed

Straits Settlements

480

10

386

8

77

:

>>

Bangkok

109

San Francisco

560

30

"

21

Daphne, str.

1,395 German

Voss

Straits Settlements

315

22

25

19

Palamed, str.

1,536 British

Jackson

433

9

11

32

33

34

""

25

Kashgar, str.

1,515

"

26

">

Patna, str.

1,149

Gadd Sanders

130

*!

496

15

A

::

""

""

26

Bengal, str.

2,532

Andrews

1131

,,

""

:

3

500

400

115

593

322

442

133

3

516

113

Port Darwin

19

Thursday Island

3

Cooktown

35

"

26 Changsha, str.

1,463

Williams

Townsville

16

139

Brisbane

18

Sydney

50

Melbourne

25

36

37

26 Cassandra, str.

28 Orestes, str...

1,097 German 1,323 British

Behrens

Straits Settlements

154

158

Hutchinson

171

173

*5

38

28 Braunschweig, str.

2,150 German

Bodecker

271

271

12

39

30 Falkenburg, str.

988

Dreyer

215

230

40

":

30 Benalder, str.

1,331 British

Thomson

255

265

41

30 Wing Sang, str.

1.517

Ste. Croix

425

10

12

447

!!

42

>

30 | Phra Chula Chom Klao, S.

1,012

Benson

Bangkok

110

6

120

43

30 City of Sydney, str.

1,966 American

Friele

San Francisco

3891

32

426

Port Darwin

24

Cooktown

16

44

31 Guthrie, str.

1,194 British

Shaunon

Townsville

اة

104

Rockhampton

16

Sydney

43

45

31 Stura, str.

46 Feb.

1 Moyune, str.

1,416 Italian 1,714 British

47

1 Chi Yuen. str..

1,211

De Marchi Hogg Null

Straits Settlements

300

225

431

48

"

፡፡

>>

4 Glenroy, str.

1,411

Webster

192

221000

Cooktown

10

Townsville

49

33

+ Airlie, str.

1,492

Ellis

302

227

436

200

40

22

Sydney Melbourne

Port Darwin Townsville

50

6 Chingtu, str.

1,459

Arthur

Brisbane

1

63

Sydney

19

Melbourne

24

51

61

*************

"

6 Taichiow, str.

$62

52

>>

6 Ajax, str.

1,525

وو

Newton Riley

Bangkok

61

61

Straits Settlements

300

53

6 Batavia, str.

1,661

Watton

Vancouver, B.C.

145

54

8 Afghan, str..

1,439

Roy

Straits Settlements

272

10 50 CO

4

313

149

284

55

10 Cardiganshire, str......

1,623

Clarke

79

79

"

56

"

10 Arratoon Apcar, str.

1,392

Olifent

425

10

11

5

451

57

11 Oceanic, str.

2,440

39

58

"

11 Glenfruin, str.............

1,936

Metcalfe Norman

San Francisco

226

237

Straits Settlements

126

130

J:

59

"

15 Lombardy, str.

1,571

60

16 Cheang Hock Kian, str..........

955

""

20 Diomed, str.

1.471

Preston Webb Bigley

31

31

189

220

62

""

20 Glaucus, str.

1.382

Hannah

63

"

22 Tai Sang, str.

1,505

Wood

125 170

2210

191

3

226

126

187

Carried forward........

96,372

Carried forward.....

12,875

262

116

41

13,294

230

RETURN of VESSELS bringing CHINESE PASSENGERS to the Port of Victoria, Hongkong,—( Continued).

No.

DATE ARRIVED.

SHIP'S NAME.

TONS.

NATION- ALITY OF SHIP.

ADULTS. CHILDREN.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHERE FROM.

TOTAL.

M.

F M. F

2882

65

64 Feb. 23

66

67

"J

Brought forward..... Ganges, str.

96,372

24 Sarpedon, str.

25 Claymore, str..

2.149 British 1,592 1,658

Stewart Chrimes

Brought forward....... 12,875 Straits Settlements

262 116

41

130

...

13,291 130

1.

60

"

>>

60

Craig

92

2

94

25 Sachsen, str.

2,874 German

Jaeger

167

167

Port Darwin

10

1

Cooktown

15

68

"}

25 Tai Yuan, str.

1,459 British

Dodd

Sydney Melbourne

48

84

7

Adelaide

...

69

27

City of Rio de Janeiro, str.

2,275 American

70

March 2

Gaelic, str.

2,691 British

71

""

3

Fidelio, str.

852 German

Seabury Pearne Brock

San Francisco

143

2

...

146

153 3

156

,,

Straits Settlements

371

1

373

72

19

3

Pathan, str.

1,762 | British

73

37

3 Parthia, str..

2,035

Roinley Arnold

120

5

3

2

130

Vancouver, B.C.

29

29

74

+.

5 Huntingdon, str.

1,464

Branston

Straits Settlements

810

17

75

11

5 Benlarig, str.

1,482

Freeman

400

12

**

"

76

5 Anchises, str.

1,304

"

Lapage

326

31

77

5 Devawongse, str.

1,057

Loff

253

:)

""

78

5

Khiva, str.

1,419

Crew

61

""

79

6 Deepdale, str.

1,715

Sharp

140

"

""

80

"

7 Telemachus, str..

1,421

Jones

335

"

55

11

7

7

*

""

7

"

8

9

12

??

12

??

81

82

83

84

85

86

87

.88

89

90

>>

1

14 Whampoa, str.

15

Deccan, str...

2,022

Case

69

"

Chi Yuen, str..

1,211 Chinese

Null

$30

Mongkut, str.

859 British

Anderson

Bangkok

75

226226 0 M 10 10

~ 3+

4

832

420

2

340

255

63

00 ET

151

355

73

839

81

Electra, str.

1,162 German

Madsen

Straits Settlements

259

259

Bisagno, str.

1,499 Italian

Toquasso

155

160

Titania, str...

2,011 Austrian

Garofolich

360

10

374

Stentor, str...

1,307 British

Milligan

300

300

Port Darwin

18

Brisbane

1

1,109

Fawcett

;)

Sydney

33

Melbourne

10

City of New York, str.

1,964 American

Searle

San Francisco

·63

66

>>

15 Kut Sang, str.............

1,495 British

Jackson

Straits Settlements

800 26

14

දීප

846

91

":

16 Euphrates, str.

1,300

Edwards

310

8

360

2)

**

92

19 Glenfalloch, str.

1,419

Cormack

260

*

...

260

""

93

19 | Phra Chom Klao, str.

1,012

Fowler

Bangkok

74

94

""

20 Uppingham, str......

1,431

Newcomb

Straits Settlements

180

20

95

23

20 Cheang Hock Kian, str.

956

Webb

548

14

"

96

97

98

99

+"

21

Venetia, str.

1,608

Cole

60

10 10.00 23

*1

21

Patroclus, str.

1,386

Pulford

366

"9

>>

21

1.

Preussen, str.

2,880 German

Pohle

233

"

21

Chowchowfoo, str.

796

Wendt

Bangkok

51

"

100

22

Benlawers, str.

1,513 British

Webster

Straits Settlements

95

"

101

2:

22 Olympia, str.

782 German

Muller

109

81

205

2

572

64

370

233

51

102

111

Port Darwin

Cooktown

102

22 Catterthun, str.

1,406 British

Darke

Cairns

Townsville Brisbane Sydney

46

12

21

103

23 Lidian,

340 Hawaiian

Duncan

Honolulu

44 2

3

49

104

24 Belgic, str.

2,695 British

Walker

San Francisco

280 26

1

1

308

105

24 Glenogle, str.

2,000

106

26 Japan, str.

1,865

Duke Gardner

Straits Settlements

283

283

412

.་

107

26 | Phra Chula Chom Klao, S.

1,012

Benson

Bangkok

501

108

27 Ningehow, str.

1,735

Castle

Straits Settlements

225

8885

26

10

1

10

CU 10 00

456

63

240

109

28 Zambesi, str.

1,565

Sams

303

303

"

110

31 Stura, str...

1,416 Italian

Caboara

172

12

>>

111

31

Kaisow, str...

1,934 British

Thomson

180

"

112

31

Jason, str.

1,412

Milligan

390

11

113

31 Kashgar, str.

1.615

Gadd

140

12

I202

10

**

114 April

3 Hydaspes, str...

1,899

Bason

73

to en

6

2MM N

191

195

399

160

3

80

,,

115

::

3 Devawongse, str.

1,057

Loff

Bangkok

98

4

102

Port Darwin

23

Thursday Island

Cooktown

116

3 Tsinau, str. ́

>>

1,459

Allison

Townsville

131

Brisbane

Sydney

17

60

Melbourne

20

117

4 Deucalion, str.

1,374

"

118

4 Galley of Lorne, str.

1,380

Asquith Graudin

Straits Settlements

209

250

10

อง

وو

"

119

4 Iphigenia, str..

Wattmer

120

5 Abyssinia, str.......

121

6 l'oseidon, str.

122

7 Wing Sang, str.

123

9 Glucksburg, str.

124

9 Glenlyon, str.

*

125

9 Mosser, str.

**

1,323

1,059 German 2,346 British 2,510 Austrian 1,517 British

916 German 1,410 British

Lee Mersa Ste. Croix Schultz Sommer

Titzek

Straits Settlements

821

>

Vancouver, B.C.

110

512

264

10

"

334

16

10

UT IF

55

1

19

90

11

10

+2

19

126

"

9 Mongkut, str.

859

Anderson

Bangkok

60

:

""

127

10

Kong Beng, str.

862

Jones

631

J

""

128

11

Surat, str.

1,677

Parfit

Straits Settlements

90

22

129

11 Dardanus, str.

1,536

Purdy

180

3

225

266

82

110

512

281

365

60

111

60

63

107

186

3"

99

Port Darwin

5

Thursday Island

Cooktown

130

وو

11 Guthrie, str.

1,494

Shannon

43

19

Townsville

1

Brisbane Sydney

14

16

Carried forward..... 198,876

Carried forward..

26,932 623 286 102 27,943

RETURN of VESSELS bringing CHINESE PASSENGERS to the Port of Victoria, Hongkong,—(Continued).

CHILDREN.

231

No.

DATE ARRIVED.

SHIP'S NAME.

TONS.

NATION- ALITY OF SHIP.

ADULTS.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHERE FROM,

TOTAL.

M. F

M. F.

Brought forward

198,876

131 April 12

Pembrokeshire, str.

1,717 British

132

15

Arratoon Apcar, str.

1,392

133

16

"

Chi Yuen, str....

1.211 Chinese

Williams Olifent Null

Brought forward... 26,932|| 623 Straits Settlements

286 102

27,943

80

4

3

87

332

332

430

12 10

459

134

??

16

Frigga, str. ...

1,400 German

135

">

16

Phra Chom Khao, str.

1,012 British

Nagel Fowler

30

30

Bangkok

70

70

136

"

16

City of Peking, str.

3,129 American

Dearborn

San Francisco

237

247

137

17

Malwa, str.

1,707 British

Atkinson

Straits Settlements

44

44

138

17 Menelaus, str.

1,300

Nelson

260

11

A

278

139

"

18 Bayern, str.

2,877 German

Sander

182

140

19

18 Printzenberg, str.

553

Ahrens

Honolulu

127

3

ra

""

141

**

19 Cheang Hock Kian, str..

956 British

Webb

Straits Settlements

336

24

142

11

19 Bormida, str.

1,499 Italian

Daquino

157

182

136

364

157

143

20 Lady Harewood,

382 British

Williams

Honolulu

75

Q

144

21 | Phra Chula Chom Klao, .

1,012

Benson

Bangkok

12

80

42

Port Darwin

13

Thursday Island

Cooktown

145

"

23 Changsha, str......

1,463

Williams

Townsville

67

Brisbane

Sydney

25

Melbourne

14

A

146

25 Achilles, str.

1,528

Anderson

Straits Settlements

365

16

15

147

25 | Tanjore, str.

1,402

Speck

98 16

EN

6

402

2

116

148

26 Taichiow, str.

862

Newton

Bangkok

39

39

149

+

150

21

151 152

27 Prometheus, str.

28 Tai Sang, str.

28 City of Sydney, str.

30 Devawongse, str.

1,537

Webster

Straits Settlements

4701

20

10

500

1,505

Jackson

450

30

8

490

>>

1,966 American

Smith

San Francisco

37 15

52

1,057 British

Loff

Bangkok

150

163

Thursday Island

Townsville

153

30 Chingtu, str.”.

1,459

Arthur

Cairns

42

??

Sydney

10

Melbourne

13

154

"

30 Glenshiel, str.

2,240

Donaldson

Straits Settlements

414

21

3

449

29

155

"

30 Oopack, str....................

1,730

Jaques

93

2

96

**

19

156 May 1 Ancona, str............

1,888

Webber

120

120

157

1

Priam, str.

1,402

Jackson

250

20

273

158

31

139

22

160

2:

161

"?

2 | Oceanic, str.

3 New Guinea, str.

4 Berenice, str.

2,440

Metcalfe

San Francisco

81

2

83

"

3 Devonhurst, str..

1,163 Dutch

Honthoff

Straits Settlements

85

90

1,700 | British

Wale

90

100

"

162

>>

4 Wyvern, str.

163

7 Mongkut, str.

164

8 Lydia, str.

1,707 | Austrian 1,108 British

859 1,170 German

19

Perini

3891

20

M

412

Brotherton

Bangkok

46

3

49

Anderson

121

19

10

10

Petersen

Straits Settlements

121

12

155 139

Port Darwin

Cooktown

Townsville

165

8 Tannadice, str.

"

1,408 British

Craig

43

Rockhampton

14

Brisbane

Sydney

18

166

"

9 Khiva, str.

1,452

Crew

Straits Settlements

86

95

167

*

9 Japan, str.

1,865

Gardner

389

27

431

"

>>

168

10 Glucksburg, str.

916 German

Schultz

430 14

477

169

"

10 Bisagno, str.

1,499 Italian

Toquasso

150

10

፡፡

170

10 Antenor, str.

1,376 British

Grier

227

2

171

11 Gleneagles, str.

1,838

Park

140

10

21

TY

172

11 Monmouthshire, str.

1.871

Cuming

28

2

173

12 Albany, str...................

1,489

Porter

75

174

"

12 City of Rio de Janeiro, str.

2,275 American

Seabury

San Francisco

64

175

";

14 Cyclops, str.

1,403 British

Nish

Straits Settlements

232

12

176

#"

14 | Phra Chom Klao, str.

1,012

Fowler

Bangkok

139

177

""

15 Verona, str.

1,876

De Horne

Straits Settlements

119

18

178

"

16 Kong Beng, str.

862

Jones

Bangkok

54

ON 10:00 2

5

20

245

165

233

155

30

75

64

250

6

156

10

117

56

179

>>

16 Chowchowfoo, str.

796 German

Wendt

35

2

3

40

180

18 Airlie, str.

1,492 British

Ellis

Straits Settlements

206 10

12

232

181

17

22 Cheang Hock Kian, str...

956

Webb

489 10

2

506

*5

">

182

""

22 Kashgar, str.

1,515

Gadd

120 10

133

>>

183

"

22 Laertes, str.....

1,391

Scale

178

3

190

""

184

"

22 Wing Sang, str.

1,517

Ste. Croix

290

30

7

3

330

":

>>

185

""

22 | Phra Chula Chom Klao, S.

1,012

Benson

Bangkok

129

6

G

141

186

,,

22 Gaelic, str.

2,691

Pearne

San Francisco

186

4

2

192

""

187

32

23 Deccan, str.

2,022

Case

Straits Settlements

126

13

5

Wi

149

"

188

""

23 Namkiang, str.

999

"7

189

25 Ghazee, str............

1,764

"

*

190

>>

28 Niobe, str.

191

**

28 Glenorchy, str.

1,666 German 1,821 British

192

19

28 Agamemnon, str.

1,522

27

McKenzie

Scotland

Paff Gedye Wilding

150

18

5

173

>>>

230 10

3

245

77

205) 25

15

250

158

164

>

120

128

>>

Port Darwin

27

Thursday Island

Townsville

193

28 Tai Yuan, str..

1,459

Vardin

Cooktown

136

Brisbane

12

Sydney

75

Melbourne

12

194

28 Duburg, str.

195

28 Parthia, str..

921 German 2,035 British

196

29 Bokhara, str.

1,711

Bertelsen Wallace Thompson

Bangkok

841

84

Vancouver, B.C.

23

24

Straits Settlements

81

SI

دو

197

27

29 Bellerophon, str.

1,396

""

198

29 Taichiow, str.

862

Guthrie Newton

112

6

124

Bangkok

89

3

92

ور

199

"

30 Hector, str..

1,590

Batt

Straits Settlements

337 35

376

:

Carried forward......

301,489

Carried forward.....

38,565 1,201

537 195

40,498

232

RETURN of VESSELS bringing CHINESE PASSENGERS to the Port of Victoria, Hongkong,-(Continued).

No.

DATE ARRIVED.

SHIP'S NAME.

TONS.

NATION- ALITY OF SHIP.

ADULTS.

CHILDREN.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHERE FROM.

TOTAL.

M.

F.

M.

F.

Brought forward

301,489

200❘ June

2

Diamond, str.

1,030 British

Gordon

Brought forward... 38,565 1,201 Straits Settlements

537

195

40,498

490 10

7

3

510

201

4

Thibet, str.

1,671

Atkinson

68

68

""

"

202

4

Ching Wo, str.

1,516

MacHugh

200

30

4

237

29

203

4 Wyvern, str.

1,108

Brotherton

Bangkok

70

70

Port Darwin

5

Cooktown

19

Townsville

2

201

>>

3

4 Catterthun, str.

1,406

Dark

70

Launceston

2

New Zealand

15

Sydney

27

205

"

5 Devawongse, str.

1,055

Loff

""

Bangkok

220

10

206

5 Telamon, str.

1,555

Jackson

Straits Settlements

235

10

43

4

234

3

2

250

25

207

208

6 Venetia, str.

1,609

"

:

;">

6

Belgic, str.

2,695

Cole Walker

157

:

157

San Francisco

99

6

3

1

109

209

#

6

Glencoe, str.

1,901

210

7

Bellona, str.

211

7 Melpomene, str.

212

8 Stanmore, str.

213

9

Choy Sang, str.

1,194

7:

214

11

Titan, str.

1,554

1,722 German

1,943 Austrian

1,269 British

Malusa Cameron Balbernie Brown

McKinlay Haesloof

Straits Settlements

158

158

150

...

150

200

15

10

2

227

་་

200

200

250

10

260

250

250

215

11

Hailoong, str.

783

Pocock

270

270

216

12

Tai Sang, str.

1,505

Jackson

330

20

361

2:

217

15 Lennox, str.

1,327

Thearle

126

:

126

"

218

16 | Phra Chom Klao, str..

1,012

Fowler

Bangkok

137

219

18 Palamed, str.

1,536

Jackson

Straits Settlements

230

11

21

145

241

220

20 Glenartney, str.

1,400

Murray

50

::

50

221

20 Palinurus, str..

1,536

Jackson

250

10

270

"

222

20 Cassandra, str.

1,097 German

223

21 Teheran, str.

224

22 Bengloe, str.

1,670 British 1,198

Thomsen Sams

99

99

148

148

Farquhar

100

100

225

22 Bormida. str.

1,499 Italian

De Negri

128

134

226

22 | Phra Chula Chom Klao, s.

1,012 British

Benson

Bangkok

84

96

227

25 Orestes, str.

1,323

Hutchinson

Straits Settlements

114

119

228

26

Japan, str.

1,865

Garduer

566

18

2

591

""

229

27

Amigo, str.

230

27 Glenfruin, str.

771 German 1,936 British

Bruhn

275

275

"

Norman

120

120

Thursday Island

2

231

27 Menmuir, str.

1,247

*

Helms

Cooktown

44

Sydney

35

232

28 City of Peking, str.

3,129 American

Dearborn

San Francisco

118

5

233

·

29 Abyssinia, str.

2.346 British

Lee

Vancouver, B.C.

232

10

LO TO

2

130

245

234

30 Daphne, str.

1,395 German

Voss

Straits Settlements

267

5

272

235

30

":

Ajax, str..............

1,525 British

Riley

136

4

140

>>

236 July

2 Teviot, str.

1,349

McCoskindale

92

со

100

1+

237

2 Lord of the Isles, str.

1,586

22

"

Felgate

100

100

21

238

#

2 Lombardy, str.

1,570

Preston

149

>>

**

239

3 Diamond, str.

1,030

Gordon

72 18

a co

158

98

"J

Brisbane

20

240

3 Changsha, str..

1,463

Williams

"

Sydney

15

::

:

35

241

Devawongse, str.

1,057

Loff

""

Bangkok

140

10

7

157

242

Cheang Hock Kian, str.

956

1

243

5 Mogul, str.

1,827

>>

244

7 Khedive, str.

2,153

Webb Johnson Loggin

Straits Settlements

187 14

3

206

250

250

87

87

Port Darwin

7

Thursday Island

245

7 Guthrie, str.

1,494

Craig

Townsville

12

1135

95

Cooktown

Sydney

62

246

""

9 Wing Sang, str.

1,517

Ste. Croix

Straits Settlements

162

247

**

9 Anchises, str...

1,304

"

248

""

10 Cambodia, str.

1.969

Lapage Wildgoose

298

10

12

470 30

1898

23

178

312

15

10

525

249

10 City of Sydney, str.

1,966 American

Friele

San Francisco

248

248

""

250

"

11 Preussen, str.

2.880 German

Poble

Straits Settlements

86

95

251

11 Khiva, str.

1,452 British

Crew

116

116

""

252

12 Bisagno, str.

253

""

254

"

255

256

257

12 Diomed, str.

13 Glenearn, str.

14 Polyhymnia, str.

14 Kong Beng, str.

17 Oceanic, str.

1.498 Italian

1,471 British 1,410 1,053 German

:>

862 British

Toquasso

152

10

170

Bigley Brass

81

10

175

සප

103

8

183

""

Schaefer Jones

130

130

Bangkok

130 10

18

~

160

2,440

Metcalfe

San Francisco

315

315

**

258

18 Sarpedon, str.

1,592

Chrimes

Straits Settlements

451 17

471

259

**

23 Mirzapore, str.

2,189

Harvey

72

260

23 Glenavon, str..

1,935

Jacobs

345

20

72 365

3:

"

261

>>>

23 | Phra Chom Klao, str.

1,012

Fowler

:)

Bangkok

50

262

24 Duke of Westminster, str.

2,426

Turner

Straits Settlements

307

50 307

"

263

26 Falkenburg, str.

264

28 Tai Sang, str.

988 German 1,515 British

Dreyer

Bangkok

38

38

Jackson

Straits Settlements

600

600

Port Darwin

30

Cooktown

1

Townsville

265

28 Chingtu, str.

1,459

Arthur

112

Cairus

Sydney

21

Melbourne

40

266

30 Glaucus, str.

1,381

Hannah

Straits Settlements

250

##

267

::

30 Namkiang, str.

999

McKechnie

634

**

268

::

30 Telemachus, str..

1,421

Jones

240

::

269

30 Batavia, str.

1,661

Watton

Vaucouver, B.C.

401

:>

270

30 City of Rio de Janeiro, str.

2,275 American

Ward

San Francisco

67

271 August 1 Venetia, str.

1,608 British

Cole

Straits Settlements

153

6 10

250

634

240

40

69

164

Carried forward..

412,597

Carried forward....

52,125 1,582

700 250

54,657

RETURN of VESSELS bringing CHINESE PASSENGERS to the Port of Victoria, Hongkong,-(Continued).

233

No.

DATE ARRIVED.

SHIP'S. NAME.

TONS.

NATION-

ALITY OF SHIP.

ADULTS.

CHILDREN.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHERE FROM.

TOTAL.

M.

F.

M.

F.

Brought forward...... 412,597

Brought forward... 52,125] 1,582 Port Darwin

700 250

54,657

10

Cooktown

2

Rockhampton

12

272 Aug.

1 Tannadice, str.

1,408 British

Shannon

Brisbane

2

126

Sydney

14

Melbourne

55

Adelaide

1

273

2 Hesperia, str.

1,136 German

Madsen

Straits Settlements

192

210

274

2

Taichiow, str.

862 British

Newton

Bangkok

142

142

275

3

Stura, str..

1,416 Italian

Caboara

Straits Settlements

89

91

276

Teheran, str.

1,671 British

Sams

158

158

""

277

7

Glengarry, str.

1,956

"

278

7

Cheang Hock Kian, str.

956

Taylor Webb

364

361

>>

271

10

15

296

>>

*279

7 Stentor, str.

1,307

22

280

7 Gaelic, str.

2,691

Milligan Pearne

426

426

San Francisco

310

18

23

355

281

8 Bayern, str.

2,877 German

Sander

Straits Settlements

279

288

282

"

13

Sung Kiang, str..

994 British

Hunt

212

212

"

283

"

13

Patroclus, str..

1,386

Pulford

320

320

"J

284

285

286

287

288

+:

13

Wyvern, str.

1,108

Brotherton

Bangkok

61

61

15

"

Maria Teresa, str.

2,011 Austrian

Constanzo

Straits Settlements

200

200

"

16

Waverley, str..

2,022 British

Calvert

210

210

";

"

16

Benledi, str.

1,497

Clark

125

125

""

"

17

Mongkut, str.

859

Anderson

>

Bangkok

199 13

3

218

289

>>

18

City of New York, str.

1,964 American

Searle

San Francisco

150

150

Noumea

122

290

""

18 Catterthun, str.

1,406 British

Darke

Sydney

15

153

Melbourne

16

291

..

20 Lombardy, str.

1,571

Preston

Straits Settlements

104

104

292

*

20 Cathay, str.

1,882

Hassall

314

31

"

293

17

20 Japan, str.

1,865

Gardner

119

co co

359

128

";

294

20 Electra, str

1,162 German

Moller

119

*:

295

21 | Deucalion, str.

1,374 British

Asquith

240

296

11

21 Wing Sang, str.

1,577

Ste. Croix

275

#

297

"

23 Glenroy, str.

1,411

298

25

Bormida, str.

299

"?

25

Kashgar, str.

1,499 Italian 1,555 British

Webster

De Negri Speck

189

9

187

205

13

:

119

240

275

198

187

2

222

300

""

27 Moyune, str.

1,714

301

27 Belgic, str.

2,695

**

Hogg Walker

199

199

San Francisco

373

13.

395

302

27 Devawongse, str.

1,057

Loff

Bangkok

185

185

Port Darwin

21

Thursday Island

8

Cooktown

8

303

A

28 Airlie, str.

1,492

Ellis

Townsville

12

93

Brisbane

12

Sydney

30

Adelaide

2

301

་་

28 Parthia, str...

2,035

Wallace

Vancouver, B.C.

48

48

305

"J

28 Jason, str.

1,412

Milligan

Straits Settlements

200

200

306

་་

30 Iphigenia, str...

1,059 German

Voltmer

75

75

307

30 Kaifong, str.

998 British

Dodd

83

83

308

"

30 Arratoon Apcar, str.

309 Sept.

1 Breconshire, str..

310

"

3 Deccan, str...

311

4 Ancona, str..

312

.་

4 Poseidon, str.

313

4 Dardanus, str..

314

Braunschweig, str..

2,510 Austrian 1,536 British 2,150 German ·

Olifent

Waring

Case

1,392

310

27

7

>

350

1,648

46

46

";

2,022

121

130

>>

1,888

Webber

50

50

"

"

Mersa

472

472

Purdy

123

16

1

141

Bodecker

226

226

Thursday Island

10

Cooktown

3

315

6 Tai Yuan, str.....

1,459 British

Vardin

Sydney

11

Wellington Dunedin Lyttelton

107

316

7 Mongkut, str.

859

Anderson

Bangkok

91

317

11

7 City of Peking, str.

3,129 American

Dearborn

San Francisco

168

318

8 Glenlyon, str.

1,410 British

Sommer

Straits Settlements

264

319

10 Cheang Hock Kian, str.

956

Webb

572

13

"

320

10 Khiva, str.

1,452

Crew

"

"

89

>:

:

321

""

11 Achilles, str.

1,529

Anderson

415

13

**

322

22

13

Tai Sang, str.

323

""

15 Frigga, str.

1,505 1,400 German

Jackson Nagel

4781

17

197

:*

321

>>

15 Bisagno, str.

1,499 Italian

Toquasso

278

**

325

16 Verona, str.....................

1,876 British

De Horne

144

O

96

174

264

591

89

431

500

197

299

156

!!

Thursday Island Cooktown Cairns

14.

8

Townsville

326

16 Guthrie, str.

1.494

Craig

80

Newcastle

I

Sydney

24

Melbourne

19

Adelaide

2

327

17 Ningchow, str.

1,735

Durdin

Straits Settlements

220

220

328

17 Glengyle, str.

2,244

Gasson

290

329

17 Devawongse, str.

1,057

! Loff

Bangkok

72

330

}:

19 Arabic, str.

2,788

331

19 Menelaus, str.

1,300

Smith Nelson

San Francisco

619

12

Straits Settlements

334

16

NGNN

300

332

"

20 Decima, str..

965 German

Oestmann

Bangkok

33

1

333

**

20 | Phra Chom Klao, str.

1,012 British

334

">

24 Glucksburg, str.

916 German

Fowler Schultz

60

3

Straits Settlements

554

6

10 00

57

81

639

354

34

73

570

Carried forward...........

512,213

Carried forward.....

65,536 1,874

823

309 68,542

234

RETURN of VESSELS bringing CHINESE PASSENGERS to the Port of Victoria, Hongkong,—(Continued).

CHILDREN.

No.

DATE ARRIVED.

SHIP'S NAME.

TONS.

NATION-

ALITY OF SHIP.

ADULTS.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHERE FROM.

TOTAL,

M. F.

M. F.

Brought forward...... 512,213

Brought forward....... 65,536 1,874 Port Darwin

823 309 68,542

47

Thursday Island

6

335 Sept. 24 Tsinan, str.

1,460 British

Allison

Brisbane

86

Sydney

11

Melbourne

16

336 337

39

26 City of Sydney, str.

1,966 American

Friele

San Francisco

389

104

"

338

339

"

26 Prometheus, str.

27 Glamorganshire, str.

27 Independent, str.

1,538 British

Webster

Straits Settlements

416

10

463

1,842

Davies

450

450

**

871 German

Schafer

Bangkok

46

46

340

"

27 Pakshan, str.

835 British

Young

31

31

**

341 342

""

27 Abyssinia, str...

2,346

Lee

Vancouver, B.C.

207

207

"

28 Namkiang, str.

991

McKechine

Straits Settlements

580

580

"

343 October 1

Venetia, str.

1,608

Cole

173

173

""

"2

341

2

Benvenue, str..

1,497

Thomson

119

119

"

"

345

2

Japan, str.

1,865

Pallett

550

550

#1

346

"

3 Priam, str.

1,402

Jackson

350

350

**

"

347

??

4 Oceanic, str.

2,440

Metcalfe

San Francisco

521

2333

12

4

560

""

348

19

5

Amphitrite, str.

2,486 Austrian

Lemesich

Straits Settlements

280

280

349

""

5 Stura, str.

1,416 Italian

Caboara

200

200

350

5 Lydia, str.

351

""

5

Kong Beng, str.

352

6 Neckar, str......

353

""

8

Wing Sang, str.

1,517 British

354

Hector, str.

1,589

"

355

"

Nestor, str.

1,269

356

11

Lombardy, str.

1,571

357

12 Cheang Chew, str.

1,213

358

13 Glenfinlas, str.

1,409

12

359

15 Cheang Hock Kian, str....

956

360

15 Telamon, str.

1,555

1,170 German

862 British 1,870 German

Jones Supner Ste. Croix Batt

Thompson Preston Dunlop Fergusson

Webb

Jackson

Petersen

50

50

11

Bangkok

60

60

Straits Settlements

271

271

400

400

"2

112

112

125

125

111

111

332

332

140

140

574

574

114

114

"

361

23

15 Arratoon Apcar, str.

1,392

Olifent

450

450

21

362

15 Albany, str..

1,489

Porter

Vancouver. B.C.

154

154

363

>>

16

City of Rio de Janeiro, str.

2,275 American

Ward

San Francisco

522

531

364

16

Surat, str.

1,677 British

Speck

Straits Settlements

t5

45

Dunedin

18

Lyttelton

365

19 Whampoa, str.

1,109

Fawcett

Auckland

46

Greymouth

17

Wellington

1

366

12

20 | Phra Chom Klao, str.

1,012

Fowler

Bangkok

71

367

**

20 Titan, str.

1,554

368

20 Niobe, str.

1,666 German

Brown Paff

Straits Settlements

440

+791

369

370

371

22 Pathan, str.

23 Glenorchy, str.

1,762 British

Golding

376

రా

"

22 Printzenberg, str.

553 German

Ahrens

Honolulu

175

1,822 British

372

"?

23 Laertes, str..

373

";

25 Palamed, str.

1,391 1,536

Gedve Scale

Straits Settlements

390

221

""

Jackson

130

"

374

>>

29 Tai Sang, str.

1,505

Jackson

716

"

375

2:

30 | Deccan, str..

2,022

Case

84

"

376

"

30 Gaelic, str.

2,691

Pearne

San Francisco

844

14

A

19

377

31

Kong Beng, str.

$62

"

379

380

378 Nov.

2 Sachsen, str.

1 Ravenna, str.

2,045

Jones Daniell

Bangkok

61

Straits Settlements

66

2,874 German

Von Gossel

349

་་

3 Bormida, str.

1,499 Italian

Do Negri

316

71

440

479

3

385

175

390

221

130

716

84

861

61

66

349

316

Port Darwin

16

Thursday Island

4

Cooktown

Cairns

22

381

3 Tannadice, str.

1,408 British

Shannon

**

Townsville

Rockhampton

Sydney

164.

18

Melbourne

40

Adelaide

382 383

384

""

385

"

386

387

5 Bellona, str.. 5 Bellerophon, str.

Namkiang, str.

5 Glencoe, str.

5 Electra, str..................

5 Batavia, str.

1,722 German 1,396 British

991 1,901

Haesloop Guthrie McKechnie

Straits Settlements

870

870

379

379

"

594

594

22

Mc Kinlay

125

1.25

"

2,095 Austrian

Mersa

250

250

"

1,662 British

Hall

Vancouver, B.C.

39

39

388

11

5

City of New York, str.

1.961 American

Searle

San Francisco

252

252

389

"

390

27

391

9 Devawongse, str.

9 Claymore, str..

12 Glucksburg, str.

1,057 British

Loff

Bangkok

138

138

1,658

Craig

Straits Settlements

125

125

916 German

Schultz

278

278

392

"

12 Palinurus, str..

1,536 British

Jackson

232

232

393

13 Japan, str.

1,865

Pallett

600

600

394

13 Diamond, str.

1,080

Gordon

385

385

"

395

14 Belgic, str.

2,695.

Walker

San Francisco

4641

466

""

396

""

15 Cheang Hock Kian, str.

956

397

>>

15 Velocity,

491

Webb Martin

Straits Settlements

150

150

Honolulu

150

150

398

"

15 China, str.

648 German

Ulderup

Bangkok

93

93

399

16 Orestes. str..

1,327 British

Hutchinson

Straits Settlements

160

160

"

400

"}

16 Kashgar, str.

1,555

Jephson

171

179

>>

401

19 Agamemnon, str.

1,523

Wilding

148

148

";

402

"

19 Oopack, str..

1,730

Jaques

210

10

231

;;

403

20 Denbigshire, str..

1,663

Rickard

80

80

:;

404

21 Ajax, str.

1,525

405

"

21 Bisagno, str.

1,499 Italian

406

"

23 Glenartney, str.

407

""

23 Wing Sang, str.

408

"

23 China, str.

1,400 British 1,517 1,093 German

19

Riley Toquasso

Murray Ste. Croix Haye

300

300

"

320

320

"

400

400

22

572

572

184

*

:

184

Carried forward......

625,366

Carried forward.......

86,021 1,962

860 324

89,167

RETURN of VESSELS bringing CHINESE PASSENGERS to the Port of Victoria, Hongkong,—(Continued).

CHILDREN.

235

No.

DATE ARRIVED.

SHIP'S NAME.

TONS.

NATION- ALITY OF SHIP.

ADULTS.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHERE FROM.

TOTAL.

M. F.

M. F.

Brought forward...

625,366

Brought forward... 86.021 1,962

860 321

89,167

409 Nov.

23

Kong Beng, str.

862 British

Jones

Bangkok

67

67

410

**

23

City of Peking, str.

3,139 American

Seabury

San Francisco

365

3

6

2

376

411

26

Parthia, str.

2,035 British

Wallace

Vancouver, B.C.

So

80

412

29

"

Preussen, str.

2,879 German

Poble

Straits Settlements

248

248

413

Dec.

1

Ulysses, str....

1,526 British

414

3 Glenfruin, str.

1,962

Butler Norman

694

694

>

350

350

Port Darwin

24

415

3 Chingtu, str.

Brisbane

50

1,459

Hunt

"

+

113

Sydney

201

Melbourne

19

416

3

*

Duke of Westminster, str.

2,426

Reynolds

Vancouver, B.C.

287

287

417

418

419

99

3

Arabic, str.

2,788

Smith

San Francisco

508

519

;"

4

Arratoon Apcar, str.

1,392

Olifent,

Straits Settlements

544

544

5

Anchises, str.

1,304

Lapage

250

250

420

6

Cheang Chew, str.

1,213

Dunlop

150

150

421

6

Chow Fa, str.

1,055

Phillips

Bangkok

46

46

422

7 Daphne, str.

1,395 | German

Voss

Straits Settlements

200

200

423

7 Berenice, str. ...

1,707 Austrian

Egger

388

388

Port Darwin

18

Thursday Island

3

Cooktown

14

424

11 Guthrie, str.

1,194 British

Craig

Cairns

17

210

Townsville

37

Brisbane

20

Sydney

38

Melbourne

33

425

"?

13 Abyssinia, str..

2,346

**

426

>>

13 Merionethshire, str.

1,245

427

"

13 Sarpedon, str.

1,592

Lee Dowling Chrimes

Vancouver, B.C.

204

204

Straits Settlements

80

80

851

85

**

428

13 Diamond, str.

"

1,030

Gordon

230

230

و"

??

429

13 | Phra Chula Chom Klao, S.

1,012

Benson

"

Bangkok

87

87

430

14 Stura, str.

1,416 Italian

Caboara

Straits Settlements

250

250

431

14 Tai Sang, str.

1,505 British

Jackson

388

388

""

432

15 Taichiow, str.

862

Morris

:

Bangkok

52

52

433

**

434

435

436

437

"

438

"1

439

19

440

441

::

442

29

17 Amy Turner,

17 Ching Wo, str.

18 Cheang Hock Kian, str...

19 Daniel Barns

19 John Nicholson

19

City of Sydney, str. 20 Polyhymnia, str...

21 Mongkut, str.

27 Coloma,

27 Oceanic, str.

960 | American

1,556 British

""

956 1,436 American

Johnson

Honolulu

105

w

4

118

McHugh

Straits Settlements

350

350

:

Webb

150

150

לי

Stower

Honolulu

150

150

685 British 1,966 American

Quine

180

180

91

Friele

San Francisco

188

188

1,053 German

Schaefer

Straits Settlements

273

273

859 British 814 American 2,440 British

Anderson

Bangkok

54

54

Noyes

Honolulu

200

200

Metcalfe

San Francisco

278

7

286

443

27

"

Glencarn, str.

1,410

Brass

Straits Settlements

420

420

444

""

27

Diomed, str.

1,471

"

Bigley

459

459

斧斧

445

>>

446

"1

447

27 Bayern, str..

29 Telemachus, str..

29 Bengloe, str.

2,877 German

Mergell

311

3

318

17

1,421 British

Jones

280

280

29

448

"

29 Chow Fa, str.

1,198 1,055

""

Farquhar

130

130

Phillips

Bangkok

179

179

TOTAL TONS..............

687,167

TOTAL PASSENGERS

95,604 1,989

877 330

98,800

From Adelaide, South Australia,

"

Auckland, New Zealand,.

"

Bangkok, Siam,.

**

Brisbane, Queensland,

Cairns, Queensland,

>>

Cooktown, Queensland,

27

Dunedin, New Zealand,

Greymouth, New Zealand,

Honolulu, Sandwich Island,

Launceston, Tasmania,

Lyttelton, New Zealand,.

27

Melbourne,

17

Newcastle, N.S.W.,

91

New Zealand,

";

39

3.

Noumea, New Caledonia, .

Rockhampton, Queensland,

Port Darwin. South Australia,

19

San Francisco, U.S.A.,.

""

Straits Settlements,

32

Sydney,

39

Thursday Island, Queensland,

"

Townsville, Queensland,

99

Vancouver, British Columbia,

19

Wellington, New Zealand,

SUMMARY.

Value of Treasure imported from Australian Ports,

ADULTS.

CHILDREN.

TOTAL.

M. F.

M.

F.

VALUE

OF TREASURE | BROUGHT.

12

12

8

4,714 142 87

208

:

69

8

39 1,982

208

68!

68

164

164

63

63

23

23

1,206

15

408

4

1

:

15

122

373

60

9,820 260 94

75,481 1,554

661

878

3

6

55

164

1,718

16

9

34

⠀⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀29° ::

1,238

416

1

15

122

375 60

10,203 $9,789,983

77,945

889 55

164

1,746 31

$1,278,795

TOTAL PASSENGERS,

95,6041,989

$77 330

98,800 $11,068,778

236

XXI.—RETURN of MARINE CASES tried at the MARINE MAGISTRATE'S COURT, during the Year 1888.

DEFENDANTS, HOW DISPOSED OF

Nature of Charge.

No. of CASES.

No. of DE- FEND-

ANTS. with

Hard

Impri- Impri- soned soned

in default

Fined.

Forfei- ture of Pay.

Repri- manded.

To be Sent dis- back to charged Duty. from

Dis- missed. for

Com- mitted

Trial.

Labour. of Fine.

Ship.

Absent from Ship without Leave,..

Assault,

19

7

8

3

Desertion,..

3

Disorderly Conduct,

Drunkenness,

..

False Particulars, Giving, (Junks),

Fishing Junk, Breach of condition of Licence,.....

Found stowed away,

Harbour Regulations, Breach of

Insubordination,

15

Leaving the Harbour during prohibited }

4

10

hours. (Junks),

Leaving without Clearance, (Junks),

10

10

Obstruction of Fairways,.....

1

10 1

Refusal of Duty,

11

68

Steam Launch. Breach of condition of Licence, Wilfully remaining behind,

TOTAL,..

70

167

63

3

38

2

Years.

N

3

AMOUNT OF

FINES.

$5.00

2000

40.00

28.00

27.00

59.00

5.00

35

35.00

53

5

$219.00

XXIII. RETURN of Work performed by the GOVERNMENT MARINE SURVEYOR'S DEPARTMENT.

Inspection of Crew space, Lights and

Markings.

Minor Inspec- tions.

Survey of Licen-

sed Passenger

Steam-Launches.

Survey of Boilers under Construction.

Inspection of Government

Launches.

Examination

of Engineers.

Examination of

Chinese Engi-

neers for Steam- Launches.

Estimated total

number of visits in connection with

foregoing Inspection.

9 months in

1881,.......

95

67

10

1882,.

154

127

00

5

8

3

:

1

3

2

1883,...

144

102

10

5

8

LO

5

1

20

1884,......

200

141

10

9

7

1885,.......

153

113

CO

6

6

6

1886,.......

149

76

2

1

11

2

1887,.......

153

101

3

6

9

1

$

1888,......

161

97

9

1

4

2 2 2 2 8 8 2 8

10

15

:

4

35

6

26

33

6

1891 18

1

284

46

Co

6

472

57

1

461

55

00

8

699

60

33

50

29

737

69

16

9

36

16

870

72

15

14

42

31

80

1

Co

6

42

ཚ⇨

930

36

1,042

XXIV.-IMPORTS AND EXPORTS OF OPIUM DURING 1888.

IMPORTS.

MALWA.

PATNA.

BENARES.

PERSIAN.

Chests.

Chests.

Chests.

26,445

25,612

14,07327

Chests. 5,205

TURKISH. Chests.

176

TOTAL.

Chests. 71,51227

EXPORTS.

MALWA.

PATNA.

Chests.

Chests.

27,092

24,878

BENARES.

PERSIAN.

Chests. 14,17527

Chests. 4,891

TURKISH. Chests.

103

TOTAL.

Chests.

71,139 27

Through Cargo reported in Manifests but not landed,..........

7,745 chests.

NUMBER OF PERMITS, &c. ISSUED DURING 1888.

Landing Permits,.......................

Removal Permits,

Export Permits,

Permits to Chinese Customs' Hulk,

Memo. of Exports sent to the Commissioner of Chinese Customs, Kowloon,

384

10,958

9,498

470

303 (1 daily.)

+

4,800,000

4:700,000

4,600,000

4,500,000

4:400,000

4,300,000

4,200,000

4,100,000

4,000,000

3,900,000

3,800,000

3.700,000

TONS.

6,500,000

6,400,000

6,300,000

6,200,000

6,100,000

6,000,000

5,900,000

5,800,000

5,700,000

5,600,000

5,500,000

5,400,000

5,300,000

5,200,000

5,100,000

A

1867.

YXII-DIAGRAM of Tonnage entered at Hongk

BLUE LINE represents Junk Tonnage only,

RED LINE represents Foreign Shipping Tonnag

THICK BLACK LINE represents entire Trade i

1871.

1872.

1873.

1874.

1875.

1876.

1877.

1878.

1879.

3.600.000

1876.

1877.

1878.

1879.

1880.

ntered at Hongkong, from 1867 to 1888, inclusive.

7 Tonnage only.

in Shipping Tonnage only.

esents entire Trade in Foreign Ships and Junks.

1881.

1882.

1883.

1884.

1885.

1886.

1887.

1888.

6,500,000

6,400,000

6,300,000

6,200,000

6,100,000

6,000,000

5,900,000

5,800,000

5,700,000

5,600,000

5,500,000

5,400,000

5,300,000

5,200,000

5,100,000

5,000,000

4,900,000

4,800,000

4,700,000

4,600,000

4,500,000

1,100,000

4,300,000

4,200,000

4,100,000

4,000,000

3,900,000

3,800,000

3,700,000

Toxs.

4,800,000

4,700,000

4,600,000

4,500,000

4,400,000

- 4,300,000

4,200,000

4,100,000

4,000,000

3,900,000

3,800,000

3,700,000

3,600,000

3,500,000

3,400,000

3,300,000.

3,200,000

3,100,000

3,000,000

2,700,000

2,600,000

2,500,000

2,400,000

2,300,000

2,200,000

2,100,000

2,000,000

1,900,000

1,800,000

1,700,000

1,600,000

1,500,000

1,400,000

1,300,000

1,200,000

1,100,000

1,000,000

£

S45

4,700,000

4,600,000

4,500,000

4,400,000

4,300,000

4,200,000

4,100,000

4,000,000

3,900,000

3,800,000

3,700,000

3,600,000

3,500,000

3,400,000

3,300,000

3,200,000

3,100,000

3,000,000

000

2,700,000

2,600,000

2,500,000

2,400,000

2,300,000

2,200,000

2,100,000

2,000,000

1,900,000

1,800,000

1,700,000

1,600,000

1,500,000

1,400,000

1,300,000

1,200,000

1,100,000

1,000,000

SUMMARY OF EXPORTS, 1888.

239

Malwa

chests.

Patna chests.

Benares Persian chests. chests.

Turkish chests.

Total

chests.

Total in Piculs.

By Steamers to Acapulco,......

8

9.60

Amoy,

1,0691

216

4,495

8463

3

6,630

7,593.3625

Canton,

2,906

6,617

1,95027

1

11,474 울음

13,188.235

Chefoo,

16

2

3

:

21

22.

Cochin China, ...

1

6

738

745

893.80

Foochow,

2,999

1,847

384

393

I

5,6241

6,080.525

Formosa,

2

658

3,414

2

4,076

4,292.95

Hankow,

3431

28

Hoihow,

13

803

96

Kiukiang,

36

:

:

:

3711

377.10

912

1,091.80

36

36. ...

London,

Macao,

Macassar,

Pakhoi,

Phillipine Isles, ..

2.050

:

:

:

:

4,002

132

86

4,220

5,046.80

8.40

:

145

758

903

1,083.60

465

35

500

600.

San Francisco,..

87

87

89.175

Shanghai,

16,875

5,897

3,805

94

26,673

28,615.75

Singapore,

17

86

9

112

132.60

Swatow,

2,4531

2,350

993

54

5,850

6,520.45

Tientsin,

12

12

14.40

Victoria, B.C....

:

437

437

524.40

:

By Junks, to various adjacent

Ports in China,

377

2,026

35

:

2,438

2,850.20

TOTAL,...

27,092

24,878

14,17527 4,891

103

71,139

27

79,073.1975

The information in column 7 above is on the following assumption :---

Patna and Benares per chest,

Malwa and Turkish per chest, Persian per chest,..............

.1.20 piculs.

..1.00

1.025

29

+

No. 334.

289

No. 20

89.

HONGKONG.

REPORT ON THE CONDITION AND PROSPECTS OF HONGKONG, BY HIS EXCELLENCY SIR G. WILLIAM DES VOEUX, GOVERNOR, &c.

Presented to the Legislative Council, by Command of His Excellency the Governor.

Governor Sir G. William Des Voeux to the Right Honourable Lord Knutsford, Secretary of State for the Colonies.

MY LORD,

GOVERNMENT HOUSE, HONGKONG, 31st October, 1889.

In connection with the Blue Book for 1888 (forwarded with the usual Colonial Secretary's Report during my temporary absence in the late Mr. STEWART'S despatch No. 287 of the 2nd ultimo) I think it may prove of interest that I should make some observations, at the same time giving additional information and statistics in respect of the present condition of the Colony and its progress in the two years during which I have administered the Government.

REVENUE.

2. The Ordinary Revenue shows a constant tendency to grow in amount pari passu with the increasing population and wealth of the Colony; and that of 1888 ($1,557,300) was larger than in any former year. The increase by comparison with 1887 ($1,427,485) was principally in (1) Stamps" which advanced to $187,150 from $170,233, (2) "Municipal Rates" which afforded $360,291 in the place of $332,863, (3) Postage" which returned $144,218 instead of $137,436, (4) "Miscellaneous Receipts," principally profit on subsidiary coins, $107,341 as against $61,227.

3. The improvement in all of these items was, no doubt, largely due to the increased business and wealth of the Colony. That in "Municipal Rates" was however more immediately occasioned by the better assessment of property which was brought about by an officer recently appointed for this special duty. I have reason to believe that there is still nuch opening for improvement in respect of valuation, and that from attention to this point as well as from the largely increased value of property, there should be a still greater advance in this item during the next few years.

4. Profit on subsidiary coins is a comparatively new item of Revenue, and is shewing a constant tendency to increase. Appended is a table shewing the number of coins issued since the supply commenced together with the profit obtained each year.

SILVER COINS. COPPER COINS.

PROFIT.

$

1864,

15,638.70

30,293.92

13,333.22

1865,

49,447.00

30,343.58

6,758.58

1866,

60,014.60

30,000.00

5,877.49

1867,

10,000.00

29,987.28

14,249.41

1872,

14,000,00

950.52

1873,

105,317.00

9,000.00

7,878.70

1874,

49,883.00

11,000.00

2,628.91

1875,

47,287.00

3,500.00

5,361.52.

1876,

44,623.00

6,500.00

8,088.13

1877,

57,680,00

12,500.00

10,781.51

1878,

38,815.00

14,700.00

8,572.34

1879,

50,595.00

12,000.00

11,528.36

1880,

30,400.00

6,300.00

7,454.80

1881,

46,600,00

4,500.00

2,850.67

1882,

100,800.00

10,000.00

10,000.08

1883,

101.900.00

2,103.47

1884,

212,500,00

26,285.37

1885,

282,200.00

33,464.87

1

1886,

$76,500.00

41,384.48

1887,

497,300.00

24,352.73

1888,

910,000.00

72,904.77

The Right Honourable

Lord KNUTSFORD, G.C.M.G.,

&c.,

&c.

&c.

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The issue this year will, according to present indications, again show a great advance, having already (October 23rd), reached a total of $948,500 consisting of 11,854,250 separate coins, and though this must not be counted on as a permanent source of Revenue I see no reason to anticipate any falling off in the demand in the immediate future.

5. The desire of the Chinese for these coins (consisting of pieces representing 20 cents, 10 cents, and 5 cents manufactured at Her Majesty's Mint for this Colony) appears to be almost insatiable; and if from any cause there is delay in the supply from England, the purchasing price at once rises to a premium, which has been known at the Chinese New Year to be as high as 20 per cent. I understand that

this coinage is growing more and more in favour among the vast population of the neighbouring Empire, probably owing to confidence in its exactly uniform standard of value, and that the coins are not only used as money, but are, to a considerable extent, converted into buttons and other ornaments.

6. Besides the causes for increase of Receipts above indicated there is another which in the next few years is likely to have a greater effect in this direction than any other. I refer to the enhanced return from the Opium Farm, which was in 1888 granted for 3 years from April, 1889, at an increase of $295,200 per annum over the price obtained for the previous term. This result is attributable partly to the large increase of population and partly to efforts, which proved successful, to arouse competition on the part of the Chinese Capitalists of Singapore and Penang.

7. It should be mentioned that the Revenue has in Hongkong a much smaller proportion than in most Colonies to the amount of trade and realised wealth, owing to the complete absence of import duties and to the fact that there are no tonnage duties on shipping beyond the small charge of of one cent per ton for lights. Moreover the Rates, which at the highest (in the Town of Victoria) are fixed at only 13 per cent. of the annual rateable value, compare very favourably with those of the principal towns of England, ranging, I understand, from 20 to 30 per cent. I see no probability of any necessity for increased taxation, and should much deplore it if it occurred, as the lightness of the public burthens has without doubt contributed largely to the extraordinary prosperity of the Colony. I refer to the above facts therefore merely for the purpose of shewing that the amount of the Revenue, by which the importance of a country is not unfrequently gauged, is, when applied to this purpose in Hongkong, entirely misleading.

LAND SALES RECEIPTS.

8. "Land premiums" (the sums received for leases of land sold by auction) which, being wisely separated from "Revenue," are applied to defence and other permanent works, amounted to $160,688 in 1888 and $155,238 in 1887, and thus show an enormous increase by comparison with all former years, though the in- creased area sold was by no means in the same proportion. In the absence of some calamity, such as war, the amount of these premiums is likely to remain large for some years to come, and that already obtained from the same source this year (in the first three quarters) is $155,200. As only a very small proportion of the available building sites in the Colony are as yet leased, it may be expected that the cost of the public works required will for a long time to come be largely defrayed from this source, and this especially if Hongkong should, according to present promise, become a large manufacturing, as well as commercial, centre.

9. It will be observed that a comparison between the year 1887 and 1888 shews an advance in the aggregate of rents which is proportionately somewhat larger than that in premiums. This is due to a change effected last year by which the rent fixed for land to be leased bears a somewhat larger proportion than formerly to the upset price at which leases are offered for competition by auction. In the belief that we had been unduly sacrificing the future to the present by obtaining in premiums so large a share of the proceeds, I had hoped to carry this change still further; but I was induced to be content at first with a short step in the desired direction, partly by the consideration that we are at present burthened with a specially heavy charge for defence and other permanent works, and partly because the local experience of my advisers suggested a doubt whether there would not be a loss in premiums out of proportion to the increase of rents. Owing to the increasing value of land it is impossible to ascertain from subsequent experience whether this doubt had substantial foundation; but as the premiums per acre received since the change was effected have, in most instances, been higher than they have ever been before for land in the same localities, I am disposed to think

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that a further advance may safely be made in the same direction. In view of the financial difficulties which have arisen elsewhere from the reckless sale of the Crown Lands and the use of the proceeds as ordinary Revenue, and bearing in mind the precarious nature of some important items of our present Receipts, I cannot but think that it would be worth while, even at some sacrifice of present advantage, to apportion a larger share of the proceeds to permanent income.

10. This consideration will be kept in view; and if it should be found inadvisable, for the reason above indicated, to further increase the rent fixed in connection with the auction sales, it may perhaps be expedient to attain the same object by giving purchasers the right of commuting the premiums for increased rent, on terms which would be likely to induce its exercise.

EXPENDITURE.

11. Though the total expenditure of the year 1888, $1,992,329, was somewhat sınaller than that of 1887, $2,023,002, this was entirely due to a large decrease in "Extraordinary Expenditure" on "Defence" and other permanent works, the aggregate cost of which in 1888 was only $530,870 as against $744,820 in 1887. Ordinary Expenditure however increased from $1,278,181 in 1887 to $1,461,459 in 1888, a result which might be expected from the demands of our rapidly in- creasing population. It is at the same time satisfactory to note that even this increased expenditure was exceeded by Ordinary Revenue to the extent of some $95,000.

12. The decrease in Extraordinary Expenditure is chiefly accounted for by the fact that our Defence Works were approaching completion and cost only $62,115 as against $258,444 in 1887. The Tytam Water-Works moreover cost only $51,150 as against $230,811 in 1887. This great enterprise, (which comprises the confine- ment of some 350 millions of gallons of water by a dam constructed of granite and concrete at a distance of 5 miles from the City of Victoria, and the conveyance of the supply by means of a tunnel 2,450 yards in length, and a cut granite aqueduct for the remaining distance,) was so far completed that the water was let into some of the existing "Mains" in October 1888. But as the "Distribution Works" which are required in connection with the new supply are not commenced, it has not been possible to obtain any return in Revenue for this improvement in supply, and the large expenditure on the works which up to this date amounts to $1,137,315 is as yet pecuniarily unremunerative.

"}

13. Not only for this reason, but chiefly because this magnificent supply of water is, and for some time to come must remain, comparatively unavailable, it is unfortunate that provision for "Distribution was not made at an earlier period during the progress of the main works. The delay in this and various other even more needed public works must be chiefly attributed to the undue weakness of the Staff of the Surveyor General's Department. The extraordinary density of the population living for the most part on or under the abrupt slopes of a hill 1,100 to 1,800 feet in height, together with the comparatively recent and very rapidly increasing settlement of Europeans on and in the neighbourhood of the summit, requires from this Department, in the interests of public health and safety, a far closer supervision of Private Works than is ordinarily necessary elsewhere, and im- poses duties which are probably more in number and far heavier in degree than are required for any similar area or population in the world.

14. From various indications it would appear open to question whether for years past the Department referred to has been strong enough in numbers to discharge its duties satisfactorily in a climate which every summer renders unfit for duty a large proportion of out-of-door officers. The health of the able and inde- fatigable Surveyor General, Mr. PRICE, who has just retired from the service, gradually succumbed and eventually broke down completely in the endeavour, naturally but very imperfectly successful, to do the work of several ordinary men; and the Department has consequently now to cope with the arrears and difficulties, resulting from these shortcomings, in addition to the new demands arising from the large increase of population. For the above reasons the reorganisation and strengthening of the Department now under Your Lordship's consideration are imperatively required. as it is only by that means that we can hope to make energetic progress in the various sanitary and other public works which are already, and are becoming more and more, grievously required. And I refer to the subject in this place in order to show that, notwithstanding the completion of the great

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works specially referred to, there are others equally required and as yet not com- menced, which will in the next few years necessitate an expenditure on permanent improvements at least equal to, if not greater than, that of recent years. For- tunately, as remarked elsewhere, there is every prospect of a sufficient supply of funds to meet the necessary cost without increase of taxation.

MILITARY EXPENDITURE.

15. "Military Expenditure" (apart from "Defence Works"), which is included in the above total of expenditure, was $134,594 in 1888 as against $128,815 in 1887, the increase being almost altogether due to the depreciation of silver, and the consequently increased number of dollars required to make up the annual contribu- tion of £20,000 towards the support of the Troops,

16. With reference, however, to the contemplated increase of this contribution, it is to be remembered that the above expenditure by no means fairly represents the burthen which is really borne by the Colony. The War Department and the Admiralty occupy land in various localities which in its aggregate area is of great extent, and much of which being in the centre of the Town of Victoria is of very great value. Unlike the other land of the Colony this pays no rent, and what is of more importance contributes nothing to the rates from the expenditure of which the Departments in question receive the benefit. When this is taken into account,

and there is also added the interest of the cost of the Defence Works and other lesser items, I estimate that the real contribution of the Colony to its Defence, exceeds $300,000 per annum, a sum equal to nearly 4th of the Revenue.

17. Judging from the information at my command, I question whether there is paid towards this object by any other Colony so large a proportion of its receipts, or anything like it; and it is moreover to be borne in mind that the defence of Hongkong practically includes to considerable extent that of all the British Mercantile Communities in the many Treaty. Ports of China and Japan which contribute nothing to its Revenue. All things considered therefore, it seems open to question not only whether Hongkong can be fairly called upon to increase its Military contribution, but also whether additional areas of land (such as are con- tinually being requisitioned for the Military and Naval Departments) should not contribute to the Colonial Revenue in the shape of either rent or rates or both.

FINANCIAL POSITION.

A Lifess

18. The only debt of the Colony is one of £200,000 raised in 1887 for Defen- sive and other Works. The sinking fund of £7,072 per annum is expected to discharge this debt in 1907. Though the total expenditure in 1888, $1,992,329, exceeded the total receipts (Ordinary Revenue and Land Premiums) $1,718,188, by $274,141, there was at the close of the year a Treasury balance to credit of $360,649.76.

LEGISLATION.

19. Of the 29 Ordinances passed in 1888, only the following deserve notice :- (I.) "The Vaccination Ordinance, 1888" constitutes the first effort made in this Colony to render general a protection which is especially required in conse- quence of (1) the frequency with which Small-pox is introduced by steamers coming from all parts of the world; (2) the impracticability of its exclusion by effective quarantine and (3) its fatal prevalence when it has once obtained a footing, owing to the density of the population and the unfavourable Sanitary conditions in which a large portion of it habitually lives.

20. We have happily in the Colony none of those-or at least none have made themselves known,-who look to the few cases in which evil has been caused, and who ignore the comparatively enormous good which vaccination has achieved for humanity. The Chinese are thorough believers in the advantage of this protection, and accept it readily a fact which is the more remarkable inasmuch as they, for the most part, reject altogether other applications of Western Medical Science.

21. (II.) "The Vagrancy Ordinance, 1888" was an attempt to meet an evil of growing magnitude, by rendering those having the management or control of vessels liable for the cost incurred by the Colony in respect of destitute persons introduced.

F

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Scarcely a week passes without the necessity of sending to their homes in Europe or elsewhere, persons who have come here ostensibly to seek a livelihood; this repatriation being the preferable and cheaper alternative to their perpetual main- tenance in Gaol or other public institutions. Some of these are sent here, apparently according to instructions, by Her Majesty's Consuls in China and Japan; and not a few come, I suspect, with the object of being sent home at the public expense. Those of them who are foreigners are almost invariably repudiated by their Consuls, as having no means of proving their nationality; and thus from one cause or another, all become a charge on the Colony. The Ordinance above referred to, which was intended as a remedy for this state of things, has probably done some good by inducing greater caution in the introduction of such persons; but it cannot so far be said to have been a marked success; and though it may perhaps be susceptible of beneficial amendment, I fear that the evil is one which can never be completely cured, and must be regarded as an inseparable incident of our position as a great shipping centre.

22. (III.) "The Rating Ordinance, 1888," was, as the title implies, enacted for the improvement of the rating system of the Colony. It embodies the more valuable portions of previous Ordinances, and contains at the same time various useful additions and amendments, principally with the object of simplifying proce- dure, which are the result of the experience gained by Mr. LISTER, the Treasurer, in the supervision of the system, and of the careful attention given by him to the subject.

23. (IV.) "The European District Reservation Ordinance" deals with an evil which has been recognized by successive Governors for years past, but for which this represents the first effort to provide a remedy. The close packing of the Chinese in their houses which is the normal condition of all classes among them, including in some degree even the well-to-do, enables a much larger rent to be obtained from land in Chinese occupation than from that inhabited by Europeans, whose health in a climate unfavourable to them (not to mention their comfort) requires much more breathing space in connection with their residences. Thus the large influx of Chinese in recent years, and the comparative advantage to land owners in providing residence for them, has caused a continually increasing intrusion of Chinese houses upon the quarter of the Town formerly occupied exclusively by Europeans. This result would have been comparatively endurable if it were possible for Europeans to live in health or comfort when surrounded by such houses. unlike the Chinese who have, probably by a long process of natural selection, become inured and insensible to the conditions inseparable from extreme density of popu- lation, they are rendered ill and miserable by the effects of habits which such insensibility produces. Thus little by little, and at a gradually increasing rate, the Europeans were being, so to speak, pushed out of the Town of Victoria; and it seemed probable that before long there would be no suitable area for their residence there, and that such as remained in the Colony would have to choose between the alternative of living under most disagreeable and unhealthy conditions, or of incurring the heavy expense, possible only to the comparatively wealthy, of residence in the Hill District.

But

24. Had the above state of things been allowed to continue, there can be no doubt that it would have brought about a diminution, if not actual at least relative, of the already small European population, a result which could not be otherwise than prejudicial to the Chinese themselves. For though possessed of many valuable characteristics, the latter are still, and are likely to be for a long time to come, lacking in some of the qualities which are essential to true progress; and I can scarcely think there is any opening for rational doubt, that without the presence of a considerable complement of Europeans (apart from those engaged in Government) this Colony could no more maintain, than it could ever have reached, its present condition of prosperity.

25. By the Ordinance in question, a certain portion of the Town is reserved, not for exclusively European occupation, but for houses built according to European models, and occupied in much more limited numbers than is usual with Chinese. If Chinese choose to live under these conditions, as I am informed they commonly do in the neighbouring Penang, there is nothing in the Ordinance to prevent their doing so; and the provisions of this Law are simply directed to secure for Europeans prescribed portion of the Town in which they can live in reasonable comfort.

26. No opposition was offered to the Ordinance on the part of the Chinese possibly because they themselves prefer to be segregated from Europeans; and there

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was none from any other quarter, though I had looked for at least some on the part of land owners, who might naturally be expected to resent such a limitation on the right of property. To their credit, however, they, tacitly or expressly assented to a measure which may thus be regarded as universally recognized to be necessary.

27. (V.) "An Ordinance to authorise in certain cases judicial investigations into the cause of fires" sufficiently explains itself. The effect of this measure has so far apparently been beyond anticipation; as the number of fires, which had become very serious, very largely diminished immediately after the law came into force. It remains to be seen whether this comparatively happy state of things will continue. If so, I apprehend that the result will be largely due to greater care in the selection of insurance risks and decreased recklessness of competition among insurers.

this

28. The principal of the twenty-six Ordinances which have already been passed year are as follows:-

(A.) "The Praya Reclamation Ordinance, 1889," is a measure for facilitating a great scheme of Reclamation along the whole of the western front of the Town of Victoria extending for 3,051 yards. By this project 57 acres will be added to the Town including a Praya or Esplanade 70 feet wide, together with other streets of an aggregate length of 5,518 yards. The cost estimated at $2,921,365 is to be defrayed by the proprietors (including the Government) of the land now facing the sea, who will in return receive the reclaimed land opposite to their frontage. As the profits on the work are expected to be large, it is probable that the great majority of the frontage proprietors will accept the terms offered. In the case of dissentients the expense of carrying out that portion of the work in which they decline to participate will fall on the Government.

29. Though it is hoped that the public Treasury will gain largely by this work: (1) from the difference between the cost of Reclamation and the value of such of the reclaimed land, as will belong to the Crown; (2) from the building sites which will be rendered available at the West of the Town by the removal of earth required for the Reclamation; and (3) in rents and rates from the large area added to the Town; — the principal objects of the scheme were:-(Ï) to afford an opening for relief from the present over-crowding of the population; (2) to bring the front of the Town in immediate juxta-position with deep water in the place of the present foreshore which is for the most part silted up and often extremely noxious; and (3) to improve the appearance and increase the mercantile convenience of the Town front by the provision of better buildings, and of a wider Praya more adapted to the requirements of a vast and growing commerce.

30. The carrying out of this great scheme, which is due to the initiation of the Honourable C. P. CHATER, does not appear likely to present any serious engineer- ing problems, and the successful solution of such as there are may be regarded as only a question of time. The principal difficulties are in connection with the financial arrangements and the due adjustment of private interests and claims. This portion of the subject, which has already occasioned much consideration and a large correspondence, is likely to require the careful attention of the Government for some time to come. But while it cannot be expected that all of the many concerned will be completely satisfied, nor that during the progress of the works there will be an entire absence of complaints on the score of inconvenience, I do not permit myself to entertain a doubt that when the whole is completed the undertaking will be almost universally regarded as having been a great and lasting benefit to the community.

31. (B.) "The Building Ordinance, 1889," is an elaborate measure of 89 clauses, intended to meet a want which has been of late years more and more seriously felt, viz.:-The means of compelling greater attention to security and sanitary requirements in the construction of buildings.

32. (c.) "The Crown Lands Resumption Ordinance, 1889," is intended to make better provision for the acquirement of land for public purposes, and constitutes a tribunal of arbitration for the award of compensation. One of the principal objects of the measure is to facilitate a contemplated experiment having for its object a permanent improvement in the sanitary condition of the Town.

A large portion of the population is densely crowded in houses, which are without yards or windows at the back, and which as regards ths of the rooms are in perpetual and complete darkness. It is proposed to acquire one or more portions of land covered with such houses and to re-sell them (1) either after the replacement of the present

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295

houses by others constructed under better sanitary conditions, or (2) with an obligation attached to the purchase for the building of such houses. Probably the first alternative will have to be adopted at the outset ; and if that should prove financially successful there would be comparatively little difficulty in respect of the second and more convenient one. It is hoped that the cost of reconstruction and the loss of building area from the provision of "back-yards" will be largely compensated by demand for the improved dwellings. If the event should prove otherwise the project need not be pushed further; but I apprehend that it would be worth some cost to the public to get rid of a grave scandal and a serious danger to the public health by the only method yet suggested which would not cause widespread distrust and discontent among the Chinese population. It will however be worth consideration in the future, whether a portion or all of the loss, if any, which may be incurred on resale should not be recouped by a special rate levied on the district benefited or by a quasi-penal rate on houses unprovided with back- yards.

33. (D.) The title of "The Protection of Women and Girls Ordinance, 1889," sufficiently explains itself. The system of purchasing or kidnapping girls, often of very tender age, for the purpose of training them to a life of prostitution seems to be generally prevalent in China, and its suppression in Hongkong is attended with many difficulties. So many are interested in it, and so much of the extraordinary cunning of the Chinese is employed in concealing its operation that its complete extinction at an early date can scarcely be anticipated. It is hoped, however, that this measure which occupied many days in its consideration by the Executive and Legislative Councils, will at least impose a serious check upon it; and will eventually render this abominable trade too dangerous to be any longer attractive.

·

34. But while the greater part of this Ordinance may be hoped to be productive of unmixed good, there is one special provision of it, passed in deference to the present condition of public opinion in England, which I cannot conscientiously approve and in respect of which therefore I have felt it an obligatory duty to give emphatic support to the protest of the un-official Meinbers of Council. I refer to the clause which gives legislative sanction to the policy, already adopted by executive order before my arrival in the Colony, of terminating the compulsory examination of women. The full expression of my views on this vexed question being inappro- priate to this report, is given in a separate despatch; and it will be sufficient to mention here (1) that "examination" is not only not objected to, but has been shewn by positive proof to be approved and desired, by the whole of the unfortunate 'class which was subject to it, and (2) that the measure of abolition now adopted is against the wishes of all classes and races of the community.

35. (E.) “The Chinese Extradition Ordinance, 1889," represents an effort to improve the Law relating to the rendition, in accordance with Treaty obligations, of Chinese subjects charged with the commission of crime in China. The principal change is one which, with regard to the rendition of prisoners, lessens the respon- sibility of the Magistrate, and increases that of the Governor in Council, who, however, will now receive the assistance of the Chief Justice, in the consideration of the evidence. There is also a much needed schedule specifying the crimes in respect of which rendition may be granted, and a provision (passed in deference to fears generally prevalent among he intelligent Chinese) by which special security is afforded to persons who have been for a year resident in the Colony. It have dealt at length with this extremely difficult subject in other despatches; and it will be sufficient to say here that, so long as Chinese ideas as to the methods and the sufficiency of proof, are so utterly at variance with the requirements of British Law, it will, I fear, be practically impossible to avoid international disagreements as to what prisoners rightly come under the designation of" criminals whose extradition is obligatory by the Treaty.

36. Among the principal of the legislative measures now under consideration, the following are among the most important:-(1.) An amendment of the Law regulating Emigration, intended to check the serious abuses which, according to evidence continually accumulating, attend the exportation of the enormous number of coolies, now probably exceeding 50,000, who annually leave the Colony for service in Sumatra, Borneo, the Straits Settlements and elsewhere. (2.) A Law for better defining the powers of the Sanitary Board established by the Public Health Ordinance, 1887. (3.) The constitution of a Public Officers' Widows and Orphans' Fund. (4.) An`amendment of the Bankruptcy Law. I had much hoped, moreover, to have initiated before now a measure for the settlement of Titles, and for rendering

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more simple the transfer of land on the principle of the Torrens Act. But in view of the minute sub-division of many of the most valuable lots, and of the frequent uncertainty as to area and boundaries, I find to my regret that any such measure, in order to be satisfactorily effective, must be preceded by a trigonometrical survey, for which accordingly I have asked Your Lordship's approval.

EDUCATION.

37. On this important subject I can scarcely do better than quote some remarks in a report, written just before his death by the late Mr. STEWART, Colonial Secretary, whose deep interest in the cause of education was evinced by the valuable aid which he rendered to it during the whole course of the long period of his public service, now unhappily come to an end.

(3

(6

{

"The advance in Education is one of the most gratifying features in the progress of the Colony. There is yet much to be done and female Education is only in its infancy; but the lines on which the system is moving seem to be correct, "and time alone is required to reclaim those portions of the field which remain "untouched. We have now four highly efficient Public Schools, not including the "Convents, which do so much for the education of girls. Government Schools are penetrating into the outlying villages. The Education code is working most smoothly, and seldom gives rise to any question which cannot be easily settled."

64

38. It is gratifying to note that since the above was written Your Lordship has approved a scheme for the establishment by way of experiment, of a Government Central School for Girls similar to the Boys School, now called the "Victoria College," which has already proved so successful. The various objections to the establishment of such a School, which I have heard urged in the Colony or which have been suggested by my own experience, were, in my opinion, entirely overcome by an able report of Dr. EITEL, the Inspector of Schools (dated the 5th of July, 1889) which has been already forwarded to Your Lordship. There appear to be strong grounds for believing that the Institution, now to be established, will meet a very urgent need; and that its success, by giving a general impetus to female education, will considerably reduce the unhappily large number of children in the Colony (8,000, the great majority girls) who are still without education.

39. The completion of the New Building for "Victoria College," as providing greatly increased accommodation for pupils, together with the additional strength given to the Teaching Staff, may be expected to assist largely in the good work,, which this Institution has already effected--not only for the higher education of the youth of the Colony, but in introducing a leaven of European acquirements in knowledge among the people of the neighbouring Empire. I should not, however, omit to state that this latter object, as well as the higher education of the Colony, is being largely served by several other Institutions which supported mainly by private subscription are assisted by Government contributions, under the Grant- in-aid system established by Governor Sir JOHN POPE HENNESSY.

SHIPPING.

40. With regard to the tonnage statistics contained in the Colonial Secretary's Report, it may be noted that the aggregate tonnage of vessels entering the Port of Victoria during 1888-6,400,410 tons-shows a slightly falling off from the returns for 1887-6,401,837 tons. In view (1) of the diminished export of tea from China in consequence of the competition of India and Ceylon; and (2) of the serious checks given to Chinese Emigration in the United States and the Australian Colonies, with the contraction of trade thereby occasioned,-it might have been expected that the shipping returns would have been much more seriously affected. But though, probably as the result of these causes, the tonnage of European vessels fell from 4,607,914 to 4,536,442 tons it will be seen that that of junks rose from 1,793,923 to 1,863,968 tons, so that the decrease of trade in one direction was almost entirely compensated by increase in another. It should be noted that the shipping returns of this Colony are very far from merely indicating the entry of steamers for the purpose of coal-supply, as is probably the case with the greater portion of the large tonnage returned by some of the Mediterranean Ports. For Hongkong is the terminus not only of the whole of the junk trade (in 1888 1,863,968 fons) and of nearly all of the European and American sailing ships entering, but also of many lines of Ocean steamers including 3 trading to America, 2 to Australia, 1 to Calcutta, 2 to Europe (the Austrian Lloyds and Florio Rubattino) and others

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to Manila, Borneo, Siam, and the Coast Ports of China; while of the steam-ships of the other great lines, the P. & O., the Messageries Maritimes, the German Lloyds, the "Ocean," "Glen," "Shire," and "Ben Lines which proceed onwards to Shanghai or Japan, there are very few which do not leave here on the outward voyage, and take in on the homeward, a considerable portion of their cargo.

AFFORESTATION.

41. The work of Afforestation, begun in 1881, is being still continued. According to a return furnished by Mr. FORD, the Superintendent of the Depart- ment, 374,882 trees were planted in 1887 and 682,325 in 1888, the number planted altogether having been 5,676,207. In so far as I have been able to judge from personal observation, a very large proportion of these plants have either failed altogether, or are merely stunted shrubs. I am awaiting a report from Mr. FORD as to the actual extent of success, with the causes of failure, before considering what measures should be taken under the circumstances.

GAOLS.

42. It is satisfactory to note that the number of prisoners in the Gaol which was 4,600 in 1886, fell to 4,308 in 1887 and to 3,627 in 1888, the daily average having similarly fallen from 674 in 1886 to 584 in 1887 and to 531 in 1888, the total decrease in both cases being over 20 per cent. The returns of prisoners tried in the Courts show also a falling off, which if it may be taken to indicate a decrease of crime is probably due to the severer discipline introduced into the Gaol. The number of prisoners still bears an abnormal proportion to the population, and the fact can scarcely excite surprise in view of the hard struggle for livelihood among the people of China, and the immediate neighbourhood to the Colony of the Pro- vince of Kwangtung of which the extremely dense population is said to be the most lawless in the Empire.

POPULATION.

43 Statistics of the estimated population are given in the Colonial Secretary's Report; but it may be well to point out here that the difference between the number returned at the census of 1881 (160,402) and that estimated for 1888 (215,000) shews an increase of 34 per cent. in 7 years and that the ratio of women to men which was 1 to 2.56 in 1881 is now estimated at 1 to 2.52. This great, and appa- rently permanent, disproportion between the sexes would appear to justify special caution in applying to Hongkong that deprivation of protection from certain disease, which has been deemed expedient in England.

PUBLIC WORKS.

44. The Tytam Water-Works have been already mentioned under the head of Expenditure. During the period under review the great dam of the main re- servoir, the tunnel and conduit received their finishing work, and the service reservoir and filter beds were commenced and completed.

45. Victoria College, which has been several years in construction, was also completed in July last. It is unquestionably a very handsome building of which the Colony may be proud, but it has cost a large sum ($251,587) and promises also to be extremely costly in maintenance. Seeing how grievous is and must have been the need of other public works, and noting that provision might have been made for the same number of pupils in a more modest building, I cannot but feel that it would have been better if much of the expense incurred, and time devoted to this edifice, had been diverted in other directions.

46. A building has been commenced and completed for the reception of girls, in charge of the Registrar General, who have been rescued from kidnappers or from brothel slavery, their maintenance, as hitherto has been customary, in a building connected with the Tung-Wa Hospital having proved unsatisfactory.

47. Of the works now most urgently required, the Filter-beds for the Pokfu- lam Water-Works, which previously to the construction of the Tytam Works afforded the chief supply of the Town, have been commenced; and, it may be hoped, will be completed before next summer, which is the season of the heaviest rain. The water of this reservoir, which is carried into the Town round the base of Mount Davis and the Victoria Peak by a conduit some 34 miles in length, has

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always been rendered muddy by heavy rains, and this disagreeable and most un- desirable effect has been aggravated this year not only by an exceptional season, but by the number of excavations for houses which have been made at the brink of the watershed. As the upper levels and other outlying portions of the Town must be still dependent upon this supply, it is a matter of urgent importance that a work, which ought to have been commenced long ago, should be as quickly as possible pushed to completion.

48. Owing to the causes referred to under the head of Expenditure, other works, although equally needed, have either made very slight progress or have not been commenced at all. The general improvement of the drainage, the necessity of which is continually increasing, will be commenced as soon as the Engineers, who are being consulted on the subject, have decided on the system to be adopted; and the same may be said respecting the distribution works required for the Tytam Water. The Western Market has not proceeded beyond the preparation of the site; and there has as yet been no possibility of commencing the public Laundries which appeared on the estimates for the year and are very much required; the present process of clothes washing being in various ways dangerous to health, especially from the quantity of soap in solution which in some quarters pollutes the air. The Epidemic Hospital has not been built because not a single site that was, or apparently can be, selected was without grave objections. In consequence, it has been determined to have recourse to a hulk; and it is to be hoped that the efforts to obtain one, commenced some months ago, may now be shortly successful.

49. A similar difficulty in respect of site, has occurred in connection with the Lunatic Asylum, intended to be provided for Chinese. Such a building is required because the present Asylum is sufficient only for Europeans, Chinese patients having been ordinarily confined under most undesirable conditions in a building in the charge of the Directors of the Tung-Wa Hospital. It is however necessary to restrict the use of the proposed Asylum to Chinese either born, or long resident in the Colony; or we should be very quickly inundated with lunatics from the neighbouring Empire. But for service within these prescribed limits such an Institution is, and must have been for a long time past, very grievously required on the simplest grounds of humanity. I am glad therefore to be able to report that a site has at length been selected, and the plan of the buildings approved; so that, it may be hoped, the work will now proceed without further delay.

50. But second to no other work in importance or necessity is that which is intended to effect the junction of the East and West Prayas by an embankment* carried along the front of the Naval Yard and the Military Cantonments, and the plans of which were forwarded to Your Lordship early in the year. This work (the expediency of which has been recognised by the Colonial Government for. many years past, though it has now for the first time received the entire concurrence of the local authorities representing the Army and Navy) has for its principal object the provision of additional means of communication between the Eastern and Western portions of the Town, now almost cut off from one another by land in the occupation of the Admiralty and War Departments; the one narrow road which runs through this property being insufficient for the present traffic and entirely inadequate to permit of that expansion of the Town eastward which is required to provide an outlet for an overcrowded population. Besides the main advantage derivable from the scheme there are other incidental ones of much importance to the Imperial Departments concerned. Thus the Admiralty will obtain reclaimed land worth (at the low estimate of $3 a square foot) $156,792, and what is of more importance will save the cost which would shortly have to be incurred for the removal of the present silted up and often noxious foreshore in front of the Naval Yard, obtaining in its place a convenient cut-stone basin, 400 feet by 200 feet, offering a much needed protection to boats and launches, as well as sufficiently deep water close along shore at all times of tide. While the War Department will obtain land worth at a similar low valuation $1,325,856, much of which will not, I understand, be required for Military purposes and will thus be available for sale. Under these circumstances I do not permit myself to entertain a doubt that a substantial Imperial contribution will be made towards the cost of the work, estimated at $691,000, which would be a heavy burthen if required to be borne entirely by the Colony--and this more especially inasmuch as it is the obstruction caused by Imperial property which has necessitated the expense. any case it may be hoped that an improvement so absolutely needed for the welfare and progress of the Colony will not be long delayed.

In

2

Not the reclamation mentioned under the head "Legislation."

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VARIOUS STATISTICS.

51. The following statistics furnished to me by Mr. WODEHOUSE, Acting Treasurer, may prove of interest :-

30th Sept., 1879. 30th Sept., 1889.

Total amount of Deposits Current and Fixed in the

European Banks in Hongkong,

$ 7,068,600

Ditto (Estimated) in Chinese Banks,

$ 23,882,000

15,000,000

Total amount in the Savings Bank,

211,000

Notes in Circulation with bullion in reserve of all

Banks,

....

4,776,856

9,100,826

Market value of all registered Companies in Hongkong, 39,380,000

63,921,700

:

REVIEW OF LEADING EVENTS AND OF THE CONDITION AND PROSFECTS

OF THE COLONY.

52. At the beginning of the period of two years above referred to viz.: in November, 1887, occurred the celebration of Her Majesty's Jubilee. The British Community fell short of no other in its outward expression of loyalty; but the most striking feature of the occasion was the heartiness with which the Chinese took part in it, and the very large expense, estimated as exceeding $100,000, which they incurred for processious and illuminations in honour of the event. There could scarcely be better practical proof that they are, on the whole, satisfied with the rule, of which they have now had some 45 years' experience.

53. In the following months occurred a very serious epidemic of small-pox among the Chinese, and one of fever among the European inhabitants of the Western District. The former was similar to what has occurred frequently, and is only what might be expected among a dense population hitherto so largely unvaccinated. The latter, though attributed at the time to other causes, has been shewn by later information to have been distinctly malarial (there having been only one case which shewed symptoms of drain-poison) and was in all probability due principally to the upturning of earth over large areas in connection with the Belcher's Bay Fort, and many private works.

54. In the spring of 1888 occurred a great "strike" on the part of some 4,000 cargo-boatmen which caused much interference with the trade of the Port and at one time threatened serious disturbance. The cause was a regulation, passed before my arrival in the Colony, according to which each cargo-boatman, as the condition of obtaining a licence, was compelled to provide (in addition to the fee of 25 cents per annum) a photograph of himself for the purpose of identification. My enquiries into the subject at once rendered it evident that, supposing a licence to be expedient for each boatman, the photograph was really necessary to preclude facility of transfer. But it was at the same time equally evident that this very facility of transfer had rendered comparatively tolerable a tax on labour which somewhat savoured of oppression, and to the burthen of which the cost and trouble involved in providing photographs would make a very considerable addition. And it moreover seemed probable that the principal object of the measure, viz., facility of police supervision over cargo-boats, might be equally well attained by less questionable means.

55. While for these reasons sympathising with the strikers as having a just ground of complaint, I felt that, in a community of this kind, it would be unwise to amend the regulation until they had modified their attitude of combined obstruction to trade, inasmuch as the success of pressure under such circumstances would have quickly caused it to be used for less legitimate objects. Notification was therefore made to them that while they as free men were of course at liberty to cease work if they chose to do so, any attempt on their part at disorder or intimidation of others would be visited with the strongest measures of repression; and. they were at the same time informed in conciliatory terms that, when they returned to work, their complaints would at once receive careful consideration. In somewhat less than a fortnight from the commencement of the "strike" this policy had at length the desired effect; and after the men had returned to work the regulations were reconsi- dered. As now amended, the tax on ordinary boatmen is abolished, and the

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necessity of a licence, with its accompanying photograph, is imposed only on the headman in charge of each boat; the restricted requirement being, it is believed, quite sufficient to fix responsibility in respect of irregularities such as had originally given occasion for the regulations.

56. One of the fortunate events of the year 1888 was the settlement with the Chinese Government of the long pending and much vexed question of the provision of a site for a lighthouse, in connection with the southern approach to Hongkong. The only suitable sites are on one or other of certain rocky islets belonging to China situate some 28 miles from the Colony; and among the various difficulties which have obstructed the settlement of this question, the principal one was the objection of the Chinese Government to cede, or even lease, to a foreign Government the smallest portion of its territory. As the discussion of this subject had been dragging on for many years past and the matter appeared to be of sufficient im- portance to justify urgent measures and very liberal terms, I caused to be conveyed to the Chinese Government various distinct proposals under any one of which the Dominion of China would remain unimpaired and the control of its Government, ordinarily nominal, might at their option be completely secured, while the whole cost of construction would fall on the Colony.

57. With the valuable and most necessary co-operation of Sir ROBERT HART, the Inspector General of Chinese Maritime Customs, Her Majesty's Minister at Peking was able to secure the consent of the Tsungli Yamên to a settlement which though differing somewhat from all the proposals made, accepted their main principle; and the work is now in progress, conducted by the Works Department, and at the sole cost of this Government.

58. As the hope of assistance from the Lighthouse Department of the Chinese Maritime Customs has failed, it has been necessary to purchase a steam vessel of considerable tonnage, specially for this service. The work has also been delayed by an extremely unfavourable season; for landing can be effected at the Gap Rock (on which the Lighthouse is to be built) only in very calm weather, which has during the last year been of rare occurrence. While further difficulty has arisen from the fears on the part of the contractors and workmen that they, on this isolated rock, will become the object of attack from the pirates, who unfortunately still abound in these seas, and whose presence in the neighbourhood may probably render necessary either a guard for the Lighthouse keeper or cable communication with the rock, as soon as the Light is in operation.

59. Owing to these various causes, I expect that both the construction and maintenance of the Lighthouse will cost more than was at first anticipated; but even if the expense should be considerably greater, there can be no doubt that the object would be fully worth it. Considering that vessels of an aggregate burthen of fully 2 millions of tons annually reach Hongkong from the South, and that all those which arrive on dark nights or in obscure weather are subject to delay and danger (sometimes for many hours) which would be for the most part pre- cluded by this Lighthouse with its warning fog horn, it may readily be estimated how enormously valuable will be this work to the trade of the Colony. Indeed it is a matter for surprise that more vigorous efforts were not long ago made to secure so great a benefit.

60. A serious outbreak on the part of convicts employed on works in gangs outside the Gaol took place in the month of September, 1888, and resulted in the death of a valuable officer besides that of two of the prisoners, killed while violently resisting recapture. My serious attention having thus been attracted to this subject, I found that similar events had occurred not unfrequently in the past, and I became satisfied that without an utterly disproportionate expense for guards, they were not likely to be prevented in the future; so many are the chances of escape offered by the situation of the island, and increased, as there is every reason to believe, by the powerful secret societies of China, which devote themselves to the assistance of criminals in confinement. A report from the Surveyor General, strongly deprecat- ing the use of convict labour on public works under ordinary circumstances, strengthened the doubt which I had previously entertained as to its economical value in a Colony where free labour is so cheap; and completely satisfied me that with any additional expense for guards it would mean actual loss. Being moreover convinced both by medical opinion and from the results of experience, that the working of the convicts outside was not at all necessary to their health, I, under all the circumstances, determined that they should for the future be confined to the precincts of the Gaol, and I am glad to say that, in the ten months which have since elapsed, there has been no cause whatever to regret the decision.

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61. In May of this year occurred the severest storm of rain and thunder ever experienced in the Colony. During 36 hours there fell some 38 inches of rain, and lightning was constant during the whole time, fifty flashes and more being occa- sionally observable in a single minute. The effect, upon a place situated as is Victoria on the lower slopes of a ridge of high hills, may be easily imagined. Landslips caused the discharge of many thousands of tons of loosened stones and earth upon the lower levels, uprooting trees, filling reservoirs, blocking and burst- ing sewers and raising some of the waterside streets from 6 to 10 feet above their natural level. In one place a strong stone and brick sewer was burst and the nineteen-feet-deep earth above it was carried away leaving a gap 300 square yards in extent; and huge granite boulders, descending from the heights destroyed in three places the solidly built cut-stone conduit of the Tytam Water-Works. For- tunately but few houses were destroyed or seriously injured; but roads, streets, sewers and other Government property suffered greatly, costing it is estimated, $112,783 for repairs. Some few lives were unhappily lost, principally by lightning; and it is matter for wonder that the number was not much larger; indeed when it is calculated how many millions of tons of water fell on the steep incline above the Town, it is a subject of congratulation, and speaks well for the general solidity of work, that there was not a far greater aggregate of destruction. In the course of a few months reconstruction and repairs will have removed in most places all traces of the storm; but some of the damage is reparable only by time, and it will take years

before Glenealy Ravine, hitherto remarkable for its abundant and luxuriant foliage, and other similar spots, can completely recover their former beauty.

62. Quite recently occurred an incident which at one time threatened a serious complication with China. Two Chinese were arrested in Kowloon, on territory belonging to this Colony, by a number of Chinese soldiers evidently acting under superior authority. There was at first much unwillingness to restore the prisoners on the ground that the place of arrest was not British. But on further investigation it became certain that the information at first received by this Government, was correct, and the news having in the meantime arrived that the men were about to be executed as actually happened in a similar case some years ago there was immediately made a second and more energetic protest on behalf of this Govern- ment, which happily produced the desired effect. The men were delivered to Mr. ALABASTER, Her Majesty's Consul at Canton, by the Viceroy of the Two Kuang and brought to this Colony.

63. The Viceroy had doubtless been misled by the reports of his officers as to the place of the arrest. They, it appears, had for some time previously been on the look-out for the chief prisoner, who lived on British ground close to the border; and at last apparently losing patience they crossed the line and seized him in his own house. I have not yet heard, however, that any of them have been punished either for the act or the subsequent inis-report of it.

64. The arrested men having, after their return here, been tried before a Ma- gistrate on a charge of piracy and murder preferred on behalf of the Chinese Government, they were discharged from custody, the evidence against them being held insufficient to warrant extradition, and they forthwith left the Colony before their relcase became known to the Government. If, as there seems reason to believe at least as regards one of them, they were really guilty of atrocious crime, this result is a matter for much regret; but the case will serve to accentuate the necessity of improvement in the testimony produced in connection with extradition charges; and what is of more importance to this Colony, it will, it may be hoped, induce greater caution on the part of Chinese Officials in respect of the violation of British territory, of which this is by no means the first example, though it is, I believe, the first occasion of the restoration of the prisoners.

65. Among the leading features of the period under report, should be noticed the great rise in the price of land. Since 1881 the market value of marine lots, has become enhanced at least 50 per cent. on the average, the rise in some instances being much greater, while inland town lots have advanced 15 to 20 per cent. The greater part of this rise has taken place within the last two years, and by way of illustration, as well as to show how great is the present value of land in favourable situations, I may mention that an area of 7,037 square feet which cost $40,000, in 1883, sold for $70,000 in 1887 and is now refused for sale on a bona fide offer of $150,000-over £3 the square foot or at the rate of more than £130,000 sterling per English acre. Another area of 44,000 square feet, which cost $335,000 in 1887, actually sold in 1888 for $465,000, about 32/- a square foot or £70,000

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per acre. Another of 33,000 square feet costing $250,000 in 1886, sold for $500,000 in 1889 (45/- per square foot or £98,000 per acre). The price of another of the same area rose in the same period from $310,000 to $500,000, and another of 33,000 square feet which cost $310,000 in 1882, is now refused for sale at $450,000 or over 50/- per square foot. The above instances are all of Marine Lots; but I am informed on good authority that Inland Lots, of large area in the aggregate, situate in the Chinese business quarter could not be obtained at a price less than $15 to $20 (45/- to 60/- sterling) a square foot or £97,000 to £130,000

an acre.

66. In the Hill District the advance in value has been relatively even greater than elsewhere; as for instance from $2,000 in 1879 to $35,000 in 1888; $10,000 in 1882 to $46,000 in 1888; $23,000 (estimated) in 1885 to $50,000 in 1888– while Government land which could not have been sold at 5 cents a square foot within this decade, has realised at auction from 20 to 50 cents per square foot.

67. The most recent advance in Marine Lots has been probably due to the prospects of profit from the Reclamation scheme mentioned above, and that in the Hill District is, no doubt, in considerable measure owing to the Tramway from the town to Victoria Gap (1,100 feet above the sea) worked on a plan similar, I understand, to that of the Railway on Mount Vesuvius. By means of this line (which was opened in May, 1887, and which carried 148,344 passengers in its first year) residence at "the Peak" is rendered much more easy to those-and they include nearly all the male population of the neighbourhood--whose occupations require their daily presence in town. And from this and other causes the demand for houses at this high altitude has become so great that 35 have been erected within the last two years, and 39 more are in course of construction.

68. Each of these houses is built on a site more or less precipitous, the requisite level for buildings and tennis courts being obtained by blasting; and as every brick, stone, timber, and other article used in construction, as well as the furniture on completion, requires to be carried on coolies' shoulders for distances varying from one to two miles to a height of 1,100 to 1,600 feet,* it may be imagined what has been the labour and cost involved in the work, and why it is that residence at the Peak must be confined to the comparatively wealthy.

69. Another of the leading features of the most recent history of the Colony is the number of joint-stock enterprises undertaken almost entirely with local capital- to which, it may be noted, Chinese have, for the first time, begun to make considerable subscriptions in common with Europeans. Since the beginning of 1888, 35† Com- panies have been formed, with capital already paid-up aggregating $9,508,475, for land investment, manufacture, and trade in Hongkong and for mining and planting enterprises in the Malay Peninsula, Borneo, and Tongking. So strong has been the tendency towards joint-stock investment that the shares of most of the Com- panies have been insufficient in number for the demand; and it may be mentioned as shewing the amount of capital available for the purpose that within two months of this year the sum of $4,890,000 was paid into the Hongkong and Shanghai Bank in connection with the shares of one Company. I

·

70. As far as is known all, or nearly all, of these Companies, especially those whose field of operations is in Hongkong, have good, some of them excellent, pros- pects of success. There can moreover be little doubt that land in Hongkong will eventually be even more valuable than now. But it remains to be seen whether property in either land or shares is at present worth the high price to which it has been advanced by speculative purchase. It may indeed be taken as certain that in very few instances can the profits within the next year or two afford a fair interest on present outlay; and hence probably arise the signs of reaction which are now beginning to show themselves. If this depression of values should continue, it would no doubt cause much distress among those who have been speculating beyond their means; but any general injury is not at all likely to be other than temporary; and in a Colony having so many solid elements of prosperity it may be taken as certain that, in the absence of calamity, the wound will be very quickly healed.

** According to a return made for me by the Police there are at the present time being carried thus to "the Peak " from 2,800 to 3,000 loads per diem of bricks and other materials.

†There are 10 other Companies registered in Hongkong of which I have been unable to ascertain the paid-up Capital, making a total of 45,

The Hongkong Land Investment Company, Limited. Capital $5,000,000 of which $2,500,000 has been paid-up together with $1,250,000 premium on the 2nd issue. The sum of $1,140,000 paid for shares not allotted was returned to the applicants.

1

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71. Though the absence of any Custom House and of any returns* of Imports and Exports, precludes any certain estimate of the amount of trade, it may be gathered from the above remarks in connection with "Shipping" that the enormous commerce of the Colony is in a condition of healthy progress. We may have not yet felt the full effects of the restrictive measures against Chinese in the United States and Australia, and of the decline in the Chinese Tea Trade; but there is good reason to think that any contraction from these causes is being rapidly compensated in other directions. But while commerce pure and simple, is, and must be for a long time to come, the principal element of our prosperity; it is, I think, from manufacture that may be hoped the greatest progress of Hongkong in the future. We can readily have abundant and cheap supplies of raw materials; and there is available, to a practically unlimited extent, the cheap labour of China; while we have also, what is absent there, the advantage of general confidence that enterprise will not be unnecessarily hampered and mulcted of its legitimate reward. Already we have seen established in the last few years sugar refineries which are doing an exceedingly large and apparently prosperous business; we have moreover ship and boat building yards, rope works, ice works (now doing a large export trade) and some 30 minor industries enumerated in the Blue Book. But considerable as is the aggregate of manufacture already, it is in all probability inappreciable by comparison with what it would shortly become if there were to be any important reduction of the price of coal, which as being almost exclusively obtained from distant coun- tries is at present very costly ($8 to $16 per ton); and such a reduction may, I think, be regarded as only a question of time. Enormous and as yet completely undeveloped coal deposits are known to exist in China and other neighbouring countries; and there is abundant evidence that the progressive party among the Chinese are beginning to awaken to the advantage of utilising their mineral wealth. Indeed unless all of the various movements, there and elsewhere, for the production of coal in the neighbourhood, should prove abortive, it may be expected that the only element needed for rapid progress in manufacturing enterprise will in no long time be supplied.

72. To render more complete the information derived from the above account of events and observations on statistics, and in order to enable a fuller appreciation of the condition and progress of the Colony, it may be well to give, however imper- fectly, some idea of its outward appearance from a contrast of the present with the past.

73. There must be some still living who saw the island before the British occupation. If one of them, having been absent during the whole interval, were now to return, even the extremely salient and beautiful features of the natural landscape would scarcely enable him to identify with the Hongkong of to-day what he would remember as a bare rock, with a fisherman's hut here and there as the only sign of habitation, and a great sea-basin only very rarely disturbed by a passing keel.

74. For now he would see a city of closely built houses stretching for some four miles along the island shore, and rising, tier over tier, up the slopes of the mountain, -those on the upper levels interspersed with abundant foliage; while on the opposite peninsula of Kowloon, which was (until very recently) an uninhabited waste of undulating red rock, he would now see-in the distance prevalent verdure; -in the foreground and along the whole sea board numerous houses together with docks, great warehouses and other evidence of a large and thriving population. Again, the silent and deserted basin has become a harbour so covered with shipping, that even if he has been round the whole world, he could never before have seen so much in a single coup d'œil. At anchor or moving are, some 40 to 50 Ocean steamers, including ships of war; large European and American sailing vessels, and

There are at present strong objections on the part both of Europeans and Chinese to any provision for such returns, partly because they would involve a certain restriction upon the complete freedom of trade, and partly on other grounds, arising from our vicinity to China.

The Shares of the China Sugar Company which own one of these refineries, not the largest, are now quoted in the market at 130 per cent. premium.

There are several docks-one of them a dry dock constructed entirely of granite which can take in, the largest vessels now afloat in the world, except perhaps the two recently built for the White Star Line. In the Kowloon warehouses of the Hongkong and Kowloon Wharf and Godown Company, all in immediate contiguity and for the most part under one roof, may be seen at any time merchandise worth over half a million sterling.

The tonnage return of Hongkong shows it to be the 3rd port of the British Empire, and therefore (with the possible exception of New York, of which I have no statistics) the 3rd in the world. The aggregate burthen of shipping is greater than that of all the British possessions on the Continent of America, or than that of the four leading Colonies of Australia,

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hundreds of sea-going junks; while in the space intervening and around are many thousand boats, for the most part human habitations, with steam-launches* rushing in all directions.

75. Going ashore our visitor would see long lines of quays and wharves, large warehouses teeming with merchandise, shops stocked with all the luxuries as well as the needs of two civilisations; in the European quarter a fine Town Hall, stately Banks, and other large buildings of stone; in the Chinese quarters houses, constructed after a pattern peculiar to China, of almost equally solid materials, but packed so closely together and thronged so densely as to be in this respect probably without parallel in the world; and finally he would see streets stretching for miles abounding with carriages (drawn for the most part not by animals but by men), and teeming with a busy population, in the centre of the Town chiefly European, but towards the West and East almost exclusively Chinese.

76. Ascending higher up he would find Churches, Public buildings and many houses, all of exclusively European design (extending now about of the distance up the mountain) for the most part detached or semi-detached, some of handsome appearance and nearly all fronted with stone arched verandahs, which at a distance give somewhat of a palatial flavour even to the smallest; he would see moreover beautifully laid out gardens, public and private, and solidly constructed roads some of them bordered with bamboos and other delicately fronded trees, and fringed with the luxuriant undergrowth of semi-tropical vegetation; while meeting here but comparatively few passengers he would scarcely realise the neighbourhood of a large population except from what has been aptly termed "the indescribable hum of congregated humanity," arising from the Town and Harbour beneath.

77. Ascending still further to the summit of the ridge, he in the course of a two-mile walk would observe that not only Victoria Peak, but Mount Gough, Mount Kellett and the heights above the Magazine Gap, with the many intervening knolls and ravines at a high elevation, are for the most part intersected by roads, and studded with houses, similar to those last described, built in one or two places so close together as to present almost an urban aspect; and looking down whence he came,, he,while no doubt recognising the grand mountain-amphitheatre of his early recollection, would at the same time notice that its arena, occupied by city and shipping, has changed as though by the wand of an enchanter.

78. Hongkong has indeed changed its aspect; and when it is remembered that all this has been effected in Her Majesty's reign, and indeed during a space of less than fifty years, on ground in immediate contact with the inost populous Empire in the world, by a comparatively infinitesimal number of an entirely alien race separated from their homes by nearly the whole earth, and, unlike their countrymen in Australia and Canada, living in an enervating and trying climate; and when it is further remembered that the Chinese, whose labour and enterprise under British auspices have largely assisted in this development, have been under no compulsion, but have come here as free men, attracted by liberal institutions, equitable treatment, and the justice of our rule; when all this is taken into account, it may be doubted whether the evidences of material and moral achievement, presented as it were in a focus, make anywhere a more forcible appeal to eye and imagination, and whether any other spot on the earth is thus more likely to excite, or much more fully justifies pride in the name of Englishmar.

I have the honour to be,

My Lord,

Your Lordship's most obedient,

humble Servant,

(Signed), G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

* Apart from those belonging to British and Foreign War Ships, there are 98 Steam-launches in the Harbour.

† It is believed that over 100,000 people live within a certain district of the City of Victoria not exceeding

square mile in area. It is known that 1,600 people live in the space of a single acre.

Besides the houses and shipping, every one of several thousand boats and sampans carries a light after dark: so that seen from the Peak on a dark night, the wide expanse of the City and Harbour beneath, has the effect of a nether firmament with more stars in it than a similar space above.

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LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 1.

WEDNESDAY, 2ND JANUARY, 1889.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(SIR G. WILLIAM DES VEUX, K.C.M.G.)

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (FREDERICK STEWART).

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the Attorney General, (EDWARD LOUGHLIN O'Malley).

the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (HENRY ERNEST WODEHOUSE, C.M.G.). the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE).

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (WALTER MEREDITH DEANE). PHINEAS RYRIE.

WONG SHING.

BENDYSHE LAYTON, (vice the Honourable ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN).

The Honourable JOHN BELL-IRVING.

ABSENT:

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

The Council met pursuant to notice.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 17th ultimo, were read and confirmed.

VOTE PASSED BY THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excel- lency the Governor, laid on the table the Report of the proceedings of the Finance Committee (No. 32) dated the 17th instant, and moved that the following Vote referred to therein be passed:-

C.5.0. 3015 of 1888.

SUPPLEMENTARY VOTES FOR 1888.

SERVICES EXCLUSIVE OF ESTABLISHMENTS. Works and Buildings.

Balance of Vote passed in May, 1887, for $9,600, for the extension of the Cattle Market, of

which only $8,000 were expended in 1887,

The Acting Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

....$1,600.00

BILL ENTITLED THE CHINESE EMIGRATION CONSOLIDATION ORDINANCE, 1889.-The Attorney General moved the third reading of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed, and numbered as Ordinance 1 of 1889.

BILL ENTITLED THE EVIDENCE CONSOLIDATION ORDINANCE, 1889.-The Attorney General moved the third reading of this Bill.

-

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass..

Bill passed, and numbered as Ordinance 2 of 1889.

BILL ENTITLED THE COMPENSATION TO FAMILIES ORDINANCE, 1889.-The Attorney General moved the third reading of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed, and numbered as Ordinance 3 of 1889.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND ORDINANCE 6 OF 1887.-The Attorney General moved the third reading of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed, and numbered as Ordinance 4 of 1889.

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BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE FOR THE NATURALIZATION OF TSU TAK-PIU otherwise CHING Ú.— The Attorney General moved the third reading of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a third time.

Question put--that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed, and numbered as Ordinance 5 of 1889.

BILL ENTITLED THE STATUTE LAW PRESERVATION ORDINANCE AMENDMENT ORdinance, 1889.- The Attorney General moved the third reading of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed, and numbered as Ordinance 6 of 1889.

BILL ENTITLED THE CORONER'S ABOLITION ORDINANCE SUPPLEMENTAL ORDINANCE, 1889.-The Attorney General moved the third reading of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded. Question-put and passed.

Bill read a third time.

Question put--that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed, and numbered as Ordinance 7 of 1889.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE POWERS OF POLICE MAGISTRATES.-The Attorney General moved the third reading of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed, and numbered as Ordinance 8 of 1889.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE REFORMATORY SCHOOLS ORDINANCE, 1886.-The Attorney General moved that the Council do go into Committee on this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill reported with amendments.

BILL ENTITLED THE MERCHANT SHIPPING ORDINANCE AMENDMENT ORDINANCE, 1889.-The Attorney General moved that the Council do go into Committee on this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill reported with a verbal amendment.

BYE-LAWS UNDER "THE PUBLIC HEALTH ORDINANCE, 1887."-Read certain Bye-Laws made by the Sanitary Board, under The Public Health Ordinance, 1887, dated the 20th December, 1887.

Question put-that these Bye-Laws be approved.

Bye-Laws approved.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned to Thursday, the 10th instant, at 4 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 10th day of January, 1889.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX,

Vœux,

Governor.

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LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 2.

THURSDAY, 10TH JANUARY, 1889.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR (SIR G. WILLIAM DES VEUX, K.C.M.G.)

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (FREDERICK STEWART).

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the Attorney General, (EDWARD LOUGHLIN O'MALLEY).

the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (Henry Ernest WODEHOUSE, C.M.G.). the Captain Superintendent of Police, (WALTER MEREDITH DEANE). PHINEAS RYRIE.

WONG SHING.

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BENDYSHE LAYTON, (vice the Honourable ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN).

ABSENT:

The Honourable the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE).

JOHN BELL-IRVING.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

The Council met pursuant to notice.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 2nd instant, were read and confirmed. MESSAGE.—Read the following Message from His Excellency the Governor :-

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

The Governor, in accordance with the intimation made to the Legislative Council last year, has had under consideration the Report of the Commission which was appointed to enquire respecting the interpretation in the Courts and other Government Departments; and as the result of further enquiries and much discussion of the subject, he is now prepared with definite recommendations, which, if adopted, will he hopes promote a more general knowledge of Chinese in the Public Service and bring about a substantial improvement in its interpreting capacity.

It should however be mentioned in the first instance that the existing state of things proved on investigation to be scarcely as defective as might be supposed from the report of the Commission. The Judges and Magistrates (from whom no information was sought or obtained) did not altogether confirm the view taken by the Commissioners in paragraph 7 of their report, and have furnished evidence showing that in respect of Hakka, the most important of the dialects specifically mentioned, the Colony is fairly well served. And even as regards the dialects of Swatow and Amoy the Governor, as the result of his enquiries, is not disposed to think that there is so wide a gap between present deficiency and what is practically obtainable as a superficial consideration of the subject is apt to indicate.

It is to be borne in mind that ideal perfection in interpretation is quite impracticable of attainment even when the two languages are far more akin than English and any dialect of Chinese. In the quick translation of any one language into any other the success of cross- examination, is, and must be, frequently affected by the failure to distinguish delicate shades of meaning; and in view of the fact that there are used by witnesses here a great number dialects of a language so utterly unlike English as is that of China, it is quite hopeless to expect the attainment of a condition under which the Courts would be altogether free of difficulty and embarrassment in respect of interpretation.

Of the Hakka dialect alone which is mentioned in the report as one single dialect there are, the Governor is informed, several varieties, each sufficiently distinct from the rest to render a good interpreter of any one very possibly a bad interpreter of any other: and it is obvious that under such circumstances to secure for the Courts the command of satisfactory interpretation in all cases is a work of no ordinary difficulty, which at the best can only be accomplished approximately.

It would be evidently inexpedient to attempt the provision of all the necessary capacity and qualifications in a class of officers employed on no other duty. For that would not only involve the very great expense of a large Department of Interpreters and of students (many of whom would probably prove ineligible for office after large sums had been spent on their training) but it would mean a body of officers, for the most part required for service only very occasionally, and whose idleness, as regards public work, in the intervals would be perhaps injurious to themselves, and certainly to the Government service generally.

J

For this reason it seems desirable to depend on regular interpreters only in respect of the two or three dialects in most common use; and as regards the less common dialects or varieties of dialects to provide the requisite capacity among other Public Officers whose services as interpreters would be called for only when actually required.

Partly with this object therefore, and also to promote improvement in all interpretation, as well as to obtain greater efficiency, through improved knowledge of Chinese, in other departments than the Judicial, the Governor has drafted certain regulations (I) which are now laid on the table and offerred for consideration, as appearing likely to secure what is required within reasonable limits of expense, and under other conditions least open to objection. With further view to the same objects, the Governor has deemed as well worthy of the test of experiment the suggestion of the Commissioners as to the encouragement of the acquisition of Chinese among the younger members of the non-Chinese, community; and some proposals for the purpose in the form of regulations (II) are also offered for consideration. Their tenure of office for a short fixed period renders unsuitable a reward in the shape of a lump sum; and it is moreover expedient in their case that a somewhat lower standard of knowledge of Chinese than is required from other Public Servants should not go without reward. For these and other reasons, after consultation with the Captain Superintendent and the Board of Examiners, the Governor has deemed it well to retain the principle of the existing system of rewards for acquisition of Chinese, increasing however the sums paid per mensem for the lower standards of knowledge, and adding a third standard, the attainment of which will carry a reward quite equal to that offered to the rest of the service. In another paper (III) now laid on the table will be found the scale of premiums which it is proposed to offer.

The case of the Police requires somewhat different treatment.

Though these various regulations which are suggested for adoption will probably be found to require amendment after experience has been gained of their working, the Governor hopes that they will at least bring about substantial improvement in the condition of things which was the (subject of the Commissioners' enquiry, and will thus tend to the greater efficiency of the Public Service.

By Command,

Government House, Hongkong, 10th January, 1889.

FREDERICK STEWART, Colonial Secretary.

I.

In C.S.O. 1407

Proposed Regulations for Public Officers, other than Members of the Police Force, for the encouragement of proficiency in the Chinese language.

I.

Public Officers who pass an examination, to the satisfaction of the Examiners, in the Chinese language, of the Cantonese or Hakka dialect, or any other dialect to be approved by the Governor, will receive an allowance according to the following scale :-

For colloquial and written Chinese, For colloquial only,

Officers in receipt of salaries under $200 per month.

$400

300

Officers with salaries over $200 a month.

$600

450

This regulation to apply only in respect of dialects which Officers have hitherto not professed to understand, or in which they have hitherto not been employed to interpret.

II.

The allowance will be granted to Cadets who acquire proficiency in other dialects than those in which they have passed.

III.

On receipt of an allowance under these regulations, an Officer will be required to give. security for the re-payment of the whole sum, or such proportion of it as may be fixed by the Governor, in the event of the Officer leaving the service of the Colony within three years from the time of receipt.

IV.

The allowance for a Chinese Teacher will be continued to Officers, who have passed their Examinations, for a period not exceeding three years, on their satisfying the Board of Examiners at the end of each year, that they are profiting by the teaching.

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II.

In C.S.O. 1407

88

Proposal for the encouragement of the acquisition of the Chinese language among residents of the Colony, with a view to"

secure efficient interpretation in the Courts of Justice and Public Offices.

I.

The Governor to appoint, from residents in the Colony under 16 years of age, who have shown an aptitude for acquiring the Chinese language, and who have distinguished themselves in the Examination for the Colonial scholarship or other similar competition three student Interpreters, each to be attached to such department of the Public Service as to the Governor may seem fit.

II.

The salary of the student Interpreters will be 40 Dollars a month, payable however subject to a certificate of the Examiners after every period of six months, to the effect that satisfactory progress is being made in knowledge of the Chinese language, and in the facility of interpreting it into English and vice versâ.

III.

Any student Interpreter who at the end of three years from his appointment as such shall pass asatisfactory examination in the Chinese language, and whose conduct in other respects shall have earned approval, will be appointed to an office with a salary of not less. than 100 Dollars a month if, or as soon as, he is of the age of 18 years.

IV.

Every student Interpreter on his appointment shall furnish security for the repayment of a sum not exceeding half of the whole sum received by him by way of salary, in the event of his leaving the service of the Colony before the expiration of 6 years from the time of his appointment.

III.

In C.S.O. 1407

Proposed Regulations for Members of the Police Force for the encouragement of proficiency in the Chinese language.

I.··

Instead of the four certificates hitherto granted, two certificates shall be granted in ordinary cases, with a third one to be awarded only in cases of exceptional knowledge.

II.

Instead of the allowances of $2.50 and $1 a month now given to European and Indian Constables respectively who hold a certificate from the Board of Examiners, the following scale of remuneration shall be adopted, viz. :-

European Constables,

1st Certificate.

....

.$2.50

Indian Constables,.............. 1.00

2nd Certificate. $5.00

3.00

3rd Certificate.

$10.00

5.00

such remuneration to be drawn only so long as the receiver remains in the Police Force.

III.

For the first certificate, a knowledge of colloquial shall be required.

For the second certificate, a higher standard of colloquial will be necessary, as well as acquaintance with a book in Colloquial to be approved of by the Board: and in the case of the third certificate an acquaintance with the written Chinese character will be necessary, as well as an advanced knowledge of Colloquial.

IV.

In no case shall the third certificate be granted without the sanction of His Excellency the Governor, upon the recommendation of the Board.

V.

Members of the Police Force already holding certificates under the old scheme, shall be allowed to continue drawing their present allowances, but will be at liberty to offer themselves for examination for the second and third certificates under the new scheme, and shall be entitled, on passing, to the higher allowances.

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QUESTIONS.-Mr. LAYTON, pursuant to notice, asked the following question:

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Has Mr. Leigh's Report on the Proposed Drainage Scheme been forwarded to the Secretary of State for the Colonies?

His Excellency the Governor replied.

Mr. RYRIE, pursuant to notice asked the following question

Has the Government got any official information of the occurrence on board the "Caledonien," which is reported in the public prints, of an Officer of the Supreme Court being obstructed in the execution of his duty?

His Excellency the Governor replied.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE CATTLE DISEASES, SLAUGHTER-HOUSES, AND MARKETS ORDINANCE, 1887.-The Attorney General moved the first reading of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE REFORMATORY SCHOOLS ORDINANCE, 1886.-The Attorney General moved that the further consideration of this Bill in Committee be postponed.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

BILL ENTITLED THE MERCHANT SHIPPING ORDINANCE AMENDMENT ORDINANCE, 1889.-The Attorney General moved that the further consideration of this Bill in Committee be postponed.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

BYE-LAWS UNDER "THE PUBLIC HEALTH ORDINANCE, 1887."-His Excellency stated that it was not possible to proceed with these Bye-Laws as it had been found necessary to refer them back to the Sanitary Board for reconsideration.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned to Thursday, the 17th instant, at 4 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 17th day of January, 1889.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

י

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX,

Governor.

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LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 3.

THURSDAY, 17TH JANUARY, 1889.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

SIR G. WILLIAM DES VEUX, K.C.M.G.)

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (FREDERICK STEWART).

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the Attorney General, (EDWARD LOUGHLIN O'MALLEY).

the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (HENRY ERNEST WODEHOUSE, C.M.G.). the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE).

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (WALTER MEREDITH DEANE). PHINEAS RYRIE.

WONG SHING.

JOHN BELL-IRVING.

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BENDYSHE LAYTON, (vice the Honourable ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN).

ABSENT:

The Honourable CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 10th instant, were read and confirmed.

NEW MEMBER.-Mr. JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART, Registrar General, having been pro- visionally appointed an Official Member, took the usual Oath and his seat at the Council table.

.

PRAYA RECLAMATION.-His Excellency the Governor informed the Council that he had received a telegram from the Right Honourable the Secretary of State for the Colonies intimating that the Praya Reclamation scheme suggested by Mr. CHATER had been generally approved by the Consulting Engineer in England, and that a despatch on the subject may be expected soon.

KENNEDY ROAD.-His Excellency the Governor informed the Council that intimation had been received from the Right Honourable the Secretary of State for the Colonies to the effect that the Military objections to building on Kennedy Road had, with certain reservations, been removed.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE FOR AMENDING THE LAWS RELATING TO THE CONSTRUCTION OF BUILDINGS IN THE COLONY OF HONGKONG.-The Attorney General moved the first reading of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED THE STONE CUTTERS' ISLAND Ordinance, 1889.-The Attorney General moved the first reading of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE CATTLE DISEASES, SLAUGHTER-HOUSES, AND MARKETS ORDINANCE, 1887.-The Attorney General moved the second reading of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a second time.

The Council then went into Committee on the Bill.

Bill reported without amendment.

The Attorney General then moved that the Bill be read a third time.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed, and numbered as Ordinance 9 of 1889.

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BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE REFORMATORY SCHOOLS ORDINANCE, 1886.-The Attorney General moved that the Council do resume consideration in Committee of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill reported with the addition of a clause.

The Attorney General then moved that the Bill be read a third time.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed, and numbered as Ordinance 10 of 1889.

INTERPRETATION SCHEME.-The Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excellency the Governor, read the following clause in substitution for clause I in Schedule II of the Interpretation scheme laid before the Council at the last meeting :-

f

"The Governor to appoint 3 Student Interpreters, each to be attached to such Department of the Public Service as to the Governor may seem fit, selection to be made from Residents in the Colony under 16 years of age, who have shown an aptitude for acquiring the Chinese language, and who have distinguished themselves in the higher examinations of any of the Public Schools of the Colony, especially as regards the English Language."

The Colonial Secretary then moved the following resolution on the subject:

That the Scheme of Interpretation indicated in the Governor's Message of the 10th January, 1889, and contained in the Minutes of Council confirmed on the 17th January, 1889, be approved by the Council.

Mr. RYRIE seconded.

Question-put and passed.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned to Thursday, the 24th instant, at 4 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 28th day of January, 1889.

ARATHOON SETH, Clerk of Councils.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

Governor.

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LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 4.

MONDAY, 28TH JANUARY, 1889.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(SIR G. WILLIAM DES VEUX, K.C.M.G.)

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (FREDERICK STEWART).

}}

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the Attorney General, (EDWARD LOUGHLIN O'Malley).

the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (HENRY ERNEST WODEHOUSE, C.M.G.). the Surveyor General, (Jony MACNEILE PRICE).

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (WALTER MERedith Deane). the Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART). WONG SHING.

JOHN BELL-IRVING.

BENDYSHE LAYTON, (vice the Honourable ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN).

The Honourable PHINEAS RYRIE.

ABSENT:

27

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

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The Council met pursuant to notice.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 17th instant, were read and confirmed. FAMINE IN NORTH CHINA.-Read the following Message from His Excellency the Governor :-

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

The Governor deems it his duty to draw the attention of the Council to the terrible famine in North China, with a view to the consideration whether some contribution in aid of the sufferers should not be made from the funds of this Colony. Similar calamities are un- fortunately only too common among the dense population of the neighbouring Empire; and sympathy is apt to be paralysed, or rather its manifestation checked, by their very magnitude, and the consequent hopelessness of affording relief at all proportionate to the enormous need for it. But if this consideration were allowed always to have weight, charity would be con- fined within exceedingly narrow limits, if not altogether extinguished. And the only questions really deserving to be considered, either by Governments or by individuals, in respect of any particular case of suffering is (1) whether it is one, in aid of which some portion of the means at disposal may be appropriately used, having regard to the many other objects deserving attention, and (2) whether in case of aid being afforded there is reasonable probability of its being properly and usefully applied.

As regards the first question, the position of a Government differs from that of an indi- vidual in this, that the former is not free to give play to sympathy, and must confine its action to a comparatively limited field. For the funds at its disposal being held as a trust, any application of them can be properly made only when, proportionately to its extent, it is beneficial directly or indirectly, to the contributing taxpayers, or when, though not materially beneficial to them, it is one which meets with their general concurrence.

After much consideration, the Governor has arrived at the conclusion that a reasonable contribution from the funds of the Colony towards the aid of the sufferers by the present calamity would fulfil one and probably both of the above conditions. For such a token of sympathy would tend materially to promote and strengthen those friendly relations with China, which are so all-important to the prosperity of Hongkong; while, having regard to the exceptional magnitude of the present calamity on the one hand, and to the favourable condition of the Colonial finances on the other, there would probably be but one opinion in the Colony as to the expediency of such a contribution, if the second of the above questions can be answered satisfactorily, viz.: that as to the proper application of the contributed funds.

But happily on this point also there is a satisfactory reply. The papers which will be laid on the table show that the local authorities at Shanghai having, in the urgent need of their countrymen, made appeal for assistance, Europeans and Chinese have alike responded to it, and being drawn together by the bond of a common humanity are working in unison for the establishment of relief-agencies. When moreover regard is had to the number and names of those who are taking part in this movement, there can be no more opening for reasonable doubt that any aid afforded will be properly applied than that such aid is urgently required.

10

As to the amount of contribution, the Governor, all things considered, is of opinion that it should be at least ten thousand dollars. He therefore invites the Council to pass a vote for that amount; he proposes to remit this, or any other sum which may meet with the approval of the Council, to H.M.'s Consul-General at Shanghai, with the request that he and the other British Consular Officers stationed there will apportion the fund among the various relief agencies, without any regard to religious or denominational prejudices, in such a manner as, according to their joint discretion, may appear likely to do most good.

As no possible amount of contributions can afford substantial relief to all, or even to any large proportion, of the millions who are suffering from this calamity, the Governor hopes that the vote which he now proposes will not prove to be a check but will rather operate as a stimulus, to that private benevolence for which the community of Hongkong is so honour- ably known; and he trusts that here also as at Shanghai, Europeans and Chinese will exert themselves for an object which appeals alike, if not equally, to the sympathies of both.

By Command,

FREDERICK STEWART, Colonial Secretary.

C.S.O. 213 of 1889.

Government House, Hongkong, 28th January, 1889.

The Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the correspondence on the subject.

The Colonial Secretary moved that the question be referred for the consideration of the Finance Committee.

The Acting Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned sine die.

Read and confirmed, this 25th day of February, 1889.

ARATHOON SETH, Clerk of Councils.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX,

Governor.

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LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 5.

MONDAY, 25TH FEBRUARY, 1889.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR (SIR G. WILLIAM DES VEUX, K.C.M.G.)

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary (FREDERICK STEWART).

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The Acting Attorney General, (ANDREW JOHN LEACH).

the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (HENRY ERNEST WODEHOUSE, C.M.G.). the Captain Superintendent of Police, (WALTER MEREDITH DEANE). PHINEAS RYRIE.

WONG SHING.

JOHN BELL-IRVING.

BENDYSHE LAYTON, (vice the Honourable ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN). CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

ABSENT:

The Honourable the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE).

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the Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART).

The Council met pursuant to notice.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 28th ultimo, were read and confirmed.

NEW MEMBER.-Mr. ANDREW JOHN LEACH, Acting Attorney General, took the usual Oath and his seat at the Council table.

VOTES OF MONEY PASSED BY THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excellency the Governor, laid upon the table the Report of the proceedings of the Finance Committee (No. 1) dated the 28th January, 1889, and moved that the following items referred to therein be passed:-

EXCESS IN THE ESTIMATES FOR 1889.

SERVICES EXCLUSIVE OF ESTABLISHMENTS.

Charitable Allowances.

Subscription in aid of the Famine in North China,

Extraordinary Public Works.

Furniture for Victoria College, re-vote,

New Streets at Kennedytown, re-vote,...... Rain-storm damages during 1888, re-vote,.

Home for Women and Girls,

...

Works and Buildings.

$10,000.00

896.00

6,700.00 2,261.00

$ 9,857.00

$ 3,955.00

$ 3,750.00

Roads, Streets and Bridges.

Lower Richmond Road, re-vote,

JURY LIST, 1889.-Strangers having retired by request, the Council proceeded to consider the Jury List for 1889.

The List was duly revised, corrected, and the Special Jurors designated, in terms of section 4 of Ordinance 24 of 1882..

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned to Friday, the 1st proximo, at 4 p.m.

Read and confirmed, this 1st day of March, 1889.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX,

Governor.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 6.

FRIDAY, 1ST MARCH, 1889.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR (SIR G. WILLIAM DES VEUX, K.C.M.G.)

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary (FREDERICK STEWART).

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the Acting Attorney General, (ANDREW JOHN LEACH).

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the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (HENRY ERNEST WODEHOUSE, C.M.G.). the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE).

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (WALTER Meredith Deane). PHINEAS RYRIE.

WONG SHING.

JOHN BELL-IRVING.

BENDYSHE LAYTON, (vice the Honourable ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN). CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

ABSENT:

The Honourable the Registrar General, (JAMES Haldane Stewart Lockhart).

The Council met pursuant to notice.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 25th ultimo, were read and confirmed.

VOTES REFERRED TO THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-Read the following Minutes by His Excellency the Governor :--

C. O. Desp. 224 of 1888.

C.S.O.

301 of 1889.

C.S.O.

155 of 1889.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

(1.)

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of Two thousand Dollars, to be vested in Trustees, for the benefit of the widow of the late V. C. PEREIRA, Assistant Turnkey, Victoria Gaol.

The Trustees will be empowered to pay the interest only upon this sum to the widow during her life; and upon her death, or re-marriage, to divide the principal among Mr. PEREIRA's children.

Government House, Hongkong, 29th January, 1889.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

(2.)

The Governor, recommends the Council to vote the sum of Four hundred and Ninety-two Dollars, to defray cost of Praya surveys in front of the Naval Yard and Military Cantonments.

Government House, Hongkong, 2nd February, 1889.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

(3.)

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of One hundred and thirty-two Dollars, being the salaries of two scavengers for the new Market at Hunghòm, viz. :-

One Scavenger at $6 per month,

-J

Do.

at $5

do.,

72.00

60.00

$ 132.00

This expenditure was not included in the Establishment of the Sanitary Department when the Board had under consideration the Estimates for 1889.

Government House, Hongkong, 4th February, 1889.

The Colonial Secretary moved that these Votes be referred to the Finance Committee. The Acting Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

1

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:

14

BYE-LAWS UNDER "THE PUBLIC HEALTH ORDINANCE, 1887."-The Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table certain Bye-Laws made by the Sanitary Board, under The Public Health Ordinance, 1887, dated the 13th February, 1889, and gave notice that at the next meeting he would move their adoption.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE FOR AMENDING THE LAWS RELATING TO THE CONSTRUCTION OF BUILDINGS IN THE COLONY OF HONGKONG.-The Acting Attorney General moved the second reading of this Bill, and addressed the Council.

The Surveyor General seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a second time.

The Council then went into Committee on the Bill.

Progress reported at clause 91.

Clauses 1, 6, 8, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 18, 20, 25, 27, 30, 36, 37, 38, 47, 48, 50, 51, 52, 53, 54, 67, 68, 80 (sub-section 6). 87, 88, 89, 90, and the Schedules, were postponed.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned to Thursday, the 7th instant, at 4 p.m.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX,

Read and confirmed, this 7th day of March, 1889.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

Governor.

3

:

16

PAPER.-The Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excellency the Governor, laid upon the table the Report of the Captain Superintendent of Police for 1888. (No.).

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE FOR THE INCORPORATION OF THE DIRECTOR, IN HONGKONG, OF THE BERLIN LADIES' MISSION FOR CHINA.-The Acting Attorney General moved the first reading of this Bill, and addressed the Council.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED THE PRISON AMENDMENT ORDINANCE, 1889.-The Acting Attorney General moved the first reading of this Bill, and addressed the Council.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED THE STONE CUTTERS' ISLAND ORDINANCE, 1889.-The Acting Attorney General moved the second reading of this Bill, and addressed the Council.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a second time.

The Council then went into Committee on the Bill.

Bill reported without amendment.

The Attorney General then moved that the Bill be read a third time. Question-put and passed.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed, and numbered as Ordinance 11 of 1889.

Bye-Laws UNDER "THE PUBLIC HEALTH ORDINANCE, 1887."-The Colonial Secretary, pursuant to notice, moved that the Bye-Laws made by the Sanitary Board, under The Public Health Ordinance, 1887, dated the 13th February, 1889, which were laid on the table at the last meeting, be approved.

Question-put and passed.

ADJOURNMENT.—The Council then adjourned to Thursday, the 14th instant, at 4

Read and confirmed, this 22nd day of March, 1889.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

p.m.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX,

Governor.

A

"

4

15

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 7.

:

THURSDAY, 7TH MARCH, 1889.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR (SIR G. WILLIAM DES VEUX, K.C.M.G.)

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary (FREDERICK STEWART).

>>

>>

99

the Acting Attorney General, (ANDREW JOHN LEACH).

the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (HENRY ERNEST WODEHOUSE, C.M.G.). the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE).

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (WALTER MEREDITH DEane). PHINEAS RYRIE.

WONG SHING.

JOHN BELL-IRVING.

BENDYSHE LAYTON, (vice the Honourable ALEXAander Palmer MACEWEN). CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

ABSENT:

The Honourable the Registrar General, (JAMES HAldane Stewart Lockhart).

The Council met pursuant to notice.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 1st instant, were read and confirmed.

VOTE REFERRED TO THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-Read the following Minute by His Excellency the Governor :-

C.S.O.

358 of 1889.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of One hundred and twenty $120. Dollars, as a compassionate allowance to the family of Mr. Ho TSUNG-CHI, late Chinese Writer

in the Registrar General's Department.

Government House, Hongkong, 5th March, 1889.

The Colonial Secretary moved that this Vote be referred to the Finance Committee.

The Acting Treasurer seconded..

Question-put and passed.

VOTES PASSED BY THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excel- lency the Governor, laid on the table the Report of the proceedings of the Finance Committee (No. 2) dated the 1st instant, and moved that the following Votes referred to therein be passed, viz. :-

C.S.O.

155 of 1889.

EXCESS OF THE ESTIMATES FOR 1889.

ESTABLISHMENTS. Sanitary Department.

Salaries of two Scavengers for the new Market at Hunghòm, viz.:-

One Scavenger at $6 per month,

Do. at $5

do.,

72.00

60.00

$ 132.00

224 of 1888.

SERVICES EXCLUSIVE OF ESTABLISHMENTS.

Miscellaneous Services.

C. O. Desp. Gratuity to the widow of the late V. C. PEREIRA, Assistant Turnkey, Victoria Gaol,-

(to be vested in Trustees, who will be empowered to pay the interest only upon this sum to the widow during her life; and upon her death, or re-marriage, to divide the principal among Mr. PEREIRA's children),

C.S.O.

301 of 1889.

EXTRAORDINARY EXPENDITURE.

Cost of Praya surveys in front of the Naval Yard and Military Cantonments,

The Acting Treasurer seconded. Question-put and passed.

.$2,000.00

$ 492.00

זי

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 8.

FRIDAY, 22ND MARCH, 1889.

17

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR (SIR G. WILLIAM DES VEUX, K.C.M.G.)

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary (FREDERICK STEWART).

-

""

the Acting Attorney General, (ANDREW JOHN Leach).

the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (HENRY ERNEST WODEHOUSE, C.M.G.), the Acting Registrar General, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES). PHINEAS RYRIE.

WONG SHING.

12

JOHN BELL-IRVING.

""

BENDYSHE LAYTON, (vice the Honourable ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN). CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

ABSENT:

The Honourable the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE), by permission.

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (WALTER MEREDITH DEANE), on leave. the Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART), on leave.

"}

The Council met pursuant to notice.

NEW MEMBER.-Mr. NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES, Acting Registrar General, having been appointed an Official Member in the room of the Honourable J. H. STEWART LOCKHART, absent on leave, took the usual Oath and his seat at the Council table.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 7th instant, were read and confirmed.

GOVERNOR'S MESSAGE.-PRAYA RECLAMATION.-Read the following Message by His Excellency the Governor :-

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

The Governor has given directions that there shall be laid before the Legislative Council an Ordinance to be entitled "The Praya Reclamation Ordinance, 1889 containing the necessary provisions for carrying out a great scheme of reclamation in front of the central and western portions of the Town of Victoria.

Though the general nature of the scheme and the manner in which it is proposed to be carried out have become well known to Honourable Members and to the community, the various questions connected with this great undertaking are now for the first time brought under the consideration of the Legislative Council; and it may be well therefore to make a short statement on the subject for the information of interested persons outside the Colony, and for the purpose of convenient reference in the future.

The project for carrying out which it is the object of this Ordinance to provide, is shortly as follows:-

To build a cut-stone sea-wall in front of the present Praya and at an average distance from it of about 260 feet, along its whole length extending from the War Office property at the North Barracks to the Gas Works, a distance of some 3,400 yards, or nearly two miles.

To fill in with earth and stone the intervening space, comprising an area of some 56 acres, in such a manner that it shall be available for building purposes; and

To construct upon this reclaimed area the necessary streets with all requisite. channels and sewers, a work which, besides a considerable number of cross- streets, will include a new Praya, 75 feet in width along the whole length of the new sea-wall, and the widening to 75 feet for a similar distance of the present Praya which will thus become an inland street.

The cost of all these works, the amount of which is estimated at somewhat more than $2,500,000, is to be defrayed by the owners of the marine frontage affected by the proposed reclamation, on the terms arranged in the correspondence which has been published, and now expressed in this Ordinance.

---

©

18

As however the maintenance of the new sea-wall when completed will be a charge on the public funds, it has been deemed necessary that its construction should be under the strict supervision of the Government. So that for this reason and on other grounds of obvious convenience the whole of the works will be undertaken by the Surveyor General's Department under a special Engineer appointed for the purpose. Though the owners of frontage-lots, as the Governor is advised on high authority, are not in a position analogous to that of riparian proprietors, inasmuch as they have no immediate access to the sea (the foreshore having for many years been occupied by a wide public street), it is held that what- ever may be their legal rights they have for various reasons, well understood here, a moral claim to compensation in respect of reclamations in front of their land. On this ground, therefore, and in order to avoid the endless litigation that would otherwise arise in respect of the complicated interests involved, it has been deemed right to come to terms with them, under which they will undertake the whole cost and risk of the work, and will receive in return a very large share of the profits, estimated from the present value of frontage land to reach the large total of over $5,000,000.

The Governor was of opinion that this profit on the part of the lot-holders was unduly large; and that either they should pay a considerable sum by way of premium, or the Government should carry out the reclamation on its own account, paying equitable compen- sation for any injury to private rights. The Secretary of State however did not take this view, and has decided that in any case negotiations have gone too far to impose any such stipulation now; and he accordingly sanctioned with some minor modifications the terms provisionally arranged with the lot-holders and approved the draft of the Ordinance now submitted for carrying them into effect.

The Ordinance in its present form has therefore already received the careful consideration of Her Majesty's Government; and the Governor has much pleasure in giving effect to the Secretary of State's decision on the scheme, which, whatever the gain of individuals, is fraught with unquestionably great advantages to the public. These are shortly as follows:-

(1.) The provision of some 32 acres of building sites, which, when covered with houses (as they are morally certain to be as soon as completed) will afford

i

a substantial relief to the present congested condition of the Town of Victoria or at least will tend to prevent the still further overcrowding of that contiguous portion of the Town which already is probably more densely populated than any other equal space in the world.

(2.) The conversion into wholesome drained land of the present noxious foreshore, which is becoming year by year a more serious nuisance, and involving an ever increasing danger to the health of the community.

(3.) A great improvement in the Port, as regards the conditions of discharging cargoes, arising from the fact that vessels of large draught will be able to lie alongside the proposed sea-wall throughout its entire length, and thus save considerable sums in lighterage.

(4.) A large pecuniary gain to the Colonial Treasury consisting of,—

(a.) The profit from that portion of the reclamation to be undertaken by the Government in front of its own property; the land to be thus reclaimed being estimated at the value of $1,803,956, against an estimated cost of $362,369, showing a probable net profit of $1,441,587.

(b.) A probable return estimated, (according to the low rate of $1 per square foot), at $300,000, from land in Kennedytown now useless, which will be converted into valuable building sites by the removal of rock and earth for the proposed reclamation.

(c.) Rent from the sites last mentioned and from the reclaimed land

estimated at $29,200 per annum.

Briefly summarised the pecuniary profit which is estimated as likely to accrue to the Government from this scheme is $1,741,587 from land-sales and an annual income from rent amounting to $29,200.

It will be observed that in the above estimate of advantages no account has been taken of the large amount, estimated at $100,000 per annum to be derived from the rates that will be payable in respect of the buildings erected on the reclaimed land and on the Kennedytown sites mentioned, the reason of the omission being that it is difficult to forecast at the moment how far this sum will be absorbed by additional charges for Police Stations, Police, Lighting, &c. It is not at all probable that these charges will reach so large a total or anything like it; but in setting forth the benefits of the scheme, the Governor desires to err, if at all, on the side of under-statement.

19

There is, however, another beneficial result which may be fairly added, as though prin- cipally of an aesthetic nature, it is nevertheless a very appreciable one, viz.: the greatly improved appearance in the front of the Town which will be brought about by the super- vision to be exercised in respect of the character of the buildings erected.

77

In view of this catalogue of advantages, it cannot be doubted that the prosecution of this great scheme is in the strictest sense a "public purpose as defined by the Ordinance, and, the question whether the lot-holders should receive somewhat more or less profit would seem, after all, of such comparative insignificance, that it should not be permitted for a moment to stand in the way of so vast a public improvement.

For against the expected profits of the private persons concerned has to be set the risk, by no means slight, which they will have to incur in respect of typhoons and other accidents; while as regards both the rent to be paid by them, ($800 per acre), and the large area (26 acres) for streets, which the public will obtain free of cost, the conditions under which this work will be undertaken are at least more onerous than have been exacted from the adjoining lot-owners in the case of any previous reclamations. And when it is moreover considered that an enterprise involving great, many and varied interests will be carried out with comparatively little, and it is hoped without any litigation, the Governor cannot but feel that the Colony is to be congratulated on the conclusion of the arrangement to be sanctioned by this Ordinance, which, whether it is, or is not, as perfect as it might have been, will in any case confer incalculable benefits on the community.

The details of the Ordinance, which may very possibly require amendment, will perhaps be best left for discussion in Committee; but the Governor thinks it well to refer briefly to an objection which he understands has been made to the third paragraph of the 6th clause of the published draft, by which compensation to dissentient lot-holders is left to the discretion of the Governor. It is needless to say that the Government has no desire to accord other than the fullest justice in respect of private rights; and though the provision in question has no doubt an arbitrary appearance, that aspect of it will probably disappear altogether from unprejudiced minds when the circumstances are fully considered. It should be remem- bered in the first place that the tenure of every one of the lot-holders is under a lease containing a condition, by which his land may at any time be resumed for a public purpose, the Surveyor General being in such case constituted the sole arbitrator--so that if the land of any lot-holder were to be, as it legitimately might be, resumed for this public purpose, the position created for him by a condition to which he has voluntarily submitted already, could hardly be regarded as preferable to that contemplated by the proposed enact- ment. There is however a more important consideration to be taken into account. provision was presumably drafted, and sanctioned by the Secretary of State, on the assump- tion of the correctness of the opinion above referred to, according to which the frontage lot-holders have no legal rights in the foreshore. In this view they are strictly entitled to compensation only in respect of the actual depreciation of their property by the reclamation in front of it; and as in the case of former reclamations here the value of the adjoining land has never, the Governor understands, been affected otherwise than favourably, it is very possible that the lot-holder, if in this case left to his legal rights alone, would obtain no compensation at all. But by the provision in question there can be taken into account the moral claims above mentioned; so that instead of being a hardship to the dissentient lot-holder, the clause in reality will operate for his protection. If however there should prove to be any lot-holder who not only declines the agreement which has received the approval of the great majority and is embodied in this Ordinance, but also prefers to stand solely on his legal rights, it seems only fair that means should be found for enabling him to do so.

The

Anticipating as certain the approval of the Council to the prosecution of the scheme, whatever the form in which this Ordinance may finally pass, the Governor has already appointed an Engineer who will, under the supervision of the Surveyor General, devote himself exclusively to the reclamation, and will submit at once for consideration his view as to the staff which will be required in order to begin and prosecute the works with all possible speed.

With a view to cause as little obstruction as possible to the trade of the Port, it is proposed that only two, or at the most three of the seven sections of the reclamation shall be taken in hand at a time; and it is probable that a commencement will be made on those at the two extremes of the foreshore.

Before concluding the Governor deems it well to acknowledge thus publicly the service which has been rendered to the Colony by the Honourable C. P. CHATER, in initiating this great enterprise, and in assisting to bring about the arrangement under which it will be accomplished. It is also only right to mention in this place the Honourable J. M. PRICE, whose able reports on the project have secured its approval by the highest engineering authority in England and its sanction by the Secretary of State, and who has thus rendered not the least of the many valuable services, now unhappily come to a close, which will render his name ever memorable in this Colony.

·

..

1

20

It may moreover be noticed in this connection that the plans, also elaborated by Mr. PRICE, for the junction of the East and West Prayas were sent to England for the approval of Her Majesty's Government some two months ago. As the local Naval and Military authorities are now in entire agreement with the Civil Government on this subject, and as the Imperial Government is only asked to pay towards the cost, a sum less by several hundred thousand dollars than the value of the reclaimed land to be acquired by the War Department and the Admiralty, it may be hoped that this great work of improvement, now by the growth of the population become absolutely necessary, will also be very soon commenced, and that the negociations of the last twenty years, hitherto unhappily fruitless, will thus at length be brought to a satisfactory termination.

Should this prove to be the case the first, and most important, steps will have been taken towards the realization of the hope, which the Governor earnestly entertains, that before the close of his administration these two great works may be finished-works which in adding a new face to the Town throughout nearly three of the four miles of its length and affording increased opportunity for its expansion in three different directions, may be expected to give a very powerful impetus to the advancement of the Colony.

By Command,

Government House, Hongkong, 22nd March, 1889.

FREDERICK STEWART, Colonial Secretary.

VOTE REFERRED TO THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-Read the following Minute by His Excellency the Governor :-

C.S.O.

633 of 1889.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of Four hundred and Seventy-two $472.58. Dollars and Fifty-eight Cents, as Personal Allowance to Mr. BRUCE SHEPHERD, Deputy Land

Officer, from the 18th March instant, at the rate of $600 per annum.

The expediency of this Vote will be explained in Finance Committee.

Government House, Hongkong, 21st March, 1889.

The Colonial Secretary moved that this Vote be referred to the Finance Committee.

The Acting Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

VOTE PASSED BY THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excel- lency the Governor, laid on the table the Report of the proceedings of the Finance Committee (No. 3), dated the 7th instant, and moved that the following Vote referred to therein be passed, viz. :—

EXCESS OF THE ESTIMATES FOR 1889.

C.S.0. 358 of 1889.

SERVICES EXCLUSIVE OF ESTABLISHMENTS.

Miscellaneous Services.

Compassionate allowance to the family of the late Mr. Ho TSUNG-CHI, Chinese Writer

in the Registrar General's Department, ...........

The Acting Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

$ 120.00

BILL ENTITLED THE RECLAMATION ORDINANCE, 1889.-The Acting Attorney General moved the first reading of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE FOR THE INCORPORATION OF THE DIRECTOR, IN Hongkong, of THE BERLIN LADIES' MISSION FOR CHINA.-The Acting Attorney General moved the second reading of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a second time.

The Council then went into Committee on the Bill.

Bill reported with a verbal amendment.

The Acting Attorney General then moved that the Bill be read a third time.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed, and numbered as Ordinance 12 of 1889.

21

:

.

BILL ENTITLED THE PRISON AMENDMENT ORDINANCE, 1889.-The Acting Attorney General moved the second reading of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded. Question-put and passed.

Bill read a second time.

The Council then went into Committee on the Bill.

:

Bill reported with a verbal amendment.

The Acting Attorney General then moved that the Bill be read a third time.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed, and numbered as Ordinance 13 of 1889.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE FOR AMENDING THE LAWS RELATING TO THE CONSTRUCTION OF BUILDINGS IN THE COLONY OF HONGKONG.-On the motion of the Acting Attorney General, the Council resumed Committee on this Bill.

Sections 1, 8, 11, 12, 13, 14, 16, 20, 27, and 36 were disposed of.

Sections 15 and 38 were struck out.

The Committee then adjourned.

QUESTION. Mr. CHATER pursuant to notice asked the following question :—

Is there any objection in stating the circumstances under which permission was recently refused for holding a Concert in the General Hospital, the entertainment having been prepared for the recreation of the patients?

No. The Governor replied, and laid upon the table a copy of a Despatch on the subject which His Excellency had addressed to the Right Honourable the Secretary of State for the Colonies.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned to Friday, the 29th instant, at 4

p.m.

G. WILLIAM DES Vœux,

Read and confirmed, this 29th day of March, 1889.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

Governor.

:

:

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 9.

FRIDAY, 29TH MARCH, 1889.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR (SIR G. WILLIAM DES VOUX, K.C.M.G.)

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary (FREDERICK STEWART).

""

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11

"}

"

""

""

the Acting Attorney General, (Andrew John Leach).

23

the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (HENRY ERNEST WODEHOUSE, C.M.G.).

the Acting Registrar General, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES). PHINEAS RYRIE,

WONG SHING.

JOHN BELL-IRVING.

BENDYSHE LAYTON, (vice the Honourable ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN). CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 22nd instant, were read and confirmed.

VOTES REFERRED TO THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-Read the following Minutes by His Excellency the Governor :--

C.S.O.

786 of 1889.

C.S.O. 785 of 1889.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of Thirteen thousand Five hundred Dollars, for the completion of Victoria College, viz. :—

Balance of Contractor's accounts in connection with the building, Extra works not included in the contract,

...

.$ 5,500.00

8,000.00

$13,500.00

Government House, Hongkong, 28th March, 1889.

C. O. Vesp. No. 221 of

1887.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of Nine hundred and Eighty-eight 25th Nov, Dollars, and Thirty-nine Cents being a personal allowance to the Honourable J. M. PRICE, at the rate of $480 a year, as compensation for the undrawn fees on Crown Land sales, to which he was entitled, but has never drawn.

Government House, Hongkong, 28th March, 1889.

The Colonial Secretary moved that these Votes be referred to the Finance Committee.

The Acting Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

VOTE PASSED BY THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excel- lency the Governor, laid on the table the Report of the proceedings of the Finance Committee (No. 4), dated the 22nd instant, and moved that the following Vote referred to therein be passed, viz. :—

EXCESS OF THE ESTIMATES FOR 1889.

ESTABLISHMENTS.

Supreme Court, (Land Office).

Cisse. Personal allowance to Mr. BRUCE SHEPHERD, Deputy Land Officer, from 18th March,

633 of 1889. $472.58.

1889, at $600 per annum,

The Acting Treasurer seconded.

$ 472.58

Question-put and passed.

PAPERS.-The Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following papers, viz. :—

Report of the Inspector of Schools for 1888. (No. ).

Report of the Head Master of the Government Central School for 1888. (No. 4).

Report of the Acting Superintendent of the Fire Brigade for 1888. (No. 35).

!

:

24

BILL ENTITLED THE ARMS ORDINANCE, 1889.-The Acting Attorney General moved the first reading of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED THE VACCINATION ORDINANCE, 1889.-The Acting Attorney General moved the first reading of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED THE RECLAMATION ORDINANCE, 1889.-The Acting Attorney General moved the second reading of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a second time.

The Council then went into Committee on the Bill.

Progress reported.

BILL FOR AMENDING THE LAWS RELATING TO THE CONSTRUCTION OF BUILDINGS IN THE COLONY OF HONGKONG.-On the motion of the Acting Attorney General, the Council resumed Committee on this Bill.

Progress reported.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned to Friday, the 5th proximo, at 4 p.m.

Read and confirmed, this 12th day of April, 1889.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

G. WILLIAM DES Vœux,

Governor.

1

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 10.

FRIDAY, 12TH APRIL, 1889.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR (SIR G. WILLIAM DES VOEUX, K.C.M.G.)

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary (FREDERICK STEWART).

""

""

19.

""

""

""

""

the Acting Attorney General, (ANDREW JOHN LEACH).

the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (HENRY ERNEST WODEHOUSE, C.M.G.). the Acting Registrar General, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES). PHINEAS RYRIE.

WONG SHING.

JOHN BELL-IRVING.

25

BENDYSHE LAYTON, (vice the Honourable ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN). CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

The Council met pursuant to notice.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 29th ultimo, were read and confirmed.

VOTES PASSED BY THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excel- lency the Governor, laid on the table the Report of the proceedings of the Finance Committee (No. 5), dated the 29th ultimo, and moved that the following Votes referred to therein be passed, viz. :-

EXCESS OF THE ESTIMATES FOR 1889.

SERVICES EXCLUSIVE OF ESTABLISHMENTS. Extraordinary Public Works. Victoria College.

Balance of Contractor's accounts in connection with the buildings,

786 of 1889.

C.S.0.

c.s.o.

785 of 1889.

Extra works not included in Contract,

$ 5,500.00 8,000.00

$13,500.00

ESTABLISHMENTS. Surveyor General.

221 of 1887.

C. O. Desp. Personal allowance to the Honourable J. M. PRICE as compensation for undrawn

fees on Crown Land sales at $480 per annum,

The Acting Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

....

$ 988.39

PAPER.-The Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following paper, viz. :-

Report of the Director of the Observatory for 1888. (No.).

BILL ENTITLED THE ARMS ORDINANCE, 1889.-The Acting Attorney General moved the second

reading of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a second time.

The Council then went into Committee on the Bill.

Bill reported with a verbal amendment.

The Acting Attorney General then moved that the Bill be read a third time.

The Colonial Secretary seconded..

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a third time..

Question put that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed, and numbered as Ordinance 14 of 1889.

BILL FOR AMENDING THE LAWS RELATING TO THE CONSTRUCTION OF BUILDINGS IN THE COLONY OF HONGKONG.-On the motion of the Acting Attorney General, the Council resumed Committee on the Bill.

Bill reported with amendments.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned sine die.

Read and confirmed, this 18th day of April, 1889.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX,

Governor.

і

27

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 11.

THURSDAY, 18TH APRIL, 1889.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR (SIR G. WILLIAM DES VEUX, K.C.M.G.)

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary (FREDERICK STEWART).

""

99

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>>

the Acting Attorney General, (ANDREW JOHN LEACH).

the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (HENRY ERNEST WODEHOUSE, C.M.G.). the Acting Registrar General, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES). WONG SHING.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK, (vice the Honourable JOHN BELL-IRVING). CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

The Council met pursuant to notice.

NEW MEMBER.-Mr. JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK, having been provisionally appointed an Un- Official Member in the room of the Honourable JOHN BELL-IRVING, absent on leave, took the usual Oath and his seat at the Council table.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 12th instant, were read and confirmed.

VOTES REFERRED TO THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-Read the following Minutes by His Excellency the Governor :-

C. O. Desp. 34 of 1889.

C.S.O.

895 of 1889,

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

(1.)

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of Six hundred Dollars, being an increase to the salary of the Director of the Observatory, from 1st January, 1889.

Government House, Hongkong, 13th April, 1889.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

(2.)

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of Two hundred and Fifty Dollars, for the construction of a verandah or balcony to the windows on the East front of the First Clerk's quarters at the Magistracy.

Government House, Hongkong, 13th April, 1889.

The Colonial Secretary moved that these Votes be referred to the Finance Committee.

The Acting Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

PAPER.-The Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following paper, viz. :-

Report of the Superintendent of Victoria Gaol for 1888. (No. 9).

BILL ENTITLED THE PROTECTION OF WOMEN AND GIRLS ORDINANCE, 1889.-The Acting Attorney General moved the first reading of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED THE PRAYA RECLAMATION ORDINANCE, 1889.-On the motion of the Acting Attorney General, the Council resumed. Committee on this Bill.

Progress reported.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE FOR AMENDING THE LAWS RELATING TO THE CONSTRUCTION OF BUILDINGS IN THE COLONY OF HONGKONG.-The Acting Attorney General moved the third reading of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed, and numbered as Ordinance 15 of 1889.

ADJOURNMENT.—The Governor then adjourned the Council till Friday, the 26th instant, at 4 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 26th day of April, 1889.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX,

Governor.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 12.

FRIDAY, 26TH APRIL, 1889.

29

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(SIR G. WILLIAM DES VOUX, K.C.M.G.)

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary (FREDERICK STEWART).

the Acting Attorney General, (ANDREW JOHN LEACH).

""

""

the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (HENRY ERNEST WODEHOUSE, C.M.G.).

""

"}

""

the Acting Registrar General, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES). PHINEAS RYRIE.

WONG SHING.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK, (vice the Honourable JOHN BELL-IRVING).

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 18th instant, were read and confirmed.

VOTES PASSED BY THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excel- lency the Governor, laid on the table the Report of the proceedings of the Finance Committee (No. 6), dated the 18th instant, and moved that the following Votes referred to therein be passed, viz. :-

EXCESS OF THE ESTIMATES FOR 1889.

ESTABLISHMENTS.

Observatory.

C. O. Desp. Increase to salary of the Director for 1 year from 1st January, 1889,

34 of 1889.

.$

600.00

SERVICES EXCLUSIVE OF ESTABLISHMENTS.

Works and Buildings.

C.S.O.

895 of 1889.

Verandah for 1st Clerk's Quarters at the Magistracy,

$

250.00

The Acting Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

PAPER.-The Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following paper, viz. :-

56 of 1889.

Statement of Revenue and Expenditure for 1888. (No. 3).

C. O. Desp. SALARIES.-The Governor intimated that, in reply to certain suggestions His Excellency had recently made to the Right Honourable the Secretary of State for the Colonies for a general increase to the salaries of the Members of the Civil Service on account of the decrease in the purchasing power of the Dollar, His Lordship had decided that a Commission should be appointed consisting of one or more Un-Official Members of Council, as well as one or more Officials, to enquire and report on the subject. His Excellency therefore proposed to appoint as members of the Commission the Colonial Secretary, and all the Un-Official Members of the Council, and enquired of the Hon. Members present whether they would serve.

The Honourable Members unanimously consented.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO REPEAL ORDINANCE No. 6 OF 1889. AND TO AMEND THE STATUTE LAW PRESERVATION ORDINANCE, 1889.-The Colonial Secretary moved the first reading of this Bill.

The Acting Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a first time.

30

BILL ENTITLED THE PROTECTION OF WOMEN AND GIRLS ORDINANCE, 1889.-The Colonial Secretary moved the second reading of this Bill.

The Acting Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a second time.

The Council then went into Committee on the Bill.

Progress reported.

(At this stage, the Honourable the Acting Attorney General, who had been absent by permission, arrived and took his seat.)

BILL ENTITLED THE PRAYA RECLAMATION ORDINANCE, 1889.-On the motion of the Acting Attorney General, the Council resumed Committee on this Bill.

Bill reported with amendments.

The Acting Attorney General then moved that the Bill be read a third time.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do

pass.

Bill passed, and numbered as Ordinance 16 of 1889.

ADJOURNMENT.—The Governor then adjourned the Council till Thursday, the 2nd proximo, at 4 P.M.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX,

Governor.

Read and confirmed, this 2nd day of May, 1889.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

7.

31

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 13.

THURSDAY, 2ND MAY, 1889.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR (SIR G. WILLIAM DES VEUX, K.C.M.G.)

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (FREDERICK STEWART).

the Acting Attorney General, (ANDREW JOHN LEACH).

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the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (HENRY ERNEST WODEHOUSE, C.M.G.). the Acting Registrar General, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES). WONG SHING.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK, (vice the Honourable JOHN BELL-IRVING).

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 26th ultimo, were read and confirmed.

588 of 1889.

C.S.O. VOLUNTEER FIRE BRIGADE.-His Excellency addressed the Council on the subject of the recent disbandment of the Volunteer Fire Brigade, and expressed the thanks of Government and of the community for the maintenance of the Brigade and for the valuable services rendered by its late members.

57 of

CO. Desp. FRENCH AND GERMAN MAIL STEAMERS.--His Excellency also informed the Council that the question of the privileges granted to the French and German Mail Steamers was receiving the attention of Her Majesty's Government.

60 of 1889.

C. O. Desp. NORTH CHINA FAMINE FUND.-His Excellency further intimated that the action of the Council in voting the sum of $10,000 in January last towards the relief of the sufferers from famine in North China had received the approval of the Right Honourable the Secretary of State for the Colonies.

BILL ENTITLED The Passengers RELIEF ORDINANCE, 1889.-The Acting Attorney General moved the first reading of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a first time

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO REPEAL ORDINANCE 6 OF 1889, AND TO AMEND THE STATUTE LAW PRESERVATION ORDINANCE, 1886.-The Acting Attorney General moved the second reading of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a second time.

The Council then went into Committee on the Bill.

Bill reported without amendment.

The Acting Attorney General then moved that the Bill be read a third time.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed, and numbered as Ordinance 17 of 1889.

BILL ENTITLED THE PROTECTION OF WOMEN AND GIRLS ORDINANCE, 1889.-On the motion of the Acting Attorney General, the Council resumed Committee on this Bill.

Progress reported.

ADJOURNMENT.—The Governor then adjourned the Council till Monday, the 6th instant, at 4 P.M.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX,

Governor.

Read and confirmed, this 6th day of May, 1889.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 14.

MONDAY, 6TH MAY, 1889.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR (SIR G. WILLIAM DES VEUX, K.C.M.G.)

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary (FREDERICK Stewart).

وو

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"

19

- 39

the Acting Attorney General, (ANDREW JOHN Leach).

33

the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (HENRY ERNEST WODEHOUSE, C.M.G.). the Acting Registrar General, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES). PHINEAS RYRIE.

WONG SHING.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK, (vice the Honourable JOHN BELL-IRVING)..

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 2nd instant, were read and confirmed: PAPERS.-The Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table: the following papers, viz.:

Despatches respecting the French and German Mail Steamers. (No. 3). Returns of Births and Deaths for the year 1888.

(No. 39).

BILL ENTITLED THE CHINESE EXTRADITION ORDINANCE, 1889.-The Acting Attorney General moved the first reading of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED THE PASSENGERS RELIEF ORDINANCE, 1889.-The Acting Attorney General moved the second reading of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a second time.

The Council then went into Committee on the Bill.

Bill reported with a verbal amendment.

The Acting Attorney General then moved that the Bill be read a third time.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed, and numbered as Ordinance 18 of 1889.

BILL ENTITLED THE PROTECTION OF WOMEN AND GIRLS ORDINANCE, 1889.-The Bill, as amended and revised at the last meeting, having been reprinted, the Council, on the motion of the Acting Attorney General, resumed Committee on it.

Bill reported with some verbal amendments.

The Acting Attorney General then moved that the Bill be read a third time.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a third time.

Question put--that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed, and numbered as Ordinance 19 of 1889.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Governor then adjourned the Council till Friday, the 10th instant, at 4 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 16th day of May, 1889.

ARATHOON SETH, Clerk of Councils.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX,

Governor.

35

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 15.

THURSDAY, 16TH MAY, 1889.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

SIR G. WILLIAM DES VEUX, K.C.M.G.)

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary (FREDERICK STEWART).

>>

""

>>

""

""

the Acting Attorney General, (ANDREW JOHN LEACH).

the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (HENRY ERNEST WODEHOUSE, C.M.G.). the Acting Registrar General, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES). PHINEAS RYRIE,

WONG SHING.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

BENDYSHE LAYTON, (vice the Honourable ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN). James Johnstone KESWICK, (vice the Honourable JOHN BELL-IRVing).

The Council met pursuant to notice.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 6th instant, were read and confirmed.

VOTE REFERRED TO THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-Read the following Minute by His Excellency the Governor :-

C.S.O.

1170 of 1889.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of Three thousand and Four $3,400. hundred Dollars, for repairing damage caused to roads outside the City of Victoria by the

rainstorm of the 29th April last.

Government House, Hongkong, 9th May, 1889.

The Colonial Secretary moved that this Vote be referred to the Finance Committee.

The Acting Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed..

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE FOR THE NATURALIZATION OF LI MAN HI otherwise POKSHAN.- The Acting Attorney General, moved the first reading of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND ORDINANCE 17 OF 1887.-The Acting Attorney General moved the first reading of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded. Question-put and passed.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE POST OFFICE ORDINANCE, 1887.-The Acting Attorney General moved the first reading of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED. THE CROWN LANDS RESUMPTION ORDINANCE, 1889.-The Acting Attorney General moved the first reading of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

His Excellency the Governor addressed the Council.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED THE CHINESE EXTRADITION ORDINANCE, 1889.-The Acting Attorney General moved the second reading of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

His Excellency the Governor addressed the Council.

Mr. RYRIE addressed the Council, and moved that the second reading of the Bill be postponed. Mr. LAYTON seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Second reading postponed.

36

POKFULAM WATER SUPPLY.-Mr. LAYTON gave notice that at the next Meeting he would ask the following question :-

Whether, in view of the unsatisfactory state of the water supply from Pokfulam, any steps are being taken to remedy the defects in that supply; and, if that be impossible, whether the Tytam water cannot be distributed to districts at present provided by Pokfulam?

His Excellency the Governor addressed the Council.

Mr. LAYTON then withdrew the question.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Governor then adjourned the Council sine die.

Read and confirmed, this 27th day of May, 1889.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

C.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX,

Governor.

A

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 16.

MONDAY, 27TH MAY, 1889.

37

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR (SIR G. WILLIAM DES VEUX, K.C.M.G.)

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary (FREDERICK STEWART).

""

2;

59

the Acting Attorney General, (Andrew John Leach).

the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (HENRY ERNEST WODEHOUSE, C.M.G.). the Acting Registrar General, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES). PHINEAS RYRIE.

WONG SHING.

BENDYSHE LAYTON, (vice the Honourable ALEXander Palmer MacEwen). JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK, (vice the Honourable John Bell-Irving).

The Council met pursuant to notice.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 16th instant, were read and confirmed.

VOTE REFERRED TO THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-Read the following Minute by His Excellency the Governor :-

C.S.O.

588 of 1889.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of One thousand Seven hundred $1,772 and Seventy-two Dollars for the undermentioned expenses in connexion with the Fire Brigade :-

ESTABLISHMENT.

1 Assistant Engine Driver @ $12.00 per month, 8 months,

1 Stoker

1 Do.

a

,, 10.00

>:

""

1 Foreman

5 Firemen, European

@"" @,, 16.00

8.00

>>

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@

9.00

2

Do. Chinese

>>

@ 1.50

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$ 96.00

80.00

""

64.00

, 128.00

""

360.00

""

24.00

$752.00

$240.00 120.00

360.00

$ 392.00

Less amounts that will lapse in consequence of the above re-arrangement :

30 Chinese Firemen @ $1.00 per month, 8 months,

6 Chinese Contingent @ $2.50

""

""

Net increase,...

EXCLUSIVE OF ESTABLISHMENT.

Purchase of Steam Fire Engine belonging to the Volunteer Fire Brigade,.

Do. of 2 Hose Reels,

Total amount to be voted,.

$1,200.00 180.00

$1,772.00

Owing to the disbandment of the Volunteer Fire Brigade, it is deemed expedient to purchase the engine and appliances which belonged to that body, and to appoint an additional

staff to work it.

The Governor has approved a proposal, of the Superintendent of the Fire Brigade for a reduction in the Chinese portion of the force which somewhat reduces the cost which would otherwise be incurred for this additional service.

Government House, Hongkong, 27th May, 1889.

The Colonial Secretary moved that this Vote be referred to the Finance Committee.

The Acting Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

38

VOTE PASSED BY THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excel- lency the Governor, laid on the table the Report of the proceedings of the Finance Committee (No. 7), dated the 16th instant, and moved that the following Vote referred to therein be passed, viz. :--

EXCESS OF THE ESTIMATES FOR 1889.

SERVICES EXCLUSIVE OF ESTABLISHMENTS.

Roads, Streets and Bridges.

C.S.O.

1170 of 1889.

$3,400.

For repairing damage caused to roads outside the City of Victoria by the rainstorm

of the 29th ultimo,

The Acting Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

$3,400.00

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE FOR THE NATURALIZATION OF LI MAN HI otherwise POKSHAN.- The Acting Attorney General moved the second reading of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a second time.

The Council then went into Committee on the Bill.

Bill reported without amendment.

The Acting

Attorney General then moved that the Bill be read a third time.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed, and numbered as Ordinance 20 of 1889.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND ORDINANCE 17 OF 1887.-The Acting Attorney General moved the second reading of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a second time.

The Council then went into Committee on the Bill.

Bill reported without amendment.

The Acting Attorney General then moved that the Bill be read a third time.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed, and numbered as Ordinance 21 of 1889.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE POST OFFICE ORDINANCE, 1887.-The Acting Attorney General moved the second reading of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a second time.

The Council then went into Committee on the Bill.

Bill reported without amendment.

The Acting Attorney General then moved that the Bill be read a third time.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do

pass.

Bill passed, and numbered as Ordinance 22 of 1889.

BILL ENTITLED THE CROWN LANDS RESUMPTION ORDINANCE, 1889.-The Acting Attorney General moved the second reading of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a second time.

The Council then went into Committee on the Bill.

Progress reported.

}

:

39

BILL ENTITLED THE CHINESE EXTRADITION ORDINANCE, 1889.-The Acting Attorney General moved the second reading of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Mr. RYRIE addressed the Council, and moved that the Bill be laid on the table this day six months. Mr. LAYTON Seconded, and addressed the Council.

Mr. KESWICK addressed the Council.

The Acting Attorney General addressed the Council.

Question put.

Council divided,-

Mr. KESWICK.

For

Mr. LAYTON.

Mr. WONG SHING.

Mr. RYRIE.

Motion lost.

Original motion carried by a majority of one.

Bill read a second time.

Against

THE ACTING REGISTRAR GENERAL. THE ACTING COLONIAL TREASURER. THE ACTING ATTORNEY GENERAL. THE COLONIAL SECRETARY. HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR.

ADJOURNMENT.—The Governor then adjourned the Council till Friday, the 7th proximo, at 4 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 18th day of June, 1889.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

G. WILLIAM Des Vœux,

Governor.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 17.

TUESDAY, 18TH JUNE, 1889.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR (SIR G. WILLIAM, DES VEUX, K.C.M.G.)

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary (FREDERICK STEWART).

""

""

29

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""

>>

""

the Acting Attorney General, (ANDREW JOHN LEAch).

the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (HENRY ERNEST WODEHOUSE, C.M.G.).

the Acting Registrar General, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES). the Surveyor General, (SAMUEL BROWN).

PHINEAS RYRIE.

WONG SHING.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

41

BENDYSHE LAYTON, (vice the Honourable ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN). JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK, (vice the Honourable JOHN BELL-IRVING).

The Council met pursuant to notice.

NEW MEMBER.-Mr. SAMUEL BROWN, Surveyor General, took the usual Oath and his seat at the Council table, as an Official Member.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 27th ultimo, were read and confirmed.

VOTE REFERRED TO THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-Read the following Minute by His Excellency the Governor :-

C. O Desp.

91 of 1889.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of £100, being a gratuity to the father of the late Police Constable STEPHEN Fox, a member of the Fire Brigade, who lost his life by the falling of a wall during the suppression of a fire in November, 1857.

Government House, Hongkong, 8th June, 1889.

The Colonial Secretary moved that this Vote be referred to the Finance Committee. The Acting Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

VOTE PASSED BY THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excel- lency the Governor, laid on the table the Report of the proceedings of the Finance Committee (No. 8), dated the 27th ultimo, and moved that the following Vote referred to therein be passed, viz. :- 588 of 1889. Expenses in connexion with the Fire Brigade :-

C.S.O.

Establishment.....

Exclusive of Establishment,

$ 392.00 1,380.00

$1,772.00

The Acting Colonial Treasurer seconded. Question-put and passed.

STORM DAMAGES. Mr. RYRIE, pursuant to notice, asked:-

Can the Government inform the Council when the heaps of ferid smelling mud, which blocks up Queen's Road and other thoroughfares, are to be removed; as in the opinion of the residents generally this mud is dangerous to the health of the Community.

The Surveyor General replied.

Mr. RYRIE then, pursuant to notice, moved

That the Government be requested to lay on the table such papers and reports as have been furnished with reference to the damage by the late rainstorm, its probable causes, the plans pro- posed for repairing the damages, and their probable cost.

Mr. LAYTON seconded.

The Colonial Secretary replied.

GAP ROCK LIGHT.-Mr. LAYTON, pursuant to notice, asked:-

What progress, if any, has been made with the erection of the light on the Gap Rock.

The Colonial Secretary replied.

SEARCHES BY OPIUM FARMER'S OFFICERS.-Mr. RYRIE, pursuant to notice, asked :-

42

Is it with the sanction of the Government that all passengers travelling by the River Steamers from Canton and Macao are liable and subject to search by the Runners of the Opium Farmer

in Hongkong.

The Colonial Secretary replied.

98 of 1899.

C. O. Desp. FRENCH MAIL STEAMERS.-His Excellency the Governor informed the Council that intimation had been received from Her Majesty's Government to the effect that the Government had given notice to the French Government to determine the Postal Convention with France of 24th September, 1856, at the expiration of one year from the 30th April last.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE MERCHANT SHIPPING CONSOLIDATION ORDINANCE, 1879.--The Acting Attorney General moved the first reading of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE CHINESE EMIGRATION CONSOLIDATION ORDINANCE, 1889, AND TO MAKE PROVISION AGAINST CERTAIN EMIGRATION ABUSES.-The Acting Attorney General moved the first reading of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED THE CROWN LANDS RESUMPTION ORDINANCE, 1889.-On the motion of the Acting Attorney General, the Council resumed Committee on this Bill.

Bill reported with a verbal amendment.

The Acting Attorney General then moved that the Bill be read a third time.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed, and numbered as Ordinance 23 of 1889.

BILL ENTITLED THE CHINESE EXTRADITION ORDINANCE, 1889.-On the motion of the Acting Attorney General, the Council went into Committee on this Bill,

Bill reported with amendments.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Governor then adjourned the Council till Tuesday, the 25th instant, at 4 P.M,

Read and confirmed, this 25th day of June, 1889.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX,

Governor.

2

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 18.

TUESDAY, 25TH JUNE, 1889.

43

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(SIR G. WILLIAM DES VEUX, K.C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary (FREDERICK STEWART).

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the Acting Attorney General, (ANDREW JOHN LEACH).

the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (HENRY ERNEST WODEHOUSE, C.M.G.). the Acting Registrar General, (NORMAN GILBERT Mitchell-Innes). the Surveyor General, (SAMUEL BROWN).

PHINEAS RYRIE.

WONG SHING.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

BENDYSHE LAYTON, (vice the Honourable ALEXANDER PALMER MacEwen).

James JOHNSTONE KESWICK, (vice the Honourable JOHN BELL-IRVING).

The Council met pursuant to notice.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 18th instant, were read and confirmed.

VOTE PASSED BY THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excel- lency the Governor, laid on the table the Report of the proceedings of the Finance Committee (No. 9), dated the 18th ultimo, and moved that the following Vote referred to therein be passed, viz. :-

Gratuity to the father of the late Police Constable STEPHEN Fox, a member of the

Fire Brigade, who was accidentally killed at a fire in November, 1887,

The Acting Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

£100.

PAPERS.-The Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following paper:-

Report of the Superintendent of the Botanical and Afforestation Department for 1888.

(No. 1).

SEPARATE DRAINAGE SYSTEM.-Mr. LAYTON, pursuant to notice, asked :—

What opinion has been expressed by the Home Government on Mr. Leigh's report on the proposed Separate Drainage System for Hongkong, and will the Government lay on the table the correspondence connected therewith?

The Governor replied.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE MERCHANT SHIPPING CONSOLIDATION ORDINANCE, 1879. The Acting Attorney General moved the second reading of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a second time.

The Council then went into Committee on the Bill.

Bill reported without amendment.

The Acting Attorney General then moved that the Bill be read a third time.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed, and numbered as Ordinance 24 of 1889.

44

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE CHINESE EMIGRATION CONSOLIDATION Ordinance, 1889, AND TO MAKE PROVISION AGAINST CERTAIN EMIGRATION ABUSES.-The Acting Attorney General moved the second reading of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a second time.

The Council then went into Committee on the Bill.

Bill reported without amendment.

The Acting Attorney General then moved that the Bill be read a third time.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed, and numbered as Ordinance 25 of 1889.

BILL ENTITLED THE CHINESE EXTRADITION ORDINANCE, 1889.-The Acting Attorney General moved the third reading of this Bill,

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Mr. RYRIE moved as an amendment that the Bill be re-committed. Discussion ensued.

Mr. LAYTON suggested a division on the question of the third reading.

Council divided,--

MR. CHATER.

For

THE SURVEYOR General.

THE ACTING REGISTRAR GENERAL. THE ACTING COLONIAL TREASURER.

THE ACTING ATTORNEY GENERAL.

THE COLONIAL SECRETARY.

Motion for third reading carried by a majority of two.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed, and numbered as Ordinance 26 of 1889.

Against

MR. KESWICK. MR. LAYTON.

MR. WONG SHING. MR. RYRIE.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Governor then adjourned the Council sine die.

Read and confirmed, this 20th day of November, 1889.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

G. WILLIAM Des Vœux,

Governor.

4

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 19.

WEDNESDAY, 20TH NOVEMBER, 1889.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR (SIR G. WILLIAM DES VEUX, K.C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary (A. LISTER).

the Acting Attorney General, (ANDREW JOHN LEACH).

45

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the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (HENRY ERNEST WODEHOUSE, C.M.G.). the Acting Registrar General, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES).

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the Surveyor General, (SAMUEL BROWN)..

PHINEAS RYRIE.

WONG SHING.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

BENDYSHE LAYTON, (vice the Honourable ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN).

ABSENT:

The Honourable JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK, (vice the Honourable JOHN BELL-IRVING).

The Council met pursuant to notice.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 25th June last, were read and confirmed.

THE LATE DR. STEWART.-His Excellency the Governor referred to the serious loss the Colony had sustained in the death of Dr. STEWART (Colonial Secretary), and directed an extract from a Des- patch from the Secretary of State for the Colonies on the subject to be read.

CO.Desp. Extract from Despatch read accordingly.

194 of 1889.

VOTES REFERRED TO THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.--Read the following Minutes by His Excellency the Governor :-

C.S.O.

1359 of 1889.

C.S.O.

1516 of 1889.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

(1.)

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of Eight hundred and Five Dollars for repairing damages caused to the Public Gardens by the rainstorm of the 29th and 30th May last.

Government House, Hongkong, 2nd July, 1889.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

(2.)

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of Five hundred and Five "Dollars to provide for certain expenses in connection with the Nursing Staff of Sisters in the

Civil Hospital, viz. :—

Rations for 5 Sisters at $15 each per month, for 5 months,. Wages of a Cook, 5 months,

Do. of an Amah, 5 months,

Do. of 2 Coolies, 5 months,

$375.00

40.00

30.00

60.00

$505.00

Government House, Hongkong, 2nd July, 1889.

(3.)

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX. ·

C.S.O.

1988 of 1889.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of One thousand Dollars for concreting a portion of the walks in the Public Gardens.

This amount will be taken from the unexpended balance of $2,500, voted in the Estimates for Tree planting which has become available owing to the failure of the Contractor to complete his agreement.

Government House, Hongkong, 10th October, 1889.

46

C.S.O.

1027 of 1889.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

(4.)

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of One thousand and Two hundred Dollars as a supplementary vote to defray the cost of desks, bookcases, chairs, &c. for the Masters' rooms and Store-room of Victoria College, omitted from the supplementary vote passed on the 12th April, 1889.

Government House, Hongkong, 14th October, 1889.

(5.)

C.S.O.

1785 of 1889.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of Three hundred Dollars as an additional vote for Office Contingencies of the Colonial Treasurer.

The excess is principally caused by expenses incurred in re-numbering houses in the villages.

Government House, Hongkong, 14th October, 1889.

(6.)

C.S.O.

2269 of 1$89.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of Sixteen thousand Dollars, as Supplementary votes, being for repairs to Government Buildings $8,000, and for Road and Street Contingencies $8,000, it being found necessary to put both roads and buildings into a condition of more permanent repair.

Government House, Hongkong, 14th October, 1889.

The Acting Colonial Secretary moved that these Votes be referred to the Finance Committee. The Acting Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

PAPERS. The Acting Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following papers:-

The Colonial Surgeon's Report for 1888.

(No. 1).

The Harbour Master's Report for 1888. (No 13).

Returns of Superior and Subordinate Courts for 1888. (No. 1).

Report on Great Storm of 29th and 30th May, 1889. (No. 1).

Correspondence respecting Special Jurors' Fees. (No. 1).

Correspondence respecting Storm Warnings. (No. 1).

Correspondence respecting the Government Girls' School. (No. 18).

Colonial Secretary's Report on the Blue Book for 1888 (Statistical). (No. 1).

Report on the condition and prospects of Hongkong by His Excellency Sir G. WILLIAM DES

Vaux, Governor, &c.-(No. 2).

SANITARY BYE-LAWS. By direction of His Excellency the Governor, the following Bye-Laws passed by the Sanitary Board were laid upon the table.

Bye-Laws made under Sub-section 6 of Section 13 of Ordinance No. 24 of 1887.

Bye-Laws made under Sub-sections 13, 14 and 16 of Section 13 to give effect to Section 30

of Ordinance 24 of 1887.

Question put-that these Bye-Laws do pass.

Bye-Laws passed.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AUTHORISE THE APPROPRIATION OF A SUPPLEMENTARY SUM OF TWO HUNDRED AND NINETY-FIVE THOUSAND AND EIGHTY-SEVEN DOLLARS AND NINETY-NINE CENTS TO DEFRAY THE CHARGES OF THE YEAR 1888.-The Acting Attorney General moved the first reading of this Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a first time.

.

71

1

47

BILL ENTITLED THE FRENCH MAIL STEAMERS ORDINANCE CONTINUATION ORDINANCE, 1889.- The Acti ng Attorney General moved the first reading of this Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a first time.

On the motion of the Acting Attorney General, the Standing Orders were suspended.

The Acting Attorney General then moved that the Bill be read a second time.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a second time.

The Council then went into Committee on the Bill,

Bill reported without amendment.

The Acting Attorney General then moved that the Bill be read a third time.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed, and numbered as Ordinance 27 of 1889.

BILL ENTITLED THE GERMAN MAIL STEAMERS ORDINANCE CONTINUATION ORDINANCE, 1889.- The Acting Attorney General moved the first reading of this Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a first time.

On the motion of the Acting Attorney General, the Standing Orders were suspended. The Acting Attorney General then moved that the Bill be read a second time.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a second time.

The Council then went into Committee on the Bill.

Bill reported without amendment.

The Acting Attorney General then moved that the Bill be read a third time.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed, and numbered as Ordinance 28 of 1889.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE HONGKONG AND SHANGHAI BANK ORDINANCE.- The Acting Attorney General moved the first reading of this Bill,

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question put and passed.

Bill read a first time.

On the motion of the Acting Attorney General, the Standing Orders were suspended.

The Acting Attorney General then moved that the Bill be read a second time.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a second time.

The Council then went into Committee on the Bill.

Bill reported without amendment.

The Acting Attorney General then moved that the Bill be read a third time.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do

pass.

Bill passed, and numbered as Ordinance 29 of 1889.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO PROVIDE FOR CERTAIN EXPENSES IN RELATION TO PERSONS NATIVES OF OK ORDINARILY RESIDENT IN THE COLONY WHO HAVE BEEN CONVICTED, OR ACQUITTED ON THE GROUND OF INSANITY, BEFORE COURTS EXERCISING JURISDICTION UNDER THE IMPERIAL FOREIGN JURISDICTION ACTS IN FOREIGN COUNTRIES.-The Acting Attorney General moved the first reading of this Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a first time.

:

48

BILL ENTITLED THE TRADE MARKS ORDINANCE, 1889.-The Acting Attorney General moved the first reading of this Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE FOR THE NATURALIZATION OF LEUNG SnÜ, OTHERWISE LEUNG ÜN OR LEUNG YUK OR YUK SHANG.-The Acting Attorney General moved the first reading of this

Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED THE MERCHANDISE MARKS ORDINANCE, 1889.-The Acting Attorney General moved the first reading of this Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE POLICE FORCE CONSOLIDATION ORDINANCE, 1887.- The Acting Attorney General moved the first reading of this Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question--put and passed.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND ORDINANCE No. 14 OF 1862 ENTITLED AN ORDI- NANCE FOR GRANTING PATENTS FOR INVENTIONS WITHIN THIS COLONY.-The Acting Attorney General moved the first reading of this Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED THE VACCINATION ORDINANCE, 1889.-The Acting Attorney General moved the second reading of this Bill.

+

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a second time.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Governor then adjourned the Council until Wednesday, the 27th instant,

at 3 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 27th day of November, 1889.

ARATHOON SETH, Clerk of Councils.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX,

Governor.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 20.

WEDNESDAY, 27TH NOVEMBER, 1889.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR (SIR G. WILLIAM DES VEUX, K.C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary (A. LISTER).

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the Acting Attorney General, (ANDREW JOHN LEACH).

the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (HENRY ERNEST WODEHOUSE, C.M.G.).

the Acting Registrar General, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES).

the Surveyor General, (SAMUEL Brown).

PHINEAS RYRIE.

WONG SHING.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK, (vice the Honourable JOHN BELL-IRVING).

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 20th instant, were read and confirmed.

49

VOTE REFERRED TO THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-Read the following Minute by His Excellency the Governor :-

C.S.O. 1516 of 1889.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of Five hundred and Five Dollars to provide for certain expenses in connection with the Nursing Staff of Sisters in the Civil Hospital, viz. :-

Rations for 5 Sisters at $15 each per month, for 5 months,.. Wages of a Cook, 5 months,

Do. of an Amiah, 5 months, Do. of 2 Coolies, 5 months,

....

$375.00

40.00

30.00

60.00

$505.00

Government House, Hongkong, 2nd July, 1889.

The Acting Colonial Secretary moved that this Vote be referred to the Finance Committee. The Acting Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Votes passed by THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the Report of the Finance Committee, dated the 20th instant (No. 10), and moved that the following Votes referred to therein be passed, viz.:-

C.S.O.

1785 of 1889.

Contingencies:

ESTABLISHMENTS.

Treasury.

Expenses incurred in re-numbering houses in the villages,

..$ 300.00

SERVICES EXCLUSIVE OF ESTABLISHMENTS.

Botanical and Afforestation Department.

C.S.0.

1988 of 1889. Concreting a portion of the walks in the Public Gardens....

C.S.O.

1359 of 1889.

(This amount will be taken from the unexpended balance of $2,500, voted in the Estimates for Tree planting which has become available owing to the failure of the Contractor to complete his agreement.)

Repairing damages caused to the Gardens by the rainstorm of the 29th and 30th

May last,

$1,000.00

805.00

$1,805.00

Works and Buildings.

C.S.O. 2269 of 1889.

Supplementary vote for repairs to Buildings,

$8,000.00

Roads, Streets and Bridges.

C.S.0. 1027 of 1889.

Supplementary vote for Road and Street Contingencies,

.$8,000.00

:

.

50

C.S.O.

1827 of 188A.

EXTRAORDINARY EXPENDITure.

Victoria College.

Cost of desks, bookcases, chairs, etc., for the Masters' rooms and Store-rooms, ..$1,200.00

The Acting Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

PAPERS. The Acting Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following papers:-

Despatches respecting the Audit of the Accounts of the Colony. (No. 3).

Report on Public Works that have been completed to date. (No. 23).

OPIUM FARM.-Mr. RYRIE, pursuant to notice, moved the following resolution, and addressed the Council:-

That the Executive be requested to lay on the table the existing agreement with the Opium Farmer

and all papers relating thereto.

Mr. MACEWEN seconded.

His Excellency the Governor replied, and laid on the table a copy of Government Notification No. 293 of the 25th June, 1888, published in a Supplement to the Hongkong Government Gazette of the 23rd June, 1888, containing the conditions of tendering and the form of Grant of the existing Opium Farm.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO APPLY A SUM NOT EXCEEDING ONE MILLION TWO HUNDRED AND NINETY-TWO THOUSAND, EIGHT HUNDRED AND FIFTEEN DOLLARS TO THE PUBLIC SERVICE OF THE YEAR 1890. The Acting Colonial Secretary moved the first reading of this Bill, and laid on the table a copy of the Estimates for 1890.

The Acting Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AUTHORISE THE APPROPRIATION OF A SUPPLEMENTARY SUM OF TWO HUNDRED AND NINETY-FIVE THOUSAND AND EIGHTY-SEVEN DOLLARS AND NINETY-NINE CENTS TO DEFRAY THE CHARGES OF THE YEAR 1888.-The Acting Colonial Secretary moved the second reading of this Bill.

The Acting Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a second time.

The Acting Colonial Secretary then moved that this Bill be referred to the Finance Committee. The Acting Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO PROVIDE FOR CERTAIN EXPENSES IN RELATION TO PERSONS NATIVES OF OR ORDINARILY RESIDENT IN THE COLONY WHO HAVE BEEN CONVICTED, OR ACQUITTED ON THE GROUND OF INSANITY, BEFORE COURTS EXERCISING JURISDICTION UNDER THE IMPERIAL FOREIGN JURISDICTION ACTS IN FOREIGN COUNTRIES.-The Acting Attorney General moved the second reading of this Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a second time.

The Council then went into Committee on the Bill.

Bill reported without amendment.

The Acting Attorney General then moved that the Bill be read a third time.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a third time.

Question put--that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed, and numbered as Ordinance 30 of 1889.

BILL ENTITLED THE TRADE MARKS ORDINANCE, 1889.-At the suggestion of His Excellency

the Governor, the second reading of this Bill was postponed.

L

51

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE FOR THE NATURALIZATION OF Leung ShÜ, otherwise Leung ÜN OR LEUNG YUK OR YUK SHANG. The Acting Attorney General moved the second reading of this Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a second time.

The Council then went into Committee on the Bill.

Bill reported without amendment.

The Acting Attorney General then moved that the Bill be read a third time.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed, and numbered as Ordinance 31 of 1889.

BILL ENTITLED THE MERCHANDISE MARKS ORDINANCE, 1889.-At the suggestion of His Excellency the Governor, the second reading of this Bill was postponed.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE POLICE FORCE CONSOLIDATION ORDINANCE, 1887.— The Acting Attorney General moved the second reading of this Bill,

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a second time.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND ORDINANCE No. 14 OF 1862 ENTITLED AN ORDI- NANCE FOR GRANTING PATENTS FOR INVENTIONS WITHIN THIS COLONY.-The Acting Attorney General moved the second reading of this Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a second time.

The Council then went into Committee on the Bill.

Bill reported without amendment.

The Acting Attorney General then moved that the Bill be read a third time.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed, and numbered as Ordinance 32 of 1889.

ADJOURNMENT.—The Governor then adjourned the Council until Wednesday, the 4th proximo.

at 3 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 4th day of December, 1889.

ARATHOON SETHI, Clerk of Councils.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX,

Governor.

53

FM

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 21.

WEDNESDAY, 4TH DECEMBER, 1889.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR (SIR G. WILLIAM DES VEUX, K.C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary (A. ĻISTER).

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the Acting Attorney General, (ANDREW JOHN LEACH).

the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (HENRY ERNEST WODEHOUSE, C.M.G.). the Captain Superintendent of Police, (WALTER MEREDITH DEANE).

the Acting Registrar General, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES). the Surveyor General, (SAMUEL BROWN).

PHINEAS RYRIE.

WONG SHING.

ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

James Johnstone KESWICK, (vice the Honourable JOHN BELL-IRVING).

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 27th ultimo, were read and confirmed.

VOTES PASSED BY THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the Report of the Finance Committee, dated the 27th ultimo (No. 11), and moved that the following Votes referred to therein be passed, viz.:—

Civil Hospital.

Expenses connected with the Nursing Staff,

Taitam Water-works.

Completion of Taitam Water-works,......

The Acting Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

$ 505.00

$41,617.00

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO APPLY A SUM NOT EXCEEDING ONE MILLION TWO HUNndred And NINETY-TWO THOUSAND, EIGHT HUNDRED AND FIFTEEN DOLLARS TO THE PUBLIC SERVICE OF THE YEAR 1890.-The Acting Colonial Secretary moved the second reading of this Bill.

The Acting Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Mr. MACEWEN addressed the Council.

Mr. RYRIE addressed the Council.

The Governor addressed the Council.

The Surveyor General addressed the Council.

The Acting Colonial Secretary addressed the Council.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a second time.

The Acting Colonial Secretary then moved that the Bill be referred to the Finance Committee. The Acting Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE POLICE FORCE CONSOLIDATION ORDINANCE, 1887.- At the suggestion of His Excellency the Governor, the further consideration of this Bill was postponed. Adjournment.—The Governor then adjourned the Council until Wednesday, the 11th instant.

at 3 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 14th day of December, 1889.

ARATHOON SEth, Clerk of Councils.

G. WILLIAM DES Vœux,

Governor.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL,

COUNCIL, No. 22.

SATURDAY, 14TH` DECEMBER, 1889, NOON.

55

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PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

SIR G. WILLIAM DES Vœux, K.C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary (A. LISTER).

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the Acting Attorney General, (ANDREW JOHN LEACH).

the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (HENRY ERNEST WODEHOUSE, C.M.G.). the Captain Superintendent of Police, (WALTER Meredith Deane). the Acting Registrar General, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES). the Surveyor General, (SAMUEL BROWN).

PHINEAS RYRIE.

WONG SHING.

ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

James JOHNSTONE KESWICK, (vice the Honourable JOHN BELL-IRVING).

The Council met pursuant to notice.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 4th instant, were read and confirmed.

REPORTS OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the Reports of the Finance Committee, dated respectively the 4th and 9th instant, (Nos. 12 and 13).

OFFICIAL SALARIES.-Mr. MACEWEN, pursuant to notice, made the following motion, and addressed the Council,-

That the Report of the Committee on the question of Official Salaries be laid on the table. Mr. CHATER seconded and addressed the Council.

His Excellency the Governor then laid on the table the Report referred to, and addressed the Council.

THE SUPPLEMENTARY APPROPRIATION BILL, 1888.-The Acting Colonial Secretary read the following Report of the Finance Committee on this Bill:-

"The Committee having considered this Bill, recommend that the same be reported without amend- ment.'

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The Council then went into Committee on the Bill.

Bill reported without amendment.

The Acting Colonial Secretary then moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed, and numbered as Ordinance 33 of 1889.

THE APPROPRIATION BILL, 1890.-The Acting Colonial Secretary read the following Report of the Finance Committee on this Bill:-

"The Committee having considered this Bill, recommend that the same be reported as amended." The Council then went into Committee on the Bill.

Bill reported with amendments.

The Standing Orders being suspended, the Acting Colonial Secretary moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed, and numbered as Ordinance 34 of 1889.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Governor then adjourned, the Council until Wednesday, the 18th instant,

at 3 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 18th day of December, 1889.

ARATHOON SETH, Clerk of Councils.

G. WILLIAM DES Vœux,

Governor.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 23.

WEDNESDAY, 18TH DECEMBER, 1889.

57

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR (SIR G. WILLIAM DES VEUX, K.C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary (A. LISTER).

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""

""

the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (HENRY ERNEST WODEHOUSE, C.M.G.). the Captain Superintendent of Police, (WALTER Meredith Deane).

the Acting Registrar General, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES). the Surveyor General, (SAMUEL BROWN).

PHINEAS RYRIE.

WONG SHING.

ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

""

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK, (vice the Honourable JOHN BELL-IRVING).

ABSENT:

The Honourable the Acting Attorney General, (ANDREW JOHN Leach).

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 14th instant, were read and confirmed.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE MERCHANT SHIPPING CONSOLIDATION ORDINANCE, 1879. The Acting Colonial Secretary moved the first reading of this Bill.

The Acting Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a first time.

The Standing Orders being suspended, the Acting Colonial Secretary moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Mr. MACEWEN addressed the Council, and enquired whether the tax proposed in this Bill to be levied for the purposes of the Gap Rock Lighthouse would be withdrawn after the Lighthouse had been finished.

His Excellency the Governor replied in the affirmative.

Discussion then ensued, in which Mr. MACEWEN, Mr. RYRIE, the Acting Colonial Secretary, and His Excellency the Governor took part.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a second time.

The Council then went into Committee on the Bill.

Bill reported without amendment.

The Acting Colonial Secretary then moved that the Bill be read a third time.

The Acting Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do

pass.

Bill passed, and numbered as Ordinance 35 of 1889.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Governor then adjourned the Council sine die.

Read and confirmed, this 15th day of January, 1890.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

G. WILLIAM Des Vœux,

Governor.

HONGKONG.

THE COLONIAL SURGEON'S REPORT FOR 1888.

Presented to the Legislative Council, by Command of His Excellency the Governor.

173

No. 12

89.

GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL,

HONGKONG, 8th May, 1889.

SIR,-I have the honour to forward my Annual Report for the year 1888 together with the Tables showing the work done in the Medical Department under my supervision, the report of the Superin- tendent of the Government Civil Hospital and that of the Government Analyst.

POLICE.

The admissions to the Hospital from the Police Force show a considerable increase, which is more apparent than real the fact being that the Force has been increased in strength by nearly fifty men. The increase has been among the European and Chinese portions of the Force as shewn in the table given below:-

Admissions to Hospital, 1881,

Do..

Do.,

1882,

1883,

Europeans.

88...

92..

.113..

87.

Indians.

212.. .230...

246...

224.... .208.....

Chinese.

..198

227 239 ..175 ..163

TUU

Do..

Do.,

1884, 1885.

Do.,

Do.,

1886, 1887,

Do.,

1888,

..124..

....

..138..

.139....

.....147

.243.... .293.

....279.....

...221 ..187

...231

There were fifteen deaths in the Force as compared with nine last year. The only European that died was suffering from Small-pox. Three Indians and four Chinese died in the Civil Hospital. One Indian shot himself at No. 7 Station and six Chinese died while away on leave in their own country.

The following table gives the admissions to Hospital and the deaths in the Force for the last 10 years :-

1879,

1880,

1881,

1882,

1883,

1814,

1885,

1886,

1887,

1888,

Admissions.

Deaths.

566..

8

588.....

...13

.498....

...10

..549..

8

.599..

..10

.486...

7

495.....

9

.602....

...14

..619.

9

...657..

......15

TROOPS.

There has been a considerable decrease in the amount of sickness amongst the Troops this year as compared with the previous two years, but a much larger number of deaths.

The sickness is still very much above the average of the last 10 years as the following table shows:-

1879, 1880,

1881,

1882.

1883,

1884,

1885,

1856,

1887, . 1888,

There were two deaths from Sporadic Cholera.

1,035....

8

1,075..

...13

.1,116...

4

.1,019

9

.1,105.

.10

.1,097

.12

.1,190....

.24

.1,607.

9

1,749.

...14

.1,485.

.21

174

GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL.

The New wing of this Hospital has at last been opened and the accommodation as far as the sick are concerned is now complete.

Quarters for the Medical Staff, the European. and Chinese Nursing Staffs are in course of con- struction as also the Laboratory and Mortuary but all these I hope will be completed before the spring of next year.

Dr. ATKINSON the New Superintendent has had a very hard time of it this year and many troubles to contend with, nevertheless, I cannot speak too highly of the energy and skill he has shewn in the performance of his duties and the esteem he has earned for his kindness and consideration to the patients in the Hospital. I am glad to think that his work will be lightened this year as a New Medical Officer has been sanctioned to assist him. Five French Sisters of Mercy will shortly arrive as nurses to the Hospital. One trained European Wardmaster, Mr. CHAPMAN, has arrived from England and given much satisfaction and another has been sanctioned and will be appointed shortly. I regret we shall lose the services of Mr. WATSON, the assistant Apothecary, who leaves the service to better himself. I only hope his successor will prove as capable and good an officer. We shall also lose the services of the Chinese Wardmaster, A Lok, who has been in the service nearly twenty years and whose good service I have had to mention on many occasions; he will retire on pension.

Mr. ROGERS, the Steward, has gone Home this year on a well earned leave.

An assistant Chinese clerk has at last been sanctioned and I hope to be able to report next year that the Hospital Subordinate Staff is in good working order.

As

Mr. CROW, the Government Analyst and Apothecary, returns to his duties after acting for eighteen months as Sanitary Superintendent in place of Mr. MCCALLUM who went Home on sick leave. President of the Sanitary Board I have to mention that Mr. CROW performed his duties to the entire satisfaction of the Board, which were exceptionaly onerous as the Board had been reconstituted and there was a great increase of work in connection with the New Health Ordinance lately passed.

The admissions to Hospital this year shew an increase of over a hundred while the deaths shew a decrease of nine as compared with last year. This increase of admissions has been principally from the Police Force. Board of Trade and Police cases.

There were 370 admissions for the various forms of malarial fever and 3 deaths among them. There were 21 admissions to Hospital of a choleraic type and 13 deaths.

Dysentery cases 54 admissions and 5 deaths.

The following table shows the number and classification of those brought to Hospital for the last

eight years :-

Police,

Board of Trade,

Private paying Patients, ...268

Government Servants,

Police Cases,

Destitutes,

1882.

549

1883.

1884.

1885.

1886.

1887.

1888.

599

486

495

602

619

657

...116

110

60

100

132

103

153

260

259

283

381

324

313

88

105

96

124

144

147

159

.207

227

231

238

142

208

242

230

201

222

270

222

255

248

1,458

1,502

1,354

1,510

1,623

1.656

1,772

Tables V A to G shew the character of the diseases admitted to Hospital. These tables have been re-arranged by the Superintendent and in a very much better form than those given in previous reports being more systematic and convenient for obtaining rapidly all necessary information. Table VI. gives the rate of mortality in the Hospital for the past ten years.

Table VII. gives the admissions of the various classes for each month of the year, May to September being the most sickly months.

The admissions and deaths in Hospital for the last ten years are as follows:-

1879,

1880,

1881,

1882.

1883,

1884,

1885.

1886,

1887,

1888,

Admissions.

Deaths.

1,071..

..55

..1,055.

..14

..1,236.

.49

..1.458.

...68

1,502......

..70.

i

1,354....

50

.1.510.

.76

79

...89

...$0

;

.1,623.... 1,656.... .1,772.

The percentage of deaths 4.51 is not above the total average for the last ten years.

175

Ten deaths occurred from injuries received. There were twenty-one admissions to Hospital of a Choleraic nature but I do not think any of them were of the Epidemic or Asiatic type for reasons I will give later on.

The total amount of fees received this year was $9805.15 about $500 dollars less than last year. But two private cases, Volunteer Firemen suffering from injuries received while on duty at fires and in the public service, were excused by Government from paying fees for that reason otherwise there would have been an increase of fees of over $1,000 instead of a deficency of $500. One case was eight months in Hospital and I am happy to say the life of a well known and much respected Citizen was spared chiefly owing to the skilful an unremitting attention of Dr. ATKINSON. The severity of the case may be judged when I say that the patient lost a leg and the severe contusions received resulted in numero is abscesses, also that one of the Chinese Nurses in attendance died from blood poisoning his duty in this case costing him his life, he had been twelve years a nurse in the Hospital and bore an exceptionally good character.

SMALL-POX HOSPITAL.

A severe epidemic of Small-pox began in November, 1887 and in the month of January this year (1888) 84 cases were admitted to Hospital. 10 cases in February and 5 more in March, April, and May-9 cases altogether, the largest number ever admitted to this Hospital in the sixteen years I have been in the Colony. Of these 16 died. Very many of the cases were very severe and one who recovered was in Hospital 137 days. No more cases occurred in the Colony from May up to the end of the year, thanks to all the precaution taken as described in my last Annual Report.

Table VIIa. gives the sex, nationality, age and length of detention of the patients admitted to this Hospital very few of whom were children.

PUBLIC MORTUARY.

Table VIII. shews the number of bodies brought to the mortuary for examination and the cause of death. This year 164 bodies were brought in, Europeans 3, Coloured 4, Chinese 113, of the latter 20 were children.

55 were found to have died from disease, 64 were accidental deaths, 31 suicidal and 3 homicidal, 2 causes unrecognizable owing to decomposition.

VICTORIA GAOL.

The following figures give the number of admissions into Gaol and the daily average number of prisoners for the past ten years.

Total No. admitted

to Gaol.

3,665..... .3,530. .4,150........

1879.

1880,

1881,

1882,

.3,498...

1883,

.3,486.

1884.

4,023.

1885,

.3,610.....

1886,

.4,600.......

1887,

.4,302....

1888,

.3,627....

Daily average No.

of Prisoners.

576.13

575.25

.666.00

..622.00

..542.15

.552.00

..530.00

..674.00

..584.00

..531.00

These figures show a considerable decrease in the number of admissions on the past ten years, but what is of most importance they shew the smallest daily average of prisoners in Gaol in the past

ten years.

Table IX. shews the number of prisoners admitted to Hospital the nature of their complaints and the nun.ber of deaths.

Table XI shews the rate of sickness and mortality of prisoners under treatment in the Gaol. There is an increase of 40 in the admissions to Hospital and an increase of 6 in the number of deaths. In 1887 there were in Hospital, 266 cases and 6 deaths, in 1888 there were in Hospital 306 cases and 12 deaths of these there were 16 cases of Choleraic Diarrhoea of which 7 died no such cases have occurred in the last fifteen years of my experience, none of these cases had any connection with the others they were confined to no particular class of prisoners and occurred in different cells, the outbreak only lasted a few days. Besides the deaths in Hospital there was one case of suicide in the cells, and two prisoners were killed in an attempt to escape from the chain-gang.

Table XIb. shews the number of opium smokers consuming one mace and upwards received into Gaol, their weight on admission and their weights in each week of the first month in Gaol or until their discharge.

:

;

176

Table XIc. shews the number of opium smokers admitted to the Gaol Hospital and the diseases they were suffering from. There were no deaths among them and no cases of Cholera occurred among them, enfeebled though they are supposed to be by this said to be pernicious habit, though they had exactly the same diet as the other prisoners and were distributed among those that were attacked. The only cases worthy of note are first, one who was 60 years of age, had been an opium smoker forty years, the longest time of all the 75 who came into Goal, smoked 3 mace per diem weight 85lbs. on admission and the same after a month's confinement though he was subject to the penal diet the same as other prisoners, he was never on the sick list nor received any particular treatment to cure him of the habit.

All opium smokers now are only under observation unless their is special reason besides this habit they receive no treatment whatever, the habit is entirely ignored and they go to their work and diet same as other prisoner.

The heaviest weight on admission was 133lbs. lost 2lbs. in the fortnight he spent in Gaol was 58 years of

age 20 years an opium smoker consumed one mace per diem.

The lightest weight admitted was 71lbs. he increased 4lbs. during a fornight's confinement was 26 years of age one year an opium smoker and consumed one mace daily.

The greatest decrease in weight among the opium smokers was 8 lbs. and this case was never on the sick list, this man had been 15 years a smoker of one mace daily.

The greatest gain in weight was 8 lbs.-this man had been 10 years a smoker of 11⁄2 mace had never been in hospital so that there was only the ordinary diet to account for the increase.

This habit in itself appears to me to be perfectly harmless. In conjunction with women, wine, late hours and gambling it is very possibly injurious, but in this case "it is not in it to use a slang phrase, compared with tobacco as while indulging in this "pernicious" habit you must devote your whole attention to it and it alone. The opium hells of Europe and America combine more than one of these attractions as a rule. The great majority of opium smokers in China have this "vice" only and too much pity is wasted abroad which might well be spent at home. The " poor heathen Chinese' affords a better example than most Europeans, it is only a small minority even among the well-to-do that are not frugal and industrious in their habits, and sober in their enjoyments though they are opium smokers.

LUNATIC ASYLUM.

Table XId. gives the number, nationality, disease and description of patients admitted to the Asylum.

There were eight patients last year of whom two remain this year in the Asylum. There being no female patients in the wards this year, they were used for European female Small-pox cases and have since been thoroughly disinfected, repainted, &c.

TUNG WA HOSPITAL.

The total number of patients treated during 1888 in this Hospital was 2.298 of these 1,428 died. 379 were admitted in a moribund condition.

The number of out patients treated was 99.721.

There remained in Hospital at the end of the year 88 patients.

To the Small-pox wards of this Hospital 349 cases were admitted of these 276 died, the majority of the admissions were infants and children and but very few cases had been vaccinated.

All the cases occurred in the first half of the year. 1882 vaccinations were successfully performed in Victoria and the outlying districts.

TEMPORARY LOCK HOSPITAL.

I regret to say this Hospital is still in the temporary buildings, the cause of this being, that the new Hospital has been given over to the European nurses of the Government Civil Hospital and other portions of the European Staff, till the New Quaters are built for them, these I hope will be ready by the beginning of next year.

Last year I reported the abolishment of the Contagious Diseases Ordinance and the unexpected wishes of the women of all classes to continue the Medical Examination. This voluntary attendance has been contrary to my expectations wonderfully good and regular but notwithstanding this the cases admitted to Hospital are of a much graver type the majority being for soft sores and buboes.

The extent of the severity is well indicated by the average number of days under treatment which has risen from 13.9 to 24.4 a larger average than has occurred since 1869.

There were 10,924 examinations made last year and 66 found diseased among the women. Table E. In this Table the admissions to the Venereal Wards of the Military Hospital shew a large increase being 401 as compared with 222 in 1887

*

*

*

x

?

177

The Naval Hospital shews a decrease in admissions to the Venereal Wards being 244 as com- pared with 268 in 1887. The Police Hospital also shews a decrease in admissions being 46 as com- pared with 70 in 1887.

The Civil Hospital a slight increase being 68 as compared with 54 in 1887.

But Tables E 2 and E 3 are the real tests shewing the amount of constitutional disease contracted in the Navy and Army. There were 10 cases admitted to the Naval Hospital as compared with 8 last year of this form of disease contracted in Hongkong.

There were 37 cases admitted to the Military Hospital as compared with 39 in 1887.

The Navy shew an increase of two the Army a decrease of two.

At any rate I think it is well shewn by these tables that the voluntary examination of the women is doing a great deal of good. We have much to be thankful for that they have shewn so much sense and it speaks well for the way the examinations are conducted in this Colony that they have caused no offence to the women.

HEALTH OF THE COLONY.

Table XVI. shews the rate of mortality amongst the European and American community in Hongkong for the last ten years from all classes of disease. The number and percentage is the highest recorded for many years, but as the number of this portion of the population has stood on the returns at 3,040 for eight years, I doubt if the percentages given of late years can be considered correct.

I give below for the fifteen years I have been in the Colony the mortality among the Europeans and Chinese as registered in Hongkong from diseases that may be attributed among other causes to insanitary houses, filth poison and overcrowding. In these Tables I have put down under the head of cholera all cases registered under the heads of Cholera Nostras, Cholera Sporadic, Choleraic Diarrhoea names given to the cholera common to Europe in the summer months as distinguished from what is known as Asiatic or Epidemic Cholera. Last summer there was a considerable outbreak of this form of disease, but there was nothing about it of the nature of an epidemic, solitary cases occurred all over the city, no particular quarter being distinguished as suffering more than another. Most of the cases occurring in the months of June and July when unripe stone fruits are imported and eaten in the Colony in large quantities. In all the cases I saw all the patients complained of griping pains in the bowels, and in all the post mortems I was present, and the stomach and bowels were extremely con- gested and inflammed. In the Asiatic form of cholera gripes are absent the only pain being from cramps chiefly in the lower extremities the vomiting and purging being quite painless. The bowels do not show any inflammation these symptoms being nearly the only difference between the two diseases except that the mortality in one is less than that of the other. The experience of the out- break in the Gaol, I think, is quite sufficient to show that this outbreak was not of an epidemic cha- racter for with the overcrowding, and the bucket system for night-soil in the cells at night an epidemic form of this disease would not have stopped at sixteen cases. No European in the Gaol was attached and stopping the drinking of cold water (which the Chinese are not accustomed to) when at work and perspiring freely, giving congee water and weak tea instead, soon put a stop to the outbreak in the Gaol which only lasted a few days. As was remarked in the outbreak among the Military three years ago the temperance men were the sufferers so in some of the cases among Europeans that I saw they attri- buted the attack to drinking large quantities of iced water.

DEATHS AMONG EUROPEANS (BRITISH AND FOREIGN).

FEVERS.

YEARS.

DIARRHEA. CHOLERA.

Simple

VOMITING

AND PURGING.

TOTAL.

Enteric.

Continued.

Typhus.

1873,

:

1874,

1875,

1

1

1876,

8

1877,

15

24

42

6459 ∞

17

17

25 26

18

24

14

24

10

27

9

29

1878.

1879,

3

21

14

38

I

12

10

24

1880.

2

17

10

29

1881.

10

13

1

13

37

1882,

1.

9

1883,

1884,

7

4

12

7

11

1885,

1886,

5

8

1887,

7

10

4

16

924666

19

23

19

46

5

18

25

:~:

25

30

1888,

T

178

YEARS.

DEATHS AMONG CHỈNESE.

FEVERS.

VOMITING

DIARRHEA. CHOLERA. AND

PURGING.

TOTAL.

Enteric.

Simple Continued.

Typhus.

1873,

12

96

16

195

:

319

1874,

125

46

231

402

1875,

31

291

2

288

612

1876,

94

343

259

696

1877,

145

370

8

311

834

1878,

89

481

33

701

1,304

1879,

116

733

21

608

1,478

1880,

309

373

348

1,030

1881,

438

168

38

435

1,079

1882,

679

71

465

1,215

1883,

262

571

3

660

1,496

1884,

132

600

2

301

1,035

1885,

105

755

561

176

1,604

1886,

9

772

10

326

19

1,136

1887,

441

25

276

13

764

1888,

299

2

361

17

236

817

The outbreak of Small-pox in the beginning of the year also contributed largely to the mortality in the foreign part of the community 29 died, amongst the Chinese there were 470 deaths from thi cause. There has not been time to test the value of the new vaccination Ordinance because previou experience has shewn that every third year there has been a

there has been a slight outbreak of this disease but neve before one so large as this year. Small-pox generally appears in the winter months beginning abou November, previous experience has shewn that one winter we have had no cases or at most half dozen the next winter there has been a dozen or two and the third winter fifty or sixty this ha been the rule during my experince of the Colony. This winter there has been only one case recorded among the Chinese and six or seven mild cases of varioloid among Europeans.

These outbreaks have brought inuch discussion over the long pending scheme of a Hospital for Infectious diseases. Some three years ago a commission was formed of the Military and Naval Surgeons the Military Engineers, the Surveyor General and myself and after long discussion it was agreed that the best and only suitable form of Hospital for Infectious Diseases in this Colony was a Hulk and to that opinion I still adhere. There is no site in the Colony to which there are not strong objections on one or more scores and most of these objections are removed when a hulk comes in question. There must be a receiving ward ashore where cases can receive immediate attention and be diagnosed. Four years ago four cases were brought in by the Police and sent into the Cholera Ward I was notified and hurried down at once much disgusted to find one drunken man one case of colic and two cases of high fever all of whom had been found "vomiting and purging" which of course proved that they were cases of Cholera, at that time there was a considerable scare and any one "vomiting or purging no matter from what cause got a dose of Cholera mixture served out to him by his nearest friend or neighbour, who could procure it from the nearest Police Station. This sort of thing shews the absolute necessity for a ward of observation and there is no place better than the present Small-pox Ward attached to the Government Civil Hospital when it has received some necessary improvements.

Dr. ATKINSON has furnished a very interesting report and also notes of some interesting cases. He has also given some valuable recommendations. He has had very hard and much annoying work but as assistance is coming out in the shape of another Surgeon and his Subordinate Staff is in a fair way now to be as near perfect as possible I hope it will never occur again.

Mr. CROW furnishes an Analytical report some of which will interest the Public, the report on the milk supplied by the Dairy Farm is a very handsome gratuitous advertisement to an Establishment that is certainly a very great benefit to the Colony.

I have the honour to be.

The Hon. F. STEWART, LL.D.

Colonial Secretary.

Sir,

Your obedient Servant,

PH. B. C. AYRES,

Colonial Surgeon.

2

POLICE.

I-TABLE shewing the ADMISSIONS into and DEATHS in the GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL

during each Month of the Year 1888.

EUROPEANS.

INDIANS.

CHINESE.

MONTHS.

Admissions.

Deaths. Admissions. Deaths.

Admissions. Deaths.

TOTAL TOTAL Admissions. Deaths.

Remaining on the 1st Jan.,

1888,.

3

8

1

12

inuary, ebruary,

Larch,

April,

15

10

8

33

8.

7

18

11

14

13

38

6

16

14

36

May,

10

21

32

1

63

1

June,

21

53

26

100

4

July,

11

24

29

64

ugust,

13

33

1

38

1

84

eptember,

18

34

19

71

Ictober,

15

29

19

63

November,

6

19

14

39

December,

10

11

15

36

Total,.....

147

279

3

231

4

657

7

J. M. ATKINSON, M.B.,

Superintendent.

II.—TABLE shening the RATE of SICKNESS and MORTALITY in the POLICE FORCE during the Year 1888.

AVERAGE STRENGTH.

TOTAL SICKNESS.

TOTAL DEATHS.

RATE OF SICKNESS.

RATE OF MORTALITY.

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

European.

Indian.

April,

Remaining on 1st Jan., 1888,| January, February, March,

2

ગાયો ની

6 10

5 14

2

May,

5 16 13

June,

10 36 3

July,...

6

20

13

August,

7 21 13

September,

11 18 7

October,

4 19 9

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

Total.

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

114

222 349 685 147 279 231

1

10 128.94 125.68 66.18 0.87 1.80 2.86

J. M. ATKINSON, M.B.,

Superintendent.

III.-POLICE RETURN of ADMISSIONS to HOSPITAL from each District during the Year 1888.

GOVERNMENT

CENTRAL No. 5

HOUSE

8

No. 2

No. 1 STONE CUTTERS'

No. 6 MOUST

3

""

""

ISLAND.

GOUGH.

WATER POLICE

STATIONS TSIMSHATSUI,

WHITFIELD.

SHAUKIWAN,

POKFULAM.

ABERDEEN.

STANLEY.

TY TAM-TUK,

YAUMATI,

No. 7.

HUNGHOM.

November, 5 8 6

December,. 4

6

Total,.

74 185

72 | 10

13

20

:

:

Chinese.

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

2

2

European.

Indian.

sai Chinese.

.

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

European.

Indian.

2

2 13

Co

3

6 8

25

6

88

17 5

1

4

3

Chinese.

J. M. ATKINSON, M.B., Superintendent.

IV.—TABLE shewing the RATE of SICKNESS and MORTALITY of the TROOPS serving in HONGKONG

during the Year 1888.

~

TOTAL.

19 1

Jul 10 39 10 09 19:

64

84

71

63

3

:*:2

2

39 36

12

] 13 30 11

6

3

9 657

::::::

~Hi wi Hi

3 100

33

18

38

1

36

63

12

European.

Indian.

Chinesc.

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

ADMISSIONS INTO

AVERAGE STRENGTH.

DEATHS.

HOSPITAL.

AVERAGE DAILY RATE OF SICKNESS.

RATE OF MORTA- LITY PER 1,000 OF THE STRENGTH.

White.

Black. Total.

White. Black. Total.

White. Black.

Total.

White. Black. White. Black.

1,284

178

1,462

1,342

143

1,485

16

5

21

69.13

5.00

12.46

28.09

RD. LEWER,

Deputy Surgeon General,

P.M.0. China Station.

179

180

V.-TABLE shewing the ADMISSIONS and MORTALITY in the GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL during the Year 1888.

DISEASES.

I.-General Diseases.

A. Diseases dependent on Morbid Poisons,—

Sub-Group 1,

"

2,

3,

4,

5,

""

Europeans.

Indians.

ADMISSIONS.

Chinese.

Total.

65

41

17

123

141

98

147

386

3

1

4

94

42

31

167

:

B. Diseases dependent on external agents other than Morbid

Poisons,-

Sub-Group 1,

"3

""

"

2,

3, 4,

C. Developmental Diseases,

1

2

40

3

14

7

D. Not classified,

32

19

II.-Local Diseases.

Nervous System,

15

Eye,.

3

10 10 10

;

::

Europeans.

Indians.

:

DEATHS.

Chinese.

2

20

1

1

1

1

10:22

9

3

46

3

33

1

1

63

1

8

9

10

11

12

Diseases of the

Ear, Nose,

Circulatory System,

Respiratory, Digestive,

Lymphatic,

22

42

17

94

4

5

8

3

4

15

6

43

34

26

103

101

78

53

232

10 9

3

1

4

·

Thyroid Body,

Supra Renal Capsules,

Urinary System,.

6

Generative System,

3

13

Female Breast,

1

14

Male

15

16

""

Organs of Locomotion,

Connective Tissue,.

22

17

Skin,

37

III.

Poisons,

1

Injuries,

IV.

√.

Under Observation,

51

Surgical Operations,

2

6

BL: NOT wi

221

12

1

3

12

:

23

52

4

14

17

21

75

20

21

5

5

23

209

283

10

10

5

8

1

1

10

26

42

Total,....

706

404

662

1,772

27

18

35

80

J. M. ATKINSON, M.B., Superintendent.

Total.

181

Va.-TABLE shewing the ADMISSIONS and MORTALITY in the GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL during the Year 1888.

ADMISSIONS.

DEATHS.

SURGICAL OPERATIONS.

:

Removal of Tumours from Parts,-

Hoematoma of Scalp, (Aspiration), Adenoma of Thigh, (Excision),

Carcinoma of Breast, (Scirrhus), (Excision),

of Tongue, (Epithelioma), (Excision), of Recurrence, (Excision),

""

29

of Penis, (Epithelioma), (Excision),

Removal of Foreign Bodies,-

Gun-shot Wound of Hand, (Bullet),

Opening of Abscess,-

Deep Abscess of Leg, (Incision),

Lumbar Abscess, Aspiration, subsequent incision,

Hepatic Abscess, Apiration, (Dr. Manson's Aspirator),.

""

"

Operation on the Eye,-

Pterygium,

Excision of Eye-ball,

Operation on the Nose,—

39

and subsequent incision,

>>

Extraction of Nasal Polypus, through the natural passages, Plugging Nares for Epistaxis,

Operations on other Parts of the Head and Face, încluding the

Mouth,-

Removal of Tongue in part (Whitehead's operation),

of Submaxillary Gland,

Operation for Harelip,

Operations on the Respiratory Organs,--

Paracentesis of Pleura, pleuritic effusion, (Aspiration),....

Operations on the Digestive Organs,-

Application of the Stomach-pump,

Washing out the Stomach,

For Abdominal Fistula,.

Fistula-in-Ano,

""

>>

Anal Fissure,

"

Hæmorrhoids, (ligature under the influence of Cocaine,) Paracentesis of the Abdomen for Ascites, (Aspiration),

Operations on the Generative Organs,-

For Phimosis, (Cocaine),

22

Hydrocele,

Obstetric Operations,-

1.-MALE.

II. FEMALE.

Application of Forceps,.

Version,

Operations on the Organs of Locomtion,--

On Bones.

Excision of portion of Tibia, (compound fracture),.

Removal of Sequestra,

On Joints.

Shoulder Reduction of Dislocation,

On Limbs as a whole.-Amputations.

Flap.-Arm at Shoulder Joint,.

Flap.-Fingers for Injury,

Flap.-Leg Upper-third Injury,

Flap. Toes, (severe burn),

Operations on the Skin,-

Skin Grafting,

Cupping,

Operations not Classified,-

Resuscitation of Drowned Persons, Treatment of Cases of Poisoning,..

تن

2

Total,....

28

* Died of Syphilis.

1

4

+:

:-

1

1

00

:

1

:

:

Europeans.

1

10 00

1

::

:

Indians.

200

1

S

1

Chinese.

Total.

1

1

1

1

1

:

1

~

10

3

1

1

1

:

1

2

6

1

1

162-

3

2

1

1

1

1

1

1

::

17

27

2010

64

64

100

3

::

:

:

Europeans.

::

Indiaus.

1

5

5

*

7.

10

J. M. ATKINSON, M.B.,

Superintendent.

Chinese.

1

1 *

:

:

1

1

Total.

182

GENERAL DISEASES.

Vb.-TABLE shewing the ADMISSIONS and MORTALITY in the GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL during the Year 1888.

ADMISSIONS.

DEATHS.

Group A.-Sub-Group 1.

1. Small-Pox, (transferred to Small-Pox Hospital),

2. Cow-Pox,...

3. Chicken-Pox,

4. Measles,

5. Epidemic Rose-rash, (Rotheln),..

6. Scarlet Fever,

7. Dengue,

8. Typhus,

9. Plague,

10. Relapsing Fever,

11. Enfluenza,

12. Whooping Cough,

13. Mumps,

14. Diphtheria,

15. Cerebro-spinal Fever,

16. Simple-continued Fever,.........

17. Enteric Fever, Synonyms, Typhoid Fever, (Typhomalarial

Fever),.......

18. Cholera, Synonyms Asiatic Cholera, Epidemic Cholera,... 19. Sporadic Cholera Synonyms Simple Cholera, Cholera

Nostras,

20. Epidemic Diarrhoea,

21. Dysentery,

GENERAL DISEASES.

Total,....

-}

10

:

Euro-

peans.

Indians.

Chinese.

13

1

14

J. M. ATKINSON, M.B., Superintendent.

VC.-TABLE shewing the ADMISSIONS and MORTALITY in the GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL during the Year 1888.

ADMISSIONS.

DEATHS.

Group A.-Sub-Group 2.

1. Malarial Fever,-

a. Intermittent, Synonymi, Ague,

b. Remittent,.

c. Malarial Cachexia,

2. Beri-Beri,

Monthly Table of Malarial Fever Cases.

INTERMITTENT.

REMITTENT.

MONTHS.

Europeans.

Indians.

Chinese.

Deaths.

Europeans.

Indians.

Chinese.

14

:

Deaths.

Total Number of

Cases.

Total Number of

Deaths.

January, February, March,

N

5

April,

May,

PANNI

6

2

3

8

June,

12

11

1

:

:

9

July,

15

13

1 3

August,

15 13 19

September,

21 21

9

October,

19 19 15

8

10

18

31

40

49

63

56

November,

4 11

20

December,

13

18

N

Total,

122 96 122

1

18 2 10 2 370

3

141 98147386 1 I 2 4

J. M. ATKINSON, M.B.,

Superintendent.

Total.

24

2

:

2

21

6

3

13

2:58

21

100

54

1

3

1

5

65

41

17

123

7

9

4

20

Europeans.

Indians.

Chinese.

Total.

122 96 122 | 340

18 2 10

1

15

30

...

16

-:

1

Europeaus. !

Indians.

Chinese.

Total.

1

1

N

2

Y

1

Euro-

peans.

Indians.

Chinese.

Total.

5

10

10

15

20

25

35

30

40

50

45

55

33

Intermittent Fever.

Remittent

66

80

75

70

65

60

Red wave.

Blue

29

85

90

95

100

No. of Cases.

January.

February.

March.

Vd.-DIAGRAM shewing NUMBER of CASES of MALARIAL FEVER admitted in each Month of the Year 1888. .

J. M. ATKINSON,

Superintendent.

.

April.

May.

June.

July.

August.

September.

October.

November.

December.

183

1. Hydrophobia,

2. Glanders,

....

3. Horse-pox,. 4. Splenic Fever.

DISEASES.

Group A.-Sub-Group 5.

DISEASES.

DISEASES.

1. Phagedona,

2. Erysipelas,

3. Pycemia,

4. Septicœmia,

Group A.-Sub-Group 3.

184

Ve.-TABLE shewing the ADMISSIONS and MORTALITY in the GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL during the Year 1888.

ADMISSIONS.

DEATHS.

Total,.....

3

:

Europeans.

Indians.

Vƒ.-TABLE shewing the ADMISSIONS and MORTALITY in the GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL during the Year 1888.

Group A.-Sub-Group 4.

1. Syphilis Synonym-pox,-

a. Primary,.

b. Secondary,

2. Gonorrhoea,

12

52

2*2

8

23

Gw :

15

13

15

90

Total,.....

12742

Europeans.

28

18

118

Indians.

Vg.-TABLE shewing the ADMISSIONS and MORTALITY in the GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL during the Year 1888.

ADMISSIONS.

DEATHS.

Total,......

:

Europeans.

Indians.

Chinese.

:

Total.

:

J. M. ATKINSON, M.B.,

Superintendent.

Europeans.

Indians.

Chinese.

ADMISSIONS.

Chinese.

J. M. ATKINSON, M.B., Superintendent.

Total.

Total.

Europeans.

1

1

Indians.

1

4.

1

Chinese.

J. M. ATKINSON, M.B.,

Superintendent.

DEATHS.

Chinese.

Total.

Total.

Europeans.

Indians.

Chinese.

Total.

185

VI.—TABLE shewing the RATE of MORTALITY in the GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL. during the last 10 Years.

Rate to Total Number of

Admissions.

Rate to Number of Europeans Rate to Number of Coloured Rate to Number of Chinese

Admitted.

Persons Admitted.

Admitted.

Per cent.

Per cent.

Per cent.

Per cent.

1879,

5.13

1879,

3.12

1879,

8.39

1879.

4.72

1880,

4.17

1880,

3.73

1880,

2.66

1880,

5.80

1881,

3.96

1881.

3.87

1881.

3.09

1881,

4.80

1882,

4.66

1882,

4.85

1882,

4.38

1882,

5.24

1883,

4.66

1883,

4.37

1883,

3.01 1883,

6.08

1884,

3.69

1884,

3.15

1884,

1.24 1884,

6.08

★ 1885,

5.03

1885,

4.65

1885,

3.06

1885,

7.01

1886,.

4.86

1886,

4.25

1886,

4.66

1886.

5.73

1887.

5.37

1887,

4.50

1887,

4.56

1887.

6.96

1888,

4.51

1888,

3.96

1888.

4.70

1888,

4.98

J. M. ATKINSON, M.B., Superintendent.

VII.-TABLE shewing the ADMISSIONS into and DEATHS in the GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL

during each Month of the Year 1888.

EUROPEANS.

COLOURED.

CHINESE.

MONTHS.

TOTAL TOTAL Admissions. Deaths.

Admissions. Deaths. Admissions.

Deaths. Admissions. Deaths.

Remaining on the 1st

January, 1888,

39

2

14

62

2

January,

60

18

45

123

February,

61

13

19

1

93

March,.

41

April,.

38

May,

55

June,

62

July,

65

August,

65

September,

78

CO CO CO IP or mod (0.

2

20

35

96

1

25

56

119

31

1

63

149

9

60

4

80

202

15

33

3

59

157

77

54

73

192

11

50

1

57

October,

65

41

1

55

November,

38

3

26

55

December,.

39

1

19

56

P 10-P 10

185

6

161

5

119

5

114

7

Total,

706

28

404

19

662

33

1,772

80

J. M. ATKINSON, M.B.,

Superintendent.

186

VIIa.-TABLE of ADMISSIONS INTO and DEATHS in SMALL-POX HOSPITAL, 1888.

No.

SEX.

NATIONALITY. AGE.

DATE OF ADMISSION.

DATE OF DISCHARGE.

NO. OF DAYS IN HOSPITAL.

DESCRIPTION OF PATIENT.

RESULT.

1

Male

Chinese

16

1st January

31st January

30

Private Paying

Recovered

27

English

34

1st

4th

12

21

Irish

21

1st

4th

3

"

"

English

36

1st

*

17th May

137

Destitute

Chinese

30

1st

3rd January

Government Servant

21

1st

3rd

P.C. 189

"

"

American

43

1st

13th

12

Destitute

Scotch

27

1st

6th

P.C. 49

English

29

1st

2nd

Assistant Turnkey

10

Portuguese

6

1st

31st

30

19

Private Paying

11

Female

28

1st

25th

24

Destitute

>>

12

Chinese

17

1st

19th

18

Wife of P.C. 230

13

Male

Colonial

39

1st

21st

20

The Board of Trade

14

English

23

1st

17th February

47

Destitute

15

40

1st

6th

36

17

Private Paying

16

Indian

18

1st

>>

3rd January

2

Destitute

17

**

Malay

1st

19th

18

**

18

Caucasian

32

1st

19 Female

Japanese

18

1st

**

1st 24th

1

The Board of Trade

*

23

Destitute

20

Male

Chinese

28

1st

5th

""

Private Paying

21

26

1st

18th

17

22 Female

Japanese

23

1st

12th

11

>>

23

Male

Chinese

1st

9th

8

29

P.C. 20S

Destitute

Son of Inspector Quincey

1 Died

Recovered Died Recovered Died Recovered

24

::

English

26

1st

3rd March

62

Destitute

""

25

Scotch

22

1st

""

>>

25th January

24

The Board of Trade

::

26

Norwegian

20

2nd

3rd

32

"

Private Paying

27

Female

Japanese

24

3rd

28th

25

"

..

"

28

Male

Chinese

8

4th

14th

10

Destitute

27

22

"5

29

::

Norwegian

28

4th

*

20th February

47

Private Paying

">

30

Swede

24

5th

23rd

19

"

19

3

31

>>

Portuguese

1

5th

5th

31

Destitute

:)

32

Scotch

19 6th

21

30th April

115

The Board of Trade

**

33

English

23 6th

20th January

14

*

23

34

26 7th

24th

17

Government Servant

35

Irish

33 8th

9th February

32

Private Paying

"

36

37

15

German English

29

9th

>>

11th January

Died

::

9th

16th

38

27

10th

::

25th February

46

Son of Government Servant Private Paying

21

39

Female

American

21 9th

14th February

36

10

Male

English

38 10th

*

15th January

41

>

Japanese

42

German

21 10th 30

11th

24th

14

22

20th February

40

43

>:

English

36 11th

20th January

9

44

American

29 12th

N

""

2nd February

21

45

Scotch

22 12th

18th

37

"

命多

"

46

Female

English

25 14th

27th January

13

47

Male

Norwegian

15th

12th March

57

་.

Assistant Turnkey

Wife of Government Servant Private Paying

Recovered

Died Recovered

Died' Recovered

48

Scotch

26 15th

27th January

12

49

Norwegian

21 16th

20th March

64

**

"

>>

Died Recovered

50

English

22 16th

2nd February

17

Assistant Turnkey

51

32 16th

6th

21

P.C. 42

**

52

Scotch

30 16th

20th

35

P.C. 103

27

>>

53

Irish

50

16th

26th January

10

Private Paying

Scotch

26

17th

"

17th February

31

P.C. 108

Died Recovered

Irish

27 17th

20th

34

P.C. 107

>

"

56

Female.

Scotch

21 17th

18th

32

Government Servant

21

";

57

Male.

35 15th

Sth

24

>>

::

Private Paying

58

English

14 17th

7th February

21

Destitute

59

Norwegian

33 17th

28th January

11

Private Paying

**

"

60

22 17th

1

17th February

31

61

29 17th

>>

28th January

il

27

27

@ 6 6 6 6 5 68ZFZREREK

62

23 17th

>>

24th February

38

--

63

41 17th

1st March

44

99

11

64

65

Irish Chinese

24 18th

1st

43

P.C. So

"

""

27

18th

19th January

1

Private Paying

66

Female.

31

18th

9th February

22

Destitute

Died Recovered

67

Male. Spanish

9 19th

7th April

79

Private Paying

2:

English

41 19th

21st January

2

69

34

19th

"

4th February

16

"?

Died Recovered

70

23

19th.

2nd

14

وو

71

Female. Chinese

15 ms. 20th

20th January

1

Destitute

72

73

74

75

Male. English Chinese American Chinese

28 20th

31st

11

Government Servant

Died Recovered

1 20th

25th

5

Destitute

27

22nd

1st March

39

Died Recovered

21 22nd

14th

52

"

*

76

26 25th

*

25th February

31

P.C. 366

*

77

18 25th

25th

31

Destitute

"

78

79

80

Female.

Scotch English Chinese

25 26th 40 26th

12th March

46

!

Private Paying

"

1

"

15th February

20

81

82

Male.

83

84

Portuguese Manila Portuguese Japanese

Scotch

German

87

American

88

89

Norwegian Swede

27th 27th 24 29th 17 30th 17 31st 22 1st February 50 4th 20 5th 23 7th 26 7th

5th

9

Died

"

21

29th January

2

Destitute

>>

>>

25th February

27

Private Paying

27th March

57

*:

Recovered

>

15th February

15

22nd March

50

Destitute

30th May

116

"3

11th February

6

Private Paying

15th March

37

.

Died Recovered

29tl. February

22

་་

90

American

7th

21st April

74

:་

91

Irish

8th

24th February

16

92

English

11th

26th March

44

93

Victorian

13th

18th February

5

94

Female.

Japanese

23 20th

12th March

21

י:

Government Servant Destitute Private Paying

"

Died

Recovered

95

Male. French

32 2nd March

2nd April

31

:

96

English

26

5th

26th March

21

"

"

97

Scotch

22

*:

4th April

10th April

P.C. 78

98

"

English

23

19th

"

7th May

18

99

Manila

19

8th May

19th June

42

Private l'aying Destitute

J. M. ATKINSON, M.B., Superintendent.

Died' Recovered

>>

-

Drowning.

Revolver wounds.

ruptured liver, &c.

Hemorrhage from

TOTAL.

VIII. RETURN of DEAD BODIES brought by the POLICE to the PUBLIC MORTUARY during each Month of the Year 1888.

EUROPEANS.

OTHER NATIONAL-

CHINESE.

ITIES.

CAUSE OF DEATH: REPORTED or ASCERTAINED BY EXAMINATION.

ACCIDENTAL.

SUICIDAL.

HOMICIDAL.

Adults. Children..

MONTHS.

Male.

Female.

Male.

January,

1

February,

March,

Female.

Male.

Female.

From Disease.

Drowning.

Children.

Cerebral and spi- nal concussion.

Frature of skull,

· limbs, &c.

Burning.

Poisoning.

Hæmorrhage from wounds and rup-

tured viscera.

Asphyxia.

Rupture of abdomi- nal muscles, protu- sion of intestines.

Opium poisoning.

Hanging.

Wounds by fire

arm.

Adults. Children. Adults.

Female.

Male.

Female.

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

April,

May,

1

June,

July,

August,

September,

October,

November,

December,

Male.

Female.

Male.

00

:

00

1

2

11

10

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:.

:.

:

:

:

1

:

:

4.

:

1

1 1

:

:

CO

10

10

13

1

19

1

:

:

...

6

7

1

I

11

4

13

4

1

6

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

Total,......

Co

A

1

1

:

1

:

:

:

3

I

2

2

1

1

1

1

6

2

N

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

1

:

:

:

...

:

:

3a

1

I

1

1

:

:

:

10 10

2

2

55 24

CO

6

113 24

1

2

ลง

17

00

:

2

1

1

1

:

:

1

...

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

00

10

10

1

16

1

13

23

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

1

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

2

:

2

1

2

(a.)—Two were far advanced in decomposition, the classification in these cases rests on a mere probability.

10

16

12

1

:

:

21

6

15

18

6

10

2 162

L. P. MARQUES, Medical Officer in charge

of Post Mortem Examinations.

187

ין

DEATHS.

188

IX.-TABLE shewing the ADMISSIONS into HOSPITAL in VICTORIA GAOL, and MORTALITY during the Year 1888.

DISEASES.

Remaining under treatment 1st January, 1888,

ADMISSIONS.

Euro- Coloured

peans.

Persons.

Chinese. ToTAL.

Euro-

peans.

Coloured Persons.

Chinese. TOTAL.

9

10

I.

Febricula,

10

14

Intermittent Fever,

Remittent

6

479

24

7

19

28

""

Small Pox,

2

1

3

Chicken Pox,

1

1

II.

Rheumatism,

1

1

III.

Sclerotitis,

:

:

:

:

1

I

IV.

2

Anæmia,

Fatty Degeneration of Heart, Hypertrophy of Heart,

Dropsy,

VII.

Bronchitis,..

Hæmoptysis,.

Phthisis Pulmonalis,

VIII.

Colic,

1

~::

2112

2

1

:

1

:::

A

10

2

2

1

1

8

8

13

14

16

16

7

1

1

1

5

1

3

3

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

3

2

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Diarrhoea,

Choleraic Diarrhœa,

Eczema and Erysipelas,. Dysentery,

""

and Fever,

Hæmorrhoids,

Jaundice,

and Remittent Fever,..

Constipation and Fever,..........

Ulceration of Rectum,

IX & X.

Albumenuria,

XII.

Bright's Disease,

Hæmaturia,

Bubo, Gonorrhoea and Soft Sores,.

Stricture of Urethra,

Gonorrhoea and Syphilis,

Necrosis of Fingers,

Abscess,

Gluteal Abscess from Flogging,...

:

1

1

25

26

5

5

Carbuncle,

1

1

Erysipelas,

5

"2

of Head traumatic,

1

Impetigo,

1

Unclassed.

Whitlow and Boils, Ecchymosis,

General Debility,

""

1

1

2

1

:

(Opium Smoker),

Delirium Tremens,

22:

20

10

22-

20

10

1

Wounds and Injuries.

Gun shot Wounds, Revolver

3

3

1

""

Contused

"1

of Head,...

1

""

Wounds from Flogging,.

67

67

Incised Wounds....

1

1

Unknown or Unrecognized,

Observation,

28

10

:9

10

:9

274

306

12

12

L. P. MARQUES,

Medical Officer.

OTHER DEATHS:-! Chinese, Suicide by strangulation in a cell;-2 Chinese killed during an attempt to escape at Kennedy Town.

TOTAL,.

189

X.-TABLE shewing CASES not ADMITTED to HOSPITAL, treated by the MEDICAL OFFICER, during the Year 1888.

DISEASES.

Europeans.

Coloured Persons.

Chinese.

TOTAL.

Remaining under treatment 1st January, 1888,

3

1

4

I.

1

Remittent Fever,

Chicken Pox,

II.

IV.

Rheumatism,

Hypertrophy of Heart,..

1

VII.

:

Bronchitis,

VIII.

1

Constipation,

Menorrhagia,

Diarrhoea,

XII.

Unclassed.

Abscess of Neck,

of Leg,

General Debility,

"3

""

(Old Age),

Delirium Tremens,

I

Wounds and Injuries.

Contused Wounds from Flogging,

Unknown or Unrecognized.

Observation,

TOTAL,.

1

6

:

1

1

1

1

1

1

3

3

1

2

1

1

2

2

1

1

1

1

5

5

1

1

101

101

1

2

118

124

N-N

XI.-TABLE shewing the RATE of SICKNESS and MORTALITY in VICTORIA GAOL during the Year 1888.

Total No. of

Prisoners

Daily Average

Total

Total

admitted to Gaol.

number of Prisoners.

Sick in Hospital.

Serious Sick, Total Sickness Trifling Deaths. to

Cases.

Total.

Rate of Sickness.

Rate of Mortality.

1

To Total. To Average. To Total. To Average.

3,627

531

306

123

15

0.843

1.182

3.621

0.413

2.788

XIɑ.-CASES ADMITTED to VICTORIA GAOL HOSPITAL, at the first Medical Examination by the MEDICAL Officer,

during the Year 1888.

SENTENCE.

No.

Years. Mos. Days.

DISEASES.

DATE OF ADMISSION.

DATE OF DISCHARGE.

REMARKS.

1234 10 COIN ∞

25

Erysipelas,

21 January.

14

General Debility, (Opium Smoker), Jaundice,

21 February.

6 February. 3 March.

27

10

وو

Albumenuria,

Delirium Tremens,

1 March. 12 April.

3

>>

16 April.

On Remand.

Observation,

42 Bubo, Gonorrhoea and Soft Sores,

1 May.

3 May.

On Remand.

3

22

""

Observation,

29

31

Ou Remand.

""

9

21

General Debility, (Opium Smoker),

1 June.

13 June.

10

42

Ecchymosis,

7

26

27

11

Observation,

27 July.

12

Observation,

23 August.

1 August. 30 29

On Remand.

13

Anæmia,

31

7 Sept.

14

General Debility, (Opium Smoker),

1 Sept.

15

3

General Debility,

20

7

""

1 October.

""

"

16

Sclerotitis,

17

Observation,

18

General Debility, (Opium Smoker),

18 October. 23 10 Nov.

29

25

On Remand.

""

16 Nov.

19

21

19

),

12

1 Dec.

25

190

XIb.-TABLE shewing the WEIGHTS of PRISONERS (OPIUM SMOKERS), for the First Four Weeks' Confinement in VICTORIA GAOL during the Year 1888.

No.

AGE.

LENGTH OF TIME OPIUM

CONSUMPTION WEIGHT WHEN

PER DIEM.

ADMITTED.

WEIGHT FIRST FOUR WEEKS.

REMARKS.

SMOKER.

1

35

1

2

44

-6

Year. Years.

1

Mace.

109 fbs.

I

110

112 110 111 110 109

Paid his fine.

""

3

48

15

117

110 110 109

>>

"

>>

34

7

106

101 103 101 102

"S

58

20

133

134

131

""

*

وو

41

18

113

116 114

112 112

""

29

""

47

14

1

119

110 108

111 112

>>

""

46

20

106

104 105 104 103

""

9

28

5

92

90

90

10

39

15

100

92

95 103 106

"5

33

11

23

12

32

13

42

14

46

15

26

16

22

17

28

4277 42∞

3

102

96

91 90

88888

89

29

""

97

96

93 96

"

""

106

106

105

99

"9

"

114

113 116

29

29

"

1

102

107

108 110 107

"

"2

1

95

90

92

""

""

3

1

110

108

106 106

"}

""

""

18

26

1

Year.

71

71 75

"

دو

19

48

15

Years.

94

96 99 98

100

""

20

54

20

2

114

110

112 110

21

39

10

22

32

11

RAA

"

"

1

110

105 105 102 104

""

1

94

""

23

50

22

2

104

93 89 91 101 103 103

105

,,

"

24

28

13

6

123

118

118

""

""

25

43

15

Discharged at once.

""

26

42

14

91

89

وو

19

27

26

6

87

84

90 7

90

87

87

"

"

28

79

37

3

79

29

21

2

30

56

26

RAA

1

86

86 88

87

"

39

3

87

86

"

33

31

60

40

85

*0.00

84

87

83. 87 84

""

29

32

59

25

103

98

99 101

53

"

199

33

66

40

80

78

85 82

08

88888

2888

92

Discharged at once.

85

100

82

22

**

>>

34

55

25

82

86

82 82

81

"

99

""

35

40

17

124

123

"

"

36

50

20

2

120

122 120 120

118 120 115 114

29

93

72

37

36

2

Discharged at once.

">

""

""

38

24

3

107

104 104 103 102

"7

""

""

39

32

2

105

""

"

""

40

30

10

1

107

>>

22

99

41

38

6

1

97

13

**

,,

42

56

25

2

86

23

多多

"

43

32

10

>>

44

30

10

2

??

45

34

2

108

91

116

""

"

46

35

10

94

>>

"

"

17

21

3

>>

48

28

,,

49

27

"

50

25

7

""

51

29

9

2

""

52

24

2 Months.

53

29

12 Years.

54

35

12

A

55

30

10

56

44

20

""

57

60

30

22

58

21

3

59

48

20

60

26

12

61

23

5:

62

35

63

40

5

.2

>>

64

22

3 Months.

22122—— ∞ ∞ ∞ - 2 ∞ ∞ OF ONE

95

100 101 101 103

101 102 105

98 99 105 102 $2 84 86

96 100 100

96 98 97 98 116 115 116 118 100 99 100 102

91 94 96

100

100

99 100

113

106 108

111

108

""

89

94 96

95 93

33

92

86 84

86

90

""

دو

93

98 100

97 97

""

""

94

94 97 95 95

""

A

">

112

109 107

105 109

19

99

95

96

98 97

"

>>

120

118

121

123

>

""

.91

88

91 89 86

A

111

""

111

99

"3

119

命命

117

>>

""

110

وو

111

32

""

1

106

25

65

40

10

Years.

122

66

56

11

108

"

67

21

86

"

""

68

28

98

"

35

69

31

12

117

.་

23

70

58

30

87

"

71

58

7

106

,,

""

72

35

1

Year.

105

>>

73

42

10

74

30

75

28

-༧ཀྱ

Years.

132

108 107 107 104

106 110 112 115 114 110 108 110 117 115 114 113 109 108 110

110 111 111 111 106 106 107 105 120 117 115 120 108 112 110 113 85 85 85 87

95 90 92

116 115 115 116

86 84 84

104 102 106 104 102 103 100 102 129 126 127 128

113

111

110 115 115

་་

**

>>

105

110

105 105 104

T

-

XIC.-TABLE shewing OPIUM SMOKERS ADMITTED to HOSPITAL and treated by the MEDICAL OFFICER

191

DISEASES.

Remaining under treatment 1st January, 1888,...........

during the Year 1887.

Europeans.

Coloured Persons.

Chinese.

Total.

General Debility, Opium Smoker, Nos. 4, 28, 30, 41, 49, 51, 65, 70, (12/S

Gaol number),

Erysipelas, Opium Smoker, No. 2,

Jaundice,

52

""

19

5,

TOTAL,

:

10

10.

1

1

1

1

12

12

XId.-TABLE shewing the NUMBER and DESCRIPTION of PATIENTS treated in the GOVERNMENT LUNATIC ASYLUM during the Year 1888.

No.

Native of

Sex.

Age.

Diseases.

Date of Admission.

Date of Discharge.

No. of Days in Asylum.

Description of Patients.

220 + 10:00

Barbadoes, Ireland,

M. 30

Mania,

1st Jan.

31st Dec.

366

M.

50

Dementia,

366

**

India, India...

M.

50

General Debility Dementia.

17th Jan.

16

M. 41

England,

M.

60

6 England,

M.

30

Mania.

8 Finland,

M.

42

Memingitis,

Imbecility,

Imbecility,

3rd Feb.

10th April.

67

3rd May.

25th October.

175

9th May.

26th May.

17

7th Sept.

31st Dec.

116

Remaining in Hospital 31st Dec.. 1887.

The Board of Trade. Private Paying. Destitute.

Destitute.

The Board of Trade. Private Paying.

Destitute.

PH. B. C. AYRES, Colonial Surgeon.

XII. TABLE of STATISTICS relating to the TUNG WA HOSPITAL during the Year 1888.

Admitted during the year 1888.

No. of Cases Treated in the

Hospital, 1888.

No, of Patients Discharged during the year 1888.

Died

during 1888.

No. of Out-Patients

Treated during

1888.

Females.

Total.

Males.

Females.

Total.

Moribund Cases,

1888.

Males.

Females.

Total.

129 29 158 1,804 494 2,298 1,804 494 2,298 795| 145 | 940 1,067

361 1,428 75,595 24,126 | 99,721 256 123

XIII.-CASES of SMALL-POX treated at the TUNG WA HOSPITAL during the Year 1888.

379

Remaining in Hospital 31st Dec.,

1888.

Males.

2

Females.

Total.

16 88

Remaining in Hospital Admitted during 1888.

31st December, 1887.

Discharged 1888.

Died 1888.

Remaining in Hospital 31st December, 1888.

Males. Females. Total. Males. Females. Total. Males. Females. Total. Males. Females. Total. Males. Females. Total.

28

15

43 173

176 349 43

30

73 130 146 276

XIV. VACCINATION performed during the year 1888 by TRAVELLING VACCINATORS of the TUNG WA HOSPITAL.

In the City of Victoria.

1,683

In Out District.

199

Total.

1,882

JAMES J. CLERIHEW,

Inspector of Nuisance,

Western Health District.

¿

192

XV.-LOCK HOSPITAL.

TABLE A

SHEWING the ADMISSIONS into the GOVERNMENT LOCK HOSPITAL, during the 31 Years of its Existence, with the Number of Diers issued and the AVERAGE LENGTH of TREATMENT.

ADMISSIONS.

NUMBER OF DIETS ISSUED.

AVERAGE NUMBER OF DAYS TREATED.

1858,

124

1858,..

4,797

1859,

162

1859,

5,389

1858. 1859.

43.8

30.8

1860,

361

1860..

9,107 1860.

23.7

1861,

442

1861,

10,778 1861.

23.4

1862,

485

1862,

12,19%

1862.

22.0

1863,

420

1863,

11.707

1863.

23.7

1864,

442

1864,

11,940

1864,

27.0

1865,

390

1865,

11,303

1865.

28.0

1866,

406

1866,

13,060

1866.

28.6

1867,

434

1867.

13,120

1867.

25.5

1868,

579

1868,

16.462

1868.

23.6

1869,

546

1869.

16.779

1869,

24.8

1870,

722

1870..

18,382

1870,

23.1

1871,

593

1871,

12.308

1871.

18.5

1872,

656

1872.

15,103

1872,

20.9

1873,

500

1873,

11,219

1873,.

19.5

1874,

345

1874..

6,814

1874,

186

1875,

134

1875

2,916

1875,

18.7

1876,

168

1876,

2,730

1876,

14.3

1877,

177

1877,

3,069

1877,

16.6

1878,

105

1878,.

2,242

1878,

19.0

1879,

129

1879,

2.199

1879,

13.6

1880,

57

1880,

1,300

1880,

14.7

1881,

44

1881,

1.330

1881.

21.7

1882,

99

1882.

1,831

1882.

15.5

1883.

278

1883.

3,451

1883.

120

1884.

325

1884,

5,174

1884,

13.1

1885,

411

1885,

6,161

1885,

15.6

1886,

401

1886,

4,837

1886,.

12.2

1887,

144

1887.

2,014

1887,

13.9

1888,

66

1888,.

1,616

1888,

24.4

Daily Average. 4.41 Longest stay 86 days.

PH. B. C. AYRES, Colonial Surgeon.

Number of Beds iu Lock Hospital.

32

Number admitted to Hospital

on 'ertificates of Visiting Surgeon.

66

TABLE B.

CONTAGIOUS DISEASES.

KETURN of the NUMBER of PROSTITUTES during the Year 1888.

Number who submitted voluntarily.

269

Total Number brought under the Provisions of the Ordinance.

269

Total Number of Examinations mnade during the Year.

10,9241

Total Number of Examinations made when no Disease was found.

10,858

NUMBER DISCHARGED FROM HOSPITAL.

No. discharged free! from bisease who still follow their former Pursuits. j

66

Number who have returned to their Friends or Emigrated.

Total Number Discharged.

269

TABLE C.

CONTAGIOUS DISEASES RETURN for the Year 1888.

PH. B. C. AYRES,

Colonial Surgeon.

TOTAL NUMBER OF MEN DISEASED

Total No. of Females!

admitted

ADMITTED INTO

AVERAGE NUMBER OF MEN IN GARRISON AND PORT (per month).

into Lock Military Naval Police Civil Hospital. Hospital. Hospital. Hospital. Hospital.

Total No. of Men Diseased.

Soldiers. Seamen. Police.

Average No. of Men in Mer- Garrison chant and Port Seamen. (per month),;

Average Percentage of Men Diseased (per month).

REMARKS.

66

401

244

46

68

759

1,468

1,097 685

14,277 17,527

0.360

Every day, Sundays and Government holidays excepted.

TABLE D.

RETURN of WOMEN examined and treated in the GOVERNMENT LOCK HOSPITAL during the Year 1888.

EXAMINATION.

HOSPITAL.

DISCHARGED,

10,924

66

10,853

DISEASES.

Primary Syphilis, uncomplicated, Gonorrhoea,

do..

Do.. and Primary Syphilis, combined. Secondary Syphilis,

P. and Secondary Syphilis and Gonorrhœa,.

TOTAL.....

* One died of Phthisis.

| No. remaining in

Hospital, 31st December, 1887.

Admitted.

Total Treated.

59*

59

4

+ ::

i

1

66

66

63

58

Cured.

PH. B. C. AYRES, Colonial Surgeon,

No. remaining in

Hospital, 31st December, 1888.

T

DISEASES.

TABLE E.

CONTAGIOUS DISEASES RETURN for the Year 1888.

Primary Syphilis, uncomplicate',

Gonorrhoea, uncomplicated,

Do.,

Gonorrhoea and

and Primary Syphilis, combined,

do.,

Primary and Secondary Syphilis, combined,

do.,

Primary and Secondary Syphilis and Gonorrhœa, Gleet,

January, February, March,

April,

May, June,

July,

August,

September,

October,

November, December,

January, February,

Marchi,

April,

May,

June.

July,

August,

September,

October,

November, December,

193

Military

Hospital.

Naval Hospital.

Police Hospital.

Civil Hospital.

*193

79

15

21

165

10.

27

38

16

1

43

31

7

1

3

TOTAL,...

.1888,......

* 401

244

16

68

TOTAL,

..1887,......

222

268

70

54

TOTAL,....

1886,.....

216

235

25

65

TOTAL,

1885,

145

200

27

130

* 63 Cases ulcer of Penis included in Admission for Primary Syphilis.

TABLE E 2.

CONTAGIOUS DISEASES ORDINANCE,

TABLE shewing the number of NAVAL MEN admitted into NAVAL HOSPITAL during the Year 1888.

SECONDARY SYPHILIS.

Months.

Contracted in Hongkong.

Contracted Elsewhere.

Total.

2

2

4

2

1

3

1

8

1

1

1

-IN-CHINA 19

2

1

4

3

1

2

1

Total Number,..

TABLE E 3.

28

CONTAGIOUS DISEASES ORDINANCE.

TABLE shewing the number of MILITARY MEN admitted into MILITARY HOSPITAL during the Year 1888.

SECONDARY SYPHILIS.

Months.

Contracted in

Contracted Elsewhere.

Total.

Hongkong.

INN 2 00 00 --TO

3

4

Total Number,.........

37

2

2

NEKE 00 00 - jf --O

4

1

3

194

XVI. TABLE shewing the rate of MORTALITY among the FOREIGN RESIDENTS in Hongkong during the last 10 Years.

Years.

Number of European and

American Residents.

Deaths.

Percentage of Deaths to Number of Residents.

1

1879, 1880,

1881,

1882,

1883,

1884,

1885,

1886,

1887,

1888,

2.767

55

1.98

2.767

69

2.49

3.040

64

2.10

3.040

55

1.80

3.040

81

2.06

3.040

94

3.09

3.040

99

3.25

3.040

103

3.38

3.040

108

3.55

3.040

122

4.01

Average of 10 Years,......

2985.4

85.0

2.771

Enclosure 1.

Report from the Superintendent of the Civil Hospital.

GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL,

HONGKONG, 12th March, 1889.

SIR,-I have the honour to submit the Annual Medical Report of the Government Civil Hospital for the year 1888.

1.-THE HOSPITAL BUILDINGS.

1. With regard to the main building of the Hospital the only alteration is the addition of a hand- lift at the east end of the building, by this considerable time and labour has been economised.

There is no doubt that in a Hospital, every contrivance to save labour and cleaning should be employed so that the time and labour of the attendants should be employed in Nursing and not in other duties, to further this I recommend that hot water should be laid to both floors.

2. The new Wing is finished and almost ready for occupation this will be a great improvement on the present building now occupied as a Male Lock Hospital, this latter will be handed over to the Colonial Surgeon and used as a Female Lock Hospital, this being the object for which it was originally intended.

3. A new Mortuary is in course of erection the early completion of which is important as the barracks for the Chinese attendants, which are urgently needed can not be commenced until this build- ing is finished.

In addition to the present arrangement in connection with these buildings I consider the following additions are required:-

1st. The construction of a suitable laundry in connection with which a small Hospital Disinfect- ing apparatus and a hot water system for supplying hot water to both floors of the Hospital should be fitted up.

2nd. The construction of an office and stores for the Compradore and also a general store-room in place of the existing Mortuary and out offices which site will be rendered available for this purpose on completion of the new Mortuary and out offices.

SMALL-POX HOSPITAL.

These temporary buildings are the same as last year with the addition of a boiler and hot water apparatus.

I am glad to record that we have not been visited with an Epidemic of Small-pox this last winter there having been only eight cases under treatment since November, 1888, where as last year there were 88 cases in same period of time.

The erection of a permanent building for the reception of all cases of infectious diseases the im- portance of which I urged upon you in my last report has received my further consideration during the past year, and I am still more impressed with the necessity of early steps being taken to place a Hospital of this class at the disposal of the Public.

ADDITIONAL OFFICER'S QUARTERS.

A new building is in course of construction between the Hospital premises and the Diocesan Home this will provide accommodation for the Assistant Medical Superintendent, the Senior Apothecary and also for the Sisters who are shortly to arrive-this building will also include a chemical laboratory.

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THE HOSPITAL PREMISES.

Some further improvements have been made in the general condition of the Recreation Grounds, ▾ and, as far as the soil will admit, in the laying out of the Gardens.

I take this opportunity of thanking Mr. FORD for the kindly assistance he has given.

The following improvements would greatly tend to the cheerfulness and security of the premises:- 1st. The substitution of a low parapet wall surmounted by a substantial open iron railing in place of the present high wall along the Hospital Road frontage of the premises adjoining the main building.

2nd. The substitution of an iron railing instead of the present, temporary bamboo fence along the High Street frontage of the grounds adjoining the Superintendent's House and used as a Recreation Ground for the convalescent patients.

THE HOSPITAL STAFF.

The Senior Apothecary Mr. CROW has been employed as Acting Sanitary Superintendent.

Mr WATSON and the two Student Apoth caries, one of whom Mr. CHAU KAM TSUN was ap- pointed after a competitive examination on the 15th October have worked well and given every satis- faction.

Mr. WATSON'S duties and responsibility have been somewhat increased during this last year owing to the Small-pox Epidemic, to the absence of Mr. CROW, and to the increased number of patients under treatment in the Government Civil Hospital.

I take this opportunity of thanking all the Officers for their ready assistance and attention during the past year which as will be seen from the returns has been one of increased pressure.

The increase in the clerical work of the Hospital rendered it necessary for me to recommend the appointment of an assistant clerk.

I am glad to see that provision has been made in the Estimates for this additional officer, as the importance of keeping the records of this Department to a high standard is of considerable practical utility.

NURSING STAFF.

We commenced this year with the services of ex-Policeman CUBIT and of H. CARNEIRO as European Wardmasters, both these officers had to be trained in their duties as they were entirely un- acquainted with nursing.

With reference to the former I cannot speak too highly of this Officer; owing to the expiration of his term of service in the Police he left the Colony on 6th November last.

I regret that Junior Wardmaster CARNEIRO proved unsuitable for his post, and on the 20th of July his services were dispensed with.

Finding it impossible to obtain a suitable trained man in the Colony I recommended on the 21st July that a Wardmaster be obtained from England such officer to have served in the Army Medical Staff Corps.

On the 1st August W. SPONG, Assistant Turnkey at the Gaol, was appointed temporarily as Junior Wardmaster.

CHINESE NURSING STAFF.

The new rules drawn up in conjunction with the Colonial Surgeon, shortly after my arrival have worked well so far.

With this class of servants constant watching and supervision are absolutely necessary.

To interest them the more in their work with the aid of Mr. Lo CHEUNG-IP as Interpreter I gave a short course of lectures on Nursing.

CHAN-A-LOK, Chinese Wardmaster, I have found very useful not only in the Nursing Depart- ment but also in Post Mortem examinations and as Interpreter to the Chinese patients having been in the Hospital for over twenty-two years he is anxious to resign, not feeling strong enough to carry on his work. However at the urgent request of Dr. AYRES and myself he agreed to remain on until our Nursing Staff became more adequate.

I regret having to report that there has been considerable sickness amongst the members of the Nursing Staff.

The total number of Staff employed at the Hospital was 44, out of this number twenty-nine Officers were 'warded' during the year for illness, of these fifteen were laid up with Malarial Fever, the earth-cutting and filling-in of the space between the main building and the new wing being in my opinion an important factor in the causation of this--during one week the two Acting European Wardmasters, two Chinese cooks, and two Chinese nurses as well as myself were laid up with Inter- mittent Fever.

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LIN TING, senior nurse, who has been in the service of the Hospital for some years unfortunately contracted "blood poisoning," and died on the 1st January after seven days' illness.

WONG NANG contracted "Typhoid Fever" on the 13th March, he was under treatment for five weeks, he recovered and resumed his duties.

In addition to these there have been six attendants from the Lunatic Asylum and Lock Hospital under Medical treatment, one of the latter KWOK TING was admitted to the Hospital suffering from "Remittent Fever" on the 28th December and died on the 31st.

Here again the earth-cutting necessitated in preparing the foundation of the New Officers' Quarters was an important factor in the causation of this disease as since the North-East Monsoon has set in both the Lunatic European keepers have had frequent attacks of Malarial Fever in addition to those Officers already mentioned.

WORK DONE DURING THE YEAR.

In classifying the differing diseases I have adopted the Nomenclature of the Royal College of Physicians of London the one usually used by the Medical profession in Statistics.

Attached to this Report are the following Tables:----

I.--Shewing the admissions into and deaths in the Government Civil Hospital during each month of the year, of the Police.

II.-Shewing the rate of sickness and mortality in the Police Force during the year. III.-Police return of admissions to Hospital from each district during the year.

V. is the General Return of the Sick treated in the Hospital.

Va. Surgical operations performed during the year.

Vb. Zymotic diseases, sub-group 1.

Vc.

""

""

2.

Vd. Diagram shewing number of cases of Malarial Fever admitted in each month of the year. Ve. Zymotic Diseases, sub-group 3.

Vf.

4.

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""

5.

""

"

Vg.

VI. Shewing the rate of mortality in the Government Civil Hospital during the last 10 years. VII. Shewing the admissions into and deaths in the Government Civil Hospital during each month of the year.

VIIa. Table of admissions into and deaths in the Small-pox Hospital.

From these it will be seen :-

1. That the number of patients under treatment, in the Hospital during the year was 1772 an increase of 116 as compared with the previous year, the total number of deaths was 80, this giving a percentage of 4.51.

2. In addition to these there were 115 out-patients treated in the Receiving Ward, these consist- ing chiefly of minor surgery cases such as dog bites, scalp wounds lacerated and contused wounds, &c. 3. Out of the 1,772 in-patients sixty-eight were females, 5 of these were women in advanced stages of labour all requiring instrumental assistance, one died, this woman had been in labour for 24 hours before admission suffering from in addition a virulent form of syphilis.. It is greatly to be regretted that these cases do not come in to the Hospital earlier as the Chinese Midwives are absolutely destitute of any obstetric skill.

4. There were 38 more Police under treatment than in 1887, they suffered principally from Malarial Fevers, injuries received while on duty, and Venereal Affections.

5. Whitfield Police Station since its re-opening from November 1st sent iu 10 cases of Inter- inittent Fever out of a total Force of 23 men.

6. Cholera contributed 21 cases, of these 12 died-a percentage of 57.1, the first case was a seaman from the S.S. Cicero, admitted on the 27th of May, the last case came in on the 5th of July. Whether this disease was true Asiatic Cholera I do not feel in a position to state.

In a hot anp moist climate like this "Choleraic Diarrhoea" is an affection met with every summer more or less. Dr. MACNAMARA states that "according to his experience there are few more certain sources of this form of Cholera than fish which has gone bad and it is very evident that whatever the deleterious influence may be which food of this description contains the mere fact of keeping it in boiling water for some time does not destroy its pernicious qualities." As fish enters largely into the diet of the population of Hongkong it is advisable that particular attention should be paid to the fish supply of the Colony.

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The majority of, these cases presented all the symptoms of Asiatic Cholera, viz :--" Violent vomiting, purging, with cramps, prostration, collapse, suppression of urine, and in three cases "rice- water stools."

The first record of Cholera in Hongkong is that by Dr. CHALDECOTT the Acting Colonial Surgeon in 1859. In his Annual Report for 1858 he states "that previously to Autumn of that year no well authenticated case of cholera was recorded to have happened in Hongkong and so confident were the Medical Practitioners of the immunity of the place that it was at first thought by them that the cases of the disease at first reported were in fact merely severe cases of Diarrhoea, but it was soon evident that the disease amongst us was true Asiatic Cholera, for no single symptom was wanting and it des- troyed its victims in an equally short space of time.

At the same time the Portuguese in Macao suffered severely from the disease and cases occurred at Canton the disease afterwards visited the East Coast reached Shanghai and it is also reported raged with great virulence over a great part of the Japanese Empire.

29

I would simply note that in a similar manner last year Macao suffered from an outbreak of this disease, it has also been reported as being rife all through the Kwangtung Province, the disease also I am informed visited the Coast ports and from the Physicians Report of the Shanghai General Hos- pital I find that from August 1st to September 17th of last year there were 8 cases of Cholera treated there of which 6 died a mortality of 75 per cent.

7. Dysentery contributed 54 cases of which 5 were fatal, a mortality of 9.26 per cent.

8. Malarial Fever contributed 371 cases of these 3 died giving a mortality of 81 per cent. With reference to the causes of Malarial Fever I quote from the Report of the Fever Commission page viii

.

"Earth Cuttings. According to W. C. MACLEAN, C.B., M.D., Professor of military medicine, in the Army Medical School, Netley, who was encamped 'in Hongkong before it was ceded to the British Government, the soil was but little disturbed and the troops did not suffer; but, when excavations were made at a subsequent time, for the construction of the City of Victoria, a fatal form of remittent fever appeared, which caused great mortality. From this and many subsequent experiences, earth cuttings, both in Hongkong and other countries, have been considered as an important factor in the production of conditions tending to the outbreak of fever. At the same time it is observed in some districts of Hongkong and more especially, at the present excavations going on at Kowloon, an im- munity from fever seems to exist in some places. In the Western District, however, earth cuttings of a recent date and of an extensive character have been in progress for some time, and the Commissioners cannot neglect the fact in the face of previous experience.'

Dr. R. YOUNG, formerly Superintendent of this Hospital, has kindly given me a short memo- randum on an outbreak of Malarial Fever at Kowloon in 1878.which I append to this. (Appendix B.)

There are doubtless many causes necessary for the evolution of the Malarial Miasm, however almost universal Medical testimony points to earth-cutting as one of these causes, our experience at the Government Civil Hospital during the past year certainly seems to bear this out.

I would strongly advise that the recommendation of the Fever Commissioners, or some slight modification of the same, with reference to the limitation of the period of earth cuttings be entertained.

The type of this Fever in Hongkong certainly seems to have been modified.

Nothing is more certain than that Aguish Districts may be rendered healthy by drainage so we may hope that in future years the type of this disease may be less severe than it is at present.

C

Last summer in the cases of Remittent Fever' under treatment there were some abnormally high temperatures in one of the cases that died the temperature taken per rectum registered 110-2° F. 9. Beri-beri-There were 16 cases of Beri-beri under treatment one of which died, this latter was a case of" Beri-beria Hydrops," the other 15 were of dry variety "Beri-beria Atrophia," all these with exception of two came from the Water Police.

The Sanitary Board having asked for information from the medical men in the Colony, concerning the prevalence, nature and habitat, of this disease as occurring in Hongkong I sent for their perusal a short memorandum the results of an enquiry I made with reference to the existence of this disease amongst the Water Police.

Appended to this report is the memorandum. (vide Appendix A.) The first record of this disease as occurring in Hongkong I find in the Report of the Colonial Surgeon Dr. WILLIAM MORRISON for the year 1852. In this he states that:

"Amongst the natives Dropsies assuming the character of Beri-beri afforded the greatest number of deaths.

Beri-beri has hitherto been regarded as a disease peculiar to Ceylon and its appearance in Hong- kong excited some surprise."

Two cases of Beri-beri were also reported by Dr. DEMPSTER in Colonial Surgeon's Report for 1856.

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:

10. Alcoholism contributed 42 cases of these two were fatal, a mortality of 4.17 These cases occurred chiefly amongst the destitute sailors.

per cent.

11. 21 cases of poisoning were under treatment, the poisonous agents being opium, stramonium, and carbolic acid, the 5 deaths were caused by opium.

With reference to the Stramonium cases, the poisonous agent was part of the plant including the flowers of "Datura alba," this was administered in the food some of which the Police fortunately obtained.

The symptoms generally resembled those of poisoning by Henbane and Night shade, in addition however all these cases suffered from hallucinations and after recovery it was found that they had lost all memory of what had happened since they partook of the food a period of about 20 hours, they never were insensible during this time and were able to walk, but with difficulty, to the Hospital.

These hallucinations were decidedly, in the majority of cases, hilarious.

I add to this Report the notes of three cases of medical interest as is the custom in the Army and Navy Annual Medical Reports, in future years I hope to be able to report more such cases.

I also include a short report on the recent Small-pox Epidemic.

During the year 39 Post Mortem Examinations have been made some being of exceptional medical interest.

The various appendices are as follows:-

Appendix A.-Memo. re "Beri-beri amongst the Water Police of Hongkong."

B.-Memo. of Dr. YOUNG on "Malarial Fever."

C.-Medical Cases.

D.-Report of Small-pox Epidemic.

The total amount of fees received from patients during the year was $9,805 15 of this the Board of Trade paid $2,271.25 and the Police $1,080.88.

Before concluding I wish to thank the Naval and Military Surgeons and the Civil Doctors for their kindly assistance especially at operations.

GIFTS OF FLOWERS, NEWSPAPERS, &c.

The patients have been much indebted to several ladies of the Colony for frequent gifts of flowers, &c.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your obedient Servant;

J. MITFORD ATKINSON, M.B., (Lond.),

Superintendent of the Government Civil Hospital.

Appendix A.

THE PREVALENCE OF BERI-BERI AMONGST THE WATER POLICE

OF HONGKONG.

The Sanitary Board having asked for information concerning the prevalence, nature, and habitat of this disease as occurring in Hongkong-I send for your perusal the results of an enquiry I have made with reference to the existence of this disease amongst the Water Police.

The reason for my selecting this body of men for the purpose of investigation is that out of eleven cases of this disease admitted into the Government Civil Hospital this year, eight have been from the Water Police, of the other three, two were Europeans and the third was a Chinese Police Constable from the Central Station. I also heard on good authority that there had been a number of cases amongst these men who had refused to place themselves under European treatment.

The Water Police mainly consist of Chinamen and are employed on boat-duty in the Harbour of Victoria and the districts of Aberdeen, Shaukiwan, Whitfield and Yaumati.

These men are on duty for the period of six hours out of the twenty-four, the bulk of them being on duty from 6 P.M. to 6 A.M.

They are under European officers, and their duty consists in patrolling the waters of the Harbour keeping watch amongst the sampans and junks.

Their uniform consists of a Chinese helmet, a jacket and trousers made of drabette cloth, stock- ings and the usual Chinese shoes during the summer months, and in winter similar clothes made of blue serge. In wet weather they are provided with overcoats and capes. When off duty they are quartered in the barracks, they provide themselves with food, and in the event of falling sick they are either sent to the Government Civil Hospital for treatment or they apply to the Inspector for leave; in some cases they will absent themselves without permission,

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I have, since my arrival in the Colony, taken special interest in this particular disease, and in ad- dition to the cases I have had under treatment at the Civil Hospital I have had the opportunity of seeing many cases of this disease in the wards of the Alice Memorial Hospital.

As far as I can ascertain in those which have come under my notice, the patient, when attacked, complains of: Numbness in the legs, accompanied by swelling (Edema) of the ankles, this is soon followed by progressive loss of power in the legs, "he soon gets tired" and as this advances he finds it difficult to walk, at times his limbs will give way completely under him so that he often falls down, there is also a feeling of numbness in the feet, and a tingling followed by numbness in the tips of his fingers.

On admission to the Hospital he presents the following symptoms

i. More or less swelling (Edema) of the ankles and feet. This seems to be the earliest symptom the Chinese complain of, although in some cases, it is altogether absent and is often very slight, in the severer forms of the disease this increases up the leg, and becomes general, in the one fatal case this was very marked, general dropsy supervening.

ii. A peculiar ataxic gait-when told to walk there is an unsteadiness in his gait, the patient feels that he is losing control over the movements of his legs and during pro- gression he lifts the foot up to an unnecessary height throws it forward and outwards and brings down the heel with a thud. In an advanced case at times, when walking he will suddenly lose all control over the muscles of his legs and fall down "all of a heap," and he cannot get up without assistance.

iii. On gently compressing the muscle of the calf with the finger and thumb considerable pain is experienced so much so that the patient will call out, this hyperesthetic con- dition of the muscles is very well marked, and in severer cases not only are the muscles of the calves affected but also the muscles of the thighs, of the arms, the pectoral muscles, and indeed nearly all the muscles of the body become similarly affected.

iv. Loss of power (paræsis), with subsequent wasting in the muscles affected, those of the

legs, thighs and arms most generally undergoing this change.

v. There is an enfeeblement of the normal knee-jerk, and in well marked cases a complete

absence of the same.

vi. An irregular action of the heart, in none of the cases have I seen evidence of valvular implication. In the fatal case before mentioned there was a peculiar tumultuous heaving action of the heart, and for two or three days before death decided evidence of heart failure, showing that the muscle of the heart was probably affected by the same degenerative changes which evidently occur in the voluntary muscles.

The only disease with which this may be confounded is Locomotor ataxy,-in both the ataxic gait is present, indeed I had two cases in the Hospital, one of Beri-beri and another of Locomotor ataxia and from the gait you could not distinguish the two, in Locomotor ataxia however you do not get the hyperæsthetic muscles, and you have a condition of the eyes, the so called "Årgyll Robertson phenomena, which you do not get in Beri-beri.

>>

There are evidently two forms of the disease, the wet (Beri-beria hydrops), and the dry (Beri- beria atrophia.)

In the wet variety the Edema is much more marked and becomes in fact general all over the body, all the symptoms are more marked and the disease runs a rapidly fatal course.

In the dry variety the Edema, although generally present at first, is very slight and soon disappears, and the disease is rarely fatal. (Fayrer's Tropical Diseases.)

I have recently, through the courtesy of The Honourable W. M. DEANE, The Captain Superin- tendent of the Police, been enabled to examine the majority of the men in the Water Police, the exceptions being those absent on leave, the total Force numbering from 120 to 130 men.

On October 12th I visited the Stations at Tsimtsatsui and Yaumati. Out of a total of one hundred and twelve (112) at these two stations, there were fourteen (14) men who had suffered from this disease. All these men showed signs of having had this disease, and on being questioned through the Interpreter, stated that they had suffered from "Dropsy" accompanied by weakness in the legs, and in my opinion it was evidently Beri-beri from which they had been suffering.

Inspector CRADOCK, who has been connected with the Force for many years and is at present in charge of the Tsimtsatsui Station, seemed quite familiar with the symptoms of this disease and he informed me that it had been a common complaint amongst these men for some years past but more men had suffered from it during the present year. He also stated that in many cases a fatal result had followed in a very short time.

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Inspector CORCORAN who is at present in charge of the Station at Shaukiwan informed me that during three months of this year (March-May) when he was in charge of the Tsimtsatsui Station, three men died from this disease at their own homes within a short time of their having left the Force.

Two of the Lukongs (Chinese Constables) said that they had cured themselves by substituting beans for rice in their diet and by eating more fish, and that they had been advised to do this by a Chinese Doctor. This fact is very interesting, as in the Japanese Navy, where the disease is common, the cases were found to improve by adopting a more nitrogenous diet, substituting beans and peas for rice, the former as is well known containing much more Nitrogen, and after this change in the diet fewer cases occurred.

On October 14th I visited the Stations of Aberdeen and Shaukiwan; at the former one man out of four stationed there showed evidence of having suffered from this disease, and he informed me that he had had an attack three months ago, and that he had been cured by some Chinese medicine which he had obtained in Hongkong.

At Shaukiwan where four of these men are stationed one had suffered from this disease eight months ago. Inspector CORCORAN also informed me that one Lukong had been attacked by this disease in September last and after being ill for a few days had left the Force and gone to his home at Stanley where he died five days after. He left the Force on September 15th and died at Stanley on September 20th; this from his account was evidently a case of "Beri-beria hydrops. When at this station, I visited the Chinese Doctor to whom the men applied for advice when attacked by this disease and he evidently was quite familiar with it. He told me that the Chinese name for this disease is Shap-Hi (Dampness rising up), and his treatment consists in giving the man as much animal food (mutton, beef, &c.) as they can eat in lieu of their usual rice, together with certain drugs. He says the disease is very common in Hongkong, and that there are several varieties of it, he has also seen cases in his own district (Tung-koon) in the interior, but there the disease is much more

rare.

The foregoing shows that out of one hundred and twenty-one (121) men examined (including one under treatment at present in the Hospital), seventeen (17) have had this disease, this being equivalent to 14.05 per cent.

With respect to the fatality of the disease, out of the eight cases I had in the Hospital one proved fatal, in addition to these, three fatal cases occurred in the Force stationed at Tsimtsatsui and one in the Force at Shaukiwan, giving five deaths this year in the entire Force of say one hundred and thirty men or a mortality of 3.84 per cent., or 17.24 per cent. of those attacked with the disease.

With regard to the infectious nature of the disease there is some difference of opinion; I have not myself in these cases coming under my treatment adopted any special precautions and have noticed no ill-effects.

In the Annual Medical Report of the Straits Settlements Civil Hospitals for the year 1886 Dr. ROWELL states page 9, section 81 :-

"As regards the contagiousness of the disease, this has been quite absent. The patients have not been placed in separate wards, but scattered among the other patients, none of whom have con- tracted the disease. Nor have the clothes conveyed the disease, for they are changed at stated periods, washed and redistributed amongst the patients, beri-beri or not, but without fresh cases occurring amongst the other sick."

On the other hand (vide British Medical Journal of December 5th, 1886) Doctors CORNELLISSEN and SUGENOYA, who have been recently investigating the disease in Acheen, conclude that:--

i. It is a contagious disease.

ii. Beri-beri patients infect certain localities, and persons in good health coming from districts free from beri-beri, and settling in those infected districts, contract the disease.

iii. That wooden structures retain the infectious product more than brick buildings. iv. That contagion through the means of wearing apparel had been observed.

I am of opinion from the observations I have made that the prevalence of the disease in Hongkong is such as to require careful investigation by the Medical Profession.

In conclusion I would express my indebtedness to Dr. MANSON for giving me the benefit of his long experience of this disease which is one peculiar to the Tropics.

J. MITFORD ATKINSON, M.B., (Lond.),

Superintendent, Civil Hospital, Hongkong.

October 17th, 1888.

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Appendix B.

MEMORANDUM re MALARIAL FEVER, KOWLOON POINT.

As near as I can remember it was during the summer or South-west Monsoon of 1878 that I attended an exceptionally large number of cases of Malarial Fever near Kowloon Point.

Coincident with these cases was the extensive fresh cutting of earth required in the preparation of the site for the New Water Police Station.

You will see on reference to the sketch plan of Kowloon Peninsular attached * that the prevailing winds of that season would blow over the houses and grounds of the building lots marked (2) on either side of Robinson Road (3.) None of these houses were clear of the fever. In the one marked ×, with the exception of the cook, every one in the establishment was ill and all were attacked about the same time. It was thus not confined to Europeans but was equally bad amongst the Native Servants.

One death occurred in the house under where the Observatory is now, and another member of the same family suffered from repeated attacks and had to remain in Hongkong in order to keep clear of fever.

Dr. J. MITFORD ATKINSON.

Appendix C.

(Signed),

R. YOUNG, F.R.C.S.E.

30th January, 1889.

MEDICAL CASES.

I.-CASE OF FRAMBESIA.

Englishman, æt. 38, admitted 6th July, 1888, with the following history:-That he had con- tracted a syphilitic sore at Malta in 1st week of May of this year, this appearing some 16 days after connection with a coloured woman; in about a week after this sore appeared he noticed a small pimple on 4th finger of left-hand, this enlarged and spread until it has reached the size it now is; some two days after this as far as he can remember, a similar sore appeared on fore-finger of right hand, then another on the wrist, and in a few days later the outer side of middle-finger of right-hand became similarly affected evidently from contact with the sore on the right fore-finger, in like manner from the sore on the 4th finger of left-hand the inner side of left little finger became affected.

About 10 days after the first pimple appeared on fingers, i.e. (in the first week of June)-ġi similar sore appeared on inner side of right ankle this soon spread discharging fœtid matter and being very painful.

Similarly the second and third toes of each foot became affected.

On admission--he presented sores in all these regions which may be described as "spreading tuber-cular-like ulcerated surfaces, presenting distinct up-growths or excrescences of a more or less convex form, and a dirty pinkish colour-these fungoid growths secreting an offensive ichorous discharge, on removing which flabby granulations were exposed."

Two weeks after admission other similar sores appeared on the face, head and heel; I think the patient must have infected these regions with the discharge from the existing sores by means of his fingers.

Those on the heel were extremely painful, the Yaw eruption evidently commencing beneath the thick cuticle and some days elapsing before the excrescences broke through the skin, when they did, there was a profuse sanious discharge-very offensive. About this time there was slight secondary ulcera- tion of throat.

Treatment.-Consisted in the internal and external administration of mercury, keeping the sores clean, and relieving the pain by the frequent application of a five per cent. solution of Cocaine, first of all the Bichloride was used, and afterwards the Double Iodide of Mercury and Arsenic, the diet being a liberal one; he gradually improved and was discharged perfectly cured on 15th of August.

* Plan not printed.

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Remarks. This disease is a very rare one amongst Europeans. Dr. MANSON who sent the patient here informed me that it was extremely rare, I have never heard of a European being affected with it before. It raises the important question whether Yaws is a distinct malady sui generis? or only a variety or modified form of syphilis, leprosy, or some other cachexia? (Vide Report on Leprosy and Yaws in the West Indies addressed to Her Majesty's Secretary of State for the Colonies by GAVIN MILROY, M.D., 1873.)

Whether syphilitic or not certainly this case tends to prove that antisyphilitic measures cure the disease, and in the Report above mentioned several Doctors (Dr. KEELAN, and BOWERBANK) state that mercury is their sheet anchor in the treatment of this disease. May it not possibly be a rare modifica- tion of syphilis, fostered and engendered amidst poverty squalor and dirt, as evinced in its prevalence and virulence amongst the natives of the West Indies prior to their Emancipation from slavery, it is undoubtedly a fact that the disease is inoculable, as from the foregoing Report we learn that "Negroes used to inoculate their children with the disease partly from the belief that they must pass through the disease at one period or another and partly as it afforded to the idly-disposed a pretext for shirking

work in the cane-fields.'

Doubtless in this case the patient was unfortunate enough to contract this disease in Malta.

II.-CASES OF DATURA POISONING.

Five Chinese coolies ages varying from 14-28 years, were admitted to the Hospital on the 17th July last with a Police order stating that they had been drugged.

An emetic was at once administered and the contents of the stomach kept for the purposes of analysis.

The patients were all much in the same condition-suffering from various hallucinations evidently due to some interference with muscular co-ordination, delirium-(this delirium being decidedly hilarious), their gait was very unsteady, and in one that of NG-A-YING æt. 18 insensibility set in about quarter of an hour after admission-this patient having probably taken more of the poison.

In each case the pupils were widely dilated, and the pulse very quick, strong coffee was adminis- tered and they were carefully watched during the night-next morning most of them were better the exception being the youth alone named, he still remained semi-insensible and subsultus-tendinum, picking at the bed clothes, &c., was strongly marked, in all the temperature two hours after admission was slightly increased (99-6° F.) they gradually improved, and informed me the next morning that on evening of the 17th they all went to a Chinese eating-house for their evening ineal, and shortly after partaking of the food which consisted chiefly of boiled rice with fresh vegetables and fish, they became giddy and forgot all that happened afterwards.

The contents of the stomach were carefully analysed by Mr. CROW, the Government Analyst, and was found to contain some of the dried flowers of the Datura Alba the Naú Yeung-fa in Chinese nomenclature. An alcoholic extract was obtained which evidently contained a powerful mydriatic alkaloid- this was proved by applying a few drops to a monkey's conjunctiva-in three minutes the pupil became widely dilated, this result occurring much earlier when applied to the human

eye.

This plant is very common in Hongkong and is evidently much used by the Chinese as a stupe- fying agent.*

There was a similar case under treatment in the early part of this year-this was the first case of the kind I had seen and it perplexed me considerably, his symptoms were more severe, the pupils were widely dilated, insensibility more severe almost extending to coma, it was with great difficulty he could be aroused, and he had completely lost all muscular power, he did not recover for some six or seven days and for some time he had completely lost his memory.

III.-CASE OF TYPHOID FEVER SIMULATING TYPHUS.

H. R. C., a Swedish sailor, æt. 23, was admitted to the Hospital on 30th October last with the following history:-

That he had been feeling unwell for last few days, suffering from a feeling of general lassitude and slight diarrhoea.

He became much worse yesterday, having had one or two shivering fits.

On admission he was feverish, Temperature 101° F., skin hot and pungent, and he presented a roseolar eruption on the front of his chest and abdomen, no gurgling in right iliac fossa, tongue was the red at tip and edges and coated with a thick white fur, his pulse was 96, and he stated that his bowels had been open three times that morning.

*Notes on Chinese Materia Medica, by C. Ford, F.L.S.; Hokai, M.B.; and W. E. Crow 8, Datura Alba in China Review, Vol. XVI., p. 2.

J

Small-pox,

203

-

October 31st.-Morning visit-his temperature had fallen to 100° F., his pulse was 96, in the evening pulse temperature was 108 and 102-8°; the rash seemed to be spreading over skin of chest and abdomen, the spots being irregular in outline, colour deeper at the centre than the edges.

November 1st.-Roseolar eruption was pretty general all over the body, pulse morning 108, Temperature 103.2° F. and in evening pulse 112 and Temperature 102° F.

November 2nd.-Bowels open four times during the last twenty-four hours, fæces thin and.... yellowish, pain was complained of this morning in the left hypochondriac region, and at base of the left lung, there was slight dulness there with a few fine crepitations, pulse and temperature will be seen by referring to the chart. *

The rash had become much more dusky in appearance, presenting a mulberry hue.

November 3rd. This evening patient was much worse and delirious, he was also markedly deaf at 11 P.M. his temperature had risen to 106° F.; previous to this the treatment had consisted in the administration five minims of Tincture of Aconite every four hours in an ounce of chloroform water, I discontinued this medicine and gave him ten grains of antipyrin every hour.

November 4th.-At 4 A.M. his temperature had fallen to 102° F., at 9 A.M. it was 96-4° the antipyrin was now discontinued and Hydrocyanic Acid dil. minim. IV. every 4 hours in an effervescing mixture was given as he had been slightly sick, there being however no signs of collapse, the rash was now more of a dark mulberry colour.

November 5th.--Seemed decidedly better to-day in the evening however he became very delirious. Chloral hydrate grain X Pot Brom grs. XX was given, he slept after this.

November 6th.-Not so deaf this morning rash desquamating slightly and fading in colour. November 7th.-Dulness at right base, a few fine crepitations to be heard, spitting a little rusty sputum, still complains of pain left hypochondrium; was sleeping at my evening visit.

November 8th.-Became delirious again early this morning rapidly sank and died at 10.45 a.m. Post Mortem Examination same day at 1.30 P.M. :—

Lower part of Ileum intensely congested, mucous membrane ulcerated the ulcers being typical typhoid ulcers, one large ulcer had perforated through the mucous and muscular coats, the mesenteric glands were enlarged, softened, and in some cases had quite broken down-spleen patch of lymph on the surface about size of a crown piece on, cutting into this there was seen a whitish opaque mass about the size of a walnut immediately under the capsule this seemed broken down in the centre (? Infarct). Remarks. Dr. AYRES, the Colonial Surgeon, and Dr. JORDAN both saw this case with me several times during this short illness and we were of the opinion that the patient was suffering from 'typhus fever'-the rash being almost typical of typhus with the exception of the slight desquamation, it all came out in three days no fresh spots being developed after this, the temperature was also more like that of typhus the gradual rise of the first three or four days, and then the decided fall on morning of

the seventh.

J

Appendix D.

MEDICAL REPORT ON THE RECENT SMALL-POX EPIDEMIC.

From November 1887 to March 1888 there were under treatment in the Small-pox Hospital one hundred and eleven cases.

The following table shews the nationalities of the patients and the number of deaths :-

Table shewing the Admissions and Mortality in the Government Small-pox Hospital during the year 1888.

Admissions.

Deaths.

DISEASE.

Europeans.

From this table it will be seen that the percentage mortality was 20.7.

* Chart not printed.

Indians.

Chinese.

71

6

34

111

12

Total.

Europeans.

Indians.

-

Chinese.

23

Total.

204

Out of the total number of case eighty-four had previously been vaccinated, of these four died-a mortality of 3.36 per cent.-of the remaining twenty-seven cases nineteen died-a mortality of 70-37 per cent.-in three of the latter series it could not be ascertained whether the patient had been vacci- nated or not as they were suffering from the "hæmorrhagic" variety of the disease: excluding these cases, we still have sixteen deaths out of twenty-four unvaccinated cases or a mortality of 66-6 per cent.

Conclusions drawn from such a small number of cases are necessarily more or less fallacious, but the difference is sufficiently striking to demonstrate the extraordinary modification of the disease induced by the protective influence of previous vaccination, and "It may be laid down as a fact ad- mitting of no question, that whenever Small-pox attacks a community the unvaccinated portion of that community will suffer in enormously greater proportion than the vaccinated." *

Treatment:-With regard to the prevention of pitting by the use of local remedies, nothing of course has been found of any avail where the primary inflammation has been intense enough to cause sloughing of the bed of the pock; but much of the eventual deformity is caused by the ulceration and erosion of the skin which goes on under the scabs.

The constant application of antiseptic oils will check the formation of pus under the crusts and in this way prevent the ulceration and subsequent pitting.

A mask of lint kept constantly on the skin, and moistened two or three times daily with carbolic oil (1 in 20) has given very good results. It is applied when the rash is maturing and in many cases after five or six days the scabs have peeled off leaving a slightly red rough surface with little or no loss of substance. Only two cases were sent away with deep pits, and the majority are marked no more than after a slight attack of Impetigo or Varicella.

As I understand the question of the site of the Hospital for Infectious Diseases is still sub judice I would take this opportunity of referring to the suggestion I made in my letter of 14th December, 1887, (C.S.O. No. 2797/89).

In that letter I advised that a hulk or disused man-of-war be fitted up for the treatment of such cases as was done in London the Castalia being so fitted up during the Small-pox Epidemic of 1884. I certainly think that this scheme presents many advantages over erecting a large Hospital on the Island of Hongkong, it would not involve such a large expenditure more perfect isolation would be ensured, it would also be more advantageous to the patients on account of the greater coolness, &c.

If such could be obtained the present Small-pox Hospital premises after a little alteration might be used as Receptive wards where all cases of Infectious Disease might be taken to for purposes of observation before transferring them to the Hulk, as many of these diseases are very obscure in their

onset.

The hulk would require to be large enough to contain some sixty beds.

* Memo: on influence of vaccination in the prevention and diminution of mortality from Small-pox.-By Ernest Hart.

Year.

Number of examinations.

Enclosure 2.

Lock Hospital's Returns.

SYPHILIS.

Primary.

Hard

And Cutane-

ous

Chancre Erup-

tion.

1886.

12,407

111 155 51

2

1887.

11,496

28: 42

3833

1

1888.

10,924

4

1 42

2%.

:

1

4 33

1

3

2 21

:

2

13

1

REMARKS.

378 12,029

129 11,367

5 Women were found disea- sed, but were treated outside the Hospital by

me.

6610,853

PH. B. C. AYRES, Colonial Surgeon.

D.

RETURN shewing the NUMBER of TIMES in which WOMEN were EXAMINED and TREATED in the Lock HOSPITAL during the Year 1888.

Number

of

1888.

Women

Examined.

Gonorrhoea.

Leucorrhoea.

Abrasion.

Ul. of os Uteri.

Abrasion of os Uteri.

Warts.

Abscess.

Free from Disease.

Remained.

FOUND DISEASED.

SYPHILIS.

Pri-Secon-

mary. dary.

Soft Sore.

:.

:

:

:.

:

Hard

Chancre.

1

:

:

2

1

January,

887

February,

786

March,

845

April,

792

May,

864

June,

776

~

:

:

:

July,

864

August, ...........

868

September,

763

October,.......

853

November,....

823

1

December,

740

1

Total,...

9,861

4

:

7*

4*

6

:

10

co

Admitted.

Total Treated.

Gonorrhoea.

Leucorrhoea.

:

:

:

3

Abrasion.

Ul. of os Uteri.

Abrasion of os Uteri.

Warts.

Abscess.

Total Discharged.

Remaining in Hospital.

DISCHARGED CURED.

SYPHILIS.

Pri-

Secon-

mary. dary.

Hard

Chancre.

Soft Sore.

:

1

:

1

1

1

2

:

1

1

:

1

1

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

885 1

2

3

2

:

782

4

839

9

789

10

8

856

6

CO

12

771

6

4

10

854

10

14

863

12

759.

8

4

12

...

1

839

4

12

16

815

11

8

19

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

N

8

1

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

2

:

1

...

1

:

:

:

:

1

:

:

:

:

:

F:

:

:

:

1

:

:

:

:

:

...

...

:

:

:

:

:

:

1

:

:

:

1

10*

:

:

-I

7

1

47

1

:

:

:

:

8

R

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

4

N

KO

CO

6

6.

CO

7

4

8

00

4:

LO

11

13

6

6

2

...

...

:

:

...

:

1

:

:

1

:

:

:

:

2

1

2

:

1

:

:

:

:

:

...

:

:

:.

1

:..

10

1

:

:

:

2 16

1

738 6

6 1 1 2 9,790

:

10

5

:

66

67

3

1

42

2

* Was not detained in Hospital but treated outside.

6 1 1

64

2

2 6

PH. B. C. AYRES,

Colonial Surgeon

205

206

TABLE 1.

RETURN of the NUMBER of COMPLAINTS against the REGISTERED WOMEN during the Year 1888.

NATURE OF COMPLAINTS.

.

RESULT OF EXAMINATION.

COMPLAINTS

1888.

FROM

Gonorrhoea.

Soft Sore.

January, February,

Different Quarters,...

13

13

Primary.

Hard Chancre.

1

8

SYPHILIS.

Secondary.

Cut. Erupt.

No. of WOMEN

POINTED OUT.

Free from Disease.

Found Diseased Detained.

:

14

11

21

21

""

>

March,..

10

2

17

16

1

>"

""

April,.

23

6

30

30

""

""

May,

10

18

17

1

""

""

June,

8

14

13

1

""

""

July,

15

1

22

21

1

""

,,

August,

3

2

12

10

2

>>

September,

12

4

4

20

19

1

"

""

October,

10

23

1

34

30

4

""

November, December,

9

28

3

40

36

4

""

29

11

34

1

46

44

2

29

Total,....

141

118

28

288

271

17

:

PH. B. C. AYRES,

Colonial Surgeon.

TABLE II.

RETURN shewing the RESULT of the EXAMINATIONS of the REGISTERED WOMEN stated to have infected men from H.M.'s Army, Navy, and others with Venereal Sores during the Year 1888.

1888.

COMPLAINTS FROM

Soft,Sore.

NATURE OF COMPLAINTS.

SYPHILIS.

Primary.

Hard and Cut. Chancre. Erupt.

Secondary.

No. of

WOMEN

POINTED OUT.

RESULT OF EXAMINATION.

Free from

Found Diseased Detained.

Disease.

>

March, April,

H.M.'s Army,

N 10

2

""

""

May,

51

June,

6 6 0 44

"2

July,

...

"

"S

August,

1

4

""

"

September, October,

3

3

6

"

23

23

19

"J

November, December,

26

26

10 6000 TE LO SO 22

5

1

8

4

5

3

1

5

1

4

4

">

34

1

35

34

1

""

111

12

123

111

12

January,

H.M.'s Navy,

1

April,

1

""

""

June,

2

""

"

August,

""

>"

September, November,

"

112

:

:

1

1

1

1

2

2

1

1

1

1

2

2

""

>>

2

6

March,.. July, September, October,

Govt. Civil Hospital,

1

1

"

...

""

1

>>

وو

November,

22

8

8

i

1

2

1

1

4

3

Total,...

117

21

:

:

:

7

7

:

138

126

12

Pí. B. C. AYRES, Colonial Surgeon.

207

TABLE III.—Shewing the RESULT of the EXAMINATIONS of the REGISTERED WOMEN stated to have conveyed Gonorrhea infection during the Year 1888.

NATURE OF COM-

PLAINTS.

RESULT OF EXAMINATIONS.

1888.

COMPLAINTS FROM

NO. OF WOMEN POINTED

REMARKS.

GONOR-

RHEA.

OUT.

Free from Disease.

Found diseased Detained.

★ January,

February,

Her Majesty's Army,

8

8

8

13

13

Do.,

6

6

March,

Do.,

16

16

April,

Do.,

7

7

May,

Do.,

6

6

June,

Do.,

9

9

July,

Do.,

5

5

August,

Do.,

September,

Do.,

October,

Do.,

November,

Do.,

0036671000DNTNO

December,

Do.,

I

1

7

7

11

11

1

102

102

99

3

January,

Her Majesty's Navy,

May,

Do.,

June, July, September, November,

Do.,

Do.,

Do.,

.....

Do.,

COCO - ++~~

3

3

3

3

3

2

1

1

1

4

2

2

2

15

15

14

1

April,

June,

July,

August,

September,

October,

November,

Government Civil Hospital,...

1

1

Do.,

1

1

1

Do.,

1

Do.,

2

Do.,

Do.,

Do.,

1.

12

12

12

January,

Miscellaneous,

April,

Do.,

July,

Do.,

∞ CO -

2

3

1

223

1

01:00 1

2

3

6

Co

6

6

:

Total,

135

135

131

#4

PH. B. C. AYRES, Colonial Surgeon.

208

F.

RETURN of WOMEN examined in WANTSAI during the Year 1888.

Number

Found diseased

of

1888.

Women Examined.

Free from Disease.

and sent to the Lock Hospital.

Gonorrhoea.

Soft Sore.

Leucorrhoea.

NATURE OF DISEASE.

SYPHILIS.

Primary.

Hard

and

Cutaneous

Chancre. Eruptions.

Secondary.

January,

31

31

February,

28

28

March,.

39

39

April,

- 32

32

May,

31

31

June,

28

28

July,

23

23

August,

46

45

1

September,

62

62

October,

48

45

1

1

November,

34

34

December,....

65

65

Total,...... 467

463

:

2

I

:

Abrasion.

Ulceration of os Uteri.

Warts.

1

Pн. B. C. AYRES, Colonial Surgeon,

TABLE A.

RETURN of the NUMBER of PROSTITUTES, brought under the Provisions of Ordinance No. 10, during the Year 1888.

Number of Beds in Lock Hospital.

Number admitted to

Hospital

on Certificates

of Colonial Surgeon.

Number who

submitted

Voluntarily.

Number against whom it was necessary to

proceed by Information before the

Registrar General.

Total Number brought under the Provisions

of the Ordinance.

Total Number of Examina- tions made during the Year.

Total Number of Examina- tions made when no Disease was found.

Total Number Discharged from Hospital.

REMARKS.

32

66

269

288

269

10,924*

10,853

64

In this table are included also the women examined at Wántsai and those examined outside.

*.5 of these women were found diseased and treated outside the Hospital by me.

PH. B. C. AYRES, Colonial Surgeon.

TABLE C.

RETURN of WOMEN examined, and treated in the GOVERNMENT LOCK HOSPITAL, during the Year 1888.

EXAMINATION.

HOSPITAL.

DISCHARGED.

No. of days

in Month on which Examinations were held.

Total Number of

Examinations made during the

Year.

Number admitted to Hospital.

Total Number of

Examinations

made when no

Disease was found.

DISEASES.

Examina-

tions are

heid daily Sundays & Govern-

ment holi- days ex-

cepted.

10,924

66

10,853

P. & Secondary Syphilis & Gonorrhœa

TOTAL.

Primary Syphilis, uncomplicated Gonorrhoea

Do.

59

do.

and P. Syphilis combined

P. & Secondary do.

do.

Gonorrhea and S. do.

do.

¦ ¦ ∞ | Admitted.

4

:: Total treated.

Cure 1.

59

58

:: 150080 TOTAL

3

Number remain- ing in Hospital,

31st Dec., 1888.

66

66

63

63

2

* One died of Phthisis.

REMARKS.

In this table are included also the women examined at Wantsai and those examined outside the Hospital.

PH. B. C. AYRES,

Colonial Surgeon.

7

:

י

209

A

Enclosure 3.

Report of the Government Analyst.

GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL,

HONGKONG, 6th April, 1889.

SIR,I have the honour to submit a statement of the work done in the temporary laboratory of this Hospital during the year 1888.

2. Owing to my being appointed to act as Sanitary Superintendent and Secretary to the Sanitary Board during the absence of Mr. HUGH MCCALLUM, only the most necessary investigations were conducted during the period under review.

MILK.

3. Judging from the results of the regular monthly analyses of the milk supplied to the Hospital when compared with the figures showing the composition of the samples obtained at the contractor's dairy by an Inspector of the Sanitary Department, the Medical Staff have every reason to be satisfied with the excellent quality of the deliveries of this important article of diet.

4. From the average result of the analyses made at regular intervals throughout the year it is evident that the milk supplied to the patients can be favourably compared to that distributed, by the Aylesbury Dairy Farm Company in England.

5. Dr. VIETH in his report on the work done in the Aylesbury Dairy Farm Company's Laboratory during 1884, gives 12.9 as the average percentage of total solids.* The average obtained in this labo- ratory during 1888 was 12.8. These two results, which show the quantity of actual water-free food contained in the milk are practically identical.

.

6. My attention has been drawn, privately, to certain passages in my report for the year 1887 on the subject of the necessity of checking the quality of the milk supplied to the Medical Department which, at the time, were evidently misunderstood by persons interested in the contracting Company. It should be remembered that the object of the analytical investigation of food is to arrive at facts concerning its composition which are unobtainable in any other way, and that any remarks by those who understand the constitution of such articles should, if received in a proper spirit, be as much a benefit to those responsible for the management of dairies as they are to the public generally. The delivery to the consumer of milk in its original purity depends on a number of details that cannot be too carefully watched.

7. Only one sample of milk was analyzed for the Magistrates during the past year. The specimen was certainly a very suspicious one, but in the absence of authentic information as to its source I was unable to certify that it contained added water.

TOXICOLOGICAL.

8. The following investigations were conducted under this head during 1888.

9. Datura Poisoning.-In July a chemical examination was ordered by Government of a quantity of fish-stew of which five carpenters were said to have partaken. As these men when under treatment in the Hospital had displayed symptoms that might be referred to a mydriatic poison a direct search was made for the alkaloid atropine, the active principle of several species of Datura and other plants of the Natural Order Solanaceae.

10. During the course of the physical examination of the contents of the stew a large number of sections of a flower were noticed which bore a striking resemblance to parts of the Chinese drug # Nau Yeung-fa the flowers of Datura alba, Nees.†

11. As there is no known chemical reaction by which atropine can be, with certainty, detected it was necessary to rely on a physiological test. An alkaloidal extract of the stew was accordingly pre- pared for ophthalmic use and handed to the Superintendent of the Civil Hospital under whose care the victims had come soon after the matter was reported to the Police.

12. In respect of the physiological action of the extract, Dr. ATKINSON certified as follows:-

"From the results of certain experiments carried out at the Civil Hospital this afternoon with a liquid submitted to me by the Government Analyst, I have no doubt that such liquid contained the alkaloid or active principle of one of the mydriatic poisons.”

J. M. ATKINSON, M.B. (Lond.)

27th July, 1888.

(Signed),

13. The discovery of a mydriatic alkaloid was strong evidence of the poisonous nature of the food, and the presence in the stew of parts of a flower closely resembling the Nau Yeung-fa of Chinese Materia Medica warranted the assumption that Datura alba, a plant common enough in waste places on this Island and on the neighbouring mainland, was the agent that had been employed.

* Analyst, vol. X., p. 69.

† China Review, vol. XVI., p. 2. Pharmaceutical Journal, (3), XVIII., p. 319.

;

210

It is

14. It is. however, almost impossible to speak with absolute certainty on the latter point. true that with the sole exception of a single specimen of Datura Stramonium, Linn, discovered on this Island in 1887,* only one species of Datura viz., Datura alba, Nees, has been recorded from S. China. Mr. MORRIS, the Assistant Director of the Royal Gardens, Kew, writing under date 21st of October, 1887, informs me however that "in all probability one, or more, other species exist." Moreover there are numbers of Solanaceous plants throughout China the flowers of which, when cut up and incor- porated with food, it would be difficult to distinguish from those of the Thorn Apple, and which may contain alkaloids that cannot be distinguished, in cases of poisoning, froin atropine.

15. In the case under notice a man, who had assisted in the preparation of the stew, was charged with administering a stupefying drug and tried at the Supreme Court, but the case fell to the ground through lack of evidence.

16. Alleged tea drugging.-In August an examination was ordered by Government of some tea infusion which it was alleged had produced dizziness in two women who had drank thereof. Unlike the case quoted above there was no real trustworthy evidence of poisoning. Both women when brought to the Hospital by the Police appeared to have nothing the matter with them, and as they refused to remain until the arrival of a Doctor, the analyst was left without the clue which could have been given by a physiologist had they been only slightly under the influence of some poison or other. 17. In this instance, although according to the Police report there was reason to suppose that the women had been under the influence of some drug, all the attempts made to discover a poisonous principle in the tea failed.

18. Where the Police have suspicion of poisoning it is of the greatest importance to let a Doctor see the supposed victims with the least possible delay. In a case of poisoning by the Chinese drug Tin Cheung-tso, the active principle of which was first isolated in this laboratory in 1884,† and identified with Gelsemium elegans, Benth., a loss of time may mean the life of a victim. In a trumped up case of poisoning a Medical man could, by early observation, probably save weeks of fruitless work on the part of the Analyst.

19. The circumstances of this case would suggest the desirability in all instances where the Police consider it necessary to take persons to Hospital who are alleged to have been poisoned, of their receiving standing orders to detain the suspected persons until a Doctor arrives on the scene.

20. Before leaving this section of my report I would respectfully urge on the Government the necessity of introducing measures for controlling the sale of certain medicines which are used by the Chinese for criminal poisoning. The value to the Police of a Sale of Poisons Ordinance in their en- deavours to secure the detection of the Crime of poisoning would, I believe, be considerable.

21. It will of course be urged that the usefulness of such a measure, in respect of the sale of vegetable poisons, is by no means evident, seeing that there are, growing wild in the Colony, the very plants which furnish the drug the sale of which it is proposed to control; and that a criminal would be hardly likely to purchase of a druggist or herbalist a poison which he could gather without much trouble in the Colony. Objections of this character are of course entitled to some weight. A perusal of the records of the crime of murder by poisoning will, however, show that the criminal, in matters of detail, is by no means so astute as people imagine.

22. I will only incidentally allude to this matter now as it is my intention to lay my views on this subject before the Government in the form of a special communication.

23. Poisonous cheese. In July an analysis was ordered by Government of certain articles in connection with the poisoning of a number of men belonging to the Band of the 58th, Northamptonshire, Regiment.

24. The facts of the case are as follows:-

About 10.30, on the night of the 22nd of July, the men of the Band after the usual per- formance in the Botanical Gardens, had a supper, consisting of coffee, bread and cheese, soon after their return to barracks. All the men, viz. 38, had coffee and bread; but only 25 ate cheese. Out of the latter number, 22 were taken ill between 1.30 and 5.30 on the following morning. Three of the men who had partaken of the cheese did not experience any ill-effects.

The symptoms displayed by the sufferers were:-"Burning pain in the stomach and violent vomiting, causing partial collapse." This information was obligingly furnished by Dr. H. A. THOMPSON, A.M.S., the Medical Officer in charge of the 2nd Battalion of the Northamptonshire Regiment.

Thirteen of the sufferers were so bad that they had to go to Hospital, and of these, two were

very seriously ill.

All the men ultimately recovered. None of them had been ill before from eating cheese. All had enjoyed their former ineals that day and were in perfect health before going to the Gardens. They did not have any refreshments while in the Gardens.

* Report of the Colonial Surgeon (Hongkong) for 1887. Enclosure No. 3, foot note 4.

+ Pharmaceutical Journal, (3), XVI., p. 95 : XVII., p. 924. Lancet, 1885, vol. I., p. 1181 : 1887, vol. II., p. 80. China Review, vol. XV.,

p. 215.

211

25. The chemical investigation was limited to the examination of a voinit and some cheese which had been handed to me by Major ELLIS and also of a quantity of bread and cheese forwarded to me by the Captain Superintendent of Police, and was conducted with a view to finding a poisonous metal in all of the above mentioned substances and an acrid oily principle in the cheese, but all the attempts in this direction proved unsuccessful.

26. From the above particulars it will be seen that there were good reasons for assuming that the cheese was the cause of the mischief, but I am unable to adduce any evidence in confirmation of this theory. Two rats were fed on the cheese for several days but they did not exhibit any signs of poisoning.

27. It is quite possible that there was some obscure principle in the cheese, developed probably by a process of fermentation, which caused the poisonous symptoms displayed by the Bandsmen. It is noteworthy that three of the men who partook of the cheese were in no way affected: a fact, which would lead one to infer that, in cheese poisoning, idiosyncrasy may play a not unimportant part.

28. Mention should here be made that, at the period of the year referred to, several civilians complained of violent sickness after eating cheese.

29. I avail myself of this opportunity for conveying my best thanks to Major W. T. ELLIS, who was then in command of the 2nd Battalion of the 58th Regiment, for the valuable assistance rendered me while investigating this obscure case of poisoning.

GENERAL REMARKS.

30. Students.—The Senior Student Apothecary, Mr. Ü I KAI has worked well during the past year and is making satisfactory progress with his studies. The Junior Student, Mr. CHAU Kam Tsun only entered on his duties on the 15th of October last. His appointment has not yet been confirmed.

31. Laboratory. The analyses required by Government have been conducted in the temporary laboratory provided in this Hospital some years ago. It is to be hoped that the time is approaching when these make-shift arrangements can be dispensed with. The analytical work for the Government of this Colony is frequently of a very trying nature: that required in forensic cases entails a very heavy responsibility which ought only to be borne by a Chemist who has the best means at his disposal that both art and science can suggest. More than five years have now elapsed since the time when I was assured a suitable laboratory would have been provided. The work during the past five years has, however, not been without some good results, but its usefulness has been restricted by the limited nature of the investigations through want of proper accommodation.

32. It would be well if, when a new laboratory is built, advantage could be taken of the presence of the Government Analyst in England for securing the necessary appliances for furnishing the building. 33. My thanks are due to Mr. MALCOLM WATSON, the Assistant Apothecary, for the assistance he has given me in the Laboratory during the past year.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

WM. EDWARD CROW, Government Apothecary and Analyst, Civil Medical Department.

Dr. PH. B. C. AYRES,

Colonial Surgeon and Inspector of Hospitals.

1

:

HONGKONG.

REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE OBSERVATORY FOR 1888.

Presented to the Legislative Council, by Command of His Excellency the Governor.

131

No. 6

89.

HONGKONG OBSERVATORY,

8th February, 1889.

SIR,-For the information of His Excellency the Governor I have the honour to forward my Annual Report for 1888.

2.

3. A report containing exhaustive investigations of the typhoons of 1886 and 1887 with five plates representing their paths has been printed. Father FAURA was good enough to send me the paths of typhoons in the Philippine Islands in 1887, which were used for that district and the Tokio weather-maps were used for the Japanese Archipelago. This reduced the amount of work that fell to my share, but the typhoons in the Pacific Ocean had to be investigated here as sufficient information does not appear to have been available at the other observatories.

4. Information concerning the typhoons of 1888 has been collected and the observations are being reduced and tabulated. In addition to the observations furnished by stations on shore, the logs of 139 different vessels containing entries on 1712 days (counting those made on board different ships on same date separately) are available. A number of log-books have of course been looked through without entries bearing on typhoons having been found. The final investigation of the typhoons of 1888 will probably be ready next year. It should be remembered that although the typhoons are exhaustively investigated here,-that does not imply the complete elaboration of all that might be done by aid of the meteorological data at my disposal. An immense quantity of information bearing on the meteorology of China is collected here, that is not utilized for lack of clerks to take it in hand, and this cannot fail to affect the results of researches on typhoons for there are certain questions con- nected with this subject that cannot be answered in the absence of a complete discussion of the climate of China.

5.

6.

*

*

7. That this requirement is fully recognised everywhere else in the Empire and properly provided for may be seen e.g. from the following extract from the Report on the Administration of the Meteoro- logical Department of the Government of India in 1887-88 (Page 16 §7). "In order to facilitate and expedite the working of these arrangements, the Telegraph Department has granted the privilege of Precedence urgency to telegrams referring to stormy weather and the hoisting of storm-signals between the Meteorological Reporter of Calcutta and the Port Officers and Meteorological Superintendents of Cocanada, Gopalpur, Madras, Masulipatam, Negapatam and Vizagapatam. The names of other officers will be added to this list as found necessary for the proper working of the system. Instructions for the preparation and dispatch of the telegrams in proper form, in order to secure priority of transmission to ordinary urgent messages, will be sent by the India Meteorological Office to the various officers permitted to send them.'

""

8. My pamphlet on the Law of Storms in the Eastern Seas as well as my reports on typhoons have been widely utilized by scientific and nautical authorities over the world. The former has been repeatedly reprinted and translated into foreign languages e.g. together with the Instructions for making Meteorological Observations, etc. by order of the Inspector General of the Imperial Chinese Maritime Customs, for the use of residents in China. Writers very rarely make use of such reports without due reference to the Observatory from which they emanated, but in a paper in the Annalen der Hydrographie (Berlin, 1887 XV page 333) the substance of my pamphlet has been republished and even paths of typhoons, which were constructed at the expense of the Colonial Government, have been reproduced

132

2

without any reference to this Observatory. However I am informed that this was due to an oversight. The fact that the wind in a typhoon blows from a direction 12 points distant from the bearing of the centre was first ascertained and proved here, but it will of course take some time before masters of vessels become familiar with this result, though its practical importance is being appreciated by degrees.

9. During the past typhoon season, in addition to those hitherto supplied, meteorological obser- vations were telegraphed twice a day from Macao through the cable of the Eastern Extension, Austra lasia and China Telegraph Company and also from Tokio in Japan through the cable of the Great Northern Telegraph Company. An attempt was made to have them forwarded from Canton, Hoihow (Hainan) etc. through the Chinese telegraph lines, but although they were sent by order of the Chinese authorities as often as there was communication, the experiment was not invariably successful. Messages from Saigon and more information from the Philippines would be useful. It is a pity that while other countries in the Far East are being meteorologically explored, the Philippines remain scientifically almost a terra incognita.

10. As stated in the "Instructions for making Meteorological Observations, etc." meteorological instruments forwarded by observers, who regularly send their registers to this Observatory, are verified here free of cost. During the past year, the following number of instruments has been verified and certificates issued. Barometers: 1, Thermometers: 5, Anemometers: 1.

11. The index errors of barometers read off on board ship are determined whenever required by comparing readings made near this port with the barograms.

12. The number of transits observed during the past year was 232, and the inclination of the axis was determined 91 times. The tick of the sidereal standard clock is heard in the transit room through a telephone. A microphone is placed on top of the case and this is connected with the telephone through an induction coil. Telephones are also used for speaking to the Assistant in the ball-tower at Tsim-sha-tsui through the time wire. The wires in the transit instrument were illumi- nated by a small electric light. Electric testing apparatus are being procured from England.

13. The rate of the sidereal standard clock during upwards of two years has been investigated. The rate was represented by the following formula, where t means the number of days elapsed since the 12th September, 1885, and the temperature in degrees Fahrenheit :

R

-0.56 0.00655t+03. 00000420 t2 - 0o. 063 (7-70°).

-

The details are published in Astr. Nachr. No. 2868 and also in 'The Observatory' for Septem- ber, 1888. The mean daily rates during ten day periods in 1888 are exhibited in the following table,

means gaining and + losing rate. The rates are represented by the following formula:

where

R+ 0.45-0.00261 t + 0.0000120ť2 · 0o.063 (r−70°)

where t is counted from the 28th June, 1888. It will be remarked that the acceleration of the clock- rate has decreased and should now cease according to the formula. The observed rate minus the computed rate is exhibited under the heading R.-R. The figures show certain fluctuations of rate of rather long period.

TABLE I.

Rate of Sidereal Standard Clock in 1888.

Period.

Temp.

Rate.

R。-RC.

Period.

Temp.

Rate.

Ro-Re-

December 26– 5,.................

64.08

+1.841

January

5-15,..

66. 2

+1.28

-0.$23 July -0.20

3-13,..

83.o1

-0.838

+0.503

""

13-23,.....

84. 0

-0.47

+0.01

15-25,-

66. 3

+1.19

-0.20

23-2,

85. 6

-0.56

+0.04

25- 4,..

64.6

+1.41

-0.05

August 2-12,

84. 6

-0.49

+0.07

February

4-14,.

65. 1

+1.46

+0.10

""

12-22,

81. 5

-0.45

-0.07

""

14-24,..

65. 7

+1.43

+0.17

22-1.

83. 2

-0.43

"

+0.06

24- 5,....

65. 9

+1.32

+0.12

September 1-11,

84. 1

-0.48

+0.09

March

5-15,

65. 9

+1.24

+0.09

99

"

15-25,..

66. 2

+1.15

+0.08

11-21, 21- 1

82. 1

....

-0.39

+0.05

81. 0

-0.33

""

>

+0.04

25- 4,..

67.6

+0.99

+0.06

October

April

""

""

4-14,. 14-24,. 24-4,.

69. 3

+0.84

+0.06

1-11, 11-21,

78. 3

-0.22

-0.02

78.8

-0.21

23

+0.04

73. 8

+0.52

+0.07

""

21-31,..

72.8

+0.15

+0.03

79.2

+0.29

May

4-14,

79.5

"

14-24,

+0.21 +0.28 +0.27 80.2 +0.05 +0.12

دو

31-10,

75. 6

+0.12

+0.16

November 10-20,

73. 2

+0.17

+0.05

"

24- 3,,

80. 4

-0.17

-0.06

""

June

3-13,..

80.0

-0.24

-0.11

20-30,...

30-10,.......... December 10-20,.

72.0

+0.26

+

+0.06

70.9

+0.28

-0.01

69. 4

+0.23

-0.16

13-23,

80.8

-0.33

""

23- 3,..

82.3

-0.37

-0.13 -0.04

""

20-30,...

65. 2

+0.48

-0.19

:

3

133

14. As stated in the time-ball notice published in the Government Gazette on the 10th January, 1885, the ball is not dropped on Sundays and on Government Holidays. The ball was dropped every working day in the past year except on the 17th, 19th, and 26th May and 26th June when it was not hoisted on account of thunderstorms, and on the 8th August the mast was found split, where two pieces were riveted together. The ball could not be hoisted on the 8th, 9th and 10th of that month, while under repair by the Public Works Department. There was not a single failure during the year.

TABLE II.

Errors of Time Ball in 1888.

means too late.

+ means too early.

Date.

Jan.

Feb.

March. April. May.

June. July. Aug.

Sept. Oct. Νοτ. Dec.

1,

2,

...

-0. 4 -0.6

+0.82

0.'1

0.1

+0.5

0.1

0.'1

0.81

0.*1

+0.3

0.1

0.1

0.$1

+0.6

+0.2

-0.2

...

3,

4,

-0.53

−0.5

-

-0.8

+0.3

+0.85

0. 1

0.1

0.1

-0.2

0.1

+0.2

0.1

0.1

+0.6

0.1

+0.2

0.1

0. 1

0.1

0.1

-0.2

5,

0.1

...

+0.4

+0.6

0. 1

0.1

-0.2

0.1

-0.2

0.1

-0.2

6,

0. 1

0.1

+0.5 +0.7

0.1

0.1

...

+0.2

-0.2

0.1

0.1

7,

0.1

0.1

+0.5

+0.8

0.1

0.1

0.1

-0.3

+0.2

+0.2

0.1

8,

0.1

+0.3

0. 1

0. 1

...

+0.3

-0.4

+0.3

0.1

9,

0.1

0.1

+0.4

+1.0

0.1

0.1

0.1

-0.5 +0.4

10,

0.1

0. 1

+0.5

+1. I

0.1

— 0.2

...

0.1 -0.6 +0.6

11,

+0.2

+0.2

0.1

+1.2

0.1

.0.1

-0.2

+0.3

0.1

0.1

...

0.1

12,

0.1

...

+0.7

+1.3

0.1

0. 1

0. 1

+0.2

0.1

+0.3

0.1

13,

0.1

0.1

+1.5

0.1

0. 1

0.1

+0.3

0.1

0.1

0.1

14,

0. 1

+0.3

+0.3

0.1

0.1

0. 1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.2

0. 1

15,

+0.3

+0.4

+0.2

0. 1

0.1

-0.2

0.1

-0.3

0.1

16,

0.1 +0.4

+0.5

+0:3

+0.2

0.1

+0.2

0. 1

0.1

0.1

...

17,

0.1

+0.4

+0.6 +0.3

+0.2

0. 1

-0.4

0.1

0.1

+0.2

18,

0.1

+0.5

...

+0.4 0.1

+0.3

0.1

0.1

-0.5

0.1

+0.3

19,

0. 1

...

0.1

+0.2

+0.4

0. 1

0.1.

0. 1

0.1

+0.6

20,

0.1

0.1

0. 1

+0.2

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

+0.7

21,

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

-0.2

22,

0.1

0.1

...

+0.4

-0.2

0.1

0. 1

0. 1

0. 1

0.1

23,

0.1

-0.2

0.1

-0.2

+0.8

-0.3

-0.2

0.1

...

0.1

0.1

24,

0.1

-0.2

0. 1

0. 1

-0.3

-0.2

0.1

-0.3

-0.2

25,

0.1

0. 1

...

-0.2 +1.5

-0.2

0. 1

-0.2

0.1

0.1

26,

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

27,

0. 1

0. 1

+0.2

0.1

-0.3

0. 1

-0.3

0.1

0.1

0.1

-0.5

28,

0.1

0.1

+0.2

0.1

+0.7

-0.3

0.1

-0.6

0.1

...

0.1

0.1

29,

+0.2

+0.3

0. 1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1.

30,

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1 +0.3

0.1

0.1

0.1

31,

-0.2

+0.4

0.1

+0.4

0.1

0. 1

0.1

15. The probable errors of the signal in the different months of 1888 (with the average percentage of clouded sky added in parenthesis) were as follows:-January 0.12 (48), February 0.19 (85), March 0.26 (91), April 0.41 (86), May 03.20 (84), June 03.14 (92), July 0.13 (59), August 03.17 (60), September 03.14 (57), October 08.14 (53), November 0.15 (48), December 0.17(56).—The mean of the probable errors was 0.18. A new standard clock with mercurial compensation has been ordered from England. When that arrives and is erected and rated the errors will be reduced during periods of persistently overcast weather (on the 14th April last year the sun was observed after 20 days of continually overcast skies). It will then have to be decided whether it would not be as well to cut a certain quantity off the zinc rod,-say a length corresponding to three-quarters of the temperature co-efficient, for no matter how well this is determined, the rate will ceteris paribus be more regular the more perfectly the clock is compensated.

16. With reference to a suggestion made concerning tidal and magnetic observations in the 5th paragraph of my last Annual Report, the Secretary of State did not assent to any discontinuation of the magnetic observations, which are ordered to be continued as heretofore. It is intended to re-inves- tigate the induction coefficient of the vibrating magnet next spring. It does not appear that any im- provement could be effected in Mr. ROBERTS's tide-tables (which represent the tides very closely indeed) by aid of the amount of trace available at present from the automatic tide-gauge, but next year when three years' trace is available would be the time to have it harmonically analyzed.

17. The following papers have been published in Europe in the course of the past year:-

"Telegraphic determination of the longitude of Haiphong" (Month. Not. R.A.S. Vol. XLVIII

No. 5).

"On comet seeking" (Journ. Liverpool Astr. Soc. Vol. VI No. 7).

134

4

"The meteorology of south-eastern China in 1886." (Quart. Journ. R. Met. Soc. Vol.

XIV No. 67.)

"Rainfall in China in 1887" (Quart. Journ. R. Met. Soc. Vol. XIV No. 67.)

"On the rate of the Hongkong Standard Clock" (Astr. Nachr. No. 2868).

Crepuscular rays in China" (Nature Vol XXXVII p.

464.)

"Cause of September typhoons in Hongkong" (Nature Vol. XXXVII p. 439.) "On the rainfall and temperature of Victoria Peak, Hongkong."

(Nature Vol. XXXVIII p. 78.)

CC

Upper and lower wind currents over the torrid zone."

Nature Vol. XXXVIII p. 565.)

"On the grass minimum thermometer" (Nature Vol. XXXVIII p. 619.)

A paper on the mean height of the barometer in Iloilo (Philippines), and a paper on the law of storms in Hongkong and in southern Formosa are in press.

18. In the China Coast Meteorological Register, based on information transmitted by the Eastern Extension and the Great Northern Telegraph Company, which was daily published, is given a summary of the atmospheric circumstances in Luzon and along the coast of China, and information concerning the weather in Japan and in Wladivostock. It contains also information concerning the first appearance and progress of typhoons.

19. Mr. FIGG took all the clockworks of the self-recording Meteorological instruments asunder and had them cleaned and adjusted after which they went as well as before. The anemometer is oiled every ten days with pure sperm-oil. During previous winters some trouble was experienced with the lamps on the barograph and the thermograph, which had a tendency to go out in the course of the night. In hot and damp weather they would burn any length of time. By using only the best kerosine oil to be had in the Colony, having the lamps washed in soda once a week and especially by emptying out all the oil left this difficulty has been overcome. Some extra fine lighthouse oil was procured from London but it was not found better than the kinds to be had in the shops here and cost many times as much. The introduction of the electric light in Kowloon would benefit the Observatory materially.

20. Among scientific men who have visited this Observatory may be mentioned Dr. SCHRADER, the well-known astronomer of Hamburgh, when on his return from an exploration in New Guinea, with whom I conversed about methods practically used in making observations; Captain FLEURIAIS com- manding La Galissonnière and Lieutenant Perrin; Captain EDLER VON WOHLGEMUTH, Director of the Observatory, JAN MAYEN, who explained to me a great many things connected with navigation ; Captain USBORNE MOORE, in command of H.M.S. Rambler, the surveying vessel; Lieutenant HARTMANN, formerly connected with the Observatory at Wilhelmshafen; Lieutenant GRATZL, of the Austrian Frigate Fasana; Professor MILNE and Mr. KNIPPING, of Tokio; Father FAURA of Manila and others.

21. I continue ín friendly correspondence with Mr. WHIPPLE, the principal authority on Meteoro- logical matters in the Empire, who is as well known for his genial disposition as for his extensive information and practical experience. Indeed Mr. WHIPPLE'S assistance is not confined to any district and meteorologists over the world are more or less indebted to him for valuable support at some time or other.

22. The crepuscular rays at sunset described in "Nature" Vol. XXXVII page 464, were during the past year carefully observed by a volunteer, who does not wish to be named':

Very faint traces of rays were seen on the 18th of January, the 25th April, the 21st June, the 2nd, 6th and 21st July, the 2nd, 4th, and 6th August.

Well developed rays were seen in the west on the 19th February, the 24th April, the 12th, and 22nd June, the 12th, 13th, 18th, and 20th, July, the 5th, 16th, 28th and 31st, August, the 1st, 11th, 14th, and 29th, September.

Strong rays both east and west, beginning in the former direction were seen on the 19th, 22nd and 23rd July, the 19th August, the 3rd, 4th and 5th September, the 14th October.

Rays stretching right across the whole sky were seen on the 8th and 10th May, the 20th June, the 30th August, the 13th, 19th and 26th September, the 12th October.

The number of observations were therefore: Jan. 1, Feb. 1, Mar. 0, Apr. 2, May 2, June 4, July 10, Aug. 9, Sep. 10, Oct. 2, Nov. 0, Dec. 0. On the 19th of February dark rays were seen above white small-cumulus clouds at an altitude of up to 60°, while the sun was still 5° above the horizon. This was followed by a great thunderstorm, a rather rare phenomenon in that month.

23. With reference to cloud classification, I have received a pamphlet from the Hon. R. ABER- CROMBY which suggests several changes in the names of clouds (Comp. Annual Report for 1887 page 3 §13). The descriptions of clouds given therein are scarcely superior to those usually printed in such Instructions," but the new names suggested would seem to recommend themselves for inter-

t

135

1

5

national use. They are cum-cir, for sm-cum, str-cir, for very high str, a common fine weather cloud in Ireland, which had not hitherto been separately denominated, and str-cum, for Roll-cum (in ▾ Hongkong str-cum is used in a different sense). Cum-nim is also used, but is defined as nim of rounded shape, while any cloud from which rain is seen falling is called nim. in Hongkong. Cum-str is classed among rare and transient forms, whereas it is really common and even characteristic of certain regions such as the Malacca Straits. An uniformly covered sky is always entered as str in Hongkong. There are some strange explanations given in the same pamphlet such as on page 7, where it is said that cumulus may be formed by collision between winds, such as land and sea breezes." The distinction "between the direction of propagation of a cyclonic cloud bank and the direction of motion of the clouds within the bank" is claimed as a new feature, whereas it is well known to practical meteorologists more especially within the tropics, where typhoons are observed, approaching in the first instance in the shape of an arch of dark cloud whose direction of motion forms an angle with the direction of the top of the arch. This has been thoroughly explained by FERREL a long time ago.

24. From an examination of thunderstorms in the Colony during the past five years it appears that they are most frequent in May and that they have not occurred in November, December and January. They seldom happen in February. With reference to the

With reference to the daily variation they are more frequent at night than during the daytime in the proportion of 3 to 2. They appear to be most abundant about la. and least so about 8a. in the proportion of about 2 to 1.

25. During the past year the temperature was on an average higher than in previous years and rose higher than before on hot days. This appears to have been at least partly due to a more south- erly direction of the wind, but indeed the temperature has been rising on the whole since 1884. Whether this is periodical remains to be investigated. There seems fair prospects of finding that it is so. It should be remembered that great care is taken with our thermometrical observations and the results are accurate in proportion. The past year was more damp than usual, the rainfall was heavy and the mean barometer below the average. The amount of sunshine was less and the cloudiness greater than usual. It is generally considered to have been an unhealthy year.

.

26. The weather in January, 1888, was very warm and dry. There was a great deal of dew but hardly any rain. Dry weather haze was common, but indeed dry haze is always common along the China coast during the NE monsoon. February set in very cold. The water froze at the Peak on one or two nights. Thunderstorms began early and were severe in March. During April the weather was very trying to the health. For the greater part it was overcast, damp and foggy. The end of April was unusually hot. There was a great fall of temperature in the afternoon on the 22nd of May, and in the morning on the 3rd June. The weather in July was hot (90°.1 at 11p. on the 14th) and close and there was very little wind. This was due to distant typhoons. On the 22nd and 23rd water-spouts were seen to the south of Hongkong. On the 20th at 7a., a double solar halo was observed by Mr. MAHOMET ALARAKIA. The radius of the inner was 23° and that of the outer about 45°.

The barometric tide was great during dry weather. The beginning and also the end of August were very hot. Rain was frequent during the night and early morning. The first half of October was rather close, warm and damp. The latter part of the month was dry and clear as usual. The force of the wind during November fell far short of the average and the weather was warm in consequence. This continued in December, during which month the amount of cloud and rain was excessive.

27. At the Observatory the cisterns of the barograph and standard barometer are placed 109 feet above mean sea level. The bulbs of the rotating thermometers are swung 108 feet above mean sea level and 4 feet above the ground. The solar radiation thermometer is placed at the same height but the terrestrial radiation thermometer is only about one inch above the grass. The rim of the pluviograph is placed 105 feet above mean sea level and 21 inches above the ground. The cups of the anemograph are 149 feet above mean sea level and 45 feet above the ground. At Victoria Peak the instruments, except the radiation thermometers and the rain-gauge are placed in the look-out. The cistern of the barometer is 1814 feet above mean sea level. The bulbs of the thermometers are about 4 feet above the floor except the maximum thermometer, which is a few inches higher. The radiation thermometers are placed at the same height above the ground as at the Observatory. The rim of the rain-gauge is 8 inches in diameter and one foot above the ground.

28. The Monthly Weather Reports are arranged as follows:-

Table I exhibits the hourly readings of the barometer reduced to freezing point of water but not to sea level, as measured (at two minutes to the hour named) from the barograms.

Tables II and III exhibit the hourly readings of the temperature of the air and of the temperature of evaporation round the Observatory as determined by aid of rotating dry and damp bulb thermometers and the thermograms. Table II exhibits also the extreme temperatures during the day and Table III also the solar radiation (black bulb in vacuo) maximum and terrestrial radiation-minimum tempera-

tures.

Table IV exhibits the mean relative humidity in percentage of saturation and mean tension of water vapour present in the air expressed in inches of mercury for every hour in the day and for every day in the month, calculated by aid of Blanford's tables from the data in Tables II and III.

136

Table V exhibits the duration of sunshine expressed in hours from half an hour before to half an hour after the hour (true time) named.

Table VI exhibits the amount of rain in inches registered from half an hour before to half an hour after the hour named.

Table VII exhibits the velocity of the wind in miles and its direction in numbers. The velocity of the wind is measured from half an hour before to half an hour after the hour named; but the direction is read off at the hour except when it is very light and changeable, in which case the average direction during the hour is estimated, taking into account the velocity from different quarters. The direction is not noted when the velocity is below 1.5 miles an hour. The vane is to be depended on except when the velocity is uniform (which is of course a rare occurrence) and below 3 miles an hour.

Table VIII exhibits for every hour in the day, the mean velocity of the wind reduced to 4 and also to 2 directions, as well as the mean direction of the wind :-

The number of miles traversed by winds from directions 31, 32 and 1 and half the number of miles from 30 and 2 are termed (N.) The number of miles from 3, 4 and 5 and half the number of miles from 2 and 6 are termed (NE), etc. We have thus :-

N=(N) + (NE) cos. 45° + (NW) cos. 45°

E=(E) + (NE) cos. 45° + ( SE ) cos. 45°

which are the components exhibited in this table.

etc.

Table IX exhibits the direction (to two points) and force (0-12) of the wind estimated at Victoria Peak and the rainfall measured at 10a. and entered to preceeding day at the Peak and at the Observatory, as well as the duration of rain estimated at the Observatory.

Table X exhibits the readings of the barometer reduced to freezing point of water but not to sea level, and of the thermometers at Victoria Peak.

Table XI exhibits the relative humidity and tension of vapour at 10a., 4p. and 10p. daily at the Observatory and at the Peak.

Table XII exhibits the amount (0-10), name and direction whence coming of the clouds. Where the names of upper and lower clouds are given, but only one direction, this refers to the lower clouds. These observations are made with the unaided vision. BRAUN's nephoscope, which has lately been again brought out in Sweden, has not been used.

29. The following annual weather report for 1888 is arranged as follows:-

·

Table III exhibits the mean annual values (or mean hourly excess above this) obtained by aid of the mean values printed in the monthly reports. The mean hourly intensity of rain is obtained from the sixth table of the monthly reports in connection with the fourth table of this report. The total amount of rain measured daily at 10a. was 104-585 inches at the Observatory and 111·17 at the Peak. The total duration registered at the Observatory was 854 hours. The rainfall was at least 0.01 inch on 173 days at the Observatory, and on 111 days at the Peak.

The excess of the black bulb above the air maximum is given as usual. It would have been much better to compare the former with the temperature registered at noon, but that is not done elsewhere.

Table IV exhibits the number of hours during a portion of which rain was registered.

Table V exhibits the total distance traversed by as well as the duration and average velocity of winds from bi-quadrantal points, obtained from the tables published on the first page of each monthly weather report.

Table VI exhibits the number of days on which certain Meteorological phenomena were noted and also the total number of thunderstorms observed in this neighbourhood during the year.

Table VII shows the frequency of clouds of the different classes.

Table VIII exhibits the values of different quantities as explained in previous reports. The hourly intensities of rain have been obtained from the data in the ninth table of the monthly reports.

Tables IX and X exhibit the monthly and annual extremes. The extremes of humidity and vapour tension have been obtained from the eleventh table of the monthly reports and are therefore as usual not quite complete as the values for only 10a. 4p. and 10p. daily are calculated.

Tables XI and XII are arranged as explained in the report on five-day means for 1886,

"

TABLE III.

Mean Values and Hourly Excess above the Mean of Meteorological Elements in 1888.

Mean or Total.

1 a. 2 a.

3 a. 4 a.

5 a.

6 a.

7 a.

8 a.

9 a.

10 a.

11 a. Noon.

1 p.

2 p.

3 p. 4 p.

5 p.

6 p.

7 p. 8 p.

9 p. 10 p.

11 p. Midt.

Observ.

atory.

Peak.

Pressure,

Temperature,..

Diurnal Range,.

...

Humidity,

+

+.005 −.006 -.014 -.017 1.4 1.6 1.7 1.9

4 + 4 + 4 + 4

-.013

.000

2.1 2.0

+.016 +.031

1.6

M

0.5

+.042 +.044 + 0.5 + 1.3

+.035 +.016 + 2.0 + 2.4

.007-027 + 2.5 + 2.4

-040045 + 2.2 + 1.7

041 032 + 0.9 + 0.3

-.019

0.0

.000 +.013 +.022 0.3 0.5 0.7

+.022 +.015|

29.833

28.104

0.9 1.2

72.4

67.0

7.3

6.1

...

...

...

...

+ 5 + 4

+

3 + 1

2

4

Vapour Tension,

+.002 .000

-.001 -.004

-.007 -.008

.002 -.002

-.004 —.006

Sunshine (Total),

10.1

89.6

155.7

176.2 191.2

...

...

Rainfall,

0.456

0:459

0.442

0.342

0.602

0.437

0.424

0.402

0.464

0.280

6

.003 -.004 194.3 187.9

0,290

7

J

7

...

-.001 ..001

6

6

4

2

0

+ 1 + 2 + 2 + 3

+ 3 + 4

79

89

-.002 -.001

.000 +.004

+.007 +.008

+.009 +.009

+.007 +.004

0.662

0.627

189.1 195.8

188.8 169.8

102.1 13.2

...

...

...

1863.8

Hours of Rain (Total),..

Intensity of Rain,.

Wind-Velocity,

Wind-Direction, Cloudiness,

Solar Radiation, Excess of do. do., Terr. Radiation,

40

50

49

56

60

60

47

54

50 33

27

0,294

28

0.137

0.110

0.108

0.073

0.120

0.087

0.108

0.089

0.111

0.102

0.129 0.126

0.488

27

0.217 0.145

0.458

38

+ ||

1.0

1.2

1.1 1.0

0.9

0.9

1.2

40

6° 6o

50.

70

100

0.8

20

0.4 + 1.4

+ 1.8 + 2.2

2o + 4°

+ 8° +10°

+ 2.4 + 2.3 12° 12°

2

...

+ 2

0.215 0.235

29 34 0.089 0.083

1.9 1.6 + 80 + 6o

2

0.265

32

0.340

0.274

0.241

0.376

0.345

0.220 -0.365

8.715

9.264

30

29

30

35

35

28

37

938

0.100 0.136

0.113

0.097

0.129

0.118

0.094

0.118

0.111

+ 1.1 + 0.1

0.9

1.4

1.4

1.3

1.2

1.0

.12,5

22

+ 4o + 3o

+ 0°

4o

40

49

5o

E 13° SE 34° S

68

...

128.4

121.2

:::

***

....

...

...

...

:::

...

:::

52.1

50.9

+3.0

+1.8

...

TABLE IV.

Number of Hours, during portion of which it rained, for each Month in the Year 1888.

7

4 a.

5 a.

Month.

1 a.

2 a.

3 a.

January,

February,

8

March,

4

April,

May,

June,

July,..

August,

5

September,

1

October,

November,

December,

ܗ:

2

2

8445

:04+007 ::~

5

7

7

6

5

11

10

13

5

5

6

7

5

1

...

...

4

4

2

:6466

240052713 N

6

6

2

5

11

5

2

3

4

222700 — 109 - 03

2-220:4*2-2

452372422-d

445124

Total,...... 40

50 49

56

60

60

47 54 50 33

27

6 a.

7 a.

8 a.

9 a. 10 a.

11 a. Noon. 1 p.

2 p.

3 p.

4 p. 5 p. 6p. 7p.

8 p.

9 p. 10 p. 11 p. Midt.

Total.

2

...

3

:482662 :* :*

:2426∞ ∞ ∞ − 1 03

N

2

2

1

6

4

5

1

1

3

2

1

1

3

4

2

3

1

1

3

3

3

1

3

1

1

1

1

2

5

...

4

H2~277+~::~

1

1

1

3

1

2

3

...

....

2

2

co

473472 ::~

2324O7NÔN

12240∞⠀⠀

pod pod CO 10 10 22*2+ :N

11

4

5

99

88

84

128

174

76

91

68

33

16

...

4

4

4

70

28

28 27 38

29

34

32

30

29

30 35 35

28

37

938

137

N,

NE,

E,

SE,

S,

SW,

W,

NW,

Calm,

138

8

TABLE V.

Total Distance traversed by, as well as Total Duration and Average Velocity of Winds from eight different Points

of the Compass during the year 1888.

WIND.

TOTAL DISTANCE.

Miles.

DURATION.

VELOCITY.

Hours.

Miles

per

hour.

8367

775

10.8

11015

853

12.9

62409

3841

16.2

5108

574

8.9

8855

853

10.4

6982

562

12.4

4256

530

8.0

2074

299

6.9

326

497

0.7

Sums and Mean,..........

109392

8784

12.5

:

TABLE VI.

Total Number of Days on which different Meteorological Phenomena were noted and Total Number of

Thunderstorms during each month of the year 1888.

Month.

Fog.

:

:

:

:

:

Electric

Phenomena.

Lightning.

Thunder.

Thunder-

storms.

Visibility.

Unusual

Dew.

Rain-bows.

Lunar

Halo.

Lunar

Corona.

Solar Halo.

Corona.

Solar

January,

1

8

:

1

:

February,

1

1

1

2

1

2

March,.

12

14

14

12

9

:

+

1

...

:.

:

...

:

2

April,

7 16

16

8

5

10

1

1

1

May,

June,

July,

August,

September,

October,

November,

December,

21

18

11

2

co

3

3

1

1

1

:

:

19

19

8

:

8

3

7

2

2

:

1

26

24

12

3

5

10

4

1

1

7

13

23

21

9

A

5

15

2

5

2

6

10

20

17

9

1

1

11

1

5

1

2

:

N

3

1

2 4

2

1

1

1

:.

10

1

1

3

:

:

:

7

:

:

:

:

:

:

Sums,

51

144

134

73

30

17

79

18

20

13

23

4

7.

9

TABLE VII.

Total Number of Times that Clouds of different Forms were observed in each month of the year 1888.

139

Month.

C.

c-str.

c-cum sm-cum. cum. cum-str. str.

R-cum. cum-nim.

nim.

January,

February,

March,

April,

:

:

:

...

4

2

15

82

14

40

21

+

:

2

2

11

73

27

25

32

57

14

1

15

107

2

27

26

37

44

22

223

27

117

1

24

41

53

May,

1

29

24

32

140

4

9

17

39

44

June,

3

44

36

26

120

1

41

25

54

July,....

7

81

19

14.

179

2

4

19

14

14

August,

8

77

September,

64

228

26

10

140

1

13.

12

23

25

29

19

147

6

14

8

14

14

9

October,......

November,.......

December,

....

18

19

20

134

11

10

14

10

:

13

13

49

144

8

6

2

3

3

34

103

:

:

16

5

14

29

Sums,......

19

368

196

272

1486

17

155

233

276

354

TABLE VIII.

Mean diurnal

RAIN FALL.

Month.

Baro- metric Tide.

variabi-

Tem- perature

MEAN DIRECTION OF CLOUDS WHENCE

NUMBER OF DAYS WITH

lity of

decrease. Mean

Tempera- for 1°

Height 1878-

Hourly Intensity of Rain.

COMING.

CLOUDS BELOW..

1888.

1887

ture.

inclus.

Lower. Upper.

Cirrus.

2000 ft. 1000 ft.

ins.

feet.

ins.

ins.

ins.

January,

0.105

1.57

417

1.47

0.185 0.021

E.

W by S

14

6

February,......

0.105

2.32

407

1.66

3.965

0.025 ESE WSW

22

11

:

March,

0.101

2.49

551

3.53

10.430

April,

0.101

1.98

380

6.55

6.955

S

0.104 SE by SW by S

0.078

W

888

23

9

28

17

May,.

0.082

2.19

280

9.82

19.525 0.169

S by W

W

26

6

June,............ 0.069

1.98

263

12.67

23.865 0.184

S

W by S

NNE

28

July,

0.069

0.92

276

16.41

10.550 0.277

SE

ENE

E by N

9

1

August,.........

0.075

1.28

300

16.93

13.315

0.206 SW by S ENE

ENE

12

6

September,

0.085

1.28

280

9.89

6.415

October,

0.089

1.43

248

5.06

0.144

4.515 0.205

E by N NE by E

12

1

...

E by S SW by W

13

3

:

November,

0.099

1.29

290

1.04

0.770

0.076

ENE

W by S

5

1

....

December,......

0.105

1.76

290

.0.49

4.095

0.058

E by NW by S

12

4

...

Year,......

0.090

1.71

332 85.52 104.585 0.122

204

72

140

10

TABLE IX.

Monthly Extremes of the Principal Meteorological Elements registered at the Observatory during the year 1888.

BAROMETER.

TEMPERA-

TURE.

HUM. VAPOUR TENSION.

RAIN.

WIND VELOCITY.

RADIATION.

MONTH.

Max.

Min.

Max. Min. Min. Max. Min.

Daily Hourly Max. Max.

Max.

Sun Terr. Max. Min.

January, 30.279

29.834

72.9 42.8

5

0.576

0.035

0.155

0.075

40

136.3

41.5

...

February,.

.335

.822

68.6

40.6

28

0.545

.0.105 0.955

0.390

37

134.3

36.8

March....... .212

.767

77.9

54.2

59

0.749

0.272

3.580

1.570

44

132.6

52.4

April,

.058

.585

84.8

58.9 68

0.847

0.442

2.815

1.580

39

145.7

56.7

May,

29.915

.526

87.1

69.4

66

0.967

0.587

5.975

2.740

36

150.5

67.7

121

June,

.751

.284

88.0

69.2

64

0.991

0.572

8.475

2.130

48

152.6

66.7

July,

.799

.110

92.9

75.8

54

1.002

0.727

3.885

1.115

40

155.3

August,

.850

.340

90.4

72.2

65

1.000

0.732

2.680 1.470

30

151.2

September,.

.941

.480

88.9

70.8

53

0.941

0.606 1.090

0.600

50

150.4

68.9

October, 30.192

.694

83.8

64.1 27

0.921

0.241

1.595

0.700

34

150.4

55.4

November,.

.215

.663

82.6 60.8 46

0.691

0.320

0.660 0.380

35

143.7

52.0

December,. .274

.797

75.2 53.4 38

0.679 0.203

1.670 0.400

35

138.3

44.5

Year,...... 30.335 29.110

92.9

40.6

5

1.002

0.035

8.475

2.740

50

155.3

36.8

TABLE X.

Monthly Extremes of the Principal Meteorological Elements registered at Victoria Peak during the year 1888.

BAROMETER.

HUM. VAPOUR TENSION. RAIN. WIND.

TEMPERATURE.

RADIATION.

MONTH.

Max. Min.

Max.

Min.

Min. Max. Min.

Daily Force Max. Max.

Sun Terr. Max. Min.

January,

28.436 28.102

67.2

44.2

31

0.535 0.116

0.87

6

129.0

41.4

February,

.429

.061

65.3

35.3

61

0.530

0.151

0.76

.6

130.0

31.8

March,

.383

.039

71.5

50.2

67

0.691

0.289

5.10

6

128.8

45.8

April,....

.253 27.935

75.9

53.9

83

0.816 0.443

2.36

6

144.4

51.3

May,

.198

.869

78.1

64.3

81

0.901

0.580

4.85

5

149.7

63.1

June,

.033

.622

79.3

65.3

83

0.908

0.568

8.75

8

141.4

63.7

July,

.106

.465

84.2

73.3

64

0.958

0.651

6.15

151.1

70.8

August,

.144

.704

82.2

68.8

82

0.916

0.694

3.60

6

148.0

66.6

September,

.197

.774

82.3

66.1

70

0.892

0.601

1.15

147.7

65.0

October,......... .402 28.012

75.9

58.3

45

0.827

0.275

1.70

5

140.3

53.3

November,...... .396 27.975

74.9

58.2

55

0.627

0.336

0.56

5

135.1

51.4

December,...... .435 28.059

69.0

47.0

59

0.595

0.264

2.36

6

127.7

42.5

Year,......... 28.436 27.465

84.2

35.3

31

0.958

0.116

8.75

8

151.1

31.8

11

TABLE XI.

Five-Day Means of the Principal Meteorological Elements observed at the Hongkong Observatory in 1888.

141

Five-Day Periods.

Barometer.

Tempera- ture.

Humidity.

Vapour Tension.

Wind Velocity.

Nebulosity. Sunshine.

Rain.

January

1- 5

30.189

56.0

30

0.140

7.9

0.4

9.5

0.000

6-10

..063

62.5

61

.345

10.7

0.1

9.5

0.002

""

.11-15

29.976

63.2

77

.450

20.0

6.9

5.0

0.001

99

.16-20

.962

65.0

84

.520

13.1

5.0

7.5

0.001

.21-25

30.070

62.2

75

.422

17.6

6.5

6.2

0.000

"

26-30

.054

60.6

79

.418

15.6

9.1

1.2

0.002

"

...31- 4

.183

46.5

68

.213

12.5

7.1

3.9

0.389

"

February

5-9

.130

52.7

75

.300

13.0

10.0

0.4

0.065

.10-14

29.924

59.8

89

.460

21.8

9.2

2.5

0.005

""

.15-19

.963

56.3

88

.400

17.8

9.7

0.7

0.023

"

.20-24

.961

54.5

84

.360

10.4

10.0

0.0

0.342

"

...25- 1

.986

61.0

74

.405

14.3

5.8

5.7

0.000

"

March

2- 6

.993

60.7

80

.435

14.2

9.9

1.0

0.235

7-11

.958

61.9

77

.427

17.9

9.2

1.2

0.001

39

...12-16

..906

65.3

87

.542

12.7

6.3

4.4

0.005

.17-21

.970

64.1

86

.529

10.2

9.6

1.2

0.249

.22-26

.908

66.5

85

.560

12.5

9.4

2.6

0.948

"

.27-31

.885

67.4

94

.631

16.2

10.0

0.6

0.648

April

1- 5

.904

64.4

85

.515

18.3

9.8

2.1

0.082

6-10

.714

71.1

90

.687

15.9

9.9

1.2

0.806

99

..11-15

.773

70.6

89

.673

17.4

10.0

0.8

0.473

"

..16-20

.845

71.1

92

.703

12.9

8.4

4.6

0.026

""

21-25

.794

78.2

83

.799

8.5

6.7

7.9

0.001

""

"

....26-30

.793

79.5

81

.813

7.8

7.1

8.8

0.003

May

1- 5

.787

75.5

• 88

.778

15.0

9.3

3.7

0.812

6-10

.774

80.5

82

.857

6.2

4.0

9.2

0.017

.11-15

.794

77.9

86

.821

12.4

8.3

3.8

0.148

99

.16-20

.590

79.2

87

.872

10.7

9.4

2.9

1.807

"

.21-25

.737

76.3

82

.745

13.1

9.6

1.9

0.383

99

""

...26-30

.716

78.1

88

.844

8.5

9.6

3.0

0.674

.31- 4

.655

79.4

80

.808

13.9

8.9

4.2

0.196

"9

June

5- 9

.619

79.3

83

.840

14.4

9.3

3.5

0.096

.10-14

.495

78.9

88

.866

22.9

9.6

1.5

1.010

39

.15-19

.437

80.8

85

.888

19.2

9.6

2.4

1.116

.20-24

.555

82.4

84

.932

10.9

8.1

5.4

0.492

.25-29

.643

81.1

86

.913

12.8

9.7

2.0

1.849

99

.30- 4

.688

82.0

83

.908

6.0

6.4

7.5

0.257

""

July

5- 9

.681

82.7

81

.904

14.9

7.3

7.2

0.383

..10-14

.568

83.9

78

.910

16.1

7.1

7.4

0.183

.15-19

.549

82.1

82

.899

14.6.

6.7

6.6

1.161

.20-24

.556

84.0

78

.913

5.2

3.4

10.6

0.000

"

.25-29

.530

83.2

79

.899

5.1

5.2

8.5

0.131

.30- 3

.551

83.3

82

.942

6.3

4.9

8.1

0.176

August

4- 8

.523

84.2

80

.940

9.1

5.0

8.5

0.204

9-13

.441

79.2

88

.875

12.7

10.0

0.3

1.328

""

99

...14-18

.563

80.9

85

.896

12.1

7.0

6.6

0.564

.19-23

.788

79.5

87

.875

5.7

6.2

7.1

0.460

59

"

............24-28

.692

81.1

82

.872

4.8

5.0

8.6

0.004

.29- 2

..672

83.0

78

.883

4.7

3.0

9.6

0.027

September......... 3– 7

.763

81.9

82

.893

6.6

4.4

8.4

0.256

8-12

.768

80.1

80

.823

10.2

6.2

5.7

0.099

"

.13-17

.829

80.7

78

.818

7.3

4.5

7.9

0.094

99

"

.........18-22

.818

81.7

82

.890

7.1

5.6

7.5

0.305

.23-27

.796

81.2

68

.724

14.5

5.9

6.9

0.244

"

.28- 2

.754

77.1

74

.693

24.2

8.8

2.2

0.260

""

October

3- 7

.884

77.6

82

.780

16.5

8.5

2.8

0.138

8-12

.859

77.2

84

.784

12.5

8.3

1.9

0.661

13-17

.872

78.4

80

.776

16.3

6.8

4.2

0.005

""

...........18-22 ..23-27

.898

75.4

67

.611

14.2

5.0

7.1

0.096

30.060

71.3

49

.376

14.2

0.6

10.6

0.000

29.957

73.0

71

.585

8.2

1.2

9.9

0.002

November

2- 6

.939

73.8

68

.571

5.7

6.0

5.8

0.000

7-11

.921

72.2

74

.585

15.7

8.0

4.1

0.133

""

.12-16

30.039

70.0

71

.523

8.7

4.1

6.7

0.000

""

..17-21

29.829

71.8

75

.589

8.9

4.8

6.0

0.019

""

..22-26

30.089

68.4

65

.454

13.5

2.6

9.1

0.000

""

.099

69.4

72

.521

16.4

4.5

7.6

0.001

"

December

2- 6

.000

69.1

75

.538

10.2

5.5

4.6

0.000

7-11

29.980

69.0

80

.568

15.7

7.4

3.6

0.085

99

.12-16

30.008

66.8

81

.538

16.2

8.9

1.2

0.082

"

.17-21

.083

61.7

77

.432

8.6

7.4

2.1

0.652

""

.22-26

.069

62.0

59

.331

8.8

2.3

8.8

0.000

..27-31

29.948

62.2

71

.402

11.8

2.1

8.0

0.000

142

Barometer.

1- 5

28.381

January

12

TABLE XII.

Five-Day Means of the principal Meteorological Elements observed at Victoria Peak in 1888.

Five-Day Periods.

Temperature. Humidity.

Vapour Tension.

Wind Force.

Rain.

51.2

43

0.172

3.9

0.00

25

99

6-10

..11-15

.291

58.4

60

.312

4.2

0.00

.193

58.6

81

.408

4.7

0.00

"

....16-20

.201

61.0

87

.486

3.3

0.00

.21-25

.293

56.9

86

"

.411

3.8

0.00

.26-30

.266

55.0

91

.404

4.1

0.00

.31- 4

.316

42.6

81

.228

4.4

19

February

0.45

5- 9

.309

45.5

91

.282

4.3

0.02

.10-14

.151

58.6

95

.475

4.5

27

0.02

.15-19

.166

53.6

93

.390

4.4

""

0.11

.20-24

.153

49.0

95

.331

""

4.1

0.30

.25- 1

.209

56,2

88

.418

3.7

""

0.00

March

2- 6

.221

57.0

87

.419

3.9

0.15

7-11

.194

56.3

92

.435

3.6

0.00

.12-16

""

....

.169

63.9

90

.543

3.6

0.00

.17-21

.208

61.8

92

.524

3.8

0.23

.22-26

.157

62.0

93

.533

3.9

1.18

.27-31

.146

65.7

96

.610

4.3

0.40

"

April

1- 5

.157

61,0

92

.500

4.0

0.00

6-10

27.993

67.5

96

23

.661

4.7

1.23

.11-15

28.036

65,6

96

.620

4.9

93

0.12

.16-20

.106

69,0

94

.681

3.6

""

0.02

.21-25

.105

72.1

94

.746

3.9

0.00

.26-30

.091

72.9

94

.772

3.8

0.00

May

1- 5

.070

70.3

96

.717

3.9

0.79

6-10

.090

73.8

93

.785

3.5

"J

0.00

.11-15

.084

72.1

94

.755

3.8

99.

0.31

"

..16-20

27.913

72.6

96

.782

4.4

1.46

.21-25

28.025

69.5

95

.701

4.2

""

0.64

.26-30

.019

71,6

98

.770

4.1

"

0.15

.31- 4

27.960

72,3

95

.765

4.5

0.25

June

5- 9

.927

73.2

97

.809

4.5

0.23

.10-14

.826

72.7

98

.796

5.1

"9

1.23

.15-19

.748

73.7

98

.824

5.2

""

1.04

.20-24

.875

75.0

97

.858

4.2

0.46

.25-29

.950

74,7

98

.850

4.6

35

2.58

.30- 4

28.009

75.3

96

.851

3.9

21

0.22

July

19

5- 9

27.993

75.6

93

.841

4.1

0.14

.10-14

.875

77.5

88

.849

4.2

0.15

15-19

.868

76.0

92

.837

3.6

1.23

"

..20-24

.890

77,5

89

.859

2.0

**

0.00

.25-29

.859

76.9

90

.842

3.1

15

0.21

30- 3

.888

77.3

91

.874

3.3

"

0.30

August

4- 8

.853

77.2

91

.859

4.1

0.31

9-13

.773

73.2

96

.797

4.3

1.92

14-18

.880

74.5

95

.828

4.2

"

1.03

19-23

28.097

74.7

92

.810

3.4

0.13

"

"

......

24-28

.019

75.3

92

.820

3.4

0.00

.29- 2

27.987

76.5

89

.823

3.1

39

0.03

September

3- 7

28.078

76.9

89

.843

2.8

0.15

8-12

.069

75.1

88

.780

3.5

0.03

""

13-17

.121

74.0

90

.770

3.5

0.05

19

18-22

.121

75.3

92

.824

2.9

0.23

"9"

""

...23-27

.082

73.9

82

.700

4.5

0.04

.28-2

.034

69.6

88

.642

5.2

0.37

""

October

3- 7

.163

70.1

94

.702

4.1

0.25

8-12

.144

70.7

97

.736

4.2

0.79

""

""

....13-17

.162

71.5

94

.732

4.1

0.00

18-22

.166

68.3

88

.635

4.3

0.06

"

""

..23-27

.309

63.6

66

.407

4.5

0.00

.28- 1

.217

66.6

82

.558

2.5

0.00

""

November

2- 6

.211

68.3

81