Administrative Reports - 1919

ADMINISTRATIVE REPORTS FOR THE YEAR 1919

Table of Contents

1 Finances

2 Shipping and Trade, industries, Fisheries, agriculture and Land

3 Legislation

4 Education

5 Public Works

6 Government and aided institutions

7 Institutions Not Supported By Government

8 Criminal and Police

9 Vital Statistics

10 Postal and Telegraph Services

A Financial Returns

A(1) Finances

B Assessment

C Secretariat for Chinese affairs

D Harbour office

E Imports and Exports office

F Royal Observatory

G Supreme Court

H Police Magistrates' Court

I Land office

J New Territories

K Police and Fire Brigade

L Prison

M Medical and Sanitary

N Botanical and forestry

O Education

P Volunteer Corps (Not Published)

Q Public Works

R Post office

S Railway

 




2

Owing to the abnormal situation in the Straits Settlements and Ceylon, the Hongkong rice market was seriously affected and it became necessary for the Government to take steps to ensure that the poorer classes of the Colony were able to obtain this commodity, which is their staple food, at a reasonable price. The Government therefore took general control of the rice trade in the Colony and made large purchases to tide over the threatened crisis. This action no doubt saved the Colony much trouble from the working classes who had shown signs of restlessness on account of the ever increasing price of rice which reached as high as $18.50 per picul for grades which normally could be purchased for $5. Even this action did not prevent the more unruly element among the working classes causing considerable disturbances in various parts of the City, and rice merchants' stores were frequently looted. The tactful supervision of the Police however prevented any serious out- break of disorder.

Celebrations in connection with the declaration of peace were held on the 18th and 19th July. Processions of various descriptions paraded the City of Victoria and the whole Colony participated in the effort to show in a suitable manner their satisfaction at the termination of the long and disastrous war.

The Colonial Secretary (Mr. Claud Severn) administered the Government from the 1st January until the arrival of Sir Edward Stubbs, who arrived in and assumed the government of the Colony on the 30th September.

I. -FINANCES.

The revenue for the year amounted to $16,524,975 being $359,240 more than the estimate and $2,140,273 less than the re- venue for the previous year.

Compared with the returns for 1918 there were increases under every head with the exception of Licences and Miscellaneous Receipts.

The expenditure amounted to a total of $17,915,925 inclusive of a sum of $2,235,002 spent on Public Works Extraordinary and one of $546,712 being a contribution to the Imperial Government for war expenses.

The detailed figures for 1919 are set out in the following

statements:

HEADS OF REVENUE.

$

$c.

Light Dues

Light Dues, Special Assessment -

74,545.18

83,973.11

specified

-

Licences and Internal Revenue not otherwise

Fees of Court or Office, Payments for specific

purposes, and Reimbursements in Aid

12,865,534.22

1,013,207.61

Post Office -

460,892.58

Kowloon-Canton Railway

490,092.77

Rent of Government Property, Land, and

Houses

1,041,431.01

Interest

112,798.43

Miscellaneous Receipts

118,539.76

TOTAL, (Ordinary) -

$16,261,014.67

Land Sales, (Premia on New Leases)

-

263,960.23

TOTAL,

- $16,524,974.90

The total expenditure brought to account amounted to $17,915,925 being $3,238,029 more than the estimate, and $1,663,753 more than the expenditure in 1918. Compared with the estimates there were decreases under 18 heads as against 6 heads where there were increases. The excess amounting to $3,821,704 under Miscel- laneous Services was due to losses on rice and exchange and to increased allowances on salaries pending revision. Military Ex- penditure was more than the estimate by $251,833 on account of the Revenue for 1918 having been under-estimated. The item Public Works Recurrent was responsible for an excess over the estimates of $120,510. Decreases were mostly due to high exchange, Public Works Extraordinary not proceeded with, and arrears of transit charges brought to credit by the Post Office.

EXPENDITURE.

C.

Governor

-

77,198.15

Colonial Secretary's Department and Legis-

lature

68,197.84

Secretariat for Chinese Affairs

52,634.57

Audit Department

35,625.67

Treasury

63,076.94

Harbour Master's Department

!

Imports & Exports Department

Royal Observatory

Miscellaneous Services

-

235,411.10 809,627.24

23,450.57

5,532,810.60

Judicial and Legal Departments -

251,434.95

Police and Prison Departments

1,066,820.94

Medical Departments

264,524.75

Sanitary Department

384,873.00

Botanical and Forestry Department

51,457.65

Education

-

357,806.43

Military Expenditure -

3,580,463.81

Public Works Department

391,382.64

Do.

Recurrent

822,509.87

Do.

Extraordinary

2,235,002.95

Post Office -

138,224.68

Kowloon-Canton Railway

437,592.45

Charge on account of Public Debt

749,649.66

Pensions

217,510.30

Charitable Services

68,638.60

TOTAL,

- $17,915,925.36

The balance to the debit on the year's working was $1,390,950 and the assets and liabilities account showed on the 31st December a credit balance of $4,290,188.

The following is a statement of the revenue and expenditure of the Colony for the five years 1915-1919 :—

1915

1916

1917

1918

1919

:

:

:

:

Revenue.

$

Expenditure.

$

11,786,106

15,149,267

13,833,387

11,079,915

15,058.105

14,090,828

18,665,248 16,252,172

16,524,975 17,915,925

6

of demonetization. The discount which prevailed between 1905 and 1916 may be attributed to the immense quantity of similar coin which was minted at Canton as well as to the amount of Hongkong coin minted largely in excess of the needs of the Colony by itself. In 1905 the Hongkong Government ceased to issue any subsidiary coin and in 1906 it began a policy of demonetising all its subsidiary coin received as revenue. This policy was continuously followed till 1918 except during a brief period in 1911. Coin to the face value of $23,235,459 has thus been redeemed. The total issue by the Hongkong Government was of the face value of about $44,000,000.

II.-SHIPPING AND TRADE, INDUSTRIES, FISHERIES, AGRICULTURE, AND LAND.

(a.)-SHIPPING.

The total of the Shipping entering and clearing at Ports in the Colony during the year 1919 amounted to 649,168 vessels of 35,615,169 tons, which, compared with the figures for 1918, shows an increase of 69,627 vessels, with an increase of 6,096,980 tons.

Of the above, 41,985 vessels of 21,072,129 tons were engaged in Foreign Trade, as compared with 43,436 vessels of 16,955,332 tons in 1918, and were distributed as follows:-

1918.

1919. Numbers. Numbers.

1918. Tonnage.

1919.

Tonnage.

British Ocean-

going Ships, 5.6%

9.2%

21.4 %

32.4%

Foreign Ocean-

going Ships,

9.8

12.6

36.1

36.2

British River

Steamers, ...

13.3

13.2

20.3

15.4

Foreign River

Steamers, ... 3.5

3.8

3.6

2.9

Steam Launches

(under 60

tons),.

13.8

11.9

1.1

0.8

Trading Junks, 540

49.3

17.5

12:3

100·0

100·0

100·0

100'0

N.B.-The movements of Fishing Junks are not included in this Table.

Of vessels of European construction, 4,571 Ocean Steamers, 4 Sailing Ships, 3,550 River Steamers, and 2,509 Steamships not exceeding 60 tons entered during the year, giving a daily average of 291 ships, as compared with 273 in 1918, and 29.9 in 1917.

-

7

The average tonnage of individual Ocean Vessels entering the Port has increased from 1,459 2 tons to 1,583'1 tons, that of British ships has increased from 1,482 6 tons to 1,772'6 tons while that of Foreign ships has also increased from 1,445'7 tons to 1,449.2

tons.

The average tonnage of individual River Steamers entering during the year has decreased from 4847 tons to 4488 tons.

That of British River Steamers has increased from 5116 tons to 529 8 tons, and that of Foreign River Steamers has decreased from 439.9 tons to 336'6 tons.

4. A comparison between the years 1918 and 1919 is given in the following table:-

1918.

1919.

Increase.

Decrease.

Class of Vessels.

No.

Tonnage. No. Tonnage. No. Tonnage. No. Tonnage.

British Ocean- |

2,444

going.

Foreign Ocean-

4,234

going,

British River

5,807

3,627,576 3,865 6,842,024| 1,421 3,214,448

6,117.893| 5,274 | 7,625,823 1,040 1,507,930

3,444,445 5,502 3,253,781

...

305

190,664

Steamers,

Foreign River

1,510

612,314| 1,599

591,679

89

20,638

Steamers,

Steamships un-

der 60 tons

(Foreign

6,002

180,738 5,035 161,689

Trade).

Trade,....

Junks, Foreign 23,439 2,972,366 20,710 2,597,133

Total. Foreign 43.436 16,955,332 11,985 21,072,129 2,550 4,722,378 4,001

Trade,......

967

19,049

2,729

375,233

605,584

Steam-launches

plying in

Waters of Colony,

499,102 10,734,658 386,188 13,366,602 87,086 2,631,944

Trade,

Grand Total,

Junks, Local *#7,003 1,828,199 † 20,995 † 1,176,438

379,541 29,518,189 | 649,168 35,615,169 89,636 7,354,322 20,009 1,257,345

¡16,008 651,761

Nett Increase,..

69,627 || 6,096,977

*Including 11,686 Conservancy and Dust Boats of 638,884 tons.

11.486

*

""

758.621

**

8

This table shows an increase in British Ocean-going Ship- ping of 1,421 ships or 581 per cent., and an increase of 3,214,448 tons or 886 per cent. This is due to a partial recovery of ship- ping after war conditions owing to the release of many ships for commercial purposes.

British River Steamers have decreased by 305 ships and 190,664 tons or 5.2 per cent. in numbers and 55 per cent. in tonnage. This is due to two ships formerly British having been transferred to the Chinese flag, to one ship having been taken off the run for three months and another having been laid up.

Foreign Ocean-going Vessels have increased by 1,040 ships with an increase of 1,507,930 tons or 24.5 per cent. in numbers and 246 per cent. in tonnage. This is due to partial return to pre-war conditions.

Foreign River Steamers show an increase of 89 ships and a decrease of 20,638 tons or 52 per cent. in numbers and 33 per cent. in tonnage. This is due to the transfer of two ships formerly British to the Chinese flag and to two large ships having been taken off the run.

In Steamships not exceeding 60 tons employed in Foreign Trade there is a decrease of 967 ships and a decrease of 19,049 tons or 161 per cent. in numbers and 105 per cent. in tonnage. This . decrease is due to a number of Steam-launches being laid up part of the year owing chiefly to the expense of coal and to two vessels formerly run as Steam-launches having been re-measured and run as vessels over 60 tons.

Junks in Foreign Trade show a decrease of 2,729 vessels of 275,333 tons or 116 per cent. in numbers and 12'6 per cent. in tonnage. This decrease is but apparent. It is due to the abolition of war time regulations, under which the movements of all junks were reported. Now many of them fail to report arrival or departure.

In Local Trade (i.e., between places within the waters of the Colony) there is an increase in Steam-launches of 87,086 vessels with an increase in tonnage of 2,631,944 or 17.5 per cent. in numbers and 245 per cent. in tonnage. This increase is due to more shipping frequenting the Port, the employment of Launches towing having considerably increased.

Junks in Local Trade show a decrease of 16,008 vessels and 651,761 tons or 432 per cent. in numbers and 35'6 per cent. in tonnage. This decrease is due to abolition of war time restrictions, under which the movements of all Junks irrespective of size were reported, whereas many of them now fail to report their movements.

The actual number of individual Ocean-going Vessels of European construction during the year 1919 was 957 of which 301 were British and 656 Foreign. In 1918 the corresponding figures were 675 of which 162 were British and 513 Foreign.

They entered 4,575

These 957 ships measured 2,230,105 tons. times and gave a collective tonnage of 7,242,689. Thus 282 more ships entered 1,232 more times and gave a collective tonnage greater by 2,364,580 tons, an average of 1,919-3 tons per entry.

9

Thus

Steamers.

No. of times entered.

Total Tonnage.

Flag.

1918. 1919. 1918. | 1919.

1918. 1919.

Steamers 158

299

1,219

British

Sailing...

4

2

4

1,938 1,803,1763,436,616 2 10,121 2,267

Steamers

291

379

911

1,148 1,744,888 2,111,252

Japanese

Sailing ..

1

1

89

Norwegian,

25

18

108

96

128,157

99,652

Chinese,

66

84

620

854

424,965 585,972

Danish,

5

6

7

6

18,915 . 17,720

Dutch,

58

39

133

113

334,347 262,213

French,

20

17

153

159

154,474 204,494

Portuguese,..

80

85

43,063

51,459

Russian,

13

15,244

9,989

Siamese,

3

2

1,801

7,916

Swedish,

2

1

8,304

2,217

Steamers

32

90

88

150

187,309

415,859

U.S.A.,

Sailing.

1

1

1

1.271

3,000

Steamers

Belgian,

2.074

Sailing

Inter Allied,

3

6

31,974

Total,.

675

957 3.343 4,575 4,878,1097,242,689

The 301 British ships carried 2,408 British officers and 32 Foreign officers, the latter consisting of 5 Norwegians, 18 Americans, 2 Danish, 2 Swedish, 1 Roumanian, 3 Russians, and 1 Greek.

Thus, the proportion of Foreign officers in British ships was 133 per cent., comprising 7 nationalities, a decrease of 1:40 per cent., with a decrease in number of officers and an increase in ships.

8. The 656 Foreign ships carried 4,659 officers, of whom 78 were British, as follows:-

1918.

1919.

In Chinese ships -

45

34

""

Japanese ships

2

2

French ships

1

1

United States ships

26

Greek ships

15

>>

57

78

Thus 16 per cent. of the officers serving in Foreign ships were of British nationality, with an increase in the number of officers and an increase in the number of ships.

10.

The Nationality of the Crews in British and in Foreign ships was as follows:

VESSELS.

BRITISH CREW.

AMERICANS

AND

ASIATICS.

EUROPEANS.

1918. 1919. 1918. 1919.

1918. 1919. 1918. 1919.

British,. 162 301

Foreign,. 513 656

9,306 19,717 641 674 86,386 134,307

751 1,359 9,113 11,725 122,479 150,517

Total,

675 957 10,057 21,076 9,754 12,399 208,865 284,824

Hence in British ships •=་

And in Foreign ships: -

1918.

1919.

1918.

1919.

9.66 %

12.74% of the crews were British.

0.58 %

0.83% of the crews

were British.

0.66 %

0.45% of the crews were other Europeans.

6.88 %

7.17 % of the crews

were other Europeans.

89.68 %

86.81% of the crews 92·54% 92-00 % of the crews

were Asiatics.

TRADE.

were Asiaties.

Detailed and accurate statistics of imports and exports are now collected and published by the Imports and Exports Depart- The rough statements hitherto included in these reports are therefore discontinued.

ment.

IMPORTS.

The number and tonnage of ships of European type con- struction carrying cargo for import and transit, compared with 1918, were as follows:-

1918.

No.

1919.

Increase.

Decrease.

Tonnage. No. Tonnage. No. Tonnage. No. Tonnage.

Steamers, 3.337 4,864,643 4,571 River Steamers, 3,660 2,028.674 3,550 Sailing Vessels,

13,466

Total,

7,237,333 1,234 2,372.690 1,917,236 5,356

110111.438 2 8.110

|7,003 | 6,906,783 |8,125 | 9,159,925 1,234 2,372,690| 112 119,548

Nett Increase.......1,122 2,253,142|

11

EXPORTS.

The corresponding figures relating to ships of European type of construction, shipping bunker coal, are as follows:-

1918.

1919.

Increase.

Decrease.

No.

Tonnage. No.

Tonnage. No. Tonnage. No. Tonnage.

3,332

Steamers,

4,862,038 4,560 7,219,802 | 1,228,2,357,761

River Steamers, 3,657 2,028,085 | 3,551 1,928,221

Sailing Vessels,

3

7,396

4

5,356 1

106 99,864

2,010

Total,.

6,992 6,897,519 8,115 9,153,379 1,229 2,357,764 106 101,904

Net Increase,

1,123 2,255,860

1918.

1919.

Increase.

Decrease.

No.

Bunker Coal.

No.

Bunker Coal.

No.

Bunker

Coal.

No.

Bunker Coal.

Steamers,

3,332

357,109 4,560

850,386 1,228 493,277

River Steamers, 3,657 52,322 3,551

53,439

1,117 106

Total,... 6,989 109,431 8,111

903,825 1,228 494,394 106

Net Increase....

1,122 494,394

:

The River Trade, compared with 1918, is shown in the following Table :-

Year.

Imports.

Exports.

Passengers.

1918,

362,146

399,458

1,410,400

1919,

323,536

328,369

1,373,947

12

The following Table shows the Junk Trade of the Colony for the years 1918 and 1919 :-

IMPORTS.

1918.

1919.

Junks.

Tons.

Junks.

Tons.

Foreign Trade, ...... 11,698

1,501,757

10,353

1,248,389

Local Trade, ....... 12,290

1,561,890

4,686

206,326

Total,

23,988

3,063,647

15,039

1,454,715

Imported 558,509 tons as under :-

Cattle, 1,608 hend,

Swine, 8,460 head,

General,

Earth and Stones,

Tons.

189

498

545,641

12,181

Total,........... 558,509

EXPORTS.

1918.

1919.

Junks.

Tons.

Junks.

Tons.

Foreign Trade,..... 11,741

1,470,609

10,357

1,349,744

Local Trade,

13,027

627,425

4,823

211,483

Total, ...... 24,768

2,098,034

15,180

1,561,232

Exported 794,566 tons as under :-

Kerosine, 2,385,000 cases,

Rice and Padi,

Coal,.....

General,

Tons.

68,710

142,262

192,869

390,765

Total,... 794,566

13

OPIUM.

The imports and exports of certificated opium during the year are as follows:-

-

Import,. Export,.....

Malwa. Chests.

Patna.

Benares.

Total.

Chests.

Chests.

Chests.

10

10

Ten chests of certificated opium were exported to Kwong Chow Wan.

Three hundred and seventy-one (371) chests of Persian opium were imported during the year, and 8 chests were exported to London, 13 chests to Singapore, and 350 chests to Formosa.

Eight hundred and sixty-nine (869) chests of uncertificated. Indian opium were imported: 374 chests for the Macao Opium Farmer, and the remaining 495 chests for the Government Opium Monopoly.

The table below shows the total imports and exports since 1911 :-

1919. 1918. 1917, 1916. 1915. 1914. 1913. 1912. 1911.

Chests Chests. Chests Chests. Chests. Chests. Chests Chests. Chests.

Stock in hand on

1st January, Imported during

the year,

253

1,290

7991 9771,3031 2,256 4,580 5,560 7,587❘ 7,123

1,2591,657 | 1,706 1,873 3,059 9,108112,36121,286

Total,..... 1,543 2,058 2,634 3,009 4,1293 7,640 14,668 19,948 28,409

Boiled by Opium

Farmer,

36 667 1,113 761

Boiled by Govern-

ment,

377

539 352 365

340

413

Spurious Opium

destroyed,

1

13

17

19

Missing or stolen, Exported during

1

4

2

9

the year,

837 1,265|1,469 |1,667

2,469 4,911 9,419 13,264120,061

Total,.

1,214 1,805 | 1,835 |2,032

2,826 5,38310,088 14,3884|20,822

Stock remaining on 31st December.........

329 253 799977

1,303 2,256 4,580 5,560 7,587

Emigration and Immigration.

Fifty-nine thousand nine hundred and sixty-nine (59,969) emigrants left Hongkong for various places during the year 1919, (43,830 in 1918). Of these, 25,303 were carried in British ships, and 34,666 in Foreign ships.

14

One hundred and thirty-six thousand and twenty (136,020) returning emigrants were reported to have been brought to Hong- kong from the several places to which they had emigrated either from this Colony or from Coast Ports, as against 74,109 in 1918. Of these, 92,385 arrived in British ships, and 43,635 in Foreign ships.

Statement of Number of Emigrants to Straits Settlements, 1910 to 1919, compared with Total Chinese Emigration.

No. of Emigrants

to

Straits Settlements.

Total No. of

Emigrants.

1910,...

76,705

111,058

1911,...

100,906

135,565

1912,..

84,024

122,657

1913,.

102,353

142,759

1914,.

44,974

76,296

1915,...

41,278

68,275

1916,.

82.797

117,653

1917,

63,292

96,298

1918,

8,019

43,830

1919,.

11,638

59,969

(b.)-INDUSTRIES.

(i.)—Under European Management.

Engineering and Shipbuilding.—The figures are as follows for the years 1918 and 1919 :-

Taikoo Dockyard and Eng. Co., Ld., Hongkong and Whampoa Dock Co., Ld., W. S. Bailey & Co.,

Kwong Tuck Cheong,

Lau Sum Kee,..

1918.

2 vessels of 3,456 gross tons and 1,700 I.H.P.

6

6

""

2

31

1

""

5,489 150 1,723 1,030

5,810

19

200

"2

11

900

480

وو

""

Total,..

.17 vessels of 11,848 gross tons and 9,090 I.H.P.

1919.

Taikoo Dockyard and Eng. Co., Ld..... Hongkong & Whampoa Dock Co., Ld., W. S. Bailey & Co.,... Kwong Tuck Cheong,

6 vessels of 22,311 gross tons and 14,450 I.H.P.

9

""

8

"

2

17,415 700 948

27

29

13,975 1,750 800

29

>>

"

22

"

Total,..

25 vessels of 41,374 gross tons and 30,975 I.H.P.

Sugar Refineries.-1919 was a good year. Demand from China was consistent, at steadily advancing prices, with the excep- tion of a period of one to two months during the summer, when heavy speculation destroyed all confidence in the market. During the latter part of the year the incidence of the Japanese boycott threw an unusually heavy demand on all other sources of supply, thus adding a stimulus to an already brisk demand for Hongkong Refineds. As a matter of interest, prices of raw sugar in Java rose from f. 13 in January to f. 42 at the end of December.

15

India and the Persian Gulf, in common with markets the world over, have felt the pinch of a general shortage of supply, and there were demands from all sources for Refineds, much in excess of Hongkong's capacity for export.

Yarn.-The quantity of Yarn imported into the Colony during 1919 was greater than during any of the war years, and the market on the whole kept very steady.

Yarn prices dropped slightly at the commencement of the year and reached their lowest in April/May, when 10s. Yarn was sold at $190 per bale. The price then advanced and at the end of the year business was done at over $260. Yarn of higher counts, say 20s., rose from $260 to $365.

The total quantity of Indian Yarn imported during the year amounted to 142,000 bales, and 22,000 bales were brought forward from the previous year.

Clearances were very good and totalled 147,000 bales, leaving a carry over of 17,000 bales.

Speaking generally, the year has been a profitable one for both merchants and dealers.

Cotton.-Liverpool Cotton in January was quoted at 20'04d. per lb. for spot and during the end of the month it receded a few points and steadily declined until about the end of March it was quoted at 15'86d. for ready and 13'61d. for forward. It then rose steadily, with very few set-backs, until the end of July when it was quoted at 21:44d. for spot, 21:71d. and 21·79d. for September/Octo- ber respectively. It again declined and during September it touched as low as 17-60d. for spot. After reaching this point it again firmed up and steadily advanced to 27′50d. at which it was quoted at the end of the year.

The year opened with Exchange at 3/4. It declined slowly until by the beginning of March it reached 3/02. It then reacted and has steadily risen with a few fluctuations until at the close of the year T/Ts. on London were quoted at 4/101.

Trading has been rendered somewhat difficult by the various alterations in the value of the Rupee which in January was equi- valent to 1/6 and rose at the end of the year to 2/5.

Rope Making.--The demand for Manila Cordage was fairly good but the total turnover showed a falling off from that of the previous twelve months. The high rates of exchange and freight which ruled throughout the year affected considerably our exports to gold standard countries.

Cement Manufacture.-The demand continued good during the year and tonnage was more plentiful. The high exchange again interfered to a very large extent with exports to gold standard countries. On the whole the turnover compared favourably with the last three years.

16

(ii.)-Under Chinese Management.

Tin. This trade showed a decrease as compared with that in 1918. Imports from Yunnan during the year amounted to about 6,800 tons and from Kwangsi to about 200 tons as against 12,500 tons and 200 tons respectively in 1918. From Java 320 tons were imported and from the Straits 2,000 tons.

During the year about 250 tons were exported to Japan, 4,200 tons to Shanghai and other China Coast Ports, and 900 tons to Europe, Canada, and the United States of America.

Rattan and Fibre Furniture.-During 1919 the value of rattan and fibre furniture exported from this port increased from $10,000 to $380,000. The value of Rattan Canes exported was about $200,000 and that of Rattan Core and Seagrass was $400,000 and $80,000 respectively.

1918.

Native Tobacco. This trade was a little better than that in

Tinned Goods.-The volume of business done during the year showed a slight increase over that done in 1918.

Samshu.

··Vinegar.

in 1918.

}The volume of business was about the same as that

Knitted Vests and Socks.-The volume of business increased by 10%, and prices went up about 5%.

Leather and Hides.-The trade in these articles showed a slight increase.

Ginger and Preserves.-There was a falling off of about 40% in this trade.

Soy. During 1919 this trade showed a marked improvement, the total exports having increased to 4,400 casks from 400 casks. This was due to the improvement of shipping conditions.

Paper. Owing to large imports from America, prices in 1919 went down about 10%. Imports from Japan declined about 20%, and the total imports into this port by about 60%.

Vermilion. This trade was about the same as that in 1918.

Lard. This trade showed a great increase in 1919 as the result of great demand from Europe and South America.

(c.)-FISHERIES.

A considerable proportion of the boat population of Hongkong supports itself by deep-sea fishing, in which pursuit a large number of junks are engaged. The villages of Aberdeen, Stanley, Shauki- wan, and also many in the New Territories, are largely dependent upon this industry for their prosperity. Fresh water fish is im-

17

ported from Canton and the West River. There are oyster beds of considerable value in Deep Bay.

(d.)-FORESTRY, AGRICULTURE, AND BOTANY.

About 16,000 pine tree seedlings were planted on the hills in the vicinity of the Fanling Golf Course and 6,450 on Cheung Chau Island.

On the hills east of the Fanling Golf Course, pine trees were sown in situ to produce 50,000 trees.

At Aberdeen, 5,960 pine tree seed sites were re-sown.

On the Fanling hills, 100 lbs. of pine tree seeds were sown broadcast, 50 lbs. on the upper part of the hills between Beacon Hill and Lion Rock on the south side, and 40 lbs. on the north side. Six and half pounds were sown on the new grassy banks of the Chinwan coastal road.

About 9,000 pine tree seedlings were raised in nurseries for planting in 1920.

Two thousand four hundred and fifty-five (2,455) broad-leaved trees were planted on the hills at Fanling, 3,493 on Cheung Chau Island, 718 near the new Pokfulam Filter Beds, 800 on Chinwan Police Station Hill, 60 on Mount Gough, and 48 in Kowloon Tong Cemetery.

Two hundred and twenty (220) Ficus creepers were also planted in Kowloon Tong Cemetery, 64 near Sukun po New Recreation Ground, and 135 on Findlay Road.

In Hongkong and Kowloon, 632 flowering trees and shrubs were planted in the vicinity of roads.

Trees which had failed along the Taipo - Castle Peak Road were replaced by others.

Between Autau and Castle Peak, 1,450 Melaleuca were planted on the side of the road which had been recently widened.

Sixty-three (63) broad-leaved trees were planted along the completed portion of the Frontier Road.

The Lok Ma Chow Road, which was completed in 1918, was planted up with 172 Candle-nut trees.

Owing to the widening of the Sheungshui Road 22 trees had to be transplanted.

Planting was continued along the Cheungshawan - Castle Peak coastal road, and 1,993 trees of various kinds were put in.

One hundred and thirty-two (132) Camphor and 10-Celtis trees were planted between the 4th mile on the Taipo Road and the level- crossing at Shatin, and on the banks of the road 260 flowering shrubs.

19

No. 11, and the Agricultural Lots in Ma Tau Chung and Ma Tau Wei Villages.

The total area of land granted during the year was 163 acres of which 127 acres were situated in the New Territories. The total area of land resumed was 89 acres.

In the Northern District of the New Territories nearly all the sites on the Taipo Fishpond Reclamation have been taken up and several excellent buildings erected. A few European houses have been erected in the neighbourhood of Sheung Shui and Kam Tsin.

In the Southern District the demand for land has been normal but there are signs of the increasing popularity of Cheung Chau as a summer resort and consequent activity in building.

{

III-LEGISLATION.

Twenty-three (23) Ordinances were passed during 1919 of which six were amendments of previous Ordinances.

The most important matters with which these Ordinances dealt

were:-

The Union Insurance Society of Canton Limited (Capital Con- version) (No. 4).

The British Traders Insurance Company Limited (Capital Conversion) (No. 5).

The Bank of Canton Limited (Capital Conversion) (No. 6). These are private enactments which were passed for converting their silver capital into gold.

The Cheung Chau (Residence) (No. 14)-a measure for reserving the southern portion of the island known as Dumb-bell Island for residence of missionaries and other persons subject to the consent of the Governor in Council being obtained.

The Sugar Convention (No. 19), the object being to relieve both the Imperial Government and the Colonial Administration from their obligations under the Brussels' Sugar Convention.

The Rice (No. 20), the object of which is for the acquisition and disposal of Rice by the Hongkong Government, and for vali- dating acts previously done.

The Places of Public Entertainment Regulation (No. 22).—This is a consolidating and amending Ordinance. The principal amendments effected are to render public cinematograph displays subject to permits being granted.

Matters in connection with the War were:-

The Non-Ferrous Metal Industry (No. 1), the object of which is to prevent former enemies from making attacks on essential

20

businesses and on the possession of essential raw materials when the war comes to an end and when they shall cease to be of the status of enemies.

The Banking Business (Prohibited Control) (No. 2).

The Termination of the Present War (Definition) (No. 9).

The Trading with the Enemy Amendment (No. 11).

The "China Companies" Custodian (No. 12).

The Rating (Special War Rate) Amendment (No. 15).

The Enemy Aliens Restriction (No. 16).

The Military Service Repeal (No. 23).

IV.-EDUCATION.

No important changes have taken place in the Education Department during the year under review. The Staff has been depleted by causes due to the war, but the deficiency has been met in part by the appointment of Mistresses resident in the Colony.

The total number of pupils at schools in the Colony excluding the Police School and the uncontrolled schools in the New Terri- tories are:-

Number of Pupils.

English

Total.

Vernacular

Schools.

Schools.

Government Schools,

2,881

2.881

Military Schools, -

129

129

ExcludedPrivate Schools,

458

26

484

Grant Schools,

1,896

1.787

3,683

Controlled Private

Schools,

3,309

12,344

15,653

Controlled

Private

Schools, New Terri-

tories,

1,151

1,151

Technical Institute, -

471

471

Total,

9,144

15,308

24,452

The most important schools, apart from the excluded schools, are Queen's College for Chinese, four District Schools its feeders, and the Belilios Public School for Chinese girls. There is an Indian School of growing importance now housed in a new building pre- sented to the Colony by Sir Ellis Kadoorie. Kowloon School and Victoria School for children of British parentage have an average attendance of 117. There is also a school for the children of

20

businesses and on the possession of essential raw materials when the war comes to an end and when they shall cease to be of the status of enemies.

The Banking Business (Prohibited Control) (No. 2).

The Termination of the Present War (Definition) (No. 9).

The Trading with the Enemy Amendment (No. 11).

The "China Companies" Custodian (No. 12).

The Rating (Special War Rate) Amendment (No. 15).

The Enemy Aliens Restriction (No. 16).

The Military Service Repeal (No. 23).

IV.-EDUCATION.

No important changes have taken place in the Education Department during the year under review. The Staff has been depleted by causes due to the war, but the deficiency has been met in part by the appointment of Mistresses resident in the Colony.

The total number of pupils at schools in the Colony excluding the Police School and the uncontrolled schools in the New Terri- tories are:-

Number of Pupils.

English

Total.

Vernacular

Schools.

Schools.

Government Schools,

2,881

2.881

Military Schools, -

129

129

ExcludedPrivate Schools,

458

26

484

Grant Schools,

1,896

1.787

3,683

Controlled Private

Schools,

3,309

12,344

15,653

Controlled

Private

Schools, New Terri-

tories,

1,151

1,151

Technical Institute, -

471

471

Total,

9,144

15,308

24,452

The most important schools, apart from the excluded schools, are Queen's College for Chinese, four District Schools its feeders, and the Belilios Public School for Chinese girls. There is an Indian School of growing importance now housed in a new building pre- sented to the Colony by Sir Ellis Kadoorie. Kowloon School and Victoria School for children of British parentage have an average attendance of 117. There is also a school for the children of

22

The University is composed of three Faculties: 1.-Medical, which offers ample facilities for the practice of medicine. The medical laboratories were the gifts of various Hongkong Chinese residents. There is a large staff of instructors in medicine and all the principal medical practitioners in Hongkong give lectures at the University. Clinical work is carried on at the Government Civil and Tung Wah Hospitals. The degrees are recognised for registration in Great Britain by the General Medical Council. 2.-Arts. The establishment of this Faculty was largely due to the munificence of a Chinese gentleman in the Straits Settlements (Mr. Cheung Pat-sze). Its special object is to provide training suitable to those who desire to enter the public service or the higher branches of mercantile life. The course of instruction comprises English and Chinese literature, political and constitutional history, political economy, jurisprudence, international and commercial law, psychology, the school practice of education and history of educational theories. 3.-Engineering. This Faculty is divided into three branches-Civil, Electrical, and Mechanical. The University has an exceptionally large equipment of machinery and apparatus, and has a number of laboratories and workshops. There is practically no place in China where students have such an opportunity of seeing all kinds of machinery in actual working and of learning their practical management. Several graduates have obtained an Honour's Degree awarded by the Examiners of the London University.

The University insists upon all students having a proper know- ledge of their own language although instruction at the University is carried out in English. Students are required to pass an exaimina- tion in written Chinese before entering, and two Chinese Professors. both Hanlin graduates, give lectures on the classics and history of China.

V. PUBLIC WORKS.

The extension of the Central Police Station was practically completed and the extension of the Harbour Office building to accommodate the Imports and Exports Department made good progress. Another storey was added to the Public Works Depart- ment Annexe, making the building a 3-storied one, and a similar addition to the European Lunatic Asylum to provide quarters for the warders was practically completed, that portion of the building hitherto occupied as quarters being utilized for the accommodation of patients. The erection of quarters for European Officers on Leighton Hill and the formation of sites for Senior Officers' Quarters on Mount Gough were begun.

A second block of quarters (6 houses) in Kowloon for Subordinate Officers was completed as was also a market at Tai O.

The additional service reservoir and filter beds for the supply of the western section of the City were completed and the laying of a new 18" main from Bowen Road to the Monument, Happy Valley, to improve the supply of water to the eastern section of the City was begun.

23

The laying of the new 18" supply main from the Kowloon Storage Reservoir to Yaumati was resumed towards the close of the year, a large number of the pipes required having arrived from England.

The widening and improvement of the old road, extending from the Aberdeen Paper Mills to near Little Hongkong Village, where it joins the new road, constructed in 1915, was completed and extensive improvements to the old Pokfulam Road, extending from the University to Aberdeen Docks, were undertaken. The new road from Repulse Bay to a point about half a mile east of Stanley and the widening and improvement of the old road from this point onwards to Taitam Tuk Dam and also from Taitam Gap to Shaukiwan were practically completed. The construction of a new road traversing the hillside in Wong Nei Chong Valley and extending to Bowen Road was well advanced. The widening of the eastern portion of Bowen Road and the construction of a new road from Bowen Road to Wanchai Gap were undertaken. The extension of Lugard Road to High West Gap, where it will join Harlech Road, was also undertaken. The new road from Shanghai Street, Kowloon, to the southern portion of the Taikoktsui Peninsula was completed and another new road from Kowloon City Road to the China Light and Power Company's new Station and the Dock Company's new houses at Tai Wan Bay was begun.

In the New Territories, extensive improvements in that portion of the Tai Po Road between the 9th and 18th milestones were still in progress.

The new coastal road from Tsün Wan to Castle Peak Bay was completed, thus rendering available for motor traffic a circular route 57 miles in length.

'Beaconsfield Arcade" was resumed by Government at a cost of $275,000 as was also Rural Building Lot 111, adjoining "Victoria Hospital". The last-mentioned building was resumed in connection with contemplated extensions of the Hospital. A com- mencement was made with the resumptions required in connection with the widening of Queen's Road East and of that portion of Wanchai Road extending from Queen's Road to Praya East.

Arrangements were made for the resumption of Kowloon Farm Lot No. 11 to enable Coronation Road to be extended northwards and the resumptions required in connection with the road improve- ment schemes mentioned in last year's Report were continued.

The work of providing scavenging lanes continues, compensa- tion being paid where necessary.

The Shamshuipo Improvement Scheme made good progress, the demolition of old village houses and construction of new houses fronting on good, wide roads being continued.

The new ferry services from various points along the City front to Yaumati, Mongkoktsui and Shamshuipo were inaugurated on the 1st January.

The re-grading of the upper portion of the Peak Tramway was completed, the depressors hitherto in use near Barker Road being abolished.

25

The Local Passengers carried were as follows

Main Line

Fanling Branch

1917. 1918. 1919.

277,968 296,379 345,314

55,211 45,187 48,917

VI.-GOVERNMENT AND AIDED INSTITUTIONS.

(a.)-HOSPITALS.

Government Hospitals consist of the Civil Hospital, to which is attached an isolated Maternity Hospital, the Victoria Hospital for Women and Children, and the Kennedy Town Infectious Dis- eases Hospital. There is an Observation Station capable of accom- modating 1,500 persons in the event of an outbreak of infectious disease on board a ship arriving in the Harbour.

The Civil Hospital contains 166 beds in 20 wards. 3,926 in- patients and 22,446 out-patients were treated during 1919 as against 3,677 and 14,480 respectively in 1918. 218 cases of malarial fever were admitted as against 211 in 1918 and 361 in 1917. The total cases of malaria for all Government Hospitals and the Tung Wa Hospital shows an increase of 246 cases as compared with the year 1918. The Maternity Hospital contains 12 beds for Europeans and 4 for Asiatics. 460 confinements occurred during the year as against 377 in 1918. The Victoria Hospital at the Peak contains 41 beds, and during 1919, 206 patients were under treat- ment there. At Kennedy Town Hospital, which contains 26 beds, 54 cases were treated in 1919, all being infectious.

(b.)-LUNATIC ASYLUM.

The Asylum is under the direction of the Superintendent of the Civil Hospital. European and Chinese patients are separated, the European portion containing 8 beds in separte wards and the Chinese portion 16 beds. 207 patients of all races were treated during 1919 and there were 8 deaths.

(e.)-THE TUNG WA AND OTHER CHINESE HOSPITALS.

The Tung Wa Hospital, opened in 1872, is mainly supported by the voluntary subscriptions of Chinese, but receives an annual grant of $8,000 from the Government. Only Chinese are treated in this institution. Various other services not appertaining to a hospital are performed by the institution, such as the free burial of the poor, the repatriation of destitutes, and the organisation of charitable relief in emergencies. Chinese as well as European methods of treatment are employed in accordance with the wishes expressed by the patients or their friends. About half the number are now treated by Western methods. The hospital is managed by a committee of Chinese gentlemen annually elected, their appoint- ment being submitted to the Governor for confirmation. It is under the supervision of a visiting physician, who is a member of

26

the Medical Department, whilst two Chinese house surgeons, trained in Western medicine, are members of the hospital staff. There are 323 beds in the buildings and 7,002 patients were accommodated during 1919.

The Tung Wa also maintain a branch hospital for small-pox cases (Chinese only) at Kennedy Town. It contains 58 beds and during 1919, 4 cases were treated.

The Alice Memorial and Affiliated Hospitals are managed and controlled by the missionaries resident in Hongkong, agents of the London Missionary Society, and consist of the Alice Memorial Hospital opened in 1887, the Nethersole Hospital opened in 1893. the Alice Memorial Maternity Hospital opened in 1904, and the Ho Miu Ling Hospital opened in 1906. The number of in-patients in 1919 was 1,395 and the expenditure $27,570.42. The number of labours in the Maternity Hospital was 403. The Government makes a grant of $300 per annum to these Hospitals.

To avoid the complete seclusion from friends and relatives, which removal of Chinese plague patients to the Kennedy Town Infectious Diseases Hospital entailed, four District Plague Hospitals are now maintained by the Chinese in various parts of the Colony. These hospitals are under the management of the Chinese Public Dispensaries Committee.

The new Kwong Wa Hospital for Chinese in the Kowloon Peninsula was opened on the 9th October, 1911. It occupies a site having an area of three acres and provides accommodation for 210 patients. The existing buildings contain 70 beds and 3,313 patients were accommodated during 1919. The collection of sub- scriptions and the supervision of the building were undertaken by a special committee under the chairmanship of the Secretary for Chinese Affairs. The hospital receives a grant of $8,500 per annum from the Government.

As will be noticed from the remarks made under the heading Education the Hongkong University is also an Aided Institution.

VII-INSTITUTIONS NOT SUPPORTED BY GOVERNMENT.

One of the most important institutions in the Colony not sup- ported by the Government is the Matilda Hospital, which stands on a commanding site of nearly three acres at Mount Kellet in the Hill District. An account of this hospital will be found in the report for 1917.

Among institutions recognised and encouraged, but not to any considerable extent supported by Government may be mentioned the Pó Leung Kuk, the Eyre Refuge, the City Hall, and the Chinese Public Dispensaries.

The Pó Leung Kuk is a Chinese Society founded in 1878 for the suppression of kidnapping and traffic in human beings. It was incorporated in 1893 and is presided over by the Secretary for

26

the Medical Department, whilst two Chinese house surgeons, trained in Western medicine, are members of the hospital staff. There are 323 beds in the buildings and 7,002 patients were accommodated during 1919.

The Tung Wa also maintain a branch hospital for small-pox cases (Chinese only) at Kennedy Town. It contains 58 beds and during 1919, 4 cases were treated.

The Alice Memorial and Affiliated Hospitals are managed and controlled by the missionaries resident in Hongkong, agents of the London Missionary Society, and consist of the Alice Memorial Hospital opened in 1887, the Nethersole Hospital opened in 1893. the Alice Memorial Maternity Hospital opened in 1904, and the Ho Miu Ling Hospital opened in 1906. The number of in-patients in 1919 was 1,395 and the expenditure $27,570.42. The number of labours in the Maternity Hospital was 403. The Government makes a grant of $300 per annum to these Hospitals.

To avoid the complete seclusion from friends and relatives, which removal of Chinese plague patients to the Kennedy Town Infectious Diseases Hospital entailed, four District Plague Hospitals are now maintained by the Chinese in various parts of the Colony. These hospitals are under the management of the Chinese Public Dispensaries Committee.

The new Kwong Wa Hospital for Chinese in the Kowloon Peninsula was opened on the 9th October, 1911. It occupies a site having an area of three acres and provides accommodation for 210 patients. The existing buildings contain 70 beds and 3,313 patients were accommodated during 1919. The collection of sub- scriptions and the supervision of the building were undertaken by a special committee under the chairmanship of the Secretary for Chinese Affairs. The hospital receives a grant of $8,500 per annum from the Government.

As will be noticed from the remarks made under the heading Education the Hongkong University is also an Aided Institution.

VII-INSTITUTIONS NOT SUPPORTED BY GOVERNMENT.

One of the most important institutions in the Colony not sup- ported by the Government is the Matilda Hospital, which stands on a commanding site of nearly three acres at Mount Kellet in the Hill District. An account of this hospital will be found in the report for 1917.

Among institutions recognised and encouraged, but not to any considerable extent supported by Government may be mentioned the Pó Leung Kuk, the Eyre Refuge, the City Hall, and the Chinese Public Dispensaries.

The Pó Leung Kuk is a Chinese Society founded in 1878 for the suppression of kidnapping and traffic in human beings. It was incorporated in 1893 and is presided over by the Secretary for

27

Chinese Affairs and not more than nine directors nominated by the Governor. The actual management is entrusted to a committee. elected annually by the members of the Society. The Society's buildings have been declared a Refuge under the Women and Girls. Protection Ordinance, and almost all women and girls detained by the Secretary for Chinese Affairs under that Ordinance are sent to the Pó Leung Kuk. During 1919 the number of persons admitted was 476 and at the close of the year 62 remained under the care of the Society. The inmates are under the immediate charge of a Chinese matron, and instruction is given them by the matron and a Chinese teacher in elementary subjects and in needlework.

The Eyre Diocesan Refuge is an institution, under mission auspices, founded for rescue work among the Chinese.

It was housed in the Belilios Reformatory up to the outbreak of war, but the work is at present carried on at Kowloon City.

A small grant is made by the Government.

The City Hall receives an annual grant of $1,200 from Govern- ment. It contains a theatre, some large rooms which are used for balls, meetings, concerts, etc., a museum in which are some very fair specimens, and a large reference and lending library, to which new volumes are added from time to time, as funds will allow. building was erected in 1866-9 by subscription.

The

Small grants are also given to the Italian Convent, the French Convent, (both of which take in and tend abandoned or sick infants), the West Point Orphange, the Seamen's Hospital, and other chari- table institutions.

The Chinese Public Dispensaries are institutions maintained in order to provide the Chinese with the services of doctors, whose certificates will be accepted by the Registrar of Deaths, and with the services of interpreters, who can assist the inmates of houses, where a case of infectious disease has occurred. Coolies are engaged and ambulances and dead vans provided in order to remove cases of infectious disease to the Infectious Diseases Hospital and dead bodies to the Mortuary. The Dispensaries receive sick infants and send them to one or other of the Convents and arrange for the burial of dead infants. Free advice and medicine are given and patients are attended at their houses. There are eight Dispensaries in existence. The total cost of maintenance was $45,363.83 for the year 1919. The Government makes an annual grant of $7,000, and the rest of the cost is defrayed by voluntary subscription. The Dispen- saries are conducted by committees under the chairmanship of the Secretary for Chinese Affairs.

VIII.

CRIMINAL AND POLICE.

The total of all cases reported to the Police was 10,542 being an increase of 2,093 or 24-77 per cent. as compared with 1918. There was in 1919 an increase in serious offences of 958 or 26.77 per cent. as compared with the previous year. The number of

!

28

serious offences reported was 900 over the average of the quinquen- nial period commencing with the year 1915. The number of minor offences reported shows an increase of 1,135 as compared with 1918 and was 214 below the average of the quinquennial period.

The total strength of the Police Force in 1919 was Europeans 159, Indians 477, Chinese 592, making a total of 1,228 (the same number as in 1918) exclusive of the five superior officers and staff of clerks and coolies. These figures include police paid for by the Railway and other Government Departments. Of this force 15 Europeans, 128 Indians, and 51 Chinese were stationed in the New Territories during the year.

During the year 1919, 46 members of the Hongkong Police Force returned to the Colony from active service, and resumed their police duties. There are still 5 men who have not yet returned.

The District Watchmen Force, numbering 100, to which the Government contributes $2,000 per annum, was well supported by the Chinese during the year. These watchmen patrol the streets in the Chinese quarter of the City. They are placed on police beats and are supervised by the European police on section patrol.

The total number of persons committed to Victoria Gaol was 5,212 as compared with 3,577 in 1918. Of these 2,552 were committed for criminal offences against 1,498 in 1918. Of committals for non- criminal offences there were 150 more for hawking without a licence, and 19 more for unlawfully boarding steamers, than in 1918.

The daily average of prisoners confined in the Gaol was 756, the average for 1918 being 601, and the highest previous average being 726 in 1904. The percentage of prisoners to population, according to the daily average of the former and the estimated number of the latter, was 015. The average percentage for the last ten years was 0-12. Owing, however, to the large floating population, which is constantly moving between the Colony and Canton, the percentage of crime to population does not convey an accurate idea of the comparative criminality of the residents of the Colony. The Gaol has accommodation for 707 prisoners.

The prison discipline was satisfactory, the average of punish- ments per prisoner being 0·96 as compared with 105 in 1918 and 1.36 in 1917.

Long sentence prisoners serving two years and upwards are taught useful trades, including printing, book-binding, tin-smithing, mat-making, tailoring, carpentering, etc. The profit on the work done was $67,735 as against $69,202 in 1918. A sum of $3,363 was received and credited to Government for non-Government work as against $3,954 in 1918.

29

IX.-VITAL STATISTICS.

(a.)-POPULATION.

The civil population of the Colony, according to the Census taken on May 20th, 1911, was 456,739, of whom 104,287 reside in the New Territories and in New Kowloon; at the Census taken in 1906 it was 301,967 exclusive of the New Territories and of New Kowloon. The estimated total population at the middle of the year under review was 596,100, but this includes the New Territories; and, as the birth and death figures given below do not include those from this area (with the exception of New Kowloon), the population for the purposes of calculating these rates is estimated at 499,000, of whom 13,600 were Non-Chinese.

The distribution of population estimated to the middle of 1919 was as follows:-

Non-Chinese Civil Community,

13,600

Chinese

Population.

City of Victoria (including Peak),....

320,080

Villages of Hongkong,

16,520

Kowloon (including New Kowloon),...

86,550

New Territories,

97,100

Population afloat,

64,250

Total Chinese Population,

584,500

598,100

Total Civil Population,

(b.)-PUBLIC HEALTH AND SANITATION.

The activity in building operations, which has been so notice- able a feature since 1912, has not abated, and the demand for housing accommodation by the Chinese continued to be greatly in excess of the supply, as many of those who fled with their families to Hongkong during 1911, 1912, and 1913 elected to remain in the Colony.

The birth-rate for the year was 39 per 1,000 among the Chinese community and 206 per 1,000 among the Non-Chinese community, as compared with 3-6 and 22.1 for 1918.

The death-rate for the year was 233 per 1,000 among the Chinese community and 199 among the Non-Chinese civil com- munity, as compared with 296 and 19-5 for 1918.

The number of deaths from Malaria (319) shows a decrease on the previous year (398). The deaths of Chinese from this cause in the City of Victoria numbered 101 out of a population of 320,080 or a rate of 0.3 per 1,000 per annum.

The deaths from Plague numbered 426 as compared with 251 in 1918.

Small-pox deaths numbered 15, all Chinese.

There were 3,049 deaths from respiratory diseases as compared with 3,316 in 1918; and 74 of these were among the Non-Chinese community. Pulmonary Tuberculosis claimed 980 Chinese and 26

30

Non-Chinese victims whilst other forms of Tuberculosis represent an additional 539 deaths making a total of 1,545 or 132 per cent. of the total deaths among the community.

Beri-beri was responsible for 555 deaths, as compared with 804 during 1918 and 654 in 1917. During the past few years circulars have been distributed to all large employers of coolie labour calling their attention to the fact that Beri-beri is produced by the consumption of white rice as the staple article of diet with- out a sufficiency of other foods, and advising that beans should be supplied with the rice, when fresh meat or fresh fish cannot be. afforded.

A tabular statement of the principal causes of death is appended.

(c.)-CLIMATE.

The principal features of the weather in 1919 were:

(a) The large departures from normal from month to month in atmospheric pressure, temperature, and wind.

(b) A typhoon, which produced a wind velocity of 60 m.p.h. at 7 p.m. on the 22nd, and a squall at the rate of 84 m.p.h. at 1h 17m. p.m. on the 22nd, although the centre passed about 150 miles to the South-West of Hongkong,

(c) Heat waves from June 15th to July 3rd, July 8th to 25th, July 31st to August 9th, and August 12th to 17th.

Barometric pressure was moderately above normal in February, July and December, and considerably above in September. It was considerably below in June and August. In the latter month it was 29 530ins, or the lowest on record except in 1911 when it was 29-521ins.. The mean pressure for the year at station level was 29-842 as against 29847ins. in 1918, and 29 844ins. for the past 36 years. The highest pressure was 30-398ins. on February 4th as against 30-391ius. in 1918 and 30-509ins for the past 36 years. The lowest pressure was 29-287ins on August 26th as against 29·108ins. in 1918 and 28 735ins. for the past 36 years.

The temperature of the air was considerably above normal in March and April, and moderately above in June. It was moderately below in February, October, November, and December. The mean temperature for the year was 72°.2 as against 71°-2 in 1918 and 71°3 for the past 36 years. The highest temperature was 92°2 on August 1st as against 91°-2 in 1918 and 97°0 for the past 36 years. The lowest temperature was 39° 4 on February 4th as against 42°1 in 1918 and 32°0 for the past 36 years.

The rainfall was moderately above normal in July and August, and moderately below normal in May, June, and September. The total for the year was 76-140ins. as against 101605ins. in 1918, and 83 620ins. for the past 36 years. The greatest fall in one civil day was 4795ins, on July 5th and the greatest in one hour was 1.350ins. between 5 a.m. and 6 a.m, on October 1st.

:

31

The wind velocity was considerably below normal from February to June and from September to December. It was moderately above in July and August. The mean velocity for the year was 114 m.p.h. as against 116 m.p.h. in 1918 and 127 m.p.h. for the past 36 years.

The maximum velocity for one hour as recorded by the Beckley Anemograph was 60 miles at 7 p.m. on August 22nd as against 63 miles in 1918 and 108 for the past 35 years. The maximum squall velocity, as recorded by the Dines Baxendell Anemograph, was at the rate of 84 m.p.h. at 1h 17m. p.m. on August 22nd as against 94 m.p.h. in 1918 and 105 m.p.h. for the past 9

years.

The climate of Hongkong is similar in its bread features to that of Kowloon and the New Territories, but at the higher levels, from 1,400 to 1,800 feet above sea level the temperature is usually from 3° to 6° lower than at the Observatory, Kowloon. The humidity is usually greater than in Kowloon and approaches saturation for several days at a time during March and April when mist is very prevalent. In summer the city of Victoria, and the rising terraces behind it, derive little or no benefit from the SW monsoon, being sheltered by steep hills from SE to SW. In winter it is exposed to the NE monsoon, which occasionally blows along the harbour through Lyemun Pass, with considerable violence. On the other hand the South-west side of the Island is protected from the NE monsoon in winter and enjoys the benefit of the SW monsoon in

summer.

X-POSTAL AND TELEGRAPH SERVICES.

The total Revenue from the Postal Service in 1919 amounted to $450,056.75, being $22,923.87 more than that collected in 1918. The net expenditure amounted to $103,931.64, being less than that of 1918 by $52,176.05. The balance of revenue over expenditure amounted to $346,125.11.

The revenue collected in 1919 from radio-telegrams amounted to $10,350.03, being $13,661.22 less than that collected in 1918. Advices of vessels signalled at the Lighthouses yielded $470.40 and semaphore messages $15.40, making a total of $10,835.83 for the Telegraph Service. The expenditure amounted to $34,150.81. The number of radio-telegrams forwarded during the year was 1,116 consisting of 15,577 words, and 2,825 received consisting of 37,121 words.

28th November, 1920.

A. G. M. FLETCHER,

Colonial Secretary.

Light Dues.

HEADS OF REVENUE.

Light Dues, Special Assessment

Appendi

FINANCIAL RETURNS FC

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF THE REVENUE AND EXPENDI

Estimates, 1919.

Actual Revenue to

31st Dec., 1919.

Revenue for

same

period of preceding Year.

Increase.

Decrease.

Licences and Internal Revenue not otherwise specified

Fees of Court or Office, Payments for specific purposes,

and Reimbursements in Aid

Post Office

Kowloon-Canton Railway

$

45,000

74,545.18

52,816.92

21,728.26

55,000

83,973.11 63,105.94

20,867.17

13,705,250 12,865,534.22 15,201,189.31

845,810 1,013,207.61 913,793.76 99,413.85

433,500

460,892.58 451,586.48

9,306.10

A

2,335,655.09

435,200

490,092.77 433,274.43 56,818.34

J1

Р

Rent of Government Property, Land, and Houses

994,900

1,041,431.01 1,010,245.71 31,185.30

Interest

Miscellaneous Receipts

48,000

112,798.43 99,302.02

13,496.41

S

B

E

121,555 118,539.76 140,644.61

22,104.85

M

P

P.

TOTAL, (exclusive of Land Sales)

16,684,215 16,261,014.67 18,365,959.18 252,815.432,357,759.94

K

Ci

P

Land Sales, (Premia on New Leases)

200,000 263,960.23 299,289.23

35,329.00

C:

TOTAL,

Deduct

Net...

16,884,215 16,524,974.90 18,665,248.41

252,815.43 2,393,088.94

252,815-43

$ 2,140,273-51

Appendix A.

FINANCIAL RETURNS FOR THE YEAR 1919.

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF THE REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE FOR THE PERIOD ENDED 31ST DEC

Revenue for

DS OF REVENUE.

Estimates, 1919.

Actual Revenue to 31st Dec.,

same

1919.

period of preceding Year.

Increase.

Decrease.

HEADS OF EXPENDITURE.

sessment

$

45,000

74,545.18 52,816.92

21,728.26

Governor

Colonial Secretary's Department and Legislature

55,000 83,973.11 63,105.94

20,867.17

Revenue not otherwise specified

13,705,250 12,865,534.22 15,201,189.31

Secretariat for Chinese Affairs

Audit Department .

2,335,655.09

Treasury ...

:

ce, Payments for specific purposes,

ts in Aid

845,810 1,013,207.61 913,793.76

99,413.85

Harbour Master's Department

Imports & Exports Department ..

433,500 460,892.58 451,586.48

9,306.10

Royal Observatory

Miscellaneous Services...

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

'ay

435,200 490,092.77 433,274.43 56,818.34

operty, Land, and Houses

994,900 1,041,431.01 1,010,245.71 31,185.30

48,000 112,798.43 99,302.02 13,496.41

121,555 118,539.76 140,644.61

22,104.85

Judicial and Legal Departments...

Police and Prison Departments

Medical Departments

Sanitary Department

Botanical and Forestry Department

Education

Military Expenditure

Public Works Department

Do.

Recurrent

Do.

Extraordinary

Post Office

(exclusive of Land Şales)

16,684,215 16,261,014.67 18,365,959.18 252,815.43 2,357,759.94

1 New Leases)

TOTAL,

Deduct

Net...

:

200,000 263,960.23 299,289.23

35.329.00

Kowloon-Canton Railway

Charge on account of Public Debt

Pensions

16,884,215 16,524,974.90 18,665,248.41 252,815.43 2,393,088.94

Charitable Services

252,815.43

$ 2,140,273-51

TOTAL,

:

:

:

:

:

Deduct

Net

:

Appendix A.

¡CIAL RETURNS FOR THE YEAR 1919.

ENUE AND EXPENDITURE FOR THE PERIOD ENDED 31ST DECEMBER, 1919.

İncrease.

Decrease.

من

HEADS OF EXPENDITURE.

Estimates, 1919.

Actual Expenditure to 31st Dec., 1919.

Expenditure for same period of preceding Year.

Increase.

Decrease.

21,728.26

20,867.17

Governor

Colonial Secretary's Department and Legislature ...

Secretariat for Chinese Affairs

79,615.00 77,198.15

73,307.67 3,890.48

78,066.00 68,197.84 60,689.31 7,508.53

57,152.00 52,634-57 50,117.67

2,516.90

2,335,655.09

Audit Department ..

Treasury...

Harbour Master's Department

37,262.00 35,625.67 32,840.82 2,784.85

65,275.00 63,076.94 63,078.01

200,805.00 235,411.10 174,414.57 60,996.53

99,413.85

Imports & Exports Department .....

979,888.00 809,627.24 747,263.87 62,363-37

9,306.10

Royal Observatory

24,009.00

23,450.57 20,028.24

3,422.33

Miscellaneous Services...

1,711,107.00 5,532,810.60 | 5,676,571.24

56,818.34

Judicial and Legal Departments...

Police and Prison Departments

31,185.30

264,034.00 251,434.95 398,765.27

1,042,879.00 1,066,820.94 873,863.95

192,956.99

277,312.00 254,524.75 237,537-58

26,987.17

13,496.41

22,104.85

Medical Departments

Sanitary Department

Botanical and Forestry Department

Education

Military Expenditure

Public Works Department.

Do.

Recurrent

Do.

Extraordinary

Post Office

252,815.43 2,357,759.94

35,329.00

252,815-43 2,393.088.94

252,815-43

Kowloon-Canton Railway

Charge on account of Public Debt

Pensions

Charitable Services

TOTAL,

Deduct

$ 2,140,273-51

Net

:

:

:

:

:

:

410,956.00 384,873.00 370,169.59 14,703.41

53,763.00 51,457.65 59,456.26

398,958.00 357,806.43 343,418.50 14,387-93

3,328,630.00 3,580,463.812,788,721.77

1,001.39

791,742.04

467,165.00 391,382.64 375,202.62 16,180.02

1.07

143,760.64

147,330.32

702,000.00

822,509.87 712,675.37 109,834.50

2,610,450.00 2,235,002.95|1,578,149.12

656,853.83

289,772.00

181,208.42 138,224.68

42,983.74

479,965.00 437,592.45 387,275.67 50,316.78

826,769.00 749,649.66 783,391.04

33,741.38

249,000.00 217,510.30 228,401.56

10,891.26

43,064.00 68,638.60 44,623.75 24,014.85

$14,677,896.00 17,915,925.36 16,252,171.87 2,042,461.90 378,708.41

378,708.41

$1,663,753-49

Appendix A (1).

REPORT ON THE FINANCES FOR THE YEAR 1919.

REVENUE.

The total revenue for the year amounted to $16,524,975 being $359,240 less than the estimate and $2,140,273 less than the revenue in 1918. Compared with that year there were decreases under the heads Licences and Miscellaneous Receipts, the former head showing a drop of $2,335,655. All other heads showed increases.

2. The principal sub-heads showing excess over the estimate are as follows:-

(a) Assessed Taxes, ...

41,283

(b) Kowloon West Ferry Licences,...

108,900

(c) Stamps,

101,156

(d) Tobacco Duties,

118,906

(e) China Companies Fees,

43,992

(f) Postage,

40,057

(g) Land Sales, ...

63,960

The increases are due (a) to new assessment, (b) to new item of revenue, (c) to more Probate Duty, (d) to increased sales, (e) to new flotations, (f) to increase of business, and (g) to more lands being disposed of.

3. The principal deficits compared with the Estimates were :-

(a) Special War Rate,...

(b) Opium Monopoly,...

$548,287 696,965

Of these, (a) was due to the abolition of the tax at the half- year and (b) to decreased sales.

EXPENDITURE.

4. The total expenditure brought to account amounted to $17,915,925 being $3,238,029 more than the estimate, and $1,663,753 more than the expenditure in 1918.

Compared with the estimates there were savings under all heads except six.

Miscellaneous expenditure exceeded the estimate by $3,821,704 mainly on account of losses under the rice-control scheme. Loss on exchange accounted for a further $786,665 under the same head and Public Works Recurrent for $120,510.-

Decrease in Pensions ($31,490), Public Debt ($77,119), and in nearly all Departments were chiefly due to the rising exchange

A (1) 2-

while another factor was the absence of a large part of the staff, their salaries being charged to War Expenditure under Micellaneous Services.

5. The expenditure for the year exceeded the revenue by a sum of $1,390,950; with the result that the surplus balance decreased to $4,920,187.

6. The following statement shows the Liabilities and Assets on the 31st December, 1919 :-

LIABILITIES.

C.

ASSETS.

$. C.

Deposits not Available, 1,369,266.59

Subsidiary Coins, ... Advances, other items,

844,316.93

659,987.90

Postal Agencies,.....

74,320.32

Rice,......

956,839.13

22

Imprest,

12,488.25

Shipping Control A/c., 2,216,204.11

House Service A/c.,

4,402.14

Crown Agents' De-

Suspense Account,......

15.00

posit Account,.

375,308.64

Unallocated Stores,

Overdraft, Bank,.....

1,179,928.37

(P. W. D.),.........

205,368.91

Unallocated Stores,

Overdraft, Crown

(Railway),

207,519.94

-Agents' Current A/c., 35,220.25

Total Liabilities,... 4,874,954.64

Coal Account,

706,137.84

Investment Account,

5,192,772.86

Balance,

4,920,187.90

Total...... $9,165,142.54

Total,......$ 9,165,142.54

7. The following table shows the Revenue and Expenditure during the last five years :-

1915.

1916.

$9

1917.

$

1918.

1919.

$

$

Revenue,..

Expenditure, Surplus, Deficit,

11,786,107 13,833,386 15,058,105 15,149,268 11,079,914 14,090,828 2,753,472 967,277

18,665,248 16,524,975 16,252,172 17,915,925

2,413,076

3,363,161

1,390,950

PUBLIC DEBt.

8. The Inscribed Stock Loans of 1893 and 1906 amount to £1,485,732 and the Sinking Fund now stands at £310,469 being £26,866 more than the amount at credit of that fund at the end of 1918.

The local Loan (under Ordinance No. 12 of 1916) stands at $3,000,000 with a Sinking Fund of $224,720 and £80,628 sterling.

A (1) 3-

GENERAL REMARKS.

9. Except the abolition at the half-year of the Special War Rate there was no alteration of importance in taxation during 1919.

10. The total receipts and payments in the Treasury books during the year were $55,626,820 and $56,841,968 respectively. The figures not accounted for under revenue and expenditure relate to transactions under various heads such as Deposits, Advances, Subsidiary Coin, Unallocated Stores, etc.

·

11. Subsidiary coins in stock on the 31st December were as follows:-

50 cents,

20

10

5

""

""

Copper,

5,994

36,111

675,568

100,092

24,753

$843,118

The nominal amount of coins in circulation is $20,764,370, and the market value is now practically par.

12. The local circulation in December of notes of the three Banks having authorized issues was as follows:

Hongkong & Shanghai Banking Corporation, $24,874,290 Chartered Bank of India, Australia & China,

Mercantile Bank of India, Limited,

10,454,944

969,276

$36,298,510

$22,550,000

The specie in Reserve came to ...

13. The rate of exchange for the Estimates was taken at 3/- whereas the average rate for purposes of conversion in the Treasury books was 3/82.

5th June, 1920.

D. W. TRATMAN,

Treasurer.

*

Appendix B.

REPORT ON THE ASSESSMENT FOR THE YEAR 1920-1921.

1. By order of His Excellency the Governor in Council, I have made a new valuation of the whole Colony.

2. The Whole Colony.--The result of the new valuation is that the Rateable Value of the whole Colony has increased from $16,304,801 to $17,408,959, an addition of $1,104,158 or 677 per

cent.

3. The City of Victoria.-The Rateable Value has increased from $13,154,420 to $14,030,330, an addition of $875,910 or 6·65 per cent.

4. The Hill District.-The Rateable Value has increased from $342,745 to $344,315, an addition of $1,570 or 0'45 per cent.

5. Shaukiwan, Saiwanho, and Quarry Bay.-The Rateable Value has increased from $409,165 to $415,550, an addition of $6,385 or 156 per cent.

6. Hongkong Villages.-The Rateable Value has increased from $269,967 to $315,980, an addition of $46,013 or 17 04 per cent.

7. Kowloon Point:-The Rateable Value has increased from $709,665 to $733,815, an addition of $24,150 or 340 per cent.

8. Yaumati.-The Rateable Value has increased from $437,780 to $190,585, an addition of $52,805 or 12:06 per cent.

9. Mongkoktsui.-The Rateable Value has increased from $330,380 to $385,515, an addition of $55,135 or 16-68 per cent.

10. Hunghom and Hokun.-The Rateable Value has decreased from $395,080 to $394,290, a reduction of $790 or 0.19 per cent. The decrease is caused by a piece of land formerly used for storage of coal having been vacated.

11. Kowloon Villages.-The Rateable Value has increased from $112,509 to $138,909, an addition of $26,400 or 2346 per

cent.

12. New Kowloon.-The Rateable Value has increased from $143,090 to $159,670, an addition of $16,580 or 11:58 per cent.

13. Vacant Tenements.-The number of tenements reported to be vacant averaged about 80 monthly, as compared with 110 last year.

B 2

14. Interim Valuations.-Between 1st July, 1919, and 1st May, 1920, 927 Interim Valuations were made as follows:-

CITY OF VICTORIA. REST OF COLONY.

New Or rebuilt

No.

Rateable Value.

No.

Rateable

Value.

tenements

222

314,970 338

162,790

and tenements structurally altered

Assessments caucelled, tene-

ments resumed, pulled down or being in other respects not rateable............

Number and increase

191

196,630 176

45,623

413 $118,340 514 $117,167

15. The following Table gives a comparison of the Assessments for 1919-1920 and 1920-1921:

District.

Valuation Valuation 1919-1920. 1920-1921.

Increase.

Per

cent.

The City of Victoria

Hill District and Hongkong Villages

Kowloon Point and Kowloon Villages. with New Kowloon

$

%

13,154,420

14,030,330

875,910 6.65

1,021,877 1,075,845

53,968 5.28

2,128,504

2,302,784 174,280 8.18

Total,......$

16,304,801

17,408,959 1,104,158 6.77

B 3

16. Comparative Statement showing the Rateable Value of the Colony of Hongkong in each of the ten years from 1911-1912 to 1920-1921 inclusive :-

Year.

Rateable Value.

Increase Decrease as compared as compared

with pre-

with pre- vious year. vious year.

Percentage of

Increase or Decrease in Rateable Value

as compared with the previous year.

1911-12

11,161,390 79,211

1912-13

12,312,306 1,150,916

1913-14

12,435,812 123,506

%

0.71 Increase. 10'31 do.

1·03 do.

1914-15

14,410,103 1,974,291

15.87

do.

1915-16

14,287,285

122,818

0.85 Decrease.

1916-17

14,282,186

5,099

0.03 do.

1917-18

14,410,153 127,967

0'89 Increase.

1918-19

15,633,736 1,228,583

8.52

dó.

1919-20

16,304,801

666,065

4.25 do.

1920-21

17,408,959 1,104,158

6.77

do.

17. In the ten years 1911-1912 to 1920-1921 the Rateable Value has increased by $6,247,569 or 55 97 per cent. Since I took over the duties of Assessor in 1889 the Rateable Value of the Colony has increased by no less than $14,125,680 or 430 23 per cent.

18. Mr. Chu Tsau-hing and Mr. So Shing-hon have discharged their duties as Interpreter and Clerk respectively to my satisfaction.

ASSESSOR'S OFFICE,

25th May, 1920.

ARTHUR CHAPMAN,

Assessor.

Appendix C.

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY FOR CHINESE AFFAIRS FOR THE YEAR 1919.

REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE.

(Tables I and II.) REVENUE.

1. The revenue derived from all sources during the year was $21,430-less than that for 1918 by $5,247. The decrease was mainly due to the smaller issue of Chinese Boarding House Licences, Marriage Licences and to less Registration of Societies.

There were three items which showed increases, riz., Emigra- tion Passage Brokers Licences, Certificates to Chinese entering the United States of America, and Official Signatures.

EXPENDITURE.

2. The total expenditure was $52,634 as compared with $50,117 in 1918 and fell short of the estimate by $4,517. The increase as compared with 1918 was due to stipulated increments and to the appointment of a 3rd Class Officer to act as Chief Assistant to Secretary for Chinese Affairs.

PROTECTION OF WOMEN AND GIRLS,

(Table III.)

Women and Girls Protection Ordinance No. 4 of 1897. Po Leung Kuk Incorporation Ordinance No. 6 of 1893.

The

3. The number of persons detained under warrant and sent direct to the Po Leung Kuk during the year was 167 as compared with 138 in 1918; the action taken in each case (as also in those cases not decided at the end of 1918) is shown in Table III. number of women whose detention was found unnecessary and who were allowed to leave after investigation was 81 or 48'5%, as compared with 89 or 645% in 1918; 61 were sent to their native places; 4 were restored to their relatives; 1 was released under bond; while 7 cases were still under consideration on December 31st.

4. Three names were added to the list of girls under bond to report themselves annually, half-yearly or quarterly to the Secretary for Chinese Affairs, a precaution taken to guard against their being forced into prostitution. The names of 5 girls were struck off the list; 1 of them was married and the other 4 were sent back to their relatives. The number of names on the list on December 31st, 1919, was 14 as compared with 16 on January 1st, 1919.

C 2

5. The number of persons reported by Hongkong residents to the Po Leung Kuk as missing during the year was 84, of whom 38 were found, as compared with 60 and 28 in 1918. The total number of persons reported missing, including reports from China and Macao, was 117, of whom 42 were found, as compared with 63 out of 111 in 1918.

EMIGRATION.

Asiatic Emigration Ordinance No. 30 of 1915.

(1.) EMIGRATION OF WOMEN AND CHILDREN, (FREE). (Table IV.)

6. The number of women and children passengers examined and allowed to proceed abroad was 8,550 (women 5,442, girls 650, and boys 2,458) as compared with 5,366 in 1918. During the first three months emigration of this type was very slack, but owing to increased shipping accommodation after the month of April it gradually increased.

During the year only two ships went to South Africa with women and children passengers; one in August and the other in September.

During the months of April and May several batches of female and minor emigrants proceeding to Bangkok, Siam, were brought to this office for examination; but after the month of May this emigration through this office ceased entirely.

7. The record of the occupations of the women emigrants aged over 16 years as given by themselves shows that out of a total of 5,442, 1,839 were going to join relatives, 1,161 going with relatives or husbands, 302 as tailoresses, 905 as prostitutes, .682 as maid- servants or nurses, 413 as cooks, and 108 to work in tin mines and on plantations. There were also I teacher, 2 actresses, 23 hair- dressers, 1 temple keeper, 2 nuns, and 3 repatriated by Government.

8. Forty-four or 84% of the total number of women and children emigrants were detained for enquiries as against 15 or 27% in 1918. Of these, 15 were allowed to proceed after enquiry, and of the remainder, who were kept temporarily in the Po Leung Kuk, 3 were restored to their relatives, 20 were sent to their native places, 1 was married, I was released under bond, 1 died, and 3 re- mained in the Po Leung Kuk at the end of the year, their cases being still under consideration,

9. There were no applications for the recovery of women or girls who had emigrated. 8 women or girls were repatriated from Singapore, 3 of them were the family of a Singapore banishee, 1 refused to stay with her husband in Singapore, 2 were taken to Singapore under false pretences, and 2 who went to Singapore riâ Amoy were returned as suspicious characters. They were all handed back to their relatives or seen off to their destinations.

One girl who absconded from Singapore with a man, was found in Hongkong and sent back to Singapore.

C

One woman who went to Singapore as a cabin passenger to join her husband and who failed to find him was sent back. She died of phthisis while detained here in the Po Leung Kuk for enquiry.

Two women and two children were returned from Penang and handed back to their relatives.

Four girls alleged to have been kidnapped or decoyed away were sent back from Bangkok and were handed back to their relatives.

The route via Bangkok (which is not covered by our Emigra- tion Ordinance) to Singapore seems to have been increasingly utilised to avoid the local regulations. The regulations also do not cover cabin passengers: and there are in addition routes which avoid the Colony altogether. Cases under all three headings have been sent back to us by the Straits Settlements, and dealt with in the usual way.

10. Prosecutions under the Women and Girls Protection Or- dinance undertaken by this office numbered 7 with 3 convictions as compared with 6 cases and 3 convictions in 1918.

(ii.)-MALE EMIGRATION, (ASSISTED). (Table V.)

11. Assisted Emigration to the Straits was practically at a stand-still throughout the year: partly for lack of shipping facilities, but very largely on account of the difficulties of exchange.

Emigration to Banca continued throughout the year. The Billiton emigration ceased during the months of June, July, August, and October; but was otherwise continuous.

12. Four batches numbering 356 coolies were passed to go to Balikpapan to work at the petroleum depôt.

Eighty-one unskilled coolies, recruited at Ningpo to proceed to Australia to man two ships, were examined and passed at this office as assisted coolies.

13. Assisted emigration to British North Borneo continued throughout the year. The total number passed was 1,353.

14. The total number of emigrants to the Fiji Islands was 54. They went about once a month in small parties.

15: Of 83 decrepits and destitutes sent back by the Penang. Government one died on the voyage, 33 went direct to Swatow or Amoy with through tickets and were only brought to this office to receive pocket money, one was a leper and was sent away by the Police, 2 died in the Tung Wa Hospital, while the remaining 46 were sent home through the Tung Wa Hospital.

Four blind coolies were sent back from Singapore, and were sent home under escort by the Tung Wa Hospital.

16. One hundred and eighty-nine (189) decrepits and destitutes were repatriated from British North Borneo as compared with 178 in 1918. One of these men was allowed to find his relatives in this Colony, and the rest were sent home by the Tung Wa Hospital. The arrangements for the repatriation of these coolies and for the

-C 4

refund of expenses by Messrs. Gibb, Livingston & Co. were carried out satisfactorily. In the cold season the men were provided in British North Borneo with quilted clothing and blankets, so that they would not, as was the case in previous years, suffer from the sudden change from a hot to a cold climate.,

17. One hundred and eight (108) assisted emigrants were re- turned from Banca. Six of these were able to return to their homes unassisted while the remainder were sent home through the Tung. Wa Hospital at the expense of the Holland China Trading Company, the agents of the employers.

18. During the year 4 applications were received for the re- demption of Assisted Emigrants from Banca. 3 of the men applied for have already returned; and of these one was redeemed by the generosity of the Holland China Trading Company, free of charge to the applicant, a poor widow.

In the fourth case the man went to Banca by way of Macao, in order to evade the Emigration Laws of the Colony. His re- demption has been sought successively through Macao, Singapore, and the Consul General for the Netherlands Indies in Hongkong. At the end of the year he had not yet returned. He has since been recovered and returned to his family.

Two applications were received for the redemption.of assisted coolies from British North Borneo. Both men have returned and have been handed over to their relatives.

A request was also received to forward a letter to an assisted emigrant in British North Borneo asking him to return at the ex- piration of his contract. The man was traced and the letter delivered.

19. Nine passage brokers' licences at $200 each were issued under the Emigration Ordinance No. 30 of 1915.

20. Classification of Assisted Emigrants by the language spoken gives the following figures: -

Cantonese,

Hakka,.

Hoklo,

Hainanese,

Southern Mandarin (mostly from

Kwong Sai and Hunan),

Ningpo,

Total,.

6,277

6,589

284

82

562

81

13,875

THE BOARDING HOUSE ORDINANCE.

No. 23 of 1917.

21. Under this Ordinance Chinese Boarding Houses are divid- ed into seven classes for the purposes of licensing and regulation.

-

C 5

22. Class I, Chinese Hotels.-These are run very much on the lines of European hotels: they are licensed for the sale of alcohol, During the year one of these houses, the "Tai Tung", was closed and another, the "Hotel China", which gave up business, was taken over for the extension of the Great Eastern Hotel". At the end of the year therefore there remained only two houses the Great Eastern" and the "Stag Hotel" both of which applied for and received fresh licences after 31st October, 1919.

23. Class II, First Class Hak U.-These are the large boarding houses which cater principally for independent emigration and inter- port passenger business. During the year a new Boarding House of this class was opened the Wah Kiu", which took up the premises vacated by the "Tai Tung Hotel". None were closed. At the end of the year there were 17 houses, all of which had taken out new licences before the end of 1919. The lawful accom- modation provided by these 17 boarding houses is 2.688 as against 2,475 for 16 houses in the year 1918.

24. Class II, Second Class Hak U-These are the small boarding houses for independent emigrants. The 3 boarding houses whose licences remained under consideration at the end of 1918 received them at the beginning of 1919, and 2 boarding houses received half-yearly licences. During the year 2 boarding houses were closed and one new boarding house was opened. At the end of the year there remained 20 of these boarding houses with accommodation for 1,349 persons. All these boarding houses received their licences after 31st October, 1919.

year.

25. Class IV, Boarding Houses for Assisted Emigrants.--These are used mainly by assisted emigrants, who may not, while staying in Hongkong, be lodged in any other place. During the year 10 new boarding houses were opened, 9 of which closed in the same These new boarding houses were merely opened during the busy emigrant seasons, as additions to existing premises. At the end of the year there were 14 assisted boarding houses, all of which renewed their licences after 31st October. These boarding houses have accommodation for 1,055 persons, and do business principally for the Netherlands Indies and Borneo.

During the year 10 licences for transfer of names of licensees, removal of premises and for additions to floors were issued to boarding houses of Classes II, III, and IV.

26. Class V, Ku Li Kun (lodging houses for coolies).—764 licences were issued as against 476 in 1918; of these 619 were renewed at the end of the year as against 215 in 1918. 18 licences were issued for transfer of names of licensees or for removal of premises as against 3 in 1918, and 87 houses were closed as against 42 in 1918. 12 applications for renewal of licence were refused because the premises were unsuitable on sanitary grounds as against 6 in 1918. 20 convictions for various offences were obtained against houses of this class as against 3 in 1918.

27. Class VI, Ku Kung Ngoi U (lodging houses for employees of firms).—398 licences were issued as against 146 in 1918: of these

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294 were renewed at the end of the year as against 32 in 1918. 5 licences were issued for transfer of name of licensee or for removal of premises as against 2 in 1918. 18 houses were closed as against 16 in 1918. 1 application for renewal of licence was refused for sanitary reasons as against 2 in 1918. 2 convictions for different offences were obtained against houses of this class (in 1918 there were none).

28. Class VII, Hang Shun Kun (residential clubs for seamen).- 111 licences were issued as against 104 in 1918; of these 103 were renewed at the end of the year as against 101 in 1918. 8 licences were issued for transfer of name of licensee or for removal of premises as against 12 in 1918. No convictions were obtained against houses of this class (in 1918 there were 4).

REGULATION OF CHINESE.

Ordinance No. 3 of 1888. (i.)-REGISTRATION OF HOUSEHOLDERS.

29. One thousand three hundred and ninety-four (1,394) house- holders were registered as against 1,594 in 1918; of these 187 were first registration as against 174 in 1918. 8,957 changes of tenancy were also notified for registration as against 9,248 in 1918.

30. The number of Chinese business men in Victoria and Kowloon offering themselves as sureties to Government Departments and reported on by this office was 1,410 as against 1,472 in 1918.

31. One non-resident householder was required to enter into a bond; the figure was also one in 1918. 48 certified extracts from the Registers were issued as against 29 in 1918. 2 Duplicate Householders' Certificates were issued as against 3 in 1918, while 18 Householders' Removal Certificates were issued as against 40 in 1918.

(ii)-DISTRICT WATCHMEN. (Table VI.)

32. The District Watchmen Committee met on 11 occasions the average attendance being 11. The loyal advice and assistance of this important Committee (which deals with every kind of question affecting the Chinese Community) continues to be of the greatest value to the Government.

33. Mr. Li Yau-tsun's term of 5 years expired and he was re- appointed by His Excellency the Governor for a further period of 5 years.

Mr. Chan Lok-chun, a 5 years' member, resigned, and Mr. Chan Kai-ming, also a 5 years' member, died during the year. The vacancies had not been filled at the end of the year.

During 1919 the two members selected from the retiring Committees of the Tung Wa Hospital and the Po Leung Kuk, who hold their appointments for one year, were Messrs. Fung Ping-shan and Choy Hing, vice Messrs. Chow U-ting and Li Yik-mui, whose terms had expired.

!

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34. The balance to the credit of the District Watchmen Fund at the end of the year was $34,208 as compared with $34,372 on January 1st, the expenditure thus exceeding the income by $164. $28,000 of the balance is invested in Hongkong 6% War Loan, and the remainder $6,208 deposited in the Colonial Treasury.

35. The total strength of the District Watchmen Force at the end of the year was 102 as compared with 103 on January 1st. The approved strength is 102. There were 6 vacancies during the year; of which 5 were caused by dismissals or desertions.

36. The number of convictions secured by members of the force was 164 as compared with 172 in 1918 and 113 in 1917.

37. The Detective Staff now numbers 23 as compared with 20 in 1918. Police Sergeant Murphy was seconded from the Police towards the end of the year to take charge of the District Watch- men detective staff. His work at once had the effect of inspiring the men to greater energy, and of fostering co-operation with the Regular detectives. A marked improvement in this department may confidently be expected under the new system.

(iii.)-PERMITS.

38. Six hundred and ninety-one (691) permits to fire crackers were issued as against 709 in 1918 and of these 471 were on the occasion of marriage.

39. Other permits issued were 28 for religious ceremonies and 9 for processions. 232 permits were issued for theatricals, 194 of which performances were held in permanent houses and 38 in temporary buildings.

MARRIAGES.

Ordinances No. 7 of 1875 and No. 6 of 1903.

40. The number of marriages solemnized during the year was 142 as compared with 115 in 1918. The number contracted at the Registrar's Office was 15. In 1918 it was 26.

CERTIFICATES OF IDENTITY TO CHINESE ENTERING THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA,

Ordinance No. 3 of 1898.

41. Thirteen certificates were issued to Chinese to enter the United States of America, but none to enter the Philippine Islands. One certificate issued was not used and the fee was refunded to the applicant.

These certificates are limited to Chinese British Subjects resident in Hongkong.

BRITISH BORN SUBJECT CERTIFICATES.

42. There were eleven applications for these certificates, six of which were granted; three were refused and in two cases passports were the real objects in view and were granted.

There was one application for naturalisation; it is still under consideration.

REGISTRATION OF BOOKS.

Ordinance No. 2 of 1888.

43. Twenty-nine books were registered during the year as compared with thirty-six in 1918.

TUNG WA HOSPITAL.

Ordinances No. 1 of 1870, No. 9 of 1904, und No. 10 of 1908 (Man Mo Temple).

(Tables VII to XII.)

44. The following gentlemen were elected to form the Com- mittee for 1920:-

Li Wing-kwong, Chairman,

Wong Pak-shan,

Li Man-kai,

Chan Tsz-tan,

Leung Kat-hin,

Wong Tak-chung,

Cheng Ngan-ming.

Tong Wan-ting,

Yu Pan-shan, Yau Sui-chi, Lo Cheuk-wan, Ho Yuk-cho, Ching Wai-tsun, Wong Sik-ki,

of whom the first three named are in charge of the Hospital finances.

45. The 1919 Directorate under the chairmanship of Mr. Ho Sai-kwong carried on the Hospital work of previous years with great energy and success. Tables VII to XII show the details of their activities. The work of the Hospital proper has increased (Table VII); a Maternity Ward has been instituted, and many improve- ments have been made in the furniture of the Wards and the regulation of the staff. Tables VII to XII give the usual returns of work done.

:

Outside the Hospital work, the most serious problem that arose was the rice shortage. The Committee loyally supported Mr. Ho Kwong, who devoted his whole time to dealing with it and in an astonishingly short space of time sheds were built, all details arranged, and congee was being distributed. The free distribution was however soon found to have its own disadvantages and the sale of cheap rice took its place. The effort was in keeping with the best traditions of the Hospital, and the Committee and their Chairman are to be congratulated on the result. The statement of accounts appears in Table XXV.

Much work was done in connection with education to which purpose it has become the practice to devote the surplus funds of the Man Mo Temple: and arrangements are well forward for a large extension of the free school accommodation on the vacant ground at the back of the Temple.

The balance sheet for the first time is made according to the European calendar, and the re-arrangements referred to in last year's report have been carried out. The result seems a satisfactory simplification of the account: though it is still a question whether

C 9

the adoption of the European calendar will be accepted finally by the Chinese Community.

46. The expenditure was $180,482 as compared with $99,126 in 1918 and $102,528 in 1917. Last year's figure includes special items of $32,859 for the purchase of property, $15,007 for the erection of a pier at the Mortuary, and $11,067 for repairs. The rise in the cost of living has also been responsible for increases in other items, such as salaries and wages.

The daily average of expenditure was thus $470.00 as against $306.89 in 1918.

The total income was $179,909, as against $115,796 in 1918 ; and the year's working shewed a small loss.

47. The following items on the receipt side show increases :--

Rent of Hospital property, Interest,

Subscriptions,

Increases.

$8,183

5,116

5,791

48. The total number of in-patients admitted during 1919 was 6,726 as compared with 6,239 in 1918 and 5,098 in 1917. Of these 2,956 or 43.8% (as against 35 10% in 1918) elected to be treated by European methods.

The out-patients numbered 140,271 as against 129,769 in 1918 (133,884 in 1917), and of these 20,949 or 15% (as against 7-83% in 1918) chose European treatment.

49. The number of surgical operations performed was 226 as compared with 207 in 1918. There were also 109 eye operations performed as against 42 in 1918.

50. The number of destitutes temporarily housed and then sent to their homes was 718 (534 in 1918), most of whom were sent to the Hospital from this office.

51. Of the Charitable Funds managed by the Hospital the Man Mo Temple Fund (Table XI) shows an excess of expenditure over receipts of $638.00. Most of the items on both sides of the account show increases.

The Emergency Fund (Table X) shows an item of $9,935 paid to shipwrecked boatmen after the typhoon in August.

52. The balance sheet of the Brewin Charity as set out in (Table XII) shows that the income for the year exceeded the expenditure by $2,422.

The amount spent in gratuities and pensions was $3,022 as compared with $2,177 in 1918 and $1,908 in 1917.

$6,000 is invested in Hongkong 6% War Bonds.

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KWONG WA HOSPITAL.

(Tables XIII and XIV).

53. The work of the Hospital again shewed an increase during 1919. In all 3,212 patients were admitted (as against 2,696 in 1918) of whom 1,864 or 58% (as against 48% in 1918 and 46% in 1917) came under European treatment, while 1,348 elected to be treated by Chinese methods.

54. The total number of out-patients treated was 35,392 as against 33,085 in 1918, and of these 25,000 elected to receive European treatment. This gives a percentage of 70-6 as against 65.3 in 1918 and 67.3 in 1917.

55. The total net expenditure of the Hospital for 1919 was $42,663 as against $32,595 in the previous Chinese year. Salaries and wages, food for staff and patients, and repairs and furniture all show increases; and the whole work of the Hospital has grown.

Further exact comparison with the previous year however is difficult as the change from the Chinese to the English year in- volves an overlap of a month and a half,

$20,000 of the Government grant of $25,000 to local Chinese Charities was allocated by the Committee to the Kwong Wa Hospital to make good the loss of revenue from the ferries: this in addition to the annual direct grant of $8,500. These payments have cleared the Hospital's debt to the Tung Wa Hospital, and left. a balance of $1,989 on the year's working. The further $10,000 in hand in the credit with the Tung Wa Hospital was voted by the whole Community out of the surplus of the cheap sale of rice fund for the purpose of building a new pulmonary diseases ward.

CHINESE PUBLIC DISPENARIES AND PLAGUE HOSPITALS.

(Tables XV to XX.)

56. The total number of cases treated at the Dispensaries dur- ing the year was 124,586 compared with 107,406 in 1918. Of this total 68,632 were new, and 55,954 return cases.

57. The number of vaccinations performed (6,367) shows an increase on the figures (4,925) of 1918. The figures in 1917, the year of the small-pox epidemic, were 39,405.

58. The total expenditure on the Dispensaries was $36,800 as compared with 34,592 in 1918.

59. The revenue of the Dispensaries, excluding the balance of $64,173 from 1918 and a grant of $4,000 by Government, amount- ed to $38,278, as compared with $48,157 in 1918.

60. Of the two Kowloon Dispensaries at Hunghom and Sham- shuipo the first shows an excess of expenditure over receipts of $450 and a decline in credit balance from $4,505 in 1918 to $4,502. The second shows a decline in its credit balance from $409 in 1918 to $208.

1

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61. The number of dead and dying infants brought to the Dispensaries was 1,356 as compared with 1,705 in 1918.

62. The number of infants under the age of 5 years brought in to be treated shows a considerable increase, 16,238 being treated as against 12,811 in 1918.

63. 1,178 corpses were removed to hospital or mortuary as against 1,510 in 1918; 528 applications for coffins were received as against 858 in 1918; and there were 572 attendances at the cleansing of infected premises as against 608 in 1918.

64. The Plague Hospitals in the Eastern and Western Districts and at Kowloon City report that no cases of any kind were admitted. whether plague or ordinary cases..

The Dispensaries Committee are again indebted to the authori- ties of the Alice Memorial Hospital for assistance in the matter of the issue of medicines and drugs, and the regulation of the consumption.

65. The number of bodies considered by the Secretary for Chinese Affairs to have been abandoned during the year was 604 as compared with 960 in 1918. The monthly figures varied from 61 in June to 37 in August. The percentage of these "dumpings' to the total number of Chinese deaths was 5·32, (Table XIX).

Of the 604 bodies abandoned 43 were taken to the Chinese Public Dispensaries.

The number of bodies reported by the Police as dumped was 574, (Table XX).

66. Table XVIII compiled from statistics in the Sanitary Department shows the number of death certificates issued in pro- portion to the total number of Chinese deaths, and the number of cases in which post-mortem examination, were held.

67. The percentage of cases in which death was certified was 48 as compared with 49 3 in 1918.

The Maternity Hospital at Wanchai has dealt with 194 cases during the year, and has been successful enough to justify a much larger venture in the more congested area of Saiyingpun. A site has been granted by the Government and plans are now under consideration.

The Committee wish to record their appreciation of the in- valuable assistance given by Mrs. Hickling in this connection. To general advice and direction, Mrs. Hickling has added close personal supervision; and besides being available at emergencies has taken tours of duty during temporary shortages in the staff.

CHINESE PERMANENT CEMETERY.

· (Table XXI.)

68. The balance decreased from $14,497 in 1918 to $10,282. In 1917 the figure was $7,394.

i

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The interest in this Cemetery continues unabated and large sums are spent in the work on separate graves. In addition, no difficulty was experienced in securing subscriptions for a fountain at the main gate, although quite important water-works became necessary, and the total cost was estimated at $5,000. The work on the fountain and water-works is in hand.

69. TRANSLATION WORK DONE IN THE SECRETARIAT FOR CHINESE

AFFAIRS DURING THE YEAR 1919.

Translation from Chinese into English.

Translation from English into Chinese.

Petitions,

178

Ordinances,

0

Letters,

136

Regulations,

42

Newspaper articles and

Government notices,

100

14

items of news,

Minutes,

1

Unspecified,

214

Unspecified,.

30

Total..

542

Total.

173

Grand Total,..

715

The total number of translations done by the Translator was thus 715 as against 617 in 1918, 607 in 1917, and 690 in 1916.

70. In addition, a large number of translations made in other Government Departments are sent to this office for revision. Much translation work is done by members of the staff other than the Translator, but of this no record is kept.

CHINESE RECREATION GROUND.

(Table XXII.)

71. The income from the stalls has decreased slightly, $3,542 as against $3,650 in 1918, and the balance has increased from $10,834 to $13,104.

PASSAGE MONEY FUND.

(Table XXIII.)

72. The net income of the Fund was $345 and the total ex- penditure $679 compared with $660 and $451 last year.

REGULATION OF CLUBS AND SOCIETIES.

Ordinance No. 47 of 1911.

73. During the year 41 applications for registration or exemp- tion from registration under the Ordinance were received and considered. 6 clubs and societies were exempted from registra- tion by notice in the Gazette, while 24 were required to register. In 3 cases permission to register was refused under section 4 of the Ordinance; 3 clubs were found to comprise less than 10 members

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and did not therefore come under the Ordinance. In the remain- ing 5 cases no action was taken and the clubs concerned voluntarily dissolved.

GENERAL.

74. Under the terms of the Deportation Ordinance, 1917, re- ports were furnished on 366 suspects arrested by the Police under warrants of detention. The number in 1918 was 214.

75. The first payment of an annual grant of $25,000 to Local Chinese Charities was made by the Government in 1919. This sum is in addition to other grants specially allocated, and is made partly by way of compensation for the loss of income which is now paid directly to the Government. The grant is administered by a Committee of the two members of Legislative Council, two members of Sanitary Board, a representative of the Tung Wa Hospital and one of the Po Leung Kuk, under the Chairmanship of the Secretary for Chinese Affairs. The Committee's allocation this year was :-

Kwong Wa Hospital,..

Sham Shui Po Chinese Public Dispensary,... Kowloon City Chinese Public Dispensary,...

$20,000

3,000

2,000

$25,000

1

STAFF.

Chief Assistant to Secretary for Chinese Affairs.

76. Mr. E. V. Carpmael was absent on leave throughout the year, Mr. A. E. Wood acted as Chief Assistant to Secretary for Chinese Affairs up to the 28th March, Mr. W. Schofield acted from the 29th March to 9th June, and Mr. S. B. B. McElderry acted from the 10th June to 31st December.

Second Assistant to Secretary for Chinese Affairs.

77. Mr. A. E. Wood acted as Chief Assistant to Secretary for Chinese Affairs up to the 28th March, and acted as District Officer, Tai Po, from the 29th March to 31st December. Mr. W. Schofield acted as Second Assistant to Secretary for Chinese Affairs up to 28th March, and from the 10th June to 29th September, and Mr. T. W. Ainsworth acted from the 30th September to 31st December.

Third Asistant to Secretary for Chinese Affairs.

78. Mr. R. E. Lindsell acted as Deputy Registrar, Supreme Court, up to the 3rd February, and as Second Police Magistrate from the 4th February to 30th November, and went on leave on the 2nd December.

19th May, 1920.

. E. R. HALLIFAX Secretary for Chinese Affairs.

Heads of Revenue.

Table I.

Revenue for the years 1918 and 1919.

Details of Revenue.

Ordinance under which received,

Revenue in

1918.

Revenue in

1919.

Increase.

Decrease.

C 14 -

Licences and Internal Revenuc not other- wise specified,

Fees of Court or Office, Payments for Specific Purposes, - and Reimburse-

ments-in-aid,....

Interest,

Chinese Boarding House Licences, Marriage Licences,

Emigration Passage Brokers' Licences, Forfeitures,

Certificates to Chinese entering U.S.A., Householders' Registration,

}}

Official Signatures,

0.

C.

No. 1 of 1889 & No. 4 of 1908. No. 7 of 1875 & No. 15 of 1902.

18,842

*

12,583

*

1,476

860

No. 30 of 1915.

1,200

1,800

600

No. 3 of 1898.

250

650

400

No. 3 of 1888.

$ .C.

C.

6,259

616

Bond by Non-resident Householders,

};

No. 14 of 1913.

$2

128

46

Registration of Societies,

No. 47 of 1911.

130

120

10

Interest accrued on official account,

26

14

11

Miscellaneous,

Refunds, etc.,

4,337

4,949

612

Other Miscellaneous

Receipts,

Permits for Firework Displays,

330

820

10

Total,.

26,678.50

21,430.72

1,658.91

6,906.72

Deduct Increase,

1,658.94

Total Decrease in 1919,

5,247.78

* Cents omitted except in the totals.

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Table II.

Revenue and Expenditure of the Secretariat for Chinese Affairs since 1910.

Revenue.

Expenditure.

Year.

Total. Decrease,

Increase. Total. Decrease. Increase.

SA

*

:

C.

C.

Percent-

age of Expen- (liture to Revenue.

0.

%

1910.

15,492.12 | 88,616.76

42,462.81

1,330.80

27409

1911,.

11,518.19

973.93

49,217.74

6,754.93 339-01

1912,

14,257.54 260.65

45,521.01 3,696.53

319-28

1913,

10,645.58 3,611.96

41,674.04 3,846.97

391.47

1914,

7,258.10 3,387.18

51,178.04

9,504.00 705.12

1915, ..

5,072.07 2.186.03

53,188.73

2,010.69 1,048-66

1916.

9,236.95

4,164.88 | 54,966.19

1.777.46 595:07

1917,

. 11,370.52

2,133.57 51,867.18

3,099.01

456.15

1918,

26,678.50

15,307.98 | 50,117.67

1,749.51

187.86

1919,

21,430.72 5,247.78

52,634.57

2,516.90 215'60

Table III.

Number of Women and Girls detained in a Place of Refuge by the Secretary for Chinese Affairs under Sections 34 and 35 of Ordinance No. 4 of 1897, and arrangements made regarding them.

Under Detention on 1st January, 1919.

Permitted to leave,

Permitted to leave under bond,

Restored to husband,

Restored to relatives,

Sent to native place,

Married,.

Adopted,

Sent to Refuge or Convent,..... Died,

Awaiting marriage,

Cases under consideration,

Detained during 1919.

Total.

Prostitutes. Emigrants. Total. Prostitutes. Emigrants.

Total.

66

15

.81

81

1

1

}

2

1

3

3

...

8

2

10

10

41

20

61

61

4

I

2

1

3

8

...

...

...

1

1

4

4

4

3

3

Total,

1

5

123

44

167

172

Cases brought forward, 5.

Cases dealt with during the year, 165.

Cases carried forward, 7.

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Π

Table IV.

Number of Female Passengers and Boys examined and passed before the Secretary for Chinese Affairs' under "The Asiatic Emigration Ordinance, 1915," during the year 1919.

Women and Children, 1919.

Total

Women

Whither Bound.

and

Children,

Women.

Girls. Boys. Total.

1918.

Burmah,

3

1

I

5

Japan,.

48

13

17

78

97

Straits Settlements and Federated Malay States,

3,884

399

949

5,232

2,844

Dutch Indies,

693

99

487

1,279

917

Borneo,

268

60

134

462

466

Honolulu,

21

2

23

46

64

Central America,

9

1

4

14

11

Canada,

2

273

275

· 483

United States of America,

45

270

323

224

Mexico,

9

9

10

South America,

17

58

76

89

Mauritius,

27

1

37

65

Australia,

10

3

28

41

46

India,

30

14

9

53

42

Africa,..

16

17

Cuba,

3

84

37

45

Fiji Islands,

2

6

Siam,

362

46

.108

516

28

Total, 1919,.

5,442

650

2,458

8,550

Total, 1918,

3,013

404

1,949

5,366

5,366

C 17

.

C 18

Table V.

Number of Assisted Emigrants.

Rejected.

Year. Examined. Passed.

Rejected

Un- willing.

at S.C.A. as unfit.

Rejected by

Total

rejected. Doctor.

Percentage.

of rejection.

1917,

20,658 15,265

626

292

151

1,072

518

1918,

9,433 6,667

277

10

37

324

3:43

1919,

13,875

12,236

89

3

32

124

.89

Treatment of Rejected Emigrants for 1919.

Sent home through Tung Wa Hospital at expeuse

of boarding houses,.

100

Sent away without help,............

6

Sent back to boarding houses to be cured out of the

number rejected by doctor,....

18

Total rejected,.......

124

Native Districts of Assisted Emigrants.

West River,.

1,208

East River,

6,334

North River,

346

Canton,...

1,210

Delta,

835

Kwong Sai,

1,347

Southern Districts,

404

Mandarin, (Hunan, Kwong Sai, aud Kiang Si),

471

Ning Po,

81

Total......

12,236

Destinations of Assisted Emigrants.

Whither bound.

Male Assisted Emigrants.

1918.

1919.

Straits Settlements and F.M.S..

...

1,219

British North Borneo,

819

1,353

Dutch Indies :—

Banka,

2,375

4,660

Billiton,

2,028

5,786

Balikpapan,

226

356

Australia,

81

Totul,

6,667

12,236

}

- Ċ 19

Table VI.

Statement of Receipts and Expenditure relative to the Hongkong District Watchmen's Fund for the year 1919.

Receipts.

*

Expenditure.

$

To Balance,

34,372

By Wages and Salaries :- -

Contributions,

27,493

Chief District Watchmen, Assistant Chief District Watch-

2,274

men,

1,105

Detectives,

4.462

Grant by Government,.......

2,000

1st Class District Watchmen,... 5,909

2nd

39

19

:>

4,954

""

Payment for District Watchmen for

Special Services,........

3rd

388

19

"

>

19,395

208

,,

Fines,.....

16

29

Miscellaneous :--

Cooks,...

""

Interest on Hongkong Government

6% War Loan,

Coolies,

Messenger,..

...

633 528

79

Interest on Current Account,

""

1,680

108

"

1,240

-

23

Rent from Mr. Lo Sau-shan for Mr. So Pui for permission to erect the iron gate on I. L. No. 680, for 1919,..........

Condemned Store,

1

15

Office Staff: Manager, Writer, Interpreter, Clerk,

Collector,

Total,..

90

132

264

33

548

1,067

21,703

Other Charges :—

Allowance to Chief District

Watchmen and Detectives, 1,997

Medal Allowance,

858

Instructor Allowance,

96

Oil Allowance,

128

Kerosine Allowance,

300

Conservancy Allowance,.

55

Coolie Hire and Conveyance

Allowance,

605

Uniforta and Equipment,

2,299

Rice Allowance to D.W., etc.,

649

Stationery and Printing,.............

241

Furniture,

116

Repairs and Fittings to D.W.

Stations,.

181

Premium on Fire Policies,

264

Rent of Telephone,

237

Crown Rent,

16

Gratuity and Reward,

555

Sundries,...

323

Photographs for District Watch-

men......

Pension:-

4 ex Chief District Watchmen, and Au

Pún's widow,

8,932

1,050

Total Expenditure,....

""

Balance,

31,685.82 34,208.22

Total,

65,894.04

Total.............$

65,894.04

Balance in Colonial Treasury :-

In Hongkong Government 6% War Loan,.. $28,000.00

Cash,......

Total,..

6,208.22

.$34,208.22

* Cents omitted except in the totals.

*

Patients.

Table VII.

Number of Patients under treatment and other statistics concerning the

Admitted.

Tung Wa Hospital during the year

on 31st December, 1918.

Remaining in Hospital

Treatment.

Chinese

Treatment.

European

Total.

Total number of pa-

tients under treatment.

Discharged.

1919.

Out-patients.

Deaths.

Remaining in Hospital

on 31st December, 1919

Treatment.

Chinese

Treatment.

European

Total.

Vaccinations.

Dead bodies brought

to Hospital Mortuary

for burial.

Destitutes sent home.

Male,

Female,

203 2,827 1,977 4,8045,007 3,506 1,310

191 74,442 12,399 | 86,841 1,510

958

718

73 943

9791,922 | 1,995

1,331 593

71 44,880 8,550 | 53,430

536

Total,..

276 3,770 2,956 6,726 7,002 4,837 1,903

|

262 119,322 20,949 140,271 1,510 | 1,494

718

Total for 1918,

233 4,107 2,222 |6,329 | 6,562

4,163 | 2,123

276 119,602 10,167| 129,769 6052,072 534

- Ĉ 20

Ć 21

www.g

Table VIII.

Statement of Receipts and Payments of the Tung Wa Hospital for the Year 1919.

Receipts.

Amonut.

Payments.

Amount.

$

39

Balance brought forward from account

1918,

To rent of Hospital property,....

To Subscriptions:-

1. Annual Subscriptions of Hongs,.... 9,314

2. Subscriptions collected on Steamers,

By Food for Staff,

11,418

65,800

""

Salaries and wages,

22,674

Sick room expenses,.

8,379

:

30,647

99

Patients' food, etc.,

15,360

Chinese drugs,

19,438

European drugs,

6,556

""

Light,....

3,643

"

Passage money

to patients and

destitutes,

325

2,457

99

Repairs,.....

11,067

""

Repairs to Hospital property,

851

3.

and Donations,

6,836

Insurance,

772

...

29

99

Crown Rent, rates and taxes,

3,459

4.

from wealthy persons,

5,705

12

Advertisements,

5.

""

from Directors, and

past Directors,

""

Sundries and bonus,

5,865

"

""

>>

6.

for the supply of

""

""

medicines, quilted clothing, coffins,

"}

and shrouds,

To Government Grant,

"

Grant from Man Mo Temple,

,, Interest,

Contribution towards Mortuary ex-

2,227

"

32,406

8,000

""

Stationery, Telegrams, Stamps, and

Expenses for Small-pox Hospital,

for Mortuary,

Construction of a Pavilion,

of a Mortuary Pier,

Subscription to the Kwong Wa Hospital and the Fong Pin Hospital,

Burial of bodies from Government

Mortuary, (Victoria),

:

1,096

2,929

1,110

2,995

2,080

15,007

...

4,000

1,410

:

2,500

Coffins for bodies from Government

وو

Mortuary, (Victoria),...

2,368

:

19,187

"

Burial of bodies by Tung Wa Hos-

pital,

3,376

""

penses,..

2,040

Coffins for bodies buried by Tung Wa Hospital, and coffins sup- plied to steamers,

7,301

towards Mortuary Pier,....

2,803

"}

14,456

""

from Directors towards

Maternity Ward,

1,000

11

Purchase of Property 102 Des Vœux

Road West,

...

32,859

""

Premium on notes, and discount on

goods purchased,

471

39

Payment for medicines, sale of kitchen

"2

""

refuse, and rent of Mortuary and Sundries,

Fees from Patients,

Interest yielded by Hongkong War

Loan Bonds,

Contribution from the Ko Shing and

">

Kau U Fong Theatres,

Transfer from cheap sale of rice and free congee funds, towards Hospital extension,

""

33

from Mortuary Fees over 10 years old,

Grand Total,............

:.

:.

Total,.....

13,451

2,066

3,000

3,046

20,000

多多

Balance,.......

19,287

$ 245,709.12

* Cents omitted except in the totals.

:

...

180,482

65,226

Grand Total,.....

$245,709.12

}

Ċ 22

Table IX.

Statement of Assets of the Tung Wa Hospital on the 31st December, 1919.

Assets.

Amount.

*

$ *

By Balance.......

House Property (original value) :—

2 houses in Bonham Strand and

Jervois Street,

65,226

10,400

1 house in Wing Lok Street (includ-

ing cost of additions to building),. 8,108 10 houses in Aberdeen Street and

Tung Wa Lane (including cost of additions to buildings),

14,900

3 houses in Connaught Road and

Des Voeux Road,

17,386

7 houses in Queen's Road West (including cost of additions to building),

30,363

2 houses in Bonham Strand West,

26,000

3 houses in Bonham Strand,

15,000

10 houses in Po Yan Street and New

Street (at present used as Plague

Hospital),

54,697

1 house in Des Voeux Road West,... 32,859

By British War Loans,

Total,.......

209,713

50,000

$324,939.47

Subscriptions not yet paid :-

From Hongs,...............

$2,860

Individuals,

"}

1,200

$4,060

* Cents omitted cxcept in the totals.

British and

Foreign

Community,

Civil,

DEATHS REGISTERED INTHE COLONY OF HONGKONG DURING 1919.

23

:

:

5

+

6 1

6

H

2

19

9

10

4

10

Phthisis & Pulmonary Tuberculosis.

Enteritis and Gastro- Enteritis.

Cirrhosis of Liver.

Peritonitis.

Nephritis.

Other causes.

Unknown.

All causes.

11

48 26 11 4 2

10 71

299

24 5 101 | 193

9 104 391174 431 | 312 27144 | 59

1475 | 522 553 25 15 137 1540 196 7,449

65 10 3

4

1

:

39

3 114

96 4 5

15 13 1

23

22 77

5

10

3 15

80 25185 73 113 14 13 35

90 141

373 276 180 11

39

7

5

10

18 148 80 987

9

55 | 446 166| 2,506

2 2

1

13 6 25 3 43

3333

:

:.

:

1 3

55

14 18

6

1

1

1

:

:

F:

:

6

2

:

1

2 22

4

:

:

:

:.

40 10

275

1

4

100

t-

:.

:

:..

:.

:

5

13

...

2|449 15 6 85

:

405

26 26 | 179

36 204 178426319 42 15126 208 10 256432 | 522 539 555 53 | 168 | 124 2043 1006805 | 47 98 968 225|251|398

15 110 446 21 *782 651 446 475 804 61 223 154 2251 1065 820| 47

* Accident at the Race Coue

-522 unknown persons of unknown nationality.

31 227 2258 460 11,647

22 285 1930 530 | 13,714

Victoria and

1182

10

LO

5 56 18 | 157 | 103 | 379 | 101

Peak,..

Harbour,

43

1

:..

7

5

LO

Kowloon,

1

193

:

17 10

8 29

9

24 9

23 42 29

Chinese

Community,

Shaukiwan,......

1

2

2

7

2

7

r-

Aberdeen,..

Stanley,

7

1

4

1

3 8 8 2 ∞

12

:

:.

:.

:.

11

Total, 1919,

>"

1918,

!

1

Receipts.

Table X.

Emergency Fund Account, 1919.

Amount.

*

Payments.

Amount.

*A

*

Balance from account 1918,

64,504

Boat-hire to destitutes,

Compensation for loss of junks during last

84

Interest,

1,548

typhoon,

Balance,

Total,.....

.$

66,052.96

9,935

56,033

Total,.

.$ 66,052.96

* Cents omitted except in the totals.

C 23

Receipts.

Table XI.

Man Mo Temple Fund Account, 1919.

Amount.

$

*

Payments.

Amount.

Balance from 1918,

10,087

Tung Wa Hospital,

2,500

Temple Keeper,..

5,246

Free Schools and sundries,

8,164

Rent of Temple property,"

9,195

Interest,

242

Repairs to Temple property and free schools, Refund of Deposit to keeper,..........

683

2,000

Refund of Police rates for the free schools,

163

Police Rates, Crown Rent, and Insurance

Refund of Crown Rent,

19

Premium,

1,497

Temple Keeper's deposits,..

2,000

Refund of Deposits,

50

Deposits,

22

Refund of Tin Hau Temple,.

47

Repair and alteration to shops in front of Temple,.

2,550

Installation of water fountain before Temple,|

110

Stamps,

17

Balance,

9;449

Total,.....$

27,023.53

Total,.

27,023.53

*

Cents omitted except in the totals.

C 24

.

:

1

Table XII.

Revenue and Expenditure of the Brewin Charity during the year 1919.

Amount.

Expenditure.

Revenue.

Amount.

*

*

To Balance from 1918,

13,977

""

"

Rent from shop property in Temple Street,.

6,143

By Charity given to widows and orphans, Photographs,

Police rates paid for Temple Street property,...

3,022

7

689

,, Subscriptions,

470

Crown Rent for Temple Street property,

103

"}

""

Insurance for the above property,

525

""

Interest on deposits with H. & S. B. C.,

60

"}

Salary of rent collector Mr. Leung Fuk- chi, .

260

#

>>

War Bonds purchased from

22

the above bank,

360

""

""

Commission on Insurance for Temple Street property,

262

وو

Salary of accountant Mr. Chan Yik-wan, Repairs to Temple Street property,..... "" Fares for launch and tram car for rent collector,....

Stamps, receipts, and printed matters, and

100

226

court fees,

>>

Interest on War Bonds through Union Insurance Society of Canton, Ltd.,

Balance,

36

16,399 †

""

102

C 25

Grand Total,..

...$

21,376.55

† By Deposits with Tung Wa Hospital,....... 186.08

Grand Total,....

.$

21,376.55

* Cents omitted except in the totals.

H. & S. B. C.,

4,710.80

"}

War Bonds,..

6,000.00

""

>>

""

bought from Union Insur-

ance Society of Canton, Ltd.,..

5,000.00

Interest on War Bonds through Union Insurance Society of Canton, Ltd.,

503.10 §

$16,399.98

Not yet collected.

Patients.

Table XIII.

Number of Patients under treatment and other statistics concerning the Kwong Wa Hospital during the year 1919.

Admitted.

Out-patients.

Male,

120

1,055 |1,210 |2,265 |2,385 | 1,627

624 134

6,193 12,776 18,969

Female,

36

293 654 947 983 583

334

66

4,199 12,224 16,423

to Hospital Mortuary for burial.

Destitutes sent home.

Dead bodies brought

:

:

163

82

Total,

156

1,3481,864 3,212 3,368 2,210

958

200 10,392 25,000 35,392

245

Total for 1918,| 128

1,396 1,300 2,696 2,824 1,671

997

156

10,392 25,000 35,392

245

:

C 26 -

:

C 27

Table XIV.

Statement of Receipts and Payments of the Kwong Wa Hospital for 1919.

Receipts.

Amount.

Payments.

*

Amount.

*A

$

Balance brought forward from

1918,

626

Refund of loan to Tung Wa

Hospital,

36,168

Government Grant,

8,500

Salaries and wages,

8,680

Special Donation,...

20,000

Food supply to staff,

3,707

Transfer from Cheap Rice and

Sundries,

517

Free Congee Funds,

10,000

Patients' food, &c.,

Loan from Tung Wa Hospital,.......

36,168

Sick room expenses,

8,313

1,709

Subscriptions from

charitable

Charcoal,

368

persons,

1,706

Chinese drugs,

2,584

Subscriptions from Ko Shing

Western drugs,........

8,233

and Tai Ping Theatres,

1,900

I

Lights,

819

Contribution from Mr. Chan

Stationery, stamps, and adver-

Kang U,

2,600

tisements,

581

Contributions from Wa Fong and

Repairs and furniture,

4,215

Tai Wo, photographers,..

600

Water Rates,..

11

Contributions from Tung Wa

Telephone,

56

Hospital,

2,000

Coffins,

2,132

Contributions

from Chinese

Grave stones,

129

Public Dispensaries,

4,449

Burial of bodies,

285

Contributions from Po Hing

from Yaumati

12

>>

""

Theatre,

759

Mortuary,

316

Contributions from Tin Hau

Credit with Tung Wa Hospital,

11,989

Temple,

875

Cash in hand,

706

Refund from in-patients for treat-

ment and medicine,..........

775

Refund from sale of medicine to

out-patients,

297

Premium on notes,

43

Sale of kitchen refuse and

sundries,

226

Grand Total,...............

* Cents omitted except in the totals.

91,527.54

Grand Total,...

91,527.54

C 28

Table XV.

Summary of work done by the Chinese Public Dispensaries: Victoria, Harbour, Shaukiwan, and Kowloon Peninsula,

Description.

Grand

Grand

Total.

Total

Total

1919.

1918.

New Cases,.

Return Cases,

68,632

55,954

Total,........

124,586 107,106

Certificates ofļnature of disease issued,

cause of death,.........

Patients removed to hospital by ambulance,. Corpses removed to hospital or mortuary..... Attendances at cleansing of infected premises, Compensation claims sent in,

Applications received for coffins,

for midwives,

""

Confinement cases in Maternity Hospital,

Infants brought to Dispensaries, (alive),

29

39

342

374

510

648

1,178

1,510

572

608

37

3

:

528

858

189

280

194

40

"

(dead),.

1,316

Total,.

1,356

1,705

Vaccinations at private houses,

135

وو

,1

Dispensaries,

Total,.

6,232

6,367

4,925

L

C 29

4,950

San Theatre,

650

Ko Shing Theatre,..

375

Wo Ping Theatre,

1,196

Donation from Mr. S. W. Tsó for

permission to hold theatrical per-

formances at San Theatre,

960

Subscriptions, Land,.

17,620

""

Harbour,...

8,610

Table XVI.

Chinese Public Dispensaries: Statement. of Accounts for the year ending 31st December, 1919.

Receipts.

To Balance,

Grant from the Government,

Donation from :-

"}

Tai Ping Theatre,

*

$

*

Expenditure.

$

Maintenance of Dispensaries, Victoria, 22,798

64,173

4,000

""

>

Dispensary, Harbour

"

""

35

and Yaumati, 5,505

Shaukiwan, 4,675

,, Kowloon City, 3,827

Fee for Boundary Stone and Crown Rent for proposed Maternity Hos- pital, Western.

Balance in Colonial Treasury

36,806

25

99

Shaukiwan,

2,033

Kowloon City,

1,882

38,278

In Hongkong Government 6% War Loan,

51,000

In Cash,

22,661

Interest,

>"

329

Advance to :·

""

6% War Loan

Interest on Hongkong Government

Rent of house No. 3 Aberdeen Street,

3,060

Dispensary Clerks,.......

120

1,272

Alice Memorial Hospital for purchase of drugs,

500

74,281

Total,.

$ 111,113 81

Total,.

$111,113 81

* Cents omitted except in the totals.

- C 30

Table XVII.

Hunghom and Shamshuipo Dispensaries.

Statement of Accounts for the year ending 31st December, 1919.

Description.

Hung-

Sham-

hom.

shuipo.

**

Receipts:-

Balance,......

4,505

409

Subscriptions, etc.,

1,922

857

Donations from :--

Po Hing Theatre,

Kún Yam Temple,

Scavenging Contractor at Hunghom,

425

600

600

158

:

Tin Han and Kwan Tai Temples at Shamshuipo,

Kai Fong for permission to hold theatrical per-

formances at Tai Kok Tsui,.......

Grant from Government,.

Expenditure:-

Total,

313

3,000

..$ 8,053.16 4,738.80

Through Secretariat for Chinese Affairs,

By Local Committee,

Total,

1,781. 2,397

2,219 2,132

4,000.99 4,530.48

Balance :-

At Colonial Treasury,

With Local Committee,

623.

21

3,428

187

.$4,052.17 208.32

Total,

* Cents omitted except in the totals.

:

Number of deaths.

:

>

Table XVIII.

Deaths of Chinese in Hongkong and Kowloon during 1919 showing number in which the cause of death was duly certified and number which a post-mortem examination was held.

1

2

in

4

10

7

Number certified.

uncertified.

Number

Percentage of

3 to 2.

Number examined after death and not sent to mortuary.

Victoria,

Harbour,...

7,449

3,910

3,539

52.0

430

57.7

3,189

42.8

987

315

672

32.0

60

6.0

192

19:4

Kowloon,..

2,506

1,092

1,414

43.5

11

0.43

1,239

49.4

Shaukiwan,

275

101

174

39.0

31

11.2

80

29.1

Other Villages in Hongkong,

131

33

98

25.0

2

15.2

15

11:4

Total,.

11,348

5,451

5,897

48.0

534

47.0

4,715

41.5

Percentage of

6 to 2.

Number sent to

mortuary.

Percentage of

8 to 2.

-C 31 —

9

...

Table XIX.

Monthly Return of Bodies of Chinese considered by the Secretary for Chinese Affairs to have been abandoned during the year 1919.

Victoria.

Month.

Harbour. Kowloon,

West.

Central,

East.

Total.

Hongkong

outside

Victoria.

New

Territories.

Total.

Grand

Total.

January,

February,

March,..

April,

May,

June,

July,

August,

September,

October,

November,

December,

Grand Total,

Total for 1918,

14

9

27

11

17

6

7

6

19

13

18

10

26

3

20

9

5

21

12

15

8

6

7

21

8

29

11

13

26

11

21

6

19

5

13

76

15

14

3734

9

20

15

17

6

12

12

15

8

6

17

7.

20

I

5

10

10

17

∞0 63 01 — 21 00 00 THE SON O

2

6

84

61

86

231

115

218

40

137

147

121

405

108

381

65

98

* In 1919, of 604, 30 were taken to Chinese Public Dispensaries. † In 1918, of 960, 43 were taken to Chinese Public Dispensaries,

}

31

58

34

63

...

25

51

28

49

39

60

35

61

25

44

24

37

38

58

32

44

29

46

:

:

33

43

373

604 *

555

960 †

C 32

C 33

Table XX.

Return of Bodies abandoned during the years 1917, 1918, and 1919.

(Figures supplied by the Police Department.)

Male.

1917.

Female.

Unknown.

Over

15 years.

15 years and under.

Over

15 years.

15 years

and under.

Victoria,

15

Kowloon,..

Harbour,

Elsewhere,

coat

160

4

168

6

110

112

4

61

13

38

192

59

28

Over

15 years.

15 years

and under.

2 10 10 20

Total.

349

233

142

74

Total,

28 369

19 367

15

798

Victoria, Kowloon,.. Harbour, Elsewhere,

7196

1918.

192 214

170

156

55

41

28

22

:

369

:00 10

6

380.

5

111

57

Total,

23

489

3 389

1

12

917

1919.

Victoria,

108

89

***

Kowloon,..

120

2

92

Harbour,

58

48

Elsewhere,

24

ོ།

14

Total,

5 · 310

243

:

0100 00

14

204

217

115

38

574

Table XXI.

Statement of Receipts and Payments of the Chinese Permanent Cemetery for 1919.

- C 34 -

Receipts.

Payments.

To Balance,

..$14,497.74 | By Rent of Telephone,

112.88

Interest from H. K. War Loan

""

Wages of Hui Yung & other gardeners,...

825.00

"" Bonds,

480.00

""

Construction of Cemetery by Hui Lit and stone em-

Interest from H. K. & S. B. C.,

14.47

bankment, etc.,

5,617.15

.....

??

Interest from Tai San Bank,

145.33

Construction of a Summer House, etc., by Hop Kec,...

850.00

>>

""

""

"}

دو

War Savings

""

Labour for cutting grass,

136.85

Association,

69.15

Flowers Pots, etc., from Tsun Lung Sang,

104.60

Sale of 66 Lots,

2,555.00

""

Freight and duty on earth by Ip Kan,

39.70

Stone Embankment,.

682.00

""

on pressed groundnut cakes by

>>

>>

Charges for filling up graves from Mr. Chan Kai-ming,

Kwan Kee,.

14.20

50.00

50 Stone Tablets,

20.00

""

Compensation for cost of land,

Sale of vacant ground in front of graves,

Printing of Annual Returns by Kung Wo Po,

1.20

871.75

Hire of Motor Cars,

28.00

105.00

27

Bamboo, Hemp, Canvas, etc.,

21.88

Stamps,

3.00

"} Rent of Wharf,

1.50

""

""

Fee for permit to obtain water,

1.00

"}

Refund of amount for the sale of Lot No. 17 including

graves and embankments,

45.00

""

Loss of Exchange on War Savings Certificates,...

1,321.06

Sundries,

44.75

9,187.77

Total,.....

$19,470.44

Balance,

፡፡

Total,

10,282.67

.$ 19,470.44

1

To Balance,

Rent of Stalls,

Table XXII.

Chinese Recreation Ground: Receipts and Expenditure, 1919.

Receipts.

*

. Payments.

?

10,834

By Wages of Watchmen, &c.,

682

Water Account,

225

>>

3,542

19

Consumption of Gas,

270

>"}

Repair to roof, walls, and stalls,

41

Rice Allowance,

25

""

Premium on Fire Policy No. 17513,... $8.16

Less refund,

4.03

4

Miscellaneous-

25

>>

Balance,

13,105

>>

Total,..

$ 14,377.40

Total,..

.$

14,377.40

* Ceuts omitted except in the totals.

C 35

Table XXIII.

Statement of Accounts of Passage Money Fund.

Payments.

*

دکو

27

72

50

170

21

353

170

55

27

By Gifts to 13 women on being married, Annual Charitable Allowance to two per- sons,

Subscription to Alice Memorial Hospital,

""

Eyre Diocesan Refuge, Gifts in aid of repatriation of emigrants,. Advance to Wanchai Pak Tai Temple,...$524 Less Refund,

Pocket money to Mrs. Hendricks and Miss Eva Arkas,.

Rice to French Convent,

Difference on $135 between S. S. & H. K. Currency paid to artisans Kang Loon, etc., Miscellaneous,.

Balance on Fixed Deposit,

Receipts.

*

Tó Balance on Fixed Deposit,

$4,250

>>

>>

in Colonial Treasury,

3,692

7,942

Passage Money received,

$1,497

>"

!)

Less Refunds,

1,444

33

53

ל,

Interest on Fixed Deposit,

$-170

"}

"}

on money deposited in Treasury,

119

Miscellaneous,

289

3

1

Total,

"

""

in Colonial Treasury,

Total,

8,287.61

* Cents omitted except in the totals.

36 --

40

46

599

.$4,250

3,359

7,609

8,287.61

4

Table XXIV.

Prosecutions under Ordinances No. 3 of 1888, No. 30 of 1915, and No. 4 of 1897.

Offence.

Convicted.

Discharged.

No. of

Cases.

Male.

Female.

Male.

Female.

Remarks..

210 2

Drums and Gongs,-Night noises by beating,

Ordinance No. 3 of 1888.

Bills,-Posting without permission,

Fireworks,--Discharging without permits,

Processions, Organising in the public streets

3

without permit,.

Householders' Registration,--Failing to register,

Ordinance No. 30 of 1915.

Decoying men or boys into or out of the Colony, Emigration House offences,....

1

:

1

2

:

:

:

:

81

19

33333

:

:

53

14

13

Personating emigrants,

Sending assisted emigrants out of the Colony with- out notifying the Secretary for Chinese Affairs,

Ordinance No. 4 of 1897.

Abduction of girls under 21,

Decoying women and girls into or away from the Colony,

Detaining, harhouring, or receiving women or girls,.. Procuring women or girls to be common prostitutes,. Procuring girls under age to have carnal con- nection,

Deriving profits from prostitution and trading in

women,

C

37 -

Donations,

Premium on Coins,

RECEIPTS.

Sale of old Rice Bags,

Sundries,

*

Total,.

Table XXV.

Rice and Cougee Funds.

EXPENDITURE,

145,747

545

*

Congee station expenses,

Cheap sale of Rice and station expenses, Donation to the Tung Wah Hospital,..... to the Kwong Wah Hospital,

40,307

21,721

20.000

10,000

2,530

22

to the New Maternity Hospital, West

Point,

20,000

345

Balance,

37,139

| 149,167.35

* Cents omitted except in the totals.

}

Total,

149,167.35

C 38

C 39

Annexe A.

Report on the work of the Po Leung Kuk for the year 1919.

The following gentlemen were elected in March to serve as Managing Committee for the year:----

Tong Yat-chuen, Wong Yiu-tung Yip Lu-kwong,

Sham Pak-ming,

Tsoi Hing,

Chan Shu-ming,

Lei Ngai-chi,

Yau Sui-chi,

Chu Pik-tung,

Chung Tai-chun,

Yip Sau-chi,

Fung Heung-tsun.

The number of inmates of the Po Leung Kuk on January 1st, 1919, was 53, and during the year 476 persons were admitted as against 356 in 1918. The circumstances of the admission and the action taken in regard to them are set out in Table A.

167 women and girls were committed under warrant, and 210 were admitted without warrant. Of the remainder 35 were lost children, 20 were accompanied by parents or guardians, and 44 were runaway maid servants.

On leaving the Kuk 176 women and girls were restored to husbands or other relatives, 34 were sent to charitable institutions in China, 19 were given in adoption, 13 married, and 3 released under bond. No cases were sent to the Eyre Refuge, Italian Convent, or Victoria Home. The number of inmates remaining in the Kuk on December 31st was 62.

The income and expenditure during the year and the assets and liabilities of the institution are set out in Tables B and C attached.

The accounts of the Managing Committee in the customary form have been audited by Messrs. Li Wing-kwong and Wong Yiu-tung. The balance to the credit of the Society at the end of the year was $23,305 as compared with $21,977 at the end of 1918.

The institution was visited monthly by Justices of the Peace, Messrs. A. Mackenzie and Chau Siu-ki, who on no occasion found cause for adverse comment. The average monthly number of in-

mates was 55.

The matron reports favourably on industry of the inmates during the year. sickness of which 25 were sent to the treatment, and of these I died.

the conduct, health, and There were 70 cases of Tung Wa Hospital for

E. R. HALLIFAX, Secretary for Chinese Affairs,

President.

19th May, 1920.

Table A.

Number of Women and Girls admitted to the Po Leung Kuk during the year 1919 and the

arrangements made regarding them.

January, 1919, In the Po Leung Kuk on 1st

Committed under Warrant from the Secretariat for Chinese Affairs. Committed under Warrant from

the Emigration Office. Pending the opening of the Secretariat for Chinese Affairs. Sent with their own consent by the Secretary for Chinese Affairs. Sent with their own consent from Singapore, Manila. and Swatow. Sent with their own consent by the Police.

Lost Children.

Accompanying parents or guardians.

Runaway maid-servants.

Admitted during the year, ... 126

63

5

:

15 11

00

8

333

53

13

N

; 11

10

10

53

Total.

Released after enquiry.

Released under bond.

Placed in charge of husband,

Placed in charge of parents and relatives.

Sent to Charitable Institutions

in China.

Sent to School, Convent, or Refuge.

Adopted.

Married.

Died.

Cases under consideration.

Total.

41 16101

16

77 35

44

476

208

Total,

131

47 19 106| 16

Kuk on the 31st Decem- Remaining in the Po Leung

ber, 1919,

4

3

4

1

1

21148 23

ཚ། ཀླུ

6

1

57

476

| 52

529

221

3 | 23 | 153 | 34

19

I

62

122224

12 46 20 62

5

2 16

62

529

€ 40

Table B.

PO LEUNG KUK.

Statement of Receipts and Expenditure from 1st January to 31st December, 1919.

RECEIPTS,

C.

EXPENDITURE.

*

Balance from previous year :-

On Fixed Deposit,

20,000

By the Elected Committee: (see Table C),

8,650

At Current Account,

1,977

21,977

Balance

Subscriptions:-

On Fixed Deposit,

Yue Lan Celebrations, West Point,.......

300

At Current Account,

21,000

2,305

Elected Committee,

.....

300

23,305

Guilds,

5,141

Man Mo Temple,

1,107

Theatres,

1,687

Hongkong Citizen,

Boy adoptions,

Interest :-

On Deposit,

On Current Account,

100

60

8,695

1,000

281

Total,.

1,281

31,955.71

* Cents omitted except in the totals.

C 41 -

Total,

31,955.71

Appendix D.

REPORT OF THE HARBOUR MASTER

FOR THE YEAR 1919.

TABLE OF CONTENTS.

1.-Shipping.

2.-Trade.

1

3.-Revenue and Expenditure. 4. Steam-launches.

REPORT.

9.-Examination of Masters,

Mates, and Engineers.

5.-Emigration and Immigration. 6.-Registry of Shipping.

7.-Marine Magistrate's Court.

8.-Marine Court.

10.-Examination of Pilots. 11.-Sunday Cargo Working. 12.-New Territories.

TABLES.

13.-Lighthouses.

14.-Government Harbour Moorings.

I.-Number, Tonnage, and Crews of Vessels entered. II.-Number, Tonnage, and Crews of Vessels cleared. III.-Number, Tonnage, and Crews of Vessels entered at each

Port.

IV. Number, Tonnage, and Crews of Vessels cleared at each

Port.

V.--Number, Tonnage, and Crews of Vessels of each Nation

entered.

VI.-Number, Tonnage, and Crews of Vessels of each Nation

cleared.

VIL--Junks entered from China and Macao.

VIII-Junks cleared for China and Macao.

IX.--Summary of Arrivals and Departures of all Vessels.

X.-Licensed Steam-launches entered.

XI. Licensed Steam-launches cleared.

XII. Number of Boat Licences issued.

XIII. Statement of Revenue.

XIV.-Chinese Passenger Ships cleared by the Emigration Officer

(Summary).

XV.-Return of Emigration.

XVI. Return of Male and Female Emigrants.

XVII.-Vessels bringing Chinese Passengers to Hongkong from

places out of China (Summary).

XVIII.-Return of Immigration.

XIX.-Return of Male and Female Emigrants returned.

D 2

XX.-Vessels registered.

XXI.-Vessels struck off the Register.

XXII.-Comparison in Number and Tonnage of Vessels in Foreign

Trade entered and cleared since 1908.

XXIII.-Revenue and Expenditure of the Harbour Department. XXIV.-Diagram of Tonnage of Vessels entered.

ANNEXES.

4.-Report on the Mercantile Marine Office. B.-Report on the Marine Surveyor's Office. C.--Report on the Gunpowder Depôt.

1.-Shipping.

1. The total of the Shipping entering and clearing at Ports in the Colony during the year 1919 amounted to 649,168 vessels of 35,615,169 tons, which, compared with the figures for 1918, shows an increase of 69,627 vessels, with an increase of 6,096,980 tons.

Of the above, 41,985 vessels of 21,072,129 tons were engaged in Foreign Trade, as compared with 43,436 vessels of 16,955,332 tons in 1918, and were distributed as follows:-

1918. Numbers. Numbers.

1919.

1918.

Tonnage.

1919.

Tonnage.

British Ocean-

going Ships, 5.6 %

9.2%

21.4%

32.4 %

Foreign Ocean-

1

going Ships,

9.8

12.6

361

36.2

British River

Steamers, ...

13:3

13.2

20:3

15'4

Foreign River

Steamers,...

3.5

3.8

3.6

2.9

Steam Launches

(under

60

tons),

13.8

11·9

11

0.8

Trading Junks,

540

· 49.3

17.5

12.3

100.0

100·0

100.0

100·0

N.B.-The movements of Fishing Junks are not included in this Table.

2. Of vessels of European construction, 4,571 Ocean Steamers, 4 Sailing Ships, 3,550 River Steamers, and 2,509 Steamships not exceeding 60 tons entered during the year, giving a daily average of 29'1 ships, as compared with 27-3 in 1918, and 29′9 in 1917.

{

D 3

3. The average tonnage of individual Ocean Vessels entering the Port has increased from 1,459 2 tons to 1,5831 tons, that of British ships has increased from 1,482-6 tons to 1,7726 tons while that of Foreign ships has also increased from 1,445'7 tons to 1,449-2 tons.

The average tonnage of individual River Steamers entering during the year has decreased from 4847 tons to 4488 tons.

That of British River Steamers has increased from 5110 tons to 529-8 tons, and that of Foreign River Steamers has decreased from 439.9 tons to 336'6 tons.

4. A comparison between the years 1918 and 1919 is given in the following table:

1918.

1919.

Increase.

Decrease.

Class of Vessels.

No.

Tonnage. No. Tonnage. No. Tonnage. No. Tonnage.

British Occan-

2,444

going,....

Foreign Ocean-

4.234

going,

3,627,576 3,865 6,842,024 1,421

6,117,893 5,274 7,625,823 1,040 1,507,930

3,214,448

British River

5,807

Steamers,

Foreign River

1,510

612,314 1,599

3,444,445 5,502 3,253,781

591,679

305

190,664

89

Steamers,

Steamships un-

der 60 tons

(Foreign

6,002

180,738 5,035 161,689

Trade),

Junks, Foreign 23,439 2,972.366 20,710 2,597,193

Trade,

967

19,049

2,729

375,233

Total, Foreign 43,43616,955,33241,985 21,072,129 | 2,550

Trade,..

4,722,378 4,001

605,584

Steam-launches

plying in

Waters of

499,102 10,731,658 | 586,188 | 13,366,602 87,086, 2,631,944

Colony,

Junks, Local

Trade,

$

*#7,003 * 1,828,199 † 20,995 † 1,176,438

16,008

651,761

Grand Total,

379,541 | 29,518,189 | 649,168 | 35,615,169 89,636| 7,354.32220,009 1,257,345

:

:

:

:

:

20,638

Nett Increase,

69,627 6,096,977

* Including 11,686 Conservancy and Dust Boats of 638,884 tons.

t

:)

11,486

"

**

**

"

15

758.621

D 4

5. This table shows an increase in British Ocean-going Ship- ping of 1,421 ships or 58'1 per cent., and an increase of 3,214,448 tons or 886 per cent. This is due to a partial recovery of Ship- ping after war conditions owing to release of many ships for commercial purposes.

British River Steamers have decreased by 305 ships and 190,664 tons or 52 per cent. in numbers and 5'5 per cent. in tonnage. This is due to two ships formerly British having been transferred to the Chinese flag, to one ship having been taken off the run for three months and another having been laid up.

Foreign Ocean-going Vessels have increased by 1,040 ships with an increase of 1,507,930 tons or 245 per cent. in numbers and 246 per cent. in tonnage. This is due to partial return to pre-war conditions.

Foreign River Steamers show an increase of 89 ships and a decrease of 20,638 tons or 52 per cent. in numbers and 3.3 per cent. in tonnage. This is due to the transfer of two ships formerly British to the Chinese flag and to two large ships having been taken off the run.

In Steamships not exceeding 60 tons employed in Foreign Trade there is a decrease of 967 ships and a decrease of 19,049 tons or 16'1 per cent. in numbers and 105 per cent. in tonnage.

This decrease is due to a number of Steam-launches being laid up part of the year owing chiefly to the expense of coal and to two vessels formerly run as Steam-launches having been re-measured and run as vessels over 60 tons.

Junks in Foreign Trade show a decrease of 2,729 vessels of 275,333 tons or 116 per cent. in numbers and 126 per cent. in tonnage. This decrease is but apparent. It is due to the abolition of war time regulations, under which the movements of all junks were reported. Now many of them fail to report arrival or departure.

In Local Trade (ie., between places within the waters of the Colony) there is an increase in Steam-launches of 87,086 vessels with an increase in tonnage of 2,631,944 or 175 per cent. in numbers and 245 per cent. in tounage. This increase is due to more shipping frequenting the Port, the employment of Launches towing having considerably increased.

Junks in Local Trade show a decrease of 16,008 vessels and 651,761 tons or 432 per cent. in numbers and 356 per cent. in tonnage. This decrease is due to abolition of war time restrictions, under which the movements of all Junks irrespective of size were reported, whereas many of them now fail to report their movements.

6. The actual number of individual Ocean-going Vessels of European construction during the year 1919 was 957 of which 301 were British and 656 Foreign. In 1918 the corresponding figures were 675 of which 162 were British and 513 Foreign.

These 957 ships measured 2,230,105 tons. They entered 4,575 times and gave a collective tonnage of 7,242,689. Thus 282 more ships entered 1,232 more times and gave a collective tonnage greater by 2,364,580 tons, an average of 1,9193 tons per entry.

Į

f

:

J

Thus:

T

D 5

Steamers.

No. of times entered.

Total Tonnage.

Flag.

1918. 1919.

1918. 1919.

1918.

1919.

Steamers 158

299

1,219

British

Sailing... 4

2

4

Steamers

291

379

911

1,938 1,803,1763,436,616 2 10,121 2.267 1,148 1,744,888 2,111,252

Japanese

Sailing.

1

1

89

Norwegian,

25

18

108

96

128,157 99.652

Chinese,

66

84

620

854

424,965

585,972

Danish,

7

6

18.915

17.720

Dutch,.

39

133

113

334,347

262,213

French,

17

153

159

154,474 204,494

Portuguese,

5

80

43,063

51.459

Russian,

13

15,244

9,989

Siamese,

3

2

1,801

7,916

Swedish,

1

8,304

2,217

Steamers 32

90

150

187.309

415,859

U.S.A., Sailing

1

1

1,271

3,000

Steamers

Belgian,

Sailing Inter Allied,

2.074

+4

31,974

Total,.

675 957 3,343 4,575 4,878,1097,242,689

7. The 301 British ships carried 2,408 British officers and 32 Foreign officers, the latter consisting of 5 Norwegians, 18 Americans, 2 Danish, 2 Swedish, 1 Roumanian, 3 Russians, and 1 Greek.

Thus, the proportion of Foreign officers in British ships was 133 per cent., comprising 7 nationalities, a decrease of 1:40 per cent., with a decrease in number of officers and an increase in ships.

8. The 656 Foreign ships carried 4,659 officers, of whom 78 were British, as follows:-

1918.

1919.

In Chinese ships -

45

34

17

Japanese ships.

2

2

French ships

I

1

""

United States ships

26

Greek ships

15

21

57

78

Thus 16 per cent. of the officers serving in Foreigu ships were of British nationality, with an increase in the number of officers and an increase in the number of ships.

D 6

9. The Nationality of the Crews in British and in Foreign ships was as follows:

AMERICANS

VESSELS.

BRITISH CREW.

AND

ASIATICS.

EUROPEANS.

1918. 1919.

1918. 1919. 1918. 1919. 1918. 1919.

British, 162

301

9,306 19,717

641 674 86,386 134,307

Foreign,. 513

656

751 1,359 9,113 11,725 122,479 150,517

Total,

675 957 10,057 21,076 | 9,754 12,399 208,865 284,824

Hence in British ships :-

And in Foreign ships: -

1918. 1919.

1918.

1919.

9.66%

12.74 % of the crews were British.

0.58 %

0.83% of the crews were British.

0.66 %

0.45% of the crews were other Europeans.

6.88 %

7.17 % of the crews

were other Europeans.

89.68 %

86.81% of the crews

were Asiatics.|

92.54%

92.00 % of the crews

were Asiatics.

2.--Trade.

10. Detailed and accurate statistics of imports and exports are now collected and published by the Imports and Exports Depart- The rough statements hitherto included in these reports are therefore discontinued.

ment.

11. The number aud tonnage of ships of European type con- struction carrying cargo for import and transit, compared with 1918, were as follows:-

Steamers,

1918.

1919.

Increase.

Decrease.

No.

Tonnage. No.

Tonnage. No. Tonnage.. No. Tonnage.

2,028,674 | 3,550 | 1,917,236

6

13,466

5,356

110 | 111,438

8.110

8.337 4,864,643 4.571 7,237,333 1,234 2,372,690|| River Steamers, 3,660 Sailing Vessels,

Total,. 7,003 | 6,906,783 8,125 9,159,925 1,234 2,372,600| 112 |119,548

Nett Increase..... 1,122 2,253,142

1.

1 -

12. The corresponding figures relating to ships of European type of construction, shipping bunker coal, are as follows

EXPORTS.

1918.

1919.

Increase.

Decrease.

No.

Tonnage. No.

Tonnage. No. Tonnage.

No. Tonnage.

3,657

3,332 4,862,038 | 4,560 2,028,085 3,551

7,219,802 7,219,802 1,228 1,228 | 2,357,764

1,928,221

106

99,861

3

7,396

4

5,356

I

2,040

Total,

6,992 6,897,519 8,115 9,153,379 1,229 2,357,704

106

101,904

Net Increase,

1,123 2,255,860

Steamers, River Steamers, Sailing Vessels,

1918.

1919.

Increase.

Decrease.

No.

Bunker

Coal.

No.

Bunker

Coal.

No.

Bunker

Coal.

Bunker

No.

Coal.

Steamers, River Steamers,

3,332

357,109 4,560

3,657

52,322 3,551

850,386 1,228 493,277 53,439

1,117 106

...

Total,

6 989

409,431 8,111

903,825 1,228

494,394 106

Net Increase,

1,122

494,394

- D7 -

D 8

13. The River Trade, compared with 1918, is shown in the following Table :-

1918,

1919,

Year.

Imports.

Exports.

Passengers.

362,146

399,458

1,410,400

323,536

328,369

1,373,947

14. The following Table shows the Junk Trade of the Colony for the years 1918 and 1919 :-

IMPORTS.

1918.

1919.

Junks.

Tons.

Junks.

Tons.

Foreign Trade,

11,698

1,501,757

10,353

1,248,389

Local Trade,

12,290

1,561,890

4,686

206,326

Total,

23,988

3,063,647

15,039

1,454,715

Imported 558,509 tous as under

Cattle, 1,608 head,

Swine, 8,460 head,

General,

Earth and Stones,

Tons.

189

498

545,641

12,181

Total..........

558,509

EXPORTS.

1918.

1919.

Junks.

Foreign Trade, ....

11,741

Tons. 1,470,609

Junks.

Tons.

10,357

Local Trade,

13,027

627,425

4,823

1,349,744 211,488

Total,

24,768

2,098,034

15,180 1,561,232

Exported 794,566 tons as under :—

Kerosine, 2,385,000 cases,

Rice and Padi,

Coal,....

General,

Tons.

68,710

142,262

192,869

390,765

Total,........... 794,566

15, Summary of the Shipping of the Port for the year 1919-

Registered.

Passengers.

No. of

Ships.

Emigrants.

Tonnage.

Bunker Coal.

Arrived. Departed.

British Ocean-going,

3,865

6,842,024

458,487

165,726.

31,888

24,642

Foreign Ocean-going,

5,274

7,625 823

391,899

93.885

76,877

35,327

British River Steamers,

5,502

6,253,781

44,668

598.381

568,299

Foreign River Steamers,..

1,599

591,679

8,771

116 217

91,017

Total,

16,240

18,313.307

903,825

974,212

768,111

59,969

Steam-launches, Foreign Trade..

5,035

161,689

46,207

6,270,741

6,265,695

Junks, Foreign Trade,..

20,710

2,597,133

103,795

83,231

Total, Foreign Trade,

41,985

21,072,129

950,032

7,348,748

7,117,037

59,969

Steam-launches, Local Trade,

586,188

13,366,602

17,031

16,394

18,454

Junks, Local Trade,

20,995

1,176,438

6,079

6,911

Total, Local Trade,

607,183

14,543,040

17,031

22,473

25,365

Grand Total,

6-19,168

35,615,169

967,063

7,371,221

7,142,402

59,969

D 9

D 10

3.-Revenue and Expenditure.

16. The gross Revenue collected by the Harbour Department during the year was $633,794.25 as against $594,728.91 collected in the previous year showing an increase of $39,065.34 or 6'16% :--

Light Dues,

Light Dues, Special Assessment.. Licences and Internal Revenue,. Fees of Court and Office, Miscellaneous Services,

1918.

1919.

Increase.

$ 52,816.92 $ 74,545.18 $ 21,728.26 63,105.94 83,973.11 20.867.17

Decrease.

168,829.34

156,353,24

$ 12,476.10

309,426.71

318,032.72

100.00

290.00

9,206.01 190.00

$594,278.91

$633,794.25 $ 51,991.44 $12,476.10

The principal increases are under Light Dues $21,728.26, Light Dues Special Assessment $20,867.17, Engagement and Discharge of Seamen $11,969.80, Survey of Steam-ships $8,907.50, Fees for use of Government Buoys $9,842.00 (due to increase of shipping after war), Medical Examination of Emigrants $9,605.00 (due to removal of quarantine restrictions against Hongkong by Straits Settlements), Examination of Masters $667.50, and Gunpowder Storage Fees $329.46.

The principal decreases are under Boat Licences $1,405.80, Junk Licences $6,241.75, Fines $4,705.32, Official Signatures $6,100.00 (due to relaxation of war restrictions), Registry Fee $1,219, Sunday Cargo Working Permits $24,900.00 (due to increase of tonnage, hence no necessity to work on Sundays).

The Expenditure of the Harbour Department for 1919 was $191,850.96 as against $173,527.64 expended in 1918 showing an increase of $18,323.32. This increase is due to more expenditure incurred on new moorings for ocean Steam-ships and salaries for officers returned from active service.

Under Special Expenditure a sum of $337.50 was expended in buying new furniture for Marine Surveyor's Office and Green Island Lighthouse; a sum of $569.10 for anchor for Bockara Rock Buoy; a sum of $7,500 for the purchase of the Steam-launch Blackhead; a sum of $163.52 for a typewriter, and a sum of $34,990 on acquisition and re-arrangement of moorings in Victoria Harbour.

1

7

J

D 11

$83,973.11

$158,518.30

No. of

Class of Vessels.

Trips.

Tonnage.

Rate

per tou.

17. The Amount of Light Dues collected during the year 1919 was as follows :—

Special Assessment.

Total Fees

Collected.

Fees

Collected.

Rate

per ton.

Fecs

Collected.

$

ሮ.

C.

Ocean Vessels,.

4,540

7,081,015

I cent.

70,810.15 1 cent.

70,810.15

141,620.30

Steam-launches,

2,140

73,574

735.74 1

785.71

1,471.48

""

River Steamers, (Night Boats),.

1,787

899,807

2,999.29

4,499.38

7,498,67

Do.,

(Day Boats),

1,391

951,341

Nil.

7,927.84

7,927.84

""

Total,....

9,858

9,005,737

$74,545.18

:

4.

D 12

Steam-launches.

18. On the 31st December, 1919, there were 350 steam-launches (including licensed motor boats) employed in the harbour. Of these, 304 were licensed for the conveyance of passengers, etc. 24 were the property of the Colonial Government, and 22 belonged to the Imperial Government, comprising 4 Military and 18 Naval. In addition to the above there were 31 motor boats privately owned for pleasure and private purposes.

Five coxswains' certificates were suspended for incompetence or negligence in the performance of their duties; one of which was suspended for three months, two for two months each, and two for one month each; the holders, besides, being required to pass a further examination, on expiration of their suspensions before their certificates were returned.

Five hundred and twenty (520) engagements and five hundred and five (505) discharges of Masters and Engineers were made during the year.

Seven (7) steam-launches were permitted to carry arms for their protection against pirates.

5. Emigration and Immigration.

19. Fifty nine thousand nine hundred and sixty-nine (59,969) emigrants left Hongkong for various places during the year 1919, (43,830 in 1918). Of these, 25,303 were carried in British ships, and 34,666 in Foreign ships.

One hundred and thirty-six thousand and twenty (136,020) returning emigrants were reported to have been brought to Hong- kong from the several places to which they had emigrated either from this Colony or from Coast Ports, as against 74,109 in 1918. Of these, 92,385 arrived in British ships and 43,635 in Foreign ships.

6. Registry, etc., of Shipping.

20. During the year, 12 ships were registered under the provi- sions of the Imperial Merchant Shipping Act, and 25 Certificates of Registry cancelled. 155 documents, etc., were dealt with in con- nection with the Act, the fees on which amounted to $1,351.00 as compared with $2,568.00 in 1918.

7. Marine Magistrate's Court.

21. One hundred and sixty-seven (167) cases were heard in the Marine Magistrate's Court (261 in 1918). Breach of Harbour Regulations, Boarding ships without permission, Failing to observe the Rules of the Road, Making fast to steamers while under way, Neglecting to exhibit the Regulation Lights, Being in Causeway Bay without permit, Dredging in the Harbour without permit, and Carrying passengers in excess were the principal offences.

L

D 13

8. Marine Court.

(Under Section 19 of Ordinance 10 of 1899.)

22. During the year 1919 three courts were held, riz.:-

(1.) On the 2nd day of April, 1919, to enquire into the circumstances of being asleep on duty on the part of E. High, Second Officer of the British Steamship Chun Sang.

(2.) On the 10th day of June, 1919, to enquire into the circum-` stances of misconduct and drunkenness on the part of W. Hudson, Second Officer of the British Steamship Chun Sany.

(3.) On the 22nd day of September, 1919, to enquire into the circumstances of misconduct on the part of F. Twomey, Third Officer of the British Steamship Jason.

9. Examination of Masters, Mates, and Engineers.

(Under Board of Trade Regulations.)

23. The following Tables show the number of Candidates examined under Ordinance No. 10 of 1899 for Certificates of Compe- tency, distinguishing those who passed from those who failed:-

Grade.

Passed.

Failed.

Master, ...

2

Master, River Steamers,

1

0

First Mate,

28

20

Second Mate,

12

15

Second Mate, Temporary,

I

0

Mate, River Steamers,...

5

4

Total,...

52

41

First Class Engineer, ...

12

Second Class Engineer,

23

28

5

9

Total,...

35

11

D 14

For Steamships not exceeding 60 tons, under Section 37 of Ordinance 10 of 1899:-

For Master,

For Engineers,

Candidates.

Total,...

Passed.

Failed.

73

16

91

N

164

18

10. Examination of Pilots.

(Under Ordinance No. 3 of 1901.)

24. There were no candidates examined during the year. Nineteen (19) licences were renewed.

11. Sunday Cargo-Working.

25. There were 1,122 permits issued during the year under Ordinance No. 1 of 1891, as compared with 1,247 in 1918. Of these, 440 were not used as the ships did not arrive up to time, and in some cases it was found unnecessary to work cargo on the Sunday.

The Revenue collected under this head amounted to $108,900 as against $133,800 in 1918.

The decrease is due to the increase of tonnage after the war, hence no necessity to work cargo on Sundays generally.

12.-New Territories.

(Twenty-first year of British Administration.)

26. The Out-stations attached to the Harbour Department con- tinued to perform the work allotted to them and during the year Licences, etc., were issued by them as follows:-

1918.

1919.

Cheung Chau, opened 1899.

2,667

2,532

Tai 0,

1899.

2,500

2,177

>>

Tai Po,

1900..

2,882

2,330

Sai Kung,

1902.

914

808

""

Long Ket, Deep Bay, Lantao,

1905..

1,288

1,455

39

1911....

1,078

1,114

;;

1912..

1,719

1,515

72

13,057

11,931

The Revenue collected by this Department from the New Territories during the year was $30,625.30 as compared with $34,273.45 in 1918.

D 15

13.-Lighthouses.

GAP ROCK LIGHTHOUSE.

27. During the year 1919, eight hundred and forty-three (843) vessels were reported by telegraph as passing this station and ten (10) were not reported, owing to communication being inter- rupted.

Three thousand and sixty (3,060) telegraphic messages, includ- ing meteorological reports for the Observatory, were sent and four hundred and ninety-four (494) were received.

Telegraphic communications were maintained throughout the year with the exception of six (6) complete days, and fourteen other short interruptions.

There were two hundred and eight (208) hours and ten (10) minutes of fog, during the year and the fog-signal was fired one thousand three hundred and nine (1,309) times.

On nine (9) occasions the relief was delayed by rough weather.

WAGLAN LIGHTHOUSE.

During the year 1919, one thousand nine hundred and ninety- eight (1,998) vessels were reported. One thousand six hundred and thirty-seven (1,637) messages were sent and four hundred and twenty (420) received.

Owing to telegraphic communication being interrupted three hundred and fifteen (315) vessels were not reported.

There were four hundred and six (406) hours of fog, and the fog-signal was fired four thousand one hundred and seventy (4,170) times.

The reliefs were regular throughout the year.

GREEN ISLAND.

During the year 1919, one thousand four hundred and eighty- eight (1,488) vessels were signalled and reported. In addition three hundred (300) messages were sent and forty-seven (47) were received.

Owing to telephone communications being interrupted during the year sixty-eight (68) vessels were not reported.

Kap Sing Lighthouse has been regularly inspected and except through a mechanical breakdown, when the light was exhibited as a fixed light for eight days, it has been working satisfactory.

The ten (10) Aga Flash Lights have been attended to from this station, namely, Cape Collinson, Mawan Island, Signal Hill Lighthouse, the Fairway and Cust Rock Buoys, and Harbour of Refuge.

These have been burning continuously, accurately, and satis- factorily during the year.

D 16

14. Government Harbour Moorings.

28. The demand for more Mooring Buoys at West Point necessitated the laying down of five (5) new moorings complete viz., two (2) B Class and three (3) C Class. These moorings are known as B 49, B 50, C 46, C 47, and C 48.

A further demand is also anticipated and will have to be provided for later.

During the year 1919, forty-four (44) moorings were lifted and relaid after necessary repairs had been effected. Twenty-two (22) Buoys were scaled and painted, and two (2) new B Class and two (2) new C Class Buoys were built by contract.

The total expenditure for upkeep of Government Moorings and Buoys for the year was $30,286.46.

The total Revenue for the year 1919 was $69,440.

"1

27

"

HARBOUR DEPARTMENT,

23rd March, 1920.

""

1918 1917

15

$59,594. $61,156.

1

BASIL R. H. TAYLOUR, Captain R.N.,

Harbour Master, &c.

Table I-NUMBER, TONNAGE, CREWS, AND CARGOES OF VESSELS ENTERI

COUNTRIES WHENCE ARRIVED.

BRITISH.

WITH CARGÕES,

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

WIT

Vessels.

Tons.

Crews, Vessels. Tons. Crews. Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Vessels.

Australia,

British North Borneo..........

23

33,684

1,654

23 33,684 1.654

22

13

20,566 1.054

:

13

20,566 1,054

2

Canada,

2

32

159,084 1,535

32

Coast of China, Ships,.....

2.838

2,162,993 |150.322

182 217,836 12,374

159,084

3.020* 2.3×0,329 162,696

1,525

1

1.167

Steamships under 60 tons....

776

Junks,

:

:

7,922

Cochin China

Dutch East Indies,

77

93,780

5,328

35

60,432

2,574

77

Egypt,

:

:

:

93.780 5,328

96

35

60,432 2,574

123

:

:.

T:

!

Europe, Mediterranean Ports...........

Atlantic Ports,

"

Baltic Ports,

2:

Formosa,

:

2,711

59

:

:

118

512,106 14,138

79

179,478 8,180

2

10,095

443

81 275.217 8,656

:

:

3 12,806 502

16

:

:

:

:

B

:

240

118

512,106 14,138

28

<

6

24.569

307

85

204,047 8,487

52

81

275,217 8,656

347

7

62

222

20,076 $3,004

172

10

5

5.553

301

665

522,765 31,487

71

:

17

:

:

:..

179

:

2

3.489

88

3

4,765

162

:

62

264

20,076

3,004

660 517,212

31,186

Steamships under 60 tons,

Great Britain,

India,

Japan,

........

Kwong-chau-wan,

Macao, Ships,

Pr

Junks,

Mauritius,

North America,

North and South Pacific Islands,

Philippine Islands,

:

1,276

74

:

68 84.265 4.699

:..

:

:

Ports in Hainan and Gulf of Tonkin,

121

116,023 7.548

Port Arthur,

7,299

286

Russia in Asia,

1,297

69

Siam,

110

133,160 8,311

:

:

:

:

:

68

84,265 4,699

19

121

116,023

7,543

519

27

:

7,299

286

22

3.230

++

2

4,527

113

110

133,160 8,311

77

:

South America,.

Straits Settlements,..

:

86

152,166 7,535

10,309

364

90

Tsingtau,

18

22,625 1,480

16,925

893

21

United States of America,

50

207,032 5.011

50

Wei-hai-wei,

11,414

687

162,475 7,899

39.550 2,373

207,032 5,011

11.414

52

8.

152 63

637

+

South Africa,

TOTAL,

4,486 4,773,896 | 263,335

205

291,506

14.814 4,691

5,065,402 278.149

12,100 | 4,796

FOREIGN.

D 17

ER, TONNAGE, CREWS, AND CARGOES OF VESSELS ENTERED AT PORTS IN THE COLONY OF HONGKONG FROM

'ARGOES,

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

ons.

Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons.

Crews. Vessels. Tons. Crews. Vessels. Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons.

Crews.

:

3.684

1,654

23

0.566 1,054

9,084

2.993150.322

13

33,684 1,654

20,566

22

69,109 1,912

22

69,109

1,912

1,054

2

5,500

156

2

5,500

156

1,535

182 217,336 12.374

32 159,084 1,535

3,020 | 2,360,329 162,696

1

3,014

50

...

1

3,014

50

:

:

3,780

5,328

1,432 2,574

35

77 93,780 5.328

60,432

96

2,574

123

1,167

776

28.516 14,943

7,922 861,973 | 131,388

110,972 5,579

263,410 7,899

753,519 66,546

198

1,708

2,013

!

51,541 17,909

323,112 28,757 9,935

173,076 8,874 1,365 926,595 75,420

2.484 80,057 32,852

1,185,085 160,145

96

1,267

43

124

110,972 5,579

264,677 7.942

BRITISH.

:

:

:

2711

59

10.095

443

12,806

502

16

90,886

3,279

16

90,886 8,279

:

4

14,641

361

+

14,611

361

3

13,905

115

3

13,905

115

240

233,871 11,880

240

233,871 11,880

1,106 14,138

118

512,106

14.138

28

113,790

3,361

5,853

174

29

119.643 3,535

1,478

8,180

6

24,569

307

85

204,047 | 8,487

52

142,967

3,192

4,338

39

53

147,305 3.231

.217 8,656

4,076

3,004

:

:

:

SI

275,217

8,656

347

798,796 23,636

7,998

168

351

806,794 23,804

62

20,076 3,004

172

52,272 8,770

172

52,272 8,770

212

31,186

5

5.553

301

665

522,765 31,487

71

11,502

921

10

8,316

541

81

19,818 1,462

:

17

527

199

8

216

25

743

263

:

179

35,560

2.147

239 27,744

3,932

418

63,304

6,079

,276

74

2

3.489

88

3

4,765

162

1,065

78

:

:

1,065

78

:

:

265

4,699

68 84,265

4,699

19

23,373

986

7,139

196

21

30,512

1,182

,023

7.548

121

116,023 7.543

519

,299

286

4

7,299 286

22

.297

69

1

3,230

44

2

4,527

113

277,603 25,222

23,987

10,492

t

4,065

186

524

281,668 25,408

991

22

:

343

3

5,601

201

6

25,987 991

16,093

344

160

8,311

110 133,160

8,311

77

78,025 4,504

1

2,222

15

78

80,247

4,519

...

:

:

166

7,535

625

1,480

032

5.011

414

637

:

:

:

48,046

969

10,309

364

90 162,475

7,899

52

86,561 2,800

16,925

893

21 39,550 2,373

50 207,032 5,011

8 11,414 637

152

8

636,560 16,259

6.487

440

48,016

969

4.295

84

51

90,856 2,884

:

152

636,560 16,259

6,487 440

896263,335

205 291,506

14,814 4,691

5,065,402 278,149

12,100 | 4,796,929 338,926

4,196 626,783 61,183

16,296 5,423,712 | 400,109

:

WITH CARGOES,

TOTAL.

IN BALLAST.

IN THE COLONY OF HONGKONG FROM EACH COUNTRY IN THE YEAR 1919,

TOTAL.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels. Tons.

Crews. Vessels. Tons.

¡Crews.

Vessels.

Tons.

Crews.

Vessels.

Tons.

Crews.

FOREIGN.

TOTAL.

22

:

69,109

1,912

45 102.793 3.566

15 102,793 8,566

2

5,500

156

15

26,066 1,210

15

26.066 1,210

...

:

3,014

50

33

162,098

1,585

33.

162,098 1,585

198 173,076 8,874

1,365

1,708

2,013

51,541 17,909

323,112 28,757

926,595 75,420

2,484 80,057 32,852

9,935 1,185,085 | 160,145

4,005 | 2,916,512 | 216,868

380

890,412

776

28,516

14,943

1,708

:

96 110,972 5,579

7,922

173

861,973 131,388

2,013

51,541 17,909

323,112 28,757

21,248 4.385

2,484

9,935

3.306,924238,116

80,057

32,852

1,185.085 160,145

201.752 10,907

173 204,752 10,907

1,267

43

124 264,677 7,942

158

323,842 10,473

1

1.267

43

159

325,109 10,516

IN BALLAST.

:

:

16 90,886

3,279

17

98,597 3,338

10,095

443

19

103.692

3,781

+

14,6+1

361

14.641

361

:

14,641

361

3

13,905

115

3

13,905

115

3

13,905

115

:

240

233,871

11,880

240

233,871 11,880

240

233,871 11,880

5,853

174

29

119.643 3,535

146

625,896 17,499

5,853

174

147

631,749 17,673

4,338

39

53

147,805 3,231

131

322,445 11,372

7

28,907

346

138

351,352 11,718

7,998

168

351

806,794 23,804

428

1,074,013 | 32,292

7,998

168

432 1,082,011 32,460

· 172

52,272 8,770

234

72,348 11,774

234 72,348 11,774

10

8,316

541

81

19,818

1,462

731

528.714 32,107

15

13,869

842

746

8

216

64

25

743

263

17

527

199

216

64

25

542,583

743

32,949

263

239

27.744 3,932

418

63,304

6,079

179 35,560 2,147

239

27,744

3,932

418

63,301

6,079

I

1,065

78

2

2,341

152

2

3,489

88

5,830

240

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

2

7,139

196

21

30,512

1,182

87 107,638

5,685

7,139

196

89

114,777 5,881

5

4,065

186

524

281,668 25,408

640

393,626 32,765

4,065

186

645

397,691 32,951

22

:

...

:..

2,987

991

26

31,286 1,277

26:

31,286 1,277

3

1

5,601

2,222

201

6

16,093

544

4

15

78

80,247 4,519

187

11,789

211,185

412

8,831

245

20,620

657

12,815

2,222

15

188

218,407 12,830

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

9

48,046

969

9

48,046

969

9

18,046

969

4,295

81

54 90,856 2,884

138

238,727 10,335

14,604

448

144

253,331 10,783

18

22.625 1.480

16,925

893

21

39,550 2,373

152 636,560 16,259

6,487

202

843,592

21,270

202

$43,592 21,270

440

16

17,901 1,077

16

17,901 1,077

626,783

61,183

16,296 | 5,423,712 | 400,109 16,586 9,570,825 | 602,261 4.401 918,289

75,997

20,987 10,489,114 | 678,258

2

:

:

4,196

COUNTRIES TO WHICH DEPARTED.

Australia,

British North Borneo,..

Canada.

Ceast of China, Ships,

::

}:

WITH CARGOES.

SHIPPED.

BRITISHI.

IN BALLAST.

Table II.-NUMBEI

Hanker

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Vessels.

Tons. Crew-

Vessels.

Tons.

Bunker

Cargoes. Coal.

Steamships under 60 tons..........

Junks,

Cochin China,...................

Dutch East Indies,

Egypt,

Europe, Mediterranean Ports,.....

"

Atlantic Ports,

Baltic Ports.

2:

Formosa,

Great Britain.....

India,

Japan,

Kwongchau-wan,

19

25,842

970

12

20,656 1,124

21

180,822 8,905

2,739 2,333,774 158,887

:

:

Macao, Ships,

多多

Steamships under 60 tons,

;;

Junks,.

:

61

80,544 3,895

10

18,714

665

13,514

512

3,500

91

20

25,98

2,400

12

20,65

8,000

24

180,82

142,300

114. 133,004

7.020 16.600 7.853

2,466,77

:

:

16,300

11

13,753

2.3.0

72

94,29

4,000

24

59,577 1.156

4.190

34

78.29

900

:

13.51

72

306,293 7,004

58

144,808

6,470

93

286,605 8,355

25,000

4,800

73

WW

73

311,09

:

22,900

144,80

24,200

93

286,60

58 18,004 2,273

1,900

215

32

الت

18,21

865

522,992 31,530

12,100

:

865

522.99

Mauritius,

North America,.

North and South Pacific Islands,

Philippine Islands,

Ports in Hainan and Gulf of Tonkin,

Port Arthur,

Russia in Asia,

Siam,

:

:

:

:

:

:

73 118,187 4,913

77

ང་

78,477

4,099

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

26,600

8

19.929

458

4.300

S}

138,11

3,300

59

72,230 3,985 7.100

1.36

145.70

20,163

197

200

98 115,911 7,140

38.900

5.099

10,063

100

100

5

25.26

690 1,900

107

125,97

Straits Settlements,

112 190,360 9,895

34,800

Tsingtau,

22

66,965 1,948

1,100

11,538

3 16,789

298 1,700

587 1,200

116

201,89%

25

$3,75

United States of America,

26 111,277 2,246

3,300

11 32,312

574 5,500

37

143,58

Wei-hai-wei.

2,095

144

:

400

:

2

2,09:

:

:

South Africa,

South America,

TOTAL,

4,429 4,651,003 | 261,172

:

377,100

247 379,400

15,553

45,306

1.676

5,030,40:

ES.

BRITISH.

IN BALLAST.

Table II-NUMBER, TONNAGE, CREWS, AND CARGOES OF VESSELS CLEARED

TOTAL.

SHIPPED.

WITH CARGOES.

SHIPPED.

Vessels.

Tous. Crews.

Bunker Coal.

Vessels.

Tons.

Crews.

Vessels. Tons

Crews.

Vessels.

Bunker

Cargoes.

Cargoes,

Bunker Coal.

Cargoes.

Bunker Coal.

Coal.

SHIPPED.

3,500

91

5

20

25.933

975

3,500

23

63,145

1,940

5,300

2,400

12 20,656

1.124

2,400

8,000

142,300

133,004 7,020

16,600

24 180,822 8,905

2,853 2,466,778 |165.907

8,000

26

158,900

1,280

124.008 2.683

870,426 70,977

300

+4,400

89

آنان

6,807

23,224 12,836

1,010.971: 114,957

5,000

1,934

3,163

16,300

11

13.753

575 2,300

72

4,000

24 59,577

1,156

4.100

94.297 4.170

B+ 78,291 1,821

18,600

53

61,529 8,120

12,100

39

8,100

54

150,941 4.470

7,500

44

:

:

900

4

13.514

512

900

15

89,870

3,475

:

:

4,600

:

:

17,775

343

600

:

:

17,893

316

:

300

:

137

148,227 5,513

4,000

125

25,000

4.800

73

500

73

311,093

7,077

22,900

58

144,808 *6,470

24,200

98

286,605 8.355

1,900

215

32

IE

12222

59

25,500

38

165,416

4.127

500

1

22,900

41

121,313 2,747

4,500

2

:

24,200

297

637,750 18,593

14,100

20

12,100

:

:

18,219 2.305

865 522.992 31,530

1,900

177

54,381 8.974

6,400

2

12,100

77

15,765 1,219

400

4

14

:

:

:

:

462

167

11

:

330

41,353

4,826

57

2

:

:

:

:

2,341

158

2,000

:

:

:

:

:

26,600

8

19.929

158

4,300

81 138,116 5,371

4,300

59

72,230

8.985

7,100

136

145,707 8,084

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

30,900

28

64.224: 1,633

12,400

285

175,683

19,595

:

.:

4,500

13

22.400

159

200

38.900

5,099

100

100

25,262

297

10,063

690

1,900

107

125,974 7,830

300

23,702

784

1.800

40,800

17

3,095 49,711

13,200

19

I

3.627

:

192

:

12

42,464 1,166

1,800

34,800

11,538

4,100

3

16,789

587

3,300

11 32,312

298 1,700

1,200

574 5,500

116

25

37

400

201,898 10,193

$3,754 2,535

143,589 2,820

2,095 144

36,500

69

123,914 4,030

8,400

5,300

+

8,800

400

5,062

119 467,082

187

300

1

14,402

18,000

10

720

17

:

:

$77,100

247 379,400 15,553 45.300

1,676 | 5,030,403 | 276,725

422.400

10,623 | 4,572,979311,572

183,000

5,699

D 18

ES OF VESSELS CLEARED AT PORTS IN THE COLONY OF HONGKONG TO EACH COUNTRY IN THE YEAR 1919.

FOREIGN.

TH CARGOES.

Crews.

SHIPPED.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

SHIPPED.

WITH CARGOES.

SHIPPED.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Bunker Coal.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Vessels.

Tons.

Crews.

Bunker

Cargoes.

Bunker Coal.

Cargoes.

Bunker Coal.

Cargoes. Coal.

1,940

5,300

23 63,145

1,940

5,300

42

88.987 2,910

:

8,800

12

20.656 1,124

2.400

2.683

300

1

1,941

47

700

27

125.949

2,730

1,000

70,977

44,400

89

76,391 3,914

8,300

1,369

946,817

74,891

52,700

50 304.830 11,588

4.019 | 3,204,200 |229,864

3.300

186,700

12,836

5,000

1,934

57,223

114,957

3,163

289,590

20,822 12,000

46,405

2.501 80,447

33,658

17,000

آزاد

9,970 | 1,300,561 | 161,362

6.807

23.224 12,836

1.010.971 114,957

5.000

8,120

12,100

39

51,468 1,983 4,600

92

112,997

10.103

16,700

114

4.470

7,500

89,598

2,094

9,400

98

240,539

6,564

16.900

64 169,655

142,073 12,015

5.135

28,400

11,500

:

3,475

4.600

343

600

:

:

15

:

316

300

:

:

:

89,870 3.475

:

4,600

19

103,384 3,987

5.500

17,775

343

600

17,775

343

600

17,893

316

300

17,893

316

300

5,513

4,600

125

109,489 4,661 3,400

262

257,716 10,174

8.000

137

148.227

4,600

4.127

500

1

4,233

56

800

39

169,649

4,183

1,300

110

471,709 11,131

25,500

2,747

4,500

2

4,788

108

900

46

126,101 2,855

5,400

102

266.121 9,217

27,400

18,593

14,100

20

29,847

810

2,000

317

667,597 19,403

16,100

390

924.355 26.948

38.300

8,974

:

6,400

2

709

108

100

179

55,090 9,082

6,500

235

72:385

11.247

8,300

1.219

400

4

1,795

166

200

81

17,560

1,385

600

942

538,757 32,749

:

12.500

167

4,826

158

11

280

96

25

742

263

14

462

167

57

:

.:

7,830

604

387

49.183

5,430

330

2,000

2

2,341

158

:

2,000

41.353

2,341

1,826

158

2,000

:

:

:

1,633

19,595

4,500

13 22,652 657 3,000

41

22.400

159 160,046 6,836

5,800

544

86,876 2,290

335,729 26,431

7,500

101 182,411 6,546

31.100

28,200

462 249.160 23,694

27.700

:

784

3,095

192

1.800

18,200

:

:

P

23,702

784

1,800

19 23,221

1,059

5,100

66

72,932 4,154

:

:

12

43.865

981

18,300

145

165.622 10,235

:

:

1

3,627

192

}

3,627

192

1,166

1,800

4,331

44

300

13

46,795

1,210

2,100

12

42,464 1,166

4,030

8,400

4,952

141

200

73 128,866

4,171

8,600

181

314,274 13,925

187

300

421

29

200

5

5,483

216

500

26

72,027 2,135

14,402

18,000

10

40,125

389 2,300

129 507,207 14,791

20.300

145

578,359 16,648

47

:

:

1

720

47

3

2,815

191

:

:

:

:

2,000

52,100

1,800

43,200

4,400

21,300

400

311,572

183,000 5,699 980,930

91,029 59,300 16,322 5,553,909 | 402,601

| 242,300

15,052 | 9,223,982 | 572,744

560,100

j

TO EACH COUNTRY IN THE YEAR 1919.

WITH CARGOES.

TOTAL.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

SHIPPED.

Vessels. Tons. ('rews.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews,

Bunker Coal.

Vessels. Fons.

Crews.

groes.

Bunker Coal.

Bunker

Bunker

Cargoes. Coal.

Cargoes. Coal.

SHIPPED.

:

SHIPPED,

5,300

12

88.987 2.910

8,800

91

43 89,078 2,915

8,800

12

20.656 1,124

2.400

12

1,000

50

304.830

11,588

8.300

1.941

47

700

20,656 1.124

51 306.771 11,635

2,400

9,000

52,700

4.01a : 3,204,200 | 229,864

186,700

203

209,395

10.934

24.900

17,000

567

23.224 12,836

5.000

1,934

6.807 1,010.971 114,957

3.163

57.223

289.590 46.405

20.822 12,000

4,222 | 2,413,595 240,798

2413,59

2,501

211,600

80.447

33.658

17,000

9,970

1,300,561 | 161,362

16,700

114 142,073 12,015

28,400

50

65.221

2,558

6,900

164

207,294

14,573

35,300

16.900

61 169.655 5.135

11,500

68

149,175

8,250 13,500

132

318,830

8.385

25,000

4,600

19

103.384

3,987

5,500

19

103,384 3,987

:

5,500

600

17,775

343

600

:

17,775

343

600

300

17,893

316

300

17,893

316

:

300

8,000

137 148,227

5513

4,600

125

109,489

4,661

3,400

262

257,716 10,174

8,000

1,300

110

471,709 11,131

:

25,500

2

9,033

129

1,300

112

480,742 11,260

26,800

5,400

102

266.121

9,217

27,400

4.788

JOS

900

104

270,909 9.325

28.300

16,100

390

924.355 26,948

38.300

20

29,847

810

2,000

410

954,202 27,758

40,300

6,500

235

600

72:385

942 538.757 32,749

11.247

8,300

3

924

140

100

238

73,309 11,387

8,400

12,500

4

1,795

166

200

946

540.552 22,915

12,700

14

462

167

11

280

96

25

742

263

330

41.853 1,826

57

7,830

604

2,000

2

2,341

158

2,000

:

:

387

49,183

5.430

~

2.341

158

2,000

:

:

7,500

28,200

101 182,411 6.546

31,100

21

42.581 1,115 7,300

122

224,992

7,661

462 249.160 23,694

27.700

219

232.276 10.821 12,900 680

481.436 34515

:

:

:

:

38,400

*40,600

1,800

12

43.865

981

2,000

18,300

1445

165,622 10,235

52,100

28

5.099

33,284

100

100

B

48.964 1,081

:

1,749 7,000

173

I

3,627

192

:

2.100

12

42,461 1,166

1,800

8.600

181

314,274 13,925

43,200

500

26 72,027 2,135

4,400

4,331

16.490

17,210

44

300

13

198,906 11,984

3.627

16,795 1,210

192

:

:

2,100

59,100

2,100

439 1.900

189

330,764 14.364

45,100

616 1,400

30

20.300

145 578,359 16,648

21,300

21

72.437

963 7.800

166

89,287 2.751

650.796 17,611

5,800

29,100

8

2,815

191

400

3

191

191

400

:

242,300

15.052 9,223,982 | 572,744

560,100

5.946

1,360,330 | 106,582 | 104,600 20,998 10,584,312 679.326

664,700

Table III.-TOTAL NUMBER, TONNAGE, CREWS, and CARG

BRITISH.

Names of Ports.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels. Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons.

Crews. Yessels.

Tons.

Crews. Vessel

Aberdeen,

Cheung Chau,.

Long Ket,

:

:

10

Saikung,.

Shaukiwan,...

رو

Stanley,

Tai O,.....

:

:

450

Tai Po,

Yaumati,..

Victoria,

4,486 4,773,896 | 263,335

205 | 291,506

14,814

4,691 5,065,402 278,149 11,82

Total,

4,486 4,773,896263,335

205 291,506

14,814

4,691 5,065,402 | 278,149 12,10

D 19

Table III.-TOTAL NUMBER, TONNAGE, CREWS, and CARGOES of VESSELS ENTERED at EACH PORT in the

BRITISH.

FOREIGN.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

ΤΟΤΑΣ.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

ssels. Tons. Crews. Vessels. Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels. Tons. Crews. Vessels. Tons. Crews. Vessels. Tons.

106

6,798

898

18

SOG

131

124

7,6041

30

:

1,999

286

12

25

32

2,041

:

:

81

2,086

524

14

729

99

2

15

8

56

900

309

95

95

2,815

ลง

2

15

230

61

65

1,130

3

214

51

4

374

69

7

588

,486 4,773,896 |263,335

205 291,506 14,814 4,691 5,065,402 278,149

11,822 4,784,917 |336,850

4,149 624,602 60,798

15,971 5,409,519

,486 4,773,896 263,335

205 291,506 14,814 4,691 5,065,402 |278,149

12,100 4,796,929 338,926

4,196 626,783

61,183

16,296 5,423,712

D 19

ESSELS ENTERED at EACH PORT in the COLONY of HONGKONG in the YEAR 1919.

FOREIGN.

TOTAL.

IS.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons.

Crews.

Vessels. Tons.

Crews.

Vessels. Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

898

18

806

131

124

7,604

1,029 108

6,798

898

18

806

131

124

7,604 1,029

286

42

25

32

2,041

311

30

1,999

286

2

42

25

32

2,041

311

524

14

729

99

95

2,815

623

81

2,086

524

14

729

99

95

2,815

623

8

2

15

8

2

15

8

15

8

309

9

230

61

65

1,130

370

56

900

309

230

61

65

1,130

370

51

4

374

69

7

336,850

4,149 624,602 60,798

588

120

3

214

51

4

374

69

7

15,971 5,409,519 |397,648 | 16,308 | 9,558,813 600,185

338,926 4,196 626,783 61,183 16,296 5,423,712 | 400,109 16,586 9,570,825 602,261

4,354916,108 | 75,612

588

120

20,66210,474,921|675,797

4,401 | 918,289 | 75,997 | 20,987 |10,489,114 678,258

Names of Ports.

Aberdeen.

Cheung Chau,

Table IV.-TOTAL NUMBER, TONNAGE, CREW:

BRITISH.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Bunker Coal.

Bunker

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Coal.

Vessels. Tous. Crews.

Bunker C'oal.

Ve

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

Victoria...

4,429 4,651,003 261,172 377,100

247 379,400

15,553

45,300

4.676 5,030,403 | 276,725422,400 1

Total,

4,429 4,651,003261,172 377,100 247379,400 15,553 45,300

4,676 5.030,403 276,725 422,400

10

Saikung...

Shaukiwan,

Stanley,

Tai O,

Yaumati,

D 20

IBER, TONNAGE, CREWS, and CARGOES of VESSELS CLEARED at EACH PORT in the COLONY of HONGKONG in t

FOREIGN.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

WITH

Tons. Crews.

Bunker Coal.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Bunker Coal.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Bunker Coal.

Bunker

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Vessels.

Tons.

Coal.

50

1,756

317

39 4,500

352

89

6.256

669

128

60

392

65

15

520

125

50

1,75

12

:

34

1,267

257

54

1,295

319

85

2,562

576

34

1,26

2

15

8

2

15

8

21

438

133

44

694

237

65

1.132

370

21

430

1

105

21

165

21

5,020,408 276,725422,400 10,510 4,569,390 | 310,805 | 183,000

5,552973,929 | 90,027 59.300

16,062 5,543,319 | 400,842 242,300

14,939 | 9,220,39:

5,030,403 276,725 422,400 10,623 4.572,979 | 311,572 | 183,000

5,699 980,930 91,029

59,300

16,322 5,553,909402,611 |242,300

15,052 9,223,982

#

ED at EACH PORT in the COLONY of HONGKONG in the YEAR 1919.

FOREIGN.

TOTAL.

ALLAST.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Crews.

Bunker Coal.

Vessels.

Tons.

Crews.

Bunker Coal.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Bunker Coal.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Bunker Coal.

Vessels.

Tons. Crew.

352

65

$9

6,256

669

50

1,756

317

39

1,500

352

89

6,256

66

15

520

125

:

128

60

7

392

65.

15

520

12

:

:

319

88

2,562

576

34

1,267

257

5f

1.295

319

:

88

2.562 571

8

2

15

8

2

15

$

15

237

65

1,132

870

:

21

438

133

41

694

237

65

65

1,132

370

21

105

21

1

105

21

105

2

90,027 59,300

16.062 5,543,319 400,842 | 242,300

14,939 | 9,220,393571,977 560,100

5,799

1,353,329 | 105,580 | 104,600

20,738 10,573,722 | 677,55^

91,029 59,300 16,322 5,553,909 402,611 242,300 15,052 | 9,223,982 || 572,744 560,100

5,946

1,360,330 | 106,582 | 104,600

20,998 10,584,312 | 679,32€

Table V.

NUMBER, TONNAGE, and CREWS of VESSELS of EACH NATION ENTERED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong in the Year 1919.

ENTERED.

NATIONALITY

OF

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

VESSELS.

Vessels. Tons.

Crews.

Vessels. Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons.

Crews.

D 21

British,

American,

4,486 4,773,896 263,335 144

205 291,506

403,674 10,219

7 15,185

14,814

227

4,691

151

5,065,402 278,149

418,859 10,446

Austrian,

Belgian,

Chinese,

1,491

793,963| 83,278

91 71,224

4,857

1,582

865,187 88,135

Junks,

8,101

897,533 133,535

2,252

350,856

32,689

10,353

1,248,389 166,224

Danish,

5

16,983 170

1

737

78

6

Dutch,

94

232,721

6,701

19

29,492

840

113

17,720

262,213 7,541

248

French,

157

203,111 11,757

2

1,383

86

159 204,494 11,843

Inter-Allied,

5 27,959

858

1

4,015

71

6 31,974 929

Italian,

Japanese,

1,058 2,029,890 66,545

91

81,451

3,385

1,149 2,111,341

69,930

Norwegian,

88

92,805 4,476

8

6,847

332

96

99,652

6,608

Portuguese,

150

52,958 5,338

6

10,003

484

156

62,961 5,822

Russian,

6

6,156 337

2

3,833

161

8

9,989

498

Swedish,

Siamese,

2,217

37

1

2,217

37

7,916 533

7,916 533

Steamships under 60

tons trading to ports outside the Colony,

TOTAL,

793

29,043 15,142

1,716 51,757 17,973

2,509

80,800 33,115

16,586 9,570,825 602,261

4,401 918,289 75,997

20,987 10,489114 678,258

Table VI.

NUMBER, TONNAGE, and CREWS of VESSELS of EACH NATION CLEARED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong in the Year 1919.

CLEARED.

NATIONALITY

D 22

OF

VESSELS.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels. Tous. Crews.

Vessels. Tous. Crews. Vessels. Tons. Crews.

British,

American,..

4,429 4,651,003 261,172 129 353,810 8,519

247379,400 15,553 24 65,141 1,153

4,676 5,030,403 276,725 153 418,951

9,672

Austrian,

Belgian,

I 3.203

63

1

3,203

63

Chinese,

1,509

Junks,

Danish,.

Dutch,

84

819,624 85,241 7,137 1,052,324 119,783 16,983 167 215,132 6,834

79 58,643

4,154

1,588

878,267 89,395

3,220

297,420

47,009

10,357

1,349,744 166,792

1

737

78

6

17,720

245

29

54,414

1,434

113

269,546 8,268

French,

148

196,123 10,899

12 8,803

568

160

204,926 11,467

Greek,

16,200

275

5

16,200

275

Inter-Allied,

6

31,974 1,098

6

31,974

1,098

>

Japanese,

803 1,716,192 56,355

338374,970 13,119

1,141 2,091,162 69,474

Norwegian,

60

71,723

3,563

29 31,386 1,349

89

103,109! 4,912

Portuguese, ....

148

56,148

5,337

10

7,086

534

158

63,229 5,871

Russian,

12,501

439

3

2,055

133

11

14,556

572

Swedish,

1

2,217

37

I

2,217

37

Siamese,

4,547

297

3

3,369

242

7,916] 539

Steamships under 60 tous

trading to ports outside

581

23,686 13,003

1,945

57,503

20,918

2,526

81,189 33,921

the Colony.

TOTAL,.

123,98 15,052 9,223,982 572,744

1,360,330 5,946 1,360,330 106,582 20,998 10,584,312 679,326

!.

Table VII.

Total Number, Tonnage, Crews, Passengers, and Cargoes of Junks ENTERED in the Colony of Hongkong, from Ports on the Coast of China and Macao, in the Year 1919.

Cargo.

Ballast.

Total.

Vessels. Tons. Crew.

gers.

Passen- Cargo, Ves- sels.

Tons.

Crew.

tons.

Passen-

gers.

Vessels. Tons. Crew.

Passen- Cargo, gers.

tons.

Canton,

1,522

246,168 29,428

West River,

4,669

Macao,

179

35,560 2,147

180,099 866 190,240 485,680 84,726 102,481 247,070 | 1,055 |128,913 10

13,514

2,388

436,408 42,942

180,099

14,405

1,296

5,724

614,593 99,131 |103,777 |247,070

12,146 239 27,744

3,932

418

63,304 6,079

10 12,146

East Coast,..

1,574

121,191 15,500

3

64,194 66 2,170

448

1,640

123,361 15,948

64,494

West Coast,

157

8,934 1,734

1,627 26 1,789

390

183

10,723 2,124

5

1,627

Total 1919,

8,101

897,533 133,535 |102,499 | 505,436 | 2,252 | 350,856

32,689

1,296

10,353 1,248,389 166,224 | 103,795 | 505,436

S

Total 1918,

8,431

1,126,962) 131,890 62,176 738,007 |3,383 | 419,61

51,866

447

|1,546,673 11,814 |1,546,673 183,756 62,923 |738,007

-- D 23

TOTAL.

Table VIII.

Total Number, Tonnage, Crews, Passengers, and Cargoes of Junks CLEARED in the Colony of Hongkong for Ports on the Coast of China and Macao, in the Year 1919.

BALLAST.

Vessels.

Tons. Crew.

Passen-

gers.

Cargo, Ves-

Tons. sels.

Tons.

Crew.

Passen-

gers.

Vessels.

Tons.

Crew.

Passen-

gers.

Cargo.

Tons,

CARGO.

D 24

Canton,.

2,758

473,778 47,981

1

453,786 125 20,216

2,310

2,883

493,994

50,291

1

453,786

West River,.

2,879

467,450

56,003

83,020

173,862 |2,405 | 197,708

37,465

120

5,284

665,158

93,468 || 83,140

173,862

I

Macao,

330

11,353 4,826

32

25,311 57

7,830

604

387

:

49,183

5,430

32

25,311

East Coast,

1,047

West Coast,

123

10,743

59.000 9,085

1,888

1

88.291

569

69,547

6,218

1,616

128,547 15,303

1

88,291

4,266

61 2.119

412

51

187

12,862 2,300

57

4,266

Total, 1919,..

7,137

1,052,824 | 119,783

83,060

745,516 3,220297,420 47,009

171

10,357 | 1,349,744 | 166,792 | 83,231

745,516

Total, 1918,

8,479

1,020,673 | 139,272||

61,486

731,659 | 3,276 405,020

46,091

425

11,725 | 1,425,693 | 185,363

61,911

731,659

C

FOREIGN TRADE.

D 25

Table IX.

Summary of Arrivals and Departures of all Vessels.

1918.

1919.

NO. OF VESSELS.

TONS.

CREW.

No. OF VESSELS.

TONS.

CREW.

British Ships entered with Cargoes,

Do.

do. in Ballast,

4,064 62

8,456,510 78,303

221,401

4,656

4,486 205

4,773,896

263,335

291,506

14,814

Total,

4,126

3,534,813

226,057

4,691

4,065,402

278,149

British Ships cleared with Cargoes,

3,972

3.365,554

224,744

4,429

4,651,003

261.172

Do.

do. in Ballast,

153

171,654

5,853

247

379,400

15,453

Total.

4,125

3,537,208

230,597

4,676

5,030,403

276.625

Foreign Ships entered with Cargoes,

2,776

3,298,129

171,375

3,206

3,870.353

190,249

Do.

do. in Ballast,

101

113,841

4,377

228

224,170

10,521

Total.

2,877

3,411,970

175,752

3,434

4,094,523

200,770

Foreign Ships cleared with Cargoes,

2,374

2,839,452

144,737

2,905

3,496,969

178,786

Do.

do. in Ballast,

493

520.859

22,296

534

626,007

23.102

Total,

2,867

3,360,311

167,033

3,439

4,122,976

201,888

do.

Steamships under 60 tons entered with Cargoes,

Do.

1,013

33,632

17,589

793

29,043

15,142

do.

in Ballast,.

1,973

16,408

20,986

1,716

51,757

17,973

Total,

2,986

50,040

38.575

2,509

80,800

33,115

Steamships under 60 tons cleared with Cargoes,

561

22,390

12,806

581

23,686

13,003

Do.

do.

do. in Ballast,

Total,

2,455

68,308

26,031

1,945

57,503

20,918

3,016

90,698

38,837

2,526

81,189

33,921

Junks entered with Cargoes,

8,431

1,126,982

131,890

8,101

897,533

133,535

Do. do. in Ballast,

3,383

419,691

51,866

2,252

350,856

32,689

Total,

11,814

1,546.673

183,756

10,353

1,248,389

166,224

Junks cleared with Cargoes,

Do. do. in Ballast,

8,449

1,020,673

139,272

7,137

1,052,324

119,783

3,276

405,020

46,091

3,220

297,420

47,009

Total,

11,725 $1,425,693

185,363

10,357

1,349,744

166,792

Total of all Vessels entered,

21.803

Total of all Vessels cleared.

21,733

8,543,496 8,413,910

624,140

621,830

20,987 10,489,114 20,998 10,584,312

678,258

679,226

Total of all Vessels entered and cleared, in

Foreign Trade,

43,536

16,957,406

1,245,970 41,985

21,073,426

1,357,484

LOCAL TRADE.;

Total Junks entered,

12,290

561,690

Do.

cleared,

13,027

627,425

116,544 122,079

4,686

206,326

47,052

4,823

211,488

49,779

Total Local Trade entered and cleared,

25,317

1,189,115

238,623

9,509

417,814

96,831

Total Foreign Trade entered and cleared, Total Local Trade entered and cleared,

Grand Total,

43,536 16,957,406 25,317 4,189,115

68,853

18,146,521

1,245,970 238,623

1,484,593

41,985

9,509

21,073,426 417,814

1,357,484

96,831

51,494 21,491,240

1,454,315

*

PLACES.

Outside the Waters of the Colony :—

Table X.

Statement of Licensed Steam-launches Entered in the Colony of Hongkong during the year 1919.

TOWING.

NOT TOWING.

Vessels.

Tonnage.

Crew.

Passengers.

Vessels.

Tonnage.

Crew.

Passengers.

Cargo,

Within the Waters of the Colony, 1918, Do.,

162,842

3,028,897 | 1,390,026

1919,

201,387 4,056,626 1,810,009

· 88,707 | 2,611,675 955,010 | 6,270,741

86,709 | 2,328,432 | 689,170 | 4,179,229

2,605

4,183

249,551 | 5,367,329 | 2,079,106 | 4,179,229 | 2,605 293,094 | 6,668,301| 2,765,010 | 6,270,741 4,183

Canton,

695 17,134 6,499

West River,

Macao,

East Coast,

Other places,

Total,.

1,716 51,757 17,973 8,208

34718,708 4,153

8 216

85 2,476

64

869

581|18,223 | 6,388 8,208

51,757|17,97:

¿

:

:

Tons.

Vessels.

TOTAL.

Tonnage.

Crew.

Passengers.

Cargo,

Tons.

267|6,892|2,668

962|24,026|9,167

7

470 19,856 7,409

773 3,085

9

25 743 263

9

123| 6,148| 3,256 773 3,085

17 527 199

270 12,054 | 7,769 4,712 2,457

355 14,530 8,638 4,712 2,457

|

116 3,422 1,250 2,694

793 29,043 15,142 8,186 5,551 2,509 80,800 33,115 16,394 5,551

697 21,645 7,638 10,902

D 26

Table XI.

Statement of Licensed Steam-launches Cleared in the Colony of Hongkong during the year 1919.

D 27 -

PLACES.

TOWING.

NOT TOWING.

TOTAL.

Vessels.

Ton- Crews. Passen-

Vessels.

nage.

gers,

Ton-

nage.

Crews.

Passen- Cargo, Vessels. gers. Tons.

Ton-

nage,

Crews. Passen- Cargo,

Bunker

Coal,

gers.

Tons.

Tons.

Do.,

Within the Waters of the Colony1918, 162,567 1919,

3,021,338 1,387,964 204,170 4,050,277|1,809,327

86,9842,345,991

691,232 | 4,199,801 88,924 2,618,024 958,692 6,265,695

2,874

3,731

249,551 | 5,367,329 2,079,196 4,199,801 293,091 6,668,301| 2,765,019 6,265,695

2,874

40,500

3,781

46,207

Outside the Waters of the Colony

:

Canton,..

917 22,866 9,312

West River,

Macao,

East Coast,

340|13,677 | 4,175

11 280

78 2,075 743

:

96

Other places,

49

132

1,329 489

6,440| 3,491¦ 1,071| 3,111

18 26

966 24,195 9,801 18

26

7,671

14 462 167

472 20,117 7,666 1,071 3,111 25 742 263

5,013

86

277 12,121 7,679 4,512 2,219

350|14,196 8,422| 4,512| 2,219 || 2,059

604|18,605| 6,592 | 9,559

109

3,334| 1,177 | 8,294

713 21,939 7,769 12,853

2,202

Total,

1,945 57,503 20,918 9,559. 581 23,686 13,003 8,895 5,356 2,526 81,189 33,921 18,454 5,356 17,031

23,686 13,00

Table XII.

Number of Boat Licences, Permits, etc., issued and Fees collected during the year 1919.

(Under Table UT, Section 40, of Ordinance No. 10 of 1899.)

DESCRIPTION.

Licence Book, $1.00 each,...

>>

$2.00

>>

Repainting,

.25

"}

Special Permits, .25

";

Passenger Boats, Classes A & B,

* Lighters, Cargo and Water Boats,

$ 2,598.00

LICENCE.

LICENCE DUPLICATE| RE- Books. LICENCE. PAINTING.

SPECIAL

PERMITS.

FEES.

:

...

1,119

2,598

3

:

4,735

...

:

:.

:

:

Other Boats,

Fish Drying Hulks,

1,803

11,406

:

:.

66

...

Duplicate Licences,

TOTAL,

14,394

2,601

:.

:..

:

:

:

00

8

ос

:

:

6.00

1,183.75

D 28

1,482

370.50

T

:.

:

:

4,735

7,104.75

45,059.95

37,516.50

540.00

8.00

1,482 $94,387.45

D 29

Table XIII.

Comparative Statement of Revenue collected in the Harbour Department during the years 1918 and 1919.

Sub-head of Revenue.

Amount Amount

1918.

1919.

$

C.

$

C.

1. Light Dues, Ordinance 10 of 1899,

""

Special Assessment,

2. Licences and Internal Revenue not other-

wise specified-

Boat Licences, Ordinance 10 of 1899, Chinese Passenger Ship Licences, Or-

dinance 1 of 1889,

Emigration Brokers Licences, Ordinance

1 of 1889,.

Fines,

Forfeitures,

Fishing Stake and Station Licences,

Ordinance 10 of 1899,....

52,816.92

74,545.18

63,105.94 83, 73.11

95,793.25

94,387.45

1,200.00 1,450.00

10,559.42

5,854,10

65.80

82.80

Fishing Stake and Station Licences, do.,

from the New Territories,

2,581.70

2,331.80

Junk Licences, &c., Ord. 10 of 1899,

38,333.25

32,795.25

Junk Licences, &c., Ord. 10 of 1899,

from the New Territories,

10,498.75

9,795.00

Pilots Licences, Ordinance 3 of 1904, Steam-launch Licences, &c., Ordinance

10 of 1899,

95.00

100.00

9,702.17

9,556.84

3. Fees of Court or Office, Payments for specific purposes, and Reimbursements-

in-Aid :—

Engagement and Discharge of Seamen,

Ordinance 10 of 1899,...........

Engagement of Masters and Engineers of Steam-launches, Ord. 10 of 1899, Examination of Masters, &c., Ordinance

10 of 1899,

Fees for use of Government Buoys,

Ordinance 10 of 1899,.....

Gunpowder, Storage of, Ord. 10 of 1899, Medical Examination of Emigrants, Ord.

1 of 1889,

Official Signatures,

Printed Forms, Sale of,

Registry Fees (Merchant Shipping Act),

Ordinance 10 of 1899,..

Steam-launches, Surveyor's Certificate,

Ordinance 10 of 1899,.....

Survey of Steamships, Ordinance 10 of

1899,...

Sunday Cargo Working Permits, Ord.

1 of 1891,.........................

4. Miscellaneous Receipts :-

Sale of condemned stores,

Sale of condemned cargo,

21,442.00

33,411.80

223.50

250.00

2,080.00

2,747.50

59,594.00 69,436.00 11,672.96 12,002.42

*34,901.50 †44,506.50

11,044.00

4,944.00

168.25

205.50

2,568.00

1,349.00

7,425.00 7,455.00

24,507.50 33,415.00

133,800.00 108,900.00

100.00

200

90

Total,............$ 594,278.91 633,794.25

*

† See next page.

Revenue collected by.

D 30

* Statement of Emigration Fees, 1918 :-

Expenditure incurred by.

Harbour Department,...... $ 34,901.50

$ 4,200.00 (Estimated.)

Office of Secretary for

Chinese Affairs,

8,795.00

2,934.37

Stamp Office, on account

of Bill of Health,

9,232.00

Medical Department,................

18,655.49

$ 52,928.00

$ 25,289.86

Net Revenue..

.$ 27,138.64

† Statement of Emigration Fees, 1919 :-

Revenue collected by.

Harbour Department,...... $ 44,506.50

Office of Secretary for

Stamp Office, on account

Chinese Affairs,

of Bill of Health,

Medical Department,......

8,800.00

10,170.50

Expenditure incurred by.

$ 4,200.00 (Estimated.)

3,303.82

17,468.28

$ 68,477.50

$ 24,972.10

Net Revenue.

.$ 38,505.40

Table XIV.

Summary of Chinese Emigrants from Hongkong to Ports other than in China, during the year 1919.

BRITISH SHIPS.

FOREIGN SHIPS.

GRAND TOTAL.

Adults.

Children.

Adults.

Children.

Adults.

Children.

PORTS.

Total.

Total,

Total.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M. F.

M.

M.

F.

M.

F.

- D 31

Africa,

75

18

...

:

Australia,

1,256

25

8 1,291 752

4

* ∞

18

3

2

113

75

18

18

113

-760| 2,008

11

28

2,051

British Borneo, .

2,564

264

130

63 | 3,021

2,564 264

130

63

3,021

Calcutta,

2,389

15

23

17 ,174 71

...

71 2,460

45

23

2,545

Canada,

6,183

8

283

6,430 775

26

8036,963

10 259

7,233

Dutch Indies,

[16,742

725

493

109 |18,069 16,742

725

493 109

18,069

Fiji,.

28

28

3

3

31

31

Honolulu,

14

19 3,495

375 163

78 4,111 | 3,509

376

167

Japan....

766

49

23

841 766

49

:

Mauritius,

93

B

107

428

26

25

180

521

27

Mexico,

263

7

270

263

གཏོ ོ;

78

4,130

841

587

270

:

:

Panama,

37

87

37

37

Siam,

530

341 106

43 1,020

580

341 106

43

1,020

South America,...

721

27

63

815

721

27

63

815

Straits Settlements...............

5,538 3,384

782

341 10,045

953

135 151

54

1,593] 6,491| 3,819

933

395

11,638

Tahiti,

6

7

6

1

7

Timor,

7

9

::

7

2

::

9

United States of America,

804

852 6,387

53 251

6 | 6,697 | 7,191

56

295

7,549

Total 1919,

Total 1918,

|19,417| 4,057| 1,360

|15,169 | 1,847 927

469 25,303 31,468 1,714 1,223 250 |18,193|22,847 1,394 1,067,

261 34,666 50,885 | 5,771| 2,583 329 25,637 38,016 | 3,241 | 1,994

Total Passengers by Foreign Ships, Total Passengers by British Ships, Excess of Passengers by Foreign Ships, Excess of Passengers by British Ships,.

730 59,969

579

43,830

31,468 1,714| 1,223 |19,417 4,057| 1,360

12,051

261 34,666

469

25,303

9,363

2,343 137

208

Table XV.

Statement of Average Number of Emigrants from Hongkong to Ports other than in

China, for Quinquennial Periods from 1880 to 1915 inclusive.

1880. 1885. 41,720 63,138

1890.

66,706 · 60,360

1895.

1900.

66,961

1905.

73,105

1910.

88,452

1915.

109,110

Table XVI.

Number of Male and Female Emigrants from Hongkong to Ports other than in China, for Ten Years, from 1910 to 1919 inclusive.

- D 32

Whither bound.

1910.

1911. 1912. 1913.

1914. 1915. 1916. 1917.

1918.

1919.

Straits Settlements, Males, Straits Settlements, Females,

65,372 83,875 68,809 85,099 11,333 17,031 15,215 17,254

Total,

76,705 100,906 84,024 102,353

36,764 32,440 66,965 53,250 8,210 8,838 15,832 10,042 41,974 41,278

5,914 7,424

2,105

4,214

82,797

63,292

8,019

11,638

Other Ports, Males, Other Ports, Females,

33,692

661

33,935

724

37,791

842

39,001

1,405

30,358

964

25,811 33,182 31,078 1,186 1,674

34,096

46,044

1,928

1,715

2,287

Total,

34,353 34,659

38,633 40,406

31,322 26,997

34,856 33,006

35,811 | 48,331

Grand Total,

111,058

135,565 122,657 | 142,759

76,296 68,275 117,653 | 96,298

43,830 59,969

}

1

=

1

Table XVII.

Summary of Chinese Emigrants Returned to Hongkong from Ports other than in China, during the year 1919.

BRITISA SHIPS.

FOREIGN SHIPS.

GRAND TOTAL.

WHERE FROM.

Adults.

Children.

Adults.

Children.

Adults.

Children.

Total.

Total.

Total.

M.

F.

M.

1.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

Australia,

1,036

75 133

40

1,284

793

39

62

Bangkok,

1,954

91 168

44

2,257

2,303

112

198

British Borneo,..

973

37

64

14

1,088

222

15

17

Canada,

4,819

101 172 55

5,147

Tutch Borneo,

730

41

72

:

Dutch Indies,

180

10

15

213

14,588

459

875

283

Havre,

6,417

6,417

:

...

Honolulu,

Japan,

Marseilles,

Mauritius,

30

239

2,217

160

36

554

46

75

19

28

291

3,301

149

237

228 22

916

1,829

114

195

2,668

4,257

203

366

259

1,195

52

81

4,819

101

172

865

730

41

72

16,205

14,768

469

890

291

6,417

...

697

584

48

78

74

3,761

3,540

168

265

JN: ENSZER

62

2,200

4,925

1,347

5,147

865

16,418

6,417

733

D 33

2,217

7,175

7,175

9,392

:.

:

4,052

9,392

J

1

5

2

171

169

+

15

2

190

329

20

361

Port Said,

145

3

5

2

155

145

155

...

...

South America,..

Straits Settlemeuts...

847

49

83

26

1,005

847

49

$3

26

1,005

United Kingdom..

55,192

11,976

1,786 3,038 897

60,913

2,378

129

204

59

2,770

57,570

1,915 3,242

956

63,683

11,976

1,317

***

1,317 13,293

13,293

United States of America,

...

Total Passengers, 1919,...

Do.,

335

85,528

1918,... 29.852

14 20 6

2,139 | 3,646 1,072 | 92,385 39,495 1,524 | 2,893 840 35,109 32,188

375

4,973

209 370 100

5,652 5,308

223 390 106 6,027

1,255 |2,213 672

43,685 125,023

3,394 5,859 {1,744 |136,020

2,014|3,743 | 1,055

39,000 62,040

3,538 |6,636 |1,895 74,109

Total Passengers by British Vessels,

85,528

2,139 3,646 1,072

92,385

Excess of

"}

??

Foreign

35

British

39,495

1,255 2,213

672

43,635

46,033

884 1,433 400

48,750

.

Table XVIII.

Statement of Average Number of Emigrants Returned to Hongkong from Ports other than in China, for Quinquennial Periods from 1880 to 1915 inclusive.

1880. 1885. 1890. 48,114 68,830 96.068

1895. 1900. 104,118 109,534

1905. 1910. 137,814 146,585

1915.

151,728

Table XIX.

Number of Male and Female Emigrants Returned to Hongkong from Ports other than in China, for Ten Years, from 1910 to 1919 inclusive.

D 31

Where from.

1910.

1911. 1912. 1913. 1914. 1915. 1916. 1917. 1918.

· 1919.

Straits Settlements, Males, Straits Settlements, Females,

Total.

110,439 114,069 7,524 5,688

117,968 | 119,757

123,594 | 123,363 | 186,753 7,869 10,381 4,605 131,463 | 133.744 | 141,358

79.349 46,454 65,539 36,662 60,812 1,482 1,201 6,896 2,534 2,871 $0.831 47,655 72,435 .39.196 63,683

Other Ports, Males,

30,986

Other Ports, Females,

615

28,816

1,321

30,335

1,450

31,756 26,462 1.421 1,007

27.953 23.933

969

817

23,827 32.011 70,070 1,970 2.899 | 2,267

Total,

31,601

30,137 31,785 33.177 27,469 28.922 24.750

25,797 31,98

72,837

Grand Total,

149,564 | 149,894163,248 166,921 | 168,827109,753

72,105 98,232 74,109 |136,020

1

R

Table XX.

Return of Vessels Registered at the Port of Hongkong during the year 1919.

Name of Vessel.

Official

Number.

Registered

Tonnage.

Horse

lower.

Rig.

Build.

Where and when built.

Remarks.

1. Kong Ning,.

142,216

161

480, B.II.P.

Nil

2. St. Day,

142,217

35

142, N.H.P.

Schooner

Carvel Hongkong, Clencher

.1918 First Registry.

1919

3. St. Dogmael,

142,218

35

142.

4. Tina,

142,219

BE

17,

Nil

Carvel

"

5. Tin Shum,

142.220

32

17,

.1916

"

#

6. Tin On,

142.221

178

Clencher Unknown,

"

7. Tin Ming,

142,222

178

"

8. War Drummer,

112,223

1,921 | 200, N.H.P.

Hougkong,

1919

9. St. Dominic,

142,224

10. Laertes,

142,225

85 142,

3,661

Schooner

1919

}}

449,

1919

"

21

"

31

11. St. Sampson,

142.226

35 142, 35

1919

12. Cardiganshire.

96,370

2,695 | 320,

"3

Belfast,

"

1889

Maru "

1919

1912 Purchased form Foreigner.

First Kegistry.

"}

Ex “Ïde Marn”, ex “ Hakusheku

CX Ameer

- D 35

Table XXI.

Return of Registers of Vessels Cancelled at the Port of Hongkong during the

year 1919.

Name of Vessel.

Official

Number.

Rig.

Build.

Where and when built.

Reason of Cancellation.

D 36 -

1. Kwai Sang,

139,569

1,135 |15, 5,17

2. Chak Saug,

139,575

1,470 | 20.10.17

3. Woosung

142,213

2,119|24. 9.18

Schooner

Nil

4. Tatarrax...

135,335

3.97626. 4.17| Fore and Aft Schooner

5. Chang On,.

72,815

1,289 | 28. 9.04

Nil

6. Teh Hsing,

72,816

1,271 | 28. 7.10

Clencher Hongkong,

1917 | Transferred to London.

1917

Do.

1918

Do.

་་

Greenock,

Shanghai,

"

7. Van Waerwijck,

142,209

1,906|22. 4.18

>>

Schooner

8. Dai On,

72,859

475|28. 9.04

Nil

9. Chin On,

72,872

472 28. 9.04

1898

1899

Rotterdam

Shanghai,

1913 Lost by Fire.

1890 Transferred to Chinese flag. 1890

Do.

.1909 Transferred to former Dutch flag.

""

:

Chinese flag.

Do.

""

10. Tai On,

72,896

61228. 9.04

1900

Do.

!!

35

11. Ping On,.

72,879

512

4.10.04

1900

Do.

"

12. Tsinan.

91.974

1,401 22. 5.18

Schooner

Greenock,

1886 Transferred to former Russian flag.

17

13. Tobolsk,

142,208

1,61911. 4.18

Petrograd,

1913

Do.

"

14. Tjitaroem.

142,210

3.66722. 4.18

Amsterdam,

1910

15. Prosper.

139,577

1,377 | 24.11.17

}}

31

Hongkong,

1917

16. Ching Chow,

76,981

1,195 6.11.13

11

$3

17. Prominent,

139,579

1,377|20. 2.18

11

Middlesbro,

Hongkong,

18. War Drummer,

142,223

1,921 2. 6.19

Nil

"1

15

19. Hoi Ming,

123,099

380 24. 1.08

Schooner

Carvel

1907

"

20. Hermelin,

139,578

1,377 25. 1.18

Clencher

.1917

}}

""

21. Laertes,.

142,225

8,661 | 24. 7.19

.1919

1877 Sold to foreigners. 1917

.1919 | Sold to foreigners.

Transferred to former Norwegian flag. Transferred to Liverpool.

!)

Dutch flag. Norwegian flag.

Transferred to former Norwegian flag.

Do.

,

}}

""

22. Kumchow.

128,682

1,450|29. 1.10

>>

33

23, Prinses Juliana,

139,580

4,998

4. 4.18

Nil

Hamburg, Amsterdam,

1891

Totally lost at sea.

.1910

Transferred to former Dutch flag,

"}

24. Hok Canton,.

89,149

25. Cornelia,

78,689

556 7. 7.17 215 11. 6.17

Schooner

Composita Glasgow,.

1875

">

ני

Chinese flag.

Clencher Montrose,

1878 Sold to foreigners.

"}

1

Appendix E.

REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF IMPORTS AND EXPORTS FOR THE YEAR 1919.

STAFF.

1. Mr. D. W. Tratman acted as Superintendent from January 1st to May 31st, and went on home leave on June 1st. Com- mander C. W. Beckwith, R.N., Assistant Harbour Master, acted as Superintendent from June 1st to the end of the year. Mr. P. Burn went on home leave on June 1st. Mr. S. Hamer, the Supervisor and Accountant, resigned on August 31st. Mr. C. J. Roe was on vacation leave from May 21st to July 31st. He was appointed Acting Supervisor and Accountant on September 1st."

LIQUORS CONSOLIDATION ORDINANCE.

2. The net revenue collected from duties and licensed ware- houses for 1919 was $739,786.25 as compared with $714,993.52 for 1918.

The general details are as follows:-

ན་

1919.

1918.

Duties on European Liquors, ...$215,552.78 $198,562.36 Duties on Chinese Liquors, ...... 517,678.47 - 510,225.33 Licensed Warehouse Fees,

Licensed Warehouse Overtime

Fees,

Total,

6,500.00

6,145.83

55.00

60.00

$739,786.25 $714,993.52

The local consumption of European liquors showed a general increase during the year as compared with 1918. There was a marked decrease in the quantity of Claret moving through the Colony.

Chinese wine distilled locally shows a slight increase but the continued high prices of both rice and sugar are a serious hindrance to the development of this industry. Details of the liquor traffic will be found in Tables I to III.

OPIUM MONOPOLY.

3. The large decrease in the amount of Opium consumed in the Colony caused a corresponding decrease in the revenue derived from this source, the amount being $697,000.00 under the estimated yield. The revenue for 1919 was $6,803,034.65 as compared with $8,686,622.48 for 1918.

E 2

The price was maintained at the same level throughout the year, viz., $14.50 per tael.

There was a large number of seizures of illicit opium during the year. Raw opium has dropped to less than half the 1918 total. Full details are shown in Table IV.

IMPORTS AND EXPORTS OF RAW OPIUM.

4. The movements of Raw Opium will be found detailed in Tables V to VII.

SUGAR.

5. The importation of Sugar for the first nine months of the year will be found in Tables VIII and IX. The Sugar Convention Ordinance was repealed on September 19th and Certificates of Origin were no longer required. From October 1st, the imports of Sugar were incorporated in the Trade Returns published by the Statistical Department.

TOBACCO ORDINANCE.

6. The net revenue collected under the Tobacco Ordinance was $618,905.55 showing an increase over 1918 of $74,045.23. There were no changes in the Tobacco Duties during the year.

IMPORTATION AND EXPORTATION ORDINANCE.

7. Table XV shows the number of permits and other documents dealt with under this Ordinance.

TRADE STATISTICS.

8. The Statistical Department required a still larger staff this year, and as the trade grows and the countries which were practically negligible from a Far Eastern trade point of view dur- ing the war resume or establish trade relations with the Orient, this Department will inevitably grow larger still.

The collection of the information necessary for the compila- tion of the Trade Returns is being effected without dislocation to trade. The Department has been in close consultation with a special Sub-Committee of the Hongkong General Chamber of Com- merce with regard to the introduction of new Rules under the Importation and Exportation Ordinance and it is hoped shortly to reduce the amount of inconvenience given to merchants to an absolute minimum. A complete Return of Trade was published each quarter, and a Yearly Return was issued summarising the quarterly figures and giving a comparison with the totals for 1918.

The total trade for the year amounted to £194,594,642 as com- pared with £130,553,309 for 1918. The Imports for 1919 were valued at £90,651,708 and for 1918 at £60,619,335, while Exports were, 1919, £103,942,934 and 1918, £69,933,974.

7

E 3

The principal items of trade for 1919 were :--

Imports.

Exports.

£

£

Chinese Medicines, Miscellaneous

1,785,322

1,832,134

Camphor.

607,362

Fish and Fishery Products, Mis-

cellaneous

1,008,737

1,488,652

Wheat Flour

1,109,825

912,488

Rice, Broken

3,320,298

2,146,274

White..

8,849,418

10,363,104

Value not

Sugar, Raw. 332,470 tons

available.

2,973,241

Refined

8,210,483

Coal..

3,119,909

Tin Slabs and Ingots.

3,255,350

1,761,871

Kerosene.

4,288,390

3,681,687

Peanut Oil

827,966

Dyed Plain Cottons, Miscellaneous

1,020,442

Silk Piece Goods

1,076,651

1,834,363

Tobacco, Raw.

655,499

Cigarettes

1,441,105

Gunny Bags

569,623

769,642

Hides

1,249,425

Leather (Sole).

909,206

1,086,665

Matches

815,107

710,171

Yarn, Cotton

9,243,107

9,244,897

The imports of Treasure for the period July 1st to December 31st, 1919, showed Gold £20,383,568 and Silver £2,156,911, while Exports were Gold £12,664,243 and Silver £3,215,666.

From the above table it will be clear that the most important industry of the Colony is that of the transhipment of goods, for the principal imports are also the principal exports with but few excep- tions. The exceptions show that Sugar-refining and the manufacture of Tobacco are important industries in Hongkong. The large amount of Coal imported is mainly used for Bunkering. Dyed Plain Cotton exports are mostly composed of coarse Cotton Native Cloth.

The apparent discrepancies between the import and export of several of the items shown is of course due to carry over from 1918, and stocks on hand at end of 1919, not to consumption or produce of the Colony.

RICE.

9. When the Government took control of Rice a sub-department of the Imports and Exports Department was formed to deal with the transactions. Mr. R. O. Hutchison, M.B.E., substantive Super- intendent of Imports and Exports, was appointed Rice Controller and Mr. A. J. C. Taylor was seconded from the Police to take charge of the accounts. A staff of 5 Temporary Clerks, 1 Godown Keeper, 4 Foremen, and 4 Tallymen were engaged. Commander C. W. Beckwith took over the Rice control from October 24th when Mr. Hutchison was appointed acting First Magistrate.

E 4

Rice was bought from Indo-China and India and sold at con- trolled rates through native shopkeepers. A commission on sales was given. The Government held a stock of Rice on December 31st of 59,823 bags=5,695 47 tons.

REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE.

10. The net revenue collected by the Department during the year was $8,164,300.74 as against $9,950,429.08 in 1918 showing a decrease of $1,786,128.34.

The actual expenditure of this Department for the year was $809,627.24 as against $747,263.87 in 1918 showing an increase of $62,363.37.

10th March, 1920.

C. W. BECKWITH, Superintendent of Imports and Exports.

Table I.

European Liquors.

E 5

Balance in

Exported

Bond on

ex Ship

Class of Liquor.

31st

Arrivals.

to Ship

Ship's

Stores.

Denatured.

Consumed

Locally.

December,

1918.

or ex

Bond.

Balance in Bond on 31st Dec., 1919.

Io H.K. & K.

Wharf & Godown Co.'s General Bonded Warehouse.

In Holt's

Wharf

General

Bonded

In Licensed Warehouses.

Total.

Warehouse.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Gallons. Gallons.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Ale, Beer, and Stout,.......

77,090

433,219

220,377

21,203

203,573

24,014

4,439

36,703

65,156

Bitters,

343

742

237

41

211

6

23

567

596

Brandy,

29,095

37,029

46,862

1,022

3,211

3,573

3,856

7,600

15,029

California Wine,

511

1,431

1,892

50

50

Champagne,

566

6,229

1,967

520

2,073

922

14

1,299

2,235

Cider,

106

42

56

40

52

Claret,

11,645

50,838

42,813

2,291 | (d) 2,177

5,157

3,306

280

6,459

10,045

Cocktail,

23

20

2

22

Gin,....

11,722

11,329

4,978

2,096

3,983

3,064

70

8,860

11,994

Ginger Wine,

11

285

18

119

159

159

Liqueurs,.

2,589

· 7,507

3,427

547

1,061

2,154

120

2,787

5,061

Madeira,

52

91

34

48

57

57

Malaga,

6

Marsala,

175

2

13

17

133

133

Medicated Wine,

58

331

342

47

47

Muscatel,.

6

100

10

82

28

6

34

Port,

7,431

13,434

9,120

657

3,733

938

462

5,955

7,355

Prune Wine,

92

153

85

1,60

160

Rum,

3,547

28,318

15,270

129

14,187

232

1,264

· 1,072

2,336

(a) (b) (c)

(a)

(b) (d)

(c)

(a) Includes 7,069 gallons distilled locally.

(b)

"}

(c)

14,187

289

52

"

""

};

(d) Used in manufacture of tobacco.

Table I,-Continued.

European Liquors,—Continued.

Balance in Bond on 31st Dec., 1919.

In H,K, & K.

Wharf & Godown Co.'s General Bonded Warehouse.

In Holt's

Wharf

General

Bonded

In Licensed Warehouses.

Total.

Warehouse.

Balance in

Exported

Bond on

ex Ship

Class of Liquor.

31st

December,

1918.

Arrivals.

to Ship

Ship's

Stores.

Denatured.

Consumed

Locally.

or ex

Bond.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Gallons. Gallons.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Gallons.

*

}

Sake,

889

11,256

1,667

40

10,092

346

346

Sherry,

2,262

3,279

1,319

536

1,385

70

Sparkling Wine,..

130

511

208

28

169

16

...

2,231

220

E

2,301

236

Spirits of Wine & Arrack,

25,599

1,105,079

785,167

54 (a)158,952

156

185,462

887

186,349

Still Wine, (not specially

mentioned),

1,906

8,459

5,095

337

2,806

317

1,800

2,117

Tonic Wine,

4

11

15

15

...

Vermouth,

3,178

16,152

⚫ 6,267

615

2,089

5,308

225

4,826

10,359

Vibrona,

23

6

Whisky,

39,202

57,586

43,940

7,685

24

15,671

5,382

6,024

18,086

29,492

Wincarnis,

66

665

374

311

46

46

Wine and Spirits, (Un- classified),

10,793 | (b) 31,248 (b) 33,220 | (b) 18

Note.-Fractions of a gallon are not shown in this table.

(a) For burning, perfumery, vinegar, etc.

(b) 7,547 |(4)1,206 | (6)

() Transhipment cargo not examined.

50

8,803

:

...

(b)

}

K

Balance in Bond on 31st Dec., 1918.

Consumed.

Arrivals.

Locally

Table II.

Chinese Liquors.

Exported.

Denatured and used for

Balance in Bond on 31st Dec., 1919.

Vinegar, etc.

Imported

Liquors

Dis-

Bonded

Ware- houses. tilleries. ported. Locally. ported. Locally.

Liquors. Distilled Locally.

Im-

Im- Distilled] Im- Distilled

jex Bond or

ex Bonded

Gallons. Gallons. Gallons. Gallons. | Gallons. | Gallons.|Gallons. Gallons.

Ware-

houses.

ex Ship

ex Dis.

tilleries.

In H.K. and

Liquors K. Wharf and Licensed In Dis- ported Distilled Godown Co.'s Liquors. Locally. Bonded Ware- tilleries.

Warehouses.

houses.

In

Total

in

Bond.

}

to Ship.

E 7

Not more than 25% of alcohol by weight,|

Gallons. | Gallons. Gallons.]

Gallons. | Gallons. Gallons. Gallons.

11,071

25,119 | 785,471

379,157 587,900 | 690,750 |201,323 77,542

8,132

333102,908

772 6,214 24,944

31,930

35%

1,639

45%

17

50%

!!

117,846

3,145

323 40,025

158 204,830

2,263

27,800 13,310 23,816 | 27,689 3.998 40,672 37,646 1,476 215,551 2,858 1,997

216

160

505

93

758

1,728

34,416

5,309

64,170

352

69,831

1,415

308

1,688

1,996

Above

50%

"

462

462

Total,

133,701

25,600 |1,083,051 947,629 641,315 716,042 445,978

84,398 10,076

333 | 137,324

6,549

72,577

25,389 | 104,515

Note.-Fractions of a gallon are not shown in this table.

Table III.

Return of Distilleries during the year 1919.

Stock on

31st Dec.,

1918.

Output,

1919.

Consumed locally.

Sold into Bond.

Exported.

for

Denatured Denatured for making preserving Tobacco. Bean-curd.

Gallons. Gallons. | Gallons.Gallons.| Gallons. Gallons.

Used for

Vinegar.

Stock on

31st Dec.,

1919.

Hongkong and New Kowloon

Not more than 25% of alcohol by weight, 13,178 470,105 | 315,631

6,136 54,209

35%

45%

225

134

}!

14,393 10,352 216

38,719 1,088

3,998

1,728

1,275

34,416

Rum,

1,749 19,796

7,069

14.187

Gallons. |Gallons.

Gallons.

96,188

11,119

I

52

346

E 8 -

289

(1)

Total,

15,286 543,013 | 327,071

8,080

66,551

14,187 34,416

96,188

11,806

Manufactured in New Territories] Not more than 25% of alcohol by weight, 11,941 281,375|| 247,442 | 1,996

23,333

for consumption in Hongkong.

"

35%

45%

(2) Total,

98

"}

13,393 13,450

24

1,897

332

1,583

6,720

13,825

41

6

12,063 296,665| 261,224 1,996 21,916

6,720

13,872

Table III,-Continued.

Return of Distilleries during the year 1919,- Continued.

Manufactured in New-Territories Not more than 25% of alcohol by weight, for consumption in New

Stock on

31st Dec.,

1918.

Output, 1919.

Consumed

locally.

Bond. Sold into

Exported.

Denatured Denatured for

for making preserving Tobacco. Bean-curd.

Gallons, Gallons. Gallons.Gallons. Gallons, Gallons.

127,677 127,677

Used for

Vinegar.

Stock on

31st Dec.,

1919.

Gallons. Gallons.| Gallons.

Territories.

""

35%

"}

45%

(3) Total,

(1) Hongkong and New Kowloon,

(2) Manufactured in New Territories for consumption in Hongkong, (3) Manufactured in New Territories for consumption in New Territories,

14

14

56

34

56

127,747 | 127,747

1

15,286 543,013 | 327,071 12,063 | 296,665 | 261,224

.8,080

66,551

14,187

34,416 96,188

11,806

1,996! 24,916

6,720

13,872

127,747 | 127,747

E 9 -

Grand Total,.

27,349 | 967,425 716,042 10,076 91,467 14,187

34,416 | 102,908

25,678

NOTE-Fractions of a gallon are not shown in this table.

Table IV.

Seizures of Illicit Opium.

Amount of Prepared Opium and Opium Dross Confiscated during the year.

Raw Opium. Prepared Opium. Opium Dross. Dross Opium.

Number

Number

Month.

of

Seizures.

of

Convictions.

1919.

Taels.

Taels.

Taels.

Taels.

January,

38

23

162.0

698.39

100.5

February,

15

8

2,490.0

312.25

118.0

·1

March,

27

13

· 3,540.0

1,673.40

26.5

April,

28

18

295.0

1,313.11

20.0

May,

25

16

190·0

2,272.25

46.5

.4

June,

34

17

1,076.5

4,205.70

96.4

July,

18

11

2,614.0

853.59

11.3

- E 10

August,

38

25

510'0

4,252.30

62.0

1.0

}

September,

36

22

8,796.0

1,617.90

277·0

·41

October,

30

15

148.0

3,811.83

31.6

November,

53

37

958.0

3,645.48

202.5

.2

December,

37

18

45.0

3,605.88

8.5

Total,

379

223

20,824.5

28,262.08

1,000.8

2.11

Total for 1918,

419

220

42,231.0

27,982.30

746.4

0.8

1.

K

K

T

E 11 -

CERTIFICATED.

Table V.

Varieties of Certificated and Uncertificated Opium Imported and Exported during the year 1919.

UNCERTIFICATED,

Grand

Total.

Malwa.

chests.

chests. chests.

Patna. Beuares. Total. Turkish. Persian. Patna. Benares. Total. chests. chests. chests. chests. chests. chests.

chests.

Stock on 1st January, 1919,

15

14

29

41

182

224

253

Imported during the year 1919,...

50

371

869

1,290

1,290

15

1.4

29

50

412

1,051

1,514

1,514

Exported during the year 1919,...

10

10

50

397

*380

827

837

15

4

19

:

15

I.

671

687

706

Boiled by Government Monopoly during the year 1919,

376

377

377

Balance on the evening of the 31st December, 1919,

15

1

19

15

295

310

329

*For Hongkong Government Monopoly and Macao Opium Farmer. For Macao Opium Farmer 374 Chests, and 6 chests Through Cargo for Kobe consigned to Hongkong in error.

Table VI.

Places of Destination of Opium Exported during the year 1919.

By Steamers to China :-

Malwa. Patna. Benares. Persian.

Total.

Total

in lb.

chests. chests. chests. chests.

chests.

lb.

...

E 12

1

By Steamers to Non-Chinese Ports:- London,

Kwong Chow Wan,

Singapore,

Keelung,.

Kobe..

Macao,

Total for Non-Chinese Ports,

Total for Chinese Ports,

Grand Total,

Through Cargo reported but not landed,

:

...

:

8

1,096

10

10

6

374

:::

1,600

13

1,781

376

51,512

960

374

59,840

390

397

787

116,789

390

397

787

116,789

(1)282

(1) 25 chests of uncertificated Benares er S.S. "Dunera" from Bombay to Keelung; 50 chests er S.S. "Inaminaka" from Bushire to Keelung; 17 chests ea: S.S. "Kwaisang" from Singapore to Kobe; 90 chests eæ £.S. “ Kwaisang "from Calcutta to Kobe; and 100 chests ea S.S. Helios" from Mokamerate to Kobe.

Σ

1

K

Table VI,-Continued.

K

Malwa. Patua, Benares. Persian. Turkish. Chinese.

Total.

chests.

chests. chests. chests. chests. chests.

chests.

Destination of Raw Opium other than Uncertificated Bengal Opium exported during the year 1919.

Keelung (Formosa),

London,...

Singapore,..

Kwong Chow Wan,.

Total,

:

376

8

13

10

10

397

:

- E 13 -

376

8

13

10

407

E 14

Table VII.

Imports and Exports of Raw Opium during the year 1919. Exclusive of Uncertificated Bengal Opium.

Malwa. Patna. Benares. | Persian, Turkish. [Chinese. Total. chests. chests. chests. chests. chests. chests. chests.

Imports,

Exports,

Imports,

Exports,

371

50

121

397

50

447

Imports and Exports of Uncertificated Bengal Opium

during the year 1919.

Patna. chests.

Benares. chests.

Total.

chests.

869

869

(1) 380

380

(1) 374 chests for Macao Opium Farmer.

6 chests Through Cargo for Kobe consigned to Hongkong

in error.

Ports of Origin of Raw Opium (all kinds) imported during 1919.

Malwa, Patna.

· chests. chests.

Benares. Persian, Turkish Chinese. Total. chests. chests. chests. chests. chests.

1

Calcutta...

Bombay,

869

371

50

121

869

:

:

Total,......

869

371.

50

1,290

I

K

1

E 15

Table VIII.

Imports and Exports of Sugar.

Return of Sugar imported into the Colony of Hongkong by vessels of different nationalities during the year 1918 and from 1st January to the end of September, 1919:-

1918.

1919.

Tons.

Tons.

British Steamers,

102,013

106,970

Japanese

122,475

73,813

>>

Dutch

135,093

89,272

"

Chinese

وو

44,092

16,590

American

14,150

1,681

French

500

436

"

Portuguese

7,360

4,408

Siamese

38

25

Norwegian

55

7,414

3,901

Sugar arrived by junks,

297

Total,

433,394

297,109

1918.

1919.

Decrease.

Tons.

Tons.

Tons.

433,394

297,109

136,285

Table IX.

Return of Sugar imported into the Colony of Hongkong during the year 1918 and from 1st January to the end of September, 1919, showing places of origin :-

1918. Tons.

1919.

Tons.

Java China

323,909

227,865

22,623

16,003

Philippine Islands

85,868

44,308

Bangkok

43

Tourane

994

United Kingdom

8,743 147

Total,...

433,394

297,109

E 16

Table X.

Tobacco Ordinance, No. 10 of 1916.

The gross amount of Revenue collected on Duties on Tobacco during 1919 was as follows:-

Licensed Warehouse Overtime Fees,................

6.00

Manufacturers' Licences,

792.00

Importers' Licences,

160.00

Licensed Warehouses Licences,........

1,737.50

Retailers' Licences,

7,844.00

:

Duties ou Tobacco,.

608,730.36

Total,

$ 619,269.86

The Refund of Duties on Tobacco in the year 1919 amounted to $364.31. The total net Revenue collected from Tobacco Duties during the year 1919 was therefore $618,905.55 as against $544,860.32- during the previous year.

:

i

Table XI.

Return of Duty Paid Tobacco Manufactured Locally during the year 1919.

- E 17

MONTH.

1st

Quality

2nd

Quality

CIGARS.

3rd

Quality

CIGARETTES.

4th

Quality

5th

Quality

1st.

2nd

Quality

Quality

3rd

Quality

4th

Quality

Chinese

Tobacco

10 c.

Amount

of

$1.50

70 c.

30 c.

20 c.

10 c.

70 c.

per lb.

per lb.

per lb.

per lb.

per lb.

per lb.

30 c.

per lb.

20 c.

per lb.

10 c.

per lb."

per lb.

Duty

Collected.

mille

mille

mille.

mille

mille

mille

mille

1919

mille

mille.

lb.

6.

January..

2

86

265

674

3,657

19,435

13.220

4,860

75,993

36,808.06

February,

7

75

115

493

2,735

15,876

9,715

2,725

45,035

27,106.84

March,

17

7

65

153

372

2,810

18,250

12,400

3,960

66,987

32,753.72

April,

10

76

149

312

2,536

16,818

11,780

4,005

62,037

30,206.80

May,

8

3

67

131

324

2,606

18,690

13,570

1,155

67,759 33,100,52

June,

19

19

90

149

332

2,108

14,295

11,265

3,080

65,849

28,071,61

July,

1

57

135

153

2,622

15,152

11,855

2,909

69,159

29,447.00

August,

10

10

138

116

258

2,780

15,310

12,180

2,620

66,623

30,192.97

September,.

7

7

98

120

194

3,055

17,414

12,855

2,321

67,338

32,263.71

October,

11

2

109

123

265

3,070

18,840

12,890

2,245

65,376

33,286.27

November,

9

19

154

117

212

2,775

17,971

12,570

2,000

62,892

31,922.05

December,

33

17

170

139

286

2,992

19,404

13,525

2,160 65,794

34,872,11

Total,......

*135

*102

*1,184

*1,712

*3,875

*33,746

*207,455 *147,825 *37,040 †780,842

380,031,66

*The figures in 1918 were shown in pounds.

† Includes 221 lb. European Smoking Tobacco.

Note.-Fractions of a pound or mille are not shown in this table.

Table XII.

Return of Duty Paid Tobacco Imported during the year 1919.

E 18

CIGARS.

CIGARETTES.

TOBACCO.

Chinese

Tobacco

MONTH.

1st

3rd

2nd Quality Quality Quality | Quality | Quality $1.50 30 c.

70 c.

per lb. per lb. per lb.

per lb.

per lb.

Tobacco

Leaf

Snuff

4th

5th

1st

Quality

2nd

Quality

3rd

Quality

4th

Quality

1st

20 c.

10 c.

70 c.

30 c.

20 c.

10 c.

Quality

70 c.

2nd

Quality

3rd

Quality

4th

Quality

Amount

of

30 c.

per lb.

per lb.

per lb.

per lb.

per lb.

per lb.

20 c.

per lb.

10 c.

per lb.

10 c.

per lb.

10 0.

$1.50

per lb.

per lb.

Duty

Collected.

1919.

Mille. Mille.

Mille.

Mille.

Mille.

Mille.

Mille.

Mille.

Mille.

lb.

lb.

lb.

Ib.

lb.

lb.

lb.

$

C.

January,

121

24

147

1,877

517

10,103

4,405

91.7

196

342

28.660

6,228

1

18,143.82

February,

86

26

106

4

1,416

817

8,855

4,221

404

15

308

1,040

11,323

6,042

14,099,82

March,

99

37

121

23

30

1,714

1,568

10,788

5,234

643

15

270

1,098

21,661

8,129

18,304.60

April,

105

27

110

15

20

2,012

2.764

6.041

2,835

423

25

531

1.370

20,676

3,526

15,805.76

May,

111

19

104

42

5

1,788

1,320

7,767

7,267

509

298

936

21.532

2,103

50

16,692.52

June,

89

20

110

17

14

1,653

2,921

11,462

5,425

570

325

364

1,354

21,533

4.058

1

18,663.78

July,

85

10

137

13

4

1,996

3,275

10,558

5,188

799

314

1,206

21,885

3,238

19,013.76

August,.

98

34

September,

199

39

October,

113

November,

81

29

December,

Total,

131

23

**

220

44

15

2,688

3,394

10,26ł

5,140

728

422

92

2,422

21,043

4.493

1

21,469.63

250

14

2,182

2,127

15,507

8,871

382

183

1,638

19,794

10,384

25,653.27

17

112

43

31

2,960

2,834

9,876

6,968

732

68

82

1,607

23,658

5,308

25

22,147,84

103

29

4

1,342

1,946

7,407

4,314

662

150

1,035

364

19,135

2,472

14,942.92

214

53

17

2,876

3,104

10,436

10,151

724

105

977

22,297

4,484

23,760.98

*1,318

*305 *1,734

*146

*306

*24,504

*26,587

*119,064

*70,019

7,493

1,327

4,467

13,377 253,197

|(1)60,465

82

228,698.70

* The figures in 1918 were shown in pounds.

(1) Used in manufacture of Chinese Pipe Tobacco consumed in the New Territories.

Note.--Fractions of a pound or mille are not shown in this table.

יי

Table XIII.

Tobacco Local Factories for the year

1919.

Balance in Bond on 31st Dec.,

Issued

for

Produced.

Exported.

Ships' Stores

1918.

manu-

Class of Tobicco.

Cigars 1. Valued at not less than $2.20 per lb.

Removed

to other

Factories.

Consumed locally.

Balance in Bond on 31st Dec.,

1919.

facture.

Mille.

lb.

lb.

Mille.

lb.

Mille.

lb.

Mille.

lb.

Mille.

lb.

Mille.

Ib.

Mille.

lb.

160

156

1,444

410

1,972

"3

2.

$1.60

"}

"

""

"

3.

$1.10

"

"

4.

}}

$ .60

}}

31

"}

5. Valued at less tha

$ .60

Total,....

1,690

1,657

12

12

135

83

1,568

1,931

8

102

152

10,228

9,161

• 4

29

1,184

988

3,920

1,636

1,712

965

5,556

1,841

3,875

1,840

4,142

22,962

16,226

24

42

:

1221

7,008

. 4,028

729,342

706,296

713,796

522,638

734,842

601,783

44,503

8,619

=*:2

11

33,746

6,289

5

207,455

1,050

147,825

34,396

72

50

37,040

832

Digarettes 1. Valued at not less than $1.60 per lb... 16,992

'

2.

$1.10

"

...

""

3.

$ .60

}}

17,570

39,674

Valued at less than

$ .60

2,483

***

2,222, 183

1,839,336

Note.-Fractions of a pound or mille are not shown in this table.

Total,..

76,719

888

:

50

426,066

42,567

:

:.

-E 19 -

Table XIII,-Continued.

Tobacco Local Factories for the year 1919.

:

221

610

221

610

(a)

841,086

14,023

E 20

841,086

14,023

Balance in Bond on 31st Dec.,

1918.

Issued

for

manu-

Produced.

Removed

Exported.

Ships' Stores.

to other

Factories.

Consumed locally.]

Balance in Bond on 31st Dec.,

1919.

Class of Tobacco.

facture.

Mille.

lb.

lb.

Mille.

Ib.

Mille.

lb.

Mille.

Ib.

Mille. lb.

Mille.

lb.

Mille. Ib.

:

:

:

25,979

4,998

30,977

Pipe Tobacco (non-Chinese)vaated at not less than

$1.60 per lb...

at les than60c. per lb...

Total,.

Pipe Tobacco (Chinese) alued at less than

2,890

230

4,425

:

:

:

:

4,425

2,890

230

(u)

60c. per lb...

Total,..

31,349

1,159,706

304,597

31,349

1,159,706

304,597

:

:

American and Manila Tobaco Leaf,

353,655 | 7,574,068

33,086

}}

Clean

101,442

6,482,537

12,729

Total,.

455,097 7,574,068

6,482,537

45,815

(a)

(b)

77

Asiatic Tobacco Leaf, Clean

}}

251,771

2,008,919

1,894

9,981

1,008 222

...

...

Total,..

261,752 | 2,008,919

1,008,222

1,894

:

"}

Note.-Fractions of a pound or mille are not shown in this table. (a) Includes 60,465 lb. consumed in the New Territories.

(b)

**

(c)

""

1,894 "

21,268

grown

33

L

:

:

:

:

449,760

112,488

562,248

(c)

306,327

9,183

315,510

CLASS OF TOBACCO.

Cigars 1. Valued at not less than $2.20 per lb.

2.

BALANCE IN BOND ON 31ST DECEMBER, 1918.

ARRIVALS.

T

TOBACCO RETU

G

MANUFAC

ISSUED FOR

MANU-

FACTURE.

Cases. Pkges. Bales. Hhds. Mille.

lb.

Cases. Pkges. Bales. Hhds. Mille.

lb.

lb.

1

1,828

281

36

213

23

53

1,905

2711

148

$1.60 $1.10

1

12

$ .60 $ .60

27

"

(Unclassified),

35

57

Total.........

35

57

"

3.

>>

#!

4.

"

5.

less than

:

Cigarettes 1. Valued at not less than $1.60 per lb.

2.

3.

$1.10 $.60

>

་་

**

4.

less than $.60

(Unclassified),

ད་

Total,.

:

553

:.

3,049

3,049

:

:

:

4,205

:

36,643

12,327

76,691 55,817

12,771

198,422

4,467

79,673

39

9,333

214

23

39

66,208

9.333 214

405,603

(Non Chinese)

Pipe Tobacco 1. Valued at not less than $1.60 per 1b.j

2

**

::

3.

13

**

19

:

$1.10 $.60

::

less than $ .60

:

*

4

!:

(Unclassified),

10

Total,.

10

(Chinese)

Pipe Tobacco, Valued at less than $ .60 per lb.

(Unclassified),

Total..

Snuff,

(Unclassified),

Total,.....

་་

(Unclassified),

Total,..

American and Manila Leaf,...

::

:

:

13

13 117

:

:

:

:

8,074

8.789

95

2.447

308 3,072

5,538

13,495

1,019 641

11,549 1,019 641

30,269

447,058

|1,729,469

ce 932 3,599

447,053 88,832 3,599

1,729,469

11,829

$2

501

11,829

501

82

81 1,831

81 1,831

Asiatic Leaf,

(Unclassified),

2,009 | 4,852

Total,...

2,009 4,852

:

:

RA

59,011

7,986,411 7,574,068

59.011

290 5,960 1,311

290 5,960 1,311

7.986,411 7,574,068

60,749

5,141,252

1,948,454

60,749 |

67450,034

674 50.034

:

5,141,252

1,948,454

Note. Fractions

i

E 21

Table XIV.

TOBACCO RETURN FOR THE YEAR 1919.

General Table.

MANUFACTURED TOBACCO.

WARE-

HOUSES.

ARRIVALS.

ISSUED FOR MANU-

FACTURE.

IN-

EXPORTED EX SHIP TO SHIP OR Ex Bond.

SHIPS' STORES,

CONSUMED

LOCALLY.

HOLT'S WHARF

lb.

Cases. Pkges. Bales. Hhds. Mille.

lb.

lb.

Cases. Pkges. Bales. Hhds. Mille. lb.

Mille.

lb.

Mille.

lb.

Cases. Bales

1,828

244

71

1,318

53

3

3

305

1,905

107

14

1,734

271

170

306

148

25

146

3,049

3,049

3,008

17

:

4,205

3.008

17

:

:

549

91

3,809

76,691

67,894

1,741

24,504

55,817

32,543

193,422

62,606

772 1,813

26,587

119,064

79,673

5,892

176

70,019

9,333

214

9,321

9.333 214

405,603

9,321

168,935

:

4,505

:

240,174

6

I

8,074

95

308

3,072

1,019 641

11,549 1,019

641

:

:

8,789

2.447

5,538

13.495

1,027

361

30,269

1,027 361

4,045

1,616

7,493

489

26

1,327

416

302

4,467

2,123

1,067

13,377

:

7,073

3,011

26,664

1

:

147,053

158,922-1-3,599

447,053 (38,832| 3,599

11,829

11,829

:

59,011

59.011

:

:

|1,729,469:

|1,729,469:

82

501

501

82

88,794 3,532:

|88,794|| 3,532 ¦

:

:

1,744,202

1,744,202

3,100

501

501

3,100

RAW TOBACCO.

7,986,411 7,574,068

386,756

290 5,960 1,311

290 5,960 1,311

7,986,411

7,574,068

248 6,030

248 6,030

277

277

386,756

5,141,252 1,948,454

2,077,910

674 49,605

5,141,252 1,948,454

674 49,605

2,077,910

60.749

60,749

674 50,034

67+ 50,034

1

Note. Fractions of a pound or mille are not shown in this table.

:

:

313,660

313.660

82

:

223

$2

::

:

::

:

79

79

Appendix F.

REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE ROYAL OBSERVATORY, HONGKONG, FOR THE YEAR 1919.

1.-GROUNDS AND BUILDINGS.

The grounds were kept in order by the Botanical and Forestry Department with the assistance of the Observatory coolies.

A portion of the area between the main building and the ser- vants' quarters was covered with concrete in March.

Four water closets were installed in May.

Many books and records were destroyed by white ants during the summer months, notwithstanding frequent airing and painting the book cases with Atlas solution.

II. METEOROLOGICAL INSTRUMENTS.

Barometers.-Casella No. 2451 was repaired by the makers and returned in December.

Comparisons between this barometer and the Observatory Standard gave for the index correction of the latter - 010" as against an adopted correction of — `007 in.

Kew Barograph.-This instrument is to be superseded by a Marvin compensated syphon barograph, which is expected shortly.

Beckley Anemograph:-This instrument was oiled once a month, and the orientation of the head checked.

Dines Baxendell Anemograph.---The head was oiled once a month, and the spindle of the float cleaned and oiled once a week. The orientation of the head was checked monthly.

The mean monthly results of comparisons with the records of the Beckley Anemograph from 1910-1918 are given in the following. table, together with the results for 1919:

Factor (Dines Beckley).

÷

Month.

Mean 1910-1918.

January,

2.14

February,

March,

April,

May,

2.20

2'19

1919.

178

1.78

I'99

2.18

2'00

2.2 I

I'99

June,

2'22

1.85

July,

August,.

September,

October,

November,

December,

Year,

2'21

197

2.32

2:03

2732

2:06

2:30

2.20

2.23

2.18

2'15

2 ΟΙ

2.II

172

F 2

The scale value of the instrument was determined in the month of May, 1918, by means of a gauge constructed at the Obser- vatory. It appeared to be correct within the probable error of observation, which was about 1 mile at a velocity of 80 m.p.h., increasing to 3 miles at 10 m.p.h.

Dines Baxendell Anemograph for Gap Rock.-This instrument was received in September, and the scale value tested. It was found that when the float was weighted to give the scale value engraved on the sheet (1m. =0.06) the water encroached on the conical portion of the float. It is proposed to adjust the float until of an inch of the cylindrical portion appears above the level of the water, and determine the scale value once a month under these conditions, measuring the records with an appropriate scale.

Plans have been prepared for the iron structure required for its erection on the lightkeepers' quarters at Gap Rock and it is expected that the installation will be finished in February.

Thermometers.--All thermometers in use were compared with the Kew Standard in winter and summer.

Thermograph.--The Richard dry and wet bulb thermograph has worked satisfactorily during the year. Its records, which are standardised by hourly readings of the rotation thermometers, indicate that the relation between the temperature in the thermograph shelter and in the open air is not constant through- out the day.

The records are time-scaled electrically. An electro-magnetic cirenit is closed by a make-contact on one of the electric dials at the 60th minute of every hour and opened at the 3rd minute. The electro-magnet lifts the pens from the paper and thus inter- rupts the record for the first three minutes of every hour.

The thermometers are aspirated from the 59th to 60th minute of each hour by an electric fan operated through a special relay by a similar contact on another dial.

Sunshine Recorder.-The shadow of the wireless mast, erected in the summer of 1917, falls on the sunshine recorder for a few minutes in the afternoon from January 16th to March 29th and September 16th to November 28th. The mast has a skeleton frame, the ribs of which partially eclipse the sun and occasionally cause a slight loss of register. A more serious loss occurs when the sun passes behind the joints of the mast (which are steel plates 3 feet square) or when sun sets behind the mast. A list of corrections to the sunshine values in Tables V and IX of the Monthly Meteoro- logical Bulletin,,on account of this interruption, is given in the December Bulletin. The correction is never large enough to affect the values given in Table XI.

Peak Anemograph.-The naval signalmen who looked after the Peak Anemograph were withdrawn by the Naval Authorities in May. It has since been necessary to send an assistant from the Observatory to change the sheet. From motives of economy the sheet is only changed once in two days. The consequent overlap- ping of the register is objectionable but will, it is hoped, soon

- F 3

cease, the local Government having decided to re-open the station as a signal station, and utilise the services of the signalman for looking after the anemograph and making meteorological observa- tions six times daily.

III. METEOROLOGICAL OBSERVATIONS AT THE OBSERVATORY.

Automatic records of the temperature of the air and evapor- ation were obtained with a Richard dry and wet bulb thermograph and of the direction and velocity of the wind with a Beckley and a Dines-Baxendell anemograph, modified as described in the report for 1912. The amount of rain is recorded automatically by a Nakamura pluviograph, the amount of sunshine by a Campbell- Stokes universal sunshine recorder, and the relative humidity of the air by a small Richard hair hygrograph. Eye observations of barometric pressure, temperature of the air and of evaporation, and the amount of cloud were made at each hour of Hongkong Staudard time. The character and direction of the motion of the clouds were observed every three hours. Daily readings were taken of self- registering maximum and minimum thermometer.

Photographic Registration with the Kew barograph ceased when the supply of bromide paper was exhausted on November 16th, 1919. A Marvin compensated syphon barograph, ordered last year, was expected before this date but has not yet arrived.

Principal Features of the Weather. The principal features of the weather in 1919 were :--

(a) The large departures from normal from mouth to month in atmospheric pressure, temperature and wind. (b) A typhoon, which produced a wind velocity of 60 m.p.h. at 7 p.in. on the 22nd August, and a squall at the rate of 84 m.p.h. at 1h. 17m. p.m. on the 22nd, although the centre passed about 150 miles to the south-west of Hongkong.

(c) Heat waves from June 15th to July 3rd, July 8th to 25th, July 31st to August 9th, and August 12th to 17th.

Barometric pressure was moderately above normal in February, July, and December, and considerably above in September. It was considerably below in June and August. In the latter month it was 29ins 530, or the lowest on record except in 1911 when it was 29ins. 521. The mean pressure for the year at station level was 29ins. 842 as against 29 847 in 1918, and 29ins-844 for the past 36 years. The highest pressure was 30398 on February 4th as against 30391 in 1918 and 30 509 for the past 36 years.

The lowest pressure was 29ins287 on August 26th as against 29ins-108 in 1918 and 28is-735 for the past 36 years.

Cus

1S..

The temperature of the air was considerably above normal in March and April, and moderately above in June. It was moderately below in February, October, November, and December. The mean

F 4

The

temperature for the year was 72°2 as against 71°2 in 1918 and 71°8 for the past 36 years. The highest temperature was 92° 2 on August 1st as against 91°2 in 1918 and 97°0 for the past 36 years. lowest temperature was 39°4 on February 4th as against 42°1 in 1918 and 32°0 for the past 36 years.

The rainfall was moderately above normal in July and August, and moderately below normal in May, June, and September. The total for the year was 76'140ins as against 101 605ins in 1918, and an average of 83-620ins for the past 36 years. The greatest fall in one civil day was 4.795ins. on July 5th and the greatest in one hour was 1.350ins. between 5 a.m. and 6 a.m. on October 1st.

The wind velocity was considerably below normal from February to June and from September to December. It was moderately above in July and August. The mean velocity for the year was 114 m.p.h. as against 116 m.p.h. in 1918 and 127 m.p.h. for the past 36 years. The maximum velocity for one hour as recorded by the Beckley Anemograph was 60 miles at 7 p.m. on August 22nd as against 63 miles in 1918 and 108 for the past 36 years. The maximum squall velocity, as recorded by the Dines-Baxendell Anemograph, was at the rate of 84 m.p.h. at 1h. 17m. p.m. on August 22nd as against 94 m.p.h. in 1918 and 105 m.p.l. for the past 10 years.

Rainfall at Four Stations. In the following table the monthly rainfall for the year 1919 at the Observatory is compared with the fall at the Police Station, Taipo, the Botanical Gardens, and the Matilda Hospital, Mount Kellet :-

Months.

Observatory Police Station (Kowloon). (Taipo).

Botanical

Gardens Hospital (Hongkong). (Hongkong).

Matilda

inches.

inches.

inches.

inches.

January,

0625

0.72

0.85

0·69

February,

1'505

1'99

2.03

187

March,

1755

2004

1'77

147

April,

4'430

10.13

6.28

547

May,

6.950

12*24

743

6.38

June,

10.815

15'05

12*22

14'09

July,

19'430

18.56

22.39

16.93

August,

19670

24'97

24°46

2545

September,...

2655

1.87

3.57

4.42

October,

4.695

3.80

4'56

4'10

November,

2.885

3.78

2'07

3'57

December,

0.725

077

2003

1:08

Year,...

76*140

95'92

89.76

85.52

J

F 5

HOM

Floods. The heaviest rainfall occurred at the Observatory as follows:

Period.

Amount.

Duration.

inches.

hours.

June...... 12a

8h to 14a 22h

5.200

20

July

3d

14h to 8d 14h

.11·740

51

July.... 26a

5 to 29d

14h

7.600

43

August... 7 August... 17 15 to 24

23h to 11

20h

6.825

32

13h

7:420

40

Typhoons. The tracks of 13 typhoons and 12 of the principal depressions which occurred in the Far East in 1919 are given in two plates in the Monthly Meteorological Bulletin for December, 1919. A depression, in the shape of a feeble typhoon, passed over Gap Rock on the early morning of June 13th. It caused no damage. A typhoon, which had been violent near the Paracels on July 30th to 31st, passed within a few miles to the south-west of Gap Rock on the evening of August 1st. It caused no damage here, as by this time it had nearly filled up. Typhoons of moderate intensity passed over Swatow in the early mornings of July 4th and August 10th, the first in a north-westerly and the second in a westerly direction. The centre of a severe typhoon passed about 150 miles to the south-west of Hongkong on a WNW track on the morning of August 22nd. A strong easterly gale occurred in Hongkong which caused a certain amount of damage to the shipping. A squall at the rate of 84 m.p.h, was recorded by the Dines-Baxendell anemograph at 1.17 p.m. on the 22nd.

IV.-PUBLICATIONS.

Daily Weather Report and Map.-A weather map of the Far East for 6 a.m. of the 120th meridian, and the Daily Weather Report (containing meteorological observations, usually at 6h. and 14h., from about 40 stations in China, Indo-China, Japan, the Philip- pines, and Borneo), and daily weather forecasts for Hongkong to Gap Rock, the Formosa Channel, the south coast of China between Hongkong and Lammocks, and between Hongkong and Hainan, were issued as in former years. Copies of the map were exhibited on notice boards at the Hongkong Ferry Pier, the Blake Pier, and the Harbour Office. One copy was sent daily to the Director of the Meteorological Observatory, Macao. Forty copies of the Daily Weather Report were distributed to various offices, etc., in the Colony, and a copy was sent daily to the Director of the Meteoro- logical Observatory, Macao. Copies were sent every week to Lieutenant Pradiyat, Royal Siamese Navy.

A charge of $10 a year is made for supplying private firms and individuals with the Daily Weather Report, and $36 for the Weather Map. No maps were published on January 1, March 23, April 3 and 23, May 2, 4, 10, 12, and 13, June 22, 27, and 29, July 1, 10, 15, 25, and 26, August 13, September 15 and 21, October 5, and December 6, owing to the late arrival of the weather telegrams. On many other occasions the map, though published, contained but meagre information,

F 6

The weather forecast is telegraphed daily to the Cape d'Aguilar Wireless Station in time for distribution at 1 p.m. It is broadcasted again at 5 p.m.

Monthly Meteorological Bulletin.-The Monthly Meteorological Bulletin, which includes the Daily Weather Report, was published as usual, and distribution to the principal observatories and scien- tific institutions recommenced in November.

Miscellaneous Returns.--A monthly abstract of observations made at the Observatory is published in the Government Gazette, and daily, monthly, and yearly results are published in the Blue Book in the form suggested by the London Meteorological Office for the British Colonies.

The monthly departures from normal of the barometric pressure at four China Coast Ports were communicated to the Common- wealth Meteorologist, Melbourne, in connection with long range weather forecasts. Monthly meteorological returns are forwarded to Symons's Meteorological Magazine, and annual returns to the Stock Exchange Official Intelligence and the Colonial List.

V.-WEATHER TELEGRAMS, FORECASTS, AND STORM WARNINGS.

Daily Weather Telegrams.-The service of daily weather telegrams has improved somewhat of late, though the Japanese and Vladivostock morning observations are never received till the afternoon. The observations from Central and South China are received by post, the Chinese telegraphic service still being in a state of chaos.

Extra Weather Telegrams.-The following stations send extra weather telegrams at half rates during typhoons, on receipt of certain code words from Hongkong:-Amoy, Canton, Macao, Phulien, Sharp Peak, and Taihoku. The Director of the Philippines Weather Bureau also sends extra telegrams, at his discretion, from Aparri or some other station nearer the typhoon centre.

The extra 9 p.m. telegram, which the Chinese Telegraph Administration kindly send from Swatow during the typhoon season, was frequently not received.

Wireless Weather Telegrams.-The Marconi Company have generously renewed the offer made in 1916 to transmit meteoro- logical telegrams from ships free of charge, and in July submitted a revised circular for issue to their operators. This circular was distributed to the various shipping companies in Hongkong, to- gether with a notice to mariners, in the month of September. Copies of both are printed below.

F 7

Notice to Mariners.

1. The Marconi International Maritime Communication Com- pany have issued the attached circular to their operators, and ship- masters are earnestly requested to co-operate in the forecasting and storm warning work of the Royal Observatory, Hongkong, by arranging for 'meteorological observations to be made in accordance with the programme given in the circular, and transmitted by the wireless operator without delay.

2. The accuracy and utility.of the Observatory forecasts will increase in proportion to the number of ships co-operating, the accuracy of the observations, and the promptness with which they are despatched. In the interest of shipping, therefore, every master possessing a radio-telegraphic installation should send observations at the hours stated, viz., 6 a.m. and 2 p.m. of the 120th Meridian Time, and endeavour to make the service as efficient as possible.

3. It is requested that mercurial barometers should be used. whenever possible, and that owners should co-operate by supplying their ships with at least one good mercurial barometer, of the Board of Trade pattern. Very few aneroid barometers are satisfactory. Generally speaking, the index error varies considerably from time to time, and is seldom constant throughout the scale. Moreover their readings are usually affected by changes of temperature though they are supposed to be compensated in this respect.

64

In every case the readings should be followed by the word. "Mercury" if a mercurial barometer is read, or 'Aneroid" if an aneriod is read.

4. It is very important that a few readings (at least four) of the ship's barometer (the barometer used for the wireless messages) should be taken in Hongkong and forwarded to the Observatory, in order that the correction to the Observatory Standard may he obtained; otherwise the barometer readings are useless. It is also very important that the readings should be exactly as read off, without any correction whatever, except in the case of ships which have not sent comparison observations to the Observatory. Such ships should correct the readings for index error, and reduce them to 32° Fahrenheit, sea level, and gravity at 45° latitude; using the best index error available and adding the word “corrected”.

26th September, 1919.

T. F. CLAXTON,

Director.

THE MARCONI INTERNATIONAL MARINE COMMUNICATION COMPANY, LIMITED.

CIRCULAR No. 364.

Operators employed on board ships trading to the Far East will note that arrangements have been made to transmit from the Cape d'Aguilar (Hongkong) Radiotelegraph Station to, ships at sea a summary of meteorological conditions and weather forecasts. return, ships will forward meteorological observations through the Cape d'Aguilar Station to the Royal Observatory, Hongkong.

In

F 8

Details of the arrangements are given hereunder :—

1. A summary of meteorological conditions and weather forecasts will be broadcasted by Cape d'Aguilar daily at 1 p.m. Hongkong standard time (5 a.m. G. M. T.) and repeated at 5 p.m. Hongkong standard time (9 a.m. G. M. T.).

2. Storm warnings are broadcasted at about noon and repeated every two hours until midnight. If a second warning is issued during the day the later warning will be substituted.

3. When within range of Cape d'Aguilar the Captain will arrange for observations to be made at 6 a.m. and 2 p.m. Hongkong time (10 p.m. and 6 a.m. G. M. T.), and a message, prepared by the observer, will be handed to the operator for transmission containing the following information :-

(a.) Ship's name, position, and the time of ob-

servation (G. M. T.).

(b.) Barometer reading (with, no correction what-

ever).

(e.) Thermometer reading (if the barometer is of

the mercurial type).

(7.) Wind direction and force.

(e.) State of weather (in plain language).

Under no circumstances will the operator write these

messages.

4. Reports for transmission from the ship will be addressed to "Royal Observatory, Hongkong," and immediately on the acceptance of these messages the operator will enter (a) Prefix "S", (b) Date, (c) Time handed in (G. M. T.).

5. All messages handed in under the. above conditions

shall be dealt with as follows:-

They shall be communicated to the coast station at the first opportunity, and shall receive priority as Government messages.

The greatest care shall be observed to have them correctly transmitted; wherever possible, cach message shall be repeated.

6. All messages shall be treated free of coast tax, ship tax,

and land charges.

C

F 9

7. Reports handed in for transmission written on any form other than on the message form numbered SI, shall be affixed to a message form SI in such a manner as not to cover the space reserved for service instruc- tions and other data.

8. The Hongkong Observatory also sends wireless Time Signals via Cape d'Aguilar at the even seconds between 11.56 a.m. and noon, and between 8.56 p.m. and 9 p.m. Hongkong time (3.56 a.m. to 4 a.m. and 12.56 p.m. to 1 p.m. G. M. T.). The 2nd, 28th, 50th, 52nd, and 54th second of each of the above minutes are omitted for the purpose of identifying the signals.

The Time Signals are preceded by the following warning signals from Cape d'Aguilar between 11.54 a.m. and 11.55 a.m., and between 8.54 p.m. and 8,55 p.m., Hongkong time (3.54 a.m. and 3.55 a.m., and 12.54 p.m. and 12.55 p.m. G. M. T.) :-

CQ DE VPS HK TIME WAIT

Both warning and Time Signals are sent out on a wave length of 1,000 metres from a 5 kw spark set. The Time Signals are dots of about 0.2 second duration. Radio-telegraphic land and ship stations within range of Cape d'Aguilar are required to keep silent between 11.54 a.m. and noon, and 8.54 p.m. and 9 p.m. Hong- kong time (3.54 a.m. and 4 a.m. and 12.54 p.m. and 1 p.m. G. M. T.) in accordance with Article 45, paragraph 3, of the Service Regulations appended to the International Radio-telegraph Convention of 1912. Operators are also required to keep themselves provided with the most accurate time available in order to know when to shut down.

9. The times given in brackets represent the G. M. T. equivalent of Hongkong standard time. The latter time is 8 hours in advance of G. M. T.

The Marconi International Marine

Communication Company, Limited,

Marconi House,

Strand, London, W.C. 2.

A

F 10

The following table gives the number of wireless meteoro- logical messages received in each month from ships of different nationalities. It will be seen that the Circular has not met with a very hearty response so far.

Month.

Dutch.

Japanese.

British.

American.

January, February,

+

March,

I

I

April,.

2

I

May,

4

June,

July,

August,

I

2

3

September,

October,....

November,...

December,

2

I

I

I

3

2

I

I

Totals 1919,

36

6

17

2

Totals 1918,... 41

14

Totals 1917,... 93

37

:

:

Totals 1916,... 95

60

Results of Weather Forecasts. The results of the comparison of the daily weather forecasts with the weather subsequently experienced are given below, with the results of the previous five

years:

Year.

Complete Partial Partial

Success. Success.

Total Failure. Failure,

%

%

%

%

62

1914

32

1915

54

37

1916

67

29

1917

67

29

1918

26

1000 3 +3

I

I

1919

27

2

No forecasts were issued on July 28 and September 21, owing to lack of telegraphic information.

The forecast comprises wind direction, wind force, and weather.

F 11

Complete success means correct in three elements. Partial success means correct in only two elements. Partial failure means correct in only oue element. Total failure means correct in no element.

The method of analysis is described in the 1918 Report.

Storm Warnings.-Storm warnings, according to the Hong- kong Local and Non-Local Codes, are displayed at the Signal Hill, Kowloon. The following ports are warned by the non-local code :- Sharp Peak, Swatow, Amoy, Santuao, Macao, Canton, Wuchow, Pakhoi, Hoihow, Phulien, Taihoku, Manila, Labuan, and Singapore.

--་

The local day signals are repeated at the Harbour Office, H.M.S. Tamar, Green Island, the Godown Company (Kowloon), Lyemun, and Lai-Chi-kok.

The local night signals are exhibited on the Observatory Wire- less Mast and repeated on the tower of the Kowloon Railway Station, on H.M.S. Tamar, and at the Harbour Office.

For the benefit of native craft and passing ocean vessels a cone is exhibited at several outlying stations during the time that any of the local signals are displayed in the Harbour, to indicate that there is a depression somewhere in the China Sea, and that a typhoon warning is displayed in the Harbour.

In the following table are given the number of hours the local signals were hoisted in each of the

years

1912-1919-

Red Signals.

Black Signals.

Bombs. *

Year.

Number

Number of hours hoisted.

of times fired.

1912

151

1913

146

1914

146

1915

64

1916

70

1917

102

1918

1919

33 78

164

189

I

178

I 20

201

36

102

105

1

I

I

The figures in the above table include the number of hours that night signals, corresponding to the day signals, were hoisted.

Prior to July, 1917, the red signals indicated that the centre of the typhoon was believed to be more than 300 miles distant, and the black less than 300 miles; the returns for 1912-1916 are therefore not strictly comparable with those for 1917-1919. The latter suggest however that the use of the new local storm warning code has already saved the Colony a considerable amount of money. The loss incurred by the

* Three bombs fired at intervals of 10 seconds indicate that wind of typhoon force is anticipated,

F 12

M

It

disorganisation of the work in the harbour, consequent upon the display of typhoon signals, is not easy to estimate. probably amounts to many thousands of dollars a day, however.

VI. METEOROLOGICAL OBSERVATIONS FROM SHIPS, TREATY PORTS, &c.

Logs received. In addition to meteorological registers kept at about 40 stations in China, meteorological logs were received from 81 ships operating in the Far East. These logs, representing 2,587 days' observations, have been utilised for verifying typhoon tracks. The corresponding figures for the years 1918 were 34 and 2,223.

Pilot Charts. No progress has been made with the construc- tion of Pilot Charts as the Chief Assistant was largely occupied with re-organising the Time Service in the latter part of the year, and the First Assistant, who returned from Active Service on August 12th, was occupied in re-measuring sunshine records and comparing magnetic instruments with the Chief Assistant.

Comparison of Barometers.-During the year about 250 com- parisons of ships' barometer have been made by means of observa- tions taken when in harbour, and several direct comparisons of barometers for shipmasters and various persons in the Colony have been made at the Observatory.

VII.

MAGNETIC OBSERVATIONS.

The mean values of the magnetic elements for the years 1918 and 1919 were as follows:-

1919.

Declination (west). Dip (north)...

Horizontal Force (C. G. S. unit) Vertical Force (C. G. S. unit)

Total Force (C. G. S. unit) ...

1918.

о

/

#

0 / //

0 17 57

0 19 50

30 48 19

30 47 30

0:37164

0.37171

0.22159

0'22151

0.43269

0-43270

The old magnetic hut is about to be demolished and the site used for quarters for the European Assistants.

In order to avoid a break in the series of magnetic observations, comparisons for horizontal force and declination are being made with Elliott No. 55 in the old hut and Elliott No. 83 in the new hut (constructed last year). Also for dip with Dover No. 71 in the old and new huts.

VIII-TIME SERVICES.

Time Ball-The Time Ball on the Signal Hill, Kowloon, is dropped daily at 13h Hongkong Standard Time (5 a.m. of Green- wich Time). The ball is also dropped at any other hour in case of necessity. No applications for a supplementary signal were made in 1919.

F 13

The ball was dropped successfully 334 times. There were 11 failures, 3 of which were caused by the negligence of the computers in charge at the tower, who were fined. The remainder were due to electrical and mechanical defects. The days on which the ball failed to drop were:-January 22, March 23, May 3 and 10, Jane 22, July 1, 5, 8, 10, and 20, and December 7. It was dropped at 14h on January 22, July 6, and December 7, and at 15h on July 10.

The ball was not raised on July 4, 26, and 27, owing to high wind. The apparatus was in course of repair, or adjustment, on February 4, 5, 6, June 14 and 24, July 2, 6, and 7, August 26, and September 3 to 10.

The ball fell with an error of 03 sec. or less on 299 occasions, and with an error of 04 sec, or ('5 sec, on 29 occasions. Errors of 06 sec. occurred 4 times, of 0·7 and 08 once each. The mean probable error of the Time Ball was 0·15 sec. The monthly values for the past 5 years are given below:-

.

Probable Error of the Time Ball.

Month.

1915

1916

1917

1918

1919

January,

+0.17

±0.15

10:17

+0!!

±0.24

February,

*44

*28

*10

13

*20

March,

17

*17

*I I

*15

*12

April..

.38

*18

•18

10

*19

May, June,

•16

:IC

.*17

12

*14

*15

*17

'10

*14

14

July,

'17

10

'21

*I I

13

August,.

15

•10

'I I

*26

*15

September,

*13

*I I

'10

·16

*10

October,

10

13

ΙΟ

*12

*15

November,

•16

*13

*10

'12

*14

December,

14

'I I

*10

14

*12

Means,,

+0.19

K

+0'14 +0.13 +0'14 +0'15

Time Signals by Wireless Telegraphy. In addition to the time. signals given by the Time Ball at 13h, signals are sent at noon and at 211 by wireless telegraph viâ Cape d'Aguilar. Particulars of the programme are given in the 1918 Report. The service has been interrupted rather frequently by circumstances over which the Observatory has no control.

Wireless Receiving Sel.-Mr. Henké, the officer detailed by the Naval Authorities to superintend the installation of a wireless receiving set at the Observatory, up to the time of his departure, in July, had not succeeded in obtaining time signals from Shanghai or Manila. Commander R. R. Cooke, R.N., is now reporting on what should be done to obtain these signals.

Transit Instrument.—Observations for time were made daily with the 3 inch transit instrument and the Hipp tape chronograph by the Chinese computers, weather permitting.

F 14

The number of observations in the years 1918 and 1919 were as follows-

Transits,

Level determination,

Azimuth

Collimation

1918. 1919.

1,522

1,321

787

676

23

23

22

22

No transits of the Sun were utilized during 1919.

The azimuth and collimation determinations were made by the Chief and First Assistants from observations of the old south mark.

Clocks. The losing rate of the Standard Sidereal clock, Dent No. 39741, varied from -0-12 sec. on February 5 (Barometer 30ins. 33 Temperature 55°6) to −0·55 sec. on August 7 (Barometer 29ins. 48 Temperature 86°0).

The rate during cloudy periods was usually derived from the formula:

r = −0·792 +0% 575 (b-29ins.) +0.00021 (t-50°) where is the computed losing rate, and b and t the mean barometric pressure and temperature, respectively, for the prece- ding 24 hours.

In the following table is given the excess of the observed over the computed error after cloudy periods during 1919 :--

Date 1919.

Interval without Excess of observed

observations.

4 days 3

52

over computed error.

secs.

+ 0:28

+ 0·64

January

11,

"

15,

29,

10

>>

""

February 4,

March

""

15, 24,

7

""

>>

18,

IO

3

25,

""

April

May

4,

699

>>

"7

19,

9

""

17,

9

26,

June

1,

18,

3

5

July

6.

3

29,

3

>>

Angust

12,

""

24, 29,

""

October

16.

22,

""

November 10,

22

December

"}

20,

3,

13,

a in m in no mo ng .n min + +++6

""

יי

""

3

3

3

5

>>

>>

27

"

"

0:36

0.16 0.80

+ 0.14 + 0·09

Ο ΟΙ

0*39 + 0.50 0'24

•28

0:08

0'31

+ 0.59

0'09

0.04

0'57

O'12

+ 0.40

041

C*00

+ 002

F 15

The Dent Mean Time clock (No. 39740) was used throughout the year for dropping the Time Ball, maintaining the electric time service in the Observatory, and sending hourly signals to the Railway, the Post Office, and the Eastern Extension Telegraph Co. The clock is corrected daily at about 10 a.m. by the electric regula- ting apparatus, and its daily rate kept below 05 sec. by the addition or removal of weights from the pendulum. It tripped 14 seconds on March 14, 12 seconds on November 20, and 22 seconds on November 21. It also tripped several times on December 23 and 24. The tripping on November 20 and 21 was caused by the driving weight suspension cord slipping from the pulley, and on the other occasions by undue pressure of the 2-second contact springs on the programme wheel.

The electric Sidereal clock was mounted in the computing room in a wood and glass case on January 9, and adjusted to keep Mean time. It gives a 2-second impulse to a dial in the computing room, aud to another in the Director's room. The clock has performed excellently, and has proved invaluable as a check on the per- formance of the minute dials.

Chronometer Dent No. 40917 is on loan to the Cape d'Aguilar Wireless Station, and chronometer Dent No. 39946 to the Peak Signal Station. Chronometer Woolf No. 5232 was forwarded for safekeeping to the Observatory by the Hon. Colonial Treasurer in August.

Batteries, Power Supply, &c.-The necessary current for the Time Service has been supplied by accumulator batteries, charged as found necessary from the alternating mains of the China Light and Power Co., Ld., through a Nodon valve. During March two Nodon valves of improved pattern and with larger electrodes were installed, those previously in use having become worn out. One of these valves is very satisfactory; the other is only efficient for very short periods.

Constantly recurring electrical faults led to a thorough ex- amination of the electric installation by the Chief Assistant and Mr. Ovenden (of the Public Works Department). It was found that the. earth return from the Time Ball was the cause of many of these faults; several defects were found on both the inner and outside circuits, and a defective main from the China Light and Power Company's system was discovered. These defects were remedied, and all earth returns abolished as soon as possible. All outside lines connected with the Observatory are now contained in a underground cable. In view of the leakage of alternating current to the clock and telegraph circuits the practice of using the battery during charging was discontinued, and the Fuller battery, hitherto reserved for the Morse instruments, was brought into use during the charging of the Tudor battery, and vice versû. One battery now supplies power for all requirements.

To give greatest effect to the new arrangements it was decided to embody them in as simple a manner as possible, on a new switchboard, and to renew all interior wiring. This was

F 16

MALAYA

accordingly done by the China and Japan Telephone Co., who commenced re-wiring on October 31, and installed a new switch- board, designed by Mr. W. R. Noble, on December 19.

In December, 7 Delco cells were obtained to form, together with the 3 similar cells procured for the radio set, another 20 volt battery for alternate use with the Tudor battery installed in 1915. A motor-generator to replace the defective Nodon valve was also installed.

"1

In March, 28 Fuller "block cells of low capacity were purchased from H. M. Naval Yard for the valve of the Radio receiving installation. These cells have now deteriorated, and in anticipation of further deterioration 30 cells of the open type are on order from England.

IX.-MISCELLANEOUS.

Staff. No change occurred in the European Staff during the year. Mr. B. D. Evans, First Assistant, returned from Military Service on August 12th.

The Director acted as Deputy Cable Censor from January 1st to March 28th, and as Cable Censor from March 29th until the abolition of the Censorship on July 23rd.

Cheng Wa So, 6th grade telegraphist, resigned on July 31st to take up a better appointment at Canton. His post was abolished and a 5th grade telegraphist, Leong Kwok Hoon, appointed on September 29th.

Expenditure.-The annual expenditure on the Observatory for the past ten years is as follows:-

Year.

Total Expenditure.

Increase.

Decrease.

C.

c.

C.

1910

21,787.55

601.08

1911

23,353.02

1.565.47

1912

22,595.08

757.94

1913

24,255.49

1,660.41

1914

25,398.31

1,142.82

1915

23.233.12

2,165.19

1916

21,977.78

1,255.34

1917

26,890.50

4,912.72

1918

20,028.24

6,862.26

1919

23,450.57

3,422.33

F 17

Acknowledgments.-Acknowledgments are here made to the Directors of Weather Services in the Far East, and the Chinese Maritime Customs authorities, for daily observations, and extra observations during typhoon weather, to the Telegraph Com- panies for transmitting the observations free of charge, to the commanders of vessels who have furnished meteorological observations by post and by wireless telegraphy, and to the Observatory staff for the manner in which they have carried out their respective duties.

1920, February 7.

T. F. CLAXTON,

Director.

Appendix G.

REPORT OF THE REGISTRAR OF THE SUPREME COURT FOR THE YEAR 1919.

1. ORIGINAL JURISDICTION.

Two hundred and thirty-one (231) actions were instituted in this division of the Court during the year 1919, as against 214 in 1918. One hundred and thirty-eight (138) were disposed of during the year, 51 being settled or withdrawn before trial, as against 137 and 50 respectively in 1918. Of the 40 cases which had been set down for trial, 18 were disposed of during the year.

No injunction was granted during the year.

The amounts involved were $2,259,725, Pesos 2,005.68, and $14,869.49 Gold U.S.A. Currency, against $1,628,273, Ticals 15,197.75 and $14,175 Gold U.S.A. Currency.

The debts and damages recovered amount to $604,792.68 as against $695,677.93 in 1918.

The fees collected amounted to $12,811.65 as against $13.596.30 in 1918.

Tables setting out in detail the figures contained in this and the following paragraphs are printed at pages O 1, O 2, Y 2, and Y3 of the Blue Book for the year 1919.

1A.-IN PRIZE.

Three actions were instituted under the above head during the year in connection with cargo consigned to alien enemy firms ou board the following vessels :——

"Tjimanock", "Castlefield ", and "Malay Maru".

Six steam launches were condemned during the year and some cargo ex S.S. "Prinz Waldemar", S.S. "Yorck" and S.S. "Gottingen" and also sundry applications In Prize were dealt with. ·

2. SUMMARY JURISDICTION.

One thousand eight hundred and eight (1,808) actions were instituted during the year as against 1,668 in 1918.

The cases were disposed of as follows:-Settled or withdrawn 733, Judgment for the Plaintiff 698, Judgment for the Defendant 18, Non-suited 7, Struck off, Dismissed, or Lapsed 25, and Pending 327, as against 654, 674, 22, 1, 31, and 286 respectively in 1918.

The claims amounted to $246,107.68 and G$290.00 as against $325,193.00 in 1918, and the amounts recovered were $158,223.93 as against $151,314.51 in 1918.

G 2

The fees collected amounted to $7,268.60 as against $6,610.00 in 1918.

The number of Rent Distress Warrants issued was 782, re- presenting unpaid rents amounting to $54,190.14, of which $24,165.29 was recovered, as against 689, $58,575.00, and $18,029.55 respectively in 1918.

Five hundred and sixty-five (565) Warrants were withdrawn on settlement between the parties as against 496 in 1918.

The fees collected amounted to $4,171.00 as against $3,680.00

in 1918.

3. CRIMINAL JURISDICTION.

There were 65 cases and 96 persons committed for trial at the Criminal Sessions, as against 66 and 102 respectively in 1918. ·

The number of persons actually indicted was 94, of whom 78 were convicted and 16 were acquitted. Against 2 persons the case was abandoned. In 1918 the figures were respectively 101, 79, 22, and 1.

4.--APPELLATE JURISDICTION.

Three appeals were lodged during the year, two from the decisions of the Police Magistrates and one appeal from the decision of the Chief Justice.

Of the two appeals from the decisions of the Police Magistrates one was dismissed and the other was referred back to the Police Magistrate with the opinion of the Court under section 109 of the Magistrates Ordinance. The appeal from the decision of the Chief Justice was still pending at the end of the year.

No leave to appeal to the Privy Council was granted.

5.--ADMIRALTY JURISDICTION.

Six actions were instituted during the year. Four were settled and the others are pending.

The fees collected amounted to $588.30 as against $139.85 in 1918.

6.-BANKRUPTCY JURISDICTION.

Twenty-two (22) petitions were filed, 11 being creditors' petitions and 11 debtors' petitions. The figures for 1918 were respectively 35, 20, and 15.

The number of Receiving Orders made was 14, being 5 on creditors' petitions and 9 on debtors' petitions. The figures for 1918 were respectively 27, 14, and 13.

The number of Public Examinations held was 13 as against S in 1918. There were 10 Adjudications as against 23 in 1918.

G 3

Two Schemes of Arrangement were put through. Six petitions were withdrawn, 1 case was dismissed, 4 bankrupts obtained their discharge, and 1 Interim Receiving Order and 5 Receiving Orders were rescinded.

The estimated assets, in cases where Receiving Orders were made and not subsequently rescinded, were $47,272.44 and the estimated liabilities $96,275.22 as against $736,156.08 and $1,480,202.93 respectively in 1918.

The fees collected amounted to $6,342.70 as against $4,936.60 in 1918 and the Official Receiver's Commission as Trustee, where no Trustee had been appointed by the Creditors, was $7,126.32 as against $7,858.07 in 1918.

7.-PROBATE AND ADMINISTRATION.

One hundred and ninety-nine (199) grants were made by the Court being:--

Probate

Letters of Administration

100

99

199

The figures in 1918 were respectively 112 and 126, total 238. The aggregate value of the estates was $4,538,965.00 as against $8,306,900.00 in 1918.

Probate and Estate Duties amounted to $157,543.00, Court Fees to $10,295.15, and Official Administrator's Commission to $1,157.38. The figures in 1918 were respectively $513,469.31, $14,253.23, and $6,365.15.

There were 82 Estates vested in or administered by the Official Administrator during the year, representing an aggregate value of $132,860.85. The figures for 1918 were respectively 75 and $137,261.48.

Ten (10) were wound up during the year, of the total value of $23,245.94, as against 16 in 1918 of the total value of $15,591.18.

8.-OFFICIAL TRUSTS.

The number of Trust Estates in the hands of the Official Trustees at the end of 1919 was 18, with Trust Funds amounting to $85,830.33, as against 24 Estates aggregating $53,044.16, plus certain house property, in 1918. One Estate was wound up during the year.

No new Trust was opened.

The amount of Commission collected was $52.96 as against $433.73 in 1918.

9.-REGISTRAR OF COMPANIES.

On the 31st December there were 307 companies on the Hong- kong Register, of which 21 were in course of liquidation. During the year 47 new companies were put on the Register and 14 struck off.

\

:

Ġ 4

The fees collected in respect of "China" companies amounted to $104,521.05 and those in respect of other companies to $10,439.40.

Two firms were registered under the Chinese Limited Partner- ship Ordinance, 1911, and one firm was registered under the Limited Partnership Ordinance, No. 18 of 1912.

Deposits to the value of $3,100,000 were made by Insurance Companies under the Fire and Marine Insurance Companies Deposit Ordinance, 1917.

10.-FEES AND COMMISSION.

The total sum collected during the year by way of fees and commission amounted to $61,305,87 as against $68,032.72 in the previous year.

11.-STAFF.

Mr. Justice Gompertz, Puisne Judge, proceeded on leave of absence on 5th February and returned on 24th November.

Mr. H. A. Nisbet, Registrar, proceeded on leave of absence on 27th November.

Mr. C. D. Melbourne, Deputy Registrar and Appraiser, acted as Second Magistrate from 1st January to 3rd February, as Puisne Judge from 5th February to 23rd November, and as Registrar from 27th November to 31st December.

Mr. F. B. Johnson, Assistant Land Officer, acted as Deputy Registrar from 1st January to 5th May in addition to his duties as Assistant Land Officer.

Mr. R. E. Lindsell, Third Assistant to Secretary for Chinese Affairs, acted as Deputy Registrar from 1st January to 3rd February. Mr. W. Schofield, Passed Cadet, acted as Deputy Registrar from 4th February to 28th March.

Mr. Leo Longinotto, Assistant Crown Solicitor, acted as Deputy Registrar from 29th March to 31st December in addition to his other duties.

Mr. N. L. Smith, Cadet Officer, Third Class, acted as Deputy Registrar from 10th June to 12th August.

Mr. T. W. Ainsworth, Passed Cadet, acted as Deputy Registrar from 13th to 29th August.

Mr. Ng Chak-wing, Assistant Interpreter, was promoted to 1st Grade Clerk on 1st January.

Mr. A: J. Mackie, Assistant Interpreter, retired on pension on 19th April.

Mr. Tang Tat-hung, 3rd Grade Interpreter, Secretariat for Chinese Affairs, attached to this department, was promoted to 2nd Grade.

G 5

Mr. Khawas Khan, 3rd Grade Clerk, proceeded on 8 months' full pay leave on 17th November.

Mr. T. F. O'Sullivan, Second Bailiff, proceeded on 9 months' full pay leave on 22nd March.

3th March, 1920.

C. 1). MELBOURNE,

Registrar.

Table showing total number of Cases dealt with in, and Expenditure and Revenue of the Supreme Court.

(From 1910 to 1919.)

Year.

Total

number of

Expenditure.

Revenue.

Percentage of

cases dealt

with.

Total.

Increase.

Decrease.

Total.

Increase.

Decrease.

Revenue to Expenditure.

3

$

C.

C.

%

1910

1,259

91,789.15

2,579.98

1911

1,963

86,702.10

5,087.05

*

1912

1,263 88,346,36

1,644.26

65,527.80

48,342.49

* 69,544 30

19,666.25

71.38

17,185.31

55.75

12,201.81

68.53

1913

898 98,351.02 10,004.66

63,303.78

2,759.18

64.36

1914

1,091

107,780,92

9,429.90

73,422.69

10,118.91

68.12

1915

832

110,667.68 2,886.76

*

63,382.63

10,040.06

57.27

1916

753

105,252.44

5,415.24

56,719.68

6,662.95

53.88

1917

764 99,662.88

5,589.56

48. 5,334.81

8,384.81

48.48

1918

931

98,281.40

1,381.48

* 68,032.72

19,697.91

69.22

1919

982

98,844.23

562.83

* 61,305.87

6,726.85

62.02

*Not including amounts paid direct to Treasury for fees in respect of Licences to keep Local Registers issued by the Registrar of Companies under the Companies Ordinance, 1911.

6 --

Appendix H.

REPORT OF THE POLICE MAGISTRATES' COURTS FOR THE YEAR 1919.

Mr. E. D. C. Wolfe acted as Captain Superintendent of Police from the 1st January.

Mr. J. R. Wood acted as First Police Magistrate and Coroner from 1st January to 13th March.

Mr. C. D. Melbourne acted as Second Police Magistrate from 1st January to 4th February and acted as Puisne Judge from 4th February.

Mr. R E. Lindsell acted as Second Police Magistrate from 4th February to 12th August, acted as First Police Magistrate and Coroner from 15th August to 23rd October, resumed duty as Second Police Magistrate from 24th October to 30th November, and went on leave on 1st December.

Mr. J. R. Wood went ou leave on 13th March, and returned from leave and resumed duty as First Police Magistrate and Coroner on 1st December.

Mr. G. N. Orme acted as First Police Magistrate and Coroner from 13th March to 6th May, and acted as Director of Education from 7th May.

Mr. R. O. Hutchison acted as First Police Magistrate and Coroner from 7th May to 12th August and from 24th October to 30th November, and acted as Second Police Magistrate from 1st December.

Mr. N. L. Smith acted as Second Police Magistrate from 13th August to 23rd October.

The number of cases was 12,998 as compared with 10,051 in 1918 and the Revenue was $90,851.36 as compared with $69,603 in 1918.

Table I shows the total number of cases tried and the Revenue and Expenditure of the Magistracy for the years 1910-1919.

Table II shows the List of Offences tried during the year. Table III gives an Abstract of Cases under Cognizance of the Police Magistrates' Courts during the year.

Table IV gives a return of Punishments awarded in respect of certain classes of offence during the year.

Table V gives an Abstract of Cases brought under Cognizance of the Police Magistrates' Courts during a period of the last ten

years.

R. (). HUTCHISON,

Police Magistrate,

22nd July, 1920.

Table I.

Table showing total Number of Cases tried in, and Expenditure and Revenue of the

Magistracy for the years 1910 to 1919.

YEAR.

EXPENDITURE.

REVENUE.

Total. Increase. Decrease. Total. Increase. Decrease.

Total

Number

of Cases

tried.

Percentage of Ex-

penditure to Revenue.

H 2 -

C. $

CA

C.

A

C. $ C.

0.

%

1910...

38,428.03

1,691.66

75,970.76

5,984.34

11,688

50.58

1911.

43,298.26

4,870.23

...

52,464.87

23,505,89

10,471

82.53

1912.

41,590.98

1,707.28 | 99,253.10

46,788.23

13,450

41.90

1913.

42,867.21*

1,276.23

158,451.56 59,198.46

13,954

27.05

1914..

42,807.15*

...

60.06 | 92,109.34*

66,342.22

11,034

46.47

1915.

44,041.33*

1,234.18

75,130.13*

16,979.21

12,263

58.62

1916.

....

40,642.43*

*

3,398.90 109,664.82* 34,534.69

15,057

37.06

1917.

38,510.07*

2,132.36 75,391.17*

34,273.65

11,922

51.08

1918.

40,804.18*

2,294.11

69,603.39*

5,787.78

10,051

58.62

1919.

40,774.23*

29.95 90,851.36* 21,247.97

12,998

44.77

*Tai Po District not included.

K

:

OFFENCES.

Table II.

POLICE COURTS.

LIST of OFFENCES TRIED during the year 1919.

NUMBER No. of OF PRI- CASES. SONERS.

OFFENCES.

NUMBER] No. of

OF

PRI-

CASES. SONERS.

H 3 -

Accessories and Abettors Ordinance-3 of 1865, Advertisements Regulation Ordinance-19 of 1912,.

10

1

Offences relating to foreign coin,

Brought forward,.

16 Coinage Offences Ordinance-7 of 1865,- Offences relating to the King's gold and silver coin, (Sections 3-12),

327 383

22020

23

(Sections

Arms and Ammunition Ordinance-2 of 1900,-- Contraventions of,

15-20),

3

نت

210

256

Asiatic Emigration Ordinance-30 of 1915.

Colonial Books (Preservation and Registration) Ordin- ance-2 of 1888,-

Contraventions of and Offences under.

73

102

Bankruptcy Ordinance −7 of 1891,-

Offences under,.

2 Dangerous Goods Ordinance-1 of 1873,—

Contraventions of,

18

23

Births and Deaths Registration Ordinance-7 of 1896,-

Contraventions of,

2

Defences (Sketching Prevention) Ordinance-1 of 1895,— Offences under...............................

1

1

Boarding House Ordinance-23 of 1917,

BB

33

Deportation Ordinance- 25 of 1917,

110

109

Boycott Prevention Ordinance-41 of 1912,

2

Dogs Ordinance-5 of 1893,-

Chinese Extradition Ordinance-7 of 1889,-

Contraventions of,

91

91

Proceedings under,

61

63

Electricity Supply Ordinance-18 of 1911.

9

13

Chinese Marriage Preservation Ordinance-42 of 1912, ...

3

Carried forward,

327

383

Carried forward,

652

748

OFFENCES.

Brought forward,

Table II, Continued.

LIST of OFFENCES, ETC.,—Continued.

NO. OF

No. OF

PRI-

CASES, SONERS,

Employers and Servants Ordinance-45 of 1902,-- Offences under,..

Explosive Substance Ordinance-23 of 1913,

Ferries Ordinance-28 of 1917,

Forest Fire Prevention Ordinance-5 of 1917.

No. of

OFFENCES.

652 748

Brought forward.....

Gambling Ordinance-2 of 1891.—

11

14

Contraventions of and Offences under,

No. of

CASES.

PRI-

SOners.

689

801

3601,705

1

Gunpowder and Fireworks Ordinance-14 of 1901,- Contraventions of and Offences under,

3

Hongkong Extension Exemption Ordinance-10 of 1899,

1

Hongkong and Kowloon Wharf and Godown Co.'s Ordinance-6 of 1908.-

Contraventions of By-laws made thereunder..

Indecent Exhibition Ordinance-3 of 1918,.

6

2

Importation and Exportation Ordinance-32 of 1915,

61

64

Interpretation Ordinance-31 of 1911,

5

17

Larceny Ordinance-5 of 1865,-

Forgery Ordinance-4 of 1865,—

Forgery of Exchequer Bills, &c., (Sections 10—13)... Bank Notes, (Sections 14-15),.

Making and engraving plates, &c., for bank notes, (Sections 16-21),

Forgery of Deeds, Wills, Bills of Exchange, (Sections

22--28),

Demanding property upon forged instruments,

(Section 39),

Forts Protection Ordinance-3 of 1891,-

Contraventions of,

Fugitive Offenders Act, 1381.-

Proceedings under,

Carried forward,-

689

?

H 4

:

Simple Larceny,

Larceny of cattle and other animals, (Sections 9—17), things attached to or growing on land, (Sections 22-28),

1,224 | 1,351

5

39

43

from the person and similar Offences, (Sections 29-37),

365

420

Curried forward,.

2,758 |4,407

OFFENCES.

Brought forward,

Table II,-Continued.

LIST of OFFENCES, ETC.,-Continued.

NO. OF

CASES. SONERS.

No. OF

PRI-

2,7584,407

OFFENCES.

Brought forward,,

NO. OF

CASES.

NO. OF

PRI-

SONERS.

4,757|6,817

H -

Larceny Ordinance~5 of 1865,—Contd.-

Sacrilege Burglary and house breaking. (Sections

38-47).

Larceny in dwelling houses, (Sections 48-49),

"

ships, wharves, &c., (Sections 50-53),

or embezzlement by clerks, servants, &c., (Sections 54-60),

Frauds by bankers, agents, &c., (Sections 62–74), Obtaining property by false pretences, (Sectious

100 116

29

40

18

21

Malicious Damage Ordinance-6 of 1865,-

Injuries by fire to buildin.s and goods therein, (Sections 2-9),

Injuries to crops, trees and vegetable productions, (Sections 16-23).

Injuries to fences, (Section 24),

34

86

*

":

cattle and other animals, (Sections 31-32),

16

21

3

TON -

10

11

75-78),

54

60

Receiving stolen property, (Sections 79-87),

102 112

Licensing Ordinance--8 of 1887,-

#9

Contraventions of and Offences under, Regulations made thereunder,

1,110 (1,373

359

358

Married Women (Maintenance in case of Desertion) | Ordinance-10 of 1905,-

Proceedings under,

(Merchant Shipping Ordinance-1 of 1899,-

Contraventions of and Offences under Part VI, (Sections 21-30);

20

t

Liquors Licence Ordinance-9 of 1911,—

Merchandise Marks Ordinance-4 of 1890,— Contraventions of and Offences under,

21

21

Contraventions of and Offences under Part II,

(Sections 41-73),

25

Contraventions of and Offences under Part III,

(Sections 74-96),

14

Contraventions of Regulations made thereunder,

3

***

18

Misdemeanour Punishment Ordinance-I of 1898,— Offences under,

58

56

3

Naval Stores Ordinance (Hongkong)-4 of 1875.- Contraventions of,

1

Magistrates Ordinance-3 of 1890,-

Offences under,

144

207

Carried forward,.

4,757 6,817.

Carried forward,,

4,863 | 6.932

OFFENCES.

Table II,-Continued.

LIST of OFFENCES, ETC.,--Continued.

No. of

PRI-

No. of CASES. SONERS,

OFFENCES.

Brought forward,...

4,863 | 6,932

Brought forward..

Offences against the Person Ordinance-2 of 1865,—

Homicide, (Sections 2-9).

14

Prevention of Crimes Ordinance-4 of 1887,- Contraventions of and Offences under.

Attempt to murder, (Sections 10—14),

7

Acts causing or tending to cause danger to life, &c.,

Post Office Amendment Ordinance-17 of 1915,

NO. OF

CASES.

No. of

PRI-

SONERS,

}

5,579 8,173

N

1

2

(Sections 16-31),

37

48

Assaults, (Sections 32-43),

230

327

Prison Ordinance-4 of 1899.-

Forcible taking or detention of persons, (Sections

Offences under,

N

12

44-45),

14

29

Opium Ordinance-4 of 1914,-

Protection of Women and Girls Ordinance-4 of 1897,- Offences under,

117

124

Contraventions of Part I, (Sections 5-18),.

40

56

*

II. (

"

19-34),

267

656

";

III, (

"

35-62),

B3

Public Health and Buildings Ordinance-1 of 1903,— Contraventions of Part II, (Sections 8-95),

158

158

**

Pawnbrokers Ordinance-1 of 1860,- Contraventions of,

፡፡

III, (

VI, (

96-235),

255-264),

293

304

I

1

£7

30

Failure to comply with B. A. Notice.. Contraventions of By-laws made thereunder,

1

Pharmacy Ordinance-12 of 1908,

22

22

Police Force Ordinance-11 of 1900,- Offences under,

Public Places Regulation Ordinance-2 of 1870,- Contraventions of Regulations made thereunder,

3

23

24

Railway Ordinance-21 of 1909,

1

Post Office Ordinance-6 of 1900,— Contraventions of and Offences under,

15

ܬܵܐ

Registration of Person Ordinance-6 of 1916.

1

Carried forward.

5,579 8,173

Carried forward,

6,163 8,775

H 6 --

K

OFFENCES.

Table II,-Continued.

LIST of OFFENCES, ETC.,—Continued.

No. of

No. OF PRI-

CASES. SONers.

OFFENCES.

NO. OF

CASES.

NO OF

PRI-

SONERS.

9,544 12,563

Brought forward,

Regulation of Chinese Ordinance-3 of 1888,- Offences under Part V, (Sections 22—28),

6,1638,775

Brought forward,

38

47

under

(Sections 42-51),

Rogne and Vagabond-5 Geo. IV, c. 83,

50

57

Sale of Food and Drugs Ordinance-8 of 1896,– Offences under,

3 | Theatres

and Public

Summary Offences Ordinance-1 of 1845,-Contd.- Proceedings

Provisions,

Contraventions of and Offences under No. 7 of 1905, -An Ordinance to amend the

Ordinance-18 of 1908,

Miscellaneous

Q

2

Q

Performances

Servants Quarters Ordinance-11 of 1903,—

Offences under,.

10

19 Tobacco Ordinance-10 of 1916,

Regulation

6

1

13

12

Small Tenements Recovery Ordinance—10 of 1897,— Proceedings under,

Societies Ordinance-47 of 1911,

Tramway Ordinance-10 of 1902,— Contraventions of and Offences under,

29 Vagrancy Ordinance-9 of 1897,- Proceedings under,

H 7

13

13

**

Stamp Ordinance--16 of 1901,—

Öffences under,.

91

91

Vehicles Regulation Ordinance--3 of 1899,- Contraventions of and Offences under,

3,304|3,473

Stowaways Ordinance-5 of 1903,-

Offences under,.

29 89

Water Works Ordinance-16 of 1903,- Offences under,...

1

1

Summary Offences Ordinance-1 of 1845,-

Nuisances,

Trespasses, and similar offences,

(Sections 3-21),

2,442 | 2,585

Weights and Measures Ordinance-2 of 1885,-— Contraventions of and Offences under,

73

73

Offences against good order, (Sections 22--35),

199

393

Possession of stolen goods, (

36-11),

508

474 Undecided Cases,

37

41

Carried forward,

9,544 12,563

Total,.

12,998 16,189

CLASSIFICATION OF OFFENCES,

Table III.

ABSTRACT of ĈASES under COGNIZANCE of the POLICE MAGISTRATES' Courts during the Year 1919.

CASES, HOW DISPOSED OF, AND THE NUMBER OF MALE AND FEMALE PRISONERS UNDER EACH HEAD.

Ordered to find Security.

WRITS ISSUED BY THE POLICE MAGISTRATES DURING THE YEAR.

Warrants.

Magistrates' Orders.

TOTAL.

M.

F. M.

F. M. F.

M. F. M. F. M. F. M. F. M. F. M. F.

M.

F.

Assaults and other offences i against the person, Malicious injuries to property, Gambling,

Offences against property other

than malicious injuries to property or predial larceny, Offences against Revenue Acts," Highway Acts, Health Acts, and other Acts relating to the social economy of the Colony,

Offences against Masters and Servants Acts, including Acts relating to indentured coo- lies,

Other offences,

22

27

358 462 222 71

16

108

31

30

Q

10

360 1,705 1,638 22

41

4

2,134 | 2,422 | 1,820 | 15

481

10 88

~

2,070 2,759 2,412 | 124

201

11

14

10

8,006 | 8,759 | 7,670|130

818 43 26

Total,

12,961 16,148 |13,788 364 | 1,662 | 108 | 146

:

:

:

:

:

20

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:.

:

:

320

:

55

18 →

7

360

:.

11

:

:

102 4,525 | 11

198

:

384

320

:

5,438

26.

1

1,679

26

2,395

27

:

2,616

143

~

ลง

6

70

~I

:.

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

3

:

13

32

18,584 175

39

2 13,673

475 4,525 11

198

...

384 320

5,438

16,189

* TOTAL MALES AND FEMALES,

* Consisting of Offenders not sentenced to Imprisonment.

H

Table IV.

RETURN of PUNISHMENTS awarded in respect of CERTAIN CLASSES of OFFENCES, during the Year 1919.

PUNISHMENTS.

Assaults

and other

offences

Number of

Description.

each kind

inflicted.

against

the

person.

Malicious

injuries to

property.

Gam-

bling.

Offences against property other than malicious injuries to pro- perty or predial larceny.

Offences against Revenue Acts, Highway Acts, Health Acts, and

other Acts relating to the social economy of the colony.

Offences against

Masters and Servants Acts,

including Acts

Other

offen-

relating to

ces.

indentured

coolies.

H 9-

Fines,

10,074

124

~

64

Imprisonment in lieu

of fine or security,

1,742

59

50

Peremptory Imprison-

ment,

1,882

59

223

Whipping,

276

1,549

1,682

10

6,638

138

145

748

1

649

20

1,410

13

I

373

183

81

8

Solitary Confinement,..

Exposed in Stocks,

118

1

112

:

:

:

:

Sentenced to House of

Detention,

56

56

Bound over with or

without Sureties,

273

104

80

24

61

TOTAL.

14,421

351

19

1,712

1,994

2,548

12

7,785

Year,

Total number

of

cases.

H 10

Table V.

ABSTRACT of Cases brought under COGNIZANCE of the POLICE MAGISTRATES' COURTS during a period of ten years 1910-1919.

CASES, HOW DISPOSED OF, AND THE NUMBER OF MALE AND FEMALE PRISONERS UNDER EACH HEAD.

Convicted and punished.

absconded.

Did not appear and

Committed

Ordered to

Coinmit- to prison or find security

ted for

Discharged.

trial at

detained

pending or-

der of His

Supreme | Excellency

Court.

the Governor.

To keep the

peace, to be of

good beha- viour, and to answer any charge.

Escaped

before

being

brought

for trialat!

the Ma- gistracy.

Escaped.

Punished for preferring false charge

Undecided.

Total number

or giving false testimony.

of defendants.

2

3

4

5

7

8

9

10

11 12

13

14 tā 16

17

18

19

20

21

M.

F.

M.

F.

M. F.

M.

F.

Λέ.

F. M.

M.

FM. M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

1910, .. 11,688

12.880

741

3,655

278 198 23

27

1

858 105

1912.

1911,... 10,471

11,000 482

13,450 15,945 877

217

1913,

1914,

14.218 19,856 641

11.192 12,890 267

2,832

187 23

3,027 329 157

2,559 181 169 24

2,401 115 110

23

891 59

88

1

10

1

401 119

:

25

8 415 97

:

G-

18

296 29

2

Total,.. 61,019

72,571 3,008 14,474 1,120 827 78

98 101.911 462

Average

per (12,203·8 |14,51426016 | 2,8948 224 1654 15.6 19.6

Year,

:

:

:

H

CO

*

:

CO

123

ة

17,248 1,153

45

6

14,482 787

16

19,612 1,382

22

1

23,046

952

63

15,789 406

3

16

269

12

90,177 4,630

2382-280-4

1

.6

3+2

1915, 12.268 12.788 305 2,056

1916,... 15,057 14,881 455 2,233

11,727 1917, ... 11,922

441 2,168

1918, 9,805 9,359 373 1,947

1919, ... 12,961 13,788 364

111 149 10

7

272 20)

96 116

4

10

$13 40

:

:

:

92119

A

127 117 10

:

:

197

1,662

108 46

248 34

41

76 7

:

Total,.. 62,008 62,545 1,938

10,066 53464729 25

1.106 142

:

Average)

per Year,

12,401-6 12,508-6 | 387-6

2,013-2106.8

129-4

5.8

10

:

221-228-4

N

Grand Total

for the 123,027 185,114 4,946 24,540 | 1,654 |1,474 107 123

103,017 544 3 6

3

16

10 Years,

Average

per Year,

12,3027 |18,5114494-6

2,454 | 165·4 147-4'10-7 12-3 1 301-7544

6

c

co

:

:

:

53.8

2-4

18,035-4 926

48

15,320 446

72

17,625 595

42

14,311

570

49

11.665 545

:

13,673 475

250

2

72,594 2,631

50

+4

14,518-8 526-2

519

14

162,771 | 7,261

1.6

51.9 1-4

| 16,277-1726.1

M

Appendix I.

REPORT OF THE LAND OFFICER FOR THE YEAR 1919.

1-REGISTRATION.

During the year three thousand and twenty-one (3,021) Deeds and Documents were registered under the provisions of Ordinance No. 1 of 1844 affecting three thousand nine hundred and twenty- Tour (3,924) lots of land. The total money consideration on sales, mortgages, surrenders, and miscellaneous documents amounted to $60,152,755.07 particulars of which are shown in Table I. The total number of documents registered in the Land Office under the provisions of Ordinance No. 1 of 1844 up to the end of 1919 was 70,260. The number of Deeds registered each year for the last ten years is shown in Table III.

2.-GRANTS OF LAND.

The total area of land sold and granted on lease during the year was 163 acres () rood 381⁄2 poles of which 127 acres 0 rood 33 poles was in respect of lands dealt with by the District Land Officer. The total area resumed was 89 acres 1 rood 8 poles being an excess of 73 acres 3 roods 30% poles of land granted over land resumed during the year. This is exclusive of quarries and lands let on short temporary permits by the Public Works Department. Particulars of the grants are shown on page W I of the Blue Book for 1919.

3.--GRANTS OF LEASES.

The number of Crown Leases granted during the year was 114 particulars of which are specified in Table II. The number of Crown Leases issued each year for the last ten years is shown in Table III.

4.- FEES.

The total amount of fees collected by Stamps, exclusive of the New Territories, during the year amounted to $52,484.90 being $355.55 more than the previous year. The amount of land registra- tion fees in the New Territories amounted to $4,646.20.

The amounts of fees collected under the different headings for the years 1910 to 1919 are shown in Table IV.

5.-CROWN RENT ROLL.

The total Crown Rent due in respect of leased lands in Hong- kong and Kowloon (excluding certain Villages in Hongkong and Kowloon entered in the Village Rent Roll) amounted for the year uding 25th December to $424,865.99 an increase of $16,094.09

I 2

on the previous year. The total amount due in respect of leased lands in the Villages of Hongkong and Kowloon appearing in the Village Rent Roll for the year ending 30th September was $3,647.85 an increase of $142.70 on the previous year due to the addition of the Villages of Shek O and Hok Tsui. The total num- ber of lots of Crown Land appearing in the Rent Rolls with the Total Rents is shown in Table V.

6.--SCAVENGING LANES.

Areas for Scavenging Lanes were, in the case of two properties, either resumed by the Crown for money payments or dedicated by the Crown Lessees as Scavenging Lanes in consideration of their being granted by the Building Authority modifications or exemptions from certain provisions of the Public Health and Buildings Ordinance, 1903, and the necessary documents were completed and registered.

7.-NOISY AND OFFENSIVE TRADES.

Nineteen licences were granted to Crown Lessees under the provisions of the Crown Leases to carry on offensive trades on their premises in cases where such licences were recommended by the Sanitary Department.

8. BUILDING CONVENANTS.

In eleven cases applications were made by Crown Lessees for an extension of time in which to comply with the building covenant in their Crown Leases or grants. The applications were granted on payment of penalties and the agreements completed and registered.

9-NAVAL AND MILITARY LANDS.

A small portion of Saiwan Reserve was resumed for the purpose of road improvements and an equivalent area of Crown land was granted in exchange. A portion of Pinewood Battery having an area of 11,860 square feet was transferred to the Colonial Govern- ment by the War Department for the purpose of extending Lugard Road for which a sum of $1,311 was credited to the War Depart- ment in the Colonial Military Lands account. Two portions of Kowloon East Battery containing 66,371 square feet and 38,900 square feet respectively were also transferred to the Colonial Government by the War Department in consideration of credits in the same account of $23,229.85 and $13,615 respectively. The Colonial Government also took over two portions being the remain- der of Kowloon East Battery Reserve and credited the War Depart- ment with the sums of $132,040.47 and $122,412.53 in the said account. The acquisition of these areas became necessary owing to development in the vicinity of the Hongkong and Whampoa Docks.

10. MISCELLANEOUS DOCUMENTS.

In addition to the above one hundred and fourteen Crown Leases and one hundred and thirty-eight miscellaneous documents

I 3

were drawn and completed, the latter including agreements to secure Government Contracts and Purchase Deeds on the resumption of properties by the Crown.

11-STAMP DUTY.

The amount of Stamp Duty paid on registered documents exclusive of Probates and Letters of Administration amounted to $136,131.46. The amount of Stamp Duty on Probates and Letters of Administration registered amounted to $144,666.27.

12.-STAFF.

Mr. Birley Johnson, Assistant Land Officer, went on leave on the 6th of May and resigned at the end of August, when Mr. H. K. Holmes was appointed to succeed him.

Mr. Ng Yuk-shu, 3rd Grade Interpreter, resigned on the 24th. of May, his place has been filled by Mr. Li Kung-shan a 4th Grade Clerk who has had much experience in this Department.

Messrs. Shiu Sze-ki and Chan Fung-cheung, Probationers, were appointed 5th Grade Clerks early in the year.

Mr. Shiu Sze-ki resigned at the end of August and has been succeeded by Mr. Ng Kwok-choi (on probation).

6th May, 1920.

PHILIP JACKS,

Land Officer.

I 4

Table I.

Particulars of Deeds and Documents registered in the Land Office.

Description of Documents.

Number Registered.

No. of Lots

or portions

of Lots affected.

i

Total Consideration.

$

.c.

Assignments

937

1,091

21,954,243.51

Mortgages and Transfers of

Mortgages

931

1,161

19,145,790.00

Reassignments and Satis-

factions

760

954

17,881,433.91

Surrenders

52

109

532,417.15

Judgments and Orders of

Court

34

87

4,000.00

Probates and Letters of

Administration ....

94

218

Miscellaneous Documents,

213

304

634,850.50

Total,..

3,021

3,924

$60,152,735.07

Table II.

Crown Leases granted during the year 1919.

Hongkong.

Kowloon.

4 49

2

1

I

1

3

2

18

32

2222

New Kowloon.

New

Territories.

1

Total.

114

I 5

Table III.

Number of Deeds registered and Crown Leases issued during the years from 1910 to 1919.

Year.

Deeds Registered.

Crown Leases Issued.

1910

1,706

180

1911

2,142

99

1912

2,353

57

1918

2,814

118

1914

2,433

66

1915

2,154

166

1916

2,670

118.

1917

2,824

135

1918

2,922

117

1919

3,021

114

Table IV.

Fees collected during the years from 1910 to 1919.

Registration Searches and

Grants

Year.

of Deeds.

Copies of Documents.

of Leases.

Total.

$ C.

$ c.

$ C.

$

1910..... 1911.

27,798.00

2,722,25

5,305.00

35,825.25

33,871.00

2,827.20

2,925.00

39,623.20

1912...

37,528.00

2,805,75

1,820.00

42,153.75

R

1913.

45,018.00

3,530,50

3,670.00

52,218.50

1914..

38,362.00

3,200.25

2,450.00

44,012.25

1915..

32,305.00

2,719.00

5,455.00

40,479.00

1916..

42,070.00

3,368,25

3,960.00

49,398.25

1917.

43,478.00

3,199.75

1,870.00

51,047.75

1918..

15,225.00

3.399.35

3,505.00

52,129.35

1919.

45,896.00

3,486.90

3,102.00

52,484.90

I 6

S

Table V.

Crown Rent Roll.

Locality and Description.

No. of Lots.

Total Crown Reut.

6.

Victoria Marine Lot

Praya Reclamation Marine Lot

Victoria Inland Lot

332 82

68,541.17

10,007.84

1,838

167,131.27

22

Quarry Bay Marine Lot

Inland Lot

Farm Lot

2

18,334.00

3,278.00

42

2,519.72

Garden Lot.....

47

1,178.00

Rural Building Lot

121

11,509.84

Aberdeen Marine Lot

5

579.16

Inland Lot.....

70

وو

2,219.16

Aplichau Marine Lot

""

Inland Lot

Shaukiwan Marine Lot...

Inland Lot

Stanley Inland Lot

Kowloon Marine Lot

20

150.56

22

172.64

10

1,928.00

146

2,544.40

4

4.00

57

41,186.13

Inland Lot

Farm Lot

""

Garden Lot

**

897

54,590.61

109.49

4.00

"

Hung Hom Marine Lot

Inland Lot..

Shek O Inland Lot Tai Tam Inland Lot Tong Po Inland Lot.

New Kowloon Marine Lot

""

2

6,140.00

197

9,764.50

2

5.00

1

1.00

I

1.00

5

7,368,00

Inland Lot

167

8,971.00

Farm Lot

4

1,068.50

""

Rural Building Lot

1

42.00

Tai Po Inland Lot...

6

332.00

Fan Ling Lot......

1,192.00

Sheung Shui Lot

408.00

Sai Kung Marine Lot

*

Inland Lot

Ping Chau Farm Lot Mining Lot......

1

500.00

1

225.00

2,862.00

Total...

4,108 $424,865.99

1

I 7

Village Rent Roll.

Locality and Description.

No. of Lots.

Total Crown Rent.

Wongneichung,

128

224.50

Aberdeen

23

83.50

Pokfulam

24

28.25

Tai Hang

163

641.50

Ab Kung Ngam..

27

20.25

Shaukiwan

55

43.00

Tai Kok Tsui

10

16.00

Mong Kok

45

98.50

Hok Un

Tokwawan

Shek Shan

94

276.00

187

328.00

31

69.00

Sun Shan.

18

59.50

Mataukok

31

44.50

Mati...

5.50

Ho Mun Tin

17.50

Ma Tau Chung

35

91.00

Ma Tau Wei

98

186.00

Kau Pui Shek..

31

112.00

Hau Pui Loong

15

53.50

Tung Lo Wan.......

5

23.00

Wong Tsuk Hang

2

34.50

Tai Hang Stream

18

77.00

Little Hongkong

2

3.00

Tong Po

2

3.50

Stanley

Tytam

Tvtam Tuk

10

19.50

1

3.50

3

2.50

Chai Wan

Wong Ma Kok

Shek O

Hok Tsui

Chung Hom Bay

Aplichan

Kowloon Tong

1

2.00

15.00

23.00

1.50

3.00

Chinese Joss House, Bowen Road, Victoria........

Tsat Tsz Mui

1

3.00

68

287.00

35

99.00

46

112.00

Telegraph Bay Hung Hom West Little Hongkong.. Shek O Hok Tsui

13

43.50

2

6.00

1.590

280.65

1,064

173.20

181

34.50

Total.....

4,084

$3,647.85

{

Appendix J.

REPORT ON THE NEW TERRITORIES FOR THE YEAR 1919.

A.-NORTHERN DISTRICT.

I-STAFF.

Mr. G. N. Orme had charge of the office until March 28th. and I acted from March 29th until the end of the year.

II. MAGISTRACY.

Table A shews the number of cases heard by the District Officer sitting as Police Magistrate and as Judge of the Small Debts Court.

The year was an exceptionally busy one for the Small Debts Court, the number of cases heard, and of writs of execution issued. being considerably in excess of previous records. Money Loan Association or "wui" disputes bave been distressingly frequent. Properly conducted, these associations are undoubtedly useful, but the spirit of P'ong Kung, their founder, seems to have depart- ed from many a New Territory "wni", and in case after case it is found that the most fundamental rules have been disregarded.

Money is scarce in the Territory and the cost of living has risen, owing to the high price of rice, and this no doubt accounts for the increase in debt cases and in the number of writs that it was found necessary to issue.

The more serious crimes reported during the year included three murders and eight armed robberies on land. Two of the three murders were due to family quarrels. The armed robberies were committed not by people of the District, but by persons from Chinese Territory.

A

Armed robberies on the water were three in number, new system of water patrols introduced during the year at the head of Deep Bay will, it is hoped, provide for the better safe-guarding of an exposed district.

In general the Territory has been quiet and the local people have given little trouble to the Police.

Two fires occurred during the year: one at Sai Kung, which was fortunately not very serious, and one at Yun Long Market, which did damage to the extent of $1,200 and might have been much more serious but for the good work of a small fire engine

P

J 2.

which had been sent out from Hongkong by the Police for the use of Yun Long Market only a few weeks before the fire broke

out.

III-LAND OFFICE.

The number of sales of land and other transactions affecting land which took place during the year are set forth in Table B.

The number of memorials registered was 3,181 as against 2,957 in 1918. The fees received as stamp duty amounted to $1,964.90 as against $1,727.20 in the previous year.

The development of Tai Po Market was well maintained. Every site on the fish-pond reclamation has now been bought for building purposes, with the exception of a small portion where the ground has not yet been brought up to the required level. Several new buildings, of an improved type, were erected during the year.

Purchases at a cheap upset price of areas of hillside for fruit-growing purposes have been encouraged. Well-to-do Chinese, not of this District, have shewn enterprise in this respect.

The 1,200 acres of salt-water padi near Ping Shan yielded an excellent return, and large reclamations of marsh land of this nature should prove profitable.

The rice obtained from salt-water padi is "red rice", and is much used for distilling purposes, besides having dietetic properties said to be useful in treatment of Beri-beri.

Little progress can be reported in the attempts to develop the mineral resources of this District. Several Mining and Pros- pecting Licences have been held but subsequently given up. A inoderate amount of work was done at the Lin Ma Hang lead mine.

IV. REVENUE.

The total revenue collected in this office is set forth under the various heads in Table C.

The total collected was $117,174,51. The Table below gives the revenue collected since 1910 :--

1910......

$

1.

1911

1912.

1913.

1914.

.101,032.40

...102,960.60

106,607.67

.111,301.72

..108.455.14

1915

112,075.71

1916.

.174,153.77

1917.

.117,095.84

1918.

.120,244.93

1919..

.117,174.51

!

J 3

It should be noted that in 1916 one particularly large sale of Crown land took place for $48,600.

In addition to the.above, the following amounts paid by the Territory, but not through this office, should be added:-

Liquor Duties, Sai Kung,

Harbour Dues, Sai Kung,..

No. 3 Launch,

**

(".

1,521,92

2,475.75

.5.715.10

""

No. 4

..3,514.50

""

No. 2

.3,334.00

""

""

Crown Rent paid in Land Office,

.4,486,56

Mining Licences,..

..2,146.87

Prospecting Licences,

.2,000.00

Tobacco Duties,....

6,046.50

Tobacco, (Manufacturing Licences),

168.00

Total,.....

.$31,409.20

The total revenue received from the Northern District during 1919 was therefore $148,583.71.

The cost of running the District Office during the year was $29,575.13.

V.-LIQUOR.

The total revenue collected from the District was :

1918.

Distillery Licences,

$ 2,772.50

1919. $2,478.75

Chinese Wine & Spirit

Licences,

3,962.50

3,606.25

Liquor Duties.....

9,206.49

8,088.54

15,941.49

14,173.54

Collected through Hongkong

at Sai Kung,

1,521.92

Total........ .$15,941.49

$15,695,46

VI-GENERAL.

The two rice crops, the foundation of life in this Territory, were more successful than they have been for many years. In- deed, the first crop was so good that it was generally characterized. as a 100% crop.

But owing to the rice situation in Hongkong, where prices rose to an unprecedented height, it was found necessary to control the export of grain from this District to Hongkong, in order to ensure enough supplies for consumption here.

!

J 4

By this meaus we succeeded in keeping down the local retail price to $8 or $9 a picul, though this is of course a big advance on normal prices, and the non-farming element such as fishermen and shopkeepers suffered accordingly.

The Laichi crop was unfortunately a complete failure through- out the District.

Good progress was made with the improvement and surfacing of the main road during the year and the motor bus service be- tween Sheung Shui and Yun Long Market was regularly main- tained and fairly well patronized.

An attempt was made during the year to stimulate interest in afforestation throughout the District. A sum of $1,500 was voted and over fifty villages were induced to plant seed, especially Pine, Camphor, and Eucalyptus, supplied by this office, payment being made for services rendered. In addition, two nurseries were started and were doing moderately well at the end of the year.

A satisfactory feature of the year was the voting of $5,000 in order to meet the needs of minor local public works such as repair of roads and bridges, and the construction of new bridges. Where necessary the advice of the Public Works Department is sought, and readily accorded, but the actual construction or re- pairs are carried out by the local people, who are paid by the District Officer upon satisfactory completion of the work. Un- der this system the District carried out a number of most useful works for which no funds would otherwise have been forth- coming.

Peace was celebrated in this District by theatrical perform- ances for four days and five nights in the market centres of Tai Po and Yun Long. Two of the best companies in South China were engaged and the markets were gay with the flags of the Allies. The celebrations were successful and generally enjoyed.

A. E. WOOD.

District Officer.

1

21st April, 1920.

A

J 5

1

www.

Table A.

POLICE COURT.

1919. Average from 1914-1918.

Cases heard,

277

228

Persons brought before the

491

392

Police Magistrate,.....

Persons convicted & punished, 269

244

Persons bound over,

58

52

Persous discharged,

156

85

Persons committed,

4

Persons imprisoned,

137

80

Fines inflicted.

.$1,499.00

$1,600.59

Warrants executed,

54

38

SMALL DEBTS COURT.

Cases heard.

313

104

Writ of execution............

324

56

Heading.

No. of Sales,

Permits, etc.

No. of Lots.

Table B.

Area.

Acres.

Increase of Annual Rent.

Decrease of

Annual Rent.

tA

Amount of Premia, Fees, etc.

Amount paid for Resump- tion of Land.

Term of Years.

S

e-

Sales of Land for Agriculture

Building

142

58

30:03

32.90

3.62

285.50

1,689.00

3,632.00

75

75

Building & Garden,

1.62

81.50

1,393.00

75

11

Drying Ground

*20

Fruit Growing

192

.20

22.00

8:42

8.70

566.00

75

AAAAA

75

Garden

2:87

17

18.40

506.00

75

Lime-kiln

*02

""

1.50

9.00

75

Threshing Floor

7

*12

.70

63.00!

75

Conversions,

12

32

17.68

116.80

75

Permits to occupy Land for Agriculture,... 17

19

11:31

25.34

5

134

243

"1

54.33

35

ད་

207.50

1

"}

>>

Building, etc.

11

11

9.84

61.92

1

Exchanges

10

1.71

173.00

75

Stone Quarry Leases

76.00

600.00

1

Surrenders

65

11:46

41.88

Ĵ 6 –––

Heading.

Permits, etc.

No. of Sales,

No. of Lots.

Table B,-Continued.

Area.

K

-CA

Increase of

Annual Rent.

Decrease of

Annual Rent.

Resumptions

Stone Quarry Permits

Permits to cut Earth, etc.

301

Acres.

25.66

41.13

67

84

Water Wheel Licences

3

Matshed Permits

98

1.28

Ferry Licences

5

Forestry Licences

473

29,960*30

Pineapple Land Leases

18

9:31

Re-entries,

129

6:30

35.88

Grave Certificates

122

Deeds Registered and Fees

3,181

Amount of Premia, Fees,

etc.

Amount paid for Resump- tion of Land.

Term of Years.

Ce

395.00

113.00

3.00

132.00

9.00

3,189.28

27.93

60.00

1,964.90

$

6,182.81

J 7 -

J 8

Table C.

Revenue 1919.

Average of Revenue for 1914-1918.

1

$

(.

$ ('.

Crown Rent,

81,690.08

80,449.83

Kerosene Oil Licences...

300.00

301.00

Chinese Wines & Spirits,

3.606.25

3,958.75

Distillery Licences,

2,478.75

2,759.70

Pawnbrokers' Licences,

$00.00

1,360.00

Money Changers' Licences,

560.00

713.00

Fines,.

1,499.00

1,485.00

Forfeitures,

1,074.03

174.08

(Land Sales),....

20.00

48.00

Distress Warrants,

225.00

61.20

(Crown Rent),

28.00

30.00

House Rent,

930.00

577.63

Liquor Duties,

8.088.54

8,124.27

Reward Fund, (Opium),

Nil.

150.00

Arms Fine Fund,

20.00

139.00

Arrears of Revenue,

Nil.

17.19

Rent of Government Furniture,

40.00

56,00

Debts & Bankrupt Estate in Court

Nil.

65.13

Unclaimed Compensation, ...

Nil.

19.85

Forestry Licences...

3,187,27

3.080,27

Permits to cut Earth, etc.,

113.00

113.40

Mining Licences,

Nil.

250.00

Grave Certificates,

$0.00

82.10

Pineapple Land Leases,

27.93

41,38

Matshed Permits,

132.00

103.40

Permits to occupy Land,

491.91

425.38

Stone Quarry Permits,

395.00

136.25

Stone Quarry Leases,..

600.00

718.95

Water Wheel Licences,

3.00

7.20

Ferry Licences,

9.00

10.20

Certified Extracts,...

88.00

94.80

Sunprints,

45.00

61.00

Premia on Land Sales,

8,043.85

20,111.65

Stamps for Deeds,..

1,964,90

1,669-20

Boundary Stones,

80.00

Nil

Deposit not Available,

574.00

844.00

Total,... $117,174.51

$128,238.81

- J 9

Table D.

Rainfall at Tai Po Police Station, 1919.

Average of Rainfall from 1914-1918.

Inches.

Inches.

January

.72 January

1.18

February

1.99

February.

1.88

March

2.04 March

2.84

April

10.13

April

5:10

May

12.24

May

12.02

June

15.05

June

21.49

July

18.56

July.

25.23

August.....

25.07

August......

15:04

September

1.87

September

11.94

October

3.80

October

2:59

November

3.78

November

3.75

December

·77

December

3:03

Total Rainfall ....... 96.02

Average... 106.09

J 10

B. SOUTHERN DISTRICT.

I-STAFF.

I had charge of the office until April 5th; Mr. R. A. C. North from then to the end of the year.

Mr. J. Grant (Private, Manchester Regiment) temporarily acted. as Land Bailiff until August 13th when he was required by the Military Authorities. On 1st October, Mr. W. E. Hollands (Lance Sergeant, Police Department) was appointed to the post and took up his duties.

Mr. Tse Kam-wo, 5th Grade Clerk and Shroff, resigned on 1st of March, and Mr. Chan Kai-man was then transferred from the Hongkong Defence Corps to fill his post.

II. MAGISTRACY.

PAPELARIA

The Assistant District Officer sitting as Police Magistrate heard during the year 194 cases affecting 282 persons. 177 persons were convicted or bound over and 42 were discharged.

The following Table gives a comparison with 1917 and 1918--

1917.

1918.

1919.

No. of cases.

133

168

194

No. of persons

affected

218

294

282

No. of persons convicted

or

bound over

162

219

177

No. of persons discharged

21

40

42

Fines

No. of persons imprisoned

Arms Fines.

Opium Fines paid to Govern-

ment Reward Fund

Forfeitures.

$93.86 $447.00 $50.00

$1,399.79

$131.75 $118.34 $82.08

30

35

63

$605.02

$641.19 $724.30

·

III.-SMALL DEBTS COURT.

176 cases were instituted during the year as compared with

108 in 1918 and 78 in 1917. Courts were held as usual in the District during the year. I find many of these cases are brought rather to secure official record of the debt than to obtain im- mediate payment.

IV.-LAND OFFICE. ·

The number of sales of land and other transactions affecting land which took place during 1919 is set forth in Table A.

1,804 deeds were registered during the year as compared with 1,631 in 1918. This is again the highest number on record. Re- gistration fees for 1919 were $2,681.30 as compared with $1,848.10

in 1918.

J 11

V.-REVENUE.

The total revenue collected by the Assistant District Officer is shown in Table B, and corresponds with that collected last year very closely. The Special War Rate was cancelled from 1st July in the year and accounts for a decrease of about $3,700 in the sum collected as compared with 1918, in which year it was exacted for the whole year.

The increase in the total of rates is due to the rapid development of Sham Shui Po.

Table C gives details of revenue collected in Licence Fees by the Police in 1918 and 1919.

Table D shows the revenue collected in 1918 and 1919 in the District by all Departments other than the District Office and in- cludes the totals of Table C.

Table E shows comparatively the total revenue collected from the Southern District by all Departments during the last three years.

VI.-LIQUOR.

Liquor duties were collected in the Southern District during 1919 amounting to $102,994.07. The total for 1918 $162,601.57.

was

The chief sources of this Revenue are given in the following Table which shows comparatively the totals of the last two years :-

District.

No. of Dis- tilleries in 1919.

Revenue 1917.

Revenue Revenue

1918.

1919.

$

$

Sham Shui Po ... Kowloon City Tsun Wan Kwai Chung Kap Shui Mun.......

Cheung Chau

Tai O

Hang Hau

Po Toi

21.8226431

52.564

42,652

53,444

12,944

12,073

11,286

64,576

60,031

764

41,672

26,062

26,926

309 22,055

426

165

18;668

8,241

2,128

2,077

1,473

494

346

289

256

129

320

Tsing I..

1

147

132

80

The decrease in production is due to the high price of molasses, resulting from shortage of shipping, and to the increased cost of rice. A considerable quantity of this liquor is sent in for Hong- kong consumption.

VII.

J 12

GENERAL.

Crops. The first crop was usually good but in many places the second crop failed owing to drought.

Trade was not good during the year owing in a great measure to the high price of rice.

Tai O.-The year only showed a slight improvement on the previous one. The rice and sweet potato crops were better than last year, but fewer junks visited the place. This is no doubt partially due to the silting up of the harbour, and partially to the lack of a really good typhoon refuge. It will be interesting to see if the lengthening of the pier (projected in 1920) to afford refuge from storms will affect the number of junks. The salt pans pro- duced only 20,392 piculs-less than in 1918 by 1,089 piculs. The market was opened in August, 1919, and did well for the remainder of the year. Its erection has certainly stimulated the demand for land in the vicinity. Crime was rather more prevalent this year, probably owing to hard times that were experienced, in spite of the fact that during the rice shortage free rice and congee were distributed to the poor by the merchants, assisted by the Tung Wa Authorities. But for this, the distress would have been much

worse.

Cheung Chau. The year was not particularly prosperous. The first crop of padi was fair but the second failed. The fishing was much less successful than last year and in consequence trade was none too good. The market however continues to flourish and all the stalls were occupied. The same excellent public spirit. continues to be shown by the Kai Fong. The town accordingly prospers. This year has seen the formation of an European re- servation on the East end of the island and residents in the Colony are building bungalows there in increasing numbers. The launch service has now been arranged so that it is possible to reside in the island and yet spend from 9.30 a.m. to 4 p.m. in Hongkong. On Saturdays, for the convenience of Europeans, the launch returns to Cheung Chau at 2 p.m.

Tsun Wan.--A prosperous year. Both crops of padi were fair-averaging only about 4,300 piculs, as against 5,500 in good years. The price however averaged $5.75 per picul as against $2.50 in previous years. The pineapple scason too was good and the fruit fetched $2.20 per picul, 20 cents in excess of any pre- viously recorded price. The District has been very quiet. The output from the Needle Hill mine averaged about 30 piculs of wolfram ore per month. The sandalwood mills continue to do well. At Ping Chau however the lime kilns have experienced a bad season. One kiln had to close down. The connecting road from Sham Shui Po to Castle Peak was opened for public traffic and seems likely to prove popular with motorists.

Lamma.—Another most prosperous year. The crops were good. Cattle and pig rearing proved very profitable, as did the

J 13

egg and poultry business. The islanders catch only enough fish for their own consumption, mainly by means of stake-nets, but as usual a number of Hoklos from Hoi Fung visited the island to fish during the shrimp season. The island seems very contented and causes the Police little trouble.

E. W. HAMILTON,

Assistant District Officer, South.

April 15th, 1920.

Table A.

No. of

Sales,

Amount

Increase

Decrease

Amount

No.

Area

of

of

of

paid for

Term

Headings.

Permits, of

in

Crown

Crown

Licences, Lots. Acres.

Premia,

Rent.

Rent.

Fees, &c.

&c.

Resump- tion of

Land.

of

years.

CA-

- J 14-

2

•20

14

*33

139

*62

5

*40

I

1

*80

23 28

.30

22.00

75

15.50

126.00

75

1,013.29

92.05

1,309.65

75

38.50

75

80.00

584

778.25

49

52.50

24

24.00

12

4.05

108

1,693.84

360

846.74

1,804

2,681.30

127

5.12

250.45

31,981.30

7

*68

6.06

40

1.52

19.33

Land Sales, Agricultural, (Islands)..

Building,

"}

Permit to occupy Land

Conversions from Agricultural to Building Land, (New Kowloon)..

""

(Islands)

Stone Quarry Permits

Matshed Permits

Earth Permits

Water Wheel Licences

Grave Certificates

Forestry Licences

Pineapple Land Leases

Deeds Registered

Resumption Surrender

Re-entry

J 15

Table B.

Revenue collected by the Assistant District Officer, Southern District. New Territories.

19 18.

1919.

$39

e.

$

C.

Land Sales....

1,952.13

1,457.65

Crown Rent

28,314.41 28,376.12

Special War Rates

8,607.00

4,894.00

Assessed Taxes

10,393.45

12,291.08

Lease of Stone Quarries

829.20

861.84

Forestry Licences

1,707.44

1,693.84

Earth Permits

65.00

52.50

Matshed Permits

809.75 -

778.25

Permit to occupy Land

997.09

1,013.29

Pineapple Licences

986.67

846.74

Registration Fees

1,848.10

2,681.30

Distress Warrants, (Crown Rent)

29.00

67.00

(Small Debts)

28.00

35.00

Writs of Summons

135.00

209.00

Fines, (Police Court)

641:19

724.30

Forfeitures....

118.34

82.08.

Certified Copy of Record

10.92

Certified Extracts

33.00

26.00

Grave Certificates

5.00

4.05

Miscellaneous Receipts..

6.00

57.21

A.D.O./S Deposit Interest

119.56

219.69

Legal Costs

5.00

17.00

Sunprint Plans

20.00

15.00

Boundary Stones

151.80

170.90.

Water Wheel Licences

31.00

24.00

Arms Fine Fund

447.00

50.00

Total......

$58,291.05 $56,677.84

Table C.

Licence Fees collected by the Police Department.

Money

Station.

Distilleries.

Wine and

Spirit.

Eating

Pawn

Kerosine.

House.

Dogs.

Chan-

Total.

Brokers.

gers.

J 16 —

C.

$

C.

$

$

Kowloon City

f 1918

400.00

3,150.00

25

74

2,250

1919

2,800.00

25

234

1,500

5,953.00

4,612.00

1918

Sham Shui Po

800.00

5,200.00

45

40

174

4,000

10,259.00

1919

800.00

4,800.00

50

55

1,200

4,000

1918

Tai O

50.00

575.00

400

1919

75.00

650.00

66

Cheung Chau

1918

149.00

999.00

41

800

40

1 1919

137.00

975.00

74

800

Tsun Wau

1918

635.25

506.25

23

10

1919

557.00

475.00

28

889898

60

10,905.00

1,118.00

841.00

2,029.00

2,036.00

1,174.50

10

1,070.00

Yung Shu Wan,

1918

75.00

75.00

Lamma Island

(1919

75.00

40

115.00

Total

{1919 $1,000,000

1918 | $2,034.25

10,505.25 9.775.00 271

196

120

1375

65

248

7,450

110

20,608.50

1,434

6,300

110

19,579.00

J 17

Table D.

Revenue collected through Other Departments from the New Territories, Southern District.

Treasury, (Crown Rent for Inland Lots)...

(Quarries in New Kowloon)

Harbour Office, (Harbour Dues, Stake Nets,

&c.)

Police, (Licence Fees)....

14,767.65 10,704.16

1918.

1919.

$

C.

$ C.

18,065.19

10,349.98

24,555.80 22,428.85

20,638.50* 19,579.00*

Imports and Exports Office, (Liquor Duties) 162,601.57 102,994.07

* See Table C.

Total,...

Table E.

$233,267.68 $173,417.09

Total Revenue collected from Southern District, New Territories, during the last three years.

By Assistant District Office,

By Other Departments,

Total,

+ See Table D.

1917.

$ c.

1918.

1919.

(.

$5

C.

58,481.03

262,539.04

56,677.84 233,267.68† 173,417.09†

$321,020.07 $291,558.73 $230,094.93

58,291.05

Appendix K.

REPORT OF THE CAPTAIN SUPERINTENDENT OF POLICE FOR THE YEAR 1919.

SUMMARY OF CRIME, 1919.

The total of all cases reported to the Police during the year 1919 was 10,542 as against 8,449 in 1918 being an increase of 2,093 or 24-77 per cent. The average of the last five years is 9,855-6.

In the division of these cases into serious and minor offences, there appears an increase, as compared with 1918, of 958 cases or 26-77 per cent. in the former and an increase of 1,135 cases or 23:31 per cent. in the latter.

The increase and decrease as compared with 1918 in Serious Offences are shown as follows:—

Increase.

Murder

...

Robbery...

Burglary and Larceny from Dwelling...

Assault with intent to rob

Offences under the Protection of Women and

Girls Ordinance

Unlawful Possession

Larceny

Other Felonies

Decrease.

Kidnapping

7

26

28

32

184

606

74

-959

Nett Increase ...

1

958

2. Table I shows the number and character of the Serious and Minor Offences reported to the Police during 1918 and 1919 and the number of persons convicted and discharged in connection with these offences.

MURDER.

3. Thirty-one murders were reported to the Police during the year as against 24 in 1918.

In connection with 17 of these reports no arrest was made, and in the remaining 14 cases, arrests were made. In 7 cases convic- tions were obtained (11 persons of whom 10 were convicted and 1 discharged). In 7 cases there was no conviction (12 persons).

K 2

MANSLAUGHTER.

4. Four manslaughters were reported to the Police during the year, and the same number of manslaughters was reported in 1918.

In connection with one of these reports, no arrest was made, and in the remaining 3 cases arrests were made. A conviction was obtained in one case (1 person). In two cases there was no conviction (2 persons).

GANG ROBBERIES.

5. Seventy gang robberies were reported to the Police during the year as against 43 in 1918.

In 49 cases no arrest was made; in the remaining 21 cases, arrests were made. In 16 cases convictions were obtained (33 persons of whom 31 were convicted and 2 discharged). In 5 cases there was no conviction (7 persons).

STREET AND HIGHWAY ROBBERIES.

6. Nineteen street and highway robberies were reported to the Police during the year as against 27 in 1918.

In 15 cases no arrest was made; in the remaining 4 cases arrests were made. In all of these four cases convictions were obtained (5 persons all of whom were convicted).

ROBBERIES ON BOATS AND JUNKS.

7. Eight cases of robbery on boats and junks were reported to the Police during the year as against 14 in 1918.

In 7 cases no arrest was made; in the remaining case arrests were made. In this case a conviction was obtained (5 persons all of whom were convicted).

སཔཡ ཡ པར

ROBBERY WITH VIOLENCE.

8. Eighteen cases of robbery with violence were reported to the Police during the year as against 5 in 1918.

In 17 cases no arrest was made; in the remaining case arrests were made. In this case a conviction was obtained (2 persons both of whom were convicted).

K 3

OTHER FELONIES.

9. Under this heading are comprised the following:-

Cutting and wounding

Demanding money or goods with menaces Embezzlement

1919. 1918.

31 24

26

31

28

Forgery

13

13

House-breaking...

65

60

Receiving stolen property

69

51

Child-stealing

17

15

Rape

2

Aiding and abetting in a robbery

1

Abominable offences

1

Throwing corrosive fluid ...

1

Falsification of accounts

Attempted arson

Shooting with intent to main

1

Shooting with intent to kill

Shooting with intent to prevent lawful appre-

hension

1

Attempting to shoot with intent to prevent

lawful apprehension .......

1

Wounding with intent to murder

Attempting to murder

Attempted robbery

Accessory after the fact of murder

Wounding and causing grievous bodily harm

Uttering forged bank notes

275

201

The number of cases in which convictions were obtained was 125 as against 73 in 1918.

GAMBLING.

10. One hundred and forty-three Gambling Warrants were executed during the year as against 87 in 1918. There were 3 cases in which no conviction was obtained.

Seventeen were lottery cases, compared with 6 in 1918.

PROPERTY REPORTED STOLEN AND PROPERTY RECOVERED.

11. The estimated value of property stolen during the year was $370,719.17 as against $295,301.90 in 1918, an increase of $75,417.27.

The avtage for the last five years is $283,715.37, an increase on the average reported in 1918 of $36,129.18.

The value of property recovered during the year was $36,089.51 as against $41,847.13 in 1918, a decrease under property recovered in the previous year of $5,757.62.

K 4.

LOST PROPERTY.

12. The following is a return showing property lost or reco-

vered:

·---

1919

1918

Articles re-

covered and

Year.

Articles reported

articles

Value

Value

found which

lost.

found.

lost.

were not

reported lost.

:

361 $16,483.38

102 $2,978.13

268 $14,054.27

100 $3.283.00

THE PIRACY ORDINANCE.

13. Number of searchers employed under the Prevention of Piracy Ordinance, 1914-

Searching vessels and in charge of Chinese searchers :~

European Lance Sergeant (on Water Front)

1

European Lance Sergeant (ou Steam Launch)

I

European Acting Lance Sergeants (on Water Front)

Chinese Constables (on Water Front)

26

Chinese Constables (on Steam Launch)

4

Female Searchers...

6

Female Searcher (Private)

1

Number of Guards employed up to 31st December, 1919 :--

Steamer Guards...

Steam Launch Guards

Shore Guards

225

22

140

Number of vessels which have entered into a bold up to 31st

December, 1919 :-

Steamers

Steam Launches...

248

22

K

K 5

14.--WEIGHTS AND MEASURES.

Weights and Measures examined during the year 1919.

Correct.

Incorrect. Total.

Foreign Scales

263

13

276

Chinese Scales

3,225

84

3,309

Yard Measures

306

309

Chek Measures

355

1

356

Total...

4,149

101

4.250

The following prosecutions were instituted under the Weights and Measures Ordinance

Number of Cases.

69

Convictions.

69

Fines.

$849.50

DANGEROUS GOODS ORDINANCE.

15. The following prosecutions were instituted under the Dangerous Goods Ordinance :-

Number of Cases.

8

Convictions.

Fines.

$646.00

FOOD AND DRUGS ORDINANCE.

16. The following prosecutions were instituted under the Food and Drugs Ordinance :-

Number of Cases.

Convictions.

2

Decision pending.

Fines.

K 6-

Samples purchased and sent to the Government Analyst :--

Brandy Rum Beer Gin Whisky Sherry Port Milk

4

7

6

N

+

All the above samples were certified to be genuine with the exception of two samples of Rum purchased from the Sincere Company Limited, and Kwan Tye, 102 Queen's Road Central, respectively, on the 27th November, 1919.

Summonses were issued against these two firms for selling Rum deficient in Ethers, &c. The summonses were heard before Mr. R. O. Hutchison on the 24th December, 1919, and were allowed to stand over for four months to give Messrs. Ruttonjee and Son, who are the Agents here for this particular Brand of Rum, an opportunity of producing a "Certificate of Origin "

TRAFFIC REGULATIONS.

17. The following prosecutions were instituted under the Traffic Regulations, (Notification No. 141 published in the Gazette July, 1916):

Prosecutions Convictions Withdrawn Remanded Discharged

2.499

2,375

28

88

MENDICANTS.

18. During the year 1919 thirty-two beggars were dealt with by the Magistrate, and 616 were sent to Canton as follows:-

How often sent

away.

Once ...

Twice...

Three times

Four times

Six times

...

:

:

:

:.

:

...

:

...

:

:

4:

:

Total,

Canton.

593

13

7

2

Ι

616

}

3

K 7 -

DEAD BODIES.

19. Table II shows the number of unknown dead bodies found by the Police in the streets and elsewhere during the year.

DEPORTEES AND VAGRANTS.

20. 1,056 persons were banished from Hongkong.

792 persons deported from Straits Settlements were sent

on by the Police.

2 persons deported from British North Borneo were sent

on by the Police.

334 vagrants received from Straits Settlements were sent

on by the Police.

261 vagrants were received from Dutch East Indies and

sent on by the Police.

1,259 vagrants were received from Saigon and sent on by

the Police.

41 coolies were received from Straits Settlements and

*

sent on by the Police.

1,744 persons were discharged from Victoria Gaol and

entered in Police Criminal Records.

LICENCES.

21. The following licences were issued during 1919 :-

1,150 Hongkong Jinrikishas.

1,138 Private Jinrikishas.

600 Kowloon Jinrikishas.

52 Sze Ka Che Jinrikishas.

800 Hongkong Chairs. 340 Private Chairs.

60 Hill District Chairs.

31,189 Drivers and Bearers.

1,274 Truck Les.

102 Motor Car (Livery).

178 Motor Cars,” (Private).

350 Motor Car Drivers.

168 Motor Cycle Licences.

177 Motor Cycle Drivers.

3 Auctioneers.

4 Licences to store Acetone.

5 Billiard Tables or Bowling Alleys.

24 Licences to store Calcium Carbide.

2 Licences to store Chlorate Mixture.

3 Licences to store Chlorate of Potassium and other

Chlorates.

8 Licences to store Compressed Oxygen.

100 Licences to store Detonators.

K 8

7 Licences to store Dissolved Acetylene. 8 Distillery Licences, (Old Territories), 25 Distillery Licences, (New Territories). 100 Licences to store Dynamite.

56 Licences to store Ether and Alcoholic Liquids. 255 Licences to shoot and take Game.

9 Licences to store Gunpowder.

12 Licences to store Kerosine Oil, (in Godown). 1,211 Licences to store Kerosine Oil, (Ordinary).

79 Licences to store Kerosine Oil, (New Territories).

! 34 Marine Stores.

215 Money Changers.

25 Licences to store Naphtha and Benzine.

47 Licences to store Naphtha, (in Garage).

2 Licences to store Nitrobenzine or Oil of Mirbane.

109 Pawnbrokers.

6 Licences to store Petroleum in bulk.

2 Licences to store Petroleum in fuel.

2 Licences to store Phosphorus.

6 Licences to store Rockets.

27 Poison, (Wholesale).

275 Spirit, (Chinese, Old Territories).

87 Spirit, (Chinese, New Territories).

31 Licences to store Sulphuric Acid and Nitric Acid. 6,345 Hawkers.

DOGS ORDINANCE.

22. 2,904 dogs were licensed during 1919.

3 watch dogs were licensed free of charge.

212 stray dogs were impounded

Home and 114 were dest

Ence

ARMS ORDINANCE.

are sent to the Dogs'

23. Three licences to import and deal in arms and ammunition and one licence to deal in Sporting Arms and Ammunition were issued during 1919. During the whole year a Proclamation has been in force prohibiting the export of warlike stores from the Colony.

The following Arms and Ammunition were confiscated during the year:

Winchester Rifles...

Automatic Pistols...

Mauser Pistols

Revolvers Shot-gun

:

12

29

23

86

1

K 9

Winchester Rifle Ammunition

Automatic Pistol

"

Mauser Pistol

Revolver

"

21

""

:

10,812 rounds

18,972 5,913 18,458

Nil.

"

}

Shot-gun

EDUCATION.

24. During the year 1 European and 191 Indian Police obtained certificates for knowledge of Chinese, 24 Indians and 1 Chinese obtained certificates for English.

MUSKETRY.

25. Eighty-seven Europeans fired their Musketry Course. Of these 15 were classified as marksmen.

P.S. A71 Pitt obtained the highest score, viz., 169 points out of a possible 185 points.

376 Indians fired their Musketry Course. Of these 71 were

classified as marksmen.

I.P.C. 214 Jewand obtained the highest score, viz., 124 points. out of a possible 140 points.

IDENTIFICATION BY FINGER IMPRESSIONS.

26. Number of searches 5,136-an increase of 1,251 over 1918. Number of persons identified by finger prints 1,378-an

increase of 328 over 1918.

Number of prints filed 5,045—an increase of 1,650 over

1918.

Number of persons convicted for returning from banish-

ment 94-an increase of 25 over 1918.

Number of persons identified by finger prints for breach of Market Ordinance 205-an increase of 97 over 1918.

CONDUCT.

27. The conduct of the European Contingent (average strength 159) was good. The total number of reports against them was 45 against 15 in 1918. There were three reports for being drunk or under the influence of drink as against one in 1918. Four were reported for sleeping on duty as against two, and five for neglect of duty as against one.

One European Lance Sergeant was convicted at the Criminal Sessions for rape, and one European Police Constable was convicted by the Police Magistrate for misconduct as a Police Constable. Both were dismissed from the Force.

.

The conduct of the Indian Contingent (average strength 477) was good. There were 230 reports as against 262 for the preced- ing year. For drunkenness there were 5 as against 5, for disor- derly conduct 32 as against 24, for neglect of duty 33 as against

K. 10

23, for absence from duty 75 as against 44,. for gossiping and idling on duty 30 as against 60, and for sleeping on duty 15 as against 24. 314 men had no report. Two Indian Constables were convicted by the Police Magistrate for misconduct as a Police Constable and were dismissed from the Force.

The behaviour of the Chinese Contingent (average strength 412) was fair. There were altogether 1,056 reports as against 1,217 in 1918. For drunkenness there was none as against none, 81 for sleeping on duty as against 136, 38 for disorderly conduct as against 19, and 476 for minor offences as against 536. 147 men had no report.

Fourteen (14) Chinese Constables were convicted by the Police Magistrate (11 dismissed from the Force), 3 for demanding money with menaces, 3 for misconduct as a Police Constable, 1 for gam- bling, 1 for giving incorrect evidence in Police Court, 1 for assault, and 5 for neglect of duty.

The seamen, coxswains, engineers and stokers (average strength 180) had 114 reports as compared with 232 for last year. For drunkenness there was none as against none in 1918, and 89 for absence from station and late for duty as against 177 in the previous year. 101 men had no report recorded against them. One engineer was convicted by the Police Magistrate for larceny of kerosine oil (dismissed from the Force).

REWARDS.

28. Third Class Medal was granted to P.S. A62 Bond for excep- tionally zealous and meritorious discharge of his duties in the Water Police and in particular for having, at the imminent risk of his life, jumped into the sea at 3 a.m. in winter in order to effect the arrest of a coal thief.

Fourth Class Medal was awarded to I.P.C. 429 Karm Din for alertness and pluck in arresting an armed man at Hospital Road.

Fourth Class Medals were granted to C.C.s 177 Ip Shu Nain, 12 Kwong Chan, 380 Lai Shing, and 179 Chan Hung for zeal and pluck in arrest of armed bad characters in Yaumati.

Fourth Class Medal was granted to L.S. A105 Lannon and Third Class Medal to C.C. 179 Chan Hung for promptness and courage shown by them in effecting the arrest of three armed bad characters in Shanghai Street.

Fourth Class Medal was awarded to L.S. A22 Field for zeal and diligence displayed by him in the arrest of two Chinese servants who severely assaulted two Parsee gentlemen (their masters) with intent to murder at No. 22 Peel Street.

Fourth Class Medal was granted to L.S. A34 Pain for zeal and pluck in securing the arrest of an armed robber in No. 50 Bonham Road under dangerous circumstances, who, with another man, attacked and robbed a hawker at Lyttelton Path.

A

K 11

Fourth Class Medal was awarded to the late L.S. 100 Wool- ford for zeal and energy displayed by him, after a long chase on No. 1 Police Launch, in the capture of five men off Shek O (Chinese Territory), who had robbed a fishing boat, wounded a boatwoman with a gun-shot, and kidnapped 6 persons at Lamma Island.

+

Third Class Medals were granted to P.S. A5 Hedge, L.S. 22 Field, P.S. C211 Lui Iu, and P.C. B82 Khar Deen, and Fourth Class Medals to L.S. A113 Clark, P.C. C48 Li Kang Yau, P.C. C530 Cheng Wa and P.C. C653 Yau Cheung for the good work done and bravery shown by them in connection with the case known as the Motor Bandit case at West Point on the 26th November in which three persons including the late C.C. 605 Ling Piu lost their lives and three out of five armed robbers were captured and sentenced to death. The deceased Constable Ling Piu (C.C. 605) would undoubtedly have been recommended for a medal had he survived. A grant of $5 per mensem to his wife has been made, and a sum of $1,200 has been privately subscribed for the maintenance of the family of this officer.

A reward of $10 each was granted to C.C. 329 Wong Ki and I.P.C. 429 Karm Din for zeal and intelligence in effecting the arrest of a Chinese male for having committed a highway robbery on a European girl at Lyttelton Path.

A reward of $15 was granted to P.C. C152 Li Fung for zeal and energy displayed by him in preventing an armed robbery at a European house, Morrison Hill, whereby three armed men were arrested.

A reward of $10 was awarded to L.S. 160 Azim Khan for alertness and activity in arresting a thief.

A reward of $25 each was given to L.S. 185 Ali Bux, L.S. 354 Lall Khan, P.C. 464 Nazan Din, P.C. 263 Ruskan Mahomed, P.C. 371 Lai Hung Chau and P.C. 108 Lai Tai Shau for pluck displayed by them in connection with the armed robbery at No. 34 Western Street on 4th May when the late C.C. 252 Chan Chu was murdered.

A sum of $25 each was awarded to I.P.C. 400 Arjan Singh, B427 Ojarger Singh, B86 Nadham Singh and B57 Harnam Singh for zeal and intelligence whereby they effected the arrest of two armed men on Kowloon City Road.

A reward of $10 was given to C.C. 254 Lan Fu for zeal and energy shown by him in the discharge of his duties while employed as a Searcher.

A reward of $10 was granted to C.C. 258 Mak vigilance and alertness on duty whereby he effected the man who had taken part in an attempted armed robbṛ Bonham Strand West.

A reward of $10 was given to C.C. 651 Ip and pluck on duty in securing the arrest of a ro1

K 12

A reward of $25 was granted to P.C. 636 Liu Fo for alertness and activity displayed by him in assisting to secure the arrest of three robbers at the Hotel China, Connaught Road Central.

A reward of $10 each was awarded to I.P.C. 99 Bishen Singh, B3 Teja Singh, B220 Sar Singh, B427 Ojager Singh, B404 Bahadar Singh, B323 Ladder Singh, B319 Jewand Singh, B295 Udham Singh, C.C. 643 Ng Fuk and C.C. 194 Tsang Chun for pluck in capturing two robbers on the Tai Po Road.

A reward of $20 each was granted to P.S. C88 Kwong Tin Kan and P.S. 157 Lo Hoi for zeal and diligence shown by them in the arrest of two Chinese servants who severely assaulted their masters with intent to murder.

A reward of $5 was awarded to C.C. 304 Li Tsing for zeal and pluck shown by him in the arrest of a bad character at night at No. 188 Praya East.

A reward of $20 was granted to P.C. C356 Lam Chung for zeal and intelligence displayed by him in the arrest of a woman at Un Long, New Territories, who had kidnapped two small girls.

A sum of $50 was awarded to P.S. 74 W. Cooper for the smart capture of a man for having committed an armed robbery at No. 247 Des Voeux Road Central.

POLICE ON ACTIVE SERVICE.

29. During the year 1919, 47 members of the Hongkong Police Force returned to the Colony from Active Service and resumed their police duties. Five men (L.S. 41 W. Spillett, L.S. 75 F. E. E. Booker, L.S. 131 R. S. R. Swan, P.C. 143 J. Brennan, and P.C. 141 W. J. Harron) have not yet returned. One man (L.S. 24 A. Pattison) was invalided and one man (P.C. 127 A. E. Clarke) died, during the year 1919, of result of wounds received while on Active Service. The following are the names of the 46 men who have returned to the Force from Active Service :

P.S. 115 H. J. Paterson.

L.S.

5 E. J. Hedge.

9 A. Marks.

88 C. McNab Wilson, M.C.

40 A. N. Reynolds,

""

113 A. R. Clark.

>>

12 J. R. Clark.

""

65 T. J. Wilson.

""

""

103 D. W. Barnett.

3 R. McFall.

64 H. Phillips.

104 A. Hutchins, M.M.

128 E. Bloor.

84 J. D. Murphy.

122 C. M. Dorrington.

133 F. W. Shaftain.

30 W. E. Wilson.

7 J. Murphy.

K 13

A.L.S. 31 W. Reed.

136 J. Stout.

110 C. J. Kelly.

>>

139 M. H. Hourihan.

142 L. P. Lane.

""

144 W. Y. Henderson.

145 G. A. Stimson.

33

146 C. L. Goble.

""

""

148 C. F. Alexander.

149 E. J. Ellis.

>>

""

150 K. W. Andrew.

A

""

153 E. A. Vincent.

78 J. McLennan, 90 E. Carpenter. 154 F. Hoare.

138 F. T. James.

17 A. Nicoll..

""

33 A. Reid.

*

77 J. S. Dick.

>

80 J. A. Munro.

99

""

94 P. Murphy.

21 E. Williams.

>>

""

""

""

2

42 A. Riach.

1 M. Kenneally.

126 S. Logan.

129 M. Murphy.

61 H. B. Phillips.

"

38 R. H. Coote.

>>

47 R. G. Robertson. Died in Government

Civil Hospital on 21st October.

69 Singleton died of influenza in England after the conclusion of the Armistice, 2nd November, 1918.

HEALTH.

30. Admissions to Hospital during the last three years were as follows:

1917.

1918.

Nationality.

Establish. ment of the Force.

Admis- sions.

Establish- ment of the Force.

Admis- sions.

Europeans,... 160

63

159

72

Indians..

481

360

481

369

Chinese,,

688

141

588

251

· 1919.

Fstablish- ment of the Fo

- 14.

K

Return of Police treated in Government Civil Hospital for Fever or Dengue Fever from the 1st January to 31st December, 1919-

Old Territories.

New Territories.

Nationality.

Establishment]

of the Force.

Establishment

Treated.

of the Force.

Treated.

Europeans,

Indians,

Chinese,

144

7

349

46

541

11

15

128

36

51

In addition to cases treated in Hospital for Fever or Dengue Fever the cases treated for Fever in the various stations in the New Territories without being removed to Hospital were :-

Europeans 8, Indians 58, Chinese 12.

SPECIAL EVENTS.

31. On the 4th May an armed robbery was committed on the 1st floor of No. 34 Western Street occupied by two Northern Chinese women. One of the women who tried to raise the alarm was fired at, but fortunately not hit and the robbers after securing jewellery and money fled, pursued by police who happened to be near the scene of the outrage, going on duty. Revolver shots were exchanged. One of the robbers ran into Des Voeux Road where he was met by Chinese Constable 252 Chan Chu, who was off duty and in plain clothes. The Constable pluckily endeavoured to stop the robber who thereupon shot him fatally in the stomach. The robber was eventually caught after a further exchange of shots and was sentenced to death and executed.

32. On the 24th August an armed robbery took place at Kowloon Dairy. A.L.S. 105 Lannon, who attempted to stop and search a suspicious person shortly after the robbery, was shot by the latter in the leg. The robber escaped leaving his revolver in A.L.S. 105's possession. He was later caught as he was about to embark on the Tai Po Sha U Chung launch at Tai Po. He was sentenced to 5 years Hard Labour.

-

33. On the 25th August C.C. 615 Chan Nam shot I.P.S. B91 Kishen Singh whom he waylaid in D'Aguilar Street. The motive was revenge and followed immediately on the decision of the Captain Superintendent to dismiss C615, who had a bad record, for being leep on duty. He was found asleep and reported by I.P.S. B91. Nam unfortunately escaped. I.P.S. B91, though shot in the

recovered.

ring the later part of July and the early part of August number of minor conflicts between rice looters and the Central, Eastern, and Western Districts of the City, at Shaukiwan. The procedure of the looters was e in transit through the streets. In all but a few

-K 15

cases they dispersed at once on the approach of the Police. The measures taken by the Government and by certain Chinese chari- table institutions very soon led to a reduction in the price of rice and a complete cessation of this form of crime.

35. On 27th November five armed robbers held up a money changer's shop in Des Voeux Road West at 2 p.m. Their attempts to escape were first challenged by I.P.C. B82 Khair Din, who was on point duty in the vicinity. During the exchange of shots, two civilians were shot by stray rounds. The robbers then made off in a motor car and succeeded in reaching the western outskirts of the City where they were tracked down by the Police in a tea house. One man was arrested there. The others, while escaping, shot Chinese Constable 605 in the stomach on the staircase. A Chinese detective was wounded in the arm and an European detective, Sergeant L. S. 113 Clark, who was fired at at point blank-range by the robbers, fortunately escaped with a slight wound in the leg. The robbers escaped to the hillside where two more were caught after they had been wounded by the Police who followed them up.

The Chinese Constable and the two civilians all died of their wounds. The three murderers were sentenced to death at the Supreme Court and duly hanged.

36. On November 29th the Police Accountant who had been in the Government Service for 31 years absconded taking with him. certain Government Funds. He was, however, captured and sen- tenced to 12 months Hard Labour.

37. On December 15th four convicts succeeded in breaking out of Victoria Gaol after one of their number had succeeded in cutting away the lock of his cell door and releasing the other three. In breaking out they murdered European Warder Speed and an Indian Warder Hernam Singh and wounded another Indian War- der. Two of them were arrested, one on the 16th December and the other later. The first convict was duly hanged and the second is under sentence of death.

38. At the close of the year the handsome new Police Building forming part of the Central Police Buildings was completed and occupied. The building includes Offices, Barracks, a large Can- teen, Stores, Armoury, Gymnasium, Recreation Rooms, and a Garage.

ESTABLISHMENT.

39. It is with deep regret that I have to record the deaths of no less than six European Police Officers during the year:-

Detective Inspector A. Terrett who was sent on a special mis-` sion on the East River was accidentally drowned in the East Riv on the 5th June.

Inspector Lamont, Inspector in-charge of the New (North) for many years, died rather suddenly on the ber, of gastro enteritis.

P.C. 127 A. E. Clarke died in England o wounds received on active service.

-comm

K 16

A.L.S. Robertson died on the 21st October.

L.S. Woolford of the Water Police died of typhoid on the 19th December.

P.S. Devney died on the 20th December.

LEAVE.

40. During the year the following officers went on leave :

Mr. T. H. King, A.S.P. Mr. Burlingham, A.S.P. Inspector P. O'Sullivan.

P.S. 101 W. R. Sutton.

P.S. 106 Appleton.

and forty-two Indians.

RECRUITS.

41. The recruiting of European Police, which ceased entirely during the war with the exception of a few men engaged locally, started during the year as a result of the cessation of hostilities at the end of 1918. 34 men joined the Police and all arrived before the end of the year. 9 had to be sent home again, chiefly on medical grounds. Practically all the newly joined recruits have seen war service. Indian recruiting also revived and 93 Indian Police were recruited. Of these 5 have since been transferred to Victoria Gaol and 3 have been invalided to India. 48 Chiness were recruited.

TEMPORARY STAFF.

42. All the Europeans temporarily seconded for service in the Police from the local British Regiment returned to their units on the return of the Police from active service. A small number of Sepoys seconded from a local Indian Regiment continued to serve, in the Police throughout the year.

HONGKONG POLICE RESERVE.

43. On the return of the European Police from active service the Special Police Reserve ceased to perform regular duty. During the early part of the year they performed particularly useful service in assisting the search of passengers going on board local steamers. This search is conducted in accordance with the provisions of the Piracy Prevention Ordinance. This special service was continued. il the return of sufficient European Police made it possible to

the Special Police of this somewhat onerous duty.

E. D. C. WOLFE,

Captain Superintendent of Police,

་་

I

K 17

Annexe A.

REPORT ON THE WATER POLICE.

The four large Police Cruising Launches Nos. 1, 2, 3, and 4 have all been thoroughly overhauled during the year besides being slipped quarterly when all small repairs necessary are effected. These Launches are, with the exception of No. 3, in first class running order. No. 3 is showing marked signs of wear and tear, suitable launch is required for Mirs Bay.

A more

The Harbour Patrol Launches Nos. 5 and 7 have run contin- ually on the Harbour Beats during the year. They have been thoroughly overhauled and are now running in a satisfactory manner. The Prize Launch "Hapag", which was hired from the Prize Court and had been running for nearly three years on Police work, proved herself in every way a valuable addition to the police fleet, but was unfortunately stranded and lost on the west side of Kowloon Bay in a Typhoon on 21st August. The Engines and Hull of this Launch were afterwards salved and bought by Government and a new hull of the same measurements laid down for the Water Police patrol.

The old Pinnaces Nos. 6 and 8 which had been laying up for a considerable time were sold at public auction and were replaced by a new 40 feet Motor Boat No. 8 which has been running daily since December and gives every satisfaction. The Kelvin engine of the wrecked No. 9 was installed in this hull owing to the delay from England of the 30 H. P. Gleniffer motor engine ordered and a new hull on the same lines laid down for this engine. In November the Police got on loan from the Public Works Department a small 20 feet Motor Launch used by them on Construction Work in the New Territories. This launch has proved very useful but is to be replaced early in the year by a shallow draft fast Motor Launch (No. 11) built specially for the shallow waters of Deep Bay and Sham Chun River. When the launches now under construction for early delivery 1920 are ready, i.e.,

New Steam Launch (No. 6) in place of "Hapag",

New 40 feet Motor Launch (No. 8) with Gleniffer engine,

New Shallow Draft Motor Boat (No. 11) for Deep Bay,

the Water Police Flotilla will be in a much higher state of patrol

efficiency than ever before and will consist of :---

4 Cruising Launches,

3 Harbour Launches one of which can be used either

for harbour or outside work,

4 Motor Boats all fast commodious and good sea boats.

All pulling boats and gear are in good order and condition. During the year No. 2 Police Launch has carried out most of her night patrols in Deep Bay. The searchlight and dynamo are work- ing very satisfactorily and are valuable for police work in this area.

K 18

Rifle and maxim gun practices have been carried out at a mark on a modified scale, owing to the shortness of ammunition, by Nos. 1, 2, 3 and 4 Launches.

The Special Police attached to the Water Police carried on the work of the members who left to go to the Front until reliev ed from duty in April on the men's return from Active Service.

I made a thorough inspection of the Police Fleet in December last and reported favourably on all launches except No. 3.

The new slipway at Yaumati is now in good working order and during the coming year should save a considerable amount in slip- ping at outside yards. Some 45 Government launches have been slipped since April.

The strength of the Water Police as it now stands is one Inspector, 4 Crown Sergeants, 7 Lance Sergeants, 8 European Constables, 21 Coxswains, 4 Boatswains, 74 Seamen, 22 Engineers, 20 Stokers, 2 Station Sergeants, 6 Station Orderlies, 2 Carpenters, 2 Painters, 1 Sailmaker, 4 Signalmen, 12 Detectives, and 17 Boat- men, making a total of 210 men.

I sincerely regret to report the loss that the Force sustained during the last month of the year in the death of P.S. A92 Devney, L.S. 100 Woolford, Seaman C263 Ng Hoi, and Stoker Fung Mun.

Sergeant Woolford especially is a great loss to the Water Po- lice, a fine seaman, fearless, and devoted to his duty, and a total abstainer. In my opinion, he would have gone far in the Water Police Force if he had been spared.

C. W. BECKWITH, Commander, R.N., Assistant Superintendent of Water Police.

29th January, 1920.

1

K 19

Annexe B.

REPORT ON THE POLICE SCHOOL.

Attendance.-School has been held 102 times during the year,

the average attendance being :-

European Police Constables

Indian Police Constables ... Gaol Staff ...

...

...

9

Staff. From 1st January to 7th October the Staff consisted of Messrs. Edwards, Badan Singh, Bishen Singh and Fatteh Mahomed.

From October 7th to December 31st Messrs. Prem Singh and G. H. Dhool took the place of Messrs. Badan Singh and Bishen

Singh.

Studies. No change to report.

Certificates of Exemption.-

European Police Constables

Indian Police Constables ...

Gaol Staff ...

:

.:.

:

:

:

:

:

6

to

6

Year.

1918.

Robbery with Violence and Assault with

intent to rob.

Cases.

Convicted.

Burglaries.

K 21

Table I.

RETURN OF SERIOUS AND MINOR OFFENCES REPORTED TO HAVE BEEN COMMITTED DURING THE YEARS 1918 AND 1919.

Serious Offences.

Minor Offences.

Larcenies and Larcenies in Dwelling-

Houses.

Discharged.

Cases.

Convicted.

Discharged.

Cases.

Other

Felonies.

Women

and Girls

Protection

Ordinance.

Unlawful

Kidnapping.

Assault and

Disorderly

Possession.

Conduct.

Gambling.

Drunkenness.

Nuisances.

Miscellaneous

Offences.

Convicted.

Discharged.

Cases.

Convicted.

Discharged.

Cases.

Convicted.

Discharged.

Cases.

Convicted.

Discharged.

Cases.

Convicted.

Discharged. Cases.

Convicted.

Discharged.

Cases.

Convicted.

Discharged.

Cases.

Convicted.

Discharged.

Cases.

Convicted.

Discharged.

Cases.

4

Co

3

1

:

:

CO

7

...

...

6

...

302512| 65 |238 1,049176

O

7

6

6

7

C

312522 66|238 | 1,049 176| 19 19

Europeans and Americans,

Indians,

Chinese,

Total,

1919.

Europeans and Americans,

Indians,

Chinese,

:

:

·4

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

94 39 23 96 14 32,776

:

:.

:

1 2

1,060 297

:

:

:

:

223 89 90 93 74 34288

:.

246

80 2 2

94 39

:

:

:སྶ

96 14 3 |2,777 | 1,060 |298|229

:

:

:

:

:

233

...

122 48 11 99 20

Total,

122 48

11

Co

2

1 2

H

2

92 94 93 74 34 288

CO

:

3

~

:

3

:

:

...

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

...

...

246 | 80

2 2

:

ལྷ

:

:

688

3,403 | 1,500 | 265|304| 162 | 103|128|107 | 28 | 472 430 89 1

99 20

...

3,408

1,503 | 268|310 168 | 106|125|110||28| 472 430 89

168 106 125 116

-

10

12

10

14

...

:

:.

:

14 14

6

6

CO

15

343526 89|380 1,889| 79|15

365550 | 90 |380| 1,889 79 35

:

35

:

:

:

:

:

:

:.

1

1

551

551

Convicted.

Discharged.

13

15

6

7

CO

Total of

all cases.

27

23

3,730 4,308 330| 8,399

552

552

3,749 4,330 336

8,449

12

12

45

...

2

I

25

:

:

999

664

664

664

664

4,546 5,039 433

5,039 433|| 10,472

4,561 | 5,053|434| 10,542

VICTORIA.

Under

one month.

1 mouth and under

1 year.

m.

f.

KOWLOON.

1 year and under

years 15 years and

Under

and

5 years.

under 15 years.

over.

one month.

1 month and under

1 year.

1 year and under 5 years.

K 22

Table II.

DUMPED BODIES, 1919.

HARBOUR.

ELSEWHERE.

years 15 years and under 15 years.

and

over.

Under one month.

1 month and under

1 year and

under 5 years.

5 years and under

15 years and

Under

1 month and

one

over.

month.

1 year.

15 years.

under 1 year.

1 year and under 5 years.

:

years 15 years and under

Total.

and

over.

15 years.

sex

sex

m.

f.

unk.!

m.

f.

m.

f.

m,

f.

sex unk.

sex

sex

sex

sex

sex

m.

f.

m.

f.

unk.

unk.

m.

f.

m.

f.

m.

f.

m.

f.

m,

f.

m.

f.

unk.

unk.

unk.

m,

f.

m.

f.

sex lunk.

sex

m.

f.

m.

Expand

junk.

sex

m.

f.

m.

f.

unk.

2

61

56

8 12

1

25

26

18

25

120

21

3

124

21

19

7

4

:

6

5

2

15

17

1

44

12 4 18

11

3

1

5 7

ແລ

13 1

14

14

14

2

sex [unk.

m.

f.

unk.

17 18

3

30

122

Year.

Victoria.

Kowloon. Harbour. Elsewhere.

Total.

Males.

Females. Unknown. Children.

Adults.

1915,

75

174

56

1916,

250

183

101

36

1917,

349

233

142

1918,

335

330

182

1919,

220

144

139

77

287

29

334

184

139

11

274

60

570

321

239

10

470

100

74

798

397

386

15

751

17

88

935

509

405

21

902

33

580

312

252

16

574

580

;

- K 23

Table III.

Return showing the Establishment and Casualties in the Force during the year 1919-

Nationality.

Establishment

of the Force.

Establishment.

Deaths.

Resignations

through

sickness.

Resignations through expiry of terms of service or otherwise.

Dismissals or Desertions.

Total Number

of Casualties.

Europeans,

159

34

Indians,

477

102

Chinese,

592

72

12

642

1

10

3

14

***

1

12

8

13

35

50

79

3853

Total, 1,228 208

22

14

26

64

126

This number includes the Police paid by other Departments, also the Engineers, Coxswains, Stokers, etc., but it is exclusive of:-

1 Captain Superintendent.

1 Deputy Superintendent.

1 Assistant Superintendent.

1 Assistant Superintendent, New Territories.

1 Acting Assistant Superintendent.

1 Accountant.

10 Clerks.

6 Telephone Clerks.

100 Messengers and Coolies.

5 Indians and 9 Chinese who are employed by private firms.

Actual Strength on the 31st December, 1919.

Europeans.

Indians.

Chinese.

Total.

Present,

139

402

569

1,110

Sick or Absent on

leave,

20

71

Excess over Estimates

7

88888

23

114

68

75

Vacancies,

4

Total

166

477

660

1,303

K 24

Table IV.

Table showing the Total Strength, Expenditure, and Revenue of the Police and Fire Brigade Departments for the years 1910 to 1919:—

Total Strength.

Expenditure.

Revenue Collected

Year.

by the

Police Force. Brigade.

Fire

Police

Fire

Police

Force.

Brigade.

Force.

$

1910......

1,042

103

583,847

41,548

161,420

1911....

1,102

103

586,985

32,421 162,026

1912......

1,196

105

591,076

41,263 172,397

1913......

1,247

105

756,663

35,319 185,250

1914......

1,304

106

789,100

35,913

193,915

1915......

1,289

106

765,911

34,922 185,589

1916......

1,215

106

703,743

36,574

192,796

?

1917......

1,229

104

694,115

32,621 210,071

1918.......

1,228

104

727,233

37,979

219,012

1919......

1,228

104

840,977

75,798

223,031

NOTE. No revenue is collected by the Fire Brigade.

K 25

REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF THE FIRE BRIGADE.

1. The annexed Report of the Assistant Engineer and Station Officer (Annexe C) gives full details of the working of the Fire Brigade during the year.

2. The European section of the Brigade was strengthened by the return of a number of old firemen who had been on military service and by the end of the year the full complement of European firemen had been secured.

3. The conduct of the Brigade has been satisfactory.

4. The Volunteer Fire Brigade which was formed in 1917 continued to do good service though its numbers were reduced owing to the departure of several members.

5. I also enclose copy of a Report by the Consulting Engineer on the state of the Fire Brigade Plant (Annexe D). -

6. A report (Annexe E) on the working of the Motor Ambul- ance which was presented to the St. John's Ambulance Association by the Hongkong Automobile Association and which is under the supervision of the Station Officer is attached.

23rd March, 1920.

E. D. C. WOLFE, Superintendent of Fire Brigade.

Annexe C.

Sir, I submit the following report on the working of the

Fire Brigade:

Fires

Small Fires

Ship Fires in the Harbour

False Alarms

Chimney Fires

...

27

65

4

12

Calls. The actual number of calls received during the year

was 108 against 106 in 1918.

Personnel :---

1 Superintendent.

1 Engineer (Consulting).

1 Assistant Engineer & Station Officer.

40 Firemen all Ranks (European Division).

(Chinese Division).

60

2 Indians.

12 Auxiliaries.

10 Volunteers.

""

127 Total (all ranks),

·

1

K 26

Estimated Loss.-The total loss during the yeas on buildings and contents within the Colony is estimated at $157,897, as against $640,405, a decrease of $482,508.

Principal Appliances.—The principal appliances in use are :—~

Steam-propelled Floating Engine Floating Engine under construction Self-propelled Petrol Motor Engine Land Steamers (small)

...

2

+

4

I

No. 2 Steamer being mounted on pontoon.

Sea Floating Engines

Manual Engines (small)

Extension Ladders

First Floor Ladders

...

Despatch Boxes (Hand Hose Carts)

Long Lengths of No. 3 Hose (100 ft.) Short

...

**

No. 4

( 20 ( 50 )

*

...

"

Hose Reels...

6

...

35

400

30

...

35

4

All the machines are well equipped for the work required of them.

The whole of the equipment of the Brigade is in good work- ing order.

Two American Fire Motors Nos. 3 and 4 were added to the Brigade in June. These machines have not yet been fitted with self-starters, but they are in order.

Water Supply. During the year a considerable advance has been made in the water supply for the suppression of fire. New mains have been laid by the Public Works Department. A large number of hydrants of the treble outlet pattern have been added. The hydrants are kept in order by the Public Works Department and are in good condition.

Hydrant Indicators.--The work of painting treble hydrant indicators has been started but has not yet been completed.

Street Fire Alarm System.-This system is antiquated and not very satisfactory. No calls have been received from the Points during the year. It is proposed to improve the system as soon as sufficient cable is available.

Theatre Duties and others.-Chinese Firemen have done watching duties at certain theatres and other buildings, private and public, during the year.

Buildings: Fire Station.-The Central Fire Station is too small causing overcrowding and there is no room for extension.

Plans for a new Central Station in Connaught Road Central opposite the Central Market are in course of preparation.

K 27

There are small Sub-Stations at Shaukiwan, Aberdeen, and Yaumati. A new Sub-Station is under construction at Tsim Sha Tsui.

The following changes have been made in the location of fire appliances :-

One steamer has been removed to Shaukiwan Sub-Station. One steamer is at Yaumati Sub-Station.

A steamer mounted on a barge will shortly be stationed

at Aberdeen.

A manual fire engine has been supplied for use at Un Long, New Territories, where a Volunteer Fire has Brigade been organized.

Staff: Sickness and Injuries.-There has been no contagious disease except influenza and there have been no accidents during

the year.

Dismissed from Service.-Two Motor Drivers were dismissed for misconduct.

Two Firemen were dismissed for misconduct.

Watching Duty-A continuous watch has been kept at the Central Fire Station by night and by day in the Telephone and Engine Rooms.

Engines starting up.-No Motor Engine has failed to start up during the year. Engines (Motors) are tested daily.

General. It will be seen by the record of fires that the work of the Brigade is on the increase. The permanent staff was increased by 8 Chinese firemen to man the new motor appliances and further increases have been approved, mainly in connection with the new Sub-Station at Tsim Sha Tsui in Kowloon. There has been a large increase in the number of new buildings erected during the year and further building operations are in progress all over the City and in Kowloon,

15th March, 1920.

A. LANE, Station Officer.

Annexe D.

Sir, I have the honour to present my Annual Report on the condition of the Fire Brigade Machinery and Equipment for the year ending 31st December, 1919.

No. 1 Fire Float.

This Float has been on regular duty for 9 years. The Hull, Machinery and Boilers were thoroughly overhauled in July and all necessary repairs carried out.

K 28

The Boilers were satisfactorily tested by 225 lbs. hydraulic pressure and found tight before raising steam.

The fire pumps and propelling engines have been regularly tested under full steam and are in good working order.

NOTE. The top end plates of both boilers are considerably reduced by corrosion, and it is recommended that these plates be renewed at next overhaul.

No. 2 Fire Float.

This Float has been on duty for 13 years. The Hull, Machinery and Boiler were thoroughly overhauled in October, repaired where necessary, and are now in good working order.

The top plate of this boiler is in much the same condition as the boilers in the No. 1 Float and its renewal is also recommended.

Motor Fire Tender (No. 1).

This Motor, which has been in service for 8 years, is in good order and has been on regular duty throughout the year.

Motor Fire Engine (No. 2).

This Motor Engine has been in service for nearly 4 years and is in good working order. During the year, in addition to attending fires, it has been regularly exercised at drills and for drivers' instruction.

Motor Fire Engines (Nos. 3 and 4).

These Motor Engines were delivered by the makers in June and have been on duty for 6 months during which time they have been regularly tested at drills, attended fires, and have proved themselves reliable and satisfactory.

Land Steamers.

No. 2 has been transferred to Aberdeen.

No. 3 is stationed at Yaumati as before.

No. 5 has been transferred to Shaukiwan.

These three steamers were overhauled during the year, and are in good working order.

No. 4 steamer is on loan to the Hongkong and Whampoa Dock Co., Ltd.

Manual Pumps and Equipment.

Manual pumps and gear, extension ladders, hose reels, and supply carts are in good working order, except the ladder at Yaumati which will shortly require to be replaced.

31st March, 1920,

R. HUNTER,

Engineer, Fire Brigade.

ľ

:

R

1

}

K 29

Annexe E.

MOTOR AMBULANCE SERVICE.

The Motor Ambulance Service, which was established on the 14th March, has done much useful work during the year. Since its establishment 97 calls have been dealt with. The Ambulance is available at all hours for accident cases and urgent cases of illness necessitating removal to hospital. The Ambulance Service is financially maintained by Government. The staff consists of one- driver and three attendants, one driver and two attendants being always on duty. The driver is a member of the Fire Brigade. There have been occasions when the machine has been called upon to carry heavier loads at one time than the engine could cope with, resulting in a breakdown, but generally speaking it has worked satisfactorily. As originally constructed the ambulance was top heavy, it was therefore found necessary to reduce the height, length, and also the weight. The necessary alterations were carried out at the Disinfecting Station with most satisfactory results. A charge of $3 is made per journey for private cases. No charge has been made for cases coming under Police supervision.

15th March, 1920.

A. LANE, Station Officer.

Table I.

Fires during the year 1919.

No. of Buildings Destroyed.

No.

Date.

Time.

Situation of Fire.

Damage.

Cause.

Remarks.

Wholly. Partly.

1

11. 1. 19.

2.20 a.m.

No. 23, Wing Lok Street...

2

27. 1. 19. 10.45 p.m. No. 41, Ha Wang Street, Sham Shui Po

7.3. 19.

1.10 a.m.

No. 67, Queen's Road West.

9,200

Upsetting of a kerosine oil lamp.

4,000

Defective chimney flue.

7,500

A spark from a drying stove ignited some matting. Shark's fins were being dried there.

Matshed catching fire through a spark from an engine on the tem- porary railway.

The adjoining house No. 39 was damaged by wa-

ter.

26.3. 19.

10 a.m.

A matshed on the Kowloon Bay Reclamation, Kowloon City

1,000

26. 3. 19.

6

9.6. 19.

26.6. 19.

9.10 p.m..

11 p.m.

No. 12, Gough Street

I

7,400

Upsetting of a kerosine oil lamp.

2 a.m.

8 | 30. 6. 19.

6.30 p.m.

No. 71, Wanchai Road Nos. 121-125 Jervois Street. No. 5, Shaukiwan Road

1,800 Unknown.

1

$1,000

Upsetting of a kerosine oil lamp.

Unknown.

Coolies may have been

38,456

smoking there.

(22 wooden

10

916. 9. 19. 1.45 p.m.

7.10.19. 12.15 a.m.

No. 10, Main Street, Aplichau

3,090

Unknown.

huts.

No. 362, Queen's Road Central

1

23,000

Unknown.

· K 30 —

R

Damage.

Cause.

Remarks.

Table 1,-Continued.

Fires during the year 1919.

No. of Buildings Destroyed.

Wholly. Partly.

No.

Date.

Time.

Situation of Fire.

-K 31 -

11

28.10. 19.

3.00 p.m.

S.S. Hai Yang..

Unknown.

12 29. 10.19.

13

31. 10. 19.

6.30 a.m.

9.15 a.m.

No. 87, Sai Kung Market.

1

450

Do.

No. 13, Un Long New Market, Au Tau, N.T..

1

1,900

14 3. 11. 19.

2.45 a.m.

Nos. 233 and 235, Shanghai Street

2

:

12,500

16

1511. 11. 19.

15.11.19.

17 16. 11. 19.

1818. 11. 19.

10.40 a.m.

4.15 p.m.

S.S. Cheong Shing

No. 22, Ta Tit Street, Kowloon City

noon.

2.45 a.m.

19

18. 11..19.

3.36 a.m.

20 24.11.19.

21 26.11.19.

6.30 a.m.

2.45 a.m.

No. 126, Queen's Road Central

Matsheds at the Government Quarries, Nathan Road

Unnumbered matshed at Cheung Sha Wan

Pig sties at Shek Shan, Hung Hom

Matsheds Nos. 1 and 5, Tin Liu Village, Sham } Shui Po

11

matsheds

1 matshed

4 pig sties

5 matsheds

1

:

:

1

3,850

480

22 26.11.19.

5.45 a.m.

Cheung Chau Village

:

:

Blanket catching fire cigarette end.

from

a

Fire supposed to have been originat- ed through the overheating of the drying kiln used for drying

medicine.

Unknown.

Dried grass catching fire from an 300 overheated stove.

250

600

6,000

300

Matshed catching fire through spark in blasting.

Matshed catching fire through a lighted cigarette end.

Upsetting of a kerosine lamp.

(Grass catching fire through a spark from the fire-place.

Fusing of electric light wire.

Unknown.

2 persons lost their lives through falling and 4 per-. sons burnt

death.

3 pigs burnt.

to

Appendix L.

REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF PRISON FOR THE YEAR 1919.

1. The number of prisoners received into prison during the year and the corresponding number for the year 1918 were as follows:

1919.

1918.

Convicted by Ordinary Courts,.

.4,336

2,717

Convicted by Court Martial,

12

18

Supreme Court for China and Korea,.

3

Debtors,

51

56

On remand or in default of finding

surety,

808

783

Total,.....

5,212

3,577

There was an increase of 1,635 on the total number of admis- sions as compared with the year 1918. There was an increase of prisoners convicted for larceny during the year under review, the number being 1,048 against 919 for the previous year.

2. The number of Revenue Grade prisoners admitted to prison was 1,801 made up as follows:-

Convicted under the Opium Ordinance,.

>

""

""

A

"

23

>"

3

5

17

"

**

""

226

Gambling Ordinance,...

175

Arms and Ammunition Ord.,..

33

Vehicles Ordinance,

65

Police Ordinance.,

Sanitary By-laws,

Harbour Regulations,.

Post Office Ordinance, Stowaway Ordinance,

Servants Quarters Ordinance, Marine Hawkers Ordinance,... Dangerous Goods Ordinance... Chinese Wine & Spirit Ord., .. Eating House Ordinance,...... Asiatic Emigration Ordinance, Societies Ordinance,

Carried forcard,

16

نا

39

7

31

3

B

2

1

626

L 2

25

Brought forward,

Convicted for committing nuisance in the street,

unlawfully boarding steamers,

626

11

31

under the Public Health and Buildings

>>

Ordinance,

62

52

hawking without a licence,...

370.

cruelty to animals,

4

""

keeping house for prostitution,

40

31

illegal pawning.....

depositing rubbish in the street,..

travelling on river steamer without

paying legal fares,

3

drunkenness,

12

>>

喃命

trespassing,

105

disorderly conduct,

13

assaulting,

obstruction,

20

28

21

""

cutting trees,

19

"3

fighting,

""

mendicancy,

52

malicious damage,

under the Trucks Ordinance,.

23

وو

,,

unlawful possession of lottery tickets,.

15

53

unlawful possession,

176

stealing,.

50

11

7

60 10 10 10

N

7

2

24

possession of implement fit for unlaw-

ful purpose,

Convicted under the Counterfeit Coins Ordinance,.

the Women and Girls (Protection)

Ordinance,

Convicted

for

for offering bribe,

Convicted under the Pawnbrokers Ordinance,

Convicted for obtaining by false pretences,

blasting stone in ૧

manner.

dangerous

soliciting in a public thoroughfare

"

for the purpose of prostitution,...

"}

conveying pigwash during pro-

hibited hours,..

"}

unlawfully receiving,

possession of false scale,

""

avoiding payment of tram car fare, impersonating, perjury,

removing dead body without per-

mission,

Convicted under the Importation & Exportation Ord., Convicted for discharging fireworks,

removing sand, stone and earth

without permission,

converting for own use,......

Carried forward,

1

1

1

TO SC

1,775

L 3

Brought forward,

Convicted for dressing the carcase of a pig in a place other

other than a slaughter house,

""

felonious intent,

Convicted under the Boarding and Lodging House Ord.,

Pharmacy and Poison Ordinance,...

Forts Protection Ordinance,..

Convicted for rogue and vagabond,

19

""

adultery,

disobedience,

demanding money with menaces,

Convicted under the Electricity Supply Ordinance,

Dogs Ordinance,.

1,775

2

1

2

1

I

Prison Ordinance,

Total,..

1,801

3. The above figures show that 41 per cent of the total admissions to prison were Revenue Grade prisoners.

The following table shows the number of prisoners committed to prison without the option of fine and in default of payment of fine:

In default payment of fine.

Year.

Without option

Served the

Total.

Paid full

of fine.

imprison-

Paid part

fine.

fine.

ment.

1918

1,498

892

152

196

2,738

1919

2,552

1,424

181

196

4,353

4. One hundred and sixty-one (161) juveniles were admitted during the year. In 47 cases corporal punishment was awarded. All of these in addition to whipping, received sentences varying from 24 hours detention to 12 months hard labour.

5. The percentage of convicted prisoners admitted to prison with previous convictions recorded against them was 127 as com- pared with 12·6 for 1918.

6. There were 153 prisoners admitted who were convicted by the Police Court in the New Territories against 98 for the previous year (73 in 1917).

I 4-

7. The following table shows the number of convicts in custody on the 31st December for the past 10 years, and the percentage of the total number of prisoners in custody to the estimated population of Hongkong:-

Year.

Estimated Number of population. convicts.

Percentage

of

Daily average

Percentage

to

number of

population.

prisoners.

population.

1910

435,986

208

*048

547

*125

1911

464,277

241

*052

595

*128

1912

467,777

222

*047

701

*149

1913

489,114

253

*052

702

•144

1914

501,304

216

*044

600

*120

1915

516,870

213

*041

594

*115

1916 528,010

203

*038

638

121

1917

535,100

209

*038

600

•112

1918

558,000

224

*040

601

•108

1919 501,000

259

*052

756

151

8. There were 723 punishments awarded for breach of prison discipline, as compared with 636 for the preceding year. Corporal punishment was inflicted in 3 cases for prison offences.

9. One hundred and fifty-five (155) prisoners were whipped by order of Courts.

10. There were four escapes. Two officers were murdered by the escaping prisoners. One prisoner was subsequently recaptured. 11. There were 19 deaths (11 natural causes and 8 execution).

12. Long-sentence prisoners of good conduct are employed at industrial labour.

13. 7,646,050 forms were printed and issued to various Govern- ment Departments and 33,952 books bound and repaired.

14. The buildings are in good repair.

15. The conduct of both the European and Indian Staff has been very good.

16. The appliances for use in case of fire are in good condition and the water supply adequate.

17. The rules laid down for the government of the prison have been complied with.

18. I append the usual returns.

P. P. J. WODEHOUSE,

6th May, 1920.

Superintendent.

· Table I.

Return showing the Expenditure and Income for the year 1919.

EXPENDITURE.

C.

INCOME.

*f

C.

Pay and allowance of officers including Uni-

Earning of prisoners

form, etc.

75,150 36

Debtors' subsistence

Victualling of prisoners....

Fuel, light, soap, and dry earth

Clothing of prisoners, bedding, and furniture

33,024 52

Wei-Hai-Wei prisoners' subsistence

15,589 56 | Shanghai

do.

11,785 72

Military

do.

Hankow

do.

Canton

do.

Subsistence of prisoners sentenced by Marine Magistrate... Waste Food sold... To Balance

191

66,273 | 09

72

67,735

413 00

185 50

384 20

279

75

288AKS2 888

14 00

19 10

80

54 00

Total..

$135,550 16

1918.

$108,651

95

Total.

$135,550 16

Average annual cost per prisoner $87.66, in 1918 $63.07, and in 1917 $65,66.

L 5 —

L 6

Table II.

Return showing Expenditure and Income for the past 10 years.

Actual cost

Average

Year.

Expenditure.

Income.

of prisoners' maintenance.

cost per

prisoner.

$

C.

C.

$ c.

1910

96,302.19

52,104.75

44,197.44

80.80

1911

93,458.23

53,889.26

39,568.97

66.50

1912

97,577.82

62,348.80

35,229.02 50.25

1913

106,275.20

61,298.50

44,976.70 64.07

1914

108,143.24

70,597.22

37,546.02 62.58

1915

109,369.95

65,541.33

43,825.62 73.78

1916

112,615.70

70,019.18

42,596.52 66.77

1917

108,212.43

68,815.01

39,397.42 65.66

1918

108,651.95

70,747.97

37,903.98 63.07

1919

135,550.16

69,277.07

66,273.09 87.66

K

די

L.

K

Table III.

Return showing value of Industrial Labour for the year 1919.

:

2

3

4

5

6

7

Value of

Value of

stock on

Value of

Value of

Value of

articles

Nature of Industry.

haud

materials

Total Dr.

ed or work

January 1st purchased. 1919.

done for

manufactur- ed or work

done for

payment.

articles

manufactur-

Gaol or other 31st, 1919.

Departments.

Stock on

8

Value of

earnings.

hand

Total Cr.

(Difference between

December

columns

3 and 7.)

L 7-

$

ር.

$

C.

C.

0.

C.

$

c.

C.

C.

Oakum,

Coir,...

393.20

393.20

1,383.92

2,745.45

4,129.37

3,046.53

982.38

393.20

1,435.18

393.20

Net-making,

20.88

92.26

113,14

134.25

8.50

5,464.09

137.75

1,334.72

24.61

Tailoring,

1,600.56

5,712.83

7,313.39

146.84

8,323.98

306.80

8,777.62

1,464.23

Rattan,

289.35

289.35

38.00

585.77

2.36

626.13

336.78

Tin-smithing,

1.50

941.46

942.96

75.80

1,659.96

71.24

1,806.50

863.54

Carpentering,

775.44

1,161.98

1,937.42

287.85

2,599.60

48.15

2,935.60

998.18

Grass-matting,

2.08

22.25

24.33

135.15

1.16

136.31

111.98

Shoe-making,

18.75

1,913.57

1,932.32

203.90

1,982.56

362.82

2,549.28

616.96

Laundry,......

4,052.60

4,052.60

2.00

10,001.80

10,003.80

5,951.20

Printing and Bookbinding,

26,738.60

43,956.76

43,956.76 | 70,695,36

250.75

84,439.75

41,950.48 126,640.98

55,945.62

Photography,

4.02

531.10

535.12

8.73

601.74

12.55

623.02

87.90

Total,..

30,938.95 61,419.61 92,358.56

4,194.15 111,312.69

44,587.44 160,094.28

67,735.72

Paid into Bank during 1919, which sum includes $191.15 for work executed in 1918, $3,363.62. Value of work executed during 1919 for which payment was deferred to 1920, $286.35.

:

K

Appendix M.

MEDICAL AND SANITARY REPORTS FOR THE YEAR 1919.

TABLE OF CONTENTS:

Page.

ANNEXE A.-Report of the Head of the Sanitary Department,.......

3

ANNEXE B.-Joint Report of the Principal Civil Medical Officer

and the Medical Officer of Health,

7

ANNEXE C.-Report of the Colonial Veterinary Surgeon,

25

30

ANNEXE D.-Report of the Superintendent, Civil Hospital,

ANNEXE E-Report of the Medical Officer in charge of the

Victoria Hospital for Women and Children,... 44

45

ANNEXE F.-Report on the Lunatic Asylum,

ANNEXE G.-Report of the Medical Officer in charge of the

Infectious Diseases Hospitals, Kennedy Town, 47

ANNEXE H.-Report of the Medical Officer to Victoria Gaol,...

ANNEXE I.--Report of the Medical Officer for Kowloon and the

New Territories,

48

51

ANNEXE J.-Number of Confinements attended by Government

Midwives in 1919,

56

ANNEXE K.-Report of the Visiting Medical Officer to the

Tung Wa Hospital, ...

57

ANNEXE L.--Report of the Visiting Medical Officer to the

Kwong Wah Hospital,

67

ANNEXE M.-Report on the Alice Memorial and Affiliated

Hospitals,

ANNEXE N.-Report of the Government Bacteriologist,

ANNEXE O.-Report on the Public Mortuary, Victoria,

ANNEXE P.-Report on the Public Mortuary, Kowloon,

ANNEXE Q.-Report of the Government Analyst,

ANNEXE R.--Report of the Health Officer of the Port, ...

69

70

76

80

83

:

87

M 3

ANNEXE A.

REPORT OF THE HEAD OF THE SANITARY DEPARTMENT.

The following were members of the Sanitary Board during the year:-

President, the Head of the Sanitary Department, Mr. D. W. Tratman, for whom Mr. Adam Gibson, M.R.C.V.S., acted from 1st January.

Vice-President, the Director of Public Works, the Honour-

able Mr. W. Chatham, C.M.G.

The Secretary for Chinese Affairs, the Honourable Mr.

E. R. Hallifax, O.B.E.

The Medical Officer of Health, Dr. W. W. Pearse, for whom Dr. A. D. Hickling, M.B.E., acted from 1st January to 10th August and from 8th September to 7th November. Captain H. G. Monteith acted from 12th August to 7th September.

Lieutenant-Colonel G. B. Crisp, D.D.M.S., China Command, for whom Lieutenant-Colonel and Brevet-Colonel L. Humphry, C.M.G., R.A M.C., acted from 11th September to 20th October.

Mr. F. B. L. Bowley went on leave and Dr. W. V. M.

Koch was appointed with effect from 13th June.

Mr. Seen Wan-tso.

Mr. Chan Kai-ming died on 11th December.

Dr. F. M. Graça Ozorio.

The Honourable Mr. C. G. Alabaster, O.B.E.

STAFF.

It is a very real pleasure to have to record that all of the ten men (the Medical Officer of Health, the Secretary, and 8 Sanitary Inspectors) who were fortunate in being permitted to go on active service, came through and are fit to return to their duties again.

The Secretary, Mr. C. M. W. Reynolds, returned from active service and resumed duty. Mrs. Danby acted for him up to 30th April and the late Mr. W. H. Woolley acted from 1st May to 29th July, in addition to his duties as Storekeeper.

Inspectors H. J. Millington, W. Thomson, W. Hill, S. Kelly, W. Old, F. Meade, G. Gipson and R. C. Witchell returned from active service during the year.

Inspectors F. Allen, L. Brewer, R. G. McEwen and H. J. Knight went on leave during the year.

M 4

LEGISLATION.

The Board recommended that overcrowding in factories and workshops be controlled by the following by-law which was made by the Board on 24th June, 1919 :-

"(.) A factory or workshop shall be deemed to be so overcrowded as to be dangerous or injurious to the health of the persons employed therein if the number of cubic feet of space or the number of square feet of area in the factory or workshop or in any room or sub-division of the factory or workshop bears to the number of persons employed at one time in such factory or workshop or in such room or sub-division respectively a proportion less than 250 cubic feet or during any period after 6 p.m. 400 cubic feet of space to every person, or at any time less than 20 square feet of floor area to every person.

(ii) The Board shall cause to be affixed in every factory and workshop a notice in English and Chinese specifying the number of persons who may be em- ployed in each room or sub-division of the factory or workshop by virtue of the preceding by-law."

The Government however, deemed that the time for such legislation was inopportune and the by-laws were not finally approved.

CEMETERIES AND CREMATORIA.

No new cemeteries were opened in 1919.

During the year there were 550 exhumations from various cemeteries. The number of exhumations in 1918 was 1,099.

There were 67 cremations, 46 at the Japanese Crematorium, So Kon Po, and 21 at the Sikh Temple.

DISEASES.

The most noteworthy infectious disease was an outbreak of a disease with choleräic symptoms. Where the cholera vibrio or its re-actions were found the disease was recorded as cholera and when the signs were insufficient to establish positively the disease as cholera the affection was called gastro enteritis. The question of. the specific entity of the disease did not much concern this Depart- ment as all cases were treated as if they had been cholera and disinfected accordingly. The number of deaths registered from gastro enteritis were 339 and 46 from cholera.

The, other diseases notified during the year were:-cerebro- spinal meningitis 269, plague 464, enteric fever 133, small-pox 27, diphtheria 50, puerperal fever 12, para-typhoid fever 3, and scarlet fever 7.

POPULATION.

The last census was undertaken in 1911, but is no longer reliable and any estimate is largely guesswork.

1

K

M 5

The white population has been estimated at 13,600, and the Chinese population at 582,500.

HOUSE CLEANSING.

The total numbers of floors cleansed were 73,008 for Hongkong and 29.232 for Kowloon.

LIMEWASHING.

It was not found possible, largely owing to shortage of staff, to ́ proceed with the departmental scheme mentioned in last year's Annual Report so that the old system was maintained. It cannot however be said to be satisfactory and it would appear that depart- mental limewashing will ultimately prove the most satisfactory solution of the difficulty.

MARKETS.

No new markets were opened during the year.

A comparative table of the market rents for the past four years will be found in the report of the Colonial Veterinary Surgeon.

There is an increase in revenue of $1,100 over the total for 1918.

CONSERVANCY.

The Contractor continued to carry out his work satisfactorily although he complained from time to time of difficulties in trans- port and sale, owing to disturbances up-country. During the year the following latrines were converted to the automatic water carriage system, viz. :-

Trough Closet at Happy Valley.

Urinal at junction of Glenealy and Caine Road.

Underground Urinal at junction of Seymour and Robinson

Roads.

SCAVENGING AND REFUSE DISPOSAL.

No change was made in the refuse disposal system.

The cost of scavenging the City of Victoria was $62,904.17 and of Kowloon $16,391.93.

A comparative table of the cost of scavenging for the last three years is appended:--

1917.

1918.

1919. $62,904.17

16,391.93

(a) City Scavenging,......$53,175.47 *$57,114.16 (b) Kowloon Scavenging, 14,595.14* 15,454.45 (c) Refuse Disposal,... 29.358.56 27,910.53 29,372.11

Total,.

$97,129.17 $100,479.14 $108,668.21

* Items (a) and (b) were in error for 1918 and should have read as now given.

M 6

The barges were delayed by typhoon signals on three occasions.

The steam barge S.D. I broke down twice.

The cost of repairs to the barges was as follows:-

Steam Barge S.D. 1,

Steam Barge S.D. 2,

Other Barges, ...

Moorings,

Paint, Turps, &c.,

Total,.

..$3,646.05

1,935.20

2,302.42

247.69

1,627.69

$9,759.05

The first item includes $627.50 for hired towage while S.D. 1 was under repair, and the second item includes $530.00 for towage while S.D. 2 was under repair.

The last item was not charged to "Barges Repairs" in previous years.

¿

The total cost of the service for the year was $29,372.11.

REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE.

The total expenditure during 1919 was $368,372.76 as com- pared with $356,062.78 in 1918: the estimate for the year was $399,146.00.

Certain revenues are collected by this Department, the bulk coming from market and slaughter-house fees and the rest chiefly from licences, registration and cemetery fees.

The total revenue was $296,798.34 as compared with $290,202.15 in 1918.

Other details of the working of the Department will be found in the reports of the Medical Officer of Health and the Colonial Veterinary Surgeon.

April, 1920.

G. R. SAYER,

Head of the Sanitary Department.

:

T

M 7 -

Annexe B.

JOINT REPORT OF THE PRINCIPAL CIVIL MEDICAL OFFICER AND THE MEDICAL OFFICER OF HEALTH.

AREA.

The Sanitary Board's control extends over the island of Hong- kong which has an area of about 32 square miles, and to that portion of the mainland between the shore and the range of Kowloon Hills extending from the village of Tseung Kwan O in Junk Bay on the East to the village of Kau l'a Kang on the west, with a seaboard of about 13 miles and an area of about 16 square miles.

This area includes "Old Kowloon which has been British since 1861, and has an area of about 24 square miles, and a portion of the New Territories, leased to this Government in 1898.

The remainder of the New Territories, about 266 square miles, is outside the Board's jurisdiction.

The City of Victoria, situated on the northern side of the island, has a frontage on the sea of nearly five miles, and is separated by the Harbour from the Kowloon portion of the Colony.

The domestic buildings in Victoria number 10,354 (excluding of barracks and Police Stations) of which 1,011 are non-Chinese ; there are also 186 dwellings in the Hill District. The number of houses completed during the year was as follows:-Victoria 153, Kowloon 265, Outlying Districts and Peak 1, making a total of 419 as compared with 406 in 1918, in addition to miscellaneous build- ings to the number of 104 (36 in 1918). These comprised offices, godowns, etc.

ADMINISTRATION.

The City of Victoria is divided into ten principal Health Dis- tricts and Old Kowloon into three such with an inspector in charge of each. It has recently been found necessary to sub-divide four of these Health Districts in Victoria into two sub-districts each so that actually fourteen Health Districts exist in the City of Victoria.

In addition four inspectors are engaged in supervising scaveng- ing and conservancy and the upkeep of dust carts, boats, etc., used for this work.

In the outlying districts sanitary work is supervised by the Police Officers of the districts except in Shaukiwan where the work is done in connection with that of No. 1 Health District.

The Inspectors in Hongkong work under the supervision of the Medical Officer of Health and in Kowloon under that of the Assistant Medical Officer of Health.

M 8

GENERAL SANITARY CONDITIONS.

The demand for housing accommodation which has been a noticeable feature since 1912 still continues and building obviously does not keep pace with the increase of population.

There is certainly much surface crowding but to what extent it is not possible to say for reasons given under the heading "Population".

In connection with anti-plague measures directed against rat infestation of houses, 307 ground surfaces have been cemented in Victoria and 55 in Kowloon (217 and 17 in 1918) whilst 928 build- ings have had rat-holes filled with cement in Victoria and 726 in Kowloon (852 and 660 in 1918).

Obstructions have been removed from backyards in 153 houses in Victoria and 46 in Kowloon (21 and 3 in 1918).

9,617 notices were issued for the abatement of sanitary nuisances in Victoria (6,095 in 1918) and 3,610 in Kowloon (1,227 in 1918) while 2,922 and 377 are the numbers of notices served in respect of building nuisances in Hongkong and Kowloon 1espectively (2,715 and 206 in 1918).

Notices to abate the nuisance of mosquito breeding were served to the extent of 39 in Victoria and 2 in Kowlcon (46 and 0 in 1918). During the year 8 public water closets have been provided and 87 installed in private dwellings.

By the department of Public Works additional training of nullahs has been carried out to the extent of 3,407 feet and scaveng- ing lanes have been provided to the extent of 4,600 feet.

METEOROLOGICAL RETURNS.

The following table gives the meteorological data recorded by the Royal Observatory during the year:-

Barometer

at M.S.L.

TEMPERA- TURE.

HUMI-

DITY.

Cloudiness.

Sunshine.

WIND.

Mouth.

Rain.

Max. Mean. Min.

Rel. Abs.

Direction. Vel.

ins.

O

о

January, February,

p.c. ins.

30.15 65.4 61.5 58.6 81 (45) 30.16 61.7 | 56.0 | 55.0 79 0.39

O

p. c. hours. ins.

points. miles p.h.

85

81.8 0.625

E by N

13.8

75

90.6 1.505

E

12.3

March,

30.04 70.9 | 66,7 | 63.9

90 | 0.60|

91

80.5 1.755

E

13 5

April,

29.94 77.1 | 72.5 | 69.2

どう 0.69

79

154.2 4.430

ESE

12.5

May,

29.86 80.6 76.6 73.6

$2 0.75

82

137.5 6,950 E

11.6

June,.

29.72 87.0 82.6 79.4

83

0.02

7+

208.5 10.815

S

8.4

July,

29.76 | 86.4 | 81.8 | 78.3

SI

0.88

69

241.4 19.430 SE by E

12.4

August,

29.64 87.1 82.8 78.5

82

0.91 72

177.719.670 ESE

11.4

September,... 29.90 84.7 80.1| 76.9

October,

30.00 78.574.2 71.0 November,

30.10 72.7| 68.1 | 64.1 December, 30.22 56.8 61,0 | 57.1

73 0.75 72 0.6! 58 67 0.48 66 0.37

نارة

51

23.4 2.655 E 172.2 4.695 175.7 2.685 ENE 198.3 0.725 NE by E

9.7

ENE

11.5

10.4

9.3

Mean or

29.96 76.5 72.1 | 68.8 Total,... {

78 0.65

70

1946.8 76.14

E

11.4

i

T

M. 9

The rainfall for the year (76.14 inches) was low, having been in 1918 101.6 inches and in 1917 81.48 inches.

POPULATION.

The distribution of the population estimated to the middle of 1919 was as follows:-

Non-Chinese Civil Population,

...

... 13,600

Chinese Civil population :

City of Victoria (including Peak),...

320,080

Villages of Hongkong,

16,520

Kowloon (including New Kowloon),

86,550

New Territories (land),

97,100

...

Population afloat,

64,250

Total Chinese population,...

584,500

Total Civil population,

598,100

The last census was taken in 1911 and there has therefore been difficulty in estimating the population of the Colony during the last few years.

The natural increase is negligible beside that due to immigra- tion. A new census will be taken in 1921 and it is probable that the estimates which have been based on previous censuses will be found too low owing to the immigration of a large but indeter- minate number of Chinese since the revolution of 1911.

The Chinese population consists mainly of adult males, but owing to the disturbances in China during the last few years and the immigration of refugees and their families the proportion of females to males appears to have increased.

The boat population is estimated at 64,250 and the registered boats belonging to the port and villages of Hongkong are as follows:

Passenger boats, class A and B,

Lighters, cargo and water boats, Fishing and other boats,

Hulks,...

Total,

1.119

1,720

7.177

66

10,082

The licensed boats in the New Territories numbered 6,639.

IMMIGRATION AND EMIGRATION..

During the year the river steamers plying between the main- land of China and this Colony brought here 714,601 persons and took away 659,346.

M 10 -

The Kowloon-Canton Railway brought 354,699 persons and took away 344,716.

This gives a total of 1,069,300 immigrants and a total of 1,004,062 emigrants by these routes. Between these two figures there is a difference of 65,238 persons but as there are other ways (of which statistics are wanting) of entering and leaving the Colony than the two here considered, it cannot be held that the population of the Colony has been increased by this amount during the year.

K

}

The following Table shows the number of Chinese houses and floors in the City of Victoria for the year 1919 :-

Health Districts.

Dwellings.

Six-storey

Dwellings.

Total Dwellings.

One-storey

Dwellings.

Two-storey

Dwellings.

Three-storey

Dwellings.

Four-storey

Dwellings.

Five-storey

K

Total Floors.

Average number

dwelling.

of floors per

1 and 1A

11

259

287

98

656

1,787

2.7

2 and 2A

12

310

740

232

1,294

3,780

2.9

*3

4

0

9

46

43

0

98

328

3.3

13

78

664

472

16

1,243

3,465

2.8

5

0

123

559

268

11

961

3,050

3.1

6 and 6A

51

37

385

453

40

966

3,292

3.4

7 and 7A

13

17

397

462

35

927

3,279

3.5

1

70

514

391

1,009

3,412

3.3

9

10

18

357

533

272

1,080

3,419

3.1

17

304

546

240

N

1,109

3,233

2.9

M 11

Total

136

1,564

4,671

2,931

138

3

9,343

29,045

3.1

* Most of the Chinese in Health District 3 live in quarters attached to European dwellings and business houses.

The following Table shows the number of Chinese houses and floors in Kowloon for the year 1919 :-

Average

One-storey

Dwellings.

Two-storey Three-storey Four-storey Total Dwellings. Dwellings. Dwellings. Dwellings.

Total Floors.

number of floors per

dwelling.

Health District 11,

1,000

632

364

122

2,118

3,844

1.8

12,

12

249

538

111

910

2,568

2.8

13,

43

322

669

9

1,043

2,730

2.8

"3

M 12

Total,

1,055

1,203

1,571

242

4,071

9,142

2.2

*

M 13

J

BIRTHS.

The births registered during the year were as follows:-

Male. Female. Total.

Chinese,

Non-Chinese,

Total 1919,

1,298 602 1,900

164

130 29-1

1.462 732 2,194 1,520 801

2,321

Total 1918,

This gives a general civil_birth_rate of 43 per 1,000 as com- pared with 41 in 1918 and 5'3 in 1917.

The birth rate among the non-Chinese community was 20′6 per 1,000 as compared with 22:07 in 1918 and 20′08 in 1917.

The nationality of the non-Chinese parents was as follows: British 113, Filipinos 7, Portuguese 80, Indian 60, American 6, Malay 4, Norwegian 2, Australian 2, Japanese 5, Eurasian 1, Dutch 3, French 1, Spanish 2, Jewish 3, Annamite 1, Parsee 2, Panamanian 2.

The birth rate amongst the Chinese as calculated from the registered births is 39 per 1,000 as compared with 3'6 in 1918.

It is not however possible to form an accurate estimate of the Chinese birth rate as owing to the custom amongst the Chinese of not registering births before the children have lived for one month and, also owing to the constant flow of people to and from the main- land of China, many births which occur here are not registered.

Every year a large number of children of about one month of age and less are left when sick at the various convents or abandoned dead in the streets, hillsides and harbour.

The number of such during 1919 was 1,192.

If it be assumed that all those children were been born in the Colony and not registered this would bring the total births up to 3,386 and the general birth rate to 6.7 per 1,000 while it would bring the Chinese birth rate up to 6'3 per 1,000 instead of 3·9 per 1,000.

It has formerly been the custom to call the higher birth rate a corrected birth rate. This is however not a suitable term. The actual birth rate is unknown.

The preponderance of male over female registered births is very marked among the Chinese there being for the year 1919 215 males to every 100 females (194 to 100 in 1918, and 219 to 100 in 1917).

In the non-Chinese population the proportion of male to female births was 120 to 100 as compared with 102 to 100 in 1918.

DEATHS.

The total number of deaths registered during the year was 11,647 (13,714 in 1918 and 10,433 in 1917) the general death rate was 23.2 per 1,000 (244 in 1918 and 23'4 in 1917).

M 14

Chinese deaths numbered 11,348 which gives a death rate for Chinese of 23-3 per 1,000 as against 24:5 in 1918 and 237 in 1917.

The deaths of non-Chinese civilians numbered 299 giving a death rate of 219 per 1,000 (19-5 in 1918 and 140 in 1917). The nationalities of the deceased were as follows:-British 75, Canadian 4. Portuguese 48, Indian 61, Japanese 43, Malay 8, American 5, Filipinos 36, Swedish, French and German 2 each, Annamite, Armienian, Peruvian, Firmish, Arabian, Eurasian, Dutch, Greek, Korean, Parsee, Brazilian, Roumanian, Persian, 1 each.

The exclusion of the Navy and Army from these statistics increases both the birth and death rates for Europeans and Indians.

AGE DISTRIBUTION OF DEATHS.

The total number of deaths of infants under one year of age was 3,474 being 298 per cent. of the total number of deaths as compared with 307 per cent. in 1918.

The deaths of children between one and five years of age were 1,807 (2,023 in 1918).

There were 25 infant deaths among the non-Chinese (40 in 1918).

Among the Chinese population the deaths of infauts numbered 3,449 (4,219 in 1918) while only 1,900 Chinese births were registered. If however the number of infants taken sick to the convents or abandoned dead as mentioned above. be added to these births we get the figure of 3,092 as representing the number of Chinese births during the year. This figure is still much lower than that repre- senting the deaths of infants (3,449). The probable explanation is that not only are many births in the Colony not registered, but that many children brought into the Colony die here. Such deaths are registered in order that burial may take place.

DISEASES.

Respiratory Diseases.

The total number of deaths from diseases of this nature was 3,049 (2,981 in 1918) of which 74 were among the non-Chinese population. Of these 1,018 occurred in infants under one year of

age.

Pneumonia was the cause of 549 deaths (654 in 1918) 34 of which were non-Chinese and 123 of which occurred in infants under one year (91 in 1918).

Broncho-pneumonia caused 1,494 deaths (1,597 in 1918) 14 of which were non-Chinese, and 881 of which occurred in infants

M 15

un der one year (1,008 in 1918). The death rate among the Chinese from diseases of the respiratory system was 6'2 per 1,000 as com- pared with 50 per 1,000 in 1918.

Tuberculosis.

The number of deaths from tuberculous diseases was 1,637 and 40 of these occurred in non-Chinese. There were 1,013 deaths from pulmonary tuberculosis, 987 Chinese and 26 non-Chinese, and 29 deaths from tubercular meningitis. The percentage of deaths from tuberculosis was 14:05 as compared with 12·2 in 1918.

Nervous Diseases.

Excluding the two infectious diseases, tetanus and cerebro- spinal meningitis, the number of deaths from these was 516 as compared with 377 in 1918. The deaths of Chinese infants from tetanus and convulsions were 270 and from meningitis undefined 11, as compared with 218 and 29 in 1918:

Malaria.

The number of deaths from malaria during the year was 319 (398 in 1918 and 416 in 1917) of which all but 6 occurred in Chinese. Owing to the constant stream of immigrants and emi- grants to and from the Colony it is impossible to form an opinion as to the number of these infections acquired in the Colony but it is certain that in a large proportion of cases infection was acquired outside this Colony.

The following tables show the distribution of these deaths in the Colony and the police admissions to hospital for malaria during the last nine and eleven years respectively :-

Table of Deaths from Malaria.

Year.

Non- Chinese.

Shauki-

Victoria. Kowloon.

wan.

Aber- deen.

Stauley.

1911.

8

176

26

54

43

1912.

18

1913.

1914.....

1915. 1916..

1917

.....

-888

214

80

34

44

110

47

33

53

1563 0

9

73

58

19

.47

20

157

66

27

46

32

182

75

25

36

19

205

98

29

68

11

1918...

1919.

189

71

16

106

10

117

101

13

71

12

The 117 deaths in 1919 under Victoria include 15 from the Harbour.

M 16

Police admitted to hospital on account of malaria during the

past 11 years:-

Average Percent- Strength

Year.

From the City.

From rest of

Total.

the Colony.

of Police

Force.

age of Strength.

1909........

87

50

87

1,050

1910.

66

69

135

1,039

13

1911.

30

83

113

1,031

11

1912.

37

51

88

1,120

8

1913...

68

95

163

1,170

14

1914...

101

81

182

1,206

15

1915.....

116

92

208

1,289

16

1916.

63

99

162

1,057

13

1917

51.

84

135

1,192

11

1918.

40

49

89

1,228

7

1919..

13

74

87

1,228

Beri-beri.

There were 555 deaths from the disease during the year (80-4 in 1918). All were Chinese except 4 amongst the Japanese com- munity.

Infectious Diseases.

The number of infectious diseases notified during the year was 1,011 (1913 in 1918, aud 919 in 1917). Of these 464 were plague, 27 small-pox and 269 cerebro-spinal meningitis (1,232 in 1918).

Tables II and III show the nature and distribution of these diseases.

Plague.

There were 464 cases as compared with 266 in 1918, 38 in 1917, and 39 in 1916. All but one were of Chinese nationality. The deaths numbered 426.

The numbers of rats caught and sent to the public mortuaries to be examined for signs of plague were for Victoria 76,793 and for Kowloon 27,311, Total 104,104 (103,641 in 1918).

In Victoria 242 were found to be infected with plague (0:31 per cent), and in Kowloon 10 (037 per cent). Last year 185 were found infected in Victoria and 18 in Kowloon.

Table IV shows the monthly distribution of plague-infected rats during the year.

Cerebro-Spinal Meningitis.

There were 269 cases notified as compared with 1,232 in 1918. Of these one was a European and one of another non-Chinese nationality. The remainder were Chinese. There were 204 deaths as compared with 968 during 1918.

X

:

M 17

Enteric Fever.

There were notified during the year 133 cases as compared with 247 in 1918 and 188 in 1917. The cases of European and American nationality were 20 (33 in 1918) and of other non-Chinese nationality 12 (32 in 1918). The remainder were Chinese.

As usual the disease has not been of the nature of a water-borne or milk-borne epidemic. The manner of acquiring infection is probably due in this Colony to (2) the eating of uncooked vegetables, c.g., in salads, (ii) the eating of shell fish, and (iii) the contamination of food by flies which convey infective material from uncovered latrine buckets.

The number of "carriers" of the disease among the Chinese is probably considerable.

The substitution of water-flushed privies both for public and private use, which is gradually taking place in the Colony, will greatly lessen the chances of infection through flies.

Paratyphoid Fever.

Three cases occurred, one being Chinese and two Europeans.

Scarlet Fever.

Seven cases were notified, two being European and five Chinese.

Cholera.

Forty-six cases were notified, including one European, forty- one Chinese and four of other nationality. There were 42 deaths.

An epidemic of gastro-enteritis occurred, during the year, of choleraic type and while definite bacteriological evidence of those cases being cholera was wanting they were regarded as being cholera and steps for disinfection, etc., were taken accordingly. There were 339 deaths ascribed to the disease.

Small-pox.

During the year 27 cases were notified (32 in 1918, 595 in 1917, and 712 in 1916), 19 cases were Chinese and 8 of other nationalities.

Diphtheria.

Fifty cases were notified (118 in 1918). Of these 10 were of European, 39 of Chinese, and 1 of other nationality.

Puerperal Fever.

Twelve cases were notified, one was Portuguese and the remain- der Chinese.

Five Government midwives attended at 550 confinements (625 in 1918).

Interments.

The following numbers of burials took place in the various cemeteries during the year :--

M 18

General Cemeteries.

Colonial

Roman Catholic

Mohammedan

Parsee

Japanese Crematorium

Sikh Crematorium..

Jewish.....

Malay

Roman Catholic, Mount Caroline..

Total.

1918.

. 1919.

64

80

1,297

303

62

68

0

1

33

47

18

21

1

1

0

0

1

1,019

1,476

1,540

Chinese Cemeteries.

1918. 1919.

Mount Caroline

1,249

699

Kai Lung Wan

1,509

1,359

Tung Wah Hospital

5,608

4,772

Protestant

61

57

Eurasian ...

7

1

Aberdeen

273

216

Stanley

33

29

Shek O

2

1

Chinese Permanent Cemetery (Aberdeen)

41

52

Lamma Island

0

Hau Pui Lung

2,899

2,638

Sai Yu Shek

117

114

Sai Yu Shek (Christian)

10

15

Kowloon Tong

180

152

Chai Wan

207

193

Tai Shek Ku

5

8

Total.......

12,201 10,308

DISINFECTING STATIONS.

At these stations in Victoria and Kowloon 39,924 articles of clothing, bedding, etc., were disinfected during the year (53,063 in 1918).

The disinfecting apparatus in Victoria was in use on 234 days and that in Kowloon on 65 days.

In addition 10,720 articles were washed and 23 public vehicles disinfected.

}

M 19

PUBLIC BATH HOUSES.

The following table shows the numbers of persons who have used the four public bath houses during the year.

District.

Wanchai (men only).....

1918. 144,818

1919. 123,741

Pound Lane (men and women)

470,075 431,654

Second Street (men only).

54,156 64.212

Sheung Fung Lane (women & children).

48,174 49,131

Total....

717,223 668,738

1

AMBULANCE SERVICE.

Ambulances can be procured at any time of the day or night from the disinfecting stations at Tai Ping Shan in Victoria and Yaumati in Kowloon (telephone numbers 363 in Victoria and K. 44 in Kowloon).

Ambulances are also obtainable in Victoria from the Eastern and Western District Sanitary Offices.

At the above-mentioned stations coolies for ambulance work are available at any time.

There are many other places from which ambulances may be obtained in emergencies, but as there are no coolies of the Sanitary Department stationed at these, it is necessary for the police to obtain volunteers or engage street coolies for these ambulances when required.

The following is a list of such places :—

1. In the City of Victoria

No. 1 Police Station.

The Recreation Ground, Happy Valley. The Seamen's Institute, Gresson Street. The Post Office.

The Supreme Court.

The Central Police Station.

The New Western Market.

The Tung Wah Hospital.

The Government Civil Hospital. The Cattle Depôt, Kennedy Town. No. 6 Police Station, Peak.

2. In Hongkong outside the City limits :-

Bay View Police Station. Shaukiwan Police Station. Aberdeen Police Station. Stanley Police Station. Pokfulam Police Station.

3. In Kowloon :-

M 20

Water Police Station, Tsim Sha Tsui. Sham Shui Po Police Station. Kowloon City Police Station.

4. In the New Territories at Tai Po.

A motor ambulance belonging to the Saint John's Ambulance Society is kept at the Fire Brigade Station (No. 5 Police Station, Hongkong) Telephone Number 600. Driver and attendants are available.

During the year the ambulances were used 569 times in Hong- kong and 245 times in Kowloon.

ADULTERATION OF FOOD AND DRUGS.

The following table shows the number and results of analysis made during the year:-

Milk..

No. of samples. Genuine. Adulterated.

Beer..

Brandy

Gin

Port Wine

Rum

Sherry

Whisky

171

7

166 7

4

4

1

1

4

4

7

5

2

2

14

14

10000ONOC

5

2

The milk samples were submitted for analysis by the Sanitary Department and the others by the Police.

Three convictions for selling adulterated milk were obtained.

J. T. C. JOHNSON, Principal Civil Medical Officer.

W. W. PEARSE, M.D., D.P.H., Medical Officer of Health.

British and

Foreign

Community,

Civil,

M 21

Table I.-DEATHS REGISTERED IN THE COLONY OF HONGKONG DURING 1919.

:

23

:

61 6 4

2

....

:

19

F

7

**

10

4

5 11

48

26 11 4 2 10 71 4

299

5 101 193

10

4 1

9 104 391174 431 312 27|144 59

39 3114 22 77

1475 522 553 25

15

137 1540 196| 7,449

10

3 15

90 | 141

39 7

10

5

18 148 80 987

LO

13

80 25185

73113 14 13 35

373276 180 11

9

55 446 166

2,506

2

:

13

6 2,5

00

43

55

14

18

40 10

1

1

:

:

:

:

:

:

00

:.

t-

6

CO

19

2

223

:

01

:

:

:

:

:

275

1

100

31

15126208

10 256432 522 539 | 555

53168124 2043 1006 805 | 47

31 227 2258 460 | 11,647

15

110 446 21 *782 651446475804 61 223154 2251 1065 820 47

22 285 1930 530 || 13,714

-522 unknown persons of unknown nationality.

Victoria and

Peak,

Harbour,

1182 10

43

1 193

:

K

Kowloon,

Chinese

Community,

Shaukiwan,......

Aberdeen,

Stanley,..

Total, 1919,

1918,

:

:

N

co

ta

5

56

7

5

9

17

10 23 42

8 29

18157103|379|101| 24

24

9 65

29

96

:

:.

:

2

7

2

1

4 1

28

8 8 2 2

12

11

:

:

:.

:

:

:.

:

85 36 204 | 178 | 426|319 | 42

2449 15 6 95 96

:

405

26 26 179 98 968 225 251 398

* Accident at the Race Course

ד 4

M 22

Table II-CASES OF NOTIFIABLE DISEASES RECORDED IN EACH MONTH OF THE YEAR 1919.

January.

February.

March.

April.

May.

June.

July.

August.

September.

October.

November.

December.

Total, 1919.

Total, 1918.

Europeans

Plague

Chinese

4

1

Others

Europeans

Typhoid Fever

Chinese

10

6

Others

1

:::-

30

94

171

132

26

1

1

2

3

8

5

6

8

3

Europeans

1

Paratyphoid Fever....

Chinese

Others

...

Europeans

Cholera

Chinese

3

Others

Europeans

1

...

Small-pox

Chinese

1

2

3

6

2

-~:27:-:-::

1

1

3

463

464

266

266

1

1

9

20

33

26

10

4

4

101

133

182

247

1

1

1

1

12

32

2

N

1

3

2

1

4

8

27

1

1

41

46

Nil

4

1

19

27

28

32

Others

4

3

7

4

Diphtheria

Europeans Chinese Others

...

Europeans

1

2

1

5

1

10

8

4

4

1

2

1

1

4

5

10

39

50

109

118

1

1

1

Puerperal Fever

Chinese

Others

1

∙1

2

2

12

11

12

1

...

2

2

5

7

3

Scarlet Fever

Relapsing Fever

Typ hus..

Europeans Chinese Others

Europeans Chinese Others

Europeans Chinese Others

Europeans

Cerebro-Spinal Fever...

Chinese

23

32

71

58

24

15

Others

Yellow Fewer....

Europeans Chinese Others

+

...

...

13

12

3

...

***

...

7

...

Total for 1919,

45

51

120 175 209

163

63

37 61

25

27

Total for 1918,

54

208 481 304 238

237 192

62

33

45

38

222

35

19

185

35

Nil

Nil

Nil

1

19

:

8

267

269

1,207

1,232

1.

6

Nil

Nil

:

...

:

1,011

:..

1,913

1

1

Peak. Kowloon.

Harbour.

New Territories. Villages of Hongkong.

No address.

Imported.

Total, 1919.

Total, 1918.

30

Table III.—The following Table shows the nature and distribution of these diseases :-

City of Victoria: Health Districts.

1

2 3 4

5

6

CO

8 9 10

2

:

8

CC

Plague.......

64 136

136 2 15

19

30

24 11 59 40

28

Enteric Fever

5

14 10 12 1 4 6

10

22

00

26

Paratyphoid Fever...

:

:

+

2

10

1

Co

:

Co

1

1

28

1

464

266

:

:

วง

9

133

247

2

:

:

:

:.

12

4

2

**

- M 23 -

3

3

46 Nil.

20

27 32

:

:

:

:

2

1

50

118

12

12

7

Nil.

1

Nil.

Nil.

...

20

2

269|1,232

:

...

Nil. Nil.

:

:

:

:

:

:

13

:

:

:

:

:

:

...

13

10

10

:

÷

10

:..

I

:

24

:

:

:

:

10

I

:

:

277

2 3

:

:

:

11

60

:

1.

:

:.

3 2

1 1

:.

Diphtheria

4

C

Puerperal Fever...

1

2

2 1

Scarlet Fever

Relapsing Fever.

Typhus Fever.....

Cerebro-Spinal-Fever..

:

:

:

23 19 2 22 12 14 10

:

...

:

:

F:

:

:.

...

:

Yellow Fever

Cholera

Small-pox

=

M 24

G

Table IV.

MONTHLY DISTRIBUTION OF PLAGUE-INFECTED RATS DURING THE YEAR 1919.

CITY OF VICTORIA.

Mus Rattus..

Mus Decumanus,

January.

February.

March.

April.

May.

June.

July

August.

September.

October.

November.

December.

Total.

:

6 11 12

48

17 18

65 39

Total Infected Rats....... 5

7

17 24 59 77 45

Human Cases of Plague,...

10

36

1 206

1 242

Local.... 4 Import-

ed,..

30 93 161 122 18

4

435

:

:

1

:

1

MONTHLY DISTRIBUTION OF PLAGUE-INFECTED RATS

DURING THE YEAR 1919.

KOWLOON.

Mus Rattus, Mus Decumanus,

Total Infected Rats,

Human Cases of Plague,...

Local,.. Import-

ed,...

January.

1

:

February.

:

March.

1 1 6

-:

April.

:-

May,

: co

:

June.

July,

:

:

:

1 10 10

7

August.

September

October,

1

1

: | ⠀ ⠀

10

10

November,

December.

Total.

:

28

:

T

}

M 25

Annexe C.

REPORT BY MR. ADAM GIBSON, Colonial Veterinary Surgeon.

STAFF.

Inspector D. Duncan was in charge in Ma Tau Kok throughout the year.

At Kennedy Town, Inspector Knight, assisted by Inspec- tor Hudson, was in charge up to the 16th of November when In- spector Knight went on leave. Inspector Hudson then took charge and was assisted by Inspector Taylor. Overseer Johanssen re- mained in charge of the Central and Western Markets.

GENERAL STATISTICS.

Cattle. The total number of cattle admitted to the Government Depôts for the year was 42,659 as against 36,381 in 1918. In Kennedy Town 36,401 were admitted as against 30,476 in 1918. There were 16 of these rejected alive as unfit for food on account of leanness against 22 for the same cause in 1918. In Ma Tau Kok 6,258 cattle were admitted as against 5,905 in 1918 and of these 18 were rejected for leanness as against 10 during 1918. There are only two slaughter houses at which cattle are allowed to be killed for food for Hongkong.

Pigs.-The fotal number of pigs admitted to Kennedy Town. was 261,557 as against 245,926 in 1918. The totals of admissions of pigs to the other slaughter houses for slaughter are misleading as they contain among them 24,758 pigs which were admitted first to Kennedy Town and afterwards sold and removed to the other slaughter houses.

Sheep and Goats.-The total number of sheep and goats ad- mitted to Kennedy Town was 27,081 as against 24,969 in 1918. As in the case of pigs, sheep and goats are admitted first to Kennedy Town and from there many are removed for slaughter to Ma Tau Kok or for export out of the Colony.

DISEASE IN DEPÔTS.

Rinderpest.-A few cases continued to arrive practically through- out the whole of the year. The type of the disease was mild. Wu Chow was said to be the centre from which the disease came but the actual place of origin is uncertain as Chinese dealers are by no means reliable as to information they give and Wu Chow simply means the port of embarkation. In all 45 cases were diagnosed.

Foot and Mouth Disease.

In November a disease very much resembling Foot and Mouth appeared but it lacked the very actively infectious character of Foot and Mouth Disease and soon disappeared spontaneously. It was apparently a Vesicular Stomatitis which disappeared when the causal agent, which was undiscovered, ceased to act.

Anthrax.

Five cases of Anthrax were found against seven in 1918. These all occurred in cattle said to have come from Wu Chow.

M 26

Tuberculosis.

Fourteen cases were found in dairy cattle sent in for slaughter as against nine in 1918. As usual native cattle did not furnish a single case.

KENNEDY TOWN ANIMAL CREMATORIUM.

The carcases destroyed in the Crematorium were :—

Cattle,

Sheep and goats,

Swine,

1918.

1919.

83

88

25

30

288

293

161

199

Dogs and miscellaneous animals,... Condemned meat,

..15,255 b. 21,049 lb.

Besides the above, 60 cart loads of old paper, books, and mis- cellaneous goods from Government offices and private firms were destroyed (19 cart loads in 1918) and 186 cases of damaged tobacco and cigarettes from the British American Tobacco Company (160 in 1918). In addition, a quantity of provisions were sent by various firms to be destroyed as unfit for food.

Under Government Notification No. 31 of 1910 the following fees were collected :-

123 large animals at $2.00 each

105 small

.50 cents each

>>

Bone ash sold'.

$246.00

52.50

118.00

Refund for fuel used in destroying private papers, &c.. 184.16

$600.66

The amount of coal used was 42 tons, 6 cwts., 0 qr., 8 fb.

Kennedy Town~~-~-

Slaughtered.

SLAUGHTER HOUSES REVENUE.

1918.

1919.

$

C.

$

..

Cattle @ 40 e.

...

***

28,026

11,210.40

33,544

13,417.60

15,360

3,072.00

16,196

3,239.20

227,848

68,354.40 236,800

71,040.00

Sheep @ 20 c.

Swine @30 c.

Cattle and swine slaugh-

tered at Pokfulam

(Dairy Farm) ...

Exported.

Cattle @ 50 c. Sheep @ 10 c.

Swine @ 10 c.

:

962.30 (not received in time

to be included)

825

412.50

1,326-

663.00

9,484-

948.40

11,177

11,177

1,117.70

8,417

841.70

13,493

1,349.30

$85,801.70

$90,826.80

+

M

M. 27

Ma Tau Kok :

Slaughtered.

Cattle @ 40 c.

1918.

1919.

$

C.

$

c.

5,869

2,347.60

6,265

2,506.00

Sheep @ 20 c.

359=

71.80

794-

...

Swine @30 c.

...

50,725

15,217.50

54,816

158.80 16,444.80

Outstanding Tickets sold

314.80

20.10

$17,951.70

$19,129.70

Sai Wan Ho (contracted out) :

1918.

1919.

$ C.

C.

Swine

Aberdeen (contracted out) :-

..7,503=2,544.00 7,699=2,580.00

1918.

1919.

$ c.

C.

Swine

4,3751,296.00 3,014-1,284.00

The total revenue, including contracts from the Animal Depôts and Slaughter Houses, is as follows:-

1918.

1919.

Kennedy Town, Fees

$85,801.70

$90,826.80

Ma Tau Kok, Fees

17,951.70

19,223.70

Kennedy Town Blood and Hair

Contract

7,296.00

7,380.00

Ma Tau Kok

32

1,344.00

1,440.00

Sai Wan Ho Slaughtering Contract

2,544.00

2,580.00

Aberdeen

1,296.00

1,284.00

$116,233.40 $122,734.50

Increase on 1918

$6,501.10

The following table shows the number of animals slaughtered in all Slaughter Houses during the past ten years:-

Year.

Cattle.

Sheep and

1910 ......30,504

1911 ......30,371

1912

1913

..33,761

..37,909

1914 ......32,642

1915 ......34,158 .44,819

1916

1917

......

40,884

1918 ......33,895 1919......39,809

Average

for 5 years, for 5 years,

38,713

Average

33,037

Goats.

17,439 17,671

18,177

17,586

17,245

17,966 21,636

19,699

15.719

16,990

17,623

Average

Average

for 5 years, for 5 years,

18,402

Swine.

223,705

227,597

242,956

244,609

228,136

264,894

290,528 258,731

290,451

302,329

Average

Average

for 5 years, for 5 years, 281,387

233,400

M 28

GRASS SUPPLY FOR GOVERNMENT BULLOCKS.

The area under cultivation remains the same as last year. The total grass cut at Kennedy Town was 224 tons 2 cwts. (101 tons 6 cwts. in 1918). A considerable amount of this was sup- plied to the Medical Department to feed the ponies used for the preparation of antimengoccic serum, and for this no charge was made.

EXPORT OF LARD TO THE PHILIPPINES AND THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

The factories at Ma Tau Kok and Kennedy Town approved for the export of lard and dried meats to American Ports, exported the following quantities under certificate :-

Lard,

1916. 1917. 1,040,055 1,103,948

Dried Meats, ...

1918.

1919.

1,820,8271 1,657,390 fb. 57,690 66,4274 101,542 99,651 fb.

In addition they exported without Certificate 133,200 Hb. to Europe, and 1,800 fb. to Port Louis, Mauritius.

RABIES.

Importation of dogs from Shanghai and Chinese ports north of Shanghai was prohibited until further notice (Gazette Notifica- tion No 461 of the 19th October, 1917).

Dogs remained unmuzzled. A total of 16 dogs was detained under observation re rabies. Of these two proved to be suffering from rabies, seven were destroyed as having been in contact with a dog suffering from rabies, and the remainder were returned to their owners.

1

}

T

1906-1915 (average for

10 years).

1916.

1917.

1918.

1919.

MARKETS.

The following statement shows the Revenue derived from Markets:-

Markets.

M 29

C.

C.

C.

Central Market

56,279.52

60,664.80

60,635.10

60,493.50

C.

C.

60,640.50

Hunghom Market

3,676.01

4,308.60

4,198.40

4,247.70

4,294.50

Mong Kok Tsui Market

1,059.65

1,237.20

1,257.80

1,258.80

. 1,258.80

Sai Wan Ho Market

1,930.63

2,263.60

2,178.70

2,348.00

2,389.00

Sai Ying Pun Market Shaukiwan Market Shek Tong Tsui Market So Kon Po Market Tai Kok Tsui Market Tsim Sha Tsui Market

Wan Tsai Market

Western Market, (North Block)

14,009.39

16,262.40

16,333,20

16,428.10

1,602.47

2,142.00

2,127,00

2,104.80

16,496.70

2,085.60

726.71

959.00

942.00

942.00

942.00

1,395.82

1,500.10

1,198.00

1,491.30

1,490.40

580.64

600.10

609.30

645.60

676.60

3,529.36

4,383.10

4,405.20

4,443.00

4,502,90

4,429.13

4,861.20

4,842,70

4,832.40

4,842.90

12,941.93

18,989.10

19,208.10

19,224.60

19,220.20 \

Western Market, (South Block)

23,098.97

29,464.30

29,788.20

32,806.90

32,553,10

Yaumati Market

7,837.06

10,019.70

10,558.30

10,758.00

10,834.00

Aberdeen Market

487.72

465.40

462.40

462.00

463.20

Canal Road, (opened 1st April, 1913)

516.00

516,00

516.00

516.00

516.00

Praya East, (opened 1st December, 1913)

556.05

381.10

415.90

351.40

291.40

Reclamation Street, (opened 1st Sept., 1913)...

2,871.20

2,727.40

2,787.10

2,764.00

2,729.10

Staunton Street, (opened 1st October, 1912)

789.30

1,124.40

1,234.40

743.55

837.00

Tai Hang, (opened 1st April, 1914)

1,403.30

1,042.50

724.80

614.70

592.00

Shum Shui Po, (opened 1st June, 1918)

2,127.10

3,102.80

Total,...

.$

139,720.86 163,915.00

164,717,60 169,603,45 170,758.70

M 30

Annexe D.

CIVIL HOSPITAL.

REPORT BY DR. C. W. MCKENNY, Superintendent.

BUILDINGS.

These have been maintained in good condition.

CHANGES IN THE STAFF.

No change was made during the year in the Medical Staff. The Matron and Nursing Sister Girling returned from long leave.

Nursing Sister Chettle went on long leave.

Mrs. McKenny, Mrs. Bullock, Mrs. Featherstone, and Mrs. Taylor did temporary sisters' duties.

Nurses Mrs. McEwen and Fraser and Staff Nurse Baynes, Tsuchimoto, Masuda, Mashima, and Ono, temporary staff, left the service.

Sister Luckman on termination of her agreement left the service.

Probationer Nurses Smith, Roberts, and Meadows left the

service.

Sisters Hurdley, Wyatt, Lund, Maclaren, Wilson, and Wootten joined the staff.

Dresser Li King-po was invalided.

Two additional dressers were appointed.

Mrs. Allen, Female Attendant in the Lunatic Asylum, left the service and Mrs. Taylor was appointed.

Admissions.

The total number of admissions was 3,926. This includes

171 patients brought over from 1918.

126 patients remained in hospital at the end of the year.

The daily average of patients was 134.

Out-patients :--

22,446 attended as out-patients.

13,739 new prescriptions and 4,480 old prescriptions were

dispensed.

828 vaccinations were performed.

Nationality of patients :-

Europeans,...

Indians,

Asiatics,

Sex of patients :-

Male,

Female,

540

982

2,404

3,229

697

1

M 31

Deaths.-219 deaths occurred which gives a death-rate of 5'5%. Of these deaths 107 (.c. 488 %) occurred within 24 hours of admission.

Various death-rates:

Men, ...

Women,

Europeans,

Indians,

...

164 deaths

55

5.7 %

7.8%

17

3.1 %

19

23

2.3 %

"

199

7.4 %

"

Asiatics,

Injuries accounted for 57 deaths and diseases of the respiratory system (including phthisis) 55.

REVIEW OF THE MEDICAL WORK PERFORMED.

Influenza.-366 cases with 6 deaths occurred (399 with 7 deaths in 1918). As in 1919 June shows the largest number of admissions 98 (269 in 1918) but, unlike the previous year, in which there were two definite epidemic periods during the year, the incidence was fairly continuous. Fortunately the disease still shows a low mortality.

Sprue.-There were 6 admissions (2 in 1918). In each case the sufferer was a European.

The largest groups of admissions were -General injuries 704 and Digestive Disorders 40.

The out-patient department progressed very satisfactorily. 22,446 patients were treated as against 14,880 in 1918.

Operations.-657 were performed. The more important of these were:

Laparotomy, exploratory,

""

for intestinal wounds, for septic peritonitis,

Appendicectomy,

Liver, abscess of,

Hernia, inguinal, cure of,

Hysterectomy, ...

Ovariotomy,

Uterus, curetting of, Urethra, dilatation of, Urethrotomy, external, Suprapubic cystotomy, Circumcision,

Cure of hydrocele,

">

imperforate anus,

:

:

9

4

2

1

2

15

5

27

1

6

Amputation of thigh,

"}

>

leg, ...

M 32

fingers,

toes,...

2

arm,...

""

Reduction of dislocations,

4

fractures,

10

**

Resection of ribs,

3

""

mastoid process,

Suture of fractures,

Sequestrotomy,...

3

16

Breaking down adhesions,

12

14

Operation for hæmorrhoids,

>

""

enlarged tonsils and adenoids,

appendix abscess,

empyema,

removal of lymphatic glands,... 53

"2

>>

""

""

>>

...

malignant tumours,.. 13

benign tumours, 36

varicose veins,

""

nails,

""

وو

""

>>

vesical calculus,

prostatectomy,

removal of urethral calculus,

eye,

1

4

8

1

2

N N N

>"

"}

cataract, breast,

6

>>

""

teeth,

4

وو

وو

"

foreign bodies,

20

29

repair of skin and muscles,

37

Trephining,

2

Plastic operation for :-

Pterygium,

Entropion,

Harelip,

Severed tendons,

:

4

1

3

3

1

Cholecystectomy,

Tracheotomy,

Iridectomy,

Gastro-jejunostomy,

Arthrodesis,

Tenotomy,...

2

3

1

1

2

Incision of various abscesses and sinuses, ...130

M 33

The following fractures were treated :-

34 with 24 deaths.

Skull,

Spine,

Femur,

4

15

1 death.

Tibia and fibula,

Fibula,

10 with 2 deaths.

1

Tibia,

8 with 2 deaths.

Radius and ulna,

Radius,

9

Humerus,...

1

Phalanges and small bones,

20

Clavicle,

5

Fibula,

1

Pelvis,

Patella,

Jaws,

N M

Ribs,...

Nasal bone,

2 with 1 death.

2

3

5 with 2 deaths.

1

:

MATERNITY HOSPITAL.

There were 543 patients admitted.

Eight of these remained over from 1918.

There were 274 free, and 269 paying.

There were 241 male and 221 female infants born.

Two cases

of twins occurred and 15 infants were still-born.

Deaths.-One mother died from post partum hæmorrhage.

Nine children died from the following causes :

Prematurity,

Asphyxia,

Atelectasis,

Marasmus, Hæmopheglia,

Nationality:-

:

:

CO

1

2

1

Asiatics, .. Europeans,

486

57

POLICE.

The strength of the Police Force was 1,261 consisting of Euro-

peans 104, Indians 424, and Chinese 673.

M 34

A

Admissions.-981 were admitted as against 695 in 1918:--

Europeans,

Indians,

Chinese,

Sick Rate:-

Europeans 77 as against 49 in 1918.

Indians 129

Chinese 46

80

59

39

127

549

305

Chief Diseases :—

Malaria,

Digestive system, Respiratory system, Rheumatism,

Typhoid fever,.......

Cellular tissues,

Injuries,

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

...

:

118 against 94

132

79

60

1

45

73

60

22

51

""

15

""

""

33

""

49

Epidemic influenza,

170

220

""

Per cent.

Per cent.

Malaria.

Total.

1919.

1918.

Europeans,

14

8.5

3.7

Chinese,

18

2.6

2.5

Indians,

86

20.2

15.0

Invaliding.-7 Indians and 2 Chinese were invalided as being

unfit for further service.

Deaths-

Europeans,

Indians,

Chinese,

Death-rate.

...4

2.9%

...2

*5%

...6

*8%

Causes of Death :-

Europeans, 1 cholera, 1 wounds, I typhoid fever, and 1

chronic bright disease.

Indians, 1 pneumonia and 1 phthisis.

Chinese, 2 bullet wounds, 2 gastro-entritis, 1 tubercular

meningitis, and 1 dysentery.

T

M 35

COMPARATIVE STATISTICS.

1918.

1919.

Admissions to Civil Hospital....

Europeans,

Indians,...

Chinese,...

3,677

3,926

431

540

733

982

2,513

2,404

Death-rate,

Admissions to Maternity Hospital,..

Death occurring in 24 hours,

470

543

6·6%

5'5%

107

107

Prescriptions dispensed,

...

13,929

13,739

Operations performed, ...

638

657

Out-patients,...

14,880

22,446

DENTAL DEPARTMENT.

Owing to the absence from the Colony of Doctors Kew and Asger the Dental Department was closed from July till the end of the year but it is again opening in January, 1920.

The following Tables are attached :-

1. Admissions and Deaths under respective Diseases.

2. Yearly Admissions from Malaria from each Police

Station.

3. Number and Class of Patients admitted during the

last ten years and deaths.

M 36

Tab

Diseases and Deaths in 1919 at the

CIVIL HOSPITAL.

Diseases.

Remain- ing in Hospital at end of 1918.

Yearly Total.

Remain-

Total

Cases

Admis- sions.

Deaths. Treated.

ing in Hospital at end

of 1919,

GENERAL DISEASES.

Small-pox

Vaccinia

Measles

1

Pertussis

Scarlet Fever

Varicella..

Dengue

Influenza

Diphtheria

Paratyphoid

Febricula......

Enteric Fever.

Cholera

Dysentery

Piague

Malarial Fever

1. Simple Tertian

2. Malignant

Malarial Cachexia

3

1

359

6

366

3

4

57

18

2

66

68

2

4

*

4

8

8

196

8

196

3

14

1

14

1

Beri-beri

Rubella

5

61

66

3

1

1

Pyæmia

2

Septicæmia

8

8

Tetanus

1

1

Phthisis (Pulmonary)

6

Tubercle

10

88.

68 22

74

7

69 10

79

4

Leprosy :-

(a) Tubercular ·

1

(b) Anæsthetic

Mumps

Syphilis

(a) Primary

1

2

65

68

2

(b) Secondary

(c) Tertiary

17

17

34

37

2

(d) Congenital

3

3

Gonorrhoea

Sprue

Alcoholism

118

125

*

6

6

2

20

22

Rheumatism

3

104

1

107

Rheumatic Fever

3

3

Carried forward....... 53

1,319

74

1,372

43

NY

1012

5

1

M 37

le I.

Civil, Victoria, and Gaol Hospitals.

VICTORIA HOSPITAL.

...

+

GAOL HOSPITAL.

Remain- ing in Hospital

Yearly Total.

Remain-Remain-

Total

ing in

ing in Yearly Total.

Remain-

Total

Cases

Hospital

Hospital

at end of 1918.

Admis-

Cases

sions.

Deaths. Treated.

at end

of 1919.

at end of 1918.

Admis-

sions.

Deaths. Treated.!

ing in Hospital at end of 1919.

3

3

1

2

3

3

...

20

5

:

:

4

...

20

8

3

4

...

5

་ ་ ་

340

: : : : : : :

19

2

1

:::::: :༠

...

...

344

19

3

1

...

4

2

1

150

152

2

1

1

1

1

1

co: i

3

3

co:

3

3

}

I

...

56

3

...

...

...

1

:

189

:

...

189

1

:ཕ

1

7

7:

1

...

332323

...

1

60

8

8 710

2 718

25

Diseases.

- M 38

Table I.-

Diseases and Deaths in 1919 at the

Remain-

CIVIL HOSPITAL.

ing in Yearly Total.

Hospital

at end Admis- of 1918. sions.

Total

Remain- ing in

Cases Hospital

Deaths.

Treated.

at end

of 1919.

Brought forward.......

53 1,319

74

1,372

43

GENERAL DISEASES,—Continued.

New Growth, Non-malignant

New Growth, Malignant

Anæmia

Diabetes Mellitus

Debility

1

39

40

2

46

48

3

9

9

2

1

1

10

10

20-0

LOCAL DISEASES.

Diseases of the Nerves :-

Neuritis

40

40

Meningitis, Tubercular

2

77

Cerebro-Spinal

AN:

2

2

4

7

??

Septic

1

1

1

3

3

1

1

3

2

3

Myelitis Hydrocephalus

Encephalitis

Tumour of Brain

Functional Nervous Disorders:

Apoplexy

Paralysis

Neurasthenia

Epilepsy Amnesia

Neuralgia

Migrain

**

1

Hysteria

Mental Diseases :—

Mania

:

1

1

6

1

2

2

5

ICO TH10 N N 10 -

6

6

ICOLO LO ON 2 CO 1

1

1

Melancholia.

1

Dementia....

1

Diseases of the Eye

3

92

95

2

Ear

2

17

19

22

""

Nose

1

1

>>

22

Carried forward,....... 64

1,619

89

1,683

57

M 39

(Continued).

Civil, Victoria, and Gaol Hospitals.

VICTORIA HOSPITAL.

Remain- ing in Hospital

Yearly Total. Total

Cases

at end of 1918.

Admis-

sions.

Deaths, Treated.

Remain-

ing in Hospital at end of 1919.

4

56

1

60

1

2

2

1

1

1

:.:

2

.....

1

1

1

GAOL HOSPITAL.

Remain- ing in Hospital at end of 1918.

Admis- sions.

Yearly Total. Total

Deaths.

Cases Treated.

ос

8

8

710

6

6

3

10

5

87

4

Remain- ing in

Ho spital

ut end of 1919.

718

25

13

13

2

:

...

...

92

8 728

2

736

27

Diseases.

M 40

Table I,-

Diseases and Deaths in 1919 at the

Remain-

CIVIL HOSPITAL.

ing in Yearly Total. Total

Hospital

at end Admis- of 1918. sions.

Remain-

Cases

Deaths. Treated.

ing in Hospital at end of 1919.

Brought forward

64

1,619

891,683

57

LOCAL DISEASES, - Continued.

Diseases of the Circulatory System...

"

"3

27

""

>>

>>

"

>>

>>

""

}}

""

Respiratory System.... Digestive System.......

Lymphatic System Urinary System

Male Organs

Female Organs.

Organs of Locomotion Cellular Tissue

Skin

Injuries, General

""

Local

Fractures...

224

14

387

70

105

42

48

150 00 00

43

656

:

སྒྲ ུ ཙ ཤཱ ཝཿ སྶ;

4

43

33

233

8

18

401

15

1

73

64

4

111

1

42

1

45

1

5

229

9

46

57

704

...

Malformations

13

1

14

Poisons

15

1

16

Nil

1

1

Parasites

36

36

Dental Disease

Under Observation..

52

Immersion

In Attendance.

76

Puerperium.

22

Parturition

NOOND

56

3

10

1

76

3

23

5

Abortion

6

Starvation

Pregnancy

3

Malingering

Marasmus

Effects of Heat

1

NN

2

2

Total....

170 3,756

219 3,926

126

M 41

(Continued).

Civil, Victoria, and Gaol Hospitals.

VICTORIA HOSPITAL.

GAOL HOSPITAL.

Remain- ing in Hospital at end of 1918.

Yearly Total. Total

Remain

Cases

ing in Hospital

Admis- sions.

Deaths, Treated

at end of 1919.

Remain- ing in Hospital at end of 1918.

Yearly Total. Total

Remain-

Cases

Admis- sions.

Deaths. Treated.

ing in Hospital at end of 1919.

1

5

87

92

9

00

8

728

736

27

1

24

154

I

16

24

42

co 1865

15

26

27

42

$

35

N:

OAN:

4

**

13

TH

13

:

35

10 00:

7

199

4 206

10

10

=

:

25

25

ai

6

6

3

:

849

9

859

28

:

M 42

Table II.-Showing number of cases of Malarial Fever among Members of the Police Force giving Station and percentage

of admissions as compared with strength.

Europeans.

Indians.

Chinese.

Station.

No. of Cases.

Strength.

Percentage.

No. of Cases.

Strength.

Percentage.

No. of Cases.

Strength.

Percentage.

Central San Tin

62

64

27 107

25

200

Tai (

50

Shau Ki Wan

25

Tung Cheong..

Sha Tan Kok....

100

Water Police

Au Tau

100

Tai Po........

50

10

30

Sham Shui Po

10

30

No. 2

17

12

Tsun Wan

2

40

Castle Peak

50

Yaumati

Pokfulam

Kowloon ity

Stanley No. 7

+

20

28

16

19

Tytam...

Sheung Shui

Sai Kung

Sheung Shui

Ping Shan...

Aberdeen

Bay View

125

16

18

Wong Nei Chong

25

16

། ༣ ། -

201

50

209

218011111|| Selfečte

Table III.-Number and Class of Patients admitted during the past ten years and deaths.

į

CLASS OF PATIENTS.

1910.

1911.

1912.

1913.

1914.

1915.

1916.

1917.

1918.

1919.

Police

613

519

657

771

728

731

552

550

695

981

Paying Patients

591

631

735

667

723

749

775

795

1,037

1,503

Government Servants

352

188

219

257

312

274

325

329

358

168

Police Cases

432

313

380

370

283

352

344

401

416

430

Free.

674

719

710

728

696

979

1,062

1,217

1,171

844

Total..

2,662

2,370 2,731

2,793

2,742

3,085

3,058

3,292

3,677

3,926

Total Deaths.

147

173

194

178

194

155

195

167

244

219

Percentage..

5'6

7.3

7·1

6.4

7.1

5'0

6.4

5:07

6.6

55

M 43

M 44

Annexe E.

VICTORIA HOSPITAL FOR WOMEN AND CHILDREN.

REPORT BY Capt. H. M. CAMERON MACAULAY, R.A.M.C., Medical Officer in charge.

Buildings. The buildings are in good condition and have been well maintained during the past twelve months.

Staff. Dr. J. T. C. Johnson, Principal Civil Medical Officer, went on sick leave in January, 1919. Capt. H. M. C. Macaulay, R.A.M.C., carried on the duties of Medical Officer in charge of Victoria Hospital from that time until the end of the year.

Nursing Sister Luckman and Nurse Smith resigned and were replaced by Nursing Sisters Lace and Wilson.

Admissions to Hospital.-There were 206 admissions during the year as compared with 175 in 1918 and 147 in 1917. Four deaths occurred in the course of the year, one from cerebral hæmorrhage; one from tuberculous meningitis; one from pulmo- nary tuberculosis; and one from cerebral tumour, All were Euro- peans.

Operations. The following operations were performed

Amputation of Breast,

Appendicectomy,

Circumcision,

Curetting of uterus,

1

4

Ι

Dilatation of cervix uteri,

Operation for removal of hæmorrhoids,

12

་,

11

"

"

malignant tumours, benign tumours,

1

1

tonsils and adenoids,

.1.3

31

Examination under anææsthetic,

Incision of various abscesses,

2

5

Total,

:

...34

}

- M 45

Annexe F.

LUNATIC ASYLUM,

REPORT BY DR. C. W. MCKENNY, Superintendent.

During the year 1919 there were 207 patients under treatment of whom 92 were brought in by the Police.

There were 47 paying patients.

The deaths numbered 8 being 3.8 % of the total number under treatment (3.2% in 1918).

Table I.

Nationality and Sex of Patients treated in 1919.

Nationality.

Remain- ing at

Remain-

Total Admit- end of ́ted. į

1918.

number treated.

Dis- charged.

Died.

ing at end of

1919.

M. F. M F. M. F.

M. F. M. F.

M. F.

Europeans,.

3 3

15 6

18

9 15 4 2 0

5

Indians,

1

0 4

0

50

نت

0 2 0

Chinese,

9

9 101

53 110

62 99 61 2

1

Japanese,

0

0

1

0 1

0 1 0

Filipino,......................

0

0

I

1

1 I I

Total,

13

12 122

60 135

72 119 66

2 8

Co

M 46

Table II.

Return of Diseases and Deaths in 1919.

Remaining in

Yearly Total.

Total

Diseases.

Hospital

Cases

at end of 1918.

Admis-

Dis- Treated.

Deaths.

sions.

charged.

GENERAL DISEASES.

Alcoholism

POISONS.

Chronic Opium Poison...

LOCAL DISEASES.

Diseases of the Nervous

System :-

SUB-SECTION II.

Functional Nervous Dis-j

orders:

Epilepsy

SUB-SECTION III.

Mental Diseases :-

Imbecility

Idiocy

Mania

1

16

17

17

:

Melancholia

Dementia

Delusional Insanity

Under Observation

2

LO

Remaining

in

Hospital at end of

1919.

11

OOHNDO

12

ལ:

12

12

...

56

67

2

5

7

9

2

21

26

3

0

2

:

63

63

:

63

Total, 1919 1918

25 182

185

207

14

12 205

185

217

25

J

M 47

Annexe G.

INFECTIOUS DISEASES HOSPITALS, KENNEDY TOWN.

REPORT BY DR. W. J. WOODMAN, Medical Officer.

Buildings.-No structural alterations were made aud the build- ings have been maintained in good condition.

Staff. Dr. C. W. McKenny acted as Medical Officer until October 27th when the hospital was taken over as an auxiliary hospital and Dr. Woodian acted as Medical Officer.

The upper floor of the hospital was used for an overflow hospital for the treatment of Beri-Beri cases which could not be accommodated in the gaol hospital, arrangements having been made for any infectious diseases to be housed in the Tung Wah infectious hospital; this was used on one occasion for three days.

The total number of admissions was 54.

The nationalities of the patients were-English 1, Scotch 1, Chinese 1, Japanese 2, Lascar 4, and Filipinos 45.

There were 17 females and 37 males under treatment.

One death occurred in a Filipino male child from generalised tuberculosis whilst under observation as a cholera contact.

The admissions were for the following causes :--Small-pox 9 (all discrete), Chicken-pox 6, under observation 40.

TUNG WAH SMALL-POX BRANCH HOSPITAL (CHINESE).

REPORT BY DR. C. W. McKENNY, Medical Officer.

Buildings. These were well maintained.

Staff. No change in the staff took place.

No patients were in hospital at the beginning or end of the year. Four patients were admitted during the year and of these two died.

All these patients suffered from small-pox.

M 48

Annexe H.

VICTORIA GAOL.

REPORT BY DR. W. J. WOODMAN, Medical Officer. Buildings.-The buildings and yards have been kept in good sanitary condition.

Health. The health of the prisoners was satisfactory until the latter part of the year when an unsatisfactory rice supply and over- crowding prevailed. The first of these conditions has now been remedied and the second one will be shortly.

Deaths. -Nine deaths from disease took place. The causes were as follows: Pneumonia 4, Heart disease 4, Enteric fever 1. This is the average for the last 10 years. Seventeen prisoners were liberated for medical reasons: Heart disease 7, Pulmonary Tuberculosis 6, Renal disease 2, Beri-Beri 2.

Occurrence of certain specific diseases,

Typhoid Fever.-4 cases were admitted, 1 death occurred. In 1918 there were 8 cases and in 1917 four cases.

Dysentry.-2 cases were admitted, no death. In 1918 there were 4 cases and in 1917 two.

Pulmonary tuberculosis.—7 cáses were recorded of which one died. In 1918 there were 7 cases, in 1917, 18.

Malaria.-There were 287 cases, of which 152 were admitted to hospital. There were 71 in 1918.

Influenza.-344 cases were admitted,

were 49.

F

one died. In 1918 there

Opium habit.-30 cases were treated as out-patients of whom 4 were admitted to hospital. In 1918, 70.

Beri-Beri.-During the first nine and a half months of the year 6 cases were admitted to hospital.

During the last week in October an outbreak of Beri-Beri occurred amongst the prisoners and is continuing at the end of the year: the number of cases to the end of the year was 202 of whom 189 were treated in hospital and 13 in the gaol.

Towards the end of July the unpolished rice given to the prisoners was changed to polished rice, owing to the impossibility of obtaining the former. Three months later an outbreak of Beri- Beri supervened.

The outbreak presents no features in any way different from other gaol outbreaks already recorded except that it was impossible to get unpolished rice and dieting in other way had to be used, and although this failed to stop the occurrence of the disease the type

م

M 49

was so mild that no death has so far occurred and all the HESUS except those which occurred early in the epidemic have been of a mild type, but have proved rather resistant to treatment owing to the rice that they were receiving being of inferior quality. On December 30th the first consignment of unpolished rice was received and I hope that some improvement will soon manifest itself.

ན་

The rice was sent to the Analyst for examination and he reported that there was only 024 of phosphorus as phosphorus pentoxide present--the minimum safe rice should contain is 0:35 and this is very low. The unpolished rice has been analysed and contains 0.50%.

An attempt was made to give the prisoners rice bran which contains the necessary vitamines but they objected to eating it and the use of it had to be abandoned.

To provide hospital accommodation for the patients the upper floor of Kennedy Town Hospital was taken over and 172 patients went there for treatment of whom 77 were still under treatment at the end of the year. *

Condition of prisoners on admission to gaol.

Of the 5,212 total admissions to gaol 1,036 or 19.9% were found to be physically unfit for the full task for the following reasons :-

541 were under weight or of too poor condition.

220 were incapacitated owing to age.

146 were juveniles.

129 were suffering from disease or the results of disease.

Of these 31 were admitted to hospital at the time of their entry into gaol.

Female Prisoners :-

There were 264 females admitted.

The average daily number was 36.

55 cases were under treatment and no death occurred.

No case of beri-beri occurred amongst the female prisoners.

General Statistics :

The total admissions were 5,212.

The daily average of prisoners was 756.

The total admissions to hospital were 859.

The total number of attendances by prisoners in the out-patient department was 19,972.

The daily average attenda ace at the out-patient department was 53'6 and in hospital (excluding those removed to Kennedy Town) 9.8.

Vaccinations.-5,794 prisoners were vaccinated and of these 1,229 were successful, 3,337 were unsuccessful, and 1,228 were not examined owing to early discharge.

* The outbreak ceased 10 days after unpolished rice was used for food.

- M 50-

Rates of Sickness and Mortality.

Total Number of :—

Daily Average

Number of:

Rate per cent. of :-

Prisoners Admitted to Gaol.

Admissions to Hospital.

Out-Patients.

Deaths due

to Disease.

Prisoners in Gaol.

Sick in Hospital.

Out-Patients.

Admissions to Hos- pital to Total Admissions to Gaol.

Daily Average in Hospital to Daily Average of Prisoners.

Daily Average of Prisoners coming to Out-patient De- partment to Daily Average of Prisoners.

Deaths due to Dis- ease to Total Ad- missions to Gaol.

1915, 4,179 365 1,294

J 1593

13-04 79.9

8-73

13.4

0.09

1916, 4,169 261 1,013

638 11:55: 63-29 6.02

9-9

0.19

1917, 3,286 | 174

998

9.2

42.8 5.2

6.5

0.18

1918, 3,577300 1,067 8

1919, 5,212 859 3,837 91756

8.6

9.6

56.0

8.4

9-3

0.12

53.6

16:3

74

0.17

M 51

Annexe I.

KOWLOON AND THE NEW TERRITORIES.

REPORT BY DR. J. T. SMALLEY, Medical Officer in charge.

STAFF.

I have continued throughout the year to perform the duties of Medical Officer, Kowloon and New Territories, and Assistant Medical Officer of Health. In addition, since April, I have taken charge of the Kwong Wah Hospital, Yaumati.

Dr. Tuk was appointed Assistant Medical Officer in the New Territories, with his residence at the Government Dispensary, Tai Po Market, on June 4th.

KOWLOON-CANTON RAILWAY,

The health of the European and Chinese Staff has been good throughout the year. The number of malarial cases still remains small, the presence of a medical officer at Tai Po Market being a great help in combating this disease amongst the Railway Staff in the New Territories.

The medical chests on the trains and workshops, etc., have heen kept replenished throughout the year, and additional ones placed in the break-down and ballast trains.

The stretcher cots which were fitted to the trains last year have proved their value and several severe accident cases have been enabled to rest in comparative comfort during their journey to Kowloon Station. On arrival at the latter, the stretcher and patient are transferred to a wheeled ambulance from the Police or Disinfect- ing Stations, all having been made of a uniform size so as to be interchangeable, thus obviating the necessity of transferring a patient from one stretcher to another. Further instruction of the guards and station masters in the administration of First Aid has been carried out throughout the year. I have held one examination and awarded certificates to the successful candidates. The standard attained was very good and reflects great credit on Inspector Wynyard who has devoted much of his leisure time to the instruc- tion of these men.

The Chinese Staff were examined with regard to their eyesight and colour vision twice during the year.

There were four serious accidents on the Railway, two of which proved fatal. One watchman at South Face Tunnel was murdered. There were a few minor accidents in addition.

THE POLICE FORCE.

The health of all ranks of the Force and their families was satisfactory throughout the year. Owing to pressure of work I was unable to inspect the Out-Stations.

M 52

KOWLOON AND NEW TERRITORIES.

The number of cases of cerebro-spinal meningitis showed a marked falling off, 30 cases in all being recorded in Kowloon as compared with 329 in 1918. They were evenly distributed through- out the year.

There were in addition 30 cases of bubonic plague and 31 of enteric fever as compared with 34 and 93 in 1918; the small-pox figures for the year were 2, whilst in the three previous years they were 15, 173, and 100. The number of recorded cases of diphtheria was 13 as compared with 24 in 1918.

The year would therefore have been a much healthier one than 1918 but for an out-break of acute enteritis accompanied on several cases with acute gastritis.

In Kowloon from the 13th August onwards we recorded 100 cases; many of these cases were clinically cholera, but the only ones returned by us as such were those in which the cholera vibrio could be demonstrated in and grown from the stools of the patient. The total number thus certified bacteriologically as cholera was 8, in which death resulted in each case.

The death rate amongst the 100 cases of enteritis was 80%-- including dumped bodies and cases diagnosed in the Mortuary— but in connection with these it must be borne in mind that the vast majority of the admissions to Hospital arrived "in extremis ", if these patients could have received treatment a few hours earlier, many could have been saved. Of the total cases 85% occurred in August and September and the epidemic had practically died out at the end of the year.

At the Public Mortuary I made 1,486 post-mortem examinations as compared with 1,696 in 1918, and 1,503 in 1917, the decrease in the figures is accounted for by the large epidemics of cerebro-spinal fever and small-pox which swelled the figures for 1918 and 1917 respectively.

During the year 27,915 rats were examined and of these 10 were found plague-infected. The corresponding figures for 1918 were 17,814 rats and 6 plague-infected. The large increase- 10,101 rats-was due to re-organisation of the staff associated with this work.

The Tai Po Market Dispensary was without a medical officer till Dr. Tuk went there in June. The patients treated there during the latter half of the year numbered 1,413.

The British Schools and Missionary establishments-the Victoria and Blind Homes, Kowloon City--have been examined by me and all scholars and inmates reported on when necessary. These reports are forwarded to parents for compliance with my remarks which mainly concern the condition of teeth, throat, and eyes.

:

1

M 53

KOWLOON DISPENSARY.

During the year the attendance at the Government Dispensary, Kowloon, numbered 13,161, which includes 70 physical examinations and 215 vaccinations. Last year the figures were 13,686 and in 1917, 12,852 which however included 3,249 vaccinations. The small diminution in figures is accounted for by the fact that some of the people who formerly came to the Dispensary now go to the Kwong Wah Hospital since my appointment there, the latter in- stitution being much nearer for many people.

A general anæsthetic was administered on 4 occasions only-— we now use the Kwong Wah Hospital for Chinese patients who need an anæsthetic.

The number of prescriptions dispensed during the year was 5,192 as compared with 5,189 in 1918.

During the year there were 195 ambulance cases compared with 269 in 1918 which were removed to various Hospitals in the Colony. Of these, 107 were removed to Hospitals in Victoria (34 being European cases), and 93 to the Kwong Wah Hospital, Yaumati, being a decrease of 60 cases for the Hospitals in Victoria and 9 cases for the Kwong Wah Hospital. The decrease in the Victoria cases is due to the absence of a cerebro-spinal meningitis out-break whilst the Kwong Wah Hospital figures show a relative increase when the absence of cerebro-spinal meningitis is considered.

M 54

TABLE OF CASES TREATED AT GOVERNMENT DISPENSARY, KOWLOON.

DISEASES.

GENERAL DISEASES.

YEARLY TOTAL.

¿

Admis- sions.

Deaths.

Mumps Influenza

354

Diphtheria

1

Enteric Fever

1

Dysentery

24

Malaria, Malignant

376

Beri-beri

54

Leprosy :--

(a) Skin

55

(b) Gland

27

(c) Lungs

109

(d) General

12

(e) Bone

9

Syphilis:-

(a) Primary

30

(b) Secondary

15

(c) Inherited

171

Gonorrhoea

260

Rheumatism

141

Gout

40

New Growth, Non-malignant

17

New Growth, Malignant..

9

Anæmia

55

Debility

247

LOCAL DISEASES.

Diseases of the Nervous System

Sub-section I-

Neuritis

Meningitis

Cerebral Hæmorrhage

Sub-section II :-

Neuralgia

Sub-section III :-

Dementia.

61

2

1

37

1

Carried forward

2,113

:

M 55

TABLE OF CASES TREATED AT THE GOVERNMENT DISPENSARY,

KOWLOON,-Continued.

DISEASES.

Brought forward

LOCAL DISEASES,—Continued.

Diseases of the Nervous System,—Continued.

Diseases of the Eye

YEARLY TOTAL.

Admis-

Deaths.

sions.

2,113

,,

1,644

"

Ear

""

Nose

634

29

25

22

Circulatory System

24

""

>>

Respiratory System

1,559

***

Enteritis....

12

""

وو

Digestive System

896

""

""

Lymphatic System

154

"

Urinary System

59

Male Orgaus

34

Female Organs

77

{

}

Flat Foot....................

Organs of Locomotions Cellular Tissue

Skin

Anterior Poliomyelitis

Injuries, General.

Tinea....

Burns

2

75

582

2,497

1

2

Local

""

1,972

4

...

...

168

Dog Bite

80

Physical Examination

47

Scabies

212

Worms, (Ascaris Lumbricoides)

41

Vaccination

215

Pregnancy

5

Eyesight and colour vision testing

23

Total,......

13,161

:

M 56

Annexe J.

Number of Confinements attended by Government Midwives in 1919.

1919.

January

23

February

19

March

23

11

April

15

9319

2

3

May

20

8

June

27

12

July.....

17

15

August

28

16

September

26

20

October

38

16

November

32

16

December

29

15

60 LO DO O1 H CO 2 50 60 CO Co co

:~~2

1

Tsun Wan.

Total.

1

49

1

38

43

T

32

35

44

35

52

51

63

57

51

Total....

297 170

20

15

43

5

550

M 57

Annexe K.

TUNG WA HOSPITAL.

REPORT BY DR. C. W. MCKENNY, Visiting Medical Officer.

The Chairman (Mr. Ho Kwong) and the Directors have con- ducted the affairs of this institution in a thorough and satisfactory manner during the year.

Buildings.-These have been well maintained and important structural alterations made as follows :-

(1.) The creation of a midwifery department which includes an excellent labour ward.

(2.) Alterations to the operating theatre, which, with an increas- ed supply of instruments and special sterilising facilities, greatly enhance the value of the former theatre.

Staff --Drs. G. H. Thomas and C. S. Chan have performed the duties of Resident Medical Officer and Assistant Resident Medical Officer in an eminently capable and efficient manner.

University Students, (Medical Clinic).-During the year, as heretofore, students have attended for lectures and demonstrations in clinical medicine given by myself and in the subjects of vaccina- tion and pharmacy by Dr. G. H. Thomas. Selected students act for periods of three months as clinical clerks in charge of medical cases under Western treatment.

Dr. G. H. Thomas has also acted as Tutor in midwifery to students who during a period of residence in the hospital attend the midwifery clinic.

The following figures express the comparative results of Eastern and Western treatment. It should be understood that all cases admitted are diagnosed by a staff trained in European methods and the diagnosis is then confirmed or rejected by the Visiting Medical Officer. It is then quite open to the patient to choose whichever of the two forms of treatment he may desire. The methods of Eastern medicine are not interfered with provided they do not endanger public health and sanitation. To the credit of the Eastern practitioner it must be stated that he frequently refuses to treat conditions in which he believes Western methods to be more successful.

The total number of in-patients were divided thus:-

Cases treated by Western methods,

3,764

Eastern methods,

3,238

Total,

7,002

- M 58

This shows that 53.7% of patients preferred Western and 463% Eastern medicine.

These figures compare with:

Western.

Eastern.

54.2

45.8

in 1918

55.1

44.9

in 1917

50-7

49.3

in 1916

52.3

47.7

in 1915

38:58

61.42

in 1914

34.63

65:37

in 1913

36.8

63.2

in 1912

314

68.6

in 1911

Death-rates.

Deaths under Eastern treatment,

"

Western treatment,

1,172=36·1% 731 19·8%

A.--Diseases for which there is a specific remedy:---

Western.

No. of Death-rate

---

Eastern.

No. of Death-rate

Disease.

Diphtheria,

Malaria,

Syphilis,

Cerebro-spinal

Meningitis,

Lobar pneumonia,..

Influenza,

cases.

percentage.

cases.

percentage.

3

66

8

10

121

10

86

44

74

2

33

27

89

35

38

92

B.-Diseases for which, at present, there is no specific remedy:-

46

26

251.

12

40

Pulmonary phthisis, 281

58

288

368

39

22

43

It will be seen that Western medicine, as judged by mortality is as 11: 27 compared with Eastern medicine where there is a specific remedy known, and as 7: 10 where a specific remedy is not known.

It is of interest to note that these figures are almost exactly the same as last year.

OUT-PATIENT DEPARTMENT.

Eastern treatment (new and old cases)

""

""

29

).

119,322 20,949

Western Approximately 84% of the out-patients received Eastern treat- This has been the proportion for several years past and it is highly improbable that the proportion will seriously change till an increase of staff and general equipment is obtained.

ment.

REMARKS ON SPECIAL DISEASES.

Beri-beri. In all 870 cases were treated with 296 deaths, i.e., 34%. In 1918 there were 904 cases with a death-rate of 43·03%. During the year a certain number of selected cases were placed on marmite, a yeast extract which is stated to contain a high vitamine percentage. The result cannot be described as wholly satisfactory but the substance, which is pleasant to taste, was greatly appreciated

M 59

as it almost immediately relieved or even cured the sensory phenomenon of the disease, i.e., pain, numbness, and tightness of the hamstring tendons.

Malaria. There were 207 cases admitted with 51 deaths, i.e., 23.6%. In 1918 there were 91 cases treated with 25.2% mortality.

The following were the various types as differentiated by microscopic examination :-

Malignant,

172 cases with 49 deaths.

.

Benign, tertian,

Malaria cachexia,

15

0

""

"

"

20

2

"}

"J

""

The usual routine as to treatment was observed.

Plague.-229 cases with 182 deaths were recorded. There were 96 cases with 84 deaths in 1918.

Cerebro-spinal Meningitis.--127 cases with 67 deaths were admitted (486 with 299 deaths in 1918).

The treatment was for the most part either definitely by Western or Eastern methods and various partial methods of treat- ment as recorded in 1918 were not necessary.

With Western treatment there was a mortality of 35% as com- pared with 92% when Eastern methods were used.

The serum used was prepared in the Bacteriological Institute and all cases received intra-thecal and either intra-venous or sub- cutaneous injection.

Taking into consideration that the cases were in no way select- ed and were sometimes in a moribund condition, I think the mortality rate (i.e., 35%) quite justified the line of treatment adopted and the potency of the serum.

Had the cases been selected. i.e., persons between the ages of 10 and 35 who had not been ill for more than 48 hours, the mortality would have compared favourably with any obtained in England or America.

Influenza.-There were 539 admissions with 97 deaths, ie., 17.9% (639 with 144 deaths in 1918).

In a very large number of these cases pneumonia was present.

OBSTETRICAL DEPARTMENT.

Cases of normal labour, {including Twins 7,

Triplets 1,

abnormal

"

Total,......

}

345

109

454

The increase in this department still continues. It is as

follows:

-

1914,.

1915,

1916,.

1917,

1918,

1919,.

87

172

212

289

354

454

M 60

All cases are treated by Western methods.

The abnormal cases are classified as follows:-

Delayed labour requiring craniotomy, Delayed labour requiring forceps delivery, Transverse presentation,.. Breech presentation,

Eclampsia,

Placenta prævia,

Premature birth,

2

9

8

22

13

11

38

6

Persistent occipito-posterior presentation,.

SURGICAL DEPARTMENT.

There has been a slight increase in the number of general operations performed: 226 operations as against 207 in 1918:-

These figures do not include:-

Intra-venous injections,.

Extraction of teeth,

Paracentesis, .

22

158

117

A classification of the operations performed is as follows:--

GENERAL OPERATIONS.

Exploratory laparotomy,...

Appendicectomy,

Abscess of liver,

Inguinal hernia,

Ovariotomy,

Curetting of uterus,

Dilatation of urethral stricture,

Suprapubic lithotomy,

Circumcision,

Radical eure of hydrocele,

Fistula-in-ano,

Hæmorrhoids,...

Amptutations, ...

Reduction of dislocations and fractures,

Resection of rib for empyæma,

Sequestrotomy,

Breaking down adhesions,

Tonsillectomy,

Excision of lymphatic glands,

Removal of benign tumours,..

Removal of breast,

Extraction of foreign bodies,

Harelip,

treated,

Abscesses, cellulitis, chronic sinuses and ulcers

Total,

6

12

1

8

11

7

14

3

16

1

4

6

11

2

18

2

74

226

-

-

M 61-

EYE DEPARTMENT.

This has, as in former years, been under the care of Dr. Harston.

The following operations were performed :---

Iridectomy, iridotomy, peritomy, etc.,...

Cataract,

Pterygium,

43

16.

10

Glaucoma (sclero-corneal trephining),.......

5

Entropion and ectropion,

32

Enucleation of eyeball,

Total,

3

109

:

The following conditions were treated

Diseases of the Conjunctiva :-

Trachoma,

Conjunctivitis,

Phlyctenular conjunctivitis,

Pterygium, ...

Gonorrheal opthalmia,

Diseases of the Cornea :-

Corneal opacities,

Corneal ulcers,

Keratitis,

Conical cornea and facetting of cornea,

Staphyloma,

Diseases of the Uveal Tract :-

Iritis and irido-cyclitis,

Episcleritis,...

Diseases of the Lens:-

Cataract,

...

Diseases of the Eyelids :-

Entropion and trichiasis, Meibomian cyst, ... Blepharitis, ...

Foreign body in eye,

Diseases of the Eyeball :-

Phthisis bulbi,

Glaucoma,

...

:

Diseases of the choroid, retina, and optic nerve, Errors of refraction, ...

Total,

1,684

41

17

14

8

147.

63

16

4

46

2

26

54

6

14

3

7

13

11

24

2,206

M 62

GENERAL COMPARATIVE STATISTICS.

1919.

1918.

Cases remaining in hospital at end of

1918, ..

276

233

Admissions,

6,726

6,329

Total number of in-patients,

7,002

6,526

Deaths,

1,903

2,123

Discharged,

4,837

4,163

Remaining in hospital at end of year,...

262

276

Males treated,

5,007

5,148

Females treated,

1,995

1,414

Transferred to Government Civil Hos-

pital,

76

36

Bodies sent to the Public Mortuary,

702

841

Bodies brought in dead to Tung Wah

Hospital,

...

1,494

2,072

Free Burials,

4,681

4,563

Destitute sheltered, ..

534

1,115

Vaccinations,

718

605

:

:

M 63

Table I.

Diseases and Deaths in 1919 at the Tung Wa Hospital.

Remain-

ing in

Yearly Total.

Remain-

Total

DISEASES.

Hospital

Cases

ing in Hospital

at end of 1918.

Admis-

Deaths.

Treated. at end of

sions.

1919.

Measles

GENERAL DISEASES.

4

0

4

Lobar Pneumonia.

100

35

104

5

Diphtheria

11

10

11

Typhoid Fever

23

18

23

Pyæmia......

2

Septicæmia

6

6

Tetanus.....

11

11

Cerebro-spinal Meningitis Influenza

127

67

127

...

8

531

97

539

Acute Gastro-Euteritis

252

136

252

Plague

Dysentery...

Beri-beri

229

182

229

5

287

82

292

7

67

803

296

870

49

Acquired

Leprosy

Malarial Fever:

(a) Benign Tertian

(b) Malignant ......

(e) Malarial Cachexia....

Syphilis :-

Tuberculosis:-

10

3

10

15

15

0 19

2

170

49

172

25

17

20

2

105

11

107

3

(a) Phthisis Pulmonalis

41

608

273

649

38

(b) Generalised

57

31

57

Gonorrhoea

29

0

29

Rheumatism

35

35

New Growths :-

Malignant...

Anæmia

Senile Debility

14

If

8

1

8

164

87

172

-+

LOCAL DISEASES.

Diseases of the Nervous System :-

I.—Organic :—

Diseases of the Nerves, Meninges,

Brain and Cord

11

424

141

435

13

II.-Functional :-

Epilepsy

2

2

Mental Diseases

10

10

Diseases of the Eye

5

91

96

3

Carried forward,

156

4.145

1,535

4,301

148

- M 64-

Table 1,-(Continued).

Diseases and Deaths in 1919 at the Tung Wa Hospital.

Remain-

ing in

Yearly Total.

Remain-

Total

DISEASES.

Hospital

Cases

ing in Hospital

at end of

Admis-

Deaths.

Treated. at end of

1918.

sions.

1919.

Brought forward,....

156

4,145

1,535

4,301

148

LOCAL DISEASES,—Continued.

Diseases of the Circulatory System :-

(a) Diseases of the Heart

"

"

Arteries

Diseases of the Respiratory System:- (a) Diseases of the Bronchi

(6)

""

>>

(c)

""

16

0

16

4

4

Pleuræ Lungs ....

N

32

400

160

432

28

Diseases of the Digestive System:-

(a) Diseases of the Gastro-intesti-

ual tract....

(b) Diseases of the Liver

(c)

""

""

Diseases of the Urinary System:-

(a) Diseases of the Kidney.....

286

293

4

20

0

24

Biliary passages

1

1

13

289

108

302

(b)

""

77

Urinary pas-

sages

10

0

10

(a) Spleen

Diseases of the Lymphatic System:

(6) Lymphatic Glands

Diseases of the Thyroid Gland

Diseases of the Generative System:

(a) Male

(b) Female

Diseases of the Bones and Joints

9

100

10

1

"

""

Cellular Tissue

Skin

Injuries.

Effects of heat or cold.

Poisons:-

Parasites:-

Opium Habit

(a) Intestinal

(b) Filaria

Labour

Diseases connected with Childbirth :-

(a) Abortion...

(b) Puerperal Fever.....

10

9

*

6

6

18

1

19

12

2

4

0

5

47

490

15

537

51

6

0

...

463

472

11

28

28

2

63

2

65

3

9

1

451

I

451

1

Total,........

276 6,726

1,903

7,002

262

M 65

Table II.

Showing the Admissions and Mortality in the Tang Wa Hospital during the year 1919, with the proportion of cases treated by Western and Chinese methods respectively.

WESTERN TREATMENT.

CHINESE TREATMENT.

DISEASES.

Admis- !

sions.

Admis-

Deaths.

Deaths.

sions.

GENERAL DISEASES.

Measles

Lobar Pneumonia

Diphtheria

Typhoid Fever

Pyæmia

Septicæmia

183022

12

Tetanus

3

022402-

3

0

58

23

8

8

17

14

...

4

4

1

8

Cerebro-spinal Meningitis..

89

32

38

35

Influenza.....

251

32

288

65

Acute Gastro-Enteritis

127

51

125

85

Plague.....

103

84

126

98

Dysentery

133

29

159

53

Beri-beri

467

127

403

169

Leprosy

6

2

I

Malarial Fever :-

(a) Benign Tertian

11

0

0

(b) Malignant

98

12

74

37

(c) Malarial Cachexia

12

I

1

Syphilis :--

Acquired.

74

2

33

Tuberculosis :-

(a) Phthisis Pulmonalis

281

(b) Generalised

Gonorrhoea

Rheumatism

Malignant

Auæmia

New Growths:-

Senile Debility

LOCAL DISEASES.

ོམ། 2

113

368

160

21

12

36

19

18

0

11

0

14

21

11

3

0

3

0

5

1

34

94

53

Diseases of the Nervous System

I.-Organic :-

II. Functional:

Diseases of the Nerves, Meninges, Brain

and Cord

226

53

209

88

Epilepsy

Mental Diseases

2

10

0

Diseases of the Eye

87

9

Carried forward,..

2,185

605

2,116

930

M 66-

Table II,-(Continued).

Showing the Admissions and Mortality in the Tung Wa Hospital during the year 1919, with the proportion of cases treated by European and Chinese methods respectively.

DISEASES.

Brought forward,..

WESTERN TREATMENT.

CHINESE TREATMENT.

Admis-

Admis-

Deaths.

Deaths.

sions.

sions.

2,185

605

2,116

· 930

LOCAL DISEASES,- Continued.

Diseases of the Circulatory System :--

(a) Diseases of the Heart

(b)

""

>>

Arteries

Diseases of the Respiratory System: (a) Diseases of the Bronchi

(b)

(c)

22

وو

Pleuræ Lungs....

Diseases of the Digestive System :--

(a) Diseases of the Gastro-intestinal tract .

.(b) (c)

39

"J

""

Liver

Biliary passages..

Diseases of the Urinary System :-

(a) Diseases of the Kidney

(b)

27

""

Diseases of the Lymphatic System :-

(a) Spleen

(b) Lymphatic Glands

Diseases of the Thyroid Gland.............

Diseases of the Generative System :-

(a) Male

(b) Female

Diseases of the Bones and Joints

10

6

CO

0

3

1

1

0

208

53

224

107

136

28

157

46

22

0

2

0

1

138

37

164

71

Urinary passages

0

2

0

7

1

1

100

3

12.

2

Cellular Tissue

Skin

248

5

Injuries

248

Effects of heat or cold

Poisons:-

21

OOOONO

0

1

0

7

0

3

3

289

0

2

224

OOOOm o

147

0

0

12

3

0

Opium Habit

Parasites:

(a) Intestinal

(b) Filaria

38

1

27

1

7

0

2

0

1

0

Labour

Diseases connected with Childbirth :-

(a) Abortion.

(b) Puerperal Fever

454

0

::

::

...

3

0

1

0

1

1

Total,....

3,764

731

3,238

1,172

M 67

Annexe L.

KWONG WAH HOSPITAL.

REPORT BY DR. J. T. SMALLEY, Visiting Medical Officer.

I took up the post of Visiting Medical Officer on April 15th. The task I was faced with was not an easy one and I have to thank Mr. Ho Kwong and his co-directors for giving me every assistance in their power.

Withcut their co-operation and sympathy I should not have been able to carry out the many reforms that were found to be necessary in the Hospital.

The Buildings which are comparatively modern and well planned on the "pavilion" style were thoroughly renovated and the water-carriage system overhauled. The latter was in a very insanitary condition when I was appointed. A new building of considerable size will be shortly commenced and will materially lessen the present congestion of patients.

A new midwifery ward was opened at the end of July and up to the end of the year 100 patients had been received and I have no doubt that these figures will be trebled in 1920.

Owing to the alteration in the nature of the work undertaken in the Hospital-mainly surgical-I found it necessary to suggest the setting aside of special rooms for the reception of patients after operation. This suggestion was carried out and obviates the necessity of carrying patients any distance the rooms are 30 yards from the theatre-or of carrying them upstairs.

The entire Hospital at the end of the year was fitted with iron bedsteads. The operating theatre, which is spacious and well designed and had not been used for the purposes of major surgery for some years past, was repainted and refitted and the ante-room to the theatre fitted out with sterilizers for the instruments, and a suitable sterilizer for towels, dressings, overalls, etc., has also been installed in the room.

These alterations have enabled us to use the theatre for its proper purpose and many operations have been performed since. July of which the following are the most important :-

The operations may be classified as follows:-

Digestive System:-

M

Hæmorrhoids

Fistula in ano and ischio rectal abscess Laparotomy (exploratory).....

54

4

1

Respiratory System :—-

Resection of rib for necrosis and abscess

1

Carried forward...

11

M 68

Brought forward...

11

Genito-Urinary :-

Carcinoma of testicle...

1

1

1

1

1

1

Circumcision

2

1

Hypo-spadias (plastic operation)

Hydrocele (radical cure)

Vesical calculus (suprapubic lithotomy)...

Urethral calculus (atony of bladder) Extravasation of urine

Elephantiasis of scrotum (plastic operation)

Old laceration of fourchette (plastic operation) 1 Posterior colporraphy

Cystocele

Hydatidiform mole

Urethral stricture (dilatation)

Osseous System :·

Necrosis of Femur

Osteomyelitis

Mastoid abscess (complete operation)

Tubercular hip.

Amputation...

Bullet wounds of elbow and arm

Compound fractures (wiring)

:

Other conditions, abscess, etc., (treated under

general anesthetics)...

Eye Operations :-

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

2

Cataract

Iridectomy

Ectropion

Pterygium

Total

2

424+

54

Staff. Dr. B. C. Wong has continued to hold the post of House Surgeon during the year. Dr. Woo was appointed Assistant House Surgeon on July 1st and resides in the Hospital.

Further additions to the staff were also found necessary, a dresser trained by me in the Government Dispensary was appointed as well as two trained midwives. The latter assist in dressings and in the operating theatre.

In-patients. The total admissions for the year numbered 3,213 of which 198 were admitted in a moribund condition or died shortly after admission, this leaves a balance of 3,015 patients of which number 1,746 elected to be treated by Western methods and 1,269 by Eastern methods.

These figures show that 56 2% oft he patients preferred Western treatment and 43.8% Eastern treatment.

M 69

During the first half of the year the number of patients under- going treatment by Western methods exceeded by 22 the number who preferred Eastern methods whereas during the second half of the year the balance in favour of Western treatment was 455.

If we now turn to the Out-patient Department we find that 35,789 visits were paid by patients and of these number 25,400 were visits to the Western-trained House Surgeons whilst 10,389 were visits to Chinese doctors.

KWONG WA HOSPITAL, YAUMATI.

(Afiliated to the Tang Wah Hospital.)

No. of Patients remaining at end of 1918..

No. of Patients admitted during 1919

156

3,313

No. of Deaths during 1919

938

Annexe M.

ALICE MEMORIAL AND AFFILIATED HOSPITALS, 1919.

Alice Memorial Hospital, Ho Miu Ling Hospital,

Nethersole Hospital,

Alice Memorial Maternity Hospital,

Total,

:

Remaining

at end of Admitted. Lid.

1918.

0

55

0

16

420

22

19

474

51

10

446

5

45

1,395

78

il

M 70

Annexe N.

BACTERIOLOGICAL INSTITUTE.

REPORT BY DR. H. B. PARKER, Bacteriologist.

THE PREPARATION OF CALF LYMPH.

Fourteen calves were inoculated (12 in 1918). The total num- ber of tubes of lymph issued was 7,394 (6,097 in 1918). The value of the lymph according to Government Notification No. 380 of 1910 was $3,437 ($2,668.50 in 1918).

MENINGITIS.

Serum praparation has been continued on the lines recommend- ed by Lieut. P. K. Olitsky and carried out by Dr. Macfarlane. To maintain the efficiency of the serum at a high standard means a considerable amount of experimental work in the way of identifying the prevailing type of organism. Some 18 to 20 litres of serum are now (December 17th) in stock.

CONTAGIOUS ABORTION.

Vaccine has been regularly supplied to the Dairy Farm Company.

CHOLERA.

During the recent epidemic of gastro enteritis investigations were made as to the presence of the cholera vibrio. The vibrio was found in about 35% of fatal cases and there was strong presumptive evidence that the organism failed to grow from cases that really were cholera.

It is almost fair to assume therefore that at least 50% of the fatal cases of gastro enteritis were cases of cholera.

No bacteriological evidence was found against foodstuff.

ROUTINE EXAMINATIONS.

Under this heading are grouped the various examinations of materials sent in. The number was 74,799 as compared with 87,136 in 1918, of which 73,008 were the examination of rats for plague :-

New Growths,-Examination by section, Widal's Reaction for the bacillus typhosus,

Examination by culture for bacillus diphtheria,

لان

48

327

paratyphoid B,.....

327

>>

21

meningococci,

>>

2)

"}

B. dysenteriæ,

";

cholera vibrio,

109

10

285

carriers of cholera vibrio, ... 36

Carried forward.........

.....1,201

}

M 71

Brought forward,......

Microscopical examination for malaria parasities and

differential count of

****

,,

""

leucocytes,

* * * * * *

""

""

gonococcus,.

plague,

52

""

bacillus of leprosy,

spermatozoa, filaria,...

of sputum for tubercle

1,201

83

18

4

421

4

2

bacillus,

130

pneumococci,

11

""

"

22

""

1

>>

**

2)

">

""

""

""

""

">

""

""

1

>>

""

11

""

""

streptococci,... 10

pus for organisms, stool for eggs,

amæba,

3

34

7

urine for tubercle bacillus, 4

pus cells, blood, cast,

6

9

...

12

dog's brain for rabies,

3

Preparation of vaccine,

blood,...

Miscellaneous,

Bacteriological examination of water,

Wassermann's reaction,

Medico-legal examination of clothing, knives, etc., for

72

2

136

9

30

Total,

1,791

EXAMINATION OF RATS.

The results are given in Table I. The total number of rats examined was 73,008 as compared with 85,402 in 1918. 242 were found to be plague-infected (186 in 1918).

BACTERIOLOGICAL EXAMINATION OF WATER.

The three chief water supplies of the Colony (Kowloon, Tytam, and Pokfulum) were examined quarterly and the results are given in Tables II, III, and IV.

In every case the sample was taken at its source, i.e., either directly before or directly after filtration.

The methods used in carrying out the examinations were the same those described in Dr. Macfarlane's "Report on an Investigation of the Pokfulum Water Supply" (No. 20 of 1911),

M 72

Table I.

The Examination (post-mortem) of Rats.

Month.

Total. Male. Female.

Plague- Preg- infected. nant.

Strychnine

poisoning.

Newly born and not classified,

January..

5,460 2,643

2,817

10

5

526

February

4,659 2,242

2,417

538

March

6,318 | 3,056

3,262

17

633

:.

:

:

173

159

266

April

6,135 2,999

3,136

24

592

274

May.

6,730 | 3,260

3,470

59 653

:

339

June

5,690 2,957

2,783

77 576

309

July...

6,152 3,004

3,148

45 573

250

August

6,392 3,126

3,266

5 589

September.... 6,339 | 3,055

3,284

1 462

:

:

304

254

October

6,471 3,152

3,319

1

567

204

November

6,053 | 2,946

3,107

574

* 196

December...

6,609 3,241 3.368

640

248

Total...... 73,008 35,681 37,327

242 6,923

2,996

Table II.

Results of the Bacteriological Examination of the Kowloon Water Supply for the year 1919.

Rate Total Colo-

nies ou

of

Sample.

Date.

Agar in 1 cc

Filtra-

tion. 24 hours. To ec.

lat 37°C. for 1

ΤΟ

MacConkey's Lactose Neutral Red Bile

Salt Peptone Water.

Presence of the Coli Group.

1 cc. 2 cc.

5 cc.

10 cc. 20 cc. | 50 cc.

Unfiltered,

Filtered,...

14-1-19.

15

14-1-19. 349

5

Unfiltered,

16-1-19.

30

Filtered,

16-1-19. 349

15

...

Unfiltered,

18-1-19.

35

Filtered,

18-1-19. 349

20

Unfiltered, 29-4-19.

35

Filtered,

29-4-19. 349

Unfiltered,

1-5-19.

50

Filtered,

1-5-19. 349

10

Unfiltered, 3-5-19.

70

Filtered,... 3-5-19. 349

15

Unfiltered,

22-7-19.

10

Filtered,

22-7-19.

2

Unfiltered,

24-7-19.

50

Filtered,

24-7-19.

10

Unfiltered,

26-7-19.

50

Filtered,

26-7-19.

5

Unfiltered,

·

7-10-19.

13

Filtered,

7-10-19.

4

Unfiltered,

Filtered,

9-10-19.

30

9-10-19.

13

Unfiltered,

Filtered,

11-10-19.

10

7

...

...

+

++ | + | + | + | +

+ 1 + 1 + 1 + 1 + 1 + !+1 1+1

+ | | | | 1 + 1 + 1 + 1 + 1 + ] ] ] + 1 4 } } }

+ 1 + 1 + 1 + 1 + 1 + 1 + 1 + 1 + 1 + !+ !+ !

+ | + | + | + | + | + |+++++++ | + | ++

++++ |+++++++ | + | +++++|+|+

Group III in ] ce.

Negative up to 50 ccs. Groups II & IV in 10 ccs. Negative up to 50 ccs. Group II in 10 ces. Group IV in 50 ecs. Groups III & IV in 1 cc. Group I & III in 50 ccs. Group IV in 1 cc. Negative up to 50 ccs. Negative IV in Negative up to 50 ccs. 1 in cc.. 2 in 1 cc. I in 20 ces., 2 in 20 ccs. 4 in 2 ccs.

cc.

Negative up to 50 ccs. 4 in 10 ces. 1 in 5 ccs. 4 in 20 ccs.

MacConkey's Classification of Coli Group not available.

11-10-19.

All samples taken either immediately before or immediately after filtration.

The rate of filtration is given by the Water Authority in gallons per square yard per day. Classification of the Coli Group is that of MacConkey, += Acid and Gas;

+

Acid ouly;

No change.

M 73 -

Table III.

Results of the Bacteriological Examination of the Tytam Water Supply for the year 1919.

Rate Total Colo-

MacConkey's Lactose Neutral Red Bile

Salt Peptone Water.

of

nies on

Presence of the Coli Group.

Sample.

Date.

Filtra-

Agarin Ice

jat 37°C. for

tion.

24 hours.cc.

1 cc. 2 cc. 5 cc.

10 ce. | 20 ec. | 50 cc.

— M 74 -

Unfiltered,

Filtered,

13-1-19.

40

13-1-19. 740

25

Unfiltered,

15-1-19.

50

Filtered,

15-1-19.

660

10

+1+1

Unfiltered,

17-1-19.

30

Filtered,

17-1-19. 664

10

Unfiltered,

28-4-19.

30

Filtered,

28-4-19.

800

5

Unfiltered,

30-4-19.

40

Filtered,

30-4-19.

800

5

Unfiltered,

2-5-19.

50

Filtered, ...

2-5-19.

760

10

Unfiltered,

21-7-19.

20

Filtered,

21-7-19.

800

5

Unfiltered, 23-7-19.

140

Filtered,

23-7-19. 880

20

Unfiltered,

25-7-19.

50

Filtered,

25-7-19. 660

10

Unfiltered,

6-10-19.

17

Filtered,

6-10-19. 753

Unfiltered,

8-10-19.

50

Filtered,

8-10-19. 658

20

1 + 1 + 1 +............

Unfiltered,

10-10-19.

35

+++ 1 + 1 + 1 + 1 + 1 + 1 + 1 + 1 + 1 + − + 1

+ + + | | | ! | + | + | + | + | + | + | + 4 ¦ |

+++++++ 1 + 1 + 1 + ++++++]+++ |

+++ 1 + 1 + 1 +++++++

++

+++

Filtered,...

10-10-19. 716

15

+++

Group I in 1 cc. Group 1 in 2 ces. Group IV in 1 cc. Group II in 10 ces. Group III in 5 ecs. Group IV in 10 ces. Groups I & IV in 3 ccs. Negative up to 50 ccs. Group IV in 2 ces. Negative up to 50 ccs. Group IV in 2 ccs. Group IV in 50 ces. 3 in To

cc.,

4 in 1 cc., 1 in 1 ce.

1 in 20 ces., 1 in 10 ccs., 4 in 10 ccs. 2 in 1 cc.

ΤΟ

4 in 10 ces.

3 in 1 cc., 4 in 1 cc.

3 in 20 ccs., 4 in 20 ccs.

MacConkey's Classification of Coli Group not available.

All samples taken either immediately

before or

Acid only;

immediately after filtration.

The rate of filtration is given by the Water Authority in gallons per square yard per day. Classification of the Coli Group is that of MacConkey, + = Acid and Gas; -No change.

Table IV.

Results of the Bacteriological Examination of the Pokfulum Water Supply for the year 1919.

Rate Total Colo-

MacConkey's Lactose Neutral Red Bile

Salt Peptone Water.

of nies on

Sample.

Date.

Agar in 1 cc

Presence of the Coli Group.

Filtra-

tion.

at 37° C. for

24 hours.

To cc.

1 cc. 2 cc. 5 cc.

10 cc. 20 cc. | 50 cc.

Group IV in 1 cc.

- M 75 -

Unfiltered,

13-1-19.

50

Filtered,

13-1-19.*

325

10

Unfiltered,

15-1-19.

70

Filtered,

15-1-19. 325

20

Unfiltered,

17-1-19.

35

Filtered,

17-1-19.

325

3

...

Unfiltered,

28-4-19.

50

Filtered,

28-4-19. 400

20

Unfiltered,

30-4-19.

35

Filtered, ...

30-4-19. 400

10

Unfiltered,

2-5-19.

40

Filtered,

2-5-19. 400

20

Unfiltered,

21-7-19.

80

Filtered,

21-7-19.

400

20

Unfiltered,

23-7-19.

100

Filtered,

23-7-19.

400

20

Unfiltered,

25-7-19.

100

Filtered,

25-7-19. 700

30

...

Unfiltered, 6-10-19.

50

Filtered,

6-10-19. 560

25

Unfiltered,

8-10-19.

170

50

Unfiltered, 10-10-19.

60

20

Filtered,... 8-10-19. 294

Filtered,

10-10-19. 450

+ 1 + 1 ¦ ¦ + 1 + 1 |

+1 +1 +1 +!

1 + 1 +++ | + | | | + 1 + 1 + 1 + 1 + 1 + 1 +

! + 1 + + + 1 + 1 + 1 + 1 + 1 + 1 + 1 + 1 + 1 +

1 ++++++++++ + 1 + 1 + 1 + 1 + 1 + 1 +

+++ |+|+++++ |+++++++++++ 1

+++++1++++

+++++++++

Group IV in 20 ccs. Group IV in cc. Group IV in 50 ces, Groups III & IV in 2 ccs. Negative up to 50 ccs.. Group IV in 2 ccs. Group III in 20 ces.

Group III in 1 cc.

Groups III & IV in 20 ccs. Group IV in 2 ces.

Group III in 50 ces,

4 in 1 cc., 2 in 1 cc.

4 & 2 in 20 ces., 2 in 10 ces.

2 in 50 ccs.

4 in 10 ccs., 4 in 20 ccs.

2 in 1 cc.

1 in 20 ccs., 1 in 10 ces.

MacConkey's Classification of Coli Group not available.

All samples taken either immediately before or immediately after filtration. The rate of filtration is given by the Water Authority in gallons per square yard per day. Classification of the Coli Group is that of MacConkey,

+

Acid and Gas L= Acid only;

=

No change.

M 76

Annexe O.

PUBLIC MORTUARY, VICTORIA.

REPORT BY THE GOVERNMENT BACTERIOLOGIST.

Report on Post Mortems.

1919.

1918.

Male bodies examined,

Female bodies examined,

Placenta only, ...

1,555 2,080

1,605

2,016

1

Total,

3,161

4,096

Claimed bodies sent from hospital and other places, 2,771

3,416

Unclaimed bodies mostly abandoned, ...

390

680

Total,

3,161

4,096

Epitome of Causes of Death.

I.-General Diseases,

1,670

2,468

II.-Local Diseases:

(a) Of the Nervous System,

26

16

(b)

Circulatory System,

43

88

(c)

""

Respiratory System,

945

· 946

(d)

""

Digestive System, ...

346

465

(e)

"

Genito-Urinary System,

21

18

(f)

Osseous System,

14

6

III.-Deaths from Violence :

(a) General,

41

51

(b) Local,...

55

38

Total,

3,161

4,096

General Diseases.

1919. 1918.

:

Small-pox

Plague

Cholera

Diphtheria

M 77

General Diseases,—Continued.

1919. 1918.

Brought forward, ...1,666 2,468

:

10 5 57 90

Leprosy...

1

31

59

Splenomedullary leukæmia Lymphatic leukæmia ...

1

2

Measles...

Influenza

Typhoid fever

Cerebro-Spinal Meningitis.

Malaria

38

72

4

5

Total

...1,670 2,468

9 69

65

257

53 160

Beri-beri

28 86

Septicæmia

52 44

Pyæmic...

Puerperal fever

11 3

Local Diseases.

(a.) Of the Nervous System :-

Cerebral hemorrhage..

Tuberculosis

Syphilis...

Rickets..

325 261 119 357

5

concussion

13

""

Hydrocephalus

Filariasis

Tubercular meningitis

Meningeal tumour

3

1

1

11

Amoebiasis

Meningitis other than C. S. F.

Pernicious anæmia

3

& Tubercular

21

Prematurity

96 146

Marasmus

180 422

Total

Still-born

36 100

ཚི།

26

Atelectasis

127

82

Icterus neonatorum

148

16

Umbilical sepsis

1

Senile decay..

1

(b.) Of the Circulatory System:---

Pericarditis, acute

Noma

1

Chronic opium habit Debility...

Purpura hæmorrhagica

Melanotic sarcoma

Lymphosarcoma

Decomposed bodies (no dia-

gnosis possible)

184 215

lalı

6

13

chronic

2

5

>>

"

hæmorrhagic

tubercular

septic

1

1

3

Aneurysm of heart

Acute ulcerative endocarditis

Congenital heart disease

Fatty degeneration of heart...

Brown atrophy of heart

Syphilitic aortitis,

liver

7

5

7

20

2

Valvular disease of heart Gumma of heart

Myocarditis...

Hæmopericardium following

rupture of aneurysm of 1st part of aorta

Aneurysm of thoractic aorta..

>>

Thrombosis of iliac vein

abdominal aorta

Rupture of aneurysm of aorta

Total

10

1511

1

43

88

Skeleton, only, no diagnosis

possible

Placenta, only, no diagnosis

possible

1

Taken for use in school of

anatomy. Hongkong Uni-

versity

18

Status lymphaticus

45

Acute pemphigus...

1

Lymphadenoma

1

Anencephaly...

1

Spina bifida...

1

Microcephaly

1

Imperforated anus

1

Carried forward, ...1,666 2,468

(c.) Of the Respiratory System:—

Broncho-pneumonia and

M 78

1919. 1918.

Digestive System,-Continued.

1919. 1918.

Brought forward ... 334 456

bronchitis...

898 556

Colitis

Tubercular broncho pneumonia

21

Intestinal hæmorrhage

1

1

Lobar pneumonia

8

117

Amoebic abscess of liver

مصر

Chronic intestitial pneumonia

1

2

Multiple pyæmic abscess of

Acute fibrinous pleurisy

4.

95

Chronic pleurisy ...

Pulmonary tuberculosis

25

Appendicitis...

Abscess of lung

1

Emphysema

Bronchiectasis

Empyema

Acute phthisis

Chronic

Syphilitic intestitial

pneumonia

Anthracosis

Gummata of lungs

Pulmonary infarct

6

20

Acute intestine obstruction

4

liver

Acute liver atrophy

Strangulated umbilical-

hernia

Gangrenous intussusception

2

oo co so

54

43

Total...

346

465

4

(e.) Of the Genito-Urinary System:—

1919. 1918.

:

Total

945 946

Acute nephritis

Sub-acute nephritis

Chronic nephritis...

(d.) Of the Digestive System :---

Tabes mesenterica

Acute peritonitis...

Chronic peritonitis

Enteritis

Acute gastro enteritis

Perforated pyloric ulcer,

Cancer of liver

1919. 1918.

14

abortion

13

26

Small white kidney

Tubercular pycls-nephritis... Post-partum hæmorrhage ... Placenta prævia

Hæmorrhage following

Hæmorrhage following rup-

1

ture of extra

uterine

280

23 349

gestation

Hydatid mole

Septic metritis

221

112000

stomach

,,

pancreas

Hepatitis

Hydatid of liver

1

1

Gumma of liver

Abscess of liver

Cirrhosis of liver...

Biliary cirrhosis of liver

Infarction of intestine...

6

1

3

Tubercular ulceration of

intestine

co

8

Co

1

8

2

100 II NA

1 1

1

1

1

Pyosalpinx

Osteomyelitis

Total...

21

18

(f.) Of the Osseous System:-

1919. 1918.

www

1

Tubercular caries of spine

17

Cellulitis

4

4

26

14

Total...

14

6

Suppurative cholangitis

Acute dysentery

Carried forward... 334 456

+

Death from Violence

(a.) General:-

M 79

1919. 1918.

1919. 1918.

Multiple injuries ...

stab wounds...

72

11

3

""

""

bullet wounds

Brought forward

Bullet wound of head ...

Stab wound of heart

Fracture of skull .....

0

1

chest...

abdomen

1

1

2

3

1

thorax

34

22

:

Hanging and asphyxia by

and rib

1

33

33

ligature

17

and

""

,,

Asphyxia

16

pelvis

Drowning

10

10

33

liver and thigh.

1

Opium poisoning.

1

2

:

""

pelvis and rib

1

Tetradon poisoning

1

neck

1

Bandoline poisoning

liver

2

Burns and scalds ...

kidney

1

Electrocution

Cerebral hæmorrhage (violence)

1

Cut-throat

Total...

51

Rupture of spleen.....

and liver...

"

(b.) Local:-

Bullet wound of brain...

and

""

1919. 1918.

kidney

1

Hæmorrhage following fracture

of rib...

N

"

heart

Carried forward ...

Total plague cases

57

Total small-pox cases

10

9

unclaimed.

9 unclaimed. 48 claimed.

1 claimed.

Number of bodies sent to Mortuary (Victoria) during 1919.

Victoria.

Harbour.

Old Kowloon.

Total...

55

38

New Kowloon.

Shaukiwan

Other Villages.

Chinese

3,138 | 3,020

55

2

47

14

American

1

1

German

1

1

Indian

3

2

1

European

2

1

Scotch.

Portuguese.

3

1

Japanese.

6

6

Filipino..

3

Finish

1

1

English

1

1

Canadian..

1

1

Total..

.3,161 3,034 62

3

47

15

M 80

Annexe P.

PUBLIC MORTUARY, KOWLOON.

REPORT BY DR. J. T. SMALLEY, Medical Officer in charge.

1. The total number of post-mortem examinations made during the year was 1,486 as compared with 1,696 last year and 1,503 in 1917.

2. During the year there were 26 cases of plague and 1 of small-pox, as compared with 7 and 11 last year, and 5 and 77 in 1917.

3. The nationalities of the bodies examined were:-

Chinese,

English,

Japanese,

Filipino,

Indians,

Unknown,

Total,

1,478

1

1

1

1,486

During the year 27,915 rats were examined and 10 were found to be plague infected, as compared with 17,814 and 6 in 1918:-

Mus

Baby

manus,

Deen- Plague Mas

Plague infected. Rattus.! infected.

Museu- Plague

Rats, Shrew.

infected.

lus.

etc.

5,541

10 4,942

3,352

Epitome of the Causes of Death.

13,832 248

1919. 1918.

I. General Diseases,

522 577

II. Local Diseases :-

(a) Nervous System,.

(b) Circulatory System,

(e) Respiratory System,

(d) Digestive System,

(e) Genito-Urinary System, (f) Osseous System,

III. Injuries:-

(a) General,

(b) Local,

IV. Decomposed Bodies,

ཨེཀྑུམྨ་ྲ ཙཧྨནྣཱ

9

6

11

12

492

540

144

220

8

32

61

34

29 21

207 252

V. Skeleton,

1,486 1,696

..

M 81

(b.) Of the Circulatory System :—

GENERAL DISEASES.

1919. 1918.

Infective endocarditis,

1

Valvular disease,

8

1919. 1918.

Arotic aneurism,

2

Plague,

26

7

Heart failure,

Small-pox,

1

11

Arteric sclerosis,

1

Enteric fever,

22

70

Ruptured aortic aneurism,..

Diphtheria,

1

11

Mitiral and aortic regurgitation, 3

Lobar pneumonia,

45

61

Tricueped regurgitation,

1

Measles,

1

5

Syphilis, congenital,

5

4

11

12

Dysentery,

5

10

...

Malaria,

51

30

Malarial cachexia,

10

General tuberculosis,

51

54

Beri-beri,

10

7

(c.) Of the Respiratory System

Septicæmia,

6

3

1919. 1918.

Marasmus,

16

Prematurity,

45

28

Gangrene of lung,

1

Still-birth,

32

41

Pulmonary tuberculosis,

47

39

Senile decay,

6

1

Empyema,

16

19

Inanition,

12

6

Atelectasis pulmonum,

56

67

Tetanus,

1

2

Bronchitis,

141

187

Icterus neonatorum,

23

19

Broncho-pneumonia,

228

226

Pleuritic effusion,

1

Leprosy,

1

Cerebro-spinal meningitis,... 21

142

Miliary tubercular of liver,

Pneumo-thorax,

1

Puerperal septicemia,

2

3

Influenza,

127

47

492

540

Septic meningitis,

Cholera,

احر

1

4

522 577

(d.) Of the Digestive System:—

1919. 1918.

Cirrhosis of liver,

6

7

Tabes mesenterica,

5

Suppurative peritonitis,

12

12

LOCAL DISEASES.

*

(a.) Of the Nervous System :-

Cerebral hæmorrhage,

Tuberculous meningitis,

Cerebral abscess,

Basal meningitis,

Enteritis,

76

190

Acute jaundice,

1

5

Tubercular peritonitis,

1

Suppurative pylephlebitis,

1

Hepatic abscess,

1

Intestinal obstruction,

1

1919. 1918.

Acute colitis,

1

2

Appendicitis,

1

4

Gastro-enteritis,

32

Primary carcinoma of liver,...

.1

Enteritis, tubercular,

8

రా

6

144

220

M. 82

(c.) Of the Genito-Urinary System :-

(b.) Local:-

1919. 1918.

1919. 1918,

Nephritis,

6

26

Post-partum hæmorrhage,

2

Rupture of spleen,

5

5

Ante-partum hæmorrhage,

1

1

Gunshot wounds,

3

2

Placenta prævia,

2

Fracture of skull,

15

Extra-versio uteri,

1

Ruptured ectopic gestation,

Fracture of pelvis,

Stab wounds,

8

32

Strangulation,

Fracture of arm,

:

:

1

2

1

1

(f.) Of the Osseous System :-

1919. 1918.

Cut throat,

Tuberculous disease of hip,

1

Spinal caries,

1

1

Osteomalacea,

-

29

21

Decomposed bodies,...

1919. 1918.

207 252

1

:

208 252

2

2

INJURIES.

(a.) General:

1919. 1918.

Skeleton,

Drowning,

24

19

Burns,

7

4

Asphyxia,

1

Multiple injuries,

15

3

Poisoning,

5

1

Hanging,

9

6

Electric shock,

61

34

M 83

Annexe Q.

ANALYST'S DEPARTMENT.

REPORT BY MR. E. R. DOVEY, F.C.S., A.R.C.SC., A.I.C., Government Analyst.

The number of analyses performed during the year was 1,792 as against 1,886 in 1918.

The following classification shows the nature of the work done :-

I.-Chemico-legal.

V.-Building Materials.

1919. 1918.

1919. 1918.

Toxicological examinations

Paint,

2

5

(including 22 stomachs), ......

57

57

Oil,

0

6

Articles for stains,

28

Granite.......

2

0

Powders,

2

Mortar,

Corrosive liquids,.

2

Timber,.

1

Explosives,

2

Wood, preservative,.

1

II.-Dangerous Goods Ordinance.

VI.-Pharmacy Ordinance.

Petroleum oil,

Liquid fuel,

888

99 79

Medicines for poisons,

8

16

68

27

Morphine,

10

3

Gasoline,

1

0

Cocaine,

2

1

Ships for inflammable vapour,

35

18

Opium,

0

3

Opium leaves,

1

III.-Food and Drugs Ordinance.

Other drugs,

14

12

Beer,

8

Brandy,

5

VII.—Mineralogical, etc.

Burgundy,.

0

Metals,

53

437

Cheese,

Ores,

151

364

Coffee,

Coal,

14 11

Flour,

Gin,

1

3

VIII-Oils, etc.

Ice cream,

Lard,

0

2

Anise,

97

32

204

102

Cassia,

37

50

Milk, fresh,

189

97

Wood,.

220

343

Milk, sterilised,

1

Peanut,

228

13

Milk, condensed,

Lubricating,

4

0

Margarine,

Teaseed,

81

21

Port wine,

Coconut,

2

6

Peanut butter,

Rice,

4

Rum,

Salt.

0

Sherry,

2

Sugar,

1

Whisky,

14

13

WONNU co i

Tallow,

Perilla, Castor, Camphor,

0

1

0

2

0

31

ON

2

0

2

0

IX.-Miscellaneous.

Coal tar disinfectants,

1

2

Urine,

10

23

IV-Potable Waters.

Sulphuric acid,

0

1

Public supplies,

36

36

Fertiliser,

1

Wells, etc.,

10

Caustic soda,

4

0

Ice,

0

......

Saltpetre,

0

M 84

IX.-Miscellaneous,—Continued.

Ammonium sulphate,......

IX.-Miscellaneous,—Continued.

1919. 1918.

1919. 1918.

1

0

Silk,

0

2

Sodium tungstate,

0

1

Rhubarb roots,

1

0

Phosphorus oxide,

0

1

Indigo,

1

0

Inks,

0

Stomach contents,...

1

0

Paper,

6

0

Aluminium sulphate,

0 ì

Alcohol,

5

Gauze,

1

Glycerine,

1

0

Cigarettes,

2

Sodium sulphide,

Resin,

Sodium silicate,

Beeswax,

1

Rat poison,

Other substances,

(00421-

Fish skin,

}

Dyes,

Liquids,

Total,...... 1,792 1,886

Linen,....

TOXICOLOGICAL.

2. Among the chemico-legal investigations made during the year were 29 cases of suspected human poisoning. The results are tabulated below

Results of Analysis.

No poison found

Opium found

Morphine found

Arsenic found...

Lead found

Gelsemium elegans found

Alcohol found.

No. of Cases.

15

2

3

5

2

1

29

Total,......

PUBLIC WATER SUPPLIES.

3. Monthly examinations of the Pokfulum, Tytam, and Kowloon water supplies showed that these supplies were maintaining their high quality.

DANGEROUS GOODS ORDINANCE.

4. Of petroleum oil and liquid fuel, 167 samples were ex- amined during the year. The tanks of 35 steamers were tested with the Clowes-Redwood apparatus. This apparatus has been re-modelled during the year and now permits the work to be done with greater ease and expedition.

-M 85-

FOOD AND DRUGS ORDINANCE.

5. The following table gives the results of 210 analyses made at the instance of the Police and the Sanitary Department:-

Description.

No. of Samples Examined.

No, found Genuine.

No. found Adulterated.

Beer.... Brandy

7

4

4

Gin

1

1

Milk

171

166

Port Wine.

4

4

Rum....

7

Sherry

2

2

Whisky

14

14

ة

2

00010 ONOO

0

METALS AND ORES.

6. The 204 samples of metals and ores examined during the year comprised the following:-

Metals.

Ores.

Description.

1919. 1918. Description.

1919.

1918.

Tin

Nickel

24 373

Tungsten..

79

270

10

Bismuth

26

5

Antimony

Copper. Zine

11

Manganese

19

15

70

S

2

Iron

7

26

Copper..

3

5

Lead

Antimony

Iron

24

Tin

Solder

Lead

6

Brass

0

Zinc.....

3

Tin Slag Platinum...............

3

Molybdenum .

1

Gold

Arsenic

Barium..

Titanium.

Calcium.

Graphite

Silver

Other Ores

0 18

Total,................

53 437

Total,..

151

364-

M 86

SAMPLING.

7. The amount of sampling done during the year is shown

in the following table:-

Tin .....

Wolfram

11,000 slabs.] Tea Oil ......

46,110 cases.

9,847 bags.

Wood Oil

138,995

Antimony

Copper.

1,120 cases.

Lard

90,502

""

932 bars.

Peanut Oil....

80,514

""

Manganese Ore.................

5 200 tons.

Coconut Oil

800

""

Anise Oil.

8,692 cases.

Camphor Oil...

407

29

Cassia Oil .......

2,410

Bismuth Ore...

2 tons.

>>

Coal.

600 tons.

EXAMINATIONS FOR THE PUBLIC.

8. Owing no doubt to the high exchange ruling during the past year, less work was done for local exporting firms than in 1918. The fees paid into the Treasury during the year amounted to $35,258.50 as against $43,995.00 in 1918.

The value of the year's work as determined from the Tariff of Fees (Government Notification No 439 of 1918) is $39,918.50 as against $48,670.00 in 1918.

LIBRARY,

9. Several standard works of reference have been added.

SPECIAL REPORTS.

10. Special Reports have been supplied on Chinese Camphor, Standards for Oils, The Macao Poisoning Case, Fuel Oils, Mineral Deposits in the New Territories, The Storage of Dangerous Goods, and the Composition of Hongkong Milks.

RESEARCH.

11. Processes for the estimation of minute quantities of Lead in Cassia Oil and for the estimation of Water in Crude Camphor have been worked out and descriptions sent to the Journal of the Society of Chemical Industry.

A new physico-chemical method for the determination of Cam- phor Oil in Crude Camphor has also been devised and a descrip- tion sent to the “Analyst”.

An extended investigation is being conducted into the nature and constitution of Chinese Camphor Oil.

STAFF.

12. Mr. Lubatti acted as Government Analyst from the end of January to the end of October, during which time I was absent from the Colony on leave. Mr. K. W. Lane joined the staff as Assistant Analyst, and Mr. I. Cheng as Temporary Assistant Analyst during the year.

LABORATORY ACCOMMODATION.

13. No further increase of work can take place in the present Laboratory which is at present worked to its utmost capacity. As a fall in exchange will almost certainly be accompanied by an in- creased demand for analytical work, it is desirable that arrangement be made as speedily as possible for the provision of more adequate laboratory accommodation.

-M 87

Annexe R.

OFFICE OF THE HEALTH OFFICER OF THE PORT.

REPORT BY DR. G. P. JORDAN, Health Officer of the Port.

During the year the work of this department was carried on by Dr. Jordan, Dr. Keyt, Dr. Pierce Grove, and Dr. Lindsay Woods.

Dr. Pierce Grove returned to the Colony on August 1st, and Dr. Keyt went on 6 months leave on August 7th.

The work is described under three headings:--

(a) Daily inspection of ships arriving in port. (b) The medical examination of emigrants. (c) Quarantine duty,

(a.)-DAILY INSPECTION OF SHIPS ARRIVING IN PORT.

During the year 4,575 vessels arrived in port and were duly boarded and examined. The usual particulars of the voyage and sickness, if any, are recorded on the prescribed forms and attested by the Master or Surgeon of each vessel. The causes of deaths are also noted. Of the above number of vessels 1,940 were under the British flag and 2,635 under various foreign flags.

The river steamers from Canton and Macao are not included in the above figures, as such vessels are only boarded when an in- fectious disease is reported, or if those places are declared to be infected ports by the Hongkong Government.

j

(3.)-THE MEDICAL EXAMINATION OF EMIGRANTS.

During the year the total number of emigrants examined was 59, 969 of whom 222 were rejected on medical grounds. This shows a considerable increase in numbers as compared with last year when the total number examined was 43,830.

The total for this year is still considerably below the average and is largely to be accounted for because of the restrictions placed upon emigrants proceeding to the Straits Settlements, and also the considerable reduction in the number of ships carrying emigrants.

With the return of more ships and the removal of restrictions in the Straits Settlements a marked increase in the number of emigrants should be returned for 1920.

Table I shows the number of emigrants and crews passed and rejections.

Table II gives the monthly emigration figures and also of the

crews.

Table III gives a list of the diseases which are accountable for the rejection of emigants..

M 88

(c.)-QUARANTINE DUTY.

This involves the special examination of all vessels arriving from an infected port as well as all vessels having any suspicion of an infectious disease on board, whether from an infected port or not.

The crews and passengers of such vessels are examined by the Health Officer on entering the Quarantine Anchorage.

Table IV gives the number of ships detained in quarantine with the causes, dates and periods of detention, and Table V gives the names of the ports declared infected, for what disease, the authority and date of rescission of the decree.

Table I.

Emigration Passes and Rejections for 1919.

Ports of Destination.

Γ

Passed. Crews.

Rejected.

Straits Settlements and Calentta...

14,183

6,014

123

San Francisco and Seattle

7,549

22

Honolulu

4,130

8,167

10

Japan

844

1

British Columbia

7,233

9,197

Australia

2,098

2,194

12

Java Ports

18,069

2,966

7

British Boruco

3,021

1,146

19

Mauritius

587

238

1

South America and Mexico..

1.122

874

4

Bangkok

1,020

262

12

South Africa

113

204

Total

59,969

31,242

222

Appendix N.

REPORT ON THE BOTANICAL AND FORESTRY DEPARTMENT FOR THE YEAR 1919.

GENERAL REMARKS.

During the first quarter of the year rain fell on 34 days amounting to 4.65 inches.

This was very disastrous to winter-flowering annuals but very favourable for most vegetables and for tree-planting.

In the second quarter there were 56 days on which rain fell, the amount totalling 26,93 inches.

The rainfall in the third quarter amounted to 50.42 inches registered on 48 days. Of this amount 6.41 inches fell on the 5th July.

Two typhoons were recorded in proximity to the Colony, one on the 26th July and the other on the 21st August.

The latter was the cause of a great deal of damage to trees in the Botanic Gardens and in other parts of the Colony.

The last quarter was favourable for gardening operations. Rain, which fell on 24 days, amounted to 8.76 inches.

GARDENS AND GROUNDS.

Botanic Gardens.-Owing to the dull autumn of 1918 many flowering shrubs and creepers flowered less profusely than usual.

For example, Rhododendron indicum, which is generally one mass of flowers, made a very indifferent show.

Birds were exceedingly troublesome during the early part of the year as they attacked young seedling flowering plants, and vegetables.

The only way to circumvent them was to put nets over the plants.

The trees of Paulownia Fortunei flowered well but, as usual, a man had to be put on to scare birds away whilst the buds were opening.

Phaius grandifolius, the Nun orchid, grown in pots, made a magnificent show in April.

Several worn-out shrubs were rooted up in both Gardens, and young specimens were planted to take their place after the ground had been trenched and manured.

N 2

On the bank at the west end of the Old Garden, eight red- flowered Rhododendrons were planted.

Plants of Rhododendron phoeniceum in the New Garden which had died were replaced by others propagated in the previous year.

Several young plants of Rhododendron Henryi and Rhodo- dendron Championa were also planted in the New Garden.

The big shrubbery in the New Garden near the conifer plot was extended and planted up with flowering shrubs after the ground had been prepared.

Vacancies in shady rockeries in both Gardens were filled up with foliage plants and ferns.

As many of the ferns on the bank just inside the Albany Road boundary had become exhausted, they were taken up, the ground trenched, and new plants put in.

The fountain basin was cleared out in February and the aquatic plants were divided and replanted.

During these operations the over-flow pipe was found to be choked, and on opening it up, it was discovered that the end of the pipe did not discharge into any drain or nullah but stopped short in the ground near the junction of Garden and Kennedy Roads.

The Public Works Department took out the old pipe and replaced it with another and connected it with the storm water drains in the Gardens.

Loranthus chinensis growing on various trees and shrubs in both Gardens was removed.

This mistletoe-like parasite is not particular as to its host, as it has been found in Hongkong on no less than 36 different species of trees and shrubs, representing 32 genera and 22 natural orders.

In connection with the formation of the new roads from Upper Albert Road to Garden Road an encroachment on the Gardens was made which necessitated the sacrifice of a fine tree of Dracontomelum mangiferum.

The main entrance was set back several feet and the old gates were replaced with more appropiate new ones by the Public Works Department.

The entrance at College Gardens was also set back somewhat and the old gate replaced by a new one of a different design.

Caterpillars on lawns were again very troublesome in the autumn but were kept in check by applications of Jeyes' Fluid mixed with water in the proportion of one part of the former to eighty of the latter.

Extensive repairs were done to the plant houses. Much of the iron and wood work had to be replaced and more than half of the bamboos.

N 3

Water channels alongside walks in both Gardens were repaired and pointed with cement.

A list of plants on sale in the Gardens was published in the Government Gazette in October and over 800 of these were sold up to the end of the year.

The Annual Show of the Hongkong Horticultural Society was held in the Old Garden on the 13th and 14th March.

The exhibits of pot plants and cut flowers, taking the damp, dull winter into consideration, were very good indeed.

Vegetables were quite up to the average with the exception of cauliflowers.

The attendance at the Show on both days was disappointing, the weather no doubt being responsible to a certain extent for

keeping visitors away.

Government House Grounds.-A large Erythrina indica tree which was growing near the east side of the Guard House was blown down and a young specimen of Cratava religiosa was put in to take its place.

The trunk and branches of the Erythrina were well covered with Renanthera coccinea-the spider orchid-and this was taken off and transferred to another tree in the grounds.

Bamboos in the hedge on the north side of the grounds which had died out were replaced with Chrysalidocarpus palms.

The hedge of this palm which was planted a few years ago has done remarkably well and is much tidier than a bamboo hedge during the winter months.

The Hibiscus hedge planted near the stables a little more than a year ago has made good progress.

The big trees of Ficus retusa on the south side of the house, as well as those near the servants' quarters, were pruned.

Towards the end of August caterpillars were found damaging the lawns and they were checked in the same way as those in the Botanic Gardens.

Two large pine trees on the northwest bank died and were cut: down.

Mountain Lodge Grounds.-The plants in the bed below the big retaining wall always suffer more or less from the effects of wind and, as usual, many had to be replaced in the spring.

This bed looked well in the autumn when the Cosmos and Golden Rod were in flower.

The Iris tectorum alongside the stream in the valley flowered well in January.

Cannas in the various beds were taken up, divided, and replanted.

N 4

The tennis lawns were given a dressing of artificial manure in February.

Over 200 seedlings of Platycodon grandiflorum, a big blue- flowered Campanula, were planted in clumps on both sides of the valley. These were raised from seed collected in Hongkong.

Blake Garden.--Forty Poinsettias were planted on the south bank of the garden.

Plants of Bignonia venusta which were planted to cover a fence at the west end of the garden were removed as they failed to make progress and were replaced with Jasminum undulatum.

"A Banian tree was blown down in the August typhoon but as it was not badly damaged it was raised and will probably recover.

Cookchafer grubs were again troublesome and were collected and destroyed.

A small rockery was made on the north side and filled with foliage plants to prevent a small bank from being continually washed down in heavy rains.

The garden seats, gates and summer houses were scraped and repainted.

King's Park. The young trees planted in previous years were frequently examined and attended to as required.

The only trees planted during the year were four Jacaranda ovalifolia and three Rhodoleia Championi.

Gangs of coolie women were employed from time to time in taking up roots of Mimosa and Lantana and cutting long grass.

Colonial Cemetery.--The bed of the stream which runs through the cemetery was concreted by the Public Works Department at the beginning of the year.

Although no doubt this has lessened the prevalence of mos- quitoes, it has not added to the beauty of the cemetery.

Summer and winter annuals were raised for growing in pots and beds as usual.

The cemetery was kept in good order throughout the year.

Other Grounds.--A small area in the Civil Hospital grounds was planted up with "blue grass". The lawns were attacked by caterpillars in the autumn and they were treated in the usual way.

In the Royal Observatory Grounds a row of Barleria cristata bushes was planted along the edge of the grass plot near the office. The Cannas and Hedychiums in the Albany Nurseries were taken up, divided, and replanted.

A few Poinsettias and Neriums were planted in the Upper Albany Nursery.

!

N 5 -

Twenty-five Allamandas were planted on a bank in the Indian School grounds at Sukunpo and the lawns given a dressing of artificial manure.

Cannas and Hedychiums in the Sukunpo Garden were divided and replanted.

The rockeries in the St. John's Cathedral compound were planted up with ferns and foliage plants and the "blue grass areas repaired.

The cricket pitch on the Hongkong Cricket Club ground was treated with artificial fertilizer in March, and the turf was repaired as required.

Grass lawns and banks at the Helena May Institute were cut regularly and the grounds kept in good order.

The lawns at the Government Quarters, Breezy Point, were attended to and patches returfed when necessary.

A small bank near the Dairy Farm Company's premises, Wynd- ham Street, was planted up with "blue grass" and Poinsettias.

The grounds at the Government Offices were regularly attended to and kept in order.

In the northern plot in Royal Square, cockchafer larvæ were discovered in the lawn, but the damage done to the turf was trifling.

The Sukunpo Recreation Ground which was planted up with Cynodon dactylon in 1918 was ready for use by the end of 1919 when it was handed over to the Public Works Department.

The numerous other small gardens, plots and rockeries under the charge of this Department were regularly inspected and kept in a satisfactory condition throughout the year.

HERBARIUM.

Mr. C. Talbot Bowring presented 292 specimens of plants collected in Hainan.

Mr. C. O. Levine of the Chinese Christian College, Canton, presented 831 specimens collected in various parts of Kwangtung.

From the Director of the Botanic Gardens, Sydney, 332 specimens were received.

The Nanking University presented 100 specimens principally of Chinese plants.

One hundred and fifty specimens were collected locally but very few additions were made to the Flora.

One hundred specimens of local plants were sent to Nanking University in exchange.

One thousand six hundred specimens were mounted and 1,640 laid in the cabinets.

N 6

FORESTRY.

Formation of Pine Tree Plantations.-About 16,000 one year old seedlings were planted on the hills in the vicinity of the Fan- ling Golf Course and 6,450 on Cheung Chau Island.

On the hills to the east of the Fanling Golf Course, pine tree seeds were sown in sites, estimated to produce 50,000 trees.

At Aberdeen 5,960 pine tree sites were resown.

On the Fanling hills, 100 lbs. of pine tree seeds were sown broadcast, also 50 lbs. on the south side and 40 lbs. on the north side, between Beacon Hill and Lion Rock.

Six and a half pounds were sown broadcast on the newly turfed banks along the Chinwan Coastal Road.

Broad-leaved Trees Planted.--2,455 broad-leaved trees were planted on the hills at Fanling, 3,493 on Cheung Chau Island, 718 near the Pokfulam Road new filter beds, 800 on Chinwan Police. Station Hill, 60 on Mount Gough, and 48 in Kowloon Tong Cemetery.

The trees planted more principally were Eucalyptus, Tristania, and Casuarina.

Care of Trees in Plantations.-The whole of the plantations between Repulse Bay and the Stanley Gap were inspected and creepers encircling trees cut.

Caterpilliars were discovered on pine trees in plantations near Homuntin in May. Altogether 9201 catties, or more than half a ton, were collected and destroyed.

In the pine tree plantations near Kowloon City caterpillars were observed in June but fortunately only in small numbers.

Many trees were felled on the lines of new roads and in con- nection with the widening of old roads.

On various Farm and Building Lots other trees were felled for the cultivation of Guinea Grass and for building purposes respec- tively.

Dead trees were removed from a number of the plantations in Hongkong and Kowloon.

At Cheung Chan a forester was stationed throughout the year, and his presence on the island has been the means of stopping all damage to the young plantations.

Several of the villages in the vicinity of Kowloon City continue to give a lot of trouble by cutting down trees and lopping off branches.

The Forest Guards made numerous arrests and obtained convictions in most of the cases.

Protection from Fire.--About 19 miles of old fire barriers were cleared in Kowloon, 16 miles in Hongkong, and 5 miles at Fanling.

R

N 7

A new barrier about half a mile long was made at Aberdeen.

Five fires were reported during the first quarter, 12 in the second, 4 in the third, and 23 in the fourth, making a total of 44 for the year compared with 65 in the previous year.

The most serious fire occurred near the Tytam Intermediate Reservoir where about 800 pine trees were either killed or badly damaged.

The fire originated through the carelessness of people worship- ping at a grave, five of whom were arrested.

Three of them were fined $10 each and the other two were discharged on account of their youth.

In a plantation above Deep Water Bay about 500 pine trees were destroyed by fire.

As this fire started in the middle of the plantation it was probably caused by a coolie collecting vegetable drugs or fuel.

On the 30th December a plantation above the Hongkong Hotel, Repulse Bay, was set on fire by workmen employed in blasting

stone.

It appears that they put a sack over a lighted fuse and when the explosion occurred, the sack was projected in a burning con- dition into the plantation.

The contractor who employed the men was made to pay for the damage done.

Mrs. J. H. Taggart, who happened to be at the Repulse Bay Hotel at the time, on seeing the fire, reported the matter to the Stanley Police Station by telephone, otherwise the damage would have been much greater than it was.

The Tsing Ming Festival was on the 6th April and nine fires were reported, but very little damage was done as stationed in various parts of the Colony where fires were most likely

to occur.

men were

At the Chung Yung Festival, on the 1st November, three fires were notified, but these were put out by the men detailed for that purpose before any serious damage took place.

To the Honourable the Captain Superintendent of Police the thanks of the Department are again due for allowing his Officers to engage coolies to extinguish fires which came to their notice.

The thanks of the Department are also due to the Honourable the Secretary for Chinese Affairs for allowing District Watchmen to assist the foresters at the spring and autumn festivals.

Forest Guards' Service.-The total number of persons pro- ceeded against for committing forestry offences was 477.

Of these, 354 were convicted, 12 had their bail estreated, I was required to find a personal bond, 53 were dismissed with a caution and 27 without.

N 8

Particulars of the cases are given in Tables II and III.

Seven contractors had various sums, amounting altogether to $91.60, deducted from their securities for damage done to growing trees in the vicinity of their coolies' matsheds.

Planting and Care of Roadside Trees.-Alongside or near roads in Hongkong and Kowloon 632 flowering trees and shrubs were planted.

Many fine old Banian and other kinds of trees had to be sacrificed to allow alteration to roads to be made by the Public Works Department.

Trees on the route of the electric tramway and those near the different telephone lines were lopped to prevent their branches coming in contract with trams or wires.

Miscellaneous Planting.-135 Ficus creepers were planted at the foot of the new retaining walls along Findlay Road, 64 at the base of an earth cutting near the Sukunpo Recreation Ground, and 220 in Kowloon Tong Cemetery.

One hundred and ten Hibiscus shrubs were planted alongside the nullah at the Sukunpo Recreation Ground.

About 120 feet of bamboos were planted along Chatham Path, 25 feet planted at Mt. Kellett Road, 114 feet at the race course, and 76 feet along Kennedy Road.

Yaumati - Taipo Road.-131 Camphor and 10 Celtis trees were planted between the 4th mile and the Shatin level-crossing, and on the banks of the road 260 flowering shrubs.

Between the Shatin level-crossing and Taipo, 256 Melaleuca and 74 Erythrina were planted, and 20 Camphor and 8 Albizzia transplanted.

For a considerable distance along the level stretch of this road at Shatin it is useless to plant trees as the branches would in a few years' time interfere with the telegraph wires which are carried on very short poles.

Taipo-Fanling-Castle Peak Road.-Between Taipo and Castle Peak trees which had failed were replaced by others.

One thousand four hundred and fifty Melaleuca trees were planted between Autau and Castle Peak on the side of the road which was completed in 1918.

The August typhoon did a great deal of damage to trees along. this road, but few were destroyed.

Much harm continues to be done to many of these roadside trees by the villagers stealing stakes, damaging tree guards and allowing their cattle to go unattended or in charge of very young children.

Some of the Poincianas near Fanling flowered well in June.

N 9

Frontier Road.-Along the completed portion of this road 63 Candlenut trees were put in.

Lok Ma Chow Road.-This road, which was completed in 1918, was planted with 172 Candlenut trees.

Sheung Shui Station Road.—At the cross road 14 Casuarina and 9 Bauhinia Blakeana were planted on the site of the old tea house.

Owing to the widening of this road it was necessary to trans- plant 22 of the trees on the west side.

Twenty-two Hibiscus were put in between the cross roads and the Golf Club Course.

Castle Peak Coastal Road.--Planting, which was commenced in 1918, was continued on the sections of the road which were finished.

Altogether 1,993 trees of various kinds were planted and this work should be completed in 1920.

Fanling Golf Course.-The Rhododendrons planted two years ago on the hills near the 17th faway flowered fairy well.

The red-leaved Cannas between the 4th and 5th fairways were taken up, divided, replanted, and the bed extended.

Trees and shrubs which had died from one cause or another were replaced by others.

A few trees were transplanted in connection with the laying out of the new course.

Several of the fairways were given a top-dressing of earth and artificial manure.

The improvement in the turf which has received these annual dressings is very marked.

Forestry Service Paths.-These paths are not only used by the Forest Guards but by many residents as they make walks and open up lovely views.

Both those in Hongkong and Kowloon were repaired at the end of the year.

Clearing Undergrowth around Houses. About 3,400,000 square feet were cleared in various parts of the Colony in connection with anti-malarial measures.

Clearing for Survey Purposes, &c.-For survey purposes about 5,800,000 square feet of undergrowth were cleared. Much of this was done so that surveys could be made for proposed new roads.

Forestry Licences, New Territories.-The total amount of fees collected amounted to $4,881.11 compared with $4,798.02 in 1918.

N 10

NURSERIES, AGRICULTURE, &c.

In the Beacon Hill Nursery about 10,000 pine tree seedlings were raised for planting in 1920.

Seedlings of the following were also raised for the same pur- pose:-Poinciana, Camphor, Albizzia, and Melia.

In the Sukunpo Nursery quantities of Cassia fistula, Bauhinia variegata and Paulownia Fortunei were grown for planting out as required.

At the Fanling Garden vegetables were grown as usual and one Chinese has started growing small quantities as an experiment.

Tobacco was again grown, but the reports received from several experts on the samples submitted to them were to the effect that they were not suitable for cigars or cigarettes.

The Manager of the British American Tobacco Company in Hongkong has kindly presented seeds of a variety of Tobacco suitable for cigarette making. This will be tried in the Fanling Garden in 1920.

An improved variety of Sug, cane was presented to several Chinese in the spring and one man reports favourably on it.

Spineless pineapple plants were also given to some Chinese for experiment. It is a much better variety than that commonly grown by the Chinese in the New Territories.

Samples of Shiu Hing (Lepironia mucronata) and Tung Kun (Cyperus tegetiformis) straw were forwarded to the Director of the Imperial Institute, at his request.

The samples were to be distributed to certain straw hat manu- facturers who were of opinion that these straws would be suitable for their business.

One hundredweight of Quercus cornea seeds were sent to the Agricultural Department, Washington, at the request of Dr. Fairchild of that Department.

This is the edible acorn of South China and Dr. Fairchild informs me that the tree promises well in the Southern States of America.

The taste of the acorn is very similar to that of the sweet chestnut.

At the request of the Director of the Government Agricultural College, Cedara, South Africa, living rhizomes of Ginger were sent to him for experimental purposes.

About 200 lbs. of pine tree seed were collected for sowing in the New Territories in 1920.

A quantity of Camphor tree seed was also collected, 10 lbs. of which were given to the District Officer, Taipo, for distribution amongst the natives of the New Territories.

N 11

During the year the Chinese in the New Territories have been distilling camphor from trees in various places, especially in the Saikung district.

The leaves were used for this purpose and I am informed that many of the trees were entirely denuded of foliage.

Owing to a new law passed by the United States Government regarding the importation of living plants into America, all bulbs shipped from Hongkong to that country had to be certified by an officer of this Department to the effect that they were believed to be free from insects pests and fungus diseases.

This threw a considerable amount of extra work on the Department as many of the Narcissus Tazetta, (Chinese New Year Flower) bulbs grown in the vicinity of Amoy are shipped to America from Hongkong.

Altogether 5,012 cases, in various lots, containing 627,630 bulbs, were examined and passed between the 7th July and 30th November.

In addition 35 cases, containing 13,100 bulbs, were inspected and rejected.

The first rice crop in the New Territories was said to be the best for many years; the second crop was also good.

good.

Lichees were poor, peanuts fair, sugarcane and pineapples

HAY FEVER.

For several years past certain members of the medical pro- fession in the Colony have held the opinion that the pollen of Ligustrum sinense is the cause of the above distressing malady.

This shrub flowers in the early part of the year and it is then that "hay fever" is prevalent.

The pollen of Ligustrum vulgare, as well as other plants, is known to produce "hay fever" in England, and it is quite possible that the pollen of Ligustrum sinense is one of the causes of the malady in Hongkong.

To prevent the pollen of the latter shrub from causing any ill effects, for the last two or three years the flower buds have been cut off before they have had time to open.

EXCHANGE OF SEEDS, &c.

The Department is indebted to the following donors of seeds, plants, and herbarium specimens :-Director, Horticultural Section, Giza Mouderieh, Egypt, Mr. E. H. Wilson, Arnold Arboretum, Harvard University, U.S.A., Captain A. E. Hodgins, Dr. Ho Nai Hop, Dr. M. Carthew, Siam, Department of Agriculture, Washing- ton, U.S.A., Commander Beckwith, R.N., Mrs. Murray, Messrs. J. F. C. Rock, H. Nehrling, and E. May, U.S.A., Mr. C. Talbot Bow-

9

N 12

ring, Hainan, Messrs. Groff and Levine, Canton Christian College; Messrs. F. P. de V. Soares, N. L. Watson, H. Humphreys, Chung King Cho, Lo Tsung Ko, the University of Nanking; and Director of Botanic Gardens, Sydney.

The following were the principal recipients :-Department of Agriculture, Washington, U.S.A., Director, Horticultural Section, Giza Mouderieh, Egypt; Dr. Ho Nai Hop; Director, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew; Director, Botanic Gardens, Sydney; Director. National Botanic Gardens, Cape Town; Superintendent, Botanic Gardens, Peradeniya; Superintendent, Royal Botanic Garden, Calcutta; The Principal, Government School of Agriculture, Cedora, South Africa; Dr. Carthew, Siam; Superintendent, Botanic Gardens, Jamaica; Department of Agriculture, Federated Malay States; Director, Botanic Gardens, Singapore; Messrs. H. Huni- phreys and N. L. Watson.

STAFF.

The Superintendent was compelled by illness to proceed on leave in May, and was absent from the 23rd of that month until the 31st August.

Lieutenant-Colonel Arthur Chapman, V.D., very kindly con- sented to take charge of the Department during that time, and rendered valuable service. Thanks to his efforts and those of the Head Gardener, the Head Forester, Head Clerk, 1st Herbarium Assistant, and the New Territories Foreman, the work of the Depart- ment was kept going smoothly during the above period.

The Assistant Superintendent was absent on Military Service throughout the year.

19th May, 1920.

H. GREEN, Acting Superintendent.

Table I.

RAINFALL, 1919.

— N 13 —

Botanic Gardens.

DATE.

Jan.

Feb.

Mar. April May June July June July Aug, Sept.

Oct.

Nov.

Dec.

inch.

inch.

1,

2.

.27

.10

.01

.04

.01

.58

9,

10,

.06 .12

11,

12,

13,

14,

.04

15,

.11

.03

16,

ಸ : : : : 88

8:

inch. inch. | inch. | inch. | inch.

inch inch.

inch. inch.

inch.

.66

.14 .08

.98

.16

.53

.02

.21

.66 .48

.30

.02 2.22 1.57

.76

.21

.48

6.41

.30

.01 3.55

.08

.78

:

.09 .14 .22

.03

.84 .02

1.11

.01 .02

.09 .02

.05

មាន: : : :

.14 .41

.01

.02

.83

.01

.35

1.61

.09

2.32

2.25

.32

2.54

.02

.14 .17

1.94

.09 .45

.07 .03 1.42

1.42

.02 1.63 .12

1.16

ཚ༅ ལྔ ::: ། :: —

རྒྱ3::་ྲ

1.96

1.22

.06

.45

.01

.02

:

.02

.40

.55

.17

.01

.04

.17

.05 .00

:72

.08

.12

:

Table I,-Continued.

DATE.

Jan.

Feb. Mar. April May

June July Aug. Sept.

Oct.

Nov. Dec.

17,

18,

19,

20,

.32

inch. inch. inch. inch. inch. | inch, | inch. inch. inch. inch.

incl. inch.

.01.

51

.01

.02

21,

.76

.03

22,

.01

23,

.02

.25

24,

.04

25,

.06

.16

26,

.02

27.

28,

29,

30,

31,

.05

.20

.02

.12

.20

.88

:23ཕྱེ ::::༼ :

1.93

1.75

.63

1.63

3.29

.01

.12

.02

.80

.35

.02 .83 .31

.15 .02 .21 .02

.33

.01

.56

.93

:8ག== ུ་ྲ

2.08

1.00

.45 .08 .10

.01

.10

.75

.10

.01 .24

: :

.14

2.71

3.44

.02

.59

3.16

.32

.80

2.27 .24

.03

.10 1.15 .25

1.05

Total,

.85 2.03 1.77 6.28 7.43 12.22 22,39 (24.46 3.57 4.66

Total for the year 89.76 inches. Average for the last ten years at the Botanic Gardens-87.16 inches. Total rainfall registered at the Hongkong Observatory for the year-76.14 inches.

2.07 2.03

K

N 14-

K

}

Village or District. Block. Compartment.

Pine trees

Table II.

FOREST GUARDS' SERVICE: OFFENCES.

stealing.

wood

Pine tree Pine tree Brush- branches needles

stealing. stealing. stealing.

REPORT OF

Grass

cutting. Wild

flowers

stealing.

Wild

fruits

stealing.

Cattle

grazing in

plantation.

Victoria,

1

Wongneichong,

2

Shaukiwan,..

A.B.C.D.E.F.G. 15 A.B.C.D.E.F.G. 3 A.B.C.D.E.F.

8

Tytam,..

A.D.F.

Stanley,

Aberdeen,

Pokfulam,

A.B.C.D.E.F. A.B.C.D.E.F. A.C.D.E.F.G.

Kowloon,..

A.B.C.

Harbour Belt,.

A.B.C.D.

19:00 00:00:00 NO

1000 10000—∞

15

47

3

20

38

4

19

14

16

2

36

20

Cheungshawan,

10

Kanghau,

11

1

New Territories,

422 300-2

MOBIL♡♡~--

12

1

12

5

1

11

Earth

cutting.

Setting

fire to

plantation.

1

1

5

Assault

on Forest

Total for 1919,.

.59

86

28

153

79

19

5

7

2

5

1

Total for 1918,

51

65

27

115

64

16

1

12

1

Nil

Nil.

Nil.

Guard.

1

Imperson-

ating

Forest

Guard.

— N 15 —

N 16

Table III.

POLICE COURT RESULTS.

Cases.

1919.

.1918.

50 cents to $1 fine,

89

62

$1.50 to $2

43

56

$2.50 to $3

27

23

$4

to $5

32

22

""

"

$6

to $10

9

10

"

$11

to $21

1 to 4 days' imprisonment,

36

27

5 to 7

63

38

8 to 14

39

20

"

3 weeks'

1 month's

5 weeks'

6

":

>>

""

Discharges,...

Cautions,

Forfeiture of Bail,

Personal Bond,

Strokes with the birch,

Withdrawal,

Total,

:

:

2

1

1

3

27

17

53

22

57

12

12

1

1

1.

447

352

Locality. Kowloon Tsai,

Fanling, ...

N 17

Table IV.

NURSERIES.

Expenses. $465.00 370.00

Total,

$835.00.

Table V.

REVENUE.

REVENUE.

1919.

1918.

$

C.

C.

Timber Sales,

1,835.11

930.66

Sale of Plants,

729.75

392.15

Loan of Plants,...

340.44

119.94

Forestry Licences,

4,881.11

4,798.02

Inspection of Nursery Stock,

490.00

Miscellaneous Receipts,

Interest on Current Account,

Fine Fund,...

7.86

9.36

9.25

6.67

14.25

25.65

$8,307.77 $6,282.45

Years.

Total Expenditure.

4413114

Table VI.

Comparative Statement of Revenue and Expenditure

from the years 1910 to 1919.

48873, 20.

48694.46

Total Revenue.

7730.52 ++48643. $144/c:51

% of Revenue to

Expenditure. -27.87 26812

1910

41,707.95

13.230.59

31.72

1911

45,750.85

7,769.82

16.98

. 1912

39,865.18

2,304.91

5.78

1913

48,745.88

8,352.06

17.13

1914

49,095.97

.6,934.2.1

14.12

1915

49,404.56

6,871.67

13.19

1916

47.325.89

7.034.67

14.86

1917

51.253.82

7,294.49

14.23

1918

51,967.08

6.282.45

12.09

1919

51,457.65

8,307.77

16.16

1920

55975.49

8547.76

15.27

1921

61428.11

1.0657.86

22

71223,47

12 46 4.32

23

77157.40

15848.76

24

86516.80

13038.79

17-35

17.50

20.54

15.07

Appendix O.

REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF EDUCATION FOR THE YEAR 1919.

SUMMARY OF CONTENTS:

Revenue and Expenditure.

Classification of Schools :-

(a) Schools to. which the Ordinance does not apply:-

Government Schools.

Military and Police Schools.

Excluded Private Schools.

(b) Controlled Schools:-

Grant Schools.

Private Schools.

Subsidised (New Territories) Schools.

(c) The Technical Institute.

Number of Pupils.

University Matriculation and Local Examinations.

General.

TABLES.

I.-Government Schools.

II-Grant Schools: Annual Grant List.

III--Chart: Total Pupils in English and Vernacular

Schools.

IV. University Examination Results.

V.--Fees remitted to Free Scholars.

VI.-Technical Institute: Balance Sheet.

VIL.- Do. Figures of former years extracted.

VII-XIII.-Scholarship Accounts: Balance Sheets.

0 2

ANNUAL REPORT ON THE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT

1919.

1. I was absent from the Colony on leave during the greater part of the year, Mr. E. Ralphs, Inspector of English Schools, acting for me.

He is responsible for this Report.

REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE.

(Tables I, II, VI, and VII.)

2. After deducting the school fees received, the total nett ex- penditure on education was $254,302 ($243,362 in 1918).

3. School and Technical Institute fees amounting to $103,505 were collected ($100,206 in 1918). In addition $4,185 fees were remitted to free scholars ($4,253 in 1918).

4. The cost of the Government Schools is compared in Table I with the average of preceding years.

CLASSIFICATION OF SCHOOLS.

5. These are divided into :---

(a) Schools exempted from liability to registration and

inspection under the Education Ordinance of 1913. (b) Controlled Schools, subject to the provisions of the

Ordinance.

SCHOOLS TO WHICH THE ORDINANCE DOES NOT APPLY.

GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS.

(Table I)

6. Queen's College.-The system of medical inspection instituted last year has been applied to Queen's College and has been extended to the Ellis Kadoorie School. It is now a rule of the Schools that

recommendations made by the Medical Officer examining the school be carried into effect by the pupils concerned. In the cases of de- fective eyesight, where a further examination by a specialist is recom- mended, such examination must be undergone, and where spectacles are required they must be obtained as prescribed.

7. The College has made progress in many directions during the year, and is now in a very efficient condition.

8. The total number of pupils enrolled during the year was 1,139 (989 in 1918). The average daily attendance throughout the year was 609 (579 in 1918).

9. Notwithstanding the shortage of Teachers in the Department, the staff of Queen's College has been well maintained during the year by the engagement of Temporary Mistresses, who have render- ed useful service.

?

0 3

10. The following extracts from the Head Master's Report are of interest :-

<<

Organization. The training of Pupil Teachers has been again placed entirely in the hands of one master instead of de- volving, as it did for a time, upon various members of the Staff.

Throughout the school the classes are now arranged in pairs, each pair of classes being taught by at least one British master or mistress and one Chinese master; this re-adjustment was instituted to ensure for boys in all Classes an equal amount of instruction from a British teacher.

"In September last a single section of Class 8, for beginners in English, was formed in response to the numerous applications received from old Queen's College boys and others..

Studies.-All boys in the two Senior Classes-Classes 1 and 2-known alternatively as the Matriculation and Junior Local Classes, were entered without discrimination for the University Examination in July.

"For Matriculation 18 students were entered, 16 of whom actually sat for the examination, and of whom 7 qualified for the Matriculation certificate. Four scholarships were gained: one Pre- sident's Scholarship, with Honours, one King Edward VII Scholar- ship, and two Canton Government Scholarships. In the December examination two more students entered and passed.

(4

Throughout Class 3, Chinese newspapers are now used in connection with translation lessons, each boy subscribing a small amount monthly and so becoming entitled to a regular supply of

papers.

"It is upon admission to Class 3, either from the lower school here, or from a District or other school, that boys are called upon to decide whether they will join the "Full" section leading up to Matriculation and the University, or the "Commercial Section which provides a course of study intended to fit them for business, and it is a matter for gratification that every year there is an increased tendency to take up the "Full" course instead of the Commercial," since it is undoubtedly an indication that there is an increasing demand among the Chinese for education" in the best sense of the term.

(6

፡፡

"Normal Class.-The nine first year Pupil Teachers attending the Normal Class were entered for the Matriculation Examination.

"Of these 3 obtained certificates and are now taking the University course for Student Teachers. This makes a total of 9 Student Teachers now being maintained by the Hongkong Govern- ment at the University.

No second year examination was held, since all our second year students had been promoted to fill vacancies occasioned by the shortage of Chinese Assistant Masters.

"General. All games continue to flourish, and are now keenly followed by a steadily increasing proportion of the boys. Among the games played are Football, Volley-ball, Cricket, Tennis, and Basket-ball. Swimming is very popular and many trophies have been won including a Life Saving Cup (won by the Ambulance Division) and the Swimming Championship Shield. One pupil came in second in the "Harbour Swim ".

6

"The Yellow Dragon' will attain its majority in June of this One very noticeable feature of the magazine is the frequency and regularity with which boys send.in contributions to its pages.

year.

"The Queen's College Division of the St. John Ambulance Brigade Overseas, which has been in existence for three years, consists of about 26 members, and is in a flourishing condition.

"The School Libraries are much used by Staff and pupils."

11. District Schools for Chinese Boys: Ellis Kadoorie, Saiying- pun, Yaumati, and Wantsai.-These Schools are again full. Large numbers of applications for admission are being refused.

12. Very good work has been done in all, special attention being given to pronunciation in English.

13. Increasing attention is devoted to athletics, school bands and swimming, and to social intercourse between the boys and the European Masters and Mistresses.

14 Ellis Kadoorie School.-The school has made considerable progress. The difference between the Upper and Lower Class Divisions was not so marked as in previous years, giving evidence of more correct classification.

15. English is successfully taught through the medium of dialogues, while the gramophone has been used as an aid to correct pronunciation.

16. The Drawing in this School calls for special mention. Swimming is a feature of the School, the boys practising "Swim- ming Drill" before taking to the water.

17. Saiyingpun School. The School has been full throughout the year.

In one month 115 applicants had to be refused admission. The attendance is regular, and 49 boys made every possible attendance.

18. The discipline and general tone of the School are excellent throughout, and the work done is highly satisfactory. Handwriting deserves special praise; in a Competition open to Schools through- out the Empire three pupils of this School gained "Distinction": while the standard of handwriting in the whole School is very much above the average.

19. English Conversation is also very successfully taught.

1

5

20. The School is used by the University in connection with the course for the Training of Teachers, Education Students being sent there to carry out their practical training.

21. The Social and Athletic life of the School has been well maintained.

22. The Library, the English Speaking Association, the Mem- bers of which pledge themselves to speak only English during certain hours, the Chess Club and the Chinese Band continue to flourish. A Company of the St. John Ambulance Brigade composed entirely of Old Pupils of this School, maintained by the generosity of Mr. Ho Kom-tong and under the command of Mr. Morris, does very useful work and was last year awarded the "Lau Chu Pak Duty Cup", as having presented the best record of actual duty during the year.

23. The Ellis Kadoorie School for Indians continues to progress. Recently Upper School work has been started, which it is hoped to extend, so that in future the boys will be able to pass direct from the School to the Hongkong University.

24. The Praya East School under a Chinese Head Master is efficiently conducted. A School Library has recently been established.

25. The boys are beginning to take an active interest in Athletics.

26. Outlying District Schools.-These schools are making steady progress.

27. The Taipo School moved into new and more commodious premises during the year; the Un Long School still requires a new building.

28. British Schools.--The attendance at the three British Schools is maintained.

29. During the year a qualified Games Mistress was appointed to supervise the Games and Physical Instruction in these schools, with beneficial results.

30. The Schools are regularly inspected by a Medical Officer.

31. A very marked improvement has taken place at the Kow- loon School.

32. Victoria British School.---The methods of teaching are up to date and the work shows a great improvement in all Classes. The weak point is handwriting which in Classes 5 and 6 is very poor. With this exception the work of the School is very satisfactory.

33. In December two candidates were presented for the Senior Local Examination and both passed, one with distinction in Biblical Knowledge.

34. One candidate was presented for the Junior Local and passed.

35. The Christmas Examination for the rest of the school showed that general progress had been made especially by those who had had the benefit of a full year's teaching. The work in the lower school was probably better than in any previous year.

36. A course of cookery lessons was given and the practical work was done by the girls with enthusiasm. The Chinese Class for the boys was inspected by the Inspector of Vernacular Schools, who reported that the boys were making satisfactory progress.

37. During the last five years, of 26 candidates presented for Matriculation, Senior Local, and Junior Local, 23 have passed. One pupil passed directly from the school to McGill University this year.

38. Premises. During the year the lavatories have been re- constructed, and the most modern system introduced.

It is now possible for the boys to have a shower bath after playing games.

39. These improvements are in every way a great benefit and are much appreciated.

40. Health.--The Government Medical Officer visited the school and examined the children. He reported the general health good. The school has been free from epidemics, and the attendance has not been much affected by illness.

41. Kowloon British School.-The discipline and tone are very good. A system of Prefects has recently been established.

42. The Annual Examination conducted in December showed a general improvement in all Classes. Good progress is recorded in the Chinese Class. The Cookery Classes were very successful.

43. In the Hongkong University Local Examinations one boy was entered for the Senior Local, but failed: 4 boys and 1 girl were entered for the Junior Local.

44. In November the first School Sports were held at the Kowloon Cricket Club and the prizes were distributed by His Excellency the Governor.

45. Since November Mr. Thompson of the Naval Yard has very kindly given the Senior Boys instruction in physical culture and in boxing.

46. Peak School.-The School has suffered a great loss in the retirement of Mrs. Main, the Head Mistress.

47. The number of pupils admitted during the year was 50. Forty-five pupils left. Attendance has been good, although there was the usual falling off in July--a number of pupils going North for short periods. The School was opened on 198 days. average attendance for the year is 45.

year.

The

48. There has been no serious case of illness throughout the

49. The age of the greater number of children attending the School is under 8.

07

50. During the first six months of the year, when several older children were still in attendance, a class was prepared for the Oxford Preliminary Examination, but all these pupils left before the examination took place.

51. Belilios Public School. This Girls' School maintains its reputation.

52. Miss Clarke, who has been acting as Head Mistress since the retirement of Mrs. Tutcher, has been confirmed in the appointment.

53. Two new rooms for the use of the Staff have been built at the eastern end of the old building; these supply a long-felt want.

54. 18 girls sat for the Senior Local Examination of the Hong- kong University in July: 12 passed, one with Honours, the only girl to be thus distinguished; she also gained a Distinction in English. In December five girls entered for the Junior Local, and all passed. Sixteen girls sat for the Oxford Preliminary in July, and 14 passed.

55. Nine past pupils entered for the Technical Institute Women Teachers' Examination, and all passed, two with Distinction. In the corresponding Vernacular Teachers' Classes, 5 entered and 3 passed.

56. A Laundry Class has been re-introduced. Cookery is, as in previous years, taught with great success. First aid to the in- jured and home nursing are popular subjects and a Nursing Division of the St. John Ambulance Brigade has been formed among the Staff and does useful work.

57. The girls maintain a cot at the Nethersole Hospital, and support a child at the Church Missionary Society. A sum of $1,150 was raised in the School for the Ministering Children's League.

MILITARY SCHOOLS.

58. I have received the following report from the Inspector of Army Schools:-

"The Garrison Schools at Garden Road remained open during the year with an average on books of 56 in the Elder Children's School and 58 in the Infants' and Sewing School, the actual numbers at the end of the year being 62 and 67 respectively. The daily. attendance averaged over 91 per cent as compared with 88 per cent the year before.

(C

The School suffered considerably in the latter part of the year owing to loss of staff through death, illness, and other causes. Reliefs are being provided by the Home Government and it may be expected that with their arrival every obstacle to the success which has marked previous years will be removed.

"One ex-pupil attends the British School, Kowloon, under the scholarship scheme sanctioned through the generosity of the Hong- kong Government and it is hoped that under the more favourable circumstances of next year fuller advantage will be taken of the concession granted.

66

The education of adults which was a feature of the Army in pre-war days largely fell into abeyance in this command during

the war, except as regards Asiatic troops. This was due to various causes of a temporary nature. This work is now being resumed. with the troops generally and it is in contemplation to extend the educational training of the regular army beyond the limits hitherto set to work in the Army Adults' Schools."

POLICE SCHOOL.

59. The average attendance was 14 (16 in 1918; 23 in 1917); the master in charge reports that the discipline and progress of the men attending have been satisfactory.

EXCLUDED PRIVATE SCHOOLS.

60. St. Paul's College was placed upon the Grant List as from 1st July, 1919. Of the schools which at the coming in force of the Education Ordinance were excluded from its operation there now remain two only: St. Stephen's Colleges for Boys and for Girls. They had an average attendance of 132 and 60 respectively (162 and 72 in 1918.)

CONTROLLED SCHOOLS.

GRANT SCHOOLS.

(Table II.)

61. Two new English Schools-St. Paul's College and Ying Wah College-and one new Vernacular School-St. Paul's Girls' School-have been added to the Grant list.

62. During the year all the English Grant Schools were visited by the Inspector of English Schools. The Classes were seen at work, and all exercises written during Term were examined. Papers were set and worked for the Inspector, and Classes examin- ed orally.

63. Weak points were discussed with the Head Teachers and Assistant Teachers concerned.

64. The work of these schools is very satisfactory, progress being apparent each year. In all, special attention is devoted to the training of character; in the Girls' Schools instruction is given in first aid to the injured, home nursing, and cookery, in addition to the usual subjects.

65. The number of Vernacular Schools in receipt of a grant is now 54, of which 31 are boys' schools, the St. Paul's Girls' School, and Boys' Schools managed by the Tung Wah Hospital and the Confucian Society, having been added to the list.

66. 141 Vernacular Teachers-61 men and 80 women-attended the Normal Class at the Technical Institute.

ENGLISH PRIVATE SCHOOLS.

67. During the year 18 Boys' Schools (4 Day and 14 Night)

}

were closed; 1 Boys' School (Day) became a Grant School, and 1 Boys' School (Night) was transferred to the Vernacular School Register. 33 new Boys' Schools (7 Day and 26 Night) were opened.

68. The total number of Schools open was :-Day Schools,-1 Girls' and 26 Boys'; Night Schools,-58 Boys'; with a maximum enrolment of 11 girls and 1,587 boys in the Day Schools, and 1,711 boys in the Night Schools, making a total of 3,309 pupils, an increase of 178 upon 1918.

69. In addition there were 2 Exempted Schools, the Catholic Seminary, a Day School with 24 Students training for the priest- hood, and a Night School maintained by the Kowloon Wharf and Godown Company for the instruction of some of their Chinese employees, with 36 in attendance.

70. The work done in most of the schools is still of a very elementary character. Pronunciation of English is often poor, the teachers themselves being in many cases not free from faults in this direction.

71. Discipline is generally good.

72. Monthly Attendance Reports are furnished by all the Schools, and the Regulations are carefully observed.

VERNACULAR SCHOOLS IN THE COLONY.

73. During the year 85 new Private Day Schools were registered, (95 in 1918); 62 Day Schools closed, of which 23 disappeared without notification.

74. 28 Private Day Schools were transferred to the Grant List from the beginning of the year. Of these, 20 are managed by the Confucian Society and 8 by the Tung Wah Hospital. Another Private Day School was transferred to the Grant List from July 1st, i.e., the St. Paul's Girls' School managed by the Church Missionary Society.

75. The number of existing Private Day Schools is now 340 (346 in 1918). Of these, 2 are Exempted Schools, 4 are placed in Class A, 258 in Class B, and 76 in Class C. 3 of the Class C Schools are to be struck off at the beginning of the next Chinese Year.

76. Of the old Grant Schools, one managed by the Church Missionary Society was struck off the Grant List at the beginning of the year thus bringing the number down to 25. The number of Grant Schools, is now 54. The Berlin Foundling House was taken over by the Church Missionary Society in March and has been transferred to the Pokfulum Foundling Home.

77. Certificates have been issued to 14 New Private Night Schools, one of which is a Japanese school for Chinese boys. 17 Night Schools closed, of which 2 disappeared without notification. The number of Night Schools stands now at 19, (22 in 1918).

O 10

78. The total number of Vernacular Schools, excluding those of the New Territories, is 412, (54 Grant, 340 Private Day and 19 Private Night Schools).

79. 8 applications for the registration of new schools were refused.

80. No prosecution under the Ordinance has been instituted.

VERNACULAR SCHOOLS IN THE NEW TERRITORIES.

81. Of the 42 Subsidized Schools in the New Territories in 1918, one school at Kam Tin closed, owing to the lack of a teacher, at the beginning of the year, and 4 others (at Sha Tin, Ha Wo Tse, Siu Lik Yuen, and Shan Ha Wai) disappeared without notification, during the course of the year. 11 new schools were subsidized, viz., the schools at Ma Wan, Lamma, Tai Wan, Tai Po, Shan Mee, Kwai Chung, Chuk Yuen, Ying Lung Wai, Wing Lung Wai, and 2 at Cheung Chau. The total number of schools is 48, 2 being Girls' (at Tsuen Wan and Cheung Chau).

82. The payment of subsidies is made in the same way as last year, i.e., each school is paid $5 per mensem for the first 3 quarters, and the balance due to those that are found to deserve the higher grant at the Annual Inspection is paid at the last quarter of the year. The 6 schools at Un Kong, Tai Lam Liu, Wing Lung Wai, (Kam Tin) Un Long, Cheung Chau (boys) and Kwai Chung respectively have earned the higher grant of $10 per mensem this year. 5 others (at Lamma, Cheung Uk Chuen, Sheung Tsuen. Mang Kung Uk and Tseng Tau) have been rewarded $30 extra for the year.

83. The number of pupils is 1,151 and the average attendance is 939. Among these, there are about 65 girls.

84. Two free scholars were admitted to Un Long English School from these Vernacular Schools, and one to Taipo.

85. Two additional sub-inspectors for the New Territories have been appointed, and the schools are divided into three groups, one group for each sub-inspector. Each subsidized school has been visited once or twice a month by a sub-inspector, and once by the Inspector of Vernacular Schools during the latter part of the year. Since provision has been made for 50 more subsidized schools, the sub-inspectors have also visited many private schools in the New Territories, and those which appear to be able to improve have been given more attention with a view to bringing them up to the standard.

5

NUMBER OF PUPILS.

86. The total number of pupils at schools in the Colony excluding the Police School and the uncontrolled schools in the New Territories are :-

O 11

Number of Pupils in

Total.

English Vernacular

Schools.

Schools.

* Government Schools,

2,882

2,882

* Military Schools

129

129

*Excluded Private Schools,

458

26

484

* Grant Schools

1,896

3,120

5,016

† Controlled Private Schools...

3,309

12,344

15,653

Controlled Private Schools,

New Territories

1,151

1,151

Technical Institute,.

471

471

Total,.

* Average attendance.

9,145

16,641

25,786

† Total enrolment.

87. This is an increase of 241 over 1918 the increase in pupils in English Schools being 182, and in the Vernacular School, 59.

year.

TECHNICAL INSTITUTE.

88. The Institute was open as usual during 8 months of the

89. The number of students in attendance during the Session ending June 30th was 471 as against 524 in 1918.

90. The Institute continues to do useful work and is always prepared to provide instruction in any subject for which there may be a demand.

91. At the end of the Session examinations were conducted as in previous years by independent examiners. 252 students were examined; 134 passed in one subject, 11 in two subjects, and 1 in 3 subjects, a total of 146, or 58% passed. The percentage of passes is lower than in recent years and is accounted for by the fact that the standard required for a pass has again been raised, especially in the Teachers' Classes.

92. At the June Examination referred to 52 Teachers' Certi- ficates were awarded. Of these 10 were given for Third Year work in English and 7 for the same in Chinese, and were in the nature of final certificates. The average number in attendance at the Teachers' Classes was 111. The Vernacular Teachers' Classes have recently been placed under the superintendence of the In- spector of Vernacular Schools.

93. Other important Classes are those for Building Construc- tion and Architectural Design, Mathematics, Chemistry, English, Cookery, Shorthand & Book-keeping.

O 12

HONGKONG UNIVERSITY EXAMINATIONS.

94. There were 208 successes (252 in 1918), of which Queen's College claims 28. Two passes in the Senior Local and 4 in the Junior Local were obtained at the two British Schools (Kowloon and Victoria).

EDUCATION DEPARTMENT,

26th April, 1920.

E. IRVING, Director of Education.

+

NAME AND NATURE. (1)

STAFF.

Certificated Passed Student'

Teachers.

and 'Student' Teachers.

· (2)

(3)

ENGLISH SCHOOLS.

Kowloon, Victoria, and Peak Schools-for children of European British Parentage. Primary and Secondary

Queen's College-mainly for Chinese and Indians. Pre- pares for Hongkong University Matriculation and for Commercial Examinations

16

O 13

M

Table I.

GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS.

Vernacular.

Maximum. Average

Rate of

At- Fees

Monthly Eurolment. tendance. per mensem.

Net Cost to

Gross Cost.

Fees

Collected.

Govern-

ment.

$

C.

3

Ditto for

each unit in

Average Attendance.

C.

Ditto

previous 5

REMARKS.

years.

$

C.

2 Chinese

213

163

Teachers.

$5-$15

37,449.21

8,560.95

28,888.26

177.22

148.81

13

10

9

769

609

$5

80,831.31 | 34,845.00

45,986.31

75.51

111.03

1 Shorthand

Teacher.

Ellis Kadoorie, Saiyingpun, Wantsai, and Yaumati Schools -for Chinese. Prepare for Upper School at Queen's College

15

40

16

1,539

1,370

77,623.42| 42,465.00 35,158.42

25.66

22.10

14

Belilios Public School for Girls-mainly for Chinese. Primary and Secondary.

2 Needlework

4

12

Teachers

529

465

$2

26,328.68 9,646.00 16,682.68

35.87

36.31

1 Drawing Mistress

2 Pupil Teachers

Co

3

1

113

94

$2

4,348.25

2,060.00

2,288.25

24.34

24.31

Praya East—mainly for Chinese. Primary

Ellis Kadoorie School for Indians--prepares for Upper School, Queen's College

Tai Po, Un Long, and Cheung Chau Schools-Elemen- tary English for Chinese. Primary

}

(1) For boys unless otherwise stated.

104

89

.0.

$2

7,994.83

1,852.00 6,142.83

69.02

65.94

3

4

119

92

3223

(2) Certificated or with the degree of a British University. (3) Student Teachers or Passed Student Teachers (local).

༢་ ་ ་་་

3,386

2,882

50 cents.

5,738.27

466.00

5,272.27

57.30

43.35

$240,313.97 99,894.95 | 140,419,02

حمله

...

:

·

O 15

TABLE II.

RECEIPT OF A GRANT UNDER

ENGLISH SCHOOLS.

THE GRANT CODE OF 1914.

CAPITATION GRANT.

A

UNIVERSITY EXAMINATION GRANT.

B

Average Attendance.

Higher Classes.

Remove Classes.

Lower Classes.

Total

Capitation

Grants

of

7

Grand

Total

Total

Senior.

Junior.

Local

Honours.

Refund

Grants

Grants

of

of

Average

Attend.

ance,

1

Rate.

Average Total. Attend-

2

Rate.

Total.

ance.

Average

Attend-

ance.

Rate.

3

Total.

Columns

1, 2 & 3.

No. of Rate.

Pupils.

4

Total.

No. of Rate.

5

Pupils.

Total.

No. of Rate.

Pupils.

6

of Fees.

Columns

Total.

4, 5, 6, & 7.

Columus

A & B.

$

*

$

09

$

20

ོ: ུ

26

22:25

530 131

406

24 3,144

184

20

3,680.

215

16

3,440

10,264 17

30

510

40

15

44

24 1,056

78 20

1,560

284 16

4,544

7,160

6

30

180

14

15

153 26

24

624

23

20

460

104

16

1,664

2,748

6

30

180

8.

15

117 18

24

432

28

20

560

71

16

1,136

2,128

289

67

174

24

13 24

1,608

87. 20 1,740

...

135 16

2,160

5,508

18

30

540

21

15

315

312

24 20

480

137 16

2,192

2,984

5

15

75

124

14

20

280

110

16

1,760

2,040

103

572

34

18

612

43 14

602 1,786

3

30

9

15

135

100*

*::*: 888

9:0

:

90

$

10 10 10 10 12:2

$

*

$

600

· 100

200

570

· 1,880

12,144

210

200

590

7,750

120

...

140

440

3,188

...

...

;

2,128

100

100

390

1,345

6,853

50

125

3,109

· 2,040

120

345

2,131

1,896 325

7,748

472

19,372 1,099

17,498

34,618

50

1,500

97

1,455

VERNACULAR SCHOOLS.

(Upper Grade.)

ISTICS.

Rate.

Total

Co

3

300

1,470

4,725

39,343

GRANT.

Rate.

ximum

Average

nthly Attendance.

›lment.

$

Total

Capitation

Grant.

49

60

51

9

459

46

-206

11

2,266

35

126

11

1,386

18

189

11

2,079

57

137

9

16

709

6161/

6,806

GRANT.

Grant in

Total

aid of

Rent.

480

459

2,746

1,386

2,079

616

480

7,286

0

64

6

61

256,

244

63

256

244

63

16

21

15

34

00

89

33

114

¡l

43

12

48

12

44

17

80

)4

91

CoA co co co co co

102

356

200

240

302

596

4

...

(a)

129

192

321

3

144

144

3

132

132

3

320

80

400

273

218

491

99

180

279

38

33

100

...

100

36

25

268

...

268

31

67

72

136

208

16

18

184

...

184

52

46

51

42

14

41

B

26

16

45

55

46

- LO LO COL

210

210

· 205

116

321

104

72

176

135

280

415

184

90

274

'8

1,078

3,580

VERNACULAR SCHOOLS.

(Lower Grade.)

39

Qn

156

1,804

5,384

156

་་

156

156

240

189

240

189

147

· (b)

147

90

272

90

272

114

114

171

183

3

171

183

39

4

80

63

67

49

30

68

38

57

61

41

33

3

36

32

54

66

96

46

43

38

32

33

31

· 40

40

31

34

52

or co co con coas os on co co co co co co a co co co co

3

3

3

3

1,333

5,016

176

99

162

198

480

138

129

114 -

176

99

...

162

198

480

138

129

(b)

SS

(b)

128*

A

165.

160

120-

93

102

260

4,086

49,090

114

128

165

.... (b)

160

120

93

102

260

1,086

2,284

56,099

School year ends 30th June. School year ends 31st December.

(a) Struck off.

(b) No grant recommended.

O 15

TABLE II.

CONTROLLED SCHOOLS IN RECEIPT OF A GRANT UNDER

No.

Name and Nature of School.

Mission.

St. Joseph's College,

*

2

Italian Convent,

3

French Convent, *

Number of

Classes.

Number of

School Days.

Maximum Monthly Enrolment.

Average Attendance.

ENGLISH SCHOOLS.

CAPITATION GRANT.

A

Higher Classes.

Remove Classes.

Lower Classes.

Total

Capitation

Grants

of

Average

Attend-

ance.

Rate.

1 Average Total. Attend-

2

Rate.

Total.

Attend- Average Rate.

3

Columns

Total. 1, 2 & 3.

ance.

ance.

Ne

Puj

40

$

$

SA

SA

€6

€€

R. C. M.

8

198

584

530

131

24 3,144 184 20

3,680

215

16 3,440

10,264

8 & Inf.

196

467

406 44

24

1,056

78 20

1,560

294 16 4,544

7,160

7 & Inf.

174

210

153 26

j 24

624

23 20

460

""

104 16

1,664

2,748

8 & Inf.

208

142

117

18:

24

432

28

20

560

71 16

1,136

2,128

R. C. M.

8

7 & Inf.

1931 363

289 67

24

1,608

87

20

1,740

135 16

2,160

5,508

196

213

174

13

4 & Inf.

""

2054

141

124

L. M. S.

8

207) 146

103

26

2222223

24

312

24 20

480

137 16

2,192

2,984

14

20

280

110 16

1,760

2,040

572

34 18

612

43 14

602 1,786

Diocesan Girls' School, *.

Diocesan Boys' School, *

C. of E.

9

St. Mary's School, *

13

St. Francis' School,*

14

Ying Wa College, *.

8

1,5781 2,266

1,896 325

7,748

472

19,372 1,099

17,498

34,618

ان

VERNACULAR

SCHOOLS

(Upper Grade.)

DESCRIPTION.

SCHOOL STATISTICS.

No.

Rate.

Total

Capitation

DUBUQJE STATISTIUS.

No.

Rate.

Name and Nature of School.

Mission.

Number Numb Maximum Average of of Schol Monthly Attendance. Standards. Days. Enrolment.

Total

Capitation

Grant.

17

Berlin Foundling House, (G.)

**

C. M. S.

60

51

9

459

18

Fairlea, (G.)

**

246

•206

11

2,266

19

20

Victoria Home and Orphanage, (G.) Training Home for Girls, **

**

135

126

11

L. M. S.

8

218

189

11

21

St. Paul's Girls' School, * *

C. M. S.

9

157

137

119

1,386

2,079

616

816

709

6,806

22

No. 26 Caine Road, (G.)*

R. C. M.

242

70

64

24

Holy Infancy, (M.)**

237

76

61

>>

28

Aberdeen, (M.)

*

*

238

26

21

""

30

33

No. 2 Taiping shan Street, (G.) ** No. 199 Queen's Road East, (G.)

L. M. S.

2111

35

34

**

'5

225

100

89

""

34

No. 156 Reclamation Street, (B.)* *

6

223

133

· 114

""

35

No. 35 Pottinger Street, (G.)

**

221

51

43

3

""

36

Wanchai Chapel, (B.) * *

226

62

48

3

"}

37

Totsai Chapel, (B.)* ·

2291

52

44

"}

38

43

Nos. 65 and 67 Battery Street, (G.) No. 158 Reclamation Street, (G.) **

**

2381

87

80

A co co co CO CO IP IP

256

244

63

102

4

356

129

144

132

320

""

223

94

91

273

,,

4+

No. 20A Aberdeen Street, (G.)

} * *

214

38

33

3

99

45

46

57

59

Tanglungchan Chapel, (G.) **

Wanchai Chapel, (G.)* *

No. 341 Queen's Road West, (G.) * *

Yaumati Chapel, (G.)

217

36

25

4

100

""

""

C. M. S.

232

81

67

268

243/

46

18

72

* *

234

52

46

184

60

No. 232 Hollywood Road, (G.) **

234

51

42

210

""

61

No. 20 Pokfulam Road, (G.)

**

L. M. S.

6

230

44

4.1

205

62

No. 44 Shaukiwan East, (G.)

***

C. M. S.

254

33

26.

104

68

No. 17 Elgin Street, (G.) *.

**

W. M.

2463

56

45

135

70

Kowloon City, (G.) **

C. M. S.

252

55

46

184

21

175

No. 126 Aberdeen Street, (B.) **

C. S.

co

1,278

1,078

3,580

VERNACULAR

(Lower Grade.)

SCHOOLS.

223

50

39

156

156

240

189

147

90

3

3

272

114

171

183

176

75

No. 126 Aberdeen Street, (B.) **

C. S.

3.

223

50

39

4

76

No. 9 Blacksmith's Street, (B.)

**

2

229

100

80

*

77

No. 6 Bridges Street, (B.)

78

No. 52 Bridges Street, (B.)*

**

**

2291

70

63

217

79

67

79

No. 111 Canton Road, (B.)* *.

235

78

49

"}

80

No. 7 Cook Street, (B.)

**

223

39

30

""

81

No. 42 & 44 Des Voeux Road Central, (B.)**|

232

78

68

""

82

No. 99A High Street, (B.)

**

2

230

44

38

}}

83

Kowloon Walled City, (B.) **

4

235

67

57

""

84

Lung On Street Temple, (B.)*

**

2

229

81

61

85

Lung On Street Guild Room, Wantsai, (B.)**|

1

221

50

44

""

86

No. 98 Nathan Road, (B.)

**

2

236

41

33

33

87

No. 208 Queen's Road East, (B.)**.

225

48

36

>>

88

No. 373 Queen's Road West, (B.)

**

2

219

50

32

}}

89

No. 32&34 Fook Tsuen Heung, Shamshuipo*

**

233/

83

54

>>

90

No. 17 Star Street, (B.)

**

232

81

66

""

91

No. 12 Tai Hang, (B.)* *,

231

127

96

""

92

No. 88A Wanchai Road, (B.) * *.

1

228

49

46

""

93

No. 25 Water Street, (B.)*

***

2333

50

43

91

No. 30 Western Street, (B.)*

**

231

43

38

99

95

No. 122A Hollywood Road, (B.)*

*****

T. W. H.

240

36

32

96

97

No. 184 Queen's Road East, (B.)* No. 253 Queen's Road West, (B.) **.

**

237

36

33

"

234

36

31

98

No. 14 Tai Yuen Street, (B.)

* *

250

45

⚫ 40

,,

99

No. 3 Centree Street, (B.) **

252

46

100

101

No. 2 Ladder Street, Ground Floor, (B.)* *. No. 2 Ladder Street, 1st Floor, (B.) **.

239

""

3

241

36

">

102-

No. 124 Hollywood Road, (B.)

**

3

244

19998

40

36

31

31

69

52

or co co co :

CT A CU CU OF C7 co co co co co co co co co co

3

3

5

>>

28

Total Number of Schools 62.

1,648

1,333

Grand Total,

6,008

5,016

NOTE.-R. C. M.=Roman Catholic Mission. C. of E. Church of England.

C. M. S. =Church Missionary Society.

L. M. S.

W. M.

C. S.

=

London Missionary Society.

-Wesleyan Mission.

-Confucian Society.

T. W. H.-Tung Wah Hospital.

B.

=Boys.

G.

-Girls.

M.

-Mixed.

99

162

198

480

138

129

114

128

165

160

4

120

93

102

260

4,086

49,090

School year ends 30th June.

School year ends 31st December.

17,000

16,000

15,000

14,000

13,000

12,000

11,000 :

10,000

9,000

Table III.

Average Attendance in all Government and Grant Schools, and total enrolment at Private Schools and the Technical Institute, which was opened in 1908.

Note. The figures prior to 1913 are not very trustworthy, as there was no right of entry into private schools until that year.

The figures for the New Territories are included in 1913 for the first time.

The University and Police School are not included.

English Schools :-Red.

Vernacular Schools :-Black.

1901. 1902. 1903. 1904. 1905. 1906. 1907. 1908. 1909. 1910. 1911. 1912. 1913. 1914. 1915.

|

1916. 1917. 1918. 1919.

10,327

9,863

12,989

12,092

11,919

13,230

15,461

16,582 16,641

}

8,962

9,145

13,000

12,000

11,000

10,000

9,000

8,000

7,000

8,140

9,863

10,327

6,785

6,065 6,100

6,000

5,752

5,527

5,582

5,420

5,230

5,000

5,096

4,580

4,540

4,660

4,630

4,610

4,130

1,490

4,000

3,970

3,680

3,375

3,213

3,000 2,900

2,000

1,000 |

12,989

6,442

11,919

12,092

13,230

9,145

8,962

8,474

7,873

7,764

7,462

Appendix Q.

REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC WORKS FOR THE YEAR 1919.

Expenditure.

1. The amounts voted, as compared with those actually expended by the Department under the various headings, were as follows:-

Amount voted.

In Estimates.

Supplemen- tary Votes.

Actual Expenditure.

Total.

(i) Personal Emoluments

and Other Charges....!

465,625.00

27,963.20 493,588.20

390,006.29

(IA) Special Expenditure;

Typewriter, etc,

` 1,540.00

1,540.00

1,376.35

(ii) Annually

Recurrent

Works,

702,000.00

152,100.00

851,100.00

(iii) Extraordinary Works.... 2,610,450.00

822,509.87.

926,296.133,536,746.13 |2,235,002.95

Total,..

| 3,779,615.00 | 1,106,359.334,885,974.333,448,895.46

Detailed statements of (ii) and (iii) are given in Annexes A and B.

With regard to (i), the saving is due to vacancies in the Staff, lapsing pay of Officers who were on Active Service, refunds on account of supervision of work executed by the Department for various public companies and the higher rate of exchange (average 3/9) which prevailed throughout the year as compared with that adopted (3-) when the Estimates were framed.

In the case of (ii), the following were the principal savings on sub-heads :

Hongkong.

Maintenance of Roads and Bridges outside City, .........$566.05 Gas Lighting, City and Suburbs and Hill District,

Electric Lighting, City, Hill District and Shaukiwan,

Maintenance of Public Cemetery,

Maintenance of Chinese Cemeteries,

6,752.91

731.49

841.22

1,221.24

Expenditure.

Dredging Foreshores,

Stores Depreciation,

Maintenance of Aberdeen Water Works,

.$ 1,518.68

1,756.28

587.52

Kowloon.

Maintenance of Roads and Bridges,

1,348.77

Maintenance of Sewers, Nullahs, etc.,

1,146.35

Gas Lighting,

1,621.20

Maintenance of Chinese Cemeteries,

500.00

New Territories.

Maintenance of Roads and Bridges...

Maintenance of Telephones,

547.01

1,177.94

The savings were far more than counterbalanced by excesses on other sub-heads, the principal of which were the following:-

Hongkong.

Maintenance of Buildings,

$14,918.35

Improvements to Buildings,.

15,947.64

Maintenance of Lighthouses,

1.913.05

Maintenance of Roads and Bridges in City,

7,742.54

Improvements to Roads and Bridges outside City,

32,219.85

Maintenance of Praya Walls and Piers,

2,476.14

Typhoon and Rainstorm Damages,

9.047.31

Maintenance of City and Hill District Water Works,

40.897.04

Water Account, (Meters, etc.),

1,090.85

Kowloon.

Maintenance of Buildings,

Typhoon and Rainstorm Damages,

2.010.08

1,494.01

Maintenance of Water Works,...

2,733.15

Water Account, (Meters, etc.).......

1,205.89

New Territories.

Maintenance of Buildings,

3,009.31

Typhoon and Rainstorm Damages,

5,688.71

Maintenance of Laichikok Water Works.

701.99

Q-3

Comparison of Expenditure, 1918 and 1919.

Expenditure.

2. The following is a statement of the expenditure in 1919 as compared with that of the previous year :--

1918.

1919.

Increase.

Decrease.

..

$ c.

C.

(i) Personal Emoluments and

Other Charges,

374,906.32

390,006.29

15,099.97

(A) Special Expenditure;

Typewriters, etc.,

296,30

1,376 35

1,080.05

(ii) Annually Recurrent Works, 712,675.37

822,509.87

109,834.50

(iii) Extraordinary Works,... 1,578,149.12 | 2,235,002.95

656,853.83

Total, $ 2,666,027.11 3,448,895.46

782,868.35

Item (i).The increase is due to the return, during the course of the year, of certain Officers who have been on Active Service and to the grants of special Bonuses to Officers who have been called upon to perform extra duties. The average rate of exchange for 1919 was 3/9 as compared with 3/23 during 1918.

"

Item (ii).-The increase under this head is principally due to in- creased expenditure under the following sub-heads:-"Maintenance of Buildings" ($6,007.96), "Improvements to Buildings" ($16,385.45), "Maintenance of Lighthouses" ($3,459.65), "Maintenance of Roads and Bridges" ($16,019.63), "Improvements to Roads and Bridges ($27,105.49), "Maintenance of Telephones" ($593.53), "Main- tenance of Praya Walls and Piers" ($3,670.00), "Maintenance of Recreation Grounds" ($967.35), "Dredging Foreshores ($2,657.95), Maintenance of Water Works' ($40,925.22), and "Water Account" ($4,347.03).

وو

"

The only decreases worth recording were under "Maintenance of Sewers" ($1,862.95), “Lighting" ($2,338.53), "Maintenance of Cemeteries" ($2,069.51), and "Typhoon and Rainstorm Damages ($5,440.67).

""

Item (iii).--The increase is due almost entirely to the great amount of work executed notably in connection with the construc- tion of new roads and improvement of existing roads. The gross amount expended under "Compensation and Resumptions was $539,523.56, as compared with $496,307.65 in 1918, an increase of $43,215.91. The principal item was the resumption of "Beacons- field Arcade" at a cost of $275,000.00.

Water Works Revenue.

Revenue from Water Works.

3. Water Works Revenue.-The following is a statement of the revenue derived from Water Works during 1919, the figures for 1918 being given in a parallel column for purposes of comparison :-

:

City including Wongnei- chong Village and

1919.

Excess Con- sumption.

Rates 2%.

C.

Total.

1918 Total.

C.

C.

properties bordering

Shaukiwan Road,

123,222.64

Hill District,

5,275.15

264,403.26

6,649.19

387,625.90

357,568.73

11,924.34 11,776.66

Pokfulam District,

3,397.10

3,397.10

2,312.90

Kowloon: including Sham-

shuipo and Kowloon

City,

50,806.53 39,350.44

90,216.97 79,258.37

Aberdeen,

Shaukiwan....

2,908.00

428.83

3,348.50 3,066.79

3,336.83

3,622.00

6,415.29

6.059,93

Laichikok,

***

28,165.37

28,165.37 23.293.00

Total,

217,183.29 313,898.51 531,081.80 483,891.59

With the exception of a trivial decrease in the case of Aber- deen, the figures show an increase in all cases, amounting in the aggregate to $47,190.21.

1

Q 5

Land Sales and Surveys.

Laud Sales, &c.

4. Land Sales, Extensions, Grants, etc.-The actual amount of premium paid into the Treasury during the year was $265,468.86, or considerably more than the estimate, which amounted to $200,000.00.

The following is a comparative statement of the Revenue derived from Land Sales, etc., for the years 1917-1919 :-

Sales by Auction

Sales without Auction

Extensions granted

1917.

1918.

1913.

$ C.

C.

106,188.00

202,675.30

159,365.87

1,531.40

547.40

257.00

41,510,57

77,359.20

98,279.30

4,300.00

Grants on Nominal Terms

:

Grants on Short Leases...

Extensions of Short Period Leases to 75

years

2,086.50

207.50

Premia derived from sale of rights to

erect piers

9.702.40

4,559.82

4,043,51

Fees for Bouudary Stones to mark lots...

1,331.30

1,639.15

1,454.59

Conversions and Exchanges

4,278.35

3,560.32

6,801.59

Premium for permission to build upon portions of Kowloon Marine Lots Nos. 10, 11 and 12

1,157.10

Total,

165,699.12

296.727.99 265,468.86

Actual amount of premium paid into

the Treasury

$ 161,851.43 301,760.87 265,468.86

5. Sales by Auction.-Fourteen lots were sold in Hongkong, five in Kowloon and one in New Kowloon which realised $79,127.35, $72,200.00 and $200.00 respectively. The District Officer at Taipo sold 197 small lots which realised $7,742.00 and the Assistant District Officer at Hongkong 7 lots which realised $96.00.

6. Sales without Auction.--There were no sales under this heading in Hongkong, Kowloon and New Kowloon. The District Officer at Taipo sold 31 lots and the Assistant District Officer at Hongkong 8 lots by Private Treaty.

7. Extensions Granted.-The extensions granted in Hongkong comprised additional areas to Inland Lots Nos. 1548, 2149, 2259,

Land Sales, &c.

2206, 2138, 2082, 1834, 2065, 2258, 1922, 2071, 1934, 2079, 2238, *1549 and 2205, Rural Building Lots Nos. 135 and 114, Marine Lots Nos. 277 and 281, Quarry Bay Marine Lots Nos. 1 and 2, Shauki- wan Inland Lot No. 445 and Garden Lot No. 26.

In Kowloon, extensions were granted to Kowloon Inland Lots Nos. 1363, 1357, 1260, 720, 1257 and 1301, Kowloon Marine Lots Nos. 93, 90 and 27 and Hung Hom Inland Lots Nos. 218 and 257. There were no extensions granted by the District Officer at Taipo uor by the Assistant District Officer at Hongkong.

8. Conversions and Exchanges.—Garden Lot No. 36 was con- verted into an Inland Lot, the area being incorporated with Inland Lot No. 1704. Shaukiwan Inland Lot No. 444 was granted in ex- change for the areas occupied by houses Nos. 65 and 66 at Tsat Tsz Mui, a sum of $1,250.00 being paid as compensation for the re- moval of the structures. An area of 1,053 square feet was granted in exchange for a portion of Inland Lot No. 522 which was required for the purpose of widening Caine Road. Arrangements were made for the conversion of Farm Lot No. 48 into an Inland Lot (de- signated I. L. 2270) subject to payment of a sum of $21,000.00 by way of premium. The premium is not payable however until 1920.

In Kowloon, a new lot designated Kowloon Inland Lot No. 1387 was granted in exchange for the Remaining Portion of Section 1 of Section A of Kowloon Inland Lot No. 425 and Kowloon Inland Lot No. 1368 was granted in exchange for Hung Hom Inland Lot No. 1.

In New Kowloon, certain exchanges were arranged in connec- tion with the re-laying-out of Shamshuipo Village.

In the New Territories, 11 conversions and exchanges were arranged by the District Officer at Taipo and 11 by the Assistant District Officer at Hongkong, particulars of which will be found in the Land Officer's report.

9. Grants on Nominal Terms.-In Hongkong, a lot designated Inland Lot No. 2275, containing an area of 4,600 square feet, was granted for the purpose of erecting a Maternity Hospital.

There were no grants under this heading at Kowloon.

In the New Territories, an area of 103 acres was granted for the purpose of erecting a hospital in the Un Long District.

10. Grants on Short Leases.-The Old Post Office was let for a period of one year at a rental of $1,380.00 per month and the Old Land Office for a like period at a rental of $453.00 per month. The Old Supreme Court was let in two portions for the same period, the rentals derived being $425.00 and $180.00 per month respec- tively.

There is nothing to report under this heading in Kowloon.

In the New Territories, the Assistant District Officer at Hong- kong let Lot No. 7171, Survey District No. 1, containing an area of 1,305 square feet, for a period of five years from 1st July, 1919.

Land Sales, &c.

11. Permits to occupy lands, etc., for short periods.-These were of a very miscellaneous character and too numerous to admit of individual mention; most of them were for small areas to be held on half-yearly permits.

12. Extensions of Short Period Leases to 75 years.-There is nothing to report under this heading in Hongkong or in the New Territories. The leases of Kowloon Inland Lots Nos. 738, 916 and 917 were extended to 31st December, 1971, the premium charged being, respectively, $67.50, $70.00 and $70.00. The lots men- tioned were originally leased to squatters for a period of 21 years from 1st January, 1897.

13. Prospecting and Mining Licences.-Five Mining Licences and four Prospecting Licences for areas in the New Territories were issued.

A

14. Resumptions.-Sections A, B, C and the Remaining Por- tion of Inland Lot No. 1362, Morrison Hill Road, containing in all an area of 4,042 square feet, were resumed at a cost of $18,500.00 with a view to a re-laying-out of the Morrison Hill areas. portion of Inland Lot No. 26, U Yam Lane, containing an area of 2,273 square feet, was resumed at a cost of $23,000.00 on account of the insanitary condition of the houses in the lane. A sum of $260.00* was paid for Shaukiwan Lot No. 195 containing an area of 476 square feet, as it interfered with the alignment of the new road to Taitam Gap. Part of the Remaining Portion of Marine Lot No. 43, amounting to 4,210 square feet, was resumed at a cost of $12,630.00 for widening Spring Gardens Lane. A sum of $31,002.10† was paid for Rural Building Lot No. 111, containing an area of 12,140 square feet, and the dwelling-house thereon for use in connection with the Victoria Hospital. Houses Nos. 155, 157 and 159, Wanchai Road, on Inland Lots Nos. 1368 and 1535 were acquired by Government at a total cost of $42,000.00 in anticipa- tion of the cutting down of Morrison Hill and the re-laying-out of the district. Sections E, F and G of Rural Building Lot No. 6, situated above and to the north of Stewart Terrace, were purchased by Govern- ment at a cost of $4,000.00. A portion of Inland Lot No. 123, having an area of 1,218 square feet, was resumed for widening Caine Road, the compensation paid being $2,212.00. Inland Lot No. 2027, con- taining an area of 5,499 square feet and Inland Lot No. 1914, con- taining an area of 9,906 square feet, both of which are occupied by dwelling-houses, were acquired by Government for $7,000.00 and $13,000.00 respectively as the owners represented that their properties were suffering depreciation owing to operations at the Government Quarry. Two village houses were resumed at a cost of $1,250 to admit of the extension of the workshops in connection with the quarry.

A portion of Inland Lot No. 797, containing an area of 508 square feet, which was required for widening Kui Yan Lane was resumed at a cost of $4,000.00. A sum of $275,000.00 was

*This was charged to Item 13 (e) P.W.E.-- Improving road from Shaukiwan to Taitam Gap.

This was defrayed from "Miscellaneous Services", a special vote being taken to defray the cost.

Land Sales, &c.

\

paid by Government for the Remaining Portion of Inland Lot No. 82 and the buildings thereon known as "Beaconsfield Arcade". A number of small areas, forming portions of Inland Lot No. 424, which interfered with the alignment of Caine Road, were resumed at a total cost of $2,389.50. Inland Lots Nos. 322 and 654 and Sections A of Inland Lots Nos. 312 and 655 were resumed, together with the houses standing thereon, (riz., Nos. 67, 69, 71 and 79, Wanchai Road), at a cost of $20,100, for the purpose of widening Wanchai Road. The following resumptions were effected in connec- tion with the widening of Queen's Road East:-No. 1 Man Ming Lane, at a cost of $1,100.00; Nos. 138-144 (even numbers) Queen's Road East at a cost of $17,658,00; No. 2 Lun Fat Street at a cost of $10,400.00; Nos. 25 and 27 Ship Street at a cost of $17,400.00 and Nos. 146-152 (even numbers) Queen's Road East at a cost of $17,000.00. Lot No. 17. Tai Hang Stream, was re-entered for non- payment of Crown rent. In Kowloon, a sum of $15,000 was paid for Kowloon Inland Lot No. 96 on Jordan Road which was required in connection with the re-laying-out of the district. Section C of Kowloon Inland Lot 106, Sections G & H of Kowloon Inland Lot 107 and Section A ss. 2 and Section B of Kowloon Inland Lot 108 were resumed at a cost of $9,250 in connection with the formation of Nathan Road on its proper alignment and a necessary re-laying-out of the area in which these properties are situated. Kowloon Inland Lot 1124 (area 4,006 square feet) situated at Fuk Tsun Heung, and the buildings thereon, which have been occupied as a Police Station for a number of years, were purchased by Government at a cost of $14,000. Compensation amounting to $2,824.95 was paid for certain cultivated areas at Tai Wan which were required in connee- tion with the sale of Hung Hom Inland Lots Nos. 257 and 258. Kowloon Farm Lot No. 1, containing an area of 6 acres, was resumed at a cost of $10,500, the area being required for the extension of Coronation Road and development purposes in connec- tion therewith. A sum of $3,696 was paid for certain lots, contain- ing a total area of 14202 Mows, for the purpose of constructing a new 100 feet road between Tai Kok Tsui and Kowloon City. In connection with the scheme for the construction of main roads in Kowloon, 18 lots at Ma Tau Kok and Ma Tau Chung, containing a total area of 59:50 Mows, were resumed at a cost of $1,963.50; Ma Tau Chung Lots Nos. 1 & 2 containing 09 acre were resumed at a cost of $1,050.50, Ma Tau Chung Lot No. 57 was resumed at a cost of $363, and Lot No. 5411 (1) Section A was resumed at a cost of $1,025. The buildings on Claim No. 45 at Lo Lung Hang were resumed at a cost of $290 for the purpose of extending Chatham Road. A sum of $298.25 was paid in respect of the exchange of Lot No. 2239 Section A, R.P., S.D. IV, for a new area of less value. Certain buildings at Un Chau Village were removed, a sum of $809.40 being paid as an act of grace for their removal.

In the Northern District of the New Territories, 303 lots, containing a total area of 2566 acres, were resumed for various reasons at a cost of $6,182.81 and 129 lots were re-entered for non-payment of Crown rent. In the Southern District, 127 lots, containing an area of 5-12 acres, were resumed for various reasons at a cost of $31,981.30 and 47 lots were either surrendered or re-entered for non-payment of Crown rent.

:

9

Land Sales, &c.

15. Lease Plans.-Plans and particulars (in duplicate) of 95 lots were prepared and forwarded to the Land Office in connection with the issue of leases.

16. Boundary Stones.-Boundary Stones were fixed for 26 lots in Hongkong, 16 lots in Kowloon and 30 lots in the New Territories.

17. Surveys.-Work in connection with the Ordnance Survey was almost entirely suspended during the year. Six members of the staff were at home on Military Service but four of them returned towards the end of the year. Numerous surveys were undertaken for the purpose of defining the boundaries of lots or for the prepar- tion of sale and lease plans, etc., and, whenever practicable, such surveys were plotted on the Ordnance Sheets. A schedule of particulars of the whole of the lots at Pokfulam owned by the Dairy Farm Company was prepared. A detailed survey of a large portion of Jubilee Road was made and plotted. The extension of the relief Golf Course at Fanling was surveyed and plotted and a revision of the eighteen-hole course was also made. The Race Course at Happy Valley, containing about 16 acres, was surveyed in connection with the issue of a new lease. The Southern portion of the coast line of Cheung Chau Island, about 4 miles long, was surveyed in connec- tion with the laying-out of a Reservation area on the Island.

A new 100-foot road from Tai Kok Tsui to Kowloon City was set out and a schedule of resumptions, etc., in connection with the same was prepared. A valuation of all the remaining village lots in Shamshuipo (Survey District IV) was made, a number of resump- tions being effected or exchanges arranged in the case of certain lots and also of the lots within the area formerly known as Kowloon Farm Lot 13. Certain lots at Shaukiwan were valued in connection with an improvement scheme.

18. Squatters.—The whole of the old squatter's holdings which came within the purview of the Squatters' Board, (Ordinance No. 5 of 1890), have been dealt with. This item will accordingly disappear from future reports.

19. Military Lands.—An area of 864 acres, forming portion of Kowloon, East Battery Reserve, was transferred to the Colonial Government, a sum of $132,040.47 being credited to the Military Authorities in the Military Lands Account. The remainder of the Reserve, containing an area of 801 acres, was also taken over by the Government, a sum of $122,412.53 being similarly credited. These two areas, which were required in connection with extensions of the Kowloon Docks, were taken over in accordance with the terms set forth in the Lewis Memorandum (Item 34). Two portions of the. area occupied by Kowloon East Battery, containing 66,371_and 38,900 square feet respectively, were acquired for Kowloon Dock extension, the sums credited to the Military Authorities in the Military Lands Account being $23,229.85 and $13,615.00 respectively.

A sum of $1,311.60 was similarly credited for an area of 11,860 square feet which formed part of Pinewood Battery Reserve and which was required for the extension of Lugard Road. Two portions of the Saiwan Military Reserve, containing 11 and 03

Land Sales, &c.

Q 10

acre, respectively, were acquired for road improvements, an equiva- lent area being granted in exchange.

20. Piers.—There were no grants under long lease in Hong- kong. In Kowloon, the rights for the erection of four piers, each containing an area of 1,601 square feet, were granted opposite Hung Hom Marine Lot No. 3, the premium paid in each case being $240.00. Similar rights for four piers, varying from 275 to 940 square feet in area, were granted opposite Kowloon Marine Lot No. 46, the total amount of premium received being $1,116.55. An extension of 6,975 square feet to Kowloon Permanent Pier No. 6 was granted, but payment of the premium, which amounted to $8,370.00, was deferred for a period not exceeding 24 months from the 27th February, 1919. Licences for the following temporary piers were issued or renewed:-21 in Hongkong, 16 in Kowloon and 8 in the New Territories. Licences were also issued or renewed for 13 slipways in Hongkong, 3 in Kowloon and 2 in the New Territories, the total fees for which amounted to $4,385.00. The premia derived in respect of temporary piers amounted to $2,436.96.

21. Cemeteries.-There is nothing to report under this head- ing in Hongkong. An extension of 57,585 square feet for the Protestant Cemetery (N.K.I.L. 5) at Kowloon City was granted.

Work under the Buildings Ordinance.

It may

22. Plans. Notwithstanding the large decrease, amounting to 529, in the number of plans classified under the heading "Alterations and additions to existing buildings", which includes plans for any substantial repairs or reinstatements required in the case of old buildings, there has been only a slight decrease in the total number of plans dealt with as compared with 1918. be mentioned that there was a large increase, amounting to 460, in 1918, under the heading just mentioned and it appears probable that it was caused by the earthquake shocks in February, 1918. which necessitated substantial repairs in the case of a large number of buildings. The following is a tabulated statement showing the number of buildings, etc., for which plans were deposited during the year, the figures for 1918 being given in a parallel column for purposes of comparison:---

1918.

1919. Increase. Decrease.

European houses.

60

168

Chinese houses,

327

381

51

Buildings and structures other than

the above,

197

197

Alterations and additions to exist-

ing buildings,

2,837

2.308

Verandahs,

204

289

Balconies,

42

168

Sunshades,

15

J01

Piers,

729

Total,

3,685

3,617

461

529

1

M

B. O. Work.

23. Certificates.--The following certificates for new buildings were issued:

117, under Section 204 of Ordinance 1 of 1903, for 458 domestic buildings of which 106 were European dwel- lings and 352 Chinese.

72 for 105 non-domestic buildings.

These figures shew increases of 52 and 68, respectively, in the case of "domestic" and "non-domestic" buildings.

24. Notices and Permits.-The following is a tabulated state- ment of the notices served and permits issued during the year, the figures for 1918 being given in a parallel column for purposes of comparison -

1918.

1919.

Increase.

Decrease.

Dangerous Structure Notices,

283

275

8

Miscellaneous Notices....

190

272

2

Private Street Improvenient

Notices.

458

391

67

Nuisances reported by Officers of

the Sanitary Department,

3,484

4,075

591

2,141

2,162

21

Fees collected on account of the

**

$ 715 54

$ 840

82

En Ek

125

$

225

Permits.

issue of permits to obtain sand and stone from Crown land,

Fees for issue of new permits......

The following is a tabulated statement of the cases in which legal proceedings were taken with regard to failure to obtain permits, the number of convictions obtained, and the amount of fines imposed-

Nature of Offence.

No. of Cases.

No. of Convictions.

Amount of Fines.

Removal of stone, &c., from Crown land or

foreshore without permission,

$

15

15

403

Depositing materials on Crown land with-

out permission,

20

19

214

Erecting or maintaining matsheds without

permission,

15

15

290

In cases where persons who had permission to obtain stone or other materials from Crown land had damaged trees in the vicinity, they were required to refund the cost of the damage as assessed by the Superintendent of the Botanical and Forestry Department. The amount collected from this source was $91.60, as compared with $24.50 in 1918, which was credited to "Timber Sales".

No fees were received in respect of advertisements on hoardings on Crown land. Fees, amounting to $16.00, were received in

B. O. Work.

Q 12

respect of permission to erect matsheds on Crown land in connection with religious festivals.

25. Resumptions for Scavenging Lanes, &c.-A statement of the work done will be found under the heading " Public Works Extraordinary" (paragraphs 109, 122 and 132).

26. Private Streets.-Re-surfacing and other repairs under the provisions of Section 186 of the Buildings Ordinance were car- ried out by this Department at the cost of the frontagers in thirty- three streets.

27. Improvements, &c., of Public Streets.-The policy of re- quiring houses, when undergoing reconstruction, to be built at a higher level where necessary in order to provide for the future raising of certain low-lying areas in Hongkong and Kowloon has been continued. In some cases, arrangements are made with owners whereby the ground floors of their houses are retained at their former levels upon their giving an undertaking to raise such floors when the raising of the street is carried out.

In the case of some streets, steps have been taken towards effect- ing improvements in the building lines whilst in others schemes for widening have been decided upon. These proposals are being carried into effect as opportunity arises. In addition to the schemes of this nature referred to in previous years' Reports, the widening and improvement of the following roads has been undertaken :- Caine Road, Bonham Road, Conduit Road, Kennedy Road and Shaukiwan Road.

The schemes for widening Wanchai Road and Queen's Road East have been proceeded with and, in the case of several premises, the widening scheme is being put into effect.

28. Footways-Attention has been given to footways under balconies and verandahs, notices having been served upon owners to repair such footways.

29. Typhoon and Rainstorm Damages.--A considerable amount of minor damage was caused by rainstorms in July and August. The damage caused to property by typhoons was very slight.

30. Landslips.--Following severe rainstorms early in July, a landslip occurred from the cutting below Findlay Path which had been increased in carrying out the improvements of the upper sec- tion of the Peak Tramway. As a result, the tramway service was wholly suspended for one day and, for about four weeks, the cars were not able to make the full journey.

There were a few other landslips of a minor nature, none of which call for special comment.

31. Collapses. The following collapses occurred :---

A portion of the 3rd floor of No. 44, Queen's Road West,

fell, causing the death of one person.

A portion of the 1st floor of No. 16, Kremer Street, gave

way, causing the death of one person.

-

L

13

B. O. Work.

There were several other collapses of a minor nature which do not call for special comment.

32. Tests of Mortar-Attention was given to the testing of mortar, 256 samples being taken from works in progress, and in no case was the mortar found to be below the accepted standard.

33. Prosecutions.-The following is a tabulated statement of the cases in which legal proceedings were taken with regard to illegal works and other nuisances, the number of convictions obtained and the amount of fines imposed

Nature of Offence.

No. of Cases.

No. of Convictions.

Amount of Fines.

Illegal works (ie, divergence from approv- ed plans, non-submission of plans before commencing building opera- tions, construction of illegal works and occupation of matsheds, &c., with- out permission),

Other nuisances (¿.., non-compliance with notices issued in connection with nui- sances reported by Officers of the Sanitary Department),

39

$75.00

155

147

1,494.00

34. Testing Drains.-Fees amounting to $50.00 were collected on account of additional inspections of drains necessitated by care- lessness or negligence on the part of the parties concerned in the carrying out of the work. This shews a decrease of $10.00 as compared with 1918. 187 drainage inspections were made during the year.

35. Modifications. -Written modifications of various sections of the Ordinance were granted in 59 cases under the powers con- ferred by Section 264b. This shews an increase of 9 as compared with 1918.

36. Applications and Appeals to the Governor-in-Council under Section 265-Applications for modifications of various sections of the Ordinance were made to the Governor-in-Council in 9 cases, 3 of which were granted, (2 conditionally), the others being refused.

An appeal to the Governor-in-Council was made in one case, which was granted on certain conditions.

37. Cemeteries.-Work in connection with forming new ter- races, &c., to afford additional grave spaces was carried out in the following cemeteries:-

Mount Caroline (Sections A, B and C).

Kai Lung Wan East (Section A and Plague Section). Aberdeen (Section A).

Hau Pui Loong (Plague Section).

Sai Yu Shek (Section A).

B. O. Work.

14

In addition, various paths were surfaced, roads formed and rainstorm damages repaired, whilst other works in the nature of maintenance were carried out at Mount Caroline and Kai Lung Wan East.

A survey was made of Kau Lung Tong Cemetery and plotted to a scale of 40 feet to one inch.

38. Theatres Regulation Ordinance.-Sixty-one licences were issued under this Ordinance during the year for the holding of various public performances. In some cases, the licences were for performances in buildings specially erected for the purpose; in some cases for existing buildings which were altered as required prior to the granting of licences; and in other cases for performances in the open air.

A sum of $1,412.00 was derived from fees paid in connection with the issue of licences.

In three cases, legal proceedings were taken in respect of cou- traventions of the Regulations made under the Ordinance with the result that a conviction was obtained in each case, fines amounting to $75.00 being inflicted.

In October, the Theatres Regulation Ordinance, 1908, was repealed, a new enactment under the title of "The Places of Public Entertainment Regulation Ordinance, 1919," being substituted for it. The necessary Regulations under the latter Ordinance were passed by the Governor-in-Council on the 6th November, those under the old Ordinance being repealed.

The new Regulations are similar in many respects to the former ones, but they contain stipulations with regard to the erection of Matsheds for Public Entertainments, and the censoring of Cinema Films and Cinema Posters. Further, the Captain Superintendent of Police has been substituted for the Building Authority as Licens- ing Authority.

39. Fires. The following buildings were seriously injured by fire, some of them being damaged to such an extent as to require reconstruction :---

23, Wing Lok Street.

12, Gough Street.

67, Queen's Road West.

262, Queen's Road Central.

121, Jervois Street.

82 and 84, Bonham Strand.

71, Wanchai Road.

233 and 235, Shanghai Street.

41, Sheung Wang Kai, Shamshuipo.

Sheds at Aplichau, about 20 in number.

Q 15

B. O. Work.

40. Reclamations.The following is a statement of the private reclamations which were completed or in progress during the year:--

Hung Hom Marine Lot 3, Hung Hom,

(completed)

Area in sq. ft.

491,000

New Kowloon Inland Lots 190 & 191,

Laichikok, (in progress)

618,000

Aberdeen Inland Lots 81 to 88, Aber-

deen, (in progress),

165,000

Kowloon Marine Lot 93, Hung Hom,

(completed),

73,500

The areas stated are those of the lots, which in some cases extend further inland than old high water mark and are therefore not exclusively reclaimed from the sea.

In addition to the above, considerable progress was made with the works in connection with the reclamation of about 230 acres of foreshore and sea-bed at the head of Kowloon Bay referred to in last year's Report.

41. Principal Works of a Private_Nature.—The extension to the School of Anatomy to accommodate the School of Physiology. and the new building on 1.L. 1859 to contain the Schools of Pathology and Tropical Medicine in connection with the Hongkong University were completed. The quarters on I.L. 1853 for one of the junior officers and the Students' Union Building were also completed during the year.

The buildings constituting the Hongkong Electric Company's new power station on M.L. 321 were completed.

The new building on I.L. 82 for the Missions Etrangères was completed.

The Repulse Bay Hotel, on R.B.L. 142, was completed and the erection of a residential wing in connection therewith was commenced.

The three new building slips on H. H. M. L. 3, referred to in last year's Report, belonging to the Hongkong and Whampoa Dock Company, were completed. Two large blocks of quarters to accom- modate the Company's European Staff were completed and two other blocks were commenced. The preparation of sites for the erection of further blocks of quarters was also in hand at the close of the year. The erection of a Platers' shed and a sawmill and extensions to the machine shop and other works were also commenced.

The large reinforced concrete godown for the Hongkong and Kowloon Wharf and Godown Company, on K.M.L. 91, referred to in last year's Report, was practically completed.

A large reinforced concrete godown, on K.M.L. 88, as well as a wharf for ocean-going steamers and other structures for the Ocean Steamship Company, was completed.

The erection of a power house for the China Light and Power Company on K.M.L. 93, Hung Hom, was commenced.

B..O. Work.

Q 16

The development of the area at Ho Mun Tin, (K.I.L.'s 1308 to 1348), referred to in last year's Report, was proceeded with. The erection of 28 European houses, in addition to the 9 referred to in last year's Report, was proceeded with, 16 houses being completed by the end of the year.

Progress was made with the construction of the additional slips on Q.B.M.L.'s 1 and 2 for the Taikoo Dockyard Company.

The laying out of a street and the erection of 40 Chinese houses on I.L. 795, Hill Road, were, completed.

The alterations to the upper portion of the Peak Tramway and the reconstruction of Barker Road Station were completed in the early part of the year.

The erection, on R.B.L. 33, Happy Valley, of four large stands for the Hongkong Jockey Club was completed early in the year.

The extensive reclamation by the Standard Oil Company on N.K.L.L.'s 190 and 191, Laichikok, progressed steadily throughout the year.

An extensive reclamation adjoining and to the eastward of the Docks at Aberdeen was commenced, and was nearing completion at the end of the year, whilst the erection of a block of houses on A.I.L. 88, situated on the reclamation, was commenced.

The laying out of a new street (Li Chit Street) and the erection of 30 Chinese houses on M.L. 25, Praya East, was commenced.

The laying out of a new street (Chun Sing Street) and the erection of 18 Chinese houses on I.L. 834 was commenced and was nearing completion at the end of the year.

The erection of a block of 9 Chinese houses on M.L. 198, Water Street, was commenced and was practically completed by the end of the year.

The erection on I.L. 1642 of a large extension to St. Joseph's College was commenced.

A large building, situated on M.L. 183, at the junction of Des Voeux Road West and Hill Road, known as the Kam Ling Hotel. was completed.

The erection, on L.L.'s 1864 and 1865, Des Voeux Road Central, of large business premises for the Kwong Sang Hong was com- menced.

1

A new Theatre, known as the Wo Ping Theatre, was erected on I.L. 1689, Des Voeux Road Central.

The erection of a large number of godowns at Kennedy Town was commenced, several of which were completed.

The erection of several factories, godowns, etc., in various parts of Kowloon was commenced, and a considerable number of such structures were completed.

B. O. Work.

A Vermilion Factory and residential quarters on L.L. 2258, . Whitfeild, were completed.

The erection of a large Cigarette Factory on I.L. 1815, Bow- rington, was commenced.

Some extensions to the Tung Wah Mortuary at Sandy Bay were completed.

Work was started in connection with the erection, on M.L. 103, Section B, in Des Voeux Road Central, of a large extension to the Hongkong Bank.

The demolition of No. 4, Queen's Road Central, on I.L. 291A, with a view to the erection of a large block of offices, was com- menced.

The erection of 18 European houses on I.L.'s 145 and 146 in Wyndham Street and Arbuthnot Road and of 14 European houses on I.L.'s 1923, 1945 and 2072, Fung Wong Terrace, Wanchai, was completed.

The erection of 20 Chinese houses on M.L. 43, R.P., Praya East and Spring Gardens Lane, was completed.

A building on I.L. 76, Upper Albert Road, belonging to the Church Missionary Society and known as St. Paul's Hostel, was completed.

A block comprising 18 residential flats, on K.I.L. 574, Hanoi Road, was commenced.

The following is a summary of the smaller works which have been completed or commenced during the year, in addition to the larger ones specifically mentioned above:--

Works completed.

23 European houses in Hongkong.

11

"2

Kowloon.

32 Chinese houses in Victoria.

7

"

158

"

20

""

67

2

>"

"

Hongkong Villages.

Yaumati and Mongkoktsui. Taikoktsui.

Shamshuipo.

Kowloon Villages.

besides numerous buildings of a non-domestic character in Hong- kong and Kowloon.

Works commenced.

39 European houses in Hongkong including 1 in the Peak

23

4

""

District. Kowloon.

Villages.

33 Chinese houses in Victoria.

19

122

97

Hongkong Villages.

35

རླབ

""

Yaumati and Mongkoktsui. Taikoktsui.

Shamshuipo.

Kowloon Villages.

besides numerous buildings of a non-domèstic character in Hong-

kong and Kowloon.

P.W.R. Hongkong.

Q 18

PUBLIC WORKS RECURRENT.

HONGKONG.

42. Maintenance of Buildings.---The buildings generally were kept in a state of good repair, a number of them being renovated throughout in accordance with the recurring programme. The expenditure amounted to $84,918.35.

43. Improvement to Buildings. The principal improvements carried out under this heading comprised the construction of four new bathrooms, provided with water-closets, at the Staff Quarters of the Civil Hospital; alterations and additional cupboards in the linen room of the Civil Hospital; the provision of two new rooms for lady teachers at the Belilios School and extensive alterations to the lavatories at the Victoria British School. Numerous other improvements of a minor nature were effected in various buildings.

The total expenditure under the vote amounted to $24,947.64.

44. Maintenance of Lighthouses.-The Lighthouses were painted and colourwashed according to programme and otherwise maintained in good order at a cost of $6,413.05.

Approximate

45. Maintenance of Roads and Bridges in City Improvements to Roads and Bridges in City. Mileage, 60.—The road surfaces were maintained generally in a satisfactory condition. The asphaltum treatment of carriageways was still further extended throughout the City, whilst a consider- able area of granite setts was laid in the carriageways in those portions of the City where the increasing traffic rendered such paving desirable.

The following figures show the extent of the operations carried out at the Government Quarry during the year :--

Stone.--Various grades passed through crushers :-

A total quantity of 15,245 cubic yards, of which 1,945 cubic yards were made into tar macadam, 1,051 cubic yards into sand carpeting and 12,240 cubic yards were delivered to various works as the material came from the crushers. Further, 36,691 granolithic paving slabs were made for use on foot- ways, 3,781 lineal yards of reinforced concrete stand- ards and rails for fences, 123 reinforced concrete piles, varying from 26 to 70 feet in length, 6 reinforced. concrete lamp columns, 85 concrete survey marks, 70 lineal feet of reinforced concrete beams, 276 lineal feet of reinforced concrete brackets, 4 small reinforced concrete huts for housing the ends of submarine cables, 129 square feet of reinforced concrete panels and 56 lineal feet of reinforced concrete steps.

1

f

Q 19

P.W.R. Hongkong.

The following are particulars of the additional areas laid with improved surfacing during the year-

Substitution of granite setts for macadam or

concrete,

8q. yds.

743

Substitution of tar macadam for ordinary

macadam or concrete,

5,097

Substitution of 2" asphaltum laid on cement

concrete bed for macadam,

3,281

Substitution of asphaltum carpeting, for maca-

dam,...

4,781

Resurfacing worn out concrete footways with

asphaltum carpeting,

829

Tarring and sanding,..

27,263 6,400

2" Granolithic paving slabs laid in footways, ...

Approx-

46. Maintenance of Rouds and Bridges outside City. Improvements to Roads and Bridges outside City. imate Mileage 40.-The roads generally were maintained in a satisfactory manner.

Extensive improvements were undertaken on the Pokfulam Road, between the University and No. 8 Bridge, and benching was carried out between No. 10 Bridge and Aberdeen. The portion of road extending from the south end of Taitam Tuk Dam to the Pumping Station Road was macadamized.

On the Victoria Road, the practice of substituting macadam,

tarred and sanded, for decomposed granite was continued.

The following are particulars of the additional areas laid with improved surfacing during the year :-

Tarring and sanding,

2" Granolithic paving slabs laid in footways,...

sq. yds.

25,120 616

47. Maintenance of Telephones, including all Cables.-The lines and instruments were maintained in good order.

The aerial lines from Shaukiwan to D'Aguilar Wireless Station were renewed. Faults which occurred in the Waglan and Green Island Submarine Cables were duly remedied. Several diversions of the telephone lines had to be made, on account of road improve- ments and alterations to buildiugs.

An alarm bell and connecting cable were installed at Cape D'Aguilar Wireless Station.

Six telephones were added to the Government exchanges at the Central Police Station and Colonial Secretary's Office.

Electric bell services were installed in seven buildings and nine buildings were wired for electric lights and fans. All electric services in Government Buildings were maintained.

P.W.R. Hongkong.

20

Work executed in the electrical workshop comprised the mak- ing of bell-pushes, 3 and 6" bells, special fittings for certain electric lights, blocks for mounting electric light fittings, rewinding of fans, and cleaning same, the making of battery boxes, and a large amount of repair work in connection with the above services.

48. Maintenance of Sewers, Nullahs, &c.--The sewers, storm- water drains and trained nullahs generally were cleaned and main- tained in good condition, the open nullahs and channels in the City of Victoria and in the Shaukiwan District being cleaned by the Sanitary Department. The automatic flushing tanks were kept working continuously and the manual flushing tanks were operated during the period of low tides. Sand deposits were cleared as they occurred. The temporary timber outfall opposite Triangle Street was kept in repair.

The sedimentation tanks at Wanchai Gap and near R.B.L. 137, Pokfulam Road, were periodically sludged.

All metal work in connection with the various drainage systems was inspected, and, where found necessary, was repaired and tarred.

Repairs were made to several sewers, nullahs, storm-water drains and channels, the most important being to sewers in Broad- wood Road, Morrison Street between Jervois Street and Queen's Road Central, Des Voeux Road West to the west of Hill Road, Shaukiwan East and West, Stone Nullah Lane between Cross Street and the Wanchai Market, junction of Wing Wo Street and Des Voeux Road Central, junction of Murray Road and Chater Road, Wing Lok Street between Des Voeux Road Central and Bonham Strand East, in Lan Kwai Fong and from the Matilda Hospital to the sea, to storm-water drains in Boundary Path, near Lower Peak Tram Station, junction of Breezy Path and Bonhamn Road, near No. 146, Connaught Road West, and in Whitty Street and to nullahs, Albany nullah south of the Service Reservoir, in Valley "P" south of Wanchai Gap, rear of I.L. 1909, Kennedy Road, in Park Road, and in Pokfulam Village.

About 6,902 feet of old disused drains of various sizes and types were destroyed and filled in.

The details of expenditure under this heading are as follows:-

Labour for cleansing operations,

Repairs,

Tools for cleansing operations,.

General incidental expenditure,

as against $17,848.92 in the previous year.

$11,333.27

4,772.65

809.85

991.07

$17,906.84

21

P.W.R. Hongkong,

49. Gas Lighting, City and Suburbs and Hill District.--The total number of lamps in use at the end of the year in the City and its precincts was 1,202, an increase of 22 over the previous year, and in the Hill District 133, an increase of 4 as compared with the previous year.

50. Electric Lighting, City, Hill District and Shaukiwan.- The numbers and positions of incandescent lamps in the principal roads of the City are as under :-

City of Victoria

Various Roads On Tramway route

55

1,000 C.P.

(58 pairs)

116

100 C.P.

Shaukiwan,

26*

50 C.P.

Bowen Road,...

10

32 C.P.

Path from Bowen Road to May Road,...

32 C.P.

Lugard Road,

32 C.P.

Barker Road,...

16 C.P.

Wongneichong Road,

100 C.P.

Magazine Gap Road,

32 C.P.

7

32 C.P.

Tregunter Path,

51. Maintenance of Praya Walls and Piers.-The principal item executed under this heading was the re-painting of Blake Pier, including the superstructure, at a cost of $3,509.51. Considerable repairs were executed to Murray and Statue Piers and to a portion of the sea-wall which protects the Shaukiwan Road.

52. Maintenance of Public Cemetery.-Rocks were removed from sections 16E and 21a in order to provide additional areas for interments.

53. Maintenance of Chinese Cemeteries.-The work carried out under this heading has already been alluded to in paragraph 37 of this Report.

54. Maintenance of Public Recreation Grounds.-The various grounds were maintained in good order. The use of departmental labour for the purpose of mowing grass, cleansing ditches, etc., was continued.

A portion of sections A (2) and C on the Wongneichong ground was turfed

55. Dredging Foreshores.-The grab dredger was employed at the following places and removed the quantities of material stated during the year :-

* In addition to these, the Taikoo Dock Company provide and light 10 lamps,- each having a cluster of 3-100 C.P. incandescent lamps,-for lighting the road adjacent to their property, and the Taikoo Sugar Refining Company provide and light 7-2,000 C.P. incandescent lamps for lighting it adjacent to their property.

P.W.R. Hongkong.

Q 22

>

cubic yds.

14,082

27,712

41,794

Drain Outfalls, ...

sea-wall,

Shamshuipo Reclamation,-trench for foundations of

Total,

The whole of the material raised was deposited on the site of the Shamshuipo Reclamation.

The vessel was put on the slip and thoroughly overhauled, de- fective engine parts being renewed, by the Hongkong and Whampoa Dock Company at a cost of $3,205.00.

56. Typhoon and Rainstorm Damages.-The heavy rains of July and August caused numerous landslips, one of these, which occurred in the Colonial Cemetery, necessitating the erection of a small retaining wall on the west side of section 7.

The rubble pitching at Causeway Bay, adjoining the outfall of the Sookunpoo nullah, became undermined and gave way, causing a small public convenience to subside. The pitching was made good and the structure raised to its former level. A portion of the sea-wall protecting the Shaukiwan Road collapsed and was repair- ed. It became necessary to construct a retaining wall for the protection of a portion of the road from Wongneichong Gap to Deep Water Bay. Slight damage was done to the Piers and Searchers' sheds along the Harbour Front, which was made good. The nullah opposite the Grand Stand, Happy Valley, and the nullah south of the Glass Works at Tai Hang Village, (I.L. 1893), suffered considerable damage, necessitating substantial repairs.

The surfaces of those roads treated with asphaltum suffered only to a trifling extent, but practically the whole of the ordinary macadamized roads had to be repaired, owing to scour.

57. Stores Depreciation.-The adjustment of store values and re-conditioning of old stores have been met from this vote and also the loss incurred by the sale of obsolete and unserviceable stores, the total amount of these items being $852.76.

The following sums were credited to the vote:-

$389.03, being rebate on freight charges in connection with stores purchased in England through the Crown Agents; $1,413.30, being the value of stores returned which had been issued prior to 1919; and $706.71, being the value of condemned castings used as scrap metal. The result has been that, instead of showing any expenditure, the vote shows a credit balance of $1,756.28.

58. Maintenance of City and Hill District Waterworks.—A constant supply of water was maintained throughout the year with- out at any time having to restrict the supply by house services or

23

P.W.R. Hongkong.

resort to the use of the rider mains. This is the first occasion since 1908 on which it has been found possible to maintain a continuous supply throughout the year.

The total quantity of water stored in the impounding reservoirs. on the 1st January amounted to 1,551-3 million gallons, there being 275.5 million gallons in the gravitation reservoirs and 1,275.8 mil- lion gallons in the low-level reservoirs requiring pumping. It reached a minimum on the 29th May when the total was 1,168.8 million gallons, there being then 117 million gallons in the gravita- tion reservoirs and 1,051 8 million gallons in the low-level reservoirs. The reservoirs were at or over their permanent overflow levels for the following periods:-

Tairam,

Reservoir.

Capacity to permanent overflow level. (Million gallons.)

384.80

22.36

Taitam Byewash,

Taitam Intermediate,

195-91

Taitam Tuk,

1,419.00

Wongneichong,

30:34

Pokfulam,

66.00

Period.

89 days between 10th July

and 13th September. 39 days between 28th July

and 7th September. 236 days between 1st April

and 30th November. 52 days between 30th July

and 19th September. 24 days between 5th July

and 30th August. 40 days between 6th July

and 9th September.

The rainfall for the year amounted to 76·14 inches (Observatory Record) or 702 inches below the average. There were only three really wet months, namely, June, July and August and, during these months, 49 91 inches of rain fell. The dry season set in early, the rainfall for September being only 265 inches as compared with an average of 9.79.

The maximum quantity of water impounded in all the reservoirs during the year amounted to 2,118:41 million gallons during August or 33 45 million gallons less than the maximum during 1918.

The total quantity of water remaining in the reservoirs at the end of the year amounted to 1,558.99 million gallons.

The repairs to the second of the two new pumping engines which had been undertaken in 1918 were satisfactorily completed in the Spring and both the new engines were run for several months. The official tests of these engines were carried out in May and July and proved satisfactory, the engines being taken over by Government as from the 13th August. On the 25th December, the base casting on the suction side of the intermediate pump valve plate of No. 3 Engine cracked, putting this engine out of commission. Repairs were put in hand at once, but had not been completed by the end of the year.

No. 1 Engine (Tangye) ran 177 days.

2

"5

""

3

""

J

""

179

97

(Simpson) 224

""

13

73

"

"

Month.

Royal

P.W.R. Hongkong.

Q 24

The total quantity of water pumped from Taitam Tuk Reservoir during the year amounted to 1,276 28 million gallons, 826 15 mil- lion gallons being pumped by the new Simpson Engines and 450·13 million gallons by the Tangye Engines. This total surpasses last year's by 544 56 million gallons.

The following is a comparative statement of the cost of pump- ing during 1918 and 1919:

Taitam Tuk Pumping Station.

Coal, Wages,

65,503.45 4,463.66

*

74,785.00 *

9,785.42

Miscellaneous, including repairs and stores other

than coal,..

5,101.92

7,219.16

Total,

$ 75,069.03

91,769.58

*This is the value of the coal consumed during the year. Coal to the value of $4,335.00 was carried forward from 1918 to 1919 and coal to the value of $6,300.00 was carried forward from 1919 to 1920. The price of coal during 1919 varied from $16.50 to $22.50, the average price being $19.17 per ton. In 1918, the price varied from $19.20 to $25.20 per ton.

A comparative statement of the local rainfall for the year at various points is given in the following table:-

Observatory.

Kowloon

Reservoir.

Public

Gardens.

Taitam

Reservoir.

Taitam Tuk Reservoir.

January,

0.625

0.26

0.75

0.35

0.55

0.67

0.72

February,

1.505

1.17

2.03

1.54

1.42

1.93

1.99

March,

1.755

1.19

1.77

1.91

1.58

2.20

2.04

April,

4.430

5.27

6.28

4.73

4.06

4.26

10.13

May,

6.950

7.33

748

9.34

9.10

7.56

12.24

June...

10.815

13.07

12.22

13.18

11.54

12.61

15.05

July,

19.430 20.12

22.39

22.32

21.73

19.22

18.56

August...

19-670 22.67 24.46

27.22

23.74

25.71

25.07

September,

2.655

2.26

3.57

3.42

1.78

3.10

1.87

October,

4.695

*2.56

4.66

2.69

2.09

2.94

3.80

November,

2.885

2.67

2.07

3.19

1.36 ! 2.77

3.78

December,

0.725

0.50

1.68

0.59

0.44

0.85

0.77

Total 1919,.

1918,.

76.140. 101.605

79.07 89.31 90.48 79.39 108.37 109.64 112.15

83.82 96.02

97.51

108.08 129.15

>"

Increase, or Decrease,

-25.465-29,30 -20.33 -21.67 - 18.12 - 24.26

-33.13

Pokfulam

Reservoir.

Taipo

Quarters.

1918.

1919.

Q 25

P.W.R. Hongkong.

The total quantity of water supplied during the year amounted to 2,437 43 million gallons filtered and 45:36 million gallons unfil- tered making a grand total 2,482 79 million gallons or 218·12 mil- lion gallons more than during 1918.

The average consumption of filtered water per head per day for all purposes throughout the year amounted to about 24 2 gallons. In arriving at this figure the population has been estimated at 275,000.

Full details of consumption, etc., will be found in Annexes C & D.

The analyses made by the Government Analyst show that the water was of good quality throughout the year and the results obtained by bacteriological examinations were also satisfactory.

The quantity of water pumped to the High Level District of the City amounted to 13874 million gallons, equal to an average daily consumption of about 380,000 gallons, whilst 42:02 million gallons were pumped to the Hill District, giving an average daily consumption of 115,000 gallons. As compared with 1918 there was an increase of 29.90 million gallons pumped to the High Level Districts and a decrease of 147 million gallons pumped to the Hill District.

The grand total pumped during the year to the High Level and Hill Districts amounted to 180.76 million gallons as compared with 152-33 million gallons pumped during 1918, an increase, of 28:43 million gallons.

Tabulated statements containing particulars of the quantities of water pumped to the High Levels of the City and to the Hill District respectively will be found in Annexe E.

All engines, motors and station buildings have been kept in good repair throughout the year.

The work of overhauling the valves on the principal_mains in the City was continued during the year, the number thoroughly repaired amounting to 109.

Tests were carried out early in the year on the Group Hydrants fixed during 1918 to the Fire Brigade's requirements. The tests proved satisfactory and a type was fixed as a standard for the future. During the year twenty more groups were fixed at points in the City specified by the Superintendent of the Fire Brigade.

The number of meters in use at the end of the year amounted to 1,838 in the City and 181 in the Hill District making a total of 2,019 as compared with 1,777 and 179 or a total of 1,956 at the end of 1918. These figures do not include 14 meters in use at Pokfulam.

The quantity of water supplied by meter was as follows:-

Filtered-Trade,

.295.62 million gallons.

193.25

Domestic (City)...

""

Unifiltered,

(Hill District),.. 42:02

Total,..

29.

45:36

576'25

29

P.W.R. Hongkong.

26

These figures show an increase of 60-23 million gallons in the quantity supplied by meter as compared with 1918.

New services were constructed or old ones altered, improved, repaired or connected to the mains to the number of 1,485 and 48 supplies were laid on for building purposes.

The number of inspections of private services carried out amounted to 14,987. Defective services were found in 170 cases all of which were put in proper repair after the usual notices had been served.

59. Maintenance of Waterworks, Shaukiwan.-A full supply of water was maintained from the beginning of the year until the end of November when, owing to the early dry season, the streams dropped rapidly and it was found necessary to curtail the supply. The average daily consumption on full supply was 164,000 gallons, but by the end of the year it had been reduced to 130,000 gallons per day. These figures do not include the quantity supplied to the Saiwan Battery.

The total consumption for the year amounted to 5477 million gallons, including 2:27 million gallons to the Barracks at Saiwan and 484 million gallons supplied to the boat population, or an average of about 150,000 gallons per day. These figures show an increase of more than 26% over the consumption during 1918.

Details of the consumption are given in Annexe F.

There were 7 meters in use at the close of the year.

60. Maintenance of Waterworks, Aberdeen.-A satisfactory supply of water was maintained throughout the year, the total consumption being 2066 million gallons, which included 575 million gallons supplied to water-boats, or an average of 57,000 gallons per day.

Details of the consumption are given in Annexe G.

There were 6 meters in use at the close of the year.

61. Water Account.-The number of meters examined and repaired during the year was 1,165. A systematic overhaul of all ineters is now being carried out.

The following is a statement of expenditure under the vote:

New Meters (difference in value between

issues and receipts),

Repairs to meters,

Meter boxes,

Miscellaneous,...

Total,

:

$2,002.22

5,802.39

133.48

3,152.76

$11,090,85

1

!

P.W.R. KOWLOON.

WLOON

Q 27

P.W.R. Kowloon.

62. Maintenence of Buildings.-The buildings generally were kept in a state of good repair, a number of them being renovated throughout in accordance with the recurring programme. The expenditure amounted to $14,936.34.

63. Improvements to Buildings.--A number of improvements were carried out at several Government buildings at a cost of $974.56. None of them call for special mention.

64. Maintenance of Roads and Bridges.

Improvements to Roads and Bridges. Approximate mileage 28. The roads generally were maintained in a satisfactory

manner.

The following are particulars of the additional areas laid with improved surfacing during the year-

Surfacing macadam with 1" asphaltum carpeting, Substitution of 2" asphaltum laid on cement concrete

bed for macadam,

Tarring and Sanding,

2" Granolithic paving slabs laid in footways,

sq. yds.

1,550

870

20,390

4,549

65. Maintenance of Telephones.-The lines and instruments were maintained in good order. Four underground telephone cables were laid, two from Signal Hill to the Royal Observatory and two for diverting the telephone lines clear of land which has been leased to the Hongkong and Whampoa Dock Company for ex- tending their premises at Hunghom.

Telephones were installed at the Waterworks Bungalow and Block House at Kowloon Reservoir and at the premises which have been occupied as a temporary Police Station at Mong Kok Tsui.

Electric bell services were installed in four Government buildings.

The Government Telephone lines were diverted from Shanghai Street to Nathan Road.

Five buildings were wired for electric light and fan services, and all electric services in Government buildings were maintained in good order.

66. Maintenance of Sewers, Nullahs, &c.—The sewers, storm- water drains and trained nullahs were cleansed and maintained in good condition, the open channels and nullahs being attended to by the Sanitary Department. Sand deposits were removed as they occurred. Repairs were made to the sewers at the junction of Gillies Avenue and Wuhu Street, Hung Hom, in Chatham Road between.

P.W.R. Kowloon.

28

Blackhead's Point and Austin Road, and to the nullah in Waterloo Road between the sea-wall and Shanghai Street. All metal work in connection with the drainage systems was inspected and, where necessary, repaired and tarred. About 314 feet of old disused drains of various sizes and types were destroyed and filled in.

The details of the expenditure under this heading are as follows:-

Labour for cleansing operations,

Repairs....

Tools for cleansing operations, General incidental expenditure,...

$4,741.48

453.48

559.35

99.34

Total,...

$5,853.65

as against $7,625.44 in the previous year.

67. Gus Lighting.-The total number of lamps in use at the end of the year was 340, an increase of 11 over the previous year.

68. Electric Lighting. The number of electric lamps in use at the end of the year, all of which are incandescent, was 132, an increase of 24 as compared with the previous year.

69. Maintenance of Praya Walls and Piers.-The principal items executed under this heading were extensive repairs to Tsim Sha Tsui Pier, costing $1,099.94, and the taking of borings at Cheung Chau in connection with a proposal to erect a new pier there.

70. Maintenance of Chinese Cemeteries.-The work carried out under this heading has already been alluded to in paragraph 37 of this Report.

71. Maintenance of Recreation Ground.-The use of depart- mental labour for keeping these grounds in good order was con- tinued during the year.

72. Typhoon and Rainstorm Damages.-The heavy rains already referred to in paragraph 56 of this Report caused severe scouring in the case of the ordinary macadamized roads, necessita- ting considerable repairs.

There were also numerous small landslips throughout Kowloon.

A long length of walling supporting the Yaumati to Kowloon City Road, near the Hau Wong Temple, collapsed and it was found necessary to pile the foundations and construct a new wall.

73. Maintenance of Waterworks.-A constant supply of water was maintained throughout the year, the total quantity supplied being 499-31 million gallons, giving an average daily consumption of 136 million gallons or, taking an estimated population of 101,700, 13.4 gallons per head per day.

Details are given in Annexe H.

29

P.W.R. Kowloon.

The quantity of water stored in the impounding reservoir on the 1st January amounted to 330 24 million gallons and it reached a minimum on the 29th May when it amounted to 2081 million gallons. The reservoir was at or above its permanent overflow level from 26th July to 8th October. The quantity of water re- maining in the Reservoir at the end of the year amounted to 299-24 million gallons.

The analyses made by the Government Analyst and the ex- aminations made by the Bacteriologist were satisfactory.

The various buildings were kept in a good state of repair during the year.

There were 547 meters in use at the close of the year, an increase of 52 as compared with 1918.

House Services were constructed, altered or repaired in 81 in- stances and 37 supplies were laid on for building purposes.

74. Special Repairs to Filter Beds.-The third and last of the original Filter Beds was taken in hand and thoroughly repaired, without interfering with the general supply to the Peninsula.

The invert of the bed was entirely relaid and regraded with a layer of cement concrete, 4 inches thick, a similar thickness of concrete being added to the side walls. The bed appears to be now thoroughly water-tight. The opportunity was taken to have this bed relaid with tiles and bricks, the cost of this work being defray- ed from the vote "Miscellaneous Waterworks, Kowloon ".

The cost of the repairs amounted to $3,915.13.

75. Water Account.-The number of meters examined and repaired during the year amounted to 295.

The following is a statement of expenditure under the vote :--

New Meters (difference in value between

issues and receipts),

Repairs to meters,

Meter boxes,...

Miscellaneous,

$3,131.48

1,720.66

340.10

13.65

Total,

$5,205.89

P.W.R. NEW TERRITORIES.

76. Maintenance of Buildings.-The buildings generally were kept in a state of good repair, a number of them being renovated throughout in accordance with the recurring programme. The expenditure amounted to $13,509.31.

77. Improvements to Buildings.- Improvements to two Govern- ment buildings were carried out at a cost of $989.41.

P.W.R. New Territories.

Q 30

78. Maintenance of Roads and Bridges.

Approximate Mileare

69-The roads generally were maintained in a satisfactory manner. A number of minor improvements to that portion of the Taipo Road between the 3rd and 5th milestones were executed, but this length of road still requires to be substantially improved. Macadam was laid, tarred and sanded on a portion of the Lai Chi Kok to Castle Peak Road near the Taipo Road about a quarter of a mile in length, in place of decomposed granite surfacing.

Improvements to Roads and Bridges.

The following are particulars of the improved surfacing intro- duced on the new roads laid out in Shamshuipo :-

Tarring and sanding,

2′′ Granolithic paving slabs laid in footways,

xy. yds. 15,864

2,729

79. Maintenance of Telephones.--The lines and instruments were maintained in good order.

Telephones were installed at the Taipo Dispensary, Taipo Island Quarters, and Tsing Lung Tau Police Station.

All telephones and signalling apparatus on the British Section of the Kowloon-Canton Railway were maintained in good condition.

All telephone alarms were kept in working order. .

Electric bell services were installed at the Tai O and Cheung Chan Police Stations.

Taipo Island Quarters were wired for electric light and fan services.

80. Maintenance of Sewers, Nullahs, de.—The sewers and trained nullahs at Shamshuipo and the concrete channels in Kow- loon City were cleansed and maintained in good order.

The details of expenditure under this heading are as follows:---

Labour for cleansing operations,...

Repairs,

Tools for cleansing operations,

General incidental expenditure,

Total,

as against $484.99 in the previous year.

$330.32

5.59

$335.91

81. Electric Lighting, Shamshuipo.-The number of lamps in use at the end of the year, all of which are incandescent, was 46, an increase of 7 over the previous year.

82. Maintenance of Chinese Cemeteries.-The work carried out under this heading has already been alluded to in paragraph 37 of this Report.

1

Q 31

P.W.R. New Territories.

83. Typhoon and Rainstorm Damages.-The heavy rains of July and August caused a considerable amount of damage in the shape of landslips along the new and old roads. The inverts of two bridges at Muk Min Ha and Kwai Chung had to be renewed. The temporary pier at Tsun Wan was destroyed during a typhoon in July and had to be renewed.

84. Maintenance of Waterworks, Laichikok The total quantity of water supplied during the year amounted to 11571 million gallons or an average of 317,000 gallons per day, which is an increase of 26% over 1918. Details of consumption are given in Annexe J.

There were 16 meters in use at the end of the year.

85. Water Account.---Meters were examined and repaired in 26 instances.

The expenditure under the vote was as follows :—

New meters (difference in value between

issues and receipts),

Repairs to meters,

Meter boxes,

Miscellaneous,

$ 6.20

279.81

1.45

2.50

$289.96

Total,

PUBLIC WORKS EXTRAORDINARY.

HONGKONG.

86. Central Police Station.—Extension.

By the end of the

year, the building was practically completed, the greater part of it (the Upper and Main Floors) being occupied. Only a small amount of work remained to be done in the Basement and Sub-Basement.

The building is generally four storeys in height, the accom- modation provided being as follows:-

Sub-Basement.-Garage, Sikh Temple, Mahommedan Mosque, Dressing Room, Gymnasium, Recreation Room and Lavatories.

Basement.-Four Recreation Rooms for European In- spectors, Sergeants and Constables, Gallery to Gymnasium, Indian Mess Room, Kitchen, Bathrooms, extensive Chinese bathrooms, lavatories and latrines, European lavatory, three Store-rooms and Armoury and Latrines.

Main Floor-Seven offices, ranging from 28' 0" 16′ 3′′ to 36′ 0′′ × 28′ 0′′, two detention rooms, two small rooms for finger-print records and lavatories.

Upper Floor.—Six rooms, ranging from 28′ 0′′x 16′ 3′′ to 52′ 0′′× 33′ 0′′, for occupation as Dormitories and Mess Rooms for 20 Indian and 182 Chinese Constables, besides kitchens, sculleries and store-rooms. -

P.W.E. Hongkong.

Q 32

The building is Classic in style, the whole of the front and the main architectural features of the back and end elevations being carried out in cement plaster. Any exposed brickwork in the exterior elevations is of red Formosa facing bricks.

The principal entrance is from Hollywood Road, which is about 25 feet below the level of the compound of the Central Police Station. A granite staircase gives access to the various floors. The main floor is at the level of the Station Compound from which an entrance to the offices and main staircase is provided. Large verandahs extend along the main fronts towards Hollywood Road and the Station Compound on the main and upper floors. 1919 Estimates,......$165,000.00 Total Estimates, Expenditure to

31/12/19,

1919 Expenditure,... 107,413.33

|

$281,000.00

227,633.10

87. Imports and Exports Office.--Connaught Road Block.- Owing to the precautions necessary for the safeguarding of adjoin- ing buildings, pile-driving operations, which were in progress at the beginning of the year, were necessarily slow. The piling was, however, completed early in March and, by the end of the year, the erection of the building was nearing completion.

1919 Estimates,

$50,000.00 | Total Estimates, Expenditure to

1919 Expenditure,... 41,425.46 31/12/19,

.$345,000.00

50,654.95

88. Quarters for European Officers, Leighton Hill.As stated in paragraph 91 of last year's Report, this work was entrusted to Messrs. Dennison, Ram & Gibbs as Architects. Drawings were prepared for eight two-storied houses in two blocks of four each and a Contract for their erection was let in August to Messrs. Lam Dore for the sum of $218,856.47.

By the close of the year, the site had been levelled, the necessary retaining walls had been constructed, the foundations of one block of buildings were completed and the foundations of the second block were in progress.

1919 Estimates,.....$100,000.00 | Total Estimates, $240,000.00

Expenditure to

1919 Expenditure,...

25,390.55 31/12/19,

25,390.55

89. Additional Storey to P.W.D. Annexe.—The addition con- sists of the erection of a third storey over the whole of the Annexe building, giving four fairly-large and well-lighted rooms facing North, which are occupied as drawing offices.

A flat roof has been constructed over a portion of the building to provide a space for sunprinting, the materials for which are accommodated in a small store on the roof.

Arrangements had to be made for carrying out the work with- out interfering unduly with the occupation of the two lower storeys and a matshed roof was therefore erected over the entire building. The contract was commenced at the beginning of the year, the new

33

——

P.W.E. Hongkong.

storey being occupied during the latter part of April, by which time the work was practically completed. All liabilities were discharged before the close of the year.

$15,000.00 Total Estimates, ......$15,000.00

|

1919 Estimates,

1919 Sup. Vote,

8,000.00

1919 Expenditure,

$23,000.00 Expenditure to

22,835.59 31/12/19,

22,835.59

90. Quarters for Scavenging Coolies, Hospital Road.-The tender of Messrs. Wing Lee & Co. for this work, amounting to $133,372.30, was accepted, the Contract being signed on the 12th September. Before work on the buildings could be commenced, it was necessary to divert Hospital Road, to erect a temporary public latrine to replace one which had to be demolished, and to carry out very extensive levelling operations, involving the construction of considerable retaining walls. Levelling operations were well advanced by the close of the year.

1919 Estimates,..

$100,000.00 | Total Estimates,

Expenditure to

31/12/19,

1919 Expenditure,... 14,801.25

$160,000.00

14.801.25

91. Officers' Quarters, (below Tanderagee).—A design for these quarters was prepared and it was decided to proceed with 3 houses in the first instance.

It was considered expedient to undertake the preparation of the sites in conjunction with the completion of the road encircling Mount Gough and a contract was accordingly let for these works to Messrs. Kang On & Co. in October. Further reference to it will be found in paragraph 97 (j) of this Report.

1919 Estimates,

1919 Expenditure,..

.$120,000.00 | Total Estimates, ...

Expenditure to 271.11 31/12/19, ...

$271.11

92. Officers' Quarters, (elsewhere).-As the resumption of cer- tain land which the Government desired to acquire for the purpose of erecting quarters was not completed by the end of the year, it was not possible to take any steps towards carrying out this work.

1919 Estimates,

1919 Expenditure,

.$100,000.00

Nil.

93. Taitam Tuk Pumping Station.-Additional Quarters for Chinese Staff-The accommodation hitherto existing for the Chinese Staff was practically doubled, the work being completed before the end of the year. It comprised four large living-rooms, a kitchen and bathroom, in addition to which two reinforced concrete stairways have been added to the main building.

1

P.W.E. Hongkong.

34

The kitchen and bathroom are in a separate building which is connected to the main building by a covered-way.

1919 Estimates....

1919 Sup. Vote,...

1919 Expenditure,

$5,000.00 Total Estimates,..

1,200.00

$6,200.00 Expenditure to

6,169.97 31/12/19,

$6,169.97

94. Lunatic Asylum, Extension.-This work was commenced in July and was practically completed at the end of the year.

The extension consists of the addition of a storey to the European Asylum, making it three storeys high in all, and a small addition to one of the wings, which was re-built. The new storey provides quarters for the two ward-masters attached to the asylum, the quarters hitherto in use being utilized to form four additional rooms for patients. One of the old single-storied wings was re-built and extended in order to provide two more rooms for patients, two bathrooms, lavatories, kitchen, pantry, etc.

Each Ward-master's Quarter contains a living-room, 23′ 0′′ x 17' 9", with verandah, a bedroom 18′ 0′′ x 15' 3", a bathroom, boy's room, kitchen and larder.

1919 Estimates, $24,000.00 Total Estimates, 1919 Sup. Vote,

1,300.00

$25,300.00 Expenditure to 1919 Expenditure,... 25,274.74 31/12/19,

$25,274.74

95. Crematorium, Happy Valley. The Public Works Com- mittee, to whom this matter was referred, advised that the structure itself and the apparatus required for cremation purposes should be in accordance with the latest and most up-to-date practice.

year.

It was not found possible to proceed with the work during the

1919 Estimates,

1919 Expenditure,

... $5,500,00

Nil.

96. Police Recreation Club Pavilion.-This building occupies the site of the old Police Club Matshed at the north-west corner of Happy Valley.

As mentioned in last year's Report, (para. 138), it was begun in September, 1918, the building being completed and formally opened by His Excellency the Officer Adminstering the Government in May.

The building is of brick and measures 66′ 0′′ × 32′ 0′′. It contains a general Club-room, 25′ 6′′ × 20′ 0′′, a Dressing-room, 18' 6" x 10' 6", with Bathroom and Lavatory attached, and a Ladies' retiring room, 18′ 0′′ x 11' 6", with Dressing-room and Lavatory. A verandah, 9' 6" wide, is provided on the Happy Valley front whilst a small separate building contains the necessary servants' quarters.

Q.35

P.W.E. Hongkong.

The roof of the club-house is designed in Chinese style.

1919 Estimates,...... $11,000.00 Total Estimates,.

|

SI1.000,00

Expenditure to

13,211.65

1919 Expenditure, .. 9,742.77 31/12/19,...

97. Latrines and Urinals.--The following public conveniences were completed during the year:--

Trough Closet (6 seats) near north-east corner of Racecourse. Urinal at intersection of Glenealy and Caine Road.

Urinal (underground) at junction of Seymour and Robinson

Roads.

The construction of a small trough closet underneath the steps leading from Duddell Street to Ice House Street was nearly com- pleted and a similar convenience near Barker Road Tramway Station was begun. These two structures were not provided for in the Estimates and a supplementary vote for $2,000 was therefore taken to provide for the former. No expenditure was incurred on the latter. The trough closet on Conduit Road, for which provision. was made in the Estimates, could not be proceeded with as its construction was involved with certain work which was in progress for a new approach path to Inland Lot 1549.

All the structures referred to above were of the usual type. The expenditure on those for which provision was made in the Estimates was as follows:

1919 Estimates (total amount),.....$4,950.00

1919 Sup. Votes,

1919 Expenditure,

98. Roads:

1,080.00

$6,030.00

4,299.02

(a.) Taitam Tuk to Taitum Gap.—New road from north end of Taitam Tuk Dum to Taitam Gap.-This work was completed in 1918, a description of it being given in last year's Report. The expenditure was for liabilities incurred in 1918.

1919 Estimates,...

$12,900.00 | Total Estimates,

$55,300.00

Expenditure to

31/12/19,

54,237.22

1919 Expenditure,

12,806.13

(b.) Aberdeen Road.-Improvements in neighbourhood of Aber- deen Docks and new road past Aberdeen Village.-This work was also completed in 1918, but certain expenditure was incurred in surfacing a portion of the road with tar macadam and executing other minor works.

1919 Estimates,

$5,000.00 | Total Estimates,...... $71,000.00

Expenditure to

1919 Expenditure,

1,051.03

31/12/19,...

64,116.93

P.W.E. Hongkong.

36

(c.) Repulse Bay to Taitam Tuk,-1st_Section,-New Road.- This section of road was practically completed at the close of the year, only some surfacing and minor items remaining to be done. A considerable balance remained to be paid in 1920. A descrip- tion of the work was given in last year's Report, the only alteration being that Stanley Gap was cut down to 397 feet above Ordnance Datum instead of 405 feet as originally intended.

|

1919 Estimates,...... $81,000.00 Total Estimates, 1919 Sup. Vote,....

21,600.00

$102,600.00 | Expenditure to 1919 Expenditure,... 97,084.59 31/12/19,

$116,000:00

126,829.67

(d.) Repulse Bay to Taitam Tuk,—2nd Section,-Improving and widening existing road.—This section of road was completed in August, but a balance remained to be paid in 1920 on account of surfacing the road with tar-painting. A description of the work was given in last year's Report.

1919 Estimates, ...... $32,000.00 | Total Estimates,................ $58,000.00 1919 Sup. Vote,.. 20,000.00

$52,000.00 Expenditure to

31/12/19,...

1919 Expenditure,... 45,226.90

69,424.47

(e.) Taitam Gap to Shaukiwan,-Improving existing road.- This road was begun in November, 1918, and was completed by the close of 1919. In many places, the road is entirely new, the align- ment or gradients of the old road rendering it impossible to incorporate such portions in the amended scheme. The road has now a width of 20 feet and is protected where necessary with stone parapet walls or with earth mounds. From Taitam Gap, which is 493 feet above Ordnance Datum, it rises with a gradient of 1 in 15 until an elevation of 660 feet above Datum is attained, whence it descends to Sai Wan Gap with gradients varying from 1 in 15 to 1 in 12. From Sai Wan Gap to Shaukiwan, it has a falling gradient varying between 1 in 10 and 1 in 101.

In connection with this work, the 6-inch water main from the filter beds near Sai Wan Gap to Shaukiwan had to be taken up and relaid and also the 2",main which traversed a great length of the old road above Sai Wan Gap.

1919 Estimates, ...... $39,500.00 | Total Estimates, 1919 Sup. Vote,

$49,500.00

27,500.00

$67,000.00 Expenditure to

1919 Expenditure,... 65,598.70 31/12/19,.

71,765.66

(f.) Aberdeen to Little Hongkong.-Improving and widening existing road.—This work was completed in May and all liabilities

Q 37

P.W.E. Hongkong.

were discharged. A description of the work was given in last

year's Report.

1919 Estimates,

$12,000.00 | Total Estimates,.

$22,000.00

.

1919 Sup. Vote,.

4,500.00

$16,500.00

Expenditure to 31/12/19..

22,712.30

!

1919 Expenditure,... 14,917.55

(g) Lugard Road Extension.--A contract for this work was let in January. The length of this extension, which provides for the completion of the road from Victoria Gap to High West Gap, is about 4,800 lineal feet. Owing to the risks attendant upon the ex- ecution of the eastern section of the extension, work upon it was deferred until after the rainy season, operations being confined, in the first instance, to the western section. By the end of the year, fair general progress had been made over the whole of the alignment. 1919 Estimates,... $10,000.00 Total Estimates,...... $55,000.00 1919 Sup. Vote,.

6,000.00

|

$16,000.00 Expenditure to 1919 Expenditure,... 15,821.40 31/12/19,..

15,821.40

(h.) Road contouring hillside in Wongneichong and Tai Hang Valleys. This road was undertaken for the purpose of opening up building sites in the two valleys mentioned, in addition to provid- ing a motor route to the Hill District and a short route to Deep Water and Repulse Bays. A contract for the first section of it, ex- tending from Gap Road to the Taitam Tunnel outlet at the east end of Bowen Road, was let to Messrs. Wing Lee & Co. in March and substantial progress had been made by the close of the

year.

1919 Estimates,

1919 Expenditure,..

$120,000.00 Total Estimates,....

Expenditure to 31/12/19...

72,704.25 |

$72,704.25

(i.) Branch road to Wanchai Gap.-A contract for this work was let in July and, by the end of the year, satisfactory progress had been made with the work. The road forms part of a motor road to the Peak District. It is 15 miles in length and 20 feet wide, the ruling gradient being 1 in 20. There are numerous building sites along its route.

1919 Estimates,...... $80,000.00

1919 Expenditure,... 28,610.95

Total Estimates,... Expenditure to 31/12/19,.

$28,610.95

(j.) Road contouring Mount Gough from Findlay Road to Gough Hill Road. -A contract for this work was let in October, 1918, and it was completed in December, 1919. The road is 10' 0" wide and has a ruling gradient of 1 in 16. As suitable stone was not pro- curable along the route of the road, the retaining walls generally were constructed of lime and cement concrete. Owing to the un- favourable nature of the hillside and the existence of certain buildings and retaining walls above the road, it was considered

P.W.E. Hongkong.

Q 38

advisable to construct a bridge with two spans of 35′ 0′′ each, the decking and beams being of ferro-concrete supported on cement concrete abutments and pier. Wherever necessary, railings of ferro-concrete standards and bars have been provided. All lia- bilities were discharged with the exception of the retention money under the contract, which remained to be paid in 1920.

It was decided to carry out, under the same vote as the fore- going work, the formation of certain sites for Officers' Quarters in conjunction with some diversions and improvements of a portion of Findlay Road which had been roughly formed about the year 1901 and a contract for these works was let in October to Messrs. Kang On & Co. Satisfactory progress had been made with them by the end of the year. 1919 Estimates, 1919 Sup. Vote,

$20,000.00 Total Estimates,..............

4,000.00

$24,000.00 | Expenditure to 1919 Expenditure,... 23,735.60 | 31/12/19,...

$23,735.60

(k.) Wanchai Road.--Widening to 42 feet. The execution of this work involved numerous resumptions of property and the setting back of the frontage line of existing buildings. Operations during the year were confined to the resumption of some of the properties involved.

1919 Estimates,

1919 Expenditure,

$60,000.00 Total Estimates,

Expenditure to

20,109.63 31/12/19,

$60,000.00

20,109.63

(1.) Queen's Road East,-Widening to 60 feet.-In this case also, extensive resumptions of property and alterations of existing buildings were involved. Substantial progress with a number of the resumptions had been made by the close of the year and the demolition of some of the buildings was in progress.

1919 Estimates, ...$150,000.00 | Total Estimates,......

1919 Expenditure,...

Expenditure to 63,558.00 31/12/19,.

$63,558.00

(m.) Pokfulam Road,---Widening.--Extensive improvements to that portion of the road extending from No. 8 Bridge to the junction of Victoria and Pokfulam Roads were carried out, the roadway being widened and sharp bends modified. The surface was macadamized and treated with asphaltuin. Similar improvements were under- taken during the year to those portions of the road extending from the University to Pokfulam Police Station and from the junction of Victoria and Pokfulam Roads to Aberdeen.

1919 Estimates,

1919 Expenditure,

$7,500.00 7,487.82

(n.) Pokfulam Road,—Improvement of Bridge No. 8.-This bridge was widened and greatly improved, the decking and beams

Q 39

P.W.E. Hongkong.

of the widened portion being executed in reinforced concrete, supported on masonry piers.

1919 Estimates, 1919 Sup. Vote,.

1919 Expenditure,

$5,500.00

3,000.00

$8,500.00

8,492.24

(o.) Raising Praya Wall and Roadway (Connaught Road West) west of Morrison Street.- The Praya Wall, west of Morrison Street, for a length of 450 feet, which had subsided to a considerable extent, was restored to its original level. The raising of the road- way was deferred until the Tramway Company were in a position. to renew their tracks, the old rails being worn-out and therefore unfit for relaying.

1919 Estimates,.

1919 Expenditure,

$4,500.00 4,497.60

(p.) General Works.-The following is a brief description of the principal works carried out under this heading :

The narrow path which had hitherto formed a connection between Upper Albert and Kennedy Roads and which was only available for pedestrian and ricksha traffic has been superseded by the construction of a short length of roadway suitable for motor traffic. Incidentally, the alteration enables motor cars proceeding to Deep Water and Repulse Bays and other points to reach Upper Albert Road from Garden Road and so avoid the great detour which they formerly had to make past the Government Offices and round boundary of Government House grounds. The work necessitated extensive regrading of Garden, Upper Albert and Kennedy Roads as well as the setting back of the eastern entrance to the Public Gardens, where new ornamental wrought-iron gates have been substituted for the former wooden gates.

The western entrance to the Public Gardens was set back and the widening of Upper Albert Road for a short distance to the westward of this point was undertaken towards the close of the

year.

Hollywood Road was raised outside the new Central Police Station and its junction with Wyndham Street was regraded and improved.

Spring Gardens Lane, from Praya East to Cross Street, was widened opposite I. L. 43. The roadway was kerbed and channelled and surfaced with tar macadam and the footpaths were payed with concrete slabs.

Kennedy Road was kerbed and channelled on the south side, east of I. L. 1744.

Ship Street, from Queen's Road East to Schooner Street, was resurfaced with 4′′ cement concrete and the footways paved with granolithic paving.

P.W.E. Hongkong.

40

A flight of steps was constructed in Sands Street, east of the nullah, to give better access to the houses recently erected on I. L. Part of the cost of this work was borne by the lessees of the lot mentioned.

2091.

Railings were erected on Tregunter Path.

The flight of steps from Queen's Road East to Kennedy Road, between I. L.'s 2072 and 2079, was completed.

The island at the junction of Robinson and Seymour Roads was cut back to improve the alignment of Robinson Road and the connection of the two roads mentioned.

The new road which has been formed on the east side of the nullah in Hill Road in connection with extensive building operations on I.L. 795 was kerbed, channelled, and surfaced with 4" macadam, the footpath being paved with granolithic. A concrete bridge has been constructed spanning the nullah.

Consequent upon the erection of new buildings, kerbing and channelling operations were executed in the following roads, the footpaths being paved and any necessary alterations in levels or alignment being effected:---

Babington Path, Bonham Road, Centre Street,

First Street,

Gordon Road,

High Street,

Praya East,

Sands Street,

Sing Woo Road, Tai On Street, Shaukiwan Road, Wanchai Road, Wing Hing Street, Whitfield and

Wongneichong Roads.

$35,000.00

1919 Estimates,

1919 Sup. Vote,

1919 Expenditure,

99. Training Nullahs:-

45,000.00

$80,000.00 72,478.28

on

(a.) Colonial Cemeteries. This work was undertaken account of the formation of stagnant pools in the bed of the stream-. course. The training comprised the laying of a cement concrete invert between the existing side-walls, of the stream-course, and the construction of channels, which vary in size from 3′ 6′′ × 3′ 6′′ to 2′ 3′′ × 2′ 3′′, in cement concrete, with semi-circular inverts and vertical sides.

The total length trained was 1,236 feet.

1919 Estimates,.

1919 Sup. Vote,.

1919 Expenditure,

$3,100.00 600.00

3,685.11

1

$3,700.00

41

P.W.E. Hongkong.

(b.) Mount Davis and Belchers.-These works were not pro- ceeded with during the year, as negotiations with the Military Authorities had not been completed.

1919 Estimates,.

1919 Expenditure,

$4,500.00

Nil.

(e.) General Works.-The two training works mentioned under items (viii) and (xi) in last year's Report (page 62) were completed.

A considerable amount of training work was done during the year, the most important items being the construction of a new east wall to the Shektongtsui nullah between Clarence Terrace and Hill Road in connection with extensive building operations on I.L. 795; the raising of the west wall and the construction of three reinforced concrete bridges spanning the nullah opposite Aberdeen Inland Lots 81-88; and the training of two stream-courses east and west of R.B.L. 142, Repulse Bay.

The total lengths trained were 2,026 feet.

1919 Estimates,...

$8,000.00

1919 Transferred from sub-head (b),

2,220.37

$10,220.37

1919 Expenditure (from

Government funds) $10,220.37

1919 Expenditure (contri-

butions by various

lessees, etc.).......... 15,080.08

$25,300.45

100. Miscellaneous Drainage Works :--

(a.) Main sewer to intercept drainage from houses on east side of Mount Kellett. -This work was begun in February, 1918, but, as explained in last year's Report, work was suspended for a long period and, consequently, it was not completed until 1919.

It con- sisted of the laying of a 6" pipe sewer from a point in the valley to the west of Stewart Terrace along the eastern slopes of Mount Kellett to join the sewer which was laid in 1906 from the Matilda Hospital to Kellett Bay. In accordance with the arrangement come to with the lessee of R.B.L. 28, that portion of the sewer which traverses his lot was laid in tunnel.

1919 Estimates,

1919 Sup. Vote,

1919 Expenditure (from Govern-

1919

Do. (contributions

$10,500.00 2,200.00

$12,700.00

ment funds),

$12,124.51

by various lessees, etc.),...

76.75

$12,201,26

P.W.E. Hongkong.

42

(b.) General Works.-Considerable lengths of storm-water drains and sewers were laid during the year, the principal works being the construction of a sewer, of 9′′ and 6" pipes, and a septic tank installation in connection with the Repulse Bay Hotel (R.B.L. 142); the extension of a 6" sewer in Barker Road from R.B.L. 70 to R.B.L. 106; the relaying of a 9" sewer in Queen's Road West from Possession Street westwards; the extension of 9′′ and 6" sewers in Main Street and in the lane at the east side of S.I.L. 443, Shaukiwan West (incomplete); and the extension of a 9′′ sewer along Main Street, Aberdeen, to A.I.L. 79. The number of drain connections made was 62.

1919 Estimates,

1919 Expenditure (from Govern-

ment funds),

1919 Do. (contributions

$20,000.00

$10,868.21

by various lessees,

etc.)...

8,540.24

$19,408.45

101. Extensions of Lighting.-47 lamps were erected during the year-21 electric and 26 gas.

1919 Estimates,

1919 Sup. Vote,

1919 Expenditure,.

$1,000.00

550.00

$1,550.00 1,520.34

Though it was

102. Wongneichong Village Improvements.

Shaukiwan Village Improvements.

not found possible to undertake these works systematically, a number of old properties at Shaukiwan have been dealt with, by arrangement with the lessees. There was no expenditure under either of these heads, any sums paid as compensation having been charged to the vote "Compensation and Resumptions".

103. Reconstruction of Ferry Piers.-The work executed under this heading has been confined to taking borings at the sites of the proposed permanent piers and making reinforced concrete piles. Sixty of these piles, varying from 26 to 70 feet in length, were made at the Government Quarry during the year.

As a temporary measure, some additional ticket offices, Money Changers' offices, and rooms for watchmen were erected at the existing piers, the entrances and exits being re-arranged.

|

1919 Estimates, ... $60,000.00 Total Estimates,

1919 Expenditure,... 22,095.41

Expenditure to

31/12/19,

$22,095.41*

104. Contribution towards cost of Structure for Chairs and Rickshas, Barker Road Station.-In connection with the improve- ment of the upper portion of the Peak Tramway and the con-

* As mentioned in paragraph 145 of last year's Report, a sum of $42,896.17 was expended in resuming and repairing or extending the old ferry piers.

Q43

P.W.E. Hongkong.

struction a new station at Barker Road, referred to in paragraph 142 of last year's Report, arrangements were made with the Tramway Company to extend the roof of their station and to construct it in such a manner as to make it suitable for a Chair and Ricksha Stand. The work was carried out by the Company, the Government merely contributing such a sum as would cover the cost of making the provision they required. This sum was assessed at $8,188.99.

1919 Estimates,.. 1919 Sup. Vote,..

1919 Expenditure,.

$6,000.00

2,188.99

$8,188.99

8,188.99

105. Chinese Cemeteries,-Laying out new areas. -A state- ment of the work carried out under this heading will be found in paragraph 37 of this Report.

1919 Estimates,.

1919 Expenditure,.

$2,500.00 1,250.40

106. Survey of Colony.-An account of the survey work executed will be found in paragraph 17 of this Report.

1919 Estimates,.

1919 Expenditure,.

$3,000.00 2,024.69

107. Boundary Stones.-A statement of the boundary stones fixed will be found in paragraph 16 of this Report.

1919 Estimates,..

1919 Sup. Votes,

1919 Expenditure,

$1,000.00

1,120.00

$2,120.00

1,728.41

108. Miscellaneous Works.-The following is a brief descrip- tion of the principal works carried out under this heading.

Searchers' sheds for the use of the Police were erected on the following piers:-

Lun Cheong, Ping On,

British-Canton,

Yuen On,

Sai Kong,

Leung Wing,

Hai On,

Hau Tak,

Kwong Wing,

Osaka Shosen Kaisha,

China Navigation,

Sze Yap.

A small office was also constructed on the British-Canton Pier and screens in connection with the searching of women were provided on the Canton and Wing Lok Piers.

Reinforced concrete shelters for Police searching purposes were erected on the Praya opposite Eastern Street and outside the King Shan Wharf.

The curve at the junction of Glenealy and Upper Albert Road was improved, the Glenealy steps being set back to enable this to be done.

P.W.E. Hongkong.

·Q 44

Both entrances to the Central Police Station were improved, that from Hollywood Road to enable motor cars to gain access to the compound, and that from Old Bailey to give easy access for rickshas and chairs.

A wood-framed building was erected at Wanchai Depôt to afford office accommodation for the Electrician and Overseers and electrical testing purposes, the roof being covered with ruberoid.

A small shelter for children was erected at the junction of Mount Kellett and Chamberlain Roads, where a playground has been formed.

A shelter for chair coolies, including a public telephone box, was erected at the Albany.

The island outside No. 2 Police Station, Praya East, was altered so that it could be utilized as a ricksha stand.

Bathing facilities were provided at North Point and Kennedy Town as in former years at a cost of $1,283, which included watchmen's wages, etc.

1919 Estimates,

1919 Sup. Votes,

1919 Expenditure,..

$25,000.00

19,200.00

$44,200.00

41,233.28

109. Public Health and Buildings Ordinance, 1903,--Com- pensation and Resumptions.—This vote provides for the resumption of areas required in connection with development scheines, the improvement of public streets or the provision of scavenging lanes as well as for the removal of riding floors over the ends of streets and other matters. Where houses are of moderate depth, a modi- fication of the open space requirements has, in many cases, been granted permitting owners to count the scavenging lanes as part of their open space, subject to the condition that no compensation is payable in respect of such lanes.

1919 Estimates,

1919 Sup. Votes,

1919 Expenditure,

$200,000.00

276,237.50

$476,237.50

419,169.21

The following is a statement of the various resumptions effect- ed during the year and of the scavenging lane areas provided by owners without compensation:-

(1.) Properties resumed:-

Q 45

P.W.E. Hongkong.

Compensation paid.

$

I.L. 424 Section A, ss. 7 and R.P.,

Portion of M.L. 43, Praya East,

I.I.'s 1368 and 1535, Wanchai Road,

C.

Portion of I.L. 797, Kui Yan Lane,

I.L. 82 R.P. (Beaconsfield Arcade),. I.L. 26 Section B, (U Yam Lane),

I.L. 123, Caine Road,

275,000.00

23,000.00

4,000.00

2,212.00

I.L. 424 Section A, ss. 2 and 5, Caine Road,..

774.90

I.L. 424 Section A, ss. 3, 4 and 6,

1,312.20

302.40

12,630,00

42,000.00

I.L. 1362 Sections A, B and C, Morrison Hill Road, 18,500.00

I.L. 1914, Tsat Tsz Mui,

13,000.00

I.L. 2027, Tsat Tsz Mui,

7,000.00

Nos. 65 & 66, Tsat Tsz Mui,

1,250.00

R.B.L. 6, Sections E, F and G.

4,000.00

Shrine on Crown land, Shaukiwan Road,

50.00

Total,

$405,031.50*

In addition to the foregoing, the resumption of R.B.L. 111, Barker Road, at a cost of $31,002.10 was provided for by a special vote, (vide paragraph 14 of this Report), whilst the resumptions of properties required for the widening of Queen's Road East and Wanchai Road were defrayed from the votes provided in the Estimates for these works.

(2.) Scavenging lanes provided by owners but not surrendered to Government.

Fourteen areas, aggregating 14,220 square feet, in the rear of various premises, were surrendered to Government during the year. (3.) Scavenging lanes to be provided by owners when an oppor- tunity occurs of gaining access to them from the adjoining streets.

One area, containing 1883 square feet, was arranged for

110. Additional Service Reservoir, etc., West Point.--These works, which were begun in 1914, were completed and in full operation by the end of April, giving very satisfactory results. They comprised the levelling of a large area of hillside, the con- struction of six Filter Beds and a covered Service Reservoir, the completion of a main to convey water from the Bowen Road Conduit to the filter beds, the laying of a main from the Pokfulam Conduit to enable water to be drawn from it and the erection of quarters for the Chinese staff.

* Sums amounting to $2,525 were paid for retaining the services of firms of architects and surveyors and for valuations made by those firms in connection with various resumptions; a sum of $11,577.83 was paid to contractors for certain im- provements in Caine Road rendered possible by the resumption of I.L. 1375; and other small sums, amounting to $34.88, were paid for various services in connection with improvements to other roads.

P.W.E. Hongkong.

46

The Filter Beds, which are six in number, are of irregular shape as they follow the contour of the hillside. The coping level is 300 feet above Ordnance Datum, whilst the level of the floor, at the outlet, is 29325 O.D. The beds have a total area of 39,557 square yards and can be supplied with water either from Pokfulam or the Taitam Valley Reservoirs, by means of the mains mentioned above.

A conduit, 3′ 0′′ x 3' 3", which runs along the back of the beds, delivers the water through 8" penstocks into the pre-filters, in which it rises and overflows into the Filter Beds proper. The pre-filters which are 3' 0" wide by 3' 0" deep and contain a·4′′ layer of pea gravel, laid on perforated vitrified tiles, supported by bricks, act in the nature of strainers.

The inverts of the filter beds consist of a layer of 6 to 1 cement concrete, 9" thick, laid in slabs, 12′ 0′′ square, the joints between the slabs being filled in with asphalte. The walls are also of 6 to 1 cement concrete finished with a granite ashlar coping.

The filtering medium consists of a layer of sand, 2′ 6′′ thick, over a 4" layer of pea gravel, laid on perforated tiles, supported by

· vitrified bricks.

The filtered water from the beds enters outlet wells and, after passing over V-notches for measuring purposes, is conveyed in cast-iron pipes to the Service Reservoir.

The Service Reservoir has a capacity of 532 million gallons and a maximum depth of 20 feet, being divided into two approx- imately equal parts by a reinforced concrete division wall. The top-water level is 286 feet above Ordnance Datum.

4

The floor of the Reservoir, which is composed of 6 to 1 cement concrete, 12′′ thick, has been laid in slabs 12' 0" square, with asphalte joints, the whole sloping to sumps at 265 Ordnance Datum. The enclosing walls, which are of gravity section, are composed of 8 to 1 cement concrete, with a 3" layer of cement mortar on the inside face, and the division wall is composed of reinforced concrete. The roof consists of concrete jack arches springing from reinforced concrete beams, 6' 0" apart, centre to centre. These reinforced concrete beams are supported on main beams, also of reinforced concrete, which are spaced 12 feet apart, centre to centre, the main beams being carried on reinforced concrete pillars 12 feet apart, centre to centre. The roof is covered with a 12-inch layer of earth and turfed over.

The draw-off pipes are led to an Outlet Well where the control valves are situated and from there cast-iron pipes, 12" and 14" diame- ter, run through a short outlet tunnel to the Pokfulam Road Pumping Station and the City respectively. The Reservoir now feeds the Western District of the City.

A description of the 12" cast-iron main for conveying unfiltered water from the Bowen Road Conduit at Albany Filter Beds to the new filter beds was given in last year's Report.

:

47

P.W.E. Hongkong.

The quarters for the Chinese Staff comprise a single-storied brick building with a Coolies' Room 14′ 0′′ × 24′ 0′′, a Watchman's Room 12′ 0′′ × 14′ 0′′ and an Office 12′ 0′′ × 14′0′′. Bathrooms, kitchens and latrine accommodation are provided.

A considerable area in proximity to the filter beds has been concreted for sand-washing purposes.

All liabilities were discharged before the close of the year. 1919 Estimates, ... $37,000.00 | Total Estimates,... $387,000.00

Expenditure to 36,586.34 31/12/19,

1919 Expenditure,...

385,851.37

111. Taitam Tuk Waterworks,—Catchwater contouring hills on west side of Taitam Bay.—Owing to lack of staff, it was not found possible to proceed with this work.

1919 Estimates,

1919 Expenditure,

$50,000.00 Nil.

112. Eastern District Filter Beds, &c. It was not found possible to proceed further with this work than the undertaking of a survey of the site and the despatch of an indent for pipes and valves required to connect the beds with the distribution system of the City. In anticipation of the arrival of the pipes from England, certain stores required in connection with the laying of them were issued.

1919 Estimates, ......$40,000.00 Total Estimates...

1919 Expenditure, ... 722.98

Expenditure to 31/12/19,.

$722.98

113. Miscellaneous Waterworks.-The following is a statement

of the expenditure under this heading :

(1.) Shaukiwan East Substituting new main, ranging from 6" to 4" in diameter for old

3" main,

(ii) Group Hydrants, (19 groups of 3 each),... (iii.) Extension to Quarters at Bowen Road Filter

Beds,

(iv.) Miscellaneous,

Total,.

$ 5,971.53

6,299.99

2,495.32

46.30

$14,813.14

P.W.E. KOWLOON.

114. Quarters for Subordinate Officers, (2nd Block).-The second block of quarters, containing 6 two-storied houses, was com- pleted in October, the houses being occupied immediately. It is situated on rising ground immediately to the westward of the first. block which adjoins Cox's Path and which was erected in 1914.

P.W.E. Kowloon.

Q 48

Each house contains, on the ground floor an entrance hall, sitting-room 20′ 9′′ × 14′ 0′′, dining-room 18′ 3′′ × 14' 0", kitchen, pantry and servants' quarters, and on the upper floor three bed- rooms, 18′ 6′′ × 14′ 0′′, 14′ 0′′ x 10′ 7′′ and 14′ 0′′ x 10′ 2′′ res- pectively together with a bathroom and water-closet. A wide verandah is provided on both floors, that on the ground floor being augmented by the addition of a bay. A basement, 5' 6" high, extends under each house.

Externally, the basement walls are of coursed stone, the ground floor walls of Formosa bricks and the upper floor walls of Canton bricks plastered with roughcast.

The retention money under the contract and various other items remained to be paid in 1920.

1919 Estimates,

1919 Expenditure,

$80,000.00 | Total Estimates,

Expenditure to

$104,000.00

105,859.31

78,901,10 31/12/19,

115. Additional Ricksha Shelter, Tsim Sha Tsui.-The Ricksha Shelter, which was erected in 1917, was extended by the addition of 9 bays, a further addition being made by constructing a second shelter, parallel with and adjacent to the first, the total length of new shelter added being about 230 feet in length. Overhanging shades to provide additional protection from sun and rain were constructed both for the new and for the original shelter. The whole of the work was carried out in reinforced concrete, being completed during the course of the year. The work necessitated the re-grading of a portion of the roadway around the shelter.

Total Estimates, ...$6,000,00 Expenditure to

31/12/19,

1919 Estimates,... .$6,000.00

1919 Expenditure,... 5,432.75

116.-Rouds :--

5,432.75

(a.) Shanghai Street to Tai Kok Tsui.-This work was completed in July. It consisted of the construction of an embankment, 1,400 feet long, with a top-width of 20 feet, surfaced with macadam, 4" thick, together with a ferro-concrete bridge, spanning the main nullah. The bridge has two 15 feet spans and, to provide for the future development of the district, the decking extends over a length of 74 feet. The foundations of the pier and abutments of the bridge had to be piled.

All liabilities were discharged before the close of the year. 1919 Estimates, ...$ 10,000.00 Total Estimates....$ 22,500.00 1919 Sup. Vote, ...

|

2,000.00

$12,000.00

Expenditure to 31/12/19,...

18,721.70

1919 Expenditure, 11,918.54

(b.) Main Roads in Kowloon.--Kowloon City to Mongkoktsui- By the end of the year, the survey and sections were finished, the resumption of the necessary land had been undertaken and tenders

Q 49

P.W.E. Kowloon.

had been received for that portion of the main road from Mongkok- tsui to Kowloon City lying to the east of the Railway Embankment. The only expenditure incurred was in connection with the survey- ing operations.

1919 Estimate,...$ 100,000.00 Total Estimates,...

1919 Expenditure,

262.29

Expenditure to 31/12/19,.

$262.29

(c.) General Works.-The following is a brief statement of the principal works carried out under this heading :—

Public Square Street, Waterloo Road, Shan Tung Street, that portion of Portland Street extending from Changsha Street to Nelson Street and that portion of Temple Street extending from Jordan Road to Ningpo Street, were all raised to their new levels.

The following roads were kerbed and channelled, the footpaths being paved with granolithic slabs and any necessary improvements being made in front of new buildings erected during the year :-

Argyle Street, Canton Road,

Hong Lok Street,

Mody Road,

Nathan Road,

Pine Street,

1919 Estimates,

Portland Street, Reclamation Street, Shan Tung Street,

Temple Street,

Woosung Street.

1919 Supplementary Vote,

1919 Expenditure,

$ 25,000.00

50,000.00

$ 75,000.00 58,953.27

117. Training Nullahs, -General Works.---The extension of the nullah in Nan Chang Street, Shamshuipo, from Hai Tan Street to Yee Kuk Street, referred to in last year's Report, was completed early in the year. A further extension of this nullah towards Laichikok Road was undertaken but was not completed at the close of the year.

Other works carried out under this heading were the con- struction of parapet walls on the Waterloo Road nullah and of two bridges spanning the same between the sea-wall and Shanghai Street and the reconstruction and raising of the walls of the nullah in Soy Street between the sea-wall and Portland Street (incomplete).

The total length of new training work done was 145 feet.

1919 Estimates,

1919 Supplementary Vote

1919 Expenditure,.

$ 5,000.00 9,500.00

$ 14,500.00

6,661.30

P.W.E. Kowloon.

50

118. Miscellaneous Drainage Works.--The extension of the sewer in Argyle Street referred to in item (viii) of last year's Report (p. 78) was completed early in the year.

Numerous extensions of the drainage systems were carried out during the year to provide for building developments. The most important were the extension of sewers and storm-water drains in the Homuntin District; the extension of the sewer, (18′′ & 15" diam.), in Waterloo Road between Reclamation Street and Homuntin, (incomplete); the extension of a storm-water drain, (33′′ & 30′′ diam.), and of a sewer (9′′ & 6′′ diam.), at Taiwan in connection with the construction of Quarters for the Staff of the Hongkong and Whampoa Dock Co.; the extension of a 15" storm-water drain in Jordan Road and of a 12" storm-water drain in Cox's Path; the extension of a 6" sewer in Lane between Dundas and Soy Streets, east of Canton Road; the extension of a 27" storm-water drain in Shan Tung Street, between Portland Street and Coronation Road; the extension of 18" storm-water drains in Soy and Anchor Streets, Taikoktsui; the extension of 9′′ and 6′′ sewers in Shan Tung Street and Lane west of K.I.L. 956; and the extension of a 9" sewer in Ningpo Street from east of Shanghai Street to Woosung Street. The number of drain connections made was 108.

1919 Estimates,

1919 Supplementary Vote,

1919 Expenditure (from Govt. funds),... $39,766.92

$20,000.00 25,100.00

$ 45,100.00

1919

(contributions by

various lessees, etc.), .

6,389.40

$46,156.32

119. Extensions of Lighting-42 lamps were erected during the year in the Kowloon and Shamshuipo Districts-11 are gas and 31 electric. Of the latter, 7 are in Shamshuipo.

1919 Estimates,.

1919 Sup. Vote,.

1919 Expenditure,

$1,000.00 400.00

$1,400.00 759.83

120. Chinese Cemeteries,--Laying out new areas.-A state- ment of the works carried out under this heading will be found in paragraph 37 of this Report.

1919 Estimates,..

1919 Expenditure,

.$2,000.00 1,392.40

Q 51

P.W.E. Kowloon.

121. Miscellaneous Works.—The following is a brief statement of the principal works carried out under this heading :—

Sundry alterations were carried out to Nos. 171 & 173 Coronation Road to adapt the premises for occupation as a temporary Police Station, including the provision of quarters for a married European Sergeant and for Chinese Constables.

Water closets and lavatory basins were installed in the Royal Observatory and in the quarters attached to same.

A set of combined storm and time electric signal lights for use during the hours of darkness was fixed to the wireless mast at the Observatory, primarily as an addition to the storm signals hitherto in use. The complete set is made up of 8 Lanterns in all, each of which contains a cluster of 3 half-watt lamps, 3 of the lanterns affording a red light, 3 of them a green light and 2 of them a white light, the whole being used in various combinations as storm signals. The white lights only are used to signal the hour of 9 o'clock each night. The whole of the lights are controlled by a series of switches fixed in the telegraph rooin at the Observatory.

A cable was laid between the Royal Observatory and Signal Hill.

A telephone line was erected between Tsim Sha Tsui Police Station exchange and the new temporary station at Mong Kok Tsui.

A retaining wall was constructed at Gun Club Hill in Chatham Road, a landslip having occurred as the result of cutting away the hill in connection with the formation of the road and railway yard.

Sunshades of corrugated iron have been provided to some of the windows of the Kowloon British School.

1919 Estimates, 1919 Sup. Votes,.

1919 Expenditure,

$4,000.00 8,000.00

$12,000.00

14,989.95

122. Public Health and Buildings Ordinance, 1903,-Com- pensation and Resumptions.-The purposes of this vote are referred to in paragraph 109 of this Report.

1919 Estimates,. 1919 Sup. Votes,

1919 Expenditure,

$50,000.00

55,500.00

$105,500.00

91,922.33*

The following is a statement of the resumptions effected during the year and of the scavenging lane areas provided by owners with- out compensation :-

* Sums, amounting to $4,142.64, which had been drawn from the Treasury in 1918 but not disbursed, were refunded in 1919 and were credited to the vote by deducting them from the amount expendled. The expenditure therefore appears as $87,779.69 in Annexe B.

P.W.E. Kowloon,

(1.) Properties resumed :

52

Compensation paid.

K.I.L. 96, Jordan Road,

$15,000.00

K.I.L. 106, Section C,'.

1,980.00

K.I.L. 107, Sections G & H,

3,200.00

K.I.L. 108, Section A, ss. 2, and Section B,...

4,070.00

K.I.L. 1124, Fuk Tsun Heung,

14,000.00

Various lots at Tai Wan,

2,824.95

K.F.L. 11,

41,076.73

Portions of K.F.L. 13,..

3,696.00

Various lots at Matauwei & Matauchung..

4,402.00

Claim No. 45, Lo Lung Hang,

290.00

Lot No. 2239, Section A, R.P., S.D. IV, difference

in value on exchange,

298.25

Certain buildings at Un Chau Village (paid as

an act of grace),

809.40

Total,.

$91,647.33*

(2.) Scavenging lanes provided by owners and surrendered to Government.

Two areas, containing in all 1,072 square feet, were surrendered to Government during the year.

(3.) Scavenging lanes provided by owners but not surrendered to Government.

Eleven areas, aggregating 9,9831 square feet, were laid out as private scavenging lanes during the year.

123. Miscellaneous Waterworks.-The following is a statement

of the expenditure under this heading:-

(i.) Tiles, etc., for Filter Beds,...

$2,956.67

(i) Extending distribution system to lots at

Ho Mun Tin,...

1,309.57

(iii.) Group Hydrants, (21 groups of 3 each),

5,846.10

(iv.) Miscellaneous,

354.48

Total,...

$ 10,466.82

*Sums, amounting to $375, were paid for retaining the services of firms of architects and surveyors and for valuations made by those firms in connection with various resumptions.

Q 53

P.W.E. New Territories.

P.W.E. NEW TERRITORIES.

124. Market at Tai 0, including reclaiming site.—This work was completed in June. It comprises the reclamation of an area, measuring 100' x 55', the seaward sides being protected by a dry rubble pitched slope and the erection of an open shed, 65′ 3′′ × 23′ 3′′, with brick pillars and a ferro-concrete roof and a room and kitchen for a caretaker. The flooring is of cement concrete. Electric light is installed.

1919 Estimates,.. 1919 Sup. Vote,..

1919 Expenditure,

125. Roads :-

$3,000.00 Total Estimates,..

710.00

$3,710.00 Expenditure to

3,607.75

31/12/19,

$6,000.00

6,738.72

(a.) Shamshuipo to Castle Peak-Section from Tsun Wan to Castle Peak,——20 feet wide.—As mentioned in last year's Report, this length of road was divided into two sub-sections for the pur- pose of letting contracts, namely:--

(i.) Tsun Wan to Tsing Loong Tau,... ...5 miles. (ii) Tsing Loong Tau to Castle Peak,.....519 miles.

Sub-section (i) was completed in September. It included the construction of three bridges, one 75' in length (3 spans), one 50' (2 spans) and one 30′ (single span). Except in the case of the single-span bridge, where the abutments are of stone, the abutments and piers of the bridges are of cement concrete, the decking being in all cases of ferro-concrete supported on ferro-concrete beams. There are 19 culverts, which are also of ferro-concrete, ranging from twin culverts, each 5′ 0′′ × 5′ 0′′, to single ones, 2′ 0′′ x 2′ 0′′. Numerous cross-drains of stoneware pipes, ranging from 18" to 9" in diameter, are provided.

There are several undulations in the road, the level of which varies from 14 to 100 feet above Ordnance Datum. The maximum gradient on any part of the road is 1 in 20. Substantial concrete fences have been erected where considered necessary for the pro- tection of traffic.

It comprised

Sub-section (ii) was completed in November. the construction of five bridges: one 175 feet in length (5 spans), one 68 feet (2 spans) and three of 30 feet, 20 feet, and 15 feet respectively, all single-span. Except in the case of the latter, which have stone abutments, the abutments and piers of the bridges are of cement concrete, the decking being in all cases of ferro-concrete supported on ferro-concrete beams. There are fifteen culverts, all of ferro-concrete, ranging from twin culverts, each 7' 0" x 5' 0", to single culverts, 2′ 0′′ × 2′ 0′′. Numerous cross-drains of stoneware pipes are provided.

In several places, where the road closely skirts the coast, sea- walls or pitched slopes have been constructed to protect it.

P.W.E. New Territories.

Q 51

The undulations in this portion of the road are somewhat less pronounced than in sub-section (i), the level of the road varying from 12 to 75 feet above Ordnance Datum. The maximum gradient is 1 in 20.

The Pak Tin Pai bridge, constructed in 1917-18 in connection with the Tsun Wan section of the road and practically destroyed. during the rainstorms of the 2nd to 4th August, 1918, was recon- structed as a 4-span bridge, with an over-all length of 112 feet. The deck and beams are of ferro-concrete supported on cement concrete abutments and piers, the foundations of which are piled.

The expenditure on land resumptions during the year for both. sub-sections amounted to $217.34.

A sum of $618.94 was expended during the year in maintain- ing, for the use of the Engineer, a house-boat and motor dinghy, and for survey expenses.

All liabilities were discharged before the close of the year.

1919 Estimates,

1919 Sup. Vote,

1919 Expenditure,

$115,000.00 | Total Estimates,

105,000.00

$220,000.00 Expenditure to

219,770.73 | 31/12/19,

$433,078.12

(b.) Taipo Road,—Widening and improving road between Shatin and Taipo.-The improvements, which extend over 8'4 miles of road, will, when finished, result in a shortening of the road by 3,000 lineal feet, equivalent to a reduction of 7% in the total length on the old alignment. They include the improvement of upwards of 70 sharp bends, a diversion, 1,200 feet in length, whereby 11 bad bends will be eliminated, the widening of 11 bridges from 14′ 0′′ to 20' 0" and the construction of 4 new culverts besides numerous pipe cross-drains. The diversion referred to has necessitated the construction of a 3-span bridge, 95 feet in length and 45 feet in height. Substantial concrete fences have been erected where con- sidered necessary for the protection of traffic.

By the end of the year, most of the work was approaching completion. The expenditure for the year on land resumptions amounted to $182.38.

1919 Estimates, $56,000.00 | Total Estimates,

Expenditure to

1919 Expenditure, 49,307.01 31/12/19,

..

..$103,463.90*

(c.) Metalling and tarring portion of Fanling to Castle Peak Road.-Arrangements were made in January for the macadamizing and asphaltic painting of that portion of the road extending from Fanling to Mai Po, a distance of 54 miles. By the end of 1919, 41 miles had been completed.

*This sum includes the cost of improving the road between the 5th and 9th milestones.

J

1

Q 55

P.W.E. New Territories.

A new contract for similarly surfacing a further length of the road, 11 miles in all, from Mai Po to Castle Peak Bay, was let in Novem- ber and the work was in progress at the close of the year.

1919 Estimates,

1919 Expenditure, .

$50,000.00 26,947.59

(d.) General Works. The following is a brief statement of the principal works carried out under this heading :---

The main road running northwards from Tai Po was extended from Fan Ling to Sheung Shui, a distance of 0·96 mile, at a cost of $9,520.46.

The short length of road connecting Sheung Shui Train Halt with the main road was widened to 20 feet at a cost of $2,046.35. That portion of the main road which adjoins Un Long Market was widened to 40 feet at a cost of $544.45.

A supplementary vote of $15,000 was taken for effecting improvements in that portion of the Tai Po Road lying between the 3rd and 5th milestones, but it was not found possible to proceed with the work further than making the necessary survey, plans and estimates.

Kerbing and channelling operations were carried out in the following roads, the footpaths being paved with granolithic slabs at the same time :-

Haitan Street, Ki Lung Street, Kweilin Street, Lai Chi Kok Road,

1919 Estimates, 1919 Sup. Votes,.

1919 Expenditure,

Nan Chang Street, Peiho Street,

Tai Nan Street, and Yu Chau Street.

$9,000.00

55,000.00

$64,000.00

42,716.06

126. Miscellaneous Drainage Works.-The drainage systems at Shamshuipo were extended in many places owing to building developments, the principal items being the construction of a 5′′ storm-water culvert in Yen Chow Street between Yu Chau Street and Apliu Street, the extension of 15′′ and 12" storm-water drains in Yu Chau Street from Yen Chow Street to Kweilin Street and the extension of 15′′ and 12′′ storm-water drains in Laichikok Road from Yen Chow Street to Kweilin Street.

The number of drain connections made was 53.

1919 Estimates,

$20,000.00

1919 Supplementary Vote,

1919 Expenditure, (from Government funds), $6,977.93

1919

(contributions by various

lessees, etc.),

8,500.00

$28,500.00

7.88

$6,985.81

P.W.E. New Territories.

56

127. Filling in between bridges, Tai Wo Shi.—It was not found possible to proceed with this work during the year.

1919 Estimates,

1919 Expenditure,

$10,000.00 Nil.

128. Further Reclamation at Shamshuipo.--The area now undertaken forms part of the general scheme of reclamation, which is being carried out by Government. It comprises approximately 2,842,000 square feet, (65-24 acres), of which approximately 1,650,000 square feet, (37 87 acres), will be available for building. The area will be protected on the south-western boundary by a sea-wall, 1,610 feet long, on the north-western boundary by the side-wall of a future núllah, 1,870 feet long, and on the north- eastern boundary by a pitched slope, 1,760 feet long.

The dredging of trenches for the sea and future nullah walls was commenced on the 10th March and, by the end of the year, a length of 1,620 feet had been completed, the quantity of material excavated amounting to 27,712 cubic yards (junk-measurement).

The contract for the Reclamation Works was awarded to Messrs. Him Tai, whose tender amounted to $636,148.50, the Contract Documents being signed on the 26th July.

Temporary offices and workshops were erected and, on the 22nd September, a commencement was made with the erection of temporary pile frames and stagings as guides to the depositing of rubble. The depositing of pell-mell rubble for the foundations of the sea-wall was commenced on the 24th October and, by the end of the year, 18,058 cubic yards of stone (measured in junks) had been deposited, of which quantity 13,585 cubic yards (ascertained from soundings) remained above the level of the bottom of the dredged trench.

It was necessary to resume considerable areas of land in order to provide routes for the transport of the material required for filling in the reclamation. The necessary surveys were made and schedules prepared, but the resumptions of the land had not been effected by the end of the year. 1919 Estimates,..... $80,000.00

1919 Expenditure,... 22,990.01

Total Estimates, Expenditure to

31/12/19,

$730,000.00

22,990.01

129. Chinese Cemeteries,—Laying out new areas.--A statement of the works executed under this heading will be found in paragraph 37 of this Report.

1919 Estimates,.

1919 Expenditure,

$500.00 137.11

130. Telephonic Communication to Police Stations.--As men- tioned in paragraph 148 of last year's Report, it was decided to establish telephonic communication with all the Police Stations on outlying islands. To enable this to be done expeditiously, certain lengths of cable which were required were borrowed from the Military

Q 57

P.W.E. New Territories.

Authorities and connected with the land-lines which were constructed departmentally. The cables however proved to be defective and it will be necessary to await the arrival of the new cables ordered before communication can be established.

1919 Estimates,

$24,000.00 Total Estimates,

Expenditure to

1919 Expenditure,... 10,258.25 31/12/19, ...

$15,319.04

131. Miscellaneous Works.-The following is a brief statement of the principal items carried out under this heading :-

Double fences of barbed wire, with barbed wire entanglements, were erected around the following Police Stations:--Sha Tau Kok, Lok Ma Chau, Ta Ku Ling and Tai O. Steel shutters were also provided to the windows of the three first-mentioned Stations.

An interpreter's room was provided at Lok Ma Chau Police Station, a verandah was added at Ta Ku Ling Police Station and various alterations and additions were made at Tung Chung, Tai O and Kat O Police Stations.

An outhouse was constructed at the Tai Po Island Quarters.

Telephone lines were constructed from the Tsim Sha Tsui Police Station Exchange to the Water Works Bungalow at Kowloon Reservoir and to the Tsing Lung Tau Police Station and from Tai Po Police Station Exchange to the Tai Po Dispensary.

The reclamation of an area at Cheung Chau to enable a portion of the old village which had been destroyed by fire to be laid out on improved lines was completed at a cost of $696.96, a further sum of $155.75 being expended on the diversion of a surface drain.

·:

1919 Estimates, 1919 Sup. Vote,

1919 Expenditure,

$10,000.00

10,000.00

$20,000.00

17,829.25

132. Public Health and Buildings Ordinance, 1903,-Com- pensation and Resumptions.—The purposes of this vote are refer-

red to in paragraph 109 of this Report.

1919 Estimates,

1919 Sup. Votes,..

1919 Expenditure, .

(1.) Properties resumed.–

$20,000.00

25,000.00

$45,000.00

32,574.66

A statement of the properties resumed in the New Territories. will be found in paragraph 14 of this Report.

(2.) Scavenging lanes provided by owners but not surrendered to Government.

Four areas, amounting to 1,533 square feet, were laid out as private scavenging lanes during the year.

P.W.E. New Territories.

Q 58

133. Shamshuipo District,—Laying_water_mains.—The pipes and valves for this work arrived in the Colony towards the end of August, when the work was immediately put in hand. It consisted of laying 3,500 feet of 10", 5,000 feet of 6′′ and 2,760 feet of 4" cast-iron pipes, with the necessary cross connections, valves, etc.

Owing to certain obstructions, it was not possible to complete the work, but, up to the close of the year, the whole of the 10" and 4" pipes had been laid and more than half of the 6", together with the necessary valves and street fountains and 4 group hydrants. Water was turned on to the district on the 23rd September.

$27,000.00 Total Estimates,

Expenditure to

31/12/19

1919 Estimates,

1919 Expenditure,... 27,057.11

$27,057.11

WORKS NOT APPEARING IN ESTIMATES.

HONGKONG.

134. Latrine under steps in Duddell Street.-This work has already been alluded to in paragraph 97 of this Report.

1919 Estimates,

1919 Expenditure,..

$1,965.07

135. Cape D'Aguilar Wireless Station, Fencing. It was deemed advisable to enclose the Wireless Station and Staff Quarters in connection with the same by erecting two barbed-wire fences, 5' 0" apart, with barbed-wire entanglement between.

1919 Estimates,

1919 Expenditure,

$3,339.83

136. Motor Car Shelter at Deep Water Bay.—This work, which was fully described in paragraph 139 of last year's Report, was completed in March, the total expenditure on it being $3,794.59.

1919 Estimates,.

1919 Expenditure,

$1,869.55

137. Shaukiwan Police Station,—Additions and Alterations. A storey was added to the servants' block containing a kitchen, boys' room and servants' bathroom, the old kitchen being adapted for housing the fire-engine.

The floor of the Inspector's Quarters were renewed in reinforced concrete, a new bathroom with flushed closet being added and a reinforced concrete staircase provided.

Sundry alterations were carried out in the Charge Room, a new platform desk and dock being installed. Some minor altera- tions were also made in other parts, a flushed trough closet and urinal being installed for Indian Constables.

All liabilities were discharged before the close of the year.

1919 Estimates, 1919 Expenditure,

$11,825.48

K

59-

Works not appearing in Estimates.-Hongkong.

138. Central Police Station,--Alterations to Charge Room, &c.- Sundry alterations were undertaken in the Charge Room, a new desk 33' 0" long, a dock and a fire-arms cage, together with new benches, etc., being installed. Minor alterations were also effected and new fittings were provided to the Detention, Inspector's and Telephone rooms and to the Store.

1919 Estimates,....

1919 Expenditure,

$3,865.24

139. Berlin Mission Foundling House, Bonham Road-Con- version into quarters for Married Police.—Alterations were carried out in the large building which was erected during 1914-15 in order to adapt same for occupation as Married Police Quarters.

Two quarters, one of four rooms and one of two rooms, are provided on the ground floor and two quarters of three rooms each on the first floor. Servants' quarters are provided on a lower floor which, owing to the configuration of the ground, extends over a portion of the building.

1919 Estimates,.

1919 Expenditure,

$2,208.62

140. Road from Deep Water Bay to Taitam Tuk,-Improve- ments to adapt for motor traffic, section from Deep Water Bay to Repulse Bay-As the improvements effected in 1917 were not alto- gether satisfactory, it was considered advisable to carry out some further improvements in order to render the road reasonably safe for the increasing motor traffic.

A contract for the additional work was let to Mr. Li Ng in August and was completed in September. The work comprised the widening of the whole of the road to a minimum of 20 feet, the improving of the alignment and grade and the construction of further parapet walls and earth mounds.

All liabilities were discharged before the close of the year.

1919 Estimates,

1919 Expenditure,

$23,889.54

141. Council Chamber,--Repairing Chairs.-The chairs in the Council Chamber were thoroughly renovated.

1919 Estimates,.

1919 Expenditure,

$515.00

142. Taitam Tuk Scheme,--Second Section.-The defective parts of the engines were replaced and the engines were finally taken over, after satisfactorily passing their trials, on the 13th August. The trials were conducted by certain members of the Staff of H.M. Naval Yard, the expenses incurred in connection with same amounting to $424.57. The balance of the expenditure was

Works not appearing in Estimates.

Kowloon.

60

for re-grading the floor of the pump-fit. The small balance on the engines, referred to in paragraph 114 of last year's Report, was still outstanding.

1919 Estimates,

1919 Expenditure,..... $775.70

Total Estimates,... $2,455,000.00 Expenditure to 31/12/19,...

2,372,205.12

KOWLOON.

143. Shelter in Children's Playground. This work was des- cribed in paragraph 124 of last year, Report. It was completed early in the year, a reinforced concrete fence being erected around the site.

1919 Estimates,

1919 Expenditure, ... $1,951,16 |

Total Estimates,.. Expenditure to 31/12/19,...

$6,637.23

144. Latrine at intersection of Ning Po and Woo Sung Streets. This work was begun in May and was practically completed by the end of the year. The structure is divided into two compartments, one containing 42 seats for men, besides urinals, and the other 8 seats for women. Accommodation for a caretaker and for storage of buckets is provided. The construction is on the improved lines. now adopted for such structures.

1919 Estimates,

1919 Expenditure,

Total Estimates, Expenditure to

$8,743.70

31/12/19,

$8,743.70

145. Repairing and Coaling Yard for Government Launches.- The electrically-driven winch, referred to in paragraph 148 of the Report for the year 1915 and in Reports for subsequent years, for operating the slipway cradle, having at length arrived, it was erected, connected to the China Light and Power Company's mains and tested. Satisfactory trial runs were made on the 9th April, from which date the slipway came into use.

1919 Estimates, 1919 Expenditure,

$6,212.22

146. Road to China Light and Power Company's new Station. Under the arrangements made with the China Light and Power Company, whereby a new site to the south-eastward of the Cement Company's Works was granted in exchange for the site of the Com- pany's present Power Station, which will revert to Government, the Government undertook to construct a road giving access to the Company's new site known as K.M.L. 93. The extensive develop- ments in connection with the Hongkong and Whampoa Dock Company's establishment at Hunghom and probable future de- velopments at Tai Wan rendered it advisable to extend the projected road further than was originally intended and to increase its width to 20 feet. A contract for the work was let to Messrs. Wing Lee

Q. 61

Works not appearing in Estimates.-Kowloon.

& Co. in November and satisfactory progress was being made by

the close of the year.

1919 Estimates,

1919 Expenditure,

$2,891.02

ADVANCE ACCOUNT.

HONGKONG.

147. Praya East Reclamation Scheme.—In order to place the Scheme before the owners of Marine Rights, quantities and estimates of cost were revised and a detailed plan and statement were prepared showing the areas to be allotted to such owners and the estimated amounts of their contributions.

A sum of $2,871.24 was expended during the year in the diversion of a stormwater drain which formerly crossed M.L. 25 by constructing a new concrete culvert, 36′′ to 39" in diameter, in Gresson Street and Queen's Road East. The work was not com- pleted at the close of the year.

t

The sum charged to Advance Account' amounted to $67,568.08 exclusive of the sum of $10,543.35*, expended in rais- ing the footpaths and floors of houses in Praya East on M.L.'s 107, 108, 109, 116, 116 R.P. and 117 carried out in 1918.

WORKS DEFRAYED FROM FUNDS NOT PROVIDED UNDER P.W.E. VOTES.

HONGKONG.

148. Peace Celebrations.-In connection with the Peace Cele- brations, on the 18th and 19th July, a number of Government buildings were decorated with flags and bunting and were also illuminated at night. The following is a statement of the buildings treated and of the manner of illuminations :-

Government House :-Incandescent electric lamps, forming the device of a Crown and the letters G. R." were displayed on the north front, which was otherwise illuminated by Japanese lanterns, containing candles.

Supreme Court :-Illuminated on all fronts and the dome by

Japanese lanterns, containing candles.

New Government Offices :-Illuminated on the three principal

fronts by Japanese lanterns, containing candles.

* This was erroneously stated as $7,602.75 in paragraph 90 of the 1918 Report. It is correctly, stated in Annexe B (p. 102) of that Report.

Staff, &c.

62

Harbour Office :-Illuminated on the north front by Japanese

lanterns, containing candles.

Victoria Hospital and Staff Quarters :-Illuminated on the

north front by Japanese lanterns, containing candles.

H.K.D.C. Head Quarters :-Incandescent electric lamps form- ing the letters "G. R." were displayed over the main entrance the east front being illuminated by Japanese lanterns, containing candles.

Old Government Offices :-Illuminated on the north and south

fronts by Japanese lanterns, containing candles.

The following buildings in Kowloon were illuminated by in- candescent electric lamps:

Railway Station, Royal Observatory (including Wireless Mast).

Tsim Sha Tsui Police Station, Post Office and Time Ball Tower..

Flags were supplied to the principal Police Stations and Schools in the New Territories for purposes of decoration.

*

The total expenditure incurred on the foregoing amounted to $8,829.99, which was defrayed from the vote Miscellaneous Ser- vices, Peace Celebrations".

year:

STAFF, &c.

149. The deaths of the following officers occurred during the

Mr. Leung Pui-cho, 3rd Grade Clerk.

Mr. Chow Lee, 5th Grade Foreman.

150. The following officers retired on pension:---

Mr. C. H. Gale, Second Assistant Director of Public Works,

14th June, 1919.

Mr. D. Jaffé, Special Engineer, 19th September, 1919. Mr. J. J. Bryan, Drainage Survey, 24th April 1919.

The two latter retired on the grounds of ill-health.

151. Mr. A. H. Hollingsworth, Executive Engineer, was pro- moted to the post of Second Assistant Director of Public Works, rendered vacant by Mr. Gale's retirement.

152. Mr. W. T. Edwards, First Class Overseer, was promoted to the post of Drainage Surveyor, rendered vacant by Mr. Bryan's retirement.

63

Staff, &c.

153. The following officers left the service of the Department during the year :-

Mr. W. E. Douglas, 2nd Grade Assistant Engineer.

Mr. A. Lambden, Temporary 1st Class Overseer. Mr. F. O'Mahney, Temporary 2nd Class Overseer. Mr. A. Delgado, 3rd Grade Meter Reader. Mr. Tang Shing-cheung, 4th Grade Clerk.

Mr. Man Hau-kat, 4th Grade Clerk.

Mr. Li Shu-chun, 5th Grade Clerk.

Mr. Y. D. Poon, 4th Grade Draughtsman. and numerous other officers of subordinate rank.

154. The following appointments were made :-

Mr. L. D. Martyn, 2nd Grade Assistant Engineer. Mr. H. J. Pearce,

do.

Mr. A. E. Clarke, Acting Electrician.

Mr. K. K. Staple, 2nd Class Overseer.

Mr. Wong Tsun-fan, 3rd Grade Clerk. Mr. Ng Tat-sam,

Mr. Shin Chung-sang,

do.

do.

Mr. Ho Kam-fuk, 4th Grade Clerk.

Mr. Lam Ming,

do.

Mr. Leung Kwai-ming, 4th Grade Shroff.

Mr. Ng Pak-chau, 5th Grade Clerk.

Mr. Fung Hoi-shun,

Mr. Leung Yan-i,

do.

do.

Mr. Lum Kwok-tung, 2nd Grade Surveyor.

Mr. Luiz Lopes, 3rd Grade Meter Reader.

Mr. Chan Pui-lan, Apprentice Surveyor. Mr. Fung Tsun,

do.

Mr. Liu Chiu-cheung, Computer.

Mr. Ho Sheung, 3rd Grade Draughtsman.

Mr. J. Scholotke, 4th Grade Draughtsman.

Mr. Hon Tsung-kan,

do.

Mr. Tam Chiu-cheung, 5th Grade Draughtsinan.

Mr. Chan Chiu-kun,

Mr. Chan Ping-fan, 6th Grade Draughtsman.

Mr. Leung Hi-cheung,

Mr. Iu Po-kau,

do.

do.

do.

and numerous other officers of subordinate rank.

Staff, &c.

64

155. A number of subordinate officers joined and left the service of the Department during the year.

156. The following officers, who had been granted long leave, were absent during the periods stated :-

Mr. C. H. Gale, Second Assistant Director of Public Works,

14.2.19 to 13.6.19.

Mr. D. Jaffé, Special Engineer, 14.3.18 to 18.9.19.

Mr. H. E. Goldsmith, 2nd Grade Executive Engineer,

12.6.19 to 31.12.19.

Mr. E. B. Reed,* 1st Grade Land Surveyor, 23.5.19 to 31.12.19. Mr. W. E. Douglas, 2nd Grade Assistant Engineer, 22.4.19

to 30.9.19.

Mr. R. J. Stevenson, Electrician, 1.7.19 to 31.12.19.

Mr. Colin Sara, 1st Class Overseer, 28.5.19 to 31.12.19. Mr. C. J. Tacchi,*

do.,

10.7.19 to 31.12.19.

The following officers were granted local leave :-

Mr. H. S. Rouse, 2nd Grade Assistant Engineer, 2 months. Mr. F. W. Wood, Assistant Land Surveyor, 3 months.

Mr. E. Larmour,

do.,

3 months.

Mr. G. H. Haskett, Inspector of Stores, 1 month.

Mr. S. R. Jones, 2nd Class Overseer, 5 weeks. Mr. Ng Ping-un, 2nd Grade Draughtsman, 4 weeks.

Mr. Tang Ngok-wan,

do..

4 weeks.

Mr. Wen Cho-ming, Junior Assistant Land Surveyor, 4 weeks. Mr. Lo Ka-tsok, 1st Grade Tracer, 4 weeks.

157. The following officers returned from Active Service and resumed duty on the dates mentioned:-

Mr. H. West, 2nd Grade Land Surveyor, 30.7.19.

Mr. A. B. Purves, 2nd Grade Assistant Engineer, 7.11.19.

Mr. E. B. Lambert, Assistant Land Surveyor, 30.7.19.

Mr. H. H. Pegg,

do.

Mr. A. Anderson,

do.

17.8.19.

12.8.19.

Mr. R.S. Vergette, 1st Class Overseer, 26.6.19.

Mr. W. Pryde,

do.

17.8.19.

Mr. J. T. Ewing, 2nd Class Overseer, 30.7.19.

Mr. J. A. Howe,

do.

26.7.19.

W. CHATHAM, C.M.G., M.L.C.E.,

Director of Public Works.

PUBLIC WORKS OFFICE,

HONGKONG, 3rd May, 1920.

* These Officers were granted leave on their release from Active Service,

-

65

Annexe A.

*

ANNUALLY RECURRENT EXPENDITURE, 1919.

PROVISI-

HEADS AND SUB-HEADS.

ESTIMATED.

ACTUAL. INCREASE. DECREASE. ONALLY VOTED.

BALANCE.

ESTABLISHMENT.

Personal Emoluments and Exchange Com-

pensation,

Other Charges,

Special Expenditure.

Typewriter,.....

Furniture,

PUBLIC WORKS RECURRENT.

HONGKONG.

·Buildings.

C.

$

C.

('.

e.

417,469 350,031.51

48,156 39,974.78

1,582.29

67,437.49 9,763.51

25,563.79 93,001.28 2,399.41 11,205.49

$465,625 390,006.29 1,582.29 77,201.00 | 27,963.20 104,206.77

540 1,000

452.60 923.75

87.40 76.25

87.40

76.25

1. Maintenance of Buildings,..

70,000

2. Improvements to Buildings,

3. Maintenance of Lighthouses,

84,918.35 14,918.35 9,000 24,947.64 15,947.64 4,500 6,413.05 1,913.05

16,600.00 1,681,65 17,500:00

· 2.000.00

1,552.36

86.95

Communications.

4. Maintenance of Roads and Bridges in

City,

76,000

83,742.54 7,742.54

8,000.00

257.46

5. Improvements to Roads and Bridges

in City,

25,000

24,973.39

6. Maintenance of Roads and Bridges

outside City,

35,000

34,433.95

26.61

566.05

26.61

566.05

7. Improvements to Roads and Bridges

outside City,

5,000

8. Maintenance of Telephones, including

all Cables,

37,219.85 32,219.85

6,500 6,302.84

32,450.00 230.15

197.16

197.16

Drainage.

:

:

:

:

9. Maintenance of Sewers, Nuliahs, &c.,

18,000

17,906.84

93.16

93.16

Lighting.

10. Gas Lighting, City and Suburbs and

Hill District,

65,000

11. Electric Lighting, City, Hill District

and Shaukiwan,

25,500

58,247.09

24,768.51

6,752.91

731.49

6,752.91

781.49

Miscellaneous.

12. Maintenance of Praya Walls and Piers,

13.

29

Public Cemetery,

14.

15.

Chinese Cemeteries, Public Recreation

6,000 2,500 1,658.78 2,500 1,278.76

8,476.14 2,476.14

2,500.00

841.22 1,221.24

23.86 841.22 1,221.24

""

Grounds,.

16. Dredging Foreshores,

17. Typhoon and Rainstorm Damages,..

3,000 3,483.47

483.47

1,500.00

1,016.53

9,000

19,000

7,481.32 28,017.31 9,047.31

1,518.68

1,518,68

9,200.00

152.69

18. Stores Depreciation,

Water Works.

100

Cr.1,656.28

1.756.28

1,756.28

20.

21.

99

1)

,,Shaukiwan,

Aberdeen,

"2

19. Maintenance of City and Hill District, .|· 150,000

22. Water Account, (Meters, &c.),

KOWLOON.

190,897.04 | 40,897.04

40,000.00

897.04

1,000

810.42

...

1,000

412.48

189.58 587.52

189.58 587.52

10,000

11,090.85 1,090.85

800.00

290.85

Buildings.

23. Maintenance of Buildings,

13,000

14,921.69

1,921.69

2,000.00

24. Improvements to Buildings,

1,000

974.56

है

25.44

78.31 25.44

Carried forward,

557,600 673,406.87 128,657.99 | 14,507.34 |132,550.00 | 19,587.30 1,187.89

*

EXCESS.

:

HEADS AND SUB-HEADS.

Brought forward,

66

ANNEXE A,-Continued.

PROVISI-

ESTIMATED. ACTUAL. INCREASE. DECREASE. ONALLY BALANCE.

VOTED.

EXCESS.

$

C.

s

f

c.

C.

$

C.

c.

$99

C.

557,600 673,406.87 128,657.93 14,507.34 132,550.00 | 19,587.30 1,187.89

Kowloon,-Continued.

Communications.

25. Maintenance of Roads and Bridges, ... 26. Improvements to Roads and Bridges,.. 27. Maintenance of Telephones,

Drainage.

28. Maintenance of Sewers, Nullahs, &c.,.

Lighting.

30,000

28,651.23

4,000

3,969.77

...

2,500

2,107.19

1,348.77 30.23 392.81

1,348.77

30.23 392.81

*

7,000

5,853,65

1,146.35

1,146.35

29. Gas Lighting,

30. Electric Lighting,

16,500 5,000

14,878.80 5,251.56

.1,621.20

1,621.20

251.56

700.00

448.44

Miscellaneous.

31. Maintenance of Praya Walls and Piers,

1,500

1,296.83

203.17

203.17

32.

Chinese Cemeteries, ...

500

500.00

500.00

33.

Recreation Ground,

1,000

وو

34. Typhoon and Rainstorm Damages,

4,000

712.12 5,494.01

287.88

287.88

1,494.01

4,000.00

2,505.99

Water Works.

35. Maintenance of Water Works, 35A.Special Repairs to Filter Beds, 36. Water Account, (Meters, &c.),

13,000

4,000

15,733.15 2,733.15

3,915.13

3,000.00

266.85

84.87

84.87

4,000

5,205.89 1,205.89

1,000.00

205.89

NEW TERRITORIES.

Buildings.

37. Maintenance of Buildings,

38. Improvements to Buildings,

Communications.

39. Maintenance of Roads and Bridges, 40. Improvements to Roads and Bridges, 41. Maintenance of Telephones,

10.500

1,000

13,509,31 989.41

3,009.31

3,000.00

9.31

10.59

10.59

22,000

21,452.99

2,000

1,962.45

547.01 37.55

547.01

37.55

4,000

2,820.06

1,179.94

1,179.94

Drainage.

42. Maintenance of Sewers, Nullahs, &c.,

600

335.91

264.09

264.09

Lighting.

43. Electric Lighting, Shamshuipo,

Miscellaneous.

2,000 1,839.00

161.00

350.00

511.00

:

44. Maintenance of Chinese Cemeteries, 45. Typhoon aud Rainstorm Damages,

100 7,000

100.00

12,688.71 5,688.71

6,500.00

100.00 811.29

Water Works.

46. Maintenance of Laichikok,.. 47. Water Account, (Meters, &c.),

2,000

200

2,701.99 289.96

701.99

89.96

800 00 200.00

98.01

110,04

825,065.99

Less credit,

Total,........

་་

702,000

*2,556.12

822,509.87 143,832.51 22,422.80 152,100.00

22,422.80 152,100.00 | 32,093.38 1,403.09

*This amount is made up as follows:-

1. Amount recovered from the Imperial Government

being cost of repair to Roads damaged through transportation of war materials...

2. Vide item No. 18.

.$ 899.84 1,656.28

$2,556.12

1

Q 67

Annexe B.

EXTRAORDINARY EXPENDITURE, 1919.

C.

PROVISION-

HEADS AND SUB-HEADS.

ESTIMATED. ACTUAL.

INCREASE. DECREASE. ALLY

VOTED.

BALANCE. EXCESS.

HONGKONG. Buildings.

1. Central Police Station,-Extension

C.

FA

C.

C.

C.

C.

*

165,000

2. Imports and Exports Office

50,000

107,413.33 41,425.46

57,586.67 8,574.54

57,586.67 8,574.54

3. Quarters for European Officers, Leigh-

ton Hill.

100,000

25,390.55

74,609.45

74,609.45

4. Additional Storey to Public Works

Department Annexe..

15,000

22,835.59

7,835,59:

8,000.00

164.41

5. Quarters for Scavenging

Hospital Road

Coolies,

100,000

14,801,25

85,198.75

6. Officers' Quarters (below Tanderagee) 7. Officers' Quarters (elsewhere)

120,000

271.11

119,728.89

100,000

100,000.00

8. Taitam Tuk Pumping Station, Ad- ditional Quarters for Chinese Staff

5,000

6,169.97

1,169,97

9. Lunatic Asylum,-Extension 10. Crematorium, Happy Valley.. 11. Police Recreation Club Pavilion 12. Latrines and Urinals :-

24,000

25,274.74

1,274.74

1,200.00 1,300.00

85,198.75 119,728,89 100,000.00

30.03

25.26

5,500

11,000

9,742.77

5,500.00 1,257.23

5,500,00

1,257.23

(a.) Trough Closet at Happy Valley (b) Trough Closet, Conduit Road (c.) Urinal at Intersection of Gle-

nealy and Caine Road ...... (d.) Urinal at junction of Seymour

2,000

1,500

2,336.19 3.63

336.19

430.00

1,496.37

93.81 1,496.37

800

766.34

33.66

33.66

650

1,192.86

542.86

650.00

107.14

13. Roads:

and Robinson Roads

Communications.

(a.) Taitam Tuk to Taitam Gap,— New road from north end of

Taitam Tuk Dam to Taitam Gap ·

T

(b.) Aberdeen Road,-Improve-

ments in neighbourhood of Aberdeen Docks, and new road past Aberdeen Village

12,900

12,806.13

...

...

93.87

93.87

:

5,000

(c.) Repulse Bay to Taitam Tuk,-

1st Section-New road

81,000

1,051.03

97,084.59

3,948.97

3,948.97

16,084.59

21,600.00 5,515.41

(d.) Repulse Bay to Taitam Tuk,-

2nd Section-Improving and widening existing road

32,000

45,226.90 13,226.90

20,000.00

(e.) Taitam Gap to Shaukiwan,--

Improving existing road

39,500

65,598.70 26,098.70

:

:

6,773.10

27,500.00

1,401.30

(f) Aberdeen to Little Hongkong, -Improving and widening ex- isting road...

12,000

(g.) Lugard Road Extension...... (h.) Road contouring hillside in

10,000

14,917.55 15,821.40

2,917.55 5,821.40

4,500.00 1,582.45 6,000.00

178.60

Wong Nei Chong and Tai Hang Valleys.

120,000

72,704,25

(.) Branch road from the above to

Wanchai Gap.

80,000

28,610.95

47,295.75

51,389.05

47,295.75

51,389,05

(j) Road contouring Mount Gough

from Findlay Road to Gough Hill Road

20,000

23,735,60

3,735.60

4,000,00

264.40

(k.) Wanchai Road,--Widening to

42 feet......

60,000

20,109.63

(1.) Queen's Road East,--Widen-

ing to 60 feet

150,000

63,558.00

(m.) Pokfulam Road,--Widening... (n.) Pokfulam Road,-Improve-

7,500

7,487.82

39,890.37

86,442.00 12.18

39,890.37

86,442.00 12.18

ment of Bridge No. 8

5,500

8,492.24

2,992.24

3,000.00

7.76

(0.) Raising Praya Wall and Road- way (Connaught Road West)

west of Morrison Street.....

4,500

(p.) General Works

35,000

4,497.60 72,478.28

37,478.28

2.40

2.40

45,000.00 7,521.72

>

Carried forward $1,375,350

....

811,804.46 119,514.61 683,060,15 143,180.00 706,725.54

::

Q 69

ANNEXE B,—Continued.

HEADS AND SUB-HEADS.

ESTIMATED. ACTUAL.

PROVISION-

INCREASE. DECREASE. ALLY. BALANCE. EXCESS.

VOTED.

$

C.

Brought forward

1,375,350

811,804.46

Hongkong,-Continued.

c.

C.

C.

C.

C.

119,514.61 683,060.15 143,180.00 706,725,54

Drainage.

14. Training Nullahs:

(a.) Colonial Cemeteries.

3,100

3,685.11

585.11

(b.) Mount Davis and Belchers

4,500

4,500.00

...

(c.) General Works

$,000

10,220.37

2,220.37

600.00

14.89 4,500.00

2,220.37

15. Miscellaneous Drainage Works :-

(a.) Main Sewer to intercept drain- age from houses on east side

of Mount Kellett.....

10,500

(b.) General Works

20,000

12,124,51 10,868.21

1,624.51

2,200,00

9.131.79

575.49 9,131,79

Lighting.

16. Extensions of Lighting

1,000

1,520.34

520.34

550.00

29.66

...

:

Miscellaneous.

17. Wongneichong Village Improvements

10,000

10,000.00

18. Shaukiwan Village Improvements

10,000

10,000.00

10,000.00 10,000.00

19. Reconstruction of Ferry Piers

60,000

22,095.41

37,904.59

37,904.59

20. Contribution towards cost of Structure

for Chairs and Rickshas, Barker Road Station ....

6,000

8,188.99

2,188.99

2,188.99

:

21. Chinese Cemeteries,-Laying out new

areas

2,500

1,250.40

22. Survey of Colony

3,000

2,024.59

1,249.60 975.31

...

1,249.60 975.31

23. Boundary Stones..

1,000

1,728.41

24. Miscellaneous Works

25,000

41,233,28

728.41 16,233.28

1,120.00 19,200.00

391.59 2,966.72

Public Health and Buildings Ordinance, 1903.

25. Compensation and Resumptions

Water Works.

26. Additional Service Reservoir, &c.,

West Point

27. Taitam Tuk Water Works,--Catch- water contouring hills on west side of Taitam Bay

28. Eastern District Filter Beds, etc. 29. Miscellaneous Water Works, .

200,000 419,169.21 219,169.21

276,237.50 57,068,29

ja

37,000 36,586.34

413.66

50,000

40,000

722.98 8,000 14,813.14

50,000.00 39,277.02

6,813.14

7,800.00

413.66

50,000.00 39,277.02 986.86

:

KOWLOON.

Buildings.

30. Quarters for Subordinate Officers, (2nd

Block)

31. Additional Ricksha Shelter,-Tsim

Sha Tsui...

80,000

6,000

78,901.10

5,432.75

1,098.90

567,25

:

1.098.90

567.25

:

:

Communications.

32. Roads:-

(a.) Shanghai Street to Taikoktsui

10,000

(6.) Main Roads in Kowloon.

100,000

(c.) General Works

25,000

11,918.54 262.29 58,953.27

1,918.54

33,953.27

99,737.71

2,000.00

81.46 99,737.71 52,000.00 18,046.73

Carried forward

$ | 2,095,950 | 1,553,503.30 405,469.78 947,915.98 507,076.49 1,051,743.06 2,220.37

HEADS AND SUB-HEADS.

69

ANNEXE B,—Continued.

PROVISION-

ESTIMATED. ACTUAL. INCREASE. DECREASE. ALLY. BALANCE. EXCESS.

VOTED.

C.

Brought forward

2,095,950

1,553,503.80

Kowloon,-Continued.

Drainage.

33. Training Nullahs,-General Works 34. Miscellaneous Drainage Works

Lighting.

$

C.

C.

C.

$

405,469.78 947,915.98 507,076.49 1,051.743.06

5,000 20,000

6,661.30 39,766.92

1,661,30 19,766,92

C.

C.

2,220.37

9.500.00 7,838.70 25,100,00 5,333.08

35. Extensions of Lighting

1,000

759.83

240.17

400.00

640.17

Miscellaneous.

36. Chinese Cemeteries,-Laying out new

areas

2,000

1,392.40

607.60

37. Miscellaneous Works

4,000

14,989.95 10,989.95

11,029.64

607.60 39.69

Public Health and Buildings Ordinance, 1903.

38. Compensation and Resumptions

50,000

87,779.69 37,779.69

55,500.00 17,720.31

Water Works.

39. Miscellaneous Water Works.

8,000

10,466.82

2,466.82

6,500.00 4,033.18

New Territories.

Buildings.

40. Market at Tai O, including reclaiming

site

Communications.

3,000

3,607.75

607.75

710.00

102.25

41. Roads :-

(a.) Shamshuipo to Castle Peak,-

Section from Tsün Wan to Castle Peak,-20 feet wide

115,000

219,770.73 104,770

105,000.00

229.27

(.) Taipo Road,-Widening and

improving road between Shatin and Taipo

56,000

49,307.01

6,692.99

6,692,99

(c.) Metalling and tarring portion

of Fanling to Castle Peak Road (8 miles)

50,000

26,947.59

(d.) General Works

9,000

42,716.06 33,716.06

23,052.41 26,000.00 19,052.41 55,000.00 21,283,94

Drainage.

42. Miscellaneous Drainage Works

20,000

6,977.93

13,022.07 8,500.00 21,522.07

Miscellaneous.

43. Filling in between bridges, Tai Wo Shi 44. Further Reclamation at Shamshuipo... 45. Chinese Cemeteries,- Laying out new

10,000 80,000

10,000.00

22,990.01

57,009.99

10,000.00 57,009.99

areas

500

137.11

362.89

362.89

46. Telephonic Communication to Police

Stations

47. Miscellaneous Works

24,000 10,000

10,258.25 17,829.25

......

13,741.75

13,741.75

7,829.25

10,000.00

2,170.75

Public Health and Buildings Ordinance, 1903.

48. Compensation and Resumptions..........

Carried forward

20,000

32,574.66

......$2,583,450 2,148,437.06

12,574.66

25,000.00 12,425.34

637,632.91 | 1,072,645.85 845,316.13 1,282,549,44 2,220.37

HEADS AND SUB-HEADS.

Brought forward

New Territories - Continued.

Water Works.

49. Shamsluipo District,-Laying water

mains

Works not appearing in Estimates.

Hongkong.

50. Latrine under steps in Duddell Street 51. Cape D'Aguilar Wireless Station,-

Fencing

52. Motor Car Shelter at Deep Water Bay 53. Shaukiwan Police Station,- -Additions

and Alterations.

54. Central Police Station,-Alterations to

Charge Room, &c.

55. Berlin Mission Foundling House,-

Conversion into quarters for Married Police

56. Road from Deep Water Bay to Taitam Tuk,-Improvement to adapt for motor traffic section from Deep Water Bay to Repulse Bay

57. Council Chamber,--Repairing Chairs 58. Taitam Tuk Scheme,- Second Section

Kowloon.

Q 70

ANNEXE B,-Continued.

ESTIMATED. ACTUAL.

:

DECREASE. INCREASE.

$

2,583,450

..

2,148,437.06

PROVISION-

ALLY. BALANCE. VOTED.

C.

c.

3

$

C.

637,632.91 1,072,645.85 845,316.131,282,549,44

27,000

27,057.11

57.11

3

:

:

:.

1,965.07

34.93

2,000.00

34.93

3,339.83

160.17

3,500.00

160.17

1,869.55

530.45

2,400.00

530.45

11,825.48

74.52 ₫ 11,900.00

74.52

3,865.24

34.76

3,900.00

34.76

208.62

1,041.38

3,250.00 1,041.38

EXCESS

$

c.

2,220.37

57.11

23,889.54 515.00

775.70

110.46 15.00 724.30

24,000.00

110.46

530.00 1,500.00

15.00

....

724.30

59. Shelter,--Children's Playground.

1,951.16

248.84

2,200.00

248.84

60. Latrine at intersection of Ning Po and

Woosung Streets

8,743.70

756.30

9,500.00 756.30

61. Repairing and Coaling Yard for Gov-

ernment Launches

6,212.22

87.78

6.300.00

87.78

62. Road to China Light and Power

Company's New Station

2,891.02

7,108.98

10,000.00 7,108.98

2,245,546.30

Less credit

10,543.35

Total

:

$ 2,610,450 2,235,002,95 637,690.02 1,083,573.72 926,296.13 | 1,293,477.31 2,277.48

* A sum of $10,543.35 which was expended in 1918 and subsequently debited to "Praya East Reclamation Scheme, Advance Account"

was credited to Public Works Extraordinary.

124

MONTH.

*1

Annexe C.

CITY AND HILL DISTRICT WATER WORKS, 1919. Monthly Consumption and Contents of Reservoirs (Millions of Gallons).

WONGNEICHONG,

POKFULAM.

TAITAM.

TOTAL CON-

COLLECTED TOT AL CON-

TENTS OF

MINT DAM BLUE POOL

AND

SUPPLIES

RAIN-

FALL

GRAND

AT

In Reser-

Delivered

MAIN.

BY-WASH. | INTERMEDIATE.

TAITAM TUK.

FROM

SUMPTION

REMARKS.

Delivered

voir 1st of

month.

over

over

gauge.

In Reservoir In Reservoir 1st of month. 1st of month.

In Reservoir 1st of month.

In Reservoir 1st of month.

gauge.

In Reser-

voir 1st of

month.

Delivered

FROM

OBSER-

over

gauge.

IMPOUNDING

RESERVOIRS.

STREAMS. (Filtered).

POKFULAM TOTAL.

VATORY

CONDUIT

Unfiltered).

(Inches).

Jan.,

34.34

9.12

239.00

.33

195.43

1,313.00

163.59

1.85

2.18 1,783.95

8.21

183.10

3.59

186.69

.625

Feb.,

29.30

5.78

219.42

.39

194.96

1,176.68

147.32

.54

:.

1,621.29

,53

153.63

3.45

157.08

1.505

March,

28.04

10.33

198.02

.05

195.43

1,062.25

172.84

1.32

:

1,485.11

.82

183.99

3.55

187.54

1.755

April,.

19.35

16.97 -

151.62

.50

195.90

946.98

158.47

1.75

...

1,316.10

7.74

. 183.18

4.06

187.24

4.430

May,

17.10

25.52

132.23

1.40

195.90

892.00

179.94

5.85

...

1,244.48

2.65.

208.11

4.49

212.60

6.950

Cons tant Supply by

June,

9.20

46.00

115.12

2.58

195.90

883.00

152.26

12.04

10.44

1,217.84

23.10

231.80

4.26

236.06

10.815

house services in all

July,

33.84

57.86

207.33

6.35

195.90

1,017.00

101.16

22.65

20.55

1,483.07

46.73

226.30

2.62

228.92

19.430

districts throughout

Aug.,

65.82

51.80

384.80

22.37

195.90

1,419.00

120.00

29.81

20.55

2,117.70

33.38

225.73

4.33

230.06

19.670

the whole year..

Sept.,

66.00

39.61

381.80

22.37

195.90

1,419.00

142.39

30.23

19.89

2,118.30

22.11

224.00

4.35

228."5

2.655

Oct.,...

56.94

17.47

342.52

4.27

196.37

1,416.83

176.23

13.66

9.45

2,030.59

23.07

226.22

3.56

229.78

4.695

Nov., .

54.20

13.28

348.68

4.42

197.31 1,274.92

175.74

6.51

7.99

1,886.04

.49

197.50

3.33

200.83

2.885

Dec.,

48.14

8.40

358.32

3.38

190.77

1,120.00

177.63

1.19

1,721.80

7.84

193.87

3.77

197.64

.725

Total,

1919.

Total,

1918.

Increase

or

Decrease.

302.14

236.73

...

:

:

+ 65.41

...

...

...

:

1,867.57

1,526.71

+ 340.86

:

91.05

132.42

176.67

2,437.43

45.36

2,482.79 76.140

335.44

2,231.30

33.37

2,264.67 101.605

41.37

***

- 158.77 + 206.18

!

+ 11.99 + 218.12 -25'465

Annexe D.

CITY AND HILL DISTRICT WATER WORKS, 1919. Particulars of Metered and Unmetered Supplies.

(Millions of Gallons.)

FILTERED SUPPLY.

UNMETERED.

METERED.

TOTAL METERED

UNFILTERED

GRAND

MONTH.

SUPPLY

AND

TOTAL.

CITY.

UNMETERED. (Metered).

CITY.

HILL DISTRICT.

TOTAL.

Trade. Domestic.

January, February,

147.50

19.57

13.08

2.95

35.60

183.10

3.59

186.69

115.71

21.21

13.51

3.20

37.92

153.63

3.45

157.08

March,

....

144.67

21.10

14.43

3.79

39.32

183.99

3.55

187.54

April,

140.16

24.17

15.85

3.00

43.02

183.18

4.06

187.24

May,

162.50

25.72

16.61

3.28.

45.61

208.11

4.49

212.60

June,.

186.01

25.42

17.03

3.34.

45.79

231.80

4.26

236.06

July,

174.51

27.70

19.75

4.34

51.79

226.30

2.62

228.92

August,

179.99

24.88

16.83

4.03

45.74

225.73

4.33

230.06

September,

174.97

27.43

18.03

3.57

49.03

224.00

4.35

228.35

October,....

180.05

25.57

16.94

3.66

46.17

226.22

3.56

229.78

November,

152.31

25.86

15.74

3.59

45.19

197.50

3.33

200.83

December,

148.16

26.99

15.45

3.27

45.71

193.87

3.77

197.64

Total, 1919,

1,906.54

295.62

193.25

42.02

530.89

Total, 1918,

1,748.65

265.33

173.83

43.49

482.65

2,437.43

2,231.30

45.36

2,482.79

Increase or Decrease,

...

+ 157.89

+ 30.29

+ 19.42

1.47

+ 48.24.

+ 206.13

33.37

+ 11.99

2,264.67

+ 218.12

{ ༣

¦

Annexe E.

CITY AND HILL DISTRICT WATER WORKS, 1919.

Water pumped to Hill District and High Levels of the City (Millions of Gallons).

it

(Theoretical Displacement of Pumps.)

HILL DISTRICT.

HIGH LEVELS OF THE CITY.

GRAND

MONTHL

700′ and 750′ TANKS. (Conduit & Peak Roads District.)

600′ and 650' TANKS. (Robinson Road District.)

TOTAL

Combined PUMPED.

Totals.

Motor.

Engine.

Total.

Motor.

Engine.

Total.

Motor.

Engine.

Total.

January,

2.95

2.95

45

2.29

2.74

3.99

2.78

6.77

9.51

12.46

February,

3.20

3.20

1.87

1.87

3.54

2.50

6.04

7.91

11.11

March,..

3.79

3.79

2.49

2.49

4.01

2.70

6.71

9.20

12.99

April,

3.00

3.00

1.06

2.65

3.71

3.76

3.12

6.88

10.59

13.59

May,

3.28

3.28

.93

3.48

4.41

3.36

3.69

7.05

11.46

14.74

June,

3.34

3.34

1.59

4.65

6.24

2.74

4.20

6.94

13.18

16.52

July,

4.34

4.34

3.00

1.23

7.23

3.57

4.40

7.97

15.20

19.54

August,

4.03

4.03

2.12

4.91

7.03

3.85

4.00

7.85

14.88

18.91

September,

3.57

3.57

44

4.62

5.06

3.68

3.75

7.43

12.49

16.06

October,

3.66

3.66

4.70

4.70

3.86

3.44

7.30

12.00

15.66

November,

3.59

3.59

4.06

1.06

3.68

3.67

7.35

11.41

15.00

December,

3.27

3.27

3.59

3.59

3.82

3.50

7.32

10.91

14.18

Total, 1919,

42.02

42.02

9.59

43.54

53.13

43.86

41.75

85.61

138.74

180.76

Total, 1918,

43.49

13.49

8.53

36.81

45.34

32.36

31.14

63.50

108.81

152.33

Increase or Decrease,.

1.47

1.47

+

1.06

+ 6.73 + 7.79 + 11.50

+ 10.61

-+ 22.11 + 29.90

+ 28.43

Annexes F, G, & J.

VILLAGE AND WATER BOAT SUPPLIES, 1919.

Details of Consumption (Millions of Gallons).

F.

G.

SHAUKIWAN WATER WORKS.

ABERDEEN WATER WORKS.

Month.

Metered

Unmetered

Total.

Supply.

Supply.

Sai Wan

Supply.

Grand

Total.

Metered Unmetered Supply. Supply.

Total.

J.

LAICHIKOK WATER BOAT SUPPLY

(METERED).

January,..

. 0.56

3.03

3.59

0.14

3.73

0.53

1.38

1.91

9.89

February,

0.57

2.53

3.10

0.15

3.25

0.45

0.91

1.36

8.93

March,

0.42

3.05

3.47

0.21

3.68

0.38

1.18

1.56

9.92

April,

0.54

3.74

4.28

0.21

4.49

0.65

1.05

1,70

10.56

May,

0.46

4.1

4.57

0.28

4.85

0.54

1.31

1.85

10.88

June,

0.51

4.43

4.94

0.21

5.15

0.39

1.37

1.76

8.94

July,

0.56

4.59

5.15

0.31

5.46

0.46

1.26

1.72

8.84

Angust,

0.46

4.31

4.77

0.14

4.91

0.36

1.39

1.75

9.29

September,

0.48

4.62

5.10

0.17

5.27

0.54

1.24

1.78

8.77

October,

0.68

4.24

4.92

0.14

5.06

0.61

1.21

1.82

8.61

November,

0.60

3.74

4.34

0.14

4.48

0.59

1.09

1.68-

10.46

December,

0.63

3.64

4.27

0.17

4.44

0.76

1.01

1.77

10.62

Total. 1919,

6.47

46.03

52.50

2.27

54.77

6.26

14.40

20.66

115.71

Total, 1918,

6.21

34.78

40.99

2.42

43.41

6.39

15.78

22.17

91.50

Increase or Decrease,

+ 0.26

+ 11.25

+ 11,51

0.15

+ 11.36

0.13

1.38

1.51

+ 24.21

}

Q. 74

Annexe H.

KOWLOON WATERWORKS, 1919.

Contents of Reservoir and Details of Monthly Consumption (Millions of Gallons).

In Reservoir

Metered Supply.

Month.

1st of Month.

Unmetered

Supply.

Grand

Total.

Remarks.

Trade.

Domestic.

Total.

January,

330.24

10.02

3.06

13.08

26.54

39.62

February,

304.80

9.19

3.19

12.38

21.15

33.53

March,.

281.96

10.11

3.43

13.54

26.08

39.62

April,

246.10

11.00

3.94

14.94

23.92

38.86

May,

231.38

12.12

4.49

16.61

28.62

45.23

June,

306.40

11.77

5.19

16.96

25.04

42.00

Constant supply

July,

250.42

10.82

4.74

15.56.

27.94

43.50

August,

352.50

12.84

5.32

18.16

25.34

43.50

throughout the whole year.

September,

352.50

13.28

4.97

18.25

23.75

42.00

October,

352.50

13.66

4.61

18.27

25.23

43.50

November,

348.15

12.88

4.25

17.13

25.87

43.00

December,

329.41

13.34

4.50

17.84

27.11

44.95

Total, 1919,

141.03

51.69

192.72

306.59

499.31

Total, 1918,

117.00

39.52

156.52

298.01

454.93

Increase or Decrease,

+ 24.03

+ 12.17

+ 36.20

+ 8.58

+ 44.78

Q76

K

Annexe K.

REPORT ON LAND SURVEY WORK FOR THE YEAR ENDING 31ST MARCH, 1920.

Map, numbered 1, accompanies this report.*

1. Organization.-The Land Survey Office, which at present includes a staff of 11 European Surveyors, 3 Junior Assistant Surveyors and 2 Apprentice Surveyors under the direction of an officer designated the Principal Land Surveyor, forms a branch of the Public Works Department.

The Principal Land Surveyor, in addition to supervising the usual survey work necessary in a rapidly developing Colony, is the executive officer for dealing with all matters relating to Crown Lands, the whole of which are under the charge of the Director of Public Works. He submits reports on all applications for land, conducts all sales of areas to be let on long leases, prepares permits for temporary occupation of land and licences for temporary piers, and attends to the preparation of lease plans for lots of land, permanent piers, etc., and to the keeping of numerous records.

Two Land Bailiffs, whose time is wholly occupied in preventing illegal squatting and encroachment upon Crown Land, which are very common offences among the Chinese population, are attached to the office.

Two Computers, three Clerks, two Draughtsmen, and five Tracers, all natives, are employed in the office.

In addition to the above staff, there are 52 Survey Coolies receiving wages varying from $9.00 to $14.00 per month with allowances.

* Not reproduced.

d.

2.--Survey Staff.

}

Office.

Name.

Rate of Salary.

Present Salary.

Allowance.

Date of

arrival in

Colony.

Date of

present

rank.

Principal Laud Surveyor,

L. C. P. Rees.

£510 to £540 by triennial increments of £30.

£540 and £60

Duty Pay.

$360 per ann. con- veyance allowance and £60 per anu. duty pay 12 months after attain- ing maximum salary.

4-1-02.

4-1-02.

1st Grade Surveyor,

B. W. Grey.

£450 to £480 by annual increments of £10.

£480 and £40 Duty Pay.

$360 per ann. con-

1-5-99.

1-1-13.

DD.y

E. B. Reed,

P.A.S.I.

£450 to £480 by annual increments of £10 commencing with £450 on 28-10-14.

£480 and £40

Duty Pay.

2nd Grade Surveyor,

F. Sutton, F.S.I. (Col.)

£360 to £420 by annual increments of £10.

£420 and £40

Duty Pay,

veyance allowance and £40 per ann. duty pay 12 months after attain- ing maximum salary.

$360 per ann. con- veyance allowance and £40 per ann. duty pay 12 months after attain- ing maximum salary.

$360 per anu. con- veyance allowance and £40 per ann. duty pay 12 months after attain- ing maximum salary.

12-12-05.

1-1-13.

29-7-08.

1-1-13.

2.--Survey Staff-Continued.

Office.

Name.

Rate of Salary.

Present Salary.

Allowance.

Date of

arrival in

Date of

Colony.

present

rank.

78

2nd Grade Surveyor,

H. West,

P.A.S.I.

£360 to £420 by annual increments of £10.

£420 and £40 Duty Pay.

$360 per ann, con- veyance allowance and £40 per ann. duty pay 12 months after attain- ing maximum salary.

3-8-10.

1-1-13.

Assistant Surveyor, W. A. J. Cooper.

£330 to £420 by annual increments of £10.

£410.

$360 per anu. con- veyance allowance.

14-8-12.

14-8-12.

Do.,

E. B. Lambert.

£330 to £420 by annual increments of £10.

£390.

Do.

27-12-13.

27-12-13.

Do.

B.H.C.Hallowes B.A., B.A.I.

£330 to £420 by annual increments of

£390.

Do.

23-2-14.

23-2-14.

£10.

Do.,

H. H. Pegg.

£330 to £420 by annual increments of

£380.

Do.

15-5-14.

15-5-14.

£10.

Do.,

E. Larmour.

Do.

£380.

Do.

19-11-14.

19-11-14.

'

19-11-14,

19-11-14.

Do.,

F. W. Wood.

Do.

£380.

Do.

Do.,

A. Anderson, B.A., B.E. (1)

Do.

£380.

Do.

19-11-14.

19-11-14.

Junior Assistant Surveyor,

Wong Hon.

$2,400 to $3,000 by biennial increments of

$2,400.

Do.

3-1-11.

1-1-19.

$120.

Do.,

Ng Ka-pui.

$1,440 to $1,800 by biennial increments of

$1,440.

$180 per ann. con-

1-2-11.

1-1-19.

veyance allowance.

$120.

Do.,

Wen Cho-

ming.

Do.

$1,440.

Do.

14-6-16.

1-1-19.

Apprentice Surveyor, Chan Pui-lau.

$720 to $1,200 by annual increments of

$720

Do.

1-2-13.

1-4-19.

$60.

Do.,

Lo Ka-tsok,

$960 to $1,200 by biennial increments of

$960

Do.

1-11-06.

1-2-20.

$120.

(1) Transferred to the Engineering Branch on 16-2-20.

79

Office.

Name.

3.-Staff of Land Bailiffs, Computers, Clerks, &c.

Rate of Salary.

Present Salary.

Allowance.

pre-

Date of First Date of Appointment. sent rank.

Q.80

1st Grade Bailiff,.

F. H. Dillon..

£250 to £270 by one

£270.

$360 per annum con-

6. 6. 04.

1. 1. 15.

triennial increment

of £20.

1st Grade Bailiff, Computer,...

Do.,

J. C. Mackay. Li Wen.

Do.

£270.

veyance allowance and free quarters. Do.

1. 10. 07.

1. 1. 15.

(1)

$360 to $840 by $60

$430.

19. 7. 17.

19. 7. 17.

annually.

Clerk, 3rd Grade,

Clerk, 4th Grade,..........

Clerk, 5th Grade,

Draughtsman, 2nd Grade,

Liu Chin-cheung.

Wong Yan-ming.

Do.

$360.

.5.

4. 19.

5. 4. 19.

(2)

$960 to $1,200 by $120

$960.

9.

1. 06.

26. 4. 18.

biennially.

Chan Tin-fuk.

annually.

Lai Ming-kai.

$720 to $900 by $60

$480 to $660 by $60

$900.

21.

6. 09.

10. 4. 12.

$660.

9.

8. 11.

25. 3. 12.

annually.

Tang Ngok-wan. $1,440 to $1,800 by

$1,440.

28. 10. 05.

1. 1. 19.

$120 biennially,

Draughtsman, 3rd Grade,

Luk-kui.

$960 to $1,200 by $120 | biennially.

$960

12.

9. 10.

1. I 19.

Tracer, 2nd Class,

Tang Ki-fan. (3)

$480 to $660 by $60

$600.

8.

9. 13.

1. 1. 19.

annually.

Do.,

Lo Nam-chui.

Do.

$540.

9. 6. 16.

1. 1. 19.

Do.,

Tracer, 3rd Class,

Do.,

Do Kam-loi.

Do.

$540.

13. 6. 16.

1. 1. 19.

Tang Chi-Jun.

$240 to $420 by $60

$420.

20. 2. 13.

20. 2. 13.

...

Fung-kun.

annually.

Do.

$420.

1. 6. 14.

1. 6. 14.

(1) Resigned on 1-2-20.

(2) Resigned on 22-2-20.

(3) Died on 5-2-20,

K

Q 81

4. Cost of Office. As the Survey Office forms part of the Public Works Department and is accommodated in the same building, the charges for numerous items such as lighting, heating, electric fans, etc., cannot be stated. Omitting these, the following is a statement of the cost-

Salaries,

Conveyance Allowances,

Wages for Coolies,

Land Survey Contingencies,

Transport & Travelling Expenses,.

Incidental Expenses,

Survey of Colony,

Surveying Instruments, Furniture,

$ 80,441.44

4,637.23

7,154.87

27.00

607.45

1,674.18

141.60

Rent Allowances,

4,484.84

Total,...

$ 99,168.61

5. Trigonometrical Survey.-No trigonometrical work was carried out during the year.

6. Topographical and Cadastral Surveys.-About 70 miles of minor traverses have been run during the year, mostly in connection with filling in the Ordnance Survey of the Colony and new roads. The European staff were at full strength by the end of January, four Surveyors having returned during the middle of the year and the last two by the end of January. One European Surveyor was transferred to the Engineering Branch in February of this year. The Kowloon Ordinance Survey 200′1′′ (6 sheets) was completed and revised and sent to England for reproduction. The Survey of the Hill District was completed and revised and will shortly be forwarded to England also for reproduction. An area of about 55 acres of the Hongkong City Ordnance Survey was plotted on 50′1′′ scale.

A considerable amount of work in connection with the Sham- shuipo Reclamation Scheme has been carried out, 37 old lots being resumed and buildings pulled down. Lease plans for 21 new lots at Shamshuipo were prepared.

In addition, 39 lots in Hongkong and Kowloon were surveyed for Lease Plans, etc., and 353 boundary stones, bearing lot numbers, were fixed.

An extensive area, comprising 338 acres, at Cheung Chau was surveyed and plotted. The new Golf Course at Fanling, (9 holes), was surveyed and the old 18-holes Course revised. Numerous lots in Fanling and district were surveyed and set out on ground, also lots at Cheung Chau. A survey of the Race Course for Lease Plans comprised 16 acres. About 4 miles of Cheung Chau coast line was surveyed in connection with the setting-out of a European Reservation and boundary stones, 15 in number, were fixed. A new Reclamation lot at Cheung Chau was also set out.

82

In addition, one Surveyor was employed on levelling and preparing working plans and cross sections for Taikoktsui - Kowloon City Road. An extensive survey of the land occupied by the Hongkong University for Lease Plans and Surveys in connection with the widening and improving of Queen's Road East, Jubilee, Pokfulam and Conduit Roads were made.

Surveys were also made for sale purposes of 20 lots in Hong- kong and Kowloon, covering an area of 523,585 square feet, which were put up to public auction and realized $151,527.35 in premium and $3,364.00 in Crown rents.

7. Maps published.—Nil.

8. Miscellaneous Matters.-The following plans were prepared for official use during the year:-164 Lease Plans (in triplicate), 28 Sale Plans (in duplicate), 314 Tracings and 2,225 Sunprints in connection with proposed sales, permits, etc., whilst 939 permits for temporary occupation of Crown Land and 63 licences for tem- porary piers and slipways were issued.

9. The undermentioned officers were absent on leave during the year, viz. :—

Mr. L. C. P. Rees

Sick Leave. Vacation Leare.

5 days 10 days

Mr. B. W. Grey

1 day

6 months

Mr. E. B. Reed

...

Mr. F. Sutton

1 day

12 days

Mr. W. A. J. Cooper

3 days

1 day

Mr. E. Larmour..

1 day

3 months

Mr. F. W. Wood..

3 days

3 months

Mr. Wong-hon

6 days

Mr. Ng Ka-pui

1 day

11 days

Mr. Wen Cho-ming

6 days

5 days

Mr. Chan Pui-lau

2 days

Mr. Lo Ka-tsok

7 days

4 weeks

Mr. F. H. Dillon...

5 days

Mr. J. Mackay...

13 days

HONGKONG, 12th May, 1920.

W. CHATHAM, Director of Public Works.

K

Appendix R.

REPORT ON THE GENERAL POST OFFICE, HONGKONG, FOR THE YEAR 1919.

1.--STAFF.

The post of Assistant Postmaster General remained vacant until 24th October when it was filled by Mr. N. L. Smith who acted until the end of the year.

The post of Superintendent of the Registration and Parcel Branches remained vacant throughout the year.

Mr. A. J. Reed, the Accountant, was absent on long leave from 9th August.

During the year the changes amongst the clerical staff were one clerk retired on pension, one clerk invalided from the Service, and four resignations.

2.-MAILS.

The number of mail bags and packets despatched from Hong- kong during the year amounted to 144,592 as against 135,162 in 1918, an increase of 9,430; the number received was 134,754 as against 126,225, an increase of 8,529,

The number of mail bags and packets sent in transit through the Colony amounted to 90,428 as against 81,562 in 1918, an increase of 8,866.

Boxes and baskets in transit amounted to 10,169 as against 11,307, a decrease of 1,138.

4,549 steamers carrying mails arrived and 6,463 left in 1919 as against 4.501 and 5,697 respectively in 1918.

Full details appear in Table I.

3.---REGISTRATION AND PARCELS.

Registered and insured articles handled by the General Post Office amounted to 955,535 as against 862,626 in 1918, an increase of 92,909.

Full details appear in Table II.

Parcels, ordinary and insured, handled by the Post Office, amounted to 219,143 as compared with 201,680 in the previous year, an increase of 17,463.

Full details appear in Table III.

R 2

4.-REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE.

Table IV contains a statement of Postal Revenue and Expendi- ture for the year.

The total revenue from the Postal Service in 1919 amounted to $450,056.75 being $22,923.87 more than that collected in 1918. The net expenditure after deducting the sum of $109,821.37, arrears of Transit Charges recovered from other Administrations, amounted to $104,073.87, being less than that of 1918 by $52,033.82. The balance of revenue over expenditure amounted to $345,982.88.

Table V shows the postage stamps, etc., of each denomination issued for sale during the years 1918 and 1919.

Table VI shows the revenue and expenditure of the Post Office (exclusive of the Telegraph Sub-Departinent) for the ten years 1910 to 1919.

Table VII gives the revenue from the sale of postage stamps. for the years 1917, 1918 and 1919. The increase of revenue from this source in the year 1919 over that of 1918 amounted to $23,339.49.

5.MONEY ORDERS.

The year under review witnessed the phenomenal rise in the price of silver, forcing up exchange from 3s 4d, at the beginning of the year, to 5s/2d per dollar in the middle of December. It was throttling the flow of inward money orders from Gold Countries and caused much consternation amongst the Chinese families who are in receipt of remittances from abroad, and who now obtained only $4 in exchange for the pound Sterling. The wide divergence between the parity value and the current rate of the sovereign in the United States money market caused great anxiety to this Office as the settlement of all balances from gold dollar using countries was fixed at $4.87 per £1, payable by bills on London. Gradually the rate fell to $3.77 per £1 and as the balances were invariably in favour of this Colony, no time was lost in rectifying the system of liquidation of accounts.

Although the Money Order Service with the Philippines was temporarily suspended from 28th October until the 1st January, 1920, satisfactory arrangements with all countries were concluded and the basis of accounting for balances due was fixed in accordance with the unit of the currency exchanged.

Notwithstanding this universal disturbance in the currencies of the world, the volume of business in Hongkong, aided by an increase in the issue of sterling orders on the United Kingdom, has resulted in a net increase of £10,109, 13s. Od. over the transactions of 1918.

During the year 15 telegraphic orders amounting to £403. 5s. 6d. were received and 39 amounting to £721. Os. Od. were despatched as against 21 for £561. Os. Od. received and 38 for £669. 11s. Od. despatched during 1918.

The average cost of a telegraphic deferred rate message was $8 as against $9.60 in the previous year.

1

R 3

An increase of £408. 10s. 6d. took place in the sale of Imperial Postal Orders. It was noticed that greater quantities of British Currency £1 bank notes were presented at the counters for exchange and it would appear that this method of remitting to the Colony from Chinese in the United Kingdom accounts for a decrease of £4,000, Os. Od. in the payment of Postal Orders last year, as there is a saving of 1d. poundage on each 20/- where a currency note is used instead of the Postal Order.

The high premium ruling at Shanghai and other Treaty Ports in China precluded the increased issue here of Local Postal Notes which declined from $40,452.25 in 1918 to $34,901:00 in 1919.

Full details appear in Table VIII, IX, and X.

6. CHINESE CORRESPONDENCE.

Chinese Delivery Section, General Post Office.

During the year this section handled 2,066,899 ordinary letters, 93,097 other articles, and 6,940 postal hong packets as against 1,665,540 ordinary letters, 100,407 other articles, and 7,055 postal hong packets in 1918.

The registered articles delivered amounted to 269, 198 of which 163,826 were from the United States and Canada, and 105,372 from China and other countries, shewing an increase of 10,976 as com- pared with 228,222 in 1918.

2,743 insured letters were dealt with as against 2,400 in 1918.

The total number of Chinese private boxes for which licences were issued during the year was 297 a decrease of 14 as compared with 311 in 1918.

The licences of 22 Chinese Hongs were renewed, the same number as in 1918.

7.-TELEGRAPIL SUB-DEPARTMENT.

1

The revenue collected during the year from radio-telegrams amounted to $10,350.03, a decrease of $13,661.22 on the amount collected in 1918. The decrease is due to the French Government ceasing to use the Cape D'Aguilar Wireless Station for the trans- mission of press telegrams to Indo-China. Advices of vessels signalled at the lighthouses yielded $470.40 and semaphore mes- sages $15.40, making a total of $10,835.83. Expenditure amounted to $34,150.81.

The telegraphic service was worked at a loss of $23,314.98.

Details are given in Tables XI and XII.

The number of radio-telegrams forwarded during the year was 1,118 consisting of 15,577 words as against 1,117 with 108,330 words in 1918, and 2,825 were received consisting of 38,191 words as against 1,475 with 19,243 words in 1918.

R 1

8.-MISCELLANEOUS.

With the cessation of hostilities postal and mail services im- proved and by the end of the year approximated to pre-war standards in regularity and frequency though of course the Siberian Service remained closed. The dearth of shipping which made itself severely felt earlier in the year became gradually less acute. The exchange of direct mails with the various European other than enemy administrations was resumed by the end of the year. Mails for enemy countries were transmitted through the intermediary of the Imperial Post Office.

During the year 100 bags of reading matter, comprising 3,029 books and 12,871 magazines sent by residents in Hongkong and in the Treaty Ports, were packed and despatched by the Post Office free to the Allied Troops in Siberia.

6th July, 1920.

M. J. BREEN, Postmaster General.

Table I.

Mails Received and Despatched during the years 1918 and 1919.

For H.M.

For Foreign

Sent in Transit

Steamers

To and From Hongkong. Ships on China Men-of-War. through Hongkong. Carrying Mails.

Station.

Loose

Bags Boxes

Bags.

Packets.

Letter

Bags.

Bags.

and and

Packets. Baskets.

Arrivals. Depar-

tures.

Boxes.

- R5-

Received in 1919,

125,410

9,344

749

1,250

643

Received in 1918,

118,651

7,574

639

1,092

632

4,549

4,501

Increase,

6,759

1,770

110

158

11

48

Decrease,....

Despatched in 1919,

114,207

385

1,481

691

90,425

10,169

6,463

Despatched in 1918,

134,241

921

1,191

684

81,562 11,307

5,697

Increase,

Decrease,

9,966

290

536

8,866

766

1,138

Table II.

Statistics of International and Hongkong Registered Correspondence and Insured Letters for the years 1918 and 1919.

Description of Correspondence.

International and Local.

Comparison with 1918.

Total 1919. Total 1918.

Despatched.

Received.

Increase.

Decrease.

Insured Letters,

3,445

5,303

8,748

6,143

2,605

Registered Articles,.......

356,983

589,804

916,787

855,455

91,332

Registered Articles viâ Siberia,

1,028

1,028.

Total,..

360,428

595,107

955,535

862,626

93,937

1,028

Total Increase of 92,909 Articles.

- R 6

Table III.

Statistics of International and Hongkong Registered Parcels for the years 1918 and 1919.

Description of Parcels.

International and Local.

Comparison with 1918.

Total 1919. Total 1918.

Despatched.

Received.

Increase.

Decrease.

Insured Parcels viâ Gibraltar,

1,385

2,768

4,153

1,988

2,165

Ordinary Parcels viâ Gibraltar,

11,544

9,438

20,982

15,948

5,034

Ordinary Parcels via Canada,....

3,202

3,202

Cash on Delivery Parcels,

59

59

101

42

America, Manila, and Honolulu Parcels,

3,379

17,715

21,094

14,594

6,500

French Parcels by French Ships,

778

773

1,200

427

Indian Insured Parcels,

972

1,449

2,421

1,647

774

Indian Ordinary Parcels,.

1,717

3,094

4,811

5,407

596

Australian Parcels,

1,359

1,857.

3,216

4,957

1,741

Japanese Parcels,...

3,246

14,635

17,881

21,483

3,602

Chinese Parcels,

18,342

32,031

Indo-China Parcels,.

9,462

8,598

Straits Settlements Parcels,

6,780

5,487

143,753

131,153

12,600

Dutch East Indies Parcels,.

3,280

264

Miscellaneous Parcels,.

12,101

47,408

R 7

Total,..

73,567

145,576

219,143

201,680

27,073

9,610

Total Increase of 17,463 Parcels.

Receipts.

1918.

1919.

$

Table IV.

Revenue and Expenditure.

Post Office.

Increase.Decrease.

$

Expenditure.

1918.

1919. Increase. Decrease.

$

Sale of Postage Stamps.

373,463.31 396,802.80 | 23,339.49

Working Expenses,

151,410.01 | 155,886.07 | 4,476.06

Unpaid Postage,

3,211.78 5.005.88

1,794.10

Box-holders' Fees,

7,935,07

8,294.00

358.93

Commission on Money Orders

Special Expenditure :--- Purchase of Safe,

328.00

323.00

and Postal Notes,

8,320.06

6,882.87

1,437.19

Profit on Exchange on Money

Carriage of Mails :--

R

Order transactions,

82,490.96

31,798.02

692.94

Transit Charges,

Interest on Money Order Funds,] 1,584.11 Void Money Orders and Postal]

1,063.28

520.83

Notes,

127.59

209.90

$2.31

Deduct Arrears of Transit Charges recovered from other Administrations.

27,724.20 58,009.17 (net)

79,536.40

00

[213,895.24

109,821.37

Total Receipts,

.$127.132.88 450,056,75

25,574.83 | 2,650.96

Refund by the United King dom of the amount paid by the Colony in respect of the P. & O. Mail Sub-

Net Expenditure,.

Share of P. & O. Mail Subsidy, 1st January to 30th September, 1918,

179,457.21 | 104,073.87 | 4,476.06| 79,859.40

46,927 22

sidy for the period from 1st July, 1917, to 30th September, 1918,]

Total,.

70,276,74

497,409,62 450.056.75

Profit,

271,025.19345,982.88

Total..

497,409,62 | 450,056.75

R 9

Table V.

Postage Stamps, etc., issued for sale in Hongkong during the years 1918 and 1919.

Denomina- tion.

1918.

1919.

Increase + Decrease

Postage Stamps,

1

cent.

544,796

580,616 + 35,820

2

cents. 4,496,160

4,602,661 + 106,501

4

2,075,756 2,227,766 +152,010

|

"

6

63,874

153,961 + 90,087

"

15

52,080

58,598 + 6,518

10

1,050,960 1,129,684

1,129,684 + 78,724

"

་་

O co 10 10

20

52,080

54,474 + 2,394

25

36,448

33,841

2,607

30

55,440

52,161

3,279

50

47,416

19,913 + 2,497

1 dollar.

21,174

""

21,401 + 227

2 dollars.

8,706

8,007

699

3

3,136

3,189

+

53

""

5

3,240

""

3,588 +

348

10

5,455

5,291

164

Books of Stamps,

I dollar.

3,678

1,240 | +

562

Post Cards,

1 cent.

52,755

43,503

9,252

I

""

"}

19,000

18,640

360

""

"

23,540

19,680

3,860

Newspaper Wrappers,

Postage Envelopes, .........

"

21,600

1,515

20,085

कु

11,400

10,947

453

Registration Envelopes,.... 10

16,475

20,245 +

+ 3,770

R 10

Table VI.

Revenue and Expenditure for the years 1910 to 1919.

Post Office.

Year.

Total Revenue.

Total Expenditure.

Profit +

Loss

Percentage of Expenditure to Revenue.

C.

C.

C.

%

1910...... 519,066,54

1911...... 399,217.15

1912...... 401,054.32

1913...... 439.189.37

1914...... 398,426.38

1915...... 368,457.77

470,984.35 + 48,082.19

90.74

422,267.97

296,867.12

622,587.51

371,646.06

ww

23,050.82

105.77

+ 104,187.20

74.02

183,398.14

141.76

+ 26,780.32

93.27

1916...... 401,742.33

403,609.02

308,136.33 + 93,606.00

35,151.25

109:54

76.70

1917...... 403,869.87

1918...... 427,132.88

1919...... 450,056.75

259,214.83 + 144,655.04

156,107.69

104,073.87

64.18

+ 271,025.19

36.54

i

+ 345,982.88

23.12

R 11

Table VII,

Comparative Table of Revenue from Sale of Postage Stamps

during the years 1917, 1918, and 1919.

Month.

1917.

1918.

$

1919.

January,

31,906.38

34,583.80

34,716.18

February,

28,296.55

26,743,58

26,200.30

March,

#2,692.21

32,902.48

35,041.36

April,

28,944.64

31,731.90

31,857.63

May,

32,486.02

31,535.55

35,002.25

June,

29,091.73

27,758.60

29,675.66

July

30,521.65

31,227.25

33,372.66

August,...

29,839.34

31,461.35

31,798.71

September,

26,595.17

28,702.70

32,901.75

October,

28,648.40

31,911.50

35,208.99

November,

29,974.25

30,445.90

33,983.60

December,.

28,471.62

34,458.70

37,543.71

Total,.

$357,462.98

$373,463.31

$396,802.80

Table VIII.

Money Order Transactions during the years 1918 and 1919.

R 12

1919.

1918.

Increase.

Decrease.

Country.

Orders

issued. Orders paid.

Orders

issued.

Orders paid.

Orders

issued.

Orders

Orders paid.

issued.

Orders paid.

£

Tasmania,

New Zealand,

United Kingdom, Queensland,

New South Wales,

Victoria,

South Australia,.

s. d. £ s. d. 18,982 14 9 20,018 0 1112,411 17 227,305 10 9

£ s. d.

£ s. d.

£ S. d.

6,570 17 7

£

s. d.

&

S.

d.

£ s. d.

7,287 9 10

Western Australia,

Union of South Africa,

United States of America,. Canada,

Philippine Islands,.

Japan,

Straits Settlements,

406 18 2

29 11 5

29 16 7

71 I 6 165 4 8 2,418 7 61 19 10 759 17 7 4,317 11 111,074 12

622 0 4 16,868 8 6 942 17 8 5,115 13 5 1,304 14 5 976 10 11

182 13 10 1,620 14 4

98 2 1019,349 14

9

523 17 6

2,481 6

1,441 10 5 6,604 18

9

498 12 9 1,489 5 4

375 2 1 1,147 19

9

23 5 10:

1,835 6

8

31 16 1

6 5 7

156 14 8

858 15 9

71 13 0

282 11 0

84 10 8

1,616 9 5

4 4 11

41 16

13 9 2

5

99 17 2

5

90 17 1

3,132 159

33 13 1

1,029 1 0

74 7

28 6

714 8

269 3 5

4

2,542 9

0 10,098 14 11

1,775 2

Federated Malay States,

980 9 416,513 18 564 17 2 7,053 11 0 444 7 33,717 19 10 12,353 10 8 37,751 8 8 2,836 9 7 5,576 0 4 2,328 18 10 221 9 4 9,076 14 10: 469 19 5

9

416 3

17,437 8 10

564 6

975 17 5 9,076 9 11

3

7,104 18 0

120 9 11

51 7 0

5,295 16 11 4,910 10 11 9,944 12 9

7.057 13 9: 4,033 8 10

507 10 9

665 9 5

248 10 1

867 17 11

Carried forward,

..£ 63,951

]

3110,913 9 3 58,583 18 5107,096 10 2 10,203 0 1 17,936 10 1 4,835 17 314,119 11 0

Table VIII,-Continued.

Money Order Transactions during the years 1918 and 1919,-Continued.

R 13 -

1919.

1918.

Increase.

Decrease.

Country.

Orders

issued.

Orders paid.

Orders

issued.

Orders paid.

Orders

issued.

Orders paid.

Orders

issued.

Orders paid.

Brought forward,

British North Borneo,

Sarawak,

Siam,

Macao,

Shanghai,

Agencies in China,

India,

Ceylon,

French Indo-China,

Base Post Office,

Total,

118 0 5

969 3 6

93 0 7

£ s. d. £ s. d. £ S. d £ s. d. £ Ꭶ. d. £ S. d. 63,951 1 3 110,913 9 3 58,583 18 5 107,096 10 2 10,203 0 1 17,936 10 1 358 16 1 1,858 6 4 414 18 7 2,030 5 8 1 10 9

£ S. d.

4,835 17

56 2

£ S. 3 14,119 11 0

d.

6! 171 19 4

967 12 9

24 19 10

15 4 4

107 16 5

14 2 0

60 17 9

1 2 4

46 18 8

1,382 11 10

1,528 11 7 1,054 2

9

731 11 8

328 9

1

796 19 11

9,217 0 89,554 19 4 13,239 11

4

8,349 8 7

1,205 10 9 4,022 10 8

14,869 3 9

12,618 8 9

2,250 15 0

24,991 4 1 28,110 5 0 25,045 19 282 4 8 1,971 7 11

5

26,054 14 6

2,055 10 6

54 15 4

171 9 5

2,524 17 1

110 15 3

553 9 2

220 17 11 941 6 8

371 6 10.

1,789 1 0

150 8 11

13 0

40 13 9

847 14 4

40 0 9

..£100,537 1 3170,825 2 9 98,988 9 4 162,264 1 8 10,668 6 724,293 15 8 9,119 14 815,732 14 7

£271,362 4 0

£261,252 11 0

£34,962 2 3

Net Increase,.

£10,109 13 0

£24,852 9 3

Table IX.

British Postal Orders issued and paid at Hongkong, and at Agencies in China.

ORDERS ISSUED.

-R 14

No. of Notes.

Amount.

£

S.

d.

10,305

9,067 19

6

15,585

13,067

5

7

VALUES.

Amount.

S.

d.

d.

S.

d.

S.

d.

S.

d.

d.

S.

d.

S. d.

0

6

6

2

6

5

0

10

0

10

6

20

0

£

Total in 1919,

694

1,710

1,176

1,203

1,956

2,349

428

5,575

s. d.

7,804 12 6

Total in 1918,

18 ]

426

1,485

1,062

1,278

2,023

2,184

322

5,305

7,396 2 0

ORDERS PAID.

:

:

:

:.

:

:

:

Total in 1919,...

Total in 1918,...

:

:

:..

Table X.

Statement of Local Postal Notes issued at Hongkong at the Agencies in China.

25 cts.

50 cts.

$1.00

VALUES.

$2.00

$3.00

20

Amount.

$4.00

$5.00

$10.00

-R 15-

$

C.

Total in 1919,

578

681

542

521

584

540

1,176

2,304

34,901.00

Total in 1918,

445

658

555

633

602

570

1,447

2,687

40,452.25

Receipts.

Message Fees :-

Radio Telegrams,......

Semaphore Messages,

Table XI.

Revenue and Expenditure-Telegraph Sub-Department.

Messages notifying vessels passing lighthouses,

Loss,

1918.

1919.

24,011,25

10,350,03

5.35

15.40

Expenditure.

1918.

1919.

Working Expenses :—

Personal Emoluments :-

Staff, G. P. O.,

7,955.50

9,745.68

Staff (Naval), Cape D'Aguilar

437.00

470.40

Station 1st Oct., 1917, to 30th September, 1918,

11,839.65

1st October, 1918, to 30th September, 1919,

15,457.72

Incidental Expenses,

39.65

88.97

Stores and Repairs,

5,150.51

8,850.94

Uniforms for Messengers,

115.42

7.50

647.13

23,314.98

Total,

$ 25,100.73

34,150.81

Total,

.$| 25,100.73

34,150.81

R 16-

R 17

Table XII.

Revenue and Expenditure for the years 1915 to 1919.

Telegraph Sub-Department.

Total

Total

Year.

Revenue. Expenditure.

Profit +

Loss

Percentage of Expenditure to Revenue.

#

C.

C.

34

C.

чу

1915, 15th July to 31st

December,

1916.

2,623.30

4,112.07

-

1,488.77

156.75

9,188.49

10,846.21

1,657.72

118.04

1917.

23,817.40

39,174.38

15,356.98

164.47

1918.

24,453.60

25,100.73

647.13

102.64

1919.

10,835.83 34,150.81

-23,314.98

315.17

"

Appendix S.

KOWLOON-CANTON RAILWAY.

(British Section.)

ANNUAL REPORT FOR 1919.

1. The roofing of the passenger platforms at Kowloon remained again in abeyance throughout the year owing to the non-delivery of the steelwork but a consignment of this material has recently arrived from England.

2. Borings were taken over the site for the new wharf for Kowloon Station yard, and plans and specifications prepared. Tenders were invited and a contract has since been entered into for its construction.

3. The brickwork shelter at Taipo Station for the accom- mod ation of passengers and goods from Sha U Chong referred to in my last report has been extended as originally intended, and the additional accommodation will be appreciated by passengers arriving and departing by the Sha U Chong Launch during the hot weather and rainy season.

4. About 3,000 sleepers were renewed in 1919 the entire re-sleepering of Beacon Hill Tunnel which began in 1918 being completed. As one pattern of the experimental reinforced concrete sleepers had proved satisfactory it was decided to make 100 more to the same pattern to be laid in 1920.

5. At Shatin Station a siding the full length of the Station Yard has been laid which facilitates the crossing of trains at that station.

6. It was found expedient to place an additional signal at Lowu Station, but as this is an up outer home for Shum Chun Station it was installed by the Chinese Section and is controlled by it.

7. The new permanent station building at Shum Chun Station for use of the British Section was completed by the Chinese Section and occupied by the British Section during the year.

8. Quarters for native sub-inspectors were erected in Yaumati Station Yard, and one of the gang huts had to be re-roofed in con- sequence of damage by white ants. The locomotive running sheds and workshops, also several bridges, were repainted during the dry season.

$ 2

9. A careful survey was made of the river bounding the line near mile 143 which threatened the safety of the high embankment at this point, and arrangements were made to protect the toe of the bank by constructing a training wall. About half of this was built before the end of the year, the remainder has since been completed. A small but important retaining wall at mile 19, which was under- mined in June, has been repaired.

10. Locomotive No. 2 has been thoroughly overhauled: all defective parts were replaced also a pair of new cylinder Piston Valves fitted. The other engines received minor repairs and 5 were painted.

11. Two coaches, one 1st class and Kitchen and the other 3rd class and Brake, were seriously damaged by white ants. It is pre- sumed that in both cases the termites were introduced by firewood, crates and wooden boxes carried in the coaches. Both vehicles have since been thoroughly overhauled and repaired.

No. 1 coach has been fitted with a Sun Roof and the large corridor windows altered to allow more ventilation. No. 28 was also supplied with a similar roof, while the other passenger stock received light repairs and 14 were re-varnished outside and painted or polished inside.

12. One wagon was fitted with a new steel roof and three with Malthoid Roofing. The latter is considerably cheaper than steel and up to the present quite satisfactory. Three wagons were repainted.

13. Owing to the wagon drawbars and drawbar springs frequently breaking it was decided to increase the size of the drawbars and substitute composite Indiarubber Springs in place of the Spiral Springs. 29 sets have been made in the Workshops and have so far proved satisfactory.

14. A Grinding Machine for grinding locomotive expansion links has been installed in the Workshops; also an Electric Welder.

15. The new system of discipline mentioned in my last report came into operation during the year with most satisfactory results.

16. Communications have been received from the Chinese Government, through the management of the Chinese Section, res- pecting the introduction of the Metric System on all railways in China in 1921 and preparations are being made for the British Section to fall into line with the scheme if necessary.

17. The through train service was interrupted on the 14th and 15th of July, owing to strikes in Canton affecting the Locomotive Department Employees of the Chinese Section, and again by the Typhoon on August the 22nd.

18. With the object of encouraging further passenger traffic the time table was revised in September and the advantages derived fully realized expectations.

19. On the occasion of the Peace Celebrations, July 18th and 19th, the Kowloon Station building including the clock tower was

T

:

S 3

gaily dressed, and at night brilliantly illuminated; and on October 11th, the anniversary of "Armistice Day", at 11 a.m. all traffic on the line stopped, and in the Workshops and elsewhere all motion was suspended for 2 minutes.

20. The amount provided in the Estimates under Special Ex- penditure was $67,330.00 and during the year at various times other sums were voted making a total of $77,834.37. Of this, how- ever, only $20,816.55 was expended and the details are shown in the Table of Expenditure herein.

21. The Revenue Statements of Earnings and Expenditure fol- low the line previously adopted. The actual Expenditure amounted to $417,032.14 against an estimate of $412,635.00 which shows an excess of $4,397.14.

22. There is a saving under Personal Emoluments of $8,276.36. Under Other Charges the Estimates proved inadequate. The Locomotives, Carriages and Wagons Expenses are mainly responsible for this. The Vote for Coal was exceeded by $12,522.97 owing to an increase in consumption necessitated by an additional train to the service, and during the year unforeseen repairs to Carriages and Wagons had to be undertaken for which purpose a sum of $4,050 was granted. However, small sums lapsed under other sub-heads and the total excess under Other Charges was re- duced to $12,673.50.

23. The Local Traffic has improved under all heads when com- pared with the previous year. The advance in passenger and goods earnings is due to increased traffic. The Sundry receipts are some- what larger owing to the inclusion of Storage Charges on Rails and Fastenings on account of the Imperial Government.

24. Through and Joint Sectional Traffic Receipts amounted to $302,327.74 or $36,632.96 in excess of 1918.

25. The Gross Receipts for the year were $490,092.77 as against $433,274.43 for 1918 an increase of $56,818.34. The balance after paying working expenses stands at $73,060.63.

26. The results of the past five years are as follows:-

Gross Receipts. Working Expenses.

Net Receipts.

1915. $343,769.08

$297,265.97

$46,503.11

1916...... 366,215.67

296,691.63

69,524.04

1917...... 428,246.46

337,431.48

90,814.98

1918... 433,274,43

356,221.07

77,053.36

1919...... 490,092.77

417,032.14

73,060.63

>

S 4

27. The Through and Joint Sectional Passengers carried were as follows:-

1917.

1918.

1919.

Passengers booked by

Stations in British

Territory to Sta-

tions in China...... 309,394

307,494

344,716

Passengers booked by

Stations in China to

Stations in British

Territory......

352,008

The Local Passengers carried were as follows:-

Main Line....

Fanling Branch.......

1917.

277,968

323,642

354,699

1918.

1919.

296,379

345,314

55,211 45,187 48,917

28. The final division of Through and Joint Sectional Traffic Receipts has been agreed between the two Administrations to the end of December 1918.

29. There were 4 accidents of more or less serious nature during the year which are included in the following:-

Coupling failures

Engine

Coach derailments

442

14

4

4

Wagon

2

"J

Serious Minor

Deaths Injuries Injuries

1*

2

3

Others

1

To Railway Employees

,, Passengers

30. With regard to "Coupling Failures" these were attri- butable in most cases to Chinese Section couplings though all couplings on both Sections are much in need of renewal, but owing to the war it has been impossible to obtain the necessary materials.

The murder of the Railway employee was in no way due to the working of the line. The other death was that of a Chinese Section Pointsman who was run over in Chinese Territory by a British Section light engine on track over which we have running powers. The three persons who received minor injuries were 3rd class (male) passengers who jumped from the train whilst in motion.

31. The First Aid Classes, commenced in 1918, were continued throughout the year and eleven Station Masters, eight Booking Clerks and five Guards presented themselves for the annual examination.

Sixteen of these candidates obtained 70% or over of the total marks awarded which may be regarded as a most satisfactory result and one that reflects great credit on their instructor Traffic Inspector Winyard and his assistant, Station Master De Loberson.

* Watchman murdered while on duty.

17

$ 5

32. During my absence through illness from May 23rd to October 17th Mr. Robert Baker, Engineer of Way and Works, acted as Manager.

Mr. J. Morris, Chief Accountant, was granted leave on March 19th, 1919, and returned to duty on January 3rd, 1920.

Mr. C. D. Lambert, Locomotive Superintendent, returned to the Colony from War Service on November 5th and Mr. Ingham Sutcliffe, Assistant Locomotive Superintendent, resigned on Novem- ber 6th.

Mr. W. G. Clark, Traffic Assistant, who left the Colony on May 18th, 1918, to join His Majesty's Forces, returned on May 25th.

H. P. WINSLOW,

13th April, 1920.

Manager.

$ 6

CONSTRUCTION ACCOUNT-MAIN LINE.

Main-Head.

Sub-Head.

Expenditure to 31st December, 1916.

$

C.

1.--Preliminary

Expenditure,. Survey,

II.-Land,..

Land,

42,277.65 2,326,740.13

III.-Formation,...!

(a) Earthwork,

2,710,115.50

(b) Tunnels,

3,819,756.18

(c) Roads,

130,857.96

IV. Bridges,......

(a) Major,

(b) Minor,

829,047.22

359,491.49

(c) Culverts,

71,567.78

V.- Fencing,

VI.-Telegraph, ... Telegraph...

(a) Boundaries,

(b) Signs,

48,232,06

727.31

41,221.11

VII.—Track,

(a) Ballast,..

178,828.79

(b) Permanent Way,

828,243.66

VIII. Stations and

Buildings,

(a) Buildings and Fixtures,

658,226.34

(b) Station Machinery,

90,953.02

(c) Furniture,

21,392.30

(d) Workshops, ....

$9,899.74

IX-Plant,.

(a) Construction,

143,518.90

(b) Loco Tools ‘and Plant,.

68,775,91

(c) C. & W. Tools & Plant,..

25.00

(d) Engineering,...................

10.00

(e) Loco Rolling Stock,.

418,907.71

(f) C. & W. Rolling Stock,.

634,843.97

• X.-General

Charges,..

(a) 1. Salaries & Allowances,...

443,874.39

2. Quarters & Offices,

3. Instruments,..

4. Office Expenses,

5. Medical,

113,457.39

10,339.91

35,402.16

23,071.90

6. Home Charges,

134,978.80

7. Interest,

701,705,62

8. Exchange,

306,794.96

(b) Accounts,

Total,........

N.B.-Figures printed in italics are minus quantities.

41,222.35

$14,710,917.29

*

S 7

Special Expenditure for the year 1919.

C.

Sub-Inspector's Quarters,

1,385.87

Shelters for passengers and goods at Taipo,...................

2,395.79

Reinforced concrete wharf at Kowloon Terminus,

2,004.83

Siding at Shatin,

6,366.23

One set of Locomotive Tyres,

1,190.32

One Typewriter,

155.09

Drawing Office Equipment and Testing Instruments,...

99.85

* Fire Appliances,

418.00

* Training Stream in Lum Cheun Valley, New Territory,

Grinding Machine for Workshop,

3,814.20

2,986.37

Total,

$20,816.55

Items voted subsequent to the preparation of the 1919 Estimates.

Summary.

Construction Expenditure up to 31st Dec., 1916, and

Special Expenditure for the years 1917 & 1918, $14,859,847.50

Special Expenditure for the year 1919,

20,816.55

Total,...........

$14,880,664.05

I.

Main-Head,

CONSTRUCTION ACCOUNT-FANLING BRANCH.

II.

Sub-Head.

III.

Expenditure to 31st December,

1918.

II.-Land,

Land,

(a) Ballast,

VII.-Track,

(b) Permanent Way,

2,389.45

11.05

46,651.14

VIII. Station and Buildings,.

(a) Station Buildings,

3,447.08

(e) Locomotive,

15,237.89

IX.-Plant,

(f) Carriages,

X.-General Charges,

(a) 1. Salaries,

21,762.36

309.60

Total of Fanling Branch Line Construction,...]

$89,808.57

www

S 8 -

UNALLOCATED STORES.

Amount.

Amount.

C.

C.

To Stock in hand on 1st January, 1919,

179,480.87

By Goods issued to Works,..

223,048.64

I

Goods received from Crown Agents during

Goods sold (Book Value exclusive of profit), ..

3,846.81

$ 9

""

"}

1919,

17,856.03

}

""

" Goods purchased locally,.

236,984.99

Balance of Stock on 31st December, 1919, carried forward to 1920,

207,426.44

$434,321.89

$434,321.89

Amount

1918.

Gross Receipts.

Per cent. on

Revenue Account for the Year ending 31st December, 1919.

Expenditure.

Amount

1919.

Per cent. on

Gross Receipts.

Amount

1918.

Earnings.

Amount

1919.

Total.

C.

44,921.86 10.37 To Maintenance

Main Line.

C.

%

C.

Local.

00

Works,

204,704.75 | 47.25

>>

of Way and Loco, Carriage and Wagon Expenses,

[132,353.37 63,622.68 12.98 | 10,761.46 Goods 16,203.82 Sundry

By Coaching Traffic,.

>>

"}

>>

C.

144,307.69

11,434.27

23,692.18

R

C.

241,452.51 49,27

53,675.01 12.39 Traffic Expenses,

"

40,716.60

9.40

64.50

*01

A

General Charges,

59,139.63 12.07 [159,318.65 40,593.20 8.28

179,434.14

Foreign.

Miscellaneous Expenditure,

69.20 .01

234,974.80 By Coaching Traffic,.

272,588.56

27,967.80

Goods

25,254.88

,,

Branch Line.

2,752.18 Sundry

>>

4,484.30

"}

3,669.52

.85

To Maintenance of Way and Works,

(265,691.78

302,327.74

3,578.78 .73

Branch Line.

7,087.32

1.63

Loco, Carriage and Wagon Expenses,

1,381.51 .32

Traffic Expenses,.

7,894,18 1.61 7,482.43 681.96 .14

By Coaching Traffic,.

7,717,17

778.57

Goods

613.72

""

>>

""

Sundry

""

356,221.07 |82.22

77,053.3617.78

$ 417,032.14 85.09

8,261.00

8,330.89

Balance (Net Earnings),

73,060.63 14.91

$433,274,43 100.00

$490,092.77 100.00 433,27

,274.43

J. MORRIS,

Chief Accountant.

Kowloon, 13th April, 1920.

Di

$ 490,092.77

H. P. WINSLOW,

Manager.

*

- S 10-

S 11

Statement of Rolling Stock for the year ending 31st December, 1919.

DESCRIPTION.

LOCOMOTIVE.

3

Total Stock at

end of previous year.

Additions during the year.

Reductions during the year.

Total Stock at end

of the year.

Tender

Pressure

or

Type. No. Cylinder.

Tractive

Tank.

per sq. in.

Force.

Total Weight in Working

Order.

lbs.

Tons. cut.

Kitson

Side Tank

2:6;4

4' 8" Gauge.

S 19" x 26"

180

24,724

89

15

8

Hudswell

O

8

Clarke

Saddle Tank

0: 6:0

2 | 14′′ × 20′′

150

10,604

29

7

20

2

4' 8" Gauge.

Hudswell

Clarke

Side Tank

0:4:0

2 | 6" X 10" 150

1,800 5 3

2

0

0

2

2′0′′ Gauge.

Orenstien

Centre Tank

Koppel 0:4:0

2′0′′ Gauge.

19" x 11" 150

4,338

10 0

1

0

0

1

Total,

13

:

13

0

0

13

$ 12

Statement of Rolling Stock for the year ending 31st December, 1919.

DESCRIPTION.

COACHING VEHICLES.

4' 8" Gauge.

Quantity.

Length of Underframes

in feet.

First Class Saloon Coach

First Class Dining Car

First Class Carriage

Second Class Carriage

1 60 11

2 60′ 11′′ 1 60' 11"

2 60′ 11′′

First and Second Composite Carriage...

4 60′ 11′′

Third Class Carriage

14 60′ 11′′

Third Luggage and Brake

4 60' 11"

Total........

28

Tare.

1

2

3

4

Total Stock at end of previous year.

Carrying

Capacity:

Passengers.

Additions during the year.

Reductions during the year.

Total Stock at end of the year.

Tons.

C & C C C C CH

36

40

36

24

36

50

34

84

35

68

12124

4

32

120

14

14

35

84

4.

28

28

Coaching Vehicles 2' 0" Gauge.

8 Wheeled Bogie First Class Carriage..

Tons.

1 24' 0" 3.5.0

16

& Brake..

24' 0" 3.5.0

8

"

>>

Third

""

"

Carriage..

324' 0" 3.5.0

28

3.

"

"

دو

& Brake Vanj

1 24' 0" 3.5.0

16

Total.......

6

6

CO

6

S 13

Statement of Rolling Stock for the year ending 31st December, 1919.

DESCRIPTION.

GOODS VEHICLES.

4' 8" Gauge.

No.

Length of

Underframes

in feet.

Tare.

1

2

3

4

Carrying

Capacity

(Tons).

Total Stock at end of previous year.

Additions during the year.

Reductions during the year.

Total Stock at end of the year.

Tons. cwt.

30-Ton Covered Goods

4

35

15

5

30

30-Ton Rail Bogie

35

13 8

30

30-Ton Open Goods

35

14

30

15-Ton Covered Goods

24

19

8 10

15

15-Ton Cattle Trucks

2

19

8 10

15

15-Ton Open Goods

19

7 16

15

15-Ton Goods Brake Van

19

15

15

Breakdown Van ...

35

15

5

30

Goods Vehicles 2' 0" Gauge.

Steel Sided Goods Wagon...

3 9' 0"

12

60 cub. ft.

3

Total...

52

52

:

52

H2OHNON-

kdy

$ 14

STATEMENT OF TRAIN MIleages.

Main Line.

Year ending 31st December, 1918.

PARTICULARS.

Year ending 31st December, 1919.

Miles.

Miles.

118,367

Passenger Train Miles

133,605

9,112

Goods

4,432

"

""

3,143

Ballast

1,371

وو

"

898

Special

243

""

""

Nil.

Attached for assistance

Nil.

34,620

Shunting at 6 miles per hour

35,040

5,815

Light Engine for Traffic

purposes.

6,3321

256

Light Engine for Loco

purposes

128

58,534

Standing in steam at 6 miles

per hour

66,727

230,746

Total Engine Miles

247,880

Fanling Branch.

Year ending 31st

PARTICULARS.

December, 1918.

Year ending 31st December, 1919.

Miles.

Miles.

15,990

Passenger Train Miles

17,975

13

Special

Nil.

672 8,298

Ballast

Nil.

""

Standing in steam and Shunt-

ing at 4 miles per bour

9,437

24,973

Total Engine Miles

27,412