Administrative Reports - 1911

ADMINISTRATIVE REPORTS FOR THE YEAR 1911

Table of Contents

1 Finances

2 Trade and Shipping industries, Fisheries, agriculture & Land

3 Legislation

4 Education

5 Public Works

6 Government and aided institutions

7 Institutions Not Supported By Government

8 Criminal and Police

9 Vital Statistics

10 Postal Service

11 Military Expenditure

12 General Observations

A Financial Returns

A(1) Finances

B Assessment

C Registrar General's Department

D Harbour office

E Observatory

F Supreme Court

G Police Magistrates' Court

H Land office

I New Territories

J Police and Fire Brigade

K Prison

L Medical and Sanitary

M Botanical and forestry

N Education

O Volunteer Corps (Not Published)

P Public Works

Q Post office

R Railway

 




HONGKONG.

REPORT ON THE BLUE BOOK FOR 1911.

COLONIAL SECRETARY'S OFFICE, HONGKONG, 22nd June, 1912.

SIR,

I have the honour to submit for Your Excellency's information the following general report on the Blue Book for the year 1911 :-

I.-FINANCES.

As the subject of the finances of the Colony for the year under review has been exhaustively dealt with in the Colonial Treasurer's report, which appears for the first time in the history of the Colony, it will be sufficient here to note that in 1911 the revenue amounted to $7,497,231, exceeding the estimate by $410,848, while the expenditure amounted to $7,077,177, or $308,143 less than the estimate. Thus the balance for the year's working was $420,051, bringing the balance of assets and liabilities up to $1,826,979 in the Colony's favour.

The total capital expenditure on the British Section of the Kow- loon-Canton Railway amounted on the 31st. December, 1910, to a sum of $11,884,427.76, and a further sum of $137,075.01 was added to the capital expenditure during 1911, making a total expenditure of $12,021,502.77 down to the end of last year. Additional expendi- ture will be necessary during 1912 for the construction of a terminal station and for the resumption of land on which to build it. The payments made up to the end of 1911 have more than exhausted the existing Railway Loan, and it is probable, therefore, that in 1912 a further loan will have to be raised.

The amount of the Consolidated Loan (Inscribed Stock Loans of 1893 and 1906) stands at £1,485,732 and in addition at the end of the year the advances by the Crown Agents for Railway Construc- tion amounted to £340,000. Against these items, however, should be placed the sum at credit of the Sinking Fund, viz., £118,267, and the sum of £440,000, being the unpaid balance of the loan to thelate Viceroy at Wuchang.

The Defence Contribution paid during 1911 was $1,342,554.

2

II-TRADE AND SHIPPING, INDUSTRIES, FISHERIES, AGRICULTURE AND LAND.

(a.)-SHIPPING and Trade.

The total of the shipping entering and clearing at ports in the Colony during the year 1911 amounted to 543,570 vessels of 36,179,153 tons, which, compared with figures for 1910, shows a decrease in numbers of 3,594 vessels, with a decrease of 355,209 tons.

Of the above, 44,978 vessels of 23,063,108 tons were engaged in foreign trade, as against 40,714 of 23,160,256 tons in 1910, and were distributed as follows:

+4

1911. Numbers.

1910. 1911. 1910. Numbers. Tonnage. Tonnage.

British Ocean-going

ships represented,... 87%

10'5%

32.9% 35·0%

Foreign Ocean-going

ships represented,...

9.3

10.6

34.3

35.0

British River-Steam-

ers represented,..... 15:3

16:0

17.8

17.3

Foreign River-Steam-

ers represented,...

3.1

3.3

3.2

3:0

Steamships (not ex-

ceeding 60 tons)

represented,

7.2

7.7

0.6

0.6

Trading Junks re-

presented,

56.4

51.9

i1.2

9.1

100'0

100·0

100.0

100.0

The movements of fishing junks are not included in the above figures.

Of ships of European construction, 4,042 ocean steamers, 7 sailing ships, 4,147 river-steamers, and 1,617 steamships not exceeding 60 tons entered during the year, giving a daily average entry of 269 ships, as compared with 26 7 in 1910 and 25'6 in 1909.

The average tonnage of individual ocean vessels entering the port has once more increased-from 2,457-3 tons to 2,495'1 tons. That of British ships has increased (2,633.5 tons as against 2,594′5 tons) while that of foreign ships has increased from 2,324.1 tons to 2,365'7 tons.

During the past 20 years, the average tonnage of ocean vessels has increased from 1,181'1 to 1,915'5 tons.

The average tonnage of river-steamers entered during the year has again decreased, from 6021 tons to 5849 tons. That of Brieish river-steamers has further decreased from 617 tons to 599 tons and that of foreign river-steamers from 529 tons to 518 tons.

T

A comparison between the years 1910 and 1911 is given in the following Table :-

*

1910.

1911.

Increase.

Decrcase.

Class of Vessel.

No.

Tonnage.

No.

Tonnage. No.

Ton-

nage.

No.

Ton-

nage.

British Ocean

4,262 8,111,946

3,907 7,589,995

going,

355

521,951

Foreign Ocean

4,312 8,103,969

going,

British River

Steamers,

6,483 4,000,073

Foreign River

1,334 706,616

4,180 7,917,640

6,871 4,116,736 388 116,663

1,423 736,057 89 29,411

132 186,329

Steamers,

Steamships un-

der 60 tons

(Foreign

3,153 136,765

3,263

130,092 110

6,673

Trade),.

Junks, Foreign

21,170 2,100,887

25,334 2,572,588 4,164 471,701

Trade,

Total, Foreign

Trade, Steam-launches

plying in

waters of the

Colony, Junks, Local

Trade,

40,714 23,160,256 41,978 23,063,108 4.751 617,805 487 714,953

466,014 10,986,234 461,984 10,981,990

*40,436 *2,387,871 136,608 +2,134,054

1,030 § 4,224

3,828 253,817

Grand Total,... 547,164 36,534,361 543,570 36,179,152 4,751 617,805 8,345 973,014

Net,

3,594 355,209

* Including 21,056 Conservancy and Dust Boats of 1,540,984 tons.

+

J

""

13,980

818,292 Decrease owing to a number of smaller sized launches being employed. Small decrease in tonnage owing to larger sized launches being employed. This Table shows a decrease in British ocean shipping of 355 ships of 521,951 tons, or of 83% in numbers, and of 64% in tonnage.

British river-steamers have increased from 6,483 ships of 4,000,073 tons to 6,871 ships of 4,116,736 tons or 2.3% in ships and 2.9% in tonnage. This is explained by the new steamer Wing On con- tributing 295 trips, also to the increased number of trips made by the Canton steamers, particularly at the time of the unrest in Canton.

Foreign ocean vessels have decreased by 132 ships or 3% in numbers and 2:3% in tonnage. This result is due to increases of 66, 47, 26, 20, 15 and 4 ships under United States, Dutch, Portuguese, Russian, French and Japanese flags respectively, which are counterbalanced by decreases of 141, 121, 27, 18, 2 and 1 ships. under German, Chinese, Swedish, Norwegian, Italian and Danish flags respectively. The increase shown under the United States flag is explained by the steamers Rubi and Zafiro being transferred from British colours, and the increase shown under the Dutch flag is

a

explained by the fact that four steamers which called at this Port in 1911 did not call in 1910. The decrease under the German flag is chiefly accounted for by the falling off in trade from Bangkok ; while the decrease under the Chinese flag is due to the loss of the Meefoo and to the stoppage of two steamers which previously traded to this Port.

Foreign river-steamers have increased by 89 ships (or 6·6%) of 29,441 tons (or 41%). This is mainly accounted for by the new steamers Shing Ping and Licorne contributing 72 trips, and to an increase in trips of vessels under the Portuguese flag.

As in former years, a comparison is inserted between the shipping of the port twenty years ago, and to-day. In 1891, 2,856 British ships of 3,593,223 net register tons entered the port, against 10,778 ships of 11,706,731 net register tons in 1911: an increase of 277.3% in numbers and of 223 % in tonnage. These figures include ocean and river-steamers and ocean-going sailing ships (not junks). Similarly, foreign shipping, during the same period, has increased from 1,495 ships of 1,545,404 net register tons in 1891, to 5,603 ships of 8,653,697 net register tons; an increase of 2757 % in numbers and of 4599 % in tonnage.

The actual number of individual ocean vessels of European type of construction entering during 1911 was 720, being 348 British and 372 foreign. The corresponding figures for 1910 were 734, 365 and 369 respectively.

These 720 ships aggregated 1,796,498 tons. They entered 4,049 times, giving a collective tonnage of 7,756,033 tons. Thus, as shown in the following table. in 1911 as compared with 1910, 14 less ships with a tonnage decreased by 8,177 tons, entered 235 less times, and gave a collective tonnage less by 356,952 tons.

Steamers

No. of Times entered.

Total Tonnage.

Flag.

1910. 1911.

1910. 1911.

1910

1911.

British Steamers

Sailing

360

344

German

113

"

Japanese Steamer

Norwegian.

101

Sailing.

Austrian.

Chinese

Danish..

Dutch

French...

Italian.

Portuguese

Russian

Swedish

ཧྥུ272 ཟྭ 1o )

5

111

106

1

34

6

16

35

7

5

U.S.A. Steamers..

15

ཨྠ©=་ྲ 88©2j*j©@

2,124

1,952

4,041,557

3,781,622

4

7

6

17,663

16,531

722

657

1,206,757

1,133,786

507

509

1,341,083

1,354,362

138

36

223

210

236,334

221,039

6

24

24

95,062

96,380

20

250

192

314,879

241,362

20

20

33,165

45,928

16

108

130

214,737

235,881

27

144

152

262,670

242,469

13

12

34,496

31,188

66

79

29,478

32,842

11

10

20

28,803

53,080

6

27

14

45,398

25,778

18

37

71

210,466

243,619

Sailing...

163

No Flag

1

1

299

734

720 4,284

4,049

8,112,985

7,756,033

i

TRADE.

As pointed out in previous reports, the figures which used to appear under this heading were misleading, being inaccurate in some cases. However, in the few items of import trade of which substantially accurate details can be given, the following remarks may be of interest :-

This

Coal.-1,046,290 tons were imported during the year. quantity, compared with the imports for 1910, shows a decrease of 68,830 tons or 66%. This decrease may be ascribed to greater quantities of coal (principally Japanese, North China and Hongay) passing through Hongkong direct to Canton than heretofore, also to the falling off in ocean tonnage.

Of the many varieties of coal imported, Japanese heads the list. Next come North China and Hongay. The importation from Pulo Laut is increasing.

There was only one cargo of Cardiff coal commercially imported. No Australian coal was discharged throughout the year.

Kerosene Oil shows a big increase in bulk oil of 62,367 tons or 1111% and in case oil an increase of 4,112 tons or 88%, while liquid fuel has increased by 7,759 tons or 82·3%. The huge increase in bulk oil can be attributed to a great extent to the cutting of rates between the Standard Oil and Asiatic Petroleum Companies. also to the fact that stocks were left short in 1910, and that much oil hitherto shipped direct to coast ports was last year trans-shipped in Hongkong, because the revolution in China caused a restriction of sales in the interior. The increase in liquid fuel tends to show that this class of fuel is now becoming popular in steamers which hitherto exclusively consumed coal.

Opium. The imports of raw opium show a decrease of 10,457 chests or 32.9% as compared with a decrease of 11·1% in 1910 and 145% in 1909. The experts show a decrease of 8,272 chests or 29.2% as compared with a decrease of 21.2% in 1910 and 97% in 1909. During the last four years the raw opium trade of the Colony is described by the following figures :-

1911. 1910. Chests. Chests.

1909.

1908.

Chests.

Chests.

Stock in hand, 1st Jan.,

7,123

4,509

5,808

4,707

Imported during the year,

21,286

31,743

35,734

41,821

Total,

28,409

36,252

41,542

46,528

Boiled by Opium Farmer,......

761

782

1,044

864

Spurious Opium destroyed, Exported during the year,

14

20,061 28,333

51 35,938

247

39,609

Total,

20,802

29,129

-37,033 40,720

Stock remaining on 31st Dec.,

7,587

7,123 4,509 5,808

1

6

Of the several varieties of opium imported, Malwa decreased by 454 chests or 92%, Patna by 6,443 or 397%, Benares by 1,249 or 19.3%, Persian by 1,090 or 27.6%.

Of the several varieties of opium exported, Malwa decreased by 2,000 chests or 43.5%, Patna by 4,196 or 29-7 %, Benares by 926 or 149 %. The export of Persian opium increased by 56 chests or 2·5%.

The trade in compounds of opium shows a decrease, the imports being 38.8% less than in 1910 and the exports 14.5% less. In morphine there is also a decrease of 39% in the imports and 19.5% in the exports. The figures for cocaine show a considerable increase, the imports being 451 lbs. as compared with 145 lbs. in 1910, and the exports being 445 lbs. as compared with 201 lbs. in 1910. During the latter half of the year, however, there has been very little trade in either morphine or cocaine owing to further restrictions placed on the import of these drugs at the various ports in China and the neighbouring countries.

Sugar. The imports of sugar show a decrease 42,076 tons or 16.7%.

Cotton and Cotton Yarn.-Here is shown a large decrease amount- ing to 34,730 tons or 87.5% chiefly due to high prices ruling for cotton during the year, which made it prohibitive to the poorer Chinese and so checked business. The last two or three months of the year were particularly bad for business owing to the Revolution.

Flour. Our returns show a great increase of 49,679 tons or 153.8% due to the poor rice and wheat crops in China throughout the year. Districts, which were supplied last year from the abundant crops of China, have this year been compelled to fall back on the American products. The price of rice has also enhanced the demand for American flour, this being used as a substitute for rice and rice- flour. The prices of rice throughout the year have practically stood at about 40% over normal prices, and possibly the high prices of flour in Australia have to some extent inflated our imports of flour here, inasmuch as such high prices have curtailed that country's shipments to ports south of Hongkong which are large consumers (Java, Straits, Burmah, &c.), and the southern ports have come to us for their supplies. Hongkong is the distributing centre of American. flour for those ports.

Rice.--Here our returns show a falling off of 152,224 tons or 26·6%. The failure of the southern crops in general, as evidenced by the high prices which have ruled on the markets for the last half year, has, of course, been the reason of the decline.

Summary. The total reported imports during the year amounted to 3,995,793 tons, as against 4,292,194 tons in 1910, a decrease of 296,401 tons or 74%. Exports show an increase of 71,672 tons, or 3·1%. Transit cargo shows an increase of 66,109 tons or 16% These figures are not however reliable, there being no means of collecting accurate information in the absence of any Customs Stafi.

E

Emigration and Immigration.

135,565 emigrants left Hongkong for various places during the year 1911, (111,058 in 1910). Of these 92,691 were carried in British ships and 42,874 in foreign ships. These figures show a substantial increase of 24,507 (or 22 %) over 1910, and can be accounted for in the same way as last year, namely, by the demand for labour in the rubber plantations of the Malay States.

Statement of Number of Emigrants to Straits Settlements 1907 to 1911 compared with Total Chinese Emigration 1907 to 1911.

No. of Emigrants

1907.

1908,

1909,

1910,

1911,

Total No. of

to

Straits Settlements.

Emigrants.

83,048

105,967

49,639

71,081

48,016

77,430

76,705

111,058

100,906

135,565

149,894 returning emigrants are reported to have been brought to Hongkong from the several places to which they had emigrated, either from this Colony or from coast ports, as against 149,564 in 1910. Of these 112,328 arrived in British ships, and 37,566 in foreign ships.

(b.) INDUSTRIES.

(i.)—Under European Management.

Engineering and Shipbuilding. This industry has improved during the year under review.

Taikoo Dockyard and Eng. Co., Ld., . Hongkong & Whampoa Dock Co., Ld., W. S. Bailey & Co., . Macdonald & Co...

وو

1911.

9 vessels of 2,281 gross tons and 3,650 I.H.P.

13

8

552 206

"

"1

703 413

3+

"

33

33

"

50

173

19

>>

27

Ulderup & Schluter,

25

Tung Hing Lung,

Kwong Tak Hồng,

1

30

1

་་

55

210

408

"

860 250

**

31

21

W. C. Jack & Co.,

3

45

192 48

**

??

"

Kwong Hip Lung Co., Ld.,

3

76

320

""

"

"

"

Total,

Taikoo Dockyard and Eng., Co., Ld., Hongkong & Whampos Dock Co., Ld., W. S. Bailey & Co.,

Macdonald & Co.,

Ulderup and Schluter,

Total,.

73 vessels of 3,883 gross tons and 6,609 I.H.P.

1910.

8 vessels of 2,231 gross tons and 1,718 I.H.P.

14

4

3

""

715

"

121

2,070 200

་་

33

169

160

317

150

"

11

31

ני

31 vessels of 3,553 gross tons and 4,298 I H.P.

Sugar Refinery.--Various circumstances combined to cause the year 1911 to be an unfavourable one for this industry. In the early part of the year the world's prices assumed a strong downward

1

tendency due to heavy crops being anticipated in the main sugar producing centres. This affected prices unprofitably in Hongkong and the East. Later a reaction in prices took place due to shortness in the European beet crops, and values mounted up here in common with other parts of the world, but the more prosperous results, which these circumstances placed within the reach of the Hongkong refin- eries, were nullified by the outbreak of the Revolution, which reduced local demand to a minimum.

Cotton Spinning-Owing to the high prices required for cotton during the early part of last year, it was impossible to work at a profit and one mill was closed for nine months. Towards the end of the year the Revolution in China dislocated business and the outlook is still unsatisfactory.

Rope Manufacturing.-There is very little requiring special com- ment, and the trade for the year has gone on without any distinguish- ing feature. The power of absorption of the local and adjacent markets seems to vary very little. The price of hemp has been fairly steady throughout the year, the extreme fluctuation not exceed- ing $3 per picul in Manila.

Cement.-There has been a fair demand throughout the year.

Brewing. The Oriental Brewery, of which hopes of success. were confidently expressed in 1910, was unfortunately unable to compete with other breweries and has passed into liquidation.

(ii.)-Under Chinese Management.

Rattan and Fibre Furniture.-Business showed a slight falling off. There are forty-one firms, large and small, in the trade.

Native Tobacco. There are twenty-six factories in existence. Business is still unsatisfactory owing to the competition in China of foreign tobacco corporations and the sale of foreign cigarettes. The local tobacco crops were fairly good.

Tinned Goods.-This business increased moderately, and con- siderable exports have been made to Annam and Singapore.

Samshu.-The local manufacturers of native spirits report hav- ing had a good year. The total local output of all kinds of native spirits (including the New Territories) was nearly 1,100,000 gallons, as against 800,000 gallons in 1910. This increase is due to a decrease in import from China consequent on the recent unrest.

Vinegar. All the large native distilleries produce vinegar as well as Samshu. The yearly output of the seven largest firms amounted to some 850,000 gallons. The figures given for 1910 (two million gallons) were probably wrong.

Knitted Vests and Socks.-There are five factories in existence. A large local demand, which has lately still further increased, exists for these articles.

#

ļ

9

Leather-There are eight local tanneries. The high price of hides affected the business adversely, and the volume of trade fell off by about 10%.

There

Ginger and Preserves.-The volume of business done still showed a decrease and was affected by the price of sugar. are fourteen factories in the Colony.

Soy. There is no improvement to report in this trade which remains dull.

Paper.--The trade still shows satisfactory progress.

Vermilion. The volume of this trade has again fallen off and at the end of the year the demand for this commodity was almost non-existent.

Lard.-Much of the lard manufactured in the Colony is exported to the Philippines, where regulations require the purity of animal products to be certified. The local manufacturers of lard made from animals killed in the Colony willingly comply with the regulations. The output still increases. During 1911 a lard and meat factory was started purely in the interests of the Philippine trade.

(c.) FISHERIES.

A considerable proportion of the boat population of Hongkong supports itself by deep-sea fishing, in which pursuit a large number of junks are engaged. The villages of Aberdeen, Stanley, Shauki- wan, and also many in the New Territories, are largely dependent upon this industry for their prosperity. Since the middle of last year a Steam Trawler has been engaged in fishing over various grounds, and has contributed its hauls to the local markets. Fresh water fish is imported from Canton and the West River. There are oyster beds of considerable value in Deep Bay.

(d.) FORESTRY, AGRICULTURE AND BOTANY.

The formation of pine-tree plantations in the Harbour Belt be- tween Laichikok and Lyemun has been continued to the extent of about 300 acres, and sites which failed in the area sown in the pre- vious year have been resown. This Belt has now been completed.

}

Mt. Davis and an area of about 70 acres at Aberdeen where pine- trees were felled in 1910 under the timber contract have been resown with pine-tree seeds

The areas cleared by fire last year on the slope of Mt. Kellett which descends to Aberdeen have also been resown with pine-tree seeds.

On Mt. Gough, where a fire occurred last year, about 1,800 sites have been sown with seeds of broad-leaved trees.

11

Land and grants of extensions to existing lots in the island of Hong- kong and Old Kowloon. The chief items were received in respect of the sales of Inland Lots 1892 aud 1901 which realized $34,600 and $80,100 respectively.

There has been a considerable increase in the number of build- ing lots in the city sold by the Government during the year, 18 lots having an area of 7 A. 3 Ř. 35; P. having been sold for a premium of $234,767 as against 6 lots with an area of 1 R. 194 P. and at a premium of $4,776 for the previous year.

There has again been a very considerable increase both in number and value of private properties which have changed hands during the year, the purchase moneys having exceeded those of the previous year by over six million dollars. There is a good demand for residental houses on the lower levels and in many instances a considerable rise in prices has been obtained, which may be accounted for by the large number of Chinese gentry who have invested in house property in the Colony during the latter part of the year. There is a considerable demand for good mortgage securties with a tendency to accept a reduced rate of interest.

Sales of vacant Crown Lands in the New Territories continue even and consist chiefly of small building sites at prices ranging from 1 to 2 cents a foot and land for purposes of cultivation at from

to cents a foot.

III-LEGISLATION.

Sixty-five Ordinances were passed during 1911, of which 41 were amendments to other Ordinances, and 5 were connected with the revision of the Ordinances of Hongkong now being carried out by the Chief Justice (Sir F. T. Piggott, Kt.). This is the largest number of Ordinances ever passed by the Hongkong Legislative Council in one year.

The most important Ordinances were :-The Defence (Sketching Prevention) Ordinance (No. 3), the Consolidation of the Liquor Laws (No. 9), the University Ordinance (No. 10), the Stamp Duties Management Ordinance (No. 35), the Code of Civil Procedure Amendment (No. 36), the Societies Ordinance (No. 47), the Chinese Partnerships Ordinance (No. 53) and the law relating to Companies (No. 58).

IV. EDUCATION.

There are 67 Government and Grant Schools, the most important of which is Queen's College. Of these 20 are Upper Grade Schools with a staff competent to give instruction in all subjects of the 7th Standard and above. These latter schools have an average attend- ance of 4,107, and the medium of instruction in all of them, with the exception of four girls' schools, is English. The 47 remaining schools are all Lower Grade. Thoy comprise one school for British Indians, where English and Urdu are taught, six Government Schools

11

Land and grants of extensions to existing lots in the island of Hong- kong and Old Kowloon. The chief items were received in respect of the sales of Inland Lots 1892 aud 1901 which realized $34,600 and $80,100 respectively.

There has been a considerable increase in the number of build- ing lots in the city sold by the Government during the year, 18 lots having an area of 7 A. 3 Ř. 35; P. having been sold for a premium of $234,767 as against 6 lots with an area of 1 R. 194 P. and at a premium of $4,776 for the previous year.

There has again been a very considerable increase both in number and value of private properties which have changed hands during the year, the purchase moneys having exceeded those of the previous year by over six million dollars. There is a good demand for residental houses on the lower levels and in many instances a considerable rise in prices has been obtained, which may be accounted for by the large number of Chinese gentry who have invested in house property in the Colony during the latter part of the year. There is a considerable demand for good mortgage securties with a tendency to accept a reduced rate of interest.

Sales of vacant Crown Lands in the New Territories continue even and consist chiefly of small building sites at prices ranging from 1 to 2 cents a foot and land for purposes of cultivation at from

to cents a foot.

III-LEGISLATION.

Sixty-five Ordinances were passed during 1911, of which 41 were amendments to other Ordinances, and 5 were connected with the revision of the Ordinances of Hongkong now being carried out by the Chief Justice (Sir F. T. Piggott, Kt.). This is the largest number of Ordinances ever passed by the Hongkong Legislative Council in one year.

The most important Ordinances were :-The Defence (Sketching Prevention) Ordinance (No. 3), the Consolidation of the Liquor Laws (No. 9), the University Ordinance (No. 10), the Stamp Duties Management Ordinance (No. 35), the Code of Civil Procedure Amendment (No. 36), the Societies Ordinance (No. 47), the Chinese Partnerships Ordinance (No. 53) and the law relating to Companies (No. 58).

IV. EDUCATION.

There are 67 Government and Grant Schools, the most important of which is Queen's College. Of these 20 are Upper Grade Schools with a staff competent to give instruction in all subjects of the 7th Standard and above. These latter schools have an average attend- ance of 4,107, and the medium of instruction in all of them, with the exception of four girls' schools, is English. The 47 remaining schools are all Lower Grade. Thoy comprise one school for British Indians, where English and Urdu are taught, six Government Schools

12

and 40 Grant Vernacular Schools. The average attendance at all these Lower Grade Schools is 2,196.

at both grades of school, is 6,303.

The total average attendance,

The revenue derived from school fees was $76,056.25 (of which $40,435 was from Queen's College).

Two schools are limited to children of British parentage. Both these schools (one for boys, the other for girls) are under the Govern- ment. In 1911 the combined average attendance at them was 76.

Higher education is represented by the Technical Institute, where instruction is given in the evening in Mathematics, Machine Drawing, Building Construction, Field Surveying and allied sub- jects; in Chemistry and Physics; in the English and French languages, Book-keeping and Shorthand. There is also a Teachers' Class, at which the junior Chinese masters of Government and Grant Schools are expected to attend. A Kindergarten Class has also been started for teachers in Girls' Schools. The Institute is furnished with a well equipped laboratory. The lecturers are chiefly Civil Servants recruited from the European staffs of Queen's College and the Public Works Department. These officers receive fees for their services.

The Hongkong University building, the gift of Sir Hormusjee Mody, was almost completed at the end of the year and was opened in March, 1912. It is expected to be open for teaching in the autumn of this year. The first chairs will be those of Medicine, Engineering and Arts. On 31st December, 1911, the Endowment Fund amounted to $839,970.11 in Hongkong currency and a sum £40,098 7s. 3d. in sterling.

V.-PUBLIC WORKS.

Of the important works in progress, the Post Office was com- pleted by the middle of the year and the following departments were accommodated on three floors of the building :-Post Office, Treasury, Registrar General's Department, Sanitary Department, Education Department, the District Office for the South of the New Territories and the Audit Department. The extensive basement was partly utilized for postal purposes and partly for the storage of materials required by the Sanitary Department. A fourth floor, which is intended to provide for future expansion, remains unoccupied; but it has been decided to let it for offices in the meanwhile. The Law Courts were practically completed. Substantial progress was made with the Mongkoktsui Breakwater, but all the work executed was invisible, being below low water level. A contract for the reconstruction of the old Western Market was let in September, and fair progress with the foundations had been made by the close of the

year.

The following buildings were completed :-Kowloon Market; Additions to No. 2 Police Station; Staff Quarters, Kennedy Town - Hospital; Police Station, Ts'ün Wan; Reconstruction of Government Pavilions; Hospital at the Quarantine Station, Lai Chi Kok; Work-

12

and 40 Grant Vernacular Schools. The average attendance at all these Lower Grade Schools is 2,196.

at both grades of school, is 6,303.

The total average attendance,

The revenue derived from school fees was $76,056.25 (of which $40,435 was from Queen's College).

Two schools are limited to children of British parentage. Both these schools (one for boys, the other for girls) are under the Govern- ment. In 1911 the combined average attendance at them was 76.

Higher education is represented by the Technical Institute, where instruction is given in the evening in Mathematics, Machine Drawing, Building Construction, Field Surveying and allied sub- jects; in Chemistry and Physics; in the English and French languages, Book-keeping and Shorthand. There is also a Teachers' Class, at which the junior Chinese masters of Government and Grant Schools are expected to attend. A Kindergarten Class has also been started for teachers in Girls' Schools. The Institute is furnished with a well equipped laboratory. The lecturers are chiefly Civil Servants recruited from the European staffs of Queen's College and the Public Works Department. These officers receive fees for their services.

The Hongkong University building, the gift of Sir Hormusjee Mody, was almost completed at the end of the year and was opened in March, 1912. It is expected to be open for teaching in the autumn of this year. The first chairs will be those of Medicine, Engineering and Arts. On 31st December, 1911, the Endowment Fund amounted to $839,970.11 in Hongkong currency and a sum £40,098 7s. 3d. in sterling.

V.-PUBLIC WORKS.

Of the important works in progress, the Post Office was com- pleted by the middle of the year and the following departments were accommodated on three floors of the building :-Post Office, Treasury, Registrar General's Department, Sanitary Department, Education Department, the District Office for the South of the New Territories and the Audit Department. The extensive basement was partly utilized for postal purposes and partly for the storage of materials required by the Sanitary Department. A fourth floor, which is intended to provide for future expansion, remains unoccupied; but it has been decided to let it for offices in the meanwhile. The Law Courts were practically completed. Substantial progress was made with the Mongkoktsui Breakwater, but all the work executed was invisible, being below low water level. A contract for the reconstruction of the old Western Market was let in September, and fair progress with the foundations had been made by the close of the

year.

The following buildings were completed :-Kowloon Market; Additions to No. 2 Police Station; Staff Quarters, Kennedy Town - Hospital; Police Station, Ts'ün Wan; Reconstruction of Government Pavilions; Hospital at the Quarantine Station, Lai Chi Kok; Work-

15

P

VI.-GOVERNMENT AND AIDED INSTITUTIONS

(a.) HOSPITALS.

Government Hospitals consist of the Civil Hospital, to which is attached an isolated Maternity Hospital, the Victoria Hospital for Women and Children, and the Kennedy Town Infectious Diseases Hospital. There is an Observation Station capable of accommodating 1,500 persons in the event of an outbreak of infectious disease on board a ship arriving in the Harbour.

The Civil Hospital contains 150 beds in 19 wards. 2,370 in- patients and 15,489 out-patients were treated during 1911 as against 2,644 and 17,759 respectively in 1910. 112 cases of malarial fever were admitted as against 340 in 1910 al 188 in 1909. The Maternity Hospital contains 6 beds for Europeans and 4 for Asiatics, 138 confinements occurred during the year as against 107 in 1910. The Victoria Hospital at the Peak contains 41 beds, and during 1911 309 patients were under treatment there. At Kennedy Town Hospital, which contains 26 beds, 22 cases were treated in 1911, 21 being small-pox.

(b.) LUNATIC ASYLUM.

The Asylum is under the direction of the Superintendent of the Civil Hospital. European and Chinese patients are separated, the European portion containing 8 beds in separate wards and the Chinese portion 16 beds.. 220 patients of all races were treated during 1911 and there were 14 deaths.

(c.)—THE TUNG WA AND OTHER CHINESE HOSPITALS.

The Tung Wa Hospital, opened in 1872, is mainly supported by the voluntary subscriptions of Chinese, but receives an annual grant of $8,000 from the Government. Only Chinese are treated in this institution. Various other services not appertaining to a hospital are performed by the institution, such as the free burial of the poor, the repatriation of destitutes, and the organisation of charitable relief in emergencies. Chinese as well as European methods of treatment are employed in accordance with the wishes expressed by the patients or their friends. About half the number are now treated by Western methods. The bospital is managed by a committee of Chinese gentlemen annually elected, their appointment being sub- mitted to the Governor for confirmation. It is under the supervision of a visiting physician, who is a member of the Medical Department, whilst a Chinese house surgeon, trained in Western medicine, is a member of the hospital staff. There are 323 beds in the buildings and 3,649 patients were accommodated during 1911.

The Alice Meniorial and Affiliated Hospitals are managed and controlled by the missionaries resident in Hongkong, agents of the London Missionary Society, and consist of the Alice Memorial Hospital opened in 1887, the Nethersole Hospital opened in 1893, the Alice Memorial Maternity Hospital opened in 1904 and the Ho Miu Ling Hospital opened in 1906. The number of in-patients in 1911

16

was 1,399 and the expenditure $16,600. The number of labours in the Maternity Hospital was 249. The Government makes a grant of $300 per annum to these Hospitals.

To avoid the complete seclusion from friends and relatives, which removal of Chinese plague patients to the Kennedy Town Infec- tious Diseases Hospital entailed, four District Plague Hospitals are now maintained by the Chinese in various parts of the Colony. These hospitals are under the management of the Chinese Public Dispensaries Committee and receive a grant of $2,000 a year from the Government.

The new Kwong Wa Hospital for Chinese in the Kowloon Peninsula was opened on the 9th October. It occupies a site having an area of 3 acres and as designed will ultimately provide accom- modation for 210 patients. The existing buildings contain 70 beds and 169 patients were accommodated during 1911. The collection of subscriptions and the supervision of the building were under- taken by a special committee under the chairmanship of the Registrar General, but when completed the hospital will form part of the Tung Wa Hospital and be under the same management. The hospital will receive a grant of $8,500 per annum from the Govern-

ment.

VII.-INSTITUTIONS NOT SUPPORTED BY GOVERNMENT.

Among institutions recognised and encouraged, but not to any considerable extent supported, by Government may be mentioned the Pó Leung Kuk, the Eyre Refuge, the Hongkong College of Medicine, the City Hall, and the Chinese Public Dispensaries.

The Pó Leung Kuk is a Chinese Society founded in 1878 for the suppression of kidnapping and traffic in human beings. It was incorporated in 1893 and is presided over by the Registrar General and not more than nine directors nominated by the Governor. The actual management is entrusted to a committee elected annually by the members of the Society. The Society's buildings have been declared a Refuge under the Women and Girls Protection Ordi- nance, and almost all women and girls detained by the Registrar General under that Ordinance are sent to the Pó Leung Kuk. During 1911 the number of persons admitted was 514, and at the close of the year 72 remained under the care of the Society. The inmates are under the immediate charge of a Chinese matron, and instruction is given them by the matron and a Chinese teacher in elementary subjects and in needlework.

The Eyre Diocesan Refuge is an institution, under mission aus- pices, founded for rescue work anong the Chinese. It is now housed in the Belilios Reformatory and receives a small grant from the Government as well as a contribution from the Pó Leung Kuk.

The Hongkong College of Medicine was founded in 1887. The government of the College is vested in the Court, of which the Rector of the College, who has always been a Government official, is

16

was 1,399 and the expenditure $16,600. The number of labours in the Maternity Hospital was 249. The Government makes a grant of $300 per annum to these Hospitals.

To avoid the complete seclusion from friends and relatives, which removal of Chinese plague patients to the Kennedy Town Infec- tious Diseases Hospital entailed, four District Plague Hospitals are now maintained by the Chinese in various parts of the Colony. These hospitals are under the management of the Chinese Public Dispensaries Committee and receive a grant of $2,000 a year from the Government.

The new Kwong Wa Hospital for Chinese in the Kowloon Peninsula was opened on the 9th October. It occupies a site having an area of 3 acres and as designed will ultimately provide accom- modation for 210 patients. The existing buildings contain 70 beds and 169 patients were accommodated during 1911. The collection of subscriptions and the supervision of the building were under- taken by a special committee under the chairmanship of the Registrar General, but when completed the hospital will form part of the Tung Wa Hospital and be under the same management. The hospital will receive a grant of $8,500 per annum from the Govern-

ment.

VII.-INSTITUTIONS NOT SUPPORTED BY GOVERNMENT.

Among institutions recognised and encouraged, but not to any considerable extent supported, by Government may be mentioned the Pó Leung Kuk, the Eyre Refuge, the Hongkong College of Medicine, the City Hall, and the Chinese Public Dispensaries.

The Pó Leung Kuk is a Chinese Society founded in 1878 for the suppression of kidnapping and traffic in human beings. It was incorporated in 1893 and is presided over by the Registrar General and not more than nine directors nominated by the Governor. The actual management is entrusted to a committee elected annually by the members of the Society. The Society's buildings have been declared a Refuge under the Women and Girls Protection Ordi- nance, and almost all women and girls detained by the Registrar General under that Ordinance are sent to the Pó Leung Kuk. During 1911 the number of persons admitted was 514, and at the close of the year 72 remained under the care of the Society. The inmates are under the immediate charge of a Chinese matron, and instruction is given them by the matron and a Chinese teacher in elementary subjects and in needlework.

The Eyre Diocesan Refuge is an institution, under mission aus- pices, founded for rescue work anong the Chinese. It is now housed in the Belilios Reformatory and receives a small grant from the Government as well as a contribution from the Pó Leung Kuk.

The Hongkong College of Medicine was founded in 1887. The government of the College is vested in the Court, of which the Rector of the College, who has always been a Government official, is

17

President. The lecturers, who are Government officials or private medical practitioners, each receive a small honorarium, the funds being derived from the fees of the students, a Government grant-in- aid of $2,500, and certain legacies and bequests. The minimum course of study is five years, and the preliminary examination has been accepted by the General Medical Council of Great Britain. 125 students had been enrolled up to last December, and of these 43 have become qualified licentiates. Most of the licen- tiates have settled in the Colony, and are exerting a most useful influence in the direction of displacing native medical methods and popularising Western medical and sanitary knowledge, while a considerable number are employed as resident surgeons in the hospitals for Chinese and as medical officers in charge of the Public Dispensaries. The work of the College has thus far been carried on in lecture-rooms and laboratories made available in various hospitals, etc., in different parts of the City. When the Hongkong University is open, the College will be merged into its Faculty of Medicine.

ment.

The City Hall receives an annual grant of $1,200 from Govern- It contains a theatre, some large rooms which are used for balls, meetings, concerts, etc., a museum in which are some very fair specimens, and a large reference and lending library, to which new volumes are added from time to time, as funds will allow. The building was erected in 1866-9 by subscription.

Small grants are also given to the Italian Convent ($1,280), the French Convent, (both of which take in and tend abandoned or sick infants), the West Point Orphanage, the Seamen's Hospital, and other charitable institutions.

The Chinese Public Dispensaries are institutions maintained in order to provide the Chinese with the services of doctors, whose certificates will be accepted by the Registrar of Deaths, and with the services of interpreters, who can assist the inmates of houses, where a case of infectious disease has occurred. Coolies are engaged and ambulances and dead vans provided in order to remove cases of in- fectious disease to the Infectious Diseases Hospital and dead bodies to the Mortuary. The Dispensaries receive sick infants and send them to one or other of the Convents and arrange for the burial of dead infants. Free advice and medicine are given and patients are attended at their houses. There are eight Dispensaries in existence including one for the boat population on a hulk in Causeway Bay. The total cost of maintenance, which is defrayed by voluntary subscription, was $33,434. The Dispensaries are conducted by committees under the chairmanship of the Registrar General.

VIII.-CRIMINAL AND POLICE.

The total of all cases reported to the Police was 9,289 being a decrease of 500 or 5% as compared with 1910. There was in 1911 a decrease in serious offences of 25 or 069% as compared with the previous year. The number of serious offences reported was 167 over the average of the quinquennial period commencing with the

18

year 1907. The number of minor offences reported shows a decrease of 475 as compared with 1910, and was 877 below the average of the quinquennial period.

The total strength of the Police Force in 1911 was Europeans 134, Indians 399, Chinese 547, making a total of 1,080 (as compared with 1,042 in 1910) exclusive in each case of the five superior officers and staff of clerks and coolies. These figures include police paid for by the railway and other government departments, and by private firms. Of this force 13 Europeans, 92 Indians and 47 Chinese were stationed in the New Territories during the year, under the District Officer.

The District Watchmen Force, numbering 124, to which the Government contributes $2,000 per annum, was well supported by the Chinese during the year. These watchmen patrol the streets in the Chinese quarter of the City. They are placed on police beats and are supervised by the European police on section patrol.

The total number of persons committed to Victoria Gaol was 4,178 as compared with 4,867 in 1910. Of these 1,191 were com- mitted for criminal offences, against 1,212 in 1910. Of committals for non-criminal offences there were 9 less under the Prepared Opium Ordinance, and 13 less for infringement of Sanitary Bye-laws, than in 1910.

The daily average of prisoners confined in the Gaol was 595, the average for 1910 being 547, and the highest previous average being 726 in 1904. The percentage of prisoners to population, according to the daily average of the former and the estimated number of the latter, was 0'14, which is the average percentage for the last ten years. Owing, however, to the large floating population, which is constantly moving between the Colony and Canton. the percentage of crime to population does not convey an accurate idea of the comparative criminality of the residents of the Colony. The Goal has accom- modation for 590 prisoners.

The prison discipline was satisfactory, the average of punish- ments per prisoner being 161 as compared with 133 in 1910 and 1:38 in 1909.

Long sentence prisoners serving two years and upwards are taught useful trades, including printing, book-binding, washing, mat-making, tailoring, oakum-picking, etc. The profit on the work done was $51,833 as against $48,902 in 1910. There was $4,627 received and credited to Government for non-Government work against $4,253 in 1910.

IX.-VITAL STATISTICS.

(a.) POPULATION.

The civil population of the Colony, according to the Census taken on May 20th, 1911, was 456,739, of whom 104,287 reside in the New Territories and in New Kowloon; at the Census taken in 1906

18

year 1907. The number of minor offences reported shows a decrease of 475 as compared with 1910, and was 877 below the average of the quinquennial period.

The total strength of the Police Force in 1911 was Europeans 134, Indians 399, Chinese 547, making a total of 1,080 (as compared with 1,042 in 1910) exclusive in each case of the five superior officers and staff of clerks and coolies. These figures include police paid for by the railway and other government departments, and by private firms. Of this force 13 Europeans, 92 Indians and 47 Chinese were stationed in the New Territories during the year, under the District Officer.

The District Watchmen Force, numbering 124, to which the Government contributes $2,000 per annum, was well supported by the Chinese during the year. These watchmen patrol the streets in the Chinese quarter of the City. They are placed on police beats and are supervised by the European police on section patrol.

The total number of persons committed to Victoria Gaol was 4,178 as compared with 4,867 in 1910. Of these 1,191 were com- mitted for criminal offences, against 1,212 in 1910. Of committals for non-criminal offences there were 9 less under the Prepared Opium Ordinance, and 13 less for infringement of Sanitary Bye-laws, than in 1910.

The daily average of prisoners confined in the Gaol was 595, the average for 1910 being 547, and the highest previous average being 726 in 1904. The percentage of prisoners to population, according to the daily average of the former and the estimated number of the latter, was 0'14, which is the average percentage for the last ten years. Owing, however, to the large floating population, which is constantly moving between the Colony and Canton. the percentage of crime to population does not convey an accurate idea of the comparative criminality of the residents of the Colony. The Goal has accom- modation for 590 prisoners.

The prison discipline was satisfactory, the average of punish- ments per prisoner being 161 as compared with 133 in 1910 and 1:38 in 1909.

Long sentence prisoners serving two years and upwards are taught useful trades, including printing, book-binding, washing, mat-making, tailoring, oakum-picking, etc. The profit on the work done was $51,833 as against $48,902 in 1910. There was $4,627 received and credited to Government for non-Government work against $4,253 in 1910.

IX.-VITAL STATISTICS.

(a.) POPULATION.

The civil population of the Colony, according to the Census taken on May 20th, 1911, was 456,739, of whom 104,287 reside in the New Territories and in New Kowloon; at the Census taken in 1906

19

it was 301,967 exclusive of the New Territories and of New Kowloon. The estimated total population at the middle of the year under review was 464,277, but this includes the New Territories; and, as the death figures given below do not include those from this area (with the exception of New Kowloon), the population for the purposes of calculating death-rates is estimated at 373,627, of whom 18,837 were non-Chinese.

The distribution of the population at the Census was as follows:

Non-Chinese Civil Community

City of Victoria (including Peak) 219,386 Villages of Hongkong

12,075

16,106

Chinese

Kowloon (including New Kow-

Population.

loon)....

67,602

New Territories

80,622

Population afloat

60,948

Total Chinese Population....

444,664

456,739

Total Civil Population

(b.) PUBLIC HEALTH AND SANITATION,

The gradual replacement of the old type of Chinese dwelling by the new premises erected in accordance with the Public Health and Buildings Ordinance 1903 is effecting a slow, but certain, im- provement in the healthiness of the native quarters; but this has been somewhat discounted during the past year, by an abnormal influx of Chinese refugees from the Canton district, which was coincident with the revolutionary movement in South China. It has been estimated that at least twenty thousand people arrived in Hongkong within a period of a few weeks during the months of April and May from this cause, and although some of these fugitives had no doubt returned to China before the close of the year, yet there is ample evidence that a sufficient number have remained to throw a consi- derable strain upon the housing accommodation of the Colony. A further, but smaller, influx due to similar causes occurred during the month of November. The chief sufferers from this cause would seem to be the Portuguese, who are largely employed as clerks, accountants, etc., in both Government and private offices. This section of the community has for some years past occupied dwellings of European type in the neighbourhood of Caine Road, Shelley Street, Mosque Terrace, etc., but they have recently been dispossessed by more wealthy Chinese tenants from Canton. At the same time the poorer classes of refugees have crowded into the native quarters of the City and of Kowloon, with the result that there has no doubt been some amount of overcrowding of a temporary nature. This has been dealt with, where it has been found that premises unfit for habitation-such for instance as basements-have been occupied, or where the overcrowding has been excessive; but it has been felt that the conditions were for the time being abnormal, and a rigid enforcement of the overcrowding laws has not been attempted.

21

The total rainfall for the year was 90'55 inches, as compared with an average of 8073 inches, during the ten preceding years. The wettest month was August with 30'06 inches, the dryest, Fe- bruary, when no rain was recorded. The greatest amount of rain which fell on any one day was 8:61 inches on the 5th August, while no rain fell on 220 days of the year. The mean relative humidity of the atmosphere for the year was 79 %, as compared with an average of 77% during the ten preceding years. The average daily amount of sunshine was 5'7 hours, being 50% of the possible duration.

These figures are those recorded at the Observatory, Kowloon, and there is a very considerable divergence between that place and Hongkong (low levels), the Peak District, or Tai Po (New Territories), both in rainfall, temperature and humidity.

X.-POSTAL SERVICE.

The total revenue from the postal service in 1911 was $399,217.15 and total expenditure $422,267.97. The result of the year's working shows a deficit of $23,050.82. Direct exchange of money orders with the Philippine Islands commenced on 1st July, and a revised parcel arrangement with Siam came into operation on 26th September.

44

:

XI.-MILITARY EXPENDITURE.

(a.) COLONIAL CONTRIBUTION.

The Colony contributed $1,342,554 (being the statutory con- tribution of 20% of the Revenue) towards the cost of the mainten- ance of the Regular Forces in the Colony including Barrack Services and Defence Works.

(b.) VOLUNTEER CORPS.

The expenditure on the Volunteers, which is entirely born by the Colony, was $49,311 compared with $34,744 in 1910.

XII.--GENERAL OBSERVATIONS.

During the past year no general assessment was made. The existing valuation for 1910-11 was ordered to be adopted as the valuation for 1911-12, the difference in rateable value being the result of interim assessments. There is an increase in the rateable value of the whole Colony of 071%. In the City of Victoria, the Hill District, Shaukiwan, Saiwanho, Quarry Bay, Hongkong Villages, Kowloon Point, Yaumati, Mongkoktsui, and New Kowloon there is an increase ranging from 10:59 to 0.29%, the largest increase being in New Kowloon. There is no change in Hunghom and Hokun. Kowloon Villages show a decrease of 1.76%.

The average rate of exchange (demand on London) which had been 1/9-6021 to the dollar for 1910 rose to 1/9°754808 for 1911.

21

The total rainfall for the year was 90'55 inches, as compared with an average of 8073 inches, during the ten preceding years. The wettest month was August with 30'06 inches, the dryest, Fe- bruary, when no rain was recorded. The greatest amount of rain which fell on any one day was 8:61 inches on the 5th August, while no rain fell on 220 days of the year. The mean relative humidity of the atmosphere for the year was 79 %, as compared with an average of 77% during the ten preceding years. The average daily amount of sunshine was 5'7 hours, being 50% of the possible duration.

These figures are those recorded at the Observatory, Kowloon, and there is a very considerable divergence between that place and Hongkong (low levels), the Peak District, or Tai Po (New Territories), both in rainfall, temperature and humidity.

X.-POSTAL SERVICE.

The total revenue from the postal service in 1911 was $399,217.15 and total expenditure $422,267.97. The result of the year's working shows a deficit of $23,050.82. Direct exchange of money orders with the Philippine Islands commenced on 1st July, and a revised parcel arrangement with Siam came into operation on 26th September.

44

:

XI.-MILITARY EXPENDITURE.

(a.) COLONIAL CONTRIBUTION.

The Colony contributed $1,342,554 (being the statutory con- tribution of 20% of the Revenue) towards the cost of the mainten- ance of the Regular Forces in the Colony including Barrack Services and Defence Works.

(b.) VOLUNTEER CORPS.

The expenditure on the Volunteers, which is entirely born by the Colony, was $49,311 compared with $34,744 in 1910.

XII.--GENERAL OBSERVATIONS.

During the past year no general assessment was made. The existing valuation for 1910-11 was ordered to be adopted as the valuation for 1911-12, the difference in rateable value being the result of interim assessments. There is an increase in the rateable value of the whole Colony of 071%. In the City of Victoria, the Hill District, Shaukiwan, Saiwanho, Quarry Bay, Hongkong Villages, Kowloon Point, Yaumati, Mongkoktsui, and New Kowloon there is an increase ranging from 10:59 to 0.29%, the largest increase being in New Kowloon. There is no change in Hunghom and Hokun. Kowloon Villages show a decrease of 1.76%.

The average rate of exchange (demand on London) which had been 1/9-6021 to the dollar for 1910 rose to 1/9°754808 for 1911.

7

/

22

3

The position with regard to subsidiary coins still remained unsatisfactory. The discount during the year on Hongkong silver subsidiary coin varied between %% on 50 cent pieces and 71% on 10 cent pieces, that on Hongkong copper cents varied from 9 to 12%. The loss on Buch coin collected as Revenue came to $49,434.96.

His Majesty's Government made the Colony a grant of £12,000 for the year 1911-12 on account of an estimated loss of $225,860 incurred during that year in respect of opium revenue.

By the agreement of the 8th May, 1911 between Great Britain and China, no Indian opium can be imported into China, unless accompanied by a certificate issued by the Indian Government that such opium has been exported from India for consumption in China. To prevent attempts to smuggle non-certificated Indian opium from Hongkong into China, an Ordinance was passed on 1st September, 1911, prohibiting the import of non-certificated Indian opium into Hongkong except for the use of the Hongkong Opium Farmer.

In August, 1911, the port of Macao was added to the list of places to which the export of morphine and compounds of opium is not permitted except on production of an official certificate from the country concerned that such import is for legitimate purposes. The import of morphine and compounds of opium for export practically ceased towards the end of the year, and considerable quantities lying in Hongkong were shipped back to London.

The 22nd June, being the day fixed for the Coronation of His Majesty King George V, was observed as a holiday and the whole of the population joined in celebrating the occasion. A review of the troops was held, at which about 3,500 soldiers and sailors paraded. A short service was held by the Chaplain and cheers were raised for His Majesty. Subsequently the troops marched through the prin- cipal streets of the City. The European, Chinese and Indian Com- munities all combined to show their loyalty and devotion. Services were held in the Protestant and Roman Catholic Cathedrals and other churches. The Parsee and Sikh Communities also held special services. The children of the Colony were entertained and were addressed by Sir F. D. Lugard, and sports of all kinds were arranged for them. The whole of the Colony was illuminated for three nights, all the men-of-war in harbour of whatever nationality combining in the display. A reception and fête was held at Government House in the evening, at which practically the whole of the European population and many Chinese and Indians attended.

In July, 1910, the audit of the Colony's Expenditure was trans- ferred from the Director of Colonial Audit and has since been carried out by the Local Auditor. The new arrangement has proved very satisfactory and the additional staff required has been very small, viz., one fourth grade and one fifth grade clerk.

;

23

In December, 1910, Mr. R. E. Stubbs of the Colonial Office visited this Colony with a view to ascertaining the conditions of service in Hongkong; and, as the result of his inquiries, it was decided that that the salaries of Cadets and some other officers should be increased by the grant of a non-pensionable "duty allowance". This allowance is only payable to an officer when he is actually performing the duties of a post to which duty-pay is assigned.

The preparation of a revised edition of the Ordinances of Hong- kong to the end of the year 1911 was considered necessary, and the revision was entrusted to the Chief Justice, Sir F. T. Piggott, who commenced work in March 1911. At the close of the year the revision work was still in progress.

On the 7th September, 1911, a Board of Chinese Vernacular Primary Education was constituted by the Governor-in-Council with the following duties:-

(1.) to promote efficient Chinese Vernacular Education in

the Colony;

(2.) to collect funds to supplement a Government subsidy

made to the Board.

The Board consists of the Registrar General and the Director of Education (ex-officio) and of five Chinese gentlemen nominated by the Governor. The Government subsidy to the Board for the year 1912 will be $4,100.00, which the Board intend to distribute after a survey of the general situation and after inspection in the month of December of schools selected from the list of applicants for assist- ance. The Board is giving attention in the first instance to boys' schools in the City of Victoria and other parts of the old Colony. Its operations do not extend to the New Territories. Girls' schools are, also, for the present not placed under the supervision of the Board.

The

The Grant Code was amended in September in certain par- ticulars. The amendments, which took effect on the 1st January. 1912, reduced the rates of capitation grants for such Vernacular Schools as are without immediate English supervision. practice of giving grants in aid of rent to vernacular boys' schools occupying leased premises is being discontinued. The reason for this restriction of expenditure is that the grant hitherto offered to vernacular schools was too high for the standard of work attained.

On 4th October the Chinese Section of the Kowloon-Canton Railway was opened for through traffic, thus completing direct com- munication by rail between Kowloon and Canton.

The revolutionary movement in China was reflected in the Colony on 6th November by an ebullition among the Chinese com- munity, which for some days was in a state of great excitement. A proclamation under the Peace Preservation Ordinance 1886, as amend- ed by Ordinance No. 52 of 1911, was issued on 29th November and was still in force at the end of the year. It was also found necessary

24

to introduce the use of the "cat" under the Flogging Amendment Ordinance No. 12 of 1911. This punishment was awarded in 29 cases during December. The Police succeeded in preventing any serious outbreak of lawlessness, though the influx of undesirable characters from Canton and other parts of China was disagreeably apparent and many cases of disorderliness, assaults and petty thieving were reported. Military assistance was provided in the form of armed patrols, and the Police Force was temporarily augmented by enlisting 20 special constables.

On 21st January, Sir Henry May vacated the office of Colonial Secretary to take up the office of Governor of Fiji and High Com- missioner for the Southern Pacific. His place was filled by the appointment of Mr. W. D. Barnes from the Federated Malay States Service, whose untimely death on the 28th October again rendered the Colonial Secretaryship vacant. Mr. Claud Severn of the Federated Malay States Service was subsequently appointed, but did not assume his duties during the year. Mr. C. Clementi was in charge of the Colonial Secretary's Department from 22nd January to 21st February, and acted as Colonial Secretary from 22nd February to 6th June and again from 29th November to the end of the year under review. Mr. Brewin acted from 30th October to 28th November.

His Excellency

C. CLEMENTI, Colonial Secretary.

The Officer Administering the Government.

1

Light Dues...

Appendix A.

FINANCIAL RETURNS FOR THE

Comparative Statement of the Revenue and Expenditure

HEADS OF REVENUE.

Estimates, 1911.

Actual Revenue to 31st Dec., 1911.

Revenue for

same

period of preceding Year.

Increase.

Decrease.

$

$

85,000.00

82,578.09 86,157.20

3,579.11

Governor

Colonial Secre

Licences and Internal Revenue not otherwise specified

4,769,876.00 4,792,952.40 4,520,427.99

272,524.41

Fees of Court or Office, Payments for specific purposes,

and Reimbursements in Aid

562,675.00 605,745.95 604,901.38

844-57

Post Office

403,100.00 399,217.15 519,066.54

Registrar Gene

Audit Departm

119.849.39

Treasury ...

Harbour Maste

Rent of Government Property, Land and Houses

829,420.00

841,239.15 832,382.20

8,856.95

Harbour Office.

Interest

4,000.00 9,621.67 3,999.81

5,621.86

Observatory

Miscellaneous S

Miscellaneous Receipts

59,812.00 67,871.00 61,248.07 6,622.93

Judicial and Le‹

Law Officers, S]

TOTAL,...

|6,713,883.00 | 6,799,225.416,628,183.19 294,470.72

123,428.50

Police and Pris

Fire Brigade, S;

Widows' and Orphans' Pension Fund and Contributions...

42,500.00 44,5II.II 42,451.99

2,05y. 12

Medical Depart

Balance of Nursing Sisters' Quarters Fund.

6,814.20

6,814.20

Sanitary Depart

Do.,

Light Dues, Special Assessment

96,000.00

92,802.14 95,810.83

3,008.69

Botanical and F

Half estimated loss on working of Postal Agencies in China

27,000 00 2,998.37

2,998.37

Education

Military Expenc

Imperial Contribution on account Opium Revenue

133,953.49

99,310.34 34,643-15

Public Works D

Do.

R

Kowloon-Canton Railway

107,000.00 153,735.12

25,512.74 128,122.38

Do.

E

Post Office

Land Sales, (Premia on New Leases)

100,000.00 270,005.59

62,685.99

207,319.60

Kowloon-Canto

TOTAL,

|7,086,383.00 7,497,231.23 | 6,960,869.28

669,613.34

133,251.39

Charge on accou

Pensions

Charitable Servi

Appendix A.

ETURNS FOR THE YEAR 1911.

nue and Expenditure for the period ended 31st December, 1911.

Decrease.

EXPENDITURE.

Estimates, 1910.

Actual Expenditure to 31st

Dec., 1911.

Expenditure for same period of preceding Year.

Increase.

Decrease.

$

$

3,579.11

Governor

84,714.00

85,887.75

83,434-15

2,453.60

Colonial Secretary's Department and Legislature ...

76,199.00 65,628.57

64,841.55

787.02

Registrar General's Department...

44,546.00 49,217.74 42,636.46

6,581.28

Audit Department

:

31,623.00

28,703.10

29,426.18

723.08

119 849.39

Treasury...

Harbour Master's Department

Harbour Office, Special Expenditure

Observatory

Miscellaneous Services...

:

:

:

61,729.00

64,392.16

59,767.91

4,624.25

228,373.00

218,269.51 224,419.51

6,150.00

12,500.00

14,872.11

14,872.11

:

:

22,951.00

23,353.02 21,787.55 1,565.47

152,407.00

186,291 29 269,687.32

245,717.00

234,685.00

233,678.53

1,006.47

83,396.03

Judicial and Legal Departments...

Law Officers, Special Expenditure

Police and Prison Departments

2,543.00

2,320.01

2,320.01

123,428.50

750,489.00

724,088,00 721,698.01

2,389.99

...

Fire Brigade, Special Expenditure

5,000.00

Medical Departments

6,814.20 Sanitary Department

239,838.00 225,442.17 217,604.53

7,837.64

363,880.00,

339,788.07 338,445.28

1,342.79

Do,

3,008.69

Special Expenditure

Botanical and Forestry Department ..

20,000.00

48,041.00

10,000 00

10,000.00

45,628 52

41,707.95

3,920.57

Education

*264,337.00

237,942.35 225,605.56

12,336.79

133,251.39

Military Expenditure

Public Works Department

Do.

Recurrent

Do. Extraordinary

Post Office

Kowloon-Canton Railway

Charge on account of Public Debt

Pensions ...

Charitable Services

TOTAL,

1,392,587.00 1,390,568.66 | 1,407,231.03

16,662.37

:

:

:

:

:

:

:.

352,455.00 308,408.12 309,784.71

1,376.59

:

416,200.00 486,940.80

429,835.24

57,105 36

1,080,400.00 807,181.09 1,204,823.53

456,897.00 422,267.97

470,984.35

397,642.44

48,716.38

:

511,276.00

561,637.17

73,574.33 488,062.84

241,577.00 256,975.32 172,036.18 84,939.14

:

:

:

:

254,709.00

267,911.13

247,165.87 20,745.26

24,332.00 18,777.60

7,385,320.00 7,077,177.23 | 6,907,113.40

16,937.67

1,839.93

724,730.72 554,666.89

Appendix A (1).

REPORT ON THE FINANCES FOR 1911.

REVENUE.

The total Revenue for the year amounted to $7,497,231 being $410,848 in excess of the Estimate and $536,362 in excess of the Revenue for 1910.

The Ordinary Revenue was $7,227,226 being $240,843 in excess of the Estimate, and the Revenue from Land Sales came to $270,005 as against the usual Estimate of $100,000.

The principal sub-heads of increase are as follows:-

(a.) Forfeitures,

(b.) Stamp Duties,

(c.) Deeds Registration,

(d) Medical Examination of Emigrants,

(e.) Markets,

(f) Imperial Contribution on account of Opium

Revenue,

(g.) Kowloon-Canton Railway,

(h.) Land Sales,

$ 16,808

135,419

13,373

24,770

11,492

133,953

46,735

170,005

of which (a) was due to two large confiscations of Opium and Cocaine, (b) to probate duty on a large estate, (c), (d), (e), (g) and (h) to more business done, and (f) to the item not having been agreed upon when the Estimates were framed.

The decreases on the other hand were chiefly as follows:-

(a.) Light Dues,

$

5,618

(b.) Fines,..

16,048

(c.) Liquor Duties,.

107,985

(d) Liquor Licencos,

13,764

(e) Public School Fees,

10,811

(f.) Water Excess Supply and Meter Rents,

9,479

(9.) Slaughter House Fees,....

11,019

(h.) Loss on Postal Agencies,

24,000

were

Of these (a), (b), (c), (e), (ƒ) and (g) are accounted for by business not being up to expectations although (c) "liquor duties" actually raised in the early part of the year; (d) by Publicans having been allowed to pay their fees in quarterly instalments instead of the whole year's fee in November as usual, and (h) by the fact that the matter has not yet been settled with the Imperial Government.

Arrears of Revenue that could practicably be collected and amounts written off as bad dues during the year were in both cases comparatively small sums, although it is hoped that collection will be improved when the Crown Solicitor's new Department has acquired experience in this regard.

A 2

EXPENDITURE.

-

The total Expenditure came to $7,077,177 or $308,143 under the Estimate and $170,064 under the total for 1910.

The votes for Public Works Extraordinary were unexpended to the extent of $273,219 the actual figure being $807,181, but this is due entirely to the fact that a Suspense Account for Stores was opened, and the value of the stock in hand which was credited to Public Works was $287,637.

The Ordinary Expenditure $6,269,996 was less than the Es- timate by $34,924.

The principal increases under this head were :-

(a.) Census,

(b.) Miscellaneous,

(c.) Public Works Recurrent,

(d) Kowloon-Canton Railway,

(e.) Public Debt,

(f.) Pensions,..

$ 9,110

33,884

70,740

50,360

15,398

13,202

Of the above (a) had not been provided for, (b) is accounted for by the new passage scheme for certain Government Servants, the Coronation Contingent, Coronation Festivities and Law Revision, &c., although there was a saving of over $25,000 on Redemption of Subsidiary Coins, (c) by Maintenance of Buildings and Roads and by Typhoon Damages, (d) by increased traffic partly owing to the opening of the line through to Canton, (e) by a portion of the Sinking Fund Contributions in respect of the 1906 Loan having been over-looked, and (f) by additions to the Pension List.

On the other hand there were decreases in most Departments partly owing to the Estimates rate of exchange (1/9) being lower than the average rate for the year (192), to some salaries not being wholly required, and to savings on Other Charges.

The principal decreases were :~

Colonial Secretary,

Harbour Master,

Judicial,

Police and Prison,

Medical,

Sanitary,

Education,

Public Works,

General Post Office,

.$10,570

7,731

11,254

26,400

14,396

34,192

26,395

44,047

34,630

Also a sum of $5,000, Special Expenditure for Fire Alarms, was not required.

The Revenue for the year exceeded the Expenditure by $420,054 as against an anticipated deficit of $298,937, the former sum being the difference between excess of $957,230 on Ordinary and a deficit of $537,176 in the case of Extraordinary items. The Finances were therefore better off than was expected by the sum of $718,991.

-

A 3

In this connection however it will be well to note that the result was attained through more or less non-recurrent windfalls as follows:--

Stores Credit,...

Imperial Government Contribution, Probate (Mody's Estate),

and perhaps Land Sales' Excess...

Total..........

$288,000

134,000

138,000

170,000

$730,000

The following Table shows the totals of Revenue and Expendi- ture for the last five years :-

Revenue,.

Expenditure,

Surplus,

Deficit,

1907.

1908.

1909.

1910.

$

1911.

$ 6,602,280 6,104,207 6,822,967 6,960,869 7,497,231 5,757,203 6,573,341* 6,542,839 6,907,113 7,077,177

280,128 53,756

845,077

469,134

420,054

...

The surplus of $420,054 added to the balance at end of 1910, riz., $1,406,925, gives a total balance at credit on 31st December, 1911, of $1,826,979.

The total Assets on that date were $5,806,639 and the Liabili- ties $3,979,660.

PUBLIC DEBT.

The Inscribed Stock Loans of 1893 and 1906 amount to £1,485,732, and the contributions to the Sinking Fund with accrued interest on investments came to £118,267 6s. 6d. being an increase of £19,375 over the figure at end of previous year. The market value of the Fund's investments on 30th December was £117,016.

Of the £1,100,000 Loan to the Viceroy of Wuchang £660,000 was repaid by October last, which amount has been advanced to Railway Construction Account.

The total Expenditure on this last account now stands at $12,021,503, funds for which have been obtained by advance of the £660,000 referred to, and by advances from the Crown Agents to the sum of £339,118, the balance being advanced from General Funds.

It seems probable that, even when credits on account of stores are taken into account, the balance of the Wuchang Loan when advanced to Construction Account will be insufficient to meet the Crown Agents' advances together with the advance from General Account so that a part, now estimated at $180,000, will have to be provided for either by an addition to the General Loan or by charging it to Extraordinary Expenditure of the Colony.

The Special Work of constructing a Harbour of Refuge at Mongkoktsui is financed by the proceeds of the Special Light Dues and by General Funds of the Colony in equal proportions.

* Disbursements for Railway Construction omitted.

A 4.

It may be observed that there has been no necessity for drawing upon the Surplus Balances on this account as contemplated in the Estimates.

The total Expenditure to end of December last was $626,934: and the proceeds of the Special Light Dues since their inception amounted to $278,950: which sum is less than the proper proportion payable by $34,517.

Some credit to construction however will later be obtained when the dredger is sold.

TOTAL RECEIPTS AND PAYMENTS.

The Total Receipts and Payments accounted for by the Trea- sury during the year came to $11,667,082 and $11,500,396 respec- tively; the figures in excess of those for Revenue and Expenditure relating to transactions under the heads of Deposits, Advances, Railway Construction, &c.

GENERAL REMARKS.

The average rate of exchange for the year was 1s. 93d.

The stock of Subsidiary Coins on the 30th December was $320,873,-valued in the Treasury Books at $298,424,-of which about $108,000 (nominal) were copper cents the rest being silver, mainly ten-cent pieces. Discount written off the stock was taken at 10 per cent. in case of copper and about 5 per cent. in case of silver Subsidiary Coins.

An Ordinance was passed, No. 65 of 1911, enabling the Mercantile Bank of India to issue Bank Notes on certain conditions, chief of which is the deposit of security to the value of the issue, but no notes have yet appeared.

The circulation of notes of the Hongkong and Shanghai, and Chartered Banks was $27,732,229 in the last month of the year.

During 1911 the Stamp Law was revised by the passing of Ordinances Nos. 34 and 35 which were subsequently slightly amended by Ordinances Nos. 55 and 56 respectively and changes were made in the rules for stamping Bills of Exchange whereby postage stamps are not now valid for such purpose.

A. M. THOMSON,

Treasurer.

TREASURY,

20th March, 1912.

Appendix B.

REPORT ON THE ASSESSMENT FOR THE YEAR 1912-1913.

1. By Order of His Excellency the Governor-in-Council a new Valuation has been made of the whole Colony, with the exception of purely Chinese Villages.

2. The City of Victoria :-The Ratable Value has increased from $9,006,555 to $10,072,535, an addition of $1,065,980 or 11.83 per cent.

3. The Hill District :--The Ratable Value has increased from $279,240 to $290,165, an addition of $10,925 or 3'91 per cent.

4. Shaukiwan, Saiwanho, and Quarry Bay :-The Ratable Value has increased from $348,805 to $365,965, an addition of $17,160 or 4.91 per cent.

5. Hongkong Villages :-The Ratable Value has increased from $117,379 to $130,394, an addition of $13,015 or 11:08 per cent.

6. Kowloon Point:-The Ratable Value has increased from $497,985 to $528,415, an addition of $30,430 or 6'11 per cent.

7. Yaumati :—The Ratable Value has increased from $256,290 to $260,575, an addition of $4,285 or 167 per cent.

8. Mongkoktsui:-The Ratable Value has increased from $133,955 to $153,975, an addition of $20,020 or 1494 per cent.

9. Hunghom and Hokun :-The Ratable Value has decreased from $301,834 to $295,449, a reduction of $6,385 or 2:11 per cent.

10. New Kowloon:- The Ratable Value has decreased from $121,219 to $119,250, a reduction of $1,969 or 1·62 per cent.

11. Kowloon Villages :-The Ratable Value has decreased from $98,128 to $95,583, a reduction of $2,545 or 2:59 per cent.

12. The Whole Colony :-The Ratable Value has increased from $11,161,390 to $12,312,306, an addition of $1,150,916 or 10·31 per cent.

B 2

13. Interim Valuations:-Between the 1st July, 1911, and the 1st June, 1912, 497 Interim Valuations were made as follows:---

New and/or Rebuilt Tenements, Tenements structurally altered,

Replacing Assessments of,

Assessments cancelled, tenements pulled down, or being in other respects not Ratable,

City of Victoria.

Rest of Colony.

No.

Ratable Value. No.

Ratable Value.

$

$

110

174,260 162

84.626

30 192,115

159,635

24 47,130 47,100

32.480

30

206.740

84,656

365

92

103,590 59

25.080

No. and Increase,...

252

$103,150 245

$ 59,576

14. Vacant Tenements

-The number of reported vacant tene- ments in the City of Victoria inspected under Section 35 of the Rating Ordinance averaged about 60 monthly as compared with 105 last year.

15. The following Table gives a comparison of the Assessments for 1911-12 and 1912-13 :-

District.

Valuation Valuation 1911-12. 1912-13.

Increase.

Per- centage.

$

%

The City of Victoria,

Hill District and Hong- kong Villages,

9,006,555 10,072,535 1,065,980 11.83

745,424 786,524 41,100 5.51

Kowloon Point and Kow-

loon Villages,

1,409,411 1,453,247 43,836 3.11

Total,... $ 11,161,390 12,312,306 1,150,916

|

10.31

$

B 3

J

16. Comparative Statement shewing the Ratable Value of the Colony of Hongkong in each of the ten years from 1903-04 to 1912-13

inclusive:-

Increase

as com-

Year.

Ratable Value.

pared with previous

year.

Decrease

as com-

pared with previous

year.

Percentage of Increase or Decrease

in Ratable Value

as compared with the previous year.

$

$

%

1903-04,

8,788,063 621,450

7-60 Increase.

1904-05,

9,929,171 1,141,108

12.98

1905-06,

10,511,163

581,992

5.86

"

1906-07,

10,969,203 458,040

4.35

1907-08,

10,716,173

253,030

2.30

Decrease.

1908-09,

10,816,753 100,580

0.93 Increase.

1909-10,

10,750,902

65,851

0-60 Decrease.

1910-11,

11,082,179 331,277

3.08 Increase.

1911-12,

11,161,390 79,211

0.71 10-31

"J

""

1912-13, 12,312,306 1,150,916

17. Staff:-Mr. A. G. M. Fletcher acted as Assessor from 29th April to 30th August, during my absence from the Colony in command of the Contingent of the Hongkong Volunteer Corps sent to represent the Colony at the Coronation of His Majesty King George V.

Mr. Tai Tin Shang and Mr. Ip Tin Shang have been promoted to the Harbour Department and Magistracy respectively. The posts of Clerk and Interpreter are now filled by Mr. Tang Shing Cheung and Mr. Chu Tsau Hing, who, although but recently appointed to this Office, have worked very satisfactorily.

ASSESSOR'S OFFICE, 7th June, 1912.

ARTHUR CHAPMAN,

Assessor.

;

Appendix C.

REPORT OF THE REGISTRAR GENERAL

FOR THE YEAR 1911.

REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE.

(Tables I and II.)

The revenue from all sources during the year was $14,518: less than that for 1910 by $974. The main decrease was due to the transfer of the issue of Hawkers' Licences to the Police Department and to the issue of fewer licences to money changers, fewer certificates to Chinese going to the United States of America and fewer certificates for re-registration of Householders. There were two items which shewed slight increases, viz., Emigration House Licences and Marriage Licences.

The ordinary expenditure was $40,107 compared with $42,462 in 1910 and fell short of the estimate by $4,488. Special ex- penses amounting to $9,110.06 were incurred in connection with the taking of the Census in May last, but these were covered by a supplementary vote of $9,150.

PROTECTION OF WOMEN AND GIRLS.

(Table III.)

Women and Girls Protection Ordinance, No. 4 of 1897. Po Leung Kuk Incorporation Ordinance, No. 6 of 1893.

The number of individuals detained under warrant was 258 as compared with 302 in 1910. They were all sent direct to the Po Leung Kuk and the action taken in respect of them is shewn in Table III. The number of women whose detention was found to be unnecessary and who were released after enquiry was 100 or 38 per cent. The cases of 34 women were still under consideration at the end of the year. Nine (9) girls were sent to the Eyre Dioce- san Refuge and three to the Italian Convent. At the close of the year the number still detained under warrant in these institutions was 16 and 5 respectively. Two ran away from the Italian Con- vent, but one was found again and sent to the Po Leung Kuk. The number of inmates of the Eyre Diocesan Refuge at the close of the year was 64.

Of

In addition to those sent to the Po Leung Kuk under warrant a large number of others were sent with their own consent. these 21 were runaway maidservants.

C 2

Thirteen (13) names were added to the list of girls under bond to report themselves regularly to the Registrar General, a precau- tion taken to prevent their being forced into prostitution. Thir- teen girls were struck off the list, and three married. The total on the list at the end of the year was 44.

The number of persons reported to the Po Leung Kuk as miss- ing during the year was 244, of whom only 39 were found. The corresponding figures for 1910 were 221 and 48. The number of boys reported missing was 71 against 90 in 1910. The total num- ber of persons reported missing, including reports from China and Macao, was 416, of whom 59 were found. The corresponding figures for 1910 were 395 and 75 (for 1909, 390 and 50).

The timidity and docility of Chinese girls make them still as easy a prey as ever to procuresses and render it very difficult to obtain convictions against such women. Several cases of alleg- ed forcing into prostitution were investigated during the year, but the only action that it has been found possible to take has been to send suspicious cases to the Po Leung Kuk: in no case was it found possible to collect the evidence necessary to secure a convic- tion in the Courts.

EMIGRATION,

Emigration Ordinance No. 1 of 1889. (i.)—Emigration of Women and Children. (Table IV.)

The number of women and children passengers examined and allowed to proceed was 24,630 as compared with 16,806 in 1910. There is an increase of 7,364 in passengers going to the Straits Settlements; a decrease of 52 in those going to the American Con- tinent, and an increase of 303 in those going to the Dutch Indies.

The rate at which the passengers were examined was about 113 per hour.

71 or 20 per cent. of the passengers were detained for en- quiries, as against 103 or 61 per cent in 1910. Seven cases were still under consideration at the end of the year, and of the remain- ing 64, 33 (or 51 per cent.) were ultimately allowed to leave with- out any order being made. A record is still kept of the occupations of female emigrants. Out of a total of 16,445 over 16 years of age, 9,609 were going with their husbands or other relative, or to join relatives; while 5,375 gave their occupations as servants, 675 as seamstresses and 630 as prostitutes.

The record of the occupations to which boys emigrating as apprentices are destined is no longer kept, since it was found that the boys' statements were entirely unreliable.

C 3

(ii.)-Male Emigration.

(Table V.)

The number of assisted emigrants presented for examination was 34,087 as against 24,986 in 1910 and the number passed was 24,605 compared with 23,554 in 1910. These numbers again include labourers going to British North Borneo who though technically not assisted emigrants are treated as such. The num- ber of those examined who refused to go has risen considerably from 179 or 0.7 per cent. in 1911 to 1,236 or 3-6 per. cent in 1911; and the total number rejected including refusals rose from 1,727 in 1910 to 4,166 in 1911.

The difference between the total number presented for examina- tion and the number allowed to proceed is about 9,500, of which number it appears from the Table as if only 4,000 odd can be accounted for. The discrepancy is however due to the fact that large numbers of emigrants who express their willingness to go abroad at the first examination change their minds afterwards and do not come up again, and that many who are rejected or have passed the first examination for one port begin the process afresh for another port; and so appear twice-or even more often-in the total of "emigrants presented".

280 assisted emigrants were returned from Singapore and elsewhere as unfit for work, and were sent back to their homes.

The demand for labour in the Malay Peninsula has not been so brisk, most contracts through the Singapore depôt having been signed for Dutch Possesions. The agencies formed in the Malay Peninsula in 1910 have had no influence at the Hongkong end, and labour is still recruited through the old channels. The num- ber of assisted emigrants passed rose from 23,554 in 1910 to 24,605 in 1911, the number going to the Straits Settlements and Malay Peninsula being 16,129 as against 18,177 in 1910; to the Dutch Indies 4,810 against 3,577, and to Borneo 3,666 against 1,800.

One case (typical of the difficulties, due chiefly to the coolies' own stupidity and docility, which have to be contended with) of the swindling of four assisted emigrants and the Company in Perak to which they were assigned by a recruiter attached to a Hongkong Boarding House was discovered. The master of the Boarding House was started in business by a Rubber Company in Perak, and received a large advance for recruiting labour for that Company. The four coolies mentioned were recruited by one Lam Sam attached to the Kwong Wai Yun Boarding House and passed the ordinary examination at this office, having, as it later appeared, been induced by Lam Sam to consent to emigrate by the promise of a present of money on arrival in Singapore; and a draft on a Singapore shop was shown them to quiet their suspicions. On arrival in Singapore, however, it was found that there was no

}

C 4

such shop, the recruiter, who took them down, explaining the matter to the coolies by saying he had been cheated by the Hong- kong Boarding House. In fact the recruiter had received the sum of $70 in cash from the Boarding House master, in payment of his own expenses and of presents to the coolies on arrival, and the draft was a trick on the part of the recruiter to keep the coolies satisfied without paying over any money until he had escorted them safely to Singapore. The scheme of the man, Lam Sam, seems to have been to use the advance made to him by the Board- ing House to redeem the four coolies in Singapore, the redemption price being $16 a head, and then to dispose of them privately at $25 or $30 each to Chinese employers of labour who cannot com- pete with Rubber Companies in the open market. He would thus make a profit for himself of $100 or more. There is nothing to show that this swindle, perpetrated not only on the four emigrants but on the Kitlang Company as well, was in any way countenanced by the Boarding House. The case did not escape the notice of the Protector of Chinese, Singapore, who watched the interests of the four coolies. Lam Sam, however, has not yet been located.

The year showed a brisk demand for Chinese labour in British North Borneo; the number of coolies examined and passed for Sandakan was just double the total for 1910. It is probable that the knowledge of the proposed new scheme of immigration had some effect in inducing planters to hurry their coolies through before the end of the year. From the 1st April, 1912, all recruiting of Chinese labourers for work in British North Borneo will be under the direct control of the British North Borneo Government. Mr. Young Riddell, who had great experience of Chinese labour in South Africa, has been appointed Labour Commissioner and Chief Protector of Labour Contracts in Borneo by the Chartered Co. and has been in close touch with this department. In accord- ance with instructions from the Secretary of State no contract for more than 300 days work will be recognised by this office after March 12th, 1912.

The "Kangany" system of recruiting labour for the Malay Peninsula, as described in the 1910 Report, does not appear to be much in vogue. No case of a recruiter carrying a certificate issued by the Chinese Protectorate either at Singapore or Penang in encouragement of this system, has come under the notice of this office. The rather ragged edges of the system as so far defined in in Hongkong-there being apparently no limit to the number of "relatives and "friends" that a kangany recruiter may take with him--and the consequent openings for fraud, will make it necessary to keep the strictest watch on its beginnings.

Thirteen (13) assisted emigrants who asserted on examination at this office that they had friends or relations willing to redeem them in Singapore, and on arrival there could find no such relatives, were sent back to Hongkong by the Protector of Chinese, and sent on to their homes, all the expenses incurred being defrayed by the Boarding Houses concerned.

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The registration and photographing of assisted emigrants have again proved a practical success, and it is now well known through- out the Kwongtung Province that missing men who have gone abroad as assisted emigrants, can generally be traced through this office, and redeemed if required.

During the year there were 52 applications for assistance in securing the return of relatives who had emigrated. Of the 55 men concerned, 39 had gone to Singapore, 9 to British North Borneo, and the remaining 7 to the Dutch Indies. 36 men returned and were restored to their relatives, 2 refused to return, 3 had abscond- ed, in one case the relatives decided not to proceed with redemption, and 13 have not yet been traced.

The expenses incurred in repatriating emigrants are now fairly constant: from the Straits Settlements and Federated Malay States $35, from British North Borneo $90, and from the Dutch Indies $60 (Hongkong Currency) respectively.

Relatives of emigrants who come to this office to make en- quiries are numerous, and are usually content with the information we can give them as to the whereabouts of the missing men and the terms of the labour contract under which they are working.

The returns of the assisted emigrants arriving in Singapore from Swatow, Hoihow and Pakhoi for 1911 have not yet reached this office, but a monthly return of the number of contracts to labour in each particular locality signed by Hongkong "unpaid passen- gers" has been furnished by the Secretary for Chinese Affairs at Singapore.

The total number of contracts signed according to these returns, between December 1910 and December 1911 was as follows:-

Straits Settlements

Federated Malay States

1,271

1,793

British North Borneo

761

Sarawak

104

Assam...

...

Malay Peninsula (Johore and New States)

3,699

Dutch Possessions

...

6,455

14,083

The licence of one Boarding House which attempted to detain assisted amigrants in the house against their will and refused to assist the Emigration Sergeant in making enquiries, was cancelled. Two other Boarding Houses were struck off the register for recruit- ing shop boys, apprentices and other unsuitable emigrants.

Forty-three (43) hotel licences (2 new) and 61 licences (21 new) to keep Boarding Houses for assisted emigrants were issued. The former had accommodation for 3,946 boarders, and the latter for

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3,199. Eleven (11) duplicate licences were issued for removal of premises or transfer of names. The number of houses holding licences at the end of the year was: -Hotels 41, and Boarding Houses 35,-no less than 23 boarding houses having closed or surren- dered their licences during the year. The number of houses required is easily and quickly adjusted to the demand. Emigration at the beginning of the year was very brisk, but slackened very considerably in the later months.

In case of necessity emigrants can be examined on Govern- ment Holidays on payment of a fee.

Assisted emigrants this year have not been classified by the language spoken but by locality (Table V). The approximate figures of. the language spoken can, however, be determined from that classification, as follows:-

Cantonese Hakka

...

Mandarin

...

Hoklo

Hainam

...

17,000

5,000

1,500

300

700

24,500

REGULATION OF CHINESE.

Ordinance No. 3 of 1888.

(i.)- Registration of Householders.

One thousand seven hundred and sixty-nine (1,769) house- holders were registered; 73 of these being first registration. 6,897 changes in respect of tenants were registered. The law was again vigorously enforced during the year, and 29 persons, as against 15 in 1910, were charged with failure to notify changes of tenancy. (Table XXV.)

This office is asked to enquire into the validity of Chinese who offer themselves as sureties to other Government Departments, if they are in business in Victoria or Kowloon. The number of sure- ties reported on during the year was 846.

(ii.) District Watchmen.

(Table VI.)

The District Watchmen's Committee met 9 times, the average attendance of members being between 9 and 10. Mr. Chan Lok- chun was selected to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of Mr. Chan Chun-tsun in 1910. During the year Mr. Ho Fuk re- signed and Mr. Tseung Sz-kai died, their places on the Committee being filled by Messrs. Ho Kom-tong and Wong Kam-fuk.

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The balance to the credit of the fund at the end of the year was $7,286 as against $9,188 in 1910. The Committee therefore spent nearly $2,000 more than their income, but the increase in expenditure was largely due to a further increase in the number of the force, and to special expenses connected with the Coronation. The best method of adjusting expenditure to the income-which is inelastic-is under careful consideration and it is hoped that the current year will result in no further drain on the Reserve Fund.

The strength of the force is now 123, as against 122 in 1910, one vacancy in the approved establishment of 124 having not yet been filled up. There were 15 enlistments during the year, 11 dis- missals or desertions, and two resignations. There was only one conviction against a member of the force.

The numbers of convictions secured by members of the force was 273 against 214 in 1910.

(iii.)-Permits.

Four hundred and twenty-one (421) permits to fire crackers were issued, 292 of these being on the occasion of marriage. 18 permits were issued to hold processions, 33 permits to hold thea- tricals in private buildings, and 41 to hold religious ceremonies.

MARRIAGES.

Ordinances No. 7 of 1875, No. 15 of 1902 and No. 6 of 1903.

The number of marriages solemnized during the year was 161 as compared with 163 in 1910. The number contracted at the Registrar General's Office was 24. In 1910 it was 50.

CERTIFICATES OF IDENTITY TO CHINESE ENTERING THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

Ordinance No. 3 of 1898.

Nine (9) certificates were issued to Chinese to enter the United States; 2 certificates to enter the Philippine Islands.

All these certificates are limited to Chinese British Subjects resident in Hongkong.

REGISTRATION OF BOOKS.

Ordinance No. 2 of 1888.

Thirteen (13) hooks were registered during the year as com- pared with 53 in 1910.

M

COPYRIGHT IN WORKS OF THE FINE ARTS.

Ordinance No. 17 of 1901.

None were registered during the year.

year.

COPYRIGHT IN BOOKS.

Ordinance No. 14 of 1910.

Three books and two newspapers were registered during the

TUNG WA HOSPITAL.

Ordinances No. 1 of 1870, No. 9 of 1904 and

?

No. 10 of 1908 (Man Mo Temple).

(Tables VII to XIV.)

The Directors for the 1912 took office on the 20th December.

Their names are :—

Lau U Fong, Chairman,

Lo Shiu Hoi,

Au Pan, Wong Ut Po,

Fan Pat Shan,

Fu Yik Pang,

Ip Sau Chi,

Yung Tso Pong,

Lo Chi Yan,

Leung Kam Chiu,

Mak Lai Ting, Tsui Ngoi Tong, Chan Pik Tsun,

Lau Kai Tseung,

Fung Tat Hing, Ng Wai Chi.

The first three directors on the list are in charge of the fin- ances of the hospital.

Under the old directorate the Small-pox Hospital at Yaumati, the construction of which was commenced in 1910, was completed in November. It contains two wards with 10 beds in each, and a mortuary is in course of construction. Hence small-pox cases in the Kowloon Peninsula need no longer be conveyed across the Harbour for treatment at the Kennedy Town Hospital.

The reconstruction of the Ko Fong wards was completed, and the wards opened on May 21st. The building consists of 9 wards with 65 beds, 4 wards being reserved for plague patients, and a special padded ward for delirious cases.

The Refuge for the kidnapped and destitute was also complet- ed, and opened for the admission of inmates on July 29th. The total cost of the undertaking was $34,880.

1

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The Hospital Operating Theatre was thoroughly overhauled and a new operating table and set of modern surgical instruments presented by the Directors, who thus made it possible for serious operations to be performed by the Tung Wa Hospital and obviated the inconvenient necessity of removing all such cases to the Gov- ernment Civil Hospital.

By minor innovations some saving has been effected in the Dispensary Account, and in June the Government grant for Eu- ropean Medicines was increased from $1,500 to $2,500 per annum, thus making it possible to procure medicines in quantity from the Government Civil Hospital at a greatly reduced cost.

Though special attention was paid to effecting economies a loss in working could not be avoided, but the estimated deficit of $10,000 was covered by the proceeds of theatrical performances at the Chung Hing Theatre (which extended over 9 days and realised $7,996) and by special subscriptions.

The total number of in-patients during the year was 3,897 (4,255 in 1910), of whom 1,201 received European treatment, a considerably smaller percentage than in 1910. The out-patients numbered 109,790, and the percentage of these receiving European treatment has again risen, from 7-9 to 11. The number of des- titutes admitted, most of whom were sent home, was 4,303, and of these 4,243 were sent to the Hospital by the Registrar General.

The accounts of the Hospital which are attached to this report (Tables VIII to XIV) are, as provided by Ordinance, for the San Hoi Chinese year. This year consisted of 384 days as against the 354 days of the preceding Kang Sut year, and hence no ac- curate comparison can be drawn between the expenditure for the two years. [It is possible however that this difficulty will shortly disappear. The Chinese Republican Government have decided to adopt the Gregorian Calendar as from 1st January, 1912, and the alteration, if it is to be successfully established at all, should be completely adjusted at the end of the current year. An obstacle to the unanimous acceptance of the new calendar at once is that it involves the loss of a month-the intercalary month-every few years: and this would necessitate re-arrangements in rents and wages.] The total expenditure, which included no extraordinary items, was only $84,162 as against $92,954 in the previous year, which shows a very considerable saving. The cost of repairs was reduced by nearly $10,000 and a further saving was again made under the head of Chinese drugs. The expenditure on the Quarters for Destitutes and on the Small-pox Hospital appears under a separate account and has been defrayed by special subscriptions.

The ordinary receipts for the year amounted to $87,388 as against $75,347 in 1910, this sum being more than $3,000 in ex- cess of the expenditure. Extraordinary receipts amounted to $8,966, being the proceeds of theatrical performances and of

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special contributions from the Ko Shing, Chung Hing and Kau U Fong theatre managements. The balance to the credit of the Hospital's account at the beginning of the Yam Tsz year is $12,191.

The Kwong Wa Hospital at Yaumati was completed in May and opened by His Excellency the Governor on the 9th October. The Managing Body consists of the Tung Wa Hospital Committee and the following local representatives:-Messrs. Chan Pak-pang, Yu Chan-pui, Heung Man, Leung Chik-cho, Tsui Tit-shan, and Fong Kin-cho. Mr. Au Fung-chi was appointed manager.

Dr. Forsyth was appointed Visiting Surgeon to the Hospital. The total expenditure on the building up to the date of open- ing was $112,000, and though at the beginning of the year theatrical performances at the Tai Ping Theatre realised a sum of $6,595, the total amount of subscriptions fell short of the expenditure by $19,000. A loan of $22,000 was therefore made from the Tung Wa Hospital funds to pay the contractor, and with the co-operation of the Registrar General further contributions were solicited from the Chinese community, and a sum of more than $30,000 was raised.

The estimated annual expenditure of the Kwong Wa Hospital is $25,000, and of this sum about a third is covered by the Government grant of $8,500. This year also the hospital funds have benefited to the amount of $9,800 allotted out of the surplus of the Coronation Celebration subscriptions.

The room originally allotted for the Chinese Dispensary proving inconvenient, and the quarters for the staff insanitary, a new building is in course of construction to meet these require-

ments.

The tables attached (Tables XV and XVI) show the receipts and expenditure of the new hospital, and the total number of patients treated between the date of opening and the end of the The total number of admissions between October 10th and December 31st was 169, of whom 59 came under European treatment; and the number of out-patients was 1,706 of whom 140, or 8-2 per cent., elected to take European treatment.

The total expenditure in the same period amounted to $14,274, and was covered by a grant from the Tung Wa Hospital.

The year under review, it will be seen, was marked by ex- ceptional activity in hospital work-either directly connected with the Tung Wa (the Ko Fong Wards) or under the direction of the Tung Wa Committee (the Kwong Wa and Yaumati Small- pox Hospital). The native community has every reason to congratulate itself on the year's work done by its representative hospital. The weight of responsibility on the Committee can be gauged from the fact that during the year a total sum of $150,000 (exclusive of the ordinary accounts of the Hospital), connected with six different charitable funds, was administered by them,

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CHINESE PUBLIC DISPENSARIES AND DISTRICT PLAGUE HOSPITALS.

(Tables XVII to XXII)

The dispensaries continue to be conducted on the established lines. The three dispensaries in Victoria and the harbour dis- pensary are managed by a Committee consisting of the Registrar General as Chairman, the Hon. Sir Kai Ho Kai, Kt., C.M.G., Vice- Chairman, and seventeen other members, and the same Committee has opened a dispensary at Shaukiwau. The constitution and general objects of the association have to receive the concurrence and sanction of the Government, and are described in a minute dated the 20th October. 1909. in 9262 07 C.S.O. The three dispensaries at Yaumati, Hunghom and Kowloon City, are managed by separate committees elected by the inhabitants, and in his work of guiding and controlling them the Registrar General is assisted by the two Chinese Members of Council and the two Members of the Sanitary Board. To enable the Registrar General to keep in close touch with the Chinese in matters relating to sanitation, Street Committees have been appointed by the Government, and are consulted on matters of importance and encouraged to ask advice. Attached to each dispensary in Victoria are a licentiate of the Hongkong College of Medicine, a clerk with a knowledge of English and coolies with ambulances and dead-vans to remove patients and dead bodies. One lecturer is maintained whose duty it is to preach against "dumping" of bodies in the streets, to point out the benefits to be derived from the dispensaries, and to explain the object of the sanitary laws; handbills are issued in profusion whenever occasion demands, and photographs are taken of bodies found in the streets and are posted up in the neighbourhood, and enquiries are made in each case by the Street Committee. There is a District Plague Hospital attached to the West Point Dispensary, another attached to the East Point Dispensary in Victoria, a third in Kowloon City and a fourth at Hunghom. The number of rats caught during the year in Victoria was 65,927 and in the Kowloon Peninsula where rat-catchers have been engaged by the dispensaries and paid by the Sanitary Department the number was 21,311. During July and August reports as to a large increase in the number of rats in Vic- toria led to effective action by the Chinese Dispensaries Committee, which employed men through the Central Dispensary to visit houses in the Central District and stop all rat-runs with cement and glass. The matter was managed by Messrs. Ng Hon-tsz and Lau Chu-pak, and the total number of rat-runs stopped was 923 in 232 houses,

The success of the opening of a public dispensary in a tempor- ary building at Shaukiwan in 1910 encouraged the District Com- mittee to draw up a scheme for a permanent dispensary building with a licentiate attached. Over $2,000 was raised among the native population, and a grant of $1,000 made from the funds of the Public Dispensaries Committee. The Government has been approached with a view to granting a site for the building, and it is hoped shortly to proceed to construction,

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The percentage of return cases to new cases treated at the Victoria Dispensaries has dropped from 57 in 1910 to 45 in 1911, but at Hunghom and Yaumati the percentage has risen again to 22, while at Kowloon City it remains about the same.

The per- centage of all return to new cases treated is 37, as against 31 in 1910.

The total number of cases treated at the dispensaries in 1911 shows an increase of nearly 13,000 over the figures for 1910; 68,566 against 55,614.

The number of infants brought to the dispensaries shows a further increase, and the number of vaccinations performed again shows nearly a 50 per cent. increase. The total expenditure on the dispensaries was $33,434.

An analysis of the returns giving the number of infants brought to the dispensaries in Victoria shows that confidence in them increases every year.

At West Point the number of dead infants brought in was double that during 1910, though the number of live ones shows a small decrease; at the Central the numbers in either class show a marked increase; while at the Eastern Dis. pensary, though there were no live infants brought in, there were again a few more dead. The number of cases in which it was not stated from what address the infant was brought, shows a slight increase at each of the three Dispensaries.

Total number of children under 5 years of age brought in for treatment has risen from 7,262 in 1910 to 7,892. ̧

The return (Table XX) included this year for the first time and compiled from statistics in the Sanitary Department, showing the number of death certificates issued in proportion to the total number of Chinese deaths during the year, will later, it is hoped, afford comparisons which should throw a useful light on the work of the Chinese Public Dispensaries.

The District Plague Hospital at Wauchai was opened to patients on the 23rd April, and formally declared open by the Registrar General with the Committee on the 17th October. It com- prises a dispensary, waiting-room, etc.. quarters for office boys and messengers, and accommodation for ambulances and dead-vans, and a small hospital with rooms for nurses. The total cost includ- ing purchase of part of the site was a little over $18,000. Of this sum $4,000 was raised by theatrical performances and the rest, by private subscriptions. Towards the upkeep of the Hospital annual contributions of $550 have already been promised. No cases of plague were dealt with by this Hospital during 1911.

The District Plague Hospital at West Point opened in 1916 did good work during the year. The numbers of plague cases treated were as follows:-

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Patients. Admitted. Discharged.!

Died in Hospital.

Remaining in Hospital at end of the year.

Male, .... 32

Female,..

23

222 223

28

Total,... 55

5

50

At the Central Public Dispensary the coolie-quarters were completed, the cost of the building being defrayed by Mr. Ng Hon-. tsz and of the land by Mr. Ho Kom-tong.

The West Point Dispensary and District Plague Hospital was granted rent free an additional strip of Crown Land, by which means more light and air are afforded to the building and easy access to the mortuary is secured.

At the request of the District Committees the Plague Ho-pitals at East and West Point respectively were allowed, whether there was plague in the Colony or not, to be thrown open to women and children suffering from ordinary diseases, on the understanding that the hospitals should be under the supervision of a duly quali- fied medical practitioner under the Principal Civil Medical Officer, and that all patients who wished for Chinese treatment and medicines should be sent by these hospitals to the Tung Wa Hospital.

The number of patients suffering from ordinary diseases admitted to the two hospitals during the year was, at East Point two, and at West Point seven.

Dr. Fitzwilliams was appointed Consulting Medical Officer to the General Committee; and Dr. Mitchell was elected to act for Dr. Gibson as a member of the Committee, with duties of visiting the Hunghom and Kowloon City Dispensaries, and supervising the purchase and use of drugs.

The number of bodies abandoned after dropping to 268 in 1910 has risen again to 315, the percentage of bodies abandoned to deaths having also risen slightly from 3-6 in 1910 to 42 in 1911 (Table XXI).

The following Table gives particulars of interest regarding Plague and Small-pos. A comparison between the figures for 1910 and 1911 and the same table in future reports will be the best means of ascertaining if fear of isolation and disinfection is in- creasing or not.

Č 14

1910.

1

2

3

1

3

Removed Treat-

Died

Cases. to

ed at

in

Hospital. Home. Hospital.

Percentage Reco-Report- of column vered. jed after 7 to

death.

column 2.

Small-pox, 22

9

13

59

Plague,

25

17

6

15

2

8

32

1911.

1

2

3

5

6A

6B

7

8

Cases.

26 64

1

180

66.4

Small-

271

91

pox,

Plague,

269 174

6 157

15*

95 35.3

* 2 left the Colony.

In this connection it should be noted that effective action was taken during the year by the various Street Committees under the Chinese Public Dispensaries Committee who, acting on the advice of Mr. Brewin, deputed one or more of their numbers to visit all houses which had been abandoned by their inmates on the occurrence of plague or small-pox, and did other good work in securing com- pliance with the Sanitary Regulations of the ('olony.

TRANSLATION WORK.

Translation Work done in the Registrar General's Office during the year 1911.

into English.

Translation from English into Chinese.

Translation from Chinese

Petitions,........

64 Ordinances,

4

Letters,

83

Regulations.

5

Newspaper articles and items

Government Notices,

55

of news,

137

Minutes,

4

Unspecified,

74 Unspecified,

23

Total,

Total,

91

!

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In addition to the above, translations made in other depart- ments are revised, and on numerous occasions translation work, of which no record has been kept, is done by members of the Department other than the translator,

CHINESE RECREATION GROUND.

(Table XXIII.)

The balance to the credit of the fund at the end of the year was $6,916. The revenue from the rent of stalls was $1,332 and the expenditure $946.

At the end of December there was a destructive fire in which seven or eight of the stalls on the Recreation Ground were severe- ly damaged. After some discussion as to the advisability of pulling down and re-erecting all the stalls that had suffered, it was decided merely to make good the damage done. This work is being carried out at an estimated expenditure of $350 which will be provided out of the balance of the fund at the end of the year.

CHARITABLE FUNDS.

(Table XXIV.)

The net income of the Passage Money Fund was $953 (in- cluding $229 transferred from the Registrar General's Office Chari- table Fund when the latter fund was wound up), and the expendi- ture $1,701 which includes a special grant of $1,000 to the Eyre Diocesan Refuge. This grant was made on the recommendation of the Registrar General from the balance of the Passage Money Fund at the end of 1910 on the same terms as the grant of $3,250 mentioned in last year's report. The balance to the credit of the fund at the end of the year was thus reduced from $1,539 to $794.

The Registrar General's Charitable Fund has now, as stated in last year's report, been merged in a larger fund, known as the Brewin Charity. A sum of $37,700 was raised by subscriptions in 1910 and 1911 through the energy of a Committee of Chinese gentlemen, of which Dr. Ho Kai was chairman. The subscriptions were placed in the hands of the Tung Wa Hospital Committee which invested $36,500 in mortgages and opened an account at the Bank with the balance. The income from these investments, which amounted in 1911 to $2,605, is administered by the Re- gistrar General in consultation with the leading Chinese gentle- men, and is to be devoted to the assistance principally of disabled workmen and widows. During 1911 pensions were granted, vary- ing from $2 to $5 per month, to nine (9) deserving cases and gratuities of 15 and $25 were made to two others. (Table XXV.)

1911

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INTERPRETATION SUB-DEPARTMENT.

Four student interpreters passed the examination for a third class certificate. One received appointment in the Police Depart- ment. Six new student interpreters were appointed. Of the 49 student interpreters appointed under the present system, 6 are still student interpreters, 19 have third class certificates and 6 second class certificates, 5 have yet to qualify for third class certificates, though they have already received appointments. 13 are no longer in the Government Service.

Nine meetings of the Interpretation Board were held. Thirty- seven candidates were examined, one first class interpreter's certifi- cate, two second class interpreter's certificates, seven third class interpreter's certificates, one first class translator's certificate and one second class translator's certificate were awarded.

LEGISLATION.

The chief Ordinances of other than technical interest, affect- ing the Chinese, passed during 1911, were as follows:--

No. 2 of 1911.-Lepers Amendment Ordinance. This gives the Government power to detain and deport any leper (not being a British Subject) arriving in the Colony.

No. 9 of 1911.-Liquors Consolidation Ordinance. By this Ordinance all the regulations affecting the manufacture and sale of intoxicating liquors are consolidated. The chief clauses affect- ing the Chinese are those which prohibit both the distilling and selling of Chinese wines and spirits without a licence, and require a licence to be taken out by keepers of restaurants and eating houses.

No. 47 of 1911.-The Societies Ordinance. The purpose of this Ordinance is to provide for a more effectual control over Chinese Societies and Clubs; and it lays down that all Clubs. Companies, Partnerships, and Associations consisting of 10 or more persons except:

1. Such as are exempted by the schedule attached to the

Ordinance.

2. Such as are constituted under Royal Charter, Royal

Letters Patent, Act or Ordinance.

3. Such as are already registered with the Registrar of the

Supreme Court.

1. Such as are formed for the sole purpose of carrying on any lawful business, consisting of not more than 20

persons.

which are neither registered at the Registrar General's Office nor exempted from registration become after 1st January, 1912. unlawful and liable to penalties or compulsory dissolution.

!

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Every society, registered or exempt, is required to supply on demand from the proper officers true copies of its constitution and rules, and information as to its officers and membership.

It is not intended that permission to be registered under the Ordinance shall be withheld except in the case of a society which is likely to be used for unlawful purposes (or for purposes in- compatible with the peace and good order of the Colony), or which may possibly excite tumult and disorder in China.

• No. 52 of 1911.-Peace Preservation Amendment Ordinance. This Ordinance gives the Magistrates power, during the continuance of any proclamation under the Ordinance, to inflict the punishment of flogging for a number of offences against peace and good order, in addition to the ordinary penalties.

No. 53 of 1911.-The Chinese Partnerships Ordinance. This is an Ordinance to provide for the registration of Chinese partner- ships, and to enable partners therein to register and thereby to limit their liability.

It is hoped that this Ordinance, which has been welcomed by the Chinese, will solve a question that has engaged the attention of the Government for nearly 40 years. The chief difficulty to be met was that the Chinese system of partnership in which there is a general partner who is responsible for all debts of the firm and others whose liability is limited, comes midway between our systems of limited liability and ordinary partnership respectively, The Partnership Ordinance of 1897 was quite inadequate in that it took no cognisance of Chinese customs with regard to partners, merely laying down the principles of the unlimited liability of each partner for the debts of the firm, the dissolution of the part- nership on the death or bankruptcy of any partner and a limit to the number of partners, none of which principles are recognised by Chinese customs. The present Ordinance recognises these customs and makes registration voluntary so that Chinese partnerships that do not elect to register are subject to the principle of unlimited liability; but it is hoped that the offer of the facilities given by the Ordinance will be sufficient inducement to secure general registra- tion.

GENERAL.

The 22nd June, the day of the Coronation of His Majesty King George V, was universally observed by the Chinese as a day of rejoicing. Triumphal arches were erected, "fish" and "lantern" processions held, the theatres were open all night for four nights, and many other forms of celebration were devised and carried out by the community.

Further representations were made to the Registrar General during the year as to the increase in number of secret societies and of bad characters in the Colony. In the summer the existence of a dangerous secret society, called the Hung To Society, was detected

1911

O 18

and its president Hung Ham banished. The hands of the Govern- ment have now been strengthened in dealing with these matters by the passing of the Societies Ordinance 1911 by which all Chinese Clubs and Societies are required to register or claim special exemption from the Registrar General.

Towards the end of the year the influx of more bad characters from the Kwong Tung Province, owing to the Revolution, and the excessive jubilation of the Chinese lower classes over the successes of the republican troops, led to several outbreaks of "mafficking resulting in several cases in assaults on the police.

""

>

The most serious outbreak was an attack by a mob on an English police officer who had arrested an offender, and the wreck- ing of a Chinese shop in which the officer took refuge. On the recommendation of the Registrar General the shop owner awarded $300 compensation.

was

The possibility of the trouble spreading led to the proclamation of the Peace Preservation Ordinance, with its severe penalties. The police force was temporarily strengthened and the District Watchmen Committee took energetic measures-by the engagement of lecturers and otherwise--to prevent further outbreaks. The mea- sures taken have been entirely successful: although peculiar and distorted views of "independence" ("Tsz Yau"), bred by the Revolution and interpreted to his own liking by every coolie, will have a permanent effect on the traditional submission to regulation which has hitherto simplified the duties of officials.

Seven appeals against the execution of banishment warrants were received and investigated, and in several other cases enquiries were made at the gaol into the statements of prisoners under sentence of banishment who protested their innocence.

A slight alteration in the procedure in cases of banishment was initiated during the year. It is now necessary for the Registrar General to interview the people whose banishment is under consideration before the issue of the warrant. The value of this innovation is doubtful in a majority of the cases summonses to appear are neglected and in all, the summons acts as a warning-resulting often in a voluntary absence for a short period from the Colony with no penalty for return.

:

The case of the alleged kidnapping of the son of a Canton official to Hongkong was reported, but the boy could not be found.

In another case four children were kidnapped from a village near Canton and held to ransom in Hongkong. The parents paid several thousand dollars ransom: but no complaint or report was made in time for any action to be taken in the Colony.

The figures given on page 1 of the Report relating to the number of persons reported to the Po Leung Kuk as missing are not the best indication of the prevalence of kidnapping. A number of adults may have left their homes voluntarily, and a safer

C 19

indication is the number of boys reported missing and not found again in Hongkong. For 1911 the number was 64 as compared with 49 in 1910 and 77 in 1909. Unfortunately the crime is still too prevalent. One case was detected through the agency of the District Watchmen's Force, and the kidnapper, a woman, sentenced to 6 months' hard labour.

In this connection it may be noted that 16 stray children were taken to the Po Leung Kuk.

:

The kidnapping of children for sale must continue so long as the children can be disposed of for money in respectable families. The Chinese do not view such purchases as in themselves an offence and in fact the children disposed of are in the vast majority of cases infinitely better off in their new circumstances. Purchased children could be found in probably 90 per cent. of the well-to-do Chinese families in the Colony: and in most of the cases they have all the rights and privileges of a proper member. While this is so, kidnapping is rated at its proper value-an offence just as serious in Chinese as in Western eyes: but the prevalence of the custom of purchase opens the door to abuse, and increases the difficulty of discovering and dealing with cases of kidnapping.

Cases of kidnapping from the North during the year were rare. One child alleged to have been kidnapped from his home at Ningpo was taken to the Po Leung Kuk, but the woman who brought him from Shanghai was acquitted.

Thirty-five applications for British Born Subjects Certificates were reported on, and three applications for naturalization. The number of certificates granted was 24 and 3 respectively.

One case of the suicide of a Chinese prostitute was investigat- ed, and a report furnished by the Registrar General.

Compliance with the regulations laid down by the Government of the Philippines to secure the purity of lard, sausages and other meat-food products exported thither, has not presented much difficulty to Hongkong manufacturers. The briskness of this trade is shown by the inauguration at the end of the year of the Hongkong Lard and Meat Factory.

During the year the constitution of the Chinese Young Men's Christian Association has been radically altered. Besides the Managing Board there is now a Supervising Board of English and Chinese including a Government officer appointed by the Governor (the first appointment being the Registrar General), and a Consulting Committee of Chinese. It is also proposed by the Association to erect a Technical Institute, and donations from the Association in America have been promised for the building.

In March the abolition of licensed gambling in Kwong Tung was commemorated by a large meeting at the Tai Ping Theatre. It cannot however be expected to eliminate at one stroke the Chinese love of a gamble.

C 20

Sixteen (16) Chinese women and children suffering from leprosy were brought to this office to be placed if possible in the hands of their relatives, 8 being sent from the Alice Memorial Hospital, 4 from the Police, and 2 from other Hospitals; while 1 came to this office to be passed as a prostitute, and I to ask for her passage home.

Of these 16:-

7 had come to Hongkong for treatment.

2 were on a visit.

7 were living in Hongkong.

One further suspicious case was investigated but found to be free from the disease.

The Rhenish Leper Asylum at Tung Kwun was again opened to cases from Hongkong, and kindly received two lepers, but the asylum at Coloane being full, the Portuguese Authorities at Macao had to refuse an application for admission. The other patients were handed over to their relations or sent to their homes chiefly through the agency of the Tung Wa Hospital.

Under the arrangements made with the Secretary for Chinese Affairs at Singapore, 249 Chinese who were repatriated from the Straits Settlements were sent on to their destinations in China and given travelling expenses.

Under similar arrangements made with the Protectors of Chinese in British North Borneo and at Penang, four decrepits from Borneo and eight from Penang were likewise sent back to their homes.

The Anti-spitting Society under the organisation of Mr. S. W. Tso continued to display considerable activity. The Society's lecturers still deliver lectures on the river steamers, and further notices have been affixed to walls and trees in prominent positions throughout Victoria requesting people to spit in the gutters, and not on the pavements and side-walks.

Labour Trouble.

A serious strike of the printers and compositors occurred towards the end of the year. The trouble originated in the office of the South China Morning Post, in an assault by a European on a Chinese employé, and was nursed by the agitators of a powerful guild which controlled the "hands" of practically all the sections of the printing trade of the Colony.

It was difficult to discover exactly what the grievance was: as by far the larger number of the men seemed satisfied and un- willing to join in the strike, and there was no sympathy with the strikers in the Colony, and even Canton found it necessary to exhort the men to return to work. It appeared in fact that there

C 21

was no real general grievance, and that the strike was engineered by agitators who put their own curious interpretation on the revolu- tionary doctrine of "independence" and wished to show the power of their guild: and they seized on the opportunity offered by the small trouble already mentioned. All the printing business in the Colony was affected for several weeks: the Chinese presses had to close down entirely for want of hands but the European concerns by dint of great efforts on the part of their foreign staffs continued their work and showed that the assistance of the strikers was not indispensable to them. Finally there was a general resumption of work-in a few cases on rather better terms, but generally on the same conditions as before: while a few of the more trouble- some men lost their appointments altogether. The two leading agitators were banished during the course of the strike-as being mainly responsible for the use of intimidation-aud the resumption was somewhat delayed by the men's demand that they should be pardoned before work could be resumed. The demand was not granted and the main result of the strike has been seriously to weaken the power of the guild.

:

In June the increased cost of living led to an application by the shipwrights of the dockyards at Hunghom for an increase in wages, and on their demands being refused by the masters, a general strike of shipwrights in Kowloon and Victoria followed. The masters at first refused any compromise and though they were eventually persuaded by Messrs. Wei Yuk and Fung Wa-chun to meet the men's representatives, no settlement was reached, and the strikers were locked out. At the end of July, however, the masters finding their new hands unsuitable, gave in to the men's demands.

This strike was closely connected with a strike among the shipyard carpenters at Aplichow, where the arrest of two agitators led to a general strike. The dispute between masters and men was, however, soon compromised.

There was also a short strike of the members of the black- wood workmen's guild, who demanded more favourable terms from their masters, to which the latter eventually assented.

Owing to the prevailing unrest in China and bad harvests in many Provinces, the price of rice rose to abnormally high figures during the year; several large rice-shops were accused of attempt- ing to corner the supply and measures were under consideration by the Government to secure a sufficient supply at proper rates for the Colony. The arrival of supplies from Bangkok and Siam relieved the tension before furthur steps were necessary.

A permit was granted for special theatrical performances in aid of the distress caused by the floods in the Swatow districts.

C 22

The publication of the Chinese Gazette of Government re- gulations and notifications was discontinued, and all such notifi- cations in Chinese are now published through the ordinary press.

The local Chinese Press continued to take a great interest in the queue-cutting movement and the boundary delimitation question at Macao until the declaration of the independence of the Kwongtung Province in November when the continued wearing of a queue came to be looked upon as an offence against republican- ism, and the Macao question was obscured by greater issues elsewhere. On the outbreak of the revolution the circulation of the Hongkong newspapers in Kwongtung was no longer prohibited.

Chinese business has seen great vicissitudes during the course of the year it promised at one time to be an exceptionally good year for all merchants, but the state of China upset many calcula- tions towards the Autumn. There were not however (as was at one time feared) any serious bankruptcies, and the very large sub- scriptions sent by the Colony to the Revolutionary Government showed that the Chinese had still been able to make their business pay. The rice merchants seem to have been the hardest hit. The variations of price were most marked in this commodity, and the consequent gambling was often unfortunate or ill-judged. Large profits seem to have been made in no particular line except perhaps in fancy goods and European clothing, hats and boots. The boom in these goods, the direct result of the Revolution, is reported to have benefited the few firms concerned to the extent of over four lakhs of dollars in the closing months of the year.

The prospects for the coming year are not brightened by the fact that large accounts are still owing from customers in China to Hongkong merchants. The disturbed state of the country has very greatly increased the difficulty of collection: and while no exact estimate is possible of the outstanding total, it is beyond doubt large enough to have a serious effect on the general course of trade in the Colony.

STAFF.

Hon. Mr. A. W. Brewin acted as Colonial Secretary from 30th October to the 28th November and went on leave on the 29th November. I was appointed to act for him as Registrar General from the 30th October.

Mr. Hutchison was appointed Superintendent of Imports and Exports on return from leave on the 4th July and Mr. Tratman was promoted to be First Assistant Registrar General. Mr. Lloyd was performing the duties throughout the year.

On Mr. Tratman's appointment to be First Assistant Mr. A. · E. Wood was given the substantive post of Second Assistant Re- gistrar General. Messrs. Tratman and Wood however held acting appointments in other Departments throughout the year, and the

!

;

C 23

duties of Second Assistant Registrar General were performed by Mr. Breen from the 1st January to the 15th October and by Mr. Lindsell from the 26th November to end of the

year.

Mr. Cheng Kei-heung, Householders Registration Clerk, died on the 1st May and the vacancy was filled by Mr. Lau Tin-tsun, Shroff from the Police Department, on the 1st August.

Mr. Wong Po-shau, Translator, died on the 23rd September and Mr. Lo Kam-chak was appointed to take his place on the 1st November.

The Emigration Sergeant, A. K. Taylor, was promoted to be Inspector in the Sanitary Department on the 27th March and Sergeant A. F. Purden was seconded from the Police Department to take his place.

The Emigration Interpreter, Mr. Cheung Sit-ting, died on the 18th December and Mr. To King-ki was appointed in his place.

Mr. Ying Man-fong was appointed 6th Grade Emigration Clerk on the 15th March.

10th April, 1912.

E. R. HALLIFAX,

Registrar General.

Heads of Revenue.

Table I.

Revenue for the years 1910 and 1911.

Ordinance under which received.

Details of Revenue.

C 24

Revenue in

1910.

Revenue in

1911.

Increase.

Decrease.

$ 0.

$ C.

$

C.

C.

No. 1 of 1889 & No. 4 of 1908.

5.338 (1)

5,530 (1)

192 (1)

(1)

460

460

No. 8 of 1887.

1,120 †

1,120

No. 7 of 1875 & No. 15 of 1902, No. 8 of 1887.

'1,315

1.442

127

1,150

3,970

180

3 of 1898.

730

500

230

16

12

4

No. 3 of 1888.

183

229

46

2,024

1.696

328

14

19

5

48

13

440

440

100

100

5

51

50

67

11

No. 14 of 1910.

2

Total,

..$

15,492.12

14,548 19

944.33

1,918.26

Deduct Increase,

....

941 33

Total Decrease in 1911,

973.93

Licences and Internal Revenue not other- wise specified,

Fees of Court or Office, Payments for Specifie Purposes, -

and

Beimburse-

ments-in-and..

Deposits not available, Interest.

Miscellaneous,

Other Miscellaneous Receipts,

Emigration House Licences, Forfeitures,

Hawkers' Licences,

Marriage Licences,

Money Changers' Licences,

Certificates to Chinese entering U.S.A., Chinese Gazette Sales,

Householders' Registration,

"}

"}

לי

Re-registration,

Reinovals,

Extracts.

***

Contribution from Chinese Dispensales.

&c., for Clerical Assistance,

Unclaimed Balances,

Interest accrued on official account, Refunds, &c,

Copyright Registration,.

(1) Cents omitted except in the totals.

For three months only. Transferred to Police Department.

C 25

Table II.

Revenue and Expenditure of the Registrar General's Department since 1902.

Revenue.

Year.

Total.

Expenditure.

$

C.

1902,... 136,888.13 1903,... 160 351.81 1904,... 167,083.66 1905,... 172,947.89

1

1906,... 177,284.21

Decrease. Increase. Total. Decrease. Increase.

$ C. $ C. 9,321.97 24,230.33) 23,463.68,26,755.64

6,731.85 31,339.71

Ge

2,525.31

Percentage of Expenditure to Revenue.

C.

7,800 71

17.70

16.68

4,581.07 18.75

5,864.23 31,761.32

421.61 18.36

4,336.32 36,947.46

5,186.14

20.84

1907,... 163,261.13 14,023.08| 1908,... 164,459.99|

35,630.88 1,316.58

21.82

1,198.86 43,848.51,

8,217.63

26.66

1909,... 104,138.8860,321.11

43,793.61 54.90

42.05

1910,...

15,492.1288,646.76

1911,... 14,518.19

973.93

42,462.81 1,330.80 49,217.74

274.09

6,754.93 339.01

Table III.

Number of Women and Girls detained in a Place of Refuge by the Registrar General under Sections 34 and 35 of Ordinance No. 4 of 1897, and arrangements made regarding them.

Under Detention on 1st January, 1911.

Detained during 1911.

Total.

Prostitutes. Emigrants. Total. Prostitutes. Emigrants. Total.

Permitted to leave,

Permitted to leave under bond,

00 co

3

4

7

67

33

100

107

3

20

20

23

Restored to husband,..

Restored to relatives,

4.

1

5

5

6

co:

3

9

34

8

42

51

Married,

Sent to native place,..

Adopted,.

Sent to Refuge or Convent,

Absconded,....

Awaiting marriage or adoption,

1

1

17

13

30

31

...

5

2

7

2

3

5

12

1

1

I

1

2

1

3

12

4

16

3

2

cr:

5

Cases under consideration,

5

5

27

7

34

39

OG: ON

2

19

5

...

C 26 -

Total,...

26

10

36

187

71

258

294

Cases brought forward, 36.

Cases dealt with during the year, 255.

Cases carried forward, 39.

Table IV.

Number of Assisted Emigrants and of Female Passengers and Boys examined and passed before the Registrar General under "The Chinese Emigration Ordinances, 1889-1908,” during the year 1911.

Whither Bound,

Male

Assisted

Women and Children, 1911.

Male

Assisted

Women

and

Emigrants

1911. Women. Girls.

Boys.

Total.

Emigrants

1910.

Children

1910.

Europe,

Japan,....

Straits Settlements, Malay Peninsula,..

Dutch Indies,

...

3

4

...

7

16,129

15,811

1,635

4,810

154

55

4,722

437

22,168

18,177

11,804

946

3,577

643

Borneo,

Honolulu,

Pelew Islands,

Canada,

3,666

...

1,800

C 27

37

7

64

108

96

{

United States of America,

16

Mexico,....

South America,

Mauritius,

Australia,

68

27

∞0-200

8

665

673

...

667

8

186

210

...

370

1

107

108

...

99

107

127

65

122

190

46

34

65

9

British Columbia,

...

31

31

Total, 1911,

24,605

16,445 1,709

6,476 24,630

23,554

13,806

Total. 1910,

23,504

10,875.

1,220

4,711 16,806

C 28

Table V.

Number of Assisted Emigrants.

Rejected.

Year. Examined. Passed.

Rejected

Un- willing

at

Rejected

R.G.O.

by

Doctor.

Sent Total back. Rejected.'

Precentage of

as unfit.

Rejection.

1909,...

1910,...

1911,... 34,087

18,511 16,803

541

1,167

155

210

2,073

11.2

24,986

23,554*

179

1,253

218

77

1.727

6.91

24,605* 1 236

2,179

470

281

4,166

12.22

*Including Emigrants to Borneo.

Treatment of Rejected Emigrants for 1911.

Sent home by Tung Wa Hospital,

!

291

Sent home through Tung Wa Hospital at

expense of boarding houses,

} 3,472

Sent away without help,

403

T

Total rejected,......... 4,166

Native Districts of Assisted Emigrants.

West River,

East River,

North River,.

Canton,

Delta,

Kwong Sai,

Southern Districts,

Mandarin,.....

5,092

4,773

1,324

2,669

1,820

4,234

3,603

1,090

Total.........24,605

2

C 29

Table VI.

Statement of the Receipts and Expenditure relative to the Hongkong District Watchmen's Fund for the year 1911.

Receipts.

Expenditure.

$

C.

4份

C.

To Balance,

9,188

By Wages and Salaries :---

Chief District Watchmen, Assistant Chief District Watch-

2,100

Contributions,

25,074

""

men,

1,492

Detectives,

1,212

""

Grant by Government,...

2,000

1st Class District Watchmen,

2,024

2nd

12,164

"1

19

3rd

707

,, Payment for Special Services, ......

"

"

632

Watchmen for prevention of

dumping,

214

Interest,..

265

Allowance to Chief District

""

Watchmen and Detectives,

1,163

Medal Allowance.......

216

Fines,

54

Instructors' Allowances,

96

""

21,389

55

Condemned Stores, &c.,....

10

5

By Miscellaneous :-

""

Messenger,

25

Cooks,

432

Coolies,

384

811

00

By Office Staff:-

Manager,

308

Writer,

120

Interpreter,

60

Collector,

300

788 00

Total,...

23,018 55

855

By Other Charges

Crown Rent,

11

Water Account,.

114

Stamp for Crown Lease,

30

Uniforms and Equipment,

1,834

Stationery and Printing,

145

Rewards,

23

Oil,

362

Premium on Fire Policies,

152

Loss on Exchange,

1.609

Cost of Telephone,“.

495

Repairs,

247

Coolie and Conveyance Hire,...

293

Gratuities,

+2

Furniture,

11

Conservancy,

Photographs, Sundries,

45

5

375

6,099

So Tai and Au Pun's widow,

By Pension:-

By Coronation Procession :----

Wages, Uniforms and Equipment for Extra District Watch- men during Procession,

516

ΤΟ

300

8 2099

25

00

Total,

.$ 37,220 55

Total Expenditure,. Balance,

29,934 50 7,286 05

Total, ............$

37,220 55

Disposal of Balance :-

On Fixed Deposit, At Current Account,

In Hand,

Total,............

Cents omitted except in the totals.

$ 3,000.00

4,286.05

none

..$ 7,286.05

A

Patients.

Table VII.

Number of Patients under treatment and other statistics concerning the Tung Wa Hospital during the year 1911.

Admitted.

Out-patients.

Vaccination.

Dead bodies brought to Hospital Mortuary for burial.

Destitutes sent home.

Male,

Female,

204|2,174

885 2,855 3,059 2,054 880 44 522 316 794 838 473 331

125

58,529 6,951 65,480 34 | 39,119 5,191 | 44,310

813

893 4,243

505

Total,.

248 2,696 1,2013,649 3,897 2,527 | 1,211

159

97,648 12,142 109,790

813 1,398 4,243

Total for 1910,

251 2,179 2,076 | 4,255 | 4,506 2,925 1,333

248 102,885 | 8,864 111,749

|102,885

902 1,176 2,084

°C 30-

– Ċ 31

Table VIII.

Statement of Receipts and Payments of the Tung Wa Hospital for the San Hoi Year (1911).

Receipts.

Amount.

Payments.

Amount.

$

SA

Balance brought forward from Kang Sut

Year, (1910).....

To rent of Hospital property,....

(1)

:

3,551

""

30,053

19

(1) By Food for Staff,

Salaries and wages,.

Patients' food and washing,

(1) 7,625 (1)

16,523

Sick room expenses,.

5,500

...

8,013

"?

Chinese drugs,

18,333

To Subscriptions :-

*9

European drugs,

2,065

Light,..

3,319

1. Annual Subscriptions of Hongs,

11,974

Wages

and food for Small-pox

Hospital Permanent Staff,

2,256

2. Subscriptions of various shops, .......

1,430

19

General Repairs,

990

...

""

Utensils, etc.,.....................

74

...

3.

"

collected on Steamers,

6,449

""

Repairs to Hospital property,

229

""

*.

and Donations,

"

3,273

Stationery, Telegrams, Stamps and

Advertisements,

,, Sundries,

5.

"

for the supply of

""

Passage money to patients,

medicines, coffins,

quilted clothing and

Insurance,

2,429

Crown Rent,

:

:

2,082 3,289

156

932

625

6. Subscriptions from wealthy persons,

2,900

72,020

7.

"

by Directors, Assistant

""

Free cemetery,

3,429

Directors and Committee,

3,709

,, Coffins,

4,701

32,166

19

Burial of bodies from Goverument

mortuary (Victoria),

1,053

To Grant from Man Mo Temple,

2,500

""

Coffins for bodies from Government

mortuary (Victoria),

1,794

""

Payments for medicine, sale of kitchen

refuse and rent of Mortuary,

""

Burial of bodies from Government

""

Interest,

""

Government Grant,

:

:

6,157

mortuary (Kowloon), ...

819

"

Coffins for bodies from Government

1,364

mortuary (Kowloon),

545

...

8,000

11,843

"

Profit on drugs supplied to Hospital

by Man Wo Cheung,

Total Ordinary Receipts,......

,, Expenditure on repatriation of emi-

3,595

grants,

297

87,388

Extraordinary Receipts.

"

Proceeds of theatrical performances,...

7,966

"}

Total,

Balance,.....

""

Contribution for 1st quarter, 1912, from the Ko Shing, Chung Hing and Kau U Fong Theatres,.......

1,000

8,966

Grand Total,.....

$ 96,354.76

Grand Total,

(1) Cents omitted except in the totals,

:

84,162.92

12,191.84

€9

:

96,354.76

☐ 32

Table IX.

Statement of Assets and Liabilities of the Tung Wa Hospital at the close of the San Hoi Year (1911).

Liabilities.

Amount.

Assets.

Amount.

To Loan from Relief Fund,.....

8,440.06

29

"

"}

99

Cheap Sale of Rice Fund, Man Mo Temple Fund,

29,681.33

By Bank Balance at close of year :—

With Shanghai Bank,

5,860.49

San Francisco Relief Fund,

5,470.17

99

To Further Loan from Man Mo Temple,...

6,000.00

>>

29

Cheap Sale of Rice

By House Property (original value) :-

2 houses in Bonham Strand and

Jervois Street,

10,400.00

Fund,.

38,887.02

To Loan from Hospital Extension Fund,.

15,226.69

109,565.76

1 house in Wing Lok Street (includ- ing cost of additions to building),. 10 houses in Aberdeen Street and Tung Wa Lane (including cost of additions to buildings),

8,108.28

14,900.00

Balance of Assets over Liabilities,

:

79,480.36

2 houses in Connaught Road and

Des Voeux Road,

17,386.00

7 houses in Queen's Road West

(including cost, of additions to buildings),

30,363.00

2 houses in Bonham Strand West, 3 houses in Bonham Strand,

26,000.00

15,000.00

Total,.....

$ 189,046.12

Subscriptions not yet paid :-

From Hongs,

:

From Individuals,

10 houses in Po Yan Street and New Street (at present used as Plague Hospital),

Total,...

$3,157.15 1,850.00

$5,007.15

!

12,191.84

54,697.00

176,854.28

$ 189,046.12

Receipts.

Table XI.

Man Mo Temple Fund: San Hoi Year (1911).

$

Amount.

Payments.

Balance from Kang Sut Year,

Temple Keeper,

4,108.00

12,710.57 Tung Wa Hospital, Free Schools and Sundries,

Rent of Temple property,.

4,763.50

Refund of Crown Rent,..

19.60

Subscription from Tin Hau Temple, Yaumati, in aid of the free school,.......

275.00

Balance at close of the year : Shanghai Bank,...

9,166.10

Interest,

Total,

:

740.00

...

$

Amount.

2,500.00

6,655.00

9,155.10

...

13,461.57

22,616.67

Total,

22,616.67

- Č 34 -

1

Receipts.

Table XII.

Kwong Chau and Shiu Hing Relief Fnnd: San Hoi Year (1911).

Amount.

Payments.

Amount.

To Balance from Kang Sut Year,

25,901.44

}}

Balance of Subscription for telegrams for Kong Pak,

By subscription for relief of distress at Wuchang and Han Kow,

18,000.00

278.83

""

""

Interest,

1,332.24

Subscription for relief of flood at Chiu Chow,.....

5,000.00

,, Stamps for Hospital Reports,

145.24

23,145.24

Total,

27,512.51

By Balance at close of the year :— Shanghai Bank,

Total,

:

:

C 35

4,367.27

27,512.51

Receipts.

Table XIII.

Quarters for Destitutes Fund: San Hoi Year (1911).

Amount.

Payments.

Amount.

Balance from Kang Sut Year,

$5,226.78

By Construction of the Quarters,

Furniture and Fittings,

$4,085.00

1,141.78

"}

Total,

5,226.78

Total,

5,226.78

C 36

Receipts.

C 37

Table XIV.

Small Pox Hospital Fund for the San Hoi Year (1911).

Amouut.

$

Payments.

Amount.

To Balance from Kang Sut Year,

Subscriptions, Interest,

22,172.44 | By Construction of Small-pox Hospital

25.00 842.30

at Yaumati,..

12,323.00

Repairs,

1,162.81

"

Aid to Construction of Quarters for

Destitutes,

1,472.87

""

Crown Rent for Small-pox Hospital

at Yaumati,.......

2.00

Repairs to Hospital Property-house

No. 91, Jervois Street,

5,000.00

19,960.68

Balance,

3,079.06

Total,.....

23,039.74

Total,....

23,039.74

Disposal of Balance:

Russo-Chinese Bank, $8,079.06.

C 88

Table XV.

Statement of Receipts and Payments of the Kwong Wa Hospital from 8th September, 1911, to 17th February, 1912, (San Hoi Year).

Receipts.

Amount.

Payments.

$

C.

Amount.

C.

(1)

(1)

Medical fees,.....

"

"

To Aid from Tung Wa Hospital,.

Premium on notes,

14,818.74 | By Food for staff,.......

1,394.62

57.62

Salaries and wages,

2,924.94

344.86

Sick room expenses,

1,058.63

"

Sale of kitchen refuse, etc.,.

49.66

Patients' food and washing,

576.05

وو

Chinese drugs,................

1,720.80

European drugs,.

645.70

Sundries,..

535,80

25

"

General repairs,

2,064.96

Furniture,

581.26

39

""

Utensils, etc.,

686.65

""

Crown rent,

.50

""

Light,

443,88

""

Stationery, Stamps and Advertise-

wents,

406.89

Coffins,

129.78

}}

Burial expenses,.

69.11

Coffins for bodies from Government

""

Mortuary (Kowloon),.

207.51

Burial of bodies from Government

22

Mortuary (Kowloon),...

117.87

Refund to Tung Wa Hospital,.

233.28

""

Expenses for Small-pox Hospital,

Yaumati,

476.32

Total,.......

14,274.56

Balance,

996.33

Grand Total,.............

$15,270.89

Grand Total,...

$15,270.89

(1) Cash omitted.

1

Male,

Female,

Table XVI.

Number of Patients under treatment and other statistics concerning the Kwong Wa Hospital from 10th October

to 31st December, 1911.

Patients.

Treatment. Chinese

Admitted.

European

Treatment.

Total.

Discharged.

Deaths.

Femaining in Hospital on 31st December, 1911.

Chinese Treatment.

Out-patients.

European Treatment.

Total.

Dead bodies

brought to Hospital Mortuary for burial.

70

38

31

8888888

108

45

40

30

61

20

18

23

283

23

1,012

70

554

70

22

1,082

6

624

7

Total,.

101

68

169

65

58

46

1,566

140 1,706

13

.

C 39 -

- C 40

Table XVII.

Summary of work done by the Chinese Public Dispensaries Victoria, Harbour, Shaukiwan and Kowloon Peninsula.

Description.

Grand Grand

To.al.

Total.

Total.

1911.

1910.

New Cases,

42,806

Return Cases,

25,760

Total,..

68,566

55,614

Certificate of nature of disease issuel,

13

17

Certificate of cause of death,

454

569

Patients removed to hospital by ambulance,

Corpses removed to hospital or mort tary.

400

395

1,061

933

Attendance at cleansing of infected premises,

272

19

Compensation claims sent in,

28

Applications received for coffins,

404

362

Applications for midwives,

172

165

Infants brought to office (alive),.....

398

""

>>

"J

(dead), Total,.

1,313

1,711

1,330

Vaccinations at house,. Vaccinations at office,

506

4,129

Total,.

4,635

3,209

Receipts.

-C 41

Table XVIII.

Victoria Dispensaries: Statement of Account 1911.

$5

$

**

c.

Expenditure.

To Balance,

Government Grant to the East and

West Point Plague Hospitals,

Donation from Tai Ping Theatre,...... 3,500

9,539

1,400

388

>>

San Theatre,

500

39

""

"

Ko Shing and Chung

Hing Theatres,...

125

Annual Subscriptions, Land,

Subscriptions, Shaukiwan,

13,104

llarbour

""

6,328

....

2,130

from Committee of

39

1,093

Dispensaries,

26,782

40

Donation from Messrs. Ho Tai- shang and Ng Hon-tsz towards the site and building of Coolies' Quarters at Central Dispen- saries,

Compensation from Government for 2 Temple lots at Shamshuipo paid to Chinese Public Dis- pensaries towards the building of Shamshuipo Dispensary, ... Donation from Yaumati "Tin Hau

Temple "towards the building of Yaumati Dispensary,......... Balance of proceeds of Theatrical performances in aid of the West Point Plague Hospital,

Interest,.

Premium on exchange,

3,670

$

60

Maintenance of Dispensaries, Victoria, 24,629

Subvention to Kowloon City Dis- Į 774

pensary,

Maintenance of Harbour Dispensary, 2,870

Shaukiwan

Cost of building of Coolies' Quar- ters, Central Dispensary..

Fee for architects to prepare a plan)

for alteration to the Coolies' Quarters West Point Plague Hospital,...

358

Balance :-

At Current Account,

500

In hand,..

331

Advance Money to dispensary clerks,

249

9

$42,840 47

* Cents omitted except in the totals.

09:

$

2,928

31,202 61

2,132

100

33,434 61

9,223

122

60

9,405 86

$ 42,840 47

C 42

Table XIX.

Kowloon Peninsula Dispensaries.

Statement of Accounts.

Description.

Receipts :--

To Balance,

Subscriptions, &c.,

Government Grant,

Donation from Shamshuipo Temple, Grant from Dispensaries in Victoria,

Expenditure:

Total,......

Hung- hom.

Yau- mati. City.

Kowloon

$ c. $ c.*

c.*

428.00

112.00

4.00

2,821.00 | 5,941.00 2,420.00

500.00

100.00

371.00

774.00

3,750.39 | 6,053.55 | 3,671.32

Through Registrar General's Office, 2,002.00 2,848.00 2,650.00 By Local Committee,

1,550.00 2,649.00 943.00

Total,....

3,553.65 5,498.21 3,594.04

Balance:-

At Registrar General's Office, With Committee,

32.00 541.00 none 164.00 14.00

Total,..

77.00

196.74 555.34 77.28

!

Total,.....

.$3,750.39 6,053.55 3,671.32

*

Cents omitted except in the totals.

Number of deaths.

Number certified.

Table XX.

Deaths of Chinese in Hongkong and Kowloon during 1911 showing number in which the cause of death was duly certified and number in which a post-mortem examination was held.

1

2

3

Number

uncertified.

Percentage of

3 to 2.

Victoria,

Harbour,

5,296

2,372

3,405

41

1,174

20

2,231

39

481

Kowloon,

1,204

418

786

35

11

1

773

64

Shankiwan,

319

39

280

12

20

6

:

Other villages in Hongkong,

196

8

188

4

5

2

Total,.

7,496

2,837

4,659

38

1,185

16

3,029

40

Number examined

after death and not sent to mortuary.

Percentage of

6 to 2.

Number sent to

mortuary.

Percentage of

8 to 2.

Ċ 43

9

Table XXI.

Monthly Return of Bodies of Chinese considerel by the Registrar General to

have been abandoned during

Victoria Districts.

the

year

1911.

Month.

Cen-

West.

East.

tral.

Victoria

Total.

Harbour.

January,

3

February,.

March,.

12

April,

11

May,

12

June,

10

July,.

August,

september,

October,

November,

December,

-110 200

12

Grand Total,

80

62

Total for 1910,.

28

३५

ER BOA VWA A O Q~~~

7

0

10

1

20

1

17

1

22

3

17

12

5

4

1

ON LO 2 10

10

12

8

5

24

9

12421 D10 2011 a

- 1 00 00 1NKAJ2-A

10

тжан сал со соста

Kowloon.

Fongkong

outside

Victoria.

New Territories.

Total.

Grand Total.

11

18

0

11

21

8

28

12

29

16

38

14

31

17

29

17

21

19

0

10

17

0

20

47

24

166

50

47

49

3

149

315

19

85

49

823

48

183

268

0 44 ---

C 15

Table XXII.

Return of bodies abandoned for the years 1909, 1910 and 1911.

(Figures supplied by the Police Department.)

Male.

1909.

Female.

Unknown.

Over

15 years.

15 years & under.

Over

15 years.

15 years

& under.

Over

15 years.

15 years

& under.

Total.

Victoria, Kowloon,.....

3

25

Harbour,

36

Elsewhere,

23

3322

55

26

41

20

292

53

27 33

111

22

Total,....

87

142

13 135

:

80

4

123

67

4

381

1910.

Male.

Female.

Unknown.

Total.

Victoria,

3

40

...

Kowloon,

19

13

1

Harbour,.

12

34

5

Elsewhere, ... 18

18

1

293=

42

85

16

49

30

2

83

14

51

Total,......

52 105

7 102

:

2

268

...

1911.

Male.

Female.

Unknown.

Over

15 years.

15 years

& under.

Over

15 years.

15 years

& under.

Over

15 years.

15 years

Victoria, Kowloon,....

13

a m

9

76

2

79

15

18

Harbour,..

11

15

2

19

Elsewhere,.

12

22

18

...

Total,...... 45 128

H

134

:

& under.

Total.

166

1

47

3

50

52

4

315

To Balance,

""

Rent of Stalls,

Total,

Table XXIII.

Chinese Recreation Ground, Receipts and Expenditure, 1911.

Receipts.

$

C.

Payments.

$

558 (1)

6,529 (1)| By Wages of Watchmen, &c.,

1,332

Miscellaneous,

"

,, Balance,

388

6,916

7,862.59

Total,

$7,862.59

(1) Cents omitted except in the totals.

C 46

Receipts.

Table XXIV.

Statement of Accounts of Passage Money Fund.

Payments.

C.

(1)

(1)

To Balance at Current Account,

$1,464

Cash,

75

""

""

1,539

>>

"}

Passage Money received,

$1,031

Less refunds,

352

19

678

By Gifts to 17 women on being married, Annual Charitable Allowance to six persons, Subscription to Alice Memorial Hospital, Subscription to Eyre Diocesan Refuge, Endowment Fund to Eyre Diocesan Refuge,.. Special Grant

40

94

50

50

1,000

250

>>

Money transferred from Registrar General's

""

Office's Charitable Fund,...

229

Interest on Current Account,

37

११

"

Miscellaneous,

9

""

""

"

"

Subscription to Victoria Home and Orphanage, Kowloon City,

Gifts in aid of repatriation of emigrants,

Small gifts to distressed persons,

Gratuity to Siu Li Ngong and his wife (mother -of triplets),

Cost of telegram, postage, &c.,

Petty Expenses,

""

"}

Balance :-

Current Account,

.....

20

146

292 222

Cash,

Total,.

$2,495.83

(1) Cents omitted except in the totals.

Total,

$628

166

794

$2,495.83

€ 47

Revenue.

Table XXV.

Revenue and Expenditure of the Brewin Charity, 1910 and 1911.

C.

Expenditure.

Subscriptions (1910 and 1911),

37,700.00 | Compassionate Allowance to widows, etc., 1910

and 1911,

Interest on Mortgages (1910 and 1911),

2,593.76 | Loss on Exchange,

Interest on Current Account,

Cheque Book,

128.46 | Stamps for receipts, Stationery and printing, Photographing of pensioners,

Balance :-

Total,.

40,422.22

On Mortgage at 7%.....

>

With Bank, (Chartered Bank), Current Account at 2% In hand (with Tung Wa Hospital Committee),

$

C.

348.50

55.80

1.25

2.15

2.50

2.90

.$ 36,500.00

3,004.71

504.41

40,009.12

Total,.

40,422 22

Table XXVI.

Prosecutions under Ordinances No. 3 of 1888, No. 1 of 1889 and No. 4 of 1897.

Offence.

Ordinance No. 3 of 1888.

Bills,-Posting without permission,

Fireworks, Discharging without permits,

Drums and Gongs,-Night noises by beating,

Convicted.

Discharged.

No. of

Cases.

M.

F.

M.

F.

Processions,—Organising in the public streets without permit,.

Householders Registration,-Failing to register,

Ordinance No. 1 of 1889.

Decoying men or boys into or away from the Colony,

Keeping unlicensed Emigration Houses,..

Neglecting to enter names of boarders on register,

Personating Emigrants,.

Ordinance No. 4 of 1897.

3

15

33

29

28

20:00

I

4

1

2

1

1121

...

1

4

•••

...

2

***

4

4

6

2

2

3

...

I

I

1

:

:

:

...

1

Abduction of girls under the age of 18 years (Sec. 26), Decoying women and girls into or away from the Colony, Detaining, harbouring or receiving women or girls, Procuration of girls under age to have carnal connection,...... Knowingly deriving profits from prostitution, letting women out for hire, trading in them,

*

2 males committed for trial at the Supreme Court. † 1 male

""

- O 49-

C 50

Annexe A.

Report of the Po Leung Kuk for the year 1911.

The following 12 gentlemen were elected in March to act as Managing Committee for the year 1911 :--

Li Sui-kam, Li Chung-chik, Li Wing-kwong, Leung Hok-lau, Yung Yik-ting,

Lam Heung-lun,

Un Wan-kiu, Wu Chu-wan,

Wu Wan-cho,

Ip Yung-sun,

Li Shun-fan, Kwok Sui-chu.

Four meetings of the Board were held during the year at which the average attendance of members was seven and the average number of the Managing Committee present was ten. Among the subjects of more than immediate interest that were dis- cussed were (1) the drafting of further regulations to be observed by the Po Leung Kuk detectives when searching for kidnapped persons on the arrival or departure of ships: (2) the desirability of cutting down expenses: (3) whether the members of the Per- manent Board could be allowed to obtain girls as concubines or maid-servants from the Po Leung Kuk or to give security for others wishing to do so;-decided in the negative.

The inmates appear to be happy and in good health, and though detention must at times be felt to be irksome discipline has been good and there has been no case during the year of any escape or attempted escape from the Kuk.

Special attention has again been paid to providing instruction in needlework, etc., and a new departure was made in the way of teaching the girls Chinese writing in which they show considerable interest. 30 of the girls are reported by the Matron to sew ex- tremely well, and 15 to show cosiderable talent for knitting.

The number of inmates in the Po Leung Kuk on the 1st January, 1911, was 46, and 514, of whom 117 were children, were admitted during the year. The circumstances of their admission and the action taken regarding them are detailed in Table A.

201 were admitted with their own consent, 16 were lost children, one accompanied her parents, and 19 were runaway maid-

servants.

On leaving the Po Leung Kak 194 were placed in the charge of their husband, parents, or other relative; 37 were sent to Charitable Institutions in China; 17 were married; 17 adopted; and 26 released under bond. The Italian Convent, the Eyre Refuge, and the Victoria Home are all ready to receive suitable

C 31

cases, and 47 women and children were sent to these institutions. The number of inmates in the Po Leung Kuk on the 31st Decem- ber was 72, and the average number of inmates each month was 66.

The usual tables showing the income and expenditure during the year and the assets and liabilities of the Society are attached. The accounts of the Elected Committee have again been audited by Messrs. Ku Fai-shan and Chiu Chau-sam. The balance to the credit of the Society on the 31st December was $18,174 of which $15,000 is on fixed deposit with Chinese Banks.

The actual expenditure for the year was $10,890 as against $11,058 in 1910. The subscriptions amounted to $8,134 as against $8,685 in 1910.

The health of the inmates has unfortunately not been so good as in 1910. In July and August there was an outbreak of mumps, which was followed in September by an epidemic of measles. In February there was a mild case of small-pox but immediate isola- tion was effective in preventing contagion.

In all 35 cases were sent to the Tung Wa Hospital, most of which, exclusive of the infectious cases, were suffering from minor ailments and soon returned to the Po Leung Kuk cured.

Dr. Perkins, M.D., the lady doctor attached to the London Mission, was appointed honorary medical adviser to the Po Leung Kuk.

The matron and other members of the staff have given satis- faction.

In March Mr. Brotherton Harker was appointed Visiting Justice in place of Mr. F. Maitland who resigned.

The Po Leung Kuk was visited twelve times during the year, on each occasion by two Justices. Only on one occasion did the Justices find anything to draw attention to-a case of measles which they considered should be more carefully isolated, and a girl who had just been admitted and was inconsolably miserable.

27th March, 1912.

E. R. HALLIFAX,

Registrar Generul,

K. HO KAI,

President.

Vice-President.

Table A.

Number of Women and Girls admitted to the Po Leung Kuk during the year 1911 and the

arrangements made regarding them.

ta

H

N

46

Total.

Committed under Warrant from Registrar General's Office.

Committed under Warrant from Emigration Office. Pending the opening of the

Registrar General's Office. Sent with their own consent

by Registrar General. Sent with their own con-

sent from Singapore,

Manila and Swatow.

Sent with their own con-

sent by the Police.

Lost Children.

Accompanying parents or

guardians.

Runaway maid-servants.

CEDRALOMALLA PELLINGAN ZUTENESSANS

Total.

Released after enquiry.

Released under bond.

Placed in charge of hus-

band.

Placed in charge of parents

and relatives.

Sent to Charitable Institu-

tion in China.

Sent to School, Convent or

Refuge.

Adopted.

Married.

Cases under consideration.

Total.

1st January, 1911, In the Po Leung Kuk on

26

10

3

3

2

46

8

3

00

12

5

Admitted during the year,...514

187

71 19 130

13

58 16

1

19 514 142 | 23

23 159

36 | 42

Total,.........560

213

81

19 133

16

16

Kuk on the 31st Decem- Remaining in the Po Leung

ber, 1911,

72

35

S.T

6

:

2

2

1 21 560 150

-

72

-

67 514

26 23 171

37

17

72 560

39 O

Table B.

PO LEUNG KUK

Statement of Receipts and Expenditure from 1st January to 31st December, 1911.

RECEIPTS.

Balance from previous year :-

C.

C.

EXPENDITURE.

By the Elected Committee

Ou Fixed Deposit, .

15,000.00

(see Table C),.

At Current Account,

4,580.69

19.580.69

Subscriptions :-

Balance :- On Fixed Deposit, At Current Account,

Yue Lan Celebrations, West Point,

475.00

Elected Committee,

305.00

Guilds,

4,113.14

Man Mo Temple,

1,762.00

Theatres,

1,478.99

8,134.13

On Deposit,

1,131.00

On Current Account,

220.65

1,351.65

Total,..

29,066.47

Total,.

Interest :-

C.

C.

10,890.00

15,000.00

3,176.47

18,176.47

Č 53

29,066.47

Table C.

Statement showing particulars of Expenditure by the Elected Committee from the 1st January to the 31st December, 1911.

RECEIPTS.

ff*

$

c.

EXPENDITURF.

#A

Balance from previous year,

50.80

Decorations,

48.45

Received from Permanent Board,

10,890.00

Food,..

3,842.66

Miscellaneous Receipts,..

66.65

Grant to Miss Eyre's Refuge,

490.00

Premium on bank notes,

316.61

Insurance,

321.64

Light and Fire,

1,277.77

Miscellaneous,

1,094.12

Passage Money,

90.06

Petty Expenditure,

Printing,

Repairs....

168.55

126,55

670.39

Stationery,..

Telephone,

131.81

110.53

Wages,

Balance,

2,840.40

11,213.23

110.83

Total,.....

11,324.06

Total,.

11,324.06

— Ċ 54 —

C 55

M

Annexe B.

Memorandum on Plague and Small-pox Statistics.

Mr. Brewin in a minute dated 3rd November, 1911, wrote:-

"The Principal Civil Medical Officer has been commenting on "the number of small-pox cases which are concealed until death "has occurred, and in consequence of what he said I have compiled "the attached tables.

"The laws relating to plague and small-pox have been much "relaxed of late years and the Chinese have secured the right to "have plague cases treated in ordinary hospitals and in the house, "if certain precautions are observed, and to have small-pox cases "treated in their own hospitals, and the patients visited by "relatives.

"The Dispensaries Committee must shew a corresponding "readiness in the Chinese Community to report cases of infectious "disease as soon as they become recognisable as such, and we can "then claim to have fulfilled the undertakings we gave and argue "that further concessions will result in a greater number of cases

being reported.

66

"The attached tables shew that more than half the cases of "small-pox are not reported till after death and that in a number

of cases of plague the floors are deserted by the inmates.

66

66

66

66

It is

true that the figures for the current year shew a noticeable im- provement (which I am bringing to the notice of the Governor) "but I think that this very improvement shews that the time has come for another burst of energy like that which reduced the "number of bodies dumped, and that further active efforts should "be made to persuade people to report cases of infectious disease "before death occurs and not to run away and leave the floor deserted. The dispensary clerks report every case of infectious "disease (see specimen attached) and I suggest that if in case of plague the floor has been deserted one of the members of the "Committee in company with a member of the Street Committee "visit the house and explain to the inmates of the other floors their duty to report cases of infectious disease and the foolishness of absconding. Plague is not always recognisable by an ordinary man and we cannot expect every case to be reported before death.

<<

With small-pox it is different. Practically every case can. "be recognised before death and in every case where the report has "not been made till after death I suggest that the house be visited, "and not only in cases where the floor has been deserted.

"I am sure that such action would have a good effect and "would result in more cases being reported.

C 56

The Medical Officer of Health informs me that between the "1st January and the 31st August last 28 houses were found "deserted in which plague had occurred and 2 in which there had "been small-pox. However, 24 out of the 180 cases of small-pox were dumped in the street and 17 cases of plague as well. 112 cases of small-pox were reported after death.

66

66

"As I am no longer acting Chairman of the Committee I do "not wish to press my recommendations, but my minute was pre- pared sometime ago and was only held over pending the verifica- "tion of some figures."

66

Tables according to the scheme have been rearranged: brought down to the end of 1911 and grouped in periods of 5 years, 1902- 1906, 1907-1911.

Table I shews that in the second period the average percentage of unclaimed bodies for plague fell from 30·6 to 16-1; the percent- age of 1911 being 4.8 on 269 cases as against 4 per cent on 25 only in 1910.

For small-pox the percentages are 37.1 for the second period as against 50 per cent. for the first: 1911 shewing a rate of 28 per cent. on 271 cases as against 31-8 on 22 cases in 1910.

Table II deals with the cases discovered after death.

In plague 52 per cent. for the second period as against 73.2 for the first. (1911 353 on 269 cases. 1910 48 per cent. on 25 cases.)

In small-pox 69.4 for the second period as against 69.1 for the first. (66-4 1911 on 271 cases, 63-6 on 22 cases 1910.)

For plague the figures may I consider be taken as satisfactory; in considering the slight set back in the percentage of 1911 as com- pared with 1910, the difference in the total number of cases must be taken into account, as must also the exceptional number of strangers in the Colony as a result of the troubles in China. This influx must naturally have tended to throw back the sanitary education of the Chinese.

For small-pox, the results cannot be called altogether satis- factory. The total percentages (always too high) have risen slight- ly, and last year shews a bad return. The influx would be expected to have more effect in connection with small-pox than with plague ; for the small-pox education even of residents of the Colony being necessarily more exacting is far short of the plague education. Sanitary precautions can be and have been safely relaxed in plague; but no relaxation has yet been found advisable in small-pox. To the Chinese mind this is hardly consistent, for even educated Chinese are in the habit of treating small-pox very lightly. The disinfection by the Sanitary Department of all cubicles and clothing

C 57

on the whole floor seems to them so unnecessarily particular that they have little scruple in taking any possible measures to avoid it.

The high percentage both of dumpings and of cases dis- covered after death in small-pox as compared with plague goes far to shew that the disease is recognised-and concealed; and the difficulty of dealing with it is therefore increased.

Action has been taken on the lines suggested by Mr. Brewin and in other directions. It is unfortunate that the unusual influx into the Colony should have given the infection a better chance of spreading, and at the same time have made it almost impossible to gauge the value of the preventive measures taken.

E. R. HALLIFAX,

Registrar General.

C 58

Table I.

Return shewing the relation between the total number of Chinese cases of plague and small-pox and the number of unclaim- ed plague and small-pox bodies (Chinese).

Year.

1902-1911.

Plague.

Total cases of Unclaimed plague

bodies-Chinese.

Percentage.

plague.

1902....

546

216

39.5

1903.

1,294

524

40.5

1904.

507

149

29.4

1905....

300

65

21.7

1906..

870

192

22.1

Total......

3,517

1,146

Average....

703

229

30.6

1907...

1908......

234

131

56.1

1,043

115

11.0

1909..

128

6

50

1910..

25

1

4.0

1911

269

13

4.8

Total

1,699

266

Average

340

53

16.1

Small-pox.

Year.

Total cases of Unclaimed small-pox

small-pox.

bodies-Chinese.

Percentage.

1902.....

48

1903.

53

25

1904..

54

29

1905

46

12

1906..

168

85

33228

68.7

47.2

53.7

26.1

50.6

Total.......

369

184

Average

74

37

50.0

1907.......

317

119

87.5

1908..

446

235

52.7

1909..

28

10

35.7

1910.....

22

7

31.8

1911.

271

76

28.0

Total.

1,084

447

Average

217

89

37.1

<

C 59

Table II.

Return shewing the relation between the total number of Chinese cases of plague and small-pox and the number of cases discovered after death,

1902-1911.

Plague.

Year.

Total Cases, Chinese.

Cases discovered

after death.

Percentage.

1902.......

546

473

86.6

1903..

1,294

917

70.9

1904..

507

312

61.5

1905.

300

219

72.7

1906..

870

647

74.4

Total

3,517

2,567

Average

703

513

73.2

1907.

234

167

71.4

1908.

1,043

627

60·1

1909.

128

86

67.2

1910.

25

12

48.0

1911

269

95

35.3

Total....

1,699

987

Average

340

197

52.0

Small-pox.

1902...

48

1903......

53

1904.

54

22885

39

81.2

41.5

51.8

1905.

46

43

93.5

1906..

168

131

77.9

Total

$69

263

Average

74

62

69.1

1907..

317

224

70.7

1908.

446

330

74.0

1909.

28

20

71.4

1910....

22

14

63.6

1911..

271

180

66.4

Total

1,084

768

Average

217

153

69.4

Appendix D.

REPORT OF THE HARBOUR MASTER

FOR THE YEAR 1911,

TABLE OF CONTENTS.

REPORT.

1.-Shipping.

2.-Trade.

3.-Revenue and Expenditure. 4. Steam-launches.

5.-Emigration and Immigration. 6.-Registry of Shipping.

7.-Marine Magistrate's Court. 8.--Marine Court.

9.-Examination of Masters,

Mates and Engineers. Examination of Pilots.

10.

11. Sunday Cargo Working. 12.-New Territories. 13. Lighthouses. 14.-Commercial

Intelligence,

Board of Trade.

TABLES.

I.-Number, Tonnage, Crews and Cargoes of Vessels entered. II.-Number, Tonnage, Crews and Cargoes of Vessels cleared. III.-Number, Tonnage, Crews and Cargoes of Vessels entered

at each Port.

IV.-Number, Tonnage, Crews and Cargoes of Vessels cleared at

each Port.

V.-Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels of each Nation

entered.

VI.-Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels of each Nation

cleared.

VII.-Junks entered from China and Macao.

VIII-Junks cleared for China and Macao.

IX. Summary of Arrivals and Departures of all Vessels.

X.-Licensed Steam-launches entered.

XI.-Licensed Steam-launches cleared.

XII.--Number of Boat Licences issued.

XIII.-Statement of Revenue.

XIV.-Chinese Passenger Ships cleared by the Emigration Officer

(Summary).

XV. Return of Emigration.

XVI.-Return of Male and Female Emigrants.

D 2

XVII-Vessels bringing Chinese Passengers to Hongkong from

places out of China (Summary).

XVIII.-Return of Immigration.

XIX.-Return of Male and Female Emigrants returned.

XX. Vessels registered.

XXI.-Vessels struck off the Register.

XXII.-Comparison in Number and Tonnage of Vessels in Foreign

Trade entered and cleared since 1902.

XXIII-Revenue and Expenditure of the Harbour Department. XXIV. Diagram of Tonnage of Vessels entered.

ANNEXES.

A.-Report on Mercantile Marine Office. B.-Report on Imports and Exports Office. C.-Report on Marine Surveyor's Office. D.-Report on Gunpowder Depôt.

1.-Shipping.

The total of the Shipping entering and clearing at Ports in the Colony during the year 1911 amounted to 543,570 vessels of 36,179,152 tons, which, compared with figures for 1910, shows a decrease in numbers of 3;594 vessels, with a decrease of 355,209 tons.

Of the above, 44,978 vessels of 23,063,108 tons were engaged in Foreign Trade, as against 40,714 of 23,160,256 tons in 1910, and were distributed as follows:-

1911. Numbers.

1910. Numbers.

1911. Tonnage.

1910. Tonnage.

British Ocean-

going ships,

8.7 %

10.5 %

32.9 %

350 %

Foreign Ocean-

going ships,

9.3

10.6

34.3

35'0

British River

Steamers,

15.3

16:0

17.8

17.3

Foreign River

Steamers,

3.1

3.3

3.2

3:0

Steam-launches

(under

60

tons),

7.2

7.7

0.6

0.6

Trading Junks,

56.4

51.9

11.2

9.1

100.0

100·0

100'0

100.0

444

D 3

The movements of Fishing Junks are not included in the above figures.

2. Of ships of European construction, 4,042 Ocean Steamers, 7 Sailing Ships, 4,147 River Steamers, and 1,617 Steamships not exceeding 60 tons entered during the year, giving a daily average entry of 269 ships, as compared with 26-7 in 1910 and 25'6 in 1909.

3. The average tonnage of individual Ocean Vessels entering the port has once more increased-from 2,457-3 tons to 2,495 1 tons. That of British ships has increased (2,633 5 tons as against 2,594.5 tons) while that of Foreign ships has increased from 2,3241 tons to 2,3657 tons.

During the past 20 years, the average tonnage of Ocean Vessels has increased from 1,1811 tons to 1,915'5 tons.

The average tonnage of River Steamers entered during the year That of British has again decreased from 602-1 tons to 5849 tons. River Steamers has decreased from 617 tons to 599 tons, and that of Foreign River Steamers from 529 tons to 518 tons.

4. A comparison between the years 1910 and 1911 is given in the following table:--

1910.

1911.

Increase.

Decrease.

Class of Vessels.

No. Tonnage. No.

Tonnage.

No. Tonnage. No. Tonnage.

British

Occan-

4,262

going,

Foreign Ocean-

4,312

going,

British River

6,483

Steamers......

Foreign River

1,334

7,589,995 8,111,946| 3,907

8,103,969 | 4,180 7,917,640

4,000,073 | 6,871 4,116,736

706,616 1,423 736.057

355

521,951

132 186,329

388

89 29,441

116,663

Steamers.....

Steamships un-

der 60 tons

3,153

136,765 3,263 130,092 110

:

6,673

(Foreign

Trade)....

Junks, Foreign

21,170 2,100,887 25,334 2,572,588 4,164

£71,701

Trade,

Total Foreign

Trade,

40,714 23,160,256 44,978 23,063.108 4.751

617,805 487 714,953

Steam-launches

plying in Wa- ters of Colony, Junks, Local

Trade,

*40,436 *2,387,871 + 36,608 +2,134,054

466,014 10,986,234 461,984 10,981,990

4,030 $

4,241

3,828 253,817

Grand Total,

547,164 36,534,361 | 543,570 36,179.152 4,761

617,805 8,345 973,014

Net...

3,594 355,209

* Including 21,056 Conservancy and Dust Boats of 1,540,984 tons.

+

"

19

13,980

of 818,292 Decrease owing to a number of smaller sized launches being employed. Small decrease in tounage owing to larger sized launches being

employed.

D 4

5. This table shows a decrease in British Shipping of 355 ships of 521,951 tons, or of 8.3 per cent. in numbers and of 64 per cent, in tonnage. This large falling off, which occurred in the latter half of the year, is principally due to a stagnation in trade occasioned by the unrest in China, failure of the Rice Crops, strikes in the United Kingdom, and to the turnover of the China and Manila Steamship Company's fleet to the United States flag.

British River Steamers have increased from 6,483 ships of 4,000,073 tons to 6,871 ships of 4,116,736 tons, or, 2.3 per cent. in ships and 29 per cent. in tonnage. This is explained by the new steamer Wing On contributing 295 trips, also, to the increased number of trips made by the Canton Steamers, particularly, at the time of the unrest in Canton.

Foreign Ocean Vessels have decreased by 132 ships or 30 per cent. in numbers, and of 23 per cent. in tonnage. This result is due to increases of 66, 47, 26, 20, 15 and 4 ships under United States, Dutch, Portuguese, Russian, French and Japanese flags respectively, which are counterbalanced by decreases of 141, 121, 27,18, 2, and 1 ships under German, Chinese, Swedish, Norwegian, Italian and Danish flags respectively. The increase shown under the United States flag is explained by the steamers Rubi and Zafiro being transferred from British colours; also the increase shown under the Dutch flag is explained by four steamers that did not call at the port in the previous year. The decrease under the German flag is chiefly accounted for by the falling off in trade from Bangkok similarly, the decrease under the Chinese flag is due to the fact of the loss of the Meefoo and the stoppage of two steamers which previously traded to the port.

Foreign River Steamers have increased by 89 ships (or 6'6 per cent.) of 29,441 tons (or 41 per cent). This is mainly accounted for by the new steamers Shing Ping and Licorne contributing 72 trips, and to an increase in trips of vessels under the Portuguese flag.

As in former years, I here insert a comparison between the shipping of the port twenty years ago and to-day. In 1891, 2,856 British ships, of 3,593,223 net register tons entered the port, against 10,778 ships, of 11,706,731 net register tons in 1911; an increase of 277.3 per cent. in numbers and 223 per cent. in tonnage. These figures include Ocean and River Steamers and Ocean-going Sailing Ships (not junks). In the same way, Foreign Shipping, during the same period, has increased from 1,495 ships of 1,545,404 net register tons in 1891, to 5,603 ships of 8,653,697 net register tons; an increase of 2757 per cent. in numbers, and of 459.9 per cent. in tonnage.

6. The actual number of individual Ocean Vessels of European type of construction entering during 1911 was 720, being 348 British and 372 Foreign. The corresponding figures for 1910 were 734, 365, and 369, respectively.

D 5

These 720 ships aggregated 1,796,498 tons. They entered 4,049 times, giving a collective tonnage of 7,756,033 tons. Thus, compared with 1910, 14 less ships with a tonnage decreased by 8,177 tons, entered 235 less times, and gave a collective tonnage less by 356,952 tons.

Thus

Steamers.

No. of Times entered.

Total Tonnage.

Flag.

1910. 1911. 1910. 1911.

1910.

1911.

Steamers! 360

344

2,124 1,952 4,041,557 3,781,622

British

Sailing... 5

4

7

6 17,663 16,534

German,

113

111

722

657

1,206,757 1,133,786

Steamers 101

106

507

509

1,341,083 1,354,362

Japanese

Sailing... 1

1

138

Norwegian,

34

36

223

210

236,334 221,039

Austrian,

7

6

24

24

95,062

95,062

96,380

Chinese,

22

20

250

192

314,879

241,362

Danish,

6

$

20

20

33,165

45,928

Dutch.

16

16

108

130

214,737 235,881

French,

35

27

144

152

262,670 242,469

Italian,..

13

12

34,496 31,188

Portuguese,

3

4

66

79

29,478

32,842

Russian,

7

11

10

20

28,803

53,080

Swedish,

5

6

27

14

45,398

25,778

Steamers

15

18

37

71

210,466

243,619

U. S. A.

Sailing..

1

1

163

No Flag,

1

1

...

299

1

Total,.... 734 720 4,284 4,049 8,112,9857,756,033

D 6

7. The 348 British Ships carried 3,445 British Officers and 12 Foreign Officers, the latter consisting of 7 U.S.A., 2 Norwegians, 2 Dutch, and 1 German.

Thus, the proportion of Foreign Officers serving in British Ships was 0-35%, comprising 4 nationalities, a decrease of 019%, with a decrease in number of officers and of ships.

8. The 372 Foreign Ships carried 2,600 officers, of whom 90 were British, as follows:-

In Chinese Ships

1911.

1910.

70

90

French

4

6

""

"}

""

Japanese

12

42

"

>>

United States Ships

6

90

144

Thus, 35% of the officers serving in Foreign Vessels were of British nationality, a decrease in the number of officers and ships.

9. The Nationality of the Crews in British and Foreign Ships was as follows:—

VESSELS.

BRITISH CREWS.

U. S. A. AND EUROPEANS.

ASIATICS.

1910. 1911. | 1910. 1911.

1910. 1911. 1910. 1911.

British,.

365

Foreign,. 369

318 24,610 22,652 449 431 131,635 119,463

372 1,352 1,195 28,216 27,181113,050 112,584

Total,

734 720 25,962 23,847 28,665 27,612 244,685,232,047

14,685|232,0

Hence in British Ships :-

And in Foreign Ships :-

1910.

1911.

1910.

1911.

15.70 %

15.89% of the crews were British.

0.95 %

0·85 % of the crews

were British.

0·29 %

84.01 %

0.30 % of the crews were other Europeans.

83.81% of the crews

were Asiatics.

19.78 %

19.28% of the crews

were other Europeans.

79.27 % 79.87% of the crews

were Asiatics.

-D7-

2.-Trade.

10. As pointed out in previous reports, the figures which used to appear under this heading were misleading, being inaccurate in some cases. However, in the few items of Import Trade of which substantially accurate details can be given, and as to these, the following remarks may be of interest :-

This

Coal.-1,046,290 tons were imported during the year. quantity, compared with the imports for 1910, shows a decrease of 68,830 tons or 66%. This decrease may be ascribed to greater quantities of coal passing through Hongkong to Canton than here- tofore, principally, Japanese, North China and Hongay coals; also to the falling off in Ocean Tonnage.

Of the many varieties of coal imported, Japanese heads the list. Next comes North China and Hongay. The importation from Pulo Laut is increasing. There was only one cargo of Cardiff coal commercially imported. No Australian coal was discharged throughout the year.

Kerosene Oil shows a big increase in Bulk Oil of 62,367 tons or 111·1%, and in Case Oil an increase of 4,112 tons or 82%, while Liquid Fuel has increased by 7,759 tons or 82.3%. The huge increase in Bulk Oil can be attributed to a great extent to the cutting of rates between the Standard Oil and Asiatic Petroleum Companies, and as the stocks were left short in 1910 it further enhanced the importation of the commodity during the year, and, also, to shipments hitherto shipped direct to coast ports, but now transhipped here. Owing to the Revolution in China sales in the Interior have now become restricted. Similarly, the increase in Liquid Fuel tends to show that this class of fuel is now becoming popular in steamers which hitherto exclusively consumed coal.

Cotton and Cotton Yarn.-Here is shown a large decrease amounting to 34,730 tons or 87.5% chiefly due to high prices ruling for cotton during the year, which made it prohibitive to the poorer Chinese and so checked business. The last two or three months of the year were particularly bad for business owing to the Revolu- tion.

Flour.--Here our returns show a great increase of 49,679 tons or 153.8%, due to the poor rice and wheat crops in China throughout the year. Districts which were supplied last year from the abundant crops of China have this year been compelled to fall back on the American product. The price of rice has also enhanced the demand for American flour, this being used as a substitute for rice and rice flour. The prices of rice throughout the year have practically stood at about 40% over normal prices, possibly, the high prices of flour in Australia have to some extent inflated our imports here, inasmuch, as such high prices have curtailed that country's shipments to ports south of Hongkong, which are large consumers (Java, Straits, Burmah, &c.), and the southern ports have come to us for their supplies; this port being the distributing centre of those districts for American flour,

D 8

D

Rice. Here our returns show a falling off of 152,224 tons or 26 6%. The failure of the southern crops in general, as evidenced by the high prices which have ruled on the markets for the last half year, has, of course, been the reason of the decline.

11. The total reported Imports during the year amounted to 3,995,793 tons as against 4,292,194 tons in 1910, a decrease of 296,401 tons or 74%. Exports show an increase of 71,672 tons or 3·1%. Transit cargo shows an increase of 66,109 tons or 16%. These figures are not, however, reliable, there being no means of collecting accurate information in the absence of any Customs Staff.

The number and tonnage of ships of European type of construc- tion carrying cargo for import and transit, compared with 1910, was as follows:-

Steamers,

1910.

1911.

Increase.

Decre ise.

No.

Tonnage. No. Tonnage.

No

Tonnage. No. Tonnage.

4,276

8,095,184 4.042

7,739,336

River Steamers, 3,910

2,354,268 4,147 2.425.868 237 71,600

Sailing Vessels,

17,801

16.697

234 | 355,848

Total, . 8,194 10,467,253 8,196 | 10,181,901 237 71.600 235

Increase,..

1

1.104

356,952

285,352

12. The corresponding figures relating to ships of European type of construction exporting cargo, and shipping bunker coal, follow :-

EXPORTS.

1910.

1911.

Increase.

Decrease.

No.

Tonnage.

No.

Tonnage.

No.

Tonnage.

No.

Tonnage.

Steamers,

River Steamers,.

4,282 | 8,082,780 | 4,029 3,907 | 2,352,421 | 4,147

7,732,115

253

350,665

2,426,925

240 74,504

Sailing Vessels,.

8

20,150

9

19,487

1

663

Total,

8,197 10,455,351 8,185 10,178,527

241

74,504

253

351,328

Net Decrease,

12

276,934

Exported 2,263,000 tons including River Trade as compared with 2,240,000 tons in 1910.

D 9

13 59,820

Strs.

Bunker

Coal.

Strs.

Bunker

Coal.

Bunker

Strs.

Strs.

Coal.

Bunker

Coal.

Steamers,

4,282

579,841 | 4,029

516,232

253

63,609

River Steamers,..

3,907

61,236

4,147

65,075

240

3,789

Total,..

8,189

611,1278,176

581,307

240 3,789

253

63,609

Net Decrease,

:

:

D 10

13. The River Trade, compared with 1910, is shown in the following Table :-

Year.

1910,.

1911,

Imports.

Exports.

Passengers.

386,813

318,412

1,984,793

337,207

308,773

2,343,414

14. The following Table shows the Junk Trade of the Colony for 1910 and 1911-

IMPORTS.

1911.

1910.

Junks.

Foreign Trade,

12.862

Local Trade,

18.798

Tons. 1,286,807 1,068,211

Junks.

Tons.

10,736 1,068,177 20,224

1,199,024

Total,

31,660

2.355 018

20,960

2,267,201

EXPORTS.

1911.

1910.

Foreign Trade,

12,472

1,285,781

10,434 1,032,710

Local Trade,

17,810

1,065,843

20,212

1,188,847

Total,

30,282

2,351,624

30,646

2,221,557

Passengers.

15. A summary of the Shipping and Trade of the Port for the year 1911. nearest 1,000 tons only :

The trade return is given to the

TONS.

D 11

No. of

Ships.

Dis-

charged.

Shipped.

In

Transit.

Bunker Coal.

Total.

Registered

Emi-

grants.

Departed.

Arrived.

Tonnage.

British Ocean-going,

3,907

Foreign Ocean-going,

1.503,000 4,180 2.156.000

1,092.000 2.157,000

221,000 4.973,000

7,589,995

169,708

9:4,000 | 1,888,000

295,000 | 5,273,000

7.917,640

108.853

137.207 92,691

100,093

42,874

British River Steamers,

6,871

243,000

221.000

51,000

515.000

4,116,736

1,097,685

1.038,374

Foreign River Steamers,...

1,123

94,000

88,000

11,000

196,000

736,057

118,693

88,662

Total,.

16,381

3,996,000 | 2,335,000 4,045,000

581.000 10,957,000

20.360,428

1,494,939

1,361,336 | 135,565

Steam-launches, Foreign Trade,

8,263

Junks, Foreign Trade,

25,334

8,000

475.000

10,00

680.000

6,000

24,000

1,155,000

130,092

2,572,588

19,630

26,837

31.845

26.991

Total Foreign Trade,

41.978

4,479.000 | 3.025,000 | 4,045,000

587,000 12.136,000 23,063,108 1,546,414

1,418,167

Steam-launches, Local Trade,

461,984

1,000

1,000

36,000

Junks, Local Trade,..

36,608

115,000

100,000

38,000

215,000

Total, Local Trade,

498,592

116,000

101,000

36.000

10,981,990

2,134,054

253,000 13,116,044 2,890,770

2,866 617

2,847,7. 3

24,153

28,282

2,875.985

Grand Total,

543,570 | 4,595,000 | 3,126,000 | 4,045,000

623.000 12,389,000 | 36,179,152 | * 4,437,184

4,294,152135,565

D 12

3:-Revenue and Expenditure.

16. The gross Revenue collected by the Harbour Department during the year was $506,964.85 as against $494,234.84 collected in the previous year, showing an increase of $12,730.01 or 2·4% : --

Light Dues,

Light Dues, Special Assessment, Licences and Internal Revenue, Fees of Court and Office................... Miscellaneous Receipts,

Total.......

..$

1910. 86,157 20 $ 95,810 83 137,288.67 174,811.89

1911. 82,578.09 $ 92,802.14

Increase.

Lecrease. $ 3,579 11 3 CUS 69

137,368.56

194.023.86

166.25

192.20

79.89 19,211.97 25.95

.$ 494,234.84 $ 506.964.85 $ 19,317.81 $

6.587.80

Deduct Decrease,

Net Increase,

$ 12,730.01

6587 SO

=

The principal increases are under Medical Examination of Emigrants, $16,533; Sunday Cargo Working Permits, $6,500; Fines, $868.88; Steam-launch Licences, &c., $569.50; Boat Licences, $339.06; Fees for storage of gunpowder, &c., $399.62; Junk Licences, $255.80: Chinese Passenger Ship Licences, $105; Survey of Steam-launches, $90 and Message Fees for notifying ships signalled $31.20.

There has been falling off in Revenue under the headings: Light Dues, $3,579.11; Light Dues, Special Assessment, $3,008.69 ; Engagement and Discharge of Seamen, $2,269.80; Survey of Steam- ships, $778.60; Registry Fees, $612; Examination of Masters, Mates, &c., $577.50; Fishing Stakes and Station Licences, $483; Emigration Brokers' Licences, $200; Pilots' licences, $90; and Sale of Printed Forms, $41.75.

17. The expenditure of the Harbour Department (exclusive of the Imports and Exports Office) for 1911 was $161,149.32 as against $160,035.89 expended in 1910. The expenditure stated above for 1911 includes $507.90 paid for coal remaining in stock at the end of December but does not include $2,500 and $12,372.11 specially ex- pended respectively for recoppering the Government Steam Tender Stanley and for the installation of Matthews Incandescent Oil Burners in Gap Rock, Waglan and Green Island Lighthouses.

;

D 13

Class of Vessels.

No. of

Trips.

Tonnage.

Rato

per ton.

Fees

Collected.

The Amount of Light Dues collected was as follows :--

Special Assessment.

Fees

Collected.

Total Foes

Collected.

Rate

per ton.

$

('.

Ocean Vessels,

3,960

7,697,557

1 cent.

76,975.57

1 cent.

76,975.57

153,951.14

Steam Launches,

1,521

61,237 1

612.87 I

612.87

1,225.74

"}

River Steamers (Night Boats),

2,749

1,196,908

4,989.65

7,484.54

12,474.19

""

River Steamers (Day Boats),

1,282

927,459

Nil.

7,729.16

7,729.16

"

Total,

9,512 10,183,251

$82,578.09

$92,862.14

$175,380.23

D 14

4.-Steam-launches.

18. On the 31st December, there were 303 Steam-launches (in- cluding Motor Boats) employed in the Harbour. Of these, 129 were licensed for conveyance of passengers, &c., 134 were privately owned, 18 were the property of the Government and 22 belonged to the Im- perial Government, comprising 4 Military and 18 Naval.

Nine Masters' Certificates were suspended for incompetency or negligence in the performance of their duties; 3 were suspended for 3 months, and were required to be re-examined before their certificates were returned; I was suspended for six months; 2 were suspended for 1 month and were required to come up for instruction at the expiration of that time; 2 were suspended for 1 month and 2 months respectively and were required to come up for examination at the expiration of those times and 1 was ordered to re-pass the examination before his certificate was returned.

Five hundred and fifteen (515) engagements and four hundred and sixty-six (466) discharges of masters and engineers were made during the year.

As in 1910, seven (7) steam-launches were permitted to carry Arms, &c., for their protection against pirates. These were all pre- viously allowed.

5.-Emigration and Immigration.

19. One hundred and thirty-five thousand five hundred and sixty-five (135,565) Emigrants left Hongkong for various places during the year 1911 (111,058 in 1910).

Of these, 98,691 were carried in British Ships, and 42,874 in Foreign Ships.

These figures show a substantial increase over 1910 of 24,507 (or 22%) which can be accounted for in the same way as last year; providing labour for rubber plantations in the Federated Malay States.

One hundred and forty-nine thousand eight hundred and ninety- four (149,894) returning emigrants are reported to have been brought to Hongkong from the several places to which they had emigrated, either from this Colony or, from Coast Ports, as against 149,564 in 1910. Of these 112,328 arrived in British Ships, and 37,566 in Foreign Ships..

6.-Registry, &c., of Shipping.

20. During the year, 20 ships were registered under the pro- visions of the Imperial Merchant Shipping Act, and 4 Certificates of Registry were cancelled. 111 Documents, &c., were dealt with in connection with the Act, the fees on which amounted to $846 as compared with $1,458 in 1910.

D 15

7.-Marine Magistrate's Court.

21. Two hundred and thirty-five cases were heard in the Marine Magistrate's Court (95 in 1910). Breach of the Harbour Regulations, Disobeying the Lawful Orders of the Harbour Master, Neglecting to exhibit lights, Failing to observe the Rule of the Road, and carrying passengers in excess were the principal offences.

8. Marine Court.

(Under Section 19 of Ordinance 10 of 1899.)

22. During the year only one Court was held :-

On the 11th December, inquiry into the circumstances attending the piracy on November 23rd on the British S.S. "Shui On", Official No. 126,987 of Hongkong, of which Robert Alexander Johnson, number of whose Certificate of Competency is 191 Singapore, was Master.

The Court found that shortly after the Ship had taken the ground on a spit N.E. of Staunch Island, West River, a number of armed Chinese pirates attacked the ship firing volleys at the Euro- pean Quarters and afterwards ransacked her, taking away valuables to the amount of $10,000, of which $9,500 belonged to the passengers and crew; and that the Chief Officer, Mr. Nicholson, lost his life in gallantly endeavouring to prevent the pirates from boarding the ship.

9.-Examination of Masters, Mates and Engineers.

23. The following Tables show the number of Candidates examined under Ordinance 10 of 1899, for Certificates of Competency, distinguishing those who passed from those who failed :-

(Under Board of Trade Regulations.)

:-

Grade.

Passed.

Failed.

Master,

9

Master, (Provisional Certificate),

First Mate,

8

1

Second Mate,

I

Mate,

1

Mate, River Steamer,

2

Total,

19

5

First Class Engineer,

Second Class Engineer,..

21

30

10 1

5

Total,

51

6

D 16

For Steamships not exceeding 60 tons, under Section 37 of Or- dinance No. 10 of 1899 :-

*----

For Master,..

Candidates.

For Engineer,

Total,

Passed.

Failed.

62

Co

3

50

1

112

4

10.-Examination of Pilots.

(Under Ordinance No. 3 of 1904.)

24. Only one candidate was examined during the year and passed. One Licence was issued, and 13 Licences were renewed.

11.-Sunday Cargo Working.

25. During the year 319 Permits were issued under Ordinance No. 1 of 1891 as compared with 267 in 1910. Of these 107 were not used as it was found unnecessary to work cargo on the Sunday and the fees in such cases were refunded.

The Revenue collected under this head amounted to $36,975 as against $30,475 in 1910.

12.-New Territories.

Thirteenth year of British Administration.

26. The Outstations attached to the Harbour Department, now seven in number, have continued to perform the work allotted to them, and during the year Licences, Port Clearances, Permits, &c., have been issued by them as follows:-

1910.

1911.

Cheung Chau opened 1899...... 13,484

13,780

Tai O

1899..

6,258

""

7,494

Tai Po

1900...

>>

9,022

8,928

Sai Kung

1902....

2,683

1

3,504

Long Ket

1905.... 8,260

6,473

Deep Bay

1901

"

closed July 1909, re-

opened December, 1911.

Ping Shan opened 1st Sep-

tember, 1911,.

560

42

>

39,707

40,781

D 17

The Revenue collected by this Department from the New Terri- tories during 1911 was $29,054 as compared with $28,141.90 in 1910.

13.-Lighthouses.

GAP ROCK Lighthouse.

27. During 1911, 899 vessels passed this station, all of which were reported to the Harbour Office by telegraph. Of this number 144 were signalled by Morse lamp.

Three thousand seven hundred and seventeen (3,717) telegraphic messages were sent, including meteorological observations for the Observatory, and 557 messages were received.

Telegraphic communication was maintained throughout the year except for a few interruptions of short duration, caused by the land lines being in contact.

There were fifty-five hours and thirty minutes (55 h. 30 m.) of fog and the fog signal was fired 352 times.

On three occasions the relief was delayed by rough weather.

WAGLAN ISLAND LIGHTHOUSE.

During 1911, 2,281 messages were sent and 663 received ; 2,063 vessels were reported, and owing to interruption of telegraphic communication 140 vessels were not reported.

There were 183 hours and forty-eight minutes (183 h. 48 m.) of fog and the fog guns were fired 1,928 times.

On two occasions the relief was delayed by rough weather.

GREEN ISLAND LIGHTHOUSE.

During 1911, 1,582 vessels were signalled and reported. 536 messages were sent and 477 received.

Owing to telephonic communication being interrupted at ten different times during the year, 67 vessels were not reported.

In the latter part of the year Matthews Trinity House vapouris- ing oil burner, on the "Kitson" system, was installed at Gap Rock, Waglan Island and Green Island Lighthouses, replacing the Trinity House wick burners.

It is the latest Trinity House improvement in Lighthouse illumination, thus bringing our three leading lights up to a high state of efficiency, and comparing favourably with any modern light. The intensity of the light is greatly increased, at the same time an approximate saving of 51% on oil consumption has been effected.

D 18

M

A satisfactory test has been carried out with White Rose Paraffin Oil, supplied locally by the Standard Oil Company. This oil will be universally adopted and being cheaper in price as compared with the oil formerly sent out from Home affects a further saving in cost of maintenance.

The light was first exhibited at Green Island on 10th August, at Gap Rock on the 1st September, and at Waglan Island on the 5th October.

14.-Commercial Intelligence, Board of Trade.

28. Fifty-six (56) letters were received during the year from firms and individuals, principally in Great Britain, asking for in- formation upon various points in connection with their business, requesting me to place them in communication with local firms, or to obtain local agents for the sale of their goods, or submitting samples or price lists.

My replies have been as full as the information and time at my disposal permitted, and my negotiations have, I understand, been productive, in many cases, of desired effects.

HARBOUR OFFICE,

13th February, 1912,

C. W. BECKWITH, Commander, R.N.,

Harbour Master.

Australia and

New Zea-

land.

British North

Borneo.

Canada

Coast of China.

Ships.

Coast of China, Steamships

under 60 tons.

Coast of China. Junks.

D 19

Table I.-NUMBER, TONNAGE, CREWS and CARGOES of VESSELS ENTERED in the CO

COUNTRIES WHENCE ARR

Cochin China.

Continent of

Europe.

Formosa.

BRITISH.

IN BALLALI.

Vessels,

Tous,

¿Crews,

WITH CARGOES.

Car-

Vessels,

Tous,.

28

30

23

3 086

58,773 60,562110,676 || 2,392,639

:

Crews....

2,320 1,666: 4,684

141,758

'8003

Discharged,

16,000 | 106.000 37,000

418,000

Transit,

18,000 6,000 39,000

420,000

:

:

53

14

4

136

158

202

31

10

1,038

75,997

49,662 10,108 | 482,389| 436,986 | 571.336

48,370 2,978 | 672,098

3,263

97,000

3,000

128 35,195

1,490 282 9,500 19,908 18,7261 1.929 11,000 | 2,000 | 141,000 176,000 221,000 70,000 | 4,00 €4,000|11,000 | 552,000 | 244,000 445,000 5,000

61,000

226

264,99!

611

:

12,182

42

21

1

137

879

8,991 2,846

21

38

176

33

:

692

556

[Vessels...

Tons,

28 30

58,773,60,562 | 110,676

28

3,312

59

14

138

159

206

32

1,040

TOTAL.

Car-

Crews....

gocs.

Discharged,

2,320 1,666 | 4,684

16,000 108,00 37,000

2,657,630

153,940

76,038

49,662 [10,108 | 483,026 | 4:7,565 580.330

418,000

Transit,

18,000 6,00 · 39,000

420,000

FOREIGN.

TOTAL.

IN BALLAST.

WITH CARGOES.

Car-

Car-

goes.

Vessels,

Tons,

34

38

69,853 53,478

Crews,......

goes,

2,979 2,161

Discharged,. 24,000 5,000

Tian-it,

28,000 20,000

881 338 9,332

782,154 12,0.S| 915,396

43,146| 3,503 | 125,078

152,000 1,000 | 466,000

210,000

3,305

97,000

3,000

57

126

79

21

337

84

66,935 463,994 |73,341 91,950 166,513 1,141,9:0, 107,624 35,695

2,697 15,209 4,097 2,152

4,519 30,546 3,039 4,312 89,000 82,000 23,000 19,000 78,000 770,000 155,000 21,000 473.000 2,000 106,000 132,000|667,000 | -51,000 1,000

66

51,216 | 2,978 | 672,790 1,430 282 9,521 19,946 15.996 1,962 128 35,211 11,000 2,000 141,000 176,000 221,000 70,000 4,000 61,000 64,000|11,000|552,000 | 244,000 445,000 5,000

17.

:

133

21,546 10

1,596 €

20,000 7

Vessels,..

Tons,

Crews,.......

Vessels,....

Tons,....

Crews,...

Discharged,

:

:

161 973 3,126

149,381 35,777 | 333,689

6,434 9,779 48,463

1

1 i 6

$

1,216

42

390 3,438

:

:

1

7,673

2,563

984

T

34 212

354

39

45

3,439

280

34

38

69,853 53,478

2,979 2,161

24,000 (85,000

:

Transit,

WITH CARGoes.

Car-

Vessels,

Tons,.

28,000 20,000 62| 63

1,042 1,311 12,458

931,535 17,795 1,249,085)

49,880 13,342 | 173,541

152,000 1,000 466,000

210,000

58

-

28

116

128,626114,040 | 110,676

Crews,....

goes.

¡Discharged,

Transit,

5,299 3,827 4,684

40,000 191,000 37,000

46,000 26,000 39,000

127 65

388

68,181 464,384 76,779 91,950 174,186 1,144,473, 108,608 35,695

24,985 16. 2,739 15,243 4,309 2,152 4,873 30,585 3,144❘ 4,312 1,876 6, 89,000 82,000 23,000 | 19,000 78,000 770,000 155,000 21,000 -20,000| 7,

473,000 2,000 106,000 132,000 667,000 51,000 1,000 3.967 838 9,332

140 83

589

$6 1,171 3,174,793 12,018 | 915,396 142,932 613,656 $3,449 574,839 603,499|1,713,215 155,994 38.673 693,644 16.

185,204 3,503 | 125,078] 5,960

570,00 1,000 466,000| 186,000

630,000

3,000

21

74

48

81

141

+

157

224

78

16,699 4,379 11,652 24,427 46,266 5,028 4,110 36,781 6.

93,000 25,000 160,000 251,000 991,000 225,000 25,000 $1,000 7,0 537,000 13,000 658,000 | 376,000 [1,112.000 56,000 1.000

TOTAL.

IN BALLAST.

Vessels,.

Tons,

Crews,..

(Vessels,

Tons,..

:

#87 973 3,126

414.372 35,777 | 333,689

19.616 9,779 48,463

G

9

5

:

1,887

84

390 3,438 137 8,552

11,557 3,830

31 212

21

392

215

78

10

4 131

336

مسر

62

68

28

117

141

128,626 114,040 | 110,676

TOTAL.

Car-

goes,

4,351 1311 12,458

86 1.181 3 3,589,165 47,795 1,249,085 144,819 514,046 36,887 574,976 612,051 1.724,803 159,824 38,673 | 697,775 16,9

89

139

233

594

80

Crews,..

Discharged,

Trausit,

3,827 4,684 203,820 13,342 | 173,541 6,041

40,000, 191,000 37,000 570,000 1,000 466,000 180,000

16.030 26,000 (39,000 630,000

16,733 4,591 11.673

93,000 25,000 160,000

3,000 537,000 13,000 658 000

24,819 46,481 5,105 4,140 37,117 6,1 254,(0)| 991,00 225,000 25,000 81,000 7.0

376,000 1.112.000j 56,000

12.0001

1,000

Great Britain.

India and

Straits

Settlements

Japanese Ports.

· Java and ot) er

Islands in

the Indian

Archipelago.

• N¥k{)-GU}}}

wan.

Macao.

Ships.

D 19

INTERED in the COLONY of HONGKONG from EACH COUNTRY, in the YEAR 1911.

COUNTRIES WHENCE ARRIVED.

Japanese Ports.

· Java and otl er

Islands in

the Indian

Archipelago.

Kwang-chau-

wan.

Ships.

Macao,

under 60 tons.)

Steamships

Масао,

Junks.

Macao.

Mauritius.

America. North

North and

South

Pacific.

Philippine

Islands.

202

31

2 1,038

71.336 48,370 2,978 | 672,098

:

15,720 1,929 128 35,195

21,000 70,000 | 4,00 ›

61,0000

45,000 5,000

1

2

8,991

2,846

692

176

33

56

:

:

.

C1

5,082

:

'u![C$),

Port Arthur.

Hainan and

Ports in

Gulf of

118

152,301

:

Russia in Asia.

Siam.

96

113,24411,962

5.964

South Africa.

America.

South

Tsingtau.

of America.

United States

co

3,760

288

182

9,000

113

7,10%

54.009

131,000

:

16,000

46,000 19,000

T:..

:

:

:

:

:

:

2,816

184

:

:

71

17, 60

1,737

577

30

:

:

:

Weihaiwei.

TOTAL.

77

If

5,112

5,285 13,179 | 257,940|18,474| 5,554,361

205

710 4,611 944 258,015

7,000 174.000|11.000 1 746,000

6.000 7,000 | 249,000| 7000| 2.157,000

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:.

:

251

300,823

13.339

11

77

14

5,393

2

2

6,695| 7,391| 474,101

5,28513,179 257,940|18,174 5.855,184

205 710 4,641 914 271,354

7,000 174,000 11,000 1,746 000

6,000 7,000 249.000| 7,000 2,157,000

12,735

5 075,483

95

195 109

9,000

16.000

14,397

139,000

50,000

2:13.664

2,733,000

1,888,000

4.547

10 267

:

602,$12

443

71.581

:

:

:

206

32

1,040

.0.330 51,216 2,978| 672,790

5,896 1,962 128 35,211

:

7,928

297

:

:

:

1,000 70,000 | 4,000

61,000

:

5,000

5,000

387

1,90 107,624 35,695

0,546 3,039 4,312

47.

84

133

303

182 1

:

:

:

0,000 155,000 21,000

21,546 16,839 |13,740|951 | 3,242

1,896 6,406 2.218 41 62

20,000 7,000 9,000 1,000 2,000

53,779

129

169,421

7.682

54,000

18,000

39

:

:

97

114,981|11,962

3,760

5,991 288

182

131,000

9,000

46,000 |19,000

230

15

238

6,389 | 191,081|39,186| 259,612

3 225

195 8,572 761; 12,029

16,00

12,000 | 190,000

363,000

7,000-$1,000

1,000

1,000

2,000

70,000 | 57,000

2,000

1

1

222

2

26

7

2,563

984

3,439

87 23,962

200

25,310

4.376

39

45

280

22 3,522

37

1,516

259

:

:

388

48

81

141 306 404

2

65

1,473, 108,608 35,695

24,985 16,926 37,722 | 951 | 3,242

200

79.119

1,585

3,144❘ 4,312

1,876 6,428 6,040 41 62

37

1,000 | 155,000 21,000 - 20,000 | 7,000| 9,000|1,000| 2,000

,000 51,000 | 1,000

:

1,000

2,000

238

6,389 | 195,457,9,186| 259,612

4 541

195 8,831 761 12,029

16,000 12,000| 190,000

363,000

70,000 57,000 2,000

237

15

2

2

1235

96

17,282

16,000

6,695 7,891 484 368

195 100 14,840

9,000

139,000

50,000

5 678.245

365 245

2.733 000

1,8 8.000

78

589

$6 1,171 303

3,216 155,994 38.673 693,644 16,839 13,760 951 8,324

,266 5,028 | 4,440]

182

1

3

157

4

206,140

36,781 | 6,406| 2,218|| 41 175

10,330

,000 225,000 25,000 81.000 7,000 9.000 1,000 2,000

70,000

2,000 56,000

1,000

:

:

17,000

2,000 116,000|76,000

326

6.389 304,325|51,148 | 263,372

195 14,536 1,049 12,211

12.000 371,000

372,000

2,000

19

241

13

172

17,877

11,980 20,570 | 732 841 |18.

*,629.794

400 い

19.038

551 679

9,000| 7,000 313.000|11,000 4479 000

6,000 (23.000| 299,000| 7.000 4,04%:00)

2

557 3,830

215

78

:

10

222

2

37

4 131

87 23,962

:

:

2,816

200 42,400

336

22 3,822

184

37 1,893

8

6.113

289

00

:

10,267

443

1,798

903,635

81.920

594

80

86 1,181 300 404 1

194

4

331

19

241

4

13

173

22 673

,803 159,824 33,673 697,776 16,926 37,722 95111,170

481 5,105 4,440

00: 225,000 25,000

000j 56,000 1,000

37,117 6,428 6,010 41 359

81.000 7,000; 9,000 1,000 2,000

200 248,510 6,389 310,438 51.148 | 263,372

37

12,223 195 14,25 1,049 12,211

70,000 12,000: 321 000

372,000

17,000

2,000

2,000 116,000 176,000

11,980 20.570 | 742,30818,474 11,533 429

400 849 19.481 914 636 599

9,000 7,000| 313,000|11,000) 4.479,000

6,000|23,000| 249,000| 7,000¦ 4.045,000

TOTAL.

TOTAL.

IN BALLAST.

WITH CARGOES.

TOTAL.

FOREIGN.

IN BALLAST.

WITH CARGOES.

TOTAL.

IN BALLAST.

WITH CARGOES

Australia and

New Zealand.

British North

Borneo.

Canada.

Ccast of China, Ships.

Coast of China, Steamships under 60 tons.

Coast of China, Junks.

D 20

Table II.-NUMBER, TONNAGE, CREWS and CARGOES of VESSELS CLEARED in the CC

COUNTRIES TO WHICH DEPA

Cochin China.

Continent of

Europe.

Vessels,

28

12

27

3,236

GO

53

1

57

149

194

13

:

1,037

Tons,

Crews.

Shipped, Punker

58,722 19,502 107,864 | 2,561,919

78 090 | 196,127 1,363 | 242,353 | 407,121 609,479

20.870

669,557

Cargoes,

2,321 1,066

19,000 3,000| 33,000

4,877

151,935

524.000

14,000

3,003

❘ 31.000

5,073

Coal,...

9.000 2,000

Vessels,

12

Tons,

Crews,

B1,429

:

:

58,000

14,000

4,000

68 4,768 19,381 15,851

1.000 30,000 160,000 42,000

3,000 39,000

814

35,103

19,000

111,000

20,600

4,000:

51,000

65

15

9

I

3

20

15

2

4

44,728

591

2,765

Bunker Coal,

2,000

4,000

Vessels,

Tons..

28

21

27

3,301

58,722 50,931 [107,864 || 2,606,647

:

:

:

:

:

21,157

28,305 | 1,424

STO

4,000

386

63

9,242 43,216

126 891

9.939

$2.178 2,978

1,508

179

717 122

112

2.000

4,000

1,000 4.000

73

2

Crews,

2,321 | 1,657

4,877

151,700

Cargoes, 19,000 3,000 33,000 Shipped, Bunker

524,000

Coal,...

9,000 4,000

62,000

Vessels,

32

14

Tons,

C6,798 18,678

Crews,

Shipped, Bunker

Cargoes,

Coal,..

2,845 1,045

19,000 | 4,000

7,000 1,000

Vessels,

1

Co

Tons,

2,109 16,595

Crews,

38 342

1,020 360 10,000

853,285 12,692 1,139,825

47,993 3,837 150,191

297,000

1 000 | 655,000

33,000 5,000

62 974 2,072

63,650 35,660 108,443

2,746 9.812 19,802

58

62

199

99.547 224,432 | 2.787 251,595 | 450,340 619.468

3,878 5 459 131

14,000 31,000 1.000

18,000 6,000

50

162

65,084 621,885 66,324

2,193 18,706 | 3 198

36,000 | 108, 00 49.000

10,000 27,000 1.00 >

60

169

28

4,894 20,275 16.630

30,000 | 160,000

42,000

3,000 43,00) 21,000 $,000

2 1,041

53,048 2,978 671,065

1.561 122 35,215

19,000

111,000

51.036

3

78

252

i

12,161 184,811 839,831

285

2,000

5,113: 24,329

71,000 91,000 50,000 12,000

20,000 48,000

6,000 6,000

56 *83

116,745 36.235 i

3,473 4,327

3

2,737

109

1,000

17

9

69

24,275 2,619 19,959

747

71 378

Bunker Coal,

[Vessels,

Tons,

1,000

33 22

68,907 35,273

5,000

3,000

:

:

:

:

91

9

3

138

79,206 197,910

19,198 | 2,303

22,727

3,905

3,929

415

84

1,781

Crews,

2,883❘ 1,387

Shipped, Bunker

Cargoes,

Coal,... 7,000 2,000

19,000 4,000

50,741 |13,649 | 169,993

297,000 1,000|655,000

38,000 5.000

(Vessels,

60

26

27

- 1,082 1,334 12,072

916,935 48,352|1,248,268| 89,359 | 624,504 86,283

2,940 18,777 | 3,576

36,000 108,000 49,000

13,000 27,000 1,000

110

59

67

163

67

3

26,000

147

2,000

343

1,000

1,000

Tons.

Crews,

Shipped, Bunker

125,520 38,180 107,864

5,166 2,111 4,877

Cargoes, 38,000 7,000 | 33,000

Coal,... 16,000 | 3,000

24.000

Vessels,

I

20

Tons,

2,109 48,024

127 974 2,072

108,378 35,660 | 108,443

32

4,256 360 10,000

3,415,204 12 692 1,139,825 143,174 | 818,012 67,687 254,514 | 591,938 1,449,310

199,928 3,837 | 150,191 5,196 23,779 | 3,266 5,053 24,494 40,180

$21,000 1,000 | 655,000 50,000 | 139,000 50,000 32,000 231,000

91,000 5,000

31,000 1,000 3,000 59,000

10

215

60

12,161 264,020 1,037,741

285 9,018 28,258

2,000~71,000 91,000

46,000 50,000

227 446

10

3

89

24

G5 86

130,943 (38,538 25,464

3,888 4,411

1,890

50,000 12,000 1,000

7,000 6,000 1,000

69

$3 1,040

137,615 36,235 672,294

4,317 | 4,327 35,212

133,000 69,000|12,00| 112,000

68,000 10,000 | 6,0,0 51,000

96

112

141

5

45,732

Crews,

38

933

:

:

5,513 9,812

19,802

1,622

30,924 21,383

457 441

Bunker Coal,

Vessels,

3,000

9,000

7,000

2,000

61

46

27

4,383 | 1,334 12,072

142

225

69

63

316

9,242 || 122,422 | 207,899

126 4,799 4,108 1,132 208 1,893

30,000 3,000 3,000

1,000

€12

51,376 5,281 24,235

93

88 1,182

Tons,

127,629 86,204 107,864

Crews,

Shipped, Bunker

5,204 | 3,044 4,877 Cargoes,. 38,000 | 7,000| 33,000

Coal,... 16,000 | 6,000

3,523,582 48,352 1,248,268188,906 848,936 89,070 263,756 714,360 1,657,209 188,991 41,516696,529

205,441 13,649|169,993 6,813 24,236 3,707 5,179 29,293 44,288 5,449 4,533 37,105

821,000 1,000 | 655,000 50,000

100,000 5,000

31,00

139,000 50,000 32,000 231,000

33,000 1,000 3,000 89,000

133,000 69,000 12,000 112,000

71,000 15,000 6,000 52,000

Formosa.

Islands in

the Indian

Archipelago.

Kwongchau-

wan.

Mag

D 20

Ships.

Macao,

under 60 tons.

Steamships

Macao,

Junks.

Macao,

Mauritius.

North America.

RED in the COLONY of HONGKONG for EACH COUNTRY, in the YEAR 1911.

ES TO WHICH DEPARTED.

Philippine

Islands.

Hainan and Forts in

Gulf of

Tonkin.

Port Arthur.

Russia in Asia.

Siam.

South Africa.

America.

South

South Pacific.

Tsingtau.

B

20.870

1,037

669,557

:

123

56

1

1

1

3

20

67

$2,178 2,978

514

35,103

19,000

111,000

4,000

51,000

15

2

4

1,508

717

122

112

4,000

28

2

1,041

:

:

:

:

9,016 180,618

60,629

2,994 1,042 2,775 6,505

:

:

28

5,171

25,117 225,477 37,732

5,524,935

324

7,819

3,486

100

56

52 243

1,178 4,402 1,774

:

:

:

137,000

18,000

1,000

5,000 1,000

24,000 104,000 36,000

263,724

1,313,000

22,000

5,000

3

45

4

2

T

:

2,000

6,000 3,000

242,000

7

2

214

:

:

4,725

60,359

7,189 3,318

21,015| 3,552

326,612

56

2,709

101 101

:

288 110

10,225

:

53,048 2,978 671,065

1,561 122

35,215

:

:

1,000

4,000

:

126

101

5

3

1

0

:

:

9,046 185,373 120,988

10,183 4,360 2,775 6,505

324

19,000

111,000

7,875 6,195

137,000 18,000

201 157

1,000

52 243

5,000 1,000

:

:

:

:

:

4.000

30,000

20

74

30

5,385

25,117 246,492 (41,284

5,851,547

1,178

4,690 1,914

273,949

24,000 104,000 36,000

1,313,000

8,000

51.00

23,000 9,000

2,000

10,000 3,000

272,000

56 *83

3

309 324

41

184

16,745 36.235

2,737 16,932 32,595 1,943

3,473 4,327

50,000 12,000 6,000 | 6,000

1,000

109 6,454 5,176

1,000 9,000 25,000 1,000

1,000

122

3,242

57,411 140,696

125

3,394 7,021

1,000 66,000 65,000

3 106

8.411 112,398

192 6,002

1,000 66,000

5

93

...

13,245

21,664 9,813

:

470,920

4,913,119

523 301

15,123

312,077

15,000

67,000

1,712,000

14,000 15,000

37,000

:

3,000

9,000

244,000

3

138

3

76

5

63

7

1

60

1

2

19,198 2,303 22,727

415 84

1,000

87 4,918

1,781 22

1,000

860

:

140

3,316 66.18 11,029 2,837 64,069

2,524

9,000

2.572

2,591

12,759

:

:

3,673

765,013

290 47 3,353

:

59

41

485

51,873

23,000

1,000

72,000

65

86

141 312 400

2

46

247

7

4 166

5

7

1

95

16,918

35,943 38,538

25,464 17,019 37,513 1,943

3,242

69

3,888 4,411 50,000 |1 2,000

7,000 6,000 1,000 1.000

$3 1,040 309 324

37,615 36,235 672,294 16,932 32,595 | 1,943

1,890 6,476 6,036 122

́1,000 9,000 (26,000 1,000

1,000

164

60,727 206,877 11,029 11,248 176,467

125

3,534 9,515 290 239 9,355

1,600 66,000 65,000

1,000 66,000

14,000 24,000

240

21,664 12,385

623 360

15,000

2,591 483,679

5,678,132

41 15,608

363,960

60,000

4,317 4,327 35,212 6,454 | 5.176 122

69,000 12,000 112,000| 9,000 |25,000 || 1

1.000

10,000 | 6,00 51,000 1,000

1,000

24

5

112

3

76

:

:

36.000

12,288 238,059 | 201,325

449 11,213 10,507

1,000 203,000 83,000

20,000

4 107

|11,405 | 113,440 2,775 28,169 9,813

292 | 6,058 52 766 301

2,000 66,000 5,000 16,000

1

$

4,000

6

67,000

9,000

1,712,000

316,000

20

37,000

3,000

160 28

18,416

25,117 696,397 87,732 10,438,054

1,178 19,525 1,774 575,801

24,000 171,000 36,000 | -3,025,000

2,000 15,000 3,000

486,000

108

7

5

62

1

1

9

2

1,132

51,376 5,281 24,235 87 4,918

208 1,893 22 860

5,000

1,030

8,011 126,540 11,029 10,026 67.387

196 5,233 290 148 3,454

1,000 13,000

|23,000

:

:

2,572

2,591

33,774 3,552

3,887

1,091,625

59

41

773 140

1,000

4,000

93

88 1,182 312 400

$8,99141,516 696.529 17,019 37,513 1,94)

5,449 4,533 37,105 6,476 | 6,036

122

59,000 12,000 112,000 9,000 25,000 1,000 15,000 6,000 52,000 1,000

1,000

5

172

348

9 169

1

8

7

21

169

12.288 246,100 327,865 11,029 21.431 180,827 2,775 28,169 12,385

149 11.409 15,740 290 440 9,512 52 766 360

1,000 203,000 83,000

2,000 66,000 5,000 16,000

37,000 33,000

60,000

4,000

62,098-

102,000

30 22,303

27,708 730,171 41,284 11,529,679

1,219 20,298 1,914

24,000 171,000 36,000

2 000 19,000 3,000

637,899

3,026,000

588,000

of America.

United States

Wei-hai-wei.

TOTAL.

D 21

Table III.--NUMBER, TONNAGE and CREWS of VESSELS of EACH NATION ENTERED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong in the Year 1911.

NATIONALITY

OF

VESSELS.

ENTERED.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels. Tons. Crews. Vessels. Tons.

Crews.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

British,.

5,142 5,554,361 258,015

251 300,823

13,339

5,393 5,855,184, 271,354

American,

63 238,915 9,926

9 4,867

617

72

243,782 10,543

Austrian,

24 96,380 1,616

24

96,380 1,616

Belgian,

Corean,

Chinese,

442 290,190 28,193

24 21,221

1,261

466 311,411 29,454

Chinese Junks,

9,514

929,156 127,296

3,348 | 357,651

52,285

12,862 1,286,807 179,581

Danish,

15

42,816 536

3,112

291.

20 45,928 827

Dutch,

80 201,842 5,319,

50 34,039

1,807

130 235,881 7,126.

French,

446

511,808 20,166

11

7,906

423

457

519,714 20,589

German,

606 1,068,409| 40,552

51

65,377

2,607

657 1,133,786 43,159

Italian,

12 31.188 1,226

12 31,188 1,226

Japanese,

491 1,332,110 35,454

18

22,232

805.

509 1,354,362 36,259

*

Norwegian,

158 172,766 6,054

52 48,273 1,582

210 221,039 7,636

Portuguese,

211

54,116 5,709

272

49

212 54,388 5,758

Russian,

20 53,080 1,243

20

53,080 1,243

12 23,800 405

2 1,978

53

14 25,778 458

Swedish,

No Flag,

Steamships under 60

tous trading to ports outside the Colony,

641 28,857 9,969

976 35,861 9,801

1,617

64,721 19,770

TOTAL,

17,877 10,629,794 551,679

4,798 |903,635 84,920

22,675 11,533,429 636,599

*D 22

Table IV-NUMBER, TONNAGE and CREWS of VESSELS of EACH NATION

CLEARED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong in the Year 1911.

NATIONALITY

OF VESSELS.

CLEARED.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Vessels. Tons. Crews. Vessels. Tons. Crews.

British,

5,171 5,524,935 263,724

214 326,612

10,225

5,385 5,851,547 273,949

American,.........

65 245.051 10,553

6 3.391

209

71 248,445 10,762

Austrian,

24 96,380 1,659

24 96,380 1,659

Chinese,

457 307,183 29,501

10

4,071

347

467 311,254 29,848

Chinese Junks,

10,324 1,172,420 155,367

2,148113,361 20,662

12,472 1,285,781 176,029

Danish,

15 42,816 616

5 3,112

314

20 45,928 930

Dutch,

120

219,304 6,698

11 19,465

198

131 238,769 7,196

French,.

445

510,060 20,366

8 6,390

327

453 | 516,450 20,693

German,

503 947,989 35,503

148 178,965

8,540

651 |1,126,954 44,043

Italian,

12 31,188) 1,240

12 31,188 1,240

Japanese,

381 1,074,888 29,199

128277,161 5,812

509 1,352,049 35,311

Norwegian,

123 132,231 5,030

91 93,331

3,43)

214

225,562 8,461

Portuguese,

78

32,570 4119

134

22,064

1,623

212

54,634 5,742

÷

Russian,

18

48,604 1,239

2 4,476

101

20

53,080 1,340

Swedish,

11

22,811

396

3

2,967

97

14

25,778 493

No Flag,

Steamships under 60 tons

trading to ports outside the Colony,

509

78

509

78

669 29,624 10,291

977 35,747 9,834 1,646 65,371 20,125

TOTAL, 18,416 10,488,054 575,801

|

3,887 1,091,625 62,098 22,303 11,529,679 637,899

}

TOTAL.

TOTAL.

IN BALLAST.

WITH CARGOES,

TOTAL.

FOREIGN.

IN BALLAST.

WITH CARGOES.

TOTAL..

BRITISH.

IN BALLAST.

WITH CARGOES.

Aberdeen.

Cheung Chau.

Long Ket.

Saikung.

Shaukiwan.

Stanley.

Tai O.

D 23

Table V.-TOTAL NUMBER, TONNAGE, CREWS and CARGOES of VESSELS ENTERED

at EACH PORT in the COLONY of HONGKONG in the YEAR 1911.

Tai Po.

Yaumati.

Vessels,

Tons,

Crews,

Discharged,

Cargoes,

Transit,...

Vessels,

:

5,142

5,554,361

5,142

5,554,361

258,015

258,015

1,746,000

1,746,000

2,157,000

2,157,000

251

251

Tons,

Crews,..

Vessels,

Tons,

300,823

300,823

1

13,339

13,339

5,393

5,393

5,855,184

5,855,184

Crews,

271,354

271,354

Discharged,

1,746,000

1,746,000

Cargoes,

Transit,

2,157,000

2,157,000

Vessels,

167

76

569

67

2,9171

8,637

12,735

Tons,

9,977 1,251

21,267

8 1,427

344,825 4,696,678

5,075,433

Crews,.

2,019

509

4.088

5 371

Discharged,

6,000 1,000

15,000

1,000

41,027

148,000 2,562,000

245,615

293,664

2,733,000

Cargoes,

Transit,

1,888,000

1,888,000

Vessels,

37 25

179

16

9

-14

4,267

4,547

Tons,

1,289

265

12,055

961

260

1,317

586,665

602,812

Crews,

217

157

1,925

234

77

165

68,776

71,581

Vessels,

504 101

748

18 *76

2,931

12,904

17,282

Tons,

|11,266| 1,516

33,322

969 1,687

346,142 5,283,343

5,678,245

Crews,..

2,296

666

6,013

239 118

41,192 314,391

365,245

Discharged,.. 6,000| 1,000

15,000

1,000

118,000 2,562,000

2,733,000

Cargoes,

Transit,

Vessels,

467 76

569

67

Tons,

9,977 1,251

21,267

Crews,

2,049 509

4,088

Cargoes,

Discharged,

Transit,..

6,000 1,000

15,000

8 1,427

5 371

1,000

1,888,000

2,917 13,779

344,825 10,251,039

1,888,000

17,877

10,629,794

41,027 503,630

148,000 1,308,000,

551,679

1,479,000

4,045,000

4,045,000

Vessels,

37

25

179

16

14

4,518

4,798

Tons,

1,289

265

12,055 961 260

1,317

887,188

903,635

Crews,..

Vessels,

247 157

504 101

Tons,

11,266 1,516

33,322

Crews,

2,296 666

6,013

Cargoes,

(Discharged,

Transit,...

6,000 1,000

15,000

1,925 234

748 18

969 1,687

239 448

1,000

77

76

165

82,115

84,920

2,931

18,297

22,675

346,142 | 11,138,527

41,192 585,745

148,000 4,308,000

11,533,429

636,599

4,479,000

4,045,000

4,045,000

Victoria.

NAMES OF PORTS.

Hunghom.

TOTAL.

1

Victoria.

D 24

Table VI.-TOTAL NUMBER, TONNAGE, CREWS and CARGOES of VESSELS CLEARED

at EACH PORT in the COLONY of HONGKONG in the YEAR 1911.

XX

Vessels,

Tons.

Crews,

NAMES OF PORTS.

Hunghom.

Long Ket.

Sajkung.

Shaukiwan.

*^3[ 1001

*que) Guno૫)

Aberdeen.

:

Cargoes,

Shipped,

Bunker Coal.

BRITISH.

IN BALLAST.

WITH CARGOLS.

:

Vessels,

Tons,

Crews,

Bunker Coal,

[Vessels,

Tons,.

Crews,

TOTAL.

:

:

Stanley.

Tai 0.

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

Shipped,

[Vessels,

(Cargoes,

Bunker Coal;

IN BALLAST.

WITH CARGOES.

:

Tai Po.

:

:

:

Yaumati.

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

TOTAL.

5,171

5,171

5.524,935

5,524,935

263,724

263,724

:

+313,000 1,313,000

242,000

242,000

214

214

326,612

326,612

10,225

10,225-

30,000

30,000

5,385

5,385

5 851,547

5,851,547

273,949

273,949

:

:

545

14

17

27,385 869

567

4,776 212 134

:

:

18,000 1,000

:

:

:

:

:

:

1.313,000 1,313,000·

272,000 272,000

2,682

9,846 13,245

334.585 4.546,208 4.913,119

38,276 267,951 312,077

118.000 1.573,000

1,712,000,

241,000

244,000

14

1,317

3 023

714,362

3;673

765,013

165

48,235

51,873

72,000

72,000

2,696

12,869

16,918

:

:

:

:

250

4

45

>

9,027

100 602

1,351

27

219

:

:

:

795

18

32

36,412

969 1,169

6,307 239 853

335,902 | 5,290,570 | 5,678,132

|18,000 1,000

38,441

118,000 1,573,000

316,186 363,950

545

14

17

27,385

8691

567

4,776 212 134

18,000 1,000,

1,712,000

316,000 316,000

2,682 15,017 18,416

334,585 10,071,143 10,438,054

38,276 531,675 575,801

3,025,000 118,000 2.886,000

486,000 186,000

250

14

:

:.

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

Tons,

120

21

3,290 215

Crews.

588 140

Shipped,

Cargoes,

Bunker Coal,

2,000

(Vessels,......

270

67

Tons,

8,069 1,536

Crews,.

1,255

441

Bunker Coal,

:

(Vessels,

390

88

Tons,

11,359 1,751

Crews,

1,848

581

Cargoes,

2,000

Shipped,

Bunker Coal,.

:

Vessels,

120

Tons,

Crews,

21

3,290 215

588 140-

Shipped.

Cargoes,

(Bunker Coal,.

2.000

...

Vessels,

270

67

!

FOREIGN.

TOTAL.

IN BALLAST.

WITH CARGOES.

TOTAL.

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

Tons,

8,069 1,536

Crews,

1,255

441

Bunker Coal,

...

(Vessels,

390

888

Tons,

Crews,

11,359 1,751

1,843

581

Shipped,

Cargoes,

Bunker Coal,

2,000

:

:

TOTAL.

9,027

100

602

1,531 27

795

18

62

36,412

969 1,169

6,307 239 353

18,000 1,000

3,237 3,887

1,317 1,070,974 1,091,625

165

58,460 62,098

102,000 102,000

2,696 18,254 22,303

335,902 11,142,117 | 11,529,679

38,441 | 590,135 637,899

118,000 2,886,000 3,025,000

588,000 588,000

:

:

:

:

:

Table VII.

Total Number, Tonnage, Crows, Passengers and Cargoes of Junks ENTERED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong, from Ports on the Coast of China and Macao, in the Year 1911.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

D 25

Vessels.

Tons.

Crew.

Ves- Passen- Cargo,

gers. Tons. sels.

Passen-

Tons. ('rew.

Ves-

gers sels.

Tons. Crew.

l'assen- C'argo, gers. Tons.

Canton,

West River,

Macao,

East Coast,

West Coast,..

Total, 1911,

Total, 1910,

1,748 | 228,785 | 29,688 3,354284,307 44,757 182 13,760 2,218 2,777 245,919 33,875 1,453 | 156,385 16,758 9,514 | 929,156 | 127,296

7,261 674,008 98,322

268154,406 1,231 | 156,157 12,295 |130,720 |1,494 | 153,199 11 8,428 222 23,962 83 | 123,781 316 17,949 601 57,502 $5 6,384 13,258 474,8373,348 357,651

19,853 148 2,979 381,942 49,541 23,971

416 154,406

18,3754,848 437,506 68,731 | 39,670

130,720

3,822

404

37,722 6,040

11

8.428

3,187

64 3,093 263,868 37,062

147123,781

1,449

52,285

1,538 162,769 18,207 18,587 12,862 1,286,807 179,581

601 57.502

31,845 | 474,837

8,764 317,116 3,475 |394,169

55,451

24,694 (10,736 1,068,177, 153,773

33,458 317,116

i

Table VIII.

Total Number, Tonnage, Crews, Passengers and Cargoes of Junks CLEARED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong, for Ports on the Coast of China and Macao, in the Year 1911.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels.

Tons.

Crew.

Passen- Cargo, Ves- gers. Tons. sels.

Tons. Crew.

Passen- Ves- gers. sels.

Tons.

Crew.

Passen- Cargo,

gera.

Tons.

Canton,.

West River,

Macao,

East Coast,

West Coast,

Total, 1911,

2,894391,821 48,708 3,316 361,979 53,344 324 32,595 5,176 2,512 238,032 31,944 1,278147,993 16,195 10,324 1,172,420 155,367

216 305,342 190 20,906

25,900 202,932 1,318 65,022

4,918

2,712

13,239

3,084

599 4,634 427,001 66,583

412,727 | 51,420

216305,342

26,499 | 202,932

25,165 76 165 101,281 498 19,070

860

3,313

400 37,513

23,010 | 257,102 | 35,257

6,036

25,165

167 | 101,281

98 45,136 66 3,445 26,379 679,856|2,148 |113,361

538

20,662

14 1,314 | 151,438 615 12,472 1,285,781|176,029

16,733

112 45,136

26,994 679,856

Total, 1910,

8,668 | 912,232 | 133,469

32,697 599,223 1,766 120,478

18,325

1,322 10,434 1,032,710 151,794

34,019 | 599,223

D 26

D 27

Table IX.

SUMMARY.

1911.

1910.

FOREIGN TRADE.

No. OF VESSELS.

TONS.

CREW.

No. of VESSELS.

TONS.

CREW.

'British Ships entered with Cargoes,

Do.

do. in Ballast,

5,112 25 i

5,554,361

258,015

300,823

13,339

5.074 300

5,640,482 419,698

264.419

18,385

Total,......

5,393

5,855,184

271,354

5,374

6,060,180

282,804

British Ships cleared with Cargoes,

5,171

5,524,935

263,724

5,139

5,622,000

269,444

Do.

do. in Ballast,....

214

326,612

10,225

232

429,839

13,499

Total,......

5,385

5,851,547

273,949

5,371

6,051,839

282,943

Foreign Ships entered with Cargoes,

2,580

4,117,420

156,399

2,600

4,161,646

156,814

Do.

do. in Ballast,.....

223

209,297

9,495

220

245,427

9,230

Total,.....

2,803

4,326,717

165,894

2,820

4,407,073

166,014

Foreigu Ships cleared with Cargoes,

2,252

3,711,075

146,419

2,226

3,706,840

141,985

Do.

do. in Ballust,..

548

615,905

21,377

600

696,672

24,009

Total,......

2,800

4,326,980

167,796

2,826

4,403,512

165,994

Steamships under 60 tons entered with Cargoes,...

Do.

do.

do.

641

28,857

9,969

813

40,932

19,609

in Ballast,.

976

35,864

9,801

756-

27,230

6,618

Total,......

1,617

64,721

19,770

1,569

68,162

26,227

do.

Steamships under 60 tons cleared with Cargoes,..

Do.

669

29,624

10,291

818

41,093

19,653

do. in Ballast,

977

35,747

9,834

766

27,510

6,700

Total,...

1,646

65,371

20,125

1,584

68,603

26,353

Junks entered with Cargoes, .....

9,514

929,156

127,296

7,261

674,008

98.322

Do. do. in Ballast,

3,348

357,651

52,285

3,475

394,169

55,451

Total,......

12,862

1,286,807

179,581

10,736

1,068,177

153,773

Junks cleared with Cargoes,

10,324

1,172,420

155,367

8,668

912,232

133,469

Do. do. in Ballast,

2,148

113,361

20,662

1,766

120,478

18,325

Total,.....

12.472

1,285,781

176,029 10,434

1,032,710

151,794

Total of all Vessels entered,

22,675

11,533,429

636,599

20,499

11,603,592

628,848

Total of all Vessels cleared,

22,303

11,529,679

637,899

20,215

11,556,664

627,084

Total of all Vessels entered and cleared, in

Foreign Trade,....

11,978

23,063,108

1,274,498

40,711

23,160,256

1,255,932

LOCAL TRADE.

Total Junks entered,

18,798

Do.

cleared,

1,068,211 17,810 1,065,843

138,349 20,224 138,445 20,212 1,188,847

1,199,024

162,848

170,378

Total Local Trade entered and cleared...........

36,608 2,134,054

276,794 40,436

2,387,871

333,226

Total Foreign Trade entered and cleared, Total Local Trade entered and cleared,.

44,978 23,063,108 36,608 2,134,054

1,274,498

40,714

23,160,256

1,255,932

276,794

40,436

2,387,871

333,226

Grand Total................

81,586

25,197,162

1,551,292

81,150

25,548,127

1,589,158

L

PLACES.

Outside the Waters of the Colony :-

Vessels.

Table X.

Statement of Licensed Steam-launches Entered in the Colony of Hongkong during the year 1911.

TOWING.

NOT TOWING,

Tonnage.

Crews.

Within the Waters of the Colony, 1910,

137,016 | 3,073,574 |

1,060,763

8,095

95,991

2,489,5 13 696,208

Do.,

1911,

133,317

2,965,788 | 1,048,459

6,425

#7,645 | 2,525,257

708,637 | 2,800,192|

Passengers.

Vessels.

Tonnage.

Crews.

Passengers.

Tons.

Cargo.

Vessels.

Tonnage.

Shamshui,

Kongmoon,

14

172

43

:

29

12

370 110

20

37

6 201

51

13

407

118

20

Kamcheuk,

:.

Wuchow,

61 2,143

564

:

32 1,760 1,120 1,072

960

Macao,

3

87

22

Other places,

895 33,092 9,062 8,873

303 16,830 6,406 5,269 7,036 304|10,192 2,427 1,591

Total,.

976 35,864 9,801 8,893

93 3,903 1,684 1,072 960

306 16,926 6,428 | 5,269 | 7,036 1,199 43,284 11,489 13,264

10,737 19,77 641 28,857 9,969 10,737 7,996 1,617 64,721 19,770 19,630 7,996

TOTAL.

1651,386

5,304

926

233,007 | 5,493,117 1,746,971| 1,859,431| 230,992 | 5,490,995 | 1,757,091| 2,866,617|

5,304

926

Crews.

Passengers.

Tons.

Cargo.

D 28

A

PLACES.

Table XI.

Statement of Licensed Steam-launches Cleared in the Colony of Hongkong during the year 1911.

TOWING.

NOT TOWING.

TOTAL.

Bunker.

Vessels.

Ton-

nage.

Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Vessels.

Ton-

nage.

Crews.

Passen- Cargo. Vessels. gers. Tons.

Ton-

nage.

Crews.

Passen- Cargo.

gers.

Coal

Tons.

Tons.

D 29

Within the Waters of the Colony 1910,

Do.,

1911,

124,253 2,584,657 124,740 | 2,834,174

960,541 11,357 108,754 2,908,460 985,830 7,320 106,252 | 2,656,821

786,430 1,368,438 771,261 | 2,840,383

2,053

1,082

233,007 | 5,493,117| 1,746,971 | 1,379,795 230,992 | 5,490,995 | 1,757,091|2,847,703

2,058

36,893

1,082

36,452

Outside the Waters of the Colony :-

Shamshui,

6

194

57

2

Kongmoon,

14

447

124

:

Kamcheuk,

:

:

:

:

:

65

16

1

37

8

:

:

259

73

15 484

132

10

:

60

134

Wuchow,

Macao,

62 2,161

595

2

3

Other places,

Total,

977 35,747 9,834| 9,845

87 22

892 32,858 9,036 9,843

35 1,865 1,142 | 1,152

309 16,932 6,454 11,053 8,914

322|10,725|| 322 10,725 2,671 4,782 480

669 29,624 10,291 16,992 10,354

1,214 43,583 11,707 |14,625 480 4,473

1,646 65,371 20,125 26,837 10,354 6,267

960

97 4,026 1,737 1,154 960 312 17,019 6,476 11,053| 8,914

870

730

#3

Table XII.

Number of Boat Licences issued and fees collected during the year 1911 as compared with the previous year. (Under Table U, Section 40, of Ordinance No. 10 of 1899.)

D 30

1910.

1911.

DESCRIPTION OF BOATS.

LICENCES.

DUPLI-

CATES.

REPAINT- FEES. LICENCES.

DUPLI-

REPAINT-

FEES.

ING.

CATES.

ING.

$

$

Passenger Boats, Class A,

506

484

Passenger Boats, Class B,

817

1

:

10,488.00

773

2

:

Passenger Village Boats,

1,717

1,536

Cargo Boats,.

1,277

24,858.25

1,259

4

Lighters,

166

7,260.50

239

9,881.25

25,436.89

7,882.75

Water Boats,

73

1,426.25

74

Other Boats,...........

1,093

5,104.75

1,082

Cinder, Bum, Hawker and Mar-

ine Dealers' Boats,

374

805.00

382

Fish Drying Hulks,.......

67

465.25

81

Repainting,...

225

56.25

1,452.50

4,898.00

807.00

581.75

282

70.50

TOTAL,

6,090

225 $50,424.25

5,910

6

282 $50,960.64

D 31

Table XIII.

Comparative Statement of Revenue collected in the Harbour

Department during the Years 1910 and 1911.

Amount

Sub-head of Revenue.

1910.

Amount

1911.

$ C. $

C.

86,157.20

$2,578.09

1. Light Dues, Ordinance 10 of 1899,

>>

2. Licences and Internal Revenue not other-

Special Assessment,

95,810.8392,802.14

wise specified :-

Boat Licences, Ordinance 10 of 1899,

50,424.25 50,763.31

Chinese Passenger Ship Licences, Or-

dinance 1 of 1889,

1,410.00

1,515.00

Emigration Brokers

Licence, Ordin-

ance 1 of 1889,..

1,200.00

1,000.00

Fines,

4,065.62

4,934.50

Forfeitures,

1,591.55

305.20

Fishing Stake and Station Licences,

Ordinance 10 of 1899, ...

166.50

154.50

Fishing Stake and Station Licences, do.,

from the New Territories,

2,818.80

2,347.80

Junk Licences, &c., Ord. 10 of 1899,

45,807.60

44,668.80

Junk Licences, &c., Ord. 10 of 1899,

from the New Territories,

25,323.10

26,717.70

185.00

95.00

4,296.25. 4,865.75

Pilots' Licences, Ordinance 3 of 1904, Steam-launch Licences, &c., Ordinance

10 of 1899,

3. Fees of Court or Office, Payments for specific purposes and Reimburse- ments-in-Aid :-

Engagement and Discharge of Seameu,

Ordinance 10 of 1899,..........

Engagement of Masters and Engineers

25,292.80 23,023.00

of Steam-launches, Ord. 10 of 1899, 258.50 Examination of Masters, &c., Ordinance

10 of 1899,

Gunpowder, Storage of-Ord. 10 of 1899, Medical Examination of Emigrants, Ord.

1 of 1889,.

Printed Forms, Sale of,

Private Moorings and Buoys, Rent for―

Ordinance 10 of 1899,..

257.50

2,262.50 1,685.00 9,461.40 9,861.02

*68,237.50 †84,770,50

249.50

207.75

2,510.00

3,480.00

Registry Fees (Merchant Shipping Act),

Ordinance 10 of 1899,..

1,458.00 846.00

Steam-launches, Surveyor's Certificates,

Ordinance 10 of 1899,.....

8,420.00 3,510.00

Survey of Steamships, Ordinance 10 of

1899,

30,186.69 29,408.09

Sunday Cargo Working Permits, Ord.

1 of 1891,

30,475.00 36,975.00

7. Miscellaneous Receipts (other)-Message Fees for notifying ships signalled, .....

Sale of Newspapers,

Total..............

..$494,234,84 506,964,85

161.00 5.25

192.20

*† See next page.

D 32

* Statement of Emigration Fees, 1910-

Revenue collected by.

Expenditure incurred by.

Harbour Department, ....$68,237.50

Registrar General's Office,

Stamp Office, on account

of Bill of Health,

5,338.00

4,000.00 (Estimated.) 6,276.24

7,674.00

......

Medical Department,...............

16,384.14

$ 81,249.50

$ 26,660.38

Net Revenue,....$ 54,589,12

† Statement of Emigration Fees, 1911 :-

Harbour Department, Registrar General's Office, Stamp Office, on account

of Bill of Health,

Medical Department,.....

Revenue collected by.

$ 84,770.50

5,530.00

6,959.50

Expenditure incurred by.

$ 4,100.00 (Estimated.)

6,387.34

15,478.25

$ 97,260.00 $ 25,965.59

Net Revenue,....$ 71,294.41

(Net Revenue, 1909, $37,308.01.)

+

Table XIV.

Summary of Chinese Emigration from Hongkong for Ports other than in China, during the year 1911.

UT -

BRITISH SHIPS.

FOREIGN SHIPS.

GRAND TOTAL.

Adults.

Children.

Adults.

Children.

Adults.

Children.

WONDER BOUND,

Total.

Total.

Total.

M.

F.

M. F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M. F.

M.

P.

Australian Ports.

Canada,

Caroline Islands,

Dutch Indies,

Fiji.....

Honolulu,

1,347

9,170

16

כו: 1

547

1,365 424 9,720] 2,692

426 1,771

18

1,791

3

118

2,213 |11,262

665

11,933

92

+

1

97

92

1

97

9,913

455

436

62 10.866 | 9,913

155

436

62

10,866

87

90

87

90

4

5

440

41

56

548

444

41

57

11

553

*

Japan.....

73

71

293

1

3

297

366

3

371

Mauritius,

808

69

118

995

808 69-

118

995

Mexico,

3,085

97

3.182

241

81

249 3.326

105

3,131

South America,..

357

19

111

487 357

19

111

487

Straits Settlements,.

Tahiti...

Timor,

261

59,573 12,369 3,804 1,388 77,131 [19,590 | 2,960 15

118

89

U. S. of America.

52

283

89 749 2,628 15 110

12

Total 1911,

Do. 1910.

697

908 314 23,772 79,163 15,329 4,712 1,702 100,906

15

9 2,792] 3,325

74.386 12.390 | 4 526 1,389 92 69136,996 | 3,579 1.902 397 42.874111,382 15,969 6,428 | 1,786 | 135,565 |66,580. 5,863| 3.454|954|79,851|27,806 | 1,916| 1,224 261 31.207 94.386|10,779 | 4,678 | 1,215|111,058

Total Passengers by British Ships,.. Total Passengers by Foreign,Ships,

|74.386|12,390, 4.526| 1,389| 92,691 [36,996| 3,579 1,902 397 42,871 992 49,817

Excess of Passengers by British Ships,

{37,390 | 8,811, 2,624 |

132 379

89

...

27

415

89

192

9 3,541

U

- D 33 --

{

Table XV.

Statement of average number of Emigrants from Hongkong to Ports other than in China, for Quinquennial Periods from 1880 to 1910 inclusive.

1880.

41,720

1885.

63,138

1890.

66,706

1895. 1900. 1905. 1910. 60,360 66,961 78,103 88,452

Table XVI.

Number of Male and Female Emigrants from Hongkong to Ports other than in China, for Ten Years, from 1902 to 1911 inclusive.

--

D 34

Whither bound.

1902.

1903.

1904. 1905.

1906. 1907. 1908. 1909.

1910.

1911.

Straits Settlements, Males, Straits Settlements, Females,

Total,...

Other Ports, Males....... Other Ports, Females,

49,260 53,759 53.131 45,948 51,589 71,141 40,746 8,408 9,628 9,596 9,026 8,731 11,907 8,893 57,668 63,387 62,727 54,974 60,320 83,048 49,639 | 48,016

40,129

7,887

65 372

83,875

11,333 17,031

76,705100.906

13,967

76

19,915 13,499

82

78

9,308 16.348

59 57

22,829

90

21,299

143

Total

14.043

19,997 13,577

9,367

16,405 22,919 21,442

28,965

449

29,414

33,692

33.935

661

724

34,353 34,659

Grand Total,

71,711

83,381

76,304

64,341

76,725 | 105,967

71,081

77,430111,058 | 135,565

1

Tabe XVII.

Summary of Chinese Emigrants Returned to Hongkong from Ports other than in China, during the Year 1911.

BRITISH SHIPS.

FOREIGN SHIPS.

D 35

GRAND TOTAL.

WHERE FROM.

Adults.

Children.

Adults.

Children.

Adults.

Children.

Total.

Total.

Total.

M.

F.

M.

M.

4

F.

M.

1.

M.

I.

J. F.

Australian Ports,

2,187

141

106

70

2,504

391

9

409

2,578

150

71

2,913

Bangkok,

3,341

149

333

91 69.

3,653

3,341

149

94

69

3,653

Canada,

3,794

113

49

1,035

3.794

115

77

49

4,035

Dutch Indies,

775

15

808

6,929

81

BI

7.086

7,704

99

53

38

7,891

Honolulu,

73

80

1,011

73

37

1,163

1,081

76

44

40

1,243

Japan,

423

439

765

59

39

27

890

1,188

67

30

1,329

Mauritius,

260

260

260

260

Mexico.

723

723

33

33

756

7.6

New Guinea,.

271

272

271

I

272

South America,..

444

14

468

141

7

14

3

468

Straits Settlements,..

94,397

United States of America,.....

2,199

17

4,166 | 1,747 | 1,161 | 101,471 38

17.791

284

131

77

18.286

112,188

4,450

1,811,238

119,757

14

2,268

4,598

200

145

103

5,046

6,797

238 162 117

7,311

Total Passengers, 1911, ... 104,571

4,4851,965 1,807 112,328

Do.,

1910, ..

99.499

5,334 | 2,240 | 1,273 108,346

35,834

1,229

39,240

866 515 351

37,566 140,405

5,351 2,480 1,658

149,894

446

303

41,218 | 138,739

6,563 | 2,686 | 1,576

149,561

Total Passengers by British Vessels, Total Passengers by Foreign Vessels, Excess of Passengers by British Vessels,

104,571

4,485 1,965 | 1,307

112,328

35,834

866 515 351

37,566

68,737

3,619 | 1,450 956

74.762

Table XVIII.

Statement of average number of Emigrants Returned to Hongkong from Ports other than in China, for Quinquennial Periods from 1880 to 1910 inclusive.

1880.

48,114

1885.

68,830

1890.

96,068

1895. 1900. 1905. 104,118 109,534 137,814

1910.

146,585

Table XIX.

Number of Male and Female Emigrants Returned to Hongkong from Ports other than in China, for 10 years, from 1902 to 1911, inclusive.

Where from

1902. 1903. 1904.

Straits Settlements, Males, Straits Settlements, Females,

Total,

1905. 1906. 1907. 1908. 1909. 1910. 1911.

108.362 | 116,705 |123,542 |114.653 | 110,525121,935125,228 112.093 110,439 114,069 3.891 5,778 4,842 6,210 4,043 2,403 4,422 3,387 7,524 5,688 112,253 | 122,483128,384 120,863 | 114,568 | 124,338 | 129,650 115,480117,963 119,757

D 36

Other Ports, Males, Other Ports, Females,

17,826

233

242

Total,

17,559

17,826 20,447 364

18,068 20,811

19.291 19,848 21,387 329 496 97

27.869

290

19.620 20,344 21,484 28,159

29,180 30,986 28,816 161 615 1,321 29,341 31,601 30,137

Grand Total,

129,812 140,551|149,195 140,483 | 134,912145,822 157,809 |144,821 | 149,564149,894

!

Table XX.

Return of Vessels Registered at the Port of Hongkong, during the Year 1911.

Name of Vessel.

Official

Number.i

Registered

Tonnage.

Horse

Power.

Rig.

Built

of.

Where built and when.

Remarks.

1903. Purchased from Foreigners. Do. Do.

1. Wayfoong,

128,696

21.64 120

Nil

Com'te Hongkong,,

1898.

2. Sun Ning,

3. Tung Ning,

4. Tai Ning,.

5. Tai Yeuk Fong,

128,697

114,370 85.24 150 Į Schooner Wood 120,136 144.60 180 Nil ! 120,157 144.60 163 Schooner 11.24 40

.་

1904.

31

77

.1905.

"}

Nil

.1896.

"}

""

6. Dairy,

128,698

11.72 35

1900.

17

19

7. Tien Lick,

128.699

48.89 150

.1910.

15

י

8. Tien Heng,

128,700 48.89 150

.1910.

;

9. William Swallow,

128.701

10. Wing On,

11. Hoi Fung,

12. Kei Kung,

13. Viator,

14. Belle I,............

15. Chuen On,

7.23 14 128,702 267.25 450 128,703 69.41 400 128,704 4.03 16 128,705 19.38 100 128,706 13.95 64 128,707 18.55 36

.1911.

11

1

}}

.1911.

"

י.

Ketch

Nil

Steel Middlesborough, ...1911. Wood, Hongkong................

""

.1896.

"}

1911.

16. White Cloud I,

128,708

17. Tai Koo,

128,709

18. Vancouver I,

15.11 20 132.78 (1200 128,710 17.41 80

Lorcha

Nil

.1911.

Steel

Wood

1911.

.1893.

19. Magna,..

128,71!

28.71

150

1905.

11

20. Dredge,

128,712

60 60 None.

Steel Shanghai,

1904.

1911.

1911. Name changed from "Tourist”.

"}

"Belle".

- D 37

Name of Vessel.

Official

Number.

Table XXI.

Return of Registers of Vessels Cancelled at the Port of Hongkong, during the Year 1911.

Registered

Tonnage.

Date of

Registry.

Horse Power.

Rig.

Built

of.

Where and when built.

Reason of Cancellation.

Kowloon,

123,087 34.20

1907 80

Njl

Wood Hongkong,

.1886 Sold to Foreigners.

Yat Ho,

123,071

188.33 1907 None

1896 Burnt.

Ilha de Coloane,

126,989

50.65 | 1908

28

Com'te.

.1898 Sold to Foreigners.

"

Silfy,

128,690

5 10 1910

10

Wood

.1909

Do.

*

D 38 -

D 39

Table XXII.

Number and Tonnage of Vessels in Foreign Trade Entered and

Cleared since 1902.

YEAR.

No. of

VESSELS.

TONNAGE,

1902

48,706

19,514,237

1903

46,255

21,716,870

1904

51,173

22,299,582

1905*

51,578

22,653,616

1906†

44,550

22,453,077

1907

47,660

23,032,891

1908

45,403

22,305,131

1909

43,794

22,415,125

1910

38,727

23,067,391

1911

44,978

23,063,108

Net Increase in 1911 against 1902: -3,548,871 tons.

Not Decrease

>>

:-3,728 vessels.

* Steamships not exceeding 60 tons in Foreign Trade included for first time. † Decrease due to Typhoon of 18th September, 1906.

Table XXIII.

Revenue and Expenditure of the Harbour Department.

Total Revenue Total Expenditure

Year.

of Department.

of Department.

Percentage of Expenditure to Revenue.

C.

C.

%

1902,.

266,765.99

187,575.65

51.57

1903,.....

285,288.42

158,936.52

55.71

1904...

301,128.95

146,951.90

48.80

1905,

302,817.76

147,396.72

48.67

1906,

274,008.78

160,899.99

58.43

1907,

348,300.10

160,389.48

46.05

1908,...

357,768,52

163,579.54

45.72

1909,

462,469.82

172,680.55

37.34

1910,.

494,234.84

160,035.89

32.38

1911,

506,964.85

* 161,149.32

31.76

*

Including $507.90 coal in stock.

i.

TONS.

11,700,000

1,500,000

11,300,000

1,200,000

£1,000,000

20,000,000

¡9,900,000

$9,800,000

$9,700,000

19,600,000

$9,500,000

$9,400,000

$9,300,000

19,200,000

#9,100,000

$9,000,000

$8,900,000

$8,800,000

$8,700,000

18,600,000

18,500,000

8,400,000

8,300,000

8,200,000

8,100,000

8,000,000

$,900,000

$7,800.000

7,700,000

7,600,000

7,500,000

7,400,000

...7,300,000

7,200,000

7,100,000

1867.

DIAGRAM of Tonnage entered at Hongkon

2

S1.

RED LINE represents British Shipping To. DOTTED BLACK LINE represents Ger DOTTED RED LINE represents Japanese Ship BLUE LINE represents Foreign Shipping Ton GREEN LINE represents British and Foreign YELLOW LINE represents Junk Tonnage only

VIOLET LINE represents Steam-launch Tonne

THICK BLACK LINE represents entire Foreig

1868.

1869.

1870.

1871.

1872.

1873.

1874.

1875.

1876.

1877.

1878.

1879.

1880.

1881.

1882.

1883.

1884.

1885.

1886.

1878.

1879.

Table XXIV.

rage entered at Hongkong, froin 1867 to 1911 inclusive. ents British Shipping Tonnage only.

LINE represents Ger. r Shipping Tonnage inly.

NE represents Japanese Shipping Tonnage only. -sents Foreign Shipping Tonnage only.

resents British and Foreign Shipping Tonnage presents Junk Tonnage only, excluding Loce presents Steam-launch Tonnage only, excludi

'rade.

Local Trade.

INE represents entire Foreign Trade in Britis, und Foreign Ships, Junk, and Sle-

1880.

1881.

1882.

1883.

1884.

1885.

1886.

1887.

1888.

1889.

1890.

1891.

1892.

1893.

1894.

1895.

1896.

1897.

1898.

299.

EROT

inclusive.

ade.

eign Ships, Junk, and Ste-

1895.

299.

|I1,700,000

|11,500,000-

11,300,000

|11,200,000

|11,000,000

10,000,000

-9,900,000...

9,800,000

9,700,000

9,600,000-

9,500,000-

9,400,000-

9,300,000

9,200,000-

9,100,000

9,000,000

8,900,000

8,800,000

8,700,000

8,600,000

8,500,000

8,400,000

! 8.300.000

8,200,000

8,100,000

8,000,000

7.900,000

-,800 000.

7,700,000

7,600,000

7,500,000

7.400.000

7.300.000

+

9,000,000

$8,900,000

8,800,000

8,700,000

8,600.000

$8,500,000

8,400,000

8,300,000

8,200,000

8,100,000

8,000,000

ƒ,900,000

7,800,000

7,700,000

7,600,000

7,500,000

7,400,000

}

7,300,000

7,200,000

Á,100,000

74,000,000

6,900,000

6,800,000

6,700,000

6600,000

6500,000

6,400,000

6,300,000

6,200,000

6,100,000

6,000,000

5,900,000

5,800,000

5,700,000

5,500,000

5,500,000

5,400,000

5,800,000

5,200,000

500,000

5,000,000

4,900.000

4,800,000

1,700,000

+,600,000

+,500,000

+1400.000

¦ +1300,000

4;200.000

| 4,100,000

+,000,000

3,900,000

}

$

r#.....

1

سل

!

A

9.000,000

8.900,000

| 8,800,000

8,700,000

8,600,000

$,500,000

8,400,000

8.300,000

8,200,000

| 8,100,000

8,000,000

7,900,000

7,800,000

7,700,000.

7,600,000

7,500,000

7,400,000

7,300,000

7,200,000

7,100,000

7,000,000

6,900,000

6,800,000

6,700,000

6.600.000

6,500,000

6,400,000

6,300,000

6,200,000

6,100,000

6,000,000

5,900,000

5,800,000

5.700,000

5,000,000

5.500,000

5,400,000

5,300,000

5,200,000

5,000,000

+,900,000

4,850,000

4.700,000

+,600,000

+,500,000

7,400.000

4,300.000

| 4,200.000

4,100,000

+.000.000

7.900,000!

| 3,800.000 ¦

4.200.000

4.100.000

4000.000

3,900 000

3,800.000

3,700.000

3,600,000

! 3.500.000

31400,000

3,300,000

31200,000

3|100.000

BLACK

3,000,000

2,900,000

2,800,000

2.700,000

+

≈ 600,000

2.500,000

2 400,000

2,300,000

2.200.000

2,100,000

1

2 poo,coo

1,900,000

1,800,000

1,700.000 1 1,600,000

1,500,000

1,400,000

YELLOW

1,300,000

GREEN

1,200,000

1,100,000

!

1,000,000

900,000

$800,000

RED

700,000

600,000

BLUE

500,000

$400,000

300,000

DOTTED

200,000

BLACK LINE

100,000

90,000

VIOLET

80,000

50,000

40,000

DOTTED

RED

30,000

LINE

20,000

-

1

1

1

4.900 900

1900.650 '

3.800 Sou

3,700.000

3 600.000

3.500.000

3.400 200

3.300.000

3.200.000

5.100,000

3,000.000

1

2,900.000

2,800,000

2.700.000

2.500.000

2.500.000

2,400.000

2,300.000

2,200.000

2.100,000

11

2,000.000

1,900.000

1,800,000

1,700.000

1,600.000

1,500,000

1,400 000

1,300,000

1,200,000

1,100,000

1,000.000

900,000

800,000

700,000

600,000

500,000

400.000

300,000

200,000

100,000

90.000

80,000

50,000

40,000

30,000

20,000

D 43

Annexe A.

!

MERCANTILE MARINE OFFICE.

18,262 seamen were shipped and 17,341 discharged at the Mer. cantile Marine Office and on board ships during the year.

166 distressed seamen were received and admitted to Sailors' Home, &c., of these 51 were sent Home, 3 to Bombay, 1 to Brisbane, 7 to Calcutta, 1 to Colombo, 1 to Port Said, 21 to Singapore, 3 to Sydney, 4 to Vancouver, 41 passengers to Canton, 1 to Foochow, 1 to Hoihow, 1 to San Francisco, 2 to Shanghai, 3 deserted, 1 died in Government Civil Hospital, 2 remained in prison and 22 obtained employment.

$3,044.61 was expended by the Harbour Master on behalf of the Board of Trade in the relief of these distressed seamen.

Annexe B.

IMPORTS AND EXPORTS OFFICE.

Liquors Consolidation Ordinance, 1911.

1. The gross revenue collected from liquor duties and licensed warehouses fees during 1911 was as follows:

Duties, European Liquors,

Duties, Chinese Liquors,..

$242,035.94

372,779.15

2,420.70

72.00

Licensed Warehouse Fees,

Licensed Warehouse Overtime Fees,....

$617,307.79

From this total must be deducted the sum of $293.64 being the amount refunded for breakages which occurred on duty paid liquor before delivery, leaving a nett revenue of $617,014.15. This shows an increase of $229,226.05 on the nett revenue for 1910 but falls short of the revenue estimated $725,000.00. The cost of collection was $57,120.19 as compared with $64,320.00 for 1910.

2. The rehate allowed in 1910 to the Naval and Military Author- ities was abolished and in March the rate on all wines and spirits

D 44

was increased. On European Wines and Spirits the increase was roughly 25%, but the increase varies on the different varieties. On Chinese Wines and Spirits the duty was doubled.

3. The total imports of European liquors show in most items a slight increase as against 1910. The exports remain on the whole practically stationary while there is a slight increase in the quantities consumed locally. This would tend to show that the increase in the duties has had no effect in decreasing the consumption. The details of the trade in European liquors are given in Table I.

4. There is a considerable decrease in the imports of Chinese Wines and Spirits. But as there is a corresponding decrease in the export of imported wines and as the output of local distilleries has considerably increased, it seems probable that the decrease is due to the disturbed state of China during the year and not to the increase in the duty. Details of the trade in Chinese liquors are given in Table II.

5. The trade of the local distilleries has been good, the total output being nearly 40% greater than that of 1910, and the quantity that paid duty being 26% greater than in 1910. This is of course mainly due to the decrease in imports mentioned above. The dis- tillers however state that their profits have been adversely affected by the high price of rice. The return for the Cheung Chau dis- tilleries shows a decrease owing to the closing down of two of these distilleries. The details of the trade done by local distilleries is shown in Table III.

6. The number of licensed warehouses is now 27; of these eight are warehouses for Chinese wines and it has been found possible to concentrate these in one building, thereby making the control more efficient. Three licensed warehouses are used for denaturing spirits, two in connection with the manufacture of tinctures and perfumes and one in connection with the bean curd trade. The remaining sixteen are warehouses for European Wines and Spirits. The owners of licensed warehouses have given every assistance by making various alterations suggested by this department to improve the con- trol of the movement of liquors.

7. During the year the laws relating to liquor were consolidated under the Liquors Consolidation Ordinance No. 9 of 1911. It in- cludes the various Ordinances dealing with liquor duties and liquor licences. This Consolidation Ordinance was further amended by Ordinance No. 46 of 1911 which corrects some omissions and makes several other small changes.

8. Opium. The trade in raw opium for the year has been considerably affected by the agreement between Great Britain and China signed on May 8th, 1911. The imports of raw opium to Hongkong show a decrease of 10,457 chests or 329 per cent. as compared with a decrease of 111 per cent. in 1910 and 145 per cent. in 1909. The exports show a decrease of 8,272, chests or 29.2

D 45

per cent. as compared with a decrease of 212 per cent. in 1910 and 97 per cent. in 1909. The figures for the last four years are as follows:-

1911.

chests.

1910. 1909. 1908.

chests. chests. chests.

Stock in hand 1st January, Imported during the year,

7.123

4,509 5,808 4,707

21,286 31,743

35,731 41,821

Total,..

28,409

36,252

41,542

46,528

Boiled by Opium Farmer,

761

i

782

1,044

864

Spurious opium destroyed,.

14

51

247

Exported during the year..

20,061

28,333

35,938

39,609

Total.....

20,822 29,129 37,033

40,720

?

Stock remaining on 31st December.

7,587

7,123

4,509 5,808

9. By the agreement of the 8th May, 1911, no Indian Opium can be imported into China unless accompanied by a certificate issued by the Indian Government that such opium has been exported from India for consumption in China. Such certificates were actually issued from January 1st, 1911, but the agreement with China was not signed till May 8th, 1911. On that day a check was taken of the stock of opium in the Colony. All opium genuinely destined for China exported from India before January 1st, 1911, was allowed to be imported into China under a special permit provided it left Hongkong before May 15th. 1,334 chests were exported under this arrangement, paying the old rate of duty--110 Haikwan taels per chest. All Indian Opium imported to China since May 15th, 1911, must be accompanied by a certificate from the Indian Government and pay the new duty of 350 Haikwan taels per chest.

10. On September 1st, 1911, an Ordinance was passed which enabled the Government to prohibit the import into Hongkong of non-certificated Indian Opium except for the use of the Opium Farmer. Between 8th May and 1st September 1,678 chests of non-certificat- ed Indian Opium were imported, the destination of which is given below. No non-certificated opium was imported to Hongkong be- tween January 1st and May 8th, 1911.

D 46

Non-certificated Indian Opium.

Patna. Benares.

Total chests.

Imported during the year, 1911,..

1,455

223

1,678

Exported to Macao,..

299

299

21

Kwong Chow Wan,

456

79

535

Panama,

6

1

7

Boiled by Opium Farmer,...

327

87

414

1,088

167

1,255

Balance on 31st Dec., 1911,

367

56

423

The general statistics of the opium trade are given in Tables IV to VI.

11. The trade in Compounds of Opium and Morphia again de- clined considerably. The trade in Cocaine shows an increase, but this was all done in the first half of the year. During the latter half of the year there has been very little trade in either Morphia or Cocaine owing to further restrictions placed on the import of these drugs at the various ports in China and the neighbouring

countries.

Figures for the years 1910 and 1911 for Compounds of Opium, Morphia and Cocaine are as follows:-

COMPOUNDS OF OPIUM.

1910.

1911.

Increase.

Decrease.

lb.

0%. lb. Oz.

16.

02.

lb.

02.

Stock on 1st Jan.,

...

Imported,

7,467

Exported,

5,069 11

4,573 13 4,333 5

2,893 3 736 6

Difference,

2,397 5

210 8

2,156 13

Sold locally,

2,397 5 240

00

Stock on 31st Dec.,...

:

1910.

-D 47

MORPHIA.

1911.

Increase.

Decrease.

Cases. lb. oz.

Stock on 1st Jan

2 50 0

Cases. Ib. 0%.

G 150

Cases. lb. oz.

Cases. lb. o.

Imported.

248 6,692 9

117 4,082

131 2,610 5

Exported.

250 6.742 9

145 4037 0

123 4.232

166 3,248 0

40 789 ()

Difference,

105 2,703 9

18

984 4

Sokl locally, ....................... 99 2,555 9

2

97 2,546 5

Stock on 31st.

December,.

150

16

975 0

COCAINE.

1910.

1911

Increase.

Decrease.

Cases. Th

0%. Cusrs. Ib.

ON.

Cases. lb. oz.

Cases 1. 0%.

Stock on 1st Jan..

9 56

4

Imported. ...

15 145

5

40 431

11

23 306 6

24 201

9

40 451

1!

Exported....

24 201

9

34 445

10 213 15

Difference,

6

6

10

6

6

Sold locally..

Balance on 31st

December,

12. During the year two convictions were obtained against persons for illegally importing cocaine. In each case a fine of $2,000 was imposed and the cocaine forfeited to the Crown. There was one seizure of morphia amounting to 1,200 oz. No arrest was made; but the morphia was forfeited to the Crown.

or 16.7

cent.

Imports and Exports of Sugar.

13. The imports of sugar again show a decrease of 42,076 tons

per

This seems to be due to the high price of sugar and a weakening demand for refined sugar in Northern China,

D 48

Return of Sugar imported into the Colony of Hongkong by

vessels of different nationalities during the years 1910 and 1911:-

1910.

1911.

Tons.

Tons.

American Steamers,

545

2,912

Austrian

185

British

136,046

76,223

Chinese

1.455

2,215

>>

Dutch

71,837

101,730

""

French

3.290

510

German

27.244

15,293

Italian

163

286

**

Japanese

525

431

Norwegian l'ortuguese Swedish

4.799

4,218

"

وو

1,260

846

33

2,722

1,833

By Junks,

1,933

3,021

Total,

251,819

209,743

1910.

1911. Decrease.

Tons.

Tons.

Tons.

Imported,

251,819

209,743

42,076

Return of Sugar imported into the Colony of Hongkong

during the years 1910 and 1911 showing place of origin:-

1910.

1911.

Tons.

Tons.

From America,

1

Burmah,

...

89

China,

14,719

8.950

Cochin-China,

3,608

2.373

Germany,

38

""

Java,

221,101

184.874

Japan,

89

London,

15

6

""

Mauritius,

556

899

New Territories,

164

3,029

22

""

Philippine Islands,

10,372

9,324

Straits Settlements,

1,284

71

""

Total.

251,819

209.743

Two hundred and eleven (211) Certificates of Origin for exportation of Sugar were issued from this Office during the year

1911.

D 49

Thirty (30) Permits for Delivery of Sugar which arrived in the Colony without Certificates of Origin were issued from this Office during the year 1911.

22nd February, 1912.

R. O. HUTCHISON,

Superintendent.

Balance in

Bond on

Class of Liquor.

31st De-

Arrivals.

cember,

1910.

Table I.

Exported

& ex Ship Consumed to Ship

or ex

locally.

Bond.

Remaining in Bond on the 31st Dec., 1911.

In Holt's

General

Bonded

Warehouse.

In H.K. & K.

Godown Co.'s

In Licensed

General Bonded Warehouses.

Total in

Bond.

Warehouse.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Ale, Beer and Stout,

95,535

748,900

322,711

325,548

4,656

22,692

168,828

196,176

Bitters,

160

549

262

228

40

Brandy,....

(1)

7,712

25.878

22,341

4,032

160

1,906

179

5,151

219

7,217

California Wine,

3,367

3,367

...

Champagne,

2,376

14,218

7,347

6,219-

48

852

2,128

3,028

Claret,

7,381

29,428

22,473

9,433

46

3,758

3,094

6,898

Cider,

158

518

291

146

22

217

239

Gin,...

4,453

30,572

22,965

6,478

40

460

5,082

5,582

Ginger Wine,

44

140

7

177

177

Liqueurs,

1,965

5,474

3,775

1,447

88

28

372

1,817

2,217

Malaga,

21

21

Madeira,

59

215 | (2)

105

46

123

123

Marsala,

191

351

158

155

229

229

Medicated Wine,

24

604

566

~

60

62

Muscatel,

1

1

...

Port,

3,215

11,812

Prune Wine,

6

39

5,879

4

4,749

32

11

:

:

324

4,043

4,399

30

30

Rum,

145

3,841

1,071 (3) 2,078

22

815

837

D 50

(1) There was some confusion in the 1910 figures for brandy, the figures under the headings "Export" and "Balance in licensed warehouses" having been transposed.

(2) Includes 25 gallons denatured for Worcester Sauce.

(3) Includes 74 gallons distilled locally.

Balance in

Remaining in Bond on the 31st Dec., 1911.

Table 1,-Continued.

Exported

& ex Ship

to Ship

or ex

Bond.

Consumed

locally.

In Holt's

General

Class of Liquor.

Bond on

31st De-

Arrivals.

cember,

1910.

In H.K. & K.

Godown Co.'s

General Bonded

Bonded

In Licensed Warehouses.

Total in

Bond.

Warehouse.

Warehouse.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Gallons.

Sake,..

545

6,183

1,800

4,490

344

94

438

Sherry,

1,807

5,292

2,730

1,999

146

2,224

2,370

Sparkling Wine,

1,121

476

510

379

CC

388

312

708

Spirits of Wine and Arrack,

21,244

193,656 (1)195,158

216

19,184

342

19,526

Other Still Wine,.

2,030

53,182 46,982

5,327

344

2,559

2,903

Tonic Wine,

6

34

26

14

14

Vermouth,.

1,367

9,410

6,931

2,202

170

1,474

1,641

Vebrona,

Whisky,

18

16,096

24

5

23

14

14

53,554

29,783

21,568

6,178

1,068

Wincarnis,

Wine (European),

(2)

167

24,492

10

84

10,963

73

18,209

...

73

24,492

...

F

(1) Includes 48.467 gallons denatured for burning, perfumery, &c. (2) Re-exported immediately without examination.

D 51

I

Table II.

Balance in Bond on 31st Dec., 1910.

Arrivals.

Consumed

Locally.

Exported.

Denatured and used for Vinegar."

Remaining in Bond on the 31st December, 1911.

In Holt's in H.K.&K. General

Godown

In Li-

Dis-

Im- Distilled

Im- Distilled ex Bond or Distilled

Im- Distilled

Bond.

tilleries. ported. Locally. ported. Locally.ex ship to Locally. ported. Locally.

Bonded

Co.'s Gen-

censed

eral Bond-

Ware-

In Dis-

tilleries.

Ship

Ware-

house.

ed Warehouses.

house,

Not more than 25% of alcohol by weight,

9,227

11,736 965,349 984,521 686,348829,827 | 278,323 79,983

71,200

70

526 9,309 15,243

59

35%

1,240

49,009 15,570 21,244 8,894 28,532 6,368

172

301

308

"}

45%

}}

50%

109,256

2,441

Above 55%

502,186

11,754

2,609

37,835 26,880

263

7,054

5,353 461,468 1,416

263 5,529

13,757 30,958

20,481

88,856

108

1,612

2.609

- D 52

Total,

122,164

11,736 1,530,907 1,038,189 744,135|844,337 | 773.862 87,767

13,757 102,158

70

21,179 |100,078*15.659

* Not including New Territories.

Table III.

Return of Distilleries during the year 1911.

Output.

Consumed Sold into Locally. Bond.

Exported.

Denatured with salt for

preserving

Used for

Vinegar.

bean-curd.

Hongkong and New Kowloon. Not more than 25% of alcohol by weight. 624,097

441,067

* 21,684

74,903

35%

13,910

6,138

856

6,308

1

15%

52,735

4.985

15,268

1,416

30,958

50%.

263

263

Rum,

་་་་

74

74

Stock on

the 31st Dec., 1911.

71,200

15,243

308

108

Total,.....

691,079

452.827

37,808

82,627

30,958

71,200 15,659

Cheung Chau.

Not more than 25% of alcohol by weight.

95,371

86,811

3,660

4,900

35%

45%

1,015

1,013

96,386

87,826

3,660

4,900

* Includes 2,395 gallons wine destroyed by fire in the Wo Chan Distillery on the 8th September.

† No figures are available.

t

- D 53

Table III,-Continued.

Return of Distilleries during the year 1911.

Output.

Consumed Sold into Locally. Bond.

Exported.

Rest of New Territories.

Not more than 25% of alcohol by weight.

303,641

301,949

1,512

180

}}

35%

1,501

1,441

60

""

·་

45%

368

368

"7

Denatured with salt for preserving bean-curd.

Used for

Vinegar.

Stock on

the 31st

Dec., 1911.

Total.

305,510

303,758

1,512

240

*

*

Hongkong and New Kowloon,

Total,.

691,079

452,827 37,808

82,627

30,958

71,200

15,659

Cheung Chau.

96,386 87,826

3,660

4,900

Rest of New Territories.

305,510 303,758

1,512

240

- D 54-

Grand Total,

1,092,975

844,411

42,980

87,767 30,958

71,200

15,659

* No figures are available.

D 55

Table IV.

J

The following Tables show the quantity of Opium imported and exported during the years 1910 and 1911 :—

1910.

1911. Increase. Decrease.

Chests.

Chests.

Chests.

Chests.

Imported,

31,743

21,286

Exported,

28,347

20,061

Through Cargo

reported, but not

landed,

7,575

8,759

1,184

10,457

8,286

Imports and Exports of Opium Skin were reported as follows:

1910.

1911.

Increase.

Decrease.

lb.

lb.

lb.

lb.

Imported,... 30,834.4 23.796.15

Exported,... 30,222.7 23,154.5

7,047.5

7,068.2

Appendix E.

REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE OBSERVATORY FOR THE YEAR 1911.

The comparison of weather-forecasts issued daily with the weather subsequently experienced has been conducted on the same system as heretofore (compare Annual Report for 1896 § 5). The results are as follows:

Success 55 per cent., partial success 32 per cent., failure 2 per cent., partial failure 11 per cent. Following the method used in Meteorological Offices, and taking the sum of total and partial success as a measure of success and the sum of total and partial failure as a measure of failure, 87 per cent. of the weather-forecasts were successful in 1911.

The average results for the four preceding years were as follows:-

Success 58 per cent., partial success 32 per cent., failure 1 per cent., partial failure 9 per cent.

2. In general the typhoons of 1911 took a more Northerly course than usual, and in contrast to the year 1910 it is noteworthy that, with the exception of a typhoon which reached Tongking to the South of Haiphong on 21st September, and a depression, of little importance, which entered Annam near Tourane on August 23rd, not a single typhoon crossed the China Sea to the Southward of the 18th parallel. The Western side of the China Sea was thus almost entirely free of these disturbances in 1911, and Annam, which was devastated by typhoons in 1910, was not visited by a hurricane during the year under notice.

Three severe gales, due to typhoons, were felt in Hongkong, the first on July 3rd to 4th, when the squalls reached a maximum velocity at the rate of 73 miles per hour, as recorded by the pressure- tube Anemograph; the second on July 27th when squalls up to a velocity of 74 miles were registered; and the third on August 3rd to 6th when the maximum velocity in the squalls reached 79 miles.

The centre of the typhoon of July 27th passed between Hong- kong and Gap Rock, but fortunately the disturbance was not of great depth. That of August 3rd to 6th, which entered the coast on the afternoon of the 5th a few miles to the West of Macao, was remarkable for the slow speed at which it moved between the 3rd and 5th, the average speed during this period being under 5 miles. per hour.

Between noon of the 4th and 5th, its rate of progression was only 3 miles per hour.

The paths of these disturbances are shown in the "Typhoon Tracks of 1911" which have been laid down by Miss Doberck. They will be published and distributed as soon as possible.

E 2

3. About 70 copies of the China Coast Meteorological Register were distributed in the City daily, and hand-made copies of the daily weather map were exhibited on the notice boards as in past

years.

4. The Directors of the Philippine Weather Bureau and of the Formosa Weather Service kindly forwarded "extra" meteorological messages from stations in the Philippines and Formosa during the prevalence of typhoons in the neighbourhood of those areas. The messages so forwarded were comparatively few in number owing to the breakdown of land telegraph lines at these times. The interruption of telegraphic communication on such occasions is a serious handicap to all those engaged in the task of issuing storm- warnings, but it is understood that wireless apparatus will be in- stalled at some important outlying stations in the Philippines in the near future, and the Chinese Government has promised to erect such a station at Pratas Shoal.

5. As in the previous year, the Imperial Maritime Customs Authorities at Swatow kindly forwarded an extra meteorological Vobservation, made at 9 p.m., from May till October, but the messages

were frequently much delayed during transmission.

6. The Hoihow and Pakhoi telegrams continue to be received too late for forecasting purposes.

7. Special warnings, in addition to the ordinary warnings 'sent by code, were forwarded to the Authorities in Canton whenever typhoons threatened the coast in this neighbourhood.

8. By the courtesy of the Naval Authorities, meteorological observations made on H.M. Ships were occasionally forwarded to the Observatory by wireless telegraphy.

9. The Telegraph Companies, as in previous years, have con- tinued to forward daily a large number of meteorological telegrams from outports to Hongkong free of charge, and the thanks of the Government are due to the Companies concerned for these valuable services. In addition the staffs of the Eastern Australasia and China Telegraph Company at Sharp Peak, Iloilo, Bacolod and Cebu, render great assistance by kindly making and transmitting meteorological observations twice daily.

10. During the year 1911, in addition to meteorological registers kept at about 40 stations on shore, 3,113 shiplogs have been received. A few of the latter have been copied on board, but the majority have been forwarded by the captains. The total number of vessels whose logbooks have been made use of was 348.

The total number of days' observations (counting separately those made on different ships on the same day) was 24,653. Acknowledgment is here made of the courtesy of those masters of vessels who have been good enough to forward their observations.

11. The entry of observations made in degree squares for the area 9° South and 45° North latitude, and between the longitude of Singapore and 180° East of Greenwich, has been continued, and 418,760 in all have now been tabulated in the books.

E 3

wwwwww.ccm

With a view to the construction of Pilot Charts, the calculation of the means of the above observations is in progress. For the area comprised by the Equator and 25° North latitude and 100° to 125° East longitude the values for March and April are approaching completion.

For use in the same connection ten-yearly means (1896-1905) of the barometer readings made at lighthouses and other stations along the China Coast have been extracted. The stations so dealt with are as follows:-Pakhoi, Hoihow, Breaker Point, Lamocks, Chapel Island, Turnabout, Sharp Peak, Pei-yu-shan, Steep Island, Gutzlaff, North Saddle, Shaweishan, Northeast Promontory and Chefoo.

The wind prevalance for the same period has been determined for the following stations:-Breaker Point, Lamocks, Chapel Island, Turnabout, Pei-yu-shan and North Saddle.

A part of this work was completed in 1910.

12. A new standard barometer by Casella, London, No. 2451, was purchased in the spring. This instrument was compared with the standards of the Kew Observatory before being despatched to Hongkong. On arrival it was mounted beside the adopted standard of this Observatory, Negretti and Zambra No. 1368, which was brought out to the Colony in 1883 and which is the standard to which all the barometric observations made at this Observatory have been referred. The following gives the corrections to the instruments as determined at Kew:-

Year 1883. Negretti and Zambra No. 1368 -0.007′′.

Year 1912. C. F. Casella & Co. No. 2451 +0.005".

A comparison between the two instruments, made here from June till October, after applying the original Kew corrections to both in- struments, shows a difference of 0.002" in the sense that using the new instrument as standard the correction to the older instrument No. 1368 is -0.005" instead of -0.007". This is so far satisfactory that it is not proposed to make any change of standard, and the barometric observations will be referred to Negretti and Zambra No. 1368 as heretofore.

13. During the past year several hundred indirect comparisons of barometers and aneroids on board ship have been made. Several barometers and aneroids have been compared for various people in the Observatory.

14. The rainfall in inches registered by the gauge placed in the Police compound at Taipo, New Territories, was as follows:-- January 1.99, February 0.53, March 3.70, April 8.65, May 21.36, June 5.19, July 12.41, August 36.33, September 7.60, October 5.57, November 3.65, December 0.10, the total for the year being 107.28 inches. On an average during the preceding five years the rainfall at Taipo was in excess of that recorded at the Observatory by 20 per cent. In 1911 it was 18 per cent. in excess.

E 4

The rainfall recorded at the Public Gardens in 1911 was as follows:-January 0.67, February 0.04, March 2.79, April 5.52, May 23.07, June 5.88, July 9.50, August 22.63, gauge choked on 6th, September 8.19, October 6.31, November 2.93, December 0.41, the total for the year being 87.94 inches. These figures are furnished by the Superintendent of the Botanical and Forestry Department. The total fall at the Gardens was 2.61 inches less than that registered at the Observatory, but this is in part due probably to the choking of the gauge on August 6th. On an average of the five preceding years the fall at the Gardens was 10 per cent. in excess of that recorded at the Observatory.

15. The comparison of the records of the Robinson Anemograph (Beckley pattern) and the Dines pressure-tube anemograph has been continued in 1911.

Particulars of the positions the instruments occupy on the roof were given in last year's report. No change has been made, but in August the recording apparatus of the pressure-tube instru- ment was taken asunder, cleaned, and the water changed, distilled water being used as before.

The records of the pressure-tube instrument have been tabulat- ed independently by two observers and the result of the comparison of the two instruments is now given under different velocities and wind directions, for the period May to December 1910 in Table XII, and for that of. January to December 1911 in Table XIII.

To reduce the actual run of the cups of the Robinson to velocities recorded by the pressure-tube instrument, using all the observations, the factor for the year 1911 was found to be 2.26, as against 2.22 found for the period May to December 1910; or omitting velocities below 6 miles per hour (Robinson) 2.29 and 2.25 respectively.

On reference to the tables it will be seen that the adoption of a constant factor to reduce the Robinson to the pressure-tube velocities would, in the case of our instrument, be impracticable-the factor varying considerably with wind direction.

Ou plotting the results on a chart and smoothing the curves, maxima are found with the wind direction near the East and West points, and minima near the North and South points, the difference in the factor varying approximately from 2.3 in the former to 2.0 in the latter.

The higher factor obtained with winds from the East and West may be due, in part, to the sheltering influences of the chimney stacks which are situated at a distance of 22 feet due East and West of the Robinson, the cups, however, being placed at a height of 4 feet above the highest point of the stacks. For these winds the pressure-tube instrument would be little affected, as it is placed on the Northern edge of the roof. There are probably other con- tributory causes, such as the rectangular shape of the building (83 feet by 45 feet, the greater length lying in an East and West direc- tion), the configuration of the surrounding ground, also the character of the wind, which is very much steadier from Easterly than from other directions.

- E Ś

It is proposed to make some experiments with a portable anemometer, which can be shifted readily to various positions on the roof, with a view to elucidating the cause of the change of factor with wind direction.

As regards velocity the results obtained in 1911 indicate that the factor remains practically constant with wind velocities above 10 miles per hour (Robinson).

Squall velocities and their relation to mean velocities as derived from the records of the pressure-tube anemograph during the typhoons of July 3rd to 4th, July 27th, and August 2nd to 7th are shown in Table XIV.

The daily maximum velocity of the wind in a gust, as recorded by the pressure-tube anemograph, is given in Table XI.

16. In February electric lamps for lighting the transit instrument were installed, the necessary current being supplied by means of accumulators.

The

The number of transits observed during 1911 was 1,195. axis of the instrument was levelled 439 times, and the azimuth and collimation errors were determined 22 times by the aid of the meridian mark. With a few exceptions, these observations were made by Mr. Jeffries. The time-ball clock was cleaned and the sidereal standard clock oiled on November 9th. The going of all the standard clocks has been satisfactory.

17. The errors of the time-ball are given in Table I. The ball is not dropped on Sundays nor on Government holidays. There was one failure, on December 2nd, when the locking apparatus slipped owing to lack of tension on one of the springs, when the ball fell two minutes before one o'clock while the winding apparatus was still in gear. The pinion was broken. A new one was supplied by the Hongkong and Whampoa Dock Co. and fitted on December 5th. On July 3rd, 4th and 27th and on August 4th and 5th the ball was not hoisted owing to gales caused by typhoons in the vicinity of the Colony. It was dropped successfully 291 times in 1911. The pro- bable error in January was Os. 18, in February 0s.11, in March

0s.14, in April 08.15, in May 08.23, in June +0s.14, in July 08.15, in August ± 0.13, in September± 08.15, in October 08.16, in November± 0.15 and in December0s.15.

In November the time-ball was overhauled by the Dock Co., some necessary repairs effected and the ball painted, without, how- ever, interfering with its dropping at 1 p.m., which was continued as usual.

18. Dr. C. K. Edmunds who, from time to time during the past six years has been engaged in magnetic survey work in various parts of China, under the auspices of the Department of Research in Terrestrial Magnetism, Carnegie Institution, Washington, spent some days here in March and July in comparing his instru- ments with those of this Observatory.

E 6

19. In January Mr. J. I. Plummer for 20 years Chief Assistant in the Observatory went on leave, prior to retirement, and in view of my own retirement in the year now current it was decided to appoint a Director Designate of the Observatory. Mr. T. F. Claxton, for several years Director of the Mauritius Observatory, received the appointment. He arrived in the Colony at the end of last May in order that he might gain some experience of the meteorological con- ditions obtaining in the Far East before I left the Colony.

At the instance of the Government, Mr. Claxton visited the Observatories at Manila, Tokio and Sicawei in October and Novem- ber in order that he might become in touch with the Directors, and acquire an insight into the methods adopted in those institutions.

F. G. FIGG,

HONGKONG OBSERVATORY, 9th February, 1912.

Director.

Table I.

Errors of the Time Ball in 1911.

means too late.

+ means too early.

Date.

Jan.

Feb.

Mar.

April.

May. June. July. Aug. Sept.

Oct.

Nov.

Dec.

E 7 -

123

0.1

0.1

0.1

+0.4 -0.3

-0.2

-0.3

-0.2

0.1

+0.8

0.1

0.1

+0.4

0.1

+0.2

0.1

+0.4

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

+0.5 1

+0.3

+0.2

0.1

0.1

-0.2

+03

0.1

+0.5

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

-0.2

0.1

0.1

0.2

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

-0.4

0.1

+0.2

+0.2

-0.2

0.1

0.1

-0.3

-0.2

+0.2

0.1

-0.3

0.1

+0,5

0.1

0.1

0.1

+0.2

0.1

0.1

+0.2

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

+0.2

0.1

0.1

0.1

-0.2

10

0.2

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

11

0.1

0.1

+0.2

+0.2

0.1

-0.2

-0.2

-0.4 -0.2

12

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.3

0.1

-0.2

13

+0.2

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.4

0.1

14

+0.3

0.1

0.1

0.1

-0.5

0.1

0.2

338333

0.1

0.1

-0.2

...

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

15

+0.2

0.1

0.1

+0,2

0.1

0.1

-0.3

0.1

0.1

16

0.1

0.1

+0.2

0.1

0.1

0.1

-0.2

+0.2

-0.2

-0.2

ને

Table I,-Continued.

Errors of the Time Ball in 1911.

means too late.

+ means too early.

Date.

Jan.

Feb.

Mar.

April. May. June. July.

Aug. Sept.

Oct.

Nov.

Dec.

-- E 8

17

+0.5

0.1

+0.3

-0.2

0.1

+0.2

18

0.1

0.1 +0.4

+0.2

-0.4

+0.3

19

-0.2

+0.2

-0.7

0.1

-0.2

+0.5

338

0.1

0.1

+0.2

0.1

0.1

-0.4

0.1 -0.2

+0.2

-0.3

0.1

20

-0.4

-0.3

0.1

+0.3

- 1.0

+0.2

0.1

+0.4

0.3

-0.4

0.1

21

-0.6

-0.2

0.1

0.1

+0.5

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

-0.2

0.1

22

0.1

0.1

-0.3

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

23

+0.2

0.1

-0.2

0.1

0.1

0.1

+0.3

0.1

0.1

24

0.1

0.1

-0.5

-0.4

0.1

0.1

0.1

-0.3

25

+0.2

0.1

+0.2

0.1

0.1

0,1

0.1

0.1

-0.2

-0.4

26

+0.3

...

0.1

-0.7

0.1

0.1

0.1

+0.5

0.1

27

0.1

0.1

0.1 i

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

-0.3

-0.3

0.1

28

+0.4

0.1

0.1 +0.3

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

-0.3

0.1

29

0.1

+0.5

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

·0.3

31

185

+0.2

30

0.1

...

0.2

-0.4

0.1

+0.2

0.1

-0.3

+0.3

0.1

-0.2

:

+0.2

0.1

+02

Table II.

Monthly and Annual Means of the Principal Meteorological Elements at the Hongkong Observatory for the year 1911, and departure from the mean of 25 years, 1884 to 1908 inclusive, (+ excess;

defect).

- E 9-

Jan.

Feb. Mar. Apr.

May. June. July. | Aug.

Sept. Oct.

Nov. Dec. Year.

Bar. Pressure at M.S.L.*

Departure Temperature Departure

Rel. Humidity %·

74

82

30.108 30.202 | 30.017

·.042+,057 .041 58.9 60.2 65.5 1.2 + 2.2 + 2.8 71 83

Cop

29.957 29.849 29.778 29.680 | 29.631 .000 .014.016-049-112 69.7 75.5 82.9 82.0 81.9 0.4 1,3 + 2.2 + 0.2 + 0.6 90 81

29.784 30.035

30.108❘ 30.153 29,942

- .053 | + .060

+,001

-.018

.018

81.1

74.3

69.1

64.3

72.1

+ 0.7

82

82

78

Departure

0

0

3+ 7

1

1

1+

+

Vap. Tension (Inches of Mercury)

0.378

0.376 0.528

0.604 0.800

Departure

.017

-.003.046

.033 + .027

Sunshine (Total hours)

139.2 189.9 106.4

Departure

Cloudiness

%

60

138.8 86.1 248.5

36+102.1 +24.0 + 34,5 66 81

Departure

+ 2

26

2

--

0.921

+ .054

67.792.3 + 38.1 11.1 76 89 70

5+ 15 6. + 2+ ŏ

0.883

0.893 0.829

214.1

-.010.009 | + .027 249.9 190.5 211.0

0.1+ 1.6+0.4

3+ 11+ 11 + 2

0.632

0.546 0.474 0.655

- .020 | + .068+.085] + .019

155.1 133 9 2063.4

2.0

74

76

77

79

App

14.4

1.8

- 34.5

70

69

57

51

68

45.3+155.0

66

68

0

Rainfall (Total

Inches)

Departure

Wind Direction

Departure

N + S...

0.735 0.000 3.810 5.935 22.145 5.090 8.060 30.060 -0.723-1.750 +0.947 -0.053 +9.850-11,293 -4.710 +15.859 E 120 NE 80 NE 2o NE 40 N +2° + 6 + 50

E

13°

10° ¡

12° + 3°

0+ 17 + 16) + 2

6.215 5.685 2.720 0.095 90.550 -3.422 +1.123 +1.268—1.090 |+6.112

S 27° E E 44° S S 38° E | E13° NE 12° NE 13° NE 17° N E 6o S

20+ 7° + 16° + 80 + 20

Wind Velocity

(Miles per hour)

Departure

0.1

13.7 14.0 14.8 0.5

13.3

14.2

11.6

1.1

1.6 +1.2

0.8

13.7 11.9 +2.8+2.2

11.4

0.5

13.2 13.2

1.4 + 0.1

10.5

13.0

1.9

0.1

✦ Not corrected to Standard Gravity.

Table V.

Number of Days with Wind from eight different points of the Compass during each Month of the year 1911.

Month.

N.

N.E.

E.

S.E.

S.

S.W.

W.

N.W.

January,

February,

44

6

19

2

19

March,.

1

4

19

April,

1

1

24

May,

21

June,

8

July,

9

August,

5

September,

1

15

112126642

I

2

1

3

2-22-

1

1

4

1

10

1

2

2

October,

5

20

November,

2

December,

4

16

2200

1

2

1

...

...

...

1

3

Sums,

27

26

197

25

22

27

24

17

-E 10 -

Table IX.

Monthly Extremes of the Principal Meteorological Elements registered during the year 1911.

BAROMETER.

MONTH.

TEMPERATURE.

HUMIDITY.

VAPOUR

TENSION.

RAIN.

WIND

VELOCITY.

RADIATION.

Max. Min.

Max. Min.

Min.

Max.

Min.

Daily Hourly Max. Max.

Sun

Max.

Max.

January,

February,

March,.

30.184

30.352 30.148 29.678 79.1

29.605

74.4

47.5

40

0.641 0.172

0.620 0.180

35 117.8

29.602 74.2

47.1

37

0.712

0.198

42 125,0

54.2

21

0.779

0.169

1.0400.535

40

125.5

April,

30.045 29.619 86.9

61.3

47

0.882

0.354

2.160 0.650

41

139.1

May,

29.914 29.527 86.9

68.1

60

0.966

0.609

2.735 1.235

39

139.5

June,

29.881 29.357 91.3

75.0

60

1.018

0.807

1.520 0.435

35

142.0

July..

29.786

29.124 91.2

75.0

54

1.037

0.657

1.590 0.830

60 143.8

August,..

29.755 29.209

93,1

74.8

53

1.027

0.741

8.610 2.350

62

141.6

September, 29.879

29.376 92.1

75.0

45

1.001

0.635

2.640 1.350

44

143.9

October,

30.115 29.251

85.5

61.6

39

0.935

0.262

3.340 0.600

36

139.6

November, 30.134 29.819

80.5

55.7

42

0.792

0.261

0.780 0.185

34

130.3

December,

30.233 29.814

75.1

53.0

48

0.695

0.278

0.025 0.015

36

127.2

Year,

30.352

29.124

93.1

47.1

21

1.037

0.169

8.6102.350

62

143.9

-E 11

YEAR.

Table XVIII.

Statement of Annual Expenditure on the Observatory Department.

TOTAL EX-

PENDITURE.

INCREASE.

DECREASE.

c.

$

1902

22,480.98

1903

22,780.97

c.

4,369.88

299.99

1904

21,937.15

843.82

1905

21,220.40

716.75

1906

19,995.17

1,225,23

1907

20,110.53

115.86

1908

21,110.61

1,000.08

1909

22,388.63

1,278.02

1910

21,787.55

601.08

1911

23,353.02

1,565.47

N.B.-Tables III, IV, VI, VII, VIII, X, XI, XII, XIII, XIV, XV, XVI and XVII, omitted from this report, will be found in the "Meteorological Observations for 1911 ".

-E 12-

Appendix F.

REPORT OF THE REGISTRAR OF THE SUPREME COURT FOR THE YEAR 1911.

1.--ORIGINAL JURISDICTION.

The number of Actions instituted in this division of the Court during the year 1911 was 200, and there were 419 pending at the commencement of that year as against 205 and 379 respectively in 1910. 139 were disposed of during the year, 50 being settled or withdrawn before trial, and 1 transferred to Summary Jurisdiction, leaving a balance of 480 undisposed of, as against 165, 66 and 419 respectively in 1910.

There were two interim injunctions granted during the year.

The total amount involved was $1,509,463 as against $1,653,941 in 1910.

The debts and damages recovered amounted to $442,047 as against $1,385,635 in 1910.

The total fees collected amounted to $12,710 as against $15,922 in 1910.

Tables setting out in detail the figures contained in this and the following paragraphs are printed at pages (0.2), (0.3), (0.4) and (Y.3) and (Y.) of the Blue Book for the year 1910.

2.-SUMMARY JURISDICTION.

The number of Actions instituted during the year was 1,868 and 177 were brought forward from 1910, as against 1,785 and 122 respectively in 1910, and were disposed of as follows:- Settled or Withdrawn 621, Judgment for the Plaintiff 819, Judgment for the Defendant 48, Non Suited 15, Struck out, Dismissed and lapsed Writs (not served) 224, Struck out of the Cause Book as having been standing over for more than a year 88, leaving 230 as pending, as against 1,907, 674, 711, 53, 8, 204, 80, and 177 respectively in 1910.

The total amount involved was $338,240 and the debts and damages recovered amounted to $140,874 as against $338,774 and $151,290 respectively in 1910.

The total amount of fees collected amounts to $8,614 as against $3,482 in 1910.

The number of Distress Warrants for Rent issued was 617 representing aggregate unpaid Rents amounting to $36,883 of which the aggregate sum of $11,618 was recovered, as against 632, $37,171 and $14,740 respectively in 1910.

F 2

403 Warrants were withdrawn on settlement between the parties, as against 411 in 1910.

The total fees collected amounted to $2,973 as against $3,005 in 1910.

3. CRIMINAL JURISDICTION.

There were 100 cases and 141 persons committed for trial at the Criminal Sessions, as against 89 and 122 respectively in 1910.

The number of persons actually indicted was 134, of whom 94 were convicted and 40 were acquitted. Against 7 persons no indict- ments were filed. In 1910 the figures were respectively 115, 88 and 27.

4.—APPELLATE JURISDICTION.

There were 13 Appeals instituted during the year, viz. :——

From the decision of the Chief Justice, 6 as against 3 in 1910.

>

,

of the Puisne Judge, 7

""

""

of the Magistrates,

13

of which the following were disposed of, viz. :—

From the Chief Justice,

""

>"

Puisne Judge, Magistrates,

-

4440

3

"

2

""

11

27

*

"

11

222

"

وو

""

6

No leave to appeal to the Privy Council was granted during the year.

5.-ADMIRALTY JURISDICTION.

There were 2 actions instituted and no action tried during the year. The case that was pending since 1908, is still pending.

No vessel was arrested.

The total fees collected amounted to $80 as against $11 in 1910.

6.-BANKRUPTCY JURISDICTION.

There were 36 Petitions filed, 20 being Creditors' Petitions, and 16 being Petitions by the Debtors themselves. The figures for 1910 were respectively 36, 21 and 15.

The number of Receiving Orders made was 23, being 12 on Creditors' Petitions, and 11 on Debtors' Petitions; 2 Administration Orders were made. The figures for 1910 were respectively 28, 15 and 13, and 2 Administration Orders.

G

F 3

The number of Public Examinations held was 15, as against 15 in 1910.

There were 16 Adjudications. The figures in 1910 were 19 Adjudications, and 3 Compositions.

There were no Discharges granted.

The aggregate amount of estimated Assets, in cases where Re- ceiving Orders were made and were not rescinded, was $109,738 and estimated Liabilities $275,321 as against $133,855 and $543,742 respectively in 1910.

The fees collected amounted to $2,332 as against $2,998 in 1910 and the Official Receiver's Commission as Trustee where no Trustee had been appointed by the Creditors to $14,435 as against $16,342 in 1910.

7.-PROBATE AND ADMINISTRATION.

There were 217 Grants made by the Court, being:

Probate,

Letters of Administration,

91

126

217

The figures in 1910 were respectively 88 and 139.

The aggregate value of the Estates was $3,816,534 as against $4,026,040 in 1910.

Probate Duties amounted to 197,981. Court Fees amounted to $8,649 and Official Administrator's Commission to $2,949. The figures in 1910 were respectively $156,970, $9,778 and $3,272.

There were 38 Estates vested in, or administered by the Official Administrator during the year, representing an aggregate value of $58,700. The figures for 1910 were respectively 47 and $55,900.

38 Estates were wound up during the year, representing an aggregate value of $85,686.91 as against 35 in 1910 representing $25,200.

8.-OFFICIAL TRUSTS.

The total number of Trust Estates in the hands of the Official Trustee at the end of 1911 vas 27 and the aggregate amount of Trust Funds $116,085 as against 24 Estates aggregating $89,698 in 1910, and certain house property.

The amount of Commission collected was $428 as against $378 in 1910.

9. REGISTRATION OF COMPANIES.

The total number of Comp unies registered from the commence- ment of the Companies Ordinance, 1865, was 724 with an aggregate capital of $348,047,200.

7

F 4

Of the 724 Companies on the Register 121 are defunct, 2 were not floated, 142 were wound up and 114 were in the course of being wound up, leaving 345 on the Register at the end of 1911 represent- ing an aggregate capital of $326,445,192.

The figures in 1910 were respectively 685, $333,497,818, 114, 2, 136, 76, 357, and $327,261,818.

There were 39 Companies registered in 1911 as compared with 86 in 1910, the revenue from which was :

Registration Fees, $5,806 as against $16,483 in 1910. Filing and other Fees,.. 3,474

4,196

$9,280

$20,679

The number of licences granted under section 4 of "The Com- panies (Local Registers) Ordinance, 1907," (No. 16 of 1907) enabling Companies operating outside the Colony to keep local registers of members was 162.

The Fees collected in respect of such licences amounted to $36,208.

No authorizations were issued under section 5 of the same Ordinance.

10. FEES AND COMMISSION.

The total sums collected during the year by way of Fees and Commission amounted to $48,342 as against $65,527 in the previous year.

11. STAFF.

Mr. Kemp, Registrar, was appointed Crown Solicitor from 1st January, 1911. Mr. Wakeman acted as Registrar until the arrival on the 15th August of Mr. Hugh Adair Nisbet, who was appointed Registrar to succeed Mr. Kemp.

Mr. Melbourne, Deputy Registrar and Appraiser, was appointed to act as 2nd Police Magistrate on the 15th November; and Mr. Fletcher, Deputy Official Receiver, was appointed Deputy Registrar to perform Mr. Melbourne's duties in addition to his own duties as Deputy Official Receiver.

Mr. Mirza, 2nd Grade Clerk of Court, was granted 3 months full-pay leave and 3 months' half-pay leave to proceed to India. Mr. Alim Khan, 3rd Grade Clerk, was appointed to act as 2nd Grade Clerk in addition to his own duties and drew a portion of the lapsing salary of 2nd Grade Clerk.

Mr. Wong Kwong Tin, 2nd Interpreter, and Mr. Wong Tak Kwong, Translator, passed the necessary examinations on the 9th September and 21st February respectively to qualify the selves for the 1st class certificate, which was necessary to enable them to draw the salaries attached to their respective posts.

2

1

F 5

Mr. Mackie, 3rd Interpreter, proceeded on 9 months' half-pay leave to England on the 20th September. Mr. To King Ki, Sergeant Interpreter, was appointed to act for him.

Mr. Howell, First Bailiff, retired from the service on pension on the 31st December, on account of ill health.

29th February, 1912.

HUGH A. NISBET,

Registrar.

Table showing total number of Cases dealt with in, and Expenditure and Revenue of the Supreme Court,

(From 1902 to 1911.)

REVENUE.

EXPENDITURE.

Total

Number

Year.

of Cases

Percentage of Revenue to Expenditure.

dealt

with.

Total.

Increase.

Decrease.

Total.

Increase.

Dec rease.

C.

နာ

3

C.

%

1902,

1,070

70,617.65

8,438.56

30,275.42

9,629.30

42.87

1903,

968

75,544.52

4,926.87

41,758.83

1,483.41

55.27

1904,

1,038

58,681.03

16,863.49 49,108.37

7,349.54

83.68

1905,

1,166

66,711.72 8,030.69

...

61,984.69 | 12,876.32

92.91

1906,

1,039

69,667.23

2,955.51

52,904.11

9,080.58

75.93

· 1907,

1,031

69,592.75

74.48

56,156.78

3,252.67

80.69

1908,

1,014

87,270.40 | 17,677.65

46,592.80

...

9,563.98

53.3

1909,

1,030

89,209.17

1910,

1,259

91,789.15

1,938.77

2,579.98

45,861.55

65,527.80

731.25

51:40

19,666.25

7188

1911,

1,963

86,702.10

5,087.05 *48,342.49

17,185.31

5570

- F 6-

* Not including $36,208.12 paid direct to Treasury for Fees in respect of licences to keep Local Registers issued by the Registrar of Companies under the Companies (Local Registers) Ordinance, 1907.

Appendix G.

REPORT ON THE POLICE MAGISTRATES' COURTS

FOR 1911.

Mr. E. R. Hallifax acted as 1st Police Magistrate from 1st January to 12th May.

Mr. F. A. Hazeland acted as Puisne Judge from 1st January to 12th May.

Mr. F. A. Hazeland resumed duty as 1st Police Magistrate on 13th May. Went on leave on 15th November.

Mr. E. A. Irving acted as 1st Police Magistrate from 15th November to 31st December.

Mr. J. R. Wood, 2nd Police Magistrate, was transferred to the Education Department as Director of Education on 15th Novem- ber.

Mr. C. D. Melbourne acted as 2nd Police Magistrate from 15th November to 31st December.

Mr. R. H. A. Craig acted as 1st Clerk from 15th February to 13th October.

Mr. G. A. Woodcock went on leave on 14th February. Resumed duty on 14th October and acted as Land Officer in addition to his own duties from the 27th November to 31st December.

The number of cases was 10,471 as compared with 11,688 in 1910, the revenue was $52,464.87 as compared with $75,970.76 for 1910.

17th February, 1912.

EDWARD A. IRVING,

Palice Magistrate,

Table showing total Number of Cases tried in, and Expenditure and Revenue of the

Magistracy for the years 1902 to 1911.

Expenditure.

Revenue.

Total

Number

Year.

of Cases

tried.

Total.

Increase.

Decrease.

Total.

Increase.

Decrease.

Percentage of Expenditure to Revenue.

$

C.

$

C.

$

C.

C.

%

1902

29,050.62

5,256.29

96,723.26

27,958.71

16,070

30.03

1903

38,0430

8,995.68

...

71,310.77

25,412.49

14,268

53.35

1904

38,485.48

440.18

95,405,12 24,094,35

14,505

40.34

1905

35,762.86

2,723.62

88,145.26

7,259.86

13,450

40'57

1906

39,303.16

3,540.30

79,557.64

8,587.62

13,871

49.40

1907

40,455,52

1,152.36

67,133.26

12,424,38

13,414

60.26

1908

46,018.18

5,562.66

68,696,43

1,563.17

10,555

66.98

1909

40,119.69

5,898.49

69,986.42

1,289.99

10,771

57.32

1910-

38,428.03

1,691.66

75,970.76

5,984.34

11,688

50.58

1911

43,298.26

4,870.23

52,464.87

23,505,89.

10,471

82.53

}

G 2

Appendix H.

REPORT OF THE LAND OFFICER FOR THE YEAR 1911.

1.-REGISTRATION.

During the year two thousand one hundred and forty-two (2,142) Deeds and Documents were registered under the provisions of Ordinance No. 1 of 1844 affecting three thousand five hundred and fifty-eight (3,558) lots of land particulars of which are shown in Table I.

2.

GRANTS OF LAND.

The total area of land sold and granted on Lease during the year was 215 acres 3 roods 15 poles of which 130 acres 2 roods 94 poles was in respect of lands dealt with by the District Offices. The total area resumed was 19 acres 3 roods 38 poles leaving 195 acres 3 roods 17 poles additional land granted during the year. Particulars of the grants are shown on pages W 2 and W 3 of the Blue Book for 1911.

3. GRANTS OF LEASES.

The number of Crown Leases granted during the year was 99 particulars of which are specified in Table II.

4.-FEES.

The total amount of fees collected by stamps during the year amounted to $39,623.20 being $3,797.95 more than the previous

year.

The amounts of fees collected under the different headings for the years 1902 to 1911 are shown in Table III.'

5.-CROWN RENT ROLL.

The total Crown Rent due in respect of leased lands in Hong- kong and Kowloon (excluding certain Villages in Hongkong and Kowloon entered in the Village Rent Roll) amounted for the year ending 25th December to $426,336.64 an increase of $5,226.27 on the previous year and the total amount due in respect of leased lands in the Villages in Hongkong and Kowloon appearing in the Village Rent Roll for the year ending 30th September was $3,565.33 a decrease of $47.75 due to the resumption of 22 small lots. The total number of lots of Crown Land appearing in the Rent Rolls with the total Rents is shown in Table IV.

6.--NAVAL AND MILITARY Lands.

The formal documents transferring the properties known as the Kowloon City Rifle Range and Mount Davis Battery were completed

H 2

during the year. Negotiations for the amendment of the boundaries of Signal Hill and Gun Club Hill were completed and the documents of transfer signed. The Military Authorities having relinquished the Electric Light Emplacements, Marine Lots 279 and 280, those lots were transferred to the Government.

7.-NEW TERRITORIES.

Regulations were made during the year under the New Territories Regulation Ordinance, 1910, by which a new scale. of fees was brought into force for the Registration of Deeds and other instru- ments affecting land in the whole of the New Territories.

8.-STAFF.

Mr. G. H. Wakeman, Land Officer, acted as Registrar of the Supreme Court, Registrar of Companies, Official Alministrator and Official Trustee from the 1st January to the 15th August in addition to his other duties. Mr. P. Jacks, Assistant Land Officer, acted as Land Officer during the absence of Mr. Wakemar from the 28th August to the 20th November and Mr. A. G. M. Fletcher, Deputy Official Receiver, acted as Official Receiver for the same period. Mr. G. A. Woodcock acted as Assistant Land Officer from the 27th November to the 31st December during the absence on leave of Mr. Jacks.

The Bankruptcy and Trade Mark Subordinate Staff were placed on the permanent staff on the 1st January as follows:-

Mr. Ho Fu Leung, 3rd Grade Clerk,

Mr. Wong Po Kai, 4th Grade Clerk,

Mr. Tsu Kwok Chan, 5th Grade Clerk,

and 2 messengers.

Mr. Ng Yuk Shu, Land Office Interpreter, was appointed to act as Interpreter to the Official Receiver in addition to his Land Office duties.

!

r

8th July, 1912.

G. H. WAKEMAN,

Land Officer.

1

M

H 3

Table I.

Particulars of Deeds and Documents registered in the Land Office.

No. of Lots

Description of Documents.

Number

or portions of

Registered.

Total Consideration.

Lots affected.

$ c.

Assignments,

877

1,184

15,343,234,29

Mortgages, Transfers of

Mortgages, Reassign-

ments and Satisfactions,

1,022

1,730

18,183,417.53

Surrenders,

Judgments and Orders of

Courts,

Probates and Letters of

Administration,

Miscellaneous Documents,

38

60

# 28

44

102

71

212

90

270

Total,........

2,142

3,558

* Including £124. 8s. 17. sterling, 130,00) Francs and 10,000 Marks at current

rate of exchange.

Table II.

Crown Leases granted during the year 1911.

Hongkong.

Kowloon and

Hung Hom.

New Territories.

Marine.

Inland.

Hill District.

Farm and Garden.

Villages.

Marine.

Inland.

Quarries.

Piers.

New Kowloon Marine.

New Kowloon Inland.

New Kowloon Farm.

Tai Po.

Sai Kung.

Total.

10

5

34

2 2 5 0 17 8 16 0 10 0 0 0

99

H 4.

*

Table III.

Fees collected during the ten years from 1902 to 1911.

Year.

Registra - tion of Deeds.

Searches and Copies Grants of

of Docu-

Total.

Leases.

ments.

$

C.

$

c.

$

C.

C.

1902,

10,128.00

1.915.25

2,135.00

14,178.25

*1903,

27,664,00

1,507.00 2,805.00

31,976.00

1904,

30,209.00

2,029.00

2,355.00

31,598,00

1905,

34,161.00

2,767.05

1,220.00

37,948.05

1406,

27.565,00

2.219.30

1.310.00

31,094.30

1907,

21,507.00

2010.05

1,835,00

25,352.05

1908,

23,178.00

1,920,50

1,970.00

27,068.50

1909,

22,325,00

2.26-.75

1,270.00

25.863.75

1910,

1911.

27,798.00 2,722.25 33,871.00

5,305.00

35, 25.25

2,827.20

2,925.00

39,623.20

* Scale of Fees increased,-Ordinance No. 36 of 1902.

H 5

Table IV.

Crown Rent Roll.

Locality and Description.

No. of Lots.

Total Crown Rent.

$

C.

Hongkong, Marine,

299

Praya Reclamation Marine, Inland,

169

63,047.90 18,549.00

1,521

140,998.66

>>

Quarry Bay, Marine,

2

18,334.00

Iuland,

11

3,207.00

""

Hongkong, Farm,...

43

1,943.80

Garden,

34

875.00

39

Rural Building,

115

10,586,84

Aberdeen, Marine,

Apleechow, Marine,.

Inland,

5

579.16

Inland,

61

2,106.16

20

150.56

22

173,64

Shaukiwan Bay, Marine,

10

1,928,00

Inland,

137

2,357.74

"

Stanley, Inland,

4

.4.00

Kowloon, Marine,

61

46,292.13

Inland,.

828

48,279.43

25

Farm,

6

161.12

"

Garden,

3

64.00

Hunghom, Marine,

35

Shek O, Inland,

Tai Tam, Inland,

2

3,862.00

Inland,..

220

6,775.50

1

1.00

1

1.00

Tong Po, Inland,

1

1.00

Lantao, Marine,

2

1,300.00

Quarries,.......

21

41,149.00

New Kowloon, Marine,

5

7,368.00

Inland,...

36

1,779.00

Farm,

940.00

Survey District IV, Lot 3,183, part,

1

12.00

New Kowloon, Rural Building,

I

14.00

Tai Po, Inland,.....

2

147.00

Sai Kung, Marine,...

1

ود

Inland,..

2

564.00

Peng Chau, Farm,

Mining, ....

2

225,00 2,560.00

Total,

3,652

$426,336.64

H 6

Village Rent Roll.

Nos.

Locality and Description.

of

Total Crown Rent.

Lots.

C.

Wongneichung,

129

225.00

Aberdeen,

29

87.50

Pokfulam,

36

73.03

Tai Hang,

158

635.50

Ah Kung Ngam,

27

20.25

Kai Lung Wan,

1

9.80

Shaukiwan,..

175

245.75

Tai Kok Tsui,

11

18.00

Mong Kok,

53

112.50

Hokun,

96

278.00

Tokwawan,..

190

331.00

Shek Shan,.

31

69 00

Sun Shan,

18

59.50

Mataukok,

32

46.50

Mati,

2

5.50

Ho Mun Tin,

9

37.50

Matauchung,

58

138.50

Matauwei,

126

220.50

Kaŋ Pui Shék,

31

112.00

Hau Pui Loong,

15

53.50

Tung Lo Wan,

5

23.00

Wong Tsuk Hang,

2

34.50

Tai Hang Stream,

21

89.00

Little Hongkong,

6

8.00

Tong Po,........

2

3.50

Stanley,

11

21.00

Tytam,

1

3.50

Tytam Tuk,

4.50

Wong Ma Kok,

2.00

Chai Wan,

Shek O,

18.00

23.00

Hok Tsui,

1

1.50

Chung Hom Bay,

1

3,00

Chinese Joss House, Bowen Road, Victoria,...

1

3.00

Aplichau,.

69

273.00

Teat Tse Mui,

35

99.00

Old Kowloon Farm Lot 13,

48

125.00

Deep Water Bay,

3

2.50

Telegraph Bay, Hung Hom West,

13

43.50

2

6.00

Total,

1,469

$3,565.33

Σ

*

'

Appendix I.

REPORT ON THE NEW TERRITORIES FOR THE YEAR 1911.

A.-NORTHERN DISTRICT.

I. STAFF.

Mr. S. B. C. Ross acted as District Officer from the 1st January until July 31st, Mr. D. W. Tratman thence until November 25th and I then acted until the end of the

year.

Mr. A. E. Wood acted as Assistant District Officer until November 25th, and Mr. S. B. B. McElderry from that date until the end of the year.

II. POLICE.

The Police Force in the Northern District of the Territories consisted in December, 1911, of 8 Europeans, 71 Indiáns and 26 Chinese, an increase of 13 Indians and 2 Chinese over 1910. This was due in the first place to the opening of Tsün Wàn Station on July 21st and secondly to additional Indian Police sent out to border stations on account of the disturbances arising out of the revolution in the neighbouring Chinese Territory.

The waters of Mirs Bay were patrolled by No. 2 Launch until November 28th when No. 3, which had been laid up for two years, was recommissioned and took her place on the Mirs Bay beat: each of these launches carries 2 European Police and 15 Seamen.

The prevailing unrest of the year made itself felt in an in- crease of crime throughout the district; but the fears expressed by shopkeepers and others that raids from Chinese Territory would be a serious menace to the public peace were not realised up to the end of the year.

The health of the Police Force in the district was better than in 1910 and the total number of fever cases was 74 as compared with 87. The opening of the new Tsün Wan Station at the end of July was productive of several cases at first but there is now every rea- son to believe that it will prove quite healthy.

III. MAGISTRACY.

There was a considerable diminution of cases during 1911- 332 criminal cases as compared with 467 in 1910, and 382 in 1909. The following table shows the returns for the last three years:

- I 2

A.--Criminal.

Cases heard

Persons brought before the Magistrate on various charges

Persons convicted

Persons discharged

Persons imprisoned

Fines

-

Warrants

Cases

B.--Civil (small debts).

Distress Warrants

1909.

1910.

1911.

382

467

332

640

558

399

278

141

***

126

4:

116

139

85

$1,947.27

300

$2,627.05 $1,829.92

292

157

240 35

205

75

In addition licences to carry arms are issued from this office, and 287 were issued in 1911, as against 271 in 1910. Towards the end of the year the unrest in China and the fear of incursions from across the border led to a sudden increase in applications for arms, especially for rifles; for the modern pirate is better armed than his predecessor, and is less likely to be frightened by the dis- charge of a musket.

IV.-LAND OFFICE.

There was a slight falling off in the number of deeds registered after the very large increase in the previous year. The following table shews the number of deeds registered annually since the Land Ordinance of 1905 :-

——

1905 -

1906 -

1907 -

1908 -

1909 - 1910 1911 -

1,794

1,407

2.160

2,384

2,544

3,885

3,590

It was decided last year to charge a small fee for registration of deeds, and from March 1st when the charge was first made until the end of the year $1,414.70 was collected. This charge has perhaps been rather appreciated than otherwise, since it invests the transaction with more dignity. The table of fees is given in Table G.

There were 108 auctions of Crown land and 129 sales by private treaty, as compared with 170 and 134 respectively in 1910. The land resumed for public purposes only amounted to 235 lots for which $2,151.42 was paid out,-this being mainly for the section of the light railway from Au Ha to Sha Tau Kok, whereas in 1910, 762 lots were resumed for $14,904.07. The large amount of money thus set free in 1910 was probably the chief cause for the larger business in registration of deeds and Crown land sales.

}

I 3

The registration of graves continued to be popular, and 419 were registered as against 325 in 1910. There were, however, several thorny disputes over grave sites, and it is unlikely that these will cease so long as fungshui continues to play a prominent part in Chinese religion. There were no serious disputes over forestry during 1911.

The rent for pineapple plantations amounted to $989.82. The figures for the last four years have been :-

1908.

1909.

1910. $1,056.80

1911.

$1,323.80 $1,096.71

$989.82.

1911 was not a good year for pineapple planters. The crop was good but there was no market for the pines owing chiefly to the demand from pineapple canners from Hongkong and Macao having fallen off. Much land planted with pineapple has recently been given up owing to the poor quality of the soil.

V.-REVENUE.

The total revenue from the Northern District is set out in Table F.

The collection of Crown Rent commenced on October 4th and was finished on November 11th ; only 20 warrants were executed on account of default of payment.

From July 1st the payment of liquor duties was made through this office, and $2,872.32 was collected to the end of the year.

The Licence Fees for Pawnbrokers and Money Changers were -paid through this office from January 1st.

VI.-OPIUM.

The number of opium cases during the year was 71 and the fines $602.90, as against 137 cases in respect of which $810.00 was collected as fines in 1910.

Owing to the restrictions placed on the sale of opium in Chinese Territory and the increased price, the smuggling of opium into our Territory has nearly ceased; there was also a considerable increase in opium sales in the Territory in the latter part of 1911.

VII.-LIQUOR.

Of a total amount $31,094, collected on account of Liquor Duties, only $2,872.32 came through this office, the rest being paid direct to Hongkong.

VIII-PUBLIC WORKS.

Little progress was made during 1911 with the Castle Peak-Sha Tau Kok Road; the sections from San Tin to Fan Ling, and from Fan Ling to Au He were completed, and the road was continued

I 4

from Au He to the Gap below Sha Tau Kok Police Station. The whole section from Fan Ling to Sha Tau Kok Station was during the year utilised for the laying of a light railway line which was duly opened for the public traffic on December 20th and well patronised from the commencement.

The pier at the end of the road at Castle Peak was completed and opened to traffic; there is not however sufficient depth of water for launches to call there except at high tide.

IX.-GENERAL.

The year 1911 was a prosperous one for the Territory until the Autumn; business was good and the first rice crop was better than usual in most districts; but the second crop was as a rule not so successful, and the conditions of trade became more unsettled owing to the disturbances in Kwang Tung Province.

The rainfall, as measured in the rain-gauge at Tai Po, was 106.74 inches. The average for the preceding five years was 97-93 inches.

Among the other crops, sugarcane came on very well in the winter, owing to the damp weather; in dry years it is apt to suffer from a kind of blight, but owing to the plentiful supply, sugar was cheap. Sweet potatoes were good throughout the Territory: there was rather a scarcity of peanuts, which affected the price of oil. Of the fruits, the pineapple crop was good, but growers com- plained of poor market: the lichee crop at Fan Ling was also good.

Notable improvement took place during 1911 in two trades, firstly bricks and tiles, and secondly bean-stick manufacture. The chief brickworks are situated in the North of the Territory near the border, and good export trade has developed to Canton at Hongkong: while in addition there was an increased demand for the erection of brick-houses in the Territory.

Bean-stick is manufactured out of imported beans; mostly in the Pat Heung and Tsün Wàn districts. An increasing quantity was exported in 1911, chiefly from two firms in Tsün Wan.

The railway ran successfully throughout the year, and on October the through line to Canton was opened to general traffic. The service of trains was not at first such as to permit of residence in the New Territory and work in Hongkong, but has since been im- proved, and it may be expected that many Hongkong residents will before long take advantage of its facilities to seek the greater freedom and economy of a country life. The Hongkong Golf Club acquired during the year an area of 55.62 acres in the valley stretch- ing West from Fan Ling, and commenced the laying out of a golf course, which promises to be one of the best, if not the best, in the East.

I 5

Mention must be made of the peaceful revolution of November last, which was accepted by the residents of the New Territories. without any hesitation and without any excitement. Within a few weeks scarcely a queue was to be seen throughout the Territory.

The Registration of Births was introduced on July 1st, but not enforced. Up to the end of the year only one birth was registered, that of a son to my interpreter.

20th June, 1912.

G. N. ORME,

District Officer.

I 6

Table A.

Strength of the Police Force in the Northern District of

the New Territories during 1911.

Ping Shan,

Sai Kung,

Sha Tau Kok,

Tai Po,

Sheung Shui,

Ta Ku Ling,

San Tin,

Au Tau,

STATIONS.

Tsün Wan,

Sha Tin,

(Block house),

No. 3 Launch,

Sergeant Interpreters,

STATIONS.

Total,

Table B.

Health of Force.

Europeans.

Indians.

Chinese.

Total.

1

9

1

3

1

12

9

+224

14

3

15

475

12

11

7

3

8

3

12

14

4

2

7

3

3

: ܗ:

2

15

17

00

8

10

75

50 135

To Hospital with fever.

To Hospital

for other

causes.

Sick in

Station with

fever.

Sick in

Station from

other causes.

Total.

Ping Shan,

3

3

7

Au Tau,

5

14

2

21

San Tin,

2

2

Sheung Shui,

2

3

1

5

Tai Po,

3

1

18

23

12

Sai Kung,

Sha Tin,

Tsün Wàn,

1

11

3

7

9

Sha Tau Kok,.

4

5

16

Total,

10

223

57

8

98

Stations.

I 7

Table C.

Crime in Northern District, 1911.

Ping Shan, Sha Tin,

3

1

I

Tsün Wàn,

Au Tau,

San Tin, Sheung Shui, Sai Kung,

Sha Tau Kok,... Tai Po,

Total,

10 14

5

16

766

1

17

1

20

1

1

3

13

2

1

11

1

14

1

3

LO CI

2

11

లు

4

9

LO

5

2

2

16

20

1

53

15

:

95

Heading.

No. of Sales &c.

No. of Lots.

*

Crown Rent or Fee.

C.

Table D.

Land Office Returns.

AREA.

$

GA

Premium.

in acres.

in square feet.

Auction Sales,

""

(quarry),

Private Sales,.

108

137

237.62 3,896 | 62-29

| 188,567 188,567

1

1

40.00

1.01

129

142

77.99 753

1.11 50,084

Total 2,901,919 Total

Total 98,436

43,996

"

""

Matshed Permits,

Permits to occupy land (Building)

Permits to cut earth, &c., and to

quarry stone,

1

1

1.02

7,500

Total

7,500

(Agriculture)

11

23

103.36

39.68

44

32.50

}

87

165.00

Sandalwood Mill Licences,

44

44.00

:

:

Ferry Licences,..

16.00

Grants in Exchange,...

2

8

.15

Resumptions, ...

235

Surrenders,

69

•12

295 Total

5,5221

8.56

3.68 1,639

Registration of Memorials,

3,590

Registration of Graves,

419

1,414.70

203.25

:

**

...

}

Reduction in Crown Rent.

Compensation.

C. $ c.

...

19.77 2,151.42

21.81

...

Remarks.

- 1 8 -

I 9

Table E.

January,

February,

March,

April,

Rainfall in 1911.

1.99 inch.

•53 ">

3.70

23

May, June, July, August,

-

8.65 21.36

>>

93

5.19

""

12.41

36.33

י

September,

October,

November,

December,

7.06

22

5.77

"3

3.65

ay

•10

Total, -

106.74

94

Rainfall for 1910, -

81.12

""

I 10

Table F.

Revenue collected in the Northern District, during the years

1910 and 1911.

1910.

1911

$

C.

$

C.

Crown Rent,

79,929.77

Kerosine Oil Licences,

242.00

80,235.88

266.00

Distillery Licences, -

2,581.97

2,540.75

Chinese Wines and Spirits,

3.763.04

3.706.25

House Rent, (Clerks),

205.00

155.00

Water Wheels,

44.00

44.00

Ferry Licences,

13.00

16.00

Distress Warrants, Small Debts,

29.00

51.00

Matshed Permits,

38.75

32.50

Pineapple Licences,

1,056.80

989.82

Premia on Land Sales,

5,387.71

4,653.00

Stone Qarries,

458.00

69.00

Permits to cut Earth,

182.00

96.00

Forestry Licences,

3,818.09

2,992.91

Grave Certificates,

150.75

203.25

Certified Extracts,

90.00

130.00

Sun Prints,

180.00

100.00

Miscellaneous Receipts,

28.00

Distress Warrants, (Crown Rent),

99.00

20.00

Fines of Court,

2,627.05

1,767.60

Forfeitures,

-

58.47

219.32

European Wines and Spirits,

50.00

100.00

Liquor Duties,-

2,872.32

Pawnbrokers' Licences,

1,600.00

Money Changers' Licences,

100.00

$101,032.40

$102,960,60

Note. About $10,000 should also be credited to the revenue of the Northern District in respect of Harbour Dues, etc., and about $28.000 in respect of Liquor Duties paid direct to Hongkong.

Jo

I 11

Table G.

REGISTRATION FEES (New Territories).

1. Conveyance on Sale...........

2. For the registration of a lease or agreement for a lease, to be charged on the amount of annual rent reserved,

3. For the registration of a lease executed in pursuance of duly stamped agreement for the

same,

4. For the registration of a) surrender of a lease or cancella- tion of an agreement for a lease,...

5. Mortgage,

10 cents for every $10 or part thereof up to $50; if above $50, 50 cents for every $100 or part thereof.

50 cents for every $100 or part

thereof.

The same fee as on the Agree- ment but not exceeding $1.

The same fee as is payable on the Lease or Agreement

itself under Article 2.

(10 cents for every $100 or part

thereof.

{

6. Redemption of mortgage,{

7. For the registration of a conveyance when no money con- sideration or merely nominal con- sideration passes, etc.,

8. For the registration of a Power of Attorney,

9. For the registration of any order or document issued under the Seal of the Supreme Court of

10 cents for every $500 or part

thereof.

$1 for the first lot and 10 cents for each additional lot or por- tion of a lot after the first with a maximum fee of $2.

10 cents.

Hongkong, Probate, Letter of | $1 for the first lot and 10 cents

Administration in respect of any land upon which Stamp or Pro- bate Duty has been paid, Certifi- cate of Satisfaction, and all other documents not herein provided for, J

10. For every

uncertified

for every additional lot or

portion of a lot.

copy of any instrument of record, 25 cents.

per folio of 72 words,.........

11. For every certified copy of any instrument of record not exceeding 3 folios of 72 words each,

$1.

For each additional folio, ...

50 cents.

5

\, \

i

I i2

B.-SOUTHERN DISTRICT.

I.-STAFF.

Mr. G. N. Orme filled his substantive post as Assistant Dis- trict Officer from January 1st to November 25th.

Mr. A. E. Wood acted as Assistant District Officer from November 26th till the end of the year.

II.-POLICE.

The Assistant District Officer, acting as Assistant Superinten- dent of Police, held quarterly inspections of the Stations at Tai O, Cheung Chau, Tung Chung, and Lamma. In November it was found necessary to put a second launch on the Southern District patrols. No. 1 Police Launch now takes the Eastern patrol (Lye- inun and Junk Bay), and No. 2 the Western, (Lantao and Deep Bay).

Table A shews the disposition of the Force in the four island stations.

The admissions to hospital from the above stations and the number of cases treated in station are given in Table B. It is gratifying to note that there were only 3 cases of fever throughout the year.

In Table C are set forth the inore serious cases of crime report- ed during the year.

III.-MAGISTRACY.

The Assistant District Officer, sitting as Police Magistrate, heard during the year 84 cases affecting 118 persons.

Of these, 112 were convicted or bound over, and 6 were discharged.

The following table gives a comparison of 1911 with the half year July-December, 1910, previous to which the Assistant District Officer had no duties as Police Magistrate :--

1911.

1910 (half year).

No. of cases,

84

21

No. of persons affected,

118

29

Persons convicted or bound over,

112

27

Persons discharged,..

6

2

Fines (exclusive of opium fines).... $478.85

$217.71

Persons imprisoned,

32

11

Opium Fines paid to the Farmer,

$20

$12.50

Forfeitures (estreated bail, and

gambling seizures),

$97.91 $11.15

A

I 13

IV. SMALL DEBTS COURT.

Fifty-one (51) cases were heard under the Small Debts Court Ordinance during the year, as against seventy-three (73) in 1910. The Assistant District Officer held regular courts at Tai O and Cheung Chau, and the advantages of a cheap and convenient hearing are appreciated by the island population. There were no cases from the mainland.

V.-LAND OFFICE.

937 deeds were registered during the year. The following table shows the number of deeds that have been registered annual- ly since the Land Ordinance came into force in 1905 :-

1905 (from August)

1906

1907

1908

1909

1910

1911

-

681

1,061

714

644

1,022

759

937

1911 thus shows an increase of 9% over the average for the six years 1906 to 1911 inclusive.

39 auctions and 17 sales by private treaty were held.

In all, 2 acres of land were sold, with an annual Crown Rental of $181.56. The total amount received as premia was $1,211.

25 lots with an area of 1.01 acres, and a Crown Rental of $45.55, were resumed for public purposes, chiefly in connection with the improvement of Ap Liu village. The cost of these re- sumptions was $3,913.10 and in two cases equivalent areas of Crown Land were granted in exchange.

137 lots were voluntarily surrendered by their owners, and 35 were re-entered upon by Government for non-payment of Crown Rent.

Graves. The regulations governing registration of Graves in the Northern District were on March 31st extended to the Southern

District.

Cemeteries, however, are provided for New Kowloon and Cheung Chau, where the demand for land will not allow the privilege of a Chinese grave. In the rest of the District. 28 permits were issued between June and November, and it will not be long before the system is well understood.

VI.-REVENUE.

The revenue collected is shewn under the various heads in Table D.

- İ 14

The largest proportionate increases appear under Quarry Leases, Matshed Permits, and Registration Fees. The Ch'ek Lap Kok Stone Quarries were leased, after competition, at an inflated rental of $155 per mensem, but the lessee failed, and only eleven months' rent could be collected from him. In 1911 the collection of fees for the occupation the pile-huts at Tai O Creek was transferred from the Harbour Office to this Department, where- upon 221 new matshed permits were issued at $1 each per annum.

The great increase in Registration Fees is accounted for by the large number of conveyances on sale for high considerations. On 41 conveyances, $758.50 were paid in registration fees, repre- senting an average consideration of $3,700 per deed.

Table E shews the revenue collected through other Depart- ments from the Southern District. The liquor figures, as a result of the increased duty, are nearly double those of 1910, and the New Kowloon Quarries show a big advance.

Tables D and E together give a grand total of $154,286.02 for 1911, as compared with $122,924.58 for 1910, an increase of $31,361.44.

VII.-OPIUM.

7,576.54 taels of prepared opium and 1,919-20 taels of Persian Opium were sold in the Opium Farmer's shops in the Southern District, exclusive of New Kowloon.

A small quantity, 2250 taels, of Dross Opium was sold in Tai O.

The average price per tael of both prepared and Persian Opium was $4.00. The total receipts were therefore about $38,000.

VIII. LIQUOR.

The liquor tax paid by the Southern District for 1911 amounted to $60,137.86.

Of the whole sum, one distillery in Sham Shui Po paid $26,362.15, while Cheung Chau contributed $22,997.88.

There are 20 distilleries in the district, of which 10 are on the Mainland, 6 in Cheung Chau, 2 in Tai 0, and 2 in Ma Wan.

IX.-CROPS.

The first rice crop was good, and the second promised well, but was unfortunately spoiled in certain places by a species of blight.

1

I 15

Sweet potatoes, Peanuts, Onions, Beans, and Turnips were. well up to the average. Onions are a noticeable vegetable in Tung Chung and other parts of Lantao, and command a ready sale in Hongkong. Pumeloes and Pineapples were both good. The latter are only grown by the Hakkas of Tsing Yi and Ma Wan Islands.

The shrimp fishery of Cheung Chau district was excellent, but the season of the "Yellow Flower" fish, so important to Tai O, was a comparative failure. The market-gardens of New Kowloon were, if anything, above the average.

The Hongkong rice trouble of September had no marked effect on the district, beyond causing an inevitable grumble at high prices.

X-PUBLIC WORKS.

Reclamation and improvement at Ap Liu village, Sham Shui Po, was put in hand, and involved the destruction of many insani- tary dwellings, and the resumption of a considerable amount of land.

The hospital at the infectious diseases settlement, Lai Chi Kok, was built during the year.

No public works were undertaken outside New Kowloon.

XI-GENERAL.

The district as a whole maintained a comfortable level of

pros- perity. Cheung Chau, where the island committee of business men are building a new market on up-to-date principles, is a notable centre of progress.

The islands were not behindhand in loyalty at the time of the Coronation. Embroidered addresses to the King were reverently presented by the elders of Cheung Chau and Tai O, where the people kept high holiday.

At Cheung Chau, H.M.S. Taku fired a royal salute, which was taken up by the miscellaneous ordnance of massed junks, and followed by festivity and a lantern procession.

Salt Pans and Quarries both had a poor year, owing on the one hand to the cheapness of salt, and on the other to the dullness of the stone-market in Canton.

New Kowloon saw considerable investment in land, by persons other than Chinese, near Kau Lung Tong and Kau Lung Tsai.

The economy of Sham Shui Po and Kowloon City is stable, and 1911 was a normal year.

Hang Hau continued to be popular as a fishing centre, and held out signs of renewed activity. Boat-building received an impetus there, and additional facilities were provided for watering the junks that come in to bream.

J

I 16

In the summer, big game were reported in Lantao Island, where a number of cattle were said to have been destroyed by tigers. A hunt was organised, but unfortunately met with no

success.

7th March, 1912.

A. E. WOOD,

Assistant District Officer,

Southern District.

Tai O,....

Tung Chung,

Cheung Chau,

Lamma,

Station.

I 17

Table A.

Strength of the Police Force in the Island Stations of the Southern District during 1911.

Station.

Europeans.

Indians.

Chinese.

Total.

1

5

4

10

10

2

7

1

2

7

10

5

Total,..

2

19

8

29

Table B.

Health of the Force.

Total.

Tai O,

Tung Chung,

1

1

2

2

1

3

Cheung Chau,

3

:

3

Lamma,

3

:

:

3

Total,.........

2

7

1

1

11

I 18

Table C.

Crime in the Islands of the Southern District 1911.

Tai 0,

Tung Chung,

Cheung Chau,

Man-

slaughter.

Armed

Robbery.

Suicide.

Kidnap-

ping.

Burglary.

Larceny.

:

1

1

Lamma,

Total,........

2

~

:

:

2

1

Total.

7

12

!

1

4

5

1

2

ON

2

1

12

20

Table D.

Revenue collected during 1911 by the Assistant District Officer. New Territories, Southern District.

1910.

1911.

$

C.

Land Sales, including premia for

1,927.56

$ C. 1,121.00

conversion,

Crown Rent,

22,934.73

24,430.32

Assessed Taxes,.

8,197.20

8,756.52

Lease of Stone Quarries,

990.00

1,795.00

Forestry Licences,

725.41

938.28

Earth Permits,

52.00

34.00

Matshed Permits,

140.00

371.00

Pineapple Licences,

30.32

29.72

Registration Fees,.

678,90

1,251.80

Distress Warrants, (Crown Rent),

94.00

160.00

Distress Warrants, (Small Debts),

20.00

Writs of Summons,

90.00

79.00

Fines, (Police Court),

230.21

478.85

Forfeitures,

11.15

97.91

Certified Extracts,

9.00

Grave Certificates,

9.75

Miscellaneous Receipts, Arrears of

110.00

Revenue,

Interest,.

14.70

7.24

$36,292.18

$39,823.39

I 19

Table E.

Revenue collected through other Departments from the New Territories, Southern District.

1910.

1911.

$ C.

$ C.

P.W.D., (Land Permits, etc.)..........

3,934.25

2,042.90

Treasury, (Crown Rent from Inland

Lots),

12,584.38

11,929.82

*Treasury, (Quarries in New Kow-

14,366.75

loon),..

23,156.00

Harbour Office, (Harbour Dues,

Stake Nets, etc.),

18,631.30

14,394.30

Police, (Licence Fees),

2,691.59

2,801.75

Duties),..

Imports and Exports Office, (Liquor} 34,424.13

60,137.86.

$86,632.40

$114,462.63

*Note-The amounts creditable to each year are given, although part of the 1911

amount was actually collected in advance in 1910.

!

Appendix J.

REPORT OF THE CAPTAIN SUPERINTENDENT OF

POLICE FOR THE YEAR 1911.

Nothing in connection with crime calling for special mention occurred during the year under review until the outbreak of the Revolution in China. The trouble began in North China about the end of September but it was not till a month or so later that its effects were felt in this Colony. On the evening of the 9th Novem- ber, excited by a rumour (false, as afterwards appeared) that Peking had fallen, practically the entire Chinese population came forth into the streets, and proceeded to discharge crackers, commandeer the trams, and indulge in other manifestations of jubilation. The outburst was quite sudden and unexpected. The crowd was for the most part quite good-natured and except for an attack on the office of a Chinese newspaper which ventured to deny the truth of the rumour no great harm was done. Soon after this, however, an unusual spirit of "hooliganism" manifested itself among the Chinese of the lower orders. Many instances occurred of attacks on, and organised resistance to the Police in the execution of their duty, and on several occasions European ladies were hustled and insulted in the streets by rowdies. It is impossible to say how many cases of the sort occurred as doubtless some were not reported. The perpetrators were probably bad characters from the neighbouring province of China, not regular inhabitants of the Colony. Prompt measures were taken to put an end to this state of things. The mea- sures taken were as follow:-

A Proclamation was issued bringing into force the provisions of Part II of the Peace Preservation Ordinance, 1886, and at the same time important amendments were made in that Ordinance, the general effect of which was to enable the Magistrate to impose a flogging with the "Cat" for practically all offences against the person. The Proclamation was still in force when the year closed. Twenty-five extra Indian Police were engaged and 20 soldiers from the King's Own Yorkshire Light Infantry were enlisted as special constables. Also from the 2nd to 21st December inclusive the streets were patrolled at irregular periods by strong Military pickets accompanied by Police and a system of Police pickets was partly substituted for the ordinary beat duties, and continued to the end of the year.

It is satisfactory to record that the epidemic of insults to ladies was short-lived, but cases of resisting the Police continued to occur, though with decreasing frequency, for a considerable period. A special Military guard was placed over the Government Gunpowder Depôt on Green Island and the arms dealers' stocks of arms and ammunition were moved thither for safe custody early in January of the present year.

J 2

ļ

The total of all cases reported to the Police was 9,289 as against 9,789 in 1910 being a decrease of 500 or 5 10 per cent.

The average for the last five years is 9,999 8.

In the division of these cases into Serious and Minor Offences there appears a decrease, as compared with 1910, of 25 cases or 69 per cent. in the former and of 475 cases or 7 68 per cent. in the latter.

The decrease and increase as compared with 1910 in Serious Offences are shown as follows :- -

Decrease.

Murder,

Burglary or Larceny from Dwelling,

Kidnapping and Protection of Women and

Children,

Larcenies,..

Total,

36

12

51

107

Increase.

Robbery,

1

Unlawful Possession,

30

Assault with intent to rob,.

7

Other Felonies,

44

82

25

Nett Decrease,....

2. Table I shows the number and character of the Serious and Minor Offences reported to the Police during 1910 and 1911 and number of persons convicted and discharged in connection with these Offences.

MURDER.

3. Eleven murders were reported to the Police during the year as against 19 in 1910.

In connection with 9 of these reports, no arrest was made. In one case three men were arrested and discharged and in one case one man was arrested but liberated for want of evidence.

MANSLAUGHTER.

4. Fifteen cases were reported to the Police during the year as against 5 in 1910. In all of these cases arrests were made but in only two cases were convictions obtained.

GANG ROBBERIES.

5. Fifty-one gang robberies were reported to the Police during the year as against 53 in 1910.

J 3

In 33 cases no arrest was made, in the remaining 18 cases arrests were made. There were 11 cases in which convictions were obtained (21 persons). In 6 cases there was no conviction (8 persons).

One case undecided.

STREET AND HIGHWAY ROBBERIES.

6. Thirty-one Street and Highway Robberies were reported during the year as against 25 in 1910.

In connection with 22 of these, no arrest was made, in the remaining 9 cases arrests were made. There were 5 cases in which convictions were obtained (6 persons). In 4 cases there was no conviction (8 persons).

ROBBERIES ON BOATS AND JUNKS.

7. Nineteen cases were reported to the Police during the year as against 22 in 1910.

In connection with one of these cases, 3 men were arrested and convicted, in the remaining 18 cases no arrest was made.

OTHER FELONIES.

8. Under this heading are comprised the following:-

1911.

1910.

Arson and attempted arson,

2

2

Cutting and wounding,

Embezzlement,-

12

9

Demanding money with menaces,

-

6

5

34

29

Forgery,

16

13

Housebreaking,

157

141

Indecent assault and rape,

1

Wounding with intent to do grievous

bodily harm,

11

6

Abominable offences,

1

1

Throwing corrosive fluid, -

2

Being armed with intent to commit a

felony,

2

:

Administering a drug with intent to

commit a felony,

1

:

Attempting to discharge a loaded revolver with intent to do griev- ous bodily harm,

1

243

209

J 1

The number of cases in which convictions were obtained was 83 as against 60 in 1910.

GAMBLING.

9. One hundred and eighty Gambling Warrants were executed and convictions obtained as against 210 in 1910.

One was a lottery case.

PROPERTY REPORTED STOLEN AND PROPERTY RECOVERED.

10. The estimated value of property stolen during the year was $256,711.32 as against $269,154.06 in 1910, a decrease of $12,442.74.

The average for the five years is $215,318.17 an increase on the average reported in 1910 of $26,628.30.

The value of property recovered and restored to owners was $51,742.89 as against 19,846.08 in 1910, an increase over property recovered in the previous year of $31,696.81.

LOST PROPERTY.

11. The following is a return showing property lost or re- covered:

Year.

Articles reported lost.

Value

lost.

Articles recovered and

articles found which 1

were not reported

Value

found.

lost.

1911

803 $17,961.50

92

$4,256.00

1910

305

$16,854.37

98

$533.75

OPIUM WARRANTS.

12. Two thousand one hundred and ten (2,110) Search Warrants for prepared opium were executed by the Police and Excise Officers of the Opium Farmer, as compared with 1,941 in 1910.

In 715 cases opium was found and 1,117 persons were arrested as against 936 in 1910.

OPIUM DIVANS.

13. Twenty Warrants were executed by the Police for keeping Opium Divans. In 14 cases convictions were obtained, 4 cases were discharged, one case was withdrawn and in one case no arrest was made.

J 5

WEIGHTS AND MEASURES.

14. The Examiner of Weights and Measures made the following verifications:-

*-

Examined. Correct.

Incorrect.

Foreign Scales,

564

563

1

Chinese Scales,.........

2,336

2,320

16

Yard Measures,..

120

120

Nil.

Chek Measures,....

324

324

Nil.

The following prosecutions were instituted under the Weights and Measures Ordinance:

No. of Cases.

17

Convictions.

17

Total amount of fines.

$333

DANGEROUS GOODS ORDINANCE.

15. The following prosecutions were instituted under the Dangerous Goods Ordinance :--

No. of Cases.

2

Convictions.

Total amount of fines.

$25

FOOD AND DRUGS ORDINANCE.

16. The following prosecutions were instituted under the Food and Drugs Ordinance

No. of Cases.

2

Convictions.

Nil.

Total amount of fines.

Nil.

Samples purchased and sent to the Government Analyst:--

Brandy,

Whisky.

6

4

Ale.

Rum.

Gin.

Port.

Samshu.

1

6

All the above samples were certified to be genuine with the exception of two samples of brandy. Summonses were taken out in these two cases. In the former a certificate of origin was produced. and the case was withdrawn, the latter case stands adjourned to

J 6

enable a certificate of origin to be produced.

The samples of Samshu were purchased in connection with a poisoning case in Aberdeen Street.

MENDICANTS.

17. Seventy-two beggars were dealt with by the Magistrates; 102 were sent to Canton as follows:-

Once,

Twice,

Thrice...

How often sent away.

Total,..

Canton.

96

2

102

DEAD BODIES.

18. Table II shows the number of the unknown dead bodies found by the Police in the streets and elsewhere during the year.

LICENCES.

19. The following licences were issued during 1911 :-

1,100 Hongkong Jinrickshas.

50 Quarry Bay Jinricksbas.

345 Kowloon Jinrickshas.

30 Private Vechicles.

20 Motor Cars.

26 Motor Cars Drivers.

4 Motor Cycle Drivers. 1,160 Trucks.

674 Hongkong Chairs.

60 Hill District Chairs. 11,794 Drivers and Bearers.

3 Auctioneers.

12 Billiard Tables.

1 Brewery.

4 To store Calcium Carbide.

2 To deal wholesale in Cocaine and its Salts,

J 7

5 To store Detonators.

12 Distillery (Old Territories).

7 Distillery (New Territories).

16 To store Dynamite.

53 To store Ether and Alcoholic Liquids.

1 Fireworks (Manufacture).

173 Game.

1 Gunpowder (Manufacture).

5

(Storage).

14 Kerosene Storage (in Godowns).

1.033

(Ordinary).

49

"

(New Territories).

29 Marine Stores.

20.

40 To store Naphtha and Benzine.

2 To store Naphtha and Benzine (in Garage).

2 To store Nitrobenzene or Oil of Mirbane.

75 Pawnbrokers.

8 To store Petroleum in Bulk.

4 Phosphorus.

2 Poison (wholesale).

6 To store Rockets.

168 Spirits (Chinese, Old Territories).

49

""

(

New Territories).

32 To store Sulphuric Acid and Nitric Acid.

14 Money Changers' (New Territories).

2 To store Compressed Oxygen.

1 To store Dissolved Acetylene. 7,293 Hawkers.

DOGS ORDINANCE.

1,641 dogs were licensed during 1911.

78 Watch Dogs were licensed free of charge.

195 Stray Dogs were impounded, 39 were ransomed, 142 were sent to the Dogs' Home at Yaumati, 9 were destroyed, 3 escaped and 2 died in pound.

ARMS ORDINANCE.

21. Four licences to import and deal in arms and two to deal in sporting arms and ammunition were issued during 1911. During the whole year a Proclamation has been in force prohibit- ing the export of warlike stores from the Colony. The following arms and ammunition were confiscated during the year, viz. :—

Fifty-two revolvers, 1 Winchester rifle incomplete, 12.957 rounds ammunition mixed, 3,002 sticks dynamite, i5 boxes de- tonators, 18 rifles, 9 carbines, 75 rifle barrels, 7 muskets. 2 powder

J 8

flasks, 1 shot gun, 3 Mauser pistols, 10 pounds gunpowder, 12 swords, 10 daggers and knives, 14 bayonets, 1 sword stick, 1 can- non, 19 coils fuse, 1,596 boxes caps, 2 boxes primers, 350 bags saltpetre, 13 bags sulphur, 35 cylinders (empty), and 1 revolver holster and belt.

EDUCATION.

22. During the year 3 Europeans and 53 Indians obtained certificates for knowledge of Chinese, one European obtained a certificate for Hindustani, and 18 Indians obtained certificates for English.

IDENTIFICATION BY FINGER IMPRESSIONS.

23. 267 persons were identified as having previous convictions against them. This number is 52 more than during the year 1910.

107 identifications were those of criminals who had returned from banishment.

CONDUCT.

24. The conduct of the European Contingent (average strength 126) was very good. The total number of reports against them was 38 as against 41 in 1910 There were 4 reports for being drunk or under the influence of drink as against 9 in 1910, 2 for sleep- ing on duty as against 5, and 3 for neglect of duty as against 8.

The conduct of the Indian Contingent (average strength 372) was good. There were 312 reports as against 382 for the preced- ing year. For drunkenness there were 19 as against 34, for dis- orderly conduct 15 as against 17, for neglect of duty 31 as against 27, for absence from duty 39 as against 54, for gossiping and idling on duty 75 as against 67, and for sleeping on duty 31 as against 23. 218 men had no report.

Three Indian Constables were convicted by the Police Magis- trate (one dismissed from the Force) 2 for assault and one for fight- ing and creating a disturbance.

The behaviour of the Chinese Contingent (average strength 404) was fair. There were altogether 1,311 reports as against 1,138 in 1910. There was no report for drunkenness as against one in 1910, 178 for sleeping on duty as against 135, 20 for dis- orderly conduct as against 28, and 430 for minor offences as against 365. Eight Constables were convicted by the Police Magistrate (5 dismissed) for the following offences:-1 for at- tempting to obtain a bribe, 3 for assault, 1 for larceny, 1 for play- ing in a common gambling house, 1 for misconduct and 1 for demanding money with menaces,

year.

J 9

159 men of this Contingent were not reported during the

The seamen, coxswains, engineers and stokers (average strength 143) had 154 reports as compared with 186 for last year. For drunkenness there was no report (same as last year), and 113 for absence from station and late for duty as against 102 in the previous year. One seaman was convicted by the Police Magi-- trate for misconduct and dismissed the Force,

72 had no report recorded against them.

POLICE LAUNCHES AND BOATS.

25. The outer waters of the Colony are patrolled by two launches. Each has a crew consisting of 1 European Sergeant, 1 European Constable, 2 coxswains, 2 engineers, 2 stokers, 1 boatswain and s seamen. No. 3 launch was recommissioued on 1st December and is manned by 1 European Sergeant, 1 European Constable, 2 Coxswains, 2 engineers, 2 stokers and 6 seamen. She is station- ed at Tai Po.

The harbour is patrolled by four small launches (not all on duty at once) manned by 8 European Police, 8 coxswains, 8 engineers, 8 stokers and 16 seamen; and two rowing boats each manned by 1 European and 4 seamen.

There is also one spare boat in reserve.

REWARDS.

26. Seven Inspectors were granted medals for long and faith- ful service, one European Sergeant was commended by His Excellency the Governor for smart capture of robbers, for ex- cellent handling of a difficult situation in the New Territories and tact and good work in the collection of Crown Rent in the New Territories, one European Lance Sergeant for prompt and cour- ageous action in saving the life of a Chinese who was in danger of being drowned, one European Constable for plucky conduct on hoard a Lighter on fire, one European Constable for excellent handling of a difficult situation in the New Territories, and three European Constables for zeal and courage in the execution of their duty.

Two Jemadars and one Sergeant-Major were granted medals for long and faithful service, 6 Indian Constables were commended and three of them were granted rewards for smart capture of robbers in the New Territories, and 2 Indian Constables were commended for smart capture of thieves,

One Chinese Sergeant was granted a nedal for zeal and ability displayed in the discharge of his duties, one Chinese Sergeant for long and faithful service, 1 Chinese Sergeant and

J 10

1 Chinese Constable were commended for smart capture of robbers. 3 Chinese Constables for satisfactory performance of their duty, 1 was granted a reward for zeal and activity in securing the arrest of the ringleader in an armed robbery at Tsat Tse Mui, 1 for smart arrest of a thief, 1 for zeal and activity in the arrest of a man who had kidnapped a child, 1 for prompt and smart capture of a thief who had committed a burglary, 1 for smart capture of a robber, 2 for smart capture of burglars and 1 for zeal and activity in secur- ing the arrest of two men for child stealing, and 4 seamen for a smart capture of dynamite.

HEALTH.

27. Admissions to Hospital during last three years were as follows:-

1909.

1910.

1911.

Nation-

ality.

Average Admis- Average Admis- Average Admis Strength. sions. Strength, sions.

sions. Strength, sions.

Europeans,. 122

72

120

76

126

73

Indians,

384

371

358

380

372

356

Chinese,

511

136

525

120

547

153

Return of Police treated in Government Civil Hospital for Fever or Dengue Fever from the 1st January to 31st December,

1911:

Old Territories.

New Territories.

Nationality.

Average Strength.

Treated. Average Treated. Strength.

Europeans,

118

69

13

Indians,..

280

217

92

39

Chinese,..

500

149

47

4

In addition to cases treated in Hospital for Fever or Dengue Fever the cases treated for Fever in the various Stations in the New Territories without being removed to Hospital were:-

Europeans 10, Indians 51, Chinese 7.

J 11

EXECUTIVE STAFF.

28. I left for England on leave on 8th March and returned on 14th December. The Deputy Superintendent (Captain F. W. Lyons) who returned from leave on 9th March acted during my absence. He left for England on 13th December. The Assistant Superintend- ent (Mr. P. P. J. Wodehouse) acted as Deputy Superintendent from 1st January to 12th May and from 30th October to 31st Decem- ber and Mr. E. R. Hallifax from 13th May to 29th October. The Probationer (Mr. T. H. King) returned from leave on 26th October and acted as Assistant Superintendent from 30th October to 31st December. Mr. R. O. Hutchison was appointed to act as Assistant Superintendent, supernumerary to the establishment. from 14th December.

POLICE FORCE.

29. Eighteen Europeans were engaged during the year, eigh were recruited from England and ten enlisted locally. Table III shows changes in the personnel of the Force during the year, and Table IV the strength, expenditure and revenue for the past ton

years.

F. J. BADELEY, Captain Superintendent of Police.

8th February, 1912.

ANNEXE A.

Report on the Police School.

School was held on 100 days in the course of the year.

Attendance:—

(a.) At the Magistracy,

7,112

(b.) At No. 8 Station,

812

Total,...

7.921

Giving an average attendance of 79.

2. Units attending School were composed of :---

E. P. C.'s,...

I. P. C.'s, ...

C. C.'s. Gaol Guards,

Total....

:

18

130

262

60

470

J 12

3. At the several examinations held throughout the year the following men obtained the necessary marks to receive exemption from attendance at school:-

E. P. C. Nos. 25,

86,

113, 69, 55, 28, 1, 114, 38, 111, 48, 99.

E. P. C. Total,...

12

1. P. C. Nos. 757, 750, 637, 856, 636, 553, 747,

640, 696, 663, 834, 632, 716, 868,

537, 539, 880, 870, 500, 655, 569,

651, 850, 762, 874, 562, 841, 895.

I. P. C. Total,......

28

C. P. C. Nos. 343, 218, 183, 276.

C. P. C. Total...

Gaol Guards Nos. 36, 91, 92, 83, 60. 53.

Gaol Guards Total,...

Total,...

50

5. Mr. R J. Birbeck of Queen's College, Assistant Master, went on 4 months leave (August-November). Mr. H. L. O. Garrett of Queen's College acted during his absence.

6. The School was visited in July by the Director of Education for the first time in the history of the School.

ARTHUR W. GRANT, B.A., (Cantab.), Master in Charge.

உார

1910.

Robbery with Violence and Assault with intent to rob.

J 13

Table I.

RETURN OF SERIOUS AND MINOR OFFENCES REPORTED TO HAVE BEEN COMMITTED DURING THE YEARS 1910 AND 1911.

Serious Offences.

Burglaries.

Larcenies and Larcenies in Dwelling

Houses.

Other

Assaults and Disorderly

Gambling.

Kidnapping.

Felonies.

Women

and Girls

Protection

Unlawful

Drunkenness.

Possession.

Conduct.

Ordinance.

Cases.

Convicted.

Discharged.

Cases.

Convicted.

Discharged.

Cases.

Convicted.

Discharged.

Cases.

Convicted.

Discharged.

Cases.

Convicted.

Discharged.

Cases.

Convicted.

Discharged.

Cases.

Convicted.

Europeans and Americans,

Indians,

10

:

74

4

3 1

54 48

11

1

3

:

...

Chinese,

111

31 32 150 13

7 2 15 3

12,739 827 285 226

1

2 17 15 4

65

Total,

112

31-35 150

13

1 |2,756 836 [304 233 | 69

8199

1911.

Discharged.

Minor Offer

:

23

223

Cases.

Convicted.

Discharged.

Cases.

Convicted.

Discharged.!

Cases.

Convicted.

Discharged.

:

:

:

...

...

...

:..

:

:

39 572 772 195 428 2,774 296 30 28 17 77 52

318

1

6 6

38

247 226

58

16

16

59

45

45

42 643 835 210 423 2,774 296 30 28 17 79 54 38 248 226

Europeans and Americans,

Indians,

:

:

:

:

6 8 1

4

2 46

45

1995

5

LO

15

13

:

...

:

12 8

5

10

10

1

5 20 15 11

1

6

:.

:

:

:

:

:

:

6

Chinese,

120

38 38 127

36

2 2,674 805 337 260

66

Total,

120

88 38 127 36

2|2,692 821 343 269

9180

58 537 760 144 354 2,407 137

41

32 28 56

69

65 603 820 160 355 2,407 143

41

918

48

15 278 258 79 15 15

32 28 56 48 15 278 258

79

22

36 35

b.

J 13

Table I.

RETURN OF SERIOUS AND MINOR OFFENCES REPORTED TO HAVE BEEN COMMITTED DURING THE YEARS 1910 AND 1911.

Serious Offences.

th

id

th

Burglaries.

Larcenies and Larcenies in

Dwelling

Other

Felonies.

Assaults and Disorderly

Gambling.

Conduct.

Houses.

Kidnapping.

Ordinance.

Minor Offences

Discharged.

Cases.

Convicted.

Discharged.

Cases.

Convicted.

Discharged.

Cases.

Convicted.

Discharged.

Cases.

Convicted.

Discharged.

Cases.

Convicted.

Discharged.

Cases.

Convicted.

Discharged.

Cases.

Convicted.

Discharged.

Cases.

Convicted.

Discharged.

Cases. Convicted.

Discharged.

Women

aud Girls

Protection

Unlawful

Miscellaneous

Drunkenness. Nuisances.

Possession.

Cases.

Convicted.

Cases.

Offences.

Total of

all cases.

Convicted.

Discharged.

:

:

...

10 7 4

4

**

1 54 48

11

3

:

...

7 2 15 3 1

2 17 15 4

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

223

23

24

19 6

116

}

6

1

1

22

32 150

35 150

13

13

1 2,739 827 285 226 12,756 836 304 233

65

39 572 772 195 423 2,774 296 30 28 17

23

77

52

38 247 226 58

16 16

69

42 643 835 210 423 2,774 296

30 28 17 | 79

54

38 248 226

59 45 45

G

:

59

1,152 1,152 3,871 4,772 596 9,614

| |

1,153 1,153 3,917 4,813 605

1,1533,917 |

22

w

9,789

6

1

8

15 13

4

O

:

:

3333

:

:

38 127

38127

:.

F:

:

36

36

12 8

22,674 805 337 260

2

2

46 45 5

1

1

34 2

105

or

10

5 20 15 11 1

6

CO

6

t-

2

2

7

9 1

53

:

:

:

:.

66

58 537 760 144 354 2,407 137

41

32 28

56

39099

48

15 278 258

79

15 15

973

973 3,696 4,107 (625

9,131

| 2,692

821 343 269

69

65 603 820 160 355 2,407

143

41

32

28 56

48

15 278 258 79

36 35 2

976

9763,736 4,150 628

9,289

:

VICTORIA.

KOWLOON.

J 14

Table II.

Dumped BODIES, 1911.

HARBOUR.

1 month

Under

one

month.

and

under

1 year.

5 years.

under

15 years.

1 year and under

5 years

and

15 years

Under

1 month

and

over.

one

and under

1 year and

under

5 years

and

month.

1 year.

5 years.

under

15 years.

15 years

and

over.

Under

one

month.

I month

and

under

1 year.

1 year and

under

5 years.

5 years

and

15 years

Under

and

one

under

over.

month.

15 years.

sex

m.

.f

unk,

B

sex

unk.

m.

sex

f.

f.

m.

junk.

m.

f.

m.

sex

વર્મ

unk.

sex

f.

m.

unk.

sex

f.

m.

m.

f.

m.

نيه

Juuk.

r

2

2

7

14

19

:

:

4 27

2

1

1

13

...

3

5

10

20

20

m.

f.

(sex

junk.

Kex

m

unk.

m.

f.

m.

f.

m

f.

SUX

m. f.

unk.

unk

1

2 1

}

10

Co

co

N

~

sex

Year.

Victoria. Kowloon. Harbour. Elsewhere Total,

Males. Females. Unknown, Children.

Adults.

1907,

649

348

154

122

1,273

758

503

12

987

286

1908,

405

306

117

161

989

604

365

20

718

271

1969,

89

119

83

90

381

261

114

6

204

177

1910,

80

76

63

76

295

192

94

158

137

1911,

99

58

31

58

241

146

85

10

174

67

EL

1 month

and

under

1 year.

mi.

ني

St

1

KOWLOON.

rears

.nd

15 years

Under

1 month

ider

years.

and

over.

one

and under

month.

1 year.

1 year and

under

5 years.

-- J 14

Table II.

DUMPED BODIES, 1911.

HARBOUR.

and

under

15 years.

years 15 years

Under

and

over.

one

1 month

and

under

month.

1 year.

1 year and

under

5 years.

5 years

and

under

15 years.

ELSEWHERE.

1 month

15 years

and

Under

one

over.

mouth.

and

under

1 year.

1 year and

under

5 years.

5 years

and

under

18 years.

15 year

Total.

and

over.

4 1

m.

3

f.

Sex

junk.

2 2

m.

10

f.

m.

f.

m.

f.

sex

Junk.

sex

m.

f.

unk.

m.

f.

sex

unk.

m.

f.

m.

f.

m. f.

sex

junk.

11.

f.

&CX

Junk.

sex

m. f.

Junk.

m.

f.

m.

f.

4 127

2 1 1

1

13

...

3 5 20 1 2 1 }

1

6

6

co

10

Year.

Victoria.

Kowloon. Harbour. Elsewhere

Total.

Males.

Females. Unknown. ] Children.

Adults.

1907,

649

348

154

122

1,273

758

503

12

987

286

1908,

405

306

117

161

989

604

365

20

718

271

199,

89

1910,

80

1911,

99

888

119

83

90

381

261

114

204

177

76

63

76

295

192

94

158

137

58

31

53

241

146

85

10

174

67

વર્ષ

t-

7

sex

m.

f.

m1.

SCX

unk.

mi.

f.

unk

1

1

10

10

:

241

J 15

Table III,

Return showing the Establishments and Casualties in the

Force, 1911.

Nationality

Europeans,. 134 18 Indians,.... 399 61 Chinese,.... 547 87

Total,.... 1,080 166

+3

3

22

2

concr

5

13

47

==

+31

14

41

58

35

64

113

This number includes the Police paid by other Departments also the Engineers, Coxswains and Stokers, but it is exclusive of:-

1. Captain Superintendent,

1 Deputy Superintendent,

1 District Officer,

1 Assistant Superintendent,

1 Probationer,

1 Accountant,

1 Clerk and Hindustani Interpreter,

5 Clerks,

6 Telephone Clerks,

88 Messengers and Coolies,

and 6 Indians and 16 Chinese who are employed by Private Firms and 20 Special Constables from the K.O.Y.L. Infantry.

Strength on the 31st December, 1911.

Euro-

peans.

Indians. Chinese. Total.

Present,..

131

377

541

1,049

Absent on leave,

1

22

6

29

Vacancies,..........

p

2

Total Establishmeut,....

134

399

547

1,080

J 16

Table IV.

Table showing the total Strength, Expenditure and Revenue of the Police and Fire Brigade Departments for the years 1902 to 1911.

Total Strength.

Revenue Collected by

Expenditure.

Year

the Police

Police Force. Brigade.

Fire

Police

Fire

Force.

Force.

Brigade.

1902...

919

97

392,248

25,992

118,160

1903...

921

97

512,860

25,167

141,491

1904...

993

97

506,008

27,428

133,597

1905... 1,018

97

509,298

28,956

130,873

1906...

1,047

97

515,874

25,499

134,212

1907... 1,048

96

522,406

46,250

138,417

1908... 1,046

96

556,607

31,172

121,288

1909...

1,054

97

564,835

72,227*

125,958

1910... 1,042

103†

583,817

41,548

161,420

1911...

1,102

103

586.985

32,421

162,026

NOTE. No revenue is collected by the Fire Brigade.

$44,120 was for the New Floating Engine.

† Crew for the New Floating Engine.

$9,852 was for the New Floating Engine.

J 17

REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF THE

FIRE BRIGADE.

There were 37 Fires and 65 Incipient Fires during the year against 28 and 67 in 1910. Details are given in Table I.

The estimated damage caused by Fires was $294,717 and by Incipient Fires 1,013.80 as against $236,668 and $851 in 1910.

The Brigade turned out 45 times during the year (33 in 1910).

2. There was a constant supply of water in the fire mains throughout the year.

3. Six fires occurred in the harbour during the year.

4. There was one prosecution for arson. One Frank Aquino was arrested for setting fire to a fish curer's matshed at Mong Kok and convicted at the Criminal Sessions and sentenced to one year's imprisonment with hard labour.

5. There are 34 Despatch Boxes kept in different places in Victoria and 12 in Kowloon, 8 different telephones to which the Police can have access to communicate with the Central Station in the event of a fire, and 16 Street Fire Alarms, of which 3 are at the Peak.

6. I enclose copy of a report by the Engineer on the state of Fire Engines (Annexe A).

7. The conduct of the Brigade has been good,

F. J. BADELEY, Superintendent, Fire Brigade.

*

14th February, 1912.

ANNEXE A.

HONGKONG,. 14th February, 1912.

SIR, I hav the honour to forward the Annual Report on the condition of the Government Fire Engines and gear for the year ending 31st December, 1911.

>

J 18

No. 1 Fire Float.

This vessel has been in commission for 1 year and 10 months, has been regularly tested at monthly drills and done good service at Fires afloat and ashore during the year. The Hull, Machinery and Boilers are all in good working order.

No. 2 Fire Float.

The No. 2 Float is kept in reserve (no crew) and is only put in commission when the No. 1 Float is laid up for repairs. At the monthly drills the Machinery is reguarly tested and the Hull, boiler pumps and propelling engines are are in good working order.

Land Steamers Nos. 2, 4 & 5 at Central Station.

These Engines are now stationed at the Central to be under better control for a large fire East, Central or West. They have been regularly tested at the monthly drills and the Boilers and Machinery are in good working order.

No. 3 Land Steamer (at Yaumati).

This Engine and Boiler was overhauled during the year, has been regularly tested at monthly drills, used at fires when required, and is now in good working order.

Manual Engines and Geur.

All the Manual Engines and Gear, Hose Reels, Ladders. Supply Carts, etc., have been kept in repair and are now in good working order.

Fire Alarms.

The Alarms (13 points) are tested daily (except Sundays) and are all in good working order.

I have, &c.,

F. J. BADELEY, Esq., Captain Superintendent of Police.

D. MACDONALD, Engineer, Fire Brigade.

Appendix K.

REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF PRISON

FOR THE YEAR 1911.

1. The number of prisoners received into prison during the year and the corresponding number for the year 1910 were as follows:-

1911.

1910.

Convicted by Ordinary Courts, - Supreme Court for China and Corea,

- 3,644

3,973

I

Debtors,

65

108

On remand or in default of finding

surety,

469

785

Total,

4,178

4,807

There was thus a decrease of 689 on the total number of admis- sions as compared with the year 1910. There was a decrease of pri- soners convicted for Larceny during the year under review, the I number being 737 against 740 for the previous year.

2. The number of prisoners admitted to prison for offences not of a criminal nature was 2,453 made up as follows :-

Debtors, -

65

Convicted under the Opium Ordinance,

882

""

""

Gambling Ordinance,

389

Market Ordinance,

266

,,

Arms Ordinance,

25

>>

11

""

Vehicle Ordinance,

41

>

"

Sanitary Byclaws,

39

""

11

לי

Harbour Regulations,

84

""

""

"

Post Office Ordinance,

Women and Girls Protec-

יי

91

tion Ordinance,

17

AAA

Stowaway Ordinance,

17

Servants' Quarters Ordce.,

6

17

""

"

3)

AAA

22

"

""

93

15

""

21

Public Health and Build-

ings Ordinance,

Dangerous Goods Ordin-

ance,

Slaughter House Ordin-

ance,

Railway Ordinance,

Pharmacy Ordinance,

Marine Hawkers Ordin-

ance,

2

8

4.

1

3

LO

5

Carried forward,

- 1,857

K 2

Brought forward,

-

- 1,857

Convicted under the Weights and Measures Or-

}}

"}

"

"

21

22

""

>>

"

"

>>

"

""

dinance,

Stamp Ordinance, Tramway Ordinance, Ordinance No. 8 of 1898, No. 6 of 1895,

2113

10

No. 1 of 1845,

1

"

"

No. 13 of 1888,

1

>

J

*

31

31

11

""

for Drunkenness,

Cruelty to Animals, -

Trespassing,

9

1

48

Disorderly Conduct,

127

Vagrancy,

23

""

""

Contempt of Court,

4

""

Assault,

109

Obstruction,

76

""

A

>>

Cutting Trees,

36

""

1)

Fighting, -

16

""

19

33

Mendicancy,

Rogue and Vagabond, Malicious Damage,

Breach of Contract,

78

47

1

**

Total,

-

2,453

3. The above figures shows that 67 per cent. of the total admis sions to prison were for non-criminal offences. The percentage in 1910 was 72.

The following Table shows the number of prisoners committed to prison without the option of fine and in default of payment of fine-

In default of payment of fine.

Without option of fine.

Total.

Served the

Paid full

Paid part

imprison-

fine.

fine.

ment.

1911.

1,477 1910. 1,254

1,350

410

407

3,644

1,644

577

499

3,974

4. There were 85 juveniles admitted into prison 55 of whom were sentenced to be whipped in addition to various terms of im- prisonment varying from twenty-four hours' detention to six months' imprisonment with hard labour.

K 3

5. The percentage of convicted prisoners admitted to prison with previous convictions recorded against them was 154 as com- pared with 13.3 for 1910.

6. There were 100 prisoners admitted who were convicted by the Police Court in the New Territories against 109 for the previous year (82 in 1909).

7. The following Table shows the number of convicts in custody on the 31st December for the past ten years, and the percentage of the total number of prisoners in custody to the estimated population of Hongkong:—

Year.

Estimated Population.

No. of Convicts.

Percentage Daily aver- Percentage

to

jage number Population. ofPrisoners. Population.

to

1902

396,835

215

⚫054

576

•145

1903

410,642

245

*059

653

•159

1904

446,217

243

•054

726

•162

1905

462,861

216

*046

697

•150

1906

414,049

156

⚫037

518

•126

1907

414,415

146

•035

502

•121

1908

420,741

130

•038

465

•110

1909

428,858

180

-042

560

•130

1910

435,986

208

*048

547

*125.

1911

464,277

241

*052

595

•128

8. There were 957 punishments awarded for breach of prison discipline, being an average of 161 per prisoner as compared with There were 2 728 with an average of 133 for the preceding year. cases in which corporal punishment was inflicted during the year. There were 166 prisoners whipped by order of the Courts.

9. There was one escape.

10. There 8 were deaths from natural causes, one suicide, and 2 executions. 11 prisoners were released on medical grounds.

11. Constant attention is given to the instruction of long- sentence prisoners of good conduct, who are employed at industrial labour.

12. There were 5,303,754 forms printed and issued to the various Government Departments and 20,582 books bound and repaired during the year under review.

13. The sanitary condition of the prison is good.

14. The buildings generally are in good repair,

الله

1

K 4

15. The conduct of the European Officers has as a rule been excellent and that of the Indian Staff on the whole good.

16. The appliances for use in case of fire are in good condition and the water supply adequate.

17. The rules laid down for the government of the prison have been complied with.

18. On the 14th December I returned from leave and resumed my duties as Superintendent.

19. From 25th October to the end of the year Mr. P. P. J. Wodehouse acted as Assistant Superintendent during the absence on leave of Mr. R. H. A. Craig.

20. I append the usual returns.

29th February, 1912.

F. J. BADELEY,

Superintendent.

1

Table I.

Return showing the Expenditure and Income for the year 1911.

EXPENDITURE.

Pay and Allowance of Officers, including

Uniforms. AC

Victualling of } tisoners,

Fuel, Light, Soap and Diy Earth, Clothing of Prisoners and Bedding, Furniture,

AMOUNT.

INCOME.

AMOUNT,

Earning of Prisoners.

51,833.36

62.980.10 Debtors' Subsisténce,

17,034.96 Wei-hai-wei Prisoner Subsistence, 8,8%1.39, Shanghai Prisoners' Subsistence, Canton Prisoners' Subsistence Vagrants' Subsistence,

4,561.78

Subsistence of Prisoners sentenced by Marine Magistrate,

Waste Food sold,

790 73

י

428.90

338.90

59.10

6.25

339.40

72.60

Paid out of Colonial Revenue for Pii- soners Maintenance,

39,569.97

1910,

93,458,25

96,302.19

Average annual cost per prisoner $66.80-in 1910 $80.80 and in 1909 $91.97.

شة

K 5

93,458.23

– K 6 -

Table II.

Return showing Expenditure and Income for the past 10 years.

Year.

Expenditure. Income.

Actual Cost Average Cost of Prisoners' Maintenance.

per Prisoner.

$

C.

$

C.

$

C.

1902..

96,311.53

33,523.09

62,788.44

108.92

1903.

108,139.60

34,136.64

74,002.96

113.33

1904.

113,251.48

37,186 64

76,064.84

104.77

1905..

110,687.83

59,444.50

71,243.33

102.21

1906..

96,202.08

39,613.26

56,588.82

109 24

1907...

89,711.39 40,079.90

49,631.49

98.86

1908....

95.537.85 48,066.33

47,471.52

102.09

1909....

97,926.80 46,421.13

51,505.67

91.97

1910.....

96,302.19 52.104.75

44,197.44

80.80

1911....

93,458.23 33,889.26

39,568.97

66.50

Table III.

Return showing value of Industrial Labour for the year 1911.

1

2

3

Nature of Industry.

Value of

Stock on

hand

4

Value of

5

6

7

Value of

Value of

Materials

Articles

Value of Articles

Stock on

Total Cr.

or work

January 1st

1911.

Purchased.

Manufactured Manufactured

done for

payment.

or work done for Gaol or other Departments.

hand

Total Cr.

8

Value of

Earnings

(Difference

December

31st, 1911.

between

Columns

3 & 7).

K 7

$

$

C.

$

$

C.

$

C.

Oakum,

934.40

934.40

934.40

Coir,

861.20

1,134.73

1,995.93

2,303.94

332.67

Netmaking,

1.20

133.62

134.82

356,35

421.18

7.47

3,057.79

1,061.86

363.82

229.00

Tailoring,

7.70

2,346.27

2,353.97

116.87

2,959.24

718.97

3,795,08

1,441.11

Rattan,

1.60

25.75

27.35

4.70

114.80

.60

120.10

92.75

Tinsmithing...

17.96

68.83

86.79

3.45

288.19

17.80

309.44

222.65

Carpentering,

304.18

161.72

465.90

146.36

437.00

299.40

882.76

416.86

Grass-matting,.

25.20

25.20

39.00

.72

39.72

14.52

Shoemaking,

12.94

2,338.18

2,351.12

263.05

3,063,80

98.62

3,425.47

1,074,35

Laundry,

Printing and Bookbinding,

.15

6,893.53

1,099.69

1,099.84

1.25

6,337.36

5.00

6,343,61 5,243.77

16,538.93

23,432.46

Stone-breaking,

175.70

45.00

53,037.54 | 10,976.31 | 64,489.55 | 41,057.09

45.00

45.00

Total, .$

8,100.46 | 23,872.92 | 31,973.38

*4,651.07 66,609.60 | 12,546,07

83,806,74 | 51,833.36

* Paid into Bink during 1911, which sum iucludes $147.9) for work exegated in 1910, $4,627.79. Value of work executed during 1911, for which payment was deferred to 1912, $171.18.

K S

Table IV.

Return showing the employment of Prisoners and the Value of their Labour, during the year 1911.

Daily Average Number

Rate

Value of

Description of Employment.

per

diem.

Males. Females. Total.

Prison Labour.

Sunday, Christmas Day, Good

Friday, and Chinese New Year Day :-

Cooking..

Cleaning,

Non-productive,

$

C.

12 c.

10

10

10

30

31

66.00 170.50

532

22

554

Other Days :-

Debtors, Reniands, On punish-

ment, Sick,.......

Crank, Shot, Shot and Stone,

572

23

595

$1

105

::

41

105

::

In Manufactories :--

Book-binding.

Printing,

Printing-labourers,

20 c.

31

31

1.922 00

20

47

47

2.914.00

10

13

13

403 00

Oakuni-picking,

2

137

146

905.20

Coir-matting.

15

26

26

1,209.00

Shoe-making,

20

14

14

$68.00

Tailoring,

15

16

23

1,069.50

Net-making, String-making, &

ships' fender-making,

10

23

23

713.00

In Building:—

Carpentering. and Fitting,

20

17

17

1.054.00

In Service of the Prison :—

Laundry,

15

41

17

2.185.50

Cooking,.

12

Cleaning,

Whitewashing,

200

10

10

872.00

10

30

31

961.00*

10

21

651.00

Total........

572

23

595 $15,463.70

Appendix L.

MEDICAL AND SANITARY REPORTS FOR THE YEAR 1911.

TABLE OF CONTENTS:

Page.

ANNEXE A.-Report of the Head of the Sanitary Department,-

ANNEXE B.-Joint Report of the Principal Civil Medical Officer

and the Medical Officer of Health, -

3

7

ANNEXE C.-Report of the Colonial Veterinary Surgeon,

34

39

ANNEXE D.-Report of the Superintendent, Civil Hospital,

+

ANNEXE E-Report of the Medical Officer in charge of the

Victoria Hospital for Women and Children,- 52

-

ANNEXE F.-Report on the Lunatic Asylum,

ANNEXE G.-Report of the Medical Officer in charge of the

Infectious Diseases Hospitals,

ANNEXE H.-Report of the Medical Officer to Victoria Goal, -

ANNEXE I-Report of the Medical Officer for Kowloon and the

New Territories,

ANNEXE J.-Report of the Visiting Medical Officer of the

Tung Wa Hospital,

ANNEXE K.-Report on the Alice Memorial and Affiliated

Hospitals,-

-

54

56

57

-

60

64

ANNEXE L.-Report of the Government Bacteriologist,

ANNEXE M.-Report on the Public Mortuary, Victoria, ANNEXE N.-Report on the Public Mortuary, Kowloon, - ANNEXE 0.-Report of the Government Analyst, -

ANNEXE P.-Report of the Health Officer of the Port,

-

72

-

73

-

77

81

84

87

L

L 3

Annexe A.

REPORT OF THE HEAD OF THE SANITARY

DEPARTMENT.

STAFF.

I. During the year Dr. W. Pearse, Assistant Medical Officer of Health, went on 7 months leave and during his absence Dr. J. W. Hartley acted as Assistant Medical Officer of Health. Inspector Cotton was invalided out of the service and was replaced by Inspector Taylor who was transferred to the Sanitary Department from the Hongkong Police Force. Three Inspectors returned from leave and four Inspectors proceeded on leave, one for four months only.

EPIDEMICS AND MALARIA.

2. Epidemic disease was more prevalent during 1911 than in the previous year as the report of the Medical Officer of Health (Annexe B) shows. There were 269 cases of plague, a large increase as compared with the 25 cases in 1910. Small-pox was also more virulent than in the previous year and 272 cases were recorded. Typhoid fever showed an increase but Malaria showed a marked decrease.

BYE-LAWS.

3. New Conservancy and Scavenging Bye-laws and new bye- laws for dealing with Öffensive Trades were passed during the year. The former were found necessary as the old bye-laws did not fully regulate the traffic in nightsoil in the Colony; the latter were passed to regulate new offensive trades such as feather pick- ing and other dusty trades which could not be dealt with under the old bye-laws. An additional market bye-law prohibiting begging in the markets was also passed.

CHINESE CEMETERIES.

4. Extensive exhumations for the purpose of providing ad- ditional burial space took place at Ma Tau Wai Cemetery, a large Chinese Cemetery on the mainland, and at Chai Wan, a cemetery which serves the village and district of Shaukiwan in the East of the island of Hongkong. These exhumations were carried out by the Tung Wa Hospital, and following the exhumations the ground was terraced and made available for fresh interments. 2,254 bodies in all were exhumed in Ma Tau Wai Cemetery, 1,276 bodies in Chai Wan Cemetery and 75 in an old disused cemetery in the Wong Nei Chung road under Orders of the Governor.

The total number of exhumations during the year amounted to 3,855 as compared with 1,520 in 1910. 266 permits were issued

L 4

to relatives of the deceased, of which 16 were subsequently can- celled for various reasons, leaving 250 which were acted upon. The total of 3,855 includes these private disinterments and also the exhumations carried out by the Tung Wa Hospital at the instance of the Sanitary Department for which 3 permits were issued. These amounted in all to 3,605. Of the bodies exhumed 176 were removed from the Colony and 3,679 re-buried within the Colony,

SCAVENGING.

5. The scheme for the departmental removal of refuse to sea from the City of Victoria which was inaugurated on the 1st January, 1911, proved a complete success both financially and from the point of view of efficiency. The two steam barges and three lighters, working at three instead of five dust-boat stations as for- merly, proved quite capable of doing the work required of them excepting at the Chinese New Year. To cope with the extra accumulations at the Chinese New Year and also in order to prevent large accumulations of refuse at the Western refuse depôt while the steam barge was at sea, it was decided to purchase and fit up another lighter for this work in September, and she was put on the run in October last. The two most important refuse stations, viz., in the centre and West of the City, are thus provided with a double set of refuse boats, one of which comes alongside as the other leaves, and the third station, a small station in the East of the City has one boat. In addition to these there is one spare boat to replace those under repair or refitting. The staff, which consists of a foreman, a coxswain and a crew of 10 scavengers per boat and a caretaker at each refuse station, worked well, and it was found possible to put a complete stop to the picking over of refuse at the bins, the dumping of refuse over the sea wall and the extortion of sums of money from private firms for the removal of trade refuse out to sea.

The cost of the scheme compares very favourably with the charges formerly made by contractors for work which at best was but indifferently performed. The average yearly cost of the refuse disposal contract from 1907 (when a separate contract for the work of removal was first let) to 1910 was $21,450. The cost of working the two steam barges and 4 lighters departmentally dur- ing 1911 amounted to $14,412.84. The capital outlay on the two steam barges and four lighters inclusive of fitting up amounted to $23,974.41. Allowing 10% of the capital outlay for depreciation, riz., $2,397.44, the total annual working cost, i.e., $16,810.28 is well below the average cost of this work when done by contract.

The departmental scavenging of Kowloon which was begun in March, 1910, was continued and worked very satisfactorily during the year. The total working cost, allowing 10% of the capital outlay, i.e., $1,200 for depreciation, was $17,002 or $1,416.67 per mensem as compared with $1,769.00 per mensem in 1910. This may be considered a very reasonable amount as in addition to the

L 5

scavenging work formerly performed by the contractor it further includes the cleansing of nullahs and the watering of the streets in Kowloon. The average cost of the Scavenging and Conser- vancy Contracts for 9 years, i.e., from 1902 to 1910 when the con- tract was cancelled, was $7,280.00 or $606.67 per mensem. During 1911 the cost of scavenging was $17,002.00 or $1,416.67 per men- sem and a revenue of $5,400.00 per annum or $450.00 per mensem was derived from the Conservancy Contract which was let separately. The nett cost of the Kowloon scavenging work performed depart- mentally in 1911 was therefore $11,602.00 or $966.83 per mensem as compared with $7,280.00 per annum or $606.67 per mensem, the cost of the work under contract. At an additional cost of $4,322.00 per annum or $360.17 per mensem the scavenging work in Kow- loon is now being done in a thoroughly efficient manner, provision is made for dealing with larger amounts of refuse as the districts expand and additional items, already enumerated above, are also in- cluded in the work. The abolition of contract scavenging work and the institution of a departmental scavenging scheme for Kow- loon would thus appear to have been. completely justified.

STREET WATERING.

As a result of the successful experiments made with bullock traction both in Kowloon and Victoria in 1910 it was possible to improve the arrangements for watering the streets in Victoria in 1911. During the year additional carts and bullocks were pur- chased and by the end of the year there were 10 water carts with 26 bullocks in use in the City of Victoria and two carts with four bullocks were ready for use in Kowloon. Hand watering was given up entirely except on the roads on the higher levels which are too steep for animal traction. The attached statement gives the valuation and the cost of maintenance of all bullocks in use in the Department both in Kowloon and in Victoria. Accurate figures have only been available for 6 months. It will be seen, however, that bullock traction especially for water carts compares very favourably with the contract prices for this work. The contract price for street watering with the water carts was $75.00 per cart per mensem. This sum included one foreman and ten coolies per cart. The same carts are now drawn by bullocks and the total cost including a driver and all accessories such as shoeing, etc, averages $30.00 per mensem. Allowing 20 % for depreciation of the stock $36.00 per mensem per cart still compares very favourably with the contract price of $75.00 per mensem.

COLONIAL VETERINARY SURGEON'S REPORT.

The report of the Colonial Veterinary Surgeon deals in detail with markets, slaughter houses and cattle depots, also with cattle disease. It shows a decrease of $1,707.00, due to the stoppage of the cattle export trade, in the revenue derived from slaughter houses, and an increase of $11,446.00, chiefly due to the triennial revision of the market rents from the markets.

;

L 6

REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE.

The total revenue collected during the year amounted to $234,723.37 as compared with $224,700.00 in 1910. The esti- mated revenue for the year was $228.490.00. The total expenditure during the year was $325,963.65 compared with $337,745.00 in 1910. The estimated expenditure in 1911 was $363,880.00.

E. D. C. WOLFE, Head of Sanitary Department.

22nd March, 1912.

Valuation of Bullocks.

1910. Purchases, less sales, less depreciation at

20 % per annum...

$1,272.80

1911. Purchases, less sales.....

663.90

$1,936.70

Less depreciation during 1911 at 20% p.a.........

387.34

Value on bullocks on 1,1/12.......

$1,549.36

Maintenance of Bullocks.

(Detailed figures are available for the latter half

of the year only.)

Kowloon.

Average number of bullocks 28.

Fodder, drivers and sundries

Depreciation in value of bullocks for 6 months

Maintenance of bullocks for 6 months.

Cost per head for 6 months.......

$1,727.37

107,21

$1,834.58

$65.52

Hongkong.

Average number of bullocks 26.6.

Fodder, drivers and sundries

Depreciation in value of bullocks for 6 months...

Maintenance of bullocks for 6 months.............................

Cost per head for 6 months...

$1,454.51

86.46

$1,540.97

$57.78

Annexe B.

JOINT REPORT OF THE PRINCIPAL CIVIL MEDICAL OFFICER AND THE MEDICAL OFFICER OF HEALTH.

AREA.

The Sanitary Board's control extends to the Island of Hong- kong, which has an area of about 32 square miles, and to that portion of territory on the mainland between the shore and the first range of the Kowloon Hills extending from the village of Tseung Kwan O in Junk Bay, on the East, to the village of Kau Pa Hang on the West-with a sea frontage of about thirteen miles and an area of about sixteen square miles. Old Kowloon, with an area of about 22 square miles, has been in British occupa- tion since 1861, but New Kowloon was leased to this Government in 1898, as part of what is known as the New Territories. The remainder of the New Territories comprising an area of about 356 square miles is not under the control of the Sanitary Board.

The City of Victoria, built on the Northern shore of the Island of Hongkong, has a frontage to the sea of nearly five miles and is separated from the opposite mainland of Kowloon by the Harbour, which is rather less than a mile and a third wide opposite the centre of the City and widens out to somewhat over three -miles at its widest part, contracting again at Lyemun Pass on the

East to little more than a quarter of a mile in width.

The domestic buildings of the City of Victoria number 9,775 (exclusive of Barracks and Police Stations), of which 916 are Non-Chinese dwellings, while there are also 165 European dwell- ings in the Hill District. The number of new houses completed during the year was as follows:-City of Victoria 85, Kowloon 31, Outlying Districts 39 and Peak 0, making a total of 155 as against 93 in 1910.

In addition to the above, miscellaneous buildings such as offices, godowns, etc., were erected to the number of 24-61 in

1910.

ADMINISTRATION.

The City of Victoria is divided into ten, and Kowloon into three health districts with a Sanitary Inspector in charge of each. The Inspector in charge of No. 3 health district of the City (the principal European Quarter) is also in charge of Peak.

There are in addition four Inspectors in charge of the scavenging work, one Inspector of Cemeteries and.one Inspector in charge of the City Disinfecting Station,-19 in all.

-

L 8-

The supervision of the sanitary work in the various villages, in Kowloon City and in Sham Shui Po is done by the Police Inspectors.

The Inspectors in Hongkong island work under the personal direction and supervision of the Medical Officer of Health while those in Kowloon are under the Assistant Medical Officer of Health.

GENERAL SANITARY CONDITION.

The gradual replacement of the old type of Chinese dwellings by new premises erected in accordance with the Public Health and Buildings Ordinance, 1903, is effecting a slow but certain improvement in the healthiness of the native quarters, but this has been somewhat discounted during the past year, by an abnormal influx of Chinese refugees from the Canton district which was coincident with the revolutionary movement in South China. It has been estimated that at least twenty thousand people arrived in Hongkong within a period of a few weeks during the months of April and May, from this cause, and although some of these fugi- tives had no doubt returned to China before the close of the year, yet there is ample evidence that a sufficient number have remained to throw a considerable strain upon the housing accommodation of the Colony; a further influx, estimated at ten thousand, due to similar causes occurred during the month of November. The chief sufferers from this cause would seem to be the Portuguese who are largely employed as clerks, accountants, etc., in both Government and private offices; this section of the community has for some years past occupied dwellings of European type in the neighbourhood of Caine Road, Shelley Street, Mosque Terrace, etc., but they have recently been dispossessed by more wealthy Chinese tenants from Canton. At the same time the poorer classes of refugees have crowded into the native quarters of the City and of Kowloon, with the result that there has no doubt been some amount of overcrowd- ing of a temporary nature. This has been dealt with, where it has been found that premises unfit for habitation-such for instance as basements-have been occupied, or where the overcrowding was excessive, but it has been felt that the conditions were for the time being abnormal, and a rigid enforcement of the overcrowding laws has not been attempted.

There can be little doubt moreover that this influx of refugees has contributed largely to the increase in the number of cases of Plague and to the considerable outbreak of Small-pox which occur- red at the latter end of the year.

In connection with anti-plague measures to render houses as far as possible rat-proof 201 ground surfaces in houses have been repaired (324 in 1910) and 3,534 buildings have had rat-runs filled up with cement and broken glass (1,675 in 1910).

Permits for the use of two basements as workshops and one as a kitchen have been issued.

L 9

Obstructions have been removed from backyards, under notice, in 129 houses (127 in 1910). Notices to abate sanitary nuisances to the number of 5,462, and building nuisances to the number of 1,743, have been applied for during the year (8,494 in 1910), while 84 notices in regard to the breeding of mosquitoes have also been served.

In addition to the above improvements in connection with dwelling-houses carried out under the supervision of the Sanitary Department various permanent improvements affecting sanitation have been effected by the Public Works Department. These in- clude the training of additional nullahs to the extent of 5,251 feet (3,887 feet in 1910) and the building of public latrines and urinals in Rutter Street, in Mee Lun Lane and under the Civil Hospital ramp, while the new Market at Tsim-tsa-tsui has been completed and the new Offices for the Sanitary and other Departments over the Post Office have been occupied.

The total area of lanes obtained for scavenging purposes during the year has been 6,191 sq. ft. (5,212 sq. ft. in 1910); the length being 1,098 ft. (867 ft. in 1910), while a further area of 2,178 sq. ft. was resumed for the construction of roadways, etc., (9,201 sq. ft. in 1910).

During the year two wells, the waters of which were unsatis- factory, were closed by the order of the Board.

METEOROLOGICAL RETURNS.

The following table gives the meteorological conditions which prevailed during the year as recorded at the Kowloon Observa-

tory:-

Month.

Barometer

at M.S.L.

TEMPERA-

TURE.

HUMI-

DITY.

Max. Mean Min. Rel.

Abs.

Cloudiness.

Sunshine.

WIND.

Rain.

Direction. Vel.

ins.

о

O

p.c.ins.

p. c.

hours

ins.

points. miles p.b.

January.

30.11 63·1 58.9 55·5 February,. 30-20 65.5 602 56.2

74 0.38 66

71 0.38

50

March.

30:02 69.5 65.5 618

83 10.53

81

139-2 0-735 E. by N. 189-90 000 106.4 3.810 E.

13.7

E, by N.

14.0

14.8

April,

May.

June,

July,

August,.

29.96 740 69-7 66-4 29-85 78 8 755 72-8 29 78 87.2 82.9 797 29 68 86-7 820 78% 29.63 86.2 81.9 784 September, 29-78 861 811 774 October, 30:03† 78-2 743 708 November, 30-11 73 0 691 65-7 December, 30-15 685 643 605

82 10 60

76

138.3 5.935 E.

13:3

90 0·80

89

86-1 22:145

E.

14.2

82 10.92

70

248.5 5·090

SSE

116

81 0.88

70

249·9 8 060

SE

13-7

82 10.89

69

190.5 30-060 SE by S

11-9

78 0.83

57

211-06-215 | E. by N.

11-4

74 0.63

51

214.1 5.685

13.2

76 0.55

68

155-1 2-720

13.2

77 0.47

66

133.9 0·095 E. Ń. E.

10.5

Mean or Total, 29-94 764 72·1] 68-6

79 0·65

68

2063·4 90·550 E.

13.0

L 10

The average annual rainfall during the ten years ending 1901 was 77.30 inches and ranged from 104.25 inches in 1894 to 45-83 inches in 1895; the average for the decade ending 1911 has been 84.20 inches. The rainfall for the last year is therefore in excess of the average of the last 20 years.

POPULATION.

The Non-Chinese population of the Colony comprised at the Census taken on May 20th, 1911, a white civil population of 6,035 ; to this must be added an average resident white population of 2,313 belonging to the Navy and an average strength of 2,360 British Troops. The coloured races (Non-Chinese, Civil) numbered 6,040 and included East Indians, Asiatic Portuguese, Japanese, Filipinos, Malays, Africans, Persians and a few others; in addition there were 2,054 Indian Troops stationed in the Colony. The Table on page 13 shows a similar classification of the Non-Chinese population for the year 1911 and from this it will be seen that the total Non- Chinese population-inclusive of Army and Navy-amounted to 18,802 (including 420 Malays and Filipinos), while the total Chinese population including 49 Chinese sappers and 200 Chinese servants employed in Naval Establishments, equalled 444,913 of whom 90,594 reside in the New Territories exclusive of New Kow- loon.

The distribution of the population at the Census was as follows:--

Non-Chinese Civil Community,

12,075

Chinese Civil Population :-

City of Victoria (including Peak),

.219,386

Villages of Hongkong,

16,211

Kowloon (including New Kowloon),

67,497

New Territories (land),

80,622

Population afloat,

60,948

Total Chinese Civil Population,

-444,664

Total Civil Population,

.456,739

The estimated total population of the Colony at the middle of 1911 is 464,277 but the figures given below in respect to births and deaths relate only to Hongkong and Kowloon (including New Kowloon), and the rates therefore in respect to these data are calculated on an estimated Chinese population of 354,790 and a Non-Chinese population of 18,837 of whom 12,110 were civilians, the remainder belonging to the Naval and Military services.

The Civil population consists chiefly of male adults. At the Census held in 1911 the proportion of males was 64.8 per cent. of the total civil population; at the Census taken in 1906 the proportion

L 11

was 70.1 per cent. and at the 1901 Census the proportion was 72.6 per cent., so there is a steady increase in the proportion of females (which means an increase in family life) during the past ten years. Over half the Civil population (52.9 per cent. of the Chinese and 55.7 per cent. of the Non-Chinese) were between the ages of 20 and 45 years.

The average strength of the Troops in Garrison during 1911 was 105 British Officers and 1,819 British N.C.O.'s and men ; and 35 Indian Officers and 1,980 Indian N.C.O.'s and men; and 49 Chinese attached to the Royal Engineers. There were also 406 British women and children, and 39 Indian women and 'children making a total of 445.

The average strength of British fleet was as follows:-

British permanently in the Colony 530, British occasionally in the Colony 5,350, Chinese permanently in the Colony 150, Chinese occasionally in the Colony 150,-making a total of 6,180. For the purpose of estimating the population it is considered a fair average to include one third only of those "occasionally" resident in the Colony ; this gives a total of 2,513 and of these 200 are Chinese.

The Chinese boat population (exclusive of the New Territories), as given in the Census taken last year was 45,302 and the number of boats belonging to the Port and the villages of Hongkong is as follows:-

Passenger boats, Cargo boats.

.2.793

.1,259

Steam-launches,....

239

Lighters,.....

303

Harbour boats,

1,619

Fishing boats,.

.3,803

Trading junks,

.1,833

11,849

This gives an average of 3·8 persons per boat,

In addition there wore 5,791 Chinese employed in the mercan- tile marine in the Harbour, making a total Chinese population afloat of 51.093 exclusive of the New Territories.

The licensed boats in the New Territories numbered 9,338.

City of Victoria Health District.

The following Table shows the number of Chinese houses and floors and the inmates per house

and

per

floor in the

City

of

Victoria

as estimated for the year 1911.

One storey Dwellings.

Two storey

Dwellings.

Three storey

Dwellings.

Four storey

Dwellings.

Five storey Dwellings.

Total Dwellings.

Total Floors.

Average number of floors per dwelling.

Number of

Number of

persons per

dwelling.

persons per

floor.

198

418

230

30

3

334

658

86

3888

5

876

1,864

2.1

13.7

6'4

Nil.

1,081

2,989

2.8

23.7

8.6

Nil.

11

18

Nil.

Nil.

29

76

2.6

*

*

8

48

562

442

11

1,071

3,613

3.4

29.2

8.6

14

135

547

262 Nil.

958

2,973

3.1

26.8

8.6

52

39

378

423

41

933

3,161

3.4

23.1

6.8

19

45

455

387

8

914

3,062 3.3

23.5

7·0

1

75

576

333

16

1,001

3,291

3.3

22.7

6.9

9

10.

62

8888

28

474

506

107

Nil.

1,115

2.922 2.6

28.6

10.9

359

373

87

Nil.

881

2,247

2.5

19.8

7.8

Totals and averages 1911,

385

1,938

4,303 | 2,157

81

Totals and averages 1910,

374

1,952

4,211 2,145 82

8,859 26,198 8,764 25,901 2.9

2.9

25.4

8.3

20.3

6.9

* Most of the Chinese of this district live in quarters attached to Offices.

12

L 13

The following Table shows the acreage of the City Health Districts with the houses and population in each district as estimated for the year 1911-

Built

Non-

Chinese

Chinese

Health Districts.

Total over

Chinese

Dwel-

Acreage

Areas

Dwel-

Popula-

Non- P'ersons Chinese per acre

¡in Acres

lings.

tion.

Popula- (built

lings.

tion. over).

1,

531

134

876

148

12.024

1,570

101

860

2,

243

140

1.081

81

25,670

850

195

Troope

3.

232

137

29

423

8,110

3.260

83

4,

56

53

1,071 :

153 31.290

1,240

614

5,

29

27

958

12

25,716

90

956

6,

30

27

933

15

21.470

130

800

7,

36

31

914

21,520

40

695

8,

49

47

1,001

5

22.756

60

485

9,

44

44

1.115

31,946

60

10,

252

106

881

64 17,498

570

170

Total 1911,.

1,502

716

Total 1910,

1,502

8.859 746 8,764

916 218,000 930 178,300

7,880

303

9,686

252

The number of Chinese living at the Peak and Stonecutters' Island is estimated at 1,720.

The following Table shows distribution of the Chinese popula- tion of Kowloon according to houses and floors in the different. sub-districts into which Kowloon is divided:

Į

Fonr

One Storey Two Storey Three Storey | Storey

Dwellings.

1

Dwellings

Dwellings.

Dwell-

ings.

1,

2,

25 3

1 197

22

227 469 1.31

900

160

15

63

. 3,

8

258 5 419

78 2 90

4,

1704

5,

837

$3 9 204

338

55

6,

85

91 35 188

2.2

7,

601

454

164

549 35 4,30029-8 | 8.5 780 2,159 2·719,200 247 89 6101,395 2-3 |11,120 |186 81 353 671 400

902 1,0671,534 14

129

195

163

1.9 3.838 11.2 5.8

319

9.915 27.2 11.9 7,320 6-8 | 41 | 2,758

314

8,

934 1

214 4

9,

451

83

104 3 23

Total

1,159 1,389 12 6,330 54 452,063

4.6 6701,038 15 4,727 7·1

1911.... 2.340 28 1,388 276 1,177 28 196 25,430 10.106 18 67,650 13-2 71 6,838 1910,... 2,224 8 1,421 300 1,089 24 20515,272

9,837 1-8 80.200 15 1 8.2 6.838

732

3

L 14

Sub-districts 7 (Kowloon City) and 8 (Sham Shui Po) are in New Kowloon. The remainder comprise the whole of Old Kow- loon and are distributed as follows:- Health District 11 com- prises sub-districts 1, 6 and 9, Health District 12 comprises sub-districts 2 and 3, and Health District 13 comprises sub- districts 4 and 5. The Non-Chinese civil population of Old Kowloon at the 1911 Census was 2,137, while the Non-Chinese population of New Kowloon was 69, and of the New Territories 117, making a total of 2,313.

BIRTHS.

The births registered during the year were as follows:-

Males.

Females.

Total.

Chinese,.

1,078

328

1,406

Non-Chinese,

193

169

362

Total 1911,

1,271

497

1,768

1910,

1,103

430

1,533

»

This gives a general birth rate of 47 per 1,000 as compared with 4.3 per 1,000 in 1910 and 4.4 per 1,000 in 1909.

The birth rate among the Non-Chinese community was 19-22 per 1,000 as compared with 14-42 per 1,000 in 1910 and 15:38 in 1909.

The nationalities of the Non-Chinese parents were as follows:- British 171, Portuguese 78, Indian 48, Malay and Filipino 31, German 13, American 5, Jew 5, Norwegian and Spanish 3 each, Japanese 2, French, Danish and African Ï each.

The number of Chinese births registered does not give an accurate record of the number of births which have occurred. Owing to the custom of the Chinese of not registering births unless the child has survived for a month and often in the case of female children not at all, it is probable that the majority if not all of the infants which are sickly at birth or die before they have lived one month have not had their births registered. It is customary, there- fore, to assume that all children of one month old and under who are admitted to the various Convents (being brought there sick by poor people) and all young infants found dead in the street, harbour, hillsides, etc., by the Police, have been born in the Colony but not registered. By adding the number of such children to the number of the registered births it is assumed that a somewhat more correct number of births is obtained and from this is calculated a corrected birth rate.

The number of such children in 1911 was 320 males and 513 females, total 833, which being added to the registered births,

L 15

makes a total of 2,601 as compared with 2,315 in 1910. The corrected birth rate is therefore 6.9 while amongst the Chinese community alone the rate becomes 63 instead of 3.9 per 1,000.

The preponderance of male over female registered births is very marked amongst the Chinese, there being 328 males to 100 females; in 1910 the proportion was 321 males to 100 females. With the addition of the 833 above mentioned unregistered births the proportion becomes 166 males to 100 females.

In the Non-Chinese community the proportion of male births. to female births for 1911 was 114 to 100, as compared with 119 to 100 in 1910 and 117 to 100 in 1909.

DEATHS.

The deaths registered during the year numbered 7,748 (7,639 in 1910). The general death rate was therefore 20·74 per 1,000 as against 21.76 in 1910.

The total number of deaths among the Chinese community was 7,496 which gives a death rate of 21.13 per 1,000 as against 22:50 in 1910 and 21:68 in 1909.

The deaths registered amongst the Non-Chinese community numbered 252 of which 230 were from the civil population, 18 from the Army and 4 from the Navy.

This gives a death rate for the Non-Chinese community of 13:38 per 1,000 as compared with 10.04 in 1910 and 12.45 in 1909.

The nationalities of the deceased were as follows:-British 71, Indian 73, Portuguese 54, Japanese 17, Malay and Filipino 13, German 5, American 4, Spanish, French and Norwegian 3 each, Italian, Russian, Danish, Dutch, Jewish and African 1 each; this gives a death rate of 8.7 per 1,000 for Europeans and whites, 17.9 per 1,000 for East Indians, and 23.8 per 1,000 for races classed as mixed and coloured.

The total number of deaths which occurred amongst the Non- Chinese resident civil population (omitting that is to say the 21 deaths in the Mercantile Marine and Foreign Navies) was 209 and allowing 850 for the Non-Chinese floating population this gives a death rate of 18.56 per 1,000 for the resident Non-Chinese civil population.

Table I shows the number and causes of deaths registered dur- ing the year.

L 16

The following Table of population, births and deaths is given for the purposes of ready comparison with similar Tables given in the reports from other Colonies:-

Number of Inhabitants in 1911.

(Census figures, + Army and Navy),..

Number of Births in 1911,

10.708

197

of Deaths in ',,

93

of Immigrants in 1911,..

"

of Emigrants in

*

N

Total.

4,066 | 354,7393,606 373,121

48 1,137 85 1,768

73 7,509 72 7,748

149,894

135,565

of Inhabitants in 1910,

(estimated),

11,532

Increase,

24,115

ΟΙ

Decrease,

824 11

408

13 4,174 330,6244,332 350,975

22,146

726 1,969

There is an enormous passenger traffic between Hongkong and the mainland of China, the passenger figures by river steamers alone being as follows:-

Arrivals 1,216,378; Departures 1,127,036.

It must not be assumed, however, that the excess of passenger arrivals by steamer over the departures (89,342) or the excess of immigrants over emigrants (14,329) represents an increase in population of the Colony, for thousands of those who arrive by passenger steamer subsequently leave for China by launch or junk and the numbers so leaving are not available.

AGE DISTRIBUTION OF DEATHS.

The number of deaths of infants under one year of age was 2,467 or 31.8 per cent of the total deaths, as compared with 32.9 per cent. in 1910 and 31.6 per cent. in 1909.

The infant mortality among the Non-Chinese community during the year was 133 per 1,000 as compared with 80 per 1,000 in 1910 and 111 per 1,000 in 1909. The corresponding figure for the United Kingdom for the decennium 1891-1900 was 168 per 1,000, but the condition of abject poverty which exists among a percentage of the population of the United Kingdom cannot be said to obtain among the Non-Chinese population of Hongkong.

L 17

Among the Chinese population the deaths of infants numbered 2,419 while only 1,406 Chinese births were registered. Taking the corrected birth figure to be 2,239 (as explained on page 12) it would even then appear that more Chinese infants die in the Colony than are born here. The Census return for 1911 showed 1,180 Chinese infants under one year of age, and 24,738 Chinese children between the ages of one year and five years; it is very evident therefore that the majority of these children are not born in the Colony but are brought here from the mainland of China.

DISEASES.

Respiratory Diseases.

The total number of deaths from these diseases for the year was 2,542 (2,641 in 1910) of which 55 were among the Non- Chinese community leaving 2,487 among the Chinese population ; 801 out of this total occurred in infants under one year of age (892 in 1910.)

Phthisis alone accounts for 775 deaths (780 in 1910), of which 753 were Chinese. Pneumonia caused 1,322 deaths (1,165 in 1910) of which 1,295 were Chinese; many of these bodies were examined in the Public Mortuaries, and in no case was death attributable to Pneumonic Plague. 647 of these deaths from Pneumonia occurred in infants under one year of age (573 in 1910).

The death rate among the Chinese from Respiratory Diseases was 701 per 1,000 as compared with 7.9 per 1,000 in 1910 and 7.8 per 1,000 in 1909; that for Phthisis alone was 2:12 per 1,000 as compared with 2-3 in the two previous years.

The deaths from Phthisis amongst the Chinese were 100 per cent. of the total deaths amongst that community, as compared with 10.3 in 1910 and 10-7 in 1909; if other deaths from Tuberculosis are included the total amounts to 1,179, or 15.7 per cent. of the total deaths among the Chinese.

Considerable efforts have been made during the past few years to put a stop to the inveterate habit of the lower class Chinese of spitting in public buildings and offices and on staircases, footpaths, wharves, etc. Notices have been posted in many public buildings, as well as in tramcars, ferry boats and other public vehicles, while lectures have been given and leaflets distributed, calling attention to the dangers incident to this habit. It is hoped in this way, coupled with the improved sanitary condition of the native dwell- ings, to gradually reduce the death rate from Phthisis. The fact that the soil in the lower levels (which are the most densely populated) is water-logged during the greater part of the year, has no doubt much to do with the heavy mortality from this disease, but it is to be hoped that the influences of education will gradually effect a further reduction in our Phthisis mortality which at pre-

L 18

sent stands at nearly double that of England and Wales, which, in the decennium 1891-1900, was only 1.3 per 1,000,

Nervous Diseases.

The number of deaths under this heading for the year 1911 was 526 as compared with 576 in 1910 and 494 in 1909. Of these 353 were of Chinese children under 5 years of age, 245 being in- fauts less than one year old. These deaths of Chinese infants com- prise 172 deaths from Tetanus, Trismus, and Convulsions, and 83 deaths from Meningitis; the influence of the Public Dispensaries and of the Public Midwives is being gradually felt, and it is to be hoped that these figures will show considerable reductions within the next few years.

Malarial Fever.

The total number of deaths from Malarial Fever during the year was 338 (as compared with 591 in 1910 and 422 in 1909), of which 8 only were Non-Chinese. Of these 330 Chinese deaths, 176 occurred in the City of Victoria (282 in 1910), while there were 26 deaths in Kowloon (70 in 1910), 102 in the villages of Hongkong (199 in 1910), 25 in the Harbour (30 in 1910) and 1 at the Peak. Some of the deaths, however, which occurred in the City were cases brought over from Kowloon or from the Harbour, for treatment in the various City Hospitals and more than 26 per cent. of these deaths occurred in one Health District (No. 9) in close proximity to which extensive building operations have been in progress during the year. Of the deaths which occurred in the villages 54 were at Shaukiwan (32 from the land population and 22 from the boat population) as compared with 125 in 1910; 43 at Aberdeen (16 from the land population and 27 from the boat population) as compared with 68 in 1910; and 5 at Stanley (6 in 1910).

Anti-malarial measures were first inaugurated in this Colony in 1899 and during the past year considerable attention has been paid to this work-special visits have been made by the Sanitary Inspectors in search of breeding places for mosquitoes, dense tangles of brushwood in the neighbourhood of houses have been cut down, Quinine has been administered to school-children in certain selected districts, the trained nullahs have been regularly swept to prevent the formation of waterweed and algae, and stand- ing water has in places been treated with kerosine or with carbol- ated creosote at regular weekly intervals (including several acres of pools in Kowloon), while such cases of Malaria as have come to the knowledge of the Sanitary Department have been investigated and steps taken to prevent the breeding of mosquitoes in the neigh- bourhood where they occurred. For this purpose weekly returns of all cases of Malaria admitted to the Hospitals are sent to the Medical Officer of Health, while information is also obtained from private medical practitioners as to special outbreaks of Malaria in

L 19

any portions of the Colony. Copies of a pamphlet entitled "Advice concerning Mosquitoes and Malaria", in both English and Chinese, have also been freely distributed to householders and every effort has been made to induce them to take part in the work of mos- quito destruction. The amount spent on nullah training for the years 1909, 1910 and 1911 were respectively $7,737, $30,628 and $24,650, while the total length of trained nullahs and channels built since the commencement of anti-malarial work in the Colony is 47,023 ft., or 8.9 miles; the total cost of this work has been $246,204.

It has been suggested that the decrease in the incidence of the disease during 1911 may to some extent have been accounted for by the nature of the rainfall during the year. It will be seen that

in two months of the Summer, viz., May and August, over 52 inches of rain fell, the heavy rainstorms in these months would Scour out the many mosquito breeding pools on the hillsides and in this way diminish the number of mosquitoes.

There can be no question that varying climatic conditions from year to year must influence the output of Anopheliues and conse- quently the incidence of Malaria-Ronald Ross has shown that this incidence bears a direct mathematical relationship to the number of Anophelines in any district-but that the explanation is not so simple as would appear from the above is demonstrated by the fol. lowing Table. This shows the rainfall during each month of the year, the monthly admissions for Malaria to the Tung Wah Hospital and the total deaths each month from this disease, and it will be seen that a low Malaria rate was general throughout the year and that the figures were uninfluenced by the heavy rainstorms of May and Angust.

January.

February.

March.

April.

May.

June.

Rainfall (inches),

•735

•000

3.8105.935 |22-145 5·090 | 8·060

30-060| 6·215 | 5·685 |2·720 | 0·095

90.550

Malaria

Admissions to

Tung Wah IIospital,

31

28

16

12

14

30

30

31

27

26

Total Malaria Deaths,

27

24

24

13

30

42

31

36

31

2283

20

24

289

24

31

338

July.

August.

September

October.

November.

December.

- L 20

Totals.

Year.

ten years :~~

Admissions.

The following Table shows the Admissious for Malaria to the two largest Hospitals during the past

Deaths.

Government

Civil

Tung Wah

Total,

Case Mortality'

Hospital.

Hospital.

per cent,

Admissions.

Deaths.

Admissions.

Deaths.

Government

Civil Hospital.

Tung Wah

Hospital.

1902,

349

1903,

347

1904,

221

1905,

266

1906,

233

1907,

247

1908,

282

1909,

188

1910,

340

1911,

112

ANNO1-03-02

403

119

762

128

2.6

29.5

Average admissions,

221

61 568

63

0.6

27.6

533.

212

56 433

58

09

26.4

153

48 419

51

2.2

31.4

Average deaths,

81.

248

96

481

103

3:0

38.5

305

87 552

95

3.2

28.5

355

93 637

96

Average admissions,

10 26.2

623.

396

87

584 1

88

0·5 21.9

!

602 186

942 191

1.5 30.9

Average deaths,

116.

289 108

401

110

1.8

37.4

L 21 -

L 22

The Police Admissions to Hospital for Malaria are shown in the following Table :-

From the

Year.

From rest of the City. Colony.

Average Percent-

Total.

Strength

of Police Force.

age of Strength

1902,

121

55

176

919

1903,

83

84

167

921

1904,

40

67

107

993

1905,

42

85

127

1,018

1906,

37

37

74

1,047

98127

1907,

40

65

105

1,049

10

1908.

32

76

108

1,018

10

1909,

37

50

87

1,050

8

1910,

66

69

135

1,039

13

1911,

30

83 *

113

1,031

11

* 58 of these cases were from the New Territories.

The following Table shows the total deaths in the Colony from Malaria during each of the past ten years :-

Total Deaths from Malaria.

Year.

Deaths in the City (Chinese only).

Total Deaths.

1902,

189

425

1903,

152

300

1904,

90

301

1905,

87

287

1906,

134

418

1907,

138

579

1908,

133

499

1909,

123

422

1910,

282

591

1911,

176

338

Average

Average

486.

352.

Hygiene is taught systematically in all the schools in the Colony, Lectures have been written for this purpose by the Medical Officer of Health for the information and guidance of school teachers and special attention is paid in the lecture on Malaria to the mode of conveyance of the infection by the mosquito, the manner in which the mosquito breeds, and the measures to be adopted for its extermination. Eleven convictions were obtained for

Average

10.6.

Average

13.3.

L 23

breeding mosquitoes on private premises after warning had failed to effect an abatement of the nuisance, the fines amounting to $170.

The Military return of admissions for Malaria is given below, from which it will be seen that the ratio per 1,000 is the lowest on record. Much of this infection is contracted in rural districts when the men are under training and camping out.

Admissions for Malaria, European Troops.

Year.

Strength. Admis- Deaths. In-

Ratio

per 1,000

sions.

valided.

1902,

1,381

1,523

6

1903,

1,220

937

1904,

1,426

390

1905,

1,370

348

1906,

1,515

480

1907.

1,461

287

1908,

2,012

515

1909,

1,943

269

1910,

1,887

334

1911,

1,849

232

OGNO TOON HO

24

1,102.8

6

768-0

9

273.5

1

254.0

15

12

17

10

62709

314.7

1960

256.0

138*4

177·0

125.5

Average

Average

179.9

532·1 ►

The admissions for Malaria amongst the Native Troops during 1911 were 63. The ratio of admissions per 1,000 for the last four years were 102-8 in 1908, 54.3 in 1909, 89.8 in 1910, and 31·8 in 1911.

Beri-Beri

There were 320 deaths (566 in 1910 and 545 in 1909) from this disease during the year of which 3 only were among the Non- Chinese community, two of whom were Japanese and the third an Indian. During the past year circulars have been distributed to all large employees of coolie labour calling their attention to the fact that Beri-Beri is produced by the consumption of white rice as the staple article of diet without a sufficiency of other food and advising that beans should be supplied with the rice when fresh meat or fresh fish cannot be afforded and it is possible that the dissemination of this information may have had some influence in reducing the mortality from this disease.

the

INFECTIOUS DISEASES.

The total number of cases of infectious disease notified during year was 702 (176 in 1910) of which 269 were of Plague.

The following Table shows the nature and distribution of these diseases —

City of Victoria: Health Districts.

1

2

3 4

5

10

6

7 8 9 10

Peak.

Kowloon.

Plague,

Typhoid Fever,

1

15

2

17

12

4

8

16

2

11 13 141 36

4

00

LO

Cholera,

1

:

Small-pox,

22 16

2 9

13

26

14

17 34

Diphtheria,

Puerperal Fever,..

2

4

co

2

1

2

:

2

Scarlet Fever,..

Relapsing Fever,

I

1

...

:

:

:

:

:

...

22

22

:

:

:

LỚN

:

:

:.

:

:

:

:

:

:

T:

:

16

Harbour,

Territories. Villages of Hongkong.

New

ON

Address.

Imported.

Total 1911.

Total 1910.

00

19

ลง

28

1

1 15269

25 1

215

L 24

107

67

1

3 5

9

70

15

3 10

5

10

25272

31

15

1

1

36 32

:

7

12

:

:

:

:

:.

:

- L 25

Plague.

The incidence of Plague during 1911 was heavier than usual, 269 cases being recorded, of which 15 were imported.

A very large proportion of the cases occurring in the City came from No. 9 Health District which is one of the poorest dis- tricts and contains many old houses with basements and defective walls in which rats can find a home. This district has always been one of the most plague-stricken in the Colony and there is little hope of thoroughly eradicating the disease therefrom until all the old houses are replaced by more modern dwellings.

The measures upon which the Colony relies for the preven- tion of Plague consist in (1) the exclusion of rats from all dwell- ings by means of concreted ground surfaces, the prohibition of ceilings in the native quarters, the prohibition of hollow walls and the protection of all drain openings and ventilating openings by iron gratings; (2) the collection and bacteriological examination of all dead rats-facilities for their collection in the native quarters are provided in the shape of small covered bins attached to lamp-posts, telephone posts, electric light standards, etc. These bins contain a carbolic acid disinfectant, and the inhabitants are invited to at once put into them all rats found or killed by them. There are 650 of these bins distributed throughout the City and its suburbs, and each of them is visited twice daily by rat collectors who take all rats found in them to the Government Bacteriologist. Each rat is at once labelled with the number of the bin from which it is taken, and if subsequently found to be Plague-infected, a special survey is at once made of the block of houses in the immediate vicinity of such bin, all rat-holes and rat- runs are filled up with broken glass and cement, defective drains and gratings dealt with, and rat poison freely distributed to the occupants, while the occurrence of several Plague-infected rats in one locality is a signal for a special house to house survey and cleansing of that district. The disinfectant in the rat bins is renewed not less than once a week. (3) the destruction of rats by poison, traps and birdlime hoards, special effort in this direction being made just before the onset of the regular Plague season which in this Colony is March to July; (4) the encouraging of the community to keep cats; (5) the systematic cleansing and wash- ing out of all native dwellings at least once in three months with a flea killing mixture-kerosine emulsion; (6) an efficient daily scavenging of all streets and lanes and the removal of refuse daily from all houses coupled with the provision of covered metal dust- bins for all houses, to reduce as far as possible the amount of food available for rats; (7) the disinfection of Plague-infected pre- mises by stripping them and washing them out thoroughly with the kerosine emulsion coupled with the disinfection of all bedding, clothing, carpets, rugs, etc., by superheated steam. No objection is raised to the treatment of Bubonic Plague cases in native hospitals, and no restrictions are imposed in regard to the burial of those dead of Bubonic Plague, except the provision of a sub-

L 26

stantial coffin, while every effort is made by means of lectures, addresses and explanations to induce the native population to participate in the above preventive measures.

All the cases of Plague with one exception occurred among Chinese; the Non-Chinese case being an Indian constable, who died. 252 of the Chinese cases died, so that the case mortality was 94 per cent. ; their monthly distribution is shown in Table II.

During the year 65,927 rats were caught or found dead in the City of Victoria and 21,311 in Kowloon, a total of 87,238 as against 77,755 in 1910. Those from the City were examined by the Government Bacteriologist, Dr. Macfarlane, at the Public Mortuary and those in Kowloon by Dr. Pearse, the Assistant Medical Officer of Health, and in his absence during part of the year by Dr. Hartley, with the result that 269 of those from the City and none of those from Kowloon were found to be infected with Plague.

Table III shows the monthly distribution of the Plague- infected rats during the year.

Typhoid Fever.

The number of cases of this disease during the year was 107 compared with 67 during 1910 and 75 in 1909: 28 of the cases were imported, namely 21 Europeans, and 7 Chinese. The cases of European or American nationality numbered 40, while the Chinese cases numbered 50, and 17 cases occurred amongst the other Asiatic races in the Colony. Seven of the European cases, (4 British, 2 German and 1 Italian), one Indian and 23 of the Chinese cases died. The case mortality among the European cases was therefore 17.5 per cent.

In most of the cases of Typhoid Fever that occur in this Colony the infection is probably contracted by eating salads of raw vegetables, which have been grown in Chinese market-garden-, where it is customary to water and manure the plants with diluted human excreta- both urine and nightsoil. Residents in the Far East should carefully avoid such articles of food as water-cress, lettuce, etc., in view of this danger of contracting Typhoid Fever, Cholera or Intestinal Parasites, all of which diseases may

be conveyed in this manner. Oysters from neighbouring Chinese ports are also occasionally the source of infection.

It will be seen from the above figures that this disease is much less prevalent among the Chinese than among Europeans in this Colony, the ratio of cases to population being in the case of Eu- ropeans 3.7 per 1,000 and in the case of Chinese 0.14 per 1,000. Five of the Chinese cases occurred in children under 5

of age.

years

L 27

Small-pox.

During the year 272 cases of Small-pox were certified, (31 in 1910 and 38 in 1909), of which 5 were Europeans, 10 were other Non-Chinese and 257 were Chinese; 25 of the cases were imported. One European case and 197 of the Chinese cases died.

The number of vaccinations for the year was 8,549 as com- pared with 7,584 in 1910.

Efforts have recently been made to secure the re-vaccination of school children, and a memorandum was issued to all school teach- ers in the Colony setting forth its advantages, while arrangements were made for re-vaccination free of cost at the schools on application.

Diphtheria.

Thirty-six cases of Diphtheria were notified throughout the year, (32 in 1910), one of them being an imported case. Ten of the cases were Europeans and nine were "other Non-Chinese " leaving seventeen Chinese cases. About half the cases occurred in the month of December and the remainder were more or less evenly distributed throughout the year.

Eleven of the Chinese died, and also four Non-Chinese chil- dren, namely 2 Indian, 1 Japanese and 1 German.

Puerperal Fever.

Seven cases of this disease were certified throughout the year, (12 in 1910). Five of these were Chinese while the other two were Europeans; all the Chinese cases died, and also one of the Europeans.

The Government employs nine Chinese midwives, trained in Western methods, to attend the poor in their confinements, and during the year 2,076 cases were attended by these women as against 1,799 in 1910. There were 38 cases of abortion, 46 still-births and 3 cases of Puerperal Fever; 47 of the infants died during the year, and 290 were taken back to China, or lost sight of owing to removals; the remainder of the infants are well. Ten of the mothers died from the accidents of child-birth, including the three cases of Puerperal Fever.

INTERMENTS.

The following number of interments in the various cemeteries of the Colony have been recorded during the year and in 1910 :--

L 28

General Cemeteries.

Colonial,

Roman Catholic,.

Mahommedan,

Jewish,

Parsee.....

1911.

1910.

106

111

1,058

1,004

52

36

2

1

1,221

1,155

Chinese Cemeteries.

1911.

1910.

Mount Caroline,

693

82

Kai Lung Wan,

628

800

Tung Wa Hospital,

3,483

3,557

Protestant,

38

30

Eurasian,

2

3

Shaukiwan,

189

312

Aberdeen,

151

153

Stanley, Shek Ö.

Ma Tau Wai,

22

24

0

1

1,155

1,092

Shai Yu Shek,

118

131

Kowloon Tong,

91

3

Christian, Kowloon City,.

11

17

Cheung Leung Tin,

3

8

6,584

6,213

د

There were in addition thirteen cremations of bodies during the year.

No less than 914 of the interments in the Roman Catholic Cemetery are the bodies of Chinese infants that have been baptized at the convents and die there shortly after admission.

DISINFECTING STATIONS.

During the year the Disinfecting Stations (in Victoria and in Kowloon) dealt with 50,422 articles of clothing, bedding, etc.

The disinfecting apparatus in Victoria was in use on 305 days, and in addition 8,551 articles were washed, 21 public vehicles were disinfected and 1,843 articles were fumigated. The disinfecting apparatus in Kowloon was in use on 77 days.

PUBLIC BATH-HOUSES.

The free Public Bath-houses, erected by the Government at Wanchai and in Pound Lane, Taipingshan, and also the temporary bath-houses, fitted up in Chinese tenement houses rented for this

L 29

purpose, at 92 Second Street and 2 Sheung Fung Laue, have been in considerable demand by the poor class of Chinese and the follow- ing figures show the total number of persons who have used these bath-houses during the year 1911 :-

Wanchai,

Pound Lane,

88,919

159,611

Second Street,

63,123

Sheang Fung Lane,

21,521

Total,

333,174

The numbers in 1910 were 359,456.

Separate baths, with an ample supply of hot water, are furnished at each of these bath-houses-that at Wanchai is for men only, and is largely used by the coal coolies engaged in coaling ships in the Harbour, and that at Second Street is also for men and boys only. The Pound Laue bath-house has separate building- for men and for women and children, and the Sheung Fung Lane bath-house is for women and children only.

AMBULANCE SERVICE..

Ambulances can be procured not only at any hour of the night or day by telephoning (No. 363) to the Disinfecting Station, Taipingshan, but additional ones are stationed at the following places for use by the Police in all cases of emergency :

The Bay View Police Station.

No. 1 Police Station.

The Recreation Ground, Happy Valley.

Eastern District Sanitary Matshed (near No. 2 Police

Station).

The Seamen's Institute, Gresson Street.

The City Hall.

The Post Office.

The Central Police Station.

The Fire Brigade Station, Queen's Road Central.

The New Western Market.

The Tung Wa Hospital.

The entrance gate in Queen's Road West to the Govern-

ment Civil Hospital.

The Western District Sanitary Office.

The Cattle Depôt, Kennedy Town.

L 30

Outside the City limits ambulances are also stationed at the Pokfulam Police Station, at No. 6 Police Station, Peak, at Aber- deen, Shaukiwan and Stanley Police Stations, at the Water Police Station at Tsim-sha-tsui and at Taipo. Ambulances may be obtained in Kowloon by telephoning (No. 44K.) to the Disinfecting Station.

These are all hand ambulances on bicycle or light wooden wheels, with rubber tyres, and of the St. John Ambulance pattern.

Those stationed in the City are in the charge of the various District Inspectors, whose duty it is to see that they are kept clean and efficient, and that they are disinfected after use. At the Sani- tary Stations coolies are always available for the conveyance of these ambulances, but at the other stations the Police obtain volun- teers or engage street coolies for this purpose, while if the ambu- lance has been soiled or used for an infectious case, the Sanitary Department is notified so that it may be cleansed and disinfected

at once.

Ambulances from the Disinfecting Stations were used 340 times in Hongkong and 127 times in Kowloon.

ADULTERATION OF FOOD AND DRUGS.

Twenty-one samples of milk were taken for analysis during the year, all but one of which were found to be unadulterated and genuine.

A number of tins of condensed milk, cocoa and chocolate, various kinds of pickles and sauces, and a quantity of fruit, all of which has become unsound were seized and destroyed. The purity of alcoholic liquors is dealt with by the Police, who periodically submit, samples for analysis. During 1911 two samples of Brandy were found to be adulterated.

J. M. ATKINSON, M.B. (Lond.), M.R.C.S., L.S.A., D.P.H., Principal Civil Medical Officer.

FRANCIS CLARK, M.D., M.R.C.P., D.P.H., D.T.M. & H.,

Medical Officer of Health.

28rd March, 1912.

- L 31 - Table I.-DEATHS REGISTERED IN THE COLONY OF HONGKONG DURING 1911.

Navy,

:

British and

Foreign Army,

Community,

Civil,

1 36 3

2

...

:

1

1

:.

:.

:

:

:

...

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:.

:

:

:

10 1 8

21

2 13

:

---

3

10 5 4 3

...

:

20

T

20

22 21

1

51

1

:

:.

6 3

1

1

:

...

:

:

:

7

39 3 228

31

4

:

:

18

6

Small-pox.

Measles.

Typhoid Fever.

Diphtheria.

Cholera.

Diarrhoea.

Dysentery.

Plague.

Malarial Fever.

Puerperal Fever.

Septic-infections.

Syphilis.

Poisoning.

Injuries.

Alcoholism. Developmental

Diseases.

Old Age.

General Tuberculosis.

Beri-beri.

Cancer.

Paralysis and Convulsions.

Heart Diseases.

Pneumonia.

Phthisis.

Gastritis.

Enteritis.

Cirrhosis of Liver.

Peritonitis.

Nephritis.

Other causes.

Unknown.

All causes.

Victoria and

Peak,

Ilarbour,

Kowloon,

Chinese

Community,

Shaukiwan,............

Aberdeen,.

Stanley,....

133 5 18

10

7

2

50

1

*

6

7

103

2192 103 | 236 | 177 4 23 97

7

1

8

13

25 1

3

1

21

41

:

6 26

14

10

35

2

C

21

54 |

3

00

8

:

:

:.

:

:

:

:.

:

:

...

6

43

:

1

LO

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

F.

:.

Total, 1911,

1910,

15

28

4

7298 168

198 10 31 15

3 244 177 253 338 6 45 112 10

7

77

17

23 591

རྱ ཙྪ

10, 30 4

30

3

:

3.

...

:

277

277 103 370 | 178

3

26

828219

20

LO

1

23 308 | 111 |1052 452

8 12 49 66

3གླ་

48

00

11

46 1066 142 5296

2

1

8

102 65 481

8

24

46 175 166

22 11 10

26

221 56 1204

:

1 9

2

1 1

1

49 26 319

4

1 11

9

1

:.

DD.

1

:

...

...

:.

:

5324 291 417 320 41377 193 1322 775 1 79 25

5 864 228 410566 26532172 1165 780

:.

3x 383

F:

:

38

:

3

147 15 30

56

2 173

2 1

23

88 1542 295 7748

888 284 7639

}

L 32

Table II.-CASES OF NOTIFIABLE DISEASES RECORDED IN EACH MONTH OF THE YEAR 1911.

Total. 1911. Total.

1910.

Europeans,

Plague,....

Chinese,.....

Others,

Europeans,

2

දය :::

16

52 112 60 19

3

3

1

4 2 1 8

Typhoid Fever,

Chinese,...

3

1

2

3

4

Others,....

1

1

Europeans,

Cholera,

Chinese,....

Others,.

Europeans,

1

1

1

Small-pox,

Chinese,...

8 15

57

35

32

milalar: 8:

1

1

2 5 3

3

5

Others,....

3

1

1

Europeans, 2

1

Diphtheria,

Puerperal Fever,... Chinese,......

Scarlet Fever,...... Chinese,....

Others,...

Europeans,

Relapsing Fever,... Chinese,...

Others,

Chinese,...

Others,....

Europeans,

Others,..

Europeans,

1

1

2

4 10

6

Nooi wi

3 4

268

269

25

25

1

4 6 2

40

25

50

107.

33

67

17

9

5

10

5

9

9

:

5

23

51

257

272

:སྶ

9

22

31

3

10

I

10

2

3

17

36

1

1

9

1

2

:ཌ©མ

20

10

32

2

2

1

5

7

10

12

...

1

1

***

1

:.

1

2

::~:

5

:.

...

:

Total 1911

"

1910,..

1212

18 25 63 10 15 11 19

17 22

1280

60 95 133 75 45 24 25 52 82

29

49

9 13 9 11 11

==

==

702

176

+

L 33

Table III.

MONTHLY DISTRIBUTION OF PLAGUE-INFECTED RATS

DURING THE YEAR 1911.

Mus Rattus,

Mus Decumanus,. Mus Musculus,.....

CITY OF VICTORIA.

June.

7

Bai

38

8

5 10

26

51

15

Total,...

2 9 5

10

Human Cases of

Plague,.

89 23

:

92

177

269

16

52 112 60 20

1

1

3 4 269

No Plague-infected rats were found in Kowloon during the year, and only four cases of human Plague occurred there.

L 34

Annexe C.

REPORT BY ADAM GIBSON, Colonial Veterinary Surgeon.

GENERAL STATISTICS.

The total number of cattle admitted to the Government De- pôt for the year was 31,374, a decrease on the previous year of 7,035. The decrease is largely due to the cessation of the trade in cattle between here and the Philippine Islands. In Kennedy Town 25,845 cattle were admitted, a decrease of 7,094 on last year. There were 147 head rejected alive as unfit for food against 107 in 1910. In Ma Tau Kok 5,529 head were admitted against 4,470 in the previous year and 60 were rejected alive as unfit for food against 11 in 1910.

The total number of pigs admitted to Kennedy Town was 197,134, a decrease on last year's total of 526.

The total number of sheep admitted to Kennedy Town was 32,220, an increase of 1,566 on 1910.

DISEASE IN DEPÔTS.

Foot and Mouth Disease. This disease in the early part of the year existed in a very mild form and disappeared altogether in the latter half of the year.

Anthrax.-Four cases of Anthrax were discovered, one in March, one in July, and two in October.

Rinderpest. In the early part of the year Rinderpest was prevalent but it gradually grew less until it disappeared altogether. The last cases occurred in September in a lot of cattle imported from Kwong Chow Wan.

Tuberculosis.-Six cases of Tuberculosis were found. They were all in cast cows from dairies in different parts of the Colony.

CREMATORIUM.

The carcases, etc., destroyed in the Crematorium for the year

were :-

Cattle including calves,

Sheep and goats,

Swine,

Horses,

52

49

207

45

-

106

-

·

7,125 tbs.

Dogs and Miscellaneous,

Condemned meat from

Slaughter House

1

L 35

In addition to these a miscellaneous assortment of 19 cart loads of old official papers from Government Departments, 3 loads from private firms and condemned food goods from different stores were destroyed.

Under Government Notification No. 31 of 1910 the following fees were collected :-

67 large animals at $2.00 each,

2 medium sized animals at $1.00 each,

67 small animals at $0.50 each,

Bone ash sold,

Total Receipts,

$134.00

2.00

33.50

59.20

$228.70

The coal used was 22 tons 4 cwts. 46 lbs. at $9.35 per ton: $207.66.

SLAUGHTER HOUSES.

Kennedy Town:-The total revenue was $69,795.70 and was made up as follows:

Slaughtered.

1911.

$

Cattle @40 e.... 25,125-10,050.00 Sheep@20 c.,.. 17,540 3,508.00 Swine @30 c....179,296-53,788.80

1910. $35 25,181-10,072.40 17,329 3,465.80

177,898=53,369.40

Exported.

Cattle @ 50 c....

354- 177.00

Sheep @ 10 c.,.. 14,262— 1,426.20

13,359

8,606 4,303.00 1,335.90

Swine @ 10 c.,.. 8,457-

@

845.70 20,379 2,037.90

Duplicate of order lost

25

Total,.........$69,795.70

$74,584.65

Decrease on 1910,...$4,788.95

Ma Tau Kok:-The total revenue was $13,644.95 and was

made up as follows:

Slaughtered.

1911.

Cattle @ 40 c.,.. 5,458

$ c. 2,183.20

1910.

$ C.

5,323 2,129.20

Sheep @ 20 c.,.. 131

26.20

110=

*

Swine @30 c., 38,100-11,430.00

23,508

22.00 7,052.40

Exported.

Cattle @ 50 C.,..

S=

4.00

143

71.50

Sheep @ 10 e....

1

10

Swine @ 10 c........

13:

1.30

80

Duplicate of order lost

25

Total,........................$ 13,644.95

Increase on 1910,...$4,368.95

* Number of swine slaughter tickets sold.

$9,276.00

L 36

The Slaughter Houses at Shaukiwau and Aberdeen were leased to a contractor. A new Slaughter House has been completed for Shaukiwan and is now known as the Sai Wan Ho Slaughter House. It is built in conjunction with the Sai Wan Ho market and was occupied on the first day of the year. Sham Shui Po Slaughter House has been abolished and the animals from there are taken to Ma Tau Kok. This to some extent accounts for the increase of revenue from that Slaughter House. The contractor's price for the privilege of slaughtering in Sham Shui Po was $3,240.00 in 1910. The increase in the Ma Tau Kok revenue is $4,368.95.

The total revenue from the Animal Depôts and Slaughter Houses including contract is as follows:-

1910.

1911.

Kennedy Town, fees collected,

.$69,795.70

$74,584.65

Ma Tau Kok,

13,644.95

9,276.00

Kennedy Town Blood and Hair Contract,

7,272.00

6,447.00

Ma Tau Kok

1,476.00

1,104.00

"

Sai Wan Ho (Shau Ki Wan) Contract,...

""

2,232.00

1,680.00

Aberdeen Contract,

744.00

540.00

Sham Shui Po Contract,

...

3,240.00

Total,.........$95,164.65 $96,871.65

Decrease on 1910, ...........$1,707.00

The total number of animals slaughtered for food were:-

1911.

Sheep

1910.

Sheep

Cattle. and Swine. Cattle. and Swine.

Goats.

Goats.

Kennedy Town, 24,913 17,540 179,296

25,181 17,329 177,988

Ma Tau Kok,

5,458 131 37,971 5,323 110 23,508

Aberdeen,

Sham Shui Po, (abolished)

Sai Wan Ho, (Shaukiwan)

3,075

7,255

3,413

12,000

6,796

30,371 17,671 227,597 30,504 17,439 223,705

Total of all animals, ......275,639

Increase in 1911,...

271,648

3,991

The figures for Aberdeen and Sai Wan Ho have been supplied

by the contractors.

L 37

The following table shows the numbers of animals slaughtered during the past ten years:-

Sheep and

Year.

Cattle.

1902.

25,669

1903,

28,335

1904.

30,829

1905,

26,758

1906,

27,141

1907,

27,631

1908.

29,612

1909.

30,848

1910,

30,504

1911.

30,371

Average

Average

for 5 years, for 5 years,

29,783.

27,744.

Goats.

20,780

22,918

23,736

19,774

16.403

18,279 18,104

17,855

17,439

17,671

Average

Average

for 5 years, for 5 years,

17,870.

20,722.

Dairies and Cowsheds.

Swine.

202,495

187.255

181,046

186,059

200,586

206,124

185,231

182,791

223,705

227,597

Average

Average

for 5 years, for 5 years,

205,090

191.490

Foot and Mouth Disease existed at the Dairy Farm, Pokfulam, but was of a milder type than in former years,

Rinderpest was also prevalent in the early part of the year and was treated with anti-rinderpest serum with good results. Texan Fever which is frequently associated with Rinderpest was found to be amenable to subcutaneous inoculations of Trypanblue.

IMPORTATION OF FRESH BEEF AND MUTTON,

The Dairy Farm Company were the only importers and im- ported 670,063 lbs. of heef and 386,634 lbs. of mutton from Australia.

MARKETS.

The Tsim Sha Tsui Market was opened for business on 1st October, 1911. The following statement shows the revenue derived from Markets:--

Markets.

Central Market, Hung Hom Market, Mong Kok Tsui Market,

Sai Wan Ho Market,

Sai Ying Pun Market, Shaukiwan Market,.. Shek Tong Tsui Market, So Kon Po Market,. Tai Kok Tsui Market, Tsim Sha Tsui Market,

Wan Tsai Market,

1910.

$ 44,949.29 & 52,801.87 $ 53,714.73

3,817.79

992.40

1,780.60

14 016 94 1,643.70 750.20

1899 to 1908 (Average for

1909.

1911.

10 years).

$ 59,457.76

1,940.18

3,935.05

3,940.80

947 07†

1,093 80

1,076.00

1,611 37

1,978.88

2,021.95

10,627.57

13,694 99

13,514.32

875.17

- 1,401.74

1,564.00

381,56

1,001.88

691.80 1,330 60

680.40

1,376.50

1,391.50

615.42

652.93

693.70

719.90

1,146.20

2,987.09

4,303.77

4,440.90

4,435,20

12,959 88+

11,678.71

12,549.30

14,384.80

23,187.13

17,964.42

20,109.16

21,750.90

4,628.99

6 436.34

6,752.50

7,398.00

Total,

$106,712.60 $117,752.24 $122,446.31

$133,892.50

† 3 years' average,

Western Market, (New).

Do.. (Old)

Yaumati Market,

L 38

INSPECTION OF CATTLE TRANSPORTS.

Except for a few head shipped to Macao nothing was done under the export part of Ordinance 15 of 1903. The regulations governing the export of live stock were made to apply to import as well. There was some grumbling among importers of poultry principally but all ultimately became reconciled to the innovation the object of which was to improve the conditions under which animals were imported. The prevention of overcrowding was the principal object aimed at.

NEW TERRITORIES.

No outbreak of infectious disease among animals was reported.

BULLOCK TRACTION.

Owing to the high price of foodstuffs it was decided, following the precedent of the Dairy Farm Company, to attempt to grow part of the fodder used. About 24 acres of hillside round the Kennedy Town Animals Depôts was cleared of undergrowth and planted with guinea grass. It was liberally manured from the Markets and Depôts and during the summer approximately 100 tons of green grass was cut and fed to the working cattle in Hongkong and Kowloon. A small area was also broken in near the Kowloon Disinfecting Station but there owing to the very poor soil of the hillside the results have not been so encouraging. During this winter more hillside has been brought under cultiva- tion and it is hoped better results both in Kowloon and Hongkong will be attained.

The labour in Kowloon was done by the Disinfecting Station coolies and the bullock drivers in their spare time. In Hongkong four coolies were engaged for that work only.

EXPORT OF LARD TO THE PHILIPPINES.

In former years a considerable business was done in the ex- port of lard to the Philippine Islands. This export ceased in the early part of the year as the conditions under which the lard was produced did not satisfy the provisions of the Pure Food Laws which had been made operative in the Islands. To meet these re- quirements special factories were erected at Ma Tau Kok and at Kennedy Town Slaughter House by the Chinese lard makers. These factories have been approved by the U.S.A. Public Health and Marine Hospital Service as complying with the intention of the Pure Food Laws and under certificate from me lard and meat products are now permitted to be shipped to the Philippines. The factories were in working order and started at the end of the year, and are now doing a fair amount of business.

L39

Annexe D.

CIVIL HOSPITAL.

REPORT BY DR. J. BELL, Superintendent.

STAFF.

I returned from leave in October and took over charge from Dr. Koch.

Dr. Moore took long leave in August and until my return Dr. Koch was in full charge.

Miss Barker, Matron, died in June to the great regret of all those with whom she was associated. As Sister and Matron she had served here for over 17 years.

Sisters Gorham, Barrow and Richards went home on leave and Sisters Maker and Jacobs returned from home and the former was promoted to Matron.

Sister Allan was invalided out of the service and Sisters" Anderton, Parkinson and Wilks joined from home.

Wardmaster Kille joined from the Police Department - rice Wardmaster Cooke deceased.

STATISTICS.

The total number of admissions was 2,369 as against 2,595 in 1910, and 7,128 out-patients attended 15,489 times as against 8,356 in 110 who attended 17.759 times.

The following Tables are attached :----

I.-Admissions and Deaths under respective diseases from

all Government Hospitals.

Il-Monthly Admissions for Malaria from each Police

Station.

III.---Number and Class of Patients admitted during the

past ten years and deaths.

The latter Table shows a decrease in the number of police, Government servants and police cases and an increase in the pay- ing and free patients.

The average daily number of sick was 912 as against 92 in 1910.

Women and Children: --There were 285 women admitted, as against 299, with a death rate of 9.8 per cent. 112 children were under treatment, as against 120, with a death rate of 13.9.

Deaths ----The deaths numbered 173 making a percentage of 73. Of this number 69 died within 24 hours of admission.

1

L 40

Nationality of Patients admitted :-Europeans 437 as against 592, Indian and Coloured 644 against 806, Asiatics 1,288 against 1,264.

The death rate was Europeans 5 per cent., Indians 5'6 and Asiatics 8.8 per cent.

DISEASES.

The most prevalent diseases were :-

Increase

1911.

1910. or

Decrease.

Malarial Fever,

112

340

-228

Febricula,

..135

66

+ 69

Influenza,

30

19

19

Dysentery,

38

58

20

Tuberculosis,.

91

69

+ 22

Beri-beri,

46

46

· ....

Rheumatism,

59

82

23

212

Diseases of Respiratory

System,.

.154 132

+ 22

Diseases of Digestive

System,

Injuries,

..186

249 ...517 527

63

10

The largest number of deaths occurred in the following

diseases :-

Tuberculosis,

Injuries,

24 deaths.

50

"

Diseases of Respiratory System, 13

"

">

Digestive

....

....

10

New Growths :-The following cases of malignant disease were under treatment :-

Chinese male aged

38 Sarcoma of neck.

52 Epithelioma of foot.

""

44 Carcinoma of omentum.

"

""

>>

""

30

""

>>

50

>>

""

leg.

29 Lympho-Sarcoma. 55 Epithelioma of hand. 37 Carcinoma of Liver.

""

Mediastinum.

40 Sarcoma of neck.

""

""

""

52

""

""

""

""

21

""

48

face.

""

W

""

""

""

35

""

A

4

"" », eye.

female

47

39

""

33

""

""

43 Carcinoma of Breast.

37 Scirrhus of Breast.

Uterus.

71

""

""

""

"}

36 Cancer of Tonsil.

"

L 41

Fractures :-The principal fractures treated were :--

Skull-

19 with 16 deaths.

Thigh-

Leg

Spine- Arm

13

2

9

1

3

2

4

1

:

Forearm Patella

• Ribs

-

Clavicle.

Jaw

J

1

1

I

1

Malarial Fever:-There was a large decrease in the number of cases treated--112 as against 340 in 1910, 188 in 1909, 282 in 1908, and 247 in 1907.

Appendicitis:-Five cases were under treatment. All recover- ed after operation.

Typhoid Fever: -There were 22 cases under treatment with 4 deaths.

This

Paratyphoid Fever :-One case was under treatment. is the first I have seen and resembled a mild case of typhoid. Tested by the Government Bacteriologist the blood serum was negative to typhoid but markedly positive to paratyphoid.

Parasites:-The question of the prevalence of intestinal parasites, as far as this Colony is concerned, not having been settled, I undertook an investigation. I examined the stools of 850 patients with the following results:-413 per cent. were infected. Euro- peans to the extent of 13.7, Indians 22.5 and Asiatics 63.8 per cent. Multiple infection was found in 25.5 per cent.

Ascaris Lumbricoides occurred in 46-6

Trichocephalus Dispar

*

26.2

多多

Ankylostoma Duodenale

13:3

"

"

Clonorchis Sinense

12.9

>>

""

Toenia Solium

Oxyuris Vermicularis Amœbæ

one case.

three cases.

28 cases, all but one being cases of dysentery.

Leishman-Donovani bodies were found in one case. The patient was an Indian Gaol Guard who had been here for a year. The typical ulcer from which the bodies were taken was of 6 weeks' duration.

L 42

OPERATIONS.

Chloroform was administered 196 times-amongst the major operations performed were five cases of appendicitis, seven cases of vesical calculus, 3 cases of liver abscess, one case of fibroid of the uterus, one case of ruptured spleen, one case of ruptured duodenum, three cases of strangulated hernia and one radical cure of hernia and one thyroidectomy.

VACCINATIONS.

case of

During the year 784 vaccinations were performed as against 618 in 1910. Of this number 415 were successful.

SICKNESS AMONGST POLICE, GAOL AND SANITARY STAFF.

Police.

Admissions:-There were 519 under treatment as against 605

last year.

Deaths-There were 3 deaths, one European from typhoid fever, one Indian from cellulitis and one Chinese from phthisis.

Invaliding-Four were invalided as against 26 in 1910-two Indians and two Chinese.

Sick Rate:

Europeans - 56-39 per cent. as against 600 in 1910.

Indians

- 75.33

**

Chinese - - 30.71

"

*

Mortality Rate :--

Europeans 0.75

Indians - Chinese -

0.23

>>

0-19

**

104.6

23.4

>>

2.2

0.5

nil

Malaria:-57 cases were under treatment as against 135 last year. The Europeans suffered to the extent of 4.51 per cent. as against 6-7, Indians 1061 as against 27, and Chinese 2:11 against 44. Only one man was in twice for the disease.

Table II shows the occurrence of malaria at the different stations.

Gaol.

There were 38 admissions against 26 last year. There were no deaths and only one was invalided.

Sanitary Department.

There were 31 admissions as against 94. No deaths occurred and no one was invalided.

L 43

MATERNITY HOSPITAL

There were 135 admissions as against 107 last year. There were no deaths. Of the admissions 87 were paying patients and 48 were free.

- L 44

Tab

Diseases and Deaths in 1911 at the

CIVIL HOSPITAL.

Diseases.

Remain- ing in Hospital at end of 1910.

Yearly Total. Total

Cases

Admis- sions.

Deaths. Treated. of 1911,

Remain- ing in Hospital at end

-GENERAL DISEASES.

Plague,

Relapsing Fever,

Small-pox,

Influenza,

30

30

Measles,

6

Whooping Cough,

1

Mumps,

8

Febricula,

2

136

138

Enteric Fever,

3

22

25

1

Dysentery,

Diphtheria,

Paratyphoid Fever,....

Malarial Fever :-

2

36

38

440

1

18

2

:

:.

1. Quartan,.

2. Simple Tertian,

2

25

3.. Malignant,

85

12 18

27

85

4. Mixed Infection,

: ܗ: :

2

...

Beri-beri,....

3

43

46

1

Pyæmia,

1

1

Septicemia,..

3

3

Tetanus, Tubercle,. Leprosy, Syphilis,

...

Gonorrhoea,....

Alcoholism,..

Rheumatism,.

Rheumatic Fever,

New Growth, Non-malignant,

Do., Malignant,

Anæmia,

Debility,

Chicken-pox,

Dengue,

Diabetes Mellitus,

⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ co como ai i

1

85

91

2

2

5

10

79

44

48

1

3

44

47

3

56

59

14

14

18

19

2

13

15

58

58

3

926

Carried forward,...

38

847 69 885 24

le I.

L 45

Civil, Victoria and Gaol Hospitals.

VICTORIA HOSPITAL.

Remain- ing in Hospital at end of 1917.

Yearly Total. Total

Cases

Admis-

sions.

Deaths.

Treated.

:-

::

GAOL HOSPITAL.

Remain- Remain- ing in ing in Hospital Hospital

at end at end of 1911. of 1910.

213

8

3

3

2

3

:.

12

25

13

3

12

10

5

73

3

نت

:

Yearly Total Total

C ases

Admis- sions.

Deaths. Treated.

Remain- ing in Hospital at end of 191'.

42

:

3

1

:

43

3

3

2

::

:

:

co

3

14

10 30

10

31

3

78

2

2

113

115

4

Diseases.

L 46

Table I.—

Diseases and Deaths in 1911 at the

CIVIL HOSPITAL.

Remain- ing in Hospital

Yearly Total.

Total

Remain- ing in

Cases

Hospital

at end Admis- of 1910. sions.

Deaths. Treated. at end

of 1911.

Brought forward,..

38

847

69

885

24

LOCAL DISEASES.

Diseases of the Nervous System

Cerebral Irritation,.......

Neuritis,

མ་

Meningitis,

7

5

Concussion,.

Convulsions,

Apoplexy,

com:

3740

Paralysis,.

6

9

to

Epilepsy,.

6

8

Neuralgia,

13

Neurasthenia,

1

Locomotor Ataxia,

Hemiplegia,

Mania,

2

19

2

Dementia,

1

I

Delusional Insanity,

2

Diseases of the Eye,

2

53

55

Ear,

6

"

22

Nose,...

3

>

>>.

""

19

Circulatory System,..

I

27

""

"

Respiratory System,...

152 13

>>

"

Digestive System,

3

183

""

وو

Lymphatic System,...

2

50

??

Urinary System,

1

41

a: Sza⠀⠀

6

B

6

28

2

154

1

10

186

5

52

42

"1

??

Male Organs,

3

67

70

"

""

Female Organs,

20

21

23

ور

Organs of Locomotion,

21

21

Cellular Tissue,

2

96

""

""

~

98

Skin,

28

31

-220:

22

""

Carried forward,...... 65 1,648 117 1,713 58

- L 47

(Continued).

Civil, Victoria and Gaol Hospitals.

VICTORIA HOSPITAL.

GAOL HOSPITAL.

Remain- ing in Hospital at end of 9:0.

Yearly Total.

Total Casts

Remain- ing in

Hospital

Remain- ing in Hospital

Yearly Total.

Remain-

Total

Cases

Admis-

sions. Deaths. Treated. at end

at end Admis-

of 1911.

of 1910.

sions

Deaths Treated

ing in Hospital at end

of 1911.

5

73

:

:

ලය

78

78

20

29

282+

2

Q

2

113

5

115

1

1

I

29

2

20

20

29

2

8

14

4887

1

17

17

Naa: Nie

7

177

8

184

4

5

176

8

181

4

+

Diseases.

L 48

Table I,-

Diseases and Deaths in 1911 at the

CIVIL HOSPITAL.

Remain- ing in Hospital

at end Admis- of 1910. 91ons.

Yearly Totul. Total

Cases

Deaths. Treated

Remain-

ing in Hos ital

at end of 1911.

Brought forward, ...

65

1,648 117

1,713

58.

LOCAL DISEASES,- Continued.

Immersion,

Injuries,

5

Malformations,

Poisons,

Parasites,

In Attendance,

Under Observation,

Effects.of Hent,

Nil,

Parturition...

Puerperium....

Born in Hospital,

9

22

49

52

516

6

2:3

22

20

1

23

24

35

38

24

24

:

:

Total,....

91 2,278 173 2,369 80

(Continued).

Civil, Victoria and Gaol Hospitals.

VICTORIA HOSPITAL.

L 19

GAOL HOSPITAL.

Remain- ing in Hospital

Yearly Total.

Total

Cases

at end Admis- of 1910. sior.s.

Deaths,

Treated

Remain-

ing in ing in Hospital | Hospital at end at eni of 1911. of 1910.

Remain-

Yearly Total. Total

Remain-

Cases

Admis sions,

Deaths Treated,

ing in Hospital at end

of 191 i.

7

177

184

4

176

181

1

1

I

2

2

:

1

:-

::

6

24

21

13

803

816

19*

60

60

1

2

39

41

39

39

:

15

295

810

9

18 -1,048

9 1,066 23

* Outdoor patients.

J

Central,

No. 2,

7,

Table II.—Monthly Admissions for Malaria from each Police Station during 1911.

Station.

Bay View,

Tsat Tse Mui,

Shankiwan,.

Stanley,.... Aberdeen,

Shek 0,

Hung Hom,..

Yaumati,

Sham Shui Po,

Sha Ta Kok,

Au Tau,

Sheung Shui,

Tai Po,

Tsun Wau,

Sha Tin,

January.

February.

March.

April.

August.

June. July.

May.

September.

October.

November.

December.

Total.

Percentage

~:

1

1

2

03

Strength.

Increase or Decrease over 1910.

: 00

22

6·8

7.5

2

5.1

2.7

2

5.9

1.9

100

32.0

3

17.6

- 13.1

1

40·0

+33·8

50·0

+33·4

7.5

7.1

I

2

3

20.0

+46

117

+ 56

2

2

15.3

39.2

2

:

Sai Kung,

Mt. Gough,.

Kowloon City,

Water,

Tung Chung,

I

Total,.

I

3

2 2

I

2

9

5

14 9

10

5

L 50

4.

2.5

2:0

2

28.5

‚5.6

7·1

Table III-Number and Class of Patients admitted during the past ten years and the Deaths.

Class of Patients.

1902.

1903.

1904.

190.5.

1906.

1907.

1908.

1909.

1910.

1911.

Police,

938

759

707

726

742

776

660

633

613

519

Paying Patients,..

956

794

794

866

720

762

724

659

591

631

Government Servants, ..

460

319

267

271

339

367

315

250

352

188

Police Cases,

300

276

262

329

307

318

285

287

432

313

.....

Free,

454

646

555

512

637

488

543

555

674

718

Total,.

3.108

2,794

2,585

2,704

2,745

2,711

2,527

2,384

2,662

2,369

Total Deaths,

140

142

128

150

167

170

157

131

147

173

Percentage,

45

50

4.1

5.6

6:0

6.2

6.2

5.4

5.6

7.3

- L 51

1

L 52

Annexe E.

VICTORIA HOSPITAL FOR WOMEN AND CHILDREN.

REPORT BY DR. J. M. ATKINSON. Medical Officer in Charge.

Staff. Dr. Atkinson was in charge during the year.

Nursing Staff-During the year four of the Nursing Sisters and three of the Nurses of the Medical Department were on duty for varying periods of time when required.

Buildings.-These were maintained in a good state of repair.

Admissions, Diseases and Deaths. There were 309 admissions during the year as compared with 344 in 1910, with nine deaths, a percentage of 2.9.

The admissions during the last three years are classified as follows:-

1. Age :--

Under 3 years,

Between 3 and 12 years,

Over 12 years,

2. Nationality :--

Europeans, Asiatics,

3. Class of Patients:

-

1911.

1910.

1909.

96

831

149

53

93 1

}

821

176

24

}}

106

160

168

113

269

307

196

40

37

23

Paying Patients, -

-

179

192

131

Government Servants,

15

12

2

Wives and Children of

Government Servants,

54

82

50

Free,

61

58

36

Malarial Fever.-There were only 31 cases as compared with

91 in 1910.

They are as follows:-

Simple Tertian,

Malignant,

Mixed Infection,

-

13 - 17 1

Of the tertian cases three were from the Diocesan Girls' School, two from Lyeemun Barracks, tvo from Quarry Bay, four from Kowloon, and one each from Kennedy Town Police Station, Military Hospital and the Peak.

L 53

The malignant cases were from Lyeemun Barracks eight, Victoria Hospital two, and one each from Diocesan Girls' School, Military Hospital, Sai Kung Police Station, Quarry Bay, Mt. Gough Police Station, Military Quarters Kennedy Road, and Pokfulum Road.

The mixed infection case was from Quarry Bay. None of these were fatal.

Operations. The following were performed during the year:-

Pyonephrosis, Nasal polypus Circumcision,

Curetting,

Abscess,

-

-

Retained placenta,

1

Confinements.-There were 41 during the year as compared with 21 in 1910, all satisfactory.

L 54

Annexe F.

LUNATIC ASYLUM.

1

REPORT BY DR. W. V. M. KoсH, Medical Officer.

During the year there were 220 patients under treatment. 98 cases were brought in by the Police.

There were 45 paying patients (26 in 1010). The deaths num- bered 14, being 62% of the number under treatment (4·6% in 1910).

Table I.

Nationality and Sex of Patients treated in 1911.

Other

Europeans. Indians. Chinese. Nation-

M.

F. M.

F.

alities.

M. F. M. F.

Total.

Remaining at end of 1910,

10

5

1

2

Admitted,

19

6

**

220

:

10

3

3

19

2

26

120 38

7

194

Total number treated,

24

Co

6

1130 41 10 2

220

Discharged,

13

6 4

109 37 11

2

172

Died,

1

:

8 1

14

Remaining at end of 1911,

8

1 1

13 3

2

30

L 55

Table II.

Return of Diseases and Deaths in 1911.

Diseases.

Remaining in Hospital at end of 1910.

Yearly Total.

Remaining Total Cases in Hospital

Treated.

Ad- missions.

Deaths.

at end of 1911.

GENERAL DISEASES.

Alcoholism,

Fractured Pelvis,

LOCAL DISEASES.

Diseases of the Nervous Sys-

tem :-

SUB-SECTION II.

Functional

Nervous

orders:

Epilepsy,

SUB-SECTION III.

Mental Diseases :

Idiocy,

Mania,

Melancholia,

Dementia,

Delusional Insanity,.

Dis-

1

General Paralysis of the

Insane,

Under Observation,

Total, 1911...............

1910,....

>>

17

1

17

1

1

2

1

]

11

3

9

1

སཊྛསྶམ

1

59

25

22

213

31

12

៨២៨

70

13

28

4

8

13

1

2

1

2

1

:

48

48

:

28

26

194

14

220

30

26

169

9

195

26

L 56

Annexe G.

INFECTIOUS DISEASES HOSPITALS, KENNEDY TOWN.

REPORT BY DR. P. J. KELLY, Medical Officer in Charge.

Buildings. The hospital buildings have been well cared for during the year and necessary repairs have been promptly dealt with.

The new Sisters', Wardmasters' and Servants' Quarters are nearing completion and will be ready for occupation early next year.

The matshed erection in the hospital compound has been removed as it will no longer be required for Sisters' Quarters.

Sixteen cases were admitted to this hospital during the year. They were as follows:-

Small-pox--13

English 4, American 1, Japanese 1, Indian 3, Chinese 4).

Leprosy-1 (Chinese).

Chicken-pox-1 (Indian).

Cholera-1 (Norwegian). Under observation.

Two cases, one of Chicken-pox (English) and one of Leprosy (Indian), remained in hospital from the previous year, so that alto- gether eighteen cases were treated in this hospital during the

year.

There were no deaths.

2

The Tung Wa Small-pox Branch Hospital (Chinese). Buildings.-The hospital buildings have been maintained in a satisfactory state of repair.

Eighty-four cases were admitted during the year as follows :--

Small-pox,..

82

Observation for Small-pox, ... 2

One case remained under treatment from the previous year, so that total number of cases treated amounted to eighty-five.

Thirty-one cases terminated fatally.

!

-İ 57

Annexe H.

VICTORIA GAOL.

REPORT BY DR. P. J. KELLY, Medical Officer.

Buildings. The prison buildings and yards are well cared for and the general sanitary conditions are satisfactory.

Gaol Hospital. The total number of admissions during the year was 188 (187 in 1910).

The percentage of hospital admissions to the total admissions to the Gaol was 4.50 (3.8 in 1910).

The number of cases of Malaria treated in the Gaol Hospital for the past ten years is as follows:—

1902

1903

1904

1905

1906

63

1907

93

1908

-

59

1909

52

1910

22

1911

- 56

- 68

· 13

16

3

There were forty-two admissions grouped under the heading of Febricula. In these cases no Malaria parasite could be found and the fever was generally of a transient and mild character.

Seven cases of Dysentery were treated in hospital, with one death. In 1910 there were 26 admissions with two deaths.

Three cases of Typhoid Fever occurred, of which two recov- ered and one still remains under treatment.

The following were the admissions on account of other diseases:

30 with four deaths.

-

10

Debility Anæmia Tubercle -

Heart Disease

Digestive System

Organs of Locomotion -

Cellulitis

Lymphatic System

Respiratory System

Dementia -

8

4 with one death.

29

6

5

4

3 with one death from Pleurisy.

Syphiles

Hemiplegia

3

Epilepsy

-

Locomotor Ataxia

1

Urinary System

2

Skin Diseases-

2

7

Local Injuries

-

Strangulation (Asphyxia) 1 with one death (Suicide).

1

- L 58

No cases of Beri-beri occurred in the Gaol during the year. There were two admissions with one death in 1910.

The total number of prisoners treated in the out-patient depart- ment was 803. In 1910 the total number was 778.

The principal diseases treated were:-

Ringworm,

Other skin diseases,

Digestive disturbance, Local Injuries, Cellulitis,

Ear, -

Eye, Syphilis, Gonorrhoea,

153 152

- 70

115

34

27

24

54

18

Eleven prisoners were discharged on medical grounds (17 in 1910). Four discharges were on account of Leprosy, four on account of General Debility, one Phthisis, one Malaria and one Insanity.

There were eleven deaths in the Gaol during the year. Eight from natural causes, one suicide (strangulation) and two by hanging in execution of death sentences.

Vaccinations.-2,308 prisoners were vaccinated during the year of which 1,013 were successful, 397 unsuccessful, and 898 could not be examined owing to early discharges from Gaol.

Rate of Sickness and Mortality in Victoria Gaol.

Total Number of :-

Daily Average

Number of :-

Rate per cent. of :-

Prisoners admitted

to Gaol.

Admissions to Hospital.

Cases treated as

out-patients.

Deaths due to

Disease.

Prisoners in

Gaol.

Sick in

Hospital.

Hospital Out-patients.

Admissions to

Hospital to Total Admissions

to Gaol.

Daily Average Sick in Hospital to Daily Average of Prisoners.

Daily Average of All Sick in Gaol to

Daily Average of Prisoners,

Deaths due to Disease to Total Admissions.

to Gaol.

1910, 4,867 187 778 12 547 5.24 18-1

3.8

.95

4.26

0.2

1911, 4,178 188

803

9 1595 5.65 23:07

4.50

•95

4 82

0.22

Le

Note.-A large percentage of prisoners admitted to Gaol during my Medical Officership, I have observed, are debilitated subjects, most often the result of the opium habit or acquired Syphilis.

Out of 102 cases detained for observation, 5 were admitted to hospital,

22 treated as out-patients, and 75 were found to be malʼngering.

L 59

g

During the year I collected data regarding the prevalence of the opium habit among those admitted to Gaol. În all I took 1,030 admissions, out of which number 275 were admitted opium smokers, or shewed evidence of it. This gives a percentage of 26.70 for the period during which I made my observations, from July 25th to December 1st, 1911.

Of this total (275) the following were the causes of re- duction of Gaol labours :-

I.-Debility and poor physical

condition,

II.-Age, i.e., over 50,................................. 39

III.--Other causes not connectedl

55 cases

20.0 %

14.0 %

1.82%

with the opium habit,.... 5

یا

L 60

Annexe I. ·

KOWLOON AND THE NEW TERRITORIES.

REPORT BY DR. J. W. HARTLEY, Medical Officer.

4

Mr. P. D. R. Naidu has acted as General Medical Assistant throughout the year.

KOWLOON-CANTON RAILWAY.

The health of the Staff has been a great deal better than was anticipated. Although there were several cases of Malaria and Febricula the patients were almost invariably old "Fever Subjects" who became infected during "Construction" days, and no part of the Railway can now be considered as a focus of infection.

Accidents were very few and for the most part of the minor kind. None of them resulted in loss of life.

Six cases were sent to hospital for the following causes :--

Febricula, Tuberculosis, Injuries, Venereal,

1

2

2

1

6

The Fanling and Sha Tau Kok branch line was in course of construction during the year.

Labour for the most part was recruited from the neighbouring villages and consequently temporary coolie camps were not established.

Such diseases as Malaria, Dysentery and Beri-beri did not appear to any but the ordinary extent.

The line was visited regularly by the Dispensary Dresser from Taipo who attended to the ordinary cases of Ulcers, Fever and Minor Injuries.

The Medical Officer and Medical Assistant also frequently visited the line.

Only one serious accident occurred resulting in the fracture of both bones of the leg.

NEW TERRITORIES.

There was the usual epidemic of Small-pox at the beginning of the year but no other epidemic made its appearance.

i

:

L 61

There were 1,254 cases of sickness treated and 401 vaccina- tions performed. A considerable number of vaccinations were also performed in the Tsun Wan District but the figures are not available.

One European died of Malignant Malaria before he could be moved to hospital and two Chinese were invalided from the Government Service on account of Phthisis. Both these cases have since died.

A new Police Station was built and established at Tsun Wan. The men sent there suffered from Malarial Fever for a short time. Some sanitary improvements were then carried out and since then the Station has been a comparatively healthy one.

TAIPO DISPENSARY,

A Chinese dresser has been in residence during the year and in addition to visiting Sha Tau Kok and other places has attended to the following cases at the Dispensary under the supervision of the Medical Officer :-

Fever,

Syphilis,

69

1

Anæmia,

12

Bronchitis,

12

Diseases of the Skin,

57

""

""

Eye,

43

Injuries,...

36

230

In addition, 55 Vaccinations were performed at the Dispensary.

KOWLOON BRITISH SCHOOL.

This school was inspected every quarter.

The general health was, as a whole, excellent and the sanitary conditions always in good order.

It was not found necessary to close the school for medical reasons during the year.

Fifteen defective children were specially reported on for the following causes :

Adenoids and oral breathing, Defective teeth,

Conjunctivitis,

After effects of Malaria,.

General Weakness,.

3

3

3

1

5

15

}

L 62

Drawing attention to the defects of these children has had excellent results in all cases.

KOWLOON.

1,802 new and 1,601 old cases from Kowloon were dealt with and 2,430 prescriptions dispensed at the Kowloon Office,

136 Vaccinations were performed.

The following table shows the details of new

cases dealt

with:-

From Kenloon.

From New Territories.

Fever (including Malaria),.

279

364

Dengue Fever,...

1

Dysentery, Diarrhoea, etc.,

340

150

Measles,

2

Mumps,

6

Chicken-pox,

1

Beri-beri,

31

76

Venereal,

178

107

Rheumatism, etc.,

78

Diseases of the Circulatory System,..

180

25

">

11

""

>

Respiratory System...

Women (including par-

163

63

turitions),

""

the Skin,

"3

Eye,

18

106

133

56

20

Ulcers, Injuries.....

Opium Poisoning,.

Small-pox, Vaccinations.....

118

138

99

158

3

3

136

401

1,802

1,655

Total,

3,457

Total Old Cases,

1,601

5,058

L 63

The following table shows the details of cases sent to hospital from Kowloon and New Territories during the year:-

Admis- sions.

Deaths.

Injuries,

34

3

Venereal,

9

Diseases of the Respiratory System,

5

">

Eye,

"

܂

33

Circulatory System, Nervous System,

,

>>

Alimentary System,

1

5

Febricula,

Malaria,

Tuberculosis,

Skin Disease,

Dysentery,

Enteric Fever,

Ulcers,

Of the 8 cases of Malarial Fever :-

2 cases came from Sheung Shui.

NAN

4

"

2

1

Sha Tau Kok.

Tsun Wan.

**

4

82

5

*

L 64

Annexe J.

TUNG WA HOSPITAL.

REPORT BY DR. P. J. KELLY, Visiting Medical Officer.

Buildings and Equipment.-The hospital buildings during the year have been well maintained and there has been some consider- able improvement in equipment.

The new hospital extension (four wards) were opened in May. They contain sixty-five beds which brings the total number of beds in this hospital up to 326.

In this new block four wards were set aside for the treatment of Plague, Typhoid Fever and other infectious diseases excluding Small-pox and Leprosy.

During the year (in July) the Refuge attached to this hospital was opened. It will accommodate about sixty destitutes.

As regards equipment, there has been some very satisfactory progress. Owing to the sympathy and generosity of this year': Directors, we have been enabled to so improve the Operating Theatre that it compares very favourably with any in this Colony. For the wooden floor, tiles have been substituted, and a new aseptic operating table, instrument cupboard, and instruments have been procured from England.

Several new text and reference books have been added to the hospital library.

Finally, a trained Chinese female nurse was attached to the establishment in February with very satisfactory results.

Staf-House Surgeon Dr. To Ying Kwan, one Dispenser, one Chemical Clerk, a senior student of the Hongkong College of Medicine, and one trained female nurse.

Statistics. The hospital with its new additions has been able to cope with all requirements for accommodation.

The total number of admissions to hospital numbered 3,897 as against 4,255 in 1910.

There were 248 patients under treatment remaining over from 1910, so that the total number of cases treated during the year was 4,145. Of this total (4,145), 3,775 were discharged, 1,211 died in hospital, and 159 were in hospital under treatment at the close of

the year.

Of the 3,897 cases 89 were transferred elsewhere for treatment as follows:-

Government Civil Hospital,

531

Infectious Diseases Hospital (Small-pox),.............. 36 }}

*g

}

L 65

Two hundred and twenty cases were admitted in a moribund condition and died shortly after admission and if this number is deducted from the total of admissions there remains a balance of 3,677 who were able to take their choice of treatment. The num- ber of patients under Western (European) and Chinese methods of treatment were as follows :•-

Western, Chinese,

1,158 2,519

Total 3.677

This gives a percentage of 314 Western treatment and 68-6 Chinese. In 1910 the percentage on each of the treatments was

50.

I attribute this falling off of cases under Western treatment to a stricter definition of what constitutes Western treatment. For instance those who are found to be taking mixed treatment are classified as Chinese.

The total number of visits to the out-patient department was 109,790 (111,749 in 1910).

Of this number 97,618 selected Chinese treatment and 12,142 Western.

Vaccinations.--There were 813 Vaccinations during the year at the hospital or in connection with it (1,581 in 1910).

Four thousand three hundred and three (4,303) destitutes (4,295 males and 8 females) were sheltered till they could be sent to their native villages or otherwise provided for.

Of this total 4,243 were sent in by the Registrar General.

One thousand three hundred and ninety-eight (1,398) bodies were brought to the hospital mortuary for burial (1,176 in 1910).

Where the history, as regards cause of death, was not satisfac- tory the bodies were transferred to the Public Mortuary for Post Mortem examination. The total number sent amounted to 304 (148 in 1910).

Free burials were provided by the hospital to 3,483 poor per- sons (3,628 in 1910):

Beri-beri.-Four hundred and eighty-one (481) admissions were on account of beri-b-ri, and 119 terminated fatally-the death rate per cent. being 247. In 1910 the admissions for the same disease numbered 719 with 256 deaths, the death rate per cent. being 35.

Malaria.-Two hundred and eighty-nine (289) cases of Malaria were admitted with 108 deaths, i.e., 37.3

This high mortality percentage I attribute to the advanced stage in which cases are admitted. For instance 25 out of the

=

L 66

total of 108 deaths were admitted in a moribund condition and died shortly after admission.

The Malaria admissions are classified as follows:--

Malignant Malaria,

Benign

Malarial Cachexia,

Quartan Malaria,

227

34

26

2

The Directors. I have to thank the Chairman and Directors through whose sympathy and generosity we have been enabled to effect some considerable improvements in hospital equipment. during the year and my association with them has been marked by courtesy and consideration throughout.

Operations. The following general operations were performed during the course of the year :-

Amputation of finger,

toe,

Aneurism-Ligature of Fe-

1

2

3

breast,

moral Artery,

Fistula in Ano,..

Circumcision,

2

Tumours of Uterus.

2

Curetting of

1

"

Necrosis of jaw,

Removal of sequestra.

Carcinoma of eye,.

1

Harelip,.

1

23

The total number of general operations performed in 1910 was 11.

Eye Department.-The eye department of this hospital as in previous years, has been under the care of Dr Harston."

The following were the operations performed :—

Cataract...... 7

Entropion 14 Total 48 (17 in 1910).

Iridectomy... 21

Pterygium... 6

The number of patients who attended the out-patient depart- ment was 683 (523 in 1910).

The following Tables are appended :-

I.

Return of Diseases and Deaths.

II.-Proportion of cases treated by European and Chinese

methods respectively.

III-Vaccinations.

IV.-General Statistics and Operations.

L 67

Table I.

Diseases and Deaths in 1911 at the Tung Wa Hospital.

Remain-

DISEASES,

ing in Hospital

Yearly Total.

Remain-

Total

Cases

at emig

Admiss

Deaths. Treated,

ing in Hospital at end of

1910.

sions.

1911.

GENERAL DISEASES,

Small-pox,

Measles,

Diphtheria,

Febricula,....

29

99*

17

17

4

227

31

241

4

Enteric Fever,

1

20

21

Cholera,

Dysentery,

Plague,

3

3

3

142

61

Malarial Fever :-

1. Quartan,

2. Simple Tertian, 3. Malignant,

Malarial Cachexia, Beri-beri,

16

362

ེར། ལཎྜསྶམཤྩ

144

2

82

97

2

34

15

52

227

91

234

5

26

2

28

1

119

409

17

Erysipelas,

Pyæmia,

Septicæmia,

Tetanus,

6

8

1

1

10

10

10

7

5

8

1

Tubercle,

Leprosy :-

(a) Tubercular, (b) Anæsthetic,

Syphilis:-

486

265

488

14

::

10

1

10

x

8

(a) Primary,

10

10

(b) Secondary,

8

18

26

(c) Tertiary,

108

21

108

8

(d) Inherited,

6

1

7

Gonorrhoea,

9

9

Relapsing Fever,

3

Mumps,..

Varicella,

I

3

Puerperal Fever,

2

2

Rheumatism,

82

15

90

11

New Growth, Non-malignant,

1

9

New Growth, Malignant,

27

14

27

Anæmia,

I

95

25

96

3

Debility,

134

63

138

Carried forward,,

112

2,223

842

2,335

76

* These cases were brought to this hospital and transferred to the Small-pox Hospital at Kennedy Town.

L 68

Table 1,-(Continued).

Diseases and Deaths in 1911 at the Tung Wa Hospital.

Remain-

Remain-

DISEASES.

ing in Hospital

Yearly Total.

Total

ing in

Cases

Hospital

at end of A 'mis-

Deaths.

Treated, at end of

1910.

S ODS.

1911.

Brought forward........

112

2,223

842

2,335

76

§ LOCAL DISEASES.

Diseases of the Nervons System :-

SUB-SECTION 1.

Diseases of the Norves:

Neuritis,

Meningitis,

Myelitis,

Congestion of Brain,

SCB-SECTION 2.

Functional Nervous Disorders :-

Apoplexy,

Paralysis,

Epilepsy,

Neuralgin,

SUB-SECTION 3.

Mental Diseases:

1

1

28

33

3

:

20

18

6

36

10

13

KON

20

42

2

14

4

++

6

:::

Mania,

Dementia,

Delusional Insanity,

Diseases of the Eye.

9

106

15 2010 200

8

5

ထာ

8

115

10

Ear,

I

1

"

"

་་

Nose,

1

1

94

Circulatory System,

10

88

46

५५

Respiratory

39

236

117

295

3

Digestive

10

305

69

315

13

""

Lymphatic

2

32

34

Urinary

1

80

84

6

Male Organs..

25

26

Female Organs,.

17

17

""

Organs of Locomotion,

159

165

15

"

Cellular Tissue,.

12

77

89

3

Skin,

12

26

Injuries, General,..

Local,

Surgical Operations,

Malformations,.....

Poisons,

31

54

252

6

268

21

47

1

2

6

Parasites,

1

CV:

2

6

1

Parturitions,.

62

1

63

2

Total,

248

3,897

1,211

4,145

139

L 69

Table II.

Showing the Admissions and Mortality in the Tung Wa Hospital during the year 1911, with the proportion of cases treated by European and Chinese methods respectively.

DISEASES.

European

ADMISSIONS.

Treatment.

Chinese

Treatment.

Total.

European

DEATHS.

Small-pox, Measles,

14

15

29

10

7

17

21

2

2

Diphtheria,

3

1

4

Fel-ricula,

43

184

227

Enteric Fever,

16

20

10 01

26

31

6

8

Choler,

3

3

3

3

Dysentery,

34

108

142

13

48

61

Plague,

15

82

97

10

72

82

Malaria

(a) Tertian Benign,

9

25

34

12

(b)

""

Malignant,

41

186

227

74

(c) Quartan.

1

1

2

Malarial Cachexia,

6

20

26

Beri-beri,......

ΤΟ

292

362

13

Erysipelas,

6

:མྦྷ .

26:

91

2

106

119

· Pyæmia,

Septicemia,

1

1

4

10

6

10

(a) Tubercular,

Tetanus,

Tubercle,.

Leprosy :--

(b) Anesthetic,

Gonorrhoea,.

Rheumatism,

Anæmia,

30

65

Debility,

27

107

134

Mumps,

1

Varicella,....

2

Puerperal

Fever,

2

Relapsing Fever,

3

Syphilis :-

(a) Primary,

6

4

10

:

(b) Secondary,

16

2

18

(c) Tertiary,

58

50 108

2

2

12

21

(d) Congenital,

1

:

1

:

New Growths :-

(a) Malignant,

17

10

27

5

9

14

(6) Non Malignant...

8

Carried forward,...

1

580 1,648 2,223 166 676

842

4

7

3

5

104

382 486

52

213

265

1

7585

ོ ཨ ་ཨྠ to c༠ ༠v

1

1

9

15

17

25

51

63

1

2.

2

1

L70

Table II,-(Continued).

Showing the Admissions and Mortality in the Tung Wa Hospital during the year 1911, with the proportion of cases treated by European and Chinese methods respectively.

DISEASES.

ADMISSIONS.

DEATHS.

Brought forward,..

580 1,643 2,223

166

676

842

Neuritis,

1

41

1

1

Myelitis,

5

::

3

3

Meningitis,

8

24

Co

8

20

28

Congestion of Brain,

4

:

...

Apoplexy,

18

20

Paralysis,

15

21

36

Epilepsy,

6

7

13

231

16

18 10

2

ลง

Neuralgia,

Mania,

Dementia,

සාය

3

4

3

3

Delusional Insanity,

2

10:00 10

::

...

1

Diseases of the :-

Eye,

101

10

5

106

>

Ear,

1

Nose,

1

4

Circulatory System,

20

68

88

77

39

46

Respiratory System,

51

205

256

14

103

117

Digestive System,

91

214 305

21

48

69

Lymphatic System,

14

18

32

2

5

7

Urinary System,...

35

45

80

13

19

32

Generative Male Organs,

12

13

25

1

Female Organs,

12

5

17

Orgaes of Locomotion,

47

112

159

Cellular Tissue,

27

50

77

222

2

64

6

4

6

Skin,

S

4

12

Injuries, General,

25

29

54

3.

5

Local,

64

188

252

6

Surgical Operations,

47

47

Malformations,

1

1

2

1

1

Poisons,

4

N

2

6

Parturition, ......

62

62

2-

2

1

Parasites,..

1

1

...

Total,..

1,248 2,696 3,944

250

961

1,211

Less moribund cases,

43

177

220

43 177

220

Less transferred elsewhere,

52

37

89

Net Total,........

1,106 2,482 3,588

207

784

991

A

L 71

Table III.

Vaccinations at the Tung Wa Hospital and Branches.

Victoria,

Stanley,

Yaumati,

Sham Shui Po,

Shaukiwan,

Aberdeen,.

734

14

13

6

11

35

813

Table IV.

General Statistics.

Males.

Females. Total.

Remaining in Hospital on 1st Jan., 1911,

248

Admissions,

3,059

838

8,897

Discharged,

1,987

45]

2,438

Deaths,

880

331

1,211

Under treatment on 1st Jan., 1912,

125

34

159

G.C.H.

T.W.S.H.

Cases sent elsewhere,

62

27

89

Males.

Females.

Moribund Cases,

131

89

220

Net total,

2,866

722

3,588

Brought in dead,..

893

505

1,398

In-patient. Brought in.

Sent to Public Mortuary,.

Free burial,

52

252

304

3,483

Out-patients-

Natives..

Foreign,

Males. Females.

58,529 39,119

97,648

6,951 5,191

12,142

Destitutes sent in by Registrar General,

4,236

4,243

59

60

from elsewhere,..

""

"

""

General Operations.

"

Amputation of Finger,

Toe,. Breast...

Tumours of Uterus,

Popliteal Aneurism-Ligature

of Femoral Artery,......... 1

4232

Necrosis of Jaw,..

2

2

Curetting Uterus, Fistula in Ano,

1

4

Carcinoma of Eye,.

1

Harelip,

1

Circumcision,

2

Eye Operations.

Cataract,

Entropion,.

14

Total,...... 48

Iridectomy,

21

Pterygium,

-

L 72

By

Annexe K.

ALICE MEMORIAL AND AFFILIATED HOSPITALS.

1911 AND 1910.

Total in-patients treated.

Deaths.

1911.

1910.

1911. 1910.

Alice Memorial Hospital,

133

116

1

...

Ho Miu Ling Hospital,

357

342

15

9

Nethersole Hospital,

564

502

57

34

Alice Memorial Maternity

345

300

11

13

Hospital,....

11

Total, 1,399

1,260

83

57

İ 73

T

Annexe L.

BACTERIOLOGICAL INSTITUTE.

REPORT BY DR. H. MACFARLANE, Bacteriologist.

THE PREPARATION OF CALF LYMPH.

Twenty-four calves (18 in 1910) have been vaccinated during the year. With the exception of one buffalo calf which died of Rinderpest, all the calves took apparently well and were sub- sequently slaughtered and declared healthy by the Colonial Veterinary Surgeon.

The lymph derived from these calves has been stored in the cold store (about 16° F.) and so far has not been required as all vaccinations done this year have been made with lymph prepared during 1910.

The method of cold storage recommended by Dr. Blaxall and Mr. Fremlin of the Local Government Board, England (see Report for 1910 p. 62) has been continued and has proved very satisfactory and economical.

A stock of lymph sufficient, presuming it to be all potent, for some thirty to forty thousand persons is now in the store.

Nine thousand eight hundred and two (9,802) tubes of lymph have been issued during the year compared with 7,997 in the year 1910.

A more satisfactory number of reports on the results of the free issues of lymph have been received this year, the total reports amounting to 7,880 compared with 1,092 in 1910. Table I sum- marises the chief points of these reports.

EXAMINATION OF RATS.

Tables II and III are compiled as in previous years. The total number of rats examined during 1911 was 65,927 compared with 56,001 during the year 1910.

BACTERIOLOGICAL EXAMINATION OF WATER.

Seventy-one samples of water have been examined during the year compared with 86 in 1910.

The majority of these samples were taken from the Public Water Supplies and the method of taking and working out of the samples was similar to that described in the 1910 Report. Samples

:

L 74

from the Public Water Supplies-Pokfulum, Tytam and Kowloon- are now examined quarterly instead of once a month.

These samples from each source are taken on alternate days during a week, the total number of samples examined is therefore the same as when the system was monthly examination, but it is considered that the new system gives a fairer test of the quality of the water.

MATERIALS SENT FOR EXAMINATION.

These amounted to 609 compared with 405 in 1910 and 120 in 1909. The following Table gives briefly the nature of the examination made:- ་

New Growths,-Examination by section, Wiidal Reaction for Bacillus Typhosus,.

**

,,

22

Examination by culture for Bacillus Diphtheriæ,

>>

""

>>

33

"

17

""

Bacillus Dysenteriæ, Gonococcus,

Malignant Pustule, Streptococci,

Microscopical examination for Tubercle Bacilli, Animal Inoculation for Tubercle Bacilli,..

Microscopical examination for Relapsing Fever,

">

"

**

,

Animal Inoculation for Piroplama Canis,

Examination for Worms,..

37 222

Paratyphoid B., Dysenteriæ,

51

2

78

Vibro Cholera,

8

5

6

1

....

1

10

3

3

Malaria,

80

Cells,

9

Piroplama Canis,

1

1

1

""

of Pus for Organisms,

Urine for Casts,..

for Entamoeba,

""

D

of Clothes for Spermatozoa,

Wasserman's Reaction for Syphilis,

Preparation of Autogenous Vaccines,

5

1

4

2

of Smears for Treponema pallida,..................

Rideal Walker Estimation of Disinfectants,

Cultural Examination of Urine for Organisms,.. Breeding out and generic determination of

Dipterous Larvæ,

Miscellaneous,

12

18

12

?

28620

8

16

609

www

L 75

Table I.

Reports on Free Issues of Lymph.

Chinese

Govern-

Prison

Public Dispen-

ment Miscel-

Depart-

Total.

Civil laneous.*

ment.

saries.

Hospital.

Total tubes issued,...

3,020

2,265

701

2,732 8,718

Total cases reported,

3,154

2,154

654

1,918 7,880

Primary cases-

-total,

2,583

26

164

1,243

4,016

Successful,

2,081

7

145

817

3,050

Not successful,..

13

6

19

16

54

Not inspected,...

489

13

410

912

% of cases successful.

99.3 %

53.8 %

88.4 %

98%

98.2%

Secondaries-total,...

446

2,088

490

462

3,486

Successful, ......

195

886

181

222

1,484

Not successful,

154

331

309

107

901

Not inspected,...

97

871

133

1,101

% of cases successful, 558 %

72.8%

37·1%

67.4%

62.2 %

Miscellaneous Multi-

ple Re-vaccination,

125

40

213

378

Out of 4,016 primary vaccinations, 912 were reported as not inspected to sec if the vaccination had been successful or not. When the great importance of primary vaccination is considered, this seems to be an unduly large number. Of the 3,094 primary cases inspected, a case success of 98.2 %

is satisfactory. The term "Secondary" has unfortunately been used to include all re-vaccina- tions whether they are secondary, tertiary or more. The results given undoubtedly underestimate the strength of the lymph and an effort will be made to have these cases sorted out into their proper classes next

year.

* Miscellaneous includes Hospitals other than the Governmen! Civil Hospital,

The Sanitary Department, Public Vaccinator New Territories, etc.

J

L 76

Table II.

Month.

Total.

Males. Females.

January,

4,097

2,047 2,050

2

177

627

191

February,

4,372

2,177

2,195

9

203

718

208

March...

6,795

3,376

3.419

5

2*2

979

394

April,..

5,512 2,748

2,761 10

234

758

485

May,

6,717 3.344

3,873 33

302

962

690

June,

5,417

2,703

2,714 98

252 1,041

593

July,

5,851

2.915

2,936

89

289|1,119

717

August,

5,514

2,7.6 |

2,768

23

264 967

573

September,

5,348

2.690

2,658

250

908 !

415

October,

5,500

2.746

2,754

272

809

672

November,

6,271

1

2,628 2.646

274

651 504

December,

5,529

2,757 2.772

302

454

485

Total,.....

65,926

32,877 33,049 269

3,1019,993 | 5,827

Table III.

January to

December

Males Examined.

inclusive.

Males Ratio Plague per infected. 1,000.

Females Ratio

Females Examined.

Plague infected. 1,000.

per

M. Decumanus,

15,102

84 5.5

15,203

93

M. Rattus,

10,267

37

3.6

10,220

83 18

6.1

55

5.3

M. Musculus, ...

7,508

7,627

|

I 77

Annexe M.

PUBLIC MORTUARY, VICTORIA,

REPORT BY DR. H. MACFARLANE, Bacteriologist.

Report on Post Mortems.

Male bodies examined,

Female bodies examined,

Sex undetermined,

Total,

1911.

1910.

...

1,065

972

...

1,045

1,017

1

4

2,114

1,993

Claimed bodies sent from Hospital and

other places,

1,723

1,730

Unclaimed bodies mostly abandoned,

391

263

Total,......

2,114

1,993

Epitome of Causes of Death.

I.-General Diseases, ...

1911.

1910.

984

767

II.- Local Diseases:

(a) Of the Nervous System, ...

3

13

(b)

Circulatory System,

49

42

(c)

བྷ་

Respiratory System,

666

759

(d)

""

Digestive System,

178

168

(e) (f)

Genito-Urinary System,

11

Other Systems,

3

III.

Death from Violence,

68

64

IV. ---Decomposed bodies,

158

166

Total,

2.114

1,993

General Diseases.

-- L 78

(b.) Of the Circulatory System,--Contd.

Small-pox,

1911. 1910. . 108

1911. 1910.

11

Brought forward,

19

22

Plague,

88

5

Valvular Discàse of

Cholera,

3

5

Heart,

30

19

Beri-beri,

14

13

Acute Endocarditis,

1

Malaria,

54

98

Septicæmia,

3

10

Total, ...

49

42

Diphtheria,

Typhoid,

9

10

General Tuberculosis,

101

130

(c.) Of the Respiratory System :·

Prematurity,

105

106

1911.

1910

Marasmic condition,

415

285

Broncho-Pneumonia

Syphilis,

3

and Bronchitis,

471

522

Still Born,

43

22

Pleurisy,

3

22

Tetanus,

23

:

Pulmonary Tuber-

Atelectasis

Leprosy,

Congenital Syphilis,

1

culosis,

95

1

Empyema,

20

27

Pneumonia,

18+

70

19

20

71

119

Senile Debility,

Icterus Neonatorum,

Sapræmia,

Other Diseases (Skeleton

and Fætus),

Total,

Abscess of Lung.

2

7

4

3

984

767

Pulmonary Hæmorrh-

age,

Pulmonary Infection,.. Emphysema,

Total,

1

1

666

759

Local Diseases.

(a.) Of the Nervous System :

(d.) Of the Digestive System

1911. 1910.

Tabes Mesenterica,

48

18

1911. 1910.

Peritonitis,

5

8

Meningitis,

Hydrocephalus,

Abscess of Brain,

9

Gastro-Enteritis,

25

62

1

Abscess of Liver,

2

3

1

Diarrhoea,

72

18

Concussion of Brain,

Cerebral Hæmorrhage,

O

Dysentery,

19

16

3

Intussusception,

1

Internal Strangulated

Total,

3

13

Hernia,

3

2

Cirrhosis of Liver.

1

Ankylostomiasis,

1

(b.) Of the Circulatory System :----

Cancer of Stomach,

1

Cholecystitis,

1

1911. 1910.

Acute Internal

Pericarditis,

9

8

Obstruction,

1

3

Aortic Aneurism,

10

Appendicitis,

1

Fatty Degeneration of

Cancer of Liver,

1

Heart,

1

4

Tubercle of Intestine,... 1

Hæmopericardium,

1

Total,

178

168

Carried forward,

19

22

L 79

(e.) Of the Genito-Urinary System:-

(b.) Local:-

1911. 1910.

1911. 1910.

Acute Nephritis,

Chronic Nephritis, Retention of Urine

(Stricture),

Post Partum Haemor-

5

5

L

3

Ruptured Spleen,

5

9

Fractured Skull.

10

11

Cut l'hroat,

3

1

rhage,

Tumour of Kidney,

Abscess of Kidney,

1

Rupture of Extra Uterine

---Pregnancy,

Total,

1

11

Heart and Lung,

a vented p

(1.) Of Other Systems:--

Acute Osteomyelitis,

Cancrum Oris,

1911. 1910.

1

2

Total,

Perforating Wound of

Rupture of Uterus,

Rupture of Stomach,... Wound of Abdomen

and Internal Hæmorrhage,

Hæmorrhage

1

from

2

1

wound of Neck,

Hæmorrhage from Stab

Wound,

Asphyxia from Ligature

of Neck,

Bullet Wounds,

Rupture of Heart and Fracture of Liver, ...

Hæmorrhage on to

Brain,

1

1

1

23

Total.

1

26

27

Injuries (Death from Violence):-

(a.) General:----

Nationality of Bodies.

1911. 1910.

1911. 1910.

Asphyxiation, ..

26

Opium Poisoning,

3

Multiple Injuries,

9

224

Chinese,

...2,095 1,987

Indian,

3

Drowning,

13

European,

1

Strangulation,

2

Fish Poisoning,

WN

2

Portuguese,

5

1

3

English,

CO. Poisoning.

Cocaine poisoning, Charrei,

∞ Hd por

1

Scotch,

2

1

British.

1

American,

1

Sandwich Islander,

1

Total,

42 37

Total, ...

..2,114 1,993

L 80

Total Plague bodies,

88

13 unclaimed.

75 claimed.

Total Small-pox bodies,..

108

76 unclaimed.

32 claimed.

Number of bodies sent to Mortuary (Victoria) during 1911.

Victoria.

Chinese,...2,095 2,015

Harbour.

Old Kowloon.

New Kowloon.

16

1

3

Portuguese,

5

:

Scotch,

1

English,

5

European,

1

Indian,

3

2

British,

1

1

American,

1

I

Sandwich Islander,.

1

:..

:

:

:

:

:

:

Total,

2,114 | 2,028

22

4

38

17

Shaukiwan.

א:

Other Villages.

17

}

1

L 81

Annexe N.

PUBLIC MORTUARY, KOWLOON.

REPORT BY DR. W. W. PEARSe, Medical Officer in Charge.

The total number of Post Mortem Examinations made during the year was 960 as compared with $36 during 1910.

The nationalities of the bodies were as follows:--Chinese 957, Indian 2, European 1. The causes of death may be classified as follows:

1911.

1910.

General Diseases,

429

338

Diseases of Circulatory System,

32

7

""

Digestive

49

94

Respiratory

370

336

(local),

Injuries (general),

Diseases of Urinary System.

43

24

17

28

3

,་

Hæmopoetic System,

יי

Reproductive System,

Developmental Diseases,

Diseases of Nervous System,

Organs of Locomotion. ..

2

1

I

959

836

General Diseascs.

L 82

Digestive System,---Cont.

1911. 1910.

1911. 1910.

Measles.

1

Brought forward.

7

8

Plague,

3

Peritonitis,

5

Small-pox,

64

1

Septic Peritonitis,

1

11

Enteric Fever,

1

1

Tubercular Peritonitis,

1

Diphtheria,

7

1

Tabes Mesenterica,

3

Puerperal Fever,

2

Intestinal Obstruction,

1

Septicemia,

1

3

Beri-beri,

25

19

Acute Yellow Atrophy

of Liver,

Dysentery,

8

7 Gastro-Enteritis.

Malaria,

12

35

Cancer of Liver,

Syphilis,

Ulcer of Stomach,

1

Tescœmia,

Biliary Cirrhosis,

Pyæmia,

1

Diarrhea,

10

General Tuberculosis,

14

12

Choleraic Diarrhoea,

Marasmus,

111

58

Enteritis,

19

21

Prematurity,

18 Strangulated Hernia,

1

Still-birth,

Senile Decay,

Debility at birth,

Inanition,

NO

Wall.

Parotid Abscess,

2

39 Abscess of Abdominal

Abdominal Tumour,

1

Decomposed bodies,..

10.5

105

Total.....

19 94

429 338

Local Diseases.

Respiratory System :

Circulatory System :--

1911. 1910.

Pericarditis,

1

1911. 1910.

Septic Pericarditis,

3 Lobar Pneumonia,

63

47

Myocarditis,

1

Broncho Pneumonia,

124

102

Valvular Disease of Heart,

Septic Pneumonia,

3

Aortic Aneurysm,

4

Pulmonary Tuberculosis,

52

21

Anæmia,

17

Emprema,

11

10

Heart,

Fatty Degeneration of

Intra-Pericardial Hæmor-

Emphysema,

3

1

Pleurisy,

17

20

Pulmonary Hæmorrhage,

1

rhage,

1

Capillary Bronchitis,

1

10

Atelectasis,

25

31

Total,.....

32

7

Bronchitis,

69 81

Bronchiectasis,

ලය

1

Digestive System: --

Gangrene of Lung,

1911. 1910.

Abscess of Lung,

Hepatitis,

3

Icterus Neonatorum,

Tubercular Pneumonia,

4 Tubercular Abscess of Lung,

1

Cirrhosis of Liver,

370

336

Carried forward,......

7

General:-

Drowning,

Injuries.

Multiple Injuries,

Asphyxia,

Syncope,

Burns,

Strangulation,

Scalding,

Local:

Fracture of Skull,

Concussion of Brain.

Intercranial Hæmorrhage. Rupture of Spleen, ... Hæmorrhage from Wound Hanging,

Abdominal Hæmorrhage, Pulmonary Hæmorrhage, Rupture of Stomach,

Rupture of Liver, Cut Throat,

Strangulation,

Gunshot Wound.

Urinary System.

Acute Nephritis, Chronic Nephritis,

:

-

L 83

Hæmopatic System.

1911. 1910.

Splenic Anæmia,

1911. 1910.

Lymphatic Leukemia,

27

14

H

1

1

1

1

Reproductive System.

1911. 1910.

Post-partum Hæmorrhage, ..

1

13

24 Uterine Hæmorrhage.

Child-birth,...

3 11

}

Developmental Diseases.

Diaphragmatic Hernia,

5 Congenital Malformation of

Heart,

1900

Nervous System.

Hydrocephalus,

Convulsions,...

17

28

2

1911. 1910.

1

1

1

1

1911. 1910.

1

7

1

Diseases of Organs of Locomotion.

1911. 1910.

2

3

Gangrene of Foot,

Tubercular Arthritis,

6

3

1911. 1910.

1

2

L 84

Annexe 0.

ANALYST'S DEPARTMENT.

REPORT BY FRANK BROWNE, F.I.C., Government Analyst. The number of analyses performed was 5 566 (5,828 in 1910). The following classification shows the nature of the work done :-

I.-Chemico-legal.

VIL-Pharmacy Ordinance.

1911. 1910.

Toxicological (including 16

Medicines for Poisons.

1911, 1910.

4

0

stomachs),..

14

41

Articles for stains,

7

26

Articles for fire enquiries,

TO.

VIII-Mineralogical, &c.

Coins,

IL-Potable Waters.

Metals,

Ores,

Public Supplies,

Wells, &c.,

36

42

Cash,

6

71

54

26

17

0

10

16

25

III.-Dangerous Goods Ordinance.

IX. Liquors Ordinance.

European Liquer,

Petroleum Oil,

91

Liquid Fuel,

Benzene,

Petrol,

Substances for Explosives,...

Ships for inflammable vapour,

པ ོ ོ ོ ོ

68

Chinese Liquor, .

19

46

Denatured Spirits,

3

46

5,020 5.091

2 106

0

12

X.-Miscel aneous,

15

0

Aerated Waters,...

1 11

Coal Tar Disinfectants,

10

TV.--Food and Drugs Ordinance.

Condensed Milk,

6

Public Gas Supply,

0

Brandy,

Milk,

Whisky,

Port Wine,

Beer,

Stont,

Rum.

Laid,

11

Soy,

3

52

41

Wood Oil,

3

11

24

Guane,

0

1

0

Rice.

10

33

14

Betus.

2

Petroleum Products,

Bank Notes.

Leather.

Liusoe 1 Dil,

V.-Building Materials.

Urine.

Ammonium Sulphate,

Concrete, Paint,

Neads,

4

0

Wire.

0

3

Cintment,

VI.—Opium] Ordinave,

Substances,

Opium Pills,

Rat i' ste,

Acid, Indian Spirit, Deposit, Codi-b, Seaweed, Eraser,

Oil, Peas, Wool, (one each),

37 10

Other Substances,

4

19

COCONN N

ao

1

5,566 5,828

F^20000 to 11 1NONODO

3

6

6

3

6

L 85

TOXICOLOGICAL.

2. Among the chemico-legal investigations conducted were 16 cases of suspected human poisoning. Opium was present in six enquiries, cocaine in one, and Japanese Star Anise in another. In this last a woman drank a decoction of about 30 fruits, which caused her death.

WATERS.

3. The results of the analyses of samples taken each month from the Pokfulum, Tytam and Kowloon Reservoirs, indicate that these supplies continue to maintain their excellent qualities. The average quantity of oxygen absorbed from permanganate was '012, '008, and 006 grain per gallon for Pokfulum, Tytam, and Kow- loon water, respectively. This very low figure shows how small in amount is the soluble organic matter, and consequently of any pre- vious sewage contamination. There are very few, even waters of the highest class, that absorb as little oxygen as these waters.

DANGEROUS GOODS ORDINANCE.

4. Of petroleum oil and liquid fuel 110 samples were tested during the year. The Clowes-Redwood apparatus for detecting in- flammable air has been used on 15 ships.

FOOD AND DRUGS ORDINANCE.

5. The following Table gives the results of 43 analyses made at the instance of the Police and the Sanitary Department :-

Description.

No. of Samples.

No. found Genuine.

No. found Adulterated.

Beer,

6

Brandy,

6

4

Gin,...

3

3

Milk,

21

20

Port Wine,

1

1

Rum,

2

2

Whisky,

4

ONCH☺☺☺

0

2

0

0

0

Many other samples were examined for the public, mostly at the low fee prescribed by the Ordinance.

MINERALOGICAL.

6. Coincidently with the recent rise in the value of tin, a much larger amount of the refined metal was shipped than in recent years. The ores and minerals sent in were of a varied kind and required valuation for the content of tin, antimony, asbestos, mercury, salt, manganese, lead, graphite, sulphur, gold, and silver, respectively.

L 86

LIQUORS ORDinance.

7. The figures given include only those samples tested in the Government Laboratory; the results of very many examinations, made by the First Assistant Analyst at the various godowns, etc., are not taken into account. The standards for Brandy, Whisky, and Rum, as fixed by the Government in 1910, have proved workable.

MISCELLANEOUS.

8. Gas Examinations.--These were discontinued as the amount of carbon monoxide was no longer restricted.

EXAMINATIONS FOR THE PUBLIC.

9. The public continue to take advantage of the Laboratory and have forwarded a great variety of samples for examination on pay- The fees paid into the Treasury during the year amounted to $4,565 as against $3,435 in 1910.

ment.

SPECIAL REPORTS.

10. Special reports have been supplied on :--Condensed Milk, Dissolved Acetylene, Compressed Oxygen, Milk Standards, Opium Ordinance, and Conditions of Licence.

11. The value of the year's work as determined from the tariff of fees (Government Notifications No. 285 of 1907, and No. 360 of 1910) is $13,793 ($12,946 in 1910). The amount does not include anything for the special reports mentioned above, there is much other work for which nothing has been set down, and all samples examined under the Liquors Ordinance have been calculated at the merely nominal rate of $1 each.

LIBRARY.

12. Several standard works of reference have been added.

STAFF.

13. Mr. A. C. Franklin, F.I.C., First Assistant Analyst, acted as Government Analyst till my return from leave on October 26.

L 97

Annexe P.

HEALTH OFFICE OF THE PORT.

REPORT BY DR. G. P. JORDAN, Health Officer of the Port.

During the year the work of the Department was carried on by Dr. Jordan, Dr. Keyt, Dr. Forsyth and Dr. Gröne.

Dr Gröne returned to the Colony after a year's leave of absence on September 25th and resumed duty the following day.

The work of this Department may be described under three separate headings, viz. :—

(a.) The Daily Inspection of Shipping on Arrival. (b) The Inspection of Emigrants.

(c.) Quarantine Duty.

(a.)-THE DAILY INSPECTION OF SHIPPING ON ARRIVAL.

This duty consists in regularly boarding all ships as they arrive in port between the hours of 6 a.m. and 6 p.m.

According to the Quarantine Rules and Regulations under Section 23 of Ordinance 10 of 1899, all "Infected" and "Suspected" ships, from ports which are declared to be inferted, are not allowed to enter the port after 6 p.m. but are permitted to come into the Quarantine Anchorage the following morning at 6 o'clock, and their crews and passengers are then inspected. "Healthy" ships, however, are exempted from these restrictions provided they have a duly qualified surgeon on the ship's articles.

During the year there were 4,042 arrivals in port, of which 1,952 were British, and 2,090 Foreign ships, these figures do not include the river steamers from Macao, Canton and West River ports, which are only dealt with when cases of an epidemic nature are reported to us.

(b.)-INSPECTION OF EMIGRANTS.

During the year there has been a marked increase in Emigra- tion as compared with last year's figures, being 136,895 in 1911, and 111,371 in 1910.

Of these 136 895 emigrants, the largest numbers left for Singapore and Straits Settlements, viz., 100,658, while from the remainder, less than half, 36,237, were for the other ports of destina- tion, such as San Francisco, British Columbia, Java, etc.

There were 1,330 through passengers, recruited from various ports other than Hongkong, and mainly being Filipinos from Mauila for Honolulu.

L 88

Table I shows the numbers of emigrants passed and rejected by us for the years 1910 and 1911. The largest monthly total was 17,981 for March, while in January the number was reduced to 5,886.

Table II shows the monthly statement of emigration figures, and also the numbers rejected and the numbers of the crews of the steamers. The total number of rejections for 1911 was 1,745 as against 1,190 for 1910, the increase being 555.

Table III gives the causes of rejection of emigrants under the various diseases quoted.

(c.)-QUARANTINE DUTY.

During the year four ships were detained in Quarantine, viz., two for Small-pox and two for Cholera.

Bangkok continued to be treated as an infected port throughout the year, owing to Cholera and Small-pox being endemic there.

Chefoo, Ching-wan-tao, Dalny, Taku, and Tientsin were declared infected from February 3rd to May 3rd for Plague.

Hoihow and Pakhoi were declared infected from May 18th to July 5th for Cholera.

Amoy for Plague from July 5th to October 18th, and Singapore for Cholera and Small-pox from November 3rd to December 28th.

Table IV gives the ships detained in Quarantine, with causes and periods of detention.

It is interesting to note that notwithstanding the number of ports declared infected with Plague in constant communication with Hongkong, not one single case of Plague was landed here during the year.

- L 89

Table I.

Emigration Passes and Rejections for 1910 and 1911.

1910.

1911.

Ports of Destination.

Passed. Rejected. Passed. Rejected.

Straits Settlements,

76,718

997 100,658

1,375

San Francisco,

6,261

16

2,904

9

British Columbia,

10,899

79

12,515

194

Java Ports,.....

8,239

50

9,967

96

Mexican Ports,

3,288

22

3,347

33

South American Ports,

960

10

571

16

Seattle,

146

1,303

1

Honolulu,

3,583

10

1,912

3

Mauritius,.

394

1

995

4

Japan,...

91

206

3

Australian Ports,

698

German New Guinea,

2.487 30

11

Manila,

99

...

Total,

111,371

1,190 136,895

1,745

Table II.

Monthly Numbers of Emigrants, Crews and Rejections.

Months.

Emigrants.

Crew.

Rejections.

January,

February,

5,886

2,351

70

6,602

2,112

61

March,

17,981

2,742

202

April,..

16,934

3,309

255

May,

16,675

2,055

242

June,

11,460

2,998

166

July,

10,497

2,849

110

August,

6,126

2,388

92

September,

13,916

3,357

130

October,

12,001

2,994

166

November,

9,518

2,953

161

December,

9,299

3,102

90

Total,......

136,895

33,210

1,745

Appendix M.

REPORT ON THE BOTANICAL AND FORESTRY

DEPARTMENT FOR THE YEAR 1911.

GARDENS AND GROUNDS.

Botanic Gardens.-The first four months of the year were very favourable for gardening operations. The month of May was unusually wet, the rainfall being the greatest registered for that month since 1992. Typhoon signals were hoisted frequently dur- ing the months of July, August and September, and the gale in early August, which was followed by heavy rain, did considerable damage.

2. Owing to the very dry autumn and winter of 1910-1911 many trees and shrubs flowered much more profusely than usual.

3. The Spanish Iris bulbs presented by Mr. J. Barton produced a large percentage of blooms.

4. Mr. M. J. D. Stephens presented seedlings of Streptocarpus and they flowered quite freely. It was the first time that this plant had flowered in Hongkong so far as is known.

5. Tillandsia Regina, a very striking Bromeliad, and the only plant in the Colony, flowered early in June.

6. Plants of Mussaenda erythrophylla, received from the Bo- tanic Gardens, Singapore, flowered for the first time in August. This plant should prove extremely useful if it will withstand the Hongkong winter.

7. Lycoris aurea is now quite a feature in the Gardens in September and October, and flowers quito as freely as the common Daffodil in England.

8. The three trees of Bauhinia Blakeuna, two in the Old Garden and one in the New Garden, flowered magnificently in September and were still in flower at the end of the year. This is undoubtedly the best winter-flowering tree in the Colony.

9. Poinsettias were much better than they have been for the last two or three years as they managed to escape the effects of the wind.

10. Several hundred seedlings of Amaryllis were planted out in a bed in the Old Garden. These plants do remarkably well, and are a fine sight when in flower.

M 2

11. The Cacti in the bed at the east end of the Lower Terrace in the Old Garden were taken up and re-planted.

12. The Agave bed on the north side of the same terrace was overhauled. Plants which were overcrowding others were removed, and vacancies filled up with young plants.

13. The lawns on the Lower Terrace, which had become very uneven, were taken up and relaid.

14. The various plant houses were repaired, colourwashed, and painted.

15. Some of the old lime-concrete surfaces of walks which were broken and worn out were taken up and replaced with cement and disintegrated granite.

16. The water supply to the fountain was a source of trouble owing to the pipe having become choked in some way. It was found that it could not be cleared without taking up the fountain basin, and to keep up a supply of water another pipe was laid on.

17. The Flower Show of the Hongkong Horticultural Society was held in the Old Garden on the 1st and 2nd of March. For- tunately both days were fine, a pleasant contrast to the preceding year.

Flowers and vegetables were about up to the average.

18. On the 22nd June, the Coronation Day of His Majesty the King, the Gardens were illuminated in the evening, and were set apart for those who attended the reception at Government House.

19. Several matsheds were erected in the Old Garden, and set pieces of Japanese fireworks were let off on the Lower Terrace.

20. The very effective way in which the Gardens were il- luminated was entirely due to His Honour Sir Francis Piggott.

21. Owing to the precautions taken by this Department the damage done to lawns and shrubs was hardly noticeable.

22. Several species of Orchids collected in Yunnan, as well as a number of plants of Phoenix Rebelini, were presented to the Gardens by Mr. C. Roebelin.

23. Government House Grounds. – A large Araucaria excelsa on the east side of the grounds was blown down in June. The trunk of the tree was found to have been eaten by white ants, so much so, that only a mere shell remained.

24. Several other Araucarias and a Magnolia grandiflora which had become unsightly were cut down.

25. Four young trees of Spathodea nilotica, raised from seeds presented by Lady Lagard who had received them from Uganda, were planted.

M 3

26. The lawns were repaired where necessary.

27. Caterpillars were exceedingly troublesome on lawns and Jeyes' Fluid mixed with water in the usual proportions was much less effective in stopping their ravages than hitherto.

28. Mountain Lodge Grounds.-Bare patches on the tennis lawn were repaired with new turf.

29. The gravel walks were repaired with disintegrated granite.

30. The concrete walks were also repaired, and a short length was laid with cement-granite where heavy rains always did con- siderable damage.

31. Several shrubs were planted in the bed at the foot of the big retaining wall, and the Hedychiums and Cannas in the same bed were taken up and replanted.

32. Blake Garden.--For the previous two years cockchafers were a source of trouble in this Garden, but this year no damage was noticed.

33. Some damage to shrubs and turf was done by gangs of Chinese who assembled to watch birds fighting. These birds were brought into the Garden in cages by other Chinese, and by prohibit- ing this the nuisance was soon stopped.

34. Young Eucalyptus trees suffered severely by the August gale.

35. Peak Garden.--The lime-concrete walk in this small garden was repaired where necessary.

36. The creepers planted at the base of the retaining wall at the upper end of the Garden are now beginning to cover the wall.

37. West End Park.-The grass was kept short and seedling trees pulled up.

38. Coolies are very fond of making short cuts across the park and frequently pull down the barbed wire fences which have been put up to prevent them doing this.

39. King's Park.-Over 200 palms were planted on the west side of the Park.

40. Many tree, and shrubs are growing up since a Park- keeper has been stationed there to stop grass-cutting and cattle- grazing.

41. The rooting up of Lantana has been proceeded with as far as funds would allow.

M 4

42. A great drawback to the Park becoming a favourite resort when laid out, unless it can be stopped, is the large quantity of cement dust which is blown over from the Cement Works at Hok Un during the winter months.

43. Colonial Cemetery.-Gravel walks were repaired, and the shrubberies planted up.

44. Trees damage by various typhoons were trimmed and and made sightly.

45. The east end of the Cemetery was much improved by the Public Works Department carrying out very badly needed repairs to walks, and as cement and disintegrated granite were used in these repairs, future damage by heavy rains will be prevented.

46. Royal Square Garden.—This small plot was kept in a tidy condition.

47. Roadside Banks.-The Rhododendrons, which consisted of pink and red varieties intermixed, on the Battery Path bank, were transplanted, the reds being out in one place and the pinks in another, so that when in flower the colours will not clash.

48. Several plants of Hibiscus Lambertianus were planted near roads where they will be seen when in flower.

h

49. Two small flowering trees, Bayinia variegata and Lager- straemia indica, were rather freely planted on banks in the vicinity of the town.

HERBARIUM.

50. Many local specimens have been added to the collection.

51. One hundred and five specimens from Kweichau Province were purchased.

52. Mr. C. Talbot Bowring, Wenchow, presented a number of Chekiang plants and Professor R. Mell, Canton, a few Kwangtung species.

53. The Superintendent described a new species of Quercus and a new species of Amorphophallus, both found in Hongkong and the New Territories, in the Journal of Botany.

54. The Key to the Flora of Hongkong, the New Territories and Kwangtung Province is now in print. The thanks of the Government and of this Department are due to Lieut.-Colonel Prani, Director, Royal Gardens, Kew, for publishing this work as an additional series of the Kew Balletin.*

* Kew Bulletin of Miscellaneous Information, Additional Series. X, 1911.

M 5

55. Additions to the local Flora are given in a supplement.

FORESTRY.

56. Demarcation.-No new areas were demarcated but num- bers and letters of the blocks and divisions were repainted.

57. Formation of Pine Tree Plantations.-The formation of plantations in the Harbour Belt was completed by the sowing of some 300 acres in 90' at a cost of $670. The sites for these seeds, 418,915, were prepared in the autumn of 1910.

58. Seeds were resown in sites in 9E, between Ma Lau Tong and Lyemum, which failed in the previous year.

39. In 9B, north of Kowloon City, vacancies were filled up by the transplanting of seedlings from the Nga Iu Tau Nursery.

60. Mt. Davis, 7G, was resown with pine tree seeds. This is one of the areas felled by the timber contractor in the previous

year.

61. In 6E, Aberdeen, about 70 acres were resown. was also felled by the timber contractor.

This area

62. On Mt. Kellett, 7C, and Shunwan, 6B, the areas which were cleared by fire in 1910 were resown.

63. In addition pine tree seeds were sown broadcast in 76. (Mt. Davis), 9A, B & D (Harbour Belt), and 11, (Kanghau).

64. Broad-leaved Trees.-Experiments were made with (sow- ing) seeds of Rhus succedaneum, Evodia melifolia, Litsea polyantha. Melia Azedarach and Camphor in 1E and F, above Bowen Road.

65. On the bare hills in 9A and B, (Harbour Belt), seedlings of Tristania conferta, Melaleuca Leucadendron, and Albizzia Lebbek were planted for experimental purposes. Some 300 cuttings of Banian were also put out for trial on these hills.

66. The Kowloon Waterworks having been completed, the big scar on the hill above the Taipo Road, between the 5th and 6th miles, where stone for the works was obtained, was planted up with Eucalyptus marginata and Albizzia Lebbek seedlings.

67. Shrubs. A quantity of seeds of Leucana glauca was sown in 9A and B, (Harbour Belt), on bare ground. The seeds ger- minated well but the roots found it difficult to penetrate the hard ground and became corkscrew-shaped, just the same as the roots of plants confined in flower pots.

68. One year old pine trees transplanted from nurseries will succeed in many of these bare places, and if the experiments which are now being made with broad-leaved trees prove unsuccessful a quantity of the former will be available for planting next year.

M 6

69. Care of Trees in Plantations.-Dead trees have been re- moved from the following blocks :-(1) Victoria, (3) Shaukiwan, (6) Aberdeen, and (7) Pokfulam.

70. Protection from Fire.-Fire barriers were cleaned to the extent of 213,659 feet at a cost of $490, and 5,215 feet new bar- riers made at a cost of $21.

71. Fires at the Tsing Ming and Chung Yeung Festivals were less destructive than usual, and no great damage was done on either occasion. At both the Festivals, the Honourable the Registrar General kindly allowed 10 District Watchmen to assist the Forest Guards and Foresters in the suppression of fires.

72. In all 43 fires were reported during the year. The principal fires were in 1F above Bowen Road, in 5F, Repulse Bay, in 7G, Mt. Davis, and 9B, Kowloon. The fire above Bowen Road was in all probability caused by the carelessness of someone walking along the road throwing a lighted match or cigarette end on to the hillside. The others were most likely caused by worshippers at tombs or grass cutters.

73. One person was arrested for setting fire to a plantation and was fined $3 at the Police Court.

74. Forest Guards' Service.- Reports of Forestry Offences were about 20 per cent. more than in the previous year and the convictions about 70 per cent. more, although the actual number of cases was rather less. See Tables II and III.

75. It was found that the 1910 amendment to the Malicious Damage Ordinance did not affect the persons it was intended to, and the fines levied on the villagers of Taihang, Chaiwan and Little Hongkong were remitted.

76. This Department was authorized to spend a sum of not more than $150 a year in rewards to the elders of villages for pre- venting and reporting Forestry Offences, and in assisting the Department in making arrests.

77. The elders of various villages were notified of this pro- posal, but so far only one case has been reported to the Department and that was from Taihang. The offender was arrested and fined $5 at the Police Court.

78. A sum of $127.50 and another of $48 were received from the contractors of the Kowloon Waterworks for damage done to trees in the vicinity of the works. The damage occurred in pre- vious years but the money was not received until after the comple- tion of the contracts.

79. Towards the end of the year, as a symptom of the general unrest at the time of the outbreak of the Revolution, the Forest

5

M 7

Guards encountered considerable difficulty in two or three cases in bringing persons arrested for Forestry Offences to the Police Stations as the residents of the villages which the Forest Guards had to pass came out in force and released the prisoners.

80. Revenue Felling.-About 70 acres were felled at 6E, Aberdeen, and about 140 acres at 7D, Aberdeen, under the tree felling contract. The original contractor was unable to carry on the work and the contract was transferred to his sureties to carry on the felling up in the end of October, after which date no other plantations were to be felled.

81. The total amount of revenue derived from timber felling was $4,694.90.

82. Grass-culting.-The cattle dealers at Kennedy Town peti- tioned the Government for permission to cut grass on the hillsides for their cattle, and they were informed that they would be grant- ed permits to cut grass in certain areas on payment of an annual fee. No application on these conditions has been received.

83. The villagers of Aberdeen made a request for permission to cut grass for their own use and localities were pointed out to them where they could get the necessary supplies.

84. Planting and Care of Roadside Trees.-Between 800 and 900 trees were planted on roads and on banks near roads in Hong- kong and Kowloon. These comprised Camphors, Albizzias, Celtis, Bainans, and a large proportion of flowering trees such as Erythrina, Bauhinia, Cassia and Poinciana.

85. The amount spent on trimming, planting and general upkeep of the above was $1,132.32. On account of the frequency with which young trees were blown over during the year more attention than usual had to be given them.

86. Shataukok-Castle Peak Road.-Planting was carried out on both sides of this road and between 4,000 and 5,000 trees were used. The cost of planting was$195.60. The trees used were Melaleuca, Tristania and Ficus infectoria.

87. Nurseries, Agriculture and Economic Planting.-The Lucerne referred to in last year's report did not prove any more satisfactory than that experimented with on previous occasions.

88. The huskless oats, also mentioned in the 1910 repcrt, grew well and produced a good crop of oats and straw in the Kanghau Nurse but a poor crop of oats in the Sukunpo Nursery. Seeds of these cats were given to the Dairy Farm Co. for trial.

89. Mr. C. V. Piper, Fodder Expert of the United States Department of Agriculture, passed through Hongkong on his way to Manila, and presented to this Department several kinds of grass

M 8

seeds which he thought might possibly succeed here for fodder purposes. The grass seeds received were Rescue, Molasses, Sudan and Colorado.

90. The Resene grass did not germinate and Mr. Piper in- formed me on his return from Manila that he had had the same result in Manila.

91. The Molasses grass germinated well and produced a good crop but not equal to Guinea grass, Panicum maximum, Jacq. Cattle, however, did not care for it.

92. The Sudan grass germinated well and produced a crop but it was also inferior to Guinea

grass.

93. The Colorado grass germinated poorly and did not pro- duce a good crop.

94. A quantity of spineless Cacti was obtained from the United States Department of Agriculture through the courtesy of Mr. D. Fairchild. These plants are used in America for fodder and they may prove useful here for the same purpose during the winter months.

95. Seeds of Mucuna nivea and Canaralia gladiata were pre- sented to the Colonial Veterinary Surgeon who wished to raise plants and make a trial of them for feeding purposes at Kennedy Town.

96. Most of the seeds presented by Sir Alexander Hosie, men- tioned in last year's report, proved to be those of well known cucurbitaceous plants, but one was a small yellow melon, previous- ly unknown here.

97. A new nursery was made near the south face of the Beacon Hill Tunnel for the purpose of raising trees for planting on the bare hills at Kowloon.

98. Forestry Service Paths.-A sum of $555.80 was spent on repairs in Hongkong and Kowloon. The path leading from Wan- chai Gap around the south side of Mt. Cameron to Middle Gap was added to the list of forestry paths.

99. Clearing Undergrowth around Houses.-An area of ap- proximately 2,900,000 square feet was cleared of undergrowth in various parts of Hongkong, Kowloon and the Police Stations in the New Territories at a cost of $910.70. An additional 1,175,000 square feet were cleared at a cost of $406.80 for the Military Authorities, and an area of about 170,000 square feet was cleared for $94.60 at the cost of private individuals.

100. Some 330,000 square feet of undergrowth were cleared for the Survey Branch of the Public Works Department.

M 9

101. Forestry Licences, New Territories.-The District Officer has reported that the fees collected for the year amounted to $2,992.91.

COMMERCIAL INVESTIGATIONS.

102. Numerous vegetable products were sent to the Director of the Imperial Institute during the year for investigation. Amongst the articles sent were the following:-Chinese Tree Oil, Tea-seed Oil, Ground Nut Oil, several kinds of Beans, Dry Ginger, leaves of Phyllanthus Emblica and Nut Galls.

103. With regard to samples of Tea-seed cake sent, a report was received to the effect that it was likely to prove

of com- mercial value in England.

104. Several firms in the Colony have requested information, which was readily supplied, concerning various kinds of seeds which had or were likely to have commercial importance. Some of the seeds submitted were those of Phaseolus Mungo, Glycine Soja, Vigna Sinensis, Perilla, Hemp, Castor Oil, Sesame, Can- dlenut, Gynocardia odorata and Biota orientalis.

STAFF.

105. Mr. Harold Green, Royal Gardens, Kew, was appointed. Assistant Superintendent, and arrived in the Colony and took up his duties on the 16th March.

106. Mr. Lo Tsung Ko, Head Forester, was transferred to the Public Works Department on the 1st September, and Mr. Tsang Iu Wa, 6th Grade Clerk, to the same Department on the 1st August, and their posts in this Department were not filled.

REVENUE.

107. Details of revenue are given in Table V. The percentage of revenue to expenditure was 16-98 as compared with 31-72 in the previous year. As stated in last year's report, the latter percentage could not be maintained and it has been further reduced by the cancelling of the timber contract. A comparative statement of revenue and expenditure for the last 10 years is shown in Table VI.

W. J. TUTCHER,

Superintendent.

24th February, 1912.

Table I.

RAINFALL, 1911.

Botanic Gardens.

M 10 -

DATE.

Jan.

Feb. Mar.

Apr. May. June. July. Aug. Sept.

Sept. Oct. Nov.

Dec.

inch. inch.

inch.

inch.

inch. inch. inch.

inch.

inch. inch. inch.

inch.

1

...

.04

.14

2.81

.41

.42

.81

2.

.02

.91

.07

.28

2.99

.04

.09

.01

.05

3.08

1.76

.01

.02

.01

3.70

1.23 1.32

.44

.42

2.82 1.29 .56

6

.02

.03

.12

6.08*

.01

7

.01

.15

.16

.07

.20

.08

8

.02

.50

.03

:

9

.94

.13

.28

10.

.63

.06

.01

.27

.01

.37

11

.01 1.37

2.88

.06

12.

.02

.05

1.21

.[1

13.

2.07 .32

.08

.02

.09

14.

.25

,21

.21

.05

.54

.08

.14

15.

.40

.45

1.02

.41

16.

.51

.06

1.59

:

.01

*Raingauge choked.

Table 1,-Continued.

M 11 -

DATE.

Jan. Feb. Mar.

Apr. May. June. July. Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec.

inch. inch. inch. inch.

inch. inch. inch. inch. inch. inch.

inch, inch.

17.

.03

.21 .09 .82 .01

...

3.53

...

.01

18.

...

.24

.01

.01

...

2.52

.03

.02

19.

.01

.01

.01

.22

.38

1.33

.29

20.

.38

.ΟΙ

.40

.10

1.78

1.29

1.27

21

.01

.52

2.48

1.63

.54

.01

.47

.02

22.

.02

.06

1.25

.66

.07

23.

.41

1.08

.02

.07

.03

24.

.80

25.

.24

.95 .05

.01

.01

.01

.03

26.

.05

1.65

.22

:.

.81

27.

...

1.26

.24

.05

.62

.04

.14

28.

.05

2.22

.03

.85

.02

.07

.38

.14

29

...

.10 .05

.15

.03

30.

.13

.05

.05

.01

31

.47

1.36

.09

Total

.67

.04

2.79

5.52 23.07

5.88

9.50 22.63

8.19

6.31

2.98

.41

Total for the year 87-94 inches. Average for the last ten years at the Botanic Gardens 91.04 inches. Total rainfall registered at the Hongkong Observatory for the year 90·55 inches,

Table II.

FOREST GUARDS SERVICES: OFFENCES.

Village or District. Block.

Compart-

ment.

Convictions.

Reports of

Re- Persons Pine tree Pine tree | Pine tree Brush- sidents. address stealing. branches needle wood

unknown.

stéaling. stealing. stealing.

Grass Cattle cutting. grazing

plantation.

Victoria, Wongneicheong, Shaukiwan,

Tytam,

123

A.B.C.D.E.F.G.

28

Nil.

A.B.C.D.E.F.G.

24

2

13

A.B.C.D.E.F.G.

24

3

27

A.B.C.D.E.F.G.H.I.

3

Nil.

4324

5

3

Nil.

1

19

69

7

Nil.

33

Nil.

2

Nil.

18

61

1

Nil.

Nil.

4

35

Nil.

Stanley,

A.B.C.D.E.F.

1

7

5

Nil.

33

25

Nil.

Aberdeen,

Pokfulam,

A.B.C.D.E.F.

9

2

15

B.C.D.E.F.G.

30

5

17

Yaumati,

8

1

Nil.

Harbour Belt,

9

A.B.C.D.E.

16

2

Cheung Sha Wan,

10

7

Nil.

Kowloon Reservoir,

11

7

1

57203 -

7

Nil.

14

27

1

9

1

19

30

Nil.

3

1

2

2

Nil.

2

1

10

42

1

4

Nil.

3

19

Nil.

2

Nil.

1

4

Nil.

Total for 1911,

156

16

103

43

4

129

285

3

Total for 1910,

48

55

116

60

6

114

161

M 12 -

M

M 13

S

Table III.

POLICE COURT RESULTS.

Cases.

5-7 days' imprisonment,

-

8-14

""

""

15-31

""

50 cents-81 fine,

$ 2

"

$3

"

$4-$ 5

""

$10-$25

"0

$50

""

Discharged,

1911. 1910.

42

33

15

29

4

1

10

2

10

12

29

27

. 22

26

6

12

0

2

Total,

138

144

Table IV.

28

3333

Locality.

NURSERIES.

Cost of Typhoon Other Expenses.

Damage.

Total.

$

C.

Kang Hau, -

60.00

$ c. 238.00

$3

C.

298.00

Nga Iu Tau,

307.60

307.60

East Point, -

Kowloon Tsai,

13.20

13.20

:

:

441.60

441.60

Total,... $60.00

$1,000.40

$1,060.40

Timber Sales,..

Sale of Plants,

Loan of Plants,

Revenue.

M 14

Table V.

1911.

1910.

$

C.

$

C.

4,694.90

8,955.04

63.00

360.72

368.04

3.48

13.41

4.17

13.01

2,706.55

3,818.09

Total,.........$

7,769.82

13,230.59

Sale of Old Tools,

Interest on Current Account,

Forestry Licence Fees,

Table VI.

Year.

Total Expenditure.

$

c.

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE

FROM THE YEAR 1902 To 1911.

Total Revenue.

C.

Percentage of Revenue to Expenditure.

%

1902

31,446.11

1,208.80

3.84

1903

31,924.01

2,311.58

7.24

1904

49,688.98

25,201.44

50.72

1905

46,670.14

3,468.94

7.43

1906

46,796.19

6,898.64

14.74

1907

44,131.14

7,730.52

17.52

1908

48,978.20

11,586.43

23 66

1909

43,694.46

11,441.51

26.12

1910

41,707.95

13,230,59

31.72

1911

45,7.50.85

7,769.82

16.98

M 15

Supplement.

ADDITIONS TO THE FLORA OF HONGKONG AND THE NEW TERRITORIES.

1. Tutcheria spectabilis, Dunn.-This tree was found in fruit in a wood associated with Quercus Blakei, Quercus Editha, and Quercus Elizabethæ, in the valley north-east of Lead Mine Pass in the New Territories. The only specimens previously known were from Hongkong, but what was, in all probability, the same species, was seen growing on Lofaushan by Mr. C. Ford, many years ago.

2. Celastrus articulatus, Thunb.-One plant found in fruit on one of the hills west of Taitam Tuk Reservoir. Previously known from Japan and from the Corean Archipelago to Kwangtung, but not hitherto recorded from Hongkong.

3. Smithia gerniniflora, Roth.—Collected on a bank below the May Road, Hongkong. Known from Kowloon and the New Territories, and throughout Tropical Asia and North-east Australia.

4. Memecylon ligustrifolium, Champ.-In a wood near Sha- taukok. The first record for the New Territories. Only known from Hongkong and Kwangtung.

5. Memecylon nigrescens, Hook.-With the preceding. Only previously known from Hongkong and Macao.

6. Elephantopus spicatus, Aubl. Collected on a bank on the May Road, Hongkong. Recorded from Formosa, and a native of Guiana.

7. Gnaphalium multiceps, Wall.-Near Fanling, Hongkong New Territories. Found throughout China and in Japan and India.

8. Diospyros sp.-Two plants male and female, about 10 ft. high, were discovered in a watercourse on the south side of Mt. Gough, and may possibly prove to be new.

9. Linociera sp.-A single tree about 12 feet high on one of the hills to the south-west of Taitam Tuk Reservoir.

10. Solanum hainanense, Hance.-Near Fanling, Hongkong New Territories. Known from Hainan, Kwangtung, and Annam.

11. Ajuga genevensis, Linn.-Collected near Pingshan, Hong- kong New Territories. Extends from Europe and Asia Minor through Central Asia to Manchuria and Japan.

12. Polygonum viscosum, Hamilt.-Near Fanling, Hongkong New Territories. Found in Hongkong, Kwangtung, Hupeh, Shing King, and Eastern India.

M 16

Schl.-In the jungle around Previously known from the

13. Aristooschia Tagala, Cham. et the District Officer's Quarters, Taipo. West River, Kwangtung; North and South India, Ceylon and Malaya to the Philippine Islands.

14. Lindera sp.-A small shrub on the wooded slopes of Mt. Nicholson above Wongneicheong.

15. Loranthus pentapetalus, Ro.rb. -Parasitic on Machilus Thunbergii, Sieb. et Zucc., near Fanling, Hongkong New Ter- ritories. Known from Hainan, Yunnan, North India, Burmah, and the Malay Peninsula.

16. Bridelia Balansa, Tutch.--Near Fanling, Hongkong New Territories. Previously known from Hongkong and Tonkin.

17. Fluggea microcarpa, Bl.-Between Fanling and Shatau- kok, Hongkong New Territories. Known from various parts of China and distributed over tropical and subtropical Asia, tropical Africa and Australia.

18. Quercus Elizabethæ, Tutch.-At Taiwai and in the valley between Lead Mine Pass and Taipo, Hongkong New Territories, and on Victoria Peak, Hongkong. A new species.

19. Castanopsis sp.--A tree, about 12 or 15 feet high, of what is, apparently, a new species to Hongkong of this genus was found on the northern slope of Mt. Gough.

20. Cybidium sinense, Willd.-A specimen of this orchid has been presented by Dr. E. A. Voretzsch, who informs me that he found it growing wild in a ravine south of Wongneicheong Gap. It is a most interesting discovery as it is, so far as I know, the first recorded locality for China. It is, however, frequently cultivated by the Chinese, and is also known from the Khasia Hills and Ceylon.

21. Habenaria leptoloba, Benth.-In swampy ground near Fanling, Hongkong New Territories. Recorded from Hongkong and the West River, Kwangtung, previously.

22. Habenaria sp.-Dr. E. A. Voretzsch discovered a small- flowered species of this genus with a bifid spur on the northern slope of Mt. Gough, but it has not yet been determined.

23. Curculigo orchioides, Gaertn. -Collected by Mr. H. Green, on the southern slope of one of the Kowloon hills. Known from Hongkong, various parts of China, Japan, Northern India and Australia.

24. Amorphophallus Dunnii, Tutch.-Found by Mr. Dunn on Lantao Island. Also known from Mt. Parker, Hongkong. A new species.

-

M 17

25. Peteris dimorpha, Copeland.-Detected in a shady spot near Fanling. Only previously recorded from the Lienchow River, Kwangtung.

26. Lygodium pinnatifidum, Su.—On the Sung Wong Toi hill and near Fanling, Hongkong New Territories. A species with an extensive range from the Himalayas to Ceylon, Philippines, Malacca, North Australia, Angola and Guinea.

Appendix N.

REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF EDUCATION

FOR THE YEAR 1911.

NUMBERS AND CLASSIFICATION OF SCHOOLS,

(Table 1)

1. Government Schools.-The number of Government Schools has been reduced during the year-two Lower Grade Schools (one at Tai Ping Shan and one at Mongkok) having been closed for want of support. There are now twelve Government Schools altogether of which seven are Upper Grade Schools and five are Lower Grade Schools. Three of the Lower Grade Schools are situated in the New Territories (Tai Po, Ping Shan and Cheung Chau).

(Table III)

2. Grant Schools.-Grant School No. 39, a vernacular school in Hung Hom managed by the London Missionary Society, was closed during the year. There are now 53 schools on the Grant List.

NUMBER OF PUPILS.

3. Government Schools.-The total number in average attend- ance at Government Schools is 2,101 (last year 1,935). This figure excludes from the calculation the two Lower Grade Schools which were closed early in the year. This shews an increase of 7.5 % over the average attendance of last year. The figures including the attendances at the two closed schools are recorded in Table I, viz., 2,120 (last year 1,960).

4. Grant Schools.-The total number in average attendance at Grant Schools is 4,183 (last year 4,169). Grant Schools 14 and 39 are excluded from this comparison, though they were included in the statistics of last year's report. Both these schools have been withdrawn from the Grant List (No. 14 during last year: No. 39 during the present year). In the schools which have completed the two years, there has been a slight increase in attendance. In- cluding the two schools omitted above the figures are 4,183 (last year 4,337)-shewing a decrease due to smaller number of schools on the Grant List. Grant Schools are mostly filled well up to their accommodation and no large increase in the number of pupils is to be looked for unless additional accommodation is provided.

އ

?

N 2

Ag

5. Government and Grant Schools together.-The combined average attendance, counting only those schools which have com- pleted both years, is 6,285 (last year 6,104); counting all schools, is 6,304 (last year 6,297).

6. Private Schools: English.-The numbers in attendance at the Private Schools of the Colony as shewn in Table II are only approximate. They show the reported maximum enrolment. The maximum enrolment at the English Private Day Schools is almost identical with that shewn for last year. The enrolment at the schools under the management of the different Missions is 589. The remainder, 988, are attending schools under Chinese management. Night Schools at which English is taught have increased in number, but according to the returns to hand the average attendance is slightly lower than that of last year. In both the Day and Night Schools there is a noticeable increase in the amount of fees collected, notwithstanding that the average attendance in both cases is less than that of the previous year. From the particulars supplied the average fee charged per unit of average attendance is a little over $44.00 (last year $22.50). The increase is accounted for by the growing usefulness of Boarding Schools which are able to charge considerable fees.

7. Private Schools: Vernacular.-There is again a large in- crease in the number of Vernacular Private Schools-243 (196 in 1910) and the reported maximum enrolment has risen from 5,759 to 7,375. This increase may be due to the influx during tlie year from neighbouring Districts, owing to the unsettled state of affairs there. From details supplied the annual fee charged per unit of average attendance is $12.00 (last year $15.50). This is a lower figure than that of last year and this may be accounted for by the fact that this year's returns include several free schools that formerly charged school fees. These free schools show an average attendance of 577.

REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE.

(Tables IV and V.)

8. The total expenditure on education was $242,066. This figure includes as expenditure fees remitted to free scholars. $4,124, an item which has not hitherto been included in the departmental reports. The expenditure, excluding the amount in fees remitted to free scholars, was $237,942 ($225,606 in 1910). Fees collected amounted to $76,056 ($75,094 in 1910). The nett actual disbursement by Government for Education was thus $161,886 ($150,512 in 1910). The proportion this figure bears to the total expenditure of the Colony is 2:41% (as against 2.30% in 1910), a percentage which will be slightly in- creased (to 247 %) if the fees remitted to free scholars are intro- duced into the calculation. The nett cost of the Government Schools for each unit of average attendance was $39.32.

N 3

GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS.

(Table 1.)

QUEEN'S COLLEGE.

9. Queen's College.-The Staff of the College is composed of one Headmaster, one Second Master, twelve English Assistant Masters, eleven Chinese Masters teaching English, and five Ver- nacular Masters. In addition to the above the staff includes the post of Translation Master, at present held by the Rev. H. R. Wells, which was intended for the supervision of the Vernacular Masters. Visiting Masters are also employed as follows:-One Gymnasium Instructor and five Vernacular Masters.

10. The average attendance is 667, as against 642 last year. It may be expected that the attendance will increase when matters in the Kwang Tung Province reach a more settled condition than has been the case during the year.

11. The cost of each pupil in average attendance is $63.05 a considerable increase over last year. The increase in the total cost of the school for the year. viz., $7,478.70, is being paid as follows by the Government $6,255.70 and by the boys in fees $1,223.00. This increase in cost is due to several causes, including the addition of two English Masters to the Staff, the engagement of five Visiting Vernacular Masters to strengthen the teaching of Chinese, and to the completion of the scheme, under which dual desks have been introduced into the school. The somewhat high cost per head of the education in this school is in some measure explained by the fact that no fewer than 72 pupils (58 Free Scholars and 14 Student Interpreters) are receiving free education in the College.

12. The year has been marked by public excitement due to the grave national crisis through which the Chinese Empire has been passing. The discipline of the school has been occasionally put to a very severe test, in all cases with credit to the school. The institution of prefects has resulted in the growth of school patriotism. Their assistance has been enlisted in the maintenance of good order throughout the school and they have shewn them- selves to possess a due sense of responsibility. What is at present desired greatly by the Headmaster and the Staff of the College is that some influence could be brought to bear upon the parents and guardians of pupils to ensure a more regular attendance.

13. An incident, which it is a pleasure to record, occurred during the year and culminated at the recent prize-giving. The boys of Class I have collected a fund which will be devoted to the establishment of a prize to be presented annually to the head boy of the school and to be named after Mr. Ralphs, the Second Master of the School.

N 4

14. Extracts from the report of the Headmaster, Mr. T. K. Dealy, are given below :-

"During the year under notice, 14 of our boys left to take service under the Hongkong Government, 17 went into the Chinese Government service, 26 obtained situations in Hongkong and 45 went abroad, going as far afield as to the United States, Vancouver, Honolulu and elsewhere. We endeavour to trace the career of our boys when they leave us, but quite a number slip from us at Tsing Ming, Midsummer and at the China New Year without either giving any reason or letting us know what they have taken up. On the last day of December we had no fewer than 64 boys on leave, while 605 were actually present.

As was announced in the Annual Report presented in January, 1911, the school year now extends, as far as curriculum is con- cerned, from Midsummer to Midsummer. For the first time in the history of the College, the Midsummer Examination, concluded in August last, constituted the Annual Examination for Class promotions, and for the awarding of Scholarships and Prizes. The examination was much more searching than in previous years. Under the old system, a boy was promoted who obtained not less than 34% of the aggregate number of marks for all subjects offered. At the examination under notice, it was necessary in order to be entitled to promotion, to obtain at least 40% of the aggregate number of marks, and in addition, at least 40% in each of the following Special Subjects:-English Composition, English Conversation, Dictation, and Arithmetic. Where, however, a boy failed in only one of the Special Subjects and got not less than 50% of the grand total of marks, his claim for promotion was specially considered; but, in no case was promotion granted to a boy who failed to pass in English Composition. This increased severity is intended to secure, as far as possible, uniformity of attainment in each Class; it is impossible to do really good work in a Class where there is very great disparity in attainment between boys at the top and those at the bottom of a Class.

As was anticipated, the percentage of passes compares un- favourably with those shewn in our previous Annual Examination.

The following brief summary will serve to shew the difference in percentage of passes this year and last.

At the Annual Examination, held in January, 1911, the results

were :-

Upper School -

Remove (Classes 4 & 5) - Lower School (Classes 6 to 8)

No, examined. No. pussed. % of Passes.

-

289 191

58

280

187

55

97%

98%

95%

At the Annual Examination held in August, 1911, the results

were:

Upper School, Remove,

Lower School,

No, examined, No. passed.

% of Passes.

w

359 190 ·

317

88%*

137

· 72%

102

68

67%

"

N 5

The percentage of passes for the whole school was 97 at the January Examination, and 80 at the August Examination. Turn- ing to the different subjects examined, I find that throughout the College there were comparatively few failures in Reading, and in the Upper School, few in English Conversation. Physical Geography was weak in 1B and very weak indeed in Classes 3B. Cand D; Hygiene was weak in 20 and 4C, Geometry in 3B and 30, Mensuration and Arithmetic in 1D, Book-keeping in 1B and 1D and in Class 2, and Shakespeare in 1B. With these exceptions, the work generally was very creditable, especially when it is remembered that the preceding Annual Examination was held only six months previously. English Composition, which I regard as one of the most important subjects in our curriculum, and one to which we have devoted much attention, is distinctly improving. In many Classes surprisingly good papers were submitted, shew ing not only originality of ideas, but the ability to express those ideas in good and correct English. Greater attention has been given to Chinese studies; and in June, fivè additional Vernacular Masters were ap- pointed, in order to enable Upper School boys to continue their studies, instead of laying them aside as heretofore, on being pro- moted to the Upper School. Upper School boys were not examin- ed in Chinese at the examination just held, as they had had only a very short time for preparation.

In the Vernacular Section of the Remove and Lower School, 267 boys were examined and 200, or 75%, passed. Of these 200, 34 were

Distinguished" and 26 were classed as Excellent".

66

66

At the Oxford Local Examination held in July, we obtained 45 Certificates, the largest number ever obtained by the College in any previous year being 35.

The successes this year were:-Seniors 12, Juniors 7, Pre- liminaries 26; of the 12 Seniors, 8 obtained the title of Associate in Arts, the remaining 4 already held that distinction. In addition, 2 Seniors were awarded Distinction in Chinese. It is worthy of note that the only successes in Hygiene obtained by Hongkong boys at the last Oxford Examination in the Senior and Preliminary Divi- sions fell to Queen's College.

Of other examinations held during the first half of 1911 I may mention that in July examinations were simultaneously held in Hongkong, Shanghai and Hankow for the selection of Engineer Students for the Tong Shan Railway and Engineering College. Competition for this position is always keen. There were 230 Can- didates in all, of whom 33 were chosen. Of these 33 Queen's College took the following places (arranged in order of merit):- Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 24, 28 and 29: that is, a total of 11 places (including the first 8) out of a possible 33. Contempor- aneously, an examination was held for the selection of 5 Engineer Students for the Pekin and Mukden Railways. Queen's College carried off all 5 places. In 1910 we sent 5 Students to the "Im- perial Railways of North China". This year the Director required 20 more; of these 20, 10 were selected from Queen's College, the remainder from various ports in China. Owing, however, to political disturbances, the boys have not yet been sent for.

N 6

None of the boys who were successful in the examinations for the Tong Shan College or for the Pekin and Mukden Railway College, and in fact none of those who presented themselves for those two examinations, were able to sit for the Oxford Local Examinations which were being held at the same time.

Among the important events of the year, I must record the visit of His Excellency Sir Frederick Lugard on May 23rd for the purpose of presenting "College Buttons", bearing the College Crest, to the boys in Class I. At the same time, Prefects were appointed and I am gratified to say that they have carried out their duties to my entire satisfaction: they are a most valuable adjunct in the upholding of order and discipline.

On June 22nd a banquet was held in the Hall, and Medals were distributed in honour of His Majesty's Coronation. The

pro- ceedings were most successful, and will long be remembered by these fortunate enough to take part in them. With the object of providing a permanent Memorial of the Coronation, the boys of the College presented a silver Challenge Shield for Swimming to be competed for annually by the various schools in the Colony. It seems appropriate that our own boys should be the first winners of this handsome trophy.

Among the gifts to the College, I must mention the Portraits of H.E. Sir Frederick Lugard, presented by the late Sir H. N. Mody which was publicly unveiled by Mr. Ralphs last August, at the closing ceremony: of Their Excellencies Sir Henry Blake and Sir Matthew Nathan, presented by Mr. Ho Tung, and of Dr. Bateson Wright presented by Messrs. Lau Chu Pak and Ng Hon Chi. We have also received the marble bust of Dr. Wright, ex- ecuted by Mr. Bertram Mackennal, presented to the College by Messrs. Lau Chu Pak, Ho Kam Tong, Wan Chung Iu, Ng Hon Chi and other Alumni of the College.

Libraries.-The Libraries opened last year are made great use of and are much appreciated. As we have now an annual Library Vote the number of books available will gradually grow larger. A small Chinese Library has also been started for the use of Vernacular and Anglo-Chinese Masters.

Sports. The number of boys taking an active interest in sports is steadily increasing. At the Annual Schools' Athletic Sports, Queen's College was represented in 1910 by only 19 com- petitors, who gained 5 trophies; at the 1911 Meeting 41 of our boys competed and we gained 14 successes, including 8 first places. Queen's College also won the Team Race for Sir Paul Chater's Challenge Cup. In the Schools' Football League Competition the College took second place in both the Senior and Junior Divi- sions. In October, Swimming Sports were held, and were very successful. The Coronation Shield was competed for by teams representing 5 different schools in the Colony. Queen's College took first place, the Diocesan School coming second. Our thanks are due to Mr. Brawn for the active interest he takes in the College Athletics.

The Gymnasium Classes and a special Athletic Course for the

N7

Football teams have been regularly given by Sergeant Barnes, R.G.A.

The College Magazine, the Yellow Dragon, has an extended circulation, and judging from the list of subscribers, is much ap- preciated outside the College walls."

DISTRICT SCHOOLS.

UPPER GRADE.

15. The three District Schools (Saiyingpun, Wanchai and Yaumati) are doing well. The combined average attendance has risen to 728 (703 in 1910). The maximum enrolment has fallen to 885 (949 in 1910). The amount collected in fees has been $22,529 ($24,493 in 1910). The nett cost of these schools to Government was $16,252 ($14,819 in 1910), a result in the main due to the decrease in amount of fees collected. The nett cost per unit of average attendance was $22.32 ($21.08 in 1910). The condition of these schools is satisfactory and they maintain a standard of work up to the syllabus prescribed for them. The ex- aminers who conducted the examination for scholarships from the District Schools commented on the weakness shewn in the three schools in the mathematical work done by the competing can- didates.

16. The Headmasters of the District Schools take the greatest interest in the progress of their pupils-both in and out of school--and are well rewarded for their efforts in the good tone prevailing in these schools. They likewise spare no effort in assisting the members of their Chinese Staff, but in this matter. they work under great difficulties, as the problem of retaining the services of assistant masters for long periods of time (specially during the recent period of unrest) has not yet been satisfactorily solved.

LOWER GRADE.

17. The Lower Grade English School, known as the Praya East School, which now occupies premises in Queen's Road East, has proved a highly successful experiment. The school has been fortunate in its Chinese Headmaster, who works under the direction of Mr. R. C. Barlow, the Supervisor. The average attendance has risen to 67 (21 in 1910). The nett cost to Government per unit of average attendance was $17.27. This school includes only the three lowest classes (Classes 6, 7 & 8), charges a lower fee than the District Schools, viz., 82.00 per month, and makes no pretence of promoting sports or athletics; but within its limitations, it is doing good work.

18. Of the outlying Lower Grade Schools, which are situated in the New Territories, two may be reported to be doing well, viz.,

N 8

Cheung Chau and Tai Po. The average attendance at Cheung Chau was 32 (11 in 1910) at a nett cost per unit of $16.99, while at Tai Po the average attendance was 20 (11 in 1910) at a nett cost per unit of $45.88. The difference between the cost of the two schools is accounted for largely by the fact that a rent is paid for the school house in Tai Po, while the premises in occupation at Cheung Chau are rent free. There is, also, at the date of this report an increase in attendance at Tai Po. which will reduce the the cost per unit there materially. The Ping Shan School has not maintained its early promise. The inhabitants of Ping Shan have shewn no readiness to co-operate. The question of either moving it to some neighbouring locality or of closing it altogether is under consideration. These schools are under the supervision of Mr. Barlow.

19. The English School for Indians is doing well and is out- growing its accommodation. It is able in many ways to do more satisfactory work for its boys than is possible in schools attended by Chinese. The Chinese boy bestows his favours upon half a dozen schools in the course of his educational career; but the sons of the Indian community have in the English School for Indians the chief, if not the only, opportunity of being instructed in Urdu and remain in the school therefore for a series of years. Boys, who have left this school for Queen's College, have been classified there into Classes for which the curriculum of the school for Indians was intended to fit them. The average attendance was 50 (37 in 1910) and the average cost per unit was $29.69 ($41.38 in in 1910). There is every prospect that this school will continue to grow and demand for itself a permanent building in the near future. The Headmaster appears to have the support and to meet the requirements of the community, which the school is designed

to serve.

BRITISH SCHOOLS.

20. Kowloon British School. This school is in charge of Mrs. Main, who is assisted by three English Mistresses. The numbers of the pupils have remained almost stationary-the average attendance being 46 (47 in 1910). The cost per unit of average attendance was $58.84 ($83.76 in 1910). The school for the first time in its history entered candidates for the Oxford Local Examinations, and out of five entries obtained four passes-two in the Junior and two in the Preliminary Examination. The Head- mistress shews a keen personal interest in all the pupils. French is taught as a language and not as a series of exercises. The school singing (to record the recollection of a visit) is a pleasure to listen to. The Infant Class is a particularly successful department of the school. Two Assistant Mistresses obtained a high mark at the examination held in connection with the class for Women Teachers at the Hongkong Technical Institute. A great want in the school is a playground. The history of the school appears to be one of steady progress.

N 9

21. Victoria British School. This school is under charge of Mr. H. A. Cox, B.A., and two Assistant Mistresses. The average attendance was 30 (31 in 1910) and the cost per unit of average attendance was $138.90 ($106.55 in 1910). This cost continues at a high figure, but it cannot be attacked by the exercise of economies. It can only yield to an increased attendance--a solution of the difficulty which the school with all its advantages very really deserves. The school under its present direction has become a new institution. The standard of work and the tone of the school are becoming eminently satisfactory.

I quote the following from the Headmaster's report:-

"So many changes have occurred in the constitution of the lowest classes, those forming the Infant School, during the year, that it is hard to form any idea of continued progress made in them.

These young children have their lessons given them in as pleasant a form as possible. They spend a considerable time at Kindergarten work, such as basket weaving, paper-flower making, &c. They are taught singing and drill-mostly by means of action songs. Many of them come to school at a very early age, there is one boy of 4 years here at present--these are taught simple reading and words, chiefly on the system of simi- larity in sound.

With regard to the work in the Lower School generally speaking, there is a vast improvement in all the work done in this section, and I now have ceased to look on the advent of new members of the Upper School from the Lower with my former apprehensions.

Instruction is given there in: Scripture, Arithmetic, Algebra, General Knowledge. Geography, History, English Composition, Reading, Writing, Dictation and Spelling, Recitation, Singing, Drill, Drawing (with pencil and brushwork), and Elementary Science (as a preparation for Hygiene)--the boys in Class 5 come to me for Geometry. I should especially note the improvement made in English Composition.

In the Upper School, which is under my charge, there have also been many changes during the year.

The standard of the work has improved. The boys, though younger on the average, are doing more advanced work than they were doing a year ago. Especially have they progressed in English Composition and I make a habit of devoting two periods. on the same day to this subject, one before, and one after lunch ; during the first period we have a kind of debate on the subject. whatever it may be, and in the afternoon the essay is written. This method has, I find, produced a marked improvement, not only in the number of ideas possessed by the boys, but also in their mode of expressing them. The hour's conversation is very useful to them too as a lesson in general knowledge, as all sorts of subjects crop up.

I have introduced Latin and French into the curriculum. The French I make as conversational as possible, and in these

N 10

conversation lessons we have received great help from two Parisian boys at present pupils of the school. It adds to the pleasure of the lesson for the English boys when they can hear the mistakes of the French and vice versû.

In Mathematics the standard is also much higher than it was. When I came, the senior boys had done the first five propositions of Euclid, no one knew them properly. Three of the boys are now learning propositions that were included in Euclid's 4th book, and have had to provide themselves with Parts 3 & 4 of the book they were practically beginning a year ago. I hope to send two of the boys in for Higher Mathematics in the Preliminary Oxford Local this coming July. The Algebra has also very much improved. Arithmetic is still rather weak, but I think, progressing

favourably.

With regard to Examinations I entered five boys for the Oxford Local last July-one for the Junior, and four for the Preliminary. Of these one left the school before the examination, and did not sit. two (Brett in the Junior, and Barrington in the Preliminary) passed and two failed.

I have introduced a school cap during the year-and all the boys wear it when the sun is not too powerful-and I think it is appreciated. Many of the girls, too, wear the school badge.

The school playing field has been surrounded by a bamboo fence which is fairly effective in keeping out the local vagabonds. though many thefts of bamboos from the fence have occurred.”

22. The British Schools have been visited quarterly by Govern- ment medical officers, and the pupils individually examined ; and, where the children's health required attention, parents have been informed.

GIRLS SCHOOLS,

23. Belilios Public School for Girls.-This school is in an inter- esting stage of transition. An English school and a Vernacular school are being welded one into the other, so that English is gra- dually becoming a more important item in the curriculum. With this object in view an additional English Mistress was added to the staff with very good results. Only those who know can realise how much taci and capacity is represented by the steady growth of this school which consists mainly of Chinese girls, from year to year, under the guidance of Mrs. Tutcher and the members of her staff.

The school is a self-contained institution training its own junior teaching staff. Its work in both sections of the school continues entirely satisfactory.

The Vernacular School is partly accommodated in rented premises in the Hollywood Road,

N 11

CHINESE VERNACULAR PRIMARY EDUCATION BOARD.

24. On the 7th September, 1911, the Board of Chinese Vernacular Primary Education was constituted by the Governor- in-Council with the following duties:-

(a.) to promote efficient Chinese Vernacular Education in

the Colony;

(b.) to collect funds to supplement a Government subsidy.

The Board consists of the Director of Education (Chairman), the Registrar General, Hon. Dr. Sir Kai Ho Kai, Kt., C.M.G., Hon. Mr. Wei Yuk, C.M.G., Mr. Lau Chu Pak, Mr. Chan Kai Ming and Mr. Ho Fook.

Up to the end of the year the Board confined its operation to collecting information and making other preliminary arrangements. It is hoped that the result of its establishment will prove to be a rise in the standard of Vernacular Schools and an increase of such schools in parts of the Colony in which the supply has been hitherto inadequate.

UNIVERSITY OF HONGKONG.

25. The University Ordinance (10 of 1911) was passed in the month of March. But up to the present time it has not been possible for the University to take practical steps to initiate teaching and to offer any guidance to the schools in the Colony, with a view to preparation for the Matriculation Examination. A minute of the proceedings of the Council and of the Court of the University has been published in local

newspapers, in which it appears that both these bodies have advised the Senate of the University to admit as Under- graduates, without examination, students holding any Senior Oxford Local Examination Certificate. I would personally endorse this advice, at least for the first two years of the University's existence. The Senate will thus be fulfilling a very widespread expectation among students who have prepared for this examination with that object in view. In the absence of particular information, present pupils in the local schools are unable to prepare directly for the matriculation examination, which will ultimately be prescribed. The Educational Staffs in the Colony are looking forward with high hopes to the time when they will be part of a system leading by continuous stages from the initial classes in our schools to the degree in our University. The University expects to commence teaching in the autumn of 1912.

HONGKONG TECHNICAL INSTITUTE.

26. The evening classes at this Institution have been open during eight months of the year. The Director, Mr. E. Ralphs, is to be congratulated not merely upon the standard of work done but also upon the improved economy of administration, which has

N 12

resulted in the cost per head to Government of each pupil attending these classes being reduced to the lowest figure yet attained, viz., $17.46 (last year $21.71).

An interesting and useful feature of the work of the Institute is the Class for Teachers. In the main, the community has to rely on this class for training its local teachers in method. The standard exacted in its examination is high. The Government is accepting the certificates granted as a proof of professional qualifica- tions. This class is well calculated to meet the needs of the situa- tion; but to ensure its usefulness some means will have to be found for inducing the members of the class to stand by the teaching profession in after life.

During the year new classes were added in Electricity, also in English--a senior course including Logic and Political Economy; and in "First Aid to the Injured". On the latter subject two classes were formed - the senior being conducted by Dr. Fitzwilliams and Dr. Allan and the junior by Dr. Ho Ko Tsun and Dr. Leung Chik Fan. At the examination 19 Seniors and 11 Juniors obtain- ed certificates from the St. John's Ambulance Association.

In connection with the classes in Shorthand an examination was held for certificates of the Pitman Institute. Six pupils obtained speed certificates, three for a speed of 60 words per minute and three for a speed of 80 words per minute.

In Chemistry, the course laid down by the Institute covers three years and includes seven examinations. Two students completed this course during the year.

27. I append the following Tables:-

I.-Statistics relating to Government Schools (staff,

attendance, fees, cost, etc.).

II. Statistics shewing the total attendance at schools in the Colony for each year from 1899 to 1911. III.-Statistics relating to Grant Schools and payment of

Grant in Aid.

IV.-Table showing Expenditure, revenue and average number of pupils under instruction in the Edu- cation Department during the period from 1901 to

1911.

V.-Table shewing the percentage of the Colonial Revenue spent on Education during the period

from 1901 to 1911.

VI.-Oxford Local Examination Results: 1911.

VII.-Table shewing the number of passes obtained in the Oxford Local Examinations during the period

from 1905 to 1911.

}

N 13

VIII-Table shewing results of the Hygiene Shield

Competition (July 1911).

IX. --Table showing the amount of fees remitted to Free

Scholars in Government Schools during 1911.

X.-Table of Scholarships (other than Government

Scholarships) held at Queen's College.

XI. Table of Examination Results: Technical Institute:

June 1911.

XII.—Table of Revenue and Expenditure in the Technical

Institute.

XIII. Comparative Table of Statistics for five years

(1907-1911) in the Technical Institute.

28. The following Annexes will be found following the above Tables:-

(a.) List of Local Teachers (i.e., teachers of other than European parentage, who teach in the English Language), who hold certificates from the Technical Institute for attending the course and passing the prescribed examination in the Class for Teachers. (b.) Rules for the Hygiene Team Competition, 1912. (e) Addresses at Prize-givings by His Excellency the

Governor.

(d.) Rules for the Lugard Scholarships.

(e.) Table of Government Scholarships sanctioned for

1912.

(f.) Syllabus for Teachers' Classes for men, in the Hong-

kong Technical Institute.

(.) Syllabus for the Teachers' Classes for women, in the

Hongkong Technical Institute.

29. During the year Mr. E. A. Irving left the Colony on leave on the 4th July, returning to duty on the 1st November. In his absence Mr. E. D. C. Wolfe acted as Director of Education. Since the 15th November, Mr. Irving has acted as First Police Magistrate and I have acted as Director of Education in his place.

J. R. WOOD, Director of Education.

23rd April, 1912.

{

N 15

Table I.-GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS.-[The figu

STAFF.

No.

NAME AND NATURE.

Number of Classes.

Nu of S

*

English.

t Local.

D

Vernacular.

1

Queen's College, (Boys),..........

15

11 Masters, 5 5 and 5 Visiting Pupil Teachers.

Masters.

2

Kowloon British School-Children of European British

Parentage, (Boys under thirteen and Girls),....

3

Victoria British School-Children of European British

Parentage, (Girls under thirteen and Boys),

3

4 Saiyingpun English School, (Boys),

2

6

1

and Infant Class.

6

1

and Infant Class.

7

3

7 Masters, 2

10

5

1

Pupil Teachers.

1

6 Masters, 2

5

5

Yaumati

do.,

do.,

6 Wantsai

do.,

do.,

Pupil Teachers.

7 Masters, 2 Pupil Teachers.

2

3

5

3 Masters.

9 Mistresses.

2 Pupil Teachers.

7

Belilios Public School, (Girls).

3

5

2

1

3 Needlework Tea-

chers.

1 Drawing Master.

8 Taipingshan English School, (Boys),

2

1

3

9 Praya East

do.,

do..

1

10. Mengkok

do..

do.,

11- English School for Indians,

do.,

2 §

12

Tai Po English School,

do.,

A

13 Ping Shan

do.,

do..

F

14

Cheung Chau

do.,

do.,

15

Aberdeen

do.,

do.,

**

"English" Teacher includes all teachers of European parentage.

1

3

1

3

2:

1

222

14

CO

3

20

I

4

1

t “Local" Teacher includes all teachers of other than European parcntage teaching in English. § Indians.

N

2

2:

22

22

21

-

N 15

SCHOOLS.-[The figures in Red are those for last year.]

Number of Classes.

Number Maximum Average Rate of of School Monthly Ar-

Fees

Ditto for Net Cost to each unit in

Days. Enrolment. tendance.per mensem.

Gross Cost Collected.

Fees

Govern-

ment.

Average Attendance.

REMARKS.

cular.

C.

(.

C.

226

772

642

Visiting

ters.

221

790

667

$5

75,012.23 39,212.00 35,800.23 $2,190.93 40,135.00 42,055.93

55.76

63.05

192

57

47

5,383.90

1,447.00 3,936.90

83.76

6

192

61

46

$2 to $5

4,214.30

1,507.50 2,706.80

58.84

and Infant Class.

197

40

31

4,369.58

1,066.50

3,303.08

106.55

6

1931/

38

30

2

to $5

5,244.35

1,077.50

4,166.85

138.90

and Infant Class.i

228

384

300

16,082.33 | 10,438.00

5,644.33

18.80

10

5

195

355

285

$3

17,259.09

8,947.00

8,312.09

29.17

228

219

145

11,760.93

5,556.00

6,204.93

42.79

2

5

196

229

191

$3

8,980.64 5,872.00

3,108.64

16.28

228

346

258

11,919.01

8,949.00

2,970,01

11.51

3

5

222

301

252

$3

12,541.60

7,710.00

4,831 60

19.17

ers.

205

534

400

esses.

14,713,69

4,165.00

10,548.69

26.37

Teachers.

ework Tea-

8

1971

184

127

$1

16,685.04

4,528.00

12,157.04

28.47

8.

82

29

ng Master.

17

1,409.81

150 00

1,259.81

74.11

1

3

14

10

10

$2

578.20

20.00

558.20

55.82 Closed in Jan., 1911.

!

82

28

1

3

2001/

87

82

12

26 2

21

1,023.83

194.00

829.83

39.52

67

$2

2,641.24

1,484.00

1,157.24

17.27

658.05

74.00

584.0.5

73.01

3

13/1/

10

9

214.93

26.00

218.93

24.33 Closed in Jan., 1911.

225

44

4

227

66

37 50

1,940.22

409.00 !

1,531.22

41.38

$1

2,027.41

543.00 1,484.41

29.69

182

14

II

829.57

61.50

768,07

69.82

1

3

205/

32

20

50 cents.

1,031.08

113.50

917.58

45.88

222

43

32

968 75

168.00

800.75

25.02

1

210

48

34

50 cents.

1,286.28

154.00

1,152.28

33.30

224

16

11

629.60

62,50

567.10

51,55

1

3

212

43

32

50 cents.

723.21

179.50

543.71

16.99

55.00

55.00

ing in English.

2

2,538

1,960

2,554

2,120

:

146,756.50 | 71,952.50 74,804.00

38 16

155,948.30

72,597.00 | 83,351,30

39.32

Number of

Pupils.

#

2

Table II,

STATISTICS SHEWING TOTAL ATTENDANCE AT SCHOOLS IN THE COLONY FOR

EACH YEAR FROM 1899 TO 1911.

1910.

1899. 1900. | 1901. 1902. 1903. 1904. 1905. 1906. 1907. 1908. 1909. 1910. 1911.

7,400

7,300

7,200

7,100

7,000

6,900

6,800

6,700

6,600

6,500

6,400

6,300

6,200

6,100

6,000

5,000

5,800

5,700

5,600

5,500

5.400

5,300

5,200

5,100

5,000

4,900

4,800

4,700

4,600

+,500

4,400

4,300

4,200

4,100

4,000

3,900

3,800

3,700

3,600

3,793

3,500

3,400

3,300

3,200

3,100

3,000

2,900

2,800

2,700

D 600

3,865

7,875

4,800

4,700

4,600

:

+,500

4,100

4,300

4,200

4,100

4,000

3,900

3,800

3,700

3,600

3,793

3,865

3,500

3,400

3,300

3,200

3,100

3,000

2,900

2,800

2,700

2,600

2,500

2,400

2,504

2,488.

2,300

2,200

2,100

2,000

1,900

1,800

1,700

1,600

1,500

1,577

1,400

1,581

1,300

1,200

1,100

1,000

900

800

700

861

888

600

500

400

300

200

310

327

100

RED Line

=

BLACK Linc

DOTTED RED Line

DOTTED BLACK Line

BLUE Line

VIOLET Line

*

-Government and Grant Schools, giving instruction principally in English, (including

Queen's College). (Average Attendance.)

=

Government and Grant Schools, giving instruction principally in the Vernacular.

(Average Attendance.)

Private Schools, giving instruction in the day time in English. (Max. Earolment.)

Private Schools, giving instruction in the day time in the Vernacular. (Max. Enrolment.) Private Night Schools. (Maximum Enrolment).

Technica' Institute. (Maximum Enrolment.)

The population of the Colony ine: sed between 1906 and 1911 from 319,803 to 456,739.

**

123

4

8

9

13

11

9

}

N 19

TABLE III.

ANNUAL GRAI

(Code of 1910.)

No.

Nanic and Nature of School.

Mission.

St. Joseph's College, (B.) Italian Convent, (G.) *

French Convent, (G.)

*

English School for Portuguese, (M.) *

Diocesan School, (G.)

Diocesan School, (B.)

*

*

St. Mary's, Kowloon, (G.)

St. Francis', (M.) *

Ellis Kadoorie, (B.)

**

*

C. of E.

R. C. M.

Secular.

Number of

Classes.

Number

Average Attendance.

of

Maximum

School Enrolment.

Days.

Total.

Total.

INGLISH SCHO

Code Section 38 A. & B.

R. C. M.

247층

534________167 273

440 24

3,120|1

10

205

353

82 198

280 22

1,320 ji

9

213

114

27

63

90 22

6

∞ ∞ ∞ — 00 00

257

72

10

48

58 22

462 1 220 1.

217

83

28

34

62 24

672

1.

244

332

144

124

268 24

3,456 1.

206

128

18

84

102 22 396 1

211

99

9

66

75

1

.226

714

174

400

574

20

3,480 1.

2,429

659 1,290 1,949

13,126

No.

Name and Nature of School.

Mission.

VERNACULAR

SC:

Under Section 39 A. & B.

Number of

Standards.

G

Nulber

Ει

¢ Maximum Scool Enrolment. Das...

Attendance.

Rate.

Total. Sup

Rate.

Berlin Foundling House, (G.)

T8

Fairlea, (G.) **

Ber. M. C. M. S.

7

2:5

77

...

219/

19

Victoria Home and Orphanage, (G.) *

**

24)

20

Training Home for Girls, **

L. M. S.

2.9

FRNE

74.54

70

56.92

72

67.78

71

61.03

f

290

260.17

!

7909

VERNACULAR

Under Section 39 A.

22 24

25

26

Bridges Street, (G.) * Holy Infancy, (M.) Hunghom, (G.) Yaumati, (G.)

*

R. C. M.

244

85

65.00 6

*

242

83

65.00

8

""

*

242

60

44.00

"}

245-

72

60.00

}}

27

Shankiwan, (G.)

*

"}

245/

58

29.00

28

Aberdeen, (M.) *

2385

57

12.00

7

29

29

No. 109 Second Street, (B.)

*

*

L. M. S.

218

64

53 57

30

No. 22 Taipingshan, (G.)

***

1

$

522

511

610

2

519

S

n

N 19

TABLE III.

GRANT LIST.

(Code of 1910.)

Average Attendance.

Upper &

Remove

Classes.

Lower

Classes.

Total.

62

Rate.

Total.

#

Rate.

$

Total.

A

Total Capita- tion Grant.

Rent Grant.

Oxford Local

Graut.

Total Grants.

40

*A

LISH SCHOOLS.

Code Section 38 A. o B.

167 1 273 82 198

440 24 | 3,120| 1- 280 22 1,320 | 14

4,050 | 7,170 2,562 5,882

...

27

63

90 22

10

48

58 22

462 14 220 15

588 1,050 720 940 480

28

34

62 24 672 15

510

1,182

690

144

124

268

24 3,456 15

1,860

5,316

18

84

102

22

396

14

966 1,362

20

9

66

75

14

552 532

174

400

574 20

3,480 13 5,200 8,680

532 220 8,900

659 1,290 1,949

13,126

16,988 30,114 1,080 2,405 33,599

CULAR SCHOOLS.

Under Section 39 A. & B.

Grant for European

num Attendance. Rate. Total. Supervision.

nent.

74.54 56.82

67.78

61.03

260.17

7999

522

511

610

549

Rate.

122 N

Total.

Total Capita-

tion Grant.

Rent Grant.

REMARKS.

1,020 8,190 125-4,007 40 1,090 1,420 75 1,857 905 6,221

Thoroughly emcient.

Capitation Grant paid on estimate of att ndance made by the Edu- cation Dept. (Upper Classes 13; Lower Classes 27; Total 400.) (Capitation Grant paid on estimate of attendance made by the Edu- cation De t. (Upper Classes 60; Lower Classes 183; Total 243.) Capitation Grant paid on estimate of attendance made by the Edu-

cation Dept. (Upper Classes 21; Lower Classes 42; Total 63.) "Thoroughly efficient." 3 years running. Thoroughly efficient." 8 years running.

1,382cation Dept. (Lower Classes 69.)

Capitation Grant paid on estimate of attendance made by the Edn-

Capitation Grant paid on estimate of attendance made by the Edu-

cation Dept. (Lower Classes 8.)

Total Grants.

REMARKS.

$

75

597

597

114

625

625

: 36

746

"Thoroughly efficient."

3

746

66

22

671

671

CC

years running. Thoroughly efficient" 3 years running. Thoroughly efficient." 6 years running.

200

2,639

ACULAR SCHOOLS.

Under Section 39 A.

65.00

330

330

68.00

410

440

Capitation Grant paid on estimate of attendance made by the Edu-

cation Dept. (55.)

Capitation Grant paid on estimate of attendance ma 'e by the Eda-

cation Dept. (55)

44.00

352

352

...

66

60.00

...

540

540

Thoroughly efficient. "

3 years running.

29.00 7

203

203

12.00

7

245

245

53.57

66

...

482

100

582

Capitation Grant paid on estimate of attendance made by the Edu-

cation Dept, (35.)

Thoroughly efficient."

6 years running.

32.56

195 136

331

T]

ghly

+ ""

No.

Nanic and Nature of School.

Mission.

1

2

St. Joseph's College, (B.) Italian Convent, (G.)

*

3

4

8

9

French Convent, (G.)

English School for Portuguese, (M.)

Diocesan School,

(G.)

Diocesan School, (B.)

St. Mary's, Kowloon, (G.) *

*

*

*

13

St. Francis', (M.) *

11

Ellis Kadoorie, (B.)

**

9

Number of

Classes.

Number

of

Maximum

School Enrolment. Days.

le 01 1910.)

Average Attendance.

Upper &

Remove

Classes.

Lower

Classes.

Total.

Rate.

$

Total.

*

ENGLISH

SCHO

Code Section 38 A. & E.

R. C. M.

8

247

534167 273

440 24 | 3,120 1

10

205

353

82

198

280

22

29

1,320 | 1

213

114

27

63

90

22

462 1:

""

*

257

72

10

48

58

22

220 15

77

C. of E.

217

83

28

34

62 24

672 15

244

332

144

124

268 24

"

3,456 15

R. C. M.

2061

128

18

84

102 22

211

99

9

66

75

396 14

12

22

Secular.

.226

714

174

400

574

20

3,480 1

2.429

659 1,290

-

1,949

13,126

No.

Name and Nature of School.

Mission.

Bernie Foundling House, (G.)

18

Fairlea, (G.) **

19

Victoria Home and Orphanage, (G.)

**

20

Training Home for Girls, *

Ber. M. C. M. S.

23

L. M. S.

VERNACULAR

SCE

Under Section 39 A. & B.

Number of

Standards.

Gr

Nuiber

Eu

¢

Scool Das...

Maximum Enrolment.

Attendance. Rate. Total. Sup

Rate.

FANN

7

2:5

77

74.54

7

2(9

70

56.82

24)

72

67.78

219

71

61.03

6909

7

522

1

511

2

610.

2

549

290

260,17

VERNACULAR SC

Under Section 39 A.

22 24

Bridges Street, (G.) *

R. C. M.

Holy Infancy, (M.)

>>

25

Hunghom, (G.)

26

27

*

*

Yaumati, (G.) Shankiwan, (G.) ·

10 10 4

244

242

242

>>

6888888

85

65.00 6

83

65.00

8

60

44.00

245

72

60.00

>>

>>

245/1/20

58

29.00

28

Aberdeen, (M.)

*

238

57

42.00

>>

29

No. 109 Second Street, (B.)

*

*

L. M. S.

218

64

53.57

30

No. 22 Taipingshan, (G.) *

227

64

32.56

>>

31

No. 5 Clarence Terrace, (B.) **.

222

32

26.88

>>

33

No. 199 Queen's Road East, (G.) **.

214

77

64.87

""

34

No. 156 Reclamation Street, Yaumati, (B.)**

217

92

58.44

35

No. 28 D'Aguilar Street, (G)

* *

>>

2284

•38

34.68

36

37

38

No. 84 Canton Road, (G)

40

42

Tauglungehau Chapel, (B.) *

43

44

45

Wanchai Chapel, (B.)

**

Hospital Chapel, (B)* -

*

No. 343 Queen's Road West, (B.) **

No. 171 Portland Street, Yaumati, (B.) No. 20a Aberdeen Street, (G.) * *

Tanglangchau Chapel, (G.)

*

208

62

50.43

""

2114

69

55.34

**

>>

""

**

JJ

**

35

>>

*

22

46

Wanchai Chapel, (G.) *

**

47

Bridges Street, (B.)

48

Sham-huipo, (M.) **

22

A. B. M.

B. M.

10 10 10 10 10 10

210

39

30.67

227

60

46.51

219

51

40.41

217

11

36.94

227

58

46.10

4

212호

43

34.07

5

210

73

62.30

...

225

85

59.00

207

117

89.92

49

50

Toky

51

High Street, (G.) * *

53

55

57

Shaukiwan, (M.) wawan, (B.)

**

No. 218 Hollywood Road, (B.) **

No. 36 Lyndhurst Terrace, (G.) No. 6 Western Street. (G.)

>>

A

220

52

43.92

**

218

27

58

45.18

228

22

75

53.12

C. M. S.

5

223

73

62.00

**

236

F

Average Attendance.

Upper &

Remove

Classes.

Lower

Classes.

Total.

Rate.

༼3

Total.

*

Rate.

Total.

*A

Total Capita- tion Grant.

Rent Grant.

Oxford Local

Grant.

Total Grants.

LISH SCHOOLS.

Code Section 38 A. ∞ B.

*A

1..167 | 273

440 243,120 15

4,050 7,170

82 198

280

22

1,320 | 14

2,562 3,882

27

63

90

22

462 14

588 1,050

10

48

58

22

220 15

720

940

480

28

34

62

24

672 15

510 1,182

600

144

124

268

24

3,456 15

1,860 5,316

18

84

102

22

396 14

966| 1,362

9

66

75

14

...

174 400

574 20 3,480 13

532 5,200 8,680

532

659 1,290 1,949

13,126

|16,988 30,114 1,080 2,405 33,599

CULAR SCHOOLS.

Under Section 39 A. & B.

Grant for European

mum Attendance. Rate. Total. Supervision.

ment.

702-

0

74.54 56.82

67.78

6103

6609

7

522

511

610.

549

260.17

Rate.

122 N

Total.

$

Total Capita-

tion Grant.

Rent Grant.

REMARKS.

1,020 | 8,190

Thoroughly emcient.

Մ

Capitation Grant paid on estimate of att ndance made by the Edu-

cation Dept. (Upper Classes 13; Lower Classes 270; Total 400.) 125 | 4,007 | (Capitation Grant paid on estimate of attendance made by the Edu-

cation De t. (Upper Classes 60; Lower Classes 185; Total 243. ) 40|1,090|| Capitation Grant paid on estimate of attendance made by the Eda-

66

cation Dept. (Upper Classes 21; Lower Classes 42; Total 63.)

1,420

"Thoroughly efficient." 3 years running. 75 1,857

8 years running. Thoroughly efficient." 905 6,221

Capitation Grant paid on estimate of attendance made by the Edu- 1,382ation Dept. (Lower Classes 69.)

532 220 8,900

20

Capitation Grant paid on estimate of attendance made by the Edu-

cation Dept. (Lower Classes 18.)

Total Grants.

REMARKS.

75

597

597

114

625

625

.36

746

746

› 22

671

"Thoroughly efficient." "Thoroughly efficient 671 "Thoroughly efficient."

2,639

ACULAR SCHOOLS.

Under Section 39 A.

3

years running.

3 years running.

6 years running.

65.00 6

330

330

68.00

440

440

44.00

352

352

60.00

540

540

29.00

203

203

42.00

245

245

...

53.57

482

100

582

Capitation Grant paid on estimate of attendance made by the Edu-

cation Dept. (55.)

Capitation Grant paid on estimate of attendance made by the Edu-

cation Dept. (55.)

Thoroughly efficient." 3 years running.“

(Capitation Grant paid on estimate of attendance made by the Edu-

cation Dept. (35.)

Thoroughly efficient." 6 years running.

32.56

195

136

331

26.88

188

120

308

64.87

584

120

"Thoroughly efficient." 2 years running. 704 "Thoroughly efficient."

8 years running.

58.14

409

80

489

34.68

243

160

403

50.43

454

454

"Thoroughly efficient."

3 years running.

55.34

332

332

...

30.67

184

80

264

66

46.51

419 176

595

Thoroughly efficient." 3 years ruuning.

40.41

283

283

36.91

259

64

323

46.10

277

160

437

34.07

204

204

62.30

371

374

...

59.00

6

354

354

"Inefficient."

2 years running.

89.92

629

629

43.92

307

307

45.18

316

316

53.12

319

319

66

62 00

9

558

244

802

44 26

310 216

526

48.12

289

126

Last year's Grant at $7.00.

Thoroughly efficient." 5 years runuing.

495 Last year's Grant at $5! ~

No.

Name and Nature of School.

Mission.

Der Foundling House, (G.)

Ber. M.

18

Fairlea, (G.) **

C. M. S.

19

Victoria Home and Orphanage, (G;)

**

20

Training Home for Girls, **

L. M. S.

I

4

Number of

Standards.

7宁77

Nurber

C

E

d

Scool

Maximum Enrolment.

Attendance.

Rate.

Total. Su

Das.

2:5

77

219/

24)

219

FRNE

70

74.54 56.92

72

67.78

71

61.03

290

260.1 1

6909

VERNACULAR

Under Section 39 A.

22

24

25

26

27

Bridges Street, (G.) * Holy Infancy, (M.) Hunghom, (G.) Yaumati, (G.)* Shankiwan, (G.) *

R. C. M.

244

85

*

242

83.

65.00 6 65.00

11

*

242

60

44.00

"}

245

72

60.00

""

245

58

29.00

""

28

Aberdeen, (M.) *

238

57

12.00

""

29

No. 109 Second Street, (B.) *

*

L. M. S.

218

64

53.57

∞ ∞ ∞ σ779

30

No. 22 Taipingshan, (G.) * *

227

64

32.56

"

31

No. 5 Clarence Terrace, (B.) **

222

32

26.88

""

33

No. 199 Queen's Road East, (G.) * *

214.

77

64.87

27

34

No. 156 Reclamation Street, Yaumati, (B.)**

217

92

58.44

27

35

No. 28 D'Aguilar Street, (G)

**

228

38

34.68

"}

36

Wanchai Chapel, (B.)

37

38

No. 84 Canton Road, (G )

40

42

43

44

45

Hospital Chapel, (B)* *

*

No. 343 Queen's Road West, (B.) * * Tanglungchau Chapel, (B.) *

**

No. 171 Portland Street, Yaumati, (B.) No. 20a Aberdeen Street, (G.) Tanglungchau Chapel, (G.)

****

*

208

62

50.43

""

211

69

55.34

#

**

**

མ མ ཐཱ མི ནྟཾསྶ

210

39

30.67

6

227

60

46.51 9

*219

54

40.41 7

217

41

36.94

""

7

227

58

46.10

6

212

43

22

---34.07

46

Wanchai Chapel, (G.) **

210

73

62.30

47

Bridges Street, (B.)

*

A. B. M.

225

85

59.00

48

Sham-huipo, (M.) *.*

B. M.

207

117

89.92

49

50

Shaukiwan, (M.) **

Tokwawan, (B.)

**

220

52

43.92

""

218

58

45.18

""

51

High Street, (G.) **

228

75

53.12

53

No. 218 Hollywood Road, (B.)

C. M. S.

223

73

62 00

55

57

No. 36 Lyndhurst Terrace, (G.) No. 6 Western Street. (G.) **

***

236

53

14.26

250

A

وو

67

48.12

-59.

60

61

62

63

61

68

69

No. 35 Pottinger Street, (G.)

70

Yaumati Chapel, (G.) * *

Nos. 44 & 46 Queen's Road West, (G.) No. 20 Pokfulam Road, (G.)

Shankiwan, (G.) * *

Stanley, (M.) * *

No. 263 Queen's Road West, (B.)

No. 5 Elgm Street, (G.) * *

Kowloon City, (G.)

72 Yaumati, (B.) *

**

-248

52

41.13

**

236

78

45.17

"

.**

248

42

39.68

>>

241

40

29.47

""

227

34

27.64

""

**

Rh. M.

209

104

82.79

W M.

236

61

53.61

229

65

60.13

""

*

C. M. S.

257

78

51.00

74

Kowloon City, (B.) * *

Secular. B. M.

235

49

34.00

203/

103

82.00

40

2,571

1,973.91

55

53

(1910.) (1911)

Total Number of Schools.

Do.

Grand Total,...............

5,290

14,183.08

NOTE.-R. C. M.-Roman Catholic Mission.

C. of E. Church of England.

C. M. S.

Ber. M.

=

Church Missionary Society.

- Berliu Mission.

L. M. S.=London Missionary Society.

A. B. M.:

Rh. M. S.

B. M.

American Board Mission.

Rhenish Missionary Society.

Basel Mission.

NOTE

W. M.

В.

G.

M.

*

=School ye

=School ye

-The school year for

No. 39 close.i.

522 511

610

549

S

num

ient.

Attendance.

Grant for European

Rate. Total. Supervision.

Rate.

Total.

74.54

56.82

67.78

61.03

6999

7

522

511

610.

549

260.1

1

122 N

Total

tion Grant.

Capita-

Rent Grant.

Total Grants.

$

75

597

597

114

625

: 36

746

625 746

· 22

671

ACULAR SCHOOLS.

Under Section 39 A.

REMARKS.

66

Thoroughly efficient." 3 years running. "Thoroughly efficien: " 3 years running. 671 'Thoroughly efficient." 6 years running.

2,639

66

65.00 6

330

330

68.00

440

440

44.00

352

352

...

CC

60.00

9

540

540

29.00

7

203

203

42.00

7

245

245

64

53.57

9

482

100

582

32.56

195

136

331

26.88

188

120

308

64.87

9

584

120

704

58.44

409

80

489

34.68

243

160

403

50.43

9

454

55.34

332

...

30.67

184

80

264

46.51

419

176

595

Capitation Grant paid on estimate of attendance made the Edu-

cation Dept. (55.)

Capitation Grant paid on estimate of attendance ma e by the Fdu-

cation Dept. (55.)

"Thoroughly efficient."

3 years running.

(Capitation Grant paid on estimate of attendance made by the Edn-

cation Dept, (35.)

Thoroughly efficient." 6 years running.

"Thoroughly efficient." 2 years running. "Thoroughly efficient." 8 years running.

454 "Thoroughly efficient." 3 years running.

332

"Thoroughly efficient." 3 years running.

40.41

283

283

...

36.94

259

64

323

46.10

277

160

4371

34.07

204

204

62.30

374

374

59.00

354

354

"Inefficient."

2 years running.

89.92

629

629

43.92

307

307

...

45.18

316

316

53.12

319

319

66

62.00

558

244

802

Last year's Grant at $7.00.

Thoroughly efficient." 5 years running.

...

44.26

310

216

526

48.12

289 136

425

Last year's Grant at $5

288

288

45.17

6

271

271

39.68

278

116

394

29.47

206

72

278

Last year's Grant at $6.00.

27.54

193

193

82.79

580

232

812

53.61

482

176

658

"Thoroughly efficient."

3 years running.

60.13

511

200

741

51.00

34.00

82.00

679

180

90

270

"Thoroughly efficient." 5 years running.

(Capitation Grant paid on estimate of attendance made by the Edu-

cation Dept. (30.)

238 120 738 112

358

850 "Thoroughly efficient." 4 years running.

1,973.91

14,074 2,910

16,984

4,183.08

46,827 3,990 2,405 53,222

W. M.

Wesleyan Mission.

B.

=Boys.

G.

M.

=Girls.

Mixed.

=School year ends 30th June, 1911.

=School year ends 31st December, 1911.

NOTE -The school year for 1912 at the Ellis Kadoorie School will end 30th June,

No. 39 closed.

Table IV.

Table showing Expenditure, Revenue and Average Number of Pupils under instruction in the Education Department, for the years 1901 to 1911.

་ནམས་འབ

Total Expenditure on

Education excluding

Grant Schools.

Total Revenue.

Average Number of Pupils under Instruction.

Average Net Cost per pupil.

Percentage of the Departmental Revenue to Departmental Expenditure.

- N 21

Year.

Goven- Techni-

Govern-

ment cal In-

Total.

Schools. stitute.

ment

Schools.

Techni-

cal In-

stitute.

Govern-

Techni-

Grant

Total.

ment

cal In-

Schools.

Schools.

stitute.

Govern-

ment

Schools.

Techni-

Grant

Schools.

Excluding

Including

cal In-

Technical

Technical

stitute.

Institute.

Institute.

$

$

".

C.

$ C.

No.

No.

No

0.

b.

0.

1901,

67,072

67,072

29,802,15

29,802.15

1,557

3,197

23.93

6.22

%

44.43

a

1902, .

73,291

73,291

32,422.35

32,422.35

1,664

3,107

24.56

6.14

44.23

1903,

112,780

112,780 | 31,366.30

34,366.30

1,618

3,542

48.48

5.37

3445

F

1904,

115,701

115,701 36,251.59

36,251.59 1.665

3.305

47.71 10.86

:

31.33

1905,

118,785

1906,

118,952

118,785

2,731 | 121,683

£1,201.50

16,436.07

41,201.50 1.797

3,526

43.17

11.31

34.68.

645.00 47.081.07 1,932

3,564

191

37.53

11.34

10.92

39.03

38.69

1907,

142,072

7,755 149,827

49,238 00 2,184.50 51,422.50 2,144

3,780

253

43.30

11.10

22.01

34.65

34.32

1908,

157,366

9,891 167,257 | 34,791.11 3,742.00 58,533.11

2,251

3,927

317

45 57

12.35

19.39

34.81

34.99

1909,

154,626

9,379 164,005 | 68,204.25 3,699,50 | 71,903.75

2,326 4,234

256

37.15

13.07 22.18

44.10

10 94

VAPO

1910,

163,955* 10,607 | 174,562 71,952.50 3,141,50 75,094.00

1,960

4,337

327

46.94

11.77

22.83

44.00

43.01

1911,

173,292*

292* 9,180 182,422

72,597.00 3,459.25 | 76,056.25

2,120

4,183

310

47.50

13.27

18.29

41.89

41 69

*

Including Head Office charges.

+

N 22

Table V.

Percentage of Colonial Revenue spent on Education.

+

Years.

Total Revenue excluding

Land Sales &

School Fees.

Total spent

on Educa-

Fees

Total spent.

on Educa-

tion (Gross | Collected. | tion (Nett ị

Cost).

Cost).

Percentage.

$

$

$་

$

%

1901,

3,943,776

86,946

29.802

57,144

1:45

1902,

4,297.290

92,356

32,422

59,934

1.39

1903,

...' 4,694,326

130,620

34,366

96.254

2:05

1904,

6,286,697

151,589

36,252

115,337

1-83

1905,

6,184,942 158,678

41,202

117,476

1-81

1906,

6,571,989

150,373 47,081

112,292

1.71

1907,

6,391,107

181,028: 51.423

132,605

2.07

1908,

5,976.316 205,875

58,533

147,342

2:47

1909, ... 6,214,929

219,359

71,904

147,455

2:37

1910. 6,553,089 225,606

75,094

150.512

2:30

*1911, ... 6,723.169

237,942 76,056

161,886

2:41

*

Fees re nittel to Free Scholars" ($4,124) are not included in

this table.

SCHOOL.

--

Table VI.

Oxford Local Examination Results: 1911.

PRELIMINARY.

Honours.

Pass.

JUNIOR.

Honours.

Pass..

1st Class.

2nd Class.

Diocesan Boys', Ellis Kadoorie, Queen's College, St. Joseph's,.. St. Stephen's,

St. Paul's College,

Victoria British School,.. Belilios Public School, C.M.S. Girls' High School, Diocesan Girls',

French Convent...

Italian Convent,.

Kowloon British School,. St. Stephen's, (G),

St. Mary's,

Private Tuition,

...

...

·1

Honours.

SENIOR.

Pass.

Total.

3rd Class.

1st Division (within age

limit).

2nd Division

(over age).

1st Class.

2nd Class.

3rd Class.

1st Division (within age

limit).

2nd Division

(over age).

1st Class.

2nd Class.

3rd Class.

Special.

1st Division (within age limit).

2nd Division (over age).

...

...

:

...

::

~

::

1

2-

2

14

5

...

26

4

15

...

mi awwnn: --72a7

Total,

1

3

17

92

-

62264

16

N

1552

1

39

19

...

...

...

:

...

::

:

986

02.

1

1

2

7 30

34

13

45

44

20

12

3:2

10

7

9

- N 23 --

5

4

10

4

6

2

F

218

. Table VII.

Oxford Local Examination Results: 1905 to 1911.

LO

:

...

:

:

:

- N 24

***

:

:

10

:

...

***

1

:

:

...

1... 9 17 34

27

2... 9 16 27

...

...

***

...

::.

2

N

:

*** ***

:

... 14 20 39

...

12 25 35

...30 44 38

31 43 59

7 38 60 113

...

:

...

I

:

Senior.

Junior.

Preliminary.

Senior.

Preliminary.

Special.

Junior.

Senior.

Preliminary.

Junior.

Senior.

Junior.

Preliminary.

Preliminary.

| Junior.

Senior.

Senior.

Junior,

Preliminary.

Senior.

Junior.

Preliminary.

Senior.

Junior.

Preliminary.

Special.

Senior.

Junior.

Diocesan

Ellis

Kadoorie

St.

Queen's

St.

Boys'.

School.

College.

Joseph's.

Stephen's

Boys'.

St.

Paul's

College

Victoria Belilios British Public

C.M.S.

Girls' High

Kowloon

St.

Diocesan French

Italian

St.

Private

Girls'.

Convent.

Convent.

British Stephen's

Total.

School.

School.

School.

School.

Girls'.

Mary's.

Tuition.

Year.

Preliminary.

Senior.

Junior.

Preliminary.

Senior.

Junior.

Preliminary.

Senior.

Junior.

Preliminary.

Senior.

Junior.

I Preliminary.

Senior.

Junior.

Preliminary.

Senior.

Junior.

Preliminary.

Special.

Senior.

Preliminary. Special, Senior.

Junior.

Junior.

Preliminary.

2

t

- 00

...

:

6 4 12 1

2

8...

...

:

་་་

...

:

:

...

...

:

:

:

:

:

...

هر

4

:

:

:

:.

:

་་་

...

:.

:

2

:

...

:

19

***

...

1906, ....

1907,

1908, .....

1909, ....

1910, ....

L

5

3

L

20

3

8

411

5 7

9

..

~

8

...

2

3

4

...

***

...

...

...

....

...

...

...

3

3

99

4 11

2

715 4

9 16

6 1910 7 14 15

... ... ...

911 12 8 12 16

6

1905,....

1911, ....

00

7 19

:

7

6

8

8

་་་

:..

...

...

...

:

:

...

w

2

:.

:..

...

...

...

:

LO

4 7

3

8

1

1 ...

...

2 ...

7 26 6 19 199

10

...

:

2

:

:

:

OC

:

:

:

...

:

:

:

:

:..

་་་

2

:

:

2

་་་

1

2

19

:

N

*

:

H

:

2

2 2

4

*

1

Position.

N 25

Table VIII.

Result of the Hygiene Shield Competition (July, 1911).

NAME OF SCHOOL.

Marks obtained.

Max. 700.

No. of

Competitors.

1st Belilios Public School for Girls,

176

62.9

2nd

St. Joseph's College,

401

10

57.3

3rd

St. Mary's,

144

4

51.4

4th

Diocesan Boys',

344

10

49.1

5th

Italian Convent,.................

341

10

48.7

6th

French Convent,

143

10

5

40.9

7th

Saiyingpun,.

282

10

40.3

8th

Kowloon School,.........

55

2

39.3

9th

Wanchai,..

262

10

37.4

10th

Yaumati,

217

9

34.4

11th

Queen's College, (Division IV A.),

194

io

27.7

12th Victoria British School,..

77

27.5

13th

14th Queen's College, (Division IV C.),

Queen's College, (Division IV D.),

86

6

20.5

97

+

9

15.4

15th Queen's College, (Division IV B.),

66

10

9.4

Note. The shield was awarded to St. Joseph's College, the first four members of its team having obtained a higher average mark than the team of the Belilios Public School.

1

Percentage.

No.

N 26

Table IX.

Amount of Fees Remitted to Free Scholars in Government

Schools during 1911.

1 Queen's College, ....

SCHOOL.

Amount of School

Fees remitted to

Free Scholars in 1911.

2,660.00

Kowloon British School,..

3

Victoria British School,

4

Saiyingpun English School,

462.00

¦

5

Yaumati

do.,

405.00

6 Wantsai

do.,

387.00

7 Belilios Public School,

160.00

8

Taipingshan English School,

9

Praya East

do.

36.00

10

Mongkok

do..

il

English School for Indians,....

8.00

12

Tai Po English School,

13

Ping Shan

do.,

6.50

14

Cheung Chau do.,

Total,...

$4,124.50

Table X.

TABLE OF SCHOLARSHIPS PRESENTED TO QUEEN'S COLLEGE.

The following scholarships are held at Queen's College and are awarded on Results of Annual Examination.

Name of Scholarship.

Senior Morrison,..

Awarded

to

Class 1.

Value.

How awarded.

$100 a year for 3 | Highest aggregate in all subjects.

27

,, Belilios,.......

Stewart,

"

years. $50 for 1 year.

Subjects:

Dictation, Composition, History and Shakespeare.

$100

$150

Blake,

>>

$100

Wright,

Ho Kom Tong,

"

,

Class II.

60

"

>>

$100

Io Tung,

Junior Belilios,

""

,,

""

"

Class III.

$25 a year for 2

""

Io Fook,

years. $100 for 1 year.

""

"}

Junior Morrison,

Class IV.

Alfred May,

Elocution. Dictation, Grammar, Com- position, History and Translation from and into Chinese.

English Conversation, Composition and Special Translation from and into Chinese.

Hygiene, Geography and Translation from and into Chinese.

Reading, Conversation, Dictation, Com- position, History, Chinese to Eng- lish, English to Chinese.

Hygiene, Geography and Translation from and into Chinese.

Dictation, Composition, Grammar and History.

Hygiene, Chinese to English, Geo- graphy, English to Chinese.

$50 a year for 3 | Highest aggregate in all subjects.

years. $60 for 1 year.

Subjects: Reading, Conversation, Dictation, Com-

position and Translation from and into Chinese.

N 28

Table XI.

Examination Results, Technical Institute, June, 1911.

Subjects.

Stage,

Number

Examined.

Number

"Passed".

Passed with

Distinction.

Total

Number Percentage

Number

of

Failed,

Passed.

Passes.

I

Machine Drawing,

II

III

I

Applied Mechanics,

II

I

Steam,

II

I

Building

Con-

II

struction,

III

Field Surveying,

I

Mathematics,

II

III

Chemistry :-

Practical,

II III

1

Metallurgy,

Physics,

Electricity,

English,

French,......

Chinese,

Ele.

0 10

Shorthand,

Inter.

12

11

II

Book-keeping,..

I

8

1

12

Teachers' Class,

II

16

III

14

Kindergarten,

%

1020ODORNO-NOL

1163N

3124 + ∞ ∞ ∞

2

67

1

100

0

1

100

100

100

100

57

50

100

875

75

33.3

66.6

100

100

100

100

75

100

90.9

83.3

100

75

66.6

93

92

67749 σ a

66.6

62.5

6

50

9

43

10

28.5

0

100

Total,..

187

87

44

131

ཚ་

56

70.0

N 29

Table XII.

Revenue and Expenditure of Technical Institute, 1911.

REVENUE.

}

EXPENDITURe.

}

Students' Fees Received,* 8,715.75 Lecturers & Staff,

9,046.00

Li Shing Grant,....

1,100.00 Equipment of Classes....

264.14

Refunds,

51.00 Examiners' Fees,...

350.00

Cost to Government,...... 5,414.40 Fans and Light,.

386.82

Incidentals,

234.19

Total,

..$10,281.15

Total,.........$ 10,281.15

* Students' Fees amounting to $256.50 were refunded to Teachers who "passed" the June Examination.

Table XIII.

Comparative Table.

1907.

1908.

1909.

1910.

1911.

Expenditure. ....

Revenue,

Cost to Government,

Number of Pupils,

Average Cost per Pupil,

$7,878.81 $9,891.20 | $10,669.69 $11,834.57 $10,281.15

2,148.50 3,742.00 5,097.26 4,733,60 4,866.75

5,694.31 6,164.20

5,572.42 7,100.97 5,414.40

253

317

256

327

310

22.01

19.39

22.18

21.71

17.46

*

N 30

Annexe A.

List of Local Teachers who have obtained Certificates from the Hongkong Technical Institute in connection with the

NAME.

Technical Institute.

1.-FIRST YEAR CERTIFICATE,

1. Chan Sai-fong,...

2. Chan Wing-to,.......

3. Chiu Kwong,

4. Fung So,

5. Fung Sze-chan,.

6. Fung Yuk-shum,

DATE OF CERTIFICATE.

1910

PRESENT EMPLOYMENT.

1911

Present employment unknown.

St. Paul's College.

"

Present employment unknown.

Yaumati District School.

33

1910.

Saiyingpun District School.

Present employment unknown.

Queen's College.

99

7. Hung Yuk-sang,

8. Lau Po,

"

Present employment unknown.

9. Li Lün-kwai,

1911

Queen's College.

10. Li Mun-kwong,

1909

Present employment unknown.

11. Lo Wai-hong, ...

Do.

""

12. Lu Chi-po, ......

1910

Diocesan Boys' School.

13. Mak King-

cheung,

1911

Saiyingpun District School.

14. Mohamed, Fateh

1910

English School for Indians.

15. Muhammad, G.

1911

Present employment unknown.

16. Pun Ü-sam,

1909

Do.

17. Tang Iu-ting,

1910

Ellis Kadoorie School.

18. Tsang Kun-sham,

""

Present employment unknown

19. Wong Nim-cho,

1911

Ellis Kadoorie School.

20. Young Kong, ...!

1910

Do.

21. Young Kün,.

Saiyingpun District School.

NAME.

N 31

II. SECOND YEAR CERTIFICATE.

DATE OF CERTIFICATE.

PRESENT EMPLOYMENT.

1. Chan Kwok-

kwong,.................

1911

Ellis Kadoorie School.

2. Chan Sing-ü,

Do.

3. Fox, W. W........

1910

4. Fung Man-sui,...)

"

5. Ho Wo-ching,

6. Ho Yan-tak,.....

7. Kung Hon,*

5

""

""

3

Saiyingpun District School.

Present employment unknown.

Wantsai District School,

Yaumati District School.

Saiyingpun District School.

8. Lai Pui-yan,...

""

Queen's College.

9. Lam Ming-shan,.

1911

Ellis Kadoorie School.

10. Leung Shiu-on, .

1910

Yaumati District School.

11 Li Tat-tseung,

1911

Praya East Lower Grade School.

12. Lo Yuk-lun,..

Wantsai District School.

13. Mak Ping-fui, ...

Yaumati District School.

14. Singh, Bishen,...

1910

English School for Indians.

15. Tang Tsok-san,...

Queen's College.

""

16. Ün Chau-tung,...

1911

Praya East Lower Grade School.

17. Ün Chun-wa,

1910

Clerical.

1

* Gained Distinction.

NAME.

N 32

J

III.-THIRD YEAR CERTIFICATE.

DATE OF CERTIFICATE.

PRESENT EMPLOYMENT.

1. Cheung Hok-chau,

1911

Queen's College.

2. Lau Tsoi,

3. Ng Fung-chau,*

Do.

>>

Wantsai District School.

""

4. Un Kwong

...

""

* Gained Distinction.

Annexe B.

Do.

RULES FOR THE HYGIENE TEAM COMPETITION, 1912.

1. A Challenge Shield is offered annually to the school which sends in the best papers in Hygiene done by a team of scholars.

2. The minimum number allowed for a team will be five scholars. The maximum number allowed for a team will be ten scholars.

3. Teams will be drawn from Class 4 only. If a school has divisions in Class 4, each division will be a separate unit for the purposes of the competition.

·

4. If Class 4, or any division of it, in any school contains only 10 scholars or less, the whole class must be entered as a team for the competition. If Class 4, or any division of it, consists of more than 10 scholars, the Head of the School will select the team.

5. Schools in which Class 4 consists of less than 5 scholars will be allowed to send in the scholars of Class 4 to the examina- tion but will not be awarded the shield.

6. The examination will be held between the 7th and 14th days of July. The Head of each competing school will forward to the Director of Education during the last week in June a list of his team.

7. Boys will be examined at Queen's College and girls at the Belilios Public School.

1.

N 33

8. The shield will be given to the school whose team obtains the highest average mark among a number of its members equal to the number of the numerically weakest team. Thus if the num- erically weakest team should be seven, the mark scored by a team of ten will be the average mark of the first seven among its mem- bers.

9. The winning school will hold the shield for one year only. The name of the school will be engraved on the shield.

10. The examination will be based on the "Course of Hygiene for the use of Hongkong Schools" (Elementary Course). Special marks will be given for papers which show that the writers have seen for themselves the things they write about and have not merely acquired a book knowledge.

11. Competitors may not write their names nor the name of their school on their papers. They will be given letters of the alphabet for the purpose of identification.

12. On the completion of the time allotted to the examination, papers will be forwarded under sealed cover by the Examiner in charge to the Director of Education.

13. All Government Schools which include a Class 4 will enter for the examination.

14. All schools entering for the examination will, if their team >core an average mark of more than 45% of the total, be exempted from further examination in Hygiene during the ensuing twelve months.

15. All rules hitherto in force are hereby repealed.

EDUCATION DEPARTMENT,

HONGKONG, 16th February, 1912.

J. R. WOOD,

Director of Education,

Annexe C.

Addresses at Prize-givings by His Excellency the Governor.

Belilios Public School for Girls.

His Excellency said that there was no more significant indica- tion of the new spirit that was pervading China, than the demand by Chinese women, for an adequate education. He pointed out the large increase in attendance, which he said would require a

N 34

large extension of the school buildings. On its completion, posts would be created for Assistant Mistresses and he hoped that they would be given to the girls at the top of the school, after they had undergone preparation as Pupil Teachers. He pointed out to the girls that in building up the character of a nation, much depended upon the standard of home-life, and upon the training of children. He dwelt upon the importance of women's duties and begged them not to go beyond those duties, as in doing so they would lose their charm and influence. There were quite enough men in the world to do men's work, and none too many women to do women's work.

Queen's College.

His

His Excellency was quite convinced that the increase in cost. in excess of last year (due in part to the increase in staff and in part to the decrease in numbers of pupils), had been well spent in improved methods which had resulted in better education for all the boys and not merely for a few of the more brilliant ones. Excellency was very pleased at the good state of discipline that had been maintained in spite of the numerous temptations to induce excitement. He spoke about the future reform in the executive and judicial administration in China and pointed out that reform could only be achieved by the integrity, patriotism, and self sacri- fice of the officers responsible for the guidance and control of the State, whether their station be high or low. He told the boys and especially those who intended to finish their studies at the Üniver- sity, that they were now receiving an education, to fit them if they desired, to take up official positions in China and that it depended on them and on their contemporaries in schools here and else- where, whether the future of China was to be one of progress and advancement, or not. His Excellency impressed upon them the importance of taking advantage of the present opportunities to fit them, not only by intellectual and educational equipment, but in character and singleness of purpose, to guide their country, in whatever position they may serve, through the difficult years that would be before them. He earnestly hoped that many of those who had done well at school would enter the University and so equip themselves with a more thorough knowledge in the various branches of study, and also acquire habits of self-control and self- sacrifice, by the study of the lives and characters of the great men of the past, irrespective of race. His Excellency said that perhaps he would not be privileged to address the Queen's College boys again, but he would like to say that it was his hope and ambition that the Queen's College boys, who have taken their degrees in the University, will be men of light and leading in China; men who will have learnt in British Institution something greater than can be acquired from text-books-a sense of duty and a standard of conduct which will carry them through their public and private life regardless of any lesser aim than the approval of their own conscience.

MM

Appendix P.

REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC WORKS

FOR THE YEAR 1911.

Expenditure.

1. The amounts voted, as compared with those actually ex- pended by the Department under the various headings, were as follows:-

Amount voted.

In Estimates.

Supplemen- tary Votes

Actual. Expenditure.

Total.

$

(i) Personal Emoluments and,

Other Charges,

352,455 00

4,356.75

356,811.75

308,408.12

(ii) Annually Recurrent Works,

416,200.00

92,288 59

508,488 59 486,940 80

(iii) Extraordinary Works, ... 1,080,400.00 257,921.44

|

1,338,321.44 1,094,817.93

Total,....

$ 1,849,055.00 | 354,566 78 2,203,621.78 1,890,166.85

·

Detailed statements of (ii) and (iii) are given in Annexes A and B.

With regard to (i), the saving is due to vacancies in the Staff, lapsing pay of officers on leave, refunds on account of supervision of work executed by the Department for various public companies, and the prevalence of a higher rate of exchange than that assumed in pre- paring the Estimates (average rate 1/92 against estimated rate 1/9).

In the case of (ii), savings occurred under the following sub- heads as set forth below:

Maintenance of Lighthouses,.

$ 1,065.67

Maintenance of Sewers, Nullahs, &c.,

3,023.91

Maintenance of Public Cemetery,.

1,823.06

Maintenance of Public Recreation Grounds,

1,023.00

Maintenance of Water Works, Kowloon,

1,411.98

P 2

The saving on Maintenance of Lighthouses was due to few repairs of a special nature being required; that on Sewers, Nullahs, &c., to the fact that the Sanitary Board took over the work of cleans- ing all nullahs on the Kowloon side; that on Maintenance of Public Cemetery to little extension work being carried out; that on Mainten- ance of Public Recreation Grounds to less work in repairs to the ground being necessary than was anticipated; that on Maintenance of Water Works, Kowloon, to the fact that the Government only had to maintain the Contract Works from July instead of from January as was expected.

The savings were more than counter-balanced by excesses on other sub-heads, the principal of which were as follows:-

Maintenance of Buildings,..

Maintenance of Roads & Bridges in City,

Maintenance of Roads & Bridges in New Terri-

$ 7,840.50

14,596.30

tories,

2,970.85

Maintenance of Telegraphs,

1,091.86

Gas Lighting, City & Hill District,

4,563.68

Electric Lighting, City,.

2,239.64

Typhoon and Rainstorm Damages,

44,531.04

Maintenance of City & Hill District Water-

works,

4,826.40

The excess on Maintenance of Buildings was due largely to renewing the whole of the tiling of the main roofs and reconstructing in ferro-concrete and asphalt the whole of the verandah roofs on Government House; that on Maintenance of Roads & Bridges in the City to tar-macadamizing part of Queen's Road Central and Wardley Street, laying Ice House Street with wood block paving and repairing the damage caused by the unusually continuous rains in the months of April and May; that on Maintenance of Roads & Bridges in New Terri- tories to special repairs to the bridge and causeway at Taipo; that on Maintenance of Telegraphs to unusually heavy expenditure due to the rusting away of wires on many of the lines; that on Gas Lighting, City and Hill District, to the fact that thirteen monthly payments for gas consumed were charged to the vote in accordance with instructions received; that on Electric Lighting City to the same reason as in last item; that on Typhoon and Rainstorm Dam- ages to the extensive damages caused by the typhoons of 27th July 6th and 5th August-over 17 inches of rain fell between the 4th and of August-and that on Maintenance of City and Hill District Water-works to again bringing into operation the temporary pumping engine installed in 1903 and thus rendering available for supply purposes the waters of certain streams which are not intercepted by the Intermediate Reservoir and permanent pumping plant.

The excess in (iii) is slight owing to savings on votes and on works not undertaken, though provided for, practically balancing the over-expenditure on the other votes.

P 3

The following is a statement of the expenditure in 1911 as compared with that of the previous year :-

1910.

0.

1911.

C.

Increase.

C.

Decrease.

C.

Personal Emolu-

ments & Other

Charges,

309,784.69

308,408.12

1,376,57

Annually Recur-

rent Works,

429,835.24

486,940.80

57,105.56

Extraordinary

Works,

1,223,909.83

1,094,817.93

129,091.90

Total,

1,963,529.76

1,890,166.85

57,105.56

130,468.47

.

The decrease in the first item is due to the higher rate of ex- change prevailing during the year (average for 1911 being 1/9 against 1/9 for 1910).

The increase in the second item is principally due to increased expenditure under the following sub-heads :-

Maintenance of Buildings,

Maintenance of Roads & Bridges in City,...... Maintenance of Roads & Bridges outside City,...

$ 7,843.21

14,595.88

1,829.19

Maintenance of Roads & Bridges in New Terri-

tories,....

7,971.79

Gas Lighting, City & Hill District,

5,012.73

Electric Lighting, City,

2,146.43

Exhumation of remains in Cemeteries...

3,924.83

Typhoon and Rainstorm Damages,..

24,534.63

Maintenance of City & Hill District Waterworks,

1,572.86

The principal decreases under the second item were as follows:-

Maintenance of Buildings in New Territories,...$ 3,220,21

Maintenance of Sewers, Nullahs, &c.,........

3,003.10

Maintenance of Praya Wall & Piers,

1,737.70

Maintenance of Public Cemeteries,

1,826.00

Maintenance of Public Recreation Grounds,.

1,455:29

Dredging Foreshores,

2,790.64

Maintenance of Shaukiwan Water Works,

1,232.09

The decrease in the third item may be ascribed entirely to the large sum ($364,979) expended in 1910 on resumptions of land intended for the site of the terminal station for the Railway and for the extension of the old Western Market during its reconstruction.

- P 4-

Land Sales and Surveys.

2. Land Sales, Extensions, Grants, &c.—The following tabulated statement gives particulars of these :--

No. of Lots.

Area in Sq. feet.

Annual Rent.

Premium.

Total.

Total.

Total.

Total.

Sales by Auction. Island of Hongkong, Kowloon Peninsula, N. T., New Kowloon,

Southern District, " Northern District,

*

Sales without Auction. Island of Hongkong, Kowloon Peninsula, N. T., New Kowloon,

Southern District, Northern District,

Extensions Granted.

...

$

C.

C.

21

452,898

2

20,806

2,880.00 166.00

$ C. 240 190.00

C.

2,294.00

39

80,150

137

2,901,919

167 50 237.62

1,127.00

3,96.00

199

3,455,773

3,451.12

247,507.00

1

3,200

34.00

960.00

...

...

17

6,969

142

98.436

14.06 77.99

84.00 753.00

160

108,608

126.05

1,797.00

Island of Hongkong,

15

Kowloon Peninsula, New Territories,

Conversions and Exchanges.

Island of Hongkong, Kowloon Peninsula,.. N. T., New Kowloon,

193–

15,1981

$6.00

57,669

332.00

4,228.90 5,926.15

1,032

4.00

20.61

19

73,899

422.00

10,175.69

10,470

96.00

3,114.50

3,471

13.16

84.00

Southern District,

"

""

Northern District,

3

5,522

.15

10

19,163

109 31

3,228.50

Grants on Nominal

Terms.

Island of Hongkong,

3

36,450

13.00

New Territories,

Kowloon Peninsula,.

Grants on Short

Lenses.

...

36,450

13.00

7,500

...

10,729

Island of Hongkong,

Kowloon Peninsula,...

New Territories,

1

Permits to occupy Land

New Territories,

"}

for short periods.

Island of Hongkong,

Kowloon Peninsula,......

N. T., let by A.D.O.,§.

Extensions of Short

Period Leases to 75 years.

Island of Hongkong,

Kowloon Peninsula,...

New Territories,

Quarry Leases.

Island of Hongkong, Kowloon Peninsula,....

N. T., New Kowloon,

469

210

.....

..

216

396

N.

19

186

1,477

5.00

47.00

18,229

52.00

8,571.91

8,418.99

2,065.26

518.31

:

344.86

[19,919.33

...

***

:

:

:

:

:

1

13,460,040

492,228

100

4,440,071

Southern District.

""

1

10,018,800

"

Northern District,

2

3,354,556

180.00

2,850.00 20,254.00 1,860 00 3,070.00

106

31,765,695

28,514.00

Mining Licenccs.

New Territories,

Northern District,

Total,

1,976

35,478,114

52,606,81

262,708.19

;

The actual amount of premium paid into the Treasury during the year was $271,804.46 or very much more than the Estimate which amounted to $100,000.00. It included the following sums which do not appear in the above tabulated statement :-

Premium derived from sale of right to

erect piers,

Premium on Kowloon Marine Lot No. 90

sold in 1909,

$4,741.77

3,957.50

In some cases, the premium for land sold in one year is not received by the Treasury until the following year, thus causing an apparent discrepancy between the Treasury figures and those given by this Department.-

The following is a comparative statement of the Revenue derived from Land Sales, etc., for the years 1909-1911:-

Sales by auction,

Sales without auction,

Extensions granted,

Grants on Nominal Terms,

Grants on short leases,

1909.

1910.

1911.

c.

* 34,531.00

$ C. 17,555.00

$ C.

247,507.00

829.00

5,302.67

1,797.00

435 45

3,571.20

10,175.69

Permits to occupy land for short periods,

etc.,

Extensions of short period leases to 75

years,

Quarry Leases,

Mining Licences,

Premia derived from sale of rights to

erect piers,.

14,401.90

28,373.04

4,741.77

Fees for Boundary Stones to mark lots,

321.00

Re-adjustments in Hongkong and Kow-

loon,..

5,670.79

470.81

Re-adjustments in New Territories,

176.60

Conversions and Exchanges,

160.00

4,323.56

3,228.50

Premium for Encroachments, Kowloon,...

171.00

Premium on Kowloon Marine Lot No. 90,

sold in 1909,

3,957.50

3,957.50

Total,

56,520.14

63,730.38 271,407.46

Actual amount of premium paid into

the Treasury,..

40,665.14

63,848 26

271,804.46

* Includes an amount of $15,830.00 to be paid by four equal annual instal- ments, the first of which was not paid until January, 1910. A payment of $25 for boundary stones for the lot was also made in January, 1910.

3. Sales by Auction.—One lot at Taipo was sold by the Public Works Department but the sale was afterwards cancelled and the sum of $100 deposited as a guarantee for the fulfilment of the pur- chase was forfeited. The Assistant District Officer at Taipo sold 137 small lots which realized $3,896.00 and the Assistant District Officer at Hongkong 39 small lots which realized $1,127.00.

P 6

The following are details of the principal Land Sales :-

Number of Lot. Area in sq. ft. Crown Rent. Premium.

IL. 1889,

.123,600

$852.00

I.L. 1892,

5,750

92.00

IL. 1895,

5,384

86.00

I.L. 1896,

3.107

I.L. 1901,

12,581

50.00 1 202.00

$18,540 34,600

5.73 48,650

Rate realized. $0.15 per sq. foot.

6.02 "

"

""

80,100

6.36 ""

""

4. Sales without Auction. There was only one item under this heading in Hongkong, viz., Inland Lot 1900, containing an area of 3,200 square feet, which was granted to the Lord Bishop of Victoria as a site for a chapel. The Assistant District Officers sold 159 small lots by private treaty.

+

5. Extensions granted. The extensions granted in Hongkong comprised small areas to Marine Lot 293, Inland Lots 1804, 1836, 1337, 1834, 389, 1677 and 1711, Shaukiwan Inland Lot 418, Rural Building Lot 114 and Garden Lot 35. Four small strips of land resulting from the Praya Reclamation Scheme of 1889 in front of Inland Lots 1871, 1872, 1220 and 1869, were also granted as extensions to these lots. In Kowloon, there were extensions to Kowloon Inland Lots 1178, 1199 and 640 and in New Kowloon to N.K.R.B.L. 1.

There were no extensions granted by the Assistant District Officers.

6. Conversions and Exchanges.--There were five exchanges in Hongkong, viz. :—

Shaukiwan Inland Lots 426, 427 and 429 granted in exchange for Shaukiwan Lots 328, 331 and 329.

Shaukiwan Inland Lot 428 granted in exchange for Shaukiwan Lots 330 and 332.

Inland Lot 1882 granted in exchange for Inland Lot 1519.

In New Kowloon, portions of Lots Nos. 1537 and 1538 were converted into Building Lot No. 1892 and Lot No. 1335 was con- verted into Building Lot No. 1886. All these lots are in Survey District II.

Three exchanges of lots were arranged by the Assistant District Officer at Taipo.

7. Grants on Nominal Terms.-In Hongkong, these consisted of three lots, viz., Inland Lot 1879 containing an area of 30,000 square feet granted to the Japanese Consul for the Japanese Com- munity as a site for a Crematorium; Inland Lot 1897 containing an area of 4,817 square feet granted as a site for a Training Institute for Chinese Nurses and Midwives; and an area of 1,633 square feet granted free of charge in connection with Inland Lot 1793 for a Chinese District Plague Hospital. There were no grants of this description in Kowloon or in the New Territories.

1

}

P 7

8. Grants on Short Leases.-One such grant was made in Hongkong, viz., Garden Lot No. 39, area 7,500 square feet, let on an annual lease, and one at Taipo, viz., Lôt 620 D.D. 32. The area com- prised in the latter is occupied by one of the Railway Bungalows, which was sold subject to the grant of a 5-years' lease of the land which it occupied, commencing from 1.12.11. It contains 10,729 square feet, the annual Crown rent being $47. The premium received for the Bungalow was $500, of which a sum of $375 was credited to Railway funds and the balance ($125) to ordinary revenue; the original cost of the building having been debited partly to Railway funds and partly to funds under the charge of the Public Works Department.

9. Permits to occupy land for short periods.-These were of a very miscellaneous character and too numerous to admit of individual mention; most of them were for small areas to be held on quarterly permits.

10. Extensions of Short Period Leases to 75 years. When Inland Lot 1882 was granted in exchange for Inland Lot 1519 (vide para. 6), the lease was extended from one year to seventy-five years.

11. Quarry Leases. Quarry Lots Nos. 1 to 4 at Ngau Shi Wan, Al to A5 and A7 to A24 at Ngau Tau Kok, B1 to B16 at Sai Tso Wan, CI to C30 at Cha Kwo Liang, D1 to D25 at Lyemun, and No. 8 at Ma Tau Kok were leased for a period of three years by Public Auction in December 1910 but the Crown Rents did not commence until January 1911. The Leases of Quarry Lots Al to A5 and A7 to A24 at Ngau Tau Kok, C1 to C30 at Cha Kwo Liang and D1 to D25 at Lyemun were terminated at the end of June 1911 and were again disposed of by Public Auction until the end of December 1913 but the annual rent realized was $3,350 less than at the previous auction. Quarry Lot No. 7 at Ma Tau Kok was leased by private tender for one year from 1st January 1911 and Quarry Lot A25 was leased by private tender for five years from the same date.

The Assistant District Officer at Hongkong let Quarry Lot No. 1 at Chu Lu Kok in 1910 but the rent did not commence until 1911.

Lung Ku Tan Quarries Nos. I and 2 were let by the Assistant District Officer at Taipo in 1910 but the rents did not commence until 1911. The Assistant District Officer North also let Lung Ku Tan Quarry Lot No. 3.

12. Mining Licences.-There were no mining licences issued during the year.

13. Resumptions.--Two areas were resumed in Hongkong, viz., Inland Lot 1796, containing an area of 52,640 square feet, which was granted in 1908 to the Tung Wah Hospital Authorities as a site for a Small pox Hospital, but subsequently surrendered to Government, and part of Shaukiwan Inland Lot 377, (area 978 square feet), required for widening Shaukiwan Road. The latter was resumed at a cost of $978,

P 8

W

Kowloon Inland Lot 1144, area 18,150 square feet, was resumed for non-payment of taxes and Claim 33, on Kowloon Farm Lot 13, for non-payment of Crown rent.

In the Southern District of the New Territories 3 lots (Nos. 5093, 5094 and 5095) were resumed at a cost of $650 for laying out roads in Survey District 1 near Kowloon City. 35 lots were re-entered for various reasons and 137 lots were voluntarily surrendered.

Particulars of the resumptions effected in the Northern District will be found in the Land Officer's report.

14. Lease Plans.--Plans and Particulars (in duplicate) of 224 lots and 12 piers were forwarded to the Land Officer in connection with the issue of leases.

15. Boundary Stones.-Boundary Stones were fixed for 13 lots in Hongkong, 4 in Kowloon, (including 20 stones for King's Park), and 13 in the New Territories.

16. Surveys. Numerous surveys were undertaken for the pur- pose of defining the boundaries of lots or preparing lease plans. The survey of Pokfulam District was continued until April and the greater portion of it plotted to a scale of 200 feet to 1 inch.` The officer engaged on this work was moved to Taipo and in conse- quence the work could not be completed. The survey of the Kow- loon Peninsula was proceeded with and the portion South of Jordan Road has been completed and plotted. The Peak District has been further connected to the lower levels by a traverse along the whole length of Magazine Gap Road. A long circular traverse was made from the Triangulation Station at Conduit Road practically enclosing the whole of that portion of the City West of Aberdeen Street. This traverse was afterwards continued along Pokfulam Road to join up with the Pokfulam survey. Some doubt having arisen as to the values of various triangulation stations, it was decided to check these by further observations commencing at the base and to obtain their values by a series of accurately closed polygons. This work took some time as the weather conditions which prevailed were not in favour of good observations, but, event lly, some excellent results were obtained. It was found that several discrepancies existed and these were rectified.

The surveyor stationed in the New Territories, besides various other work, surveyed fourteen villages containing about 1,200 houses. He also plotted the whole of his work on the 50 feet to the inch Ordnance Maps.

Two Chinese computers were engaged under agreements for the purpose of performing the calculations of co-ordinates and areas, &c., thus enabling the surveyors to be relieved of a considerable amount of office work.

17. Sites for booths at the Race Course.-A sum of $11,526 was realized by the letting of sites for the erection of booths and stands at Happy Valley during the Race Meeting.

P 9-

18. Squatters.-The Squatters' Board has now completed the work for which it was formed and all questions under this heading have been settled. The issue of leases still remains to be done in many cases.

18. Military Lands.-During the year, Mount Davis Battery was surveyed and agreements were prepared and completed in con- nection with the transfer of this area and the Kowloon City Rifle

range.

20. Naval Lands.-There is nothing to record under this heading.

21. Piers.-There was only one case in which the right of erecting a pier under long lease was granted, namely, the pier in front of Marine Lot 95, West Point, which was originally construct- ed under Johnson's Piers and Wharves Ordinance, 1884. An extension was granted in connection with one pier at Kowloon. Licences for the following temporary piers for various periods were issued:-7 in Hongkong, 11 in Kowloon and 11 in the New Terri- tories. Licences were also issued or renewed for 11 slipways in Hongkong, 3 in Kowloon and 4 in the New Territories, the fees for which amounted to $2,920. The premia derived in respect of per- manent pier rights amounted to $164.27 and temporary piers to $4,577.50.

22. Cemeteries. All work performed in connection with the cemeteries was carried out in the Buildings Ordinance Office.

Work under the Buildings Ordinance.

23. Amending Ordinance 1911.-A short amending Ordinance (No. 60 of 1911) was passed on the 28th December and was assented to by H.E. the Governor on the 29th December. The only amend- ment affecting the opations of this Department was one relating to the provision of windows in Chinese tenement houses erected on sites not previously so occupied in such a manner as to admit of the sub-division of such houses into small rooms and thus prevent the formation of cubicles (s.s. 2 of s. 153). The terms of the section, which referred to rooms of a suitable area", were found to be too vague to render its provisions effective and the maximum area and minimum dimension of the rooms to be provided for were therefore specified in the amending Ordinance.

<<

24. Plans.--The number of plans dealt with shows a considerable increase as compared with 1910, the greatest difference being in the number deposited for alterations and additions to existing buildings. There is however a very considerable increase in the number of plans submitted for European houses. The following is a tabulated statement showing the number of buildings, etc., for which plans

P 10

were deposited during the year, the figures of 1910 being given in a parallel column for purposes of comparison :—

European Houses,

Chinese Houses,

Buildings and structures other

than the above,

Alterations and additions to

existing buildings,

Verandahs,

Balconies,.

Sunshades,

Areas,

Piers,....

Total,..

1910. 1911. Increase. Decrease.

14 39

25

135

151

16

82

73

:

9

1,573 1,994

421

63

57

6

63

101

38

21

25

4

:

:

1

4

6

6

1,958 2,450

507

15

25. Certificates.-The following Certificates for new buildings were issued

91 for 155 domestic buildings under Section 204 of Ordi-

nance 1 of 1903.

22 for 24 non-domestic buildings or works.

These figures show an increase of 62 in the number of domestic buildings and a decrease of 37 in the number of non-domestic buildings certified as compared with 1910, or a nett increase of 25.

26. Notices and Permits.-Notices relating to structures in a dangerous condition were served in 330 cases, whilst 1,270 permits, 340 notices of a miscellaneous nature, and 1,816 notices dealing with nuisances reported by the officers of the Sanitary Department were issued. These figures show increases of 37 in the dangerous structure notices and of 294 in the number of permits issued, and decreases of 123 in the notices of a miscellaneous nature, and of 721 in the nuisance notices. The fees collected on account of the issue of per- mits to obtain sand and stone from Crown land amounted to $1,460.80. In one case in which stone was taken from a position not mentioned

P 11

in the permit which had been issued, a penalty of $50 was imposed, this amount being deducted from the sum which had been deposited in the Treasury as security for the fulfilment of the conditions attached to the permit.

27. Resump ions for Scavenging Lanes, &c.-A statement of the work done will be found under the heading "Public Works Extraordinary".

28. Private Streets.--Re surfacing and other repairs under the provisions of Section 186 of the Buildings Ordinance were carried out by this Department at the cost of the frontagers in the following streets :

Kwok Hing Lane.

Lane at rear of 1/19 Third Street.

>>

"

"

Tai Loi Lane.

13

34,68 Bridges Street.

43'63 Yee Wo Street.

19 Second Street and 2/10 First Street.

1,14 Austin Avenue.

Wing Sing Street.

29. Improvements, &c., of Public Streets.--The policy of re- quiring houses, when undergoing reconstruction, to be built at a higher level where necessary in order to provide for the future raising of certain low-lying areas in Hongkong and Kowloon has been con- tinued. In some cases, arrangements are made with owners whereby the ground floors of their houses are retained at their former levels upon their giving an undertaking to raise such floors when the raising of the street is carried out.

30 Footways.-Attention has been given to the footways under balconies and verandahs, notices having been served upon owners to ropair such footways. In several cases the necessary work has been carried out by this Department at the cost of the owners. The areas dealt with were, however, small and are not worthy of specific mention.

31. Typhoon and Rainstorm Damage.-Comparatively little damage was done to buildings in the Colony by typhoons and rain-

storms.

32. Collapses.-There were no collapses worthy of special mention.

33. Tests of Mortar-Attention was given to the testing of mortar, 227 samples being taken from works in progress.

In 3.cases where the mortar was found to be much below the accepted standard prosecutions were taken which resulted in fines amounting to $300 being imposed.

P 12

34. Prosecutions for Defective Building Work.--Legal pro- ceedings were taken on account of defective work in 2 cases in each of which a conviction was secured, the fines imposed amounting to $125.

35. Prosecutions for other nuisances.-Legal proceedings were taken in 157 cases for non-compliance with notices issued in con- nection with nuisances reported by officers of the Sanitary Department. In the case of 88 of these, fines were inflicted.

36. Cemeteries.--Surveys in connection with the Chinese Cem- eteries have been continued but owing to vacancies in the staff and pressure of other work, the progress made was not very great. The necessary surveys for keeping the records of new grave spaces in the Colonial Cemetery up to date were made.

Work in connection with forming new terraces, &c., to afford additional grave spaces was carried out at Mount Caroline, Kai Lung Wan, Chai Wan, Aberdeen, Sai Yu Shek and Ma Tau Wei Cem- eteries, and in addition some nullah training was done at Mount Caroline and a roadway was formed at Chai Wan Cemetery.

Extensive exhumation was carried out at Mount Caroline, Ma Tau Wei and Chai Wan Cemeteries.

37. The tres and Public Performances Regulation Ordinance.-- In all 12 buildings were licensed under this Ordinance during the year for the holding of various public performances. In some cases the licences were for performances in buildings specially erected for the purpose and in other cases for existing buildings which were altered as required prior to the granting of the licences.

Licences were also issued in the case of 2 circuses which were permitted to perform at Causeway Bay and Kowloon.

A sum of $1,300 was derived from fees paid in connection with the issue of licences.

The new "Victoria Cinematograph Theatre" in Des Voeux Road Central on the Praya Reclamation to M. L. 14 was completed in August and the new Chinese Theatre in Kau U Fong on Inland Lot 1858 in September, both being open for public performances. These theatres are included in the number given above.

Steps have been taken towards making existing buildings, which are used as places of public entertainment, comply as far as possible with the requirements of the Ordinance. Those dealt with were the Ko Shing Theatre, the City Hall and the theatre at Mt. Austin Barracks, in all of which the alterations required were practically completed at the end of the year.

L

38. Fires.-One house, No. 222 Queen's Road East, was des- troyed by fire on January 2nd and rebuilding was necessitated.

P 13

A considerable fire occurred on January 10th at Ap Liu, near Sham Shui Po, numerous sheds and huts belonging to and occupied by the villagers being destroyed.

Three houses on Inland Lot 17, Aplichau, were partly destroyed on October 30th and are being re-instated.

Several other fires occurred in the Colony, but none were of large dimensions.

39. Reclamations.-The following is a statement of the private reclamation werks in progress during the year:-

Completed.

N.K.I.L. 27, Sham Shui Po,

41,

In progress.

Arca in sq. ft.

11,310

.20,240

N.K.I.L. 39, Sham Shui Po,

..11,880

The areas stated are those of the lots which extend further inland than old high water mark and are therefore not exclusively reclaimed from the sea. Additional areas beyond those stated have to be reclaimed for roads.

.40. Principal Works of a Private nature:

Hongkong University: considerable progress was made with the main building, whilst the Principal's and Professors' houses and other adjunct buildings were begun. The whole of the buildings were well advanced at the close of the year.

A Hostel, projected for the use of students attending the University, situated on Inland Lot 754, Bonham Road, and under the control of the Church Missionary Society, was commenced.

The preparation of a site for a similar hostel, on Inland Lot 1874, Hatton Road, to be under the control of the London Missionary Society was in progress.

Some additions consisting of Oil tanks and godowns have been made to the Standard Oil Co.'s premises at Lai Chi Kok.

The No. 1 Dock extension at Hunghom was completed.

Further alterations were in progress at the Hongkong Hotel.

The construction of the Star Ferry Co.'s Wharf opposite the end of Ice House Street was commenced, practically the whole of the wharf being completed by the end of the year whilst a considerable portion of the superstructure was erected.

P 14

A building, comprising a school and chapel, in the compound of St. Paul's College and adjoining Glencaly, was completed.

The erection of a Church for the Christian Science community was commenced. It is situated in Macdonnell Road, on Inland Lot 1855, and was nearing completion at the close of the year.

Amongst other works which have been commenced or completed during the year, the following may be mentioned:---

Works commenced.

5 Chinese houses on I. L. 767, Junction of High Street and

6

9

""

21

7

CO

6

COLO

>>

>>

3

"1

>>

Western Street.

I. L. 1892, Squire Street

M.L. 239, Kennedy Town.

P.R.M.L. 59, Connaught & Das Var

Roads West.

M.L. 299, Des Vieux aud Connaught

Roads Central.

I.L. 1895, Shin Hing Street.

""

"J

12

>>

""

I.L. 1896,

3

2

1

1

9

3

11

""

3

""

.་

"

LO

A

>>

25

13

""

""

י

21

S.I L. 423, Shaukiwan.

429,

43A, 101, Main St., Shaukiwan E.

,, IL. 1861, Tunglowan.

"

""

""

""

K.M.L. 31, Reclamation Street.

K.I.L.'s 1192, 1193 & 1199, Portland St.

N.K.I.L. 39, Sham Shui Po.

""

10,

Lot 1886, S.D. II, Ngau Chi Wan.

K.M.L. 90, To Kwa Wan.

1

6

1

1

3

14

>>

25

3

13

""

""

K.I L.'s 1168 and 1169, Shanghai Street.

12

55

2 Houses on I.L. 1878, Bonham Road.

Lot No. 5459, S.D. T, Sheung Sha Po.

28

"

+

6

15

وو

757,

""

"}

19

591,

"

"}

423, Caine Road.

2

1

1

""

""

1881, Kennedy Town.

"

1890,

1876,

""

1677,

R.B.L. 135, Victoria Road.

1, Sec. D, Peak.

1

""

1

29

""

1

""

21

"

1

6.

""

1

11

""

K.I.L.'s 517 and 519, Cameron Road.

1 Block of buildings containing 18 flats on K.I.L. 571,

Carnarvon and Mody Roads.

P 15

Rebuilding of Smith's Villas, Magazine Gap.

Additions to the Peak Hotel.

Alterations to Nos. 6, 12 and 20A, Des Voeux Road Ceutral. New shops and offices at No. 20,

>>

Godown on M.L. 126, Des Voeux Road West.

وو

Central block, Ellis Kadoorie Schools, I.L. 1244. Alteration to Ice Factory, East Point.

""

22

Jockey Club's premises, Happy Valley.

Aerated Water Factory, M.L. 293.

Pavilion, Chinese Recreation Club, Causeway Bay.

Formation of site, retaining walls, &c., R.B.L. 136, Pokfulam. Sea Wall, Q.B.M.L.'s 2 and 3, Quarry Bay.

Works completed.

2 Chinese houses, T.H.L.'s 86 and 87, Tai Hang.

32

1

""

33

various lots, Tai Hang.

S.I.L. 154, 33 Main Street, Shaukiwan.

""

""

""

411 and 415,

3

36

""

::

""

""

""

I.L. 427, Sampan Street, Queen's Road East

and Cross Street.

K.F.L. 4, Argyle Street.

K.I.L. 1211, Shek Shan,

Lots 472, 473 & 478, S.D. I, Ngau Chi Wan.

K.I.L. 964, Shanghai Street.

1

4

1

""

""

4

8

>>

22

1

"}

>>

K.I.L. 1187, Mong Kok Tsui.

""

S.D. II, Lot 1892, Ngau Chi Wan.

>>

N.K.I.L. 17, Sham Shui Po.

1

1

5

1

K.I.L.'s 780 and 1119, Fuk Tsun Heung.

"

37

""

I.L. 767, High Street.

"

21

R.B.L. 134, Chai Wan.

Addition to Tung Wah Hospital, I.L. 835. Po Yan Street. East Wing, Ellis Kadoorie Schools.

Wing, Italian Convent, I.L. 58 R.P., Caine Road.

Hospital, Wanchai, I.L.'s 790 and 1838, Stone Nullah Lane. Bake-house and Quarters, I.L. 1337, Cross Street.

Hospital, Kwong Wah, K.I.L. 1213, Dundas Street.

""

Small-pox,

""

"?

1264, Tai Shek Ku.

Fat-boiling factory and Quarters, K.I.L. 1266, Ma Tau Kok. I.L. 1883, Kennedy Town. Theatre ("Victoria ") on P.R.M.L. 14, Des Voeux Road Central. Chinese Theatre, I.L. 1853, Kau U Fong.

P 16

41. Reconstruction of old buildings.—A notable feature of the year's work was the very considerable number of old Chinese houses of which the reconstruction was undertaken, principally as the result of the service of dangerous structure notices, under Sections 205-207 of the Buildings Ordinance, but in some cases as the result of fire or collapse. In the older portions of the City, it frequently occurs that the demolition of one house results in the revelation of such defects in the adjoining houses that they also have to be pulled down and rebuilt. The following is a statement of the houses which have been dealt with in this manner :-

>

Jervois Street.........Nos. 91, 93, 95*, 97*, 99, 101, 103*, 105*,

107*, 109*, 96*, 98*, 100* and 102*.

35*, 107 and 133*.

Bonham Strand ..

Burd Street

Tung Street

3*.

21

>>

33..

103*, 249* and 251*.

34* and 36.

Hollywood Road...

Ko Shing Street Queen Street

Queen's Road C... Queen's Road W. Wing Lok Street..... Aberdeen Street.. Queen's Road E.... St. Francis Street Wing Fung Lane W. Kennedy Street

11

2 and 4.

"2

335*.

""

67 and 69.

"

2)

36, 38, 145* and 225*.

71

33

33

... 19

13*, 15* and 17.*

232*

8-12 (portions of).

7*.

2*, 4* and 6*.

In most cases, arrangements have been made for the provision of scavenging lanes which are to be opened up by the owners when required. Particulars with regard to such lanes are contained in para. 114 of this Report.

PUBLIC WORKS RECURRENT.

42. Maintenance of Buildings.-The buildings upon which any considerable sum was expended were the following:

Government House-Reconstructing in reinforced concrete and asphalt all flat roofs, re-

tiling main roofs, painting throughout, providing metallic filament lamps, &c., &c., -

$19,099

Government Civil Hospital :-

"A" Block-General repairs and

internal painting,

- $2,001

European Lunatic Asylum - General repairs and painting through- out;

* Completed and certified during 1911.

1,113

{

3

P 17

Chinese Lunatic Asylum-General repairs and painting through-

out, -

Various minor repairs to buildings

generally,

Kennedy Town Depôts & Slaughter Houses

Cattle Depôt-General repairs, painting and limewashing throughout,

Sheep & Swine Depôts-General repairs and limewashing throughout,

$561

669

-$4,344

-$3,186

and limewashing throughout, 1,522

-

1,304

Slaughter Houses-General repairs.

6,012

Queen's College-General repairs and painting

throughout,

*3,341

Central Market-General repairs and limewashing

throughout, &c., -

3,063

Saiyingpun Market-General repairs, limewashing and painting throughout and provid- ing iron fittings to stalls,

-

Kowloon Cattle Depôt and Slaughter Houses, &c., Mataukok-General repairs, painting and limewashing throughout,

1,441

1,484

Victoria Gaol :-

Supplying materials and sundry

repairs, -

$888

Reconstructing roof of shed,-

Mountain Lodge-Internal painting and general

796

1,684

repairs, -

1,083

Central Police Station- Sundry repairs to buildings

generally,

-

946

Green Island Depôt for Explosives--General repairs

and painting throughout,

898

Stanley Police Station-Sundry repairs and recon-

structing verandah roof,

878

Chair Coolies' Quarters and Shelter, Victoria Gap- General repairs and painting throughout,

755

P 18

Wanchai School-General repairs, painting and

colouring throughout,

Government Villas, The Peak--General repairs and

painting throughout,-

Bay View Police Station - General repairs, painting

and colourwashing throughout,

Aberdeen Police Station-Renewing roof and sundry

repairs, -

Hunghom Police Station- Sundry repairs and

reconstructing roof of coolie quarters,

Sookunpoo Market-General repairs, painting and

colour washing throughout,

-

Kennedy Town Police Station-General repairs, painting and colourwashing throughout, -

$747

791

672

660

631

500

500

Houses resumed for extension of Chatham Road,

Kowloon -Sundry repairs, -

457

Sai Wan Ho Market-General repairs, painting and

limewashing throughout,

352

Saiyingpun School-Sundry repairs, and external

painting,

344

309

305

Shaukiwan Police Station-Sundry repairs,

Mongkoktsui Market-General repairs and lime-

washing throughout, -

43. Maintenance of Buildings, New Territories.-In the case of the New Territories Buildings, the following are those which entailed considerable expenditure:--

Taipo Police Station-Reconstructing roof of coolie quarters and rebuilding coal house and latrine, -

- $1,484

Sheung Shui Police Station-Reconstructing veran-

dah and staircase in reinforced concrete, 891 Sai Kung Police Station-General repairs, painting and colour washing throughout, Tung Chung Police Station—

864

Do., do.,

402

Taipo Island Quarters-Sundry repairs,

407

347

Kowloon City Police Station-Sundry repairs,

44. Maintenance of Lighthouses.-The following sums were

expended upon the various lighthouses

Gap Rock-General repairs, painting, colour washing

-

-$1,237

and limewashing throughout, Waglan-External repairs, painting and colour-

washing,

709

हे

Signal Hill,

P 19

Kowloon Point-Providing clock inovement for revolving light and gear for lighting, &c., -

Green Island-External repairs, painting, colour-

washing and limewashing throughout,

Cape Collinson-General repairs, painting, colour- washing and limewashing throughout,

Cap Sui Mun-

Do.,

do.,

$452

403

389

156

45. Maintenance of Roads and Bridges in City.-The road surfaces were maintained generally in a satisfactory condition. The surfacing of macadamized roads was considerably damaged by the continuous rains in May and by the typhoons of the 27th July and the 5th and 6th August.

That portion of Ice House Street between Queen's Road and Des Voeux Road Central was paved with 6" wood blocks laid on cement concrete 4" thick, the total area being 760 square yards. Half of the street was laid with camphorwood and the remainder with Jarrah blocks.

Victoria Road was macadamized up to the City boundary and for some distance beyond as mentioned in the next paragraph.

Wardley Street, adjoining the City Hall, that portion of Queen's Road between the City Hall and Ice House Street and that portion of Kennedy Road between Garden Road and the Union Church were laid with tarred macadam.

46. Maintenance of Roads and Bridges outside City.-The road surfaces generally were maintained in a satisfactory manner,

That portion of Victoria Road from the City boundary to the approach road to Mount Davis Battery was macadamized, the Military Authorities contributing $750 towards the cost.

The tar macadam surfacing of Barker Road was extended for a distance of about 1,000 feet.

47. Maintenance of Roads and Bridges in Kowloon.—The roads were maintained in good condition.

On the Hunghom to Kowloon City Road macadam was substituted for decomposed granite for a length of 200 yards; on the Yaumati to Kowloon City Road for a length of 800 yards and on Nathan Road for a length of 500 yards.

Argyle Street from Shanghai Street to Kowloon City Road was macadamized and also the branch road from near the Tai Shek Ku Temple to Mataukok Slaughter House.

a

- Ŕ 20 —

Those portions of Chatham and Gascoigne Roads which were raised on embankments and carried over the railway by bridging were taken over from the Railway Department.

48. Maintenance of Roads and Bridges in New Territories.- Considerable damage was done by the typhoons of July 27th and August 5th and 6th, that portion of the Taipo Road between Lok Lo Ha and the 12 mile point being washed away. It was made good and channelled. A reinforced concrete culvert was formed under the roadway near Taipo Market to carry off flood water.

Repairs to the bridge and causeway at Taipo were carried out at a cost of $3,885.54 and most of the rubble pitching protecting the causeway was reset in lime and cement mortar, all holes being made good.

49. Maintenance of Telegraphs.-The lines and instruments were kept in good repair. The telephone lines between the Central Police Station and the Peak and from the Central Police Station along Caine Road were renewed. Owing to the sale of Inland Lot 1891, Kennedy Town, it was necessary to divert the cable to Green Island further west and to construct a new cable house. The cost of this work was defrayed by the purchaser of the lot.

Sub-exchanges were established in the New Government Buildings and in the Courts of Justice, the cost being charged to the Votes for these buildings. These exchanges were connected with the Government and Telephone Co.'s systems, the necessary branch lines being run to the various departments housed in the respective buildings.

50. Maintenance of Telegraphs in New Territories.—The lines and instruments were maintained in working order.

Telephonic communication was established between Shatin Police Station and Shatin Gap Block House.

A telephone line was also constructed from the Government Exchange in Tsim Sha Tsui Police Station to Tsun Wan Police Station, the cost being defrayed from the Vote "Miscellaneous Works".

51. Maintenance of Sewers, Nullahs, etc.-The sewers, storm- water drains and trained nullahs were systematically cleansed and maintained in good condition and the flushing tanks were periodi- cally worked. Two additional large flushing tanks were put into operation towards the end of the year, one at the junction of Arbuthnot Road with Wyndham Street and the other at the junction of Stone Nullah Lane with Lung On Street.

- P 21

-

The details of expenditure under this heading are as follows:-

Labour for cleansing operations,

Repairs,

Tools for cleansing operations,..

$13,037.53

4,153.13

765.50

19.93

General incidental expenditure,

as against $20,979.19 in the previous year.

$17,976.09

52. Gas Lighting, City of Victoria and precincts and Hill District. The total number of lamps in use at the end of the year in the City and its precincts was 1,036, an increase of 14 over the previous year and in the Hill District 119, an increase of 3.

The positions of the various additional lamps and a note of any lamps removed will be found in paragraph 104 of this Report.

53. Electric Lighting, City.-The number of arc lamps (75) remains unaltered. The Agreement with the Hongkong Electric Co., Ltd., for lighting these lamps has been renewed on the same terms as previously for a period of 5 years from January 1st 1912, the Company undertaking to replace the lamps hitherto in use with up-to-date Hame are lamps before the end of June 1912 and to extend the hours of lighting by lighting the lamps ten minutes earlier in the evening and keeping them lighted fifteen minutes later in the morning.

The number of incandescent lamps in Bowen Road remains unaltered. These are now lit at the cost of the Colonial Government, the arrangement whereby the Military Authorities contributed half the cost having terminated.

54. Gas Lighting, Kowloon.-The total number of lamps in use at the end of the year was 251, a decrease of 4 as compared with the previous year. Particulars of the positions of additional lamps erected and a note of the lamps removed will be found in paragraph 104 of this Report.

55. Electric Lighting, Kowloon.-The new section of Chatham Road forming the approaches to the bridge over the Railway was lighted with electric light, entailing an addition of 16 lamps of 16 candle-power and one lamp of 32 candle-power and bringing the total number of electric lamps in use to 39.

:

;

- P 22

56. Maintenance of Praya Walls and Piers.-The following is a statement of the principal items of expenditure under this vote:--

Kennedy Town-Making good rubble pitching at

west end of reclamation-General repairs.. $1,273

Taipo, Pier at Island-Reconstruction

822

Blake Pier-Painting, including small repairs

789

....

Kennedy Town Pier-General repairs.

608

Queen's Statue Wharf-General repairs...

403

Aplichau Sea-wall-General repairs.....

217

Water Police Pier, Kowloon Point--General

repairs....

233

Kowloon City and Green Island Piers-General

repairs...

186

159

128

Harbour Office Pier-General repairs

Lai Chi Kok Pier-General repairs...

57. Maintenance of Public Cemetery.-Several of the unsur- faced footways were surfaced and channelled and a new terrace was formed in the western portion of the Cemetery.

58. Laying out Chinese Cemeteries and trenching for burials.

- An account of the

59. Exhumation of remains in Cemeteries. S work carried out under these headings will be found in paragraph 36 of this Report.

60. Maintenance of Public Recreation Grounds.-The various grounds were maintained in good order. The area of Crown land on the east side of Tai Hang Nullah was raised considerably to bring it above flood level. The expenditure on this work, including turfing and fencing, amounted to $1,763.67. A fence was erected between the Polo Ground and the ground allotted to the Chinese Recreation Club at a cost of $161.13.

61. Dredging Foreshores -The dredger was employed for a considerable time in excavating a trench for the wall and pitched slope to enclose the reclamation at the north end of the Typhoon, Refuge, Mongkoktsui. In all, 25,039 cubic yards of material were dredged at a cost of $5,734.12 which amount was debited to the Harbour of Refuge vote. The following is a statement of the other work done by the dredger during the year: -

Causeway Bay

Storm water outfalls.

Wing Lok Street Wharf

Hongkong and Kowloon Wharf and

Godown Co.'s Wharf at Wes- tern Street

6,981 Cubic Yards.

4,161

1.598

549

**

Kowloon Point

1,831

Police Basin, Kowloon Point

139

""

North Point

324

""

""

Total.........

15,606

15

34

P 28

The dredger was withdrawn for one day for repairs and was laid up for shelter on account of storm signals for 161 days.

Bowrington Canal was cleared by coolie labour at a cost of

$1,520.

62. Typhoon and Rainstorm Damages. -A special_report_on this subject was forwarded to Government on the 31st August, after the Typhoons and Rainstorms of the 27th July and 4th-5th August. During the latter, 17 inches of rain fell.

The damage caused was generally comparatively slight but very extensive. The following were some of the most serious items:-

Large landslips above the catchwater of the Kowloon Re- servoir, which blocked the channel and caused an extensive wash-out below the catchwater. Collapse of portion of the retaining wall between St. John's

Cathedral grounds and the Parade Ground, Breaches in the Tai Po Road and damage to the causeway

at Tai Po.

Damage to the pitching of the rubble mound protecting the

Gunpowder Depôt, Green Island.

63. Town Clock.-Repairs of a minor character were carried out to the clock, the only other charges being those incurred for winding and regulating the clock.

64. Maintenance of City and Hill District Waterworks.- Intermittent supply of water by the rider main system was in force from the commencement of the year until the 18th May, after which date a constant supply in all districts was maintained until 31st October. The rider mains were again brought into operation on the 1st November and were continued in use until the end of the year.

The quantity of water stored in the impounding reservoirs on 1st January amounted to 523,081,000 gallons and it reached a minimum on the 30th April when it amounted to 189,610,000 gallons.

The reservoirs were at or over their permanent overflow levels for the following periods :-

Reservoir.

Total Capacity.

Gallons.

Tytam,

384,800,000

Tytam Byewash,

22,366,000

Tytam Inter-

mediate, - Wongneichong,

195,914,000

30,337,000

Pokfulam,

<<

Period.

Aug. 6th to Dec. 8th (125 days). Aug. 6th to Sep.13th & Oct. 3rd

to 12th (49 days).

May 26th to Nov. 14th (173 days). Various periods between May 25th & Oct. 11th (85 days).

66,000,000 Various periods between May

23rd & Oct. 17th (81 days).

P 24

The total quantity of water remaining in the reservoirs at the end of the year amounted to 527,927,000 gallons.

Pumping was commenced at Tytam Tuk on the 6th February and was continued until the 2nd May. It was resumed on the 1st November and continued until the end of the

year.

The total number of hours of pumping amounted to 1,450 with No. 1 Engine and 2,114 with No. 2 Engine, equal to 1483 days of one engine. The total quantity of water pumped by this plant during the year amounted to 193,206,000 gallons.

In addition to the permanent pumps already mentioned, the temporary pump which was installed during 1903 for the purpose of raising water from the stream below the Tytam Reservoir and rendering it available for the City supply was brought into opera- tion on the 15th January and pumping was continued until the 13th April. It was resumed on the 1st November and continued until the end of the year. The total quantity of water pumped by this engine amounted to 70,165,000 gallons.

The gross quantity of water pumped during the year by both the permanent and temporary engines amounted to 263,371,000 gallons.

The following is a comparative statement of the cost of pumping during the years 1910 and 1911 :—

Tytam Tuk Pumping Station-permanent pumps.

1910.

1911.

$

C.

$

C.

Coal, Wages,

6,860.00

4,887.15

3,436.82

3,074.93*

Miscellaneous, including repairs

and stores other than coal,

1,949.87

2,002.81†

$ 12,246.69

$ 9,964.89

Coal, Wages,

Tytam Stream-temporary pump.

Miscellaneous, including repairs

and stores other than coal,

$

1910.

1911.

$ C.

$.

C.

5,234.65

1,228.96

Not in use.

1,676.62‡

$ 8,140.23

* Includes erection of lightning conductor.

† Includes new valve ($324) and new delivery valve diaphragm plate ($200). Includes cost of cleaning out storage pond and part cost of connection with

rising main.

Month.

P 25

A comparative statement of the total rainfall for the year, recorded at various points, is given in the following table :—

Tytam Tuk.

Pokfulam

Reservoir.

Tai Po

Quarters.

January,.. .73 1.02

.67

.45

.66

.48

1.99

February,.

.04

.05

.07

.53

March,... 3.82 3.45

2.79

2.04 2.33

2.38

3.70

April,...... 5.94 3.59

5.52

4.71

391

3.87

8.65

May,....... 22.14 25.07

23.07

23.37

26.43

18.61 21.36

June,...

5.09

3.89

5.88 5.52

5.23

4.40 5.13

July,

8.06

8.84

+

9.50 6.01

7.34

7.55

12.41

August,... 30.06 36.15

22.65* 24.75

25.04

23.72 36.33

September. 6.21 $.06

8.19 7.58

8.07

6.35 7.60

October,... 5.61 6.13

6.31

6.51

6.38

5.73

5.77

November, 2.72 1.89

2.93

2.28

2.90

1.81

3.65

December, .10

.07

.25

.18

.2 3

.19

.10

Total

1911, .. 90.55 98.16 87.78 86.45

88.59

75 12 107.28

ļ

"

1910, 70.08 76.29 77.28

75.33

73.33

70.43

$1.12

Increase,.. 20.47 21.88 10.50 11.12 13.26

4.69 26.16

The total quantity of water supplied during the year amounted to 1,633,723,000 gallons filtered and 43,162,000 gallons unfiltered, making a grand total of 1,676,885,000 gallons or 40,680,000 gallons more than in 1910.

The average consumption of filtered water per head per day for all purposes amounted to 181 gallons, taking an estimated population of 247,219. The figure for the population is based upon the census taken during the year.

* Gauze reported choked.

i

P 26

Full details of consumption, contents of reservoirs, &c., will be found in Annexes C and D.

The analyses made by the Government Analyst show that the water was of good quality throughout the year and the results obtained by the Bacteriological examinations were also satisfactory. As the result of representations by the Sanitary Board as to the risk of the supply from the Pokfulam Catchment Area being cɔn- taminated, a special and exhaustive investigation of the water from this source was carried out by the Bacteriologist. His report, which was issued on the 1st October, 1911, was laid before the Legislative Council on the 21st December (Sessional Paper No. 2) of 1911). He found that, though the area in question appeared to be liable to some intermittent contamination with focal matter, such contamination did not appear to be either continuous or large in amount nor did it appear to be sufficient to render the water in- capable of being converted into a good drinking water.

The quantity of water pumped to the High Level District dur- ing the year amounted to 76,155,000 gallons, equal to an average daily consumption of 209,000 gallons, whilst 30,983,000 gallons were pumped to the Hill District giving an average daily con- sumption of 85,000 gallons. As compared with 1910, there was an increase of 7,451,000 gallons in the quantity pumped to the High Level District and of 1,629,000 gallons in that pumped to the Hill District.

The grand total pumped during the year amounted to 107,138,000 gallons as compared with 98,058,000 gallons in 1910.

Tabulated statements containing particulars of the quantities pumped to the High Levels and the Hill District respectively will be found in Annexe E.

All engines, motors and station buildings were kept in a good state of repair throughout the year.

The number of meters in use at the end of the year was 1,222 in the City and 174 in the Hill District or a total of 1,396 as compared with 1,181 and 169 in 1910 or a total of 1,350. The figures do not include 11 meters in use at Pokfulam.

The quantity of water supplied by meter was as follows:-

Filtered:-Trade,.....

.201,543,000 gallons. .139,901,000

Domestic (City),

Do. (Hill District)

""

Unfiltered,.....

30,683,000 43,162,000

""

1

Total,... 415,289,000

P 27

This shows an increase of 37,296,000 gallons in the quantity of water supplied by meter over 1910.

New services were constructed or old ones repaired, altered, improved or connected to the mains to the number of 477 and 72 supplies were laid on for building purposes.

The number of inspections of private services was 3,625: all defects were made good after the usual notices (258 in all) had been served.

The cleaning of Tytam Tunnel, a work of a somewhat excep- tional nature which was partly carried out in 1910, was completed, the expenditure in 1911 amounting to $1,087.19.

65. Maintenance of Kowloon Waterworks.-The storage reser- voir, the construction of which was completed on 1st December 1910, was finally taken over by the Public Works Department on the 27th July.

The total quantity of water supplied amounted to 307,490,000 gallons which gives a daily consumption of 842,000 gallons or, taking an estimated population of 89,450, say, 94 gallons per head per day. Details are given in Annexe F.

The supply was constant throughout the year and the analyses made by the Government Analyst and examinations by the Bacteriologist gave satisfactory results.

The various buildings were maintained in good repair.

There were 394 meters in use at the end of the year, an increase of 20 over 1910.

Private services were constructed, altered or repaired in 84 instances and 10 supplies were laid on for building purposes.

66. Maintenance of Aberdeen ond Shaukiwan Waterworks.—A satisfactory supply. was maintained throughout the year at Aberdeen, but at Shaukiwan intermittent supply had to be resorted to as the population has outgrown the supply of water at present available.

As recorded under Public Works Extraordinary, steps were taken to augment the supply by constructing certain works in the Sywan Valley.

The total consumption at Aberdeen amounted to 8,114,000 gallons and at Shaukiwan to 21,425,000 gallons or about 22,000 and 59,000 gallons per day respectively. Details are given in Annexes G and H.

The supply to Sai Wan Battery, which is included in the Shaukiwan returns, amounted to 2,890,000 gallons for the year.

:

P 28

There were 4 meters in use at Aberdeen and 7 at Shaukiwan.

67. Maintenance of Lai Chi Kok Waterworks: Water Boat Supply. The total quantity of water supplied during the year amounted to 75,541,000 gallons or about 207,000 gallons per day. Details are given in Annexe J.

There were 12 meters in use or 1 less than in 1910.

68. Water Account. --The fixing of meters to properties not supplied by the Rider Mains was continued and at the end of the year the work still remained incomplete. The properties remaining to be served by meter are, however, from the point of view of consumption, unimportant.

P

The number of meters examined and repaired during the year amounted to 722.

The following is a statement of the expenditure under the vote :-

ཡ་

New meters fixed (difference in value be-

tween issues and receipts),

Repairs to meters, ...

Meter Boxes,

Miscellaneous,

Total,....

.$2,802.00

5,363.43

1,035.57

693.45

.$9,894.45

69. Waterworks Revenue.—The following is a statement of the revenue derived from Waterworks during 1911 :--

City, including Wongnei- chong Village and properties bordering Shaukiwan Road,

$

Total.

C.

Excess Consumption.

$

Rates. 2 %

C.

$

C.

Hill District,

88,876.74 3.200.67

180,811.04

269,687.78

5,555.81

8,756.48

Pokfulam District,

1,129.50

1,129.50

Kowloon, including

Shamshuipo and Kow-

loon City,.

23,648.51

26,407.48

50,055.99

Aberdeen,

Shaukiwan,

33.50 153.75

325.18

358.68

1,850.24

2,003.99

Laichikok,

18,929.00

18,929.00

Total,

$135,971.67 214,949.75 350 921.42

'

P29

P 29

The following is a comparative statement of the rev.nue derived from Waterworks during the years 1910 and 1911 :-

City, including Wongneichong Village and properties bordering Shauki- wan Road,

191).

1911.

$

C.

$

C.

277,492.58

269,687.78

Hill District,

8.674.85

8,756.48

Pokfulam District,

1,366.50

1,129.50

Kowloon, including Shamshuipo and,

Kowloon City,

48,178.16

50,055.99

Aberdeen,

521.50

358.68

Shaukiwan,

2,105.47

2,003.99

Laichikok,

17,814.2

18,929.00 .

Total,.

$354,153.88

350,921.42

PUBLIC WORKS EXTRAORDINARY.

70. Law Cour's --Superstructure.-The whole of the work com- prised in this Contract, with the exception of a small amount of punching down, pointing face work and a few other minor items, was completed.

Owing to the failure of the Contract ›r. to make satisfactory pro- gress with the work, an Agreement was entered into with him on 15th June whereby the Contract was handed over to the Public Works Department for completion.

71. Law Courts-Joinery, Fittings, etc.-The whole of the work under this Contract, with the exception of the teak flooring to some of the ground floor rooms and a little painting and distempering, was practically completed. The work under this Contract was also handed over to the Public Works Department for completion under the Agreement already mentioned.

72. Law Courts-Lighting and Lifts.--The Contracts entered into with the Hongkong Electric Co. for executing the necessary wiring and casing and fixing the electric light fittings and also for erecting two passenger lifts with motors etc. were completed.

73. Law Courts--Furniture.-The furnishing of the Library with teak bookcases, tables, chairs, etc., was completed whilst that of the Courts, comprising Judges' chairs, chairs and tables for the Bar, etc., was practically completed. The furniture and fittings for the Crown Solicitor's Officcs and Par Robing rooms were all completed and the special fittings for the Land Office were well in hand.

74. Law Courts--Heating Apparatus.--The heating apparatus, which was supplied by Contractors in England, had to be erected departmentally as the firm which supplied it became insolvent and was unable to carry out the work. The erection of the apparatus was practically completed by the end of the year.

P 30

-

The Crown Solicitor occupied the rooms allotted to him in August but no other portion of the building was occupied up to the close of the year.

1911 Estimates, ... 1911 Sup. Vote, ...

$46,800.00 Total Estimates, $856,310.00

53,219.00 Expenditure to

31/12/11, 867,828.90

$100,019.00 96,564.10

1911 Expenditure,

75. Post Office--Building.-The Contract for the superstructure was completed and the basement, ground, first and second floors were occupied by the middle of the year by the various Government Departments to which they were allotted. The third or top floor, which is intended to provide for future expansion, remained un- occupied.

After the occupation of the building, it was found necessary to provide additional lavatory and strong-room accommodation, also borrowed lights, telephone boxes, screens to offices and verandalı, mail notice boards, &c., &c., all of which were practically completed.

76. Post Office-Lighting and Lifts.-The Contracts for the installa- tion of electric light and for the erection of the lifts were completed.

77. Post Office-Heating Apparatus.-The apparatus required for this building was supplied by the same Contractors who furnished that required for the Law Courts. As already mentionel, the firm became insolvent and was unable to implement its Contract which included the erection of the apparatus. It was not found possible to proceed with its erection departmentally before the close of the

year.

1911 Estimates, ... $100,000.00 | Total Estimates, $930,000.00 1911 Sup. Vote, ... 84,558.48 Expenditure to

1911 Expenditure,

$190,558.48 190,633.59

31/12/11, 1,035,485.50*

73. Post Office-History.-The following is a brief history of the circumstances connected with the erection of this building.

It was realized in -1891 that the Colony had outgrown the accom- modation afforded by the buildings occupied by the various Govern- ment Departments including that occupied by the Post Office and Treasury (erected in 1867) and, in September of the year first- mentioned, a Committee was appointed to consider the question of erecting new buildings for the Government Departments generally. The Committee reporte in November 1896 recommending inter alia the erection on the site now occupied by the Courts of Justice of a building to contain the Post Office, Treasury and other Govern- ment Offices, the design to be put up to competition among Architects in Hongkong, Shanghai and Singapore.

After prolonged correspondence and discussions, chiefly concern- ing the site upon which the building should be erected (ride Sessional Papers 2, 1898 and 16/1902 and Legislative Council Minutes

P 31

28/2/98), it was finally proposed in February 1902 to purchase, at an outlay of $508,280, that portion of the recently reclaimed area on the west side of Pedder Street, containing 25,414 square feet and belonging to Sir Robert Jardine.

This proposal was confirmed by resolution of the Legislative Council on the 10th April 1902 and the purchase was subsequently completed.

The sanction of the Secretary of State to invite competitive designs was obtained and the Conditions of Competition were published in December 1902, Shanghai and Singapore Architects being invited to compete. The building was specified to be three stories in height with a basement underneath for storage purposes, etc., and the limit of cost, exclusive of Architects' fees, was stated as $500,000.

Only three designs were submitted,-two by Hongkong firms and the third by a Shanghai firm. Of the three, that prepared by Messrs. Denison, Ram & Gibbs was selected, official intimation of the fact being communicated to them on the 17th July 1903. The designs had been adjudicated upon by the Public Works Committee, who, in forwarding their report to Government, recommended that a fourth storey should be added to the building and this recommenda- tion was approved.

Messrs. Denison, Ram & Gibbs, having expressed some doubt in the report accompanying their design as to the adequacy of the sum mentioned in the Conditions of Competition as the limit of cost of the building, namely, $500,000, to provide for granite dressings and the use of teakwood, &c, the matter was referred to Government and it was decided by the Governor, then Sir Henry Blake, that a very important public building such as this should be constructed of first class materials and of granite where the Architects considered it desirable to introduce it in the principal fronts.

To facilitate the erection of the building, it was arranged that a Contract for the foundations and basement only should be let in the first instance and tenders were invited accordingly.

Difficulty was experienced in obtaining reasonable tenders but ultimately a Contract for this portion of the work was let in November 1903. Delay was caused in the execution of the work by the loss of a vessel containing a cargo of piles and by unexpected difficulties which were encountered when the foundations were opened up, and the Contract was not completed until January 1906. Meanwhile a Contract for the superstructure had been entered into in July 1905 but the Contractors were not given possession of the site until the 23rd January 1906.

When the foundations were nearing completion, Sir Matthew Nathan, who had succeeded Sir Henry Blake as Governor, proposed that a Clock Tower should be added to the building. This proposal was adopted and the necessary alterations in the foundations were carried out, contributing towards the delay in their completion.

P 32

Besides giving rise to extra work in the foundations, the proposed addition of a Clock Tower necessitated the substitution of granite for brickwork in the construction of those walls upon which the tower would be carried, thus causing additional expense. Owing to the increased cost of the building, resulting from the addition of a fourth storey, the alterations entailed by the proposal to construct a Clock Tower, the general and large advance in cost of work which occurred about the time the Contracts were let and other causes, it was ultimately decided, in January 1910, that the tower should not be proceeded with in the meanwhile and the structure has been terminated and covered over immediately above the ridge of the roof of the main building.

As already recorded, the building was occupied by the middle of 1911, though the installation of the heating apparatus and various minor alterations had to be carried out subsequently.

79. Post Office - Description of Building.-The building, which * contains basement, ground, 1st, 2nd and 3rd floors, is situated between Connaught and Des Voeux Roads at their intersection with Pedder Street. The basement and ground floor extend over practically the entire site, but, at the level of the first floor, a large, central courtyard, measuring about 60' × 50', is introduced, round the four sides of which the remainder of the building is disposed. The various offices are arranged on the three sides abutting on the above-mentioned roads, whilst on the fourth, which abuts on a private lane, jointly owned by the Government and the P. & O. S. N. Co., are arranged the lavatories and coolie quarters. The courtyard over the central portion of the ground floor, which consists of a concrete flat, is utilized as an emigration yard, certain portions being provided with a glazed roof supported on brackets projecting from the walls to form a shelter.

The verandah pillars and arches on the ground floor are constructed entirely of granite, which is also extensively, used in the pillars and arches of the remaining floors and in the main walls of the building on all three principal fronts. Otherwise the walls are of Canton red brick, faced externally with Amoy bricks. Many of the floors are constructed of cement concrete covered with tiles or granolithic, the others being of teak boarding on hardwood joists. All corridor walls are tiled to a height of 3' 6", all lavatory walls to a height of 5' 0": the walls of the Chinese Letter Department, which is situated in the basement, to a height of 4' 0" and the remaining internal walls are plastered and distempered. The whole of the doors, windows and finishings are of teak, stained and dull polished.

For heating the Postal and Treasury Halls, a system of low-pressure hot water heating through radiators is provided. Arrangements are being made to extend this to some other portions of the building which are unprovided with open grates.

The roofs generally are covered with Canton tiles on hardwood rafters supported on iron parlins, but at the gables special tiles and rolls of cement concrete reinforced with small iron rods are used.

- P 38 -

The flat roofs to verandahs and over the central portion of the ground floor are formed with cement concrete, covered with "A Grade Pabco" and finished with granolithic.

The building is lit with electric light and fitted with electric fans throughout and is also provided with two electric passenger lifts and one electric goods lift for conveying mails from the basement to the ground floor. Exhaust fans are placed in the Chinese Letter Department for the extraction of foul air.

The main staircase, which is situated at the south-east angle of the building, is of teak. Subsidiary staircases, constructed of gran- ite, are provided in the north-west and south-west angles of the building. A staircase for office attendants is also provided from the first to the third floor. An iron fire escape connecting with all floors is fixed on the West Front adjoining the private lane previously mentioned.

The arrangement of the various Government Departments on the different floors is as follows:

Basement, occupied principally by the Postal Depart- ment, contains the Chinese Letter Department, a tiffin room and a number of store rooms, one of which is used by the Sanitary Department. The boiler for the heating apparatus is also located in the basement.

Ground Floor, entirely occupied by the Postal Depart- ment, contains the Postal Hall, 93' × 45', Sorting Hall, 93' x 65', Registration Room, 57' x 29', Box-holders' Room, Postmaster General's and Assistant Postmaster General's Offices. As already mentioned, an electric lift for raising letters to the main sorting hall connects this floor with the basement.

First Floor, occupied by the Treasury and the Regis- trar General's Departments, contains the Treasury Hall, 76' x 36', the Stamp Office, 43' 6" x 14' 3", Stamp Vault, 40' x 18', 12 other offices, ranging from 34' × 30' to 13' 6" x 10', and 2 strong rooms. 3 small rooms on the western side of the building, adjoining the private lane, are used in connection with the inspection of emigrants.

Second Floor, occupied by the Sanitary Department, the Local Audit Office, Education Office, Southern District Office and a telephone exchange, contains in all 21 rooms used as Offices, ranging in size from 50′ x 21′ to 13′ 6′′ × 10'.

Third Floor, provided for the future expansion of the Departments housed in the building, contains 20 rooms ranging in size from 36' x 30' to 13' 6" x 10'.

In addition to the above, there are 16 small rooms for office attendants on the western side of the building, adjoining the pri- vate lane, a inezzanine floor being here interposed between the first and third floors of the main building.

P 34

Lavatories are provided on all floors except the basement.

The steel structural work throughout the building has been encased in fine cement concrete with a view to protecting it in case of an outbreak of fire.

80. Public Latrines and Urinals.

(i.) The latrine in Mee Lun Street, begun in 1910, containing 27 seats and 3 urinal stalls was completed at a cost of $3,073.05 of which $1,407.30 was expended during 1911. (ii.) The latrine in Rutter Street, begun in 1910, containing 14 seats for men and 6 for women was completed at a cost of $2,697.05 of which $1,173.80 was expended during 1911.

(iii) The trough closet under the ramp leading to the Govern- ment Civil Hospital, begun in 1910, containing 38 seats and 2 urinal stalls was completed at a cost of $4,880.17 of which $2,003.65 was expended during 1911.

All the above were constructed of brickwork or masonry.

No new structures were begun during the year.

In addition to the amounts of expenditure stated above, a sum of $150 was paid for valuations obtained from a local firm of architects in connection with the proposed resumption of a site for the erection of a latrine, the negotiations with regard to which fell through, and a sum of $10.50 was spent in connection with the supervision of the construction of the works carried out.

1911 Estimates..... 1911 Expenditure,

$9,000.00 $4,745.05

81. Kowloon Market. The question of reconstructing the roof, referred to in last year's Report, was ultimately referred to the late Mr. Lindsey, Manager of the Railway, as arbitrator, with the result that the Contractor was ordered to remove the whole of the concrete and replace it with new material. After considerable delay, this and all other work in connection with the building was completed and it was handed over to the Sanitary Department in September.

The building, which is partly two-storied and partly three- storied, is situated at the junction of Peking and Canton Roads, immediately to the north of the Water Police Station. It forms the eastern half of the ultimate proposal for a market in this locality, the erection of the western half being left for some future period. The walls are of Canton red brick with Amoy facings and the floors are of cement concrete, finished with granolithic, the upper floor being supported on steel girders and stanchions. The roof is of reinforced concrete, partly flat and partly barrelshaped, covered with asphalt and finished with granolithic. The staircase is of granite. The walls of the market are lined internally for a height of 7 feet with buff tiles and those of the staircase with similar tiles for a

height of 3 feet 8 inches. Large openings, filled in with iron

-P 35

grilles, provide the market with light and ventilation. The ground floor of the market proper contains 12 fish shops, 12 fish stalls, 6 fruit and 12 vegetable stalls and the upper floor 8 meat and 4 poultry shops. The three-storied portion contains, on the ground floor, latrine, bath-room, cook-house, fish tank room and stores: on the first floor, coolie quarters, caretaker's room, living room and kitchen and on the top floor, poultry-killing room, bed room and bath-room.

:

The building is lighted throughout by electric light and water is laid on where necessary.

1911 Estimates,... $20,800.00 | Total Estimates, 9,211.16 Expenditure to

31/12/11,......

1911 Expenditure,

$66,000.00

56,584.67

82. Additions to No. 2 Police Station.-This work was fully described in last year's Report. The building was occupied by the Police on the 1st March.

1911 Estimates,... $5,000 00 | Total Estimates, $18,000.00

1911 Sup. Vote, ...

2,900.00 Expenditure

31/12/11,

$7,900.00

7,656.70

to

19,081.36

1911 Expenditure,

83. New Magistracy.-Sketch plans were prepared and for- warded for the consideration of Government.

84. Sanitary Inspectors' Office, &c., Wanchai District.—A contract for this work was only signed in December and consequently no expenditure was incurred during the year.

1911 Estimates,..........

1911 Expenditure,

$15,000.00

£5. Chinese Staff Quarters, Kennedy Town Hospital.-This work, begun in 1910, was completed during the year. As mentioned in last year's Report, it included quarters for the European staff and comprised two buildings, both of which are of red brick in lime mortar, plastered externally with lime and cement rough-cast. The western building contains a room for a medical officer and quarters for two sisters and 8 amahs whilst the eastern building contains quarters for two wardmasters and 16 Chinese ward attendants.

1911 Estimates,... $9,000.00 | Total Estimates, 1911 Sup. Vote,... 1,764.00 Expenditure

$10,764.00

1911 Expenditure, 10,763.05

31/12/11,

to

$11,500.00

11,636.10

86. Old Western Market-Reconstruction.-A contract for this work was let to Messrs. Sang Lee & Co. in September. By the end of the year the old buildings on the site had been demolished, 150 hardwood piles driven and the foundation trenches for the North

– ₹ 36 –

Wing and about one half of those for the West Wing had been con- creted and the brick footings for the walls of the North Wing had been commenced.

1911 Estimates,... $25,000.00 | Total Estimates, $240,000.00 1911 Expenditure, 7,430.58 Expenditure to

31/12/11,...

7,430.58

87. Prison Extension.--The expenditure under this heading consisted merely of the balance payable under the Contract, which, as mentioned in last year's Report, was completed in December 1910.

1911 Estimates.... $2,500.00 Total Estimates,

690.00 Expenditure to

31/12/11,

1911 Sup. Vote,...

$3.190.00

1911 Expenditure,... 3,188.27

$20,500.00

20,507.45

Prior to

88. Yaumati English School--Additional Storey.-A contract for this work was let to Messrs. Po Yick & Co. in June. commencing operations on the building, a matshed was erected on the playground to enable the work of the school to be carried on whilst the additions were in progress.

By the end of the year, the whole of the brickwork of the main building was completed, all door and window frames were fixed, the old roof was re-erected, several of the reinforced concrete floors were laid and the rough-cast coating to the external walls was practically completed.

1911 Estimates,... $16,000 00 | Total Estimates, $18,500.20 1911 Expenditure, 9,467.20 Expenditure to

31/12/11,.

9,467.20

89. Police Station, Tsun Wan.-This station, begun in 1910, was completed in July. It comprises a main block, partly one and partly two-storied, and a wing containing servants' quarters, &c., also two-storied.

The buildings are of red brick in lime mortar, plastered externally with lime and cement rough-cast. The roof is of double pan and roll tiling.

The buildings contain a charge room and cell, a room for an Inspecting Officer with bathroom attached, quarters for a European Sergeant (2 rooms and bathroom, kitchen, &c.), 10 Indian Constables and 7 Chinese Constables, besides the necessary kitchens, ablution rooms and latrines. Verandahs, 5 feet wide, are provided on the south-east and north-east sides of the build- ing. The station occupies the top of a low hill, which has been levelled off to form a parade ground. An approach path was formed from the existing pathway to the station.

1911 Estimates, $6,000.00 | Total Estimates, ...$13,500.00 1911 Sup. Vote, 2,400.00 Expenditure to

31/12/11,

13,062.17

$8,400.00

1911 Expenditure,

8,053.70

- P 37 -

90. Rebuilding Government Pavilions (two).The erection of two semi-detached bungalows on the site formerly occupied by the old wooden pavilions, Mount Kellett Road, which was begun in 1910, was completed in June. Each house contains a dining room with ante-room opening from same, 3 bedrooms, enclosed verandahs, kitchen, pantry, drying room and 3 bath-rooms: there are also the necessary servants' quarters and an enclosed yard.

The walls are built of Canton red brick in lime mortar, plas- tered internally. The floors of the rooms are of 14" hardwood on China fir poles: beneath the ground floor of the main buildings is a space for ventilation, the ground surface of same being covered with 3" of lime and cement concrete.

The roofs are of double pan and roll tiling on China fir purlins and battens supported on hardwood trusses.

The building is lighted throughout with gas, the fittings and piping taken down from the old buildings being utilized as far as possible.

A portion of the surrounding area has been turfed and concreted paths have been provided whilst railings and an ornamental wrought iron fence and dwarf wall were constructed along a portion of the front.

1911 Estimates, ...$16,000.00 1911 Expenditure, 15,224.35*

Total Estimates, ... $31,000.00 Expenditure to

31/12/11,

...

27,624.35*

91. Market and Slaughter House at Aberdeen. The prepara- tion of the site for this market, begun in 1910, was completed in March at a cost of $4,613.11, of which $2,413.11 was spent in 1911. It consisted of reclaiming an area on the foreshore between the principal portion of the village and the Dock Company's premises and included the construction of one of the side walls of a nullah.

A contract for the erection of the buildings was let in August and was nearing completion at the close of the year.

The market consists of an open shed; the roof, which is of double pan and roll tiling, being supported on red brick pillars built in lime mortar and pointed in cement. It measures 61' × 32' and has accommodation for 10 meat stalls, 10 fish stalls, 14 vegetable stalls and 4 poultry stalls.

The slaughter house is 16' x 13' with caretaker's room 10' x 8' and lean-to kitchen. A latrine containing two seats and a urinal is also provided. The buildings are of red brick in lime mortar pointed in cement, roofed with double pan and roll tiling.

|

1911 Estimates, $9,200.00 Total Estimates, ...$11,400.00 1911 Expenditure,

5,965.94 Expenditure to

31/12/11,

These figures include a sum of $781.35 for furniture,

8,165.94

- Þ 38 -

P

92. City Disinfecting Station-Workshops and Shed for dust- carts, ambulances, &c.-This work, which was begun in 1910, comprised the removal of the old quarters to the north of No. 2 Tank and the erection on the site thus rendered available of a new building, partly one-storied and partly two-storied. The building contains, on the ground floor, a blacksmith's workshop, 64' x 15', and a carpenter's workshop, 49' x 15', and, on the upper floor, quarters consisting of two rooms, each 15' 0" x 14' 6", one room, 14' 6" x 9' 6", a kitchen, and a bath-room. The two-storied portion has a verandah of iron and concrete 12 feet wide.

×

The walls of the ground floor are of granite, which was obtained from the demolition of the old quarters, and those of the upper floor are of red brick in lime mortar, pointed in cement. All the floors are of cement concrete and the roof is covered with double pan and roll tiling.

In addition to the foregoing, an extensive lean-to shed for dust-carts and ambulances was erected on a site to the north of the workshops, bounded on three sides by Caine Lane. The shed has a floor area of 3,568 square feet, the roofing consisting of boarding covered with ruberoid supported on brick pillars and timber rafters.

The work was completed in the beginning of June.

1911 Estimates,

1911 Sup. Vote,

...$4,500.00 Total Estimates, ...$10,500.00

3,310.00 | Expenditure to

7,810.00

31/12/11,

11,717.17

1911 Expenditure,... 7,809.99

93. Lai Chi Kok Quarantine Station,-Hospital, &c.--This work, begun in 1910, was completed in April 1911.

The buildings are one-storied, built of red brick in lime mortar and pointed in cement. With the exception of the Hospital and wardmasters' room, which have hardwood floors laid on cement concrete, all the floors are finished in cement concrete. The roofs are of double pan and roll tiling. The accommodation provided consists of a hospital (115′ 0′′ × 26′0') capable of containing 20 beds for men and 10 for women, two wardmasters' rooms (16′ 0′′ × 14′ 0′′ and 8′ 3′′ x 8'0') with bathrooms, a room for a Chinese Medical Officer (14' 0" x 10' 0"), an Assistant's room (14′ 0′′ × 10'0'), a store (14' 0" x 10' 0"), a dispensary (8' 3' x 6' 0"), a kitchen (12′ 0′′ ×` 10′ 0′), a cook's room (10′ 0′′ × 8′ 0′′), a mor- tuary and a latrine.

1911 Estimates, ...$7,000.00 1911 Expenditure,... 6,461,49

Total Estimates, ...$11,000.00 Expenditure to

31/12/11,

10,461.49

94. Yaumati Disinfecting Station-Stables.-The site of these buildings is situated immediately to the south-eastward of the Kow- loon Disinfecting Station.

P 39

A contract for the work was let in November and, as the for- mation of the site involved a considerable amount of excavation, a light railway was laid to Reclamation Street where the material could be usefully disposed of in raising the levels of some roads. A small concrete bridge was constructed over Waterloo Road nullah to carry the railway and to serve as a permanent approach to the stables.

1911 Estimates,... $10,000.00 | Total Estimates,... $16,000.00 1911 Expenditure, 501.94 Expenditure to

31/12.11, ......

501.94

95. Imports and Exports Office-Quarters for Searchers.—A contract was let in March for the erection of a two-storied brick building on a site adjoining the Harbour Office and was completed on the 1st November. The ground floor affords accommodation for 35 Chinese Searchers whilst the first floor contains quarters,-2 rooms, bathroom and kitchen,-for the European Officer in Charge.

1911 Estimates,... $4,500.00 | Total Estimates,...... $10,000.00 1911 Sup. Vote, ... 5,500.00 Expenditure to

$10,000.00

1911 Expenditure, 9,753.95

31/12/11,.....

9,753.95

96. Lighthouse and Quarters on Kap Sing Island.-A contract for this work was let in November and a commencement was made with the excavation for foundations and formation of site. The only expenditure incurred during the year was for the light apparatus which was procured from England.

|

1911 Estimates, $10,000.00 Total Estimates, ... $13,000.00 1911 Expenditure, 9,520.30 Expenditure to

31/12/11,

9,520.30

97. Maternity Hospital. -A contract for this work, which con- sists of the addition of a new wing at the north end of the Maternity Hospital, was let at the end of March. The site was known to be on made ground, but, as it had been in existence for over 25 years, it was anticipated that it would be sufficiently consolidated to admit of its supporting a one-storied building with suitable foundations. A severe rainstorm, (5th-6th August), when over 15 inches of rain fell, occurred however after the foundation trenches had been opened with the result that considerable settlement took place and, as the retaining walls supporting the site were constructed of dry rubble, it was considered advisable to strengthen them by con- structing buttresses in High Street. This was done and the building was subsequently proceeded with. At the close of the year, the walls of the building were about completed and the roof timbers were in course of erection.

1911 Estimates, ... $10,000.00 1911 Expenditure, 6,743.87

Total Estimates, ... $13,000.00 Expenditure to

31/12/11,

6,743.87

— P 40 —

93. New Roads in Kowloon.-The only work carried out under ૩. this Vote was some filling-in in Argyle Street and widening the bridge in road from Argyle Street to Mataukok Slaughter House.

1911 Estimates,...... 1911 Expenditure,..

$25,000.00 755.74

99. New Roads in New Territories.-The works executed under this heading were the following:-

(i.) Road from Castle Peak Bay to Ping Shan.-The approach

to the pier has been paid for under this heading, the pier itself being defrayed from a special vote. The expenditure during 1911 amounted to $1,769.25.

(ii.) Extension of Ping Shan Road to Un Long (length 17 miles, width 8 feet).-The two bridges referred to in last year's Report were completed, thus completing this sec- tion of road. The expenditure during the year amounted to $5,553.20, which included $90.00 for supervision, etc., bringing the total cost to $20,336.50.

(iii.) Extension from Un Long to Au Tau (length 0-80 mile, width 8 feet). The small items remaining to be done at the end of 1910 were completed, expenditure during 1911 amounting to $1,838.81, which included $43.01 for supervision, etc., thus bringing the total cost of this sec- tion to $5,873.03.

(iv.) Road from San Tin to Au Ha Gap (length 85 miles, width generally 8 feet). This section was also com- pleted after considerable delay owing to difficulties experienced in getting the contractor for the bridges to provide sufficient pumping power in order to keep the foundations dry. The expenditure during 1911 amount- ed to $30,740.44, which included $555.00 for supervision and $290.52 for land resumption, bringing the total cost to $63,442.12.

On the completion of this section, it was decided to lay a light railway on that portion of it extending from Fan Ling Railway Station to Au Ha Gap, the railway being extended onwards to Shataukok, but all work in connection with this scheme was carried out by the Rail- way Department. As a result, practically the whole of the road was absorbed by the railway, only a narrow footpath along one side remaining available for ordinary traffic.

(v.) Extension from Au Ha Gap to Shataukok.-As it was found impossible, owing to the difference in level be- tween the country to the eastward and westward of the Au Ha Gap, to lay out a route for a combined road and railway, it was decided that the Railway Department should carry out whatever work was necessary to admit of the formation of a route for the light railway. The only expenditure incurred by this Department was for surveying on which a sum of $78.30 was spent,

P 41

(vi.) A short branch road connecting the main road with Fan Ling Railway Station was constructed at a total cost of $895.40, the expenditure in 1911 being $839.00.

1911 Estimates,...

1911 Expenditure,

...$60,000. ...$40,879.

100. Forming and Kerbing Streets.-The following is a state- ment of the works executed under this heading except those of a trifling nature. The sum stated is in some cases only a part of the cost owing to the work extending into more than one year:

HONGKONG.

(i.) Straightening Wongneichong Road past I.L. 1698 and extending same northwards to near I.L. 1577 (not completed),......$2,952 (ii) Improving Shaukiwan Road past Q.B.I.L.

4 (completed),

3,007

(iii.) Forming roads, &c., in connection with re-

construction of old Tai Hang Village, 1,467 (iv.) Constructing path to west of Peak Tramway between May Road and Bowen Road (completed),

(v.) Constructing road to Japanese Crematorium (I.L. 1879) in Sookunpoo Valley (com- pleted),

(vi.) Constructing road 10 feet wide contouring north face of hill and connecting Chamberlain Road with Plantation Road (not completed),

5,845

2,277

1,641

(vii.) Forming and kerbing Watson Road between M.L.'s 285 and 293, North Point (com- pleted),

1,173

(viii) Resuming portion of S.I.L. 377 for widen- ing Shaukiwan Road (completed),................

979

(ix.) Constructing path on east side of Peak Tram- way from Kennedy Road to Boundary Path (not completed),

891

(x.) Diverting and forming road on east side of

Caroline Hill,

783

(xi.) Concreting and channelling portion of Stone

Nullah Lane (completed),

639

i

(xii.) Concreting footpaths, &c., around New Law

Courts (not completed),

445

(xiii.) Raising footpath round No. 2 Police Station and forming and kerbing triangular area in front of same (completed),......

418

- P 42

(xiv.) Constructing branch path below Victoria

Hospital,

KOWLOON.

$286

(xv.) Concreting surface of sea end of Saigon

Street (completed),

514

(xvi.) Concreting surface of sea end of Jordan

Road (completed),

289

(xvii.) Constructing bridge over Waterloo Road

nullah at Yaumati Disinfecting Station, 265 (xviii.) Forming and channelling portion of south

end of Canton Road (completed),

1911 Estimates,

1911 Expenditure,

...

...$30,000.00 25,249.57

250

Item (i.) This work was alluded to in last year's Report. In addition to completing the section therein referred to, a further length of the road on the east side of Happy Valley was undertaken between Inland Lots 1698 and 1577 thus linking up the portion opposite "Le Calvaire" with the part previously executed.

Item (ii.) This item forms a continuation of the work referred to in last year's Report, which contained a full description of it.

Item (iii.) This work formed part of the Tai Hang Village Improvement Scheme referred to in paragraph 113 of this Report and was in continuation of that referred to in last year's Report.

Item (iv.) This work was undertaken in order to improve the communication between Bowen Road Tramway Station and Queen's Gardens District and also to afford more direct communication with Barker Road, the path bifurcating some distance above the Albany Filter Beds. The path is 1,624 feet long and 8 feet wide and is surfaced with concrete throughout. The lower portion adjoining the Peak Tramway is carried on bridging.

Item (v.) In accordance with an arrangement come to with the Japanese community, whereby interments of their nationals in the Colonial Cemetery will cease, a path was constructed to a site in the Sookunpoo Valley on which they are about to erect a crematorium, The path is 1,000 feet long and 12 feet wide.

Item (vi.) The construction of the road in question has been undertaken in response to a petition signed by residents in the neighbourhood of Plantation Gap. By arrangement with the lessee of R.B.L. 77, a strip of that lot was acquired to enable a connection to be made with Chamberlain Road. Leaving Chamberlain Road, the road passes between the upper terminus of the Peak Tramway and the Peak Hotel property (R.B.L. 77) and, after rising at a mean gradient of 1 in 25 for a distance of 500 feet, contours the hillside until it meets Plantation Road at a point where the objectionable

P 43

gradients met with in the lower part of this road cease. From Plantation Road, it continues eastward on a downward gradient of 1 in 20 until it meets a path constructed some 10 years ago above the Victoria Hospital. The object of the latter portion of roadway is to open up communication with some favourable areas for building sites. The road is 10 feet wide and 3,260 feet in length and is surfaced with concrete throughout. A contract for its construction was let in November and a fair start had been made with the work before the close of the year.

Item (vii.) It became necessary to put this road in order on account of the completion of Messrs. Watson & Co.'s new ærated water factory.

Item (viii) A strip 10 feet wide of the lot mentioned was acquired for the purpose of widening Shaukiwan Road at this point.

Item (ix.) This path was constructed to give access to a new lot below Kennedy Road and to improve communication with that road and with the district south of same. It is 480 feet long, 8 feet wide and has several flights of granite steps.

Item (x.) This work was done in conjunction with item (v) in order to connect the path to the Japanese Crematorium with Caroline Road. The road which existed formerly traversed Inland Lots 1018 and 1464 and had consequently to be diverted clear of these lots.

Item (xi.) Owing to the completion of the branch plague hospital for the Eastern District, it became necessary to put in order that section of Stone Nullah Lane giving access to it.

Item (xii.) The work included under this item consisted of concreting the footpaths and otherwise putting in order the roads. adjoining the new Law Courts which were about to be occupied at the close of the year.

Item (xiii.) On completion of the reconstruction of No. 2 Police Station, it was necessary to raise the level of the adjoining footpaths and to put in order the triangular area in front.

Item (xiv.) This was a short length of path connecting Barker Road at a point a little east of Victoria Hospital with the existing path up from May Road.

Items (xv.) and (xvi.) Portions of the roads mentioned were concreted in order to prevent damage to the roads themselves and to the sea-walls protecting them during typhoons.

Item (xvii.) This work consisted of a bridge across the Waterloo Road nullah to give access to the new stables in course of construc- tion for the Sanitary Department adjoining the Disinfecting Station, Yaumati.

Item (xviii.) This work was carried out for the purpose of more efficiently draining the portion of Canton Road mentioned.

P 14

101. Training Nullahs.-The following is a statement of the works carried out under this heading :-

(i.) Main and branch nullahs in valley between the Military Sanitarium, Magazine Gap, and "Coombe ",

Length trained. Expenditure. Lin. Ft.

$10,631.15 2,009

less contribution by Military Authorities, ...... 5,315.58

(ii) Upper portion of nullah flowing under No. 12 Bridge, Shaukiwan, (completed),

$

5,315.57

1,102

7,229.85

(iii.) Nullah East of the Military Hospital between Kennedy and Bowen Roads -continuation of work mentioned in last year's Report (completed),.... 1,486

4,374.89

(iv.) Nullah between Bowen Road and

Magazine Gap,........................

2,074

4,125.45

(v.) Nullah at Pokfulam below and above No. 8 Bridge, Pokfulam Road, (not completed),.....

1,200

3,247.42-

(vii.) Channels immediately to the eastward

(vi.) Nullah diversion South of I.L. 1883,

Smithfield, Kennedy Town, (com- pleted), (cost $654.67 less $200 paid by lessee of lot in accordance with Conditions of Sale),.

of Garden Lot 34, Barker Road, ($294.67 less $50 paid by owner),...

90

454.67

289

244.67

(viii) Channels below May Road near Al-

bany Nullah (completed),

164

66.92

1911 Estimates,.

$25,000.00

1911 Supplementary Vote,..

400.00

$25,400.00

1911 Expenditure,...$25,119.54

102. Large Flushing Tanks for Main Sewers and Substitution of Iron for Earthenware Pipes.-Two large flushing tanks were constructed under this heading: one at the junction of Arbuthnot Road with Wyndham Street and the other at the junction of Stone Nullah Lane with Lung On Street. Several short lengths of drain were also laid to connect the heads of existing sewers, disc valves being provided to enable the various lines of main sewer to be flushed as desired.

1911 Estimates, ... $5,000.00 | Total Estimates, 1911 Expenditure, 3,959.96 Expenditure to

31/12/11,

$24,147.55

P 45

103. Miscellaneous Drainage Works.--Extensive works were carried out under this heading. The following is a statement of the principal items, the amounts stated representing in some cases only a portion of the cost, owing to the work extending into more than one year:

HONGKONG.

(i.) Drainage works at Shaukiwan West (com-

pleted),..

(ii.) Extension of sewer in Craigmin Road, Hill District, first section extending from R.B.L. 50 to R.B.L.'s 90, 120 & 127 (completed),...

(iii) Extension of sewer to I.L. 1711, Bowen Road, (completed) (cost $1,081 less $750 paid by lessee of lot under Con- ditions of Sale),

(iv.) Extension of sewer to Shaukiwan Water-

works Bungalow (completed),

(v.) Extension of sewer and stormwater drain in Victoria Road near Kennedy Town Hospital (completed),.

(vi.) Diversion of sewer in Bonham Road adjoining

I.L. 754 (completed)

Cost of work

Contribution by Church

Missionary

Society

$685.51

(owners of I.L. 754),...$685.51

(vii.) Extension of sewer to Kennedy Town

Police Station, (completed),

(viii.) Extension of sewer to I.L. 1883, Smithfield,

Kennedy Town, (completed),

.$ 5,420

(ix.) Extension of sewer to I.L. 1881, Kennedy

Road, (completed),

(x.) Substituting earthenware pipes for old stone culvert in Compound of Victoria Gaol, alongside Old Bailey (completed),

(xi.) Extension of sewer in Ormsby Street, Tai Hang Village, (completed),

(xii.) Constructing channels on R.B.L.'s 2 & 3 for the discharge of storm water from Plantation Road, Hill District, (com- pleted),.....

+

3.049

331

1,019

805

656

538

404

306

231

192

P 46

(xiii.) Extension of storm water drain in yard adjoining Watkins' Dispensary (com- pleted),

(xiv.) Reconstruction of gullies in Douglas Lane (completed), Cost of work, $153.94 Contribution by owners,...... $153.94

(xv.) Diversion of sewer from I.L. 1896, Shin

Hing Street (completed),

(xvi.) Drain connections and other small items

(completed),

.$ 164

146

2,979

KOWLOON.

(xvii.) Laying storm water drains in area west of Nathan Road and extending from Waterloo Road to Soy Street, Mong- koktsui, (completed),...

(xviii.) Drainage works at Shamshuipo, (not com-

pleted),....

10,891

1,688

(xix.) Training a short length of nullah in Water- loo Road north of No. 4 Railway Bridge (length 380 feet) (completed), 3,604

(xx.) Diversion of sewer near Slaughter Houses,

Mataukok, (completed),

703

(xxi.) Extension of sewer in Mody Road to K.I.L.

574 (completed), .

569

(xxii.) Extension of sewer in Saigon Street (com-

pleted),...

549

(xxiii.) Drain connections and other small items,

(completed),

1911 Estimates,

1911 Expenditure,

696

$40,000 00 38,086.51

Item (i.) This item was described in last year's Report (ride (ii)) and is now completed.

Item (ii.) This work was undertaken to intercept the drainage from various houses situated within the watershed of the Aberdeen Valley. Only the first section of the work, extending from near R.B.L. 50 to R.B.L's 90, 120 & 127, was undertaken during the year. It consisted of the laying of 6" pipes along Craigmin Road and 4" pipes for the branches to lots.

Item (iii.) This work was required to take the drainage from new houses erected on I.L. 1711. It consisted of the laying of a 6" pipe along the pathway to the west of I.L's 1509 & 1570 and the construction of an inspection culvert underneath the Bowen Road Conduit.

P 47

Item (iv.) This work was undertaken to prevent the pollution of the Shaukiwan Water Boat Supply by the drainage from the Waterworks Bungalow. The work consisted of the laying of 9", 6" & 4" pipes.

Item (v.) This work was necessitated by the tipping of earth along the foreshore, which tended to block up the outlets of the storm water drain and sewer opposite the Kennedy Town Hospital. The outlets were accordingly diverted to the westward of their former positions. A 15" pipe was laid for the storm water and a 9′′ pipe for the sewer.

Item (vi.) This work formed part of a scheme for the diversion of Bonham Road to enable the Church Missionary Society to obtain an extension of I.L. 754 for the purpose of erecting a hostel in con- nection with the University. In accordance with the arrangements made, the cost of this and all other work involved was borne by the Society.

Item (vii.) This work was carried out in order to improve the sanitary condition of the Police Station, the drainage having hitherto discharged down the hillside. The work consisted of the laying of a 4" pipe and construction of the necessary manholes.

Item (viii.) The erection of two blocks of buildings in the valley above the Cattle Depôt, Kennedy Town, for the production of lard, necessitated an extension of a 6′′ pipe sewer.

Item (ix.) It became necessary to lay a sewer along the new path adjoining the Peak Tramway below Kennedy Road to take the drainage from houses to be erected on I.L.'s 1875 & 1881. A 6′′ pipe was laid for this purpose.

Item (x.) Owing to water leaking into the Central Police Station Quarters from the old stone drain in the Compound of Victoria Gaol, it was found necessary to relay it with 12" pipes.

Item (xi.) This work was required to take the drainage from new houses erected at the south end of Ormsby Street, Tai Hang Village.

Item (xii.) This work was necessary to prevent the formation of pools on R.B.L.'s 2 & 3, Plantation Road, which formed breeding places for mosquitoes.

Item (xiii) Owing to a complaint received from adjoining owners, a 9" pipe was laid to take the storm water from the lane between the old Land Office and Watkins' Dispensary and adjoining. yards.

Item (xiv.) Owing to a complaint that the existing gratings in Douglas Lane at its junction with Des Voeux Road Central were not of sufficient size to take the sullage water and debris that flowed from the lane, the work of reconstructing the gullies and making other minor improvements was undertaken by the Government at the expense of the owners of the property in the lane.

P 48

Item (xv.) In the sale conditions of I.L. 1896, it was stipulated that the 6" sewer crossing the corner of this lot should be diverted by Government into the scavenging lane at the side.

Items (xvi) & (xxiii). These items require no comment.

Item (xvii.) The area mentioned in this item had no storm water drains to take off the surface water from the streets that are partially formed and built on, the result being that, after heavy rainfalls, large pools of water were formed. Pipes, 15" & 12" diameter, were laid in Canton Road, and in Reclamation, Shanghai and Portland Streets.

Item (xviii.) Owing to the development of Shamshuipo, a drainage scheme was prepared and certain sections of sewers have been laid, where buildings are erected. The work done during the year was the construction of a length of 24" cement concrete culvert near N.K.I.L. 26, two lengths of 6" sewers for N.K.I.L.'s 17 & 21, a length of 6" temporary drain to divert the drainage from property on the foreshore, owing to the outlets being obstructed by the new reclamation, and a short length of nullah training 20 feet wide, with temporary and permanent lengths of 15" pipes for diverting the existing storm water and surface sullage drains from lanes and pro- perty on the foreshore obstructed by the reclamation of N.K.I.L.'s 46-50.

Item (xix.) The training of this length of nullah was required owing to the erosion of the side of the road running parallel to the railway.

Item (xx.) The diversion of the 18" pipe sewer was required on account of the building of a Fat-Boiling Factory on K.I.L. Î266.

Item (xxi.) This extension was required to take the drainage from buildings being erected on K.I.L. 574.

Item (xxii.) This extension was necessary to take the drainage from the Weaving Factory erected on K.I.L. 571.

104. Extensions of Lighting.-The following lamps were erected :-

CITY AND HILL DISTRICT.

Pound Lane Latrine,

Sampan Street, Spring Gardens Lane, Mee Lun Lane Latrine,

Trough Closet under ramp to Government

2*

2+

1†

Čivil Hospital,-

2+

Bonham Road, junction with Park Road,

-

-

1

1*

1

Tai Loi Lane,

Corner of Catchick Street and Smithfield,

* These lamps were charged to Advance Account "Private Streets Improve-

ments

11

†These lamps were charged to the Vote "Public Latrines and Urinals ".

P 49

Path between Smithfield and Kennedy Town

Police Station,

Watson Road, North Point,

3

1

Peak Urinal, -

-

2*

Peak Residents' address board,

1*

French Street Pier,

1*

18

Deduct lamp taken down at entrance

to Old Western Market,

Net increase in City and Hill District, 17

1

KOWLOON

Arthur Street, Yaumati,

New Bamboo Wharf, Tsim Sha Tsui, for

coaling Government launches, -

Shanghai Street between Argyle Street and

Fife Street,

Deduct lamps removed from Chatham

Road (temporary route),

Net decrease,

1911 Estimates,...

1911 Expenditure,

1*

1

LO

5

9

$1,500.00 802.00

TH

105. Triangulation Survey of Colony.-A description of the work accomplished will be found under paragraph 16 of this Report.

1911 Estimates,... $5,000.00 | Total Estimates, 1911 Expenditure, 1,247.65 Expenditure to 31/12/11,...

$11,000,00

3,486.02

106. Royal Square, Fencing in Gardens.-After much dis- cussion as to the manner in which the areas belonging to Government should be enclosed, it was decided that iron railings and granite pillars of the same design as those surrounding the plots belonging to the Hongkong & Shanghai Ranking Corporation should be adopted. It was further decided that the area to the west of the Hongkong Club, corresponding with that occupied by the Courts of Justice, should not be enclosed with granite pillars and iron railings.

Drawings were accordingly made, quantities prepared and ten- ders called for for the carrying out of the necessary work. An indent

* These lamps were charged to the Vote "Miscellaneous Works".

P 50

was also despatched for the railings. No expenditure was incurred during the year.

1911 Estimates,... $14,000,00 | Total Estimates,

1911 Expenditure,

$14,000.00

Expenditure to 31/12/11,...

107. Pier opposite Royal Square.-Borings were taken over the site of the proposed new pier but it was decided by Government that the work should not be proceeded with meanwhile and no further steps were therefore taken.

|

1911 Estimates,... $30,000.00 Total Estimates, 1911 Expenditure, 135.24 Expenditure to,

31/12/11,... $135.24

108. Miscellaneous Works.-The following are the principal items of expenditure under this heading, representing in some cases only a part of the cost of the works in consequence of their execution extending over more than one year :-

Water Police Station and Basin

Erecting shed in Police Basin Compound for storage of coal for Government launches,

Constructing Bamboo Pier for coaling

Government launches,-

Laying gas service to do., -

$

3,028

795

114

Constructing Bathroom in connection with

shed for Undesirables,

149

Repairing and altering boat-slip,

367

Providing new Typhoon Signals and repair-

ing old do.,

122

Constructing Chinese kitchen in connection

107

Sundry small items, -

26

4,708

with D.S.P.'s Quarters,

Dust Boat Stations and Refuse Depôts :--

Extending Ship Street Pier and construc-

ting dust shoot at same,

Constructing dust shoot at Eastern Street, Repairing dust-bin opposite Central Market,

Constructing telephone line to Tsun Wan Police

Station,

Government Civil Hospital:--

Lunatic Asylums-Constructing balcony to wardmaster's quarters, repairing dam- age caused by fire to padded cell, &c., "B" Block-Providing linen cupboards,

tiling bathrooms, &c.,

3,989

407

112

4,508

3,213

485

402

''

- P 51

"A" Block-Converting Waiting Rooms into General Office, fixing white glazed tiles and Lavatory Basins, &c., - Laying gas and electric light services, &c., Constructing new wood store,

Providing new boiler, &c. for Hot Water

Supply,

Shaukiwan Market-Erecting brick shed for fruit stalls in place of matshed structure destroyed by fire, -

$

បទ

CA

213

114

371

771

2,356

1,523

Coal Shed at Tai Po-Constructing shed for

storage of coal for Police launches, Reclamation at Wanchai Store-Carrying out

extension northwards,

1,433

1,409

Duke of Connaught's Statue-Providing new

granite pedestal, -

1,200

Small extensions of nullahs west of Sai Wan Ho Market and in Sun Shing Street, Shaukiwan, and formation of channels on foreshore to prevent drain outlets being silted up,

Clerks' Quarters at

Quarters at Tai Po-Constructing additions,

Government House-Re-silvering mirrors, fix- ing numbers on articles of furniture, pro- viding separate meters for electric light and re-arranging service, &c., -

No. 2 Tank-Filling in brick rubbish removed from Bridges Street and demolishing arches,

Kennedy Town Cattle Depôts and Slaughter

Houses:-

997

910

871

831

Providing additional Scalding Pans,

110

Rebuilding Crematorium, providing new

iron work for furnace, &c.,

598

Installing Gas Service in Inspector's Quar-

ters,

175

883

Wanchai School-Reconstructing old verandah roof in ferro-concrete, renewing concrete of ground floor, opening doorway, &c.,

873

Shaukiwan Police Station :-

Altering cells and concreting path,

306

Brick wall to enclose station, including

iron entrance gate,

287

Forming Drying Room,-

72

665

Stables for Sanitary Department-Converting disused temporary market behind Harbour Office into Stables,

508

P 52

Queen's College :-

Installing electric light in Great Hall, Constructing Stalls, &c.,

Gap Rock and Waglan Lighthouses-Providing

Semaphores,

€Ð

233

260

493

463

Kennedy Town Police Station :--

Installing gas lighting,

162

Providing wire gauze to doors and win-

dows, &c.,

296

458

Yaumati Police Station :-

Constructing cook-house for Indians, Enclosing verandah, -

234

129

Wire netting to cell windows, &c.,

95

458

Central Police Station :

Erecting matshed to provide for temporary

increase in police force,

Miscellaneous small matters,

Hunghom Police Station-Constructing mess-

room for European Constables, &c.,

Street Watering-Additional Fountains

Victoria and Kowloon,

Government Offices-Additional lights, electric

fans, &c., -

City Disinfecting Station :

300

140

440

377

365

327

Erecting coal sheds, &c.,

240.

Lengthening chimneys to forges,

Dangerous Buildings-Shoring Nos. 13, 15 and

17 Aberdeen Street,

80

320

316

Victoria British School-Bamboo fence round

playground,

278

260

257

Monuments-Repairs to monuments at Wan-

chai and Happy Valley, - Shektongtsui Nullah-Demolishing old dams, Belilios School--Enclosing verandahs at west end on 1st and 2nd floors to form teachers' rooms and making other necessary alter- ations in connection with same,- Kowloon Mortuary-Altering service for sprays

to mortuary tables,

Pokfulam Village-Constructing tanks in con- nection with training of stream-course to enable villagers to obtain water for garden- ing purposes,

Kowloon British School-Sundry additions, Bay View Police Station-Installing gas service,

257

228

224

218

203

- P 53

A sum of $105.29 was recovered from the owner of No. 11 Morrison Street for the shoring up of a dangerous wall and was credited to this vote.

1911 Estimates,

1911 Supplementary Vote,

1911 Expenditure,

...$35,000.00 3,600.00

$38,600.00

36,850.14

109. Typhoon Refuge, Mongkoktsui.--Operations during the year were confined to quarrying or collecting from beaches and depositing pell-mell rubble and to dredging trenches for the rubble mounds which will enclose the reclamation to be constructed at Taikoktsui, south of Kowloon Marine Lot No. 32.

The latter work was begun on March 27th and completed by December 7th, being carried out by the Government grab dredger. The total quantity of material dredged, consisting of mud, sand and coral, amounted to 26,092 cubic yards (junk measurement).

The fleet of junks for the collection and conveyance of stone, which on the 1st of January numbered 10, was rapidly added to and by May numbered 85; whilst the quantity of stone deposited per month, which was for January 7,980 cubic yards (junk measurement), had increased by May to 27,076 cubic yards. By the end of October, the two-ton boulders forming the inner and outer toes of the rubble mound constituting the breakwater and the small stone hearting between the same had been deposited and by the end of the year the stone throughout the entire length of the breakwater stood at an average height of eight feet above the bottom of the dredged trench.

. The total quantity of stone deposited during the year amounted to 259,636 cubic yards (junk and barge measurement) of which 252,883 cubic yards were deposited in the breakwater and 6,753 cubic yards in the south jetty and in the mounds to enclose the reclamation south of Kowloon Marine Lot 32.

1911 Estimates, ...$300,000.00 | Total Estimates, $2,301,600.00 1911 Sup. Vote, ... 25,000.00 Expenditure to

--

325,000.00

1911 Expenditure, 320,324.86

31/12/11, ...

626,934.16

110. Reclamation opposite K.M.L.'s 29-31, Yaumati.-A con- tract for this work was let to Mr. Keng Tak Cheong on the 2nd. December for the sun of $63,708.65. The reclamation will have an area of 394,350 square feet and a water frontage of 635 lineal feet. No payment was made to the Contractor before the close of the year. The only expenditure incurred during the year was for valuations in connection with claims made against the Government by the Marine Lot holders on account of alleged interference with their rights of access to the waters of the harbour. Under section 12 of "The Harbour of Refuge Ordinance, 1909" the lot-holders were required to forward their claims to Government and, failing an amicable settlement, provision was made for the reference of such claims to one of the Judges of the Supreme Court. As no settlement

+

— Ÿ 54 —

could be arrived at, all the claims, with the exception of one, were so referred. One claim was under consideration with a view to an amicable settlement.

1911 Estimates, ...$12,500.00 | Total Estimates, ...$87,000.00 1911 Expenditure,

427.00 Expenditure to

31/12/11, ......1,666.00

111. Reclamation between Kowloon Marine Lot 83 and Hung- hom Marine Lot 1, Hunghom.-This work was completed in Novem- ber. A description of it was contained in last year's Report.

1911 Estimates, ...$ 7,000.00 1911 Sup. Vote,... 5,620.00

12,620.00

1911 Expenditure, 12,580.36*

Total Estimates, $17,000.00 Expenditure to

31/12/11,

16,848.36*

112. Improvement of Ap Liu Village.-Substantial progress was made with the filling-in of the area to form a new site for the village, 65,000 cubic yards of material being deposited and 800 cubic yards of rubble pitching set. The expenditure under the Con- tract amounted to $9,426.50 whilst sums amounting to $16,325.25 were drawn for disbursement in the shape of compensation for land and buildings.

-

1911 Estimates, $13,000.00 1911 Sup. Vote,

14,000.00

$27,000.00

1911 Expenditure, 25,751.75

Total Estimates, - - $28,800.00 Expenditure to

31/12/11,

w

25,751.75

113. Improvement of Tai Hang Village.-The works described in last year's Report were continued, 16 houses and 24 pigsties. being demolished and reconstructed on new and improved sites during the year.

1911 Estimates, - $6,000.00 | Total Estimates, - - $15,500.00 1911 Expenditure, 5,865.00 Expenditure to

31/12/11, - 10,349.81

114. Public Health and Buildings Ordinance, 1903.-Com- pensation.—This vote provides for the resumption of areas to form scavenging lanes and for the payment of compensation in connection with the removal of houses over the ends of private streets or lanes or for the loss of storeys resulting from the operation of section 188 sub-section (3) of the Public Health and Buildings Ordinance. In

• some cases, where houses were of moderate depth, a modification of the open space requirements has been granted, the owners agreeing to provide a lane without compensation in consideration of being permitted to count it as part of their open space.

1911 Estimates,

-

1911 Supplementary Vote, -

$12,000.00 564.00

1911 Expenditure,

$12,564 00 12,563.09

* Includes a sum of $2,095.50, being retention money under the Contract,

transferred to "Deposits not available".

J

+

P 55

The following is a statement of the resumptions effected and compensation paid during the year :—

Scavenging lanes resumed on payment of compensation.

In rear of 6 houses on S.I.L. 377, Shauki-

wan West, -

In rear of Nos. 78 to 92, Des Voeux Road West and Nos. 27 to 41, Ko Shing Street.

Area in Compensa-

Sq. Ft. tion paid.

596 $ 417.20

1,055 8,442.67*

A lane in the rear of 10 houses in High Street on Inland Lot 767 was also formed but payment for it had not been made before the end of the year.

Scavenging Lanes provided by owners but not surrendered

to the Government.

In rear of 4 houses on K.I.L. 964, Shanghai

Area in Sq. Ft.

Street,

371' 0"

Do.

36 houses on I.L. 427 in Queen's Road East, Sampan Street and Cross Street,

1,746' 0"

Do.

3 houses on P.R.M.L. 14, Connaught

Road Central,-

262' 1"

Do.

Do.

1 house on S.I.L. 184, Main Street,

Shaukiwan,

1 house on I.L. 60, s. G, s.s. 1,

Aberdeen Street,-

66' 3"

-

8071"

Do.

1 house on I.L. 60, s. G, R.P.,

Aberdeen Street,-

Do.

1 house on I.L. 553, Queen's Road

Central,

80'71"+

55' 0"

Scavenging Lanes to be provided by owners when an opportunity occurs of gaining access to them from the adjoining streets.

In rear of 35, Bonham Strand on I.L. 1201,

Sec. C.,-

Do. 133, Bonham Strand on I.L. 1235,

249, Hollywood Road on IL. 281,

Area in Sq. Ft.

144' 0"

83′ 11′′

Do.

Sec. D., -

69'-8"

Do.

251, Hollywood Road on I.L. 281,

R.P.,

69' 8"

-

Do.

433, 435 and 437, Queen's Road West

on M.L. 180, R.P.,

271′ 6′′

Do.

97, Jervois Street on I.L. 855, R.P.,

78' 6"

Do.

95,

do.

do. 868,-

59' 2"

*This lane forms part of a street 22 feet wide which was formed on P.R.M.L. 57 in 1909. Owing to legal difficulties in regard to the ownership of the property, the compensation was not paid until 1911.

In these cases a portion of the area required for the lane was provided by the Government from adjacent Crown land.

J

P 56

In rear of 103 and 105, Jervois Street on I.L.'s

858 and 859, R.P.,

-

Area in Sq. Ft.

162' 0"

Do.

107, Jervois Street on I.L.'s 859 and

860, R.P., -

78' 0"

Do.

3, Burd Street on M.L. 16 B, Sec. B.

70' 10"

>

Do.

6, Cochrane Street, on I.L. 23,

122' 3"

Do.

232, Queen's Road East,-

-

73′ 11′′

Do.

145, Wing Lok St. on M.L. 162, R.P.,

68' 9"

Do.

233,

do.

on I.L. 1330,

55' 6"

Do.

225,

do.

on I.L. 348,

47' 9"

Do.

8, Shelley Street on I.L. 116, Sec. K.,

108' 6"

Do.

34, Ko Shing St. on M.L. 58, Sec. F.,

120' 0"

Do.

196, Hollywood Road on I.L. 532,

99' 9"

Loss of Storeys.

Compensation was paid for the loss of a storey at No. 17 Aber- deen Street (Inland Lot 60, Sec. G, s.s. 2) resulting from the opera- tion of sub-section 3 of section 188 of the Buildings Ordinance. The house in question collapsed and had to be rebuilt in accordance with the provisions of the Ordinance relating to the erection of new build- ings.

Amount paid,.

$1,176.90

Compensation was also paid for the loss of part of a storey at No. 33 Tung Street (Inland Lot 233), the owner of which claimed a sum of $3,000. The matter was referred to arbitration and some legal difficulties which arose were argued before Mr. Justice Gom- pertz with the result that a sum of $625 was awarded as compensa- tion, with costs against the Government. The latter, including fees paid to the Arbitrator and Architect appointed by the owner of the property, amounted to $1,864.85.

An old party wall at the rear of No. 13 Aberdeen Street was found to be in a dangerous condition and, as it stood partly on land which had been resumed by Government in connection with the Mee Lun Lane Resumption Scheme, half the cost of taking it down, amounting to $36.47, was defrayed by Government. The item was charged to the vote "Compensation ".

115. Kowloon Wuter Works.-As mentioned in last year's Re- port, in which a full description of the works was given, there was a sum of $11,292.43, which was payable in 1911, due to the Kang On firm for the completion of the Main and Byewash Dams of the Storage Reservoir, and certain matters in connection with Tsang Keng's Contract for the construction of the Storage Reservoir and Caretaker's Bungalow had been referred to arbitration, the late Mr. Lindsey, who was in charge of the British Section of the Kowloon-

Canton Railway, being appointed arbitrator,

}

P 57

The result of the arbitration and the expenses arising out of same were as follows:-

C.

• Amount awarded to Mr. Tsang Keng, Half of Arbitrator's fee ($2,300) Messrs. Dennys & Bowley's Costs,

35,600.94.

1,150.00

5,445.75

Additional Commission payable to Messrs.

Denison, Ram and Gibbs on amount

2,029.05

awarded to Mr. Tsang Keng,

-

Total,

$44,225.74

Certain sinall amounts, which had been deducted from Mr. Tsang Keng's Account on account of damage caused to trees and public roads by his operations, amounting to $779.79, were transferred to the respective votes to which the cost of the necessary repairs had been debited and the sum of $180.00 for unused stores, referred to in last year's Report, was credited to the Vote in 1911,

The cost of item (i) "Storage Reservoir" was incorrectly stated in last year's report as $622,499.48; it should have been $619,022.87. The total cost of the works should similarly have been given as $1,234,373.54 instead of $1,237,850.15.

The following is a statement of the cost of the works, including the Arbitrator's award and expenses incidental thereto and other items mentioned above :-

(i.) Storage Reservoir :-

Value of work executed by

Contractors,

$ C.

654,788.80

Costs of Arbitration and

half of Arbitrator's fee,..

6,595,75

661,384.55

(ii) Caretaker's Bungalow,

19,093.04

(iii) Catchwaters (as before),

163,868.64

(iv.) Clearwater Channel (do.),

7,231.00

(v.) Main from Storage Reservoir to Filter

Beds (do.),

60,723.35-

(vi.) Filter Beds (do.),

68,496.40

(vii) Main from Filter Beds to Service Reser-

voir (do.),

65,745.61

(viii.) Service Reservoir (do.),

67,639.31

(ix.) Main from Service Reservoir to Yaumati,

&c.,

74,490.05

(x) Miscellaneous :---

(a.) Engineers' Commission, 65,753.52 (b.)-(g.) as in 1910 Report, 24,953.60

90,707.12

Total Cost,............

.$1,279,379.07

*

P 58

1911 Estimates,... $12,000.00 | Total Estimates, $1,236,000.00 1911 Sup. Votes,.. 44,187.96 Expenditure to

$56,187.96

1913 Expenditure, 56,117.96

31/12/11, .. 1,279,379.07

116. Shaukiwan Water Works Extension.-Owing to recent developments, it became necessary to increase the supply of water to this important village. A thorough investigation of the surround- ing district was made with a view to finding a suitable site for the construction of a storage reservoir, but without result.

It was accordingly decided to lay a cast-iron main, contouring the western side of the large valley draining towards Sywan Bay in order to intercept the waters of an important stream in the south-western portion of the valley as well as several streams met with en route. A site for the construction of a service reservoir and filter beds near Sywan Gap was also selected.

Whilst the necessary plans and specification were being pre- pared for the latter works, arrangements were made for the laying of the main. All suitable pipes in store were issued and an indent was despatched to England for the additional pipes required. The latter had not arrived by the close of the year but about 5,000 feet of main had been laid with the pipes available locally.

1911 Estimates, ... $40,000.00 | Total Estimates, $60,000.00 1911 Expenditure, 7,573.33 Expenditure to

31/12/11,

7,573.33

117. Additional Service Reservoir, &c., West Point.--As it became necessary to consider the question of providing additional filter beds in connection with the proposed service reservoir, further investiga- tions were made into the matter of sites. The question was further complicated by the fact that much of the area surrounding the site selected for the reservoir had been granted for the construction of the Hongkong University and buildings in connection with same. As no other suitable site was found to be available, it was decided to prepare a scheme providing for the construction of filter beds on top of the reservoir. It was not found possible to proceed with the preparation of the necessary drawings, &c., before the close of the

year.

1911 Estimates, ... $30,000.00 Total Estimates, 1911 Expenditure, 3.30 Expenditure to

31/12/11,

$3.30

118. Miscellaneous Water Works.-The following are the prin- cipal items of expenditure under this heading, representing in some cases only part of the cost of the works in consequence of their extending over more than one year :-

(i.) Substituting 6" main for old main (partly 4" and partly 3") in Praya East, Yee Wo Street and Shaukiwan Road, extending from Percival Street to Inland Lot 1617, (completed),

-

1,159

P 59

(ii.) Reconstructing invert of Mount Parker Catchwater,

(completed), -

(iii.) Substituting 3" main for old 2" main round Mount

Kellett, (not completed),

(iv.) Renewing portion of 5" main from No. 4 Motor, Bowen Road, to 650' service reservoir, (com- pleted),

(v.) Connecting up ends of existing mains near

Wongneichong Village, (completed),

- $7,560

2,784

- 1,186

1,267

(vi.) Connecting up ends of existing mains near Tai

Hang Village, (completed),

999

(vii.) Providing floor plates and additional stays to valve spindles in valve well of Tytam Intermediate Reservoir, (completed),

(viii.) Altering the position of No. 4 Tank, Peak, con- sequent on the sale of R.B.L. 133, (completed),

(ix) Extending water main at To Kwa Wan as far as K.M.L. 90, and erecting fountain for the supply of the Basel Mission School, (completed),

-

762

721

1,201

Item (i.) The reasons for this work were stated in last year's Report.

Item (i.) This was necessary owing to the invert of the catch- water channel having been worn away by sand, &c., conveyed by the water during rainstorms. In reconstructing the invert, glazed half- pipes were inserted to take the dry-weather flow and the shape of the invert was improved.

Item (iii) The new main was laid, but the old main was not removed nor the road surface made good by the end of the year.

Item (iv.) This was necessary owing to the corrosion of the old pipes which had been laid in 1900.

Items (v.) & (vi.) These connections were made for the pur- pose of improving the circulation of water in the mains and affording better pressure.

Item (vii.) The provision of floor plates was found to be neces- sary in connection with the execution of ordinary maintenance work and repairs, and some additional support was also required for the valve spindles.

Item (viii.) Under the Conditions of Sale for R.B.L. 133, a sum of $500 was paid into the Treasury for the removal of the tank in question. As mentioned in last year's Report, this sum was credited to the Vote in 1910.

:

P 60

Item (ix.) This calls for no explanation.

66

With regard to Item (viii) in last year's Report, which was reported as not completed", no further work had to be carried out during 1911.

1911 Estimates,

1911 Expenditure,

Works not appearing in Estimates.

$25,000.00 17,828.86

119. Pier at Castle Peak Bay.-This pier is 190 feet long and is, for the most part, constructed of rubble with a top width of 6 feet, the surface being finished with cement concrete. The outer end is constructed of timber with 12" x 12" hardwood piles and a platform 15' x 15' to enable launches to get alongside. The approach road is carried on an embankment about 200 feet long, the slopes being protected by rubble pitching. The surfacing is of decomposed granite.

1911 Estimates,

1911 Expenditure,... $2,599.19 Expenditure to

Total Estimates,...$3,000.00

31/12/11......... 2,937.19

compensation beingpaid for

Total Estimates,...$3,459.00

31/12/11... 2,570.00

120. Compensation to Squatters in Hok Un Village.--This item was described in last year's Report, some additional houses.

1911 Estimates, ......

1911 Expenditure,... $405.00 Expenditure to

121. New Quarters at Tai Po for Public Works Department Officers. The expenditure under this heading consisted principally of a transfer to Railway funds for the value of the bungalow taken over from the Railway as referred to in last year's Report.

1911 Estimates,.....

Total Estimates,...$5,752.00

1911 Expenditure,... $5,582.09 | Expenditure to

31/12, 11... 5,582.09

122. Fan Ling Branch, Kowloon-Canton Railway.—The ex- penditure under this heading consisted merely of a transfer to Railway funds on account of earthworks executed by that Depart- ment in connection with the light railway to Sha Tau Kok. As explained in paragraph 99 of this Report, the construction of the road to Sha Tau Kok by the Public Works Department terminated at Au Ha Gap. all work to the castward of that point being executed by the Railway Department.

1911 Estimates, ...... 1911 Expenditure,...$17,277.02

Total Estimates,... Expenditure to

31 12/11, ... ..$17,277.02

123. Resumption of Land in connection with the laying out of Survey District No. 1.-This consisted merely of the resumption of 3

$

P 61

small lots at Kowloon City, the buildings on which had been pulled down on account of their dilapidated condition. As the lots fell within the lines of a projected street, it was considered inexpedient to permit the lessees to re-erect their buildings on them and they were accordingly resumed.

1911 Estimates, ...

1911 Expenditure,.

$C50.00

124. Resumption of Land in connection with future improvements in Shaukiwan.-As one of the old squatters' lots at Shaukiwan (Shau- kiwan Lot 323) interfered with the laying out of a new lot (Shau- kiwan Inland Lot 429), a portion of it was resumed, compensation to the extent of $350 being paid for the surrender of the land and - removal of the buildings occupying it.

1911 Estimates,

1911 Expenditure,

$350.00

125. Metallic Circuits to Telephone Lines.-As the Hongkong Tramway Co. refused to meet the claim of the Government for a refund of a portion of the outlay which they had incurred, during 1905 to 1908, in constructing metallic circuits for their telephone service, consequent on the introduction of Electric Tramways, an action was brought against the Company in the Supreme Court. The case had not been decided by the close of the year but it was considered expedient to debit the amount of the claim ($26,128.54), which had hitherto been treated as an Advance Account, to Public Works Extraordinary and the amount was transferred accordingly.

126. Coronation Celebrations.-Extensive illuminations were carried out on the night of the 23rd June in connection with the Coronation of Their Majesties King George V and Queen Mary. The following are some particulars of the buildings illuminated :-

Government House and grounds-590 incandescent elec- tric lamps forming the devices of a Crown, Prince of Wales' feathers and the letters G.R. and 2,000 Japanese lanterns.

Clock Tower-4,000 fairy lamps and 60 flare lamps.

New Post Office – 5,000 Japanese lanterns.

New Law Courts-4,200

Victoria Hospital and Quarters--2,500 Japanese lanterns.

Tsim Sha Tsui Police Station-2,500

"

Time Ball Tower and Signalling Station-1,000 Japanese

lanterns.

In addition to the above, the Government subscribed a sum of $970 towards the illuminations of the Queen's Statue which were carried out by the Coronation Committee. The expenditure by the Public Works Department, including the sum of $970 just men-

P 62

tioned, amounted to $5,805.87 which was defrayed from a special vote under the heading "Miscellaneous Services,-Illumination of Public Buildings in connection with Coronation Celebrations ".

year:

Staff etc.

127. The deaths of the following Officers occurred during the

Mr. L. M. Flores, Foreman, 17th October.

Tsang Kam Fuk, Storeboy, 10th October.

128. The following Officers retired on pension during the

year:

Mr. J. F. Boulton, 2nd Assistant Director of Public

Works, 13th April.

Mr. H. W. Wolfe, Overseer, 17th December.

129. The following Officers left the service of the Depart-

ment:

Mr. E. E. Rigold, Assistant Engineer.

Mr. J. E. Piercy, Surveyor.

Mr. S. R. Boyd, Overseer.

Mr. R. J. Howard, Overseer.

Mr. Do Kam Loi, Temporary Tracer. Mr. Cheng Kan, Head Storekeeper. Mr. F. X. P. Garcia, Clerk.

Mr. G. M. Santos, Foreman.

Mr. Chu Kam Fuk,

Mr. W. L. Choy,

Mr. Leung Tang,

do.

do.

do., and numerous other Officers of subordinate rank.

180. The following appointments were made:-

Mr. J. S. Chalmers, Temporary Land Surveyor. Mr. Wong Hon, Computer:

Mr. Ng Ka Pui,

do.

Mr. Colin Sara,

Overseer.

Mr. W. H. Edmonds, do.

Mr. T. J. Richards,

Mr. J. E. Eldridge,

do.

do.

Mr. Lai Wing Sheung, Head Storekeeper.

Mr. H. G. Leong, Clerk.

P 63

Mr. Chan Ip Man, Clerk. Mr. Lo Tsung Ko, do.

Mr. Lai Chung Lau, do.

Mr. Chow Lee,

Foreman.

Mr. L. A. Sales,

do.

Mr. C. Thomson,

do.

Mr. Leung Shing, Waterman, Harbour of Refuge Works. Mr. Chan Shing Tsau, do.

Mr. Chan Kan,

do.

do.

do.

Mr. E. Thompson, Watchman, Kowloon Reservoir, and nu-

merous other Officers of subordinate rank.

131. The following joined and left the service of the Depart- ment during the year:-

Mr. J. M. Cruz, Temporary Surveyor.

Mr. W. E. Jackson, Overseer.

Mr. J. M. Reis, Clerk.

Mr. Hung Shui, do.

Mr. G. Thomas, Watchman, Peak Reservoir, and numerous

other Officers of subordinate rank.

132. The following Officers returned from leave and resumed

daty on the dates mentioned:-

Mr. C. H. Gale, Executive Engineer,

Mr. A. E. Wright,

do.

do.,

Mr. F. A. Biden, Assistant Engineer, ·

Mr. A. T. Walker,

1st March.

-

-

17th August.

-

-

14th March.

-

Mr. L. C. Rees, Principal Land Surveyor,

Mr. B. W. Grey, Land Surveyor,

Mr. P. Julyan, First Clerk,

Mr. W. T. Edwards, Overseer,

Mr. W. Dobbs,

do.

do.

do.

Mr. J. Hutchings,

Mr. I. A. Wheal,

Mr. A. W. J. Simmons, do.

Mr. A. M. de Souza, Clerk, Mr. Yung Yuk Tong, dɔ. Mr. Fong Yau Leung, Tracer,

PUBLIC WORKS OFFICE,

HONGKONG, 3rd October, 1912.

J

18th December.

5th January. 4th December.

2nd October. - 16th March. - 20th June.

18th October.

4th December. 18th December. - 25th May.

22nd February. 15th February.

• W. CHATHAM, C.M.G., M.I.C.E., Director of Public Works.

i

P 65

Annexe A.

ANNUALLY RECURRENT EXPENDITURE, 1911.

*

HEADS AND SUB-HEADS,

ESTABLISHMENT.

Personal Emoluments and Exchange Com-

pensation,

Other Charges,

PUBLIC WORKS RECURRENT.

Buildings.

1. Maintenance of Buildings,.

2.

22

Territories,

>>

3. Maintenance of Lighthouses,

Communications.

ESTIMATED. ACTUAL. INCREASE. DECREASE.

PROVISION-

ALLY VOTED.

*

C.

317,407 35,048

282,917.89

25,490.23

$352,455

308,408.12

$

C.

$

C.

34,489.11 9,557.77

3,412.91 943.84

44,046.88

4,356,75

57,000

64,840.50

7,840.50

7,838.76

in New

6,000

5,828.87

4,500

3,434,33

171.13 1,065.67

4. Maintenance of Roads and Bridges in

City,

55,000

69,596.30 14,596.30

15,000.00

5. Maintenance of Roads and Bridges

outside City,

26,000

25,557.50

442.50

6. Maintenance of Roads and Bridges in

Kowloon,......

22,000

21,808.55

191.45

500.00

7. Maintenance of Roads and Bridges in

New Territories,

15,000

17,970.85

2,970.85

8. Maintenance of Telegraphs,

8,500

9,591.86 ⚫ 1,091.86

4,000.00 1,500.00

9.

in

""

New Territories,

4,000

3,848.20

151.80

Drainage.

10. Maintenance of Sewers, Nullahs, &c.,

21,000

17,976.09

3,023.91

Lighting.

11. Gas Lighting, City and Hill District,. 12. Electric Lighting, City,

46,000

50,563.68

4,563.68

22,500

24,739.64

2,239.64

5,000.00 2,500.00

13. Gas Lighting, Kowloon,..

10,500

10,493.51

6.49

14. Electric

1,000

1,489.55

489.55

550.00

Miscellaneous.

16.

15. Maintenance of Praya Wall and Piers,

of Public Cemetery,

6,000

5,260.35

2,500

676.94

*39.65 1,823.06

17. Laying out Chinese Cemeteries and

trenching for burials,

6,000

5,997.78

18. Exhumation of remains in Cemeteries,

6,000

5,603.86

2.22 396.14

::

19. Maintenance of Public

Recreation

Grounds,....

3,500

2,477,00

20. Dredging Foreshores,

7,000

6,208.16

1,023.00 791.84

21. Typhoon and Rainstorm Damages,....

12,500

57,031.04

44,531.04

22. Town Clock,

200

255.00

55.00

50,500.00 55.00

Waterworks.

23. Maintenance of City and Hill District, . 52,000

24.

"

Kowloon, ..

""

8,500

56,826.40 7,088.02

4,826.40

4,844.83

25. 26.

""

"7

Shan-ki-wan,

1,000

606.12

1,411.98 393.88

...

""

Aberdeen,

500

>>

147.83

352.17

27.

""

""

Lai Chi Kok,.

1,500

1,128.42

371.58

28. Water Account, (Meters, &c.),

10,000

9,894.45

105.55

Total,..

$416,200

486,940.80 83,204.82

12,464.02 92,288.59

2.

}

P 66

Annexe B.

EXTRAORDINARY EXPENDITURE, 1911.

3

HEADS AND SUB-HEADS.

PUBLIC WORKS EXTRAORDINARY.

Buildings.

PROVISION-

ESTIMATED. ACTUAL.

INCREASE. DECREASE.

ALLY VOTED.

FA

C.

C.

$

C.

好き

C.

1. Law Courts,

46,800

96,564.10

2. Post Office,

3. Public Latrines and Urinals,

4. Kowloon Market,

106,000

190,633.59

49,764.10 84,633.59

53,219.00 84,558.18

9,000

4,745.05

4,254.95

20,800

9,211.16

11,588.84

5. Additions to No. 2 Police Station,

5,000

7,656.70

2,656.70

2,900.00

6. New Magistracy,..

20,000

20,000.00

7. Sanitary Inspectors' Office, and Shed

for dust-carts, ambulances, &c., Wantsai District,......

15,000

15,000.00

8. Chinese Staff Quarters, Kennedy Town

Hospital,

9,000

10,763.05

1,763.05

1,764.00

9. Old Western Market, Re-construction,

25,000

7,430.58

17,569.42

10. Prison Extension,

11. Yaumati English School,—Additional

2,500

3,188.27

688.27

690.00

Storey,...

16,000

9,467.20

6,532.80

12. Police Station, Tsun Wan,..................

6,000

8,053.70

2,053.70

2,400.00

13. Re-building Government Pavilions.

(two),

16,000

15,224.35

775.65

14. Market and Slaughter House, Aber-

deen,....

9,200

5,965.94

3,234.06

15. City Disinfecting Station--Work-

shops and Shed for dust-carts, ambulances, &C.,.......

16. Laichikok Quarantine Station,-Hos-

4,500

7,809.99 3,309.99

3,310.00

pital. &c.,.......

7,000

6,461.49

538.51

17. Yaumati Disinfecting

Station,-

Stables,....

10,000

501.94

9,498.06

18. Imports and Exports Office,-Quarters

for Searchers, &c.,

4,500

9,753.95

5,253,95

5,500.00

19. Lighthouse and Quarters, Kap Sing

Island,

10,000

9,520.30

20. Maternity Hospital,

10,000

6,743.87

479.70 3,256.13

Communications.

21. New Roads, Kowloon,

25,000

755.74

24,244.26

22. New Roads, New Territories,

60,000

40,879.00

23. Forming and Korbing Streets,

30,000

25,249.57

19,121.00 4,750.43

Drainage.

24. Training Nullahıs,

25,000

25,119.54

119.54

400.00

25. Flushing Tanks and Iron Pipes, 26. Miscellaneous Drainage Works,

5,000

40,000

3,959.96 38,086.51

1,040.04 1,913.49

}

Lighting.

27. Extensions of Lighting,

Miscellaneous.

1,500

802.00

698.00

28. Triangulation Survey of Colony,

5,000

1,247.65

3,752.35

29. Royal Square,-Fencing in Gardens,...

14,000

14,000.00

30. Pier opposite Royal Square,

30,000

31. Miscellaneous Works,

35,000

135.24 36,850.14

29,864.76

32. Typhoon Refuge, Mongkoktsui, 33. Reclamation opposite K.M.L.'s 29

31, Yaumati,..

300,000

320,324.86

1,850.14 20,324.86

3,600.00

25,000.00

12,500

427.00

12,073.00

Carried forward,

$ 935,300 903,532.44

172,417.89 204,185.45 183,341.48

تم

- P 67

ANNEXE B,-Continued.

HEADS AND SUB-HEADS.

ESTIMATED.

ACTUAL. INCREASE. DECREASE.

PROVISION-

ALLY.

VOTED.

$

C.

Brought forward,

935,300

903,532.44

$ C.

172,417.89

$ c.

$

c.

204,185.45

183,341.48

34. Reclamation between K.M.L. 83 and

Miscellaneous,-- Contd.

H.M.L. 1, Hung Hom,

7,000

35. Improvement of Ap Liu Village,

13,000

36. Improvement of Tai Hang Village,... 37. Store Account,....

6,000

12,580.36 25,751.75 5,865.00

5,580.36 12,751.75

5,620.00 14,000.00

135.00

100

Public Health and Buildings Ordinance,

1903.

38. Compensation, .........

Waterworks.

39. Kowloon Waterworks..........

12,000

12,563.09

563.09

564.00

12,000

40. Shaukiwan Waterworks Extension,..

40,000

56,117.96 7,573.35

44,117.96

14,187.96

32,426.67

41. Additional Service Reservoir, West

Point,....

30,000

3.30

29,996.70

42. Miscellaneous Waterworks,

25,000

17,838.86

7,161.14

Works not appearing in Estimates.

43. Pier at Castle Peak Bay,

44. Compensation to Squatters in Hok

Un Village,..

45. New Quarters at Tai Po for P.W.D.

Officers,

46. Fan Ling Branch, Kowloon-Canton

Railway,

47. Resumption of Land in connection with the laying out of Survey District No. 1,

48. Resumption of Laud in connection with future improvements in Shaukiwan,

49. Metallic Circuits to Telephone Lines,...

:

:

2,599.19

405.00

2,599.19

2,662.00

405.00

794.00

5,582.09

5,582.09

5,752.00

17,277.02 17,277.02

650.00

650.00

650.00

...

350.00 26,128.54

350.00 26,128.54

350.00

Total,

Less Store Account Credit,

1,080,400 1,094,817.93 288,422.89 273,904.96 257,921.44

287,636.83

4:

!

$807,181,10

MONTH.

TAITAM.

Annexe C.

CITY AND HILL DISTRICT WATER WORKS, 1911. Monthly Consumption and Contents of Reservoirs ( Gallons).

POKFULAM.

WONG-NEI-CHONG.

• MAIN.

In Reser-

Delivered

BY-WASH.

INTERMEDIATE.

Delivered

voir 1st of

month.

over

over

gauge.

In Reservoir In Reservoir 1st of month. 1st of month.

In Reservoir 1st of mouth.

gange.

In Reser-Delivered voir 1st of.

month.

over

TOTAL CON-

TENTS OF

IMPOUNDING

RESERVOIRS.

MINT DAM, BLUE POOL

RAIN-

COLLECTED TOTAL CON-

FALL

FROM

SUMPTION

AND

SUPPLIES

FROM

GRAND

AT

OBSER-

REMARKS.

STREAMS. (Filtered).

gauge.

POKFULAM TOTAL. CONDUIT (Unfiltered).

VATORY

(Inches).

|

1,607,000|113,474,000 | 4,311,000-117,785,000 nik523,081,000 1,607,000 113,474,000 4,811,000 117,785,000

P. 68

+

29,380,000 22,571,000 313,850,000

Jan.,

Feb., March, 4,100,000 2,472,000 184,590,000 April,. 5,280,000 2,738,000 120,885,000

9,675,000 9,322,000 239,270,000

May, 16,200,000 14,182,000 75,220,000

487,000 17,568000 89,296,000 1,801,000 27,000 175,320,000 99,297,000 2,017,000 320,000 154,420,000 104,965,000 1,908,000 541,000 128,250,000 98,924,000 1,876,000

73

Intermittent supply-

by Rider Mains.

426,309,000 985,000 109,604,000 4,226,000 113,830,000 245,338,000 6,340,000 113,777,000 3,592,000 117,369,000

·00

Do.

3.82

*Do.

""

609,000 109,210,000 81,736,000 2,855,000 66,000,000 -35,196,000 337,480,000 8,241,000 195,900,000 116,670,000 80,337,000 9,000

""

.

1

}

637,958,000 11,105,000 162,971,000 3,678,000 166,649,000 July, 62,410,000 39,163,000 321,905,000 1,892,000 195,900,000 114,553,000 29,812,000 2,142,000 611,919,000 9,364,000 165,222,000 3,271,000 168,493,000 Aug., . 61,420,000 33,306,000 306,525,000 3,402,000|195,900,000 107,795,000 | 28,709,000 2,273,000 595,956,000 22,481,000 | 165,955,000| 3,241,000 169,196,000 30-06 Sept.,. 69,100,000 37,438,000 407,000,000 20,564,000 207,640,000 103,430,000 33,077,000 2,142,000 787,381,000 15,884,000 158,894,000 3,226,000 162,120,000 6.21 Oct.,... 61,780,000 39,216,000 400,450,000 5,086,000 | 210,155,000 78,361,000 | 28,551,000 | 27,122,000 706,022,000|16,313,000 | 161,012,000| 3,459,000 | 164,471,000 Nov.,. 55,100,000 27,401,000 407,000,000 4,786,000 205,480,000 82,981,000 7,075,000 10,624,000 679,441,000 1,439,000 122,145,000 3,672,000 126,117,000 Dec.,39,420,000 | 21,356,000 389,800,000 1,539,000 184,130,000 100,673,000 1,294,000 nil. 616,183,000 1,200,000 123,229,000 3,624,000 126,853,000

| 256,832,000 | 5,415,000 107,077,000 3,317,000 110,394,000 204,094,000 | 34,145,000|130,063,000| 3,545,000 133,608,000 22.14 5.09

5.94

Do.

Constant supply from 19th.

Constant supply.

,,

8.06

Do.

Do.

Do.

5.68

Do.

2.72

Intermittent supply by Rider Mains from 1st.

•10

Do.

Total,

1911.

284,361,000

1,178,081,000

44,403,000

:..

126,278,000 1,633,723,000 43,162,000 1,676,885,000 90.55

Total,.

1910.

266,976,000

Increase

or

Decrease.

4-17,385,000

:.

:

987,317,000

86,074,000

|266,367,000 1,606,734,000 29,471,000|1,636,205,000 | 70·08

+191,364,000

- 41,671,000

5,989,000 -140,089,000+26,989,000+13,691,000 +40,680,000+20-47

Estimated average population for whole year, 247,219. Consumption of filtered water per head per day, 18·1 gallons,

"

*

Annexe D.

CITY AND HILL DISTRICT WATER WORKS, 1911. Particulars of Metered and Unmetered Supplies.

FILTERED SUPPLY.

:

Ref..

- P 69

UNMETERED.

METERED.

MONTH.

CITY.

CITY,

HILL

DISTRICT.

TOTAL.

UNFILTERED

SUPPLY

(Metered).

GRAND TOTAL.

Trade.

Domestic.

January,

February,

March,

85,015,000 16,027,000 10,040,000 83,563,000 15,153,000

2,392,000 113,474,000

4,311,000

117,785,000

85,992,000

16,393,000

9,093,000

8,849,000 2,039,000 109,604,000 2,299,000 113,777,000

4,226,000

113,830,000

3,592,000

117,369,000

April,

79,681,000 15,161,000

10,211,000

2,021,000

107,077,000

3,317,000

110,394,000

May,

100,192,000 15,795,000

11,565,000

2,511,000 130,063,000

3,545,000

133,608,000

June,

130,752,000

16,571,000

12,908,000

2,740,000 | 162,971,000

3,678,000

166,649,000

July,

130,109,000

18,321,000

13,972,000

2,820,000 165,222,000

3,271,000

168,493,000

August,.

133,725,000 15,810,000

13,102,000

3,318,000

165,955,000 3,241,000'

169,196,000

September,

122,052,000 | 19,306,000

14,574,000

2,962,000 158,894,000 3,226,000

162,120,000

October,....

129,196,000

16,585,000

12,445,000

2,786,000 161,012,000

3,459,000

164,471,000

November,

December,

89,539,000 18,316,000 91,777,000 18,105,000

12,286,000

10,856,000

(1,261,596,000| 201,543,000

2,304,000 122,445,000 3,672,000 2,491,000 123,229,000 3,624,000 30,683,000 1,633,723,000 43,162,000

126,117,000

126,853,000

1,676,885,000

Total, 1911, 139,901,000 Total, 1010, ...... 1,258,212,000| 216,029,000 103,139,000

|

Increase or Decrease,..+.3,384,000-14,486,000 +36,762,000

29,354,000 1,606,734,000 29,471,000 1,636,205,000

+1,329,000 (+26,989,000+13,691,000

+40,680,000

Annexe E.

CITY AND HILL DISTRICT WATER WORKS 1911. Water Pumped to Hill District and High Levels of the City (Gallons). (Theoretical Displacement at Pumps.)

HIGH LEVELS OF CITY,

P 70

GRAND

HILL DISTRICT.

COMBINED

MONTH.

TOTAL

700′ and 750′ TANKS. (Conduit & Peuk loads District)|

600' and 650′ TANKS. (Robinson Road District.)

TOTALS.

PUMPED.

Motors.

Engine.

Total.

Motors. Engine. Total.

Motors. Engine.

Total.

January,

February,

2.392,000 2.392,000 2,039.000 2,039,600

1,237,000 1,237,000| 2,740,000 1,756,000 1,194,000 1,194,000 2,672,000 1,300,000|

March,

2,299.000 2.299.000

1.197,000 1.197,000

2.874,000 1,192 000

April,

May,

June,

88,000

2,021,000 2,511,000 2,511,000 2,652,000 2,740,000

2,021,000]

1.875,000

1,375,000

2,507,000|

4.496,000 5.733,000 8.125.000 3,972,000 5,166,000 7,205,000 4.066,000 1,585,000 4,092,000|

5,263,000

7,562,000

5,467,000

7,188,000

1.703.000 1,703 000

2,523.000

1,816,000 4,339,000

6.042.000

8,553.000

1.305,000)

1,305,000

3,745,000

1,713,000|| 5,458 000

9,763,000

9,503,000

July,

83,000 2,787,000

2,820.000

1.636,000)

1,636,000

4,243 000

1.566,000| 5.809,000

7.445,000

10,265,000

August,

458,000 | 2,880,000

3,318.000

1,112,000

1,112,000

3,984,000

1.458,000| 5,412,000

6,554,000

9,872,000

September..

354,000 2.908,000

3,262,000

1.144,000 1 144,000

4.009,000

1,369,000 5,378,000)

6,522,000

9,784,000

October.

11,000

2.775.000

2,786 000

1,758,000

1,758,000 3,888,000

1.378,000 5,266,000||

7,024,000

9.810,000

November,

...

2,301,000

2,304,000

1,610,000

1,610,000 3.580,000

1,846,00

5,426,000 7,036.000

9,340.000

December,

2,491,000

2,191,000

Total 1911,

994,000 | 29,989,000| 30,983,000|

...

Total 1910...

29,354,000 | 29,354,000|

Increase or Decrease,..| +994,000| +635,000 |+1,629,000Į

29,000

1,921.000 1,924,000 3.558,000

1,658,000 5,216,000 7,140,000 9,631,000

17,159,000 17,195,000| 40,323,000 18,637,000 58,960,000| 76,155,000 107,138,000 14,530,000 14,530,000| 41,819,000| 12,355,000 54,174,000|| 68,704,000 98,058,000 +2,665,000]

·2,665,000—1,496,000+6,282,006|-+-4,786,000 +7,451,000 +9,080.000

2,665,000—1,496,000

6,000

2

7

Į

·

Annexe F.

KOWLOON WATER WORKS, 1911.

Contents of Reservoir and Details of Monthly Consumption (Gallons).

Metered Supply.

-

Month.

In Reservoir 1st of Month.]

Unmetered

Supply.

Grand

Total.

Remarks.

Trade.

Domestic.

Total.

January,..

February,.

March,

April,

May,

June,

July,

August,

September,

October,

352,500,000

November,

351,200,000

2,873,000

December,

339,975,000

2,184,000

Total, 1911,...

Total, 1910,...

33,632,000

28,535,000

281,175,000 5,949,000 2,700,000 8,649,000 13,451,000 22,100,000 265,300,000 4,228,000 2,017,000 6,245,000 14,735,000 20,980,000 243,800,000 3,882,000 1,954,000 5,836,000 17,984,000 23,820,000 219,960,000 5,834,000 2,609,000 8,443,000 14,797,000 23,240,000 205,520,000 5,808,000 2,751,000 8,559,000 16,981,000 25,540,000 339,550,000 5,076,000 3,271,000 8,347,000 18,363,000 26,710,000 241,800,000 5,481,000 3,561,000 9,042,000 18,808,000 27,850,000 256,200,000 3,355,000 5,471,000 8,826,000 19,834,000 852,500,000 5,886,000 3,104,000 9,290,000 5,758,000 2,953,000 8,700,000 19,174,000

5,516,000

5 491,000

64,375,000

67,571,000

Constant supply throughout the whole year.

}

P 71

28,660,000

18,880,000

28,170,000

27,880,000

8,389,000 17,781,000

26,170,000

7,675,000 18,695,000

26,370,000

98,007,000 209.483,000 307,490,000

|

96,106,000 96,106,000 | 191,652,000* 287,758,000

-8,196,000 +5,097,000+ 1,901,000 j+17,831,000+19,732,000

This total was erroneously given as 195,252,000 iu the Report for 1910, an error of 3,600,000 having been made in the unmetered supply for December, 1910.

Increase or Decrease,...

•*

Appendix Q.

REPORT ON THE POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT FOR THE YEAR 1911.

STAFF.

1. Mr. C. McI. Messer went on leave on April 19th, and during his absence Mr. E. Curnewall Lewis acted as Postmaster General from 19th April until October 4th when he was succeeded by Mr. A. M. Thomson. On December 20th Mr. Messer returned to the Colony and resumed duty. Mr. Lewis, the Assistant Postmaster General, went on sick leave on October 4th. Mr. Breen has acted as Assistant Postmaster General since October 16th. Amongst the staff there were one resignation and six appointments; five new posts having been instituted.

MAILS.

2. The number of mail bags and packets dealt with in the General Post Office, Hongkong, amounted to 237,325, an increase of 11,249 or 6 4 per cent. This increase, succeeding a corresponding increase of 65 per cent in 1910, points to a steady development of the postal business of the Colony. The number of bags and packets sent in transit through the Post Office amounted to 65,571, an in- crease of 1,751 over the preceding year, while the number of parcel receptacles handled in transit rose from 3,480 to 3,769, an increase of 289. Further details are given in Table I.

REGISTRATION AND PARCEL BRANCH.

3. Registered articles and parcels handled in Hongkong amount- el to 933,475, a decrease of 68,335 compared with the previous year. The decrease in registered articles is due to (1) more mails which passed through closed and not à decouvert; (2) the disturbed state of China during the last months of the year. The decrease in parcels is due mainly to the disturbed state of China and consequent inability to forward parcels into certain parts of the interior. The amount of registered matter forwarded via Siberia continued to show a marked increase during the year and is an evidence of the increasing popu- larity and of the greater frequency of this route. Further details are, given in Table II.

REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE.

4. A statement of Revenue and Expenditure is given in Table III. Revenue amounted to $399,217.15, being a decrease of $119,849.39 as compared with the year 1910. Expenditure amounted to $422,267.97, a decrease of $48,716.38. Both decreases were largely due to the Imperial Government relieving this Colony of the British

:

Postal Agencies in China from 31st December, 1910. The sale of Postage Stamps in Eongkong accounted for $346,246.77 of the Revenue, being an increase on the figures for the previous year of $7,473.08 or about 2 26 per cent. The decrease in transit charges, owing to the Imperial Government being responsible for the Agencies in China will not be fully apparent until 1912 and 1913, as transit charges are paid in arrear.

MONEY ORDERS.

5. The total Money Order transactions for the year amounted to £167,346. 38. 5d., constituting an increase of £5,549 over the figures for the previous year, the record year hitherto. British Postal Or- ders were cashed in the Hougkong Office to the amount of £8,044. Os. 6d., an increase of £1,778 on the previous year. This increase more than compensated for a decrease of £1,140 in the issue of such or- ders. Local Postal Notes were issued during the year to the amount of £34,090, an increase over the previous year of £5,309.

A direct Exchange of Money Orders with the Philippine Islands came into force on the 1st July. Further details are given in Tables VII, VIII and IX.

DEAD LETTERS.

6. The keeping of statistics regarding the number of Dead and Undelivered Letters returned to the senders was discontinued this year. Newspapers and printed packets are not now returned to the senders unless a request to that effect is superscribed.

PILLAR BOXES.

7. The total number of articles collected during the year from all Pillar Boxes was 227,658 compared with 220,832 in the year 1910.

CHINESE BRANCH POST OFFICE.

8. The total number of Chinese Registered Articles delivered by this Branch was 213 394, of which 141,496 were from the United States and Canada and 71,898 from China and other countries, shew- ing a total increase as compared with 1910 of 5,224 and an increase of 29,589 as compared with the total for 1909. The figures for the three years were as follows:——

From U.S.A. & Canada.

From China & other countries,..

1909. 1910. 1911. 119,436 138,135 141,496 64,369 70,035 71,898

183,105 208,170 213,394

The amount of ordinary correspondence dealt with has also largely increased, though no records are kept.

The number of Hong Licences issued during the year was 32, viz., 31 licences were renewed and 1 new licence issued. The number shews a decrease of 2 Hong Licences on the figures for 1910.

I

Q 3

WESTERN BRANCH POST OFFICE.

9. The amount of correspondence between this Branch Office and Canton was-Despatched 712,803 letters, 2 542 other articles and 7,394 registered letters; Received 1,062,561 letters, 7,222 other articles, and 5,212 registered letters. These figures shew an increase of 144,068 compared with the previous year. In addition 9,696 Hong Packets were despatched and 11,462 received, the corre- sponding figures for the previous year being 10,641 and 14,462 respectively. The tendency towards decrease in the number of Hong Packets dealt with and towards increase in the number of ordinary letters which was displayed in the preceding years was thus maintained during 1911. The value of stamps sold at this Branch amounted to $56,960 during the year, a decrease on the pre- ceding year of $8,534.60.

MISCELLANEOUS.

10. The removal of the Post Office Department to the New Post Office Building took place on the 19th June.

11. During the first 28 days of November statistics were taken of the weight of letters and post cards sent to Europe viû Siberia. The results of the statistics are shewn in Table VI. These statistics will form the basis of the calculations of the amounts of Transit Dues payable to Japan, the Chinese Eastern Railway, and Russia for the years 1910, 1911 and 1912.

12. A Parcel Post Agreement between this Administration and Siam was concluded on August 22nd. 42 parcels in two boxes destined for the British Post Office, Shanghai, placed on board the S.S. Asia, were lost in the wreck of that vessel. The Pacific Mail Steamship Company accepted responsibility and paid all claims in connection therewith.

25th March, 1912.

C. McI. MESSER, Postmaster General.

Table I.

Mails Despatched and Received during 1911.

To and From Hongkong.

For H.M.S.

in China

Station.

For Foreign Men-of-

War.

Sent in transit

through

Hongkong.

Steamers Carrying Mails,

Loose

Bags Boxes

Bags.

Packets. Letter

Bags.

Bags.

Boxes.

and and Packets. Packets.

Arrivals.

De-

partures.

Received in 1911,

118,725

10,843

2,119

7,862

1,239

6,493

Received in 1910,

117,833

2,411

1,991

7,794

1,284

6,084

Increase,

1,392

8,432

428

68

409

...

Decrease,.

45

...

Despatched in 1911,

106,923

834

1.934

6.198

1,725

Despatched in 1910,

97,742

5,590

1,918

1,490

65,571 1,334 63,820 3,480

3,769

6,017

6,739

Increase,

Decrease,.

9,181

16

4,708

391 1,751

289

4,756

722

Table II.

Statistics of International and Hongkong Registered Correspondence and Parcels for the year 1911.

Description of Correspondence.

International and Local.

Comparison with 1910.

Total 1911, Total 1910.

Despatched.

Received.

Increase.

Decrease.

Insured Letters,

951

1,319

2,270

2,040

230

Registered Articles....

295,853

468,765

764,618

835,345

70,727

Registered Articles via Siberia,

39,159

15.048

54,207

46,210

7,997

Insured Parcels via Gibraltar,

2,265

2,066

4,831

4,347

16

Insured Parcels viâ Brindisi,

116

307

423

302

121

Insured Parcels viâ Marseilles,

376

376

362

14

Ordinary Parcels viâ Gibraltar,

10,543

12,669

23,212

24,997

1,785

Ordinary Parcels via Brindisi,

210

706

916

696

220

Ordinary Parcels via Marseilles,

1,779

1,779

1,035

744

Cash on Delivery Parcels,

235

239

210

29

Carried forward,

349,101

503,270

852,371

915,544

9,355

72,528

:

Table II,-Continued.

Q 6

International and Local.

Comparison with 1910.

Description of Correspondence.

Total 1911. Total 1910.

Despatched.

Received.

Increase.

Decrease.

Brought forward,

349,101

503,270

852,371

915,514

9,355

72,528

· America, Manila, and Honolulu Parcels,

3,887

3,109

7,296

6,364

932

German Parcels by German Ships,

517

2,516

3,033

3,298

265

French Parcels by French Ships,

1,039

1,038

885

153

India Insured Parcels,

1,260

977

India Ordinary Parcels,

2,381

2,111

Australian Parcels,

1,803

1,314

67,837

73,774

5,937

Japan Parcels, ......

1,847

2,113

Miscellaneous Parcels,.

Parcel- received for China Fleet,

27,385

26,643

Total,

388,184

1,900

545,291

1,900

1,945

45

933,475

1,001,810

10,440

78,775

Grand Total for 1911:

933,475. Decrease of 68,335.

}

(

Table III.

Revenue and Expenditure.

Receipts.

1910.

1911.

Increase

Decrease.

Expenditure.

1910.

1911. Increase. Decrease.

Sale of l'ostage Stamps, H K.,

Do.,

Agencies,....

Unpaid Postage,.

Boxholders' Fees,..

Commission on Money Orders and Postal Notes,.

Profit on Exchange on Money ́Order Transactions, Interest on Money Order Fund, Void Money Orders & Postal Notes,

...

338,773,69 346,216.77 7,433.08 |128,665.12

Carriage of Mails:-

12,983.81

115.681 31

4 827 25

3,750.87

1,076 38

7,652.50

4 421.50

3,231 00

Gratuities to Shipmasters Share of P. & C. Mail

8,003 02

7,997.75

5.72

I

19,918.84 | 12,667,46

7,251.38

Transit Payments,

Subsidy.

Working Expenses,

125,526.74 117,774.87

7,751.87

|134,116 80 |142.169.34 |8,052.54 203, 37.79 154,326.01

17.833.67

49,011,78

1,321,64

17,991 99

1,032.79

158.32

288 85

73 83

121.96 48.13

Total Receipts,.........$ 519,066.54 399,217 15 7,679.53127,528.92

Deficit,.

23,050.82

Total,

19,066.5

519,066.54 422,267.97

:

Total Expenditure,... $ 470,984.35 422,267.97 8,052.54 56,768.92

Profit,

48,082.19

Total,

$519,066.54 422,267.97

Table IV.

Postage Stamps. etc., issued for sale in Hongkong during the years 1910 and 1911.

Denomina- tion.

1910.

1911.

Increase + Decrease

Postage Stamps,

*

1 cent

518,672

561,600

+ 42,728

2 cents

2,824,796

3,018,720

4

ag

1,941,836 | 2,058,240

+ 193,924 + 116.404

6

55,671

61,200

5,529

50.876

"

55,5 10

+

4,654

10

**

965,036 | 1,092,2 10

+ 127,204

12

לי

27,112

31,050

+ 3,968

20

59,156

"?

61,431

2,325

30

>>

31,316

""

42,666

11,350

1

50

..

"

39,296

44,776

5,480

1 dollar

""

32,316

30 xil

1.475

2 dollars

13,028

11,642

1,386

3

"

4,422

3,670

1,352

5

J

11

11

2,294

2.017

243

10

3,793

197

Books of Stamps,

Post Cards.

1 dollar

6.283

6.641

358

1 cent

27,230

47,023

19,793

2 cents

100

29

4

"

وو

8

"

Newspaper Wrappers,..

""

Postage Envelopes,

""

2

13.150 50 1,390

210 12,670

100

480

190

50

6280

1,890

590

10

715

265

350

2,230

22

9,050

2,450 10,225

180

140

Registration Envelopes,

101 11

130

375

1

9,865

9,410

+ { ++

220

1,175

40

55

45

1

Table V.

Revenue and Expenditure of the Post Office for the years 1902 to 1911.

Year.

Total

Revenue.

Total

Expendi-

Profit +

Loss

ture.

! Military Percentage Contribution.

of

Expendi-

ture to

Revenue.

?

Net Profit + Net Loss

J

after deduct-

20 per cent.

ing Military Contribution.

on Total

Revenue.

Q 9

C.

ľ.

c.

1902,

387,066.19, 316,340,12, +

70,826 07

81.70 77,413.24,-

6,587.17

1903,

414,867 20 334,177,40+

80,689.80

$0.55

82,973.44-

2,283.64

1994,

1905,

408,459.92, 316,756,56 + 91,702.36 77.54 81,691.78 +

414,838.19 585,449.25- 170,611.06 141.12 82,967.64 253,578.70

10,010.58

1906,

1907,

1908,

1909,

444,046 5% 510,729.99 66,683.41

1910,

519,066.54 470,984.35+

48,082.19

1911,

420,454.04 359,484,08+ 69,959.96 85.491 84,090.81 23,120,85 445,420.92 366,452.47+ 75,968.45 82.27 89,084.18. 10,115.73 412,431.60 371,486.17+ 40,945.43 90.07 82,486.32. 41,540.89 115.01 88,809.32 155,492.73 90,74 103,813.31] 55,731.12 399,217.15 422,267.97 23,050.82 105.77 79,843.43 102,894.25

Q 10

Table VI.

Weights of Mails sent from Hongkong to Europe, etc., viá Siberia during the Statistical Period 1st to 28th November, 1911.

Destination of Mails.

London,.....

do.

do.

do.

Cracov-Vienna,

Gross Weights of Mails sent during the Statistical

Period.

Letters and Post Cards.

Kilogrammes. 774: 031 139: 178

26:

872

36: 167

Travelling Post Office Alexandrova-Berlin,...

Erquelines-Paris, Harbin-Manchuria, ...

Total Gross Weight for year, Deduct 10% for weight of bags, etc.,.

Net Weight of Correspondence,

14: 606

990: 854

Multiplied by 13.

Kilogramines. 12,881: 102 1,288 : 110

11,592: 992

Country.

,

Table VII.

Money Order Transactions during 1910 and 1911.

1911.

1910.

Increase.

Decrease.

Orders issued. Orders paid. Orden issued. Orders paid. Orders issued. Orders paid. "Orders issued. Orders paid.

£

s. d. £

s. d.

s. d. £ s. d.

£

s. d.

United Kingdom, Queensland,.

Victoria,

South Australia,.

15,816 0 7 20,399 6 4

15,107 9 118,757 15

New South Wales,..

Tasmania,...

New Zealand,

Western Australia..

Union of South Africa,.

140 7 9 11,480 5 0 584 12 6

411 14 0

96 5 2

19 13 6

275 0 0

49 5 4

25 6 11

97 11 7

13,526 11

708 11 6

42 16 2

£ s. d.

1,641 11 2

£

s. d.

£ s. d.

2,040 6 9

2,849

3

944 11 9

2,679 11

169 17 7

359 19 3

953 10 2

642 15 10

1,309 5

231 1 10

355 15 5

1,553 2 8

38 15 10

922 8 4

57 9 4

630 14 4

347 5 6

United States of America,

1,119 12 8

Canada,

Philippine Islands,

Japan,

283 8 3

63 12 0

24,108 17 11

Straits Settlements,

Federated Malay States,

1,041 11 0

64 13 11

1,743 12 5

4,469 16 7 275 8 0

5,275 4 11 1,867 9 5 557 18 2

1,193 12 6 2,984 4 7 3,054 14 10

74 13 9

207 19 7

112 10 9

18 9 6

804 3 5

292 4 7

184 2 ō

55 0 3

136 16 11

1,568 16 4

67 0 5

174 16 1

3,973 3 7 152 4 6 6,663 15 3

1,503 17

496 13 0

63 5 5

6 17 5

315 9 3

123 3 6

1,388 10 +

9

63 12 0

363 11 8

557 18 2

8 16 4

23,470

7 9

2,567 16 1

638 10 2

1,625 16 5

736 19 10

1.864 8 0

307 11 2

52 5 4

2.458 11 0

12 8 7

1,119 16 7

596 3 10

Carried forward,

..£44,103 1 662,005 0 442,600 18 7 58,432 7 5 2,220 6 0

7,500 2 4

718 3 1 3,927 9 5

Country.

Table VII,-Continued.

1911.

1910.

Increase.

Decrease.

Orders issued. Orders paid. Orders issued. Orders paid. Orders issued. Orders paid. Orders issued. Orders paid.

£

s. d.

Brought forward,.

British North Borneo,

Sarawak,

292 13 11

61 15 4

£ s. d. £ s. d. £ s. d. 44,103 1 662.005 0 442,600 18 7 58,432 7 5 1 12 8 1,074 6 1

4 2 0

£

s. d.

2,220 6 0

£ s. d.

7,500 2 4

£

s. d.

718 3 1

£ s. d.

3,927 9 5

143 17 5

670 10 4

15 0 4

112 + 8

E

403 15 9

180 9 3

142 4 9

15 0 4

4 0 7

62 7 0

0

} 5

Macao,

German Post Offices in China,. Shanghai,

192 17 2

84 12 8

7,923 13 0

194 17 2

165 15 5 3,295 14 0

160 14 3

260 8 4

32 2 11

0 11 8

65 11 2

56 5 2

8.517 2 8

63 15 8

28 7 6

101 19 9

4 554 1 2

598 9 8 1,258 7 2

Agencies in China,.

5,794 11

Base Post Office,..

8

5 1

5,484 14 9

309 16 11

India,

Ceylon....

Germany,.

French Indo-China,

21,951 13

95 11 3

1,757 3 5 46 6 7

0|10,477 19 1|20,820 1

710,336 6 11

1,131 11 5

331 2 0

6,909 2 8

577 11

1,298 15

191 0

S

11 17 7

0

259 10 8

7,687 17 5

53 0 0

458 7 9

34 9 0

5 1

141 12 2

71 11 4

524 11

95 8 9

778 14 9

Total,

76,160 13 391,185 10 273,819 13 1087,977 4 4

187,977

3.905 6 0

9,239 0 0

1,564 6 7

6,030 14 2

Nett Incrcase for 1911 :—.

– £5.549-5-3...

£167.346 3 5

£161,796 18 2

£13,144 6 0

£7,595 0 9

12

2

Table VIII.

British Postal Orders issued and paid at Hongkong and at the Agencies in China.

ORDERS ISSUED.

VALUES.

AMOUNT.

S. d.

S.

d. S. d. S. d. S d.

1

6

1

6

2 6

10

d. S. d. S.

10 6 20

£

s. d.

Total in 1911,

1,691

4,401

3,367

3,701 5,753

5,612

1,167

12,810

18,641 8 0

13

Total in 1910,

1,336

3,896

3,115

3.193 5,978

6,07 1 LIB

13,808 19,784 15 6

ORDERS PAID.

No.

AMOUNT.

£

d.

Total in 1911,

10,028

8,044

0

6

Total in 1910,

7,997

6,263

9

9

Table IX.

Statement of Local Postal Notes issued at Hongkong and at the Agencies in China.

25 cts. 50 cts.

$1.00

VALUES.

$2.00

$3.00

$4.00

$5.00 $10.00

AMOUNT.

Total in 1911,

451

581

384

448

570

563

1,049

2,320

34,090.25

Total in 1910,

420

516

367

411

493

535

856

1,933

28,781.00

7

Je

14

Appendix R.

KOWLOON-CANTON RAILWAY,

(British Section.)

ANNUAL REPORT FOR 1911.

Construction.

During the past year a Permanent Siding has been laid from the Reclamation to Holts Wharf from which it is hoped that con- siderable traffic will accrue especially when the connection between the Chinese Section and the Canton-Hankow Railway is establish- ed.

2. The Workshops have been satisfactorily completed with all Machinery, Shafting, and Tools. Additions have been made by installing a transverse pit from the engine pit in the Erecting Shop, to the wheel lathe, in which a Hydraulic Ram can now lower a pair of wheels direct from a locomotive and carry them up to the lathe.

3. The Engine Running Shod is only just sufficient for present requirements and it will be necessary to provide accommodation for the locomotives now on order.

4. The construction of a two-foot Gauge Light Railway from Fanling to Sha Tou Kok, a distance of 74 miles, was commenced in April and completed up to the 6th Mile (Shek Chung Au Station) and opened for traffic on December 21st.

3. A somewhat serious slip occurred in Cutting No. 1 after the Typhoon in August which necessitated suspension of traffic for a day or so. The slopes in this Cutting and also in Cuttings 4 and 47 have been carefully watched and places liable to slip have been • pitched, and where disintegration is likely to occur have been plastered with good effect, and loose and dangerous rocks and. boulders have been removed. The pitching to banks along the sea front between Miles 9 and 13 damaged by the same storm has needed and received considerable repair.

6. Ballasting was completed during the year and a large quantity of ballast left over was transferred to a Ballast Suspense Account to be drawn on for maintenance purposes as required.

!

R 2

J

7. The diversion of Gascoigne and Chatham Roads which was opened to the public at the end of last year was handed over to the Public Works Department on the 1st June, when the Con- tractors' term of maintenance ended.

8. The telephone poles, lines and instruments have been well maintained during the year and the work of supervision and maintenance will be transferred in 1912 to the Public Works Department, the Railway being debited with a proportion of the upkeep while the Public Works Department's telephones which run parallel to the Railway will be transferred to Railway poles to effect a further economy.

9. All Stations and Buildings remain the same as when last reported on. Lowu Station was closed on October 5th when the Chinese Section was opened and through traffic commenced with China and Canton. The station now in use is Sham Chun just over the border and in Chinese Territory where the Chinese Section have erected a wooden Station Building on the western platform for the use of the British Section. The Lown Station loop is used for shunting and making up trains and it is intended to main- tain it as a Supplementary Station for Military purposes or emergencies.

10. The site of the Permanent Station at Kowloon has been under discussion during the year and various proposals have been sub- mitted. The question being one of a great importance both to the Colony and the Railway has received very careful consideration and it is hoped that the matter will be settled in the near future and that the work of laying out the yard and building the Station will be commenced during 1912.

Accounts-Construction.

11. At the end of 1910 in order to complete Construction as then decided upon a sum of $544,501.59 was required. A portion of the amount, viz., $132,000 was expected to be obtained by sales of buildings, construction plant, etc., and the balance $412,501.59 was voted by the Council. Of this amount only $137,075.01 has been expended during the year, $100,087.37 on Main Line Account

• and $36,987.64 on the Fanling Branch Construction as shown under the various heads in the table of expenditure herein. It was anticipated that expenditure would be incurred on the Terminus at Kowloon also on the purchase of a Third Locomotive and of eight coaches but as events have proved this expenditure will not be incurred till next year.

Revenue and Expenditure.

12. The general results of the past year are set forth in the following tables, but no comparison in respect of gross figures of

!

R 3

Revenue Receipts and Working Expenses can be made this year as the Line was only running three months during 191. It is however gratifying to note that Revenue exceeded the Estimate by $40,058.80.

13. The estimated working expenses for the

under report year excluding interest were $183,108,00 and at the time the Estimates were prepared it was agreed to charge $81,832.00 of this amount to Construction Account, it being ordinary Railway practice on exceptionally heavy constructions for extra maintenance to be charged to Capital during the first year of operation. However at the end of March it was decided that all future expenses of whatever nature should be charged direct to Open Line working with the result that only $5,689.10 was debited to Capital instea i of $81,832.00 as was originally intended. Under this arrang “ ment $76,142.90 additional expenditure was borne by Revenue, but as the excess of estimated Revenue is $40,058.80 the loss on the year's working is only $24.845.14 which may be considered very satisfactory.

14. Under the Working Agreement a claim of $7,316.00 has been made against the Chinese Government for compensation for late trains, and for suspension of Through Traffic from Novem- ber 7th to December 14th. The amount is not included in the accounts but when paid will reduce the loss on the year's working to $17,529.14.)

15. The expenditure including interest against the Grant of $566.720.59 is $561,637.17 which shows a saving of $5,083.42.

Passenger Traffic.

16. It was anticipated when the Estimates for 1911 were being prepared that connection with Canton would be made about the middle of the year and that the Railway would benefit for five or six months from through traffic with the Chinese Section. This unfortunately was not the case as the line was not opened until October 5th. From the commencement a steady passenger traffic developed in both directions as is shown by the figures, the number of Inward and Outward Passengers being practically identical. On November 7th, at the request of the Viceroy of Canton, owing to disturbances in the Kwong Tung Province, through traffic was suspended and not resumed until December 14th, when the effects of the cessation of traffic at once became apparent in the shrinkage in the earnings, and it cannot be expected that much improvement will be seen until more settled conditions prevail.

17. It will be observed therefore that the Railway has had to depend almost entirely on Local Traffic for its Revenue, but despite this fact the number of passengers carried exceeded ex- pectations and there is little doubt that under more favourable circumstances even better results would have been obtained.

R 4

18. The shortage of Rolling Stock and Locomotives has given considerable anxiety, and the limited train service provided has only been maintained under the greatest difficulties. This trouble however will disappear on the arrival of the Coaches and Locomo- tives now on order, when it will be possible to extend and improve the present train service.

Goods Traffic.

19. The Goods Traffic-calls for little remark as this has been purely local consisting of Fruit, Rice, Dried Fish, Vegetables and other market commodities. The amount carried is 4,360 tons of which 2,460 tons was Construction Material for the Section.

Staff.

Chinese

20. Mr. E. S. Lindsey, Chief Resident Engineer, terminated his agreement with the Railway in December last, and it is with deep regret that we have to record his death shortly after leaving the Colony. Mr. H. P. Winslow succeeded Mr. Lindsey as Manager.

Mr. J. Morris, Chief Accountant, was appointed to the Permanent Staff in June.

Mr. Robert Baker went on leave in April and on his return in September was appointed Engineer in charge of Way and Works on the Permanent Establishment.

Mr. Charles Stewart, Locomotive Superintendent, arrived in the Colony in April, but owing to urgent private affairs resigned in September, and was succeeded by Mr. C. D. Lambert.

Appendices.

21. The usual returns and certificates are attached hereto.

April 26th, 1912.

H. P. WINSLOW,

Manager.

.

R 5

KOWLOON-CANTON RAILWAY.

(British Section.)

I.

II.

Main Head.

Sub-Head.

III.

IV.

T.

VI.

Revised Estimate for 1910.

Expenditure to 31st December, 1911.

Funds Available.

Grand Total.

I-Prelimina-)

ry Expen-

diture... Survey..

II.-Land,

Il-Formation] (7) Earthwork.

Land,

(b) Tunnels,

(c) Roads,

IV.-Bridges. (a) Major,

() Minor,

C.

$

C.

42,277.65

42,277 65

1.195,879.20 778.974.45

2,587.580.00 2,551,554 45

C.

42.277.65

25,537.88

804.532.33

7.912.81

2,559,467 26

3,811,145,19 3,808.382.63

2,779.43 3,811,362.06

120,200.00

118.363.64

654.65

119,018.29

816,495.41

829.017.22

237 58

828.809 64

350,126.47

359.491.49

105.69

(<) Culverts,

72,546 09

71,587.78

V.-Fencing,...] (7) Boundaries,

39.999 45

36.469 67

1,099.32

(3) Signs.

400.00

640 31

359,385 80 71,567.78 37,568.99

640 31

VI.-Telegraph, Telegraph.

30.032 17

36.790.21

284 60

VIL-Track,

(a) Ballast.

132,066 54

158.63197

153 23

36,505 64 158.788.20

(0) Permanent

Way...

732,192 71

754,961.29

2.216.92

737.208.21

VIII.-Stations & | (a) Buildings &

Buildings Fixtures,

310,000.00

176,772 33

123,227.67

300,000.00

(b) Station

Ma-

chinery.

40,000.00

32,143.12

3.981.08

36,124 20

(4) Furnitures,

3,000 00

11,293.28

1,052.65

10,240.63

(d) Workshops,

60,000.00

77,293.75

13.839.23

63,454.52

IX.- Plant,

(a) Construction,

101,884.53

185,535 58

26,310.10

211,845.68

(b) Loco Tools and

Plant,

50,000.00

65,307.87

15,307.87

50,000.00

(c) C. & W. Tools

and Plant,

10,000.00

25.00

9,975.00

(d) Engineering,.

10 00

10.000 0

10 00

(e) Loco

Rolling

Stock,...

88,000.00

117,069.09

45,315.28

162.384.37

(ƒ) C. & W. Roll-

ing Stock,

309,540.00

201,587.91

125,512.07

117.099.98 •

X.-General

(a) 1. Salaries and

Charges,..

Allowances,.

399,720 43

433,482.25

6.477.62

£39,959.87

2. Quarters and

Offices,.

68,495.13

63,335.54

1,360.00

67,695.54

3. Instruments,|

11,639.61

10,654.03

277.00

10,931.03

4. Office

Ex-

penses,

33,710 93

33,455.53

2.15

33,457,62

5. Medical.

22,319.46

23,071.90

23,071,90

6. Home Char-

Res.......

124,478 29

134,329.92

3,620.27

130,709.65

7. Interest,

713,922 67

701,705.62

701,705.62

8. Exchange...

200,000.00

110.997.29

47,646.34

63,350.95

(b) Accounts,

42,843.53

41,222.35

62.79

41,159.57

(as) Store in Sus-

pense,

Bricks,

185,769.20 1,080.00

8,208.70

193,977,90

240.00

1,320.00

Anticipated Credit by Sales.......... .$

12,521,495.46 12,021,502.77

150.000.00

$12,371,495.46 12,021,502.77

407,426,58 12,128,929.35 132,000.00 132,000.00

275,426.58 (12,296,929,35

NB. Figures printed in italics are minus quantities.

I.

Main Head.

1.-Preliminary Expenditure, Survey,

II.-Land,

III.--Formation,.

IV.--Bridge Work,

V.-Fencing,..

VI.-Telegraph, VII.-Track,.

VIII.-Stations & Buildings,

IX.-Plant,

X.-General Charges,

Table of Expenditure for 1911.

II.

Sub-Head.

III.

Expenditure to 31st December, 1910.

IV.

Expenditure during 1911.

Main Line. Fan Ling Branch.

V.

Expenditure to 31st December,

1911.

$ c.

c.

$

42,277.65

Land,

774,532.33

2,242.12

C.

2,200.00

(a) Earthwork,

2,506,205.98

45,348.47

C.

42,277.65

778,974.45 2,551,554.45

Tunnels,

3.811,362.06

2,779.43

3,808,582.63

Roads,

79,098.84

39,264.80

Major,

833,758.03

4,710.81

Minor,

357,503.78

1,987.71

118,363.64

829,047.22

359,491.49

Culverts,

71,567.78

71,567.78

Boundaries,

35,568.99

900.68

Signs,

640.31

36,122.41

667.83

(a) Ballast,

155,530.91

3,104.06

36,469.67

640.31

36,790.24

158,634.97

(b) Permanent Way,

738,264.47

8,709.13

25,405.95

754,961.29

Buildings and Fixtures,

171,386.25

4,914.45

471.63

176,772.33

Station Machinery,

28,600.22

3,542.90

32,143.12

Furniture,

10,038.80

1,254.48

11,293.28

(d) Workshops and Stores,

46,486.78

30,806.97

77,293.75

(a) Construction,

320,328.08

134,792.50

185,535.58

(b) Loco Tools and Plant,

39,688.00

25,619.87

65,307.87

(c) C. & W. Tools and Plant,

25.00

25.00

Engineering Tools and Plant,

10 00

10.00

Loco Rolling Stock,

90,318.60

20,292.43

6,458.06

117,069.09

(f) C. & W. Rolling Stock,

283,454.65

5,990.86

2,142.40

291,587.91

1. Salaries and Allowances.

409,707.04

23,465.61

309.60

433,482.25

2. Temporary Quarters and Offices,

67,695.54

4,360.00

63,335.54

3. Instruments,

10,981.03

327.00

10,654.03

4. Office Expenses,

33,257.68

197.85

33,455.53

5. Modical,

23,071.90

23,071.90

6. Home Charges,

126,709.65

7,620.27

134,329.92

8. Exchange,

7. Interest,

(b) Accounts,

(ss) Stores in Suspense, Bricks,

685,252.41

16,453.21

701,705.62

63,350.95

47,646.31

110,997.29

40,146.72

1,075 63

41,222.35

116,866.82

68,902.38

185,769.20

1,320.00

2:10.00

1,080.00

R 6

Total,..

$11,884,427.76

$100,087.37

$36,987.64

$12,021,502.77

N.B.-Figures printed in italics are minus quantities.

Fan Ling Branch– Construction—2′ 0′′ Gauge.

Itom

Main Head.

No.

Sub-Head.

Revised

Estimate.

Expended to 31st December, 1911.

Funds

Available.

1.

Land,

C.

2,200.00

C.

2,200.00

2.

Earthwork,

III a

3.

Track Ballast,

VII a

2,000.00

2,000.00

5.

Track-Permanent Way,

VIIb

29,307.00

25,405.95

3,901.05

5.

Station Buildings,..

VIII @

1,200.00

471.63

728.37

6.

Locomotives,

IX c

18,600.00

6,458.06

7,141.94

Carriages,.

IN T

7,000.00

2,142.40

4,857.60

8.

Salaries,

Xal

1,000.00

309.60

690.40

$54,107.00

$36,987.64

$17,119.36

Item No. 1.- No provision in Revised Estimate.

Item No. 2.—Work under this head is chargeable to Public Works Extraordinary. Figures printed in italics are minus quantities.

- RT

Three months ending 31st December 1910. |

Per cent. on

Gross Receipts.

Revenue Account for the year ending the 31st December, 1911.

Expenditure.

Abstract.

Year ending 31st December 1911.

Per cent. on

Gross Receipts.

Three Months ending 31st December 1910.

C.

%

4,300.50 12 65 To Maintenance of Way

Ca

C.

26,657.86

Works and Stations...

A

34,272.26 | 23.31

11,382.86 33.50

11,300.59 33.26 6,163.72 18.14

""

Loco Carriage

and

7,141.31

181.16

Goods

"3

Wagon Expenses

B & C

51,560.62 | 35.06

"

Traffic Expenses

D

32,902.29 22.37

General Charges

D

53,121 77 36.12

"5

Special & Miscellaneous

Expenditure

47.00 03

33,147.67 97.55 832.66 2.45

Total Expenditure....

171,903.94 116.89

To Balance (Net Earn-

ings),

,, Loss on Working

24,845.14 | 16.89

Earnings.

Abstract.

Year ending

31st December 1911.

Total.

Local Earnings.

By Coaching Traffic..

Sundries

31

Total Local Earnings.

Foreign Earnings.

By Coaching Trallic Goods

Total Foreign Earnings..

GH

3

107,398.05

12,515 41

11,729.24

131,642.70

15,317.64

98.46

15,416.10

33,980.33 100.00

Total

8,147,058 80 *100.00] 33,980.33

Total..

$ 147,058.80

To Loss on Working excluding Interest

"}

24,845.14 12 months' Interest on Crown Agents' Advances, 167,787.93 12 months' Interest on Wuchang Loan

By Balance being loss on Working including Interest

414,578.37

221,945.30

$ 414,578.37

414,578.37

N.B.---Figures printed in italics are minus quantities.

Hongkong, 19th April, 1912.

J. MORRIS,

Chief Accountant.

- R 8

+

Three months ending 31st December, 1910.

R 9

"A".

ABSTRACT

•MAINTENANCE OF WAY, WORKS & STATIONS.

1,773

C.

C.

1.-General Superintendence:-

1.-Engineer's Salaries & Allowance

1,400

00

234 33

2. Sub-Inspector's

Do.

139 50

3.-Office Expenses...

83

2,371

57

}

84

00

:

:

:

:

:

II.—Maintenance and Renewal of Track :-

2,332

02

la.

Wages

20.- Ballast

39

55

55

84

00

1

:

:

:

FM.

:

:.

:

:

26.--Stores

2c.-Rails ...

2f.-Points and Crossings

III-Repairs of Bridges, etc. :—

1.- Bridges

2.-Fencing

3.-Miscellaneous Expenses

Current Year.

C.

6,646 07

1,171

C.

93

671

: 24

8,489 24

17,756

36

6,811

14

468

94 50

8888

87

1

20

25,132

от

IV.-Repairs to Buildings of every Description,

Including Station Yards and Signals.

71 10

V-Unclassified Expenditure.

$4,300

50

Mileage maintained by Revenue :—

Double Line,

Single Line,

Sidings,

Total Single Track, including sidings,

Cost per Mile......................

Total,....

2

.00

1.8

22

70

24

70

626

25

$34,272 26

Mile.

Nil.

22

8

30

$1,142.40

EA

$

Three months ending 31st December, 1910.

C.

C.

1

R 10

ABSTRACT “B” and “C”.

LOCOMOTIVE CARRIAGE AND WAGON EXPENSES.

851 418 96 156 56 381 61

8895

2.

3. Salary of Office Establishment...

I.-General Superintendence :—

1.-Salary of Superintendent and Assistant...

Allowances...

4.-Office Contingencies ...

1,809

02

Current Year.

$3

C.

c.

6,157 18 1,041 1,306 34

05

8,804 57

II.-Running Expenses:-

3,396 72

1.-Drivers and Firemen, etc..

2.-Overtime Allowance..

5,955 83 372 23

3.—All labour connected with fuelling, cleaning and looking after Engines in Yard 4. Contingent Expenses, including Clothing

and Travelling Expenses 5.-Labour including Wages of oilers, carriage

cleaners and examiners

1,430

...

1,251

0800 10

86

45

4,814 07

6.-Stores including Oil Grease and other

stores for consumption on Vehicles

3,396 72

4,091

80

III.-Coal:-1,441 tons and 15 cwt.

1.--Labour, etc.

4,091 80

313

96

IV. Water including Labour, etc.

L

1,219

55

1,233 58

12,817

58

15,058 02

15

:

165

04

12,982

19

91

33

22

1,533

51

V-Oil, Tallow and Other Stores expended on

Engines in Work

VI.-Maintenance and Renewal of Locomotire

Engines:---

359

35

1.-Wages

169

1885

2.-Overtime Allowance

...

...

96

3.-Material

529 31

22 50

$11,382 86

9

13

1953535

45

05

VII.-Repairs and Renewals of Coaching

Vehicles:

1.-Wages...

...

2.-Material

2,609

57

2,700

79

4,278

71

37

84

2,160

03

6,776

63

554 43 479 177

1,034

20

20

...

3,374 34

ד

I

405

5825

77

87

26

3,814 90

VIII-Repairs and Renewals of Goods Vehicles:-

1.—Wages..........

2. -Overtime Allowance

3,-Material

IX.— Maintenance and Renewals of Machinery,

Tools and Plant :

1.—Wages.....

2.-Overtime Allowance

X-Unclassified Expenditure:-

1.-Wages...

2. Material...

184 93 201

39

389 32

Total,..........

$51,560 62

Three months ending 31st December, 1910.

C.

#f

C.

R 11

ABSTRACT “D”.

TRAFFIC EXPENSES.

I.-Salaries, Wages, etc:-

General Superintendence :--

49

1,478 51

533 98

56 65

1.-Traffic Superintendent and Inspectors

2.-Office Establishment

3.-Contingencies

:

:

5.009 80

2a. Station Staff

1,211 41

:

:

:

:

:

:

3a.-Train Staff...

46.-Overtime Allowance

Telegraph Staff.

4a.-Wages...

46.-Stores...

Current Year.

C.

**

5,152

77

3,170

66

96 00

14,402

78

1,934

52

151

24

:

:

:

:

:

62 10

8,352 48

II-Fuel, Lighting and General Stores :-

649 17

277 45

1.-Fuel, Lighting, &c. ...

2.-Office and Station Fittings and Furniture.

926

62

1,329 24

III.-Clothing

692

2,021

49

$11,300

59

25 IV-Printing, Stationery and Tickets

V.-Miscellaneous Expenses

:

Total...

739 05

47 28

1

C.

28,697 30

973 09

09899

62

971

71

553 SO

1,907

59

:

768

89

3,230 28

$32,902 29

1

Three months ending 31st December, 1910.

$

C.

$

C.

2,601 97

1,101

60

5,992 07

R 12

ABSTRACT "E".

GENERAL CHARGES.

I.-Salaries, Wages, etc. :-

1.-Controlling Office

2.-Audit and Accounts Office

3.-

:

$3

Current Year.

I c.

$

26,022

64

9,771 46

1

26

4.-Stores

767 06

5.-Medical

437

92

50

60

667 6.1

6.--Conservancy

7.-Rent of Building and Land

8.-Furniture, Fittings, etc.

9.-Printing and Stationery

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

...

4,928

57

1,669

00

1,517

2,645 00

88

32

899 59

1,250

10. Medicine and Contribution to Hospital

41

...

69809

66

293 99

11. -Miscellaneous

II.-Police:

--

1.-Constables ...

2. Contingencies

161 65

10

00

18 8

161 65

III.-Advertising.

10

00 IV.-Miscellaneous.

$6,163

72

:

:

:.

:

:

Total...

C.

48,747

84

2,222

37

241

72

2,464

1,909 84 1,909

883

09

84

$53,121

77

R 13

ABSTRACT "F".

Special and Miscellaneous Expenditure.

Three months ending

Main Head.

31st December, 1910.

I.-Compensation.

Current Year.

Damages...

$47.00

Total...

$47.00

Three months ending 31st December, 1910.

Amount.

Total.

R 14

ABSTRACT “G”.

COACHING TRAFFIC.

Local Earnings.

PARTICULARS.

Current Year.

Amount. $ C.

Total.

C.

543

869.60

-2,367

4,881.86

5,751.46

2,910

2,981 2,441.90

9,815

6,936.29

9,378.19

12,796

299,842 87,193.02

C.

C.

248

363.40

1st Class Single

747

2,363.85

1st Class Return

2,727,25

995

1,136

822.00

2nd Class Single

2,762

3,745.75

2nd Class Return

4,567,75

3,898

62,189

18,205.10

3rd Class Single

848/ 330.55

3rd Class Return (Warrant)

:

:

:

:

:

::.

:.

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:..

:

:

18,535.65

63,0371

67,931

25,830.65

Total...

11 Tons.

239.25

Passengers' Luggage

1. Parcels...

...

587.96

2. Country Produce

3. Live Stock

:

:

:

...

7:

:

:.

:..

:

:

:

25,615.57

Public Traffic

1,042.29

Government Traffic...

26,657.86

:

4,230 2,948.90

304,072

90,141.92

319,778

105,271,57

32.25

443.51

171.04

1,510.13

1.80

2,126.48

Total...

105,225,08

2,172.97

$107,398.05

Ly

PAN

Three months ending 31st December, 1910.

R 15

ABSTRACT "H".

GOODS.

Local Earnings.

PARTICULARS.

.ου.

Tons.

Amount.

Current Year.

Tons.

Amount.

2,469 $7,141.31

Merchandise-General.

1,3601 $12,515.41

2,469 $7,141.31

Total,..

4,360

$12,515,41

ABSTRACT “I”.

Three months ending 31st December, 1910.

SUNDRIES.

Local Earnings.

PARTICULARS.

Current Year.

$ c.

$

C.

181.16

Rents of Shed, Stall Holders, etc..

Rents of Land...

7,800.00

Stall Holders

:

720.75

Hire of Wagons

:

1,987.95

Water Supply...

354.64

Wharfage...

865.00

Proceeds by sale of Lost Luggage..

.90

$181.16

Total...

$11,729.24

Particulars.

R 16

ABSTRACT "G".

COACHING.

Foreign Earnings.

From 7th October to 31st

December, 1911.

No.

Amount.

Total.

$ c.

$

Outwards.

1st Class Single,

>>

2nd Class Single,

Return,

3rd Class Single,

Excursion,

179

312.80

Returu,

78

189.51

1,022

853.85

196

230.12

14,394

5,221.88

30

21.00

6,829.16

15,900

Parcels,

1.32

Passengers' Luggage,

Carriage, Horse and Dogs,...

Excess Fares,

20.94

.44

.88

23.58

Inwards.

1st Class Single,

""

2nd Class Single,

""

451

847.35

Return,

15

44.26

2,295

2,118.32

Return,

3rd Class Single,

100 13,778

110.41

5,277.85

Excursion,

25

18.81

8,417.00

16,664

Parcels,....

29.21

Passengers' Luggage,.

12.92

Carriage, Horses and Dogs,

5.77

47.90

Total,...$ 15,317.64

d

17

R 17

ABSTRACT "H".

GOODS TRAFFIC.

Foreign Earnings.

Particulars.

From 7th October to 31st December,

1911.

General Merchandise.

C.

Inwards,

Nil.

98.46

Outwards,

Total,

98.46

به

ށ

Tank

Side

Total.

Tender

or

Tank.

ลง

"

2

Tyre.

No. Cylinder.

sure. Pres-

Force. Tractive

Weight in

Working

Order.

lbs.

The

Tons, ewt

N

19′′ x 26′′

180

24,724

89.75

:

ลง

:.

:

Total

LOCOMOTIVES.

Total Frock at

end of previous year.

Additions during the year.

1

2

?

Statement of Rolling Stock for the year ending 31st December, 1911.

DESCRIPTION,

7

REPAIRS AND RENEWALS

Reductions during the year.

Total Stock at end

of the year.

Actual Stock in run-

ning order on the last day of the year.

Number Repaired during the year.

Number Renewed!

during the year.

Number undergoing or awaiting Repairs on the last day of the year.

Number undergoing or awaiting Renewals

on the last day of

the year.

Average namber'under- going Repairs or Renewals at any one time.

Stock condemned in this

and previous years await- ing replacement.

-

R

9

8

6

10

11

14′′ x 20′′

150

10,604.6 | 23

6′′ x 10′′

150

1.800

2

6

་་

9

2

:

10

N

:

10

2

6

6

2

2

13

N

:

:

R 18

.

Statement of Rolling Stock for the year ending 31st December, 1911,

DESCRIPTION

Coaching Vehicles.

4' 8!" Gauge.

Second Class Carriage First Class Carriage

First and Second Composite Carriage

Third Class Carriage

First, Second, Third and Brake Third, Luggage and Brake

Total

Bogie Brake Van Carriages....

Coaching Vehicles 2′ 0′′ Gauge.

Total

:

8

Quantity

Length of

Underframes

in feet.

Tare

1

1 60′11′′ 35

160′11′′ 35

3 60' 11'32

1 60' 11":35

1 60' 11" 34

60′ 11′′ 36 Ts.

17

8 9'0" 11 Cwt

200

2 16'0" 15

10

10

T

2

3

4

9

7

8

i

6

}

10

11

Carrying

Capacity: Passengers.

Total Stock at end of previous year.

Additions during the year.

Reductions during the year.

Total Stock at end of the year.

Actual Stock in running order on the last day of the year.

Number Repaired during the year.

Number Renewed during

the year.

Number undergoing or awaiting Repairs on the

last day of the year.

Number undergoing or

awaiting Renewals on the

last day of the year.

Repairs and Renewals.

Average number undergoing Repairs or Renewals at any one time.

Stock condemned in this and previous years awaiting replacement.

T

T

8

8

00

8

1

8

R 19

}

Goods Vehicles.

Goods Brake Vans

15 Ton Open Goods 15 Ton Cattle Trucks

15 Ton Converted Goods 15 Ton Covered Goods 30 Ton Open Goods 30 Ton Rail Bogie.

30 Ton Covered Goods

Total.

50

30

:

7.

DESCRIPTION.

No.

Statement of Rolling Stock for the year ending 31st December, 1911.

1

2

6

7

8

00

Repairs and Renewals.

Length of

Underframes in feet.

Tare.

35

Ton ewt.j

T

35

6

35

14 8

LO 00 00

16

19

19

19

19

19

31 - 00:00 00

8 10

15

15

15

15

15

NON

6

10

11

Carrying

Capacity (tons).

Total Stock at end of previous year.

Additions during the year.

Reductions during the year.

Total Stock at end of the year.

Actual Stock in running order on the last day of the year.

Number Repaired during the year.

Number Renewed during

the year.

Number undergoing or awaiting Repairs on the

last day of the year. Number undergoing or

awaiting Renewals on the last day of the year.

Average number undergoing Repairs or Renewals at any one time.

Stock condemned in this and previous years awaiting

replacement.

50

50

1

;

50

1

I

}

:

R 20

J

+

Three months ending 31st December, 1910.

R 21

Statement of Train Mileage.

PARTICULARS.

Year ending 31st December, 1911.

Miles.

Miles.

10,868

1. Train

miles run for Public

Traffic,..

49,286

415

2. Train miles run for Maintenance,

1,203

11,283

4,120

15,403

Total Train Mileage,.......

3. Miles of Engines shunting and standing in steam for traffic purpose at 5 miles an hour,.....

rey

50,489

16,425

Total,....

66,914

d.

I

R-22

ENGINEER OF WAY & WORKS' CERTIFICATE.

I hereby certify that the Permanent Way, Bridges and Build- ings of this Railway have been maintained in good condition,

ROBERT BAKER,

Taipo, April 26th, 1912.

Engineer of Ways and Works.

LOCOMOTIVE SUPERINTENDENT'S CERTIFICATE.

I hereby certify that the whole of the Plant, Carriages, Wagons, Machinery and Tools have, during the last year, been maintained in good working order and repair.

The Passenger Locomotives have been maintained in working order with the greatest difficulty, owing to not having a spare Passenger Locomotive.

Hung Hom, April 22nd, 1912.

C. D. LAMBERT, Locomotive Superintendent.

MANAGER'S CERTIFICATE.

I hereby confirm the certificates given by the Departmental Officers above.

H. P. WINSLOW,

Manager

7

Kowloon, 26th April, 1912.

21

The total rainfall for the year was 90'55 inches, as compared with an average of 8073 inches, during the ten preceding years. The wettest month was August with 30'06 inches, the dryest, Fe- bruary, when no rain was recorded. The greatest amount of rain which fell on any one day was 8:61 inches on the 5th August, while no rain fell on 220 days of the year. The mean relative humidity of the atmosphere for the year was 79 %, as compared with an average of 77% during the ten preceding years. The average daily amount of sunshine was 5'7 hours, being 50% of the possible duration.

These figures are those recorded at the Observatory, Kowloon, and there is a very considerable divergence between that place and Hongkong (low levels), the Peak District, or Tai Po (New Territories), both in rainfall, temperature and humidity.

X.-POSTAL SERVICE.

The total revenue from the postal service in 1911 was $399,217.15 and total expenditure $422,267.97. The result of the year's working shows a deficit of $23,050.82. Direct exchange of money orders with the Philippine Islands commenced on 1st July, and a revised parcel arrangement with Siam came into operation on 26th September.

44

:

XI.-MILITARY EXPENDITURE.

(a.) COLONIAL CONTRIBUTION.

The Colony contributed $1,342,554 (being the statutory con- tribution of 20% of the Revenue) towards the cost of the mainten- ance of the Regular Forces in the Colony including Barrack Services and Defence Works.

(b.) VOLUNTEER CORPS.

The expenditure on the Volunteers, which is entirely born by the Colony, was $49,311 compared with $34,744 in 1910.

XII.--GENERAL OBSERVATIONS.

During the past year no general assessment was made. The existing valuation for 1910-11 was ordered to be adopted as the valuation for 1911-12, the difference in rateable value being the result of interim assessments. There is an increase in the rateable value of the whole Colony of 071%. In the City of Victoria, the Hill District, Shaukiwan, Saiwanho, Quarry Bay, Hongkong Villages, Kowloon Point, Yaumati, Mongkoktsui, and New Kowloon there is an increase ranging from 10:59 to 0.29%, the largest increase being in New Kowloon. There is no change in Hunghom and Hokun. Kowloon Villages show a decrease of 1.76%.

The average rate of exchange (demand on London) which had been 1/9-6021 to the dollar for 1910 rose to 1/9°754808 for 1911.